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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


The Beekmans

Cornelius C. Beekman, March 1914 SunsetCornelius C. Beekman, March 1914 Sunset
Cornelius C. Beekman, March 1914 Sunset

C. C. Beekman, One of Southern Oregon's Most Respected Pioneers. Financier and Man of Marked Business Ability. Handled Millions in Gold As Banker and Express Messenger.
    No history of the pioneer of Jacksonville and the Rogue River Valley, "which derived its names from the character of its Indians," would be complete without reference to the early career of the late C. C. Beekman, pony express rider [not THE Pony Express, however], business man and banker. Possessed off resolution, ambition and endurance in a marked degree, he was peculiarly well fitted to grapple with the hardships and problems of early days, and from the time when as express rider he made his lonely and dangerous trips over the Siskiyou Mountains carrying letters and papers and hundreds of thousands of dollars worth of gold dust, always traveling at night to lessen the chances of molestation by hostile Indians and bad white men, he was ever among the foremost in advancing the development of the country in which we live. An old history of Southern Oregon [A. G. Walling's history] contains the following personal mention of Mr. Beekman:
    "
He was born in New York City, January 27, 1828. He received his education in the public schools, and while yet in his minority he learned the carpenter's trade. In the year 1850 he sailed from New York, coming via the Isthmus of Panama, and arrived in San Francisco in the fall of that year. He went to Sawyer's Bar, where he was engaged as a miner; thence to Yreka working at his trade, after which we find him at Scott's Bar, mining; returning to Yreka, where, in 1853, he entered the employ of Cram, Rogers & Co., as express messenger between that place, Jacksonville and Crescent City. He was often obliged to cross the Siskiyou Mountains under cover of darkness on account of hostile Indians. He retained this position until the failure of Adams & Co. in 1856, which carried down with it the house of Cram, Rogers & Co. He then commenced carrying express on his own account, resuming his perilous trips across the mountains until a stage road was built and the stages of the old California Stage Company put on the route. In 1863, when Wells, Fargo & Co. completed their overland connections with Portland, they tendered Mr. Beekman the agency at Jacksonville, which he accepted, and has been retained up to the present time with credit and ability. During Mr. Beekman's term of service as express messenger on his own and others' account, he has handled millions of money, and, in fact, more than any other man in Southern Oregon; and his retention and promotion by his employers is a sufficient guarantee for his unswerving honesty and integrity. Investing his earnings judiciously, Mr. Beekman has amassed a fortune, not by miserly conduct; not by oppressing the poor; not by taking advantage of the necessities of his fellow men, but by strict observance to business principles, and a careful management of his own affairs. As a financier and a man of ability, he is the peer of any man in Southern Oregon. To prove this, if proof was necessary, we call the attention of our readers to the facts that Mr. Beekman has been repeatedly elected one of the trustees of Jacksonville, and for several terms held the honorable position of mayor, or president of the board. He has also held the office of school director for nine years, and it was mainly through his business tact that the commodious school building was erected, and, withal, his love for educational advancement has placed the standard of education for the young on a plane that would do credit to a larger town. The year 1878 will be ever memorable to him, for, without the slightest effort on his part, he was selected by the Republican party from among his compeers and placed in nomination for governor of Oregon. This was a closely contested and hard-fought battle. Mr. Beekman's popularity was so great that he was supported not only by Republicans, but by a large number of Democrats in Southern Oregon. He was defeated by his Democrat opponent, Gov. W. W. Thayer, by forty-nine votes."
    During later years Beekman's Banking House, unique among institutions of its kind, was esteemed a sort of Mecca by tourists, and until the time of Mr. Beekman's death and subsequent closing of the bank, no tour of Southern Oregon was considered complete unless it included a trip to Jacksonville to visit the old building and view the superb collection of nuggets it contained.
    As a proof of the confidence reported in Mr. Beekman's integrity by his fellow pioneers, it might be said that when his banking house was closed a number of deposits, consisting principally of gold dust and ready money, was found which dated back almost to the beginning of his career as a banker. Early miners, desiring a place of safekeeping for their surplus cash, had placed it in Mr. Beekman's hands and promptly forgotten it. Much difficulty was encountered in finding rightful owners or heirs to this wealth.
    Mr. Beekman's family; Mr. Beekman, formerly Miss Julia Hoffman, a member of a pioneer family, Miss Carrie Beekman and B. B. Beekman, now make their home in Portland.
Jacksonville Post, June 26, 1920, page 1


    BEEKMAN: It is now a pretty well-established fact that the families in New Jersey bearing the name of Beekman are descended from two distinct sources, one of which is Willem Beeckman (Beekman), of New York, who emigrated to New Amsterdam in 1647, and the other Maarten Beeckman, of Albany, who is the progenitor of the branch of the family at present under consideration.
    (I) Maarten Beeckman emigrated to New Netherlands in 1638 and settled in Albany, where he plied his trade of blacksmith and died before June 21, 1677. He married Susanna Jans, and had at least three children: Johannes; Hendrick, referred to below; Metie.
    (II) Hendrick, son of Maarten and Susanna (Jans) Beekman, lived for a number of years at Schodack, near Albany, and November 13, 1710, purchased from Octavo Coenraats, merchant of New York, two hundred and fifty acres of land on the Raritan River in Somerset County, New Jersey, it being a part of the tract bought by Coenraats from Peter Sonmans, who in turn had purchased it from the proprietors of East Jersey. The deed for this land has never been recorded, and is now in possession of Mrs. Elizabeth (Beekman) Vredenburgh, who still owns a portion of the land described, which she inherited from her father, Benjamin Beekman, and her mother, Cornelia Beekman. He married Annetje, daughter of Peter Quackenbush, and among his children was Marten, referred to below.
    (III) Marten Beekman, son of Hendrick Beeckman, was born in 1685, died October 27, 1757. The descendants of his three sons are very numerous in New York, Ohio, Indiana, Illinois, Michigan, Oregon and elsewhere. He married June 21, 1734 Elizabeth, daughter of Samuel and Neeltje (Bloetjoet) Waldron, and granddaughter of Resolved Waldron, of Harlem, who was sheriff of New York City under Governor Peter Stuyvesant. She was born in 1709 and died November 27, 1760. Children: Elizabeth, Hendrick, Samuel, Annatje and Johannes.
    (IV) Johannes (John), youngest child of Marten and Elizabeth (Waldron) Beekman, was born November 5, 1741, in Somerset County, New Jersey, where he died March 17, 1789. He married July 30, 1769 Arriantje Tunison, born October 12, 1753, died January 11, 1833. They were the parents of four children.
    (V) Cornelius, son of John and Arriantje (Tunison) Beekman, was born January 28, 1772, in Somerville, New Jersey, and died July 5, 1850. He married in 1702 Rebecca Sharp, born January 2, 1772, died February 27, 1844, aged seventy-two years. They had three sons and two daughters.
    (VI) Benjamin, son of Cornelius and Rebecca (Sharp) Beekman, was born April 27, 1804, in Somerville, and died at Dundee, New York, April 8, 1870. He married at Plainfield, New Jersey, March 21, 1827, Lydia Compton, born there March 3, 1806, died in Dundee New York, October 2, 1891, daughter of Joshua and Catherine (Cosad) Compton. He resided in Somerville, New Jersey and New York City and removed to Dundee after 1829. Children: 1. Cornelius C., born January 27, 1828, in New York, now resides at Jacksonville, Oregon; married at Jacksonville Julia E. Hoffman; 2. Abram, mentioned below; 3. John, born March 9, 1832, at Dundee; married (first) Elizabeth Disbrow, (second) Helena Ackerson, and died at Bath; 4. Lydia Ann, May 30, 1834, died in Dundee in 1910; married there in 1833 Marcus T. Seely; 5. Thomas DeWitt, August 22, 1841, now resides at Dundee, New York, married in 1863 Isadore Fowler, of Elmira, New York; 6 and 7. Cyrus and Augustus, twins, born August 25, 1844, in Dundee. The former died there in 1851 and the latter when four days old.
Cuyler Reynolds, Genealogical and Family History of Southern New York and the Hudson River Valley, 1914, page 487


    Cornelius Beekman, son of Benjamin Beekman, born January 27, 1828, christened May 11, 1828, Dutch Reformed Church, Greenwich Village, New York, New York
familysearch.org


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Public Meeting--"Law of the Mines."
    The following curious report of some curious proceedings at Johnson's Bar, Scotts River, we publish as the copy was sent to us:
JOHNSON'S BAR, Scott River, Feb. 27, 1852.
    Messrs. Editors:--You will confer a favor by inserting the accompanying "Report" in your paper, trusting that by so doing evil-doers will reflect before they come among us:
    At a meeting held at Johnson's Bar, on Scotts River, on Friday evening, February 27th, for the purpose of examining Dr. A. Bardt, who was accused of having stolen a certain sum of money of G. W. Smith, to the amount of seventy ounces of gold dust, at two various times; and also, on declaration of Cyrus Hurd, Jr, who says he has every reason to believe that the said Bardt stole from him some two months since fifty dollars in gold dust, and since that time a saddle, bridle and lash rope, which were found in his possession.
    The meeting being called to order, E. B. Neff was elected Chairman, and C. C. Beekman appointed Secretary.
    In accordance with the confession of the prisoner (Bardt), some sixty-five ounces of Smith's gold dust was found buried near the mouth of Scotts River. The balance was found in his possession, with other gold dust (some thirty ounces), amongst which said Smith thinks he recognizes some of his gold dust, and Cyrus Hurd says he also recognizes some of his lost money.
    Thereupon, it was unanimously resolved that said Dr. A. Bardt should make up all the deficiency to said Smith, which amounts to nine ounces.
    On motion, it was resolved that said Bardt pay all the expenses that have accrued for the detection of the said thefts.
    On motion, it was resolved that Dr. Bardt pay to Cyrus Hurd, Jr., the sum of fifty dollars, being the amount he lost.
    On motion, it was unanimously resolved that Abraham Thompson, the acting constable from Shasta Butte City, be paid his bill for services rendered, and for the use of three mules, amounting to eight ounces.
    On motion, it was resolved that Mr. Felix Parent be allowed twenty dollars, for detaining him under arrest on suspicion of being concerned with said Bardt, but afterwards proved wholly innocent.
    All of the above sums being severally paid by the Chairman out of the money found on the person of said Bardt, it was found that he still had one hundred and twenty dollars; whereupon it was resolved that Doctor Bardt should have thirty dollars to enable him to leave the mines, and the balance (ninety dollars) should be paid to Messrs. Hurd and Smith, jointly, to defray their expenses in going to Shasta Butte City to bring the prisoner to this Bar.
    On motion, the meeting adjourned, to meet at 9 o'clock the next morning.
   

SATURDAY MORNING, Feb. 28.
    The meeting having been called to order, Mr. Campbell was appointed Chairman, and Cyrus Hurd, Jr., Secretary.
    On motion, it was resolved that Dr. A. Bardt be whipped for the said thefts.
    On motion, it was resolved that Dr. Bardt should receive thirty-nine lashes on the bare back, and leave the mines in three days.
    It was moved and seconded that Dr. Bardt should be cropped. The motion, on being put, was negatived unanimously.
    On motion, it was resolved that Dr. Bardt be whipped by the Constable, Mr. Thompson, with a rope.
    On motion, it was resolved that the Constable should proceed immediately to the discharge of his duty.
    On motion, it was resolved that the Secretary be requested to furnish a copy of the proceedings to be published in the California papers.
    The punishment having been inflicted, it was, on motion, resolved that the meeting do adjourn sine die.
    By order.                             CYRUS HURD, JR. , Secretary
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, March 21, 1852, page 2


CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S OREGON EXPRESS.
THE SUBSCRIBERS hereby give notice that they have purchased the express business of Messrs. DUGAN & CO., and having perfected arrangements for a permanent Express, will continue the business in all its branches.
    The MINERS and community in general can rest assured that all business appertaining to an Express Company will be
Attended to with Promptness and Dispatch,
with due regard to safety.
CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
    OFFICES at Yreka, Jacksonville, Portland (Adams & Co.), at Salem (W. C. Griswold's).
----
NOTICE.
    The undersigned, having disposed of their entire interest in the Express business to Messrs. Cram, Rogers & Co., most respectfully beg leave to recommend them with entire confidence to the miners and public in general, as persons competent to transact all business entrusted to their care.
DUGAN & CO.
    P.S.--All persons having unsettled demands with the subscribers will please present the same at the office of Messrs. Cram, Rogers & Co., at Jacksonville, on or before the first of February next, for adjustment.
D. & Co.
    Yreka, Nov. 25th, 1852.
Oregonian, Portland, March 19, 1853, page 4


    Robert Hereford, of Cram, Rogers & Co.'s express, is an authorized agent for the Oregonian in Southern Oregon.
Oregonian, Portland, December 18, 1852, page 3  In 1852 "Southern Oregon" usually meant all the territory south of the Columbia.


CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S
CALIFORNIA AND OREGON
EXPRESS.
    Connecting at Shasta with ADAMS & Co.'s well-known and unrivaled Pacific, Atlantic and European Express.
    C.R. & CO. would most respectfully inform the public, that they have made arrangements to forward a Weekly Express, to and from the following places, in charge of our regular messengers;
PRINCIPAL OFFICES.
        Yreka,                         Shasta,
            Jacksonville,              Weaverville,
                Althouse,                     Pittsburgh,
                                                    Pitt River.
ALSO
                Trinity River,                      Scott River,
            Scott's Bar,                          Scott Valley,
        Klamath River,                    Salmon River,
    Rogue River,                        Indian Creek,
Deadwood Creek,                Humbug Creek,
    Greenhorn Creek,                 Hungry Creek,
        Cottonwood Creek,               Cherry Creek,
            Bestville,                               Hamburgh,
                Sailor Diggings,                     Crescent City,
            Canyonville,                          Winchester,
        Salem,                                    Portland and
Oregon City.
We sell at either of our offices
SIGHT DRAFTS
on ADAMS & CO., in the Atlantic States and Europe.
C H E C K S   A T   P A R
on Adams & Co.'s Offices, throughout the States.
    DEPOSITS Received, special or otherwise.
    The highest price paid for
GOLD DUST.
    Treasures, Valuable Packages, letters, &c. forwarded by our regular messengers with the utmost dispatch.
    Particular attention paid to Collections. Orders for Goods, parcels or packages promptly attended to, and forwarded according to instructions.
    All Business entrusted to our care will be faithfully and promptly executed.
CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
The Mountain Herald, Yreka, June 18, 1853, page 4


CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S
VIA YREKA, Jacksonville, O.T., Oregon City, Winchester, Salem, Marysville and Portland. Also branches running to
  Humbug Creek, Scotts Bar,
Hamburg, Althouse Creek,
Sailors Diggings, Klamath and
Salmon Rivers.
    Treasure, valuable packages, letters &c. forwarded by our regular messengers to any of the above-named places.
    Drafts drawn on any of Adams & Co.'s offices in the Atlantic States and Europe.
    Checks drawn at par on all of Adams & Co.'s offices in the state.
    Highest price paid for gold dust.
    Collections made, and all business entrusted to our care attended to promptly, and with dispatch.
CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, July 23, 1853, page 2


GOLDSMITH & BEEKMAN,
CARPENTERS AND BUILDERS.
SECOND door above Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express, Main Street. All orders for work in our line executed with neatness and dispatch.
Yreka, June.
Mountain Herald, Yreka, September 17, 1853, page 3


CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S
CALIFORNIA AND OREGON
EXPRESS
    Connecting at Shasta with ADAMS & Co.'s well-known and unrivaled Pacific Atlantic and European Express.
    C. R. & CO. would most respectfully inform the public that they have made arrangements to forward a Weekly Express to and from the following places, in charge of our regular passengers:
PRINCIPAL OFFICES.
    Yreka, Jacksonville, Althouse, Weaverville, Pittsburgh, Pitt River.
ALSO
Trinity River, Scotts Bar, Klamath River, Rogue River, Deadwood Creek, Greenhorn Creek, Cottonwood Creek, Bestville, Sailor Diggings, Canyonville, Salem, Scott River, Scott Valley, Salmon River, Indian Creek, Humbug Creek, Hungry Creek, Cherry Creek, Hamburgh, Crescent City, Winchester, Portland and Oregon City.
We sell at either of our principal offices
SIGHT DRAFTS
on ADAMS & Co., in the Atlantic States and Europe.
CHECKS AT PAR
on Adams & Co.'s Offices, throughout the States.
DEPOSITS Received, special or otherwise.
The highest prices paid for
GOLD DUST
    Treasures, Valuable Packages, Letters &c. forwarded by our regular messengers with the utmost dispatch.
    Particular attention paid to Collections. Orders for Goods, parcels or packages promptly attended to, and forwarded according to instructions.
    All Business entrusted to our care will be faithfully and promptly executed.
CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
    Jacksonville, Oct. 13, 1853.
Oregon Spectator, Oregon City, October 13, 1853, page 3


Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express.
    We understand that this old and enterprising express firm is about extending its line on to Scottsburg, situated on the Umpqua, some hundred and fifty or seventy-five miles from Yreka. Their line then will be not far short of 300 miles in length.
Shasta Courier, Shasta City, California, October 29, 1853, page 2


Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express.
    We are indebted to Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express for Oregon papers, brought by way of Jacksonville and Yreka.
    These gentlemen have just extended their express line to Scottsburg and Coos Bay. See their new advertisement in today's paper.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, November 12, 1853, page 3


    We are indebted to C. C. Beekman, of Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express, for the Mountain Herald of Dec. 31st.
"From Yreka," Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, January 7, 1854, page 3


    C
RAM, ROGERS & CO.'S EXPRESS.--
It is unnecessary for us to call attention to the advertisement of the widely known Express of Cram, Rogers & Co. The reader can't help but see it. As will be perceived by their advertisement, this express firm have extended their branches to almost every portion of Northern California and Southern Oregon, and we congratulate them that, by their promptness and dispatch in executing business, they have secured the confidence of the public.
Shasta Courier, Shasta City, California, April 22, 1854, page 2


ADAMS & CO.'S EXPRESS
LEAVES the office of Adams & Co., Shasta, every morning, for Marysville, Sacramento and San Francisco.
    We forward Expresses to the Atlantic States twice a month, by the Panama and Nicaragua Steamers.
    We send packages, parcels and treasures to all parts of the States.
    We sell drafts on
New York, Baltimore,
Boston, Washington,
Philadelphia, New Orleans,
Pittsburgh, Cincinnati,
Cincinnati, St. Louis,
London.
We send Expresses to all parts of Europe by
EDWARDS, SANFORD & CO.
----
BANKING.
    We do a banking business of Deposit only. Checks on any of our offices in this State are sold at par by
CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
    We send regularly to Weaver, Yreka, Jacksonville and Oregon [sic].
    Checks or drafts on us can be obtained at any of their offices.
E. W. TRACY, Agent.
Shasta, November 12, 1853.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, November 12, 1853, page 2


    I would propose to deposit with one of the two express companies in Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon Ty. One is known as Rhodes & Co., a well-known house in San Francisco. The other is known as Cram, Rogers & Co. This company connect with Adams & Co. Also a well-known house in San Francisco. I do not know of any difference in the facilities offered by the two firms. Both have the reputation of being good and responsible houses. Large sums are frequently deposited with and transported by them. In this connection I might say that the quartermaster and commissary at this post (Fort Lane) receives his money from San Francisco through one of these houses.
Indian Agent Samuel H. Culver, letter of August 31, 1854, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1873, Reel 13; Letters Received, 1854, No. 98.


    CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S EXPRESS TRAIN.--It is scarcely necessary to call attention to the full-grown advertisement of Cram, Rogers & Co. in today's paper. It will be seen that this old and reliable firm has established, in connection with the express, a mule passenger train, to run daily between Shasta and Weaverville. By this arrangement they are enabled to run a daily express between Shasta and Weaverville, Yreka and Jacksonville.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, September 23, 1854, page 3


CRAM, ROGERS & CO.'S
Express and Passenger Train!

FROM
SHASTA TO WEAVER
Notice is hereby given that we have placed on the above route
A TRAIN OF FIRST-RATE RIDING ANIMALS,
CONNECTING WITH THE
CALIFORNIA STAGE COMPANY,
and are authorized to give passengers through tickets to any point to which the above Company's Stages run.
NEW ARRANGEMENTS HAVING BEEN MADE, WE SHALL FORWARD A
DAILY EXPRESS
Between this Place and Weaver, Yreka, Jacksonville, O.T.
AND ALL OTHER POINTS IN THE VICINITY.
----
ADAMS & CO.'S DRAFTS
For sale on any of their offices in the Atlantic States.
CHECKS ON ADAMS & CO. on all their offices throughout the States.
HIGHEST PRICE PAID FOR GOLD DUST                    CRAM, ROGERS & CO.
Shasta, September 23, 1854.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, September 23, 1854, page 3


    To  Messrs. RHODES & WHITNEY we are very much indebted for valuable papers, by BEEKMAN'S Express, far in advance of the mails.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1856, page 2


All Persons
HAVING MONEY, or other valuables, deposited with the late firm of CRAM, ROGERS & Co., can obtain the same, by applying to the undersigned. And are requested so to do.
C. C. BEEKMAN,
    Jacksonville, Jan. 5, 1856
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1856, page 3


    Our various expresses have, as usual, conferred numerous favors upon us during the past week, in the way of regular and numerous files of California dailies and weeklies, States papers, &c. Mr. Beekman, proprietor of Beekman's California and Oregon Express, has our thanks for a copy of the Table Rock Sentinel, and other favors.
Yreka Weekly Union, January 26, 1856, page 2


In the District Court for Jackson County, O.T., August Term, A.D. 1856. Action at law to recover money.
LOYAL BROWN, et al.,
vs.
RICHARD DUGAN, et al.
    AND NOW at this day comes into Court the parties to the above entitled cause by their respective attorneys, and it appearing to the Court on the affidavit of the plaintiffs that Frank Rogers, Robert Cram and A. E. Raynes, three of the defendants, are non-residents of this Territory, but that they have property therein.
    It is ordered by the Court, that service be made upon the said Raynes, Cram and Rogers, by publication of the summons once a week, for the term of at least three months, in the Yreka Union, a newspaper published in Yreka, State of California, that unless said Rogers, Cram and Raynes shall appear and answer to the complaint of the said plaintiffs in said action, on the first day of the May Term of said Court for the year A.D. 1856, the said plaintiffs will take judgment against them by default, in the sum for which they pray judgment in said complaint, and that personal service of said complaint and summons be made on said defendants, if they can be found otherwise that copies of the same be deposited m the Post Office at Jacksonville, directed to each of them, and this cause be continued to said Term.
----
TERRITORY OF OREGON,
    Jackson County. ss.
To Richard Dugan, Frank Rogers, Robert Cram and A. E. Raynes, partners under the firm and style of Cram, Rogers & Co.:
    You are hereby required to be and appear before the District Court, in and for said County, on the first day of the next Term thereof, to be holden at Jacksonville, in said County, to answer to the complaint of Loyal P. Brown, John S. Drum and William M. Barr, partners trading under the firm and style of Brown, Drum & Co., in action at law to recover money.--And you are hereby notified that unless you do so appear and answer, judgment will be rendered against you for the sum of $1400, with costs and expenses, as claimed in said complainants' complaint.
    WITNESS my hand, and the seal of said Court, at Jacksonville, affixed this 12th day of May, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five.
S. H. TAYLOR, Clerk.
----
Territory of Oregon,
    Jackson County, ss.
    I, S. H. Taylor, Clerk of the District Court, of said County, do certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the original summons and order of the Court in the above entitled cause.
S. H. TAYLOR, Clerk.
"Legal," Yreka Weekly Union, January 26, 1856, page 4


In the District Court for Jackson County, O.T., August Term, A.D. 1856. Action at law to recover money.
J. B. WADSWORTH, et al.,
vs.
RICHARD DUGAN, et al.
    AND NOW at this day comes into Court the parties to the above entitled cause by their respective attorneys, and it appearing to the Court on the affidavit of the plaintiffs that Frank Rogers, Robert Cram and A. E. Raynes, three of the defendants, are non-residents of this Territory, but that they have property therein.
    It is ordered by the Court, that service be made upon the said Raynes, Cram and Rogers, by publication of the summons once a week, for the term of at least three months, in the Yreka Union, a newspaper published in Yreka, State of California, that unless said Rogers, Cram and Raynes shall appear and answer to the complaint of the said plaintiffs in said action, on the first day of the May Term of said Court for the year A.D. 1856, the said plaintiffs will take judgment against them by default, in the sum for which they pray judgment in said complaint, and that personal service of said complaint and summons be made on said defendants, if they can be found otherwise that copies of the same be deposited m the Post Office at Jacksonville, directed to each of them, and this cause be continued to said Term.
----
TERRITORY OF OREGON,
    Jackson County. ss.
To Richard Dugan, Frank Rogers, Robert Cram and A. E. Raynes, partners carrying on business under the firm and style of Cram, Rogers & Co.:
    You are hereby required to be and appear before the District Court, of said County, on the first day of the next Term thereof, to answer the complaint of J. B. Wadsworth, J. B. Peters and R. J. Ladd, partners trading under the firm and style of Wadsworth, Peters & Ladd, in an action at law to recover money. And you are hereby notified that unless you do so appear and answer, judgment will be rendered against you for the sum of $2100, with interest, costs and expenses, as claimed in said complainants' complaint.
    WITNESS my hand, and the seal of said Court, affixed at Jacksonville, this 27th day of April, A.D. one thousand eight hundred and fifty-five.
S. H. TAYLOR, Clerk.
----
Territory of Oregon,
    Jackson County, ss.
    I, S. H. Taylor, Clerk of the District Court, of said County, do certify that the foregoing is a true copy of the original summons and order of the Court in the above entitled cause.
S. H. TAYLOR, Clerk.
"Legal," Yreka Weekly Union, January 26, 1856, page 4


    MAILS.--The Jacksonville Sentinel of the 19th ult. complains again of the irregularity or failure of the mails:
    "As usual, we have had no mails this week. Travelers from different directions say, 'No news--nothing of any consequence occurring--nothing doing,' &c. Were it not for Beekman's Express, we should get no information of less than a month old from beyond our valley--and as it is, get nothing later from Oregon. When the express comes in it brings news from Oregon via San Francisco and Yreka in time to publish it in advance of the mails that come direct. The mail has become of no account whatever to the country, and it is not worth while to inquire into its failures."
Crescent City Herald, February 6, 1856, page 2


F O R   S A L E .
25,000  LBS. OF OATS,
by
BEEKMAN & GLENN.
Table Rock Sentinel, March 22, 1856, page 3


    C. C. Beekman will please accept our thanks for express favors during the past week.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1856, page 2



A CARD.
DURING THE ABSENCE of DR. CRANE, U.S.A., in the field, the office of the undersigned will be at this post.
CHAS B. BROOKS, M.D.
    Fort Lane, O.T.,
        April 30, 1856.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1856, page 4


By Beekman's Express
    We are indebted to Dr. Wadsworth, of Rhodes & Whitney's Express for files of San Francisco and Sacramento dailies.
    Dr. Wright, of the Yreka Book Store, will accept our thanks for files of latest States papers, pictorials, &c.
    Jerry Sullivan, of San Francisco, has our thanks for copies of Illustrated News, Ballou's Pictorial, Punch, Deseret News, and files of States papers.
    Beekman will please accept our thanks for favors.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 9, 1856, page 2


Sheriff's Sale.
BY VIRTUE of an EXECUTION issued out of the Clerk's office of the District Court of Jackson County, O.T., and to me directed, against the property of Richard Dugan, Frank Rogers, Robert Cram and A. E. Rains, partners trading under the name and style of Cram, Rogers & Co., and in favor of J. B. Wadsworth & Co., for the sum of ($2454.40) two thousand four hundred and fifty-four dollars and forty cents principal, and ($214.77) two hundred and fourteen dollars and seventy-seven cents cost of suit--
    I have levied on, and will expose at Public Auction, to the highest bidder, for Cash, at the door of my office, in Jacksonville, on Tuesday, the 2nd day of January, A.D. 1857, between the hours of 10 o'clock A.M., and 4 o'clock P.M., of said day, the following property, viz:
    Lot No. One, of Block No. (8) Eight, of the Town Plat of the town of Jacksonville, Oregon Territory, which is situated on the corner of California and 3rd streets, directly opposite the Union Hotel; also, the House situated thereon, formerly owned and occupied as the Express and Banking House of the said Cram, Rogers & Co., together with all the hereditaments situated on said lot of ground--all of which will be sold by reasons of the above premises.
    Given under my hand, this 1st day of December, 1856.
THOMAS PYLE,
    Sheriff of Jackson County, O.T.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1856, page 3


CHAS. B. BROOKS,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DRUGGIST,

Express Building, Opposite 'Union House,'

JACKSONVILLE, O.T.
JUST RECEIVED A LARGE AND SPLENDID ASSORTMENT of Drugs, Medicine, Oils, Perfumeries, &c., &c., which I offer for sale, FOR CASH, at reduced prices. Also a Well Selected Stock of Patent Medicines, such as Græfenberg's, Sand's, Townsend's, Corbett's and Shaker's Sarsaparilla; Jayne's Expectorant, Alteratives, Vermifuge, Hair Dye, Carminative Balsam, Fever and Ague Pills and Sanitive Pills; Græfenberg's Eye Lotion, Dysentery Syrup, Panacea, Pile Ointment, Vegetable Pills and Fever and Ague Pills; Holloway's Green Mountain Ointment and Pills; Lee's, Wright's, Brandreth's, Cook's, Moffat's, Holloway's, Jayne's, Græfenberg's, and Anti-Bilious Pills; Nerve and Bone Liniment, Mustang Liniment, Radway's Ready Relief, Pain Killer, Cholagogue, Opodeldoc, Seidlitz Powders, Hunter's Eradicator, Thorn's Extract, Poor Man's Plaster; and others too numerous to mention, which will will sell cheaper than ever sold before in Jacksonville.
    I will continue the practice of Physic, Surgery and Obstetrics, as heretofore.
    N.B. Cash Patients Promptly Attended to.
CHAS. B. BROOKS, M.D.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1856, page 3


TRI-WEEKLY STAGES.
The California Stage Company will hereafter run Coaches three times a week from Yreka, Cal., to Jacksonville, O.T., leaving Yreka  on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, arriving at Jacksonville same days. Leave Jacksonville on Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, arrive at Yreka same days, making the run in eleven or twelve hours.
    OFFICES--At the "Yreka Hotel," Yreka, and "Union House," Jacksonville.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 6, 1856, page 3


    Ordered that William Hoffman, County Auditor, be and he is hereby authorized to rent the Room heretofore used and occupied by Doct. L. S. Thompson and Beekman's Express Office, provided that he can have the use of the Vault for the County Records to be deposited in at night and provided also that the rent shall not exceed Two hundred dollars per annum to the County. It is further ordered that said room be occupied by the Probate Judge.

