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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1914-1916

News from Eagle Point, Oregon and the Upper Rogue, mostly from the pen of A. C. Howlett. Transcribed by Dale Greenley and Connie Bissell.
   

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ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Sadie Chambers of Jacksonville is spending the holidays with her daughter, Mrs. Hiram Webb of Derby.
    Mr. Wyant and son James of Talent spent last week with his daughter, Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    Norman Gage went to Central Point Monday.
    John Foster has returned to Eagle Point after working the last year and a half at Chiloquin. He was the guest of his sister, Mrs. Henry French, last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. James Cornutt were Christmas visitors at the W. Houston home.
    Those who attended the dances at the Bellows' hall Christmas Eve report a good time.
    Verna Matthews and Miss Nora Winkle were married the 23rd of December. They have lived near Eagle Point all of their lives. We wish them a long happy married life.
    Miss Howe had a nice Christmas tree and fine program at the Ash hall, Trail, Christmas Eve. This was followed by a dance, and a large, jolly crowd was present.
    Milton and Miss Eula Houston met Tuesday's train to meet relatives who came to spend Christmas with them.
    Miss Clara Skyrman and pupils and parents met at Mrs. Daw's and had a nice little Christmas tree and a good time.
    Miss Ida Houston has returned home from Medford.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno is home from a visit to her brother, Walter, at Irving, Oregon.
    Will Lewis returned to Eagle Point Christmas.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pence and son Herman spent Christmas with relatives at Central Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There has been quite a stir in our usually quiet little village since I last wrote. In the first place, there was a shooting match for turkeys and chickens, and that attracted quite a crowd, and the Nimrods of our town and vicinity had considerable sport, and the lucky ones carried off the prizes in the shape of nice fat chickens and turkeys and then the young folks, and some of the old folks as well, had a nice New Year's dance and a lunch served at the Tavern, although quite a number came over to the Sunnyside and ate a regular supper. Mrs. Howlett had set the table for breakfast and left quite a lot of edibles on the table, and some of the young folks in the bunch knew where the edibles were, so looked around and helped themselves. They said that they had a good time and of course plenty to eat.
    The gaieties of the occasion were somewhat interfered with by the sudden death of our nearest neighbor, John Watkins. He had been troubled with asthma for some time and was taken Thursday afternoon and died about 8 o'clock that evening.
    Died--December 31, at the family residence in Eagle Point, Or., John Watkins, aged 71 years, 5 months and 7 days. Mr. Watkins was born in Athens, O., September 24, 1842. He leaves a wife and four daughters, viz.: Mrs. Adda Guches of Medford, Mrs. Allie Phillips of Eagle Point, Mrs. Dora Phillips and Miss Anna Watkins, and one brother, James Watkins; five sisters, Mrs. Nora Reed of Missouri; Elizabeth Gray, Klamath County; Tabitha Tungate, Jacksonville; Mrs. Margaret Wooley and Mrs. Lottie Ayres of Eagle Point, and eleven grandchildren. Mr. Watkins has been a citizen of Jackson County for a number of years and a resident of Eagle Point for the past eight or ten years. He was appointed justice of the peace under Judge Neil's administration, and at the next election to the same office, which office he filled at the time of his death.
    The funeral services will be conducted Friday morning at the family residence by Dr. W. W. P. Holt and at the grave by the Grand Army of the Republic post of Central Point, he being a member of that post.
    Tuesday evening John, Bert and Eddie Higinbotham came out with twenty-seven head of fine beef cattle for the Medford market and stopped overnight with us, going on to Medford on Wednesday, returning to the Sunnyside the same night, and while here Bert told us of his experience with two young panthers. He said that he was out riding after his stock and had a shepherd pup with him, and he heard the pup while and soon heard it cry as if in trouble, so riding in he found that there were two young panthers had tackled him, so as quick as thought he rode into the bunch and knocked one of them loose from the pup, and it ran up a tree, and the dog finally killed the other, and there he was with a panther treed and no gun, and it three miles to the nearest house where he could get a gun, so he pulled off his coat, put it on a pole and placed it on the side of the tree and started post haste for a gun, reaching Mr. Hollenbeak, found that he had only a 20-20, and only two loads for it, but he started for his panther and found him where he had left him up the tree, and with one shot brought him to the ground. About this time he began to think that probably the old mother panther might be close around, so he started on a hunt for dogs that would track her up, and finally after two days Lucius Kincaid managed to kill her about a mile from where Bert had killed the two young ones.
    Mr. McDonald of Trail, one of the brothers who brought out the Johnson brothers, called for the night Tuesday, and Wednesday took the train for Medford. And the same evening Miss Elsie Wright, the primary teacher in the Butte Falls school, came out on business and remained with us until Thursday morning, taking the train for home. But I see that I am getting my letter too long again, so will stop here.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 2, 1914, page 4


OBITUARY.
    Oregon loses another of its pioneers with the death of Mrs. Martha M. Brown at Brownsboro.
    Mrs. Brown was born at Buffalo, N.Y., June 3, 1839. The family removed to Lake Geneva, Wis., where she was married to Henry R. Brown in 1860. Leaving the comfortable parental home, she and her husband set forth to brave the perils and hardships of pioneer life, crossing the plains in one of those famous trains of "prairie schooners" which brought so many of our forefathers and mothers across the great American desert to the homestead in the wilderness.
    They settled in Brownsboro, a small town which Mr. Brown had previously founded. Here their children were born, three daughters, Mrs. L. C. Charley, Mrs. Mary Terrill, Mrs. Emogene Charley, and one son, George B. Brown, all still living near Brownsboro.
    Mrs. Brown was a woman of sincere Christian belief, whose loving heart always pleaded for peace and fairness; a woman to whom those in trouble instinctively turned for sympathy and advice as one whom they trusted and on whom they depended; a woman of strong character such as Oregon needed in a pioneer mother. She leaves a wide circle of relatives and friends to mourn her loss.
    Mrs. Brown had been ill for several weeks, and on December 23, 1913, she answered the call, and met her savior, face to face.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 6, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I thought that me letter was getting so long that I omitted several things that I had jotted down in my little book and among them was that C. E. Bellows has volunteered to come into the list of readers of the Weekly Mail Tribune so as to keep posted on the general topics of the day. That Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Turpin of Medford came over to Eagle Point to attend the dance of the 31st and were accompanied by the Misses Hattie and Ruth Pearson and while here took rooms at the Sunnyside. Also that Guy Pruett and sister Miss Mabel and Miss Lorena Grigsby of Central Point were among the dancers that night, that Miss Alma Goule, who had been visiting the family of Mr. Henry Meyers of Lake Creek returned on the first and took dinner with us. That Chauncey Florey and family came out from Jacksonville to visit his parents Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey. That on Thursday morning word came over the phone to Mrs. Howlett that there would be a company of twelve came for dinner, and about 12:30 Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and son Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements and nephew and J. B. Jackson and wife came marching into the dining room, blessed with a good appetite and tried to do justice to the dinner.
    Miss Hazel Antle, Miss Esther Warner and Miss Allison O'Brien of Medford were spending a few days in our town the guests of Miss Hazel Brown.
    Rev. Edith Hill Booker, state president of the W.C.T.U. of Oregon is expected to be here to lecture on the subject of statewide prohibition on Monday, January 19. She is said to be one of the best speakers on the Pacific Coast [and] is highly recommended by those who have heard her. Let the advocates of a wet town turn out and hear her.
    Last Saturday the local W.C.T.U. met at their regular time in the church and had a very interesting time and some of the ladies become quite enthusiastic, there were several pieces read, and at the close the ladies gave a lunch of cake and coffee in honor of Mrs. Pointer's and Mrs. Buchanan's birthdays.
    The family of the late John Watkins have in the Daily Mail Tribune a card of thanks to their friends for their kindness, sympathy and liberal donation of flowers on the occasion of the death and interment of their husband and father.
    Sunday morning we had a little excitement in our town. Mrs. Wallace Bergman came in a one-horse buggy and by some means the buggy ran so as to have one of the electric poles stand between the front wheel and the bed of the buggy and in extracting the buggy the horse became frightened and ran the buggy into a fence, jerking off one of the wheels and otherwise doing damage to the buggy, but Mrs. B. came off unhurt.
    L. H. Ossman of Trail and Miss Mabel Goule of Medford came out Sunday and took dinner at the Sunnyside, taking the car for Medford in the afternoon. Our cashier in the Eagle Point State Bank, J. V. McIntyre and family and Carl von der Hellen, also were among the guests for dinner Sunday. F. A. Bellows and son are at present stopping with us. Robbie Pelouze of this place and Earl Hubbard of Medford and Weider Sage were also guests Sunday night.
    Rev. J. Lindblad of Ashland came up and filled the pulpit for Rev. L. L. Simmons during his temporary absence last Sunday.
    A. M. Aleson, representing Brown & Bigelow of St. Paul, Minn., was a caller for dinner the last of the week.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    New Year's evening a crowd surprised Peter Betz and wife and spent the evening in dancing and general good time.
    Miss Howe closed her school in the Trail district Friday. Saturday evening she gave an entertainment at the Ash hall. This was followed by a basket supper and dance.
    John Foster is visiting relatives on Rogue River.
    Mrs. Mary Gage and Bud Johnston are visiting in Medford.
    George Lynch of Elk Creek was a Medford visitor last week.
    The warm days are welcome after the rain of last week.
    Mrs. Grant Mathews and Mrs. Peter Betz spent Saturday night with Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    Santa Claus was a little late reaching the home of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Morgan, but left the gift of a seven-pound boy made up for it.
    A number of the friends of Jasper Hannah and family gathered at their home New Year's Eve, and had a merry time.
    Miss Eula Houston began her second term of school in the Antioch district January 5.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston and Mr. and Mrs. Green went to the valley Monday.
    The Trail Telephone Company held a meeting at Trail December 27. L. J. Mareks was elected president, John Houston vice president and Edwin Peile secretary. Mr. Houston has been the vice president during the six years of the existence of the line.
    Mrs. Mae Daw went to Medford Monday.
    The Rogue River-Eagle Point telephone company held their annual meeting at the home of Eugene Bellows January 3. Dr. Kirchgessner was elected president; Henry French, vice president, and Edward Foster, secretary.
    Perry Foster, Henry French and Eugene Bellows were in Eagle Point Monday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner was called to attend Mrs. Morgan, who was taken seriously ill Monday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. I. Hoefs of Butte Falls was with us a few nights ago. He had been to Medford to join his brother who had been in Alaska for the past fifteen years, and his two sisters who came from Portland, and have not seen each other for the past seven years. They all met with their mother unannounced so far as she was concerned, but it was one of those unexpected occurrences in life that acts as beacon lights along life's rugged pathway, a very happy family reunion.
    Mr. Swihart, the Derby merchant, was among us last Tuesday night and so was Mr. Ash of Trail. He was down after a new supply of goods for his Trail store.
    In my last I unintentionally omitted to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune that Roy Ashpole and his wife had the pleasure of entertaining Mr. and Mrs. John Ashpole, and brother Wilbur, and Mr. and Mrs. John Rader, Mrs. Roy Ashpole's parents, on New Year's day.
    Timmy Duggan was doing business among us Tuesday afternoon.
    Mrs. J. F. Lewis of Wellen and her little son were in our town Tuesday. The little fellow sat in the buggy and held the horse while his mother done the business and while here I naturally asked her about how they were getting along on the farm and she told me that her husband had gone to Portland on business and that she was running the farm; that the silo they had put up this fall had proved a grand success; that they had simply hauled the corn fodder in from the field, cut it up in short bits, etc., and that the stock seemed to relish it and that they ate it all up clean and smooth, thus saving what is generally thrown away, the large stalks, and that the cattle seemed to do better on that kind of feed than they did on the fodder or hay either.
    There is a young bachelor who had a homestead back in the hills that wants me to try to help him get a wife, but I hardly know how to proceed as it has been over fifty years since I tried to get one for myself.
    W. T. Clements and Harry Cogswell of Marion County, Oregon, who have been up near the Soda Springs on the south fork of Butte Creek, came out last Tuesday. They have been trapping and fishing in that section but report that the kind of game that they have been looking for is very scarce as the stockmen have been putting out poison for wolves and by that means have killed off almost all kinds of the fur-bearing animals. They stopped with us until Thursday afternoon and then went to Medford.
    In a letter to my daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, received this Thursday morning, I learned of the death of Mrs. George (Addie) Morine at Klamath Falls on the morning of the 6th inst. The deceased has several relatives in Rogue River Valley and at the time that she lived here in Eagle Point had a host of friends.
    Thomas Stanley of Lake Creek and Mr. W. W. Willits of Persist were among the guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday night and W. C. Bainett of Los Angeles and Fred A. Bellows have been stopping with us for the past few days. Mr. Bellows made a hurried trip to Roseburg, returning Thursday morning.
    I see that my letter is getting rather long but I must ask space for a word about the Bybee bridge. I see in the Mail Tribune of the 7th two very interesting letters, one from Mrs. J. C. Pendleton of Table Rock, and the other from our old friend, J. S. Howard, each protesting against changing the name of the old landmark "Bybee Bridge" to Modoc bridge. As one of the few old pioneers of the country I feel that I have the right to join with the others in objecting to the change. Among the first names I learned when I first came to the valley in 1861 was the name of that noble old man, Bill Bybee, and for the past fifty years have been in the habit of hearing the name associated with the old crossing and now to have to destroy the landmark simply because the land on which the bridge is built belongs to a wealthy lady or syndicate to try to substitute a name that has no endearing thoughts but on the contrary thoughts that cause, to say the least, unpleasant memories to arise in the mind, and another serious objection is that the name is misleading, naming a bridge in commemoration of an event of treachery, bloodshed and deliberate murder, is revolting to the finer feelings of those who love the old landmarks of Rogue River Valley.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune George H. Wamsley and daughter, Miss Mable, have gone to Tucson, Arizona to spend a few months and see the country. They will be greatly missed from our circle as Mr. W. was quite an active member of the I.O.O.F. and Miss Mable was an active worker among the Rebekahs.
    John Gaines of Trail was doing business among us last week.
    J. A. Howard, one of the veterans of the Civil War, was with us from Friday until Monday. He had been to Medford and was on his way to his home on the ferry road.
    Before Mr. Wamsley left he resigned as a member of the town council, and the retiring council elected Art Nichols to fill the vacancy.
    Henry French was a pleasant caller last week and while here renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Last Saturday night a party consisting of Mr. and Mrs. Jacob Jones, Miss Loretta Childreth, Jud Edsall, our daughter Hattie and Mrs Howlett procured a handcar from the P.&E. railroad company and made a visit to the Minter family, who live about four miles from here, to spend the evening and try to encourage Mr. Minter's son Marshall, who had been afflicted with tonsillitis. They report having had a very enjoyable time, returning home about midnight.
    L. H. Ossman and his sister, Miss Effie, came out from their home at the fish hatchery above Trail last week and spent the night at the Sunnyside. They are recent arrivals in this country and are joining with us in telling of our wonderful Oregon climate.
    A. J. Florey, our accommodating postmaster and notary public, is being kept busy registering the voters now so that they can vote at the primary election next May.
    Mr. Carl von der Hellen came over from his farm at Wellen to attend the club dance last Saturday night. His wife, son and Miss Joe Riley came over with him but returned the same afternoon. They all stopped at the Sunnyside.
    Frank Crane of Tillamook has been here for the past few days visiting his uncle M. S. Wood. Speaking about Mr. Wood, he has been reading the Weekly Mail Tribune for several years, but has concluded to change and has discontinued his subscription to the weekly and paid for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    The readers of the Mail Tribune will bear in mind that the noted speaker Rev. Edith Hill Booker will be here to lecture in the church on Monday evening the 19th. She is the state president of the W.C.T.U. and is said to be one of the best speakers in the state.
    Frank Miller, George Barron and Mr. Dickey of Ashland came up Sunday and took dinner with us. Also Charles Bacon, the conductor of the P.&E. railroad and family, J. V. McIntyre and family, Roy Willits and William Perry and wife of Butte Falls.
    Mrs. A. S. Abergast of Trail attended church here last Sunday.
    The following officers were installed in the I.O.O.F. Lodge No. 227 January 3, 1914: N.G., Chas. Bacon; V.G., Thos. M. Riley; W.G., H. Wamsley; C., Roy Ashpole; I.G., James Ringer; O.G., Floyd Pearce; R.S.N.G., George Fisher; L.S.V.G., Nick Young; chaplain, L. L. Simmons; R.S.S., Jud Edsall; L.S.S., Lon Smith.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Mima Hannah is visiting friends in Gold Hill.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tim Daily are spending a fortnight on Upper Trail.
    Harvey Richardson and Mr. Tarbell of Agate were at Trail one night this week.
    Mrs. Woolery of Eagle Point returned home Friday after a pleasant visit with her daughter, Mrs. Grant Mathews.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence and Jasper Hannah were in Medford Thursday.
    T. C. McCabe took Friday's train to visit his daughter, Mrs. N. Garrett of Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tom Raimey and Miss Ora are the guests of Mrs. Jasper Hannah.
    Mr. McCloud and John Grieve passed en route to their homes above Trail Friday.
    Jerry Bellows is visiting his cousins, Edward and Bennie Bellows, this week.
    Rev. Smith of Medford preached to an appreciative audience at the Lone school house on Reese Creek Sunday. He will preach every evening this week.
    Ira Dawson was a business visitor in Medford recently.
    A large crowd of the friends of the Blaesses surprised them Saturday evening and had a merry time dancing.
    Mrs. Henry French and daughters, Misses May and Cora, were the guests of her brother, Ed Foster and family Sunday.
    Alec Vestal spent Saturday night with Lloyd French.
    T. C. Gaines of Trail was in Jacksonville this week.
    Dr. and Mrs. Kirchgessner were in Medford Tuesday.
    Among those in Eagle Point this week were Henry French, Perry Foster, Fred Pettegrew, Harry Howard, Ed Foster, Grant Mathews and Eugene Bellows.
    Mrs. McCabe was the guest of her son Philip at Derby last week.
    Miss Eula Houston spent the weekend at her home on Long Branch.
    Fred Bellows and son Jerry were the guests of his brothers, Herbert and Art, in Roseburg a couple of days last week.
    John Foster called on his friend, Steve Smith of Medford, one day last week.
    There is to be a Sunday school entertainment in the near future at the Lone school house.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    One of our leading business men has suggested to me that it would be a good idea to start the ball in motion to have a cannery established here at Eagle Point as we have some of as fine garden ground in this section as can be found in any other section of the country. We have, so I have been informed, about 1100 acres under an irrigation ditch and that is is all good garden land and almost any kind of vegetables can be raised on it, and it is a notorious fact that there are hundreds of dollars worth of fruit and vegetables that even now go to waste and hundreds of dollars worth of canned goods are bought in other countries and brought here that could be raised here and canned if we just had a way of taking care of what we can raise. For instance the other day one of our merchants and his wife were eating dinner with us and we were eating kraut that we had bought of him and commenting on the quality of it and I asked him where he got it, supposing that he had bought it of some of our farmers and what do you think was my surprise when he told me that he got [it] from Michigan, and our sweet potatoes from California and our spuds from the Willamette Valley, and still we have hundreds of acres of garden land that ought to bring in hundreds of dollars, simply because we have no way of saving what we raise at home.
    James and John Owens of Wellen were here last Tuesday and John was telling about his little boy, about four years old, who had climbed up and taken a can of concentrated lye off of a shelf and in handling it got some of it on his face near one of his eyes and [it] was causing him considerable bother as it had burned the face close to the eye. Dr. Holt was called and prescribed for the burn.
    I came near having to record another fire in our neighborhood. Last Sunday as Rev. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church here and at Brownsboro, was away from home to his appointment at Brownsboro his house caught on fire in the roof, the stove pipe became unjointed near the roof and soon caught the dry wood and had it not been that the scuttle hole had been left open so that his little girls happened to see the fire, and gave the alarm, in a few minutes the house with all of its contents would have been destroyed, but fortunately the little girl gave the alarm and the neighbors soon extinguished the fire. The next day he procured some extra terra cotta and fixed it safe.
    J. H. Mayfield and wife of Siskiyou County, Cal., are here visiting her sister, Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
    N. T. McDonald of Trail and S. J. Wise of Pennsylvania came out from Trail Wednesday, spent the night with us and the next morning started on their journey, Mr. McDonald for Minneapolis and from here to Eastern Canada and Mr. Wise was on his way to his old home. He had been out here visiting friends near Trail.
    Wm. Perry and wife, who have been spending a few days visiting relatives and friends here, spent the night with us last Tuesday and Wednesday.
    Our new council met last Tuesday night and organized by electing John W. Smith as president of the council in the absence of the mayor and Lon Smith as marshal.
    A. R. Chase, one of the rural school supervisors, was a pleasant caller for dinner Thursday. He has been visiting the schools in this section of the county. He brings a favorable report from the schools that he has visited. He is trying to create an interest among the children with regard to raising corn and seems to be greatly encouraged in his work. He takes the place that G. W. Ager filled last year and Mr. Ager is teaching at Talent.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. E. Bellows and his brother Fred were here for dinner Saturday. Mr. Bellows is one of our recent subscribers to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Henry Meyers and wife came out from Lake Creek last Saturday and report that the wind was blowing a gale along the road and Monday Mrs. Mark Garrett and Mrs. George Nichols, Jr., came out and while here reported that they had had a terrible storm up in their section and that the wind blew so hard that it blew one of the doors in Nichols' house right out, breaking both the hinges and forcing its way into the house and that is had blown down quite a quantity of timber and Mr. John Newstrom reports that still higher up the creek, Butte Creek, the wind had partly unroofed several barns and in one instance unroofed a dwelling house about a mile above the Lake Creek post office, and I learned over the phone Monday that it had blown down a new barn that Mr. Simmons had put up this fall. James Owens reports that it had blown down several rods of rail fence for him, but he said that he had no business having a rail fence in this progressive age when wire fence is so much better. It also blew down what had been known as the old Pelling barn in the lower part of town.
    Wm. Taylor, who owns a farm joining town, called on business last Saturday and reported that A. B. Zimmerman had succeeded in killing two coyotes up on the river with his dogs.
    I omitted to report the marriage of Joseph Pool and Miss Bessie Patten in the Catholic church by the Catholic priest of Medford, on the 14th. I did not attend as I was feeling quite unwell with the grippe. The announcement had been made some three weeks before according to the rules of that church and quite a number of the friends attended to witness the ceremony and extend congratulations, and their many friends are wishing them a joyful journey over life's road.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. G. Bishop of the Hollywood orchard were among the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Heath last Saturday night.
    John Rader was among us Saturday and reports that his stock is doing fine; that they are still on the range, but he knows where they all are except two.
    Edward Miller, who has a homestead on Trail Creek, and I. C. Moore of Elk Creek were passengers on the Persist stage Monday morning.
    Our electric meter man was out Monday counting up the amount of juice we had used during the past month and he told me that wind storm had blown down about two miles of their line besides doing considerable other damage.
    Harry Stanley was smiling on his friends Monday.
    There is a call meeting for tonight to try to devise a plan to have a cannery established here. What they do will be reported next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Graham has returned from a three months' visit to relatives in the East.
    Steve Smith of Medford was a guest of Henry French the first of the week.
    Dr. Kirchgessner was in Medford Saturday.
    There was a large crowd at the Lone school house Sunday to hear Rev. Smith preach.
    Saturday evening there will be a fine program at the Lone school house. This will be followed by the auction of the ladies' lunch boxes. Everyone is invited to attend.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Central Point are spending a merry week at the Jasper Hannah home.
    There is over an inch of snow on the lowlands along the river this Tuesday morning, and it is still snowing.
    Dave Pence had to come from Elk Creek and refloor a bridge on the Dry Creek hill.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 22, 1914, page 7



