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The Infamous Black BirdSouthern Oregon History, Revised


Notes on Rogue Valley Photographers
Notes on individual photographers. Photographers are often mentioned in association with others' studios; be sure to search the entire page. Click here for unidentified photographers and more general local photography notes.
   
Some information taken from Thomas Robinson's Oregon Photographers. See also Peter Palmquist's "Camera Fiends and Kodak Girls in Southern Oregon 1850-1950."

A-M CARD CO.
Postcards with the same company name and distinctive handwriting also exist from the company's sojourn circa 1910 in the Crandon, Wisconsin area. The A-M numbering system overlaps those of Western Card Co. (q.v.). 
    The A. & M. Photo Company have taken several splendid photographs of the firemen and the hose wagon. The firm is composed of E. X. Anderson and O. McDonald. They are now engaged in group and commercial work in Medford.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, July 2, 1909, page 5
    E. X. Anderson and [Orton] McDonald, scenery photographers, left here for Northern California the last of the week.
"Social and Personal," Medford Daily Tribune, September 30, 1909, page 5
    Married--Edwin X. Anderson and Miss Agnes Peil, Sunday, December 26, 8:30 a.m. at the home of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Peil, East Medford, W. Theo. Matlock officiating. The happy young couple left on the 10:35 train Sunday morning for Fresno, Calif., where they will make their home for a short time only, as they expect to return to Medford soon.
"Social and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1909, page 3
The 1910 census lists Edwin as a photographer in Fresno. He apparently returned to Medford in the 1920s--see "Edwin X. Anderson," below.

ABELL & WELSH
(Ashland/Jacksonville 1876-77, Kerbyville, Roseburg, Cottage Grove, Eugene 1877+)
F. G. Abell, John Oliver Welsh

    Mr. Abell, the superior photograph artist, left for Ashland last Saturday to take pictures at that place. Our Ashland neighbors will find him to be one of the finest artists in the country.
"Yreka Notes," Ashland Tidings, November 11, 1876, page 3

    NEW PHOTOGRAPH GALLERY.--Messrs. Abell & Welsh, late of Yreka, are putting up a building in front of our window for a photograph gallery. They will be ready in a few days to accommodate those who desire a first-class picture. They come well recommended as artists.
Ashland Tidings, November 11, 1876, page 3

    MR. ABELL, photographic artist, desires us to say that it makes no difference whether the weather is cloudy or not for taking pictures, and that his time is positively limited. Those wanting pictures govern themselves accordingly.
Ashland Tidings, November 18, 1876, page 3

    If you want photographs of superior quality and finish taken, bear in mind that Abell & Welsh have put up a building on the corner of California Street, opposite Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office, where they will remain for a few weeks only. . . . Gallery open every day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 6, 1877, page 3

    GOOD PICTURES APPRECIATED.--The crowds that are thronging the gallery of Messrs. Abell & Welsh show that the people know where to obtain first-class work, and in consequence they are rushed with business. Don't delay or you may be too late.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 24, 1877, page 3

    Persons wishing photographs of their residence, business house, horses, cattle, etc., should call on Abell & Welsh, as they make a specialty of doing outdoor work. Low prices to suit the hard times.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1877

    ABELL & WELSH, photographers, have gone to Kerbyville, and will remain there three weeks.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 11, 1877, page 3

    Frank Abell, of Abell & Welsh, photographers, who has been sojourning among us for some months, accompanied by his wife, left us this morning on a professional trip northward. He is a No. 1 artist and a sociable and liberal gentleman and we wish him success wherever he may go.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1877, page 3

    . . . we reach Jacksonville at 7. Here I had the pleasure of grasping the hand of Frank Abell, Mr. Welsh's partner in the photographing and mining business. He passed most of the winter in Ashland, I believe, and is to start tomorrow at 3 a.m. for Roseburg . . . we finally reach Canyonville at 6:30. Here Mr. Welsh leaves us. He will take pictures here for awhile, then move elsewhere.
"Notes on the Way to Oregon," Pacific Rural Press, San Francisco, July 7, 1877, page 2
    Everybody should bear in mind that the celebrated artists--Messrs. Able & Welsh--will not be with us always. This is the best chance ever offered the citizens of Eugene and surrounding country to obtain really superior pictures. Bear in mind also that they are only transient and will remain but a short time longer, as their engagements in other places makes their time positively limited.
"Brief Mention," Eugene City Guard, September 1, 1877, page 3
    Abel & Welsh are now in Eugene City.
Oregon Sentinel, September 5, 1877, page 3

    F. G. Abell, at one time a well-known photographer, but now traveling in the interest of some lodge, was in the city Saturday.
"Jacksonville Items," Medford Mail, January 10, 1902, page 3

FRANK GEORGE ABELL
(San Francisco 1862-66, Stockton 1866, San Francisco 1867-70, Grass Valley 1872-75, Red Bluff 1875, Yreka, 1876, itinerant, Ashland, Jacksonville 1876-77, Roseburg 1877, Eugene 1877, Portland 1878-88, Jacksonville 1883, Corvallis 1886, Colfax, Washington 1888, San Francisco 1889-94, Portland 1897-1907, Tacoma 1910)
    Frank Abell has leased the photographic rooms of Bosco & Megler in Portland and located in that city.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 30, 1878, page 3
    Frank Abell has one of the finest selections of photographs to be found anywhere on this coast.
Willamette Farmer, Salem, May 9, 1879, page 3
    Mr. Frank Abell, acknowledged to be the finest photographic artist in Portland, has rented Mr. Britt's establishment for a short time, and those wanting pictures had better call soon. Mr. Abell is in poor health and leaves his large business in Portland only temporarily in order to regain it. He has the beautiful setter dog with him that won the silver cup in California last year.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 18, 1883, page 3

    Abell, the leading photographer of Portland, has leased the photograph gallery of Peter Britt for a few days and will be pleased to see any and all of his old friends and patrons of the past. Negatives only will be made here, all work will be finished at the Portland gallery. Those wishing photographs will not delay, as his time here is short. The instantaneous dry plate process will be worked for children. The gallery will be in running order Monday afternoon.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1883, page 3
    BABIES WANTED.--That's nothing strange--everybody wants babies except crusty old bachelors, but this time Abell the photographer wants them--twenty per day--in order to take lifelike pictures of the little sweets. His specialty is taking children's pictures, and those fortunate enough to have their children's pictures taken during his short stay will find them finished in the highest style of the art. A look at his specimen copies at Mr. Britt's gallery will be sufficient proof of his ability.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 25, 1883, page 4
    TAKE NOTICE.--Frank G. Abell, the well-known Portland photographer, returned home on a visit this week but will be back again next Thursday when he will stay here another week taking pictures at Britt's gallery. He will then go to Ashland for a short time before returning home. Mr. Abell is one of the best artists on the coast, and those wishing good pictures should call at once. Children's pictures a specialty.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 8, 1883, page 4
    HAVE YOUR PICTURES TAKEN.--Frank G. Abell, the well-known Portland photographer, is now at P. Britt's gallery, engaged in taking pictures. He has a reputation second to no artist on the coast, and our citizens are therefore afforded a good opportunity to have their photographs taken in the highest style of the art. He makes a specialty of babies' pictures, using the dry-plate process. Negatives alone will be taken, and the work finished at the Portland gallery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 14, 1883, page 3

    Frank G. Abell returned from Portland on Friday's stage and will remain with us another week taking photographs at Britt's gallery. Call soon, as he will not remain longer than the time mentioned.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 15, 1883, page 4
    Frank G. Abell, the photographer, went to Ashland this week, where he will take pictures for those who desire first-class work.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 22, 1883, page 3
    A photograph of one pier of the new Rogue River railroad bridge was taken by Frank Abell last week. The bridge will be a most substantial one, and among the finest on the route of the O.&C.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 29, 1883, page 3
    Frank G. Abell, the photographic artist, returned to Portland this week after a short stay in the valley. He done some fine work while here.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 13, 1883, page 3
    Frank G. Abell and wife will leave for Boston about January 1st, and thence for Rio de Janeiro, South America, to remain five years. Mr. A. has sold his photograph gallery to E. W. Moore.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 3

    Frank A. Abell, at one time a well-known photographer in this state, but of recent years making his home at Ottawa, Canada, is visiting in Portland.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1898, page 3
    D. C. Herrin and wife, and Frank Abell have gone into the photograph business at Portland. All are well known in this country.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1898, page 3
    Frank G. Abell, who is well known to many citizens of Jacksonville as a photographer, having operated here many years ago, is again in the valley. He is deputy supreme president of the Order of Lions, a new and popular fraternal order, and is organizing lodges.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1901, page 7

ADM

Overlapping ADM logo--see D. M. Averill. Postcard publisher.

George W. Ager, May 16, 1916 Oregonian
GEORGE W. AGER (1911-1920)
Talent, Oregon. Postcards often titled with spaced-out all-caps rubber-stamped inscription.
    . . . Prof. George W. Ager, the newly elected principal of the village schools, was called upon to tell what was planned for Talent in that line. Prof. Ager stated that it was planned to add the first two years of an accredited high school course to the Talent schools; that hereafter pupils could get credits on work in Talent which would enter them as juniors in any accredited high school in the state.
"Banquet Is a Success," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1913, page 3
    George W. Ager and son Cecil went to Butte Falls Saturday forenoon.
"Talent News Items," Ashland Tidings, August 4, 1913, page 3
    George W. Ager is building an addition to his woodhouse which he built after his house was destroyed by fire, and will continue to occupy it as a residence during the winter. He contemplates building a first-class residence next summer.

"Talent News Items," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1913, page 3

    Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Burgan, Mr. and Mrs. Peter Vandersluis, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Thomas and Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Ager motored to Grants Pass Sunday in the Burgan and Thomas cars.

"Talent News Items," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1914, page 3

    G. W. Ager returned from a fishing trip on Rogue River.
"Talent and Vicinity," Ashland Tidings, August 23, 1915, page 3
G. W. Ager Out for County School Supt.
    Ex-Rural School Supervisor G. W. Ager, superintendent of the Talent schools, in asking for nomination on the Republican ticket for the office of county school superintendent of Jackson County, advocates (1) economy in the superintendent's office, (2) supervision by the superintendent, (3) education for efficiency.
    Mr. Ager received his early education in Minnesota, where he was employed as principal of a town school for six years before resigning in order that he might cast his lot in the far West. The first fifteen years of his life were spent on the farm, and being of poor parentage, much of his life has been a struggle for educational advancement. He has always maintained a progressive attitude toward the teaching profession, however, and in order to keep abreast of the times and familiarize himself with the western school systems, he has taken special courses in school administration, rural and city school supervision, and many other educational subjects during four different sessions in the University of Oregon and in the University of California.
    Professor Ager, who has been in educational work in this county for the past eight years, was for two years rural school supervisor in eastern and southern Jackson County. He resigned the position to go back into the Talent schools, where he had formerly taught for two and one-half years at a salary of $35 a month over that which he had previously received in the same school. Mr. Ager is still superintendent of the Talent schools, where he has been unanimously elected to the same position for another year, but seeks a position for which he has made special preparation and for which he has long aspired.
Ashland Tidings, February 28, 1916, page 1
    G. W. Ager and family have returned from a motor trip to Portland, where Professor Ager attended the N.E.A.
"Jacksonville," Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1917, page 5
    The Industrial Club members of the Tolo school [were] accompanied by Mr. G. W. Ager to the club meeting at the Dardanelles school Friday.
"Tales from Tolo," Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1918, page 4
    Prof. G. W. Ager, our school superintendent, drove over this Wednesday morning, left his auto here and took the railroad motor car for Butte Falls.

A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1919, page 6

    Earnest Carpenter, A. S. Bliton of Medford, G. W. Ager, our county school superintendent, and W. G. Morrow of Grants Pass were here for dinner Thursday.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail Tribune, May 24, 1920, page 6
    G. W. Ager, who recently resigned from the office of county superintendent of the public schools, left the first of this week for Vale, where he will assume a more remunerative position. Mr. Ager states that he has enjoyed the work in Jackson County and regrets very much that his work will take him beyond the Rogue River Valley, where he hopes someday to return to make his home.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Weekly Tidings, August 18, 1920, page 4

JOHN W. AID
(1891-92)

    J. W. Aid has recently been taking some excellent photographic views of Talent and surroundings, which are establishing a reputation for good work in that line that will stand him in good stead in the future.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 3

    J. W. Aid, our local photographer, has lately taken some fine views of Talent and vicinity. Johnny is establishing a reputation as an artist.
"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, May 22, 1892, page 2

    John Aid of Talent is in town canvassing for handsome photographic views and is meeting with considerable success.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 3
    John W. Aid, the Ashland photographer, was in town this week delivering views he took here on Decoration Day. His firm does excellent work.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3
    J. W. Aid, the photographer, went to Hornbrook Tuesday to begin photography work in Siskiyou County. Mr. Aid makes a specialty of farm scenes, family groups and outdoor views of all kinds and has been doing considerable satisfactory work in those lines in Southern Oregon, and will no doubt meet with like success in Siskiyou County.
Ashland Tidings, June 24, 1892, page 3

    John W. Aid, the Ashland photographer, is now in Siskiyou County, and will doubtless do a good business.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3
    J. W. Aid, the enterprising artist, writes from Beswick, Cal., that he is at present hard at work for the Klamath River Lumber Co., but that he has ordered a new lens in place of the one broken by the upsetting of his cart a few weeks ago, and will soon resume his favorite occupation of photographic viewing. Johnny has had to do some lively rustling to repair the damage to his outfit, but he has the fortunate facility of turning his hand to nearly every kind of employment, and to overcome difficulties with comparative ease.
Talent News, August 15, 1892, page 1

    John W. Aid of Pokegama will start a photograph gallery at the lumber town in a short time.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1893, page 3
    J. W. Aid came in from Pokegama on the 3rd on a short visit to relations and friends. He has purchased the Logan photographic outfit which he takes back with him. He had some fine views, which he had taken, of the log chute on the Klamath, the dam at Pokegama and others. Mr. Aid is an artist of no mean ability. He returned last Saturday.
Talent News, May 15, 1893, page 4

    J. W. Aid, now of Pokegama, last week bought the Logan photographic outfit at Ashland, and will employ it in his gallery over the hill.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3
    J. W. Aid has taken his departure from Ashland for Pokegama, to open a photograph gallery there.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1893, page 3
    J. S. Aid has settled up with the company and after a visit in Jackson County will go south to seek a location for a photograph gallery.
"Pokegama Notes," Valley Record, Ashland, June 21, 1894, page 4
    John W. Aid went to Wheatland to start a photo gallery.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, July 19, 1894, page 4


ALBERTYPE CO.

Brooklyn, N.Y. postcard publisher

R. M. ALLEN (1909)
    R. M. Allen was yesterday taking some photographic views of prominent buildings and street scenes, etc., to be used in a souvenir pamphlet which he is expecting to have ready in a couple of weeks.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, June 4, 1909, page 5
    Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Allen left yesterday for Portland, where they expect to remain.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, July 23, 1909, page 8

ALVERSON (1876)

    A young fellow named Alverson, who had a photograph gallery at Ashland for a while last summer, recently left the state with a span of horses and a buggy belonging to a relation of his residing at Eugene City, which he disposed of at Tehama, Cal., and left for Nevada. He was accompanied by a stepson of his victim.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1877, page 3


RAY ANDERS
(1934-72)
232 E. Main, 307 E. Jackson, Medford
Anders Photo Shop
    Mr. Ray Anders has bought the Harwood photo equipment, which is valued at $500, at the studio he has opened at his home. Mr. Harwood is now living on the Redwood Highway, and Mr. Anders is working in connection with him. Mr. Anders has done very satisfactory work in the past, and with his new equipment is now able to make enlargements and [he] does all of his own finishing. He specializes in Crystal Kote finish and Kodak work.
Central Point American, April 12, 1934, page 4
    Dwaine E. Smith of 814½ East Jackson St. and Jim W. Anders of 941 Dakota Ave. have filed the assumed business name of Classic Studios at 1110 North Riverside Ave., according to records in the county clerk's office. The business will be concerned with commercial and portrait photography, the certificate said.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1954, page 11
Anders Photo Shop 1966-6-2p3MMT
    Now completely installed in their attractive new store at 307 East Jackson Street in Medford, Anders Photo Shop will begin their opening celebration activities this week. The long-established Medford firm, with six staff members, occupy the location next to the Rogue Ski Shop, with access to downtown and residential areas and ample customer parking.
    The opening celebration will feature special values and prizes, owner Jim Anders announced. Moving to the new location has made it possible to expand display and selling area, studio and commercial darkroom facilities, Anders said.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 3, 1966, page 7

ALFRED J. ANDERSON
(1927-1931)
See California Studio.
Anderson Buys California Studio
    A. J. Anderson, who has had a lease on and operated the California Studio, has purchased the same and changed the name to Anderson's Studio. It is located upstairs at 128 East Main Street.
    Mr. Anderson is an experienced photographer of several years [and] will specialize in portraits but is equipped to do all kinds of commercial work, enlarging, Kodak finishing and color work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1927, page 10
Anderson, Portrait Artist.
    Alfred J. Anderson is one of the leading portrait artists of this section and is ably assisted by Mrs. Anderson. They do general work and specialize in commercial work, indoor and outdoor.
    Their studio is located at 128 East Main, upstairs.
    The Andersons have spent many years in their chosen work and have become experts. They have been in Medford for several years.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1928, auto section, page 8 (page 42)
    A. J. Anderson, owner of the Anderson Studio, will leave Sunday morning for Portland, where he will gain new ideas in photographic art at the Pacific International Photographers' convention. . . .
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 25, 1928, page 2
BARRETT ASSOCIATED WITH ANDERSON STUDIO
    Jack Barrett, veteran photographer of Dallas, Ore., who recently came to Medford with the view of locating here permanently, will in the future be associated with A. J. Anderson in his studio on Main Street.
    Mr. Barrett has been a photographer for the past 30 years and will specialize in portrait work at the Anderson studio. Mr. Anderson plans to devote a majority of his time to outdoor commercial photography.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 16, 1929, page 4
    Anderson Studio Now in New Ground Floor Location, 407 E. Main.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 18, 1930, page 3
ANDERSON STUDIO IN NEW LOCATION
    Anderson's studio of photography will be formally opened at the new location, 407 East Main Street, across from the Piggly Wiggly store, Thursday morning, June 19.
    The new studio occupies a portion of what was formerly the Hall paint store, and it has been completely remodeled and decorated. A red and black color scheme has been carried out in the woodwork and furniture so that the studio presents a pleasing combination of artistic arrangement and color.
    A. J. Anderson has been in the photographic business in Medford for the past five years, in a studio at 128 East Main. His portrait and commercial photographic work, enlargements and coloring have been recognized by leading men in the profession. Mr. Anderson is official photographer for the American Legion Post No. 15, and for two years has been the photographer for the Jackson County Fair Association.

Medford Mail Tribune, June 18, 1930, page 5

EDWIN X. ANDERSON

See A-M Card Co.
    E. X. cider. Try its superior quality. Delivered any place in Medford. Phone 1070, or E. X. Anderson at Public Market, Wed. and Sat.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, November 26, 1926, page 2
    F. J. Huber vs. Edwin X. Anderson et ux.--Foreclosure.
"Circuit Court," Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1913, page 9

J. A. ANDERSON

    J. A. Anderson, a Walla Walla banker, in pursuit of happiness with the private photographic fad raging in him, is snowed in somewhere on the Siskiyous, taking views of mountain sublimity enveloped in white.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1890, page 3


ALFRED J. ANDERSON STUDIO
(1925-31)
128 East Main, Medford
A. J. Anderson ad, January 31, 1927 Medford Mail Tribune
January 31, 1927 Medford Mail Tribune

ANDERSON ASSUMES STUDIO MANAGEMENT
    A. J. Anderson, who has been a resident of Medford for several months, has assumed management of the California Studio, over Marsh's grocery. Under his management a campaign will be launched to make the California Studio one of the best in this city, and the slogan "Portraits of Distinction," which has been adopted by Mr. Anderson, will be followed to the letter with all work from the making of the negative to the finished print will be [sic] done in Medford under his personal supervision.
    Mr. Anderson is well fitted to manage the California Studio, having had years of experience in photographic work in large studios in Minneapolis as well as Butte, Montana and Spokane, Washington.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1926, page 6
Anderson Buys California Studio
    A. J. Anderson, who has had a lease on and operated the California Studio, has purchased the same and changed the name to Anderson's Studio. It is located upstairs at 128 East Main Street.
    Mr. Anderson is an experienced photographer of several years [and] will specialize in portraits but is equipped to do all kinds of commercial work, enlarging, Kodak finishing and color work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1927, page 10

A. J. Anderson's camera (left) reflected in the Crest Confectionery mirror, circa 1928
A. J. Anderson's camera (left) reflected in the Crest Confectionery mirror, Medford, circa 1928

    A. J. Anderson of the "Anderson Studio" arrived home Saturday night Portland, where he attended the annual convention of the Pacific-International Photographers Association. . . . Mr. Anderson exhibited in both the portrait and commercial class, winning a blue ribbon in each class, selection being based on outstanding distinctive examples of photographic work.
"Anderson Is Back from Big Contest," Medford Daily News, September 4, 1928, page 2

WESLEY ANDREWS CO.
Portland, Ore.
postcard publisher
Charles Wesley Andrews
Born: Aurora, Ontario, Canada, December 10, 1875
Died: Portland, Oregon, December 22, 1950
    Wesley Andrews' postcard company began operation in Baker in 1904 and continued in business until the starting of World War I. During the 1920s he moved his business to Portland.
    Coming from the East as a young boy, he and his parents first settled in Canyon City. A short time later they moved to Baker. In addition to his postcard business Andrews served for awhile as publisher of the Morning Democrat.
    He made frequent trips to the Oregon beaches, photographing many sunsets and ocean views. Many of his cards taken along the ocean carry poetry of his own composition.
    The business was sold to Herb Goldsmith. Many of the negatives today are in the files of the Oregon Historical Society.
Edwin D. Culp, "Oregon Postcards," Oregon Historical Quarterly, December 1965, page 309

ANGELO STUDIO (Grants Pass 1909-16)
Angelo 1909-9-10p8RRCourier
September 10, 1909 Rogue River Courier
    For a touch of individuality in lighting and posing go to the Angelo Studio.
"Personal and Local," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, November 5, 1909, page 5
    Artistic photographs, postals, stamp pictures, amateur finishing. Come and see samples at the Angelo Studio, 605 Sixth Street. Mid-summer prices.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, August 12, 1910, page 8
    One-third off on all photos on Dollar Day at the Angelo Studio, 510 Sixth St., opp Court House.
Advertisement, Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 20, 1915, page 3
    The Angelo Studio is preparing to go out of business in Grants Pass. Prints from old negatives or new can be obtained for the next few weeks at reduced prices.
"Personal and Local," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, June 28, 1916, page 4

ARBUCKLE-MORAN (1951-54)
Robert N. Arbuckle, Jack C. Moran
    Business names assumed by various persons Saturday included "Arbuckle and Moran Studio" by Robert N. Arbuckle and Jack C. Moran.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, March 20, 1951, page 9
Photographers Named by Festival Officers
    Ashland, June 16.--Shakespearean festival officers announced today that Jack Moran Jr. and Robert Arbuckle, 5120 Crater Lake Highway, Medford, will do the photography work for the festival program this year.
    The young men attended Los Angeles Art Center school. Moran specializes in portraiture and painting and Arbuckle, who has come here recently to make his home, specializes in photography.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 17, 1951, page 15
Photographers Buy Field Studio Here
    Robert Arbuckle and Jack C. Moran, who have been conducting a photography business here for the past year, have purchased the Field studio in the Leverette building, it was announced today.
    Both young photographers attended the Art Center school in Los Angeles before coming to the Rogue Valley. They did the photographic work for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Association program this summer.
    Moran, in addition to his photographic work, is also a portrait painter and has painted a number of local people.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Field, proprietors of the studio for several years, are retiring to their ranch on Ross Lane on the west side of the valley.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 1, 1951, page 8
    To Portland--Jack Moran Jr. and Bob Arbuckle, who operated the former Arbuckle and Moran photographic studios here, left today for Portland, where they plan to enter photographic business.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 25, 1954, page 15

ART-RAY

Charles Arthur Payne and Leslie Rae Payne, Crescent City
postcard publishers. Charles was the photographer.

ARTCRAFT CAMERA SHOP
(Grants Pass 1927-1982)
    [Philip Franklin] Brainerd was born Nov. 9, 1913, in Havre, Mont. The family moved to Grants Pass 14 years later, where his father [Philip A. Brainerd] opened a photography shop, Artcraft.
"Brainerd Studio Is Sold to J. C. Wilson," Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1995, page B2
    Starting in his teen years, he worked with his father and brothers at the Artcraft Camera Shop and Portrait Studio. On his return from World War II, he took over ownership of Artcraft, installing the first color photo finishing plant in Grants Pass. He retired in 1982.
Obituary of Gordon A. Brainerd, died March 20, 2003; Medford Mail Tribune

ARTVUE POST CARD CO.