Jackson County Commissioners' Journals, April 22, 1858

Beekman receipt, 1850s

    BEEKMAN has placed us under obligations for files of States papers of April 5th, and California papers.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 8, 1858, page 2


    A HOAX.--On Saturday afternoon last some individuals were desirous of creating a little fun, got access to our office during our absence, and caused some slips to be printed purporting to be an extra of the Shasta Courier, and announcing the arrival in San Francisco of the steamer Sonora, with intelligence of the capture of the British war steamer Styx by an American clipper ship fitted out for the purpose, after a severe engagement in which several persons were killed and wounded on both sides. The slips were then placed in a package directed to Beekman's Express, sent out of town, and brought in and delivered to Beekman by a young man who had been out riding, who stated that they were handed to him by a person who was passing on hastily through the valley. The news spread like wildfire, and the excitement occasioned by it was intense. A large crowd soon gathered round the express office, a flag was run up, anvils were procured, and more than a hundred rounds fired before the seli was discovered. Some enthusiastic individuals were for raising a company and proceeding immediately to Fraser River. At length, however, it leaked out that the whole affair was a hoax, when the firing suddenly ceased, the flag was hauled down, and the military ardor of our citizens suddenly collapsed. A few of the sold were very much enraged at the hoax which had been played off upon them, but the majority, and the more sensible portion, laughed it off, and considered it a good joke.--Jacksonville Herald.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, July 27, 1858, page 3


WM. HOFFMAN'S EXPRESS!
HAVING Purchased of BEEKMAN his interest in the Express and Banking business, I will conduct the same as heretofore.
    Leave Jacksonville every other day for Yreka, connecting with
WELLS, FARGO & CO.,
at that place, for all parts of California, the Atlantic States, and Europe.
Sight Bills of Exchange
procured, payable in any of the Atlantic cities, Canada, or Europe.
GOLD DUST BOUGHT!!
LETTERS

procured from any Express or Post Office in California.
    Collections made, and everything appertaining to the Express business promptly attended to.
    Particular attention paid to filling Orders of every description at Yreka, and any point below.
    The patronage of the public is respectfully solicited.
WM. HOFFMAN.
Nov. 16, 1858.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 22, 1859, page 3

Beekman ad, May 19, 1860 Oregon Sentinel
May 19, 1860 Oregon Sentinel

    P.M.S.S. Golden Age, James T. Watkins commanding, left Panama, August 15th, at 8 P.M., with 330 bags United States mails, and 640 passengers from New York per steamer Moses Taylor. August 1st, at 6 P.M., arrived at Acapulco, received usual supplies, and nine bags of mail, and ten passengers via Tehuantepec, and sailed at 9 A.M. August 28th, at 5:45 A.M., arrived off the heads. Among our passengers is Señor Mugarrieta, Mexican Consul for this port. Panama Railroad Co.'s new steamship Guatemala arrived at Panama on the 10th instant, having made the run from New York in sixty-three days and one hour. Constantly under steam, her running time was sixty-three days and twenty-one hours. Passengers: . . .  C. C. Beekman
"Arrival of the Golden Age," Sacramento Daily Union, August 29, 1859, page 1


Map of Oregon.
    We have been presented by S. J. McCormick, Esq., of Portland, with a most beautiful map of our young state, which was compiled from the latest and most reliable government surveys by J. A. Pownall, Esq., of Oregon City. In size it is three and a half by five and a half feet, is well mounted on rollers, and has been declared by the Eastern press to be the handsomest state map in the Union. The margin of the map is embellished with splendid views of the principal towns in Oregon, namely--Salem, Jacksonville, Eugene City, Dalles, Oregon City, Corvallis and Portland, and the best representation of the Falls of the Willamette ever made. These views were all engraved from drawings made by M. de Girardin, expressly for this purpose. It is, indeed, "an ornament that should adorn every household in Oregon," and reflects great credit upon Mr. McCormick, the enterprising publisher, who has been at great expense in getting it up. The maps can be had in this city of Mr. Fleming, at the post office. Price, five dollars. The price is so low that no family in Oregon can well afford to be without a copy. By all means, have one of these maps hanging up where your little "shavers" can daily see it, and they will acquire some idea of the "way the land lays" in Oregon, which they might not otherwise get soon. It would also prove of considerable benefit to a large number of older heads.
Oregon Argus, Oregon City, January 14, 1860, page 2


    THE PRESIDENCY AND FIGHT NORTH.--The Jacksonville Sentinel, of May 12th, relates the following incident on the reception of the first news in relation to the Charleston convention and the prize fight:
    Wednesday's stage brought news which come by Pony Express of the doings at the Charleston convention and of the great fight between those two amiable cusses, Heenan and Sayers. The news was expected, and, of course, Beekman's was crowded with eager intelligence seekers. Up wheeled the stage--out shouted a voice from the crowd: "Jo. (the driver), which whipped?" Evidently mistaking the question, obliging Jo. responded: "Nobody yet, but Douglas had the best of it." "Douglas!" exclaimed the fellow, "who the d---l is he?" "Why, he's up for President," said Jo. "Oh! d--n the President, I want to know which whipped in the fight--Heenan or Sayers?" remarked the questioner. He was told how the fight ended, and went away in evident disgust that nobody had been whipped.
Sacramento Daily Union, May 17, 1860, page 2


    Fowler & Keeler's lode over on Applegate is paying very richly. We were shown the produce of their week's labor, at Beekman's, yesterday--three large balls of amalgam, with some fragment flakes, weighing, in all, nearly $700--and this from one arrastra. The lead bids fair to rival Gold Hill.--Jacksonville Sentinel.
"Quartz Mines of Southern Oregon," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, July 26, 1860, page 1


    SAFES.--Parties wishing to purchase fire- and robber-safes are asked to look at Tillman's advertisement. Safes of his manufacture can be seen at  Beekman's, Anderson & Glenn's, Love & Bilger's, and other business houses in town. They are the best manufactured.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1860, page 3


S A F E S !    S A F E S !
F. TILLMAN,
No. 90, Battery Street, San Francisco, Cal.

SOLE AGENT for TILTON & McFARLAND'S celebrated
Fire-Proof
AND
Burglar Safes
    This Safe is well known in the market for its unsurpassed fire-proof quality, having withstood in California, as well as in the East, the hottest fire known. We can refer to endless certificates from parties in our mining towns, where these safes have been subject to the most severe tests of its fire-proof qualities. The safes are secured by our COMBINATION LOCK. This Lock is in every respect the most secure one in use--it requires the key and combination to open the Safe. If the key should be abstracted from the owner, it would be perfectly useless to the possessor without his knowing the mental key which the owner carries in his head. To those in want of a reliable Safe, we offer the above cheaper than any other in the market.
    A large assortment on hand and to arrive.
F. TILLMAN, 90 Battery St.
Nov. 1, 1860.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1860, page 2


    ELECTION AT JACKSONVILLE.--The election for town officers was held on Tuesday last, says the Jacksonville (Oregon) Sentinel, of the 15th inst. There was little strife for any of the offices, save those of Marshal, Recorder and Street Commissioner. The following is the result: For Trustees, Joseph Burpee, B. T. Davis, John Love, W. Hoffman, J. A. Brunner. For Marshal, G. M. Banks. For Recorder, Henry Klippel. For Treasurer, Jas. T. Glenn. For Street Commissioner, C. C. Beekman.
San Francisco Weekly Herald, December 28, 1860, page 3


MARRIED.
    In Jacksonville, on the evening of Tuesday, January 28th, at the home of the bride, the Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. C. C. BEEKMAN and Miss JULIA E. HOFFMAN, eldest daughter of Wm. Hoffman, Esq.
    A large assemblage of the friends of the young and happy couple honored by their presence the nuptials, and made the occasion one to be long and gratefully remembered by the twain as a tribute of high regard and steadfast friendship.
    This office was beautifully favored by the happy couple, and we most cordially wish them eternal contentment and joyous fortune "in the union."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 2, 1861, page 2


BEEKMAN'S
E x p r e s s

C. C. BEEKMAN
HAVING RESUMED THE E X P R E S S
A N D
BANKING BUSINESS,
at his old stand, in Jacksonville, continued during his absence at the East by WM. HOFFMAN, Esq., will conduct the business as before.
    The Express leaves Jacksonville by the California Stage Co.'s coaches for
YREKA
Every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday,
Returning on Monday, Wednesday and Friday,

and connecting with
WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S
Express to all parts of California, the Atlantic States and Europe.
Sight Bills of Exchange
procured, payable in any of the Atlantic cities, Canada, or Europe.
G O L D   D U S T   B O U G H T ! !
LETTERS
procured from any Express or Post Office in California.
    Collections made, and everything appertaining to the Express business promptly attended to.
    Particular attention paid to filling Orders of every description, at Yreka, and any point below.
    The patronage of the public respectfully solicited.
Jacksonville, December 21, 1859.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 25, 1861, page 4


    MAP OF THE STATE OF OREGON.--We were presented by Wm. Hoffman, Esq., with a map of Oregon, published by S. J. McCormick, of Portland, and printed in New York City. It is a beautiful map, in fact one of the prettiest we have ever seen, highly colored and large, with a picture of all the principal towns in the state embellishing its border. It is a map that should hang in every business place in town. To be had at Beekman's Express. Price $5.00.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 28, 1861, page 3


    DUST.--There is a very large amount of gold dust on the market, but no coin to purchase the same. Has the business become unprofitable? We want to see some of this dust in the shape of almighty dollars rolling around this burg. Send it out on its inspiring mission, and let it work its magic changes.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 5, 1862, page 3


    SANITARY FUND.--Mr. Beekman requests us to say that he will make remittance to Mr. Holbrook of the amount collected in this county on Saturday of next week. We hope all the precinct agents will report to him before that time. Send in your contributions, and let your offerings go forward on their mission of love and healing joy to your sick and wounded brothers in the East.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 25, 1862, page 2


    EXPRESS BUSINESS.--Wells, Fargo & Co. have purchased the entire interest in what is known as the "Beekman Express" and will continue the business for the accommodation of the public, with Mr. Beekman, Esq., as agent. Those wishing to purchase drafts, or sell bills of exchange on the Atlantic States or Europe, can do so by calling on Mr. Beekman. See advertisement.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1863, page 2


Express.
THE UNDERSIGNED, having purchased the entire interest of Beekman's Express, will continue to run daily express from Jacksonville, connecting with our California and Oregon Express, with C. C. Beekman as agent.
WELLS, FARGO & CO.
Jacksonville, May 7, 1863.
----
THE UNDERSIGNED will continue in his own name to purchase Gold Dust, sell Bills of Exchange on the Atlantic States and Europe, draw Drafts on San Francisco in sums to suit, and do a general Banking Business, as heretofore, at the office of Wells, Fargo & Co.
C. C. BEEKMAN.
Jacksonville, May 7, 1863.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1863, page 2


Born.
    On the 3rd inst., in Jacksonville, to the wife of Mr. C. C. BEEKMAN, a son.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 5, 1863, page 2


    IMPROVEMENTS.--The old frame building on the corner of California and Union streets, for many years used as jeweler and drug stores, have [sic] been razed to give place to a fine building now being erected for C. C. Beekman and Dr. L. S. Thompson. This improvement will greatly add to the attractive appearance of our town.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 15, 1863, page 2


    REMOVED.--Mr. C. C. Beekman has removed the express office into his new building, on the corner of Union and California streets. The new office was erected especially for the express business, and is extremely neat and favorably located.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 28, 1863, page 2


JACKSONVILLE, May 18th, 1864.
    Ed. Sentinel: I have the pleasure of replying to you that one gentleman, a good Union man, has responded to the proposition of the Union man published last week, offering to be one of ten, contributing $100 Union currency to the Sanitary Commission and has actually deposited the money with me, as local treasurer of the Commission. Contributors' names will be published when the purse is made up. Who are the next eight to take stock in this proposition?
Yours,
    C. C. BEEKMAN.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 21, 1864, page 7


C. C. Beekman, Jacksonville, Oregon.
"Arrivals at the Russ House, June 17th," San Francisco Bulletin, June 18, 1864, page 2


    PERSONAL.--C. C. Beekman, Esq., left on Tuesday morning last for San Francisco, carrying with him something over $1,000 for the Sanitary Commission, which he will deliver in person to Dr. Bellows.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 18, 1864, page 7


    THE SANITARY CAUSE IN JACKSON, OREGON.--C. C. Beekman, Treasurer of the Sanitary Commission in Jackson County, acknowledges the receipt of $134.25 in coin from citizens in Cañon Creek and Althouse, in Josephine County, collected on election day; also, $106 in coin and $70 in currency raised on the same day at Ashland and Forest Grove, in Jackson County. These amounts are in addition to those previously acknowledged. The total contribution of Jackson County on election day is reported at $1,300 currency, coin having been converted into greenbacks by the agent.
Sacramento Daily Union, July 29, 1864, page 3  Reprinted from the Oregon Statesman of July 25, page 1


JACKSONVILLE, May 3rd.
    EDITOR SENTINEL:--I hereby transmit the receipt for all moneys received and forwarded by me to the U.S. Christian and Sanitary Commission, since my last published report, amounting in the aggregate to $277.00. Two hundred and twenty dollars of this amount was raised at a meeting of the citizens, occasioned by the fall of Richmond.
    I would suggest to the people of Southern Oregon the great importance of keeping alive the noble work of necessity, to which they have already contributed so liberally. Although we have bright hopes of a speedy peace, yet peace cannot bring health to the invalid nor a cessation of pain to our wounded and maimed soldiers who have shed their blood to bring about this happy result, and who are now pining in military hospitals throughout the length and breadth of our land. Let us remember the blessings we have enjoyed on this coast, during the entire period of this terrible war, as compared to all other sections of the Union; and express our gratitude by a liberal contribution of our abundance for the relief of the distressed who have borne the burden from our shoulders.
    The following receipts will show the additional amount of money contributed for the U.S. Sanitary and Christian Commission from Jackson County since my last published report.
C. C. BEEKMAN, Treasurer.
----
PORTLAND, March 6th, 1865.
    Received from Wells Fargo & Co. twenty-two dollars, amount contributed from the M.E. Sunday school, at Jacksonville, for the U.S. Christian Commission.
W. S. LADD, Treasurer.
PORTLAND, Oregon, April 7th, 1865.
    Received through Wells Fargo & Co. from citizens of Jacksonville $30 in currency, collected at municipal election, for the U.S. Sanitary Commission.
P. C. SCHUYLER, Jr.
Per S. D. SHATTUCK,
    Sec. Oregon Branch.
PORTLAND, April 26th, 1865.
    Received from C. C. Beekman, Treasurer, two hundred and twenty-five dollars in currency for the U.S. Christian Commission.
W. S. LADD, Treasurer.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 6, 1865, page 2


    "When I was a little chap I used to crawl under the floor of C. C. Beekman's bank with my gold pan and scoop up the dirt and wash it out. Many of the deposits he took in were in gold dust, and in blowing the sand out of the gold dust the fine gold would be blown on the floor, and when the floor was swept it would sift through the cracks so that I could usually pan out from two to four bits per pan."

Ray Lee Farmer, quoted by Fred Lockley, "Impressions and Observations of the Journal Man,"
Oregon Journal, Portland, December 5, 1933, page 8  Today's Beekman Bank has tongue-and-groove floorboards that completely prevent any dust from reaching the crawl space. Farmer was born in 1859 and may have been crawling under the building Beekman vacated in 1863.


    TO BE REMOVED.--The flagstaff on [the]
Express corner has been pronounced unsafe by the Board of Trustees, and is to be removed.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 24, 1865, page 2


    HOME AGAIN.--During the past week J. T. Glenn and lady, Mrs. A. Martin, P. McManus, M. Branon, C. C. Beekman and lady, and Max Muller have returned home after a visit of several weeks in San Francisco.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 12, 1865, page 2


    WELLS, FARGO & CO.'S EXPRESS.--We are under many obligations to the above named company for carrying our exchanges, the stage drivers driving from this place for their politeness in carrying our papers to subscribers on their routes. We have always found them ready and willing to oblige, ofttimes seriously inconveniencing themselves for the accommodation of others.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 1, 1865, page 2


Born.
    In Jacksonville, December 10th, to the wife of C. C. BEEKMAN, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 16, 1865, page 3


    Last week, says the Jacksonville Sentinel of the 9th, we saw at Mr. Beekman's banking house a large specimen of solid gold, weighing five hundred and ten dollars, which was obtained in the mines of this vicinity. The piece was purchased from a Chinaman, and has evidently been cut in two. Mr. Beekman thinks that the nugget, as originally found, must have weighed about sixty ounces or one thousand dollars.
"State Items," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 18, 1867, page 2

Beekman ad, January 26, 1867 Oregon Sentinel
January 26, 1867 Oregon Sentinel

    The Sentinel recently saw, at Mr. Beekman's banking house, a specimen of gold weighing $510, which was obtained in the mines in that vicinity.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 18, 1867, page 311


    SCHOOL BOOKS.--We notice in Beekman's Express Office a fine stock of school books, just received by Mr. Hoffman. The catalogue comprises all the standard books in use in the schools of this county, and Mr. H. offers them at the very lowest rates.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 31, 1867, page 1


    SIDEWALKS.--Under the ordinance of the city fathers, our sidewalks (we don't mean around this office) are assuming quite a respectable appearance. On California Street they are being rebuilt with plank. Beekman's crossing, over Rich Gulch, will be a blessing to pedestrians, who live across that stream, on dark nights, and may save some poor fellow from strangulation in the water and mud. The Greenman brothers have laid a substantial gravel walk in front of their property, and covered it with sawdust, which makes it much easier to walk upon. Property owners are reminded that only about ten days more are allowed in which to comply with the ordinance.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 7, 1867, page 3


BORN.
BEEKMAN.--In Jacksonville, Nov. 16th, to the wife of C. C. Beekman, a daughter.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 23, 1867, page 3


    NEGRO OUTRAGES IN SOUTHERN OREGON.--We have just heard of two most diabolical outrages on the part of some of our "colored" population, against the Democratic record of the "nigger," which our Copperhead exchanges are welcome to gobble and pass around. A short time since a "nigger" sold a quantity of gold dust in the express office, received the "coin" and left. Scarcely half an hour had elapsed until he returned and, approaching the counter in a very mysterious way, announced that he had received ten dollars too much and insisted on returning it. The banker was not aware that he had made a mistake, but the "infernal nigger" was positive and handed back the amount. The second affair is not so extensive, but quite as "diabolical." A gentleman of this town hired an "infernal black scoundrel" last week to saw some wood, and meeting him on the street when the work was done, paid him the sum agreed on. Scarcely had the gentleman reached his home when the man presented himself and handed back half a dollar which he had been overpaid by mistake. The above cases must strengthen the Democracy in the belief that "niggers will steal," and is, in many respects, actually "stealing" a march on the ragtag and bobtail of the "white man's party."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1868, page 2


    IN ANOTHER LIGHT.--The Jacksonville Oregon Sentinel is responsible for the following:
    Last week a Conservative Democrat was standing in front of the Express office looking very sad, when a friend of the "lost cause" stripe approached him. "Hello, old boy! what's up?" says the Confederate. "Boo-hoo, boo-hoo," whimpered Conservative, wiping his weak-looking eyes with his dirty coat sleeve, "Didn't you hear that 'Andy' was impeached?" "Why, what's nothing," says Confed.; "Brick Pomeroy is all right, and you know 'Andy' hung the widow Surratt--the drunken old bloat! Let's take a drink." The afflicted Conservative saw the matter in another light; he gave a convulsive snuffle or two, blew his nose, wiped his eyes again, and the parties adjourned to the El Dorado and swung round the circle."
Marysville Daily Appeal, Marysville, California, April 11, 1868, page 3


    The Republican State Convention, which assembled at Salem on the 25th of March, nominated, for Congress, David Logan; for Presidential Electors, A. B. Meacham, Wilson Bowlby, and Orange Jacobs, and elected the following delegates to the National Republican Convention: J. A. Parrish, Max Ramsby, M. Baker, C. C. Beekman, H. R. Kincaid, Josiah Failing.
"Political," New York Tribune, April 29, 1868, page 4


    FOR SAN FRANCISCO.--Mr. C. C. Beekman, agent Wells, Fargo & Co. in this place, left Thursday morning on a business trip to San Fran., and will be gone about three weeks. Mr. B. is a delegate to the National Union Convention, to be held at Chicago on the 20th, but business engagements will not permit him to attend in person, and his proxy has been sent to a gentleman in the East.Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 2, 1868, page 3


    RETURNED.--Messrs. Beekman and Klippel returned on Saturday last from San Francisco. Beek came back cheering for Grant and Colfax, and feeling proud of a fine school bell that he purchased below, and now on the way here. Henry brought his pockets full of the bills of a large stock of tin and hardware, soon to arrive for the new firm; and both gentlemen seemed glad to get home again to the little town in the "nook" of the mountains.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 30, 1868, page 3


    BELL ARRIVED.--The fine bell for the public school of Jacksonville district, procured mainly by the energy of Director Beekman, has arrived. It is from the foundry of W. T. Garratt, San Francisco, weighs 450 pounds and when hung will doubtless be heard at a distance of three or four miles. There is still due on it about $150, which has been liberally advanced by Mr. Beekman, and which should be promptly made up by subscription. It is unfair that one citizen should be overtaxed to benefit all and we hope this community will come forward and contribute the necessary sum at once.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 13, 1868, page 3


    THAT SIDEWALK.--We believe there is a town ordinance regarding sidewalks in force. Some of the sidewalks have never received the repairs required by the town ordinance, and the attention of the Street Commissioner is called to the fact. That from the Express corner to Mrs. Love's residence is actually dangerous, and should any person receive a sprained ankle or a broken limb from the protruding planks, the corporation might have to suffer.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 12, 1868, page 3


    LARGE SPECIMENS.--Last Sunday a miner named Wm. Harriott found a chunk of gold on Applegate Creek, near Steamboat city, that weighed 41 ounces, and is worth about $480. This piece is on exhibition at the banking house of C. C. Beekman. Another weighing 69 ounces was taken out on Saturday, but it has not been offered for sale yet. These pieces were found below the claims now being worked, and seem to indicate that our mines are not yet played out.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 19, 1868, page 3


    Jacksonville Sentinel, Sept. 19th: Last Sunday a miner named Wm. Harriott found a chunk of gold on Applegate Creek, near Steamboat City that weighs 41 oz., and is worth about $680. This piece is on exhibition at the banking house of C. C. Beekman. Another weighing 69 ounces was taken out on Saturday. 

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 3, 1868, page 215


    MORE PROTECTION.--Mr. C. C. Beekman has commenced to dig a well on the Express corner and has on the way a large force pump, capable of throwing water over the whole block, which he intends placing in it. We are glad to see a little public spirit left among our citizens, as the majority of them seem inclined to take no precautionary measures. If in connection with this creditable work Mr. B. will only mend his way and make his sidewalk passable we will never pass over it without thinking that he is one of the slow and sure kind--slow to move but sure to go ahead when he takes the notion.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 10, 1868, page 3


    MONEY LOST.--A person lost a purse containing $50 last week on the Dry Creek trail. If any honest man finds it he will be rewarded by leaving it at Mr. Beekman's.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 24, 1868, page 3


    'TIS WELL!--The new well of Mr. C. C. Beekman on the Express corner is finished. A good supply of water was struck at 27 feet, about ten of which was through the bedrock. Mr. Beekman intends putting one of the new American submerged pumps in it, which in case of fire will be a great protection. Mr. Beekman deserves credit for his public spirit, and we would be glad to see others do likewise.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 24, 1868, page 3


    CIRCULATING LIBRARY.--Messrs. Sutton & Stearns have fitted up the room formerly occupied by Wm. Hoffman, in the rear of the Express building, for a circulating library and reading room. We commend the enterprise of these gentlemen and hope they will meet with success. They already have a large number of subscribers, but room for more. Everyone should come forward and sign.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 31, 1868, page 3


    The library and reading room started by Sutton & Stearns is a success. It is one of the most cozy places in town to spend an evening in.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1868, page 2


    DEBATE.--We are requested to announce that a meeting will be held at the Pioneer Reading room this (Saturday) evening, for the purpose of reorganizing the Jacksonville Legislature. Let all those who take interest in such proceedings be at their posts, as there are a great many important measures acted upon or omitted by the Oregon Legislature that want attending to.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1868, page 3


    AT LAST!--That sidewalk of Beekman's is no longer an eyesore nor the terror of nocturnal pedestrians. It is fixed, but had it been deferred till spring it would have lasted longer.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 28, 1868, page 3


To the Reading Public.
WE have fitted up a comfortable Reading Room and Circulating Library, which will give everyone who wishes to read a chance. For particulars inquire at the City Drug Store.
SUTTON & STEARNS.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 5, 1868, page 2


    SUBMERGED PUMP.--The new submerged pump just placed in the well of C. C. Beekman at the Express Corner is a success. It will throw a stream of water across the street to the roof of Horne's Hotel and can never freeze up. They are furnished by Hoffman & Klippel, at manufacturer's price and freight, and it always gives Mr. K. great pleasure to explain their many advantages.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 5, 1868, page 3


    WHOLESALE ROBBERY.--Sometime during this week Mr. Beekman discovered that some thieves had been making free in his storehouse where his family's supply of groceries are kept. About twelve boxes of candles had been stolen, and it was impossible to tell what quantity of other articles had been taken.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 5, 1868, page 3


    The Board of Trustees met at the Pioneer Reading Room, at 7 p.m., according to the adjournment.
"Board of Trustees,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 20, 1869, page 2


    SCHOOL ELECTION.--There will be an election held at the school house on the 5th of April for a school director to take the place of Mr. Beekman, whose term expires on the 1st.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 27, 1869, page 3


    SCHOOL ELECTION.--The election on Monday resulted in the unanimous choice of Mr. C. C. Beekman for director and the election of S. J. Day, the present incumbent, for clerk. Mr. B. desired to be relieved, but the people seem so well pleased with the interest he has taken in the school that they will not allow him to retire with the honor he has already won. A resolution was adopted requiring the directors to instruct the clerk to report the names of all delinquents at each meeting in order that the deficiency may be made up by a tax.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1869, page 3


    IMPROVEMENTS.--We notice considerable improvement going on--new fences, repainting, and on Oregon St., between Main and California, a new brick sidewalk is laid. The Express corner shines with a new coat of paint but inside as black (politically) as ever.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1869, page 3


    C. C. Beekman is having his banking house painted and made to look like a new building.
"Improvements," Democratic News, Jacksonville, May 1, 1869, page 3


    THE BEST PUMP IN USE.--Is the "American Submerged," for which Hoffman & Klippel are agents. It never freezes, will force water over any building, is invaluable for irrigating, and will not get out of order. One can be seen in use at the Express corner, and H.&K. have a large invoice on hand.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 5, 1869, page 2


    HANDSOME NUGGET.--A Chinaman sold to Mr. Beekman during the week a piece of solid gold weighing over $200. Several smaller pieces from one to two ounces have been brought in lately, and it is probable that some of the companies have struck a good streak.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 12, 1869, page 2


THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY.
Jacksonville, Oregon July 19, 1869.
P.O. Dept. July 21
    Senator Geo. H. Williams
        or Parker, Commr. of Indian Affairs
Imminent danger of disaffection among Snake & other Indians urgently demands the continuance of Agent Applegate at Klamath Agency.
S. D. Van Dyke
J. C. Tolman
J. M. McCall
C. C. Beekman
Wm. Turner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 615 Oregon Superintendency, 1866-1869, frames 598-599.


    FOR THE OLD HOME.--Mr. C. C. Beekman, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of this place, started with his family overland on Wednesday for a visit to the old folks in New York. Were it not for his promise to return about the 1st of November we do not know how he could be spared, as he is an oracle in matters political, financial and general, and his advice is usually sound. We wish him and his family a pleasant journey and speedy return.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 4, 1869, page 2


    GOT STARTED.--Mr. Beekman and family left San Francisco on Wednesday, overland for New York. They were all in good health.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 11, 1869, page 2


   
DELEGATES TO THE NATIONAL CAPITAL CONVENTION.--Gov. Woods has appointed Messrs. A. A. McCully of Marion County, John Barrows of Linn County and C. C. Beekman of Jackson County delegates to the convention to be held at St. Louis, Oct. 20th, to take steps to secure the removal of the national capital to the Mississippi Valley.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, September 17, 1869, page 2  This was reprinted in the Sentinel of September 25, page 2.


    The Dundee Expositor says:--Mr. C. C. Beekman, formerly a resident of Dundee, and a son of B. B. Beekman Esq., is in town after twenty years absence. he is engaged in prosperous business at Jacksonville, Oregon.
"Other Localities," Home and Around, Corning, New York, September 30, 1869, page 2



   
. . . C. C. Beekman, of Oregon, [is] at the Metropolitan Hotel.
"Personal," New York Times, October 13, 1869, page 5


    PERSONAL.--C. C. Beekman and family returned last Tuesday night on the stage from their Eastern visit.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 27, 1869, page 3


    VISITORS.--Chas. Hughes, County Clerk, and Sheriff Chapman, of Josephine County, have been visiting our town during the past few days. The case of C. C. Beekman vs. John Bolt, Treasurer of Josephine County--mandamus to compel the Treasurer to pay coin on a county order, issued in 1862--which was investigated, last Monday, before Judge Prim, was the occasion of their visit. They have both returned.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 11, 1869, page 3


    IMPORTANT DECISION.--Judge Prim decided yesterday, in the case of C. C. Beekman vs. John Bolt, Treasurer of Josephine County, which was mandamus to compel the Treasurer to pay a county order issued in March, 1862, in gold and silver coin, that the plaintiff was not entitled to a coin payment.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 11, 1869, page 3


    IRON DOOR.--A large iron door, for Beekman's vault, has just been finished at D. C. Miller's shop, in this place. It is quite an undertaking for a blacksmith shop, but Dave has made the ripple, and we begin to think he can make anything that's got iron about it.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 1, 1870, page 3


    Contracts for mail routes in this vicinity, according to information from Washington, has been let as follows: The following bids were made for the route between Oroville and Portland: . . . Cornelius C. Beekman, $158,000 . . .
"Mail Routes Let," Weekly Butte Record, Oroville, California, April 2, 1870, page 3
  Beekman wasn't the lowest bidder, and didn't get the contract.


    DRYING UP.--Two of the principal wells in town--the one at Beekman's corner and that at the New State--manifested indications of "letting up," or rather, refused to let come up their accustomed supply of water this week. In newspaper parlance, they have discontinued.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 6, 1870, page 3


    THE HUMBOLDT BRANCH.--Articles of incorporation of a company to build the Humboldt Branch Railroad through Rogue River and Umpqua valleys, in accordance with the Williams amendment, were filed, or are to be filed with the Clerk of Jackson County the present week. We have examined the articles of incorporation and find thereunto appended the names of many of our most substantial, moneyed citizens. The entire capital stock is put down at $5,000,000, or fifty thousand shares, at $100 each. The headquarters of the company will be Jacksonville, Oregon. This movement effectually puts a quietus upon Congressman Smith's argument that no company would undertake to build the road through these valleys. The following are some of the names of the incorporators: James T. Glenn, J. B. Wrisley, Jacob Ish, James D. Fay, Sachs Bros., John Bilger, W. H. S. Hyde, R. Benedict, J. D. Coughlin, P. P. Prim, H. Klippel, Wm. Hoffman, Andy Davidson, Wm. Turner, P. Britt, C. C. Beekman, John Neuber, Jesse Applegate, Jacob Thompson, N. C. Dean, Thomas Chavner and K. Kubli.--Democratic News.
Corvallis Gazette, September 3, 1870, page 2


    Messrs. Beekman and Fay are putting up a handsome fence between their residences.
"Improvements," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1871, page 3


    Mr. Beekman, in the course of a few well-timed remarks, impressed upon the minds of our people the sad extremities [in which] the late calamity had left many of the citizens of our neighboring town, and that our sympathies should be accompanied by immediate substantial aid. He thought that, if the matter was only presented, there would be a liberal response by the people of our valley, and proposed a liberal donation on his part.
"Meeting for the Relief of Yreka," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1871, page 3


    SCHOOL EXHIBITION.--On Thursday and Friday evenings of last week, the scholars of this district, under the control of Professor Robb and Miss Eckleson as teachers, gave a very interesting entertainment to a large audience at the district school house of this place. . . . C. C. Beekman was called on for an address on the first evening and responded and made some telling hits in his usual able and happy manner.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 30, 1872, page 3



THE REV. MR. BEEKMAN'S CONVERT
    When we were compelled to expose Billy Alequacheek Turner's [William M. Turner, editor of the Sentinel] rascality on the Klamath some months ago, his spiritual guardian, Mr. C. C. Beekman, declared that while it was true he was a rascal on the Klamath, he had repented and was disposed to do right; that so saint-like had he become that he could be turned loose unmuzzled and unhandcuffed in a whole warehouse full of handsaw files, and he would not appropriate a file; that if he had a ton of alequacheek and a wagonload of woodpecker heads [both media of Indian wealth], and were placed in the midst of a  digger reservation with forty decks of marked cards, he would feel no temptation to gamble with the diggers; that if he had a chance to swindle the government out of thousands of dollars by simply swearing to a false account, he would not swear worth a cent; and that he was in all respects as truthful and honest a man as the weather would permit.
    Up to that time we had the highest veneration for the Rev. Mr. Beekman's moral sagacity, but we could not see Billy Alequacheek's moral reformation with the specs we possessed, and when we thought of that suit of clothes he took for appraising the school lands, we lost our grip entirely, and were not surprised much when he committed forgery in that letter business. His penitence had come too late, and proved a pet theory of ours that repentances made so late in life are seldom efficacious, unless the penitent dies pretty soon afterwards. We have always held the opinion that when the legs of the penitent thief on the cross were broken and he gave up the ghost, it was the very best thing that could happen him; it saved him the perils of temptation. Now, if Billy had been gathered to his fathers soon after his conversion under the ministrations of the Rev. Mr. Beekman, it is true he would have lost the suit of clothes and would not now hold the somewhat anomalous position of Chairman of the Republican County Central Committee, and at the same time edit the Deputy Sentinel, and be the special eulogist of a Democratic Governor; but we honestly think his chances for a celestial crown would have been much better than they appear to be at present.
    Whether the Governor will be spiritually or politically benefited by his association with Billy remains to be seen. Judging from the moral and political debasement which has befallen his associates here, we may be permitted to entertain grave doubts. Fortunately for the Governor, he lives so far away from Billy that the latter cannot tempt him to commit forgery as he did Linn, nor to lie as he has others of his confreres, unless he uses the telegraph for that purpose; wherefore we take the liberty of warning the friends of the Executive against the wiles of the Rev. Mr. Beekman's convert.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1872, page 2  The target of this screed is apparently William M. Turner, then chairman of the Republican Central Committee. A letter in the June 1, 1872 Democratic Times alleges Turner's theft of saw files, as well as his gambling with Indians for Indian money. "Alequacheek" is apparently related to Chinook "chickamin," the word for white man's money.