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Monday, January 12, was quite a prominent day in Eagle Point for a small village, for on that night Mrs. Edith Hall Booker had been booked for an address on the subject of "Statewide Prohibition," and she is considered a very prominent speaker, and the announcement had been extensively circulated. A large assemblage of people met at the church to hear her, although word had been received in the forenoon that Mrs. Booker was taken sick the day before and had gone to Portland. Still the word had not reached very many; in fact those who had charge of the meeting did not take any pains to let it be known, as the arrangement had been made for Rev. Mrs. MacCullough of Medford to come out and speak in her place. Well, she came out on the evening train but did not reach here in time for the afternoon meeting that was announced for Mrs. Booker to talk especially to the members of the Eagle Point W.C.T.U., so Rev. L. L. Simmons filled the place. But Mrs. MacCullough came and gave us a very interesting talk and at the conclusion announced that her husband, the pastor of the Baptist church in Medford, would be out on Wednesday, the 28th, and deliver a lecture on the subject of "How to Get Rid of the Saloon," and will also secure names of the anti-saloon voters of Eagle Point and vicinity to a petition to have the question of statewide prohibition placed on the ticket next November. There was another meeting announced for the same evening to take steps towards getting a cannery established here, but the meeting was not very well attended as almost everybody who could went to the prohibition meeting, but there was enough to make a start and to start the ball moving. The meeting was called to order and F. M. Stewart was elected as temporary chairman and W. C. Clements secretary, and after talking the matter over Carl Narregan and W. C. Clements were appointed a committee to go to Talent and ascertain what would be necessary to arrange for a cannery and the approximate cost. Some of the pessimists around here that have been following the same old rut are snickering in their sleeves at the idea of having anything our of the ordinary or especially anything new away off out here twelve miles from Medford, but if they will take the trouble to look around a little they will discover that Eagle Point is coming to the front, and that very rapidly, and that the old croakers are being left behind.
    Since I wrote last, that was Monday, Prof. P. J. Wells, our county school superintendent, has been out and visited our school and while here for dinner reported that we had a fine school as well as a fine set of teachers, but we knew that before.
    Steve Smith of Medford also was with us on Tuesday.
    Miss May Trusty, who is assistant at the phone office, made a trip to Medford last Wednesday, returning on Saturday.
    Mrs. John H. Tyrrell of Lake Creek, her son Irvin, her little granddaughter Bessie Farlow, and her son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyers, Jr., came out last Tuesday and were with us for dinner and Mrs. Terrill, Irvin and his little niece, Miss Bessie, went on to Medford, Irvin going to California, where he is engaged in business.
    O. D. Tucker and wife, who live on the old Tucker place above the mouth of Elk Creek, accompanied by his mother-in-law, Mrs. M. Manafee of Los Angeles, California, spent the night with us Thursday on their way to Los Angeles, where Mrs. and Mrs. Tucker expect to remain for a few months.
    Mike Hanley of, well I was going to say Medford, but he has a farm between Medford and Central Point, and another on the north fork of Butte Creek, was with us Thursday. He thinks that Jackson County is a great country, no snow, fine grass and warm weather here the 22nd day of January.
    The downpour Wednesday and Wednesday night caused some trouble in the new addition to Eagle Point; the water came rushing down from off the desert and flooded the north side of the street leading to the depot, filing some of the cellars in the business houses, but done but little damage.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Henry Childreth of Eagle Point was a passenger on Friday's stage for Elk Creek.
    Mrs. Bellows is the guest at the home of her son Eugene.
    Jack Daw was in Central Point one day this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Merriman returned to their home at Trail Friday.
    The storm of the past few days raised the small streams a great deal, but the river is about the same as before.
    Roy Willits, the Eagle Point-Persist mail carrier, made his trips all on the west side of the river this week.
    T. C. McCabe has been spending the week with his son Phillip at Derby.
    Tim Daily was a Medford visitor Thursday.
    Henry French was trading in Eagle Point Friday.
    Robert Minter came very nearly having a serious fire Wednesday morning. The ceiling and part of the walls of the dining room were afire when discovered. They extinguished the fire in a little while. It is supposed to have caught from the stove.
    The Eagle Point correspondent in a recent issue mentioned the need of a cannery in Eagle Point. A cannery would be a great benefit to the farmers as we could dispose of our surplus which now goes to waste and also fill our pocketbook with a little silver.
    Mrs. Ed Pence of Elk Creek was an Eagle Point visitor this week.
    Miss Clara Skyrman spent the weekend at the J. C. Hannah home.
    Last Wednesday afternoon during the rain there came several bolts of lightning and claps of thunder. The last one struck a pine tree in front of the house of Jasper Hannah. Mr. Hannah had been working under the tree and had just gone into the house before the lightning struck the tree.
    Ira Dawson was at Trail Thursday.
    John Winningham and Howard Ash killed an old cougar and her three kittens on the first of the week.
    Dan Foeller has been on the sick list this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno were shopping in Eagle Point Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Hughes, one of the leading merchants of Butte Falls, was a guest at the Sunnyside last Friday night and so was Bert Higinbotham and Ed Hollenbeck of Prospect. Mr. Higinbotham had been out to Medford to prove up on his homestead claim and Mr. Hollenbeck was one of [the] witnesses.
    Ed Dutton, our new road supervisor, came in town limping and on inquiry I learned that his horse had got scared and jumped into a ditch and in the act fell on his leg and came near breaking it.
    I saw some time ago what purported to be a report of the different schools in the valley, in the Mail Tribune, and in the report stated that there were but 60 pupils in attendance in our school and so I called the attention of the principal to it and he informed me that the average attendance is 72, and that the report was made by a lady who was traveling over the country visiting the schools and that she simply ran her eye over the school and decided that there was about 60 without going to the trouble to examine the register.
    Last Saturday J. G. Miller of Ashland called for dinner and showed Mrs. Howlett his samples of brooms. He represents the Southern Oregon Broom Mfg. Co., of Ashland. He had visited many leading merchants of our town and taken orders at each place. He is also interesting farmers in raising broom corn in the valley and wants them to put in at least four hundred acres this coming season.
    Ed Higinbotham came out from Derby last Saturday on horseback, returning the same day.
    Gus Nichols, one of our leading stockmen, was among us Saturday.
    Last Saturday night the good people of the Lone-Reese Creek school district gave a box social and notwithstanding the inclement weather and the mud they had a full house, a fine program and the teacher, Miss Rose Nealon, simply brought down the house in reciting a comic piece on love and marriage, so my reporter tells me. The result of the sale of the boxes, with Eugene Bellows auctioneer, was $51.10, the money to be applied to the Sunday school fund.
    Now I have a bunch of news that is not so pleasant to relate. Last Sunday during the heavy wind storm the wind tore about two thirds of the roof off of George Brown & Son's store building and the debris went with such force and carried it clear across the street and crushed one of the large windows in von der Hellen Brother's hardware store, and at the same time partly demolished a knockdown tent belonging to George Wehman, Thomas Riley and Mr. Wiener. While the wind was blowing such a gale the rain was pouring down in torrents. In the course of a few minutes the word was phoned over town and almost everybody turned out to save the goods. A part of them were carried into the bank building, some into the old Model store building, etc. The entire building was exposed to the rain, but they managed to cover up quite a lot of the goods so as to keep them dry. This Monday morning about all of the carpenters in our town were at work besides such help as could be secured and quite a lot of volunteer help and by tonight they think that they will have the roof on so as to protect not only the goods but the interior of the building. It will be hard to estimate the amount of damage done, but it will be quite considerable. The Brown brothers have the sympathy of the entire community in this, their misfortune.
    R. A. Seaman and wife of Rogue River have been up about Brownsboro visiting the families of Charles Terrill and Mrs. Mary Terrill and came out Monday morning and took dinner at the Sunnyside on their way home.
    I have learned that the wind yesterday blew down W. J. Winkle's barn just outside of our town, and I expect that if I should take the pains to collect an account of all the damage done by the storm that I would have a long, dismal letter to the Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday, Jan. 24, the Ladies' Missionary Society of the Baptist church met at the home of Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Childreth and had a regular literary and spiritual feast. The subject for discussion was a trip to Bermuda, and among other papers read was one by Mrs. Buchanan, the wife of the principal of our school, on "A Trip to Bermuda." On the trip she took the members of the Eagle Point Baptist Missionary Society and when they reached San Francisco they began to realize that they had an undertaking that was entirely new to them, for not one of them had ever been, and salt water lent as they started, in their imagination they were encountering a freak storm at sea, but they finally arrived at the land of the heathens and began their missionary work trying to convert the natives. The paper was well written and quite instructive. After some discussion and some of the missionary topics, light refreshments were served and they all went to their homes feeling more determined than ever to do more for the general mission work.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mr. W. E. Hammel, who owns a large tract of land about four miles north of Eagle Point, returned from a trip to St. Louis, Mo., last Monday.
    Also that Mr. Wiener, the young man who has had charge of the Eagle Point lumber yard, and went to San Francisco on a visit about a month ago, returned on Monday.
    I understand that the unusually heavy wind we had last Sunday did considerable damage along through the country. John Foster heard that the wind had blown the roof off of his father's, Perry Foster, house and started home Tuesday morning. That it had blown down R. R. Minter's barn and partially demolished his Spalding hack, that it had blown down W. J. Winkle's barn and partly unroofed Green Mathews' barn, uprooting trees and playing havoc with things generally.
    Misses Samantha and Jessie Minter were here Tuesday night to attend the meeting of the Rebekahs and spent the night with our daughter Hattie.
    Mrs. G. W. Owings, the landlady of the Eagle Point Hotel, in going to church in the dark last Sunday night stepped off of the sidewalk and sprained her ankle quite badly but is so that she can walk on it a little again.
    Wednesday evening we had Rev. MacCullough of Medford out to talk to us on the subject of state and nationwide prohibition. He had a large audience considering the kind of a night it was and he gave us a very instructive and interesting lecture, something entirely new in the line of temperance work. He kept the audience interested for over an hour and many of them was sorry that he closed so soon.
    He circulated slips of paper for the voters to sign in which they not only pledged themselves to vote for statewide prohibition but also pledged to contribute of their funds to carry on the work. I don't know how many signed up but I heard one of the men that collected the slips say that he thought that there was enough votes there that night to carry Eagle Point dry again and if the feeling manifested here is any indication of the general feeling throughout the state the death knell of the saloon is sounding in Oregon.
    Mrs. S. H. Harnish and her daughter, Miss Dollie, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Wednesday.
    It was the calculation to have held another meeting in the interest of getting a cannery established here last Monday but as almost everybody was engaged and interested in getting a roof on the Brown store the meeting was forgotten and another date has not been fixed, but will be soon. Keep the ball moving.
    Mrs. Mary Campbell, recently from Wisconsin, came in Wednesday morning on her way to visit her daughter, Mrs. Swihart of Derby. She expects to build a home and live near her daughter.
    Herbert Carlton was among us Wednesday and says that he is keeping a batch on the old home farm. If I thought that he wouldn't mind it I would suggest that some of the marriageable ladies might do worse than to go into partnership with him and break the monotony of bachelor life.
    Henry Trusty is here visiting his brother-in-law, H. O. Childreth.
    Agent C. Parton, a son of T. J. Parton, owner of the old Rader home place, a recent arrival from Texas, was in town Wednesday.
    Mrs. F. M. Stewart was visiting Mrs. Howlett Thursday afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    The windstorm last Sunday took off roofs, upset sheds, blew down rail fences, broke off and uprooted trees and twisted some brush out of the ground.
    Mrs. Bellows and son Fred took Sunday's train for Ashland and Medford respectively. They have spent some time visiting Eugene Bellows.
    Henry French took a ton of potatoes to Eagle Point Monday and shipped them to Mr. Hughes of Butte Falls.
    Eugene Bellows and Jasper Hannah attended the I.O.O.F. lodge and banquet at Eagle Point Friday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah went to Central Point Thursday.
    John Foster came over from Eagle Point the first of the week and helped his brother Ed replace part of the house roof which blew off Sunday. He also called on his father, Perry Foster, and sister, Mrs. Henry French.
    Grant Mathews and family were shopping in Eagle Point Saturday.
    Peter Betz is on the sick list this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz entertained Mr. and Mrs. Tim Daily Friday night.
    The program at the Reese Creek school house for the Sunday school was splendid and over $51 was taken in by the auction of the boxes. Eugene Bellows was the auctioneer. A large crowd was present and a good time was had by everyone.
    The friends of Amos Ayres are glad to hear he is doing as well as can be expected at the hospital in Medford where he was operated on last Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Clarence Pierce, one of Medford's real estate men, was a caller Thursday night.
    W. I. Mapes of Newport, who has been here for the past few months, has returned to Newport with his family. He has been engaged in cutting and mounting different kinds of stones that are so plentiful in this section.
    Hon. S. M. Nealon of Table Rock was here last Friday in the interest of the G.A.R. post of Central Point.
    F. S. Johnson, representing the Honeyman Hardware Company of Portland, and Charles Williams, representing Wadham & Kerr Bros. of Portland called on our hardware merchants last Friday.
    Prof. W. E. Buchanan gave our two lady teachers, Miss Ethel Sidlinger and Miss Mabel Huff, a dinner last Thursday evening at his residence. The three teachers are working together admirably, and the school is in a very promising condition.
    Brown Bros. have been having the brick replaced on their store building that was thrown off by the heavy wind Sunday, the 25th.
    A. S. Bliton of the Mail Tribune force was out in our town last week soliciting job work, making envelopes a specialty, and I understand that he succeeded quite well. He also went to Butte Falls the next day, Jan. 30.
    H. J. Taylor of Pendleton, G.M. of the I.O.O.F., was among us last Friday and met the I.O.O.F. and Rebekah lodges and of course had to have a big feed. He spoke in the highest terms of the Eagle Point lodges and especially of the young members, said that they will compare favorably with any lodges in the state.
    D. R. Patrick was also with us the same night and furnished some fine music for the two lodges.
    Jasper Hannah of Trail also came out and attended the meeting of the lodges.
    P. M. Kershaw, representing the marble works of Medford, was a guest with us Saturday.
    E. G. Harding, who has a homestead on Little Butte Creek above Lake Creek, was with us Saturday night.
    Miss Stratton of Medford has been out here visiting the family of Chris Natwick and returned home Monday morning.
    Mr. Adams, the cyclone anti-saloon lecturer that caused such a sensation in Eagle Point a short time ago, will lecture in the Eagle Point opera house next Thursday evening at 7:30. Everybody come and hear something new on the line of statewide prohibition.
    Last Sunday, Feb 1, your correspondent was called on to go to Sams Valley to perform the marriage ceremony for O. W. Treshman and Miss Fay De Ford. The marriage was performed at the home of the groom's father, as Mrs. De Ford was confined to her bed with la grippe. There was quite a number of the neighbors and friends invited in and a very pleasant time was had and as fine a dinner was served as anyone need to serve. For me to say that we had a good time would be about right.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was on my way to Grants Pass, and as I was about five minutes late to catch the early morning train, 8:27, concluded to spend my time as profitably as possible, so went into the Mail Tribune office and wrote a batch of Eaglets for the paper and noticed when it (the batch of Eaglets) came out that I had omitted one very important item of interest to at least one family and that was that the stork had visited the household of M. D. Duncan and made Mr. and Mrs. Duncan happy by leaving a fine 9½-pound girl, so reports Dr. W. P. Holt.
    Well, after writing my Eaglets I took the 10:22 motor and started for Grants Pass. I noticed that just below Gold Hill that the cement company have been pushing their work right along and have quite a number of buildings well under way, and from appearances from the car window, they have quite a quantity of rock already out to be used as soon as they get their machinery in place. I noticed but little change in other respects along the road since my visit about December 20.
    Last Tuesday night L. B. Warner, Sr., of Medford was a guest at the Sunnyside. He was out canvassing for fruit trees. Also Mr. Ash, our Trail Creek merchant, was with us. He came out after another load of goods.
    G. B. Conwell and G. W. Manworth were also here for dinner on Wednesday. They had been putting in a transformer and connecting up J. B. Jackson's house with the electric wire that runs to the rock crusher.
    Last Tuesday night, February 3, was a regular time for our council meeting but as two of our newly elected councilmen, John W. Smith and George Fisher, were away from home and J. F. Brown did not put in an appearance; about all that they did was to meet and adjourn to meet on the evening of the 10th.
    Peter Young, one of our prosperous farmers, was in town Wednesday and reports that there has been a new survey made so as to estimate the heavy grade on the hill going from Eagle Point to the Antelope bridge, something that should have been done years ago.
    Corbin Edgell, one of our prosperous orchardists, called on your correspondent to insert an ad. in the Daily Mail Tribune for a lost dog, but before I had time to mail the letter the dog was found.
    R. R. Minter, our progressive sheep man and farmer, and W. E. Hammel, one of our big land owners of Eagle Point, and John Winningham of Trail were with us Thursday night.
    H. R. Lowe of Denver, Colorado, representing the Carewell Horse Nail Company, was among us Thursday.
    W. A. Laidlaw of Portland is here looking over his property, the old Dr. Coghlan orchard.
    Carl Jackson of Butte Falls is here visiting his parents, J. B. Jackson.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Mae Daw and son Cyril were the guests of her sister, Mrs. Shoults, of Medford the first of the week.
    Rev. Smith preached four evenings of this week at the Lone school house on Reese Creek.
    Mrs. Nathan Garrett of Medford is the guest of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. C. McCabe.
    Miss Eula Houston spent the weekend at home.
    Messrs. Ash and Middlebusher of Trail were down in the valley after supplies this week.
    Mr. Arbogast and son were in Central Point delivering butter this week.
    Over 25 of the friends of Perry Foster gave him a surprise party on the evening of his birthday, the 4th of February. The evening was spent in games, music and dancing. The ladies served a nice lunch and in the wee small hours of the morning the party departed, wishing him many happy returns of the day.
    Joe Hannah, Jr., was in Medford one day this week.
    Charles Drexler and Owen Conover were Eagle Point visitors Saturday.
    Misses Janie and Mary Johnson called on Miss Rachel Mathews Thursday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard spent a few hours Sunday at the Peter Betz home.
    All the men are chopping wood nowadays to keep warm out of doors.
    Peter Betz and Eugene Bellows were trading in Eagle Point the last of the week.
    George McDonough of Sams Valley was seen up here last Sunday.
    Mr. Walker and grandson were Medford visitors a few days ago.
    The 2nd of February was a bright sunshiny day but we hope the groundhog here is old and blind and did not see his shadow. We hope to have spring weather. Spring must be coming though, as some of the children have found a few yellow flowers.
    Miss Ethel Ewen called on Mrs. Eugene Bellows Friday.
    Murt Daily spent Wednesday night with his brother Tim. Then Tim returned home with him and spent several days.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday, when I last wrote, I had so much to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune that I had to save some of it for today so will commence right where I left off. Thursday night was quite a noted night in our little town, for on that night we had first the meeting of the I.O.O.F. lodge, it being their regular meeting night, then we had it announced that the cyclone anti-saloon lecturer would speak, and on the same evening Mrs. Holt and Mrs. J. Frank Brown had sent out invitations to their friends to have a card party at the home of Mrs. Brown, so with the three gatherings our community was pretty well scattered.
    The card party was said to have been quite a swell affair; the following persons were present and my reporter assured me that they had one of the most pleasant times of their lives. Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown, Dr. and Mrs. Holt, Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze, W. H. Crandall, Miss Crandall, Harry Young, H. Wiener, Thomas Riley, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. Bolt, Miss Geynell Jackson, J. V. McIntyre and wife, S. B. Holmes and wife, Miss O. Natwick, Carl Jackson, Mrs. Tillie Nichols, W. E. Hammel, Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen, Miss Mabel Huff, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Narregan, Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Heath, Joe Moomaw, Mrs. Lottie Van Soy, Fred Heath, Jr., Miss Ethel Sidlinger and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen. During the evening light refreshments were served. As the reader will see there is quite a number in the foregoing list that do not live within the incorporated limits of our town and several live some distance in the country, but the most of those named live either in the town proper or in the suburbs. And in spite of the party still the church house was filled to hear J. G. Adams lecture on the liquor question. He held his audience spellbound for an hour and a quarter. The I.O.O.F. lodge met and pushed through the business as fast as possible and closed so as to go almost as a body to hear the lecture. In commenting on the name I gave him, the cyclone lecturer, he said that the people in Texas where he had been lecturing called him the x-ray and dynamite lecturer because he threw the light on and the dynamite exploded the fallacy of liquor traffic.
    At the close he called for contributions to help along the work and the people responded quite liberally. I did not learn the amount.
    W. E. Buchanan, the principal of our school, announced Sunday that there would be a program in the school Thursday afternoon rendered by the children and steps taken to secure the services of a teacher in manual training, in conjunction with four other schools, to give one day's training each week, to have that branch taken up with the next fall term of our school. All of the patrons of the school are especially invited to be present.
    Mr. and Mrs. Masaul of Lake Creek were interviewing Dr. Holt last week.
    P. H. Daily of Medford and L. A. Wright, principal of the Butte Falls school, were visiting Prof. W. E. Buchanan Saturday.
    Lester McDonald of Trail came out last Saturday on the Eagle Point-Persist stage and took rooms at the Sunnyside.
    W. E. Hammel came out to attend the card party given by Mrs. Holt and Mrs.Amy Brown; he also came out and enjoyed the club dance Saturday night, taking rooms at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    John J. Winningham of Trail came out Thursday and brought out five cougar hides taken from animals he had killed. He sold four of them in Medford at four dollars apiece and then received one hundred and twenty-five dollars from the county, the bounty on the scalps.
    But I see that I am making my letter long again and so will have to stop right here and keep the rest of my notes for the next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Phillip McCarma of Medford, who had taken a contract to get out several thousand fence posts and shingles for W. M. Lewis on his Flounce Rock farm, was here with Mr. Lewis last Saturday night on their way to Medford. Mr. Lewis was with a team to haul out several hundred pounds of seed wheat, oats and grass seed to his farm.
    R. Y. Allen of Medford, but recently from Montana, a mining man, took dinner with us Sunday.
    Mr. Morgan of Persist was a pleasant caller Sunday and Prof. C. E. Johnson, who is teaching school in the Laurel Hill district, was with us at the same time.
    J. T. Summerville and wife and C. D. Bowman and wife and daughter called for dinner Sunday afternoon.
    Mrs. Jennie Simpkins of Evans Creek is here visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank Lewis, and family.
    Grandma Heckathorn was among the churchgoers last Sunday.
    Amos Ayres, who has been in the hospital in Medford for some time having had an operation performed, has so far recovered as to return Sunday to his home on Reese Creek and at last accounts was doing quite well.
    Miss Marguerite Florey, daughter of our postmaster, and one of the most popular young ladies in these parts, has gone to Jacksonville to stay a while with her brother, Chauncey Florey.
    Mrs. Arns of Iowa arrived a few days ago at the A. Corbin orchard to visit her daughter, Mrs. John Quackenbush. Mr. Quackenbush is the foreman on the place and there was general rejoicing. Mrs. Gorman, another daughter, also lives on the same orchard.
    Wm. H. Newstrom and C. W. Newstrom of Lake Creek were here on business.
    Rev. John Lindblad held a series of meetings at the Lone school house last week.
    E. L. Balcom, representative of Gaddis & Dixon of Page fence fame, spent the night with us Tuesday on his way up Little Butte Creek.
    F. M. Stewart has received the appointment as justice of the peace in the place of the late John Watkins. He is well qualified for the position and has had considerable experience in that line of business.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church here, has gone to Lake Creek to hold meetings this week.
    Some of the farmers are taking advantage of the fine weather and are improving the time sowing their spring grain.
    W. H. Crandall and his sister were doing business here Tuesday.
    Miss Rosa Ayres, who has been taking a vacation for the past few weeks, has returned to her former position in the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Von der Hellen Bros. have had the large plate glass replaced in the front of their store that was broken by the gale a few Sundays ago.
    Jud Edsall made a business trip to Klamath Falls last Sunday, returning Wednesday.
    Prof. C. E. Johnson, who put in an ad in the Eagle Point Eaglets some time ago for a pair of spectacles he had lost, recovered them recently. There is nothing like advertising in a live paper.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 13, 1914, page 6


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Central Point spent the weekend with Jasper Hannah and family.
    Mrs. Kent of Medford is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Ed Morgan.
    John Warner of Trail was in Central Point Saturday.
    Dave Pence of Elk Creek was seen down the river one day this week.
    Two loads of grain were taken up to McLeod's a few days ago.
    Mrs. Tim Daily was in Medford this week having some dental work done.
    Our roads are in a very muddy condition and not good traveling and teams should load accordingly.
    Mrs. Zimmerman gave an old-fashioned quilting party last Thursday. She served a bountiful dinner at noon and nice luncheon at four o'clock. Everyone said they had one of the most enjoyable times of their lives. Those present were Mesdames Watkins, Pettegrew, Bellows, B. Clarno, J. Clarno, Betz, C. Bergman and Zimmerman.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made a professional call at Trail Saturday.
    Wallace Coffeen has built a neat little cottage on his homestead. Mrs. Coffeen and children came out to her new home Thursday. She has been visiting relatives in Medford for the last three months.
    We are glad to hear that John Winningham is having such good luck killing panthers.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 16, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our school entertainment last Thursday proved to be a grand success. The children had their party well and everything passed off very pleasantly. There was something like forty or fifty of the patrons and friends present. After the program was rendered the question came up with regard to the employment of a teacher to teach manual training and physical culture, and a large majority of those present seemed in favor of the move. The proposition was to have say five school districts combine and employ a competent teacher and have him devote one day a week to each school, and by that means keep him constantly employed and have the expense divided among the five school districts.
    Last Saturday night, Mr. James Vogeli, our saloon and tavern keeper, gave a birthday party to the most of the men of the town, beside sending invitations to a number outside of the town, the meeting to be held at his residence, and it was especially mentioned that it was to be a "stag party." I have interviewed quite a number who were present, and they report having a good time. They had a fine supper, good music, both instrumental and vocal, and some of them seemed to have enjoyed themselves to a high degree. He invited each member of the council and the mayor, but the mayor did not attend, and some of the councilmen was away from home.
    Last Saturday night Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hawk, who own a farm a short distance above town, had the misfortune to have their house burn down between 7 and 8 o'clock. The fire started from a defective flue. John Foster, who is working for Mr. Cooley on the farm just above, saw the fire when he was out feeding his team, but thought that it was where Mr. Wolfer had been burning cornstalks, etc., so went on to the house and got ready to come down to the town, still noticing the fire, but as he approached nearer the house discovered that it was on fire, so ran to the house, giving the alarm that aroused George von der Hellen, and he phoned to central. In the meantime Mr. Foster ran into the house and found the family sitting quietly. They got busy and commenced to carry out furniture, as the fire had got under such headway by that time as to be beyond their control. As soon as central received the word they phoned to different ones to go render assistance. They saved quite a lot of furniture, but the loss is quite heavy, as not only the house, but the woodshed and other outbuildings were destroyed. I understand that Mr. Hawk was carrying an insurance policy for $1000 on the property. Fortunately the wind was blowing from the barn to the house, or that probably would have gone too. The family has the sympathy of their many friends here and elsewhere.
    Mrs. Charles Pruett and her daughter, Miss Mabel, were visiting Mrs. Howlett last week.
    Ben. H. Brophy was in town on business last week, and while here gave me a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. John McDaniel of Montana came out last week to visit her brothers, Rabe, Jeff and Frank Johnson, and other relatives. Her husband, John McDaniel, had to stay with his brother, Larkin, who is now 92 years old, and is pining away his life because he cannot come back to his home, the present home of L. K. Hawk, who is reported in this letter as having been burned out last Saturday night, to die. Mrs. McDaniels was reared in this section of the country, and she and her husband's family were all among the early settlers of this section.
    Mrs. J. B. Jackson, her daughter, Miss Gaynell, Miss Mabel Huff, our primary teacher, went to Butte Falls on horseback last Friday afternoon to attend a masked ball. They were accompanied by Thomas Riley and Master Harry Young. I have not seen any of them since, so can't say what kind of a time they had, but I will make the guess that they were somewhat tired when they reached Butte Falls.
    I have a long list of items in my catch-book that I will have to keep until the next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Caroline Drexler is visiting her mother, Mrs. Frank Johnson.
    Miss Coffeen drove to Medford and spent the weekend with her brother, John. Miss Ely, from the East, accompanied her home to spend some time visiting.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard entertained Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz and Miss Mima Hannah Sunday.
    Norman Gage went to the valley towns Monday.
    The sewing circle met at Mrs. Zimmerman's and quilted a beautiful quilt. A nice dinner and a lunch were served. Those present were: Mesdames Betz, Bergman, Bellows, R. Clarno, J. Clarno, Zimmerman and Foster.
    Tom Raimey came out from Central Point and helped Jasper Hannah break some young horses this week.
    John Walker and son, Jack, were out to the valley after supplies a few days ago.
    Miss Clara Skyrman closed a six month's term of school Friday. The parents gathered at noon and served a luncheon, which was followed by a program. Tiny Vivian Daw spoke a cute little piece. Miss Clara will begin a four months' term of school in the McLeod district, near the upper steel bridge.
    John Warner of Trail took up a load of seed grain and wire fence the first of the week.
    Mrs. Stowell and children have moved from Eagle Point to the ranch on the river this week.
    Mrs. John Smith and Miss Dollie Stowell called on Mrs. Henry French Wednesday.
    Henry French is at Jacksonville attending court as a juror.
    Mrs. Woolery and children of Montana are the guests of her sister-in-law, Mrs. Grant Matthews and family.
    Mrs. Charles Skyrman of upper Trail spent Thursday evening with Mrs. Mae Daw. Miss Clara returned home with her to spend a couple of days.
    The dance at Johnson was well attended Saturday evening.
    Jack Houston and family gave a party to a large crowd of friends Friday night. All report a merry time.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I promised to tell something about what Rev. L. L. Simmons found in the collection, not in the collection plate or basket. He had been up in the Lake Creek school district holding services and the last day he was there he was talking to one of his members about buying a sow and eight pigs and when he got ready to start Bro. C.------ remarked "Well, you can just give the Brownsboro church credit for one sow and eight pigs when you get home" and then the question arose just how to place the credit on the "church book," and how much money value was to be credited on the pastor's salary, but the preacher got the sow and pigs and the board will have to decide as to the value of said swine and the sooner the better for the preacher.
    Another item of importance that had to be kept over was a Valentine party that was given to some of the school children by the principal, Dr. W. E. Buchanan and wife, on the evening of the 14th instant. The following pupils were among the guests: Carlyle Natwick, Gladys Natwick, Harold Van Scoy, Lyle Van Scoy, Theo. Florey, Jud Florey, Isaac Childreth, Glenna Childreth, Nora Childreth, Thelma Nichols, Bernice Simmons, Ruth Grover, Verda Grover, Helen Holt, Ruth Nichols, Robert Harnish, Katrine Bryant and Carey Owens. Light refreshments were served and among other things that the children enjoyed was some fine music and games. The doctor and his wife know just how to entertain the children so as to have a good time generally.
    A Baptist young people's union was organized on Sunday, the 15th inst., and Mrs. W. E. Buchanan was elected president and Miss Loretta Childreth secretary and treasurer. There were about forty names enrolled and the young people seem to take quite an interest in the move. The meeting was largely attended Sunday, the 22nd, and a fine program rendered. The juvenile branch of the union will meet next Sunday, March 1st at 3 p.m.
    Mr. Cogswell and E. P. Power of Medford were callers last Thursday and the next day Mr. Power was joined by C. A. Pickel, also of Medford, and they two went to work tearing out the old flume that supplies the old Snowy Butte mills with water and are engaged putting in a new one. They are rooming at the Sunnyside.
    Roy Davis of Derby was doing business in our town last week.
    L. H. Ossman and his sister, Miss Ethel of Trail, were guests at the Sunnyside last week. Mr. Ossman came out from the Elk Creek hatchery to meet Mr. Thomsen here with a batch of fish eggs for the Elk Creek hatchery.
    Mike and Joe Sidley were callers Friday. Joe had come out to have Dr. Holt redress his hand.
    Mrs. Kringle (Grandma) came out from her Lake Creek home last week, went to Medford and on her way spent a while with Mrs. Howlett.
    Mrs. Herman Meyer, Jr., came out from her home in Lake Creek last Friday and went on to Medford.
    James Ringer had been repainting and repapering the interior of Mayor Nichols' home.
    William von der Hellen started for Portland with his family last week to consult a specialist with regard to his daughter.
    Miss Mary Holmes and Miss Allison O' Brien of Medford and Miss Hazel Brown of this place were callers on Saturday. Misses Holmes and O'Brien and Harold Guerin of Portland were here visiting their relatives, the Browns.
    Last Saturday Thomas Stanley came out from his home on Salt Creek, bringing with him Miss Helen Sidley. Mr. Stanley gave me a year's subscription to the Mail Tribune. Marsh Garrett and wife also came out and went to Medford and brought out Mrs. Garrett's sister, Miss Maude Nichols. They took rooms at the Sunnyside. George Nichols, Jr., and wife came out to attend the dance Saturday night.
    Miss Scott, who is engaged teaching on Elk Creek, came out on the stage Saturday, attended the dance and went to Medford Sunday.
    Miss Cassia Plymire, who has been spending a part of the winter with her mother and stepfather in the vicinity of Dead Indian Soda Springs, came out Saturday and was the guest of our daughter, Hattie, until Monday, returning to Medford on the P.&.E.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    S. E. McDonald of Medford was a pleasant caller last Monday. He was here canvassing the town and surrounding country for photos to enlarge.
    R. P. Cowgill, civil engineer for the Rogue River Land, Irrigation and Canal Company, was out superintending the work on the new flumes in the old Snowy Butte mill.
    Bert Clarno, who lives near the county road from here to Trail and L. C. Myers of Lake Creek, were doing business with our merchants Wednesday.
    Marsh Applegate and E. E. Ash of Trail were at the Sunnyside Tuesday night. Mr. Ash was out after a load of goods to replenish his stock.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, the school house janitor, pastor of the Baptist church here and general roustabout, was tearing away the old dilapidated board fence from around the school grounds the first of the week, thus relieving us of an eyesore that should have been removed long ago.
    Mr. Riggins came out from his home near Derby Tuesday evening, spent the nigh with us and went on to Medford and Jacksonville the next morning on land business.
    E. P. Power, who has been at work on the flume on the old mill, cut his ankle Wednesday morning and had to lay off. He went to Medford Thursday morning.
    A. W. Walker and George Carstens of Medford were pleasant callers last Wednesday for dinner. Mr. Walker is a candidate for sheriff on the Republican ticket at the primary election May 15. He seemed to meet with some success while here, as those who know him speak favorably of him.
    George B. Weaver of Central Point was also here for dinner the same day. He was canvassing for a pneumatic sweeper and seemed to be meeting with considerable success.
    Harvey Stanley and Gus Nygren of Brownsboro were doing business here Wednesday.
    Last Wednesday was Rev. L. L. Simmons' thirty-sixth birthday, and in anticipation of that day or event the ladies of the Aid Society took the notion into their wise heads to make a nice quilt and present it to him on that occasion. They also decided to insert the names of the persons who were interested in the quilt, and another notion they took was to tax each one who had their names in the quilt ten cents each and the proceeds to be given to Rev. L. L. Simmons to be applied on his back salary but this was all to be kept a profound secret from him. Now just to think of one hundred and fifty persons, men and women, all knowing of the plan and still keep it from him; but it seems that they did, but how will be hard for me to tell. Is was all arranged that we were all to meet at the home of Mr. Painter on Wednesday evening and not let him know anything of what was going on and Mr. Painter is Mr. S.'s nearest neighbor, but the ladies were equal to the occasion, so Mrs. Florey planned to have them take dinner with them that day, and in the afternoon Mrs. Bryant planned to have Mrs. Simmons spend the afternoon with her fitting a dress so as to have them away from home all day and Mr. S. was at work on his schoolyard fence. Well, the result was that just after dark the neighbors commenced to come in while Rev. S. was in blissful ignorance of what was going on studying his sermon for next Sunday when about 8 o'clock a committee waited on him to invite him and his family over to Brother Painter's to spend the evening, and when he arrived he was met by fifty-five of his neighbors to tender congratulations. Now, imagine his surprise when he was ushered into such a crowd. (I have the names of those who were present, but the list is so long that I am afraid that ye editor might think that they would take too much space.) In a short time six ladies came marching out with the quilt, having previously placed Mr. S. in the doorway between the two rooms, and then Dr. W. E. Buchanan, the principal of our school, made a neat and appropriate presentation speech, presenting Rev. S. with the quilt; also the purse containing 155 ten-cent pieces.
    Rev. Simmons responded with a short speech of acceptance and thanks, but he was so filled that he could scarcely talk at first. Then an organ was brought in from one of the neighbors and some took part in music and singing in one room while the rest joined in playing some of the games of our childhood days. About 10 o'clock light refreshments were served and along toward the close of Wednesday and near Thursday morning the crowd began to disperse, feeling that another evening had been spent pleasantly and perhaps profitably, all wishing that our pastor may live to see and enjoy many more happy birthdays.
    Charley Thomas and family arrived from Klamath County the first of the week. He has been engaged in logging in that country for the past year.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 27, 1914, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charley Thomas has returned to Klamath County, but left his family here for the present.
    Elvin Adams of Siskiyou County, California, passed through here last Saturday on his way from Butte Falls where he had been visiting his sister, Mrs. Aaron Beck. Mr. Mathews, Sr., of Butte Falls passed through here on his way to Medford on the same train.
    Mrs. A. H. Horton of Brownsboro came out from Medford Saturday on the train and went on up to her home on the Eagle Point and Lake Creek stage.
    George B. Warner of Central Point was out last Saturday talking to the housewives about the pneumatic sweeper that he is handling.
    John Higinbotham of Butte Falls came out last Thursday, remaining until Saturday.
    There was a man and woman here Saturday from Eugene. They looked all over our town but were very reticent with regard to their business. I did not learn their names but learned that they were not looking for a location.
    Miss Louise Henry, who is engaged teaching in the Lem Charley school district, called for dinner last Friday on her way to Medford.
    Fred R. Heath has sold his farm just above Brownsboro to Roy Tuft. I understand that he has several teams at work pulling up the fruit trees and leveling off the ground to sow it in alfalfa.
    Mr. Holbrook, who lives at the Gilchrist orchard, was doing business with our merchants Saturday.
    A. J. McDonald, who has been clearing a tract of land northeast of our town for J. H. Cooley, finished up the job last week and has gone to the McDonald farm near the mouth of Elk Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Todd have gone on the ranch to assist in its management.
    Mrs. Susan Hart was in town on business Saturday.
    Mrs. R. McDonald of Lake Creek came out last Saturday to bring her son to Dr. Holt to have his foot dressed. He had cut his instep open with an ax; that was the cause of the visit. They were accompanied by her brother, J. D. McCraig.
    David Cingcade's daughter, Hattie, who lives in San Francisco, I have forgotten her surname, writes to her mother that she hears from Eagle Point every week, for she gets the Daily Mail Tribune and that it is like a letter from home.
    F. M. Corlies, who has moved onto the Alta Vista orchard to take charge of it, and his daughter, Miss Maud, were callers on business Saturday and after introducing himself remarked that he had been reading my Eaglets for the past eight years back in Iowa. They were here to meet his daughter, Miss Veneta, who is attending school in Medford.
    Although I seldom write hospital news I will break over this time and say that the little Messal boy, who was operated on a week ago Saturday, is gradually improving. Miss Flora Fleming, the nurse who was with him at the time of the operation, had other engagements so that she had to give up her position to go to another case and Miss Georgia Myers has taken her place.
    There was a small load of lumber went out to the Antelope orchard Saturday to be used in fixing up things, getting ready for the spring work.
    Mrs. Kee of Butte Falls is here visiting her daughter, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Buchanan.
    Benj. C. Sheldon, secretary of the Medford Commercial Club, etc., and a general Medford booster, was out Saturday night to visit J. V. McIntyre, the cashier of the Eagle Point State Bank, and family, and called on us Sunday morning for breakfast. He pays our business men a very high compliment, for he claims that we have the most progressive set of businessmen here that there is in any of the small towns in Jackson County.
    Clyde McMurtry of Medford, a quartz miner, came in Sunday night from Derby and on his way picked up quite a lot of stones in the agate variety. He is engaged in mining on the Applegate.
    I have some more notes in my scratch book but will have to wait until the next time to write them.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1914, page 6