225 Fifth Ave., New York, N.Y.
postcard publisher

ASHLAND COMMERCIAL CLUB

Postcard publisher. See Chester Stevenson


DAVID M. AVERILL COMPANY

Portland, Oregon
postcard publisher, manufactured in Germany
   
Souvenir Postal Cards, set of 10, 15¢. D. M. Averill & Co., The Curio Store, 331 Morrison St.
Advertisement, The Sunday Oregonian, Portland, December 15, 1901, page 5

AW/WA Logo
Wesley Andrews Co. (q.v.). When handwritten, logo resembles a flying "A":
Wesley Andrews Logo

CHARLES BACHELER (1902)
    Mr. and Mrs. Bacheler, of Sardine Creek, passed through Medford Saturday en route to Klamath County, where Mr. Bacheler will do photographing.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 20, 1902, page 6


ALFRED LESLIE BAILEY (1900-1904)
See Dunlap & Bailey

    A. L. Bailey, the young photographer of Phoenix, has been visiting friends and relatives in this vicinity the past week.
"Missouri Flat Items," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, November 18, 1900, page 2
    Leslie Bailey returned to his home last week from Medford where he has just finished [learning] the photographer's trade under George Mackey.
"Provolt Items," Medford Mail, February 7, 1902, page 5
    Lester [sic] Bailey has opened a photograph gallery in Jacksonville. He is an expert workman.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 5
    A. L. Bailey has moved his photograph tent to the Neil property on Fifth Street, opposite the court house.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1902, page 5
    L. Bailey, the photographer, who has been at Jacksonville for some time, is now in Medford. He recently returned from Jump-off Joe district, where he took some excellent views.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
July 23, 1902, page 5
    Leslie Bailey returned to his home last week from Medford, where he has just finished [learning] the photographer's trade under George Mackey.
"Provolt Items," Medford Mail, February 7, 1902, page 5
    Lester Bailey, the photographer, has laid aside his camera and is selling confectionery, cigars and soft drinks at Jacksonville in company with W. H. Miller, having bought C. T. Davidson's interest.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1904, page 2

    A. L. Bailey, who has been a partner with W. H. Miller in the confectionery and notion business, has sold his interest in the store to Mr. Miller and will resume his trade of photographer. The firm has had a good trade this summer, but Mr. Bailey does not like the confinement of the store, preferring the outdoor life in traveling about the country with his photograph tent. He left this Friday for Applegate and from there will tour Josephine County.
"Local News Notes," Jacksonville Sentinel, August 12, 1904, page 6

    A. L. Bailey has sold his interest in the Model Confectionery and cigar store to his partner, W. H. Miller, and left for Josephine County Thursday, accompanied by his wife. He is an excellent photographer and will follow that business hereafter.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1904, page 1
    Mr. Lester Bailey, who was formerly in partnership with W. H. Miller in the confectionery business here but who sold out during the summer and has been traveling and doing photographic work, was over Monday from his home on the Applegate and visited friends here.
"Local Briefs," Jacksonville Sentinel, November 25, 1904, page 3

F. M. and C. A. BAKER (BAKER BROS.)
(1895-1896)
    F. M. and C. A. Baker have fitted up the photograph gallery, on North B Street, and about the first of November they expect to be able to open their place for business. Some five or six years ago these gentlemen were in the grocery business in this city.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 25, 1895, page 8
    Baker Bros., photographers, have a new display ad in today's Mail. The gentlemen have fitted up a very cozy gallery on North B Street, to which they invite all parties in quest of first-class work, and at figures that are reasonable.
Medford Mail, November 1, 1895, page 8

    C. A. BAKER left Tuesday evening for Redding, Calif., at which place he will do mine photographing.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, January 10, 1896, page 5

    My prices for cabinet photos still continue at $1.50 and $2.00 per dozen. F. M. Baker, B Street.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 21, 1896, page 5
    C. W. Corson has opened a paint shop in one of Palm's buildings, south of the Western. He is now engaged in doing scenic painting for F. M. Baker's photo studio.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, March 13, 1896, page 5
    F. M. Baker, the photographer, has added several new scenes to his studio parlors--all of which but tend to make his place more beautiful and attractive.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, April 3, 1896, page 5
    Baker, the photographer, has decided to take to field work again, and will, within a few days, commence doing mining and farm viewing. H. L. Miser will have charge of his studio in Medford, and the same is being rearranged and refitted.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, May 8, 1896, page 5
    The Medford Gallery, on North B Street, formerly occupied by Baker Bros., has been reopened with H. L. Miser at its helm and is prepared to make anything in the line of photography at reasonable prices and with satisfaction to its patrons.
Excerpt, Medford Mail, July 3, 1896, page 8
Twelfth Street Studio
    F. M. Baker will open his Twelfth Street studio on Saturday, September 21st, and on that day will make first-class cabinet photos, on that day only, for $2.00 per dozen. All other work from stamp photos up, done in first-class style.
"City News," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 17, 1907, page 5
    F. M. Baker--Twelfth Street photographer. All kinds of photo work done at living prices. Call and see my work and prices. Viewing a specialty; also headquarters for amateur developing and finishing. Cabinet photographs $3.00 per dozen. Between Woolen Mills and O.K. Store.
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 21-October 14, 1907, page 7

FRED H. BAKER
(1951)
128 East Main, Medford
    Open Soon--Baker's Commercial Photographers announced today that they expect to open their shop Tuesday, February 27. A complete line of equipment recently arrived for the new business from Portland and Los Angeles, they said.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1951, page 12

    Closes Studio--Photographer Fred Baker reported that he has closed his studio here to accept a foreman's post on the Lookout Dam project in the Eugene area. His family will remain here through the summer.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, June 22, 1951, page 15


MAUD BALDWIN

    Mrs. Tweed Coburn returned to Grants Pass Tuesday with her babe, having recovered her voice again which had almost been destroyed by the la grippe. Her sister Miss Baldwin of Mrs. Tyler's photograph gallery went with her.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, August 6, 1891, page 3

    Miss Maud Baldwin, who has been employed in Camps' photo gallery for several months, returned to Klamath Falls yesterday.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, February 27, 1902, page 3
     Miss Maud Baldwin, whose picture is shown, is engaged in the photograph business at Klamath Falls. She is the daughter of County Judge George T. Baldwin, one of the ludest [sic] merchants in the county.
"The Woman on Horseback," Oregon Journal, Portland, March 19, 1905, page 33
    Mr. [sic] Baldwin, Klamath Falls, Oregon
"Oregon's Photographers," Oregon Journal, Portland, September 8, 1907, page 14

CORA BALDWIN
    The Tyler photograph gallery at Ashland has been reopened, being now conducted by Geo. H. Tyler, assisted by Miss Cora Baldwin, who for a long time prior to the death of Mrs. Tyler had been connected with the establishment, and who understands all the detail work.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1893, page 3
    Geo. H. Tyler has become possessor of the Wirth Photo Co.'s gallery in Medford as well as the plant which he owned, in Ashland. Mr. Wirth is badly involved. Miss Cora Baldwin is in charge of the gallery in Ashland and Tyler is running things at Medford.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, Oregon, January 24, 1895, page 3
    Miss Cora Baldwin, who has been employed in Mrs. I. M. Barnard's photograph gallery, returned to her home in Ashland Sunday.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, October 28, 1898, page 3


DAVID BALL

    David Ball has his photo tent in town.

"Woodville Items," Medford Mail, November 29, 1901, page 3

MRS. FRED BALL

See Edith Hayden Jones Bell


DAISY L. AND
GEORGE G. BANCROFT
    The Picture Mill, located on the block west of the First National Bank in this city, is now open for business. . . . The Picture Mill will specialize upon high grade portraiture and will do a general photographic business. Call and inspect the new studio and convince yourself that Grants Pass has at last secured an attractive, convenient and modernly equipped Picture Mill.
"The Picture Mill Is Now Open for Business," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, September 27, 1917, page 4
    The building in which the late A. T. Lewis conducted a studio has been completely remodeled, and it now shows the distinctive artistic taste of the proprietor, Mrs. Geo. Bancroft, who with her husband spent many days in planning and weeks in carrying out the plan. The equipment is of the very latest and includes a modern flash-light apparatus for use on dark days or in home portraiture.
"Bancrofts Open a Well-Equipped Photo Studio," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 7, 1917, page 5

BARDELL ART CO.
San Francisco
postcard publisher
    Errand boy wanted; must have had some experience in printing office. Bardell Art Printing Co., Sierra Bldg., Front and Clay.
San Francisco Call, November 3, 1912, page 69

BARKALOW BROS.

Railway News Service, Omaha, Nebraska
postcard publishers

MRS. ISABEL MARY BARNARD
(circa 1894-99)
    Our photographer, Mrs. Barnard, is going away for the summer and is taking pictures at greatly reduced rates. Mrs. Barnard does first-class work and has a liberal patronage.
"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, February 21, 1896, page 1

    Mrs. I. N. Barnard has reopened her photograph gallery at Central Point, where she will be until Nov. 15th. Prices reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 16, 1896, page 7

    Perry Ellis has opened a photograph gallery at Central Point in Mrs. Barnard's old stand, and will locate there for the winter.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, December 4, 1896, page 7
    Perry Ellis, the photographer, of Prospect, has leased Mrs. Barnard's gallery for the winter.
"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, December 11, 1896, page 3

    Mrs. J. C. Barnard opened her photograph gallery last week and is having all the work she can do.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, June 11, 1897, page 3

    Miss Cora Baldwin, who has been employed in Mrs. I. M. Barnard's photograph gallery, returned to her home in Ashland Sunday.

"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, October 28, 1898, page 3

    Mrs. I. M. Barnard has closed her photograph gallery and is making preparations to leave Central Point about May 1st. Her numerous friends will regret her departure and hope to have her again among us in the near future.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1899, page 2

GEORGE ALFRED BARROWCLOUGH
(circa 1906-10)
    Barrowclough briefly shot and sold postcards in Medford, apparently on his return from a photographic expedition to the San Francisco earthquake zone.

JOHN BASS
(Ashland 1952)
    It's not too early to have your child's portrait made for Christmas gifts. John Bass, Photography of Children & Pets, Rm. 1, 31½ N. Main (above Perrine's).
Advertisement, Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1952, page 8

H. T. BAUGHMAN
(Medford, circa 1907)
H. T. Baughman Stereoview, Rogue Valley
    H. T. Baughman.will be in Independence and vicinity for the summer. He has been teaching in the vicinity of Medford, but his term closed a few weeks ago. Mr. Baughman has been doing considerable work in photography and will devote his leisure hours during the summer to making a large number of Western Oregon scenes.
"Independence," Polk County Itemizer, Dallas, June 27, 1907, page 4

ROBERT VINTON BEALL

    Vint Beall of Central Point precinct has gone to Berkeley, Calif., where he will attend the deaf-mute college.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 10, 1893, page 3
    Vintie Beall, of Central Point, was displaying some of his kodak work at the Nash Hotel the other day. The pictures are all very fine and show an artist's hand in their finish.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, April 28, 1899, page 6
    A Mail reporter was this week shown some photographic work done by Vintie Beall, who is at Effingham, Ill., where he has been attending a school of photography since last February. The work is marvelously fine--best work your reporter has ever seen--embracing several new methods in photography. Vintie has graduated from the institution and is now casting about for a position with some big photograph house. For the time being he is an instructor in one of the departments in the institution from which he graduated.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 12, 1900, page 7

    R. Vinton Beall, of Central Point, a recent graduate of an Illinois school of photography, and who has been in that capacity in North Carolina for some time, has been called to New Orleans to assist during the Mardi Gras in that city. He will be employed on one of the highest branches of the photographer's art--that of carbon printer, at a good salary. Vinton has a large number of friends in this county who will be elated to learn of the flattering success he is achieving in his chosen profession. He may remain in New Orleans permanently.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 22, 1901, page 7

    Vint Beall of Central Point is at New Orleans engaged in the photographing business and may locate in that city.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, February 28, 1901, page 1

    R. Vinton Beall, Jr., was in Medford several days this week visiting relatives and friends. He has lately returned from New Orleans, where he has been engaged in the photographing business, and will remain here until fall.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 6
R. Vinton Beall ad, July 11, 1902 Medford Mail
July 11, 1902 Medford Mail
Beall's Photos.
    It is conceded that Pacific Coast photos beat the world when done by an expert. Realizing the need of this valley in this line and the advantages which a rural gallery offers in perfecting this line of work. Mr. R. Vinton Beall, a graduate of the Illinois College of Photography at Effingham, Illinois, has just completed the installation of a thoroughly modern and up-to-date plant in his recently erected studio at the Beall ranch, two and one-half miles north of Medford, and is now ready to arrange sittings for family groups, schools, child portraiture, all styles of adult photos, commercial and still life work. So complete is the gallery equipment that weather conditions cut no figure and the display of samples of the artist's handicraft will convince anyone that a new era has dawned in Jackson County photography. As suggested in Mr. Beall's advertisement in another column, it would be as well to arrange for sittings, as delays in photography are always to be avoided if possible.
Medford Mail, July 11-18, 1902, page 2
An Up-to-Date Gallery.
    The Medford Mail newsman, in his search for the ever-exclusive new item, visited the photographic gallery, recently built by R. Vinton Beall, on his father's (R. V. Beall) place three miles north of Medford. The building is 16x24 feet, with 12-foot walls, and no ceiling to interfere with his light arrangements, which are absolutely perfect, having sky and sidelights in plenty which, with curtains and backgrounds, enable him to control the light, and this prevents his pictures from being rendered unsightly by one side being too dark and the other too light. His largest camera cost $65, and the lens for it cost $135 in New York City, and it is of the best make on the market. He has his studio well supplied with all the accessories that add to the unique effects desired by many persons in their photos.
    Mr. Beall is a graduate of the Illinois College of Photography, taking the full two years' course.
    At the close of his school work he was instructor in carbons for several months, after which he went to Asheville, N.C., and then returned to Oregon, for he was not content except in old Jackson County. At the college he learned photography as an art, for in addition to being an expert in all the mechanical details, he thoroughly understands posing, a feature little understood by many photographers, as is proven by the awkward figures made by many persons who have been posed by them. Mr. Beall does all the latest in photography, including carbons, platinotypes, platinos, veloxes, opals and transparencies.
    Mr. Beall is also a practical chemist and has quite a laboratory in his dark room, which is one of the most complete in Oregon. Mr. Beall's work speaks for himself, for it is equal to the best that is done in any of the galleries in this state.
Medford Mail, July 25, 1902, page 2
The Unrivaled Carbon!
    The art gems of photography, whose beauty, artistic value and absolute permanence cannot be excelled by any other process. The acme of perfection in photography the world over. Made in some fifteen different colors on paper, celluloid, porcelain, ivory and opal glass. BEALL MAKES 'EM. The Wayside Studio, 2½ miles north of Medford.
Medford Mail,
July 25, 1902, page 7

    Horace Nicholson has had on exhibition lately some very fine photographs of the Ray dam near Tolo with historic Table Rock as a background. The pictures are finely finished and show a complete mastery of the photographic art. They are the work of R. Vinton Beall, of the Wayside Studio. Mr. Beall's work is all high class, and his studio is equipped with everything in the way of modern facilities for the making of fine photographs, and the operator knows how to handle them so as to get the best results.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 3, 1902, page 7
    Vinton Beall of the Wayside Studio, the popular artist, is kept busy. His work is of a superior quality and pleases all.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1903, page 1

    Vintie Beall, from near Central Point, was in Jacksonville Tuesday greeting the many friends he has in this town. Mr. Beall has a photographic gallery at the home of his father, Vinton R. Beall, that is one of the most complete in Southern Oregon. Mr. Beall as an artistic photographer has few equals in this state; his work, both of persons and of scenery, is of a very high order. His work both in posing, style and finish cannot be excelled by any gallery in Southern Oregon or even in Portland.
"Local Notes," Jacksonville Sentinel, May 29, 1903, page 6

    Vinton Beall, the clever artist, is doing much of the excellent work for which he is noted. Among his latest productions are photographs of Miss Centenna Rothermel as queen of the Grants Pass carnival, in a number of poses, which are really fine and reflect much credit on Mr. B. [The glass negatives for those poses are archived at the Southern Oregon Historical Society Research Library.]
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1903, page 3
    R. Vinton Beall, who conducts the Wayside photograph gallery at Central Point, was in Jacksonville Monday accompanied by his mother, who was here to attend the funeral of the late John E. Harvey. Mr. Beall, who holds the reputation of being one of the best photographers in Southern Oregon, has not been well much of the time this summer, but he is in good health and he is getting out his photographic work on time now and he is having a fine patronage.
"Local Notes," Jacksonville Sentinel, September 4, 1903, page 7


FRANK W. BECK

San Francisco, Woodland, Fresno

    Dr. Patterson, his brother, Henry Patterson, and Frank Beck, a photographer, all of Visalia, Cal., Alex. Ireland and Joe Delk, of Medford, and J. Crit Tolman, of Ashland, returned a few days ago from a 6 weeks' hunting trip for big game through the wilds of Curry County. They followed the Illinois River for three days' travel with their pack outfit, then went south into the Curry County mountains. . . . Mr. Beck had a complete photo outfit along and took a large number of views of interesting scenes met with.
"Elk, Bear and Deer," Ashland Tidings, September 30, 1895, page 3
    Alex. Ireland returned last week with his hunting and pleasure party. The party consisted of Dr. J. Patterson, Frank Beck, a photographer, Henry Patterson, a farmer, all of Visalia, Calif., Crit Tolman, of Ashland, and Joe Delk, of Medford. . . . The object of the trip, so far as the California parties were concerned, was to have a good time and take photographs of the several places of interest which they visited, and of the pictures they gathered in just an even one hundred and four--all of them different scenes.
"Slew Plenty of Deer," Medford Mail, October 4, 1895, page 1
    Mr. Ireland has but recently received letters from Dr. Patterson and photographer Beck, the gentlemen who were here last summer from Visalia, Calif., stating that their party of six would be here about July first prepared for a four months' hunt in the mountains.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 28, 1896, page 5
    Fortunately, in proof of these statements, Mr. F. W. Beck, a well-known photographer of San Francisco, formed one of the party. True to his trade he carried his camera, and views were taken from time to time of the progress and success of the expedition.
"Hunting in Southern Oregon," Overland Monthly, August 1897, page 146
    Beck Brothers, the photographers, have secured a large photograph of Jim Walker, the first sheriff of Fresno County. . . .
"Jim Walker Photographed," Fresno Weekly Republican, February 17, 1899, page 5

BECK'S PHOTOGRAPHIC GALLERY

    A new photograph gallery has been started in town.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1877, page 3
    Photographic artists have opened their camera in the building formerly occupied by Abell & Welsh.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 17, 1877, page 3
    Ferrotypes made at reduced prices for the next 30 days at Beck's opposite Sentinel.
Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, September 12, 1877, page 3
    Pictures made and delivered in ten minutes at Beck's Photographic Gallery, opposite Sentinel office.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 19, 1877, page 3


RICHARD BEHRENDT
San Francisco, Cal. postcard publisher. Cards manufactured in Germany

BELL ART STUDIO
(1942-44)

    Bell Studios, new photographic studio at 109 East Main Street in this city, will open Saturday, according to an announcement by Dave Bowman. The new studio, under the management of Mr. Bowman, will specialize in hand-painted portraits in oil. Latest-type Cooper-Hewitt lightings and professional Hollywood backgrounds will be employed by Bell Studios, with emphasis upon theatrical poses and speed film for photographs of children and tiny babies. . . . Dave Bowman, one of the owners and the general manager of the Bell Studios in this city, comes from Klamath Falls, where he has managed a similar studio for some time.
"Bell Studio to Open Here with Bowman Manager," Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1942, page 5
    Bell Art Studio on East Main Street has undergone a complete remodeling and redecoration during the past three weeks, and is now open to the public with new floors, drapes, counter and other redecoration features. A new darkroom has been installed for Kodak finishing.
    The local photography studio was opened in March of 1942, and is affiliated with Bell Studios in Klamath Falls and Eugene. M. C. Stott of Portland is proprietor of the chain, which employs 35 persons, and Edna P. Myers is manager of the Medford studio. Mrs. Myers, who has been here two and a half years, returned last month from a three-month vacation.
"Bell Studio Undergoes Entire Redecoration." Medford Mail Tribune, July 9, 1944, page 5
NOTICE
Bell Studio closed. All undelivered orders may be called for at the Hotel Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 8, 1945, page 3


NOAH S. BENNETT
(1880s-1906)
Portland harbor, N. S. Bennett stereoview
    Mrs. N. S. Bennett was in Medford last week taking orders for panoramic views of the Rogue River Valley which her husband has but recently taken and developed. The views are taken from a prominent point on the east side of the valley, and they include all of the country from Pilot Rock, near Ashland on the South, to Table Rock on the north. The views show all the towns in the valley and also Mt. Shasta in California. They make a very fine present to send to friends in the East. Especially well are they suited for this as they give strangers a very good idea as to the length and width of the valley. Mrs. Bennett was quite successful in her sales, and those whom she has not already seen she will call upon later.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 6, 1903, page 7
    From the Klamath Falls Republican: N. S. Bennett, a photographer of Medford, arrived in the city Saturday on his way to Crater Lake, where he expects to get some fine pictures of winter scenery around the lake.

"Klamath County News," Medford Mail, March 11, 1904, page 3

    N. S. Bennett returned Sunday from a two weeks' trip to Klamath County. He spent a good part of his time in the Wood River Valley--where the snow was from two to three and a half feet deep--but he provided himself with snowshoes and succeeded in securing several fine views of that picturesque country. He was not, however, fortunate in getting views of Crater Lake, as there was a storm on every day during his five days' stay near the lake.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 18, 1904, page 4

    If you want to give your friends in the East some idea of what scenes in Southern Oregon are like, you send them a collection of the stereo views taken by N. S. Bennett. These views comprise a wide range of subjects and thoroughly cover the scenery of Southern Oregon. They can be had either at the Medford Book Store or at H. B. Nye's.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, July 8-August 26, 1904, page 1

    N. S. Bennett is in the Butte Creek section this week, looking after his homestead. Mr. Bennett expects to leave in a few days on an extended trip up and down the coast, taking views of various points of scenic interest. After a visit to the Shasta country he will go north, take in the exposition, climb Mt. Hood, Rainier and other high peaks. Mr. Bennett will travel in the interest of a large eastern firm engaged in the making of stereo views.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1905, page 5
    N. S. Bennett:--"You want to know about my summer trip north. Well, it would take quite a while to tell all of it and more space, probably, than you could spare. I made the trip to the summit of Mt. Hood and spent several days taking views of the glaciers on the mountain. I put in quite a spell in Eastern Oregon, making pictures of the big harvesting outfits in the Columbia River bottom, and had a good time all around, coupled with considerable exposure and hardships, and, in the getting of the Mt. Hood views, no little danger. I had considerable trouble in getting views of interiors of the buildings at the fair. They wouldn't allow me to enter the grounds with my regular camera, so I was obliged to get a 'Brownie.' I got them just the same."
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, September 22, 1905, page 1
    N. S. Bennett has gone to San Francisco to secure photographs of the ruins.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 27, 1906, page 4

    N. L. [sic] Bennett and family spent July 4 on the snow-capped summit of Ashland Peak. Photographs were taken of the children playing in the snow and making a snowman.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, July 6, 1915, page 2

THEODORE W. BENTON

    Theodore W. Benton of Colusa, California is touring Oregon taking views of scenery for an eastern publication.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1911, page 5

BIGELOW, DAVIS & HURSHER
(1888)

   
Messrs. Bigelow, Davis and Hursher [Herscher?] are traveling over the county taking photographic views and a description of the country.

"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, June 14, 1888, page 3

BIGELOW & BROTHER
(1890)

    We are being visited by some itinerant photographers.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 2

    Bigelow & Brother, photographers, are here and will remain for a month.
"Central Point Items," Ashland Tidings, October 31, 1890, page 2

F. E. BIRGE
(1896)

   
F. E. BIRGE returned Sunday from a quite extended trip in the Illinois Valley country. He was there looking after mining matters. While en route and at the mines he took fifty kodak views which will make up a collection of rare grandeur, as this particular route is especially noted for its grand scenery. Mr. Birge states that he saw some gold nuggets while away that were beauties and of no small value.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 17, 1896, page 5

CHARLES F. BIXBY
(1909-12)

   
Chas. F. Bixby arrived in Grants Pass Saturday to enter the photographic business, and he has leased the former Loveridge studio, next back of the Hotel Layton. Mr. Bixby was in the business in Los Angeles for many years until three years ago, when he went to Alberta, Can. At that time he considered Grants Pass a possible location, but he was desirous of a more decided change of climate. He says he does not care to spend another winter in Alberta. He has rented a house at 621 South Fourth Street and expects Mrs. Bixby and the children to arrive soon.
"Personal and Local," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, September 10, 1909, page 3

   
As one of the sidelights on the recent raids by Josephine County and Grants Pass authorities on "blind pigs," James Bixby, a photographer of that city, was shot in the shoulder by Chief of Police Rowley. The shooting occurred during the service of a search warrant upon the home of Fred Wickman, in which sixty gallons of liquor was confiscated by the officers.
"Photographer Shot During Raid on Grants Pass 'Blind Pig'; Cries of Holdup Alarms," Medford Sun, February 25, 1912, page 1

    A bill for expenses and damages of $5263 was presented to the city council of Grants Pass by C. F. Bixby, a photographer, who was shot in the shoulder during a whiskey raid in February.
"Brief News of Oregon," The Madras Pioneer, October 3, 1912, page 4
    Miss Cora Coutant . . . discovered C. F. Bixby, formerly of Grants Pass, now conducting a studio in Denver.
"Bixby in Denver," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 16, 1918, page 4

FRANK L. BLAIR
Oregon City 1891, Ashland 1892
    F. L. Blair, of Portland, came out last Tuesday to carry on the photographic business at the Logan gallery.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1892, page 3
    F. L. Blair of Portland is now in charge of the Logan gallery at Ashland, Mrs. Logan having accepted a position in a gallery at that metropolis.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3

    F. L. Blair, who for a time ran the Logan photograph gallery, is employed at Lamb & McAlpin's gallery in Portland.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, April 28, 1892, page 3


BOSTON PHOTO CAR
(1894)

    The Boston R.R. Photo Car went north yesterday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1894, page 3

    The Boston R.R. Photo Car will be at Gold Hill until Monday night, Oct. 29. They do fine work at most reasonable rates. Finest cabinets only $2.50 per dozen.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1894, page 3
Elegant Photography.
    The Boston Photo Co. have arrived in Jacksonville with their car and will remain until next Thursday, December 6th. The excellent character of the work done by them can be seen from the samples displayed, with are first-class in every respect. Their group pictures show much artistic taste, especially in arrangement, and are a radical departure from the usual stiff method of posing. The car will remain open during Sunday for the taking of negatives, and all work done by Monday will be finished before the company leaves. Rain or shine, it makes no difference; in fact, cloudy weather is preferred for taking negatives and finishing them. The new Mantell size, between a card and a cabinet, will be made for $2 per dozen; cabinets $2.50. Call early and get your photographs finished before the car leaves.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, November 29, 1894, page 3
    Stormy weather preferred for taking pictures at the Boston Photo Car. Satisfaction guaranteed at prices to suit the times.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 6, 1894, page 3
Remains Awhile Longer
    On account of the storm the Boston Photo Car will be held in Jacksonville another Sunday. All sittings made by Sunday, the 10th inst., will be finished before the car leaves. Stormy or cloudy weather good for sittings. Don't miss the last opportunity. Come and see 50 photos of your own people made by us.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 6, 1894, page 3
    Robison's [sic--Boston?] photograph car, No. 13, was on the side track Tuesday night, having arrived from Jacksonville, where it had been for the last two weeks. It was taken to Sisson, Cal., on No. 32 Wednesday morning.
"Bits of Local Railroad News," Medford Mail, December 14, 1894, page 5

    The Boston Photo Car will be here next week from the 17th to the 20th of the month. Now will be the time to get the finest sun-picture of yourself to present to your best girl.
"Sacramento Canyon Pick-Ups," Dunsmuir News, December 15, 1894, page 3
    There is much complaint among some of the patrons of the Boston Photo Co., whose car was sidetracked in Jacksonville for a few weeks not long ago. They say that they paid in advance for photographs which were to be finished at once, but have heard nothing from them or the photographers. Unless they square themselves soon those artists must be considered as itinerant frauds.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 27, 1894, page 3


F. H. BOYD
    F. H. Boyd, a photographer of Grants Pass, who was formerly in business here, was in the city Wednesday.
"Personal Mention," Oregon City Courier, August 31, 1906, page 5

HENRY J. BOYD
(Eugene 1891, Lebanon 1893-1901, Jacksonville 1901, Ashland 1902, Medford 1902, Ashland 1903-17)
    H. J. Boyd, our photographer, informs us that owing to the bad condition of the roads it will be impossible for him to be in Florence as he expected. He will come later in the season.
The West, Florence, Oregon, June 9, 1893, page 3
    Mr. H. J. Boyd, a photographer of Eugene, has rented the photograph gallery in Courtney's brick, and will be ready for business about the middle of October. Mr. Boyd has been with F. A. Rankin at Eugene for the past four years, which fact speaks very favorably for his skill as a photographer, that gallery having the reputation of turning out a fine grade of work.
"Expressions," Lebanon Express, September 29, 1893, page 5
    H. J. Boyd pitched his photograph tent at Shedds this week. His brother Jim will run it during the summer, and will send the negatives here to Lebanon, to have the work finished. We will say that those who patronize this tent will get first-class work, as Mr. Boyd is by far the best artist that ever came to this city, and we will say his work will compare favorable with any in the state.