    WHO FURNISHED THE COIN?--We have often been asked who furnished the coin to run the Deputy Sentinel, as it is well known that two of the publishers are pecuniarily unable to conduct a newspaper which possesses neither advertisements nor subscribers, and the other--"Sugar-Foot Dave," or David, the carpenter [David Linn?]--has not hitherto been noted for his liberality to newspaper enterprises. We cannot say, with certainty, who is the backer of the concern, but from its warm championship of Gov. Grover and other indications of close affiliation between Grover and the bolters, it is thought that some of the Governor's coin was contributed to the medium through which Billy Alequacheek and "Sugar-Footed Dave" vented their malice and promulgated their forgeries and slanders.
----
    GOING TO RUN IT HIMSELF.--The express office ring, composed of Beekman, Hayden, Langell and one or two others, started in to control the county offices as soon as it is known that the Republicans had carried the county. They determined that Billy Alequacheek should be Clerk (probably because the Rev. Mr. Beekman had converted him from the errors of his ways), and the Sheriff office should be run in the interests of the combined Pinto and Express ring. Well, we are happy to state that the little game has failed. Mr. Dunn will perform the duties of his office himself, and he will not disgrace the county by the appointment of Billy Alequacheek as his deputy. Thos. McKenzie will run his office also, without any reference whatever to the dictation of the express office or cobbler shop.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1872, page 3  The "Deputy Sentinel" was apparently a political publication of the Oregon Sentinel office, then edited by Harrison Kelly.


    On Tuesday morning of last week, in Dundee village, a barn owned by Mr. B. B. Beekman was struck by lightning and burned. On hearing the clap of thunder so near, he went to the barn and found both of his horses down, and while trying to get them on their feet, he saw that the building was on fire. One of the horses finally broke loose and escaped, and Mr. Beekman dragged the other out by the halter. The fire soon gained full headway, and, assistance arriving, the efforts were directed to saving the contents of the barn--everything saved except about 200 bushels of oats. Loss, $1,000. They have a fire engine in Dundee called the "Comet." It was got on the ground soon after the fire broke out, and safely stowed away where the fire couldn't damage it, and then the firemen went to work with pails in the old-fashioned way.
"Pen and Scissors," Schuyler County Democrat, Watkins, New York, August 21, 1872, page 2


    IMPROVEMENTS.--C. C. Beekman has embellished his express office front with a lot of ornamental trees, which, when in full plumage, cannot but greatly beautify that part of town. Our citizens should all follow suit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 7, 1872, page
3


Destructive Fire at Jacksonville.
    JACKSONVILLE (Oregon), April 3rd.
    The most destructive fire that ever occurred in this place broke out this evening at half-past 5 o'clock, in the United States Hotel, and spread with fearful rapidity towards the eastern portion of the town. In less than fifteen minutes it was completely beyond control. Very fortunately there was little wind blowing, and that in an opposite direction to the main business or center of the place. Having no fire engine, the main reliance was in tearing down buildings, which was done as rapidly as possible. The express and banking house of C. C. Beekman was badly scorched. The fire was got under control at 7 o'clock p.m. Losses, as near as can be ascertained, are as follows: Horne, proprietor of United States Hotel, $10,000; Mrs. Brentano's millinery, $700; Dr. Aiken, books and instruments, $400; Miss Kent, accounts and household furniture, $800; Democratic Times office, $1,500; Kubli & Wilson, livery stable building and hay and grain, $4,000; David Cronemiller & Bro., blacksmith shop, $1,100; Jacob Meyer, wagon shop and tools, $1,000; Pat Donegan, blacksmith, $1,500; James T. Glenn, dwelling occupied by Mrs. T'Vault, $1,000; Mrs. Ganung's dwelling, $800; P. J. Ryan, store and stock, $30,000; James Casey's building, $1,000. There was not a dollar of insurance, and the whole loss is total. Little property was saved from any of the buildings. Very fortunately the wind changed when the first buildings were nearly burned down, and saved the eastern part of town and city buildings.
Marysville Daily Appeal, California, April 4, 1873, page 3


    A GANG OF BURGLARS ON THE TRAMP.--The excitement of the week has been about burglars. Last Sunday night Mr. Beekman's house was entered, and his pants taken outside and "gone through," when the thieves hung the pants on the fence. Twenty dollars in change and some keys were the spoils. The burglars, no doubt, had hoped to get possession of the keys belonging to the safe in Mr. B.'s express office. In this, however, they were disappointed. The burglars did their work so well that none of the inmates of the house were awakened, although they must have passed in a few feet of where Mr. Beekman was sleeping. The parties concerned in this robbery are evidently old hands at the business, and, from what can be learned of their movements, are evidently on a professional visit south. An overcoat was stolen from Johnny Crouch in this vicinity previous to the robbery at Mr. Beekman's house. The coat is said to have been seen at Ashland and again at Casey's. The residence of Mr. Davis, at Ashland, was entered a few nights since, Mr. D.'s pants taken out and searched, and then left in the yard. These circumstances should warn people to be prepared for the light-fingered gentry.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 6, 1873, page 3


    BURGLARS ABOUT.--Some burglars made a raid on the residence of C. C. Beekman one night this week, and got away with that gentleman's pantaloons, containing a few dollars. They seemed to be after the coin only, for the pantaloons were found on a neighbor's fence the next morning. The same persons went through the residences of Sheriff McKenzie and Patrick Fehely that evening, capturing sundry articles of food, and the next evening were about entering Silas J. Day's dwelling, when they were discovered and frightened off. They were next heard of at Ashland, where they entered O. A. Davis' house and robbed his pantaloons of some money.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 6, 1873, page 3


    SISKIYOU NEWS.--We clip the following items from the Yreka Union of Sept. 6th: "We learn that a party of three men, tramps, who have been plundering the various towns and stopping places on the stage road in Oregon all the way up from Portland, are now in California. They robbed Beekman's house in Jacksonville, one at Ashland, and also one just the other side of Cottonwood, yesterday morning. They were seen on the road between here and the Klamath River on Friday afternoon, and no doubt are among us now. We therefore advise our citizens to keep their doors shut and their eyes open. If we were the gents referred to we would either keep right on without stopping or turn back immediately. This county is very unhealthy for their kind, and our citizens generally have to pay for the coffin.
Weekly Trinity Journal, Weaverville, California, September 13, 1873, page 3



    STAGE ROBBED.--The O.&C. stage was stopped by highwaymen near Redding, California, and the express box captured by them. It is thought that C. C. Beekman, W. M. Turner and some other citizens of Jacksonville had various sums in the box. No further particulars as yet.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1873, page 3


    In Jacksonville, on Wednesday morning, October 22, 1873, LYDIA L. BEEKMAN, youngest daughter of C. C. and J. E. Beekman, aged 5 years, 11 months and 6 days.
    "Little Lydia," as she was familiarly called, was the joy of her parents and the pet of her brother and sisters. Her uncommon intelligence and childish graces readily won for her the regard and affection of all her playmates and acquaintances, young and old. The Angel of Death in his flight stooped to pluck the brightest jewel from the family group and has placed it to shine forever more in the diadem of Heaven.
"Died," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 25, 1873, page 3


    C. C. Beekman has removed the old awning in front of his banking house, and is having a neat, new one put in its place.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1873, page 3


    Warren Lodge No. 10, of Jacksonville: Thos. G. Reames, W.M.; C. C. Beekman, S.W.; Jas. A. Cardwell, J.W.; J. Bilger, Treasurer; Max Muller, Secretary; R. S. Dunlap, Tyler.
"Masonic Election," Oregon Statesman, Jacksonville, December 13, 1873, page 4


    Lydia L. Beekman, died Oct. 22nd; aged 5 years, 11 months and 6 days; pneumonia; in Masonic cemetery.
"Mortality Report," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1874, page 3


The Fire at Jacksonville, O.
JACKSONVILLE, April 14th.
    The following is a list of losers by the fire and the amount of losses as far as can now be obtained: Wolters' saloon, fixtures and personal effects, $2,000; Kreutzer's bakery and stock, $1,500; E. Jacobs' grain, flour, etc., $700; Cohn, clothing and dry goods, $2,000; Drum, groceries, $400; Wm. Boyer, grocer, about $3,000; Schumpf's barber shop and fixtures, $500; A. Fisher & Bro., general merchandise and building, $28,000; Judge & Nunan, saddlers, $2,000; Solomon, general merchandise, $8,000; Langell, buildings and shoemaker's stock, $700; Pape's saloon, fixtures and stock, $500; Coleman buildings, about $1,000; Ben Sachs' notions and variety goods, $500; John Orth, damage to building, $500; Schultz' building, about $2,000; McManus & Owens' building, $1,500; John Bilger, damage to building, $500; David Linn, damage to building, $3,00; C. C. Beekman, damage by removal, $250; P. J. Ryan, building destroyed, $1,000; amounting in all to $59,550. Probably there were other losses not now ascertained, to swell the grand total to between $60,000 and $65,000. Of this there is only known to have been insured; A. Fisher & Bro., $10,000; Judge & Nunan, fully insured, $2,000; L. Solomon, $3,000; Coleman, $5,000; Ben. Sachs, $500, fully insured; John Orth, $500, fully insured; John Bilger, $500, fully insured; making a total insurance of $17,000, and cutting the probable actual loss down to $45,000. The persons arrested on suspicion of incendiarism have been discharged from custody, as nothing could be found against them.
Sacramento Daily Union, April 15, 1874, page 2


    RADICAL PRIMARIES.--The Radical primaries held last Saturday were fairly attended. The following are the delegates to their convention, which meets today: W. J. Stanley, M. Bellinger, Jesse Dollarhide, John A. Boyer, Geo. Brown, Sam Hall, R. C. Armstrong, P. D. Parsons, Jos. Blatt.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1874, page 3



    It was ordered by the Court that the bill of C. C. Beekman for mucilage furnished to the County Clerk be allowed, amt. $1.75.
Jackson County Commissioners' Journals, session of July 8, 1874


This space is reserved for JOHN A. BOYER,
who will shortly open out a complete and
superior stock of General Merchan-
dise, etc., in Linn's Brick Build-
ing, Cal. St., Jacksonville.
Advertisement, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1874, page 2


    WELL REPAIRING.--C. C. Beekman is having his well cleaned and otherwise repaired. This well will be a valuable auxiliary in case of fire.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1874, page 3



    A new sidewalk has been laid down in front of Beekman's banking house and the City Drug Store.
"Improvements," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1874, page 3


A CARD.
    The undersigned returns his heartfelt thanks to his many friends for the kindness extended his father and himself since the recent fire, and also respectfully notifies the public that he has opened a new store with a fresh stock of groceries, etc., in David Linn's new building on California Street, where he will be pleased to see his father's old friends and customers, besides as many others as will favor him with a call.
Respectfully,
    JOHN A. BOYER.
Jacksonville, August 5, 1874.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1874, page 2


New Store!    New Goods!
JOHN A. BOYER.

LINN'S BRICK BUILDING, CALIFORNIA ST.
DEALER IN
GROCERIES AND PROVISIONS,
Assorted Nuts,
PLAIN AND FANCY CANDIES,
FRUITS IN SEASON.

PRODUCE TAKEN IN EXCHANGE. Please give me a call.
Jacksonville, August 5, 1874.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1874, page 2


    Boyer keeps all the fruits of the season. Call and try them.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1874, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family left on Wednesday on a visit to Dundee, Yates County, New York, Mr. Beekman's native city. they expect to be absent about two months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1874, page 3


    John A. Boyer has so far recovered from his sickness to be about again.
"Personal,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1874, page 3


    Latest advices from C. C. Beekman say that it will be some time before he will return--perhaps upwards of a month. His family and himself are enjoying their visit finely.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1874, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family, who have been on a lengthy visit East, returned Saturday evening.
"Personal," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1874, page 3


    HOME AGAIN.--C. C. Beekman and family, who have been on a visit to relatives and friends in the eastern states during the past few months, returned home on Saturday evening last. "Benny" says he saw Gen. Grant's house in Washington, but as the general wasn't at home he didn't go in.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 12, 1874, page 3


    FOR SAN FRANCISCO.--Hon. Henry Klippel left for San Francisco this week to purchase a mill for the quartz mine of Klippel, Beekman & Johnson, on Rogue River. This ledge promises well. We are pleased to see that the gentlemen interested repose enough confidence in it to venture buying a mill, and trust their energy and enterprise will be amply repaid.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 18, 1874, page 3


    RETURNED.--Hon. Henry Klippel has returned from San Francisco, where he has purchased a fifteen-horsepower steam engine for the quartz ledge of Klippel, Beekman & Johnson, on Rogue River. The engine has been shipped already, and will arrive shortly, when operations will commence in earnest.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1874, page 3


    Hon. Henry Klippel left for San Francisco last week to purchase a mill for the quartz mine of Klippel, Beekman & Johnson, on Rogue River. This ledge promises well.
"State News," Willamette Farmer, Salem, December 25, 1874, page 1


    ARRIVED.--The machinery for Klippel, Beekman & Johnson's quartz ledge on Rogue River has arrived, and Mr. Klippel has gone to superintend putting it up.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1875, page 3


    The new machinery to be used in crushing quartz from the mine of Beekman & Co., near the mouth of Applegate, Jackson County, was placed on the ground on last Sunday week, by Jos. Beggs, who took it up from Roseburg, without a break or accident of any kind. Jim Hurd is superintending the setting up of the engine, which is pronounced a gem of its kind, and it is thought crushing will begin with a month. It is a portable engine of 15 horsepower, and the company--Beekman, Klippel and Johnson--have two 12-foot arrastras, intending to crush the ore with stamps to feed them, which they calculate will enable them to reduce at least three tons per day. They have now something more than 100 tons of ore on the dump, which it is calculated will yield fully $25 per ton. They have tested some of it in a mill and realize as high as $40 per ton. The gold is of very fine quality.

"Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, January 19, 1875, page 1


    AT WORK.--The quartz mill of Klippel, Beekman & Johnson, on their ledge on Rogue River, is now in working order, and running constantly. Mr. Klippel, who arrived last Saturday from the ledge, informs us that they have 125 tons of quartz taken out already and that the mill is pounding it up at the rate of three tons a day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1875, page 3


    The "Elizabeth" mill (Beekman & Co.) started up on Monday last. Everything worked to a charm, and they will make their first cleanup in about a month.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Oregonian, Portland, February 23, 1875, page 1


    John A. Boyer has a superior supply of garden seeds for sale.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1875, page 3



    The quartz mill of Klippel, Beekman & Johnson, on their ledges on Rogue River, is now in working order and running constantly. Mr. Klippel, who arrived at Jacksonville from the ledge, informs the Times that they have 125 tons of quartz taken out already and that the mill is pounding it up at the rate of three tons per day.
"Oregon News," Sacramento Daily Record-Union, March 2, 1875, page 1


    TRANSPLANTING.--A large amount of fruit and shade trees have been and are yet being transplanted. C. C. Beekman had some maple trees set out alongside the express office this week, which will be a useful ornament in the future. We hope to see several more improvements of this kind made.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 12, 1875, page 3


    The recent municipal election in Jacksonville resulted in the election of the following: Trustees, C. C. Beekman, Sol. Sachs and Henry Judge; Recorder, U. S. Hayden; Treasurer, Henry Pape; Marshal, Jas. P. McDaniel; Street Commissioner, Silas J. Day.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, March 13, 1875, page 2


    Klippel, Beekman & Johnson have nine men at work on the Elizabeth ledge and work is progressing finely. They will clean up in the course of a short time.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 19, 1875, page 3



    CLEANUP.--Messrs. Henry Klippel and C. C. Beekman this week returned from a visit to the Elizabeth quartz ledge, having witnessed the first cleanup of the new mill lately put up there. Ninety-three tons of quartz have been crushed, which averaged over $15 per ton. This is a good yield, considering that considerable of the quartz was bedrock and the difficulty experienced in getting the machinery in working order owing to the cold. The company feel encouraged enough to keep ten men constantly employed, and are sanguine of the ledge paying even better than this. The main ledge has not been discovered as yet.
Oregon City Enterprise, April 16, 1875, page 3  This article was reprinted from the
Democratic Times of April 9, 1875, page 3


    PERSONAL.--C. C. Beekman left last week for San Francisco, and is expected home in a few days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 25, 1875, page 3


    C. C. Beekman took 25 pounds of ore from the Elizabeth ledge with him to San Francisco, which he will have subjected to a practical test.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 25, 1875, page 3


    Ah Hoo, arrested a few days ago for stealing a watch and indicted by the grand jury for larceny, was let out on bail, C. C. Beekman and U. S. Hayden being his sureties.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 25, 1875, page 3


     C. C. Beekman took 25 pounds of ore from the Elizabeth ledge with him to San Francisco, which he will have subjected to a practical test.
"The Southern Oregon Mines," Oregonian, Portland, June 28, 1875, page 1


    C. C. Beekman has returned from a trip to San Francisco.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 2, 1875, page 3


    FIREWORKS.--John A. Boyer has just received a complete and first-class supply of fireworks for the Fourth, consisting of rockets, roman candles, etc., of all sizes, which will be sold at reasonable rates. Call and see them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 2, 1875, page 3


    THE ELIZABETH LEDGE.--Rock from the Elizabeth ledge taken to San Francisco by C. C. Beekman, and subjected to a mill test, makes a showing of over $21 a ton. Mr. Klippel thinks that not reliable, as the rock pays $13 by arrastra working, by which a greater portion of the quicksilver is lost and of course much gold with it. The ore is refractory, but the proprietors of the ledge believe they can now overcome the difficulty, which, if successful, will greatly increase the bullion product. An experiment with some tailings of the ledge this week revealed the presence of considerable quicksilver containing quite a sprinkling of gold.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 2, 1875, page 3



    PERSONAL.--C. C. Beekman left yesterday for Portland, intending to be present at the grand Masonic reunion of the Masons of Oregon, Washington and Idaho territories, mentioned in the Times
a few days ago.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 13, 1875, page 3


    LOT SOLD.--The lot formerly occupied by the U.S. Hotel was last Saturday sold to C. C. Beekman for $710, which is a small price for it. We learn that the prospects of a brick hotel being built on it at an early day are favorable. We hope so, as such a structure would greatly improve the appearance of our town.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1875, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and lady returned Tuesday from a trip north. They were also participants in the late grand Masonic reunion and excursion, at which an "away-up" time was had.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 3, 1875, page 3


    SHERIFF'S SALE.--The goods in the store of John A. Boyer will be sold at sheriff's sale on Saturday, September 11th, between the hours of 9 o'clock a.m. and four p.m. The stock consists of groceries, provisions, boots and shoes, tobacco and cigars, candies, nuts, stationery, etc., of the first quality, and those wishing the best of goods at their own rates should not fail to be on hand.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 10, 1875, page 3


    Sam Bowden is now fulfilling a contract of running a tunnel into the Elizabeth ledge for Klippel, Beekman & Co.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 17, 1875, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, agent of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express, will receive subscriptions intended for the sufferers of the Virginia [City] fire and forward them free of charge.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1875, page 3


    The state warrants held by Douglas County against the Swamp and Tide Land Fund were ordered to be sold to C. C. Beekman of this place, who has offered forty percent of their face value, payable in U.S. gold coin.

"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 21, 1876, page 3


    The state warrants held by Douglas County against the swamp and tide land fund were ordered to be sold to C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville, who has offered forty percent of their face value, payable in United States gold coin.
"Oregon," Morning Oregonian, January 31, 1876, page 1


    C. C. Beekman left on a trip to the East the other day.

"Personal," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman returned from San Francisco Sunday. He will not go East until later.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1876, page 3


    Henry Klippel and C. C. Beekman offer a first-class, portable steam engine for sale. For terms, etc., see new advertisement elsewhere.
    C. C. Beekman this week received a splendid clock from San Francisco, which is about the largest and finest in town. It also keeps the day of the week and month.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 10, 1876, page 3


DIRECTIONS.
    The clock is screwed to the box at top and bottom. After removing it from the box, set it upright, and if hanging remove the notched iron plate from the small box at the top of the case and screw it to the back at the bottom, and draw the tacks from the month roller. The clock now stands at 5 minutes before 11 p.m. Turn the minute hand forward until the calendar changes, and set the calendar according to directions below. Hang or set the clock in the desired position so that the large wire in the pendulum rod will come directly back of the notch in the brass circle around the calendar dial, which will secure a perfect beat. Then, if hanging, secure the clock by driving a nail or screw through the notched plate into the wall and attach the drop by the screws which fasten it to the box. Hang the weights upon the cords, being careful to remove the tacks which hold the cords. To regulate, raise or lower the pendulum ball by means of the screw nut below it.
    TO SET THE CALENDAR.--Raise the wire ring found at the back of the clock, between the dials, and turn the pointer MODERATELY forward (NEVER BACKWARD) until the right month and day of month appear. Still holding up the wire, turn the day of the week upward till right. This process can be employed at any time to correct the calendar if wrong. Every clock, before leaving the works, is tested thoroughly, both as to time and calendar, and the calendar being set on the right year when the clock is packed, will give the leap year and other Februarys correctly, unless interfered with, or worked ahead of time. But if this should occur, it can readily be set right as follows. Raising the wire as above, turn the pointer forward until a February is shown, and then, placing the pointer on the figure 29, drop the wire, and if the pointer cannot then be moved, you have a leap year February. Calling this 1872, or the last leap year, work forward as before to the right year and month. If the pointer is not held fast on the figure 29, continue the process until it is.
    CAUTION.--Use no oil on the calendar. It is not needed, and will work only injury when used, by attracting dust and clogging the machine.
Instructions pasted inside the Beekman Bank clock.


    C. C. Beekman left for Salem Tuesday.

"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 24, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman has returned from Salem.

"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 31, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman will in a few days start on a Centennial trip East.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and son left last week on a trip to the Centennial.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 5, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, has been visiting his parents in Dundee, after twenty-five years absence [sic] on the Pacific Coast.
"Yates County," Corning Journal, Corning, New York, October 26, 1876, page 2  See September 30, 1869 entry, above.



    Mr. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, has been visiting his native town, Starkey, and left the other day for the Centennial. In 1850 he went to the land of gold to better his fortune, and since that he has seen many changes in the home of his adoption.
"Starkey," Yates County Chronicle, Penn Yan, New York, October 26, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and son were registered at the Centennial Exhibition on October 30th.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 23, 1876, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and son returned home this week from a Centennial trip to the East.

"Personal," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1876, page 3



    Beekman is the banker, express agent, etc., and is a sociable, accommodating gentleman and can appreciate a joke as well as anybody.
"A Clever Notice," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1877, page 1


    Beekman & Klippel have sold their engine and boiler, used by them on the Elizabeth mine, to Mr. Irwin, who will at once remove it to Sams Valley, for use in running a sawmill.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1877, page 3


    BIG STRAWBERRY.--Beekman, of this place, has raised the champion strawberry. It measures 8 by 7 inches in circumference and is about three-fourths of an inch in diameter [sic]. Will somebody give the solid contents of that measurement? It is one big berry made up of 8 or 10 smaller ones, all grown together in the form of a rosette.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1877, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, accompanied by his wife and daughter, left on Saturday's stage, bound for a month's vacation in San Francisco and surroundings.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1877, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family returned from San Francisco yesterday. They came via Portland.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 3, 1877, page 3


    PERSONAL.--Governor Chadwick arrived by yesterday's stage and will remain a short time in this section. His Excellency proposes making a trip to Lake County ere his return, leaving tomorrow, accompanied by C. C. Beekman and others. Mrs. Chadwick is with him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 24, 1877, page 3


    Gov. Chadwick, C. C. Beekman and Col. J. N. T. Miller left Saturday on a trip to Lake County.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 31, 1877, page 3


    Governor Chadwick, C. C. Beekman and N. Langell returned from Lake County last Monday. On Tuesday's stage the Governor and lady took their departure for Salem.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 7, 1877, page 3


    SCHOOL RECEPTION.--Prof. Merritt gave a reception to the pupils of his department at his residence on Saturday evening last, and also awarded premiums of excellence at the same time. A multitude of boys and girls assembled and passed off the evening in a pleasant manner. The teachers of the other departments of the district school were also in attendance. The following prizes were awarded: 1st class--Higher Arithmetic, B. B. Beekman; Practical Arithmetic, Jas. Cronemiller. 2nd class--Higher Arithmetic, George Huffer. Algebra, Frank Huffer. Geography, Miss Katie Jones. Grammar, Miss Mary Oliver. Bookkeeping, Wm. Mensor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 14, 1877, page 3


    GUBERNATORIAL MENTION.--Our fellow townsman, C. C. Beekman, is brought to the front as a Republican candidate for Governor. Beek would fill the office with great dignity; but it is doubtful whether he will consent to the immolation that awaits him and his compatriots.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 1, 1878, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, of Jackson, is talked of as the Radical gubernatorial Paschal lamb.
"Pen and Paste-Pot," State Rights Democrat, Albany, Oregon, March 15, 1878, page 3


Not a Candidate.
    EDITOR SENTINEL--SIR:--Learning that my name is being mentioned throughout the state in connection with the Governorship I desire to say that I am not a candidate for that or any other position.
    I am not a politician in any acceptation of the term, have never occupied official place except in a limited local sphere, and prefer the position of a private citizen to any in the gift of the people of Oregon. Hoping that the Republican convention will select a candidate more desirous of political honors, acceptable to the people, and better fitted to discharge the executive duties, I am respectfully,
C. C. BEEKMAN.
Jacksonville, April 9th.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1878, page 2


    OUR GOLD PRODUCT.--C. C. Beekman has handled over $10,000,000 in gold dust during his 25 years' residence in this place, and estimates that as much more passed through the hands of other buyers. This enormous amount of bullion was the product of the mines of Jackson and Josephine counties, which still furnish a great stretch of mining ground that has never been worked and only awaits the introduction of capital to make it yield forth its golden treasure. Hydraulic mining is destined to be one of the leading industries of Southern Oregon, and a very remunerative one, too. 

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 6, 1878, page 213


Swamp Lands and the Governorship.
    Merganser, Lake Co., Or., March 25, 1878.
To the Editor of the Oregonian:
    As C. C. Beekman is mentioned as a probable Republican candidate for Governor, space is asked in your columns for a view of the situation in Lake County.
    Swamp land matters being paramount with citizens universally, it is not unreasonable to suppose that settlers will favor their own interest at the ballot box next June.
    Mr. Beekman has been speculating quite extensively in swamp land bonds, and it is generally understood that he owns quite a large tract of swamp land, and the settlers here consider him their enemy. Many of the citizens of this county are of the same opinion of your correspondent--i.e., they expect to support the candidate whose interests are identical with theirs, regardless of political color. Knowing that a candidate's personal financial interests are in unison with the swindling swamp land ring and that the ring depends upon the Governor for its main support, it is safe to say that Lake County will not support any such man for that office.
A REPUBLICAN SETTLER.
Daily Oregonian, Portland, April 10, 1878, page 4


A Declension.
    Our fellow townsman C. C. Beekman, whose name has been very freely used by the Republicans as a possible candidate for Governor on their forthcoming ticket, comes out in a card [above] in the last Sentinel, declining the proffered honor. After disclaiming any exalted political ambitions, he hopes "that the Republican convention will select a candidate more desirous of political honors, acceptable to the people, and better fitted to discharge the executive duties." On the whole we are constrained to admit that the party might select a much worse candidate than Beekman, but we commend his judgment in declining the empty honor of candidacy with the certainty of defeat. We learn, from the language of his card, however, that certain "conjunctions" might induce him to submit to the chance of being struck by lightning."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 12, 1878, page 2


    At the evening session all the candidates for Governor who had before been named were withdrawn, and W. D. Hare, of Clatsop County, and C. C. Beekman, of Jackson, were put in nomination. On the fifth ballot Beekman was nominated. The nomination was on motion made unanimous.
"Oregon Radical [sic] State Convention," San Francisco Examiner, April 18, 1878, page 1


OREGON REPUBLICAN NOMINATION.
    Salem, Oregon, April 18. The Republican State Convention has nominated C. C. Beekman for Governor on the fifth ballot.
"Miscellaneous News," Buffalo Commercial, New York, April 18, 1878, page 3


Our Next Governor.
    In the course of his speech at the Portland ratification last Saturday evening, B. F. Dowell, Esq., of Jacksonville, gave a short personal sketch of C. C. Beekman, Republican candidate for Governor:
    "Mr. C. C. Beekman had been an old-line Whig; was born in the town of Dundee, in the great state of New York, and had emigrated to this state in 1852. Since that time Mr. Beekman has been a citizen of Southern Oregon. He is an honorable and capable gentleman. By honesty, industry and enterprise he has acquired a handsome fortune. He was a shrewd business man and a good financier. If elected, the speaker said he believed he would be able to bring this state out of debt. One thing could be said in favor of Mr. Beekman--he is an honest man, and under his administration there would be no peculations and no plundering of public funds. Mr. Beekman had ever been a consistent and unswerving Republican. He has for years been connected with a large business house in Jacksonville. During the time he has been acting as agent millions had passed his hands and not one dollar had stuck to them."
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 25, 1878, page 2


    N. Langell returned from Salem Sunday, where he manipulated matters in the interest of our friend Beekman. June will prove to Nat. that it was "love's labor lost."
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 26, 1878, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, of Jackson County, Southern Oregon, candidate for Governor, is a moral, temperate man, although not a member of any church or temperance organization. The fact of his wife's being a member of the Presbyterian Church may, however, subject him to censure by Democratic editors. No better recommendation is needed for him than to state that for the past twenty-three years he has held the important and responsible position of Wells, Fargo & Co., in a mining district, where millions of dollars, perhaps, have been entrusted to him, and which fully establishes his reputation as a financier. With unquestioned integrity and good executive ability, Mr. Beekman will guide the affairs of state honorably and successfully.

"Republican State Ticket," Corvallis Gazette, April 26, 1878, page 2


    A letter from Cottage Grove, Lane County, asks us if it is true that Mr. Beekman ever bought any swamp land. We don't know. We have heard, however, that both he and Mr. Thayer filed applications for such lands under the state law some years ago. (Mr. Thayer to a much larger extent than Mr. Beekman.) But whether either or both did so does not appear to be a matter of much importance. The state offered these lands, and it was the right of any citizen to buy them. If the terms were not advantageous to the state it was the fault of the lawmaking power.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 30, 1878, page 2


A Nice Little Game.
    The Oregonian and the Republican candidate for Governor are running a little mutual admiration society. Beekman's private secretary writes Scott a flattering epistle enclosing a complimentary notice of the anxious candidate, and the latter responds by giving it space in his columns. A nice little game. "You tickle me and I'll tickle you."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 3, 1878, page 2


KNOWS "BEEK."
    That lively, newsy, snappish little Democratic paper, the Roseburg [Western] Star, is on its ear because Republican exchanges are trying to tell it who Beekman is. It says:
    "It is useless for any Republican to attempt to tell us who C. C. Beekman is; we have known him ever since he came to this state. "Beek," as he is familiarly known, has made a fortune in this state, and at present is a banker of Jacksonville. Although he got all his money in Oregon, he has seldom made a legitimate investment within the state but confines himself to the business of buying gold dust, discounting notes, and participating in jobs, no matter how disreputable, where he can make a dollar. He is known here--not very favorably, we are constrained to admit--as the person who purchased the $15,000 road warrants from Douglas County. He has neither religious nor political principles, but has been a Republican just so far as it directly interested "Beek," and as to his "peculiar fitness for the office for which he was nominated," we have been unable to discover. It is true he has had some experience--having at one time been President of the Board of Trustees of the town of Jacksonville--but even in that capacity he failed to impress anyone with his "executive ability." The only claim he had on the Republican Party was his connection with several powerful rings, which alone secured him the nomination for Governor, and in the event of his election these rings will have to be sustained at the expense of the people of Oregon. Indeed, it looks too much like a repetition of the Woods administration to meet with success at the hands of the voters of this state.
State Rights Democrat, Albany, Oregon, May 3, 1878, page 2  According to George Turnbull (pages 235-236), the Western Star was started by C. L. Mosher and edited by Fred Floed.