Eagle Point W.C.T.U.
    Saturday, February 28, was the day appointed for our semi-monthly meeting, which was well attended. There was a good deal of interest shown in our union. Believing in the efficacy of our watchword, "Educate, Agitate and Organize," we are planning a good deal of work for our union, and expect to execute as well as plan. The cause is a glorious one, and there ought not to be any lagging behind. But work we must, enthusiastically, for our convictions.
    After attending to the business part of our meeting, there was some lively discussions on various topics pertaining to the temperance cause, and some excellent readings by different members which were very interesting. We then adjourned our meeting earlier than usual in honor of one of our most loved members, Mrs. William Knighton, as we wished to surprise her to a handkerchief shower on her 68th birthday. After a few hours of merry conversation and congratulations on her long and well-spent life and wishing her many returns of the happy event and praying that God's choicest blessings might always be hers, we then adjourned until our next meeting.
PRESS CORRESPONDENT.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 4, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Monday morning, when I wrote last, I hurried up so that I could go to the school house and hear Professor Wells, our county superintendent, and L. P. Harrington, one of the field workers for industrial fairs. Superintendent Wells gave a short but very interesting talk to the children and the parents who were in attendance, setting forth some of the advantages of the move, and then Mr. Harrington was introduced and he gave us a general talk on the move showing the object of organizing clubs. As the move is an educational affair he dwelt at first on the advantage to be derived from an organization, showing that by that means they could have systems and by that means the members of the club do everything by rule and not haphazard. He then told us how the boys and girls who enter into the work could be helped by a mutual contest, and by studying the various methods of others who have made a success in the various lines of agriculture and domestic economy. He dwelt more particularly on the subject of raising corn and potatoes, telling particularly how to select the best seed for each, but he did not neglect to call attention to the children and especially the girls to the household duties, more particularly to bread making, and right here I wish to emphasize the thought of bread making for during my travels over the country during the past 60 years I find a host of people that don't know how to make bread. He tried to impress upon the minds of his hearers the fact that in order to succeed in any line of business that they must make that branch of business a special study. By way of encouragement he told us that provision had been made to give valuable prizes to those who succeeded, and among them was a trip to the Panama exposition. He is a fine talker and managed to hold the attention of the children all through the address. At the close he organized a club of 47 members. They then proceeded to elect their officers. President, Miss Clara Owens; vice president, Thelma Nichols; secretary, Roberta Pearce; treasurer, Bernice Simmons, and Rev. L. L. Simmons, as advisor. The contest in some of the selections was quite short and the children seemed to manifest good judgment. In electing the advisor there were three candidates, Rev. Simmons, E. S. Wolfer and Dr. Buchanan and the vote stood Simmons, 18; Wolfer, 18; Buchanan, 13, so they then dropped Dr. Buchanan and the result was 24 to 21 in favor of Rev. Simmons.
    Prof. A. R. Chase, one of our rural school supervisors, was with us Monday and attended the lectures and then he and Mr. Harrington went to the Antelope school district.
    A post office inspector was here Monday and Tuesday until 2:25 p.m. looking after our post office interests.
    The men who have been here working on the old mill ditch have gone up up to where the flume crosses Little Butte Creek, where they will repair the support of the flume and then they will go on up to the intake and do some work there.
    John Ashpole was over Tuesday visiting his son Roy.
    Mr. Hildreth and wife of Butte Falls spent the night with us Monday and Tuesday took the train for Butte Falls.
    Miss Ethel Ewen was the guest of Miss Rosa Ayres Tuesday.
    Mr. Frideger of Medford had been a guest with us the past few days. He is out here looking after his orchard just above town.
    Herman Meyer of Lake Creek was doing business here Tuesday and so was Tim Ryan, who owns a farm just below town.
    George Childreth came out Monday to visit his brothers and to see his sister-in-law, who is sick with paralysis.
    Mrs. T. A. Petty went to Grants Pass Tuesday with her mother, Mrs. Roda Potter, to have her eyes treated.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze were in town Tuesday doing business and visiting friends.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 9, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Henry French returned home Friday. He has been one of the petit jurors at Jacksonville for the last two weeks. He called on W. B. Jackson and Steve Smith in Medford who are two of his boyhood friends.
    Eugene Bellows and Marshall Minter went to Talent Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Fry and Velma came home from Grants Pass Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tim Daily moved to Medford Thursday to make their home. They have lived among us the last two years and we are sorry to lose them.
    Saturday there was a special business meeting of the Trail Telephone Company at the Central school house.
    John Nealon of Table Rock began the spring term of school in the Long Branch district last Monday. Mr. Nealon taught in the same district last fall.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Smith have returned to Eagle Point after spending a month with her folks.
    John Conover of Dillon, Montana, is visiting his brother Jeff. Mr. Conover says Montana is too cold for him so he has sold his ranch there.
    The Circle met at Mrs. Jettie Clarno's last Thursday and had an old-fashioned wool picking. A nice dinner and a lunch were served. Those present were Mesdames Zimmerman, Betz, Mathews, Bergman, B. Clarno and Mrs. Jettie Clarno.
    Jim Vincent of Sams Valley was seen here this week.
    Ira Dawson has moved to Sams Valley.
    Mr. and Mrs. Raimey and Miss Ora of Central Point were recent visitors at the Jasper Hannah home.
    Mrs. Harry Howard has bought an Old Trusty incubator.
    A party of musicians came out from Portland and stayed at Peter Betz' a few days fishing.
    Some of the chronic fishermen are catching a few fish.
    Don't forget your overcoat when going fishing as you need it while wading on rainy days.
    Lorance Daw is staying with Joe Hannah.
    Miss Mima Hannah is in Medford.
    Miss Deihless Minter spent several days last week with Mrs. Eugene Bellows, and Miss Myrtle Minter was the guest of Miss May French.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 9, 1914, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Paul Opdyke, formerly of Shasta County, California, although they came direct from Sacramento, they came in Sunday evening and engaged a room at the Sunnyside. The next morning they procured a team and driver from the Harnish & Son stable and went up to the old Tucker ranch on Rogue River. Mr. Opdyke has purchased a half interest in the ranch, lately known as the Enyart ranch, and will have the management of the place. Mr. Opdyke has also disposed of his ranch in Shasta County, California, for a good price. He was visiting here last spring and was so well pleased with the country that he concluded to invest in real estate and live among us. Mr. and Mrs. Opdyke were on their way from Sacramento, where they had attended the wedding of Mrs. Opdyke's brother, John D. Tucker and Ruby M. Oiler. The Tuckers are well known in this country and Mrs. O.'s friends will be glad to have her among them again. While here Mr. O. gave me a subscription for the Mail Tribune so as to keep posted on the affairs of the world at large.
    Fred Frideger of Medford is here at the Sunnyside again. He is here getting his fifteen-acre orchard in readiness for the summer. He is having it cultivated, getting the ground ready, as I understand that the Haselton boys, Frank and Willie, are going to put the entire tract, twenty acres, in beans this season.
    Dr. F. G. Carlow, one of the Medford osteopaths, came out on the train Monday to see Roy Smith and Mrs. W. L. Childreth. I understand that Mrs. Childreth has improved considerable.
    C. E. Bellows and Marshall Minter came into the Sunnyside late Sunday evening for supper. They had come that day from Talent with a bunch of cattle, left them at the Cingcade ranch and came on up here for supper.
    I am under the necessity of chronicling another accident. Charley Klingle's little children of Lake Creek were on their way to school on horseback and by some means the boy fell off and in falling pulled his sister after him and in alighting struck a rock and his sister fell on top of him, and the result was he had two of his ribs broken. The girl was not hurt. Dr. Holt was called and reduced the fracture.
    Charles Newstrom and family of Lake Creek were guests at the Sunnyside last Monday.
    Floyd Pearce, one of the deputy assessors, is assessing our town and the surrounding country and he is the first assessor that we have had for a long time that rushed the business. He keeps going all the time. While he was here at the Sunnyside he gave me a subscription for the Mail Tribune, said that he wanted to keep posted on current events.
    Miss Allie Klippel of Medford came out this Wednesday morning and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for Trail where she will keep house for her uncle while he puts in his crop.
    Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek was in town Wednesday after a load of grain to sow.
    Henry French was in town Wednesday interviewing our school clerk, A. J. Florey, with regard to furnishing our school house with wood for the coming season.
    Mrs. Henry Meyers of Lake Creek came in Wednesday with a lot of chickens for the market.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Kee of Butte Falls, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. W. E. Buchanan, returned home Friday last.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey, wife of our esteemed postmaster, went up to Prospect to visit her mother, Mrs. Chauncey Nye. She expects to remain for about two weeks and while in that section aims to visit the W.C.T.U. at Peyton that she organized some time ago.
    Speaking of Peyton, Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church, went up there and preached Tuesday night for them and while there registered 23 voters and in talking about registering voters, said that every one of them were going to go to the polls and vote dry on the question of wet and dry amendment to the state constitution. In fact he says that a large majority of the rural voters are going to vote to put out the saloon this fall.
    Our town council held a meeting last Tuesday night the 10th, and ordered an ordinance drawn up to put a stop to people riding on the sidewalks on their bikes, and making some changes in the management of our municipal affairs.
    Frank Brown, one of our leading merchants, has bought an automobile, and John W. Smith is building a garage for him.
    Speaking about automobiles, the auto agents are getting quite numerous around here and there are several around town who are talking of purchasing machines.
    Wilbur Ashpole, one of the Medford meat market men, was out visiting his brother, Roy, this week.
    Miss Ethel Sidlinger, our primary teacher, went to Medford last Friday to meet her uncle and aunt and secured the services of Mrs. George von der Hellen to take charge of her school during her absence.
    Mrs. Huff, of Corvallis, who has been visiting her daughters, Mrs. George von der Hellen and Miss Mabel Huff, returned home Saturday. Mr. and Mrs. von der Hellen and Miss Mabel Huff accompanied her as far as Medford. They all four took dinner with Mrs. Howlett Friday.
    E. R. Peterson, one of the rural school supervisors, spent the night at the Sunnyside Friday night. He reports that he has been visiting the schools and organizing boys' industrial clubs and has succeeded in organizing one in almost every school in his division of the county where there are enough children.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Earl Coft, who have charge of the Cooley place, just above town, a boy March 13, 1914.
    Wilbur Jacks and Benj. Brophy took dinner at the Sunnyside Friday and while here gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    J. H. Cooley, Claude Gaines and Mr. Garrison were guests at the Sunnyside Friday night.
    Herman G. Meyers of Lake Creek was a guest at the Sunnyside Saturday and while here paid me a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Thomas Cingcade, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen, was in town Saturday and while here paid me for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Pete Betz and wife, who own a farm on the banks of Rogue River about eight miles above here, were doing business with our merchants Saturday.
    Robbie Pelouze, who is attending school in Medford, came out Saturday morning to visit his parents.
    John S. Quackenbush, foreman on the Corbin orchard, was doing business in town Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote last Saturday I was expecting to start away Sunday morning, to be gone three or four days, but unforeseen events caused me to change my plans. We--that is, Rev. M. C. Davis and myself--had planned to procure a team in Sams Valley and go to Trail and Elk Creek, and while he would pay particular attention to the interest of the church, I would combine that work with my interest in connection with the Medford Mail Tribune and look after that some. As it was, we started Sunday morning on the P.&E. train for Agate station, and was met by D. W. Beebe with his auto and taken to his house, and from there to the Agate school house, where Rev. Davis preached. After attending Sunday school and in the evening took us to Table Rock, where I preached. While at Agate we had the pleasure of visiting at the home of Professor B. F. Nibert, the principal of the school. He has as his assistant his niece, Miss Myers, who has charge of the primary, and Miss Earhart, who teaches the intermediate departments. They have seven pupils in the high school grade and they are teaching a very interesting school.
    Saturday evening, after I had mailed my letter to the Mail Tribune, W. H. Crandall came in for supper, and while here paid me for two months' subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    John Conover and family spent Saturday night with us, and Sunday Mrs. Howlett had Carl von der Hellen and family, Mr. and Mrs. Fred R. Heath and son, Fred. Fred is taking practical lessons in civil engineering on the Pacific Highway.
    Dr. Holt and family were also guests of Mrs. Howlett Sunday for dinner.
    E. S. Hitzler of Medford came out Monday to do some grafting and pruning for L. K. Hawk, and when he came in for supper Tuesday night he brought in two grafts that he put in last spring in an apple tree for Mr. Hawk that measure seven feet and a half of an inch. That shows what Butte Creek soil will do in that line.
    Mrs. G.A. Ranstrom of Anacortes, Wash., a sister of Miss Georgia Myers, who is here nursing Mr. and Mrs. Messal's little boy who was operated on some two weeks ago for appendicitis, was here visiting her sister last Monday.
    C. A. Garth, who bought the old Abger place from Mr. Hitchcock, came out on the car Monday and went on over to his place.
    Mrs. William von der Hellen, who has been in Portland with her daughter for medical treatment, returned last Monday.
    H. D. Corlies and wife, father and mother of F. M. Corlies, who is the foreman on the Alta Vista orchard, came out from Iowa to visit their children and grandchildren last week.
    Last Tuesday morning Messrs. John Greb, McQuoid, Rev. M. C. Davis and Rube Johnson and Mrs. F. M. Stewart took the train for Medford.
    Mr. Gorman, who has been with his wife's brother-in-law, J. S. Quackenbush, on the Corbin orchard, has taken charge of the Laidlaw orchard and Mr. Duncan, who has had charge of the orchard, will go to Rogue River to take charge of a dairy farm.
    I am glad to be able to announce that Harry Lewis, the little boy that was operated on some time ago for appendicitis, is able to be around town again.
    J. G. Miller, representing the Southern Oregon Broom Manufacturing Company of Ashland, was here Tuesday for dinner and reports that he has contracted for 130 acres of broom corn to be planted this spring.
    Charles Edler of Lake Creek was here Tuesday.
    George S. Downing and wife of Montana are here visiting his cousin, O. E. Nichols.
    Mr. and Mrs. William G. Knighton made a trip in an auto to Talent and back last Saturday.
    F. G. Will of Albany, a cousin of E. S. Wolfer, came in Tuesday and took a room at the Sunnyside. He wanted to see the country and gather some agate stones to take home. He is in the jewelry business.
    Mrs. Mary Baker of Butte Falls was with us Tuesday night and went to Medford Wednesday morning.
    A. L. Cusick of Medford came out on his wheel Wednesday. He is soliciting for the enlargement of photos.
    Charles Klingle and John Tyrrell of Lake Creek were here Wednesday and took out each a barrel of spray fluid.
    William Newstrom of Lake Creek was here Wednesday.
    Clarence Cox was also here the same time. He has been up on Salt Creek visiting his sister, Mrs. Gus Nichols.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 20, 1914, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Eva Jutermuth of Portland was here the first of the week, introducing a line of toilet articles that are on sale with Von der Hellen Bros.
    C. E. Gates of Medford and A. O. Reed of Portland were here last Wednesday. Mr. Gates is the agent for the Ford auto and came out to sell one to one of my neighbors and I think succeeded, although the lady involved in the transaction cautioned me not to say anything about it in the Eaglets until they had received it.
    Mr. Wiener, our lumber man, Mr. Newport, the railroad depot agent, and Mr. Vogeli have introduced the moving picture show business here and seem to be making a success of the undertaking.
    George Nichols and Wilbur Ashpole of Medford were out here last Wednesday to buy mutton sheep. And Mr. Ashpole and J. F. Hittson were out Thursday getting signers to a petition to place Mr. Hittson on the primary ticket as a candidate for sheriff.
    Mrs. Chauncey Florey, wife of office Deputy Assessor Florey, came out Thursday to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis.
    Thomas Riley has been engaged in repainting the windows of the Baptist church. He also has just finished the job of painting the new garage for Frank Brown.
    James Ringer has gone to Fort Klamath to do some painting and paper hanging.
    A. J. Florey, our accommodating postmaster and notary public, has been registering quite a number of our voters. At last account he had registered 146 names, and still they come.
    Last Friday morning your Eagle Point correspondent called in and visited the principal's room in our school. There were twenty pupils present, and from all appearances they intend to use the time allotted them to advantage. The first thing on the program was music, and the organ and singing by the school, and then Professor Buchanan called on me for a talk to the children, so I talked a few minutes, telling them some of my experiences in school over seventy years ago; about my experience teaching a primitive school without a blackboard in California in the '50s, and how I converted a school board of old men that had never seen a blackboard to the necessity of one.
    I know that I will get a scolding from our primary teacher, for she has made me promise several times to visit her department, but it is not too late yet, and I expect in the near future to visit her room and also the intermediate branch of the school.
    Last Friday night the members of the Ladies' Home and Foreign Missionary society had a meeting in the Baptist church. It was opened by singing a solo by Mrs. Bryant, reading a scripture lesson by Mrs. Simmons and prayer by the pastor, another solo by T. A. Petty and then the pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, gave a brief history of the origin of the Baptist Foreign Missionary Society by Mr. Judson and Mr. Wright in Burma 104 years ago. Of some of the hardships they underwent, etc., after which we had a class of five boys and five girls, little folk, each made a little speech and dropped in a dime with the contribution dish then we had several tableaus and wound up by taking a collection for the Home and Foreign Missionary Society amounting to $4.95. There was a good attendance considering that it was gotten up on the spur of the moment, for it was not publicly announced until the day before, Thursday.
    Henry Meyer and son of Lake Creek called for dinner Saturday, and so did Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard of Trail. Mrs. H. was having trouble with an ulcerated tooth and came to see Dr. W. E. Buchanan about it.
    There was a company of the school children and their mothers, some of them at least, went out on the hills Saturday to have a picnic dinner and to gather wild flowers, and you may be assured that they had a good time.
    Von der Hellen Bros., two of them, have been taking one copy of the Daily Mail Tribune, and as they each of them have a family and live about half a mile apart, they have had a time trying to get the news, and so the other day I suggested to George von der Hellen that he take it, too, so that his family could have an equal show with his brother's family, and he, being a sensible business man, saw the advantage of the suggestion and of course subscribed. In fact, the Daily Mail Tribune is considered almost a necessity in this part of the country.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 23, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Hannah and children were the guests of relatives in Central Point the first of the week.
    Mrs. Henry French entertained Mrs. Stowell and Mrs. Bellows Friday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher of Trail made a business trip to Central Point this week.
    Murt Daily of Eagle Point autoed out to Joe Hannah's Sunday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made a professional visit at Ed Morgan's Sunday.
    A. A. Hall spent one night this week with Harvey Richardson of Agate.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bellows spent Sunday at the Minter home.
    Ira Dunlap has bought the Willard place, above Trail, and is moving up there this week.
    Charley Coffeen and Harry Howard were Medford visitors this week. Mr. Hale returned home with Mr. Howard, bringing a nice piano for the Howard home.
    Miss Mima Hannah returned home from Medford Saturday.
    Norman and Teal Gage were recent valley visitors.
    Mrs. Harry Howard was in Eagle Point Saturday having some dental work done.
    The circle met with Mrs. Bert Clarno and quilted on a quilt. A nice lunch was served. Those present were: Mesdames Mathews, J. Clarno, Zimmerman, Bergman and B. Clarno.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz were Central Point visitors Wednesday.
    Miss Flora Stacey of Beagle is teaching the spring term of school in the central district. She taught four months in the same district last fall.
    Mr. Ash and family autoed to the valley this week.
    Miss Rose Nealon has given such good satisfaction in the Lone district on Reese Creek that the directors have extended her school one month.
    Mrs. Alvin Conover is spending the week at her old home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Garrett of Medford came out Sunday in their auto to see her parents, Mr. and Mrs. McCabe. Mr. Garrett found some pretty rough roads for an auto.
    Mrs. Harry Howard and M. W. Slusser received the sad news of the death of their father at Pasadena, Cal., last week. Mr. Slusser was 78 years of age at the time of his death and he leaves a wife and ten children to mourn his loss.
    Everyone is planting garden this week.
    The weather is so warm there is no frost nights.
    Miss Mabel Scott closed a seven months' term of school Friday in the upper Trail district. The parents of the pupils served a bountiful lunch at noon which was followed by a nice program.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 23, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Porter J. Neff and wife, Miss Mealey and Benjamin C. Sheldon of Medford and John V. McIntyre, cashier of the First State Bank of Eagle Point and wife took dinner at the Sunnyside last Sunday, and Thomas Abbott of Lake Creek and Miss Lorena Grigsby of Central Point spent Sunday night with us.
    Miss Ellen Fox of Lake Creek filled the pulpit for Rev. L. L. Simmons last Sunday night and gave us a rousing lecture on the subject of the use of alcoholic drinks, treating the subject from a scientific standpoint, showing the effect that alcohol has on the human system. Then she told us of the effect its use had on the community at large, giving statistics showing that the expense of the liquor traffic amounted to more than the cost of bread and sugar, and that it took 100,000 of our boys and girls to replenish the ranks of those who die from the effects of its use. She is a very pleasant speaker and if she keeps on in the work will eventually make her mark in the world as a public speaker.
    A. H. Horton and wife of Brownsboro were in town Monday.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols and her cousin, George S. Downing, and wife of Montana took a trip up on Little Butte Creek to visit Mrs. Nichols' brother-in-law and her sister, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Farlow. Mr. Downing is very much pleased with our country and especially our climate, but thinks that the Upper Butte country is rather rough. They were up as far as the old Farlow place, just this side of the soda springs.
    Henry French was doing business among us Monday. He expects to have a fine crop of peaches this summer.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Tucker of Brownsboro, since the last of February, started for their home the 15th inst., spent the night with their niece, Mrs. William Morris, at Central Point. They came in via Portland and made several stops on their way, visiting relatives and taking in the sights along the route. They are going to via San Francisco and spend some time there. Mr. Tucker expects to return in 1915, take in the world's fair and then come up here and settle in this valley, for he is simply delighted with Southern Oregon.
    Ed Dutton, our new road supervisor, has been changing the road between here and the Antelope bridge and those who have seen his work are singing his praise. He surely is doing some fine work.
    Tuesday morning's train bore the remains of D. G. Karnes, and there were quite a number of the members of the I.O.O.F. lodge of Medford, and also several of the members of the Eagle Point lodge, went to Butte Falls to take part in the burial exercises. Rev. L. L. Simmons officiated.
    J. P. Alexander, sales manager of the Studebaker cars, was at the Sunnyside for dinner Thursday; also Irvin Howe and his uncle, George Howe, of Trail. They came out from Trail to bring a lot of mohair for Mr. Ash, the Trail merchant.
    Mrs. O. Bell of Brownsboro and her son-in-law, George Brown, were doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    A notice calling for applicants for examination in the civil service for the position of postmaster in Eagle Point to meet the examiners in Medford April 11, 1914, is posted in our post office. It seems to be the universal desire that the present incumbent, A. J. Florey, will be continued in the position, as a more efficient and accommodating man will be hard to find.
    Miss Edna Whitney of Portland, a member of the nurse corps of that city, came down to bring William von der Helle's little daughter, Joyce, who has been in a hospital for treatment. Miss Edna is one of our Jackson County-raised girls and has quite a number of friends here.
    Mrs. W. W. Willits and her daughter, Miss Inez, came out from their home, Persist, Tuesday, spent the night with us and went to Medford Wednesday morning.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Jacks, Tuesday, March 24, 1914, a son.
    August Edler of Lake Creek spent Tuesday night with us at the Sunnyside.
    Carl von der Hellen of Wellen went to Lake Creek on business Wednesday afternoon, to be gone two or three days.
    The farmers are wishing for rain.
    Corbin Edgell, one of our prosperous orchardists, was in town Wednesday afternoon, and while here paid me a six months' subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1914, page 3


EXAMINATION FOR EAGLE POINT POSTMASTER
    The United States Civil Service Commission announces that on April 11 an examination will be held at Medford, Oregon, to fill a contemplated vacancy in the position of fourth-class postmaster at Eagle Point, Oregon. The compensation of the postmaster at this office was $793 for the last fiscal year.
    Age limit, 21 years and over on the date of the examination, with the exception that in a state where women are declared by statute to be of full age for all purposes at 18 years, women of 18 years of age on the date of the examination will be admitted.
    Application forms and full information concerning the requirements of the examination can be secured from the postmaster at Eagle Point, Oregon.
    The present postmaster has announced his retirement on account of age.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Campbell, mother-in-law of Mr. Swihart of Derby, spent the night with us last Wednesday on her way to her home, Derby.
    I understand that there are five persons who will apply for a position as postmaster at this place through the civil service examination.
    Mrs. W. W. Taylor, her daughter Miss Levenah Taylor, and Mrs. Taylor's mother, Mrs. Thompson, Miss Maud Periose, Miss Hazel Brown, Miss Lanore Taylor, Ed Wolfer's stepdaughter, John Winningham of Trail and your correspondent took the car for Medford last Thursday, and John Winningham and I went on to Jacksonville to pay our taxes. Speaking of taxes, some of our citizens who were so anxious to bond our town and to bond the county for the Pacific Highway are kicking themselves all around for their foolishness in listening to the boosters and grafters, and some of them are wondering why our taxes are so high.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ridgeway, father and mother of Mrs. T. F. Boltz, made a hurried trip to Portland last week, returning Thursday, and was met by their daughter in Medford.
    Miss Mabel Huff, our primary teacher, dismissed her school Thursday afternoon in time to catch the 2:25 and went to Medford and back that afternoon, making up the lost time, only any hour, the next day.
    Mrs. W. W. Willits and daughter, Miss Inez, who went to Ashland last Wednesday, returned Thursday, spent that night at the Sunnyside and took the stage for their home Friday morning.
    A. J. Smoot of what was formerly Dudley, or what I used to write up as the unsurveyed country, came out Wednesday, spent the night with us and went on to Medford Thursday, returning the same day. Mr. Smoot and Elmer Spencer were the first ones to locate in that section, some eight years ago, they were soon followed by four of Elmer's brothers and families, beside Mr. Hawk, Mahony, Mrs. Albert, etc., and soon had a star mail route, post office, school and a flourishing settlement. They all remained until they made their final proof on their homesteads and now have as fine a body of timber as there is to be found in the hills of Big Butte and Rogue River. But they are all gone except Mr. Smoot and he is thinking of living in Butte Falls instead of on his homestead. They have all literally filled the requirements of the homestead law and are now enjoying life in a more thickly settled community.
    Last Friday night we had an essay contest in our school in the fifth, sixth, seventh, and eighth grades. For the fifth and sixth grades the subject was "What Effect Does the Cigarette Habit Have on the Human System," and for the seventh and eighth grades "Why Will Business Men Refuse to Employ Persons Who Are in the Habit of Using Alcoholic Beverages?"
    The meeting was held in the Baptist church and the exercises were opened by singing "Oregon Is Going Dry," and prayer by A. C. Howlett and singing "We Are Marching On."
    A short address was made by the principal of the school, W. E. Buchanan, and then the sixth grade was called to the platform and Carlyle Natwick, Miss Verta Grover, Adin Haselton, Ruth Nichols, Nellie Coy and Thelma Nichols came forward. The judges for this grade were Mabel Huff, Ethel Sidlinger and Mrs. W. E. Buchanan. They were called on to read an essay in the order named and each read an essay, not necessarily their own, for they changed off so that the judges could not be influenced by knowing the reader. In a clear distinct voice they each read an essay that was worthy of older heads.
    Mrs. S. A. Thomas of Medford came out Thursday and has spent a few days looking over the country making headquarter at the Sunnyside.
    Out of this grade Miss Adin Haselton received the first prize and Master Carlyle Natwick the second prize. The prizes offered were for the first prize, one dollar, and for the second 50 cents in cash or a book of their own choosing of the same value of the money. The same for each grade.
    The next was the fifth grade and Floyd Lake, Edna Bergher,  Hawk, Bow Buchanan and Florence Lake took their places. The judges for this grade were Mrs. Bryant, Mabel Huff and Mrs. Petty and they awarded the first prizes to Florence Lake, first prize, and Bow Buchanan the second.
    The seventh grade was called and Bernice Simmons, Laura Webber, Albert Conley, John Butler and Myrtle Farlow [omission]. The judges for this grade were Miss Huff, Mrs. Bryant and Mrs. Petty and they gave the first prize to Bernice Simmons and the second to Miss Laura Webber.
    Then the eighth grade was called for and Clara Owings, Gladys Natwick, Roberta Pearce, Jennetta Haselton, Walter Painter and James Butler came forward and took their places. The judges for this grade were E. S. Hitzler of Medford, Rev. L. L. Simmons and Miss Sidlinger and they awarded the first prize to Roberta Pearce and the second to Gladys Natwick.
    Mrs. Bryant sang a solo between the fifth and seventh grades. The exercises continued until 10:30 and it was apparently universally considered that it was the best entertainment we have had for several years. The essays were well written and they showed that the children had been thoroughly taught along these lines and also showed that the older ones had been reading up on the great question of the day, "Why Business Men Will Not Employ a Habitual User of Intoxicants." There was a large audience who paid strict attention and many of them will remember the lessons they were taught by the fifth, sixth, seventh and eighth grades of the Eagle Point school. Some of them expect to enter the contest for the state prizes. The audience was dismissed by Rev. L. L. Simmons.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed Cingcade, one of our promising young men, started last Friday for California. He has gone to assist his uncle, Mr. Little, on a stock ranch.
    Harvey Stanley of Brownsboro was doing business in our town last Saturday.
    Messrs. C. H. Bettman, representative of H. Wolf & Sons of Portland, agent for Boss of All Overalls and play suits, and F. H. Rider of Baker, Ore., of the firm of Rider Bros. He was selling calendars and leather novelties, were here for supper the last of the week.
    J. H. Tyrrell of Lake Creek, his son John R. Tyrrell and wife and Mr. Tyrrell's granddaughter, Miss Eva Farlow, called for dinner last Sunday on their way home from Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Clements and their little nephew Bert, Art Nichols and wife, Fred R. Heath and wife, Wm. Messal of Lake Creek, Mr. and Mrs. F. Newport and F. E. Diamond of Medford were here for dinner Sunday and about three o'clock George von der Hellen and wife and J. V. McIntyre of the Eagle Point State Bank and wife came in for dinner. They had been up on Butte Creek and Lake Creek registering voters. They had already ordered dinner and expected to have been here by 12:30, but had a puncture so had to stop on the way for repairs, but they were thoughtful enough to phone down and let Mrs. Howlett know why they didn't come on time and assured her that they would be on hand by 3:00 o'clock and so they did, and they had such an appetite that almost anything would taste good, but all hands were satisfied by the time they got through. They reported that they had registered 31 voters during the day and had a good time, besides.
    Thomas Riley, one of our boarders, celebrated his birthday last Sunday and had a dinner at the old parental home. Our primary teacher, Miss Mabel Huff, was among the invited guests. There was only a few of the special friends of the family invited.
    Miss Vivia Pence of Elk Creek has been here the past few days visiting the family of Frank Lewis, Mrs. Frank Lewis and Mrs. David Pence, Miss Vivia's mother, are cousins.
    Perry Foster of Trail was in town Tuesday morning and reports that David Pence, the road supervisor of Trail district, has moved down from Elk Creek and established a camp at Foster's place, and is getting ready to work on the road again. Dave seems to be giving general satisfaction where he has worked on the country roads.
    Mrs. Henry Meyers of Lake Creek was with us Tuesday for dinner. She was accompanied by her son.
    Sam H. Harnish, our liveryman, has been buying up a few young calves for future market.
    George Brown and sons have been buying up a lot of mohair for the eastern market.
    Our express agent, F. Newport, shipped a fine lot of turkeys last Tuesday to the Portland market.
    There was a mothers' and teachers' meeting held in the Baptist church Monday night, but as your correspondent was slightly on the bum, he is not able to give a detailed report of the meeting, but will try to next time.
    Mrs. A. C. Howlett and our daughter, Hattie, went to Grants Pass last Saturday to see R. Findley.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1914, page 6



