HOME



The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1917-1919

News from Eagle Point, Oregon and the Upper Rogue, mostly from the pen of A. C. Howlett.


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Al Sturgis of Elk Creek, Trail P.O., spent the night with us Tuesday night. He reports the snow at his place seventeen inches deep. Last Wednesday afternoon after I had written the Eaglets, Ed Conley and James M. Riley, both of Eagle Point, gave me their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune. Mr. Conley is the manager of the T. E. Nichols general merchandise store, successor to F. L. Heath.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Smith in Eagle Point, December 27, a six-pound daughter, Dr. Holt reports.
    We have had some little excitement in our little town during the past few days. William Thomas of Brownsboro took out a writ of replevin to secure four hogs, from Chas. Hanscom, also of Brownsboro, in Judge F. M. Stewart's court a week or more ago and the case was set for last Wednesday, but continued until Thursday, and by two o'clock that morning the three attorneys had arrived and the court house, the town hall, was almost packed with boys and men, all anxious to see and hear the case, for Mr. Hanscom had attracted some attention already as a defendant in a suit with Mr. Hoagland to recover two horses, in which he lost out. The plaintiff in this case, Wm. Thomas, had employed Newton W. Borden and H. A. Canady, and the defendant Gus Newbury. The first thing to be done was to draw a jury and in order to facilitate business instead of drawing the jury from the jury box, the constable, Leroy Smith, picked the jury up in and around the court room and thus saved time and expense to the party who had the cost to pay. The following persons were selected as jurors in the case from the twelve who were summoned: Timmy Dugan, G. H. Wamsley, Sam Coy, Mr. McQuoid, Sr., Wm. G. Knighton and Mr. Swanson. After the jurors were sworn in the court adjourned for dinner and the plaintiff, his attorney and most of the witnesses repaired to the Sunnyside for dinner, and I suppose that the defendant and his attorney went to the Farmers' hotel. By one o'clock p.m. the court room was again crowded with anxious spectators and the proceedings begun in earnest. The first witness was the plaintiff Wm. Thomas and he told where he got the hogs and when and how he paid for them, how he had treated them, raised them as pets and all the particulars as to how. they were marked, showed that his mark was recorded, etc., and that in changing the mark that the defendant had left some of the mark, next to the head, splits in both ears, and then substantiated his statement so far as the purchase was concerned by his brother, Richard, and cousin Sam Courtney, and his continued possession for nearly two years by Ralph Tucker and his son and his son-in-law, Mr. Staub, and Mr. Hoagland. The defendant, Mr. Hanscom, swore that he bought the hogs from Wm. von der Hellen in a bunch of hogs that Mr. von der Hellen had bought from a man named Jordan in a closing-out sale by the Eagle Point Bank, and his former partner, Mr. Ramack, swore positively to the pigs as the property of the defendant. During the examination of the defendant and his main witness Mr. Newbury asked several questions that were ruled out by the court. There was considerable cross-firing between the three attorneys and at last the case was argued pro and con until 5 p.m., when it was given to the jury to decide and in a few minutes they brought in a verdict in favor of the plaintiff. They only balloted twice on the question as to who should have the hogs. The first time the ballot stood four to two for the plaintiff and the next time was unanimous for the plaintiff. It is such a novelty to see three real live lawyers out here at one time, unless it is during a campaign, that the case attracted more attention than it would, had it been a case tried by the justice without such a display of legal talent. Another thing that, perhaps, had quite a bearing on the case was that the defendant is now out on bonds to answer an indictment for the larceny of these same hogs.
    Mr. Hoagland has moved from his place near Central Point to his farm near Brownsboro.
    Mr. Moore, the father of Mrs. David Cingcade, came out on the P.&E. Thursday to visit his daughter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jackson and a son of the late E. E. Smith were on the train on their way to their home in Butte Falls.
    H. H. Fox, who is engaged teaching school in the Lake Creek district, was here for dinner Thursday and so was a man by the name of Fuller and his daughter and friend by the name of Cooper. Mr. Fuller is talking of buying a place just above town where Mr. Gorman lives. They are all three from Los Angeles and came as far as Sisson in a Ford, but the snow storm blocked their way.
    Jacob Klippel of Portland took the Eagle Point-Persist stage Friday morning for Trail, where he will visit his sister-in-law, Mrs. Henry Klippel.
    Miss Claire Zimmerman and our daughter, Hattie, went up to Edsall to visit friends and have a good time in the snow, taking pictures of the snow-covered scenery. They expect to return today, Saturday.
    Mrs. Gus Gorman was in town on business Friday.
    Wishing the readers of the Eaglets a happy New Year, we close the year 1916.
    Charley Manning of Peyton came in in the afternoon from Climax and stayed until after the dance.
    Mrs. W. C. Daley of Lake Creek, Mrs. F. J. Ayres of Reese Creek, and Miss Fay Perry of Eagle Point came out from Medford last Saturday. Mrs. Daley had been caring for her daughter, Myrtle, who has been confined to her bed with pneumonia, and Mrs. Ayres and Miss Fay had been visiting Mrs. Ayres' daughter, Mrs. F. T. Newport, and Miss Fay was visiting her step-aunt. The return trip of the train took fifteen cans of cream to Medford.
    Mr. Talbert went to Medford on the same train and so did F. M. and H. D. Carlisle of Medford.
    There was quite a number of people attended the masque ball Saturday night and danced until 1:30 Sunday morning. If our new district attorney will take the trouble to investigate he can probably find several cases of the violation of the prohibition law, for I heard one of our prominent business men make the remark that out of about fifty men who were there, that he did not think there was ten men who were strictly sober.
    Saturday night we had, as guests at the Sunnyside: Carl von der Hellen, Miss Nell Thompson, Carl Ringer, Miss C. Zimmerman and Harry Lewis.
    Al Clements, P. S. Anderson, O. Adams of Butte Falls; Robert Como of Talent, and Glen Haley and his brother Percy; N. W. Slusser, our barber and jeweler; Ed Cingcade and Henry Trusty, the mail carrier from here to Persist, were here for breakfast Sunday morning.
    William Heoiff, Frank Gillespie, and Mrs. Mario van Reffer were here for dinner.
    Ralph Tucker and his son-in-law, Mr. Staub of Brownsboro, came down Tuesday. Mr. Staub brought down a crate of chickens and Mr. Tucker took back two bales of wire fencing.
    Gus Stinson and S. K. Ballond, two of the "trouble men" on the electric line, came in Wednesday noon for dinner. They had just come in from McLeod, where they had been repairing the lines that had broken down under the pressure of the snow. They say that they have had considerable trouble in the hills and the snow is so deep that they had to leave their auto and take a team and in many instances had to go on foot as the snow is so soft that they cannot use snow shoes.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Howard, one of the Medford insurance agents, came out last. week and wrote out an insurance policy for the Baptist church of this place for $1000.
    Charley Manning of Peyton came out on Friday, the 5th, went up on Antelope Creek near Climax and brought out Saturday Miss Mabel Henson, took her to the P.&E. depot and started her for her school on Applegate. Miss Henson has been spending her vacation with her father on the farm near Climax.
    Since I last wrote there has been a number of accidents in this neighborhood. Among them was Mrs. Ed Coy. She slipped on the frozen snow and fell, and her husband came out to assist her in the house, and as he was stooping over to lift her up was taken with a catch in his spine and he fell by her side, but at last accounts they were both out of danger. About the same time Mrs. Sarah Coy, the mother of Ed Coy, fell on the ice and had some painful bruises, and a short time later Mrs. John Smith met with a similar accident and hurt her knee, but from what I can learn none of the accidents were serious. Here I will remark that the three incidents just recorded were all hearsay, as I have been and am now confined to the house with la grippe, and have to gather my items as best I can. This is Thursday morning and I have not been away from the house but once for over a week, and then took a short walk, so that what I have to write has been picked up as best I could.
    P. S. Anderson, recently from the Alberta country, and is at this time making the Sunnyside headquarters, came out from his farm on Rogue River, spent two nights here, then went to Medford, Jacksonville and Grants Pass on business.
    Miss Nell Peachey, who is teaching in the John Rader district, spent her vacation with her parents, south of Ashland, and spent Saturday night with her sister-in-law, Mrs. Bert Peachey, at G. W. Daley's, of this place.
    Miss Vera Kershaw of  Wellen, who, with her brother, James, own and operate a large stock ranch on Antelope Creek, came in with her cream for shipment Tuesday. She says that their stock is doing fine, consisting of sheep, goats, cattle and hogs.
    Mrs. J. H. (Bess) Carlton of Central Point came over the first of the week to visit her brothers and sisters, the late George Brown family. Her and her sister, Lottie Van Scoy, spent Tuesday evening with us.
    Among the business men who have called since I last wrote were R. M. Diller of San Francisco, Cal., C. R. Hunt of Portland and G. N. Birkland of Medford. They were representatives of three different hardware firms.
    Last Monday Bert Bryant of Medford, formerly of this place, came out to go to work on the A. Corbin packing house that gave way under the pressure of the snow. John Smith had been working on it a few days. This is the second time that the same structure has given way, the first time under its own weight, on account of it being not properly braced, and the foundation being defective, and this time on account of shoddy work in the building in the first place. The contractor left the country as soon as he could and left the other fellow to hold the bag.
    Mrs. Minnie Bryant came out Tuesday, attended the Rebekah lodge and spent the night here at the Sunnyside with her husband.
    Tuesday night they had the installation of the officers in the Price Rebekah lodge of Eagle Point. The following persons were installed by D. D. P. Minnie Bryant; Lottie Coy, N.G.; Ed Coy, R.S.; Norman McQuoid, L.S.; Minnie Clark, V.G.; Charles Clark, R.S.; Hattie Howlett, L.S.; Mrs. Norman McQuoid, secretary; Mrs. May Painter, financial secretary; Sarah E. Howlett, treasurer; Mrs. M. S. Wood, Chap. Sophia; Mrs. M. S. Wood, chaplain; Sarah Childreth, warden; Nettie Grover, conductor; W. L. Childreth, I.G.; Ed Cingcade, O.G.
    V. A. Heffner of Trail, who has charge of the Elk Creek hatchery, spent Monday night with us. He is planning to rebuild the hatchery this coming spring on a much larger and improved scale.
    Noble Zimmerman and C. A. Newstrom, the latter from Lake Creek, came in Wednesday for dinner. Mr. N. is the road supervisor in the Lake Creek district and seems to be doing good service and giving satisfaction.
    William Thomas and Mr. Staub of Brownsboro were in town Wednesday and Mr. T. called on your correspondent on business and took dinner.
     I received a message last night over the phone from Thomas Carlton ordering the Daily Mail Tribune to be sent to Prospect.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 16, 1917, page 5


FLOUNCE ROCK FRILLS
    We have had day after day of cloudless blue sky and bright sunshine, while the valley is blanketed with fog most of the time.
    Mr. Irwin returned Saturday from Medford, where he had dental work done. He was glad to get back into the sunshine.
    The grippe is still wending its wearying way through our midst. Some have recovered and others are just getting it.
    Stan Aiken, Jr., visited Miss Belva Walker Sunday of Mr. Vaughn's.
    Mr. Bergman has returned from the valley and his younger brother came with him. Miss Bergman has gone to California.
    Saturday night the young people of the neighborhood assembled at Mr. Dawson's and proceeded in a body to Bert Higinbotham's to surprise the Higinbotham family and spend the evening. Music, games and dancing were the program.
    Earl Peyton spent Saturday and Sunday at home.
    Mr. Sandow of Elk Creek spent one day last week at Mr. Mansfield's.
    Mrs. Green is visiting her daughter, Mrs. Nye, and has been for several weeks already, but we are very slow to learn news this winter.
    A young man from the valley is visiting Charles Manning.
    Mr. Manning, Sr., is in Sheridan, Wyo., where he was called by the illness of his father, who is now recovering.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl Richardson visited at Elmer Dawson's Sunday.
    Luther East returned to the valley after spending a few days with J. F. Ditsworth, Jr.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 17, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thursday afternoon, the 11th inst., George Trusty came out from his home on Elk Creek, Trail, post office, so as to be here on Saturday afternoon to attend a meeting with those who were to be here to perfect the organization of the Eagle Point Federal Bank Loan Association. He was accompanied by G. W. Herrington of Portland, who is representing the DuPont Powder Co.
    The same day Mrs. George West came out with Bert Peachey in his new auto and later in the day Mr. West and F. Carlson, two of the forest rangers, came in on their way up to the Dead Indian Soda Springs; they had two teams and were preparing to haul hay up there to feed on while they and others were engaged in making a road and building bridges from Lake Creek to the springs, something very much needed. They procured hay from our enterprising farmer, J. D. Singleton. They returned in a few days and reported that they had built a barn to keep the mules in and then took up more hay. They expect to employ five or six men on the job, and by the time that the tourists get ready to go up there next summer will have a good road to travel on.
    It becomes my duty to chronicle the death of another of our pioneers, Jeff Johnson, who passed away on the 12th inst. He leaves two brothers to battle with the trials of life, Rube and Frank, and a sister, Mrs. Jeff Conover. The three brothers at one time owned what is now known as the McDonald Elk Creek ranch, and at the time of his death he was interested in a livery stable in Central Point. The remains were interred in the family burying ground on Indian Creek.
    John Foster, who has been up at Edsall for some time, came out the same day, spent two days here and then went up to his farm near Debenger Gap.
    Word came to me over the phone that John Allen of Derby had been kicked by a horse and had his leg broken just above the knee, a painful and serious accident for a man of his age, and in addition to all that he has his stock, a part of the Derby ranch and the rest at his ranch near Rancheria, and it will be hard for him to get anyone to look after his stock as he did.
    Charles Tull of Medford and Chas. Horton of Klamath Falls called in for dinner last Saturday on their way from Gus Nichols', where they had been to do business. Mr. Horton is buying up stock cattle and shipping them to California. He has already shipped three cars of cattle south.
    The E.P.F.L.B. association met as per announcement Saturday afternoon in the Eagle Point school house, with L. K. Haak in the chair and E. H. Hurd, acting secretary. There were twenty-seven persons present at the opening. but several more came in later, until the list was swelled to be about fifty. After the reading of the minutes of the last meeting they proceeded to elect the board of directors, who were L. K. Haak, C. L. Farrar, George Trusty, H. L. Young and Jud Edsall. They then elected L. K. Haak president, H. L. Young vice-president, and E. H. Hurd, secretary-treasurer, and C. L. Farrar, J. E. Edsall and George Brown as the board of appraisers, and George Trusty as the fourth, or the substitute. Thus perfecting the organization so far as it goes. The boundaries are beginning at the south line of township 36 south, range 1 west, north to the Umpqua divide, including township 37, ranges 1, 2 and 3 east, and from the west line of range 1 west, east to the Klamath County line. The applicants ask for $168,000.
    T. S. Branson and W. E. Fansher, representing the New York Life Insurance Co., were here last Monday for dinner on their way up to the Lake Creek country.
    Mr. and Mrs. Baxter of Medford were visiting Mrs. B.'s sister, Mrs. Brittsan, the first of the week, and Mrs. B. returned to Medford with them Monday.
    A. E. Cohoon, a traveling forest ranger, came in Wednesday for a late dinner from Trail.
    I was called on Tuesday to go to attend the funeral of Mrs. Curbrit, mother of Mrs. Hessler, who died at the home of the latter, near Brownsboro, on the 15th inst. She was 96 years old and up to a short time prior to her death went wherever she wished, walking quite a distance. I was unable to go, as I am still confined to the house with the grippe, but am gradually improving, and trust that in a few days I will be able to resume my daily task of looking after the interest of the Medford Publishing Co.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Peyton, whose father owns a farm near Prospect, spent Wednesday night with us.
    George B. Brown of Brownsboro came out from Medford Wednesday evening, took supper at the Sunnyside and then Jud Edsall took him up home. While here he told me that he had discovered cinnabar on his place, and that he pounded up about seven pounds of the rock and procured a lump of quicksilver as large as the end of his finger. He seemed to think that there is a large deposit of the ore that will be of value in the near future. There is no telling what may be found yet in this Butte Creek country, for Messrs. Daley and Conley have been developing their copper mine on Lake Creek, and if this cinnabar proves to be a success there is no telling what may be the future of Eagle Point, for it seems to be the business center of this whole section, and with the prospect of the Pacific Highway coming from near Canyonville, Douglas County, via the Trail Creek route, thus saving a distance of about forty miles, the whole geography of this country may be changed.
    George West and Frank Carlson, when they had gone a little above the Russ Moore place, found that the stream was frozen over, but not hard enough to bear up the mules, but so hard as to be in danger of cutting their legs, so they unloaded the hay and retraced their steps as far as Mr. Moore's, spent the night there, coming out here the next day. They left men to fix a crossing so that they could cross on their return, so by this time they have their feed all up there and will try to get their dynamite up by the first of the week and then go to work in earnest on the ground, to the joy of all travelers.
    Jerry Bishop of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. last Thursday and was taken to the Sunnyside to be treated by our local M.D., W. W. P. Holt. His mother and sister, Miss Ida Bishop, are with him. I heard the doctor remark that he was improving.
    It is strange how things do happen in this world. Yesterday Mrs. Howlett took a notion that she would put in a comforter in the frames and tack it out at her leisure. Well, strange to say, she had hardly got it on the frames when Mrs. William Perry, Mrs. Charles Clark and her mother, Mrs. Newman, just dropped in, and later Miss Claire Zimmerman, one of the phone girls and a regular boarder, was off duty for a few hours, so she came in just in time to be handy, so they all together made an assault on the comforter, and in a very short time had it ready to bind, but before they were through with the job, Mrs. John W. Smith and  her sister, Miss Perl Stowell, dropped in and in a few minutes Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Peachey and his sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Port of Jacksonville, came in and altogether they had one of those old-fashioned social times. Mr. Port remained overnight with us and the others went to Jacksonville. They were in a new car with O. V. Myers, who was trying to trade his car, a Maxwell, for Mr. Port's Ford. Mr. Port is one of the forest rangers and was on his way up to join Messrs. West and Carlson at Dead Indian Soda Springs, taking the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage today.
    T. S. Branson, of the New York Life Insurance Co., stopped here for supper Friday evening, then went on to Medford that night.
    This morning when I reached the P.&E. depot I heard a most unearthly noise and on inquiry learned that there were three cages of trained dogs in the depot that had been shipped to one of our townsmen, J. B. Jackson, by his brother, who had been using them in connection with a traveling show.
    A. J. Mitchell, a Christian Science healer of Medford, and Arden Tyrrell were among the passengers who stopped off here Saturday morning. Mr. Mitchell was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. William G. Knighton and while here he visited your correspondent and family. If it was not that the lady who has recently been cured of sudden blindness and deafness has requested me not to give it publicity I could give another remarkable cure by him and others of his faith.
    Lee Farlow, one of our enterprising farmers and stockmen of Lake Creek, came out Saturday in his car.
    W. H. Crandall and family drove in Saturday afternoon to do some shopping.
    C. A. Newstrom and Fritz Pech of Lake Creek came in Saturday after a load of piping for ground culverts.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 23, 1917, page 5


ANTELOPE ORGANIZES COMMUNITY CLUB
    Saturday evening, January 20, a meeting was called at the Antelope school, district No. 12, by its teacher, Miss Nell Peachey, for the purpose of organizing a community meeting. A surprisingly large number were present and arrangements were made for the next meeting, which is to be held Saturday evening, February 17. The program committee consists of Mrs. Bert Rippey, Owen Grigsby and Miss Clarida Walch, and the program promises to be very interesting. It is the purpose of these meetings to bring the people together to enjoy a pleasant evening and at the same time receive something educational and instructive. A cordial invitation is extended to all residents of the district, and outsiders will be heartily welcomed.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night Henry Trusty, Joe Moomaw and Miss Claire Zimmerman gave a social dance, as Miss Claire said, just something to break the monotony, and it proved to be a success both financially and socially, for those who participated "chipped in" and made up enough to pay the rent of the opera house and the music, and I heard one young man remark that there were but two or three who showed signs of having been drinking. There was a number of the young men who attended the dance came into the Sunnyside about 1 a.m. Sunday, took breakfast and the most of them remained for dinner, among whom were Lyle Purdin of Medford, who remained until Monday morning; the two Haley brothers, Ed Cingcade, Harry Lewis, and later his brother Will; Orville Childreth, Al Clements and Mr. Reter of Jacksonville.
    W. R. McLeod, our enterprising merchant, who has a store near the upper steel bridge on Rogue River, spent Saturday night with us on his way home with a load of supplies for his store.
    Among the callers for dinner Sunday beside those already mentioned were George von der Hellen, one of our hardware merchants; Mrs. Wm. Perry and daughter, Miss Estella Betz, and stepdaughter, Miss Fay Perry, Joe Moomaw, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney and Mrs. Arden Smith of Medford and Mr. Sitzler.
    Last Saturday while Will Holman of Climax and Ray Harnish were feeding their cattle the team ran away, and the first jump they made threw Ray Harnish off the rear end of the wagon and knocked him senseless, and sooner than it takes me to write the account of the accident, the team ran over a precipice about twelve feet high, turning the wagon over and landing the wagon bed on Mr. Holman, breaking his leg just above the knee, and otherwise bruising him very badly. That night Dr. Holt was called, reaching there about midnight. The doctor went as far as be could with his auto and then procured a rig and went on up. The place is up in the mountains on Antelope Creek. He set the broken bone as best he could with the facilities he had and the next day brought him out to the Sunnyside, when Dr. Thayer was called from Medford, reaching here about 4 p.m. The two doctors then went to work to reduce the fracture and make Mr. H. as comfortable as possible. While this was going on here, Pete Stowell and wife were waiting at Pete's brother-in-law, John Smith's, with his stepson, about 10 years old, to have Dr. Holt come and reduce a fractured wrist for the boy. It appears that he was climbing on a fence and fell oft, and thus had his wrist broken. But the doctor fixed him up all right so that his parents took him home the next morning. That makes two broken legs and a broken wrist that Dr. Holt has had to set in about a week, John Allen of Derby, Mr. Holman and the Stowell boy. It looks as though someone was unfortunate, to say the least.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Messer of Hastings, Mich., and Frederick Heath and his mother motored out Monday and went as far as Brownsboro. Mr. and Mrs. Messer were here about a year ago visiting Mrs. Heath. Mrs. Messer is a sister of Mrs. F. L. Heath, now of Medford, and since she was here she and Mr. Messer have been married. They are now on their way to the Hawaiian Islands to spend the winter.
    Mr. Stewart, who owns a tract of land about two miles northeast of here, was in town Monday, and so was Mrs. Charles Terrill of Brownsboro. They were both doing business with our new merchant, T. E. Nichols.
    Monday. Messrs. M. Marshall, D. Marshall, W. H. Norcross and J. C. Herring of Central Point called in for dinner, and so did C. A. Newstrom and a stranger from Lake Creek.
    P. S. Anderson, one of our occasional boarders, who has been spending the past week in Ashland and Montague, Cal., returned to his room Monday evening, and Lee Grissom of Climax also spent the night with us.
    Mrs. John Greb, who has been visiting friends and relatives in Medford, returned home Monday on the P.&E.
    Tuesday morning Ernest Smith and wife of Butte Falls, Harvey Smith and Mr. Berrian, the Butte Falls fish hatchery man, were on the P.&E.
    At the P.&E. depot Tuesday morning I noticed that the agent, Amos Ayres, had a crate of fine chicks for the Medford market. Speaking of the chicken business here, he told me that he had paid out between September 1 and December 3l, for poultry alone $911.94, beside all those who have shipped their own poultry.
    I see that Thomas Farlow, one of our thriving farmers and stockmen of the upper Butte country, has shipped a quantity of alfalfa meal. He claims that it is one of the best things to build up a poor cow extant.
    Herman Meyer, the mail contractor and carrier between here and Lake Creek, reported that his younger son Ed fell off a trestle Tuesday morning about five feet high and bruised himself up considerable. He was here to consult Dr. Holt on the subject.
    Since my last report Amos Ayres has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. and Pliney Leabo has subscribed for the D.M.T.
   
I have a lot more of items to write, but have not time to write them this (Tuesday) evening, as I want to get this in the evening mail.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 25, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was so crowded for time that I didn't have time to write all the items I had, so will give a part of them, at least, in the beginning of this letter.
    Marsh Garrett, owner of one of the best stock ranches in the Lake Creek country, and Frank Miller, who owns a stock ranch in Eastern Oregon, but lives in Medford, were here last Tuesday for dinner and to visit their old neighbor and friend, William Holman, who has his leg broken and is stopping at the Sunnyside.
    Also C. C. Cate, our county pathologist, Howard Bushnell, Henry Van Hoevenburg, Jr., of Sams Valley, and Henry Schumann-Heink of Medford were here for dinner the same day. They were on their way up to the A. Corbin orchard. Mr. Van Hoevenburg, Jr., has it rented and is now operating it. Mr. Cate was also here the next day for dinner. He said that he was riding around the country talking to the farmers about the prospect for fruit, etc., this year.
    Frank Carlson and Mr. L. Port, two of the forest rangers, spent Tuesday night with us.
    A man by the name of L. L. Conger passed through here Wednesday with a band of about twenty-five head of cows, on his way to the Big Butte country. And the same day Ben Brophy drove about 125 head of mixed cattle over to the valley to have them fed.
    A. B. Cox, a traveling man, who has his headquarters in Portland and is traveling in the interest of four hardware manufacturing  establishments, was here the first of the week visiting his brother-in-law Dr. W. W. P. Holt.
    Mrs. F. T. Newport, wife of the Pacific & Eastern Railway agent, of Medford, came out Wednesday evening, spent the night with her brother, Amos Ayres, and wife, and Thursday took the train for her parents', F. J. Ayres, spending the night with them.
    George Little, formerly of Central Point, but now a resident of California, is here visiting his  brother-in-law, David Cingcade, and family.
    John Reter, one of the tonsorial artists of Jacksonville, was out here for dinner Thursday, and his son Raymond has got to be almost a regular boarder here. He seems to like this climate very much.
    J. V. McIntyre, the cashier of the First State Bank of Eagle Point, and wife came in for dinner Thursday. They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Davis and C. E. Terrell of Talent, and just as they were about through dinner Mr. Findley, the ex-forest ranger, and J. H. Driscoll came in for a hurry-up dinner, for they had only half an hour to eat dinner and go to the opera house, get ready to meet an engagement for a movie show at 1 o'clock, and before they were through Frank Brown, one of the firm of George Brown & Sons, came in with J. H. Cookson, a traveling man representing L. Dinkelspiel Co. of San Francisco, and about that time, Miss D. A. Barrenger, representing the Standard Pattern Co., came in, and with Mrs. Murphy, her mother, Mrs. William Holman, Mrs. Ray Harnish, beside the home folks, it made up quite a bunch, but we all got through and some of us started for the opera house to see the movie picture show, and just as I reached the footbridge I met Mrs. Shesler and about twenty-five of the school children on the bridge, and on an inquiry learned that one of those little woolly dogs that are generally considered a nuisance had followed one of the children to school that morning, and after annoying the teacher, Mrs. Shesler, and the children all the forenoon, had bitten one of the little boys, Heath Childreth, through the lip, but fortunately the bite did not tear out, simply making a painful wound, and at last account the boy was getting along all tight. Well, after the matter was talked over with the teacher and the brother, we all went to the opera house to see the show, and there we found that the Brownsboro school had chartered a team, wagon and hay rack and the Reese Creek school had come in wagons and on horseback; the Wellen and Roosevelt schools had turned out and with our school and the grownups we had the house pretty well filled, and after waiting for over half an hour to get the "juice" hooked up and the machine properly arranged, the movies began to appear, but there was so much light in the room that we could hardly distinguish what they were intended to represent. The daylight coming in and the weakness of the electric current made it very unsatisfactory, when finally Mr. Painter came in with an armful of bed quilts and hung them over the windows, and that made it a little better, but still there was too much sunlight came in, so on the whole the movie was not up to expectations.
    Mrs. Henry Klippel of Medford came out Friday morning and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for Trail to visit her daughter, Miss Alice, who is living on their ranch on Trail Creek.
    J. H. Baker, agent for the Overland automobile, came out Friday and brought Mrs. A. N. Thomas of Central Point to visit Mrs. Howlett.
    L. D. Hurt, a forest ranger of Klamath Falls, came in Friday evening to spend the night, taking the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage at noon Saturday.
    I understand that a man by the name of Fuller has bought the Laidlaw place of Mr. Findley. Mr. Gorman, the present occupant and manager of the place, expects to move onto a place near the Roosevelt schoolhouse.
    Mrs. William Beale of Butte Falls came out and went to Medford in the William Lewis jitney Friday.
    Corbett Smith was doing business in our town Friday and Saturday, visiting Medford in the meantime. While he was here he renewed the subscription of his sister, nee Nellie Smith, to the W.M.T.
    Theodore Jenson of Seattle spent the night with us. He came out to look at a tract of land just north of our town.
    Mrs. A. C. Howlett went up in the neighborhood of Butte Falls Saturday, combining business with pleasure. Mrs. Carl Jackson went to Butte Falls on the same car.
    Mrs. George von der Hellen, wife of one of our hardware merchants, who has been visiting relatives in Corvallis, returned to her home Friday evening.
    Keyon Grissom came in Saturday to visit his neighbor, William Holman. Jr., and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Since my last report A. J. Florey has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. L. Jones, one of the forest rangers, who was around among the cattle men seeing how many they had to turn on the forest range this summer, spent the night with us Saturday and returned Monday for dinner. He said that the object in view in counting the cattle in advance was to see that the range was not overstocked.
    Lee Bradshaw, and wife, who went to Medford Friday, returned Sunday, stopping at the Sunnyside to see Wm. Holman, who is here nursing a broken leg.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. motor Monday was C. V. Cummings, foreman on the Alta Vista orchard; Bert Peachey, one of the forest rangers; Dr. Goble, an eye specialist, and Mrs. Wallace Bergman. Dr. Goble spent the day on business and spent the night at the Sunnyside, going on to Butte Falls Tuesday.
    Charles Klingle, one of our progressive farmers and stock growers, and Frank Nygren, son of another progressive citizen, both of Lake Creek, were here for dinner Monday, and so was Mrs. W. W. Taylor, Mrs. Lucinda Thompson of Climax and Mrs. M. S. Thompson of Medford. Mrs. Taylor is the mother-in-law of Mr. Holman and Mrs. Lucinda T. is grandmother to Mrs. Holman, and Mrs. M. S. Thompson is a daughter-in-law to Mrs. L. Thompson. They were all here to visit Mr. H. Mrs. M. S. Thompson spent the night with us, taking the train for Medford Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. B. McNair, Mrs. W. H. McNair, Miss Helen Moore and Miss Gertrude Moore called for dinner Sunday. They were on the way up the country with Miss Helen, who is engaged teaching school in the Laurel Hill district, and was expecting someone to meet her between here and Laurel Hill school house, which is near the Ditsworth settlement. They were all of Ashland.
    O. C. Boggs, one of the Medford attorneys, came out on the P.&E. Tuesday on his way up into the hills, returning the same day. Robert Vincent and wife and her sister, Miss Gordon, of Trail, were on the car on their way home. They had been out to attend the funeral of Grandma Gordon, their mother.
    Mr. Brown, the man who hustles for the Mail Tribune, was also a passenger on his way to Butte Falls.
    John Rader, one of our farmers and stockmen, was in town Tuesday for medicine for a sick horse, and I am glad to say that the horse is greatly relieved and on the road to recovery. He is valuable work horse.
    Eugene Bellows was here yesterday. He was hauling out posts to repair the telephone line running along Rogue River up the north bank. While he was here the subject of cows, milk and cream came up, and he said that he was milking six cows, feeding them on barley hay, and that he realized $40 a month for the cream and had the separated milk to feed his calves and pigs, and that he sold his steer calves this fall for $25 apiece. He said that when he had alfalfa hay to feed that it made a difference of $2 or $3 a month in the returns. Another case where it pays to keep a few cows to milk.
    Pete Betz and Bert Clarno were among the country visitors Tuesday. P. S. Anderson went up to his farm, the Vatchi place, on Rogue River, returning to his room Tuesday.
    Mr. Lewis, the Central Point sheep man, passed through here Tuesday with about 2000 sheep on his way to the Bear Creek country.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Austin took a trip to Gold Hill last Saturday, and Mrs. Austin remained, visiting her mother. George is the mail contractor and carrier between here and Climax, so he had to return to his post. Mrs. Austin is an assistant in the telephone office here.
    George Given and Tom Martin have just come in to see Mr. Holman. Tom Martin lives on the old Peter Britt place, near the mouth of Butte Creek.
    Since my last report W. E. Hensley, owner of the Frank Nichols orchard, has paid up his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, and George Given has renewed his subscription to the W.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 1, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Koenig, who has an interest in the sawmill near Derby, was a passenger on the P.&E. Thursday on his way home. He had been to Medford on business connected with his mill.
    There was a carload of wheat come in Thursday for the Brandon Bros.' Snowy Butte mill, and they expect to have two cars more here next week. In spite of the kicking of some of our professional kickers, you know that every little town have their kickers, and they predicted all sorts of trouble for the Brandon Bros. when it was learned that they had bought the mill, as it would be impossible for them to get wheat, but notwithstanding their predictions they have been so crowded during the winter that they run most of the time day and night and find a ready sale for all the product of the mill.
    Ray and Carl Cobleigh of Butte Fails were here Thursday on business.They are preparing to put in a pumping plant on their place below Butte Falls and have been securing the necessary machinery.
    Mrs. F. J. Ayres came out from the farm and spent Wednesday night with her son Amos and wife.
    Mrs. F. J. Newport of Medford was a passenger on the P.&E. Thursday.
    G. W. Ager, our county school superintendent, came out in his car Thursday and left it at the Sunnyside while he took the train for Edsall station where he visited the Crater Lake school, going from there to the John Higinbotham school, and from there to Butte Falls and Derby; walked in Saturday morning, taking his car for home. He laughs at such little things as snow 18 inches deep and mud, but just goes right on through.
    Harvey Standley and wife were doing shopping in our town. His brother Thomas, who was recently married, was with them.
    Herbert Carlton of Wellen was doing business with Ray Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants Thursday. He reports that the stock is doing fine, so far, this winter.
    Miss Sarah Singleton, daughter of one of our prosperous farmers, was shopping here Friday.
    W. L. Jones, the forest ranger who has been around among the cattle men counting the cattle, was with us Thursday night taking the E.P.-L.C. stage Friday noon. He was going to West and Carlson's road camp. While here he gave me his sub. to the W.M.T.
    Harris Geppert came out Thursday [omission] and Friday nights with us.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been spending a few weeks in the hills, came in Thursday and is at the Sunnyside at this writing, Saturday.
    W. T. Croft brought in a crate of fine Plymouth Rock hens Saturday morning and shipped them to Geo. Mansfield, who runs a fine farm on Rogue River above Trail. He had advertised for a lot of blooded hens and thus secured the fine lot.
    John Shafer, who is living on the old Benj. Higinbotham place just above McLeod, was a passenger on the P.&E. Saturday on his way home. He had been out to Medford on business.
    Mrs. Edgar E. Smith of Butte Falls was also on the train going to her home. Miss Estella Betz was also a passenger on her way up to her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres.
    Mrs. Royal Brown, wife of one of the firm of Geo. Brown and Sons, who has been in Medford, returned this morning.
    Word came over the phone this morning asking me to go this p.m. to the Antelope cemetery to officiate at the funeral of Thomas Stinson, but as I have been grappling with the grippe I decided that it was not prudent to go. I did not learn any of the particulars of the death, etc.
    Mrs. Sullivan, a sister of Grandma Klingle, and Mr. Mike Sidley of Lake Creek, came out on the L.C.-E.P. stage; came to the Sunnyside, got a cup of hot tea and went on to Medford.
    George Klingle of L.C. called in at the Sunnyside Saturday morning to see Mr. Holman. He seems to have a host of friends who are interested in him enough to come in to see him and help care for him.
    I understand that C. E. Clark, who was foreman on the Tronson orchard, is planning to open up a meat market here next week.
    Since my last N. Gorman, Eagle Point, has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and W. L. Jones of Butte Falls has given me his sub. to the W.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon W. H. Crandall and J. L. Robertson drove into town and Mrs. John Robertson and her two daughters went home with him.
    P. S. Anderson, who had been doing business in Medford, returned to his room Saturday afternoon.
    Saturday evening George Nichols, wife and her sister, Miss Verna Charley, and Lee Bradshaw motored out from Medford to visit Will Holman, the man who is confined here with a broken leg, and after supper Lee B. went on up home, as he had left his horse with us since Friday before.
    Ben Haley, A. Spitzer and J. L. Ashton, who is engaged teaching school in the Derby district, and Raymond Reter spent Saturday night with us.
    Sunday we had among the guests Orville Childreth, Harry Lewis, Al Clements, George von der Hellen and wife and son Donald, and her sister, Mabel Richardson, nee Mabel Huff, formerly our primary teacher in the school; Frank Brown and wife, C. W. Clements and wife.
    Ray Wilkinson and wife, formerly of Central Point, but now of Colusa County, California, came in to visit their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Harnish, the last of the week.
    Last Sunday we had a little excitement in our usually quiet town. Will Lewis was just about ready to start with his jitney for Medford when one of the company of young men, for there were several had collected in front of Lewis' confectionery, asked permission of Will to take a little ride, and the request being refused, he still persisted in his plea, and finally he cranked the car and jumped in. Still Will persisted in his refusal, but he started anyhow, ran about a hundred yards, turned around, came back to the same place, and just then Mr. Gorman drove in front of the store, jumped out to procure something, leaving his little boy in the hack, and just then the car driver arrived to stop the ear, but something went wrong and instead of stopping it, ran right into the rear end of the hack, with full force, causing the team to run away, but fortunately the tongue of the hack broke out, freeing the horses, and thus perhaps saved the life of the little boy, but the collision was so great as to put the lights out of commission and damage the radiator considerably, costing the young man about $20 and giving our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, the job of putting in a new tongue in the hack. But we all feel thankful that it was no worse, for the child may have been killed or badly hurt. It should be a lesson to parents to never leave a child in a rig alone unless the horses are securely tied. It is a common occurrence to see people from the country come in and leave their team untied for "just a minute" while they run into the store and secure something they want, not thinking that during that minute the team might start and cause a vast amount of damage, besides endangering the lives of others.
    Monday one of the Edler men and one of the Frey men from above Lake Creek, George Nichols, Jr., George Klingle, Marsh Garrett and Frank Muller stopped in for dinner on their way up to Mr. Garrett's ranch, in the Lake Creek country, to dehorn a band of cattle.
    Sam Courtney was also among the callers Monday.
    One of W. E. Hensley's sons has moved into the Frank Nichols home, in the lower part of town.
    J. H. Stewart was in town Monday, went to Medford, returning Tuesday.
    F. De Ford of Sums Valley brought in a load of wheat to the Snowy Butte mills Monday, and Tuesday the Brandon Bros. received another carload of wheat from Griffin Creek, near Medford.
    Eugene Bellows brought in his cream Tuesday and shipped it to Medford.
    John H. Daley came out on the car Tuesday.
    Charles Clark has opened a meat market in the old George Brown & Sons store building.
    Henry French was among the business callers Tuesday.
    C. W. Clements has put in a telephone in the meat market building for Mr. Clark.
    Caroline Dexler of Fall River, a stepdaughter of Frank Johnson, came out Tuesday evening on the Lewis jitney, was met here by her brother, J. F. Johnson, and wife and went out to their home. Mrs. J. F. Johnson ordered a renewal of the W.M.T. while here.
    J. E. McDonald and T. L. Anderson of the Elk Creek hatchery were here for dinner Wednesday. They had been out to move Mrs. Ossman, who lost her husband last fall, to Medford. They report that they are getting things ready to make considerable improvements in the hatchery this spring.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
     Frank Neil and wife of Derby drove out to Eagle Point Thursday, took the Lewis jitney for Medford, returning Wednesday morning on the P.&E. motor. The day they came out there was a carload of baled hay went up on the P.&E. for Mr. Neil and John Allen.
    Fred Frideger of Medford, who owns a twenty-acre tract of pear orchard in the edge of town, came out Monday to reset a few trees and to prune his orchard. He stopped during his stay at the Sunnyside.
    Will Whitman has taken charge of the old Farmers' Hotel. I understand that he has traded for the property, but there is a hitch, so that the deed cannot be made for a short time. Further notice given later.
    Last Tuesday evening George H. Wamsley and Mrs. Louisa Whitney were joined in wedlock by F. M. Stewart, J.P, and Friday a lot of the young boys--there were some of the ladies started to join the party, but their hearts failed them--made an assault upon the home of the couple with everything they could raise that would make a noise, and gave them an old-fashioned charivari. Their many friends are extending congratulations.
    Ralph Bieberstedt and his sister were doing business in our town on Thursday.
    W. R. McLeod, owner and operator of the McLeod store, near the upper steel bridge, came out on the P.&E. Thursday. He was accompanied by a lady who was going up to look over the situation.
    T. M. Peelor, owner of the Evergreen ranch, near Flounce Rock, was also a passenger on the car on her way home. Messrs. Frank and Lea Farlow, Ed Meyer and C. M. Martin of Lake Creek were also passengers on the car, and Mr. Berrian, the Butte Falls fish hatchery man, was on his way to Butte Falls.
    Andrew Grissom of Climax and Grandma Pech of Lake Creek were here Thursday for dinner.
    Professor Peterson, one of the school supervisors, came out and gave an illustrated lecture at the school house Wednesday night. It was not generally known, and consequently there was not the attendance that [there] would otherwise have been.
    Henry Meyer and wife of Lake Creek were here for dinner Thursday.
    Miss Lula Smith and her mother, who have been living here with Mrs. Smith's daughter, Mrs. Shesler, our primary teacher, started Thursday for Reedley, Cal.
    Otis Hubbard of Butte Falls came out Thursday to work in the Hubbard Bros. store in Medford.
    Frank Wight of Medford spent the night here Thursday.
    There was another carload of wheat came out Thursday for Brandon Bros.' mill and they loaded the same car with flour and other millstuff. They seem to be doing a thriving business.
    J. W. McCoy of Fort Klamath came in on the P.&E. motor, procured a rig and went out to see Mrs. George Stowell on business.
    J. L. Ragsdale of Lake Creek was here Friday for early dimer and took the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage for his home. While here he told of Rudolph Pech and John Watkins killing a large panther.
    Lyman McCord of Prineville is here visiting his sister, Mrs. A. L. Haselton.
    Mr. Cardwell, son-in-law of Joseph Riley, was in town Friday, having some repair work done on his farming machinery by W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith.
    W. E. Butler and family motored to Ashland Friday.
    Mr. Tobin, who owns the farm and orchard occupied by Frank Smith, came in Saturday morning on the P.&E. So did Mrs. Guy Cobleigh of Talent; Rev. Smith, who is working in the interest of the S.S.U.; Miss Frances Greb and G. N. Burkhart, who is soliciting for Failing, 
McCalman Co.; Mrs. Cobleigh, Mr. Burkhart, Wig Jack, Benj. Brophy, Gus Nichols and wife and Noble Zimmerman were at the Sunnyside for dinner Saturday.
    There was to be a meeting of the Stockgrowers' Association this (Saturday) afternoon, but I have not been able to learn who they elected as the new officers as yet.
    Mrs. O. M. Goff of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. Saturday, was met at the depot by Mrs. William Perry and her daughters and taken to their home.
    Brittsan Bros. had a land of land plaster come out on the P.&E. Saturday.
    J. L. Robinson was in town Saturday, and while here renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., and Frank Johnson gave me his subscription for the W.M.T. Friday.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 13, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night there was what is called a social dance--that is, got up on the spur of the moment, by calling those interested in such a move by phone and thus making arrangements in a. hurry. There was a good attendance, and those who took part report having had a very enjoyable time. They danced until about midnight, and among the young men who took part the following came to the Sunnyside for beds and breakfast: Lyle Purdin, Raymond Reter of Medford, who remained until Monday morning; George Guerin, Al Clements, Jack Florey, now of Jacksonville, and Henry Trusty.
    Mrs. William Holman, Sr., came out Saturday to visit her son, W. R. Holman, who is confined here with a broken leg, and returned to her home Sunday afternoon. There was a regular string of visitors came in Sunday to see Mr. Holman. Among them were Mrs. Sam Coy, Miss Verta Grover, Miss Nellie Coy, Mrs. S. H. Harnish and daughter, Mrs. Fred Dutton, Mr. and Mrs. George Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw, Mr. and Mrs. George Austin, Mrs. Edna Edsall, besides quite a number whose names I did not learn.
    Henry Trusty and Miss Louisa Brady were among the guests for dinner Sunday.
    W. L. Jones, who is serving Uncle Sam by going around among the cattle men and ascertaining the number of cattle they want to put on the government range this spring, was with us Saturday night.
    J. H. Rigsby and family of Crook County, Oregon, arrived here and were met at the train by his father-in-law, Mr. Logan, who came in from that country last fall. They are thinking of settling in this section.
    Mrs. O. M. Goff of Butte Falls, who has been visiting the family of William Perry, returned to her home Tuesday on the P.&E.
    Mr. Brown, the county surveyor, came out on the P.&E. Tuesday to survey out the line between the lots owned by Mrs. Rose Potter and the one owned by A. B. Zimmerman.
    Mrs. Jude Mayham was taken to Medford the first of the week to consult a specialist with regard to her eyes, as she is blind at times. In the morning when she first gets up she can see to distinguish the different persons around, and by 2 o'clock p.m. she is stone blind. The old lady is of the old pioneer stock, as her father, John Mathews, was among the earliest settlers in this section, and was born and raised in this neighborhood, and was one of my pupils in school in 1867. Her friends sympathize with her in her affliction.
    Lyman McCord, a brother of Mrs. A. L. Haselton, started for his home in Prineville last Monday.
    W. D. Roberts and daughter were shopping in our town Monday.
    Benj. Brophy brought out a band of cattle that he has been feeding at A. E. Strong's place, Monday evening.
    Speaking of Mr. Strong brings to mind that he was here Monday and gave me the following item for the readers of the Mail Tribune: Those interested in the poultry association or in the poultry industry in this section of the country, are to meet in Brown's hall next Saturday at 2 o'clock p.m. to take steps toward the organization of a poultry association in this section of the country. W. W. Watson, secretary of the Jackson County association; H. W. Frame, president; Mr. Webb of Central Point, director; C. C. Cate, county pathologist, and others are expected to be here. The object of the meeting is to create more of an interest in the poultry industry and to consolidate the interests so as to be able to do business on a larger scale, so as to be able to ship the product in carload lots and thus minimize the cost of freight. The plan is to induce those who have orchards to arrange so as to have from 100 to 150 dozen hens on a place, hire an expert to superintend the work and care of the hens, so as to bring the production of eggs to a higher plane and thus increase the revenues and utilize a lot of land that is otherwise wasted.
    There were twenty-six cream cans put off the P.&E. train here Tuesday on the trip from Medford to Butte Falls. That gives some idea of what is doing in that line in this section.
    W. E. Butler, one of our progressive farmers, received a stump puller Tuesday from Hubbard Bros., Medford.
    Lem Charley and wife passed through here Tuesday on their way to Medford.
    In my last I gave an account of a panther being killed up in the Lake Creek country and credited Rudolph Pech and John Watkins, and it should have been Rudolph Pech and John Walch, instead of Watkins.
    Mrs. Nellie Wooley, Mrs. Roundtree and two ladies from Central Point went out to Medford in Will Lewis' jitney Tuesday.
    Jud Edsall, Wig Jack, Benj. Brophy and T. E. Nichols went to Medford Tuesday.
    Floyd Pierce, who has been in the mines for the most of the winter, returned to his home Tuesday.
    Perry Foster, Pete Young, Henry French, John Rader and wife, and James C. Johnson were among the business callers Tuesday, and while here Henry French paid up his subscription to the W.M.T. and ordered the D.M.T. and Mr. Johnson paid up his subscription to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1917, page 5


 FLOUNCE ROCK FRILLS
    Dr. Holt was called to this neighborhood Thursday night to attend Mr. and Mrs. Mansfield's youngest child, Dorothy. She was taken suddenly with something like convulsions, which developed into paralysis of the left side. She is a little better now. A trained nurse is staying with her.
    Mr. and Mrs. Mooney and son started to Medford Monday. They stopped at John Grieve's for the night.
    Mr. Stinson took his wife to the valley Saturday as she is quite sick. Mrs. Sholl accompanied them. Mr. Stinson took Mr. Irwin's car, as his own was a runabout.
    Mr. and Mrs. Erskine spent the day Thursday with Peelors and Blanchards. Mrs. Erskine spent that night at Mrs. Dawson's and the next day visited the Flounce Rock school.
    The W.M.B. met at Mrs. Violet Ditsworth's Saturday afternoon and proceeded to tack a comforter. Mrs. Blanchard was a guest of the hostess that day. Mrs. Ditsworth served dainty refreshments of pink ice cream and angel food cake. There were 10 ladies present besides the children.
    There was a very pleasant party Friday night at G. W. Kincaid's. The old-fashioned fun-making games were played. Mrs. Carl Richardson and Miss Belva Walker made candy, which was said to be delicious, and someone popped corn and Howard popped the question, but was rejected because of his thatch.
    Miss Delie Whisenant spent Friday night with Hazel Ditsworth and attended the party at Mr. Kincaid's.
    Pearl Peyton went home with the Nye young folks Friday night and stayed several days with them. There was a party at Mr. Nye's Saturday night and Sunday the young people visited at Ed Hollenbeck's.
    Mrs. Shannon went to Medford Thursday to be gone several months.
    Paul Peyton spent part of Saturday night with Stewart Ditsworth.
    Mr. Peyton and son James transacted business in the valley several days of last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gus Ditsworth visited at R. B. Vincent's Monday.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. S. Quackenbush and Newt Gorman were among the business visitors Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Quackenbush has bought a forty-acre tract of land off of Big Sticky, and Mr. Gorman has moved onto a tract of land just east of his tract. They are old neighbors and friends, and it seems good that they are so situated that they can still neighbor. We miss them both, and the families from our midst and school.
    Miss Maud Merritt of Derby was visiting the family of one of our hardware merchants, William R. Ashpole, Wednesday.
    J. H. Rigsby and family, who arrived here last week from Crook County, have bought out Mr. McNair of Brownsboro, and expect to move household goods arrived today. Mr. Rigsby seems to be quite a striving man, and will be welcomed to our community.
    Lester Weaver came out Wednesday might in an auto and called at the Sunnyside for a bed at one o'clock, a.m. He thought that there was a dance here that night, as it was Valentine's Day, but was disappointed. The next morning he took the P.&E. for Butte Falls to visit the Smith brothers, Polk and Corbett.
    There was a part of a carload of baled hay went up on the same train for one of the Kelsoes.
    T. E. Nichols had a ton of land plaster on the same train.
    P. C. Jackson and family of Yakima, Wash., is here visiting his brother, J. B. Jackson.
    George E. Shively, his son, George D., and his son, David, came out Thursday and are moving into the Thomas Farlow home, formerly occupied by F. L. Heath. For the present they are taking their meals at the Sunnyside. They have rented a part of the Narregan place, and are expecting to put in about 100 acres of sugar beets. Mr. Shively has had experience in the cultivating of sugar beets and seems to think that he can make a grand success of the business here. Among the first things that Mr. Shively did was to give me his subscription to the Mail Tribune. R. M. Comble is expected. to come in a few days and they two, Shively and Comble, will work together in the business. They are from Portland, although they have raised sugar beets in Nevada. F. E. Hammon of Medford moved them out, and he also was home for dinner.
    A. R. Marion of Derby brought in a bunch of 13 head of cattle that he had just bought into the Sunnyside corral and spent the night with us. He says that he finds that it is hard to find cattle for sale in this section.
    Jud Edsall of Butte Falls went to Sams Valley Friday and bought a ton of seed oats, bringing them here and shipping them to his farm on the P.&E. He also took up a lot of furniture and household goods.
    Nelson Nye of Prospect was on the train on his way home.
    The conductor on the P.&E. reported Saturday that he had 30,000 pounds of freight for this place, and after unloading that they took on several tons of freight for Edsall and Butte Falls.
    George Plymate of Fort Morgan, Colo., and W. A. Bishop, also of Fort Morgan, came in on the train and went direct to the Sunnyside. They are on their way up into the Lake Creek country, where Mr. Bishop has a tract of timber land. I spoke to him about the copper prospect in that region and he said that he was an old miner and that he would probably investigate the prospect.
    When Herman Meyer came in this morning, he had five passengers on his stage, namely, Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Daley and their daughter, Eva, on their way to Medford, and Grandma Pech of Central Point on her way home. She had been up in the Lake Creek country visiting her son, Rudolph.
    G. A. Griffin received a new instrument for cultivating the soil, in this section at least. It was a revolving harrow, so arranged that the driver can sit on his seat, guide his team and the two cylinders filled with spikes about five inches long will revolve and thus tear up the land as deep as the spikes go.
    Since my last report, in addition to George Shively's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, Mrs. Isabel Heckathorn, of Eagle Point, gave me her subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune and Jud Edsall of Butte Falls renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 19, 1917, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon Messrs. Ernest Webb, Henry W. Frame, P. E. Wynkoop and W. W. Watson drove into town to meet an engagement, as per announcement in the Mail Tribune, to talk over with the people of Eagle Point the prospect of creating an interest in the poultry industry. It was a cold, bleak day and consequently a very disagreeable afternoon and the result was that there was a very small attendance, and perhaps another reason for the small crowd was that the ground had just got dry enough so that the farmers could begin to plow and sow their spring grain and prepare their land for corn and sugar beets. But the few who were in attendance were entertained for some time, first by Mr. Frame, who opened the meeting, and after giving a short talk on the subject of raising and caring for chickens introduced W. W. Watson, who gave us a good, lengthy talk. I suppose it was an interesting talk, but he spoke so low that I couldn't hear much that he said, but I suppose that it was good by the interest that those who could hear well manifested, for they seemed to be greatly interested and after he was through they asked him quite a number of questions on the subject. The subject was the different breeds of chickens, and the manner of handling them, and to one who could hear what was said no doubt would be profitable. At the close of the lecture Mr. Watson asked for the names of those who desired to join the Southern Oregon Poultry Association and quite a number paid their fee and were enrolled as members of the association. Before leaving this subject, I would like to say that while Mr. Watson is writing so much on the subject of poultry raising and its benefits that would be derived from joining the association.
    Miss Louise Blass came out Saturday evening and gave a dance in the opera house and it appears from reports that it was well attended. They danced until about 2 o'clock Sunday morning and then dispersed and the following persons were found at the Sunnyside Sunday morning: Clifford Dickson, Guy Pruett, Glen Haley, George Guerin, Lyle Purdin and Raymond Reter of Medford and Al Clements, Dave Smith and Noble Zimmerman. They seemed to be well pleased and had but few complaints to make.
    The Jacksonville basketball team came out Saturday evening and played against the Eagle Point team, and carried off the laurels, the game standing 25 to 13. Mr. Bradshaw of the Jacksonville Post was among the guests for supper and said that he came out to see the game.
    Mrs. McCaslin of the Alta Vista orchard was here Saturday afternoon to attend the Southern Oregon Poultry Association meeting and spoke on the subject of the production of eggs, saying that she had thirty-five Orpington hens and that they had averaged her twenty-three eggs a day all winter. She spoke very highly of that breed and so did A. E. Strong.
    Judge Tou Velle and wife were among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday for dinner.
    Irvin Daley, wife and daughter, Miss Venita, came out on the P.&E. Monday and took the Lake Creek stage for their home in the Lake Creek country.
    Norman McQuoid, one of our town councilmen, and a respected citizen, left Monday for Oakland, Cal., expecting his family to follow in about two weeks.
    C. M. Martin and Frank Farlow came out from Medford on the P.&E. Tuesday and took the Lake Creek stage for their homes.
    R. C. McMillan, representing an insurance company of Portland, was here for dinner Tuesday, and so was Wayman Bergman and Milton Houston of Trail. They were putting up the telephone poles along the route from here up the river that had been broken down by the snow. Thomas Vestal and three other men were here for dinner, whose names I failed to procure,
    C. V. Cummings, the superintendent on the Alta Vista orchard, was in town Tuesday, having irons made to make frames to haul his crude oil from the depot. He has ordered 25,000 gallons, to be used this spring in spraying the fruit trees in the orchard.
    Thomas E. Nichols shipped 110 sacks of potatoes from here to the Medford Fruit Co. Medford, Tuesday.
    Mr. M. McIntosh came in Tuesday evening and engaged a room at the Sunnyside. He is working for the P.&E. section gang.
    At this writing, Wednesday afternoon, the snow is ten inches deep on a level here. We have had an unusually hard snow storm for the season, but the sun is shining bright now.
    I omitted to state in the proper place that Mr. William Holman, who has been here for the past month with a broken leg, was taken to his father-in-law's, the home of W. W. Taylor. He was carried on a litter by five or six men. He is doing finely.
    J. H. and Aden Tyrrell of Lake Creek came out from Medford in their Ford, but the snow is so deep that they thought it best to leave it and take the stage.
    J. R. Milon of Lake Creek and L. W. Wencer and Fred Bellows were among the guests here Wednesday for dinner.
    Since my last writing Henry French has paid his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and stopped his Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. D. Hart and J. O. Clarkson, two of the forest rangers, who have been employed making a wagon road this side of the Dead Indian springs, stayed here Wednesday night. They report that owing to the extraordinary cold weather and deep snow that they have not accomplished as much as would be desired. They were on their way out to Medford.
    Ed Watson and wife, Mrs. Cowden, Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth, Ira Dodge and J. T. Summerville were passengers on the P.&E. for points east of here. Mr. Summerville was formerly a resident of Medford, but now his home is in Portland. He is traveling in the interest of the Mishawaka Mfg. Co., of Indiana.
    A. C. Edler of L.C. was here for dinner Thursday. His home is up the north fork of Little Butte Creek near the McCallister Soda Springs and he reports that the snow there was about three feet deep and still snowing; that his brother Charles, while feeding his cattle, having his dogs with him, said that his dogs found the carcasses of three deer that had been killed by the coyotes; that they were killing quantities of deer now since the snow was so deep that they could run on top of the frozen snow while the deer would break through. If our county court would spend more of the proceeds from our taxes trying to exterminate the coyote instead of paying men to go around among the people who live in the backwoods to watch them to keep them from killing a deer occasionally for food for their families it would be a saving proposition, for the coyotes kill enough young stock including pigs every year, to have a nice fund brought in, in the way of taxes on the stock that they kill.
    Speaking on the subject of taxes, I see by the delinquent tax list that the people in our little town are behind in their taxes $567.55, and three of them are owing $233.27 of that and the rest is scattered around town among thirty others, although there are several who own property here and have moved away or bought lots for speculation, but that does not lessen the load on those of us who pay up every year, and this list is not for 1915 alone, but about the same list appeared last year and many of them the year before, and I heard one of our heaviest taxpayers complaining that those who pay are burdened with a tax that should be met by all the property holders, and he asked if there is not way to get the money out of the property.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Ling came in Friday for early dinner for they said they wanted to take the E.P.-L.C. stage at 12 o'clock noon. They were on their way up above Brownsboro to visit Mrs. Ling's mother, Mrs. H. L. Young, and in the afternoon Mrs. L.'s brother, Ray Burris, came in and took the P.&E. for Medford. Just as Mr. and Mrs. L. were eating their lunch Miss Margaret Hudson of Ashland, who is teaching school in the Debenger Gap school house, and Miss Mamie T. Clark of Medford, who is teaching in the Central school house four miles below Trail, came in for early dinner. Also they were to take a rig at noon for their several destinations. So by noon S. H. Harnish's team was at the door ready to start with them and he started but none too soon, for the next morning I asked the driver, Gradon Childreth, what time he got back and he replied 10:30 p.m., 10 and a half hours going a distance of 11 miles and back. He said the road was without any bottom in many places and the snow was about a foot deep most of the way.
    D. L. McNary of Brownsboro, who has disposed of his place to J. H. Rigsby, moved his household goods to our depot Friday to be shipped to Medford, and Mr. Rigsby moved his goods from here into the McNary home today (Saturday).
    John Ashpole of Medford came out to visit his son, William R. Ashpole, and family. His son is one of our: hardware merchants.
    Saturday morning the P.&E., after unloading a lot of freight for our three leading merchants, Geo. Brown & Sons, von der Hellen Hardware Co. and T. E. Nichols, went on up the road with a part of a carload of hay for Mr. Hill and Mr. Davis of Derby and a full car for Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls.
    Mr. Burkhart, who is traveling for the McCalman-Failing Co., Portland, came out on the P.&E., took dinner at the S.S., and returned to Medford the same day.
    Fred Pelouze had goods come out on the P.&E. and among them was a cable for his stump puller.
    Since my last Pliney Leabo has renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Edward Anderson Feb. 24, in Eagle Point, twins, sex not known.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 26, 1917, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There was an announcement made that there would be a dance given last Saturday night by Carl Ringer and a man by the name of Howell and that a special feature of the dance was to show how the one-step, two-step and other fancy dances should be performed and that a charge of 25 cents would be charged spectators. But owing to the extreme disagreeableness of the weather conditions, snow, rain and slush, there were very few attended. I heard one elderly woman make the remark that the dancing, that is the scientific dancing, was simply fine and fully up to date. There was another feature about the dance or party and that was, when the lady started to collect the 25 cents that there was a general rush for the door by a certain class, but there were enough remained to make it quite interesting. If it had been generally known just what was coming and the night had not been so very disagreeable there would have been a different turnout.
    Frank Haselton, who has been spending the fall and winter in the state of Washington, has returned to the parental roof.
    Saturday night we had among the transients J. J. Richardson, adjuster of fire losses and appraiser, who came out that afternoon, spent the night here, and Sunday went out to A. S. Carlton's farm to adjust the claim for fire that burned the residence building some weeks ago. The house was insured for $1000 and was readily allowed by the appraisers. Among others who spent the night with us were Lyle Purdin, Roland Reter of Medford, and some five or six of our neighbor boys, and Sunday we had Wm. von der Hellen, wife and two children, J. V. McIntyre and family, George H. Wamsley and wife, Estella Betz, Al Clements, Joe Moomaw, Carl Ringer, Harry Lewis and Mr. Petzor.
    Gus Nichols brought out a band of about 100 cattle Monday and took them to J. D. Singleton's to feed and Benj. Brophy brought out another band and took them over near Medford to feed.
    There was another carload of baled hay went up to Derby Tuesday morning on the P.&E., consigned to Chas. Humphrey, but I learned that it was to be divided with others in that neighborhood. I understand that some of the cattlemen up on Rogue River, where the snow is so deep that the cattle cannot be drove out, are having a time trying to save their stock. As a rule they do not have to feed so long as they have had to this season; in fact as a rule they turn their cattle out to grass by this time, but this winter has hung on so long and many of the cattle were thin when they were brought in off of the range and consequently had to be fed earlier in the fall and the fact of their having to feed earlier and later both have run the most of the cattlemen short of hay, but those who are fortunate enough to have hay to sell are reaping the benefit of the situation.
    Brandon Bros., owners of the Snowy Butte mills, shipped out another carload of flour and other products of the mill. They still have a lot of wheat to ship in from Sams Valley and over near Medford as soon as the ground gets hard enough to haul it to the railroad. They have done a fine business here this winter and a prospect of doing better next year.
    Miss Grace Cooley has been out visiting her mother and brother Ed, who is the manager of the T. E. Nichols store.
    L. E. Smith had a lot of furniture come out on the P.&E. Tuesday.
    Mrs. J. L. Ragsdale and her son, Ty Ragsdale, and Mrs. Martin Bowles, and Geo. Frey, of Lake Creek, came out on the E.P.-L.C. stage Tuesday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford that evening. They were going to Jacksonville to be a witness in the John Ragsdale case on trial today (Wednesday).
    Miss Alice Nygren of Lake Creek, Scott Claspil and Mr. Berrian came out on the P.&E. Tuesday. Miss Alice came to the Sunnyside for early dinner, [and] took the E.P.-L.C. stage for her home.
    Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen and her sister, Mrs. Mabel Richardson of Alaska, were visiting Mrs. Howlett Tuesday. Mrs. Richardson expects to leave for Corvallis Friday to spend the spring and up to June with her parents.
    B. F. Bingham of Ashland came out on the P.&E. and spent the most of the day in distributing samples of a washing powder that is being manufactured in Ashland by his firm.
    He said that they were just getting started in the business and were greatly encouraged in the enterprise.
    Walter H. Corliss a youth from Medford, stopped with us Tuesday night on his way up to the L.C. country. He was going up on the stage to live on the homestead of his aunt, Mrs. Louisa Henry.
    Miss May Warner of Trail came out Wednesday morning and took the stage for her home.
    Since my last report T. F. Boltz has renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune; G. W. Brandon has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T., and W. C. Clements has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ex-County Commissioner James Owens, one of our progressive farmers and stock men, was in town Thursday and while here renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. He, in speaking of the hard winter and the length of time they have had to feed their cattle, remarked that he thought that he had feed enough to carry him through, that is, he had feed enough for another month. Wig Jack, another one of our hustling stock men, said that he could feed for another month, although quite a number of our stock men are running short on hay. Ben Brophy took out another band of about 75 head of cattle to the Hanley ranch Thursday to be fed.
    Mike Hanley was here for dinner Thursday, and while here remembered that he had about two hundred tons of hay on hand for sale.
    H. L. Stiles, who, with his brothers, have a saw mill on Indian Creek, passed through town Thursday morning with two carts loaded with hay, taking it up home to feed his stock. It seemed rather a slow way of getting hay up there, about fourteen miles from here, but the roads are so bad that he could not haul as much any other way with the teams. It is the old free ferry road for about 11 miles, and it is so bad every winter that no one who is familiar with it will attempt to haul a load over it in the winter. It is simply a fright.
    Thursday there were about 20 passengers got off of the P.&E. car at this place. Among them were George Wrist, J. C. Carlson, L. D. Hurt, W. L. Jones and J. E. Gribble, five of the men in the forest service for Uncle Sam. They are all engaged in making a road that inadvertently is styled the West-Carlson road, but Mr. West tells me that it is the Soda Springs-Eagle Point road. I am glad that our dear old uncle has had compassion on us poor mortals, who have to travel through that country, for the last time I was up in that section, in a one-horse buggy, I was almost afraid to ride over some places the road was so steep and sidling.
    Among the other passengers on the P.&E. Thursday was Mrs. Martin Bowles, Mrs. J. L. Ragsdale, and her son, Ty. They had been out to Medford to be witnesses in the John Ragsdale case, but it is reported that the case was put off for some time. George Frey came out with Mike Hanley in a buggy and the whole bunch of them were here for dinner. Mrs. Ragsdale, son and Mrs. Bowles went on up to Lake Creek on the P.&E. stage.
    C. J. Helgesen, salesman for the Chas. H. Lilly Co., was also with us Thursday, also another salesman, but I did not learn his name.
    W. Hart Hamilton and son, Sherwood, came in on the P.&E. Wednesday afternoon and Mr. Hart started for his home in San Jose, Cal., the next day. his son remaining. Mr. Hart is the owner of the old Wm. Ulrich farm and the old Ashpole farm combined. Sherwood has resumed his place at the table in the Sunnyside Hotel.
    C. R. McIntosh. one of the men in the section gang on the P.&E. who has been boarding at the Sunnyside, had his family come out Thursday evening, spent the night with us and Friday moved into the house recently vacated by Norman McQuoid, and Mrs. M. McQuoid started to meet her husband in Oakland, Cal.
    Thursday evening some of the friends of Mr. and Mrs. David Cingcade gave them a surprise party. The company was comprised principally of elderly people. Light refreshments were carried in by the guests and coffee, pie, and cake were served, and all seemed to enjoy themselves. In fact, "Ma" Cingcade knows just how to arrange to have people have a good time.
    Ed Boothby, formerly of Prospect, and Peyton, but now of Ashland, was here for dinner Friday on his way up to their home, north of Ashland, with his brother's horses to feed, from near Peyton as he, Percy Boothby, was about out of hay. In fact, hay is a cash article anywhere in the hills now. This morning (Saturday) there was two cars of hay went up to Derby, one for John Allen and the other for Jeff Brophy, and this morning two men were in town handling hay for sale.
    Miss Lee Middlebusher of Trail came out on the car Friday morning and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for her home. She had been to Jacksonville to visit her sister, Mrs. Strong.
    N. Gorman and wife were in town Friday getting supplies from our merchants.
    E. A. Hildreth and Jeff Brophy were passengers on the P.&E., and so was John Pappafotis, a traveling salesman on his way to Butte Falls.
    C. H. Wetthers and wife, a son-in-law of Mrs. F. M. Stewart, from Spokane, Wash, are here visiting her mother and stepfather.
    Glen Terrell of Brownsboro was here for dinner Saturday on his way to Jacksonville to play basketball with the Eagle Point team vs. Jacksonville tonight.
    C. E. Clark, our meat market man, has added to his meat business a full line of bakery goods, such as bread, cookies, etc., and has given me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. We speak for him a lively business.
    In addition to Messrs. James Owens and C. E. Clark, C. R. McIntosh has subscribed and Joe Norman has paid up his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 6, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Nellie Wattenburg, president of the Rebekah Assembly for Oregon, came in Saturday afternoon and presided at a special meeting of the order in our town that evening. There was a very good attendance and the lodge members seemed to appreciate her visit. After the regular routine of business, light refreshments were served with coffee and about the approach of Sunday morning the company began to arrive at their homes. Mrs. Wattenburg remained with us until Monday morning, when she took the car for Medford. She expects to reach her home in Klamath Falls the last of this week.
    Mike Hanley Jr., Charles Edler and Fred Frey, all of Lake Creek, came in Sunday evening for the night and asked for an early breakfast the next morning. They had brought out a band of two hundred head of cows, taking them to the Niedermeyer ranch to be fed.
    On Monday Fred McPherson passed through here with another drove of cattle on the way to the Hanley ranch to be fed. The past winter has proven to be a hard winter on the stock men, as they have had to feed so long that many of them have had to buy hay to keep their stock alive. And many of the stock men along and on the north side of the P.&E. have shipped hay in, driving their stock as near the Derby depot as they can get feeding places. Tuesday there was.a carload of hay came in to Eagle Point for John Thompson of Climax, and he had a load of it taken to the old Bybee place on Antelope Creek to feed his sheep that night. He brought his band out to Sam Coy's to feed. There was another part of a carload of hay taken on up to Derby, but I did not learn who it was for. Some of those who are compelled to buy hay are paying as high as twenty dollars a ton for it, and about all of the hay in this section has been bought up that was on the market.
    Mrs. Shesler, who has had charge of the primary department of our school for the past two terms, has resigned and she and her son, Walter, started for her new field.in Canada where she has a school engaged for ten months. The school board have employed Mrs. W. O. Wheeler, the wife of the principal of our school, to teach the rest of the term. She was to have commenced last Monday, but the powers that be thought it best to fumigate the primary room, as it was discovered last Friday that the teacher and her son had what they call "pinkeye," so instead of taking any chances on having the disease spread, decided to have the room fumigated on Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Wetthers of Spokane, who have been here visiting Mrs. Wetther's mother, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, started for their home Tuesday.
    Work Pool was a business caller in our town Monday, and so was James Owens. He was here as a member of the board to examine the affairs of the First State Bank of Eagle Point, and while here for dinner he said that they found the bank in a very healthy and prosperous condition and that the deposits were greater than last year and that its management was O.K.
    Henry Trusty, the mail contractor and carrier from here to Persist, was so much indisposed Monday morning that he employed Jerry Lewis to drive the stage that trip. He made the trip all right, but this Wednesday morning he was so greatly improved that he thought he could stand the trip.
    Our meat and bakery man, Carly Clark, has established new standard scales and put up a new meat sign over the door of his shop.
    Thomas Stanley and Guy Pruett were business callers in our town Tuesday, and so was A. G. Bishop, one of our leading orchardists. He was trying to find a way to hitch three horses abreast to a wagon with a tongue in it, so as to have each one do his part. He has a quantity of oil to haul from the railroad for smudging purposes.
    Our depot agent, Amos Ayres, has been furnishing Irvin Daley with a fine lot of finishing lumber for his house that he is building in the Lake Creek country.
    W. Hart Hamilton has rented a part of his farm to Sherman Wooley to be put in corn, and he will live in the house now occupied by Frank Abbott, and Frank will move into the house built some time ago by a Mr. Lake. He has John W. Smith, our leading carpenter, putting an addition of two rooms and otherwise improving the place. Mr. Hart has purchased about a dozen cows and thinks of going into the dairy business on a limited scale.
    Among the passengers on the eastbound train Tuesday were Otis Hubbard, of Derby; Robert Lewis, of Persist; Miss Kay Kincaid of Prospect and John Winningham of Elk Creek (Trail). Miss Kincaid was returning home from Applegate, where she has just closed a six months' term of school.
    Mrs. Amos Ayres, the wife of our depot agent, who has been visiting relatives in Medford, has returned to her home again.
    Since my last writing, Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, has renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and John Howard has ordered the Daily Mail Tribune. He used to take the Weekly Mail Tribune and had it discontinued when he started back east and now that he has returned, wants the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Joe Parker, former depot agent of Medford, but now of Portland, called for dinner Wednesday. He seemed     glad to get back among his old friends again.
    Since writing the foregoing, Art Smith, who owns and operates a farm on Big Sticky, has called for dinner and paid a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 9, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    G. C. Lamb, specialist in poultry industry, of the O.A.C., Corvallis, came out last Saturday, the 3rd inst., and delivered a lecture to a few of our citizens who are interested in the poultry business. There were but a few people in attendance, not over ten or twelve, but he gave us a good long lecture and the most of it was quite interesting, especially that part in which he explained the best methods in caring for the hens after they come to maturity. He explained the different methods of housing them and the necessity of giving them the proper kinds of food and what kind was best for them to cause them to produce the best results in egg production. He dwelt particularly on the kind and amount of food best to have the hen lay and illustrated it by showing the number of eggs produced under different kinds of food, showing that when hens were fed principally on whole grain, such as corn and wheat, that it took up an unnecessary amount of energy for the hen to grind that grain, whereas if the grain had been run through a chopper that it would not require more than one-half the labor on the part of the hens' digestive organs, the gizzard, and that saved energy could be applied toward egg production. There was quite a number of questions asked Mr. Lamb on the different phases of the subject and his answers seemed to be very satisfactory. He showed conclusively that if the people who handle hens would do so scientifically instead of in the slipshod way they are treated, that they would reap dollars where they now do not reap cents.
    Henry Childreth, formerly of this place but now of Medford, was out Wednesday with us. He was combining business with pleasure, trying to dispose of his property here.
    Charles Edmondson and his daughter, Mrs. Baker of Butte Falls, and one of the Thompson girls of Derby, and Frank Johnson of Indian Creek, Eagle Point post office, came out on the P.&E. Thursday.
    Thomas Ragsdale of Lake Creek came out and took dinner here Thursday. He came out for a load of mill feed from the Snowy Butte mills and to get a sewing machine they had at the depot.
    I see that Wm. Perry, who now owns the old Haselton place, has been making some decided improvements around in the way of fencing, as he has torn away the old fence and replaced it with a neat post and wire fence.
    Jud Edsall and John Foster have gone into the sheep business on a limited scale, having purchased one hundred and three from George Brown of Brownsboro.
    H. E. Dillon and Arthur Wilson of San Francisco, representing the Standard Oil Company, were here for dinner Thursday.
    Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek, one of our enterprising farmers, returned from a business trip to Medford Friday.
    J. L. Robinson, who is successfully farming a sticky farm about three miles north of here, went to Medford Friday.
    T. Hoefft of Lake Creek came out Friday with [a] four-horse load of potatoes that he shipped to Medford. He says that there is quite a lot of potatoes to be had up in that section.
    L. L. Anderson of the Elk Creek fish hatchery (Trail) was here for dinner Friday on his way to Medford.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been engaged in trapping this winter, spent the night here with us on his way to Weed to go to work in the lumber business.
    Mrs. John Ashpole of Medford came out Friday to look after the interest of her little grandson.
    Dave Swihart of Derby, who has been over to Hilt, Cal., came in Friday night and spent the night with us.
    Earl Wood, son of Walter Wood, is the proud possessor of a new bicycle that he just received from Seattle.
    Mrs. Roy Smith took the P.&E. Saturday morning for her parents' home, F. J. Ayres.
    The P.&E. brought in hay for Carl Stanley, Wm. Nichols of Lake Creek and W. J. Austin of Climax this Saturday morning.
    Mrs. L. Charley of Brownsboro came in Saturday morning and was met here by her daughter, Mrs. Geo. Nichols, Jr., and taken to Medford.
    Miss Norma Smith Rader, of Ashland, called Saturday for early dinner and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for the Lake Creek school district where she will commence to teach Monday.
    J. E. Nordstrom, chief quartermaster of U.S. navy, G. N. Birkland, representing Failing 
McCalman Co., and Carl J. Schillings, representing the Remington Arms Union Metallic Cartridge Co., and Charles Clark came out on the P.&E. Saturday and all took dinner here except Mr. Clark and went right onto his farm from here. Percy and Glen Haley were also among the diners.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 12, 1917, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. O. Campbell of Portland was here Saturday visiting his partner, George Shively. They have rented a part of the Narregan place and are preparing to put in quite a large area of it in sugar beets. They seem to be men of energy and push and we believe that they will cause some of the kickers in this section to stand up and take notice.
    Benj. Brophy and Gus Nichols were among our business callers Saturday. They are both counted among our leading stockmen. They have been driving out quite a lot of cattle to the valley to be fed. They report that their cattle are doing fine and many of them are ready for beef.
    W. D. Roberts, who is farming the J. M. Rader place near here, was a business caller Saturday.
    I omitted to state in my last that our town council held a meeting on Tuesday the 5th inst., the first meeting they have held for some time, on account of the lack of a quorum, as one of the council had moved away some time ago and then Norman McQuoid, another member, went about a month ago, leaving but four members, but the four members met, namely Frank Brown, John W. Smith, James Jordan, and George Phillips, and swore in W. L. Childreth and Mr. McQuoid Sr. I failed to produce his Christian name, and they transacted what little business there was to attend to, such as allowing a few small bills, and talked over some needed reforms.
    Among the guests here Saturday night were Jay Spitzer, Glen and Percy Haley, [and] Charles Clark. Mr. Clark was formerly a school boy in our town, and has inherited a forty-acre tract of land known as the old John Pelling place, about two miles northeast of here. He has moved onto his place and expects to put in a crop of corn this season.
    Lyle Purdin of Medford was also with us Saturday night and Sunday night, also G. F. Hall of Prospect. He reports the snow being five feet deep in that section at one time the past winter. Also a man by the name of Lewis of Medford.
    There has been some changes in business lines here since my last. Henry Childreth has sold his residence property to D. A. Shively, consideration not to be told, and Mr. Shively has moved from the L. L. Simmons place into his own home and Ed Coy has moved from the old James Ringer home into the house vacated by Mr. Shively.
    Mrs. George Brown of Brownsboro, who has been visiting relatives in Medford, came out on the P.&E. Monday and took the E.P-L.C. stage for her home.
    Charles Painter went to Medford Monday on the P.&E. motor car and while there secured a part of a car of hay that came out Tuesday. And there was another car of hay came out for the Bieberstedt Bros. of Brownsboro and another car for John Allen of Derby.
    Thomas Spengler was here Monday shaking hands with some of his old-time friends.
    Roy Vaughn and Herbert Carlton[, who] passed through here Monday going over to the Carlton ranch after some horses, returned Tuesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    W. E. Hammond made a short business visit to our town Tuesday.
    There were 35 empty cream cans taken off the P.& E. Tuesday for this section of the country. That means cash for quite a number of our citizens.
    Wm. Moore, formerly of Elk Creek, but now of Ashland, was on the train Tuesday bound for Butte Falls.
    Monday Mrs. Fred Stimson and child went up to Prospect via Trail on the E.P.-Persist stage.
    Tuesday G. W. Sorrel of Trail came out on the stage on his way to Phoenix. I had just received word that morning announcing the death and burial of his daughter, Mrs. Rachel Traft of Phoenix, this county. The telephone lines were out of commission so that they could not get word through and there was no mail until Monday, so he did not get word sooner. This is the second time that I have met Mr. Sorrel; the first time was at Fort Klamath when I was called on to attend the funeral of his son, who accidentally shot himself on Huckleberry Mountain in August, 1905, and this the second time, he was going to try to console his wife and son-in-law on the death of his daughter. A strange coincidence.
    Richard Ridgeway and wife, parents of Mrs. T. F. Boltz of our town, who have been spending the winter here with their daughter, left Tuesday for their home in Lumberton, N.Y.
    Since my last Pete Young has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T., J. V. McIntyre has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T., and Ed Coy has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. all of E.P.
    There was a meeting of the citizens of Eagle Point in the town hall in Eagle Point and was addressed by C. C. Cate and then he introduced R. A. Ward of the bureau biological survey of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, explaining the best methods for destroying the various pests in our county. After which a club was organized to act in unison to destroy these pests. Frank Brown was elected president pro tem and Carl Marijon, secretary. A meeting is called for Saturday afternoon of the citizens throughout this part of the country to meet in the town hall Saturday, March 17th, for the purpose of completing the organization and [to] take steps to secure assistance from the county in ridding the country of the ground squirrel, rats, etc. Everybody is invited to come and take part in the deliberations.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 15, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred Edler of Lake Creek was among the callers for dinner Thursday. Ho was out making arrangements to store a lot of hay here until the roads were so that he could haul it to his ranch. The hay came out on the train Saturday and he is storing it at this writing. He thinks that he will have to feed for at least three weeks yet.
    Mr. Weideman, who is living in the old Hitchcock place, was here Thursday for a load of lumber.
    There was another car of hay passed through here Thursday for Derby, and another car for Carl Stanley, representing the Stanley Bros.
    Newt Gorman and family, now living on the old Pool place on the east end of Big Sticky, were here Thursday trading with our merchants. He says that he can do just as well here with our merchants as he can anywhere, so lets well enough alone.
    W. D. Roberts of Antelope came in Thursday with a few sacks of grain for our grist mill, taking back with him some of the products of the grist mill and also a small lot of lumber.
    Mr. Rhodes and Mr. Stewart, who have farms northeast of Eagle Point, took two lots of hogs to Central Point Thursday, realizing eleven and one-half cents per pound on foot, and now the farmers are kicking themselves for not having hogs to sell, but thus it goes: When it rains much and milk we have no spoon to eat it with.
    W. H. Crandall was a business caller Thursday.
    Amos Ayres, our Eagle Point depot agent, received a lot of fine shakes Thursday from Butte Falls.
    Since my last report Mrs. D. S. Nichols has ordered the Daily Mail Tribune and so has Fred Pettegrew ordered the daily, and Daniel Cingcade has renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    The street committee of our town, after examining the wagon bridge, decided that it was not safe for heavy loads, so had four new braces put under the weak part of it and expect to have it fixed permanently when the water gets lower.
    Mr. Kline, deputy fruit tree inspector, was here for dinner Friday.
    Speaking of Friday, March 16th, it made the eighty-fifth anniversary of my birthday, and in commenting on the subject some ladies, bless them, tried to flatter me with the thought that I looked young, while the Sunday Oregonian of March 4th presented what they called my photo and my daughter, in Portland, in writing on the subject, said that it made me look as though I was one hundred and thirty-seven years old, but nevertheless, I told the ladies that I had a verbal contract to write for the Mail Tribune for fifteen years yet!
    Milton Watkins and wife were doing some shopping here Friday. One of the Brittsan brothers was in town Friday, having his plows fixed up, getting ready by the time the ground is fit to plow.
    J. Rigsby of Brownsboro, a newcomer, bought six pigs about a month ago, fed them some apples and sold four of them for about fifty dollars and had the two left. He gave five dollars a head for them.
    Our sheriff, Ralph Jennings, was on the P.&E. Saturday morning on his way to Butte Falls on official business.
    In addition to the car of hay that came in this Saturday morning there was another car on the way to parties in Derby.
    Among the passengers besides our sheriff was Thomas Farlow of Lake Creek and L. Bassett of Butte Falls. The latter went out on Tuesday to be treated by a specialist in Medford and was on his way home.
    Carl Stanley brought in a box of bacon Saturday morning and shipped it to Butte Falls.
    Last Wednesday evening the Haines-Wilbur Stock Dramatic Company came out on the P.&E. motor. They had to leave their seven trunks until next train to be brought out. They took rooms at the Sunnyside and showed for four nights. The first and second nights I attended and the performance was very good. The next night I did not attend and they are to show again tonight (Saturday), so all that I can say about them is from hearsay and the reader knows that there is such a diversity of opinion on such subjects that it would not be right to put it in print. Last night Mrs. P. C. Jackson added to the regular performance an exhibition of her trained dogs that seemed to be well spoken of. They have had a very good attendance so far.
    T. F. McCabe, Frank Farlow, Herman Meyer, Fred Edler and Charles Clark were here Saturday for dinner.     Will give a report of farmers meeting next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon, as per announcement in the Mail Tribune, there was a meeting of the farmers in Brown's hall, the object being to perfect the organization of the club, elect permanent officers and decide on a name for the organization. There were twenty names enrolled and A. E. Strong was elected as president and Frank Brown, treasurer and secretary. The name "Go Get 'Em Club" was the name adopted. By-laws, already prepared by Carl Narregan, were adopted, requiring each member to pay an initiation fee of fifty cents to become a member, with the understanding that each member is entitled to that amount of the prepared poisoned grain. The plan is to have the county employ what is to be called a county mixer, whose duty it will be to prepare the poisoned grain ready for use, at the expense of the county and distribute it to persons appointed by the county court, and they distribute it to the farmers at the cost of production. And it was estimated that that would be about 8 or ten cents a quart, and each member of the club is entitled to enough of the prepared grain to amount to what money he or she has paid into the local treasury. It is further understood that each member is to use all diligence in trying to exterminate the digger squirrel. By that means the farmer can get rid of one of the greatest nuisances in the country and save a hundred times what to will have to expend in ridding the country of the pest. it is the expectation that the "Go Get 'Em Club" will have an increase in membership until it reaches into three or four figures, for almost every farmer with whom I have talked seemed favorably impressed with the feasibility of the plan.
    Irvin Daley of Lake Creek came out with a load of potatoes for Geo. Brown & Sons and took back with him a load of doors and windows for his new house he is building on his father's farm last Saturday.
    Charles Clark, who is preparing to build on his farm as soon as he can get the lumber on the ground, is stopping at present at the Sunnyside.
    Saturday Carl Ringer and Mr. Launspaugh gave a dance, but before the dance the Haines-Wilbur Stock Company gave another of their vaudeville entertainments by special agreement with the parties who had the opera house engaged and I learn that they had a twenty-dollar house at 10 to 25¢ admission, and then Mr. Ringer reports that he and his partner sold sixty-four tickets at one dollar each, and still we talk about the [omission]
    