MR. BEEKMAN SERENADED.
    Mr. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Republican nominee for governor, arrived in this city last evening from the south. He was serenaded last night at the hotel at which he was stopping by the Northwestern Band. The music drew together a large crowd, and after several lively airs by the band Hon. J. N. Dolph appeared on the balcony, and after addressing the assembled people for a few minutes introduced Mr. C. C. Beekman.
    This gentleman came forward on the balcony and was received with considerable enthusiasm. Mr. Beekman spoke not to exceed two minutes. He stated that he was no public speaker; that he had never addressed so large a crowd before in his life. His life had been devoted to business and not words. He had been nominated by the Republican convention as one of the standard-bearers of that party. The nomination had not been sought for by him; he had never solicited it at the hands of the party. But as it had been tendered him, he accepted it and proposed to go in to win. He had made no pledges to any party or clique, and he owed no allegiance to anyone. The only pledge he had made was that of retrenchment and economy in the administration of state affairs, and if elected he proposed to carry out that pledge to the letter. He had no platform other than his letter of acceptance. He thought that the governor of this state should be a man of action and have "backbone." The taxpayers of Oregon had too long borne up under the load of state debt, and they wanted this reckless extravagance stopped. If elected, he promised to carry into effect the pledges made to prevent a further squandering of the people's money. In conclusion Mr. Beekman promised if he was chosen as the next executive of the state not to leave as a legacy when he retired from office a debt of nearly three quarters of a million dollars. Thanking the crowd again and again for the honor conferred, Mr. Beekman retired. . . .
    At the close of the speaking a number of persons called on Mr. Beekman in the hotel parlors and paid their respects to him.
Oregonian, Portland, May 9, 1878, page 4


C. C. BEEKMAN,
the Republican candidate for Governor. The gentleman had very little to say, disclaiming any pretensions to oratory, but did not better his case in the attempt to forestall his competitor by gratuitously announcing that Mr. Thayer was a lawyer and speaker. He had not a word to say on the important questions of the day, even neglecting to give the people any assurance that he comprehended the duties of the office to which he aspired. He gave his letter of acceptance, telegraphed to the Republican convention, as the platform upon which he stood. What that is purported to contain three-fourths of the audience knew not and cared less. It was very equivocal, to say the least. He made a quite ingenious bid for the votes of the extremely few nonpartisans in attendance by pretending to eschew politics, though it is a mooted question whether he can tell the dividing lines between the several parties. After excusing himself for the extreme paucity of his remarks he retired. . . .
"Mr. Thayer in Jacksonville," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 10, 1878, page 2


    Last Wednesday evening C. C. Beekman, Republican nominee for Governor, delivered an address to a large audience at [the] St. Charles Hotel.
"Home News," New Northwest, Portland, May 10, 1878, page 3


    Accepting the Republican nomination for Governor of Oregon, Mr. C. C. Beekman said: "I appreciate the unsought honor, and, if elected, will endeavor to fulfill the duties of the position so as to earn and merit the title of Governor from all persons and parties, independent of all political or sectional combinations, thoughtful only of the best interests of the whole people. I pledge myself, if chosen, to conduct the affairs of the state with the same care and scrupulous economy that would govern my own private business."
"Minor Notes," Vermont Phoenix, Brattleboro, May 10, 1878, page 2


    Mr. C. C. Beekman, the Republican candidate for Governor of Oregon, writes to a friend: "I assure you that if I am the choice of the people they will never complain of extravagance, double salaries or peculation in the state departments during my administration. Simple application of business rules to the affairs of the state can be understood, must be successful, and certainly will be appreciated by the people."
"Political Notes," New York Times, May 13, 1878, page 4


Mr. Beekman on His Travels.
    His honest, straightforward manner, and brief but forcible language.--Bro. Turner.
    Good again. His speech here was brief enough. In fact it was a very fair juvenile effort. But it is evident he is improving. The Oregonian says he spoke full two minutes at Portland. Beek is learning fast.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 17, 1878, page 2


    C. C. Beekman, Ed. Hirsch and R. P. Earhart went [to] The Dalles last Tuesday.
Corvallis Gazette, May 17, 1878, page 2


(Salem Mercury)
HOW IS THIS?

    The Republican candidate for Governor, C. C. Beekman, is supposed to be a wealthy man, and we believe he is, but as the most of his wealth is invested in San Francisco, it does not appear on the assessment rolls. The amount for which he was assessed last year is as follows:
    360 acres of land valued at $  4,500.00
Value of city lots 900.00
Value of improvements 1,800.00
Money, notes and accounts 14,630.00
Household furniture 600.00
1 horse 75.00
1 head of cattle           15.00
Gross value of property $22,520.00
Amount of indebtedness and property exempt     7,194.00
Total value of taxable property $15,326.00
    Now this assessment appears all right enough on its face, and is a matter which is nobody's business, perhaps, if it were not for another little item which does not show in this statement. Mr. Beekman draws from the State Treasury yearly the sum of $1,400 as interest on Modoc war bonds. These bonds bear seven percent interest, and consequently he must have invested in these bonds the sum of $20,000. Of course this amount cannot be included in the sum charged above as "money, notes and accounts," as that item is only placed at $14,630, and it is hardly possible to get $20,000 out of a less sum. We can't quite see how these bonds on which he regularly draws interest are exempt from taxation, but perhaps they are a sort of "floating" bonds, and float over the line into California about the time the Assessor is around. We also have it on good authority that Mr. Beekman owns $15,000 worth of Douglas County Wagon Road bonds, or what is known as the "Black Mud Swindle," which it is probable also have floated around in such manner that the Assessor never knows of their existence. We also wish to inquire if the item of 360 acres of land given above is the half section up Jackson Creek, which Mr. Beekman made oath was more valuable for agricultural than mining purposes, and which every citizens of Jackson County knows would not support a jackrabbit six months in the year, and is not worth $4.50 for agricultural purposes. This ground is supposed to contain valuable mines, and in order to get a patent to it "Beek" had to make oath as above, and if it has any value at all it is for mining purposes. Possibly this half section of mineral land purchased as agricultural land is not the one assessed above for $4,500. But these matters properly rest with the Assessor and "Beek's" conscience, and if they are satisfied we suppose the people should be. "Beek" is a success as a broker and money lender, and is doing such a good business in that line that the people of Oregon won't feet like asking him to abandon it for the poor pittance of a Governor's salary; besides, if he were obliged to stay here in Salem he wouldn't have so good an opportunity for looking after his swamp lands in Lake County.
State Rights Democrat, Albany, May 17, 1878, page 2


    DISTINGUISHED VISITORS.--Last Saturday, about noon, Messrs. C. C. Beekman, next Governor of Oregon, R. P. Earhart, next Secretary of State, and Ed. Hirsch, next State Treasurer, accompanied by Hon. T. B. Odeneal, of Albany, arrived in our city, by private conveyance, unannounced. After a sumptuous dinner at the New England House, they made the acquaintance of most of our business men--and without a doubt made many votes. Messrs. Hirsch and Earhart have frequently visited Corvallis, and had numerous acquaintances. Not so with Mr. Beekman--it was his first visit--but he expressed himself delighted with Corvallis and its surroundings, and well pleased with the people. In consequence of the absence, from the city, of Prof. Milner, leader of the band, a projected serenade, in the evening, was spoiled. The candidates, however, were greeted with numerous calls during the evening at the spacious parlors of the New England House, and returned to Albany the next day, well pleased with their impromptu reception in the "heart of the valley."
Corvallis Gazette, May 24, 1878, page 2


    Vote for W. W. Thayer for Governor. He is a whole-souled genial gentleman fully competent and will make a Governor that you will be proud of. He is a brother to the late Judge A. J. Thayer, who died some years ago at Corvallis. Mr. Thayer is classed among the best lawyers of the state; is strictly temperate, liberal and genious, and is most popular where he is best known. His opponent is said to be just the reverse. Those who knew Beekman say he is a perfect skylock, always demanding his "pound of flesh," never missing an opportunity to drive a hard bargain when he finds a poor man in distress.
East Oregonian, Portland, May 25, 1878, page 2



    Mr. C. C. Beekman, a former resident of Dundee, has been nominated as the Republican candidate for Governor of Oregon. He went out to the Pacific Coast in 1848.

"Vicinity," Watkins Express, Watkins, New York, May 30, 1878, page 2


    C. C. Beekman, Republican candidate for Governor, returned on yesterday's stage. His countenance has grown longer since he left us.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 31, 1878, page 3


A CAMPAIGN INCIDENT.
    The Portland papers have not told one of the campaign incidents that is at least amusing and decidedly pleasant. It seems that No. 1 Fire Company had a reunion the other evening, largely attended by the brotherhood of firemen, which was prolific with good feeling and redolent with lager beer. Keg after keg of the latter was disposed of in the most amicable manner, when the brilliant idea struck someone that Beekman was in town, and ought to be in attendance. Word was conveyed to the gubernatorial candidate that a few friends would like to see him, and unsuspicious of the crowd and its surroundings, and accompanied by an old friend, Silas Day, Judge of Jackson County, and as earnest a Democrat as Beekman is a Republican, he came to the hall where he was mounted on a table to make a speech. He complimented firemen in general and Portland firemen in particular, and was winding up his remarks when someone at the back of the hall said: "Hurrah for Thayer!" "Beek" immediately took his cue, and said: "My friend over there can't set me back any by hurrahing for Thayer, who is a friend of mine, and an elegant gentleman with whom I have done business. If I am to be beaten I want it to be done by just such a man as Thayer, and I don't mind giving three cheers for him myself," when he swung his hat to give the signal and led off with the three cheers, which were responded to by the crowd and followed by "three rousing cheers and a tiger for Beekman," given with great good will. Silas Day was then introduced, and told them "Beek," as they called him out south, was "a first-rate man, and if it wasn't for his politics he wouldn't mind voting for him himself." Day said he was at home among firemen, used to be a fireman himself, once ran with "No. 6" at Baltimore, at which a big Dutchman at the further end of the room began to shove things one side and elbow his way to the speaker, vociferating, "Mein Gott, did you used to belong to Number Six?" until he reached the table, caught hold of Silas, pulled him down and gave him a bear's hug of an embrace, swearing that he was delighted to see a man who had belonged to his own old company. Day says that the German was the best friend he ever had, for he was just at the end of his speech and didn't know what to do next. That must have been a jolly reunion.--Salem Record.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 14, 1878, page 1


WHO IS GOVERNOR?
    Though it cannot yet be said positively that Thayer is elected governor, the chances certainly are that way. If Grant has given Beekman twenty majority, as advices indicate, Thayer is ten ahead, unless his majority in Umatilla and Baker fall below the figures heretofore given, namely, 316 in the former and 160 in the latter. Beekman got a remarkable vote in his own county, but this was offset by results elsewhere that could not have been anticipated. It was supposed by most persons who have given the subject attention that the greenback movement would call off more Democratic than Republican votes. But the contrary was the result. In Linn and Lane a majority of recruits for the Greenback Party were from the Republican ranks. Comparison of the vote with that of 1876 proves this in a most conclusive way. Had there been no greenback movement Lane would have given Beekman a majority and Thayer's majority in Linn would be much reduced. It has been said that Republican politicians encouraged the Greenback sideshow, especially in Linn, under a supposition that it would give them an advantage. The result proves that these devices and experiments don't pay. Again, Beekman lost a good many votes in Multnomah through the various expedients employed to elect the "straight" legislative ticket here. So great was the eagerness to get votes for this ticket that many of the other Republican candidates, including governor, congressman, district attorney and sheriff, were swapped out of votes by wholesale. The independent Republicans threw for the state ticket several hundred votes that went against the "straight" legislative ticket, and if all others who spied the latter had voted the former, Beekman's majority in Multnomah would be double what it is. Eagerness to elect the "regular" candidates for the legislature was attended by corresponding indifference on other points. The vote of the state is much increased. It was supposed very generally that the immigration had favored the Republicans, but it is only truth to say that the count of votes does not show much result.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 14, 1878, page 2


    Our friend Beekman has taken passage for Salt River. The Democracy of this county welcome him, as it has some experience in the premises itself.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 21, 1878, page 3


    Beekman, the Republican governor of Oregon, was formerly a resident of Dundee.
"All Sorts of Items," Penn Yan Democrat, Penn Yan, New York, July 5, 1878, page 2


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman is sojourning at the Soda Springs.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1878, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman has returned from the Soda Springs.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1878, page 3


    A few days ago at Jacksonville articles of incorporation were signed by C. C. Beekman, Alex. Martin, J. M. McCall, E. D. Foudray, John E. Ross, Jacob Ish, M. Hanley, R. D. Hume, J. N. T. Miller, John Orth and N. Langell. The object of the company is to construct and equip a narrow-gauge railroad from Rogue River Valley to the seashore, at a point to be determined by survey. The capital stock is fixed at $2,000,000, divided into shares of $200 each. The length of the road will probably be less than 100 miles.

"Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, September 9, 1878, page 3


    For Governor, W. W. Thayer received 16,201 votes, C. C. Beekman 16,132, M. Wilkins 1,432 votes.
"Oregon Legislature,"
Corvallis Gazette, September 13, 1878, page 2


    Referring again to Mr. Beekman, it probably is not known to the people who are here assembled that he was at one time candidate for Governor on the Republican ticket and he was elected but the Democratic machine counted him out. It was afterwards disclosed by the succeeding Secretary of State that when the Legislature convened, which was Democratic, to canvass the vote, it was disclosed that on the tally sheet that came in from each county, there was subtracted 10 votes from the total that Mr. Beekman had received in that county and that elected the Democrat candidate by the narrow margin of 31 votes. [Every account gives a different number of votes.] Mr. Beekman, however, did not become very much disgruntled because of his defeat by those nefarious means and advised me that he considered it was a very fortunate thing for him that he had been counted out because in all probability, instead of being a successful banker, he would be a broken-down, discredited politician.

Address by Gus Newbury, Aug. 7, 1949 at Jacksonville's Gold Rush Jubilee, Southern Oregon Historical Society Research Library, Gus Newbury vertical file



    C. C. Beekman is the heaviest tax-payer this year, with Major Barron next.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1878, page 3


    The largest taxpayer in Jackson County is Mr. C. C. Beekman, whose property is assessed at $25,001.
Oregonian, Portland, September 28, 1878, page 1


    A NOVEL RACE.--David Cronemiller undertook to ride to Yreka and back in eighteen hours, on a wager of $150 with Joe Clough, starting from Beekman's banking house at three o'clock Monday afternoon. He progressed as far as Ashland on time; but, upon reaching the Mountain House, his mare collapsed and he was compelled to abandon the race. The affair, being a novel one, created quite a sensation in town for the time being. Other trials of speed and endurance are talked of, but none have assumed a definite condition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1878, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family left for San Francisco on Tuesday last, expecting to be gone a few weeks.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1878, page 3


    Wm. Hoffman assists in the express office during the absence of Mr. Beekman.
    C. C. Beekman, we learn, will purchase while in San Francisco a lot of mining machinery.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 18, 1878, page 3


    For all kinds of willow ware call on Robert Waetzman. He can be found on Oregon Street, at the residence formerly occupied by John Boyer. Baskets, chairs, etc., made to order, and old cane-bottom chairs repaired.
"All Sorts," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 23, 1878, page 3



    Hon. C. C. Beekman returned from San Francisco last Monday night.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 6, 1878, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family arrived from San Francisco on Monday last, after a several weeks' sojourn in that city.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, 
November 8, 1878, page 3


    NEW ENTERPRISE.--Another mining enterprise, which promises to be quite important, is under way. The company which proposes to conduct it is composed of C. C. Beekman, U. S. Hayden, Wm. Bybee, W. M. Turner and others. The gravel bed lies on Rogue River, a few miles from Wilderville, in Josephine County, and it is proposed to run a ditch taking the water from Slate Creek. This ditch will be about fifteen miles long, but plenty of dump and an inexhaustible supply of ground seems to be assured. A party consisting of J. S. Howard, Wm. M. Turner, Chas. Schultz and others, fully equipped, started for that section this week, intending to make a survey of the proposed ditch and take general observations. It is to be hoped that this enterprise will meet with a full measure of success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1878, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and K. Kubli are in recent receipt of new vehicles of improved pattern.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, 
November 15, 1878, page 3


    We learn that Bybee, Hawkett & Co., who are about opening their mines at the mouth of Slate Creek, now propose to commence the survey of another ditch, taking the water out of that stream at a point near the one Beekman, Hayden & Co. talk of commencing their ditch from. Some conflict seems liable to occur here.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 13, 1878, page 3


    Beekman, Turner & Co. will soon test the quality of their mining ground on Rogue River by sinking shafts.
"Mining Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1879, page 3


MORE NARROW GAUGE R.R.
    While the Willamette Valley seems all alive on the narrow-gauge railroad question, Southern Oregon is not asleep. On the 4th inst., an enthusiastic mass meeting was held at Jacksonville to discuss the project of building a narrow-gauge road from Rogue River Valley to tidewater at or near Ellensburg, Curry County, Oregon. Many of the most substantial merchants and farmers, representing nearly every precinct, were present, and nearly all of them had something to say in favor of the scheme. E. K. Anderson acted as chairman, and Geo. E. Strong as secretary of the meeting. E. D. Foudray explained the purpose of the call, and brief addresses were made by Messrs. Ross, Kahler, Beekman, Hopwood, McCall and Kent.
     A committee was appointed to prepare a subscription paper to be presented to the citizens of Jackson County for contributions towards defraying the expense of a preliminary survey of the proposed road. Over $500 were raised, in a few minutes, C. C. Beekman heading the subscription with $100, Col. Ross and others following with $50 each, while subscriptions ranged from five dollars up. From the enthusiasm manifested, we have no doubt the enterprise will be a success, and although Rogue River may not be navigable, Southern Oregon will yet have an outlet to the sea. Success to the undertaking.
Corvallis Gazette, January 17, 1879, page 2


DEATH OF HON. U. S. HAYDEN.
    About two-thirty a.m. on Friday last Uriah S. Hayden, one of the early pioneers of Southern Oregon, expired after an illness of only one week in the 70th year of his age. On the evening of Thursday, Jan. 23rd, Mr. Hayden was taken with a severe chill resulting in an acute attack of pleurisy which soon developed into pleuro-pneumonia, and notwithstanding the constant watchfulness of medical skill and the tender nursing of affectionate friends it was soon evident from his gradually sinking condition that he was beyond human skill, and he passed unconsciously and peacefully away.
    Mr. Hayden became a resident of Oregon in 1850, having located a claim in the northern part of French Prairie in Marion County and remaining there nearly two years. Coming here from the Willamette Valley in 1852 he engaged in mining, which business he continued with varying success until 1857, when he accepted a clerkship in the store of Kenny and Hamlin, subsequently resigning it in 1858 for a position in the Express office of Wm. Hoffman. In 1859 the Express business went again into the hands of Mr. Beekman, who has retained Mr. Hayden as his confidential clerk for nearly twenty years, always placing in him the utmost reliance, frequently leaving his whole business in his hands during many months of absence. During the past twenty-five years the deceased has filled an honorable and important place in the history of this county. In 1853 his probity and inflexible sense of justice were recognized and he was elected second "alcalde" of this mining district, and even among a wild and turbulent population his decisions, so equitable, so true to the principles of justice, were never questioned. In 1863 he entered into the mercantile business with Theodric Cameron, at Uniontown, in this county, but did not give it his personal supervision; and in that year was elected Recorder of the town of Jacksonville, having held the position, with an "interregnum" of one term for fifteen consecutive years to the time of his death, and occupied by him with distinguished integrity and ability.
    Little is known of Mr. Hayden's early life except that he was a native of Connecticut, and from one of the oldest families in that state. He was at one time in the mercantile business in New York City, once supercargo of a vessel sailing to the Mediterranean, an extensive traveler in the southern and western states, and at one time a resident of the Sandwich Islands. He was a gentleman of the old school in every respect, of refined culture, the very highest sense of honor, and whose mind was as pure as that of an infant. A consistent member of the Protestant Episcopal Church, he lived in the spirit of his religion and died in the fullest and firmest faith in immorality. If he had any of the failings that are wrapped in the passionate flesh none but the Recording Angel may pen them, and he leaves us with neither blemish nor stain upon his character. The funeral took place on Sunday last from the residence of Mr. C. C. Beekman, to whom he was warmly attached. Six of the members of the Pioneer Society, L. J. C. Duncan, Jno. B. Wrisley, Peter Britt, M. Hanley, S. J. Day and Thos. F. Beall, acting as pall bearers, and the hearse was followed by K. Kubli, David Linn, N. Langell, T. G. Reames and J. Nunan, comprising the Board of Trustees of Jacksonville. After funeral services at the church by the Rev. M. A. Williams the long procession moved to the cemetery where, in accordance with the last request of the deceased, the solemn service of the Episcopal Church was read by that clergyman. The attendance was exceedingly large, very many persons coming from the country to pay their last tribute of respect to an honored citizen. The remains were laid in the beautiful and hallowed spot consecrated to Mr. Beekman's own beloved dead--where now the tender bud and the withered tree await together the vivifying sound of the Redeemer's voice.
    Farewell, old friend! We feel that you will be judged lightly at that Tribunal before which all humanity must stand. None will miss your gentle, kindly encouragement more than we; and we only hope to be permitted to greet you when the veil of the Infinite is pierced beyond the shadowy stream you have passed so safely.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 5, 1879, page 2


    POSITION FILLED.--We are glad to see that Mr. John Boyer has received the position in Mr. Beekman's banking and express office made vacant by the death of U. S. Hayden. Mr. Boyer is a very worthy and deserving citizen, and we offer him our congratulations.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 5, 1879, page 3



    Tiring of a miner's life, in 1857 [Uriah S. Hayden] engaged in clerical duties, first accepting a position in the store of Kenney & Hamlin, then doing business in Jacksonville. In these pursuits he continued until the time of his death, having retained the position of confidential clerk in C. C. Beekman's banking establishment for twenty years.

"Gathered to His Fathers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1879, page 2



    C. C. Beekman has appointed John A. Boyer to fill the position in the express office made vacant by the death of U. S. Hayden.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1879, page 3


    Ex-Governor Chadwick and H. P. McNevin--the latter a quartz miner of much experience--have purchased a ledge situated on the land of O. Ganiard and near the landing of Fisher's Rogue River ferry. This lode was prospected not long since by Messrs. Beekman, Klippel, Fisher and Sifers, who worked some of the ore by arrastra process, with indifferent results. It is supposed to contain quartz in endless quantity and of a fair quality. The new proprietors will prospect the ledge before long.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1879, page 3


    The canvass of the vote for governor, as made by the legislative assembly of 1878, does not correspond with the certified returns made by the various county clerks and filed in the office of the secretary of state, in that the returns from Marion and Umatilla counties are incorrectly reported, Mr. Beekman having received ten more votes in each county than he is credited with in the legislative canvass, reducing Gov. Thayer's majority twenty votes, leaving him but 49 majority instead of 69 as heretofore reported.
"From the Capital," Corvallis Weekly Gazette, April 25, 1879, page 2


    Benjamin B. Beekman, one of the most enterprising and prominent citizens of Dundee, and one who has done much for its prosperity and advancement, died in that village, April 8th, aged about 75 years, and his demise is deeply regretted and mourned by its people. He became a resident of Dundee when a young man, many years ago, always had full faith in the future growth of the locality, and ever "showed his faith by his works." His anticipations, since the construction of the S.G.&C. Railway, have been more than realized, as Dundee is now one of the most thrifty and flourishing interior villages in the state.
Watkins Express, Watkins, New York, April 24, 1879, page 3


    We learn that Messrs. Beekman and Linn decline selling their land on Walker's Creek and will fit up a public park on their own account.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1879, page 3


    AN EXCELLENT IDEA.--The question of securing a public park for Jacksonville is attracting much attention and has been canvassed by our citizens during the past week. In fact, some action in the matter is already being taken. Bybee's Grove has long ago been found to be unsuited to public occasions for evident reasons, and some of our enterprising citizens propose furnishing a place of public resort that will answer all purposes. C. C. Beekman and D. Linn own a parcel of land a short distance west of Col. J. N. T. Miller's farm, which is found to possess the necessary requirements, and they have very generously offered to allow the public its perpetual use free of any charge. It is situated about a mile from town and is easy of access from various directions. A beautiful grove of pines flourishes there, supplying ample shade, while water could be conveniently procured from Walker's Creek, not far distant. Several of our citizens have visited this location and find the project in view quite feasible. It will require the outlay of no large amount of money and labor to trim the trees, fit up the grounds and purchase water pipe; and when this is complete we can boast of public grounds that would be a credit to any interior town. We trust that the interest manifested in this matter will not be allowed to subside.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1879, page 3


    All the local papers of Dundee, N.Y. pay marked and handsome tributes to Benj. B. Beekman, father of our townsman, Hon. C. C. Beekman, who died at the age of seventy-six on the 8th inst.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 30, 1879, page 3


    The grounds Messrs. Beekman and Linn offered the citizens of Jacksonville a perpetual lease of for public park purposes are now being cleared and put in order by those gentlemen themselves.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1879, page 3


    Surely St. John's may well be termed the "honorable" school. Among others whom we may not omit were John Dykman, who was in Sands Street School when it was organized in 1816, and marched in its lines fifty years, since County Judge of this county; W. W. Pettit, who was with his class in St. Ann's at the first anniversary, and J. H. Van Winkle, who marched with Sands Street School in its first parade fifty years ago and carried of the tassels to the big banner, and expects to march with the same school tomorrow; and there are Mr. J. Mundell, Mr. A. J. Beekman, Mr. J. Brinkerhoff, Mr. C. C. Beekman, Mr. Henry Butler and Mr. R. J. Thorne.
"Fifty Years: The Semicentennial of the Brooklyn Sunday School Union," Brooklyn Daily Eagle, May 22, 1879, page 2  This may be a different C. C. Beekman, or possibly George C. Beekman.



    S. D. Brastow, who ran as express messenger between this place and Yreka alongside of C. C. Beekman and A. E. Raynes in the days of gold, passed through town last week. He is now acting as assistant superintendent of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express business.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1879, page 3


    C. C. Beekman has had a new sidewalk constructed on Third Street, east of the express office, which adds materially to public convenience.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 23, 1879, page 3


    A party consisting of Mrs. J. L. M. Plymale, Misses Cora and Maggie Linn, Millie Vining and Carrie Beekman, accompanied by Thos. J. Kenney and others, started for the vine-clad hills of the Squaw Lake country Saturday, intending to spend a few days in recreation.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1879, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman heads the subscription list for the building of a Presbyterian church in Jacksonville with $1,000. About $2,000 has already been subscribed.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1879, page 3


    ARRIVED.--The Union Sunday School of this place last Tuesday received its organ, most of the funds for the purchase of which were raised by a series of concerts given last March. It is one of D. F. Beatty's best instruments, embellished with an ornamental pipe top that gives it magnificent proportions, and in tone and general excellence is said to be superior. It is a five-octave organ, has three sets of reeds, thirteen stops, two knee swells and is encased in sold walnut finely finished. A balance of $75 remains due, and it is proposed to divert the funds realized by the Jacksonville Dramatic Association at its recent entertainments for the purpose of settling this indebtedness. T. G. Reames, C. C. Beekman and E. D. Foudray have been selected as custodians of the instrument and will have its disposition in hand. A more munificent gift could not be bestowed upon the Sunday school, which is to be congratulated because of it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1879, page 3


    The Literary Society elected the following officers last Tuesday evening: Chas. Prim, President; Chas. Strang, Vice President; B. B. Beekman, Secretary; Wm. T. Moore, Treasurer; Frank Huffer, Warden.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1879, page 3


    ALL ABOUT AN ORGAN.--The organ purchased with the proceeds of a series of concerts given under the auspices of the young ladies of Jacksonville last March is in chancery and promises to furnish a delicate point of law. T. G. Reames, C. C. Beekman and E. D. Foudray were appointed custodians of the instrument and it is now in their charge awaiting
the liquidation of a balance due and freight charges upon it, amounting in all to about $79. It was specified by the ladies managing the concerts that the organ should be presented to the Union Sunday School; but who constitutes this organization seems to be the mooted question. The members of the M.E. church have taken steps in the matter and agree to pay off the indebtedness in case they are allowed to assume possession of the organ. What the upshot will be must hereafter appear.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1879, page 3


    One individual alone, C. C. Beekman of this place, informs us that he has, for himself and the express company, handled over ten million dollars worth of gold dust since 1853, the largest portion of which was taken from Rich Gulch, Jackson, Jackass and Sterling creeks.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 24, 1879, page 3


    M.E. CHURCH MEETING.--The members and friends of the M.E. church met at the residence of Mrs. McCully on December 22nd, Rev. D. A. Crowell in the chair and Miss Issie McCully acting as secretary.
    Dr. Danforth, on behalf of the committee whose duty it was to wait upon the custodians of the organ, reported that the committee did wait upon Mr. Beekman, one of the trustees of the organ, who promised to call a meeting of his colleagues. Mr. Beekman presented an instrument of writing, setting forth the conditions under which they (the custodians) will let the organ go into the church, which conditions the committee could not accede to.
    Whereupon the following preamble and resolutions were introduced, discussed and adopted:
    WHEREAS, We, the members and friends of the M.E. church of Jacksonville, Oregon, have held several meetings for the purpose of adjusting the dispute between C. C. Beekman, T. G. Reames and E. D. Foudray, custodians of the organ purchased for the M.E. church of Jacksonville; and
    WHEREAS, We have made every reasonable effort to settle the difficulty without resort to law; now, therefore, be it
    RESOLVED, That it is the sense of this meeting that suit be begun for the purpose of recovering the $110, the amount raised by the entertainments.
    RESOLVED, That the case be turned over to the proper authorities of the church.
    RESOLVED, That the minutes of this meeting be offered for publication in the county papers.
    On motion, the meeting adjourned sine die.
D. A. CROWELL, Chm'n.
ISSIE MCCULLY, Secretary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1879, page 3


    The large chronometer in C. C. Beekman's banking house refused duty several times during the past week, the cold weather having stopped the works. After a short thaw the timepiece resumed business.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1880, page 3


    A box in the rear of Beekman's banking house, in which some hot ashes had been deposited, caught fire one night last week and might have caused a conflagration but for its timely discovery by J. A. Boyer, the clerk, who was awakened from his slumbers by the persistent barking of his dog, which seemed aware of the impending danger.