PIONEER TIMBER BUYER SAYS BUG SCARE NONSENSE
    Levi L. Angle of Ashland was in Medford a few days ago, visiting his brother, William Angle of 609 East Main Street.
    Mr. Angle formerly resided in Medford, twenty years ago. At that time he was owner of part of Medford's townsite, and aside from being interested in Medford real estate, he was locating timber land, the Keene and Jenny Creek section of sugar pine, east from Ashland, being his field of operation. This tract of land now embraces several thousand acres and is known as the A. C. Hopkins tract.
    Mr. Angle claims to be the founder of the big Hopkins tract. "Yes," said Mr. Angle, "I don't think there is any mistake as to who first began gathering up this immense tract of timber. I came to Medford in September, 1885, from Pennsylvania. I had been a lumberman then and was an experienced cruiser and estimator of timber. I made inquiry in Medford to learn if there was any timber land to be had in this part of the coast country. I was told there was lots of it, but that it was not worth paying taxes on; but in 1886 I secured plats and information from J. S. Howard, then a surveyor of Medford, and started for the timber. I soon discovered that there was lots of timber in that locality and I began corresponding with lumbermen in Pennsylvania, and finally interested my old friend, A. C. Hopkins, who in 1889 sent C. H. Pierce here to look over the timber.
    "The inspection proved satisfactory and in about 1890 they commenced buying land at $5 an acre. This buying continued at about this price until 40,000 acres had been acquired.
    "While all this buying was going on I endeavored to induce Medford people to take up some of the government land then vacant in that section, but they only laughed at me--no one would take a quarter section. That tract of land is now worth between three and three and a half million dollars.
    "This bug scare in the timber over there is a delusion and is intended to impair the value of the timber. There are no more bugs now that there were twenty-five years ago."
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1914, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    H. K. Flower of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, came in last Wednesday and engaged a room, and the next day went up on the head of Salt Creek to look over a timber claim that belongs to one of his neighbors in Idaho.
    Bert E. Hill of Moward, Ill., was also a guest with us the same night. He was on his way to Derby.
    Miss Edna Whitley of Portland, who has been the guest of Mr. and Mrs. William von der Hellen for the past few days, went up to Prospect to visit her parents last Wednesday.
    Mrs. Jones, nee Lelah Fryer, of Seattle, Wash., came down just in time to see her mother before she passed away last Wednesday, April 1, and the next morning Mrs. Arglee Green, her sister, arrived from near Los Angeles.
    Died--April 1, 1914, Mrs. Lavicia Jane Fryer, consort of the late J. J. Fryer, after a lingering illness of several years, aged 62 years, 8 months and 23 days. The subject of this notice was born in Platt County, Missouri, July 8, 1851, crossed the plains in '52 with her parents, John Lewis, who settled in the Willamette Valley, just below Albany, where she remained until she was 16 years of age, when her parents moved to Jackson County. While they were in the Willamette Valley they were washed out of their house and home in January, 1862, making Mr. Lewis' family one of the historic families of that section. The few early settlers who have survived perhaps will remember the incident of the family's remarkable escape during that flood, and as I was in Eugene at the time the incident comes fresh to my mind. The waters of the Willamette River at that time were spread all over the low land along both sides of the river, and in many instances, owing to sloughs being filled with water, the inhabitants were often cut off from their barns and also from the higher land. In this particular instance Mr. L. had managed to get to his barn and turned all of his stock loose, but had no way of going to the upland, which was about a mile away. So he was there with his wife, her mother, Grandma Turner, a perfectly helpless invalid, and five children, namely Henry, now of Coeur d'Alene, Idaho; Newton of Applegate, Frank of Eagle Point, Mrs. Amanda Bell of Talent. (There were two other children born later, but they were not in the flood, that is, Mrs. Mary D. Woods of Coos Bay and Mrs. Belle Miller, whose residence I could not learn.) As the water began to come into the house those who were large enough to carry things upstairs took such as they could up and then began to look with all anxiety for the rescuers, but they were looking in vain, and about 2 p.m. Mr. L. saw that the house was bound to go, so he took a bed cord off one of the bedsteads (they didn't have spring beds and slat bedsteads in those days), taking the rope he tore off a part of the roof of the house, climbed from there to a clump of balm or cottonwood trees, and taking the rope wove a place where he could place the boards of the upper floor, then taking the children and lashing them on the platform one by one, he then took Mrs. Turner and then his wife, and after they were all safely anchored in the branches of the trees, worked as long as it was light enough to see. But they waited in vain. They had not been in the tree top but a few minutes until the house washed away, and Mr. Lewis, Uncle Johnnie, as we used to call him, in relating the incident to me, said that every time the trees would vibrate he could feel that they were gradually giving way. And thus they sat during that long night and the rain coming down in torrents, expecting to be dashed to a watery grave every moment. But at last, about 10 o'clock the next day, the rescuers came and took them off. This was a part of the experience of the deceased in her younger days.
    She was married to James John Fryer in March, 1867, and has spent all of her married life in this neighborhood, except two years she spent in Coos Bay. To this union were born three daughters, Arglee Green, Lelah Jones and Gladys Pierce, with whom she was living at the time of her death. Shortly after her marriage she made a profession of her faith in Christ and was immersed by Rev. R. C. Oglesby and later united with the Baptist Church at this place. In the latter part of her life she seemed resigned and seemed to realize that the time was short when she would go to that mansion prepared for her.
    She not only leaves her three daughters and five grandchildren, but a host of friends to feel the bereavement. The funeral services were conducted at the family residence by her pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, and the remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on Friday, the 3rd inst. There was a large concourse of people in attendance during the services, and quite a number followed the remains to the last resting place.
    Died--April 3, 1914, Mrs. Rachael Allen of Derby, aged 93 years, 2 months and 18 days. A more extended notice later.
    Professor C. B. Johnson closed his school in Laurel Hill district last Wednesday. They had a nice program in the closing exercises, and Mrs. Clarno, with whom he boarded, gave a party at night, and they had candy pulling, music, etc., no dancing, and a good time generally.
    George Wilkins of Kentucky and Mr. Mahan and his son, of Siskiyou County, California, spent Friday night with us.
    A. W. Walker, candidate for sheriff on the Republican ticket, and Henry Miller of Medford were with us Friday. Mr. Walker seems to be quite popular in our little town. We also had Dr. Seely and wife and A. R. Saling and Mrs. Cunningham, all of Medford, for dinner Friday. Mr. Saling was out to show them some of our good land.
    Mr. and Mrs. Paul Opdyke of Trail came out Saturday, took dinner with us and went on to Medford Saturday afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 6, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Samantha Minter was the guest of Mrs. Eugene Bellows the last of the week.
    Tom Belcher has traded his Elk Creek property to Mr. Lee for Central Point property. He moved to Central Point the first of the week.
    Mrs. Frank Johnson and children have returned home after spending the winter on Reese Creek.
    Miss Eula Houston closed the spring term of school in the Antioch district Friday.
    Elton Raimey was in Central Point Thursday.
    Harry Coffeen went to Medford Wednesday to play baseball.
    C. Kregor and Harry Howard were Central Point visitors Wednesday.
    Professor Johnson closed a six months' term of school in the Laurel district Wednesday with a nice program. In the evening Mrs. Jettie Clarno gave a candy pulling and all present report an enjoyable time.
    The rain Saturday was welcomed by the farmers.
    Mrs. Daily of Medford spent the weekend with her father, J. C. Hannah.
    Bert Wygant of Ashland has been visiting his sister, Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    Amos Ayres stayed with Lloyd French Wednesday night.
    Mr. Arbogast has sold his farm near Long Branch to California parties and has gone back to his former home on the John Day River.
    Mrs. George Stacey of Beagle was the guest of her sister, Mrs. Will Houston, of Long Branch.
    Mr. Trusty of Elk Creek (our next mail carrier) made a trip on the stage recently to learn his new duties.
    Ed Pence and family are camped at Perry Foster's, cooking for Dave Pence's road crew.
    Mrs. Peter Betz was hostess to the circle Tuesday and quilted on a quilt. Those present were: Mesdames Howard, Coffeen, J. Clarno, B. Clarno, Betz and Bergman.
    Tom Raimey of Central Point has rented the Lawrentz place and has been up putting in a crop.
    Chris Natwick is grading and building a piece of road south of Reese Creek.
    Steve Smith of Medford drove out to spend Saturday and Sunday with Henry French.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 6, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. A. R. Eyer of Reymore [Kenmore?], Wash., is here visiting one of her old neighbors, Mr. Hoogerhyde and family.
    Edward M. Koenig of Oakland, Cal., a representative of the Building Investment Company of Oakland, Cal., spent the night with us Monday on his way to Derby to visit his mother, Mrs. Hill.
    C. J. Herron, formerly manager of the Dr. Coughlin orchard, has been here for the past few days, packing his furniture, getting it ready to be shipped to Portland, where he will take charge of a floral establishment.
    Mr. Hughes of Butte Falls was with us Monday night on his way to his home in Butte Falls. Mr. Hughes had been out to Medford to put in an order for more goods for his store at Butte Falls. He seems to be quite optimistic with regard to the future of his home town.
    Herman Meyer and his son, Herman J., of Lake Creek, were at the Sunnyside for dinner Tuesday.
    Last Saturday afternoon Ed Winkle and a man by the name of Wyatt came in from Medford in a rig and soon after engaged in a fist fight on the street and soon found themselves in the lockup or cooler, but were soon released on $10 cash bail to appear before our town recorder, J. V. McIntyre. Monday morning Mr. Wyatt failed to appear, but Mr. Winkle was on hand and at first pleaded not guilty to the charge of disorderly conduct and fighting on the street, but after hearing the evidence of H. O. Childreth he changed his mind and pleaded guilty, and the court imposed a fine of $12.60, including costs, which he paid.
    Our town marshal ran three donkeys into the pound last Monday, but they were taken out Tuesday.
    Jeff Brophy of Peyton and wife were in town Tuesday.
    Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro brought in his clipping of mohair Tuesday and sold it to Brown Bros. and they shipped it to Salem.
    George Lynch of Elk Creek also brought in his mohair Tuesday night for the same firm. He was in company of John J. Winningham and they spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    I understand that David Cingcade has sold his band of sheep to Geo. Brown of Brownsboro and Frank Rhodes, but I did not learn the price paid. I also learned that David Cingcade has purchased about fifty head of cattle, but did not learn the particulars. Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, was helping him brand his cattle Tuesday.
    S. A. Carlton of Ashland, who had been on his farm, about five miles southeast of here, was in town the first of the week.
    Mrs. Katie Walch came over on Tuesday night to see her little grandson, Lester Messal, who was operated on by Drs. Holt, Stearns and Thayer some time ago for appendicitis, is on the road to recovery.
    In my last I made mention of the death of Grandma Allen April 3, and promised to give more of the particulars in my next. Mrs. Rachel Allen was born in Lunenburg County, Ky., January 15, 1821, aged 93 years 2 months and 18 days. She was married twice, the first time to Cyrus Ganes in her native state, and after his death she married Thomas J. Allen in St. Louis, Mo. The dates of the marriages could not be obtained. She crossed the plains in 1864 to Portland, Or., and in 1869 moved to Jackson County, Oregon, where she had made her home most of the time up to the day of her death. She professed religion when she was quite young and united with the Baptist Church and lived a consistent Christian life. She leaves two boys by her first husband and three boys and one girl by Mr. Allen. She also leaves two stepsons by Mr. Allen's first wife. She was a woman that was highly esteemed by those who knew her best. She died at the home of her son, John M. Allen, near Derby, where she made her home during the latter part of her life. For several years she was blind and dependent, but the kindly hands of her son's family ministered to her every want. The remains were interred in the Jacksonville cemetery Monday, April 6. The religious ceremonies were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 9, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Margaret Howard called on Hildreth and Mabel Foster Sunday morning.
    Will Houston and family attended the entertainment given by their daughter Miss Eula and school at Antioch last Saturday night.
    Mrs. Hammond's father, sister and husband autoed out from Medford and spent Sunday with her.
    Mr. Martin went to Trail Sunday to visit his daughter, Mrs. Merriman.
    Tom Raimey of Central Point has bought the Burch farm.
    Ira Dunlap of Trail went to the valley Friday.
    Dave Pence has moved his road crew to the Dodge place and has a good crew at work.
    Mrs. Jasper Hannah and children spent Sunday with Miss Mima Hannah.
    Mrs. Gene Bellows took dinner with Mrs. Pettegrew Sunday.
    Mrs. Conover was in Eagle Point Saturday.
    The rain is the cause of the many smiles on the farmers' faces this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 12, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Henry, one of our rising young school teachers, who has a homestead on Rogue River near the mouth of Big Butte Creek, came out Wednesday afternoon and went on to his old home in Jacksonville the same day.
    James Culbertson of Lake Creek went to Medford on the same car on his way to Ashland to visit his mother and brother, returning Thursday morning.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent also the P.&E. train for Medford Wednesday afternoon, spending the night in Medford, and the next morning took the Southern Pacific for Ashland to hear ex-Governor Patterson of Tennessee speak on the reason why he changed his advocacy of the saloon interests to the cause of prohibition, and feel well paid for the trip. Notwithstanding the fact that it was raining like guns, there was a large crowd met him with hearty cheers. Dr. Purley A. Baker, superintendent of the National Anti-Saloon League, made the opening address and made a profound impression on the minds of his hearers, telling more particularly of the wonderful progress that has been made in the cause of prohibition and the wonderful results and of the bright prospect there is for California, Oregon, Washington and Idaho to be voted into the dry ranks this coming fall.
    Mr. Patterson was in poor plight to try to make a speech, for he was so weak that he could hardly stand without assistance; in fact, he had to brace himself by the back of a chair. Still he spoke in a clear, distinct voice and was interrupted several times by bursts of applause. He related his own experience when he was in the ranks of the whiskeyites and how hard he fought to try to keep the saloon interests in the lead, even vetoing the prohibition bill passed by the legislature of Tennessee to try to save the state from going into the dry ranks, but finally the liquor habit entered his own family, taking his own son, and then he thought that it was time to call a halt and change his course, and now he is spending the rest of his life trying to undo the evil he had done.
    The next morning I started out to take a view of the city and see what improvements had been made since I was there some five years ago. As I started out to take a stroll over at least a part of the city and had just reached the post office, and who should I meet but Judge C. B. Watson, who I have known for the past forty years, and about the first thing that he suggested was for us to take a walk up in the park, so we started and I was soon bewildered, for I could not find the old Ashland mills, and Nicholson blacksmith shop and some of the old surroundings, and in the place of the old water wheel there came a nice waterfall, and the water was used to irrigate and beautify the park, and if I say that they have one of the most beautiful parks in the state I feel that I am inside of the truth. Leaving there, we went to the city hall, a beautiful large building with offices arranged for every department of the city work; from there to the armory, but it was closed, so that we could not enter, and the same fate awaited us upon our visit to the Natatorium, it being also closed, but the building showed public enterprise, and after visiting several other places of interest, such as the Elks' building, the new theater, etc., the judge invited me to walk out to the high school, but by the time I had kept up with stairs and greeting old-time friends and new acquaintances, I felt tired enough to call a halt. But one thing is sure, that is that Ashland has improved very much in the past five years, and shows signs of prosperity, if they do have to go to Medford for their whiskey.
    On my way home I rode with F. D. Swingle, a friend of mine, in his auto to Medford and had a fine view of the surrounding country, and after spending a part of the day visiting friends in Medford, took the P.&E. for home, and among the passengers were Rev. L. L. Simmons, Fred R. Heath, W. E. Buchanan and W. C. Clements, who had been in Medford to take the civil service examination for the position of postmaster of Eagle Point.
    Also among the passengers were Miss Frances Heath, who has just returned from Eugene, where she is attending the state university and has come home to take a week's vacation with her parents.
    Accompanying Dr. W. E. Buchanan was an old friend, Dr. J. E. Montgomery of Bandon, who is here now visiting the doctor. He seems to be highly pleased with our country and surroundings; also Dr. W. P. Holt, Mrs. T. F. Boltz, Mrs. Charles Bacon, John Greb and daughter, Miss Frances; A. Witherby, recently from Iowa, who was on his way to visit his son and family, who are living in this neighborhood, and Mrs. F. M. Stewart was also on the car.
    Mrs. John Stevens of Myrtle Creek, Or., who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, of this place, returned home Saturday.
    As the result of our saloon, John Laden is now languishing in the cooler, laying out a fine of $12 for drunkenness and disorderly conduct and the taxpayers are paying his board.
    Died--In Eagle Point, April 12, 1914, Mrs. W. L. Childreth. Particulars the next time I write. Funeral services Tuesday, the 14th in Central Point cemetery.
    I have quite a lot of items, but will have to keep them for next time, as my letter is now too long.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 15, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Seedy, mother of Mrs. Dr. W. P. Holt, is here visiting her daughter and last Sunday took dinner at the Sunnyside with the doctor and his family. We also had as guests at the hostelry, Rev. W. E. Smith, who is traveling in the interest of the American Sunday School Union, for the missionary Medford district. Prof. Charles E. Johnson, George H. Wamsley, Prof. A. H. Peachey of Ashland, who is engaged selling Wards medicines and extracts, J. A. Howard, who has a homestead on Rogue River and Chris Bergman, one of our prosperous farmers who lives on the free ferry road.
    J. L. Hovey, who has had charge of the Alta Vista orchard for some time, and had planned to move back east but has decided to remain here and has ordered the Daily Mail Tribune to be sent to him again, also Mr. J. M. Cox has ordered the Weekly Mail Tribune to be sent to his son, O. M. Cox, in Throckmorton, Texas. The old gentleman believes in keeping posted himself but also keeping his sons posted, for this is the second subscription he has given me for his boys and takes the paper himself.
    While we, that is my wife, daughter, Miss Rosa Ayres, assistant in the Sunnyside Hotel, and myself, were off to attend the funeral of the late Mrs. W. L. Childreth and Jud Edsall had charge of the hotel, there was quite a number of people came in for dinner but did not learn the names of any except Mrs. George von der Hellen and her sister, Miss Mabel Huff. Mrs. von der Hellen took the place of Miss Ethel Sidlinger, who has charge of the intermediate department of our school who went to the funeral of Mrs. Childreth and secured the services of Mrs. von der Hellen for the occasion. County Commissioner Con Leever was also among the guests Tuesday.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. Charles Jones, nee Lelah Fryer, of Seattle, started for her home on Monday, the 13th. She came down to see her mother in her last hours and remained a while visiting her sister, Mrs. Floyd Pearce.
    In my last I made mention of the death of Mrs. Grace C. Childreth, wife of W. L. Childreth. The subject of this notice was born in New Pence, Mo., October 11th, 1876 and died April 12th, 1914, aged 37 years, 6 months and 1 day. She was married to Wesley L. Childreth December 12th, 1893, and to them were born six children; one died in infancy and she leaves two daughters and three sons, her husband, father and mother, three brothers and one sister. She was converted at the age of fourteen and united with the Baptist Church and has lived a consistent Christian life up to the day of her death. She came to Eagle Point in 1903 and since that time has been an active worker in the church, a regular attendant at prayer meetings, an active member of the W.C.T.U. and was universally beloved by those with whom she associated. The funeral services were conducted by the members of the Rebekah lodge of Eagle Point. The funeral sermon was preached by her pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, in the church building and the interment was in the Central Point cemetery April 14th. There was a very large procession followed the remains to her last resting place. Her death has caused a vacancy hard to fill.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Chris Bergman made a business trip to Jacksonville the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Garrett of Medford spent Easter with home folks, the McCabes.
    Mrs. Ira Dunlap and children went up to their new home on Trail Monday.
    Jakie Ragsdale spent the weekend with the Daw boys.
    Among those in Eagle Point this week were: Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz, Gene Bellows, Henry French.
    Mrs. Wallace Coffeen in being visited by her mother from Ohio.
    Jasper Hannah was in Central Point Friday.
    Harry Coffeen went to Sisson on Wednesday to spend the summer.
    Mrs. C. Kregor is visiting relatives in Sams Valley.
    Miss Clara Skyrman spent the weekend at home.
    Easter was the occasion of a large crowd at the Lone school house. After Sunday school and Christian Endeavor in the morning a bountiful picnic dinner was served. In the afternoon a nice Easter program was given.
    Fred Hoffman was out from Medford and spent a week on the ranch and then went to Applegate the first of the week.
    C. Kregor went to Central Point Thursday.
    The Wards and Rawleigh wagons were through here this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday was set apart as fire department day in our school and in the afternoon the principal, W. E. Buchanan, gave his room instructions along that line of work and he reports that the children seemed to take considerable interest in the subject. Your correspondent visited the intermediate department in the afternoon, but Miss Sidlinger had secured the services of Mrs. W. E. Buchanan, wife of our principal, to take charge of her room and Miss Mabel Huff, our primary teacher, had turned her school over to the care of Mrs. Buchanan also and the two teachers had gone to Medford to witness a play at the Page, so you may rest assured that Mrs. Buchanan had her hands full with about 40 little boys and girls but she seemed to be equal to the occasion. Speaking of our school brings to mind the fact that our school board have employed the teachers for the next year as follows: Principal, W. E. Buchanan, $100 per month; Miss Minnie B. Taylor, intermediate, $75 per month, and Mrs. George von der Hellen, primary teacher, $75 per month. The first and the last have been tried as Professor Buchanan is the principal at present and Mrs. von der Hellen taught our primary last year and gave universal satisfaction. Neither Miss Sidlinger nor Miss Huff applied for a position, as I understand they did not wish to teach this coming season.
    W. E. Hammel was among the business visitors last Friday.
    Mrs. Susan Hart was in town the last of the week and reports that she was riding horseback and by some means the horse got from under her and when she came in contact with the ground she came near breaking her back and the result was when I saw her she was quite lame, but no serious injuries.
    A. J. Daley is driving the posts for his fence to open the new county road through his land joining our town, and Joseph Grey, representative of Gaddis & Dixon, the Page fence men of Medford, was out to see him with regard to supplying him with the fence.
    Grandma Klingle of Lake Creek came out on the P.&E. Saturday and took the stage for her home.
    John Foster, who has been working in Medford for some time, came out Saturday.
    John Conover and family were in town Friday night and went up to their home Saturday.
    Mrs. Dennis of Derby was attending prayer meeting Friday night.
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock, who is teaching at the Reese Creek school house, was a visitor at the Sunnyside in company with Mrs. F. J. Ayres. Miss Nealon will close her school next Friday and Saturday night; her school will give an entertainment in the Reese Creek school house.
    Mr. and Mrs. Paul Opdyke of Trail came out Tuesday on their way to Medford to see her father, J. S. Tucker, who has been up to their ranch, the old Stone home, and returned Thursday and was taken with an attack of paralysis in Medford.
    As I was away from home Sunday, Monday and Tues. I am not able to tell much of what was going on here during that time, but I learned that Miss Helen Yockey, the caretaker of the interests of the Mail Tribune, and her mother were at the Sunnyside for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1914, page 4


Eagle Point Items
    T. E. Nichols, Lewis Smith, Tommie Nichols, and Roy Ashpole made a business trip to Medford Tuesday.
    Miss Marguerite Florey, who spent the past week with Miss Loretta Childreth, returned to Jacksonville Sunday.
    Irvin Culbertson, sister Miss Mabel and brother attended the lecture of Mrs. Shepherd Sunday at the Baptist church.
    Hess and Bryant have been doing some carpenter work the past week for A. Corben, one of our prosperous fruit growers.
    Mrs. Wm. Dennie of Derby came down Thursday to purchase her monthly supply of provisions from Brown Bros., returning Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Wolfer and daughter Lenore and son Stanley spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan parents of Mrs. Wolfer.
    Mr. and Mrs. Conover and daughter, recently from Montana, were at the Eagle Hotel Friday night. They expect to reside at the Round Top ranch this summer.
    The Parent-Teachers meeting was held Monday evening. The subject discussed was "Physical Welfare of the Child." Several talks were given. Dr. Holt gave a very interesting talk of the proper food for the growing child which was appreciated by all.
    The people of Eagle Point were treated to a lecture by Mrs. Lulu Shepherd Sunday at the Baptist church. The Eagle Point people should feel especially favored as she never goes to small towns and only came here by a mistake in the date but expressed herself as much pleased with our little town. She was accompanied by Mrs. Godlove of Medford and both were entertained at the home of Mr. and Mrs. B. H. Bryant.
    Died, at her home in Eagle Point, Grace C. Childreth, aged 38, beloved wife of W. L. Childreth. Death came Sunday evening after an illness of some two months. All medical aid and loving hands could do was done but to no avail; the grim reaper claimed her for the realms unknown. During her illness she was patient, kind, loving, never complaining and only dreaded the parting from her loved ones as she had no fear of death. Mrs. Childreth had lived in Eagle Point 9 years and had won the love and respect of old; to know her was to love her. She was a loving wife, a devoted mother, a true friend and neighbor. She united with the Baptist Church at the age of 14 years and was a loved member of the First Baptist church of Eagle Point at the time of her death. She was also a member of the Rebekah lodge, who took charge of the body at the grave and consigned her to the grave with their usual ceremony, which was beautiful. The funeral sermon was preached by her beloved pastor, Rev. Simmons, at the Baptist church where a large congregation had gathered to pay their last tribute to their friend and sister. She leaves to mourn her loss a husband and five children, Loretta, Orvil, Graydon, Nara and Heath, a father, mother, three brothers and one sister and hosts of friends and hearts go out in sympathy to the parents in this the loss of their first child. The family have the sympathy of the entire community. The beautiful casket was covered with floral tributes costly, beautiful, and rare. The Baptist church presented a wreath of white carnations and rosebuds. The Rebekahs a wreath of delicate pink carnations and ferns. The senior class of B.Y.P.U. a lovely anchor of calla lilies. The junior class a lovely little cross of Easter lilies. The W.C.T.U. a spray of delicate white flowers. A beautiful motto made of daisies with the words "Mother at Rest'' by Mrs. Della Nichols and Mabel Taylor, and numerous bouquets by other friends. Interment was made in Central Point cemetery where a large procession of sorrowing friends followed her to her last earthly resting place.
Central Point Herald, April 23, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Saturday the 18th Rev. M. C. Davis came up to the Sunnyside to pay me a visit and engage my company to go with him the next day to Antioch school house where he had reorganized a Sunday school and had an appointment to preach at 11 a.m., so starting out with our team and rig we went directly to the school house where we found the Sunday school in session and while I was riding along I noticed that the road and especially at the Modoc orchard they had been making some decided improvements and one thing that I noticed was that they are putting up a large barn in addition to the one they already have. I also noticed that the road supervisor has been doing some very substantial work on the road. After preaching and partaking of a fine dinner with our friend, Mrs. Chase, and her son, we turned our course for Agate where I preached to an attentive if not large audience. Again retracing our steps we went to Table Rock and Brother Davis preached again and after spending the night with our old friend Captain S. M. Nealon, we turned our course up the river for Elk Creek, reaching there in time for a late dinner with another old friend, Geo. Lynch, and about the first thing we noticed was a neat picket fence around his place, besides some material changes in his residence. I also notice that Mr. McDonald has erected three houses on the farm he bought from the Johnson brothers, besides making some other substantial improvements. I also noticed that George Wicks has been fencing and clearing more land and other improvements. While I was on my rounds Monday and Tuesday I tried to do something for the Medford Mail Tribune, but about the first thing that I would hear was "I tell you, Mr. Howlett, it took every cent I could raise to pay my taxes and in some instances had to borrow the money," and some of them would relate how their taxes were increased over last year's from 25 to as high as 100 percent, and the question of taxation seemed to be the paramount thought, or rather how we are to meet our taxes.
    Miss Alma Gould, who has been teaching on Poormans Creek, came out on the P.&E. and after taking dinner with us went on up to Lake Creek with Charley Klingle to pay them a visit. She taught in that district last year and has a host of friends in that neighborhood.
    Mrs. Clements of Central Point came out Wednesday to visit some of her old-time friends here. She formerly lived in our town.
    J. S. Vestal, who has a farm on the Derby road, was doing business among us Thursday.
    Prof. C. E. Johnson went to Medford to hear Sam Small speak on state and nationwide prohibition.
    The Ladies' Aid Society is having a nice large croquet ground laid off in the town park.
    Bert Higinbotham of Prospect was a guest with us Thursday night.
    A. Corbin is having some substantial improvements made on his place and among other things is having a lot of wire fence put up.
    N. Garren, who formerly worked on the Corbin place, is now superintendent on the Laidlaw orchard and since he has moved has concluded to subscribe for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    E. C. Silliman, representing the Medford Candy Manufacturing Co., and N. C. McConnell, representing the Crescent Mfg. Co., of Seattle, Wash., were doing business among us Wednesday, and took dinner with us.
    Ralph Stanley of Brownsboro was here for dinner Thursday.
    There seems to be considerable rejoicing among the many friends of Thomas E. Nichols on account of his receiving the nomination for state senator.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 27, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Mima Hannah is in Medford with her sister, Mrs. Tim Daily.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pence went to Central Point Saturday.
    Miss Rose Nealon closed her seven months' term of school with a splendid program Saturday evening. Miss Nealon and her school went to Derby Friday and joined them in a picnic. They had a cyphering match, foot races, sack races and other amusements, but what was enjoyed most of all was the bountiful picnic dinner. Mr. Peterson was present and gave them a nice talk.
    Miss Murl Coffeen returned home from Medford Sunday.
    Harry Howard made a flying trip to Medford this week.
    John Foster was over from Eagle Point the first of the week visiting relatives.
    Tuesday there was a school rally at Trail. All of [the] neighboring schools were represented and everyone enjoyed themselves.
    Among those in Eagle Point this week were Ed Foster and Gene Bellows and families.
    Charley Coffeen and sister, Miss Murl, spent Thursday evening with Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard. They spent the evening in musical entertainment. The violin they used is an instrument made in the seventeenth century and has been in the Howard family for several generations.
    John Coffeen is visiting home folks.
    Mrs. McCabe and Mrs. Jettie Clarno are on the sick list this week.
    C. H. Veighte was down from Ashland to his ranch this week.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made professional calls at Butte Falls and on Applegate this week.
    Miss Mae French caught a nice trout a foot and a half long in the Rogue River a few days ago.
    Several attended the ball game near Beagle Sunday.
    Bennie Bellows gave a party Saturday, it being his fifth birthday. After a merry time playing games, a nice luncheon was served. Those present were: Bertha and John Clarno, Frank Pettegrew, Cora French, Hildreth and Mabel Foster and Edward and Bennie Bellows.
    Mesdames French, Clarno and Foster and Miss Ethel Ewen called on Mrs. Eugene Bellows Saturday.
    Mr. Price and family of Medford autoed out to take dinner with his sister, Mrs. Wallace Coffeen, Sunday. Their mother, Mrs. Price, returned home with him.
    John Houston and wife and Grandpa Houston were Beagle visitors Sunday. Grandpa Houston remained with his daughter, Mrs. Jasper Rogers, to visit.
    A tiny stranger of ten and one-half pounds made his arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Radford Monday. Dr. Holt was in attendance.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 27, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Rhodes, one of our civil engineers and a homesteader, had a load of silo lumber taken from the Eagle Point lumber yard out to his farm last Friday. I notice in my rounds in the country that there is getting to be quite a number of silos erected, and all that have used them speak in high terms of the ensilage for food for hogs and cattle.
    Ed Foster and family were doing business with our merchants last Saturday.
    Miss Alma Gould returned from her trip up in the lake country Saturday. She managed to make her trip up in that neighborhood just at the time of the school rally and she reports having had a very enjoyable time among her old friends.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons went up to Lake Creek with Irwin Culbertson, the mail carrier, and while there registered 30 voters and secured 40 additional names to a petition he has been circulating to have the question of placing an amendment to the constitution prohibiting the manufacturing or sale of intoxicating liquors in the state of Oregon except for scientific medicinal and sacramental purposes, swelling his petition to considerable over 100, while I have over 100 names on the one that I have been circulating.
    Mrs. John Tyrrell of Lake Creek came out and took dinner here with Miss Alma Gould and both went on to Medford the same day, but Mrs. Tyrrell came back Sunday and went on up home.
    Samuel T. Owings of Woodburn, Ore., is here visiting his brother George, the proprietor of the Eagle Hotel. He is on his way to Klamath County where he has a stock farm.
    R. R. Minter and his daughter, Miss Minnie, were here on business last Saturday.
    Miss Rose Nealon closed her school in the Lone (Reese Creek) district last Friday and on Saturday night her school gave an entertainment that reflects credit on the school, teacher and the managers. It has been a subject of remark what a fine program they had and how well it was carried out. There were people from most of the surrounding school districts, and the house was so full that a large number had to stand not only in the main building but in the cloak room. If you want to get up something that is really good, where it is not killed with red tape, go to the country school districts.
    Mrs. James Ringer, formerly of this place but now of Medford, has been here for the past few days looking after her property.
    Mrs. B. W. Bryant has gone to Josephine County to visit the family of Rev. J. P. Moomaw.
    Our picture show men seem to be doing a good business in their line, as I am informed by F. T. Newport that last Saturday night they had a full house and in conversation with him he assured me that they intend to cut out having their moving picture show on Sunday nights as they do not want to interfere with the regular church services.
    A. E. LaPointe, representing the I.N.L. Monument Company of Central Point, was here Sunday and called for a late dinner.
    Fred Pelouze, who has been on a business trip back east, has just returned and is singing the praises of Southern Oregon louder than ever.
    Mrs. J. P. Loosley of Fort Klamath and her niece Miss Ruth Culbertson of Ashland and her nephew Irwin Culbertson of Lake Creek were callers at the Sunnyside Monday for dinner. Mrs. Loosley, nee Mary Culbertson, was partly raised in this neighborhood and has a number of old acquaintances here yet. This is the first time she has been here for several years.
    W. C. Pool, one of our progressive farmers, was in town Monday morning, and while here paid me a year's subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune. F. T. Newport, our railroad agent, also paid a six month's subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1914, page 4


ROUGH AND TUMBLE BATTLE AT PROSPECT
    Tom Perdue and Bill Kincaid of Peyton attended a dance at Prospect Saturday night. They have not been friends for many months. They declared war when the dance began, but declared an armistice until the festive occasion was over, for a fight at a country dance breaks up the dance. Now Mr. Perdue is in the Sacred Heart Hospital under the care of Dr. F. J. Conroy with a broken jaw and other injuries.
    About three o'clock in the morning, the men and aides and friends retired to the back yard and fought. Kincaid was the master of the rough and tumble tactics, and conquered Perdue after 15 minutes of milling. They kicked, bit and pummeled, and the battle is said to be the most sensational and bitter ever waged in the foothill country of Jackson County. The entire neighborhood knew of the grievance between the two, and was interested in the combat.
    Warrants will probably be the next development in the case.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charles Morgan of Persist was a guest at the Sunnyside last Tuesday.
    Green Mathews was in our town buying hardware from Roy Ashpole, one of our leading hardware men.
    Last Tuesday, April 28, I hitched up the old mare, Dobbin, to the shay and started out on a tour of inspection of the roads and orchards and to try to do something in the line of business for the Mail Tribune. I found that the roads were getting wore down in places so that they were fairly good, much better than I found them between here or rather Reese Creek schoolhouse and the free ferry, for that road is just as bad as it is possible for it to be at this time of the year, extremely rough and interspersed with bad mudholes. I saw where one man had gone about seven miles from here, when he wisely turned his course and returned, really before he had reached the worst of the road. It is a fright. But on this trip I found that the road was traveled considerable and was quite decent for a buggy.
    Riding along, I noticed that A. L. Haselton has a nice lot of onions planted and is preparing to raise a large crop of beans to go with them. I did not stop, as he is a paid-up subscriber, so, passing on, I went to the Laidlaw, the old Herrin, orchard and there learned that the frost had done considerable damage to the fruit, but I learned that it had done but very little damage to the Corbin and Edgell orchards. The next day I started to the Alta Vista orchard. There I met the owner, Mr. Knight, and he took me around through a part of his orchard, for he has about 175 acres in orchard, and notwithstanding the fact that the trees were literally covered with black smoke from the crude oil that he had been burning, and every tree showed that his foreman, J. L. Hovey, whom he has had for the past several years, not only understands his business, but is a stickler to have everything just right, for he has surely one of the handsomest orchards in the valley. He said that they were using 3000 gallons of oil a night and had succeeded so far in in saving the fruit.
    From there I went to the Parton farm, but found no one at home. Mrs. Parton had gone to Medford to see her children, who are attending school there, and Mr. P. was out somewhere on his big farm, but I looked over a part of the farm, and it was truly a sight to see such a fine lot of hogs he has on the place, for they were in evidence all along the part of the farm allotted to them. He does not allow them to go everywhere, but has large alfalfa fields for them to run in. He is making a specialty of raising Poland China hogs, and judging from what I saw, will have a large lot to dispose of this fall.
    Retracing my steps when I reached home, I found Joseph O. Grey, the representative of Gaddis and Dixon, the Page fence men of Medford, and the next morning he said that he wanted to go to Mr. Parton's and John Rader's, and asked me to go with him, offering to bring me home, a distance of five or six miles, but I said no, but take me on to Medford. So we started and after going through a number of gates we reached there, but found no one at home again. Well, after riding around the farm for some time we retraced our steps, got onto the county road for Medford and started for the Rader farm. It is only a mile from Parton's straight through, but we took a circuitous route and traveled about seven miles, and the last mile was on the county road from Eagle Point to Wellen, and of all the rough roads in the United States, that takes the lead. Rough, rocky, in fact there are rocks--they are too large to call them stones--all the way from as large as a man's head to as large as a bushel basket, and Mr. Grey had to climb every steep hill with his little Ford auto, but he made the trip all O.K. But we found a better way out by going through a neighbor's farm. Well, in my rounds I collected of F. M. Corlies one subscription of the Daily Mail Tribune, $2.50, and one on the Weekly Mail Tribune of 25 cents; one subscription of J. L. Hovey of $5 and a two years' subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune from T. F. Boltz of $10.
    I see that I am getting this letter too long, but I must add that some of our enterprising citizens have laid off and arranged a tennis ground, where they can spend a few hours in the cool of the day, taking a little exercise in that line, and someone has put up some nice swings in the park for the benefit of the children.
    James M. Cronemiller, Republican candidate for county treasurer, was smiling on the people of Eagle Point Thursday and the renowned William (Bill) Hanley, progressive candidate for United States Senator, was here Wednesday. But I must stop right here, for if I don't, that editor will fire either me or my Eaglets to the wastebasket.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mat Beebe and wife of Agate, May and Marie Nealon and brother John of Table Rock autoed out to Reese Creek to the entertainment given at the school house. A number of people were up from Eagle Point also.
    Rev. Lindblad began a series of two weeks protracted meetings last Tuesday.
    Jack Frost was too friendly this week as he robbed us of most of our fruit, bit tomatoes, corn, cabbages, but did help us by killing the weeds.
    Mrs. M. Pence and children are guests at the Middlebusher home at Trail.
    Mrs. Tom Raimey and Miss Ora were out from Central Point to Jasper Hannah's the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry French were shopping in Eagle Point Monday.
    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Radford has been quite sick.
    Commissioner Smith was out calling on Dave Pence Friday.
    Tom Dawson of Trail called on his daughter Mrs. Ed Pence a few days ago.
    All those who attended the May Day parties report a good time. Some went to Prospect, Eagle Point, Beagle, Bellows and other places.
    Pete Betz was in Eagle Point Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1914, page 5