"Expressions," Lebanon Express, April 12, 1895, page 3

Cut This Out.
    It will count you 50 cts. on every $2.00 worth of work, if presented at the Lebanon Art Gallery any time between this date and March 1st, 1896.
H. J. Boyd
Photographer
Lebanon Express, January 16, 1896, page 3
    Boyd the photographer--first-class work.
"S'More Things," Bohemia Nugget, Cottage Grove, April 7, 1899, page 4

    H. J. Boyd and family of Lebanon, Oregon, arrived in Medford last week, and after making several unsuccessful attempts to rent a dwelling house he decided his best and only way to house his family was to make a purchase and proceeded to possess himself of the J. W. Losher residence, on North C Street, paying $700 therefor. The deal was made through the F. M. Stewart real estate agency. Mr. Boyd is a photographer and has purchased an interest in the H. C. Mackey gallery, in the Hamlin block. He is said to be a first-class artist and has been known to Mr. Mackey for the past twelve years.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 5, 1900, page 6
    H. D. Boyd has opened a photograph gallery at Ashland. He is a good workman.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1901, page 7
    The firm of Mackey & Boyd was dissolved last month. H. C. still holds forth at the big tent, while his quondam partner is operating at Ashland.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1902, page 4
    It is a far cry from the "picture gallery" of those days to the modern, up-to-date studio of today, such for instance as that of Mr. H. J. Boyd at 177 East Main Street.
    Mr. Boyd is one of Oregon's native sons, and learned his business under one of the state's best photographers, has since put forth every effort to advance with the times and today is turning out work that is not excelled in large cities.
    He has devoted twenty-four years to photography, eleven years of that time being spent here in Ashland, and we
are confident that his host of satisfied customers in this city and vicinity will bear us out in the statement that he is more than a mere photographer--that he is an artist in the truest sense of the word.
    He specializes in portraiture, but is also prepared to do outdoor view work of all kinds. Mr. Boyd did all the photographic work for the Ashland High School annual this year, and it speaks for itself far more eloquently than we could.
"Boyd's Studio," Business Edition--Ashland Record, magazine supplement, 1912, SOHS M44E3
    H. J. Boyd has rented his studio for a year to Mrs. Wynne Scott of Jules City, Kan. Mr. Boyd will take a needed rest during the term of the lease, having been tied to the studio for 24 years.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1912, page 5
    Mrs. Wynne Scott, who is to take charge of the Boyd studio for the coming year, arrived in the city Friday.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 1, 1912, page 5
    Ashland, Oregon has two new photographers, both Mr. Camps and Mr. Boyd having leased studios there.
Camera Craft, October 1912, page 486
    Wynne Scott, the photographer, who has occupied the Boyd studio for some months past, has leased the room occupied by Madame Dilhan's millinery store and will move her gallery there about June 1. . . . Mr. Boyd, it is reported, will occupy his building himself after Mrs. Scott vacates it.
"For New Gallery,"
Ashland Tidings, April 24, 1913, page 8
Henry J. Boyd ad, June 12, 1913 Ashland Tidings
June 12, 1913 Ashland Tidings
    Boyd the photographer wants two loads of wood. Will pay half cash and half photos.
"Local and Personal,"
Ashland Tidings, September 29, 1913, page 5
    Photographers come and photographers go, but Boyd stays forever. See his ad in this issue.

Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1914, page 1
    O. H. Barnhill and Miss Kirkpatrick of Ashland and Mrs. Parker and daughter of Portland--who are visiting at the Gregory and Yeo homes--form a party that will be taken to Crater Lake Friday by Mr. Boyd, the photographer.
"In the Social Realm," Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1913, page 4

J. N. BOYD (Cottage Grove 1899-1904, Grants Pass 1904-1905)
    Cabinet photos $1.50 per doz. for a few days. Come now, save money. J. N. Boyd, photographer.
"S'More Things," Bohemia Nugget, Cottage Grove, February 23-March 17, 1899, page 4
    Grants Pass is to have the third photographic gallery, the new one to be put in by J. N. Boyd, who comes from Cottage Grove, where he has been in the business for the past three years. But during that time he has had his eye on Grants Pass, and deciding that it has the best future of any town in Southern Oregon and is a town that will have a steady growth and permanent prosperity, he has decided to "pitch his tent in the city of promise" and that he will do in reality for he is unable to secure a room for his purpose. He expects to be ready for business by the first of next week.
"Our Personal Column," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, December 15, 1904, page 5

    J. N. Boyd, who has been in Portland for the past month, whither he went to take the remains of his wife for interment in one of the cemeteries of that city, returned Wednesday to Grants Pass. Mr. Boyd will again resume his photographic business, which he left in charge of A. E. Kaiser.

"The Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, June 16, 1905, page 3

    J. N. Boyd came up from Ashland Monday to turn over his photograph tent to Mr. Bruch [sic--see Branch, below], who will conduct the business in the future. Mr. Boyd is now engaged in the grocery business in Ashland.
"Items of Personal Interest," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, September 15, 1905, page 7


DAVID, PHILIP FRANKLIN and VerNETTE BRAINERD
(1940-42, 1946-82)

WILFLEY STUDIO IS PURCHASED BY PHILIP BRAINERD
    Ray S. Wilfley today announced the sale of his Wilfley Studio and Camera Shop, 40 South Central Avenue, to Philip Brainerd, engraver on the Salem Statesman and son of P. A. Brainerd, at whose photograph studio in Grants Pass he received his early training.
    The new owner will take over the Wilfley business tonight upon his arrival from Portland. Ruth LeClerc, associated with the local studio for ten years, will remain.
    Mr. Wilfley, accompanied by his wife, will return soon to Fairbury, Neb., where he will return to the banking business, which he gave up to come to Medford in May 1938 to take over the Kennell-Ellis studio. The Wilfleys resided at 29 Ross Court. Their daughter, Mrs. Ray A. Young, a bride of last September, will remain here. She and her husband reside at 25 South Orange Street.
    Mr. Wilfley is a member of the Kiwanis Club and the Elks Lodge. He has been a popular worker in civic and club affairs since coming to Medford.
    Mr. Brainerd, before going to the Statesman last June, was photographer and engraver on the Grants Pass Courier. He installed the photoengraving department at the Courier in 1935.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 14, 1940, page 7

Miss Swartsley to Wed Phil Brainerd at February Service
    Mrs. Edith Swartsley of Ashland has announced the engagement and approaching marriage of her daughter, Miss VerNetta, to Phil F. Brainerd, of this city, son of Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Brainerd of Grants Pass.
    The wedding will be an event of February 8.
    Miss Swartsley, who is a graduate of the Ashland High School and worked at the office of the chamber of commerce there, has been employed in the office of the secretary of state in Salem for the past year.
    Mr. Brainerd, the present owner of Wilfley's studio, was graduated from the Grants Pass High School and was a student at the University of Oregon in Eugene, and Oregon State College. For five years he was a photographer with the Grants Pass Daily Courier, and before taking over Wilfley's studio was with the Oregon Statesman in Salem. He was previously with the Artcraft camera shop in Grants Pass.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1941, page 5
Brainerd Studio Is Sold to J. C. Wilson
    Phil Brainerd, proprietor for the past two years of the Brainerd Studio and Camera Shop, 40 South Central Avenue, announced yesterday the sale of the business to J. C. Wilson of Portland, an experienced photographer, who will assume possession on [omission] and open for business Tuesday. Sale price was not revealed.
    The new owner will engage in portrait photography only, and will bring his own equipment. Brainerd and Mrs. Brainerd will remain here for a few days before moving to Grants Pass, where they will reside until Brainerd leaves to enter the U.S. army signal corps in about two weeks.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1942, page 5
BRAINERDS RETURN FROM WAR DUTY; PURCHASE STUDIO
    Purchase of the Evergreen Studios at 40 South Central Avenue from R. R. Gibbons was announced yesterday by Phil Brainerd, who, associated with his brother, Dave, will operate the business under the name Brainerd Studio and Camera Shop.
    Phil Brainerd was proprietor of a photo shop at the same address prior to entry into the army three and one-half years ago. A cameraman with the army service forces, he was chief army photographer at the United Nations conference in San Francisco and has many interesting pictures of the event. He and his wife are residing at 1628 E. Main Street.
    Dave Brainerd, formerly with Artcraft Camera Shop in Grants Pass, was a naval photographer in the South Pacific during the war. He and his wife have made their home at 18 Hawthorne Street.
    The two men will do portrait, commercial and finishing work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1946, page 12
    Mr. and Mrs. Dave Brainerd and daughters, Jan and Lynn, formerly of 21 South Groveland Avenue, left last week for Petaluma, Calif., where they will make their home. . . . Until recently Mr. Brainerd was associated with his brother, Phil Brainerd, at Brainerd Studios. At Petaluma he will enter the photographic equipment business.
"Brainerds Leave for California; Guests at Parties," Medford Mail Tribune, February 14, 1954, page 2

Brainerd's Photo Studio, Medford, Oregon 1960
1960.
    The studio continues as Brainerd's, but it has been sold to Robert and Joyce Duncan. . . . Brainerd's moved to its present location at 120 E. Main St. in 1955. The grand opening was Sept. 17 that year and more than 2,000 attended, including representatives from the major camera and photographic supply companies, such as Kodak, Argus and Polaroid. The opening was the subject of articles in Rangefinder magazine and Kodak Dealer News.
    All the Brainerds--P.A., Phil, his brother Gordon and his son Phil--are graduates of the Winona, Wisc. Professional School of Photography. Brainerd explained that only experienced professional photographers are admitted to the school. The Brainerds' son, Paul, now is a Kodak vice president.
    The Brainerds lost most of their files of old films when Robinson's Store burned in 1978. The shop received extensive water damage, and only five years of negatives could be salvaged.
    The Duncans come from a small town near Great Falls, Mont. They had a small studio there, handling weddings, portraits and wildlife photography on a freelance basis. Duncan worked for the U.S. Forest Service and had been on a job in the Applegate district a few years ago. When he and his wife saw Brainerd's advertisement for sale in a national photography magazine, they decided to move to Medford and buy the business.
"Brainerd's Photography Has Seen Many Changes," Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1982, page C13
Longtime Photographer Philip Brainerd Dead at 81
    Philip Franklin Brainerd, 81, professional photographer in Medford for 60 years, died Tuesday (Jan. 3, 1995) at his home in Rancho Mirage, Calif.
    In 1945, while a master sergeant in the U.S. Army, he was the official photographer for the founding conference of the United Nations in San Francisco. He headed a staff of 54 photographers.
    Mr. Brainerd and his wife, VerNetta, owned and operated Brainerd's, 120 E. Main St., Medford, until retiring in 1982. They moved to Rancho Mirage that year.
    Mr. Brainerd was born Nov. 9, 1913, in Havre, Mont. The family moved to Grants Pass 14 years later, where his father opened a photography shop, Artcraft.
    After graduating from Grants Pass High School, Mr. Brainerd attended Oregon State University, then transferred to the University of Oregon.
    He worked in hs father's business before becoming photographer for the Grants Pass Courier. He later was hired by Charles Sprague, owner of the Salem Statesman.
    In the fall of 1940, Mr. Brainerd bought the Wilfley studio in Medford.
Excerpt, Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1995, page B2
Brainerd's Photo Studio, Medford, Oregon 1964
1964.

J. W. BRANCH PHOTO STUDIO

    J. N. [sic] Boyd came up from Ashland Monday to turn over his photograph tent to Mr. Bruch [sic], who will conduct the business in the future. Mr. Boyd is now engaged in the grocery business in Ashland.
"Items of Personal Interest," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, September 15, 1905, page 7
    Go to Branch's Studio (Big Tent) for pictures and frames.
"Some Bargain Pointers," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, November 17, 1905, page 4
     Having moved to the Hammock Studio on Sixth Street, opposite the post office, I would be pleased to have my old customers to continue with me, and I will appreciate as many new ones as I can accommodate. I will make you anything from a stamp picture up to one 40x60 inches. Thanking you for your past patronage and thanking you in advance for your future support, I am respectfully,
BRANCH PHOTO STUDIO.       
"Some Bargain Pointers," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 12, 1907, page 5
Christmas Photos.
    Xmas photos made at Branch's Photo Studio opposite post office are hard to beat for Xmas presents. His freehand paintings, crayon works are fine. His products are sent to New York, Massachusetts, Norway, Austria and Germany. His is the finest equipped little studio on the coast. Satisfaction guaranteed. See?
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, December 6, 1907, page 5
    Miss Helen [sic] Loveridge has sold her photograph studio on Sixth and H streets to J. W. Branch and will go to Eugene to live with her father.
"Items of Personal Interest," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 10, 1908, page 5

    H. C. Mackey, the new proprietor of the Branch Studio, has taken hold of his work in this city and is enjoying a rush of business. Mr. Mackey is well known in this valley as a photographer, having for many years conducted a studio at Medford, where his excellent work drew much attention. He has made a study of the newest and best methods employed in his profession and in putting these methods into practice is able to produce photographs which are not excelled anywhere. Those wishing photos with the pose just right and the workmanship perfect will be pleased with the results of a visit to his studio on Sixth Street.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 23, 1908, page 1

EMIL BRITT (1878-circa 1915)
    Emil Britt is expected back from San Francisco soon to take charge of Peter Britt's photographic gallery in this place. Emil is said to be a first-class artist now, having studied under the masters in San Francisco.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 21, 1883, page 3
    Emil Britt returned from San Francisco on last Sunday's stage. He will remain here now and assist his father in the photographing business.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 27, 1883, page 3

    Emil Britt has been taking views of the town, which are quite natural and reflect credit on his skill as a photographer.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1884, page 3

PETER BRITT
(1852-1905)
    AN ENTERPRISING ARTIST.--Mr. Peter Britt, our resident daguerrean and photographic artist, has, within the past few months, completed the building and furnishing of one of the best arranged and most complete galleries to be found anywhere on the Pacific Coast. The edifice is situated on the rise of the hill between Jackson Creek and Rich Gulch, in the center of a beautiful garden. The site is a prominent one, and the form and general appearance of the building itself exhibits an artistic taste that cannot fail to strike the attention of strangers as they approach our town from the north or south.
    Mr. Britt has now got his arrangements complete for taking the best of pictures in every style of the art. He is now kept quite busy in making, by the dozen, album photographs. Nature evidently designed Mr. Britt for an artist, for he never appears happier than when making chemical experiments or reading works devoted exclusively to his art. That he holds a high rank in his profession we have the evidence of a practicing artist, who has written to a person in this place that Mr. Britt's ambrotypes would grace the first galleries in Philadelphia. That Mr. Britt keeps himself thoroughly booked on the very latest improvements in the art is evidenced from the fact that he can produce the famous "spirit pictures," about which late Eastern correspondence tells us the spiritualists of Boston were "thrown into a furor of excitement." His skill and enterprise entitle him to the full confidence and liberal patronage of our community.
Oregon Sentinel, January 31, 1863, page 2
    PHOTOGRAPHIC ALBUMS.--Among all the parlor ornaments and expedients for investing home with additional sacredness, which fashion fabricates from time to time, nothing meets so many wants as the photographic album. With its rich binding it gives a literary air and makes a beautiful display upon a table, and, better than that, it preserves the counterfeit presentiment of those whose forms and memories are hallowed by love and friendship. Mr. Peter Britt, our skillful resident artist, can accommodate you.
Semi-Weekly Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 15, 1863, page 2
    Photographic--At no place in town can you enjoy yourself so well for an hour or two as at Peter Britt's Photography Rooms. Hundreds of familiar faces greet you on every side, and make you feel at home. Mr. Britt has just received from San Francisco a beautiful stereoscope giving a large number of fine views, from every part of the world.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 30, 1864, page 3
October 1, 1864 Oregon Intelligencer, Jacksonville
October 1, 1864 Oregon Intelligencer, Jacksonville
    Peter Britt, photographic artist, is prepared to take pictures in every style of the art with all the late improvements. If pictures do not give satisfaction, no charges will be made. Call at his new gallery, on the hill, examine his pictures, and sit for your likeness.
Advertisement, Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 25, 1865, page 1
    Mr. Peter Britt is making fine pictures this spring, and those who contemplate getting pictures this year will do well if they go now. As we understand Mr. B. will close his gallery during the hot summer months, that he may get time to finish some oil paintings which he has under way.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 8, 1867, page 3

Peter Britt ad, August 22, 1867 Oregon Sentinel
August 22, 1867 Oregon Sentinel
    FOR ROGUE RIVER.--P. Britt left for the Rogue River Falls on Thursday morning. He took his photographic apparatus with him, and intends taking photographs of the falls and other scenery. Jackson County abounds in romantic scenery, which would be a credit to any work containing it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1874, page 3
    Peter Britt yesterday took Barden's picture at the county jail.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 16, 1875, page 3
    Capt. O. C. Applegate, of Lake County, favored us with a call last Saturday. He informs us that a party of tourists will start in a few days for Crater Lake, accompanied by Peter Britt, of this place, who will take photographs of the magnificent scenery the country affords.
"Personal," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 10, 1875, page 3
    Peter Britt has gone on a trip up Rogue River. He will take photographs of the principal scenery.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 31, 1876, page 3
    Peter Britt started the other day for Lake County, where he will take photographic views of the most prominent scenery that section affords.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 10, 1877, page 3
    Peter Britt has returned from a trip through Southeastern Oregon and Northern California. He took photographic views of much of the prominent scenery his journey afforded, including Mount Shasta.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 17, 1877, page 3

    The last number of the West Shore contains a picture of Rogue River Falls [actually, Mill Creek Falls] from a photograph by Peter Britt, of this place.
Oregon Sentinel, September 5, 1877, page 3

    P. Britt left for the Lake country, via Lake of the Woods, this week. He will take photographic views of the scenery as he proceeds and will be absent for several weeks.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1879, page 3
    P. Britt and party returned last week from a trip to the Dead Indian country. He took several photographic views during his absence from town, which prove valuable additions to his already large assortment of pictures of native scenery.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1879, page 3
    P. Britt is now employing the latest and most popular methods of photography and takes first-class pictures.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1879, page 3
    "Death loves a shining mark," therefore get your photograph taken at Britt's before being made an example of.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 14, 1880, page 3
    P. Britt, accompanied by his son and daughter, will make a trip to the coast in a few days, expecting to be gone several weeks. He will take photographs of the most prominent objects of scenery as he progresses.
"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 30, 1880, page 3

    Peter Britt, artist and florist, from Jacksonville, has been spending a few days among us. He came down for the purpose of taking views of the coast, and, as he says, to hear the roar of "old ocean" once more. His son and Miss Mollie, his daughter, accompanied him; also Mr. Linville, wife and daughter, and Miss Addie Langell. We spent two very pleasant evenings with the party. Mr. Britt is a true artist, and we enjoyed the interchange of ideas in regard to photography very much. He left for his home on last Thursday.--[Del Norte Record.

"Personal Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1880, page 3
    P. Britt took a number of photographs of the new and handsome Red Men's wigwam in this place Saturday.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1885, page 3
    Peter Britt took several photographic views of the gallows and surroundings attending the execution of O'Neil.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 20, 1886, page 3
    Peter Britt, our local photographer, assisted by his son, takes photographs of every style and by the latest improved methods. Their work will compare favorably with any done in the state, and their prices are quite reasonable.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887, page 3
    [A pair of thieves] were photographed by P. Britt yesterday, in response to a telegram from the railway authorities, L. R. Fields, the general traffic superintendent, thinking they are responsible for other crimes in which the railroad is interested.
"Car Thieves Caught," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3
    P. Britt & Son took a number of photographs during the 4th of July, which are first-class.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1893, page 3
    Several of the Chinese residents of Jackson County were in town during the past few days, having their photographs taken by P. Britt & Son so that they can be properly registered by the federal officials.
Democratic Times, January 11, 1894, page 3

BROCK (1892)
    The Logan photograph gallery at Ashland has passed into the hands of artist Brock and wife of Astoria, who will operate it in the future.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 3
    Mrs. Hattie Logan of Portland was at Ashland last week, making arrangements for the renting of her photograph gallery at the granite city to an Astoria gentleman, who is now in charge.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2

BROWN PHOTO COMPANY
(Ashland 1894)

    Remember, until Oct. 21st you can get six finest cabinet photos for only $1; one dozen, $1.50 at Brown & Co.'s gallery. (These are special rates to advertise our work.)
Ashland Tidings, October 22, 1894

    Cloudy weather preferred at the Brown Bros. photo gallery, and good work obtained without any delay in finishing on account of the weather.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1894, page 3
    Over a hundred people photographed already in Ashland by the Brown Photo Co., and chance for hundreds more at the $1 rates until next Wednesday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1894, page 3

    The Brown Photo Company, to accommodate people who could not get sittings last week, will continue their low rates until next Wednesday, Oct. 31st, viz. 6 finest cabinet photos $1, or 1 dozen for $1.50.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 25, 1894, page 3
    Finest cabinets only $1.00 per dozen. We have concluded to leave Ashland next Thursday, Nov. 15th, and having more goods on hand than we care to ship back east, we will, until next Monday night, Nov. 12th, make our best cabinets for only $1.00 per dozen. BROWN & Co. (Tyler's old stand), Ashland, Or.
"Photos at Bedrock," Valley Record, Ashland, November 8, 1894, page 3

JEROME BROWN
(1948-1949)
JEROME BROWN OPENS PHOTOGRAPHIC STUDIO
    Jerome Brown, formerly of Los Angeles, announced Saturday the opening of a photographic studio at 233 South Riverside Avenue. Brown has had much experience in photographic work and was for a time an artist on the Walt Disney Studio staff in Hollywood. Since coming here this spring he has engaged in freelance work and magazine pictures.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 3, 1948, page 11
Photographer Needs Babies
    Jerome Brown, Medford photographer, today asked for Ashland babies as subjects for a series of pictorial stories of Mother Goose rhymes. He hopes to sell the completed series to a newspaper syndicate for national distribution.
    The series will be titled "Brown Babies," and include pictures of the youngsters with appropriate captions telling the story. Parents have been invited to contact the Jerome Brown Studio at 233 South Riverside.
Ashland Tidings, February 11, 1949, page 4
    WANTED--Cute babies for photographic illustration. Jerome Brown Studio, 233 S. Riverside. Ph. 8275.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, March 14, 1949, page 10
    Last chance for a Jerome Brown portrait. Studio will permanently close December 24th, 1949.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, December 4, 1949, page 10

MILES BROWNRIGG (1901-02)
    Rev. M. Brownrigg, pastor of the Church of Christ at Phoenix, has decided to open a photograph gallery at that place and is erecting a building for that purpose. He was engaged in photography before entering the ministry.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 20, 1901, page 7
    The Phoenix photo gallery is now running at full blast and cheap prices for thirty days.

"Phoenix Items," Medford Mail, December 6, 1901, page 3
    Elder M. Brownrigg will soon close his ministerial labors in Phoenix. He desires to finish his college course, and this cannot be done while his time is taken up in preaching. Besides this he is badly afflicted with nervousness caused by too much worry and hard study. He will try to finish his course in one year and will take photos at the same time to defray his expenses.

"Phoenix Items," Medford Mail, December 13, 1901, page 3
Photo Outfit Sale Cheap.
    Regular 8x10 (portrait) camera, lens, shutter, background, headrest and etc. Apply to M. Brownrigg, Phoenix, Oregon.
Medford Enquirer, April 19, 1902, page 5


BRUBAKER AERIAL SURVEYS

Portland, Oregon
postcard publisher

BRUNO ART STUDIO
(Medford 1940-41)
    Medford is the latest Oregon city to be entered  by the Bruno Art Studio, which is established in several Northwest cities . . . Mr. and Mrs. T. S. Beem, of Seattle, will be in charge of the studio's operation.
"Bruno Studio Opening Here," Medford Mail Tribune, September 6, 1940, page 7
    Bruno Studios announce their Medford studio at Main and Central will close Saturday, Jan. 18.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1941, page 7

OWEN S. BURNS

    O. S. Burns, a Portland photographer, who has been in the valley for some time looking for a location, states that he has purchased both galleries at Ashland and would operate the two under one management.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 20, 1895, page 5


WILBUR C. BUSHNELL STUDIO
(Ashland 1931-1948)
    Cash prizes were awarded in eight different classes and J. Verne Shangle, Medford photographer, was the grand sweepstakes winner, with W. C. Bushnell of the Bushnell-Perkins Studio of Ashland as second high winner.
"Bushnell Wins Many Prizes," Southern Oregon Miner, Ashland, October 25, 1935, page 1
    In July of 1931, Mr. Bushnell first came to Ashland. Having recently graduated from school, he was anxious to get a start in business, so purchased the Hinthorne studio, which was located in the Peil building on the corner of the Plaza and Winburn Way. Competition was strong at this time, and the country was suffering from depression years.
    Six months later Bushnell closed [the] studio in the Plaza and went to work for the Darling Studio, which was located where the Bushnell Studio and Camera Store now is. After six months with the Darlings, he went back to the Plaza shop and four months later made arrangements to buy out the business interests of the Darlings. . . .
    Mr. Bushnell was raised in Eugene and took two years of electrical engineering at Oregon State College. From Corvallis he returned to Eugene, where he attended the University of Oregon school of architecture for five years and was awarded his degree.
"Modern Equipment Enables Bushnell Studio to Handle Photographic Needs," Ashland Tidings, February 12, 1948, page 5

BUSHNELL-PERKINS STUDIO
(Ashland 1935-1937)
    Wilbur Bushnell has as his guests for a week or more Mr. and Mrs. Drew Perkins of Eugene. Mrs. Perkins and Mr. Bushnell are brother and sister.
"About People You Know," Southern Oregon Miner, September 6, 1935, page 3

C.T. AMERICAN ART COLORED
(for Curt Teich; q.v.)
Chicago
postcard publisher. White border, matte, tinted

CALIFORNIA STUDIO
(1925-27)
    Opened on Easter, April 12, 1925 at 128 East Main, over the Model Clothing Store.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1925, page 9
ANDERSON ASSUMES STUDIO MANAGEMENT
    A. J. Anderson, who has been a resident of Medford for several months, has assumed management of the California Studio, over Marsh's grocery. Under his management a campaign will be launched to make the California Studio one of the best in this city, and the slogan "Portraits of Distinction," which has been adopted by Mr. Anderson, will be followed to the letter with all work from the making of the negative to the finished print will be [sic] done in Medford under his personal supervision.
    Mr. Anderson is well fitted to manage the California Studio, having had years of experience in photographic work in large studios in Minneapolis as well as Butte, Montana and Spokane, Washington.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1926, page 6
    Having assumed entire control of the California Studio, I wish to state that all persons holding coupons may have them honored if presented at the studio on or before
April 1st, 1926. [A. J.] Anderson, California Studio (over Marsh's Grocery).
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1926, page 8
    . . . A. J. Anderson was appointed official post photographer.
"D. G. Tyree Team Is Winner for Legion Members," Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1926, page 3
    Immediately following the dinner, Mr. Anderson of the California Studio and Mr. R. E. Mulligan of Central Point assembled the men on the lawn, where the Cirkut camera "shot" the bunch. The ladies were then asked to join the circle and whole group photographed.
"Rain Is No Bar to Central Point Picnic," Medford Mail Tribune, May 24, 1926, page 3
Anderson Buys California Studio
    A. J. Anderson, who has had a lease on and operated the California Studio, has purchased the same and changed the name to Anderson's Studio. It is located upstairs at 128 East Main Street.
    Mr. Anderson is an experienced photographer of several years [and] will specialize in portraits but is equipped to do all kinds of commercial work, enlarging, Kodak finishing and color work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1927, page 10
    See Alfred J. Anderson.