"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1880, page 3


    MINING ITEMS.--Jacksonville Sentinel, Dec. 24: Ed. Hutt, one of the miners on Foot's Creek, in making a partial cleanup last Monday, took out a nugget weighing $22. Along Foots Creek is some of the best mining ground in Southern Oregon. There are five hydraulic mining companies at work on the left-hand fork of Foots Creek, and one on the right-hand fork of that stream. Three are worked with six-inch pipe, one with ten-inch, and one with eleven-inch pipe. Week before last a slide occurred at the Squaw Lake company's ditch, which it took only a few days to shovel out. The ditch was never in better condition than now. Piping commenced Tuesday morning of last week on ground which had previously been thoroughly prospected. Notwithstanding there is 20 inches of snow on the ground, the company was piping at last account. The very light estimate usually placed on the gold yield of Jackson and Josephine counties by writers on Oregon has induced us to make inquiry into the subject. There is no way to ascertain with certainty what the actual yield has been during the past 25 years, but from the most reliable sources of information we are satisfied that it has been quadruple the amount usually estimated. One individual alone, C C. Beekman, of this place, informs us that he has, for himself and the express company, handled over $10,000,000 worth of gold dust since 1853, the largest portion of which was taken from Rich Gulch, Jackson, Jackass and Sterling creeks. From his intimate knowledge of the business of other buyers, and from information derived from equally reliable sources in Josephine County, Mr. Beekman gives a decided opinion that at least as much more has passed through other hands from that date until the present. This would give an average yield of $800,000 per annum for the two counties, and when the really small amount of ground worked over is considered an approximation of the probable future yield of gold in Southern Oregon would seem fabulous and incredible. Hydraulic mining is proving successful wherever sufficient water can be obtained, and it seems as if mining in this end of the state was just commencing.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 3, 1880, page 12


    Mr. Benner, one of the proprietors of the Centennial mine in the Willow Springs district, returned from Portland this week. He was accompanied by his daughter, who will take up a residence in this place and probably form a class in portrait painting. A handsome sample of Miss Benner's skill may be seen at Beekman's banking office.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1880, page 3


    BEAUTIFUL PORTRAIT.--There is on exhibition, at Mr. Beekman's banking office, a very finely executed portrait from the brush of Miss Anna Benner, who is now located in Jacksonville, having her studio at Mr. Britt's residence. Miss Benner comes among us a stranger, but. bringing pleasant letters of introduction from friends in the North. She is prepared to paint portraits in oil or give instructions to others, and her merit as an artist is quite apparent from the beauty of her work.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 14, 1880, page 3



    The Jacksonville Literary Association elected the following officers last Saturday evening: B. B. Beekman, President; Miss Lillie Ulrich, Vice President; Miss Emma Ulrich, Secretary; Fred. Cronemiller, Treasurer; Chas. Wolters, Warden.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1880, page 3


    At the express office in this place could be seen an accurate and finely finished picture of C. C. Beekman, enlarged from a photograph by the Universal Copying Company of San Francisco. We believe it is intended as a present to Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M., of which Mr. Beekman is the Worthy Master.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1880, page 3



    Jno. A. Boyer returned from Ashland afflicted with inflammatory rheumatism.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 21, 1880, page 3


    John Boyer is slowly recovering but still confined to bed.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 28, 1880, page 3


THE ORGAN QUESTION.
    The following will explain themselves:
    This instrument in writing witnesseth: WHEREAS, We, the undersigned, by our personal efforts and with the assistance of others, have heretofore given two concerts of vocal and instrumental music, the proceeds of said concerts to be appropriated to the purchasing of a cabinet organ, and claiming the right to designate the persons who shall have the control and management of said organ when procured, do by these presents appoint C. C. Beekman, T. G. Reames and E. D. Foudray as Trustees, to have the full and absolute control of and to designate the purposes for which said organ shall be used, with the understanding that said organ shall primarily be used in the Union Sunday School in Jacksonville, Oregon, and for other purposes of a proper character, in whatever place said Union Sunday School may be held, and also may be used elsewhere as the said Trustees may deem proper.
    The amount realized from said concerts over and above expenses is $110, which sum we hereby authorize C. C. Beekman, one of said Trustees, to apply to the purchase of said organ and transportation thereof so far as said sum will reach.
    Witness our hands this 16th day of April, A.D. 1879.
IDA MARTIN,
MARY F. GASS.
----
OAKLAND, Dec. 19, 1879.
Messrs. Reames, Beekman and Foudray:
    Gentlemen:--A few days ago I received a letter from three ladies of Jacksonville, who were appointed a committee to ask my opinion in this trouble with the organ. I answered them in sum and substance just about what I am now going to write to you. Ida's and my intention were from the first to procure an instrument that could be used for the good of the whole community, and it does not seem right to me to change our minds now, because of a mistake in having our tickets printed, "for the benefit of the M.E. church." I know that the building called the Methodist church was built in an early day by subscription, and I supposed those who raised money for its construction intended that it should be used by all denominations, as Presbyterians, Episcopalians and Methodists each held services there while I was in town. I did not question for a moment, but considered this an established fact. Therefore, when Ida and I exerted ourselves to secure a good organ, I for one hand had no desire to give it to one class, to be used and claimed as their particular property, to the exclusion of all other denominations. Had this been my wish I should have, as a matter of course, preferred placing it in the hands of Episcopalians. I reminded the three ladies referred to that only one or two Methodists were present at the concerts and I thought as those who really paid for the organ were of different beliefs, they surely had as much right as the Methodists to the use and enjoyment of the instrument. The ladies informed me that the Presbyterians "refused to accept the organ upon any conditions whatever." Be this as it may, I assure you I have not the most remote idea of withdrawing my name from the paper which gives you gentlemen control of it, to be placed where you wish, and used for any purpose your judgment deems proper. I regret our poor organ has been the cause of so much trouble, and I sincerely hope the affair will be settled satisfactorily all around. I remain
Yours respectfully,
    MARY F. GASS.
----
THAT ORGAN.
    At the meeting of the Quarterly Conference of the M.E. Church, held at Phoenix on the 24th, the organ question was brought up and carefully considered, after which the following resolution was passed and signed by the Board of Trustees:
    RESOLVED, That D. A. Crowell be, and he is, hereby appointed on behalf of the Trustees of the M.E. Church to settle by arbitration or to begin suit for the recover of $110, raised for the purchasing of an organ for the M.E. Church, and now held by C. C. Beekman, T. G. Reames and E. D. Foudray, if in his judgment he thinks best.
S. C. TAYLOR,
E. F. WALKER,
C. H. HOXIE.
    In accordance with the above resolution, I called on Mr. Beekman on Monday to see if some arrangement could not be made to settle the difficulty without further trouble and hard feeling. The whole subject was talked over, and it was finally agreed upon by Mr. Beekman and myself that I should write to Miss Gass and whatever arrangement I could make with her and Mrs. Aiken he would accede to. It was understood that the matter should rest there until I could communicate with Miss Gass. After I left his office arrangements were made to have the documentary evidence on that side of the case, together with an editorial, published in the Sentinel, with the hope, I have no doubt, of intercepting any arrangement I might be able to make with the ladies referred to. This is simply carrying out the principle which has been acted on from the beginning. The Sentinel says I informed him that "suit would be at once commenced." This is an error. I told Mr. Beekman I desired to adjust the difficulty without further bad feeling, and this has been the desire of the Church from the first. And now, as Mr. Beekman has published his evidence in the case, I shall next week, with your permission give your readers the evidence on the other side, and let them judge who is in the right.
D. A. CROWELL.
Jacksonville, Jan. 28, 1880.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1880, page 3


    PICNIC.--A May Day picnic will be given tomorrow at Beekman & Linn's park on Walker Creek (about a mile west of town) under the auspices of the Legion of Honor and the District and Sunday schools. The procession will be formed at the Court House at half past eight o'clock a.m. Everybody is invited to participate. As considerable preparation has been made for the event, we have no doubt but that it will prove quite pleasurable. The following interesting programme has been arranged for the occasion the exercises to take place at the grounds: 1. Opening chorus; 2. Song by Sunday school; 3 Address by R. A. Miller; 4 Duet, Misses Cora Linn and Anna Little; 5. Song by the girls; 6. Declaration by S. F. Floed; 7. Song, Forest Echoes; 8. Stump speech, by Wm. Vining; 9. Closing song; 10. Dinner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 30, 1880, page 3


    The Times . . . vilified Mr. Beekman two years ago and Mr. Beekman was beaten [by]only 31 votes in a county with 300 Democratic majority.
"Editorial Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 19, 1880, page 2


    C. C. Beekman is having a "fireproof" well constructed in front of his banking house.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 4, 1880, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and T. G. Reames have gone to Portland to attend the Grand Lodge of Masons, to which they are representatives from Warren Lodge.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 11, 1880, page 3


    Beekman & Linn's park is being overhauled and beautified for the Fourth of July celebration.
    T. G. Reames and C. C. Beekman, who have been attending the Masonic Grand Lodge, returned home Sunday.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 25, 1880, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and Tod. Cameron were passengers on the southbound stage on Saturday--destination San Francisco.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 18, 1880, page 3


     B. B. Beekman and W. W. Cardwell will today apply to Superintendent Fountain for scholarships in the state university at Eugene City.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1880, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and Theo. Cameron are expected to return from San Francisco next week.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1880, page 3


    On Monday's stage Messrs. C. C. Beekman and Tod Cameron were passengers. They tarried a week in the Bay City. Ex-Senator Mitchell came up part of the way on the same stage with them.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 1, 1880, page 3


    While in San Francisco C. C. Beekman purchased the bell for the new Presbyterian Church of this place. It is a fine one, of different tone than those we now have, and can be heard eight miles on a favorable day. The bell and fixtures will weigh in the neighborhood of 1,000 pounds.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 3, 1880, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, returned from San Francisco on the stage which passed here Monday.
"Local Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 3, 1880, page 3



    The Dundee Observer says that C. C. Beekman, a son of the late B. B. Beekman of that place, now a banker in Oregon, has since the year 1850 [sic] bought over ten million dollars worth of gold dust. He had it made into money.

"Brief Mention," The Steuben Advocate, Bath, New York, September 15, 1880


    The Dundee Observer says that C. C. Beekman, a son of the late B. B. Beekman of that place, now a banker in Oregon, has since the year 1859 bought over ten million dollars worth of gold dust. He had it made into money.
"Vicinity," Watkins Express, Watkins, New York, September 23, 1880, page 2


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman left for Eugene City on Tuesday's stage, intending to pay relations there a brief visit.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1880, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, who has been visiting at Eugene City, returned to her home in this city on Thursday after an absence of three weeks.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 1, 1880, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman last week returned from a brief visit to Eugene City.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 3, 1880, page 3



    M. S. Dean, school teacher at Williams Creek, favored us with a pleasant call last Saturday. Mr. D. and our townsman C. C. Beekman hail from the same county in New York, and the two were schoolmates as boys.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 8, 1880, page 3


    The name of our fellow townsman, C. C. Beekman, is again prominently mentioned in connection with the Republican nomination for Governor in 1882. 'Tis rather early for political incubation, but the wires are already being laid by the Portland ring. As the Republicans have a better show for success than when Beek ran before, we fear he is not on the slate. No man from Southern Oregon need apply, only when there is a good chance to be beaten.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1880, page 2


    B. B. Beekman, W. W. Cardwell and Frank Huffer, students in the state university from Jacksonville, acquitted themselves creditably upon entering that institution of learning and are well up in classes with students considerably older.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1880, page 3


    The following is a full list of the officers installed for Adarel Chapter No. 3, O.E.S.:
    W. Matron, Mrs. J. N. T. Miller; W. Patron, David Linn; Asst. Matron, Mrs. W. Jackson; Sect. Mrs. N. Fisher; Treas., Mrs. E. R. Reames; Conductress, Miss Annie Miller; Asst. Conductress, Miss Alice Berry; Ada, Miss Sarah Berry; Ruth, Miss Jennie Levy; Esther, Mrs. C. C. Beekman; Martha, Miss Ada Ross; Electa, Miss Tillie Miller; Organist, Miss Cora Linn; Chaplain, C. C. Beekman; Warder, Theo. Cameron; Sentinel, R. S. Dunlap.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 29, 1880, page 3


SEALED PROPOSALS
WILL BE RECEIVED at the Recorder's office at Mr. C. C. Beekman's Bank, until noon of January 31st, 1881, for the sale of a lot and the building now used as the town hall. The lot has a frontage on 3rd Street of 50 feet, more or less, and runs back 100 feet. The Board of Trustees reserves the right to reject any or all bids, as the interests of the town demand.
J. NUNAN, Recorder.
Jacksonville, January 19th, 1881.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1881, page 2


    Gen. T. G. Reames and C. C. Beekman are about enclosing the hill back of their premises with barbed wire fence.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1881, page 3


Beekman ad, October 1, 1881 West Shore
October 1, 1881 West Shore, Portland

    The town of Jacksonville, according to the last census, contains a population of 850 souls. It is well supplied in all branches of mechanical and mercantile pursuits. What we need is a banking institution of some kind to accommodate the growing want of the people of Southern Oregon. The town takes in an area of many hundred miles, commercially speaking, Lake, Josephine and Jackson, and a portion of Siskiyou Co., California, with an estimated population of 15,000 persons, and were we blessed with a bank that would loan its money regardless of persons, providing their security were A-1, isolated as we are, the institution would prove profitable to the owners and an inestimable benefit to Southern Oregon and Northern California. Such an opening for a bank, national or private, does not exist elsewhere in Oregon. Should a competent person inaugurate an enterprise of this kind we believe half the capital necessary could be found in our midst. With the buying of gold dust, percentage on exchange and the amalgamating of the insurance business, life and fire, a permanent and most lucrative business would be the result.
Jerry Nunan, "Rogue River Valley, Oregon,"
The West Shore, Portland, April 1881, page 88


    Gen. T. G. Reames and C. C. Beekman have finished enclosing their park in a barbed-wire fence. We have not learned whether they will fix it up for the next Fourth of July celebration.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1881, page 3


    Messrs. Beekman and Reames, having purchased a portion of the McCully hill, have enclosed it with a very substantial "barbed wire" fence. The fence is very deceptive, for yesterday a calf walked straight at it, not seeing the wire, but running its nose against a "barb" bucked out very rapidly.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 9, 1881, page 3



    NEW SCHOOL BOOKS.--A portion of the school books adopted in this state has been received by Wm. Hoffman, agent, and are ready for exchange or introduction until October 1, 1881. For terms apply to the agent at the Express office in Jacksonville.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 14, 1881, page 3


    [illegible] Revised New Testament can be had by applying to Wm. Hoffman, at the express office.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 4, 1881, page 3


    Gen. T. G. Reames and C. C. Beekman went to Little Butte yesterday to pay Fred. Heber, who is ill, a fraternal visit.

"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1881, page 3



    OFF FOR CRATER LAKE.--The following excursionists left here on Thursday bound for Crater Lake: Tod Cameron, Mrs. C. C. Beekman, the Misses Carrie Beekman, Mamie and Maggie Linn, Mrs. Florence Shipley and two children, William L. Bilger and Prof. J. C. Scott. In going they will take the Ashland-Linkville, and returning the Fort Klamath-Rogue River route. They expect to be gone some three weeks.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 6, 1881, page 3


    C. C. Beekman will make a trip to San Francisco before long.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1881, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman arrived at the old home, Dundee, N.Y., safely on the 12th inst. He is expected back here about the holidays.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 19, 1881, page 3


    Mr. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, the eldest son of the late Benj. B. Beekman, has arrived in this village, on a visit to his aged mother and other relatives. His last visit here was during Centennial year. Mr. Beekman left this village for the extreme West in the year 1849, and since that time has made his home there, and has abundantly prospered financially, as well as socially. It is only a few years ago he was nominated for Governor of Oregon, and came within a few votes of being elected. He has many incidents to relate of frontier life, and it is not only a pleasure, but highly instructive, to pass an hour or so in conversation with him on these subjects. He brought with him numerous specimens of the productions of that climate, among which are two large pears, the weight of the largest being two pounds and one-half ounce. It measures 19¼ inches in circumference one way, and 15 inches the other. The other pear is one ounce less in weight. They resemble our Bartlett pear in shape and color, but look as large as our summer squashes. They are what they term a common fruit, and were grown on his premises. Mr. Beekman will remain here for some time, and no doubt will meet many of his old acquaintances.
Unidentified 1881 newspaper clipping,
University of Oregon Special Collections Ax 10.  Photocopy archived at the Southern Oregon Historical Society Research Library, MS134


    C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, eldest son of the late Benj. B. Beekman, is visiting his mother in Dundee.
"Yates County," Corning Journal, Corning, New York, December 1, 1881, page 2



    C. C. Beekman, who is now visiting the scenes of his childhood days in Dundee, N.Y., took home with him a pair of pears weighing about two pounds each, which created quite a sensation there. The local paper compares them with summer squashes. Talking agriculturally and horticulturally, we put Oregon against the world, and Jackson County against any other portion of the state.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1881, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, who has been paying his old home in New York a protracted visit, is expected home in a few days, having arrived in San Francisco last Wednesday.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1882, page 3


    Mr. C. C. Beekman will leave San Francisco, tomorrow morning for home and is expected here Wednesday morning. His absence in the East has been protracted longer than he expected.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 21, 1882, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, who has been absent for several months on business, returned home last Tuesday. He spent the greater portion of his time at his old home in Dundee, N.Y.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1882, page 3



Returning Home.
    C. C. Beekman, who has been paying his old home in New York a protracted visit, is expected home in a few days, having arrived in San Francisco last week.
Corvallis Gazette, January 27, 1882, page 2


    RETURNED.--Hon. C. C. Beekman returned from the East on Tuesday last after an absence of about three months. He seems glad to reach his western home again after experiencing the rigor of an Atlantic winter and says there is no place like Oregon.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 28, 1882, page 3


    PRESBYTERIAN MITE SOCIETY.--This organization held a very pleasant meeting at the residence of C. C. Beekman last Tuesday evening, the spacious apartments being crowded to their utmost capacity with old and young. Everybody enjoyed themselves. Refreshments were also served and duly appreciated. The receipts of the evening were $31.50.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1882, page 3


    A writer in the Albany Herald asks if the Republicans of Southern Oregon desire Mr. Beekman for Governor. We can only answer that Mr. Beekman is the first choice in this end of the state and point to the remarkable vote he received in Jackson County, four years since, as an earnest of his acceptability. We believe that Mr. Beekman is really the choice of the Republican Party throughout the whole state, and if the convention represents the party honestly he will be nominated. If, on the contrary, it is captured by political intriguers he will not, and the nomination will be given to someone craving office more than he and willing to do dirty work for it.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 1, 1882, page 2


    Jacksonville Lodge of Odd Fellows hoisted its flag last Sunday, in honor of the return of J. A. Boyer, who was last week elected to the responsible position of Grand Master of Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 26, 1882, page 3



    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, accompanied by Mrs. Grainger and Miss Carrie and Ben Beekman, returned from the North on Tuesday's stage. Mrs. Grainger started for Ashland on Thursday to visit her mother.--Mrs. Vining.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 1, 1882, page 3


    Turner's surveying party--consisting of Wm. N. Turner, Steve Hubbard, Frank Huffer, George Huffer, Ben. Beekman and Jas. Lindsay, started for Lake County last Thursday, to be absent about six weeks. After finishing the work there they will go to the Butte Creek country.

"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 8, 1882, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, born in New York City, Jan. 27, 1828, emigrated from Dundee, Yates County, N.Y. to Cal., and from thence to Jacksonville, Ogn., in March 1853. Banker.

"Southern Oregon Pioneers," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 8, 1882, page 3


    A HANDSOME PAINTING.--Miss Anna Benner of this county, who is attending an art school at San Francisco, has painted for Frank Ennis of Sterlingville a portrait of Mr. Powers, a friend of his, who was washed through a flume in Nevada County, Cal., several months ago and drowned. It is a faithful facsimile of the photograph after which it is painted and would do credit to a much more experienced artist. The painting may be seen at Beekman's banking house.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1882, page 3


    A fine oil painting, the work of Miss Anna Benner, is on exhibition at the express office and is a fine piece of work. We predict a bright future for Miss Benner as an artist.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 23, 1882, page 3


Operating Pumps in Mines.
    Mr. John Huffer, of Jacksonville, Oregon, has just patented through the Mining and Scientific Press Patent Agency a new method of operating pumps in mines or deep wells, where the pumps are located on different levels or stations. The object of the invention is to furnish means for operating all the pumps upon the various levels or stations at the same time by the application of the original power, which, by certain mechanical devices, is transmitted throughout the entire system.
    Across the top of the shaft is suitably journaled the driving shaft, upon which is a pulley on which is firmly clamped a flat wire cable. This cable is clamped to its center at the top of the pulley to prevent slipping, as its ends are loose and swing down upon each side over the face of the pulley. This power pulley does not make a complete revolution, but oscillates, that is, it revolves part way and then back.
    At the first side station or level is journaled a horizontal shaft, carrying upon one end a double-faced pulley. Upon the outer of these faces is clamped at the center and underneath the pulley another flat cable, the ends of which pass about the face of the pulley at its sides, and extend up to connect with the lower ends of pieces of round cable already attached to the flat cable of the power pulley, thus making a connection with the upper pulley. In the pieces of round cable connecting the flat cables are placed set screws or links, whereby the cable connection can be tightened and adjusted. Over the other face of the pulley at the station is another flat belt connected in a similar manner to that already described, with the pulley at the next station by similarly arranged belts. Each level is connected with the one above in this way, and at each station is a pump.
    The shafts of each of the sets of pulleys have pinions at their ends, these pinions engaging with a rack, either formed with or attached to the piston rod of the pump. Power is applied to the main driving shaft and pulley at the surface to give the pulley an oscillatory motion. This is transmitted through the continuous belt or cable connections to the pinions at the several stations, and by means of these pinions the piston rods of the pumps are moved back and forth to operate the pumps. The pumps may be single or double-acting, or two single-acting pumps, one at each end of the rack, may be used.
    The pumps may be operated at any angle desired, by clamping the flat cables at suitable points upon their pulleys, and by the interposition of guide pulleys the power may be transmitted to them in any location, as in a tunnel or down another shaft. The general principle of operating a series of pumps simultaneously is not new, but the other devices differ from Mr. Huffer's. The vibrations of the cable is provided for, and also the stretching of the cables.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 3, 1883, page 72  A patent model for this device survives, on a shelf in the vault of the Beekman Bank.


    B. B. Beekman is expected to return from Eugene City tomorrow.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1883, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and daughter left for San Francisco Saturday, and will be gone a few weeks.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1883, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and daughter have gone to San Francisco.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 23, 1883, page 3


    C. C. Beekman is expected home before long and will return via Portland.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1883, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife, who have been in California for several weeks past, returned home Sunday, via Portland.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 28, 1883, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife returned from San Francisco this week via Portland. Their daughter, Miss Carrie, remained in San Francisco to attend school.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 29, 1883, page 3


    To all appearances the central depot for this valley has been definitely located 3½ miles northeast of town on a straight line. C. C. Beekman, C. W. Broback, C. Mingus and I. J. Phipps, on whose land it will be placed, have each agreed to donate several acres for the use of the railroad company, although the depot will be mostly on Mr. Broback's farm.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 2, 1883, page 2


    OUR DEPOT--The Grand Central railroad depot has been located at last and the company have decided on putting it on the land owned by C. W. Broback, C. Mingus, C. C. Beekman and I. J. Phipps. It is on a corner owned by the four above mentioned parties but the depot property will be on the land owned by Broback. A town site will be laid out and property offered for sale.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 3, 1883, page 3



    At a late examination of the Mills Seminary in California, Miss Carrie Beekman, daughter of our fellow townsman, Hon. C. C. Beekman, received 100 percent in every study and was the only scholar with such a record. The showing was so extraordinary that it was made the subject of special mention before the school, and it is not only creditable to the young lady herself but to her former preceptor, the principal of the Jacksonville school, Prof. Merritt.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, November 24, 1883, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman of this place, in a recent examination at Mills Seminary, California, received a standing of 100 percent in every study, a very handsome showing, and which also reflects credit on her former preceptor, Prof. Merritt.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 30, 1883, page 2


    John Boyer, at the express office in this place, last week had for sale some fine oysters, which came all the way from the East via the N.P.R.R., packed in ice. this is the first shipment of the kind ever made here.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 18, 1883, page 3  The railroad had not yet reached Jackson in December 1883. The oysters were probably picked up at the Grants Pass depot.


    Miss Cora Linn returned from Portland last Thursday after a protracted visit to that city. B. B. Beekman also came back on a holiday vacation from college, and W. W. Cardwell is expected next Sunday.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 22, 1883, page 3



    HON. C. C. BEEKMAN.--The reminiscences of the early pioneers of the Pacific coast must ever possess a peculiar interest for the Oregonian. Green in their memory will ever remain the trials and incidents of early life in this land of golden promise. These pioneers of civilization constitute no ordinary class of adventurers. Resolute, ambitious and enduring, looking into the great and possible future of this western slope, and possessing the sagacious mind to grasp true conclusions, and the indomitable will to execute just means to attain desired ends, these heroic pioneers, by their subsequent career, have proved that they were equal to the great mission assigned them, that of carrying the real essence of American civilization from their eastern homes and planting it upon the shores of another ocean. Among the many who have shown their fitness for the tasks assigned them, none merit this tribute more fully than the subject of this sketch, whose portrait appears in this work. He was born in few York City, January 27, 1828. He received his education in the public schools, and while yet in his minority he learned the carpenter's trade. In the year 1850 he sailed from New York, coming via the Isthmus of Panama, and arrived in San Francisco in the fall of that year. He went to Sawyer's Bar, where he was engaged as a miner; thence to Yreka working at his trade, after which we find him at Scott's Bar, mining; returning to Yreka, where, in 1853, he entered the employ of Cram, Rogers & Co., as express messenger between that place, Jacksonville and Crescent City. He was often obliged to cross the Siskiyou Mountains under cover of darkness on account of hostile Indians. He retained this position until the failure of Adams & Co. in 1856, which carried down with it the house of Cram, Rogers & Co. He then commenced carrying express on his own account, resuming his perilous trips across the mountains until a stage road was built and the stages of the old California Stage Company put on the route. In 1863, when Wells, Fargo & Co. completed their overland connections with Portland, they tendered Mr. Beekman the agency at Jacksonville, which he accepted, and has been retained up to the present time with credit and ability. During Mr. Beekman's term of service as express messenger on his own and others' account, he has handled millions of money, and, in fact, more than any other man in Southern Oregon; and his retention and promotion by his employers is a sufficient guarantee for his unswerving honesty and integrity. Investing his earnings judiciously, Mr. Beekman has amassed a fortune, not by miserly conduct; not by oppressing the poor; not by taking advantage of the necessities of his fellow men, but by strict observance to business principles, and a careful management of his own affairs. As a financier and a man of ability, he is the peer of any man in Southern Oregon. To prove this, if proof was necessary, we call the attention of our readers to the facts that Mr. Beekman has been repeatedly elected one of the trustees of Jacksonville, and for several terms held the honorable position of mayor, or president of the board. He has also held the office of school director for nine years, and it was mainly through his business tact that the commodious school building was erected, and, withal, his love for educational advancement has placed the standard of education for the young on a plane that would do credit to a larger town. The year 1878 will be ever memorable to him, for, without the slightest effort on his part, he was selected by the Republican Party from among his compeers and placed in nomination for governor of Oregon. This was a closely contested and hard-fought battle. Mr. Beekman's popularity was so great that he was supported not only by Republicans, but by a large number of Democrats in Southern Oregon. He was defeated by his Democrat opponent, Gov. W. W. Thayer, by forty-nine votes. The closest scrutiny into the life of Mr. Beekman demonstrates the fact that no man can find a blemish in his character. Notwithstanding he is wealthy, you could not observe that from his conduct. He is not like many men of means--supercilious. He knows himself, and that is half the battle of life. He tries to do no man wrong, having lived up to the golden rule all his life. He resides in Jacksonville, Jackson County, one of the prettiest spots in Oregon, where he has made many warm friends and keeps them. He often says with Sydney Smith: "Let every man be occupied, and occupied in the highest employment of which his nature is capable, and die with the consciousness that he has done his best." It were well if our young state had many such generous and enterprising men as C. C. Beekman. He married Julia E. Hoffman, daughter of William Hoffman, and by this union they have one daughter and one son.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 524


    C. C. Beekman's banking office was also on fire once and that side of the street in danger, when the wind fortunately shifted to the south and allowed the people at work to concentrate their efforts on one block.
"Great Conflagration,"Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3


GREAT CONFLAGRATION.
$50,000 WORTH OF PROPERTY DESTROYED.
    January 1st was ushered in at Jacksonville by a disastrous fire, which consumed at least $50,000 worth of property. Several years ago we had become accustomed to this sort of thing; but when at two o'clock that fateful New Year's morning the fire alarm was sounded, no wonder it struck terror to the hearts of our citizens.
    The conflagration originated in the New State Saloon, located in the corner of a large and highly inflammable building situated on California Street, but from what cause is not exactly known. Noland & Ulrich, the lessee of the saloon, think it hardly probable that their flue should have been defective, and are of the opinion that it was the work of some spiteful incendiary. Be that as it may, in less time than it takes to tell it the whole structure was a mass of fire, which rapidly communicated with J. S. Howard's store adjoining, also a frame building. The wind was blowing from the southeast at the time, and for a while the greater portion of the town was in peril. The Eagle Sample Rooms, opposite and east of the New State, and the next house on the south were badly scorched and ablaze several times. It was with the greatest difficulty that they were saved. C. C. Beekman's banking office was also on fire once and that side of the street in danger, when the wind fortunately shifted to the south and allowed the people at work to concentrate their efforts on one block. The flames were not long in reaching Ryan's building, occupied by Baruch Fisher and H. M. Rice, although the post office store, a fireproof brick, stood between it and Howard's. Here the best work of the night was done. The citizens had formed themselves into a bucket brigade and kept a large amount of water pouring on the fire and the buildings in the vicinity. The hook and ladder company, although but organized for the time, also did excellent service. By dint of a tremendous effort the houses in the rear of the stores on fire were kept from burning, and after John Miller's place had been made secure, the conflagration was virtually under control. Only one more unfortunate circumstance followed, and that was the burning of the entire contents of the post office building, something which now seems as if it could have been averted. Unknown the flames had entered through the openings in the cellar and set afire the large amount of goods stored there. While the roof was a long time falling in, a great fire raged inside soon after the blaze first entered, making it dangerous as well as useless to attempt the rescue of anything. The iron doors were therefore kept closed and the flames allowed to spend their force inside.
    The following is a list of the losses and the amount of the insurance, as near as we can learn: C. W. Savage, building, furniture, etc., $5,000, insurance, $2,000. J. S. Howard, building and stock of goods, $13,000, insurance, $4,500. Max Muller, merchandise, $16,000, insurance, $6,000. Baruch Fisher, goods, $4,000, insured for $3,000. Noland & Ulrich, saloon fixtures, etc., $1,000, insured for $400. H. M. Rice, photograph instruments, etc., $250, no insurance. L. Solomon, post office building, $2,000, fully insured. P. J. Ryan, building, $1,500, no insurance. T. T. McKenzie, liquors in Muller's cellar, $300, no insurance. Besides these there were numerous minor losses, which will swell the total a few thousand dollars.
    Surveying the situation at this time, the town may consider itself fortunate that no more harm resulted under the circumstances. Had there been water in the cisterns and the engine operated in the correct manner, the fire could have been confined to the New State and Howard structures. As it was, the water supply proved none too great; besides, some inexperienced person forgot to attach the strainer to the suction hose of the engine, which allowed rocks and other rubbish to accumulate in the valves and thus rendered the machine useless.
INCIDENTS OF THE FIRE.
    There were more good-for-nothing spectators than we have seen at a fire in a long time. The ladies could hardly be expected to do much; still some of them were of vastly more benefit than a number of lazy men who stood leisurely by with hands in their pockets, toasting their shins. We must, however, say a word in praise of the many who did noble work. There were several strangers, having no interest in the town whatever, who afforded great assistance in overcoming the fire.
    Accidents were fortunately few. One of the two of a serious nature befell Harvey Fowler, barkeeper for Jack Marshall, who had a room in the second story of the New State Hotel. When he awakened he was in such close quarters that he jumped through the window and fell violently to the ground, breaking his arm in two places. The other unfortunate was Wm. Egan, who was struck in the face by a falling board, receiving a painful wound. Erysipelas setting in, his condition was dangerous at one time.
    L. S. P. Marsh also lodged in the New State, and would have been in immediate danger only that someone broke the door of his room in and aroused him. In his hurry he left $160 in money behind.
    Two young ladies named Jordan, from Applegate, in the employ of Mrs. C. W. Savage, also had a narrow escape, losing some $40 in money and all of their clothing and other effects.
    Some parties moved their goods and lost a few through pilferers.
    There was general good behavior and no stealing to speak of.
    J. S. Howard, Noland & Ulrich and B. Fisher lost their account books. M. Muller's safe contained his, besides many other articles of value, all of which were saved.
    The Chinese proved good spectators but poor workers. A number of them were pressed into service at the point of the boot, however.
    P. Avery lost a $1,100 check, which was in the post office at the time. It can be easily duplicated, however.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3


    RELIC FOUND.--After the fire last Tuesday morning a silver medal with numerous emblems of the Masonic order was found in the ruins of the New State Hotel by J. H. Hoffman. Besides the emblems there is an inscription as follows: "Jabez Whipple, initiated March the 9th, 1796." It can be seen at Beekman's express office.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1884, page 3


OUR NEW YEAR'S FIRE.
    About two o'clock on New Year's morning the citizens of Jacksonville were startled by the alarm of fire, getting its start in the New State Saloon and burning about half of the block on California Street from the corner of Third. Those who seen it first say that the flames first broke out in Noland & Ulrich's saloon opposite the second window from the front and only a short distance from where the stove sat. In less time than it takes to tell it the whole building was in flames so that the lodgers in the hotel in the same building had barely time to save their lives without trying to save any of the property. From there it went on and took the frame building owned by J. S. Howard when it jumped over and set afire P. J. Ryan's building occupied by Baruch Fisher, burning that to the ground also. By this time the fire got so hot that no one could get near enough to do effective work when Max Muller's post office brick got afire on the inside and it also succumbed to the flames. The next building on the west was John Miller's brick, where some good work was done and the fire checked from going any farther. The buildings on the opposite side of California Street and Jones' saloon on the other corner were badly scorched but escaped with slight damages to the fronts. Beekman's express office, Jones' saloon and the small wooden buildings in the rear of the last mentioned place were afire several times but by good steady work on the part of the firemen and some of our citizens the buildings were saved. The ladies of the town also did some effective work in saving goods and a number of them stood in line with the bucket brigade and worked as hard as anyone else. The fire engine was brought out in good time and first run down to Savage's well, but by the neglect of someone the strainer on the suction hose was not in place, and it was not long before the engine was disabled by drawing up gravel into the valves. This caused quite a delay while the fire went right along and it is probably the reason of its not being stopped when it reached the post office brick. This building burnt on the inside for several hours before the flames broke through the roof, but as nothing could be done it was thought best to keep the doors closed and thereby confine it to that building alone. The origin of the fire is still a mystery, as the saloon was closed about ten o'clock p.m. when there was very little fire in the stove and the lamps were put out. The marshal and other parties passed the saloon only a few moments before when no light or sign of fire could be noticed.
    The losses and the insurances are about as follows: Max Muller, general merchandise, $16,000, insured for $6,000 in the New Zealand. J. S. Howard, merchandise and building, $14,000, insurance $4,500--divided between the Home Mutual, Western Fire and Marine and the [New] Zealand companies. B. Fisher, general merchandise, $3,500, insurance $2,500. L. Solomon, post office building, $2,500, insured for $2,000. P. J. Ryan, building, $1,500, no insurance. C. W. Savage, hotel building and furniture, $4,000, insurance $2,000. Noland & Ulrich, saloon and fixtures, $1,000, insured for $400. H. M. Rice, photographic gallery, $500, no insurance, T. T. McKenzie, liquor, $300, in Max Muller's cellar, no insurance. Besides this there was considerable damage done to adjoining buildings by fire and water and some loss resulted in the moving of goods.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1884, page 3


