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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised



Who Was Who in Southern Oregon
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SOUTHERN OREGON PIONEERS.
Historical Record of the Early Settlers of this Valley.

    We copy the following history of the pioneers of Southern Oregon from the records of the society as kept by the Secretary--S. J. Day. A number of the members have failed in furnishing their biographies up to this time, and as a full record is desired, those behind should give it in at the next annual reunion to be held in Jacksonville next September:
    John E. Ross, born in Madison County, Ohio, on the 15th of February, 1818. Emigrated to Oregon, in 1847, from Illinois, engaged in farming.
    James M. Sutton, born in Morgan County, Illinois, June 29, 1830, emigrated to Oregon in 1851, from Illinois, arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1854; died November 1879. Editor.
    Frederick Heber, born in Wirtanberg, Germany, July 26, 1811. Emigrated to the U.S. June, 1823, and emigrated to Oregon in the fall of 1852 from Weston, Missouri. Engaged in farming.
    Alexander M. Berry, born in Lancaster County, Pa., January 16, 1817. Emigrated to Lancaster, Ohio, in 1820, thence to Indiana, in 1832, thence to Oregon in 1852, arrived at Portland Sept. 4, 1852 and at Jacksonville Oct. 21, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Lucius Danforth, age 53 years. Emigrated from Rock Island County, Ills., and arrived in Oregon Oct. 20, 1847. Physician.
    James Hamlin, born in Lewis County, Kentucky, April 1, 1815. Emigrated from Marion County, Iowa, and arrived in Oregon, Oct. 12, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    James N. T. Miller, born in Kentucky Oct. 10, 1826, and emigrated from Missouri to Oregon in 1845. Engaged in farming.
    John B. Wrisley, born in Bennington, Vermont, August 16, 1819. Emigrated from Ills. to California Aug. 22, 1849, and arrived in Oregon Oct. 15, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Burrel B. Griffin, born in Kentucky, 1808, and emigrated to Missouri in 1835, and arrived in Oregon in 1848 and in Rogue River Valley in June 1852; died in 1881. Engaged in farming.
    Granville Naylor, born in Jackson County, Ind., Feb. 16, 1822, and emigrated from Iowa to Oregon in 1851. Engaged in farming.
    James A. Cardwell, born in Jackson County, Tennessee, Feb. 22, 1827, and emigrated from Iowa to Oregon in 1850. Engaged in farming.
    William M. Mathews, born in Westmoreland County, Pa., Nov. 1, 1829, and emigrated from Pa. to Oregon and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Samuel D. Van Dyke, born in Pa., Aug. 7, 1809. Emigrated to Iowa in 1845 and from thence to Oregon and arrived in Rogue River Valley Sept. 22, 1852; died August 13, 1880. Engaged in farming.
    Emerson E. Gore, born in Windham, Vermont, and emigrated from Lee County, Iowa, to Oregon and arrived in Rogue River Valley Sept. 22, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    David Dunlap, born in Logan County, Ohio, Dec. 24, 1828. Emigrated from Iowa and arrived in Oregon Oct. 5, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Joseph P. Parker, born in Wooster County, Mass. Emigrated from Missouri and arrived in Oregon in Sept. 1852 and in Rogue River Valley in 1854; died June 17, 1882, aged 66 years, 7 months and 22 days. Engaged in farming.
    Haskel Amy, born in New Hampshire in 1826 and emigrated to Oregon in 1852. Engaged in farming.
    John Watson, born at St. Stephens, New Brunswick in 1823. Emigrated via Cape Horn in 1849 and arrived in Oregon in 1852. Engaged in farming.
    James McDonough, born in Green County, Pa. and emigrated from Washington County, Pa. and arrived in Oregon in April 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Andrew Davison, born in Fountain County, Ind. in 1832 and emigrated thence and arrived in Oregon Dec. 13, 1852. Engaged in farming.
    James W. Simpson, born in Elizabeth Town, Hardin County, Ken., Aug. 16, 1827. Emigrated from Mo. to Cal. in 1849 and arrived in Oregon in Oct. 1851. Engaged in farming.
    S. C. Taylor, born in Mass. in 1828 and emigrated from Winnebago County, Ills. and arrived in Oregon in 1853 and in Rogue River Valley Oct. 27, 1853. Engaged in farming.
    Jerome B. Coats, born in Carter County, Penn., Nov. 8, 1829, and emigrated from Springfield, Ills. and arrived in Oregon in Oct. 1854; died Dec. 12, 1881.
    William Hoffman, born in the city of Baltimore, Maryland, Sept. 7, 1801 and emigrated from Covington, Fountain County, Ind. across the plains and arrived in Rogue River Valley Oct. 27, 1853. Notary.
    Thomas Smith, born in Kentucky, and emigrated from Texas to Cal. in 1849, and from thence to Oregon and arrived in Oregon June 7, 1851. Engaged in farming.
    L. J. C. Duncan, born in Blount County, Tenn., Nov. 1, 1818, and emigrated from Georgia to Cal. in 1849, to Ogn. in 1850, and to Rogue River Valley in Dec. 1851.
    Kaspar Kubli, born in Nestall, Canton Glarus, Switzerland, Aug. 1, 1830, and emigrated to the U.S. and arrived in New Orleans in 1852 and from thence to Oregon about Oct. 1, 1853. Merchant.
    E. Dimick, born in Morgan County, Ohio, July 21, 1836, left Rushville, Schuyler County, Ills. April 6, 1852 and arrived at Portland, Oregon in the fall of 1852. Hotel keeper.
    Lewis Calhoun, born in Muskingum County, Ohio Dec. 25, 1820, and emigrated to Oregon in 1849. Laborer.
    David Linn, born in Guernsey County, Ohio Oct. 28, 1826, and emigrated from Ills. and arrived in Ogn. in Sept. 1851. Cabinet maker.
    John M. McCall, born in Washington County, Penn., Jan. 15, 1825, emigrated to Iowa in 1842 and crossed the plains to Oregon in 1850; wintered in the Willamette Valley and went to the Yreka mines in 1851 and has resided in Jackson County since 1852. Merchant.
    C. K. Klum, born in New Trenton, Franklin County, Ind. Sept. 2, 1829, and emigrated from Louisa County, Iowa to Oregon in 1847. Saddler.
    E. J. Farlow, born in the state of Ills. April 24, 1851, and emigrated to Oregon in 1852. School teacher.
    James C. Tolman, born in Washington County, Ohio March 1, 1813, and emigrated from Ottumwa, Iowa to Oregon in 1852. Farmer and tanner.
    Oliver C. Applegate, born in Yamhill County, Oregon June 11, 1845.
    Theodric Cameron, born in Madison County, New York June 21, 1830, and emigrated from Iowa and arrived in Oregon Aug. 14, 1852. Merchant.
    Eli K. Anderson, born Monroe Co., Ind. Dec. 20, 1826, and emigrated to Cal. in 1849 and arrived in Ogn. Jan. 5, 1852. Farmer and miller.
    Jasper Houck, born Aug. 27, 1829 at Wallse on the Rhine, Germany. Emigrated to the U.S. and arrived at New Orleans in 1839, from thence to St. Louis, Mo. and to Cal. in 1849 to Oregon in 1852. Hotel keeper.
    B. F. Dowell, born in Albemarle County, Virginia Oct. 31, 1826, and emigrated to Oregon April 27, 1850. Attorney at law.
    James J. Fryer, born Oct. 19, 1828, in the city of Norwage, Eng., and emigrated to Long Island, N.Y. in 1837, to Wisconsin in 1848, to Iowa in 1850 and to Oregon 1851 and Jacksonville June 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Levi Tinkham, born in Rochester, Mass. in 1821, and emigrated to Oregon in Sept. 1850; died Dec. 2, 1880. Engaged in farming.
    P. J. Ryan, born in Tipperary County, Ireland May 1, 1830, arrived in Oregon in 1852. Merchant.
    D. Hobart Taylor, born in Ashtabula County, Ohio, Sept. 4, 1831, emigrated to Oregon (Rogue River Valley) Oct. 27, 1853. Engaged in farming.
    Peter Britt, born in Switzerland March 12, 1819, emigrated to the U.S. in 1845 and to Oregon in the spring of 1852, arrived in Jacksonville Nov. 9, 1852. Photographist.
    Joseph F. Ruark, born Oct. 15, 1827 in Henderson County, Kentucky; ranger in the Mexican War, crossed the plains to Oregon in 1850.
    Mrs. Rhoda T'Vault, born in Warren County, Ky. Nov. 19, 1810, arrived at Oregon City Oct. 14, 1845.
    Wm. L. Colvig, born Sept. 19, 1814 in Loudoun County, Virginia, emigrated from Platt County, Mo. and arrived at Portland, Oregon Sept. 22, 1851. Physician.
    Helen M. Colvig, wife of Wm. L. Colvig, born at Hartford, Conn. Sept. 16, 1816, emigrated from Platt County, Mo., arrived at Portland, Oregon Sept. 22, 1851.
    William M. Colvig, born in Ray County, Mo., Sept. 2, 1845, emigrated from Platt County, Mo., arrived at Portland, Oregon Sept. 22, 1851.
    Rufus Ball, born in Cambridge, Mass. May 20, 1812, sailed from Boston Jan. 14, 1849, sailed from San Francisco in 1851 for Trinidad, formed a party (Geo. T. Vining being one), started for Oregon over the mountains and arrived at Fort Perkins in this valley Dec. 8, 1851, only two houses in the valley at that time. Engaged in farming.
    Wm. Bybee, born in Clark County, Kentucky April 20, 1830. Arrived in Cal. July 17, 1852 and got to Rogue River Valley in 1854.
    C. C. Beekman, born in New York City Jan. 27, 1828, emigrated from Dundee, Yates County, N.Y., to Cal., and from thence to Jacksonville, Ogn. in March 1853. Banker.
    Alexander J. Watts, born Oct. 29, 1831 at Brashear Furnace, St. Lawrence County, N.Y., from whence he moved to Sangamon County, Ills. in autumn of 1833, thence to Oregon in 1851, crossing the plains and settled in Josephine County, Ogn. in 1853 and resides there still. Surveyor.
    Rial Benedict, born Mar. 21, 1822, in Genesee County, N.Y., moved to Crawford County, Penn. in 1837, thence to Kane County, Ills. in 1843 and emigrated to Ogn. in 1852. Engaged in farming.
    Henry W. Clayton, born in Perry County, Ohio April 13, 1812, went to Iowa in 1837 and from there to Ogn. in 1853.
    N. H. Clayton, born Dec. 18, 1845, Van Buren County, Iowa, and came to Ogn. in 1853.
    Isaac Miller, born Feb. 8, 1806 in Carter County, Tenn., thence went to the Territory of Ind. in 1808, thence to Montgomery County, Ind. and from thence to Ogn. in 1848. Died, he and his wife Elizabeth Miller, Feb. 26, 1878.
    Gilbert G. Anderson, born July 15, 1853 in Monroe County, Iowa and emigrated from thence to Oregon in 1854.
    William G. Parker, born Ills. July 18, 1845, arrived at the Dalles in Ogn. in the fall of 1852 and to Rogue River Valley in 1854.
    Claiborne Neil, born in Claiborne County, Tenn., arrived in Ogn. Sept. 1853.
    William Kahler, born in Louden County, Virginia, emigrated to Oregon in 1852, was raised in Morton County, Ohio, from which state he left for Oregon. Engaged in farming.
    J. H. Chitwood born in Jefferson County, Ind. in 1824 and emigrated to Oregon in 1853.
    B. F. Miller, born July 31, 1832 in Hamilton County, Ohio, from thence to Morgan County, Ills., from thence emigrated to Oregon in 1854 to the Willamette Valley and in Dec. 1854 arrived in Rogue River Valley.
Oregon Sentinel, July 8, 1882, page 3


SOUTHERN OREGON PIONEERS.
Historical Record of the Early Settlers of this Valley.

    We copy the following history of the Pioneers of Southern Oregon from the records of the society as kept by the Secretary--S. J. Day. A number of the members have failed in furnishing their biographies up to this time, and as a full record is desired, those behind should give it in at the next annual reunion to be held in Jacksonville next September:
    Margaret J. Miller, wife of B. F. Miller, born in Morgan County, Ill. December 1838. Emigrated to Oregon in 1854 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1857.
    J. B. Thomas, born August 22, 1821, in Cooper County, Missouri; emigrated to Oregon in 1847 and resided in Linn County twenty years and came to Jackson County in 1867.
    Addison Helms, born in Montgomery County, Virginia August 20, 1825, went to Illinois in 1848 and from thence to California in 1849 and thence to Oregon in March 1855.
    Charles W. Savage, born in the state of Maine December 8, 1826; spent several years in seafaring and crossed the plains with Col. Fremont's company, to California, in 1845, and from thence came to Oregon in 1846.
    Daniel F. Fisher, born in Augusta County, Virginia December 28, 1817; moved to Missouri in 1836, thence to Louisiana in 1840, thence to California in 1849, thence to Oregon in 1851.
    Thomas F. Beall, born in Montgomery County, Maryland August 27th, 1827 and moved to Illinois in 1835, thence to Rogue River Valley, Sept. 27, 1852.
    Paine P. Prim, born in Wilson County, Tenn. May 1, 1822, and emigrated to Oregon in the fall of 1851 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in the spring of 1852.
    Robert V. Beall, born in Montgomery County, Maryland, from thence parents moved to Springfield, Illinois in 1835 and thence I came to Oregon, arrived at Oregon City July 18, 1852 and in Rogue River Valley in September, 1852.
    J. W. Manning, born in Richland County, Ohio May 3, 1838, from thence to Missouri, from thence to Rogue River Valley in 1852.
    James Thornton, born in Tippecanoe County, Indiana May 29, 1827; emigrated to Iowa in 1835, crossed the plains in 1850 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1851.
    Thomas Wright, born in Kentucky Oct. 22, 1822, emigrated to Missouri in 1824, and thence to Oregon. Arrived in Oregon in 1851 and in Rogue River Valley in March 1852.
    George W. Mace, born in the state of Maine August 21, 1828; emigrated to Pike County, Illinois in 1836, thence to California in 1850 and thence to Rogue River valley in 1853.
    J. P. McDaniel was born in Hickman County, Kentucky, May 14, 1840, arrived in Oregon October [illegible date], 1852.
    [illegible name], born in the town of Munson, County of [illegible] in the state of Vermont on the [illegible] day of February 1808; emigrated to the state of Illinois in 1834, came across the plains in 1853 and arrived in Rogue River Valley October 9, 1853.
    Silas J. Day, born in Anne Arundel County, Maryland, April 3, 1826; emigrated to Oregon July 5, 1853.
    J. H. Huffer, born in Washington County, Maryland August 12, 1834; in his infancy his parents moved to Tippecanoe County, Indiana, came to Oregon, Rogue River Valley in October 1852.
    Samuel R. Taylor, born in Mount Carmel, Illinois February 16, 1828; emigrated to Oregon and arrived at Portland in the fall of 1852 and came to Rogue River Valley in the spring of 1853.
    David L. Hopkins, born New Brunswick, [omission] September 19, 1823, emigrated to California in 1850 and came to Oregon in October 1850, and to Rogue River Valley in 1851.
    James H. Russell, born in Tennessee, April 5, 1823, emigrated to California in 1849 and came to Rogue River Valley in the winter of 1850 and '51.
    Asa G. Fordyce, born in the state of Illinois in the year 1816, emigrated from Iowa to Oregon in 1853, to Rogue River Valley.
    Milo Caton was born in Cayuga County, New York, January 27, 1827. Arrived in Oregon October 17, 1852.
    A. K. Williams was born February 8, 1819 in Ohio; came to Portland, Oregon in 1849 and to Jackson County in 1854.
    Miles S. Wakeman was born on the 25th day of Oct. 1829 in Dutchess County, New York; same to San Francisco in 1850 and to Oregon October 5, 1855.
    Mrs. Zany Ganung was born in Madison County, Ohio February 15, 1818, and emigrated from Illinois to Oregon in 1847.
    George W. Isaacs, born in Lincoln County, Middle Tennessee, January 12, 1831, came to Oregon in 1852, first to this valley, then to Benton County, and returned here in 1858.
    Thomas G. Reames was born in Hart County, Kentucky in 1839. Arrived in Oregon September 1, 1852.
    Evan R. Reames was born in Macoupin County, Illinois April 5, 1850. Arrived in Oregon September 1, 1852.
    E. D. Foudray, born in Fleming County, Kentucky January 8, 1823, came to California in January 1850, and to Rogue River Valley September 1852.
    R. A. Cook, born in Blount County, Tennessee, on [the] 31st day of May 1833, came to Oregon in June 1853, and to Rogue River Valley June 18, 1859.
    J. P. Tuffs, born in Washington County, Maine, January 12, 1825, came to this coast June 28, 1850, and to Rogue River Valley in 1851.
    Simon Bolivar Hull, born in Ypsilanti, Michigan March 20, 1833, thence to western Iowa, and crossed the plains to Yamhill County, Oregon in 1853 and arrived in Rogue River Valley Nov. 13, 1854.
    John O'Brien was born in County Galway, in Ireland, May 15, 1828. Emigrated to U.S. in 1847; landed in New York, from thence to Vermont some year, from there to Wisconsin, left Wisconsin and arrived in Oregon in the fall of 1852.
    John B. Griffin, born Jackson County, Oregon September 14, 1853, joined the Pioneer Society July 28, 1881.
    Arthur Langell, born in Nova Scotia, June 6, 1829. Arrived in Oregon in the fall of 1851.
    Albert Alford, born in Sheridan County, Missouri May 4, 1833. Arrived in Oregon in the fall of 1850.
    Catherine K. Alford, wife of A. Alford, born in Sheridan County, Missouri. Arrived in Oregon in the fall of 1850.
    Almira A. Cook, wife of R. A. Cook, born in Christian County, Kentucky February 27, 1833. Arrived in Oregon June 1853, and in Jackson County June 18, 1859.
    John Beeson was born in Lincolnshire, England Sept. 15, 1803. Emigrated to New York in 1830, and to Rogue River Valley in 1853.
    Thomas Snee, born in Pittsburgh, Pa. August 1821. Came to California in 1849 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1853.
    M. Hanley, born in Guyandotte, W. Va. June 1824, arrived on this coast 1850 and in this valley 1852.
    R. J. Cameron, born in Madison Co., New York June 27, 1829; emigrated to Iowa in 1839 and to Jackson Co., Oregon in 1852.
    J. Leslie, born Longford Co., Ireland in August 1814. Came to California in 1849 and to Rogue River Valley in 1851.
    W. C. Myer was born in Jefferson Co., Ohio April 22, 1818. Emigrated from there to Van Buren Co., Iowa April 1843, arrived in this valley overland Sept. 3, 1853, crossed the plains twice on horseback, nine times by rail and twice over the Isthmus of Panama.
    U. S. Hayden was born in Saybrook, Conn. July 8, 1810, sailed from New York around Cape Horn and arrived in San Francisco in 1849. Came to Oregon in 1850 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1850. Died in Jacksonville, January 31, 1879.
    John Holton was born in Westminster, Windham Co., Vermont, July 6, 1817, where he remained until Sept. 9, 1835, when he removed West, arriving at McDonough Co., Illinois Dec. 16, 1835, remaining there until the spring of 1837, when he removed to Burlington, Iowa, remaining in Iowa most of the time until he crossed the plains, arriving in Rogue River Valley Oct. 9, 1853, remaining until April 1847. Went East and returned, crossing the plains in 1860, arriving at Wagner Creek Aug. 25, 1860.
    Veit Schutz, born in Bavaria, Germany, Nov. 1, [blank], came to Oregon in the spring of 1852.
    Sam'l. Phillips, born in Wayne Co., Kentucky in March 1819. Emigrated to this coast overland in 1853 and arrived in Rogue River Valley in 1854, where he still resides. Engaged in farming and stock raising.
    Mrs. L. J. Plymale, born in Platte County, Missouri June 3, 1845. Crossed the plains in 1846 and arrived in Oregon October of that year and arrived in Southern Oregon in 1850, and [has] been a resident here since.
Oregon Sentinel, July 15, 1882, page 3


Our Legislators.
    The Statesman has published a brief biography of the members of the legislature, from which we take the following:
    Snider, A.--Lakeview, Lake and Klamath, age 60, born in Stuttgart, Germany, came to Oregon in 1868, merchant, postmaster, city councilman. Wants another judge for the first district. Boards at Z. M. Parvin's, corner Capitol and Chemeketa.
    McCall, J. M.--Ashland, Jackson, age 65, born in Washington County, Pa., came to Oregon in 1850, merchant, was member of house in '76. Is keeping his eye peeled on the road bill for Klamath and Jackson. Boards at E. B. McElroy's, Court Street, opposite the statehouse.
    Merritt, J. W.--Central Point, Jackson, age 38, born in Syracuse, N.Y., came to Oregon in 1875, merchant. Has no pets.

    Furry, Samuel.--Phoenix, Jackson, age 67, born in Pa., came to Oregon in 1860, farmer and stockraiser, been county commissioner, representative in 1882.

    Cameron, Theodric.--Uniontown, Jackson, age 61, born in Madison County, N.Y., came to Oregon in 1852, merchant and postmaster. State appropriations for wagon roads his hobby. Boards at Willamette Hotel.
    Cogswell, C. A.--Lakeview, Crook, Klamath and Lake, age 47, came to Oregon in 1869, born in Rutland, Vt., served during war as scout under General Logan, attorney, been county judge of Lake. Wants his labor bill to become a law. Boards at Prof. Parvin's, Chemeketa and Capitol streets.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 1

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    CHARLES W. KAHLER: lives in Jacksonville; is a lawyer; was born in Morgan County, Ohio, November 4, 1840; arrived in state and county October, 1852.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504


    CHARLES WESLEY KAHLER. A sound and able lawyer, having the confidence and esteem of his fellow men, Charles Wesley Kahler has been for many years an honored member of the legal fraternity of Jackson County. From 1868 to 1903 he was actively engaged in the practice of his profession in Jacksonville, and was justly considered one of the foremost attorneys in the city. January 26, 1903, he suffered a stroke of paralysis, and has since been suffering from locomotor ataxia, a most trying disease. A son of William Kahler, he was born November 4, 1840, near McConnelsville, Morgan County, Ohio. His grandfather, Jacob Kahler, was born and bred in Pennsylvania, but removed to Virginia, and from there migrated to Ohio, where he spent his declining years.
    A native of Loudoun County, Va., William Kahler removed with his parents to Morgan County, Ohio, where he cleared and improved a farm. In 1852 he came across the plains to Oregon, bringing his family and household goods in ox wagons. Locating immediately in Jacksonville, he followed mining and carpentering for two years. In 1854 he took up one hundred and sixty acres of wild land near Table Rock, and was there engaged in agricultural pursuits for several years. Selling his ranch in 1880, he removed to Jacksonville, where he lived retired from active business until his death, in 1895, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was a strong Republican in his political affiliations, and served one term, about 1878, in the state legislature. In an early period of his settlement here, he was a member of the county association. He married in Morgan County, Ohio, Georgianna Johnson, who was born in London, England, in 1817, emigrated with her father to Morgan County, Ohio, and died in Jacksonville, Ore., in 1890, aged seventy-two years. Of their family of six children, four sons and two daughters, one son and one daughter are dead. Those living are Rebecca N. McDonough; Charles W.; Dr. George, of Tacoma, Wash.; Andrew, of Centralia, Wash.; Thomas P. and William E., of Sumpter, Ore.
    The second child in order of birth of his parents, Charles W. Kahler laid a substantial foundation for his future education in the common schools of Jackson County. Subsequently entering Willamette University he completed the English course, and was graduated in 1865 with the degree of B.S. Mr. Kahler afterwards studied law with Orange Jacobs of Jacksonville, and was admitted to the bar in 1868. Immediately beginning the practice of his profession in that city, he built up a large and remunerative practice, which he carried on with eminent success until his recent illness, as mentioned above. In 1869 he was appointed district attorney to succeed W. G. T'Vault, who died while in office, receiving his appointment from Governor Wood. He has been a candidate for both county judge and circuit judge, but has always been in the minority. In politics Mr. Kahler is a staunch Republican, and has always been ready to further the interests of his party. In the pursuit of his profession, he has accumulated a considerable property, owning valuable farming lands, and some mining property. He has never married. Mrs. Rebecca N. (Kahler) McDonough, Mr. Kahler's sister, was born in Morgan County, Ohio, and came to Jackson County with her parents. She married James McDonough, who was born near Pittsburgh, Pa., in 1826 and came to Oregon by way of the Isthmus in 1851, and settled in Jacksonville. He was first employed as a carpenter, but later bought land, and was most successfully engaged in agricultural pursuits, being noted throughout Southern Oregon as a breeder of fine horses, including some which made good records on the turf. He died on his farm near Tolo June 8, 1901, at the age of seventy-five years. He was a man of strict integrity and sterling worth, liberal and hospitable, and was held in high esteem throughout the community. In politics, Mr. McDonough was a sound Democrat. Unto Mr. and Mrs. McDonough were born six children: Carlos, a rancher in Washington; Helen, widow of I. M. Rowe; Harriet, widow of George D. Ridinger; John W., a rancher in Idaho; Martin C., on the old homestead; George C., a lumberman of Ashland.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 869-870


    DR. GEO. KAHLER: lives at Phoenix; is a physician; was born in Morgan County, Ohio, February, 1843; came to state and county in 1852; was married October, 1867, to Sylva Oglesby. Children Orange, Earl, Albion, Fred and Linn.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



    DR. J. M. KEENE, delegate from Jackson County, First Congressional District, has been a lifelong Republican. He comes from pioneer stock, his father and mother crossing the plains and settling in Marion County in the early '40s. Dr. Keene's early education was received in the common school of Fairfield and at Forest Grove. In choosing a profession, Dr. Keene selected dentistry, and after his graduation he went to Philadelphia and took a thorough course in the Philadelphia Dental College. He was elected president of his class the first year, and in his second year he was elected president of the Garretsonian Literary Society. On his return to Oregon, Dr. Keene took an active interest in politics, and at his home in Medford he is looked upon as a leader.

"Oregon Delegates to the Republican National Convention," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, April 17, 1904, page 10


KEENEY, ROBERT J.
Architect.
b. Hong Kong, China; son of Thomas P. and Elizabeth Ann (Williams) Keeney; educated University of Oregon B.S. 1930; Delta Tau Delta; m. Rosemary G. Gardner of Oregon City, May 10, 1939; began as estimator, plan serviceman, Big Pines Lumber Co. 1930-37; associated in designing Siskiyou and Josephine County hospitals; designer of Mt. Shasta and Prospect schools, Myron Root Company Plant, Stage Coach Orchards, Leverette Cold Storage, Bear Creek Orchards Plant, Rogue River Orchards, Crystal Springs Package Company, Reter Fruit Plant and numerous private residence; captain U.S. Army Engineers, European Theater of Operations 1943-46; cited; member Chamber of Commerce; Rogue River Country Club; University Club; American Institute of Architects; home Anderson Rd., Phoenix; office 123 E. Main St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 303


    CHAS. KEETON: lives in Jacksonville; is a farmer; was born in Cass County, Mo.; came to state and county in 1878; married November, 1881, to Ada Killahan. Child, infant.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



    KELLOGG, Clarence D., pianist and organist, began his piano studies with his mother at the age of six. Soon was placed under best teachers in Detroit, Michigan, where he received a thorough training. Going to Medford, Oregon, in 1905, he became active in the musical life of that place, teaching and acting as organist of the First M.E. Church. In 1910 he came to Los Angeles, doing advanced work in piano and organ with Elmer Todd, and since then he has been actively engaged in teaching in Los Angeles and Pasadena and doing much accompanying. For eight years has been organist at Lake Ave. Methodist Episcopal Church in Pasadena, and five years at Sanai Temple, Los Angeles.

Wiley Francis Gates, Who's Who in Music in California, 1920, page 84


KELLY, EDWARD C.
Lawyer; ex-State Legislator.
b. Blackfoot, Idaho, Aug. 6, 1904; son of E. E. and Agnes C. (Cantwell) Kelly; educated public schools; University of Oregon Law School; admitted to Oregon Bar 1927; began practice with father, Medford; served as attorney, review attorney, state attorney and regional counsel, Public Works Administration; later special attorney Department of Justice, Nome, Alaska; appointed Assistant General Counsel, Bonneville Power Administration 1940; served as State Representative Jackson County 1933; private law practice 1927-43, 1946-; served as captain U.S. Army, Allied Military Government, European Theater of Operations 1943-45; Legionnaire (service officer); Knight of Columbus; Granger; president Parent's Club, St. Mary's Academy; Democrat; Catholic; home 430 Haven; office 407 Medford Center Building, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, pages 309-310


KELLY, EDWARD C.
    Lawyer
b Blackfoot, Ida, Aug 6, 1904; son of E E and Agnes C (Cantwell) K; educ, pub schs; Univ Or Law Sch; law prac, 1927; began with father, Medford; served as atty, review atty, state atty and regional atty, Pub Works Admin; later, special atty, Dept of Justice, Nome, Alaska; apptd Assistant Gen Counsel, Bonneville Power Admin, 1940; serv as state representative, Jackson Co, 1933; capt, US Army, Allied Military Govt, European Theatre, 1943-45; mem, Parents Club (pres), St Mary's Acad (pres); Legionnaire (serv officer); Knight of Columbus; Granger; Democrat; home, 430 Haven; ofc, 407 Medford Center Blg, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 574


EDWARD E. KELLY.
    Residence, Queen Avenue; office, Palm Block, Medford. Born May 18, 1867, at De Witt, Iowa. Son of Thomas and Nancy (Flater) Kelly. Attended public school and high school of De Witt, Iowa, and graduated from the Law Department of Lake Forest University, Chicago, with LL.B. degree. Admitted to the bar of Illinois in 1896; to the bar of North Dakota in 1897; practiced in North Dakota one year and in 1898 enlisted in First Dakota Volunteer Infantry, and was transferred to First Company, Signal Corps, and, commissioned Second Lieutenant of same in February, 1899. In 1900 moved to Blackfoot, Idaho, and was admitted to the bar of that state in the same year. Remained there practicing his profession until he came to Oregon in 1907. Was admitted to the bar of this state in the same year, and formed a partnership with H. Withington, at Medford, which exists to date. Member Masonic, K. of P. and Redmen fraternities. Democrat.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 164


    REESE P. KENDALL. Born in Cincinnati, Ohio, May 12, 1829, Mr. Kendall's father, Richard G., and his grandfather, Reese, were born in Salem County, N.J., the family having been established there as early as 1750 by the paternal great-grandfather George, who was born in Canada, and died on his New Jersey farm. Reese Kendall followed the martial fortunes of Washington during the Revolutionary War, and was wounded in the ankle at the battle of Monmouth. He was a shoemaker by trade, and combined the same with farming for his entire active life. Richard G. Kendall was reared on the New Jersey farm, and married Ann Brown, a native of Salem County, N.J., a daughter of Samuel Brown, a tailor by trade, who died on his farm in Salem County. Mr. Kendall was educated in New Jersey and Philadelphia, Pa., graduating from a medical college in the latter city, where he also took a course of lectures in the early '30s. After removing to near Cincinnati, Ohio, in 1827, he practiced medicine for many years, and was latterly an invalid, and died of cholera July 4, 1849, his wife surviving him until the following year. Of the family of eight children, four sons and four daughters, four sons and two daughters attained maturity, Reese P. being the oldest of ail.
    Mr. Kendall was educated primarily in the common schools, and from 1852 until 1855 attended the Cincinnati Medical College. Entering Miami College in the fall of 1855, he graduated the following year, and forthwith engaged in professional practice in Shelby County, Ill., later practicing near Liberty, Adams County, for about four years. An exceptionally busy life was interrupted by the outbreak of the Civil War, and he enlisted in the fall of 1861 in Company L, Second Illinois Cavalry, after six weeks being promoted to acting assistant surgeon of the Sixteenth Army Corps. From July 22, 1864, until November, 1865, he served as major surgeon of the Eleventh United States Colored Infantry, and at the completion of this service was discharged at Memphis, Tenn.
    From the close of the war until 1871 Dr. Kendall continued to practice in Illinois, and then located near Beloit, Mitchell County, Kans., where he pre-empted and owned a farm of three hundred and twenty acres for many years, although he was often absent from it in the performance of his duties. In 1874 he removed to Illinois, and in 1875 attended college at Davenport, Iowa, the following year increasing his opportunity for usefulness by taking a course in the Episcopal theological school at Topeka, Kans. In the spring of 1877 he assumed charge of Christ Church at Warsaw, Ill., at the same time occupying his farm of one hundred acres near that town. In 1878 he returned to his Kansas ranch, and in 1882 came to Oregon, assuming charge of St. Thomas Church at Canyon City. His field of labor covered a large territory and included the towns of Prineville, Mitchell, Hay Creek, Prairie City, Dayville and several others, Mr. Kendall being the first preacher in Harney Valley and Dayville. In the spring of 1885 he went to Benton, Ala., where he preached and kept books for a lumber company for six months, following this by a month at Decatur, Ala., where he prepared confirmation classes for the bishop.
    From 1885 until 1887 Dr. Kendall lived on his farm near Hamilton, Ill., returning then to the farm near Beloit, Kans. He came to Medford, Ore., in 1893 as a literary worker for the Cincinnati Tribune, now the Commercial Tribune, and during his two years' association with the paper contributed a series of articles known as Tales of the Argonauts. In the fall of 1895 he accompanied his daughter to Boston, to place her in the conservatory of music of that city, but owing to the ill health of the latter she was obliged to leave the conservatory after four months. Dr. Kendall again removed to Oregon, and January 10, 1899, located in San Jose, Cal., where his daughter, since entirely recovered in health, entered the conservatory of music and graduated in the class of 1900 with the degree of Bachelor of Music. In August, 1901, the doctor came to Medford, where he now lives, and has since been practically retired from active life.
    Literary work has been one of his chief sources of revenue, as well as one of the most congenial of the occupations in which Dr. Kendall has engaged. Possessing a graphic style, extensive vocabulary, and pleasing manner of expression, his efforts have been eagerly sought by leading periodicals throughout the country, and have ranged from a book published in New York on Elementary Theology, and Higher Criticism Simplified, to Pacific Trail Camp-Fires, and the argonaut articles in the Cincinnati Tribune. In Liberty, Adams County, Ill., Dr. Kendall married, May 16, 1858, Mrs. Annie Maria Grubb Collins, born in Crawford County, Pa., and the mother of three children: Ann G., the wife of Aaron Andrews, of this vicinity; George Everett, of Spokane, Wash.; and Abby, at home. Dr. Kendall is a Republican in politics, and was formerly a strong Abolitionist, and a staunch friend of Salmon P. Chase. He is fraternally connected with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member of the Grand Army of the Republic.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 971-972


KENNEDY, ERNEST RAY
    Businessman;
    Civic and Fraternal Leader
b Lincoln, Nebr, July 20, 1909; son of Roy E and Odessa J (Steele) K; educ pub schs, Lincoln, Nebr and Los Angeles, Cal, High Sch of Agr, Curtis, Nebr, Univ Oreg; m Ruth E Baker, Syracuse, Kan, Jan 30, 1930; ch, Ernest R Jr, Katherine Lee, Wm Everett, Carl Monte; farm equip and hardware bus, whsl, retail feed and seed, Junction City, 1939-45; owner, Kennedy's Variety Store, No Bend, 1947-; council, 1949-; mem, sch bd, Junction City, 1945-46; City Recorder, 1941-42; mem, Chamber Commerce (dir 1948); Lion (pres, Junction City, 1938); Odd Fellow (past noble grand, 1934, secty, 1935;  R Mason (past master, 1936); OES (past patron, 1945); Republican; Methodist; home, 2218 McPherson; ofc, 804 E Main (Box 958), Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 574


    T. J. KENNEY: lives in Jacksonville; is a saddler and harness maker; was born in Jackson County, Oregon; was married December 22, 1878, to Rosa Ulrich. Children Daniel, Katie J. and Christian J.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504


    THOMAS JOSEPH KENNEY. A native Oregonian, the son of one of Jackson County's early pioneers and a descendant of distinguished ancestry, Thomas J. Kenney is a worthy representative of the esteemed and valued citizens of Jacksonville. Dependent upon his own resources from an early age, he labored with indomitable will and courage, and by his persistent energy and foresight became established among the successful business men of the city while he was yet a comparatively young man. A son of Daniel M. Kenney, he was born in Jacksonville, December 23, 1855. His grandfather, John Kenney, came from New Orleans, La., to Oregon in 1857. After his second marriage, he removed to Oakland, Cal., where he spent the remainder of his life, passing away at the advanced age of four score years.
    A native of New Orleans, La., Daniel Mow Kenney was born March 9, 1822. Coming by way of the Isthmus to the Pacific coast in 1850, he was engaged in mining on the Sacramento and Tuolumne rivers for two years. Removing from Yreka, Cal., to Oregon in the spring of 1852, he established the first business house in Jacksonville, opening a store of general merchandise, which he conducted until his death, February 18, 1860. As a merchant he met with a fair share of success, and as one of the leading members of the Whig Party he was active in politics. February 18, 1855, at Dardanelles, Ore., he married Elizabeth T'Vault, who was born in Evansville, Ind., a daughter of W. G. T'Vault. Her paternal grandfather, William T'Vault, was born, reared and married in France. [He was not.] Emigrating to the United States in 1818, he located in Tennessee, near Nashville, where he had relatives, among them being the Claybornes, people of distinction. Removing to Indiana about the time of its admission to the Union as a state, he settled in Evansville, where he was in business as a capitalist until his death, at an advanced age. His wife, who attained a ripe old age, also spent her last years in that city. W. G. T'Vault was born March 23, 1818, on the ocean, while his parents were en route to this country. Educated for the legal profession, he first practiced as an attorney at Booneville, Ind., and then in Plymouth, and while a resident of the latter city was a representative to the state legislature. He subsequently lived for a short time in Warsaw, Ind., from there coming across the plains to Oregon in 1845.
    Locating in Oregon City, W. G. T'Vault practiced his profession there for seven years, and under the name of The Oregon Spectator edited and published the first newspaper published on the Pacific Coast. He was active in public affairs, served as the first postmaster general of the Territory of Oregon, and represented Clackamas County in the constitutional convention. He was a man of brilliant attainments, and a noted writer and journalist. Coming to Jackson County in 1852, he took up a donation claim of six hundred and forty acres, known as the Dardanelles, as it was the only trail along the east side of the Rogue River. Taking up his residence in Jacksonville in 1855, he started the first newspaper published south of the Calapooia Mountains, calling it the Table Rock Sentinel. In addition to his journalistic work he followed his profession, and for a number of terms was prosecuting attorney for the fifth judicial district. He was for several years a representative to the state legislature, and in 1858 was speaker of the house. He died in 1868 of smallpox. He married Rhoda Boon Burns, who was born in Kentucky, and was a granddaughter of the famous hunter and trapper, Daniel Boone. She was of patriotic ancestry, her father, a corporal in the Revolutionary army, having received a land grant for his services in that war a tract that includes the site of the present city of Bowling Green, Ky. Of the union of Daniel M. and Elizabeth (T'Vault) Kenney, three children were born, namely: Thomas Joseph, the subject of this sketch; William G., city marshal of Jacksonville; and Rhoda, deceased. Mrs. Daniel M. Kenney is an honorary member of the State Press Association; a member of the State and Southern Oregon Pioneer Associations and of the Presbyterian Church. W. G. T'Vault was prominent in all public affairs, was acquainted with Dr. McLoughlin and Dr. Whitman, and in his house the first proclamation of the governor of the territory was written. In 1847 he went with a party to interview the Indians, and his daughter Elizabeth acted as interpreter for General Lane.
    Receiving a very limited common school education, Thomas J. Kenney began working as chore boy in the livery stable of Daniel Cawley when he was but eight years of age, and two years later, at the age of ten years, he began an apprenticeship at the trade of a harness maker. In 1880, borrowing $240, he embarked in the harness business on his own account. Beginning on a modest scale, he gradually enlarged his operations, at first taking in second-hand goods, then adding a stock of hardware, and for a time dealing in all kinds of merchandise. At the present time Mr. Kenney handles hardware and groceries, only, and is carrying on a large and lucrative business in this line of goods, being one of the leading merchants of the city. By his own persevering efforts he has achieved success in business circles, and has accumulated considerable property. At Butte Creek, he owns half interest in a mountain ranch of one hundred and sixty acres; on Williams Creek he has a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres, which he devotes to the raising of grain and alfalfa; and in Jacksonville he owns the business block in which his store is located, and has a fine residential property, consisting of two lots, on which he has erected the dwelling house in which he lives. This is a two-story frame house, containing eleven rooms, equipped with all modern improvements, and is surrounded by a beautiful lawn, rendering it one of the most attractive estates in the vicinity. He is also a stockholder, and treasurer, of the Jacksonville Mining and Milling Company, which was incorporated with a capital of ten thousand shares.
    In 1874, in Jacksonville, Mr. Kenney married Rosa Ulrich, who was born in Burlington, Iowa, a daughter of Christian Ulrich, a thrifty German citizen of that city. Three children have blessed their union, namely: Christian J., Mervyna, and Francis, all living at home. Politically Mr. Kenney is a staunch Republican, and is now a member of the city council, in which he has served many terms. He has often served as school director, and was chairman of the board when the new schoolhouse, costing $10,000, was built. Fraternally he is a member of Roseburg Lodge, No. 326, B.P.O.E.; and a charter member and treasurer of Banner Lodge, No. 23, A.O.U.W., of Jacksonville; Jacksonville Assembly, No. 60, Artisans, and P. P. Prim Cabin, Native Sons of Oregon.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 906-907


    WILLIAM G. KENNEY: lives in Jacksonville; is a stage driver; was born in Jackson County, Oregon.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



    W. W. KENTNOR: lives in Ashland; is a wagon maker; was born in Illinois, November 27, 1828; came to state and county in 1853; was married October 20, 1861, to Sarah A. Million. Children Ida F., Johnnie and Albert.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504


W. W. Kentnor, of Ashland.
    W. W. Kentnor, president of the Pioneer Society of Southern Oregon, is a native of Illinois, where he was born November 27, 1828. He moved to California in 1852, and followed mining in Siskiyou County, leaving his work there in 1853 to fight in the Rogue River Indian War, under General Joe Lane. He retrurned to Siskiyou County, and remained there until 1860, when he came to the Rogue River Valley, and has since resided there, and now, in his 71st year, still follows his trade of wagonmaking. Mr. Kentnor is a prominent Odd Fellow, and has always held the respect and esteem of the people of the town.
Oregonian, Portland, September 8, 1899, page 6


    WILLIAM WILSON KENTNOR. No better representative of the substantial, respected and well-to-do citizens of Ashland can be found than William Wilson Kentnor, who is now living retired from business cares at his pleasant and attractive home, which is located in the heart of the city. Distinguished as a pioneer settler of Jackson County, and as a veteran of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, he has always been a conspicuous factor in the development and advancement of the material interests of his community, and for more than forty years was actively identified with its industrial interests as a carriage manufacturer. A son of John B. Kentnor, he was born November 27, 1828, in Columbia, Monroe County, Ill. He comes of German ancestry, his paternal grandparents having both been born and bred in Prussia, Germany, whence they emigrated to America, locating in Pennsylvania.
    Left an orphan when a child, John B. Kentnor was brought up by his father's brother, from whom he learned the trade of a tanner and currier. Removing to Monroe County, Ill., in 1816, he established in Columbia a tanner's shop, which he operated for some time. He was subsequently employed in lead mining in northern Illinois, from there going to Potosi, Grant County, Wis., where he continued work in the lead mines until his death, at the age of sixty-eight years. He married Nancy Alexander, who was born in Kentucky, of Scotch parentage, but brought up in Chillicothe, Ohio, where her father improved a homestead. She died in Monroe County, Ill, in 1837. Of the five children, four sons and one daughter, that she bore her husband, two of the sons only are living.
    The oldest child of the household, and the only one to come to the Pacific Coast, William Wilson Kentnor is a typical representative of the self-made men of today, having made his own way in the world since nine years of age, when his mother died and the home was broken up. Until about seventeen years old, he worked in the lead mines of Grant County, Wis., after which he served an apprenticeship at the wagonmaker's trade in Potosi, Wis., and then worked as a journeyman in Galena, Ill. In the latter place he joined a party about to start for California with a train of ox teams. At Oskaloosa, Iowa, however, the company dissolved, and in the division of stock Mr. Kentnor came into possession of a pair of oxen, which he there traded for a horse. With one of his companions, he then proceeded to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he sold his horse, and paid his passage across the plains. Ninety-two days after leaving Council Bluffs, he arrived in Yreka, Cal., where he at once embarked in mining and prospecting, which he followed for eight years before he was fully satisfied with the results of his labors. While in Yreka, in 1853, he served in the Rogue River Indian War, under Captain Rhoades, in the regiment commanded by Gen. Joseph Lane. He took part in the different engagements with the savages, being in the final battle at Evans Creek, where they defeated the Indians, and General Lane made the treaty that was ratified at a gathering of chiefs on the north side of the Rogue River, near what is now Bybee ferry. Locating in Ashland in 1860, Mr. Kentnor opened a wagon shop on the banks of the creek, off the plaza, and successfully followed wagon and carriage making for many years thereafter in this city. In 1900 he retired from active pursuits and has since lived in Ashland, his house being one of the first residences built west of the creek.
    In Ashland Mr. Kentnor married Sarah Million, who was born in Lafayette County, Wis., a daughter of Bennett Million. Further ancestral history may be found elsewhere in this work, in connection with the sketch of W. B. Million. Mrs. Ida Ward, the only child of Mr. and Mrs. Kentnor, resides in Oakland, Cal. For forty-seven years Mr. Kentnor has been an Odd Fellow, having united with the order in Yreka, Cal., and is now a member of Ashland Lodge, I.O.O.F., of which he is past noble grand, and has served many times as delegate to the Oregon Grand Lodge. He also belongs to the Encampment, of which he is past chief patriarch and ex-representative, and has served as an officer in the Grand Encampment. Taking great interest in civic affairs, he has served two terms as councilman, being elected each time by the Republicans, with whom he affiliates in political matters. He is a member, and ex-president, of the Jackson County Pioneer Society, and belongs to the Presbyterian Church, in which he has been an elder for many years.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 649-650


    SILAS WRIGHT KILGORE. While he has not resided upon his present farm many years, Mr. Kilgore is an early settler of Klamath County and has long been identified with its stock-raising interests. It was during 1899 that he came to his present homestead eleven miles south of Klamath Falls, where he owns three hundred acres, of which one hundred and fifteen acres are in alfalfa. In addition to making a specialty of hay, he devotes considerable attention to the stock industry, and now has five hundred head of cattle, mostly of the Durham breed. Besides his home place he is the owner of a section of land in Langells Valley, where he formerly made his home.
    Near Canton, Stark County, Ohio, Silas Wright Kilgore was born July 18, 1842, a son of James and Mary Ann (Dean) Kilgore, natives respectively of Westmoreland County, Pa., and Stark County, Ohio. At an early age James Kilgore accompanied his father, David, from Pennsylvania to Ohio, and there, about 1837, married Miss Dean, who was born October 8, 1819, of German and English ancestry. April 11, 1854, they left Stark County en route for the Far West, and after an uneventful but difficult journey landed at Ashland, Jackson County, Ore., October 1, same year. After two years in Ashland the father rented a farm near Central Point, and from there in 1859 moved to John F. Miller's place, two miles north of Jacksonville, which he purchased. For years he continued on that farm. In the spring of 1873, disposing of his interests there, he came to Klamath County. During the Modoc War he engaged in carrying the mail from Ashland, Ore., to Cedarville, Modoc County, Cal. Returning to Ashland in 1875, he bought one hundred and twenty acres adjoining the town, and took up his residence in Ashland, where he continued to reside until his death, December 27, 1887. He was then seventy-six years of age, having been born in December, 1811. His wife died at Ashland April 11, 1902. They were the parents of the following-named children: Lucetta, deceased; Martha Washington, widow of Robert Hargadine; Felix, deceased; Silas W., of Klamath County; Amanda, wife of G. W. Whitmore; Mary, Mrs. Henry Duncan, of Langells Valley, Klamath County; David, whose home is in Placerville, Cal.; E. G., living in Langells Valley; James, deceased; Josephine, wife of A. F. Squires, of Milwaukee, Clackamas County, Ore.; and Florence, who makes her home in Ashland, this state. The father was a man of religious principles, but not a member of any denomination. Before leaving Ohio he was elected to the state legislature from Stark County, on the Democratic ticket, and served for one term, filling the position with tact and intelligence. Fraternally he was connected with the lodge of Odd Fellows at Jacksonville, this state.
    When the family settled in Oregon Silas W. Kilgore was a boy of twelve years. Primarily educated in the schools of Ohio, he later attended those of Jackson County, Ore. On starting out for himself in 1862, he went to the mines of eastern Oregon, but failed to meet with the desired success, and in 1864 returned to Jackson County. In 1869 he came to Klamath County and secured employment as farmer at the reservation, in the Indian Department, under Capt. O. C. Knapp. After two years in that position he removed to Langells Valley and located a farm near the post office of that name, taking up three hundred and twenty acres at that time. From that year to this he has made a specialty of stock-raising, in which he is meeting with deserved success. He gives his attention closely to the oversight of his lands and, aside from voting with the Populists, takes no part whatever in political affairs. May 1, 1879, he was united in marriage with Mary Alice Herrin, who was born May 1, 1857. The record of the Herrin family appears in the sketch of her father, John S. Herrin, upon another page of this volume. Of her marriage to Mr. Kilgore there are three sons. The oldest, Roy, is a stock-raiser at Bonanza, Oregon; the other two, Silas Warren and Merle, remain with their parents in Klamath County.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 1006-1007


    WILLIAM R. KINCAID: lives near Ashland; is a former postmaster of Ashland; was born April 6, 1843, in Augusta County, Va.; came to state and county in 1864; married June, 20, 1869, to Ophelia J. Evans. Children William D., May Ann, Alice M., Ettie F., Archie R., Daisy O. and Martha J.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



KIRBY, Dr. Louis Copeland
Methodist Clergyman.
b. Trinidad, West Indies, April 2, 1881; son of William Robert and Helen Elizabeth (Kirton) Kirby; educated grade schools West Indies, high school Fayette, Iowa; Upper Iowa University B.A. 1923; hon. D.D. 1942; Kimball School of Theology, Salem, Oregon B.D. 1925; Kappa Phi; m. Esther E. Holden of Portland, Oregon Dec. 31, 1937; children Joyce Evelyn, Robert Louis; began as resident missionary West Indies and British Guiana, five years; student pastor Strawberry, Iowa 1920-23; pastor Marshfield First Church 1923-30; Sellwood First Church, Pendleton 1937-40; First Church, Medford 1940-; past president Pendleton and Medford ministerial associations; chairman Accepted Supply Pastors of Oregon; member Qualifications Committee and Conference Relations for Oregon; secretary Cascade District Missionary Board; president Medford Board of Christian Education; many years leader missionary work; Kiwanian since 1924; Republican; home 27 N. Orange; office West Main and Laurel, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 318


    JOSEPH E. KIRKLAND.--Mr. Kirkland was born in 1831 in Illinois. He was the son of a farmer who removed in 1832 to Arkansas, where he gave his children the advantages of a common-school education. In 1851 the family crossed the plains with oxen to Lane County, Oregon, the journey occupying four months. They took a donation claim, and worked in the Southern Oregon mines from 1852 to 1857, perfecting, in the meantime, their title to their donation. At the time of the Indian disturbance, Joseph Kirkland and his father owned pack trains; and, when the volunteers bivouacked on Table Rock, they ran the gantlet and came through to the Cow Creek country in safety.
    He was mining on Althouse Creek when the Indian hostilities of 1855 commenced on Rogue River, and came out with John Cox from Kerbyville to Vannoy's ferry in the night, and there found Robert Williams with a squad of miners, organized but poorly armed. The next day Thomas Elliff came rushing down, reporting that Flem Hill had just returned from Cow Creek, where the Indians were killing and burning. Kirkland joined a squad of twenty, who went to the relief of those possibly besieged men. They found, at Smith's on Cow Creek, several families forted up; and upon the porch of the house lay the dead body of Hall Bailey, who had been killed on his wagon a mile or so from the house while en route to Yreka with a load of chickens and a drove of hogs. The Indians killed his oxen while they were hitched to the wagon, and strewed the ground with the butchered hogs.
    Proceeding up the valley, they found at Bates' farm Quartermaster Johnson lying dead on the porch of the house, while several more families were barricaded within, one man being severely wounded. That night Kirkland and William Stannos carried a message from Lieutenant Stone, who commanded the pass, back to Captain Williams on Rogue River. Not being successful in obtaining weapons, Kirkland came to the Willamette Valley. The next spring he joined Keith's company of Lane County boys, and entering stayed with the war to its close. One day, while the company was drawn up in line on the bank of Rogue River, Old John, the Indian chief, and some of his braves, saluted them from the opposite bank with a shower of bullets, severely wounding Clay Houston, and strewing a hail of lead among the party. Some of the boys soon found an old canoe, and, hurriedly crossing the river, rushed to the spot from which the fusillade had come, finding only one Indian, who rose from his hiding place in the brush and fired upon the command at very short range. They charged upon him with shouts and yells; and when he jumped into the water they filled his body with bullets, and then drew him out of the water, awarding him to Perry Skinner, who claimed the dead shot.
    In 1857 Mr. Kirkland was married to Miss Mary Standefer, a cousin of Jefferson Standefer. In 1865 they moved to the Walla Walla Valley, and have made it their home to the present time. Mr. Kirkland now practices law at Milton, Oregon, and owns a nice fruit ranch on the edge of the town.

History of the Pacific Northwest: Oregon and Washington, vol. II, 1889, page 414



    ARTHUR S. KLEINHAMMER is one of the enterprising and successful farmers in Little Applegate Valley, having his residence on an extensive ranch of four hundred and ninety-four acres which he owns, located on Applegate Creek, in Jackson County. He was born in the county where he now resides, May 22, 1870, and is the son of Claus and Frances (Saltmarsh) Kleinhammer, his father being a native of Germany and his mother of the Willamette Valley, this state, her parents having settled in Oregon in 1849. Claus Kleinhammer was identified with mining interests at Sterling continuously for a period of twenty-six years. He was one of the early gold seekers who emigrated to California in 1849, from which state he removed to Oregon in 1851, locating in Sterling, where for twenty-six years he was interested in mines and mining. He removed later, however, to the Rogue River Valley, settling two miles south of Medford, where he purchased a farm of one hundred and fifty acres. He continued to live upon this place and improve it until 1904, at which time he sold this property and removed to Ashland, in Jackson County, where he spent the remaining years of his life, his death occurring in Ashland in 1908. Mrs. Kleinhammer is still living and maintains her home in Ashland.
    Arthur S. Kleinhammer was reared in his father's home and educated in the public schools. He remained under the parental roof until he was twenty years of age, at which time he began his business career. He has, however, been deeply interested in stockraising since he was a boy of sixteen, and has spent his entire business life in Jackson County, engaged continuously in the stock business. His fine ranch of four hundred and ninety-four acres has been improved during the years until now it is regarded as one of the most complete and best-equipped ranches of its kind in this part of the state. His beautiful residence, recently finished, is equipped with all modem conveniences, including hot and cold water.
    Mr. Kleinhammer was united in marriage to Miss Mary E. Anderson, of Jackson County, on August 8, 1900, and to this union three children have been born, Esther F., Dorris C. and Claus T. He is a member of one of the fraternal orders of this locality, and he and his wife are church members.
    Mr. Kleinhammer is interested in all measures affecting the industrial and moral advancement of the people and is well known throughout his county as being a successful stockman and a friend of every just and worthy cause.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, pages 194-197


    C. KLEINHAMMER: lives near Phoenix; is a farmer; was born in Hanover, Germany, October 24, 1832; came to state and county in 1860; married in Linn County, Oregon, 1863, to Francis A. Saltmarsh. Children Frederick, Catherine M., Arthur S., Mary I., Augusta, Mazette and William.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504


    CLAUS KLEINHAMMER, Western Oregon has a well established reputation for her food products, especially her fine fruits, and so, in giving the lives of the representative men of this section, we should be loath to omit the name of the well-known gentleman who is the subject of this sketch, for he takes a foremost place among the progressive and practical fruit-growers and farmers of Jackson County. A native of Hanover, Germany, he was born October 24, 1832, and his early mental training was received in his native land, where he continued to live until he reached the age of fourteen years. He then went to sea as a cabin boy on board a sailing vessel from Hamburg, and in the course of time the vessel upon which he sailed landed at New York, where Mr. Kleinhammer determined to remain. Securing employment at a wholesale grocery house, the three years following his arrival in that city found him packing goods, etc., in that establishment, and about that time he, like many others, yielded to an intense desire to try his fortune in the far distant land of California. The trip to the Golden Gate was made via the Nicaragua route, and for several years after his arrival in that state he followed prospecting and mining with fair success. In 1860 he came to Oregon, and for a number of years thereafter he was identified with the Sterling mines of this region. Purchasing a one-fourth interest in the Dutch Boys' claim, he opened up and developed this mine, which was successfully operated by him until 1883, when he disposed of his interests, and the same is now owned by Portland parties. Mr. Kleinhammer then invested his money in a ranch of one hundred and forty-three acres, two miles south of Medford, and turned his attention to farming pursuits. On this farm he has since lived, making improvements that reflect credit on his good judgment and progressiveness. In 1890 he planted twenty-five acres in orchards, and subsequent plantings have increased the number of acres to forty-five, twenty-five acres being standard varieties of winter apples, twelve acres in pears, all fine, bearing trees, and many choice varieties of other kinds of fruit are to be found in his orchards. Quite a good deal of attention is also given to general farming, especially to hay-raising, twenty-five acres of his splendid farm being devoted to raising alfalfa, which is profitably grown in that section.
    The home ties of Mr. Kleinhammer began in 1863, when he married Miss Mary A. Saltmarsh, and to them have been born the following seven children: Fred, Catherina (who is now Mrs. Sam Van Dyke), Ida, Arthur, Augusta, William and Frances. The family enjoy the esteem of the entire community. In his political views Mr. Kleinhammer is a Republican, but has kept aloof from politics, having been too busy a man to take any active interest in the oft-occurring elections.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 407-408


    SIMON KLINGLE: lives on Little Butte Creek; post office is Brownsboro; was born in Pike County, Ill.; came to state and county in 1866; married 1868 to Anna M. Sullivan. Children Katie (deceased), Charles and Ellen.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504


    HENRY KLIPPEL; born in Germany, December 11, 1833. His parents brought him to America when four years old, and settled at Cincinnati, Ohio. His father died here and the family moved to St. Joseph, Mo. In 1851, Mr. Klippel crossed the plains to Oregon, arriving August 16th of that year. After remaining in the Willamette Valley about six weeks, he came across the state to Yreka with a gentleman who was going to that place: arriving in the fall. Here he mined during the winter and in February, 1852, came to Jacksonville, Jackson County. He mined first at Galice Creek, Josephine County, but soon returned to Rich Gulch, where he engaged principally in mining until 1857, after which time he followed various occupations until 1860, when the Gold Hill mine was struck. He then gave this mine his entire attention and put up on that mine the first quartz mill built in Oregon. In 1864 he went to Idaho and mined successfully--returning in the fall of that year. In 1868 [he] engaged in the hardware trade in company with Wm. Hoffman. This business he followed for six years. At the incorporation of Jacksonville, he was elected recorder, and afterwards president of the board of trustees. In 1870 was elected sheriff of Jackson County, holding the office one term. In 1872, he was appointed one of the capitol commissioners, and after the first year was elected president of the board. In 1874, the legislature met, and Mr. Klippel was elected to the office of capitol commissioner, and resigned about November, 1874. Returning to Jacksonville, built another quartz mill with Mr. Beekman on the Jewett claim. He was also one of the discoverers of the Emeline cinnabar mine, which yielded a fair percent of quicksilver. In 1874, he was chairman of the Democratic state central committee and in 1876 nominated for a Tilden elector. In 1872, he was nominated by the Democratic Party to represent Jackson County in the legislature, but was defeated. In 1877, he with a company built a water ditch from Swan Lake to the mines they owned on Applegate and ran a hydraulic mine. These mines he took charge of after the completion of the ditch, and followed this business until 1880, when he was elected county clerk; re-elected in 1882 and is the present incumbent. Mr. Klippel married Elizabeth J. Bingham, January 24th, 1860, and they have five children living.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 530-531


Klippel, Edgar Albert
    Superintendent of Telegraph, Oregon-Washington R.R. & Navigation Co.
    Office: Portland, Ore.
Born July 5, 1864, at Chicago, Ill. Education in common schools. Entered railway service 1883 as telegraph operator on construction work Oregon Ry. & Navigation Co., since which he has been consecutively to Oct. 15, 1889 operator at various points and clerk superintendent's office same road; Oct. 15, 1889, to June 22, 1898, manager telegraph office same road at Portland, Ore.; June 22, 1898, to date, superintendent telegraph same road (now the Oregon-Washington R.R. & Navigation Co.); April 10, 1905, to Nov. 1, 1911, also superintendent of telegraph Southern Pacific lines in Oregon; Sept. 20, 1918, to Feb. 1, 1920, also superintendent of telegraph Southern Pacific lines north of Ashland, Ore.
Biographical Directory of the Railway Officials of North America, New York, 1922, page 350



    C. K. KLUM: lives in Ashland; is a dealer in saddlery and harness, was born in Franklin County, Ind.; came to state in 1847 and to county in 1853; was married June, 1875, to Lucinda H. Finley. Children Hypatia. Charles W and Blaine.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



KNIGHT, ELLIS L. (Buck)
Legion Leader; with U.S. Veterans Administration.
b. Iowa Park, Texas Dec. 9, 1898; son of George E. and Frances E. Knight; educated Washington State College; member Sigma Nu; m. Helen A. Sims, La Grande, Oregon, Sept. 18, 1927; children Susan Carolyn, Sally M.; began as building contractor 1921-27; field supervisor, State of Oregon Veteran State Aid commissioner; Chief Officer; U.S. Navy 1943-45; contact representative, U.S. Veterans Administration, 1945-; past post commander American legion; district commander, La Grande; National Committeeman 1942-43; Elk; past Leading Knight; Republican; Congregationalist; home 815 W. Main; office 33 N. Riverside, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 321


KNOX, LELAND JAY
Certified Public Account.
b. Fossil, Oregon. Feb. 6, 1893; son of Frank and Mary (Parks) Knox; educated grade and high schools Fossil; University of Oregon LL.B. 1913; Oregon State College B.S. 1916; Alpha Kappa; m. Elsie Jobe of Fossil June 14, 1914; children Franklin Ansel, Galen Richard and Edna Lucille (Mrs. Percy R. Williamson); admitted to practice before Treasury Department and U.S. Tax Court; admitted to practice Oregon 1914; certified as accountant 1929; taught school Salem 1916-18; homesteaded near Fossil 1918-22; head commercial department Medford High School 1922-30; private practice Medford since 1930; member Oregon State Bar Association; Lion (past president, district governor 1940-41, secretary since 1935); Eagle; secretary Woodman of the World; Republican; Protestant; home 221 Portland Ave.; office U.S. National Bank Bldg., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 323


KOOZER, RALPH EARL
Cannery Executive; Civic and Community Leader.
b. Lakeview, Oregon Oct. 9, 1885; son of Aaron P. and Hattie M. (Bond) Koozer; educated public schools Lakeview, Oregon; m. Effie Nyswander of Lakeview 1905 (deceased); m. 2nd Emma J. Jenkins of Medford June 1, 1937; daughter Ruth (Mrs. Charles L. Wilson); began on farm; publisher Lake County Examiner, Lakeview 1910-15; employee State Industrial Accident Commission 1915-16; with Bagley Canning Co., Talent, Oregon 1916; partner and manager Ashland 1925, secretary, manager 1927 to date; chairman finance committee City Council 1936-44; president Oregon Pacific Highway Association 1928 to date; Jackson County chairman Republican Central Committee 1944 to date; Elk (past exalted ruler, Medford); Chamber of Commerce; Protestant; home Rt. 1, Box 238; office 290 Helman, Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 324


KOOZER, RALPH EARL
    Cannery Executive;
    Civic and Community Leader
b Lakeview, Oregon, Oct 9, 1885; son of Aaron P and Hattie M (Bond) K; educ, public schools, Lakeview, Oregon; m Effie Nyswander of Lakeview, 1905 (dec'd); m 2nd Emma J Jenkins of Medford, June 1, 1987; dau, Ruth (Mrs Charles L Wilson); began on farm; publisher, Lake County Examiner, Lakeview, 1910-15; employee State Industrial Accident Comn, April 1915 to Oct 1, 1916; with Bagley Cannery Co since 1916; with Bagley Canning Co, Talent, Oreg, 1916; partner and mgr, Ashland, 1924; secty, mgr, 1927 to date; chmn, finance committee, City Council, 1936-44; pres, Oregon Pacific Highway Assn, 1928 to date; Jackson County chmn, Republican Central Committee, 1944 to date; Elk (past exalted ruler, Medford); Chamber Commerce; Protestant; home, 108 Nursery St; office, 290 Helman, Ashland, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 524


    FRANK KRAUSE: lives in Jacksonville, is a printer and telegraph operator; was born in Burlington, Iowa, March 5, 1851; come to state and county in 1860; married March 5, 1879, to Miss Mollie S. Bilger. Children Ella L. and Frank O.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



KROSCHEL, Sam A., manager; b. New Ulm, Minnesota February 18, 1881; to Oregon 1889; business college; m. Julia Wise May 7, 1911; children--Robert, Sam Jr., Thomas. Sponsor dairying in Southern Oregon; B.P.O.E.; Shrine; Commercial Club; Business Men's Association. Republican. Christian Church. Address: 522 W. 4th Street, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 132


KROSCHEL, SAM A.
    Manager, Kroschel Dairy
b. New Ulm, Minnesota, Feb. 18, 1881; educ., Business College. Married Julia Wise of New York City, May 7, 1911; three sons, Robert, Sam Jr., and Thomas. Resident of Oregon since 1889. Sponsor dairying industry in Southern Oregon, January 1911. Ex-Councilman, Medford. Elk. Shriner. Commercial Club. Business Men's Association. Republican. Christian Church. 522 W. 4th Street, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 321


    KASPER KUBLI: lives in Jacksonville; is a hardware merchant; was born in Canton Glarus, Switzerland; was married December 27, 1857, to Elenor J. Newcomb. Children Ellen Watson, Henry, Minerva (deceased), Francis (deceased), Kasper, Lulu and Valine.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



KYLE, ROBERT FLOYD
Savings and Loan Executive.
b. Republic County, Kan., Nov. 27, 1898; son of Robert and Vinnie (Fisher) Kyle; educated grade and high schools, Central Point, Oregon; Oregon State College B.S. 1921; Delta Upsilon; Scabbard and Blade; m. Metta Pulley of Los Angeles, California, Nov. 22, 1924; children Robert Jr., Richard R. and Jean Arden; entire activity devoted to investment banking business since 1921; with G. E. Miller and Co., Portland and Los Angeles 1925-32; secretary-treasurer and manager First Federal Savings and Loan Association, Medford, 1934 to date; assisted in government procurement of war lands and properties World War II; former finance officer Boy Scouts; served U.S. Navy World War I; commissioned 2nd Lt. U.S. Army 1921; director American Legion several years; director Housing Commission, former chairman; past chairman O.P.A. Price Panel; president Oregon State Savings and Loan League; chairman city budget committee; member war finance committee; S.R. Mason; Hillah Shriner; Republican; Protestant; home 609 S. Oakdale; office 27 N. Holly, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 328


KYLE, ROBERT FLOYD
    Savings and Loan Executive
b Republic Co, Kan, Nov 27, 1898; son of Robt and Vinnie (Fisher) K; educ, pub schls, Central Point, Or; Or State Coll, BS, 1921; Delta Upsilon; Scabbard and Blade; m Metta Polley of Los Angeles, Cal, Nov 22, 1924; ch, Robt Jr, Richard R, Jean Arden; investments business since 1921; with G E Miller and Co, Portland and Los Angeles, 1921-25; Morthland Mortgage Co, Los Angeles, 1925-32; secty-treas, mgr, First Fed Savings and Loan Assn, Medford, Or, 1934 to date; assisted in government procurement of war loans and properties, former finance officer, Boy Scouts and Am Legion, World War I; 2nd lieut, US Army, 1921; dir, Am Legion, several yrs; dir, Housing Com, former chmn; past chmn, OPA Price Panel; past pres, War Finance Com; past pres, Or State Savings and Loan League; past chmn, city budget com; SR Mason; Hillah Shriner; Republican; home, 609 S Oakdale; ofc, 27 N Holly, Box 1348, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 490


    GEO. W. LANCE: lives at the mouth of Foots Creek; post office address Rock Point; is a farmer and stock grower; was born in White County, Tenn., March 11, 1832; came to state and county in 1870; was married October, 1870, to Mrs. Esther Fitzgerald, daughter of John Robb. Children George W. and Francis M.; by second marriage, William, Lillie and Mary.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 504-505