There was quite a company came to the Sunnyside for beds and breakfast, among whom were Lyle Purdin, Nick Nickleson of Medford, Miss Ruth Thompson of Derby, Jay Spitzer and Glen and Percy Haley, besides quite a number of our neighbor boys, and for dinner Sunday Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Brown and daughters, Helen and Mae, L. J. Kenny, F. Kenny and Fosma Kenny of Medford, Philip Jackson and wife, William von der Hellen, wife and son, Hugo, and daughter Joyce, Charles Clark, Geo. P. Haines and wife, Miss Peggy Hileherest and Walter DeSormas, beside some half dozen of our young folks who come almost every Sunday for dinner or supper.
    George B. Brown of Brownsboro was an early visitor in our town Monday morning. He says he has sold all his sheep except two hundred and fifty and that he is going to grade them up and keep nothing but a high grade of sheep. He sold one hundred and fifty-two to the Grissom brothers.
    Perry Foster of the Debenger Gap settlement was a business caller Monday.
    Ed Dutton, our efficient road supervisor, passed through town Tuesday morning on his way to the Reese Creek country with a road drag to level down the roads in that section.
    George (Pete) Stowell was in town Tuesday morning after a small load of shakes to add to his shed room, as he is planning to go into the dairy business on a large scale. He reports that he has done fine in the egg business this past winter, as his hens are bringing him in an average of about fifty dollars a month; that during January and February he sold one hundred and ten dollars worth of eggs. I was talking to one of my neighbors about what he said and he replied, "But he did not tell how many dollars a month of wheat he had fed his hens," and I told him no
, but he said that he let the hens feed themselves by putting away a lot of wheat in the sheaf at harvest time and letting them thresh it out themselves, giving them plenty of exercise and keeping them healthful.
    George Brown & Sons have had a car of cedar fence posts brought out from Butte Falls to supply the demand here.
    Mr. Bass, owner of a small orchard southeast of here about two and a half miles, also an owner and director in the Continental Orchard Company on Antelope, arrived Tuesday morning from his home in, I think, New York state. He came out to look over his interests and to attend a meeting of the board of directors of the C.O. company.
    There were two cars partly loaded with hay passed through here for Derby and Butte Falls Tuesday. I learned that one of them was for Benjamin Fredenburg of Butte Falls. There is no telling how much longer the stockmen will have to feed their cattle before they can turn them out on the range, as I have just learned that there was two inches of new snow fell last Tuesday night at Butte Falls on the old snow. Some of the stockmen are turning out some of their stronger cattle in the foothills where there is plenty of chaparral for them to browse on.
    Fred McPherson and Mr. Lewis passed through here with about a hundred head of cattle Tuesday to be turned out on the range.
    There was over a carload of spray dope came in Tuesday for the different orchardists in this section; twenty-five barrels for the Corbin orchard and six for the Tronson orchard and the rest is scattered around the country.
    Eugene Bellows and wife brought in this week's supply of cream Tuesday.
    Mr. Wiseman was here for another load of lumber. He has to haul it about eight or nine miles to get it two and a half miles, on account of the bad roads.
    Mr. Gaddis, and Mr. Gray, one of the firm of Gaddis & Dixon, and one of their traveling men, were out here Tuesday taking pictures of our suspension bridge.
    Since my last report Ed Conley, manager of the T. E. Nichols general mercantile store, and Mrs. D. S. Nichols, have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 22, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Gus Lovegren, chief of the forest bureau in this department, was on the train on his way to Butte Falls Thursday.
    Charlie Clark has moved his meat market and bakery from the old Geo. Brown store building into the room formerly occupied by Art Nichols, in the Nichols block.
    Fred Edler of Lake Creek was doing business in our town Thursday, and while here dropped into the Sunnyside for dinner.
    Mr. Lee Port, one of the U.S. forest rangers, who is stationed on Trail Creek, spent Thursday with us at the Sunnyside.
    Martin Wood and John Iseli, who are located near the Duprey saw mill, came out Friday and came here for dinner, and while here, Mr. Iseli gave me his subscription for the W.M.T. He said that when he left home that morning, the snow was just twenty-two inches deep in his yard.
    W. J. Canon, our Brownsboro merchant, phoned to me Friday night that Fred Stanley had left the money with him to pay a year's subscription to the W.M.T. and ordered it sent to his address at Brownsboro.
    E. A. Strong, the president of the "Go Get 'Em Club," has followed me the following list of directors of the club: Frank Neil, Derby; Nick Young, Eagle Point; George Brown, Brownsboro; and Carl von der Hellen and Henry French of Wellen. The interest seems to be growing in the move to exterminate the digger squirrel and the farmers generally are signing up for the poison grain. I see in the Mail Tribune that the powers that be have decided to let the members of the various clubs throughout the county have the poison grain at six cents a pound. I would suggest to the farmers living in this section of the county, that is, on Rogue River, Big Butte or Little Butte, Antelope, Dry and Yankee creeks, that when they are in town to call at Brown & Sons' store and sign up as members of the club and thus secure the poisoned grain and then scatter it wherever a digger is found.
    George Mansfield, Jr., whose father owns and operates a fine farm on Rogue River, on the Prospect road, and Bert Higinbotham spent Friday with us. George Mansfield came came out primarily after six fine registered ewes that his father had had expressed from Sheridan in the Willamette Valley. They are of the Shropshire breed and look as though they might be quite an accession to Mr. Mansfield's flock of sheep. He seems to be dealing in fine blooded stock, as I understand that he has some thoroughbred cattle on his farm.
    Bert Higinbotham came out to bring a load of household goods for William Kelly, who has been living in his neighborhood, Flounce Rock. Bert reports that the snow was three feet deep at his place when he left home, but probably there is not so much now, as it was raining this Saturday morning, according to word received over the phone.
    E. L. Hallan, from California, has moved onto the old Herron orchard, where Newt Gorman has been living for the past few years. I haven't met him but hope that he will prove to be as companionable as Mr. Gorman has been.
    Mr. E. M. Koenig of Derby and F. O. Stinson of Prospect and Mr. Berrian, the Butte Falls fish hatchery man, were on the P.&E. this morning on their way home and Mr. H. P. Berlinton of Lake Creek got off here and took the stage for home. While here Mr. Berrian renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    In addition to the three already mentioned, Henry Trusty, our mail carrier from here to Persist, Pliney Leabo and Dr. W. P. Holt have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    E. H. Russell, sales engineer of the Kellogg Switchboard and Supply Company, Portland, Ore., was here doing business with our telephone man, W. C. Clements, and while here took dinner with us.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. A. Bass, one of the directors of the Commercial Orchard Company, William von der Hellen and family, one of our hardware merchants, and James W. Pew of Ashland, were among the callers last Sunday.
    Monday was one of unusually dull days as there were but very few of the people from the country came in and there seemed to be but very little doing, Miss Mae Maltby, one of the lady teachers, came out on the P.&E. motor, [and] took the E.P.-Persist stage for Long Branch, where she is engaged to teach. She came out a week before, went up to teach but found the snow so deep that the children could not attend, so postponed for another week. Most of the schools in the mountain districts have had to suspend on account of the deep snow.
    Reed Charley, son of Lemon Charley, was in town Monday evening, brought in a few sacks of spuds for Geo. Brown & Sons, and sent a package of choice seed off by parcel post.
    B. C. Clark, formerly of Ashland, but more recently of Roseburg, who at one time had a homestead on the side of Round Top, came out Monday morning, procured a rig and driver of S. H. Harnish's livery stable and went up in the Lake Creek and Salt Creek country, on a business venture, returning about 8 p.m. to the Sunnyside for supper and the next morning ate his breakfast and was off for Medford by 5:30. He is some goer.
    Tuesday was a busy day in our little town. When the P.&E. train, nine cars, came it brought in quite a number of passengers, and a car of hay for Walter Wood, another for Mike Hanley, and a part of a car to be taken to Derby for Fred Kelso. In addition to the car of hay for Mike Hanley it brought a ton of rolled barley and a ton of alfalfa meal for him and at this writing [he] has his teams hauling it up to his ranch on the N.F. of Little Butte. In addition to that there was a quantity of goods unloaded here for our merchants. Among the passengers were the Misses Ethel Fredenburg and Mabel Johnson of Butte Falls. Miss Ethel has been teaching in the Butte Creek district, about three miles above Brownsboro, and Miss Mabel is teaching in Butte Falls. Mr. A. E. La Port of Central Point of the I.X.L. monument works. Also Mr. Henry Pech of Medford and Messrs J. B. Ridgeway and H. Promdisse of San Diego, Cal. They all three took early dinner at the Sunnyside, then went to the Lake Creek country in Meyer's stage, the two last named going up to look over u tract of land in that section, returning today, Wednesday.
    Mike Hanley and Mr. J. H. Temple, a traveling man for a firm in Indianapolis, Ind., were also here Tuesday for dinner.
    John Butler shipped, via the P.&E. route, a lot of bacon to J. P. Hughes of Butte Falls. George Stowell shipped a case of cream and two crates of eggs on the P.&E. to Central Point. George says that if it was not for his hens he would starve. He has 150 hens and ships 60 dozen eggs a week.
    The P.&E. also brought out five hundred pounds of poisoned grain to be used by the farmers to rid the country of digger squirrels. It was shipped to George Brown and Sons. As Frank Brown is secretary-treasurer of the club, he is distributing it among the farmers. Those who took advantage of the shipment, so far as I have learned, were Henry French, A. A. Betz, John Butler, Pete and Nick Young, George Stowell, Frank Neil of Derby, John Singleton, Fred and E. C. Bellows, Sam Coy, Mr. Throckmorton, A. E. Strong, Charles Painter, Frank Smith, John Greb, J. D. Roberts, James F. Johnson and your Eagle Point correspondent. So the readers may be looking for results, as many of them took more than the seven pounds allotted to them for their membership fee in joining the club. In a former letter I stated that the price would be, to members of the club, six cents per pound, but on account of freight and drayage, it was found necessary to. raise the price to seven cents, but that that is about four or five times cheaper than when bought in the stores. Let everybody. join in and scatter the poisoned grain and it will result in gathering dollars at the harvest.
    William Nickel of Lake Creek passed through here Tuesday with a load of baled hay for Gus Nichols.
    J. E. Gribble, one of the forest rangers, came out Wednesday morning on the P.&E., took the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage for the west, going to the Carlson road camp, near Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    There was a meeting of the board of directors of the "Go Get 'Em Club" held in Brown's hall Tuesday and arrangement made to extend the distribution of the squirrel poison.
    I have just received a request over the telephone to send the Daily Mail Tribune to Louie Blass of the free ferry. The people want and will have the best newspapers and consequently call for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Since my last W. E. Hammel and George von der Hellen have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    R. J. Kirkley and H. R. Lowe, selling horseshoe nails, were doing business with our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 29, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charles Clark, our meat market man, has moved his family from the old Geo. Brown & Sons store building into the Wm. von der Hellen house, formerly occupied by Clay Cole.
    Mr. Griffin, who now owns what is known as the old Tucker, or stone house place on Rogue River, was here Wednesday for dinner and spent the night with us. He seemed to be looking for a band of sheep of a certain grade.
    Our beautiful Little Butte Creek got on a rampage Thursday morning and one of our neighbors, L. K. Haak, lost a valuable young cow. She started to cross the creek and got one of her feet fast under a rock and drowned. About the same time we had five of our little bunch of cattle undertake to cross the creek and one of them, an elderly cow, drifted down and finally landed on the same side of the creek on which she started, but landed under a steep bank some ten or twelve feet high, but by the use of a rope and the assistance of three strong men we managed to get her up the bank all O.K.
    John Allen of Derby had another lot of hay shipped up to try to save his stock and Gus Pech of Lake Creek had a part of a car shipped out from Medford to be taken up to his place. Among the passengers on the P.&E. Thursday were Ira Tungate, B. F. and Mrs. F. T. Newport and daughter on their way up to visit Mrs. N.'s. parents.
    Dr. Holt made a professional call in Butte Falls via the P.&E. road.
    Wm. Holman of Climax, the man who broke his leg and was at the Sunnyside for several weeks, but now at his father-in-law's, Wm. Taylor, recovered so as to be able to go a little on crutches, had the misfortune to have one of his crutches slip and threw his weight on his broken leg and bent it, as the bones had not thoroughly knit together. Dr. Holt was called and he soon straightened the leg and now he is confined to his bed again. He surely has had a hard time this winter.
    Mrs. Dr. Holt has gone to Oakland, Cal., to visit her daughter and other relatives.
    Mrs. J. B. and Mrs. Phillip Jackson, Mrs. John Watkins and her daughter, Miss Anna, went to Medford Friday. Mrs. Watkins and her daughter were going to Central Point to consult a specialist with regard to her daughter's health.
    Gus Nichols and his son, Thomas F., were in town Thursday and Friday and Friday took a band of about one hundred head of cattle to the range on Salt Creek. They were looking very well. Gus is too much of a cattleman to let cattle die for want of feed when it can be had.
    Mike Hanley passed through here Friday on his way to his ranch. He [omission] Saturday. He is another cattleman who will provide feed, if possible, for his stock.
    Friday the school children here had their flag day exercises, speeches, songs, and the raising of the flag, after which the entire school joined in singing patriotic songs. The exercises are highly spoken of and seemed to be highly appreciated. The citizens of Eagle Point are raising money to defray the expense so as to have another track meet with our school May 3. They had such a good time last year that they have decided to try again. They expect to have at least ten or twelve schools take part in the exercises and try to excel the one we had last year. The school board met Friday night at the school house for the purpose of electing the teachers for the coming year. There were eleven applications presented to the board but there were no selections made, as the members of the school board wanted time to think and investigate.
    Gus Gorman and John Quackenbush were among the visitors Friday.
    Charles S. Painter and a man by the name of Gay gave me their subs. to the Daily Mail Tribune Friday p.m. Mr. Gay had his daily addressed to Irvin Dahack, Eagle Point. They are herding a band of sheep belonging to Mr. Lewis of Central Point on the prairie north of here.
    A. H. Peachy and son Robert were here Friday combining business with pleasure.
    Since my last report in addition to the two subscriptions mentioned above I have sent Fred Stanley a receipt for his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune,
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Carl Jackson of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. Saturday afternoon and was met at the train by her mother-in-law, Mrs. J. B. Jackson.
    S. F. Ward of Butte Falls and Ed Meyer of Lake Creek came out on the same train and went on to Medford and Mrs. Key, of B.F., mother-in-law to Dr. Buchanan of Ashland, was on her way to Ashland, and Mrs. John Greb, wife of one of [the] prosperous farmers, boarded the car for Medford to spend the weekend with her daughter, Miss Francis, who is finishing her course of study as a teacher in the teachers' training course of the Medford high school.
    Jerry Lewis, one of our town boys, went to Hilt, California, to go to work in a sawmill.
    Charles S. Painter and George H. Wamsley, our deputy assessor, went to Jacksonville Saturday on business of an official nature.
    Mrs. W. W. Taylor and her daughter, Mrs. Wm. Holman, were shopping Saturday afternoon in Eagle Point.
    Wm. Perry, one of our leading citizens and a member of the school board, made a business call in Butte Falls Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Grant Mathews, who own and operate the old John Black farm on the free ferry road, were trading here Saturday.
    Mrs. Mamie Clark, who is teaching school in the Central S.H., was a passenger on the E.P.-Persist stage Saturday.
    J. M. Wilfley, owner of an orchard northeast of E.P., came in Monday on the P.&E. and the first thing he did was to give me his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    John H. Stewart, of Los Angeles, son of F. M. Stewart, also came in Monday on the P.&E.
    Mrs. F. L. Chitwood of Grants Pass, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. James Culbertson of Lake Creek, also came in on the P.&E. Monday and so did Mrs. A. J. McDonald of Trail and Mrs. H. H. Fox and her mother-in-law, Mrs. M. A. Fox of Lake Creek, also Tim Daley and Stanford Houston of Trail, Mrs. McDonald, Messrs. Daley and Houston taking the E.P.-Persist stage and the other three ladies to the E.P.-L.C. stage for Lake Creek. There were seventeen came out on the P.&E. jitney.
    Russ Moore and his two daughters passed through our town Monday on their way to Central Point, being called there on account of the death of his mother-in-law Mrs. N. J. Pankey, one of the pioneers of Jackson County, as she has lived in Sams Valley and Central Point for over fifty years.
    A. J. Anderson, the agent of the Standard Oil Company, Medford, came out Tuesday to interview the users of his goods as to the trade this season. There is quite a number of people who have autos and gasoline engines who buy gasoline by the barrel and consequently get it cheaper than at retail. Mr. Anderson was a guest at the Sunnyside Tuesday for dinner.
    Mr. Berrian, the superintendent of the B.F. fish hatchery, and Mrs. Lee Steers of Rogue River and Mr. Wheeler of B.F. were passengers on the northbound train, Mrs. Steers being on her way to the Minter Bros. ranches to visit them, as they are her uncles.
    There was a lot of hay on the train Tuesday for the stockmen of Derby, and almost a carload of rolled barley for different parties around here.
    There was a small lot of lumber come out on the train for Roy Bailey. E. A. Bass also came out on the same train and brought out a lot of fruit trees to replant his orchard.
    There was a special meeting of the Parent-Teachers Society Monday night at the school house to arrange a program for the track meet here May 3 next. The committee report that they have raised near a hundred dollars to be invested in prizes, etc. and the Ashland high school has promised substantial aid; the Ashland band has agreed to donate their services and from all appearances we were going to have one of the times of our lives at that time. It is expected that there will be twenty different schools represented. In addition to the silver cup that is to be contested for, the committee have decided to offer a second and third prize for the second and third result.
    George Stowell brought in his regular two cases of eggs and can of cream Tuesday.
    Robert Dawson of Trail passed through here Tuesday with a small load of hay. We spent the night with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
    A. V. Cummings, superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, had a little mashup on the street Tuesday p.m. He started to unhitch his team in front of the blacksmith shop and just then an auto came dashing by that scared the horses and Mr. C. grabbed one of them by the bit but could not control them, finally letting them go after spinning around a few minutes. They made a dash, collided with a telephone pole, breaking the tongue, doubletrees, neck yoke and both lines, thus freeing the horses and one of them went down one side of the creek and the other on the other and the one on the side of the creek where they started; when he came to the ford at the old Simmons place [he] stopped rather than to take a cold bath. Fortunately no one was hurt and our blacksmith soon repaired the damages by putting in new ones.
    It is not raining or snowing today, April 4.
    Rev. Paul S. Bandy of Central Point, who is working in the interest of the Red Cross Society, will meet the citizens of Eagle Point in the Baptist church next Sunday evening, April 8, at 8 p.m. There will be a short Easter service and at the close Rev. Bandy will present the subject of the work of the Red Cross for our consideration and use his persuasive powers to get up an interest here on the subject.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 7, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    N. B. Stoddard, the Butte Fails hardware merchant, spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside. His wife, Mrs. Stoddard, had gone to Santa Ana, California to visit relatives.
    In my last I announced the arrival of J. M. Wilfley, one of our large orchardists, but he was soon called by telegraph to return to Berkeley on account of the serious illness of his wife.
    I noticed there was several barrels of spray mixture came in on the cars Thursday for the company of which he is a member.
    The stockmen are still having hay shipped out from Medford. There were two cars for this place for different persons and a part of a car went up to Butte Falls for Benj. Fredenburg Thursday.
    There was another car of wheat came out for the Snowy Butte mills.
    Mike Sidley of Lake Creek was a business caller Thursday.
    Rev. Paul S. Bandy of Central Point came out Thursday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and left an appointment to hold a meeting in the E.P. Baptist church to present the cause of the Red Cross Society.
    Roy Stanley and his brother Lloyd came in about 11 o'clock Thursday night with a band of cattle, turned them into our pasture and spent the rest of the night with us. They have had them out in the valley feeding them and were taking them back to the range.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Farrar of Lake Creek were here Thursday for dinner Thursday.
    Thursday afternoon there was quite a gathering of the loyal citizens of Eagle Point and vicinity, as it had been announced that a recruiting officer was to be at the post office that afternoon at 2 o'clock for the purpose of enlisting any young men, who could fill the requirements, into the service of the U.S. government. There was quite a number of the young recruits came from Medford to add enthusiasm to the move. The school children formed a double column and marched from the school house to the wagon bridge, where they dropped in behind the procession of autos from Medford and marched to Brown's hall where it was arranged to meet, but that was found too small to hold the crowd, so the line was reformed, led by the Medford High School band and marched to the opera house, where we were entertained for an hour or more with songs and addresses by different ones. Our school children covered themselves all over with glory by their singing and further patriotic exercises. The speakers were interrupted several times by the enthusiastic applause of the multitude. There was among the musicians a lad aged, I suppose, about twelve or thirteen years who carried off the honors among the Medford boys. The young bugler who carried a large flag, and during the exercises gave us a tune on his bugle, was encored, and we thought that the last was better than the first. The report came with the Medfordites that their principal speaker had through mistake taken the wrong car and gone to Jacksonville, but there were several gave short speeches and Mr. Stine seemed to be the principal speaker. Mrs. J. B. Jackson, one of our lady citizens, was called to the platform and read a part of a letter from her son James, who enlisted some weeks ago in the navy department and is stationed at Mare Island, Cal., telling of the kind of a time he was having and how he was getting along in his new school of life. At the close of the speaking a call was made for young men to join the seventh company and there were four signified their willingness to go and serve their country, but when called on to come up forward and give their names, but one came forward, a young man from Brownsboro, but I did not learn his name and I learned that the other three said that they would go to Medford and enlist in a few days. It.was not generally known that there was going to be a general rally or there would probably have been at least a hundred more attended. But as it was an enthusiasm is manifested here that shows that the spirit of our revolutionary fathers is still alive, but perhaps a little dormant.
    Friday morning Miss Mamie Clark, who is teaching in the Central S.H. and Miss Margaret Mansfield, who is attending the university of Oregon at Eugene, came out and took the E.P.-Persist stage. Miss Clark had been out to her home being treated for poison oak poison and was on her way to resume her work and Miss Mansfield was going up to visit her parents near McLeod.
    J. A. Moore, special agent for the United States land office, was on his way up on Reese Creek. He wanted a rig but he was told conditions of the road and decided to go on a horse without the rig and when he returned he said he had all he wanted to do to get through on horseback.
    Miss Bernice Baker of Butte Falls is here visiting Wm. Perry and family.
    C. A. Newstrom, wife and son of Lake Creek, and A. H. Peachey of Ashland were among the guests here Friday noon and at night Prof. J. C. Barnard, who is teaching at Tolo, was with us to spend the night. He was here to see the members of the school board but learned that the principalship was conditionally promised. The board will meet again this evening (Saturday), but not in time to give the results in this letter.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. this morning was C. L. Farrar of L.C. He had a lot of fruit trees with him to reset his old orchard; and I. E. D. Zundel of Medford, he was going up to look after his goats on Reese Creek. Mr. Louie Moore of Butte Falls was a passenger.
    Fred Stanley was just hauling away the last of his hay from the car this morning as the train pulled in to take the car to Butte Falls for wood.
    Since my last report F. J. Ayres, E.P., has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T., and John Howard, E.P., has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    W. E. Butler has stopped his W.M.T. and subscribed for the D.M.T.
    J. E. Spencer, E.P., has given me his sub. to the D.M.T.
    Charles Clark, our meat market man, has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    Friday afternoon some of our enterprising ladies met at the school house and entered upon the task of preparing the ground for the annual flower gardening. They commandeered folks they could find and tried to enlist some of the young men but I understand failed, but the primary teacher and a few of the young lady pupils and our lady school director, Mrs. L. K. Haak, went at it with a will and the result was that the work was done. Our primary teacher, Mrs. W. O. Wheeler, found that she was better adapted to teach in the primary department than to make flower gardens, for she is said to be on expert in that department, and the little folk are expressing their regrets that she is not going to remain and have charge of that department next year. She is very popular with the little folks.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT SCHOOL NOTES
    The third meeting in the interest of the Eagle Point Community Day and school meet was held at the school house Monday night, April 2. The committee on prizes for afternoon sport reported fifty dollars in cash and merchandise already subscribed by the business people of Medford and the local community. A communication was read from the Ashland Round-Up committee offering a twenty-dollar prize. Since that time additional prizes have been subscribed, which brings the total up to $105.
    Another meeting was appointed for Monday night April 9th, at which time it is hoped to get the program and prize list arranged. The name of each subscriber will appear on the program, together with the amount given. These meetings are open to all and it is hoped that a large number will be present.
    Among the visitors at the school recently were E. R. Peterson, Mrs. L. K. Haak, Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mrs. Frank Brown, Mrs. McCaslin and daughter, Mrs. Baltz, Mr. Perry and Mrs. Perry and Robert Peachey.
    Mr. Nibert of Applegate and J. C. Barnard, principal of the Tolo school, were also among the out-of-town visitors.
    Last Wednesday was cleanup day at the school. The entire afternoon was devoted to cleaning the school grounds and getting the play apparatus ready for the school meet. In the evening a large friendship fire was built out of the rubbish collected during the day and a camp fire lunch served.
    The Parent-Teachers' Association met Friday and set out some flower bulbs and with the assistance of a few of the older boys spaded the lawn and got it ready for planting. The association also purchased netting and lumber for the tennis court. The boys are putting it up and have it nearly completed.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1917, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sunday morning there was an unusually large attendance in the Sunday school and after the regular lesson was disposed of the Easter program was rendered by the children. The few ladies who seem to be the leaders in the Sunday school work here deserve a great deal of credit for the work they are doing in that line and especially for the part they take in assisting the children in preparing for the various parts in the exercises in the entertainments.
    There was a meeting of the school board last Saturday afternoon, but they did not get through until it was too late for me to put the result in my last report of the doings in and around Eagle Point. The board met at the school house about 3 o'clock and examined the various applications for positions in our school but came to no official conclusion as the lady member of the board pleaded for more time to consider the matter, although the other two directors had already agreed on at least two of the teachers. Prof. B. F. Nibret was over from Applegate to see the members of the school board Saturday. The arrangements have been made to have a grand time here the 3rd of May next. Those who seem to be more interested in the track meet than any of us outsiders met at the school house and have given out that there will be something over a hundred dollars distributed among the various schools that meet and that the Ashland High School band will furnish the music free and that there will be two exhibitions of moving pictures in the afternoon and also at night free and after that show there will be a social hop, etc.; that all of the proceeds of the dance and other sources of income will be applied to the fund to be used toward putting in a water system on the school ground so as to irrigate the shrubbery and ornamental trees. I understand that all of the expense of the water system is to be assumed by the Parent-Teachers' Society. I understand that the society is to have a stand on the ground where there will be a supply of soft drinks, nuts, candies, etc., to satisfy those who desire such things.
    Sunday evening Rev. Paul  S. Bandy, R. H. Parson and Dr. S. A. Mulkey of Central Point came out and organized an auxiliary unit to the Medford Red Cross society. Rev. Bandy opened the exercises by singing the national hymn, "The Star Spangled Banner," followed by prayer. He then read and commented on the fifteenth chapter of I Cor., giving us a short talk on the object of the Red Cross movement. He then introduced Mr. Parson who explained more fully the object of the meeting, viz: to obtain new members to the society and raise funds to relieve the suffering of the sick and wounded among the soldiers. The church building was well filled, as almost every seat was occupied, and the result was the enrollment of forty new members. Dr. W. W. P. Holt was elected as president, Miss Minnie Taylor, secretary; Y. V. McIntyre, treasurer and Mrs. Carl Narregan, director. After the close of the services Rev. Bandy agreed to come out again next Sunday night, April 15, and preach for us.
    Monday morning W. E. Hammel, Orville Childreth, Royal G. Brown and Lyle Purdin took Lewis' jitney to Medford.
    J. W. Wakefield of Medford and W. A. Williams of Portland, two insurance men, E. A. Evanson and Frank Isaacs of Medford, W. C. Clements and wife and Mr. McDonald, who is foreman on the Rhodes farm, were here for dinner.
    When the P.&E. train pulled in among the passengers were J. J. Good of Derby, O. Adams of Butte Falls, Miss Mina Minter of Eagle Point, Mrs. C. L. Farrar of Lake Creek. Mrs. F. came to the Sunnyside for early dinner and took the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage for her home. She had been out to Medford spending a few days in the city.
    Mrs. J. Ragsdale and son, G. W. Frey and wife, E. A. Evanson and Frank Isaacs were also here for dinner Tuesday. The last two named are working in Mr. Evans' orchard cutting out blight. Mrs. Ragsdale was on her way to Medford.
    John Allen and Fred Kelso of Derby had a car each of hay go up Tuesday and there were two smaller lots came to Eagle Point, one for Ben Brophy and the other for George Austin, our Eagle Point-Climax mail carrier.
    R. F. Ogden, representing the U.S. Steel Corporation, was here for dinner Wednesday, and so was Dr. C. E. McDonald and his brother, W. G. McDonald of Trail, the latter the owner of the Elk Resort at the mouth of Elk Creek, and L. L. Anderson, also of the Elk Creek fish hatchery, and Guy Cronk and wife of Medford, and a stranger whose name I did not get were here for dinner Wednesday.
    I omitted to state in tie proper place that Jud Edsall and myself started for Medford Monday afternoon and just as we were starting Mr. McDonald, the foreman of the Rhodes farm, came and secured passage to Medford and just as we were passing the house on the Roguelands demonstration farm Mrs. C. J. Dutton came out and secured a seat in the car and went to Medford, returning via the same route.

Medford Mail Tribune,
April 13, 1917, page 5



Trail Items
    Mrs. Cora Trail is visiting at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Hall.
    Mr. and Mrs. Rufus Trusty, of Weed, Calif, are visiting at Persist.
    Mr. Clarence Middlebusher made a trip to the valley on business this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Zimmerlee have moved to Phoenix.
    Mrs. Nat Slusser, who has been ill for the past two weeks, is improving.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tom Gaines went to the valley last week.
    We are sorry to hear of the death of Mrs. [Sarah] Gobie Fry of Medford. Our heartfelt sympathy is with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Croft, of this vicinity.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 13, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When the P.&E. train went through here last Thursday there was a small lot of hay shipped from here to Derby for the Stanley Bros.
    James Owens of Wellen, one of our ex-county commissioners; A. B. Zimmerman, formerly one of our Eagle Point merchants, but now located on a ranch some ten miles northeast of Butte Falls; Mrs. Frank Abbott, Allison Allen of Oakland, Cal.; his niece, Miss Agnes Allen, of Derby, and E. M. Koenig of Derby were passengers on the car for Derby and Butte Falls, besides Lee Farlow and wife of Lake Creek, who took the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage here.
    Corbett and Polk Smith of Butte Falls were here visiting William Perry and family, and they took passage on the P.&E. for their homes Thursday.
    C. E. Austin of Climax, father of George Austin, the mail contractor, was here visiting his son Thursday, and took a small load of baled hay up to his place for his son George.
    Mrs. Henry Meyer and son, who have been in Medford visiting an older son, who is attending high school, came out Thursday.
    John Iseli, who has a farm and a fine body of timber on the north side of Round Top, came out Thursday, attended the I.O.O.F. lodge meeting and was a guest at the Sunnyside that night.
    Mrs. Rosetta Potter, the Eagle Point milliner, has just received a fine assortment of ladies' and children's hats.--Adv.
    Mrs. M. E. Goss came out from her home in Butte Falls and spent a couple of days with Mrs. William Perry and while here attended the meeting of the school board that met Friday night, returning to Butte Falls Saturday morning.
    There was a party of five passed through here Friday morning. Three men and two ladies, who reside northwest of Gold Hill, went up on the desert to gather agates. Well, after spending the day in that work they started for their homes in high spirits, and just as they began to move something gave way with a snap, and on examination found that an axle was broke, and they with about a hundred pounds of agates, their lunch box, wraps, etc. They felt that they were in a box, for go home they must, so they finally decided to start on foot, but when they reached Eagle Point they secured the services of Rob Harnish with his Ford to pull the car in, and took it to E. Hurd's repair shop, and he soon had the cause of the trouble discovered. The end of one of the axles broke off, so the only thing to do was to leave the car here and start for home, so still holding on to Rob, they were soon on their way to Central Point, where they could catch No. 16 and go to their homes. They had a fine assortment of agates and, barring the mishap, had a lovely time. They promised to come back this summer and camp near the Sunnyside Hotel, where they can get a square meal occasionally. One of the party has been here before, but for fear his grandchildren will laugh on account of their troubles, I suppress the names, hoping that the next time they come they will not be so unfortunate as to break down.
    While I was standing in front of the post office Friday afternoon waiting for the evening mail and just as Mr. Harnish was bringing the mail sacks out of the post office door, the team started to run, taking a turn around the corner up Main street, aimed to turn into the barn by the Farmers' Hotel, then collided with a telephone pole, cutting one of the horse's mouths quite badly and demolishing the dray, breaking the front axle, doubletree, crossbar and hames and the tongue and tearing things up generally, and almost stripped the harness off one of the horses. There is no ordinance in this city against leaving teams standing untied on the street, but there probably will be in the near future. If there had been small children on the street at the time they might have been run over and badly hurt.
    There was another meeting of the school board here Friday night, and Mrs. L. K. Haak, acting chairman of the board, called me on the phone this afternoon (Saturday) and told me that they had elected Professor B. F. Nibret as principal and Mrs. M. E. Goss as intermediate teacher, at a salary of $90 for the principal and for intermediate $85 a month. The board has not decided on who will be the primary teacher. They had about decided on who we would have for that position, but the lady was called away on account of sickness.
    The P.&E. brought in a large lot of freight Saturday morning for our merchants. Geo. Brown & Sons had a lot of groceries, von der Hellen hardware; our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, iron and steel, horse nails, etc.; T. E. Nichols, general merchandise, etc., besides a lot of miscellaneous goods for other people. They took up a carload of crushed rock and gravel to be used on the fish hatchery. The superintendent of the fish hatchery at Butte Falls was on board the train, and so was J. E. Nordstrom, chief quartermaster, U.S.N. He was going up to enlist recruits for the U.S.N. in Butte Falls. S. M. Hawk and wife of Butte Falls and M. J. Clifford of Medford came out and went up to Lake Creek to look after property there.
    N. W. Slusser, who has had to close his barber shop for a few days, has returned and reopened and is again taking his meals at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Petty, who is farming the Thomas M. Riley place, was a business caller Saturday.
    Since my last report, William Perry has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 17, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    One of the party mentioned in my last as an agate hunter, who had to leave his car for repairs, returned Saturday, spent the night with us and Sunday took his car home all O.K.
    There was a dance here Saturday night, but the attendance was not as good as might be desired.
    Among the guests here Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Wamsley, Mr. and Mrs. W. O. Wheeler, Dr. Holt, Frank Smith, Percy and Glen Haley, Chas. Clark, Carl Ringer, Joe Moomaw and Rev. Paul L. Bandy of Central Point. Rev. Bandy preached for us Sunday night to a good congregation and left an appointment to preach regularly every Sunday evening until further notice at 8 o'clock.
    Henry Wendt, formerly of Jacksonville, but now of New Pine Creek, Or., and his brother Chester of Jacksonville were here for early dinner, as Henry Wendt wished to take the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage for Mrs. Nussbaum's, his mother-in-law, and Chester returned to Jacksonville. Mrs. John Ragsdale of Lake Creek was with us at the same time and went up home on the stage.
    Floyd Jennings of Medford was out Monday posting tobacco ads for Klum Advertising agency.
    If I can read the signs correctly, Deputy Assessor G. H. Wamsley is liable to find some of the hidden wealth that some of the taxpayers refuse to give in, so those who refuse to give in their assessment correctly had better be a little careful about what they give in.
    Mrs. Harvey Stanley was shopping in our town Monday afternoon and visiting with her sister, Mrs. Roy Ashpole, the wife of one of our hardware merchants.
    Amos Ayres, wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. J. H. Trusty of Elk Creek, were among the guests here Monday evening for supper and visited until bed time.
    W. O. Wheeler, the principal, and his wife, who has charge of the primary department, are taking their evening meals at the Sunnyside. He informs me that they are engaged to teach as principal and primary teachers in the Talent school, where they taught together for four years, and Mrs. Wheeler taught one year before they taught together, and now to be called back to the old stand speaks well for them as instructors.
    Mrs. Ida Magerle of Rogue River has been up here visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank Lewis, and her mother, Mrs. Isabel Heckathorn.
    Messrs. S. S. Bullis and Fred Cummings came out on the P.&E. Tuesday on their way to the big timber. Mr. Bullis was going up to arrange to bring out a large donkey engine he had purchased of Edgar Hafer. He says that he is going to draw in logs for his mill near Medford. Lucius Kincaid of Prospect, the mighty panther hunter, was also on the train, beside ten others, all strangers. The same train brought out a lot of hay for George Austin, the mail contractor, between. here and Climax; Mrs. F. T. Newport, wife of the Medford depot agent for the P.&E., and her daughter, Lucille. There was also a large lot of miscellaneous goods came out for our merchants.

    Mrs. Irving Daley and her daughter, Miss Venita, came out on the Lake Creek stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the train.
    Alex. Vestal, Henry French, Perry Foster, F. J. Ayres and wife, Mr. Weaver of Butte Falls, O. Adams of Butte Falls, Carl von der Hellen and wife were doing business in town on Tuesday. 
    Mr. Edington, superintendent on the Corbin orchard for Henry Von Hoevenburg, who has it leased, was hauling hay through town from the Walch farm, on Antelope Creek. They had four very large horses. There was about three-quarters of a ton of loose hay on the wagon, and Percy Haley, who was driving the team, said that it was about all that they could do to get out with that, for the roads are so bad.
    Our M.D., W. W. P. Holt, predicts that it will not be long until we have peace again, for he reports the birth of a girl baby in the family of Carl Jackson, born April 17, and on the morning of the 18th another girl baby to Mr. and Mrs. Richard Muskopf. Carl Jackson lives in Butte Falls and Mr. Muskopf lives near McLeod, but the two girls were born here in Eagle Point.
    Mrs. Clay Cole, wife of the engine¢r on the P.&E., and son, A. E. Bass, and two strangers came out on the P.&E. motor car Wednesday morning. Mr. Bass had a few walnut trees to set out on his little orchard.
    S. F. Spencer and T. L. Walker of Butte Falls came out Wednesday forenoon, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to visit Mr. Spencer's brother, Jay.
    Rudolph and Fritz Pech of Lake Creek were diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday noon, and so was Dr. Holt. While Mrs. Holt is away in Oakland, Cal., the doctor takes most of his meals with Mother Howlett.
    P. F. Anderson, deputy sheriff, and wife called for late dinner Wednesday on their way to the Debenger Gap section. When told of the condition of the roads he hesitated quite a while about undertaking the trip with a car, but finally decided to make the venture.
    We have had no rain for nearly two days, and the farmers are correspondingly happy.
    Since my last report, Mrs. Rosetta Potter has renewed her subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 19, 1917, page 5


Trail Items
    Mr. H. Foster of the forest service office in Medford gave an illustrated lecture at Ash's hall Friday night. He explained the work which his department is carrying on and emphasized the prevention of forest fires. A large number attended the lecture and enjoyed it very much.
    Mr. Clarence Middlebusher went to Central Point Saturday morning to bring back his mother, who has been visiting there.
    Mrs. Tom Gaines came down to attend the lecture Friday night.
    Mr. Will Houston went to the valley to buy hay this week.
    Mr. Roy Willits stopped here Friday night on his way home from the valley.
    We are all glad to see the sunshine again. The roads are beginning to dry and three cars have been able to get up here.
    Mr. Pence, the road supervisor, has begun to drag the roads.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. A. Weideman, who is one of our enterprising German-American citizens, was in town Thursday and while here renewed his subscription to the W.M.T.
    George Stowell was getting lumber Thursday to build a flume to use on his new ditch he has built this past winter.
    Rev. Smith, the Baptist S.S. evangelist, was on Tuesday's train on his way to Derby.
    Miss Rosetta Potter, the Eagle [Point] milliner, has just received a fine assortment of ladies' and children's hats.--Adv.
    F. J. Ayres and wife went to Medford Wednesday, returning Thursday on the train.
    County Surveyor Brown was an eastbound passenger on the Thursday train.
    The Snowy Butte mill shipped one hundred barrels of flour Thursday to Medford.
    W. T. Moore, who has been spending the winter with his children in Central Point, is now making his home with his daughter, Mrs. David Cingcade, of this place.
    Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer, Jr., of L.C. brought out five large dressed hogs and shipped them to Ashpole and Nichols, Medford.
    School Supervisor Peterson was out visiting our school Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    C. L. Farrar of L.C. was a business visitor Thursday.  
    The ladies of the Red Cross Society of E.P., met in Brown's hall Thursday afternoon and took their first lesson, under the direction of Mrs. Carl Narregan, the R.C. director, is making bandages for the wounded soldiers. They intend to meet every week and continue the work of preparing for the worst. We have a noble set of patriotic ladies in our community. The real red-blooded kind.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nygren and their daughter, Miss Anna, came out and took the train for Medford Thursday.
    Allison Allen, of Oakland, Cal., a brother of John Allen, of Derby, who has been up visiting his brother John, came out on the train and spent the night with his old friend, F. M. Stewart.
    Fred Cummings, county supt. of the water system, who went up beyond Butte Falls Tuesday, returned Thursday. Jack Tungate, of Butte Falls, was on the train on his way to Jacksonville to visit his parents.
    Thursday afternoon there were three men came in a Ford, and were met by C. H. Terrill of Brownsboro, and the four proceeded to the bank. They were soon joined by George Brown and wife, Delbert W. Meyer, Mrs. Hessler, Mrs. H. L. Young and Manley Conley, all of Brownsboro. They were transacting some kind of a deal, but the nature of the deal I am unable at this time to publish, but will have more to say on this subject in a short time. Eagle Point is coming to the front.
    Delbert W. Meyer, of Brownsboro, has sold his farm to Lee Bradshaw and intends to move onto an island off the coast of British Columbia.
    A. C. Bishop, who is an owner in an orchard west of here, was buying supplies in our town and as he came out of Geo. Brown and Son's store he showed me a little strip of bacon and remarked that there was a dollar's worth of bacon, and still going up higher.
    R. G. Brown, of the firm of Geo. B. & Sons, had a lot of lumber taken to his place Thursday to have built a scratching floor for his hens. He says that he is preparing to produce his own eggs. Everybody is waking up to the fact that we must produce more and waste less. One of our enterprising business men has rented a lot, one that is not occupied, and is planting it to spuds.
    Mrs. Frank Abbott, who has been up to Butte Falls visiting her mother-in-law, returned Thursday.
    W. G. Young, who is traveling in the interest of the Morning Oregonian, was here Friday to appoint another agent. While here he called on your correspondent, took dinner and spent quite a while visiting with us.
    Miss Bermuda Lewis, daughter of our confectionery man, Frank Lewis, is visiting her sister, Mrs. Chauncey Florey, wife of our county recorder, in Jacksonville.
    J. W. Martindale, traveling auditor of the Wells Fargo Co., spent Friday night with us.
    Roy Ashpole, our hardware merchant, bought a lot of hides Friday of Roland Mathews and shipped them to Medford.
    John Minter was among the business callers Friday.  
    Fred Frideger of Medford, who owns a twenty-acre orchard in the edge of town, came out on the train Saturday to work in his orchard.
    Jack Tungate of B.F. and G. N. Birkland were on the eastbound train Saturday. The latter is with Failing 
McCalman Co., Portland. He was among the diners at the Sunnyside and so was Mike Sidley and his sister, Julia, and Mrs. C. L. Farrar, all of L.C.
    Joe Haskins of Trail had a lot of wire fencing come out on the P.&E. Saturday morning and Marsh Garrett of L.C. had a lot of hay on the same car.
    There was also a lot of hay on the train for Butte Falls, but I did not learn who it was for.
    Since my last, beside Mr. Weideman, D. S. Nichols has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    There is a move on foot to have the managers of the P.&E.R. run a special train on the third of May, the day of the track meet in Eagle Point from here to Butte Falls. To have the train go to Butte Falls on Wednesday eve spend the night there, start Thursday morning at 6:30, bring those who wish to come from there to E.P., returning at twelve, midnight. I was talking with the manager, Mr. Johnson, on the subject and he seemed to think that it could be done for about one hundred dollars, so let those who are interested in the matter take notice.
    W. Hart Hamilton lost a fine Jersey heifer a day or two ago. Could not account for the cause.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1917, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt reports that there was born to Mr. and Mrs. E. Hurd, April 22, a son.
    Sunday morning broke clear and pleasant and the change in the weather made us feel as though we were once more living in the Italy of Oregon, and it cheered the hearts of the lovers of nature to sec the blooming of the fruit trees, the flowers and the renewed signs of vegetable life after an unusually long, tedious, disagreeable winter and spring. Among those who took advantage of the lovely spell of weather and came to Sunnyside for their lunch or dinner were Wm. von der Hellen, wife and two children, Dr. Holt, Jay Spitzer, Percy Haley, Thomas Stanley and wife, Guy Pruett, J. W. Smith and wife.
    Rev. Paul S. Bandy, the pastor of the Presbyterian church in Central Point, came out and preached for us again Sunday evening to an unusually large congregation. He remarked that it was the largest one he had addressed for some time. After he had the song and prayer service and read his scripture lesson from the thirteenth chapter of Romans, he remarked that he had forgotten his sermon when he left home; he had left it there, and I heard several remark after he had preached that they thought that it would be well for him to forget his sermons every time, as the one he had just preached was good enough for them. He will preach here again next Sunday night, and we speak for him a good crowd.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been working in the logging camp at Weed, Calif., returned to his room at the Sunnyside Monday.
    P. E. Brittsan, who is on the P. S. Anderson farm on Rogue River above here, was a caller for dinner Monday and so was Ray Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants. His wife had gone over to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Rader. Mrs. Irvin Daley and her daughter, Miss Venita, dinner at the S.S.
    Art Smith, who owns and operates a farm on Big Sticky, was also a caller Monday noon.
    Corbin Edgell, owner of a fine orchard joining the A. Corbin orchard, who has been spending the winter in Denver, Colo., returned last Monday and among the first things he did was to renew his sub. to the D.M.T.
    Irvin Culbertson brought out two traveling men Monday afternoon; they were interviewing our hardware men.
    E. Hurd has gone to Portland to take an examination in the engineering service of the U.S.
    Dan Fellows, Lewis Marks and John Cooper of Trail came in Tuesday morning with about one hundred pounds of mohair and sold it to Geo. Brown & Sons at seventy cents a pound. They also brought in four beef hides and nineteen goat pelts and sold them to Roy Ashpole.
    A large lot of hay came in on the car Tuesday for C. A. Newstrom of L.C. and a lot more for Derby and Butte Falls. The local hay barns in this section have been empty of hay for some time and now the farmers have to ship in hay to do their spring work.
    A quantity of household furniture came in on the S.P. Tuesday for E. W. Lewis and was unloaded here.
    John Minter and his sister, Mrs. Clearwater, started for the Willamette Valley near Portland.
    C. Edgell made a business trip to Medford Tuesday afternoon.
    Born to the wife of our depot agent, Amos Ayres, April 24, a boy; mother and child are all O.K., but I don't know so well about Amos, now that he is [a] daddy, but we hope he will live through it. This is the fourth birth reported by Dr. Holt in one week. If every little community in the county will do that well the losses by war will soon be restored.
    Tuesday morning our daughter, Hattie, went out to Klamath Falls to spend a few days, and then she will go on out to Fort Klamath to visit her sister, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt.
    Jud Edsall and John Foster took their sheep from here to the Edsall ranch near Butte Falls, Tuesday.
    Tuesday afternoon I took a trip over to Central Point with Dr. Holt, who was called to see George W. Beale, who has been complaining for some time.
    Geo. W. Frey of L.C. was a passenger to Medford Tuesday on the P.&E.
    Shorty Miles and W. E. Fansher were here Tuesday selling the Chevrolet auto. They were having considerable success, as they say they have sold four in this section.
    Frank Abbott lost one of his work mares this Wednesday morning. Sherwood Hamilton was driving the team in the field scattering land plaster when the team stopped and one [omission]
    John Rader was a pleasant caller this afternoon and while here dropped the W.M.T.
and paid a year's sub. to the D.M.T.
    Since my last writing Corbin Edgell and Luis Van Scoy have paid subscriptions for the D.M.T. H. S. Meyer has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and W. D. Roberts has given me an ad for the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. H. Lauer, of Colorado Springs, Colo., spent Wednesday night with us he was on his way up to Lake Creek to inspect a timber claim that he had traded for in that section of the country.
    J. A. Moore, who is in the U.S. land department service, was on the P.&E. train Thursday on his way to Butte Falls.
    E. R. Peterson, one of the school supervisors, was here visiting our school and took supper at the Sunnyside, going on to Butte Falls on the train Thursday morning.
    W. McDonald, a traveling salesman for the American Tobacco Company, was here Thursday.
    A. H. Peachey of Ashland spent Thursday night with us and Friday was met here by his daughter, Miss Nell, who is teaching in the Antelope district. She went home with him.
    W. C. Pool and Henry French were among the business callers Thursday. Henry came in to deliver his week's supply of cream.
    W. D. Roberts, who is on the old Joe Rader place, brought in two loads of barley to the mill for George Brown & Sons Thursday.
    I am inclined to think that we are going to have an improvement in our roads out in this section of the county as a large lot of metallic culverts have gone through here on the P.&E. lately for the upper county.
    Marian Trusty came out from Elk Creek with his brother, Henry, the mail contractor, and the next day took the mail up to Trail and Persist and his brother went on to Medford. Mrs. J. H. Trusty, mother to the two men mentioned and Mrs. A. T. Poole, wife of one of the Trail Creek forest rangers, were passengers on the stage with him.
    Ralph Stanley of Butte Falls was among the business callers Friday and while here gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    E. H. Hurd, one of the Medford attorneys, came out Friday morning on the P.&E. and went directly to the Sunnyside, having notified those in this division, who are expecting to borrow money from the federal land board, to meet him there. There was only a very small number responded as since the change in the weather and the warm sunshine the farmers are very busy trying to put in their spring crops. Several responded to the call over the phone, promising to be on hand today, Saturday. Among those who came in Friday afternoon was John Butler and he signed up for what he wants to ease his burden.
    Mrs. Joe Riley (Elsie Riley) came in but as there was no particular rush for the money and Mr. Hurd only had a limited number of blanks, he postponed the matter until later in the season. While Mr. and Mrs. Riley were here Mrs. Riley paid me five dollars sub. to the D.M.T. for her son, J. M. Riley.
    Mrs. C. A. Farrar of Lake Creek also was a passenger on the P.&E. Friday morning and after taking an early dinner at the S.S., took the E.P.&L.C. stage for her her home.
    J. W. Wolfard, representing J. K. Gill Co., Portland, Gus Ditsworth and Thomas Long were among the diners Friday and Mr. J. Cobleigh and his son Carl, and Fred Frideger spent the night with us.
    The three teachers, the children and a number of the patrons and friends of the school are bending every nerve to try to make the Community Day and school track meet if possible better than it was last year. They are expecting to have a larger number this year than last and are preparing to try to hold the silver cup that was donated by the Eagle Point State Bank that they won last year. So it would be well for those who contemplate striving for it to get right in at work or the E.P. school will win out again.
    Quite a number of our citizens went to Medford Friday night to participate in the reception given Company Seven, Coast Artillery Corps, as a number of our young men joined that company.
    Mrs. C. H. Peelor, Mrs. Maud H. McDonald and E. A. Hildreth and son were on the P.&E. Saturday morning on their way to their homes at Butte Falls. Mrs. Peelor had been in Medford to see her little grandson, born April 26, 1917, in the hospital, to Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Morris, of B.F.
    J. A. Vaughn of Peyton was a business caller Saturday. He was at the depot for a load of spray dip for H. C. Carlton, to be used on the old Fred and Charley Lewis orchard near Wellen. Mr. Koenig of Derby was also on the train. He had been to Medford to dispose of the product of his and Mr. Hall's mill near Derby.
    Truman (Buster) McClelland, our boy boarder, went to Medford Friday afternoon, returning Saturday morning in company with Ralph Turpin, of Medford, and the two little boys had [omission]
    George Stowell was one of the men who came in to take advantage of the federal land loan act Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1917, page 5


Trail Items
    A dance will be given at Ash's hall Saturday night, May 5.
    Miss Lee Middlebusher has gone to Portland to spend a few weeks.
    Mrs. J. Zimmerlee was the guest of Mrs. Middlebusher for a few days last week.
    The Trail school spelled against the Central school one day last week, the latter winning the honors. Both of these schools are doing fine work in spelling.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Craft visited relatives near Trail Sunday.
    The roads are quite good now, and cars are coming up from the valley every day.
    Mrs. Middlebusher has recently purchased a Ford truck, and expects to have it here soon.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 2, 1917, page 2


Reese Creek Riplets
    The snows are melting in the mountains and causing the river to rise so high the stage could not ferry across all last week, making it inconvenient for the people on this end of the route to get their mail.
    Everyone has been busy the last week working in their fields, gardens, orchards, raising chickens, etc., trying to do their share for Uncle Sam.
    The rain Monday was a benefit to the seeds already in the ground.
    Marshall Minter and W. E. Hammel were in Medford Saturday on business.
    Miss Anna Robertson, who has been in Medford the past year, has returned home for the summer.
    Last Friday being the last day of the Brownsboro school, they gave an entertainment in the evening; a number from Reese Creek attended.
    Last Sunday afternoon Mr. R. J. Brittsan preached at the school house. He will also preach again next Sunday afternoon.
    Miss Lola Hudson, the teacher at Reese Creek, visited at the home of W. H. Crandall one evening last week.
    The Reese Creek and Brownsboro schools united and had a picnic Sunday at Mr. Bellows' grove on the river. There was a large crowd. The dinner was good and there was plenty of it, which is one of the main features of a picnic. There were running races, potato races and diversities of ways of enjoyment.
    Sunday afternoon after returning from a walk through the fields with his son, George, old Mr. Fisher dropped from a paralytic stroke. Dr. Kirchgessner was called. Monday morning he was reported as being able to be up and eat breakfast.
    R. R. Minter, who left some time ago to drive through to Coos Bay, arrived there all right and liked it fine, but reported being in some storms and that the roads were very bad through the Coast Range.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 2, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon about fifteen of those who are interested in the establishment of an auxiliary branch of the federal loan bank met at the Sunnyside Hotel and proceeded to perfect the organization by electing L. K. Haak as permanent president; H. L. Young as vice president; E. H. Hurd as secretary-treasurer and L. K. Haak, George E. Stowell, Jud E. Edsall, C. L. Farrar, E. W. Frey and H. L. Young as the board of directors. They then proceeded to decide on the business of the district and the name. The name adopted was the Eagle Point Federal National Land Association. They then named George E. Stowell, Jud E. Edsall and L. C. Farrar as the board of land examiners with Mr. Swan Bergquist and Ed. Frey as alternates. There were a few who finished out their applications for loans but the meeting seemed to be more for the purpose of perfecting the organization than to finish up the applications. There is quite a number who are applying to the association for money to improve and stock up their places, that are not in such close financial strain as to be forced to borrow money to pay old debts; some want to stock up with dairy cows, while others want to fence more land and a few take advantage of the low rate of interest to pay off the old 8 or 10 percent mortgage. The federal loan association proposes to lend on long time from 5 to 20 years, and have easy payments made every year with the privilege of paying off both principal and interest at any regular stated time. There will be another meeting here in the near future on the call of the president.
    Among the callers here Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. F. J. McPherson and son, George von der Hellen and family, W. O. Wheeler and wife, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Wamsley and three strangers.
    County Commissioner George Owen was out looking after the road work in this section. He started up to the Lake Creek country but learned that the mud was so bad that he could not get through with his car. He and Wm. von der Hellen took dinner together at the Sunnyside.
    A. E. LaPonte, manager of the I.X.L. monument works, Central Point, was a business caller Monday at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Rosetta Potter, the Eagle Point milliner, has a fine assortment of ladies' hats and trimmings.--Adv.
    Mrs. Wilbur Ashpole was out visiting her brother-in-law, Ray Ashpole, and family.
    Stanley Spencer of Butte Falls, who has been out in the valley visiting his brother, Ray, spent Monday night with us and Tuesday morning took the P.&E. for Butte Falls.
    N. C. Maris, district leader in [the] food preparedness campaign, under the direction of Dr. W. J. Kerr, president, came out Tuesday and met the members of the various clubs in Barron's hall and gave us a very interesting talk on the subject.
    John Rader and wife were among the business callers Tuesday. They brought in their can of cream for shipment on the P.&E.
    Mr. Peelor, L. Bassett, of Butte Falls, and Lee Edmondson and wife of Derby, and Jack Plymale and Otis Hubbard were among the passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday.
    R. S. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons had a car of wood brought from B.F. Tuesday. G.B.&S. shipped two crates of eggs Tuesday to Medford; they are shipping from 20 to [omission] crates a week now.
    Henry French and wife came in Tuesday to bring in their cream and other farm products. And so did E. C. Bellows and wife. Mrs. Graham came in with them.
    Carl von der Hellen and wife were business callers Tuesday.
    The ladies of the Eagle Point improvement club have donated thirty dollars cash to the Red Cross fund and shipped 3,047 pounds of paper to Medford, the proceeds from the sale to be applied to the same fund, and they are gathering all the old books and papers and magazines they can to send, and anyone who has any to donate will take them to George Brown & Sons' store and the stuff will be forwarded by them.
    E. R. Peterson, our school supervisor, returned from Butte Falls Tuesday and took supper with W. O. Wheeler and wife at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Rufus Trusty and two children came in Tuesday evening from Elk Creek, where she had visited her father-in-law, J. H. Trusty, and spent the night with us. She is on her way to Klamath Falls to meet her husband, who has gone from Weed, California, where he has been working.
    J. C. Barnard, wife and daughter Miss Oneita, came in for late supper Tuesday evening. Mr. Barnard was here to meet the school board but there is.nothing done as yet definitely, so far as employing the teachers is concerned, as Prof. Nibret has decided not to accept the position of principal here.
    V. A. Heffner of Trail, the superintendent of the Elk Creek fish hatchery, came in Tuesday and spent the night with us and while here renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune, and since my last report L. K. Haak, E.P., Miss Frances Greb, E.P., C. S. Painter, W. H. Brown and Y. L. Brown have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Bert Higinbotham came out from his farm on Flounce Road and spent the night with us. He says that he has only lost two young calves this past winter and they died for want of milk as the cows did not have the milk to sustain them, but that he has fed a lot of hay and grain.
    F. J. Ross of Nevada and a young man by the name of Hatfield of Ashland came out on the P.&E. Wednesday morning and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for L.C.
    Our mayor and two of the city dads went to work Wednesday morning and repaired the floor on the footbridge, replacing an old plank that was badly shattered with a new one and renailed the floor, greatly improving the appearance of the bridge.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    N. F. Horn of Medford, agent for the Continental Tailors, Chicago, came out Thursday morning and took a room at the Sunnyside Hotel and during the day and Friday took several orders for suits. He remained until Saturday.
    W. C. Wheeler and wife, the principal and primary teacher in our school, were visited by Mrs. Emmit Busen of Talent, Mr. and Mrs. William Roberts of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Robinson of Talent. The last two named, Mr. and Mrs. Robinson, are the parents of Mrs. Wheeler. Mr. Frank Elliott, Miss Marian Shaw of Talent and Everett Busen, all of Talent. They are old friends and neighbors of Mr. and Mrs. Wheeler and took advantage of the opportunity to pay them a visit and enjoy the day during the track meet.
    On Wednesday the following young people came in from Butte Falls and took rooms at the Sunnyside: Misses Pearl L. Gould, Etta Stewart, Noma Stewart, Mildred Morris, Mable Johnson, Hulda Abbott, Mrs. Bernice Baker and Master Byron Stewart. There was a nice lot of boys out at the same time, but they camped instead of taking rooms. They were the teachers from the Butte Falls and Crater Lake districts who came out
to take part in the various exercises at the school grounds Thursday. There was a nice crowd of people
and everything passed off nicely; the day was an ideal one and the children from the various schools vied with each other in the contests for the prizes. The Butte Falls school outclassed the E.P. school but because they lacked in having the proper percentage of representatives they were ruled out. The roads are so
miserably bad between here and Butte Falls that it is with difficulty that one can get out and the result was
about the only way they could come was to walk, although the young ladies hired W. W. Parker to bring
them down as for as Brownsboro and they were met there by two autos, Dr. Holt and Mr. Wheeler meeting them and bringing them down and taking them back again to Brownsboro and Mr. Parker met them there and took them home Friday.
    There was a crowd estimated to be about 1,500 people. A picnic dinner was served in the park and quite a number had their lunch baskets along and about 250 or 300 took their meals at the Sunnyside. This includes those who came for the two meals, dinner and supper. At the dance there were sold 145 tickets at $1 each and the ladies who sold soft drinks, etc. netted $17. Taking everything into consideration, Thursday, May 3, 1917, will be a day long to be re membered by many of the school children in this part of the county.
    Gus and Fritz Pech of Lake Creek were among the business callers Friday.
    D. T. Lawton, who is in the employ of the state to look after the weights and measures, was with us Friday looking over the scales and measures among our business men; he found that Thomas E. Nichols had been giving a half pint of gasoline too much with each gallon he sold, so he regulated his gasoline pump but he generally found the scales correct.
    James Hartman, the bridge builder, was out Friday and while here he examined the wagon bridge and found that it was so near worn out that it was not worth repairing, so I suppose that we will have to have a new bridge built; this one was built in 1888, 29 years ago, although it has been repaired and is now considered safe for ordinary loads.
    Our town mayor, Mr. John Nichols, and wife, went to Medford Friday with his son-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Jack, in their new Chevrolet.
    Thomas Abbott, who is working for Gus Nichols on Salt Creek, came out and went to Medford some ten days ago and had an operation performed on his nose, returning Saturday. His mother, Mrs. M. L. Abbott, who has been staying with her son Frank and family for the past two weeks, returned to her home in Butte Falls Saturday.
    Mrs. Carl Jackson and her sister, Miss Bessie Chambers, who have been stopping with Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson for some time, returned to their home in Butte Falls Saturday.
    Miss Maud Merrill of Derby, who has been working in our town for the past winter, went up home Saturday on the P.&E.
    Our sheriff, Ralph G. Jennings, was a passenger on the P.&E. for Butte Falls Saturday morning.
    There was a car of crushed rock and sand sent to Butte Falls for Mr. Mills Saturday and on the same train there were five barrels of spray for Thomas Farlow of L.C.
    Mrs. Herman Meyer, Sr., wife of our mail contractor between E.P. and L.C., came out Saturday morning to interview our deputy assessor George H. Wamsley and try to straighten out the tax list on her property in Brownsboro. Mr. W. says that the lots are all disarranged and that a new plot will have to be made.
    There will be a dance given by the Red Cross Society for the benefit of the Red Cross May 12, 1917.
    Mrs. Al Mayfield is here visiting her sister, Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1917, page 6