LAKE CREEK FEUD AIRED IN COURT
    A new angle in the Cool-Chapman-Daley row, which has been in progress in the Lake Creek district for eighteen months, came to light today when Judge F. M. Calkins of the circuit court, upon application of Attorney W. J. Canton, issued a temporary restraining order prohibiting W. S. Chapman from maintaining a fence that blocks the path that leads to irrigation ditch gates that furnishes the water for the Cool farm. The hearing on the injunction will be held in a day or two.
    It is alleged by the Cools that the fence is a part of a persistent effort that is being made by the pioneer families of the Lake Creek community to run them out of the country, as the result of a feud that started when W. C. Daley, a pioneer, was hit over the head with a shovel in the hands of Mrs. Cool during a fight eighteen months ago. Cool and his wife were tried on charges of assault and acquitted, but this did not smother all the bitterness.
    The Cool farm lies between the Daley and Chapman tracts. They are Portuguese, and Sergeant Pat Mego acts as interpreter.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our road supervisor, Ed Dutton, is doing some fine work on the county road between here and the Reese Creek school house, in addition to the work being done by C. H. Natwick.
    Henry French and family were among us the last of the week.
    Mr. Ash of Trail came out for a load of supplies last Saturday for his store.
    Ed Wolfer reports that he had fresh strawberries on the 29th of April, in spite of the frost.
    E. M. White of Persist, Rev. Good, the school teacher of Derby, and S. W. Eaton of Seattle, introducing the New International Encyclopedia by Dodge, Mead & Co. of New York City, were with us Friday night, and Mr. Eaton remained two days and seemed to be doing considerable business.
    Friday morning your Eagle Point correspondent went to Grants Pass to visit Dr. M. C. Findley and secure a new supply of eye water for his eyes, returning the same evening, but was just fast enough to be left by the Pacific & Eastern, so spent the night in Medford and on the way out Saturday morning fell in company with J. Hart Hamilton of San Jose, Cal., the owner of a large orchard joining Eagle Point. He simply came out to look over his orchard and take dinner at the Sunnyside, returning the same day.
    On the same train, but in his private car, came L. C. Gilman, the president of the Hill system of railroads. He went on up to Butte Falls the same day.
    Mrs. H. G. Henry and her daughter, Miss Louise, of Brownsboro, came out on the Eagle Point and Lake Creek stage, and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner, taking the P.&E. train for Medford the same day, but Miss Louise returned today, Monday.
    David Henry, an old veteran and once a respected citizen of this community, was here for dinner Friday. He was accompanied by Mrs. Hudson, a sister of his first wife. They were going to Jacksonville.
    P. E. Zepp and H. M. Coss of Medford were among the guests at the Sunnyside Saturday.
    L. K. Hawk, one of our large orchardists, was in town Saturday and told me that the frost had done him no damage at all, simply thinned out his fruit a little and saved him the expense.
    Joe Stickel of Gold Hill came in Sunday morning to visit his daughter, Mrs. Jake Jonas.
    Saturday night the blacksmith shop of Henry Childreth was burned down. He was carrying $550 insurance with a London company on the contents of the shop, and I understand that the owners of the building had it insured for $250. I understand that he and his brother, W. L. Childreth, intend to build a still larger and up-to-date shop and will soon be doing a thriving business again. Mr. Childreth had two forges and quite a supply of stock on hand and the insurance will help him to replace his stock. He has the sympathy of his many friends.
    E. A. Bass, who owns an orchard on Dry Creek; Alex Vestal of Reese Creek, Dr. W. P. Holt, wife and daughter, Miss Helen, and Mrs. Holt's mother, Mrs. Purdy; Amos Ayres, also of Reese Creek, and Professor C. E. Johnson were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday.
    I understand that Mrs. Charles Rippey, nee Lottie Taylor, formerly of this place, but now of Portland, is here visiting her mother, Mrs. R. G. Brown, and her sister, Mrs. W. H. Brown.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey, wife of our postmaster, went to Jacksonville to witness the marriage of her daughter, Marguerite, to Harold Simpson of Talent. Mrs. Simpson is one of our Eagle Point ladies, and her host of friends are showering her and her husband with congratulations. Mr. Simpson had charge of the lumber yard here for some time before he was transferred to Talent, and he has a host of friends here.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 6, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Monday night, May 4, we had a parent-teachers' meeting at the schoolhouse and in connection with it an old people's old-fashioned spelling match, which afforded considerable amusement for the listeners, for some of the worst breaks imaginable were made. For instance, one of the men that we all knew better, spelled until "untill," and another spelled Wednesday "Wenesday," etc., and that shows the ease with which one can misspell a simple word. But everybody had a good time and went home feeling that there is something yet to learn from the spelling book.
    Miss Olive Petty came into town in her father's big auto, bringing her mother, Mrs. T. A. Petty, and grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Petty, and drove up to Mr. Heath's store just the same as though she was in a one-horse buggy. She seemed to be mistress of the situation and handled the great machine as well as her father.
    I understand that the manager of the Eagle Point opera house has placed eighty new chairs in the building, so that now those wishing to attend the picture shows will not have to sit on a rough board without a backrest, as of old--a decided improvement.
    Last Wednesday J. L. Ragsdale and Wallace Cushman of Trail came out and took dinner at the Sunnyside on their way to Portland. They have been summoned to serve as jurors in the United States court for the present term.
    Joseph O. Gray, the Page fence man, motored out Wednesday to the Sunnyside, looking for W. S. Baker and Mr. Pepper to go to work to put up a lot of fence for Fred Pelouze and Austin Corbin. They were not here, however, but arrived later.
    They have several miles of fence to put up for different parties in this section and expect to be here for several weeks.
    George Phillips is setting the anchor posts for A. J. Daley's fence at this time, so as to open up the new road between here and the intersection of the Medford-Brownsboro road.
    Ex-Sheriff Joe Rader and wife were out the night of May 1, attending the dance here. They were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole.
    Word came to me yesterday that Mr. Dupray, who has a sawmill near bridge 9, on the P.&E., had his store building burned, but I have not been able to learn the particulars.
    A. Corbin and H. B. Tronson, two of our leading orchardists, went to Medford Wednesday.
    Charles Humphrey of Derby was doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    Last Tuesday night County School Superintendent J. Percy Wells and wife took the evening meal with Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen, it being George's birthday, and George, in speaking of the event, remarked that Mrs. Howlett made him a birthday cake as large as his show case in the store, but he was evidently excited.
    W. R. McLeod, who has a store near the upper steel bridge, was also doing business here Tuesday.
    We are having quite a contest here between J. V. McIntyre and C. W. Clements to see who will be the champion tennis player of Eagle Point.
    Harvey Stanley and wife, nee Ina Rader, were doing business with our merchants Wednesday.
    J. H. Cooley, one of the Medford lumber merchants, and his son, C. R. Cooley; Mr. Sullivan, the business manager of the Roguelands & Irrigation Company, and Mr. Cowgill, the civil engineer for the company; A. P. Brown, Harvey Ling, P. Murphy and Philip McCabe were at the Sunnyside for dinner Thursday, and while here Mr. McCabe gave me a subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 11, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Wallace Coffeen is quite sick. Her brother, Mr. Price, and wife of Medford, autoed out twice this week to see her.
    Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Foster were Eagle Point visitors Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Bergman spent a few days with his mother, Mrs. B. Clarno.
    Messrs. Wygant and James are the guests at the Bellows home. Mr. Wygant and son have spent several months in the East this spring.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bellows and Mrs. Graham were in Eagle Point Thursday.
    Charles Kregor went to Central Point Friday.
    Joe Hannah, Sr., is the guest of his son, Jasper. We are glad to see Mr. Hannah is able to be out again.
    Mr. and Mrs. Miller of Central Point are spending a few days with Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah.
    Clay Kregor spent a few days with his parents the last of the week.
    Harry Merriman called on home folk near Central Point this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 11, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Swen Berquist, who have a farm west of our town near the mouth of Butte Creek, were in town last Thursday.
    Elder Lindblad is conducting a meeting in the Reese Creek school house.
    Miss  Hawk, little daughter of one of our leading orchardists, was so unwell as to be unable to attend school last Friday and in telling me her reason for not being at school she expressed her regrets that she had to lose a day from school, remarked that she disliked to lose a day as she had a hard time with her arithmetic. Girls that appreciate school hours as she does will always succeed.
    Mrs. R. Gardner and Mrs. Frank Cool of Lake Creek were out here for dinner last Saturday and to do business with our merchants.
    I omitted to state in my last that three of our elderly ladies, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Mrs. A. J. Daley and Mrs. John Nichols each had the misfortune to fall, by one means or another, and each was quite badly hurt, Mrs. Stewart in her hip, Mrs. Daley in her spine and Mrs. Nichols in her wrist, but at last accounts they were all getting along quite well.
    Last Saturday John A. Honey and Charles A. Warner were here for supper. They are traveling in the interest of the Northwestern National Life Insurance Company of Minneapolis.
    A. W. Bradshaw, who is superintending the Commercial orchard on Antelope Creek, was doing business last Saturday with one of our leading merchants, F. R. Heath.
    The Ladies' Aid Society will serve chicken dinner on election day May 15th in the park.
    Ralph Stanley of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller last Saturday for dinner.
    Walter Woods was with us for dinner Saturday and he brought Mrs. Howlett some nice mutton. Henry French also brought us in three sacks of fine spuds Saturday.
    E. J. Lewis and wife, owner of the Flounce Rock ranch near Prospect, came in Saturday night with six dozen hens and two full crates of eggs for the market. They disposed of them to our railroad agent and spent the night at the Sunnyside. Sunday morning they went on to Medford to spend a few days there attending to their interests there.
    Mrs. Anna Hannah, nee Anna Pankey, formerly of Central Point, but now of the Willamette Valley, is here visiting her sister, Mrs. Thomas Cingcade.
    Grace B. Pearce of Forest Creek and Harry Maury of Jacksonville were here visiting her brother, Floyd Pearce, and family Sunday.
    Mrs. Arglee Green arrived from Southern California Sunday. She expects to live in her home, formerly the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    E. A. Bass, who owns an orchard joining the T. J. Parton farm, was here for dinner Sunday and so was J. V. McIntyre, the cashier of the First State Bank of Eagle Point and his wife.
    Harris Geppert came out Sunday to the Sunnyside, spent the night and Monday joined the crowd that went to Medford Monday morning to see the show. I learned that there were 70 went on the P.&E. beside half that number in autos and rigs. Talk about hard times in Jackson County!
    I understand that the movies were fine last Saturday night. They represented the U.S. Navy as it appears off Vera Cruz. I did not intend to go and see it but had been out riding for the Mail Tribune that day and was too tired to go out at night in the rain. Talk about rain, but it was simply fine. During my rambling I have to report that W. J. Winkle has paid up for another year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 13, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    F. Heimroth and E. E. Morrison of Medford went to Butte Falls on the P.&E.R.R. simply to see the country.
    Mrs. Ollie Bell of Brownsboro was doing business in our town the first of the week.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons and wife and Mrs. W. E. Buchanan went to Butte Falls last Tuesday in company with Mr. Kee, Mrs. Buchanan's brother.
    N. Garman and wife, foreman on the Laidlaw orchard, was in town last Tuesday and while here paid me two and a half dollars on his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. While here he gave me an account of the smashup that Mr. Petty had and what a remarkable escape they had but as the account was already published in the Daily Mail Tribune I will not repeat it in the Eaglets.
    C. W. Rice, representing the Sanitary Mattress Co. of Medford, was here taking orders for work in that line last Tuesday.
    Mrs. Arglee Green has moved into her home, the old J. J. Fryer place, and like a sensible woman gave me her subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune. She and her son Austin have gone to work to straighten up the place having several changes made in the house and putting things in shape so as to make it her home.
    Henry Thornton of Persist came out on the P.&E.R.R. on his way from Ashland where he had been visiting his old friends and relatives and the next morning took the stage for Persist.
    Last Wednesday morning I started out so see some of the old subscribers to the Daily and Weekly Mail Tribune and the first place I stopped was at the truck farm of E. S. Wolfer and about the first thing he did was to pay me a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune and then he showed me through his berry patch where he has some of the finest strawberries one would want to see and then his currants, raspberries, etc. He had just come in from doing a job of plumbing for George von der Hellen.
    I also stopped and looked over Mr. Pelouze's farm but did no business with him; passing on I met the men who are putting up a lot of wire fence for Pelouze and Mr. Corbin. Passing on through Brownsboro I stopped for dinner with one of the old standbys, Mr. George Brown and family, and while there he paid me a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Mr. Brown has been selling off some of his land and also some of his stock and is now preparing to reroof his mammoth barn that the last winter's wind partially unroofed. Leaving there I crossed the footbridge and went over to the farm of R. Hessler but did no business with him. I also visited the farm of A. H. Horton but he was not at home, although I met him on my return just coming home from San Francisco where he had been to attend the funeral of his father, but did no business with him. Going on up the creek I fell in with a company of road workers and among them was the road supervisor C. E. Stanley and he paid up his subscription. Going on to Lem Charley's I found no one at home and as it was then near 5:00 o'clock and I wanted to see some parties on the road home, turned my course homeward and in a short time met Mr. Nygren, who has a fine farm at the mouth of Salt Creek, and he looked at me and remarked, "Well I suppose that you are out again after the subscribers to the paper," and on my answering him in the affirmative he said, "Well I suppose I might as well pay you right now although we like to see you up in our country." Then I met Mr. Myers, who has a nice farm on the road but he said that he wanted to take the paper but would see me later. I also called on L. L. Bradshaw but he was not at home, but I met his estimable wife and she settled the subscriptions for the paper. The next day while waiting to have my horse shod at Fisher & Matthews blacksmith shop I took a subscription for the Daily from Verna Matthews and collected some on George Fisher's subscription and while there met Gus Nichols of Brownsboro and secured his renewal. After dinner I started out and secured the subscription of F. W. Haley to the Weekly. Going from there to P. J. Parton's I found him out in his orchard at work and there received his order for the Daily Mail Tribune instead of the weekly and then started home in one of the best rain storms I was ever in, for it rained hard and plenty of it. The next day, election day, I succeeded in collecting only one subscription and that was from an old county commissioner, James Owens, who has his mail come out from Medford to Agate on the rural route. The next time I want to tell about the good work that is being done on our roads, for I am now trying the patience of the editor.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 18, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    T. C. Gaines of Trail went to the valley Tuesday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher bought two extra fine Durham cows at Medford and her son Frank brought them up to Trail the first of the week.
    Rev. Lindblad preached three sermons Sunday at the Reese Creek school house to a large crowd. A fine picnic dinner was served at noon.
    Mrs. Harry Howard and Margaret were the guests of friends in Medford the first of the week.
    Gene Bellows, Henry French, Green Mathews and Jeff Conover were among those who attended circuit court Monday.
    Miss Mima Hannah returned from Medford Wednesday.
    T. C. Gaines of Trail went to Medford this week.
    John Grieve returned home from the valley Sunday.
    Mr. DeFord of Table Rock started for Crater Lake Sunday to spend the summer.
    Mark Winningham of Forest Creek is visiting his brother John of Trail.
    John Griffith of Central Point was a Sunday visitor at the Tom Raimey home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah went to Central Point Saturday and Mr. and Mrs. Miller returned home with them.
    Tobe Raimey and Frank Zuccala were in Jacksonville paying taxes for this year's assessment last Thursday.
    Mrs. Mary Gage and son C. C. are in Medford making final proof on their homesteads.
    Nate Garrett and family autoed out to the McCabe home Sunday.
    Thomas Raimey and family moved Tuesday from Central Point to the Burch place which they recently bought. They can't stay away from Dry Creek.
    Will Houston and family, Jack Houston and wife and Grandpa Houston attended dinner given in honor of Grandma Rogers at Beagle Sunday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner was called to see C. O. Rodgers of Beagle a few days ago.
    Mrs. Daw and children, Teal and Norman Gage, attended the entertainment given by Miss Shoults at Antioch Saturday evening.
    Mr. Brown was soliciting subscriptions for the Medford Mail Tribune the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Pence were Eagle Point visitors Saturday.
    Mr. Price and family autoed out to Wallace Coffeen's from Medford Sunday.
    James Davies of Forest Creek took a load of machinery to Elk Creek this week.
    Albert McCabe and Lloyd French were in Medford Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I promised the readers that the next time I would tell them something about the condition of our county roads in this section and what the supervisors are doing.
    The reader will remember that a short time ago I related my experience in riding over the road from the free ferry to its juncture with the Butte Falls road and last Thursday County Commissioner Con Leever and our road supervisor took dinner at the Sunnyside and while there told me that they had just been over the road and thought that I had told about the facts with regard to the condition, and that they were going to go up there and cut out the brush and trees so that one could get through and try to put it in good shape. Mr. Dutton, our road supervisor, has finished up his job on the road from here to the Reese Creek school house and he surely deserves credit for the work he has done. There was one place in particular, just as we go from here upon the desert north, that has been a source of expense and troubles for the past 40 years, that he has fixed and now one can go over it with their rig or auto with perfect ease. He surely understands road work. He has also been improving the road between here and Brownsboro although he has not finished it up yet.
    I also had occasion to ride over a part of the road from Brownsboro to Lake Creek and found C. E. Stanley, the road supervisor in that district, at work with a small gang of men and four horses. They were grading down the hill just in front of Lem Charley's fine residence and were doing a fine job. He had completed his work on the road that far, except the graveling, and in dry weather it is simply a pleasure to ride over it. Private individuals have put in some good substantial wagon bridges and among them are A. H. Horton and L. L. Bradshaw. They each have put in bridges that have cost about $500 each and the enterprising people up in that country are making their places look like homes indeed, and the crops bid fair to be up to the standard.
    The contract for hauling gravel to put on the street that was left unfinished last fall was let to Frank Abbott at $1.24 per cubic yard. The gravel is to be sifted through a two-inch screen so as to have no boulders on the street. Mr. Abbott commenced the work Monday.
    Mrs. Robert Potter and her daughter, Cecile, came in from Ashland last week to visit Mrs. Potter's mother, Mrs. A. J. Daley, who was hurt by a fall some time ago and has been confined to her room ever since.
    James Frosty of Weed, Cal., came over last Saturday to visit his sister, Mrs. Henry O. Childreth.
    The Childreth Bros. have bought a lot of Wm. Ulrich on Main Street and intended to build a blacksmith shop, but today, Monday, as I started to write they had about succeeded in buying out Fisher & Mathews and so I suppose will not build. The most of the people in our town are glad that they have decided to remain.
    Our election passed off very quietly; there was only 165 votes polled while there should have been 400, but this fall there will be more interest taken in the election.
    W. C. Cartwright and wife of the Medford Furniture and Hardware Co., Mrs. A. Slover and Mrs. C. Bellinger of Medford were out hunting agates and dropped in for dinner Sunday. Mrs. Cartwright told me that she used to straighten out the tangles in the Eaglets while I was writing for the Medford Mail under Mr. Bliton.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 20, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    H. D. Corlies came out last Tuesday to visit his son F. M. Corlies and family, who is foreman on the Knight orchard.
    George West and wife, one of the forest rangers, came out the first of the week and spent a few days at the Sunnyside and then went on up to Prospect to spend the summer.
    J. Slover of Medford was a caller for dinner Wednesday.
    As I suggested in my last the Childreth brothers have bought out Fisher & Mathews blacksmith shop and business, so we now have but one shop in our town, but that is enough, for there is not business enough to justify having two shops.
    Isaac Smith and his sister, Mrs. Buthweiss, brother and sister of the late John W. Smith, came in last Thursday morning on the P.&E. to visit their nephews, John Leroy and Lewis Smith, the first time they have ever seen each other. They are from Colorado and are on their way to Canada.
    Henry Noyer, recently from Idaho, and an old acquaintance of his boyhood days, R. P. Dopp, stopped here for dinner last Thursday. They are mining men and on their way to the Elk Creek country.
    Thursday night was rather a remarkable night in our little town. It happened to be the birthday of two different persons, William Haselton and Miss Mabel Wamsley. So Willie's sisters concluded to give him a surprise party and supper, so they managed to get up a fine supper and invite in a number of their young friends, but Billie had a surprise in store for them, so quietly stayed away, so when the invited guests came and began to look around for the aforesaid Billie, lo, he was nowhere to be found, but the young folks had a good time nevertheless.
    Miss Mabel Wamsley happened to have her birthday on the same date so Mrs. Howlett decided to give a supper in commemoration of the event, and also have her annual teacher's gathering at the same time, so she notified Prof. W. E. Buchanan and family, Miss Ethel Sidlinger, Miss Mabel Huff, the three regular teachers, and Mrs. George von der Hellen to be on hand promptly at 5:00 p.m. and of course they all responded. She also invited quite a number of their intimate friends and the result was that we had as guests for the occasion Mr. and Mrs. H. C. Clements, Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Buchanan, Miss Mabel Huff, Miss Ethel Sidlinger, Thomas Riley, Jr., Roy Willits, George Wamsley, Miss Mabel Wamsley, Mrs. Rachel Woolery, Mrs. Jonas, Kee Buchanan, Dora Buchanan, Katie Buchanan, Joyce von der Hellen, Hugo von der Hellen, Jr., Donald von der Hellen, and Bert Clements. I tried to find out how old Miss Mabel Wamsley was but she gave me no satisfaction, but when I appealed to her father he said that she was born May 21st, 1875. Well of all the times the little folks did have, playing, running, wrestling, jumping and having a good time, and the older ones spent the time in a social and about 9:00 o'clock began to start for home, wishing Miss Mabel many returns of such an event.
    Friday George von der Hellen and Mr. Young, a traveling salesman from Portland, called for dinner and later in the day O. C. King, a traveling salesman for the Medford Grocery Company, and wife, Miss Beth Blackford and Mrs. Muerarl also called.
    Mrs. Rolli Smith of Gold Hill was a pleasant caller Friday afternoon.
    Since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I have been scattering around some but I find that it is hard to find the people at home sometimes. I started out last Wednesday and the first place I visited was the Alta Vista orchard where I found J. H. Holmes, and after he had renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, I went out to the Parton farm and orchard where he has as fine a prospect for a crop as anyone could wish, and while he is turning his attention to the orchard and alfalfa, he is also raising some hogs, for one of his large fields in fairly dotted with black porkers. While I was there he settled for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. I then went to the farm of Charles Pruett but found no one at home. The next stop I made was at the old Peter Britt place; there I met Mrs. J. L. Frink and asked for her subscription for the Mail Tribune and to my surprise she told me that they were taking it and reading the Eaglets every week, they get it over the rural route from Medford. Passing on I met W. P. Holbrook cultivating his orchard and he gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune. Passing on I went to the house of Swen Berquist and learned that he and his wife were out to the orchard, so driving on I found them and he said that he had no money in his pocket but would pay me the first time he came to town, which he did on Thursday. In conversing with him I learned that he had a valuable horse killed during the electrical storm on the 14th. I then steered my course for home. Passing, I stopped at the farm of Nick Young, but as he is a bachelor and was off to work I did not see him. I find that the Mail Tribune is generally liked and as a rule is generally taken throughout the country.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 25, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had to omit several items on account of the length of my letter, so now will give the most important ones. On Monday night, May 18, we had a meeting of the parents and teachers in the Eagle Point opera house that proved to be a grand success. The scale was turned and the parents and grandparents were the ones to interest the younger portion of the community. We had a "mock school" and Prof. A. L. Haselton acted the part of the principal. The songs were all original, composed for the occasion by our local talent and were sung with about the discord you would find in an old-fashioned country school. One would think by the general deportment that the pupils had been raised in the backwoods and never knew what school discipline meant--it was a complete farce from start to finish and some of the old grandmothers and grandfathers excelled our modern pupils in the exercises and deportment. It was a grand success and those who assisted in getting the entertainment up are entitled to a great deal of credit.
    Two of the Messrs. Kelso, who have homesteads on Big Butte, came out to make their final proof last week and brought Arthur (Shorty) Dodge of Flounce Rock as a witness, and on their return they came to the Sunnyside for breakfast.
    I learned last Sunday evening that Ed Cingcade, son of one of our respected townsmen, had the misfortune to have his hand very badly mashed while helping to load a steam shovel on a car in Nevada.
    Last Monday morning Mrs. A. J. Florey of Eagle Point and her mother, Mrs. Chauncy Nye of Prospect, went to Medford and from there to Jacksonville to visit their son and grandson, Chauncey Florey, candidate for county recorder on the Republican ticket, returning the same day. We had quite a number of passengers on the train that morning and many were strangers. Several school children, among them Robert Pelouze, the two Misses Corlies, Harry Bryant, etc., also J. M. Cox, who owns a 20-acre tract of land adjoining town, Miss Lorene Walker and Mr. Lake.
    Wm. Perry and wife of Butte Falls came out last Saturday to see his sister, Mrs. Frank Nichols, who was operated on by Drs. Pickel and Holt last Friday for appendicitis, and in this connection I am glad to say that Mrs. Nichols is getting along nicely.
    Mrs. George Carter of Eugene came out on the P.&E. Monday. She is a sister of Mrs. Clay Cole, whose husband is engineer on the P.&E. and was met in Medford by Mrs. Cole.
    I learned last night, Monday, that Robert Minter came near having his dwelling destroyed by fire last week while he and his oldest children were attending court in Jacksonville. The fire caught from a spark in the moss on the roof and before they had it extinguished it burned over about a "square" in the roof. I obtained the foregoing facts from Prof. C. E. Johnson, who is stopping with us at the present.
    Mr. Ray Davis, who has a homestead near the Derby station, spent Monday night with at the Sunnyside. And so did Clarence Pierce, one of the hustling real estate men of Medford, also Prof. E. R. Peterson, one of the rural school supervisors. He is on his way to Butte Falls to visit the schools in that neighborhood. Also Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Gasper of Idaho. They have been here visiting his uncle, John Butler, who has a place northeast of here. They are on their way to their home in Idaho.
    Miss Mabel Wamsley entertained a number of her friends last Monday evening and the report comes to me that she surely knows how to entertain.
    The rain has made everybody to rejoice because of the prospect of fine crops.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 27, 1914, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote, J. H. Cooley and son, Charles, lumber merchants of Medford; Gus Smith of Ashland, Art Smith of Big Sticky, Ed Foster of Trail, Oliver Ginsen [Gaines?], John Basin of Phoenix, who was riding over the country looking for mutton sheep; Oliver Gray, the solicitor for Gaddis & Dixon, Page fence men, of Medford; W. S. Baker of Derby, Ray Davis of Derby, Professor C. E. Johnson of Derby, Irvin Turrel of Lake Creek, Mr. Bowerman, Miss Mabel Huff, Laurence Nichols, the meat cutter for Harry Carlton's meat market, of Eagle Point; Perry Foster and wife of Butte Falls, Herman Meyers, Sr., Mrs. Henry Meyers and son, Rev. Wilker, the Lutheran minister of Medford, and Mr. Sandoz of Elk Creek have been guests at the Sunnyside, beside the regular boarders and a number of transients whose names I failed to secure.
    Miss Mary Scott of Medford, who has been teaching school on Elk Creek, came out Tuesday on the Eagle Point and Persist stage, having closed her school for the season, and took the P.&E. for Medford.
    Mrs. A. N. Thomas started last Tuesday for Butte, Mont., to visit her children, who live there.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Corlies of the Alta Vista orchard, went to Medford last Wednesday to attend the wedding of their son to an Agate lady.
    Herman Meyers Jr., passed through here last Wednesday with his wife, taking her to the Medford hospital to have an operation performed for appendicitis, and I learned today, Saturday, that she was getting along nicely.
    Harry Carlton has rented the meat shop formerly occupied by Art Nichols, and seems to be doing a very good business, and as long as his prices are such that the average housekeeper can afford to buy meat he will probably do well.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols has moved from here to Medford.
    Our school closed Friday, the 29th ult., and the good people gave a swell dinner. County Superintendent of Schools J. P. Wells and wife were out and he took part in the exercises in the forenoon, and after dinner we had almost all kinds of sport for the children. In the egg race between three little girls, Miss Katie Buchanan won the first prize and Denet Lake the second. In the potato race Orville Childreth won the first and Robbie Harnish the second. Then we had the three-legged race by little girls, and the result, Katie Buchanan won the first and  Hawk the second. That was about the best-conducted race of any and afforded about as much amusement as anything else. In the boys' three-legged race, Heath Childreth won the first and A. Simmons the second. They had jumping and running contests by both boys and girls, and high jumping by the boys, and the sack race by the boys, etc. The exercises were quite creditable and all seemed to enjoy the good time they were having.
    Professor W. E. Buchanan entertained the children of his room on Thursday night, and on Friday night the memorial services were held in the church. The exercises were opened by singing "America," and prayer by Rev. Simmons, and then the address of the evening was delivered by Professor W. E. Buchanan. He gave us a good, plain, sensible talk that was full of instructive suggestions, after which A. J. Florey, our postmaster, gave us an account of his experience while in the army in the sixties, after which we were dismissed.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school evangelist for the Congregationalists, came out on his motorcycle Thursday and spent two nights with your correspondent. He is planning to have a Sunday school picnic on Rogue River, near Table Rock, on the third Sunday in June, being the 21st, and it is arranged to have the Reese Creek, Agate, Elk Creek and Antioch Sunday schools meet at the same time. It is now planned to have Dr. Paddock, the state superintendent of the Congregational churches of the state of Oregon, to be with us at that time. There will be a picnic dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The citizens of our town observed Decoration Day last Saturday and quite a number of them went to Central Point cemetery and decorated the graves of their departed loved ones, and also paid honor to the memory of those who had fought for the perpetuity of our government. Among the old veterans who went to Central Point and took part in and enjoyed the exercises of the day were A. J. Florey, our postmaster, he was accompanied by his wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. Chauncey Nye and M. S. Woods, another of the old veterans, also Mrs. John Watkins, wife of the late John Watkins and her two daughters, Miss Anna and Mrs. George Phillips and her husband, Mrs. Rachel Woolery, widow of one of the soldiers of the Civil War, G. H. Wamsley, another one of the veterans of the Civil War and his daughter, Miss Mabel, besides quite a number of our citizens who have friends and relatives buried there. There was also quite a number went from here to Medford, who have friends and relatives buried there and a few went to Phoenix, Antelope cemetery, Jacksonville, etc. Thomas E. Nichols took several in his car to Central Point, W. D. Knighton took his carful to Phoenix and almost every team and rig to be had in town was in use.
    Mrs. A. C. Stock of Eugene is here visiting her friends Mr. and Mrs. R. Heath, one of our leading merchants.
    Last Sunday Rev. L. L. Simmons administered the rite of baptism by immersion in Butte Creek to Mrs. Arglee Green and Mrs. Floyd Pearce at the close of the 11 o'clock services. There was but a small attendance as it was not generally known that they were to be baptized at that time.
    I see that our telephone man, Walter C. Clements, has received the appointment as postmaster of Eagle Point, to take the place of our old standby, A. J. Florey, who has been in the office almost continuously for the past 30 years. We trust, and have reason to believe, that the new incumbent will prove as efficient and accommodating as what "Jack" has been.
    Mrs. Harry Simpson, nee Margaret Florey, of Phoenix, came over last Saturday with Mr. Knighton and visited her parents and grandmother, Mrs. Chauncey Nye, and Mrs. Nye started this Wednesday morning for Phoenix to spend the night with her granddaughter, and then will go to Roseburg to visit her two sisters.
    Miss Ruth Porter of Ashland, who has been up in the Lake Creek country visiting her cousin, Miss Louisa Henry, and the aforesaid Miss Henry stopped here for dinner Monday.
    Also Rev. Conrad Wilker of Medford and William Newstrom of Lake Creek. Rev. Wilker had been up in the Lake Creek neighborhood and conducted services on Sunday.
    In a former article I made mention of the work done on the road between here and Reese Creek school house and inadvertently made a wrong impression and that was that Mr. Ed Dutton had built the entire road, but I should have said that his road only reached across the desert and that Mr. Chris Natwick had built the first mile or more this side of the school house, and those who have seen it since its completion, so far, speak in high terms of the work done.
    Nick Young, one of our prosperous farmers, was in town Monday and while here renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Also Mr. Croft, who is the foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard, was in town Tuesday and renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Thomas Riley, the Eagle Point painter, assisted by James Jackson, are at this writing engaged in painting the Eagle Point opera house.
    H. J. McCoy and wife of Oroville, Cal., called for dinner at the Sunnyside Tuesday on their way up to the Lake Creek country to visit Mrs. McCoy's brother, Wm. Messal.
    Irwin Howe and Miss Rena Ash of Trail were doing business in our town Tuesday and took dinner with us. They report that a Miss Howe, a cousin of Irwin, had been teaching on Trail Creek, had just closed her school and gone to Medford.
    The Childreth Bros., who bought out Mathews and Fisher, blacksmiths, have just received a new supply of goods in their line and are rearranging their forges, putting an electric blower on and fixing up the shop in modern style.
    W. C. Clements has moved from the von der Hellen hardware store into the house occupied and owned by Mrs. E. O. Nichols.
    Fred Sturgis and wife of Elk Creek came out Tuesday with a team, stopped at the Sunnyside and this morning Mrs. Sturgis went to Medford on the P.&E.
    Just as I am finishing up this flock of Eaglets Mrs. H. G. Henry and her daughter Miss Louise and Mrs. Maynard Smith of Talent, called for dinner. Mrs. Smith is a niece of Mrs. J. S. Quackenbush, whose husband is the foreman on the Corbin orchard.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 6, 1914, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thomas Riley, Jr., and James Jackson have been engaged in painting the Eagle Point opera house and while engaged at the work the scaffolding gave way, but there was no very serious damage done. Jimmie had his ankle sprained and Thomas had a severe scratch on the back by coming in contact with a nail, but they are both on top and ready for another job.
    Our annual school meeting will be held in the school house on Monday, June 15, and I understand that a move is on foot to try to levy an additional tax for extra teachers and equipments. Let everybody that is in favor of retrenchment in expenses turn out to the school meeting.
    Mrs. Harry Stanley, nee Ina Rader, was in town on business last Wednesday and so was Mrs. L. K. Hawk and her daughter, Miss .
    Wednesday evening Charles Cooley drove up with his auto, accompanied by Mrs. J. H. Drew and her daughter and called for supper. Mrs. Drew is the wife of contractor J. H. Drew, who has the contract for building a fine house on the old Alfred Gordon place on Rogue River, for Mr. Mansfield is getting the lumber of Charlie's father for the building.
    B. Klum and a force of four men were out here last week posting ads for Mann's big extension sale and while here called on Mrs. Howlett for supper.
    Henry A. Meyer and wife of Lake Creek came out last Thursday, he brought out his low-wheeled wagon for repairs and while here Mrs. Meyers spent a part of the time visiting friends. They took dinner at the Sunnyside and while here reported that the rain was doing considerable damage to the hay both standing and cut.
    George Givan, one of our prosperous farmers and stock raisers, passed through our town Thursday on his way to the Big Butte country beyond Butte Falls. He has about 60 head of cattle up there and was going up to look after them and make arrangements for haying but by the time he reached here he about concluded that he was most too early for haying as it was raining then and has been ever since, and this is Saturday.
    Henry French, another of our prosperous farmers, was in town. He has been hauling his potatoes in for shipment to Medford and Butte Falls.
    J. H. Later, civil engineer in the employ of the state, and his assistant J. T. Chinnock stopped for dinner Thursday on their way to Butte Falls. They are traveling over the state measuring the water in the ditches so as to assign to each person their proper amount of water.
    Miss Mabel Huff, who has been teaching our primary department in the school, started for her home in Corvallis Monday the first. She seemed to give very general satisfaction as a teacher and has left a host of friends here, especially among the children.
    A man by the name of J. B. Thornton came in Friday noon with an auto, for dinner. He is traveling over the country buying up old auto tires and doing repair work on those who need such help.
    W. H. Crandall, who has a fine young orchard about three miles north of here, was in town Friday and while here paid me a six month's subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 8, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Dave Pence attended commissioners court at Jacksonville Wednesday.
    Mrs. George Fry and Velma came home Thursday after two months' stay in Grants Pass.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. A. Hall were Central Point visitors Thursday.
    Mrs. J. Houston was in Grants Pass last week.
    Ed Pence and Robert Dawson made a business trip to Central Point Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Howard, N. C. Hannah and daughter, Miss Mima, were pleasant callers Sunday at the Jasper Hannah home.
    Lloyd French and Albert McCabe were Medford visitors a few days ago.
    Harry Howard and Marshall Minter are fencing their homesteads with wire fence.
    Miss Viola Pence is staying with Mrs. William Houston.
    Grandma Pence went to Elk Creek to visit Mrs. Dave Pence Monday.
    E. E. Ash was a Eagle Point visitor Monday.
    Mr. Pence and family of Medford autoed out to W. Coffeen's the last of the week. Miss Helen Coffeen returned home with them.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 8, 1914, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Born, June 6, to Mr. and Mrs. C. Hoogerhyde, a boy, and Dr. Holt, the attending physician, reports that the mother and child are doing well.
    J. H. Later, the state civil engineer and J. T. Chinnock, state water commissioner, returned from Butte Falls last Saturday and report that they had quite a time getting out with their auto after the rain Friday night. The sticky did not roll, but sometimes the hind wheels, with the chains on, would roll around three times and the front wheels would stand still. Such is life in Oregon.
    Frank Neil, the road supervisor of Derby, was out doing business in our town Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Swihart and Mr. Caster of Derby passed through Eagle Point Saturday on their way to the county seat.
    A man who gave his name as George Wilkins and represented himself as one of the prominent land owners of Jackson County came into the Sunnyside Saturday evening for supper and a bed, paid his bill and left the next morning before breakfast. He said that he lived in Medford.
    George Weber, who came here with his daughter some three months ago, looking for a place of business, started this Monday morning for Dorris, Cal. They seemed to be very nice people and we regret to have them leave.
    I see that the Childreth Bros., who bought out Mathews & Fisher in the blacksmith business, have put up a very neat sign in the place of the old one. The sign was the work of Thomas Riley, Jr.
    Monday morning Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Carpenter, who have been living in Medford the past winter, and have charge of the business of the estate of his brother, the late Judge Carpenter, came out and was met at the train by W. H. Crandall to take them out to his home for a few days. Mr. Crandall has charge of Mr. Carpenter's orchard.
    Miss Ethel Sidlinger, who has been in charge of the primary department of our school, started for the state of Washington Monday where she expects to visit a short time, and then go to North Dakota. She leaves a host of friends behind her.
    Mr. Lake, who has been living on a tract of land he bargained for on the J. Hart Hamilton place, has moved to the coast.
    Mr. Ossman, his mother and little brother were out doing business in our town and while here stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner. Mr. Ossman is engaged with the fish hatchery at the mouth of Elk Creek.
    E. A. Bass, who owns a young orchard joining the Parton place, on Antelope Creek, was a guest Monday at the Sunnyside. He is getting his place fixed up in fine shape.
    Last Sunday after attending church at Eagle Point I hitched "Nellie" to the buggy and took Prof. C. E. Johnson up to Reese Creek school house where they have a flourishing Sunday school and Christian Endeavor Society. Mrs. Watkins has charge of the Sunday school and is making a grand success of it. the school voted to go as a body to Table Rock to meet with the Agate, Antelope and Table Rock Sunday schools in the children's day exercises which is to be held on June 21. They anticipate having a fine time.
    There was an old gentleman by the name of Smith here for supper Saturday night who said that he had charge of the Whiteside orchard and that he would have to thin his peaches. Although some people say that the frost took all the peaches this year but that is all bosh.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 10, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Sunday night, by a vote of the church it was decided to dispense with the young people's meetings until the days and nights were more equally divided.
    Last Sunday June 7th was Grandma Curtis' eighty-fifth birthday and the members of the W.C.T.U. of Eagle Point decided to give her a shower both of birthdays and postal cards, so on Sunday afternoon there were quite a number of her friends met at the home of her son-in-law, Mr. Painter, and tendered their congratulations.
    Mrs. Charley Thomas and family started Wednesday morning to meet her husband who is engaged in teaming for a mill company in the Klamath country.
    Rube Johnson was in town the first of the past week.
    The wet and dry question was being thoroughly discussed between two of our country lads and one of them wanted to make a bet of a suit of clothes on the result, but there were no stakes put up. The question is getting to be a live one, for the people are getting aroused and getting on their fighting clothes ready for the great battle next November. While on the car the other day I heard a gentleman from Portland remark that that was the principal topic of conversation in the city.
    W. E. Hammel, our Reese Creek orchardist and stock raiser, was in town the first of the week on a hurried business trip.
    B. U. Young and Frank Farrell, who are engaged in the fruit industry, called for dinner last Wednesday. They were looking over the valley to see the prospect for fruit. Mr. Young represents the Producers' Fruit Company with a branch office in Medford and the main office in Sacramento, California.
    Norman Zimmerman and his mother, Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman, who are now located on the Veatch [Veighte?] farm on Rogue River, came in last Tuesday with a fine lot of lard for the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Ed Mills of Brownsboro was doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    Mrs. A. W. Bradshaw came in from the Commercial orchard last Tuesday for a load of supplies. She said that her husband, who is manager of the orchard, was too busy to come so sent her.
    Last Wednesday afternoon your E.P. correspondent left home to take the P.&E. train for Medford, but while on the way to the depot Mr. B. U. Young saw me and invited me to ride with him in his car, so by that means I had an opportunity to ride over our old wagon roads and note the changes along the route. One thing that I noticed was that the roads were being greatly improved and made so that one can ride over them without being jolted all to pieces. I also noted that the grain along the road was looking fine and if we have good weather to harvest our crops think that we will have fine crops. After spending the night in Medford I took the 8:20 train for Glendale where I was met by my old neighbor and friend, O. P. McGee, and was taken to his fine home on Cow Creek and where I am at this writing and the next time that I write will have something to say about the country between here and Medford and some of my present surroundings.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 15, 1914, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I was at the home of our old friend and neighbor, O. P. McGee, where I have been stopping for the last few days, and when I wrote I promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something of what I saw along the route and while here. I started from home on Wednesday afternoon and while on the way to the depot was picked up by Mr. B. U. Young and brought to Medford where I spent the night, taking the 8:20 train Thursday morning for Glendale where I was met by Mr. McGee and hurried off to his beautiful home in Cow Creek Valley. There was nothing of note to attract my attention along the route. As far as Grants Pass the farmers were generally cutting a little hay but the weather was too unsettled for haying. The day was rather warm and the car was very close and I finally asked the conductor to assist me in opening one of the windows, which he did, but in a few minutes an elderly lady asked to have it closed as she was too cold. It is strange how it is that some people traveling on cars would rather breathe the foul air than to have a little pure air with some chill, but such is life. I noticed when I reached the neighborhood of Merlin that there seemed to be a vast difference in the appearance of the crops, from what they did around Grants Pass, and the orchards and grain seemed to have a different color and presented a better appearance, although the town district did not show much sign of life. The country through this section is a mining region as well as an agricultural country and the farms are necessarily small as most of the farming land lies along the creek bottoms. I noticed about the little town of Hugo that there were some fine-looking orchards and some life displayed, as there were several teams loaded with lumber on the streets. Passing on we next came to Leland. This is a small mining town situated in the Grave Creek hills, although there are some small farms where they grow considerable hay but not enough to supply the demand. Next we passed Wolf Creek, another small mining town, and in a few moments we came to Glendale, where I was met by Mr. McGee, so did not see much of the town as we hurried off for his beautiful farm in Cow Creek Valley. After leaving the train we passed up Cow Creek about eight miles through a continuous lot of fine farms. The Cow Creek Valley is not very wide, averaging perhaps three quarters of a mile or perhaps more in width, with indentures on each side with nice farms and orchards. This is more of a stock country than the country between here and Rogue River Valley or the valley itself, for many of the farms contain several hundred acres and the people are employed to a great extent in the dairy business. They are raising a mixture of oats and vetch for hay and they claim that is the best feed they can get for their cattle. They have just commenced to cut their alfalfa, but the soil here does not seem to be adapted to the growth of alfalfa, but for oats and vetch and barley it surely does fine. One thing that they seem to take pride in is their roads, for they are surely up to date. They have neat school houses all along the road up the valley so far as I have gone, twelve miles, and the people surely believe in having good schools. Yesterday, Monday, was the school meeting day and the people in this, the Fir Grove district, voted unanimously to open and maintain a high school in connection with the other grades.
    On Sunday the different Sunday schools in the neighborhood celebrated children's day in this section, but I have not the paper at hand on which to write an account of what was done, how they did it and what a good time they had, so will have to wait until I get home and will then try to tell the readers something more about this beautiful country, for surely Southern Oregon is the garden of the Pacific Coast.
Glendale, June 16, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 18, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I was still at the home of my friend Oliver McGee and while I was there had the pleasure of meeting with quite a number of his neighbors at a Sunday school picnic. There were two schools met at a beautiful fir grove on the bank of Cow Creek, where about 250 were congregated. The exercises commenced about 10:30 a.m. and was conducted by Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school evangelist for the Congregational Church, and there was quite a spirited discussion between the leader and some of the members of the schools, and they left off just where they commenced, of the same opinion still. After the review of the Sunday school lesson the regular program commenced and it was fine, especially with the smaller children. There were four little tots that looked as though they were not over four years old that rendered three different parts and they did fine; in fact the whole program was well rendered and some of the exhibits were entirely original. One of the most attractive features of the whole thing was the dinner, and now it is useless for me to try to describe it, for of all the varieties of good eatables that Southern Oregon produces they were on hand that day and all as free as the air we breathe. And everyone seemed to be perfectly at home, including your correspondent. After dinner and an hour or so spent in social converse the audience was called together again and your correspondent preached a short sermon on the necessity of entering the services of the master while young. The audience in the forenoon was taken by the artists in different groups. The collection taken for Sunday school purposes amounted to $8.77. About 4:30 we started for our different stopping places, for while I felt very much at home with the good people in that section still I was simply a sojourner for the time being. I remained with my friends until Wednesday noon when Miss Verna McGee, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. McGee, accompanied by Miss Edna Coker, daughter of Robert Coker, Sacramento, Cal., but formerly a resident of the now famous Coker Butte, northeast of Medford, her cousin, started to take me to Glendale on my way home. Miss Edna Coker, who had been there visiting her uncle and aunt, had a call by phone to return as her mother was quite unwell, so I had the pleasure of her company as far as Medford.
    When I reached home I found that Prof. W.E. Buchanan and children had gone to Butte Falls to visit her mother, Mrs. Kee, that Dr. Holt's daughter, Miss Helen, had gone to the Willamette Valley to visit her grandparents, that Thomas Riley, Jr., had gone to Fort Klamath to do some painting, that Miss Dottie Harnish had gone to Butte Falls, that Mr. Lake had moved his family to Grants Pass, that J. M. Cox had traded his place here for a place below Trail and moved there and in fact there have been so many changes made that I hardly know where I am at.
    On looking around after I reached home I found that Lucy A. Conover had left the money for her subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune and I found out that M. S. Thomson and another man had come in on Tuesday night about midnight with two loads of wool and occupied a room at the Sunnyside, and when I looked around a little more I found Henry Tonn, Wm. and Andrew Grissom with three teams at the Sunnyside with their wagons loaded with grain and salt for their sheep; they had brought in their wool for shipment. I also found James Campbell and his son of Phoenix; they had a band of sheep taking them to the range and called for supper; also R. R. Dodge of Medford and R. R. Ross, formerly of Colorado, and Thursday we had Mr. Phelps and F. Thordarson of Lebanon, Ore.; they had been out to look at the Hammel tract of land; also O. N. Nelson and daughter, Miss Linnea, he was out looking after his insurance business.
    Miss Francine Heath, daughter of one of our leading merchants, returned from a visit to Eugene Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 22, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Joe Hannah, Sr., is visiting his daughter Mrs. Tim Daily of Medford.
    Mr. Wyant, James and Miss Christina are the guests of Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    The Reese Creek Sunday school was well represented at the picnic near the Bybee bridge Sunday.
    Mrs. Sorrel sold a bunch of cattle to Mr. Toft of Medford this week.
    Ed Pence has bought property in Central Point. Mr. Pence and family started for Klamath County Tuesday to spend the summer.
    In the Debenger Gap district there was a large crowd present at the school meeting. Elton Raimey was elected director for three years, Harry Howard for one year and Edward Foster clerk. In the Reese Creek district Eugene Bellows was elected director and W. E. Hammel re-elected clerk. In the Laurel district Jeff Conover was elected director and Mrs. Jettie Clarno re-elected clerk.
    Mr. Tarbell took some fine goat meat to the valley Tuesday.
    Miss Mima Hannah spent the weekend with her brother Jasper and family.
    Mrs. McCabe has been on the sick list for a few days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah and Perry Foster attended the carnival in Medford two days last week.
    Among the callers at Henry French's ranch Sunday were Fred Pettegrew, John Foster, Edward Foster and family, Mrs. Bellows and Miss Christina Wyant.
    Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Garrett, Robert and Albert McCabe came out to the McCabe home Sunday.
    Commissioner Smith was up from Rogue River the last of the week.
    Mrs. George Fry and Velma went to Grants Pass Tuesday.
    Ed Houston has bought a fine buggy and Mrs. Middlebusher a covered hack.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 25, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had to omit quite a number of items for lack of space, for that good-natured editor has asked me to keep inside of a half a column, but some of the items are like the old ladies' church letter, will keep. Among the items omitted last week was one about our school election. There were fifty-three present and among other things they did was to elect George von der Hellen as director and J. V. McIntyre as clerk, and voted a six-mill tax.
    Just while I was writing, the old postmaster, A. J. Florey, was preparing to turn over the post office fixtures to the new postmaster, W. C. Clements, and he and his good wife are now filling the position of postmaster and deputy P.M. and are getting along nicely with their work. But we confess that it is with feelings of regret that we have to miss the time-honored face of the old vet A. J. Florey.
    Clay Cole, the engineer on the Pacific and Eastern, has moved to Medford.
    Last Friday afternoon Mrs. George von der Hellen called Mrs. Howlett over the phone and engaged supper for a little party of seven or eight, as it was their seventh anniversary of their marriage. The company consisted of Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen and son Donald, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements and nephew Bert, J. V. McIntyre, the cashier of the First State Bank of Eagle Point, and Dr. Wm. P. Holt, our local M.D. After the feast was ended the ladies, including Mrs. Howlett, repaired to the opera house where a blind lady by the name of Brown gave a free musical entertainment and those who heard it were well pleased. At the close a collection was taken up amounting to over ten dollars.
    At the supper given for Mrs. von der Hellen and friends, I missed Mrs. Dr. Holt and Mrs. McIntyre, and upon inquiry learned that Mrs. McIntyre had gone east on a visit and that Mrs. Holt was in the hospital in Medford, but the word is that she is getting along nicely.
    Last Sunday morning Rev. M. C. Davis, our S.S. evangelist, left the Sunnyside on his motorcycle and your correspondent and C. E. Johnson started in a buggy for Table Rock to attend the children's day exercises, and on reaching the ground found W. E. Hammel, Mr. Bergman and his sister, Mrs. Clarno and two children, Misses Samantha, Jessie and Deihless Minter of Reese Creek Sunday school and a few from Agate, Central Point, some from Antioch, but we found that we were ahead of the crowd. Soon the rest of the Agate school arrived and the people came from every direction, amounting to about 200, and soon the exercises commenced, led by the evangelist Rev. M. C. Davis, and then the program was in full swing and some of the pieces rendered by the Sunday school children would almost make an old drunken sot shed tears, they being so pathetic and well rendered. At the close of the program a collection was taken up for the Sunday school cause, amounting to $6.45; after which dinner was announced. And right here I want to suggest to the editor of the Mail Tribune that he go out into the country and attend one of those picnic dinners, and then he will know how to sympathize with his correspondents in their efforts to do justice in writing an account of what they have to eat and what an enjoyable time they do have, where everything is free as the air we breathe and of the very best the land affords.
    But I must stop right here or that editor will fire me for my trying his patience. But I will add that last week Roy Ashpole, one of our leading business men, renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and that Mrs. B. Clarno gave me a sub. for the Weekly Mail Tribune for her daughter, Jettie Clarno, while she was in town last Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 25, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I see by the last batch of Eaglets published that I neglected to mention the fact that Rev. Smith, the traveling evangelist for the American Sunday School Union, preached for us Sunday during the Sunday school exercises. And another item I noticed was in the Table Rock Items in which the writer says that "Father Howlett carried off the honors of the table for he was the first to commence and the last to get through.” Well, I was very busy about that time and had my mind occupied with other things, and among them was one that impressed me very forcibly and that was that a certain young man that I strongly suspect of being the Table Rock correspondent for the Mail Tribune was so busily engaged in looking after the welfare of a certain young lady that was there on a visit that his mind, that is usually very clear, was somewhat beaddled and thought that because they continued long at the table and that because I happened to be still in the crowd that perforce I must have been eating, but one thing that I do admit was that we had one of the best dinners of the season and I do hope that he and his "Duley Dear” had all that they could eat in spite of my piggishness. But we all had a good time. I know that your E.P. correspondent was not the only correspondent that had a good time.
    While on the subject of the meeting I will add that Rev. M. C. Davis will preach at the Reese Creek school house on the third Sunday, July 19, at 3 o'clock p.m.
    Miss Inez Willits of Persist came out on the 20th, went to Medford to meet her aunt, a sister-in-law of her father, from Minnesota, who went up on the stage together last Monday.
    Speaking of the Willits family brings to mind the fact that Roy Willits, the contractor for delivering the mail on the route from Eagle Point to Persist, will have filled his contract next Tuesday, June 30, and intends to start for Alaska in a few days, and Mr. Trusty, the new contractor, will take his place and we all wish that he may prove as agreeable and meet with the success that Mr. Willits has for during the four years that he has been carrying the mail. He has not been behind time but twice and then it was absolutely unavoidable.
    S. M. Cox, who has been living just below town and one of our best citizens, has traded his place for one below Trail a few miles. He was in town last Monday with his good wife after the last load of their household goods. His friends here regret to have him leave us but we hope that he has bettered his condition.
    Dr. W. E. Buchanan, who went to Portland some ten days ago, returned Monday, and his family who have been visiting Mrs. R's mother returned home Tuesday.
    W. I. Vawter and wife, Mr. H. H. Word, a Portland capitalist, Seely Hall and William von der Hellen called for dinner last Wednesday. Mr. Vawter came out on business and the others came to see our beautiful valley and have a good time.
    George Almy of Albuquerque, N.M., who has been visiting his mother, Mrs. Boles, on the South Fork of Little Butte, came out Tuesday on the stage, took dinner with us and went on to Medford to take the train for home.
    Miss Edith Fredenburg of Butte Falls, who has been attending the state normal school at Monmouth, returned home Tuesday. She stopped overnight at the Sunnyside on her way home.
    Mr. C. J. Lewis, traveling solicitor for the Oregonian, spent a day and night with us, leaving Thursday morning. While here he took a walk up on the Agate field and picked up a few agates to take home with him.
    The farmers are very busy now with their hay and but very few of them take time to come to town although Mr. W. E. Hammel came in Thursday and hurriedly left three drills at Childreth's blacksmith and hurried off to the depot.
    Mike Sidley and his sister came dashing into town Thursday and took the 7:45 train for Medford, returning the same day.
    C. A. Newstrom and daughter, Marea, came in Friday and so did Mrs. Henry Meyers and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 29, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston made a trip to the valley Saturday.
    Frank DeFord and Mr. and Mrs. Minear passed en route for Crater Lake Monday.
    Elton Raimey was a Medford visitor Monday.
    There was a very large crowd at Trail Sunday attending the Sunday School entertainment, which was greatly enjoyed by everyone. The picnic dinner was plentiful and delicious. One man who attended said he never saw such sociable people in his life.
    Ed Houston sold several loads of hogs to Elbert Glass of Beagle.
    Edward Foster and family, Dave Pence and Bill Lewis were Eagle Point visitors Friday. Dave Pence has moved his road camp to the Morgan Hill and Mrs. Dave Pence has moved down from Elk Creek to cook for the crew.
    Miss Mima Hannah is in Medford visiting Mrs. Tim Daily.
    California autos were seen here this week. Also two from Bandon, Oregon.
    Jack Stowell and family moved in from Klamath County this week.
    We received the sad news of the sudden death of Mrs. M. H. Cusick of Santa Rosa, California, which occurred June 10. Mr. and Mrs. Cusick and family have lived near Trail for five years. They moved to Santa Rosa last winter. Mrs. Cusick was a faithful wife, a loving mother and a kind neighbor. She leaves a husband and several children and a host of friends to mourn her loss.
    Tom Raimey was in Central Point Saturday.
    Mrs. C. Skyrman and Miss Clara were shopping in Medford Tuesday.
    Pat Daily of Medford was out on the river fishing Friday evening.
    Miss May French was the guest of Miss Christina Wyant Wednesday night.
    There is to be a picnic at Trail on the 4th. Come and bring your basket. At night there is to be a grand ball. Mr. Ash has just completed a fine maple floor in the hall.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 1, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In writing up the account of the Sunday school picnic at Table Rock of June 21st, I omitted to mention the names of Elmer Robinson, Anna Robinson, Mary Robinson, John Caster, May Wilson and Thomas Vestal, who were members of the Reese Creek Sunday school.
    David Pence of Elk Creek, the road supervisor of that district, was in town last week getting supplies for his family and for the road work.
    Mrs. Mary Campbell of Derby was a guest at the Sunnyside last Friday on her way home from Medford.
    Mr. Davis and son, formerly of Persist but now of Derby, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Saturday.
    Harry Geppert of Butte Falls came out Saturday to have an old wagon repaired.
    Henry Pech of Lake Creek was a visitor last Saturday and took home with him two rolls of wire fencing. Those good old-fashioned German citizens upon Butte Creek have been taking out quite a lot of wire fencing this season that shows that they, at least, are prospering in business.
    J. S. Quackenbush and wife, the foreman of the A. Corbin orchard, were in for new supplies Saturday.
    Last Saturday E. S. Wolfer was delivering some fine strawberries in this town, and while here renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Last Sunday morning as I returned from church I met at the Sunnyside Miss Helen Yockey, the bookkeeper of the Medford Publishing Company, who we always meet in the Mail Tribune office, Miss Ethel Curry, Miss Jerry Rukes, another member of the Mail Tribune force, Mrs. Yockey and Mrs. Rukes, all of Medford, who had come out in Miss Helen Yockey's car, they said for a good dinner.
    On the way out they ran into a mud hole, caused by the overflow of the irrigation ditch, and the result was they had to get out and lift out a wheel of the machine, but got out all O.K. with a little of the mud still adhering to their clothes but after they arrived at the Sunnyside a change of some of the outside apparel and a little rubbing with a brush, etc., effaced all marks of the disaster. I also found Mr. Sullivan, the superintendent of the Rogue Lands and Improvement Company, his wife and two daughters, also that indefatigable attorney, Gus Newbury, and wife of Medford, they also had called for dinner. Just after dinner, that is the first table was through, Dr. Holt called, but before his arrival C. E. Johnson and your correspondent had ate our dinner and started for Reese Creek for Sunday school where we met quite a number of good people of that section. At the close of the school the Christian Endeavor met and was presided over by Mrs. Jettie Clarno in a very able and impressive manner and everything showed that the people of that section are thinking of something a scale higher that the dance and Sunday ball game.
    Monday morning Mrs. Howlett, our daughter Hattie, Mabel Wamsley and your correspondent started by team for Prospect at 3:15 a.m. with Jud Edsall as driver, arriving at the latter place at 10:15 a.m. where we were met by our son-in-law C. E. Hoyt of Fort Klamath with his seven-passenger car and taken on to his place, arriving there at 4 o'clock p.m. We found the roads in a very good condition, and being still improved, for we passed several gangs of men at work on the roads in different places. They are making some very material changes along the old Alfred Gordon place, where Mr. Mansfield is putting up a very fine residence. I noticed considerable improvement in different places. At Trail Mr. Ash has been making several changes and put up two new buildings. When we reached Prospect, or rather the trail leading down to the Mill Creek Falls, we met Mr. Hoyt and his cousin's wife, Mrs. Steven Hoyt and son, formerly of California. They had gone down the canyon to take a look at the falls and after eating a good hearty dinner we started. But before I get too far on my subject I must say something about the town of Prospect, for it has been greatly changed since I was there before. They have torn away the old barn that has been standing for the last 40 years and put up a new one, tore away the old store and erected a new one and James Grieve and wife, the proprietors, are kept busy with the store and hotel, but everything looks fresh and clean. But I must stop for this time, but the next time I will say more about what I saw on the road and what I see here.
Fort Klamath, June 30, '14.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 3, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I promised to tell something more of what I saw on the way out here from Eagle Point. After leaving Prospect I was agreeably surprised to find the road so good, although from Prospect to Union Creek the road could be greatly improved by cutting away some of the trees that seem to be standing right in the middle of the road and cause the passengers to expect every moment to come up standing against one of them; but after we reached the government reserve there seemed to be more work done on the roads and after we reached Warpig camp the road had been straightened, cut out wider so that we could ride with more comfort so far as the mind is concerned, but we got through to the government station all right and there we left Mrs. Steven Hoyt and her son, as they, that is Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt, are camped there. There we stopped to register so that Uncle Sam can tell how many of his subjects pass over the road. I don't know if all of them are counted as going to Crater Lake or not, but if they are it leaves a wrong impression, for there is a great many who pass by the station who do not go to the lake.
    Here we found that everything was astir and among the busy crowd we met Mr. Tee, the civil engineer who done the work in laying the boundaries of the town of Eagle Point. They were rushing the work in trying to get the hotel in readiness for the thousands of guests expected this summer.
    Passing on from there we soon came to another camp at Cold Spring where they were stretching their tents and getting ready to go to work on that part of the road. This seemed to be a new camp, but as we progressed on our journey we kept meeting teams and auto trucks loaded with supplies of hay and grain and provisions for the commissary department. The farther we progressed on our way the more men and camps we found and soon we came up in front of a mammoth steam shovel right in the road on a sharp curve and that was being moved on up the hill, but by cutting away some brush, removing a few stones, sticks, etc., we managed to pass, for that machine, the steam shovel, was being moved on planks, for the ground is so soft that it could not travel on it. From there on down the hill we kept meeting more men and teams at work and soon came to where they had finished the road except the rolling. One thing that I particularly noticed was that along the edge of the canyon through which Anna Creek passes where the road runs close to the edge of the bank, they have set posts and spiked heavy poles so as to prevent anyone running over the bank.
    While the U.S. government is spending a lot of money on the roads, for it is in the reserve, it will enhance the value of property in Wood River Valley. After we reached the valley we had free sailing the rest of the way and as I said in my last reached Fort Klamath at 4 o'clock p.m. and among the first things I learned was that a man went up in a balloon, dropped with his parachute and lit in the middle of Wood River, but was rescued by two Indians, although his balloon burned up--a new one he had just bought--but he fixed up his old one ready for the next day's performance.
    The next item of interest to the general reader was that a drunk man shot into a house where there were women and children and an officer went to arrest him and the drunk took his gun away from him and marched him up the street, but finally a Medford man, I could not learn his name, slipped up on him and knocked him senseless and disarmed him, placing him in the cooler.
    That night, Monday, we, that is Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt, Mrs. Howlett, Hattie, Mabel Wamsley and myself went in Hoyt's car to the celebration grounds to see the Indian war dance, but before I begin to tell what I saw at the war dance I want to tell something about the town of Fort Klamath.
    It is a small village situated near the bank of Wood River. I could not learn, even approximately, the number of persons here but my daughter tells me that there is not enough to incorporate, but they have four general merchandise stores, two hotels, a creamery, church, dance hall, three garages, two meat markets, two blacksmith shops, one livery stable, one saloon in a hotel, and I heard one of the leading businessmen of the place remark that the saloon would take in at least two thousand dollars during the four days' celebration and used that as an argument in favor of an open town, two restaurants, a drug store, and are starting a newspaper, a confectionery and a gun shop. This may look like a great array but the readers must remember that the town is in the center of one of the richest valleys in the state, a first-class stock country.
    I must close for this time but will tell something about what has been done in my exit.
Fort Klamath, Ore., July 1.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 7, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When we arrived in Fort Klamath among the first ones we met that we knew was James Ringer and Thomas Riley, our Eagle Point painters, and after spending a short time with them and meeting a few friends of former acquaintance, among whom was Alfred Garden, he is running a moving picture show, and eating a hearty supper, Ed Hoyt brought his car again and we all started again, this time for the celebration grounds, for the people of Fort Klamath do things on a large scale. They had planned to have a celebration to last four days and had everything arranged for a good time. The grounds are situated in the lower part of the town near a grove of trees that afford a nice shade, but the grounds proper are on a prairie and a large tract is enclosed with a high board fence so that it can be used for a baseball grounds as well as for other purposes. They have a race track all around the outside of the enclosure, with a grandstand situated so that one can see all around the track. But I am getting off my subject as I started to tell what I saw on the ground. The reader will remember that we did not reach F.K. in time to see anything of the first day's program except at night when the Indians were to give a war dance, and this was given inside the enclosure; in fact, everything except the horse racing and balloon ascension was inside and the toll was only 25 cents per head for admission. They had in connection with this war dance the F.K. brass band to make music to break the monotony. Well after everything was in readiness the Indians of the Warm Spring tribe, about 40 or 50, came into the arena all dressed in their finest costumes with their trinkets, bells and feathers and the performance commenced. There is quite a difference in their way of dancing, especially the war dance and the dance of the white people, but one thing that I noticed was that each one of them so far as I could see kept the step to a dot. They seemed to have their leaders who gave directions with their long poles all decorated with paper and silver and gold trimmings. They each danced alone, no hugging the other fellow's girl, and they danced in a circle with occasionally the four leaders would jump outside of the circle. There was a bunch of what appeared to be squaws would squat in groups and one of them would beat on an Indian drum which consists of a strong hoop braced with two sticks placed at right angles to each other and the hoop is covered with a piece of rawhide while wet and then dried which answers very well as a drum and the rest of the music is made by the Indians themselves, a kind of a singsong of a noise. That lasted for about an hour; this ended the first day's performance.
    The next morning they had a ball game and a balloon ascension scheduled but neither came off on time, but they both did in the afternoon. The first thing in the afternoon was the horse races; the track was in fine condition with the exception of the dust, for the land here is pummy and when dry, very light. There did not seem to be very much excitement about the races, for there was but few except saddle horses, so we would put that down as rather tame. Then came the bucking contest. There were about 12 or 14 horses that were entered and the rider who was judged the best one and rode according to the rules was to have a prize of a hundred-dollar buckaroo outfit consisting of saddle, bridle, spurs, quirt, hackamore, chaps and riata and the second best was to receive a smaller prize. But they had certain rules that they must follow, and among the rules was the rider must keep his feet out from under the horse's belly and not catch his spurs in the cinch, have one hand hold the halter strap and the other hand in the air. They generally held their hat in one hand and used it as a whip striking the horse over the head. There were a few of the riders who were thrown off and one man was stunned for a few moments. One man made a fine ride but about the time that he reached the gate his spur broke loose and off he came while another pulled his boot off with his spur and almost reached the ground when he regained his position in his saddle while another had his horse buck completely from under him and he lit on his feet.
    These bucking contests seemed to be the most exciting performance of the occasion. This was followed by a ball game, but they are so common that they attract but little attention.
    But I must close for this time as my letter is getting too long. The next time will tell about our visit to the Indian camp where there were several hundred of them together and gave a genuine war dance.
    But before I close I wish to thank the readers of the Eaglets for the many compliments they have paid me during the last 29 years that I have been writing regularly for the Mail Tribune and its predecessors, for during that time I have written from one to five articles for publication every week and am now past 82 years old. Who can beat that record?
Fort Klamath, Ore., July 2, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 8, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Enid Middlebusher was an Eagle Point visitor Monday.
    Wm. Davis and Jakie Ragsdale visited relatives at Trail last Friday.
    Mrs. Julia Beaudroit and Misses Edna and Gladys are the guests of her mother, Mrs. Mary Martin, and sister, Mrs. Skyrman.
    Jasper Hannah was in Medford on Friday having some dental work done.
    A number of people went up to Butte Falls on the excursion Sunday.
    Haying is still the principal occupation of the farmers here.
    Gene Bellows has the finest-looking piece of corn on the east side of the river and Will Houston's is the best on the west side.
    The people from town lined the banks of the river the Fourth with fishing and picnic parties. They came in autos, auto trucks, hacks, carts, horseback, bike, motorcycles, wagons, and some even walked.
    Ed Woods of Pasadena, Cal., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard.
    The picnic at Trail was an enjoyable affair and a large crowd was present during the day and a larger one attended the dance. In the afternoon a nice program was rendered. One of the best features of it was a star drill given by 18 young ladies. There was horse racing and bucking contests. The program follows:
    Star Drill by 18 young ladies.
    Recitation, Gwendolyn Houston.
    Recitation, Beatrice McDonald.
    Song, Lynch quartet.
    Recitation, Kathleen Peile.
    Recitation, John Ragsdale.
    Duets, Gladys and Edna Beaudroit.
    Recitations, Alice, Ada and Opal Hammond.
    Song, Bertha Applegate.
    Recitation, Doris Richardson.
    Recitation, Autumn Lynch.
    Recitation, Hattie Johnson.
    Reading, Verda Lynch.
    Song, Lynch quartet.
    Reading, Effie Ossman.
    Solo, Miss Scott.
    Reading, Mrs. McDonald.
    Speech, George Lynch.
    Song, "America," by the audience.
    Mrs. Howard was up to John Houston's Monday.
    Frank Houston of Klamath County is visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston.
    Miss Fern Daily of Medford is the guest of Miss Ida Houston.
    Dave Pence is lessening all the road grades and it makes a big improvement to the road. He has Mr. Murray go over the road once a week to throw out the loose rock.
    Miss Helen Kregor returned to Sams Valley with her mother, Mrs. N. Kregor, Sunday.
    Roy Willits made his last trip Tuesday as Eagle Point-Persist mail carrier, and Mr. Trusty began Wednesday to carry the mail.
    Mrs. George Fry and Velma returned from Grants Pass Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 9, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had given a brief sketch of the first two days' proceedings at the celebration ground at Fort Klamath. The other two days' proceedings were about the same with the exception of on the third day they had in connection with the other things the capturing of a greased pig. He was not simply a pig but a genuine hog that would weigh near one hundred and twenty-five pounds and was covered all over with a fresh coat of grease and the proposition was to allow the one who caught him to have him as his prize. And when he was turned loose then the fun commenced among the boys and young men. One would grab him and then another and one would fall on him and grab him by the ear or front leg and find himself well greased but no hog, but finally three of the cowboys arranged to head him off so that he would run against one of them and they had on their chaps with long goat's wool and one of them straddled him and by squeezing him tight between his knees managed to hold him fast. Take the fair or July celebration as a whole it was very good and the bucking contest was simply fine,. The riders are entitled to great credit for their efforts to make the exhibition as good as it was, and the managing committee surely are entitled to considerable credit. There were several cash prizes awarded from $5 to $100 and the business men and women of the town showed good judgment when they contributed so liberally to meet the expenses. Saturday morning we, that is our son-in-law and daughter, Ed Hoyt and wife, Miss Mabel Wamsley, Mrs. Howlett and daughter Hattie and myself beside two strangers started in Ed's auto and in about two and a half hours we landed same in Klamath Falls where we saw quite a number of the Medford people, a few that we recognized as Ashland people, and Mrs. Howlett said that she saw Mr. Wiener of Eagle Point, but there was such a jam that it was hard for me to see for you know that I am a little like Zacharias of old, small in stature. After dinner we all went out to the rodeo grounds and were highly entertained for the afternoon. The performance was on a larger scale than what it was at Ft. Klamath and they had some very fine horses and they showed off to a good advantage. The racing seemed to be on the square to a verdant old man and as a rule was quite interesting. There was one mishap, a cowgirl by the name of McGinnis while riding one of the races had her saddle turn on the horse's side so that she fell off but fortunately was unhurt. The bucking bull appeared to be the most attractive animal on the ground, for as a rule about the time the rider lit in the saddle he would be hunting for a soft spot to fall on, but in this case the rider stayed with him several seconds, but the most laughable stunt was the half-mile race by eighteen cowboys on eighteen wild horses. The rule was they were to go to the corral, catch the horse designated by the number drawn and with the assistance of one man each bring the horse to the place in front of the grandstand, bridle and saddle him and be ready to mount in a specified time. Well, now of all the times they did have, some of them would lay down and they would have to saddle and bridle them the best they could and when the signal was given to mount and start some would hardly get in the saddle before they would be on the ground, and the horse would be off. Each man was required to ride around the half-mile track with his left hand to the pole and the one who came out first won the first prize of $25, second $15, third $10 each day. The bucking contest there was, if anything, more interesting than at Ft. Klamath because there were more riders and more noted horses. I must mention the manner in which they manage to hold the buckers while they saddle them, they as a rule are gentle but when they attempt to put on the saddle the horse as a rule acts ugly so one man sits there with his horse and snubs the bronco up to the horn of his saddle and then grabs the horse by both ears, then reaches over and takes hold of one of them with his teeth and as a rule the horse will hold still until he is saddled and the buckaroo is mounted. Then the halter rope is cut loose and the fun commences and generally the rider stays with his saddle. But I see that I am getting too long again so will stop for this time.
    I am sending with this an article that was sent to Eagle Point and forwarded to me here from Trail giving an account of a S.S. picnic they had on Sunday June 28.
Ft. Klamath, July 7, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 10, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Ray Coffeen and son are here from Pennsylvania visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Coffeen.
    Carl Hammond and Elmer Robertson are at Crater Lake for the summer.
    Mrs. Wallace Coffeen and children are the guests of her brother, Mr. Price, and family in Medford.
    A party of painters are painting the steel work of the Dodge-French bridge.
    Misses Hildreth and Mabel Foster called on Mrs. Kirchgessner Friday.
    Misses Louisa Blaess and Mattie Minter have gone to Klamath County to spend the summer.
    Mr. and Mrs. Robert Lewis of Persist made a trip to the valley this week.
    Mrs. George Fry and Velma spent Tuesday night with Mrs. H. Howard.
    John Nealon of Table Rock has been engaged to teach the fall term of school in the Central district. This district has raised his salary. We could not get along without John up here.
    Mrs. Clara Skyrman will teach at Peyton this fall.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bowman, Mr. and Mrs. St. John and Mrs. Bowman, Sr., are camped at Henry French's. The party came in an auto from Portland, riding night and day.
    John Warner of Trail is hauling some fine shakes to the valley.
    Miss Flora Stacy and Henry Morgan were married last week and surprised their friends. We wish them a long happy life. Mrs. Morgan is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. George Stacy of Beagle and was a school teacher. Henry is a son of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Morgan. Both young people have a host of friends, as they spent their lives here.
    F. Hammond caught a fine 24-lb. salmon a few days ago.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 13, 1914, page 4