RT. REV. ARTHUR C. LANE.
    The Rt. Rev. Arthur C. Lane, who since 1905 has had charge of St. Mary's church, school and hospital at Albany, of which latter institution he was the founder, and upon whom Pope Benedict XV has bestowed the office of prothonotary apostolic, is a native son of Oregon, his birth having occurred in Roseburg, August 9, 1872. He comes of most distinguished ancestry. His father, Lafayette Lane, was born in Indiana in 1844 and in 1848 was brought by his parents to this state, the family home being established in Oregon City. They were numbered among the very early pioneers of the state, and General Joseph Lane, the grandfather of Rev. Arthur C. Lane, became one of the most prominent men of the state. He had the distinction of being the first Territorial Governor of Oregon and was one of the first two Senators from Oregon in the national law-making body at Washington. He likewise gained distinction in military affairs, serving with the rank of brigadier general during the Mexican War, in which connection he rendered most valuable service to the government. At the termination of the war he returned to Oregon and purchased land in Douglas County, which he continued to operate for a number of years and then went to Deer Creek, Oregon, where he bought a large tract of land. This he cultivated and improved, converting it into a valuable property, upon which he resided for many years, but at length retired from active life and made his home with his son until his death in June, 1882. His distinguished services in connection with political and military affairs led to his selection for the office of Vice President of the United States on the Democratic ticket, the presidential nominee being Mr. Breckinridge, but the Republican Party was victorious, Abraham Lincoln being elected to the Presidency. Mr. Lane was one of Oregon's greatest statesmen, and his name will ever be inseparably associated with the history of the state, which honored itself in honoring him.
    His son, Lafayette Lane, was reared and educated in this state, later pursuing a law course at Harvard University and completing his professional studies at Georgetown University of Washington, D.C. Returning to Oregon, he opened an office at Umatilla and while there residing was chosen to represent his district in the state legislature. He received the nomination for a second term but was defeated. He subsequently removed to Roseburg, Oregon, and here continued in practice the remainder of his life, being accorded a large and representative clientage, which his diligence, his talents and his solid attainments well merited. His cases were always well prepared, so that he went into court with a clear conception of what he desired to show, and he always treated his opponents with courtesy, dignity and good nature without abating in any degree his loyal and enthusiastic zeal for his client's rights. He was local counsel for the Southern Pacific Railroad for a number of years and was regarded as a sound and able lawyer, who ever followed the highest professional standards. He was likewise called to the office of mayor of Roseburg and gave to the city a most businesslike and progressive administration. He married Miss Amanda Mann, a native of Alabama, who passed away February 5, 1902, while his death occurred November 23, 1896.
    Their son, Rev. Arthur C. Lane, attended the schools of Roseburg until he reached the age of eleven years, when he went to Canada and pursued a course in Montreal College, after which he entered the Grand Seminary at Montreal. He remained for twelve years as a student at the seminary, there pursuing his studies for the priesthood and was ordained on the 5th of August, 1895. He was stationed at the cathedral at Portland for a half year and for a year at St. Mary's Home at Beaverton, Oregon. His first pastorate was at St. Louis, Oregon, and he was then called to Astoria, where he remained for three years. The next two years were spent at Jacksonville, Medford and Ashland, Oregon, and in 1905 he came to Albany, where he has since been stationed, having charge of St. Mary's church, school and hospital. He has been very active in missionary work, having opened missions at Jefferson, Mill City, Brownsville, Harrisburg, Shelburn and Scio. He has received the degrees of A.M. and S.T.L. from Laval University, Quebec, Canada. Pope Benedict XV has bestowed upon Father Lane the office of prothonotary apostolic, an ecclesiastical office which carries with it the title of Monsignor. The honor is said to be held by comparatively few of the priesthood in the United States, and is awarded only in recognition of signal service to the cause of the Roman Catholic church, thus indicating the value of the work which Father Lane has accomplished in extending the power of the church and spreading the faith. He is a highly cultured gentleman and a tireless worker, whose efforts have been far-reaching and effective in promoting the work of the church. He is greatly beloved by his parishioners, to whom he is ever a sympathetic friend and wise counselor, guiding them in material affairs as well as in spiritual matters. He is a patriotic and public-spirited American and during the war with Germany rendered valuable service to the government by his active support of the Liberty Loan, Red Cross and other drives. In his political views he is a Democrat and fraternally is identified with the Catholic Order of Foresters. He likewise belongs to the Knights of Columbus, which has an enrollment of one hundred and ten members at Albany.
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, 1922, volume II, pages 514-515


    LANGELL, HON. N., a merchant of Jacksonville, was born near Pictou, Nova Scotia, January 6, 1831, and came to Oregon in 1854, locating at Jacksonville. He is also interested in stock raising in Klamath County. He is a wheel horse of the party, having been in every county convention since 1864 and state conventions from 1864 to 1890. He served as Deputy Collector of Internal Revenue during the administrations of Presidents Arthur and Harrison, and has been the party nominee for county judge and county treasurer. He was elected to the legislature in 1872, and is again nominated for that position.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 233


    NATHANIEL LANGELL. A review of the lives of the retired citizens of Medford must necessarily renew one's confidence in those homely and straightforward attributes which our forefathers were wont to regard as essential to business and personal success. Few among those pioneers have depended solely upon mining and kindred speculative enterprises, but have toiled earnestly at soil cultivation, at stock-raising, at plodding business, and in conscientious political service. Among these may be mentioned Nathaniel Langell, who came to the state in 1854, and who with his father and brother has caused the name to be associated with substantial development, while he has personally impressed his worth as a citizen and prominent business man upon the people of Oregon.
    Mr. Langell is of French descent, and his family was established in Nova Scotia so long ago that no record has been kept of the emigrant. His paternal grandfather, George, was born there, as was also his father, Joseph, and his mother, Achsah (Bigney) Langell. The latter died in Cambridge, Ohio, in 1840, when her son Nathaniel, the third child of her four sons and two daughters, was nine years old. Joseph Langell learned the ship carpenter's trade in his youth, and followed that vocation for two or three years in Buffalo, N.Y., to which place the family removed at an early day. The journey to Buffalo was a trying one for the family, for the grandfather, George Langell, died on the way in a canal boat, leaving his family in straitened circumstances. In 1841 Joseph Langell located in Michigan, and shortly afterward became a journeyman boat builder and repairer, plying his trade at various boat-building places on the Great Lakes, and in time locating in Morocco, Ind., where he engaged in general merchandising. In 1854 he came with his two sons, Nathaniel and Arthur, to Jackson County, Ore. The father and sons together purchased three thousand acres of land in what is now known as Langell Valley, in Klamath County, one-half of the tract being owned by Nathaniel. His family made their home, however, in Jacksonville, where Nathaniel conducted a boot and shoe store and repair shop, his father and brother attending to the stock-raising in the valley. In 1880 Nathaniel disposed of his share of the realty to his brother. The father passed away in 1879, and his son Arthur died in 1894, after an association of many years with his brother Nathaniel.
    In 1876 Mr. Langell was appointed deputy internal revenue collector for this district and served six years, and after completing his term became interested in the cattle business, engaging therein for many years. In 1898 he was appointed forestry supervisor and served in that position for three years. After the expiration of his term of service he settled down to a retired life in Medford, where he has many friends, and where he is held in the highest esteem. The farsightedness and practical results of Mr. Langell's political service are worthy of special mention, and have been characterized by the thoroughness and good faith shown in his business and other associations. In 1872 he was elected to the state legislature from Jackson County on the Republican ticket, and during the session was chairman of the committee on mining and state institutions, and assisted by his vote and influence in electing Senator John H. Mitchell to his first term in the United States Senate. In 1896 he was again elected to the state legislature, but did not serve, owing to the failure of the body to organize. He has been a member of the county central and state committees, and for many years was president of the city board of Jacksonville. Fraternally he is a Mason, identifying himself with the order in Zanesville, Ohio, in 1852. He is now identified with Warren Lodge No, 10, of Jacksonville, of which he was at one time master.
    June 7, 1858, Mr. Langell married, in Jacksonville, Loretta Jane Hensley, a native of Missouri, and a daughter of William Hensley, a native of Franklin County, Mo., and an Oregon pioneer of 1853. Mr. Hensley spent his first winter in Salem, in the meantime making inquiries regarding desirable land, and in the spring of 1854 settled in Jackson County, taking up three hundred and twenty acres of land on Butte Creek. In 1858 he removed south to California, and is at present making his home in Tehama County, aged eighty-seven, while his wife is eighty-five years of age. Notwithstanding the years that have passed over his head, Mr. Hensley is enjoying health and strength, and is making the most of a small ranching enterprise.
    Ten children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Langell, six of whom are living, three sons and three daughters. In order of birth the children are: Eliza, the wife of former Judge W. C. Hale, of Grants Pass; Mary L., the wife of State Treasurer C. S. Moore, of Salem; an infant, deceased; Addie, deceased; Frank B., deceased; Arthur T., engaged in the stock business in Klamath County; Harry N., deceased; Jessie C., the widow of G. J. Farnsworth; Frederick, making his home in Montana; and Harry N. (the second child to bear that name), engaged in ranching in Klamath County.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 622-625


LAUSMANN, ANTON ALBERT
Lumberman.
b. Graslitz, Bohemia, Nov. 28, 1889; son of Vinzenz and Anna (Riedl) Lausmann; educated public schools; business school, accounting and stenography; m. Grace Stewart of Hood River, Oregon, August 21, 1916; children Jerry Stewart and Carolyn Ann; began as stenographer W. E. Barrett and Co., Chicago 1906; assistant superintendent and director Stanley Smith Lumber Co., Hood River 1907-16; president and director Hood River Forest Products Co. 1916-17; Mitchell Point Lumber Co. 1917-22; director and secretary East Side Logging Co. Portland 1920-34; director and treasurer East Side Mill and Lumber Co. 1929-33; director and secretary-treasurer Squaw Mountain Lumber Co. since 1934, Highway Auto Co. since 1929, Tiller Mill and Lumber Co. Medford since 1941; partner and manager Lausmann Lumber Co. since 1942; served as member Lumber Industry Advisory Board, receiving citation from War Production Board for service World War II; past member U.S. Employment and Social Security Board; member Postwar Planning Commission; board member Pacific Logging Congress (past president and treasurer); Southern Oregon Director West Coast Lumbermen's Association; member forest conservation committee, Pacific Northwest Loggers Association (past trustee); past director Willamette Valley Lumbermen's Association; member University Clubs, Portland and Medford, Aero Club; Mason; Shriner; Republican; Presbyterian (trustee); home 200 Medford Heights; office Box 1268, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 335


LAWRENCE, JOHN FREDERICK
    Owner, Lawrence's Jewelry Store
b. Madison, Wis., Dec., 19, 1865; educ., pub. schs., St. Paul, Minn. Married Julia Louise Winker, St. Paul, Minn., 1893 (dec'd. 1925). Married 2nd, Thora Smith, Yuma, Ariz., 1927; two daughters, Ruth Carolyn (Mrs. Austin B. Brownell), and Elsie Louise (Mrs. Arnel P. Butler). Apprentice in watch repairing, Frohney and Church, 1884; with A. I. Hayman, 1888; owner of jewelry establishment, 1890; with Bullard Bros., 1894-1907. Proprietor, Lawrence's Jewelry Store, Medford, 1908 to date. Served Home Guards, 1915-18. Worthy Patron, Eastern Star, four years. Secty., Modern Woodmen, six years. Mason; Master, 1922; High Priest, 1923; Venerable Master, 1934-35-36. K.C.C.H., Shriner, Republican. Lutheran. Home: 525 S. Riverside Avenue. Office: 8 N. Central Avenue, Medford, Ore.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 330


    JOHN T. LAYTON: lives on Applegate; owner of Faris Gulch mines; post office, Applegate; was born in Lincolnshire, England; came to state in 1851, and to county in 1852; has followed trading and mining since 1851 in Jackson and Josephine counties.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 508


    JOHN THORP LAYTON. The claims of John Thorp Layton upon the consideration of his fellow residents of Jackson and Josephine counties rest upon his more than ordinary ability as a miner and prospector. The mining camps of this part of the state have long been familiar to him and of whom it may be said he has operated with a comparatively sure hand, and while making rapid progress, has proceeded with extreme caution in his investments. Today he is the fortunate owner of the Ferris Gulch and Williamsburg mines, both placer claims which have been in active operation for more than forty years, and about thirty miles of mining ditches. He is further represented among the stable and upbuilding enterprises of the county by the Layton Hotel at Grants Pass, erected by himself and J. W. Howard in 1889, and now the sole possession of Mr. Layton, being one of the well-patronized hostelries of this part of the county. Mr. Layton owns eight hundred acres of mineral and agricultural land.
    Lincolnshire, a maritime county of England, and next to Yorkshire on the north, the largest in the country, has been the ancestral home of the Laytons for many generations. Here the present miner of Josephine County was born at Bourne, May 16, 1831, his father, William, being a native of the same place, and born January 29, 1799. His mother, Mary Ann (Pears) Layton, was born a few miles distant from Bourne, about 1800, and died in 1855, after rearing a family of eight children, of whom Charlotte and John T. are the only survivors. William Layton, who was a farmer for a portion of his life, died in 1872. John T. was educated in the public schools of Lincolnshire, and in time served an apprenticeship of four years in a hardware establishment.
    In July, 1849, Mr. Layton bade adieu to his native land and shipped in the bark Jane Dixon as common seaman, sailing around the Horn to San Francisco, which he reached in January, 1850. Leaving the vessel, he engaged in boating and fishing on the Sacramento River and San Francisco Bay until the spring of 1851, after which he took passage from San Francisco and came to the mouth of the Umpqua River in Douglas County. Landing at Gardiner, he made his way through Southern Oregon to the mines at Yreka and Scott River, Northern California, remaining in the locality until August 1, 1852. He then came to Jackson County, Ore., and worked in the mines around Jacksonville until 1858, thence to Williamsburg, Josephine County, where he engaged in trading and mining with fair success. In 1877 he located on his present farm, taking it up as a homestead, and proving up in due time.
    Naturally, Mr. Layton suffered inconvenience because of the Indian encroachments in the early days, and the call to arms for protection against the foe found him ready to do his share in suppressing the trouble. August 8, 1853, he enlisted in the company of Capt. John F. Miller, as a private, and served for thirty days, and October 13, 1855, he enlisted in Company F, commanded by Capt. A. S. Welton, being mustered out of service November 13, 1855. While living in Jacksonville, February 13, 1856, Mr. Layton was united in marriage with Mary T. Nail, born in Missouri in 1840, and whose ancestry is spoken of at length in the sketch of George T. Baldwin, of Klamath County. Of this union there were five children, of whom the oldest died in infancy; Charlotte is also deceased; Lola is the wife of John Bailey, of Williams Creek, Josephine County; Mary is the wife of H. A. Stephens of Tacoma, Wash., and Ida is deceased. Mrs. Mary T. Layton died December 20, 1864. For a second wife Mr. Layton married August 18, 1866, Harriett F. Doak, who was born in Illinois, and who had one child, William, now a resident of Oroville, Cal. His second wife was divorced in 1868. For a third wife Mr. Layton married, November 8, 1871, Theresa Moore, born on Spencer Creek, Lane County. Ore., April 24, 1852. She became the mother of the following children: Edward, living at Applegate, Ore.; Rose, deceased; Ella, the wife of C. E. Smith, of Grants Pass; Florence, the wife of Myron Wilbur of Deer Park, Wash.; Lester, living on Williams Creek, Josephine County; Lena, at home; Cora, deceased, and Jessie and Amy, at home. Since becoming a citizen of this country Mr. Layton has thrown his political sympathies with the Democratic Party, but has always been averse to office holding. Fraternally he is connected with Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M., of Jacksonville. Mr. Layton has led an industrious and well-directed life, and has been interested in mining nearly fifty-three years. He has established many warm friendships in the course of his coming and going in the West, and is known for his generosity, his liberal-mindedness, and his enthusiastic advocacy of the climate and resources of the state of Oregon.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, 1904, page 486



LEAVITT, ERNEST PEARSON
National Parks Executive.
b. San Francisco, Calif. February 23, 1885; son of Ernest Currier and Annie (Foster) Leavitt; educated public schools and special advanced courses; m. Anna Isabel Canova, Coulterville, Calif. Jan. 2, 1918 (deceased 1937); m. 2nd Katherine Sue Huntress of Medford, Oregon March 6, 1943; secretary to agent Southern Pacific Co. Stockton, Calif. 1907-09; to division superintendent 1909-10; administrative assistant superintendent Yosemite National Park, Calif. 1918-30; superintendent Hawaii National Park, Territory of Hawaii 1931-33; superintendent Mesa Verde National Park, Colorado 1933-35; superintendent Lassen Volcanic National Park 1936-37; superintendent Crater Lake National Park and Oregon Caves National Monument 1937 to date; past president Federal Business Men's Association; member American Planning and Civic Association; Sierra Club of California, California Academy of Science, Shasta Cascade Wonderland Association; member Crater Lake Club; Rotarian; Kiwanian (hon. Medford); Mason; home 1317 Queen Anne Ave.; office Federal Bldg., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 337


LEE, DR. ROBERT ELMER
Optometrist.
b. Davis Creek, Calif. June 17, 1898; son of Rollin H. and Pauline A. (Jamison) Lee; educated grade school Chico, Calif.; high schools San Diego and Oakland; University of California Dr. Optometry 1925; Beta Sigma Kappa, Omega Delta; m. Dema Mary Hurkett of San Diego, Feb. 22, 1918; children Robert Edwards and Betty; private practice, San Diego 1925-29; Medford 1929 to date; served State Board of Optometry 1936-39; appointed by Gov. Charles Martin; chairman Southern Oregon District Optometrists Extension Program, educational program for betterment and development of optometry field; extensive ranch operator; member state (past vice-president) and national optometrists association; delegate to national congress 1937; occasional contributor Optometry Weekly and Optical World; Elk; Lion; charter member and first president Toastmasters; Granger; K.T. Mason; Shriner; Republican; Protestant; home Rt. 1, Central Point; office 103 N. Central, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 339


HON. WILLIAM H. LEEDS.--State Printer.
    Hon. W. H. Leeds, State Printer, was born in New Jersey, and is still under 40 years of age. In 1877 Mr. Leeds moved to Tacoma, Wash., where he engaged in the newspaper and printing business until 1878, when he took up a permanent abode at Ashland, establishing the Ashland Tidings, which stands today among the leading journals of Southern Oregon. Not only in that section, but throughout the entire state, the Tidings has become a household word as a strong, brainy journal. Until his nomination for State Printer by the Republicans in 1894 Mr. Leeds had always refused to run for any office. He is well equipped for the position to which he was elected, and will bring the result of years of practical experience to bear in the discharge of his duties. Through his journal Mr. Leeds has for many years been the mainstay of his party in Jackson, Josephine, Lake and Klamath counties, and his selection for the office of State Printer by the Republicans is only a well-deserved reward for his work.
Oregon Blue Book 1895, page 67


    LEEDS, HON. W. H., State Printer of Oregon, was born in New Jersey about forty years ago. In 1877 he engaged in the newspaper and printing business, and in 1878 founded the Tidings at Ashland, Oregon, which is today one of the leading papers of Southern Oregon and the foremost advocate of Republican principles. Though a constant party worker, he never accepted office until he was nominated for State Printer in 1894.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 234


    WILLIAM CONSTANT LEEVER. Given a good constitution, a clear brain, and a wholesome comprehension of the duties and responsibilities of life, the average man succeeds because of the very rationalness of his attitude, and because he is prepared to cope with the world and its vicissitudes. Such a man is William Constant Leever, successfully engaged in the hardware business at Central Point. In addition, Mr. Leever has the incentive to noble living which arises from admirable family connections, for relatives on both sides of his family have displayed exceptional bravery and forethought in coping with the pioneer conditions of our country. German conservatism and stability have taken an important part in the rising fortunes of the family, and the paternal great-grandfather, to whom America offered a solace for the limitations of his fatherland, embodied the best of the traits which make the Teutonic citizen a desirable acquisition to any community. This sire settled in the state of Pennsylvania at an early day, purchased farm lands which he cultivated and handed down to his children, and where he died at an advanced age. His son Samuel, the next in line of descent, established the family in the state of Ohio, where William T. Leever, the father of William Constant, was born February 27, 1829.
    William T. Leever was educated in the public schools of Cincinnati, Ohio, and at an early age engaged in school teaching in his native state. In 1853, accompanied by his brother, Cornwall, he came to Oregon with horse teams, being on the road barely three months. This was a decided improvement in time over the old-time ox teams, and the company being small, there were less hindrances to speedy and successful traveling. Mr. Leever lived first on a farm near Scio, Linn County, teaching school in a pioneer log cabin until 1854, and then removed to Roseburg, where he taught for about a year. In 1855 he came to Jackson County and followed teaching near Central Point, and in 1856 purchased a ranch of three hundred and twenty acres near the town, which continued to be his home until his death, March 2, 1903. At the outbreak of the Civil War he enlisted in Company A, First Oregon Volunteer Cavalry, as first sergeant, and served under Capt. William V. Rhinehart until his discharge November 23, 1864. His war experiences were centered principally on the frontier, and had to do with fighting the Indians, and in conducting emigrants to points of safety upon their arrival from the East. During the service he was at Fort Boise, Fort Harney, Vancouver, and other stations in Oregon, Washington, and Idaho, and during this time he had ample opportunity to study the Indian question from all sides. In innumerable ways his education aided in accomplishing his success in the West, and even when far on in life he was a staunch supporter and worker for higher mental training. He took great interest in Republican politics, but was never willing for his name to appear as a candidate for office. As a deacon and worker in the Baptist Church he affiliated with the pioneers who believed in morality and humanity, and many are the instances when he went out of his way to perform an act of kindness to those less fortunate than himself.
    Mr. Leever married into a family renowned for its good name, and conspicuous among the early pioneer influences of Oregon. Elizabeth M. Constant was born near Springfield, Sangamon County, Ill., and died at Central Point in 1901. This estimable woman, and mother of four sons and six daughters, inherited her strong and reliant characteristics from her father, Isaac, who was born in Virginia, and moved with his parents to Kentucky while yet a boy. When grown to manhood he moved to Sangamon County, Ill., whence he enlisted in the Black Hawk War, serving with credit and distinction. Imbued with commendable zeal, he crossed the plains in the memorable emigrant year of 1849, and after his long and wearisome journey he helped to hew timber for the first grist mill in Oregon City. He was well pleased with the crude but to him promising country, and in 1850 returned to Illinois for his family, fully determined to cast his lot with the men upon whose strong shoulders rested the responsibilities of developing the Northwest. Returning to Oregon in 1852, he located a claim half a mile east of Central Point, adding to his land from time to time until he finally owned eight hundred acres. Here he extensively carried on general farming and stock-raising, at the same time interesting himself in politics, and the various phases of development around him. During the Civil War he espoused the cause of the Union, staunchly defending his personal friend, Abraham Lincoln, whom he had known in Illinois, and for whom he entertained the most profound admiration. About 1884, he came to know Major Lipton [sic--1854? Lupton?], of Indian war fame, and when that enthusiastic fighter sought to enlist his aid in fighting peaceful Indians, he stoutly maintained an attitude of friendliness towards the despoiled red men, all of whom had responded to his overtures of peace, and treated him with all fairness and consideration. He even went so far as express the hope that if the fighting major persisted in his determination to annoy the Indians, he would meet with his just deserts. The prophecy was fulfilled as history narrates, and the Indians lost an implacable foe in the death of the obstinate warrior. So well did Mr. Constant understand the loyalty and friendship of the Indians, that he invariably succeeded in his dealings with them, converting their deep-seated hatred of the whites in general into perfect friendship for himself. At the outbreak of the Rogue River War Chief Joseph, mindful of many kindnesses on the part of his friend, specially dispatched a messenger in the person of his favorite daughter, Mary, assuring the Constant family of their absolute safety should they desire to continue on the home farm. Mr. Constant possessed a large heart and comprehensive insight into the Indian question, and in his judgment dealt fairly with themselves and their grievances. Many times he considered the whites the aggressors, and his attitude of tolerance inspired many of the settlers to follow his humane example. Mr. Constant added to his many accomplishments that of mountaineer and scout, and in this capacity he took the first white party to Crater Lake, in Klamath County, now a national park. Members of this party included Judge P. P. Prim, Judge Jacobs, and others. The undertaking was considered a hazardous one for the times. He became a prominent man in the county, known far and wide for his generosity, and liberality of belief, and few among the pioneers represented a finer array of personal attributes. Friends, honor, financial success, and popularity rewarded his forceful grasp of western opportunities, and in his death, in January, 1890, the state lost a true-hearted and noble gentleman of four score and four years, one who had conceived broadly and acted wisely, and who in passing left the world better for his having lived.
    William Constant Leever is a native son of Oregon, having been born on his father's claim near Central Point, April 4, 1858. He was educated in the public schools, and during 1876-7 attended the Ashland Academy. In 1880 he went to the Puget Sound country, and at Renton engaged in the drug business with a partner, stepping out in 1883 with fair profit. Returning to Oregon, he was employed in the construction department of the Oregon & California Railroad, between Roseburg and Ashland, and at the completion of the road in 1885 he turned his attention to a lumbering and warehouse business at Central Point. Five years later, in 1890, he engaged as clerk in the hardware enterprise of which he became sole owner and proprietor in 1893, and for the enlargement and improvement of which he has unceasingly labored. In addition to his town home he owns a tenth interest in the paternal claim, twelve acres of which he has devoted to apples and general fruits. He is also interested in mining, and is president of the Pearl Mining Company, operating on Elk Creek, and incorporated for $100,000.
    Since coming to Central Point Mr. Leever has married Isabella Armstrong, who was born in Jackson County May 15, 1863, and who is the mother of three children, of whom Wayne H. and Ward M. are at home, and Amy is deceased. Mr. Leever is a genial, whole-souled man, interested in the world of undertakings, of which he is an important part, and progressive in the extreme, favoring innovations which have the stamp of practicability and utility about them, and forwarding in example and speech education, morality and happiness. He is fraternally connected with the Modern Woodmen of America, the auxiliary of the Royal Neighbors, and various other social and business organizations. As a Republican he has held membership in the city council many terms, and has materially influenced the deliberations of that body. He is typical of the moving, energizing spirit of the West, and as such is deserving of all the good fortune that comes to him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 764-765


LEEVER, William Constant, Merchant; born, Central Point, Ore., April 4, 1858; son, William T. and Elizabeth M. (Constant) L. Edu.: common schools. Married, Isabell Armstrong, July 13, 1887, at Central Point, Ore. Pres., Pearl Mining Co.; vice-pres, Bear Creek Cement Pipe and Block Co.; vice-pres., Central Point State Bank; Mayor of Central Point, three years; during administration a municipal water and sewer system was installed. A Republican. Member: Royal Arch, Knights Templar and Shriners, Master Mason. Address: Central Point, Ore.
Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, pages 341-342



    WILLIAM T. LEEVER: lives near Central Point; is a farmer; was born in Clermont County, Ohio, February 27, 1829; came to state in 1853 and to county in 1854; married January 1, 1857, to Elizabeth M. Constant. Children Wm. C., Lavinia Ida, Edmondson C., D. Carlos, Thomas, Ada, Lucinda, Nellie and Lizzie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



LENOX, ELBERT LEON
Public Utilities Official; Masonic Leader.
b. on a farm near Roseburg, Oregon, Aug. 16, 1895; son of Edward Harvey and Emma J. (Benedick) Lenox; great-grandfather captained immigrant train to Oregon 1843; educated grade and high schools, Roseburg; m. Neva S. Smelcer (owner and operator, Jacque Lenox, women's apparel shop since 1926) of Adin, Calif., June 10, 1917; began in county clerk's office (E. H. Lenox, father), Roseburg and Lloyd Oddy, clerk, Coos County 1917-20; with the California-Oregon Power Co. since 1920, beginning as clerk in Klamath Falls until 1922; later in construction department Klamath River, Medford office since 1923; assistant secretary 1927-31, secretary Medford since 1931; served Coast Artillery U.S. Army 1917-18; Elk; Legionnaire; member Knife and Fork Club; K.T. Mason since 1925; master Medford Blue Lodge 1931; High Priest R.A. 1932; Illustrious Master Council 1934; commander Malta Commandery Ashland 1936; Potentate Hillah Temple 1944; director Ashland Court Royal Order of Jesters 1946; active in Jackson County Shrine Club; S.R. Mason; member Rogue Valley Country Club; Democrat; Presbyterian; home 2322 E. Main; office 216 W. Main, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 341


LENOX, ELBERT LEON
    Public Utilities Official;
    Masonic Leader
b on farm near Roseburg, Oreg, Aug 16, 1895; son of Edward Harvey and Emma J (Benedick) L; great-grandfather captained immigrant train to Oreg, 1843; educ, pub schs, Roseburg; m Neva S Smelcer of Adin, California, June 10, 1917; began in county clerk's office (E H Lenox, father), Roseburg and Lloyd Oddy, clerk, Coos County 1917-20; with the Calif Oreg Power Co since 1920, began as clerk, Klamath Falls to 1922, later in construction dept, Klamath River, Medford office since 1923; asst secty, 1927-31, secty, Medford since 1931; served, Coast Artillery, US Army, WWI; mem, Knife and Fork Rogue Valley Ctry Clubs; Elk; Legionnaire; SR, KT Mason, past master Blue Lodge, 1931; High Priest, RA, 1932; Illustrious Master Council, 1934; comdr, Malta Commandery, Ashland, 1936; Hillah Shriner (potentate, 1944; dir, Ashland Ct, Royal Jesters. 1946); active in Jackson Co Shrine Club; Repub; Presbyt; home, 2322 E Main; ofc, 216 W Main, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 352


LEVERETTE, Walter H., realtor; b. Vancouver, B.C. June 7, 1889; to Oregon 1920; business college; m. Alice P. Halfhill 1912; children--Doreen, Jean, Bruce. President Medford Realty Board; chairman city planning commission; vice president Medford Chamber of Commerce 1927; R.A.M.; K.T.; Scottish Rite; Shrine; I.O.O.F.; B.P.O.E.; Rotarian. Republican. Christian Scientist. Address: 527 South Holly Street, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 137


LEVERETTE, WALTER H.
    Theatre Owner and Operator
b. Vancouver, B.C., June 7, 1889; educ., public and high schools; Business College. Married Alice P. Halfhill, 1912; children, Doreen, Jean and Bruce. Resident of Oregon since 1920. Former president, Medford Realty Board; former chairman, City Planning Commission; vice-president, Medford Chamber of Commerce, 1927. Odd Fellow. Elk. Rotarian. Shriner. R.A.S.R., K.T. Mason. Republican. Christian Science. Address: 611 S. Oakdale Ave., Medford.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 335


LEVERETTE, WALTER H.
Theater Owner; Orchardist; Rancher.
b. Brookville, Ontario, Canada June 7, 1889; son of Milton and Cordelia (Wolfe) Leverette; educated high school and business college; m. Evelyn Hollister; children Dorreen (Mrs. Vinson Vaughn), Jeanne (Mrs. George Kotchik) and Bruce M. (U.S. Navy); owner Leverette Interstate Theaters (Medford, Ashland, Yreka and Weed), Northern California Amusement Co. Inc., Lithia Investment Co. Inc., Orchard Park Farms at Medford and Circle (L) Ranch, Table Rock, all since 1925; retiring from theater business 1947; active Community Chest drives; member Chamber of Commerce; Rotarian (charter member); member University Club, International Footprinters Association; captain Jackson County Sheriff Posse; Elk; Mason; Shriner; Republican; Christian Scientist; home RFD 4, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 342


    GEORGE W. LEWIS: lives on Applegate; is a fruit and vegetable grower; post office, Murphy; was born in Linn County, Mo., 1842; came to state in 1852, and to [Josephine] County in 1878; married Mary C. Sears, August, 1865. Children William H. (deceased). Harry L., Viola, May and James.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 509


LILJENQUIST, LESLIE W.
    Truck Dealer; Civic Leader
b Moreland, Ida, Nov 14, 1904; son of Chas E and Martha K (Williams) L; (grandfather was one of original Mormons to Utah); educ, pub schs Moreland; m Evelyn Benson of Scholls, Oreg, Feb 15, 1940; dau, Leslie Joyce; began with Union Pac RR, Pocatello, Ida, 1920-22; with whlsle grocery Pocatello, 1922-24; co-partner, trucking business, western US 1924-37; plant mgr, Utah Equipment Co, 1937-39; factory representative, Mack Truck Co, Portland, 1939-42; co-ordinator, maritime comn, Oreg area, 1942-44 (in chg of all ferry and bus transportation, Portland Traction Co); owner, Liljenquist Motor Co, Mack Truck dealer, 1944 to date; owner, Red-E-Mix Concrete Co, Eugene, 1946-; mem, Chamber Commerce, Portland Aero Club; Elk; mem, Latter Day Saints Ch; addr, 1016 N Riverside (Box 246), Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 498


    GEORGE PIERRE LINDLEY. During his ten years of retirement in Medford George Pierre Lindley has commanded the same honest appreciation and good will which brightened his many-sided business life in the Northwest. At the present time he owns four acres of land in the town, upon which has been erected a comfortable cottage, and he is also the fortunate possessor of a ranch twelve miles east of the city, one hundred and sixty acres in extent, and heavily covered with timber. He also owns a two-story brick building, 25x140 feet, in Medford, the same being rented to various parties.
    A native of Brooklyn, N.Y., Mr. Lindley was born November 22, 1849, and is the second child of the seven sons and two daughters of Robert and Sarah (Grant) Lindley, the latter of whom was born in Kilkenny, Ireland, and came to the United States with her parents, locating on a farm in New York state. Robert Lindley was born in Lincolnshire, England, and until his twentieth year lived on his father's farm, attending the public schools, and gaining a fair business experience. He emigrated to America in a sailing vessel, was several weeks on the ocean, and finally settled on a farm near New York City. About 1855 he removed to Monona County, Iowa, purchased a fair-sized farm, and lived there until his death at the age of sixty-eight years, his wife living to be sixty years old. The children in this family were reared to habits of thrift and industry, and were taught the independence and satisfaction of a life in the country.
    At the age of twenty-one George Pierre Lindley engaged in stock-raising and farming on his own responsibility in Monona County, Iowa, leaving the proceeds of the home farm for the younger children, fast approaching maturity. In 1888 he followed out a long-thought-out plan and traveled to the West, visiting various parts of Washington and the Sound country, and engaging in various occupations there represented. The competence which permits him to live in comfort in Medford, as well as his land possessions, indicate the possession of good business judgment, and of wise disposal of the opportunities which have come to him. As a Democrat he has taken a prominent part in town offices, has been a member of the council for one term, and served two years as county treasurer, being elected in 1898. In Illinois he married Sarah Lindley, a native of St. Louis, two children being born of this union. Cornelia, the only daughter in the family, is deceased. George R., in whose career his parents take justifiable pride, is cashier of the Jackson County Bank. The younger Mr. Lindley was born in Iowa and accompanied his parents to Oregon in 1888. He was educated primarily in the public schools, graduating from the Lynden Normal School, and also attending the Lebanon College of Ohio. He is a young man of exceptional energy and moral courage, and gives promise of continued success as a wide-awake business man.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 687


LINDLEY, George Robert, Banker; born Blencoe, Iowa, Aug. 5, 1872; son, George P. and Sarah P. Lindley. Edu.: Northwestern Normal School, Lynden, Wash.; Natl. Normal School, Lebanon, O. Married, Katherine Ulrich, June 1, 1893, at Godfrey, Ill. Vice-Pres., Jackson Co. Bank of Medford; Dir., Trust and Savings Bank of Klamath Falls. Member: W.O.W. Address: Medford. Ore.

Harper, Franklin, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, 1913, page 346


LINDLEY, George Robert, Medford, Oregon.
    Banker: b. in Blencoe, Iowa, Aug. 5, 1872; s. of George P. and Sarah A. Lindley; ed. in Northwestern Normal School, Lynden, Washington; and National Normal School, Lebanon, Ohio; m. Godfrey, Ill., June 1, 1893, Katherine Ulrich; children: Nolo M., Robert G., Sarah May, Josephine, Katherine. Has been engaged in farming most of time, and for last ten years cashier, now v.-pres. and dir., Jackson County Bank of Medford; dir. Trust and Savings Bank of Klamath Falls, Woodman of World, Democrat, Methodist (trus., First Methodist Episcopal Church).
Who's Who in Finance, Banking and Insurance, 1922, page 416


LINDLEY, G. R. (Mrs.), born in Godfrey, Illinois, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Ulrich, a resident of Oregon for thirty years. Married to George Robert Lindley. Children: Robert G., May, Josephine, Katherine, Gertrude. Active in club and civic affairs. Member: Woman's Library Club (president), O.E.S., P.T.A., Garden Civic Club. Home: Lindley Heights, Klamath Falls, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, page 161



    DAVID LINN: lives in Jacksonville; is a contractor and furniture manufacturer; was born in Guernsey County, Ohio, October 28, 1826; came to state in 1851 and to county in 1852; married Anna S. Hoffman August 30, 1860. Children Corinne, Maggie, William, Fletcher, George, Mary and James.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    DAVID LINN. Esteemed and respected as a pioneer of Jacksonville, David Linn is honorably entitled to representation in this biographical work. For more than thirty years he was a prominent merchant and manufacturer, running a planing mill and carpenter's shop, and dealing in furniture. He is a fine example of the self-made men of our state, honest, upright and straightforward in all of his transactions, and enjoys to the full the confidence of all who know him, be it in an industrial, business, social or fraternal way. A son of William Linn, he was born October 28, 1826, in Guernsey County, Ohio, of old Virginian stock.
    A native of Virginia, William Linn removed with his parents to Guernsey County, Ohio. When a young man he was appointed gate keeper on the Ohio National Road, and served in that position fourteen consecutive years. Accumulating some money, he purchased land, and was engaged in agricultural pursuits for a number of years. Subsequently removing to Tuscarawas County, Ohio, he lived there retired until his death, at the age of three score and ten years. He was active in politics, and was one of the leading Andrew Jackson Democrats of his day. He married Margaret Gray, who was born about 1800, and spent her fifty-five years of earthly life in Ohio. Of their family of eight children, five sons and three daughters, David, the subject of this sketch, was the oldest son, and the third child in order of birth.
    Educated in the common schools of Ohio, David Linn began to learn the carpenter's trade when eighteen years old, and served an apprenticeship with an uncle, remaining at home during the entire time. He was ingenious, and possessed considerable mechanical ability. Leaving home in 1849, he located near Elizabethtown, Ind., where he was an employee in a fanning mill manufactory for a few months. Going to Muscatine, Iowa, in the spring of 1850, he followed the same business for six months, and then went to Albany, Ill., where he found employment in putting up fanning mills and machinery. In the spring of 1851 Mr. Linn and one of his shopmates came across the plains to Oregon, bringing with them three yoke of oxen, and one cow. After a journey of six months Mr. Linn arrived in Oregon City, where he remained but two months. Going to California, he stopped for a time in Yreka, and then proceeded to the Humbug Creek, where he was engaged in mining for a few months, when he went to Yreka flats, remaining here until June, 1852.
    Returning then to Oregon, Mr. Linn became one of the original settlers of Jacksonville, and for a time carried on a remunerative business as a carpenter, erecting many of the earlier buildings in this vicinity. Embarking in business as a furniture manufacturer and dealer, in 1854, he also opened a carpenter's shop and a planing mill, and carried on a large and flourishing business until burned out, in September, 1888. Not caring then to rebuild his plant, he subsequently confined his attention to his furniture business alone, until selling that out, in August, 1903. Mr. Linn in the meantime had other interests of value that consumed a part of his time, and to which he is now specially devoted. He has a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres, twenty acres of which are already devoted to the culture of fruit, principally apples, and another orchard is in process of development. He is also a stockholder in the Jacksonville Milling and Mining Company, of which he is president and business manager. This company, which was incorporated with a paid-up capital of $10,000. is developing a large quartz mine about two miles west of Jacksonville.
    Mr. Linn married Annie Sophia Hoffman, a native of Covington, Ind., who came to Oregon with her father, William Hoffman, in 1853. Mr. Hoffman was born in Baltimore, Md., and in his early life spent a number of years in Indiana. Coming from there to Oregon with his family, he located four miles southeast of Jacksonville, where he followed farming for two years. Removing to Jacksonville in 1855, he became prominently identified with public affairs, and for about twenty-five successive years was county recorder and clerk. He died in this city in 1885, at the venerable age of four score and four years. He was active in politics, at first being a Douglas Democrat, and later becoming a staunch adherent of the Republican Party. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Linn seven children have been born, namely: Corinne, living at home; Margaret, of Portland; William, deceased; Fletcher, president and manager of the Oregon Furniture Manufacturing Company, of Portland; George, a druggist of Eugene, Ore.; Mary, wife of Lewis J. Gay; and James, deceased. Politically Mr. Linn is a tried and true Democrat, and has filled many public offices of importance and responsibility. In 1854 he was appointed county treasurer of Jackson County, and served fourteen consecutive years, eight years of the time making his trips to Salem overland, on horseback, carrying from $12,000 to $14,000 in his saddlebags. He has served as councilman a number of terms, many times being president of the council, and nearly all of his active life he has been school director. Fraternally Mr. Linn belongs to Warren Lodge, No. 10, A.F.&A.M.; and to Oregon Chapter, No. 4, R.A.M.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 903-904


LINN, FLETCHER
    President and Manager, Pacific Coast Linen Mills,
    Vancouver, Wash.
b. Jacksonville, Oregon, November 10, 1866; educ., University of Oregon, B.A. 1890; M.A., 1892. Married Louise M. Sawyers, February 3, 1892. President and manager, Oregon Furniture Mfg. Co., Portland, 1902-1911. President and manager, Beaver Portland Cement Co., 1915-1918. President and manager, Pacific Coast Linen Mills, since 1934. President Oregon Manufacturers Assn. 1903-1907. Director Portland Y.M.C.A. 1903-1913. Member Oregon Flax and Linen Board, 1935. City Councilman, Eugene, Oregon, 1892-94. Trustee, Albany College, 1913-30. Many years active with organization of Oregon Industries. Director Portland Chamber Commerce 1909. Republican. Presbyterian. Officer First Presbyterian, Portland, 33 years. Home: 1830 S.W. Laurel Street, Portland. Office: Pacific Coast Linen Mills, Vancouver, Wash.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 339


LINN, GLENN L.
Principal, Medford Junior High School.
b. Portland, Oregon April 5, 1906; son of William E. and Maud D. (Morton) Linn; educated public schools; Pacific University A.B. 1929; University of Washington; Alpha Zeta, Phi Alpha Tau, Blue Key; m. Lucille Davis of Sherwood, Oregon Aug. 22, 1931; children Penny, Cheryl; began as science instructor Tigard (Oregon) Union High School 1929-37; superintendent of schools Umatilla 1937-40; principal Medford Junior High School 1940 to date; Lion (past secretary, president, director); past president Junior High School Principals Association; director YMCA; vice-president Jackson County Oregon Education Association; Mason; Republican; Episcopalian; home 119 Washington; office 2nd and Oakdale, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 346


    TOBIAS L. LINKWILER: lives on Antelope Creek; is a farmer; post office, Eagle Point; born in Rockbridge County, Virginia; came to state and county in 1852; married in 1859 to Mrs. Hannah Riley. Children George, William, Joseph, James, Ellen and Catherine.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    JAMES R. LITTLE: lives in Jacksonville; dealer in tobaccos, confectionery, etc.; born in Jacksonville.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



LITTRELL, E. A. (AL)
Businessman; Civic and Community Leader.
b. Colfax, New Mexico, Sept. 21, 1900; son of E. A. and Belle (Philips) Littrell; educated grade and high schools Raton, New Mexico; m. Nell Lewis of Raton, New Mexico May 23, 1917; children Harold R. (U.S. Army), William W. (U.S.N.), Robert D. 2nd Lt. Air Corps, Army) and Helen Louise; began as mechanic New Mexico; removed to Oregon 1920; partner Littrell Parts Co. 1923-27; incorporated 1927; president to 1935; owner, Littrell Parts Co. 1935 to date (branches Grants Pass, Dunsmuir and Yreka, Calif.); secretary Jackson Investment Co.; owner Sparta Bldg. and Elliott Bldg.; chairman advisory committee Office of Defense Transportation World War II; member City Council 1933-34; member Motor and Equipment Wholesale Dealers Associations, Society of Automotive Engineers; one of first three parts houses to sell automobile parts exclusively; past president Lions Club; Rotarian; Elk; K.T. Mason; Hillah Shriner; Republican; Presbyterian; home 619 E. Main St.; office 319 E. 6th St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 347


LITTRELL, E. A. (Al)
    Businessman; Civic Leader
b Colfax, N Mex, Sept 21, 1900; son of E A and Belle (Philips) L; educ, pub schs, Raton, New Mex; m Nell Lewis of Raton, N Mex, May 23, 1917; ch, Harold R, William W, Robert D, Helen Louise; began as mechanic, N Mex; to Oreg, 1929; partner, Littrell Parts Co, 1923-27; incorporated, 1927, pres to date; owner, Littrell Parts Co, 1935 to date; (branches, Grants Pass, Dunsmuir, Yreka, Calif); secty, Jackson Investment Co; owner, Sparta Bldg and Elliott Bldg; chmn, advisory com, Office of Defense Transportation, WWII; city councilman, 1933-34; mem, Motor and Equipment Whlsle Dealers Assns, Soc of Automotive Engrs; one of first 3 parts houses to sell automotive parts exclusively; past pres, Lions Club; Rotarian; Elk; KT Mason; Hillah Shriner; Repub; Presbyt; ofc, 319 E 6th, PO Box 432, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 500


LITTRELL, EARL K.
    Auto Parts Executive
b on ranch near Dawson, New Mex, Oct 6, 1892; son of Elija A and Belle (Phillips); educ, pub schs, New Mex, Park Coll, Parkville, Mo; m Edna Orin of Raton, New Mex, Feb 22, 1913; ch, Earl K Jr, Lucille (Mrs Fred Birch), Marion A, Robert T, Lois Jan (Mrs Andrew Newhouse), John E; began in operation of father's ranch at age of twelve; cattle business, New Mex, operator of large ranch at Springer, New Mex; partner, Littrell Parts Co, Medford, 1926-30; co-partner, Earl Littrell Supply Co, Coos Bay, 1936 to date; dir, Coos Bay Nat Bank; stockholder, Coast Fuel Co; city councilman, 1944-47; mem, Nat Standard Parts Assn, Motor and Equipment Wholesale Dealers Assn, Chamber Commerce (dir), Coos Ctry Club; Rotarian; Elk; Repub; Presbyt; home, 681 S 1th [sic]; ofc, 340 2nd, Coos Bay. Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 499


LIVELY, James Ward, engineer; b. Portland, Oregon August 1, 1902; University of Washington 1924; m. Pauline Dick October 17, 1925. Delta Upsilon; Mason. Republican. Presbyterian. Address: Gold Hill, Oregon; home: 38 Summit Avenue, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 139


LOCKWOOD, Sheridan Alfred, Physician; born, Independence, Kansas, Oct. 18, 1874; son, Nelson and Elizabeth (Jacobs) L.; descendant of Robert Lockwood, Puritan, settled at Watertown, Mass., 1630. Edu.: Santa Rosa, Cal. High School; Healdsburg (Cal.), College; M.D., Am. Med. Missionary College (now merged with Med. Dept., Univ. of Ill.), 1900. Married, Myrtle E. Spencer, M.D., Oct. 16, 1901, at Portland, Ore. Licensed in Oregon, July, 1901; licensed in Cal., June, 1901; licensed to practice medicine and surgery in Empire of Japan, Dec., 1902; established Hosp. and Sanit. for Americans and Europeans, in Kobe, Japan, April, 1903; resided there until April, 1907. Supt., Portland Sanitarium, Portland, Ore., Aug. 1907, to Jan. 1909; practiced in Medford, Ore., since May, 1909. Member: Southern Oregon Med. Assn., Oregon State Med. Assn., Am. Med. Assn. Res.: 45 Lindley Ave.; Office: 216 E. Main, Medford, Oregon.

Harper, Franklin, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, 1913, page 351


    E. H. LOFTUS: lives in Ashland; is a stock raiser; was born in Christian County, Kentucky in 1827; came to state in 1853 and to county in 1859; was married in 1852 to Elizabeth Banta. Children Mary F., Columbus C., Edward H., John W. and Oscar D.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    CHARLES W. LOGAN: lives in Ashland; is a photographer; was born in Davenport, Iowa; came to state in 1868 and to county in 1871; married September, 1879, to Hattie M. Reeser. Child, Blanche D.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


LOMBARD, Benjamin Tongue
    Lawyer
b Portland, Or, Oct 13, 1905; son of Martin Gay and Mary (Tongue) L; (grandfather, Oreg pioneer of 1859; early Or lawyer); educ, Univ Oreg, 1923-25; Northwestern Coll of Law, LLB, 1930; Chi Psi; m Jessie Craig Smith of Portland, June 10, 1932; son, Ben T Jr; with Union Pac RR Co, 1926-42; office boy to asst mgr, Industrial Dept; priv law prac, Ashland, 1946 to date; capt, Army, Transportation Corp, WWII; vice-chmn, Ashland sch bd; city atty, Talent, Or; mem, Am, Or, and Southern Or (vice-pres, 1952-53) bar assns, Chamber Commerce (director, 1947), Southern Oregon Kennel Club (past president), Oak Knoll Golf Club (director), Mult Ath Club; Repub (co com); Episcopalian (sr warden Trinity Parish); home, 326 Ridge Rd; ofc, Knox Blg, Ashland, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 460


    LOVE, GEORGE M., a merchant of Jacksonville, was born at that place December 29, 1860, and has always lived there. He is a working Republican and was a delegate to all the county conventions from 1884 to 1892, and the state conventions of 1890, 1892 and 1894. In 1888 he was nominated assessor. He was appointed postmaster by President Harrison, and served till July 1, 1894.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 236


LUMAN, CHARLES W.
Retail Food Merchant; Ranch Owner and Operator.
b. on farm, Lewis County, Washington July 17, 1892; son of Preston and Ellen (Bellville) Luman; educated public schools Chehalis and Centralia, Wash.; m. Verda Gilman of Grants Pass, Oregon June 4, 1917; daughters Marguerite (Mrs. Garold Saunders) and Anna (Mrs. Gordon Corum); entire activity devoted to meat and food business: five years meat packing business, Carsten Packing Co., Tacoma; two years Frye Packing Co.; partner of brother Luman Bros. Food Store, Medford 1917 to date; owner and operator of own slaughtering houses and of 422-acre cattle ranch near Medford; member Oregon Grocers Association; Odd Fellow; Republican; Protestant; home 624 N. Central; office Main and Bartlett, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 353


LUMAN, CHARLES W.
    Retail Food Merchant; Rancher
b on farm, Lewis Co, Wn, July 17, 1892; son of Preston and Ellen (Bellville) L; educ, pub schs Chehalis and Centralia, Wn; m Verda Gilman of Grants Pass, Oreg, June 4, 1917; ch, Marguerite (Mrs Garold Saunders), Anna (Mrs Gordon Corum); entire activity devoted to meat and food business; 5 yrs, meat packing business, Carsten Packing Co, Tacoma; 2 yrs, Frye Packing Co; partner with brother, Luman Bros Food Store, Medford, 1917 to date; owner, operator of own slaughtering houses and 422-acre cattle ranch near Medford; mem, Oreg Grocers Assn; Odd Fellow; Repub; Protestant; home, 624 N Central; ofc, Main and Bartlett, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 398


LUMAN, WILLIAM ALBERT
Retail Food Merchant; Ranch Owner and Operator.
b. Centralia, Washington Oct. 14, 1890; son of Preston and Ellen (Bellville) Luman; educated public schools Centralia and Chehalis, Wash.; m. Grace Edith Stagg of Medford 1913; children William J. (U.S.N.), Bert Preston (U.S. Army veteran), Frances (Mrs. Carl T. Dawson) and James A.; entire activity devoted to meat and food business; partner Luman Bros. Food Store since 1917; stock buyer; owner 465-acre stock ranch near Medford and other extensive real estate; formerly active in dairy business; Odd Fellow; Granger; Republican; Methodist; home 14 Cottage; office Main and Bartlett, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 354


LUMSDEN, TREVE B.
    Manager, U.S. National Bank,
    Civic Worker and Leader
b Medford, Oregon, Jan 22, 1890; son of Harold U and Bessie F (Berlin) L; educ, Stanford Univ; Kappa Alpha; m Lucile Messner, of Oregon, 1920; ch, Anna Lee (Mrs Bruce Kirkpatrick), Treve B Jr; began business career in mercantile lines; present position since 1935; for many years active in the civic, commercial and club affairs of Union County; enlisted Army, served, AEF, overseas, World War I; Mason; Elk; Republican; Presbyterian; home, 801 O Ave; office, US National Bank, LaGrande, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 227


    G. H. LYNCH: lives on Wagner Creek; is a farmer; post office Talent; born in Brunswick County, Virginia; came to state and county in 1869; married November 12, 1866, to Rosa Lynxwiler. Children W. M. F., Mary E., Lillie R., Clara E., Travis H., Harry S. and Warren.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    PATRICK LYTTLETON: lives in Ashland; is a gardener and horticulturist; was born in Pennsylvania June 8, 1837; came to the state and county in 1879.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


MacCRACKEN, Edith Bolte (Mrs. Gordon), a native of Chicago, resident of Oregon for the last 12 years. Married to Dr. Gordon MacCracken. Children: Chester Caldwell, Charles Gordon, Elliott Bolté. Former president Ashland Civic Club; past president District Fed. Women's Clubs; former state regent, D.A.R. Member: Ashland Civic Club, O.E.S., Society 1812, D.A.R., American Legion Auxiliary. Home: Ashland, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, pages 161-162



MacCRACKEN, Edith Bolte, b. Chicago, Illinois; to Oregon 1914; m. Dr. Gordon MacCracken March 15, 1900; children--Chester Caldwell, Charles Gordon, Elliott Bolte. Jackson County Central Republican Commission; state regent, D.A.R.; president Ashland Women's Club 1925; president Southern Oregon District Federation of Women's Clubs 1924; vice president Lincoln Club; president P.T.A.; O.E.S. Republican. Address: 262 Hargadine Street, Ashland, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 143


MacCRACKEN, EDITH BOLTE (MRS.)
    Club Woman
b. Chicago, Illinois; educ., public schools, Chicago. Married Dr. Gordon MacCracken of Winnetka, Illinois, March 15, 1900; three sons, Chester Caldwell, Charles Gordon, and Elliott Bolte. Resident of Oregon since 1915. Civilian service, World War. Member, Jackson County Central Republican Committee. Compiled Medical History of Jackson County, Oregon, 1935. President, Parent Teachers Association, 1917; regent, Mt. Ashland Chapter, Daughters American Revolution, 1920. Past president, Southern Oregon Dist. Federation Women's Clubs, 1924; president, Ashland Women's Club, 1925; state regent, Daughters American Revolution, 1926-28; vice-president, Lincoln Club, 1927; president, Ashland Study Club, 1934; president, Jackson County Medical Auxiliary, 1935. Chaplain, Eastern Star, 1936. Vice-president, United States Daughters of 1812. Mem., Chmn., American Legion Aux. National Defense. Historical Womans Auxiliary to State Med. Society, 1936-37. Republican. Episcopalian. Home: 262 Hargadine Street, Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 350


MacCRACKEN, ELLIOTT BOLTE
Educator.
b. Winnetka, Illinois May 24, 1911; son of Dr. Gordon and Edith B. (Bolte) MacCracken; educated public schools Oregon; Oregon State College B.S. in E.E. 1932; Southern Oregon College of Education 1933; Columbia University M.A. in Education 1941; Eta Kappa Nu, Theta Delta Phi; began as instructor Oregon public schools 1936-42; instructor Southern Oregon College of Education since 1946; served as 2nd Lieutenant and Captain U.S. Army Signal Corps, World War II; Mason; Republican; Episcopalian; home 262 Hargadine St., Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 356


MacCRACKEN, ELLIOTT BOLTE
    Educator
b Winnetka, Ill, May 24, 1911; son of Dr Gordon and Edith B (Bolte) M; educ, pub schs Oreg; Oreg State Coll, BS in EE, 1932; Southern Oreg Coll of Education, 1933; Columbia Univ MA in Ed, 1941; Eta Kappa Nu, Theta Delta Phi, Phi Delta Kappa; began as instructor Oregon public schs, 1936-42; asst professor, Southern Oreg Coll of Education since 1946; served as 2nd Lieut and Captain, US Army Signal Corps, World War II; Mason; Republican; Episcopalian; home, 262 Hargadine St, Ashland, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 254


MacCRACKEN, Elliott Bolte
    Educator
b Winnetka, Ill, May 24, 1911; son of Dr Gordon and Edith (Bolte) MacC; educ, Oregon State Coll, BS in EE, 1932; Columbia Univ, MA in Ed, 1941; Stanford Univ; Eta Kappa Nu; Theta Delta Phi (national president, 1950-52); Phi Delta Kappa; teacher, pub schs, Talent, Oreg, 1934-36; Ashland High Sch, 1936-42; Southern Oreg Coll, 1946-; vet, Army, 1942-46; KT Mason (master, 1950; comdr, 1952); Repub; Episc (treas, Trinity Ch, 1947-52); home, 262 Hargadine; ofc, Southern Or Coll, Ashland, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 466


    MAEGLY, AARON H.--Real Estate and Financial Broker, 210 Fourth Street, Portland, Ore. Born St. Joseph, Mo., October 1, 1854. Educated public schools. Came to Oregon, 1877. Engaged in hardware business, Jacksonville, Ore., 1881. Married Cecilia Levy, Jacksonville, Ore.; has three daughters. Society: A.F.&A.M. Republican. Residence: 729 Glisan Street, Portland, Ore.

Who's Who in the Northwest,
vol. 1, Western Press Association 1911


    CONSTANTINE MAGRUDER; born in Greene County, Ill., on the 18th of May, 1835. Parents left in 1838 for Andrew County, Mo., where they resided until 1844, in which year they came to Oregon; settled at Oregon City and lived there until the fall of 1848. That fall Mr. M. went through this valley on his way to the gold mines on Feather River, Cal. Next spring returned to Oregon by water, and in 1849 went back to California. In the spring of 1850 returned to Oregon, and in the spring of 1851 went through the valley for the third time on the way to the gold mines at Yreka. Followed mining at Yreka and in Northern California and Southern Oregon until August 1854, when he finally settled in this valley. Married April 21st, 1875, to Miss Marjory E. Constant, of Central Point, also a native of Sangamon County, Ill., and who crossed the plains in 1852. Went into a mercantile business at Central Point in October 1868, where he still resides. His father took up a donation claim on Foots Creek in August, 1854. His mother died near Oregon City, March 9, 1846; and his father, in Jackson County July 7, 1875.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 533


MALMGREN, Theodore John, Physician and Surgeon; born, Union Co., S.D., Oct, 1871; son, Hendricks and Margareta C. (Nederberg) M. Edu.: Union Co. public schools, 1889; Prep., Univ. of S. Dak. (normal), 1894; A.B., Univ. of S.D., 1903; M.D., Iowa State Med. College; post grad. work, Rush Med. College, Chicago, 1907. Married, Frederike B. Haan, (B.A., Wis, M.A. Iowa S.U.), Dec. 22, 1909, at Medford, Ore. Taught school from fall of 1895 to spring of 1898; and from fall of 1903 to spring of 1904. Has practiced medicine in Phoenix, Ore., since June, 1909. Member: Am. Med. Assn. Address: Phoenix, Ore.

Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, page 379


MANN, EDWIN HANER
    Truck Body Manufacturer
b Spink, So Dak, Aug 8, 1888; son of W H and Sarah (Haner) M; educ, pub schs, Sun Prairie, Wisc; m Louise May Gravenslund of Kennewick, Wn, Sept 14, 1911; ch, Richard Edwin, Marylou (Mrs A B Jonason); began as farmer Benton Co, Wn, 1909-28; with Colyear Motor Sales Co, Medford, 1928-29; owner, E H Mann Co (truck body builders and distributors truck lines and equipment), 1929 to date; elected State Representative 1950; vet, US Army, WWI; Repub; home, 47 Rose; ofc, 1312 Court, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 355


MANN, John C., president Mealey Dry Goods Co.; born in Canada, 1865; son of F. R. and Mary (Woodsworth) Mann; educated in public and high schools of Goodrich, Ont. Began active career in dry goods business at Goodrich, 1879; came to St. Paul 1883 and became connected with Michael Mealey, dry goods and notions; on the retirement of Mr. Mealey in 1902, the business was incorporated as the Mealey Dry Goods Co., of which he is president. Club: Commercial. Office: 7th and Wabasha sts. Residence: 583 Carroll St., St. Paul.
Albert Nelson Marquis, The Book of Minnesotans, Chicago 1907, page 339



MANN, JOHN CLARKSON
Owner Mann's Department Store.
b. Goderich, Ontario, Canada March 28, 1865; son of Frederick and Mary (Woodsworth) Mann; educated grade and high schools Canada; m. Margaret Booth of Los Angeles and Willmar, Minn. Jan. 1, 1912; daughter Margaret Mary (Mrs. Roger Holmgren), Janet Irene (Mrs. John Crawford); served apprenticeship dry goods store Canada at age of 14, 1879-82; associated with Clarence M. McLain, St. Paul, Minn. 1882-86; with Mealey Dry Goods Co., St. Paul 1886-1906, purchased store, managing owner until 1910; removed to Oregon, owner, Mann's Dept. Store, Medford 1910 to date; vice-president, director, Jackson County Building and Loan Association; member school board six years; member City Council two terms; active many years State Retail Merchants Association; past president Chamber of Commerce; Elk (since 1915); Democrat; Episcopalian (served on vestry and as junior warden); home 815 E. Main; office 14 N. Central, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 360


    J. W. Marksberry, nominee for assessor, was born in Kentucky in the year 1848 and emigrated with his parents to Illinois in 1857, and remained in that state until 1874, when he moved to Texas and lived there until 1884, then came to Jackson County, Oregon. It is with pleasure that we accord Mr. Marksberry an honorable position in the front ranks of the Farmers' Alliance and People's Party. His labors have been untiring to advance the best interests of the cause at all times, and although never seeking office he is well qualified to fill any position accorded him, and will make the county an assessor above reproach.
"The Nominees," Medford Mail, April 22, 1892, page 1


MARSHALL, Edison, author; b. Rensselaer, Indiana August 28, 1896; to Oregon 1907; University of Oregon; m. Agnes Sharp January 1920; children--Edison, Nancy Sharp. Winner O. Henry Memorial Prize, best short story 1921; author of over a dozen books, published in 7 foreign languages; Sigma Upsilon, Delta Tau Delta; Mason; B.P.O.E. Republican. Protestant. Address: Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 146


MARSHALL, EDISON
    Author and Writer
b. Rensselaer, Ind., Aug. 28, 1894; educ., Univ. of Ore., 1913-15; Delta Tau Delta;
Sigma Upsilon. Married Agnes Sharp Flythe of Augusta, Ga., Jan. 1920; children, Edison and Nancy Sharp. Resident of Oregon many years since 1907. Began writing while in college, has since written short stories and serial novels for leading magazines. Served U.S. Army, enlisted and commissioned 2nd Lieut., 1918. Winner of O. Henry Memorial Prize, Best Short Story, 1921. Decorated by French Government, 1934. Author of many books, published in seven foreign languages. Elk. Mason. Republican. Protestant. Address:
Seven Gables, Augusta, Georgia.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, addendum


    ALEXANDER MARTIN, SR. Although a resident of Oakland, Cal., for a long period Mr. Martin has had important financial and commercial interests in Klamath Falls, Ore., and numbers among his friends some of the leading citizens of Southern Oregon. Identified with the history of the Pacific Coast regions since 1853, he is a native of Illinois, born in Scott County, March 17, 1835, his parents being Samuel and Susan (Sisson) Martin, natives of Ohio County, Va. His paternal grandfather, Alexander Martin, immigrated to America from Ireland and settled in Virginia, where he followed the trade of jeweler and watchmaker. The maternal grandfather, Lewis Sisson, was a native-born American and by occupation a farmer. The genealogy of the Sisson family is traced to Germany.
    During 1832 Samuel Martin took his family from Virginia to Illinois and settled in Scott County, where he entered a tract of government land and became a pioneer farmer. On that homestead he died in 1844, aged sixty-six years. Afterward his widow continued to live on the same place until her death, which occurred in 1866, at the age of almost seventy years. In their family were three sons and six daughters, namely: Maria, who married A. M. Henderson, both now deceased; Frances, Mrs. Charles Lewis, also deceased; George, who for twenty years officiated as clerk of Scott County, Ill., but is now living in Nebraska; Sarah, Mrs. Ephraim Lewis, deceased; Eliza, Mrs. William Crabtree, deceased; Alexander; Martha, Mrs. James Hosac, of Nebraska; Samuel, of Harvard, Neb.; and Susan, who married William Cahn, of Kansas.
    In the days when Alexander Martin, Sr., was a boy schools were few in number and crude in their method of instruction. Hence his educational opportunities were meager. At an early age he learned the blacksmith's trade. In the spring of 1853 he started for the West, crossing the Missouri River on the 12th of May and the Klamath River, seventeen miles from Klamath Falls, on the 29th of August. The entire trip consumed four months and was made with ox teams. After spending the winter in Jacksonville, Ore., in the spring of 1854 he went overland to California and followed his trade at Sacramento. Returning to Oregon in the spring of 1855, he took up work at his trade in Jacksonville. During 1865 he returned to Illinois and visited relatives and friends. The spring of 1866 found him again in Jacksonville, where he embarked in the general mercantile business with J. T. Glenn and John S. Drum under the firm title of Glenn, Drum & Co. The business was conducted under that name until 1869, when Major Glenn purchased the interests of the other owners. A later venture of Mr. Martin was as superintendent of the line of stages owned by the Western Stage Company and running from Portland to Lincoln, Cal. The work was difficult and the duties of the superintendent responsible, for he was obliged to take the oversight of four hundred head of horses owned by the company, engage suitable drivers and see that the stage reached Portland daily.
    In 1872 Mr. Martin bought Major Glenn out and thus became a member of the firm of White & Martin. The following year he had a contract for transporting troops and supplies from the end of the railroad at Roseburg into the lava beds. In 1874 he sold out to Reames Bros., and in 1879 removed from Oregon to California, and has since made his home in Oakland. However, he has continued his commercial and financial interests in his old home state. During 1880 he became a member of the mercantile firm of Reames, Martin & Co., at Klamath Falls. In 1886 C. S. Moore bought out the interest owned by Mr. Reames and the store has since been conducted under the name of Reames, Martin & Co., Thomas Reames at present holding an interest in the enterprise. Another important business which owes its inception to Mr. Martin is the Klamath County Bank at Klamath Falls, which was incorporated with a capital stock of $50,000 and has since taken a place among the conservative and substantial financial institutions of Southern Oregon. Fraternally Mr. Martin was at one time connected with the lodge and chapter of Masonry, but is not now affiliated with the organization. He is a member and holds the office of an elder of the First Presbyterian Church of Oakland.
    June 24, 1857, Mr. Martin married Elvira M. Gass, who was born in Virginia March 3, 1839, and died at Jacksonville, Ore., March 3, 1878. Her father, Thomas Gass, died in the East, and in 1853 her mother brought the children to Oregon, settling in Jackson County. The family of Alexander Martin, Sr., and his wife consisted of five children, namely: Ida, wife of Dr. G. H. Aiken, of Fresno, Cal.; Alexander, Jr.; William, a dentist having his office on Market Street, San Francisco; George, a dentist, now residing in Berlin, Germany; and Elvira, wife of F. H. Woodward, of San Jose, Cal.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 447-448


MARTIN, Alexander, Banker; born, Ill., Mar. 17, 1835; son, Samuel and Susan (Sisson) M. Edu.: public schools. Married, Elvira (Myer) Gass, July 22, 1857, at Jacksonville, Ore. Crossed plains, 1853, with ox teams. Pres., Klamath County Bank, First Natl. Bank of Merrill. Address: Klamath Falls, Ore.

Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, page 384


    ALEXANDER MARTIN, JR. As cashier and manager of the Klamath County Bank, of which his father, Alexander Martin, Sr., is president, the subject of this article is intimately associated with one of the important financial institutions of the county, an institution that through the conservative management of its officials has come to hold a high rank among similar enterprises in Southern Oregon. Included among its depositors are many of the leading business men of the county, whose confidence has been won through the wise policy of the bank in matters of investments and loans. The establishment of the bank has thus proved of benefit to the people and to the town of Klamath Falls as well.
    In Jacksonville, Jackson County, Ore., Alexander Martin, Jr., was born July 3, 1867. His primary education was obtained in the schools of his native county. About 1879, after the death of his mother, the family removed to Oakland, Cal., and there he attended the public schools. Later he had the advantage of a course in Heald's Business College in San Francisco, from which he was graduated in 1884. Immediately afterward he left home and came to Klamath Falls, Ore., where he became a clerk in the mercantile establishment of Reames & Martin. After having continued for a time as a clerk, in 1886 he acquired an interest in the business, and this he conducted until 1899, when he disposed of his interest to F. W. Jennings. Since that time he has devoted his attention entirely to the management of the bank of which his father is the chief owner.
    The marriage of Mr. Martin was solemnized in Klamath Falls in 1888 and united him with Martha F. Smith, who was born in Reno, Nev., November 8, 1866. Her father, Judge George W. Smith, now a resident of Phoenix, Ariz., was formerly identified with the citizenship of Klamath County, where for several years he engaged extensively in farming and also filled the office of county judge for four years. Mr. and Mrs. Martin are the parents of one son, who bears his father's name. In his political views Mr. Martin is a supporter of Republican principles. Preferring to give his attention wholly to business matters, he has as yet not mingled in public affairs, but he consented to serve as county treasurer and filled the office from 1894 to 1896. In fraternal relations he is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen of Klamath Falls, in which he has passed through the chairs and is now financier. As a Mason he is active in Klamath Lodge No. 77, A.F.&A.M.; Siskiyou Chapter No. 21, R.A.M., of Ashland; Malta Commandery No. 4, K.T., also of Ashland; and Al Kader Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S., of Portland.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 425-426


MARTIN, Alexander, Jr., Banker; born, Jacksonville, Ore., July 3, 1867; son, Alexander and Elvira (Gass) M. Edu.: public schools. Married, Martha F. Smith, Oct. 4, 1888, at Klamath Falls, Ore. Cashier, Klamath County Bank. Secy., Klamath Hotel Co., The Brick Store Co. County Treas., Klamath Co., 1894-6; Mayor, Klamath Falls, 1 term. Democrat. Member: R.A.M., Knights Templar, Elks, Shriners, United, Workmen. Address: Klamath Falls, Ore.
Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, page 384


MARX, HOMER A.
Civil Engineer; General Manager, Medford Concrete Construction Company.
b. Etna, California January 23, 1901; son of Martin and Sarah (Davis) Marx; educated public schools Etna; St. Marys College B.S. 1922; m. Beatrice A. Semon of Medford October 4, 1927; children Patricia G., Gordon D.; began as civil engineer, California; with Medford Concrete Construction Co. since 1925, vice-president, general manager 1938-; partner Asphalt Paving Co.; member Associated General Contractors, Concrete Products Manufacturers Inc.; member Chamber of Commerce; Jackson County Sheriff's Posse; Elk; Rotarian; Republican; home 1985 Kings Highway; office 1320 North Riverside Ave., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 364


    WILLIAM M. MATHES, whose home--one and a half miles northeast of Phoenix--is illustrated in this volume, was born in Westmoreland County, Penn., November 9, 1829. At the age of eight years his father died, when his mother with the children removed to Huntington County, on the Juniata River, and from thence, when William was twenty, came to Fulton County, Ill. In 1852 he crossed the plains to Oregon. At John Day's River his company was broken up and, managing to secure a pony on which to pack his clothes and a single blanket, he procured two pounds of flour and started out by himself to complete the journey. Arriving in the neighborhood of the Deschutes River he learned of a new crossing and hurriedly hearing the directions pushed forward hoping to cross before night. But losing the way he traveled on, he knew not whither, until late in the night. Finally all appearance of a road disappearing, and groping his way through darkness and brush, he espied what seemed to be an impenetrable gloom of darkness just in front of him. Deeming it wise to halt here for the balance of the night, and hastily fastening the pony to a tree, he wrapped himself in his blanket and was soon in the arms of Morpheus. At early dawn he awoke from his slumbers and was horrified to find himself on the very brink of a huge precipice whose yawning cavern below was the impenetrable gloom of the night before. On the 18th day of August, he left Barlow's in a rain which increased in violence all day and continued all the succeeding night. At nightfall he came across a camp of emigrants consisting of one man and his wife and seven children and also the grandmother of the children. Of the team, one ox only was alive. The women and children were all piled in the wagon. The man was trying to keep comfortable by a log fire he had kindled for the purpose. Here Mr. Mathes concluded to spend the night and with this unhappy emigrant kept sleepless watch all that night of storm and rain without food or shelter--the pony sharing the fire with the men, turning first one side and then the other to the fire. At early dawn the journey was resumed, and breaking a piece of bread from the cake he had made of his two pounds of flour, he ate it as he traveled. At ten o'clock he encountered a company of emigrants from Peoria, Ill. Arriving at this place the evening previous, eleven of their horses, poor from the long trip of scanty feed, exhausted from the travel, and chilled by the rain of the previous day, had perished during the night. Still pressing on, at the crossing of a rapid mountain stream he saw two men leading and supporting a poor horse upon whose back a woman and three children were being carried across the water, and to their destination, all other means of travel having been previously lost in the terrible journey. This day he crossed [the] Little Sandy, whose swollen waters carried him and his pony some distance below the ford, where it was with great difficulty that the latter made the land. The rain having ceased, the second night was spent in comparative comfort, barring hunger. Here the balance of his little store of provisions was eaten. The next evening he arrived at Foster's, where there was plenty to eat, and his sufferings for the time being were at an end--but not the journey. Starting from home for the mines, he never stopped until he reached them at Jacksonville in September of that year (1852). From Jacksonville he went to Jackass Creek where he spent the memorable winter of 1852-3, living for two months on very poor venison without salt, even. Returning in the spring to Jackson Creek he barely escaped striking a fortune there, which so disgusted him that he left the mines forever and settled on the land where he now resides, in May, 1853. In 1861, Mr. Mathes returned to the Atlantic States; was married October 3rd of that year and with his wife returned to Oregon and the homestead in 1863. In 1873, he returned to Wisconsin and brought his mother to the Coast. Mrs. Mathes' maiden name was Christina Riddle. She was born in Edinburgh, Scotland, January 16, 1842. The children are Harry G., Bertha L., Mary S., George W., Jessie A. and Donald Clyde.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 533


    DUDLEY POLK MATHEWS. That farming may be made a congenial as well as profitable occupation is proved by the happy and thoroughly contented life of Dudley Polk Mathews, owner and operator of a farm of six hundred acres on the Little Butte Creek, twelve miles northeast of Medford. The visitor is impressed with the air of neatness and thrift pervading this property, and with the modern buildings and general improvements. Since coming to his present farm as a boy of nine, Mr. Mathews has known no other home. This was in March, 1854, and it is with a sense of pride and gratification that he recalls the many changes that have taken place, and which reflect the energy and pioneer efforts of his noble-hearted father. Mr. Mathews was born on a farm in Mercer County, Mo., October 28, 1844, and four years later accompanied his parents to Iowa. In 1853 the father, with his wife and six children, prepared to come to the coast, packing their household goods in two wagons, and investing in strong, trustworthy oxen to convey them the long distance. It is not recalled that any unusual incidents marked the journey, and in March, 1854, the family located on a farm now occupied by the son Dudley, where the father died at the age of seventy, his wife living until about the same age. The elder Mathews was a practical farmer and worthy man, and his children recall with pride his manly life and earnest efforts in their behalf. Ten more children were added to the care of the mother in the West, and all received as fair a common school education as the parents were able to give them.
    The Mathews farm is devoted to general farming and stock-raising, having admirable watering facilities in both wells and creek, and being stocked with high-grade cattle, horses and sheep. Mr. Mathews has made a special study of stock, and because of their excellent care he is able to command the best market prices. He is a genial and kind-hearted man, interested in all that has to do with his town and county, and adding his earnest support to charities and enterprises of a worthy nature. Quiet and unostentatious, he has no political ambitions, although he supports the Republican Party with his vote.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 567-568


    JOHN MATHEWS: lives at Eagle Point; is a farmer; was born in Montgomery County, N.C., March 2, 1816; came to state and county in 1853; was married October 1837, to Elizabeth Wooley. Children William (deceased), Drucilla, Millie, Dudley P., America, Ruth, Hezekiah, Juda R., Mary E., Elizabeth J. (deceased), Martha, Maria. Green B., Champion G. and Minerva (deceased).

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


MATLACK, JACK DEAN
    Publicist; Theatre Executive;
    Civic Leader
b Manton, Calif, Feb 22, 1914; son of Ralph Hanford and Luella Jeanette (Karkeet) M; educ, public schools, Calif; Chico State Teachers College Calif, 1930-33; entire business activity devoted to theatrical enterprises, beginning as portrait painter (movie stars), Senator Theatre, Chico, Calif; doorman, Craterian Theatre, Medford, Oreg, 1934-40; advertising dir, Geo A Hunt Theatres, Medford, 1940-43; mgr, Holly Theatre, Medford; 1942-43; mgr, Broadway Theatre, Portland, 1943-46, exec asst to pres; adv dir, J J Parker Theatres, 1943-; named First Citizen of Portland, 1944; mem, Forum Com, Senior Chamber Commerce; president and mem, bd dir, Oreg Advertising Club, 1946; director of the Retail Trade Bureau; Board of Directors, Portland Council of Churches, Conf Christians and Jews, Summer Band Concert Assn; vice chmn, Public Service director, 1949, Community Chest; winner, Quigley War Showmanship Award, 1942, 43, 44; recipient Quigley Silver Award, top theater advertising job out of 16,000 theater mgrs; only winner west of Rockies, 20-Year Anniversary Award, Metro-Goldwyn-Mayer, 1944; mem, KOIN Million Dollar Club, Galloneers; summoned, Washington DC, conference with Henry Morgenthau, Secty of Treasury, plans for Fifth War Loan Drive; Oreg Pub Dir, Theatre Participation, 6, 7 and 8th War Loans; very active in war service organizations and paralysis drives, World War II; mem, Multnomah Club, advertising dir, 1946 Motion Picture Red Cross Drive; Mason; Shriner; Republican; Methodist; home, 3075 SE Ogden; ofc, 1008 SW Broadway, Portland, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 320


    CARREL B. MATNEY: lives on Applegate Creek; is a farmer and blacksmith; was born in Redford County, Tenn.; came to state in 1850, to county 1852; was married July 24, 1859, to Margaret A. Maupin. Children Samuel (deceased), Jefferson D., Alvis M., Carrel B. (deceased), Nancy, Martha J., Thomas F., Mary, William W., George W., John N., May, Isaac D., Millie, Icy B. and infant.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    COL. REUBEN F. MAURY: lives near Jacksonville, is a farmer, was born in Bath County, Ky.; came to state and county in 1852; was married December 14, 1856, to Elizabeth Chambers. Children L. P., G. L., Mary P., H. C., Sallie A. and Effie (deceased). Mrs. Maury died August 27, 1878. Col. Maury was in Mexican War in 1846 and promoted during war to Second Lieutenant. In 1861 raised first regiment Oregon cavalry.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    REUBEN F. MAURY. No name in Jackson County is more familiar to the students of its history than that of Reuben F. Maury, familiarly known as Colonel Maury. This pioneer of 1849 has won his success in the West, and as a merchant, miner, farmer, and all around promoter of peace and prosperity, commands the respect of all, and the good will of every one with whom he has had to do. Mr. Maury's life has been laid along practical and progressive lines, and at no time has the visionary or vague found place in his plans or desires. He was born on a farm in Bath County, Ky., May 23, 1821, and the lessons there learned have followed him through life and inspired him to do his best in whatever capacity he has been called upon to serve. His father, Mathew, was born in Albemarle County, Va., November 25, 1777, and was of French descent, his ancestors being early settlers in the South. June 17, 1812, he married Susan P. Fry, also born in Virginia, and continued to make his home in Kentucky until his death, September 4, 1860. His wife died December 3, 1857.
    Reuben F. Maury received his preliminary education in the public schools of the vicinity of Louisville, Ky., and when eighteen years old entered the post office at Louisville as a clerk, remaining in that position for about nine years. In 1846 he enlisted as a private in Company A, First Kentucky Infantry, for service in the Mexican War. He served for one year and rose to the rank of second lieutenant, participating in the battle of Monterey. In the spring of 1849 he started with a party of young men from Louisville with ox teams, his destination being the gold mines of California. Leaving Independence, Mo., May 1, 1849, he reached the Sacramento Valley, September 1, the same year, and at once began to mine and prospect along the American River. Not feeling sufficient confidence in mining to depend upon it solely as a means of livelihood, he took up a claim in the Sacramento Valley about three miles below Sacramento City in the fall of the same year, but sold the same in May, 1850, and returned to mining for about a year. He then started a freighting business from Sacramento to the mines, and in 1852 came to the Rogue River Valley, Ore., and continued to freight with fair success. His course lay between Scottsburg, Crescent City and the mines, and although he was successful in his undertakings, he sold out his business in 1854, and with Benjamin T. Davis engaged in a general merchandise business in Jacksonville. Disposing of the store in 1859, he assisted in organizing the First Oregon Volunteer Cavalry, of which he was appointed lieutenant colonel by President Lincoln, later being advanced to the rank of colonel. He served about four years in all, the duty of the regiment being to guard the settlers on the frontier. He was mustered out in Vancouver, and after returning to Jacksonville, engaged in mining for about nine years.
    January 16, 1856, Mr. Maury married Elizabeth Chambers, who was born in Ohio, the daughter of Aaron Chambers, who crossed the plains in 1852, and took up the donation claim upon which Colonel Maury and his family now make their home. With his wife he moved to this farm in 1875, and at present owns one hundred and thirty-three acres of land, one of the most desirable properties in the county, upon which he has made many fine improvements. Colonel Maury has engaged for years in general farming and stock-raising, also in raising small fruits and vegetables. He is very successful, and is one of the most prominent and influential men in this valley. Everything about him appeals to the sincere appreciation of his intelligent neighbors, and he represents all that is substantial, reliable and noble in character and attainment. He is a staunch Democrat, but has preferred rather to work for his friends than himself, steadily refusing most of the offices tendered him. The following children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Maury; Lawrence P., of Coquille City; Gillis M., of Crescent City; Mary P., and Henry C., both at home; and Sallie M., the wife of J. Cowgill, of California. Mrs. Maury died in 1878. The Maury farm is one of the most hospitable in Jackson County, and thither come the hosts of friends which this genial and always entertaining host has gathered on his successful life journey.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 719-720


    JOHN MAVITY: an early pioneer of Jackson County, Oregon, now a horticulturist and resident of St. Helena, Napa County, Cal.; was born in Ripley County, Ind., August 3, 1829, and came to Oregon in 1852, settling in Jackson County in the fall of that year; in 1870 he moved to his present home in Napa County, Cal.; was married October 22, 1857, to Miss Amelia W. Hull. They have four children, viz: Katie A., John M., Willis W. and Carrie B.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 521


McALLISTER, WILLIAM M.
Lawyer; Legislator.
b. Portland, Oregon, November 2, 1905; son of William J. and Mary (Menzies) McAllister; educated Gresham High School; Willamette University LL.B. 1928; Delta Theta Phi; m. Jean Middleton of Salem, Oregon 1932; two children William Jr., Kathryn J.; engaged in practice of law 1931 to date; member House of Representatives, Oregon State Legislature 1937, '39, '41 sessions, Speaker of House 1943; served U.S.A. Major 1943-45; Elk; Mason; Republican; Presbyterian; home 129 Willamette Ave.; office Fluhrer Bldg., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 369


McALLISTER, WILLIAM M.
    Lawyer
b Portland, Oregon, November 2, 1905; son of William J and Mary (Menzies) McA; educ, Gresham High School; Willamette Univ, LLB, 1928; Phi Delta Theta; m Jean Middleton of Salem, Oregon, 1932; two children, William M, Kathryn J; engaged in prac of law, 1931 to date; mem, House of Representatives, Oregon State Legislature, 1937-39, '41 sessions, Speaker of House, 1943; served, USA, Major, 1943-45; mem, st senate, 1949; mem, bd of governors Oreg St Bar, 1949-61; Elk; Mason; Repub; Presbyt; home, 2615 Hillcrest Rd; ofc, Fluhrer Bldg, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 320


    GENERAL JOHN MARSHALL McCALL, who represented Jackson County in the assembly in 1876, and whose portrait appears in this work, to use the language of Professor Huxley, is "a man so trained in youth that his body is the ready servant of his will, and does with ease and pleasure all the work that as a mechanism it is capable of; whose intellect is a clear, logical engine, with all its parts of equal strength, and in smooth working order, ready, like a steam engine, to be turned to any kind of work, and spin the gossamers as well as forge the anchors of the mind." And this, indeed, is the man so familiarly called General McCall. He is, so to speak, one of those men whose brain is well proportioned to his body. He never stops to consider trifles, and never reaches after the impossible or impracticable. He gives proper attention to the details of his business, but would not like to be detailed to do so. He has a powerful mind, and what adds to its strength is the fact that it is his own. It will not brook insult nor be dictated to. It abhors presumption and detests flattery. In short, he is a self-made man. He was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, on January 15, 1825. He emigrated to Louisa County, Iowa, in 1842, and from there crossed the plains with ox teams to Oregon in 1850, and in the year 1852 settled in Jackson County. It was in 1859 he located at Ashland, where he purchased an interest in the Ashland Flouring Mill. The year 1861 will be ever memorable as the period when a great dissension between two vast sections of the country threatened the dismemberment of the nation. The consequence was that, in many places throughout the Coast, military regiments were organized for the emergency that was expected to arise at any moment. Among other organizations of this character, the 1st Oregon cavalry was raised, and the subject of this sketch was the first to respond. He was commissioned second lieutenant of company "D," and in 1865 was promoted to captain. It was during this year that he commanded an escort to B. J. Pengra, that gentleman having in charge a surveying party in laying out the wagon road from Eugene City to Steens Mountain. General McCall remained with the party at Fort Klamath, and in the following spring was honorably discharged at Vancouver, and immediately returned to his old home at Ashland. In the spring of 1867, at the solicitation of many citizens of the place, he founded the woolen mills, which today is one of the prominent enterprises of Ashland. In 1883 he was commissioned brigadier-general of the Oregon State Militia by Governor John L. Moody, which position he has maintained to the present writing. General McCall has been twice married; the first was to Miss Theresa R. Applegate, on April 30, 1868. The second was to Mrs. M. E. Brown, née Mary E. Anderson, on July 4, 1876. His children are: Lydia T., Elsie May and John A.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 533-534


    McCALL, GENERAL JOHN M., was born in Washington County, Pennsylvania, January 15, 1825. In 1842 he went to Iowa, and in 1850 came to Oregon, settling in Jackson County in 1852, and in Ashland in 1859, where he established woolen mills in 1867 and resided until his death in 1895. He served in the First Oregon Cavalry during the war. In 1883 he was appointed brigadier-general of the Oregon Militia by Governor Moody. He was an earnest Republican, was for years a delegate to conventions, and at the time of his death was president of the Ashland Republican Club, of which his son, John A. McCall, is now secretary.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 241


    MRS. MARY ELIZABETH McCALL. Coming across the plains with her brother and sister in 1854, Mrs. Mary E. McCall, widow of the late Gen. John Marshall McCall, taught in the first school established in Ashland. A woman of culture and refinement, she is prominent in social and fraternal circles, and has the distinction of having served as the first grand matron of the Grand Chapter, O.E.S., of Oregon, having been elected to this office at the first meeting of the Grand Chapter, which was held in 1889 at Roseburg. A daughter of George Anderson, she was born in Bowling Green, Ind., of Scotch descent. Her paternal grandfather, Daniel Anderson, was born in Pennsylvania, where he spent the larger part of his active life, although he died in Indiana.
    Born on the home farm in Pennsylvania, George Anderson was reared to agricultural pursuits. Subsequently going to Indiana, he was engaged in the hotel business at Bowling Green for a few years. Removing to Albia, Monroe County, Iowa, in 1850, he took up land and improved a homestead, on which he lived until his death, in 1852. He married Hannah Knighten. who was born in North Carolina and removed with her parents to Indiana in girlhood. Two years after the death of her husband, in 1854, she came across the plains to Oregon, and lived here until her death, at the age of seventy-three years. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, to which Mr. Anderson also belonged. Six children were born of their union; Daniel Preston, who came to Oregon in 1857, died in California; Eli Knighten, who crossed the plains to California in 1850, located in Oregon in 1852, and now resides near Talent, Jackson County; James Firman died in Siskiyou County, Cal.; Marion, who came to Oregon in 1854, died near Talent; Mary E. is the subject of this sketch; and Nancy is the wife of F. W. Chapin, of Sacramento, Cal.
    In 1854 Mary E. Anderson came with her mother, her brother Marion, and her sister Nancy, to Oregon, making the journey with ox teams, and being six months en route. They came by the southern route, via Klamath and Soda Springs, and were met on the way by James Anderson, a brother, who furnished them with provisions, which they very much needed, their own supply being nearly exhausted, and piloted them to their brother Eli's ranch. Miss Anderson and her sister and some of the men of the party rode on horseback through Ashland, in which there was then a mill, a blacksmith shop, a hotel and one store. Arriving at her brother Eli's, she assisted in preparing supper for the rest of the party, that meal being the first she had eaten in a house in six months. She subsequently attended school at Eden precinct, Jackson County, continuing her studies at Umpqua Academy, where she was graduated in 1856. She immediately began teaching, and taught in the first school opened in Ashland. After teaching three years, Miss Anderson married, at Mountain House, Jackson County, in 1858, Rev. George H. Brown, a Methodist minister. Mr. Brown was born in Massachusetts, came to Oregon by way of the Isthmus in 1855, and settled first as pastor of a church near Corvallis. Going from there to Clackamas County, he preached in Oregon City until his health failed, when he engaged in farming near Talent, Ore. Two years later, hoping to improve his health by a change, he removed to Henley, Cal., where he resided until his death in 1866.
    July 4, 1876, Mrs. Mary (Anderson) Brown married for her second husband Gen. John Marshall McCall, a man of great prominence and influence. A Pennsylvanian by birth, General McCall was born in Washington County, January 15, 1825, and died in Ashland, Ore., November 4, 1895. Going to Iowa when about seventeen years old, he lived in Louisa County a number of years. During the great excitement that followed the finding of gold at Sutter's run, he was seized with a desire to try his fortune at finding the precious metal, and emigrated, in 1850, to California. Meeting with but fair success, he came to Jackson County, Ore., in 1852, and seven years later took up his residence in Ashland, becoming part owner of the Ashland Flouring Mills, in which he was for some time interested. Responding to his country's call for volunteers in 1861, he was commissioned second lieutenant of Company D, First Regiment, Oregon Volunteer Cavalry, and was subsequently promoted to the rank of captain. During the closing year of the conflict, in 1865, he was in command of an escort to B. J. Pengra, the head of the party that surveyed and laid out the wagon road from Eugene to Stone Mountain. Remaining with this party at Fort Klamath until the following spring, General McCall was honorably discharged at Vancouver, having won an excellent record as a soldier and an officer. Returning to his home in Ashland, he became actively interested in its industrial interests. In the spring of 1867 he established the Ashland Woolen Mills, of which he was the manager for a number of years, building up an extensive and profitable business. Active and influential in public affairs, he was made brigadier-general of the Oregon State Militia in 1883, receiving his commission from Gov. Z. F. Moody. He also served as a representative to the state legislature, in which he served on important committees.
    April 30, 1868, General McCall married for his first wife Theresa R. Applegate, a daughter of Lindsay Applegate, one of the very earliest settlers of this state, coming to the Willamette Valley with the first train of Oregon emigrants. Of their union four children were born, namely: Lindsay, deceased; Lydia, a resident of Ashland; Elsie, who died at the age of eighteen years; and John A., of Redding, Cal. July 4, 1876, General McCall married, as previously stated, Mrs. Mary (Anderson) Brown, who still continues her residence in Ashland. Mrs. McCall is very active in fraternal circles. February 24, 1888, she was made a member of Alpha Chapter, O.E.S., which she has served as matron several terms, and in which she is affectionately referred to by her junior sisters as the mother of the order in Oregon. In 1889, in Roseburg, at the first meeting of the Grand Chapter of Oregon, she was elected grand matron of the Grand Chapter of Oregon, and has since served one term as grand treasurer of the Grand Chapter. In 1901 she was presented by the Grand Chapter with the grand matron's jewels as a token of the high esteem in which she is held in the fraternity. Mrs. McCall is also a member of the Ashland Women's Relief Corps, No. 24, of which she was the first president. Politically she is a Republican and a suffragist. General McCall was prominently identified with the Masons, belonging to lodge and chapter, and was a member and ex-commander of Burnside Post, No. 34, G.A.R. 

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 615-616


    ANDREW McCALLEN. The substantial and well-to-do citizens of Jackson County have no finer representative than Andrew McCallen, cashier of the First National Bank of Ashland. Energetic, capable and progressive, possessing abundant financial and executive ability, he has led a busy life, and has acquired an assured position among the keen, wide-awake business men of the thriving city in which he resides. A son of the late Andrew McCallen, he was born in Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Ill., September 15, 1848. His paternal grandfather, Hayes McCallen, was born and bred in Scotland. Emigrating to the United States when a comparatively young man, he took up land in Harrison County, Ind., and was there engaged in tilling the soil until his death.
    Born in Indiana, near Palmyra, Andrew McCallen, Sr., studied law, and after his admission to the bar settled in Illinois, locating first in Elizabethtown, Hardin County, Removing from there to Gallatin County, he continued the practice of his profession in Shawneetown, having a wide circuit, frequently being associated in important cases with Abraham Lincoln. He also served as registrar in the United States land office at Shawneetown at the time when land was selling for twelve and one-half cents an acre. He died in that city, in 1861, while yet in the prime of manhood, being fifty years of age. In his early life he was identified with the Whigs, but was a firm adherent of the Republican Party from the time of its formation until his death. He was much interested in Masonry, and served as master of his lodge. His wife, whose maiden name was Mary Castle, was born in Philadelphia, Pa., and died in Shawneetown, Ill., in 1878. Of the five children born of their union, three are living. One son, Hayes McCallen, came to Modoc County, Cal., in 1877, and subsequently died in San Francisco. One daughter, Mrs. Mary Snider, settled in Modoc County, Cal., in 1876, and in Lakeview, Ore., in 1882.
    Obtaining his early education in the public schools of Shawneetown, Ill., Andrew McCallen began learning the drug business when sixteen years old. He subsequently entered Bryant and Stratton's Business College in Chicago, Ill., and after his graduation was employed as bookkeeper for a Chicago manufacturing firm for two years. Returning then to Shawneetown, Mr. McCallen opened a drug store, which he carried on until the spring of 1875. Disposing of his stock at that time, he came to California, locating in Modoc County, where he was employed as clerk and bookkeeper for eighteen months. In the fall of 1876, when the town of Lakeview, in Lake County, Ore., was in its infancy, he went there as manager of a general merchandise house, a position that he retained eleven years. In the meantime he made wise investments, becoming a large land owner, and a man of prominence. In 1887, in company with C. A. Cogswell and others, he organized the Lakeview Bank, of which P. G. Chrisman was made president, W. B. Whittemore vice-president, and Mr. McCallen cashier. The cashiership he retained until 1898, when the bank was sold. In 1900, after the affairs of the bank were all settled, Mr. McCallen removed to Ashland, where he has since resided. In 1901 he assisted in the organization of the First National Bank of Ashland, which was incorporated March 20 and was opened for business May 15, 1901, with Mr. McCallen as cashier. This position he has since successfully filled, being especially fitted for it by his previous training and experience. As a business man he has been fortunate, and has acquired considerable valuable real estate, being the owner of several farms in Lake County, Ore.
    While living in Modoc County, Cal., Mr. McCallen, in 1879, was married to Miss Josephine Applegate, daughter of the late James Applegate, for many years a prominent citizen of Douglas County, Ore., which he represented for one term in the state legislature. Her grandfather, Charles Applegate, was one of the three original settlers of Douglas County. Coming with his parents to Oregon in early life, James Applegate was for many years engaged in agricultural pursuits in Douglas County, near Yoncalla, and took part in the Rogue River Indian War. Subsequently removing with his family to Modoc County, Cal., he was engaged in farming and stock-raising in the Goose Lake Valley. Selling his ranch, he afterwards located in Monrovia, Los Angeles County, where he resided until his death, at the age of sixty years. Mr. Applegate married Caroline Johnson, who is now living in Monrovia, Cal. Of the seven children she bore her husband, four are living, namely: Mrs. McCallen; Mary, wife of J. H. Clayton, of Portland, Ore.; Lulu, wife of George Dodge, of Ashland; and Mabel, wife of H. C. Oakley, of Los Angeles, Cal. Mr. and Mrs. McCallen are the parents of five children, namely: Gertrude, a graduate of St. Mary's Academy, Jacksonville, Ore.; Nannie, attending the Southern Oregon State Normal school; Andrew, Edward and Edna, all students at the Ashland High School.
    Politically Mr. McCallen is an active member of the Democratic Party, and has filled various offices of trust and responsibility. In the fall of 1878, when the county seat was moved from Linkville to Lakeview, Mr. McCallen was appointed county treasurer, and served for eighteen consecutive years, or nine terms of two years each, being re-elected each succeeding term. For one year he served as councilman of Lakeview, and for one term filled the mayor's chair. Fraternally he is a member of Lakeview Lodge No. 63, I.O.O.F.; was a charter member of Lakeview Encampment; and now holds membership in Pilot Rock Encampment of Ashland. He is a member, and the treasurer, of the Ashland Board of Trade. Mrs. McCallen belongs to the Methodist Episcopal Church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 809-810


    SIMON McCALLISTER: lives at Soda Springs on Butte Creek, is a school teacher; post office Brownsboro; was born in Sangamon County, Ill., 1831; came to state in 1852, to county in 1861; was married September 21, 1853, to Elizabeth Ogle. Children Mary E., Celia A., James A., John G., Elizabeth H., Minnie G. and Joseph M.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


McCASKEY, HIRAM DRYER
    Geologist
b. Fort Totten, North Dakota, April 10, 1871; educ., Lehigh University, B.S.S. mining, 1893; M.S., Geology, 1907; Delta Upsilon. Married Mary Louise Fuller, June 7, 1913. Chemist, Montana, 1893-95; Instructor, Mathematics, Engineering, Mississippi, 1896-98; California, 1898-1900. Member Mining Bureau, Manila, P.I. 1900-06. Fellow, Geologist, Lehigh University, 1906-07; Assistant Geologist, 1907-10; Geologist, 1911 to date. Chief Secretary, Metal Resources, 1912-19. Geologist in charge Division Mineral Resources, 1915-19. U.S. Geologist Survey. Author of various reports on mineral resources and geology of Philippine Islands; metallic mineral resources of U.S., especially gold, silver, quicksilver. Member, Geology Mining Societies, including American Association for Advancement of Science; Companion Loyal Legion; Chevy Chase; Cosmos; Tuna; University (Rogue River Valley); Rogue River Valley Golf; Philippine Assn. Home: Bora Da Orchards, Central Point, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 366


    C. C. McCLENDON: lives in Sams Valley; is a farmer; post office Sams Valley, was born in Bledsoe County, Tenn., 1832, came to state in 1852, to county in 1864; married October 6, 1858, to Susan Brown. Children William P. (deceased), Benjamin F. (deceased), Mary J., Joseph B., Samuel W., Susannah (deceased), John H., Rosa .\I., Lillie B. and Nora B.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


McCOY, J. WALTER
    Cashier, First National Bank, Ashland
b. Golconda, Ill., Sept. 20, 1878; educ., pub. schs., Golconda, Ill. Married Agnes Granger, St. Joseph, Mo., April 22, 1903 (dec'd.); children, Margaret E. (Mrs. Thea. J. Norby), and Frances. Married 2nd, Imogene Wallace, Central Point, Ore., July 5, 1936. Began as jeweler until 1898; clerk, Swift and Co., St. Joseph, 1898-1903; asst. cashier, First Nat'l. Bank, Norton, Kan., 1903-07; asst. cashier, Bank of Ashland and U.S. Nat'l. Bank (successor) until 1910. Cashier, U.S. Nat'l. Bank and First Nat'l. Bank (consolidated 1914), 1910 to date; director. Active in bond sales and Red Cross drives, World War. Past president, Chamber Commerce. President, Oregon Bankers Assn., 1925-26; twice vice-president for Oregon, American Bankers Assn. President, Kiwanis Club. Republican. Presbyterian. Home: 311 N. Main Street. Office: 74 East Main Street, Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 368


McCOY, J. WALTER
Retired Banker.
b. Golconda, Illinois September 20, 1878; educated public schools Golconda; m. Agnes Granger, St. Joseph, Mo. April 22, 1903 (deceased); children Margaret E. (Mrs. Theo J. Norby) and Frances (Mrs. Charles V. Stayton); m. 2nd Imogene Wallace, Central Point, Oregon July 5, 1936; began as jeweler, Swift & Company, St. Joseph 1898-1903; assistant cashier First National Bank, Norton, Kansas 1904-07; assistant cashier Bank of Ashland and U.S. National Bank (successor) to 1910; cashier U.S. Bank and First National Bank of Portland 1937, manager to 1940; owner until 1946, McCoy Machinery Co. (industrial and farm), Medford; active in U.S. bond sales and Red Cross drives, World War I; past president Chamber of Commerce; president Oregon Bankers Association 1925-26; twice president for Oregon, American Bankers Association; Kiwanian; Republican; Presbyterian; home 311 N. Main St., Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 373


McCRACKEN, J. R.
Dairyman; breeder of purebred registered Jerseys; owner one of highest producing dairy herds in U.S.; winner of numerous awards including Gold Medal; a leader among dairymen in community and state; address Valley View, Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 374


    JOHN WILMER McCULLY: formerly of Jacksonville, now of Joseph, Oregon, is a physician, was born in New Brunswick; came to state in 1851, and to county 1852; was married June 28, 1848, to Miss Janet Mason, of Alloa, Scotland. Children James C., Mollie Bell, (Merrett died January 1884) and Issie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    J. P. McDANIEL: lives in Jacksonville: is a miner; came to state in 1852, and to county in 1854; was married November 20, 1872, to Catherine Parker. Children Fred, James, Ida, Ella (Eddie and Emma twins).

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    JAMES McDONOUGH: lives near Willow Springs; is a farmer and carpenter; was born in Greene County, Penn., June 8, 1826; came to state and county in 1852; was married August 18, 1855, to R. M. Kahler. Children Sarah C. (deceased), Carlos, Helen, Harriett, John W., Martin C. and George.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    JAMES McDOUGALL. After a boyhood spent upon the high seas, an early manhood devoted to the no less exciting experiences of a prospector and miner, and several subsequent years when bridge building was followed, in 1876 Mr. McDougall came to Jackson County, where he has since made his home. The ranch which he owns and operates and which has been his property since 1890 originally comprised eighty acres, but now embraces eighty-seven. It forms a part of the Harding donation claim and lies three and one-quarter miles south of Gold Hill. The improvements noticeable on the place have almost entirely been placed there by the present owner, who has given considerable attention to the converting of the land into a valuable ranch. The value of the place is increased by the fact that a mine is located on it, and the development of this mine receives special thought and care on the part of its owner.
    In Scotland, John McDougall and Mary McClain were born, reared and married, and from there they removed to Prince Edward Island. They were the parents of five sons and six daughters, one of whom forms the subject of this article. After settling on the island the father conducted a grist mill until the infirmities of age prevented him from further identifying himself actively with business cares. He lived to be almost ninety, while his wife passed away at eighty-five years.
    In 1858 James McDougall took passage at New York City on the North Star Line for San Francisco via the Isthmus. After his arrival in California he followed prospecting and mining for twelve years in California and Nevada. During this period, in 1860, he served for three months as volunteer in the Piute Indian war and assisted in subduing the savages. On coming to Oregon in 1870 he took up the carpenter's trade in Portland and for about six years was employed as bridge builder for the railroad. When he came to Jackson County, in 1876, it was for the purpose of mining, and this occupation he followed near Gold Hill a number of winters, meanwhile working as a bridge builder for the county during the summer months. On discontinuing that work he took up a homestead of one hundred and sixty acres in the Blackwell district. This property he proved up on and made his home for seven years, going from there to the place he now occupies and owns. His neat farm home is presided over by his wife, who is a native of Jackson County and bore the maiden name of Catherine Ralls. Among the people of this county Mr. McDougall has a high place. He is regarded as one of the most successful mining men in the vicinity, his knowledge of that industry being the result of years of practical experience in mines. While he has never allied himself with any of the prominent political parties, his interest in politics is nonetheless keen and constant, and he gives careful consideration to matters brought before the people for decision. In local elections he gives his support to the men whom he considers best qualified for the office in question, while in general elections he also carefully weighs the problems before the people, the character and ability of the candidates themselves, and then votes in accordance with his carefully formed opinions.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 580-581


    JOSEPH S. McFADDEN: lives on Applegate; is a farmer; post office, Murphy; was born in Fairfield County, Ohio; came to state in 1872, and to [Josephine] County in 1876; married June 3, 1880, to Kate Kubli. Children James and Joseph.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 509


    JOHN W. McKAY: lives near Willow Springs; is a farmer; was born in Iredell County, North Carolina; came to state and county in 1852; was married December 1, 1861, to Sarah A. Slagle. Children Robert L. (deceased), Martha A. (deceased), Hughey, Nancy C., George G. and John H.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    AMOS M. McKEE is a native Oregonian, who by reputation and lifelong occupation has been identified with placer mining and is at present operating in a placer district located on Palmer Creek. In addition to his mining interest he is the owner of a ranch of one hundred and sixty acres of fertile land located on Big Applegate Creek, in Jackson County, this state. His birth occurred May 27, 1864, and he is a son of John M. and Mariam (Bowen) McKee.
    Amos M. McKee received his education in the public schools. At a very early period in life he became interested in mining and since his youth he has continued to be identified with this industry, operating principally placer properties on Forest Creek while at present he is working placer ground located on Palmer Creek, this state. Besides his mining interests he is the owner of one hundred and sixty acres of choice farm land located on Big Applegate Creek. He moved upon this property and for one year operated it under a lease, at the expiration of which he purchased the ranch upon which he has since resided.
    Mr. McKee was united in marriage in 1887 to Miss Charlotte F. Pence. She is a native of Logan County, Illinois, and is the daughter of William Pence, who removed from Illinois to Oregon in 1876 and located in Applegate Valley. To the family of Mr. and Mrs. McKee four children have been born: Ernest H., now employed in Hubbard's Implement Store in Medford; Floyd E.; Pearl A.; and Clara H., the three last named being at home with their parents.
    Mr. McKee is a Republican in politics, following the fortunes of his party in national and state issues. Though deeply interested in mining he still gives attention to the constant improvement and cultivation of his home ranch and is recognized as being a prosperous ranchman as well as a successful miner. He is always interested in any public measure affecting the betterment of the people in his county and state, and has proven himself to be public-spirited, enterprising and successful in all relations of life. 

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, page 238


    T. T. McKENZIE: lives in Jacksonville; was born in Inverness-shire, Scotland; came to state in 1855; to county in 1865; married March 27, 1866, to Rebecca Hopwood. Children May (deceased), Percy, Selina, Thomas, Monroe, William and Charles P.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 504



    ROBERT McLEAN: lives in Ashland; is a Presbyterian minister; was born Oneida County, N.Y., February 22, 1846; came to state and county in 1883; married August 29, 1877, to Lucy R. Norris. Children Roy McGregor and Robert N.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



WILLIAM P. MEALEY.
    Residence, 16 Belmont Avenue; office, 18 North Front Street, Medford. Born at Campton, Colorado, on December 5, 1883. Educated in the public school of Campton and at the high school of Los Angeles, California. Graduated from Leland Stanford, Jr., University, in May, 1909, receiving degree of Bachelor of Arts. Studied law for two years at Leland Stanford, Jr., University. Admitted to the bar of California, July 19, 1909. Removed to Oregon December 1, 1909, and was admitted to practice before the Oregon courts in January, 1910.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 185


FRED WINCHESTER MEARS.
    Fred Winchester Mears, a member of the Medford bar, now filling the office of city attorney, is separated by the width of the continent from his birthplace, for he is a native son of Massachusetts, born in April, 1873. Since the decade between 1630 and 1640 the Mears, Davis and Winchester families have been known as leading residents of their respective communities. Among the direct descendants of these families were Fred Miles Mears and Eliza Jane Davis, whose marriage was celebrated in New England and who became the parents of Fred W. Mears of this review. The son was educated in the grammar and high schools of Newton Centre, Massachusetts, where his birth occurred, but at the age of twelve years he lost his father, who, having served in the Civil War, never recovered from the wounds that he sustained in that struggle. Determined to obtain a classical education, the young man eagerly embraced every opportunity of earning money that would enable him to pay his way through Brown University. He pursued his studies through the day sessions and taught night school in order to acquire the requisite funds, and the laudable ambition that prompted him carried him through to success and he was graduated from the university in 1895 with the Bachelor of Arts degree, thus laying broad and deep the foundation upon which to rear the superstructure of professional knowledge. He then entered the law department of the University of Michigan and again he resorted to every possible means to add to his financial resources that he might meet the expenses of his law course, and once more his determination and energy carried him forward to his goal. He was graduated in 1898 from the University of Michigan and was admitted to the bar. Immediately thereafter he located for practice in Sioux City, Iowa, where he followed his profession through the succeeding ten years, gaining a large clientage and winning an enviable reputation as an able and forceful lawyer and an earnest, eloquent and convincing public speaker. In 1910 he paid a visit to the Pacific Coast, traveling from Los Angeles northward. Learning of the rapid growth of Medford, his attention was attracted to this city and he stopped off to convince himself of the reliability of the reports he had heard. That visit secured for Medford another substantial resident, for he at once decided to locate here. Returning to Iowa, he closed out his affairs in that state and since the fall of 1910 has made Medford his home. He has engaged in practice, and for five years he filled the office of city attorney. His official record and his private work have both established him high in public regard as a wise counselor and capable advocate in the courts.
    In 1903 Mr. Mears was married to Miss Sara P. Blythe, a daughter of the Rev. J. W. Blythe, whose people were for many generations among the best-known divines of Indiana and Kentucky. The grandfather of Mrs. Mears was the founder and president of one of the leading colleges of that state. She was educated in the Western College at Oxford, Indiana, and is a woman of liberal culture and innate refinement. She is now and for some years has been the executive secretary of the Red Cross chapter, and she is active in church club life and social affairs in Medford. Mr. and Mrs. Mears are members of the Baptist Church. By her marriage she has become the mother of two children: Frederick Blythe, a graduate of the Medford high school; and James Blythe Davis, who is now attending public school.
    Mr. Mears is an active member and supporter of the Republican Party, has been drafted as a speaker in every campaign since locating in Oregon and is known in every section of the state as a strong, forceful and influential political speaker and writer. Following the leadership of Roosevelt, he became a member of the Progressive Party and one of the campaigners in the "Flying Squadron." The Progressive Party in 1914 made him its candidate for congress from this district, but he failed of election. In the campaign of 1916 he became a supporter of Hughes and now gives earnest allegiance to the Republican Party. During the World War he strove to enter the service in any branch but was debarred on account of his nearsightedness. Finally he was suggested for service in the army as judge advocate, but before the red tape could be unwound the armistice was signed. Mr. Mears is a Knights Templar and thirty-second degree Mason and member of the Mystic Shrine and exemplifies in his life the beneficent spirit and purposes of the craft. He was made an Odd Fellow while a resident of Iowa. Throughout his entire life he has never been content to choose the second best but has pushed on toward a higher goal, and as a man, attorney and citizen he occupies an enviable position in public regard and those who know him prize his friendship and attest his worth.
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, 1922, volume II, pages 707-708


    The senior member of the [Medford Distilling & Refining Company], Mr. F. V. Medynski is a native of London, England, born February 6, 1851. His parents were Vincent and Sarah (Thompson) Medynski, the former a native of Poland, the latter of English birth. They had seven children, the subject being the fourth. He served seven years' apprenticeship as machinist and marine engineering, and came to America in 1871, locating in Chicago, where he engaged in shops for a time, and later followed his profession on the lake for some two years. He was next employed at the Phoenix Distillery for three years, when he again followed engineering and piloting on the lake until 1881, when he went to Des Moines, Iowa, and was engaged at the Atlas Distillery for several months. He next took charge as superintendent of the International Distillery, in the interests of George W. Kidd, for several years, at a salary of $3,000 a year. In 1889 he went to La Salle, Illinois, in the employ of the same gentleman, and built a distillery, which was purchased by the trust syndicate before being put into operation.
    He was married in Chicago, in April, 1876, to Ella Palmer, a native of that city. They have one daughter, Etta, and one son, deceased.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, page 1148


    MARY A. MEE. It is not often that the name of a woman appears in the pages of a history of the commercial and agricultural development of a state, but as the proprietor and manager of one of the thriving business enterprises of Jackson County, as well as an extensive property holder, Miss Mary A. Mee is entitled to such mention. She is a native of this county, her birth occurring on the 11th of July, 1862, and a daughter of Thomas and Drusilla (Wooldridge) Mee, the father a native of England and the mother of Missouri. Thomas Mee came to the United States in 1843 and for nine years thereafter lived in Chicago. In 1852 he and a friend drove across the plains to Oregon, and settled in the vicinity of Portland. The next year he came to Jackson County, but very soon after that he resumed his journey, going to California. In 1852 he again took up his residence in Jackson County and for a time thereafter engaged in teaching school. Mr. Mee was an able man and always manifested keen discernment and excellent judgment in the direction of his business activities. After his marriage to Miss Wooldridge on the 29th of September, 1861, he turned his attention to ranching and also engaged in the lumber business. He prospered in both and became one of the foremost men of the county by reason of the resourcefulness and general versatility he evidenced in whatever capacity his energies were directed. During the latter years of his life he was associated in business with his sons, and they had extensive lumber interests and large mills at Grants Pass, where Mr. Mee was killed in a runaway on the 23rd of February, 1893. The mother is still living and continues to make her home on the old ranch in Applegate Valley. Of the five children born to Mr. and Mrs. Mee four are still living. Fraternally the father was affiliated with the Masonic order.
    Miss Mee was reared at home and educated in the public schools. She subsequently qualified herself as a pharmacist with the expectation of pursuing a business career, and as she is a woman of clear judgment, practical ideas and the determination of purpose which invariably wins recognition in any field of activity, she has made a success of her undertakings. She is the owner of a fine drug store in Central Point, which she is profitably conducting, and in addition to this she has acquired several pieces of city property and owns nine thousand shares in a gold mine in California. Miss Mee is held in high regard in both the business and social circles of her community and has hosts of friends, whose loyalty has been won through her many excellent personal qualities.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon, vol. II, 1912, page 442


MEEKER, CLARENCE ALFRED
Mayor of Medford.
b. Traer, Iowa July 6, 1882; son of William and Clara (Brown) Meeker; educated grade and high schools Medford, Oregon; m. Ruth Esther Wheaton of Sheboygan, Wisc. and New York City Dec. 22, 1943; daughter Eleanor Jane; began as clerk W. H. Meeker Co. (established by father 1894) 1901-12; firm now known as M.M. Department Store, Medford, owner 1912-37; councilman 1931-35, 1940-42; Mayor Medford 1942-; owner M.M. Dept. Store Bldg., Meeker Bldg., Medford; director Commercial Finance Co. many years; member Oregon Retail Merchants Association (ex-director); active in Red Cross; director League of Oregon Cities 1940-; chairman Jackson County Housing Authority; member Chamber of Commerce; Elk; Odd Fellow; Mason; Republican; Methodist (chairman board of trustees); home 724 E. Jackson; office City Hall, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 385


MELLORS, Rebecca B. (Miss), born in Weir, Kansas, November 7, 1899, daughter of Thomas and Annie Willey Mellors. Former resident of Kansas and Idaho. Educator. Secretary-Clerk, School District No. 49. Member: O.E.S., Business and Professional Women's Club. Home: Medford, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, page 162



MERKEL, DR. A. ERIN
Physician and Surgeon.
b. Glenham, South Dakota, April 16, 1902; son of John L. and Louise (Stickelmeier) Merkel; educated Union College, Lincoln, Neb. B.S. 1934; College of Medical Evangelists, Loma Linda, Calif. M.D. 1936; interned Los Angeles County General Hospital 1935-36; post-graduate study University of California; m. Gladys O. Watwood, Dallas, South Dakota 1924; child Sharon Jean; resident physician, Los Angeles City Maternity Service; C.C.C. surgeon, Medford, Oregon District 1937; Jackson County Health Officer 1937 to date; clinic director Jackson County Child Guidance Committee, member Jackson County Medical Society, American Medical Association, American Public Health Association, Oregon Health Officers Association; Diplomate of the National Board of Medical Examiners; Rotarian; Republican; home 30 Barneburg Road; office Courthouse, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 386


MERRICK, Stella J. (Mrs. F. E.), born in Iowa, 1867, a resident of Oregon for twenty-four years. Married to Fred E. Merrick. Children: Ruth M., Walter D., Emerson P. House designer and real estate operator. Active in civic work; member: O.E.S., Daughters of the Nile, Greater Medford Club. Home: 118 N. Riverside Avenue, Medford, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, page 162



    MRS. ARTINECIA MERRIMAN: lives near Central Point; is a farmer; post office Jacksonville; was born in Champagne County, Ohio in 1830; came to state 1851, and to county in 1856; Artinecia (Riddle) Merriman was married February 22, 1848, to James Chapman, deceased. Children John W., Lucinda J., George F., Laura A., Maria E., Annie A., Isaac A., Mary B., Isabel, Effie, Josephine and Willie. Mr. Merriman had one daughter, Auletta L.; Mrs. Merriman has buried four children, Chas. H., Walter, Prudence and Winaford.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    MERRIMAN, GEORGE F., of Medford, was born in Douglas County, Oregon, September 16, 1853. He is a blacksmith by occupation, having pursued it for twelve years in Medford. He was a member of the Douglas County convention in 1886 and 1882, and the Jackson County convention in 1886, 1890 and 1894, and of the state convention in 1894. In 1892 he received the nomination for Sheriff. In 1894 he was secretary of the McKinley Club, and a member and secretary of the county central committee.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 245


    GEORGE FRANCIS MERRIMAN. In tracing the source of the importance of Medford, mention is due George Francis Merriman, who, from obscurity and financial limitations, has risen to business, educational, and political prominence. Mr. Merriman's ladder of success has been made up of a useful blacksmith trade, fine personal honor, and exceptional executive and general ability, all of which may be acquired by persistent effort, a truth which furnishes vast encouragement to the industrious and ambitious. His family is one of the well-known ones of the state, for his parents, William H. and Artinecia (Riddle) Merriman, reared a family of fifteen children, five sons and ten daughters, of whom three sons and eight daughters respond to the roll call of residents of this prosperous state, and are established in homes of their own. Mr. Merriman is the second of these children, and was born in Douglas County, Ore., September 16, 1855, his father and grandfather, both named William H., being natives of the state of Illinois, born near Springfield. The younger William H. was a farmer, blacksmith and wagon-maker, and in 1852 crossed the plains to Oregon, locating near Riddle, Douglas County. In 1856 he removed to Jackson County and located two miles north of Medford, purchasing one hundred and twenty acres of land from Jesse Robinson, upon which he farmed until his death in 1877, at the age of fifty-two years. He was an active Republican, and in religion was a member of the Baptist Church. His wife's family is perpetuated in Oregon in the town of Riddle, and her brothers, J. B., George W. and Stilley Riddle, are honored residents of this vicinity. Mrs. Merriman was born in Cleveland, Ohio, and in Illinois married John W. Chapman, who died in Illinois, after which his wife crossed the plains in the same train with her future husband, Mr. Merriman.
    George Francis Merriman's zeal in promoting the cause of education is quite remarkable, considering the difficulties which hedged in his own opportunities in this direction. From earliest youth his ears became accustomed to the sound of industry emanating from his father's busy blacksmith shop, and he was put to work at an age when most boys are considering ways and means by which to keep away from school. Not so this youth, however, for while his days were filled with serving an apprenticeship, begun in his fourteenth year, his evenings were spent in poring over books, and acquiring the knowledge denied him in the schools. After completing his three years of compulsory service he continued a year more with his employer, and in 1874 went to Eastern Oregon, and for two years worked in a blacksmith shop at Canyon City. For the following two years he ran a shop at Central Point, in the Rogue River Valley, and in 1878 was employed as blacksmith by the Oregon & California Stage Company. In 1880 he began a four-years' business in Oakland, and in 1884 located in Medford, where he has since continuously worked at his trade, with the exception of two and a half years. He does many kinds of wood work, wagon manufacturing and horse-shoeing, and so large is his trade that four men are required in the shop.
    Mr. Merriman's services as a staunch Republican official have been of a high order, and demonstrate his breadth of mind and knowledge of municipal affairs. While not seeking recognition himself he has earnestly helped his deserving friends, and by no means confined himself to any one party in offering help. He has been a member of the city council one term, and was nominated for county sheriff in 1892, escaping election by only one hundred and eighty-seven votes in a county claiming five hundred Democratic majority. He was appointed postmaster of Medford January 17, 1900, and still holds the office, which is of the third class. Mr. Merriman finds recreation and friends in various fraternal organizations, among them Medford Lodge No. 103, A.F.&A.M.; Oregon Chapter No. 4, R.A.M., of Jacksonville; Independent Order of Odd Fellows; Knights of Pythias; Ancient Order United Workmen; and Woodmen of the World. He is also identified with P. P. Prim Cabin Native Sons of Oregon, and Roseburg Lodge No. 326, B.P.O.E. In all possible ways he has forwarded the best interests of education, has been a member of the school board for many years, and is one of the promoters and directors of the Medford Business College, having succeeded in raising a large fund for its erection. Two miles east of Medford Mr. Merriman married Mary Murry, who was born in Illinois, and whose father, William Murry, emigrated from Scotland to Illinois, and from there to Oregon in 1874, locating on a farm near Medford. Eight children have been born to Mr. and Mrs. Merriman, of whom William H. is deceased; Thomas is working in his father's shop; May is the assistant postmistress of Medford; George also is in his father's shop; and Blanch, Mollie, Vera, and Sherron C. are living at home.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 887-888


    WILLIAM H. MERRIMAN: died in Jackson County, September 16, 1877; was a cabinet maker and joiner; was born in Kentucky; came to state in 1852 and to county in 1856; was married February 10, 1853, to Mrs. A. Chapman.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    MERRITT, HON. J. W., of Central Point, was born in Syracuse, New York, and came to Oregon in 1875, and for ten years was principal of the Jacksonville school. He then engaged in mercantile pursuits, locating at Central Point in 1889. He is prominent in many private and public enterprises. He was elected to the legislature in 1890 and 1892.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 244


HON. J. W. MERRITT.--There is probably no name more familiar to the people of Jackson County than that of J. W. Merritt. He has been a resident of the county since 1875, and during his residence in the state has figured prominently in the educational history of Jackson County. He was born in Syracuse, New York. He grew up inured to the hardships of a farm life, being a self-educated man. He attended the State Normal School at Oswego, New York, graduating in 1875, and in the same year accepted a call from the Jackson County school board and came here under contract. On his arrival at Jacksonville he at once took charge of the school and filled the position of principal for ten successive years. At the end of that time he engaged in mercantile business until 1889, when he established himself at Central Point, where he carries a well-selected stock of all kinds of merchandise except hardware. He is considered, by those in a position to know, one of the most enterprising and progressive business men in Southern Oregon. Many of the enterprises in connection with which he is duly entitled to praise must be omitted in this brief sketch from the fact that he declines to be interviewed on these and kindred subjects, as he does not seek notoriety in any form; however, it is but just to that gentleman that we should mention some of the important enterprises with which he has been connected. He is one of the stockholders and secretary of the Southern Oregon Lumber and Manufacturing Company, incorporated in 1890. The plant is operated by steam power and has a yearly output of $10,000 worth of material, while the capital stock consists of the same amount. He is one of the directors and members of the Jackson County Agricultural Association with a capital stock of $8,000. Mr. Merritt has shown his faith in the future prosperity of Central Point by making investments there in property. He has always been a Republican. He has been a member of the state legislature for two years past, and June 16, 1892, was again elected on the same ticket, clearly demonstrating his popularity in the community, as the county is largely Democratic. He is certainly a man of more than ordinary executive ability, as we are informed by his townsmen that, through his energetic efforts he succeeded in passing through the legislature a franchise in favor of the Sugar Pine, Flume and Lumber Company, over the Governor's veto. Owing to Mr. Merritt's objection to any matter which might be misconstrued into notoriety we are compelled to leave much important matter untold in this sketch, but deem it prudent and in justice to the community to at least place his name in the category to which it justly belongs.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, pages 333-334


    JOHN W. MERRITT. While a superior education is not necessarily responsible for the success of John W. Merritt, it has nevertheless aided him in arriving at conclusions which else had been reached through years of practical experience. As it is, experience and education are happily blended in his career, and have resulted in the betterment of his adopted state of Oregon. Born on a farm near Syracuse, N.Y., October 30, 1846, he comes of sterling farming ancestry long identified with the eastern state, where his father, Ebenezer, was born near the Hudson River, and where his grandfather, John, lived to the good old age of eighty years. Ebenezer Merritt, whose farm near Syracuse yielded him a comfortable living, was seventy-eight years old when he died, while his wife, formerly Eliza Hiller, lived to be eighty-five. Mrs. Merritt was born in Schoharie County, N.Y., a daughter of Richard Hiller, a Lutheran in religion, and a soldier in the War of 1812. Mrs. Merritt was the mother of nine children, three of whom were sons, and her last years were spent at the home of her daughter near Syracuse.
    The third child in his father's family, John W. Merritt was educated in the public schools of Oswego, N.Y., graduating from the normal school of Oswego in 1875. His diploma gave him lifelong permission to teach in the schools of New York state, but in August, following his graduation, he came to Oregon, and became principal of the school of Jacksonville. During his nine years' tenure of this position he maintained a high standard of discipline and mental training, and upon retiring to the mercantile business in Jacksonville in 1883, he carried with him the good wishes and regrets of those whom he had assisted to a broad and comprehensive survey of life and responsibility. After four years of fair success as a merchant in Jacksonville, Mr. Merritt removed his stock to Central Point, where he has since catered to a constantly growing business, and where he is known as one of the foremost business men of the town. He carries a stock of about $10,000, and has been so successful that he has opened a $15,000 business of the same kind in Gold Hill, placing it under the able management of Robert Moore. Nor have Mr. Merritt’s efforts been confined strictly to merchandising and teaching on the coast, for between 1893 and 1903 he was extensively engaged in sheep-raising on six thousand acres of land. His earnings have been invested principally in country lands, and he at present owns five farms, aggregating five hundred acres, upon which is raised grain, fruits, hay and general produce. He is also interested in mining to a considerable extent, being treasurer of the Pearl Mining Company, incorporated with a capital stock of $100,000.
    Politically Mr. Merritt is a believer in the principles of the Republican Party, for the best interests of which he has labored zealously and with practical results. Elected to the state legislature in 1890, he served on the committees of commerce and engrossing, and served in the same capacities after his re-election in 1892. He has been a member of the city council of Central Point for twelve years, bringing to the deliberations of that body the experience of a trained and far-seeing mind. Mr. Merritt married first, in Jacksonville, July 27, 1877, Mollie B. McCully, a native of Jackson County, Ore., and who died January 17, 1884, leaving a son, George H. The latter is attending the University of Oregon, and will graduate in the class of 1906. For a second wife Mr. Merritt married, December 10, 1891, Jennie E. Moore, who was born in Missouri, and who is the mother of Esther Louise, living at home with her parents. Mr. Merritt has discretion, large experience, and integrity of character, and as such commands the honest admiration of his intelligent and progressive townsmen.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 672-675


    H. C. MESSENGER: lives in Ashland; proprietor of saw mill; was born in Chenango County, N.Y.; came to state in 1858 and to county in 1879; married, July 5, 1882, to Bessie L. Marsh. Only child Walter J.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



MEYER, Delilia Stevens, accountant; b. Eagle Point, Oregon October 7, 1900; business college; m. Vernon L. Meyer June 1, 1927. County clerk 1925-29; Rebekah; business & professional women's club. Republican. Methodist. Address: 616 S. Ivy Street, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 150


    MICHAEL MICKELSON. Among the early pioneers of Southern Oregon the name of Michael Mickelson is prominent as that of a man who proved his worth as a citizen by giving the best part of a long and useful life to the upbuilding of a western statehood. Of an earnest and practical nature, inherited characteristics from a Norwegian ancestry, he readily found and worthily filled the position which came to be his both in the state wherein he first made his home through his father's emigration and that which he himself sought in mature years, with cheerful courage bearing the burdens that fell to his lot. He came to be known and loved for his gentle and kindly nature, and his death, October 5, 1894, at the home of Henry H. Chapman, on Emigrant Creek, Ashland precinct, removed a man who had the entire esteem and confidence of the people with whom he had so long been associated.
    Mr. Mickelson was born nine miles from Christiana, Norway, May 26, 1831, and with his father's family came to America in 1849, settling at the town of Argyle, Wis., which was then a border state. When he was but seventeen years old his father died and the burden of the family fell upon his young shoulders, the duty of caring for his mother, four sisters, one brother and an adopted sister becoming his. He faithfully fulfilled the trust, for twenty-three years caring for and supporting his mother, taking the trip back to Wisconsin to bring her to his western home, where her death occurred. In 1854 Mr. Mickelson came across the plains to Oregon and settled in Jacksonville, Jackson County, and a year later came to Ashland and established the first blacksmith shop of the place, becoming well and favorably known throughout the valley in his capacity of blacksmith as well as silversmith. He prospered in his work and five years afterward, 1860, he returned to Wisconsin and brought back with him to Ashland his mother, brother and two of his sisters. When the town was still but a village Mr. Mickelson bought thirteen acres of land near the center of the site and built upon it one of the most substantial residences of the valley. The house has since been moved to another lot--its old site being occupied by the Hotel Oregon--and apparently is as solid and substantial as when first built. In the early '70s Mr. Mickelson rented his business property in Ashland and for some years was in the mining camps of northeastern Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Nevada, though he always made Oregon his home.
    In addition to being an excellent mechanic Mr. Mickelson had the creative faculty well developed, having invented many useful articles, besides those which he had already patented, having on hand at the time of his death several in preparation for the patent office department, among which were a truck plow, the second of the kind ever used; a hay scales; a sheep counter and separator; a felloe of a carriage wheel, a miner's lock, and others too numerous to mention. During the Indian wars he was the gunsmith of the valley and so great was his ingenuity in repairing that it was said of him that if the hammer was left he could make the gun. Fraternally he was a charter member of Ashland Lodge No. 23, A.F.&A.M., Siskiyou Chapter No. 21, R.A.M., and a charter member of Jacksonville Lodge, I.O.O.F.; and both he and his wife were members of the Rebekahs.
    The marriage of Mr. Mickelson occurred in Ashland October 14, 1890, and united him with Miss Victoria Chapman, for a history of whose family refer to the sketch of Henry H. Chapman, which is found elsewhere in this work.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 588-591


MIKSCHE, RAYMOND ANTHONY
President, General Manager, Monarch Seed & Feed Co.
b. Breckenridge, Minn. Aug. 19, 1894; son of Leo John and Anna Marie (Kraker) Miksche; educated grade and high schools, Medford, Oregon, Medford Business College; m. Mazie W. Turpin of Medford Oct. 2, 1920; children Norbert, Leo David, Stephanie and Mary Ann; began as partner of father L. J. Miksche, Monarch Seed Co. 1913; general manager 1928; president and general manager 1941-; partner Ted's Feed & Seed Store, Ashland (extensive operations in milling and seed processing); contributor to trade journals; director Pacific Coast Seedmen's Association; president Tri-State Seedmen's Association (Oregon, Washington, Idaho); Elk; member Chamber of Commerce; Republican; Roman Catholic; home 813 Minnesota Ave.; office 103 N. Bartlett, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 389


Thaddeus W. Miles, 1910THADDEUS W. MILES.
    Residence, Oakdale Avenue, Medford, Oregon; office, Jackson County Bank Building, Medford, Oregon. Born near Carthage, Mo., February 11, 1874. Son of John Webster and Ruth (White) Miles. Left state of Missouri at the age of four years and moved to Stafford County, Kansas. Attended the rural schools of Kansas and the high school at St. John, Kansas. Moved to the State of Oregon in 1893. Attended the Capital Business College at Salem, Oregon; graduated from both business and shorthand courses. Principal of the business department of the State Normal School at Ashland, Oregon; taught in the Portland Business College; graduated from the Law Department of the Law School of the University of Oregon in June, 1900, with degree LL.B. Admitted to the Oregon bar in 1900; admitted to the California bar in July, 1901. Married to Jessie W. Wagner, of Ashland, Oregon, on June 25, 1902. Practiced law at Medford in conjunction with the Jackson County Abstract Company, from July, 1905, to present date. Member of the Crater Lake and Commercial Clubs, and the Modern Woodmen of America fraternity.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 187


    T. W. MILES, a member of the Jackson County bar and head of the .Jackson County Abstract Company, has his office in Medford. He has spent much of his life on the Pacific coast, and the spirit of enterprise which characterizes this section of the country is manifest in his life. He was born in Jasper County, Missouri, near Carthage, February 11, 1874, and is a son of J. W. and Ruth (White) Miles, who were natives of Ohio and Iowa respectively. The mother is still living and now makes her home with her son, T. W. Miles, but the father passed away on his ranch four miles south of Salem, Oregon, in the fall of 1902, when fifty-seven years of age. He was reared in Ohio, whence he went to Missouri and afterward became a resident of Stafford County, Kansas, in pioneer times. He spent fifteen years there,. was deputy register of deeds while living in that county and was also the first county sheriff. He was likewise employed for a time in the First National Bank of St. John, Kansas, and in May, 1892, he came to Oregon, where he engaged in fruit-growing, devoting his attention to horticultural pursuits south of Salem until his life's labors were ended. Unto him and his wife were born four sons: A. C., who is living four miles south of Salem; O. B., a practicing physician of Salem; T. W.; and Walter J., who is a pharmacist of Portland.
    T. W. Miles resided with his parents until after he had completed his education. He is a graduate of a high school of Kansas and of the Capital Business College at Salem and likewise of the law department of the University of Oregon, in which he completed a course in 1900. He devoted ten years to the profession of teaching, spending most of the time in a business college, three years being passed in the Portland Business College and five years in Bakersfield, California, in connection with the commercial department of the high school. For the past seven years he has been in Medford, where he has been engaged in the law and abstract business, organizing the Jackson County Abstract Company, of which he is sole proprietor. He also practices law and in both branches has been winning a satisfactory clientage.
    In June, 1903, Mr. Miles was married to Miss Jessie N. Wagner, a native of Jackson County and a daughter of Jacob Wagner, who was a prominent pioneer of this part of the state but has now passed away. Mr. Miles votes with the Republican Party but manifests only a citizen's interest in politics. He is a member of the Medford Commercial Club and of the Oregon and the American Associations of Title Men. Energetic and determined, he recognizes the splendid possibilities offered by the Northwest and means to use his opportunities to good advantage, as he has already done and is still doing.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, page 223


THADDEUS WHITE MILES.
    Thaddeus White Miles, member of the Jackson County bar practicing at Medford, was born in Carthage, Missouri, in 1874, a son of John Webster and Ruth (White) Miles. His father belonged to one of the pioneer families of Ohio and after living for a time in Missouri removed to Kansas in early manhood. There he prospered in business and won a reputation as a citizen of sterling worth. He took up his abode in the Sunflower State at an early period in its development and served as the first sheriff of Stafford County, Kansas. Later he became connected with the First National Bank of St. John, Kansas, and devoted a number of years to the banking business, contributing much to the substantial growth of the community in which he lived.
    Thaddeus W. Miles was educated in the graded and high schools of St. John, Kansas, and in early manhood took up the profession of teaching, which he followed for about a year, but in 1892 decided to remove to the Pacific Coast and here became an orchardist. After pursuing a commercial course in the Salem Business College at Salem, Oregon, he entered the law department of the University of Oregon and was graduated therefrom with the class of 1900. Through the succeeding five years he engaged in teaching school, but regarded this merely as an initial step to other professional activity, it being his ambition eventually to concentrate his efforts upon law practice.
    In 1905 Mr. Miles opened a law office in Medford and about the same time organized the Jackson County Abstract Company, of which he was president for a period, but the growth of his law practice forced him to give more and more of his time to his professional duties and to relinquish active work in other connections, although he remains the vice president of the abstract company. He has always prepared his cases with great thoroughness and care and has presented his cause in a forceful, logical and conclusive manner. His assertions are seldom, if ever, seriously questioned in court, and he has won many notable verdicts favorable to the interests of his clients.
    Mr. Miles married Miss Jessie M. Wagner, a daughter of Jacob Wagner, one of the earliest of the pioneers of the Rogue River Valley. Her father established the first flour mill in the valley and was among the most progressive of its early settlers. Mount Wagner, the famous snowclad peak that overlooks the valley, was named in his honor.
    In public interest Mr. Miles has manifested deep concern and has given his hearty cooperation to many well-devised plans for the public good. He is a member of the Medford city council and also chairman of the public library board. His wife takes an active interest in social affairs and in the club work of the city, and both Mr. and Mrs. Miles occupy an enviable position in the regard of their fellow townsmen. He is an Elk and is chairman of its board of trustees. All other interests in his life, however, are made subservient to his duties and obligations as a representative of the bar, and he is now a member of the Southern Oregon Bar Association, which he is serving as secretary.
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, 1922, volume II, pages 737-738


MILES, THADDEUS WHITE
    Lawyer
b. Carthage, Mo., 1874; educ., grade and high schools, Saint John, Kan., business course Salem (Ore.); Univ. of Ore., Eugene, law, LL.B. 1900. Married Jessie M. Wagner. Teaching, one yr.; orchardist on the Pacific Coast, 1892; teacher, 1900-07. Law practice at Medford, Ore., since 1905. An organizer 1905, Jackson County Abstract Co., former pres.; officer and vice-pres. many years. Former member Medford City Council; Chrmn. public library bd. mem., Southern Ore. Bar Assn. Elk (chrmn. bd. trustees). Home: 203 N. Oakdale St. Office: Jackson County Bank Bldg., Medford, Ore.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 385


B. F. MILLER, one of the most prominent pioneers of the Rogue River Valley, has been prominently identified with horticultural pursuits since 1857. He established what is known as the Sardine Creek Nursery, near Gold Hill, over seventeen years ago. Many of the largest and best orchards of the valley were started with trees from this nursery. Mr. Miller has since started another similar business, in company with his son, he having sold out his other nursery in 1890. He and his son have a very fine nursery at Central Point, where he will soon take up his residence.
    Of late Mr. Miller has been buying and selling real estate. He is also interested in placer mining in the county. In 1882 he organized the Fruit Growers' Association of Southern Oregon, and has served as its president for four successive years, and each year since has been elected to accompany and take charge of the exhibit sent by the association to the North Pacific Industrial Exhibition, held at Portland.
    Mr. Miller was born near the city of Cincinnati, Ohio, July 31, 1832, where he was reared and educated. His parents are Tobias and Lydia A. (Edwards) Miller; the former being a native of Ohio, the latter of New Jersey. They are both living and reside in Jackson County. The fathers of both Tobias and Lydia Miller were patriot soldiers and participated in the Revolutionary struggles and the War of 1812. Mr. Miller springs from an exceedingly long-lived family. His father is now past eighty-four years of age, while his mother is seventy-seven years of age, and they are both enjoying the best of health. Our subject is the second of eleven children.
    He crossed the plains by ox team to Jackson County, Oregon, in 1854, and for a few years actively engaged in mining pursuits, but later turned his attention to horticultural pursuits, in which he has since been engaged. His present nursery being located at Central Point, as above mentioned, consists of eight acres, cultivated to growing all kinds and qualities of fruit trees and berry bushes.
    He was married in Polk County, May 14, 1857, to Margaret J. Sutton, native of Illinois, daughter of Captain John Sutton, of Morgan County, Illinois, who first came to Oregon in 1851, and returned in 1852 for his family. They have three living children and three deceased; those living are: Mary E., now the wife of D. W. Dean, ex-Sheriff of Jackson County. Mrs. Dean was the first white child born north of the Rogue River in Jackson County. John T., and Maggie A. are still residing at home. The deceased members of the family were: James T., who died in 1864; Frank E. in 1868, and Curtis B. died November 17, 1889.
    Mr. Miller is a staunch Republican and is the candidate for county assessor at this time of his party. He is a pleasant and intelligent gentleman and is well worthy to fill any office that may be conferred upon him. He is a member of I.O.O.F. and also the Encampment degree of this order. He had been a member of the society for nearly forty years.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, pages 409-410


    BENJAMIN F. MILLER: lives near Rock Point; is a horticulturist; was born in  Hamilton County, Ohio, July 31, 1832; came to Oregon in 1854; married May 14, 1857, to Martha J. Sutton. Children Mary E., Benjamin C., John T. and Maggie A.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    DAVID H. MILLER: lives at Medford; is a merchant; was born in Jefferson County, Iowa, May 10, 1859; came to county in 1875; was married July 2, 1871, to Elmira Brons.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