Reese Creek Riplets
    At the field meeting at Eagle Point last week, Eagle Point school won the silver cup, but Reese Creek came in a close second. The games were all good and there was a large crowd. In the free-for-all in the afternoon several of the Reese Creek people won prizes. Among the successful ones were: Mrs. Gene Bellows in the women's running race; Edward Bellows in the crab race; Nye Mathews in the pie contest and Hattie Johnson won a prize or two.
    Reese Creek closed an eight months term of school last Friday.
    The boys are now enlisting in the corn fields.
    The farmers are late with their crop because of the late spring.
    The orchards have been beautiful the last week many of the trees were in full bloom and have the appearance of a good yield of fruit, if there is not a late frost
    Henry Trusty, the River Road and Trail route mail carrier, has been going in his car the past week. The autos have been traveling on the ferry road the last week or so.
    Chris Bergman, who was hurt a short time ago by his team while plowing, is getting all right again.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman called on Mrs. Roundtree one day last week, combining business with pleasure.
    Willard Robertson has something growing over one of his eyes. He with his sister, Miss Anna, went to Medford to consult a specialist.
    John A. Robertson and family of 
Eagle Point spent last Sunday at the home of his parents.
    Mrs. W. Sage, formerly Miss Rose Nealon, was at the field meet and went home with Mr. and Mrs. Ager and visited friends at Reese Creek for a few days. She expects to return to her home in Montana the first of June.
    Mr. Lewis, the sheep man, has bought the Finley place and expects to move soon.
    The Zundel boys have moved into the Watkins homestead house.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney is visiting her sister, Mrs. W. E. Hammel, this week.
    William Whitman, the Eagle Point barber, called on H. Watkins Sunday. Also the boys from the Riverside.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote last Saturday, I spoke of the grand time that we had at the track meet in Eagle Point but intentionally left out the most interesting part of the narrative because I didn't have a list of the names of the prize winners in the various contests, so will give a partial list of them at this time. The list embraces only those who are living here and are attending our school: First, Hazel McCaslin, second egg race cash prize, $1.50; second, Mary Boltz, first prize little girls' race prize candy maypole. The maypole consisted of a huge stick of candy two feet and ten inches long, nine inches in circumference and eight pounds, and the little girl almost fainted when one of the committee men grabbed her as she struck the tape line, she was so excited. Third, Eden Anderson, second prize little girls' race, cash 50 cents; fourth, Fay Terry, ladies' race, two-pound box of candy. Fifth, Fay Terry, third auto potato race, $2.00 mdse. Sixth, Mrs. W. O. Wheeler, our primary teacher, first auto egg race, $5.00 box candy. Seventh, Varian Jonas, second married ladies' race, $2.00 mdse. Ninth, Joyce von der Hellen, first race of girls under 12 years, cash prize, $1.50. Tenth, Mayma Winkle, second race for girls under 12 years of age, 50 cents. Eleventh, Ruth Grover, third prize box of candy. Twelfth, Glen Anderson, pie eating contest, prize $1.00 mdse. Thirteenth, Truman McClelland and Lyle Van Scoy, wheelbarrow race, a flashlight each, value $1.50. Fourteenth, Heath Childreth and Glen Anderson, second wheelbarrow race, but in the second Heath Childreth won a paperweight. This was nearly more sport among the children than among the older ones, although it was quite amusing to see such men as ex-County Commissioner James Owens pull in the tug of war contest and such athletes as Wm. von der Hellen and Dr. Holt enter the fat men's race, but it all made sport for the crowd.
    Miss Agnes Allen of Derby, who has been out visiting the Perry girls, called in company with the Perry girls Sunday afternoon on Mrs. Howlett.
    Among the Sunday diners at the Sunnyside were Jay Spitzer and A. V. Cummings and Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney, Mrs. A. Schmitt, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Budge, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Trowbridge and daughter Miss Florence Trowbridge of Medford, Judge and Mrs. Tou Velle, Mr. and Mrs. H. K. Hanna of Jacksonville, Frank Brown and wife, Al Clements, Harry Lewis, Noble Zimmerman, W. O. Wheeler and J. H. Carlson, one of the forest rangers in the employ of the U.S. He spent the night with us.
    Sunday evening when the church bell rang to notify the people of the town that it was time to go to church there was a good-sized audience gathered in the church to hear Rev. Bandy of Central Point preach, but when we reached the place found instead of Rev. Bandy, Mrs. E. S. Palmer and Miss Agnes Dunlap also of Central Point had come in his stead, as Mr. Bandy was called to attend the meeting of the Presbytery at Rogue River, and as he is the secretary, he thought that he had to be there. But we were not disappointed, for the two ladies conducted the services all O.K. Mrs. Palmer conducted the opening exercises and then Miss Dunlap gave us a very interesting discourse on the subject of "Who Is My Neighbor," that seemed to be highly appreciated by the most of the audience. Rev. Bandy expects to fill the pulpit next Sunday evening again as usual as it is understood that he will preach each Sunday night.
    Charles Mathews, a son of Ky Mathews, formerly of this place, came in from Montana the first of the week to visit friends and relatives.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Gardner of Lake Creek were in town Monday on business and while here Mrs. Gardner took dinner at the S.S. and gave me an ad for the Mail Tribune, offering two horses for sale.
    Lee Charley of Brownsboro was in town on business Monday having our auto machinist work on his auto.
    Irvin Bieberstedt of Lake Creek was doing business with our merchants Tuesday. He reports the snow seven feet deep at his place and eleven feet at the Blue Canyon.
    W. C. Daley was a business visitor Tuesday and while here renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. A. V. Cummings, the foreman at the Alta Vista orchard, also renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and A. M. Gay gave me his sub. to the D.M.T. and Louis Blass renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. since my last report.
    When the P.&E. train pulled in Tuesday the following named gentlemen were on. Messrs. E. S. Davis, Charles F. Russell, B. L. Mitts, E. L. Wilson and C. B. Calpins. They are all railroad men; Messrs. Davis and Russell are going over the road placing a valuation on the property, contrasting the first cost with its present valuation, and the other three are figuring on the cost of maintenance.
    E. D. Schrader of Antelope Creek came in Tuesday for late dinner. He had brought in his mohair to George Brown and Sons.
    James Vestal, one of our Eagle Point boys who is attending the O.A.C., Corvallis, came in Wednesday morning on the P.&E. and took the Moomaw stage for his father's on Reese Creek. He says that there is in the neighborhood of three hundred of the young men students in the college leaving to take practical lessons in agriculture among the farmers, going into the producing business instead of consuming all the time.
    D. S. Patrick of Brownsboro, called for dinner Wednesday and so did a stranger from Medford.
    George von der Hellen, one of our hardware merchants, left Wednesday morning for the officers training camp at the Presidio, San Francisco, California.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 14, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Lust week the road supervisor was out with the road scraper leveling down the roads, which had been quite rough from travel while muddy.
    James Vestal is home from the O.A.C.; came to help the boys on the farm.
    Mrs. H. Watkins visited in Medford one night last week.
    Miss Anna Robertson is in camp cooking for her brothers while they are putting in grain on John Winter's ranch. They expect to plow some for Mr. Dahack as soon as they are through with their own corn.
    Some have reported as having their corm all in.
    Sweet corn is peeping through the ground on some ranches.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Watkins called at Mr. Robertson's last week, Mr. Watkins on business.
    Lee Watkins of Medford bought about four tons of corn from J. L. Robertson and hauled it to Medford on his auto and truck. Lee Watkins has a feed store in Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bellows visited at Mr. Vestal's Sunday.
    Miss Ellen McCabe was at Mr. Winter's Sunday.
    Miss Mary Robertson is the champion chicken raiser; she has nearly three hundred little chicks already.
    Dick Johnson's family are living on Jeff's old place at present. They expect to move to their own place the first of June.
    There was Sunday school at Reese Creek last Sunday.

Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1917, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    M. L. Ericson, chief of the forest rangers, was a passenger on the P.&E. train on his way to Butte Falls Thursday and so was O. C. King and wife of Medford. Mrs. King came out to make a visit to Mrs. W. C. Clements, wife of our P.M. and principal owner of our telephone system.
    On the same train there was a lot of lumber came out for Mr. N. W. Slusser, our town barber. The party who owns the building he is now occupying has rented it to another party and he says that he will not be run out of town by a little thing like that, so [he] is building a house for himself, and the result will be a much neater building for a barber shop and in equally as good a location. The house will be ready for occupancy by the middle of the week.
    Mr. Stout, the boss bridge carpenter, brought out four men Thursday to work on the bridges and put in new metallic culverts along the R.R. between here and Butte Falls, and Mr. Vaughn, the section foreman, is doing quite a lot of repair work along the track.
    Among other goods for George Brown & Sons was about forty barrels of flour. People will eat if the price of flour and meat are out of the question when it comes to prices.
    Mrs. Huff, of Corvallis, Oregon, came in on the train Thursday to visit her daughter, Mrs. George von der Hellen. She will be a great deal of company now since her husband, Geo., has gone to the training camp in the Presidio.
    Miss Viola Hogan, who has been teaching up near McLeod, came out Thursday on the E.P.-Persist stage, took dinner with us and took the Lewis jitney for Medford the same day.
    John Rader was a business caller Thursday.
    Charles Clark, our meat market man, has bought himself an auto and removed the hind end of the bed and put in the place a neat meat box and is now traveling over the country supplying the farmers with meat.
    Frank Wilson and Antone Ring of Elk Creek were among the diners Friday.
    Some of our energetic young men are taking advantage of the times and are putting in corn, beans and potatoes to help feed the hungry the coming season. George H. Wehman, our harness maker, is putting in about twelve acres in beans and Noble Zimmerman is putting [in] three or four acres of spuds, and John W. Smith, our town carpenter, in putting in several acres of spuds, while others are putting
[in] corn and Thomas Lewis has in three acres of onions, so thus it goes. If the war does nothing more, it is stirring up the young folk to try to do something for themselves beside working for wages.
    Since George von der Hellen has gone to San Francisco to the officers' training school, as he was an important factor in the von der Hellen hdw. store, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen is being trained by her husband to partly fill his place.
    Prof. Jessie Buoy, the principal of the Butte Falls school, and Stanley Spencer, also of B.F., came in Thursday evening late for beds and the next morning took the Lewis jitney for Medford. Prof. Buoy had joined the U.S. service and was called to go to the officers training school at the Presidio, Cal.
    Fred Pelouze, wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. Ensign, New York City, were doing business with our merchants and blacksmith Friday.
    Mrs. J. Rigsby of Brownsboro was in town Friday having some repair work done on his spray pump and having his team shod by our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth.
    Florence Edler, formerly of Lake Creek, but now of Medford, was here for dinner Friday. She had been up in the L.C. country visiting her brothers and was on her way home.
    The Jackson Co. Creamery truck passed through here Saturday morning, returning in the afternoon. When the driver reached Frank Lewis' confectionery store he unloaded a hundred gallons of cream that he had collected on the route from Medford, including Table Rock, and then went load up Butte Creek, and then went on to Lake Creek and gathered on the trip one hundred and thirty-eight gallons of cream and while he was gone there was forty-three gallons brought in here, making a total of (281) two hundred and eighty-one gallons of cream and he estimated that the cream would yield three hundred and seventy-five pounds of butterfat and that was worth thirty-five cents a pound, making a total of one hundred and twenty-one dollars and twenty-five cents. The driver said that during the last sixteen days of April he gathered up cream to amount to $8,100.00 or over $6000 a month and that during this month he will gather more cream and pay out more money than that, and still some people will say that it don't pay to bother with cows, it is so much work.
    Mr. Anderson, the Standard Oil man of Medford, was on the train Saturday morning on his way to Butte Falls.
    Mrs. F. T. Newport, wife of the P.&E. Medford depot agent, came out and went on up the road to visit her parents, F. J. Ayres.
    E. H. Hurd, the federal loan hustler, came out and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for L.C. where he is to hold a meeting this Saturday p.m.
    There was a lot of hay on the train for the Nygren family of L.C.
    J. R. Harvey and Dr. J. F. Reddy were here for dinner Saturday and were making special inquiries with regard to the prospect for mineral up the Butte Creek and especially with regard to the cinnabar on the George B. Brown place.
    Born, May 11, to Mr. and Mrs. Arden Tyrrell, of Lake Creek, a daughter, reported by Dr. Wm. P. Holt.
    Rube Johnson and J. H. Hittson were among the business callers Saturday.
    Since my last report Floyd Pierce has renewed his sub. to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1917, page 3


Trail Items
    Mrs. John Winningham of Elk Creek has been seriously ill the past week.
    A great number of pioneers motored out from the valley Sunday, to enjoy the charms of the mountains.
    Dr. Pollenitz of Medford has been called out here several times during the past week.
    W. Bowne and E. Tumy were among the number of Medford people who motored out here Sunday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher has her new truck here now. Her sons were out trying the road Sunday.
    Miss Lee Middlebusher has returned from her trip to Portland.
    Bub Gage of Debenger Gap has gone to Weed, Calif.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 16, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Floyd Charley of Brownsboro came over Saturday afternoon to bring E. H. Howard to catch the P.&E. motor. He had been up to the Lake Creek schoolhouse to assist in the organization of a farmers' association. There was a good turnout and they are talking of reviving the grange again, as they begin to realize the necessity of cooperation.
    Mrs. Charles Painter went to Gold Hill Saturday to visit her daughter, Mrs. Wall, Sr.
    Last Saturday one of our accomplished young ladies, Miss Margaret Florey, was united in marriage to Raymond Peter at the Presbyterian parsonage in Ashland, and that takes from our midst one of the phone girls as well as one of the  post office clerks. She will be greatly missed by her many friends in and around Eagle Point.
    A meeting was held at the schoolhouse Saturday evening of those who were interested in the agricultural department. Owing to the heavy downpour of rain that evening at about 6 o'clock the attendance was not as large as was desired but those who were there seemed to take considerable interest in the subject and felt that the time had not been misspent. The president of the association, A. E. Strong, presided.
    There was also a dance given by the ladies of the Red Cross Society Saturday night, and the receipts of the evening amounted to $52. I am requested to announce that the managers of the society intend to give another dance on the night of June 3.
    Sunday we had about our usual number here for dinner but Sunday evening we had Mr. and Mrs. George Andrews of Medford and Rev. Paul Bandy and Dr. and Mrs. Mulkey of Central Point for supper. Rev. Bandy conducted the services at the church in the interest of the Y.M.C.A. and during the opening exercises Geo. Andrews sang Barbara Fredchia  ["Barbara Fritchie"?] and later in the evening he sang Mother o' Mine. During the discourse Rev. Bandy made an appeal to the citizens of Eagle Point for a subscription in behalf of the movement and had $59 subscribed besides the loose collection. At the close Mrs. Mulkey sang "The Star Spangled Banner" and was joined in with on the chorus by the congregation. The house was well filled. Rev. Bandy will preach again next Sunday at 8 p.m.
    Dr. Holt reports that Geo. Austin and wife are the proud parents of a five-pound boy, born Sunday, May 13, 1917.
    Sam Ashley came out Monday evening, took a room at the Sunnyside and the next morning started on for Medford. He says that he has entirely lost his hearing about three years ago.
    W. E. Hammond was a business caller Monday.
    Floyd Holman spent Monday night with us, arriving about midnight.
    Sergeant Bowers, U.S. army, came out on the P.&E. Tuesday on his way to Butte Falls. He said that his object was to see all the postmasters along the route on the subject of securing new recruits for the army.
    H. J. Eberly of Derby was also a passenger on the train.
    Miss Gertrude Thompson of Derby was also on the train on her way home. She had been out to Medford visiting her sister, Mrs. Earl.
    I noticed on the car a lot of new alfalfa hay for Derby.
    O. D. Spencer was with us for dinner Tuesday and took the Lewis jitney for Medford in the afternoon.
    F. L. Ayres and wife were shopping here Tuesday.
    C. B. Davis and Charles F. Russell, the two railroad men who are going over the Pacific and Eastern R.R. and as I understand are placing a valuation on the property, after wringing out the water, if there is any watered stock in the road, also ascertaining the first cost of the road, so as to see the depreciation in the valuation of the property.
    Our school closes on the 25th day of May.
    There are but few of the farmers coming into town these days as everyone that can work is busy putting in corn, beans and spuds.
    Since my last report, Pliney Leabo has renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    And our daughter, Hattie, who is visiting her sister, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, has her sub. to the D.M.T. commenced, as she is lost without the "Tribune."
    W. R. Coleman of Climax has renewed his sub. to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ruby Haley was shopping in our town Wednesday last.
    Wm. Holman of Climax was a pleasant caller Wednesday afternoon and while here renewed his sub. to the W.M.T. and the next day returned to his home. Mr. H. is the man who had his leg broken last winter in a runaway smashup and has been stopping in this section ever since.
    We now have two barber shops in our little village. Mr. Slusser has moved into his own shop and Wm. Whitman has opened up in the place that Mr. S. vacated. He is the man who has rented the old Farmers Hotel. He has given me his sub. to the D.M.T. before he opened the barber shop.
    On Thursday morning the P.&E. train arrived on time as usual and among the passengers was Mr. and Mrs. O. B. Morris and son, Mrs. H. O. Mills of Butte Falls. A. L. Cross, also of B.F., who had been out to Medford on special business and while there visited a tonsorial parlor and was relieved of his whiskers, greatly improving his appearance. George Lindley, vice-president of the Jackson County Bank, was also a passenger on the P.&E., also Lucius Kincaid the noted panther hunter of Prospect and John Greb, one of our citizens who has joined Co. 7 of the coast artillery Medford.
    Percy Boothby of Prospect came out Thursday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Margaret McQuiston, one of the enterprising teachers of Jackson County, came out from Medford Thursday evening on the P.&E. motor, went to the S.S. to spend the night and the next morning by six o'clock had secured a rig and driver, and was off for Lake Creek to look after business affairs before leaving for Los Angeles, Cal.
    Friday morning Mrs. Gus Nygren, widow of the late G. Nygren of Lake Creek and her children Frank, Carl, Alice, Anna and Eric came out from their home in time to catch the P.&E. motor, went to Medford and attended to their business, returning the same day.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. motor Friday morning was Ed Hadfield of Ashland. He was out here looking for a small tract of land to rent so he could add his mite to the supply of eatables.
    Fred Johnson, Glen Goodman [and] A. E. LaPonte of Central Point I.X.L. Monument Co. were passengers on the P.&E. the same morning and Mr. LaPonte to dinner at the S.S.
    Rob Pelouze, son of one of our enterprising farmers, who has made his mark in the world by his energy and perseverance, came up from the Stanford University to visit his parents before leaving with his company to go to join in the great struggle in France to try to secure the establishment of democracy in Europe. While here his many friends gave him a reception Saturday evening in the opera house. There were about fifty guests and they spent the evening in dancing and other ways of amusement.
    W. E. Hammel passed through our town in his new Chevrolet on his way toward Medford.
    W. F. Horn, agent for Continental Taylors, Chicago, Ill., came out from Medford Saturday morning and was busy all day. He put [up] the night with us at the S.S. Hotel. Among the other passengers on the P.&E. were George W. Baker and wife, the Butte Falls banker, E. R. Hildreth, the deputy assessor for that district, Mrs. Steve Bremble and H. M. McIntyre of Derby.
    There was a meting of the stockmen's association here Saturday afternoon and about all of the stockmen who belong to the association were here, but I was unavoidably hindered from attending the meeting and thus giving an account of whatever was done, but perhaps will give the names of the officers in my next. Among those who were with us at dinner was John Howard, C. Clark, Owen Wood, Gold Hill. Thomas Carlton and wife, Herbert Carlton, Mr. Gaines of Trail, Henry Meyer and wife, L.C., Roy Stanley and wife of Trail and O. V. Meyer of the A. W. Walker Auto Co., Medford.
    The Red Cross Society will give a dance on Saturday eve, June the second.
    There will be memorial exercises in the Sunday school next Sunday and at night conducted by Rev. Paul Bandy pastor of the Presbyterian church of Central Point at 8 o'clock sharp.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 22, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sunday morning broke on us bright and clear, and the result was that quite a number of those who could afford an auto took advantage of the weather and took a spin out of the cities into the country to get a breath of fresh air and in some instances spend a while angling in our beautiful Little Butte Creek for members of the finny tribe. Mr. and Mrs. Snider and daughter, the couple who furnish the Medford people milk, took a run from their home out to the Lake Creek country seeing the sights along the route, returning to the Sunnyside by 10:30 a.m. and on their arrival informed the hostess that they were blessed with a good appetite and that it was about as ravenous about that time as usual. When being informed that they would have to wait until 12:30 for dinner Mr. S. drew a long breath and said that he guessed that he could stand it to wait, but it was awful, but he did and by the time for him to begin to satisfy his appetite Mr. and Mrs. George H. Wamsley, Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Shorty Miles of Medford, he was out with a new Chevrolet car, Mrs. T. F. Boltz and her two children, Mary and Lour, E. S. Trowbridge, wife and daughter, Jay Spitzer, Orville Childreth, Percy Haley, W. O. Wheeler, and wife, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols and their grandchildren, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Abbott and their two children and Mr. N. F. Horn, who had spent Saturday night with us beside our regular boarders, and by the time they had all eaten the tables looked as though a cyclone had struck them. But they all seemed to enjoy themselves socially and seemed to be satisfied with their visit to the Sunnyside.
    W. D. Roberts has an ad in this issue of the D.M.T. for stock pasture.
    Fred Frye of Lake Creek came out on the P.&E. motor Monday morning and took an early dinner at the S.S., taking the L.C. stage for home.
    Mrs. Childreth and Mrs. Y. W. Grover started Monday morning for Eugene as delegates to the grand lodge of the I.O.O.F. and Rebekahs. W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, and J. W. Grover were chosen by the members of the I.O.O.F. lodge to go as representatives of the order, but Mr. Grover did not go until later in the week and Mr. Childreth could not go at all on account of the work in the shop.
    Mr. Eddington, the foreman on the Corbin orchard, was in town Tuesday and reports that the prospect for fruit is better than was anticipated. They are expecting a bumper crop.
    Mrs. S. M. Hawk and Mrs. Carl Cobleigh and her niece and nephew of B.F., E. H. Hurd of Medford and Miss Mae Wilson of Derby, Misses Mamie and Maud Smith of B.F., Misses Edythe and Cecile Creed of B.F. were on the train Tuesday on their way up the country. Mr. Hurd was going to Derby to get together those of the farmers in that section who wish to take advantage of the federal loan act, and have them decide if they will have a separate association there or go into the Eagle Point association.
    James Grieve, the hustler of Prospect, and Paul Peyton came in for dinner Tuesday. James had had his horses wander off and was looking for them. He heard of them near here and I suggested to him to put an ad in the Mail Tribune if he wanted to find them quick.
    I understand that Marian Trusty of Trail (Elk Creek) has joined the U.S. service to be a submarinable seaman. His brother, George, was here Tuesday morning for breakfast.
    W. S. Chapman of Lake Creek brought out two dressed veals and shipped them to Medford. He also brought out some homemade bacon and hams and sold them to George Brown & Sons. He went on to Medford on the train.
    Mrs. Jake Jonas and son started Tuesday for Lakeview to visit her mother, Mrs. Burns.
    Mr. Berrian was on the P.&E. on his way to Medford. He says that they have done considerable work on the B.F. fish hatchery but have been hindered on account of the snow and rain.
    Lee Edmondson and wife and Mr. Koenig of Derby were passengers also on the P.&E. for Medford Tuesday.
    Thomas Stanley and his brother-in-law, Guy Bruce, were doing business with Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, Tuesday.
    Alex A. Betz, one of our prosperous young farmers, was doing business in town Tuesday. He reports that he has his crop all in in good shape.
    John Quackenbush, formerly on the Corbin orchard, but now on his own place on the south side of the desert on Big Sticky, was a business visitor Tuesday.
    Tuesday night when Mrs. Howlett returned from the Rebekah lodge she found two young men in the sitting room--I had gone to bed--who gave their names as Elders Harry G. Erickson and W. Lavon Wright. They said that they were traveling missionaries representing the Church of Jesus Christ of the Latter Day Saints, 810 E. Madison Street, Portland, and that they had no money, but wanted to stay with us for the night, and perforce of habit she said all right. They inquired all about the different roads up toward B.F., Derby, Trail, Prospect, etc. It appears that the Mormon oligarchy is sending out their missionaries to try to convert us poor  heathen gentiles, for this is the second couple who have been here recently. They left their grips here and started out to canvass the lower end of the town Wednesday morning before starting for Butte Falls. They travel on foot and appear to depend on charity for food.
    Mrs. H. C. Rippy, nee Lottie Taylor, and little daughter of Portland are here visiting her mother, Mrs. R. G. Brown, and sister, Mrs. W. H. Brown and many friends in these parts.
    Aden Haselton, one of our high school pupils, had the misfortune to break his arm Tuesday night while trying to crank W. O. Wheeler's auto. I understand that it is broken in two places. Our M.D., Dr. Holt, was away so he was taken to a doctor in Medford to have the fractures reduced.
    Fred Dunlap and a stranger from Derby were here on business today, Wednesday.
----
    Wednesday evening Chris Beal of Central Point and George Sanders of McLeod came in and spent the night with us.
    Thursday morning when I met the P&E. train at the depot, Mrs. Ackerman and her son, Lyle, of Anson, Nebraska, and her mother, Mrs. M. A. Tambling of Lincoln, Nebraska, got off the train and Mrs. Ackerman and her son started out onto the desert to hunt for agates, while Mrs. Tambling, being most too aged and feeble to tramp so far, spent the time in reading and vicinity [sic] at the Sunnyside. The next day I met the three in Medford. Mr. A. told me that they had picked up quite a number of agates, but she did not know as to their value, but she was living in hopes that some of them would prove to be good.
    James S. Bailey and Mr. Irv Berrian, the superintendent of the U.S. fish hatchery, were on the train on their way to Butte Falls. Mr. Bailey had on board 650,000 trout eggs from the U.S. station at Grants Pass to be put in the hatchery at Butte Falls. J. W. Scott of Cherry Grove, Oregon, was on his way up to B.F. Lee Edmondson and wife were also on their return trip from Medford. Mr. Edmondson is the proprietor of the sawmill on Big Butte near Derby, and he tells me that he is still doing business at the same place getting out a fine lot of lumber.
    Mr. James Hartman, the boss bridge builder, and his three boys are putting in new timbers under the wagon bridge in our town. It was not considered perfectly safe, as some of the main posts had been in for about nine or ten years, and as a preventive of harm the county court ordered the repairing done, and now when Mr. Hartman gets through it will be safe with any ordinary load.
    John Allen and wife of Derby passed through here Thursday on their way to Medford. Mr. Allen is the man who had his leg broken some months ago and has been confined to the house most of the time since. I see that he still has to use his crutch, although he only uses one. He has had a long hard spell and his friends sympathize with him and his family in their troubles.
    Jay W. Grover, the delegate-elect to the I.O.O.F. grand lodge in Eugene, started Thursday for Eugene, returning Friday with his wife and Mrs. W. L. Childreth, the two delegates to the Rebekah lodge.
    George Brown & Sons are beginning to receive the spring clips of wool. When John Allen came in he brought his wool in to them and at the same time Mike Sidley of L.C. brought in his clip of wool, although, on account of the cold weather, the most of the sheepmen are waiting for a few days, so as to have the grease come out in the wool, as it will weigh more and is better fiber.
    E. S. Moston, who is living on the Thomas Riley orchard, was in town Saturday morning with his family, doing business with our merchants.
    While in Brown & Sons' store Saturday morning the subject of the production of eggs came up and R. G. Brown remarked that they had shipped more than twice as many eggs this spring as they ever have before, shipping an average of twelve crates a week for a long time.
    While talking with Mr. Brown Saturday morning the subject of road work came up and he said that he thought if a move was made to have all of the owners of autos including Fords for each one to put a team and men on the road between here and the Dead Indian Soda Springs for one day each to haul shale rock from the pit just this side of Brownsboro, that by that plan, especially if the county would do as much, that they could make a perfectly good road from here to the springs, for there are at least thirty-five or forty autos and Fords above here along the creek and he said that he was satisfied that the most of the owners of machines here in town would do their part. Let us put the ball in motion and agitate the subject at any rate.
    I was talking with one of the Central Point merchants Friday while there and he was rejoicing to think that the forest rangers had done so much work on the upper part of the road between here and the soda springs.
    In spite of the hard times and high cost of living I saw twenty-five barrels of flour unloaded and five or six cases of canned lard and several sacks of beans unloaded at the depot Saturday morning off the cars.
    Among the callers Saturday noon at the Sunnyside were John Winningham, Mrs. E. P. Miller, J. G. Miller of Trail, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rader, Mrs. Burdette Dodge, Mr. Howard, Capital Insurance Investments, Mr. R. S. Hoagland, capitalist, Los Angeles, California Insurance Investments, Mr. T. H. Miles, attorney, Medford, Mr. J. W. Dressler, real estate, Medford, Gus Lovegren, U.S. inspector of the general land office, Mr. and Mrs. H. P. Burleson and daughter, Miss Blanche Burleson. They were on the way to Medford with their daughter, Miss Blanche, to perform an operation on one of her legs far an abscess of tuberculosis of the bone, our M.D., Dr. Holt, in charge. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Farlow and Anton Meyer, all of Lake Creek.
    I omitted saying anything about who went to the track meet at Applegate Thursday as I was away from home Friday and have not seen Mr. W. O. Wheeler since he went, but will try to tell something in my next, as it was planned to have quite a number go from here.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1917, page 6


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mary Robertson is staying with Mrs. Wilfred Jack this week, whose children have the measles.
    Measles seem to be the topic of the day now. Almost everyone who has not had them is taking them, unless they are staying at home quite closely. Community day at Eagle Point it seems some were there who were taking them and consequently spread the disease.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno and Miss Blanch Conover called on Mrs. H. Watkins last Tuesday.
    Blanch Conover was visiting her sister, Mrs. Walter Wood, a few days last week.
    Mrs. Wm. Perry of Eagle Point was out last week helping her mother, Mrs. F. J. Ayres, clean house.
    Frank Massonna, now of Medford, was in this vicinity last Friday looking for his stray colt.
    Mr. Grieve of Prospect was around looking for his team that had strayed.
    F. J. Ayres had a colt badly cut on the barbed wire last week. It was on the range. The colt was so disabled it would not lead. H. Watkins showed him how to fix a rope that caused it to lead without hurting itself.
    The road supervisor is making a grand improvement on the old Mathews lane out from Eagle Point. He is covering up the rock with dirt. This is an improvement that all who travel the road will appreciate. It is one that has been needed for a good many years.
    They are cutting the timber along the road from Grant Mathews' to the ferry, making the road wider and improving the appearance. Those working in that section were Owen Conover, Joe Hall and George Fisher.
    The workers have also been along with the drag smoothing down the road. All these are needed and greatly appreciated by the public.
    Mr. Slickert and family of Medford visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
    The last few warm days is causing vegetation to grow.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 31, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday evening Mayor C. E. Gates, Mrs. C. E. Gates, Fred C. Mears, city attorney of Medford, H. L. Walther, manager of the Oregon and California Power Company, and Geo. E. Boos, secretary of the Tri-State Good Roads Association, and R. A. Koppes, city editor of the Medford Mail Tribune, came out and gave us some thoughts on the subject of the good roads question. The meeting had been announced in the Mail Tribune some days before, but the farmers as usual were so busy and so tired, having improved the opportunity to do farm work that they did not respond to the call as readily as was desired and the consequence was that there was but few turned out. The meeting was held in the opera house and was called to order by Fred Pelouze, who after a very short talk introduced Mayor Gates, who explained the object of the meeting.  Explaining the law that had been enacted by the last legislature and referred to the people to be voted on on next Monday, June 4, to decide whether we would endorse the move to bond the state for six million dollars to be applied on the public highway through the state. He pointed out very clearly that we would be greatly benefited in Jackson County from the fact that if the bond bill is endorsed by the people, that we as a county would be relieved of the cost of finishing the Pacific Highway through the county and then all of the money that is collected for road purpose--there is a state law assessing a certain percentage for road purposes--and all of that would be applied on the laterals so that the county districts would have the benefit of the money. He also showed how the full amount of the money, as the bonds are to be used in five years and consequently it will take five years to spend the money, will be raised through the auto license, doubling the old licenses and how much money it would raise. Another item of interest is that under the provisions of the law, although Multnomah County would have to pay 40 percent of the tax caused by the doubling of the license that they would not receive a dollar direct benefit, I say direct benefit, for Multnomah County, while it would not receive a dollar of the money thus raised, would derive a benefit through the increase in business channels. Mayor Gates was followed by Mr. Walther, but he spoke so low that I could not understand all that he said, but he gave us some very good suggestions on the necessity of having our roads improved showing that the farmer would be greatly benefited even if we only had the main thoroughfare made good that he could double [team] until he reached the good road and then go with half of the team on to his destination. There is quite a number of our citizens who are opposed to the bonding system, still, this seems to be a case when it would be a benefit, not only to the present voters but also to our children, as well, for good roads make good times and good times make prosperity. Mr. W. was followed by Mr. Mears and he made a passionate plea for us to vote for the bonds. But I see that I am taking up too much space in this letter on that subject, but my apology for saying so much on this subject is that I have been traveling over our roads for about fifty-six years and want the coming generations to have more comfort in riding through the country than I have had.
    Sunday morning was another one of our beautiful spring mornings, that gladdens the heart of the farmer especially and the town people as well, when the sky was clear and the air was just right to make one feel grateful that he is blessed with the privilege of living amid such lovely surroundings, and the result was that there were a large number of the citizens of our towns and cities improved the opportunity to ride out into the country and rest the eye by looking on something else beside the paved streets and brick or stone walls of the city; where they could see the rich fields of grains and grasses growing and hear the song of the bird as it enjoyed the freedom of the woods and valleys. Quite a number passed through here on their way up the streams to fish and enjoy a picnic dinner, but there was quite a number who took advantage of the occasion and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner, among whom were J. W. Grubb, Angie L. Engle of Ashland, Noble Zimmerman, W. O. Wheeler and wife, John F. McPherson, wife and son, Herman Meyer Jr. and wife, L. C. Clements and wife, Shorty Miles and wife, Medford, J. F. Brown and wife.
    Ed Hadfield of Ashland came in on the P.&E. motor Monday morning and started to look for a small tract of land that he could rent to put in beans. He soon succeeded in securing ten acres from the W. Hart Hamilton tract near the depot.
    John Rader and Sam Coy were doing business with our merchants Monday morning.
    John Ashpole and wife, formerly of E.P., but now of Medford, came out Monday morning, Mr. A. to take charge of the Ashpole hardware store and Mrs. A. to help care for their son, Roy, who is down with the measles.
    Miss Mabel Henson, who has been teaching in Uniontown on Applegate, came in Monday on the P.&E. and was going on up to her home on Antelope Creek, but when she stopped at S. H. Harnish's to see her little sister Hulda, found that she and Mr. H. both had the measles, so decided to remain and help care for the sick.
    B. G. Bigham of Ashland, M. E. Root of Medford and Marsh Garrett of Lake Creek were here for dinner Monday and Mr. L. L. Conger spent Monday night with us.
    Miss May Maltby came out from Medford and took the E.P.-Persist stage for Trail.
    Since my last report Mrs. Rebecca Jonas of E.P. has given me her sub. for the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 2, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    County Commissioner George Owen, Wm. von der Hellen, W. C. Daley and his son, George, were here this week for dinner on their way up to look over the proposed change in the road on the Nygren hill just this side of Salt Creek, and everybody who has to travel over this road wishing that that arrangement can be made to effect a change, for the hill has been an eyesore to the travel now for over 53 years that I know of, although it has been greatly improved since I first traveled over it.
    Ralph Olson, George Hall of Trail, G. W. Davis and Mrs. E. G. Hadley of Medford were here for dinner. Mrs. Hadley was traveling over the country lately traveled by her deceased husband while he was selling Watkins' remedies, collecting up the little accounts he had left uncollected. She had Mr. Davis to go with her in an automobile as he is somewhat familiar with the country.
    James McCaslin, who is working on the Alta Vista orchard, was in town having some repair work done, getting ready for the summer work.
    Mrs. Charles Painter, who has been visiting her son-in-law, Mr. Walker, and family, in Gold Hill, returned the first of the week, and on her return Mr. Painter went to visit them as they were getting ready to start for California.
    Roy Davis of Derby came out about the middle of the week and went to plowing for L. K. Haak. He is boarding and lodging at the Sunnyside.
    William Lewis of C.P. passed through here with a bunch of his sheep, taking them from the range north of here to the Fish Lake Ditch Co.'s pastures on the desert to be sheared. The weather has been so cold so far this spring that the sheep men have been holding off, waiting for warmer weather before shearing.
    I see that Geo. Brown & Sons are getting on some small lots of wool, although the bulk of the wool has not been sold yet although the price is the highest for several years. Mr. Olson of Trail brought in about 600 pounds for G. B. & Sons and received $300 cash for it. And Ed Tucker of Brownsboro brought in a small lot, realizing 50 cents a pound for it.
    B. L. Dodge, who owns the Riverside ranch, had five barrels of gasoline come in on the P.&E. Thursday and taken to his ranch. He is using it to propel his Caterpillar (I believe that is the name of the machine) to plow up his land this spring. I understand that they do fine work and are very fast, plowing several acres
a day.
    E. H. Hurd of the federal loan bank association went up to Derby to perfect an organization Thursday, returning Friday on the Jo Moomaw stage.
    C. P. Stefford, representing the Reinhart Lumber Co. of San Francisco, Calif., was on his way up to the Hill & Koenig sawmill near Derby. He is buying up all the lumber he can in this section.
    Chris Beale was also a passenger on the P.&E. for Butte Falls, and Mike Hanley had about a ton of hay shipped in to take to his mountain ranch.
    John Tyrrell of L.C., John Talent of Salem and George B. Brown of Brownsboro were among the guests at the Sunnyside Thursday. Mr. B. has sheared his sheep and says that he has some two-year-old wethers that sheared 14 pounds, each realizing $7 per head for the wool. He is one of the main men in that Cinnabar mine on and near his place that I spoke of some time ago, but they are all as dumb as an oyster about the deal that I spoke of in a former letter.
    Mr. Hoagland of Central Point was a passenger on the P.&E. and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for Brownsboro.
    Mrs. G. Nygren came over Thursday morning on the
E.P.-L.C. stage [and] transacted business with our merchants, returning on the same stage.
    L. A. Stephens of California has moved into the Charley Bacon house.
    Melissa Armantrout, a niece of Wm. Knighton from Grants Pass, is here with her uncle and aunt.
    Aden Haselton, the boy who had his arm broken, went to the hospital this Saturday morning to have his arm reset.
    Frank Rhodes was doing business this morning in our town and so was Mrs. James McCaslin and A. G. Bishop, owner of the Greenwood orchard.
    S. F. Ward of Butte Falls and I. F. Koenig of Derby and Junior King of Derby were passengers on the P.&E. this morning.
    Miss Hazel Brown, daughter of one of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons, R. G. Brown, who has been attending the Medford high school, and graduated, returned home Saturday morning.
    While I was writing this letter Verna Mathews called me up on the phone and subscribed for the Weekly Mail Tribune, and since my last report Charles Painter has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. C. Fruit, one of the forest rangers, stopped overnight at the Sunnyside Saturday night.
    The dance Saturday night given in the interest of the Red Cross Society netted $42. There was a good attendance and the only complaint I heard was that they stopped dancing too soon.
    Sunday was another ideal day and the result was that many took advantage of the occasion to spend a few hours out in the country. Among the guests at the Sunnyside were Gus, the tailor, and wife, of Medford, H. D. Foster, wife and son, A. H. Wissing, wife and son of Medford, J. B. Tyrrell and wife, John Darby and wife of Medford, C. B. Holt, a brother of our M.D., Dr. W. P. Holt, of Portland. Mr. Holt is an expert accountant and was on his way to San Francisco to expert the books of a large firm in that city.
    Fred Pelouze, wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. Ensign, of New York City, who is out here to spend the summer with her daughter, J. W. Smith and wife, F. W. Herrin, wife and babe, Mrs. Benton Bowers, Jr., Miss Nina Fenton of Ashland, O. W. Shuet, proprietor of the Optima Cafe of Medford, Wm. von der Hellen and family, besides a number of young people, among whom was Miss Ruth Thompson of Derby.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. motor were Mrs. Charles Blass of Trail, Mrs. Wallace Bergman and E. J. Gallagher, one of the P.O. inspectors, and a stranger who took passage on the E.P.-Persist stage, Mr. Gallagher returning the next day and taking dinner at the Sunnyside, then going with the mail contractor and carrier, Henry Trusty, to Derby and Prospect and back to the S.S. Tuesday night and Wednesday morning went to Brownsboro and Lake [Creek] with the same driver to inspect those post offices, returning in time to start with the mail for Persist the same day. Henry is some hustler.
    Fred Peddysen, Mr. Isabel, Nick Young, Timmie Duggan, Wm. Butler and his father were among the business callers Monday morning.
    Pete Betz and wife, John Howard, Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of Lake Creek. Mr. Wilkinson is one of the forest rangers stationed at the Dead Indian Soda Springs and Mrs. W. had been out to her farm east of Medford on the Phoenix road.
    Grandma Minnie Nussbaum and her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Newstrom of Lake Creek, were among the diners Monday.
    J. E. Reed and family of Wellen were doing business with our merchants Monday and while here gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    J. H. Rigsby of Brownsboro was among the business callers Monday.
    The Eagle Point Hardware Co. are installing an electric machine for the purpose of blowing up auto tires, and one good thing about it is that it will save a lot of hard work on the part of our autoists. Since Wm. von der Hellen has charge of the business, on account of his brother George going with the service of U.S., William is making some changes for his own convenience and to bring trade.
    Born to the wife of George von der Hellen, June 4, 1917, a daughter, Dr. Holt reports.
    Prof. W. O .Wheeler, in speaking of the school that has just closed, stated that there were five pupils who had not been absent or tardy during the term of nine months and that Misses Margaret and Ethel Riley had not been tardy or absent, the first for three years and her sister for two years that he knew of and that he did not think that she had been either tardy or absent during the past three years, a fine record for two girls who had to walk almost two miles to attend school during the fall, winter and spring. The names of the other three are Frank Brandon, son of our miller in the Snowy Butte mills, and Roscoe Roberts, who had to come two miles across farms, and Truman (Buster) McClellan. Children of that stripe will make their marks in the world if they live.
    Monday night there was the most excitement in our town that there has ever been realized here for the last 50 years that I know of. There seemed to be a break in the Fish Lake dam and it became necessary to open up the floodgates to relieve the pressure and word was phoned down along the creek to the settlers to warn in case the leak should prove serious, and the rush of water coming down the stream washed away a cofferdam that Mr. McCallister had put in the creek to get water for his saw mill, and someone along the creek who knew that it was washed out telephoned down that item of news and someone else eavesdropped and just heard "the dam is washed out" so sent that word on down the line and so by the time the word reached here as it had increased as it came, quite a number of our citizens began to make preparations to move to the hills or some place of safety. Several moved what movable property they could up to the upper story of the house and one man kept his team ready harnessed all night, while others left their homes and all of the available autos were lined up ready to take the people to the higher ground but they were all scared before they were hurt. About 3 o'clock a.m. the creek began to raise and come up four or five feet but did no damage, but it was a chance that the break did not prove more serious for, from what I can learn, the dam is not as strong and safe as would be desired, as I am told it is composed of loose rock, timber and dirt and is liable to give way at any time under a high pressure of water. It would be a good idea for the government authorities to investigate the subject before there is any damage done.
    Noble Zimmerman started Tuesday on the P.&E. for the Zimmerman ranch near Blue Courier to visit his parents.
    Election day passed off quietly; there was quite a number of votes cast, about 175, but there seemed to be no especial interest taken unless it was to try to keep down expenses. When it came to voting on the question of raising the salary of the legislators and giving them ten days more time to squander the people's money, there was just 15 votes for and 124 against and I have heard quite a number of the voters remark that they would like to vote to do away with the legislature entirely and have a commission form of government instead and let the people make their own laws.
    The next day, being registration day, was not so interesting as that day the young men were required to enroll their names subject to the draft into the service of our country, but there seemed to be no slackers for the number registered, 78, went far beyond the most sanguine expectations. I have heard many of them express their willingness to go if their country called for them.
    Since my last report I have received an order from J. E. Reed, Wellen, for the Weekly Mail Tribune and W. H. Crandall, E.P., has renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and Charles Clark has renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and C. E. Hoyt, Fort Klamath, Ore., has renewed his subscription to the weekly.
    Our daughter, Hattie, returned from Fort Klamath Tuesday evening.
    George Nichols, Jr., spent the night with us Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 8, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Grandma Curtice celebrated her eighty-eighth birthday last Wednesday. She has been in the habit of having the old people among her acquaintances in town join with her on these anniversaries, and the most of them would bring in some little keepsake for her to cheer her along "life's rugged way" but as her granddaughter, Mrs. Walk of Gold Hill, was just getting ready to start for San Juan, Calif., and they were all more or less excited over the event her daughter, Mrs. Charles Painter, concluded to dispense with that this time but there were quite a number of her old friends who remembered the date and went in to tender congratulations.
    Frank Neil of Derby was among the business callers Wednesday.
    Henry, Tom and Lee Farlow of L.C. and Dean Terrill of Brownsboro drove into the Sunnyside yard with a truckload of salt and deposited it in the granary for safekeeping and to have it handy to take from here up to the range or rather to the places of deposit, for the salt belongs to the Butte Creek Stock Association and the association buys a few tons of salt in the summer, takes it up to a convenient place and then each member of the association takes his turn and goes out on the range to distribute the salt at the regular salting stations.
    Mrs. Joe McKeen of Prairie City, and Mrs. Rader and Miss Mabel Thompson and Misses Helen and Leah Parker of Medford were passengers on the P.&E. Thursday. Mrs. McKee and her daughter, Mrs. Barr, were just going to Butte Falls to visit relatives. Miss Mabel had been out to visit her sister, Mrs. Carl von der Hellen, and the two Misses Parker were going up to Derby to have an outing after their schools had closed.
    Lemon Charley of Brownsboro was in town Thursday and in speaking of the break in the Fish Lake dam said that the water had seriously damaged quite a number of the farms along the creek, more particularly Mr. Carpenter's and Mr. Farrar's, Mike Hanley's and Thomas Farlow's, especially Mr. Farlow's garden, and that a complaint was being sent to the governor calling his attention to the dangerous condition of the dam and asking to have a competent civil engineer look over the situation and condemn the present dam.
    A. P. Poole, one of the forest rangers, and wife, passed through here via the E.P.-Persist stage line on route for Medford. Mr. Poole was on his way to Pelican Bay to cruise the government timber, and Mrs. Poole simply accompanied him as far as Medford, returning the next day on the P.&E. Mr. Poole has been stationed at Trail for some time and Mrs. Poole said that she was going to stay there and take care of what they have.
    A. W. Stone of Willow Springs, who is working with the Bardwell Fruit Co., took dinner with us Thursday. He is an old newspaper man and we spent a short time very pleasantly together.
    E. Hurd, the man who has been the main help to autoists around here when they got into trouble, has gone to Marysville, Calif., to go into business. He is a good machinist and will be greatly missed from our community.
    County Commissioner Geo. Owen was among the callers for dinner Friday. He seems to be the right man in the right place, as he seems to be up and going all the time. Mike Sidley and Wm. Nussbaum of Lake Creek were also diners at the S.S. Friday.
    We are glad to see George Phillips around among us again. He has been confined to his room for several days with the measles.
    Friday evening took a drive up to the Fred Pelouze farm and while there he gave me a sub. for the Daily Mail Tribune to be sent to his son, Robert F. Pelouze, to be sent to Paris, France, care of the American ambulance field service, as Robbie is one of the favored ones who has responded to the call of his country to fight for universal freedom. He also renewed his sub. to the Medford Sun. Mr. Pelouze has a fine farm on the banks of Little Butte Creek and is making it one of the most attractive places in this section of the country.
    Geo. Brown & Sons are receiving several lots of wool, among them about 1800 [lbs.] of George B. Brown of Brownsboro, but the bulk of the wool has not been brought in yet. Wm. Butler brought in the wool off of fourteen sheep and received $85 for it.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Saturday morning were Mr. Shartrean and son, Mr. and Mrs. Caster, Sr., Mr. Swihart of Derby, Mr. Hawk, E. A. Hildreth, Mr. and Mrs. Watson of Butte Falls. Mrs. W. was going home from the G.S. hospital in Medford, where she had been operated on. Mr. and Mrs. Tungate of Jacksonville, Mrs. James B.F., Mr. and Mrs. Mills of B.F. and Wm. Welch of Asbestos.
    Since my last report in addition to the sub. to the D.M.T. of Robbie Pelouze, S. F. Coy, T. F. Boltz and W. M. von der Hellen have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune and W. P. Morgan, who lives on the road between here and Trail, gave me his sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 12, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. Robertson and sons had Mr. Dahack's engine and saw a few days last week sawing up some of their wood they cut last winter on Mr. Hammel's place.
    Ellen McCabe visited Mary Robertson one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Jack called at Mr. Robertson's last Wednesday evening.
    Mrs. Robertson called on Mrs. Watkins last Thursday.
    Merle and Fern Jacks visited at their grandparents most of last week.
    Lloyd French and Pearl Stowell visited at Mr. Vestal's Sunday.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney, Mrs. W. E. Hammel, Marshall Minter and the Misses Mina and Myrtle Minter called on Mr. and Mrs. H. Watkins.
    The apples on some of the orchards are falling so fast they are almost thinning themselves.
    Mr. McCabe began Monday in his orchard. Some of the workers are Ethel Ewen, Mrs. French and Charles Pettegrew. They expect to begin at Mr. Jack's, that is, the Wilfley orchard, this week sometime. Some of the workers engaged are Anna and Mary Robertson, Fay Perry and the Allen girls.
    Wallace Bergman visited his mother, Mrs. Clarno, Sunday night. He started this week to Washington to find a location.
    Wallace Bergman, who is working at the Vilas ranch, visited his sister, Mrs. Will Crandall, Sunday.
    Weldon Zundel, having driven his new car out to where his goats are herding near Reese Creek, left his car in a bypath while he and Frank Massonna went to see the goats. After having been gone about half an hour, he returned to find his car reduced to ashes. Mr. Zundel phoned into Medford for a taxi to come out to meet him and take him home. They came out Saturday with a truck and took the remains of the car into Medford.
    Miss Anna Robertson has been staying with her sister-in-law, Mrs. John Robertson of Eagle Point. Mrs. Robertson was just up from a bad case of the measles, and since the night of the scare of Fish Lake dam, she has not been so well.
    Mr. G. C. Griffin, the new missionary for this part of Oregon of the American Sunday School Union, came out in this community Saturday evening, stayed overnight with Mr. and Mrs. H. Watkins, was at the Sunday school and gave a short, interesting address, went from there to the Laurel Sunday school where he again preached. He is anxious to organize new Sunday schools where they are needed, as well as to aid those already organized. Mr. Griffin has taken Mr. Smith's place, who has not been well and [is] unable to do the work. All are sorry to learn of Mr. Smith's poor health.
    T. J. Pullens and mother, also Miss Anna and Miss Mary Robertson, attended church in Ashland Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 14, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon, after I had written my article for the Medford Mail Tribune, the following young ladies arrived at the Sunnyside on their way to the Alta Vista orchard to begin thinning apples and pears: Misses Bessie Chambers, Wilma Morris, Mildred Patton, Ursula Geppert, and Mrs. Anna Corum, all of Butte Falls. The last two came out in an auto with Jud Edsall and John Foster, and the next morning, Sunday, after having added our daughter Hattie to the company, started for Ashland, but by the time they reached Ashland concluded to go on to Hornbrook, returning in time for supper, and the next morning the five ladies, dressed in their overalls, started to work in the orchard, and Jud and John returned to the Edsall farm near Butte Falls.
    The same afternoon I learned that Geo, Brown and Sons had purchased the Frank Abbott and Joe Mayham wool. I also met in the von der Hellen store Mr. and Mrs. Firm and Mr. Haite of Sardine Creek, near G.H. and George W. Daley, Jr., of L.C. He was just returning from Jacksonville, where his father had been arraigned on a criminal charge and the case was dismissed by the court.
    Mrs. Huff, who has been stopping with her daughter, Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen, for some weeks, left for her home in Corvallis Friday.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cingcade, Sunday morning, June 10, a son.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday were Miss Alice Hanley and her niece, Miss Claire Hanley, Hulda Leslie, Elva and Frank Abbott, wife and two children, Jo E. Moomaw, C. V. Cummings, Guy Pruett, Jay Spitzer, Percy and Glen Haley and Mr. Grigsby.
    Clarence Robinett, who has been up in South Dakota for the past year, returned to meet his mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Childreth and other relatives in our town Sunday evening, taking them on surprise.
    George Andrews, the noted singer and musician of Medford, and a company of his pupils and associates will give a concert in the Eagle Point opera house on Friday evening, June 29, at 8 o'clock. A small admittance fee will be charged and after the expenses of the hall, etc. are paid the remainder will be applied toward paying Rev., Paul S. Bandy, the minister who is filling the pulpit here now, for his services. Let everybody remember the date, tell their friends, and come and hear some fine vocal and instrumental music.
    J. F. Maxwell of L.C. and Perry Foster of Trail were among the business callers Monday.
    Mrs. T. F. Boltz and two children left Tuesday to join her husband in Helena, Montana to spend the summer, expecting to return again this fall. Mrs. Boltz and her two children will be greatly missed from our midst and little Tom, everybody's pet, will be missed not only by the children, but by almost everybody in town.
    When the P.&E. train pulled in Tuesday morning there was but few passengers on, but among them was Miss Ella Hildreth of Ashland on her way to Butte Falls to visit her grandparents, E. A. Hildreth and wife.
    There was two flatcars loaded with sand and crushed rock to be used in fixing the foundation in the B.&L. Co.'s sawmill at B.F. The superintendent of the Co., Mr. Mills, has given it out that the Co. intend to start up the mill and utilize all the lumber they can by making fruit box material, and we wish them unbounded success in their undertaking.
    There was a lot of long stepladders on board for the J. M. Wilfley orchard to be used in thinning and picking fruit.
    W. C. Daley and his daughter, Myrtle von der Hellen, came out on a short business trip Tuesday morning, staying but a few minutes, but while here I had a talk with him with regard to the dam at Fish Lake and he says that it is a constant menace to everyone living along the banks of Little Butte Creek, that the dam is so loose that the water simply gushes through it and is liable to give way at any time and sweep out the entire Butte Creek Valley. And in talking with Mr. Frey, who was at the dam at the time of the late disaster, and he said that there was no break over the dam, but that there was a break through the dam or three breaks, one ninety feet long, one thirty and one ten feet, where the water had simply washed dirt away from the  loose rocks and was gushing out at the foot of the dam. There was a meeting held at Lake Creek Monday and one here on Tuesday to take steps for our protection in that line. At the meeting at Lake Creek Mike Hanley was elected tempo chairman and resolutions were passed urging the necessity of the authorities to investigate the subject and take steps to protect us from any such menace. At the meeting at L.C. Lemon Charley and C. L. Farrar were appointed to take charge of the matter and the people there subscribed $320 and in Eagle Point $110 as a starter and the committee was instructed to institute legal proceeding to stop the repair work on the dam and have the general government take supervision of the work of making a dam that will be safe. H. B. Tronson was appointed to act in conjunction with the two men from L.C. in the proceedings. There was only a few men attended the meeting here, as it was not generally known that there was to be a meeting of that kind here.
    J. R. Kline, the fruit tree inspector for this district and J. A. Allen, a fruit buyer, Perry Foster of Trail and T. Morgan, were here for dinner Tuesday.
    The frost came Tuesday morning in force enough to kill quite a lot of garden stuff, such as beans, squashes, tomatoes, potatoes etc. in many localities, but in this immediate section did but little damage, but from Brownsboro up the creek did considerable damage.
    Will Lewis Tuesday morning brought out on his jitney R. E. Eicher, Frank DeFord, Henry Reynolds and Mark Wooley. They were on their way up to the Grissom sheep ranch to shear his sheep.
    Bert R. Greer, E. J. Smith and R. F. Ferguson of Ashland were here for dinner Wednesday. They were spotting the country in the interest of the Ashland Roundup, scattering handbills and posting large bills and urging everyone to come to Ashland July 3, 4, 5 and see and enjoy the sport. They are making vast additions to their seating capacity and are expecting many more than was there last year.
    G. C. Griffin of Medford, a traveling Sunday school evangelist, working in the interest of the American S.S. Union, called on us Wednesday afternoon. He reports success in the work, having organized schools in Laurel Hill, Derby and Trail districts.
    Since my last report Fred Pettegrew has given me a classified ad to sell swine and T. L. Harlow, L.C., has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 16, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. W. Frey, C. L. Farrar and George Stowell went up to the Edsall ranch Thursday morning on the P.&E. train to join Jud Edsall as a committee appointed by the federal loan association of Eagle Point to place a valuation on the land of the applicants for loans from the federal loan association. They worked out toward Eagle Point and reached here Thursday, traveling by auto, stopped at the Sunnyside Thursday night. All except Geo. Stowell; he went out home and Friday went as far up as the McCallister Soda Springs, leaving Mr. Frey at his home. Edsall, Stowell and Farrar returned to the S.S. and Mr. Stowell returned home. Mr. Farrar returned home Saturday. It will take several days to go over the list and make the appraisements, but after it is done and the farmers secure the money and invest it judiciously, it will make a vast difference in the business affairs of the county.
    Prof. L. A. Wright and wife and Mrs. Ernest Smith of Butte Falls were on the train Thursday on their way home and so was Mr. Netherland, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Medford; he was on his way on to work on the Butte Falls Lumber Co.'s sawmill. He is going to help put concrete foundations under the saw stocks and try to arrange it so that it will be operated at a profit to the owners.
    Miss Minnie Taylor, who has had charge of the intermediate department of our school for the past two years, started for Long Beach, Wash., Thursday afternoon on the P.&E. It is with deep regret that the patrons of the school, at least a large proportion of them, bade her good bye, for she has by her earnest and consistent efforts and perseverance entwined the affection of the children around her so that many of them felt as though they were losing their best friend. She was assuredly the right woman in the right place. She has her life certificate and is qualified to teach in any of the departments of our schools. She has left a host of friends behind her.
    Ed. Hadfield of Ashland, who has rented a six-acre tract of land off of the W. Hart Hamilton place and put it in beans, has been taking his dinner at the Sunnyside lately.
    Gus Ditsworth called for dinner Thursday on his way home this side of Prospect.
    Otis Hubbard, who has a farm in the Butte Falls district, was on the train Thursday on his way to Medford and Carl Jackson moved out from B.F. the same day and was met here by George Stevens and daughter, Miss Mattie, and took a load of his household goods to one of the Stevens places on the Medford-Brownsboro road. Mr. Jackson will work on the place this season.
    Since my last George Brown & Sons have received wool from Alvin Bieberstedt, John Foster and Jud Edsall. 
    Thursday afternoon T. F. Nichols and wife and sister, Miss Ruth Nichols, daughter of Mrs. Wilbur Ashpole by her first husband, passed through here on their way to Mr. Nichols' home on the south fork of Little Butte Creek, L.C.
    John Zimmerlee and wife have moved back into the old Farmers' Hotel again as Mr. Whitman, I understand, is going to Montana.
    Geo. Hall, one of the F.R., came out Friday morning on the P.&E. motor, took passage on the E.P.-Persist stage for Trail.
    John Ashpole and wife, who have been out here for the past two weeks, returned to their home in Medford Friday. They have been out here taking care of Roy Ashpole while he had the measles, and John stayed in the hardware store, and later, after Roy was able to be in the store, and Mr. Ashpole and the baby it took John and his wife to attend them both, but they are all well again now.
    Friday I took a drive around the country to work for the Medford Mail Tribune, and the first place I stopped was at the home of J. D. Singleton; found him hauling in his alfalfa hay. He says that his alfalfa is as good as it ever was, if not better, and while I was there he had last sheared off a ram weighing 18 pounds and another fleece that came off of a ewe that weighed 11 pounds. He sold the bunch to a Mr. Meyer of Sams Valley. He sold the two fleeces of wool for 55 cents a pound, realizing $15.95 for the two fleeces and a good price for the buck that he sold. Mr. S. is one of our wide-awake, progressive farmers and keeps everything around the farm up to date and believes in keeping nothing but the best of stock. While I was there he renewed his sub. to the W.M.T. He wants to take the D.M.T. but as he lives three miles from the P.O. and can't get his mail every day has to put up with the weekly.
    Born, to the wife of S. N. Gorman, June 16, 1917, a daughter, so Dr. W. W. P. Holt reports.
    Mrs. S. F. Stine and her little son came out Saturday morning on the P.&E. on her way up the Little Butte Creek to visit her mother, Mrs. McDonald.
    John Winningham of Trail, Mr. Richardson, a road contractor of Medford, Jay Davis of Derby, O. Adams and Charles Stewart of B.F. were on the train Saturday.
    J. H. Cookson, representing Dunkelspiel Co. of San Francisco, spent the night Friday, and Saturday morning took passage on the Lewis jitney.
    Charles Edler took dinner with us Saturday and then took a load of the salt stored here up to the range. Amos Ayres also took dinner here; his wife has gone up to visit her parents, J. H. Trusty and family, for a few days and while she is gone Amos takes his meals at the S.S.
    While I was out Friday I called on C. A. Pruett, had a pleasant visit with his wife and daughter, Mrs. Thomas Stanley. Mr. P. was out hauling hay and Mrs. P. had to show me through her fine garden and flower bed; she surely has some fine flowers and roses. While there Mrs. P. renewed her sub. to the W.M.T.
    In addition to the foregoing I am to report the renewals of W. C. Clements, E. Conley and Lottie Van Scoy to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 19, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. Dutton, the road supervisor, was having lumber hauled last week from Mr. Stile's sawmill.
    Mrs. F. J. Ayres' sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Tungate of Jacksonville, visited them last week.
    Pauline Massonna of Medford is with Mrs. Watkins this week.
    Bertha Clarno visited her grandmother, Mrs. Bert Clarno, last week.
    Mr. Jacks' mother, Mrs. Minnick, visited them last week.
    Mrs. Wallace Bergman is visiting Mrs. Clarno this week.
    There was singing last Friday night at T. J. Pullens'. Several were present but it was decided to postpone the singing until the work in the orchards was over, as so many are busy thinning fruit.
    Tom Vestal is working for Mr. Haak at present.
    Miss Anna Robertson is working at the Alta Vista.
    Mrs. Alvin Conover is working at the Alta Vista.
    Blanch and Stella Conover are working at the Wilfley orchard.
    Mr. Peachey, the Wards man, was around last week.
    Mr. W. E. Smith, the former Sunday school missionary at Reese Creek, Sunday on the Resurrection.
    The Reese Creek school meeting was held Monday afternoon, and elected the following officers: Gene Bellows, director for three years; Will Crandall clerk for one year. The school tax was carried by a unanimous vote.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno took some chickens to town Tuesday. She says she is going to sell all her chickens and try Leghorns.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 20, 1917, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday, June 17, Rev. M. C. Davis, wife and two children, Bertie and Esther, motored from Wolf Creek, Douglas County, to pay us a short visit and after visiting with us a few hours, returned home the same evening. Among other callers Sunday were Porter J. Neff, Clara Wood, Delia King, Ethel Curry, Mrs. Yockey and her daughter, Helen, all of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, George H. Wamsley and wife, John Simon, Charles Clark, the two Haley brothers Glen and Percy, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Hadfield, Miss Ursula Geppert and her sister, Mrs. Anna Corum, Bessie Chambers, Wilmer Morris, Mildred Poltern and brother, Harris Jay Spitzer, Ed Grigsby and Mr. Cadzow of Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Rector, formerly of Medford, but since he married one of our townsman's daughters, Margaretta Florey, has been living at Weed, California, came over Saturday afternoon to visit her parents, A. J. Florey and wife.
    Irving Frey and Russ Moore of L.C. were among the callers Monday noon. Mr. Moore called to take a load of salt out to the stock range belonging to the stockmen's association.
    Our school meeting passed off very pleasantly last Monday afternoon. There was a good turnout, but the most of them were ladies and the result was Dr. W. P. Holt was elected director for three years and Walter C. Clements, our postmaster, was elected clerk. There was no contention this year and there was only one nomination for director and one for clerk, and by a vote of the people the acting clerk, Mr. Carl Narregan, was instructed to cast the vote for each. As the budget had not been posted there was no vote on that, but will be later on in the season.
    Ed. Dutton, our efficient road supervisor, has commenced to haul lumber from the Stiles mill on Indian Creek to build a large barn on his place.
    Miss Beatrice Thurston, who is traveling in the interest of a Chautauqua company, is stopping at the S.S. She is canvassing the town and surrounding country trying to secure enough season tickets to justify them coming here for a three days' run, Up to last night, Tuesday, she seemed to feel greatly encouraged in her undertaking. She seems to make a favorable impression wherever she goes. She travels over the neighborhood on foot, making a house-to-house canvass. Her idea is to have a Chautauqua meet in the small towns like Eagle Point and work up an interest in the outlying district and small towns nearby, like Brownsboro, Butte Falls, Lake Creek, etc.
    On Sunday, the 9th inst., Wm. von der Hellen and Frank Brown motored out on the Crater Lake road to a point one mile beyond Union Creek, but found so much snow that they could go no farther and last Sunday 17 went up to the natural bridge, but found the snow was too deep to go on, and Charles W. Austin and wife and Mrs. Jenette Carl and Miss Alta Steel, all of Medford, stopped here Tuesday afternoon. They had been up to their old homesteads in "the unsurveyed" region and found the snow was there in abundance. At the Reed homestead the snow was three feet deep yet, so the presumption is that we will have aplenty of water in Butte Creek to supply all demands this season.
    Mrs. C. A. Newstrom of L.C. came out with merchant Thompson, who has a store and P.O. at L.C., Tuesday and went on to Medford.
    Mrs. C. E. Bellows, who, with her husband, have a farm and dairy on Rogue River, above here, came in Tuesday to bring in her cream.
    Sergeant Bowers of Company Seven, Coast Artillery, came out Tuesday and went up to L.C. with Robert Harnish and a young man, son of John McCallister, came out with them, and some reported that he was a slacker, but it appears that he is only about 19 years old and of course is too young to be subject to the selective draft.
    I understand that another of our boys has entered the service in Co. 7, Graydon, son of our blacksmith, L. L. Childreth.
    It surely pays to advertise in a live paper like the Medford Mail Tribune, for last week I put in for Fred Pettegrew a class ad offering sow and pigs for sale and he told me Tuesday that he had sold them before he saw the ad in the paper, because the D.M.T. did not reach this P.O. Saturday eve as usual, so he did not receive his D.M.T. until Tuesday, he living on the rural route, and others saw the ad, and E. A. Strong bought the sow and a part of the pigs and a Medford lady came out Sunday in her auto and took the rest of the pigs home in her auto, so if you have anything to sell, just put it in the classified ads in the M.M.T. and you will get results.
    Perry Farlow of L.C. came out Tuesday, spent the night with us and started home with Frank Brown in his auto Wednesday morning. Frank is working for the Red Cross Society.
    C. W. Hays and R. R. Slight of Paul's Electric Store, Med., called for dinner Tuesday.
    Since my last report C. M. Gay, who has charge of Wm. Lewis' sheep, and George (Pete) Stowell have renewed their sub. to the M.M.T., Mr. Gay for the daily and Mr. Stowell for the weekly.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 21, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Lurline Brown of Lebanon, Oregon, who is in the employ of Ellison-White Chautauqua Company, came out from Medford to visit Miss Beatrice Thurston, who is also in the employ of the same company, but when she reached the Sunnyside Hotel found that she had started in the morning toward Brownsboro, so the telephone was brought into play and about 9 o'clock p.m. she was located and Miss B. secured the services of Fred Edsall with his auto to go after her, and in a short time the two girls were together. That Miss Thurston earns her salary is not a debatable question, and she seems to be meeting with success in her undertaking. The next day Miss Brown went to Butte Falls with Mr. Edsall in his auto to look over the prospect in that section, returning the same day. From every appearance we are going to have a genuine Chautauqua here this fall.
    Tuesday noon C. C. Cate, our county pathologist, J. R. Kline, our deputy fruit inspector, Henry Town of L.C., E. Wheeler of B.F., Mr. Starr, a hardware salesman from Portland, George Nichols and wife of Lake Creek, H. O. Pellet and wife of Talent, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Sayle and Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Sayle of Ashland and Hugh W. Shelley of San Francisco, California, representing Shedd-Brown Manufacturing Company, Minneapolis, Minnesota, called for dinner. Mr. Town came to take a load of salt up to be used by the B.C.S.A.and while here renewed his sub. to the W.M.T. and also gave the item that he had that morning brought out the wool of seven sheep and sold it to Geo. Brown & Sons for thirty-four dollars and sixty cents, almost five dollars per head.
    Thursday morning Dr. W. P. Holt left early for Medford to meet his wife and daughter, Miss Helen, and Mrs. Holt's mother, Mrs. A. T. Hatch, and her little daughter Nancy of Berkeley, California. Mrs. Holt and her daughter Helen have been spending some months in Berkeley while the latter has been attending school and the Doctor has been taking a part of his meals while they were gone at the Sunnyside. Mrs. Hatch is a sister of Mrs. Holt and has come up to spend a part of the summer in our healthy climate.
    The Red Cross committee have surely been going some the past few days. I have not been able to ascertain the amount they have raised, but I notice some of the objects of their search dodging around the corners of the buildings and one lady, who seemed to be on a "hot trail," ran square against our road supervisor and came near running into me as I was talking to him at the time, but he braced himself and kept from falling and I dodged back just in time, but there was no harm done and the aforesaid lady is just as pleasant as ever. I understand that they have been very successful in their undertaking.
    Miss Wilmer Morris, one of the young ladies who came out from Butte Falls to thin apples on the Alta Vista orchard, was taken sick and had to go home on the train Thursday morning, and I have learned since that she will have to undergo an operation before she can get well.
    Wm. G. Knighton, one of our best citizens, started early Friday morning to take Mrs. C. Painter to Medford in his Ford to be with her mother, Grandma Curtice, who is failing very rapidly, as she is in the 89th year of her age.
    Swan Bergquist, one of our enterprising farmers, went up to the Edsall station Thursday to assist in placing a valuation on some of the real estate in that section for men who desire to take advantage of the federal loan act.
    The farmers who have had alfalfa to cut and cure have had a fine time to do it as we have had a long dry spell, and now they are ready to do something else, as the first crop is about all cared for.
    The Von der Hellen Hdw. Co. have succeeded in getting installed a motor blower for the use of the autoists who come in with flat tires. A very great convenience.
    James Culbertson and daughter of L.C. motored in Friday.
    W. E. Hammel was a business caller Thursday.
    Mayor Gates with Messrs. Carkin, Gaddis, Hargrave and the irrepressible Dr. Keene, accompanied by the city engineer of Medford, Mr. Arnspiger, who had been up to the intake of the Medford water system, stopped here and had soft drinks at Lewis' confectionery and a smoke. They seemed to think that the Fish Lake dam was all right as long as the company did not raise the water any higher, but we want no thinks about it, but a positive know that it is safe, and no foolishness about it, for there are some of our citizens will be prematurely gray on account of the scare they had when the dirt washed away from the rocks that had been thrown in the dam.
    Since my last report Henry Town of Lake Creek and Mrs. D. S. Nichols have renewed their sub. to the M.M.T., the first to the W.M.T. and the second to the D.M.T., and J. E. Spencer has given me his sub. to the Medford Sun.
    This Saturday morning about 10:30 I met Mr. Herman Meyer, our mail carrier from here to L.C., and asked him why he had not gone with the mail, thinking that perhaps someone was sick, and he said that he did not have to reach here until 11 o'clock a.m., and that now he carried a pick and rake and worked the road as he came down, that he had spent over an hour working on the Nygren hill and that he was going to do some work on the road just above Brownsboro, that he was saving money by working the roads, for they are so rocky that they ruin his tires.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 25, 1917, page 4