FRANK L. CAMPS
(Olympia, Washington 1891, Ashland 1893-1912)
Photography.
    Mr. F. L. Camps, recently from Olympia, Wash., has arrived in Ashland and has associated himself in the photography business with Mr. Geo. H. Tyler. These gentlemen can be found at the old established Tyler stand in Myer Block, where they will be pleased to accommodate all wanting anything in the photographic line.
Ashland Tidings, May 26, 1893

    F. L. Camps, who has charge of the Logan photograph gallery at Ashland, called on us last Saturday. He is a first-class artist and is building up a good business.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 24, 1894, page 3

    Camps' Photo Gallery has the largest line of views of Southern Oregon scenery to be had, having just finished a fresh supply. C. Olton, an experienced scenic view photographer, who has been in the Cascades all summer with his instrument, has a lot of negatives of his skillful work being turned out at the Camps gallery. There is nothing better to send to your friends for a present than some of our magnificent scenery.
Valley Record, Ashland, December 5, 1895, page 3
Bought Out Camps.
    Louis Larson, a photographer from Tacoma, has purchased F. L. Camps' gallery in Ashland and is in charge of the same. For the next 30 days he will make cabinet-sized photos for $3.00 per dozen.
Valley Record, Ashland, July 9, 1896, page 3
Married.
CAMPS-LOGAN--At the residence of the bride's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Reeser, Sunday morning, July 12th, by Rev. George N. Annes, F. L. Camps and Mrs. Hattie M. Logan, both of Ashland.
    The wedding ceremony was performed in the presence of the family and the couple left almost immediately on the southbound train for San Jose, Cal., where Mr. Camps contemplates engaging in the photography business.
Ashland Tidings, July 13, 1896

    Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Camps have returned to Ashland, after an absence in California for some time. They will take charge of their former photograph gallery.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1898, page 3
    M. F. Eggleston furnished the Portland Telegram of the 5th with a sketch of the history of Jasper Fource of Talent, who was born 100 years ago, and that paper prints a photograph of him made by F. L. Camps the day before Christmas.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, January 10, 1901, page 3

    You can get photo-buttons at Camps' studio--right prices.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1900, page 3
    Walter Collinge came out from Portland Saturday to assist F. L. Camps, the photographer.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, July 26, 1900, page 1
    F. L. Camps will have his photograph building raised up and will build underneath it a 40x40 building either of stone or brick. The building will be converted into two store.
Valley Record, Ashland, June 27, 1901, page 3

    Photographer Camps has taken a few excellent views of the dining room of the Depot Hotel that give a very good idea of the place.
"Excellent Photographic Work," Ashland Tidings, October 14, 1901, page 3

    Etna Advance: Frank L. Camps, Ashland's popular photographer, will be in Etna about June 30th, and will be pleased to meet the people at the Fashion, where he will open up his parlor.
"Personal and Local," Valley Record, Ashland, July 3, 1902, page 3

F. L. Camps, December 31, 1914 Ashland Tidings
December 31, 1914 Ashland Tidings
F. L. Camps To Build.
    A handsome two-story brick block will in the near future, replace the wooden building now occupied by F. L. Camps with his photograph gallery. The preliminary drawing which Mr. Camps is now having made by architect F. C. Clark show a front elevation the peer of any building now in Ashland, and one which will be fully in keeping with the sightly spot where it will be located. The block will have a frontage of 46 feet by a depth of 70 feet, and the lower floor will be occupied by a store. On the second floor, besides Mr. Camps' gallery, there will be four office rooms. The store room is already practically leased.
Ashland Tidings, December 14, 1903
    F. L. Camps returned from Portland Sunday, where he has been for some time attending the Eastman School of Photography. Mr. Camps is keeping up with the new and practical methods in the making of fine photos. He is prepared to give his patrons all the new and up-to-date styles in artistic photography.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 3, 1912, page 5
    Mr. L. W. Marble . . . has leased the Camps Studio of this city and is now prepared to serve the people of Ashland. . . .
"New Studio," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1912, page 4

    Ashland, Oregon has two new photographers, both Mr. Camps and Mr. Boyd having leased studios there.
Camera Craft, October 1912, page 486
    A decree of divorce was granted by the circuit court at Jacksonville to Hattie Camps versus F. L. Camps last week.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 16, 1916, page 5

CANYON PUBLISHING CO.

Canyonville, Oregon
postcard publisher

CARDINELL-VINCENT

San Francisco
postcard publisher; manufactured in Germany. "CV Co." logo

SPENCER T. ST. GEORGE CAREY
(1897)
    S. T. St. George Carey not long since succeeded in reaching Crater Lake, and secured a number of photographs of that great scenic wonder in its winter garb.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1898, page 3
WINTER TRIP MADE TO CRATER LAKE IN 1897
Daring Englishman Takes First Photographs of Famous Body of Water
in Winter Time and Almost Perishes on Return Journey.

    KLAMATH FALLS, Or., May 6.--(Special.)--That Crater Lake was visited in the dead of winter 14 years ago last January and pictures taken of the lake and precipitous sides of the crater when the country about the lake was covered with snow more than 12 feet deep is proved by a number of photographs owned by Mrs. Frank Ward, of this city.
    A few days ago Mrs. Ward read in the Medford papers of the return to that city of Benjamin F. Heidel, government engineer, who has charge of the location of trails and roads in the Crater Lake National Park, and others of that city, who had made the trip on snowshoes to the crater and secured the "first" pictures ever made in winter time of that great natural wonder.
    To show that the Medford party had not taken the first winter photographs Mrs. Ward shows more than a half dozen pictures of the lake taken from many different places around the rim. These show the lake in winter garb with everything hidden by deep snow except the shape of the surrounding bluffs, Phantom Ship and the island in the midst of this body of water. The pictures also prove that although the temperature was then from 8 to 15 degrees below zero, the lake was perfectly free from ice. On the back of one of the photographs notations were made by the man who made this perilous journey and took the pictures, which were dated January 4, 1897.
    These pictures were taken by S. B. St. George Carey [sic], an Englishman, who was spending the winter of 1897 in Klamath Falls, and who was a guest of a boarding house conducted by Mrs. Ward. Mr. Carey left here accompanied by a companion for the rim of the crater. He said he would be back within .a given time, but was gone several days over the date specified, and a searching party was being organized here and [also] one to go from Fort Klamath, 22 miles this side of the crater, to search for him, when he returned to the Fort almost exhausted from his hard trip. His hands and face were badly frozen.
    The following spring he left Klamath Falls and returned to London, England, where he had the pictures developed. He sent 13 of these different views to Mrs. Ward.
    Mr. Carey was the scion of a wealthy family, and later returned to Newcastle, Cal., where he now resides. Following his perilous journey to Crater Lake, he wrote several articles, which were published in some of the leading magazines.

Sunday Oregonian, Portland, May 7, 1911, page 60

KIT CARSON
(1879)

    Kit Carson, of Cottonwood, came over the mountains with the photographic outfit last Tuesday.
"Local Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1879, page 3


CASE
(1891)
See McBride & Case
    Case, the eastern Oregon photographer, will open a gallery in Medford in a short time.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3
    Mr. Case, the photographer, and Miss Flora Hurst of Medford were married recently. They will live at Oregon City.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, November 12, 1891, page 1


P. A. CAVERLY
(Central Point 1908)

    P. A. Caverly and wife, who are in the city with their photograph car, have been doing some excellent work for their patrons. They will be here for a few days longer, and everyone who desires work in their line should give them a call.
"Local and Personal," Central Point Herald, September 24, 1908, page 1
    Mr. and Mrs. P. A. Caverley, of the photo car, left yesterday for a deer hunt in the mountains. The Herald is promised all kinds of venison and bear meat when they return.
"Local and Personal," Central Point Herald, October 1, 1908, page 1


ED. L. CHAPPEL
(1902)

    For Rent--The Elite photo studio, best location in city. Inquire at the Mail office.
Medford Mail, July 4, 1902, page 1
    G. W. Mackey has leased the Elite Studio, in the Hamlin block, and expects to at once open a photograph gallery there. He will continue to operate the gallery in the Adkins block. Ed. Chappel, a photographer from Kansas, will have charge of Mr. Mackey's new gallery.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 10, 1902, page 7
    E. L. Chapale has sold his interest in the photograph gallery to F. H. Hull.

"Local News Notes," Medford Success, December 16, 1902, page 1

CHICAGO PORTRAIT CO.

    Those of our readers who have any pictures they desire enlarged will do well to call at this office and see samples and get prices. We are taking orders for the well-known Chicago Portrait Company and can guarantee the work to be entirely satisfactory. They have done lots of work through the country here about and their work speaks for itself.
"Personal and Local," Gold Hill News, September 9, 1899, page 5

    Lin Purdin and Roy Richardson are over in Coos County selling pictures for the Chicago Portrait Company.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 13, 1901, page 7
    George S. Parker left Wednesday evening for Tacoma, Wash., where he has accepted a lucrative position with the Chicago Portrait Company, under John Devlin, formerly of Jacksonville, who is superintendent of the Pacific Coast agency for the company.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 6
    J. H. Devlin, who has been acting as Washington state manager for the Chicago Portrait Co., spent a few days at his old home on Applegate last week.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 26, 1903, page 6

FLOYD K. CHURCHILL 
Editor of the Gold Hill News and photographer.

AMATEUR PHOTOGRAPHERS ATTENTION.
    Having fitted up a large and commodious dark room, I am prepared to serve your wants. I will carry in stock any supplies you desire and am prepared to do your finishing work; such as developing plates or films, printing, toning or mounting your pictures in an artistic manner. Give me a trial. At the News office, Gold Hill, Oregon.
Gold Hill News, July 28, 1900, page 5
    YOU'RE LOOKING WELL.--That naturally suggests a good time to have your photograph taken. With your good looks and our good work, the result ought to be good, too. We make cabinets, cards, or any other size or shape you may want, at the lowest possible price. We make 24 stamp photos for 25 cents. Call and see our samples at the News office.
"Personal and Local," Gold Hill News, October 6, 1900, page 5
    Monday morning we expect to begin work erecting a large platform and will stretch a large photo tent over it to accommodate our patrons who desire pictures. We have secured the services of Mr. E. D. Weston, one of the best photographers on the Pacific Coast, for our art department and are now prepared to meet the competition of any town in the state of Oregon.
"Personal and Local," Gold Hill News, November 3, 1900, page 5

CLASSIC STUDIO (1954-67)
Ray Anders, Dwaine E. and Janet L. Smith, 1306 West Main, Medford
    Dwaine E. Smith of 814½ East Jackson St. and Jim W. Anders of 941 Dakota Ave. have filed the assumed business name of Classic Studios at 1110 North Riverside Ave., according to records in the county clerk's office. The business will be concerned with commercial and portrait photography, the certificate said.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1954, page 11


Clevenger 1904-11-10p3RRCourierCHARLES L. CLEVENGER (Grants Pass 1880s-1907)
    Chas. Clevenger, formerly of this city, now operating a photograph gallery at Grants Pass, is very highly spoken of by the Grants Pass papers on account of his work as a photographer.
"Brief Mention," The Plaindealer, Roseburg, July 14, 1898, page 3
    Sunday evening, August 28th, 1898, at the home of the bride's parents in this city, Mr. Charles Clevenger and Miss Sarah A. Wimberly, Rev. S. A. Douglas officiating.
    Mr. Clevenger has a host of friends in Roseburg, where he was formerly connected with the Electric Light Company, and afterwards learned photography with H. D. Graves, of this city. He is an expert photographer, one of the best on the coast. Mr. Clevenger is now in the photograph business at Grants Pass, where he has made a reputation as a first-class artist, and enjoys a successful business.
"Married," The Plaindealer, Roseburg, August 29, 1898, page 3
    Clevenger has some very unique souvenir photographs of Grants Pass and vicinity, bound in booklet form. They make a very appropriate Christmas present for a friend, and can be easily mailed. Call and see them.
"Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, November 29, 1900, page 3
    C. L. Clevenger made some flash light exposures after the cantata Wednesday evening and secured two very good negatives of the chorus.

"Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, December 13, 1900, page 3
    Clevenger's cabinet of child's photos at the Layton Hotel corner is a very interesting study and shows that the artist has a peculiar talent for obtaining the finest results in the portraiture of the little people as well as those of larger growth. Mr. Clevenger is a photographer who is observant and progressive, and he is doing some fine work.

"Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, March 7, 1901, page 3
    C. L. Clevenger, the photographer, returned last week from Placer and vicinity, where he has been making a collection of views and incidentally recording the countenances of the people of that district. He established quite a complete gallery at Placer while he remained there, being well equipped with tents and all paraphernalia for operating.

"Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, May 30, 1901, page 3
    C. L. Clevenger attended the convention of photographers last week at Portland. He took with him a splendid collection of Southern Oregon mining and scenic views which will be on exhibition during the exposition.

"Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 10, 1901, page 3
    C. L. Clevenger made a trip to Medford and Ashland last week, in order to add to his collection of Southern Oregon views.

"Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 17, 1901, page 3

    Probably the largest photograph ever made in Southern Oregon was a panorama photo of the Golden Drift Dam, made by C. L. Clevenger and [which] was sent to Chicago by C. W. Ament as a Christmas present from his son M. C. Ament. The picture was an excellent piece of workmanship; it was six feet two inches long and 20 inches wide and taking in a scope of country not less than half a mile in length along the river, showing the dam and all the property controlled by the Golden Drift Mining Co.

"A Large Photograph," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, December 31, 1903, page 2

    You will find the Clevenger and Loveridge negatives at Branch's Studio opposite P.O.
"Some Bargain Pointers," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, May 29, 1908, page 5


EMANUEL C. CLUTTER
(1889-1890)

    E. C. Clutter of Forest Grove will next week open out in business in the photograph gallery lately occupied by Mrs. Morris, having leased the same from that lady.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 3
    E. C. Clutter, wife and daughter, of Forest Grove, last week arrived in Medford to make this place their home. Clutter & Wagner will engage in the photograph business in our city.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890, page 3
Timeline for E. C. Cutter:
1846 Born in Licking, Ohio, on December 3rd
1860 Lived in Iowa; his profession was "artist"
1868 Married Frances Drucilla Benjamin (1843-89) in Jasper Co., Iowa
1870 Clutter & Co. in Forest Grove
1883 Married Nancy Louise Burnett (1842-1923) on Sept. 16th
1880s Stayed on Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, photographed Oglala Lakota people
1889 Opened studio in Medford, OR
1890 Photographed Ashland, Grants Pass, and Medford, OR (summer months)
1909 Moved to Venice, CA
1927 Died in Venice, Los Angeles, CA, on June 15th
Forest Grove City Library web site

CLUTTER & MOORE CO.
(1890)
     Clutter & Co., the Medford artists, prepared a series of flood photos, showing the Bear Creek bridge when the water was at its highest and Hammon's barn still standing on the further side, and subsequent pictures showing the bridge in various stages of demolition after the barn had fallen.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 4
    E. Clutter, having raised the required $300 to pay for the work, will soon issue the book of lithographic views of Medford which he has been preparing.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 2
    E. Clutter of Medford was in Grants Pass recently endeavoring to get our citizens interested in publishing lithographic views of the place.
"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 2
    Clutter & Co., the Medford photographers, have dissolved partnership, Frank Wagner continuing the business.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3


             
To Sketch Ashland.
    E. Clutter and E. S. Moore of Oakland, Cal., are in town this week for the purpose of working up interest in a scheme of sketching this city. The city will be sketched on a town plat, which gives a splendid view of every point in it. It will require about $400 to get the stone up and print 1000 copies, after which they can be procured at a reasonable figure. Ashland has never yet had a decent view taken of her shapely form, and the samples show that Mr. Moore is able to do the work.
Valley Record, Ashland, August 14, 1890, page 3
For a Picture of the Town.
    Mr. E. Clutter, the photographer, with E. C. Moore, an experienced and skillful artist, are in Ashland this week for the purpose of making a sketch of a birdseye view of the city, which they will have lithographed if sufficient substantial encouragement be offered them by the citizens. They have been doing Grants Pass and Medford, and judging by the lithographic sample of work done by Mr. Moore for Chehalis, Wash., they will be able to make a handsome picture of Ashland. If the citizens will contribute money enough to purchase 10,000 or 20,000 copies of such a picture and have them circulated in connection with suitable printed matter, it will be an excellent advertisement for the town and valley.
Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1890, page 3
Good Picture of Ashland.
    Mr. E. Moore, the artist who is here for the purpose of making a birdseye view of the city, has about completed his sketch for the lithographer, and has made a picture which from all that can be judged by a sketch of this kind, will show a handsomer town than any of the lithographic views of any of the towns of the state. Such a picture of Ashland will be worth much to the town and valley as an advertisement to the world of what is being done in Southern Oregon; and with views of some of the handsome residences and business blocks around the margin, as such pictures are usually gotten up, the picture will be one which the citizens of Ashland will take pride in sending to their friends in distant regions. It is to be hoped that a large number of the views will be ordered and sent abroad.
Ashland Tidings, August 22, 1890, page 3
    Clutter & Moore, who have taken the contract to furnish handsome lithograph views of Grants Pass and Medford, were last week engaged in working up Ashland citizens to the point of investing in ten or twenty thousand views of the granite city.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3
The Picture of Ashland.
    A comparison of the sketch of Ashland just made by the artist, Mr. E. Moore, with the lithograph of the town as it was seven or eight years ago, shows a wonderful improvement in the period that has intervened between the two sketches. The new sketch will make a handsome lithograph, and it may be made a most valuable advertisement for the town. Mr. Clutter is now making a canvass for subscriptions for copies of the picture, and it is to be hoped a large number of orders will be given. Every picture sent abroad with the proper amount of reading matter will be a good advertisement for the town and valley.
Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1890, page 3

JOHN A. COFFER
(1980)
Tintype artist (MMT9/26/1980)

C. E. COLLINS ART STORE
(1912-13)
    The Collins Art Store, consisting of $2300 stock, was recently purchased by D. S. Wood and son. Mr. Wood was formerly of the East, but has been located in Medford for the past three years and has represented an eastern photo company, which does very good work in all kinds of enlarging and pillow top work. In connection with the art store, Mr. Wood will still remain as an agent for the company and the work can be had at the store, where it will be framed if desired. All work is guaranteed, and Mr. Wood and son request their patrons to call and see them in their new home.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1913, page 4
    Art Store moved to 30 North Grape Street and now leads for bargains on everything. D. S. Wood.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 5, 1913, page 4

ZEB COLLINS
    Zeb. Collins, the photographer, was among friends near Watkins Sunday.
"Watkins Items," Jacksonville Post, March 12, 1910, page 1


J. W. CONNER
    J. W. Conner has erected a tent on the Sunny Side [the Sunnyside Hotel] of Eagle Point and opened a photograph gallery.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, January 12, 1906, page 3
    J. W. Conner, our photographer, made his tent last Saturday and took to the tall timber to spend the summer.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, June 1, 1906, page 3

ELDRED W. CORLEY
(1935-41)
    Eldred W. Corley, who has been conducting a photographic studio at his residence on South Riverside, has moved his studio to 215 East Main Street, over Swem's. Mr. Corley, who had ten years' experience in Portland and Eugene studios before entering this field, will carry on his business under the name "Corley Photos."
"Corley's Studio in New Location," Medford Mail Tribune, November 3, 1935, page 12
    Eldred W. Corley, photographer of 12 years experience, has opened a studio in new location at 216½ E. Main across the street from the former one. This location offers many more accommodations than the former studio but still retains the original prices.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, October 19, 1938, page 3
    I HAVE the 1940 and 1941 negatives from Corley's Studio. Anyone wishing a reprint may contact E. E. Jordan at 515 W. 2nd.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1942, page 9
    Corley Here--E. W. (Spike) Corley, former Medford photographer now a photographer's mate first class in the navy, is in Medford visiting friends and relatives.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 14, 1944, page 9

J. H. COYLE & WILLIAM G. CUTBERTH
(Medford 1893)
    A good, live, progressive city of over 2,000 people and no photographer--that's Medford.

Editorial, Medford Mail, July 21, 1893, page 2
    Last week we said that Medford had no photographer--this week we have two. In the face of this there are perhaps those who will say advertising doesn't pay.
Editorial, Medford Mail, July 28, 1893, page 2
     Messrs. J. H. Coyle and W. G. Cutberth, of Stockton, Calif., have opened a photographer's gallery in Medford--in the Hamlin block on Seventh Street. They are both married men, and their families are with them, and all propose to remain permanently. Work is coming in fairly well, and they feel correspondingly encouraged. They are said to be first-class artists, and such being the case they deserve our patronage.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 28, 1893, page 3

    Medford has no photographer--just think of it! A city with a population of over two thousand people and no photographer. The Mail editor is not so handsome that he desires particularly to be focused, but there are a whole lot of good-looking girls and boys, whose ages range all the way from the cradle to pretty close to the grave, in this city who would look well in a frame, but--no photographer no picture, no picture no frame. If some good, reliable artist will anchor a base right here in Medford and can prove by his work that he is a workman worthy of the hire, he will do a good business. No fakes need apply--our people have been bilked quite aplenty.
Medford Mail, September 8, 1893, page 2


H. S. CROCKER CO., INC.

San Francisco
postcard publisher

SAMUEL B. CROW (1913)
    S. B. Crow, who for the past two years has had a picture gallery opposite the courthouse, has moved to his fine new establishment in Kinney's building almost opposite St. Mary's Hospital. . . . Mr. W. A. Bell of San Francisco is associated with him; his long experience in the best galleries of the metropolis will be of value to those who wish to secure the shadow ere the substance fades.
"First-Class Photograph Gallery," Daily Morning Astorian, June 14, 1884, page 3
    I also applied to Dr. Aborn one month ago. I soon found relief. My ear now feels as well as it ever did, and my hearing is restored. I have resided at Astoria for eight years and can be referred to. S. B. Crow, Photographer, Astoria, Oregon.
"Hearing Restored," advertisement, Oregonian, Portland, November 2, 1890, page 7
    The name of S. B. Crow is notorious, and it needs but be added that he is the celebrated photographer of Astoria. His place of business is on Third Street, near the Central Hotel, and his work is of such excellence of character that once seen it attracts persons to it. Lifelike and attractive are Mr. Crow's photographs, and if you don't believe go and see him and send a photograph back to your dear old mother.
"Santa Claus Coming," Daily Astorian, December 21, 1890, page 3
    Samuel B. Crow v. Matilda A. Crow, decree for divorce allowed.
"Circuit Court," Hillsboro Independent, July 20, 1894, page 3
    The Gregory studio has been sold to S. B. Crow of Portland, an experienced photographer. Mrs. Gregory will move to Long Beach, where she will open a studio.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1913, page 6


WILLIAM G. CUTBERTH (Medford 1893, Spokane 1901, Portland 1902-16, Tacoma 1905-08, Sacramento 1912)
See Coyle & Cutberth


DAILONG
(?)

    Mr. Dailong [sic--Dunlap?], a traveling photographer, pitched his tent here last Saturday.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, April 5, 1901, page 5

CARL C. DARLING
(1918-33)
Some postcards have a handwritten "CD" logo of a large "C" wrapped around a small "D" (See Chester Stevenson). Others are inscribed "C.D." or "Darling."
    All of the victims of the explosion at the Braden mine are doing nicely. An operation was performed on Carl Darling at the Grants Pass hospital Sunday evening, removing the gravel from the base of the brain. Carl stood the effect of the operation well, and now that the wound is thoroughly cleansed it is thought that there will be nothing to impede his progress.
Gold Hill News, December 7, 1906, quoted in Gold Hill News, December 8, 1932, page 4
    Carl and Leslie Darling both arrived home Thursday, the former from Nevada City, California, where he works in a power plant, and the latter from Frisco, where he has been in a hospital as a result of an accident three months ago at Hornbrook.
"Local News Notes,"
Gold Hill News, March 4, 1911, page 5
    Chester Stevenson has sold his studio to C. C. Darling of Oakland and expects to take up aerial photographic work in the army soon. Mr. and Mrs. Darling are experienced photographers.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1918, page 5
    Mrs. W. E. Darling of Gold Hill has come to Ashland to make her home with her son, photographer C. C. Darling.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1919, page 5
Carl Darling ad, May 14, 1926 Ashland Daily Tidings
May 14, 1926 Ashland Daily Tidings

ISAAC GRUNDY DAVIDSON
    Quite a number of our citizens will visit Crater Lake this season. Among them we will notice Messrs. Johnson, Redfield, Agers, and the photographer Davidson, who will take views of the scenery.
"Klamath County," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3

J. H. DAVIS
    J. H. Davis and family left Tuesday for Klamath Falls, at which place Mr. Davis will engage in photography.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 18, 1902, page 6

FRANK and JUNE DEMENT
    Frank and June Dement have established their firm in the Rogue River Record office on Broadway Street and will sell photo supplies, do commercial developing and do commercial and portrait photography. They came here a month ago from Eugene, where Dement was a student at the university.
"Rogue River Has New Businesses," Medford Mail Tribune, May 9, 1947, page 7

CHARLES A. DeSCHENKA (1914-1915)
    We have leased the F. L. Camps Art Studio and are prepared to make the best high-class, up-to-date photographic work that high-priced instrument and artistic ability can produce.
Advertisement,
Ashland Tidings, December 17, 1914, page 4
New Photographer Wyoming Mayor
    The Hartville (Wyo.) Uplift mentions the following in regard to Mr. DeSchenka, who left there for Salem some time ago, and who has now opened up the Camps Studio: "C. A. DeSchenka and daughter, Daisy, departed Wednesday evening for Salem, Ore., where Mr. DeSchenka expects to locate. Mrs. DeSchenka and family will join him after the holidays. The people of Hartville feel that they have lost a valuable citizen in Mr. DeSchenka. He was prominent in the politics of the town and had served as mayor and city clerk. He also edited the Hartville Uplift until it came under the present management. His many friends wish him every success in his new location."
Ashland Tidings, December 21, 1914, page 8

JOSEPH SILAS DILLER
(Crater Lake 1901)
    Prof. J. S. Diller is at Crater Lake making a report on some features of the country for the scientific department of the government. He was accompanied by an assistant and Burton Cunningham, of Ft. Klamath, is assisting them with the plates from his photo camera. It will take a month to do the work.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, July 4, 1901, page 1

ORVIL DODGE
(Jacksonville 1862 and 1864-66, Phoenix 1864, Roseburg 1867, Oakland 1871, Myrtle Point 1880s)
    New Photograph Rooms at Phoenix, Oregon, where artistic and life-like pictures are being taken, unsurpassed for beauty of outline and touch of finish and in the latest and most improved style of the art. Old pictures copied, improved, and rendered imperishable.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 6, 1864, page 2
    Ira came down and went with me to training at Ashland, he rode a colt he is breaking for Anderson, there were thirty members of the company present. we had a pleasant time. I took dinner at the Captains Applegates after noon Proffessor Dodge took the photographs of the company all in position. We have had a fine day Mrs. Holton and Mrs Robison were visiting at Ashland. Wallace is rather worse to night. Peggy Blackburn went on the stage to Coles ranch to work this morning Sarah is at Naylors, Eliza at Wagners
Welborn Beeson Diary, June 4, 1864
    Orvil Dodge has opened a new Photographic Gallery in Jacksonville. Give him a call.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 24, 1864, page 2
    
ORVIL DODGE would announce to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Jacksonville and vicinity that he has permanently located in Jacksonville for the purpose of taking pictures in all the improved art of Photography, and would respectfully solicit a share of the public patronage.
    