D. H. MILLER
Can Give Bonds in Almost Any Sum.
    D. H. Miller, Democratic nominee for county treasurer, is the pioneer merchant of Medford. Not alone as a business man is he thoroughly fitted for the position, but by nature and character as well. Those who know him are aware that every promise he makes will be carried out to the letter. He did not seek the position. It went hunting for him because the convention realized that only the very best men could hope to be successful. There is scarcely any doubt about the result. Mr. Miller was born in the state of Iowa, May 10, 1850. He migrated to Oregon in the year 1875, and moved to Jackson County September 21, 1875, and has been a resident of the county ever since. He moved from Jacksonville to Medford November 28, 1883. The people will make no mistake in electing him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 4


D. H. Miller 1904Chapman    DAVID HENRY MILLER. The association of David Henry Miller with Medford began November 28, 1883, at which time there were few indications upon which to base the town's present industrial and commercial supremacy, and he claims the distinction of being the first white man to take up his residence within the town. In 1886 he assisted in the incorporation of Medford, and since then has lent the aid of an enterprising spirit and capable mind to its development. Especially has he promoted clean municipal government, and as a Democrat has filled many of the important offices of the town. He served as postmaster under Cleveland's administration for five years, has been a member of the city council three terms, has acceptably served as a member of the county and state central committees, and in June 1902 was elected to his present responsibility as treasurer of Jackson County. The cause of education has found in Mr. Miller a staunch and untiring advocate, and since helping to erect the first school house here, he has sought to bring the standard of instruction up to that of older and more settled communities. No name in the town better represents the earnest and forceful spirit of the western slope, the striving after all that is strong, satisfying and substantial.
    In Jefferson County, Iowa, where he was born May 10, 1850, the name of Miller was identified with a large farming enterprise conducted by his father, Henry A. Miller, a native of Pennsylvania. The elder Miller left Pennsylvania at an early day, and after journeying overland to Indiana, erected the first cabin upon the site of Logansport. He afterward lived in Illinois for several years, and upon removing to Jefferson County, Iowa, located on a farm twelve miles north of Fairfield. The year 1875 witnessed the departure of himself and family for Oregon, where he settled in Jacksonville, and made that town his home until his death in July 1881, at the age of seventy-five years. His wife, formerly Nancy A. Sears, of Ohio, lived to be seventy-four years old. The parents reared a family of three sons and four daughters, of whom David Henry is the third youngest. 
    After his marriage in 1871, to Elmira Brous, David Henry Miller settled on a farm in Marion County, Iowa, remaining there until coming to Oregon in 1875. His wife is a native daughter of Marion County, Iowa, her father, James M. Brous, having been born in Pennsylvania. Mr. Brous removed from his native state to Ohio, and from there to Iowa, eventually coming to Oregon, where he made his home with his son-in-law until his death in January 1896, at the age of eighty years. Upon coming to Oregon Mr. Miller located in Dallas, Polk County, for a few months, and in 1876 engaged in farming near Jacksonville, Jackson County, owning one hundred and sixty acres of land. Coming to Medford in 1883, he started a drug business the following year, and later increased his stock by a complete hardware supply. In this he was seconded by a partner, Dr. Vrooman, of Jacksonville, the latter of whom managed the drug department, Mr. Miller taking charge of the hardware. The partners finally established a large and paying business, and after the death of Dr. Vrooman the drug department came under the management of Mr. Strang. This was the first business of the kind in Medford, and its success stimulated trade, and in time inspired the zest of competition. May 11, 1891, the partners divided the business, Mr. Miller still retaining the hardware department, which he has since increased, from both the standpoint of quantity and the variety of goods represented. He carries a complete line of stoves, ranges, paints, guns and ammunition, tinware and plumbing outfits, his stock being valued at about $6,000.  Mr. Miller is one of the promoters of the Medford Business College, incorporated in July 1903, and is a member of its board of directors. He is fraternally connected with Medford Blue Lodge No. 103, A.F.&A.M., and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co. 1904, page 591



    HON. D. H. MILLER. Gold Hill is fortunate in having among its citizens so eminent and valuable a man as Hon. D. H. Miller, a successful hardware merchant and an owner of city property. He is a man with a notable political record and is extremely active in matters which concern the public good. He was born in Jefferson County, Iowa, May 10, 1850, the son of Henry A. and Nancy Miller. In 1840 the parents took up their abode in Jefferson County upon a donation claim, where they resided until 1866, when they removed to Marion County, Iowa. In 1875 they came to Jackson County, Oregon, where the remainder of their lives were spent. In their family were ten children, of whom only three survive.
    D. H. Miller attended the common and high schools and remained at home until he attained his majority. He then embarked in agricultural pursuits, choosing Marion County, Iowa, for his field of operations. He farmed there until 1875, when, becoming convinced that the West offered advantages superior to those of the Hawkeye State, he emigrated to Oregon and engaged in farming for seven years. In 1883 he removed to Medford and entered the mercantile business, in which he continued for twenty-one years. He then disposed of his interests in Medford and settled in Gold Hill, where he engaged in the hardware business. In this line of trade he is meeting with much success, and in addition to the business which he owns and operates he is the possessor of several pieces of real estate in Medford and Portland.
    In 1871 Mr. Miller was married to Miss Elmira Brous, a native of Marion County, Iowa, and a daughter of James M. and Mary Brous, the former a native of Pennsylvania and the latter of Ohio. In 1842 the parents removed to Iowa, where the mother passed away. The father later emigrated to Jackson County, Oregon, and resided there until the time of his death.
    In his political views Mr. Miller has always been a member of the Democratic Party and has risen high in its councils. In 1909 he was elected to the state legislature, serving for two years. He also served for two terms as county treasurer and was for five years postmaster of Medford, having been appointed by President Cleveland. He is a member of the Masonic fraternity of Medford and also belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows of that city, while his wife is a member of the Order of the Eastern Star. Both Mr. and Mrs. Miller are active and consistent members of the Christian Church and to the extent of their ability labor to make that denomination effective in the community. The Hon. D. H. Miller stands very high in business, fraternal, political and social circles of Gold Hill, where he has long since been recognized as one of the leading citizens of the town. Having been extensively engaged in politics, he has a statewide political acquaintance, many of his closest friends being prominent and honored state political figures. In his immediate community and county he is widely and favorably known and as he is active in his efforts to build up and promote the various interests of Gold Hill, he is regarded as one of its most prominent men.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, page 360


    COL. J. N. T. MILLER: lives in Jacksonville; is a farmer and stock grower; born in Kentucky, 1826; came to state in 1845 and to county in 1854; married August, 1852 to Bessie H. Aubury.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



    JOHN MILLER: lives in Jacksonville; is gunsmith and hardware merchant; born in Barbaren, Germany; came to state and county in 1860; married March, 1854, to Mary Shmutz. Children Melia, Sarah M., Philip, Katie, John, Mollie and Henry.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



GENERAL JOHN F. MILLER.
    Prominent among the Democratic politicians of this state, and one who has served his party with earnestness and fidelity, is Gen. John F. Miller, of Salem. He has been intimately associated with the party successes of the past and is today an honored representative of its silent minority. His personal appearance is such as would attract the attention of any one in a crowd, being tall and commanding, with full face, free from whiskers, and a clear, penetrating eye. He was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, near the birthplace of the immortal Lincoln, and received the advantages only of a common school education. He was raised on a farm, and in 1841 moved with his parents to Howard County, Missouri, where he resided until the breaking out of the Mexican war of 1846, when he enlisted as a private in the "Chihuahua Rangers," under Capt. Tom Hudson, which company was attached to Col. A. W. Doniphan's regiment. He participated in the battles of Sacramento and Brazito, and received an honorable discharge at New Orleans in June, 1848. Returning to Missouri, he was, on the 25th day of March, 1849, married to Miss Zerelda Jackson, daughter of Gov. Hancock Jackson, of that state. He came to Oregon "the plains across" in 1851 and settled in Jackson County, where he took up a donation claim. Was elected Captain of Company A, First Regiment of Volunteers, under Gen. Joseph Lane. After several sharp skirmishes with the Indians at Evans Creek and elsewhere, his company was ordered back on the plains to protect immigrants, making their headquarters on Lost River, among the afterwards famous Modoc tribe of Indians. He represented Jackson County in the lower House in 1853 and 1854 and was afterwards appointed Indian Agent at Grande Ronde under President Pierce, and was reappointed by President Buchanan. Moved to Salem in 1862, and, with other capitalists, interested himself in the organization and erection of the Willamette Woolen Mills, being president of the company for two years, and closely identified with its interests for some fifteen years. He received the nomination for Governor at the hands of the Democratic State Convention in 1862, and made a stirring canvass of the state, but was defeated by the Republican, Hon. A. C. Gibbs. In the Legislature of 1866 he received his full party vote for the honorable position of United States Senator, his successful competitor being Hon. Geo. H. Williams. Was also vice president of Willamette Falls and Lock Company at Oregon City, and was actively interested in its construction and completion. Was appointed by the Legislature in one of the commissioners to select the 90,000-acre grant of agricultural college lands, which were by them located in Southern Oregon. Was by Governor Grover appointed one of the Capitol Building Commissioners and was elected chairman of the board. It was under their supervision that by far the greater portion of the work on this building was performed, and its general character is commended by all who have given it a careful examination. During the last few years Gen. Miller has been actively engaged in the stock business, with his headquarters on the range in Lake County, his family meanwhile living on his farm near Salem. He has five children, all daughters, two of whom are married and have families of their own.
Frank E. Hodgkin and J. J. Galvin, Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon, 1882, pages 70-71


CAPTAIN JOHN F. MILLER.
    SALEM, Jan. 24.--Captain John F. Miller has fought Indians, served in the territorial legislature of Oregon, run for Governor on the Democratic ticket, and at the age of 73 weighs upwards of 200 pounds. Captain Miller was born in Hardin County, Kentucky, April 30, 1825, but came to Oregon in 1851, and took up a donation land claim in Jackson County. In 1853 he was elected to represent Jackson County in the territorial legislature. His arrival in Oregon was in good time for the Rogue River Indian War. He took active part in subduing the hostile Indians, and, the war ended, did much toward their pacification. With the character of Chiefs Sam, Jo and Jim, of the Rogues, and Limpy and John, of the Applegates, Captain Miller was familiar. His memory probably covers more incidents of the Rogue River Indian War and of Southern Oregon Indians generally than is held in memory by anyone now living.
    It was John F. Miller who was made captain of the first company of volunteers raised in the Rogue River Valley after the Indian outbreak. It was he who led a company into the vicinity of Humboldt River to protect immigrants from the Modocs. It was he who served as lieutenant when the Umpquas and Calapooias threatened war, and it was he who took part in the campaign against the Modocs. After the memorable battle with the Rogue River Indians, on Evans Creek [in 1853], Captain Miller, together with General Joseph Lane, Colonel Ross, interpreter Metcalfe and other volunteer captains, held a preliminary council with the Indians inside the enemy's lines. The meeting place was on a butte near Evans Creek. The whites were supposed to deposit their arms with a detachment of Indians. Captain Miller, suspicious of Indian treachery, crossed the line with a revolver secreted beneath his coat. At the council lodge [at Table Rock] the whites were assigned places, and the Indian chiefs were surrounded by their armed warriors. During the progress of the council Chief Limpy, less inclined to peace than the rest, delivered an impassioned appeal to his people against the whites. The effect on the Indians was perceptible, and, knowing Captain Miller was armed, one of his companions whispered to him, "Keep your eye on that d--n scoundrel!" General Lane had, however, taken the precaution to secure a son of Chief Jo as hostage, and the party came safely out of a trap similar to the one into which General Canby and his men were led and butchered by the Modocs 20 years later.
    A living picture in Captain Miller's mind is of a scene witnessed on his way to the council lodge. As he crossed the battlefield Indian women were engaged in burning the slain. Captain Miller's attention
was attracted by the writhing of Indian bodies on brush heaps. This he took to be Indians undergoing cremation alive. It was found upon closer investigation, however, that the contortions were due to the heat, and that only dead Indians were being burned.
    At the conclusion of the [1855-56] war the Indians were removed to Grand Ronde Reservation, in Yamhill county. The volunteers, with the exception of Captain Miller's company, were disbanded. There was a report that a party of 25 immigrants had been murdered on the east side of Tule Lake, and that Indians were committing depredations in the Humboldt country. Captain Miller, with his company, hurried into that action. Arrived at Tule Lake, smoke was observed rising out of the tules. Constructing boats of their wagon beds, Miller's men rowed out in the lake, and discovered a fleet of canoes, on which Indians were living in hiding. The squaws and papooses had on blood-stained garments taken from the whites. One party escorted through the country of the hostile Indians, while on this expedition, was that of Rev. T. F. Royal. The night following the meeting of the soldiers and the Royal train a boy was born to the wife of Rev. Mr. Royal. In honor of the captain of the volunteers the boy was named Miller. He grew to manhood, and, having been graduated from the public schools, was given money and wished success by Captain Miller. At the last Democratic convention held in Pendleton Captain Miller was called on by his namesake, who had become a college professor, and was returned the money. Only a few days ago Captain Miller had a pleasure of meeting Rev. Mr. Royal, and recalling the circumstances of their acquaintance in pioneer times.
    In 1856 President Pierce appointed Captain Miller Indian agent for the Grand Ronde Reservation, bringing him into association with the Rogue River Indians with whom he had fought and treated. He held this position six years, resigning when President Lincoln was elected. The winter Captain Miller took charge of the agency was very rainy. Sickness prevailed, and many Indians died. Chiefs Sam, Jo, John, Limpy and George went before him and implored him to allow their people to return to their native haunts. "I shall never forget John's remarks on that occasion," said Captain Miller. "The eloquence of earnestness marked every word of the appeal. 'It is not your wars, but your peace, that kills off my people,' John said." Agent Miller could only answer that he had no authority to grant the request. A plot for an uprising was afterward formed among the Indians. Mary, a daughter of Chief Sam, who never liked the Applegate tribe, told the agent of the Indians' intentions. John and his son Adam were arrested and deported to Merced, Cal. When the steamer on which they were carried reached the mouth of the Rogue River [it was at Humboldt Bay], looking over the forests of their old home, they made an attempt to take the ship and escape. A sailor put a stop to the effort by shooting Adam in the leg. John and his son were afterward returned to the Grand Ronde Reservation, Adam being short one leg, as the effect of the gunshot wound received at the hands of the sailor.
    Captain Miller is informed that all the Indian chiefs and most of their wives, brought up from Rogue River, are dead. The wife of Sam, now old and decrepit, visited him last fall. Upon meeting Captain Miller the old woman wept like a child. All of the old men, she said, and all of the old women but herself, who were transferred from Rogue River Valley were dead.
    After resigning as Indian agent, Captain Miller, in 1862, was given the Democratic nomination for Governor, and canvassed the state against Addison C. Gibbs. He was defeated. His attention since has been chiefly given to farming and looking after other property interests. He has a ranch of 11,000 acres in Klamath County. He spent 15 years on this ranch raising and selling stock. His health became impaired a year ago, and he returned to his Salem home, where he is now living. It is his intention to return to his ranch next spring in a buckboard, passing on his way over the battlefields of his earlier days.
Oregonian, Portland, January 25, 1899, page 10


    JOHN FRANKLIN MILLER. The wide-awake, enterprising and progressive merchants of Jacksonville have no better representative than John Franklin Miller, who is ably managing the hardware business established here by his father, the late John Miller, forty years ago. He is a young man of good executive and business ability, straightforward and honest in all his dealings, and in addition to his mercantile interests he is now serving as postmaster. He is a native-born citizen, his birth having occurred in Jacksonville, April 5, 1870.
    Born in Bavaria, Germany, May 31, 1830, John Miller lived in his native country until twenty years old, acquiring a practical common school education, and learning the gunsmith's trade. Emigrating to the United States in 1850, he located first in New Jersey, where he worked at his trade a few years. Subsequently removing to Burlington, Iowa, he was there employed as a gunsmith until 1860. In that year he came across the plains to Oregon, making the journey with ox teams, and settled in Jacksonville. Establishing himself in business as a dealer in hardware in 1862, he was successfully engaged in this branch of his industry until his death, in 1893. A man of good business energy and acumen, he made judicious investments and acquired considerable property, becoming sole owner of the Farmers Flat, or Miller, mining claim, located four miles southwest of Jacksonville, and realized a good income therefrom. This property was sold to a Portland company in 1894, but on account of nonpayment it has again come into the possession of Mr. Miller's heirs, who are managing it with satisfactory results. John Miller was a staunch adherent of the Republican Party, and was a member of the order of Ancient Free and Accepted Masons; of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows; and of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. In 1855, in New Jersey, he married Mary Smith, who was born in Baden, Germany, August 25, 1835, and at the age of eighteen years came with her brother Harry to the United States, locating in New Jersey. Her father, John Smith, a farmer by occupation, was a lifelong resident of Germany. Of the union of John and Mary (Smith) Miller, eight children were born, namely: Amelia, wife of Dr. J. A. Callander, of Los Gatos, Cal.; Philip, deceased; Matilda, wife of Dr. J. W. Robinson, of Jacksonville; Philip (the second child bearing that name), deceased; Catherine, who married Edward Scott, and is now deceased; John F., the subject of this sketch; Mollie, wife of K. K. Kubli, of Portland; and Harry, a druggist, in San Jose, Cal.
    On the death of his father, in 1893, John Franklin Miller succeeded to the hardware business established in 1862, and has since carried it on with undoubted success. In 1897 he was appointed postmaster, and is now serving his second term, having been reappointed in 1901. He has a very neat and attractive office, it being one of the best kept in the Northwest. Mr. Miller is also interested in agricultural pursuits, having a stock ranch of two hundred and forty acres, on which he keeps about fifty head of cattle. He has also city property, comprising a business block in Jacksonville.
    April 15, 1903, Mr. Miller married Mabel T. Prim, who was born in Jacksonville, a daughter of Charles Prim, of whom a brief sketch will be found on another page of this volume. An earnest Republican in politics, Mr. Miller uniformly sustains the principles of that party by voice and vote. He is actively interested in the welfare of the city, and has served two terms as city councilman. He is identified with the Masonic fraternity, being a member of Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M., and of Oregon Chapter No. 4, R.A.M. He also belongs to P. P. Prim Cabin, Native Sons of Oregon.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 900-901


    JOHN S. MILLER: lives on Applegate Creek; is a farmer; born in Clay County, Mo., in 1824; came to state in 1846 and to county in 1852; was married May 27, 1852, to L. Margaret Griffin. Children Josephine, Nancy, Richard (deceased), Louisa, John, Anistasia, Burrell, Lydia (deceased) and Walter. Mr. Miller was in the Cayuse War.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



ROBERT A. MILLER.
    Residence, 670 Johnson Street; office, 333 Worcester Building, Portland. Born near Eugene, Oregon. Son of James Naper Tandy and Elizabeth Ann (Aubrey) Miller. Married to Sarelia W. Grubbe, September 11, 1893. Attended Jacksonville public schools, and from 1874 to 1875 the University of Pacific, at San Jose, California. Graduated from Willamette University, Salem, Oregon. Received diploma from New York Chautauqua August 15, 1900. Admitted to Oregon State Bar at Salem, Oregon, March 7, 1887; to Supreme Court of United States, May 10, 1893; to United States District Court of Oregon, and United States Circuit Court of Oregon, November 23, 1904. Admitted to all bureaus of Interior Department, at Washington, D.C., December 15, 1897. Aide-de-camp to  Governor Pennoyer six years, as lieutenant colonel. Representative from Jackson County in legislatures of 1887-89. Candidate for Congress in 1890, and for Presidential elector in 1892. Register United States Land Office, Oregon City, Oregon, 1893-97. Mason. Democrat.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 188


    MILLER, ROBERT A.--Attorney at Law, 333 Worcester Bldg., Portland, Ore. Born Lane County, Ore., October 22, 1854; son of James Napper Tandy and Elizabeth Ann Ambrey Miller. Educated Jacksonville public school. Willamette University. Admitted to Oregon State Bar 1887; Supreme Court of United States, 1893; United States Circuit Court of Oregon, 1904. For some time Register United States Land Office, Oregon City. Representative of Jackson County to Oregon Legislature, 1887-1889; Aide-de-Camp to Governor Pennoyer for six years. Admitted to all bureaus of Department of Interior, Washington, D.C., 1897. Club: Commercial. Societies: A.F.&A.M. (32nd degree), Scottish Rite, National Geographical Society. Address: 670 Johnson Street, Portland. Ore.

Who's Who in the Northwest,
vol. 1, Western Press Association 1911


    WILLIAM M. MILLER: lives on Applegate Creek; is a farmer; post office, Applegate; was born in Galway County, Mo. in 1829; came to state in 1852, and to [Josephine] County in 1855; was married January 15, 1854, to Mary A. Miller (deceased July 29, 1880). Children Corilda, Frederick, John, Lewis, Francis, Sarah, Viretta, Arininta, Nancy, Mollie and William E.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 509


    BENNETT MILLION: lives at Ashland; is a farmer; was born in Adair County, Ky., February 12, 1812; came to state and county in 1854; was married March 24, 1841, to Miss Armilda Beam. Children Eliza E., John B., Sarah A., Laura J., Martha, Kizzie A., Phebe A., Jackson M., Caetha E., William B., Joseph T. and Charles C., all living in the same vicinity.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    WILLIAM B. MILLION is no stranger to most of our readers, for his whole life has been spent in Jackson County, Ore., he having been born March 3, 1861, on the old Million donation claim, in the vicinity of Ashland, a son of Bennett and Armilda (Beam) Million, and a grandson of Benjamin Million, an early settler of Wisconsin, where his death occurred. Bennett Million, the father, who was born in the year 1812 in Kentucky, was among the early settlers of Mineral Point, Wis., where he engaged in lead mining. During the Black Hawk War, he served with distinction. After entering a homestead claim in Wisconsin, he followed farming, clearing and improving his farm until the gold fever of 1849 struck the country. That year he crossed the great plains and followed mining in California until 1852, when he returned to Wisconsin by way of the Isthmus of Panama and up the Mississippi River. Upon reaching his home he sold his farm and prepared to transfer his belongings across the plains. In company with his wife and six children he started on his long and tedious journey with a large outfit drawn by ox teams. His intention was to return to California, but on the way he was persuaded to turn his steps toward Oregon instead, and in the fall of 1854 arrived in Jackson County. At once he took up donation claims of three hundred and twenty acres on the present site of Ashland, and by improving his farm little by little he was soon enabled to engage in both the grain and cattle business. He laid out a part of his land into city lots and by this means accumulated money rapidly. A tract of one hundred and forty-three acres of the original land is still in the possession of the family and is operated by two of Mr. Million's sons as a dairy farm. For the past twenty years the father has lived retired. He is very infirm and feeble, having passed his ninety-first birthday.
    Mr. Million was a member of the party that discovered the two dead Indians in 1856, in what is now known as the Dead Indian Country. In his younger days he was a man of great prominence, whose influence was felt throughout his section, and he took an active interest in the Rogue River War. In politics he is a Democrat, and has served as justice of the peace. Prior to removing to Oregon, he was twice elected sheriff in Wisconsin, and also served as tax collector for three terms. He was united in marriage with Armilda Beam, who was born in Indiana, a daughter of John Beam, a pioneer settler and farmer in Wisconsin, who accompanied the Millions to Oregon and died many years ago. Mrs. Armilda Million is still living, and she and her husband reared twelve children, all of whom are still living, the greater part of them residing in Ashland. They are as follows: John B., a carpenter; Eliza Ellen, now Mrs. Gedding; Sarah, Mrs. Kentnor; Laura J., Mrs. Woodson; Martha, Mrs. Morgan; Kizzie; Alice, Mrs. Baldon, of Klamath Falls; Jackson H., who resides in Humboldt County, Cal.; Esther, Mrs. Lytleton, of Siskiyou County, Cal.; William B.; Joseph T.; and Charles. The latter is a partner with William B. in conducting the dairy ranch.
    William B. Million grew to manhood in Jackson County, and his training in the public school of Ashland was supplemented by a scientific course in the Ashland Academy. On account of his father's advanced years he took charge of the farm when seventeen years old, and his untiring efforts have been invariably crowned with success. The brothers are profitably engaged in raising hay, having one hundred acres of irrigated land, which is devoted solely to raising alfalfa. They cut three crops per year, and raise from three to four tons to the acre. In addition, the brothers have twenty head of high-grade cattle and do quite an extensive dairy business, selling both milk and butter to the nearby market of Ashland.
    Mr. Million was joined in marriage with Cora Handgen, an Ohioan by birth. Mrs. Million came to Oregon ten years ago, and they have one child, Mildred E. They worship at the Presbyterian Church, of which Mrs. Million is a member. In his political convictions Mr. Million is a staunch Republican, and although not an office seeker, he has served as councilman of the first ward. Fraternally he is allied with the Knights of the Maccabees and Knights of Pythias, being ex-representative and past chancellor of the latter. Mr. Million is today an example of what an honorable and upright man should be, and he has seen the land chosen by his father develop and grow in value.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 967-968


Conrad Mingus, 1912 Centennial History    CONRAD MINGUS. From 1868 to the time of his death, which occurred on the 25th of May, 1900, Conrad Mingus was a resident of Oregon. He had already had several years of experience as a western man, having previous to that period been a resident of California. He was imbued with that spirit of enterprise which is characteristic of this section of the country and he contributed in no small measure to the work of general progress and improvement, while his efforts as an agriculturist resulted in the conversion of an old donation claim into richly cultivated fields. He was born in North Carolina, on the 6th of May, 1822, and was a son of Jacob Mingus. who died in that state. Conrad Mingus spent his youth under the parental roof and when about twenty years of age started out in life on his own account. Leaving North Carolina, he went to Missouri where he lived for several years, and then removed to Kansas. He was a brick mason by trade, following that occupation in the two states, but in 1849 he joined the long procession that was slowly wending its way over the plains to the gold fields of California, and for some time thereafter he worked in the mines. He then turned his attention to teaming and freighting and still later engaged in farming in Solano County.
    While residing in California, in 1862, Mr. Mingus was united in marriage to Miss Lavina Dollarhide, a daughter of Jesse Dollarhide, who crossed the plains from Iowa to California in 1861. The couple began their domestic life in that state but in 1868 removed northward to Oregon, settling in the Rogue River Valley in Jackson County, two and a half miles north of Medford. The place was an old donation claim known as Heber Grove, having been entered by Mr. Heber. Mr. Mingus resided on this farm until 1888 and during that period a notable change occurred in its appearance. Wild land was converted into rich fields that annually yielded golden harvests; fences were built; modern machinery introduced; and the progressive methods of the present age were followed. The years brought Mr. Mingus success as the result of his sound judgment and well-directed efforts, and in 1888 he retired with a handsome competence saved from his earnings. Taking up his abode in Ashland, his remaining days were there passed and he ever enjoyed the respect and good will of those among whom he lived.
    As the years passed by, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Mingus was blessed with a family of four children, namely; Francis M., residing at Grangeville, Idaho; Dr. Everett Mingus. a physician and surgeon of Marshfield, Oregon; Clara, who married W. A. Aitkin, of Medford, Oregon; and Daisy, the wife of Fred Robley, of Clackamas County, this state. Since the death of her husband Mrs. Mingus has continued to make her home in Ashland, where she has many warm friends. She belongs to Alpha Chapter, No. 1. of the Order of the Eastern Star. Mr. Mingus was a valued and representative member of the Masonic fraternity, belonging to Jacksonville Lodge. He was always loyal to its teachings concerning mutual helpfulness and brotherly kindliness, being ever ready to extend the hand of assistance to one in need. His political allegiance was given to the Democratic Party and he kept well informed on questions of the day but did not seek nor desire office. He had traveled life's journey for seventy-eight years when called to the home beyond, and the record he made through that entire period was one which commanded the confidence and high regard of all who knew him. There were no exciting chapters in his life record and no spectacular phases but he always did his duty faithfully, performing any task that devolved upon him in a public or private relation and it is such citizens who constitute the real strength of a community.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, page 768


    J. W. MITCHELL is a representative of industrial activity at Medford where he is engaged in wagon-making and in dealing in wagon-maker's supplies. He is also well known in the town as a public-spirited citizen and is now serving as a member of the city council. He was born at Fort Jones, Siskiyou County. California, February 22, 1867, his parents being James and Minerva (Quigley) Mitchell, who were natives of Indiana. The father learned the harnessmaker's trade in St. Louis. Missouri, and after his marriage he crossed the plains at an early day, locating in Siskiyou County, California, where he conducted a harness-making business at Fort Jones to the time of his death.
    J. W. Mitchell was but ten years of age at the time of his father's demise and a lad of twelve years when his mother was called from this life. In their family were nine children, six who reached adult age and are still living. J. W. Mitchell was the youngest son and with one exception the youngest child. He remained at the place of his nativity until he had attained his majority, when he went upon the stock ranches of eastern Oregon, spending four years as a cowboy. He then returned to Montague, California, where he began learning the blacksmith's trade, after which he continued in that business together with farming, taking up government land there. In 1901 he came to Medford and established his present business in connection with E. C. Boeck, under the firm style of Mitchell & Boeck. The relation was continued for about ten years, or until October, 1911, when Mr. Mitchell purchased his partner's interest and now conducts an independent business under his own name as a wagon maker and dealer in wagon-maker's supplies. He has built up a good business in this connection and he also does automobile repairing and rubber-tire works, employing four men. The business was started in a small way on Main Street, the partners doing all of their own work and their blacksmithing at that time. As the years have passed, however, the factory has constantly increased and the business has assumed large and profitable proportions. In 1902 Mr. Mitchell in connection with Mr. E. C. Boeck purchased eighty acres of land five miles northeast of Medford and began the cultivation of an apple and pear orchard. In this and other ways Mr. Mitchell has won success as the result of his well-directed labors.
    On Christmas Day of 1890 was celebrated the marriage of Mr. Mitchell and Miss Phoebe A. Woodson, who was born in Ashland. Oregon, in 1870, and is a daughter of James and Laura (Million) Woodson. The Million donation land claim is now a part of the site of the city of Ashland. Mr. Woodson also crossed the plains at an early day and became identified with the pioneer development of that community. Unto Mr. and Mrs. Mitchell have been born two children, Grace Elizabeth and Marvin James, aged respectively eighteen and twelve years.
    Mr. Mitchell is well known in Odd Fellows circles, holding membership in the lodge and encampment. Politically he is a Democrat and is now serving for a third term as a member of the city council, in which connection he exercises his official prerogatives in support of many progressive public movements. He favors the town's advancement along modern lines and his reelection to office indicates the confidence and trust reposed in him by his fellow townsmen.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, page 229


MOFFAT, JOHN PAUL
Dept. Store Executive; Civic Leader.Vice-
b. Dubuque, Iowa May 12, 1895; son of Robert P. and Elizabeth (Mann) Moffat; educated grade and high schools Dubuque, Iowa; Oregon State College; extension courses; Sigma Nu; m. Mary A. Holmes of Medford, Oregon Feb. 13, 1921; children John P. Jr., William R.; began as clerk, various positions, Mann's Dept. Store, Medford, Oregon 1914, manager since 1938; past president Medford Retail Merchants Association; member school board 1939-; member National Retail Dry Goods Association; member State Advisor Board, Oregon Merchants Association; chairman United War Chest 1941-43; served as director Community Chest and Red Cross; member price panel and O.P.A.; Elk; Rotarian; member Chamber of Commerce (director), Valley Golf Club; University Club; Jackson County Apprenticeship Council; Republican; Episcopalian (vestryman); home 34 North Berkeley Way; office 14-22 N. Central Ave., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 397


MOFFAT, JOHN PAUL
    Dept. Store Exec.; Civic Leader
b Dubuque, Ia, May 12, 1895; son of Robt P and Elizabeth (Mann) M; educ, Oreg St Coll; extension courses; Sigma Nu; m Mary A Holmes of Medford, Or, Feb 13, 1921; ch, John P Jr, Wm R; began as clerk, Mann's Dept Store, Medford, 1914, gen mgr, since 1938; past pres, Medford Retail Merchants Assn; mem, sch since 1939; chmn, United War Chest, 1941-43; served as dir, Community Chest, Red Cross; mem, price panel, OPA; Elk; Rotarian; mem, Nat Retail Dry Gds Assn, Chamber Commerce (dir), Valley Golf Club, Univ Club, Jackson Co Apprenticeship Council; Repub; Episc (vestryman); home, 34 N Berkeley Wy; ofc, 14 N Central, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 532


MOHR, EMIL HENRY
Vice-President and Manager, Medford Hotel Company.
b. Medford, Oregon, January 19, 1913; son of Emil and Hedwig (Boettger) Mohr; educated University of Oregon; m. Berte Allen Crane of Medford, Oregon November 20, 1934; began as dishwasher and busboy, Crater Lake Lodge, Oregon; engineer, Hotel Medford 1934; steward and food buyer 1935; desk clerk 1936-37; manager since 1937; vice-president and manager since Nov. 1937; served U.S. Navy, World War II; director Jackson County Chamber of Commerce 1940 to date; president Southern Oregon Hotel Association 1939; vice-president Oregon State Hotel Association 1939; Republican; Presbyterian; address Hotel Medford, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 397


    LORENZO D. MONTGOMERY: lives in Ashland; was born in Hancock County, Ind., August 18, 1823; came to California in 1849, to state in 1854, and to county in 1858.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JACOB P. MOOMAW is one of the enterprising farmers of Josephine County, where he is engaged in the cultivation of a fine ranch located at Williams Creek, near Williams, in this state. He was born in Virginia, December 17, 1837, and is the son of Philip and Susan (Peters) Moomaw, who became the parents of nine children, of whom the eldest is the subject of this review.
    Jacob P. Moomaw was reared in his parents' home and received his early education in the public schools. He remained under the parental roof until twenty-five years of age and at that time enlisted as a volunteer in the Confederate army and continued in that service for a period of eighteen months, after which he was honorably discharged and mustered out of service at Richmond, Virginia. He then engaged in farming and later entered educational work and taught school for six months. In 1895 he emigrated to Oregon and settled at Eagle Point upon eighty acres of land, where he established his home and some years afterward removed to Williams Creek, where he purchased eighty acres of land, upon which he resides, and is now engaged in its cultivation.
    Mr. Moomaw was united in marriage on February 2, 1862, to Miss Mary Zollman, a native of Virginia, and to them nine children were born, Charles, Ora, Ellie, Mary, Ben, John, Jewel, Jasper and Virginia. Mr. Moomaw is affiliated with the Republican Party, and is an elder of the Dunkard Church, of which he has been a member since 1862. He is one of the enterprising and successful agriculturists of his section of the state and is a man whose influence is always readily secured to assist in the advancement of any enterprise affecting the welfare of the community in which he resides.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon, vol. III, 1912, pages 249-250


    A. S. MOON: lives in Sams Valley; is a merchant; born in Susquehanna County, Penn.; came to state and county in 1859; married April 11, 1865, to Melissa Cox. Children Laura, Grant (deceased), Charles, Ralph, Newman and Truman (twins), Beulah, George, Andrew, Martha and Clara (deceased).

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


MOORE, Charles Allan, Lawyer; born, Knox Co., Mo., Mar. 9, 1864; son, John William and Edna Frances (Payton) M. Edu.: public schools, Mo., Cal., and Oregon; State Univ. of Oregon, Eugene; took 3 years course at Univ. Married, Hattie A. Newbury, Dec. 30, 1898, at Jacksonville, Ore. Secy., mgr. and dir., Baker Abstract & Trust Co. Republican. Res.: 1723 Valley Ave.; Office: 2104 Court St., Baker, Ore.

Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, page 407



MOORE, William Joseph, attorney; b. Adair County Missouri May 22, 1862; to Oregon 1878; m. Anna H. Moss July 6, 1885; children--Frank S., Bessie B., Beatrice B. President state bank Ashland past 4 years; admitted to bar 1897; superintendent of schools and newspaper editor Lakeview 4 years; prosecuting attorney Klamath and Lake counties 4 years; city attorney Ashland 6 years; I.O.O.F.; Rebekah; W.O.W.; B.P.O.E. Democrat. Address: Ashland, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 155


MOORE, WILLIAM JOSEPH
    Lawyer
b. Adair County, Mo., May 22, 1862; educ., public schools, Mo., Calif., Ore. Married Anna H. Moss of Lakeview, Oregon, July 6, 1885; children, Frank S., Bessie B., Beatrice B., and Ralph A. Resident of Oregon since 1878. Admitted Oregon Bar, 1897. Superintendent, Lakeview Schools, 1884-88; editor of newspaper, Lakeview, 1894-96; former prosecuting attorney, Klamath and Lake counties, 1906-10; former city attorney, Ashland, 1918-24. Bank official, Ashland, 1924-28. Active law practice, Ashland. Active in Democratic politics. Past Grand Master, Odd Fellows. Rebekah. Woodman. Elk. Democrat. Address: Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 394


    RAPHAEL MORAT: lives near Jacksonville; is a grape and wine grower and distiller; was born near Pyrenees Mountains, France; came to California in 1859 and to state and county in 1870.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    SAMUEL MORGAN: lives in Ashland; is a blacksmith; was born in Stark County, Ohio, August 23, 1832; came to state September 15, 1850; to county, 1851; was married first to Miss Wells (deceased), and was again married to Martha Hendrix in 1878. Children William, William, Francis, James, Myrtle B., John B. and Samuel.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    EDWIN MORGAN: lives at Phoenix; is proprietor of a saloon and livery stable; was born in Littledean, Gloucestershire, Eng.; came to state and county in 1852: married, 1857, to Lucretia Oden. Children Sarah E., Mary C., Charles D., Walter S., Richard M., Mark P. and William H.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505


    G. C. MORRIS. As chief dispatcher of the Southern Pacific Railroad at Ashland, Mr. Morris holds a position of the greatest responsibility, but one which he has filled in a manner satisfactory to his superiors and indicative of superior ability on his part. The greater part of his life has been passed in Oregon, and since attaining manhood he has been continuously connected with railroad affairs, meanwhile gradually working his way up from an unimportant position to the place which he now fills. He is a native of Ohio, born in Washington County, August 10, 1864. and was the youngest of three children, the others being Richard E., a farmer near Harrisburg, Linn County; and Mrs. Hattie D. Ray, of Medford. His father. Charles L., who was born in Washington County, Ohio, and followed farming and stock-raising there for a considerable period, removed to Oregon in the winter of 1870-71 and settled in Salem, afterward following the butcher's trade until his retirement. He died in Oakland, Ore., as did also his wife, who bore the maiden name of Polly M. Palmer and was born in Ohio.
    It was the ambition of Charles L. Morris to give his children fair educational advantages and thus prepare them for the responsibilities awaiting them in the world. The sons were sent to school regularly, and G. C. is a graduate of the business department of Willamette University, where he took a thorough course in telegraphy, having the advantage of special training under the oversight of William DuMars, then manager of the Western Union Telegraph Company at Salem, but now of Portland. His first position was in 1884, when he became agent and operator at Shedds, Linn County, for the old Oregon & California Railroad. Two years later he was transferred to a similar position at the car shops, and from there after six months he was sent to the general office at Portland as operator and dispatcher. Since the spring of 1887 he has been connected with the dispatchers' department. When the Southern Pacific acquired possession of the narrow-gauge [sic] road in 1889, he was transferred from Portland to Dundee as dispatcher. Eighteen months later he returned to Portland, and continued there until 1898, when he was raised to the position of chief dispatcher at Ashland, and to the duties of this position he has since given all of his time and attention. While at Dundee he established domestic ties, his wife being Miss Ella A. Bowker, a native of California.
    The political views of Mr. Morris bring him into hearty accord with the Republican Party, but, owing to the heavy demands of his occupation, he is unable to participate in public affairs or to accept offices within the gift of his party. For some years he has been an enthusiastic disciple of Masonry and a hearty admirer of its lofty principles of charity and brotherly kindness. After coming to Ashland he was made a Mason in Ashland Lodge No. 23, A.F.&A.M., in which he is now officiating as master for the second term. In addition he is connected with Ashland Chapter No. 21, R.A.M., Malta Commandery No. 4, K.T., in which he has been honored with the office of generalissimo, and is a member of Al Kader Temple, A.A.O.N.M.S. of Portland. That kindred society of Masonry, the Eastern Star, numbers both himself and wife among its active members. He assisted in the organization of the board of trade at Ashland, was elected its president and later re-elected, and in this position he was enabled to promote measures for the benefit of the town and the growth of its commercial interests.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 606-609


    LEVI MORRIS. As one of the earlier settlers of the Pacific Coast, Levi Morris, now living retired from active business in Ashland, Ore., was an important factor in developing the mining and agricultural resources of this section of the country. A resident of Jackson County for the past fifteen years, he has been one of the leading promoters of its industrial prosperity during that time, and has gained, to an eminent degree, the respect and esteem of his fellow men. A son of William Morris, he was born January 18, 1832, in the town of Gauley Bridge, Fayette County, W. Va. His paternal grandfather, Joshua Morris, a native of England, settled in Virginia in colonial times, and was one of the famous Indian and bear hunters of his day.
    Born in old Virginia, William Morris was engaged in the manufacture of salt during the earlier part of his business career, shipping his product down the Big Kanawha River, and thence down the Ohio and Mississippi rivers to New Orleans, shipping to the latter place during the War of 1812. He was subsequently engaged in lumbering for awhile, and then purchased a farm in Nicholas County, W. Va., where he spent his last years, dying at the age of seventy-three years. He married Ann Chapman, who was born in Kentucky, and died in West Virginia. Her father, John Chapman, a native of Wales, emigrated to America and settled in Kentucky. Enlisting as a soldier in the War of 1812, he was killed in battle. Of the eleven children born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. William Morris, ten grew to years of maturity, and four are now living, one son, Harriman, being a resident of West Virginia.
    The third child of the parental household, Levi Morris, was trained to agricultural pursuits on the home plantation and obtained his early education in the public and subscription schools, learning to write with a quill pen, while the teacher, in the customary pioneer fashion, "boarded around." As a young man he learned the sawyer's trade and was afterwards superintendent of a large plantation for a number of years. Following the well-trod emigrant pathway, he went to Kansas in the summer of 1856, and located about four miles from Lawrence, on the Wakarusa River, where he assisted in building a sawmill. Starting with a company of young men for Pike's Peak, Mr. Morris left St. Joseph, Mo., in 1859, with ox teams and cattle. While en route the party met so many returning from Pike's Peak that they changed their minds in regard to their point of destination, and on reaching the Sublette Cut-Off struck the old California Trail, which they followed until reaching Tuolumne County, having journeyed six months.
    Engaging at once in mining operations, Mr. Morris remained in that part of California until the spring of 1863, when he located in Virginia City, Nev. Embarking in mining and prospecting on the north fork of the Feather River, he continued his operations in that locality for ten years, carrying on placer and river mining. In order to facilitate his work he invented a derrick, which proved a very successful and substantial help, although he never had his invention patented. He carried on an extensive and lucrative business, employing twenty-three men as miners, and meeting with far more than average success in his undertakings. Returning to California in 1870, Mr. Morris located at Buckeye, where he purchased five hundred acres of land in the valley and began business as a grain and stock-raiser. Devoting a part of his ranch to the culture of fruit, he set out an apricot orchard of eighty acres, in addition planting thirty acres of cantaloupes and melons, on which he cleared $3,000 the first year. The third year after settling there he shipped ripe fruit from his orchards, sending it by carloads to the various coast markets. He subsequently bought land on Putah Creek, where he set out a large orchard, and bought another farm nearby. After the death of his wife Mr. Morris disposed of all of his California property and came to Oregon. Locating in Jackson County about 1888, he purchased the Henry Ammerman estate on Bear Creek, where he was profitably engaged in agricultural pursuits for several years. On his ranch, which contained twenty-two hundred acres of land, he raised large quantities of grain, hay and stock, in the latter line of industry making a specialty of Durham cattle. In 1902 Mr. Morris sold his ranch and has since lived retired at his pleasant home in Ashland.
    Mr. Morris married first, in California, Mary Frances Harriman. who was born in Missouri, of English ancestry, her paternal grandfather having been born and reared in England. Her father, Shadrach Harriman, was born in Virginia, and lived in the East until 1864, when he. came to the Pacific Coast, locating in California, where he was a well-known Baptist minister for many years. He is now living in Yolo County, Cal., at the advanced age of ninety-three years. Mrs. Mary F. Morris died in California in 1889, leaving seven children, namely: Albert, of Winters, Cal.; Luther R., a miner at Nome, Alaska; Simeon R., a farmer, residing in Montague, Ore.; Ransom Cary, of Ashland; Benjamin, of Ashland; Paul, of Ashland; and Mrs. Annie Jacobs, of Talent, Ore. For his second wife Mr. Morris married Alice L. Gray, who was born in Sydney, Australia, a daughter of John T. Gray, who emigrated from England, his native land, to Australia, coming from there to San Francisco, Cal., where for some years he was engaged in the plumbing business. He died in 1894. Of this union one child has been born, a daughter, named Ruth L. Morris. In political affiliations Mr. Morris is a Democrat. He has filled several public offices of importance, having been school director and stock inspector a number of terms, and for four years, under Governor Pennoyer, served as horticultural commissioner. He is a consistent member of the Baptist Church, and while living in California was trustee of the church and superintendent of the Sunday school.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 256-257


MORRIS, MAJOR McKINLEY
Business Executive; Vice-President and General Manager, Medford Ice & Cold Storage Co.
b. Lebo, Kansas June 13, 1898; son of George W. and Rebecca Grace (Courther) Morris; educated grade and high schools Ashland, Oregon; m. Lorraine M. Lawton of Medford Dec. 31, 1921; entire life activity in cold storage business; with Medford Ice & Cold Storage Co. (one of largest in Oregon) 1919-; engineer, various positions, superintendent 1925, manager 1930; vice-president 1944-; established and co-owner Medford Ice Arena; original developer of modern pre-cooling of fruit; director Columbia Empire Industries; member National Association of Ice Industries, Refrigerator Warehouseman's Association (past director); president Growers Refrigerating Co.; director Oregon Orchards Inc.; member Chamber of Commerce, Rogue River Golf Club, University Club of Medford and Gadwall Duck Club, Klamath Falls; K.T. Mason; Hillah Shriner; Republican; Protestant; home Kings Highway; office 531 S. Fir St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 403


McQUEEN, STUART VINCENT
    Lumber Executive;
    Manufacturer
b Portland, Or, Jan 7, 1920; son of Stuart A and Anna McQueen; educ, Llewellyn Grammar Sch, Wash High Sch, Portland, Or; Oreg State Coll, BS, 1943; Sigma Alpha Epsilon, Phi Kappa Phi; m Margaret L Mark of Portland, Or; ch, Mark S, Ladd V, Marily Margaret; pres, Kogap Lumber Industries, Medford, Or, since 1946; US Army, WWII; bd mem, Medford YMCA; dir, Community Chest; Wash Lodge; Presbyterian; home, 2136 Hillcrest Rd; ofc, Box 1268, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 543


MORTON, OLIVER ORA
Miller; Businessman, Morton Milling Company.
b. Carthage, Mo. April 3, 1893; son of Joshua James and Lydia (Barnhart) Morton; educated public schools; m. Alice A. Pence of Williams, Oregon May 15, 1920; children Robert J., Donald (killed in Italy), Raymond A., Olive V. (Mace), Coral G., Linda J.; began as carpenter; worked with father in milling business; now chief partner Morton Mills, Medford; served air force 22 months in France, World War I; Legionnaire; member Veterans Foreign Wars; Republican; Protestant; home Rt. 2.; office 10 W. Jackson St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 405


MULIT, Lloyd Lyman, Banker; born, Pleasant Hill, Mo., Nov. 2, 1876; son, Henry S. and Marietta (Smith) M. Edu.: public schools. Married, Gertrude McCallen, Aug. 10, 1905, at Ashland, Ore. Dir. and cashier, First Natl. Bank, Ashland; dir., Granite City Savings Bank, Ashland. State Senator from Jackson Co., Ore., 1907-09. Member: Ashland Lodge, No. 23, F.A.M.; Siskiyou Chapter, R.A.M., No. 21; Malta Commandery, No. 4, K.T.; Hillah Temple, A.O.N.M.S.; Ashland Lodge, No. 944, Elks. Address: Ashland, Ore.
Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, pages 417-418

    MULKEY, B. F., of Dallas, was born in Williamson County, Illinois, July 26, 1862. Ten years later he came to Oregon, locating near Eugene. He graduated at the Monmouth Normal School in 1887, and is by profession a teacher. From 1887 to 1892 he had charge of the Bethel Academy, and during the latter year was president of the Polk County Teachers' Association. He has been a delegate to the state league meetings twice, and once to the state convention. He is president of the Dallas Republican Club. In 1892 he was elected county clerk, and again in 1894. Mr. Mulkey is a fluent speaker and a good campaigner, and is the Republican nominee for the state senate.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 254


BENJAMIN F. MULKEY.
    This gentleman is a native of Illinois, and was born July 26, 1862. Ten years later he came to Oregon, settling near Eugene. He graduated at the Monmouth Normal School in 1887, and by profession is a teacher. From 1887 to 1892 he had charge of the Bethel Academy, and in the latter year was president of the Polk County teachers' association. In 1897 he was chosen one of the faculty of the State Normal School, at Monmouth, and since then has been professor of mathematics and physiology in that institution. Politically he is a Republican, that party electing him county clerk of Polk County in 1892 and again in 1894, and as state senator in 1896 and 1900.
    He was first united in marriage September 15, 1885, with Miss Tillie E. Parks,
who was born in Lane County, April 3, 1866, her parents being John W. and Margaret Parks. Her father was a pioneer of 1847 and her mother of 1853. She died March 2, 1897. Two daughters and one son were the fruits of this union. Mr. Mulkey was again married October 18, 1899 to Miss Constance Hawley, who was also an Oregonian. Her parents, John H. and Eliza (Mulkey) Hawley, being pioneers, the former coming to the state in 1844 and the latter in 1853. Mr. Hawley was representative from Polk County in 1882. Mr. Mulkey has made his home in Monmouth since 1897.

Oregon Native Son, March 1901, page 476



    PHILLIP MULLEN: lives in Phoenix; is a miner and assayer; born in Sullivan County, N.Y., June 14, 1839; came to state and county in 1875.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    MAX MULLER: lives in Jacksonville; is a merchant; born in Reckendorf, Germany; came to state and county in 1855; married June 11, 1868, to Louise Hesse. Children Ike, Emily, Betta, Will and Sophie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



    MULLER, MAX,  a merchant of Jacksonville, was born in Reckendorf, Bavaria, January 20, 1836, and came to Oregon in 1855, locating in Jacksonville, and has lived there ever since. He is one of the old Republicans, having been a delegate to county conventions ever since 1862 and state conventions from 1870 to 1886. In 1868 he was elected county treasurer, was postmaster from 1870 to 1888, and was elected county clerk in 1888, 1890 and 1892.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 254


MAX MULLER, County Clerk of Jackson County, is a widely and favorably known old settler of this county, having located here in 1855. Since that period he has been the county servant in several capacities for some years. He is regarded as a fixture in one of the most important county offices, to judge by his reelection, not only by his own party, but by all who know him.
    He is a native of Reckendorf, Bavaria, January 20, 1836. He is the youngest in a family of five children, born to Isaac and Betta Miller. He was reared and educated in the kingdom of his birth. In 1851 he emigrated to America and engaged in clerking in a mercantile house for a period of four years. At the end of that time he had become familiar with the English language and took passage in the old steamer Uncle Sam  via Nicaragua for the new Eldorado. The same year saw him in Jacksonville, where he engaged in clerking until 1858, when he engaged in the merchandise business for himself. He was postmaster from 1870 to 1888. He was elected county treasurer in 1868, at which time he broke the ranks and was elected on the Republican ticket. In 1888 he was elected to his present office, was reelected in 1890 and again succeeds himself in the year 1892.
    He was married to Miss Louisa Hesse, a native of Prussia, June 11, 1868. They have five children living, namely: Isaac M., Amelia, Bettie, William and Sophia. They have lost two children, a son and a daughter.
    Mr. Muller is a member of the Council and is a staunch member of the Republican Party. He is a member of the A.F.&A.M., blue lodge; Chapter No. 5, Eastern Star degree, and A.O.U.W., and is occupying official chairs in both orders. He and his wife are influential members of society.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, page 410


MULLIN, ROBERT LAWRENCE
Public Worker.
b. Gold Hill, Oregon Nov. 2, 1930; son of A. L. Mullin and Edna (Sutton) Mullin; former manager Ashland Chamber of Commerce; veteran WWII; address Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, pages 406-407


    JOHN MURPHY.--A little way off the road leading from Ashland to Major Barron s, and nestled among the mountains, is the home of this old pioneer. It is a lovely spot, and we have selected it as one of the illustrations in these pages. John Murphy was born in County Cork, Ireland, in December, 1820. He came to the United States in May, 1847, and located in Orange County, New York; thence to Iowa in 1852, settling in Lee County. The following year he crossed the plains to Oregon, with some of the settlers who are now his neighbors, and located in Jackson County. After working for a short time at the Mountain House ranch, he settled on his present farm, which consists of twenty-two hundred acres. In 1853 Mr. Murphy joined Captain Williams' company and engaged in the war with the Rogue River Indians, remaining until its close. In 1854 a band of marauding Indians came near Mr. Murphy's house, where they killed an ox belonging to Myron Stearns. A party of settlers followed the Indians, and coming up to Murphy's cabin and not finding him there they supposed he had been killed. But when they had proceeded a little way up the creek there was Mr. Murphy planting potatoes, and he knew nothing of the Indians having been in the neighborhood. The subject of our sketch joined the settlers, who followed the trail of the Indians to Grizzly Rock, put them to rout and broke up their camp at that place. In July, 1858, Mr. Murphy went to San Francisco and married Mary Goodwin. Mrs. Ann Murphy, the mother of the subject of this sketch, is now residing near Ashland with her daughter and enjoys good health, her reasoning faculties are well preserved and she is now ninety-two years old.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 534


W. C. Myer, of Ashland.
    One of the early pioneers of Oregon who has been prominently identified with the development of the state for nearly half a century is W. C. Myer, of Ashland. He was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, April 22, 1818. In 1853 Mr. Myer, with his wife, who died several years ago, and other members of the family took up the line of march from Iowa, whither they had moved from Ohio, to the Pacific Coast, arriving in the Rogue River Valley September 3, and settling near Ashland. Mr. Myer engaged in the stock business, and became widely known over the state as an importer of purebred horses and cattle. He was the first to introduce purebred Percheron horses on the Pacific Coast. The names of White Prince, Doll, Maggie and Perche, Napoleon, Pride of Perche, Gen. Fleury, White Rose, Jennie and Arabian Boy, which are found in the list of Percherons imported by him, are familiar to the horse world, and made his stock farm near Ashland well known over the coast. Mr. Myer was also the first man in Oregon to introduce the Shetland ponies for breeding purposes, and the first in Southern Oregon to introduce Jersey cattle, of which he has long maintained a fine herd. Mr. Myer enjoys the distinction of having brought the first gang plow to Southern Oregon, as well as the first one of the hay carriers, now so common in farm barns. Mr. Myer is now in his 82nd year, but is still more active and energetic than many men 30 years his junior.
Oregonian, Portland, September 8, 1899, page 6



    WILLIAM MYER. Occupying a place of prominence among the native-born citizens of Jackson County is William Myer, of Ashland, whose birth occurred August 15, 1857, on the parental donation claim, about three miles north of this city. He has succeeded to the business of his father, the late William C. Myer, who, for nearly half a century, was one of the foremost agriculturists and stockmen of this part of the state, having an extended reputation, and being a trustworthy authority on all questions relating to the breeding of fine horses. A close student of all things pertaining to his special line of industry, progressive and enterprising, he did more than any other one man to improve the blooded stock of the county, being the first to import thoroughbred Percheron horses and Jersey cattle.
    Nathaniel Myer, Mr. Myer's paternal grandfather, was born and reared in Lancaster County, Pa., being a millwright and surveyor by trade. He later settled in Jefferson County, Ohio, from there removing to Van Buren County, Iowa, where he cleared and improved a farm. In 1853, with his wife and numerous members of the Myer family, he came to Oregon, locating in Jackson County. Taking up a donation claim near Ashland, he resided here until his death, January 13, 1870, at the advanced age of four score and one years. His wife, whose maiden name was Mona Ridinger, survived him, dying April 25, 1882, at the age of ninety years. Of their union the following children were born, and all came to Oregon with their parents in 1853: William Cortez, father of William Myer; Benjamin F., who died in Ashland, Jackson County, in 1896; Mrs. Eli K. Anderson, living near Talent, this county; Mrs. Fowler, who died in Oakland, Cal.; Mrs. John P. Walker, residing near Ashland; Mrs. A. G. Rockefeller, of San Diego, Cal., and Mrs. Sarada M. Scott, of Pennsylvania.
    Born in Jefferson County, Ohio, April 22, 1818, William Cortez Myer was a pioneer settler of Jackson County, and died in Ashland, May 21, 1903. With his parents, he removed to Iowa in 1843, and ten years later, with his own and his father's family, he crossed the plains to Oregon, arriving in the Rogue River Valley September 3, 1853. Very soon afterward he took up land near Ashland and embarked in agricultural pursuits. Having a large range, he made a specialty of stock-raising, being particularly interested in the raising of horses. In 1865, going back to Ohio, he bought the noted horse Captain Sligart, which he placed at the head of his herd. Deciding to again take up his residence in the Middle West he took two hundred head of horses across the plains, going by the southern route, and being five months on the road. Locating in Franklin County, Kans., six miles from Ottawa, he sold his horses and engaged in farming. A year later, not pleased with that country or climate, he came again to Oregon, settling on land that he had previously purchased, about one mile from Ashland. As interested as ever in the breeding of good stock, he brought with him four full-blooded Percheron horses, the first introduced on the Pacific coast, namely: White Prince, Doll, Maggie and Perche. Establishing a successful stock business, he soon found it necessary to add to his stock on hand, and again went east, returning in 1872 with Napoleon, a superb Percheron stallion, four Jerseys, the first brought to Oregon, and some Cotswold sheep for J. P. Walker, the first brought into Jackson County, and a few Durham cattle for E. F. Walker. In 1876 he brought from Wisconsin a Percheron stallion, Pride Perch, and General Fleury and two mares, White Rose and Jennie. In 1883 he again added imported horses to his herd, buying the fine stallion Gambetta, and a noted Shetland stallion, King Kole. In the breeding of a superior grade of horses and ponies he was one of the foremost in the state, making large shipments from his ranch to all the important points of the great Northwest. As an agriculturist he employed all modern methods, being the first in the valley to use a gang plow, an improved Haines header, and the screw pulverizer. In his efforts to have a pottery established in Ashland he was the first to attempt to make use of the kaolin beds of this locality. In his various importations of cattle and horses, Mr. Myer had some very noted animals, which attracted much attention, and will long be remembered. Among the finest of these imported to Oregon in 1878 was an Arabian Percheron, named Arabian Boy, which was sired by the Jenifer Arabian, imported from Arabia by Colonel Jenifer, an American officer in the Egyptian cavalry, and a handsome filly, Juanita, raised by Colon Cameron, of Pennsylvania.
    April 3, 1849, in Ohio, where he returned from Iowa for his bride, William C. Myer married Elizabeth Nessley, who was born in Jefferson County, Ohio, June 17, 1820, and died in Ashland, Ore., November 6, 1887. Two children were born of their union, namely: Frances M., a native of Iowa, the wife of G. F. Billings, of Ashland; and William, the special subject of this sketch. Politically Mr. Myer was a staunch Republican, and religiously he was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
    Brought up on the homestead, William Myer obtained a practical education in the public schools, and in the old Ashland Academy. Endowed by nature with mechanical ability, he has always been interested in machinery, and has shown considerable aptitude for mechanical pursuits. From early manhood he assisted his father in his agricultural industries, later assuming the entire charge of the home farm, which originally comprised four hundred and sixty acres. Twenty-five acres of this land has been laid out as the W. C. Myer addition to the city of Ashland, and Mr. Myer now owns three hundred and two acres. He carries on general farming most successfully, raising large quantities of hay, and continuing the stock business established by his father, his Jersey cattle, Percheron horses and Shetland ponies being celebrated throughout the county and state.
    September 27, 1893, in Ashland, Mr. Myer married Annie L. Gall, who was born in Sams Valley, Jackson County, a daughter of C. C. and Sarah J. (Pankey) Gall, the former a pioneer ranchman of that locality, who crossed the plains from Iowa in 1852, settled in Jackson County and subsequently served in the Rogue River Indian War. Mr. and Mrs. Myer are the parents of two children, namely: Cedric Nessley and Frances Bernice. True to the political faith in which he was reared, Mr. Myer is a straightforward Republican. Fraternally he belongs to Ashland Lodge No. 45, I.O.O.F., and to the Woodmen of the World. Mrs. Myer is a member of Elizabeth Applegate Cabin, Native Daughters of Oregon, and both Mr. and Mrs. Myer are members of Acorn Circle No. 54, Women of Woodcraft, of Ashland. In 1903 they removed to their beautiful residence on High Street in Ashland.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 676-677


    W. C. MYER.--W. C. Myer and Elizabeth Nessly were born in Jefferson County, Ohio, the former April 22, 1818, and the latter June 17, 1820. They were married on the 3rd of April, 1849, and set out immediately for Iowa, to which place Mr. Myer, in company with his father's family, had removed in 1843. In 1853 the numerous Myer family, including the subject of this sketch, took up the line of march to the Pacific, arriving in Rogue River Valley on September 3rd of that year, and settling three miles north of Ashland. Engaging in the stock business Mr. Myer soon found himself surrounded with a large herd of horses. Wishing to improve the stock of this herd he went East in 1865, and brought out the noted horse Capt. Sligart. In 1869, not altogether satisfied with his adopted home, and desiring to find a market for his rapidly increasing stock, he determined to return to the western states, which he reached in the autumn of that year and settled in Kansas. Here he disposed of his horses and betook himself to farming. One year, however, of the climate of that country, with its doubtful crops, satisfied him that he had made a great mistake and turned his longing eyes and glad feet again toward the Pacific. During his Kansas experience, however, he never for a day ever forget his favorite--the horse. Industriously searching the records and the country, he found his ideal in the Percheron, and hastily selling his Kansas farm, bought White Prince, Doll, Maggie and Perche and returned to this country December, 1870. So rapid was the increase of this stock and so great the demand for it, that Mr. Myer found it necessary to make new importations. In 1872 he returned East and brought out Napoleon. With this importation he also brought out four Jersey cattle: one bull St. Louis, one cow Nacky, and two heifers. To these he has added from time to time by importations from the best milkers in California as the nature of the case demanded. Mr. Myer's fourth importation of stock from the Atlantic to the Pacific was made in 1876 when he brought out Pride of Perche, Gen. Fleury, White Rose and Jennie. In 1878 the fifth importation, consisting of an Arabian Percheron, named Arabian Boy, and the filly Juanita, was made. This filly, which appears elsewhere in the book, in Mr. Myer's group of fine stock, was raised by Colon Cameron of Brickersfield, Penn. Arabian Boy was sired by the pure-blooded Jenifer Arabian imported from Arabia by Col. Jenifer an American officer of Egyptian cavalry fame. He is the only Percheron Arabian in the United States. He may be seen in the group. With this importation Mr. Myer brought out a small lot of Cotswold sheep for J. P. Walker and a small lot of Durham cattle for E. F. Walker, also for himself four Shetland ponies. Two of these were brought from the Shetland Islands that year and two were bred in the United States, the stallion--Bobby Burns--by Alexander, of Kentucky. Taking advantage of the invitation given by the N.P.R.R. Co., in the autumn of 1883 to the pioneers of the Pacific, Mr. Myer made his sixth importation of fine stock, bringing the celebrated horse Gambetta and a Shetland stallion, both imported to America the same year and both of which also appear in his group. In this importation there were six Jerseys, one bull and five heifers, all directly descended from the best butter producers in the United States. Some of their ancestors have sold as follows: several for $2,000 each and one for $12,500. These Jerseys also appear in the group. Percheron horses bred from Mr. Myer's importations have found their way to British Columbia and Southern California, and from the Pacific throughout Oregon and Washington and Montana territories, and in all this territory are giving the very best of satisfaction. As additional evidence of the enterprising character of this gentleman we record the fact that to him belongs the credit of introducing to Rogue River Valley the first gang plow, the first improved Haines header and the first screw pulverizer; and to him and his brother Frank the first horse fork for hoisting and stacking hay. Though more than a decade past the meridian of life, Mr. Myer is more active and energetic than many other men at that very desirable epoch. The children of Mr. and Mrs. Myer are Frances, now Mrs. Billings, and William.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 534-535


NAFFZIGER, Atlanta Parker
Artist; Club Leader.
b. Petaluma, Calif. 1872; educated public schools and academy Willamette Valley; m. Gilbert R. Satchwell; two daughters, Vale (Mrs. Carl Hoots) and Hattie (Mrs. Karl Knapp); m. 2nd C. E. Naffziger Sept. 15, 1942; resident Oregon since 1890; secretary Medford Chamber of Commerce during World War; head of civic department, Greater Medford Club, four terms; secretary three terms; secretary Jackson County Health Association three years; organizer for Southern Oregon District Federation Women's Clubs; president Rogue River chapter, Western National League of Writers three terms; secretary-treasurer 2 terms; former member Democratic Central Committee, Jackson County; former art teacher; artist in oils and pastels; writer and lecturer on early Oregon history, also author poems and fiction; member Greater Medford Club, Dixie Club, Kodak Club, Delphians, State Federation Women's Clubs; Democrat; Episcopalian; address 116 South Ivy, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 410


J. T. C. Nash     CAPT. JOHN T. C. NASH. Yet another of the forerunners of civilization to step from a life before the mast, and in the wild and unsettled West find a continuation of the life of adventure and danger to which storm and tempest had accustomed him, is Capt. John T. C. Nash, a pioneer miner of 1850, an Oregonian since 1886, and a retired citizen of Medford since the early '90s. Hotel Nash, erected in 1895, with every thought for the comfort and convenience of guests, is a monument to the enterprise and sound business forethought of this honored man, while the esteem and popularity which he enjoys among his friends and the community at large is the best evidence of his fine personal traits and public spiritedness. Although conducted personally by Captain Nash, the management of the hotel has always reflected credit upon the builder, and is always patronized by a large transient and permanent trade, its sixty guest chambers affording ample accommodation for emergencies. Other property has come into his possession in the town and county, aside from his own beautiful home on the outskirts, which is surrounded by a fine hedge twelve feet high.
    Captain Nash was born in Knox County, Me., March 31, 1833, and when ten years old put to sea as a cabin boy on the ship of his father, Capt. Thomas Nash. The latter was also a native of Maine, as was also his wife, Rebecca (Elwell) Nash, the mother of four sons and three daughters, of whom John T. C. was the second. Capt. Thomas Nash began at the bottom round of the ladder in a sailing vessel, advancing to the position of able seaman, finally assuming command of the ship, upon which his death occurred when his son John T. C. was eighteen years old. True to teaching and example, the latter also advanced in nautical lore, took kindly to the freedom-loving existence, and courted rather than shunned danger and adventure. In 1848 he became mate of the William Jarvis, and in 1849 was quartermaster on the steamer Philadelphia. Some time prior to coming to the Pacific coast Captain Nash was employed on the Mississippi River, sailing the steamer Lyon until it was blown up. Later he sailed the steamer New Guatemala between New Orleans and Havana, Cuba. For a time thereafter he mined in California, but soon returned to his former business and had charge of the steamer Patagonia, plying between Valparaiso and London, England. This was followed by a return to California, where he was employed in the mines until placed in command of the clipper ship Silver Sea Wing, running from Valparaiso to Manila. He made two voyages. The captain has had many narrow escapes from a watery grave. At one time he was off Cape Horn in a terrible storm, during which the ship was [dismasted] and the rudder lost. Later the ship came into port with nothing but her lower sails and a jury rudder, which had been improvised from a barrel of water. Another narrow escape occurred off Cape Hatteras, when everything above deck was swept into the sea, and but for the timely arrival of another ship everyone would have been drowned. In 1850 Captain Nash first touched western shores as quartermaster of the sailing bark Illinois, having rounded the Horn and reached San Francisco just as the mining excitement was at its highest point. Quitting his ship, he engaged in placer mining on the Yuba River, and in 1852 took advantage of the exodus to Minnesota, Cal., where fortunes were supposed to await all who journeyed hither. A year later he went with renewed confidence in golden reports to Gold Lake, but for a year looked in vain for the wealth he had so fondly hoped for. These disappointments caused renewed faith in the occupation of sailing, and the year 1855 found him again in Maine, where he purchased a sailing craft called the Shenandoah, of which he became commander, and contracted to carry rock for the government to Staten Island. In 1857 he sold his vessel and came to the West by way of the Isthmus, engaging in mining at Monte Cristo, the following year going to La Porte, Cal., and later to Bald Mountain, at that time yielding large amounts of gold, but which has since then been phenomenally remunerative. He was the fortunate discoverer of the Yankee mine in 1859, upon which he erected a mill, but finally sold it, becoming identified in a similar capacity with the Black Bear mine in Siskiyou County, which he also sold, but which is still being operated.
    During 1859 Captain Nash returned to the East via the Isthmus of Panama and in 1860 was again in California, mining there and in the Boise Basin, Idaho, in the Caribou district, and in other parts of the Northwest. During the early days of the mining excitement in Idaho, Captain Nash, with a party of five other men, went on a prospecting tour, and while in the Green River country a band of one hundred wild Indians attacked them. When the Indians were within two hundred yards the men opened fire upon them, causing a lively retreat on the part of the Indians. About thirty Indians and horses were killed, and this so incensed the Indians that they renewed their attack upon the white men, who were saved with one exception, owing to the fleetness of their American horses. Picking up their dead comrade they carried him on a pack horse until they were out of danger, and then buried him. In his mining experiences Captain Nash was successful beyond his expectations, and in 1865 returned to California and mined in Trinity County until 1886. Near Riddles, Douglas County, he engaged in farming on four hundred acres of land for one year, during which time he continued to mine and prospect on Cow Creek, where he opened and developed the Victory mine, which has proved quite remunerative. Retiring from the farm, he located in Medford, as heretofore stated, and has since made this place his home.
    October 14, 1897, Captain Nash was united in marriage with Miss Ella Brown, a native of Columbia City, Ind., and a daughter of Daniel Brown, who lived and died in Indiana. Mr. and Mrs. Nash have one son, Elwell Crawford, born May 27, 1899. Fraternally the captain is widely known and is associated with Blue Lodge No. 103, A.F.&A.M., and the Royal Arch Chapter of Jacksonville. In national politics he is a Republican, and in religion is a member of the Presbyterian Church. Hale and hearty and good-natured, Captain Nash is a typical pioneer, broad-minded, liberal and humane, and with a fine capacity for making and keeping friends. In his travels Captain Nash has been around the world once by water, has visited all the large cities in the world, and been in all the seaports from Alaska to Cape Horn on the Pacific, and from Cape Horn to Prince Edward Island on the Atlantic. The last ship which he sailed on was the clipper ship Pride of the Ocean, in the service of the East India trade.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 735.  The Pride of the Ocean, a 1,400-ton clipper, in 1854 was one of the five ships that carried England's 17th Lancers from Portsmouth to the Crimea--and the Charge of the Light Brigade.