Reese Creek Riplets
    Several people from Reese Creek attended the dance at Eagle Point Saturday night, given by the Red Cross. They say they took in over a hundred dollars (of course expenses will come out of that) but financially it was a success.
    With Crandall visited at Bert Clarno's Sunday.
    Mrs. Lottie Woods and Blanch Conover spent Sunday with their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Conover.
    Mrs. Isabel visited at Mr. Hammel's one evening last week.
    Mrs. Logan of Eagle Point called on Mrs. Watkins one afternoon last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel made a flying trip to Medford and back Saturday evening.
    The Sunday school hour at Reese Creek has been changed from 2 p.m. to 10 a.m.
    Mr. Brittsan of Medford preached al Reese Creek Sunday morning. He returned to Medford this week.
    Elmer Robertson has been hauling wood this week.
    The Eagle Point, Derby, Trail, Laurel Hill and Reese Creek Sunday schools are planning for an all-day convention July 15. All are to bring dinner and eat on the grounds.
    Mr. McCabe visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 28, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon Rollie Mathews brought in a fresh beef hide for Roy Ashpole and realized a good round price. There is no wonder that shoes are high.
    Mrs. John Rader and her daughter, Mrs. Harvey Stanley, were among the business callers Saturday p.m.
    Mr. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek and one of his sons were business callers Saturday, and so was Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Fuller. Mr. and Mrs. Fuller now own the orchard formerly known as the Herrin orchard about two miles up the creek from our town. And they have one of the nicest orchards in this section. I visited them this week on business connected with the church affairs and found them to be of the progressive class of citizens. He is planning to make some decisive improvements on his place. He has a prospect for a bountiful crop of fruit this season.
    Harris Geppert motored out Saturday evening from his home near Butte Falls, bringing his mother, two brothers and two nieces, the Misses Corum. They attended the dance here, returning to their home after the dance. The dance was given for the credit of the Red Cross Society here, but I did not learn the amount received, but those who were there report that there was a good crowd, but I am sorry to say that there was quite a number reported as violators of the dry law.
    John Foster, who is staying on the J. E. Edsall ranch and is interested with Mr. Edsall in the sheep business, came out Saturday p.m., returning to the ranch Monday morning.
    Sunday morning after Sunday school Rev. Carstens, the pastor of the Baptist church of Medford, and Rev. Smith, formerly S.S. evangelist for the A.U.S.S. Society, came out and Mr. Carstens preached a very interesting sermon on the subject of "Does It Pay to Live Religious." His text was 1st Timothy, 4 ch. 8 v. and I think that the most of his hearers were convinced that it pays to live a  religious life.
    At night Rev. Paul S. Bandy, the pastor of the Presbyterian church in Central Point, preached from "Behold the Man," John 19, chap. 5 verse. At the close of the sermon Mr. J. W. Grover stepped forward and announced that the preliminary steps had been taken to secure the services of Mr. Bandy to preach for us every Sunday evening for a year, unless he was providentially called away, and asked for an expression of the people as to whether his services were desired by rising to their feet, and almost everyone in the house arose. The next step was to secure the funds to pay the sum agreed on to pay for his services, and by Tuesday p.m. the most of the funds were subscribed, so we have at last secured the services of a man who can and does draw and interest an audience.
    Mr. Fred L. Heath and family of Medford came out Sunday evening and visited Dr. W. P. Holt and family and Mrs. Holt's sister, Mrs. A. T. Hatch of Berkeley, California.
    On Sunday Henry Trusty, Miss Claire Zimmerman, Carl Ringer and Miss Gertrude Thompson went to the von der Hellen farm and took lunch with Mr. and Mrs. Carl von der Hellen and later in the day were joined by Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Clements, Mr. and Mrs. William von der Hellen, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze, T. McPherson and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Young, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson visited the Holman Springs in Ashland, enjoying the fine scenery and waters of that helpful resort in Ashland.
    Tuesday morning Misses Burthy and Pearl Burrell of Medford called on us on their way home. They had been out to Mr. R. A. Weideman's to attend a meeting of the school board of the Antelope district, and while there Miss Pearl Burrell signed a contract to teach in that district this fall, beginning the first Monday in September.
    Perry Foster and Henry French came in Tuesday. Henry came in to bring his cream and Perry, his father-in-law, came in on general business like any ordinary farmer.
    J. T. Talent, formerly of this county but more recently of Salem, Oregon, came out on the Lewis jitney and took the stage for L.C.
    Mrs. Mary Martin and Miss Tressie Pierce of Trail came out Tuesday on the stage and Miss Tressie went on to Jacksonville to take the examination to become a teacher in our schools. Miss Tressie has been attending the normal school at Monmouth and has taken the teachers' course. She expects to teach in her home district.
    Oscar Heintz of Portland, representing Todd Protectograph Co., was among the callers Tuesday and so was Mr. Root, who is associated with the R.R.F. association.
    Wm. Whitman, who traded for the old Eagle Hotel, now the Farmers' Hotel property, a few months ago, has given up the undertaking of keeping hotel in Eagle Point, and surrendered the property to the party again and gone to Montana with his family in his automobile. He also leased the old barber shop, but had to give that up also as Mr. Slusser, the old barber, who was occupying the old shop at the time he leased the shop has built a new shop and was doing about all the business.
    H. E. McCuiston of Porterville, California, who is engaged in the lumber business and has been stopping in Medford, came out Wednesday to see the town, enjoy the cool breeze along the bank of Little Butte and take dinner at the Sunnyside. He seems to be buying up a certain grade of lumber to be shipped to California.
    Since my last report Amos Ayres has renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune, and so has Mrs. Rosetta Potter, our milliner, renewed her sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 29, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Stanley were visiting Mrs. Stanley's sister, Mrs. Roy Ashpole, Wednesday afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rader of Phoenix, Ore., and Mr. and Mrs. L. W. McLaffey, recently from Klamath Falls, where they were united in marriage, Sunday, June 24th, were also visiting the Ashpole family, as Mrs. Ashpole is a niece of Mr. Rader. After visiting with the Ashpoles at the Eagle Point hardware store, Mr. R. and his company drove to the Sunnyside for supper and to visit the Howlett family, as we were near neighbors from Mr. Rader's infancy to manhood. Mrs. Ethel Taylor, a friend of Mr. and Mrs. Rader, accompanied them.
    Mrs. Frank Abbott started Friday to go to Fort Klamath to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Artie Nichols.
    The Brittsan brothers, who are Jiving on the P. S. Anderson place on Rogue River, north of here, took a load of barley to Medford Thursday.
    Mrs. Wallace Reeder of Ashland and Mrs. Fannie Thompson of Medford were passengers on the P.&E. Thursday on their way to Butte Falls, and so was Delany Woodworth and A. B. Edwards, S. S. Bullis, the R.R. and mine promoter, Jerry Young of Medford, E. H. Minus and family, on their way to Duprey's sawmill, Mrs. Murphy, Miss Margaret Sears of B.F. and Mrs. S. H. Maxwell and two little boys, recently from Nevada. Mrs. Maxwell took the E.P.-L.C. stage for Brownsboro. They were all passengers on the P.&E. Thursday.
    Mrs. Charles Bacon, wife of the conductor on the P.&E.R.R. train, came out and spent the day with Mrs. Howlett and our daughter, Hattie, Thursday.
    M. E. Root, who is in the employ of the Denney Produce Co., Chicago, was here Thursday for dinner and while in our town leased the large warehouse belonging to the Brandon Bros., who own the Snowy Butte mills and warehouse. It is to be converted into a fruit packing house. I understand that they intend to buy fruit either on the trees or delivered in the long boxes, pack and ship direct from here, and as the prospect for fruit this season is extra good, I predict that they will do a thriving business this season.
    Roy Willits and Henry Thornton of Persist called for supper Thursday on their way home, going home about 30 miles, in his auto. When a few years ago for him to make the round trip to Medford and back, with a team, would have taken or at least spoiled at least three days, but now the farmer can get up and do his chores in the morning, jump into his auto, ride 25 or 30 miles to Medford or anywhere he wants to go, attend to his business, visit a few hours, read the latest news, go back home in time to get up the cows, milk, separate the cream before dark, surely they are a great convenience and now a necessity.
    A lady by the name of Parkinson, from San Francisco, got off of the train Thursday and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for Mrs. Clay Charley's. Mrs. A. T. Poole of Trail, wife of one of our forest rangers, now in Klamath County, came out and took passage on the E.P.-Persist stage.
    There was a man who gave his name as Fred Taylor, from Baker City, Ore, with his family and another lady, with his Ford considerably out of commission, while he was in Medford as he was on a corner and another auto was coming to meet him; they collided, the other machine catching onto the fender on Taylor's Ford, completely turning him around, bending the front axle, breaking out one of the lights and otherwise damaging the Ford. After getting Bob Harnish to help him to patch it up they went on up the creek toward Brownsboro.
    W. H. Morgan of Persist came out Friday and spent the night with us, and one of the Dahack boys came in for bed and breakfast Friday.
    Friday evening, as was announced in the Mail Tribune, George Andrews, the noted singer and vocal and instrumental music teacher, came out to give a concert and was accompanied by his wife, Carlton Janes, violinist, Miss Geraldine Theiss, Mrs. Guy Childers, Mrs. Carl Knapps, Mrs. Sadabel Lacy, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Gore, and Rev. Paul S. Bandy, for whose benefit the concert was given, and by ten minutes after 8 o'clock p.m. the opera house began to fill and by the time to commence the exercises the room was well filled. I did not procure a copy of the program, as there was none printed, and Prof. Andrews simply had a note of what he wanted penciled on a slip of paper, so cannot give a correct gist of the acts, but it was opened by a duet by the Prof. and a lady whose name I did not hear; that was followed by songs, duets, quartets, interspersed with instrumental music by different ones in the piano and violin, and about the middle of the exercises Prof. Andrews called on Mr. Bandy and he gave us a very interesting talk on the subject of "Appreciation"; it was one of those plain practical talks that everyone in the house could understand and appreciate. The only trouble with the whole of the evening's exercises was that the most of us have not been schooled up to appreciate that class of singing, although I heard quite a number speak very highly of the singing and I heard a prominent society man say that he thought that it was all right but that it was too high for his caliber, but the ladies showed remarkable skill in the use of their hands in touching the piano keys and the modulation of their voices. The receipts of the evening amounted to about $20.
    W. Hart Hamilton and his son, Sherwood, started for Crescent City, Calif. Friday morning.
    I have a lot more notes to write up but will leave them for the next lime.
    Since my last report Charles Painter has renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and so has Chas. Clark renewed his to the D.M.T. Frank Abbott has paid up two months' arrears on the W.M.T. and stopped taking it but subscribed for the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 3, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    This is the time of the year when people generally are in the hay. Women are helping with the new-mown hay on a good many ranches on account of the scarcity of help.
    Aleck Vestal took a load of hogs to Medford Monday.
    Earl Brittsan was in Medford last week on business.
    Mrs. Sears and children visited Mrs. Vestal one evening last week.
    Gene Bellows sold some calves to the butcher last week.
    Mr. Fox, the goat man, came out to the valley to get a few goats.
    Marshall Minter, Charley Drexler and others started to the mountains with some cattle; they expect to be about three days going and coming. This is the second trip Marshall Minter has made this summer with cattle.
    Mrs. Isabel visited at Mrs. Graham's last week.
    The girls working in the Wilfley orchard are having a vacation of a few days after the Fourth.
    A few of the people that don't go to Ashland will gather on the river at Mr. Betz' for a 4th of July picnic.
    John Caster visited at home Sunday.
    Frank Caster and family visited at W. E. Hammel's Sunday.
    The Sunday school all-day meeting will be at Reese Creek July 22nd instead of the 15th as stated last week.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 6, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Bessie Chambers and Miss Mildred Patern of Butte Falls, who have been thinning fruit on the Alta Vista and Ringwood orchards, have returned to their homes again.
    Mrs. Riggins of Derby and Mrs. Doubleday of Butte Falls were on the train homeward bound Saturday.
    W. T. Croft, foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard, and Mr. McCaslin of the Alta Vista orchard were doing business in our town just before I left for Portland.
    R. H. Bardwell and D. W. Stone of the Bardwell Fruit Co., Medford, were diners at the Sunnyside last week.
    J. H. Tyrrell and his daughter-in-law, Mrs. A. M. Tyrrell, were among the pleasant callers Saturday.
    W. J. Canon, our Brownsboro merchant, was doing business with our merchants on Saturday, June 30.
    Mr. Spencer, H. B. Tronson's foreman, and Mrs. Harvey, Mr. Tronson's housekeeper, were doing business in our town, getting ready to attend the Roundup in Ashland.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols of Lake Creek were among the business callers just prior to my leaving home.
    There was a private select dance given by Mr. Eddington on the Corbin orchard on Saturday evening, June 30, and some of the dancers report that there was a very enjoyable time. The dancing continued until about 3 o'clock a.m. Sunday.
    Among the callers Sunday were Everett Dahack, Lewis Robertson, Miss Constance Vance, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Vance, Miss Helen Brown, George H. Wamsley and wife, Vern Grigsby, Wm. Lewis, Percy and Glen Haley.
    J. W. Smith is building a large barn for Ed. Dutton and Ed. says that he is getting along finely and by the time it is finished he will have his hay all put away in it, as he was planning to put his hay in as soon as the frame of the building was up and put the roof on later.
    The Misses Neil, granddaughters of Judge Neil, came out Monday morning, and by the time they reached Eagle Point their machine stopped on them and they were unable to move and our local expert was unable to repair the break as one of the connecting wires had burned out, so they hired Bobbie Harnish to haul their machine to Medford and took advantage of the occasion to go to Medford at the same time, the two ladies riding in their own machine and Bob and I in the other, but we had not gone far before the ladies discovered that there was something wrong in the steering apparatus and finally Bob suggested that one of the young ladies take his place in his machine and he would try to manage their machine, thus giving each one of us a lady as a traveling companion, a very pleasant change, but we reached the Ford headquarters in time and the damage was soon repaired and the two young ladies went on their way to Jacksonville all O.K. One of the Misses Neil is working in the recorder's office at this time.
    On my arrival in Medford I repaired at once to the office of the Medford Mail Tribune, attended to some business and gave my sub. for 
the D.M.T. to be sent to me, then went to the S.P. depot, procured my ticket to go where I pleased for a limited distance, 2000 miles, and at 7 o'clock p.m. started for Portland, but before I had been on the train very long discovered that I was on "the slow train through Arkansaw," for they would have to stop every little while to fix something about the engine, and by the time we reached Grants Pass we were held up there for about an hour having the engine repaired and by the time we reached Roseburg we were one hour and forty minutes late and the result was that we had to stop every little while to wait for oncoming trains and by the time we reached Portland we were a little over two hours late.
    Mr. McCaslin and family, who have been living on the Alta Vista orchard for some time, moved the first of the week onto a farm near Phoenix.
    For some time before I started from home I heard the complaint of the knockers that our crops in Rogue River Valley were going to be short, but from what I saw along the route I was led to believe that the crops in our valley will be up in the average in quality and above the average in quantity.
    As the reader will see, I am now in Portland, and the next issue I write will tell something of what I saw and heard in Portland and Vancouver, Wash.
Portland, Ore., July 7, 1917.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 9, 1917, page 4


Reese Creek Riplets
    Wayman Bergman, who has been working on the Vilas ranch, has quit and is home for a few days this week.
    Miss Lulu Steers of Portland and Mr. Vern and Miss Vira Steers of Rogue River, cousins of Mrs. W. E. Hammel and Mrs. Sam Courtney, called on them last Thursday.
    John Robertson and family of Eagle Point visited at his father's, Mr. J. L. Robertson, last Wednesday, the Fourth. Also T. J. Pullen and mother visited at Mr. Robertson's the same day, where they had ice cream and a regular Fourth of July dinner.
    A number went to Ashland from Reese Creek especially among the young people.
    The picnic on the river was well attended with a good time.
    Mrs. Watkins called on Mrs. Pullen Friday evening.
    Will Crandall and family visited at Mr. Pettegrew's Sunday afternoon.
    Dick Johnson killed a small rattlesnake near his home Sunday morning.
    Mr. Dodge, the father of the Dodge Brothers, is coming from the East to visit his sons and expects in the near future to move on the Riverside ranch.
    J. S. Robertson called at Mr. Pettegrew's Tuesday.
    The girls who were thinning fruit on the Wilfley orchard finished Monday noon. There were some tired girls, but most of them had stayed with the work quite faithfully.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno and Mrs. Chris. Bergman were in Eagle Point on business last week.
    Mrs. Fred Pettegrew and sons, Charley and Frank, were in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    The Sunday school convention to be held by Eagle Point, Derby, Trail, Laurel Hill and Reese Creek will be held at Reese Creek Sunday, July 22, instead of the 15th, as was in the Riplets some time ago. Any are invited to attend.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 11, 1917, page 4


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    As I have no news from Eagle Point and vicinity to write and have the afternoon to myself, I have concluded to try to tell some of the readers of the Mail Tribune some of the things I saw and heard since I left home one week ago today. Starting so late in the afternoon, 6:40, I could see but very little along the route, as by the time I reached Grants Pass it was beginning to get dusky and then we were held up there for an hour, so that by the time we got started from there, there was nothing to see but the hills and some of the fine timber of Southern Oregon, but by 5 o'clock Tuesday morning we could begin to see some of the beauties of the route, and I noticed all along the route down the coast fork of the Willamette River that the prospect was good for bountiful crops and in a few places the farmers had commenced to cut hay and I was surprised to see large tracts of fine bottom land still covered with stumps where the large fir trees had been burned down and rolled together and burned. And on one place [I] saw the old rail fence that I think I saw as early as 1861 and '62, when I used to ride the circuit as an itinerant preacher, and some of the same old log houses were still in evidence, and the land, that is now so valuable, used for pasture for a few cows. I say a few cows, for on that kind of a place there is not energy enough to accumulate very much, but the crops, what there was, looked fine and the most of the farms had good, substantial buildings and fences and gave evidence of enterprise and prosperity. I heard some of the men in the Rogue River Valley telling about the short crops in the Willamette Valley, but as near as I could judge, looking from the car window, the crops are up to the average, if the state has gone bone dry. I noticed that there are several large hop fields still in sight along the route.
    As we proceeded along the way, and I saw such lovely farms and farm [omission] me feel proud to think that I was one of the thousands of the Oregonians who had helped to develop this great country, I looked back to the time when we used to ride on horseback over the then-undeveloped regions and wondered if there would be such great changes made in the next fifty years.
    Wending our way through a labyrinth of farms, orchards, cities and towns, we reached Portland at last, two hours late, tired and sleepy and soon was at the home of my daughter, and the most of the day was spent in sleeping, for I had slept but very little during the trip from home.
    The next day being July 4, we spent the time looking over the city and in the afternoon witnessed the military parade where the U.S. recruits marched, and our old (aged) hearts swelled with pride to think that Oregon could send forth such a fine lot of noble youths, for the most of them looked as though it might be the first time they had left the parental roof, but they had the step and actions of "true blue stock." It is not necessary for me to say that there was a large crowd in the city on that day for the people were so thick that one could hardly go anywhere, for go where you would, you would meet men, women and children of all colors, ages and nationalities going and coming everywhere you went. We went to a picture show after the parade was over where we could secure a good seat and see something attractive. And then took a ride on the street car for eight or nine miles to our home, and as soon as dinner (supper) was over, I commenced to put in ten hours sleeping, which I did to perfection.
    The next day took our two little granddaughters and went to one of the east side parks, where the city has arranged for the comfort and safety of the little folk. Among other things they have, situated in a beautiful grove, surrounded by flowers, roses and sunberry of almost all kinds, are swimming pools where there is a man who has charge of the boys', and a woman who has charge of the girls' departments who act as chaperon and instructor, teaching them to swim, where they have bathing suits furnished by the city, and outside of the close enclosure there is an open pool about a foot deep so that the little folk can play in the water, and they have a large pile of sand in a concrete vat for the children to play in and some of us old ones remember how we used to play in the sand along the edge of the streams where we used to go bathing. They also have lawn laid off and kept up where the children can play ball, croquet, tennis, or anything they want to play. Among the most attractive thing is the sunken flower garden, where a large tract of land is simply covered with the most beautiful roses, flowers and shrubbery of all kinds that can be found. Among the most attractive things in Portland to a country Jake like me is their gardens. The principal vegetable is potatoes; they have not only planted the vacant lots, but in many places have planted them between the rose bushes and in many places have dug up the lawns between the sidewalk and the street curbing, and planted the ground in spuds, corn, beans, and I noticed one place where they had planted garlic. I heard a person remark that there would be enough potatoes raised in the city of Portland to supply the city's demand. But I see that I am getting this letter long enough, so will stop for this time and the next time will tell of our trip to Castle Creek, Vancouver, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 12, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Last Saturday afternoon the people's anticipations were raised, just to be crushed again, as they thought the long-looked-for rain was coming. But all it did was to sprinkle after thundering and lightning a good deal. Perhaps our turn will some soon.
    Sunday was like one of the days one reads about but does not often experience. The thermometer at Bert Clarno's registered 117.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney, July 10, a six-and-a-half-pound boy; the mother and son are doing nicely.
    Miss Anna Robertson is staying with Mrs. W. E. Hammel for a few days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ayres and baby of Eagle Point visited at Amos' parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, last Sunday.
    Merle and Fern Jacks visited their grandparents Sunday night.
    Misses Maudie and Minnie Slikert of Medford were week end guests at Mr. Robertson's.
    Mr. W. S. Hammel had about 20 of their choicest turkeys killed by the coyotes last Friday night.
    Mrs. Graham called on Mrs. Watkins one afternoon last week.
    A. P. Pardue of Agate had 42 chickens killed last Saturday night by some mysterious varmint; their heads were crushed, but their bodies not touched. Perhaps someone can enlighten us to what it was.
    Marshall Minter and Miss Anna Robertson visited Miss May Wilson of Derby Sunday.

Medford Mail Tribune, July 18, 1917, page 4


Reese Creek Riplets
    The Sunday school convention, or group gathering, met at Reese Creek in the grove near the school house. The forenoon was taken up principally by singing and reports from the superintendent or a representative from the different schools. Mr. Stiles, superintendent of the Laurel Hill, responded. T. J. Pullen, superintendent of Reese Creek, told of the work at Reese Creek. Art Vestal reported for the Derby schools. Mrs. Fuller spoke in behalf of the Eagle Point Sunday school. Miss Hillis gave a report from the Lone Pine. Miss Mabel Hillis told of the work at the Dewey school. Trail had no representative. During the noon hour the workers met for a short conference. After a bounteous repast which everyone seemed to enjoy, the afternoon session was held with the addition of a delegation from Medford. Songs and recitations by children representing the different schools was first on the program. The children all did well and were enjoyed by the audience.
    Rev. J. C. Collins, the Methodist minister of Medford, gave a short message on "Christian Patriotism," which was well received.
    Mrs. Hovious of Medford sang a solo which was well rendered and highly appreciated by music lovers.
    Mrs. H. S. Stine of Medford talked for a few minutes on "The Worth of the Soul."
    Mr. Davis, also of Medford, on "The Value of a Smile." Both talks were well worthy of comment.
    Mrs. Hovious again sang. She was accompanied by Miss Hillis.
    Rev. F. W. Carstens, the Baptist minister of Medford, then spoke on the "Christian's Ally" in his earnest, convincing way.
    We hope the Medford people will come again, as well as all the others.
    Mr. G. C. Griffin, the Sunday school missionary, had charge of each session.
    Pictures were taken of the table after it was filled with edibles; also a picture of the people.
    After it was over a private committee decided that Laurel Hill had the pretty man, Medford the useful man and Reese Creek the homely man. H. Watkins claims the honor of being the homely man.
----
    Tom Vestal was in Roseburg last week on business.
    H. Watkins was in Medford last week on business.
    Gene Bellows started Tuesday to take a drove of cattle to the mountains.
    Mrs. Freeman Newport of Medford visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, over Sunday.
    Mrs. Lottie Wood visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Conover, last week.
    Mrs. Gene Bellows called on Mrs. Graham last Saturday.
    Tom Vestal started last Friday for Klamath where he expects to get work during the harvest.
    Several men from this locality have gone to Klamath or elsewhere for work because of the dry weather causing a shortage of crops.
    The forest fires are raging in the mountains.

Medford Mail Tribune, July 25, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was in Portland, Oregon, and that was at a time of excitement and hurry, as I was visiting my son-in-law and family, and they were doing all they could to make my stay with them as pleasant as possible. After writing, we--that is, my daughter and I--visited the new auditorium that had just been built and dedicated. The convention of the National Educational Association was in session, and when I entered the building where the different displays were exhibited I concluded that the convention was not in session, as it looked as though there could not be a much larger crowd collected in one place, but after looking around at the display of--well, I was going to say what, but will simply say everything one can think of to interest the visitor. We entered the auditorium proper, a room arranged to seat comfortably 4000 people, and found it completely packed with people of all ages, sex and conditions in life. Someone was speaking at the time, but I was so far from the speaker that I could not understand what was said, but we soon met Mr. Peterson, the school supervisor of Jackson County, passed the time of day and he hurried on his mission. I do not feel that I can give even a faint description of the building or its contents, for my mind seemed to be in a perfect whirl, there was so much to see and hear, but after looking around we started for other scenes, but soon discovered that it was nearing the time for us to take a car for home, a distance of eight or ten miles, where we arrived in time for supper, thus ending the week, tired and hungry.
    The next day being Sunday, I went to Sunday school and church with the children, and heard a fine sermon from an old evangelist past 80. On the way out to my temporary home I saw a large sign announcing that a camp meeting was in session, so Monday morning I concluded to take a stroll out to the camp ground. The meeting was being conducted by the people of the Apostolic faith, and as I was not familiar with their customs and had heard much about their way of conducting their meetings I simply walked into the camp ground, and just as I entered an elderly gentleman overtook me and told me that he had just arrived the  night before, but that his two sons had come the past week from near Spokane, Wash., almost 400 miles, so as to attend the meeting. On entering the ground, a beautifully shaded spot, I noticed quite a number of small tents and two large ones, the larger of the two arranged with seats, etc., but as I entered the ground no one seemed to notice me. I thought it a little strange, for in my younger days I was familiar with the ways camp meetings were conducted among the Methodists and other denominations, and the rule there was when a stranger came in someone would meet him and welcome him to the meeting, but I found that these people were of a different type, so I looked around and found a large bulletin board and discovered that they were going to hold prayer meeting at 10:30 a.m., so as I had just received a copy of the Mail Tribune, took a seat under the tent and commenced to read it, but as I entered the tent I noticed a few men reclining in the straw, but thought nothing of that, but soon the men began to collect, and by 10:30 o'clock there were probably twenty-five or thirty men collected, and just then a very large man shouted, "Let us pray," and then all hands commenced to pray, I suppose, for there was such a confused noise that I could not understand much that was said, for it seemed that each one tried to make more noise than his neighbor, and then the women began to come in and join in the tumult. In addition to the noise they made they seemed to work themselves into a frenzy by pounding the air when the large man pulled off his coat, then his vest, necktie and collar, and many of the men followed in his steps, and after they kept this up for fully five minutes some of the women began to retire, and as one of them passed me I asked, "How long will they keep this up?" and she replied, "Until lunch time." I remained until 11:30 and retired, contrasting the praying session with the one recorded in I Kings, 18:25-40. I did not for a moment doubt the sincerity of the people, but it was all so new to me.
    Among the places of interest I visited was the city of Vancouver, Wash. We took the street car and after traveling for eight or ten miles the first thing we knew the conductor called on each of us for 5 cents, and in a very short time he called on us again for another nickel, and on inquiry as to why he did so, was informed that the first payment was for the ride to the city limits, the next was to the bridge, and the third was for crossing the bridge. The bridge is the great interstate bridge between Oregon and Washington, and they charge everyone a nickel for crossing, and thus get back the money paid out for its construction. It is, counting the approaches, about two miles long, and one of the sights in that part of the country, but one cannot see its beauty and grandeur from the car window, as we ride across it, but when crossing the railroad bridge just below it, one has a fine view of it, and in riding on the interstate bridge has a fine view of the railroad bridge. The city of Vancouver, Wash., is beautifully laid out with its broad streets and avenues, parks and various places of interest, and about a half mile from the business part of the city is the barracks, where at the time I was there were quartered about 6000 soldiers. The time I went to the barracks I was accompanied by my daughter and her sister-in-law, and you would have smiled if you could have seen me with a lady on each arm promenading the walks of the parade ground--just between you and me, they were afraid that I would get run over, but I came out all O.K.
    Going back to the city, we took lunch and then returned to the soldiers' quarters, as Mrs. Donald wished to see a young friend of hers who was in the hospital, and we could not see him until the afternoon, and when we were admitted we met a youth about 19 years old, a new recruit, who had just been vaccinated, and of all the homesick boys I ever saw, I think that he was the limit. It was the first time he had ever been away from home to stay, and he being sick and under military rule, something entirely new to him, he looked at first as though he did not know which to do, laugh or cry. During the hours we were on and around the military grounds, there was a constant stream of men, drilling, getting ready for facing the enemy. They all seemed to be cheerful, and a finer-looking lot of young men I never saw.
    But I find that I am making this letter too long, so will close for this time, and the next time I write will tell something about what I saw on the route from Portland to 
Lamont and its surroundings, and from Lamont to Spokane, and on to Colville and here in the country nine miles from Colville.
    J. M. Lewis Ranch, 7-21-17.

Medford Mail Tribune, July 26, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Died--Kenneth Robert, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney, died at the home of Mrs. Courtney's sister, Mrs. W. E. Hammond, Tuesday evening, July 24. R. R. Minter and Sam Courtney arrived that day, the father and husband of Mrs. Courtney; the former from Coos Bay, where he had been at work, the latter from California, where he was employed.
    Mr. Graham returned home last Friday from Klamath, where he was working for a few days. He sold his team of mules while away.
    Mrs. Watkins' sister, Mrs. Hess, of Medford, visited here a few days last week.
    Mr. Robertson was in Medford last week on business.
    Marshall Minter was in Butte Falls Sunday.
    Mr. Schleichert and family of Medford visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
    T. J. Pullen, Lewis Robertson and the Misses Mary Robertson, Alice and Maude Schleichert, took a trip to Prospect this week.
    Miss Anna Robertson visited Mrs. Watkins Sunday night.
    Mrs. Pettegrew and Miss Ethel Ewen visited at Mr. Robertson's Friday.
    W. E. Hammel is having his house repainted. Sam Courtney is doing the work.
    The singing at Mr. Crandall's last Friday night was well attended. They expect to meet again next Saturday night, August 4.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno is stocking up with White Leghorn chickens. She purchased the same at Mr. Stowell's.
    Frank Johnson was in Central Point Monday on business.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 2, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had given an account of my trip from Portland to Lamont and a partial sketch of the scenery along the route, although one riding on the cars, with the small low windows, for the windows on the S.P.&S. cars are much smaller than on the S.P. and so low down that it is difficult for one to see anything to advantage from a car window, compared to traveling in an auto or a carriage, but I saw enough to convince me that there is much better country in Southern Oregon than there is along the route I had traveled over.
    The town of 
Lamont is one of the many towns that was built up along the S.P.&S.R.R. and is situated in a rich farming country and as it fell to my lot to spend a week in and around the town and my stay was with one of the merchants, a nephew of Mrs. Howlett's by marriage, I had the privilege of meeting quite a number of the leading farmers in that section and asked quite a number of questions about the country, and in addition to that rode out on to the farming community. But before I begin to tell about the farming community, I wish to say something of what I saw and heard in the town. Lamont is strictly an inland town situated about fifty miles from Snake River and is surrounded by a sparsely settled community of farmers who do the most of their trading in Lamont, although there are other small towns close by along the R.R. lines. In the town they have a new-looking school house and three churches and before the state went dry they supported three saloons. There are about three hundred inhabitants. The town incorporated and of course is heavily in debt. They have a water system. A large well at the foot of a hill in the edge of town, from which they pump water into a reservoir on the hill, thus giving fire protection as well as a good supply of water for domestic and irrigation purposes, on a small scale. I suggested to some of the leading citizens that they could put in an electric plant right at the foot of the hill, taking water from the reservoir for the power to run the dynamo, and thus have lights and power, but they invariably protested that it was out of the question, as the town was already in debt so deep, that their taxes were almost unbearable. I noticed that the merchants do business very much as we did in Jackson Co., Ore., in an early day, the farmers come in, hand the list of goods desired to the merchant and go about other business and the bill is charged. In many instances the account runs from one harvest to the next, but they the merchants say that they lose but very little on account of bad debts, but they always put on an extra profit to cover all such losses. To give an idea of how they do business up in this part of Washington, I will specify two instances. Last fall, when flour and salt was as low as they were likely to get, Mr. H. laid in five thousand dollars worth of flour and three carloads of salt and sold them with the raise, thus cleaning up a nice little fortune on just those two articles, and he will sell anything a farmer wants from a hand rake to a combined harvester.
    After spending a few days in town, I was met by my granddaughter and her husband and taken to their home out in the wheat belt, and to the casual observer the rolling hills look more like waste desert land, a volcanic ash that is so light that it will fly worse than ashes, but when one gets close enough to examine the products of the stuff, for it don't look like soil, he begins to wonder where any dampness comes from to produce such grain.
    But the mystery was solved when I saw how they farm in that country. As soon as they get their spring crop in the ground they commence to plow for the next season's crop, using generally about one-half of the ground for crops each year. After plowing the land thoroughly, they then harrow it down smooth and let it lay until vegetation begins to grow, then they harrow it over again until it is all powdered and if vegetation starts again they go over it again with the harrow, and as soon as they can, after the rain generally in July or August, they sow the wheat in the dust and the ground has been so thoroughly worked that it is a complete mulch and the wheat starts to grow, and as soon as the grain is a few inches high they begin to pasture it off and keep it down until the rain, generally snow, comes. But I imagine I hear some of our E.P. farmers complain that they can't farm in that way in our country, but there it is different on the farm joining the one where I was stopping. They had two ten-mule teams and were running four harrows, two thirty-foot and two twenty-foot broad, and there was such a fall of dust followed them that the drivers could hardly see their teams. The land is very hilly and in some places it looked as though it would be impossible to run a binder of header over them, but they do and the result is that generally they harvest from forty to fifty bushels of wheat and sixty to ninety bushels of oats or barley. You don't find any "For Sale" signs on those farms. This part of the country is much better watered than the country around Pilot Rock of which I wrote some four years ago.
    There is one serious drawback to that country and that is there are vast tracts of the country that are covered with rock that is good for nothing but pasture, but it is good for that and the places are interspersed with springs and lakes and generally quite level and even these places have oases of very rich land. I noticed one place in particular in one of the rocky tracts of about forty or fifty acres where the men were cutting grain hay and it seemed to be very rank and thick. While I was out to my grandson's place, he took me out riding in his Ford through the grain belt so that I had a fine view of that part of the country, and while I do not fancy it for a home, it is too mountainous [see August 13 letter, below], as there is scarcely a tree to be seen except occasionally an orchard, but the thousands of acres of wheat, oats and barley surely looked good to me.
    But I see that I am getting this letter too long, so will close for this time, and the next time will tell about the country between Lamont and where I am now, nine miles from Colville.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 6, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. Robertson was at Mr. Hammel's one day last week.
    The Misses Mary Robertson, Alice and Maude Schleichert visited at Mr. Pettegrew's one day last week.
    The Misses Alice and Maude Schleichert returned to their home in Medford last Thursday, after a two weeks' visit at the home of Mr. Robertson.
    W. E. Hammel and wife, Sam Courtney and wife, called at Mr. Robertson's last Thursday evening.
    Mr. Graham was in Medford Thursday on business.
    Sam Courtney was in Medford Friday on business.
    Mrs. Sam Coy visited Mrs. Hammel and Mrs. Courtney last Thursday.
    Mr. Dougherty, the Raleigh man, was in this community last week calling on his customers.
    Ellen McCabe visited Ethel Ewen Sunday.
    Charley Pettegrew is working at Wilfred Jack's this week.
    The Robertson boys are hauling wood this week.
    W. E. Hammel and wife, Sam Courtney and wife visited at R. R. Minter's Sunday.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno was at Mrs. Crandall's a few days last week.
    Mrs. Dick Johnson visited her mother, Mrs. Grant Mathews, Monday.
    The little threshing machine is in the neighborhood. A good many are availing themselves of the opportunity to thresh.
    Dick Johnson, Alex. Vestal, Bert Clarno are among the number that have threshed.
    Charley Pettegrew visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday,

Medford Mail Tribune, August 8, 1917, page 5



EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    As it has been some time since I have written for the Medford Mail Tribune I have concluded to write again, as there is so much to tell of this wonderful country, but before I proceed any further I wish to correct a mistake as regards to the general appearance of the country around Lamont. In the letter published August 6th the printer made me say in speaking of that country for a home, that the country was too monotonous; he made me say it was too mountainous, when in fact it is not a mountainous country at all, but simply rolling prairie land. The hills are not very high, but the land is broken by hills and vales, with scarcely a tree to be seen, but after my spending sixty-five years of my life in the hills and mountains of California and Oregon, where I could look in almost any direction and see mountains and timber on every side. The surroundings of that part of Washington did. not appear very attractive to me, but perhaps if I was sixty-five years younger it might be more attractive. As I drew nearer to Spokane the country began to look more like our beloved Oregon, with the exception of the soil. It still had the same blue, ashy appearance and is so light that the least disturbance causes a fog of dust to raise that will almost smother an uninitiated one, but the people in this part of the country don't seem to notice it any more than we do a little "sticky."
    The city or town of Colville is situated in the northeastern part of the state of Washington, about thirty-five miles west of the Idaho line and perhaps forty or fifty miles from British Columbia. It is one of the oldest towns or cities in the state, as it used to be one of the important trading posts in the early history of Hudson Bay companies' trading with the Indians during the life of Mr. McLoughlin. It is now a city of about 8000 inhabitants and the most of the buildings are modern and up to date. There seems to be considerable business done and presents signs of thrift and prosperity. They have good schools and churches--in speaking about the churches I asked one of the business men the other day while I was there how many churches they had in the city and he began to enumerate them. The Methodist, Presbyterian, Baptist. etc., until he named seven, and I asked if they all had church buildings, and he said that the most of them had. Among the manufacturing establishments they have a sawmill, planing mill, sash and door factory, grist mill and the usual amount of other branches, such as blacksmith and wagon and cabinet shops, and the place presents a lively appearance. The streets are very wide and are in a good condition; kept clean yes, very clean, considering the character of the soil, although the surrounding country is altogether different from what it is around Lamont, for Colville is surrounded by high hills, not mountains such as we have in Oregon, but simply high hills covered in many instances with timber, pine and tamarack and fir. This is cleared off and made into lumber and posts. The tamarack is used for fence posts and the timber that cannot be thus utilized is slashed and burned and then the land is cultivated, but before it is cultivated it burned over in order to destroy the pine leaves or needles, and take the turpentine off the land. The most of the land seems to be free from rock and is easily cultivated after it is cleared. Instead of burning the stumps out of the ground they use powder and blow them out and then have to remove them off the land, although some of the farmers are getting rid of the stumps by boring an auger hole in the center of a stump and putting in a small quantity of saltpeter, filling the hole with coal oil and stopping it up, and after a few months setting fire to it, and as the saltpeter and coal oil have permeated every part of the stump, it readily burns, and thus are entirely rid of the stump, roots and all--a cheap way of clearing the land. The land is very productive as a rule, generally producing from thirty to forty bushels of wheat and from fifty to sixty bushels of oats and barley to the acre, although this season it is here, as it is all over the coast, the extreme hot spell in July and the unusual dry spell, for I see in the Medford Mail Tribune that during the month of July they have had no rain, and here the farmers are complaining that they cannot sow their winter wheat on account of the drought, as they have to depend on rain in July or the first part of August for moisture to bring up the wheat and keep it growing. More anon.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 13, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. and Mrs. Hammel and Mr. and Mrs. Courtney motored to Medford last Wednesday.
    Johnnie Caster was in Medford last week.
    Miss Anna Robertson was in Medford Wednesday of last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caster were in Medford and Jacksonville last Thursday, where Mr. Courtney went to take the physical examination, he having registered in Stockton, Cal., and his number among the ones drawn.
    Mrs. Hess of Medford visited her sister, Mrs. Watkins, a few days this week.
    Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Hammel, and Mr. and Mrs. Courtney visited their cousins in Rogue River.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ayres of Reese Creek, Mr. and Mrs. Freeman Newport and daughter of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. William Perry and daughters, Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ayres and baby of Eagle Point all took their dinner Sunday and spent the day on the river fishing, but with no success as regards to fish.
    Sunday, after Sunday school at Reese Creek, T. J. Pullen, Miss Anna and Mary Robertson went to the Sunday school group gathering of the Sunday school near the 401 ranch.
    While going over a rough place in the road the car gave a lurch and jostled Miss Anna against the car and cut her nose so badly she had to be taken to Medford and have a stitch taken.
    The Little machine threshed at Mr. Pettegrew's the first of the week.
    Elmer Robertson has charge of Frank Rhodes' machine this year. They threshed Mr. Rhodes' and from there [went] to Frank Caster's.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres and Mr. H. Watkins were in Medford Tuesday.
    John Minter returned Monday from the fire belt in the hills, where he has been fighting fires for the last few weeks. The fires are still bad in places.
    R. R. Minter has gone to Crater Lake to work.
    Ethel Ewen is helping Mrs. Frank Caster cook for threshers.
    Leland Pettegrew has not been well for a few days.
    Earl Brittsan was in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. I. Brittsan of Medford visited their son, Earl Brittsan, and family Sunday.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Louis Gibson, a girl, Monday, August 13. Mother and daughter are doing nicely.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 18, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Miss Hattie Howlett of Eagle Point visited at Mr. Hammel's last Thursday.
    Mrs. Pettegrew's sister-in-law, Mrs. Wright, is visiting her for a few days.
    Mrs. Pullen, Mrs. Robertson, T. J. Pullen and the Misses Anna and Mary Robertson went to Ashland Sunday to attend church.
    Last Saturday several from this vicinity went to the Alta Vista orchard, where they were having packing school, teaching how to pack pears.
    The Little threshing machine has pulled in for the season. They had a short run, the crop not being very good.
    Myrtle Minter visited Miss Ethel Ewen last Friday night.
    Mrs. Dick Johnson and Miss Myrtle Minter visited Mrs. Johnson's mother, Mrs. Grant Mathews, Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Perry and Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Smith and Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ayres of Eagle Point visited their parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres.
    Mrs. Ayres and Mrs. Isabel visited Mrs. Watkins Tuesday.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 23, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I tried to give a partial account of the city of Colville and now will try to tell something of the valley of Colville. It is situated on other side of the Colville River; it runs through a beautiful valley about 60 miles in length and an average width of about one and a half miles, although in some places it is six or seven miles wide; the land is generally quite level and as a rule very productive and is particularly adapted to the growing of wheat, oats and barley, although the soil is generally of the same character as the rest of the soil in central and eastern Washington, a volcanic ash. The valley is interspersed with small towns along the railroad that runs through the valley. The Colville River is a good-sized stream and was originally quite shallow and during the spring and early summer seasons overflowed its banks inundating a large portion of the valley, but in the course of time the farmers dredged the river bed and made it deep enough to carry off the most of the surplus water and the result is that during the dry season, such as they have had this summer, the land lacks moisture with the result that the crops are short of what they would be if they had let the natural flow of water spread over it, although the water is used to a certain extent for irrigating purposes and as a rule the most of the farmers are on "easy street." The land, as a rule, is owned by the occupants or else the owners live in the towns or cities and hire laborers to cultivate and tend the land; occasionally you will find a tenant on a farm but as a rule when you do they are so bound up that the owner of the land gets the "lion's share." As in some instances at least the tenant is required to do a certain amount of extra work, for instance a part of the land may have been "laid off" and the stumps are left and the tenant will be required to remove the stumps off of the land and then give a certain percent of the grain or hay, putting it in the barn, granary or sacks, or it may be the owner will require the tenant to summer fallow a part of the place and then the owner will plant the ground in corn for his silo, when if the land would be left without any crop it would produce a much greater quantity of wheat. The valley is bounded on the sides by a mountainous country and the hills are covered with some fine bodies of timber and as a matter of course they have a number of sawmills all along the valley and some of them are employing quite a number of men in that branch of industry; in fact this part of Washington is quite lively. One thing that I have noticed with the farmers is that the most of them own their own machinery, such as gang plows, seeders, binders or headers, and in many instances threshers. They have a small thresher, run by a gasoline engine with all the modern attachments, blower, band cutter, self-feeder, etc., as they require no horses and but very few men, barely enough to get the grain to the machine and take it away. These machines are generally used in the immediate neighborhood where they are owned, and the neighbors exchange work and by that means get through with the harvest in short order with but very little expense. There seems to be but very little attention paid to the fruit industry in this section of the country, I judge, from the fact that I have seen but very few orchards since I left Oregon, but the grain makes up for it as this is truly a great country for grain although this season the complaint is general that the extreme hot weather in July has damaged the grain and in many places has ruined it. I noticed in some instances that the wheat is badly shriveled and on examination of the oats find that there is nothing but the hull of the grain but that was caused by a heavy freeze they had July 28. But I will tell more about the climate in my next.
    I see that I gave the number of inhabitants of Colville as 8000 and it should have been 2000.
    More anon.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 25, 1917, page 3


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Medford Mail Tribune I tried to give a partial description of the Colville Valley and some of its surroundings, but omitted to mention that the mining interests are attracting considerable attention. Near here there is a mine of copper and lead and another of asbestos, but they have neither of them been fully developed because they are so far from the railroad that is difficult to get the necessary machinery in to develop them although the owners of the copper mine have done considerable development work on it last season.
    The lumber interests are among the leading industries of this section. As I came out to Colville from my present home, that of my son-in-law, James M. Lewis, I passed through a fine body of yellow pine timber. Although I failed to see any sugar pine timber such as grows so plentifully in our Southern Oregon forests, but the yellow pine timber seems to be the equal to that in Jackson. I am now within hearing distance of two saw mills that are sending out qualities of fine lumber to the eastern market.
    This valley, if it should be called a valley--for the land is more or less broken, although it is a farming community--is situated on two streams--the Pend Oreille River and Norris Creek, which are quite large streams. The river rises in the 
Pend Oreille lake, a lake of some note in this section, as it is noted as a summer resort where hundreds of the citizens go to spend a few days, or in some instances weeks, during the hot weather. It is situated in the high mountains and consequently is a fine summer resort. It is noted for its abundant supply of fine fish, as well as the scenery surrounding it.
    But I started in to say something about the valley itself, although without the lake and the river the valley itself would be of little value, as the farmers have to depend on these for moisture, not that they use it for irrigation purposes altogether, but to a certain extent, and by that means raise clover, alfalfa, etc.
    The soil is very much like the rest of the soil in Eastern Oregon--of volcanic ash--and here in this section I notice that from a foot to three feet below the surface that there is a heavy white clay subsoil that is very hard when dry, in fact so hard that it has to be blasted like rock, and still, when wet, is as soft and pliable as potters' clay. This strata is about five or six feet thick and then comes a strata of gravel.
    The soil is generally quite productive, but some seasons, like this, the crop is generally light. This is attributed to two causes. First, last fall when it commenced to rain it continued cold and froze the ground solid and then the snow fell on the frozen ground and laid on until spring, and then went off with a Chinook wind while the ground was frozen, and the result was that there was little moisture entered the ground, and when the hot weather came in July, it simply dried up everything in the vegetable line. This result is that there is not even a half crop of grain in this part of Washington.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 29, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    W. H. Crandall was in Medford one day last week.
    Mrs. Pettegrew was at Mrs. Roundtree's last Thursday and Friday, sewing.
    Earl and John Brittsan's mother, Mrs. R. I. Brittsan, of Medford, visited them a few days last week.
    T. J. Pullen and mother moved to Eagle Point last week.
    Owen Conover was up in the hills last week, looking after and salting his cattle. He says they are looking well.
    Mr. and Mrs. Graham returned from Crater Lake a week ago Monday. They had a nice trip. They were at home a week, taking care of things and resting up, preparing to go to Klamath Falls to work.
    Mrs. Vestal went to Medford Saturday to visit for a few days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hammel and Mrs. Watkins were in Medford Saturday.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney was in Medford last Friday.
    Mrs. Isabel took some chickens to Medford Friday. She was preparing to go to Klamath Falls to join Mrs. Isabel, who has been working in that country for some weeks past.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel started Monday in their car for a short pleasure trip to Klamath Falls. Mr. and Mrs. Graham and Mrs. Isabel went with them as far as the falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. Regan of Derby visited at Mr. Brittsan's last week.

Medford Mail Tribune, August 30, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    R. R. Winter came home from Crater Lake last week to remain a few days. He started to the lake again Monday and got as far as Mr. Caster's, when he took sick and had to be brought home.
    H. Watkins came home from Crater Lake last Wednesday, where he had been for some [time] past. He reports good weather while there, also good treatment for men and horses.
    Marshall Minter and Owen Conover started to the lake this week with their teams, where they expect to work. John Minter has also gone to the Lake.
    Charley Pettegrew, while cutting bands last week on the Rhodes threshing machine, stepped onto the feeder table, slipped and fell on the belt and was carried half way to the engine before being thrown off. He received a bruised arm and badly sprained shoulder. He is now carrying his arm in a sling. He is going to school this week, however.
    Wayman Bergman, who is working at Fort Klamath, got peach hungry and his mother sent him a box of peaches by express.
    Tom Vestal, who has been working at Fort Klamath for several weeks past, came down home on the stage last Saturday.
    Reese Creek school began Monday, with Miss Kitty Mayes as teacher.
    Laurel Hill school began Monday also.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney have rented a house in Eagle Point, where they expect to live while picking pears at the Alta Vista orchards.
    Misses Anna and Mary Robertson began packing pears at the Ringwood orchard Monday.
    Mrs. Roundtree is packing in Eagle Point this week.
    Mr. Hammel is picking his pears this week.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    I have just received the Mail Tribune of August 29 containing my last letter to that lively newspaper and am reminded that it is time that I was getting to work to write again.
    In speaking of newspapers I have been showing some of the people up here in northeastern Washington some of the copies of the D.M.T. and some of them are paying high compliments to the management of the paper and speak very encouragingly of it, especially the bold and fearless editorials and the fine class of correspondents as well as the typographical appearance of the paper. While we are receiving the two Colville papers, the Examiner and the Statesman Index and the Spokesman-Review of Spokane, there is noticeable deficiency in the correspondence, one of the most attractive features of the Mail Tribune barring, of course, the editorials, for they take the lead in every respect of everything. I have noticed that where they give any news items that it is hard to trace the item to its original source and especially with the two Colville papers that they use a very large amount of plate news. But I didn't intend to write a dissertation on newspapers or to criticize the makeup of the Washington papers but was forced to notice the difference between them and the Southern Oregon papers. Since I last wrote for the D.M.T. I have had the privilege of riding over some more of this wonderful country, yes wonderful on account of its makeup, for as one rides over it he is struck with the beauty of the landscape and the primitive appearance of some of the places, for here you can see the good old-fashioned log houses, chinked and daubed with the white clay that I spoke of in my last, and almost everyone in this section (out in the country from eight to 16 miles from the county seat, Colville) have a cellar dug in the yard and roofed ever with first small logs six or eight inches through, and then covered over with dirt so as to keep out the heat and cold both and by that means keep butter cool and in the winter keep their vegetables from freezing. The most of the farms in this section are small or at least the cultivating land is in small patches where the timber has been laid off and cleared and is generally hilly and in some places is quite stony, although as a rule, from what I can learn, it produces quite well. The principal crops here are wheat, oats, barley and potatoes, although in some instances the frost comes too early for the potatoes to mature and it is no country for corn, as the soil does not seem at all adapted to corn. What I have seen looks very sickly and grows very short ears. In places where they have water to irrigate they raise alfalfa and clover, but they do not grow as well as they do in a lower altitude. I have been trying to ascertain the altitude here but have not been able to do so, but according to the accounts of the fall of snow here, the old settlers claim that it sometimes falls five or six feet deep and lays on for five months. They have freaks in nature here as well as elsewhere, for instance the night of the 28th of July there was a freeze here that froze the water in the horse trough to a depth of 3/16ths of an inch, and ever since then it has been cold enough to require a good supply of bedclothes to keep warm and in the morning one needs a good warm coat, but later in the day it got quite warm for a few hours. The threshing machine will be here next week and then I can tell more about this country.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 6, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    Since my last to the Mail Tribune I have had the privilege of seeing some more of this wonderful country. The first of this week we, that is, my daughter, Mrs. J. M. Lewis, her son Edward, and my wife and I took a drive out into the regions of the White Lake country and in the drive we passed the White Mule Lake, a small lake situated in the hills northeast of Colville, one of the lovely resorts where the pleasure-seeker can resort for a day's rest and social enjoyment, and then we passed another small, deep lake, and when the name was announced I naturally inquired how deep it was and was informed that they had never found any bottom to it, that the bottom seemed to go out from the bank until it reached a certain point from the shore and then simply dropped off over a perpendicular bluff. I inquired if there were any fish in the lake and was told that fish had been put in the lake, but that for some reason they didn't live, perhaps owing to some mineral in the water. After traveling over what is called the state road, a wide and well-built dirt road but extremely dusty, in fact all of the roads seem to be properly graded and are generally plenty wide for two teams to pass, but the nature of the ground is such that the travel over them naturally cuts them up, making them rough to ride over, and dusty. We finally came to the White Lake, a beautiful, clear body of water about a mile long and varying in width from a few rods to a quarter of a mile and surrounded by low, grass-covered hills, or what people from the East or Middle West would call a mountain.
    Passing on through a timber belt in the course of a few miles we came to where a California company were developing a mining plant. Dolomite, a low grade of magnesite, to be used in the manufacturing of paper; the rock from which [it] is extracted looks like marble. They have several furnaces already for operation and are putting in a quantity of machinery. The company is giving employment to a number of men and the prospect is that the plant will prove to be of considerable value to the community. The harvesting up here is about over; the thresher is in this neighborhood now. The grain is proving to be of a very inferior quality, owing to the extreme hot weather in July on the one hand and also to the freeze on the 28th of July. I am still with my son-in-law, J. M. Lewis, but expect to start for Seattle on Wednesday the 12th, where I expect to spend a few days on my way home. More anon.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 13, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    A week ago today I wrote my last article for the Mail Tribune, and so I am reminded that if I wish to keep my record unbroken--for the last 34 years I have written from one to five letters for publication every week--and I don't wish to break the record, especially while I am on a trip visiting my relatives and friends.
    Wednesday noon I bade farewell to my daughter and granddaughter, Mrs. J. M. Lewis and Mrs. J. E. Lewis, at the depot in Colville and took the train for Spokane, traveling over the same country that I passed over on the nineteenth day of July, so saw but little that was new to me, although I perhaps saw some things that I did not notice on my other trip, but when I passed over the route before the grain was standing, uncut, but this time the most of it was standing in the shock or stack, as the grain did not seem to be so forward as it was out in the country where I have been staying for the past seven weeks, for out there the most of the farmers are through with their threshing, and I am sorry to say that the crops didn't turn out as well as the farmers had expected, for in some instances the grain was almost a complete failure, ranging from five to 25 bushels an acre. But to return to the trip to Spokane. All along the route one could see farms scattered along and as a rule where I saw cows and hens I saw generally good, substantial buildings and fences, and where the order was reversed, no cows and few chickens, the places had a woebegone appearance, but some of the farms looked like what we call out in Southern Oregon "squirrel ranches," poor land and still poorer management, but as a rule the farms presented a fair appearance. We passed several towns along the route and as a rule they looked neat and prosperous. After riding on the train for a little over three and a half hours I reached Spokane and found that city full of business and stir, and after a few minutes I engaged a room at the Montana Hotel, where I had a good bed by paying 75 cents. After securing my room I took a stroll over a part of the city and wherever I went I noticed that there seemed to be considerable activity and the merchants appeared to be busy in most of the shops and stores. After supper I attended a movie show where I spent an hour or so very pleasantly and then went to my room to sleep, but just imagine a country man trying to sleep in a hotel on a corner of the street where the street cars passed every minute going four ways and in addition to their noise other kinds of noises, but I managed to sleep and by 5 o'clock a.m. was ready for my day's work, or rather for my day's travel. After breakfast I procured a copy of the Spokesman-Review and read until train time, 7:55, when I took the train for Seattle. I was quite fortunate in taking train No. 1, as it did not stop but a few times during the day and then only a short time at each place, the first stop they made being at Harrington, a run of 50 miles through a thinly settled country. In fact almost all of the country we passed through was sparsely settled, for it was what is known as "the wheat belt" and the farms are generally very large, often containing one or more sections, 640 acres in a farm and in some instances two or three sections. The land is what they call dry land, and in order to secure a crop the land is plowed either in the fall or spring and then cultivated all summer to keep down the weeds and the seed sown in the latter part of the summer or early fall, as the land does not produce well where it is sown in the spring, but as a rule where the land is properly cultivated the yield is good, although this season the hot weather in July damaged the grain very much, as from what I can learn there was a shortage in the yield this season of from 30 to 50 percent. But I see that I am getting this letter too long, so will have to close for this time, but the next time will try to tell more about this wonderful country, as I have notes on the fruit belt as well as the grain country.
Seattle, Wash., [September] 15, 1917.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 19, 1917, page 7


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mrs. Pettegrew, Miss Mayes and Miss Ethel Ewen called at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
    Carl Bergman and Miss McDougal were at Reese Creek Sunday school Sunday morning, then visited at W. H. Crandall's the remainder of the day.
    Frank Caster called at Mr. Watkins' Saturday.
    Tom Vestal is working at Crater Lake.
    Mr. Robertson and Mr. Crandall were in Medford on business Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caster moved to Medford this week, where he expects to work.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel is recovering from a severe attack of tonsillitis.
    Mr. Hammel has been hauling wood to Eagle Point the last few days.
    Mr. Cowden and family of Butte Falls are moving on Frank Rhodes' place for the winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Graham returned home Tuesday from Klamath Falls.
    The Messrs. Stiles are hauling straw.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 22, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was in Seattle, Wash., and was giving an account of what I saw along the route from Spokane to that city, and when I closed my letter [I] had just given an account of passing the city of Harrington that is situated in the edge of the great wheat belt of the state of Washington. After leaving there we pass through a country that was diversified with hills and vales and in many instances did not have the appearance of a productive country, but we occasionally would see teams of four, six and in one instance of eight horses or mules with two wagons loaded with grain, and nearby would see large warehouses along the railroad track for the storing of wheat, for that is the principal production of the soil. And soon we came to another town, Odessa, where everything looked as though the people were alive and prosperous, for by this time we were getting into the very heart of the wheat belt, and while some would be hauling their grain to the warehouse, others would be threshing, and some would still have the grain in the shock, but everything presented the appearance of thrift and prosperity. About 20 miles from Odessa we came to the  thriving city of Wilson Creek, and there we discovered a change not only in the soil but also in the character of the products, for by this time we were entering a farming community where they seemed to raise something besides wheat, oats and barley, for I began to see quite a number of orchards and the houses seemed to be closer together, for through the exclusive wheat belt the houses are so far apart that they can have no rural free delivery routes and it looked as though they were almost destitute of schools or churches, and in many instances we would travel for miles and not see a house or a tree, and to the casual observer it looks more like a dreary waste than a rich farming country, but now orchards and occasionally a cornfield made things look more homelike. The next place of note was the Wenatchee Valley, where our eyes feasted on the fine orchards and more of diversified farming. Here we passed through one of the beauty spots of Washington, and as we looked out of the car window we were reminded of our own beautiful Rogue River Valley. Leaving here we began to ascend a stream that I supposed to be the Wenatchee River, and as we went on up the river the country began to change in appearance, for we soon began to encounter timber and the soil was of a lower grade until we soon began to come to saw mills and realize that we were approaching the Cascade Range, but on and on we went, up and up, and I began to anticipate again witnessing the beautiful scenery crossing the Cascades, but in this I was to a certain extent disappointed, for when we began to reach the higher points where the scenery was so beautiful when I crossed over the road some seven or eight years ago, I found that the railroad company had built snowsheds along the most dangerous points and so shut off the beautiful landscape to a great extent, but still the scenery is sufficient to justify the trip if one has any business in that section of the country. After we had wound our way to the summit of the mountain and began to descend we were then about 250 miles from our starting point, Spokane, and had traveled over one of the finest parts of Washington, truly a wonderful country interspersed with towns and cities every few miles, although the train that I came on only stopped about 10 or 12 times on the whole route. I arrived in Seattle at 8 p.m., and was met by my niece, Mrs. C. F. Hammargren, with whom I spent a few days very pleasantly, and the next time I write will have something to say as to what I saw and heard while there.
Portland, Ore., Sept. 21, 1917.

Medford Mail Tribune, September 24, 1917, page 4


REESE GREEK RIPLETS
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnson, a six-pound girl; mother and daughter are doing nicely.
    Mrs. San Courtney is helping Mrs. Howlett at the Sunnyside; Mrs. Howlett has been confined to her bed,
but is improving.
    Several from this vicinity attended the fair at Medford last week; among the number were Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel, the Misses Mina and Myrtle Minter.
    Gene Bellows was in Medford Tuesday on business.
    Miss Diehless Minter, who has been In Minnesota for the past year attending business college, after visiting relatives in California on her return trip, arrived Tuesday afternoon.
    Missionary G. C. Griffin was at Reese Creek Sunday school Sunday morning and conducted the service which was interesting as well as profitable; he spoke particularly on the prayer life of Daniel. In the afternoon he visited Derby.
    Mr. Griffin took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Hammel Sunday.
    Sunday evening about nineteen or twenty gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Watkins and spent the evening singing, interspersed with Bible characters, also Bible stories.
    Sunday night there was quite a heavy frost, which did more or less damage on low ground.
    Mr,. and Mrs. Conover visited in Central Point the first of the week.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 28, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I gave an account of my trip from Spokane to Seattle, and on reaching the Great Northern depot was met by my niece and her husband and taken to their home, and after a good night's sleep the next day began to look over the city, and after looking over a good portion of it. We visited one of the public markets--a wonderful place. It covers a full block and is so arranged as to accommodate everyone, for here one can procure almost anything desired in the way of eatables, right fresh from the producer, either vegetables, meats or fish of any or all kinds, and.after dinner (supper) we attended a movie show. The next day Mr. H. and wife took me out in their auto to see other parts of the city, and among the different places of interest we visited was the state university grounds, where the state university is situated, and it is needless for me to say that everything connected with the grounds were on a grand scale. The different buildings were so arranged as to impress the visitor with their beauty, and the grounds were so artistically arranged with the different kinds of  shrubbery and trees as to make one wish to linger and enjoy the scenery. But we hurried on to take a look at the Sound and Lake Washington, with the shipping and the various manufacturing establishments.
    When I was here last eight years ago, the city authorities were digging and washing away some of the hills upon which the city was built, and I could see a very material change for the better, but there remains quite a number of the hills yet, but the streets have been so graded that the city presents a fine appearance. As a business  center, Seattle will compare favorably with either Eagle Point, Medford or even Portland.
    The next drive we took was out into White River Valley, some fifteen miles from the city, and as we left the city we rode along the sound for several miles on a hard-surfaced road that was almost as straight as an arrow, but then we turned our course into the timbered country for a short distance, when we entered the White River Valley, and as we proceeded up the river we could see off to our left the coal mines that were being worked, where a quantity of the coal that is used in Seattle is mined, but our object was to visit some of the towns of the valley and see the valley itself.
    As we proceeded, it opened up a large and one of the most beautiful valleys I have seen in the state of Washington. It is mostly level, and the land seemed to be very productive, judging from the shocked grain and standing corn, as well as the green pastures, and these were dotted with generally Holstein cattle, mostly milch cows, for it has the appearance of a dairy country, as almost every farm we passed had from one to three silos, and milch cows were to be seen on almost every turn.
    Among the many things of interest that attracted my attention was the cornfields and alfalfa, but the corn especially, for it seemed so rank and luxuriant I could not but compare it with the corn I saw up near Spokane and Colville.
    The city of Kent, where there is a large milk condensing establishment, a beautiful little inland city with its paved streets and water system, and from what I saw I should think that it was quite a business place.
    Leaving there, we proceeded on up the valley to another lively little town--Auburn, where we took lunch. This town seemed to be considerable of a railroad town, as there seemed to be railroad workshops and a sawmill, also another factory for condensing milk. Here we retraced our steps over as fine a road as anyone could wish, and through one of the finest valleys I have seen on the coast, in some respects equal to our own beautiful Rogue River Valley, and in others superior.
    One thing that I noticed along the route that we traveled was that the farmers not only kept a number of cows, but also a quantity of chickens, and as a natural consequence the farms presented a neat appearance and generally good, substantial barns and neat dwelling houses with the necessary outbuildings. But I must bring this letter to a close or the editor may use the blue pencil.
More anon, Portland, Ore.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 1, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Sunday T. A. Vestal, Mr. and Mrs. Wilfred Jack and children gathered at the home of their parents, Mr. and Mrs. James Vestal, to do honor to James Vestal who was home for the day and expecting to return to the O.A.C. the first of the week.
    Quite a representation from Reese Creek, also from Laurel Hill attended the Sunday school group gathering at Agate last Sunday. They report a good meeting.
    A good many took their horses to Medford Monday, expecting to sell to the government, but only a few succeeded.
    The teaming work at Crater Lake shut down for this season and R. R. and Marshall Minter have returned home.
    John Minter started to Portland Thursday.
    Roy Watkins, while hauling rock on the Wilfley ranch, dropped a rock on his foot, mashing his toes pretty badly and consequently had to take a vacation.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hammel and Miss 
Diehless Minter called at Wilfred Jack's one evening this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 8, 1917, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was in Portland, and then gave an account of my trip from Spokane to Seattle, and now will finish up my journeyings for a while, at least outside of my little local sphere. After spending about a week in that city of the hills, although it is located on Puget Second, I took passage on the Great Northern route for Portland. Wherever I could I selected the daytime to travel, so that I could see the country, for when I made my other trip through Washington I had to travel a good part of the way in the night, and consequently saw but very little of the country through which I passed, but this time I had a fine view of it, considering the difficulties in seeing from a car window. Leaving Seattle at 11:15 a.m., we soon reached the White River Valley, although we passed through a timber country interspersed with farms, but as we began to ascend the river and the valley began to open up to view, I was still more impressed with its beauty and apparent richness. After traveling up the valley some twenty or twenty-five miles and passing through three towns or cities--Kent, Auburn and Puyallup--we began to leave the valley and enter the more hilly and timbered country, where we would every little while come to a large sawmill, and began to partly realize how the strike would affect the owners of the mills, where they had hundreds of thousands of dollars invested, and were compelled to have their business arrangements all frustrated. The most of the country on to the Columbia River was of rather a poor quality, as it appeared to me, for it had the appearance of desert land, at least a large part of it, but that may have been like some other parts of Washington, where the railroad men place the railroad track on poor land to get a solid roadbed. After striking the Columbia River we went on up until we came to the railroad bridge, and then we were soon inside of the corporate limits of Portland, although we had to travel some twelve miles or more to reach the depot, where I was met by my daughter, Mrs. Grant Shaw. After remaining with her about a week I took a trip by jitney out to my brother-in-law's at Damascus, Albert Cooke, and while there he showed me some of his spuds that he was raising, for they were still green, and he estimated that he would have 500 sacks off a little over two acres of land, and while I was there he sold 100 bushels of wheat for $200, and the purchaser took it from the granary and furnished the sacks to put it in. The wheat is of a fine quality.
    My next move was to Clackamas, where I met Frank Foster, formerly of this place. He is now in one of the leading business houses of the city. The same day I took the S.P. for Oregon City, where I spent the night with two more of our relatives. Again taking the S.P. the next morning, my next stop was at Salem, where I met my old friend and benefactor, Dr. Findley; had him fit me out with new glasses, and that night at 10:08 took the S.P. for home, where I arrived in time to get my feet under the table at the Sunnyside at noon.
    On my arrival here I learned that James Jordan had made a trip to Iowa to visit his relatives and returned. That Professor J. C. Barnard had taken charge of our school as the principal; Mrs. Goss of Butte Falls and Miss Pina Benedict, an intermediate and primary teachers; that we have a good attendance and the school is progressing finely. The children say "they are awful strict," which speaks well for the teachers.
    We have had one death in our town during my absence, Mrs. Harnish, the wife of S. H. Harnish, which seemed to cast a gloom over a large part of the community. She left a husband, father and mother, Elder Moomaw and wife, two sons and a daughter, and a number of warm friends. I also miss quite a number of the young men who have volunteered to go in answer to our country's call to defend the principles of democracy, and among them is Robbie Harnish, who was absent at the time of his mother's death.
    J. L. Combs and family of Klamath Falls have moved into the P. H. Daily house and there are quite a number of people moved into the neighborhood this fall to take advantage of our fine school.
    Mrs. Amanda Fitzgerald, one of the pioneers of this section, being a daughter of the late John Mathews, came out Tuesday.
    D. W. Meyers, formerly of Brownsboro, but now of Hell Graham Head, B.C., but before he left he left a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune to be sent to him at the Eagle Point Bank for me.
    Robert A. Neil of Brownsboro called for the night at the Sunnyside and while here renewed his subscription to the W.M.T.
    There were two fine Cotswold bucks came in on the P.&E. train Tuesday for a man on Elk Creek by the name of Olson, who has sheep up there. They were taken out on the stage.
    Noble Zimmerman, one of our hustling young men, who has been up in Washington, returned Friday, took dinner and went on up to Butte Falls. He says that the I.W.W.s won't let people work when they get a job up there.
    There is a middle-aged man here by the name of Wilcox who reports that while he was sleeping in a rooming house in Redding, the room was so warm that he opened the door to let it cool off, and dropped off to sleep, and when he woke up he found his pants that he had laid on a chair in the doorway and $57.39 missing from his pocket, but the thief left nearly $200 and a gold watch undisturbed. The larger amount was paper, and the thief overlooked that. He admits that it was a very careless trick, carrying so much money in his pants pocket, but he knows better now.
    J. P. McCabe passed through town Saturday morning on his way to Medford.
    J. B. Stevens of Tolo passed through town to the agate fields Saturday morning.
    George B. Brown and three of his five little girls motored from Brownsboro, his home, this (Saturday) morning. He brought out some produce to ship on the P.&E.
    B. F. Fuller brought out a lot of household goods for Orville Spencer to be shipped to Medford this a.m.
    Brandon Bros. shipped 1000 pounds of flour to Butte Falls the same day.
    Rudolph Pech, one of the Lake Creek hustlers, came in to the P.&E. depot this morning with five sacks of land plaster and took out three rolls of wire fencing.
    Henry French brought in his regular weekly supply of cream to go to Medford today.
    John Howard, who has been spending the season with Pete Betz, came in today, paid up his subscription to the D.M.T. and started for Los Angeles.
    J. G. McCallister of Lake Creek brought in 150 pounds of mohair for George Brown & Sons today.
    Messrs. M. Liebman, G. W. Liebman and R. S. Putnam are making fruit boxes at the Tronson orchard. They are taking their dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Al Clements, one of our regular boarders, made a flying visit to Ashland Thursday.
    Friday afternoon I called at the Runyard orchard and while there A. G. Bishop renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 9, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. and Mrs. Vestal took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Graham Sunday.
    Ethel Ewen took dinner at Mr. Watkins' Sunday.
    