    Crosby is generally considered a good rustler for jobs, but he failed in getting the contract for whitewashing the front of Beekman's bank.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 26, 1884, page 3



    The Northern Pacific Express office is now fully established at James R. Little's. Quite a reduction in freight has been occasioned by the competition between this company and Wells Fargo.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 3, 1884, page 3


    C. C. Beekman's banking office has been repainted and presents a neat appearance. This is one of the principal improvements of the year. Chas. Schultz did the work.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 3


    The express corner presents a much better appearance since it received a couple of coats of fresh paint. Beek says he intended doing it all the time, and that's why he declined letting the job to a whitewash artist.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 17, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman went to Eugene City Tuesday evening to attend commencement exercises at the state university. Her son Ben will graduate there at that time.
    C. C. Beekman will leave for San Francisco soon. He will return to Oregon, via Portland, shortly and will be accompanied by his daughter, Miss Carrie. They will attend commencement exercises at the state university.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1884, page 3


    The Express corner and Max Muller's new store were treated to new coats of paint this week. Chas. Schultz is doing the outside work, while John Carter does the graining and fancy work.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. Beekman, of Jacksonville, is visiting at the residence of her sister, Mrs. G. B. Dorris.
"Personal," Eugene City Guard, May 24, 1884, page 3


    The express corner presents a better appearance now since Carter & Schultz have painted and varnished the outside.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 14, 1884, page 4


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, accompanied by her son and daughter, are making a tour of Puget Sound.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned this week from quite a visit in the Willamette Valley and Washington Territory, accompanied by her son and daughter. They extended their trip as far as British Columbia.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, accompanied by Ben and Miss Carrie, returned from Portland and Victoria this week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 19, 1884, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman has returned to Oakland, Cal., to resume studies at Mills Seminary. Her brother Ben accompanied her to San Francisco, where he will remain awhile.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3


    PORTLAND, July 26th.--The following passengers leave for San Francisco on the State of California, sailing at midnight: C. C. Beekman and sister . . .
"Passenger Lists," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, July 26, 1884, page 8



    Miss C. Beekman, Jacksonville.
"Hotel Arrivals: Palace Hotel," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, August 2, 1884, page 8


    Ben  Beekman left for Eugene City last night, where he will assume a responsible position in the state university.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3


    Miss C. Beekman, Oregon
"Hotel Arrivals: Palace Hotel," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, December 18, 1884, page 2



    C. C. Beekman and wife have gone to San Francisco to spend the holidays and visit their daughter, Carrie.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 20, 1884, page 3


    Repairs have been made to Beekman's banking office by replastering the cracks near the vault, caused by the sinking of one end of the building.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 31, 1885, page 3


    Messrs. Huffer & Jackson talk of putting in one of their new style pumps in either the Red Men or Beekman wells so that people can see their advantages.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1885, page 3



    NO FAILURE YET.--While meandering around yesterday afternoon we dropped by C. C. Beekman's express office when we seen him put up a package of 25 pounds of gold dust, the result of the week's purchases from the miners living nearby. The mining season has been an exceedingly poor one on account of the scarcity of water, but this showing proves that we have good paying ground if we only get water to work it.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


    C. C. Beekman of this place a short time since presented A. L. Johnson, Dr. Geary and J. S. Howard, as trustees of the Presbyterian church at Medford, with two choice lots, upon which it is proposed to build a church building in the future. A liberal act.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1885, page 3



    C. C. Beekman starts for San Francisco today. His daughter, Miss Carrie, will accompany him on his return.

    Mr. C. C. Beekman recently presented two lots to the trustees of the Presbyterian Church at Medford. J. S. Howard, A. L. Johnson and Dr. E. P. Geary are the trustees.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, Oregon.
"Hotel Arrivals: Palace Hotel," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, May 27, 1885, page 7



    Miss C. Beekman, Jacksonville.
"Hotel Arrivals: Palace Hotel," Daily Alta California, San Francisco, May 30, 1885, page 2


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman left for Eugene City last Friday evening to pay relatives there a visit and also witness the commencement exercises at the State University.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1885, page 3


    Notwithstanding the unfavorable mining season a considerable quantity of gold dust has been taken out. C. C. Beekman alone has bought and shipped several thousand dollars worth.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1885, page 3



    W. F. & Co.'s express office and the banking business of C. C. Beekman here is in charge of John A. Boyer during Mr. Beekman's absence. John is an obliging business man, and everything runs as smooth as when the Governor is around.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 6, 1885, page 3


    Beekman's bank has been neatly repainted and presents a much improved appearance.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1885, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman is visiting at the residence of Senator Dorris.
    Mr. B. B. Beekman during the summer will leave for Europe, where he will spend a year or more.
Eugene City Guard, June 20, 1885, page 4


    Gen. T. G. Reames, grand master of the A.F.&A.M. for this state, accompanied by C. C. Beekman, Wm. Kahler and other members of Warren lodge of this place, went down to Grants Pass yesterday to institute a new lodge.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1885, page 3


    WILL TRAVEL.--Prof. B. B. Beekman, one of the tutors in the University of Oregon, has been granted an absence of two years, during which time he proposes to travel and study in Europe. There has been no other change in teachers, although it was at first proposed to appoint a successor to Mr. Beekman, but the faculty finally concluded the university had a sufficient number of teachers now employed to do all the work.

Oregon Sentinel, June 27, 1885, page 3


    Prof. B. B. Beekman returned from his trip to British Columbia yesterday morning and will remain with us awhile.
    Gen. Reames, C. C. Beekman, J. A. Slover and Wm. Kahler of this place, G. W. Williams of Medford and Chas. Hughes of Kerbyville went to Grants Pass last week to organize the Masonic lodge of that place.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1885, page 3


    Profs. Woodcock and Beekman returned from a short trip to Puget Sound points and Victoria, B.C., last Monday. Prof. Beekman left for his home at Jacksonville Wednesday afternoon, where he will spend the summer.
"Personal," Eugene City Guard, July 4, 1885, page 3



SOUTHERN OREGON FRUIT GROWERS.
    A called meeting of the fruit growers of Southern Oregon was held at Jacksonville last week. There was quite a large attendance, G. F. Pennebaker presiding and J. H. Griffis acting as secretary. Among other things it was resolved that hop culture be considered one of the interests of the fruit growers' association. A communication from C. W. Clark on hop culture was read by the secretary. The question of locating headquarters of the association was then taken up, resulting in the selection of Jacksonville. On motion of R. F. Maury the association resolved to hold its annual meeting on the 8th of October, 1885. C. C. Beekman moved that the association hold a horticultural exhibition at their annual meeting in October next, lasting one or two days, according to the discretion of the permanent officers of the association; carried. The chair was empowered to make arrangements for the exhibition. On motion of Martin Peterson, the association invited all persons interested in fruit and hop culture to preserve such fruits as could not be exhibited green, in order that as many kinds could be exhibited as possible.
Oregonian, Portland, July 16, 1885, page 3


    Henry Pape, Jr., Ben Beekman, Wm. Cardwell and Chas. Bilger have gone on a trip to the mountains.
    We inadvertently omitted to state that much of the good order and success of the Fourth of July celebration here was due to the excellent management of D. Linn, president of the day, also that Miss Carrie Beekman officiated at the organ in a very excellent manager.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1885, page 3


    Grand Master T. G. Reames, accompanied by R. S. Dunlap Grand Tyler, C. C. Beekman, Ben Beekman and Prof. J. W. Merritt, went to Eugene City this week to assist in the laying of the cornerstone for the new state university at that place. All who heard the oration by Prof. J. W. Merritt pronounce it a masterly effort and with the intelligent audience that he had as listeners Mr. Merritt may well feel proud of the compliment.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 1, 1885, page 3


    Prof. Beekman was in Eugene last Tuesday at the laying of the cornerstone. He will leave Jacksonville for San Francisco about September 1st.
"Personal," Eugene City Guard, August 1, 1885, page 3



    Tutor B. B. Beekman is in San Francisco attending Heald's Business College.
"Brevities,"
Eugene City Guard, October 10, 1885, page 5


    John A. Boyer is now agent of the Home Mutual Insurance Co., having succeeded the late Wm. Hoffman, who held the agency many years.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1885, page 3


    Report says that a company of men from Ashland have "jumped" what is known as the Holman ledge on Jackson Creek, owned by C. C. Beekman, who holds a title on the ground from the government as school land. This is considered one of the most valuable pieces of mining property in the state, and we would like to see it worked by someone.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 23, 1886, page 3



    B. B. Beekman, who has been in San Francisco for several months past, has returned home.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


    The Presbyterian congregation of Dundee had been struggling to raise money for a new church, and after all their efforts they lacked $700 of the amount required in order to ensure the largest subscription, which  was given conditionally upon the raising of the amount. Last Sunday morning, after the regular service, the pastor announced that he had received by mail the previous evening a New York draft for $1,200 from Mr. C. C. Beekman, of Oregon. This announcement sent a wave of enthusiastic gratitude through the congregation. Mr. Beekman is a brother of the Messrs. Beekman, of Bath.
"Brevities," Steuben Courier, Bath, New York, April 30, 1886



    A few days ago Rev. W. H. Tracy, who was soliciting subscriptions for building a new Presbyterian church in Dundee, received a letter from Mr. C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville, Oregon, with a draft for $1,200 enclosed therein, and all the required fund of $8,000 has been pledged.
"Vicinity," Watkins Democrat, Watkins, New York, May 5, 1886, page 3


    A contract for running a tunnel to tap the Johnson ledge will soon be let by C. C. Beekman, the owner, so we are informed.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, May 15, 1886, page 3


    Miners are cleaning up, and a large amount of dust finds its way to Beekman's bank.
    A nugget weighing near $300 can be seen at Beekman's bank. It was found by a Mr. McDonald on Wagner Creek. It is probably not necessary to state that it is a beauty, and for that reason we refrain.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 22, 1886, page 3


    B. B. Beekman and W. W. Cardwell have returned from the north.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 26, 1886, page 3



    C. C. Beekman is having his quartz mines on Jackson Creek surveyed, and will probably have tunnels run and shafts sunk on them before long. We believe that good ore exists there in paying quantities and hope to see the matter thoroughly tested soon. B. B. Beekman and Frank Huffer are engaged in making the survey.
"Southern Oregon Mining News," Oregonian, Portland, July 15, 1886, page 2


    C. C. Beekman has let a contract for running a tunnel 100 feet long, to tap his ledges in the Jackson Creek district, to J. N. Casteel. We are glad to know that he has concluded to prospect his mines, for they are supposed to be first-class. This will also give an impetus to quartz mining in Southern Oregon.
"Mining News," Eugene City Guard, August 7, 1886, page 7


    A new pump has been placed in the well at the express corner by Mr. Beekman for which those living nearby are thankful.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1886, page 3


    B. B. Beekman and Miss Carrie Beekman started east last Monday night, to be gone for the winter at least. Ben will likely stay longer to attend college.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 25, 1886, page 3


    Two hundred and eighty-nine taxpayers in Jackson County pay taxes on $2,000 assessments. The O.&C.R.R. pays on $125,780; Bank of Ashland, $30,000; C. C. Beekman, $26,600; H. F. Barron, $23,165; A. L. Ritter, $25,260; G. W. Coaksey, $23,682. Twenty-six more pay on sums in excess of $10,000.
"State and Territorial News," Willamette Farmer, Portland, October 22, 1886, page 5



    Many handsome pieces of marble work have lately been put up in the Jacksonville cemetery. The lots of Mr. Beekman, and Mr. Linn, have been enclosed with substantial stone coping ornamented with marble urns and vases, much improving the appearance of that part of the cemetery. In the town cemetery a very elegant monument has been erected over the grave of Rowland Hall. The material is Rutland marble, and the style is massive and beautiful. The Bybee lot has also been enclosed with a stone coping and a magnificent family monument placed in position. The material is Rutland marble of a light shade; upon a double sandstone base is a massive pillar of the marble surmounted by a tapering column, upon which is an urn of oriental design, half draped. The marble is susceptible of a very high polish, and the finish is fern fronds and ivy, wrought in tracery. The six grave markers are of the dark marble upon a base of pure white marble. The most exquisite little piece of marble work marks the grave of Mr. Whipp's little daughter; it is a tiny cabinet with marble coping. The front is a scroll with rustic lettering; across the stone is a wreath of ivy and immortelles and above it is a dove in flight. The design is a rare combination of art and genius that cannot be excelled on this coast. The work has all been executed at the marble works of J. C. Whipp in Jacksonville.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 4, 1886, page 3


    C. C. Beekman was elected worshipful master of Warren Lodge No. 10, F.&A.M., for the eleventh time, which is the best record of the kind in the state. The other officers of that lodge have also held their respective offices several years in succession, especially R. S. Dunlap, the tyler.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1886, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman, of Oregon, and Miss Seeley, of Dundee, were guests of Mrs. A. Beekman the first of the week.
"Personal," Bath Plaindealer, Bath, New York, December 11, 1886, page 2


    C. C. Beekman and wife will soon pay the eastern states a visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 17, 1886, page 3


    Brick-laying is finished on the Presbyterian church, and the slating is nearly done. The large front window of the edifice will be an artistic and elegant memorial design, in honor of the late [sic] C. C. Beekman, and it will cost $500.--Dundee Observer.
"Vicinity," Watkins Express, Watkins, New York, December 23, 1886, page 2


    Frank Huffer is engaged at the express office during the absence of Mr. Beekman.
    C. C. Beekman and wife started on a trip to New York state on Monday evening and will be gone several weeks. Bon voyage.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 31, 1886, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife of Jacksonville have gone east over the Oregon Short Line. We wish them a pleasant sojourn and safe return.
"Local and Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, January 7, 1887, page 3



    Mr. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, and Mr. DeWitt Beekman, of Dundee, were guests of Mr. A. Beekman on Wednesday and Thursday.
"Personal Mention," Steuben Courier, Bath, New York, January 14, 1887, page 2



    C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, and Dewitt Beekman, of Dundee, visited at A. Beekman's a couple days this week.
"Personal," The Bath Plaindealer, Bath, New York, January 15, 1887


    Dundee Observer: Cornelius C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, formerly of Dundee, is on a visit.
"Yates County," Corning Journal, Corning, New York, January 20, 1887, page 2



    A message from the governor was received appointing T. J. Hendricks and C. C. Beekman regents of the state university. The senate confirmed the nominations.
"The State Legislature," The Daily Morning Astorian, February 9, 1887, page 1


    C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville and T. G. Hendricks of Eugene City have been appointed regents of the state university by Gov. Pennoyer and the state senate immediately confirmed their nominations.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 11, 1887, page 3


    J. A. Boyer of the Jacksonville express office received a handsome present on St. Valentine's Day from C. C.  Beekman, his employer, who is now in New York, in the shape of a handsome gold watch and chain. Mr. Boyer is naturally quite proud of his valentine.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife will probably leave New York this week and may be expected home the forepart of next month.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter, of Jacksonville, arrived from the East yesterday and are registered at the St. Charles.
"Personal," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 30, 1887, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter arrived in Eugene Thursday direct from Dundee, N.Y.
"Brevities," Eugene City Guard, April 2, 1887, page 5


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman is visiting relatives and friends in Eugene City.
    B. B. Beekman of Jacksonville, who has been attending Harvard College, has ceased his studies there and entered Yale.
    C. C. Beekman, accompanied by his daughter, returned home last Sunday morning. They have been absent from here for several months past, most of which time was spent in New York state.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1887, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned from Eugene City last week, where she has been visiting relatives and friends.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1887, page 3


H.M.S. Meeting.
    There will be a meeting of the Ladies' Presbyterian Home Missionary Society at the Presbyterian church in Jacksonville on Thursday, April 21st, at 2 o'clock P.M. All members are requested to be present, as business of importance will come up before the meeting.
MRS. C. C. BEEKMAN, Pres.
MRS. G. H. AIKEN, Sec.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1887, page 3


    C. C. Beekman is expecting some relatives from New York to pay him a visit soon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887, page 3


    C. C. Beekman to Jas. Hamlin; quitclaim deed to the undivided one-half of 320.40 acres in Secs. 6 and 7, T38, SR1W. Consideration $250.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 1


    C. C. Beekman and daughter, Miss Carrie, went to Eugene on Monday last to attend the commencement exercises of the state university. Mr. B. will return in a few days, but the latter expects to be absent for several weeks.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1887, page 3


    The degree of A.M. was last week conferred on B. B. Beekman, a graduate of the state university, by the regents. Ben is well entitled to it.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


New Banking House.
    Jacksonville has now been provided with what it should have had long ago--a banking house. C. C. Beekman, who has conducted Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office and a private bank here for nearly thirty-five years, has become associated with T. G. Reames, and they have established a bank, to be conducted on thorough banking principles, with a capital of $55,000. Both gentlemen are well known as honorable business men, and no doubt the long-felt want will be satisfactorily filled. Jacksonville has always offered excellent inducements in this line, and the only wonder is that they have not been taken advantage of before.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


    Work is progressing nicely on the tunnel being run by C. C. Beekman and the Jacksonville Milling and Mining Co. in the Jackson Creek district.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 2


    Judge Day and C. C. Beekman were indisposed the forepart of the week, but are again able to pursue their wonted avocations.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman has returned from her visit to the Willamette Valley.
    C. C. Beekman has been confined to his room for the past fortnight, and is still unable to be about, we are sorry to say.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 3



    C. C. Beekman is able to be about again and is improving in health.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 3


    We learn that C. C. Beekman and family will go to San Francisco, Cal. soon.
    A party consisting of C. C. Beekman and wife and daughter, T. G. Reames and family and Dr. DeBar and wife spent Wednesday on Rogue River picnicking. A number of fine trout were also caught by the party,
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1887, page 3


    Mrs. John Beekman and her nephew, Mr. Benjamin Beekman, of Oregon, have gone to the Thousand Islands.
"Personal Notes," Steuben Advocate, Bath, New York, September 7, 1887, page 2



Beekman & Reames'
BANKING HOUSE
SUCCESSORS TO
C. C. Beekman's Bank.
The undersigned have formed a co-partnership with an authorized
CAPITAL of $55,000.00
for the purpose of carrying on
General Banking Business
IN ALL OF ITS BRANCHES IN
Jacksonville, Oregon.
OFFICE at the old stand of Beekman's House, S.E. [sic] corner of THIRD AND CALIFORNIA STREETS.
C. C. BEEKMAN
THOS. G. REAMES.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 15, 1887, page 3


    Geo. Jensen and Hi. Allison, who are running a tunnel in the vicinity of the old Holman ledge, in Jackson Creek district, for C. C. Beekman, have struck a well-defined vein of quartz, which seems to contain a liberal quantity of gold. Some of the ore has been tested and is rich. A permanent, paying mine will sooner or later be struck in this vicinity, when Jacksonville will begin to wake up again.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 4


    C. C.  Beekman and family went to San Francisco last week and will be gone several weeks.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 4


    C. C. Beekman and family are now paying Southern California a visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 3


    C. C. Beekman to Medford school district No. 9, Q.C.D. to property in Medford, $1.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 1


    C. C. Beekman and family are in San Francisco at present.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1887, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family, who have been spending some time past in California, returned home last Tuesday evening. Mr. B. reports a very pleasant trip.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 3


    Messrs. Jensen and Allison are still running a tunnel for C. C. Beekman, to tap the old Holman ledge, and are hopeful of excellent results. Good prospects have recently been found.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 2


Beekman & Reames ad, October 20, 1887 Oregon Sentinel
October 20, 1887 Oregon Sentinel

    School tax in this district is now delinquent. Those indebted should call at Beekman & Reames' bank at once and settle.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, who had some lemon and orange trees, lost them during the cold weather. All of our ladies mourn the loss of more or less house plants.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 3



    The report that Mrs. C. C. Beekman lost her lemon and orange trees during the recent cold weather is unfounded.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 4


    Mr. and Mrs. John Beekman left on Monday for Jacksonville, Oregon, where Mr. Cornelius Beekman, a brother, resides. They will be gone three months.
"Personal Notes," Steuben Advocate, Bath, New York, March 7, 1888, page 2


    Mr. and Mrs. John Beekman will spend three months in the West, visiting Mr. Cornelius Beekman, a brother of John and Abram Beekman, at Jacksonville, Oregon.
"Personal," The Plaindealer, Bath, New York, March 10, 1888


    John Boyer shipped a fine lot of smelt from Portland Monday which he sold "like hotcakes."
"Brevities," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1888, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, one of the regents of the state university, started for Eugene City Wednesday to attend a meeting of the board. He will extend his trip to Portland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 23, 1888, page 3


    John Beekman of New York, brother of our fellow townsman C. C. Beekman, is paying Jacksonville a visit, accompanied by his wife. They will make a tour through California before returning home, and Miss Carrie Beekman will go with them.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1888, page 3


Heavy Interest on Warrants.
    Yesterday C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville presented five warrants on the state treasurer that were just fourteen years old, having been drawn on the 5-percent tide, swamp and overflowed land fund, on May 20, 1874. The face of these warrants was $7,000, and it took $16,792.23 to pay the principal and interest. The state treasurer has issued a call for $10,500 more of these warrants (principal) with interest, which will increase the amount to about $30,000. There are yet about $25,000 worth of these warrants, which were drawn under the authority of the acts of the legislature of 1874, in payment for road improvements. About two years more of the 5-per-centum allowance of the government on the sales of land will be required to pay these warrants, and the balance of the fund will accrue to the common school fund. The warrants that will come in under the two calls issued by State Treasurer Webb will use up all the fund recently received from Washington.
Capital Journal, Salem, May 24, 1888, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, who is a student at Yale College, has finished his studies and will graduate during the coming month. Ben. is a young man of much promise and will no doubt become a prominent member of some profession.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1888, page 3


    C. C. Beekman has returned from his visit to Portland.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1888, page 3


    Beekman & Reames' banking house in this place is being generally renovated.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, a graduate of the class of '84, finishes the law course at Yale this June. He was one of four chosen to compete for the prize for oratory. The Oregon boys compare quite favorably with those of the East.
"State University," Eugene City Guard, June 16, 1888, page 3



    C. C. Beekman of Oregon . . . [is] at Willard's.
"Personal," Evening Star, Washington, D.C., July 19, 1888, page 1


    C. C. Beekman and family visited Washington, D.C., lately.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 4


    Beekman & Reames' banking house will soon be painted and grained in a handsome manner. T. J. Cress will execute the work.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family are visiting relatives in Dundee, N.Y., and will not return to Jacksonville before fall.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 3


    Beekman & Reames' banking house has been painted, grained and thoroughly renovated, and now presents a very nice appearance.
    T. J. Cress will commence painting the school house in a few days, when he will have completed the painting of Beekman & Reames' bank.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman and Miss Carrie Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon, and Miss Nina Beekman, of Dundee, have been visiting relatives in town this week.
"Personal," The Plaindealer, Bath, New York, September 22, 1888


In Prospecto.
    Those who are familiar with the surroundings of Jacksonville are aware that there is a considerable body of fine sugar pine timber on the divide between Jackson Creek and Rogue River which has never been touched by the woodsman, having been owned by private parties for many years. David Linn owns an interest in the tract, and has been seriously considering the advisability of establishing a sawmill on Jackson Creek to work up the timber, and a sash and door factory at Jacksonville to be operated in connection with it. Should the project meet with the approval of C. C. Beekman, who is also interested, it is probable that a joint stock company will be organized next winter, with that end in view. There is a practically inexhaustible supply of yellow pine and fir also on the tract.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


    The Home Mutual Life Insurance Company, through J. A. Boyer, its local agent, promptly adjusted the loss sustained by the Masonic building at the late fire, amounting to $46.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and family, who have been spending the past seven months in New York, are expected home before long.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family, accompanied by relatives from the East, were quartered at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco for several days this week, and are expected home this evening or tomorrow after their long sojourn in the eastern states.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 21, 1889, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, who has been east all winter accompanied by his wife and daughter, was in San Francisco the first of the week and will return home soon.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, February 21, 1889, page 3



A Solid Man's Opinion.
    Those who are intimately acquainted with C. C. Beekman, the pioneer banker, will agree that he is not given to any undue enthusiasm, but that, on the contrary, he is conservative and cautious in business matters, and his views of the extent of the probable emigration from the eastern states to the Pacific Northwest the coming season will doubtless interest those who are still in doubt as to Oregon's prospects. He states that in the far eastern states the fame of our climate and resources has gone abroad through every hamlet, and that while the fact that Washington Territory is just emerging into statehood has attracted an undue share of attention to that section, yet that "Oregon" is in almost everybody's mouth, and that tens of thousands of families will be headed for the Northwest Coast before the summer is over. In the richer agricultural sections of the eastern states, where are the most highly cultivated and improved farms in the country, farmers of moderate means find themselves unable to live and "keep appearances," and hundreds of them are preparing to pull up makes and seek few homes, and Washington or Oregon is the Mecca of their thoughts. On the broad and once-fertile prairies of Illinois, Iowa and Kansas--even on the inexhaustible alluvial bottoms of Missouri and the lower Mississippi country--a long series of arctic winters, droughty summers and years of low prices for all products have begotten discouragement and discontent; and the magic words "Washington" or "Oregon" alone can conjure up hope in the bosoms of the farming classes. Even on the very confines of Oklahoma, in the rich cotton belt of Texas, along the Mexican border, on the waving mesas of New Mexico and Colorado, attention is concentrated upon the far Northwest, while the tales that have been wafted to Dakota and Minnesota of our glorious winters and balmy summers have implanted but one hope in the hearts of her citizens--to reach elysium in Washington or Oregon. It may be that the flood will subside after one season's flow; but there are few residents here who realize the extent of the coming tide. The men who are coming are men of some means, men who "wear good clothes"; and they are coming with their families and coming to stay, to make themselves habitations and homes. Mr. Beekman is of the opinion that no one can go amiss in purchasing agricultural lands in this or other valleys of Western Oregon at present prices as, beyond the possibility of a doubt, figures for farming lands will range much higher before the summer is over.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife, together with Miss Carrie and Ben. Beekman, returned home last Thursday evening. They were accompanied by Miss Nina Beekman of Dundee, New York, a niece of C. C. Beekman, who will visit in Jacksonville for a few months before returning home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, a graduate of the Yale law school, was admitted upon a certificate of the supreme court, to practice in all the courts of the state.
"Supreme Court," Capital Journal, Salem, March 6, 1889, page 4



    B. B. Beekman went to Salem the forepart of the week, and was admitted to practice in the supreme court upon motion of Judge Prim.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, who was admitted to practice in the supreme court last week, is still in the Willamette Valley. He will soon locate in some city to practice his profession.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1889, page 3


An Important Enterprise Promised.
    It is reported, and we think reliably so, that steps are on foot for the establishment of a steam sawmill in the fine timber tract belonging to Messrs. Beekman & Linn west of town, and a box, sash and door factory in connection therewith in Jacksonville. Such an undertaking cannot fail to be profitable to those engaged in it, and will be of great benefit to our town. In the present timber famine that prevails in this valley this will be good news to persons engaged in making improvements, while it will afford employment to quite a large number of operatives in the mills and lumber yards, and will be the means of again concentrating business of importance at the county seat. There is a good prospect of the scheme materializing at an early day, as our citizens are abundantly able to develop our resources in this manner, and now show a commendable disposition to encourage and assist in making the enterprise a success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman has returned from a trip to Portland.
"Jacksonville Notes," Valley Record, Ashland, March 21, 1889, page 3



    It is reasonably certain that Messrs. Beekman and Linn will put a sawmill on their large body of land west of town, where a great deal of excellent timber is growing. A sash, door and box factory at Jacksonville will no doubt follow. It would be hard to compute the benefit that would arise from the inauguration of such an enterprise.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, who was recently admitted to the bar, occupies a desk in H. K. Hanna's office.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 3


    Beekman & Reames' banking house will soon be embellished with a new sidewalk.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1889, page 3


    Centenary day was observed in Jacksonville by a partial cessation of business, hoisting the stars and stripes on the various flagstaffs in the town and by many of our citizens going to the woods to seek pleasure on the picnic grounds. Religious services were also held. The pupils of the Sisters' school repaired to Beekman & Linn park on Walker Creek, in charge of their preceptors, and spent a most enjoyable day, while the pupils of the public schools entertained themselves on the banks of Rogue River.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 2, 1889, page 3


    Beekman & Linn have had a large force of men engaged in building a new road to connect their extensive belt of timber land west of town with the main Jacksonville road. They have ordered a large and first-class sawmill and will engage in manufacturing lumber, etc., as soon as possible.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3


    Beekman & Linn have a large force of men engaged in building a road to their proposed mill site.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    Beekman & Linn's big sawmill will soon arrive. They have built a good road to within a short distance of their timber land.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1889, page 3


    Ben. B. Beekman will deliver an address before the alumni association of the state university next Thursday at Eugene City.
    Messrs. Beekman & Linn paid a visit of inspection to Mee & Son's sawmill on Thompson Creek last Saturday. The sawmill business bids fair to be of great importance in the valley hereafter.
    The new road leading to the mill site of Beekman & Linn west of town has been completed for a distance of about a mile and a half, and operations on the same have been suspended for the present. It is a fine piece of work and one of the best mountain roads in this section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife were passengers on yesterday's evening train for Portland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1889, page 3


Quite Complimentary.
    The Oregonian, in its account of the commencement exercises at the university of the state of Oregon, pays the following high tribute to a Jacksonville boy: "It was a matter of special pride that the literary societies had selected one from the alumni association to address them. Mr. B. B. Beekman, of the class of '84, is the first alumnus to enjoy the deserved distinction of being chosen to deliver one of the addresses apart from the regular alumni programme. Mr. Beekman's address on "Social Dynamics" was second to no effort heard at this or other commencements. It was marked by broad thinking, real eloquence in expression and superb delivery."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    The State University will hereafter offer additional inducements to its students to attain proficiency in oratory and literary composition through the munificence of C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville and Henry Failing of Portland. The latter last week donated to the University the sum of $2500, to make provision for a prize of $150 to be offered each year for the best oration or essay, and the former donated the sum of $1500, to provide for a second prize of $100 to the graduate whose production shall rank second in excellence. This is most commendable.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman has returned from the Willamette Valley.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1889, page 3


    Ben B. Beekman will take the place of one of the advertised orators of the day at the celebration at Jacksonville today, by special request of the committee on orators. An interesting talk may be expected from him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife are making Puget Sound a visit, but will return about the 15th inst.
    Misses Carrie and Nina Beekman have returned from their visit to the Willamette Valley, accompanied by a daughter of W. Breyman, the Salem banker.
    Prof. Frank Huffer was a passenger on the evening train Sunday for Grants Pass, from whence he took a stage for Smith River and Crescent City for a six weeks' tour of the coast country. He took two complete outfits of leggings, etc., with him, and B. B. Beekman will follow him in a few days to make use of one set.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 3


    Miss Beekman and Miss Carrie Beekman, of Jacksonville, were in Salem yesterday visiting Miss Anna Breyman. They returned home last night accompanied by Miss Anna, who will visit with them for a few weeks. A sojourn at Crater Lake is among the pleasures in store for her during her absence.--[Statesman, July 6th.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, July 11, 1889, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and wife are expected to return from Portland in a short time. We are sorry to learn that Mrs. B. is suffering from quite a severe attack of malarial fever.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 3


    J. A. Boyer is in charge of the bank and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office during the absence of Messrs. Beekman and Reames.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    Professors B. B. Beekman and Frank Huffer were at last accounts making themselves popular in the coast country by making a very preliminary survey for a railroad up to Grants Pass. We hate to give the boys away, but if something isn't done, the Crescent City people will begin calling them "Colonels" and rendering undue homage. It showed great foresight to take a barometer along. It beats a bottle as a means of readily introducing oneself, especially with a railroad scheme behind it. Jacksonville boys don't propose to get left when they go abroad, even if they do go afoot.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife returned from their northern trip Tuesday evening last. Mrs. B.'s health is considerably improved at this writing.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 3


    A gay party of tourists from Jacksonville left for a two weeks' trip to Crater Lake yesterday, composed of Mrs. Carrie and Nina Beekman and Miss Annie Breyman, their Salem guest, accompanied by Prof. G. W. Watt, Fletcher Linn, Kaspar Kubli, Jr., and Everett Mingus.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


    Ben. B. Beekman and Frank Huffer returned from their trip to the coast yesterday morning greatly benefited in health and spirits.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 3


    Beekman & Reames have served notice of suit to foreclose a mortgage of about $20,000 on the farm of Geo. Love and John Hanley near Jacksonville and also on the Humphrey place at the mouth of Bear Creek. It is one of the finest farms in the valley.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, August 29, 1889, page 3



    C. C. Beekman vs. James Hamlin; motion for leave to issue execution. Trial by jury before Judge R. S. Bean of the 2nd judicial district, and verdict for plaintiff. Judgment given for $11,850, for which leave is given to have execution issue. Defendant given 60 days in which to file the bill of exceptions.
"Circuit Court," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 2


    Steps have already been taken to appeal the case of Beekman vs. Hamlin, recently decided in favor of plaintiff, also the case of Anderson vs. Hammon, in which a decision was rendered for defendant.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    B. B. Beekman has gone to Portland to practice law with the firm of Watson, Hume & Watson. Success to you, Ben.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, September 26, 1889, page 2


    Mrs. Geo. B. Dorris of Eugene City, daughter of Mrs. C. B. Hoffman, is visiting her old home in Jacksonville, accompanied by Mrs. A. V. Peters of the same place. They are guests of Mrs. C. C. Beekman.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1889, page 3


    With the fact that Binger Hermann is to be overthrown as a candidate for Congress comes the announcement that Hon. C. C. Beekman is to be entered in the race as the Southern Oregon candidate for Governor.--Roseburg Review.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 3


    C. C. Beekman is now being run for Congress instead of for Governor by the exchanges. A late one says: Papers throughout the country are already beginning to talk of a candidate for Congress at the June election. Binger Hermann, the present incumbent, is favorably spoken of, and there seems to be no opposition of force to his renomination. The Heppner Gazette, Eastern Oregon, is in favor of Hermann, provided there is no good candidate from that section. Hon. W. R. Ellis, of Morrow County, is mentioned, as well as C. C. Beekman, of Jackson.
Valley Record, Ashland, November 28, 1889, page 2



    The varying political rumors seem just now to point more directly to the nomination of our fellow townsman, Hon. C. C. Beekman, for congress rather than for governor. Nothing would be more gratifying to his friends than to see him secure this important and responsible position. Mr. Beekman's personal habits and business methods are such as to particularly fit him for this position; socially and politically he stands above reproach and would make an excellent governor or a safe, conservative congressman. Several persons have been mentioned as possible candidates at the coming election from Southern Oregon, and it is possible if there are too many in the field a conflicting contest will defeat all. The utmost caution should be observed and every element of strength concentrated to accomplish a single purpose. Considering the odds against us north of Roseburg, we will be fortunate indeed to secure one important place on the ticket, and Southern Oregon should be a unit for this purpose. Mr. Beekman is not an office seeker, as is well known, and if a candidate [he] will be made one by his friends, solely through considerations of personal fitness and personal worth. We will certainly be entitled to a representative on the next state ticket, and there is no person whose election could be assured with the same degree of certainty as Mr. Beekman's. While his name has been prominently mentioned lately for congress it would be altogether more desirable to nominate him for governor. He is an able, cautious, conservative man, and would make one of the safest and best governors the state ever had. One of the grandest things that has been said of him is that he will wear no man's collar; he would be just what the people elected him to be, and in any position his integrity and honor would be the only lever needed to control aright every official act. By all means, let his friends push forward his name for governor and unite in a grand endeavor to elect him to the position.