    GRANVILLE NAYLOR: lives near Jacksonville; is a farmer; was born in Jackson County, Ind., Feb. 16, 1822; came to state in 1851; to county in 1853; was married June, 1848, to Minerva Seris. Children Adolphus, Malvina, Melvin, Nettie, Alta, Minerva and Ida.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    S. M. Nealon, one of the three nominees for representative, was born in Connecticut and is fifty years of age. He was educated in the common school and is an old soldier, having volunteered during the war and served in the army of the Potomac until discharged with the regiment at the close of the war. He moved to Oregon from California and bought a farm in Table Rock precinct and has lived on it nearly nine years. He was postmaster at Table Rock over five years, and is an honest, straightforward farmer, and as a representative he would cause corruption to quail before convincing arguments.
"The Nominees," Medford Mail, April 22, 1892, page 1


REPRESENTATIVE S. M. NEALON.
    Hon. S. M. Nealon, Representative from Jackson County, was born in Connecticut in 1841. He went to Georgia with an uncle at the age of 15, where he remained clerking until 1862. Then to avoid conscription into the Confederate army he made his escape on foot and reached the Union army in Tennessee ragged and hungry. He served in the Connecticut volunteers until the close of the war. Mr. Nealon came to Oregon in 1883 and has since resided in Jackson County. Originally a Republican, Mr. Nealon joined the Populists in 1891. He was defeated as Representative in 1892, but elected in 1894.
Oregon Blue Book 1895, page 91


S. M. NEALON.
    S. M. Nealon, Representative from Jackson County, was born in Connecticut in 1841. He went to Georgia with an uncle at the age of 15, where he remained clerking until 1862. Then to avoid conscription into the Confederate army he made his escape on foot and reached the Union army in Tennessee, ragged and hungry. He served in the Connecticut volunteers until the close of the war. Mr. Nealon came to Oregon in 1883 and has since resided in Jackson County. Originally a Republican, Mr. Nealon joined the Populists in 1891. He was defeated as Representative in 1892, but elected in 1894.
Oregon Mist, St. Helens, Oregon, February 15, 1895, page 1


    HON. STEPHEN M. NEALON. The travels of Mr. Nealon have taken him through many portions of the United States. Born in the East, trained to business life in the South, a traveler through many states during the period of his service in the Civil War, and a student of conditions in various parts of the Pacific Coast region, he has since 1883 made Oregon his home and is an enthusiastic believer in the opportunities offered by this state to young men of industrious habits and ambitious temperaments. During the year of his arrival in Oregon he purchased a ranch of two hundred acres at Table Rock, Jackson County, and here he has since engaged in raising stock and general farm products. In addition, for five years he held office as postmaster of Table Rock, and in 1895 was a member of the state legislature, to which he had been elected on the Populist ticket.
    In Fairfield County, Conn., December 26, 1841, Mr. Nealon was born, and there the first fifteen years of his life were uneventfully passed on a farm. He then went to Atlanta, Ga., and became a clerk in his uncle's store there, remaining until May of 1862, when the progress of the Civil War and his own ardent northern sympathies rendered it advisable for him to return to his old home. During February, 1864, he enlisted as a private in Company H, Eighth Connecticut Infantry, and was mustered into service at New Haven, whence he was ordered to Portsmouth, Va., and assigned to the Eighteenth Army Corps. Among the engagements in which he participated were those at Walthall Junction, Port Darling or Drury's Bluff, Cold Harbor and Bermuda Hundred near the James River. From the 15th of June until September he participated in the siege of Petersburg, after which with his regiment he crossed the James River and attacked Fort Harrison in front of Richmond. With the very first of the troops they marched into Richmond, April 3, 1865, and saw the old Confederate capital given into the hands of Federal soldiers. A month later he was transferred to Lynchburg and engaged in patrol duty until December 1, 1865, when he was mustered out at Hartford, Conn., as first sergeant of his company. During the entire period of his service he was never wounded. Twice, however, he was captured by the enemy, both times being at Drury's Bluff within one-half hour.
    Shortly after his discharge from the army Mr. Nealon returned to Atlanta. His uncle, who had been a strong Union man, aroused the dislike of his neighbors by his outspoken sentiments, and was murdered in Atlanta. Under the service of the government Mr. Nealon acted as deputy revenue collector and assistant assessor of Georgia, in Macon, Savannah and Atlanta, continuing in that capacity until 1881, when he removed to St. Louis. A year was spent there in the mercantile business, after which another year was passed in the Santa Clara Valley in California, where he thought of settling. However, not finding a suitable opening, he came on to Oregon and bought the ranch where he has since made his home. As might be expected of one who served so valiantly in the Union cause, he takes a deep interest in the Grand Army of the Republic and enjoys meeting with those who, like himself, suffered the hardships of forced marches and sanguinary contests on southern battlefields. At one time he was honored with the office of commander of the post at Central Point, of which he is still a leading member. During the twenty and more years of his residence in Jackson County he has won the confidence of his associates and gained an influential position among the citizens of Southern Oregon.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 715-716

PORTER J. NEFF.
    Residence, 16 Belmont Avenue; office 18 D'Anjou Street, Medford. Born at Bushnell Illinois, September 13, 1871. Son of John and Mary (Porter) Neff. Married October 19, 1895, to Isaben Neff. Attended public schools at Bushnell and the University of Minnesota, graduating therefrom in 1892 with B.L. degree. Admitted to the bar of Minnesota in 1892. Practiced at Minneapolis and at Duluth, Minnesota, from 1892 to 1908, when he removed to Oregon and was admitted to the bar of this state in that year. Democrat.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 197


NEFF, Porter Joseph, attorney; b. Bushnell, Illinois September 13, 1871; to Oregon 1908; Minnesota University 1894; m. Isabel Mealey October 1900; children--John. City council Duluth, Minnesota; city attorney 1909-13. Delta Tau Delta; B.P.O.E.; University Club; Rogue River Gold Club. Address: Cargill Court Apartments, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 165


NEFF, PORTER JOSEPH
    Lawyer; member firm, Neff & Frohnmayer
b. Bushnell, Ill., Sept. 13, 1871; educ., Minnesota, Univ., 1894; Delta Tau Delta. Married Isabel Mealey of Minneapolis, Minn., Oct. 19, 1900. Resident of Oregon since 1908. Director and attorney for Commercial Finance Corp.; president, Siskiyou Memorial Assn. Councilman, several years at Duluth, Minn. Former city atty., Medford, 1909-13. Member, Medford Town Club. Democrat. Home: Highcroft Addition. Office: Cooley Theatre Bldg., Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 405


NEFF, PORTER JOSEPH
Lawyer; member firm, Neff & Frohnmayer.
b. Bushnell, Illinois, September 13, 1871; son of John F. and Mary F. (Porter) Neff; educated Minnesota University LL.B. 1894; Delta Tau Delta; m. Isabel Mealey of Minneapolis, Minn. October 19, 1900; resident of Oregon since 1908; director and attorney for Commercial Finance Corp.; president Siskiyou Memorial Association; councilman, Duluth, Minn. several years; former city attorney Medford; member Medford Town Club; Democrat; home Highcroft Addition; office Cooley Theatre Bldg., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, pages 411-412


NEFF, PORTER JOSEPH
    Lawyer
b Bushnell, Ill, Sept 13, 1871; son of John F and Mary F (Porter) N; educ, Minn Univ, LLB, 1894; Delta Tau Delta; m Isabel Mealey of Minneapolis, Minn, Oct 19, 1900; resident of Or since 1908; mem law firm, Neff & Frohnmayer; dir and atty for Commercial Finance Corp; pres, Siskiyou Memorial Assn; councilman, Duluth, Minn, several yrs; former city atty, Medford; mem, Medford Town Club; Democrat; home, Highcroft Addition; office, Cooley Theatre Blg, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 409


    CLAIBORNE NEIL: lives near Ashland; is a farmer; was born in Claiborne County, East Tenn.; came to state in 1853, and to county in 1854; was married Dec. 5, 1839, to Louisa C. Gibson. Children James R., John H., William L., Sarah A., Leander A., Robert P., Louisa C., Thomas S., Tennessee V., Mary A., J. C. and Gertrude.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    CLAIBORNE NEIL. A veteran agriculturist, now living retired in Ashland, Claiborne Neil is numbered among the original settlers of this section of Jackson County. As a pioneer, he came here when the country was in its virgin wildness, schoolhouses, churches, costly residences, and substantial business blocks, barns and outbuildings being conspicuous only by their absence. Neither railways, telegraph or telephone lines spanned these broad lands, few evidences of civilization and refinement being then visible. In the changes that have since taken place, he has been closely identified, contributing his full share in establishing and maintaining beneficial enterprises. Little do the young people of this day and generation realize what they owe to those brave spirits of old, who first uprooted the trees, plowed the sod, and made a broad pathway for the advance of civilization and progress. A native of Tennessee, he was born near Tazewell, March 1, 1821, a son of John Neil, and grandson of Peter Neil, who was born in England, settled as a pioneer farmer in Claiborne County, Tenn., and died near Chattanooga, Tenn., at an advanced age.
    Born in Claiborne County, Tenn., John Neil was there reared and educated. He subsequently bought land in McMinn County, not far from Chattanooga, and there engaged in general farming. A man of strong individuality, well educated and intelligent, he was influential in the community, and one of the leading Democrats of his state. He served as county judge for many years, and as a prominent member of the constitutional amendment convention assisted in framing the laws of Tennessee. He was a deacon of the Baptist Church, and lived for more than four score years. He married Sarah Lane, a native of Tennessee, the daughter of Isaac Lane, a soldier in the Revolutionary War, and subsequently a farmer in McMinn County, Tenn., where he died at the age of eighty years. She, too, attained the age of four score years. Of the eleven children born of their union, three are living, namely: Claiborne, the special subject of this sketch; Mrs. Sarah Fitzgerald, of Lakeview, Ore.; and Joseph, living in Tennessee.
    Brought up on a farm in Tennessee, Claiborne Neil received his early education in the primitive log schoolhouse of these days, when the teacher was paid by a subscription from each pupil. At the age of eighteen years he began the battle of life on his own account. Going with a sister to Missouri just as the Platte purchase was opened, in Buchanan County, he took up a claim, paid some on it, and was there engaged in farming for six years. Returning then to Tennessee he resumed his agricultural labors, remaining there until 1853. The country in that vicinity being so thickly populated with negroes, he decided to migrate to the western frontier. Purchasing oxen, wagons and other necessaries, he started with his wife and six children joining a company of fifty persons, Rev. T. H. Small being captain of the band. Traveling through Kentucky and Illinois to Missouri, the party spent the winter at St. Joseph. Leaving there April 22, 1853, Mr. Neil and his family continued their journey across the plains, coming by the Barlow route, and, although they had one or two skirmishes with the Indians, met with no losses. Arriving in the Santiam Valley September 22, they remained near Brownsville throughout the winter.
    Coming to the Rogue River Valley in the spring of 1854, Mr. Neil took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres five miles south of Ashland, on a creek that was subsequently named in his honor Neil Creek. Indians were very troublesome, keeping the pioneers in a state of terror much of the time. Mr. Neil assisted in building a fort at the Thomas Smith, now the Houck, place, and there the half-dozen families gathered for protection against the Indians. In the Rogue River Indian War that followed he took an active part. Moving his wife and younger children to Yreka, Cal., in the fall of 1855, he with his eldest sons remained on the farm, the family returning home in the spring. Improving a fine homestead, Mr. Neil carried on general farming and stock-raising most successfully for forty-eight years, making improvements of an excellent character. He set out a large orchard of all kinds of fruit, and put in the first irrigating ditch in this section, bringing the water from Neil Creek through the center of his land in such a way that the whole farm can be well irrigated. In 1901, when eighty years of age, he located in Ashland, leaving the care of his home farm to his son, Jefferson C. Politically Mr. Neil is a Democrat, and religiously he is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church.
    Mr. Neil married first Louisa C. Gibson, who was born in Virginia, and died, in 1877, on the home farm, in Oregon. Her parents, James and Hannah Gibson, were natives of Virginia, but removed from there to Tennessee, and then to Buchanan County, Mo., where both spent their declining years. Mr. Neil married second Mrs. Amanda (Downing) Haymond, who was born and reared in Iowa. By his first marriage Mr. Neil had twelve children, namely: J. R., an attorney and ex-judge, living in Jacksonville, Ore.; John H., who died at the age of thirty years; William L., a stockman in Grant County, Ore.; Mrs. Sarah Chapman, residing near Ashland; Leander A., a farmer in Jackson County; Robert P., of whom a brief sketch will be found on another page of this volume; Louisa, wife of J. R. Tozer, of Ashland; Mrs. Jennie Alford, of Klamath County, Ore.; Mrs. Mary E. Dean, of Josephine County, Ore.; Jefferson C., who is carrying on the home farm; Mrs. Gertrude Murphy, of Jackson County; and Thomas, who died at the age of three years.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 671-672


    LEANDER A. NEIL: lives near Ashland; is a farmer and stock raiser; was born in Tennessee; came to state in 1853, and to county in 1854; was married Nov. 14, 1880, to Augusta R. Sisson. Children Elmore S. and Ellis.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


ROBERT P. NEIL
Is the Proper Man for State Senator.
    Robert P. Neil, nominee on the Democratic ticket for state senator, is a self-made man. He was born in McMinn County, Tennessee, April 12, 1851. He crossed the plains to Oregon with his parents in 1853. The first winter was passed in the Willamette Valley. In 1854 his parents located five miles south of Ashland, which place is still retained as the old homestead. His father having a large family to support, Robert struck out for himself at the age of 18, working in summer and going to school in winter. He finally graduated from what was then known as the Ashland College, conducted by Rev. J. H. Skidmore. In 1877 he married Miss Lydia Russell of Ashland.
    For several years Mr. Neil was engaged in the butcher trade in Ashland. In 1883 he sold out, and at the present time was one of the best ranches in the valley, near Ashland, and is engaged in other enterprises. Mr. Neil served as a councilman of Ashland for several terms, and in 1900 was elected mayor of Ashland. For several years he has been a member of the board of regents of the Southern Oregon state normal school. Mr. Neil is a successful business man and known for his integrity and affability. He is well qualified for the office of state senator, which he will fill with credit to himself and his constituents.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 4


    ROBERT PROCTOR NEIL. A pioneer settler of Jackson County, and the son of an honored pioneer, Robert P. Neil, of Ashland, is well worthy of representation in a work of this character. Prominently associated with the industrial progress of this section of the county, being one of its largest landholders, and most active business men, he is widely and favorably known as an upright, straightforward man, and a representative of the leading agriculturists of this part of the state. Coming here as a small child, when a half dozen families constituted almost the entire population of the southern portion of the Rogue River Valley, he has been among the foremost in transforming the wild land into a magnificent agricultural region, which is devoted to general farming and stock-raising. A son of Claiborne Neil, he was born April 12, 1851, in McMinn County, Tenn. His grandfather, John Neil, was a lifelong resident of Tennessee, and was a son of Peter Neil, who emigrated from England to the United States in colonial times. (Further parental and ancestral history may be found elsewhere in this work, in connection with the sketch of Claiborne Neil, a venerable and highly esteemed resident of Ashland.)
    One of the twelve children of Claiborne and Louisa C. (Gibson) Neil, being the sixth child in order of birth, Robert Proctor Neil was two and one-half years old when he came with his parents to Oregon, and three years of age when they located on a farm about five miles south of Ashland, where he grew to manhood. Through the days of his boyhood and youth, he assisted in the farm labors, attending in the meantime the district school. Beginning life for himself at the age of seventeen years, he worked for wages at general farming, and completed his studies at the Ashland Academy, paying his own way through that institution. In 1873, in company with his brother, L. A. Neil, he embarked in the butcher business as a member of the firm of Neil Brothers, proprietors of Central Market. He afterwards continued business on the same site as junior member of the firm of Pelton & Neil, having three hundred and twenty acres of land, on which the slaughterhouse stood, on Bear Creek, in addition renting a large ranch. Continuing thus employed until 1888, Mr. Neil carried on a successful business in that line of industry. Buying then, in company with Mr. Virgin, the Ashland Flouring Mill, he operated it for four years, when he sold out his interest in the plant. In 1892 Mr. Neil purchased the old B. F. Meyer farm of nineteen hundred acres, lying two and one-half miles northwest of the city, with twelve hundred acres of it plowed land. On this ranch, which is the largest in the valley, he raises stock and grain, keeping a high grade of Hereford cattle, and cutting usually one hundred and fifty tons of hay per annum. He has also a stock range of five hundred and sixty acres in Dead Indian Valley, about sixteen miles east of Ashland, and this he devotes to stock-raising, and the raising of hay. He has a valuable residential and business property in the city, and likewise owns considerable real estate in Ashland. A man of energy and enterprise, he has met with far more than average success in his various operations, and is entitled to rank among the leading business men of Jackson County.
    In Ashland, February 25, 1877, Mr. Neil married Miss Lydia F. Russell, a native of Missouri, whence she crossed the plains to Oregon in 1863. Three children have been born of their union; Frederick Robert, who was graduated from the Portland Business College, is associated with his father in stock-raising and also holds the chair of bookkeeping and penmanship in the Southern Oregon State Normal School and is secretary of the faculty; Roy H. died while in the senior class of the Southern Oregon State Normal School, at the age of nineteen years; and Grover Russell is a student in the Southern Oregon Normal School. Mr. Neil has always been deeply interested in promoting the educational welfare of his city and county. He was a member of the board of regents of the old Ashland College, and since that institution was reorganized into the Southern Oregon Normal School he has served continuously as a member of its board of regents, and a member of its executive committee. In December, 1900, he was elected mayor of Ashland, and served for one term. For a number of years he rendered good service as councilman and school director, and is now a member of the Ashland Board of Trade. In national politics Mr. Neil is a sound Democrat, and an ex-member of the county central committee. He is connected with several fraternal organizations, belonging to Ashland Lodge No. 23, A.F.&A.M.; to the Woodmen of the World; to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, of which he is past noble grand and past chief patriarch of the encampment. He is also a member of the Jackson County Pioneer Association. Mr. and Mrs. Neil are members of the Ashland Presbyterian Church, in which Mr. Neil is serving as an elder and trustee.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 677-678


NEILSON, GEORGE WILBERT
District Attorney, Jackson County.
b. Toronto, Canada Sept. 20, 1886; son of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) Neilson; educated public schools Toronto, business college Toronto; University of Oregon LL.B. 1916; m. Dorothea Moore of San Jose, Calif. June 23, 1910; sons Donald W. (Lt. U.S.A.) and John H. (Lt. U.S.A.); railroad employee 1902-21; superintendent P&ERR Medford 1917-21; active law, lumber and mining business 1922 to date; deputy district attorney 1928-40, District Attorney 1940 to date (term of office to 1949); active in the d'Autremont bandit case; Intelligence Service World War I; government appeal agent World War II; owner Associated Lumber Co.; member Oregon State Society, Oregon Bar Association; Elk; Pythian; Eagle; Kiwanian; K.T. Mason; Al Kader Shriner; patron Order of Eastern Star; Republican; Presbyterian; home 436 N. Bartlett; office Courthouse, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 412


NEILSON, GEORGE WILBERT
    District Attorney
b Toronto, Can, Sept 20, 1886; son of John and Elizabeth (Thompson) N; educ, pub schs, Toronto, Business Coll, Toronto; Univ Oreg, LLB, 1916; m Dorothea Moore of San Jose, Cal, June 23, 1910; ch, Donald W, John H; railroad employee, 1902-21; supt, P&ERR, Medford, Or, 1917-21; active law, lbr and mining business, 1922-; deputy dist atty, 1928-40; dist atty, 1940 to date; active in the D'Autremont bandit case; Intelligence Service, WWI; gov't appeal agent, Lumber Co; mem, Oreg State, So Oreg Bar Assn; Elk; Pythian; Eagle; Kiwanian; KT Mason; Al Kader Shriner; Eastern Star (patron); Repub; Presbyterian; home, 436 N Bartlett; ofc, Court House, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 528


    GUS NEWBURY. Although admitted to the bar as recently as 1902, Gus Newbury already has a gratifying clientele, recruited from the ranks of those who, for many years, have watched his growing success as an educator. In his case it would seem that teaching is contagious, for three of the two sons and two daughters in his father's family have achieved excellent results along educational lines, all having contributed to the advancement of the schools of Jackson County. Mr. Newbury was born in Tioga County, Pa., March 27, 1869, his father, George W., a native of England, being at the time engaged in milling and mill-building, an occupation to which he devoted the most of his active life. The elder Newbury died in Tioga County at the age of eighty-seven years, and is survived by his wife, formerly Barbara Yaudas, a native of Germany, who now lives in Jacksonville, Ore., with her daughter, Mrs. Mary Peter.
    The boyhood of Gus Newbury was characterized by excessive zeal as a student, and by considerable expenditure of midnight oil. At the age of sixteen he entered upon his educational career in Jacksonville, to which he came in 1881, and taught continuously in the town and county until engaging in the practice of law. For five years he was vice-principal of the schools of Jacksonville, and in 1894 was elected county superintendent of schools on the Republican ticket, in 1896 being re-elected, and serving in all four years. In 1898 he was elected county clerk, succeeding himself in the election of 1900. In the meantime, in 1894, he began the study of law, and since being admitted to practice has devoted his entire time to his professional duties. At present he is a clerk on the school board, and is a member of the Republican county central committee. Mr. Newbury is also an active member of the board of trade.
    In Jacksonville, in 1893, Mr. Newbury was united in marriage with Nellie Rose, a native daughter of this county, and whose father, L. A. Rose, is a farmer in the vicinity of Phoenix, this state. Maud, Donald, and Carl, the three children born of this union, are living at home and are being educated in the public schools. Mr. Newbury is connected with Warren Lodge No. 10, A. F. & A. M., of Jacksonville, Ore.; the Eastern Star; Medford Lodge, Knights of Pythias; Woodmen of the World; and the Artisans, in which he has passed all of the chairs.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co. 1904, page 826


    NICKELL, CHARLES, whose upward career in Oregon is attracting favorable notice, was born at Yreka, Cal., on the 27th day of February, 1856. His parents had been drawn to that part of the country on account of the great gold stir, and the early environments of their son's life were of a nature calculated to inspire him with an adventurous spirit. Before he was fourteen he assisted Professor Duenkel in the English-German school for a period of four months. From the school room Mr. Nickell stepped into the Yreka Journal office, and for two years learned the rudiments of the typographical profession. In 1871 the Democratic Times, of Jacksonville, Ore., required a quick, reliable worker, and Mr. Nickell was engaged. Within a year he rose to the position of city editor, having charge of the local news department, notwithstanding that he was but sixteen years old. Shortly after he, with P. D. Hull, purchased the Times. Mr. Nickell assumed editorial charge of the paper, and the prospects for a successful career seemed bright. Then came a fire, and paper, press, and type were turned into smoldering ruins. July, 1873, witnessed the resurrection of the journal and the continuance of the partnership. In 1874 Mr. Nickell purchased the entire interest in the Times, and from that time to the present has remained sole proprietor of the newspaper. His work in establishing the property on a paying basis has been fraught with a rare degree of success. From a small folio sheet with the modest patronage of four hundred and eighty subscribers, the Times, in his hands, has grown to a paper containing thirty-six columns subscribed for by over 2400 people and patronized by leading advertisers. Ever since his majority Mr. Nickell has rendered active service to the Democratic Party. He has been present at nearly all the state conventions since 1878. In 1886 he was the Democratic candidate for State Printer. In June, 1892, he was elected a member of the Oregon Legislature by a large majority. He has served his town as councilman for several terms and is prominent in every enterprise. Mr. Nickell is eminent as a journalist in the Northwest, and has served as president and secretary of the Oregon Press Association. When the National Editorial Association met at St. Paul, Minn., in 1891, he represented Oregon in the convention, and was chosen a delegate to the same body in 1892. In all his achievements, public and private, he has been actuated by motives of the highest order, and the place which he holds today in the esteem of his many friends is one of admiration and respect.
Julian Hawthorne, The Story of Oregon, vol. II, New York 1892, pages 456-457


    M. NICKELSON: lives at Ashland; is a blacksmith; was born in Holland County, Norway, May 26, 1831; came to America July, 1849, and to Oregon in 1854.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



NIEDERMEYER, Henry Frederick
Farm and Community Leader.
b. Medford, Oregon April 1, 1901; son of Louis and Charlotte (Bergfeld) Niedermeyer; educated public and high schools (correspondence course in business management); m. Marion Gray of Medford March 4, 1932; child Evelyn Carol; began working for father on farm; became partner 1922-29; partnership with brother, Niedermeyer Bros. 1929-38; operator, owner 1938-; director Niedermeyer Inc. (commercial building owners); member, secretary, Jackson County Selective Service Board No. 1 1940-47; director Medford Gun Club; Granger (past master); secretary, past president Jackson County Recreation Club; Elk; Republican; Presbyterian (trustee); address Rt. No. 2, Box 466, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 417


NILES, EDWARD CHATFIELD
Lumberman; Manager, Medford Lumber Company.
b. Minneapolis, Minnesota, Feb. 27, 1909; son of John D. and Gertrude (Chatfield) Niles; educated Minneapolis public schools; University of Minnesota, Forestry, Commercial Lumbering 1931; Tau Phi Delta; m. Helen Marie Schonebaum of Minneapolis October 14, 1933; children Robert John, Bruce; began at Canfield Dietrich Lumber Company, St. Louis Park 1931; with U.S. Forest Service 1935-42; entered lumber business Medford, Oregon; manager Medford Lumber Company 1945-; member Young Men's Christian Association board 1946-; served on Community Chest committee; Kiwanian (president 1947); Elk; Republican; Presbyterian; home Rt. 1, Box 524; office 3rd and Fir, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 417


NILES, EDWARD CHATFIELD
    Lumberman; Manager,
    Medford Lumber Company
b Minneapolis, Minn, Feb 27, 1909; son of John D and Gertrude (Chatfield) N; educ, Minneapolis pub schs; Univ Minn, Forestry, Commercial Lumbering,1931; Tau Phi Delta; m Helen Marie Schonebaum of Minneapolis, Oct 14, 1933; ch, Robert, John, Bruce; began at Canfield Dietrich Lumber Co, St Louis Park, 1931; with US Forest Service, 1935-42; entered lumber business, Medford, Or; mgr, Medford Lbr Co, 1945-; mem, YMCA bd, 1946 to date; committee, Community Chest; Kiwanian (pres, 1947); Elk; Repub; Presbyterian; home, Rt 1, Box 524; ofc, 3rd and Fir, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 542


    WARREN H. NORCROSS. The genealogy of the Norcross family is traced to William Norcross, who came from England in an early period of our country's history. Accompanying him were two sons, one of whom settled in Maine. From him descended John Norcross, a native of Maine, and a school teacher by occupation. While visiting a brother in Pennsylvania he made the acquaintance of the lady who afterward became his wife. For a time they resided in Vermont, but later made their home in New York, and as early as 1839 became pioneers of Wisconsin, where they spent their remaining years. They were happy in their married life and in death were not long divided. When he was seventy-seven and she seventy-six years of age they passed away within two days of each other and were buried in the same grave. In their family were four sons and two daughters. One of the sons of the family, Walter W., was born in Baldwinsville, Onondaga County, N.H., February 28, 1824, being the youngest of the children. When a boy he attended district schools in New York and Wisconsin, but the knowledge he possessed was acquired less from textbooks than from habits of observation and self-culture. In 1840 he took up a tract of government land near LaGrange, Walworth County, Wis., and there he continued to reside until, feeling the burden of advancing years, he retired from active cares. His last days were spent in the town of LaGrange, where his life came to an end after seventy-two useful and honorable years. In 1849 he married Lucy A. Moore, who was born in New York state, in the town of Millsville, August 4, 1833, and now makes her home at Whitewater, Wis. Of their union were born the following named children: Edward J., of California; Leonard L., of South Dakota; Warren H., of Oregon; Zoa E., Mrs. Arnold, of Iowa; Lucy A., Mrs. Brown, of Wisconsin; Sarah, Mrs. Holt, also of Wisconsin, and Justice B., who is manager of a mine in Bisbee, Ariz.
    On the home farm near LaGrange, Walworth County, Wis., Warren H. Norcross was born July 22, 1855. Excellent advantages were given him in youth. After having completed the studies of the LaGrange public school, he carried on supplementary studies in Whitewater (Wis.) Normal School and later was a student in Milton (Wis.) College. His first occupation was that of teaching, which he followed in Newburg, Minn. In 1874 he went to Ida Grove, Iowa, where he taught school for four years. On abandoning that work, in 1878, he entered the employ of the Sioux City Nursery & Seed Company, with whom he remained as field manager for nine years, meanwhile gaining a thorough knowledge of the nursery business in all of its details. His interest in the fruit business dates from that period, and the large fund of information on the subject which he now possesses was acquired during those years of active experience. Before leaving Iowa he was united in marriage, January 22, 1888, with Lola M. Hull, who was born near Logan, that state. Their family comprises four children, Eva G., W. F. Hull, Paul J., and Helen.
    In the spring of 1888 Mr. Norcross came to Oregon and settled in Jackson County, where soon afterward he bought twenty-four acres one mile east of Central Point. The entire tract was heavily timbered, and it represented the work of many months and years to remove the timber and bring the land under cultivation, but this he has done, and in addition has erected a neat frame dwelling and good outbuildings. The improvement of this desirable property by no means represents the limit of Mr. Norcross
' activities. Finding upon experimenting that fruit could be successfully grown in this locality, he planted his place in an apple orchard and established here the first nursery in the vicinity of Central Point. This he has since conducted, although it is his present intention to retire from the business as soon as practicable. Another important organization which owes its inception largely to his enthusiastic support is the Rogue River Fruit Growers' Union, of which he is secretary and manager and which has its office and packing house at Medford. No man in the valley has done more than he to advance the fruit industry, and the large success it has attained may be attributed in a considerable measure to his keen judgment and thorough knowledge of the business. Aside from voting the Republican ticket at elections and holding membership in the Ancient Order of United Workmen (in which he has held all the chairs) he has devoted his attention wholly to the fruit industry since coming to Southern Oregon.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 951-952


    JOHN R. NORRIS. A prominent business man of Ashland, John R. Norris is actively associated with its mercantile progress as a member of the well-known firm of Vaupel, Norris & Drake. He is a man of mark, and of recognized worth as a citizen, his ability and integrity being unquestioned and his character irreproachable. As to his private affairs, he is enterprising and progressive, rarely allowing anything that might improve his business methods to escape his notice. A son of Ralph S. Norris, he was born September 6, 1862, in Galena, Ill. He comes of English ancestry, his Grandfather Norris having been born and reared in England, afterwards emigrating to the United States, and settling in Maryland.
    Born in Maryland, near Baltimore, Ralph S. Norris was there reared and educated. As a young man, he took up his residence in Illinois, and was for some time engaged in mining pursuits in Grant and Jo Daviess counties. Making his home in the latter county, he ran a furnace there for a number of seasons. Subsequently buying a farm about three miles from Galena, on Hazel Green, he embarked in agricultural pursuits, continuing thus employed until his death, in 1887, at the age of sixty-nine years. He was active in the management of public affairs, and for fourteen years served as county clerk of Jo Daviess County, being re-elected to the position six times. He married Phoebe S. Wood, who was born in Alabama, and brought up near Gratiot Grove, Wis., where her father, Jeremiah Wood, was a pioneer school teacher.
    The youngest child of the parental household, John R. Norris, spent his earlier years in the vicinity of Galena, Ill., acquiring his rudimentary education in the public schools. Subsequently being graduated from the academical department of Beloit College, in Wisconsin, he entered the college as a pupil, and completed the freshman course of study. The ensuing year he worked on the home farm, assisting his father in its care. In 1883 he came to Oregon, locating in Ashland, where his sister, Mrs. McLean, was then residing. His first employment in this locality was that of chain bearer for the surveyors in constructing the railroad addition to the eastern part of the city. For nine years afterwards Mr. Norris was a clerk for J. M. McCall, in the store which is now a part of his own establishment. In May, 1893, forming a partnership with Messrs. Vaupel and Drake, he bought out Mr. McCall, and embarked in business on his own account as a member of the firm of Vaupel, Norris & Drake. Subsequently buying out D. R. and E. V. Mills, this firm has built up an extensive and prosperous business, being the leading merchants of Jackson County. The large, double store occupied by this firm is 40x100 feet, and is well stocked with a choice assortment of general merchandise.
    In Ashland, Mr. Norris married Sarah May Drake, a native of Jacksonville, Ore., where her father, the late M. H. Drake, was a pioneer settler. Born and reared in Steuben County, N.Y., M. H. Drake came by way of Cape Horn to the Pacific Coast in 1852, and for six or more years was engaged in mining in California, afterwards being in the stock business in the vicinity of Stockton. Coming to Oregon in 1859, he stopped at first in Portland, remaining there until September of that year, when he settled in Jackson County, taking up land, and engaging in the raising of stock, near Jacksonville. Removing with his family to Ashland in 1873, he resided here until his death, in 1893. He served for a time as county commissioner of Jackson County, and was identified by membership with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. He married Elizabeth Preator, who was born in Ione, Cal., of English ancestry, both of her parents having been natives of England. Mrs. Drake survived her husband, and is now living in Ashland. Mr. and Mrs. Drake became the parents of five children, namely: Frederick M., junior member of the firm of Vaupel, Norris & Drake; Ida, who died in the seventh year of her age; Belle, wife of J. S. Parson, of Ashland; Sarah May, now Mrs. Norris; and Ella, wife of George S. Calhoun, of Grants Pass, Ore. A native of Jacksonville, Ore., Frederick M. Drake was educated in the public schools of Jackson County, and for four years after leaving school was a clerk in his father's store. For seven years thereafter, he was a resident of Harney County, Ore., being associated with his father in the cattle business. On retiring from that industry he engaged in mercantile pursuits with his present partners, becoming junior member of the firm. A staunch Republican in his political convictions, Mr. Norris is a member, and ex-president, of the Ashland school board. He is also a member, and the vice-president, of the Ashland Board of Trade. He is connected with several fraternal organizations, being a member of the Knights of Pythias, of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, and of the Woodmen of the World. Mrs. Norris is a member of the Presbyterian Church.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 526-527


NUTTING, BERNARD LEE, SR.
Manager, Medford Corporation.
b. Iron River, Wisconsin July 18, 1901; son of Henry Lee and Nelda (Rossman ) Nutting; educated public schools Columbia City, high schools Silverton, Salem; Oregon State college B.S. 1923; Kappa Sigma, Xi Sigma Pi; m. Ruby A. Swanson of Bellingham, Wash. Aug. 27, 1927; children Bernard L. Jr. and Ronald Gene; began as tallyman, yard foreman, California-Oregon Lumber Co. (now Medford Corp.) since 1924, various positions from yard foreman to assistant manager 1938; manager 1940-; member executive committee West Coast Bureau, Lumber Grades and Inspection; director Willamette Valley Lumberman's Association; trustee Pine Industrial Relations Committee; served on City Budget commission; Medford; director Community Chest 1944; director YMCA 1943 to date (president 1946); director Keep Oregon Green committee; Rotarian; member Chamber of Commerce (director three terms); member Izaak Walton League; Mason; Elk; Republican; Protestant; home 31 Glen Oak Court; office N. Riverside Ave., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 421


NUTTING, BERNARD LEE, Sr.
    Manager, Medford Corporation
b Iron River, Wisc, July 18, 1901; son of Henry Lee and Nelda (Rossman) N; educ, pub sch, Columbia City, high sch, Silverton, Salem; Oreg State Coll, BS, 19_; Kappa Sigma, Xi Sigma Pi; m Ruby A Swanson of Bellingham, Wn, Aug 27, 1927; ch, Bernard L Jr, Ronald G; began as tallyman, yard foreman, Cal, Oreg Lbr Co, Brookings, Or; with Owen-Oreg Lumber Co (now Medford Corp) since 1924, various positions from yard foreman to asst mgr, 1938; mgr, 1940-; mem exec com, West Coast Bur Lbr Grades and Inspection; dir, Willamette Valley Lbrman's Assn; trustee, Pine Industrial Relations Comm; served on City Budget Comm, Medford; dir, Community Chest, 1944; dir, YMCA, 1943 to date (pres, 1946); dir, Keep Oreg Green Committee; member, Chamber Commerce (dir, three terms); Izaak Walton League; Rotarian; Mason; Elk; Repub; Protestant; home, 31 Glen Oak Ct; ofc, N Riverside Ave, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 539


HARRISON B. OATMAN.
    This gentleman came to Oregon in the pioneer days, made his home here, invested every cent of money which he possessed in our land, and ever since has had his interests identified with that of the state. Such being the case, he ever stood ready to contribute his share by word and act toward its prosperity, and the result has been that today Mr. Oatman is one of our large land owners, and possesses multifarious interests throughout our city and state. He was born in Courtland, New York, in 1826. When a child his parents moved to Bellevue, Ohio, where he attended school, and when he was at the age of twelve they again removed, this time to Rockford, Illinois, in which place they farmed for four years. At the age of twenty-one, Mr. Oatman was married to Miss Lucena K. Ross, and in the year 1852 he, with his wife and family, crossed the plains to Oregon and located in Rogue River Valley, where he engaged in farming and afterwards mined and trafficked in merchandise. He remained there fourteen years and then came to Portland, where he has since resided. On arriving here, he went into the grocery business, and, becoming the owner of considerable real estate, he finally gave up the grocery trade and devoted himself solely to speculating in lands. Last October, when the Metropolitan Savings Bank was organized, Mr. Oatman was one of the first subscribers to its stock, and he is now one of its heaviest stockholders. On April 4, 1865, Mr. Oatman joined the First Oregon Infantry, and after serving two years, was mustered out July 14, 1867. It was said that this company was the last one composed of white men in the volunteer service. In this company Mr. Oatman was made lieutenant and was frequently commended for gallant conduct on the field.
Frank E. Hodgkin and J. J. Galvin, Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon, 1882, pages 118-119


    OATMAN, HARRISON B., of Portland, was born in Courtland County, New York, February 25, 1826. His father, Harvey B. Oatman, died one year after the birth of our subject. One year later he accompanied his mother to Bellevue, Huron County, Ohio, where the family remained ten years and then settled in West Liberty, Ohio. Here they remained four years, after which they removed to Elgin, Illinois, and a few years later to Ogle County, in the same state. The latter place was at this time a new country, and here Mr. Oatman commenced life on his own account as a farmer on land obtained from the government. On December, 25, 1847, he was married to Miss Lucena K. Ross, a most estimable lady, who from that day to the present time has not only shared his fortunes, but has been a most excellent wife and mother and in its highest sense a worthy helpmate and companion.
    He remained at Ogle until the fall of 1852, when he removed to Des Moines, Iowa, and the following summer (1853) with his brother, Harvey B. Oatman, and their families, started on the long journey across the plains to Oregon. After several weary months of traveling they arrived in the Rogue River Valley, in the fall of 1853, and here the two brothers and their wives took up a claim of 640 acres to which they were entitled under the donation act, near Phoenix. The old wagon which had survived the journey of more than 3,000 miles was placed on the line dividing the respective claims and served as a place of habitation until a log cabin could be erected, and in this primitive way they commenced life in Oregon.
    For fourteen years following Mr. Oatman remained in the Rogue River Valley engaged in farming, mining and merchandising. He was a part owner of the mine of the "49" Mining Company in Southern Oregon, retaining his interest until after he had located in Portland. He also established the first store in Phoenix, which he successfully conducted for some time. Numerous incidents occurred during the period Mr. Oatman resided in Rogue River Valley illustrating the dangers of pioneer life in Oregon at that day. Perhaps the most thrilling incident in his experience occurred on September 25, 1855. On the preceding day Mr. Oatman, with Daniel P. Brittain and Calvin M. Field, started from Phoenix, each with ox teams and a load of flour destined for Yreka, California. Camping the first night near the foot of the Siskiyou Mountains, the train started up the ascent in the morning, Mr. Oatman in the lead. When within 300 feet of the summit the party was fired upon by Indians. Field and a young man by the name of Cunningham, who was passing at the time, were killed, Mr. Oatman alone escaping of those attacked, as Mr. Brittain, who was in the rear of the party had not reached the scene, but having heard the shots fired in the vicinity of the men in advance, fled down the mountain to the Mountain House, three miles from the place of attack. Mr. Oatman, although within sixty feet of the guns, miraculously escaped unhurt and fled to the Mountain House for assistance. Before leaving, the Indians killed thirteen of the oxen, the remainder of them escaping. The attack was without provocation and the first in a series of Indian outrages which led to the greatest Indian war known on the Pacific Coast, which raged along the Columbia, around Puget Sound and in the region of Rogue River, from the fall of 1855 to the summer of 1856. No less than 4,000 warriors were at times in arms against the whites, and only a lack of hearty and intelligent cooperation on the part of the hostiles saved the outlaying settlements from total annihilation, and the more populous communities of the Willamette Valley from all the horrors of barbaric warfare.
    The first years of the war of the rebellion passed without faraway Oregon experiencing much of the hardships of the great struggle. But as it grew in magnitude and hundreds of thousands of men were needed by the North to carry on the gigantic strife, the regular troops were withdrawn from the remote frontiers and sent to the front. Oregon, in common with the other states and territories of the Pacific Coast, was left exposed to the hostility of the Indians, who immediately after the departure of the troops who had kept them in peaceful subjection, began to assume a warlike attitude and on several occasions were guilty of acts of violence. In this emergency the loyal men of Oregon were called upon to defend the life and property of the people. Mr. Oatman was among those who promptly volunteered for this service and on April 4, 1865, enlisted in the United States Army, to serve during the war, being mustered in at Camp Baker, Rogue River Valley, as first lieutenant of Company I, Captain F. B. Sprague, First Regiment of Oregon Infantry. The services of this regiment were confined to the protection of the frontier and in operations against the Indians, being actively employed until mustered out July 19, 1867, and supposed to be the last volunteer regiment discharged from service by the government.
    Mr. Oatman made a highly commendable record as a soldier, on several occasions being entrusted with important duties, which he discharged in such manner as to receive high praise from his superior officers. On October 14, 1866, he was ordered by Capt. Sprague, with twenty-two men from his command, and four Klamath Indians as scouts, to proceed from Fort Klamath and to scout the country from that point east to Camp Bidwell, California. On the day following the order he started on his mission, and in seven days arrived at Camp Bidwell, 153 miles distant. On the return Lieut. Oatman's command was joined by a small detachment of regular troops, under Lieut. Small, U.S. Cavalry, and on October 25th an engagement was had with a band of Snake Indians, in the vicinity of Lake Abert. In this engagement, which lasted for three hours, the Indians numbering seventy strong were completely routed, fourteen were killed, more than twenty wounded and fifteen lodges, together with winter supplies for a hundred men were destroyed. For his service in this battle Lieut. Oatman's conduct was highly commended in general orders by Major General George F. Steele in command of the Department of the Columbia, while Lieut. Small in his report of the battle stated: "Lieut. Oatman commanded the line on the left with commendable skill and energy, and the troops acquitted themselves throughout the engagement in the most soldierly manner."
    In October, following his discharge from the army, Mr. Oatman with his family located in Portland, where he has ever since resided. He first embarked in the grocery business, in which he continued for some two years alone, after which Hon. Van B. DeLashmutt became a partner. The latter was succeeded as a partner by Frank Hackney, with whom Mr. Oatman remained in partnership about two years. At this time he had become the owner of considerable real estate, and he gave up the grocery business that he might devote his attention to land speculation. In 1872, with Mr. DeLashmutt, he embarked in a real estate and brokerage business. They are still associated in numerous purchases of real estate in and near the vicinity of Portland, owning many acres of very valuable land. Mr. Oatman has been very successful in his real estate speculations, which have been conducted on a large scale, and which already have realized him a large fortune. He was one of the first subscribers to the stock of the Metropolitan Savings Bank, and is also largely interested in the Coeur d'Alene mines.
    As a business man Mr. Oatman has achieved a high degree of success. He started in life with very limited educational advantages, and without the aid or assistance of money or influential friends. All that he has he has acquired by his own exertion, and is a fine type of the so-called self-made man, of whom the Pacific Slope furnishes so many illustrious examples. He is a man of cheerful, jovial nature, who looks on the bright side of life and believes in extracting all the good out of existence possible and consistent with right living.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oatman have had four children, all of whom are living. The eldest, James Harvey, is a very prosperous merchant at Bonanza, in Southern Oregon, while the other children, Charles, John and Lucena, are living at home with their parents.

H. V. Scott, History of Portland, Oregon, 1890, pages 617-619



HARRISON B. OATMAN, one of Oregon's respected pioneers, came to the state in 1853. He was born in Cortland, New York, February 26, 1826. His parents, Harry B. and Matilda (Knapp) Oatman, removed to Ohio, where the subject of this sketch was raised until his twelfth year. He then went to Rockford and was married there to Lucinda K. Ross in 1847. She was a native of Orleans County, New York, and the daughter of Nathan K. and Lucy (Braman) Ross. When Mr. and Mrs. Oatman came to Oregon they settled first in Jackson County, on a donation claim. Their house was contrived out of the wagon cover with which they had crossed the plains, and it was in these wilds that they lived. Their nearest neighbor was over a mile off. When the Rogue River Indian war broke out, Mr. Oatman enlisted in Company I, First Oregon Infantry, and was stationed at Fort Klamath. He was made first lieutenant at the close of the war and was mustered out. After he had spent several years at the mines he located a mile south of Phoenix, in Jackson County. He took out considerable gold from what was called the Forty-Niner Claim. In the fall of 1867 he sold it and came to Portland and engaged in the retail grocery trade, on the corner of First and Main streets. After five successful years of business he sold out and embarked in the real estate business on his own account. The constant increase in the value of land in Portland and vicinity crowned his efforts with success and resulted in his amassing a large amount of property. He purchased a farm three and one-half miles southeast of the center of the city of Portland and built a house upon it in 1877. He cleared up the land, and one of the railroads runs through the property. He has enlarged and rebuilt the residence, and now has a beautiful home and the land is valued at $1,500 an acre. Seventeen years ago it cost $20 an acre. Mr. Oatman has a large amount of city property.
    They have four children: James Harvey, married to Priscilla Dollarhide of Iowa, and have six children. The other children are Charles, John R. and Lucena, now the wife of C. W. Kern.
    Mr. Oatman is a member of the G.A.R. and of the Masonic fraternity. In politics he is a Republican. At the time of writing this article Mr. Oatman was in poor health, and most of the material for the article was given by his son James Harvey. Mr. Oatman is a good man, a worthy pioneer, and his many friends wish him a speedy recovery.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, pages 315-316


    J. H. OATMAN: lives near Phoenix; is a farmer; was born in Ogle County, Ill., Jan. 28, 1849; came to state and county in 1853; was married Dec. 31, 1875, to Priscilla Dollarhide. Children Olive I. and Jessie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    BARTLETT OBENCHAIN: lives near Central Point; is a farmer and stock grower; came to state and county in 1862; married June 23, 1850 to Nancy Morse. Children Elias N. (deceased), Alice I., Hiram N. (deceased), Elizabeth H. (deceased), Maldoren, Jennie, Silas H., Sarah M., Nancy M., Minnie C. and George E.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    BARTLETT OBENCHAIN. During the forty-one years of its existence in Jackson County, the family to which Bartlett Obenchain belongs has been the only unbroken one between Gold Hill and Jacksonville. Its members have uniformly cherished high ideals, and have been exceptionally worthy from the standpoint of character and ability. Painstaking and conservative, and never wasting their energies in useless directions, they have built up a strong wall of popular esteem, and are valued as exemplary and notable acquisitions to a prosperous and promising community.
    Bartlett Obenchain, representing the second generation in the West, was born in Botetourt County, Va., September 22, 1827, the son of John and Margaret (Obenchain) Obenchain, natives of Virginia and of German descent. The year after the birth of Bartlett the family removed to Indiana, remaining there until settling in Illinois in 1842. Two years later they made their way to Iowa, and in 1861 crossed the plains with horse and mule teams, being on the road about six months. Six months in the mines of California sufficed as an experiment of more or less doubtful character, and the family then came to Oregon, settling first near Central Point, Jackson County. Soon after they moved to Butte Creek, where the father farmed and raised stock for the balance of his life, and died in 1884 aged eighty-four years, and where his wife also died four years later at the age of eighty-eight years. Besides Bartlett, the oldest of the ten children, those living are John, of Butte Creek; and Washington, of Klamath County.
    Educated in the public schools, Bartlett Obenchain had the advantage of the schools of Indiana, Illinois and Iowa, and passed his youth in toil on the home farm, leaving it only upon the occasion of his marriage, June 23, 1850, with Nancy Morse, who was born in Erie County, Pa., February 16, 1836, a daughter of Samuel L. Morse, own cousin of Professor Morse, inventor of the telegraph. Mrs. Obenchain's brother, Amasa Morse, met a tragic death at the hands of the Indians during the Rogue River War, November 20, 1855. At the time he was an enlisted soldier in Company B, First Oregon Volunteers, under command of Capt. R. L. Williams. Amasa Morse was born in Ontario, Canada, in 1828, in time removing with his family to Iowa, from which state he crossed the plains in 1853, settling in Josephine County, where he mined on Althouse Creek until the outbreak of the Rogue River War.
    After his marriage Mr. Obenchain went to housekeeping in Buchanan County, Iowa, afterward living in several counties in the state until coming to the West in the spring of 1861. Starting April 28, he crossed the plains with horse teams, being five months on the way, and encountering no serious trouble with the Indians. He first located in Marysville, Cal., and after following teaming for nine months came to Oregon, reaching his present farm June 18, 1862. This farm consists of one hundred and forty-nine acres of land, and is located one mile west of Central Point, its points of vantage being manifold, and its improvements of the highest order. Mr. Obenchain has never been content to follow the example of others in the management of his farm, but has continually sought broader methods, welcoming any advance based upon utility and practical common sense. Twelve children have been born to himself and wife, of whom Alice A. is the wife of James Lindsley of Klamath County; Maldoren lives at Gold Hill; Jennie is the wife of J. Wilson of Klamath County; Silas is a farmer of Klamath County; Sarah M. is the wife of O. R. Pankey of Central Point; Nannie is the wife of William H. Pankey of Klamath County; Minnie is the wife of Fred Peninger of Gold Hill; and George is a farmer and stock-raiser of Klamath County. Mr. Obenchain is a Republican in politics, as have been his father and grandfather, his sons adhering to the same political principles. Mrs. Obenchain has been a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church since her fourteenth year.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 868


    GEORGE WASHINGTON OBENCHAIN. A native of Indiana, since coming west, in 1861, Mr. Obenchain has resided almost continuously in Oregon, where he has made a record for himself as a successful rancher and stockman, and as a man of enterprise and progressiveness. As in the case of many others, his land when purchased was without a single improvement, and the energy of Mr. Obenchain is proven by the fact that not only is it now under cultivation, but it has been added to until now there is a fine eight-hundred-acre farm in place of the original purchase of one hundred and fifty-eight acres.
    The Obenchains originally came from Germany, but the father, John Obenchain, was a native of Virginia, being a farmer by occupation. After his marriage in that state he removed to Indiana, locating in Putnam County until 1844, when he went west to Illinois for the winter. In the spring of the next year Mr. Obenchain located in Iowa, first in Linn County, but afterwards in Buchanan County, where he remained until his removal west. His first trip to the Far West was in 1850, at which date he traveled to Yreka, Cal., engaging in mining there for two years and returning to Iowa in 1852. Again going westward, this time accompanied by his family, he located in California at Marysville for one winter, removing to Oregon in the spring. A permanent settlement was made in Jackson County, where the father engaged in stock-raising on Butte Creek until 1893, when he departed this life, at the age of eighty-five years. His marriage had united him with Miss Margaret Deady. a Pennsylvanian, who also passed away when about eighty-four years old. Of the nine children born to this honored couple, but three are now living, as follows: Bartlett. a resident of Central Point, Ore.; John, of Brownsboro, Jackson County, Ore.; and G. W., of Bly. Three sons and three daughters are deceased; Julia Anne, Emma, Jane, Davis, James and Madison.
    February 22, 1835 marks the birth, at Fincastle, Putnam County, Ind., of George Washington Obenchain, who when a boy was taken by his parents to Iowa, where his early education was received. When the family crossed the great plains to Oregon G. W. accompanied them, and in 1866, after a few years' residence there
, spent two years in Idaho during the gold excitement there. The Sprague River Valley first became his home in 1877, when he brought a herd of cattle to that place and located permanently, purchasing his ranch of which we have spoken. Besides his general farming interests, he makes a specialty of stock-raising, with splendid success, owning two hundred head of fine cattle and eighty horses. As he has all his life been honest and persevering, success has crowned his efforts as a natural result. As consistent in his political views as in other matters, Mr. Obenchain has been a Republican all his life, and supports that party to the best of his ability.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 984


    MADISON OBENCHAIN. During many years of active life in Jackson County Madison Obenchain was known as an industrious and worthy citizen and one who was always ready to lend a helping hand to those less fortunate than himself. The patience with which he bore a long and trying illness, which terminated in his death December 29, 1896, was indicative of the unselfish nature of his character, which invariably evidenced greater thought for others than for himself. As a youth of eighteen he came to Oregon in 1862 from Buchanan County, Iowa, where he was born January 29, 1846, and where his father owned a large farm. The family located on Butte Creek, Jackson County, Ore., in the spring of 1863, and here Madison lived and worked until about twenty-five years of age. He then came to Jacksonville and engaged in a butchering business for a short time, and in 1880 removed to Klamath County, where he took up four hundred acres of land and engaged in cattle-raising on a large scale. He cleared a large portion of his farm, made many fine improvements, and prospered greatly until stricken with illness, during which time he was in Jacksonville, surrounded by his friends, and cared for by his faithful and devoted wife.
    Near Jacksonville Mr. Obenchain married Minnie Krach, who was born in Germany, a daughter of Simon Krach, a native of the same portion of the Fatherland. Mrs. Obenchain's mother, Dora (Topper) Krach, after being left a widow in the country across the sea, brought her daughter Minnie to America, and settled on a farm near Jacksonville. Subsequently she lived with her daughter until her death in 1888, at the age of sixty-nine years. Franklin, the only child born to Mr. and Mrs. Obenchain, is one of the wide-awake and successful farmers of Klamath County, and at present is living on and managing his late father's property in that county. Mr. Obenchain added to his land from time to time, and at his death owned four hundred acres which has since been added to and is owned by his wife and managed by his son. It is one of the finest farms in that section, and the progressive son is continually adding to the improvements made by his father. It is located near Bly, between Lakeview and Klamath Falls. Mrs. Obenchain also owns town property, including her pleasant home. Her motherly and domestic spirit is shown in the air of comfort which pervades the interior, and the love of nature which is manifest in the pretty arrangement of flowers and shrubs on the surrounding grounds. Mrs. Obenchain can only think of her husband as the personification of kindness and consideration in his family. While an ardent Republican, he never cared for office or the turmoil of political agitations. For many years of his life he was identified with the Masonic fraternity and was prominent in the lodge of Jackson County.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 869


O'BRIEN, IDA BELLE
    Director of Training; Associate Professor Education,
    Southern Oregon State Normal School
b. Oxford, Iowa, Nov. 19, 1880; educ., Iowa State Teachers College, 1901 and 1903; Drake Univ. 1906-1907; Univ. of Iowa, B.S. 1927; Univ. of Southern Calif., M.S., 1932; Pi Lambda Theta. Unmarried. Teacher, elementary schools, Iowa, Washington, and Minnesota, 1903-1916, principal grade school, North English, Iowa, 1916-18; supt. of schools, Iowa County, Iowa, 1918-1924. Primary supervisor, Conn. State Board of Educ., Canaan, Conn. 1927-1930. Primary supervisor and instructor in education, Southern Oregon State Normal School, 1930-1931; intermediate supervisor and instructor in education, 1932-1934. Author: A Comparison of the Use of Intensive Training and of Wide Reading in the Improvement of Reading, publ., Educational Method, Mar. 1931; A Drive on English in a Rural Supervisory District, publ., Elementary English Jurisdiction Journal, April, 1931; A Unified Course in Social Studies and Sciences in Primary Grades, pub., Oregon Education Journal, March, April, 1932. Member, American Assn. of Univ. Women. Republican. Christian Scientist. Home: 316 Hargadine St. Office: So. Ore. State Normal School, Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 414


O'BRIEN, IDA BELLE
Educator.
b. Oxford, Iowa Nov. 19, 1880; daughter of Joel Pleasant and Emma Isabelle (Williams) O'Brien; educated Iowa State Teachers College 1901, 1903; Drake University 1906-07; University of Iowa B.A. 1927; University of Southern California M.S. 1932; Pi Lambda Theta; teacher elementary schools Iowa, Washington and Minnesota 1903-16; principal grade schools, North English, Iowa 1916-18; superintendent of schools Iowa County, Iowa 1918-24; primary supervisor Connecticut State Board of Education, Canaan, Conn. 1927-30; primary supervisor and instructor in education Southern Oregon College of Education 1930-31; intermediate supervisor and instructor in education 1932-34; Supervisor of Training and Associate Professor of Education 1935-; author: A Comparison of the Use of Intensive Training and of Wide Reading in the Improvement of Reading, published in Educational Methods, March 1931; A Drive on English in a Rural Supervisory District, published in Elementary English Journal, April 1931; A Unified Course in Social Studies and Sciences in Primary Grades, published in Oregon Education Journal, Mar.-Apr. 1932; member American Association of University Women; Republican; Christian Scientist; home 450 Liberty St., Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 422


    JOHN O'BRIEN: lives on Applegate; is a farmer and stock raiser; post office, Applegate; was born in County Galway, Ireland, 1828; came to state and county in 1852; was married March 19, 1862, to Sarah S. Barkdull. Children Emmett, John E., James A. and Sarah R.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 508


JOHN D. OLWELL.
His Life Lies Like an Open Book Before the People of Jackson County.
    Among the candidates is none more worthy of the place than John D. Olwell, nominee for representative of Jackson County on the Democratic ticket. He is known to almost every resident in Southern Oregon. He was practically forced into accepting the nomination by his friends; but since he has entered the fight he is determined to win. In sending such a man to represent Jackson County the people will make no mistake. He is frank, open, genial, thoroughly honest, and once knowing he is right nothing will move him from his purpose. Taxpayers can feel safe when such men are in power. He was born in 1870. He came to this state as a boy with his parents. The family came to Jackson County by wagon from Roseburg. Mr. Olwell, Sr., was engaged in the milling business in Missouri and at Phoenix, and John was brought up in the trade of flour milling. Subsequently the family engaged in the fruit business. Some fourteen years ago they planted 160 acres of vacant land to orchard at Central Point, apples being the leading feature. This orchard bas become noted as one of the finest apple orchards in the whole Pacific West, and is accepted as a model as to rare management and production of fine apples by horticulturists in Southern Oregon. The business is managed under the the name of Olwell Bros., of which John is the head. They are now the largest shippers of apples in Oregon. The name of Olwell Bros. is a guarantee to buyers of apples as to fine quality, for every box bears it in the extensive markets of the eastern states and in Great Britain, where their product is sold. Mr. Olwell from habit and training is painstaking and vigilant as to all details of his business. He received a liberal education in the schools of this county, and in San Francisco and Portland, is a young man of excellent understanding, and with a mind alert to all that comes before him. He is therefore without narrow prejudices, and would be open, liberal and competent in his treatment of all questions which would come before him as a legislator in the event of his election. The state educational institutions, with which he is familiar, would have a good friend in Mr. Olwell. He ts one of the regents of the State Agricultural College, under appointment of Gov. Geer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 4


    JOHN ORTH: lives in Jacksonville; is a butcher; was born in Bavaria, Germany, May 14, 1834; came to state 1857, and to county in 1859; was married March, 1862, to Ella Hill. Children Flora, Celia, Charles S. (deceased), Josephine, John S. (deceased), Annie, Henry and Ella.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


JOHN S. ORTH
A Native of Jackson County Who Will Make a Good County Clerk.
    Another native son whose clean-cut career will tell largely in his favor when the votes are counted is John S. Orth, a native of Jacksonville, who, at the earnest solicitation of friends, consented to run for county clerk on the Democratic ticket. Not only is he genial and competent, but he has sterling business qualities, a firm character and a knowledge of human nature, all of which make him well fitted to fill the position.
    Mr. Orth was born October 9, 1872 and is therefore 29 years of age. His father, the late John Orth, was a butcher by trade, and one of the leading business men of Jacksonville. Upon his death John, then a mere boy, took charge of the business, and by careful management has continued to conduct it upon a good paying basis, and today is regarded as one of the solid and successful men of the county. He is a young man of correct social and business habits, of fine native ability, superior judgment, and as a good practical education, supplemented by a wide and critical knowledge of business. He has never sought office. Mr. Orth is a man of clean and sturdy character, which invites confidence. As county clerk he would be an efficient and pleasant official, and would early establish a kindly relation between himself and those having business at the county seat.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 1


    WILLIAM OWENS, of Jackson County, Ore., owns a farm of two hundred and eighty acres near Medford, which bespeaks the prosperity and thrift of the owner and is one of the best improved in the neighborhood. Born in Clay County, Mo., January 21, 1834, Mr. Owens continued to live there until he was eleven years old, accompanying his parents at that time to Des Moines, Iowa. When sixteen years old Mr. Owens accompanied his father to California, and soon after their arrival in that state the father fell a victim to the scurvy. The son followed prospecting and mining in that state for three years, but became discouraged and in 1853 turned his face homeward, making the journey on pack mules to his home in Iowa, where his mother and the remainder of the family still lived. For two years after his return home he was engaged in breaking prairie with ox teams and in other farm work, which occupied his attention until his marriage with Miss Sarah Harper, a native of Indiana. Soon after marriage the young people went to Kansas and engaged in farming pursuits near Oskaloosa, Jefferson County, and during their stay in that section the famous border war took place. In 1856 they moved to a farm near Lawrence, which Mr. Owens afterwards traded for three hundred and twenty acres in Jackson County, near Holton, whither he removed in the fall of 1864. The year following he sold this farm to advantage and determined to locate in the Far West, and purchased a three-hundred-and-twenty-acre farm near Harrisburg, in the Willamette Valley. Here for seventeen years he cultivated and improved his farm, and in connection with ranching pursuits he ran a sawmill, thus developing the natural resources of the country.
    Disposing of his interests in that county, Mr. Owens invested a part of his savings in stock and embarked in cattle raising in Crook County, but during the severe winter of 1884-85 nearly all of his stock perished. This caused him to leave that section and seek a more desirable location for a home in Jackson County. Locating upon the farm which is still his home, once more he turned his attention to stockraising and this time success has crowned his efforts. His fine ranch is located along Dry Creek.
    Upon first taking up his residence in Kansas Mr. Owens had considerable trouble with the Indians, who frequently annoyed the settlers and caused loss by their depredations. In making the trip overland across the plains in 1865 he was chosen captain of the party. In politics his views coincide with Republican principles, and although not an active politician he has served as judge of the election and in other minor offices. His busy life has excluded him from joining many fraternal orders, and he is a member of but one secret society, the Masons, which he joined in 1857.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 962


PAINE, William Herman, army, retired; b. Westford, Connecticut May 9, 1870; to Oregon 1921; U.S. Military Academy West Point 1894; Infantry & Cavalry School, Kansas, 1905; U.S. army staff college 1906; m. Ella Belle Vail June 1, 1897. U.S. army 1890-; Puerto Rico, Cuba, Philippines; Spanish War veteran; American Legion; association of graduates U.S. Military Academy. Republican. Presbyterian. Address: 56 N. Orange Street, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 171


PAINE, WILLIAM HERMAN
    Colonel, U.S. Army, retired
b. Westford, Conn., May 9, 1870: educ.. U.S. Military Academy, West Point, 1894; Infantry & Cavalry School, Kansas, 1905; U.S. Army Staff College, 1906. Married Ella Belle Vail of New York City, June 1, 1897. Resident of Oregon since 1921. Served United States Army, 1890-1920. Active service, Puerto Rico, 1898; Cuba, 1899-1902; Philippines, 1906-07, 1916-17, 1918-20. Member, Spanish War Veterans; Assn. of Graduates, U.S. Military Academy; American Legion. Past District Comm. of Boy Scouts. Republican. Presbyterian. Home: 56 North Orange St., Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, pages 422-423


PAINE, COL. William Herman
U.S. Army Officer, retired.
b. Westford, Connecticut, May 9, 1870; educated U.S. Military Academy, West Point 1894; Infantry and Cavalry School Kansas 1904; U.S. Army Staff College 1906; m. Ella Belle Vail of New York City June 1, 1897; resident of Oregon since 1921; served United States Army 1890-1920; active service Puerto Rico 1898; Cuba 1899-1902; Philippines 1906-07, 1916-17, 1918-20; member Spanish War Veterans; Association of Graduates of U.S. Military Academy, American Legion, former district commander, Boy Scouts of America; Republican; Presbyterian; home 56 North Orange, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 431


PAINE, COL. WILLIAM Herman
    U.S. Army Officer, Retired.
b Westford, Connecticut, May 9, 1870; educ, US Military Acad, West Point, 1894; Infantry and Cavalry School, Kansas, 1905; US Army Staff College, 1906; m Ella Belle Vail of New York City June 1, 1897 (dec'd); res of Oreg since 1921; served US Army, 1890-1920; active service, Puerto Rico, 1898; Cuba, 1899-1902; Philippines, 1906-07, 1916-17, 1918-20; member Spanish War Veterans; Assn of Graduates US Military Acad, former dist comnr, Boy Scouts; active in Red Cross work; Legionnaire; Republican; Presbyterian; home, 56 North Orange, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 106


PALMER, Burton J., merchant; b. Cortland, Illinois October 8, 1869; to Oregon 1911; m. Esther C. Isaac June 8, 1892; children--Alice, Marion, Dorothy, Esther, Elinor. School director; M.W.A. Democrat. Methodist. Address: 211 N. Oakdale, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 171


    JAMES A. PANKEY: lives in Sams Valley; is a farmer; was born in Hickman County, Tenn.; came to state in 1853, and to county in 1859; was married March 1842, to Fannie Stricklin. Children Catherine (deceased), Sarah J., Martha L., Lydia (deceased), Thomas L., Mary A., Emily and Emma, twins, and Ross (deceased).