Diehless Minter is working at the Pruett Hill orchard a few days this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crandall and children visited at Bert Clarno's Sunday. While crossing a ravine about half a mile from the house the coupling broke, separating the front wheels from the back, throwing Mr. and Mrs. Crandall and little baby over the dashboard onto the ground, the baby landing on some rock. The other children did not leave the wagon. None were seriously injured, however, which seems a miracle.
    Mrs. Pullen visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
    Millard Robertson, while riding his bicycle last Saturday, in some way came in contact with a mule and was thrown from his wheel. He was bruised considerably and received quite a shaking up generally. The mule was not injured, however.
    Quite a crowd gathered at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel Sunday evening and spent the time singing, with Bible incidents and stories.
    The forest fires are again raging in the mountains beyond Trail. An auto load went up from this vicinity Tuesday to fight fire.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 10, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. H. Crandall, one of our progressive citizens, farmer and orchardist, has been making regular trips to our town and occasionally makes a trip to Medford. He has been supplying some of our lovers of choice fruits with some excellent peaches the past few days.
    John R. Norris, who has charge of the Fruit Packers and Shippers packing house, was a guest at the Sunnyside Thursday evening for supper. While I was away the company fitted up the old Eagle Point lumber yard warehouse and now the six young ladies who are working there are kept busy packing J. M. Wilfley's apples and from appearances will be kept busy for some time yet.
    E. Persons of Table Rock brought over a load of barley to have it chopped in Brandon Bros.' grist mill last Wednesday.
    Speaking about the Snowy Butte mills reminds me of the predictions made by our chronic kickers when the Brandon Bros. purchased the mill and began to put it in shape for business, and I am glad to be able to say that their predictions of failure amounted to nothing more than idle words, for notwithstanding the scarcity of wheat last year they have managed to keep up a supply of mill stuff and this fall are doing a rushing business so that they have to run the mill from fifteen to twenty-four hours a day and the demand for flour and mill stuff is such that they cannot fully supply the demand.
    Grandma Heckathorn, one of our venerable citizens, has been down to Ashland visiting some of her old-time friends and among them were Frank Swingle and wife, and last Thursday he brought her home to help her daughter, Mrs. Frank Lewis, celebrate her [blank] birthday. Mrs. Lewis requested me not to tell her age. There were no invitations, although Mr. Swingle and wife were among those who partook of the feast. Mrs. S. A. Carlton and Mrs. Sarah E. Hopwood came up from Ashland in the car with him, Mrs. Carlton visiting her aunts, Mrs. T. E. and Mrs. J. M. Nichols, while Mrs. Hopwood visited Mrs. Howlett.
    S. H. Harnish, who has been out in the hills on Antelope, returned and has resumed the carrying of the mail to and from the trains. Speaking of the trains, who have been having a time here lately, or rather the P.&E. railroad company have. The first of the week there was a breakdown with the locomotive so that they were unable to make their regular trip to Butte Falls, so Thursday they took the mail and as many passengers as they could get on the little motor car and started for Butte Falls and just before reaching there they collided with a loaded wood car, crippling the motor quite badly, but they made out to get back as far as Eagle Point where they attached the little gasoline flatcar, that is used to move the section men and material to use on the road, to the motor and hauled it to the Medford depot and laid it up for repairs, but did not bring the mail out, so we had to do without any mail until ten o'clock the next day, but by Saturday they had patched up the locomotive so as to come out but when we--several of us--went to the depot to meet friends, attend to business and gather items of interest, found that the train had not left the Medford depot at ten o'clock a.m., so we retraced our steps, but in the [omission] with the mail and went on up towards Butte Falls but we live in no hopes of having better service in the future.
    Wm. Holman of Lake Creek was among the callers about the middle of the week and so was Grant Wertz, P. L. Miller and A. H. Sunderman, the three men who are canvassing their part of the county in the interest of the Kansas City Life Insurance Company. They had been up to Butte Falls and reported quite good success.
    Miss Minnie Given was among the callers Thursday.
    Frank Brown, of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons, reports that he has fifty fine hogs that he is feeding to sell this fall.
    Mrs. J. H. Trusty of Elk Creek came out with her son Henry, who has the contract to carry the mail between here and Persist, to visit her daughter, Mrs. Amos Ayres.
    Jud Edsall, who is hauling saw logs to the P.&E. tract at the Edsall station for shipment to Medford, broke one of the wheels to his log wagon and came out for repairs Thursday eve. W. L. Childreth did the repairing.
    H. G. Passey, a traveling salesman, and William von der Hellen were among the diners at the S.S. Friday.
    Mrs. G. W. Garrett and little son of Hood River spent the night with us Friday, and Saturday went on up to the L.C. country.
    Mr. Hayworth of L.C. took dinner with us Saturday. He was here on business of a private nature.
    Thomas Lewis shipped a small lot of onions to Derby and Butte Falls Saturday.
    Since my last report J. C. Barnard, principal of our school, has given me a sub. to the D.M.T., and Ed Dutton, G. W. Brandon and Mrs. R. Potter have renewed their subscriptions to the D.M.T.
    John Winningham of Trail was here for dinner Sat. on his way to Red Bluff to bring his father-in-law, Mr. Mathews of Butte Falls, home. He is there on the sick list.
    Mrs. Siler, who has been spending a few days with us, went to Butte Falls Friday with Jud Edsall.
    Susan Hart, E.P., has renewed her sub. to the W.M.T., and later Gus Nichols has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 15, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. and Mrs. Bellows were in Medford one day last week on business.
    Mr. and Mrs. Vestal visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday after Sunday school.
    Miss Mayes visited at Mrs. Pettegrew's Sunday after Sunday school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno, Carl Bergman and Miss McDougal visited at W. H. Crandall's Sunday.
    Mrs. Robertson is suffering from an attack of tonsillitis.
    Miss 
Diehless Minter has a position as stenographer, in the Sun office.
    Johnnie Caster returned from Crater Lake last Friday. There are a few workers left at the lake as yet.
    There have been some slight improvements on the road near Reese Creek the last week, filling in some places and putting gravel on other parts, All these things are appreciated, but still we need more.
    Monday night and Tuesday the smoke cleared away quite perceptibly. The forest fires are evidently under control.
    Almost everyone who is not busy at something else is in the apple orchard helping conserve the fruit.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 17, 1917, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Nygren of Brownsboro came out Saturday and took back with him a full load of wire fencing.
    Nelson Nye, wife, two children and Ed Boothby came out Saturday from their home in the vicinity of Prospect, went to Ashland, visited friends and transacted business, returned, took supper at the Sunnyside and went on up home, about thirty miles, the same day. Surely this is a fast age, compared to what it used to be a few years ago, when it took a day to come out here, over the unmarked roads, another to go to Ashland and attend to a little business, and then two days to make the return trip, whereas now with an auto, even a Ford, they can make the trip and have time to visit. It shows that the auto has become a necessity, especially in the farming community.
    Mrs. Hazel Shaw, recently of Portland, but more recently of Derby, came out Saturday and took a position as one of the operators in the Eagle Point telephone office in the place of Miss Claire Zimmerman, who is taking a two weeks' vacation in the Tronson orchard picking apples for a change. She has taken a room at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Zula Geppert of Butte Falls, who is working in the Pruett Hill orchard, came over Saturday evening and spent Sunday with us, returning Monday morning. There is quite a number of our married ladies, as well as younger ladies, working in the orchards this fall; in fact, laborers are so scarce, especially young men, and there is such a demand for help, and the orchardists are offering such prices, $2.50 a day, that that is quite an incentive to those of the ladies who care to earn a few dollars to help to tide over the winter. I heard of one woman who last Monday morning got up at 1 o'clock and done her week's washing, so that she could walk about two miles in time to go to work picking apples at 7 o'clock. She is a hustler.
    Two of the Bradshaw boys, Percy Haley and his brother Glen, Jay Spitzer, John Foster and Jud Edsall spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside, and all but two took dinner here, and so did S. B. Jackson and wife and Miss Stella Betz.
    Rev. Paul Bandy, our minister, whom we have engaged to preach for us each Sunday evening for a year, beginning July 1, was here as usual on time and gave us another fine sermon on the subject of the "Possibilities of Faith," and announced that next Sunday evening there will be a grand rally, a patriotic meeting, and that Colonel Washburn will be one of the principal speakers, but in addition to him, there will be a number of the prominent in the workers in the conservation movement. Let everybody turn out and learn what the move is for and fill the church building full once more. There is expected to be some of the choice singers of Medford and Central Point with us on the occasion.
    While on the subject of meetings, Mrs. Nettie Grover, who is to receive the money subscribed to pay Mr. Bandy for his services, requests those who subscribed for his support to pay up, as the receipts are rather small so far.
    There has been quite a lot of commercial fertilizer come in on Saturday's train, and among those taking advantage of the product are Lee Bradshaw, Lemon Charley, John Welsh and some others whose names I failed to get, as I was unable to meet the train that day.
    W. E. Crandall, J. L. Robinson, James Johnson, W. C. Daley, Frank Abbott and Mr. Eddington, the foreman on the Corbin orchard, were among the business callers Monday.
    While Mr. Robinson was here he renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., and so did C. R. McIntosh renew his subscription to the D.M.T.
    Saturday morning when the P.&E. arrived there was on the car Mrs. G. H. Adamson, who was recently taken to the hospital in Medford from the Trail section. She has so far recovered as to be able to come this far and will remain here until she more fully recovers. I did not learn the sex of the babe she gave birth to.
    There was also on the same train the body of the late Simon Peter Mathews, who passed away last Sunday, the 14th, in Red Bluff, in charge of John J. Winningham. The corpse was being taken to his old home, Butte Falls. He was quite aged, as he was 86 years of age. I could not get the particulars, as the train started just as Mr. Winningham gave me the above.
    B. M. Howard, the examining engineer of the P.&E., was also on the car on his inspection trip over the road.
    S. A. and Al Johnson of Medford were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday, and so was Otto Meyer and William Holman and Miss Merl Miller of Lake Creek. The young lady went out to Medford in the Lewis jitney, also L. H. Ossman, of Medford, who was out demonstrating the Paige car.
    In the afternoon County Superintendent of Schools G. W. Ager called and we together visited our school, and he addressed the children on the subject of "Conservation of Food," showing the necessity of saving all that we can to help our boys that are now and soon will be in the active service in the front. We found that Professor Barnard had already been teaching the children along these lines.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 18, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the transients at the Sunnyside Hotel Wednesday night were A. G. Baker of Seattle, L. E. King of San Francisco and George Finch of Grants Pass. They were on their way up Little Butte Creek, but were very reticent as to their business. Later while I was up in the Little Butte country I heard of them, but as they requested me not to give them more publicity, although they were not up there exclusively for their health, and I expect, in the near future, to be able to give a more definite account of some of the work that is going on in that section that will cause some of the mossbacks to sit up and take notice.
    The same night there was a very large man--a German--I think his name is Sunderlin. He is peddling spectacles, and although he is a German, he is one of the must bitter enemies of the kaiser I have ever met. N. T. McDonnell and Mrs. L. C. Anderson and her brother, L. H. Ossman, called for supper and later went on up to the Elk Creek hatchery. Mr. Ossman succeeded in making a trade with our banker, J. V. McIntyre, leaving with Mr. McIntyre a new, up-to-date Paige auto, and Mr. Ossman took the car that Mr. McIntyre had and went on up to Elk Creek with his passengers.
    The same night Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Liebman, Mr. Liebman and George Bethel came in and took rooms by the week, as they have taken a contract to pack the apples on the H. P. Tronson orchard and are now engaged putting them up.
    Roy Stanley and Corbett Smith were also among the guests Wednesday night.
    Thursday morning I hitched old Babe to my buggy and started for the Brownsboro and Lake Creek
countries, and when I started in to begin to write receipts I found that I had only five or six receipt blanks with me, so after giving Mrs. C. C. Charley a receipt for $5, began to retrace my steps for home to procure another receipt book, in the meantime calling on several, some of whom I found at home, among them Carl Bieberstedt, but had but two days before been to Medford and renewed his subscription, but while there Mr. Bieberstedt showed me his new dryer that he had just put up, so that he could save at least a part of his enormous crop of fruit, among which is some of as choice apples as I have seen anywhere--in fact the apple crop this year is remarkable for its amount, as well as the quality. Some of them are very large and are well colored. I also met W. E. Butler, who was on the road with his threshing. machine. He had just finished threshing for Joe Pool and his father, W. C. Pool, about a hundred sacks of Sudan grass seed, and was on his way up the creek to thresh a lot of millet seed. I also met William Holman coming out with a four-horse load of stove wood. He has a very large rack that will hold several tiers of stove wooed, and on the return trip he takes back a load of fertilizer, thus killing two birds with one stone. I also called on George B. Brown, one of the rustling farmers and stock raisers, but he was gone up to Four-Mile Lake to bring out his sheep, so did not see him. I also called on Charley Terrill and found that he had paid up in the M.M.T. office, Medford. I also called on Mrs. Ed Tucker, but did no business.
    The next day, Friday, I took another start in a different direction, and the first place where I stopped was at the home of Charley Cingcade but found that he was not at home, and his wife said that they were undecided whether to continue taking the W.M.T. or to stop that and take the Daily Mail Tribune, but would decide later. While there, however, I met David Cingcade, and I renewed his subscription to the W.M.T. From there to Al Turpin's, but found that they were paid up on the D.M.T. up to next spring. My next stop was at the Art Smith orchard, but could not find him, and after looking through the orchard for some time gave up the chase, as I was not sure that he was there, and as he is a bachelor and had no wife to direct the inquirer. I again moved on and after driving over a new road that has just been finished for a short distance I came to where my friend, N. Gorman, lives, and Mrs. G. gave me directions where I could find Mr. G. and J. S. Quackenbush, so tramping for some time at last I found them busily engaged picking apples. Their apples were quite wormy, and they were assorting them as they went, throwing the wormy ones in a wagon, and these were taken to Medford to be used in different ways, realizing a little over $6 a load at the cannery. While there, J. S. Quackenbush renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. Leaving there, my next stop was at the beautiful home of James Owens, where I fed Babe, ate my dinner and learned that James had just a few days before renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. in the office. From there I went to the Rogue River Commercial Orchard, where I found the foreman, J. E. Robins, out at work picking apples, but he was without money in his pocket or check book, so did no business with him. But I met J. E. Reed, and he renewed his subscription to the W.M.T. My next drive was to the Fred Luy farm, but found no one at home or around the place. From there my next drive was to the Dolph Kent farm, but on my arrival learned that a man by the name of Simmons was living there. Here I asked for a subscription for the Mail Tribune, but learned that Mr. Kent's paper was still coming there. Mr. Simmons is a brother-in-law to Mr. Kent, so they were reading his paper before he gets it, and that Mr. Kent had moved some two miles up the creek. I drew a long breath, for the roads are not as smooth as the streets in Medford. But there I learned that Mr. Kent had gone out to hunt for cattle and would not be home until late, so I took another start and landed at the home of John Owens, tired and hungry, where I put up for the night. During the evening Mr. Kent passed by, and as he did not have the cash in his pocket, said that he would send the amount to me by mail. Before we went to bed John Owen renewed his subscription to the W.M.T. Saturday morning I started out again, and passing Mr. Simmons, went back to Fred Luy's place again, but still found no one at home, so turning my course, my next stop was at the elegant home of Thomas Riley, where I met Mrs. Riley, but she said that Mr. R. was somewhere about the place, but she had no idea where, as he did not say where he was going, so after visiting with Mrs. R. for a few moments, resumed my ride.
    My next stop was at the home of R. A. Weideman, but although he was not at home, Mrs. W. invited me in and wrote out a check for $1.50, taking a receipt for a year's subscription to the W.M.T. Bidding Mrs. W. good day, I started for home, where I arrived in time for dinner. So the reader can see what a good time a collector and solicitor for a newspaper has riding over this rough sticky country, through broken-down gates, over plowed ground and in some instances over ground covered with rocks from the size of a man's head to the size of a bushel basket. More anon.
    Since writing the foregoing Thos. Vestal has paid up for two years' subscription to the D.M.T. He is another one of our hustling young men who has been spending the summer out at Crater Lake and comes in with the cash to do business.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 23, 1917, page 7


Reese Creek Riplets
    Tom Vestal returned from Crater Lake last Friday, where he had been working; the road work had shut down for the season but a few remained to pack the tools, etc., before the heavy snows which are prevalent at the lake. Tom is spending a few days in Medford this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Vestal visited at Mr. Wilfred Jack's Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Minnick of Central Point visited Mrs. Minnick's sons, Wilbur and Wilfred Jack, last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres visited in Eagle Point Sunday.
    Mrs. Pullen, J. T. Pullen, Anna and Mary Robertson attended preaching in Ashland Sunday.
    Mrs. Gene Bellows and Mrs. Earl Brittsan, also Mrs. H. Watkins and Miss Mayes, attended services at Laurel Hill Sunday afternoon. Mr. G. C. Griffin, the Sunday school missionary, began meetings there Sunday, to continue through the week. Mr. Griffin is a good speaker and thoroughly in earnest.
    Several in this neighborhood are on the sick list, among the number being Myrtle Minter and Bennie Bellows, who have had to remain from school on account of sore throat.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel has been sick for a few days.
    The little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Vernie Mathews is quite sick with something like typhoid.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 25, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I omitted to mention quite a number of incidents that had occurred, on account of the length of my letter, so now I will mention a few of them at least.
    Mr. Logan, one of our townsmen, who came in about a year ago and settled among us, has rented and moved onto the Dr. Nudingfarm, near Brownsboro.
    Joe Rader and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Colver of Phoenix were among the callers Saturday evening for supper.
    J. M. Wilfley and wife were also in town the same afternoon. Mr. Wilfley has had to suspend apple packing for a few days on account of not being able to procure box material.
    There was a dance in Eagle Point Saturday night.
    Sunday we have quite a company here for dinner, among whom were John Smith and his two sons, Polk and Corbett; Jay Spitzer, Percy and Glen Haley, Perry Farlow (Mr. Farlow had just come in from Four-Mile Lake, where he has spent the summer looking after the sheep belonging to Jud Edsall, John Foster and George Brown; they put their sheep together and thus saved the extra expense of extra herders), John Foster, Miss Zula Geppert, Miss Ruth Thompson of Derby, Richard Diamond of the P.&E., Mrs. M. S. Kahlow of Okanogan, Wash.; Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney. Miss Blanch Haney and Mr. Haney's mother, Mrs. Schmidt of Medford. Mrs. Kahlow is a sister of Mr. Haney, and Miss Blanch Haney is his niece, also from Washington. Harris Geppert of Butte Falls spent the night with us and went on to Jacksonville Monday; John W. Smith and wife, formerly of this place, but now living on the Commercial Orchard on Yankee Creek; W. O. Wheeler and wife, Guy Pruett, Mrs. H. L. Whitehead and Mr. Whitehead, Mrs. L. B. Mills, Mrs. W. H. Mowat and Mrs. George Williams of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. A. Anked, Miss Midge and Master Rike Anked. There was quite a number here for dinner besides whose names I failed to procure.
    It had been announced in the Mail Tribune that there would be a patriotic meeting at the church Sunday evening, and the result was that there was quite a number of the good people of Medford and Central Point came out to take part in the proceedings, and the following persons took supper with us: Mrs. H. W. Davison, Miss Imogene Wallace, Professor E. B. Stanley, superintendent of schools of Central Point; Rev. Paul Bandy, Mr. and Mr. Ed Gore of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. Clark, Mrs. H. W. Davison, Miss Frances Davison, Miss Alta Norcross, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Washburn of Table Rock, Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Parson of Table Rock, Miss Bessie Chambers, Miss Mildred Patton, Miss Noma Stewart, Miss Madeline Silver, Oscar Higinbotham, Robert Coffman and Charley Jones, all of Butte Falls. I should have mentioned the fact that there was a dance here on Saturday night, and that may account for there being so many of the young people here Sunday and Sunday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. B. Chase of Medford came in later for supper, and so did Roy Stanley and his father-in-law, N. Nilsson, of Clatsop County, Oregon, and Monday night Roy and wife were with us.
    There has been a busy time in our little town for the past few days, for the farmers are bringing in their wheat to the mill and the orchardists are rushing to get their fruit taken care of during the fine dry weather, and the farmers and stockmen are getting in their supply of fertilizers to put on their land, and everything seems to be going with a rush. Among those from the Lake Creek country who have been in for land plaster are Charley Klingle, T. F. Nichols, Gus Nichols, Charley Seefield, Robert A. Neill, Henry Meyer, Irvin Daley, Will Holman, besides a number whose names I failed to procure.
    F. H. Page and wife of Portland and Mose Barkdull were among the diners at the S.S. Tuesday. Mr. Page has been connected with the wholesale fruit handlers of Portland for the last two or three decades, and is very generally known in this section of the country, especially among the fruit men.
    M. E. Root of Medford, another prominent fruit handler, and George Hacker of the Pacific Fruit Express Co., also car inspector for the P.S.&S. Co., were here for dinner Tuesday, beside three men who are hauling fruit from the orchards on trucks.
    Since my last report, L. K. Haak and B. H. Brophy have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune, and Thomas F. Nichols and F. J. McPherson have renewed their subscriptions to the W.M.T. 
    I see, in looking over my letter, that I have omitted to say a word about the meeting Sunday night. It was well attended, but perhaps would have been more if the ground from here to Hornbrook had not been so good, but we had a good audience, and the reading of the scripture lesson and comments by Rev. Paul Bandy were very good and quite interesting, and the singing by the ladies and gentlemen from Medford and Central Point was very good. After the introductory exercises Professor E. B. Stanley gave us an interesting talk on the object of the movement to conserve food and the advantage it would be to our allies, as well as to our own boys.
    Then Colonel Washburn made the speech of the evening, setting forth the necessity of raising money to keep up the great war and the dire consequences of neglecting to subscribe to the liberty bonds. The colonel is a very pleasant and forceful speaker. The result will be seen later.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Jackson, one of our young men in the service of the U.S.N., has come home on a furlough to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Rigsby of Brownsboro, October 18, a ten-and-a-half-pound boy, and at last account the mother and child were both doing well. Mrs. Logan, the grandmother, says that he is the finest boy in the state. He surely is a buster.
    Business is remarkably lively out in these parts, as the road is lined with teams, trucks and autos going in every direction. There are a number of teams engaged hauling wood into our town and several are hauling even to Medford, and one man, W. E. Butler, who stopped me to pay his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, told me that he had been hauling wood to Medford and that he could not supply the demand.
    There has been a vast quantity of land plaster shipped out here, for one man told me that there had already been 100 tons shipped out, and there was still another car to come out yet. The stockmen are using quantities of it on their meadows, and they claim that it makes a difference of 100 percent in the production of grasses and clover or alfalfa. In speaking of the production of hay, while talking with Lemon Charley, who owns one of the best farms on Butte Creek, he said that he had been experimenting with Sudan grass, and that he had sowed it on a piece of dry land and that, although it had had no rain on it, that probably one-half of the seed come up and grew from four to five feet in height and yielded a fine crop of hay, and that after he had cut it once that the second crop had come up and was then waist high, and that he was utilizing it for calf pasture. I inquired how the stock seemed to like the hay, and he said that it was as fine cow feed as he had ever used, and that although it was coarse straw, that the horses and cattle seemed to like it better than any other hay, as they would eat it all up clean.
    The reader will have to excuse the shortage in items of a local character, as I started out the next day after I wrote for the Mail Tribune and was gone three days and two nights and am now utilizing this Saturday forenoon writing, so have but a very few items of interest.
    When I started I went over the same ground that I had visited the week before, although I met V. M. Bell of Brownsboro, and he settled up a small account on his brothers' subscription to the Mail Tribune, and also put up his own subscription to the Medford Sun. I also visited J. H. Rigsby. He was out in his orchard picking apples and had no cash in his pocket, and did not have time to go to the house to get it, but said that he would see me in Eagle Point in a few days. My next stop was at the beautiful farm of L. C. Charley, and found that he had already paid up his subscription to the Medford Sun, but he gave me some good points on raising hay for stock. My next stop was at the farm of Nygren Bros., and found them just hauling in their fourth cutting of alfalfa. They said that they had stopped their Weekly Mail Tribune and subscribed for the Daily, as they wanted all of the war news. My next stop was at the home of Charles Klingle, and there I was in the act of writing out a receipt for the W.M.T. and Mr. K. asked what the D.M.T. would cost, and on being told that it would cost $5 for a year's subscription, remarked that I better make the receipt out for the D.M.T., and stop sending the weekly, and Mrs. Klingle joined in and said that she wanted to keep posted on the war news, so she approved of the change. Going on from there, my next stop was at the home of J. H. Ruch, and he renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. Leaving there, I went up to the fine mountain ranch of George Nichols, and when I drove up and looked around, I saw no sign of anyone around, so I began to holler, and soon Ed Holman made his appearance and told me that George would be in sometime that night, so I put up for the night, and about 8:30 p.m. George and wife and brother came in, and the next morning he renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    From there I went to the home of W. M. Nichol, but their subscription to the W.M.T. had not expired, and they did not wish to change to the D.M.T., so I went on up Little Butte Creek, and on the way met R. A. Pech on his way with a load of spuds for Medford, but he stopped long enough to take a receipt for $1.50 on subscription to the W.M.T. My next stop was at the home of W. L. Farlow, but as he had changed from the W.M.T. to the D.M.T. and paid up, I did no business there. But just before I reached Mr. Farlow's I stopped and took dinner with an old gentleman by the name of Martin, but could not persuade him to take either of the Medford papers. My next move was to John Miller's, where I met Mr. and Mrs. Miller and daughter, also met Mrs. Frank Farlow, and she told me that Frank was out in the timber cutting saw logs, but Mr. Miller renewed his subscription to the W.M.T.
    While en route to Mr. Miller's I stopped at the Farlow mill, and there I learned that the Manganese Metal Co., of Tacoma, Wash., had rented the mill and was cutting out the lumber to build a large concentrator mill; that the aforesaid company had taken an option on three of the mining claims belonging to J. H. Terrel, John Walch and E. G. Harding. There is at this writing a carload of machinery at the Eagle Point depot ready to be taken up to Lost Creek. I met C. W. Scott while there. He is the manager of the job and seems to be quite sanguine of success in the undertaking.
    My next move after leaving Mr. Miller's was to go to Russ Moore's, the last farm on the creek before reaching the Dead Indian Soda Springs, although Charles Wilkinson lives at the springs, but does not farm. I thought of going up there, but learned from Mr. Moore that Charley was out on the range, as he is one of the forest rangers. 
    I was very agreeably surprised when I traveled over the road from Mr. Miller's to Mr. Moore's to find such an improvement in the road as what there was, for it will be remembered that the forest rangers were at work on the road in that section last winter, and I wish to say that they are entitled to a great deal of credit for the excellent work they did, and they will have the thanks of the traveling public who travel over it. Mr. M. says that they did not finish the road because they had to go elsewhere. After spending the night with Mr. Moore and family, the next morning I began to retrace my steps, stopping at the hospitable home of T. L. Farlow, but found that Mr. F. was not at home, but Mrs. F. renewed their subscription to the D.M.T. After taking dinner I turned my course for home. There are several subscribers in this section, but some were not at home and some had their subscriptions paid up, so I stopped but a few times on the return trip, but met W. E. Butler on the road, and he renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    After I returned Friday evening, on Saturday I met Henry French at the P.&E. depot, where he was delivering his cream, and he renewed his subscription to the D.M.T., and later in the day Harris Geppert stopped for dinner, and while here renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    I see in looking over my letter that I made a mistake and instead of going from Mr. Rigsby's direct to Lem Charley's, I stopped at the home of Geo. B. Brown and he renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., and while there I met John Welsh and he renewed his subscription to the W.M.T. More anon.

Medford Mail Tribune, October 31, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I gave a partial account of my trip up in the Lake Creek country, but I discovered after I had written that I had omitted to state that in addition to the discovery of manganese and cinnabar that Charley Terrell of Brownsboro had discovered another something, [a] kind of clay that possesses some quality that will remove dirt or stains, and when he showed it to an expert mining engineer he acknowledged frankly that it was something new to him, and one man who came up from California and was examining the stuff said that it looked considerable like the compound that the celebrated borax soap of California was made of but that it was not exactly like it. Mr. Terrell has been experimenting with it and tried it in cleaning the dirty collar of a coat and he said that it left it nice and clean. He intends to send samples of it to the state agricultural college and Washington, D.C. to have it analyzed, for he has great hopes of it proving to be valuable.
    C. D. Abbott and wife and daughter were here Friday evening, October 6th, for supper. Mr. Abbott is visiting the different lodges of I.O.O.F. in Josephine, Douglas and Jackson for the G.M. and the E.P. lodge held a special meeting that evening and had open lodge to the Rebekahs and their husbands and held one of their feasts. Those who were in attendance report having had a very enjoyable time.
    George W. Neilson, the new superintendent of the P.&E.R.R., came out and went over the road last Saturday for his first time, but I have not learned his opinion of the road--(private--and I don't suppose that I ever will). He seems to be a fine-appearing gentleman and we hope that he may prove to be as nice as his predecessor, Mr. Johnson, was.
    There was a carload of machinery last Saturday to be taken up to Lost Creek, Lake Creek P.O., to be used in separating the manganese from the rock and teams are now busy taking it up to where the concentrator is to be built.
    Mrs. Maud Stickel of Gold Hill was a pleasant caller Saturday afternoon.
    Wm. Walch, J. W. Hubble and D. R. Patrick were among the callers Saturday.
    G. A. Shively, father of the sugar beet raiser in this section, started for Idaho Falls, Ida., last Saturday.
    Among the callers Saturday evening were George Mansfield, wife and two little girls and Mrs. T. A. Carlton, who live near McLeod. Mr. Mansfield has what is proving to be one of the best farms on Rogue River. He has been experimenting with some of the soil on his farm. He has a 20-acre tract of land that the former owners considered almost worthless, as it would not produce anything of value, so he began to analyze and study the soil and discovered that it lacked lime, so he procured a ton of lime and spread it over an acre of the land, then sowed it to clover and when it came up he pastured it until April with his Poland-China pigs, then took them off and during the summer cut 9000 pounds of hay off of the one acre, and the result will be that he will have 20 acres of the finest clover land in the country as a reward of his trouble, labor and slight expense. They had been out to Medford and I think that Mrs. Carlton had been out to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley, who own the old Higinbotham place on Rogue River, came in Saturday evening and have taken a room at the Sunnyside Hotel for a few days.
    On Sunday Judge T. L. Tou Velle and wife and her brother-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Struchman of Ohio, called for dinner; Wm. von der Hellen and family, Manly Conley of L.C. were also diners and so was Harry Lewis who recently returned from Klamath County and his brother William, who operates a jitney between here and Medford. There was also quite a number of our young people who are working in the orchards around here called for dinner and later in the day Thomas Stanley.
    Charlie Rice, formerly of the P.&E., called for dinner. [omission] E. force, who has been up in Washington for the past four or five years, called on us Monday for dinner and and so did Tony McCallalowd who has been one of the regular hands on the P.&E. for the last several years called on us Monday to make a visit and to visit his son, Truman, who is living with us and attending our school.
    C. A. Newstrom, wife and son, Theodore, were among the diners Monday.
    S. H. Harnish and daughter, Mrs. Fred Dutton, and Wm. Perry were here for dinner Monday.
    P. E. Sherrill, formerly of lmperial Valley, Calif. and [who] has been stopping with us for the past two weeks, started for Portland Saturday.
    A. Clements, one of our fire fighters on Elk Creek for several weeks, returned to the Sunnyside Monday.
    Since my last writeup, George Mansfield has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. and Frank Farlow and C. A. Newstrom of L.C. have renewed their subscriptions to the W.M.T.
    Since writing the foregoing, John Blaso has pleased to have us send him the Daily Mail Tribune. Thus the people call for a live newspaper so they can get the news all the time.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 1, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Just as I was leaving Eagle Point for a trip up in the Trail, Elk Creek, Prospect and Derby country, Tuesday morning the sad intelligence came of the death of young Mr. Stewart by the hands of W. E. Butler--but as the incident has already been noted and commented on in the Mail Tribune I refrain from making any comments on the subject further than to express our sympathy for the two families directly interested.
    After attending to a few duties on Tuesday morning I started up the country to visit some of my old friends in the interest of the Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun. Taking the regular stage road and zigzagging through fields and pastures, I reached the free ferry. On the way I called at several places, but found the men of the house away, but was fortunate enough to give receipts to Peter Betz, Chris Bergman, Lucy A. Conover and J. B. Black for renewal of subscriptions to the W.M.T.
    Crossing the river on the ferry, I proceeded on my way up Trail Creek as far as J. D. Fry's, where I spent the night, but found that he had been to Medford a few days before and renewed his subscription to the W.M.T. The next morning I proceeded on my way up the creek to the home of W. E. Cushman, but found that he was away from home, so did no business there. Retracing my steps to the town of Trail, Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher, the proprietress of the Trail Hotel and store, as well as postmistress, renewed her subscription to the W.M.T. My next stop was at the home of J. B. Dorson, and had him renew his subscription to the W.M.T., and there I learned that Fred Sturgis, Dave Pence, J. J. Winningham and Acel Weeks were not at home, so did not go up Elk Creek, but stopped at the Elk Resort, but found that the proprietor, W. G. McDonald, was not at home, and that Dr. C. E. McDonald had gone to Mobile, Ala., so did no business there.
    My next stop was at the Elk Creek hatchery, where I found V. A. Heffner, the superintendent of the hatchery, busy at work superintending the construction of a large hatchery. He himself taught the men by example how to do the work, for he was down leveling off the concrete floors. He thinks that he will be ready in a few days to put in the necessary vats, etc, to have as complete a hatchery as there in on the western coast. Having Mr. H. renew his subscription to the D.M.T., and taking dinner with his family, I proceeded on my way, and my next stop was at the home of R. A. Vinson, but did not find him at home, but Mrs. Vinson gave me a check for a renewal of their subscription to the W.M.T.
   
I discovered that since my last trip in this country that Mr. Vinson has built a neat family residence on his farm.
    My next stop was at the home of Thomas Carlton, but found that he was not at home, but as his subscription to the D.M.T. does not expire until January 15, 1918, did no business there. I intended to have stopped at the beautiful home of George Mansfield and take a look at some of his fine stock, but just before I reached his home I met him and family on their way out to the valley, so did not stop, as he had already paid me his subscription to the D.M.T., so I went on up to the Evergreen ranch, where I spent the night. But while I was on the road I discovered that there had been several changes made, for Mr. McLeod had sold out his store and ranch to J. T. Adams, and he and his son were duly installed in business. I heard it hinted that Mr. Adams intends to make it one of the most attractive resorts on the Crater Lake road, as it has the advantage of being right at the junction of the Derby and Trail-Prospect roads, and also right at the mouth of Big Butte, making it a very desirable place for people to camp for a few weeks in the summer.
    The next morning Ed Higinbotham and his brother, W. A. (Bert) both renewed their subscriptions to the W.M.T. Leaving there, I began to retrace my steps and my next stop was at the home of C. H. Toney, and soon gave him a receipt for a year's subscription to the W.M.T. The reader will notice that the most of the subscribers take the W.M.T., but they would--at least the most of them--take the daily, but as they have only a triweekly mail, they have to put up with the weekly, but there is strong talk of trying to have a daily route established as far as Trail in the near future, so that they can get the news every day. After leaving Mr. Toney's, my next stop was at the Edmondson sawmill, where I found Mr. E. busy at work. He paid up a little balance on his subscription to the W.M.T.and ordered the daily instead. From there I went to Chas. Humphrey's, but found he and his wife both away from home, so did no business there. My next stop was for dinner at the home of H. E. Webb, but did no business there. Calling on Mrs. A. B. Chartraw and giving her a receipt for a year's subscription to the W.M.T. I proceeded to F. R. Neil's, where I gave a receipt for a year's subscription to the D.M.T. From there on toward home I called at several houses, but did no business.
    The evening before I started out on my last trip our son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, came in from Fort Klamath. They are looking for a location in a warmer climate.
    Mr. Shively, the sugar beet man, is loading cars with sugar beets and our orchard men are shipping out a quantity of apples.
    O. C. King, wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. Smith, were guests at the Sunnyside, Friday, and so were Joe Rader and wife and her sister, Mrs. Effie Taylor; also Joe's sister, Mrs. W. E. Phipps.
    Our daughter, Mrs. Grant Shaw, of Portland, came down Friday.
    J. E. Stepp, the head sawyer in the Butte Falls mills, was a guest at the Sunnyside Friday night, and so was Percy Boothby. There is also about all that can be bedded at the S.S. Hotel now, apple pickers and apple packers.
    Since my last, beside those mentioned in this letter as having renewed their subscriptions, D. S. Nichols and C. S. Painter have renewed their subscriptions to the D.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 5, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Miss Mayes, who teaches at Reese Creek, and Miss McDougal, at Laurel Hill, was among the teachers who attended the institute at Ashland this week. Miss Mayes visited her sister in Hilt, California, Saturday and Sunday, prior to attending the institute.
    
Diehless Minter visited at home Sunday.
    Mrs. Pettegrew and Ethel Ewen called at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
    The meeting at Laurel Hill closed Saturday night, conducted by missionary Griffin, Mr. Stiles preaching. They are both consistent and earnest workers.
    The Hoover food campaign was on last week; the teachers were well supplied with pledge cards, sending them to the different housewives, who in turn showed their patriotism by signing them at once--a greater part, at least.
    The Brittsan Bros., cousins from Wimer, made them a hurried call Tuesday.
    Earl Brittsan sold a load of hogs Wednesday to T. E. Nichols.
    A good many of the farmers are hauling fertilizer to enrich their land.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno visited in Medford this week for a few days.
    Vernie Mathews' baby is quite sick.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 5, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sunday morning it was announced that there would be a lady lecturer in connection with the evening services and the result was that there was quite a large congregation out and after Mr. Bandy had read and commented on the 10th chapter of Romans and offered the evening prayer he introduced Miss Anne McCormick, district demonstration agent for Jackson and Josephine counties. She is appointed by the authorities in Washington, D.C. Her theme was the duties of parents to the children, emphasizing the necessity of having discipline in the family, for the benefit of the children. She was accompanied from Central Point by Prof. E. B. Stanley and Miss Chaney, who is teaching in the Long Mountain district. The entire exercises were very good. Miss McCormick is a very fluent speaker and made a fine impression on the audience.
    Among the business callers Monday were W. C. Pool and Joe Mayham, and while here Joe renewed the sub. of his deceased mother to the W.M.T.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Monday were Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Guthrie. Mr. Guthrie was at one time interested with Mr. Tronson in what is known as the Tronson orchard, but finally they dissolved partnership and Mr. G. now owns some two or three orchards out in the valley proper.
    Thomas Vestal, D. R. Patrick, and William Coleman, recently of Alaska, were also among the diners. Mr. Coleman is here loading apples in the cars for the Mose Barkdull Co. He was formerly county clerk of this county, but recently has been working for Madden and Henley in one of their fish canneries in Alaska. Frank Brown, one of the firm of George Brown & Sons, and Mr. Cooksey, representing I. Duckfield & Co., S.F., were also with us at noon on Monday.
    A. Clements, one of our progressive young men, now of Medford, was with us Monday and Tuesday. There was quite a number of our citizens from the country in town, among whom were Benj. Brophy, F. J. McPherson, and J. L. Robison. The latter says that he has a hundred acres of wheat sown all ready for the fine rain we have had during the past few days.
    C. E. Bradley of Harney Valley, but formerly of this place in its early days, wife and child, came in Monday night with a crippled car, spent the night with us and the next morning took the car to Childreth's blacksmith shop and by noon was ready to proceed on his way up to his ranch near Derby, where he was born.
    Mrs. Harvey Smith, the lady who was sick so long last summer and after her convalescence has been stopping near Rogue River with her mother, came in Monday night and so did Roy Stanley and wife. Each of the three ladies had a baby--three babies in the house at one time--a remarkable incident, but they were all of them good babies and disturbed no one, but among the eleven women that were here that night the babies had all the attention they needed. 
    Brandon Bros., owners of the Snowy Butte mills, are doing a rushing business in the way of shipping flour by parcel post, for they had an order for 2600 lbs. to be shipped by mail to Happy Camp, Calif. They send 600 pounds at a time and that goes by rail as far as Hornbrook and is carried the rest of the way by stage and pack mules. The drayman here objects to hauling so much p.p. goods, for Tuesday p.m. there were eight boxes of apples and 600 pounds of flour besides some other p.p. small stuff, and the R.R. Co. have to hire a dray to transfer it from the P.&E. depot to the S.P. depot and thus it goes, but it's not so hard on the drayman and the R.R. Co. as it [is] on the star route contractors, where they have to draw it through the mud and storms.
     Mrs. Geppert and Mrs. Harvey Smith of Butte Falls were passengers on the P.&E. Ry. Tuesday northbound train. And so was W. C. Kulisch of Portland and Bert Holcomb, also of Portland, two business men, were on the way to B.F. Tuesday.
    Tuesday Mrs. Fred Pettegrew was in town getting ready for her sale next Saturday, and while here she paid up her subscription to the 20th inst., as they are all going to Los Angeles, Calif., at that time.
    Frank and Ruby Johnson and E. C. Bellows were business callers Tuesday.
    J. C. Frederick and G. G. Cornell have been getting out a fine lot of manzanita wood off of one of the hills north of town and have had Ernest Dahack to saw it into stove wood and are shipping it to Medford.
    Tuesday's train looked more like business than anything I have seen on the P.&E. track; there were six log cars loaded, two of wood, four box cars taken out in the afternoon, besides the regular passenger car.
    Wednesday morning word came over the phone that T. B. Higinbotham had passed away. He was in usual health, but died very suddenly. I have just been called over the phone to attend the funeral tomorrow, Thursday, and will give the particulars later.
    M. McGuirk of Medford, who makes the Mt. Pitt and Gov. Johnson cigars, was here doing business Wednesday, and also took dinner at the S.S.
    Henry A. Meyer of L.C. was also here for dinner Wednesday and while here settled up for the W.M.T. and paid a sub. to the D.M.T.
    W. P. Holbrook has also renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. last Saturday.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 9, 1917, page 6


Reese Creek Riplets
    Dick Johnson has moved back on Rube Johnson's place, near the school house.
    Earl Mathews helped Ernest Dahack a few days last week.
    Ernest Dahack took Mr. Slusser's place in the barber's chair a few days the latter part of the week.
    The teachers are again back trying to put into practice some of the many things they heard last week.
    Mr. Robertson was in Medford one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel were in Medford one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. V. Caster visited at Mr. Hammel's a few days this week.
    Wayman Bergman returned home last week from Klamath, where he had been working the past summer.
    Mr. Merritt of Derby has moved on Mr. Pollard's place for the winter.
    The rain last week was very acceptable to the ranchers, but the orchardists would have been glad to have had it wait another week.
    The new heating plant for the school house has come. The directors brought it out and will install it in the near future.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    As I announced in my last I was called over the phone last Wednesday asking me to come up to the old Caster place now owned by Edward Higinbotham, to attend the funeral of Ed. H.'s father, and when I reached there on Thursday morning at 9:45 found that a very large crowd of his neighbors and friends had collected at Ed's to honor Thomas Benton Higinbotham, who was born in Cass County, Mich., Nov. 6, 1849. He was married Nov. 8, 1871, to Susie Phillips at Peresell City, Neb. Came to Oregon in 1877 and shortly after his arrival settled in Eagle Point, where he lived for several years, working at his trade as a wagonmaker, but finally moved up to a point on Rogue River some six miles above Trail, where he remained, working in partnership with his sons in the stock business. A short time ago he sold his farm to Roy Stanley and moved to live with his son, Edward, where he died Nov. 6, being 68 years of age. His wife died but a short time previous, Aug. 25, 1917. He leaves two daughters and three sons, Mrs. A. B. Chartraw, John, Edward and W. A. and Mrs. Rosa Fallis Bradley. The latter has been a resident of Alberta, Canada, for a number of years. He also leaves a brother, Cass Higinbotham, and two sisters, Miss J. H. Wrisley of Medford and Mrs. Geo. Gray of Fort Klamath, besides a number of grandchildren and a number of friends to mourn his loss. His death was very sudden and unexpected, as he was in his usual health and simply ceased to breathe. He was a devoted husband and father and has raised a family that any parent may feel proud of. The remains were interred in the Butte Falls cemetery Thursday afternoon beside the grave of his wife. The religious services were conducted at the home of his son, Edward.
    After conducting a short funeral service at the grave I went to the home of Jud Edsall to spend the night and the next day I went to Butte Falls to look after the interests of the Mail Tribune but found that almost every man living there was off at work either in the logging camp or sawmill and wood camp, so did but very little business in that line but succeeded in having Corbett Smith pay up the balance on the subscription of his sister, Nellie, who is now married, had her sub. stopped and paid for a year's sub. for himself. I also secured the renewal of Mrs. E. E. Smith, one of the Butte Falls merchants, and Howard McDonald, who own a stock ranch near Rancheria Prairie and are raising horses and mules. After spending another night at the bachelor home of Jud Edsall, who is engaged in getting out a lot of saw logs for the sawmill at Medford, I started for home Saturday morning, reaching home about 11 o'clock, but I stopped at Brownsboro long enough to interview J. Rigsby and gave him a receipt for a year's sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune and note the fact that he has purchased the Hessler place and is planning to move onto it this fall. He is one of our wide-awake, progressive farmers and stockmen and is planning to turn his attention to raising swine and sheep. He seems to think that he can make a success of raising alfalfa and let the swine and sheep do the work of harvesting. Along the way I noticed that some of the farmers were sowing wheat and the ground looked as though it was in fine condition to receive the seed.
    Among the first things that I noticed on reaching home was that Herman Meyer and Henry Town of Lake Creek were hauling the equipage up to Lake Creek to develop the manganese mines that have been discovered in that section. They have been engaged in hauling for the company now for the past two weeks and are still at it. They are to receive a carload of lumber next Thursday from Duprey's mill. While I was up to the Edsall place I took a walk out to the mill and found Mr. D. getting out lumber but did no business with him for the Mail Tribune. He has in the course of construction a neat bungalow and barn.
    Another thing that I noticed was that the P.&E. Ry. Co. are doing a rushing business, for when I went to the depot I found eight box cars standing on the track and when the train came in there were several cars besides the regular passenger and baggage car and among them was a car of lumber for the citizens of Eagle Point.
    At noon I met Floyd F. Howard of Butte Falls, the two Rumley brothers who are helping to develop the manganese mine on Lost Creek and W. J. Canon, the Brownsboro merchant. He was here with his truck, hauling apples from the Harry Carlton orchard.
    A. J. Florey, Jr., one of the army boys, of Co. 7, C.A., who stopped off on a two days' furlough, on his way from San Francisco to join his company at Fort Stevens, to visit his parents and friends.
    John Simon, who has been up in Montana, mining, returned Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 14, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mrs. Pettegrew's sale was well attended last Saturday and most everything sold quite well. Frank Brown of Eagle Point was the auctioneer.
    Mrs. Pettegrew and family leave Tuesday for Los Angeles to join F. Pettegrew, who is there working.
    John Minter is back from Hillsboro for a few weeks.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel were in Medford Monday afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Roundtree were in Medford Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crandall visited at Bert Clarno's Sunday.
    R. J. Brittsan of Medford, who is [omission] Brittsan preached at Reese Creek Sunday morning after Sunday school.
    Cleo and Lois Robertson of Eagle Point visited their grandparents Sunday.
    The high winds and rain have caused the orchardists to lose some of their apples, those who had not already finished picking.
    Four Medford High School students, Joe Bateman, Arthur Hess and two lady students, were out visiting the schools in behalf of the army Y.M.C.A. They were at Reese Creek Monday afternoon and made quite a plea for the Y.M.C.A. work among the soldier boys. Reese Creek will show its loyalty by contributing something for the work.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday night, just as we were eating supper, Norris Geppert drove up with his Ford, accompanied by Lloyd Stanley, Miss Vera Rigsby, Charley Pattison, Miss Bessie Chambers and Nellie Patton, and called for supper and beds. They had come from Butte Falls to attend a dance given in the interest of the Red Cross and wanted to secure beds so that they could rest after the dance closed. After eating breakfast about 8 o'clock they started for their homes, but I dare not say that they went directly there. The dance, I understood, was well attended, but I have not learned the result financially.
    I should have mentioned in my last that the Lindeman brothers, who have had the contract for packing the apples on the Tronson orchard, and their assistants, who have been boarding at the Sunnyside, finished their job Friday and left for some other field of labor.
    We found Mr. and Mrs. Lindeman and his brother, as well as their assistants, to be very fine people, and wish them success in the future.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday noon were B. E. Haney and wife, his mother, Grandma Schmidt; his daughter, Miss Margarete Haney, and his sister, Mrs. M. L. Kahlow, of Medford; Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Briggs and daughter, Miss Nellie; Dr. R. L. Burdic and Dr. Giles of Ashland; Mr. and Mrs. William Brown, Howard Painter and Miss Cecil Potter, Jay Spitzer, Percy Haley and Guy Pruett.
    Monday morning, C. W. Scott, the manager of the movement to develop the manganese mines in the Lost Creek country, and the Ruble Bros. came in to assist in loading the teams with the machinery for the plant in course of construction. Herman Meyer, the mail contractor for carrying the mail between here and Lake Creek, tells me that they are excavating a place for the foundation of the building, which is to be 40x60 feet, and are pushing the work right along. From the number of beds, bedsteads and springs they are taking up they must intend to work a large force of men this winter. I understand from the depot agent, Amos Ayres, that they have a crusher in the car now being unloaded that weighs over three and a half tons, to be used in crushing the rock containing the metal.
    There is another company who have had their representatives here making bids for other manganese mines in the same neighborhood where these mines are located, but there has been no definite contract made as yet that I know of. My informant, Mr. Meyer, told me that the company intends to put in an electric power plant near the mine to afford light, if not power, to light up the entire works, as they expect when they get started they will run both day and night.
    Among the other callers for dinner was A. J. Florey, Jr., one of our E.P. boys who joined the army, but has been in the hospital in San Francisco for some time, and while here obtained a receipt for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune for his father, who is one of the regular subscribers to that newsy paper. Also Arthur Hess, Joseph Bateman, Bessie Jackson and Georgia Williams, all of Medford, were here for dinner. They were canvassing among the schools in the country for funds for the Y.M.C.A. in our army.
    One of the Nygren boys passed through town Monday forenoon with a load of hogs on his way to the valley.
    There was a carload of wheat unloaded Monday for the Snowy Butte flour mills.
    Mrs. George W. Brandon, wife of one of the owners of the Snowy Butte mills, has gone to San Francisco to visit relatives in and around the city.
    John Singleton, one of our wide-awake farmers, orchardists and stockmen, was in Tuesday for a load of lumber. He is going to put up another large shed on the end of his barn. He says that sheds save feed and make the stock look and feel better.
    C. E. Keller started Tuesday morning for the Elk Creek country.
    Thomas Lewis shipped seventy-five sacks of onions to Medford Tuesday afternoon on the P.&E.
    Mrs. Ray Harnish came out from their ranch on Antelope to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Taylor.
    E. G. Harding of Lake Creek came out on the P.&E. Tuesday and took passage on the E.P.-L.C. stage for his ranch.
    Besides the renewal of A. J. Florey to the D.M.T., C. R. McIntosh, Ed Conley and W. D. Roberts, all of Eagle Point, and W. J. Canon, our Brownsboro merchant, have renewed their subscriptions to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 16, 1917, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last few days have been rather busy days, as there have been teams coming and going. The farmers have been getting ready to do their fall farming, and some have been in to secure their supply of fertilizers, some have have been driving beef cattle to the market, while others have been bringing in their surplus supply of hogs, while perhaps the most important work has been the unloading of the second car of machinery for the manganese mine on Lake Creek. But to particularize:
    Miss Zula Geppert of Butte Falls has accepted a position in the telephone office here and has taken a room at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Sarah Hessler of Brownsboro has moved to Medford, having sold her place to J. Rigsby.
    Mrs. Ray Harnish, Mrs. Ed Coy, Mrs. William Holman, M. S. Wood and your E.P. correspondent took a trip to Medford Wednesday, and on the return trip came out on the P.&E. motor, and by the time we reached home were ready for our supper, owing to the shakeup we had riding over the road, for if one will follow it up they will never die of dyspepsia or liver complaint.
    Mrs. Stranson of Medford, a sister of Mrs. W. W. Taylor, was also a passenger on the P.&E. at the same time, coming out to visit her sister.
    A. M. Gay, formerly of Prospect, but now of Butte Falls. was a guest at the Sunnyside Wednesday night.
    S. A. Sanford, appraiser of land for the Federal Loan Association, came in and spent Thursday night with us. He and Henry Meyer of Lake Creek are appraising the land of the applicants for loans.
    Thomas Roseberry and W. J. Burbidge, who are running trucks hauling apples for J. M. Wilfley, have been stopping with us a part of the time during the week.
    Sam Leidman, one of the apple packing contractors on the Tronson orchard, came out the same evening and spent the night with us.
    Mrs. Frenar E. Boyd of Klamath Falls, employed by the Goodrich Drug Co. of Omaha, Neb., came in Thursday evening and is doing business with our merchants.
    The same evening as the P.&E. jitney came out it ran over a cow that was fast in one of the cattle guards, but fortunately did no damage to the car or passengers, but the cow was not so fortunate, for her feet were fast in the guards, and by the time the jitney ran clear over her she was badly bruised up, so that she had to be killed.
    Hugh Mitchell, general superintendent of the fish hatcheries, went up to Butte Falls on the P.&E. Saturday.
    O. Adams of Butte Falls, Irvin Daley and Mike Sidley of Lake Creek were here for dinner Saturday, and while here Mike renewed his subscription to the W.M.T.
    Miss Mabel Cobleigh of Butte Falls was a passenger on the P.&E. for her home Saturday.
    Carl Bieberstedt and son were doing business with William von der Hellen Friday.
    Mrs. W. E. Butler brought in a fine lot of Plymouth Rock hens for our railroad agent, Amos Ayres, Friday.
    C. E. Bellows, H. J. Stewart, Eli Dahack, Walter Wood, C. H. Natwick and D. S. Patrick brought in a fine lot of hogs for George Brown & Sons Friday and Saturday. They were shipped to Portland. Royal Brown accompanied them to the city.
    Jessie Richardson of Central Point came out Saturday morning to unload a car of land plaster for our farmers.
    Herbert Brewitt, president of the Tacoma Metal Co., now building a plant for the development of a manganese mine on Lost Creek, and Jess Bamford, one of his associates, were here Saturday on their way up to the mine. They told me that a great deal depends on the condition of the road between here and the mine as to how much they would do, but if the county court would make good roads they would send out a carload a day of the metal.
    S. S. Bullis was on the P.&E. Saturday on his way to Butte Falls, looking over the situation as to the supply of saw logs.
    John Allen of Derby was out for a load of land plaster Saturday.
    The sad news of the death of Charles Allen Pruett last Friday reached me Saturday, and as mention has already been made of his death it is not necessary for me to say more than to express our sympathy for the bereaved. Mr. Pruett was one of our highly esteemed citizens and his loss will be felt by the entire community.
    Andrew Grimes and Dr. Decker, a veterinary of Ashland, were here Saturday, and so was Roy Stanley and family.
    Since my last report, in addition to those already reported, C. E. Bellows, Eagle Point; George Phillips, Eagle Point, and Charles Wilkinson, Lake Creek, have renewed their subscription to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney have moved on the old Morrison place. Mr. Courtney expects to farm it the coming summer.
    Mr. and Mrs. Steve Smith are moving this week to the Pettegrew place, which they have rented.
    George Brown & Sons shipped a carload of hogs to Portland last week. Gene Bellows, Mr. Natwick and others contributed to the shipment.
    Mr. Natwick has the contract for crushing rock and building 500 yards of road on the Lake Creek and Eagle Point road, beginning this week.
    Tom Vestal, Elmer Robertson and Wayman Bergman left this week for Portland, where they expect to work in the stock yards.
    Wilfred Jack has moved to Eagle Point. Mr. Jack is working on the rock crusher.
    Mr. Brittsan preached at Reese Creek Sunday after Sunday school. Mr. Brittsan took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Watkins Sunday.
    Mrs. Elsie Robertson and daughters, after attending Sunday school at Reese Creek, visited at J. L. Robertson's.
    Miss Mayes visited at Mr. Robertson's Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 26, 1917, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday night there was quite a number of young folks gathered at the Sunnyside and had a time taffy-pulling and otherwise enjoying themselves, and Sunday evening there was quite a number called to congratulate Sam Leidman and Miss Claire Zimmerman on their prospective marriage that was booked to come off in Medford the next day. But I am anticipating.
    Sunday was one of our beautiful fall days. The morning broke bright and clear, one of those mornings that we seldom find anywhere except in Jackson County, Oregon, and the result was that there was quite a stir among the auto owners, some going one way and some another. Henry Meyer, who was running his Ford taking S. A. Sanford out to place a valuation on the land of the applicants for federal loans, having stopped here with Mr. Sanford, started up Elk Creek way so that he could examine the land and by a little after 10 o'clock a.m. the people from the different parts of the country began to arrive for dinner, and among the first were Mrs. M. A. Brown, Mr. and Mr. G. S. Butler, Miss Grace Davis, Orvil Swartout of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney and his mother, Mrs. Schmidt, and Miss Margaret Haney of Medford; Miss Zula Geppert, Orville Childreth, Percy Haley, Miss Estelle Betz, Jonas Wold, wife and son, one of the Medford druggists, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Lyle Fisher and son Billy, of Sams Valley, came over to see the country and become acquainted with the Eagle Point scribbler who writes the Eaglets, so they said that they had read them so much and so long that they had a curiosity to become better acquainted. He said that he had treated himself to a Ford and proposed to take some enjoyment out of life, and as my wife was not at home at that time, said that they were coming over some Sunday and take dinner and become better acquainted.
    Since Wilfred Jack has moved to town he and his good wife have concluded to become subscribers for the Daily Mail Tribune, so as to keep posted on what is going on in the world.
    The owners of the Ringwood orchard are hauling their apples to the P.&E. depot at Eagle Point for shipment, and it is claimed by the men who are doing the hauling that they are as free from worms as any in the valley. They are fine lookers.
    Monday I saw an aged man in an auto and my curiosity led me to go and introduce myself. So without the formalities of an introduction I announced my name and asked his name, and found that his name is Wm. R. Walker of Sams Valley. At present he is living with his son, Lawrence, who is the foreman on the Tronson orchard, and on further investigation found that the young man and his wife, who were present, were acquaintances of twenty years ago, Mrs. W. being a daughter of Riley Meyers of Central Point, so by being a little inquisitive I met two old friends.
    Mrs. Palmer, whose husband is working in the Butte Falls mill, has moved up there.
    Mrs. Irvin Daley of Lake Creek came out on the P.&E. Tuesday morning and took passage on Herman Meyer's auto stage for home.
    Mrs. John A. Miller of Lake Creek was a passenger on the P.&E. going to visit her son-in-law, Ralph Stanley,.east of Butte Falls.
    O. Adams of Butte Falls, who has been here to have his wrist dressed by Dr. Holt, took the P.&E. train for home Tuesday.
    Mrs. R. A. Weideman, who is clerk of the Antelope school district No. 12, was here Tuesday and requests me to say to the voters of said district that there will be a special school meeting in said district November 28 to vote on the tax levy for the year. The meeting is called for 4 o'clock p.m. sharp.
    J. J. Skein and Manuel Bishop and five ladies, all of Medford, who are engaged in packing apples on the Fuller orchard, called for dinner at the S.S. Tuesday. As some of the ladies expressed a wish to have their names withheld from publication, I have withheld them all. They are packing for the Denney & Co. fruit distributors of Chicago, Ill. Other guests for dinner were C. A. Newstrom, wife and son, and Mr. Farrar of Lake Creek; C. W. Scott, manager of the manganese mine, Herbert Brewitt,  president of the company, and Jesse Bamford, one of the owners of the mine on Lost Creek, Lake Creek post office.
    George Austin moved his family out from his mountain home Tuesday and were guests with us.
    There were fifteen head of horses rounded up and put in the pound Tuesday, and late in the afternoon there were six of them left in, and the mayor is worrying over the thought that some of them are so worthless that he fears that they will not bring enough to pay the expense of posting and keeping.
    Mrs. Mary A. Campbell of Derby spent the night with us Tuesday and took passage on the Moomaw stage Wednesday morning.
    There is a notice that someone has lost a sack of flour and a sack of farina. The finder will find the owner by writing to Box 135, Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 26, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    If the breathing out anathemas of the people of Eagle Point and those living along the different star routes were as effective as they are said to have been in olden times, the person or persons responsible for the delivery of our mail from Medford would surely be in a horrible condition, for it has got to that point where forbearance ceases to be a virtue. The time card of the Pacific & Eastern railway is to leave Medford at 9 a.m. and arrive at Eagle Point at 9:45 a.m. and leave here for Medford on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays at 10 a.m. and on the other weekdays, train days, leave Medford at the same time in the morning and arrive at the same time here, but instead of returning at 10 a.m. the train goes on to Butte Falls, returning at 2:25 p.m., etc. But this fall by some hocus pocus the time is changed to start from Medford whenever they can get off and reach Eagle Point at any time between 9:45 and most any old time, varying from 10 a.m. to 1:20 p.m., greatly to the inconvenience of the public. One cause of the trouble is the horrible condition of the propelling power, especially the condition of the motor car, for there seems to be the principal trouble, for from what I can find out--you know railroad men are as dumb [i.e., tight-lipped] as an oyster--but from observation and catching a word occasionally, one can form an idea, especially when it takes the combined efforts of the crew to get it started and keep it going. One trouble may be that it has been run over the rough road so much that it is shaken all out of commission. At any rate, it is very disappointing to go to the post office expecting to get the mail and have to wait, and then go home without it, as has been the case now for the past several days. We do not care to censure the railroad men, for they evidently do all that they can, but the fault lies with the higher-ups for putting us off with such worn-out motor or locomotive.
    J. E. Merrill and wife, living on Reese Creek, were in town doing some trading Wednesday afternoon.
    Irvin Daley of Lost Creek has been hauling in his potatoes and I understand is storing them for future use. Wm. Nichols brought in a four-horse load for him Thursday.
    W. B. Chance, mill inspector of Salem, was on the P.&E. train Thursday on his way to inspect the sawmill near the mouth of McNeil Creek on Big Butte Creek.
    J. M. Berger of Yreka, grandfather to the manager of the T. E. Nichols store, Ed Conley, came in Thursday to visit his grandson and Ed's mother.
    John Iseli and John Scheidlinger of Butte Falls came out from their homes early Thursday morning and went on to Medford with Gus Nichols and wife, returning the same day and spent the night with us at the Sunnyside.
    Dave Pence of Trail came out Wednesday evening and spent the night with Frank Lewis and the next morning stopped me on my way to the depot and renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    The men who combined together and shipped a carload of hogs to Portland a few days ago have their returns and report realizing over 16 cents a pound for the lot.
    Walter Wood, one of our stock men, who has been out on the high range, reports that the cattle are looking well as a rule, although some of them are a little thin.
    The ladies of the Red Cross are holding their regular meetings now every Thursday and Friday. Mrs. Wm. Brown informs me that they have already made up and shipped to the front several hundred dollars' worth of goods, such as sheets, pillow cases, etc., but that they are handicapped by the want of funds, but that they are going to give a grand Thanksgiving ball on Thursday, Nov. 29, and are desirous of having a good attendance.
    Since my last, in addition to D. W. Pence of Trail, renewing his sub. to the D.M.T., Wm. Nichols of Lake Creek and Ray Harnish of Climax have renewed their subs. to the W.M.T.
    Thursday M. E. Root, agent for Denney & Co., of Chicago, apple packers and distributors, was here for dinner, and so was J. J. Skinner, Manuel Bishop, Mrs. M. White, Mrs. Cole, Mrs. Rose Samson. Mrs. Cloe Kessler, and Mrs. Lee. They were packing fruit for the Denney Co. J. J. Skinner is the general superintendent of the work, looking after the sorting, packing and shipping of the fruit.
    While attending to some business in the Eagle Point Bank and talking with the cashier, J. V. McIntyre, about the financial conditions in general, he remarked that there was no scarcity of money, and that the deposits in the bank had increased 70 percent in the last season, notwithstanding the fact that they have had to carry quite a number who have invested in the federal bonds, and that would indicate that money is not very scarce.
    Wm. von der Hellen and G. G. Goodman, representing the Goodrich Tire and Rubber Co., were here Thursday for dinner.
    We have had another death in our community. Ralph E. Potter died Friday afternoon, aged 28 years, 11 months and 8 days. He leaves his father, mother, Robert Potter and wife of Ashland, a sister, Cecil, and brother, Boyd, of Central Point. The deceased has been a sufferer all of his life, and consequently his death is not lamented as though he had been of a robust constitution.
    Thursday we had R. B. Ebel, O. O. Alenderfer and Lesley Choto of the Calif. and Ore. Power Co. of Medford here for dinner, besides one of the young men who has been working for the Co. but had quit (struck).
    Wm. Nussbaum of Lake Creek was a business caller Friday.
    Wallace Bergman and wife, who have been living near Eugene, Ore., came in Friday and went out to his brother's, on the free ferry road.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 27, 1917, page 7