ROOMS opposite P. J. Ryan's New Brick.
    Jacksonville, December 23rd, 1864.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 29, 1865, page 4
    Mr. Orvil Dodge desires us to say that he will close his photograph gallery one week from next Monday, as he leaves for Ft. Klamath at that time. Those desiring to get good pictures at reduced rates should avail themselves of this opportunity.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 3, 1865, page 2

    NOT GONE YET.--Orvil Dodge, who we announced some time since was going to Fort Klamath, wishes us to state that he has postponed his visit for a few weeks, and is still prepared to render up "the human face divine"
 at his rooms in this place.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 24, 1865, page 2
    ORVIL DODGE would announce to the Ladies and Gentlemen of Jacksonville and vicinity that he has received an invoice of new stock, rearranged his gallery and is now permanently located in Jacksonville for the purpose of taking pictures in all the improved art of Photography, and would respectfully solicit a share of the public patronage.
    ROOMS opposite P. J. Ryan's New Brick.
    Jacksonville, December 23rd, 1864.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 24, 1865, page 3

    PHOTOGRAPHY.--We are informed that our old townsman, O. Dodge, has taken rooms at Roseburg, and is prepared to take pictures in all styles of the art.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 23, 1866, page 2

BERTRAND DOT DOTSON (Eugene 1931-present)

FRANK DUNCAN (Klamath Falls)
    Frank Duncan, a Klamath Falls photographer, Charles Patten, Ernest W. Smith, Earle Brainard and Roy Parker of Butte Falls hold the record of having ascended Mt. Pitt the earliest of the season. . . . Mr. Duncan secured some views on the mountain's summit and through the country about the hills.--Klamath Falls Northwestern.
"Climb Mount Pitt," Ashland Tidings, June 27, 1912, page 4

DUNLAP & BAILEY (1902)
George A. Dunlap and Alfred Leslie Bailey
    Geo. A. Dunlap and Lester [sic] Bailey, two excellent photographers, have gone to Josephine County on business connected with their profession. They never fail to please.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1902, page 1
    Geo. Dunlap, the expert photographer, was in town Thursday. He is operating in Josephine County with Lester Bailey and doing well.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
November 6, 1902, page 2

DUNLAP & KERSHAW (1901)
George A. Dunlap and Peter M. Kershaw

    G. W. Dunlap and P. M. Kershaw, photographers, have been taking several fine views of Medford streets, also some birdseye views of the town. These they find are taking well among our townspeople and they are selling many of them.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, April 19, 1901, page 2

    Dunlap & Kershaw of Medford were down the Applegate this week doing very good work in photography. Their pictures of schools, mines and farm residences are very natural, and need no further praise. They took a picture Sunday of the two ball teams on Applegate, and a special one of the good-looking group of ladies present.
"Applegate," Valley Record, Ashland, May 9, 1901, page 2
    P. M. Kershaw left Monday for several Northern California points, where he will canvass for the sale of stereoscopic views. He expects to be absent about two months when he will return and resume work in that line in Jackson County.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, January 10, 1902, page 6

GEORGE A. DUNLAP (1900-02)
    For stamp photos see Mackey & Dunlap. 24 for 25 cents.

Medford Mail, September 21, 1900, page 6

    Mackey & Dunlap for superior photos. Always the best and prices O.K.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 21, 1900, page 7

    Ed. Weston, who has been conducting the Medford photograph gallery with G. W. Mackey, has retired and is succeeded by Geo. Dunlap of Phoenix.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1900, page 3
    George Dunlap and family, of Medford, spent Thanksgiving with relatives in Phoenix.
"Phoenix Items," Medford Mail, December 7, 1900, page 3
    G. W. Dunlap and P. M. Kershaw, photographers, have been taking several fine views of Medford streets, also some birdseye views of the town. These they find are taking well among our townspeople, and they are selling many of them.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, April 19, 1901, page 2

    Messrs. P. M. Kershaw and G. A. Dunlap left this week for the Waldo country, where they will do photography for a couple or three weeks.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 28, 1902, page 6

    Messrs. Kershaw and Dunlap, who are excellent photographers, are in Josephine County with their outfit, to remain several weeks.
"Southern Oregon News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1902, page 1
    G. A. Dunlap, a well-known photographer formerly of this city, but who is now an honest granger owning a fine ranch on the Applegate near Murphy post office, was in Phoenix over Sunday, visiting with his relatives, and Monday he was in Medford greeting his old-time friends.

Medford Success, December 16, 1902, page 1
    Geo. A. Dunlap, the well-known photographer, who is now farming in Josephine County, has been visiting in Medford and Phoenix.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1902, page 2

ROBERT H. and GEORGE A. DUNLAP (ca. 1870)
    The 1870 census lists Robert H. Dunlap, 30, born in Michigan, as a photographer in Applegate precinct.

    G. A. Dunlap, a well-known photographer formerly of this city, but who is now an honest granger owning a fine ranch on the Applegate near Murphy post office, was in Phoenix over Sunday, visiting with his relatives, and Monday he was in Medford greeting his old-time friends.
Medford Success, December 16, 1902, page 1


EASTMAN'S STUDIO
(1907-80s)
Jervie Henry Eastman, Kennett, California 1880-1969. Postcard publisher.
    Rex H. Lampman was at Jacksonville with photographer Eastman on business Monday.
"Local News Notes,"
Gold Hill News, January 27, 1912, page 5

EDDY
(Oregon City 1910-47+)
Ralph J. Eddy, Lillian Eddy, Watson B. Eddy.
Postcard Publisher.
Ralph J. Eddy 1909-10-2p4EnterpriseNews-Record
October 24, 1909 Enterprise, Oregon News-Record

ELITE STUDIO (1901-03)
See J. W. Hunter, James Owings, E. L. Chapale, Frank Hull, George Mackey, Frank Redden

    The Elite Studio, located in the Hamlin Block, opened for business Thursday morning. The proprietor, J. W. Hunter, has been having a great deal of work done on the interior of the studio and now has one of the prettiest and best arranged galleries in Southern Oregon. He has had the room thoroughly renovated, repapered and repainted from floor to ceiling, and has provided new and modern light reflectors and other strictly modern studio fixtures. The public is cordially invited to call and see samples of the work turned out by him.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 26, 1901, page 7
    The tone of the picture and the smoothness is why the people are talking about the Elite Studio's work, can't be beat.
    The photos that come from the Elite are so smooth and fine, nicely retouched, that's what opens the eyes of the people.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 24, 1901, page 7
    Reduced rates on photos at the Elite Studio in Medford. In order to thoroughly introduce our work to the public, we will for a time make cabinets for $1.50 per dozen. Satisfaction guaranteed or no pay. Yours for fine work, Elite Photo Company.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 9, 1902, page 7

    G. W. Mackey has leased the Elite Studio, in the Hamlin block, and expects to at once open a photograph gallery there. He will continue to operate the gallery in the Adkins block. Ed. Chappel, a photographer from Kansas, will have charge of Mr. Mackey's new gallery.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 10, 1902, page 7
    Frank Redden returned Monday from Jacksonville and the Applegate country, where he has been in the interests of the Elite Studio. He reports very good success on this, his first trip.
    F. H. Hull, of the Elite Studio, is having an entire new set of backgrounds made. The largest one will be 10 feet high and 15 feet long, large enough for any group which can be accommodated in the studio.
"City Briefs," Medford Success, February 10, 1903
     The Elite Studio has had a change of management this week. F. H. Hull has bought the studio for the present month, but has secured the services of G. W. Mackey for the finishing work. The deal was completed last Wednesday and Mr. Hull took charge at once. On Thursday Frank Redden began soliciting orders for the studio and Mr. Hull expects to have others and start out himself soon, expecting to do everything possible to increase the business of the Elite. Frank is a hustling, energetic young man and deserves the patronage of the public.
"City Briefs," Medford Success, February 10, 1903, page 2
    Why not buy your Kodak supplies where you can get instructions for using them? The Elite Studio.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 5, 1903, page 7

 
PERRY ELLIS
(Prospect 1893-96, Central Point 1896-97, Hillsboro 1899-ca.1902)
    Perry Ellis and wife last week returned to the valley and proceeded to Prospect, where they will operate a photograph gallery during the summer season.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 2
    Mr. Ellis is a photographer and has many fine views of the upper Rogue River and its falls, as well as many others of the beautiful scenery which abounds thereabouts.

"Purely Personal,"
Medford Mail, June 29, 1894, page 3
    Perry Ellis, photographer, Prospect, Oregon. Photographs of pleasure and outing parties a specialty. Views of Crater Lake, Rogue River Falls and all other points of interest in this locality furnished upon application at reasonable terms.

Advertisement, Medford Mail, August 31, 1894, page 2

    Our photographer, Perry Ellis, will visit Crater Lake soon to enjoy a holiday and secure views of the grand and rugged scenery there.
"Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, August 31, 1894, page 4
    Perry Ellis, who is now located near Prospect, is still fond of his photographic instruments and has been taking a tour of the scenic points of Klamath County.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, September 13, 1894, page 1
    Perry Ellis, the Prospect scenic photographer, was in Medford Tuesday. The gentleman has taken many beautiful pictures of Crater Lake and upper Rogue River country and is now offering them for sale.

"Purely Personal,"
Medford Mail, November 16, 1894, page 3
    Photographer Perry Ellis has been splitting a large number of rails, to be used in fencing Miss Kittie Ellis' farm.

"Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, February 21, 1896, page 2
    The following young men will not live single longer if they can help it. They desire to correspond with ladies matrimonially inclined. Will positively answer every letter received. Photos exchanged. Each of these young men have property and money. Perry Ellis--photographer, age 30, dark hair and mustache (Perry is almost a handsome man), 5 feet 9 inches, 150 pounds. Ren Green--wavy, dark brown hair, small mustache, age 22, weight 175, 5 feet 9 inches tall. George Stockton--light brown hair and small brown mustache, 5 feet 8¾ inches tall, 138 pounds, prominent nose.

"Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, March 20, 1896, page 2
    Perry Ellis is taking views of Rogue River Falls and other scenes for Stan Aiken, which he will have cuts made of to use on his stationery.
"Prospect Items," Medford Mail, May 29, 1896, page 2
    Perry Ellis, the Prospect photographer, was in the metropolis last week exhibiting some of his excellent views of the fine scenery of the upper Rogue River country. The gentleman has some most excellent views of the magnificent scenery along the Rogue River--and of these he has a large supply with which to supply the visiting Mazamas. There is, without a doubt, no more beautiful scenery anyplace in Oregon than is found along the Rogue River, and nearly all these points of interest will be pointed out to the Mazamas in their trip from Medford to Crater Lake in August.
"Purely Personal,"
Medford Mail, June 26, 1896, page 8
    We up here are all just a little proud of each other. In this connection, we're all proud of the work done by photographer Ellis, which is unequaled. He is still enlarging his collection of views, which includes some of the wildest and grandest of scenes. He is just now taking several more views about Crater Lake. Messrs. Moore, Beauregard and Stockton had him secure likenesses of their respective farms recently, and Beauregard [Olaf Rye Bjerregaard] had a photograph of his famous inlaid wood frame taken.

George Stockton, "Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, July 24, 1896, page 5

    Perry Ellis, our photographer, is busy taking scenes along Rogue River, and expects to go to Crater Lake in a few days to take views of the lake.
"Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, August 14, 1896, page 5

    Photographer Ellis' business cards [i.e., small signs] are quite noticeable up and down the road--as to the quality and neatness--bearing Mail office style of print about them. Perry's work in the photograph line is of the same good quality.
George Stockton, "Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, September 25, 1896, page 3

    PERRY ELLIS, the Prospect photographer, was in Medford last week. Mr. Ellis is doing considerable work in the valley these times.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 16, 1896, page 6

    Perry Ellis, of Prospect, purchased from C. W. Palm this week lot five in block twenty-two, on D Street, and will build thereon soon. He is figuring on erecting a two-story brick house arranged so as to enable him to use part of it for a photograph gallery. The price paid for the lot was $200.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, November 13, 1896, page 7    Lot 5 was on Central, not Front. I don't know if Ellis actually built on the lot.

    Perry Ellis has opened a photograph gallery at Central Point in Mrs. Barnard's old stand, and will locate there for the winter. Owing to his inability to haul his lumber from Prospect this winter, on account of the conditions of the roads, he has decided not to build on his recently purchased lots in Medford until spring, at which time he will erect a gallery and locate there.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, December 4, 1896, page 7
    Perry Ellis, the photographer, of Prospect, has leased Mrs. Barnard's gallery for the winter.
"Central Point Items," Medford Mail, December 11, 1896, page 3
    Perry Ellis, the photographer, has quit business at Central Point and will move back to Prospect.
"Prospect Pointers," Medford Mail, January 29, 1897, page 3
    I am now prepared to make photographs in my new studio five blocks east of the court house, corner 7th and Baseline streets. Perry Ellis, Hillsboro, Feb. 22.
Argus, Hillsboro, February 23, 1899

    Perry Ellis, a former Hillsboro photographer, and who knows the art family throughout, was in town from Hillsdale Saturday, accompanied by Mrs. Ellis. He is handling real estate and farming.
The Argus, Hillsboro, June 10, 1909


ELLISON PORTRAIT STUDIO
(1942-52)
Clarence E. Ellison
    Business Retirement--C. Ellison has filed an application in the county clerk's office for retirement of the assumed business name of the Ellison Studios in Jackson County.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, May 7, 1952, page 11
    Mr. Ellison has been associated in the photography business for the past twenty years, formerly owned and operated the Ellison Studios, 32 North Central Street.
    Mr. Ellison, who resides at 453 Haven Street, has been a resident of Medford for the past 12 years; he is married and has two children, Carol Faye Ellison, 16 years old, who attends Medford Senior High School, and Judy Ann Ellison, 14 years old, freshman at Medford junior high.
    Mr. Ellison is widely known in Medford for his excellent photography work.
    As a service to our many customers Big Y Market is proud and privileged to have the services of a professional photographer such as Mr. Clarence Ellison.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1952, page 3
    Ellison Studio, 32 North Central, N. Harry Foreman, Operator-Photographer for the Past 3 Years. No Connection with the Deal at the Big Y Market.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1952, page B7
    Assumes Name--Harry Foreman has assumed the name Ellison Studio for a photography business at 32 North Central Avenue, according to county clerk's records.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1953, page 7


KENNETH ERSKINE
(Flounce Rock 1910-12)


EVERGREEN STUDIO
(1942-45)
James C. Wilson, 40 S. Central, Medford

Brainerd Studio Is Sold to J. C. Wilson
    Phil Brainerd, proprietor for the past two years of the Brainerd Studio and Camera Shop, 40 South Central Avenue, announced yesterday the sale of the business to J. C. Wilson of Portland, an experienced photographer, who will assume possession on [omission] and open for business Tuesday. Sale price was not revealed.
    The new owner will engage in portrait photography only, and will bring his own equipment. Brainerd and Mrs. Brainerd will remain here for a few days before moving to Grants Pass, where they will reside until Brainerd leaves to enter the U.S. army signal corps in about two weeks.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1942, page 5
Evergreen Studio Operator Studies Glamor Technique
    Mrs. Ruth Devon of the Evergreen Studio here recently completed a training tour in Hollywood, studying methods of lighting and other effects used by motion picture photographers in putting glamor and action into their still photos. Amos Carr, famous photographer of the film capital, was the instructor.
    The training including photographing many screen and photo stars by Mrs. Devon.
    Mrs. Devon's training course included photographing many screen and radio stars, among them Jane Powell, Kenny Baker, J. O'Farrell McDonald, Jimmy Durante, Donald Woods, Dale Evans and Constance Moore, and also a demonstration in Hollywood photographic makeup.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 15, 1944, page 10
November 19, 1944 Medford Mail Tribune
November 19, 1944 Medford Mail Tribune


ELIAS F. AND RAY EVERITT
(1884-1898)
    Louis Heller, the well-known photographer, has returned to Fort Jones, Cal., his old home. He is succeeded at Ashland by E. F. Everitt.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, July 25, 1884, page 3
    Come and see the views of [the] National Park at Everitt's Gallery, Ashland.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 26, 1884, page 3
Everitt's Gallery, August 1, 1884 Ashland Tidings
Everitt's Gallery, August 1, 1884 Ashland Tidings
    E. F. Everitt, the photographer, has gone to Grants Pass, to try business there. He is a first-class photographic artist, and has taken portrait and landscape pictures of which the finest photographers of the cities might be proud.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1884, page 3
    Mr. Everitt, proprietor of the Grants Pass photograph gallery, has been absent for a few days. Mr. Everitt is a first-class artist. His gallery is in the big tent on Sixth Street.
"Local News," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 3, 1885, page 3
    Persons who may wish photographs from negatives made by the undersigned while in Ashland can procure them by sending orders to Grants Pass, as the negatives have all been preserved.                                                           E. F. EVERITT.
    Grants Pass, Or., May 29, 1885.
Ashland Tidings, February 5, 1886, page 3
    Everitt the photographer took pictures of the wonderful tree specimen discovered by Wm. Chapman.
"Local and Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, October 1, 1886, page 3

    Mrs. Wm. Fehely of Kerbyville precinct is studying photography at Grants Pass under E. F. Everitt, and is making commendable progress.
"Josephine County News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 2

    E. F. Everitt has taken possession of his new photo gallery, and a neat place of business it is.
"Josephine County," Valley Record, Ashland, September 6, 1888, page 2

    E. F. Everitt, the artistic photographer of Grants Pass, was visiting his daughter, Mrs. Geo. Hargadine, (and new granddaughter) this week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 13, 1889, page 3

    E. F. Everitt, the photographer, has taken several group views of the ladies who took part in Friday's business carnival.
"Grants Pass Notes," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1890, page 2
    E. F. Everitt will devote himself to outside work in the photographic line during the coming summer, having secured a competent assistant to take charge of his gallery.
"Josephine County Items," Southern Oregon Mail, Medford, April 24, 1891, page 2

    E. F. Everitt of Grants Pass, while the teachers' institute was in session, photographed Helen Colvig of Jacksonville in eight different positions, with pleasant effect. The young miss was on the programme for several recitations and acquitted herself creditably. It was in the attitudes she then assumed that she was photographed, under the direction of Miss Jennie Reames, her teacher in elocution.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 13, 1894, page 3

    R. Everitt, of Grants Pass, and Miss Ollie Butler, of this city, were married at Grants Pass on Wednesday of this week. Mr. Everitt is a photographer at Grants Pass, and Miss Ollie, she who is now Mrs. Everitt, is the accomplished daughter of our good townsman and jeweler, B. N. Butler. The happy couple came to Medford Wednesday and remained the day with the bride's parents, returning to Grants Pass in the evening. The Mail is congratulating.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 23, 1896, page 7
    R. M. Everitt, the veteran photographer, is now in business in San Diego County, Cal.
"Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, January 28, 1897, page 3
    Mr. and Mrs. B. N. Butler and daughter, Mrs. R. J. Everitt, took Sunday's delayed train for Colestin to spend a few weeks. R. J. Everitt, the Grants Pass photographer, joined them, coming up on the same train. Mr. Butler returned to Medford Monday evening.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 23, 1897, page 6
    Ray Everitt, the photographer, has sold his gallery and is seeking a new location. He is in Medford at present. Success to him wherever he goes.
"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 21, 1898, page 2
    R. J. Everitt, the photographer, is visiting Mrs. Everitt and her parents, Mr. and Mrs. B. N. Butler, in Medford.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, February 3, 1899, page 6
    Mrs. Everitt is engaged at photographic work in the Van E studio. The lady has but recently recovered from quite a severe illness, as has also her mother, Mrs. B. N. Butler.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 24, 1899, page 7

    E. F. Everitt and Ray are now engaged in the photograph business at Redlands, Calif.
"Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, September 5, 1901, page 3

HARRY FIELD
(1945-51)
    WANTED--On or before Sept. 1st  1- or 2-bedroom unfurnished house or apartment in or near Medford by business couple. Call Monday through Friday, 1 to 4 p.m. Field Studio, Liberty Bldg. Phone 4087.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1945, page 5
Photographers Buy Field Studio Here
    Robert Arbuckle and Jack C. Moran, who have been conducting a photography business here for the past year, have purchased the Field studio in the Leverette building, it was announced today.
    Both young photographers attended the Art Center school in Los Angeles before coming to the Rogue Valley. They did the photographic work for the Oregon Shakespeare Festival Association program this summer.
    Moran, in addition to his photographic work, is also a portrait painter and has painted a number of local people.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Field, proprietors of the studio for several years, are retiring to their ranch on Ross Lane on the west side of the valley.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 1, 1951, page 8


HENRY C. FINSTER

    Miss Martha Laack, of Utica, Minnesota, and Mr. H. C. Finster, met about three years ago at Ashland, Ore., while Miss Laack was there on a visit to her sister. Mr. Finster was a traveling photographer.
"Minnesotan Weds an Oregonian," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, December 5, 1900, page 3

AMASA PLUMMER FLAGLOR
(1878)
    COMING.--A. P. Flaglor, of Eureka (Cal.), a first-class photographer, will be in Jacksonville ere long, well supplied with apparatus and prepared to take pictures in the highest style of the art. Mr. Flaglor's reputation is well established wherever he is known, and he guarantees satisfaction.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 28, 1878, page 3

    A. P. Flaglor, of Eureka, California, a first-class photographer, will arrive here soon.
"Brief Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1878, page 3
    PHOTOGRAPHS.--Mr. A. P. Flaglor is still in Jacksonville, and will remain here two weeks more. We had reason to speak of his ability as an artist, and we are pleased to say that Mr. Flaglor has fully sustained his reputation as an artistic photographer. Mr. Flaglor will visit Ashland, Kerbyville and Roseburg before returning to his home in California. Mr. Flaglor's prices are low and his pictures are the best. Call early.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1878, page 3
    PHOTOGRAPHS.--We take pleasure in calling the attention of our readers to the fact that A. P. Flaglor, of Eureka, Cal., is now in Jacksonville and will remain here for a few weeks. Mr. Flaglor is an accomplished artist, and the photographs produced by him are equal to any that are made. His great success in taking pictures of children is a guarantee that the "little ones" will be successfully photographed. Mr. Flaglor's prices are so reasonable that we trust all will avail themselves of this, the best opportunity to get first-class photographs at San Francisco prices. Call early, as his stay is limited.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1878, page 3
    POSTPONED.--We have information that Mr. Flaglor, the photographic artist, will not be in Ashland until the 17th inst.
"Local Intelligence," Ashland Tidings, September 13, 1878, page 3

    No more photographs have been taken at Flaglor's since last Sunday. He has a large number of negatives on hand, which it will probably take him until October 5th to finish.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 25, 1878, page 3
    CLOSED DOWN.--A. P. Flaglor, the photographer, on Sunday last ceased taking pictures, and is now engaged in finishing up those previously taken. During his stay here he has been well patronized, his excellent photographs giving general satisfaction. Messrs. Flaglor and Wunderlich leave for Eureka next week, well pleased with their trip to this place. They talk seriously of returning next year.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville,
September 27, 1878, page 3
    The Eureka (Cal.) papers announce the insolvency of A. P. Flaglor, the photographer, who made this place a visit last summer. Flaglor is an excellent artist, and we hope that he will be able to extricate himself from his unfortunate predicament.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1879, page 3

    Mr. A. P. Flaglor has removed his photograph gallery to his new and elegant rooms on Second Street, one block below the courthouse, and is now prepared to make all styles of photographs known to the art. The public are invited to visit the gallery. Reader, drop in as you are passing.
The Daily Humboldt Times, Eureka, California, July 1, 1879

    We are pleased to learn that A. P. Flaglor of Eureka (Cal.), who paid our town a visit last summer, is about to extricate himself from the financial difficulties that have overtaken him. He is an amiable gentleman and a first-class photographer, and we hope to hear of his unbounded success.
"Brief Reference," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1879, page 3
    Henry Wunderlich of Eureka, Cal., who spent a season in Jacksonville with A. P. Flaglor a number of years ago, has become a first-class photographer and is taking pictures for the S.F. Examiner.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3


ROBERT LACHLAN FORBES (Jacksonville 1865, Eugene 1873-76)
    Subscription list of Waldo precinct to the Josephine County Volunteer Bounty Fund Association, January 26th 1865 . . . Robert L. Forbes. . . .
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 20, 1865, page 2
    Mr. Frank Alverson has purchased the photograph gallery for a long time run by R. L. Forbes, and proposes to give us a "new deal."
Oregon State Journal, Eugene, September 2, 1876
    LUCKY WIDOW.--An Oregon grass widow at one time a resident of Jacksonville as the wife of a photographer named Forbes has turned up in a San Francisco court as plaintiff in a breach of promise suit. It seems that she had received the attention of a frisky old bachelor named Ridgeway for about ten years and, failing to bring him up to the matrimonial point, she commenced a suit for metallic compensation for wasted time and wounded feelings. The court has awarded her $5,000, which will get her a husband most anywhere, and the gay old trifler will learn not to fool with widows unless he means business.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 18, 1882, page 3

FOREMAN STUDIO (1951-55)
N. Harry and Ruth T. Foreman

    Ellison Studio, 32 North Central, N. Harry Foreman, Operator-Photographer for the Past 3 Years. No Connection with the Deal at the Big Y Market.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1952, page B7
    Assumes Name--Harry Foreman has assumed the name Ellison Studio for a photography business at 32 North Central Avenue, according to county clerk's records.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1953, page 7
    Foreman's Studio, formerly Ellison's Studio, 32 North Central.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, October 18, 1953, page B7


FRYE & SMITH, LTD.

San Diego, California
postcard publisher. F&S logo, Kromekote postcards, "color by Bolty"

W. P. FULLER CO.

Wooden postcards, Longview, Washington
Displaying Woodcuts
    W. Madole of Longview, Wash., representing the W. P. Fuller Co., Seattle, was a visitor in Medford today, displaying postcard woodcuts of different Northwest scenic attractions, including Crater Lake, Mt. Hood and Mt. Rainier. The wood postcards can be sent through the mails, and are being made largely for an advertising project. Mr. Madole also had with him a large wood picture of Theodore Roosevelt, which did not resemble the likeness of its subject, unless the viewer was 15 or 20 feet away.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1930, page 3

GANDEE PRINTING CENTER

Medford, Oregon
occasional postcard printer

ROSWELL HENRY GARDINER
(itinerant: Roseburg area 1887; Rogue Valley 1887, 1889; Victoria, B.C. 1888; Clackamas 1888; Hillsboro 1889; Portland 1892-95)
    R. H. Gardiner, photographer, is in our city taking views of residences, etc.
Plaindealer, Roseburg, April 22, 1887, page 3
    Judge Stearns yesterday granted Roswell H. Gardiner a divorce from Mary Gardiner on the ground of cruelty. This case was tried last Friday.
"Local Notes," Oregonian, Portland, July 24, 1888, page 3  See issue of July 21, 1888, page 8.
    Two agents of the Great Eastern photo and advertising company, of which R. H. Gardiner is the manager, are in Southern Oregon for a short time, making views along the railroad for advertising purposes. The company wants views of all residences and business places. They will show you the pictures and give you a chance to purchase some if you wish. They are sold in one-half dozen and one dozen lots at low rates. Give them a chance to show up your business.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1889, page 3  These photos are mounted on a board imprinted "On the Line of the Oregon & California Railroad."