CAR OF TROUT FRY FOR BIG BUTTE DUE WEDNESDAY
    A car of trout fry, containing 70,000 young trout in 140 cases, 50,000 eastern brook and 20,000 rainbow, will arrive on train No. 15 at 4 o'clock Wednesday from the Bonneville hatchery, be switched off at Crater Lake junction and be taken out at once to Butte Falls by a Pacific & Eastern engine for ditribution in the waters of Big Butte Creek.
    The trout were sent by State Superintendent of Hatcheries Clanton, upon requisition by the Rogue River Fish Protective Association. The fry were hatched and reared at the state hatchery at Bonneville and are in excellent condition. At Butte Falls local sportsmen will be on hand, headed by E. A. Hildreth, to take the fry to the upper waters.
    A second car of fry is expected soon, which will be in response to applications from Gold Hill, the Applegate, Talent and Ashland. In addition a third car has been applied for the Big Butte, the only stream in the country where there are scarcely any irrigation ditches.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 14, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Well, after so long a time, I am at home again and seated in my little studio with pencil in hand to write to the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune once more. We--that is, Mrs. Howlett, our daughter Hattie, Miss Mabel Wamsley and myself, started from the home of our son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Hoyt, the morning of the 10th and after a run of seventeen miles to the government station at the head of Anna Creek Mr. Hoyt dropped us and went on up toward Crater Lake on a business errand, and on his return brought with him his cousin, Mrs. Steven Hoyt, and little son. While he was gone and the ladies were visiting with some of their friends, for there are quite a number camped there, your correspondent was looking around to see what improvements had been made since I last visited the place, for although I passed through there on the 29th of June, I had no time to look around, for Mr. Hoyt was in a hurry to get through to Fort Klamath. Well, the last time that I was here before this trip some five or six years ago, there was but one house there, whereas now they have several very good, substantial ones, with a water system and everything fixed up in good shape. There we met Mr. Momeyer. He is the registrar, and he informed us that the travel was much more now than it was this time last year, as it now runs up into the thousands.
    Starting again, we met several cars and teams on the road to Fort Klamath, besides several pedestrians with their rolls of bedding on their backs, some on their way to the station and some for Wood River Valley, looking for work, and among those with teams were one of the Blaess boys, with his sister, Louise, and Miss Samantha Minter. We reached Prospect at 11:30 a.m., where we found Jud Edsall with our team, ready to take us home, and after eating a good, hearty dinner in the shade of one of the Prospect apple trees we started bidding adieu to the hostess of the Prospect Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. James Grieve. One would think to take a look at him that the climate surely does agree with him, for he is quite stout. In the course of a few miles we met his father, John Grieve, the boss road supervisor, with a gang of men and teams making roads. And he seemed to be making a success of his undertaking. We also met Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Higinbotham at their quiet home. I noticed that there is considerable improvements going on, and some of the farms show signs of thrift and enterprise. Passing on through Trail, we noted that that little town is coming to the front very fast, and by the time they get their electric motor car line there it will be quite a business center.
    We reached home about 7 p.m., tired and dirty, and found the two ladies, Miss Rosa Ayres and Mrs. J. W. Grover, we left in charge of the Sunnyside on duty. They were just cleaning up the supper dishes. They report that on Sunday, July 5, they had J. W. Meyer and wife, J. W. Merritt and wife, T. H. Pankey, wife and daughter, Victor Bursall and wife, Miss Alice Hanley, Miss Claire Hanley, I. C. Robinett, wife and son, all of Central Point, and on Thursday, the 9th inst., Hon. G. H. Wamsley of New York City, F. C. Lunze of Vernon, B.C., and H. M. Coss of Medford for dinner, and today, Saturday, we had George Styzine of Portland, who is traveling in the interest of the Grolier Society.
    This morning I started out to try to gather up some items of news, and among the first is that G. W. Owings, husband of the proprietress of the Eagle Hotel, and his son, Ralph, had started for Nevada, and that Harrison Hess accompanied them as far as Crater Lake, and Jack Florey, Jr., went to Fort Klamath; that Louisa Blaess and Samantha Minter had gone to Wood River Valley to remain until after haying season is over; that George H. Wamsley was fixing up the old von der Hellen store building for a post office and telephone office, and that Mr. Clements was going to move the post office and telephone business there so as to consolidate the two businesses; that a company of traveling horse traders had camped just below the wagon bridge with some half-dozen wagons and a lot of horses and mules; that Smith Bros. have rented the rooms formerly occupied by G. W. Owings as a store building and intend to move their billiard and pool tables and confectionery goods into it.
    The family of H. O. Childreth has gone to Elk Creek to remain during the hot part of the season, and Mr. C. is boarding at the Sunnyside during their absence.
    I understand that there is to be two weddings, one in our town and one in the country, next Wednesday July 15, but as I have the item simply as a news item am not at liberty to give the names of the parties.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 14, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman and son Norman were doing business in our town last Saturday.
    Smith brothers have been cleaning out the old store building formerly occupied by G. W. Owings and removing the counters, show cases, shelves, etc., and by the time this is in print they will have moved their billiard and pool tables, etc., there and Mr. Whitman the barber will move his shop into a part of the building.
    Earl Croft, the foreman on J. H. Cooley's orchard, was in town Saturday and while here left the money to renew his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Last Sunday evening B.T. Dodge, Jr., wife and mother and Mr. and Mrs. Milo Parton, all of Medford, came in for supper.
    Mrs. S. H. Harnish, who has been spending some time in Butte Falls, returned home Saturday.
    S. H. Harnish, our livery stable man, has bought out the dray and draying business.
    Mrs. A. N. Thomas, who has been visiting some of her children who live in Montana, returned home while I was in Fort Klamath, but I did not learn of it until Sunday. I also omitted to state that Wm. Haselton had gone with Mr. Owings as far as Bly to work this summer.
    While on the P.&E. on my way to Medford Monday last, I met W. E. Hammel, one of our prominent orchardists and stock men, M. R. Wood, he was on his way to Medford to make the final arrangements for his marriage to Mrs. Rachel Woolery, tomorrow, Wednesday, but further mention will be made of the affair in my next.
    Jeff Johnson, formerly one of the owners of the famous Johnson ranch on Rogue River and Elk Creek, E. L. Ingal of Oakland, Cal., traveling salesman for G. Dunkel Speel Co., of San Francisco, Cal., a dry goods firm; he had been in Eagle Point so as Geo. Brown & Sons could order their fall and winter supply. Grandma Curtis and her daughter, Mrs. Painter, were also on their way to Medford. Also Mrs. J. D. Arens, wife of the foreman on the C. Edgell orchard.
    On the return trip was one of our townsmen, Fred Findley, who is now engaged in hauling wood to the railroad track between Eagle Point and Butte Falls, and his niece, Miss Bessie Trask of Grants Pass, who is on her way to Butte Falls to spend a while in the mountain air and visit her aunt and family.
    I am requested to say by the road supervisor, Ed Dutton, that the bridge across Butte Creek at Brownsboro has been repaired and is now in good condition.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 16, 1914, page 3