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bergman and family of Irving are visiting Mrs. Bert Clarno. They expect to locate in Medford for the winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Watkins visited at Mr. Ayres' last Saturday.
    Miss Mayes was in Medford last Saturday, visiting with her sister, Mrs. F. A. Blasing, who was passing through the city.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney, were Medford visitors Monday.
    Mrs. Robertson, Miss Anna Robertson and Miss Mayes visited at Mr. Hammel's Sunday.
    The directors have put up the new heating plant in the school house. It is hoped it will prove satisfactory in heating the building.
    The rains have come at last, breaking the long dry season; if it continues warm there will soon be plenty of grass for the stock.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 1, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    If it was not for our railroad accommodations, even if they are not up to date, I hardly know how we could get along, for it is in constant use taking the products of our farms and dairies to the city market and bringing in many of the necessities of life. For I notice that those who are short of hay are having that necessary commodity brought in, while others who have hay to sell are shipping it out. The apple men are also taking advantage of the opportunity to get their fruit to the market, thus saving the extra expense of hauling them on wagons and tracks to the S.P. depots. Frank Abbott had a part of a car of hay brought in Saturday and I notice that there has been several lots of hay passed through here for the county east of here. There was a carload of wood came out Saturday for Geo. Brown & Sons and a car of lumber from Butte Falls.
    John Edsall, who has been helping his son, Jed, get out a lot of saw logs and ship them to Medford, came out to visit his son-a-law, John Caster, and returned Tuesday.
    George Wamsley, during the past few days, has been posting notices of the Chautauqua here, Dec. 10, 11 and 12. This is in accordance with arrangements made last spring when a handsome young lady that knows just how to present her subject to the young folks arranged to have 25 of the citizens of Eagle Point and vicinity agree to secure enough ticket buyers to amount to $350 for the promoters of the scheme, but we expect to have a good attendance, for the program is said to be a very good one.
    Mrs. G. W. Leibman and Mrs. M. Leibman, nee Claire Zimmerman, came out from Medford Saturday p.m. and remained until Monday evening, starting from here for Oroville, Calif.
    Among the other guests for Sunday dinner were H. C. Stark and his daughter, undertakers, of Ashland,
who came over to inter the remains of Ralph Potter, whose funeral was held on Sunday. Rev. Van Scoyoc of Ashland officiated. There was [a] large attendance. The services were conducted at the family residence.
W. C. Daley of Lake Creek was also with us, coming out to attend the funeral. Mrs. Nettie Grover, Ed. Cingcade, the two Haley brothers, Jay Spitzer were also guests of the Sunnyside Sunday.
    One of the Middlebusher boys of Trail came out on the P.&E. Monday and so did H. J. Harding of L.C., the latter taking the Meyer auto stage for L.C.
    Robert A. Neil of Brownsboro was doing business here Monday and Ed. Vincent of Table Rock came over with a load of wheat for the Snowy Butte mill to exchange for flour, etc., asking dinner at the S.S.
    G. E. Cowden, who is living on the Rhodes farm, and his family, were in town Monday and while here gave me his sub. to the W.M.T. for Grant Wertz of Rogue River and A. H. Sunderman, insurance man, spent Monday night with us and so did O. Adams of Butte Falls, who came out to have his wrist dressed by Dr. Holt.
    The barber business has increased so in our little town that Mr. Slusser has to employ an assistant a part
of the time.
    Mrs. John Butler brought in her hens to our railroad agent, [Amos Ayres], Tuesday. She said that they
were disposing of their chickens and removing to Ashland.
    O. Swiffer has moved into the Findley house with his family. He has four or five children of school age.
    There were five box cars left here Tuesday to be filled with apples. Denney & Co. are filling three of them at this writing. A. E. (Shorty) Dodge, James Eaton and Lewis Knips are superintending the filling of the cars. There were also five wood cars out on up to Edsall's crossing and Butte Falls.
    Messrs. Dodge, Eaton and Knips are stopping at the Sunnyside.
    Cande Gaines and Philip McCabe were diners here Tuesday and so was Mr. and Mrs. Lee of Medford.
    Later in the day, W. A. Folger, G. B. Dean, and Ed White called on on business.
    Jerry Lewis, who has been working in Medford for some time, returned home Tuesday and took supper at the S.S. Hotel.
    Edward Skibitzka, a traveling salesman for the Union Meat Co. of Portland, was with us Tuesday.
    M. E. Root of Medford, representing Denney & Co. of Chicago, Ill., was with us Wednesday for dinner, and
so was Mrs. Fred Frey, nee Flora Edler, and her brother, F. E. Edler, among the diners Wednesday, and
so was M. C. Gray and Frank E. Roomis were among the diners also Mr. Gray is a representative of the
Oregonian, and Mr. Roomis is acting as an assistant.
    Since my last report, in addition to Mr. Rose having paid up a small balance on his sub. to the W.M.T. and decided to take the D.M.T. instead, and W. C. Daley of L.C. has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. John Higinbotham of Butte Falls has renewed his sub. to the W.M.T. A. M. Gay has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T., Prospect, and changed the address to Butte Falls. Dolph Kent, Wellen, sent in his check to renew his sub. to the W.M.T. and D. S. Nichols has renewed her sub. to the D.M.T.
    The most of the farmers are rejoicing over the gentle showers we are having today, Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 3, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. R. McQuoid and wife started last Wednesday afternoon for Oakland, Calif., to remain indefinitely so as to be with their children, who are in business in that city.
    Miss Ruth Grover, who is one of the bright little pupils in our school, was taken Wednesday to Medford to have her throat treated by a specialist.
    Wednesday afternoon our school gave a very interesting entertainment and the school room, the high school department, was well filled. The exercises consisted of recitations, dialogs, drills, etc.; the corn drill by seven girls was especially attractive and well rendered; in fact the whole performance was very creditable and seemed to interest everyone. Our new teachers, Prof. J. C. Barnard, Mrs. Goss and Miss Benedict, seem to be doing finely and while, as regards discipline, they are up to date, seem to be very popular with the children.
    Thanksgiving day was observed in the usual manner here, a few gave dinners and invited some of their special friends, and others went to different places to dine with their friends, but when night came there was a goodly company assembled at the dance hall--the opera house--and spent the most of the night dancing and otherwise enjoying themselves; the music was said to be extra good and the young folk have the promise of the same musicians for [the] New Year's dance, January first. The dances are given in the interest of the Red Cross Society and all the proceeds after expenses are paid are applied to that cause. The receipts of the evening, at least the number of tickets sold, was 88, and the cost amounts to about $30, leaving a balance of about $30 for the R.C.S. Friday morning came in with the long-looked-for rain in the old-fashioned Oregon style, for it came with all the force and energy possible, for it left the ground not only well soaked, but also well packed, but after raining all day and all Friday night it left our foothills covered with a light skift of snow.
    Lloyd Stanley and Charles Patton of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. and took rooms at the Sunnyside and later in the day Miss Alene Mahoney and Miss Mildred Patton came in and took rooms. They were preparing for a rest place after the dance. Mr. and Mrs. Reter came out to attend the dance and to visit Mrs. Reter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    F. J. Newport, the ticket agent for the P.&E. at Medford, and wife, came out Thursday and spent the day with relatives in E.P.
    E. M. Stannard of Ashland came out on the P.&E. and went on up to Butte Falls.
    I am in receipt of a letter from Mrs. F. W. Mears, corresponding secretary of [the] Soldiers' Auxiliary, calling my attention to the exhibit Monday and Tuesday nights, Dec. 3 and 4, of the different pictures of camp scenes taken of the Seventh Company of Medford boys and asking me to help to advertise the subject as best I can but I am afraid that the letter was received too late for this letter to help very much but I will help what I can, for I would be glad to render any assistance to our boys in my power.
    Among the helpers in the way of patronage to the dance Thursday night I notice that our county coroner, Mr. Perl, and wife, were out and brought with them six young ladies to take part and assist in the cause of the Red Cross movement. If some more of our other county officials would have done.as much that would have added to the pleasure of the occasion--remember the R.C.D. for Jan. 1st, 1918.
    Charles Clark, who has been out in Klamath County this fall working in the government sawmill, returned Friday and came back to his room at the S.S. Hotel.
    Theiron Taylor and Percy Haley spent Friday night at the same hotel.
    L. F. Swanson was in town Saturday morning and reports that he has bought and moved onto a tract of land formerly owned by Luke Ryan of Medford, lying west of Eagle Point about one and a half miles.
    The constant downpour Friday kept the most of the people at home but Sam F. Coy ventured out and employed himself removing a fence that was across Antelope Creek on his mother's place. The day before he renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 4, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith, November 29 (Thanksgiving day), a seven-pound boy. Mother and son are doing nicely.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel, who is in the Central Point hospital, having undergone an operation, is getting along as well as could be expected, at last reports. Mr. Hammel and Mr. Minter, husband and father, are both with her.
    John Minter, who has been in this vicinity for a few weeks past, returned to Boston Monday.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been working in the saw mills at Butte Falls, was down getting his traps and camping outfit together, preparing to go up Big Butte to trap for the winter.
    There were several family reunions in the neighborhood Thanksgiving day.
    Mrs. Walter Bergman, also Mrs. Sam Courtney, visited Mrs. Watkins Monday.
    Walter Bergman was in Medford Tuesday on business.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 6, 1917, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers Saturday night were William Wilson of Butte Falls, on his way to Medford, beside a number of our young people who are working in the different orchards who generally come in to spend the night and Sunday with us.
    Sam Courtney and John Minter came in late Saturday on business.
    Wm. Winkle passed through here with a small band of sheep, on his way up Rogue River to the Elk Creek country.
    Thomas Stanley drove in a band of about seventy head of young steers to the Jackson pasture, that he has sold and are to be delivered in a short time.
    C. A. Newstrom, the Lake Creek road supervisor, came in Monday for dinner and reports that the Tacoma Metal Company, who are opening up the manganese mine on Lost Creek, are pushing the work right along building their mill and placing the machinery. They are now working about twenty-five men, although as yet they are not opening up the mine to any extent. That the company have still another car of machinery to come. I understand that two representatives of eastern capital went up a few days ago to try to buy the company out but thus far have not succeeded.
    Mr. W. P. McCabe and Mr. Joy, an elderly man who is living with him, were here Monday for dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl von der Hellen were shopping here Monday.
    Miss Lucy Berger of Yreka, Calif., is here visiting her aunt, Mrs. Conley.
    After so long a time the rock crusher located just above town has commenced crushing rock to put on our streets. C. H. Natwick has charge of the road work.
    Notices were posted in our little town calling for a town election to be held on Tuesday, Dec. 4th, but on the eve before the attention of the mayor and recorder to the ruling of the attorney general in which he expressed the opinion that the elections in incorporated towns and cities were to be held at the same time that the state elections were held, so our accommodating mayor, John Nichols, took the trouble to notify those who had been appointed to act as judges and clerks that the election was called off, thus saving the town the twelve or fifteen dollars it would have cost to have held the election. Bat there was a special meeting of the town council called for the same afternoon and I met our mayor on the footbridge as he was returning from a trip to see Mr. James Jordan, one of the city dads, where he had been to notify him of the meeting, and he told me that the council was to meet at four o'clock p.m., so about that time I started for the town hall and when I reached the blacksmith shop I found him there with the aforesaid councilman in tow trying to persuade the smith to drop his work and go to the hall and take part in the meeting, and he finally succeeded and then he rounded up Ed Conley and Frank Brown, two more of the councilmen, and the recorder, J. V. McIntyre, and got them all in the hall, called the meeting to order and proceeded to take action on the budget for 1918. It was fixed at $400 for town purposes, $600 to pay the interest on the bonds and $400 for a sinking fund, making a total of $1400 to be raised by taxation next year. His honor said that the tax levy would not be near so much if those owning property in town would pay their taxes but that those who worked and voted for the bonds were on the delinquent list and had been for several years. If the reader will take the trouble to look over the delinquent tax lists for 1916 they will find the names of a number who work hard to get the little village incorporated and then voted to have the debt saddled on the town. And the trouble with us is that we have so few people living in our town that we cannot force a collision of the taxes and our county court hesitates to make a move in that direction for fear that the county would have to buy the property in and would have a white elephant on their hands so that those of us who do pay have to be taxed more to make up the deficiency. One way the town dads have devised to bring in cash to the treasury is they enacted an ordinance first to take up all loose stock that happens to be passing through town and put them in the pound but they found that to pay a marshal a living wage to look after that would "bankrupt the town" so they drove away the town marshal and ordained that anyone finding stock inside of the corporation might take it up, put it in the pound and receive the sum of 15 cents per head for their trouble and the result is that if stock comes in there is a lot of children, boys and girls, watching to make a few nickels. A few evenings ago. Monday afternoon, there was a band of 26 head of cattle came out of the hills on Antelope Creek and came into town and they had hardly got inside the town limits before the children rounded up 18 of them and turned them in and the next morning S. H. Harnish paid $11 and took them out. This is not an isolated case but it is often the case that stock from the near ranges come here for water and are thus trapped, and in two instances that have been called to my attention the children have been known to go outside of the limits and drive the cattle in in order to make a little cash.
    I have learned since my last that Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Smith were presented on Thanksgiving day with a fine boy baby.
    W. E. Denny of Derby, L. G. Palmer, O. A. Hubbard and Frank Netherland of Butte Falls were passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday.
    John Holtz, one of our forest rangers, and J. C. Rowe of Sams Valley, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bollenger and Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Dyment of Sioux City were here for dinner Tuesday noon. Mr. Bollenger and wife live near Medford and the four had been out looking for agates.
    Since my last report W. T. Croft, foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard, has renewed his sub. to the Daily Mail Tribune.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 10, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    M. E. Root came in Wednesday with Jack Emmerson, Morton Hall, Mrs. Alta Lee, Mrs. Cloe Kessler and A. E. Dodge, to finish up the job of apple packing here. After taking dinner they worked with a vim to get through with the job, working until it was quite dark, when they all returned to their homes in Medford.
    Mrs. Nygren of Lake Creek and J. F. Conrad of Medford called at the Eagle Point Bank Wednesday for a few moments and then went on up to Mrs. Nygren's home on Salt Creek.
    In addition to the coming of the Chautauqua Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday of next week, the receipts of which are to be divided with the Red Cross Society, the energetic ladies, in addition to their working with their hands to make clothing, bandages, etc., for our soldier boys, are getting up a grand masquerade ball for the night of January 1, and they expect to gather in several dollars for the society.
    Lowell C. Paget, superintendent of the Chautauqua here, has been here since Wednesday eve, working to make the Chautauqua a brilliant success.
    A. L. Cross and John Iseli were on the P.&E. bound for Medford Thursday. Mr. Iseli was on his way to Portland to select machinery to be added to the Butte Falls saw mill. I understand that the management intends to overhaul the mill and repair the defects, put in new machinery and start in the spring to do business on a larger scale.
    Friday morning Herman Meyer, our accommodating mail carrier between here and Lake Creek, brought out a box of goods that had been prepared by the Red Cross Society of Lake Creek, to be forwarded to headquarters, but I noticed that when he gave it into the care of the express agent that he promptly informed him that the express charges were to be paid in advance, so it would appear that the express companies are not patriotic enough to do the expressing free or even to take the chances of collecting the fare at the end of the journey. But the poor companies have to live, as well as the rest of mankind. The Parent-Teachers' Association met Wednesday evening at the schoolhouse, and among other things, elected new officers, to wit: President, Mrs. Nettie Grover; vice-president, Mrs. Sophia Childreth; secretary, Mrs. L. K. Haak. They also took steps toward having a Christmas tree for the children Monday evening, December  24.
    Mr. McNary, formerly of Brownsboro, but now of Medford, came in on the P.&E. Saturday, and went on up to his old home; George Barker, the Butte Falls banker; H. D. Mills, the superintendent of the Butte Falls Lumber Co., and L. C. Moore, formerly of Elk Creek, but now of Butte Falls, and A. L. Cross were on the train, besides quite a number whom I could not name. The train reminded me of some of the trains I saw up north the past season, for in addition to the regular passenger car there were two box cars and eight flat cars, five of them for saw logs and two for lumber from [the] Butte Falls mill, and the other for wood. The P.&E. manager, Mr. Neilson, has a fine lot of ties already here, and is having new ties placed all along the track between here and Medford. The train had a carload of flour and feed for W. S. Kee of Butte Falls, and took on a quantity of flour and feed from our Snowy Butte mill.
    L. E. West, a brother of Oswald West, of Tacoma, Wash., came in on the train Saturday, took the E.P.-L.C. stage and went out to the Lost Creek manganese mines. He is interested in mining and wants to see for himself what there is there,
    L. C. Kemp, a traveling salesman for Good-Fit Manufacturing Company of New York, was canvassing our town for orders for waterproof coats Saturday.
    Lewis Blass of the free ferry, J. J. Winningham, Henry Trusty of Trail and E. L. Webster of Eugene, representing Sherman-Williams Co., and a stranger were here for dinner Saturday.
    Since my last report, Art Smith, who owns and operates a farm on Big Sticky, called for dinner and while here renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy has given me her subscription to the D.M.T.
    Grandpa Butler, father of John and W. E. Butler, was doing business with the von der Hellen Hardware Co. on Saturday morning.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 12, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Caster and family were doing business with our merchants Saturday evening.
    Wm. Hughes of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. Saturday from his home and stayed until Monday morning with us, and Al Clements, who has been working on the Chas. Buett ranch, was also a caller Sat. eve.
    Roy Cobleigh of Butte Falls accidentally shot one of his fingers off a few days ago. He is the same man who shot himself in the leg a year or more ago. He seems to be either unfortunate or fortunate--perhaps the latter--for when he shoots himself it is in a place where he does not seem to endanger his life, although this last shot proved rather bad, as he loses his finger and I understand nearly bled to death before he got relief.
    Mrs. Geppert and her daughter, Zula, came out from their home Saturday p.m. on the P.&E. to attend the meeting of the Chautauqua and were at the Sunnyside a part of the time.
    Sunday morning we had a very interesting session of our Sunday school, it being the time to nominate officers and teachers for the ensuing year. The following persons were nominated for the different offices, to wit: Superintendent, Mrs. Nettie Grover; vice-president, A. C. Howlett; secretary, Nora Childreth; treasurer, Mrs. Charles Cingcade. For teachers, the Bible class, A. C. Howlett; young people's class, Miss Kennedy, our primary teacher; assistant, Mrs. A. J. Florey; infant class, Miss Nettie Coy. The election will take place at the close of the Sunday school next Sunday.
    Rev. Brittsan, who is living with his son on Rogue River, requests me to say that he will preach in Eagle Point on Sunday morning, Dec. 23rd, at the close of Sabbath school.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday were John Holtz and J. C. Rowe of Sams Valley; Percy Haley and Miss Estelle Betz, Jay Spitzer and Miss Margaret Riley, Orville Childreth and Miss Zula Geppert, Wm. Haselton, J. O. Rummel, J. E. Rummel, Wm. A. Ewing, A. D. Neiler, Eugene Dow.
    Monday morning Percy and Glen Haley, Al Clements and Wm. Haselton went to Medford to take the preliminary examination for entrance into the different departments of the service in the U.S., some wishing to enter the navy, one the aviation chose.
    Died, in one of the hospitals in Medford, Dec. 8th, Edward Mills of Brownsboro. aged 58 years. The remains were interred Monday morning in the Brownsboro cemetery. The funeral services were conducted at the grave by A. C. Howlett. Mr. Mills' wife preceded him to the other world some year or more ago. He leaves no relatives that are known of here. He owned a farm and some personal property, and in his will bequeathed all of his property to the Brownsboro school district. From what I can learn he did not appoint anyone as executor of his will.
    Mr. Holman, Sr., of Climax, has been here for a few days on business.
    Fred Surran of Medford spent Monday night with us on his way up to
work at the Lost Creek manganese mine.
    Prof. R. E. Morris, school supervisor of this part of the county, spent Tuesday night with us.
    J. L. Robison was in town Tuesday and I noticed that he was putting a new traveling trunk into his wagon and naturally inquired if any of his family were going away, when he told me that his daughter, Anna, was thinking of taking a trip back east. She will have been married by the time this goes into print, but I didn't get the name of the lucky man, but wish them unlimited joy and happiness.
    John Cobleigh and his sister, Mabel Hildreth, were doing business here Tuesday p.m.
    A. H. Bradshaw and W. Mann were here for supper Tuesday. They were inquiring for some cattle that had strayed away.
    Word came to me Wednesday p.m. that Edward Lewis, father of our son-in-law, James W. Lewis, and Robert Lewis of Persist, and Walker Lewis of Weed, died Monday night, Dec. 10, 1917. He was about 84 years of age. He has been living for the past few years with his son, Robert, on the headwaters of Elk Creek. The remains were interred on his son Robert's place, where he died. He had been in poor health for the past year and his death was not unexpected.
    Among the guests Tuesday night were Mike Hanley, Charley Seefield of Lake Creek, E. F. Olson and A. L. Elgerson of Grants Pass. They are lumbermen and were out looking for a location for a sawmill.
    R. R. Minter came out to attend the Chautauqua Tuesday p.m. and remained to enjoy the evening program.
    C. A. Baer of Medford was also here Tuesday night for supper.
    W. E. Hammel was in town Wednesday morning. He brought in a load of wood for the church here.
    The P.&E. failed to bring out the mail Tuesday p.m. again and the result was that about a hundred readers of the Medford Mail Tribune were very much disappointed. It seems unfortunate that the train men have so much trouble with their little motor car they have to depend on to use on the road between here and Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 15, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the lodgers at the Sunnyside Wednesday night were Professor R. E. Norris, the school supervisor, and J. N. Shaffer of Red Blanket.
    The Ellison-White Chautauqua that has been held here the 10th, 11th and 12th inst. closed Wednesday night, and before speaking of the different acts and parts of the performance, I wish to mention a little incident in the beginning of the exercises. The superintendent of the Chautauqua remarked, when opening the exercises, that the children of Rogue River had deported themselves the best of any place he had been, and that he wanted the children here to try to do as well and see how still they could keep. Well, say, they were so quiet that one would hardly know they were there only when the actors would make a good hit, and they they would simply clap their hands. Why, they simply discounted Rogue River 10 to 1, and although we are accustomed to having our children behave properly, they did extra well this time, and we feel proud of the way they acted, and the Chautauqua people left with the impression that the children of Eagle Point are truly up to date.
    After the opening exercises for the afternoon we were favored with a concert by three young ladies. Then we had impersonations by one of the young ladies that seemed to be highly appreciated by the audience. In the evening we had a concert prelude by the same three young women that was fine, but the most attractive part of the day's exercise was the lecture by Dr. A. D. Carpenter, subject, "Worlds in the Making." He kept his audience interested from start to finish, although he spoke for an hour and ten minutes. It was a common remark heard, "Well, I could have sit and heard him for an hour longer." He carried us back into the past for millions of years and showed us the formation, first of the world's planets and stars, their final collapse, and how the whole planetary system is kept up, its immensity and wound up by assuring as that there was an all-wise Creator that formed all these and kept them in constant motion.
    Tuesday afternoon we had simply an entertainment by Marion Olson, dramatic readings and character sketches. The entertainment was very good and interesting and seemed to be highly interesting. In the evening we had a French Canadian drama by the Comus players, "Carson of the North Woods"--a splendid play.
    Wednesday afternoon a concert prelude by [the] Waikiki Hawaiian quintet that was quite good, but the crowning act was the lecture by J. Sherman Wallace. His subject was "The Salvation of America." He was pleading for a higher educational standard among the masses, showing the advantage that an educated person has over the ordinary eighth grade pupil. Among other good things he said was he showed the young folk the evil effect that the use of tobacco has on the mental powers and stated that during his eight years' experience as an instructor in a university he had never known of a cigarette smoker to complete his four years' course, that they absolutely could not perform the work to be done on account of the deadening effect that the use of tobacco had on the thinking powers. He then paid the kaiser a compliment by comparing him with the arch fiend, who in speaking of Woodrow Wilson and others, composed some to the great men of the age, but said that God never made but one Woodrow Wilson. He spoke for eighty minutes and held the audience's attention all the time. His address was interspersed with an anecdote occasionally to hold the attention of the young folk. The people here feel that the two addresses, if nothing more, were well worth all that it has cost them. The evening was devoted to a grand concert by the Waikiki Hawaiian quintet, consisting of songs and stories of the South Sea Islands. It was all good.
    There was a move started to have the management put on another Chautauqua next fall, and hopes are entertained that it will prove a success. It coming so late in the season and at a time when the farmers were busy plowing and the roads so bad that many who would have attended could not, on account of the bad roads, but if we can have one not later than November 10 there is no doubt but it will prove a success financially.
    Mr. Von Hoevenburg of Sams Valley, who has the A. Corbin orchard leased, had a 12-20 Cleveland tractor brought out and tested on the orchard this week, but owing to the heavy sticky soil and the fact that the land was set in alfalfa and clover, it was found that there was not sufficient power to pull the two twelve-inch plows, although after they had taken off one of the plows it seemed to do good work. After trying it on that place, the demonstrators, H. A. Tucker and H. W. Lippeko, took it over to the Sams Valley orchard, where they would have a different kind of soil. It may be that owing to the fact that it was showery weather when they tried it on the sticky soil that that might have made against the operation.
    We have had another change in the Thomas Nichols store, Ed Conley, the manager and salesman, having enlisted in the navy, has left Mr. Nichols with the store on his hands, and he knows more about handling cattle and hogs than he does the merchandise business, but he says that he thinks that he and his wife can manage to keep it going.
    James Bowers, Roy Stanley, Roy Roundtree, J. W. Grover, Jake Jonas, W. C. Clements and H. A. Tucker and H. W. Lippeko, the last two named are the demonstrators of the Cleveland tractor, were among the guests at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    Mrs. John Miller and Mr. Thompson of Lake Creek were passengers on the P.&E. Thursday.
    Joe Riley shipped two boxes of apples to his niece in Arizona last Thursday.
    I noticed a lot of wood pipe at the P.&E. depot for the manganese mine on Lost Creek.
    Since my last report Rosa Potter, W. C. Clements and Ed Coy have renewed their subscription to the D.M.T. and Owen Swift has subscribed for the W.M.T. and put an ad in the classified column.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1917, page 5


FLOUNCE ROCK FRILLS
    The teachers' examination commences Wednesday morning, December 19, and continues till Saturday.
    Earl Peyton and sister, Miss Pearl, came up from Medford Monday afternoon and visited with their parents till Friday morning, returning to Medford. Mrs. J. H. Erskine went down with them. Mr. Erskine went out on the P.&E. Saturday morning.
    Misses Lillian and Hope Nye and Hazel Ditsworth have gone out to Jacksonville to take the teachers' examination.
    J. F. Ditsworth of Cascade Gorge went out to the valley Wednesday for supplies.
    Ace Hollenbeak is visiting Bert Higinbotham and family for a few days.
    James Peyton, with fourteen other boys, went to Portland Tuesday evening, December 11, to take the physical examination for the aviation corps.
    J. W. Richardson and Ralph Peyton have the contract for cutting 20 tiers of wood for School District 66.
    Miss Lillian Nye spent Thursday night with Miss Pearl Peyton while she was at home visiting.
    Everybody in this community is very busy getting ready for Christmas.
    Frank and Gus Ditsworth each took a load of potatoes to the valley Sunday morning.
    Earl Ulrich of Prospect spent Sunday night at Tom Carlton's.
    Paul Peyton went to Medford Sunday morning for a few days' visit with his brother and sister.
    Harold Peyton, who is still working for William Lewis, visited his folks Sunday and returned in the evening to his work.
    Uriah Vaughn, who is working for Frank Ditsworth, was a pleasant caller at the Peyton home Sunday.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 19, 1917, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Miss Anna Robertson of Reese Creek and James W. Panell of Oklahoma were married December 12 in Jacksonville by Rev. Gammons. The happy couple started for Oklahoma Thursday, where they expect to make their future home. The bride was a most estimable young lady and will be greatly missed by her many friends of Reese Creek.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel, who was in the Central Point hospital, was able to return to her home last Saturday. She is improving.
    Mrs. H. Watkins was in Medford last week visiting her sister, Mrs. Hess.
    The meetings at Reese Creek conducted by missionary G. C. Griffin are increasing in interest, although the rains have caused the sticky to stick and made [it] somewhat difficult to get around. Mr. Griffin is an earnest, pleasing speaker. He is being assisted some by Mr. Britton of Medford, who is also a spirit-filled man.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Roundtree were in Medford last Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caster have moved onto the Frank Nichols place.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 19, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ray Davis of Derby and Mrs. Joseph Geppert of Butte Falls were lodgers at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. L. Stone of Colville, Wash. was a passenger on the P.&E. on her way out to Yankee Creek to visit her brother, J. A. Reed, and after spending a short time with him and his family they came out Tuesday on horseback and she resumed her journey towards home.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside not reported were Mrs. Wilbur Ashpole and her son and family, Thomas F. Nichols, wife and child, and J. A. Cochran of Medford.
    L. K. Haak shipped a small lot of apples out by express.
    There was another carload of hogs made up by the farmers and hog raisers of this section and sent out Saturday afternoon. Royal G. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons had charge of them; they were taken to Portland.
    Mrs. Varian Jonas has been visiting her mother, Mrs. E. E. Bond of Lakeview. They returned to this county, her mother going to Central Point to visit her own mother, Mrs. Ann Thomas, and Mrs. Jonas came over to her home for her little son, returning to Central Point the same day.
    Among the guests Sunday was Paul Peyton and Miss Hazel Ditsworth of Peyton. Miss Haver came out to take the teacher's examination. They drove on to Medford the same afternoon.
    Monday afternoon our little community was agreeably surprised by the advent of Robbie Harnish, one of the E.P. boys who enlisted in Co. 7, coast artillery, and was stationed at Fort Columbia. It was found that there was a defect in one of his knees so he received an honorable discharge and came home, greatly to the satisfaction of his father, sister and brother as well as a large circle of friends.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday was Prof. R. E. Morris, one of the school supervisors, J. H. Mitchell of Medford, the Christian Science healer, besides those others whom I did not know. Prof. Morris was on his way up to Butte Falls. He intended to procure a saddle horse there and visit the different schools in the neighborhood and he said that if he did not succeed in setting a horse he was going on foot. Frank Neil of Derby was also on the train to his home.
    Among the things in the line of freight to Tacoma Metal Co., who are developing the manganese mine on Lost Creek, [they] had a 25-h.p. engine come out from Seattle to take to the mine. Messrs. Herbert Brewitt and Chas. Scott are here dismounting it so as to take it up over the horrible roads between here or rather Brownsboro and Lost Creek. The people up in that section of the county subscribed money enough to pay for one-half of the work, and the county court was to appropriate the other half towards making a good road up in that country and in one way and another the matter has been put off until now and I understand that the bids for the contract are to be opened sometime next month, January, when the contract on the subscription called for the work to be done complete last fall, and now when capitalists come in and undertake to develop the country they are handicapped by the slow work of our county officials.
    Mrs. F. T. Newport, wife of the ticket agent at Medford for the P.&E.R.R. Co., came out Tuesday to visit her brother, Amos Ayres, and family. Mr. Ayres is the agent at the E.P. depot.
    Tuesday noon Mrs. Nygren of L.C., Mrs. L. Stone of Colville, Wash., and her brother, J. E. Reed of Wellen, Herbert Brewitt, and C. W. Scott were with us for dinner. Mrs. Nygren and Mrs. Stone took the train for Medford.
    When the P.&E. came in Tuesday afternoon, on time, there was a train of three cars of saw logs--they took two cars from here that had been sidetracked--three cars of wood and two box cars besides the passenger and baggage car. I understand that the P.&E. are repairing the motor car that was used on the old Barnum road between Medford and Jacksonville to put on in the place of the worn-out motor car they have been using on the route between here and Medford.
    Wednesday Herman Meyer and Claus Charley came in with two four-horse teams and wagons to haul out the engine for the mine and they, Messrs. Brewitt, C. W. Scott and Thomas Lewis, were here for dinner.
    Rev. Brittsan is to preach here on Sunday morning at 11 o'clock.
    The ladies of the Red Cross Society are putting forth every effort to secure funds and supplies for our soldier boys.
    Our school is to give an entertainment Friday evening instead of Monday, as announced.
    Our teachers are gaining in popularity, not only with the children, but also with the patrons of the school.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 20, 1917, page 7


LONG MOUNTAIN SCHOOL WORKING ON NEW LINES
    No. 37, or Long Mountain school, is a little school out in the chaparral brush about three miles from Eagle Point. The building is not a modern one, and can be reached only by crossing a mud flat. The school, however, is working along very modern lines, having introduced some of the newest features in education. The community there is awake to this fact and is becoming proud of its school.
    The teacher, Miss Jessie Chauncey, has instituted what proves to be a very effective way of encouraging personal care and courtesy on the part of the children. She places a star on the board each day for a pupil who has kept his hands and face clean, brushed his teeth in the morning, comes to school with a clean handkerchief, helps Mother or Father with the work, gets up with a smile, and does a few other things of like character. The use of correct language at all times is given proper credit, and with very desirable results.
Hot Lunches Served.
    The school room is decorated by the children, each pupil or group of pupils having charge of a certain portion of the work. There may be a lack of harmony at times, but with the counsel of the teacher the children keep the room attractive and are benefited, of course, by the experience of doing the work. Picture study and other forms of art are carried on in connection with room decoration.
    They have recently begun to serve hot lunches at the Long Mountain school, and indications are that it will add one to the successes in that line. The pupils bring cold sandwiches and other articles as they may choose, then with that they have at noon a bowl of hot soup or some other hot dish prepared at school.
    Members of the agricultural class are raising various kinds of plants for study. Ornamental plants are raised with those for study, just to make the boxes and the room more attractive.
    The pupils and their teacher are now laying plans for industrial club work, to begin soon after the Christmas vacation.
Gravel Playground.
    One of the recent moves in the Long Mountain school is to get the use of a team and haul gravel to gravel a portion of the playground.
    The school is entering wholeheartedly into the county contests; pupils are working for the Palmer awards in writing; the school made 100 percent in the recent pledge card campaign. All this is to the credit of a wide-awake people.
    The teacher and pupils are not alone in their progressive tendencies. The school board has plans for making some needed improvements, and the community as a whole seems to be with the school in its good work. There will probably be formed a community organization of some kind during the school year.
    It is true, no doubt, that the traditional school subjects are first in importance, but a school is expected now to be of the greatest possible service to the community, and it can accomplish this only by doing such things as are mentioned above. Reports show that schools carrying on such work are not running behind in the more formal school subjects, but in nearly every case rank high in that regard.

Medford Mail Tribune, December 24, 1917, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Thursday morning were Fred Pelouze, P. S. Anderson and O. C. King. Mr. Pelouze had just returned from San Francisco, where he and his wife had been to meet their son, Robbie, who has been engaged in the ambulance corps in France and has returned to join an aviation corps in California, but is expected to be here today (Saturday) on a short furlough. His mother remained in San Francisco with him and they are to come home together, P. S. Anderson is direct from Alberta, Can., where he has a large farm and is one of the heavy wheat growers of that section. He also owns what is known as the old Reese farm, on Rogue River, about six miles north of Eagle Point. He took dinner at the Sunnyside and was met here by one of the Brittsan brothers, who have the farm leased, and went on up to the farm the same day.
    Ray Harnish came up from his home of Antelope Creek Wednesday evening and he and his father, E. H. Harnish, went to Medford Thursday.
    Mrs. Ollie Conley and her niece, Miss Edna Burger, the former the mother of Ed Conley, who has been the manager and salesman of the T. E. Nichols store, have moved, as her son Ed has joined the U.S. navy, so as to leave her alone with a younger son.
    Thursday evening Mrs. Royal Brown and her daughter, Miss Hazel, were guests at the Sunnyside, and after the evening meal I was sitting alone reading the Daily Mail Tribune in the parlor, and having a good time alone, when all at once my quiet was disturbed by the aforesaid Miss Hazel when she seated herself by my side and commenced in her own peculiar and fascinating way to tell me of the pressing needs of the Red Cross Society for funds and urging me to join the R.C. Society, but I told her that I had already joined last spring, but she informed me that I was expected to donate the time between now and the first of April and join again. I then pleaded poverty, but that would not pass. I then mentioned "hard times," and she just laughed at the idea of hard times here in Jackson County, and the result was that I had to surrender unconditionally and she kindly let me off on my giving a dollar to the R.C. fund and then consoled me with the thought that she had only taken $3 from the house. If it would not be considered cowardice to run from a woman, I think that the next time I see her coming I will take to the woods, for she never lets one go until she succeeds in her undertaking. But such is life in the far West.
    Friday morning, Mrs. Amos Willits drove in with a car and had as passengers her sister-in-law, Miss Inez Willits, George Hall of Trail, Frank Nichols and Mrs. Andrew T. Poole of Trail. Mrs. Poole went on up home on the auto stage. Frank Nichols came from North Yakima to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols, and other relatives here. Frank was raised and carried [sic] here, but sold out and moved to Washington some time ago.
    William Heckathorn of Trail was a passenger with Mr. Trusty on the Eagle Point-Persist auto stage.
    Sam Courtney, our local painter and paper hanger, has just finished a job of paper hanging for Carl von der Hellen of Wellen.
    William Walch of Wellen was in town Friday and while here gave me a classified ad advertising a stray steer that will appear in this issue.
    Miss Margaret McQuiston, who is teaching school in the Lake Creek district, spent Friday night with us on her way up to her school. She has been visiting in Medford.
    T. F. Boltz, formerly on the P.&E. force, but now superintendent of a concrete company in Montana, came in Friday morning. He was met by his family in Medford Thursday.
    Charley Sherman, who left here about a year ago and went back to New Mexico to take possession of his land claim that had been in litigation, returned the first of the week and has been spending a few days in Ashland, has come back to his room in the Sunnyside.
    Friday evening our school gave an entertainment that proved to be a glowing success. It consisted in songs, recitations, drills, vocal and instrumental music, readings, etc. The introduction was a song by some of our local talent and prayer by Dr. Holt, and all the rest was by the school children. The first was a drill by four boys and four girls that was fine. The dialogue, "Squire Hawley's Objections," was especially well rendered, and so was the holly drill by six girls. The whole performance seemed to be highly appreciated. Owing to unforeseen occurrences, Professor Barnard, our principal in the school, was called away and was unable to take part in the proceedings, but our primary and intermediate teachers, Miss Benedict and Mrs. Goss, were prepared for the management of the proceedings. At the close Dr. Holt made a short address in behalf of the Red Cross movement and in his talk spoke of the success they were having in the drive. He, in speaking of the work in the Lake Creek country, remarked that they had a hundred members up there, but in talking with Mr. Farrar, whose wife is one of the leaders in the move there, said that before this drive was on that they had sixty-five members up there, and that during the drive they had increased the membership to 165, and that in a community where the majority are of German descent that speaks for the loyalty of the citizens of that section.
    Since my last report, R. A. Petty, of Eagle Point, has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    D. S. Nichol of Eagle Point has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T., and Mrs. M. Nussbaum of Laken Creek has renewed her subscription to the W.M.T.
    Saturday there was held another meeting of the Federal Loan Association to make the final arrangements to secure the money from the federal loan board. It appears that when the change was made to have the cashier of the State Bank of Eagle Point become the secretary-treasurer of the association there was some little thing left undone and therefore they had to call another meeting to rectify the oversight.
    Messrs. Marian, John Allen of Derby, George Given, George Lewis and Joe Moomaw of Eagle Point; Jud Edsall of Butte Falls, Harry Young of Medford and Mr. Farrar of Lake Creek were diners at the Sunnyside Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 26, 1917, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Hotel last Saturday night were P. S. Anderson of Alberta, Can.; Rev. Brittsan of Medford, Jay Spitzer, Orville Childreth, Glen Haley and Jay Davis of Derby.
    Rev. Brittsan preached for us Sunday morning, but owing to the circumstances, bad weather and worse roads, preparing for Christmas, and on that account several had gone and to enjoy the Christmas festivities among friends and relatives, and other causes, the congregation was not up to its usual size, although he gave us a good, practical talk, but not what would be called a first-class sermon. He is a member of the Free Methodists.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday were: T. F. Boltz, wife and two children, Joe Moomaw, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jackson, Miss Margaret Riley, Jay Spitzer, Rev. Brittsan, P. S. Anderson, beside several of our Eagle Point citizens.
    Rev. Carstens, the general superintendent of the Baptist churches in Southern Oregon, sent out word that he would preach here Sunday night, but for some reason he changed his plans and sent word that he would come some other time, but Rev. Paul Bandy, our regular minister, came, but owing to a terrific downpour of rain about the time for people to start for church, and the fact that our lights were shut off that evening until about 8 o'clock, there were but a few came out, but Mr. Bandy filled his appointment as usual. In speaking of Mr. Bandy, we regret to say that he has been called to supply another field, so that he will be unable to preach for us after next Sunday, so I suppose that we will have to look around for someone else to care for this field. We regret very much to have to be separated from Mr. B. as our pastor, for he is a stronger man than is generally found in a small country village, but we console ourselves with the thought that our loss will be somebody's gain.
    Monday morning there was a regular jam of people here who wanted to go to Medford, but there was a very poor provision for passage to or from Medford. As William Lewis could take only seven in his Ford and the old motor car on the P.&E. was laid up for repairs, so that they had to use the little gasoline car that the section men use on the road to go and come on and move material on the ground to use in their work, and that could not accommodate more than about four passengers, and even that was late, so that there was a general scrabble for passage, as there were at the depot waiting transportation Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Daley, Mrs. John Rader, Harvey Stanley, John Greb, P. S. Anderson, George Phillips, wife and son, and three from Trail. But as the little car could not bring all of the U.S. mail at one trip, so made two trips, they managed to get there by hiring Thomas Lewis to take a load in his Ford. But we are looking for a decided improvement from now on. I was told this (Wednesday) morning that the company is going to put on a new car this afternoon that will be able to accommodate all who wish to travel either way.
    Clarence Robinett, one of the soldier boys of Company 7, C.A., of Medford, came out to visit his mother, Mrs. W. L. Childreth, and other relatives, returning to his post today.
    Madames Ed and P. D. Coy were among the guests at the S.S. Monday.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday were Scott Claspil of Butte Falls, Henry Gordon and family of Fort Klamath, Chris Beale of Central Point, on their way to Butte Falls, and Wilfred Jack, wife and three children. They had been to Medford on Monday and came home on the P.&E.
    John Winningham of Trail came out Tuesday on the Eagle Point-Persist auto stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside, and while here renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., then went on to Medford on the P.&E.
    Art Nichols and family, now of Siskiyou County, California, but formerly of Fort Klamath, came over to take Christmas dinner with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols.
    James Vestal, one of the students of the O.A.C., and George Maddox, a friend of his from Medford, came in on the P &E. Wednesday morning and took passage on the Moomaw stage for the Vestal home on Reese Creek.
    Among the guests here Christmas were S. H. Harnish, son Robbie, Fred Dutton and wife, Philip Jackson and wife and Henry Trusty.
    The Brown family gathered at the home of R. G. Brown for Christmas dinner, except J. Frank Brown and wife, and they had Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements as guests. R. G. Brown was unable to be present at the Christmas reunion on account of his being away to Portland on business.
    Since my last report, beside John J. Winningham, Roy Ashpole has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. and G. H. Frey of Lake Creek has given me his subscription to the W.M.T.
    Carl von der Hellen and wife went up to Derby on the P.&E. to spend Christmas with her mother and family.
    F. T. Newport, our old depot agent, and family took dinner with our new agent, his brother-in-law, Amos Ayres, Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1917, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday afternoon John Rader, one of our leading stockmen and progressive farmers, was doing business in our town.
    Mrs. L. B. Caster of Derby came out on the Moomaw stage and took passage en the P.&E. motor for Medford. She was met at the depot by her son Frank and family. They were on their way down to some point in California--I did not learn where--to be with her son, Byrd, who had been knocked off a carload of lumber and badly hurt, and fears were entertained that his hurt would prove very serious, as his body was paralyzed from his shoulders down.
    Walter Bergman and family of wife and three children were also at the depot waiting for some conveyance to Medford. Also his mother, Mrs. A. B. Clarno.
    When the little gasoline motor [arrived], the one the section men use in the repair work on the road, it had four passengers on for this section, and when I saw the crowd at the depot waiting to go to Medford I wondered how they were going to manage to ride on that little car--four women, four children and four or five men--but later I learned that provision was made for those who could not get on the motor to go in a jitney. During the season when the roads are bad so that most of the people dislike to take their Fords and autos out in the mud or the roads are so bad that they are afraid to try to run them, then they will rush to the train and if, as is the case now, the railroad company happens to have trouble with their cars they raise a howl about the poor service we get from the railroad company, but they never stop to think that the company has been running this route ever since they started at a loss of from $15,000 to $25,000 a year, and that the employees have to put up with such conveniences as they can get.
    I noted a few days ago that there were twelve persons who wanted to go to Medford, and if the wagon road had been good and dry not one of them would have thought of traveling on the railroad, but would have gone in their own cars. I asked one woman why she did not go in her own car and she replied that they could not get the car out to the county road.
    Mrs. Laura Abbott and son Orbra, who have been out here visiting her son Frank and family, and O. Adams took passage on the P.&E. for their homes in Butte Falls Thursday, and Jack Tungate of Butte Falls was also a passenger on the P.&E. for his home.
    Messrs. Farrar and Harding of Lake Creek were also passengers on the P.&E. and stopped off here. A. M. Tyrrell of Lake Creek and family came out on the Meyer auto stage Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside, and C. W. Scott, the manager of the Lost Creek mining enterprise; Claus Charley, Herman Meyer, Jr. and Frank Hand were among the diners at the S.S. Thursday.
    E. E. Bond, wile and two children, of Lakeview, and Mrs. Bond's daughter, Mrs. Varian Jonas, came out on the P.&E. and were guests at the Sunnyside Thursday, and while here gave an account of a family reunion of the family of A. M. Thomas in Central Point Christmas. The entire family, including her five daughters, sons except Charley, grandchildren, nieces and nephews. My informant said that she could not give the number or names of the company, but that there was a perfect jam of men, women and children. Some of them came from distant parts of the U.S. to have a good time visiting their dear old mother and grandmother.
    Herman Meyer had his car loaded this (Saturday) morning, as he has six passengers, among them Miss Blanche Burleson and her brother of Lake Creek, on their way out to Phoenix to go to school, and some of the others were men interested in manganese mining who had been up there looking over the situation.
    The Tacoma Metal Co. had another engine come in and taken up to the mine, that being about all of the heavy machinery they will have to take up this winter.
    Among the lodgers at the S.S. Friday night was John Iseli and wife of Butte Falls and Mrs. A. B. Chartraw and son, Fred, of Derby. They took passage on the P.&E. for their homes Saturday morning, and so did Mr. Watson of Butte Falls and John Smith of Eagle Point. Mr. Smith was going up to visit his children.
    Mrs. A. B. Clarno, who lives north of here a few miles; Mrs. Farrar and a lady friend of Lake Creek, came out Saturday morning and took passage on the E.P.-L.C. auto stage for their homes. Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Tyrrell were also passengers on the P.&E. for Lake Creek.
    L. H. Pickel, who is running an auto truck for the Jackson County Creamery; Mrs. R. A. Weideman, who is assisting in the T. E. Nichols store on Saturdays, and Mrs. Nichols, Nick Young and Amos Ayres, our depot agent, were among the diners at the Sunnyside Saturday.
    Since my last report, W. H. Crandall has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    I am wishing the entire force in the Medford Mail Tribune office a happy new year and the readers of the Eaglets not only a happy new year, but a prosperous one through life.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1918, page 3


Reese Creek Riplets
    The Reese Creek school, Miss Mayes, teacher; also the Laurel Hill school, Miss McDougal, teacher, began school Wednesday after a short vacation.
    Miss Mayes visited Mrs. Watkins a few days the first of the week.
    The Misses Alice and Maudie Schleichert of Medford were weekend visitors at Mr. Robertson's, Miss Mary Robertson returning home with them to spend New Year's.
    James Vestal, who was home for the holidays, returned to the O.A.C. this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Caster, John Caster and mother are in California at the bedside of Byrd Caster, who fell from a lumber car, causing paralysis.
    John Brittsan is in Medford for a few days.
    Chris Bergman's brother and nephew, from Missouri, are visiting them for a few days. They expect to leave for California this week, where they will also visit relatives. Chris will accompany them to California.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1918, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
     There will be preaching service in the church Sunday, January 6, commencing at 7 o'clock. The same evening all of the young people are requested to be there by 7 o'clock sharp. It is expected that Rev. Carstens will be with us on the occasion.
    Rev. Carstens of Medford was with us last Sunday and preached a fine sermon to a small audience. It was not known that he was to be here until late Saturday evening, so late that there was not time to circulate the announcement, but those who were there seemed to enjoy the service very much. He remained until after the evening service and took part with Rev. Paul Bandy in the services. Mr. C. was accompanied by his daughter, Miss Lillian, who sang for us at both services, and Miss Virgie Meadows and C. S. Webster, and at night John Johnson, Dana Davis, Childs and Merl Willits of Medford came out and attended the evening service,
    We had as guests at the Sunnyside Sunday Dr. W. P. Holt, wife and daughter, Miss Helen, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Boltz and two children, Mary and Thomas, Jr., William Lewis, Henry Trusty, Glen Haley, Orville Childreth, Miss Eula Geppert, Albert Clements, Estella Betz, Aden Haselton, Joe Moomaw, Howard Painter, Roy and Lloyd Stanley.
    Prof. J. C. Barnard, the principal of our school, wife and brother-in-law, Joe Welch, and Miss Benedict, our primary teacher, who went to Ashland to spend their vacation, returned to their posts so as to be at church Sunday. Mr. Welch remained in Ashland for a while.
    Mrs. L. B. Caster of Derby returned Monday morning from her visit to her son, Byrd, who was seriously injured by being thrown off of a load of lumber at Dorris, Cal. She reports that there is but little hope of his recovery. Her son Frank and family came out Tuesday and they report that it is a question as to how long he may linger but they think that he cannot recover. John J. Winningham of Trail also came out but after his arrival found that it was necessary for him to return to Medford the same day.
    Mrs. R. A. Weideman, who is helping T. E. Nichols to invoice his stock of goods, and Mrs. T. E. Nichols, Amos Ayres, our depot agent, John Winningham were diners at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jeff Conover and family were doing business with our merchants Monday.
    Mrs. Carl Jackson, whose husband is in Mare Island, Cal., moved her household effects to Butte Falls Tuesday. Charles Edmondson was on the same train for his home in Butte Falls.
    Miss Ida Huston of Trail, one of our progressive teachers, came out from Medford on the same train. and Miss Tressie Pence of Trail came out on the Trusty auto stage. John C. Wise of Prospect also came out on the stage and after dinner went on to Medford on the afternoon train.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside New Year's Day was Wm. von der Hellen, wife, daughter Miss Joyce and son Donnel, Miss Tressie Pence, Henry Trusty, J. C. Wise, Roy Ashpole and family, Mrs. T. E. Nichols, Mrs. R. A. Weideman, C. A. Newstrom of Lake Creek, Thomas Carlton and wife and Ray Davis. Later in the day L. H. Ossman and wife of Medford called. Mr. Ossman was out with a Paige car, for which he is the agent. He reports that he is meeting with considerable success in his line of business.
    A. Marion of Derby, and Harris Geppert of Butte Falls came out to attend the dance Tuesday evening.
    W. O. Johnson of Jacksonville came out Monday evening with a dozen cows that he had sold to Mr. P. S. Anderson and after spending the night here took them on up to Mr. Anderson's farm on Rogue River, now occupied by V. E. and John Brittsan. Mr. Anderson is aiming to stock the farm with about twenty milk cows and have the Brittsan brothers milk them. Mr. Johnson returned to the Sunnyside where he was met by Mr. Anderson Tuesday night.
    The Red Cross dance here Tuesday night proved to be a grand success so far as numbers are concerned, for those in attendance report that there was a perfect jam there, but I have not learned the final result, but will try to find out for my next letter.
    Wednesday morning the P.&E. force came out with a new motor car and were on time. Tuesday night the old motor car gave out on the men and Wednesday morning the men hitched the old motor on behind the new car and started for Medford but I have not learned, at this hour, Wednesday p.m., the result of the undertaking but hope for the best.
    This morning just as the men were getting the new car ready to start for Medford Frank Nygren and his sister Miss Alice drove up to the depot with Mr. and Mrs. Frank Sundberg and their three children Leroy, Alfred and Hazel. They came from Loveland, Colorado, to visit Mr. Sundberg's sister, Mrs. Gus Nygren of Lake Creek. Mr. Sundberg is one of the well-to-do farmers of Colorado and came out here with his family to visit his sister and see the country. He says that he admires our valley, but not being used to the rocks and hills of the upper Butte Creek, although he thinks that this is a fine country to live in. But the rocks and hills don't suit him.
    Since my last report Charles Cingcade had paid up a small balance due on his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune and ordered it discontinued and the Daily Mail Tribune sent in its place. The demand for the Daily Mail Tribune is increasing every day.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1918, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday night D. H. Barneburg and E. C. Bartley, two of our prominent stockmen, came in and spent the night. They had made the arrangement to procure a band of cattle from the Stanley brothers, and were to meet them here Thursday. Thursday they looked over the cattle and after spending another night at the Sunnyside, started with 120 head of cattle for the southern end of the valley, where they will pasture and feed them during the winter. The same evening (Wednesday), Lloyd C. Wilson, the mail contractor who is carrying the mail from Derby to Prospect, was also here and spent the night; also John Scheidegger and Horace Geppert of Butte Falls and Alva Marion of Derby spent the night with as, the last three named taking the train for their homes Thursday. Also Miss Alta Allen of Derby was a passenger on the P.&E. for her home.
    Mrs. Ed Watson of Butte Falls, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Ed Conden, on the Rhodes place, took passage on the P.&E. Thursday. While coming from home to catch the train, Mr. Conden came near having a smashup as, while he was driving very fast to reach the train in time, a bolt came out of one of the hounds that held the tongue to the axle, causing the tongue to drop down, but fortunately no damage was done, and Mrs. W. reached the train in time.
    Owen Swift and his son went to Butte Falls to cut wood for one of the companies that are engaged in that business.
    Frank Bergman and his son, William, of Missouri, who have been visiting his brother, Chris Bergman, who lives about eight miles north of here on the free ferry road, were passengers on the P.&E. They were accompanied by his brother, Chris, and he intended to accompany them as far as Sacramento City, if not all the way back to their homes in Missouri.
    V. Conley and Charles Centers of Sams Valley spent the night with us Thursday. They were out looking for milch cows to buy. There seems to be quite a demand for milch cows just now, as three different persons have been here the past week looking for them. If the small farmer will turn his attention to the use of the silo and keep as many good milch cows as he can raise feed for we will soon see a different state of affairs in this country.
    Mrs. Bertha Emerick and her infant daughter, Eleanor Mae, of Medford, who have been visiting the family of C. Farrar of Lake Creek, took passage on the Meyer auto stage Friday morning at Lake Creek in time to catch the P.&E. motor car. Mrs. Emerick is a teacher of music on the piano.
    Speaking of the motor on the P.&E., I see that the company have installed the old Jacksonville motor car on the P.&E. and are trying it out, and if it proves to be a success are thinking of purchasing it. It is to be hoped that it will prove a success, for surely the old one has been an eyesore to not only the men who have had to run it, but also to those who patronize the road.
    Miss Helen Moore, who is teaching school in the district just above Brownsboro--the Lem Charley district--has been visiting the Harnish
family and Mr. Harnish's daughter, Mrs. Fred Dutton.
    C. Davies of Suisun, Cal., came out on the P.&E. motor car Friday and he and Mr. Neilson, the manager of the railroad, went on up to Butte Falls on the little gasoline car used by the section men, to look over the timber section. Perhaps I will have more to say on the subject later on.
    Speaking of timber brings to mind that there is on hand a deal for lumber from the Butte Falls mill to parties in Medford to be shipped out soon. They have been putting out as fine a lot of lumber from the Butte Falls mill as can be found in the country, as they have as fine a body of sugar and yellow pine timber in that section as there is on the coast.
    Friday, H. G. Meyer, Jr., and wife, and his uncle, Henry Meyer, were here for dinner, and before he left H. G. Meyer Jr. gave me his subscription to the D.M.T.
    Mrs. Rosa Smith and her niece, Miss Estella Betz, were also with us for dinner at the same time.
    It had been announced in the school during the week that Robert Pelouze would talk to the school on Friday afternoon and give an account of his experience from the time he left here until he returned, and of course a great many of his old friends here were anxious to hear what he had to say and to meet him personally, as he received a part of his education in our schoolhouse. About 3 p.m. Robbie drove up to the schoolhouse in his father's car with his mother and C. P. Menick, a particular friend, of Medford, and was met by Professor J. C. Barnard and your correspondent, and Professor B. escorted him to the high school department and soon introduced him to the school and the visitors. He began his talk by referring to his schoolboy days when he was a pupil in the same house, and expressed his regrets that he had not been more diligent and studious in his boyhood days, advising the children to improve every opportunity to acquire knowledge, not only from the text books, but also from every source at hand, especially to read the newspapers and glean information from them as to what was going on in the world. After giving the children some good, wholesome advice along that line, he told us of his experience while crossing the Atlantic, of their contact with a submarine and their lucky escape, and then his labors while engaged in the ambulance service, what he saw and of the atrocities of the Germans, some of which seem to be almost unbelievable. Such a maiming for life of poor little children, poisoning the drinking water, defacing and destroying the fine engravings and sculpture, etc. He then exhibited a lot of curios that he had brought from the battlefield and told us how the enemy used them to try to destroy the innocent little children, and finally closed his talk by encouraging us to use every means in our power to help along the good work of securing a stable democratic form of government throughout the world.
    I see that I have omitted one very important part of his speech, and that was when he spoke of the unflinching bravery and determination of the French soldiers, of their nerve to endure pain and their willingness to do all in their power to carry on the war until victory crowns their efforts. He spoke for about an hour and held the attention of the entire audience all the time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Stanford Aiken of Prospect were on the train this (Saturday) morning on their way home. Mrs. F. T. Newport and daughter Lucille were on their way up to visit Mrs. N.'s parents, Mr. and Mrs. Freeland Ayres. Miss Beth Blanchford, who is teaching in Rancheria district, and Miss Mable Johnson, who is teaching in Butte Falls, were also on their way to their schools, on the P.&E.
    John McPherson passed through town this morning with a band of cattle, taking them to where he had hay stored for them, and a short time after Wig Jack and Ben Brophy took a band of cattle to Talent to feed. Up to this time the cattlemen have not had to feed scarcely any.
    W. L. Jones of Butte Falls and F. L. Carson of Fort Klamath, two of the U.S. forest rangers, and Marian and Henry Trusty and Fred Middlebusher of Trail were here for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Pearl Burrell of Medford, who is teaching in the Antelope district, came out on the P.&E. motor Saturday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Sunday morning Mrs. Dr. Ray, son Charles, and daughter, Miss Mabel, came out from their home in Medford to take dinner at the Sunnyside. Lloyd Stanley and Mrs. Roy Stanley also came in for their noon meal.  
    About noon Sunday our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt (Millie) came in from Roseburg. Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt formerly lived in Fort Klamath, but he having sold his sheep decided to go to  a warmer climate, so have located temporarily in Roseburg, and Mrs. H. is now visiting with us, as her husband had a business call to the Willamette Valley.
    Sunday evening, Mike Hanley, Jess Eadley and a man by the name of Form came in and spent the night with us, and Roy Stanley joined his wife and brother that night here for supper.
    Charley Cingcade and family took dinner Sunday noon with our depot agent and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ayres.
    W. D. Roberts, who is living on the Joe Rader farm on Antelope Creek, near here, was a business caller on Monday.
    Alvin Conover and wife were passengers on the P.&E. for Medford Monday.
    J. C. Wise of Prospect, Rudolph Pech, Mrs. Carl Farrar of Lake Creek and A. F. Poole, one of the forest rangers, whose headquarters is Trail, were passengers on the P.&E. coming in from Medford Monday, beside quite a number of passengers I didn't know. There seems to be considerable travel on the P.&E. just now, and many of them are strangers looking over the country for locations in different branches of business, and from the number of men I meet who are looking for sawmill sites and timber land that is on the market leads one to the conclusion that there is going to be something done in the line of railroad extension on the P.&E.
    Grandma Maggie Pech and her son, Fritz, Lottie Tonn, M. D. Bowle and Thomas Ragsdale of Lake Creek came out Monday, some of them to sign up their questionnaires before Judge J. V. McIntyre, our banker. They all came to the Sunnyside for dinner, and so did James Bowers and W. E. Pearson of Ashland.
    Mrs. Walch and one of her twin daughters, of Wellen, who have been up to Butte, Mont, to visit her daughters, Mrs. Charles Thomas and Mrs. Ed Fought, returned home the first of the week.
    Mrs. Josephine Houston of Thompson Creek was here the first of the week visiting her aunt, Mrs. Jack Montgomery.
    Mrs. Middlebusher, the proprietress of the Trail Hotel, came out the first of the week on her way to a hospital for medical treatment.
    The owners of the property in front of some of the business houses are having crushed rock hauled from the rock crusher and placed so as to do away with one of the bad mud holes along the sidewalks, among whom are Thomas E. Nichols, general merchandise. Also along the street in front of and on each side of the post office, and it is the intention of the business men to have some crushed rock placed in front of each one of their places of business, something that has been greatly needed, for in some places the mud was so deep that a pedestrian could hardly get along without rubber boots.
    George Trusty of Elk Creek came out Tuesday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and Wednesday morning started home with a load of land plaster.
    W. E. Walker and A. J. Anderson, agents for the Standard Oil Company, shipped out ten barrels of gasoline on the P.&E. and brought out two barrels on their little Ford truck and distributed it among our merchants, Thomas E. Nichols and von der Hellen Hardware Co. They also brought out a barrel of Pearl Oil for George Brown & Sons. They found that the roads were so soft that it would not be safe to come out with their large truck, so adopted that  plan to supply their customers. While here they patronized the Sunnyside.
    Since my last report George B. Brown of Brownsboro called me up on the phone and ordered his W.M.T. discontinued and the D.M.T. sent in its place.
    J. F. and W. H. Brown of the firm of George Brown & Sons have both renewed their subscriptions to the D.M.T. and Fred Dutton has paid up his subscription to the D.M.T. and ordered it discontinued, as he and his wife are keeping house for her father, S. H. Harnish, and as he is taking the D.M.T. did not see the necessity of both of them taking the same paper.
    A. S. Anderson had a lot of lumber come out on the P.&E. Tuesdays to be taken out to his ranch on Rogue River. He bought some more cows Tuesday and took them up to his ranch, and the lumber is to fix up the barn for the dairy business.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 11, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Al Bell of Talent was a passenger on the P.&E. Thursday and took the auto stage for Brownsboro to visit relatives.
    Mrs. R. S. Gleason and her sister, Miss Juanett Sears, of Butte Falls, were also on the train. They were going up to the country beyond Butte Falls onto Mrs. Gleason's homestead.
    William Gunn and Oliver Adams were also on their way to Butte Falls.
    John Foster, who is interested with Jud Edsall in the sheep business, and has been on the Edsall ranch the most of the time this winter, came out Thursday to have their team shod up, preparatory to hauling saw logs, and while here went to Medford on business. He has made the Sunnyside headquarters. He returned to the Edsall ranch Saturday.
    E. J. Gallagher, one of the post office inspectors, was here Thursday, and after inspecting our post office and taking dinner at the Sunnyside, went out to Wellen and examined that office, returning to Medford that night.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Houston, who have a farm on the E.P.-Trail road via the French-Dodge bridge, were doing business in our town Thursday. They brought out eight boxes of apples and shipped by parcel post to parties in Fort Klamath.
    Buel Hildreth and wife of Butte Falls were passengers on the P.&E. bound for San Francisco, Cal., to visit Mrs. Hildreth's mother, whom she has not seen for eight years.
    Sam Ward, who lives on Rancheria Prairie, was a passenger on the P.&E. for Medford Thursday and returned Saturday.
    P. S. Anderson came out Wednesday and went on up to his ranch, returned to Medford the next day.
    F. J. Ayres and wife came out on the P.&E. Tuesday and went on to Medford. They were accompanied by their daughter, Mrs. Leroy Smith.
    R. S. Bullis of Medford was a passenger going to the lumber camp near Butte Falls.
    In a former article I promised to say something with regard to the work [of] the ladies of the Red Cross Society here, what they are doing and the result financially of the dance that was given the night of January 1. I spoke of there being such a large attendance, and now am able to give the result in cash. After paying all expenses the net income amounted to just $90, and that amount has been or will be applied toward purchasing material to be made up into useful articles for our soldier boys. The last report handed to me embraces the list of made-up articles up to January 3, 1918, is 50 draw sheets, 10 hot-water covers, 5 wash cloths, 35 face towels, 15 bed shirts, 4 bath robes, 1 convalescent jacket, 760 gauze compressors. There is a small society of industrious ladies who meet over George Brown [&] Sons' store twice a week and spend the afternoon working for the comfort and happiness of our soldier boys who are engaged in the struggle to down militarism and firmly establish the principle of true democracy, and when the war is over and the credits are awarded, many of them will be bestowed on the ladies who are giving their lives to help along the work of the Red Cross.
    The same ones who were at the head of the move to have the last dance are planning to have another dance on the 14th of February in the Eagle Point opera house for the Red Cross Society.
    J. R. Norris of Medford, who is with the Rogue River Produce & Packing Co., of Medford, came out Friday morning and had the paraphernalia used in the old lumber house, used by the Big Pines Lumber Co., when they were in business here, but later by the B.F.P.&D. Co., taken out and shipped to Medford.
    Frank Caster and family were in town Friday afternoon buying a bill of goods of one of our merchants.
    J. H. Stewart, who owns a farm east of our town, has made a business trip to Medford, returning Saturday morning, and Alex. Vestal also came home from Medford on the same train.
    Mrs. Frank Abbott and two children were passengers for Butte Falls on the P.&E. Saturday, and so were Roy Cobleigh, H. D. Mills and Sam Ward.
    The same train brought out a lot of lumber from Medford for Mr. Von Hoevenburg of Sams Valley, who has the A. Corbin orchard leased.
    Mrs. Roy Stanley drove out to Medford in her car to meet A. B. Manley of Portland to bring him out to her home. She spent the larger part of her life before her marriage with Mr. Manley and he said that he came down from Portland to see Mrs. Stanley's fine baby boy. Mr. Stanley started to move some of their furniture up to their farm on Rogue River Friday. They were at the Sunnyside for dinner Saturday, and so were Frank Nygren and his mother of Lake Creek and L. C. Charley of Brownsboro.
    Since my last report, Frank Abbott and W. L. Childreth of Eagle Point have renewed their subscriptions to the D.M.T., and J. D. Arnes has given me a classified ad--he wants to buy a team.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Sam Courtney, who has been working on the Tronson orchard, came home Sunday.
    Mrs. Roy Roundtree was taken suddenly sick in the night last Wednesday. She was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital in Medford the next day, where she had an operation for appendicitis; at last reports she was doing nicely.
    The rains Friday and Friday night raised the creeks and river; Saturday morning Reese Creek was higher than it has been for some years; it soon began to fall, however. The river also was up Saturday so that the mail could not cross, but returned by the river road.
    Lloyd Stanley, who has been up to the old Higinbotham place helping move his brother, Roy Stanley, to Eagle Point, got almost to the Ash Springs when the wagon wheels refused to move except to bury themselves deeper in the mud, consequently Lloyd spent the night at Mr. Watkins' but when daylight came, with the help of his brother, Roy, they soon pried the wagon out.
    Mrs. Watkins visited at Mr. Hammel's Tuesday.
    Prayer meeting every Wednesday night at the school house. Everyone come.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 16, 1918, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside Sunday were Philip Jackson and wife, Jay Pitzer and Miss Margaret Riley, Orville Childreth and Miss Zula Geppert, Glen Haley and Rev. Paul Bandy of Central Point.
    Rev. Bandy preached for us at the close of the Christian Endeavor Society exercises. Although the night was remarkably dark and stormy and the streets muddy, except on the sidewalks, there was a good attendance and the entire audience remained to hear Rev. Bandy preach. He gave us a very interesting talk in the introductory service on the parable of the unjust steward, and at the close preached a short but very interesting sermon on the subject of the harmony and Christian fellowship existing today between the Protestant churches, of the great change that had been brought about through the influence of Christian men and women who are devoting their lives toward the upbuilding of society, and referred to the fact that now it is a common custom for ministers of different denominations to exchange pulpits, and even do as he himself was doing, acting as pastor of the Presbyterian church in Central Point and of the Baptist church in Eagle Point at the same time. And that shows that the Christian world is dropping some of its old "hidebound ideas" and embracing a more conservative spirit.
    Mr. Bandy, after preaching, went to spend the night with B. F. Fuller.
    Among the passengers who came out on the P.&E. motor Monday morning were Mrs. C. M. Wisdom of Elgin, Or., and her sister, Mrs. J. A. Obenchain, of Butte Falls. They were on their way up to visit their brother, John A. Miller, of Lake Creek. Mrs. Wisdom was raised near Brownsboro, but has been away for about fifteen or more years, and consequently had not seen her brother for all that time. They went up as far as Lake Creek on the stage and was met there by their brother.
    Mrs. B. H. Bryant, formerly of this place, but now of Medford, and Mrs. Mary H. Lancaster, president of Rebekah assembly, Astoria, Or., were also on the same train. The latter two stopped at the Sunnyside and attended a special meeting of the Rebekah lodge, where the following named officers were installed: Mrs. Nettie Grover, N.G.; Hattie Howlett, V.G.; Sophia Childreth, secretary; Sarah E. Howlett, treasurer; Louise Wamsley, warden; Mae Painter, conductor; West Childreth, R.S.N.G.; Nick Young, L.G.; Geo. Wamsley, R.S.V.G., and Rachel Wood, chaplain. At the close of the session the tables were spread with a bounteous feast and those who were present report having had a joyful time. Mrs. Lancaster is a woman of a pleasing address and her lecture and general course of procedure was highly spoken of and has added a long list of friends to her list of admirers.
    J. L. Mackechnie of Jacksonville and Bert Peachey, one of the forest rangers, were here Monday for dinner.
    L. T. Kemp of Medford and an eastern lady came out Monday and took rooms at the Sunnyside and the next day employed S. H. Harnish to take them up in the neighborhood of Derby to look at a tract of land Mr. Kemp has to dispose of. The lady asked me not to publish her name.
    Marian Nealon and a friend by the name of Kyle called on your correspondent Monday on business connected with the sale of a tract of timber land in Applegate.
    Mrs. C. A. Thomas and her daughter, Miss Gertrude, who have been to Ashland, where Mrs. Gertrude is attending high school, and on their way stopped at Mrs. T.'s son-in-law's, Carl von der Hellen, but finally reached the S.S., where they spent the night, taking the train Tuesday morning for their home.
    I am requested to announce to the readers of the Mail Tribune that Miss Anna McCormack, emergency home demonstration agent for Jackson and Josephine counties, will speak in the schoolhouse on Wednesday, January 23, at 3 p.m., before the Parent-Teacher Association. All who are interested are invited to be present.
    There was a lot of machines came out Tuesday on the train for the Tacoma Metal Co., who are developing a manganese mine in the Lake Creek country.
    L. A. Taylor of Portland was here Tuesday for dinner. He is selling Shayle's separator. He was visiting the company's agent, von der Hellen Hardware Co.
    W. C. Daley of Lake Creek came out on the E.P.-L.C. stage Monday, caught the outgoing car, went to Jacksonville to attend a meeting of the county court, as he is interested in the building of a good road from the manganese mine to Eagle Point, so he attended to learn at first hand the result of the bid, for there was but one for the construction of the new road around the Nygren hill. The bill was turned down by the court as too high, $4000. He returned on Tuesday.
    Since my last report, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy has renewed her subscription to the D.M.T.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 17, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    B. W. Paul and A. B. Cunningham of Paul's Electric Store in Medford were out and took supper at the Sunnyside and Miss Helen Cowgill, assistant state club leader of O.A.C., Corvallis, and R. E. Morris, school supervisor, Medford, spent the night with us.
    John Iseli of Butte Falls and Fritz Pech of Lake Creek were passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday. There were also quite a number of strangers on the same train going up the country.
    Wednesday Brandon Bros. of the Snowy Butte Mills sent out a carload of flour and feed to parties in Medford.
    B. F. Piatt of Medford came out and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage Wednesday for Trail.
    John Iseli and J. P. Hughes of Butte Falls and Fred Warner of Trail were among the guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday night, and so was Miss Helen Cowgill and Prof. R. E. Morris among the lodgers here the same night. While here Thursday morning they visited our school and Miss Cowgill took steps toward the organization of an industrial club in our school. There was some eight or ten of the boys who agreed to enter the contest in the agricultural pursuits and a committee was appointed to have others join in the movement, and also a motion was made to have some of the vacant lots utilized so as to produce something more to sustain our army and the armies dependent upon the allies.
    W. J. Cannon, our Brownsboro merchant, shipped out to Medford one hundred and twenty sacks of potatoes on the P.&E. Thursday afternoon.
    Mrs. Carl Jackson shipped her household goods to Butte Falls Thursday.
    Louis Smith and family were passengers on the P.&E. on their way to visit Mrs. Smith's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Palmer, in Butte Falls.
    J. U. G. Morrison, formerly of Medford and Table Rock but more recently of Nevada, was on the train on his way to Derby.
    Floyd Howard and his sister, Mrs. McDonald, were also passengers on the P.&E. bound for their home on Rancheria Prairie where Messrs. Howard and McDonald are engaged in the stock business, principally raising horses and mules.
    Ernest McKee, general roustabout of the firm of Hubbard Bros. of Medford, was on the train going to Butte Falls.
    J. H. Tyrrell of Lake Creek came out Friday from his home. He reports that the Tacoma Metal Company who are developing the manganese mine on his farm have the machinery all in and will be ready for operation as soon as they can get the water ditch ready and that they are planning to build another mill in the near future but they are handicapped now on account of the horrible roads between here and the mine.
    It seems to me that our county officials are standing in their own light, as county officials, when they dillydally along as they have over that piece of road around that Nygren hill, and now, judging from the experience in the past, we will have to wait indefinitely before we will have anything more done on it. In conversation with a gentleman this Saturday morning, who was on the train, he remarked that on account of the condition of the roads, they being so bad that the people of the country instead of going to town to do their trading sent their money away to the cities to get their supplies and we see almost every train day evidence of the truthfulness of the statement, and the mail carriers are being loaded down in consequence.
    Pete Betz has just received a machine for cutting wood in the tree. He took it home Friday and said that he was going to start it that afternoon.
    John Blass, who lives at the free ferry, was in town Thursday and while here renewed his subscription to the D.M.T. His father takes the W.M.T. but he says that a weekly paper is too slow these fast times, and he is not alone, as the general call wherever there is a daily mail service is for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    There was a lot of long lumber brought out from the Duprey mill Thursday for George Brown & Sons.
    Mrs. Frank Abbott and her two children came out Thursday from Butte Falls where they had been visiting her mother-in-law, Mrs. Wm. Abbott.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen went to Medford Thursday on the P.&E.
    W. E. Hensley. one of our progressive farmers, was trading with our merchants Thursday.
    Thursday evening Robert Pelouze favored us with another interesting account of his travels and experiences in the service of the U.S. His talk was along the same lines he touched on before, although he was much more explicit and extended his remarks over a wider field. He held his audience, the church being well filled, for an hour and forty minutes, and the most of them seemed to be sorry when he stopped. He in a very easy and pleasant speaker. There is no attempt at oratory, but he has his subject so connected that everyone is interested from start to finish.
    W. D. Roberts, who is on the Joe Rader place, was in town Friday and brought in a few sacks of wheat to the mill and took back a load of wire fencing to be used on the farm.
    Mr. Barker, the Butte Falls banker, was a passenger on the P.&E. Saturday morning.
    Jud Edsall had a car of hay taken up to the Edsall ranch Saturday.
    Mrs. John Butler and two men from Ashland and J. H. Tucker of Medford were diners at the Sunnyside Saturday.
    Since my last report C. R. McIntosh, John Blass and O. M. Goss have renewed their subscriptions to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. John Butler, whose husband is working in the round house in Ashland, moved her household goods and went to Ashland Saturday on the train.

Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our paper hanger and expert sign painter, Sam Courtney, has painted two neat signs on the T. E. Nichols store that add to the attractiveness of the building.
    W. H. Crandall and Marion Mitchell of Asbestos were in town trading Saturday afternoon. Mr. Mitchell's father was some years ago one of the leading citizens of our town, and was also mail contractor for carrying the mail from here to Brownsboro, that being at that time the outside boundary of the circle that was favored with mail facilities.
    Sunday forenoon the people began to assemble at the Sunnyside for dinner about 11 o'clock and by dinner time, Sundays 12:30 p.m., the following had arrived: Fred Pelouze, wife and son Bob; that is the name that J. W. Grover used when be introduced him to the audience on the Wednesday night before, when he gave us that fine address on his experiences in France. Mr. and Mrs. Harry Carlton and two of their children, Prof. J. C. Barnard and wife, Miss Estella Betz, Glen Haley, Orville Childreth, Miss Zula Geppert, Lloyd Stanley and sister-in-law Mrs. Roy Stanley, Joe Moomaw, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and E. P. Merrick of Medford, as a guest of Rob Pelouze. It would have been fine if the editor of the Mail Tribune could have been with us at that time, for in addition to having a good dinner he would have been able to have spent an hour or so in the best of company and heard Rob give an account of his experiences while away from the parental roof. Later in the day Jay Pitzer and Miss Margaret Riley came in but not in time for the enjoyment of all in the company.
    Monday J. C. Aiken of Medford, the superintendent of screens in the different irrigation ditches in this section of the country, B. W. Paul of Paul's Electric Store in Medford and his helper, Richard Sleyher, were also here for dinner. They have been here before and left one of their electric washing machines to be tried as to its merits as a clothes cleaner and had come that Monday morning to show what it would do in that line of business, and after having Mrs. Geo. Daley give it a thorough test--well, they left the machine in the laundry room and the hostess of the Sunnyside is satisfied with the arrangement.
    Mr. and Mrs. Edington were trading Monday with Geo. Brown & Sons and so was Harry von der Hellen of Wellen.
    Some of the Red Cross ladies were packing up a lot of goods Monday morning when I interviewed them, there was only Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mrs. Geo. Wamsley, Mrs. A. L. Haselton and Mrs. T. F. Bolz; they were working away like beavers to get everything ready to be sent out on the next train; they had ready for shipment 10 bed sheets, 15 bed shirts, 20 towels, 5 wash cloths, 560 4x4 gauze compresses and later Mrs. Wm. Brown reported over the phone that they had sent away 15 yarn sweaters and had 17 more in the course of construction. There are about 165 members of the Red Cross Society here, but there are only about 17 who are devoting their time to the work of the society. The dance given last Saturday night netted the society $9.00.
    Tuesday morning your E.P. correspondent took the Lewis jitney for Medford and the result was that he didn't meet the P.&E. train as usual, but he met it at the depot in Medford on its return and met quite a number of the passengers as they got off the car, among whom were Mrs. A. N. Thomas of Central Point and her daughter, Mrs. Kate Denine of Butte, Mont. They had been over to Eagle Point to visit some of their old-time friends. Also I met Charles Painter, Ed Cingcade, H. B. Tronson, Frank Nygren, W. L. Childreth and wife and our daughter, Mrs. Millie Hoyt, formerly of Fort Klamath but now of Roseburg. She has been visiting her parents here for the past two weeks. I also met Miss Ruth Thompson of Derby. Messrs. Painter and Cingcade were going to Portland to secure work in the shipyards and Mr. Childreth and wife were going up to Port Stevens to visit their son Graydon, who is in the service of the United States at that place. I should have said that Mrs. A. J. Florey also went to Medford the same morning, Tuesday, in the Lewis jitney.
    Mr. Childreth has closed his shop while he is gone and now that it is closed there are some of the farmers at a loss to know how to get along without him, as his is the only blacksmith shop in or near here, but there is but little doing here as the roads are too muddy and rough to travel over in an automobile and our farmer citizens are so used to going at the rate of from 20 to 40 miles an hour that they can't stand it to poke along at a slow rate.
    Since my last report S. H. Harnish of Eagle Point has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and Joseph Proll of Derby but now of Portland has paid up his sub. to the W.M.T. and ordered it discontinued for the present.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1918, page 4


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mrs. Bellows visited Mrs. Graham one day last week.
    Mrs. Wilbur Jacks and children visited at Mr. Bellows' last Thursday night.
    Mrs. Wilbur Jacks and children spent the weekend at Mr. Crandall's. Mr. Jacks is in Portland working at the shipyards.
    Sam Courtney has been painting a new sign for T. E. Nichols of Eagle Point.
    Mr. Lewis has moved his sheep out on the desert for a short time.
    The directors of Reese Creek met one day last week and put up a swing on the school grounds, to be enjoyed by the pupils.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1918, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Anne McCormack, emergency home demonstration agent for Jackson and Josephine counties, and her sister, Mrs. Max Todd of Phoenix, Arizona, called at the Sunnyside Wednesday afternoon before going to the school house to give her lecture before the Parent-Teachers Association. Promptly at 3:30 p.m. the president of the association, Mrs. Nettie Grover, called the meeting to order and after singing "My Country 'Tis of Thee" and two songs by the children, for school was still in session at the time of opening the meeting, the president introduced Miss McCormack and she give us a fine lecture on the subject of the different kinds of food, giving us an account of the different properties they contain and what kinds were best adapted to the different stages in the growth and development of the child. She used the blackboard to point out the various component parts, showing the different food properties and the usefulness of some of the foods that have little or no food properties, etc. She is a very pleasant speaker and entertained the audience for about an hour or more, closing just in time for them to catch the five o'clock motor.
    Thursday morning the P.&E. was on time and on its arrival there was quite a number of passengers, among whom were Mrs. Irvin Daley and Mr. Edler of Lake Creek and C. O. Guches, one of the creamery men of Medford. Owen Swift, who is in the wood business, took passage on the train from here to Duprey's mill. There was a lot of hay came out for Frank Abbott on the car. On the return trip Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, Ira Tungate, Ben Fredenburg, the last two were from Butte Falls, and Mr. Tungate reports that the B.F.M. Co. are making preparations to run the sawmill the coming season up to its full capacity.
    Mr. Benedict of Ashland took passage on the car for his home. He has been here a few days visiting his daughter, Miss Pina Benedict, our primary teacher.
    O. C. Boggs, one of the Medford attorneys, came out and took dinner at the Sunnyside Thursday and so did Phillip Jackson and his wife.
    Since Mr. Charles Painter has gone to Portland to work in the shipyards his wife has had a telephone installed in their home.
    Howard Painter has gone to Ashland on special business.
    Frank Lewis and Geo. Brown and Sons have had a lot of finely crushed rock placed before their places of business, and if the von der Hellen Hdw. Co. and Roy Ashpole Hdw. store and W. L. Childreth blacksmith shop would follow the example set it would improve the appearance of their places very much and add to the convenience of their patrons.
    H. R. Burrill, who is in the service of the U.S. land office, and E. O. Siecke, deputy state forester, spent Thursday night with us. Mr. Burrill was on his way up in the Lost Creek country to look over the homestead of Mr. Harding, and Mr. Siecke is making a tour through the country giving illustrated lectures on the forest subject. He had lectured in Butte Falls on Tuesday evening and at Derby Wednesday and lectured to a good-sized audience here Thursday evening. He exhibited one hundred different pictures of single trees, forests, foresters' stations, trails, lookouts, observation stations, logging camps and logging trains, sawmills, etc., and the scenery was not only well taken but the lecture was quite entertaining.
    Mrs. O. E. Ragsdale of Lake Creek, who had been to Medford and Jacksonville on business, returned Friday morning, took an early dinner at the Sunnyside and went up home on the Meyer stage.
    Since W. L. Childreth has gone away to Camp Stevens to visit his son, Graydon, who is in the United States army getting ready to go to France, someone has posted a notice on his shop door, "Gone to France to get the kaiser," and when the attention of a couple of Red Cross workers was called to it, one of them remarked that "if he did we would all have a grand jollification right in the streets of Eagle Point."
    Amos Ayres, our depot agent, took dinner at the S.S. Friday, and Mrs. Ayres, his wife, went to Medford on the motor car.
    L. H. Ossman of Medford was out Friday in a new Paige car interviewing some of our business men.
    C. W. Scott, who has the management of the business of the Tacoma Metal Co., who are developing the manganese mine on Lost Creek, and Herbert Brewitt, president of the company, were here Friday on business with our bank and the von der Hellen Hdw. Co. and reported that they expected to start the mill and commence to grind out the ore Saturday and as soon as the roads were in a condition so that heavy loads can be hauled over them they would be shipping out the metal to be used by the United States.
    Since my last Mrs. O. E. Ragsdale has renewed her sub. to the W.M.T.
    Mr. Harrington of Portland, the explosive man, was also here interviewing Wm. von der Hellen, who handles his explosives, and Mr. Scott, as to the amount of powder, fuse and caps they would likely need, and I expect to be able in a short time to report that they are grinding out tons of ore.
    P. S. Anderson, who owns the Vatche farm on Rogue River, and also who has just purchased a small farm just outside of Medford near the P.&E. crossing on the C.P. road, and Lloyd Howard, who with his sister, Mrs. McDonald, owns a fine stock farm (Rancheria Prairie) northeast of Butte Falls, spent the night at the Sunnyside Friday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 30, 1918, page 3


Reese Creek Riplets
    Died--Mr. Hoeft died Monday evening, Jan. 27, of paralysis, at the home of his son-in-law, Mr. Steve Smith. He was buried at Lake Creek Thursday.
    Mr. John Stille preached at the school house last Friday night. He took the train Saturday for Butte Falls, where he expects to hold protracted meetings.
    Mrs. Roy Roundtree, who had an operation for appendicitis, came home Sunday and is getting along very nicely.
    Mr. W. E. Hammel was in Medford one day last week on business.
    M. F. Lewis, who has been herding sheep for Mr. Lewis, has quit and Chris Beale has taken his place.
    Paul Robertson while helping build a place for some chickens in some way fell off the ladder and dislocated his arm, but is getting along very nicely and is attending school.
    Mr. W. H. Crandall was in Medford Thursday and Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 5, 1918, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Theo. Florey, one of our promising youths who is attending the high school in Medford, came out Saturday to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. P. S. St. Clare, Jan. 20, 1918, a daughter.
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside last Sunday, the 26th, were Lloyd Stanley, Robert Harnish, Miss Helen Moore, who is teaching school in the Lem Charley district, three miles above Brownsboro, B. E. Haney and wife, mother, Mrs. Schmidt, and his niece, Miss Margaret Harney, Glen Haley and Miss Virtie Grover, Jay Pitzer and Miss Margaret Riley, Orvie Childreth and Miss Zula Geppert, Henry Trusty and Albert Clements.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. R. Ebel of Medford were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jackson on Monday and took lunch at the old resort, the Sunnyside. Joe Moomaw and Amos Ayres also took lunch at the S.S.
    Miss Clara Gordon of Trail, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Riley Meyer of Central Point, came over from C.P. Monday and took the E.P.-Persist stage for her home. She was accompanied as far as E.P. by her sister, Mrs. R. Meyer, and two of her children, Jake Meyer and Mrs. Florence Walker.
    Wm. Nickle of Lake Creek and S. W. Tracy were also diners at the S.S. Mr. Tracy is traveling in the interest of the Mishawaka Woolen Mfg. Co. and was doing business with our merchants.
    Wm. Grieve, ex-county assessor and now engaged in the Forest Service, and A. J. Young of Abbotsford, Wis., came out on the P.&E. Tuesday, also Mrs. L. B. Caster and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Byrd Caster, wife of the late Byrd Caster, who died recently from the effects of a fall he had near Dorris, Calif.
    Last Monday your E.P. correspondent spent the afternoon visiting the primary and intermediate departments of our school and Wednesday forenoon spent an hour in the high school department. I visited the primary room first and there I met the teacher, Miss Pina Benedict, and about 20 of the little folk and as I went in at recess time could see just how they were managed and what they were doing. After the little necessary confusion of taking their seats and commencing their work, the teacher called the first reading class, new beginners, and I was surprised to see little tots that were just beginning call off the words so readily. Upon inquiry as to how long they had practiced on the lesson, was told that they had commenced on it the day before The teacher then put some of them to work on the blackboard and others to writing on paper and they showed clearly that they had been in the habit of taking pains in their work, and I concluded that they had the right person in that department, for I have long since concluded that if any of the different grades should be served with an incompetent teacher, that the primary should always have the best, for it is so hard to undo, especially with a child, errors in teaching the first lessons. I then went to the intermediate department and found the teacher, Mrs. O. M. Goss, busily engaged hearing a recitation, but she was about through and soon called the class in hygiene and the readiness with which the children answered the questions and explained their lesson convinced me that they had done some work in that line. She then called the language class and they seemed to be just as proficient in that branch as they were in the other. One thing that I noticed was that almost every one of the children seemed to be interested in their work, and speaking of Mrs. Gass as an instructor, I heard one of the larger boys remark that she could come nearer explaining a lesson so that they, the children, could understand it than any teacher he ever saw. In fact I concluded that we had at least three first-class, up-to-date teachers. I only spent a short time in the principal's room and heard but one recitation and that was the class in biology. The lesson was on plant life and the class seemed to understand what they were talking about. The school seems to be all O.K. and up to date.
    George W. Neilson, the superintendent of the P.&E. railway, was here for dinner Tuesday. He had come out on the train as far as the bridge across Little Butte, where he left it to inspect the bridge. He is one of the wide-awake men in the employ of the company and tries to see to the whole road; he steps off the car and walks over the road so as to examine every part. He is having men cut up the timber that was cut down when the right-of-way was cleared for the railroad, and selling it so as to give the road the hauling, and he seems to be building a good business all along the route.
    H. C. Stock, one of the Ashland undertakers, and G. F. Bates of the Ashland Transfer & Storage Co. were here for dinner Tuesday . They came up to bring a casket for Carl Heifft, who died at the home of his son-in-law, Steve Smith, between here and Trail, on the north side of the river. The remains were interred Wednesday in the Lake Creek cemetery. I have not been able to learn any of the particulars but suppose that the writer of "Along Rogue River" will give it in her next.
    Mrs. Monia and her son, who live east of Brownsboro, came in Tuesday with a load of wood for L. E. Nichols.
    Fred Cummings, the water boss of Jackson County, called Wednesday for late dinner; he had been up in the Lake Creek country and to the manganese mine. He reports that the mill is in operation and the owners are grinding out the ore.
    There was a carload of wheat unloaded on the track Wednesday for Brandon Bros.' Snowy Butte mills.
    Since my last N. W. Slusser, our barber, has given me his sub. for the D.M.T. and Pat Young has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and D. S. Nichols has renewed her sub. to the D.M.T., all of Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed Cingcade, one of our prosperous young men, went to Portland a short time ago to try to get on a job there but failed as he is not a carpenter, so he returned and went to Medford Thursday to take the examination for the army or navy but seems to be doomed to stay at home and run his cattle, for that is his business.
    There is getting to be considerable business done on the P. and E. now, as every train day the passenger car seems to be well filled and there seems to be quite a lot of freight brought out and about every trip there are at least five wood and hay cars pass up and on the return trip bring cut about the same number of cars loaded with wood for Medford and saw logs for the Medford mill, and the prospect is favorable for us to have three trains every day to Butte Falls as I understand that the Butte Falls Lumber Company intend to run up to its full capacity the coming season and ship out lumber, and it is strongly hinted that there is to be another mill built beyond Butte Falls and the road extended farther into the timber, and that with the output from the manganese mine that is now being developed the P. and E. will begin to prove to be a factor of no small moment.
    Mr. and Mrs. Buel Hildreth, who have been visiting Mrs. Hildreth's mother in San Francisco, returned to their home Thursday and among the other passengers was Mrs. Doubleday, Horace Geppert, Oliver Adams and Mr. Sam Ward. Mr. Hildreth in speaking of California, especially of the climate, says that there is no comparison between that and our Oregon climate. Although business is good down there and wages are high that he prefers our even, mild climate to that where in the forenoon one will want on a summer suit and in the afternoon a heavy suit and overcoat. Horace Geppert had been out to take the examination for the army, and although they found some defects the board passed him as a class-one subject to the draft.
    Wm. von der Hellen, manager and one of the proprietors of the von der Hellen Hardware Company, and Harry Stark, representing Marshall-Wells Hardware Company, Portland, were here for lunch Thursday and I should have said that Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her two children were here Wednesday for lunch. Carl Farrar and one of the Edler boys were also diners Thursday.
    The Paul Electric Store Co. of Medford has just installed an electric pumping plant in our school house.
    John Smith, while working for Wm. Perry putting up some wire fence, was quite badly hurt by the anchor post giving way and catching him. It came near breaking his leg.
    Robbie Harnish while leading a horse past another in the stable was kicked on the leg just above the knee and came near breaking it. He is now going on crutches.
    Mrs. Wm. Butler sent in by her son another nice lot of hens to Amos Ayres, our depot agent.
    Saturday morning the P.&E. was on time again and had quite a list of passengers for the upper country, Derby, Duprey, Edsall's Station and Butte Falls. A number of them were young men who had been out to Medford to take the examination for military service and the most of them seemed to be very cheerful as about all of them had passed A-1 and are getting ready to start for France, Belgium or Italy or any other place where they are needed to help along the cause of universal democracy and put a stop to the bloodshed and carnage. Scott Claspil, Charles Patton and Frank Smith were among the passengers from Medford and Mrs. Ira Tungate, who has been visiting Mrs. T. Cowden and family took passage for her home in Butte Falls. Ed Cowden accompanied her to the train and while here paid on his subscription to the Medford Mail Tribune.
    Phillip Jackson received Saturday morning by train a "bug" to put on his Ford in place of the heavy body there is now on it.
    Otto Meyer and Otto Frey of Lake Creek came out on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage Saturday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the P.&E.
    J. W. Grover and Jake Jonas who have the W. Hart Hamilton place rented are engaged in putting up a lot of wire fencing on the line between the Hamilton place and Mr. Perry's.
    W. D. Roberts, who is farming the old Rader farm now owned by Joe Rader, has been putting up quite a lot of new fencing on the place. Mr. Rader sold it to a Mr. Parton and he traded it off to another party, he assuming the payment of the balance and failed and now Mr. Rader has the place back again.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Saturday evening a number of the people of the district met and surprised Miss Mayes, the teacher. The evening was spent in games; everyone seemed to enjoy themselves.
    The pupils of the Reese Creek [school] who made a hundred in the last spelling contest, Jan. 28, were: Third grade, Bennie Bellows; sixth grade, Cora French; eighth grade, Paul Robertson. Several others passed the 95 percent. Those neither absent nor tardy during the month were: Bennie Bellows, Edward Bellows, Cora Belle French, Millard Robertson, May French, Myrtle Minter, Paul Robertson and Robert Merritt.
    The annual telephone patrons of line 23 met at H. Watkins' Monday afternoon, Feb. 4, and transacted the business of the company.
    Mrs. John Robertson of Eagle Point is visiting at Mr. Robertson's this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Percy Outlack of Albany came in Saturday afternoon and engaged a room and said he was going out on the agate field to look for agates. Later in the p.m. he came in and inquired at what time he could get passage to Medford; was told that there was no jitney or car service to Medford Sundays. so he concluded that he had better take the P.&E. motor that afternoon. He said that he had found a few agates but no real nice ones as the ground seemed to have been pretty well picked over.
    D. A. Borad of Medford, in the employ of the Cal -Ore Power Co., was here on his way to the Dodge ranch to do some work for the company.
    Mrs. Claud Hunt and Miss Helen Moore were here Sunday visiting Mrs. Fred Dutton.
    Monday was one of those dismal, gloomy days that we have once in a great while in our beautiful valley and there seems to be a mutual understanding with all concerned that they would stay at home and it seemed as though they all kept the agreement intact for there seemed to be scarcely a one on the street and even our blacksmith who seems to be busy most of the time appeared to be idle but Tuesday made up for any lack of life for the first thing in the morning I met Mr. Egenbury and his daughter on my way to the train and then Mrs. Wm. Perry going to the train where she was met by her sister, Mrs. F. T. Newport, wife of the ticket agent of the P.&E. at Medford. They were going up on the train to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Ayres. I also met one of our sturdy, progressive farmers, and he was regretting that the ground continued so wet that he could not sow more wheat. Fred Chartraw of Derby was on his way from Gold Hill where they have their cattle, being fed this winter. Also A. J. Potts of Davis; he was here transacting business with our bank. Irvin Daley of Lake Creek came in on the E.P.-L.C. stage that morning. Miss Sarah Singleton, whose parents own and operate one of the choice farms in Little Butte Creek bottom, was also a visitor among the merchants Tuesday.
    Fred Surran, who has been working at the manganese mine, J. H. Tyrrell, who sold off his farm and interest in the mine on Lost Creek, were here Tuesday for dinner and so was Mr. Potts, and while here Mr. T. stated that they were getting out quite a lot of manganese and I asked him what they were going to do with all the dirt that would come from the mine, a very natural question for an old California miner, and he replied that they were going to put it on the road near the mill, in a bad mudhole, and that it packed hard like cement and after a short time he could run over it with a buggy and that the wheels would hardly make an impression. J. D. Patrick was also among the guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday and so was Mr. Jack Aiken, the superintendent of the ditch screens in this district.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Watkins were also business callers Tuesday.
    Frank Nygren of L.C. came in for a load of wire fencing Tuesday.
    W. T. Croft, who has been the foreman on the J. H. Cooley farm, has moved away and Mr. Grover Cooke has taken his place.
    Our town authorities have been having some repair work done on the sidewalks, greatly to the satisfaction of those who walk over them in the night without a lantern.
    Since my last report W. E. Hensley, one of our busy farmers and orchardists, has renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Sam Courtney, our house and sign painter, came into our house and remarked that he was going to subscribe for the D.M.T., for by my mentioning his painting a sign for T. E. Nichols, he had secured the job of painting Mrs. Charles Pruett's house, at least eight rooms, and another job of painting a house for John Rader. There is nothing like advertising in a live paper.
    There were a dozen boxes of apples and a barrel of cider shipped to parties in Butte Falls Tuesday, I think by Mr. Haak.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 12, 1918, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Max Jackson, a brother of J. B. and Philip Jackson of this place, came out Thursday to visit his brothers and their families. Mr. Jackson is in business in New York City and has come to this coast combining business with pleasure. He only spent a few hours with his brothers.
    Gus Nichols, one of the leading stockmen of the valley, and wife, came out from Medford Thursday on the P.&E. and went directly to their home on Salt Creek.
    John W. Smith and wife, formerly of this place, but now living on the Antelope orchard, also came out and were met here with a rig and taken to the country. And Polk Smith, who with his brother, Corbett, own the old Perry place near Butte Falls, was a passenger and went on up to his home.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, has installed an up-to-date gasoline pump in connection with his other business. He has one of the best stands in the town, right on the main thoroughfare to Crater Lake.
    J. H. Cooksen, representing T. Denkelspeed & Co., S.F., was here doing business with Geo. Brown & Sons Thursday and Friday and while here took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    On Friday C. W. Scott, the business manager of the Lost Creek manganese mine, motored out bringing with him the foreman of the company, Herbert Brewitt, Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Faust of Seattle. Mr. Faust is general manager of the Faust Concentrating and Manufacturing Company of Seattle and is the inventor and patentee of the machinery for concentrating the manganese after it is run through the crusher, thus separating the metal from the dirt and rock. Also Mr. Comroy, an expert geologist, who has thoroughly inspected and analyzed the material in the mine and they report that there is one of the best mines of its class in the Lost Creek section in the United States. It extends from the hills south of Little Butte to the north fork, a distance of several miles, and in conversation I mentioned that I have heard that the company was planning to erect another mill in the near future. Mr. Comroy remarked that he thought that there would likely be a dozen more mills erected in the course of another year. G. H. Tyrrell, the man of whom the company bought the mine and the land adjoining, drove out and brought the baggage for Messrs. Brewitt, Comroy, Faust and Mrs. Faust. He also brought out samples of the metal as it comes from the mill. They all took dinner at the S.S. together. They all except Mr. Tyrrell went to Medford in the afternoon and all except C. W. Scott went on up north but Mr. Brewitt expects to return in a few days. Mr. Tyrrell took a hackload of sacks up to the mine with him as they will have to sack the metal until they have better facilities for shipping it out than they now have.
    L. C. Port, one of the forest rangers who is camped near the Dead Indian Soda Springs, was here Friday night and while at the supper table said something about his having a family record and upon inquiry he stated that he had the old family Bible that was published in London, Eng., in A.D. 1609, and has the family record of the "Port" family since 1653. It was handed down from one generation to another, always giving it to the youngest child, and he expects to have it handed down to the next generation through his youngest child. It is prized as a family heirloom.
    Saturday morning there were four men on the train who were strangers to me but I met Mrs. Amos Willits, formerly of Prospect, but now of Medford, Mrs. Haak, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Medford, Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby and Mrs. F. J. Ayres who lives on the E.P.-Derby route.
    There was also a part of a car of hay for Philip McCabe en route for Derby.
    C. E. Bellows came in Saturday morning with his can of cream to be shipped to the creamery.
    Saturday noon we had at dinner C. W. McCallister of the Union stockyards of Portland, H. D. Foster, forestry service, Medford, and Claud C. Cate, the pathologist of Jackson County. They were on their way to Brownsboro to attend a meeting of the stockmen of this subdivision.
    Since my last report Amos Ayres, our depot agent, has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
    Rev. Mrs. W. M. Ferris, assistant pastor of the Baptist church of Ashland, will preach in Eagle Point on Sunday morning and evening, and her husband, Rev. Wm. Ferris, will preach on Monday evening at 7:30.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 13, 1918, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. Wm. Ferris, the pastor of the Baptist church of Ashland, came up last Saturday evening on the P.&E. and was met at the depot by your correspondent and taken to the Sunnyside to spend the night. The next morning he preached to a fair-sized congregation and arrangements were made to have his wife, who acts as assistant pastor to the church in Ashland, come up next Saturday, February 16, and preach next Sunday, both morning and evening for us and the next day, Monday, Rev. Ferris will come up and conduct services again at 7:30 p.m. As near as I can understand the arrangement they are coming up with, an idea of at least partially taking charge of this work as Reverend Bandy has had to make a change in his plans on account of the removal of the Methodist minister of Central Point to some other place. We regret very much to have Mr. Bandy leave this field as he is a very interesting speaker and seemed to be gaining in popularity with the people. But we hope that if Rev. Ferris is "called" that he may prove to be quite as acceptable a preacher. The sermon he preached Sunday was very good--above the average.
    On Sunday among the callers was Mr. E. DeRoboam, one of the pioneers of Jacksonville, as he was born there during the early history of that city. We also had Grandma Schmidt, an early resident of that city. Among the old settlers her presence brings to mind the times when we used to go out of the business centers to Mother Schmidt for a square meal. She was accompanied by her son and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney of Medford, Miss Lucile Watson, Miss Florence Trowbridge, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Trowbridge of Medford, Wm. Nickle and wife of Lake Creek, besides quite a number of our town people.
    Floyd Pearce reports that he and Sam Vestal have discovered another manganese mine. This one is not in the same locality, but on Reese Creek, about five or six miles from Eagle Point, and almost on the P.&E. railroad track. Mr. Pearce said that they had sent some of the rock to have it tested and the report was quite favorable. If it proves to be what he anticipates we may have a mill with the concentrators right in hearing. If this proves to be a success there is no telling what discoveries may be made yet in that line of business. The opinion is that this is simply an extension of the same lode that has been found on the south fork of Little Butte Creek.
    Mrs. W. W. Willits of Persist came out on the P.&E. Monday and took the E.P.-Persist stage for her home. She had been in Medford combining business and pleasure.
    Messrs. O. H. Sheersbery and E. J. Ellis, traveling book agents, called for dinner Tuesday and Horace Geppert came out from his home near Butte Falls Sunday forenoon, "Walker's Line," and went on to Medford Monday, returning to the Sunnyside the same day and Tuesday to the P.&E. for home.
    Jud Edsall came out Sunday evening and spent the night with us, as did Roy Davis of Derby.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton went to Medford on Monday, remaining until Tuesday afternoon. While she was gone her husband and brother, Rob. Harnish, took their meals at the Sunnyside.
    W. E. Denny and wife of Derby were on the P.&E. Tuesday on their way home from Roseburg where they had been to attend the funeral of Mrs. Denny's brother, R. C. Smith. The funeral services were conducted under the auspices of the I.O.O.F.
    James W. Dunlap, one of the real estate men of Medford, and George W. Neilson, superintendent of the P.&E. Railroad, were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Neilson had been unloading a car of rock at the Ruth Creek bridge to keep the water from undermining it.
    Since my last report Alex Mathews has given me his sub. to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 14, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    P. J. Wellen, one of our progressive young men, made a business trip to Derby last Thursday.
    Mrs. Tungate, formerly of Jacksonville, but now of Butte Falls, and her daughter, Mrs. Col. Thomalson [Caroline Thomason?], formerly of Gold Hill but now of Butte Falls, were on Thursday's train homeward bound.
    Lee Edmondson, owner and operator of a sawmill on Big Butte, was also a passenger on the P.&E. Thursday on his way home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Robert Halla and two children were on their way to locate on a place near the McCabe crossing.
    Floyd Pearce, one of the discoverers of the manganese mine on Reese Creek, went out Thursday on the P.&E. to more fully develop his discovery.
    Frank Netherland, the head sawyer at the Butte Falls mill, was also on his way home Thursday.
    E. Conkling came out Thursday with a load of caskets from the Perl undertaking parlors of Medford for W. L. Childreth and our blacksmith who has accepted an agency for his goods. He uses the old building formerly occupied as a barber shop before Mr. Slusser built his new shop.
    The ladies of our town are arranging to have a hard times party in the church Friday evening, where the principal requirement will be to be dressed in anything but your "store clothes." They anticipate having a good time, as all will be on an equality.
    Wm. Haselton, who has been working in the country for some time, returned and took dinner at the Sunnyside Thursday and among other guests were Charles Vatche of Ashland, Carl Farrar of Lake Creek, C. W. MackGee, representing Chamberlain medicines, and Mrs. Villa Stovall, who is advertising the Golden West coffee, Guy Perrett, A. Clements and Nick Zoimy were among the diners Thursday. Mrs. Stovall remained with us until Saturday.
    George Collings, a brother to James and John Owens, formerly a resident of the Dry Creek section, but now a Montana farmer, spent Thursday night with us. He had returned to settle up some unsettled business and disposed of a lot of his cattle he left here.
    C. S. Webster and A. J. Anderson of Medford were among the business callers Friday.
    Miss May Warner of Trail, who has been stopping in Medford for some time, returned and took the E.P.-Persist stage for her home Friday.
    Frank Smith, who lives north of our town, has been spending several days in Medford recuperating.
    Ray Harnish and wife, who live on Antelope Creek, came out Friday to spend a few days with their relatives and friends.
    Since my last report C. J. Vaughn, the foreman of the section gang on the P.&E.R.R., has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. and J. N. Edington, the foreman on the Corbin orchard, has given me his sub. to the D.M.T. and Henry Trusty of Trail has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    For the past week your E.P. correspondent has been tussling with la grippe and that has kept him so busy that he could not gather the usual amount of items, but hopes to do better in the future.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 20, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Mrs. Seal's brother and family of Idaho are visiting them and perhaps will locate, as he owns a ranch in the vicinity.
    Wayman Bergman, who has returned from the shipyards at Portland, is now confined to his home with the la grippe.
    Mrs. Vestal is suffering with an attack of la grippe.
    May French is rapidly recovering from a slight injury on the school play grounds. The school board met Monday and while there repaired the flag pole, run up the flag and forgot and left it at half mast.
    Miss Mayes visited at Mr. Robertson's after Sunday school.
    The Sunday school is increasing in interest as well as attendance.  Everyone is made welcome.
    Word was sent out Monday for Marshall Minter to appear in Medford Tuesday at 3:30 to take the federal examination, but as Marshall was somewhere in the vicinity of Butte Falls and the line was down from the recent storm, the family tried all the remainder of the day to get him but as far as we are informed at this time they had not succeeded in locating him.
    The last week was the first winter weather of the season in this locality. Snow fell to the depth of about two inches, but was soon gone, however; the rains continue causing high water and lots of mud.
    Mr. W. E. Hammel was in Medford Monday on business.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 21, 1918, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night there was a gathering of some of the young folks, married and unmarried, at the Sunnyside, and while they were enjoying themselves in social converse the head of the culinary department and her assistant were busy arranging an old-fashioned candy pulling in the kitchen and about 8 o'clock the announcement was made that the taffy was ready to pull and in less time than it takes me to write it Mr. and Mrs. Roy Harnish, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Hatton, Mr. Robert Harnish and Miss Helen Moore, Mr. Orville Childreth and Miss Zula Geppert, Glen Haley. Miss Estella Betz and Truman McClelland marched to the south porch and commenced their evening's work. Now no one except those who have participated in or witnessed a free-for-all candy pulling can form any adequate idea of the amount of fun they had. Well, they kept it up until bedtime when they began to depart, hoping that it will not be long before they will be able to spend another such evening at the S.S.
    L. W. Woodward, the 5-10-and-15¢ store man of Medford, and his brother-in-law, Matlin Olson of Seattle, Wash., were among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday. And so were Mrs. Fray von der Hellen and her two children, Joyce and Hugo, Mrs. Thomas E. Nichols and Mrs. R. A. Weideman, Miss Margaret Riley, Mr. Pitzer, besides George and Thomas Lewis, Philip Jackson and wife, Joe Moomaw and Geo. Sanders of Wellen. Mr. Sanders is the foreman on the Antelope orchard, had been to Medford and on his return spent the night with us.
    In addition to having a good company here at the S.S. we had preaching service twice on Sunday. Mrs. Ferris, wife of the Baptist minister in charge of the work in Ashland. preached twice for us on Sunday. In the forenoon her subject was "The Second Coming of Christ," and in her discourse she took up the various prophecies in the Bible with regard to the great war and pointed out where the prophets had predicted the rise and fall of the different nations now involved in the war, thus following the old ecclesiastical rut that has been followed for the last half or three-quarters of a century, but in all of her explanations of these predictions, not only by the lady, but by all that I have seen except Dr. Baldwin of Tennessee, they have invariably left out what is now admitted to be the most powerful and leading nation in the world today, the United States of America. If the prophecies in the Bible so closely refer to Russia, Turkey, Germany, England, France, etc., as the explainers of them claim they do, why is it that in all their research they fail to make mention of our own great nation. If the prophetic predictions refer to all these great European and Asiatic nations why should not they refer with equal clearness to the United States, and if they do how is it that none of the explainers of them have ever brought them to the surface? The two sermons were quite interesting but I confess that I was disappointed in her not even mentioning a prophetic sentence that might point to the United States. The suggestion I have given may lead some of our more modern thinkers to investigate the subject more thoroughly and bring more light to bear on the subject. On Monday Mrs. Ferris lectured the school children and gave them a reading. She is a very pleasant speaker and well qualified to interest an audience. Monday night we were favored with a fine sermon from her husband. There was a good attendance and he made a good impression, and many of us would be glad to have him preach for us regularly, but no arrangements to that effect were made.
    Monday C. M. LeValley of Portland was here in the interests of the Chippewa show.
    Monday evening B. W. Paul of Medford and his friend, M. H. Nichols of the Western Electric Co. of Portland, called late for supper. They said that they were hungry and after the meal was over they both admitted that they were but felt better. They had been out by Thomas Riley's place where Mr. Paul had installed an electric light plant, up by Brownsboro around through sticky, so they were entitled to a good appetite.
    Welborn Beeson of Talent, one of the leading men in the valley, spent Monday night with us on his way to Butte Falls.
    Miss Zula Geppert took the P.&E. for her home Tuesday.
    Among the passengers Tuesday were C. Adams, J. W. Berrian, the fish hatchery man, Floyd Pearce, a man by the name of McCormack, who seemed to be interested in a timber deal, Otie Hubbard of Medford, besides quite a number I did not know.
    Mrs. J. H. Carlton and one child and her neighbor, Mrs. Marshall, and two children, W. E. Hammel, J. H. Tyrrell and one of the Rummel brothers and Frank Smith were diners Tuesday at the S.S.
    W. J. Cannon, the Brownsboro merchant, was doing business in our town Tuesday and George Mansfield, Jr., of Prospect, spent Tuesday night with us. He had come out for a ditching machine to use on the Mansfield farm.
    Benj. Brophy, one of our leading stockmen, went to Butte Falls with Mr. Beeson on the P.&E.
    Roy Smith and family spent Monday night with us before starting for Medford on Tuesday's train and while here he renewed his sub. to the W.M.T.
    George Phillips has also moved to Medford. He and Roy Smith are working for the P.&E.R.R. Co. and consequently have moved to Medford to comply with orders.
    Since my last report Mrs. N. E. Watkins of Eagle Point has given me her sub. for the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1918, page 4


 EAGLE POINT SCHOOL NOTES
    A Junior Red Cross has been organized in school. One period a week will be devoted to teaching the children to make different articles for Red Cross use. Women from the local Red Cross chapter will instruct the children. G. W. Ager, county superintendent of schools, is at the head of this movement and all schools in the county are supposed to join the Junior Red Cross and devote one period a week to its work.
    Much team work is being done in our schools today. Industrial clubs, thrift stamp campaign, conservation of food campaign, and now Junior Red Cross. Successful team work is as necessary a part of a child's education as is the study of the three R's--readin', 'ritin' and 'rithmetic.
    Monday afternoon Mrs. Ferris, wife of the Baptist minister at Ashland, visited the school and gave a short talk to the children on the evils of the cigarette habit. She also gave a reading in German dialect of the "Little Blue Hen." Mr. Howlett, Mrs. Grover and Mrs. Childreth were also at school with Mrs. Ferris.
    Little Johnnie Phillips, a pupil in the sixth grade, has moved to Medford.
    Washington's birthday will be observed at school with appropriate exercises. The children, no doubt, will again have their attention drawn to the fact that there has been at least one American boy who could not tell a lie.
    We are sorry to state that while two of our pupils received a 100 count in the December county spelling contest, no pupil received 100 in the January contest, although there were nearly 100 more pupils in the county getting 100 in January than there were in December.
    The traveling library at the school is not being patronized as much as it should be by the public. This library contains many good books which are loaned to anyone in the community desiring them for a period of two weeks, when they may be renewed or exchanged. These books may be had by applying to the principal at the school from 4 to 4:15 p.m., or recess. 
    G. W. Ager will be at the schoolhouse on Wednesday, 3:30 p.m., to give a talk to the Parent-Teacher Association. Mr. Ager is very anxious that all women in Eagle Point and vicinity attend.
    Mrs. Hank visited the school all of Monday afternoon. She spent most of the time in the intermediate room.

Medford Mail Tribune, February 26, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    William Nickle of Lake Creek, who had been to Medford to visit his wife, who was in a sanitarium in Medford, having had an operation performed, came out on the P.&E. Thursday morning, and so did Henry Meyer, also of Lake Creek, and both took passage on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, had a Fresno brought out Thursday for Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro.
    R. C. Weideman, who is living on a ranch near the Antelope school house, brought in a fine calf and shipped to one of the Medford meat market men Thursday.
    Thomas Cingcade came in Thursday for a lot of chicken wire fencing. He says that the cats took nearly all of his young chicks last year and that he is going to fool Mr. Red this time and move his chicks away from the old building and try to raise quite a lot of them this year.
    W. D. Roberts, who is on the Joe Rader place, has just completed putting up a lot of wire fence on the place.
    Carl Imes, one of the forest rangers, who has been up on the railroad land to warn people not to cut the timber off the land, came out Thursday and started for Klamath Falls.
    George Brown & Sons received a large car of cordwood Thursday, and wood seems to be in demand in these parts.
    Henry Meyer, Jr. of Lake Creek, who is attending school in Medford, came out Friday morning on the P.&E. motor and went on up home on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    Among the business callers Friday were Guy Pruett and his mother, Thomas Stanley and wife, George Stowell and his mother, W. H. Crandall and family, Miss Minnie Given and Sam Vestal. Mr. Vestal is one of the men who discovered the manganese mine on Reese Creek, and he and Floyd Pearce have been interviewing some of our business men and capitalists with regard to the development of the mine.
    Emmett Nealon of Table Rock was a business caller Friday. He had brought a load of wheat over to the Brandon Bros. Snowy Butte mills, and he speaks in the highest terms of their way of doing business as men of high standing and moral worth. We are glad to have such men doing business among us.
    J. J. Skinner was also doing business among us Friday.
    Friday evening we had our hard times party in the church. It was gotten up in the interest of the school children and, as was announced by the principal mover in the undertaking, Miss Pina Benedict, they did not expect to have very many attend but in this she, or they, were agreeably disappointed, for the house was filled. The exercises were commenced by singing on the phonograph our national hymn, "My Country, 'Tis of Thee," etc. Then we had songs, recitations, readings, etc., and some of the little folks done themselves great credit by the way they performed their parts. There were a few of the older ones took an active part, and I will mention Jake Jonas and Glen Haley. Also Mrs. R. C. Weideman. Messrs. Jonas and Haley sang a duet and were encored, and so was Mrs. Weideman. The condition of admission was that we were to wear our worst clothes and neckties were absolutely forbidden, and I had hardly entered the building before I was held up on account of wearing an old cast-off necktie, but I ran a bluff on the five girls, and so their attention was soon called to L. K. Haak. He, perhaps, had not noticed the restriction with regard to dress, but I think that they let him off easy. Then came poor George Wamsley. He had unthoughtably tied a piece of a curtain cord around his neck, and when the bevy of girls made the attack on him he pleaded that he had to tie the cord around his neck to keep his shirt collar together, because there was no button, and he was too poor to buy one; and thus they went the rounds, but all hands seemed to enjoy themselves. After the exercises were over lunch was served, consisting of baked beans and sandwiches without meat--they are all Hooverites--pickles and coffee to those who brought cups to drink out of. After all had eaten, then the question came up as to who should have the prize for being the most shabbily dressed, and the prize fell on Mrs. Nettie Grover, and she received an antiquated negro doll. The next day she told me that she had to have a good old Bible name for it, so she called it Joseph. It was one of those joyful times such as we can have out in the country where the restraints of arbitrary rules are forgotten.
    During the past week there was a number of our soldier boys passed through Medford, and among them was one of our Eagle Point boys, Percy Haley, on his way to Washington, D.C., and there was quite a number of our citizens met him there to cheer him on his way.
    M. E. Morris, our school supervisor, was out looking after the interest of our school.
    There was a Junior Red Cross Society organized in our school during the past week, consisting of fifty-two members, each member paying an initiation fee of 25 cents, and several of them promised to subscribe more in the future. The following ladies were appointed as a committee of instructors: Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mrs. W. L. Childreth, Mrs. O. M. Goss, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, Miss Pina Benedict and Miss Hazel Brown, and Mrs. J. W. Grover, as president of the Parent-Teacher circle, is president of the auxiliary chapter, and Mrs. W. L. Childreth is secretary-treasurer.
    Among the business callers Saturday were Mr. Arnes, foreman on the Edsall orchard; Sam Coy, Sam Vestal, Henry French, Miss Alma Gould, who is teaching in the Agate school; Brittsan Bros., Ed Walker and family. Ed is deputy game warden and while here on official business brought his family out to enjoy a visit at the Sunnyside.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Saturday were Mrs. W. E. Buchanan and two of her children, on her way to Butte Falls to visit her mother; Mrs. Key, John Higinbotham, Mrs. Dora Hafe, G. C. McCallister and two children, and H. D. Mills, superintendent of the Butte Falls Lumber Co., who had with him a lot of machinery for the sawmill at Butte Falls.
    Since my last report, Mrs. N. E. Watkins has given me her subscription to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 26, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sherman Morehouse and wife and daughter, Caribel, of Ashland, and Mr. Morehouse's sister, Miss Anna Morehouse of Oskaloosa, La., came over last Friday evening to spend the weekend with Professor J. C. Barnard and family, and while here attended the hard times party social. The above item was handed in too late for my Saturday letter.
    Sunday morning Judge Tou Velle, our county judge, and wife drove over from their farm near Jacksonville and took dinner at the Sunnyside. G. W. Wamsley, our Eagle Point poet, and wife, Mrs. William von der Hellen, and daughter, Miss Joyce, Philip Jackson and wife and Joe Moomaw were also among the diners at that hostelry.
    William von der Hellen and son Hugh, made a trip up Butte Creek to the manganese mine Sunday. He and his brother-in-law, Chauncey Florey, have each located mining claims in the Lake Creek district that may prove to be valuable as the manganese mines are developed.
    Sunday evening our county assessor, J. B. Coleman, came in and spent the night. He is trying to ascertain the number of cattle there is among our cattlemen, as there seems to be a deficiency in the memory of some of them. According to the report of the old deputy assessor, Mr. Wamsley, there was a kind of agreement among some of the cattlemen to give in only a small part of the cattle, and the result was that men who were supposed to have from 75 to 300 head of cattle only gave in to the assessor from 30 to 40 head each, and the result was they were called before the equalization board and had their memories so refreshed, making a difference in the assessed valuation of some forty or fifty thousand dollars. But after Mr. Coleman and his deputies get through counting the cattle in the various feed yards it will be less trouble for them to remember how many cattle they have.
    Mr. Roundtree was a business caller Monday and so was George Given. Mr. Given is one of our sturdy, progressive farmers and stockmen, generally up to date in everything.
    J. C. Aiken, the superintendent of fish screens for this district, was here for dinner Monday and while in town was exhibiting a model screen such as is being used in the irrigating ditches in this section. While here the representatives of the Eagle Point Ditch Company signed up for one of them, to be placed in the entrance of the ditch just above the Fred Pelouze farm.
    A. G. Bishop, one of the leading orchardists of Jackson County, was doing business here Monday.
    Frank Abbott has moved his family to Butte Falls, as he has taken a logging contract in that section.
    Word was received Monday announcing the death of J. R. McQuoid in Oakland, Cal., February 24. Mr. McQuoid had been a resident of our town and a short time ago he went to spend the winter with his children in Oakland, intending to return this spring, but death claimed him. He was about 70 years of age and leaves two sons that I know of and a devoted wife to feel their bereavement.
    A gentleman giving his name as A. Blin of San Francisco was here on Tuesday with Mr. Aiken. He seemed to be simply looking over the country.
    Thomas Cingcade and wife were doing business here Tuesday. Among other things, he was procuring some anchor posts for a new fence.
    R. M. Wood and N. H. Otis of Medford were here Tuesday looking over the prospects for a meat market here. They were interviewing T. E. Nichols about renting his building for a market house, but I have not learned the result of the visit.
    A. S. Worswick of San Francisco spent Tuesday night with us. He was on his way up into the timber belt. He was very reticent with regard to his business, but intimated that he was a representative of a New York syndicate.
    Mrs. Samuel Courtney and her sister, Miss Mina Minter, came into the Sunnyside Tuesday morning, and Mrs. Courtney is still here at this writing, Wednesday eve.
    Miss Zula Geppert came out from her home and went to Medford Wednesday, returning the same day.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Carey of North Talent came over Wednesday with Joe Rader and spent the day at the Sunnyside. They are in the plant-producing business, raising the different kinds of plants for sale. They expect to put 100,000 tomato plants on the market this spring and other kinds of plants in proportion.
    Wednesday the Junior Red Cross spent a part of the day beautifying the school grounds, the principal, J. C. Barnard, and some of the larger boys planting trees and shrubbery and the two lady teachers and larger girls were working in other branches of the business.
    There was a meeting of the school board Tuesday night, and at that time Professor J. C. Barnard gave notice that he was not an applicant for the position in the school the coming season. Many of us would be glad to keep Professor Barnard here as principal of the school for another year, for he has given very general satisfaction as an instructor, and his discipline has been as near perfect as can be in a mixed school like ours. He seems to talk as though he may be forced to quit teaching and turn his attention to another line of business, although he has already secured his life certificate.
    Since my last report Mrs. Isabel (Grandma) Heckathorn has given me her subscription to the W.M.T. She has been away for some months, and as soon as she returned she says she must have the W.M.T. She has been getting it up among her children near Rogue River--and she is lost without it.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Marshall Minter is working in Butte Falls, helping build a flume.
    Miss Diehless Minter returned here last week from a few days' visit at Butte Falls.
    Mrs. Ayres is suffering from an attack of rheumatism.
    R. R. Minter and W. E. Hammel were in Medford Thursday.
    Mr. Brittsan will preach at the schoolhouse Sunday morning, March 10. Subject, "John's Vision of the Holy City."
    Reese Creek now has a Junior Red Cross organization, with every pupil a member.
    A good many of our boys are taking the federal examination.
    As Jackson County went over the top in volunteers, also the farmers' questionnaires, now comes a Jackson County poet from Ashland whose poem is over the top, entitled "From Dad," signed Dick Posey, printed in the semi-weekly Journal, February 22.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 2, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thursday morning there was quite an exodus from Eagle Point to Medford and Jacksonville. Among them were Mrs. David Cingcade, Mrs. Geo. Wamsley, Miss Zula Geppert, E. R. Minter, W. E. Hammel, besides quite a number who were summoned to be witnesses in the W. E. Butler trial.
    Mrs. J. C. Barnard, wife of the principal of our school, went to Ashland to spend a few days with some of her old neighbors, and during her absence Professor B. took his noon meal at the Sunnyside.
    On Thursday Harvey Smith of Butte Falls, O. V. Meyer of Medford, representing the A. W. Walker company, one of the companies of Medford who are handling the various autos on the market; C. E. Barnard, representing Parker, Holmes & Co. of Boston. shoe dealers, and A. A. Fasnant, representing Endicott, Johnson & Co.'s shoes, were doing business in our town, and all met at the Sunnyside at dinner time, and a little later Mrs. R. Hargood, Mrs. D. T. Glenn, Mrs. Thomas H. Simpson of Ashland and son, Corp. G. C. Simpson, 13th company, Ft. Stevens, called for dinner, and in conversation with them found that the four represented four generations. The son, mother, grandmother and great grandmother, the great grandmother is in her 73rd year of her age, and her husband served in the Civil War, her son in the Mexican War, her son-in-law served in the Spanish-American War, and she has two great grandsons in the service at the present time--quite a patriotic record. Corporal Simpson came out on the train with the troops that passed through Medford Wednesday and stopped to visit the folks in Ashland, and his mother decided to have all hands take a trip to the Sunnyside Hotel of Eagle Point for dinner.
    Mr. Combes, the folks who lived in the P. H. Daily house last fall and moved to Table Rock, re-entered the house last Thursday.
    Since the school board have had the electric pump installed they have had wash bowls and a drinking fountain put in, greatly improving the situation.
    Thursday evening a stranger came in about early bed time and engaged a bed, said that he did not want supper, but he was so reticent that all I learned was that he was going through the country interviewing a few of our citizens, but he appeared to be a traveling man who knew how to attend to his own business--a gentleman.
    Word came over the phone Friday morning that a son had been born to Mr. and Mrs. Bert Peachey in Ashland, March 1. Bert is one of the forest rangers and was at the time of the birth of the boy up in the neighborhood of the Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    Bert Higinbotham of the Evergreen ranch, near Flounce Rock, came out Thursday with 1000 pounds of corn to have it ground. He took it to the Russ mill, Medford, Friday and had it ground, returned the same evening and spent the night with us. He and his neighbors are Hooverizers and are trying eating cornmeal. He took a lot of land plaster home with him to be used on his garden and meadows.
    B. E. Haney of Medford came out Friday morning in his auto to bring a man out to see Mr. Combes, who has just moved into the P. H. Daily house.
    James W. Dunlap of Medford was here for dinner Friday. He is representing the Rogue River Oil Company, and his business seemed to be to secure leases on land for the purpose of prospecting for oil and coal.
    Guy Pruett, who is operating the C. Pruett place, just below town, was in town Friday procuring paint to finish painting the Pruett home. Sam Courtney has just finished the job of painting. Mr. Courtney is the man who said that my little notice I gave of his painting a sign for T. E. Nichols brought him two jobs of painting, and that he intended to give me his subscription to the D.M.T. and so he kept his word and gave it to me Saturday morning.
    Mrs. R. G. Brown informed me Friday evening that the Red Cross Society of Eagle Point had another lot of supplies ready to be shipped to France to be used by the soldier boys.
    There were seven lady passengers off the car Saturday morning. Among them were Mr. William Nickle of Salt Creek who has just left the hospital and is on her way home; Mrs. Carl Farrar, Mrs. Irvin Daley and Mrs. Herman Meyer, Sr. They had been as delegates to attend a Red Cross convention in Medford.
    Mrs. Burleson, Mrs. Rose Potter and her daughter, Miss Cecil, and E. H. Hildreth and wife, Ed Higinbotham and one of the Runnel brothers of Lake Creek and C. Adams and Harvey Smith were passengers for Butte Falls.
    Miss Pina Benedict, our primary teacher, went to Ashland, her home, to spend the weekend with her people.
    J. H. Tyrrell of Lake Creek, the man who owned the place where the Tacoma Metal Company have their mill, and Charley Seefield, also of Lake Creek, came out Saturday. Mr. Tyrrell has given possession to the company and has moved into a place belonging to Herman Meyer. He has not decided yet where he will settle. They and William Nickle and wife were among the diners Saturday. Bert Higinbotham and son, Courtney, were among the lodgers and Amos Ayres and wife, agents at the P.&E. depot, were here for supper.
    Since my last report, in addition to the subscription of Sam Courtney D. S. Nichols has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 5, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon, after I had sent my letter to the D.M.T., Miss Diehless Minter and Miss Mary Robertson, two young ladies who live with their parents about three miles north of Eagle Point, were doing shopping in our town.
    Miss Allison Officer of Medford, a cousin of Miss Hazel Brown, was out visiting her uncles, R. G., W. H. and J. F. Brown, and their families and other relatives.
    Mrs. Nell A. Hanman of San Francisco, Cal., representing the publishers of the Designer, came in Saturday afternoon, engaged a room and remained until Monday morning. She reports having had considerable success in her line of business.
    Mr. and Mrs. McDonald, who are living on the Fred Pelouze place, attended our Sunday school Sunday morning.
    William G. Knighton and wife, W. C. Clements and wife, Rev. William J. Meagher of Medford, Mrs. von der Hellen and family, Orville Childreth, Miss Zula Geppert, Jay Pitzer, Miss Margaret Riley, George Lewis, Amos Ayres and wife, John Foster, P. D. Jackson and wife, Joe Moomaw, Geo. Mansfield of Prospect, Albert Clements and Mr. Trusty were among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday.
    Rev. William J. Meagher conducted services in the Catholic church in our town Sunday morning.
    John Foster came out from his home on the Edsall ranch, near Butte Falls, Sunday and reported that it was snowing to beat the band when he left. He drove out in a buggy and by the time he reached here was completely chilled through. He and Jud Edsall are drawing saw logs down the chute for the Bullis sawmill of Medford.
    Robert I. Miner, one of our progressive farmers and stockmen, was a caller Monday morning and took the Lewis jitney for Medford. Ed Fisher was also a business caller Monday.
    Ed G. Harding, formerly of Lake Creek, but now of Medford, and C. W. Hays of the Paul's Electric Store, Medford, came out on the P.&E. motor Monday morning and took the E.P. and L.C. stage for the manganese mine, & Mr. Hays was going up to install an electric motor for the company to generate their own electricity.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. U. Morrison of Medford came out Tuesday on their way to Derby, where they expect to spend a few days visiting friends. The newly wedded couple, Mr. and Mrs. Richard Diamond, were also on. Mrs. D. was going to Derby to visit her mother, Mrs. Thompson. They were accompanied by Miss Agnes Allen of Derby. Mr. and Mrs. Diamond have a host of friends in these parts who are wishing them all kinds of enjoyment in life.
    Corbett Smith and Miss Myrtle Drake were also on the train bound for Butte Falls, their homes. Mr. Smith and his brother, Poke, own and operate the old Perry farm near Butte Falls. Mrs. Leroy Smith was also on the train on her way up to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres. J. A. Coos of Portland was a passenger on the P.&E. He had been up in the B.F. country looking over two places that are for sale and intended to go out about twelve miles to look at another place.
    John Rader, one of our leading stockmen, brought in his can of cream to be sent to Medford Tuesday.
    Mrs. Nygren of Lake Creek came out Tuesday on the E.P.-L.C. stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford that afternoon.
    George West and a man by the name of Double, both forest rangers, came in Tuesday for late dinner.
    There was quite a number of passengers on the P.&E. Wednesday morning, but I did not learn the names of but two of them--Rev. W. C. Driver, chapel car evangelist, traveling in the interest of the Baptist Church. He stopped off here to look over the prospect for holding services here for a while, but I have not learned the result of his visit at this writing, as the question is still undecided at this writing, Wednesday afternoon.
    Mr. Deaton, representing the Simmons Hardware Company, Portland, and William von der Hellen, one of our hardware merchants, dined at the Sunnyside Wednesday, and so did W. A. Stewart of Medford and O. R. Stewart of Klamath County. and Walter Wood, one of our local cattlemen. The Stewart brothers were out looking at some of the cattle in these parts.
    Everybody is busy and the result is very few people are coming to town.
    Prof. J. C. Barnard, our high school teacher, was called away Wednesday to attend the funeral of his wife's brother-in-law, who died in Ashland Monday.
    If the reader will address Box 43, R.F.D.. 2, Central Point, Ore., they can learn of a fine tract of timber for sale. See ad in this paper.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 9, 1918, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. H. Ackerman, president of the state normal at Monmouth, Ore., and G. W. Ager, school superintendent of Jackson County, visited our school Wednesday afternoon; they first spent a few minutes in Miss Pina Benedict's room, the primary, and Mr. Ackerman, after giving a little folks a short talk, had the three rooms called together and gave the entire school a lecture and the Junior Red Cross work, and spoke very encouragingly of the prospect before us in that line. Miss Benedict was formerly a pupil under Mr. Ackerman and she expressed herself as being very much pleased to meet with him in her own school room.
    Mrs. Ida Magerle of Rogue River has been down here visiting her mother, Grandma Heckathorn, and her sister, Mrs. Frank Lewis and family besides some of her old friends in this neighborhood.
    Sam Courtney, our painter and paperhanger, has finished another job of painting for David Cingcade.
    Fred Pelouze, one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, was in town Wednesday afternoon getting some lumber.
    John Foster of Butte Falls, who came out on Sunday the 3rd inst. has attended to business in Medford and here and returned home Friday.
    Amos Ayres, our accommodating depot agent, received a part of a car of shingles Thursday.
    R. S. Bullis, who is interested in procuring saw logs for the Applegate mill at Medford, was a passenger on the train Thursday for the timber belt. On the same train was a car of hay for different parties in this neighborhood. Mr. Hickox took several loads of it out to the Wilfley orchard.
    J. L. Robertson, who is operating a large farm north of here, was in town Thursday and reports that his wheat is looking fine. He took the chance on rain last fall and sowed his wheat in the dry--not dust, for it is sticky--and the result is that he has a fair prospect for a fine crop of wheat this summer.
    W. H. Crandall and family motored through town Thursday on their way to Medford.
    R. A. Petty, who is farming the Thomas Riley, Jr., farm, was doing business with our merchants Thursday. He is another successful farmer who sowed his wheat in the dry last fall and the result is a very bright prospect for a big crop of wheat.
    J. H. Tyrrell of L.C., E. G. Harding of Medford and Henry Meyer of Brownsboro were business callers Thursday.
    J. W. Walford of Portland, representing J. K. Gill Co., and Mr. Harding called for early lunch and took the E.P.-L.C. stage Thursday.
    Our accommodating and efficient road supervisor, Ed Dutton, did us a fine job scraping the road from the wagon bridge across Butte Creek up to the Sunnyside Hotel Thursday.
    R. E. Morris, our school superintendent, spent Thursday night with us on his way to L.C.
    Died, at the Sacred Heart Hospital, Medford, Mrs. Hannah Whetstone, last week, after having had an operation performed. A daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Riley of this neighborhood. She leaves a husband, a 3-year-old boy, father, mother, two brothers, James and Thomas, and five sisters, Mrs. Mollis and Inez Hayse, Hattie Cardwell, Misses Ethel and Margaret. The remains were interred in the Antelope cemetery on Saturday afternoon, Owing to the extreme disagreeableness of the weather and the condition of the road to the cemetery there was not as large an attendance as there would have been. The bereaved families have the sympathy of the entire community.
    J. W. Dressler of the real estate firm of Page, Dressler & Co. was here for dinner Friday. He was looking for suitable land to lease for the purpose of securing it for the Rogue River Oil Co. He claimed that they were succeeding quite well in their undertaking.
    Among the business callers Friday were Harvey Stanley, F. J. McPherson and family and Mrs. Dee Bradshaw.
    Saturday morning Dr. Holt reported that on March 5th there was born near Trail to Mr. and Mrs. George Weeks a girl baby; March 6th to Mr. and Mrs. Owen Swift, E.P., a daughter, and March 6th to Mr. and Mrs. David Smith, B.F., a daughter.
    L. K. Haak shipped via the P.&E.R.R. 22 boxes of apples to parties in Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Stanley went to Butte Falls Saturday morning on the P.&E.
    Mrs. Lena M. Thrift and son, Boyd, of Jacksonville, came in on the P.&E. Saturday morning and took the E.P.-L.C. stage for Lost Creek, where she is engaged to teach the spring term of school.
    Mrs. Herman Meyer, Jr., and Mrs. Henry Meyer, both of L.C., came in on the E.P.-L.C. stage Saturday morning, and Mike Sidley, also of L.C., came in at the same time.
    E. L. Webster of Portland, representing Sherwin Williams Co., was a diner at the S.S. Saturday noon.
    Miss Estella Betz, one of the telephone girls, has taken a room at the Sunnyside.
    Since my last report Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T.
    F. J. McPherson has exchanged his sub. from the W.M.T. to the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 11, 1918, page 7


Reese Creek Riplets
    W. H. Crandall has indulged in the luxury, or necessity, of a Hupmobile car. Mr. Crandall expects to keep up with the times in traveling.
    Mr. Bellows bought a new Ford car some time ago, and left it at Eagle Point on account of the bad roads in this direction. He has it home now, however, and they expect to enjoy themselves when the roads permit. They expect to spend less time traveling by being able to travel faster.
    A certain young man living in Eagle Point started to Reese Creek Sunday school in his car the other Sunday, got stuck in the mud, but by the heroic aid of his lady friend who went to his rescue his car was finally extracted, but too late for Sunday school.
    It certainly would be appreciated if some of the good roads money would be spent in this part of the county. A great many places are very bad, where a little work and money from the county would put them in very good condition.
    Elmer Robertson is home from Portland.
    W. L. Crandall and family visited at Mr. Hammel's Sunday all day.
    Miss Mayes visited Miss Diehless Minter after Sunday school.
    Mrs. Chris Wooley is quite sick.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney has an attack of la grippe.
    Miss Maud Merritt is cutting blight at the Potts orchard, near Medford.
    Mr. Brittsan preached at Reese Creek Sunday school last Sunday.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Smith, Thursday, March 7, a daughter, Edna May. Mother and daughter are doing nicely.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 14, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. John Greb and two of her daughters were among the business callers Saturday afternoon.
    E. J. Darson [sic] of Tacoma, Wash., called Sunday afternoon and spent the night at the Sunnyside Hotel. He was on his way up to the manganese mine. He is one of the owners of the mine and seems to be as thoroughly posted on the subject of mines and mining industries as anyone I have talked with on the subject. He claims to be somewhat of an expert in the business. He was taken up to the Lost Creek mine on Monday afternoon by one of our hardware merchants, Wm. von der Hellen. While here he called on our deputy assessor, Floyd Pearce, who is one of the discoverers of the manganese mine on Reese Creek, and after carefully examining the specimens he had, expressed the opinion that the samples were very good, that the discovery is likely to prove valuable. One advantage that the Reese Creek mine has over the Lost Creek mines is in the matter of transportation, as the R.C. mine is only about a mile off of the P.&E.R.R. In speaking on the subject of moving the metal out from the L.C. mine Mr. Darron [sic] expressed the opinion that they would use trucks to haul it out to the railway and that if the P.&E. did not give rates to suit that they would while they had it on the truck take it right on to Central Point or Medford and place it on the S.P. road at once. He furthermore expressed the opinion that the company, after they got well under way, would put in an electric railway and ship direct from the mill, for he says that they have a whole mountain of the metal.
    There was an auto carload of manganese miners passed through here Monday on their way up to the L.C. country to look over the mining claims that the company have secured, with a view to taking a lease, and I have it on good authority that they have the necessary machinery on the way to thoroughly prospect the different places, for the holdings embrace a large tract of land.
    Thomas F. Boltz, one of our traveling men who is in the employ of a large concrete company, formerly a consulting engineer on the P.&E.R.R., and whose family still reside here, came in Saturday evening to visit his family, returning to Portland Monday. While here he and his wife paid a visit to the Sunnyside Sunday afternoon.
    Thomas Vestal and Elmer Robertson, both of this neighborhood, who have been working in the shipyards in Portland, returned home Monday.
    Miss Lee Middlebusher of Trail, who has been in the Applegate country for the past two weeks, came out on the P.&E. Monday and took the E.P.-Persist stage for her home.
    William, George and Thomas Lewis, three brothers, have been taking some of their meals at the Sunnyside since Sunday evening. Thomas has been looking over some of the real estate near the S.S. and may settle down for life as one of our neighbors. There are some good locations on our side of the creek.
    There were 37 rolls of wire fencing came out on Tuesday's train for L. F. Charley and five or six rolls for Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley of this place were passengers from Butte Falls Tuesday.
    Among the passengers going to Butte Falls was Shorty Dodge, who has been engaged with a fruit packing company since last fall. He said that he had just got through with the apples and was going to Butte Falls to work in the timber.
    C. R. McIntosh, the fireman on the P.&E.R.R., had his face badly burned Tuesday while firing on the train. While at Butte Falls using oil for fuel there seemed to be an explosion of gas and it struck him in the face, burning him quite badly. Dr. Holt was called over the phone to meet him at the depot, where he administered some relief, but he went on to Medford where he was placed under the care of the company physician.
    The parties who placed their bids for carrying the mails over the star route from Derby are rejoicing over the fact that the U.S. government has called the bids all off after the bidders had been notified of the acceptance of their bids. This was caused by the government raising the amount to be put in a package in the parcel post mail, from 50 to 70 pounds. They, the contractors, say that if they would have to carry the mail with that addition that I would do away with the pack horse altogether and there are places on some of the routes where it is out of the question to think of carrying the mail in a rig unless it would be a cart and then they could not get all of it on for sometimes they have several hundred pounds of parcel post mail. A short time ago George Austin, the mail carrier from here to Climax, had so much grain in 50-[omission?]tin, the mail carrier from here to [omission] take four horses and a heavy wagon to haul it.
    J. P. McCabe and Ed Dutton were among the diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday.
    Since my last report Verna Matthews has paid up his sub. to the W.M.T., E.P.P.O. J. V. McIntyre has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, E.P., has renewed her sub. to the D.M.T.,.and T. C. Dugan has renewed his sub. to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 15, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred Pelouze, one of our enterprising farmers, has given me his sub. to the D.M.T.
    Rev. M. T. Wire, the pastor of the M.E. church of Grants Pass, came in Wednesday afternoon and spent the night with us and the next morning had an early start for the agate field to try his fortune hunting agates. He took a lunch with him and intended to hunt until the train came along to the Mountain View station and board the train for home.
    There were 22 boxes of apples shipped Thursday morning on the P.&E. to two of our Butte Falls merchants.
    Mrs. Harry Young, whose husband is in the U.S. service, took passage on the P.&E. Thursday for Butte Falls.
    Messrs. Powers and Sunday [Leander?] Swihart and Jase Hartman were passengers on the same train going to Butte Falls.
    The E.P. Telephone Company shipped a lot of seasoned telephone poles from here to be used along the line between Derby and Butte Falls. The company have a force along the route doing repair work.
    Louis Baker of Portland, a son of James Baker, formerly of this place, passed through here on his way to Butte Falls to visit his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Tungate and intends to take them to Portland to live during the summer.
    Benj. Brophy, one of our hustling farmers and stockmen, received a fertilizer spreader to be used on his farm.
    Charley Seefield came out Thursday to take up the furniture for C. W. Scott, the foreman and business manager of the Tacoma Metal Co. in the Lost Creek manganese mine. Mr. Scott met his family with his car in Medford and took them direct to their home, the J. H. Tyrrell place, that the company bought at the same time they bought the mine. Mr. Seefield called at the Sunnyside for his dinner in company of Frank Hard who lives on the old Obenchain road from Brownsboro to Butte Falls. Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Stewart of Klamath County were also diners Thursday at the Sunnyside. They had been over to look at a band of cattle he afterward bought of Walter Wood.
    Claus Charley of Brownsboro took a big load of machinery for drilling purposes to the L.C. mine about the middle of the week and Friday and Saturday took up two loads of wire fencing four miles, that they will use on the C. C. Charley place near Brownsboro.
    There was a car of men who are interested in the Rogue River oil projects out here Friday but I have been unable to ascertain what they did. I understand that W. E. Hammel came in to see about signing up his 1400 acres but did not see him.
    George Trusty and Amos Ayres, our depot agent, were here Friday for their meals as Mrs. Ayres has taken a vacation and gone to Elk Creek to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trusty.
    H. C. Stock and his sister, Ashland undertakers, were here on business Friday.
    C. S. Cole of Medford and A. B. Cunningham of Paul's Electric Store, Medford, were here for dinner Friday. Mr. Cunningham is putting in an automatic pump for L. K. Haak on his farm just above here.
    Miss Margaret McQuiston, who is teaching the Lake Creek school, came out on the P.&E. Saturday morning, took early lunch at the Sunnyside and went on up to L.C. on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    T. M. Stowell and Miss Bessie Eckenberg were married Friday in Jacksonville and their many friends here are covering them with congratulations.
    And the report is very current that one of our popular young ladies and a popular young jitney driver of Medford are to be married this Saturday evening, but as I have no authority to make the announcement will leave the matter until my next.
    Since my last report Dolph Kent, Wellen P. O., has renewed his sub. to the Weekly Mail Tribune; Perry Foster has renewed his sub. to the W.M.T. and Henry French has renewed his sub. to the D.M.T. Henry brought in his week's supply of cream.
    Friday evening O. R. Stewart of Klamath County and his cousin passed through here with 60 head of cattle he had bought here. Fred Frideger, Wm. Mansfield and a young man who did not register spent the night with us. Miss Zula Geppert is spending a few days at the Sunnyside.
    Our popular road supervisor has treated himself to a Chevrolet car and, well, there is no telling what will be done next.
    E. A. Bass, who owns an orchard in this neighborhood, arrived on the P.&E. Saturday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 18, 1918, page 3