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JAMES A. PANKEY has been a resident of Oregon for half a century, and all but the first six years of that time he has lived in Jackson County, where he now lives in peaceful retirement, enjoying the fruits of his past years of toil. He is the owner of a fine ranch seven miles northeast of Gold Hill, in the Sams Valley district, of which he originally purchased one hundred and sixty acres, adding to this until now his home place comprises four hundred and twenty acres. Although he still makes his home on this ranch Mr. Pankey leases out the land and derives a competence from the income and from some mountain lands which he also owns.
    But little is known concerning the ancestry of James A. Pankey save the fact that his parents resided in Hickman County, Tenn., where he himself was born June 22, 1822. While he was still a small child the family removed to what is now Saline County, and in 1848 located in Morgan County, Ill., and James A. there passed his youthful days and resided until reaching young manhood. However, this was not always to be his home, for, in 1853, believing that the Far West held opportunities for his betterment, he began the journey across the plains, with two wagons, nine yoke of oxen, seven cows and two mares, but, on various accounts, when he reached his destination, only nine head of oxen and three cows were left of his possessions, after a trip of six months.
    Upon taking up his abode in the Far West, a desirable location was found in Polk County, Ore., and farming pursuits occupied his attentions there, where he bought the right to a donation claim four miles from Dallas, engaging in his chosen vocation until 1859. In the fall of that year he sought a more southern home and settled permanently in Jackson County, making his first land purchase there the same year. We have already told of his landed interests, and his success in farm pursuits, and his present position of affluence testifies to his worth. Well known in his county, he is honored and esteemed not only by the Democrats, with whose principles his political views coincide, but by all who have the honor of his acquaintance. His patriotism to his country was shown by active service in quelling the Modoc Indians in the war of 1872. Mr. Pankey and his worthy wife, who was before marriage Miss Fannie Strickland, became the parents of ten children, three sons and seven daughters. Five of these are now living; Louisa, who married J. N. Smith; Thomas, who resides at Sams Valley post office; Louis, a stock dealer living on Sprague River; Mary Ann, who married James Fredenburg; and Emily, who lives at home.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 833-834


    CHARLES C. PARKER: lives on Kanes Creek; is a farmer and lumberman; post office Willow Springs; was born in Marion County, Oregon; came to county in August 1854; was married October 13, 1880, to Mrs. Mary M. Marshall. Children Charles S. and Delbert H.; children by first marriage, Joseph E. and Hartie Bell.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



    WM. H. PARKER: lives at Brownsboro; is a school teacher; was born in Knox County, Ill., in 1845; came to state in 1852; to county in 1854; was married August 11, 1867, to Fannie Jones. Children Jennie, Iva M., George, Day, Otis, Joseph Watt.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



    JACOB PARKS: lives near Sterling Creek; proprietor of saw mill; post office address, Jacksonville; was born in Poweshiek County, Iowa; came to state in 1875, to county in 1880; was married in 1871 to Lizzie Waters. Children Edna M., Mattie A., Ethel V., Ella A. and Hollis I.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    J. S. PARSON: lives in Ashland; is a physician and surgeon; was born in Lycoming County, Pa., in 1850; came to state and county in 1881; was married October 11, 1882, to Olive Belle Drake.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



    JOHN S. PARSON, M.D. The family represented by Dr. Parson, of Ashland, is of English lineage, but has long been identified with our own country. One of the honored members of the family, Rev. George Parson, was born in Harrisburg, Pa., and upon the completion of the regular collegiate course entered the Gettysburg Theological Seminary, an institution conducted under the auspices of the Lutheran denomination. After completing the course he was ordained to the Lutheran ministry. Thereafter his life was devoted to the preaching of the gospel, his field of labor lying in the central part of Pennsylvania. When the infirmities of advancing years rendered continuance in the ministry inadvisable he retired from the profession, but not until his death (which occurred at seventy-nine years) did his interest in the work cease. As his earliest ambitions had been toward ministerial work, so his latest thoughts were fixed upon the advancement of Christianity. His wife, Emma, was born in Lycoming County, Pa., and now makes her home at Sunbury, that state. She was a daughter of Benjamin Bear, a native Pennsylvanian, of German descent, and by occupation a farmer.
    In the family of Rev. George Parson there are four sons and two daughters, all now living. One of the sons, Rev. W. E. Parson, D.D., of Washington, D.C., pastor and builder of the Church of the Reformation, was at one time professor of mathematics in the Imperial College of Tokyo, and also enjoyed the distinction of making a tour of the world with Prince Kido of Japan. Dr. John S. Parson, who was third among the six children, was born in Muncy, Lycoming County, Pa., May 25, 1850, and spent the years of boyhood in his native town. He was sent to Milton High School and Hanover Academy and spent one year in Pennsylvania College. The study of medicine he prosecuted in Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia, from which he was graduated in 1873 with the degree of M.D. During his stay in Philadelphia he had the advantages offered by St. Mary's Hospital.
    After engaging in general practice in Pennsylvania for a short time and later holding the position of surgeon for the Indiana Block Coal Company near Covington, Ind., in 1880 Dr. Parson came to Oregon and settled at Ashland, where he now conducts a general practice in medicine and surgery and also holds the position of district surgeon for the Southern Pacific Railroad. Actively associated with organizations connected with his profession, he was at one time honored with the presidency of the Southern Oregon Medical Association, and is also identified with the State Medical Society and American Medical Association. The only local office which he has thus far consented to hold is that of city health officer. Intensely devoted to his profession, he justly deserves the high standing he has gained as a practitioner, for he has been a constant student of the science of materia medica, a thoughtful reader of medical journals and an earnest advocate of modern methods of acknowledged value. In politics he is a firm Republican and in religion, though not a member of any denomination, is a contributor to the Presbyterian Church, with which his wife is connected. After coming to Ashland he married Miss Belle Drake, who was born in Jackson County, this state, and they have one son, George Frederick.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 525


A PROMINENT NORTHWESTERN FRUIT GROWER
    The president of the Northwestern Fruit Exchange of Portland, Oregon, Reginald Hascall Parsons, was born October 3, 1873, in Flushing, New York. In 1880 his family moved to Colorado Springs, Colorado.
    Mr. Parsons received his education in private schools in the East and the University of California.
    While living in Colorado Springs Mr. Parsons became interested in gold mining in the Cripple Creek district, which afforded an opportunity for a wide business experience. Subsequent to his residence in Colorado Mr. Parsons engaged in the manufacturing business with Bemis Brothers Bag Company at St. Louis. From St. Louis he went to San Francisco in the interest of the same company, and in 1904 removed to Seattle to establish a branch factory for the company. Mr. Parsons continued in the general management of the Seattle branch for several years, but the lure of the land was always strong in his veins, his ancestors for several generations having been engaged directly and indirectly in horticulture. It was natural, therefore, that this life should appeal to him, and he was particularly attracted to the Rogue River Valley, in Southern Oregon. He became the principal owner of one of the largest and finest orchards in America-- the Hillcrest Orchard Company, at Medford, Oregon.
    The Hillcrest Orchard, valued at between $400,000 and $500,000, is one of the most famous in all the world, and its brands are in eager request in all of the principal consuming centers, being particularly well known in New York and London. The Hillcrest Orchard brand of Comice pears holds the world's record in price for car lots. A car of this brand was sold in London two years ago at an average of $10.08 per box. This season a car of the same brand averaged $10 per box. The Hillcrest Orchard comprises two hundred acres, of which one hundred and ninety-two acres are in trees and one hundred and fifty-eight acres in bearing. There are one hundred and five acres of pears, including Bartletts, d'Anjous, Howells, Boscs, Winter Nelis and Comice, and the balance--eighty-seven acres--are in apples, the principal variety being Yellow Newtowns, and the balance Spitzenbergs and other red varieties. There are about 11,000 trees in this wonderful orchard, which is in the highest state of scientific cultivation. In Mr. Parsons' office at Hillcrest are found every modern feature of orchard record and accounting. There are maps of various kinds, some showing land contour, water and air drainage, etc., and others showing the location and variety of every tree of the eleven thousand. Mr. Parsons is working on a pathological record by which he will be able to trace the history of every tree in the orchard and keep a record of its bearing from year to year. The Hillcrest Orchard has every modern mechanical appliance. Packing houses, fire system and barns were built on the most modern lines.
    Mr. Parsons says modern orchardry is practically manufacturing, and his business is conducted accordingly. It is his ambition to have the Hillcrest Orchard pass, undivided, to his children and his children's children. He is not a land promoter or real estate operator in any sense of the word, but a fruit grower first and last.
    It became apparent to him very soon after becoming interested in fruit growing that the weakest side of the industry from the growers' standpoint was the assembling and marketing of the fruit. Realizing the difficulties of the individual grower, no matter how large a producer he may be, in meeting the demands of the increasing supply of deciduous fruit produced in the Northwest, he became instrumental in the formation of the Rogue River Fruit and Produce Association at Medford. This step having been successfully taken, it became further apparent that without a consolidation of the common interests of the entire Northwest in some strong, practical central selling agency, it would be impossible to conduct the marketing of the fruit in a scientific and thorough manner. The elimination of wasteful competition was the main thing to be brought about, from the growing of the fruit to the final consumption of it. During the latter part of July, 1910, the Northwestern Fruit Exchange was organized, with Mr. Parsons as president and other prominent and public-spirited fruit growers, representing other important producing districts in the Northwest, as officers and directors. The Exchange has met with phenomenal success, having been carefully organized and conducted with the view of effecting a wide distribution of the fruit, which would permit the avoidance of the crowded centers and thereby enable better prices to be obtained. About seven hundred cars were put at the disposal of the Exchange during its first season by various fruit growers' associations, with results which have been universally gratifying to the growers. Mr. Parsons has cast his lot with the fruit growers and producers of the Northwest and is doing his best to aid in solving the problems connected with the industry. He has given a great deal of time to the direction of the Exchange, and its success is largely due to his public-spirited work.
    In all of his previous business experience Mr. Parsons has shown his wide public spirit. He is a member of the Municipal League and Chamber of Commerce of Seattle and director in the Title Trust Company of that city. Before leaving Seattle for Medford he was chairman of the "City Beautiful" and a member of various municipal committees engaged in solving some of the more important municipal problems.
Better Fruit, May 1911, page 73



    JOSHUA PATTERSON was born in Eaton County, Michigan, December 2, 1857. His parents took him to Iowa when quite young, and from Belfountain they crossed the plains to Oregon in 1862, being five months and five days making the journey to Ashland. The family first settled on the Holton ranch, where they resided about one year, then took up a residence on a farm five miles north of Ashland, where the father lived up to the time of his death. The subject of this sketch went to California in the fall of 1872 and engaged in farming and running a threshing machine for about nine years. He there made the acquaintance and married Ella Jane Fewel on the 18th of September, 1881. They came to Oregon that fall and settled on the old homestead where he has since lived. His children are Myrtle, born July 4, 1882, and Henry Clay, born Nov. 12, 1883.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 536-537


    JOSHUA PATTERSON. The foundation of the present ample competence of Joshua Patterson was laid in patient toil and unusual perseverance, for this honored farmer of Jackson County had practically no resources when he first began to earn his living in 1873. At that time he was sixteen years old, having come to the West with his parents in 1862, from Eaton County, Mich., where he was born December 2, 1857. Choosing Sonoma County, Cal., as his home, he worked on a farm for a year, ran in debt for a threshing machine, which he paid for on time, and conducted with fair returns for a couple of years. Disposing of this machine he purchased a $5,000 threshing outfit, operated it for a year, and the following year purchased one costing $6,000. During 1876 and 1877 he farmed on the plains of Yolo County, and altogether made considerable headway in acquiring the fortune of which he had thought so much, and for which he had planned so wisely.
    In 1882 Mr. Patterson renounced his bachelor state and married Ella J. Fewel, in Sonoma County, soon afterward returning to Jackson County, where he purchased the ranch upon which his parents had settled in 1862, and where he has since made his home. He now owns two hundred and thirty-eight acres in the home place, one and a half miles east of Talent, besides another ranch in the vicinity consisting of two hundred and forty acres. He also owns forty acres of timber land. Repeating his former threshing success, he has owned and operated machines in this county continuously from 1882 until 1900, and his experience in the line is probably as varied and lengthy as that of any other man in the West. His patronage from the largest and most prosperous farmers in this state and California has enabled him to gain an accurate idea of the grain and general produce resources of the West, and it is needless to say that he thinks this part of the country a Mecca for the deserving and ambitious young man. In platting his land Mr. Patterson has thought of the pleasures as well as the profit of existence, and his gardens and orchard are intended primarily to contribute to the comfort and convenience of his immediate family. He had one hundred and thirty-five acres set out in apples, including the three leading varieties of winter apples--the Spitzenberg, Yellow Newtons and Jonathans. He raises high-grade stock, grain, alfalfa, and garden produce, and runs his farm along modern and scientific lines. Mr. Patterson is a Republican in politics, and in addition to other local offices, he was elected county commissioner in 1901. He finds diversion in two of the foremost fraternal organizations of the country, viz., Ashland Lodge No. 45, I.O.O.F., and Phoenix Lodge No. 107, A.O.U.W. Mr. Patterson is highly respected by his fellow agriculturists of Jackson County, and wherever he has lived his earnest and industrious and highly moral life has commanded both approval and admiration.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 214


    SYLVESTER PATTERSON. Prominent among the solid, alert and progressive citizens of Ashland is Sylvester Patterson, a prosperous orchardist, and one of the foremost business men of the city. For many years he was conspicuously identified with the promotion and advancement of the agricultural prosperity of Jackson County as one of its most skillful and thoroughgoing farmers. Ever ready to lessen the labors connected with farming, and to add to the profits of his work, he took advantage of the most approved modern machinery and appliances, keeping abreast of the times in regard to inventions, and has the distinction of having introduced the first derrick wagon for elevating headed grain from the stack to the thresher, and subsequently of being the first to bring a combined harvester and thresher into Southern Oregon. This harvester was run by twenty-two horses, and was of great assistance to the men in the harvest field. A native of Michigan, he was born near the town of Charlotte, January 14, 1856. Further parental and ancestral history may be found on another page of this volume, in connection with the sketch of William Patterson, a brother of Mr. Patterson.
    Coming across the plains with his parents when a lad of six years, in 1862, Sylvester Patterson remembers but little of the dreary journey which consumed about six months. Brought up on the home farm, he attended the Wagner Creek school when it was in session, obtaining a practical knowledge of the three Rs. In 1872 his father, while on a visit east, died suddenly. Mr. Patterson, then a youth of sixteen years, started in life for himself. With his brother Lair he took charge of the homestead, conducting it for his mother for five years. In 1877, forming a partnership with his brother Joshua he purchased the parental homestead of five hundred acres, and continued his agricultural labors there for two years. Selling his interest in the estate in 1879, Mr. Patterson bought the Frank Meyer farm of one hundred and sixty acres, lying three and one-half miles north of Ashland. He subsequently purchased adjoining land, increasing the size of his ranch to five hundred and twenty acres, and was extensively and profitably engaged in grain and stock-raising for several years, being one of the most enterprising and thrifty farmers of the county. Since 1886 he has rented his farm, and resided in Ashland. Buying eight acres of land in Ashland, he set out an orchard of peach trees and apple trees, and has since carried on a large and remunerative business as a fruit grower, his trees being in a fine bearing condition, and bringing him in a good annual income. In 1894 Mr. Patterson was nominated for sheriff, and, although not a regular candidate, was elected to the office, and served from July, 1894, until July, 1896, when he declined a renomination to the position.
    In Phoenix, Jackson County, Mr. Patterson married Sarah E. Payne, who was born in Linn County, Ore., where her father, C. T. Payne, now living retired in Ashland, was a pioneer settler. Three children have been born of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Patterson, namely: Rosa, Lillie and Dexter. Politically Mr. Patterson is a staunch Republican, and has served one term as councilman. Fraternally he belongs to the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and is a member and past chancellor of Ashland Lodge, K.P. Mrs. Patterson is a member of the Presbyterian Church, in which she is an active worker.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 959-960


PATTERSON, Sylvester, farmer; b. Eton County, Michigan January 14, 1856; to Oregon 1862; m. Sarah E. Payne April 29, 1877; children--Rose, Lillian, Dexter. Vice president Citizens Bank, Ashland; Sheriff Jackson County 1894-96; city council; I.O.O.F.; K. of P.; B.P.O.E. Republican. Address: 639 N. Main, Ashland, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 173


    WILLIAM PATTERSON. The present superintendent of the Ashland Water Works assumed his responsibility in 1900, and has since had ample opportunity to demonstrate his managerial and general ability. Under his control the works have been enlarged, new machinery placed, and at present there is no more modern or satisfactory water supply in this part of the state. The water is brought from Ashland Creek and is conveyed through large steel pipes, every effort being made to insure pure and clean water as well as a sufficiently large supply. Mr. Patterson is a pioneer of 1862, and previous to assuming his present position was well known as a carpenter and builder, lumberman and miner. He was born near LaFayette, Ashland County, Ohio, May 10, 1845, a son of Joshua and Catherine Patterson, natives of Dauphin County, Pa. Joshua Patterson removed at an early day to Ohio, living first in Ashland, but later near Charlotte, Eaton County, afterward removing to near Knoxville, Monon County. In all of these places he was a pioneer settler, and cleared farms from almost primeval wilderness. In 1862 he brought his wife and eight children to Oregon, buying a farm near Talent, and engaged in farming and stock-raising for the balance of his active life. He died while on a visit to his old home in Ashland County, Ohio, his wife also dying in the same state. The children, in order of birth, are: John, of Riverside County, Cal.; Elizabeth, the wife of James Thornton, of Ashland; William; George, of San Francisco; Joseph, of Portland; Lair, living in San Diego County, Cal.; Sylvester, a resident of Ashland, and ex-sheriff of Jackson County; Joshua, a farmer near Talent and county commissioner; Frederick, living in Mariposa County, Cal.; B. F., a resident of San Diego County, Cal.; and Belle, Mrs. Morris, of Mariposa County, Cal.
    William Patterson was educated in the public schools, and in 1854 went to Michigan, removing to Iowa in 1859. In the latter state he heard much about the West, and determined to cast his fortunes with its growing prosperity. Leaving Iowa in May, 1861, he came by way of Lander's Cut Off on the Snake River, then down to Humboldt and through the Shasta Valley to the Rogue River and Talent. Here he remained on his father's farm until 1866, in the meantime supplementing his rather meager education by a course at the nearby public school. In 1866 he began sawmilling on his own responsibility, erecting a mill on Wagner Creek, and later conducting a similar enterprise on Big Butte Creek. Subsequently he removed to the north Umpqua River in Douglas County and ran a mill for a couple of years, then sold out and came to Ashland, where he followed the carpenter's and builder's trade for many years. He also became interested in mining in Siskiyou County, Cal., giving up these combined interests to become superintendent of the Ashland Water Works in 1900.
    One of the pleasantest residences in Ashland is that built and now occupied by Mr. Patterson. This home is presided over by his wife, a native of Canada, whose maiden name was Annie E. Clift. Six children have been born into the family, of whom Elsie M., Maude E. and Minnie Blanche are graduates of the high school, and Jessie, Harold and Margaret are prospective graduates of the same institution. Mr. Patterson is a staunch adherent of Republicanism, and in religion is a Presbyterian. Fraternally he is a popular member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of which he is past noble workman, and the Knights of Pythias, of which he is past chancellor. He is a progressive and highly honored citizen, lending his influence to all efforts for the betterment of the community which he is faithfully serving.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 960-961


PATTON, Hamilton, financier; b. Chicago, Illinois October 21, 1891; to Oregon 1914; Amherst 1913; m. Edith Platt Warner October 15, 1914; children--Dons Warner, Helen, Hamilton Jr., William Weston. Chi Phi; B.P.O.E.; Rotary; University Club. Republican. Protestant. Address: 10 Jackson County Bank Building; home: 1211 West Main Street, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 173


HON. THOMAS McF. PATTON
Was born in Carrollton, Ohio, March 19, 1829, and in 1838 moved with his parents to Findlay, Ohio. He attended school at Martensburg Academy and the Ohio Wesleyan University, Delaware, read law and was admitted to the bar in 1850. He started for Oregon overland in 1851, and settled in Yamhill County, where he remained a few months and moved to Salem in December of the same year. In the spring of 1853 he went to Jackson County and was shortly afterwards elected County Judge, which position he resigned in 1854. During the Indian war of 1853 he served as orderly sergeant in Company A, commanded by Captain John F. Miller. He returned to Salem, and on August 3, 1854, was married to Miss Fannie Cooke, only daughter of Hon. E. N. Cooke, afterwards State Treasurer. He served as Chief Clerk of the House in 1860 and was appointed Chief Clerk in the office of Superintendent of Indian Affairs in 1861 under W. H. Rector, Esq. He was for several years secretary of the People's Transportation Company, and was again elected Chief Clerk of the House in 1866. In 1872 he was elected a member of the House from Marion County, and on the 26th of March, 1876, he was appointed Appraiser of Merchandise for District of Willamette, which position he still holds. He was elected Grand Master of Masons in 1872 and was re-elected in 1873. Mr. Patton is a gentleman of about medium height, spare built, with sharp-pointed features, eyes set back well into his head, with full beard and hair of a dark brown color. He is a good business man, cautious in his investments and therefore more or less successful in his business enterprises. He owns considerable real estate in Salem and is considered comfortably well-fixed in worldly matters. His family consists of three children, two sons and one daughter, the latter married to John D. McCully, Esq., of Joseph, Union County. Politically speaking, Mr. Patton is a Republican, and his religious tendencies are cast with the Congregational Church.
Frank E. Hodgkin and J. J. Galvin, Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon, 1882, page 103


    THOMAS McF. PATTON: an early resident of Jackson County, but now a member of the legal profession in Salem, Oregon; is a native of Carrelton, Ohio, and at an early age began the study of the law; a short time after his admission to the bar, he started for the Pacific Coast, selecting Oregon for his future home, arriving within its borders in the fall of 1851; in 1853 Mr. Patton located in Jacksonville and in that year was elected to the office of county judge, he being the first to fill that position in Jackson County; two years later, on the expiration of his term of office, he removed to Salem where he has since resided. Mr. Patton was united in marriage in 1854 to Miss Francis M. Cook.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 521


    PATTON, HON. THOMAS McF., deceased, was born in Carrollton, Ohio, March 19, 1829. He was admitted to the bar in 1850, and came to Oregon in 1851. With the exception of a short time in Jackson County where he was County Judge, he lived many years in Salem. In 1860 and 1866 he was chief clerk in the house of representatives of this state. In 1872 he was elected to the legislature, and from 1876 to 1884 was United States Appraiser, when he was appointed United States Consul to Japan. Upon his return he engaged in business in Salem till his death, a few years ago.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 259


HONORABLE THOMAS McF. PATTON, a representative pioneer of Oregon and one of Salem's prominent business men, is a native of Ohio and was born in Carrollton, Carroll County, that state, on March 19, 1829. His father, David Patton, one of Ohio's pioneer settlers, married Margaret McFadden, a native of Middletown, Pennsylvania. They have nine children, a son and eight daughters. The son, the subject of this sketch, and one daughter, are now the only surviving members of the family. He was the oldest child and was educated at Martensburg Academy and at the Ohio Wesleyan University. He read law with Judge James M. Coffenbury of Cleveland, Ohio, and was admitted to the bar in December, 1850, and the following March started for Oregon, making the trip overland in company with Mr. Edwin N. Cook and Mr. Hiram Smith. Mr. Patton with another young man left the train and walked to Portland, where he at once engaged in such work as he could get to do. His first job, he remembers, was cleaning out a well, for which he received $18, nearly as much as he was paid for a month's teaching in Ohio. He then thought he would dress up, and paid $14 for a pair of corduroy pants. He then paid $1 to have his hair cut and the alkali cleaned out of it, so that he soon parted with his first earnings. He then went to Yamhill County, where he was employed as clerk in a store at Dayton at $50 a month. He had been there but a month when the proprietors sold out. He had boarded at a hotel and slept on the counter in the store. When he asked for his board bill, he was told that it was $64. He gave the man his $50, and said "That is what they paid me for my work while I was boarding out, and it is all I have in the world." He then went to the river and found a boat coming to Salem. He told the captain that he had no money, but the captain took him on board, made him his guest and landed him at Salem. It was then about the middle of November, 1851. He first got a job to saw wood. He then hung out his shingle and began the practice of his profession, but the clients came in slowly, so he did a little of everything he could get to do. In the spring of 1853 he started for Rogue River and commenced to practice there and grew up with the country. After being there a week he was elected county judge of the new county of Jackson. After serving in this capacity for a year he was nominated for the Legislature. He resigned his judgeship, made his canvass and was beaten by sixty-five votes. He was on the Territorial ticket, and the Democrats prevailed, and through a legal technicality it was found that he was still the legal judge. He held two sessions of court and then resigned a second time. He returned to Salem and later went into the Office of Indian Affairs, and received the appointment of chief clerk. In this capacity he served for two years under the administration of President Lincoln. He later helped to organize the People's Transportation Company, of which he was secretary for two years. They built fourteen or fifteen steamboats and were very successful. They sold out to Benjamin Holladay when that gentleman began the building of the Oregon & California Railroad. In 1872 Mr. Patton was elected to the Legislature on the Republican ticket, and through his efforts the money was voted to build the statehouse at Salem, and it was also his privilege, as Grand Master of the Grand Lodge of Masons of Oregon, to lay the cornerstone of the edifice, and used a silver trowel for the purpose which was afterward presented to him, and which he still cherishes among his most precious possessions. On the 26th of March, 1876, he received the appointment of Appraiser of Merchandise for the district of Willamette, in which capacity he served for seven years. After this, May 20, 1884, he was appointed United States Consul to Kobe, Japan, where he remained two years, one year under President Arthur's administration, and one under that of Cleveland. During the Indian war of 1853 he served the country as Orderly Sergeant in Company A, Captain J. F. Miller. He served as chief clerk in the Legislature of 1860. After his services in Japan he returned to Salem and purchased the book and stationery business in which he has since been engaged. He has a fine store, which he built, owns a large stock, and does a good business.
    Mr. Patton was married August 3, 1854, to Miss Frances M. Cooke, only daughter of Hon. E. N. Cooke, who afterward became State Treasurer, and who came to Oregon in the same company with Mr. Patton. Mr. and Mrs. Patton have had five children, three sons and two daughters, all born in Salem: Lillian E. married Mr. John D. McCully; Flora C. died when three years of age; Edwin C. and Hal D. are with their father in the store and are efficient and capable young business men. A little son, Roy V., died when eight years of age, and in 1886, after thirty-two years of happy married life, Mrs. Patton also died.
    Mr. Patton has an enviable record as a member of the Masonic fraternity. He was made a Mason on June 24, 1852, in Salem Lodge, No. 4. In 1853 he was one of the organizers of Warren Lodge, No. 10, and was appointed its Master, under dispensation. He secured its charter and was afterward elected Master. He has served two terms as Grand Secretary of the Grand Lodge of the state. He was appointed Grand Treasurer to fill a vacancy, and has served three years as Deputy Grand Master, and was the elected Grand Master, and as such laid the corner-stone of the state capitol, on the 8th of October, 1873. He has taken all the degrees, including the thirty-second, and by virtue of his office is a life member of the Grand Lodge. He represented the Grand Chapter, R.A.M. of Oregon, in General Grand Chapter at Detroit, Denver and Washington City, and Grand Encampment of Knights Templars at Chicago in 1880; San Francisco, 1883; St. Louis, 1886 and Washington City, 1889, and Denver, 1892.
    At his home in the city of Salem he takes an interest in the moral and religious affairs of the place, and has been connected with the Congregational Church for many years. He is a deacon in the church, and has been superintendent of the Sunday school for twenty-one years, continuously, except for the two years when absent in Japan.
    On the 10th of January, 1889, Mr. Patton married his present wife. She is a native of New York and is the daughter of James J. Buss, a native of England. She was the widow of Mr. Joseph Holman, who came to Oregon in 1840, and who was one of the most worthy pioneers of the state. His son by his first wife was the first male white child born in Marion County. Mr. Holman was a linseed oil manufacturer and a prominent merchant of Salem and figured prominently in the earliest settlement of Marion County. Mrs. Patton is a refined and intelligent lady. She has been the second wife of two of the worthy men of the state. She takes a deep interest in the city of Salem and in the prosperity of the state. They own a beautiful home, appropriate surroundings for persons of their worth and culture, which is often thrown open for the entertainment of their host of admiring acquaintances and friends.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, pages 552-554


    WILLIAM PATTON: lives near Talent; is a farmer; came to state in 1873, and to county in 1874; was born in Vermilion County, Ill., 1827; married June 13, 1852, to Marena A. Parham, born Decembers 8, 1834. Children Mary F., Georgetta C., Annie B., Emma E., Willie S., Laura M., Alpha C. and Nathan F.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    C. T. PAYNE.--Among the early settlers of Oregon is the subject of this sketch, and a view of his residence is one of the illustrations in this history. He was born in Keytesville, Chariton County, Missouri, on the 15th of December, 1831. Here he grew to manhood and married Elizabeth McCollum, April 15, 1852. She was born in Chariton County, Missouri, October 21, 1834. They emigrated to Oregon with ox teams in 1852, via overland route, and arrived in Linn County, where they settled August 10th of that year. Here he maintained a permanent residence until coming to Jackson County in June 1868, and the following February settled on his present ranch. John, James M., David, Sarah E., Martha J., Minnie May, Stacy, Champ T., Taylor, Mandy Lee and Richard F. are the names of their children.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 537



Emil Peil    EMIL PEIL has the distinction of being an expert mechanic, and for many years has successfully followed his trade as a blacksmith in various localities. Since 1893 he has been a citizen of Ashland, where he now has one of the finest and best equipped wagon, buggy and implement stores in the city. Mr. Peil began dealing in agricultural implements in 1900 and recently built a fine three-story store building, 60x70 feet, to accommodate his increasing trade. He deals in all kinds of farm implements and carries the largest and most complete stock of its kind in Ashland. He makes a specialty of handling Benicia Hancock disc plows, Canton plows, Buckeye & Hodges harvesters and mowers, Bain wagons and Racine buggies.
    Emil Peil was born October 6, 1858, in Linkoping, Sweden, a son of Carl and Ulla (Carlson) Peil, who never left their native land, Sweden. The beloved mother died at the age of forty-eight years, and the father's death occurred in 1900, he being then in his eighty-fourth year. He served in the Swedish army and after returning to civil life took up the occupation of a farmer for a livelihood. Seven children were born to Mr. and Mrs. Peil. Three of these are living, all being residents of America. They are Frank, of Medford, Ore.; Emil, and August, a farmer in Idaho. Emil was reared to farm life in his native land and in 1873 he came to America, where his brothers were already located. He joined them at Calumet, Mich., and attended school there seven months, also taking a course in a night school. Subsequently he became apprenticed to the blacksmith's trade, and for eight years he worked at his trade in that locality. In 1881 he went to Denver and did similar work in the Denver & Rio Grande Railroad shops for a couple of years. While there he was a diligent student at St. John's Hall night school, from which he derived great benefit. In 1883 he went to Salt Lake City and entered the railroad shops of the same road there, but remained only four months, afterward proceeding to Oregon. His first work in this state was in Medford, where he established a blacksmith shop, which was also the first building to be erected in that place. He conducted this shop until the following spring, and then purchased a ranch on Antelope Creek, and like nine out of every ten who went to that section, he engaged in stock-raising. He still owns this ranch and has added to his original purchase until he now has five hundred and thirty-seven acres in one tract. He followed ranching for three years and in 1887 re-engaged at his trade as blacksmith during the building of the big tunnel through the Siskiyou Mountains on the Southern Pacific Railroad. When that difficult piece of engineering was successfully accomplished Mr. Peil accepted a position with the company and for two years worked in their shops at Sacramento.
    Leaving Oregon, Mr. Peil secured a lucrative position in the shipyard at Seattle, Wash., and worked there until the spring of 1892, then he went to Douglas Island, Alaska, in the interest of the Treadwell Mining Company. He made a second trip to that section for the same company the following year, but before its close he returned to Oregon, locating in Ashland, again taking up his favorite occupation. In the spring of 1894 he opened a shop near the depot, but the following year rented a shop opposite the Hotel Oregon. Two years later he bought the Matison blacksmith shop and devoted his entire time to the wagon and implement business. Since then Mr. Peil has given the latter business his undivided attention and his patronage is steadily on the increase. As a businessman he is shrewd and methodical and has few equals among his countrymen. While a resident of Michigan, he united with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and now affiliates with the local lodge, of which he is a past noble grand. He also belongs to the Rebekah Lodge, Woodmen of the World, and is a valued member of the Board of Trade in Ashland. In his political convictions he is ever on the side of the Republicans, and both his vote and influence are used in advancing the cause of that party.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 224


    ENOCH PELTON: died in Sams Valley; was a farmer; was born near Little Rock, Ark.; came to state and county in 1853; married Mary S. Rowe. in 1857. Children Horace I., James W. and John E.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    HORACE PELTON. Many of the most successful agriculturists of Jackson County, Ore., are her native sons, men who were born and reared within her friendly boundaries, and who have made there their permanent homes. These men know the land and are more capable of making a success of cultivating it than those who, although expert farmers, are comparative strangers in the West. We name Horace Pelton as belonging to the former class and as one who deserves credit for the progressive spirit which he manifests in carrying on his farm pursuits.
    In the early '50s there came to Oregon a man named E. C. Pelton, a native of Little Rock, Ark., who had traveled across the great plains in search of a good western location. Attracted by the stock and farming possibilities of Jackson County, he settled therein and purchased a farm in Sams Valley, where he resided continuously up to the time of his death with the exception of two years spent in Idaho running a pack train to and from the mines. A thorough American, he displayed his patriotism by active service in the Rogue River Indian War. He left this life September, 1865, leaving his wife and three sons, all of whom were natives of Oregon. His wife was before marriage Miss Mary Stewart Rowe, a native of Missouri, who crossed the plains in 1850, but did not come to the Rogue River Valley until seven years later. Horace is the eldest son, and his two brothers, James W. and John, are both stockmen, the former at Fort Klamath and the latter at Ashland. The widowed mother survived her husband until December 28, 1901, when she too passed away.
    Horace Pelton was born in Jackson County, September 1, 1858. Choosing farming as his life work, he studied to that end, and after leaving the common school in 1877 he entered the State Agricultural College at Corvallis, Ore., taking a course of about three years. Feeling equipped for a successful career, in 1880 he began to apply his knowledge as a farmer and stockman on the home ranch. Situated five miles north of Gold Hill in Sams Valley, this ranch comprises four hundred acres of excellent land and has been improved wonderfully by Mr. Pelton. Devoting his time especially to general farming, Mr. Pelton also is a co-partner with his brother James in a fine sixteen-hundred-acre ranch at Fort Klamath, and of this place the latter gentleman acts as manager. In connection with this ranch Mr. Pelton also conducts a dairy.
    Making such a success of his vocation, Horace Pelton is justly considered a representative citizen of Jackson County, and, being still a young man, he will undoubtedly make a fine record. He and his brother James are directors in the Medford Bank, and both are Masons, being valued members of the Jacksonville lodge. The Democratic Party claims him as their staunch supporter, but he cannot be termed an active politician.
    On January 5, 1902, Mr. Pelton was united in marriage with Miss Meta Morine, of Jackson County. Her father, Frank Morine, is a stock-raiser and farmer of Klamath County, Ore.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 843


    JASPER C. PENDLETON. The success which has come to Jasper C. Pendleton, of Table Rock, Jackson County, has been the result entirely of his own efforts. Being forced to rely upon his own exertions, at sixteen years of age he gave the strength of a practical and progressive nature toward the upbuilding of that fortune which is every man's right though not every man's possession, and has accomplished much in a comparatively brief time. Since 1893 he has been engaged in general farming upon the ranch of one hundred and sixty acres, which he purchased in that year, becoming well and favorably known throughout Jackson County, the esteem of the people being manifested by his election in 1898 as county assessor and his re-election in 1900 to the same office.
    The birth of Mr. Pendleton occurred in Winterset, Iowa, April 13, 1859, and that location remained his home until 1870, when his parents crossed the plains to Dixon, Cal. A short time afterward they removed to the Pit River country, or what is known as the Big Valley, being one of the first families to locate there. They took up government land and engaged extensively in stock-raising, but met with serious losses during the hard winter of 1874, immediately thereafter locating in Reno, Nev. Just about this time Mr. Pendleton, then a boy of sixteen years, found it necessary to seek his own livelihood, which he did by engaging in freighting from Reno to Virginia City and other points, continuing for five years, when he entered commercial activity as a traveling salesman. For thirteen years thereafter he was so employed, traveling throughout the Pacific coast states in the interests of a hardware business and ably demonstrating his ability to take a leading part in the commercial world. However, becoming interested in the agricultural possibilities of the Northwest, he came to Oregon in 1893 and purchased the ranch whereon he now makes his home, and has since proven the benefit of the practical training and business methods which has enabled him to make a success of his work in whatever line he chose to follow.
    Mr. Pendleton was united in marriage in 1885 with Miss Maude M. Hall, of Oakland, Cal., a stepdaughter of W. J. Frierson, a pioneer of California, and they have one son, Verne H., who is now fifteen years old. In 1879 Mrs. Pendleton was graduated from the Sacramento Seminary and thereafter engaged in teaching for a number of years. In his political convictions Mr. Pendleton is a Republican and has always been active in the promotion of the principles which he endorses. Fraternally he is a member of the Masonic order of Medford.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 842-843


    DAVID PENINGER: lives near Willow Springs; is a farmer; was born in Lewis County, Virginia; came to state and county in 1852; was married March 1869, to Louisa Cox. Children John and Charles, twins, George (deceased), Fred and Hattie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    WILLIAM H. PENINGER. A large number of the men now prominent in the development of the resources of Oregon are native-born sons of the state, and such a distinction belongs to Mr. Peninger, who was born February 13, 1856, in the county of Jackson, where he still makes his home. He is a member of an honored pioneer family. His father, John Peninger, was born in Hampshire County, Va., the son of a family of farmers early established in the Old Dominion. In his native county, in 1836, he married Mary Smith, who was born there January 7, 1816. Six years after marriage they removed to Iowa and settled on a raw tract of land, the development of which engaged their attention for some years. During 1852 they started across the plains with ox teams. It was a time of peril. Whole trains of emigrants had been murdered by the Modoc Indians in that year. Pioneers truly carried their lives in their hands in attempting the long and toilsome journey across plains and deserts. Yet they escaped with no further trouble than the theft of some horses by the savages. However, the journey was marked by a great sorrow in the death of one of their little children.
    After six months the family arrived in Jackson County, Ore., where Mr. Peninger took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres, occupying the present site of Tolo, ten miles north of Medford. During the Indian troubles of 1853 all of their property was burned. Later a military reservation was established and a fort built on his land, which was known as Fort Lane. At the same time he established a trading post on his place and this he conducted until his death, in the fall of 1855. On account of an error in the office at Washington, proofs of his claim were overlooked, so, in 1857, his widow bought a ranch of three hundred and twenty acres, known as the Walter Davis and Ben Drew donation claims, situated nine miles north of Medford. The first improvements of any value on this place were made under her direction. In June of 1863 she became the wife of Daniel Fisher, who had crossed the plains to California in 1849, came to Oregon two years later, and served as an unenlisted soldier in the Indian wars of 1853-55-56. Their union was a happy one and death did not long part them, for Mrs. Fisher died June 5, 1898, and Mr. Fisher on the 4th of July of the following year. After the death of Mrs. Fisher a committee consisting of Mrs. J. M. McCully, Mrs. R. M. McDonough and Mrs. W. J. Plymale prepared a memorial in behalf of the Oregon pioneers, testifying to her beautiful character and self-sacrificing life. From it we quote as follows: "During her lifetime she followed to the grave nine of her ten children; the saddest of all must have been the little grave she left unmarked on the plains, and only those who have lost children can realize what that implies. Well do we all remember the winter of 1852 in Jacksonville, known to the pioneer as the winter of hardships, privations and starvation. Mrs. Peninger, then a young woman in the prime of life, cheerfully took hold without a murmur, creating comfort with her cheering presence, and alleviating pain by her tender touch. When flour sold for $1 per pound, salt for $16 per pound, and not to be had at that price only a pinch at a time for the sick (and they were many) Mrs. Peninger and others soaked the flour sacks to make gruel for the sick and destitute. All the flour and groceries used that winter were packed on backs of mules from Salem, Ore., through rains and floods, through cañon and over mountains. The empty flour sacks were of much value for the caked flour in the rich corners to soak for gruel. Adversity in pioneer days brought out all the ingenuity in their makeup. Many a big cup of this gruel did Mrs. Peninger carry to the sick in their miserable huts and tents, and felt happy if she could obtain a pinch of salt to season this delicious beverage; with a few dried herbs she brought across the plains in case of emergency, cheerfully divided around to make tea for the sick in the fever-stricken camps. The poor homeless boys would return thanks with many a prayerful blessing for their 'ministering angel,' as they called her. The fear of Indians overshadowed our lives for months and months, as we prayed to God for aid and protection, putting out trust in heavenly promises. Nevertheless our faith would waver sometimes and we all frequently expected to be killed before the light of another day. The camp guards would come in and order all lights to be put out. 'Indians! We are surrounded by Indians! Let the women and children all get together for protection.' Mrs. Peninger would try to be brave and say, 'All I ask is to be killed outright and all together. We are as near heaven here as any place on earth.'
    "Mrs. Fisher's last days were surrounded by plenty. She never was so poor but she had always to spare. No one ever went away empty-handed from her door. She needs no flowery obituary to perpetuate her memory. No pen in the hand of any pioneer can do justice to this noble woman. Her charitable deeds will live and be handed down to posterity when many of the high officials of the pioneer days of Oregon will be forgotten."
    The only surviving child of the ten born to the union of John Peninger and Mary Smith is William H. Peninger, who remained at home until his marriage, March 15, 1885. His wife, Alvina Hess, was born in Germany January 27, 1862, and came to the United States with her relatives in 1867, two years later settling in Jackson County, Ore., where she grew to womanhood. Of her marriage there are three children, viz.: Mary E., Bertha A. and William H., Jr. The family occupy the old home place, where Mr. Peninger now owns four hundred acres, one hundred acres being under cultivation to general farm products. A specialty is made of stock-raising, in which he has been successful. Substantial improvements have been made on the place, among which may be mentioned the neat and modern dwelling. The political views of Mr. Peninger are in harmony with the principles of the Democratic Party, and fraternally he is connected with the Knights of Pythias, Ancient Order of United Workmen and the Degree of Honor.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 572-573


    GEORGE F. PENNEBAKER: lives at Talent; is a farmer; was born in Shelby County, Ky., April 1, 1821; came to state and county in 1879; was married April 8, 1858, to Sarah A. Predmore. Children E. Della, John S., George W., Mary B. and Edwin R.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


PENNINGTON, LLOYD DREW
    Chemist; College Professor
b Portland, Oreg, April 4, 1917; son of Chester P and Kathern S (Gumm) P; educ, Reed College, BA, 1939; Oregon State College, MA, 1941; Univ of Wisconsin; m Hazel Franke of Atlanta, Idaho, Aug 30, 1942; ch, Craig Anthony, Gary Noel, Carol Louise, Kathryn Ann; began as a chemist with Crown Mills, 1941; junior engineer, Oregon Shipbuilding Corp, 1941-42; chemist, Portland Gas and Coke Co, 1942-45; teaching asst, Univ of Wisconsin, 1945-46; asst professor of Science, Southern Oregon College, 1946 to date; mem, Am Chemical Society, Am Assn of University Professors; Republican; Christian Scientist; home, 932 S Walker, Ashland, Ore.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page
111


    REV. MARTIN PETERSON: lives at "Mound Ranch," on Sticky Flat, is a minister and farmer; post office, Jacksonville; was born near Cincinnati, Ohio; came to state and county in 1864; was married in 1842 to Sarah Arrowood (deceased), leaving one child, Mary E. Was again married September 18, 1844, to Elizabeth Hamrick. Children Lorena (deceased). Kittie, Silas (deceased), William G. (deceased). Smith (deceased), Frank (deceased).

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



JULIAN WELLS PERKINS.
    Southern Oregon and the County of Douglas in particular owe a debt of gratitude to Julian Wells Perkins, who has been a dominant factor in the upbuilding of this section of the state. After having traversed the United States from coast to coast, he selected Douglas County, Oregon, as his home, not because of what it could do for him but because of its mild and even climate and because there was plenty of
development work to occupy his time and talents.
    Julian W. Perkins was born in Meriden, Connecticut, in 1870, a son of William H. and Julia Ellen (Atkins) Perkins. Both parents were descendants of families of pre-Revolutionary days, one of the forebears of Mr. Perkins being that eminent man, Governor Welles of Connecticut, who wrote his name indelibly on the early pages of the American Republic. The early boyhood of Julian Wells Perkins was spent in his native state, and there he remained until 1884, when his father removed to Indianapolis, Indiana, to accept the position of vice president and general manager of the E. C. Atkins Saw Company, a position he held until his death in 1897. Mr. Perkins completed his education in the high school at Indianapolis and, as was customary in those days, entered the factory of the Atkins Saw Company to learn the business from the bottom up. From the actual manufacture of the company's product he steadily advanced to the general offices, where he remained until 1894, when he was sent as traveling salesman on the road, first covering the Middle West. Later he was made assistant secretary of the company, having charge of the jobbing trade throughout the United States. In 1900 he was appointed Pacific coast branch manager at Portland, Oregon, and retained that position for three years, when he decided that he preferred a wider field of activity, being possessed of a desire to assist in the upbuilding of the Pacific coast and especially the state of Oregon. As a result he resigned his position with the Atkins Company and purchasing some two hundred acres near Medford, Oregon, on which was an apple and pear orchard of twelve thousand trees, he proceeded to develop the land. His success is evidenced by records which show that his orchard, "Hillcrest," became one of the showplaces of southern Oregon and that it secured the maximum price record tor fruit on the New York market, bringing three thousand two hundred dollars per carload for "Comice" pears, which established southern Oregon as a fruit growing section. In 1904 he sold his orchard and promoted the acreage that is now the town of Sutherlin in Douglas County. To him almost alone is due the growth of that thriving community of today, with its orchards and general appearance of prosperity. Selling his interests in Sutherlin and becoming satisfied that this section could and would produce oil in commercial quantities, Mr. Perkins turned his attention to that field and was the first man to use the diamond drill in Douglas County. He is still a firm believer in oil production in Douglas County and is actively engaged in prospecting another valley where indications are most encouraging. In all of his enterprises for the upbuilding of the country Mr. Perkins has never offered to the people of Oregon one dollar in stock sales and has consistently declined to sell any portion of his projects. In 1912 he purchased a lot on Cass Street in Roseburg, Oregon, and engaging the services of a Portland architect, erected a four-story modern brick office building that is complete in every detail and contains every modern device known to office buildings in our largest cities. The Perkins building houses four large stores and has seventy-two offices, with hot and cold water in every office, has elevator service and is the finest office building in the state outside of Portland. In addition to the Perkins block he owns some of the best business property on Cass Street, much of which is already improved and occupied as business premises. He will build on his vacant lots to suit reliable tenants.
    In 1903, in Portland, occurred the marriage of Mr. Perkins and Miss Essie M. Sherman, a daughter of W. J. Sherman, connected with the Oregon-Washington Railroad & Navigation Company.
    Mr. Perkins gives his political support to the Republican Party and was a representative in the state legislature from Jackson County in 1907. He has since refused political preferment, desiring to devote his entire time to his business interests. Fraternally he is a Mason and is a member of the Shrine, which he reached by both the York and Scottish Rites. He is likewise affiliated with the Elks. He is a member of the Chamber of Commerce and during the World War was very active in all drives and other patriotic projects.
    Like his forebears, he lends his aid to his country at all times, never forgetting that his ancestors fought gallantly in the Revolution and the War of 1812 and that his father was a volunteer in the first heavy artillery company leaving Connecticut for service in the Civil War and valiantly defended the Union throughout the period
of hostilities between the North and the South. 
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, vol. III, 1922, pages 711-712


PERL, (William) FRANK
Manager, Perl Funeral Home.
b. Jennings, Louisiana Nov. 14, 1904; son of John A. and Nellie (Bundy) Perl; educated grade and high schools Medford; Oregon State College; Cincinnati College of Embalming; Delta Upsilon; m. Dorothy Brown of Medford, Nov. 17, 1928; children Marianne, William Frank Jr.; entire activity in Perl Funeral Home; firm established by father 1908; with firm since 1926, manager 1935 to date; county coroner 1932-40; member Oregon State and National Funeral Associations; past president Southern Oregon Funeral Directors Association; Kiwanian; Elk; S.R. Mason; Hillah Shriner; Republican; Presbyterian (former trustee); address 426 W. 6th St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 440

    WILLIAM PERNOLL: lives on Applegate; is a merchant and farmer; post office, Applegate; was born in Hamburg, Germany; married, July 8, 1876, to Nancy Miller. Children John W., Martin V., Lillie H. and infant.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 509


PEROZZI, Louise A. (Mrs. D.), born in Chicago, Illinois, July 13, 1877, a resident of Oregon for forty years. Married to D. Perozzi. Children: Lucille, Thelma. Member of Board of Education (chairman 1927-28). Member of Oregon Republican State Executive Committee. For eight years Secretary County Educational Board. President Rebekah Assembly of Oregon (1928-29). Member P.T.A., Ashland Study Club, Delphian, Women's Civic Club. Home: 88 Granite Street, Ashland, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, page 163



PEROZZI, Louise A., b. Chicago July 13, 1877; to Oregon 1880; Eastern Oregon Normal School; m. D. Perozzi November 12, 1902; children--Lucille, Thelma. State advisory committee state Republican organization; city and county boards of education; Rebekah; P.T.A.; study club. Republican. Methodist. Address: 88 Granite Street, Ashland, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 176


PEROZZI, LOUISE A.
Clubwoman.
b. Chicago, Illinois July 13, 1877; educated public schools Ashland; Southern Oregon Normal School, graduate 1899; m. D. Perozzi, Ashland, Oregon November 12, 1902; children Lucille and Thelma (Dorsch); taught school Ashland and Jackson County 1894-1902; resident of Oregon since 1880; for many years active in civic and public affairs; past president Rebekah Assembly of Oregon (1928-29); member Study Club; Women's Civic Club; Republican; Methodist; home 88 Granite, Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 440


PERRY, WILLIAM
Farm Leader.

b. on farm near Butte Falls, Oregon Feb. 16, 1876; son of Martin and Susie (Singer) Perry; educated public schools Oregon; m. Margaret E. Betz 1907 (deceased); m. 2nd Augusta E. N. Seefield of Lake Creek, Oregon June 3, 1945; one daughter, Gertrude Fay (Mrs. G. W. Pruitt); followed extensive farming until 1920, ranch owner until 1942; deputy county roadmaster and supervisor 1921-32; county commissioner, Jackson County, 1938-47; director Eagle Point Irrigation District eight years; president Little Butte Irrigation Co. (director 1915 to 1946); member Crater Lake-Butte Falls school board; member Eagle Point school board; member State Welfare Commission; one of original growers of clover and alfalfa, Eagle Point district; Granger (past master, overseer); Elk; Eagle; Mason (life member); Republican; Protestant; home Box 1093, Eagle Point
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 441


    SAMUEL PHILLIPS: lives on Applegate Creek; is a farmer and stock grower; post office, Uniontown; was born in Wayne County, Ky., in 1819; came to state and county in 1853; was married January 1, 1858, to Mrs. Elizabeth J. Finley. Children by first marriage, Lucinda, William, Henry and Grant; by second marriage, Adaline and Charles R.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



WILLIAM ESTILL PHIPPS.
    Residence, 1313 Riverside Avenue; office, rooms 1-2 Stewart Building, Medford, Oregon. Born in Alleghany County, North Carolina, August 2, 1868. Son of A. B. and Margaret Ann (Cox) Phipps. Married to Clara Rader, October 27, 1909. Attended public schools and State Normal School at Athens, West Virginia; Carson College, Tennessee, and Hiwassee College, Tennessee. Taught school several years. Came to Oregon in July, 1893, admitted to the bar of Oregon in June, 1898, since practicing law in Jackson County, Oregon. City Attorney of Medford, Oregon, 1901-1903; of Ashland, Oregon, 1904-1905. Democrat.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 205


Dr. E. B. Pickel    E. BARTON PICKEL, M.D., a prominent physician of Medford, Oregon, was born in Monroe County, east Tennessee, September 17, 1861. He was the son of French and Mary H. (Matheny) Pickel. The former was a native of Virginia, of German descent, and came to Oregon and located in Medford, May, 1888. He died November 26, 1890. His mother was a native of Tennessee, of English extraction. Her people were early pioneers of Tennessee. The family consisted of ten children, E. Barton Pickel being the ninth child.
    At the close of the war the family removed to the state of Georgia, locating at Athens, but after one year returned to east Tennessee in Roane County. E. Barton attended the Grant Memorial University at Athens, Tennessee, and completed his course in 1880. He began the study of medicine at Rockwood, Tennessee, in 1883, with Dr. J. E. George, an eminent physician of the old school. He took his first course of lectures in the medical department of the University of Louisville, Kentucky, in 1885. He practiced medicine two years in Roane County, Tennessee, after which he again returned to Louisville, and there graduated in medicine and surgery, in the class of 1887 and 1888.
    He came to Medford in the same year, and has since enjoyed a good practice. The doctor is a man who always keeps abreast of the times, as is manifested by the number of medical journals to be found on the tables in his office. Although comparatively a new arrival at Medford, he has already gained for himself a reputation in the community, not only as a skillful physician, but also as a progressive and prominent citizen.
    He is a member of the State Medical Society, also secretary of the Medical Society of Southern Oregon, organized May 10, 1892. He is chairman of the City Board of Health, and was elected to the City Council in 1892. The doctor takes no active part in political parties, but is prominently identified with the orders F.&A.M. and I.O.O.F., and Camp degree of the last-named order. He has passed all the official chairs in the Subordinate Lodge, I.O.O.F.
    He was married in Loudon County, Tennessee, May 14, 1885, to Miss Mattie E. De Lashmutt, also a native of Tennessee. They have no family.
Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, page 431


    CYRUS H. PICKENS (deceased)--Mr. Pickens was born in Greene County, North Carolina, November 8, 1801, and is a descendant of that branch of the family which is so well known in that state today. He emigrated to California in 1849, crossing the Isthmus of Panama. In 1865 he came to Jackson County and settled on the ranch now owned by his son, Elijah P. Pickens, and died there, aged seventy-seven years. He married Helen Moore, who was born in Landon County, Virginia, July 6, 1808. Elijah P. Pickens, son of the above, was born in Pleasants County, [West] Virginia, August 3, 1841. In 1858 Mr. Pickens came to California, settling in Siskiyou County, where he lived until 1878, then moved to Jackson County and settled on the farm of his father in Table Rock precinct--a view of which is found in this work. He married Elizabeth A. Everill, a native of England.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 537


PIERCE
    OREGON & CALIFORNIA PINE LAND DEVELOPMENT COMPANY: Charles Hopkins Pierce and Joseph G. Pierce, managers at Medford, Oregon. Charles H. Pierce is a native of the Empire State, and dates his birth at Forestville. His education was received at the home academy and Cornell University, where he completed his studies in 1884. Following this Mr. Pierce took a two-years' course in law, reading under the eminent Judge J. H. Orvis, of Belford, Pennsylvania. In September 1886 he came to Washington and became bookkeeper and manager at Blanchard of the Store & Lumber Company, in the interests of Governor Alger until 1889. He came to Medford in the same year, having spent the winter in Alaska, and returned to Medford the following spring. The first year was spent in preliminary work in his own interests. He improved timber belts, and discovered that the timber lands, bordering on the rivers and lakes in this section, by far surpassed all other timber in the section. In December 1889 Mr. Pierce, in company with his brother, Joseph, became interested with the Hon. A. C. Hopkins, member from Pennsylvania, and a prominent lumber merchant of that state, by which a consolidation of interest was effected, and by July 1, 1892, the purchase of 35,000 acres of yellow and sugar pine timber land was consummated. The plans of the company have not at this writing been fully determined, but it is highly probable that in the near future this famous line of timber belt will be developed by means of a branch railroad from the Oregon & California main line. In addition to the above timber interests Mr. Pierce is interested in the Coos Bay water frontage, besides owning valuable city property in Seattle, Washington, and also financially connected with the Jackson County Bank, of Medford.
    Joseph G. Pierce is jointly interested with his brother, and makes a specialty of surveying boundary lines.
Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, page 1293


    FRANCIS M. PLYMALE, born in Giles County, Va., March 17, 1833. He went to Knox County, Ill., about the year 1835, and there was educated and raised on a farm until the year 1852, when the family crossed the plains with ox teams and settled in Jacksonville, where his father died. In March, 1853, Mr. Plymale settled on his present ranch six miles northeast from Jacksonville, where he has since lived. He married Jane E. Nichols, December 28, 1865. Anna, Norah, Cassie, Francis C., John S. and Medie are the names of his children.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 537


    WILLIAM PLYMALE, whose portrait appears in this work, was born in Knox County, Illinois, February 9, 1837. In the year 1852 his parents emigrated to Oregon, arriving in November at Jacksonville, Jackson County. Here Mr. Plymale received his primary education, and finished a course at the Willamette University. He first engaged in farming in this county, and followed this occupation about twenty-three years. He has resided in Jacksonville about ten years. He was twice elected county surveyor of Jackson County, and to the legislature in 1874. He married Josephine L. Martin, daughter of William J. Martin, formerly register of the land office at Roseburg. Has a family of nine children living.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 537


    C. M. POLEY. As an active and energetic business man whose success can only be attributed to his own superior natural abilities and qualifications, Mr. Foley easily ranks among the most influential citizens of Ashland, Ore., which has been his home for the past ten years. He has been identified with the lumber and farming interests in Jackson County for a longer period, having located in that county in 1890, when he left his Illinois home to seek a permanent location on the Pacific Slope. A native of Sangamon County, Ill, having been born November 30, 1850, near Auburn, Mr. Poley is the youngest in a family of ten children and was the first in this family to seek a western location. Like many of the most prominent and successful men of the day, he was reared on a farm and attended the ordinary district school. At the age of fourteen years he had the misfortune to lose his father, Joseph Poley, who was among the most influential farmers and stockmen in Sangamon County, Ill. His sketch will be found elsewhere in this volume in the biography of Mrs. J. K. Reader, his sister.
    Among the first of the Poley family who settled in America was Charles Poley, the grandfather of C. M., and he settled in Kentucky as overseer of a large plantation there. Prior to his removal to this country he was a resident of either France or Germany. Indications point toward the former, as he was highly educated in French, and it is known that other members of the Poley family, or Pauly as it was then written, were known to be residents of France at an early day. An interesting story concerning one of these, John Baptiste Pauly, who was geographical engineer to Louis XV, of that country, was discovered a few years ago by Samuel Parks, a nephew of the two Ashland Poleys, while a student in France, and a complete account of the voyage of this engineer and astronomer, who was a great-uncle of C. M. Poley, was published recently in Ashland. He was leader of a party sent to California one hundred and thirty-four years ago by King Louis XV to observe the transit of Venus June 3, 1769, and was the sole survivor of that expedition. A more extended mention of this important historical event will be found in the sketch of Mrs. J. K. Reader, of Ashland.
    After the death of his father, young Poley was placed under the care of a guardian and for several years thereafter continued to remain on the ranch, but he subsequently went into the grain and milling business with a cousin, Jack Welch, in Auburn, continuing in that line of business for several years, and at the same time he was largely interested in the coal and tile works in the same city. Like his father, he was prosperous in his business ventures and soon acquired a fine farm of four hundred and forty acres in Auburn township. In 1890 he went west to Wallowa County, Ore., and was employed in the double occupation of lumbering and farming in the vicinity of Enterprise. Purchasing land in that section, he began raising cereals on the improved part, and, building a sawmill, he engaged in clearing more land for this purpose, making lumber from the timber as fast as removed. After several years, he sold his interests in that county and in 1893 took up his residence in Jackson County, locating at once in Ashland. Entering mercantile life, he opened a retail grocery store on North Main Street, and for a period of four years a large and profitable business was conducted at that stand under the firm name of C. M. Poley & Son. About that time the real estate business offered many inducements to Mr. Poley and he opened up an office in the city, also dealing in insurance, loans, etc. He transacts a large business in this section, and has a reputation for fairness and reliability.
    Mr. Poley has been a valuable acquisition to Ashland, as his successful business methods have not only added wealth to the city and aided in its growth, but have assisted in stimulating trade and by so doing offered inducements for others to locate there. In addition to building a fine large residence there, he owns other valuable real estate in the city, and timber lands in various parts of the county, being largely interested in the development of the latter tracts. While a resident of Auburn he was united in marriage with Miss Addie Brown, a daughter of Coswell Brown, a prosperous farmer near Zanesville, Montgomery County, Ill., and their union has been blessed with a family of six children, whose names are Clarence, Montie, Charles, Lora, Harold and Hazel. The eldest of these, Clarence, is attending the state university of Oregon, and Montie is attending the southern state normal school at Ashland. In religious affairs the family favor the belief and are members of the Progressive German Baptist Church. In his political attachments Mr. Poley is a staunch Republican, and while living at Auburn and Enterprise served as a member of the city councils.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 900


    ARTHUR POOL: lives at Eagle Point; is a blacksmith and hotel keeper; was born in Bedford County, Penn.; came to state and county in 1873; was married September 4, 1852, to Lettie Apger. Children Carinda E., James M., Josephine, Chester W., Rhoda A., Dora M., Winfield, Belle (deceased), Carrie, Benton, Arthur and Lottie (deceased). Mrs. Pool died at Eagle Point August 1882.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    B. R. PORTER. Like the other eastern and central states of our Union, Wisconsin has done her share toward populating the Far West, sending her good and industrious citizens to extend the civilization of the East into the states along the Pacific Slope. Such a one is Mr. Porter, who came into this life May 19, 1848, at Green Lake, Wis., on the farm where he lived throughout his boyhood while in attendance at the common school. Upon leaving the state of his nativity, in 1870, he did not directly travel very far westward, but removed only to Iowa, working on a farm near Mason City for a number of years. The attractions of the unknown West were so strong for Mr. Porter that it was impossible for him to remain in Iowa, so the year 1874 saw him wending his way across the great plains. Arriving in the fall he spent his first winter at Carson City, Nev., and the next year he went to the logging camps near Truckee, Cal., where he worked diligently until the fall of 1885. Harney County, Ore., was his next location, and while in that county Mr. Porter engaged in stock-raising with success, for a period of about sixteen years, 1901 being the date of his removal to Jackson County of the same state. Immediately upon his settlement in Jackson County he made the purchase of the ranch where he now lives, two hundred and forty-five acres, beautifully situated in the vicinity of Sams Valley, and improved upon by Mr. Porter until it is quite a valuable place. With his characteristic care and thoroughness, Mr. Porter carries on general farming and also fruit-raising to some extent, fifty acres of his land containing apple orchards alone.
    While still a resident of Iowa, Mr. Porter was united in matrimony to Miss Mary Anderson, March 12, 1873, being the date on which the ceremony was performed. Four children have gladdened the hearts of this couple, and to them have been given the following names: Myrtle, Margaret, Stewart and Harry. Of these, but three are now at home, the eldest having been given in marriage to Richard Jennings. The family unite in worship at the Baptist Church, of which Mrs. Porter is a faithful and earnest member. The public confidence is unhesitatingly given to Mr. Porter, and this trust is never violated by him, in consequence of which there are few who hold a higher position in the esteem of their fellow men. Still in the prime of life, we trust there are many bright years yet before him. The Republicans claim Mr. Porter as one of their number, and his political efforts are always given to the furtherance of their cause.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 836-837


PORTER, Elias Hull, Physician and Surgeon; born, Russellville, Ky., Aug. 19, 1865; son, Elias and Elizabeth (Richardson) P. Edu: Bithu College, Russellville, Ky., 1880; M.D., Cincinnati College, Medicine and Surgery, Cincinnati, O., 1898. Married, Josephine Perry, June 6, 1907, at Worcester, Mass. Con. Surg., U.S. Army, 1898 to 1906; First Lieut. Med. Dept., U.S. Army, 1906-10. Member: Reserve Med. Corps, U.S. Army, Soc. Military Surgeons. Sou. Oregon Med. Soc. Res.: 1010 S. Oakdale; Office: St. Marks Bldg., Medford, Ore.
Harper, Franklin, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, 1913, page 458


PORTER, GEORGE WATTS
    Mayor, City of Medford
b. Midland, Mich., Jan. 12, 1882; educ., public schools, Medford; Medford Business College, 1898. Married Maude Ada Vaughan, Ashland, Ore., Nov. 11, 1904; one son, Jack Luther. Foreman, Big Pines Lumber Co., Medford, 18 years. Owner and president, Porter Lumber Co., Medford to date. President, Southern Ore. Brewing Co. Councilman, Medford, 1915 and 1930-34. Mayor, City of Medford, 1934 to date. Eagle. Elk. K.T., S.R., Mason. Shriner. Republican. Episcopalian. Home: 826 Minnesota Avenue. Office: 204 South Fir Street, Medford, Ore.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 444


PORTER, GEORGE WATTS
Owner, Porter Lumber Company; ex-Mayor of Medford.
b. Midland, Michigan January 12, 1882; educated grade and high schools Medford; Medford Business College 1898; m. Maude Ada Vaughan, Ashland, Oregon, November 11, 1904; son Jack Luther; foreman Big Pines Lumber Co., Medford, 18 years; established Porter Lumber Co., owner to date; City Councilman 1915, 1930-34; Mayor of Medford (appointed 1934), twice elected, resigned Sept. 1937; Eagle; Elk; Scottish Rite, York Rite Mason; Shriner; Republican; Episcopalian; home 826 Minnesota Ave.; office 204 South Fir St., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 451


PORTER, GEORGE WATTS
    Retail Lumberman
b Midland, Mich, Jan 12, 1882; educ, pub schs, Medford; Medford Business Coll, 1898; m Maude Ada Vaughan, Ashland, Or, Nov 11, 1904; son, Jack Luther; foreman Big Pines Lumber Co, Medford, 18 yrs; established Porter Lumber Co, owner to date; city councilman, 1915, 1930-34; apptd mayor, 1934, twice elected, resigned Sept 1937; Eagle; Elk; KT, SR Mason; Shriner; Repub; Episcopalian; home 826 Minnesota; ofc, 204 South Fir, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 495


PORTER, Josephine Perry (Mrs. Elias Hull Porter), 1010 South Oakdale Av., Medford, Ore.
    Born Worcester, Mass., June 6, 1874; dau. Joseph Stone and Lucy Ann (Day) Perry; ed. graded and high schools, Worcester, Mass.; Smith Coll., B.L. '96 (Biological Club); m. Worcester, Mass.; June 6, 1907, Dr. Elias Hull Porter; children: Robert Day, b. Oct. 17, 1908; Bertha, b. Feb. 16, 1910; Norris Kent, b. Sept. 14, 1912. Interested and active in church and in Good Samaritan Soc. Work. Mem. Greater Medford Club, Smith College Club, and of the Woman's College Club of Medford. Recreations: Walking, bowling, outdoor life. Congregationalist. Favors woman suffrage. Progressive Republican.
John William Leonard, Woman's Who's Who of America, 1914, page 654


POSTON, DR. RALPH EVANS
Physician and Surgeon.
b. Dodge City, Kansas May 26, 1899; son of Aurelius V. and Fay (Evans) Poston; educated grade and high schools Dodge City and La Grande, Oregon; University of Oregon A.B. 1923; University of Oregon Medical School M.D. 1927; member University of Oregon Glee Club four years; Theta Chi, Alpha Kappa Kappa, Phi Mu Alpha (musical); m. Maria Pozo of Ecuador May 26, 1935; children Ralph E. and Jeanette M.; interned at Gorgas Hospital, Panama Canal Zone, to Ecuador, South America 1929-37; chief surgeon South American Development Company; private practice Portland 1937; Ashland 1937 to date; licensed to practice in South America; member Chamber of Commerce (past president, two terms); Lion (past president); City Health Officer 1945-; memorial park board and zoning committee; president Jackson County Medical Society 1945; president Southern Oregon Medical Society 1945; member Oregon State Medical Association; Elk; Mason; Republican; Protestant; home 117 Morton; office Swedenburg Building, Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 451


POWELL, ARTHUR EDWARD
Publisher and Editor; County Commissioner.

b. Mankato, Minnesota May 27, 1875; son of John W. and Rhoda (Gray) Powell; educated grade and high schools Minnesota; University of Minnesota, two years, studied mechanical engineering; m. Virginia E. Smith of Sundance, Wyoming June 25, 1897; children Carrol W., Ruth V. (Mrs. B. C. Jolly), Kenneth D., John W., Harry E., Helen (Parker), Dorothy (Mrs. John Townsend); began as printer in Little Falls, Minn. 1892; to Oregon 1908; dean of Jackson County printers; printer, Tribune, ten years; later with other newspapers; partner Central Point American 1931 to date; Jackson County Commissioner 1941 to Jan. 1949; Mayor of Central Point 1939-41; member school board 1932-35; member Oregon National Guard 1917; served in U.S. Army at Ft. Stevens, Oregon; Legionnaire (vice-commander 1945); member Central Point Businessmen's Association; Republican; Christian Church; home Box 234; office N. 2nd St., Central Point
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 452


BENJAMIN W. POWELL.
    Among the veterans of the Civil War, who did valiant service for the Union and later settled on the Pacific coast, is Benjamin W. Powell of Portland. He is a son of George W. and Margaret (Miller) Powell, and was born in De Kalb County, Indiana, March 9, 1844. He comes of good American ancestry. His grandfather, Benjamin Powell, served in the war of 1812, and was wounded at the battle of Sackett's Harbor. The father was a farmer and served as first justice of the peace of Fairfield township, De Kalb County. His brother, John G. Powell, was a member of the One Hundredth Indiana Volunteers, and died in service at Vicksburg, Mississippi.
    Benjamin W. Powell was reared on a farm and educated in the common schools. Shortly after he had passed his seventeenth year, the early battles of the Civil War created intense excitement all over the country and, like thousands of patriotic young men in the North, he responded to President Lincoln's call to arms, and at Toledo, Ohio, on the 22d of August, 1861, he enlisted to serve three years, or during the war. He was mustered into the United States service at Toledo as a private of Captain Jacob W. Brown's Company C, Fourteenth Regiment Ohio Volunteer Infantry, Colonel James B. Steadman commanding. In the winter of 1861-62 he was sent to a hospital at Lexington, Kentucky, and when able to be forwarded, he rejoined his regiment at Mill Springs, Kentucky, and from there was sent to a hospital at Louisville, was granted a furlough and returned home, receiving an honorable discharge on the 1st of April, 1862, by reason of disability. He reenlisted at Indianapolis, Indiana, on the 19th of August, 1862, for another term of three years, or during the war, and was mustered in as a private of Captain Carl C. Kingsbury's Company C, Seventy-Fourth Regiment Indiana Volunteer Infantry, which was commanded by Colonel Charles W. Chapman. The regiment proceeded to Indianapolis, where eight companies were mustered into the service August 21, 1862, and at once moved to Louisville, Kentucky. From this point the regiment went to Bowling Green, Kentucky, where it remained until September 5, and then returned to Louisville.. On the 1st of October it marched with the Second Brigade, First Division, Army of the Ohio, in pursuit of General Bragg, and his command participated in that campaign and in the battle of Perryville or Chaplin Hills, Kentucky. Companies C and K joined the regiment at Castillian Springs, Tennessee, December 4, 1862, thus making the organization complete. December 7 it aided in driving Morgan's force across the Cumberland River at Hartsville and on the 25th marched northward, overtaking the enemy December 30 and driving them across the Rolling Fork of Salt River. The regiment was now assigned to the Second Brigade, Third Division, Fourteenth Corps, Army of the Cumberland, and participated in the following engagements: Stone River, or Murfreesboro, and Hoover's Gap, Tennessee; Dug Gap, Chickamauga, Georgia; Chattanooga, Lookout Mountain and Missionary Ridge, Tennessee; Buzzard Roost, or Tunnel Hill, Resaca, Rome, Dallas, or New Hope Church, Kennesaw Mountain, Lost Mountain, Chattahoochee River, Peach Tree Creek, the siege of Atlanta, Jonesboro, Lovejoy Station, the march to the sea and Savannah, Georgia; Averasboro and Bentonville, North Carolina; and a number of minor engagements. April 30, 1865, the regiment started for Washington, D.C., encamping near Richmond, Virginia, and arriving at the national capital May 19, where it participated in the grand review on the 24th and remained there until June 9, when it was mustered out of service. Private Powell was slightly wounded several times, but did not leave his regiment. With two companies of the Seventy-Fourth Indiana he was captured at Mumfordville, Kentucky, September 17, 1862, the detachment having been surrounded by the enemy. He was paroled on the field, given thirty days' furlough and went home. At the expiration of the furlough he reported to the provost marshal and was sent to the Soldiers Home at Indianapolis, thence to the hospital and when convalescent was granted a furlough and returned home. He rejoined his regiment, having in the meantime been exchanged. These two companies, C and K, were left at Indianapolis to fill up their ranks and complete their organization, starting on the 27th of August for Bowling Green, Kentucky, to join the regiment, but were stopped at Mumfordville on the 30th to assist in the defense of that place. On the 14th of September the companies took part in an engagement at that place until compelled to surrender after a gallant defense against greatly superior numbers on the 17th of September, 1862. The companies were exchanged November 17th and rejoined the regiment December 4th. In addition to engagements at Mumfordville, Kentucky, Private Powell bore a gallant part in all other engagements of his regiment, beginning with Missionary Ridge, Tennessee, and he rendered faithful and meritorious service throughout the time of his enlistment. He received an honorable discharge at Washington, D.C., on the 9th day of March, 1865, by reason of the close of the war.
    After the expiration of his military service, Mr. Powell engaged in his duties as a private citizen and later studied law, being admitted to the bar in Nebraska in 1881. Soon afterward he became, by appointment, judge of the county court of Colfax County, Nebraska. For seven years from 1884 he lived at Medford, Oregon, and was city recorder there, holding that position until he resigned in 1889. He was the first city attorney of Castle Rock, Washington, and for five years served as a member of its city council and also for six years filled the office of justice of the peace of Castle Rock, which he resigned in August, 1907, to remove to Portland, where he has since made his home.
    In 1871 Mr. Powell was united in marriage to Miss Alice G. Wade, at Butler County, Nebraska, and unto them one daughter was born, Estella, now living at Govan, Washington. On the 5th of December, 1900, at Baltimore, Maryland, Mr. Powell was married to Miss Carrie Koehler. Two sons bless this union, Benjamin Russell and Binger W., the elder being born March 20, 1902, and the younger May 9, 1905.
    Mr. Powell is a man of strong individuality, and although he did not begin the practice of law until middle life, he threw so much energy into his work that he has attained success as an attorney and even surpassed many who started earlier in the race, with advantages of college and technical training. Energy, perseverance and determination have accomplished for him what they will accomplish for any ambitious man, if properly directed. Mr. Powell is a member of General Compson Post No. 22, Department of Oregon, Grand Army of the Republic, and also of the Independent Order of Odd Fellows, and has many friends in the Northwest who admire him for his manly qualities.