    Mrs. George von der Hellen and son, Master Donald, will arrive here this evening from their home at Eagle Point, Southern Oregon, on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Huff, and numerous old-time friends. They will spend six weeks in Corvallis, Portland and at coast resorts, returning home the latter part of August. Mrs. von der Hellen will be remembered in Corvallis as Miss Grace Huff, for years a resident of this city and at one time an instructor in the primary grades of the local schools. She has many friends here who will be interested in learning that she is soon to arrive in the city.
"Local," Corvallis Gazette, July 16, 1914, page 3



ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Joe Hannah and sister Miss Mima were Medford visitors a few days ago. They brought a Toledo range home with them.
    The party at Wm. Coffeen's Thursday eve was well attended and everyone reports an enjoyable time.
    Velma Fry, Hildreth, Mabel and Johnnie Foster have an attack of the whooping cough.
    There was a surprise party at Mr. Zimmerman's last Saturday evening. After a pleasant evening refreshments of ice cream and cake were served and all departed for home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sorrell were down to Agate a few days ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Art Bellows and Herbert Bellows are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bellows.
    Miss Rachel Mathews and Dick Johnson were married in Eagle Point Wednesday. Miss Mathews is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Grant Mathews and Dick is the son of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Johnson. We wish them a long happy married life. Their friends gave them a surprise party at the Mathews home Wednesday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bellows were called to Medford by the sickness and death of his mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Bellows.
    Misses Martha Raimey and Mabel Mann of Central Point were the guests of Miss Ora Raimey a couple of days this week.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Bellows died in Medford July 15th at the home of her son Fred. She was born April 25, 1849 in Vermont, Michigan, and was past 65 years of age at the time of her death. She was married to Franklin Bellows who died about thirteen years ago. She has lived in California and Phoenix, Medford and on Rogue River in this country. She leaves five sons, Gene of Eagle Point, Ora of Coburg, Fred of Medford, Herbert and Art of Roseburg, and eleven grandchildren, who have the sympathy of their host of friends in their sad bereavement. She was laid to rest in the Central Point cemetery. The funeral services were conducted at the grave by a minister from Central Point.
    Mrs. Vestal is on the sick list this week.
    Misses Ethel Lamming and Ethel Evans of Medford has spent the last two weeks with Miss Myrtle Coffeen.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnson have gone to Klamath County to spend the summer.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 20, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I had finished my letter to the Mail Tribune last Saturday I had just got to where I wanted to tell the readers something of my experience in riding over the country soliciting for the leading newspaper of Southern Oregon and the reader will naturally say, "Why that is the Mail Tribune." Well, I started out Wednesday morning and the first place that I stopped was at the Cingcade farm and found that Thomas and his wife were away from home and Charley had gone to look after the company cattle on the range so did no business there, although Charley's wife was at home. From there I went to the farm of T. D. Singleton and on entering the gate met his daughter and she told me that I would find her father in the hay field, so on I went and found him raking alfalfa while his son was shocking. He had already cut and hauled over two tons of hay to the acre off of the tract and now was putting up about one and a half tons with the expectation of cutting another crop this season. While there he pointed with pride to his young orchard and assured me that he was making it pay raising grain and hay between the trees. After renewing his subscription I passed on by Mr. Haley's fine farm; he is a paid up subscriber so did not stop to see him, but went to C. A. Prewell's farm and found he and his son hard at work hauling grain and I tell you that it did look fine. There I had to put up for dinner or else risk the displeasure of mine host so after partaking of their hospitality and giving them a receipt for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, I steered for home. The next morning I again started and went to the farm of John Rader, but as John was not at home I could do no business; passing on to the Geo. W. Stevens farm I happened to find him and his family there, they had just come out from Medford in his car. Mr. S. is one of the most thoroughgoing men in that section and thanks to his push and perseverance they have a new country road opened from Eagle Point to intersect the Brownsboro-Medford road so as to accommodate quite a number of the citizens of the Antelope Valley. After giving him a receipt for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune I passed Mr. Derricks' but he was getting the paper so I went to the beautiful home and farm of the Lewis Bros. I was greatly pleased to find Mrs. Fred T. Lewis so enthusiastic over their prospect, for although she was raised in a city and when they bought the farm of A. S. Carlton and D. Bradshaw, about 300 acres, she knew but very little of the practical workings of farm life, but now she seems to have a very correct idea of how to work a farm and handle stock. When I inquired for Mr. Lewis was told that he was out in the orchard hauling in his hay. Last year I had occasion to mention his putting in red clover in his orchard as an experiment but it has now proved to be a grand success for he was hauling in his second cutting, and it was a fine crop and was rushing his work so as to make room for the third crop of clover hay, mark you, that that he raised between his fruit trees. In addition to his hay, and he estimates that he will have in the neighborhood of 170 tons. He has some as fine looking grain as I have seen anywhere; he is planning to put most all of his land in clover. After giving him a receipt for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, I next went to the Walsh farm owned by Mrs. Katie Walsh; her farm is situated on Antelope bottom and on the sticky land joining and is very productive. After straightening out her account with the Mail Tribune and have her pay up to date and a year in advance, for she has an abhorrence of going in debt, bidding her and her family adieu I next went through the fine farm of Senator von der Hellen, passed on to Fred Luy's, found him at home and, giving him a receipt for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, turned my course, for it was too hot to try to climb up those hills between Antelope and Dry Creek and went to the home of A. W. Bradshaw, the foreman of the Commercial orchard, and found that he was away but would be home at night, so I settled down quietly for the night and had a very pleasant visit with Mrs. Bradshaw and children. In the evening he came in with a bunch of cattle he had gathered up to take to the range on the higher hills. Surely he is a busy man, having charge of an orchard one and a half miles long by one mile wide with 14 men to look after and in addition to all of that he has several hundred turkeys and hundreds of hogs, in fact everything is on a large scale. In the morning after giving him a receipt for $5 on his subscription I started to look for some new subscribers as I learned that there was several families above there although several of them were taking the Mail Tribune and had paid up in advance. On my way I stopped at a house and asked the lady if she did not want to take the Mail Tribune and she told me "No," for said she, "I get to read my neighbors' papers." Going on I passed a neat school house where a lady by the name of Good is teaching and as I was riding along I met a gentleman and lady and I mistrusted that he was a man that lived high on the hill and it was getting quite tropical so when we met I simply asked him is his name was--and he said yes, and in about two minutes he had a receipt for $1.50 on his subscription. Now, Mr. Editor, wasn't that gall to hold up a couple in that way. That finished up my successful work for that trip although I tried several others, but they put up the plea of hard times.
    But before I bring this to a close I must add that we have an energetic class of people on Yankee Creek and they are making some substantial improvements in the line of fencing, for they seem to be fencing in all of that country.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 22, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock has secured the school again in the Reese Creek district. She taught the last school for them and gave such satisfaction that the board has engaged her for this fall's school.
    Charley Bacon, the conductor on the P.&E.R.R., has been making some decided improvements on his home, having added screen wire rooms.
    C. W. Clements, our new postmaster, has had the old von der Hellen store building remodeled and has moved the post office fixtures, etc., into it, and also moved the telephone office out of the von der Hellen brick into the rear of the post office building, and now they have their work consolidated and am glad to say are getting along nicely with the business and giving general satisfaction to the patrons of the post office.
    J. T. Carpenter and J. T. Bates of Medford came out Monday, secured a rig at the Sunnyside and went out to W. H. Crandall's.
    Since the post office has been moved out of the Heath building, Fred R. Heath has placed a large sign, undertaking supplies, over the front porch.
    William Leach and wife of Trail were among us the first of the week.
    Mrs. George von der Hellen, wife of one of our hardware merchants, and her son, Donald, have gone to Corvallis to spend a short time visiting her mother, and then expects to go to Newport to spend the summer.
    George von der Hellen, J. B. Jackson and his son, Carl, autoed to Elk Creek and McLeod last week.
    Miss M. A. Patterson of Butte Falls came out Tuesday and took dinner and in the afternoon went to the home of George Givan to try to secure a position as teacher in that district, but failed to find him, as he was here in town at the same time, so she returned, spent the night with us, and the next day went to Antioch. She taught on Evans Creek last term.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Burdic of Ashland and Walter Wood were also here for dinner the same day. Mr. Burdic has been engaged in shipping cattle out of Mexico during the past year and can tell some interesting incidents that occurred there during the time. He was on a deal to sell some cattle to Mr. Wood.
    Paul W. Robinson, pathological chemist of Washington, D.C., came out in Mrs. George West's car, bringing with him Mrs. West, Mrs. Howard Day Foster of Medford, and after visiting a while, engaged breakfast for Mr. Robinson and Mrs. West the next morning and returned to Medford. Returning Tuesday morning at 6:30 o'clock, after eating breakfast they started for George West's camp on Mill Creek. Mr. West is one of the forest rangers and cruisers in the employ of Uncle Sam and is camped on Mill Creek.
    George Wilkins of Medford came out Tuesday and spent the night. The next morning he went to the C. Edgell orchard, where he secured a position and commenced work Thursday.
    The many friends of Mrs. Harold Simpson, nee Marguerite Florey, gave her a hearty greeting last Saturday when she returned to the parental roof for a short visit.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno and her two children and her mother, Mrs. A. B. Clarno, called for dinner Thursday.
    The town council is having more crushed rock put on the street below the bridge, something that is greatly needed, and another job that is needed very much is to have the red hill just below town cut down, as it is impossible for anyone in crossing the hill to see if there is anyone on the opposite side, and the result is that there is danger of an auto running into a team at any time or coming in close contact with a skittish team. One is liable to have an accident at any time, and I think that it will stand the county authorities in hand to look after the matter.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 25, 1914, page 4


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston and Miss Ida spent Sunday with Jasper Rogers and wife of Beagle.
    Mrs. Harry Howard was in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    Mrs. Fry and Velma went to Grants Pass Monday.
    Margaret Howard is enjoying the whooping cough.
    Mr. Wyant and James were the guests of his daughter, Mrs. Eugene Bellows, a couple of days this week.
    Albert and Robert McCabe are working at Crater Lake.
    Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and Givan spent the weekend with Mr. and Mrs. James Cornutt of Central Point.
    Mrs. Stacey and Miss Dessie were over to the river in their auto Thursday.
    Mr. Backus and party have returned to Portland after having spent a pleasant week at Henry French's fishing. Mr. Backus is of the firm of Backus & Morris, makers of fishing equipments.
    Frank Zuccala was to Central Point after supplies Tuesday.
    Miss Mima Hannah spend Sunday with Mrs. Mae Daw.
    Charles Coffeen went to Medford Friday.
    Mr. Price and family of Medford have spent the week with Wallace Coffeen and family.
    Lloyd French took the auto stage Monday for Crater Lake to spend the summer.
    John Foster was calling on relatives here the first of the week.
    Miss Eula Houston was one of the successful applicants at the last teachers' examination.
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock will teach the winter school in the Reese Creek district.
    Norman Gage is binding grain for his neighbors.
    Tom Raimey and Miss Ora were Central Point visitors Friday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made a professional visit Friday to Ed Foster's children.
    Jasper Hannah and family are camping on Upper Trail for ten days.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 28, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday I took a spin around for a while in the afternoon to interview some of the subscribers of the Mail Tribune and the first place I stopped was the farm, or rather orchard, of J. M. Wilfley, where he has a quarter section of genuine black sticky and the most of it in young trees. Here I met T. A. Petty, who formerly owned an interest in the place and has been supervising the work but has sold his interest to his partner, Mr. Wilfley.
    The place is known as the John Hart place. They have torn away the most of the old buildings and erected new ones and in the place of the old dwelling house they now have two neat up-to-date residence buildings and a large commodious barn, a neat garage, large enough to hold two autos, and are getting the place in fine shape. The orchard is kept in good order and everything looks home-like and tidy. When Mr. Petty paid me the subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune he ordered [it] discontinued on the 1st of August as he expects to start at that time, with family, in his auto for the state of Missouri. The friends of the family regret very much that he has decided to make that move for they will be greatly missed from the community. His wife and daughters, especially, will be missed not only from the social world, but from the church field, as they have taken quite an active part in that line of work. The two daughters have been having young ladies' parties for the past week, having from three to five of their school and college associates come out at a time and spend a few days with them before their departure for the East. While I was there I met Misses May Henderson, Elizabeth Blackford and Beth Stewart, and a company of five had just returned to their homes in the Willamette Valley. I next went to the home of Mrs. Susan Hart but did no business with her. Here I met old David Smith, 84 years of age, who has had a stroke of paralysis and is dependent on friends and charity for care and sustenance. His friends wanted him to go the soldiers' home but he did not want to go.
    Saturday morning I started in company of Prof. C. E. Johnson for Tolo, taking him as far as the road near the Bybee bridge, as he wanted to go to Table Rock to secure a boarding place while he is teaching the school in that district. Leaving him, I wended my way through the farms across the desert and was surprised to see so much vegetation on that land, but after I had reached the bottom land my surprise was changed to admiration, for as I was driving along through the bottom land I counted 14 large stacks of hay in one field and they were still hauling, but that Bear Creek bottom land is as good as there is in the state or on the coast. Crossing Bear Creek near Tolo I went direct to the home of E. N. Davis, who has charge of one of the Dr. Ray places. The place that he has charge of contains 600 acres of land and has an orchard of 285 acres, an alfalfa field of some 60 acres and the rest is grain land and Mr. Davis and his three sons have charge of the whole farm. It requires from 16 to 20 horses and mules to do the work. I went to meet Rev. Mark C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church, where we had planned to have preaching in the Tolo school house and organize a Sunday school. Speaking of the school house, they have as nice a one as I have seen in the country anywhere. It is built of brick and in the main room they have desks to accommodate 52 pupils beside cloak rooms, toilets, a class room for small children, and everything is up-to-date. We had services in the forenoon but the congregation was small, but at night we had a good-sized audience and at the close organized a Sunday school with Mrs. E. N. Davis as superintendent and Miss Elsie Webb as secretary-treasurer.
    This Monday morning I returned home accompanied by Rev. Davis and found Mrs. Oscar Wright, wife of one of the former agents of the P.&E. railway company at this place, but now they are located in Oil Center, Cal. He is engaged as an oil tester for an oil company. Mrs. Wright is out on a visiting tour and before she came here spent a few days at Klamath Falls. I learned that there were two couples, Mr. and Mrs. Sullivan and Mr. and Mrs. Clay of Medford, here for dinner Sunday besides several of our local friends, but as they did not register will not try to give their names for I find that I am getting this letter too long, but will add for the benefit of the readers of the Mail Tribune that the Sunday school will meet in the Tolo school house next Sunday at 10:30 a.m. and that Rev. M. C. Davis will preach in the Yankee Creek school house on the evening of the third Sunday in August, being the 16th, at 8 p.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 29, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. V. Wright, a brother of Prof. Wright of Butte Falls, who has been attending Oregon Agricultural College for the past three years, stayed at the Sunnyside on his way up to Butte Falls to visit his relatives there last week while I was away from home.
    I. C. Moore, who has a farm on Elk Creek and spends a good part of his time there, but lives in Ashland, was called home the first of the week on account of the sickness of his wife.
    R. G. Burdic, son R. G. Jr., and Walter Wood were here for dinner last Tuesday. Mr. Wood was on a deal with Mr. Burdic for a lot of cattle. Mr. Burdic has been, and may be yet for all that I know, in the business of shipping cattle from Mexico.
    Three of the von der Hellen brothers were here for dinner Tuesday; they were George, Carl and Harry.
    Wm. G. Knighton took a carload of people to Reese Creek last Sunday to hear Rev. L. L. Simmons preach in the afternoon.
    P. C. Burdic who has a homestead on Indian Creek, was a pleasant caller for dinner Tuesday.
    Gus Rosenberg, who has been engaged with Chris Natwick in his road work in blasting, has secured a machine and is now engaged in the well-boring business near Derby.
    Charley Bacon, the accommodating conductor on the P.&E. railroad, and family have gone to Portland to visit relatives and for a outing. Mr. Richard Diamond has taken his place and Jud Edsall has taken Mr. Diamond's as first brakeman during Mr. Bacon's absence.
    E. A. Bass, who bought a tract of land of Wm. von der Hellen, made a trip to Crater Lake the first of the week and reports the roads badly cut up especially on the pummy. He in speaking of the roughness of the roads and, devising some plan to keep them smooth, suggested that they be kept damp all the time, and F. M. Stewart suggested that they be covered with about three inches of crude oil, but that was decided to be too expensive and Mr. von der Hellen's idea was to bring water from the nearby streams, say Rogue River, Mill Creek, Union Creek, Whiskey Creek, Whitehorse, etc., and have stations and sprinkle the roads. While it would be attended with some expense it would place the roads in fine shape, for the more water you put on the pummy land the harder it packs, and if we are going to fix the roads for ease, comfort and beauty, why not do it right? But I would suggest that if the county, state or general government is going to so much expense to charge the autoists for the privilege of riding over it, to be applied to the upkeep of the road and not tax the poor pedestrian who has to walk and carry his kit.
    Henry Head and wife of Central Point stopped here for supper last Tuesday evening on their way home from Crater Lake. They drove out with a team and just had the time of their lives. They went out to the island and into the crater and took in all of the sights.
    J. L. Harrison of Medford is the name of the new man at the Eagle Point lumber yard. He is here to fill the place formerly occupied by Mr. Wiener and says that he can be found at the yard at all times during business hours.
    Mrs. Mary Wrighter Ringer, who has property just below the town line and has been living in Ashland for some time, came in to spend a few days looking after her property.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 3, 1914, page 3


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. McCabe spent Monday the guest of Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    Mrs. Tim Dailey returned to her home near Medford Wednesday after a week's visit with home folks.
    George Lynch and son, Autumn, of Elk Creek made a trip to the valley this week.
    Mrs. Slusser of Pasadena is the guest of her daughter, Mrs. Harry Howard.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Richardson of Agate have spent a week with their daughter, Mrs. Wesley Kelso.
    Mr. Olesson is a man with lots of friends who regret to hear of his untimely end.
    Tom Raimey and Jasper Hannah were in Medford Monday.
    Henry French and wife and Gene Bellows were in Eagle Point Saturday.
    Perry Foster was over to Jasper Rogers' store Wednesday.
    Miss Mima Hannah went to Medford Friday to visit her sister, Mrs. Tim Daily.
    J. C. Hannah is the guest of his son, Jasper.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Houston, Mr. and Mrs. John Walker and Elmer Simmons attended the funeral of Sam Walker at Antioch Tuesday.
    School teachers are as thick as May bees here.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pettegrew and Frank spend Sunday with Eugene Bellows and family.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Bergman of Irving are the guests of the Clarno families.
    It is reported that Henry Olesson of Elk Creek was killed by an Ashland man for a deer.
    Rumor says Pete Stowell was married a few days ago to a lady from Washington. We wish them a joyous married life.
    Frank Hammond is Papa Hooligan now, as a tiny five and three quarter pound daughter, Gertrude, arrived at his home a few days ago. Mother and babe are getting along nicely now. Dr. Holt of Eagle Point and Dr. Stearns of Medford were in attendance.
    Dr. Kirchgessner was called Monday to attend Alec Raimey.
    Tuesday morning William Coffeen was leading his cow down the hill to water when she began to run and threw him on his head and shoulders. He had a fractured shoulder and was pretty badly bruised. Dr. Holt of Eagle Point attended him and Mr. Coffeen is doing fine.
    Wesley Coffeen came up from Medford to see his father, William Coffeen, this week.
    Dave Pence attended the good roads meeting in Medford Monday.
    Miss Ida Houston was one of the successful applicants at the last teachers' examination.
    Miss Florence Kincaid of Agate will teach the fall term in district 50.
    Mr. Howard of Pasadena, Cal., surprised his nephew, Harry, Monday by arriving for a few days' visit.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred Sturgis of Elk Creek (Trail) came out last Friday and spent the night at the Sunnyside. He came out for a load of dynamite for the government.
    The same night Mr. Bryan of Kerby, Josephine County, spent the night with us. He has been working on a large barn that the Messrs. Cotterall are putting up in the Meadows.
    Henry Meyer of Lake Creek and his family were also guests at the Sunnyside. Mr. Meyer had brought his team out to have it shod up, getting ready for his fall work. He and his family, in company with Mike Sidley, Sr., were also here on Sunday for dinner. They had come out to attend the Catholic church, as the priest comes out on the first Sunday in each month and conducts services in the church building here.
    George Fry, also of Lake Creek, was a guest for dinner.
    Mr. Hughes, one of the leading merchants of Butte Falls, spent the night with us last Saturday. He had been to Jacksonville as a witness in the case where four of the boys of Butte Falls were arrested for some of their meanness. He said that he never heard a set of boys get such a general scorching as Judge Kelly gave them, and he hopes that the lesson taught them will do them good.
    But I see that I am getting ahead of my story, for I want to tell what a good time the leading people of our town had at the lawn social given by Mrs. Arglee Green and some more of the prominent citizens of this place. The social was given to assist in raising money to meet the salary of the pastor of the Baptist church of this place. The social was held on Mrs. Green's lawn on Friday evening, and invitations were sent out to almost everyone to come and have a good time and help along a good cause. The lawn is quite large and interspersed with trees hanging with green flags, and in and around these trees were hung some forty or fifty Japanese lanterns. The ground was well supplied with tables covered with white cloths and chairs, and benches were arranged so as to seat all who wished to be seated. The phonograph was brought out on the porch so that they had good music while other things were being prepared for the entertainment of the guests, and during the evening the young folks played different games. Among them was "going some," that proved to be of great interest to the most of the company. But the most interesting part of the program was the selling and eating the cake and ice cream. Tickets had been prepared and each ticket was sold for 10 cents, and that would entitle the holder to a dish of ice cream and a piece of cake. The milk, cream and cakes were all donated by the friends of the minister, Rev. L. L. Simmons, and as the proceeds were to go to him no one hesitated to buy a ticket, although some of them complained that the spoon was very small that they dipped the ice cream out with, but as it was for the preacher that was all right, but there was another turn resorted to. A man would be seated at a table eating a dish of cream and here would come along a lady friend with say two or three other women, or perhaps young ladies, and she would introduce all of them to the aforesaid man and of course he would invite each of them to take a dish of ice cream, and thus it would go around. I heard one lady say that she ate three dishes of ice cream in that way, but it was for the preacher, so it was all right. But the social was a grand success. They sold nine gallons of ice cream and realized $20.50, and it will be a long time before the lawn social on Mrs. Green's lawn will be forgotten.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1914, page 5


DODGE BLAMED FOR SHOOTING HENRY OLSON
Coroner's Jury Finds Death Due to Gunshot Wound from Gun
in the Hands of Louis Dodge, Carelessly Fired--
Victim Only Thirty-five Feet Away at Time of Shooting.