"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, November 29, 1889, page 2


    Miss Carrie Beekman entertained a few friends at Thanksgiving dinner last Thursday in ye old-time hospitable manner.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3


    The case of C. C. Beekman vs. Jackson County, for damages on account of a location of a county road through his lands in Big Butte precinct, was argued in the supreme court this week by Judge Prim for the appellant, Geo. W. Colvig of Grants Pass appearing for the county.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1889, page 3


    The cases of Beekman vs. Hamlin, and Kane vs. Amy & Rippey, tried in the circuit court at the September term, will be appealed to the supreme court.
    The W.H.M. Society met on Thursday, the 25th inst., at the residence of Mrs. C. C. Beekman in Jacksonville. At the close of the meeting the ladies were elegantly entertained by Misses Carrie and Nina Beekman.

    Among the many handsome Christmas presents given and received in Jacksonville, none will excite more general admiration than a finely mounted specimen of the Chinese golden cock pheasant sent to Gen. Thos. G. Reames by H. Pape, Jr., of Corvallis, whose prowess as a sportsman is well known in this neighborhood. The mounting of the specimen is lifelike, and as he stands, with his best foot foremost and all attention, he exemplifies the innate pugnacity that distinguishes his kind, and renders plausible the theory that the game fowl owes his bravery to an infusion of pheasant blood. He will make a splendid counter ornament at the bank of Beekman & Reames.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1889, page 3


    The Beekman boom is an actual and stubborn fact. The candidacy of Hon. J. C. Carson, for state treasurer, the Roseburg Review says, backed as he is by Jos. Simon, means that no Portland man can secure the Republican nomination for governor. Mr. Beekman is a man who commands personal strength of this own, and he will likewise be supported by all who desire to shelve the Hon. Binger Hermann. Will Mr. Hermann combine with Beekman and try for the senatorship? At any rate there are lively times ahead.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 1  The Valley Record printed this item on December 12, 1899, page 3. "Boom" refers to a campaign for nomination, not an economic boom.


    The Hanley & Love property on Rogue River was sold at sheriff's sale last Saturday. It was bid in by the mortgagees, Beekman & Reames, at $5475.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


    The case of Beekman vs. Hamlin, which has been appealed to the supreme court, will come up for hearing at the March term.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3


    In the circuit court last Saturday, in the case of Beekman & Reames vs. Hanley & Love, et al., a judgment for $10,490, $500 attorney fee and costs was rendered and a decree of foreclosure granted.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 6


    Beekman & Reames vs. Hanley & Love; to foreclose mortgage. Decree and judgment for $10,490, $500 attorney's fee and costs and disbursements.
"Circuit Court," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 4


    A grapevine dispatch from out in the woods at the head of Bear Creek states that our fellow citizen C. C. Beekman will be the compromise candidate for Congress on the Republican ticket in case D. P. Thompson is given the nomination for Governor. The rumor lacks confirmation, not having yet received the stamp and signet of Leon's endorsement, or announcement by the Medford Mail, and cannot by any means be considered authoritative or as coming from Mr. Beekman himself. C. C. is entirely eligible for the position, having never written any poetry that we know of.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1890, page 3


    The Beekman-Hamlin case will be heard in the supreme court on April 21st.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 3


    Real estate is looking up again. C. C. Beekman has sold eleven lots in the northwestern portion of town for $500.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 2



    Mrs. T. D. Beekman, of Dundee, N.Y., arrived on Thursday's train to spend several months in visiting Oregon. She is a guest of her brother-in-law, C. C. Beekman.

"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, April 17, 1890, page 2



    Mrs. John Beekman of Bath, New York is paying relatives in Jacksonville a visit.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1890, page 3


    The fine nugget recently picked up by Logg & McDonnell on Forest Creek, the value of which is $80, is on exhibition at the bank of Beekman & Reames
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


    Ben B. Beekman, formerly of Jacksonville, but now of Portland, is stumping part of the state for the Republicans.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, May 15, 1890, page 3



    Hon. C. C. Beekman was on Sunday's train for a business trip of several days in San Francisco.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, May 29, 1890, page 3


    Col. R. A. Miller and B. B. Beekman arrived from the north Wednesday morning.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, June 5, 1890, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and family, accompanied by the family of his brother, John Beekman, will pass the summer months rusticating in the mountains and valleys of old Mexico.
    B. B. Beekman returned home to Jacksonville for a few days, after his canvass of the state in the interest of Mr. Thompson, last Wednesday morning. Ben is quite a good talker and made a fine reputation for himself as a stumper, very sensibly refraining from commenting too vigorously with regard to the respective merits of the two candidates for governor.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1890, page 3


    B. B. Beekman has returned to Portland after a short visit in town.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, June 12, 1890, page 3



    B. B. Beekman has returned to Portland, to resume the practice of law.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 3


    In 1889 Henry Failing made the Eugene state university a gift of $2500 and C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville one of $1000 and the prize funds were established for the best original orations. Edw. H. McAllister of Portland won this year's Failing prize, $150, and Agnes M. Greene of Seattle, the second (Beekman) prize of $100.
"Brevity Basket," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 26, 1890, page 3


    B. B. Beekman and Frank Vining have placed the Times corps under obligations for a supply of fine cake. May their shadows never grow less.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 9, 1890, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and daughter Miss Carrie went to Portland one day last week. Miss Carrie will accompany a party of young folks on a pleasure trip to Mexico before returning. Mrs. D. P. Thompson of Portland with chaperon the party.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, July 10, 1890, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, who has been at Portland on business, returned home yesterday morning.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1890, page 3


    Gen. T. G. Reames and wife, C. C. Beekman and wife, Misses Lizzie Graves, Nina Beekman and Mrs. T. D. Beekman departed Tuesday for Yaquina Bay, to be gone several weeks.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, July 17, 1890, page 3


The Beekman-Hamlin Case.
    The supreme court in the case of C. C. Beekman, respondent, vs. Jas. Hamlin, appellant, reversed the judgment of the lower court upon grounds never before recognized in Oregon. Judge Strahan, who rendered the decision, fell into the line of courts in other states which have decided that a judgment that has been undisturbed for a period of twenty years is supposed to have been paid, and is consequently invalid after that date, unless, during that time, the parties interested have had a specific agreement that the line of the judgment shall be extended past the period aforesaid. Oregon courts have always previously decided that a domestic judgment never dies, and the statute of limitations was not pleaded in the lower court in this instance. Mr. Beekman had recovered a judgment against Mr. Hamlin about 28 years ago for a sum in the neighborhood of $1300, which, at the rate of interest then obtaining, had grown into the sum of $14,500. The case has been remanded to the lower court to give the plaintiff an opportunity to show, if possible, that a legal attempt had been made during the twenty years to collect the judgment.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman, after visiting in Portland for several weeks, is now in San Francisco, having gone there by steamer.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Gen. Thos. G. Reames and C. C. Beekman, accompanied by their wives, Mrs. D. Beekman and her daughters, and Miss Lizzie Graves, departed last Tuesday afternoon for a few weeks' sojourn by the sounding sea.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    We regret very much to learn of the death of Mrs. John Beekman, which occurred in New York. She was about 40 years of age and a most estimable lady, beloved by all who knew her. Together with her husband she visited Jacksonville a few years ago.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman and the Misses Moore of Portland, who are making a tour of the Pacific Coast, were registered at the Palace Hotel in San Francisco last Monday and Tuesday.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman, who have been making an extensive visit to Yaquina, will return this week via Portland, where they will be joined by their daughter, Miss Carrie, who has been spending the month of July traveling with the Misses Moore of Linkville in California.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, July 31, 1890, page 2


    The case of C. C. Beekman vs. Jackson County, tried in the circuit court several months ago, has been appealed to the supreme court.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and wife returned from their northern trip Tuesday morning last. Mrs. B.'s health is considerably improved at this writing.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3


    Thos. G. Reames and wife and Miss Lizzie Graves returned from Yaquina last Friday, after a pleasant season of recreation on the beach. C. C. Beekman and wife went to Portland to bid farewell to Miss Nina Beekman and her mother before their departure for their New York home, and arrived here on their return on Wednesday morning. Miss Carrie Beekman accompanied them home from Portland after a pleasant tour through California with Portland friends.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


    Thos. G. Reames and wife and Miss Lizzie Graves returned from Yaquina last Friday, after a pleasant season of recreation on the beach. C. C. Beekman and wife went to Portland to bid farewell to Miss Nina Beekman and her mother before their departure for their New York home, and arrived here on their return on Wednesday morning. Miss Carrie Beekman accompanied them home from Portland after a pleasant tour through California with Portland friends.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


    E. S. Smith, the mining expert, went up Jackson Creek last Monday, accompanied by C. C. Beekman and J. H. Huffer, who are interested in the old Holman ledge. The former talks of bonding this mine.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, Esq., came out Sunday from Portland to rusticate, and will probably view the entrancing scenery about the ocean at Smith River before returning.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, September 11, 1890, page 2


    Ben B. Beekman, who is practicing law in Portland, is visiting relatives and friends in Jacksonville.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 3


Native Sons of Oregon.
    The preliminary steps towards the organization of the above named society was taken at the pioneer reunion in Jacksonville last Thursday. It will be similar to the California organization, to include in membership all native-born sons and daughters of Oregon. Robt. A. Miller and Geo. R. Neil are president and secretary and with themselves and B. B. Beekman, Geo. W. Dunn and Miss Hattie Reames compose an executive committee to frame constitution and enlist members. This is the first organization of the kind in the state. The recent brilliant social success of the California sons will undoubtedly give the new enterprise a big boost.
Valley Record, Ashland, September 18, 1890, page 3


    B. B. Beekman has returned to Portland after a pleasant visit among us.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


    Judge Prim, who went to Salem to argue the motion for a rehearing in the Beekman-Hamlin case, succeeded in having the petition granted.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


    C. C. Beekman had his premises beautified by a neat picket fence during the week.

    The Hanley & Love ranch near Central Point, now owned by Beekman & Reames, was the scene of a quite successful attempt at steam plowing during the past two weeks, a portable engine and two double gang plows turning over about sixteen acres per day in the open ground.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    A portable engine and two double gang plows on the Beekman-Reames farm near Central Point turned over about 16 acres per day in the open ground. Steam plowing is a rare occurrence in this part of the country.
Valley Record, Ashland, November 13, 1890, page 1


    No one would think it, to look at them, but the fighting weight of three of our leading citizens, S. J. Day, C. C. Beekman and Thos. G. Reames, is the same to a notch.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 3


    A number of alumni of the University of Oregon who reside in the metropolis have completed the organization of the Portland University of Oregon Club. The club has for its object the promotion of the closest social relations and the advancement of the interests of the University of Oregon. The following officers were elected: President, B. B. Beekman; first vice president, A. L. Frager; second vice president, Miss Etta Moore; secretary, J. R. Greenfield. A committee was appointed to make arrangements for a banquet to be given at the close of the year.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1890, page 3


Decision Affirmed.
    The supreme court, which granted a re-hearing in the Beekman-Hamlin case, appealed from this county, affirmed its former decision on Wednesday last. As will be remembered, the case was decided in favor of Jas. Hamlin in the upper court, on the ground that a presumption of payment was raised because the judgment executor had not had an execution issued for twenty years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3


BEEKMAN & REAMES'
BANKING HOUSE,
Successors to C. C. Beekman's Bank,
JACKSONVILLE, OR.
    THE UNDERSIGNED HAVE FORMED a copartnership with an authorized capital of $55,000, for the purpose of carrying in a General Banking Business in all of its branches in Jacksonville, Oregon. Office at the old stand of Beekman's Banking House, S.E. [sic] corner California and Third streets.
C. C. BEEKMAN,
THOS. G. REAMES.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 1


    The case of Beekman vs. Hamlin has come up again in the circuit court.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 3


    B. B. Beekman came up from Portland this morning to attend the Odd Fellows' ball.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


    Ben Beekman of Portland was visiting at Jacksonville the past week.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, April 30, 1891, page 1


    B. B. Beekman, a promising young attorney of Portland, is spending the week with his parents.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, April 30, 1891, page 3


    Beekman & Reames are the only purchasers of gold dust in Southern Oregon nd report lots of the yellow dust coming in this spring, more than for several years past. The prospects of the miner as well as the farmer and fruit grower of Southern Oregon are most cheering for an abundant yield this year.
"Brevity Basket," 
Valley Record, Ashland, April 30, 1891, page 3


    B. B. Beekman of Portland is paying Jacksonville a visit. He is practicing law at the metropolis and meeting with considerable success.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


    B. B. Beekman returned to his law business in Portland last Saturday, after a visit at his old home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 3


    Ben Beekman of Portland delivered the leading address at Newport on Memorial Day. It was both able and interesting and is highly complimented by all who heard it.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


    Ben Beekman, of Portland, delivered the memorial address at Newport on Decoration Day. It was a fine effort.
Valley Record, Ashland, June 11, 1891, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family will soon leave Jacksonville to spend their summer vacation.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter Miss Carrie departed on Tuesday evening for New York to visit Mr. B.'s aged mother. They were accompanied to Medford by a number of their young friends.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, June 25, 1891, page 3



    A. E. Reames is taking lessons in the banking house of Beekman & Reames.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    Beekman & Reames have procured a Smith-Premier typewriter, and John Boyer and Evan Reames, Jr., are busy in mastering its mysteries.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3



    C. C. Beekman and family are expected to return from New York in a few weeks.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 2


OBITUARY.
    BEEKMAN--After a long and painful illness, Mrs. Lydia Compton Beekman, widow of Benjamin B. Beekman, passed away on Friday, October 2nd. Her death was calm and peaceful. Mrs. Beekman was born in New Jersey, March 30th, 1806, and was 85 years, 6 months and 2 days old. In 1827 she married Mr. Beekman and moved to the town of Starkey in 1830. For 60 years or over she has been a member of the Presbyterian Church of this village, and down to her death she manifested a lively interest in its welfare. Her Bible, her constant friend and companion for more than thirty years, was used at the funeral for the reading of scriptural selections. The text was chosen by one of the family, Isaiah 64:6, "And we all do fade as a leaf," and a sermon in which the beauty and glory of a  Christian life was epitomized was preached by her pastor, Rev. Stanley B. Roberts. It was exceedingly fit and proper that as the shadows lengthened on that beautiful October day that she should be laid to rest among the falling leaves on the hillside to await the resurrection of the past. A large number of her friends filled all the available portion of the church to show their respect for the honored dead. Mr. Andrew Harpending and Mrs. Elizabeth Doty, own cousins of Mrs. Beekman, were at the funeral. Many welcomed her coming to this place over 60 years ago. Seven children, two of whom died in infancy or early youth, were born to Mrs. Beekman; Cornelius C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, Oregon; Abraham and John Beekman, of Bath, N.Y.; T. Dewitt Beekman and Mrs. Lydia Seeley, of Dundee, all of whom were present at the funeral. Thus we are called to chronicle the death of one who has long been identified with the history of the church and the village, and while we sincerely mourn her loss we rejoice that she lived among us as an illustration of the Christian faith.--[Dundee [N.Y.] Observer.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 3


    Many have viewed the beautiful specimens of gold brought in by John Wells of
Thompson Creek at the banking house of Beekman & Reames in this place during the past fortnight, and they are well worth viewing, even in their broken condition, the sections of the golden platter representing a piece not less than seven inches in diameter and worth at least $1,500. Just the amount yielded in the pocket is not for the public to know, but it was something worth mentioning in mining talk anywhere. It is truly demonstrated that the mining era has by no means drawn to a close in Southern Oregon.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 3


    We learn that C. C. Beekman and family are expected to return home in the near future.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3



STEUBEN.
Marriage of Two Prominent Young Society People at Bath.

    Wedding bells rang out merrily yesterday afternoon in Bath over the nuptials of Miss Julia E. Averill and George W. Beekman. It was a society event of prominence, and took place in the presence of about sixty guests. The ceremony was performed at the home of the bride's parents on Steuben Street, by Rev. B. S. Sanderson, of St. Thomas' Episcopal Church. Shortly before 5 o'clock the guests began to arrive. Half an hour later Sutton's orchestra commenced playing Mendelssohn's wedding march, and the officiating clergyman, followed by the groom and the best man, his brother, Edgar Beekman, descended the hall stairs. Behind them came the ushers, James R. Kingsley and Thomas Hassett, and then the bridesmaids, Misses Blanche Ramsey and Belle Averill, immediately preceding the bride. She was attired in a white silk gown, en train, and wore a Brussels knit veil, and her corsage was trimmed with orange blossoms worn by the bride's mother at her wedding. The contracting parties stood under a parapluie of white immortelles in the front parlor. The bride carried bride's roses. Miss Rumsey, wearing a light yellow gown, carried roses to match. The bride's sister wore a pale blue silk and carried white roses. After the ceremony Mr. and Mrs. Beekman received the cordial congratulations of their many friends present, and an elaborate supper was served, and dancing continued to a late hour. The bride and groom were the recipients of many handsome and useful presents. Among those present from out of town were: Mr. and Mrs. Edward A. Thompson, of Meadville, Pa.; Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Beekman, and their daughter, of Jacksonville, Oregon; Dewitt Beekman and Mrs. Seeley, of Dundee; Ambrose Butler, of the Buffalo News; Miss Raines, Buffalo; Miss Rose, Hammondsport; Rev. and Mrs. Caterson, Catawha, and Mr. and Mrs. Burt C. Brown, Canisteo. On the Erie, at 8:50 o'clock, Mr. and Mrs. Beekman left for Washington and other cities in the South.
Rochester Democrat and Chronicle, December 10, 1891, page 7


    The Beekman homestead, which was erected in Middletown, N.J., prior to the Revolution, was burned to the ground. Some valuable relics of colonial days were lost.
Unidentified newspaper clipping, University of Oregon Special Collections Ax 10.  Photocopy archived at the Southern Oregon Historical Society Research Library, MS134.  The clipping is from the Brooklyn Daily Eagle, December 10, 1891, page 4.


    Hon. C. C. Beekman and family who have been in New York for the past year are expected home the 10th of February.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, January 28, 1892, page 3


    An adjourned term of the circuit court will soon begin here. Several cases will then be tried by the jury which will come together then, including the Beekman-Hamlin case, the issues of which have been completed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family are expected to return home next month. A correspondent of the Oregonian says that Mr. Beekman recently visited Washington and was the guest of Senator Mitchell.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3


    The Beekman-Hamlin case will be tried at the adjourned term of court soon after Beekman arrives from his eastern trip. The amount is very heavy ($13,000).
"Brevity Basket," 
Valley Record, Ashland, February 4, 1892, page 3


    The new silver half dollar has been introduced here by Beekman & Reames and seems to be popular.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and family, who have been spending several months in New York, are expected to return home next week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3


    The jury, which was discharged last month, to reassemble on the 15th, will be here next Monday, ready for business. Several cases will be brought before it, including the Beekman-Hamlin suit.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3



    Hon. C. C. Beekman and family are expected home next week, and will remain at their home in Jacksonville during a large portion of the summer months. They have been making a tour of Washington city, Richmond, Va., Jacksonville, Fla., and New Orleans on their journey home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 2


    Hon. C. C. Beekman and family returned yesterday from a six months' trip to New York. While absent they visited many Eastern cities, including the national capitol.
"Jacksonville Items," Medford Mail, February 18, 1892, page 2


    C. C. Beekman and wife returned from their trip to New York state last Saturday, after an absence of over seven months. Their daughter, Miss Carrie, tarried in the Willamette Valley, to pay friends a visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman has left Eugene for Salem to visit friends at the capital city.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman has arrived in Jacksonville.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, March 17, 1892, page 1


    Miss Carrie Beekman of Jacksonville and Miss Ankeny, of Sterlingville, have been added to Mrs. Nichols' art class the past week.

"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 25, 1892, page 3


    Messrs. Beekman, Day, Howard & Rapp this week sold their timber land located in tp. 40 to a syndicate. They each realized $1000.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, April 7, 1892, page 3



    B. B. Beekman, who is practicing law at Portland, arrived Tuesday for a visit with relatives.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, May 12, 1892, page 3


    B. B. Beekman of Portland is visiting his old home in Jacksonville.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, May 19, 1892, page 1


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman left for Eugene on Monday evening's train to witness the commencement exercises, which will doubtless be of a fine order.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


    STATE UNIVERSITY.--Commencement exercises of the state university at Eugene closed last week, and were highly interesting. Ben Beekman and W. W. Cardwell of Jacksonville were among the graduates and acquitted themselves with great credit. We learn that Mr. Beekman has been offered a position as tutor in the university at a very fair salary, and he will probably accept it. Next week we will endeavor to give fuller details.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3


    The commencement exercises at the University of Oregon were of even a more interesting character than usual, and were witnessed by a very large audience. The oration of B. B. Beekman (who is one of the college's most promising graduates) is spoken of as a masterly effort and reflects much credit on our young friend.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife returned from their trip to the Willamette Valley yesterday.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Rogers and wife of Quincy, Ill. are paying Dr. DeBar and family a visit. They leave for Alaska in a few days, and will be accompanied by Misses Lizzie Graves and Carrie Beekman. We wish them a pleasant trip and safe return.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 3


    Misses Carrie Beekman and Lizzie Graves, accompanied by Mr. Rogers and wife of Quincy, Ill., left for Portland Saturday. from there they will go to Alaska for a pleasure trip.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, July 21, 1892, page 3



    C. C. Beekman is exhibiting a cotton plant, in full bloom, which he obtained during his visit to Florida last year. It is quite a curiosity to those who have never seen cotton in its natural state.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    John A. Boyer, who is at Yaquina Bay, has been sick ever since his arrival, but is improving now.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


    John A. Boyer has returned from Yaquina Bay and is rapidly regaining his health. He had a serious spell of sickness while on the coast.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2


    J. A. Boyer is back at his accustomed place in Beekman & Reames' bank.
"Local and General," Medford Mail, August 12, 1892, page 3


    Misses Carrie Beekman and Lizzie Graves, who recently joined a party of excursionists to Alaska, returned home Wednesday delighted with their trip.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, August 25, 1892, page 3



    Misses Carrie Beekman and Lizzie Graves returned from their trip to Alaska on Wednesday. The ladies made friends in Portland and Tacoma a visit after their return from the frozen north, and altogether had a very enjoyable time.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, went to San Francisco Saturday to attend the bankers convention.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter left for San Francisco Saturday, to be absent several weeks.

"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


BEEKMAN & REAMES'
BANKING HOUSE,
Successors to C. C. Beekman's Bank,
JACKSONVILLE, OR.
THE UNDERSIGNED have formed a copartnership with an authorized capital of $55,000, for the purpose of carrying on a General Banking Business in all of its branches in Jacksonville, Oregon. Office at the old stand of Beekman's Banking house, S.E. corner of California and Third streets.
C. C. BEEKMAN,
THOS. G. REAMES.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 1


    In answer to invitations sent out in rhyme by Mayor and Mrs. G. M. Granger, their parlors were filled on Monday evening with a large crowd of young men and women who came to do honor to the Hallowe'en party given in honor of Mrs. Granger's cousin, Miss Carrie Beekman of Jacksonville. The acceptances and regrets were sent in rhyme and read by Mrs. H. C. Myer for the entertainment of the guests. There were many witty and sublime thoughts, as well as some grotesque ideas, expressed. The bright and lively crowd assembled made a merry time and one that will be long remembered.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, November 3, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, J. R. Neil, Jacksonville.
"Hotel Arrivals: Willamette," Capital Journal, Salem,
November 3, 1892, page 2


    The case of C. C. Beekman, appellant, vs. James Hamlin, respondent, appeal from Jackson County, was argued and submitted to the supreme court on the 3rd by Prim and Watson for Beekman and Fitch for Hamlin, as was the case of H. H. Sparlin, respondent, vs. J. N. Gotcher and G. B. Bristow, appellants, appeal from Jackson County; argued and submitted, J. R. Neil, attorney for appellants, P. P. Prim, attorney for respondent.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, November 10, 1892, page 1


    C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter Carrie will spend the winter in Portland society.

"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, December 15, 1892, page 1


    B. B. Beekman, who is now a prominent young attorney of Portland, made his relatives and friends here a visit during the week, returning to Portland on Wednesday.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife, accompanied by their daughter, Miss Carrie, left during the week for Portland, where they will spend several weeks.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1893, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned from Portland, where they have been spending the winter, on yesterday's train. They thoroughly enjoyed their stay at the metropolis.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman arrived home during the week after spending some months in the Willamette section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3


    B. B. Beekman of Portland delivered the oration at the celebration held at Dallas, Polk County, on the 5th. It is very highly spoken of by all who heard it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1893, page 3


    C. C. Beekman went to Eugene on Wednesday to attend the annual meeting of the regents of the University of Oregon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1893, page 3



    W. T. Clemmens, who has been doing some work on C. C. Beekman's quartz mine in Jackson Creek district, has finished his contract.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1893, page 3



A Valuable Addition to Our Bank.
    Beekman & Reames this week received one of the finest safes in the state. It is absolutely fire- and burglar-proof, the manufacturers Herring, Hall and Co. offering a large sum to anyone who can open it in 24 hours. Although not a large safe, it weighs nearly 5000 pounds and cost $1000. It is very solid and made of steel of the best quality, being fitted up with the latest and most improved devices for the safety of the money, bonds, etc. that may be placed in it, including a time lock. The banking house of Beekman & Reames, while always staunch and reliable financially, now offers better inducements than ever to depositors.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3


    Yan, the Chinese cook who has been in the employ of C. C. Beekman for so many years, left for San Francisco yesterday morning, to engage in business.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, accompanied by his wife and daughter, will soon start on a trip to the eastern states, stopping at Chicago, while en route to New York.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, son of Hon. C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville, was invited to deliver the address at the opening of the Portland Industrial Exposition, which was quite a compliment to bestow upon so young a man. Ben was equal to the emergency, however, and his effort is highly spoken of by all who heard it, for it was able, interesting and delivered with good elocutionary effect.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1893, page 2


Settled at Last.
    The case of Beekman vs. Hamlin, which has been in the courts since 1861, has been amicably settled by the parties in action. This is probably one of the most interesting cases ever adjudicated in the state; but it would consume too much space and subserve no present purpose to give its history or a summary of the complaints, answers and interminable motions and countermotions involved in the case and arising from time to time have puzzled the wisest attorneys in the state, and diversity rather than uniformity of opinion among the legal fraternity, as to the merits of the case, has seemed to prevail from the very commencement of the action. The parties to this expensive case are to be congratulated upon its final and satisfactory settlement.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1893, page 3


    C. C. Beekman will soon leave on a trip to the eastern states, accompanied by his family. Miss Lizzie Graves will go with them as far as Chicago. Her many friends regret to learn that she will not return to Jacksonville.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1893, page 3


    Hon. C. C. Beekman and wife, accompanied by their daughter, Miss Carrie, and Miss Lizzie Graves, left Portland for the East on Wednesday. We wish them a pleasant trip.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1893, page 3


    Jacksonville furnished the orator for the Portland exposition, now progressing, in the person of B. B. Beekman, who gained new laurels by his effort, which is pronounced first-class in every respect. It was well delivered and full of merit from a literary and elocutionary standpoint.
    The terms of the compromise between C. C. Beekman and Jas. Hamlin are the payment in two years by the defendant of $3,500. Mr. Hamlin also pays the costs of the last suit, which amount to several hundred dollars. The whole matter could probably have been originally adjusted for that sum, and the thousands of dollars paid in attorneys' fees and costs by both parties saved.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1893, page 3


    Gen. T. G. Reames, who went to San Francisco Sunday, returned Thursday evening, having been recalled by the serious illness of John Boyer.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1893, page 2


    The many friends of J. A. Boyer will be glad to learn that he is at his post again, as usual.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 24, 1893, page 3


    John A. Boyer, the efficient clerk at Beekman & Reames' bank, is indisposed, but not seriously so.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1894, page 3


    An error crept into the estimate of the bank capital of this valley which is corrected by saying that Ashland carries the heaviest, $100,000.00. Alfred Hillman's uncle Dan has just sold some property in the latter city. But perhaps Jacksonville's bank, with a modest capital of $55,000.00, represents in its stockholders the heaviest backed names of one, and possibly another represents $400,000.00 of valuable property. At least two lease gold mines on shares from which large incomes are obtained. More about the mines comes to us daily and sometimes the fear arises that temptation will come strong enough to coax one of the "refugees" upon a prospecting tour when spring fully opens. But we had not exhausted the subject of banks, for a cashier said yesterday that banking was so much overdone in this valley that existing institutions could not make paying dividends, and that a new one would starve. But that is usually the "outside" cry of any successful business.