Joseph Gaston, Portland, Oregon, Its History and Builders, 1911, page 296


POWELL, KENNETH DeWITT
    Newspaper Publisher; Editor
b Medford, Or, Feb 10, 1909; son of Arthur E and Virginia (Smith) P; educ, Sch for the Deaf, Salem, Or; m Violet M Franks of Monmouth, Or, Nov 19, 1939; son, Teddy Franks; printer under Arthur E Powell; co-publisher, Central Point American since 1931; Lutheran; Repub; home, 247; ofc 124 N Second, Central Point, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 496


    ALEXANDER H. PRACHT. Conspicuous among the rising young business men of Jackson County is Alexander H. Pracht, who is well and favorably known to many of the patrons of the Southern Pacific Railway line as proprietor of the Depot Hotel at Ashland. Active, enterprising, genial and accommodating, he is an ideal host, and is meeting with excellent success in the management of his house, which is well patronized and very popular with the traveling public. A native of Missouri, he was born February 18, 1875, in St. Louis, a son of Max Pracht.
    Born and reared in Germany, Max Pracht came with his parents to America, and for a while lived in Ohio. During the Civil War he served as a soldier, being connected with the United States navy. He was subsequently commercial salesman for a St. Louis firm for a while, and then settled in San Francisco, Cal., where he traveled for Neville & Co. for a number of years, for about ten years being a member of the firm. Going thence to Alaska, he was engaged in salmon packing at Loring until 1887, when he came to Oregon, locating in Ashland, where he became identified with the Ashland Woolen Mills. Subsequently buying twenty-five acres of raw land, he improved it and set out a large number of fruit trees, establishing the now celebrated Peachblow Paradise orchard, which contains a choice variety of peach trees and other varieties of fruit. As head of the firm of Max Pracht & Sons, he is carrying on an extensive and remunerative fruit business, having his own packing house and shipping principally to Portland and the Sound cities. The products of the Peachblow orchard are widely and favorably known, having taken premiums and gold medals at several expositions, including the World's Fair, held at Chicago in 1893; the Pan American Exposition, held in Buffalo, N.Y., in 1901, and at Charleston, S.C. Under President Harrison Max Pracht served as collector of customs for the district of Alaska, being located in Sitka. He drafted and secured the passage of the bill establishing the Alaska Fish Commission, and was afterwards fish commissioner in Alaska. He married Mary Winings, a native of Ohio, and of their union three children were born, namely: W. B., of Ashland; Alexander H., the subject of this sketch; and Charlotte Bronte, wife of A. R. Wilkins, of Dunsmuir, Cal.
    Removing with his parents to San Francisco when quite young. Alexander H. Pracht attended the public schools of that city until 1888, when he came to Ashland, where he continued his studies, completing his education at the public schools. He subsequently assisted in the care of the home orchard until 1891, when he became clerk in the large hotel, The Oregon, which his father owned and managed from 1891 until 1892. Since that time Mr. Pracht has been in the hotel business more or less. Entering the employ of J. A. Gross in 1895, he became clerk at the Depot Hotel, with which he is now connected, and gradually worked his way up to manager of the house. In 1901 Mr. Pracht bought out Mr. Gross' interest in the house, which he has since conducted with good success, making it one of the leading hotels of Southern Oregon, being especially patronized by transient guests.
    In Portland, Ore., October 15, 1899, Mr. Pracht married Miss Susie Martin, who was born and bred in Chippewa Falls, Wis. In politics Mr. Pracht is a firm adherent of the Republican Party and has served as councilman one
term, representing the first ward. Fraternally he is a member of Roseburg Lodge, No. 326, B.P.O.E.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chicago 1904, page 308


    PRACHT, MAX, of Ashland, was born in the Palatinate, Germany, in 1846, and two years later his father fled from the persecution that also drove Schurz, Hecker, Sigel and Rosecrans to the land of liberty, and brought his family to America. He served in the navy during the Rebellion, and is a comrade of Burnside Post, No. 23, G.A.R. He is the proprietor of the famous Peachblow Paradise orchards, at Ashland, and is still waiting for the Cleveland administration to raise enough revenue or sell enough bonds to buy him the gold medal he won as the first prize against all comers at the World's Fair. He is a Republican of irrepressible enthusiasm. It was born and bred in him. Much of his time the past two years has been spent traveling in the interest of the American Protective Tariff League, of which he is financial secretary. During the last Republican administration he was Collector of Customs and special commissioner in charge of the salmon fisheries of Alaska, and his Republicanism was so offensive that, as soon as Cleveland was inaugurated, the telegraph and a special steamer were used to inform him that he was removed from office. In 1894 Mr. Pracht was chairman of the Oregon delegation at the National League convention, at Denver, and was made vice-president for Oregon for the ensuing year. Wherever he goes, whether at home or abroad, his voice and pen are used to acquaint the world with the beauties and resources of Oregon, inducing both immigration and the investment of capital.
Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 260


    JOHN WALTER PRALL. The fortune which John Walter Prall has made in life is all the more valued since it is the result of his own unaided efforts. Thrown upon his own resources at the age of seven years, he has clearly demonstrated his ability to make and hold a prominent position in the everyday affairs of life, while earning a livelihood and accumulating a competence not neglecting to give of his success that potent influence which materially aids in the moral, mental and financial growth of a community. Mr. Prall is now a resident of Medford, Jackson County, and though but a brief time has elapsed since his permanent settlement in the West he enjoys the confidence and esteem of all who have come to know him. Commercially, he is well known, the result of his successful connection with a brick yard, while as a stock dealer no man on the coast exceeds him in the quantity of stock purchased.
    John Walter Prall was born in Fayette County, Ohio, November 4, 1850, the son of Jacob Prall, also a native of that state. The elder man was a well-known hunter and trapper of the states in that section of the country and became very friendly and intimate with the Indians, by whom it is supposed he was killed, as he disappeared when his son, John W., was but six months old and was never heard of again. His mother was in maidenhood Mary Ann Ryan, who was born near Kokomo, Howard County, Ind., the daughter of Messick Ryan, who was born and died in that state, having spent his entire life as a farmer. Mrs. Prall was married three times, besides two sons and one daughter by her first husband having two sons and two daughters by the other unions. John Walter Prall was the youngest of his father's family and received his education in the common schools of Indiana and Missouri, having been taken to the former state when he was but six months old, his mother returning then to her parental home. In the fall of 1856 the mother took her family to Iowa, traveling in a large company to Spirit Lake. When within seventy-five miles of their destination they stopped to spend the winter, which proved a disastrous one for them, as the Sioux Indians went on the war path, killing seventy-two families in the train, including nearly all of the relatives of Mr. Prall. Out of seventeen taken prisoner only two were rescued, these two being spared for eleven months when the government bought them; the others were tortured to death, one by one. The remainder of the party sought a refuge in northern Missouri, where Mr. Prall located near Trenton, Grundy County, securing a brief attendance in one of the primitive schools of the county. The following year found him earning his own livelihood, remaining in Missouri until 1861, when with the family he went to Osceola, Iowa. After the war he again located in Grundy County, where he continued to make his home until his marriage in 1868, in that year removing to Clay County, Neb. He there engaged in farming and with the accumulation of sufficient funds became interested in the cattle business, buying cattle and hogs and shipping to the markets of Chicago and Omaha with profitable results. In 1890 he came to The Dalles, Ore., and in the surrounding country purchased a thousand range horses and shipped to Nebraska and disposed of them with considerable profit, continuing in this occupation two years and becoming the owner of about a dozen farms, which contained an aggregate of sixteen thousand acres. Five of these farms are still in the possession of Mr. Prall. In 1891 he entered into partnership with a lawyer of Arcadia, Neb., John Wall by name, and this partnership continued for four years. In 1895 he came to Medford and later bought the Wrisley ranch of one hundred and ninety-six acres located two and a half miles north of town, where he cultivated alfalfa and raised Jersey cattle. At a later date he bought the Hagy property, which consists of three acres set to fruit, and after renting the farm Mr. Prall removed to the city, where he has since made his home. As before mentioned, he is engaged in a brick manufactory located in this city and also has a plant at Gold Hill, which has a capacity of ten million per year. Mr. Prall will contract for brick buildings at any location in the state and has furnished brick for many buildings, among them being the post office at Salem, Ore. Mr. Prall owns the Fredenberg gold mine at Gold Hill, which is as yet entirely undeveloped though the mine is equipped with two tunnels seventy feet deep. In his stock dealing Mr. Prall buys at all the main stations from Grants Pass to Red Bluff, Cal., and ships to Portland and San Francisco.
    The marriage of Mr. Prall occurred in Grundy County, Mo., in 1868, and united him with Sarah J. Tolle, a native of Indiana, by whom he has had five children, namely: William J., who is thirty-one years old, resides in Idaho; Joseph died at the age of ten years; Theodore is at home; Charles, twenty-four years old, lives near here on his ranch; and Maud is deceased. In his fraternal relations Mr. Prall is associated with the Odd Fellows, being a member of Medford Lodge, No. 83, of Medford, and is a Republican in his political convictions. One of the most absorbing interests of Mr. Prall is that of deer and elk raising, having given over fifteen acres of his ranch near Medford to this purpose. He has stocked the park with twenty deer and ten elk and contemplates raising for the market.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 859-860


PRICE, RICHARD WILLIAM
Vice-President, Managing Director, Crater Lake National Park Co.

b. Portland, Oregon July 9, 1880; educated public schools Portland; Minnie Struble of Portland; three daughters, Mrs. Joseph P. Price, Mrs. Jane McConkle, Ruth Catherine; began as apprentice harness maker; later in harness business, Portland; over fourteen years manager Mallory Hotel, Portland; now and for several years active as vice-president and managing director Crater Lake National Park Co. and Crater Lake Lodge; Rotarian; address Sept. 20th to June 15th 3966 S.E. Hawthorne Blvd., Portland; summer Crater Lake
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 455


    WILLIAM KERTIS PRICE. The ranch which has been Mr. Price's home since 1887 comprises three hundred and twenty acres, of which two hundred acres have been brought under cultivation. Formerly known as the Hughes donation claim, it lies in the immediate vicinity of Tolo, Jackson County, one mile south of Table Rock and nine miles northwest of Medford. Among the valuable ranches of the county this holds a conspicuous position. The farmhouse is one of the neatest in the vicinity, the other buildings are substantial and adapted to their varied purposes, and everything is arranged
so as to facilitate the raising of stock and general farm products. In the stock industry he makes a specialty of Shorthorn cattle. He was one of the first in this vicinity to experiment with the raising of alfalfa, and his success encouraged others to follow his example.
    The Price family is of Virginian ancestry and Revolutionary stock. Nimrod Price, the son of a native Virginian, was born in Kentucky in 1819 and settled on a farm near Danville, Ill., at an early date. While living there, about 1848, he married America Froman, who was born in Indiana. The Price family, consisting of himself and wife, his mother, two brothers and two sisters, in 1849 traveled across the plains with ox teams and after a journey of six and one-half months arrived in Oregon, having fortunately escaped attacks from Indians, then numerous and hostile. During the same year he took up a donation claim four miles east of Albany, Linn County, and also operated a sawmill on the Santiam River. In March of 1850 he settled on his claim and there he makes his home to this day, a period of more than fifty years since his location thereon. With the exception of Isaac Froman, he is the only man in his vicinity who is still living on the donation claim that he took up from the government. Besides conducting ranch and stock-raising pursuits he has engaged in the sawmill business. His house was the first one built in Linn County that received a finish of plaster. The improvements on his place were made under his personal direction, and many of them represent the work of his own hands. Politically he votes with the Democratic Party, and fraternally belongs to Corinthian Lodge, No. 18, A.F.&A.M., of which he is the only charter member now living. Not only has he met with fair success, but at the same time he has enjoyed great personal popularity and is one whom all his associates respect and honor. It is worthy of note that he and his wife are the oldest married couple living in Linn County. Of their  twelve children the following survive: William K., of Tolo, Jackson County; Richard S. and Thomas B., of Prineville, Crook County; Clark, who cultivates the home place in Linn County; Mrs. Anna E. LaFollett and Mrs. Kate Powell, both of California; and Mrs. Clara E. Wolverton, of Salem, Ore.
    On the home farm near Albany, Ore., William K. Price was born January 19, 1850. His education was completed in Albany College. January 15, 1872, he married Pauline Hackleman, who was the first white child born in Albany, Ore. Immediately after his marriage he settled on a ranch near his father's home and there engaged in raising stock, also in buying and selling the same, his sales being made largely in eastern Oregon. On disposing of his stock interests in 1884, he removed to Albany. A year later he sold out there and came to Jackson County, where at first he farmed near Medford, but since 1887 has owned and operated a ranch near Tolo. In his family there are two sons, namely: Roscoe K., a coffee and cotton merchant at Tampa, Mexico; and Sterling, who is now at Prineville, Ore. Interested in politics, Mr. Price is a firm believer in Democratic principles, and on his party ticket he was elected to the legislature from Jackson County in 1889. In addition he has filled various minor offices. In every office he has been characterized by high principle, promptness and dispatch in business, and devotion to the welfare of his constituents. In fraternal relations a Mason, he holds membership in Warren Lodge, No. 10, A.F.&A.M., in Jacksonville. In his character are noticeable those traits of integrity and honor that are his rightful inheritance as the son of a pioneer and the descendant of a long line of worthy ancestry. The position which he occupies is that of a resourceful and capable man, a public-spirited citizen and a successful stock-raiser.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 243-244


    CHARLES PRIM. A prominent and well-known resident of Jacksonville, and one of its native-born citizens, Charles Prim holds an honored position as county judge of Jackson County. A skillful attorney, he has brought into the practice of his profession an earnest zeal, a well-trained mind, and habits of industry that have gained for him success in the legal world. Keenly alive to the truth of the facts, and the principles of the law, involved in cases brought to his special notice, he is ever just in his rulings, and his decisions are rarely questioned. A son of the late Paine Page Prim, he was born July 25, 1859, in this city.
    A native of Tennessee, Paine P. Prim was born near Nashville, in 1822, and died in Jacksonville, Ore., in 1898. Early deciding upon a professional career, he was graduated from the law school of Cumberland University, at Lebanon, Tenn., and first settled as a lawyer in his native state. Coming across the plains to Oregon in 1851, he took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres near Albany, Linn County. Settling in Jacksonville in 1852, he was engaged for awhile in placer mining, and then resumed the practice of his profession. In 1857 he represented Jackson County in the constitutional convention. Upon the organization of the state, and after its admittance into the Union, he was appointed by Governor Whiteaker, justice of the supreme court of Oregon, and served in that position from 1859 until 1879, discharging the duties devolving upon him with commendable fidelity, punctuality and success. In 1882 he was elected to the state senate, and served for one term. He was subsequently engaged in the practice of law in Jacksonville until his death. He married Theresa M. Stearns, who was born in Vermont, and is now living in Jacksonville. Of their three children, Charles, the subject of this biography, is the second child, and only son.
    Acquiring his early education in the public schools, Charles Prim subsequently took a general course in Willamette University, which he attended two years, from 1874 until 1876. Beginning his active life as a teacher, he taught first in Applegate, and afterward in Jacksonville for two years, during the time spending his vacations and leisure hours in reading law in his father's office. In 1881 he was deputy sheriff under William Bybee, and subsequently deputy county clerk for six months. Being appointed deputy internal revenue gauger and storekeeper in Jacksonville, Mr. Prim served in this capacity from 1883 until 1887. Resuming the study of law with his father in 1888, he was admitted to the bar in 1890. Immediately forming a partnership with his father, he continued in practice with him for eight years, when the partnership was dissolved by the death of the senior member of the firm. Mr. Prim subsequently continued as a general practitioner until 1900, when he was elected to his present position of county judge of Jackson County.
    August 18, 1882, Mr. Prim married Effie Bybee, a native of Jackson County, and they have five children, namely: Mabel T., wife of John F. Miller, postmaster in Jacksonville; Maud E.; Leila; Bertha I.; and Charles William Page. Politically Judge Prim is a straightforward Democrat, and has served one term as city councilman. Fraternally he is a member of the Artisans of the Ancient Order of United Workmen, of P. P. Prim Cabin, Native Sons of Oregon, and Roseburg Lodge No. 326, B.P.O.E. As a testimonial to Judge P. P. Prim the local cabin of the Native Sons was named in his honor.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 682


HON. PAINE PAGE PRIM,
Senator from Jackson County, is a gentleman who has been prominently connected with the history of our state for a number of years past. He is a Democrat and is held in high esteem by his party. He was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, in 1822. He followed the plow on his father's farm until well along in years and graduated in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon. He came to Oregon in 1851, his means of transportation being the primitive emigrant wagon of the day. He settled in Linn County and moving to Jackson County in 1852, commenced the practice of law. His knowledge of the profession, and his keen perception of technicalities, soon attracted the attention of litigants, and he found himself possessed of a lucrative practice. The year 1857 marked two important epochs in his life, the most prominent being his marriage with Miss Teresa M. Stearns, which event was closely followed by his election as a member of the State Constitutional Convention. He continued the practice of law until the organization of the state government in 1859, when he was appointed Supreme Judge and ex-officio Circuit Judge of the first Judicial District. This position he held until the act of 1878 was passed, making a separate Supreme Court, when he was appointed one of the Associate Judges. Being renominated in 1880, he was defeated, and, on doffing the ermine, again resumed practice and is now acknowledged as one of the leading attorneys of the first district. He was elected Senator from Jackson County at the last general election, and was the Democratic caucus nominee for United States Senator, receiving thirty-three votes for that honorable position. He is considered one of the ablest men of that body.
Frank E. Hodgkin and J. J. Galvin, Pen Pictures of Representative Men of Oregon, 1882, pages 17-18


    HON. PAINE PAGE PRIM was born in Wilson County, Tennessee, in 1822. He followed the plow on his father's farm until well along in years, graduating in the law department of the Cumberland University at Lebanon, Tennessee. He came to Oregon in 1851, the means of transportation being the primitive wagon of the day. He first settled in Linn County, but moved to Jackson County in 1852, where he was engaged as a miner, and afterwards commenced the practice of law at Jacksonville. His knowledge of the profession and keen perception of technicalities soon attracted the attention of litigants, and he found himself possessed of a lucrative practice. The year 1857 marked two important epochs in his life, the first being his marriage with Teresa M. Stearns, which event was closely followed by his election as a member of the state constitutional convention. He continued the practice of law until the organization of the state government in 1859, when he was appointed supreme judge and ex-officio circuit judge of the first judicial district. This position was held until the act in 1878 was passed making a separate supreme court, when he was appointed one of the associate judges. He was nominated for the same position in 1880, but, being defeated, again resumed the practice of his profession, and is now acknowledged as one of the leading attorneys of the first judicial district. He was elected senator from Jackson County in 1882, and was the Democratic caucus nominee for United States Senator, receiving thirty-three votes for that honorable position. He is a gentleman who has been prominently connected with the history of our state for many years and is held in high esteem by relatives and friends.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 537


PALMER, BURTON, J.
    Real Estate
b. Cortland, Ill., Oct. 8, 1869; educ., Sycamore, Ill., high school. Married Esther Isaac of Maple Park, Ill., June 8, 1892; children, Alice, Marion, Dorothy, Esther, Elinor. Began as grocer clerk, Aurora, Ill., 1889-99; owner, 3rd interest in laundry, 1889-1902; salesman, McCormick Harvester Co., 1902-04; piano salesman, 1904-11. Established Palmer Music House, Medford, 1911, president; sold firm, 1936. Many years director, Medford public schools. Now in real estate business. Modern Woodman. Democrat. Methodist. Home: Route 2, Box 211, Medford. Office: 234 East Main Street, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 423


PEROZZI, LOUISE A.
    Club Leader
b. Chicago, Ill., July 13, 1877; educ., pub. schs., Ashland, Oregon; Southern Oregon Normal School, graduate, 1899. Married D. Perozzi, Ashland, Ore., Nov. 12, 1902; two daughters, Lucille and Thelma. Teacher, pub. schs., Ashland and Jackson County, Oregon, 1894-1902. Resident of Oregon since 1880. Active with Red Cross during World War. Member, State Advisory Committee and State Republican Organization, 1924-32. Member, City and County Boards of Education, 1924-34. Past president, Rebekah Assembly of Oregon, 1928-29. Member, Parent Teachers Assn., Study Club Women's Civic Club, Delphians, Pub. Health Assn. of Jackson County. Rebekah. Republican. Methodist. Home: 88 Granite Street, Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 433, also page 448


    DANINA BANANI PROVOST. The mayor of Ashland, who has been identified with the history of Oregon since 1870, is a descendant of an ancient French family and was born near Montreal, Canada, February 26, 1852. He was one of four sons, the others being Moses, a farmer in the Northwestern Territory; Julian, a general merchant at St. Paul, Marion County, Ore., and Peter, a retired merchant residing in Ashland. The father, Benjamin, a native of Montreal and the son of a Canadian farmer, followed agricultural pursuits until his death, which occurred in his native land at sixty-six years of age. In early manhood he married Favi Leonard Favrost, a member of an old Montreal family of French extraction; she survived him many years, dying in 1902, at ninety-three years of age.  
    During boyhood years D. B. Provost was a pupil in the national schools of Canada. In 1867 he went to Troy, N.Y., and a few months later worked his way to Savannah, Ga. In the spring of 1870 he came west to California, and in the fall of the same year settled in Oregon, where for three years he rented a farm near Gervais, Marion County, on French Prairie. Removing from there to Yamhill County, in 1874, he embarked in the meat business at Bellevue and continued in the same enterprise until 1890. Meanwhile he bought and improved farm lands, and owned eight hundred acres of fine valley land, all under excellent improvement, and situated a few miles north of Sheridan. In 1893 he disposed of all of his possessions in Yamhill County and came to Ashland, where he built and now occupies a comfortable residence on the hill. Soon after his arrival he became a member of the firm of Kenney & Provost, owners of the finest hardware store in the town. Later he purchased his partner's interest and conducted the business alone until 1902, when he sold out to his nephews. While conducting the store he learned the tinsmith's trade and did a large business in that line, also established an important trade in plumbing. During the early days of his residence in Oregon he learned the carpenter's trade and did some work in house building, but since then he has given little attention to that trade, except in superintending the erection of buildings for himself. Possessing mechanical ability of a high order, he is an expert worker with tools and understands the putting together of machinery of all kinds.
    The industry with which Mr. Provost is now especially identified, the Ashland Iron Works, is an incorporated company, of which he is president and treasurer, and which owns a plant thoroughly up to date in every respect. In addition to his duties as an officer of the company, he is now filling the office of mayor of Ashland, to which he was elected on the Democratic ticket in December, 1902, taking the oath of office in January, 1903, for a term of one year. A prominent member of the Democratic local ranks, he has rendered efficient service not only as a member of the county central committee, but also as a member of the state central committee. Fraternally he is connected with the Woodmen of the World. Physically and mentally, he is sturdy, vigorous and robust. That he possesses a fine constitution was proved by an experience he met with in the summer of 1903. While helping to pull out the rods from an old oil well, by some means he was struck by the cable, which hurled him through the air and landed him fifteen feet away, with his head against a pile of lumber. Those who hastened to his side feared life would be extinct and were relieved to find that, though unconscious, he still breathed. He was carried to his home, where he lay for four weeks and two days before regaining consciousness, but his strength then came back to him rapidly and he is now apparently none the worse for his dangerous experience. Among the people of Ashland he is held in the highest esteem, as a man of the utmost integrity, an able administrator of civic affairs and a successful business man.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, 1904, page 314



    ROLAND PRYCE was born in North Wales in 1848, growing to manhood in his native land, where he received a fine education. He attended Dublin Medical College, after which he came to the United States, settling first in the state of Vermont. From a residence in Vermont he removed to Ohio, and later came to Hillsboro, Ore., where he lived for a few years, after which he located in Medford. He practiced his profession of physician and surgeon after coming to the United States and met with entire success in his work. September 10, 1893, he was united in marriage with Mary A. Chavner, who was born in Jackson County, and in 1893 they removed to the ranch which had been the property of Mrs. Pryce's father, where they lived at the time of Dr. Pryce's death in 1894. He was then a prominent and influential physician of the community with a large and lucrative practice, to the attention of which he gave the effort and energy of a practical knowledge. He was also largely interested in the political affairs of the community, serving as county coroner for several terms in the interests of the Democratic Party, of whose principles he was a staunch adherent. He was a member of the Presbyterian Church.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 202


    M. PURDIN: lives at Eagle Point; is a blacksmith; was born in Linn County, Mo.; came to state in 1864, and to county in 1873; was married Sept. 1874, to Lizzie Worlow. Children Ira E., Iva, Lindsay and Lottie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



Mahlon PurdinMAHLON PURDIN.
    Residence, 328 North Central Avenue; office, Jackson County Bank building, Medford Oregon. Born in Linn County, Missouri, March 22, 1853. Son of Caleb Boyer and Rachel Browning (Fuel) Purdin. Came to Oregon in 1864. Married to Lizzie Worlow. deceased September, 10, 1874; Rena B. Ely, May 3, 1909. Attended country schools only. Admitted to bar at Salem, Oregon, October, 1900. Postmaster, Medford, Oregon, 1896-1900; member Oregon Legislature, 1909; member A.F.&A.M. and K. of P. fraternities.
History of the Bench and Bar of Oregon, 1910, page 208



    MARTIN PURKEYPILE: lives near Myrtle Creek; is a carpenter; came to state and [Douglas] County in 1874; was born in Champaign County, Ohio, February 25, 1842; married September 11, 1864, to Maria Hall.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 515


PURUCKER, LILLA MIRIAM
Businesswoman; Owner, Purucker Piano House and Melody Lane.
b. Union, Tennessee; daughter of Rev. Sherwood L. and Lucy M. Grigsby; educated Mississippi Synodical College; College of Emporia and Kansas State Normal School; m. Herman O. Purucker of Medford, Oregon Feb. 24, 1916; son Robert L. (deceased); began as music teacher, Kansas State Normal School; removed to Pendleton, Oregon, later Medford; owner Purucker Piano Store since 1932; has developed an outstanding music store and is very active in musical circles; recipient of national recognition by all leading music magazines; store acclaimed one of most attractive in U.S.; active Music Club and Medford Musical Society; member Garden Club; Protestant; home 13 Glen Oak Court; office 111 N. Central, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 456


JOSEPH M. RADER
Has All of the Qualities for the Office of Sheriff.

    Genial, obliging and honest, there is no more popular candidate than Joseph M. Rader, nominee for sheriff on the Democratic ticket. He is a native son and well known to the people of Southern Oregon, having been born on the family homestead near Eagle Point, of pioneer stock, about 38 years ago. He has a commanding presence, is cool and firm in time of danger, and has all of the other qualities which serve to make a good sheriff. The people will make no mistake in giving him the office. He did not ask for the nomination, but his friends urged him to accept it for party reasons, and because he had all of the qualifications to faithfully perform the duties of such an office. The Rader family is known for its integrity in business matters, its hospitality and kindly neighborship. Joe shares these qualities. He was educated in the public schools of this county, and has pursued the cattle business, he and his brother being among the leading stock-growers of Jackson County. No man stands higher among his business associates than he does. His native good sense can be relied upon in every issue in case he is elected.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 1


    JOSEPH M. RADER. A man of activity, ability and sterling integrity, Joseph M. Rader, of Jacksonville, is a worthy representative of the native-born citizens of Jackson County, where his entire life has been spent. Born and reared to agricultural pursuits, he became a tiller of the soil from choice, and in the prosecution of his free and independent calling he has met with well-deserved success. A son of the late Jackson Rader, he was born near Eagle Point, Jackson County, July 31, 1864.
    Born in Missouri, near St. Louis, Jackson Rader joined the tide of emigration moving westward when a comparatively young man, and crossed the plains of Oregon in 1852. Locating in Jackson County, he at first took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres near Jacksonville. Not satisfied with his purchase, he sold out, and removed to Antelope Creek, near Eagle Point, where he bought land, improved a good ranch, and engaged in general farming and stock-raising, with good success. He was a staunch adherent of the Democratic Party, and influential in public affairs. In 1870 he was elected as representative of the state legislature for a term of two years. In 1871, during a session of the legislature, he was stricken with the smallpox, and died in Salem, the capital of the state. He married Clara Loehkamp, who was born in St. Louis, Mo., and still resides on the home farm, in this county. Of her six children, three sons and three daughters, Joseph M., the subject of this sketch, is the fourth child. 
    In the district school, with its limited accommodations and equipment, Joseph M. Rader acquired his early education. Left fatherless when scarcely seven years of age, he was brought up on the home farm, and as soon as old enough assumed its management. Industrious, ambitious and persistent in purpose, he has continued the improvements inaugurated on the homestead before he took charge of it, and has a well-appointed ranch, everything about the premises being neat and tasteful, indicating the supervision of an enterprising and progressive farmer. He and his mother live together, their home being most pleasant and attractive. In June, 1902, Mr. Rader was elected sheriff of Jackson County for a term of two years, and in this capacity is rendering most efficient service. He is a steadfast Democrat in politics, and an earnest worker in party ranks.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 894-895


    JOSEPH M. RADER, ex-sheriff of Jackson County, is one of Oregon's popular sons now residing on a little farm of twenty acres near Phoenix, this county, living comparatively retired. He was born a mile and a half south of Eagle Point. July 31, 1864, a son of Jackson and Clara (Loehkamp) Rader. The mother crossed the plains from Missouri to Oregon in 1850 or 1851, coming as a girl with friends, her parents having died when she was a child. The father migrated to this state some time previous, and both settled in Jackson County. It was soon after the mother came to this state that their marriage was celebrated, and they took up their abode near Jacksonville. Four or five years later they removed to a ranch near Eagle Point, where the father died in 1872. His widow continued to reside on the homestead until 1902. when she made her home in Jacksonville with her son Joseph, of this review. Four years later she removed to Medford, where she has since resided with her daughter, Mrs. Clara Phipps.
    Joseph M. Rader was reared in the home of his parents and acquired his education in the common schools of Oregon. After attaining his majority he continued to remain at home and assisted in the operation of the home ranch, containing five hundred and thirty acres, and it required the combined efforts of the entire family to successfully conduct the farming business in which they were engaged. In 1904 Joseph Rader purchased the old home ranch, which he sold to
advantage in 1910. During the same year he purchased his present little home of twenty acres near Phoenix, where he is now living comparatively retired and at ease.
    In 1902 Mr. Rader was elected to the office of sheriff of Jackson County on the Democratic ticket, being reelected in 1904 to succeed himself in that office. During his period of service as a public official he proved to be a popular and efficient sheriff.
    Mr. Rader was married on the 7th of April, 1908, to Miss Bertha M. Rose, a daughter of L. A. Rose, one of the pioneer settlers of Jackson County, who is still living, making his home in Phoenix. Politically Mr. Rader has always been a staunch Democrat and for many years has been an active man in his party. He is a member of Medford Lodge, No. 168. B.P.O.E., and belongs to Jackson Tribe. No. I. I.O.R.M. He is one of the well-known residents of Jackson County, and is highly esteemed by all who know him.

Joseph Gaston, The Centennial History of Oregon,
vol. III, 1912, pages 293-294


    ALFRED F. RAGSDALE: lives on Salt Creek; is a farmer and stock raiser; post office is Brownsboro; was born in Jackson County, Georgia, came to state in 1852, and to county in 1872; was married July 2, 1872, to Malinda W. Taylor.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    FRED RAPP. As representing what may be accomplished through the exercise of superior ability and practical common sense is the farming enterprise being conducted by Fred Rapp and his parents, a family held in the highest esteem by all who are privileged to know them. Mr. Rapp has known no home save that upon which he is now living, for he was born here July 19, 1880, received his education in the nearby common schools, and in 1896 attended the Ashland normal school. A conscientious student, he advanced rapidly in his classes, and has since improved every opportunity to keep abreast of the times, not only agriculturally, but from a general standpoint.
    Joseph Rapp, the father of Fred Rapp, was born in Reading, Berks County, Pa., December 15, 1818, and was in turn the son of John Rapp, the representative of a Dutch family. In 1849 Joseph Rapp came to California and engaged in mining, an occupation which he followed for many years with gratifying success. About 1872 he came north to Oregon and located in Jackson County, upon a farm advantageously situated upon Wagner Creek, one and a half miles from Talent, where he remained until his death, September 21, 1897. He was engaged principally in horticultural pursuits. In fraternal relations he was a Mason and politically adhered to the principles of the Republican Party. He belonged to the Lutheran Church. January 13, 1876, in Ashland, Ore., Mr. Rapp married Martha E. Reames, who was born in Grayson County, Ky., October 26, 1841. Her father, Woodford Reames, was also a Kentuckian by birth, his father having accompanied Daniel Boone to that state in the early days of the Middle West. In 1848 Woodford Reames emigrated to Illinois, where he remained until 1852, when he crossed the plains to Oregon in the employ of the Hudson Bay Company. Upon his arrival in the West he located at St. Helens until 1853 and then removed with his family to Jackson County and took a donation claim near Phoenix. He died near Talent, twelve miles from Jacksonville, May 21, 1882. Two children blessed the union of Mr. and Mrs. Rapp, of whom Edward Woodford, born in 1878, died in infancy, and Fred, of this review, is living in Talent.
    The Rapp farm consists of three hundred acres of land, one hundred and ten of which are in the bottoms, and remarkably fertile. A specialty is made of alfalfa, and the sixty acres thus covered furnish three crops a year, and averages five tons to the acre. During the past year the farm yielded two hundred and forty tons. A large orchard is not the least remunerative part of the farm, and gardening is carried on extensively, as well as stockraising. The finest of modern improvements increase the value and add to the productiveness of this model property, the house being a comfortable and roomy one, and the barns sufficiently large to house the hay, grain and general products. Mr. Rapp is one of the most energetic and resourceful of the young farmers to whom old residents look for the carrying on of their pioneer efforts, and his personal characteristics are such as to win him friends in the present and popularity and influence in time to come. He has but recently established a household of his own, having married Artie E. Oatman, July 7, 1903.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 894


    GEO. W. RATRIE: lives on South Fork of Butte Creek; is a farmer and stock grower; was born in Loudoun County, Virginia; came to the state, and county in 1860; was married January 15, 1872, to Sarah Swingle. Children Henry H., Edith O., May and Ida S. Post office Brownsboro.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    WILLIAM RAY: lives on Applegate Creek; is a farmer, post office Jacksonville; born in Butler County, Penn.; came to state and county in 1857; was married October 23, 1872, to Mrs. Louisa Engart Ward (deceased). Children William, Robert, Mary B. and Mathew.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    J. K. READER, M.D. As one who holds an indisputable position of prominence among the representative citizens of Jackson County, Ore., we have undertaken to briefly outline the life history of Dr. Reader, who for more than twenty-two years has been profitably engaged in the practice of his chosen profession in that section, and whose history is closely interwoven with the home of his adoption since the date of his location there in 1880. As a successful practitioner, both of medicine and surgery, in the city of Ashland, where he located in 1896, Dr. Reader also has the unique distinction of having represented the state of Oregon at various national and international gatherings and has materially added to her proud fame. He was appointed by Governor Lord as delegate to the Prison Reform Association, which met at Austin, Tex.; by Governor Geer as commissioner from Oregon to the Universal Exposition at Paris in 1900; and by Governor Chamberlain as commissioner from Oregon to the Fifth International Exposition at Osaka, Japan. Each trip occupied several months' time and added fresh laurels to his fame.
    In tracing the ancestry of Dr. Reader back on the paternal side to the grandfather, Jeptha Reader, we find him to have been born at an early day in Salem, Roanoke County, Va. Leaving his native state he settled in Overton County, Tenn., and was known to be a rich planter in that section. The latter years of his life, however, were spent in Macoupin County, Ill., whither he removed and where his death took place, but not before he had rendered valuable military services as lieutenant colonel of a regiment of Illinois troops during the Black Hawk War. By his marriage with Winifred Harrison, he linked his fortune with one of the most illustrious families of Virginia, as Mrs. Reader was a granddaughter of Gov. Benjamin Harrison, one of the colonial governors of Virginia, and a signer of the Declaration of Independence. It is worthy of mention that it is through his relationship to this ancestor that Dr. Reader is a member of the Sons of the American Revolution. This colonial governor was an uncle of William H. Harrison, of Tippecanoe fame, and great-granduncle of the late Benjamin Harrison, each of whom filled the highest executive office in our country, that of President.
    The father of Dr. Reader, P. L. Reader, was also a native of Salem, Va. After the family located in Illinois, he took a prominent part in military tactics, being promoted in the state militia to the rank of major, and taking active part against the savages in the Black Hawk War. He also assisted in driving the Mormons out of Nauvoo, Ill., witnessing the death of Joseph Smith, their leader. His military career over, he became prominent as a farmer in Macoupin County, and spent his remaining years in that section of the state, which he represented at one time in the state legislature. His marriage united him with Margaret Rafferty, a Kentuckian, daughter of James Rafferty, who left Kentucky for a home in Macoupin County, Ill., where he followed farming pursuits and became the father of ten children, only four of whom are living at this writing. Both parents passed to their final rest on the old home farm in Macoupin County, the scene of their many triumphs and happy days.
    We will now proceed without further delay with the personal history of Dr. Reader, who is the eldest son of his parents, born May 13, 1846, in Carlinville, Macoupin County, Ill. The recipient of a splendid education, the foundation of which was obtained in the public schools, and supplemented by a scientific course in the Blackburn University, from which he graduated in 1868 with a degree of A.B. attached to his name, at the age of seventeen, young Reader took up the profession of teaching during the winter months, working on the farm in vacation time. In this way he saved his earnings toward defraying the expenses of a professional education. Having decided upon entering the medical profession as his life work, he accordingly spent two years studying medicine in the office of Dr. Humbert, of Upper Alton, subsequently entering as a student the Missouri College of Homeopathy at St. Louis, graduating from that institution in 1872, a full-fledged M.D. Immediately engaging in the practice of his chosen profession at Auburn, in Sangamon County, and later in his native county of Macoupin, Dr. Reader met with fair success, and in 1875 went on a pleasure trip to the Pacific coast. Returning to Illinois the following year, he re-engaged for several years in the practice of his profession. In 1880 he again went to the Pacific coast, this time to seek a permanent location. Locating in Wallowa County, Ore., near Lostine, as a pioneer physician of that section, Dr. Reader soon became prominent and was elected on the Republican ticket to the office of county coroner. Removing in 1890 to Coos County, he established a good practice at Myrtle Point, which was his home until the date of his removal to Ashland in 1896. Since locating in that city, Dr. Reader's ability as a physician and surgeon has again brought him into prominence, and he now has a practice second to none in that locality. He is an influential member of the Pension Bureau and for nearly a quarter of a century has been United States examiner for pension applicants in his section. It may be appropriately mentioned in this place that the doctor is a worthy subject for a pension himself, having entered the Union army in 1862 when a mere lad, as a member of Company D, One Hundred and Twenty-second Illinois regiment, serving until the close of the war. He has served one term on the city council and is a prominent member of the Board of Trade in Ashland. He keeps abreast of the times in his profession, is a member not only of the State Homeopathic Medical Society, but of the International Homeopathic Medical Association, having served as a delegate from this county to the meeting of the latter association in Paris in 1900. In his religious views, Dr. Reader is an active member of the German Baptist Church. He is known to be a broad-minded, liberal citizen, influential in every movement for the public good, largely interested in mining and prospecting and in developing the natural resources of the country. While a young man, practicing his profession in Auburn, he was united in marriage with Miss L. E. Poley, a native of that city, and a brief sketch of her life is given in close proximity to this.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 897-898


    MRS. J. K. READER. Mrs. Reader is a daughter of Joseph Poley, who changed the family name from Pauly to Poley, as the people persisted in calling him. A Kentuckian by birth, he left his native state for a home in Illinois at an early day, and he very soon became a man of consequence in the Prairie State. He took up the double occupation of a farmer and stockman, and at one time he owned forty thousand acres of land in Sangamon and Morgan counties. He was also engaged in saw- and grist-milling at Auburn, and possessed keen business foresight. He possessed the confidence of the people to a large degree and his faithful services as county treasurer of Sangamon County and as justice of the peace showed that their confidence was not misplaced, and he filled the latter office for a number of years at Auburn.
    In tracing the ancestry of Mrs. Reader further back, we find the progenitor of the family in America to have been her grandfather, Charles Pauly, a native of either France or Germany, it is not certain which. At any rate, he was highly educated in French and also wrote and spoke six other languages, and two of his brothers fought under King Louis VII [sic]. This grandfather came of an important Catholic family, and, upon coming to this country, settled in Muhlenberg County, Ky. Here for years he was overseer of a large plantation, but so kind-hearted and just was he that he never raised a hand or a whip to strike a negro, believing rather in a more humane policy of dealing with them. During his latter years he forsook the family religion and united with the German Baptist Brethren Church, and his descendants still cling to that faith. After his death, his widow and child removed to Illinois.
    On the maternal side, the grandfather of Mrs. Reader, Michael Gates, was a native of Germany, and, upon emigrating to this country settled for a time in Kentucky, but afterward removed to Illinois, where the remainder of his life was spent. His daughter, Fanny Gates, the mother of Mrs. Reader, was born in Green County, Ky., but accompanied her parents to Illinois, where she married and thereafter knew no other home. Ten children were born to her and her husband; nine of these children lived to reach manhood and womanhood and seven of them are still living, among them Mrs. Reader, who, like her brothers and sisters, was reared in Illinois.
    It is a pleasant thing to be able to trace one's family record through long years of change and struggle, but it is doubly pleasant when this record presents the lives of men or women who have achieved some special feat of bravery which forever rendered their name famous. It is just so in the Pauly ancestry and one illustrious member, John Baptiste Pauly, a brother of Mrs. Reader's grandfather, was a member of an astronomical party which was sent by King Louis XV of France to California to observe the transit of Venus, which took place June 3, 1769, and was an object of interest to all noted astronomers throughout the world. Mr. Pauly was geographical engineer for King Louis and was the only survivor of the expedition, and by his efforts alone were the observations preserved for the benefit of the scientific world. The party set sail for Mexico in September, 1768. After a perilous voyage of three thousand leagues they arrived at their destination on Easter Day, 1769. Eight days later they resumed the journey, traveling on mules a distance of three hundred leagues, amid lofty mountains, dreadful precipices and arid deserts. At last they arrived at the port of San Blas, on the Pacific Ocean, whence they embarked for California on a brigantine, which the viceroy of Mexico had had prepared. After six weeks' sailing, during which time they had covered one hundred and fifty leagues, they found themselves near the port of San Joseph, which, however, was a very perilous landing. Some of the party wished to wait for a favorable wind to land at Cape St. Lucas, about ten leagues distant, and while this discussion was going on Mr. Pauly and several others let down the longboat and started out in search of a landing place. After many fruitless attempts at disembarking they finally discovered the mouth of an unknown river, and they at last reached the coast, although with the greatest difficulty. They sent the boat back after the rest of their party, landing on the peninsula May 21, 1769, thirteen days before the epoch of the transit of Venus. After considerable difficulty they constructed an observatory, and a few days later, on June 3, made the observations for which they had risked their lives. The distressing scourge which was prevalent in that country attacked the party six or seven days after the observation. One by one they buried their companions. Fearing that none of the party would survive to tell of their expedition, Mr. Pauley gathered all the papers relating to the object of their voyage and, placing them in a casket, addressed it to the viceroy of Mexico. This was to return on the vessel which was to arrive in September to take them back to France. The captain of the vessel finally arrived, and the remnant of the party embarked for the return trip. Several of their number succumbed on the way. They landed at Cadiz, Spain, July 21, 1770, and reached Paris on December 5 following. Mr. Pauley sent the observations which they had made in California to the academy, the society expressing the greatest satisfaction with his zeal and services, and presented him to the king and to all the ministers.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 898-900


    ALFRED EVAN REAMES. A man of literary and scholastic attainments, well versed in legal science, Alfred Evan Reames is now rendering excellent service as district attorney for Jackson and Josephine counties. A native-born citizen, Jacksonville, the city in which he resides, may well be proud of her distinguished son, who has achieved praiseworthy success in his professional career, and has won a good reputation for judicial impartiality and legal ability. A son of Thomas G. Reames, an early settler of Jacksonville, he was born February 5, 1870. Woodford Reames, his paternal grandfather, a native of Kentucky, came to Oregon with his family in 1853, crossing the plains with ox teams, the customary mode of traveling in those days. Locating in Jackson County, he took up a donation claim of three hundred and twenty acres, lying midway between Phoenix and Talent. The upper portion of his claim was the site of the diggings of 1849, and is still rich in placer, and valued highly by the family, who have retained its possession until the present time. Retiring to Jacksonville in 1884, he lived here until his death, in 1885, at the age of seventy-two years. He was a blacksmith by trade, and worked at his trade in connection with farming during his years of activity.
    A native of Grayson County, Ky., Thomas G. Reames was but a boy when he came with his parents to Oregon. Completing his education in the pioneer schools of Jackson County, he first embarked in mining pursuits, and was afterwards a general merchant in Phoenix for three years. Disposing of his Phoenix store, he came to Jacksonville, and, in company with his brother, E. R. Reames, bought out the firm of Sachs Bros. & Co., and engaged in the mercantile business, conducting a general store. He subsequently organized the firm of Reames, Martin & Co., of Klamath Falls, Ore., the firm including, besides his brother and himself, Alex Martin, now living retired in Oakland, Cal., and Charles S. Moore, now state treasurer. E. R. Reames is still at Klamath Falls, where he is carrying on a prosperous banking and general mercantile business. During the time that the soldiers were in Fort Klamath, Mr. Reames and his brother carried on a substantial business in that locality. On retiring from the business in Jacksonville, E. R. Reames was succeeded by John F. White at first, and later by Lee Jacobs. In 1886 Mr. Reames became connected with the banking business of Jacksonville as junior member of the firm of Beekman & Reames, a position that he retained until his death, in 1900, at the age of sixty-three years. In 1885 he was appointed by President Cleveland postmaster inspector for Oregon, Idaho, Washington, Montana and Alaska, but at the end of eighteen months he resigned the position. In 1874 he was deputy sheriff of Jackson County, and in 1887 was elected sheriff, and served one term. In 1878 he was nominated for the position of secretary of state, but was defeated by only one hundred and twenty-six votes. One of the leading Democrats of the state, he served on the county and state Democratic committees until 1890. He married Lucinda Williams, who was born in Missouri, near St. Joseph, and is now residing in Berkeley, Cal.
    The second child in a family of four sons and six daughters, Alfred Evan Reames acquired the rudiments of his education in the common schools of Jacksonville. From 1888 until 1889 he continued his studies at the University of the Pacific, in San Jose, Cal., and the ensuing three years was a student in the University of Oregon, where he took a short course preparatory to taking up the study of law. Entering the Washington and Lee University, at Lexington, Va., in 1892, he was graduated in 1893 with the degree of B.A. Returning to Oregon, Mr. Reames began the practice of his profession with Eugene Skipworth of Eugene. Going to Portland in 1894 he was associated with C. M. Idleman, who was later attorney general of Oregon. Returning to Jacksonville in the fall of 1896, he was engaged in practice with William M. Colvig until 1900, when the partnership was dissolved. In that year he was elected district attorney for Jackson, Josephine, Klamath and Lake counties on the Democratic ticket, receiving a majority of four hundred and eighty-nine votes, although the counties went Republican by a majority of seven hundred and fifty votes. On the death of his father-in-law. Congressman Tongue, in 1903, Mr. Reames received the Democratic nomination for congressman from the First Congressional District.
    In Hillsboro, Ore., in 1895, Mr. Reames married Edith L. Tongue, who was born in Hillsboro, Washington County, Ore., August 26, 1871, a daughter of the late Thomas H. Tongue, of whom a brief biographical sketch may be found elsewhere in this work. A man of activity and enterprise, progressive and far-sighted, Mr. Reames is associated with many of the leading industries of this locality. He owns a controlling interest in the Deep Gravel Mining Company, of which he is secretary. This company, incorporated with a capital of $85,000, of which $75,000 is paid up, owns a valuable mine in Josephine County, about a mile north of Waldo. He is president of the Three Pines Timber Company, which owns ten thousand acres of timber land in Jackson and Josephine counties. In Jacksonville he built, and owns, the Jacksonville Gasoline Lighting Plant, the only one in existence in this part of the state. He is a student, and his valuable library contains a choice collection of books, being one of the finest in Jackson County.
    Politically Mr. Reames is an earnest supporter of the principles of the Democratic Party, and a prominent worker in its ranks. Fraternally, he is a member of Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M.; of Oregon Chapter No. 4, R.A.M.; of Oregon Commandery No. 1, K.T. of Portland; of Al Kader Temple. N.M.S., of Portland; of P. P. Prim Cabin, Native Sons of Oregon, of which he was grand president in 1900-01; and of Pocahontas Tribe No. 1, I.O.R.M.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 305-306


Alfred Evan Reames, January 1938ALFRED EVAN REAMES.
    As one reads the history of early Oregon the name of Reames will frequently appear upon its pages, for the family was among the earliest pioneers of the state and its members have done much to develop and upbuild the country. Woodford Reames, a native of Kentucky, in which state his people settled in pioneer times, came to Oregon in 1852 and for a brief period resided at St. Helens. A year later he took up a donation claim in Jackson County and thus the name became identified with the progress of southern Oregon. His son, Thomas G. Reames, was a small boy when the family came to this state and after reaching manhood he turned his attention to mining, while later he became a merchant and eventually a banker. In 1886 he concentrated his attention upon banking business as a member of the firm of Beekman & Reames, who succeeded to the banking business of Beekman's Banking House. Mr. Reames held many positions of public honor and trust in Oregon and left the impress of his individuality and ability for good upon many lines of the state's development. He held the office of sheriff of Jackson County for several years and under the Cleveland administration he served as post office inspector for the district embracing Oregon, Idaho, Washington and Alaska. He was one of the most popular residents of southern Oregon, as is evidenced by the fact that he came within but a few votes of election as secretary of the state, although the Democratic candidate in a commonwealth that normally gives a strong Republican majority. He married Lucinda Williams, whose parents came to Oregon in 1853. To this marriage was born on the 5th of February, 1870, at Jacksonville, Oregon, a son, Alfred Evan Reames, now residing in Medford.
    Alfred Evan Reames acquired his education in the common schools of his native city and in the University of the Pacific at San Jose, California, in the University of Oregon and the Washington and Lee University of Virginia, being graduated from the last named institution in 1893. He was admitted to the bar in that state, after which he returned to Oregon and was admitted to practice in the courts here. He entered upon the active work of his profession in connection with E. R. Shipworth of Eugene, under the firm style of Shipworth & Reames, there remaining until 1894, when he removed to Portland and became associated with C. M. Idleman up to the time the latter was elected attorney general of the state. Mr. Reames then associated himself with William M. Colvig at Jacksonville, Oregon, and the partnership was maintained until 1902, when Mr. Reames was elected district attorney, in which office he continued to serve for eight years. In 1906 he became associated with his brother, Clarence L. Reames, in a partnership that was terminated with the appointment of the latter as deputy United States attorney for Oregon. After that time Alfred E. Reames practiced alone in Medford until 1921, when he admitted his younger brother, Charles W. Reames, to a partnership, the latter having recently served as deputy United States district attorney. Thus the firm has again become Reames & Reames, a style that is well known in Oregon, for they enjoy an extensive practice of an important character, the brothers ranking high as able representatives of the Oregon bar.
    Alfred E. Reames was united in marriage to Miss Edith L. Tongue, a daughter of Congressman Thomas L. Tongue of Hillsboro. She passed away in 1918, her death deeply deplored by many friends.
    Upon the death of his father-in-law in 1903, the Democratic Party nominated Mr. Reames to succeed him as candidate for the office of congressman and though the Republicans carried the district he succeeded greatly in reducing their usual majority. In fact his vote was so large that for a time the result was in doubt. The large vote accorded him was certainly an indication of his personal popularity and of the confidence and trust reposed in him.
    Mr. Reames has always been active in the upbuilding of his state and has contributed to its development in many ways. He has been interested in mining and in timber and has been the active head of large companies which have done important development work along these lines. His native town of Jacksonville is indebted to him for its lighting plant, which he built almost alone. As a lawyer he is a member of the Southern Oregon Bar Association and of the Oregon State Bar Association. He is also a member of the American Bar Association. His status as a lawyer requires no comment, for his ability is conceded on all sides and his name is known in legal circles throughout the West as that of one of the strongest representatives of the bar in the Pacific coast country. Fraternally he is a Mason, having attained the Knights Templar degree of the York Rite, and he is a past high priest of his chapter and a Noble of the Mystic Shrine. He likewise belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks. His activities and his interests are thus broad and varied. While appreciative of the social amenities of life and a valued representative of the different orders to which he belongs, it has been by reason of his connection with important business and professional interests that he has come to the front as one of the prominent residents of his state. He is a man of broad vision, displaying keen insight into the opportunities of a situation and readily recognizing and utilizing opportunities which have not only resulted in the upbuilding of his individual fortunes but have constituted a splendid element of public progress and improvement. 
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, vol. III, 1922, pages 304-307


REAMES, ALFRED EVAN
    Lawyer
b. Jacksonville, Ore., Feb. 5, 1870; educ., public schools, Jacksonville; Univ. of the Pacific, San Jose, Calif.; Univ. of Oregon; Washington and Lee Univ. of Virginia graduate 1893. Married Edith L. Tongue, (dec'd.) of Hillsboro. Admitted to bar of Va. and Oregon; practice of law with E. R. Skipworth as Skipworth and Reames, Eugene, Ore., until 1894; in association with C. M. Idleman, Portland, Ore.; in partnership with William M. Colvig, Jacksonville, until 1902; District Attorney, Jackson County, 1902-10; in partnership with brother, Clarence L. Reames; in practice alone at Medford, Ore.; 1921 in partnership with brother, Charles W. Reames, as Reames & Reames. Active in politics. Interested in mining and timber. Built lighting plant for Jacksonville. Mem. Southern Ore. State, and Am. Bar Assns. K.T. Mason. Shriner. Elk. Member Exec. Com., Demo. State Central Committee. Home: 816 W. 10th St. Office: Liberty Bldg., Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 454


REAMES, Charles Wilkinson
Lawyer.
b. Jacksonville, Oregon April 5, 1891; son of Thomas G. and Lucinda (Williams) Reames (father and mother crossed plains in ox team; father was partner in Jacksonville, famed Beekman and Reames Bank; was one of first sheriffs of Jackson County); educated grade and high schools Berkeley; University of Oregon; LL.B. 1917; Phi Alpha Delta; m. Bess Myall of Oakland, California Feb. 10, 1914; children Thomas (U.S. Army), Carvel (Mrs. Harold Wall), Betty (Mrs. Vernon Plank); began as chief clerk U.S. Attorney's office, Portland, also assistant U.S. Attorney, admitted to Oregon Bar 1917; partner, brother late A. E. Reames; private practice 1926 to date; special assistant in charge of war work, World War II, U.S. Attorney's office; admitted to practice, U.S. District Court 1917; member of state and local bar associations; Lion; Elk; K.T. Mason; Hillah Shriner; Presbyterian; home 27 Geneva St.; office Medford Center Bldg., Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 461


    EVAN ROGERS REAMES. In reviewing the career of Evan Rogers Reames one is impressed with the practical and substantial, as against the speculative and visionary, in business. Starting out in life as a clerk in a general store, he advanced by easy stages, keeping his mind focused on success, and with no thought of failure to clog his mental or physical machinery. It is to this steady and persevering class of men that communities owe their backbone, and whose affairs, always in order and well adjusted, are rarely influenced by temporary financial depression. Mr. Reames' fifty-three years of life began in Litchfield, Montgomery County, Ill., April 5, 1850, his father being Woodford Reames, born in Hart County, Ky., April 4, 1811, and his mother, Hulda (White) Reames, born in the same state and county April 2, 1825. His paternal grandfather, Aaron Reames, although a southerner and large slave owner, ranged himself on the side of the Union when the keeping of slaves became a national issue, emphasizing his sincerity by liberating those who had toiled for his success with the yoke of ownership upon their shoulders. In the Civil War he attained to the rank of colonel in the Union army. He was probably of Scotch descent, his emigrating ancestor having settled in Virginia, from where his parents moved to Kentucky, the state of his birth. He was the father of nine children, and he lived to an advanced age. Woodford Reames learned the blacksmith trade in his youth, working at the same in Kentucky and after his removal to Montgomery County, Ill. In April, 1852, when Evan, who was next to the youngest of the six children, was two years old, the father brought his family across the plains with ox teams, having six yoke of cattle, and a sufficient number of wagons to travel in comfort. There were many other home seekers in the train, and the party arrived at St. Helens, Columbia County, in October, 1852. The following spring Mr. Reames located one mile south of Phoenix, Jackson County, where he took up three hundred and twenty acres of land, the same now occupied by his son, James R. On this farm he made many fine improvements, and in connection with farming ran his little shop, one of the first in his neighborhood. About 1879 he retired to Jacksonville, where his death occurred in 1884, his wife surviving him until 1890. The oldest son in this family, Thomas G., a banker of Jacksonville, died in March, 1900; Martha is the widow of Joseph Rapp, of Talent, Ore.; James R. is a farmer of the vicinity of Phoenix, Ore., and Dora is the wife of Oliver Harbaugh, of Jacksonville, Ore. One child died in infancy.
    The early public schools of Jackson County afforded the preliminary education of Evan R. Reames, and at the age of nineteen he entered upon a six years' clerkship in the store of Major James T. Glenn, a pioneer merchant of Jackson County. While thus employed the Modoc War made an appeal to the able-bodied sons of the state, and he enlisted, as second lieutenant November 26, 1872, in Company A, First Oregon Volunteer Cavalry, serving until April, 1873. The company, under command of Capt. Harris Kelly, was detailed to service in both Klamath and Siskiyou counties, and at the first important battle Mr. Reames received a flesh wound in the leg. With the return of order he again took his place in the general store, and in 1881 engaged in a similar business in Jacksonville, in partnership with his brother, Thomas G., under the firm name of Reames Brothers. The business expectations of the brothers were so far realized that they were enabled to start a branch store in Klamath Falls, of which Evan R. assumed control in 1881, moving here, the better to superintend what was in reality a business of county importance. The store here was managed under the firm name of Reames, Martin & Co., and Mr. Reames continued with it until 1886, when he sold his interest both in this and the Jacksonville store, and turned his attention to stock-raising on his splendidly appointed ranch of two thousand acres two miles south of Klamath Falls. For a few years he was engaged in business in San Jose, Cal., the superior educational facilities of that town for his child being the chief incentive, for removal. Returning to Klamath Falls in 1890, he engaged in a general hardware business with George T. Baldwin, and in 1898 sold out both his stock and hardware business engaging in a general merchandise and banking enterprise with Alexander Martin and son. At the expiration of two years Mr. Reames purchased Martin's interest, and has since conducted his business under the firm name of Reames & Jennings.
    The broad and tolerant public spirit of Mr. Reames has found vent in many avenues of town activity, and he has been particularly energetic in seeking to gain the foremost of modern advantages for his adopted town. He is one of the promoters and a stockholder in the light and water works of Klamath Falls, and is treasurer of and owns a quarter interest in the Midway Telephone & Telegraph Company. He is also vice-president of the Klamath County Bank, one of the solid financial institutions of this part of the state. Although independent in politics, he has held many positions of honor in the community, and when Klamath was divided from Lake County he was appointed county treasurer by the Governor, and was elected to succeed himself, serving in all four years. For many terms he has been a member of the town council. Fraternally he is connected with the Klamath Falls Lodge No. 77, A.F.&A.M., the Knights Templar, and the Royal Arch Masons, being the present treasurer of the latter organization.
    Near Jacksonville, Ore., October 3, 1873, Mr. Reames was united in marriage with Jennie E. Ross, who was born in 1855 on a farm near Jacksonville, Jackson County, Ore., a daughter of Gen. John E. Ross, one of the best known of the Indian fighters of the Northwest. Mollette, the only daughter born of this union, is one of the cultured and very popular young women of the county, and is the wife of F. W. Jennings, of the firm of Reames & Jennings. Architecturally and otherwise, the Reames home on the riverside is an exposition of latter-day elegance and refinement, and just such a center of hospitality as one might expect from a man of Mr. Reames' advanced ideas and unquestioned appreciation of the benefits of beautiful and attractive surroundings. To an unusual extent the genial owner possesses the nameless element of popularity, and with it the sincere good will of the many associates who regard him as the embodiment of western prosperity and shrewd business sagacity.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 924-925


    JAMES R. REAMS: lives near Phoenix, is a farmer; was born in Grayson County, Ky., January 6, 1844, came to state and to county in 1853; married May 16, 1875, to Lavica A. Strong. Children Lillie M., Elsie A., Harry W. and Nellie.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JAMES R. REAMES. The ranch now occupied by James R. Reames has been in the possession of his family since 1853, and in the meantime has undergone a change from the wild and uncultivated to the modern and productive. Located one and a half miles southwest from Phoenix, it is three hundred and twenty acres in extent, and the successful owner raises a variety of products, as well as much fine stock. He has a pleasant rural home, bearing slight resemblance to the one-room log cabin erected by his father when he first came here, and his barns are far superior to the rude shacks which protected from the blasts of winter the stock which crossed the plains. Mr. Reames and his industrious and capable sons are thoroughly practical in their methods, and their farm presents one of the typical examples of agriculture to be found in this county.
    In Grayson County, Ky., where he was born January 6, 1844, Mr. Reames lived the first four years of his life, and in 1848 was taken by his parents to Macoupin County, Ill., where his father, Woodford Reames, engaged in farming and blacksmithing. In the spring of 1852, when James R. was eight years old, the family started across the plains with two wagons and six yoke of oxen, accomplishing the long journey to Oregon without any particular adventure. After spending the winter at St. Helen they came in the spring of 1853 to Jackson County, where the elder Reames selected the farm now occupied by his son, erected the log cabin heretofore mentioned, and finally cleared a little patch of ground for the sowing of the first seed. Soon afterward he went to Talent and Fort Wagner with his wife, and four children, in both of which places the settlers had stockades to protect them from the Indians. After the Rogue River War life and property were assured greater safety, and the family returned to their own, and industriously set about making a home in the wilderness. The father lived to be seventy-two years of age, and almost up to the time of his death in 1882 kept his cheerful spirits and good health. His wife, many years younger than himself, survived him until 1891, dying at the age of sixty-two years. Mrs. Reames was formerly Malinda White, and she was the mother of six children, of whom Thomas G., the oldest son, is deceased; Martha is the widow of Joseph Rapp; James R.; Evan R. lives at Klamath Falls, Ore.; Medora is the wife of Oliver Harbaugh of Jacksonville, Ore.; and Richard died at an early age.
    Until 1869 James R. Reames lived on the home farm and then tried to improve his prospects by engaging in the livery business in Jacksonville for a couple of years. He afterward clerked in a general store in Phoenix for five years, making himself a valuable employee of Reames & Sachs. At the end of this period Mr. Reames, in company with C. S. Sargent, purchased the business which they conducted until 1876, when their store was destroyed by fire. Mr. Reames soon afterward opened a business of his own, which he conducted for five years or until he located on his present farm. In 1875 he was united in marriage with Alice Strong, of which union six children have been born: Lillie, Elsie, Harry W., Ernest, Archie, and Nellie, all of whom are still at home. From his home in Phoenix Mr. Reames returned to the old home place in Jackson County, where he has since lived uninterruptedly. He finds his mercantile experience of invaluable aid in the management of his farm, but naturally prefers the occupation in which he was trained in his youth, and which nets him a comfortable yearly income. From time to time Mr. Reames has taken an active interest in local politics, and for eighteen successive years has been a member of the school board. He is a supporter of the Democratic Party, although he is liberal minded enough to vote for the man best qualified for the office in question. He is esteemed as a man of honest convictions, industry, and progressiveness, and his farm and himself are a credit to his prosperous and well-conditioned community.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 846-847


    THOMAS G. REAMES was born in Litchfield, Kentucky, December 15, 1838. When he was about six years old his parents settled in Carlinville, Illinois, where they remained until 1852, and came to Oregon that year. With his father he was employed by the Hudson's Bay Company during the winter, and in the spring they came to Jackson County, arriving just before the commencement of the Indian war in 1853--and settled near Phoenix. Mr. Reames was farming and mining here until 1864, when he took up his residence in Jacksonville and was appointed deputy sheriff, holding the office until 1868. That year he was elected sheriff--serving one term. After engaging in the livery business one year he opened a mercantile house at Phoenix, under the firm name of Reames & Sachs, which continued four years. Then, in conjunction with his brother, [he] bought out Messrs. White & Martin, at Jacksonville, and since that time the firm has been "Reames Bros." Mr. Reames has been mayor of Jacksonville several terms, and a number of times a member of the common council. He was appointed brigadier-general of the first brigade of Oregon militia by Governor Thayer. Received the nomination for secretary of state on the Democratic ticket in 1878, but was defeated by R. P. Earhart by 191 votes. He is a prominent citizen of Jacksonville, and is a past grand master of Masons in Oregon. His portrait appears in this work. Married Lucinda Williams, and has a family of seven children.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 538


REDFORD, Walter, educator; b. Osceola, Missouri April 9, 1888; to Oregon 1926; B.A. University of Washington; M.A. 1925; Ph.D. 1926; m. Hazel Margaret Beeler April 14, 1917; children--Lois Margaret. Head geography department Southern Oregon Normal School; F.&A.M.; Phi Delta Kappa; Commercial Club; Phi Delta Kappa Nu. Methodist. Address: 427 Palm Avenue, Ashland, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 183


REDFORD, WALTER
    President, Southern Oregon Normal School
b. Osceola, Mo., April 9, 1889; educ., pub. schs., Mo.; U. of Wash., B.A., M.A., Ph.D., 1912-17; Phi Delta Kappa. Married Hazel Margaret Beeler, April 14, 1917; one daughter, Lois. Supt. of schools, Whitman Co., Wash., 1917-22. Head Geography Dept., Southern Oregon Normal School, 1926-32; President, Southern Oregon Normal School, 1932 to date. Served U.S. Army training school, Camp Zachary Taylor, World War, Member, Ashland Commercial Club. Mason. Methodist. Home: 427 Palm Avenue. Office: Southern Oregon Normal School, Ashland, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 454


REDFORD, DR. WALTER
Realtor; ex-College President; Councilman, Ashland.
b. Osceola, Missouri April 9, 1890; son of Charles and Margaret (Furry) Redford; educated public schools Mo.; University of Washington B.A., M.A., Ph.D. 1912-17; Phi Delta Kappa; m. Hazel Margaret Beeler April 14, 1917; one daughter, Lola; superintendent of schools, Whitman County, Wash. 1917-22; head Department of Geography, Southern Oregon Normal (now Southern Oregon College of Education) 1926-32; president of the college 1932-46; real estate business 1946; member city council; served U.S.A. Training School Camp Zachary Taylor, World War I; former member executive board Oregon Shakespeare Festival Association; Rotarian; member Ashland Chamber of Commerce; Mason; Methodist; home 427 Palm Ave.; office 40 E. Main St., Ashland
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 462


    C. H. REED: lives in Jacksonville, is a painter; was born in Howard County, Ky., came to state in 1853, and to county in 1854; was married June 23, 1863, to Calista Smith. Children Edd, Dell, Myrtle and Frank.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