    R. H. Gardiner, the photographer, is still here and doing considerable work in the country.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1889, page 3
    J. F. Faulkenberry, salesman for R. H. Gardiner, the photographer, was in the city Saturday. They will leave for Siskiyou County next week..
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, February 7, 1889, page 3

    Porter, the drummer, and Mr. Gardiner, the photographer, made our valley a visit last week.
"Sams Valley Items," Valley Record, Ashland, February 7, 1889, page 3

    R. H. Gardiner, the traveling photographer, was here Monday accompanied by his wife. He has been kept busy because he does first-class work.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3
    Mr. Gardiner, the photographer, left Wednesday morning with a wife for Yreka, after having done a large amount of work in this and neighboring towns.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, March 1, 1889, page 3
FINE PHOTOGRAPHS.
    The Great Eastern Photo and Advertising Co. will be in Medford for two weeks only, commencing on May 27, 1889.
    All who desire pictures can now be supplied in the way of FIRST-CLASS PHOTOGRAPHS. Remember that a Thing of Beauty is a Joy forever, and a good Picture of a dear friend is memory's greatest Souvenir. We are prepared to do just as fine picture work as can be done in San Francisco or Portland, at prices ranging from $3.50 to $4.50 for the best cabinet photos ever made in Rogue River Valley. Remember, we do not tarry. When our time is up we go. And how often said and yet how true, that you will never miss the music until the sweet-voiced bird has flown.
    We guarantee satisfaction in every respect and give TWO SITTINGS. Don't think because we are in tents that we do inferior work, as this is not so. The best of light can be obtained in a tent if you know how to work them. From long experience in scientific photographer, and with superior instruments, [we] can do as fine work as produced in the best photograph galleries. Positively we will be in this place but two weeks. Don't miss this chance; come and see for yourselves. Do not stop for rainy or cloudy weather, but come and bring the babies early in the day.
A CHANCE FOR THE LADIES.
    $10 in cash will be presented to the best lady subject out of 50, during our two weeks' stay in Medford. No work done on Sundays.
    Will be in Eagle Point for one week, commencing Monday, June 10, 1889.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889 et seq., page 3
    WANTED--One first-class all-round workman to travel with photographer's tent. Address R. H. Gardiner, Hillsboro, Or.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 18, 1889, page 3
    R. H. Gardiner, a photographer from Portland, met with a serious accident while in Cathlamet. While sitting on the door step a chain attached to a yoke of oxen which was going by flew around and caught his right leg below the knee, crushing the muscles and producing a fracture of the leg.
Oregonian, Portland, August 8, 1893, page 4

ARTHUR M. GEARY
    Arthur M. Geary was a pleasant caller Wednesday on his way from the [Cat Hill] fire belt, where he has been taking photos of the fire and the means [they put out] the fire for the Oregonian.
"Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1910, page 10

JONATHAN OTIS GERKING
(1912-16)

    The funeral of Mrs. May Gerking, who died Saturday at her home on North Sixth Avenue, will be held at 10 o'clock this morning from the parlors of Moore & McLellan. Interment will be made in K. of P. cemetery. The deceased came to Phoenix with her husband from Portland, Oregon about four months ago.
Arizona Republican, Phoenix, January 31, 1911
    J. O. Gerking, the best all-around photographer in Southern Oregon. Always reliable. Negatives made anywhere, time or place. Studio 228 Main St. Phone 320-J.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, January 12-July 1, 1914
    Kodak finishing and all kinds of commercial work by Gerking, the photographer, over M.&M. Department store.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, February 13, 1914, page 6
    Have Gerking, over the Model Clothing Store, develop your Kodak films.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, June 13, 1915, page 2

    Take those Kodak negatives to Gerking over [the] M.M. Store for developing.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, June 2, 1916, page 2
J. O. Gerking, November 4, 1916 Medford Mail Tribune
November 4, 1916 Medford Mail Tribune
    J. O. Gerking, who formerly managed a photograph gallery in Medford, has returned to the city from an extensive stay in eastern Oregon and Klamath Falls. While at Klamath Mr. Gerking, who is a crack rifle shot, was engaged as a guard at one of the lumber mills in that section. He says for a time the feeling against the I.W.W. agitators was intense, and everyone toted a gun.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, August 9, 1917, page 2

    J. O. Gerking, the photographer, who was sworn in Tuesday as a temporary policeman to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of night officer Eugene Amann, is a candidate for the permanent appointment, and in furtherance of his cause has presented a petition to the city council bearing the names of a large number of citizens. The vacancy will not be permanently filled until the next council meeting.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, September 20, 1917, page 2

    Former city policeman J. O. Gerking, who resigned his position on the force a week ago, left Medford last night for Portland, where he performs a patriotic duty to Uncle Sam by entering the shipyards and aiding in the construction of war ships. . . . Many friends of the former policeman were at the depot to bid him farewell.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, March 31, 1918, page 2
    [The Hoover-Cooper Building fire was a loss to] J. O. Gerking, who had a lot of chemicals and apparatus stored in his former photograph gallery on the second floor.
"Fire Damages Clothing Store, Guts Building," Medford Mail Tribune, September 9, 1918, page 6
    J. O. Gerking, the former Medford photographer and policeman, who for some time has been a member of the Second Company, Oregon Military Police and stationed at Portland, was badly bruised in an auto accident near North Plains, Ore., last Sunday, in which three other fellow members of the state police met with serious injuries. The police detail was being hurried to combat a forest fire at the head of Scappoose River when the accident happened.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 11, 1918, page 2

GERKING & HARMON
(1913-14)
Jonathan Otis Gerking, Loren M. Harmon
    Gerking & Harmon, Commercial Photographers.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, January 14, 1913, page 2

    Crater Lake photographs pronounced by experts to be the best ever made of the lake at Gerking & Harmon's studio, 128 East Main Street, near First National Bank. Phone 2154. Kodak finishing and enlarging, negatives made any place.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 13-20, 1913, page 2
    Gerking & Harmon, studio portraits, home portraits, flash lights, kodak finishing, post card work and enlarging; 128 East Main Street; telephone 215 R.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 26, 1913, page 2

    Mr. Gerking, of the firm of Gerking & Harmon, the successful Medford photographers, was in this city Wednesday taking views and arranging with the staff of the high school annual to provide the illustrations for that publication. Mr. Gerking carried a portfolio of scenic views in and about Crater Lake, together with photographic records of flood and field--with Toggery Bill Isaacs frequently and conspicuously waist-deep in the flood and battling with seven-pound steelheads.
"Local News Notes,"
Gold Hill News, March 1, 1913, page 3
    Gerking & Harmon, studio portraits, home portraits, flash lights, kodak finishing, post card work and enlarging; 128 East Main Street, telephone 215 R.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, March 28, 1913, page 2

    Orchard, hunting, fishing and Crater Lake scenes for sale at Gerking & Harmon's studio. Negatives made any place, Kodak finishing. 128 East Main Street. Phone 215 R.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 6, 1913, page 8; Medford Mail Tribune, June 17, 1913, page 2
    The finest studio in southern Oregon has been opened by Gerking and Harmon at 228 East Main Street, first stairway east of Star Theater. Our work is always the best, views of all kinds for sale. The best of Kodak finishing. Negatives made any time or place. Phone 320-J.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, August 9, 1913, page 4
    Crater Lake pictures, a book of 12 pictures, hand colored, the finest ever made of the lake for sale at Gerking and Harmon's studio. Call and see them. 228 East Main Street, phone 320-J.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, August 9, 1913, page 4--also Medford Mail Tribune, September 11, 1913, page 5

    Wynne Scott, one of the most up-to-date portrait artists on the Pacific Coast, is taking charge of the portrait department for the Gerking & Harmon Photo Company, 228 East Main Street.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 10-November 7, 1913, page 2


GIBBS & WHEELER
(1893-94)
John B. Gibbs
    That Medford is going to have a resident photographer. A Cottage Grove man is now negotiating for gallery rent.

"It Is Whispered Around," Medford Mail, November 3, 1893, page 3
    J. B. Gibbs, a photographer from Oakland, Oregon, is in Medford looking over the city with a view to opening up our photograph gallery. He is a friend of our townsman, W. R. Woolsey.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 15, 1893, page 3

    Gibbs & Wheeler are here from Oakland, Oregon, and will open a photographer's gallery in this city. They will lease the old gallery if possible, but whether they do this or not they will remain here and do outside work. The old gallery is now held by lease by Cottage Grove parties, but there is no certainty that they will occupy it.

"All the Local News," Medford Mail, December 15, 1893, page 3
    Photographer Gibbs was at Phoenix last Friday and took some fine views of the Phoenix public school building, pupils and teachers.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, February 23, 1894, page 3
    There is a noticeable goneness in the second story of the Halley block. Gibbs & Wheeler, the photographers, have moved to D Street, near Mrs. Brous' residence.

Medford Mail, March 2, 1894, page 3

    Messrs. Gibbs & Wheeler, the photographers, are now prepared to execute the best of work in any and all lines of photographing. Their cabinet photos, as well as all outside work, such as buildings, orchards, stock, etc., is a prime article--and while the work is especially good, the prices are exceedingly low and within the reach of all--hard-time prices for flush-time work. Located on D Street, near Mrs. Brous' residence, Medford, Oregon.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, March 30, 1894, page 3
    There are a number of our people who remember Mr. Gibbs, of the photograph firm of Gibbs & Wheeler, who conducted a gallery in this city about a year ago, and they will be pleased to learn that he was married last week to Miss Dollie Lease, at French Gulch, California. The bride is an old acquaintance of Marion Tryer, and was at one time a resident of this section.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 27, 1895, page 5
    J. B. Gibbs, erstwhile Medford photographer, writes from Lewiston, Calif., stating that himself and Wheeler have dissolved partnership, and that he has been having considerable sickness in his family of late.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 18, 1896, page 7

BENJAMIN A. GIFFORD
    Listed among the Mazamas on an expedition to Crater Lake.
"Mazamas Leave for Crater Lake," Valley Record, Ashland, August 13, 1896, page 3
    Bent on a walking tour of Oregon that will yield several hundred fine photographs of the scenery of the state, B. A. Gifford of The Dalles, who has made many of the most famous photographs of Oregon and Columbia River scenery, will start for Seaside to commence his task of covering picturesque Oregon.
    Mr. Gifford and his son will have a pack horse to carry cameras and a camping outfit and will tramp the most of the way, so as to see everything that is worthwhile. They have made arrangements so that they can camp at certain points for a week if need be in order to secure the right atmospheric conditions. They intend walking down the cost to Newport from Seaside and later, after the rain has put out the forest fires and cleared the atmosphere, to go to the Rogue River Valley and the Crater Lake National Park.
    From Crater Lake they will go to Klamath Lake and then up the Deschutes River Valley, through Central Oregon and the Columbia River and Willamette Valley. They will be out until after the first of the year.
    The photographs are to be used by W. D. Harney in a book of Oregon views to be published by him, the history for the work being now under way by Judge George H. Williams.
"Will Take Views of Various Parts of State," Medford Daily Tribune, September 29, 1908, page 3
    Scenic wonders adjacent to Medford and the Rogue River Valley occupy no small part of an elaborate book of photogravures of Oregon scenery entitled "Art Work of Oregon," published by W. D. Harney, which is now being delivered to subscribers at Medford. There are 115 pages of photogravures and a history of Oregon.
    The photographs, each of which is a work of art, were taken by Gifford of The Dalles on a trip through this section last fall. . . . The photogravures of Southern Oregon are entitled as follows: "Jackson County Sugar Pine," "Crater Lake," "Treacherous Rogue Near Medford," "Lake of Woods," "Landscape from Dead Indian Trail," "Rogue Is Broad Near Medford," "Mill Creek Falls," "Lake McLaughlin," "Rapids of the Rogue," "Ashland Creek Near Ashland," "Mount Pitt--Desolation," "Orchard Scene Near Medford," "Where the Rogue Belies Its Name--Grants Pass," "New Government Trail on Lower Rogue," "Interior, Josephine County Caves," "Gold Ray, Table Rock in Distance," "Rogue River at Prospect," "Klamath Marsh," "Klamath Lake," "A Glimpse of the Rogue Near Medford," "Toadstool Rock Near Ashland," "Mt. Pitt from Dead Indian Trail," "Anna Creek Canyon Below Crater Lake."
"Book Portrays Scenic Wonders of Rogue Valley," Medford Mail, July 14, 1909, page 1
    It is entitled "Art Work of Portland: Mount Hood and the Columbia River." I wrote the text, and Gifford a photographer at The Dalles, took the photographs.
Fred Lockley,
"Impressions and Observations of the Journal Man," Oregon Journal, Portland, March 20, 1936, page 10

J. C. GITTNER

    J. C. Gittner, the clever photographer of Washington, is here putting the rosy cheeks of our young people on pasteboard. He has been kept very busy since coming here and is showing some splendid work in his line. He will remain here a short time, after which he will be found at Eagle Point.
"Sams Valley," Valley Record, Ashland, September 6, 1900, page 3

GLENDENNING (Ashland 1901)
    Now is the time to patronize Glendenning, the photographer and jeweler, who is now in your midst for a short time. He expects to go to the Willamette Valley about May first but his place will be filled by F. C. Crandell, an expert jeweler.
"Letter from Klamath Falls," Valley Record, Ashland, March 28, 1901, page 1


LEON A. GLUNTZ
New Portrait Studio Opened in Medford
    A new photographic studio specializing in color portrait work has been opened in Medford, it was announced today by Leon A. Gluntz of Gluntz Photo Studio, now in operation at the J. J. Newberry store here.
    Gluntz, who operates Gluntz Studio in Grants Pass, said that the Medford studio will be a branch of the Grants Pass concern. It will be managed by Ed Shaw and will be located here permanently, Gluntz said.
    The camera used is specifically designed for color portrait work and is the only one of its type in this area, Gluntz said. Only one company manufacturers it, and Gluntz said that he has the exclusive franchise in this area. The portraits are not tinted, he said, but use color film
    Gluntz also plans to open a commercial and engraving department in the near future, he said.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 18, 1949, page 10

J. A. GOFF
(1892)
    J. A. Goff has purchased the Medford photograph gallery from McBride & Case. We wish Mr. Goff success in his new venture.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 3, 1892, page 3
J. A. Goff ad, June 3, 1892 Southern Oregon Mail
June 3, 1892 Southern Oregon Mail
    J. A. Goff's photograph gallery sports a fine new sign.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 17, 1892, page 3
    Much better work is being done at the Medford photograph gallery since J. A. Goff became proprietor. His prices are also more reasonable.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 2
A Great Offer.
     I will give for the next 30 days one enlarged 11x14 picture, in India ink, with every dozen cabinets.
    J. A. Goff, Photographer, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3
    Cloudy days preferred for taking photographs by our instantaneous process.
J. A. GOFF, Medford, Or.               
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1892, page 3
    A good, live, progressive city of over 2,000 people and no photographer--that's Medford.
Editorial, Medford Mail, July 21, 1893, page 2
    J. A. Goff of Grave Creek, the pioneer miner, called last week. We are sorry to learn that his health is not the best.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 28, 1893, page 3
    John W. Goff, of Grave Creek, formerly a photographer in this city, visited relatives here during the past week.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 16, 1897, page 6
    I will not be responsible for any debts contracted or liable to be contracted by my wife, Mary Ethel Goff, as she left my bed and board without just cause or provocation.
JOHN A. GOFF, Leland, Ore.           
"Notice," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, May 18, 1906, page 4
    John A. Goff, 90, died Wednesday in the Parkview Nursing Home. His usual residence was 610 S.E. Riverside. Born Sept. 29, 1873 at Sams Valley, he had lived in this area for 86 years. He was a retired section foreman for the Southern Pacific railroad.
Daily Courier, Grants Pass, July 2, 1964

T. DeWITT GOODPASTURE
(1898, 1906-08)
    Portraits, all kinds and prices at The Medford Studio, opposite the post office. Best work and best prices. All work guaranteed. I can please you. Kodak finishing. DEWITT GOODPASTURE.
Southern Oregonian, Medford, July 24, 1898, page 5

    T. G. Goodpasture, of Willow Springs district, was in our midst the latter part of the week. He is handling a very fine lot of the Keystone views, of which he sold a quite a number.
"Phoenix Items," Medford Mail, January 19, 1906, page 8

    T. D. Goodpasture, of Central Point, was in Medford last week, calling upon his many acquaintances. While here he made a canvass of the city in the interest of stereoscopic views which he is selling. He found it pretty hard work getting an opportunity to show his goods. Our people have been flimflammed so many times with cheap, trashy stuff in this line that it is difficult to get them to look at his goods, notwithstanding the fact that they are far superior to anything shown here before. The views are many of them of especial local interest, and as they are made with a view to bringing out every detail clearly--hence exceedingly valuable. Give Mr. Goodpasture an opportunity to show you his views, and you will surely be interested.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 9, 1906, page 5

    DeWitt Goodpasture, who has opened a photograph gallery across the street from the Mail office, reports that he is doing a fine business, and more is coming to him each day. He is a splendid young man and deserves to do well.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 26, 1907, page 4

Opening of Goodpasture's Studio
    The photograph gallery which has been fitted up for occupancy by DeWitt Goodpasture, in the Clay building, over the Model Clothing Company's store, is now ready for use, and on Saturday of this week, October 12th, Mr. Goodpasture will have his opening. The studio is 18x57 feet in size and is said to be one of the best-appointed studios in Oregon south of Eugene. It is supplied with all modern features known to photography, and in it Mr. Goodpasture asserts that he will be able to produce the very best possible results in moder and up-to-date picture making. For one day--Saturday--Mr. Goodpasture will make pictures at half the usual price.
Medford Mail, October 11, 1907, page 5
Something New.
    Under the sun is what all the world is looking for, but fortunate indeed is the one who finds it. But now you have it right here in Medford, and it is well worth your time to go and have a look. Every year men come through here, call on you and get pictures of your loved ones to enlarge. They bring you a picture which they call a perfect likeness of the one you gave them, but which you know full well is not. There is something about it that you do not like, and yet you must take it or have the eyes punched out of the small picture which you sent away, or perhaps lost it entirely.
    There is a NEW gallery in town, run by a man who can make better enlargements than any agent can give you. He will give you plain pictures or one colored in natural, lifelike colors. Go to the gallery, and he will "show you" that his pictures are the best made, and they are the best.
    He makes a specialty of children's pictures. He likes the children, and they like him. He has the best studio in Southern Oregon and the bets equipment. He has the ONLY GOOD group light in town. Call at the Medford Studio if you want something new and up to date.
    Nothing is better for Christmas presents than pictures. Come in now, before the Christmas rush, so that I can guarantee delivery before the holidays. Pictures from 50 cents a dozen to $5 each.
    The Medford Studio, DeWitt Goodpasture, sole proprietor. Remember, Goodpasture makes Goodpictures.
Medford Mail, November 29, 1907, page 1
    The Medford Studio, DeWitt Goodpasture, prop., over Model Clothing Co.
"Social and Personal," Medford Daily Tribune, December 6, 1907, page 3

    The Medford Studio, DeWitt Goodpasture, sole proprietor. 7th and D streets, over the Model Clothing Co.
Medford Mail, December 27, 1907, page 1

    --Goodpasture makes Goodpictures.
Medford Mail, February 21, 1908, page 9
    T. D. Goodpasture, formerly a real estate dealer in Medford, came in recently from his ranch on Willow Creek. Mr. Goodpasture is putting out a fine orchard.
"Local Briefs," Southern Oregonian, March 4, 1908, page 8

    De Witte Goodpasture has sold his photo studio over the Model Clothing Store to Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Gregory, formerly of Butte, Mont.
Medford Daily Tribune, July 11, 1908, page 1

    J. B. Welch, DeWitt Goodpasture and C. J. Anderson were down from Meadows precinct the middle of the week.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1912, page 2

GOVE & MERRILL
(1878-79)
    Gove & Merrill have erected a photographic tent in Ashland.
"Local Intelligence," Ashland Tidings, July 12, 1878, page 3
    Messrs. Gove & Merrill have been doing a rushing business this week at their photographic tent. They take a new style of picture, called the Ferro photograph, which are not to be excelled. Call soon, as their stay in this place will only be five days longer.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 31, 1878, page 4
    The enterprising "picturizers," Messrs. Gove & Merrill, after having satisfied everybody, "quietly folded their tent," packed their photographing appliances and started for the Siskiyou County fair grounds. Their work is good, cheap and done on short notice.
Ashland Tidings, September 6, 1878, page 3
    Gove & Merrill, the accomplished photographic artists, are expected here today. They will remain as long as business justifies their staying.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 6, 1879, page 3
    After leaving Rock Point Messrs. Gove & Merrill will again visit Ashland.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 14, 1878, page 3

    Gove and Merrill, photographers, have gone to Rock Point. They will be in Ashland in about one week and will stay just five days.
Ashland Tidings, August 16, 1878, page 3
    TROY DYE.--Those who desire to see what manner of looking man that human fiend, Troy Dye, is, can see a fine portrait of him at the photo tent of Gove & Merrill.
Ashland Tidings, August 30, 1878, page 3
    Gove & Merrill, the happy artists of the photo tent, have again made their appearance in our town, and erected their tent immediately under our window, preparatory to furnishing you first-class work. You should avail yourself of this opportunity of supplying your friends with a splendid likeness of your "phiz," as they positively will not remain longer than till Monday.
"Personal Notes," Ashland Tidings, August 30, 1878, page 3
    Gove & Merrill, the accomplished photographic artists, are expected here today. They will remain as long as business justifies their staying.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 6, 1879, page 3

    PICTURE GALLERY.--An opportunity will be given to the citizens of this valley to secure most excellent pictures of themselves and friends at the "Sciopticon Gallery," which will be at the following places, and will positively remain only the specified time: Ashland, until Thursday, Aug. 7th; at Phoenix, 8th, 9th and 10th; Eagle Point, Aug. 12th, 13th and 14th. Particular attention paid to children, and good pictures guaranteed. Old pictures copied and enlarged and finished in watercolors or crayon. Call at once, as time is limited.
Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1879, page 3
    A free sciopticon exhibition was given at the picture gallery of Snook & Merrill on Monday evening which was very entertaining and highly appreciated by those in attendance. The proprietors of the gallery decided to remain in Ashland one day longer than they had announced, on account of the Masonic celebration. They go to Phoenix today, and will give an exhibition at that place tomorrow (Saturday) evening.
"Local Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1879, page 3
    The Sciopticon Gallery, so well and favorably known, will be at Jacksonville on the 18th of August and will furnish those excellent pictures at reasonable rates, for which it is noted.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 20, 1879, page 4
    Messrs. Snook & Merrill will go with their sciopticon gallery to Josephine County. They will visit Kerbyville and perhaps other points and proceed thence to Crescent City from which place they will sail for San Francisco. Those desiring pictures should not fail to give them a call.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 27, 1879, page 3


GRAYCRAFT CARD CO.

Danville, Virginia
postcard publisher

S. H. GRAYDON
(Jacksonville 1900)
    S. H. Graydon, the clever artist, has opened a studio in Jacksonville.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 12, 1900, page 3
    S. H. Graydon, a photographer, has opened a gallery in Jacksonville and appears to be doing a good business. His pictures are up-to-date.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 20, 1900, page 3
     S. H. Graydon, the stamp picture artist, who has been taking pictures in Jacksonville for the past week, left for Clatsop Beach Wednesday. He did a large business and gave good satisfaction.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, July 27, 1900, page 6

GREAT EASTERN PHOTO AND ADVERTISING CO.

    The Great Eastern Photo and Advertising Co. will be in Medford for two weeks only, commencing on May 27, 1889. . . . Will be at Eagle Point for one week, commencing Monday, June 10, 1889.
Advertisement, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


CHARLES P.  GREGORY & SON
    We desire to announce to the citizens of Klamath Falls and vicinity that we have opened a business and realty brokerage office. . . . We will make a free photo for display at our office or mailing of all property listed with us. . . .
C. P. GREGORY & SON,
    Klamath Falls, Dec. 27, 1907.
"New Brokerage Firm," Klamath Republican, Klamath Falls, January 9, 1908, page 1
    C. P. Gregory & Son, photo publishers, are in the city, getting out an illustrated souvenir of Medford and vicinity and are at present taking views of business houses for this purpose.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, June 19, 1908, page 5

ELIZABETH W. GREGORY
(1913)
    Mrs. L. A. Gregory has returned from a four weeks' trip to California. [She] is now ready to resume work in her studio. She will introduce all the newest and most up-to-date ideas in the photo profession.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 5, 1913, page 6
    The Gregory studio has been sold to S. B. Crow of Portland, an experienced photographer. Mrs. Gregory will move to Long Beach, where she will open a studio.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1913, page 6

    Mrs. L. A. Gregory of Los Angeles stopped off in Medford Sunday morning for a few days' visit with Mrs. M. E. Riddle. Mrs. Gregory is en route home from an extended visit with relatives and friends in Seattle and different points in Montana. The Gregorys formerly resided in Medford, having conducted a photograph gallery here
"Local Briefs," Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1920, page 2

LAWRENCE A. AND ELIZABETH W. GREGORY
(1908-13)
See Charles P. Gregory
    De Witte Goodpasture has sold his photo studio over the Model Clothing Store to Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Gregory, formerly of Butte, Mont.
"Wedding Licenses," Medford Daily Tribune, July 11, 1908, page 1
    Are you going to have pictures made? If so, watch these picture talks. I have had years of experience in one of the largest cities. I'm going to tell you something about modern, up-to-date photography in this space. The subject will be changed each time. The first subject will be "Child Portraiture." I develop kodak work, make all kinds of views, take interiors, take your order for a cut [i.e., engraving], and can make you a first-class, up-to-date portrait.
L. A. GREGORY
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHER

Over Model Clothing Store
Medford Daily Tribune,  July 22, 1908, page 3
    Photographing babies and small children. The best time to get a good picture of a baby or small child is when it's in the "mood," or feeling good. A good receipt: Give the child a good nap, feed well, dress quickly and take it to the photographer. It ought then to be feeling its best. Nine or 10 o'clock in the morning is a good time to photograph babies. Do not wait until late in the afternoon, when the child is tired and warm and the light is poor; try the early forenoon. Platinum papers make absolutely the highest grade finish. They are more expensive than the common finish, but the results are beyond comparison.
L. A. GREGORY
MODERN PHOTOGRAPHER

Over Model Clothing Store
Medford Daily Tribune,  July 25, 1908, page 4
    Photographer Gregory has taken several very fine views of the coal mines, east of Medford. These pictures show actual operations at the mine, and huge blocks of coal corded up like wood at the mouth of the tunnel. There ought to be one or more of these pictures over the desk of every business man in Medford. There is a something about the picture which is interesting--chief among its features is the fact that it is right at Medford's door--and there are mountains of it.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, April 16, 1909, page 2

Lawrence A. Gregory, November 16, 1910 Medford Mail Tribune
Lawrence A. Gregory, November 16, 1910 Medford Mail Tribune

    The educational exhibit prepared by the city schools will be filed and indexed and added to the educational exhibit at the Alaska-Yukon-Pacific exposition. The written work is illuminated by many excellent photographs of local scenes. . . . The photographs, which add so materially to the interest of the written work, are supplied by courtesy of the Commercial Club. The interior views at the schoolhouse are taken by Mr. Gregory, and the ornamental lettering was done by Mr. B. Klum.
"Educational Work Display," Medford Mail, May 21, 1909, page 6
    Mrs. H. I. Conrad, assistant secretary of the Commercial Club, and photographer Gregory expect to spend most of Friday getting photographs of the Rogue River near the Bybee bridge and some distance views above for the use of the club.
"Social and Personal," Medford Daily Tribune, June 10, 1909, page 8
    Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Brown and photographer Gregory were at Butte Falls a couple of days this week. Mr. Gregory was there in a business capacity--that of procuring photographs of Butte Falls, the sawmills and other features of interest--and these for Mr. Dewing, who has large timber holdings there.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, June 18, 1909, page 2
    Photographer Gregory was in Butte Falls a couple of days this week in a business capacity--that of procuring photographs of Butte Falls, the sawmills and other features of interest.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, June 18, 1909, page 2

    Mrs. L. A. Gregory, wife of photographer Gregory, is having a hairdressing and beauty parlor fitted up in the studio. Mrs. Gregory served three years with Mlle. Carroll of Butte, Mont., in the largest institution of the kind in that state, and thoroughly understands the work.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, October 8, 1909, page 5

    Lawrence Gregory has prepared a set of ten color photos nearly 24 inches square of orchard scenes in the Rogue River Valley, which will be entered at the Spokane national apple show to be held this month in a contest for a $100 prize. He also has prepared a large view of an apple tree in bearing which will be entered in a contest for a $50 prize.
    The photos are marvels of beauty. The first work of producing the pictures was carefully handled and then each photo was colored with the most painstaking care. The effect is truly splendid and the views should do much good while on exhibition in Spokane.
"Splendid Views of Orchards for Exhibit," Medford Mail Tribune, November 4, 1909, page 4
    Lawrence A. Gregory, a photographer of this city, at the Spokane National Apple Show won first prize for a display of photographs depicting Rogue River Valley apple scenes. The photographs were "made in Medford" and were very fine. They won over a score of competitors.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 30, 1909, page 1

    A wagon load of 30-pound watermelons was brought to the Allen grocery by S. L. Neal from near Central Point Monday. L. Gregory, a photographer, took a picture of them for the Medford Commercial Club.
"Eggs Go Up to 40 Cents," Medford Mail Tribune, September 14, 1910, page 7
    Gregory's Studio, open Sundays. Photos by Gregory are sensible Xmas gifts.
"Personal Items," Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1910, page 5
    L. A. Gregory, the photographer, left this morning for northern California, where he is to do some special photographic work.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1911, page 2

    Mr. Landowner, Gregory's panorama pictures have been the greatest factor in the sale of nearly all the large tracts in the valley. Ask the men who sold them.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, May 7, 1911, page 2
Notice.
    Having sold out our studio to S. B. Crow of Portland, we wish to thank all our friends and patrons for favors in the past.
MR. and MRS. GREGORY.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1913, page 6

W. A. GUNTER
(1929-30)
    Roosevelt School received several outside visitors last week. They were: . . . Messrs. Gunter and Bopp, photographers.
"Roosevelt School," Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1929, page B7

EDRICK L. GURNEA
    E. L. Gurnea and George Howard left Medford Monday morning for the Crater Lake National Park, at which place they will remain for a couple or three weeks. Mr. Gurnea took his camera with him and, being a scenic photographer of ability, it will be safe to give out that he will return with a great variety of scenes from that natural wonderland. Mr. Gurnea puts the views up in stereoscopic form and has them for sale.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 11, 1902, page 6
    E. L. Gurnea:--"Did you see that view I took of the result of G. P. Lindley's fall hunt? No? Then come down and I'll show it to you. There are eleven big bucks hung up, as you see. Four of them are so large that they touch the ground, while the heels are somewhat higher than a six-foot man's head. Yes, I've seen a lot of other views of the valley [of] Rogue River between here and Crater Lake and everywhere. Some of them you don't see every day. Don't know what that is? Why, that is a picture taken on Ashland Creek, a little way from the town. Chances are you have been by there lots of times and never saw it. You have to be looking for those things in order to see them. I don't take any credit for seeing things where others can't. It's simply a matter of practice. What I would like to do is to take a trip through the Oregon mountains, hunting with my camera. I believe I could get some shots that would be all right. I'm going to try it one of these days."