Trail Items
    Mr. and Mrs. George Weeks are the proud parents of a fine baby girl, Lucy Kathleen.
    Mrs. Mary Warner returned home Monday from Medford, where she was called to the bedside of her daughter, May, who was taken suddenly ill with pneumonia. She reports her much improved.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Springer are moving from Trail to their homestead near Derby.
    Fred Sturgis, Mr. Ditsworth and C. Skyrman were Medford business callers last week.
    Mrs. Amos Ayres of Eagle Point and little son are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Trusty, on Elk Creek.
    Paul Wright passed through Trail on Sunday on his way to his mine on Elk Creek.
    C. Skyrman and W. Willits are returning from the valley with their cattle, as the warm rains have started the grass sufficient to turn them on the range.
    The Misses Lee and Enid Middlebusher were Sunday guests at the Blass home.
    George Mansfield and family motored to Medford Saturday.
    The recent storms have put long faces on some of the farmers, as they were planning to soon start general farm work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 20, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Fuller has moved out of the John W. Smith house into Leroy Smith's house.
    The death of Mrs. Margaret Wooley on March 16 has already been announced in the Mail Tribune and interment was made in the Central Point cemetery on Monday. Religious services were conducted by your E.P. correspondent. Owing to the downpour of rain and inclement weather the services were abridged as much as possible.
    Miss Hannah Stewart and Miss Ella Belford of Central Point came out Saturday afternoon to attend the Red Cross dance here, and engaged a room at the Sunnyside for the evening.
    Sunday, not counting the guests who remained after the dance for breakfast, we had Marian Nealon of Table Rock, who came on other business and spent the night with us; L. B. Brown, wife and daughter, Miss Helen; W. T. Learned and Mrs. A. E. Anderson of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Philip Jackson, William Mansfield of Trail (he also spent the night), Wm. von der Hellen, wife, son Hugo and daughter Joyce; N. W. Slusser, our barber; Wm. Haselton, Amos Ayres, Judge Tou Velle and wife, our county judge; Henry Trusty, Jay Pitzer, Jud Edsall, Harry Lewis, Albert Clements, Thomas and George Lewis.
    Ed Cingcade, one of our rustling stockmen, started for San Francisco to visit his sister, Hattie, and to visit their friends in that city.
    Miss Mildred Seefield of Lake Creek came in from Medford on Monday morning on the P.&E., took an early lunch at the Sunnyside and went on up to her home on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    R. R. Minter and daughter, Miss Diehless, were doing business here on Monday.
    Joe Haskins of Trail was also a business caller Monday.
    John Painter of Montana, a brother of our townsman, Charles Painter, who is now working in one of the shipyards in Washington, came in Tuesday on the train to visit the Painter family.
    Miss Zula Geppert of Butte Falls, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside for the past week or so, started for her home Tuesday on the train.
    D. L. McNary, who has been living in Medford for some time, has purchased the interest of Mr. Banker in the farm in Brownsboro. Mr. McNary used to live on and is going to move onto the place, so he tells me.
    Mrs. Campbell of Derby, who has been spending some time in Medford, went up to her home Tuesday.
    E. A. Hildreth was also a passenger on the train for B.F. Tuesday.
    Floyd Pearce had a lot of hay shipped in Friday.
    Mrs. Slusser, wife of our barber, and Mrs. Amos Ayres, wife of our depot agent, who have been visiting Mrs. Slusser in Medford and Mrs. Ayres her parents on Elk Creek, both returned home Tuesday.
    Mrs. Alvin Conover and two sons went to Medford Tuesday, returning Wednesday morning. They were accompanied as far as the depot by Mrs. Walter Wood and her father-in-law, Jeff Conover.
    On the return trip of the P.&E., Ira Tungate and his father and mother of Butte Falls were passengers on their way to Portland to visit their daughter, Emma Carson, Lee Edmondson, M. Marion and Miss Alta Allen, the last three named going to Medford or Jacksonville.
    I learned Tuesday that the Red Cross dance had Saturday night, St. Patrick's Day, was a grand success, the receipts for the dance being $95.75, for refreshments $17.55, making a total of $113.30. The expenses were: For musicians, $31, including carfare; hall rent, lights, etc., $7; printing, $4.25, leaving a balance in favor of the R.C. Society $71.05--quite well for these hard times.
    Irvin Tyrrell of L.C. was moving his household goods out to Medford Tuesday.
    John Simon, who has been working on Elk Creek for some time, returned to his sister's, Mrs. George W. Daley, Tuesday.
    Mrs. Mary F. Stowell and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. T. M. (Perl) Stowell, called on your cor. Wednesday and left one and a half dollars for a year's sub, to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Mrs. Stowell said that they had been taking the W.M.T., but had ordered it stopped, but found that it was hard to get along without a county paper.
    R. G. Brown, one of our leading merchants of the firm of George Brown & Sons, called for dinner on Wednesday and remarked that his wife and daughter, Miss Hazel, had gone to Medford and he was left without a cook.
    Sam Courtney, our fancy painter, is doing a lot of work on the von der Hellen Hardware Company's store.
    In addition to Mrs. Stowell's sub. to the W.M.T., John W. Smith of Wellen has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    Died--Mrs. Chris Wooley died Mar. 16 at her home near Eagle Point; she leaves a husband and three sons.
    John Stille preached at Reese Creek Sunday both morning and evening. He gave us two able, earnest sermons.
    The Junior Red Cross are busy making quilts, etc.
    Mr. Lewis has moved his sheep back on the Finley ranch; they are busy building corrals, etc., getting ready for the shearing season.
    Also Mr. Steers of Rogue River has a band of sheep on Marshall Minter's ranch,
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel visited Mrs. Watkins last week.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 22, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    L. J. Allen of the Oregon Agricultural College, state pig and club leader, and R. E. Morris, our school supervisor, were out and met quite a number of our citizens at the schoolhouse Wednesday evening. Professor Morris gave us a short talk on the importance of the club work, interspersing his remarks with thoughts on the necessity of utilizing everything to help along the advancement of the cause of democracy. At the close of his speech he introduced Mr. Allen, who gave us a very interesting lecture on the club work in general, of its progress and its accomplishments. He then gave an illustrated lecture with a set of stereopticon views. The views were designed to impress on the minds of the children the advantage of systematic work in agricultural and stockraising lines. The two lectures, both by Mr. Morris and that by Mr. Allen, were quite interesting and seemed to be appreciated by most of the audience.
    Fred Frideger and E. H. Hessler of Medford came in Wednesday evening and engaged rooms at the Sunnyside for the rest of the week. Mr. Frideger has a small orchard just outside of the town of about eighteen or twenty acres and they have been pruning and shaping it up, getting it ready for the fruit season.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. train Thursday going up the country were M. Marion, Miss Alta Allen and Lee Edmondson for Derby and Mrs. Caroline Thomason going to Butte Falls.
    Charles H. Brown and J. C. Brown of Medford were out Thursday seeing what they could do in the way of securing cull fruit for a fruit evaporator to be built in Medford. They seemed to be very optimistic over the project, as almost every one of the orchardists seemed willing to contract what fruit was not fit to ship. They both took dinner at the Sunnyside, and so did J. J. Skinner, the electric light man. Belmont Pankey of Tolo came in later and spent the night with us.
    Marsh Garrett, now of Medford, was a business caller Thursday.
    Mrs. Emily M. Pishon of New York City and Mrs. G. T. West of Hornbrook came out Friday morning, took an early lunch at the Sunnyside Hotel and started in their hired car for Ashland.
    Among the transient diners at the Sunnyside Friday were Clifford Sitsen, S. H. Harnish and son Robert, John Pomeroy, Fairbanks, Wash.; J. F. Leach and W. A. Ewing of Seattle, and Miss Vera Kershaw of Climax.
    John Sevedge and wife and John Ashpole and wife of Medford were out Friday visiting Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole.
    E. A. Bass, who owns a small orchard on Antelope Creek, and came out from his home in Massachusetts, has leased his orchard to Fred Dutton and started Saturday morning for his old home.
    A. G. Bishop, James Gibson and Miss Minnie Given were among the business callers Friday.
    Thomas Vestal and his sister, Mrs. Wilfred Jack, started Saturday morning for the Vestal ranch on Reese Creek, on the P.&E., where she expects to remain until they can drive across the mountains to Bend, Ore.
    T. M. Stowell and wife were business callers Saturday morning, and so was Mrs. Thomas Smith.
    Ira Tungate returned from Portland, where he had been to take his father and mother Saturday morning and went on up to his home in Butte Falls.
    There was a car of machinery, etc., came out for the Tacoma Metal Co. of Lake Creek Saturday morning and a half dozen tanks of fuel oil.
    T. B. Tronson and L. K. Haak had a lot of spray on the P.&E. Saturday morning, twenty barrels.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze were in town Saturday morning, and she was telling me of a narrow escape she had while crossing the wagon bridge in our town. She met a band of cattle on the bridge--it is covered and sided up so that a person approaching it from either direction cannot see what is coming, and she was on the bridge with her machine before she discovered the cattle, and perhaps was a little confused on account of them--and the result was the car collided with a railing on the side of the approach, tearing it off but fortunately did no damage to the machine or to her, although she came very near going over the side of the bridge, car and all--a lucky escape.
    Ardin Tyrrell, who has lived about all his life in the L.C. country, has moved to Medford, but expects when the roads get good to move to South Dakota. We dislike the idea of losing such families as the Tyrrells from our community. He and Charles Newstrom, Charles Edler of Lake Creek, Albert Conley and H. N. Beecher, who is traveling in the interest of the Pacific Coast Borax Co. of Portland, were at the Sunnyside for dinner Saturday.
    Since my last report S. F. Smith, E.P., has given me his sub. to the W.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 27, 1918, page 7


Reese Creek Riplets
    The Junior Red Cross had a pie social at the school house Saturday evening, realizing over $20. The pies averaged $1.12 2-9 [sic], the ladies taking the pies, they being auctioned off to the highest bidder, who hunted up his lady and together they ate the pie. Mr. Crandall was the auctioneer "who has followed the business one summer for 13 months." The evening was spent in games out of doors, beside a big bonfire which the juniors heroically piled up for the occasion, Miss Mayes, the teacher, laying the first brush. Everyone went home feeling they had spent a pleasant evening, also pleased over the amount that was raised.
    Under the efficient leadership of the teacher, Miss Mayes, the juniors are very enthusiastic. As school will be out in a few weeks they elected the following officers: Chairman, Mrs. Bellows; secretary, May French; treasurer, Paul Robertson.
    The following pupils were neither absent nor tardy during the past month: Johnnie Clarno, Bennie Bellows, Edward Bellows, Cora French, May French, Myrtle Minter, Paul Robertson, Mina Minter. Those receiving certificates in the spelling contest were: Paul Robertson, 8th grade, 100; Robert Merritt, 8th, 98; Cora French, 6th, 100; Nye Mathews, 3rd, 96; Bennie Bellows, 3rd, 100. Bennie Bellows has the distinction of having 100 at each contest.
    Mrs. Lizzie Jacks and children have moved from Eagle Point to Mrs. Jacks' parents, Mr. Vestal's, where they expect to stay for a short time before joining her husband in Eastern Oregon.
    Mr. Leaper and family of near Rogue River are living on the Rhodes place.
    Mr. Lewis of Central Point was out the first of the week looking after his sheep.
    Mr. Crandall has been on the sick list the last few days.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 29, 1918, page 5

   
Trail Items
    Mrs. Rena Avery and Mrs. J. L. Ragsdale were guests at Mrs. Albright's Tuesday.
    E. E. Ash is blasting and clearing more alfalfa ground.
    George and Marion Trusty bought about 40 head of cattle last week and drove them to Trail and branded them in the new chute before taking them home.
    Harry Banks is visiting friends around Trail. He expects to return to his work at Weed, Cal., the first of April.
    Fred Sturgis and George Weeks were Medford callers this week.
    Enid Middlebusher was appointed on the committee in the thrift stamp campaign this week.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher and son, Fred, made a trip to the valley this week for supplies with their truck. They reached home O.K., although the roads are very bad for cars now.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Mansfield were Medford visitors Friday, returning Saturday with their daughter, Marguerite, who has been attending school.
    W. P. Morgan had blacksmithing done by George Fisher Tuesday.
    Mrs. Irwin Howe and Mrs. Rena Avery were callers at the Warner home Monday. We are all in sympathy with the relatives and friends of May Warner. who passed away on Sunday night. She leaves many friends who will mourn her death, as she was loved by all who knew her. The funeral services were held at the Trail cemetery Tuesday at 2:30 p.m.
    Mr. Sandry of Elk Creek made a trip to Central Point Monday.
    The Misses Tressie Pence and Eva Osburn of Elk Creek spent Saturday and Sunday at the Ash home. Miss Osburn and Mrs. Pierce were schoolmates in California.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 29, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James W. Pew of Ashland, who has resided in this valley for the last thirty-five years, came up the latter part of the week to visit some of his old-time friends and to take birthday dinner with David Cingcade. They have been in the habit of celebrating their birthdays together, as Mr. Pew's comes on the 23rd and Mr. Cingcade's on the 24th. And David has a first-class cook for a wife, and Mr. P. is a bachelor. They generally manage to take the birthday dinner at Mr. Cingcade's, where he can have his children that are at home with them. Mr. P. being one of our old personal friends, called on us Saturday and spent the night, and Saturday afternoon your correspondent took him through the principal business portion of the town and called his attention to the fine stock of goods there is in the different stores and to our fine bank and store buildings. He remained until Tuesday morning. After meeting quite a number of his old friends, he took the Lewis jitney for home.
    There was quite a number of our young folks went from here to Gold Hill to attend a dance that was given there Saturday night, and when they returned Jack Taylor, Harry and George Lewis spent the remainder of the night at the Sunnyside.
    As Sunday was not a very pleasant day and the recent rain had made the roads between here and Medford somewhat slippery, there was not the usual company at the Sunnyside, but B. E. Haney, wife and mother, Mrs. Schmidt, and L. B. Brown, wife and daughters, Miss Helen, of Medford; Clifford  Sitson, Albert Clements of Eagle Point and Miss Ella Balford of Los Angeles, Cal., called for dinner. Miss Balford is a tapestry artist, whose pictures ornament several prominent places in the United States. Her masterpiece, as she calls it, was purchased by Mrs. George Talcott of Los Angeles, and sent to her daughter, Mrs. Gordon C. Hunt, wife of Captain Hunt of London. Miss Balford has been spending the winter on the Stewart farm, northeast of Eagle Point.
    Harvey Stanley, Fred Warner and Charles Edler were passengers on the P.&E. motor car Monday, and Fred went up to his home on Trail and Charles took the E.P.-L.C. stage for his home near L.C.
    W. P. Holbrook and A. G. Bishop were among the business callers Monday.
    W. B. Hensley and his daughter, Mrs. Allen, Wort Pool and R. A. Petty were callers Monday.
    Mrs. J. C. Barnard, wife of the principal of our school, has gone to Ashland to arrange for their garden and Prof. Barnard is taking his noon meal at the Sunnyside during his wife's absence.
    Charles Loar of Medford spent Monday night at the Sunnyside. He had been out in the mountains with his brother-in-law, Ed Walker, and they returned here and found Mrs. Walker ready to take her husband on to Medford in her car and leave Charley with the team to care for.
    Tracy Boothby of Prospect and Wm. Moore of Butte Falls were among the passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday.
    Peter Young, Timmie C. Dugan and George P. Stowell were among the business callers Tuesday morning and later in the day J. L. Robertson and daughter Miss Mary. Mr. Robertson says that his wheat looks as well as he ever saw it.
    Hamilton Watkins and his wife were passing through our town and stopped to do a little trading with our merchants Tuesday.
    Wm. von der Hellen, one of our hardware men, and Harry M. Parks of Portland, director Oregon Bureau of Nines, were with us Tuesday evening for supper. Mr. Parks had been up to the L.C. manganese mine and was on his way to.Medford, going that night.
    There were six passengers came in on the P.&E. motor Wednesday morning but they were all strangers.
    Since my last report G. W. Brandon has renewed his subscription to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I unintentionally omitted to state in my last that Miss Anna McCormack, home demonstration agent, delivered a very interesting lecture, illustrated with slide views, in the school house here Sunday evening, March 24. There was not so large an audience as might have been desirable, but those who were present were well pleased with the lecture as well as the views.
    Miss Estella Betz, one of our efficient post office clerks, as well as one of the telephone operators, went to Medford and spent the day with her aunt, Mrs. Leroy A. Smith.
    Miss Garnett Nichols, a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols, formerly one of our promising school girls, but now of Seattle, Wash., is here visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols; her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Nichols, beside a number of other relatives and friends.
    Wednesday afternoon, after I had written my letter for the Daily Mail Tribune, I met the following persons from different parts of the community: Pearl Stowell, Robert R. Minter and daughter, Miss Diehless, W. W. Edington of Sams Valley, the father of John N. Edington, foreman on the A. Corbin orchard: J. H. Carlton, Chris Natwick, the road work contractor; Bert Peachey, one of the forest rangers of Ashland, who was on his way home to see his new baby, Charles and John Painter--Charles had just returned from somewhere in Washington, where he has been working in a paper mill; Miss Ruby Haley and J. L. Robertson. Wednesday was one of our nice, warm spring days, and it seemed as though almost everyone who could come to town that afternoon did.
    There was a carload of machinery came in Thursday, and Claus Charley took up a load of it to the manganese mine on Lost Creek.
    George Pech of L.C., one of our loyal citizens of German descent, was doing business here Thursday.
    When the P.&E. train arrived Thursday morning, among the passengers were Ed Walker, deputy game warden, and H. D. Mills, the superintendent of the Butte Falls Lumber Co. He was on his way from Portland, where he had been to investigate the working of the eight-hour law for mills and logging camps. Rev. George Black, a Baptist minister, formerly of Medford, when Medford was in its infancy. He came unannounced and said that he was going to have a big revival here, and started in that night. There were but few turned out to hear him, about a dozen, but he persisted in staying and held services again Friday night, but I did not learn the result. He will probably remain over Sunday, and perhaps longer.
    Al Mayfield and wife of Ashland came up Thursday to visit Mrs. Mayfield's sister, and Mr. Mayfield and his brother-in-law, William G. Knighton, drove up to the manganese mine. They report that it looks good to them, and Mr. K. says that they have enough in sight to last for a generation. The Tacoma Metal Co. have commenced to haul out some of the metal already for shipment, but can make but little headway until the roads dry up and are improved.
     S. F. Smith and wife were doing business with our merchants Friday, and while here he paid me his subscription to the W.M.T. he had ordered over the phone a few days before. Joe Mayham, Verna Mathews and wife were also business callers Friday.
    George R. Brown and wife of Brownsboro motored into town Friday, and J. L. Robertson and Robert R. Minter went to Medford in a buggy, returning Friday morning.
    Misses Margaret and Ethel Riley were trading here Friday.
    Friday evening Dr. J. F. Reddy, Henry Callahan of Medford and Harry M. Parks phoned from somewhere on Butte Creek that they would be in for supper in about an hour, and in the course of human events they arrived, hungry, tired and--well, I was going to say dirty, but perhaps they were just soiled. At any rate, they reached the Sunnyside in time to eat at the third table. The tables were not all filled, but Fred Frideger and Mr. Hessler, who have been working in Mr. Frideger's orchard, were late coming to supper, so they made the second table. The three gentlemen named had been up to the L.C. mine and were just returning, and after supper and resting awhile, they went on to Medford that night. They spoke very favorably of the prospect for manganese.
    George W. Stowell, who is making a specialty of the chicken business, comes in every Friday and last Friday brought in over four double crates of eggs. He was met here by an auto truck from Central Point, and exchanged his full crates for empty ones. The driver said that he was also gathering cream for the Hazelwood creamery.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Haak, who own and operate a farm and orchard combined, and Mrs. H. makes a specialty of raising pure-bred chickens, made a trip to Medford and Jacksonville on Friday.
    I noticed a truckload of flour going out from our Snowy Butte Mills Friday.
    Levi A. Richter of Elk Mountain, near Asbestos post office, was here for dinner Friday and spent most of the afternoon with us, taking the P.&E. motor for Medford that P.M. C. W. Scott, manager of the L.C. mine, and Mr. Sherman were here for dinner Friday, and John and Ray Cobleigh and their mother spent the night at the Sunnyside Friday. The two brothers had bought up thirteen head of calves and yearlings and were taking them up to their place below Butte Falls.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Saturday morning were Professor Van Scoy of Ashland. He was here on business connected with the school and visiting his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy. Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Wilfley, they were returning from their visit to Los Angeles. He is an owner of what is known as the Wilfley orchard, about three miles from here. About the first thing he did was to give me his sub. for the D.M.T.
    Roy Martin and family. wife and two children, were also passengers on the P.&E. They were met at the depot by V. E. Brittsan and taken to the S. V. Anderson ranch,
    A. E. Dodge and his bride were on the train moving to Butte Falls.
    D. L. Swihart and W. S. Baker of Derby were also among the passengers.
    There was also a part of a car of wire fencing for Dr. Emmerson of B.F. and a lot of machinery for the B.F.L. Co.
    Chris Bergman and R. A. Petty and Ed Dutton were among the diners with us Saturday. Ed Dutton is our road supervisor, and has been doing sane much-needed work on the road from the Sunnyside to the county bridge. He has plowed up the sides of the road and graded up so that if begins to look like a turnpike.
    In addition to those already reported, J. B. Jackson has renewed his sub. to D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1918, page 5


Trail Items
    Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Palmer of Medford motored to Trail Friday to visit their daughter, Mrs. L. B. Pierce, who is teaching the Trail school.
    Fred and Frank Middlebusher, E. E. Ash and R. R. Dawson were Medford business callers this week.
    Miss Eva Osborne spent Easter with her mother, Mrs. Osborne, in Medford, returning to her school on Elk Creek Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Middlebusher of Centralia, Wash., are visiting relatives and friends in Trail.
    Fred Sturgis has purchased a new car, a Chevrolet.
    Robert Thomason of Drew is spending a few days at the cinnabar mine near Trail.
    The Misses Enid and Lee Middlebusher and Mrs. Frank Middlebusher attended the Easter services on Elk Creek Sunday.
    Minnie Poole of Drew is boarding with Mrs. Ash and going to the Trail school.
    Mrs. R. R. Dawson visited her mother, Mrs. Mary Warner, Friday and Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Fader, one of our enterprising stockmen and farmers, was among the business callers Saturday afternoon, and so was Mrs. Radcliffe; she was disposing of her week's product of eggs with our merchants.
    Easter Sunday morning broke with all of its splendor, without a cloud to mar its beauty and those who had been anxiously watching to see the usual Easter rain were disappointed, for they looked in vain for it proved to be one of the most delightful days of the season. In fact it was one of those rare occasions when almost everyone remained at home or near home for there was scarcely anyone stirring, in our quiet little village at least. For that day we had but few guests outside of our regular boarders, but those who were at the Sunnyside that day were J. F. Brown and wife, W. G. Knighton and wife, Nick Young, who was just introducing his Chevrolet car, Clifford Sitson, Albert Clements, Miss Ruby Haley, Miss Garnett Nichols, Joe Moomaw, and Geo. Lewis
    Charley Sherman, who has been working at Hilt, Calif., returned to the Sunnyside Sunday night.
    Among the business callers Monday was A. T. Poole, one of the forest rangers of Trail, Mr. Downs, also of Trail, and John Holtz, another of the forest rangers of Sams Valley, Fred Pelouze, one of our successful farmers, C. W. Scott, manager of the L.C. manganese mine, the two Rummel brothers, also of L.C., Frank Hard of Brownsboro, the foregoing were all here for dinner. W. P. Haley, A. G. Bishop, A. E. Strong were here simply on business.
    J. H. Tyrrell, one of the oldest and most respected citizens of the Lake Creek country, who sold his manganese mines and farm to the Tacoma Metal Co., moved out to Medford Monday.
    Corbett Smith, one of the prosperous young farmers and stockmen of Butte Falls, was with us Monday night.
    We had another of those devastating fires in our little town Monday night, the home of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole being burned, the fire taking place about 8 o'clock p.m. It appears that Mrs. Ashpole had a short time before built a fire in the heater and in a few moments she discovered that the ceiling was all on fire. The alarm of fire was rung over the telephone and in an incredibly short time almost every available person, man and woman, was there to try to save what they could. They managed to save about all of the household goods that was on the floor proper but the things that were in the cellar were lost, consisting of her nice dishes, silverware and fruit. They were carrying insurance, but not enough to begin to replace the property. The next day they moved into the house belonging to John W. Smith, recently vacated by Mrs. Pullen and her son.
    Tuesday was rather a busy day, as there seemed to be quite a number of people in town besides the regular visitors and among those who visited the S.S. Hotel were Royal G. Brown, one of our merchants; he came over for his breakfast; he said that the night before at the time of the Ashpole fire something went wrong with the electric pump in the grist mill and they connected the water wheel up with the water tank that supplies that part of town with water and the pressure was so great as to burst a pipe connected with the reservoir in the culinary department and the result was that that part of the house was completely flooded with water so he resorted to the S.S. for breakfast.
    Fred Frey and wife of L.C. came out Tuesday morning but reached here too late to catch the Lewis jitney so [he] went to the S.S. Hotel for dinner, taking the P.&E. train in the afternoon. Ralph Cowgill, R. S. Stewart, E. Andrews and H. C. Johnson came in for dinner Tuesday; the last three engaged rooms and board at the S.S.; they are engaged in building a new wagon bridge across Little Butte Creek for H. B. Tronson, replacing the old one that is considered unsafe. John Rader, wife and daughter, Mrs. Harvey Stanley, Roy Ashpole and family were also diners at the S.S. Tuesday. Mr. Ashpole is a son-in-law of John Rader and they all came over to see the result of the fire and help Mr. Ashpole into their new home.
    Miss Zula Geppert came out from her home near Butte Falls Tuesday and spent the night with us and Wednesday morning went to work for John Edington on the A. Corbin orchard.
    Fred Frey returned from Medford Wednesday morning, took early lunch at the S.S. and went up home on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    F. H. Russell of Portland was here Wednesday morning working in the interest of a telephone supply house and A. B. Cunningham of the Paul's Electric Store, Medford, came out to install an electric washing machine for Mrs. L. K. Haak. They both took dinner with us.

Medford Mail Tribune, April 5, 1918, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my last that T. F. Boltz, formerly of the P.&E.R.R. Co. force, but now in a business position in Montana, came in to pay his family a visit on Saturday night, Mar. 30, remaining until Monday morning.
    Another item of general interest I omitted to mention was that the setting of the clocks ahead on the 31st of March knocked Rev. George Black out of preaching his Easter sermon on that day. It appears that the family where he was stopping went by the old time and the superintendent by the government regulation and commenced S.S. at the appointed time, 10 o'clock a.m., and that brought the Sunday school exercises to a close at 11 o'clock a.m., new time, and the result was that the people became impatient and restless and after waiting for over half an hour began to disperse and by the time Rev. Black arrived, 12 o'clock noon, most of the congregation had gone, so after a consultation with the few who remained he decided that he would not try to preach at that hour but would preach at night, which he did, but the congregation was rather small compared to what it might have been.
    A. G. Bishop and an elderly gentleman, a relative of Mrs. Bishop (deceased), were in town Wednesday afternoon.
    Dave Pence, the enterprising stockraiser of Elk Creek, was a guest of Frank Lewis Wednesday night.
    Mrs. J. R. Safley and Miss Viola Hughes of Butte Falls spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside. They had been out to Medford and came out this far to spend the night, on the P.&E. motor car. Mrs. J. Montgomery also came out on the same car.
    C. W. Scott motored out Thursday morning in time to catch the train for B.F. He was in a hurry for a lot of lumber and had a special car taken up to bring out 5000 feet that day for his flume, as his water was failing at the manganese mines. Claus Charley came out the next day and took one-half of the lumber up to its destination.
    N. W. Slusser, our barber, has moved out of the James Ringer house into the J. R. McQuoid house where he can have more land to cultivate and also have the use of water to irrigate.
    Our school board met last Wednesday night and among other things employed Prof. E. N. Deardorff as principal of our school to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of the present principal, Prof. J. C. Barnard who has about decided to turn his attention to a different branch of business. I have had it hinted that he is likely to be the nominee for county judge on the Democratic ticket. The board also re-employed the present teacher, Miss Pina Benedict, as the primary teacher, greatly to the joy of the little folk, for they seem to almost idolize her.
    E. E. Farley of Upper Table Rock and A. O. Olson of Trail and Frank Smith were among the diners Thursday, and among the other visitors were Master Walter Allen of Derby, Rube Johnson, Owen Conover and Fred Stanley. Fred looked kinder lonesome, so on inquiry I learned that his wife and baby were in Portland visiting relatives. J. M. Garrett was also a business visitor and while here he paid up a balance due on his sub. to the W.M.T. and had it stopped and paid a year's sub. to the D.M.T. There are so many stirring events to read about now that the general reader is unsatisfied with a weekly paper so are changing from the weekly to the daily.
    J. W. Granthan of Medford came out Thursday evening to the Sunnyside and engaged board and room, and the next morning went to work for R. A. Stewart, the contractor, on the H. B. Tronson bridge.
    J. N. Edington, the foreman on the A. Corbin orchard, was in town Friday putting an extra gasoline tank on his auto. He said that he was preparing to go to the hills and wanted to take along extra gas. George W. Stowell also came in with his four crates of eggs, the weeks' product, and was met by the representative of the Central Point produce merchant who takes eggs, cream, etc., to C.P.
    Mrs. J. M. McDonald of Elk Creek came out on the P.&E. motor and went on up home on the E.P.-Persist stage.
    Miss Evelyn Watenburg and Miss Winifred Haak, two of our bright, promising high school girls, went to Ashland to spend the weekend with Prof. and Mrs. J. C. Barnard.
    Mrs. Ray Harnish of Climax came out during the week, combining business with pleasure, returning Friday.
    A. C. Spence and wife of Brownsboro drove down Friday and were trading with Geo. Brown & Sons.
    Miss Pina Benedict, our primary teacher, and Miss Julia Sidley of L.C. went to Medford on the Lewis jitney Saturday morning, Miss B. intending to go to Ashland so as to attend the funeral of Rev. Van Scoy, who died very suddenly at Rogue River.
    Mrs. J. M. King of Medford, Mrs. John Obenchain of Butte Falls and Mrs. F. J. Ayres were also on the train going to their homes.
    J. C. Findley of Aberdeen, Wash., and his son came out on the train Saturday morning to locate on the old Irvin orchard place, now belonging to a widow lady. He tells me that among the first things he will do is to pull up the fruit trees on the place and plant the ground to corn.
    Mrs. Amos Ayres, the wife of our depot agent, was taken to the hospital in Medford Friday evening and operated on for appendicitis and at latest account was resting well and getting along all O.K.
    J. W. Cookson, one of our traveling salesmen, was here for dinner Saturday.
    The members of the Junior Red Cross are scattering handbills around town announcing a lecture on Mexico by W. L. Mellinger, a noted lecturer. See class ad.
    There was about a half car of sacks came in Saturday morning for the L.C. mine.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 9, 1918, page 7


Trail Items
    Harry Skyrman and sister Clara motored to Medford Sunday in their new car.
    R. R. Dawson returned from the valley Sunday, where he has been plowing.
    L. B. Tucker left Tuesday for Weed, Cal., where he has employment for the summer.
    Mrs. E. P. Knapp returned to the valley Saturday after visiting friends and relatives in Trail for a week.
    Fred Sturgis passed through Trail Sunday, driving his cattle to the mountains after feeding them near Central Point this past winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Weeks and family spent Sunday at the Johnson home near the ferry.
    Mrs. Rena Avery and Mrs. Hattie Ragsdale were Sunday callers at Mrs. Tucker's.

Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1918, page 6


Reese Creek Riplets
    The Sunday school contest closed Sunday, March 31, with the addition of members. Friday was the Sunday school reception. There was a short program, consisting of patriotic selections and a social hour, in which some of the young folks played games outside. The refreshments consisted of Hooverized cake and pickles. There was to have been ice cream, which was shipped out, but the depot being closed that day on account of Mrs. Amos Ayres, the depot agent's wife, having an operation that day, they could not get the cream.
    Missionary G. C. Griffin preached at Reese Creek Sunday morning on "God's Special Protection." "But my God shall supply all your needs, according to His riches in glory by Christ Jesus." Mr. Griffin preached at Laurel Hill in the afternoon also. Those who miss his messages are missing something.
    The Sunday school elected two commissioners Sunday, namely: W. H. Crandall and T. J. Pullen, to confer with the neighboring Sunday schools, Laurel Hill, Eagle Point and Derby, to arrange for group gatherings for the summer.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel is visiting in Butte Falls for a few days.
    Marshall Minter was home from Butte Falls for a few days while he was waiting for the mill to open at that place.
    Tom Vestal went to Butte Falls Monday to get work.
    Mary Robertson has been confined to her home for a few days with la grippe.
    Several people are having bad colds and sore throat.
    Mr. Griffin and family visited at H. Watkins' last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Graham visited at Mr. Bellows' Sunday.
    Miss MacDougal visited Miss Mayes Saturday night.
    W. H. Crandall and family, Mr. and Mrs. Leaper, motored to Rogue River Sunday.

Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon Miss M. P. Borrell and Mrs. S. A. Van Hardenberg were trading here. Miss Borrell is engaged in teaching in the Antelope district.
    Sunday was another one of those delightful days such as we so commonly see here in the spring and the result was quite a number of the Medford people took advantage of the occasion and drove out for a ride, enjoy the fresh, invigorating morning air and pay a visit to the Sunnyside Hotel. Among them were George H. West of the Forest Service and wife. Mrs. West has recently returned from Portland where she was confined to her room for some time, but we are glad to be able to say that she has so far reclaimed her health that she is looking and feeling fine again. They come out with Mrs. Emma Cook and her daughter Miss E. V. Cook and grandson, Master Harwood Cook. Miss Cook is the head bookkeeper in the forester's office, Medford. Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Gates, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Gates, Miss Marie Gates, Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Mitchell, Miss Grace Mitchell, Miss Geneveor Fillery, besides Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Wamsley, Thomas and Harry Lewis, Orville Childreth, Jay Pitzer, Clifford Silson, Miss Mamie and Master Thomas Boltz and Al Clements. It was the first time that Mayor Gates or his brother or their wives were at the Sunnyside, but the ladies expressed a determination to come out quite frequently as they found everything quite satisfactory.
    Miss Marie Gates came out Saturday evening to visit Miss Hazel Brown and I suppose to take part in the Red Cross dance. I understand that there was a large crowd attended the dance and that the most of the attendees had a fine time but there were several who were unthoughtful
enough to leave their wraps, lap robes and in some instances their handbags in their cars and had to go home without them as there was, I am informed by the mayor, Hon. John M. Nichols, that there was about $60 worth of articles taken by petty thieves. While there may be and probably are some in this vicinity who would not hesitate to take such things, still there were some from a distance might be tempted to purloin a little thing, take a good warm overcoat or even a lap robe. I understand that there was quite a lot of empty bottles in evidence the next morning.
    Miss Estella Betz and Thomas Lewis motored over to Medford Sunday morning where they were joined by A. L. Smith and wife and took a trip up to Rogue River (town) and had a royal good time.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt reports that Mr. and Mrs. John J. Winningham of Trail have been visited on April 6th by "the stork" and the result is another girl is added to the family.
    Wm. Ewing of Seattle, who is interested in the manganese mining enterprise, was here for dinner Monday and so was D. T. Lawton, the weight and measure tester for this district.
    Ed. Hoyt, our son-in-law, and Loven Miller of Roseburg came in Monday evening, spent the night and the next day, going on to Medford Tuesday evening. They were here interviewing our cattlemen with regard to the cattle market.
    Mrs. Carson of Butte Falls, who has been visiting Mrs. J. B. Jackson and family, returned home Tuesday.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. train were a sister and aunt of Mrs. Chris Natwick but I did not learn their names; they were on the way to visit Mrs. Natwick.
    Tuesday was a busy day at the Sunnyside. Among the callers were Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Graham, who own a farm about five miles northwest of here on the free ferry road. They were on their way to Spokane, Wash., to spend the summer. Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bellows, John Thurm, agent for Valvoline oil, from Portland; A. T. Poole of the Forest Service, Trail; Walter Wood, one of our stockmen; Prof. J. C. Barnard, J. H. Cookson and three strangers who came in, ate their dinner and left as soon as they paid their bill without leaving their names.
    J. C. Findley and son were in town Wednesday morning to get a plow. He is the man who has settled on the old Irvin Dahack place. He intends to put in a crop of corn.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam Folk of Portland have been here visiting her grandparents, M. S. Wood and Susan Hart. They were going to Gold Hill to visit her father, Thomas Henderson.
    Mesdames John F. Boltz and Fred Frey came in from Medford Wednesday morning and took the E.P.-L.C. auto stage for Lake Creek. Mrs. Boltz is of Medford and is spending a while visiting relatives in the L.C. country.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Miller also came in from the Weed lumber camp and took the E.P.-Persist stage for Trail.
    Mrs. Giles S. Gitzen, nee Bermuda Lewis, is here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis. Mr. and Mrs. Gitzen were married last summer and went direct to Indianapolis, Ind. Mrs. G. was born and raised here and she says that she has all of that cold country that she wants, that there is no place like Eagle Point. Her husband has gone on up to Portland, where they intend to locate.
    Ed Gore and Mr. C. M. Speck motored out from Medford Wednesday morning; they were inquiring for sheep and hogs.
    W. C. Daley, pioneer of the Upper Butte Creek country, passed through here on his way home from Medford where he had been having dental work done.
    Mrs. Howlett returned from an extended visit to Portland, Oregon City and Damascus Wednesday evening.
    Rev. F. L. Hornshuh and a company of five others motored into town, saw some of the trustees of the Baptist church and made arrangements to conduct services this Wednesday evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 12, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Ed. Cowden and daughter went up to Butte Falls Thursday. Mrs. Leroy Smith and Mrs. Chartraw were also passengers, the first named to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, and Mrs. C. to her home near Derby.
    John Edington, foreman at the A. Corbin orchard, was in town Thursday morning to take out a new tractor plow to try in the orchard. He has tried one of the tractors with two twelve-inch plows and found that the work was too hard. The ground is black, deep sticky set in clover and alfalfa, and has been pastured off with hogs for two to three years and is completely packed. But he thinks that one plow will do the work all right.
    Rudolph Pech, William Hoeft, Henry Toun and C. A. Newstrom of L.C. were doing business in our town Thursday. And so was Miss Sarah Singleton, who is living on a farm west of Eagle Point. Miss Ruby Haley was also here on business.
    I should have mentioned in the first of this article that Rev. F. L. Hornshuh and his company consisting of Mrs. Hornshuh, J. J. Gard, Lawrence Grace, Nettie Dow and Marie Shelby held services in the Baptist church on Wednesday evening. Before commencing the services they toured the town in their Ford, giving a short concert with instrumental and vocal music, and made the announcement that there would be services, etc., also just as school was being dismissed they stopped in front of the school house and sang and played, and gave out to the children copies of The Apostolic Faith, and by that means secured quite an attendance. As they were a new sect in these parts, there was quite a number turned out, some through curiosity and many went on account of the singing and music, which were fine, while others went because they wished to enjoy religious services. About eight o'clock they began by singing, with instrumental music, and after singing several lively songs they had an "experience season," when each one of the six related their personal experience, telling what God had done for them in the line of a personal salvation. They then all united in audible prayer, each one praying aloud, then Rev. Hornshuh gave us a short talk on the teaching of Christ, emphasizing the doctrine that we must live above sin in order to escape hell fire. There was considerable criticizing and quite a number seemed to think that he used too strong language, etc., but he gave us something to think about, and we trust that they did some good. They seemed to be very sincere.
    Ed Hoyt, S. C. Miller and his son Loren Miller of Roseburg came in Thursday for dinner. Ed and Loren Miller had been here looking at some cattle and they wanted the opinion of the old gentleman on some points of the deal, so he came down.
    A. A. Lathrop of Medford and Wm. Lewis were also here Thursday for dinner and so were B. H. Horn of Gold Hill, J. B. Leabo of Trail, W. H. Coffey, representing a Portland firm, and whooping it up for Mosier of Portland for governor. David Rummel, from the L.C. mines, was also here for dinner.
    Rev. Brittsan, his son-in-law, Roy Miller, daughter and grandson were here Thursday on their way to Medford. They were brought to town from the Anderson ranch by Rev. B.'s son, V. E. Brittsan. They went to the depot to take the train, but there was a little hindrance on the road, so they hired Mr. Harnish to take them over to the city.
    Benj. Brophy, who has been living in town the past winter, has moved back to the ranch.
    C. W. Scott, the business manager of the L.C. mine, and C. L. Stone came out with a tractor and one trailer bringing 3000 pounds of manganese, and Mr. Stone said that a part of the time the hind end of the trailer was dragging in the mud. They loaded up with sacks and gasoline that afternoon and Mr. Stone spent the night with us, but a rig came out for Mr. Scott, so he went home that night.
    Mrs. Royal G. Brown, wife of one of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons, has taken a trip to Vancouver, B.C., to visit her aunt, Mrs. Lottie Brown.
    W. E. Hammel went to Medford Friday and brought out his car that he had in the repair shop.
    The school board met Thursday evening and among other things, employed Miss Elizabeth Blackford to take charge of the intermediate department of our school.
    Tharon (Zack) Taylor and Carlyle Natwick spent Friday night at the Sunnyside.
    Friday was a remarkably quiet day in our town; perhaps one reason was that we had a very stormy day, at least the latter part of the day, but in the evening it partly cleared off and we had a good time for the lecture by W. L. Mellinger on Mexico. There was a good attendance. The proposition was to give one-half of the net receipts to the Junior Red Cross Society, the receipts being $24.75. Mr. Mellinger is a fine lecturer, has a good voice and fine delivery, and while he dug up some of the things in the history of the dealings of the United States with Mexico along in the days of slavery when the plot was laid to grab the state of Texas, so as to make more slave territory, etc., he related nothing but the plain facts in the case, but some of his hearers could smell "German propaganda" in his talk, but if the lecture had been given at any time besides during our present trouble with Germany, it would have been pronounced first-class. His slide views were very good, and well explained. He held his audience for over an hour and a half, and the most of them seemed sorry to have him stop so soon.
    Saturday morning our P.&E. train looked quite dignified. There were several flat cars for wood and logs, two box cars and two passenger cars--a special, as there was a delegation of school teachers, all male, came to Butte Falls to hold a school teachers' club, and the arrangement was for the railroad officials to hold the train in Butte Falls until 3 o'clock p.m., so as to give them time to get through with their work. Among the passengers were Lincoln Savage of Grants Pass, J. S. Levan, G. W. Godward, H. H. Mathews, S. L. Spencer, R. E. Morris and G. W. Ager. Beside these, there were S. S. Bullis, O. Adams, D. Swihart, besides several others whose names I cannot recall.
    John Simon went to Medford and Jacksonville on business Saturday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 15, 1918, page 3


Trail Items
    Clara Skyrman returned home Sunday from Central Point, where she has been visiting friends and relatives the past week.
    Mrs. Charles Blass returned to her home at the hatchery Sunday after a few weeks in Medford.
    T. C. Gaines is hauling grain from the valley.
    Mrs. Boyd Tucker and little son, Wilbur, left Thursday for Weed, Cal., where her husband is working.
    Miss Dorothy Palmer of Medford is visiting with her sister, Mrs. L. B. Pierce, at Trail.
    W. McDonald motored to the Rogue Elk Resort Sunday.
    Mrs. Palmer left for her home in Medford Sunday, after spending a couple of weeks with her daughter, Mrs. L. B. Pierce, at Trail.
    R. R. Dawson and W. Cushman are working on the road for D. Pence.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 17, 1918, page 5


REE E CREEK RIPLETS
    Miss K. Mayes closed a successful eight months' term of school Monday of this week. At noon the teacher and pupils, with some of the patrons, enjoyed a picnic dinner, after which Mr. Bellows took the fifteen pupils all in his car at one time for a short joy ride. The directors have engaged Miss Mayes for the next winter term of school. She was packed ready to go on the train when one of the directors of Debenger Gap came over and employed her to finish out the school year at that place, their teacher having enlisted for service in the government. He was called east the first of the week, leaving about nine weeks of school yet to be taught. The pupils who went with their teacher from Reese Creek to Debenger Gap to attend school are: May French, Myrtle Minter, Paul Robertson, Millard Robertson and Cora French.
    Wayman Bergman is in Irving, having failed to pass the government examination.
    Tom Vestal is visiting his father's brother and wife in Mosier, Or.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel, Miss Diehless Minter, also H. Watkins were in Medford Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bellows were in Medford Wednesday.
    Our artistic painter, Sam Courtney, is now in Butte Falls, where he is painting a house both inside and out, for Mr. Barker.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 19, 1918, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Van Hardenburg and Mrs. J. H. Carlton of Wellen were here Saturday evening trading with our merchants.
    On Sunday morning our Medford postmaster, George P. Mims, Mrs. Frank McKee, Miss Ruth Hamilton and Miss Blanche McKee of Medford drove out to the Sunnyside to have a visit, take dinner and meet your Eagle Point correspondent, and as Mr. Mims is the postmaster in Medford and knowing that we have no mail out here on Sunday, was thoughtful enough to bring out the morning Sun and the latest Oregon Journal so as to partly relieve our minds on the all-absorbing subject of the great battle that is now raging in Europe, and we all highly appreciated the favor. Go thou and do likewise! Beside Mr. Mims and his company, we also had that day Mrs. J. H: Trusty and her son, Henry. Mrs. Trusty spent the night with us and the next day took the stage for her home on Elk Creek; Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, her daughter Miss Joyce and son Hugo; Orville Childreth and Miss Zula Geppert, Will Haselton, Miss Ethel Riley, Jay Pitzer, Miss Margaret Riley, George Lewis, Miss Estella Betz and Joe Moomaw.
    Wm. von der Hellen went up to his manganese mine Sunday.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our big orchardists, was doing business Monday and so was J. P. McCabe, another one of our orchardists, Charles Clark, who is working on the Alta Vista orchard, and wife were in town Monday. Sam Coy, another one of our hustlers, was here Monday.
    When the train pulled in Tuesday morning there was quite a number of strange-looking men on board bound for Butte Falls to enter the lumber camp; in fact, there is quite a lot of people on the different roads, some going to Butte Falls and some to the Lake Creek mines, some to the Applegate logging camp, while others are simply going to see what they can find. Among the passengers that I knew were Mr. Trowbridge of Medford and S. S. Bullis, who were on their way to the big timber.
    George W. Frey, Sr. and one of his sons called for dinner Tuesday.
    Mrs. D. M. McDaniel, who, with her husband, are living on the Fred Pelouze place, took the P.&E. car for Medford Tuesday evening, and so did T. C. Berry of Ashland.
    Mrs. M. L. Pruett, widow of the late Charles Pruett, called on your correspondent and agent Tuesday evening and gave him a notice to be published in the Mail Tribune, inviting those interested in beautifying the Central Point cemetery to meet at that place on Saturday, the 20th inst., to help do the work. See ad.
    Tuesday evening F. L. Putnam and W. C. Bibby of Ashland and George Lamb stopped with us on their way to the Applegate logging camp, with their teams. They had been employed to get saw logs to the railroad track for the Medford mill. The demand for men to work in the various industries is such that I learned that Thomas Stanley, who has charge of the making of the new road between here and the Lake Creek mine, cannot get the men to do the work, work that is greatly needed, for upon that depends to a large extent the success of the manganese mines that are so promising, and it has been suggested that the Tacoma Metal Co. will have to shut down their mining for a while and put the force they have on the road before they can haul the ore out. I understand that they have now quite a force of men and they are adding to the number daily.
    R. E. Morris, the school supervisor, visited our school Wednesday forenoon, took dinner at the Sunnyside, and in the afternoon visited the Long Mountain school. Miss Benedict also took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Pina Benedict, our primary teacher, moved out of the Charley Bacon house into the one formerly occupied by N. W. Slusser, our barber. She says that she wants to get on a place where she can raise a garden. She is a Hooverizer.
    John Simon has taken a room at the Sunnyside, and Amos Ayres, our depot agent, is taking his meals at that hotel during his wife's stay in Medford. She is getting along nicely, was taken out of the hospital Tuesday evening and expects to be home in a few days.
    News items and money appear to be very scarce.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 22, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. C. Dunn and wife and W. R. Black and wife of Medford called at the Sunnyside Wednesday for dinner.
    Wm. Stallings of Hornbrook, who had been up to the L.C.  mine, came out on the E.P.-L.C. stage Wednesday and went to Medford, purchased an outfit for sleeping, returned the next morning and returned to the mine.
    J. R. Robertson and Wig Jacks were business callers Wednesday.
    Miss Laura Gates of Medford has been visiting Miss Hazel Brown of this place.
    Ray Harnish of Climax came out on business with his father, S. H. Harnish, Wednesday.
    L. R. Cook of Butte Falls went up home Thursday morning on the P.&E.
    W. B. Chance, state deputy Labor Commissioner and factory inspector, was a passenger on the P.&E. on his way up to Butte Falls to inspect the machinery in the mills in that section last Thursday.
    Miss Nettie Grover and Mrs. Etta Florey came in from Medford on Thursday morning, where they had been to attend the W.C.T.U. county institute, and report having had a very interesting and profitable meeting.
    Rev. Brittsan of Ashland and his nephew came out on the P.&E. Thursday; Mr. Ward of Rancheria and David Rummel also was a passenger. He was going up to his ranch on Trail Creek.
    Nimrod Charley of Climax was shaking hands with some of his old-time friends about the middle of the week.
    L. C. Charley of Brownsboro and son, John Singleton and J. A. Howard were business callers in our town Friday.
    W. C. Fruit of the Blue Ledge mining district went up to the Round Top country Thursday and spent the day prospecting for manganese, returning in time to catch the P.&E. motor. He did not discover anything of consequence.
    Carl Gross and his brother, William, and Emil Pekurl, three Poland Russians, came out on the E.P.-L.C. stage Thursday morning, procured an auto and went up to Medford to look at some railroad land for homesteads, returning to the Sunnyside about 9 o'clock p.m. for supper and bed, and about the same time Corbett Smith of Butte Falls came in, and he also wanted supper and bed. He had just come out with Dr. Holt in his car, and Friday morning they all four went to Medford in Lewis' jitney. The three Russians had come recently from Michigan to Portland.
    Friday about noon there was a message came over the phone asking Mrs. Howlett if she could serve dinner for five men about 2 p.m., as they could not get here sooner, as they were weighing cattle at the von der Hellen ranch and could not get there sooner, and of course the answer returned was yes. So about that time Carl von der Hellen, John McPherson, Shorty Allen, John Mayham and Ed Dutton came in, and of all the excited men you ever saw Carl was the limit. He had hardly got into the house before he began by telling that he had sold 75 head of two-year-old steers to Mr. McPherson at 9½ cents a pound, right off the grass, and that they weigh on an average 948 pounds each; that they was the finest bunch of steers that was ever sold in this county, etc., but when we learned more about the transaction found that they averaged about 350 pounds each, and the price was about one-half what was stated. But Carl was most wonderfully excited, and if we did not know him so well we might think that he had been over to the Shasta Soda Springs.
    C. E. Stone and H. A. Sherman came out Friday afternoon from the L.C. mine with a load of 5500 pounds of manganese ore with their tractor engine and a wagon trailer. They spent the night at the S.S. and report that everything is prospering nicely, but that the roads are still in a very bad condition and are bound to be for some time, as they are not properly drained, and in some places are just as nature made them.
    Pearl Stowell, wife and mother have moved into the Norman McQuoid house in town.
    Mrs. John Rader and her son-in-law, Harvey Stanley, came over to town Friday in their automobile, the first time they have been able to bring it out this spring, on account of the mud, not on the county road, but between the road and their house. While here Mr. Stanley asked me if their sub. to the D.M.T. was not due, and being informed that it would be out the 27th of April, remarked that he [might] just as well renew it now, so wrote me a check for $5. There is some business in that. And the same day Miss Estella Betz, one of the P.O. clerks, called me and said that Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy wished to see me, so going into the phone office, she wanted to renew her sub. to the D.M.T., which she did.
    H. A. Sonne of Baker, Or., was a lodger here Friday night and took the Lewis jitney for Medford Sat. morning.
    C. E. Bellows and John Joy, who is living on the Graham place, came out Saturday morning in Mr. Bellows' auto, he bringing in his cream for shipment to Medford.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Saturday morning was Mrs. Mary Clevenger, Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Hildreth, H. D. Mills, wife and two children, and Mr. Mills' mother from Michigan, Mr. and Mrs. Amos Ayres. Mrs. Ayres was just returning home from Medford. She had been operated on by Dr. Holt for appendicitis. She has surely got along finely after the operation, and her many friends here are rejoicing with her and her husband over her speedy recovery.
    Mrs. Mary Beale and her son, Corbett Smith, of B.F., were also on the train going home.
    Thomas F. Boltz came in to visit his family Friday from his business home in Montana.
    G. N. Barklund, one of our hardware salesmen; J. W. Pomeroy, Wm. Ewing and J. D. Seack, the last three from the L.C. mine, were guests of the S.S. Saturday noon
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1918, page 5


Trail Items
    Miss Flossie Tucker is staying with Mrs. R. R. Dawson until school is out.
    Mrs. Wallace Cushing left Sunday to cook for the men working on the road near Dr. Kirchgessner's.
    Miss Dorothy Palmer returned to her home in Medford after spending a week at Trail.
    D. Olson was a Sunday caller at Trail.
    John Winningham and J. E. McDonald are working the road between Trail and Persist.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. Sturgis motored to Trail Sunday and spent the day with Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ash.
    R. Thomason and E. E. Ash are working their cinnabar mine near Trail.
    Mrs. A. Poole of Drew is visiting friends near Trail for a few days.
    Miss Ide Cushman returned to her home on Trail, after a few weeks in Gold Hill.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 24, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Robert R. Minter and daughter, Miss Diehless, Misses Margaret: and Ethel Riley, James Johnson and wife, Miss Minnie Given, Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Watkins and Charles Clark were among the business callers Saturday afternoon.
    Sunday was another one of these delightful days that tempts the pleasure lover to make a move for a change in the location and try new fields for enjoyment, and so it was with a large number of people in Rogue River Valley, for a little after sunrise the autos were buzzing through our quiet little village, some going one way and some another, according to the particular tastes. Some were headed for the fishing grounds on Rogue River and some for Butte Creek above and below our town, while others were out for a little recreation and a good dinner, some taking it along the banks of the streams and some going to the hotels. Among those who patronized the Sunnyside were Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Wagner, Masters Paul, Lawrence and Wilfred Wagner, Mrs. L. N. Lease, Mr. and Mrs. G. S. Butler, all of Ashland; Mr. George T. Mims, the Medford postmaster, Mrs. Frances McKee, Miss Ruth Hamilton, Miss Blanch McKee and Miss Jeannette Richardson of Medford: Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Foster, Mr. Day Foster, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Wissing and Carl Wissing of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Reter of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. E. V. Carter, Mrs. A. H. Pracht, Mrs. Ella B. Mills of Ashland, S. C. Roseburg, T. F. Boltz and wife, Miss Mary and Master Tom, William von der Hellen, wife and son and daughter; Mr. Cross of Butte Falls, beside a dozen or more of the young folks who come to the S.S. almost every Sunday for lunch or supper.
    Monday morning Mrs. Dan Gray of Fort Klamath and Rube Johnson came in and took the Lewis jitney for Medford. Mrs. Gray was on her way to her home; she came in to attend the funeral of her sister-in-law, Mr. Margaret Wooley, but did not reach here in time. John Allen, one of the Derby stockmen, and Ed Higinbotham, another Derby stockman, came in Monday on business, Mr. H. going on to Medford in his car.
    I should have mentioned that the citizens in the vicinity of the Antelope school house gave a dance last Saturday night for the benefit of the Red Cross Society and the report comes that they had a large attendance and of course a fine time. They always have a nice time at these country gatherings. They charged $1 admission and put the money into W.S.S. They also served sandwiches and cake and these were donated and the receipts applied toward the Red Cross fund. There were also two nice large cakes raffled off and these fell to Randolph Wiesman and Rob Harnish. The net proceeds amounted to over $50. These littles all go to help meet the demands on the government to keep up the expenses of the war, and it seems that the longer it lasts the more determined we are to win out and crush Prussianism.
    Monday was quite a lively day in our little town, and among others who were here were C. A. Pickle, D. A. Donar, J. J. Skinner, Sam Jones and F. F. Loder. They were a company who came out from Medford to rearrange the substation (electric plant) here. They came out with Mr. B. E. Haney and all came to the S.S. for dinner. Mr. McGuirk, the cigar manufacturer of Medford, and J. H. Carlton were also diners at the S.S. Monday.
    About 4 o'clock Monday afternoon there was an auto loaded with the following young folks: Eva Collins, Eva Nealon, Myrtle Bycum, Floyd Nordwick and Mary Collins, all from Table Rock, stopped in front of the post office door and they commenced to canvass the town for W.S.S. They said that there was a contest between the Table Rock school and the Agate school to see which could raise the most money for the benefit of the soldier boys. After they had tried almost everyone in town they realized that we have some workers here, but they are entitled to much credit for their nerve and pluck and we wish them abundant success in their laudable undertaking. They said that they were to give a Red Cross dance in Colonel Washburn's packing house, Table Rock, Friday night and make a charge of $1, the proceeds to be given to the party in W.S.S. so that all that they will be out they will have refunded with interest.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Kerby of Ashland were here for supper the same evening.
    L. S. Frence of Portland and John O'Harry of Seattle and O. M. Goss and William Cross of Butte Falls and S. S. Bullis of Medford were passengers on the P.&E. Tuesday.
    J. C. Pomeroy, William Ewing and wife and J. H. Harding were here Tuesday for dinner. Mr. Armstrong is an expert in mineralogy and the company he represents are going to work right away to put up another manganese mill. This one is to be put on Mrs. Ragsdale's place. Mr. Ewing, who is interested with Mr. Pomeroy in the mine, said that they were going to put up a sawmill of their own soon on the Harding place to cut their own lumber to make the manganese mill, so that they will not be annoyed getting lumber as these others have been.
    Wednesday morning Mr. J. W. Miller and Mr. V. A. Heffner, superintendent of the Elk [Creek] hatchery, came out on the P. & E. and went on up home on the E. P. Ferris stage.
    T. B. Denson was also among the passengers on the P.&E. and E.P.T. stage.
    Fred Pelouze and wife passed through here Wednesday morning for Medford.
    The Snowy Butte Mills of Eagle Point are at this writing receiving a quantity of wheat, I understand, from Sams Valley.
    Miss Estella Betz, one of the post office girls, as well as one of the phone girls, has been saving up her money and has invested it in Liberty bonds. She has an eye to business as well as being interested in the welfare of our boys in the army.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Ashpole of Medford were visiting his brother Roy, one of our hardware merchants, Wednesday.
    Since my last report F. J. Ayres has renewed his sub to the D.M.T.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 25, 1918, page 5


ROBERT PELOUZE SERIOUSLY ILL
    The many friends of Robert Pelouze and his family throughout the city and county were shocked at the news received yesterday afternoon that the popular young soldier was critically ill with spinal meningitis at the Leatherman General Hospital, the military hospital at the Presidio in San Francisco. He was stricken with the dread disease yesterday and the first known of it was when his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze, received a telegram from the hospital authorities yesterday afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze, almost frantic with anxiety, left late last night for San Francisco. No word was received in the city today up to the hour of going to press of Robert's condition.
    For the past month or more Robert had been finishing his preliminary aviation course in the training school at Berkeley, and he was to have been graduated from the school May 4.
    Shortly after his return from France, where he served in the Leland Stanford University unit of the American Ambulance Service, Robert enlisted in the aviation service at San Francisco and came home on a visit while awaiting orders to report and take the flying course. These orders came about a month ago. He is about 20 years old.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1918, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our sheriff, Ralph Jennings, was out Wednesday afternoon on official business.
    Our son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, who have been spending the winter in Roseburg, and have been spending a few days with us, started for Fort Klamath Thursday morning. They are traveling in their own automobile.
    Mr. Carson of Butte Falls was a passenger on the P.&E. Thursday and on the train was quite a lot of machinery for the Butte Falls Lumber Company. There were also four fish screens unloaded off of the train here to be used in the irrigating ditches in this section.
    Mrs. L. H. Wyant and son, Mr. and Mrs. Settles of Ashland, and Mr. Frank Smith were among the diners at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    The Antelope school district presented, through Mrs. R. A. Weideman, the district clerk, to the Eagle Point Junior Red Cross social $25.26 cents received from the patrons of the dance given at the Antelope school house on Saturday evening, April 20.
    Rev. F. L. Hornshuh and his assistants will conduct services in the Baptist church in Eagle Point on Wednesday evening, May 1st at 8 p.m. They are the same company who conducted services here on Wednesday, the 10th of April, and serenaded the town.
    Mrs. W. G. McDonald, hostess of the Rogue Elk resort, came out on the E.P. tourist stage Thursday and took passage for Medford on the P.&E. evening train. She was one of the diners at the Sunnyside, and so were Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Schurck, Mr. and Mrs. Chester Fitch, Dr. Henry Fitch of Utica, N.Y., Miss J. C. Fitch, also of Utica, N.Y., Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Elleste of Central Point.
    Mr. Charles Wounal of Derby, who has been engaged in the timber by the Butte Falls Lumber Company, cut his foot quite badly and came out Thursday and took a room at the Sunnyside so as to be handy to Dr. Holt, our M.D.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Rader were here Thursday visiting his niece and nephew, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants.
    Mr. J. C. Aiken, the superintendent of fish screens in Jackson County, was here Friday. and so was O. C. King and C. E. Polhemus of Chicago. They are both selling the Acme Company's canned meats, the Red Crown.
    Dave Pence, the road supervisor of the Elk Creek district, came out and got a load of material for culverts Friday.
    Mr. J. T. McCabe, one of our hustling farmers and stockmen, brought in two cows and their two litters of pigs Friday, one for Roy Stanley and the other for Carl von der Hellen. Speaking of Carl brings to my mind the mistake I made in my writeup I gave of that deal Carl made with Mr. McPherson. I had Mr. Mc.'s name John, and it should have been Fred.
    Among the passengers on the P.&E. Saturday morning were Miss Margaret McIniston, teacher of the L.C. school, and Miss Blanche Burleson, who has been attending the Phoenix high school and was called home on account of her mother's sickness, who took the E.P.&L.C. stage here for their homes.
    Mr. A. D. Naylor came out from the L.C. mines Saturday morning on the E.P.-L.C. stage and went to B. F. on the P.&E. to work for the B.F.L.C. for a short time putting in new machinery, and Miss Winifred Haak, one of our high school girls, also took passage on the P.&E. for Derby, where she will visit Miss Alta Allen until Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper B. Hanna and their two daughters, Misses Dessie and Velma, and Terry Foster, who live on the stage road from here to Trail, drove in Saturday morning in their car to have their plows sharpened and patronize our merchants.
    William von der Hellen and Mr. H. M. Park of the state bureau of mines, Portland, Mr. T. Tarbell of Elk Creek, Fred McPherson, wife and two sons and Mr. G. W. Baker of Butte Falls, the banker, were our guests for dinner Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 29, 1918, page 5


Reese Creek Riplets
    W. E. Hammel has purchased a couple of thoroughbred Jersey dairy cows, which are beauties.
    H. Watkins has also bought a couple of dairy cows.
    Miss Mayes and Miss Myrtle Minter walked to Mr. Minter's from Debenger Gap last Friday after school.
    Miss MacDougal closed an eight months' term of school at Laurel Hill Monday with a picnic dinner.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney returned Saturday from Butte Falls, where she had been visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank Caster; also her husband, who has a painting contract at that place.
    Frank Caster, who broke his arm some time ago, while cranking his car, is getting along very nicely. They spent the weekend at Mr. Hammel's.
    Mr. Freeman, of Wiley, Freeman & Co., of Central Point, was in the Reese Creek neighborhood Sunday, looking for some colts that had strayed away.
    Mrs. Lizzie Jacks is in Central Point visiting her husband's mother, Mrs. Minnick.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 1, 1918, page 4


Trail Items
    Harry Skyrman of Central Point spent the weekend with his parents on Trail Creek.
    Geo. Weeks transacted business in Medford this week.
    Miss Minnie Poole visited Lucy and Eula Foeller Sunday.
    Lowell Ash and Oren Adamson killed the first rattlesnake of the season this week.
    Ella Adamson returned home Friday from Medford, where she had been working the past winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis motored to Medford Tuesday.
    Lulu Adamson is on the sick list.
    Cyril Dan of Medford spent a few days last week with friends on Trail Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 1, 1918, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night, April 27, the Red Cross Society of Derby gave a dance in the school house, and I understand that the receipts amounted to in the neighborhood of $75. There were representatives from Butte Falls, Flounce Rock, Prospect, and Eagle Point, and their surrounding communities, and the only trouble seemed to be the room was too small to accommodate all that came. My informant tells me that they had a very fine time, as well as a fine supper, contributed by the ladies of the Red Cross Society.
    Speaking of the Red Cross brings to my mind the report of Mrs. B. A. Weideman, the efficient clerk of the Antelope school district, since she reported the donation of the $25.26 from the Antelope Junior Red Cross social she has made a supplementary report of another donation by the Antelope J.R.C. of $8.20 to the E.P.J.R.C. and requests the Medford Mail Tribune to publicly tender thanks for the same.
    Fred Peterson of Baker, Ore., came in and spent Saturday and Sunday nights at the Sunnyside. He came to visit Mr. Chris Beale of Central Point.
    Rev. Dunlap, who has charge of the Baptist chapel car, will commence a series of meetings in the Baptist church here on Friday, May 3, 8 o'clock p.m.
    On May 12 there will be Mother's Day exercises in connection with the Christian Endeavor Society 8 p.m. and at the school house on May 10, 2:30 p.m. Everyone invited to attend.
    The following persons were guests of the Sunnyside for dinner on Sunday. April 28: Mr. and Mrs. Verne Luce, Mr. and Mrs. B. E. Haney and her mother, Grandma Schmidt, Miss Margaret Haney, Miss Ruth Bullock and Miss Rose Bullock, Mr. and Mrs. Asahel Hubbard and son Chester, Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Brown and Nealon Brown, P. J. Neff of Medford, J. V. McIntyre and family, William von der Hellen and family, George Lewis of E.P. and later in the day, Charles Bacon and family, Mr. B. is the accommodating conductor on the P.&E. He has treated himself to an auto, not a Ford, and used that to come out and visit Mrs. H. and family. He was accompanied by his sister-in-law, Miss Mida McIntosh. Joe Moomaw, Will and George Lewis were here for supper.
    Sunday morning Thomas Lewis took his mother, grandmother, Mrs. Heckathorn, and Miss Estella Betz and visited his aunt, Mrs. Magerle, on Evans Creek above Rogue River.
    J. C. Mann and M. Purdin came out Monday morning and stopped a few minutes here, just long enough for them to see some of the leading Democrats in town. Mr. P. is one of the candidates for county judge.
    Miss M. D. Wetterer of Jacksonville came out on the P.&E., took the E.P.-L.C. stage for L.C. to visit Miss Margaret McQuiston, who is teaching in that district.
    J. E. Weaver of Talent, special deputy assessor, was here Monday. His duty is to assess the merchants in the county and by that means they, the merchants, will be likely to pay taxes on the amount of goods they have on hand the first of March, as he calls for the inventory and if they object to showing it he has a way to induce them to comply and they generally do so without any trouble. It takes but a short time and by that way of assessing the merchants, it is hard to cover anything up even if they had a disposition to do so, and he thinks that by that means that there will be several thousand dollars of assessable property on the assessor's books that might be overlooked.
    Brandon Bros. have during the latter part of April received about 3,000 bushels of wheat from Sams Valley and are now running the Snowy Butte mills to their full capacity, running night and day to fill a government contract for 70,000 barrels of flour to be delivered May 15.
    Mr. J. M. Shafer of Flounce Rock spent Monday night with us.
    Mr. W. H. Everhard, formerly of Portland, but now of Medford, representing an orchard company selling an appliance to brace fruit tree limbs when they are too much loaded with fruit, was here Monday and went up to the manganese mine on the E.P.-L.C. stage.
    Mrs. William Beale and her son, Corbett Smith, passed through town Monday on their way from Medford to their home near Butte Falls.
    J. H. Carlton of Wellen came in Tuesday morning and brought in Jack Vaughan of Prospect. Mr. Vaughn has been working for Mr. Carlton during the past year, but owing to sickness of Mr. Ditsworth, who is working his farm, had to go home to assist in putting in the spring crop. He went up to Butte Falls on the P.&E., and so did Jerry Palmer. Mr. D. L. Von Needa, Utah, Mr. M. H. Otis and Mr. and Mrs.
Sandoz, merchant of Butte Falls, and family.
    Mr. R. E. B. Avy of Fallon, Nev., was also a passenger on the P.&E. on his way to look over the tract of land owned by the Spencer Bros. There were five or six brothers who took up homesteads on what was known as the unsurveyed, lived on their clearings and proved up, secured a title and now have one of the finest tracts of land in the woods, embracing a large body of the best timber in Southern Oregon. He said that he represented a wealthy syndicate of timber owners.
    A man by the name of Schrader of Climax came in Tuesday for late dinner and reports that the coyotes were very troublesome among his goats.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 3, 1918, page 6


Derby Dribs
    Miss Mary Wilson of Prospect spent several days with Derby friends during the past week.
    Miss Winifred Haak of Eagle Point was the weekend guest of Miss Alta Allen.
    Mr. and Mrs. Reginald Earle of Medford spent Sunday with the latter's mother, Mrs. C. A. Thompson.
    A. B. Chartraw of Gold Hill spent this week at his home in Derby.
    The Red Cross entertainment and dance given under the auspices of the Junior Red Cross of the Derby school Saturday evening were well attended and were complete successes in every way. The net receipts of the evening were a little over $70. After the expenses were deducted the entire remainder was immediately sent in to headquarters. The pupils of the Derby school and their teacher, Miss Gladys Holmes, wish to thank the people of Derby and the whole countryside for their splendid cooperation and help in this undertaking. Never was such a spirit of patriotism manifested as on the night of April 27th.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Kelso, Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Cowden, Mrs. John Higinbotham, Mrs. King, Misses Madeline Silver, Wilma Morris, Hulda Abbott, Bernice Edmondson, Norma Stewart, Millie Patton, Bessie Chambers, Vernon Jones, Ed Chartraw, Marion Hill, Polk Smith, Corbett Smith, Oscar Higinbotham, Bob Coffman, Chester Jones and John Smith were among the Butte Falls residents represented at the Derby schoolhouse Saturday night.
    Miss Ila McIntyre of Edsalls Crossing enjoyed a few days' visit with Derby friends recently.
    Eagle Point was well represented at Derby Saturday night. Among those present from there were Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Jacks, Mr. and Mrs. Bill von der Hellen and children, Mr. and Mrs. Chauncey Florey, Mr. and Mrs. George Cook, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Misses Fay Perry, Stella Betz, Tiny Lewis, Jud Edsall, Guy Pruett, Will Lewis and Joe Moomaw.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1918, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    B. W. Paul of the Paul Electric Store, Medford, and M. H. Nichols of the Western Electric Company, Portland, were out and took supper at the Sunnyside Wednesday evening and also Thursday evening. They are installing electric light plants to be run by gasoline engines and seem to be meeting with considerable success.
    Miss Mae Wilson of Derby came out on the P.&E. and spent the night with her old friend, Mrs. Amos Ayres, wife of our depot agent at this place, and while here visited Charles Wornall of Derby who is stopping at the Sunnyside, under the care of Dr. Holt, nursing a cut foot.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey took passage on the P.&E. Thursday for Prospect to visit her mother, sister and family. They have measles in the family and she has gone up to assist in caring for them.
    Rev. F. L. Hornshuh and four of his associates came out and conducted religious services Wednesday night. They had a very good congregation, about 60, and they seemed to be very much interested. Rev. H. preached a very good, plain, old-fashioned sermon, something out of the ordinary. He insists on people living better lives, studying their Bibles more and taking Christ as their partner instead of drifting in the old ecclesiastical ruts.
    Rev. Driver, who has charge of the Baptist Publication Society's chapel car, came in Friday morning. He and his wife have a special car, so arranged that they live in the car and when they visit a community where they have no church they can hold services in the car. They arrived Thursday and commenced the meeting on Friday, I suppose, for I left home on Friday afternoon and am now writing at the home of my old friend, Rev. M. C. Davis of Wolf Creek.
    Prof. N. L. Narregan of Medford, the truant officer for Jackson County, was out on official business Thursday.
    Mrs. A. V. Heffner, wife of the superintendent of the Elk Creek fish hatchery, who has been in one of the hospitals of Medford for some time, came out Thursday and expected her husband to meet her and take her home. She was feeling fine when I saw her on the way to the hotel.
    C. S. Webster, who is working in the interest of the Standard Oil Co., was at the S.S. for dinner Friday.
    John Singleton, one of our progressive farmers, was doing business in Medford Friday and so was B. F. Fuller, one of our farmers of Eagle Point, and Mrs. R. A. Tucker of Brownsboro was also transacting business in Medford. W. H. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons of E.P. made a flying trip to Medford and back Friday. George Nichols Jr. of Medford who had been up Little Butte Creek on business came through E.P. Friday afternoon and I had the pleasure of his company in his auto between E.P. and Medford. We had a fine ride and a very pleasant time on the road. After arriving in Medford the first thing I did was to go to the Mail Tribune office and transact a little business, then went to the Hotel Holland and secured a room for the night and then started out to take in the city, for I go to Medford so seldom that I have to be shown some of the changes being made and had not gone far before I met that jovial Republican candidate for the nomination for sheriff of Jackson County [A. W. Walker] and he invited me to go over and take a look at his new quarters for he was fixing up a fine commodious garage at 125 West Main and was decorating the main room for an opening dance that night and gave me a special invitation to attend but I told him that was rather out of my line as I did not dance. I might have gone and seen how nicely he had his new quarters fixed up but before the time for the dancers to begin I was so tired I went to my room and after reading the D.M.T. through went to bed and had a good night's sleep. The next morning at 7 o'clock started out to find something to eat and went to three eating houses and found no one around--they must be doing business in the morning by the old time--and finally I asked a stranger if he could tell me where I could get my breakfast and be told me to go around the corner a short distance and I would find a cafe that kept open all night. After eating a hearty breakfast I went to the S.P. depot and at 8:02 started for this place, was met by Brother Davis with his Maxwell and taken to his home. More anon.
Wolf Creek, 5-4-18.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 7, 1918, page 5


Trail Items
    Mr. Verbick, Mrs. W. P. Morgan and Mrs. Rena Avery were Sunday callers at the fish hatchery.
    Mrs. L. B. Pierce, teacher at Trail, came down with the measles Saturday, so there will be no school this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Earl Hayes of Eagle Point spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Howe.
    Howard Ash left Friday for Kennett, Calif., where he intends to work for a few months.
    Miss Lulu Adamson has recovered sufficiently to resume her work again.
    We can hear wedding bells ringing faintly.
    Mrs. Rena Avery and little son Ernest spent Friday with Mrs. Middlebusher.
    Dolph Olson drove his sheep home from the valley this week, where he had them all winter and spring.
    Mrs. E. P. Miller left for California Saturday after a few weeks at her home on Trail Creek.
    Mrs. E. A. Ash spent Monday with Mrs. J. I. McDonald at the Rogue Elk Resort.
    R. R. Dawson spent the weekend at his home near Trail.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 8, 1918, page 4