    BENJAMIN F. REESER. Among the earlier settlers of prominence in Jackson County Benjamin F. Reeser occupies a noteworthy place. Locating in this section of the state more than forty years ago, he has since been a most useful and honored citizen, and an able assistant in promoting its agricultural and industrial interests. Having by industry, energy and persistency of purpose acquired a competency, he is now living retired from active business cares in Ashland, where he and his estimable wife are respected for their many excellent traits of mind and character. He was born August 14, 1838, in Mount Carbon, Pa.
    His father, Benjamin Reeser, a native of Berks County, Pa., was born near the town of Reading, being descended from one of the early and respected families of that locality. A miller by occupation, he was first established in business in Dauphin County, afterwards removing to Mount Carbon, where he operated a grist mill for a number of seasons. Going thence to Pottsville, Pa., he there spent his last years, dying in 1855. His wife, whose maiden name was Sarah Leiz, was a lifelong resident of the Keystone State. She bore her husband eleven children, of whom seven grew to years of maturity, Benjamin F. being the youngest member of the family and the only one to come to the Pacific Coast. One son, Reuben Reeser, served with a Pennsylvania regiment during the Civil War.
    Leaving school at the age of fourteen years, Benjamin F. Reeser spent the next three years as a copying clerk under his brother Lewis, who was county clerk and recorder for Schuylkill County, Pa. Migrating then to Iowa, he served an apprenticeship at the tinner's trade under Spooner & Hulbert, the leading tinsmiths of Lyons. After his marriage he started for the Pacific Coast with his father-in-law, Horace Root, leaving Clinton, Iowa, with horse and mule teams, April 15, 1861. Crossing the Missouri River at Council Bluffs, the company proceeded by way of South Pass and the Humboldt River to Susanville, Cal., thence over the mountains, via Lawson Butte, first into the Shasta Valley in California, and then to Rogue River Valley, in Oregon, arriving there August 31, 1861. Locating in Jacksonville, Ore., Mr. Reeser was a tinner and plumber for the firm of Love & Bilger for the ensuing five years or more. Investing his money in land in 1868, he purchased a ranch near the site of the present town of Talent, and was there engaged in grain and stock-raising for three years, being quite successful as an agriculturist. In 1872, just as Ashland was beginning to grow, he sold his farm, and moved into the embryo city, of which he was subsequently one of the active and prominent upbuilders. At once erecting a store on Main Street, he embarked in mercantile pursuits, putting in a stock of hardware, stoves and tinware. He also worked at his trade as a tinsmith, and afterwards did plumbing throughout the city. More room being required in the management of his extensive business, Mr. Reeser subsequently added to the original building, giving his store a frontage of fifty-four feet. He continued in business for nearly three decades, being the leading hardware merchant and plumber of the city until January, 1901, when he sold out, and has since lived somewhat retired, attending only to his private interests, which are extensive. He owns a tract of four hundred and eighty acres of fine timber land on Dead Indian Road, twelve miles from Ashland, on which he has erected a sawmill. In 1888 Mr. Reeser bought fourteen acres of land on what is now Gresham Street, and has since laid out Highland Park addition to Ashland, on which his fine residence stands.
    In Iowa Mr. Reeser married Matilda J. Root, who was born in Illinois, a daughter of Horace Root. Mr. Root was born and reared in New York state. Engaging in agricultural pursuits, he was a pioneer farmer of Clinton County, Iowa. Crossing the plains to California with the "forty-niners," he was engaged in mining pursuits for four years, when, going by way of the Isthmus, he went back to Iowa. In 1861, accompanied by his family, which included Mr. and Mrs. Reeser, he returned to the coast. Locating in Jackson County, Ore., he purchased the old claim on which he formerly lived, near Phoenix, and resided there for a time. Afterwards buying land which is now within the corporate limits of Talent, he carried on general farming quite successfully for many years. He married Eliza Thomas, a native of New York state, and they reared three children, namely: Matilda J., now Mrs. Reeser; Mrs. Anna M. Gunnison, whose death occurred in Ashland; and Charles A., who died in Talent, Ore. Both Mr. and Mrs. Root spent the declining years of their lives with their daughter, Mrs. Reeser, he passing away at the age of seventy-three years, and she at the age of seventy-five years. Mr. and Mrs. Reeser became the parents of nine children, namely: Mrs. Hattie Camps, of Ashland; Lida, a music teacher of Ashland; Benjamin, who died at the age of five years; Mrs. Tillie Pennebaker, of Jackson County; Mrs. Pearl Hooper, of Ashland; Margaret, a graduate of the Oregon state normal school at Ashland, living at home; Horace, who is engaged in extensive stock-raising with his brother-in-law, G. W. Pennebaker, near Ashland; Netta, the wife of W. B. Freeland, of Portland; and Olive, who died in Ashland, at the age of two years. Mr. Reeser is a member of the Ashland Board of Trade, with which he has been connected for many years. He is a firm adherent of the Republican Party, and during Ashland's earlier history was honored with the office of city treasurer. Fraternally he is a member of the Ancient Order of United Workmen. Mrs. Reeser is a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church, in which she is an active worker.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 957-958


REIMER, FRANK CHARLES
    Horticulturist; U.S. Dept. Agri., So. Oregon Experiment Station
b. Stevensville, Mich., Sept. 4, 1881; educ., Mich. State College, B.S., 1903; Univ. of Florida; M.S., 1905. Assistant botanist and horticulturist, Florida, 1905; asst. professor; associate professor, and professor, horticulture, North Carolina State College, 1905-11. Superintendent, Southern Oregon branch experiment station, Talent, 1911 to date. Explorer for state of Oregon and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Japan, Korea and China, 1917-19. Author of Pollination and Breeding Muscadine Grapes; Blight Resistance of Pears; Sulfur as a Fertilizer for Alfalfa. Member, A.A.A.S.; Society of Horticultural Science; Phytopathic Society; Assn. of Northwest Horticulture, Entomology and Plant Pathology, president, 1931. Address: Talent, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 456


REIMER, FRANK CHARLES
Horticulturist; Southern Oregon Experiment Station, U.S. Department of Agriculture.

b. Stevensville
, Mich., Sept. 4, 1881; educated Michigan State College B.S. 1903; University of Florida M.S. 1905; assistant botanist and horticulturist Florida 1905; assistant professor, associate professor and professor of horticulture North Carolina State College 1905-11; superintendent Southern Oregon branch experiment station, Talent, 1911 to date; explorer for State of Oregon and U.S. Department of Agriculture, Japan, Korea and China 1917-19; author of Pollination and Breeding Muscadine Grapes; Blight Resistance of Pears; Sulphur as a Fertilizer for Alfalfa; member American Association for Advancement of Science, Society of Horticultural Science; Phytopathic Society; Association of Northwest Horticulture Entomology and Plant Pathology (president 1931); address, Talent.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 464


    JESSE RICHARDSON. In the early days of the history of Oregon, men accompanied by their families flocked here from every section of the United States, and not a few of the early settlers were Kentuckians by birth, Mr. Richardson being of the number. He was born in Cumberland County, August 12, 1834, and when about three years old, his parents went west to Illinois and settled for a time in the vicinity of Jacksonville. A few years afterward, in 1840, they continued westward to Macon City, Mo., where young Jesse attended the public schools and in them obtained the rudiments of an education without which no man can compete with the progress of the age and successfully fulfill his mission on earth. His early manhood was also spent in that locality, and on October 13, 1861, his marriage took place to Miss Martha Plymire, in Caldwell, Mo., and of the four children born to them, two are living--Henry H. Richardson, of Los Angeles, Cal., and Samuel I., of Medford, Ore.
    Having heard a great deal about the increased advantages of life in the West, the young people determined to seek a home there and in 1864 began the tedious journey across the country. After traveling for six months and enduring many hardships, they reached Austin, Nev., spending the winter there. When spring opened and the weather became milder, they continued their journey to Butte County, Cal., which was their home for a couple of years. Not being entirely satisfied with that section of the country, in 1866 Mr. Richardson journeyed northward in search of a more favorable location, which he found in Jackson County, Ore. Renting land on the present site of Medford, he followed agricultural pursuits there for two years, and was so well pleased with the country that he decided to purchase land, and accordingly became the possessor of three hundred and twenty acres of fertile land, three miles to the east of his former location. For a period of fifteen years, he cultivated and improved his land and carried on general farming pursuits with an unusual degree of success. He invested his savings in an adjoining farm, whither he removed and which continued to be his home until 1897. He then purchased a fine farm at the head of Sams Valley and his splendid four-hundred-and-four-acre ranch there is among the best improved in that vicinity, and upon it a variety of farm products are raised. His undivided attention has been given to the furtherance of his business interests, to the almost total exclusion of anything else. Politics do not appeal very strongly to him, and he is content to exercise his franchise as a simple American citizen and as a supporter of the Democratic Party. Although not an office-seeker, he has upon several occasions filled various minor offices in his locality, always proving worthy of the trust reposed in him by his fellow citizens. The wife of his young manhood died in 1868, and in 1876 Mr. Richardson was again married, his second wife being Miss Cordelia Bell, of Jackson County, Ore. Eight children were born of the second marriage, four boys and four girls--Jesse Sanford, Miles Monroe, Walter Woodford and Christopher Claud; Mary Elizabeth, Clara Bell, Gertrude and Josephine.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 897


    THOMAS RILEY. For more than a quarter of a century, Mr. Riley has proved himself to be a useful citizen of Jackson County, Ore., chiefly engaged in the agricultural development of this section, although a part of his attention has been given to the stock industry. The first thirteen years of his residence there found him a resident of Jacksonville, but a subsequent removal in 1890 to his present home along Antelope Creek brought him increased prosperity and success. At that time he purchased his fine four-hundred-acre farm eleven miles east of Medford, many improvements having been added to this place, which is one of the best-improved ranches in that locality.
    A worthy descendant of a prominent Ohio family, Mr. Riley claims the same state as the place of his nativity, having been born in Belmont County in the vicinity of Barnesville, April 8, 1850. His attendance at the public schools of his native place was terminated by a desire for adventure and a taste for a military career, for, at the early age of fourteen years, young Riley ran away from home and enlisted in the Union army, without the consent of his parents, who had no knowledge of his whereabouts. He took up our country's cause April 14, 1864, as a private in Company E, Sixty-second Ohio Volunteer Infantry, and was mustered into service at Marietta, Ohio. Participating in the siege of Richmond, Va., where his company was stationed for sixteen months, he was wounded in an active engagement on the second day of April, 1865. Comrades carried him from the field and he was taken to the field hospital for treatment, but was afterwards transferred with others to Hampton hospital at Fortress Monroe, where his wounds received attention and he was discharged from Hampton June 16, 1865. His military career covered a period of three years. Returning home to Ohio, he remained there only a short time, subsequently going west as far as Illinois, where he took up his residence for several years, afterward removing to the territories of Dakota and Montana. Anxious to avail himself of the increased advantages of the Far West, in 1877 he sought a home on the Pacific Slope, locating in Jacksonville, Ore., for a number of years as previously mentioned. December 30, 1882, Mr. Riley was united in marriage with Miss Sarah G. Hurst, a daughter of Martin Hurst, an esteemed citizen of Jackson County, Ore. Three children now brighten their home, Thomas M., Myrtle M. and Josie P. The family enjoy the highest esteem of their neighbors and acquaintances and are among the most useful citizens of their community. In fraternal circles, Mr. Riley is a prominent member of the Red Men of the World, and owing to his military career he is a worthy member of the Grand Army of the Republic organization of Medford. His adherence to the Republican Party is unquestionable, and his election by that party to the office of county commissioner in June, 1900, was an auspicious circumstance, and the manner in which he discharges the duties of that office is highly commendable.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 788-791


    JASPER N. RINEHART is a highly esteemed citizen of Ashland, Jackson County, and stands foremost among the successful agriculturists and stockmen of his section. At the present writing he is acceptably filling the position of city councilman from the third ward, but is otherwise living in retirement, enjoying the fruits of his early industry. The Rinehart family is of German descent and originally came from England to America. The progenitors of the family in this country were three brothers, one of whom was the grandfather of Jasper N. These brothers settled in Philadelphia, where Mr. Rinehart's grandfather followed the shoemaker's trade. The other two brothers were able-bodied men, and as such they took up the defense of our country in her war for freedom. Their fate is unknown, but it is supposed they perished in the Revolutionary War. The grandfather afterward moved to Tennessee and located on a farm near Memphis, where Lewis Rinehart was reared, although a Pennsylvanian by birth.
    Jasper N. Rinehart was born November 20, 1848, near Oskaloosa, Iowa, and is a son of Lewis and Elizabeth (Ellis) Rinehart, whose marriage took place in Tennessee. Shortly afterward, they removed to Illinois, but later located near Oskaloosa, Iowa, and were among the early settlers of that place. In 1854 they started across the plains in wagons drawn by oxen, six months later landing near Eugene, Lane County, and soon afterward purchased a farm in that vicinity. In 1870 they moved into Union County, buying land near Summerville, where they spent their declining years. The father passed to his final rest in 1881, aged eighty years. The beloved mother survived him for many years and died when she had attained to the age of ninety-four years. Both parents were consistent members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, and were esteemed for their sterling qualities. Their family consisted of eight sons and five daughters, as follows: John, who died in Union County; Mrs. Polly Ann Ratliff, who died in Iowa; Mrs. Barbara Edwards, who died in Lane County; George, a stockman in Gilliam County; Mrs. Louisa Duncan, who died in Lake County; Mrs. Elizabeth Jane Jasper, who died in Union County; J. H., an ex-member of the legislature and successful miller and banker of Union County; F. M., a stockman of Gilliam County; Henry, an ex-member of the legislature, now a stockman of Union County; L. B., who is also engaged in the stock business, in Yakima, Wash., and is an ex-state senator; W. E., a stockman of Idaho; J. N., the subject of this narrative; and Sarah, who is married and lives in Gilliam County.
    Jasper N. Rinehart was reared to farm life, and his early mental training was obtained through attendance at the district schools. In 1854 he accompanied his parents to Oregon, and completed his education in the Eugene schools. In 1870 he went into Union County and purchased three hundred and twenty acres of wild and undeveloped land. After plowing his land he hauled rails ten miles to fence it in, and engaged in raising wheat and other cereals. He followed this line of work for a period of thirty years and was very successful. In 1900 he sold this farm in Union County and purchased a fine place on Fairview Street in Ashland, which is still his home. Upon this he built his present fine residence, which is surrounded by ample grounds of about an acre and a half. However, he still owns a ranch, twelve miles east of Ashland, on Dead Indian Road, where his son George carries on cattle-raising.
    Mr. Rinehart chose for his wife Catherine Neville, and their marriage being solemnized at the home of the bride in Union County. Mrs. Rinehart is a native of Iowa, and was born in Wapello County, a daughter of E. T. and P. J. (McGuire) Neville. Mr. Neville settled in Union County, Ore., in 1871, following farming and stock-raising, and served one term as county commissioner. Three children blessed the home of Mr. and Mrs. Rinehart. Edward, the eldest, was accidentally drowned when a youth of sixteen years; George, previously mentioned, conducts his father's ranch; and Stella is at home with her parents. The family worship at the Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of which they are members and in which Mr. Rinehart is serving as trustee and steward. In politics he is a pronounced prohibitionist and believes intemperance to be the greatest evil in our fair land.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 665-666


GEORGE M. ROBERTS.
    Though it has been many years since Horace Greeley uttered his well known admonition "Go west, young man," the advice is still being followed, and throughout the Pacific coast country and especially in Oregon the alert and dynamic young men of the state are sturdy fellows who have come west to embrace the opportunities offered in a growing and rapidly developing country. They are to be found in all sections and in all professions, a great number being representatives of the law. Among those who are conspicuous as progressive and able lawyers is George M. Roberts of Jackson County. He was born in Lawrenceburg, Indiana, in 1889, his parents being George M. and Kate H. (Harding) Roberts. The Roberts family were among the earliest of the pioneers of Indiana and their lineage is traced back through the Roberts and White families to the colonial epoch in American history, many representatives of both families serving as soldiers in the war for independence and later In the War of 1812. The Hardings were of old Ohio pioneer stock and are closely connected with the early history of that state. George M. Roberts, Sr., was a prominent Indiana lawyer and for many terms served as mayor of Lawrenceburg, where he was also honored with various other positions of public trust.
    George M. Roberts of Medford was educated in the graded and high schools of his native town and in the University of Indiana, from which he was graduated with the Bachelor of Laws degree. Admitted to the bar of Indiana, the same year he accepted the position of assistant cashier in the People's National Bank at Lawrenceburg and continued to occupy that position for a year. He then determined to find a broader field of labor and started for the Pacific coast. He left his old home assured that he could build up a practice in his home town, with the backing of his father, but he was ambitious to succeed on his own account and traveled along the Pacific coast from San Francisco to Seattle. With rare good judgment he decided to become a resident of Medford and since 1912 has practiced law here, his clientage growing steadily, while a well-earned reputation places him in the front rank among the able lawyers of this part of the state. In 1916 the public, recognizing in him an attorney above the average and a man of excellent oratorical ability, tendered him the office of district attorney, to which he was in due time elected, serving with satisfaction to his constituents and with credit to himself until January, 1921. He has accepted no other political office, determining to devote his attention to the practice of his profession and at all times regarding the pursuits of private life as in themselves abundantly worthy of his best efforts.
    In 1912 Mr. Roberts was married to Miss Blanche Early, a daughter of H. B. Early, the president of the Early & Daniel Company, grain merchants of Cincinnati, Ohio, with a national reputation. Mr. and Mrs. Roberts now have two children: Mary Lee and Dorothy Frances, both of whom are pupils in the Medford schools. Mrs. Roberts is a graduate of the Bartholomew-Clifton College of Cincinnati, and is regarded as a model mother and a most gracious hostess. Mr. Roberts is a Knights Templar Mason and has crossed the sands of the desert to membership in Hillah Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Ashland. He likewise belongs to the Benevolent Protective Order of Elks, to the Knights of Pythias and still holds his membership in the Phi Kappa Psi, a fraternity of which he was president in his college days. He belongs to the University Club and to the Medford Chamber of Commerce. In politics he is an ardent Republican, but prefers to serve his party in the ranks rather than in office. In a word, it is his desire to concentrate his efforts and attention upon his professional interests and duties and he is now the general attorney of the Medford National Bank and of other large interests. 
Charles Henry Carey, History of Oregon, vol. III, 1922, pages 237-238


ROBERTS, George M., lawyer; b. Lawrence, Indiana August 2, 1889; to Oregon 1912; LL.B. Indiana University 1911; m. Blanche Early August 1, 1912; children--Mary Lee, Dorothy. District attorney Jackson County 1916-20; Phi Kappa Psi; Mason; Shrine; K.P.; B.P.O.E. Address: 201 Medford National Bank Building; home: 22 Geneva Avenue, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 186


ROBERTS, GEORGE M.
    Lawyer
b. Lawrenceburg, Ind., 1889; educ., grade and high schools of Ind.; Univ. of Ind., LL.B., Phi Kappa Psi (former pres.). Married Blanche Early, of Cincinnati, O., 1912; children, Mary Lee, Dorothy Frances. Admitted to bar of Ind.; asst. cashier, People's Nat'l. Bank, Lawrenceburg, one year. Since 1912 in practice of law at Medford, Ore.; Prosecuting Attorney, Jackson County, 1916-21; genl. attorney for Medford Nat'l. Bank; mem. Medford Chamber Commerce. K.T. Mason. Shriner. Elk. Pythian. Home: Crown Hill. Medford. Office: Medford Nat'l. Bank Bldg., Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 464


ROBERTS, GEORGE M.
Lawyer; ex-District Attorney.
b. Lawrenceburg, Indiana 1889; educated grade and high schools of Indiana; University of Indiana LL.B.; Phi Kappa Phi (former president); m. Blanche Early of Cincinnati, Ohio 1912; children Mary Lee, Dorothy Frances; admitted to Indiana bar; assistant cashier Peoples National Bank, Lawrenceburg, one year; law practice Medford, Oregon since 1912; District Attorney Jackson County 1916-21; member Board of Governors, Oregon State Bar Association (1938-September 1941, past president); member Medford Chamber of Commerce; K.T. Mason; Shriner; Elk; Pythian; home Crown Hill; office U.S. National Bank Building, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 474


ROBERTS, GEORGE M.
    Lawyer
b Lawrenceburg, Ind, 1889; educ, grade, high schs, Ind; Univ Ind, LLB; Phi Kappa Psi (past pres); m Blanche Early of Cincinnati, Ohio, 1912; ch, Mary Lee, Dorothy Frances; admitted Indiana bar; asst cashier, Peoples National Bk, Lawrenceburg, Ind; law practice, Medford, Or since 1912; dist atty, Jackson Co, 1916-21; governor, Or St Bar Assn, 1938-41 (past pres); mem, Chamber Commerce; KT Mason; Shriner; Elk; Pythian; home, Crown Hill; office, US Nat Bank Bldg, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 546


ROBERTS, William Jackson, Civil Engineer; born, Caroline Islands, 1860; son, Ephraim Peter and Myra Holman (Farrington) R.; A.B., Univ. of Ore., 1887; S.B., (C.E.), Mass. Inst. of Technology, 1891. Married, Caroline Odell Wilmore, June 15, 1911, at Berkeley, Cal. 1891-92, Irrigation Engr.; 1892-95, City Engr., Colfax Wash.; 1895-98, Asso. Prof., C.E. Wash. State College; 1896, survey of boundary, Colville Indian Reservation, Wash.; 1906-09, Sanitary Engr. in charge drainage and protection of Seattle's water supply, during construction C.M.&P.S. Ry.; 1898-1908, Sanitary Engr., Wash. State Board of Health; 1908-10, construction of water system for Medford, Ore. Since 1911, State Highway Commissioner, Olympia, Wash. Member: Am. Soc. Civil Engrs., New England Water Works Assn., Soc. for Promotion of Engrg. Education. Author: "Improvement of Country Roads,: 1899, issued as Bulletin No. 39 from Agr. College, Exp. Station, Pullman, Wash.; "Drainage," article in "Drainage Journal"; "Economic Size of Penstock in High Heads," printed in Transactions of Am. Soc. C.E.; "Computation of Brickwork in Egg-Shaped Sewers," printed in "Engineering News." Address: State House, Olympia, Wash.

Harper, Franklin, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, 1913, page 482


EDWARD CONSTANT ROBINSON, attorney, of Oakland, was born in Jackson County, Oregon, February 6, 1855, a son of Dr. Jesse and Lavinia Jane (Constant) Robinson, both living in Solano County. His mother, who was born in Sangamon County, Illinois, March 12, 1834, a daughter of Isaac and Lucinda (Merriman) Constant, was married in Jackson County, Oregon, April 27, 1854. Isaac Constant, born in Clark County, Kentucky, April 5, 1809, a son of Thomas and Margery (Edmonson) Constant, was married in Sangamon County, Illinois, February 14, 1833, to Lucinda Merriman, born in Scott County, Kentucky, February 21, 1813, a daughter of Reuben and Betsey (Bennett) Merriman. Isaac Constant came to Oregon in 1849; made a homestead entry; returned to Illinois; sold his property there; brought his family to Oregon in 1852, settling in Jackson County, where he died late in December, 1889, and his wife early in January, 1890. His father, Thomas Constant, born in Virginia August 14, 1769, moved to Kentucky, was married there June 17, 1796, and settled in Clark County. About 1810 he moved to Xenia, Ohio, and thence in 1820 to Sangamon County, Illinois. They had five sons and eight daughters. Both died at Athens, Illinois, he on December 14, 1840, and she on March 1, 1842. Reuben Merriman, the father-in-law of Isaac Constant, born in Connecticut September 6, 1790, went to Kentucky in 1811, and returning was married May 4, 1812, when he went back to Kentucky, settling on Big Eagle Creek, in Scott County, where he was engaged for several years in milling and coopering. In 1829 he moved to Sangamon County, Illinois, and settled in Williams township, where he died February 28, 1842, having survived his wife a single day.
    The paternal ancestry of the subject of this sketch is of New England descent for several generations, and is perhaps derived from William Robinson, one of the early colonists of Cambridge, said to be a kinsman of Rev. John, pastor of the Pilgrims in Leyden. Be that as it may, Eliakim Robinson, the great-grandfather of our subject, was a resident, and probably a native, of Worcester County, Massachusetts. He was married about 1770, to Deborah Brown, a daughter of Bryant and Hephzibah (Chandler) Brown, of Thompson, Connecticut, the mother being a native of Pomfret, Connecticut, where she was born August 12, 1720. Eliakim and Deborah Robinson had seven sons, the oldest of whom, Samuel, lived and died in Worcester County, Massachusetts; Silas, Jesse and Solomon settled at Hartwick, Otsego County, New York; Moses and Aaron, twins, settled in Wyoming County, New York, and Bryant, the youngest, is supposed to have settled in Rhode Island. Jesse, the third son, who was born in Webster, Worcester County, Massachusetts, November 14, 1773, was married November 16, 1806, being then a widower with one son, to Abiah Larned, born in Dudley, in the same county, November 19, 1784, a daughter of John Larned, by whom he had five sons and three daughters. He died in Hartwick, New York, January 6, 1848, his wife surviving to March 21, 1866. One of her sisters, Lovina, by marriage Mrs. Head, was remarkably long-lived, having been born July 13, 1783, and living to January 14, 1890.
    Jesse, the youngest but one of the children of Jesse and Abiah Robinson, and the father of the subject of this sketch, was born in Hartwick, New York, August 28, 1825, and received his early education there. At eighteen he entered the medical college at Woodstock, Vermont, at which, after a course of over three years, he was graduated, in 1846. Then he moved to Lee County, Iowa, where he practiced until he left for California, arriving in September, 1849. He engaged in mining, and between mining and prospecting at different points, some fifteen months had passed, when, on the organization of Shasta County, in December, 1850, he was elected its first County Clerk. In 1851 he bought a farm in Scotts Valley, Siskiyou County, on which he raised cattle chiefly; and in 1853 he moved into Southern Oregon, where he engaged in a more varied business, including a sawmill, grist mill and packing. He was married there, April 27, 1854, to Lavinia Jane Constant. In 1861 he was appointed Quartermaster of the First Oregon Cavalry, United States Volunteers, which he accompanied in its various expeditions, and was mustered out September 30, 1865, as Chief Quartermaster of the District of Boise, Idaho Territory.
    Returning to Oregon he settled in Jackson County, where he engaged in farming until he moved to Oakland, in November, 1868, chiefly for the better education of his children. He was variously engaged here until April, 1881, when he entered upon the discharge of his duties as assessor of Oakland township, to which he had been elected in 1880, and which he held by re-elections until January 1, 1887. Before the close of the latter year he took up his residence on his fruit ranch of 160 acres in Vaca Valley, Solano County, where he still resides. His children are: Edward C., named at the head of this sketch; Chester Larned, now a salesman for C. M. Plum & Co. of San Francisco, married in 1881 to Annie Belle Prince, a native of Maine, and has one child, Jesse, who was born in 1886; Thomas M., the third son, who is the subject of the following sketch; and Maury, who is interested with Thomas M. in a ranch in Vaca Valley, which he superintends.
    Edward C. Robinson completed his school days in the University of California. From 1873 to 1878 he was in the coal business as collector, bookkeeper or foreman for F. Chappellet & Co., and for six months as half owner of their branch yard at Alameda, and finally as superintendent of their headquarters in this city. In 1878, his health being somewhat impaired, he went to the mountains and engaged in hydraulic mining, owning at one time a two-thirds interest in the Josephine mine in Josephine County, Oregon. Disposing of his mining property he returned to Oakland, and was appointed in 1880 a deputy County Clerk, and detailed as Clerk of Department Two of the Superior Court of Alameda County. Finding an opportunity to study law, under the guidance of the late Henry Vrooman and afterward of the Hon. W. E. Greene, then and now one of the Judges of the Superior Court, he was admitted to the bar of the Supreme Court of California, August 9, 1882. Retiring from the position of deputy County Clerk in January, 1883, he entered upon the practice of law under the style of Robinson & De Golia (which partnership continued one year), and was appointed Attorney to the Public Administrator, and served as such to the close of 1886. From June 1, 1887, to October 1, 1888, he was one of the law firm of Smith & Robinson, otherwise practicing alone since January, 1884. In July, 1890, he was appointed Town Attorney of Berkeley. He has successfully conducted some cases that have attracted attention on account of the principles involved, and has established an excellent standing among, and is now one of the prominent members of, the bar of Alameda County.
    Mr. Robinson is Past Master of Live Oak Lodge, No. 61, F.&A.M., and Past Grand of University Lodge, No. 144, I.O.O.F. In June, 1888, he was elected Colonel of the Sons of Veterans, United States army, Division of California, for the usual term of one year.
    He was married October 17, 1889, to Miss Sarah Theodora Merritt, who was born at Payson, Adams County, Illinois, March 27, 1867, a daughter of James B. Merritt, now residing in Seminary Park, a suburb of this city.
The Bay of San Francisco: A History, Chicago, 1892, vol. ii, pages 102-104



ROBINSON, Edward Constant, Lawyer; born, Jackson Co., Ore., Feb. 6. 1855; son, Jesse and Lavinia Jane (Constant) R. Edu.: public schools, Ore. and Cal.; Univ. of Cal. Married, Sarah Theodora Merritt, Oct. 27, 1889. Member law firm, Robinson & Robinson. Atty. to Public Administrator, until 1886. Town Atty., of Berkeley, 1890. Past Col. Commanding Sons of Veterans of Cal. Member: Masons, Knights Templar, 33°, Scottish Rite. Republican. Res.: 552 East Oak St.; Office: First Natl. Bank bldg., Los
Angeles, Cal.
Franklin Harper, ed., Who's Who on the Pacific Coast, Los Angeles 1913, page 484


ROBINSON, FRED Ellis
Businessman.
b. Grants Pass, Oregon May 6, 1914; son of George L. and Maude M. (Hampton) Robinson, pioneer family to Oregon in 1860s; educated public schools in Grants Pass and Medford; La Salle Correspondence School; m. Donna Carol Clement of Austin, Minnesota, Oct. 7, 1939; children Jack Dale and Janice Anita; began as accountant; owner of City Transfer Co. 1943-47; with brother Raymond purchased Utz Men's Store (leading firm), renamed it Robinson Bros., partner 1947-; member Chamber of Commerce; Republican; Apostolic Faith; home 1409 Euclid; office 114 E. Main, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 476


ROBINSON, FRED E(llis)
    Businessman
b Grants Pass, Oreg, May 6, 1914; son of George L and Maude M (Hampton) R, pioneer family to Oregon in 1860s; educ, public schools in Grants Pass and Medford; Lasalle Correspondence School; m Donna Carol Clement of Austin, Minn, Oct 7, 1939; ch Jack Dale, Janice Anita, Fred E Jr; began as accountant; owner of City Transfer Co, 1943-47; with brother Raymond, purchased Utz Men's Store (leading firm) renamed it Robinson Bros, partner, 1947-; mem, Chamber Commerce; Republican; Apostolic Faith; home 1409 Euclid; office, 114 Main, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 225


DR. J. W. ROBINSON is among the prominent members of the medical profession of Southern Oregon, and none [are] more worthy of mention than the gentleman with whose name we introduce this sketch. Dr. Robinson is a native of Washington County, Oregon, born November 12, 1850. His parents were Nathan and Mary (Dorland) Robinson, both of whom were natives of Ohio. The former emigrated to Oregon in 1847, where he engaged in farming for many years, but toward the latter years of his life he has been prominently identified as a real estate dealer in the business circles of the city of Portland.
    Our subject was the fourth child in a family of five children. He was reared in Multnomah County. He attended the Portland Academy and completed his studies in 1870. He began reading medicine at Salem. His preceptors were Drs. Hall and Reynolds, two eminent practitioners of that city. He graduated in the medical department of the Willamette University in 1877, and the following year he removed to Jacksonville, subsequently going to New York, where he graduated in medicine and surgery. On his return to Jacksonville he established himself in the drug business and now carried a full supply of drugs [and] toilet articles, including stationery. In addition to the drug business he enjoys a lucrative city practice and is very popular as an enterprising and progressive citizen. He was elected to the city council in 1888, and at the present time, 1892, is the mayor of the city.
    He was married at Jacksonville, May 17, 1872, to Miss Tillie Miller, of Iowa. She was the daughter of John Miller, who came to Oregon in 1860. Doctor and Mrs. Robinson are the parents of three children, but one of whom is still living, death having robbed them of their son and daughter; Willie died October 15, and Leah followed on the twenty-first of the same month, 1890.
    In political matters he is a Republican, and is a member of Warren Lodge, No. 10, A.F.&A.M. Dr. Robinson's father may be termed a pioneer of the pioneers, coming to Oregon even before the early emigrants came to the now-famous state, and engaged in farming pursuits of the Willamette Valley, which contained but a few whites. He died in 1880 and his wife in 1889.

Rev. H. K. Hines, An Illustrated History of the State of Oregon, 1893, page 462


ROBINSON, RAYMOND E.
Businessman.
b. Grants Pass, Oregon July 16, 1924; son of George L. and Maude M. (Hampton) Robinson, entire family Oregon pioneers of 1860; educated public schools of Medford; La Salle Correspondence School; m. Barbara L. Neff of Medford June 20, 1946; veteran of infantry overseas, World War II; with City Transfer Co.; later owner and operator of Allen Hotel to date; with brother Fred purchased Utz Men's Store (a leading firm), renamed Robinson Brothers, partner 1947-; member Chamber of Commerce; Republican; Apostolic Faith; home Rt. 1; office 114 E. Main, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 476


ROBINSON, RAYMOND E.
    Retail Clothier
b Grants Pass, Or, July 16, 1924; son of George L and Maude M (Humpton); entire family Oreg pioneers of 1860; educ, pub schs, Medford; m Barbara L Neff of Medford, June 20, 1946; ch, Nancy Jean, Dennis Earl; vet, Inf overseas, WWII; with City Transfer Co; owned and mgr, Allen Hotel (now lessor of hotel); with brother Fred, purchased Utz Men's Store (local leading clothing firm), renamed Robinson Bros, partner, 1947-; mem, Chamber Commerce; Vets Foreign Wars; Exchange Club; Repub; Apostolic Faith; home, 855 Pennsylvania; ofc, 114 E Main, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 547


    SAMUEL M. ROBISON: lives on Wagner Creek; is a farmer, post office Talent, is a native of Indiana; came to state and county in 1853; was married April 13, 1864, to Hannah E. Barneburg. Children John R., Susan A., George M., William G., Ella D. and Delia M.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    SAMUEL M. ROBISON. John and Susan (Milligan) Robison were industrious farmers in Ohio who hoped to increase the prospects of themselves and children by removal to the state of Iowa. They traveled overland in covered wagons after the custom of the time, and March 16, 1837, their family of children was increased by the advent of a son, Samuel M., now one of the foremost farmers and stock-raisers of the vicinity of Talent, Jackson County, Ore. The parents located on a farm in Linn County, Iowa, and eight years later moved to another farm in the same county, and made that their home until the spring of 1853. The winter previous had been spent in preparation to cross the plains to Oregon, and the father had provided three wagons and three yoke of oxen on each wagon, also fifteen mares and twelve blooded cows, with which they made the journey. With admirable forethought he had laid in a stock of provisions sufficient to last a year, and he also bought many peach seeds, and things of incidental use in starting life in a new locality. Few men were better equipped than he, and few possessed such thorough insight into the possibilities awaiting him on the coast. Arriving in Jackson County August 30, 1853, he located a claim of three hundred and twenty acres on Wagner Creek, the same being now occupied by his grandson, Edward Robison, and here he erected a little cabin for the immediate accommodation of his family. Soon he found that life and property were unsafe without more adequate protection, and he therefore hewed timber and built a heavy stockade around his cabin. Upon the calming down of the Indian troubles the stockade was taken down, and Mr. Robison put in his vegetable and other seeds, and prepared to make a comfortable home for those dependent on him. In the winter of 1853 he set out his peach seeds and in time had the first peach orchard in Oregon, and his vegetable garden furnished products to many of his neighbors to whom such things were positive luxuries. He encouraged and assisted with the making of the first roads in his neighborhood, and in all ways proved himself a strong and capable and public-spirited pioneer. His death occurred on his donation claim in 1870. He was survived by his wife until 1889, when she died at the age of eighty-three years.
    Samuel M. Robison was sixteen years old when he came to Oregon, and his vigorous young strength aided materially in clearing the land and in overcoming the difficulties by which the family was surrounded. In 1857 he left the farm and began working at the blacksmith trade, but after eighteen months gave it up and found employment on a ranch. April 13, 1864, he married Hannah E. Barneburg, who came to Oregon in 1860, and with whom he went to housekeeping on his present ranch, two miles southwest of Talent. He is the owner of two hundred acres of land, and for twenty years has been extensively engaged in the dairy business, his products acquiring the reputation deserved by their purity and excellence. Anderson Creek, running through the farm, furnishes water for stock, and other watering facilities abound, as well as the most modern of improvements. The five children of Mr. and Mrs. Robison are all married and have homes of their own near their parents. John lives near Talent; Annie is the wife of Nicholas Brophy; George has a farm of his own; Eva is the wife of George Dewey; and Della is the wife of Ford Roper. Thus Mr. Robison has achieved satisfaction not only as far as his financial fortunes are concerned, but he has added stalwart sons and womanly daughters to perpetuate his name and add to the well-being of the state in whose interests he has devoted the best years of his life.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 882-883


THOMAS M. ROBINSON, Clerk of Department Two of the Superior Court of Alameda County, was born in Jackson County, Oregon, February 28, 1858, a son of Dr. Jesse Robinson. (For parentage see preceding sketch of his brother [Edward].) In his eleventh year he came with his parents to Oakland; he went first to Lafayette school, then to the high school, and afterward learned bookkeeping and commercial law under a private tutor. In November, 1877, he became a clerk in Oakland, and on July 29, 1878, became bookkeeper of the Josephine Mining Company in Josephine County, Oregon, holding that position until 1880, when he returned to Oakland. In April, 1881, he was appointed deputy Assessor of Oakland township by his father, with whom he remained until the close of his administration of that office in January, 1887. He was then appointed deputy by Thomas Molloy, Assessor of Alameda County, under whom Mr. Robinson held the position of chief deputy, with the marked acceptance of his principal and the public, until the close of his term in January, 1891, when he received the appointment of deputy County Clerk, and was detailed as Clerk of the Superior Court, Department Two, which position he now fills. Mr. Robinson is an ideal public officer, being at once capable, diligent and careful, as well as courteous and obliging to all with whom his duties bring him in contact.
    He is a member of the Sons of Veterans, U.S.A., Division of California, and a Knight of Pythias. He is interested in a fruit ranch of 225 acres in Vaca Valley, Solano County, with his youngest brother, Maury, who manages the place.
    Mr. T. M. Robinson was married in Oakland, July 27, 1887, to Miss Mary J. Havens, born in Essex County, New York, March 22, 1864, a daughter of Judge H. H. and Elizabeth H. (Shattuck) Havens, now living in this city. They have three children: Ethel, born September 6, 1888; Constant Havens, January 6, 1890, and Florence, June 23. 1891.
The Bay of San Francisco: A History, Chicago, 1892,
vol. ii, page 104


    WILLIAM ROBINSON. Among the retired residents of Jacksonville who retain mental and physical vigor in spite of having passed many milestones on the journey of life, William Robinson is deserving of special mention. His life has been an active and useful one, yet ever since coming to Jacksonville in 1898 he has absented himself on long prospecting journeys in different parts of the state, often being away for six or seven months at a time. He confesses to a great liking for this sort of work, and being a great pedestrian, seems abundantly able to withstand the hardships incident to the prospector's life. A liberal income is derived from working a placer claim in Rich Gulch.
    This venerable man of experience was born in White County, Tenn., September 30, 1826, and comes of southern stock, long ago identified with the plantation life of Virginia. His father, Reuben, and his grandfather, Jacob, were both born in the Old Dominion, the former on a farm near Bunker Hill. The family was established in Tennessee at an early day, and there the grandfather not only owned a large plantation and many slaves, but derived a liberal income from a salt works. He was a very prominent man, active and public-spirited. The family name was taken to St. Clair County, Mo., by Reuben Robinson in 1837, his son William being then ten years of age. The father engaged in tobacco and hemp farming in Missouri, and in 1853 sold out his interests and crossed the plains with ox teams via the Platte route. Locating on the Long Tom River in Lane County, he took up three hundred and twenty acres of land, improved it with the aid of his children, and after the death of his wife in 1856, at the age of forty-eight years, divided his farm up among his sons and daughters, of whom he had twelve, ten sons and two daughters. His wife was formerly Elvira Defrieze, a native of North Carolina, and daughter of George Defrieze, who removed from North Carolina to White County, Tenn., and died there at an advanced age. Mr. Robinson spent his last days with his children, and died in 1868, at the age of seventy-eight years. He was a Democrat in politics, and a member of the Presbyterian Church.
    The second child in his father's family, William Robinson had the advantage of both public and private schooling. He studied medicine with his uncle in Missouri, but never engaged in practice. For two years he engaged in driving a team at Fort Leavenworth, Kans., for the government, and in 1852 crossed the plains in an ox train, working his way by driving oxen and loose stock. Until 1856 he mined on Canyon Creek in Eldorado County, Cal., and August 9, 1856, he came to Oregon to attend his mother's funeral, expecting to retrace his steps to the mines. Instead, he was favorably impressed with this great northern state, and followed mining at the Sterling mines until 1866. He married Cynthia A. Oglesby, a native of Missouri, and daughter of William Oglesby, relative of Gov. Richard Oglesby, of Illinois. Mrs. Robinson died in 1868, in Josephine County, at the age of twenty-eight, leaving two children, Roscoe Vance and Frederick Alexander, both of whom are deceased.
    After his marriage Mr. Robinson returned to the mines of Sterlingville, Ore., and in the fall of 1867 he settled on a farm in the district of Josephine County, and invested the money from the sale of his mines in a farm. In 1877 he drove his cattle to Klamath County, where he bought a ranch of five hundred acres, and lived thereon until coming to Jacksonville in 1898. Marked public spiritedness has characterized the career of Mr. Robinson, and although his wanderings are many, and nature and the mountains claim him most of the time, he yet maintains a keen interest in the general affairs of his county, and rejoices at its material prosperity. As a Republican he has held many offices of minor importance, including that of road supervisor and school clerk in Klamath County, the latter office for sixteen years. He is a member of the Southern Oregon Pioneer Association, and is fraternally connected with Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M.; Oregon Chapter No. 4, R.A.M.; Malta Commandery No. 4, K.T.; Al Kader Temple, N.M.S., of Portland, and the order of the Eastern Star.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 895-896


    ISOM CLEMENT ROBNETT. The native sons of Oregon constitute a large gathering, and those who are men, and are promoting the well-being of the state to which they owe filial allegiance, represent a great army of pioneers without whom civilization would never have advanced to the western coast. A singular and seemingly recognizable pride lurks in the makeup of these men whose eyes opened upon the struggles of those nearest to them, and who have taken up with increasing fervor the work laid down by hands rendered useless through long striving with adverse conditions. This energetic second generation has a large-hearted and successful representative in Isom Clement Robnett, engaged in the mercantile business at Central Point, and who was born at Shedds, Linn County, this state, October 22, 1869.
    John A. Robnett, the father of Isom C., was born in Buchanan County, Mo., June 1, 1837, and came of southern ancestry, his father, John, having been born in Tennessee. The family was established in Buchanan County at a very early day, and both father and son crossed the plains to Oregon in 1849. meeting with few accidents on the way, and locating near Shedds, Linn County. After the death of the grandfather, John A. succeeded to the management of the home place, reared his two children, of whom Isom C. is the youngest, and improved a farm the original timber of which he had helped to clear. He took a commendable interest in Democratic politics, and his election to the state legislature in 1882 registered the largest vote on the ticket up to that time. His wife, Octavia (Cranfill) Robnett, was born in the state of Illinois, and died at Shedds in April, 1870, at the age of twenty-three. Mrs. Robnett, thus early cut off from life and happiness, was a daughter of Isom Cranfill, mention of whom may be found elsewhere in this work.
    Following upon his common school education, Isom Clement Robnett attended the State University of Oregon for three years, in the meantime continuing to live on the home farm until 1895. Notwithstanding the fact that his mother died when he was a baby, he received an excellent home training, becoming skilled in farming, at which he looked through the eyes of the practical and intelligent student. Removing in 1895 to Central Point, he inaugurated his business career in that year as a clerk in the general merchandise store of Cranfill & Hutchison and so well succeeded in this line that in January, 1898, he was able to purchase Mr. Hutchison's interest in the business, and the firm became Cranfill & Robnett, which has since been maintained with large profit to the promoters. A stock of $20,000 includes the articles in demand in growing and progressive communities, and the store has two floors, with display space measuring 64x55 feet on each floor. Mr. Robnett owns the store in which the business is conducted, as well as the home in which he lives at Central Point.
    In 1897 Mr. Robnett was united in marriage with Edna L. Gibson, who was born near Urbana, Ohio, a daughter of John Gibson, who was born July 3, 1849, s native of Champaign County, Ohio. The Gibson family is numbered among the very successful ones of Jackson County, for Mr. Gibson came here in 1886 with the determination to make the best of his opportunities, and has realized many of his expectations. At first he lived on a farm near Phoenix, Jackson County, but in 1887 bought a farm near Central Point, where he has since engaged in general farming and stock-raising. Mr. Robnett and his wife are members of the Methodist Episcopal Church, and are active in promoting its growth. Mr. Robnett is independent in politics, and is fraternally identified with the Ancient Order of United Workmen, in which he has taken the degree of honor; and the Modern Woodmen of America, in which he is past consul. He is a prudent and careful business man, advancing slowly along legitimate lines, conscious of the strength and ultimate satisfaction to be derived from fair and honorable dealing, and the possession of a good name.
Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, page 760


ROOTS, WALTER J. JR.
    Automobile Dealer
b Portland, Oregon, Feb 23, 1921; son of Walter J and Ruth (Johnson) R; educ, Univ Oreg, BS; m Anita J Roots, Dec 24, 1943; member firm, Roots and Schetsky, Inc, truck body builders, Portland, 1947-50, vice-pres and sales mgr; now co-owner Roots Motor Co, Medford, 1950 to date; Dodge-Plymouth Sales and Serv; 1st lieut, Air Corps, World War II; mem, Multnomah Athletics Club; Republican; address 101 W Jackson, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 230


    LOUIS A. ROSE: lives in Phoenix, is a farmer and stock grower; was born in Lee County, Iowa, June 12, 1846; came to state and to county in 1852; was married November 16, 1871, to Isabel Colver. Children Effie L., Ella M., Louis A. and Bertha M.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



ROSENBERG, David Hugh, horticulturist; b. Seattle, Washington August 22, 1889; to Oregon 1913; Cornell University 1913; m. Muriel Kinney June 18, 1921; children--David Hugh Jr., Gloria Nanette. Mason; B.P.O.E.; Rogue Valley Golf Club. Address: 41 Ross Court, Medford, Oregon.
Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 188


    GENERAL JOHN E. ROSS.--The subject of this sketch was born in Madison County, Ohio, February 15, 1818. His father moved to Fountain County, Indiana, when he was ten years old; thence to Cook County, Illinois, in 1833. He married, in 1840, the daughter of Alexander Robinson, of Chicago, who died after they had been married about eight months. In 1847 General Ross came to Oregon, and was captain of a company which crossed the plains. Col. Ross, Jo. Kline, and an Englishman, left the company at Grand Ronde, with the intention of coming on through ahead of them. On the road beyond Rock Creek, they discovered where a train had been attacked by the Indians. They overtook the emigrants after crossing John Day River, who proved to be the Warren party. They had been robbed of all they possessed, the Indians not even sparing them their wearing apparel. Mr. Ross traded his clothes to the Indians for provisions for this destitute band, and remained with them until his own train arrived--all coming to Oregon together. General Ross landed at The Dalles without a dollar, and went to work on a boat--which brought down emigrants to the falls--at one dollar per day. About the first of November, 1847, he went to Oregon City and opened a butcher shop, which he conducted about one month. Then the Cayuse War broke out, and he enlisted in the first volunteer company, with H. A. G. Lee, captain, Joseph Magone, first lieutenant; and Mr. Ross, second lieutenant, and went to the mission station at The Dalles, on the Columbia River. Lee and Magone were promoted, and General Ross was commissioned captain of the company, holding this position during his term of service in that war. He returned to Oregon City after the Cayuse War in 1848, and was engaged in running a threshing machine when the news reached him of the discovery of gold in California. Leaving his machine standing in the field--which he never saw afterwards--he went to the mines on Feather River, and there engaged in mining until the fall of 1849, when he returned to Oregon; went back to the mines in California, in the spring of 1850, and was one of the first discoverers of gold on Scotts River. In 1851 he came to Yreka, thence to Josephine Creek, and was one of the first discoverers of gold on Canyon Creek, in Josephine County. He returned to the Willamette Valley in the winter of 1851 and purchased a band of cattle, drove them to the Rogue River Valley in January, 1852, and opened a butcher's shop at Jacksonville. In the fall of 1852, General Ross raised a company of thirty men and went to rescue immigrants who were attacked at Bloody Point on Tule Lake. They joined Ben. Wright's company at Clear Lake, and with them met a party of immigrants between Clear and Goose lakes, returning with them. On the road.they buried about fourteen of the immigrants, who had been killed by Indians. Ross and his company paid their own expenses on this trip, and for pay they received the thanks of the Oregon legislature. In January, 1853, he married Elizabeth Hopwood, this being the first marriage in Jacksonville; the ceremony was performed by a Methodist preacher by the name of Gilbert. He settled on his present farm in December, 1853. In August, 1853, an Indian war broke out, and he was colonel in command of two battalions of mounted volunteers. After operating a few days in conjunction with Colonel Alden, of the U.S. army, and having only a few skirmishes with the Indians, General Lane arrived and took command. After a hard-fought battle on the headwaters of Evans Creek, in which engagement General Lane and Colonel Alden were wounded, and [Pleasant] Armstrong killed, the Indians made a treaty with General Lane. Colonel Ross acted as interpreter, both at the preliminary arrangements for the treaty, and at the treaty itself, although J. W. Nesmith was the appointed interpreter by General Lane, and is so reported by him. The Indians, however, did not know Nesmith, and were acquainted with General Ross, and it was only through him that they would communicate what they had to say in relation to the treaty. In 1854 he was ordered by the Governor to organize a company and send them out to protect the immigrants on the southern route, which was done, Captain Walker commanding. On the fifth of June of that year he was commissioned colonel of the 9th regiment by Gov. John W. Davis. In the fall of 1855, a breakout of the Indians, not only in this county but in the northern part of the state as well, resulted in a general war. Colonel Ross being in command of the 9th regiment, took the field, fought several severe battles, and was at length superseded in command by Col. [John] K. Lamerick. At a special election held December 15, 1855, he was elected to represent Jackson County in the territorial council to fill a vacancy caused by removal of Dr. Cleaveland, and at the general election in June, 1866, to the legislative assembly. In 1866-7 when the California and Oregon Railroad Company was formed, Colonel Ross was elected one of its directors, and the directors transferred the franchise to Holladay. He was appointed brigadier-general of the first brigade of the Oregon militia by Gov. L. F. Grover, on Dec. 2, 1872. The next important move was at the beginning of the Modoc War, when he was commissioned brigadier-general and took the field, commanding as such throughout the war, and participated in the principal engagements. In 1878 he represented Jackson County in the state senate, and was honored by being appointed chairman of the military committee. He was appointed one of the investigating committee to report upon the acts of the preceding administration. Gen. Ross' portrait, and a view of his residence, will be found in this work.
A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, pages 538-539


    GEN. JOHN ENGLAND ROSS, well-known pioneer and Indian fighter of the West, was born in Madison County, Ohio, February 15, 1818, and when ten years of age removed with his parents to a farm upon which has since sprung into being the splendid city of Chicago. His father, Angus, who came to America from Scotland, died in Oregon, at the home of his son, J. E. Ross, at the advanced age of eighty-five years. John E. Ross married Elizabeth Hopwood, born near Uniontown, Pa., in August, 1830, and of English descent. There were ten children born of this union, six sons and four daughters, Mrs. Reames being the second child. In the spring of 1847 Mr. Ross crossed the plains with ox teams to The Dalles, and from there went by boat to Oregon City. In that city he engaged in a butchering business for a short time, but soon entered upon that active Indian career which practically dominated his life in the West. He was first lieutenant in a company of Oregon riflemen who sought to quell local disturbances and protect the lives of the settlers, and soon afterward took an active part as captain in the Cayuse War. When the war was over he returned to his butchering business, and afterward took the first threshing machine in the state to the Tualatin plains. From 1848 until 1849 he mined with indifferent success in California, and later mined and fought Indians throughout the northern part of California and Southern Oregon. In the fall of 1852 he located in Jackson County, and in January, 1853, married the wife who so materially aided in his success, this being the first marriage solemnized in Jacksonville. In December, 1853, Mr. Ross located on his claim of three hundred and twenty acres, upon which the balance of his life was spent, and a short time afterward he was elected colonel of the volunteer forces called out to subdue the Indians. In 1854 he was commissioned colonel by Governor Davis, and served through 1854-5-6, bringing additional distinction upon a name already endowed with the finest attributes of the soldier.
    In 1866 Colonel Ross was elected a member of the legislature, and in 1872 was commissioned brigadier general of the First Oregon State Militia, serving in that capacity during the Modoc War. In 1878 he was elected state senator from Jackson County, and during the session represented the interests of his promoters with his usual tact and discernment. The death of this brave soldier and successful politician and farmer occurred on his home farm, three miles from Jacksonville, February 17, 1890. He is survived by his wife, who is making her home at Central Point. Besides Mrs. Reames, there are four daughters and four sons living of the ten children in the family.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 925-926


    CARL G. B. ROSTEL: lives in Jacksonville, is a tonsorial artist; was born November 25, 1849, in Filehne, Germany; came to state and county in 1877; was assistant surgeon in Franco-Prussian War.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JOHN L. ROWE. Among the varied occupations in which a man may engage in our prosperous land, that of a farmer occupies an important place, for without our honest agriculturists what would our nation do? One thus engaged is John L. Rowe, a worthy and progressive resident of Jackson County, Ore., where he was born and reared and where he has lived all his life. Such a man as he understands fully how to succeed in his farming and stock-raising, having followed that occupation ever since he left school. At this writing, he lives near Sams Valley, prosperous and well liked by his many friends and neighbors.
    Missouri is claimed as the birthplace of Mr. Rowe's father, Joab Rowe, who in the early '50s made his tedious way across the vast plains from his native state to Oregon; the usual method of traveling by ox teams was employed. Upon arriving at his destination he was attracted by the beautiful Willamette Valley, and following his inclinations made his first settlement there. However, after a short residence there, he removed to a ranch in Jackson County, now owned by Mrs. Case, remaining at that place for a number of years. Upon leaving his first farm in 1861, he located upon another and continued to abide there in prosperity until removed by death in 1865. Missouri was also the native home of Miss Martha Ingraham, who was joined in wedlock with Joab Rowe before he left for the West. This happy union was blessed by four children, whom we mention here: Marcellis. the eldest, is now a resident of Nevada, and the second child is John L., whose name entitles this biography. Of the two others, Rosetta married George Bartlett and now lives at Portland, Ore., while Annie, the fourth child, departed this life when still in her youth. The revered mother of these children is still living and has reached the age of sixty-five.
    While a boy John L. Rowe trudged to the common school for an education, and all this time he lived upon the ranch on Snider Creek, where his birth took place February 10, 1859. This ranch came into his charge when he had reached his majority, and he has given his attention to it ever since, with much care and industry, owning as he now does, one hundred acres of fine, fertile land. A Democrat in his political views, his time is not given to thoughts of an official career, and as to fraternal circles, he belongs to but one order, the Independent Order of Odd Fellows. Oregon would be glad to have more of this kind of men, who by their honesty and straightforwardness cannot fail to elevate the community in which they live. Mr. Rowe's marriage occurred in 1883, his choice being Miss Martha A. Smith, and with her and their four children, Lucy, Ethel, James and Joseph, he lives a life which is in itself full of good influence.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 839-840


    MILLER G. ROYAL: lives in Ashland; is principal of Ashland College; was born October 6, 1853; in Roop County, Nevada; came to state in 1853; was married August 19, 1877, to Tirzah H. Bigelow. Only child Ethel.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506



RUHL, Robert Waldo, publisher; b. Rockford, Illinois January 21, 1880; to Oregon 1911; Harvard University 1903; m. Mabel Jeanette Works December 19, 1910; children--Roxane, Robert W. Jr. (dec.), Alicia May. Co-editor Medford Mail Tribune; N.Y. Globe, commercial advertising 1904-06; editorial staff, Republic, Rockford, Illinois 1907-09; editorial staff, Spokane Spokesman-Review 1909-11; contracted to national magazines. B.P.O.E.; University Club; Rotary; Red Cross board. Republican. Unitarian. Address: Hillcrest Road, Medford, Oregon.

Who's Who in Oregon 1929-1930, Oregon City Enterprise, page 190


RUHL, ROBERT WALDO
    Publisher and Editor, Medford Mail Tribune
b. Rockford, Ill., Jan. 21, 1880; educ., pub. schs. and Andover, Academy, Andover, Mass.; Harvard University, B.S., 1903; Theta Delta Chi. Married Mabel Jeanette Works, Dec. 29, 1910; children Roxane, Robert W. Jr. (dec'd.), and Alicia Anne. Resident of Oregon since 1911. Reporter, New York Globe and edi., Republic, Rockford, Illinois, 1907-09; Editorial writer, Spokane Spokesman-Review, 1909-11. Publisher and editor, Medford Mail Tribune to date. President, State Editorial Conference, 1936. The Mail Tribune awarded Pulitzer Prize 1934 for distinguished and meritorious public service. Contributor to national magazines, Outlook, Leslie's etc. Member, Town Club, Rotary Club (honorary). Member, State Board of Higher Education. Elk. Republican. Unitarian. Home: Hillcrest Road. Office: Mail Tribune, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 473


RUHL, ROBERT WALDO
    Publisher and Editor,
    Medford Mail Tribune
b Rockford, Ill, Jan 21, 1880; son of A S and Nellie (Brown) R; educ, public school and Andover Academy, Andover, Mass; Harvard Univ, BS, 1903; Theta Delta Chi; m Mabel Jeanette Works, Dec 29, 1910; ch, Roxane (Mrs Charles Herbert Simmons), Robt Jr (dec'd), Alicia Ann; resident of Oregon since 1911; reporter, New York Globe and editor Republic, Rockford, Illinois, 1907-09; editorial writer, Spokane Spokesman Review, 1909-11; publisher and editor of the Medford Mail Tribune to date; pres, State Editorial Conference, 1936; Medford Mail Tribune awarded Pulitzer Prize for distinguished service during 1934; former mem, State Board of Higher Education; member, Rogue Valley Golf Club, University Club (Portland), Harvard Club (NY); Rotarian (hon); home, Hillcrest Rd; ofc, Mail Tribune, Medford, Oreg.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 287


RUNTZ, FRANK J.
Painting Contractor.
b. St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 17, 1882; son of Thomas and Mary (Huonder) Runtz; educated public schools of Portland; m. Katrina Bryant of Medford April 29, 1928; child Jean; began as pattern maker in Portland 1920-23; painting contracting business, retail sales, Medford 1923-26; owner Frank J. Runtz Paint and Wallpaper Store 1936-; member city budget committee 1929; city councilman 1940-50; vice-president Master Painters Association of Oregon 1943-44; troop committeeman Boy Scouts of America; Lion (past president 1941-42); Elk; member Medford Chamber of Commerce; Republican; Protestant; home 101 Cottage St.; office 315 E. Main, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 484


RUNTZ, FRANK J.
    Painting Contractor
b St Paul, Minn, Feb 17, 1904; son of Thomas and Mary (Huender) R; educ, public schools of Portland; m Katrina Bryant of Medford, April 29, 1928; ch, Jean; began as pattern maker in Portland, 1920-28; painting contracting business, retail sales, Medford, 1923-26; owner, Frank J Runtz Paint and Wallpaper Store, 1936 to date; member, city budget committee, 1929; city councilman, 1940-50; vice-pres, Master Painters Assn of Oregon, 1943-44; troop committeeman, Boy Scouts American; member, Medford Chamber of Commerce; Lion (past pres, 1941-42); Elk; Republican; Protestant; home, 101 Cottage St; office, 315 E Main, Medford, Or.
Capitol's State Who's Who Combined with Who's Who for the Western States, July 1953, page 600


    H. D. RUSSELL: lives on Forest Creek, is a miner; post office Jacksonville; was born in Wabash County, Ind., in 1847 came to state in 1878, to county in 1881; married November 1, 1878, to Eliza J. Morgan. Children Edward and Nathan.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JAMES H. RUSSELL: lives in Ashland; is a marble cutter; is a native of Tennessee; came to state and county in 1851; married May 9. 1854, to Ann Haseltine Hill. Children James B., Grace, Nellie, Martha, Mary, Hortense, Docia, Bertha E., Mabel E., Carl Marvin, Pearl H.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 506


    JAMES H. RUSSELL. Closely associated with the early advancement and industrial growth and prosperity of Ashland was the late James H. Russell, a man of marked ability and integrity. Coming to the coast with the venturesome miners of 1849, he assisted in developing the rich mineral resources of this section of the Union, and after settling permanently in Oregon, in 1851, was one of the first to make use of the veins of fine marble underlying much of the land in the southern section of the state. As an early settler of Jackson County, and its leading pioneer marble worker, he is justly entitled to honorable mention in a work of this character. His widow, Mrs. Ann H. Russell, is also especially deserving of commendatory notice, being a woman of intelligence, culture and great artistic talent. Since the death of Mr. Russell she has continued the business which he so firmly established, and has the distinction of being one of the oldest and most capable marble workers in the United States.
    A native of West Tennessee, James H. Russell was born April 5, 1823, and died at his late home, in Ashland, Ore., October 1, 1895. His parents, James and Mabel (Howard) Russell, were born and reared in Marietta, Ohio, and both died while yet in the prime of life. Thus left an orphan at the tender age of five years, James H. Russell was educated in Washington County, Ohio, near Marietta, living there until fifteen years old. Going then to Pittsburgh, Pa., he served an apprenticeship at the trade of a marble worker and stone cutter, and afterward worked as a journeyman in that city. Joining a party of seventy enterprising and ambitious young men, he started for the gold diggings of California in 1849, coming across the plains from the Missouri River with the Big Mule Train. After mining on the Yuba River for two years he came with three companions, Messrs. Gibbs, Hare and Barron, to Jackson County, Ore. Locating at a place now called Barron, they took up a donation claim containing two sections of land, and, continuing in partnership, carried on the land, and conducted the Mountain House, which they established, until 1858. During the Indian wars of 1853-56, Mr. Russell was actively engaged, serving as major in the regiment commanded by Col. John Ross.
    Settling in Yreka, Cal., in 1856, Mr. Russell was employed in the butcher business for four years. Returning to Jackson County, Ore., in 1860 he located on Coleman Creek, near Phoenix, where he opened a marble quarry, and put in a marble mill, which was furnished with water power. A year later he went to Canyon City, and while working in a tunnel of the Blue Mountain mines was struck by a huge boulder, which shattered his leg, inflicting such serious injuries that he did not get home for eighteen months.
    April 14, 1865, Mr. Russell moved with his family to Ashland, where he erected a marble mill, its site being at the rear of the lot now occupied by the Odd Fellows' building. After his accident Mr. Russell had the able assistance of his wife, who had employed her leisure time while he was away in developing her hitherto latent artistic talent, becoming in the time an adept marble carver and sculptor. Quarrying his marble in Josephine County, Mr. Russell had it hauled here with teams until the completion of the railroad as far as Roseburg, when he had it shipped in from the East. He had the honor of erecting the first monuments in Jackson, Josephine, Douglas, Klamath and Lake counties, Ore., and in Siskiyou County, Cal. After his first mill burned he ordered his marble from eastern quarries and continued his business until his death. He had an enviable reputation throughout the country, at the time of his death his name being but the fourth from the top, in regard to length of time and financial integrity, in the marble directory of the United States. A generous, public-spirited citizen, he was ever one of the foremost in the encouragement of beneficial enterprises, and was prominent in the building of schoolhouses, churches and public buildings. Mr. Russell served as councilman one term; was an active member of the Methodist Episcopal Church South; belonged to the Jackson County Pioneers Association; and was one of the leading Prohibitionists of city and county.
    May 9, 1854, at the home of the bride, Mr. Russell married Ann Haseltine Hill, who was born in Sweetwater, Tenn., and came across the plains with her father, Isaac Hill, when fourteen years old, and settled in Jackson County, Ore. A more extended history of the Hill family may be found elsewhere in this volume, in connection with the sketch of Mrs. Dunn, a sister of Mrs. Russell. Since Mr. Russell's death, Mrs. Russell has conducted the marble business most successfully, her well-equipped shop being at the rear of her residence. She is one of the pioneer marble workers of the country, and the oldest woman marble worker in the United States. Her work, which is of a superior order, will be found in Southern Oregon, Northern California, and Eastern Oregon. Among the beautiful and artistic monuments which she has erected in Ashland are the Atkinson, Wagner, Chitwood, Dennis, Tolman, McCall, Ganiard, Thomas Smith and Russell monuments, all of the inscriptions on same, except last date, being cut by herself. These monuments are truly works of art, and a credit to her good taste and workmanship. Of the union of Mr. and Mrs. Russell eleven children were born, namely: James B., in the marble business at Yreka; Mrs. Grace Fountain, an artist, living in Portland; Nellie, at home; Mattie, wife of Rev. Mr. Boyd, of Woodland, Cal.; Mrs. Mollie Eubanks, a twin sister of Mrs. Boyd, who died in Ashland; Mrs. Hortense Vining, of Los Angeles, Cal.; Mrs. Theodosia Walter, of Portland; Bertha, wife of O. Winter, of Ashland; Mabel, an artist, residing in Ashland; Carl, engaged in mining in Siskiyou County, Cal.; and Pearl, at home. Mrs. Russell belongs to both the Jackson County Pioneers Association, and the State Pioneer Association, and is a member, and ex-president, of the Woman's Christian Temperance Union. Politically she is a strong Prohibitionist, and religiously she is a consistent member of the First Presbyterian Church. At Rest Cottage, Evanston, Ill., the last earthly home of Frances E. Willard, may be seen a beautiful piece of Mrs. Russell's handiwork. It represents the badge of the W.C.T.U., the white ribbon bow, carved from marble. It was first exhibited at the W.C.T.U. booth, at the Jackson County Fair, later at the World's Fair, and is now in the memorial room in Rest Cottage.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co., Chicago, 1904, pages 947-948


RYNNING, PAUL BERTHEAU
County Engineer; Past Potentate Hillah Shriner.
b. La Crosse, Wisconsin April 5, 1890; son of Erik B. and Cathinka (Steen) Rynning; educated grade and high schools La Crosse, Wisc.; University Wisconsin C.E. 1912; m. Ivy Hansen of Astoria, Oregon July 17, 1920; son Delroy Finlay; began construction engineers Portland; location and resident engineer State Highway Department 1917-25; county engineer Jackson County 1925-; member Medford City Water Commission (chairman 1933 to date); secretary State Association County Engineers 1926 to date; served U.S. Army, France, World War I; member American Association of Engineers, American Road Builders Association (president, county division); S.R. Mason (past master all S.R. bodies); K.C.C.H.; Republican; Lutheran (secretary of board); home 16 Rose Ave.; office Courthouse, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 485


    JOSEPH B. SALTMARSH: lives on Sterling Creek; is a miner; post office is Jacksonville; was born in Ripley County, Ind., 1825; came to state in 1851 and to county in 1852; was married first, February 19, 1852, to Mary E. Klum (deceased). Children Annie and Charles M. (deceased), Arthur, Arzie, Lillie and Edward. Was again married, November 24, 1881, to Mrs. Ella Cameron. One child, Madison. Mrs. Cameron at time of last marriage had two children, Ola B. and Mary J.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 507


    CONRAD S. SARGENT: lives in Phoenix; is a merchant; was born in Western Virginia, July 21, 1832, came to state and county in 1853; was married, August, 1856, to Loetta Houck. Children Maggie E. and Laura D.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 507


SATCHWELL, Atlanta Parker (Mrs.), born in Petaluma, California, 1872, former resident of California and Nevada, living in Medford, Oregon for the last 17 years. Married to Gilbert R. Satchwell. Children: Mrs. Carl Hoots, Mrs. Earl Knapp. Artist; secretary of Medford Chamber of Commerce during war period; head of civic dept. Greater Medford Club, 4 terms, secretary 2 terms; secretary of Jackson Co. Health Assn. 3 years; former organizer for Southern Oregon District Fed. of Women's Clubs. Member: Greater Medford Club, Dixie Club, Kodak Club, Delphian Study Club, District and State Fed. Women's Clubs. Home: 411 South Front St., Medford, Oregon.

Max Binheim, ed., Women of the West, Los Angeles 1928, page 164


SATCHWELL, ATLANTA PARKER
    Artist; Club Leader
b. Petaluma, Calif., 1872; educ., pub. schs. and academy, Willamette Valley. Married Gilbert R. Satchwell; two daughters, Valey (Mrs. Carl Hoots), Hattie (Mrs. Earl Knapp). Resident of Ore. since 1905. Secty., Medford Chamber Commerce, World War. Head civic dept., Greater Medford Club, 4 terms; secty., 3 terms. Secty., Jackson Co. Health Assn., 3 years; organizer for So. Ore. Dist. Federation Women's Clubs. President, Rogue River chapter, Western Nat'l. League of Writers, 3 terms; secty. treas., 2 terms. Former member on Democratic Central Committee, Jackson Co. Former art teacher; artist in oils and pastels. Writer and lecturer on early Ore. History; poems and fiction. Member, Greater Medford Club; Dixie Club; Kodak Club; Delphians; State Federation Women's Clubs. Democrat. Episcopalian. Home: 41 Ashland Avenue, Medford, Oregon.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1936-37, page 478


SCHADE, Lawrence (Larry) Joseph
Jeweler; Boy Scout Leader; Councilman, Medford.
b. Portland, Oregon Aug. 15, 1889; son of Joseph and Anna (Welch) Schade; educated grade and high school Portland; Christian Brothers College (business course); m. Grace Noben of Grafton, North Dakota, Dec. 15, 1915; children Madelyn (Mrs. Walter Kleinfelter), Larry Nolan; began as apprentice watchmaker; then watchmaker and jeweler, Felix Bloch, Portland, many years; manager store in Medford 1919-27; owner jewelry business Medford 1919 to date; president Crater Lake Council Boy Scouts of America 1925 to date; originated and built Camp Lake of the Woods at a cost of $20,000 (open for use of Camp Fire Girls and other groups); member Regional Board No. 115; one of the original members of the City Planning Commission; councilman Medford since 1935; president term (to Jan. 1949); two terms, eight years president; member Oregon State Jewelers Association, Merchants Association; member Chamber of Commerce; Elk; member Knights of Columbus (Grand Knight, many years); Republican; Catholic; home 989 S. Oakdale; office 9 South Central, Medford
.
Capitol's Who's Who for Oregon 1948-49, page 490


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