"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, October 30, 1903, page 1

    E. L. Gurnea:--"Say, Bliton, you have no idea of the amount of business I have worked up on those Southern Oregon stereoviews. Why, only last week I sent nine dozen of them to different parties in Washington, D.C. These were views of Crater Lake and the upper Rogue River country. Those people back there want something rough and rugged, and some of my views are all of that. There is plenty of rugged country up Rogue River and I have focused about all there is of it and from all the possible viewpoints. I have over 300 stereonegatives of Oregon views, and fully 200 of them were taken in Southern Oregon. Mrs. Gurnea does the printing, and night and morning I make the views ready for the market. They sell at $2 a dozen--and I am building up a good business. It's quite a side issue and does not interfere with my other work. I'll show you the entire collection one of these days."
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, November 20, 1903, page 1

    Percy DeGroot was at Ashland Wednesday evening in attendance at Chautauqua. He tells that while passing through Talent he saw E. L. Gurnea, formerly superintendent of our light plant, doing photographer's work in a tent. Mr. Gurnea, we understand, is making a tour of Southern Oregon--doing photographic work, especially landscape viewing.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 22, 1904, page 5

HAL'S SPORT SHOP
(1946-1963+)
    Hal's Sport Shop will be the name of the new store which is scheduled to open April 1 at 523 Main. Harold Shidler, operator of the army and navy store at 627 Main for the past two years, is opening the new store. Bert Rohu, sportsman and camera enthusiast, Helen McClure and Mrs. Shidler will assist him.
"Hal's Sport Shop To Open," Herald and News, Klamath  Falls, March 16, 1946, page 2

A. F. HALE
(Medford 1889-1890)
    A. F. Hale has succeeded Mrs. Morris in the management of the photograph gallery.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3
    A. F. Hale, the expert photographer, has gone to Grants Pass.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3

FRED G. HALL
(1951-1962 Ashland and Medford)
    Fred Hall, former Bend resident who now has a photo studio in Ashland, visited here over the holidays with his daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Lingerfelt and family.
"Here and There," Bend Bulletin, July 5, 1955, page 5

L. D. HAMMOCK
(Grants Pass 1906-1907)
    J. A. Hammock and two sons, L. B. and L. D. Hammock, of Seymour, Texas, arrived in Medford Thursday. Two of the gentlemen are photographers and one is a printer, and all expect to remain some place in the valley.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 23, 1906, page 5
    L. D. Hammock has leased the second floor of the Conklin building opposite the post office and has for the past week or more been busy remodeling and fitting up for a photographic studio, and he now has everything in readiness for work. Mr. Hammock is a photographer who has had a number of years of experience and training in city galleries, and he starts in business with a new outfit purchased from the Grants Pass Photo House.
"A Brief Record of Local Events," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, December 7, 1906, page 7
    On account of the increasing business at Hammock's studio he advertises to take an apprentice at half price. See him on Sixth Street, opposite post office.
"Some Bargain Pointers," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, January 11, 1907, page 5
    Hammock the photographer now has two young lady helpers and can attend to any amount of work promptly. Come and see what we have for you. Opposite post office.

Rogue River Courier,
Grants Pass, March 15, 1907, page 1

     Having moved to the Hammock Studio on Sixth Street, opposite the post office, I would be pleased to have my old customers to continue with me, and I will appreciate as many new ones as I can accommodate. I will make you anything from a stamp picture up to one 40x60 inches. Thanking you for your past patronage and thanking you in advance for your future support, I am respectfully,
BRANCH PHOTO STUDIO.       
"Some Bargain Pointers," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 12, 1907, page 5

HARDING & MAYER (Central Point 1909-10)
    Messrs. Harding and Mayer, two recent arrivals from Los Angeles, have opened a photographic gallery in a tent opposite the opera house, where they are now prepared to serve the public with anything in their line. These gentlemen expect to become permanent residents of our city and have leased the Stewart residence on Oak Street and have moved their families into the same. Mrs. Harding has been in this section for the past three months and, becoming very enthusiastic over the climate and business prospects, induced her husband and his associate to dispose of their California interests and come here to reside.
"Local and Personal," Central Point Herald, July 29, 1909, page 4
    Bert C. Mayer, commercial photographer, will close his gallery here Wednesday, August 25, to return in two weeks. Persons wishing work done soon should call early for their sittings.
"Local and Personal," Central Point Herald, August 19, 1909, page 4

    Bert C. Mayer and Mrs. Mayer arrived from Los Angeles Sunday evening and will open their photograph gallery as soon as the building being prepared for them is ready. Mr. Mayer was here for a while in September and operated a tent gallery with splendid patronage.
"Local and Personal," Central Point Herald, November 18, 1909, page 4


LOREN M. HARMON (1913-14)
See Gerking & Harmon
   
L. M. Harmon, formerly of Gerking & Harmon's, who has been manager of the gallery for three months, will remain with Mr. Weston.

"Weston Opens Camera Shop," Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1914, page 6

JOHN C. HART (1909 Jacksonville; 1909-11 Ashland)
    Hart has pitched a photographic tent one block west of the court house and will make all sizes of portraits and groups. Will make cabinet portraits for $2.75 per dozen until the 15th.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, September 4, 1909, page 3
    Photos at Hart's for 40¢ per dozen.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, September 25, 1909, page 3

    Get your photo before Hart leaves.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, October 2-23, 1909, page 3
    Hart will move his tent studio to Ashland on or about October 23.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, October 23, 1909, page 3

    Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Hart of Ashland started Friday evening on a trip to Stockton, Kan. to visit relatives. From there on to Kansas City[, then] they will go to Pleasanton, where Mr. Hart will visit his parents and his old home. They expect to be gone two months.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 24, 1914, page 5
    FOR SALE--Piano and household goods, photo tent and studio outfit. Call 455 Mountain Avenue.
Ashland Tidings, August 20, 1917 et seq., page 8


January 1, 1928 Medford Mail Tribune
January 1, 1928 Medford Mail Tribune

HARWOOD PHOTO SERVICE (1925-33, postcards 1924-30)
Burhl Ronell Harwood. His middle name is also reported as "Renell." Many of his postcards bear a circled "H" logo.

    Harwood's panoramic postcards of Crater Lake and Southern Oregon views on sale at Swem's, Davidson's, Model Pharmacy, Jap Art Store.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, May 10, 1925, page 2
    The Harwood studio, Medford's newest photo establishment, opened today in the Farmers' & Fruitgrowers' Bank building over the People's Electric Store, with a full line of attractive Crater Lake colored pictures and complete photographic facilities and equipment. B. R. Harwood, proprietor of the new studio, needs no introduction here as he has been a resident in Medford for the last four years, during which time he has worked at Swem's and has recently managed his own business. Owing to the demand for his services Mr. Harwood found it necessary to open a downtown studio.
'Harwood Studio Opens in Medford," Medford Mail Tribune, November 27, 1925, page 7
Harwood Studios Are High Class
    The Harwood studios are splendidly equipped, and their pictures are recognized everywhere as strictly high class. In addition to regular studio work they specialize in outdoor photography, and many of the pictorial features of this issue is due to their excellent work.
    Burhl R. Harwood is ably assisted by Mrs. Harwood.
    They are large producers of postal cards, presenting the beauties of southern Oregon.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1928, page F3
HARWOOD PHOTOS READY FOR FAIR
    A display of unusual interest to Southern Oregon people is being prepared for exhibition at the Jackson County Fair this year by the Harwood Photo Studio. This novel display will show, in photographs, the steps in growing, harvesting and shipping the yearly crop of pears in the Rogue River Valley. Because of the interest locally in the fruit industry, the Harwood exhibit at the fair this year will prove a real attraction.
    Some other unusually interesting pictures have recently been secured by Mr. Harwood, among them being the photographs of Colonel Lindbergh and his plane taken at the Medford airport. One of these pictures appeared in a recent edition of the Mail Tribune and caused considerable favorable comment.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 9, 1928, page 7

    Photographs showing the Wright snowplow in action on the Crater Lake Highway are attracting attention in a display case of the Harwood Photo Studio on East Main Street. The pictures show the snow being thrown many feet on either side of the road and are taken from various angles.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1929, page 2

HARWOOD STUDIO IN NEW LOCATION
    After having been located in upstairs offices on East Main Street for several years past, the Harwood Photo Shop will open in a new location on East Sixth Street next Saturday, B. R. Harwood, proprietor, announced today. The company will follow a new policy, will pay its attention to commercial photography and will no longer be in the portrait business.
    It will feature rapid picture development and guarantee that films left there before 9 o'clock in the morning will be completed by 5 o'clock in the evening. A receiving receptacle will be placed outside the door. The studio will also no longer be in the postcard business but will continue to deal in scenic pictures tinted in color. The company will deal in Kodak supplies.
    The new establishment has been remodeled for the studio and for several days workmen have been busy moving over equipment. The company will also be on the air Friday night with a radio program.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1930, page 8

    Harwood Photo Service, Southern Oregon's finest photo shop, opens today in the new location--229 East 6th St.--and you are invited to attend.
Advertisement, Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1930, page 6
    The Patterson interests have purchased the postcard business that had been carried on here by B. R. Harwood.
"To Join Mr. Patterson," Medford Mail Tribune, February 27, 1930, page 2

    B. R. Harwood, Medford photographer, returned yesterday from a short trip to the sea coast in the region of Bandon, where he spent three days taking photographic views of shore scenery. The pictures have already been developed and are on display at his place of business on Sixth Street.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, April 9, 1930, page 2
    A miniature Indian village against a photographic village of Crater Lake is attracting attention in the display window of the Harwood photo shop on Sixth Street. Indian dolls gathered about a tepee of genuine buckskin enliven the scene, made to appear natural by the addition of green shrubbery. A tinted picture of Mil Creek Falls forms another portion of the attractive background.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, October 2, 1930, page 2
Harwood Studio Making Portraits
    B. R. Harwood announced yesterday that after two years of scenic and commercial work he has added new equipment and remodeled his studio and is again prepared to do portrait work. He is introducing a new idea to Medford in making the place a one-price studio. Harwood's is the oldest photographic concern in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 11, 1931, page 8
Many People Shop at Harwood Photo Studio's Final Sale
    The closing-out sale of Harwood's photo studio, 329 East Sixth Street, which started Monday, is attracting a large number of people, it was reported today. A complete variety of photographic supplies, which the Harwood studios have carried during their location in Medford, are rapidly becoming depleted.
    Harwood's studio also has a group of Indian dolls for souvenirs, which are being closed out in the sale this week. A collection of framed photographs of Southern Oregon and Northern California scenes have been reduced in prices, as well as photo frames and stands.
    Mr. Harwood has announced that all cameras have been reduced to half price, and the numerous redwood novelties have also been lowered in price.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1932, page 7
MEDFORD VISITOR HERE
    B. R. Harwood, commercial and scenic photographer of Medford, is visiting his cousin, C. E. Harwood. The Medford man is a witness in the Banks trial.
Eugene Guard, May 4, 1933, page 3
    Mr. Ray Anders has bought the Harwood photo equipment, which is valued at $500, at the studio he has opened at his home. Mr. Harwood is now living on the Redwood Highway, and Mr. Anders is working in connection with him.
Central Point American, April 12, 1934, page 4

LEON B. HASKINS

    Postcards imprinted "Pub. by Leon B. Haskins, Druggist, Medford, Ore." presumably date between January 1905, when his father George Haskins retired, and July 1924, when Leon sold to the Heath family. Most seem to date to circa 1910.


GILBERT HASSELL

    G. Hassell, photographer for the Southern Pacific Company, was in Medford Wednesday, on his return from a trip to Crater Lake, Pelican Bay and other points of interest. He secured a number of fine views of the scenery along the route, among which was one of Crater Lake with its lofty rim covered with snow and snowbanks on the sides of the least precipitous cliffs surrounding it. The picture is a unique one, and shows the great natural wonder in a way it is seldom seen by the visitors, as the snow is nearly all gone by the time the season commences. He also took views of Mill Creek Falls, Annie Creek canyon and other picturesque spots. Wednesday he made a trip to Table Rock for the purpose of photographing that famous spot, and the same afternoon took a picture of one of Medford's principal streets.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 26, 1903, page 7
    Gilbert Hassell . . . was sent out by the S.P. Co. to take photographs of the most interesting points for use in the literature that it will issue in the near future. He returned this week, and although hampered by deep snow at Crater Lake, took a number of fine views, which will be seen next season.
"Attracting Much Attention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1903, page 2

    G. Hassell, the Southern Pacific photographer, had some rather rough experiences on his recent trip to Crater Lake. He was three days in getting a satisfactory picture of the lake, but when he did get it the effect was beautiful. George Jackson, who accompanied him, describes it as the most beautiful view he had ever had of the lake, and he has seen it many times. The air was clear as crystal, and every cliff and head and even the few clouds floating above were plainly reflected in the shining surface of the lake. This was faithfully reproduced by the camera and should make a picture of surpassing beauty. The snow was from ten to fifteen feet deep at the rim of the lake, and going to and from camp was no small job. Once Mr. Hassell was walking and leading his horse, when he broke through the partially melted snow at the foot of a tree, and the horse fell into the hole on him. Neither was able to get out until Mr. Jackson came to the rescue.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 3, 1903, page 7
    Forty-five photographic views of scenes in and about Crater Lake have just been received from San Francisco by W. E. Coman, general freight and passenger [agent?] for the Southern Pacific lines in Oregon. The pictures were taken by photographer Hassell of the Southern Pacific. Prominent among the views are four of Crater Lake.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1903, page 6
    The Southern Pacific Company started out one of its new photographic cars yesterday to take photographs of industrial scenes in the San Joaquin Valley to replace the pictures destroyed in the fire. The car is in charge of G. Hassell and is well fitted up for the work of photography. It has darkrooms and developing rooms. Two of these cars were built last June. Photographs have been taken of the line from Los Angeles to Portland, and pictures will be taken of the scenery between here and New Orleans. The orders are now that photographs are to be taken of scenery along branch lines.
"Gossip of the Doings of the Railroad Men," San Francisco Call, October 11, 1906, page 9
Will Photograph Josephine Caves
    G. Hassell, the official photographer of the Southern Pacific Company, is in the city and will leave tomorrow morning by the stage for Cave camp and the caves for the purpose of making a series of photographs for his company. He will take a number of pictures along the highway and the trail, as well as numerous flashlights within the caves. His coming is a direct result of the recent visit of Vice-President McCormick to this district, Mr. McCormick having visited the caves and become much impressed with their scenic beauty. The photographs will be used by the company in exploiting this district and in attracting tourist travel to it.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, August 28, 1916, page 4

FRANK HASTY
(1886)
    Frank Hasty, the accomplished artist, has taken some photographic views of scenes up the Ashland canyon which would be noticed as choice pieces in the portfolio collection of any artist anywhere.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 23, 1886, page 3

L. Hazeltine, November 4, 1881 Ashland Tidings
November 4, 1881 Ashland Tidings

L. S. HAZELTINE (1881-)
    PHOTOGRAPHS.--Mr. L. Hazeltine has opened a photograph gallery in Ashland in a temporary building on B. F. Myer's lot on Main Street, and is doing some excellent work. He has already printed a number of cabinet photographs which are first class--unusually good for the work of an artist anywhere outside the large cities. He invites examination of his work, and guarantees satisfaction before payment. Give him a call.
Ashland Tidings,
November 4, 1881, page 3


HEATH'S DRUG STORE
(circa 1915)
Medford postcards printed by Albertype, Brooklyn, N.Y.

DeVERE and HELEN HELFRICH

    Klamath Falls residents, the Helfrichs produced postcards of the July 1945 Sheriff's Posse Rodeo and Horse Show, held at the Medford fairgrounds.

LOUIS HELLER (1883-1884)

    Louis Heller of Fort Jones, Cal., a good artist, is about putting up a photograph gallery in Ashland.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, June 22, 1883, page 3
    L. Heller of Fort Jones, Cal. has opened a photograph gallery at Ashland.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, July 6, 1883, page 3
    Louis Heller has his photograph gallery at Ashland in operation. He is a fine artist.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, July 27, 1883, page 3
    Our old Siskiyou friend, Louis Heller, is engaged in photography at Ashland and doing well. He is a first-class artist.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, December 14, 1883, page 3
    Louis Heller, the well-known photographer, has returned to Fort Jones, Cal., his old home. He is succeeded at Ashland by E. F. Everitt.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, July 25, 1884, page 3
    Mrs. M. E. McCall has sold to Avery Johnson her business lot on west side of Main Street, adjacent to McCall's brick block. The lot has a frontage of 35 feet, and contains a rough lumber building put up by Louis Heller for a photograph gallery several years ago.
Ashland Tidings, March 19, 1886, page 3
    Mr. Lewis Heller, the photographer of Fort Jones, and Miss Alice O. Daggett, of California, were married at Yreka on the 5th inst., and will reside at Ft. Jones. Both bride and groom resided in Ashland for a time, and many friends here congratulate them.
"Carnival of Hymen," Ashland Tidings, November 15, 1889, page 3
    Louis Heller, formerly in the photography business in Ashland, has been appointed postmaster at Fort Jones, Siskiyou County.
Ashland Tidings, June 2, 1893


JACKSON E. HENDRICKS
(1910)
    J. E. Hendricks, of Denison, Texas, reached Ashland last week with his family, consisting of wife and five children. They are temporarily located at 76 Lincoln Street. Mr. Hendricks is a professional photographer and may conclude to locate permanently here. He was in this vicinity 22 years ago, and finds the situation considerably changed from ye olden time.
"Personal Mention," Ashland Tidings, March 24, 1910, page 5


HERRIN & HUTCH
(Ashland 1897)
Advertised in the midsummer 1897 issue of the Oregon Mining Journal.

DAVID C. & MARGARET E. HERRIN (Medford 1888-89, itinerant 1895, The Dalles 1895-96, Ashland 1897, Portland 1898-1901)
    Robert Hatfield and D. C. Herrin have gone into partnership in the boot and shoe business, and will shortly open a complete stock of goods in that line in the store in [the] Odd Fellows building recently vacated by O. H. Blount. Mr. Hatfield will go to San Francisco to purchase the new stock.
"Business Changes," Ashland Tidings, July 9, 1886, page 3
    D. C. Herrin has been learning the photographic art, and will travel in that business in the coming season.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 24, 1888, page 3
    Among the recent arrivals, of those who come to stay, we are pleased to mention D. C. Herrin of Ashland, long a resident of this valley. Mr. Herrin has secured the Lyons building of Douglas & Co., agents, on D Street and just as soon as it can be fitted up he will open a photographic gallery, and be prepared to do fine work in that line. Mr. Herrin is in possession of the secret process of instantaneous picture-taking, and tells us that he can take a train on the run or a horse running and show an exact picture of the people flocking to and from the train. He will give us such a picture some of these days.
Southern Oregon Transcript, Medford, March 13, 1888, page 3

    The building on D 
Street known as the Lyon building is being plastered and put into shape for a photograph gallery.
"Notes from Medford," Oregonian, Portland, March 27, 1888, page 3

    D. C. Herrin will open business at Medford in the photographic line this week. He has spent much time in preparing himself for photographic work.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 30, 1888, page 3

    D. C. Herrin and family have located at this place. Mr. H. has opened a photograph gallery in Lyon's building, where he is now ready to accommodate those who wish good work in his line.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 2
    D. C. Herrin has erected a new photograph gallery on C Street. It is well located, and nothing is to hinder him from doing a fair business. He is considered a fine artist and is up with the times in that art. We wish him success.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3

    D. C. Herrin started for San Francisco last Monday, where he will take in all the latest points of Photography. He will be gone about three weeks.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, June 1, 1888, page 3

    The handsomest lady on the 4th of July ground at Medford will be presented with one dozen cabinet photographs of herself by D. C. Herrin, the leading photographer of Southern Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 3
    Mrs. I. L. Hamilton was adjudged to be the handsomest lady by the judges of the celebration here, and gets the photographs offered by D. C. Herrin, our enterprising photographer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3
    D. C. Herrin, our leading photographer, has gone to Linkville on a business trip and better prepared than ever to turn out first-class work. His wife will have charge of the gallery here while he is absent.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, July 19, 1888, page 2
     Dave Herrin, our photographer, is making a business trip east of the mountains.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3

    D. C. Herrin, our leading photographer, has gone to Linkville on a business trip and better prepared than ever to turn out first-class work. His wife will have charge of the gallery here while he is absent.
"Medford Items," Valley Record, Ashland, July 19, 1888, page 2
    D. C. Herrin, the Medford photographer, has just returned from San Francisco, where he has "taken in" all the latest styles of photography. Give him a call.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 3
    D. C. Herrin, Medford's expert photographer, is in this section on business. He takes the best of photographs at reasonable figures and never fails in giving satisfaction.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1888, page 2
    D. C. Herrin is taking the best photographs at Linkville. He is located in John Friese's building.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 9, 1888, page 2

    Don't fail to call on Herrin, the expert photographer, soon, as his stay will not be long. His work gives general satisfaction and his prices are moderate.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1888, page 2

    Herrin, the photographer, is still busy at Linkville and doing a first-class business.
    D. C. Herrin, the Medford photographer, has just returned from San Francisco, where he has "taken in" all the latest styles of photography. Give him a call.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1888, page 3
    D. C. Herrin was in the city this week packing up his household goods preparatory to taking up his permanent residence in Linkville. Dave is a good photographer and will no doubt succeed in his new field.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, September 14, 1888, page 3
    D. C. Herrin and family have returned from Klamath County. Dave took many first-class photographs while gone.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, September 20, 1888, page 3
    We are sorry to learn that Dave Herrin, our popular and efficient photographer, will soon become a permanent resident of Linkville, the county seat of Klamath County. Success to him.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3
    D. C. Herrin has been busy taking photographs at Linkville lately. He does the best of work.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 15, 1888, page 2

    Herrin, the photographer, has located permanently in Lakeview.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3
    D. C. Herrin, the clever photographer, passed through Linkville last week, en route home.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 2
    Herrin, the Lakeview photographer, has been in Linkville since Thanksgiving Day on business intent.
"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1889, page 2

    Dave Herrin, late of Ashland, is now securing the shadow ere the substance fades in a photo gallery at East Portland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3

    D. C. Herrin, the East Portland photographer, was joined by Mrs. H. last week, she having continued to reside at Ashland up to that time.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1890, page 3
    D. C. Herrin, the Ashland photographer, will spend the summer taking views of Oregon scenery for an eastern firm. He does first-class work.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 3

    D. C. Herrin is now located at The Dalles, where he is doing well in photography.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3

    D. C. Herrin, late of Ashland, is doing well at The Dalles in the photographic line.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 3
    Mr. Herrin has been here but a short time, but his work has made a name for him. A visit to his gallery will convince the most skeptical that he is master of his profession. With one of the best galleries in Oregon and all the latest improvements he can make photos equal to any in the state, from locket size to 18x22, direct from life.
    His views of Columbia River scenery cannot be beaten anywhere, by any body.
"Color Photography," The Daily Chronicle, The Dalles, November 2, 1892, page 3
    Prof. D. C. Herrin, formerly of this valley, has discovered the trade secret of photographing on wood, which, if he had discovered five years ago, would have made him enormously rich.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 24, 1893, page 3
A Handy Device.
    A new print washer for photographers was shown by Mr. D. C. Herrin, the inventor, this morning. It is a wonder the implement has not been invented and generally used many years ago, saving, as it does, a great deal of valuable time to the photographer. by an under, instead of an overflow of water, the prints are kept constantly moving, without the tedious work of handling them, as is now the universal custom.
Dalles Daily Chronicle, March 25, 1893, page 3
    Mrs. Kate Howell of the granite city [Ashland] is at present visiting her daughter, Mrs. D. C. Herrin at The Dalles.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3
    David Herrin has sold out at The Dalles and opened a photograph gallery at La Grande.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, February 1, 1894, page 4

    D. C. Herrin, formerly of this county, has opened a photograph gallery at La Grande.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1894, page 3
    The best is always cheapest. Herrin makes the best cabinet photographs for only $2.50 per dozen. Chapman block, upstairs.