Reese P. Kendall, "Pacific Notes,"
Western Call, Beloit, Kansas, January 19, 1894, page 1


    B. B. Beekman's aspirations are now turned toward the attorney generalship. Ben is a bright young man and would undoubtedly be able to capture the delegates from southern Oregon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1894, page 3


    B. B. Beekman's aspirations are now turned toward the attorney generalship. Ben is a bright boy, and would undoubtedly be able to capture all the delegates from Southern Oregon, as well as to corral a few from this city in the Republican convention.
"State Political Drift," 
Valley Record, Ashland, March 1, 1894, page 1


    Mr. and Mrs. Cornelius Beekman and Miss Carrie Beekman of Portland, Oregon, have been guests of A. Beekman's this week.
"Purely Personal," The Plaindealer, Bath, New York, March 24, 1894, page 2

The Political Horoscope.
    The Republican primaries were held throughout the county last Saturday, but the full result will not be developed until the county convention meets next Saturday. The warm weather of the past few days has brought out the usual crop of candidates, and Jackson County will holds her own as a producer of that article. Max Muller would like to have the nomination for secretary of state, W. H. Leeds thinks he would make a good state printer and C. C. Beekman would not be averse to being nominated for governor. For county offices, J. H. Huffer would like to step into Muller's shoes as county clerk, while the latter isn't unwilling to succeed himself if he cannot get the nomination for a state office. J. G. Birdsey, as usual, is a candidate for sheriff, as also are Geo. F. Merriman of Medford and Alex. Orme of Foots Creek. N. Langell and Geo. M. Love are after the nomination for treasurer, and if Leeds can't be state printer Fred. Wagner would accept the nomination for county recorder, for which place J. E. Enyart of Medford is also mentioned. Senator Cameron desires to succeed himself and W. I. Vawter of Medford also has yearnings to be ranked among the lawmakers of the state.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, March 26, 1894, page 3


    C. C. Beekman would be strongly supported for governor, but he positively declines to enter the contest.
"Republican County Convention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 2, 1894, page 2



    Says the Salem Statesman: In a letter to a friend in this city the statement is made that Hon. C. C. Beekman, of Jackson County, positively announces that he is not a candidate for the nomination of Governor on the Republican ticket, neither will he accept the same if it were tendered him.
"From Thursday's Daily," Dalles Times-Mountaineer, April 7, 1894, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman and Miss Caroline Beekman, who have been visiting relatives in Bath, left Monday evening for Rochester, where they will visit for some time before returning to their home in Oregon.
"Bath's Budget," Hammondsport Herald, Hammondsport, New York, April 25, 1894, page 5


    C. C. Beekman and family, who are now at San Francisco, are expected at home in a short time.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 14, 1894, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter, have returned from their eastern visit of many months.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 21, 1894, page 1


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter, Miss Carrie, arrived last Thursday from a nine months' eastern trip.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, June 28, 1894, page 1


    C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter Miss Carrie, have returned home from the East after almost a year's absence.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, June 28, 1894, page 3



    C. C. Beekman, the Jacksonville banker, is in Portland.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, July 26, 1894, page 3


    A party consisting of T. G. Reames and Dr. DeBar and their families left today for Crescent City, Calif., to spend a few weeks at the seashore. Miss Carrie Beekman and Henry Orth accompanied them.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1894, page 3


    Dr. Geo. De Bar, Gen. T. G. Reames and their families, Miss Carrie Beekman and Henry Orth arrived here Sunday evening from Crescent city. They had a pleasant trip.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, August 23, 1894, page 3



A Society Event.
    Miss Carrie Beekman gave a handsome social at her residence on California Street Wednesday evening, in compliment to her cousins, Misses Mae and Stella Dorris of Eugene, who are paying Jacksonville a visit at present. A number of young ladies and gentlemen participated in the entertainment and spent the time very pleasantly. Progressive whist was indulged in until after ten o'clock, Miss Jo. Orth and Chas. Nickell being awarded the principal prizes, while Miss Jo. Nunan and Mr. Dunham of Medford captured the booby gifts. The company then did justice to a toothsome repast, after which they were favored with instrumental music by Miss Carrie Beekman and singing by Misses Dorris, Cronemiller, Linn and Miller, Messrs. Selby, Horton and Miller, also a recitation by Miss Louise Kubli, all of whom acquitted themselves admirably. It was nearly one o'clock when leave was taken of the clever hostesses.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 20, 1894, page 3


    Mrs. G. E. Dorris and daughter, Miss Stella, who have been visiting friends and relatives in Jacksonville for the past fortnight, returned home to Eugene Monday evening. Miss Mae Dorris will remain some time longer as the guest of Miss Carrie Beekman.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1894, page 3


Grants Pass Fire.
    The losses by the fire which occurred at Grants Pass last week were as follows: Palethorpe's bakery, loss $300, no insurance; Howard & Fayle, building, $400, no insurance; Strohecker building, $300, no insurance; J. R. Williams' fixtures in butcher shop, $100, no insurance; J. R. Gage, buildings occupied by Williams and also McGregor's restaurant, loss unknown, insurance $675; Dr. Will Jackson, dental instruments, $200, no insurance; Beekman & Reames, building, $200, no insurance; J. W. Howard, damage to building, $100, insured; Mrs. Stone, damage to building $250, insured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1894, page 4


    B. B. Beekman, one of the most prominent young lawyers of Portland, arrived here this morning for a short visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1894, page 4


    Benj. B. Beekman, of Portland, arrived on Monday's southbound passenger to visit old-time friends.
    Miss Mae Dorris left for her home at Eugene, after a pleasant visit of a month with relatives. She was accompanied by Miss Carrie Beekman, who will spend some time in the Willamette Valley.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, October 11, 1894, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, who has been paying relatives and friends at Jacksonville a visit, starts for Portland this evening.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 11, 1894, page 3


    Miss Mae Dorris, who has been paying her sister, Mrs. Hugh Thompson of Salem, a visit, is now visiting Portland. Miss Carrie Beekman is still at the capital city.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 22, 1894, page 3


    Huffer & Beekman on their Jackson Creek ledge realized $108 from 8 lbs. of concentrates run through the Selby Co.'s smelters in San Francisco.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, November 1, 1894, page 1


    C. C. Beekman, the Jacksonville banker, went to Portland last week accompanied by his wife and daughter.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, November 22, 1894, page 1


    From forty pounds of quartz a sum of $1000 was realized a few days ago from the Beekman-Huffer ledge. It is reported that they have struck a vein of pure silver.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, November 22, 1894, page 3



    C. C. Beekman returned from Portland on Tuesday, accompanied by his wife and daughter, Miss Carrie.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1894, page 4


An Old Landmark Gone.
    The oldest building in Jacksonville, and probably the most ancient in this part of the state, was torn down during the week, having been weakened and rendered dangerous by the high wind of Tuesday afternoon. It stood on the corner of California and Third streets, opposite the U.S. Hotel, and was built by Richard Dugan for Cram, Rogers & Co., who conducted an express business in connection with Adams & Co. on this coast in 1852. When Adams & Co. failed in 1856, which will be remembered by all old settlers, the business and building fell into the hands of C. C. Beekman, who continued to carry express until 1863, when he was succeeded by Wells, Fargo & Co. This historical structure has been successively occupied as a saloon, telegraph office, store, and finally as a warehouse by J. Nunan, who removed his goods from it a few months ago. It belonged at the time of its demolition to Mrs. J. M. McCully. The buildings erected at the same time that it was [erected] have been destroyed in one way or another. For many years it has stood [as] the last relic of the eventful days of the settlement of Southern Oregon, a silent memento of the times and men that were and are now no more.--[Times.
Ashland Tidings, April 15, 1895, page 1


    J. H. Huffer, who has taken out some $3000 on the Huffer & Beekman ledge on Jackson Creek this spring, took out 16 lbs. of ore a few days ago that is nearly all gold.
"Mining News," Valley Record, Ashland, May 23, 1895, page 3



    Another pocket of gold and silver ore was taken from the Beekman & Huffer ledge on Jackson Creek lately, which is much richer in gold than anything yet discovered in this ledge. No estimate of the value of these finds can be made on account of the rock being rich in both silver and gold.
"Mining News," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 6, 1895, page 1


    Ben Beekman, the Portland lawyer, is visiting his folks at Jacksonville.
"Personal and Social," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 20, 1895, page 3


    J. H. Huffer went to San Francisco Tuesday to buy either a three- or five-stamp quartz mill to be placed on the Huffer & Beekman quartz ledge on Jackson Creek, which has been turning out some very rich ore of late, the last cleanup realizing $1,200. The mine has already earned more than the mill will cost.
"Mining News," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 20, 1895, page 3


    R. M. Garrett and A. R. Thompson are at work on the Beekman & Huffer quartz mine on Jackson Creek, having a contract to take out 50 tons of ore and doing some cross-cutting. J. H. Huffer returned Sunday from San Francisco, where he bought a 3-stamp mill and steam outfit, which will arrive this week and be put to work.
"Mining News," Valley Record, Ashland, July 4, 1895, page 3



    Beekman & Huffer's new quartz mill is being put up on their Jackson Creek ledge.
"Mining Items," 
Valley Record, Ashland, July 18, 1895, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman and daughter, Miss Carrie, left Jacksonville Tuesday for Portland and Mr. B. will join them next week for their eastern visit. Miss Carrie will make a year's tour in Europe with a party of friends.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, July 25, 1895, page 3



    Cornelius Beekman of Portland, Oregon, has been a guest at A. Beekman's this week.
"Purely Personal," The Plaindealer, Bath, New York, November 23, 1895, page 7


    BEEKMAN, C. C., of Jacksonville, was born in New York City, January 27, 1828. In 1850 he came round the Horn to San Francisco. He went to the northern mines, and in 1853 became an express messenger between Yreka, Crescent City and Jacksonville. In 1856 he embarked in the express business on his own account. In 1863 he became Wells, Fargo & Co.'s agent at Jacksonville, where he was resided ever since, and is engaged in the banking business. Mr. Beekman is a successful business man, and is recognized as the leading man of affairs in Southern Oregon. He has been repeatedly school trustee, city trustee and mayor. He has been a prominent and active Republican, and in 1878 was the Republican nominee for Governor, being defeated by only 49 votes. He has held many positions of trust in the party, and is considered as one of the strong, clean men to whom it can turn in time of need.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 182


    Huffer & Beekman's 3-stamp mill is crushing ore from their Jackson Creek ledge.
Valley Record, Ashland, January 2, 1896, page 3


     We neglected to note in our last report that C. C. Beekman and wife have returned from their extended eastern visit. Their daughter, Miss Carrie, will spend the winter in Berlin, Germany and will visit Egypt before her return to the United States.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, January 10, 1896, page 1


    Beekman & Huffer's quartz mine near Jacksonville made a handsome cleanup this week, but they won't make known their returns.
"Personal and Social," 
Valley Record, Ashland, January 23, 1896, page 3


    John Jacobs, who has been milling for Huffer & Beekman's mine on Jackson Creek, went to Siskiyou county Monday to put to work a new concentrator that he received a patent on a few months ago. He will put it at work on the McCook mill on Humbug. One of the principal features of the concentrator is that it will cost only half as much as ordinary concentrators now on the market.
Valley Record, Ashland, February 6, 1896, page 3


    E. G. Hurt of Medford is engineer for the Beekman-Huffer mine near Jacksonville and has moved his family there for the summer.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, March 19, 1896, page 1


    Huffer & Beekman, who have been making some extensive improvements on their Jackson Creek quartz mine, start up their mill this week on a lot of rich ore.
"Mining Items," Valley Record, Ashland, June 25, 1896, page 3



    Miss Carrie Beekman, who has been in Europe over a year, returned to Jacksonville Sunday. Her father met her at Portland.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, January 14, 1897, page 1


    Hon. C. C. Beekman, of Jacksonville, regent of the U. of O., is in the city.
"Wednesday, June 16," Eugene City Guard, June 19, 1897, page 7


    C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter, Miss  Carrie, left for San Francisco Tuesday on a pleasure trip.
"Personal and Social," 
Valley Record, Ashland, August 19, 1897, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman and daughter, Miss Carrie Beekman, returned home from Jacksonville Tuesday from a stay of some three months, visiting in San Francisco.
"Jacksonville Jottings," 
Valley Record, Ashland, November 18, 1897, page 3


    E. W. Calkins came over from the Beekman & Huffer mine, near Jacksonville, last Saturday for a visit to his friends and to his lodge--the Odd Fellows. He reports mining fairly good at the mine. Says with a three-stamp mill he put through thirty-five tons of rock in seventy-five hours. He has been cleaning up some refuse rock during the past week and from a four days' run on this rock they took out over $200 in gold. The rock was supposed to be of no value.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, May 27, 1898, page 6


    SAN FRANCISCO, Aug. 19.--The steamer Pomona sailed today with the following passengers:
    For Santa Barbara--C. C. Beekman, wife and daughter . . .
"Steamer Passengers," Los Angeles Herald, August 20, 1898, page 4


    C. C. Beekman, the well-known banker of Oregon, is at the Grand with his family.
"Around the Corridors," San Francisco Call, August 10, 1898, page 6


    C. C. Beekman, a prominent general merchant of Portland, is at the Grand.
"Around the Corridors," San Francisco Call, October 19, 1898, page 6


    Cornelius Beekman of Jacksonville, Oregon, brother of Abram and John Beekman of this village, has been selected by Governor Geer of Oregon to be one of the three commissioners to represent that state at the Paris Exposition in 1900.
"Local Brevities," Steuben Advocate, Bath, New York, April 26, 1899, page 2


    Cornelius Beekman, a former Dundee boy, has been appointed by the governor of Oregon to represent that state at the Paris Exposition next year.

"Dundee," Penn Yan Democrat, Penn Yan, New York, May 12, 1899, page 8   I can find no confirmation that Beekman was appointed; it's unlikely he attended.


    C. C. Beekman, a banker of Portland, Or., is at the Grand with his wife.
"Around the Corridors," San Francisco Call, July 14, 1899, page 6


    Hotel St. George: C. C. Beekman and wife . . .
"Yesterday's Hotel Arrivals," Evening Sentinel, Santa Cruz, August 31, 1899, page 4


    Attorney B. B. Beekman returned to Portland Saturday after spending the holidays in Jacksonville.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, January 4, 1900, page 1


A Dead Pioneer.
By the Associated Press
    ASHLAND, Or., Feb. 23--Thomas G. Reames, an Oregon pioneer and one of the best-known men in the state, died at his home in Jacksonville last night. Together with his father he was one of the employees of the Hudson Bay Company in Oregon Territory, but moved to Southern Oregon upon the discovery of gold there. He became associated with C. C. Beekman in the banking house of Beekman & Reames, the pioneer bank in the southern half of Oregon. He was at one time prominent in Oregon politics and was widely known in Masonic circles, of which order he was past grand master of the state.
San Jose Herald, February 23, 1900, page 8


General Reames Dead.
Special Dispatch to The Call.
    MEDFORD, Feb. 22.--General Thomas G. Reames of Jacksonville died last night after a brief illness. He was a partner in the banking house of Beekman & Reames and a pioneer leader in Democratic politics. He leaves a large family.
San Francisco Call, February 23, 1900, page 6


    Attorney B. B. Beekman of Portland was on yesterday's train en route to Lakeview to attend circuit court.
"Personal and Social," 
Valley Record, Ashland, May 17, 1900, page 3


    Ben Beekman visited his folks at Jacksonville Friday and Saturday en route home to Portland from Lakeview.
"Personal and Social," 
Valley Record, Ashland, May 31, 1900, page 3


    C. C. Beekman and wife, of Jacksonville, are guests of the Portland.
"Personal Mention," Oregonian, Portland, June 16, 1900, page 7



    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned to Jacksonville last week from a visit at Eugene and Portland. Mr. Beekman is a regent of the University of Oregon.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 28, 1900, page 1


    Hon. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman, Mrs. Gus Newbury and Miss Bernice Cameron of Jacksonville and Miss Nellie Towne of Phoenix arrived today for the concerts.
"Chautauqua Personals," 
Valley Record, Ashland, July 19, 1900, page 3


Mrs. Caroline Barbara Hoffman, Prominent Pioneer.
    ASHLAND, Or., Sept. 10.--Mrs. Caroline Barbara Hoffman, one of the most widely known of the pioneer women of Southern Oregon, who a few days since sustained severe injuries from a fall, died at her home in Jacksonville last evening. She was a native of Maryland, and came to the Rogue River Valley in 1852. Six daughters of the deceased survive her--Mrs. C. C. Beekman, Mrs. David Linn and Mrs. J. C. Whipp, of Jacksonville; Mrs. M. H. Vining, of Ashland; Mrs. George B. Davis, of Eugene, and Miss Kate Hoffman, of this city.
Oregonian, Portland, September 11, 1900, page 4


DIED.
HOFFMAN--In Jacksonville, Sept. 9, 1900, Mrs. Caroline Barbara Hoffman, aged 86 years, 9 months and 12 days.
    There were present at her bedside the following children: Mrs. Mary Vining, Ashland, Mrs. C. C. Beekman, Jacksonville, Mrs. D. Linn, Jacksonville, Mrs. Geo. B. Dorris, Eugene, Mrs. J. C. Whipp, Jacksonville, Miss Kate Hoffman, Jacksonville. The funeral took place at Jacksonville Tuesday afternoon. Mrs. Hoffman was a highly esteemed pioneer lady of Jackson County, coming here with her husband, the late Wm. Hoffman, in 1853. She has raised a family of children who live in the high esteem of all.
Valley Record, Ashland, September 13, 1900, page 3


    B. B. Beekman of Portland opened the campaign in Lake County last week for the Republicans.
"Klamath County," 
Valley Record, Ashland, October 18, 1900, page 1


    Ben B. Beekman arrived yesterday from Lakeview and will visit the folks at Jacksonville a few days before returning to Portland.
Valley Record, Ashland, October 18, 1900, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville went to San Francisco Saturday on a visit.
"Pressed Bricks," 
Valley Record, Ashland, December 6, 1900, page 1


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned to their home in Jacksonville, from San Francisco, Wednesday evening. They were accompanied by their daughter, Miss Carrie.
"Jacksonville," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, December 23, 1900, page 15



    Ben B. Beekman returned to Portland Saturday from a visit with his folks in Jacksonville.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, January 3, 1901, page 1


    Rev. Mr. Knotts, the missionary, held interesting services at the Presbyterian church Sunday. Mrs. Fletcher Linn of Portland, an accomplished vocalist, sang a solo, accompanied by Miss Carrie Beekman on the organ, which is highly complimented by all who heard it.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1901, page 5


    Miss Carrie Beekman has instituted a reading circle, which will meet semi-monthly at the homes of its members. The circle met for the first time at the residence of C. C. Beekman, on California Street, on Thursday afternoon. Mrs. Geo. DeBar was appointed reader and Mrs. Susie Neil critic. A sketch of the "Life of Queen Elizabeth" was given for the entertainment of the circle, after which a delicious luncheon was served by the hostess.

"Jacksonville News,"
Medford Mail, February 22, 1901, page 3


    John A. Boyer, the clever clerk at Beekman & Reames' bank and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office, who has been quite ill for some time, is convalescent, we are pleased to announce.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1901 page 3


The Biggest Transfer Yet.
    The Times learns that the big mining syndicate, represented by J. W. Opp and C. C. Beekman, have completed negotiations whereby the former has become possessed of some valuable mining property, situated in Jackson Creek district. The consideration is said to have been $25,000. This means much to the future of Jacksonville, as no doubt one or more valuable ledges will be discovered there. The pioneer town of Southern Oregon may yet become its principal one. Full particulars will be given in our next issue.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 28, 1901, page 3


A $100,000 REDUCTION PLANT.
J. W. Opp Will Have It in Operation on the McWilliams-Casey Mine Near Jacksonville July 1st.
    J. W. Opp was up from Jacksonville Tuesday accompanied by four mining men from the East. Mr. Opp this week purchased an additional 180 acres of mining ground from C. C. Beekman near Jacksonville, making in all 200 acres, together with 5-stamp quartz mill, water rights, etc., the price being $25,000 cash. This property adjoins the Gold Standard mine of McWilliams Bros. and P. S. Casey, which Mr. Opp has under bond and will purchase at maturity. The latter property has been developed by some 500 feet of tunnel, some of it costing $10 to $20 per foot by the hand process. There is a ten-stamp mill on this property. The Beekman and Huffer mine has also been developed.
    Mr. Opp leaves this week for Denver where he will purchase an extensive roller crushing process, concentrators and cyanide plant which he will place on this property. The mine will also be equipped with compressed air machine drills with which to do the development work.
    The entire plant will cost $100,000 and will be by far the most complete mining outfit in Southern Oregon and one of the best in the state. Besides doing their own work they will crush ore for the general public, purchasing the ore delivered at the mill at an assay value and charging $1.50 per ton for crushing. The roller process will be a large concern in two parts. This first part will be a machine that will crush the coarse ore and run it over five concentrators. The next will crush it fine and run it over four concentrators. A first-class cyanide process plant will then finish the work. It is expected that the plant will be in operation by the first of next July.
Valley Record, Ashland, February 28, 1901, page 3


    C. C. Beekman, J. W. Opp and J. H. Huffer went to Medford today, to complete the transfer of a considerable area of valuable mineral ground, situated in Jackson Creek district.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1901, page 7


    The first payment of $5000 to C. C. Beekman by J. W. Opp for 200 acres of land in the Jackson Creek district, which includes the Holman ledge, mill, etc., has been made. The new proprietors will immediately commence the development of the property.
Oregonian, Portland, March 10, 1901, page 5


    The popular and reliable banking firm of Beekman & Reames, which has been doing business in Jacksonville for a number of years, will be dissolved April 1st, owing to the death of the junior member thereof. The business will be continued by C. C. Beekman, who has been prominently identified with the best interests of Southern Oregon for about half a century, nearly all of which time he has been engaged in banking and as agent of Wells, Fargo & Co. at Jacksonville. In point of solidity and reputation this bank stands second to none in the state. It has the best wishes of everybody.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1901, page 5



    J. H. Stewart, Roberts & O'Neil, W. S. Crowell, Horace Pelton and others have disposed of their stock in the Medford Bank. It is stated that C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville, the pioneer banker, has become one of the principal stockholders of the institution, although he denies it. J. E. Enyart and Geo. R. Lindley will respectively continue to act as cashier and bookkeeper, having given general satisfaction.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1901, page 5


    Jacksonville Reading Circle held its last meeting at the residence of Mrs. W. M. Colvig, on April 12th. Those in attendance, besides the hostess, were Miss Carrie Beekman, Mesdames Susie Neil, Florence DeBar, Lucinda Reames, Tillie Robinson, Anna Beach; also Mrs. W. T. Reames of Gold Hill. Mrs. DeBar was the reader, continuing the subject perused at the previous session.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1901, page 7


    J. A. Boyer, a prominent Odd Fellow of Jacksonville, left for Portland Sunday evening. H. G. Dox is filling his place at Beekman's bank and express office during his absence.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1901, page 7


    The annual meeting of the board of directors of the Medford bank was held in Medford on Monday of this week. The books of the bank, and all the institution's transactions during the year were carefully looked into, and everything was declared to be in a very satisfactory condition. The officers elected were H. E. Ankeny, president; J. H. Stewart, vice president; J. E. Enyart, cashier; M. L. Alford, assistant cashier. Mr. Stewart, who has been the bank's president since its organization, two years ago, declined a reelection, owing to other business which requires his personal attention. The stockholders of the bank are H. E. Ankeny, J. H. Stewart, C. C. Beekman, R. H. Whitehead, Horace Pelton, Ben Haymond, James Pelton, W. H. Bradshaw and J. E. Enyart.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 14, 1901, page 7


    At the annual meeting of the stockholders of the Medford Bank the following officers were elected: President, H. E. Ankeny; Vice President, J. H. Stewart; Cashier, J. E. Enyart; Assistant Cashier, M. L. Alford. The stockholders are: H. E. Ankeny, J. H. Stewart, C. C. Beekman, R. H. Whitehead, Horace Pelton, Ben Haymond, James Pelton, W. H. Bradshaw and J. E. Enyart.
Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, June 20, 1901, page 1



    John A. Boyer, cashier of Beekman's Bank at Jacksonville, who is suffering from a cancer on the face, went to Portland last week to consult a homeopathic doctor about his case. On the 13th he was found in his room partially paralyzed. He returned to Jacksonville Sunday accompanied by a trained nurse.
"Medford," Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, June 20, 1901, page 3



    Hon. William Colvig and daughter, of Jacksonville, Oregon, visited at John Beekman's this week.
"Purely Personal," The Plaindealer, Bath, New York, June 23, 1901, page 2


    Abram Beekman has shown us a copy of the Democratic Times, published at Jacksonville, Ore., in which is contained an account of "The Failing and Beekman Prizes." These prizes are given to the two students at the state university of Oregon who present the best and next best original orations at graduation. The first prize is the income of $2500 and the second prize the income of $1600, and they are given annually. The Beekman prize was founded by Mr. Cornelius C. Beekman, a brother of Messrs. Abram and John Beekman, of this village. In Corning there are two prizes given annually, the Wellington and Olcott prizes, at commencement. Both prizes doubtless create a livelier interest in school life, and it is strange that Haverling has never been favored in this manner.

"Local Brevities," Steuben Advocate, Bath, New York, July 17, 1901, page 2


    Jacksonville Reading Circle held another of its delightful meetings--at the residence of Mrs. Dr. Robinson last Thursday afternoon, which was attended by Miss Carrie Beekman, Mesdames Miller, Whipp, Reames and Beach.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1901, page 7


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman went to Ashland this morning, to meet their son, B. B. Beekman of Portland, who has been selected to deliver an address during the memorial services which will be held in that city.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1901, page 5


    B. B. Beekman of Portland, and his sister, Miss Carrie Beekman of Jacksonville, have left on a trip to New York, and will visit different points of interest before returning.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1901, page 7


    The Jacksonville Reading Circle spent a pleasant afternoon at the residence of Mrs. C. C. Beekman last Thursday.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 3


    C. C. Beekman is having the foundation laid for an addition to his residence on California Street. A commodious kitchen, pantry, bathroom and other conveniences will be added.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, October 25, 1901, page 3


    A. C. Nicholson and assistants, of Medford, are engaged this week in building an addition to C. C. Beekman's residence.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, November 8, 1901, page 3


    A. T. Robinson, the expert plasterer and brick mason, will be in Jacksonville tomorrow (Friday). Those needing his services will find him at the residence of C. C. Beekman.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1901, page 5


    A. T. Robinson, an expert plasterer and brick mason, will be employed at C. C. Beekman's residence in Jacksonville Tuesday, Wednesday and Friday of this week, and those needing his services can then give him their orders. He guarantees satisfaction.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1901, page 7


    Miss Carrie Beekman, who has been visiting different points in the East for the past two months, arrived in Portland last Saturday.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, December 13, 1901, page 3


    B. B. Beekman of Portland has returned from his trip to New York.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1901, page 5


    Contractor A. C. Nicholson is engaged these days in building an addition to the residence of banker Beekman, in Jacksonville.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 20, 1901, page 7


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman, Jacksonville.
"At the Hotels: The Portland," Morning Oregonian, December 30, 1901, page 8


    Miss Carrie Beekman, who has been visiting in the East and at Portland during the past several months, returned home one day last week.
    B. B. Beekman, a prominent attorney of Portland, spent the holidays in Jacksonville. He was accompanied by his mother, Mrs. C. C. Beekman, on his return to the metropolis.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1902, page 3


    Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned Friday from a short visit in Portland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1902, page 5


    John A. Boyer, who has been suffering with a cancer in his face for about a year, died last Tuesday morning. The funeral will take place today, under the auspices of Jacksonville Lodge No. 10, I.O.O.F., and Ruth Rebekah Degree Lodge No. 4, of which he was a prominent member. Mr. Boyer was a resident of Jacksonville for more than a quarter of a century, and always had the highest esteem of the whole community. He was engaged in merchandising for a few years, succeeding his father in the store on California Street after his death. Afterward he entered the employ of C. C. Beekman, with whom he remained until physically unable to perform his duties. The soul of honor, kind and accommodating, he will be missed by many.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1902, page 5


    John A. Boyer died in this city Tuesday morning, at the age of seventy-three. A native of Pennsylvania, Mr. Boyer has lived in Jacksonville continuously for more than a quarter of a century. He leaves no relatives except a sister and nephew residing in Philadelphia. Modest and unassuming, an honorable, upright gentleman he was in every sense of the word. The funeral took place from the Odd Fellows hall Thursday afternoon, under the auspices of Jacksonville Lodge No. 10, I.O.O.F., and Ruth Rebekah Lodge No. 4, of which deceased was an honored member. The remains were laid beside those of his father in the I.O.O.F. burying ground.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, January 24, 1902, page 3


    John A. Boyer, who died at Jacksonville last week, aged 73 years, had long been a resident of that place and for 25 years was Wells-Fargo agent and employed in the Beekman Bank. He was a prominent member of the I.O.O.F. lodge, at one time serving as grand master. He was a single man.
Valley Record, Ashland, January 30, 1902, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman left for San Francisco Tuesday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1902, page 5


    SAN FRANCISCO, June 4.--Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman, of Oregon, registered at the Palace Hotel today.
Oregonian, Portland, June 5, 1902, page 14


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman have gone to San Francisco to meet a brother of Mr. Beekman, who will return with them for an extended stay in this section.

"Jacksonville Items," Medford Mail, June 13, 1902, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman returned home to Jacksonville Monday from their trip to San Francisco. They were accompanied home by his brother, Mr. and Mrs. De Witt Beekman of Dundee, N.Y., who attended the Mystic Shrine convention in San Francisco.
"Personal and Local," 
Valley Record, Ashland, June 19, 1902, page 1


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman, who went to San Francisco lately, have returned. They were accompanied home by DeWitt Beekman of Dundee, N.Y.,  Mr. B.'s brother, who will visit here several weeks.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1902, page 2


    B. B. Beekman, an attorney of Portland, arrived Saturday for a short visit.
"Medford," Valley Record, Ashland, July 3, 1902, page 3


Will Boom Things.
    The Iowa Lumber Co., who bought the Beekman-Linn timber land three miles back of Jacksonville, will erect two saw mills with 60,000 feet per day capacity, extend the branch railroad and put in a box factory, so manager Williams reports.
Valley Record, Ashland, July 3, 1902, page 2


    B. B. Beekman, of Portland, arrived here last Saturday to spend a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, July 4, 1902, page 3


    B. B. Beekman left for Portland Sunday evening, after a visit of several days in Jacksonville.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1902, page 5


Buy Timber and Will Build Mill.
    MEDFORD, July 8.--The Iowa Lumber Company, of Council Bluffs, Ia., has purchased 1500 acres of sugar, yellow and white pine lumber of Beekman & Linn, of Jacksonville, and will commence at once the erection of two mills. The timber is situated one mile from Jacksonville. The work on the mills and the extension of the Rogue River Valley Railroad to the timber will be begun at once. The company will erect a box factory, either at Medford or Jacksonville. A strong effort will be made to secure it for Medford.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, July 10, 1902, page 4



    Mr. and Mrs. DeWitt Beekman, of Dundee, N.Y., who have been visiting C. C. Beekman and family, left for Portland on Tuesday of last week on their return home.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, July 25, 1902, page 3


    DeWitt Beekman, who with his wife has been the guest of his brother, C. C. Beekman, and his family, has returned to New York state.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1902, page 5


    Miss Carrie Beekman left Monday for Portland, where in company with her brother, B. B. Beekman, they will leave for a tour of the Yellowstone Park.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, August 1, 1902, page 3


    C. C. Beekman & wife, Jacksonville.
"At the Hotels: The Portland," Morning Oregonian, August 3, 1902, page 7



    Hon. C. C. Beekman, who came to Portland yesterday for the purpose of attending the meeting of the State University regents, is the guest of his son, B. B. Beekman, at the Hotel Portland. Mrs. C. C. Beekman and Miss Beekman are also at the Portland.
"Personal Mention," Sunday Oregonian, August 3, 1902, page 8


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman left for Portland Friday. They will not be gone long.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1902, page 6


    C. C. Beekman and wife left the latter part of the week for Portland.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, August 8, 1902, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Beekman have returned from Portland, where Mr. Beekman went to attend a meeting of the regents of the state university.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, August 15, 1902, page 3


    B. B. Beekman, the Portland attorney, and his sister, Miss Carrie, have returned from their trip to the Yellowstone Park. Miss B. has since gone to San Francisco, where she will visit for some time.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1902, page 5


    Miss Carrie Beekman has gone to San Francisco for an extended visit.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, August 29, 1902, page 3


    Miss Carrie Beekman returned to Jacksonville Tuesday. During her absence she made a trip to the Yellowstone Park, in company with her brother, B. B. Beekman of Portland, of which they speak in the highest terms.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1902, page 1


Lumbering at Jacksonville.
    J. N. Williams, general manager of the Iowa Lumber Company, who recently put up a sawmill on the tract of timber which his company bought a few months since from Beekman & Reames and David Linn, near Jacksonville, reports that the sawmill is now in operation and that a goodly amount of lumber is now on the yard, much of which is being used in the construction of buildings for the company's use. It is the intention of the company, Mr. Williams states, to build a tramway from the mill to connect with the Medford-Jacksonville shortline at Jacksonville.
Valley Record, Ashland, October 16, 1902, page 1


AN IMPORTANT WORK.