The Daily Chronicle, The Dalles, May 4, 1895, page 3
    Mrs. D. C. Herrin, formerly Miss Maggie Howell of Ashland, accompanied by her two children, arrived Friday from The Dalles for a visit with the folks here. D. C. is a leading photographer at The Dalles now.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 29, 1895, page 3

    On Friday evening, February 12th, D. C. Herrin, grand lecturer of the A.O.U.W. of Oregon, will deliver a free lecture upon the benefits of this order--at the opera house. A musical and literary program is being prepared for the occasion in addition to this lecture. Everybody is invited to attend. Mr. Herrin is said to be a fine speaker. He was formerly a photographer in this city.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 5, 1897, page 7
    The people of Ashland will now have an opportunity get first-class photos; Mrs. Margaret Herrin, a photographer of The Dalles, has charge of the Larson studio. All are cordially invited to call at the studio and see the samples of work.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 3-17, 1897, page 3

    Mrs. Margaret Herrin of The Dalles has charge of the Larson studio. Mrs. Herrin has an enviable reputation as an artist.
"Local," Town Talk, Ashland, June 12, 1897, page 3
    Mrs. M. E. Herrin, the Ashland photographer, is in Grants Pass, where she will have charge of the Everitt gallery for a couple of weeks.
"A Grist of Local Haps and Mishaps," Medford Mail, November 5, 1897, page 7

    Superior Photographs, Excelling all others in Life Like, Artistic and Permanent Results. Mrs. M. E. Herrin, Art Gallery. Opposite Hotel Oregon.
Advertisement, Valley Record, Ashland, April 28, 1898, page 3

    David C. Herrin of The Dalles has been elected grand master workman of the A.O.U.W. of Oregon.
"Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1898, page 2
    D. C. Herrin and wife and Frank Abell have gone into the photograph business at Portland. All are well known in this country.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1898, page 3

Hicks Chatten Engraving Co. ad 1904LUCIUS J. HICKS
(Salem 1888, Marshfield 1891-92, Portland 1895-1912)
    Mr. Hicks, the photographer, is now located in Moonville and is prepared to do good work in his line. The people should not let this opportunity pass.
"Sams Valley Items," Valley Record, Ashland, October 20, 1892, page 1
     L. J. Hicks, a senior member of the Hicks, Chatten Engraving Company, of Portland, was in Medford this week securing photographs of the city to be used in the Southern Pacific Company in an advertising pamphlet, and by the Oregonian in its annual edition. He secured a fine birdseye view of Medford and several orchard and fruit views.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 6

    John P. Jones, the irrepressible railroad traveling agent, spent an afternoon in Jacksonville last week, accompanied by Mr. Hicks, an expert photographer, who is taking views of Southern and Western Oregon for the literature the Southern Pacific Co. will soon issue for distribution in different parts of the United States.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1902, page 5


R. F. HIGH
    R. F. High is building a photograph gallery at Ashland.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 1, 1883, page 3

    R. F. High has bought the building heretofore occupied as a dentist office and opened a barber shop this week. It is neatly fitted up.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 30, 1883, page 3


JOHN BAPTISTE HIGINBOTHAM
    Mr. J. B. Higinbotham intends opening a photographic gallery in the old Reveille office, on California Street, above Chas. Blackwell's barber shop. Give him a call.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1871, page 3
    Mr. Higinbotham, having thoroughly refitted his gallery, is now prepared to take ambrotypes and photographs in the latest and best style, as his specimens will show. Gallery over Blackwell's barber shop, California Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1871, page 3


ANDREW P. HILL
    Andrew P. Hill, the artist, who took the leading part in the effort to secure legislative action for the preservation of the redwoods of the Big Basin forest, has been appointed official photographer of the Southern Pacific Railway. He will begin work in Oregon with one of the largest lenses in the world.
"United States," Amador Ledger, Jackson, California, April 12, 1901, page 1

BERTRAM H. AND HARRIET M. HINTHORNE
(Blackfoot, Idaho 1912-13, Ashland 1913-43)
Hinthorne ad, October 23, 1913 Ashland Tidings
October 23, 1913 Ashland Tidings
    B. H. Hinthorne, formerly of Omaha, Neb., has rented the room on East Main Street fitted up by Wynne Scott for a photograph gallery and will open there this week. Mr. Hinthorne has had much experience in that line and will make a specialty of high-class, up-to-date photography, having worked in many of the leading galleries in the large cities of the Middle West.
"New Photographer," Ashland Tidings, October 20, 1913, page 4
    Studio Ashland is being arranged for Mr. Hinthorne and will be much more convenient when the work is completed.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 9, 1914, page 5
    Photographer Hinthorne of the Studio Ashland has opened a branch studio in Yreka under the name of the Yreka Branch of the Studio Ashland.

"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 2, 1915, page 5

    Mrs. A. A. Holmes of Superior, Ia., mother of Mrs. B. H. Hinthorne, local photographer, . . . has been visiting her daughter here for some time past.
"Ashland and Vicinity," Medford Mail Tribune, August 27, 1915, page 5
    Two Ashland photographers, B. H. Hinthorne and Mrs. Wynne Scott, conduct studios in northern California towns, the former at Yreka and the latter at Dunsmuir. Hinthorne's studio at Yreka is a branch of his Ashland establishment.

"Ashland and Vicinity," Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1915, page 5

    The Hinthorne and Stevenson photographic studios will be merged at the headquarters of the former. Hinthorne will conduct the studio and Stevenson will devote special attention to outdoor phases of the art, especially exteriors and scenic attractions.
"Ashland and Vicinity," Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1916, page 3
    C. J. Benedict, an Austrian artist, . . . is in Ashland from Portland with his wife and son and is painting some backgrounds for the Ashland Studio's photographic work.
"Austrian Artist Sees Great Future," Ashland Tidings, February 28, 1916, page 1
    The Ashland Studio photographers, Messrs. Hinthorne and Stevenson, secured some first-class pictures of the buckers and the races at the round-up.
"Get Fine Pictures of the Round-Up," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1916, page 2

    The pictures of the first company taken at Fort Stevens will be on display at the Studio Ashland as fast as they are returned from Captain Malone, whose O.K. was necessary. Orders may be left at the studio for the postcard pictures.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 10, 1916, page 5
Studio Ashland Wins Leslie Prize
    The Studio Ashland received the third prize from Leslie's Weekly for the best photograph of a current news event during the month of July. Their photograph was of Donal Canon winning the saddle in the bucking contest at the Rogue River Roundup at Ashland.
Ashland Tidings, October 5, 1916, page 1
    Dunsmuir News: B. H. Hinthorne, Ashland photographer, spent a couple of days in Dunsmuir for the purpose of opening a studio in connection with his studio in Ashland. Being unable to find anything, he returned home on the Overland Wednesday.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 14, 1917, page 5
    Bert H. Hinthorne, Ashland's enterprising photographer, secured an excellent picture of the eclipse of the sun June 8.
"Picture of Eclipse Taken at Studio," Ashland Tidings, June 10, 1918, page 1

Hollywood Photo Studio ad, March 30, 1928 Medford Mail Tribune
March 30, 1928 Medford Mail Tribune
HOLLYWOOD STUDIOS (1928)
    The Hollywood Studios, a stamp print photo shop, opened its doors for business today on East Main Street for a period of three weeks, after which the studio will be moving to Eugene. The same establishment was here last year for five weeks during May and June, and since that time has been moved to Missouri, Kentucky, Alabama and other eastern and southern states.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, March 27, 1928, page 2

LARRY HOLMAN

    Larry Holman, Medford Mail Tribune photographer, was guest speaker. He told of his first hobby which started with a 1901 Edison phonograph. Later he acquired an ABC Process photography kit and began a hobby of photography, which has continued for 18 years and has now been made his profession.
"Photographic Association Officers Are Installed," Medford Mail Tribune, December 8, 1963, page C7

JAMES S. HOWARD & JOHN B. JAMES (Medford 1900)
    J. S. Howard and J. B. James, of Santa Barbara County, California, arrived in Medford last week and have decided to open a photograph gallery in Medford. These gentlemen have been in this line of business in California for some time, but the repeated almost failure of crops in the past and the promise of a total failure for the coming season has driven them to more succulent pastures.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 23, 1900, page 6

    The photographers, J. S. Howard & Co., who a few weeks ago came to Medford with the determination of locating here, have gone back to California and located at Chico.

"Additional Local Items,"
Medford Mail, April 6, 1900, page 6

A. HOWELL

    A. Howell of Bonanza has embarked in the photographing business at Susanville, Cal.

"Klamath County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 2


EDGAR WADE HOWELL
(Yreka 1891-1900)
    Capt. Siemens has received from Howell, the Yreka photographer, several photos taken during the late encampment at Fort Klamath.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 28, 1893, page 2

LOGAN HUGHES
(Camp White 1953-54
    The lad that does some of Camp White's best photo work is none other than Logan Hughes, who has a complete photography shop on the upper deck of the arts and crafts building.
    Greybeard Logan had a long siege of illness at Barnes Hospital, Vancouver, Wash., before he was sent to White for domiciliary care. Before his health broke down he had not only worked for various newspapers but maintained his own studio.

L. J. Malarkey, "Pickin' Pears," Medford Mail Tribune, November 4, 1953, page 8

    Logan Hughes [is] Camp White's official photographer. . . . Hughes had 18,000 hours flying time in Alaska following his service in the Navy during World War One. Photographer Hughes flew to Point Barrow when Will Rogers and Wiley Post crashed and died. Logan took the pictures of the tragedy and Life magazine published them.
L. J. Malarkey, "Pickin' Pears," Medford Mail Tribune, December 11, 1953, page 20
    Gene [Lower] tells that a recent letter from Logan Hughes, who is now in the Walla Walla, Wash., VA hospital, states that he is a bed patient.

L. J. Malarkey, "Pickin' Pears," Medford Mail Tribune, June 29, 1955, page 18


HUGHES PHOTO SERVICE
(27 N. Main, Ashland 1953-62)
Ronald R. and Faustina Hughes

FRANK H. HULL
(Medford
ca. 1900-11, Central Point 1912-17)
    Frank Hull has taken a position as assistant in G. W. Mackey's photo studio.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, September 8, 1899, page 6

    Frank Hull:--"Last week I told the Mail readers in an advertisement that I was going to take orders for Christmas photos for H. C. Mackey & Boyd, and that I was going to give away a present. I've made different arrangements--that is, Messrs. Mackey & Boyd have. When I went to them to close up the agreement we couldn't come to a satisfactory understanding of affairs as I remembered had previously been talked--and it was all off. I simply offer this in explanation of the why I will not be able to live up to the promises made in the advertisement. I hope, however, to soon commence taking orders for G. W. Mackey & Dunlap."
"Echoes from the Street," Medford Mail, November 23, 1900, page 7

    Frank Hull, the photographer, has gone to Gold Hill, where he temporarily pitched his tent.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1903, page 1
    Frank Hull, the photographer, has gone to Jacksonville, where his headquarters will be for some time.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1903, page 1

    Frank Hull, a well-known photograph of Medford, will open a gallery in Jacksonville about April 1st. Mr. Hull is a hustler, a good photographer and should do a good business in Jacksonville. Mr. Hull, who has married since he was in Jacksonville last summer, will have his wife with him.
"Local Notes," Jacksonville Sentinel, March 25, 1904, page 4

    Frank Hull:--"Yes, I'm in the photograph business by myself now. I have quit the partnership business. It didn't seem to work right some way. I have my studio opposite the post office fitted up in good shape and have settled down for the winter."
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, December 16, 1904, page 1
    Frank Hull, the Art Studio man and landscape artist, of Medford, was in town Wednesday and made this office a pleasant call. Mr. Hull has but recently returned from trips to Crater Lake and other scenic localities of Southern Oregon and has a collection of Oregon views that is second to none in this section of the state.
"Local Briefs," Jacksonville Sentinel, December 16, 1904, page 7
    Frank H. Hull, the photographer, took several views of the new Opp mill yesterday.
"News While It Is Yet Newsy," Jacksonville Sentinel, December 16, 1904, page 8
    Frank Hull, the photographer, passed through here Monday en route home from Sterling, where he had been for several days in the interests of his business.
"Local Happenings," Jacksonville Sentinel, January 27, 1905, page 8

    Frank H. Hull:--"I note by your last week's paper that you stated I was fishing at Rogue River a few Sundays ago. Well, I was, in a manner, and I think I caught more fish than anyone else on the river that day. I was taking pictures for W. F. Isaacs, the 'Toggery man.'"
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, September 22, 1905, page 1
    Frank Hull, the art photographer, made Ashland a business visit Tuesday.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 8, 1905, page 4
    Frank H. Hull, Oregon
"Oregon's Photographers," Oregon Journal, Portland, September 8, 1907, page 14

    Frank H. Hull of Medford was making some photographs at the cemetery Tuesday; his wife accompanied him.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, April 3, 1909, page 3

    Let Hull do your scenic work, such as a photo of your orchard, home, etc. 331 E. Main Street.
Medford Daily Tribune, September 6, 1909, page 2
    Hull Frank H (Hull Printing Co), res 331 E Main
1912 Polk's Directory

JOSEPH B. HULSE
(Lakeview 1894)

    Bill Thompson . . . seems to have developed a wonderful amount of pure cussedness upon a very slight provocation. He started in to give the town a free exhibition by going into J. B. Hulse's photograph tent and firing off his revolver.
"A Bad Man and His Antics," Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1894, page 1

HUNDLEY PRINT SHOP
(1963)
Postcard publisher, 702 South Grape Street, Medford
    Mrs. Jane Hundley, an employee in cost accounting for the City of Medford's public works department for the last 14 months, resigned her position effective Monday. Mrs. Hundley will work with her husband, Charles H. Hundley, at the Hundley Journal Print Shop, 702 South Grape St.
"City Employee Resigns Position," Medford Mail Tribune, April 16, 1963, page 3
    Mrs. Dennis Hammond was honored at a layette shower recently when Mrs. Charles H. Hundley entertained in her home, 702 South Grape Street.
"Shower Honors Medford Woman," Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1963, page 6

JOHN W. HUNTER (Gold Hill 1895, Medford 1901)
    J. Hunter and family arrived here this week from Junction City, Or. Mr. H. will open a photograph gallery here.
"Gold Hill Items," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1895, page 2

    J. W. Hunter and F. S. Sherer, of Oklahoma, who arrived to Medford a couple of weeks ago, have leased the photograph gallery in the Hamlin block, which has been occupied by Mr. Mackey for several years, and will open up a studio therein in the near future. H. C. Mackey & Boyd, the present occupants of the building, will remove their studio to some other building in the city, but the exact location has not yet been decided upon.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, March 15, 1901, page 6

    J. W. Hunter and F. S. Sherer, expert photographers, who lately arrived from Kansas. have rented the gallery occupied by Mackey & Boyd, and will take possession about April 1st.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1901, page 7
    Messrs. Hunter & Sherer, the photographers, have moved their families to the G. W. Isaacs residence property, on South C Street.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 7
Elite Studio ad, May 24, 1901 Medford Mail
May 24, 1901 Medford Mail
     Messrs. Hunter & Sherer, the photographers, have moved their families to the G. W. Isaacs residence property, on South C Street.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 7
Elite Studio ad, April 26, 1901 Medford Mail
April 26, 1901 Medford Mail
    The Elite Studio, located in the Hamlin block, opened for business Thursday morning. The proprietor, J. W. Hunter . . . has had the room thoroughly renovated, repapered and repainted from floor to ceiling, and has provided new and modern light reflectors and other strictly modern studio fixtures.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 26, 1901, page 7
    The photos that come from the Elite are so smooth and fine, nicely retouched, that's what opens the eyes of the people.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 10, 1901, page 7
    H. S. Sherer, of the firm of Hunter & Sherer, the photographers, left last Monday for Oklahoma and Kansas, where he goes to look after his property interests and supervise the harvesting of his crops.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, May 24, 1901, page 6

    Hunter, the retoucher and operator of the Elite, is teaching retouching; if you want to learn the art call at the Elite studio.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 24, 1901, page 7
    The Elite is the popular photograph gallery of Medford today. Under the management of J. W. Hunter it has come to the front. Everybody is pleased with the work that comes from the Elite, and only two months since the studio opened--quite a record.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 5-26, 1901, page 7
    F. S. Sherer, of the firm of Hunter & Sherer, photographers, returned Tuesday evening from a two months' business visit to Kansas and Oklahoma. He reports intense heat and much suffering therefrom in the localities he visited.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 19, 1901, page 6
    The firm of Hunter & Sherer, photographers, has been dissolved, Mr. F. S. Sherer retiring. Mr. J. W. Hunter will continue the business as heretofore, in the Hamlin block. Mr. Hunter is unquestionably one of the best photographers in all Oregon. He has had years of experience in the East where only the best work possible in the art is permissible. The samples displayed in front of his studio is evidence of the superior work he turns out. He is a high art photographer--who makes portraits--not mere pictures. Mr. Sherer is not himself a photographer, and the line of business he will engage in he has not yet decided upon.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 2, 1901, page 7

    One thing certain the Elite Studio, under Mr. Hunter's management, is turning out the finest portraits in photography ever made in this county. The reception room is filled with work he has done here in Medford that would be a credit to any city,showing work to the public in posing, lighting and fine smooth retouching which shows plainly he is a master at his profession. Photos of familiar faces adorn the walls, and people come from all the towns around to have work done by the operator of the Elite Studio. He has been here but a short time, but notwithstanding he is the busiest man in Medford. If you appreciate a work of art, call at the Elite photo studio and leave your order. "A word to the wise is sufficient."

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 7
    G. W. Mackey and J. W. Hunter, the photographers, have consolidated their business and are now occupying the Elite studio in [the] Hamlin block.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, October 25, 1901, page 6
    G. W. Mackey and J. W. Hunter have consolidated their photograph galleries and will have their headquarters in the Hamlin block.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1901, page 2

    The Elite Studio can show the finest display of photographs in Jackson County.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 13, 1901, page 7
    J. W. Hunter, the photographer, and wife left Medford last Saturday for Northern California, where they expect to locate.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, January 10, 1902, page 6

CLARENCE L. HUNTINGTON
(Portland 1898-1903, San Francisco 1909)
BOX KITE PHOTOGRAPHY
    What appeared to be an airship has been seen flying over the city on several occasions during the past week. It proved to be a box kite, on which was suspended a small camera with which "birdseye" views of scenes in this vicinity were taken. The kite has been made to ascend, when the winds are favorable, to a height of about 500 feet. The greatest difficulty in having the kite remain in a proper position is the various cross-currents in the upper strata of air. The kite is the property of C. L. Huntington of San Francisco, a traveling photographer, and is capable of lifting 50 pounds when the winds are favorable.
Medford Mail, May 7, 1909, page 2  His Southern Oregon photos are not known to have survived.

ULYSSES G. HURLEY (1896, 1910)
    From the Klamath Falls Express: U. G. Hurley, wife and child, of Talent, arrived Friday. Mr. Hurley has opened a photograph gallery in the Shellabarger building next door to the Central.
"A Few Klamath County Items," Medford Mail, September 25, 1896, page 2
    There was an itinerant photographer here during the week who has been taking views of our town and its many homes and buildings, as also of the surrounding country.
"Butte Falls Items," Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1910, page 12
    U. G. Hurley, a photographer from Fruitvale, Cal., has been to Butte Falls and came out Wednesday, where he had been taking views of the scenery in that section. He has been stopping at the Sunnyside for a couple of days taking photographs of some of the buildings, orchards, our school, etc.
"Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1910, page 12

HUS
(Medford circa 1910-20)
All-caps rubber-stamped legend; some postcards inscribed "HUS Post Card." Probably Hussey's Cash Store [1908-13], possibly Harry Urban Scholz.
    A quiet wedding was solemnized at the Catholic rectory Friday evening at 6 o'clock when Miss Irene Norris became the bride of Harry U. Scholz. . . . The groom is the son of Mr. and Mrs. R. Scholz and is employed at the Pullman bakery.
"Society," Medford Mail Tribune, June 24, 1916, page 3


JAMES MASON HUTCHINGS
(1855)


THOMAS O. HUTCHINSON
(Myrtle Creek 1891, Portland 1901-02, Holly 1909)
    New gallery at Myrtle Creek, O. Latest styles and processes. Popular prices. Satisfaction guaranteed. Mrs. T. O. Hutchinson will be on hand at all times to attend to the wants of the public.
Plaindealer, Roseburg, June 18, 1891, page 4
    T. O. Hutchinson, of Springfield, Oregon was in the city yesterday on his way to Crater Lake, where he will do quite a bit of photograph work for the Weister Picture Company, of Portland. Mr. Hutchinson is an old time acquaintance of Joseph Stewart, of this city.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, October 29, 1908, page 5
    Monday night Irvin Murphy and a man by the name of Hutchison of Portland, a photographer, went to Crater Lake. Mr. Hutchinson is traveling in the interest of a firm in Portland and is going to Crater Lake to take views. He intends to go all around the lake and take views of the lake and all of the surrounding country to make scenic views. He anticipates finding considerable snow, but thinks that they can stand the rigor of that climate. They expect to be gone several days.
"Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, November 5, 1908, page 6

ISSOTT STUDIO
(1919-27)
James and Anna Wendt Issott
    Issott's Photo Studio is now open for business over Hubbard Bros. We do portrait work exclusively and make a specialty of baby photos. Your satisfaction guaranteed.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, July 27, 1919, page 2
    Bring in that picture you want copied. We will do it right. Issott's Studio, over Hubbard Bros.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, September 21, 1919, page 2
    Mr. and Mrs. Albert Peasley, formerly of Portland, have purchased the Issott Studio, 331 East Main Street, and will operate it under the name of "The Peasleys."
"The Peasleys Purchase Issotts," Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1927, page B6


JACKSONVILLE BOOSTER CLUB
    The Jacksonville Booster Club is issuing a colored postcard this year. The picture is of the club's bicentennial project, a quilt with local scenes in the blocks. They were designed by artist Ann Butte and sewn by club members.
Betty Miller, "Mayor of Area Town Helps in Card Revival," Medford Mail Tribune, November 7, 1976

ROBERT H. JONAS (1902-03 Eagle Point)
    Last Saturday Bert Peachey left for their mountain home near Mt. Pitt, and on Sunday Robert Jonas and Boyd Potter started for the same place. The three expect to remain there for several weeks, hunting, fishing and taking pictures, Mr. Jonas being an adept in the latter art.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, December 12, 1902, page 5
    R. H. Jonas was in Medford Thursday from his home at Eagle Point to get supplies for a photograph gallery which he expects to open at that place in the near future.
"Local News Notes," Medford Success, March 20, 1903, page 6

    R. H. Jonas has given up the role of reporter and returned to Eagle Point, where he is operating a photograph gallery.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1903, page 3
    Robert Jonas has erected a tent on his father's place and is engaged in the photograph business.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, April 10, 1903, page 5

EDITH HAYDEN JONES BALL
(1915-1921 Roseburg, 1921-48 Medford)
    Miss Edith Hayden, the well-known local photographer, left this morning for Pasadena, Cal., where she will visit for a week or ten days with her parents. On her return she will stop at San Francisco, where she will attend the exposition.
"City News," News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon, July 23, 1915, page 3
    Miss Edith Hayden, a local photographer, left here today for San Francisco, Pasadena and points in Arizona, where she will spend several weeks with friends.

"Local and Personal," News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon, July 23, 1915, page 5
Roseburg Resident Married Monday
    Miss Edith Hayden, a well-known photographer of this city, was united in marriage Monday, January 10, to E. J. Jones, a former resident of this city. The ceremony took place in Vancouver. Mrs. Jones returned to this city on Wednesday and will take immediate steps to settle her business here. Mr. Jones, who is employed by the Walker Auto Company of Medford, is attending to business matters in Portland connected with the auto show. Mr. and Mrs. Jones expect to reside in Medford for a short time and may go to California. He was associated with the Nash garage here for a short time last summer.
News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon, January 14, 1921, page 6
    Mr. and Mrs. James H. Clark today completed the purchase of the photographic studio formerly owned by Mrs. Edith Hayden, located in the Bell building on Jackson Street.
"Hayden Studio Sold to James Clark," News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon, April 21, 1921, page 8
    Mrs. Hayden Jones, who left recently for Medford to make her permanent home, is now opening a new photographic studio in the latter city. 

"Around the Town," News-Review, Roseburg, Oregon, May 11, 1921, page 4
MRS. JONES ISSUES DEFY TO HUSBAND
    The notice in yesterday's Tribune, that Mr. E. J. Jones (proprietor of the Service Garage) would not be responsible for any bills contracted by Mrs. E. J. Jones after July 18th, must be a joke, for although he married me some six months ago and I am now his lawful wife, he has done practically nothing toward my support but has borrowed from me several hundred dollars, none of which he has repaid, and notice is hereby given that I will pay no more bills for him after this date, and I will further state that if said E. J. Jones will produce one bill that he has ever paid for Mrs. E. J. Jones the undersigned will make him a present of $10.00.
(signed) MRS. E. J. JONES.               
Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1921, page 3
    Photos finished in five days from time sitting is made. Upstairs Photo Shop, 208 West Main Street.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, December 10, 1924, page 2
    EXPERT PORTRAIT WORK either at studio, 627 S. 6th St., or your home. Call 234, ask for E. Hayden Jones.
Classified ad, The Evening Herald, Klamath Falls, December 4, 1925, page 7
    Jones, Edith H., Mrs., photographer, r 235 S. Central
1927-28 Medford City Directory
    Jones, Edith H., photog. Swems, r 607 W. 2nd
1930-31 Medford City Directory
    KODAK FINISHING--Easy-to-pay prices. E. Hayden Jones Photo Studio. 607 W. 2nd. Phone 1282-M. Hours 11 to 7.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1934, page 7
    SAVE on Kodak finishing at the E. Hayden Jones Studio, 607 West 2nd. Phone 1282-M.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, August 7, 1936, page 17
    BABY'S PHOTO--Special offer, 50¢ total price, one 8x10 photo of any child under 6 years. Proofs shown. E. Hayden Jones Studio. Dial 3364. 607 West 2nd, past junior high.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1941, page 11

    Miss Jones is a native of Missouri, Kansas City, to be exact. Her father served in the Confederate Army. Her earlier days were happily spent on a farm. When fifteen, she entered the University of Oklahoma, leaving the college while a sophomore. Readers will recall a popular fad of that time, leather pillow covers, with Indian scenes painted on them. She obtained employment as a painter of these scenes, since her urge for art would naturally interest her in these productions. Meanwhile, she had several friends in Oklahoma City who owned a photo studio, another outlet for her artistic trend. By questions and answers, experiment and trial, she learned the rudiments of the profession and soon showed skill as a retoucher. Soon she discarded pillow top art for retouching in several studios. By this time her parents moved to Yuma, Arizona. She moved with them, but after a six months' stay decided to go further west, and went to live with a cousin in Portland, Oregon. There being no retouching to be done, she purchased a stamp picture studio, and, to use her words, "the fun began." Perhaps she had in the mind the time when she and a partner had a studio houseboat on the Columbia River, and the incidental camping experiences along the river, as the "studio" moved from town to town. Interested in photography, her real hobby is raising unusual plants and flowers. She and Skipper, the pup, constitute the family. Her studio today is located in Medford, Oregon.
The Focus, July-August 1942, quoted in Peter Palmquist, "Camera Fiends and Kodak Girls in Southern Oregon 1850-1950"
    [I am] Picking pears as a patriotic duty, but studio [is] open Thursday, Friday, Saturday and every evening from 6:30 to 8 p.m. E. Hayden Jones Studio, 607 West 2nd. Phone 3364.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, August 30, 1942, page 5
E. HAYDEN JONES PHOTO STUDIO
    Phone 3364 under name Mrs. Fred Ball in 1944 telephone directory, 607 W. 2nd.
Classified ad, Medford Mail Tribune, August 16, 1944, page 9
Obituary
    Edith Hayden Ball, a resident of this community for 25 years, passed away at the family residence, 1411 Dakota Avenue, yesterday. She was born at Hicks City, Mo.
    Survivors include her husband, Fred, Medford; two brothers, B. E. Hayden, Menlo Park, Calif., and J. E. Hayden, Santa Monica, Calif.
    Funeral services will be conducted from the Perl funeral home Friday at 2 p.m. with the St. Mark's Episcopal Church officiating. Interment will take place in Siskiyou Memorial Park.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 11, 1948, page 11

A. E. KAISER
(Grants Pass 1904-1906)
    H. E. Kaiser [sic], of Chicago, has purchased the New York Studio. The people of Oregon City and vicinity will appreciate the fact of having an up-to-date photographer. The work done by Mr. Kaiser is strictly first class at moderate prices.
"Additional Local," Oregon City Courier, November 13, 1903, page 4
    A. E. Kaiser has bought the photo studio of C. D. Nichols, opposite the courthouse. Mr. Kaiser makes a specialty of platinum and carbon prints.
"The Local Happenings," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, July 7, 1904, page 3

    J. M. Boyd, who has been in Portland for the past month, whither he went to take the remains of his wife for interment in one of the cemeteries of that city, returned Wednesday to Grants Pass. Mr. Boyd will again resume his photographic business, which he left in charge of A. E. Kaiser.