    Louis Dodge, of Ashland, who shot and killed Henry Olson Saturday night, mistaking the latter for a deer, was arraigned in Justice Taylor's court this afternoon on a complaint sworn out by Prosecutor Kelly charging him with manslaughter. The defendant waived examination and was bound over to the grand jury on $1000 bail bond, which was furnished by the defendant's father and E. A. Estes.
    Carelessness upon the part of Louis Dodge of Ashland caused the death of Henry Olson on Elk Creek last Saturday evening, when he was shot through the heart for a deer, according to the verdict of the coroner's jury held at the Perl undertaking establishment this morning. The verdict is as follows:
    "We, the coroner's jury, find that Henry Olson was a native of Wisconsin, age 23 years, and that he came to his death from a gunshot wound from a gun in the hands of Louis Dodge of Ashland, carelessly fired."
    "Carelessly fired" was substituted for "carelessness" upon the grounds it was a softer term.
    The jury was composed of A. N. Lofland, Al Garretson, C. H. Herman, Fred Burk, F. C. Clayville and W. A. Malley.
Startling Evidence
    Startling evidence was introduced at the hearing. Three witnesses testified that the dead man was not over thirty-five feet away from Dodge when he fired the fatal shot, and that it was practically open country. H. O. Childreth of Eagle Point testified that Olson must have been visible "from the knees up." Dodge testified the distance was forty or fifty feet, the country brushy and that he was guided by noises in the woods.
    Dodge, showing plainly the heavy nervous strain, testified that he had heard a deer in the brush around the camp fire where he was cooking supper. He said he heard the chug-chug of the hoofs and before he fired saw plainly the outline of a buck, horns and all. He ran to see the result and found Olson near the trail.
Dodge Close to Victim
    Merle Willits, a young man of Persist, testified that he had measured the distance between the camp fire where Dodge was cooking and where Olson fell and that it was nine rifle lengths. The rifle was 38 inches long. He said that Olson in traveling from the Twin Licks, where Olson left Estes, the third man in the party, he had taken the most natural route to reach camp. He testified there was no obstruction between Dodge and Olson, except bare fir limbs.
    E. A. Estes, a member of the party, testified that it was his first experience in the mountains, and that he went to sleep at the Twin Licks, being tired, while Olson hunted. He was awakened by a shot, and then heard Dodge yell for help. He rushed down the trail and found Olson.
    Coroner Kellogg attached considerable importance to the brush in the neighborhood of the shooting, and Al Garretson on the jury proposed that the jury make a trip to the scene of the tragedy to investigate the conditions. Prosecutor Kelly said that the brush cut no figure, and that it was not necessary for the coroner's jury to go into the fine points to determine the cause of death.
    Adolphus Olson, a brother of the dead man, caused a thrill after Dodge had told for the second time of hearing the chug-chug of hoofs in the brush, by asking for the hobnailed shoes the dead man wore, and asking if they would make a noise like hoofs on the bedrock of the creek bottom. Olson also testified a man could tell the color of the eyes at the distance between Dodge and the victim.
    Olson wore a checkered shirt, and H. O. Childreth testified that while packing the body out through a dark canyon at 8 o'clock at night the party was able to distinguish the shirt easily.
    After five minutes' deliberation the coroner's jury returned its verdict. A formal complaint will be filed in the justice court this afternoon by Prosecutor Kelly. Dodge will be released upon bonds to ensure his appearance before the fall grand jury and will probably waive the preliminary hearing. Attorney C. D. Briggs of Ashland is his attorney.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1914, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John M. Nichols, our town mayor, had the misfortune to get his hand very badly bruised and cut a few days ago while fixing his pump and windmill on his farm. Dr. Holt was called and dressed the wound, and now he is crippled in one of his hands and his wife is still unable to use her hand that was hurt some months ago. They both come occasionally to the Sunnyside for a meal.
    Miss Elsie Greb returned from a trip up to W. C. Daley's and the upper Soda Springs Friday. She reports that they killed a rattler with nine rattles.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 7, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There was a company of four stopped here for dinner the first of the week, but as I was away from home on business for the Mail Tribune, I did not have the pleasure of meeting them. They had started from Medford and been to Crescent City, thence down the coast to San Francisco, then up the Sacramento River to Weed, thence to Klamath Falls, Burns, through Eastern Oregon, back via Crater Lake via Eagle Point for supper at the Sunnyside, and when they reached here they complained of being hungry, said that they had hardly stopped long enough to eat, but they seemed to be well satisfied when they left here.
    Mrs. J. B. Jackson and her daughter, Mrs. Harry Young, were pleasant callers here last Tuesday. Mrs. Jackson said that she expected to start for Yakima, Wash. in a few days to take charge of a large fruit-packing establishment and would probably be gone until December.
    Henry O. Childreth, one of the firm of Childreth Bros., blacksmiths, of this place, who went to Elk Creek last Saturday to visit his family who were there taking an outing, returned Tuesday. While he was there he was in the party that went to hunt for Henry Olson, who was shot by Mr. Dodge of Ashland. He was the first one to touch the dead man, although his, Olson's, brother was the first one to find him. He says that after the man was shot the two men, Dodge and the other man--I believe his name is Estes--turned him over on his back and then left him and moved their camp a short distance, spent the night, and the next morning they both went to the nearest neighbor, about seven miles, and gave the word out that he was shot, and then a company of thirteen started to find the man, but neither of the men would go. So after hunting for considerable time they found him, but then the next thing to do was to get him out, for they had to carry him about seven miles on a stretcher down a canyon, and they made the stretcher as narrow as they could to hold the corpse, and then had to cut out a trail so as to get along, getting into the Olson home about 10 o'clock p.m., without dinner or supper, but those who had congregated there had prepared supper, so they all remained there the rest of the night, and the next day the corpse was brought out to Medford and an inquest held, and the readers of the Mail Tribune know the rest. He says that he never had such a time in his life as he did in helping to carry out that corpse. When he returned he brought his wife and the younger children with him, and they all were visitors at the Sunnyside Wednesday evening when he related the above statement.
    Roy Smith and Amos Ayres and his sister, Rose, and Miss Mae Trusty started last Monday for Crater Lake and the Fort Klamath country for an outing.
    Mrs. H. G. Henry and her daughter, now of Medford, but formerly of Brownsboro, were here for dinner last Thursday; also Herman Meyer, Jr., and Henry Newstrom of Lake Creek.
    Miss Mabel Scudder of Medford came out Tuesday to visit some of her old friends of this place, and on Wednesday went to Lake Creek with Timmie Duggan and family.
    John Walsh took ninety rods of two-inch pipe up to his ranch on Butte Creek last Thursday.
   David Pence of Elk Creek (Trail), the road supervisor of that district, reports to me that his wife started Friday morning for Elkton, Douglas County, to visit her mother, Grandma Jerry Heckathorn, who had had a paralytic stroke. She is about 90 years old and has lived in this country the most of her life and has several relatives visiting her now.
    Mrs. Frank Redding of Medford and her three children came out from the upper Soda Springs Friday with Henry Meyer. They were all here for dinner. Mrs. R. and children had been up there for a little over a month.
    Thursday night, D. E. Wood of Spokane, one of the United States postal inspectors, spent the night with us, and the next morning Carl von der Hellen of Wellen came about 5 o'clock for breakfast and to take him to Lake Creek, etc., returning in time for dinner at the Sunnyside. Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Whitman of Berkeley, Cal., were also here for breakfast.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 10, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. A. Whitman and wife have moved into the house formerly owned by Mr. Diamond, and I understand that he has charge of the business of W. Hart Hamilton in this section of the country.
    B. Klum, Walter Marquis and Floy Jackson were out here last Friday evening posting bills for the Southern Oregon fair. They called for supper and intended to bill the town after they had eaten.
    The same evening Mr. and Mrs. I. Osenbrugge and Mrs. Sturgis of Applegate called for rooms for all except Mr. Osenbrugge, as he decided to sleep in his auto. They were on their way to Crater Lake and Fort Klamath, going out for a good time and to see the ninth wonder of the world--Crater Lake and its surroundings.
    Mrs. Harry Howard and little daughter, of Trail, and her mother, Mrs. Martha Slossen of Pasadena, Cal., came out from Mr. Howard's homestead to consult with Dr. Holt last Saturday and came to the Sunnyside waiting for his return from Butte Falls. J. A. Howard and Pete Betz and wife were also here for dinner the same day.
    Tuesday night of last week the Christian Endeavor League of Reese Creek gave a social at the home of Mrs. Jettie Clarno. They intended to have ice cream and cake, but failed to procure the ice, so had in the place of ice cream, lemonade and cake, but my reporter, Professor C. E. Johnson, says that they had a fine time; in fact, the time passed so pleasantly that they lingered until after midnight. There were about forty or more present, and all tried to make the occasion as pleasant and profitable as possible.
    I unintentionally omitted to state in my last that Miss Hazel Brown, daughter of one of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons, had returned from Portland, where she has been visiting her half-sister, Mrs. Charles Rippy, and since her return home has had her cousins, the Misses Holmes of Central Point, visiting her.
    Miss Louise Grigsby of Central Point came out last Saturday to attend the moving picture show and the dance following. She was a guest at the Sunnyside, returning home Sunday afternoon in a buggy with Lew Smith, one of our confectioners.
    On Sunday Mrs. Howlett gave one of her chicken dinners, and among the guests were J. V. McIntyre and wife, Fred R. Heath and wife and daughter, Miss Francis, T. A. Boltz and family, Dr. William P. Holt, Charley Bacon, Nick Young and Professor C. E. Johnson.
    Charley Bacon returned from his visit to Portland and other points. He says that he ran around so fast that a letter could not catch him. He left his family in Douglas County to spend a few days visiting relatives and friends.
    Sam Harnish, our livery stable man, took his wife and son Robert to the hills about Prospect Monday morning to spend a while inhaling the mountain air.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 12, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    George Stacey and children were fishing on the river a few days ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bellows ate dinner and watermelons with S. Vestal and family Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno, Mrs. A. Clarno and Mrs. Walter Bergman start Wednesday for Crater Lake and Klamath Falls.
    Messrs. Gates of Portland and New York left for their homes Monday after spending several days at Henry French's fishing. Mr. Gates of New York was greatly pleased with a fifteen-pound fish he caught. A two- or three-pound fish is a big catch for a fisherman at his home.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows visited relatives in Medford and Ashland this week.
    Jasper Hannah is hauling material to remodel his house.
    Mrs. Slusser and Mrs. Howard were Eagle Point visitors Saturday.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman has spent the last three weeks in California visiting her stepdaughter, Mrs. Clara Butler.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz were shopping in Eagle Point one day this week.
    District Attorney Kelly and Editor Putnam were out interviewing the fish this week.
    Rogue River is easily waded now, as the water is so low.
    We need rain very badly.
    The hunter is getting to be a nuisance to the river rancher. He shoots in our stock pastures, where we will not shoot ourselves. On two ranches children had narrow escapes and on another while a man and his wife stood on the river bank on his own farm some bullets went whistling near their heads, and then the same day another bullet hit near the man.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made a professional call in Medford Sunday night.
    Mrs. Hannah, Mrs. T. Raimey and Miss Ora went to Mrs. Welch's, at Asbestos, Tuesday.
    Two autos of people from Medford called on Dr. and Mrs. Kirchgessner Sunday.
    The Russell-Gage thresher is threshing for themselves and neighbors.
    Horace Pelton was buying hogs and hunting a threshing crew this week.
    Henry Childreth and family were passengers on the Persist-Eagle Point stage Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 13, 1914, page 5


Eagle Point Items
(Tou late for last week)

    Mrs. A. Nye returned from Roseburg Monday and was met at Medford by her daughter, Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    J. W. Grover and family have moved to the Alberta [Alta Vista?] orchard, where Mrs. Grover takes charge of the boarding house.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bettie and daughter started for a week's camping trip in our beautiful mountains before they leave for the East.
    Miss Rosie Ayres, Miss Mary Trusty and Amos Ayres and Roy Smith started Sunday for Crater Lake and expect to return by way of Klamath Falls.
    Clay Cole, the P.&E. engineer, is taking a vacation at Colestin. Tonie McClelland has taken his niece, and Mr. Coleman is doing the firing act and engaged board at the Eagle.
    Miss Chapman of the Dalles was at the Eagle Saturday on her return from a visit to her mother and brothers at Lake Creek. Miss Chapman is a teacher in the Dalles school and will soon return to take up her work.
    A Mr. Lake, who visited Jackson County some three years ago, wrote to J. W. Grover a short time ago and stated that he had traveled all over ever since he was here and had not found anything that suited him as well as Jackson County and the country around Eagle Point, and that he had intended to return and buy property as he met the most hospitable people at Eagle Point that he found in all his travels. Others would do well to follow his example and come and settle among the best people on the globe.
Central Point Herald, August 13, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. Hart Hamilton of San Jose, Cal., has been stopping for several days at the Sunnyside and so has R. A. Whitman, who is interested with him in some of his business here. Mrs. Whitman has gone to Berkeley, Cal., to visit her mother and bring her things so as to go to housekeeping.
    Mr. Kimball and wife of Klamath Falls called for dinner last Tuesday on their way to Crater Lake. Mr. Kimball is looking after the interests of the Weyerhaeuser Lumber Co. in Southern Oregon. Thursday Arden Tyrrell of Lake Creek was here for dinner.
    Mrs. J. H. Howard of Trail and her mother, Mrs. Slossen of Pasadena, Cal., came out again to interview Dr. Holt concerning Mrs. Howard's little girl and while here took advantage of the nice cool screened porch of the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Olie McPherson, nee Olie Nichols, and Mrs. William von der Hellen were also pleasant callers on Mrs. Howlett and our daughter Hattie, also Mrs. F. M. Stewart was visiting Mrs. Howlett Wednesday.
    On last Wednesday Ernest McKee of Medford, who is in the employ of Hubbard Bros. came out to doctor our gasoline engine and brought with him his wife, Mrs. Charles Lebo and Mrs. Sam Richardson and while he was working with the engine they went up to the swimming hole and waded in the nice cool water of Little Butte. They had such a good time they promised to return someday and take dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Poiser, the pioneer hack driver of Medford, came out last Thursday with some men who were posting bills for a wild west show and took dinner with us. That is only the third lot of bill posters that have been out here posting bills for shows of one kind or another. They must surely think that money grows on trees in these parts, and I suppose that it does by the amount of apple box material that is passing through our town the past few days, for the orchardists are taking out load after load of box material and soon apple picking will begin and then money will become more plentiful. From what I can learn the apple crop in this section will be up to the standard and about a half crop of pears.
    F. J. Ayres and his granddaughter Miss Stella Betz were in town last Wednesday and as he went home he took a load of grain. Speaking of grain, the farmers around here have done their threshing but the grain was not up to the standard; the hot dry spell damaged it some.
    Green Mathews, who owns a farm about three miles north of our town, was in yesterday and reports that his corn crop is good. It is on sticky land and it never fails when properly treated.
    J. W. Lawton and his two daughters Misses Helen E. and Lorraine came in from Crater Lake last Wednesday afternoon and stayed at the Sunnyside until after supper and drove home in the cool of the evening.
    G. C. Curley of Ashland and W. Vaughn of Hayfork, Cal., came out from Jacksonville for breakfast on Wednesday morning on their way to Trail to attend the funeral of Mr. Curley's father-in-law and Mr. Vaughn's father.
    James Culbertson came out Friday morning and brought some very nice mutton for sale in our town.
    I see that my calling attention to the danger attending the crossing of the little red hill just below town has had its effect, for our road supervisor, Ed Dutton, has torn the top of it off, dragged it down on each side and done a fine job. He is surely the right man in that place. He has not only removed a dangerous menace but removed one of the hardest hills to pull over there is in the country.
    I see that I made a mistake in my last when I stated that Sam Harnish had taken a part of his family to Prospect but I should have said that they had gone to the Dead Indian Soda Springs. But I see that I am getting my letter too long again although I have several items in my catch book yet, but they will keep.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 17, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the items I had to omit sending the Mail Tribune last week was that Dr. P. J. Korinek and W. E. Barnes of the Korinek Veterinary Company of Medford were here for supper last Thursday.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman has returned from a visit to California, where she has been visiting relatives.
    Mrs. P. J. Parton and her daughter Miss Pearl were the guests of Mrs. Howlett on Friday afternoon, and while here Mrs. Parton informed me that her daughter, Miss Clyde, had graduated from high school in San Jose, Cal., and had secured a position to teach school in Texas, her old home. She has two brothers in Texas and will visit them while there. On Saturday I had occasion to visit the Parton farm and while there he took me around the place to show me some of his fine hogs, and he surely has some of them, and among them he has about 150 little pigs that are still with their mothers. He had up in one bunch 90 that he was fattening for the market.
    Green Mathews, one of our prosperous farmers and stockraisers, was in town last Thursday and while here paid up his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, and also paid up the subscription of his son Verna to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    M. M. Root of Table Rock was here last Friday evening for supper. He was the guest of Messrs. W. Hart Hamilton and R. A. Whitman. Mr. Root is a member of the American Canning Company of San Francisco; he also owns an orchard in Table Rock. He is very pessimistic with regard to the future of Rogue River Valley.
    F. M. Corlies, foreman and general superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, was in town last Monday and said that they expected to commence to pick their pears today, Tuesday, Aug. 18. He says that the pear crop will be rather light owing to the unfavorable season.
    Roy Smith, Amos Ayres, Misses Rosa Ayres and May Trusty, who started for Eastern Oregon to see the sights, returned last Saturday via Klamath Falls and Ashland.
    Last Sunday morning I received a phone message from Rev. M. C. Davis that he was in Medford afoot and would be out on the afternoon train to go to Yankee Creek, but when I told him that the Sunday train did not reach here until 8 o'clock p.m. he then decided to walk out, so I started with a buggy about the same time that he did, and we met about half way and we went on together to Yankee Creek where he organized a Sunday school of about 45 members, after which he preached and at the close of the services it was decided to hold a basket dinner meeting on next Sunday, August 23, and have services at 10 o'clock a.m., Sunday school 2:30 p.m., and then preaching and also preaching at 8 p.m. A cordial invitation is extended to all to come, bring their dinner and have a good time.
    While we were at Yankee Creek at Commercial orchard, his little girl, about two years old, got hold of some concentrated lye and burned her tongue and lips quite badly.
    J. Stickel of Gold Hill has been out here visiting his daughter, Mrs. Jake Jonas.
    Mr. Wilkins, who has been working on the A. Corbin orchard, has been stopping at the Sunnyside for the past few days.
    A. J. Florey, Jr., who has been working out in Klamath County, returned home the first of the week and his sister, Mrs. Harry Simpson, who has been spending a few weeks at her parental home, returned to Talent Monday.
    Peter Betz, Jeff Conover and J. H. Hutchinson spent Sunday night here on their way to Medford to make final proof on one of their homesteads. I could not learn which.
    Roy Caster was here Tuesday for dinner.
    W. E. Buchanan, the principal of our school, who has had his family out in the hills near Butte Falls, returned home Monday evening with his family.
    The following persons were elected officers of the Yankee Creek Sunday school last Sunday night: Superintendent, O. E. Rose; assist. superintendent, C. D. Schell; secretary, Miss Grace Austin; treasurer, Miss Francis Winn; librarian, Miss Anna Dora.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Messrs. Cornell and Morris of Portland returned home Thursday after a week's fishing on the river at Henry French's.
    John and Davie Walker were valley visitors this week.
    Mrs. Daw and daughters were the guests of Mrs. Skyrman Sunday night.
    Joe and Jasper Hannah were in Medford Saturday night.
    Tom Raimey and Frank Miller were Central Point visitors Saturday.
    Mrs. Chris. Bergman returned home Friday from California.
    Mr. and Mrs. Earl Keller are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tom Raimey.
    Mr. and Mrs. N. Garrett of Medford and T. C. McCabe spent a Sunday at Crater Lake.
    On Elk Creek it is reported that a dozen fires were seen to start one after another in a string in the woods.
    Messrs. Martin and Lindley and families autoed out to Frank Hammond's Sunday.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows had the misfortune to have someone pick all of her canning pears and take them away.
    M. Slusser came out from Medford on his motorcycle Sunday.
    George Stacey and wife autoed over to the river Saturday and fished.
    Steve Smith came out Monday from Medford to spend a few days with Henry French.
    Frank Zuccala and Bird Johnson returned from Horace Pelton's Saturday evening. They said the threshing crew had to fight fire Friday afternoon. Two young men were overcome by the heat. A doctor was called to attend them (Messrs. Centers and Thresham) and were getting along slowly. The fire was a pretty spectacle if it had not been for the danger of it.
    Mr. and Mrs. McDonald of Elk Creek went to the valley Tuesday.
    Mrs. Robertson and Miss Mary were the guests of Mrs. Henry French and Miss May Tuesday.
    Mrs. Harry Howard took her mother, Mrs. Slusser, to Eagle Point Wednesday where Mrs. Slusser took the P. and E. to visit her son in Medford.
    Miss Murl Coffeen is visiting relatives in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1914, page 5


13-FOOT CORN FROM EAGLE POINT FARM
    J. B. Jackson of Eagle Point sends to the Commercial Club field corn 13 feet in height, with two ears to the stalk, 13 inches in length.
    A dairyman with a field of corn like this running 50 to 60 tons to the acre, a silo to take care of it, need not worry during an unusually dry summer and fall about keeping up the milk flow of his herd.
    The cost of silage should not exceed $3.00 a ton, and the economic production of a valuable succulent dairy food at a season when it is urgently needed should be taken advantage of; according to reports some of the best corn ever raised here will be shown at the fair.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 20, 1914, page 2


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl Skyrman were in Central Point after supplies this week.
    Dr. Holt reports the arrival of Hazel Gwendolyn Dawson on the 12th at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dawson.
    There was a large crowd at the picnic at Trail Sunday the 16th.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Rogers passed en route from the lake to their home Wednesday.
    Dick Vincent is hauling hogs to Sams Valley.
    George McDonald of Sams Valley passed en route to Prospect one day this week.
    Ray Coffeen went to Medford on Wednesday.
    Perry Foster, Henry French and family were in Eagle Point Saturday.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows was the guest of Miss Jessie Minter Thursday.
    Mrs. Kirchgessner was a Medford visitor Wednesday.
    Misses Mary Robertson, Clara Caster and Myrtle Minter are visiting Minter sheep camp above the Brown cabin.
    The hunters are coming out of the mountains in droves.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller have returned to their home in Central Point.
    Dr. Kirchgessner came out to Trail from Medford Friday and he reports the arrival of an eight-pound son to Mr. and Mrs. Fred Warner of Trail Friday the 21st.
    Mrs. George Fry was in Grants Pass Friday.
    Joe Hannah was in Central Point Friday and his sisters, Mrs. Daily and Miss Mima, returned home with him.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Abbott are the proud parents of a bouncing 11½ pound boy, which came to live with them Tuesday the 18th.
    Miss Ora Raimey went to Central Point to pack fruit the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. James Cornutt of Central Point came out Friday and are the guests of the W. T. Houston home.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 24, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. M. C. Davis will hold services at Tolo on next Sunday at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m.
    I see that in my mention of Mr. M. M. Root of Table Rock being here that I made a terrible blunder. In speaking of his idea of the future developments of this valley I wrote that he was very pessimistic when I intended to say that he was very optimistic, for he thinks that there is a bright future for Rogue River Valley. He phoned to a friend of mine that it took all of his time to explain his views on that subject since that item appeared in the Mail Tribune.
    A. Corbin's team went out of here with a load of lumber a few days ago and on inquiry I learned that he was still building, this time a warehouse to put things away that he don't need at present.
    Jasper Maxfield and wife of Weed, Cal., were in town Wednesday. They were looking for a location in this neighborhood and visiting Mrs. Maxfield's brother-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Charley Cingcade.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Hessler of Lake Creek were doing business with our merchants Wednesday.
    Fred L. Heath, one of our merchants, has just received a carload of flour from Pendleton, so you see that we will not go hungry for awhile if our funds hold out.
    The stork has surely been busy in this section of the country for the past week as will be seen by the list of births herewith attached: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Abbott, August 18, a son, and at last account the mother and child were doing well.
    Dr. W. P. Holt reports the following births up to noon today, Saturday: To Mr. and Mrs. Marshall of Agate, a girl born Sunday August 16. To Mr. and Mrs. Robert Dawson of Trail, Oregon, a daughter named Hazel Gwendolyn, August 19. To Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Brown, of Brownsboro, August 21, a daughter. No race suicide in these parts.
    Charles E. and Ralph E. Stevens of Seattle were with us Wednesday night and on Thursday morning they secured a rig and driver to go to the Dead Indian Soda Springs. They were here looking for land to locate on or to purchase.
    I understand that the Eagle Hotel is about to change hands again. This time G. W. Owings has traded the property for a farm in Nevada to J. D. Downey. Mr. Owings is now in Nevada and as soon as the deed that Mrs. Owings has signed here can be forwarded to Mr. Owings for his signature, and the deeds exchanged, Mrs. Owings will go to Nevada and Mr. Downey will come out here and take possession.
    Wm. Newsbaum of Lake Creek and his sister, Mrs. G. M. Steadham, and her two children of Grants Pass were here last Friday. Mrs. Steadham and her children were on their way home. They had been up to visit her parents, brothers and sister for the past two weeks.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols, formerly of this place, who has been visiting her brother in the Lake Creek country, was visiting relatives in our town Friday.
    We had two of the prohibition candidates here with us Friday afternoon. Curtis P. Coe, candidate for Congress and H. S. Stine, candidate for the United States Senate. They spoke in the park where were congregated about 40 of the voters of Eagle Point. They had a very dry crowd and among them were a dozen or more ladies, but while the crowd was dry the speeches were [in] no wise dry, but they each spoke about 40 minutes and held the audience and they seemed loath to have them stop speaking. One thing that I noticed was that there was not a single wet voter among them. They seem to be afraid to come out and hear the other side of the question.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Sisson of Rogue River were with us last Friday night. They were here looking around for a place to settle.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 24, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I omitted to state that on Wednesday evening about seven o'clock J. F. Ditsworth of Prospect drove up with his daughter, Mrs. J. L. East, and her daughter, Miss Margaret of Medford, and his wife's son-in-law and family, Mr. and Mrs. Alex Russell, Miss Marjory Russell, Masters Donald and George Russell of North Platte, Nebraska. They have been visiting Mrs. Russell's mother and her sister, besides her stepfather and family for the past two weeks. And on Friday evening after supper time Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Summerville and Mr. and Mrs. Carl Bowman of Medford came up in their auto and called for supper, tired, dusty and hungry. They had left Crater Lake that day and had a little smashup, so were detained somewhat but not too late for something to eat at the Sunnyside.
    Died, at the residence of his son, Samuel H. Harnish, August 28, 1914, Benjamin W. Harnish, aged 83 years, 8 months and 7 days. The deceased was born in Lancaster County, Pennsylvania, and moved to Nebraska in 1896, and after remaining there about nine years came to Eagle Point with his son, with whom he has lived the most of the time for the past twenty-four years. He leaves four children. Harry is in New Mexico, Michael in Pennsylvania, Samuel H. in Eagle Point, and a daughter, Mrs. Lizzie Furry, also in Pennsylvania. During the time the old gentleman has been in Eagle Point he has made many friends. He was always very industrious and up to the time of his last sickness he could often be seen in his little garden. The remains were taken to the Baptist church on Sunday, August 30, and Rev. L. L. Simmons delivered a funeral discourse and then they were taken to Central Point cemetery for interment followed by a large concourse of friends and neighbors by whom the grave was covered with a fine assortment of flowers. Cephas Moomaw and wife of Josephine County, relatives of the deceased, came over to attend the funeral.
    There was quite a number of our citizens went to Medford last Saturday to see the show.
    Last Saturday instead of my going to Medford to see the big circus I started after dinner for the little town of Tolo, situated on the S.P.R.R. about four miles north of Central Point, and there on the arrival of the regular passenger train met Rev. M. C. Davis, and we went to the home of E. H. Davis, where we found him busy packing peaches and while there the question was asked, "What will be done with all the peaches and pears, say nothing about apples in the Rogue River Valley when all the trees go to bearing?" For the peach is so short lived that it has to be put up very soon after it ripens. On Sunday we held services in the school house at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m., myself preaching in the forenoon after the Sunday school session, and Rev. Davis at night. They have a very flourishing Sunday school at that point and the people seemed glad to have religious services held there.
    The last time that I wrote I had just got through with an account of my visit to the Pelouze farm and my paper gave out so had to quit. Leaving there I went through the A. Corbin and Corbin Edgell farms or rather orchards, but did not see any of the folks except two young ladies and the children as Mr. Corbin was in Medford that day, but I saw that he had a fine prospect for fruit and had the water so arranged that he could irrigate about all of their orchard. Passing on the next place on my route, or rather off my route, was Mr. F. Loomis, so I started through a wood pasture with a covered buggy and took the wrong road but kept right on for about three quarters of a mile through chaparral brush over logs, etc., but finally I reached the place by leaving my rig, climbing a wire fence and when I reached the home found Mr. Mann, one of the "ditch walkers," and he informed me that Mr. Loomis was not at home and did not know where he was. It was then ten minutes to twelve noon, so I retraced my steps and soon found myself at the home of Dr. Nuding, where I found the doctor and his estimable wife and after putting away my horse we settled down for a visit while the good lady was preparing dinner. After dinner, bidding mine host and hostess adios, I kept on from house to house, meeting with varied success, for the people tell me that money is very scarce but in the course of my travels I called on some friends, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Horton, where I did some business for the Mail Tribune. I next called on Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Hessler and gave him a receipt for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune and while there I met Grandma Marguerite Culner, ninety-three years old, and she goes all around visiting her friends on foot. More anon.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 2, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    John Fry of Trail was in Medford this week and bought a new Moline wagon.
    Eugene Bellows was kicked on the leg just below the knee by a horse a few days ago.
    Charles Burch of Agate was smiling on his many friends this week.
    William Coffeen and family, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Morgan, Mrs. Middlebusher and sons, Fred and Denzil, Ed Houston, Miss Viola Pence and Clara Skyrman were among those who attended the circus in Medford Saturday.
    William Houston and family have just returned from a trip to Klamath County.
    F. C. Gaines was a Medford visitor this week.
    Several farmers took their hogs to Eagle Point Tuesday to ship to Sears in California. Walter Wood is doing the buying.
    Tom Pankey was up from Sams Valley looking for hogs this week.
    Frank, Ed and Sanford Houston have returned from Klamath County after spending a month in haying there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Hammond went to the valley to remain this week. Schuyler Hammond and family took them down and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Hammond returned home with them to visit relatives at Trail.
    The neatest and completest house on wheels went up a few days ago. It is the cookhouse for the copper mines, about thirty miles above Trail. They will begin near the Cushman place to build a road to the mine. Dave Pence and road crew will do the road work.
    Mr. and Mrs. Marsh spent the weekend with Dr. and Mrs. Kirchgessner.
    John Walker went to Central Point Monday.
    Mrs. Graham was the guest of Mrs. Eugene Bellows Monday.
    Rev. Sharp of Ashland has held a three weeks' series of meetings at Trail with attentive audiences.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry French went to Eagle Point Sunday. Mrs. French is to have some important dental work done.
    Tom Cingcade and family of Eagle Point spent several days fishing on the river.
    Mrs. Howard and Miss Murl Coffeen were trading in Eagle Point on Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1914, page 5


HARRY CINGCADE GIVEN DIVORCE
    The divorce of Harry Cingcade against his wife on a charge of cruel and inhuman treatment was heard this morning at the county seat. The divorce was granted on the plaintiff. Mrs. Cingcade did not appear.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 5, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    P. J. Halley, wife, brother W. L. Halley, mother and Mrs. Muladay of Medford were at the Sunnyside on last Tuesday. W. L. was looking after the insurance business.
    Thomas E. Nichols, the prohibition candidate for state senator, took a trip to the Lake Creek country on business, but before he started he gave me his sub for the Daily Mail Tribune so that he could keep tab on what was going on in this uncivilized world.
    Mrs. G. W. Owings, formerly hostess of the Eagle Hotel, they having disposed of the hotel property, has gone to Nevada to join her husband and the new landlord has opened up business at the old stand.
    Last Tuesday, September 1st, was the day set for the farmers to bring in their hogs that they engaged to Walter Wood for Mr. Burdic, and he is taking them to California to feed. Among those who brought in their hogs was Mr. W. W. Willits of Persist, J. H. Tyrrell of Lake Creek, Henry Tonn of Lake Creek, Augustus Pech also of L.C., Jeff Conover, E.P. post office. Here I will remark that there is a large section of country around Eagle Point that receive their mail at this place, consequently in speaking of persons living around here we say of Eagle Point, although some of them live eleven miles from our town. Green Mathews also brought in fifty-one head and has sixty large ones at home yet to dispose of later. Grant Mathews, Fred Pettegrew, Mr. Graham, Wig Jacks, Frank Johnson, J. L. Robinson, he later gave me his sub for the Weekly Mail Tribune, Chris Bergman, Ham Watson, H. E. Webb, all living around Eagle Point and James Culbertson of L.C.
    Well, about noon Mrs. Howlett was busy putting up fruit when almost every one of them came in for dinner, but she took in the situation and began to place the victuals on the table and by the time the first were served, preparations were made for the second table, and while all this was going on Senator von der Hellen and two of his sons, Carl and George, his wife and their little boy, Donald, Mrs. George von der Hellen, had just returned from Newport where she and her little son have been spending the latter part of the summer. Also among the guests that day for dinner were Robert Kame, Henry Mayer and wife, Walter Wood, Mr. Burdic, Mr. Patrick Ernest Dahack, and John Butler. Well after dinner I started out to work for the Mail Tribune and taking notes on what I saw in the vegetable line. So as I was going up the hill to the "Desert" north of town I met Mr. T. F. McCabe coming to town with a load of fruit and vegetables and he took a receipt for a year's sub to the W.M.T. From there I went to W. H. Crandall's farm, but as he is a paid-up sub did no business, but I noticed that he had some fine-looking corn and his place looked neat and tidy; from there I went to Mr. J. L. Robinson's and there found that he also had a good stand of corn and while there secured his sub to the W.M.T.; from there I went to J. S. Vestal's and there met his daughter, Mrs. Wilfred Jacks, and her three children, who had just arrived from Lake County, Oregon, near Silver Lake. Well, after partaking of a piece of nice ripe watermelon and giving him a receipt for a year's sub to the W.M.T. I started for home, arriving there tired and hungry.
    Mrs. Mayfield of Siskiyou County, California [and] her daughter, Mrs. Hursburger of Baden, arrived at the home of Mrs. Mayfield's sister, Mrs. G. D. Knighton, Friday p.m.
    I am now writing by electric light and find that it is past my bedtime so will stop for this time. I have just returned from a three days' tour up the Little Butte Creeks and will try to tell something of what I saw and heard on that trip.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 8, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I gave an account of some of my meandering through this part of the valley, looking after the interests of that live paper, and stopped short on my return home Tuesday evening. Wednesday morning I started out again and the first place that I stopped was the farm of Mr. Rhodes to see Ed Conley, but he was away from home, but I met the proprietor, and he gave me some idea of what he was doing in the line of business. He had already threshed his wheat, and told me that it yielded thirty bushels of wheat to the acre. He also had about sixty acres in corn, and that part that I passed through looked very well, especially for this season. He was just finishing a silo, thirty-four feet high and sixteen feel in diameter, the largest silo in the valley, and he was expecting to commence to fill it the next day with his corn, calculating to put 125 tons of ensilage in it. I find that the farmers are beginning to wake up to the importance of the silo as a means of saving food for stock, as it answers in the place of grain food during the dry season for milch cows, and is equally as good for hogs and young cattle.
    Leaving there, I next went to the farm of W. E. Butler, on the Eagle Point-Brownsboro road, and there secured a subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. The next place where I stopped was at the farm of Lemon Charley, but did no business, as there was supposed to be a mistake in the accounts, owing to a transfer from the Medford Weekly Sun to the Mail Tribune office. The receipt had been lost or destroyed, so that I could not straighten it out. Mr. Charley has one of the finest farms and dairies on Butte Creek and always keeps a lot of fine stock to show to his friends. Passing on, I called at several places, but found the men were away from home, so could do no business, but finally I came to the farm of Charles Klingle and found him out in the field putting up his corn, and some of it looked very well; in fact, the corn on Little Butte Creek as a rule looks very good. It seemed to be well eared and the ear well filled.
    From there I went to the home of C. Eiler, but found that he was away from home, so did no business there. Turning my course, I stopped for the night with my old friend, William C. Daley, on the north fork of Little Butte Creek, and found him busy at work with his son, Irvin, shingling his woodshed. He had just reroofed one of his large barns and was building a garage. He has one of the best places in the Butte Creek country.
    The next morning I went to the farm of Thomas Farlow, but he had just started out on his large farm and so did not see him. In my rounds I went to my old friend, Mike Sidley, and had him renew his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. He was just in the act of loading a lot of hogs to take to Medford, intending to go in the night, while it was cool.
    My next stop was at the farm of J. L. Ragsdale, where I took dinner, and there I saw some as fine corn as I have seen anywhere in the country. He is in the dairy business and has some very fine Jersey cows, as well as some fine hogs. He is a very practical farmer and everything is up in shape. His farm is cut up in small tracts, and I had to open and shut six gates to get in to where the dwelling home is. But he was like several others that I met--short of ready cash. That is no crime on Butte Creek, for I found several others in the same boat. I forgot at the proper time to state that I called on Augustus Pech and he paid up all arrears and a year in advance. He is one of our prosperous German citizens. Henry Tonn, his neighbor, had paid me a few days before in Eagle Point.
    Leaving Mr. Ragsdale's I went from there to the home of W. T. Kinney, and the next morning he phoned to me to stop as I went home and take his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. The next place was the home of J. A. Miller, but found that he also was away from home, so did no business. Next I went to the Frank Farlow sawmill, where he renewed his and his brother's, W. L. Farlow's, subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Passing on up the creek, I next went to the home of C. R. Moore, that is the last house on the road to Dead Indian Soda Springs, and when I reached the house found no one at home, but in the course of half an hour Mr. Moore came in with a load of saw logs on his way to the Farlow sawmill. He is having lumber sawed out for a new house, and Mr. Farlow is sawing the logs on the share one-half for the other half. Spending the night with Mr. Moore and his family, I received an order for the Weekly Mail Tribune over the phone the next morning to have it sent to Charles F. Wilkinson to Lake Creek.
    But I see that I am getting this letter too long, and still have a long list of items that I wish to write, but will have to put that off until the next time, but will add that our school opened Monday morning with twenty-five in the primary department, thirty in the intermediate and twenty in the principal's room. There were ten new beginners in the primary department, but Mrs. von der Hellen is just at home with that class of little ones. Our teachers for this season are W. E. Buchanan, principal; Minnie Taylor, intermediate department. I have not met her and don't know whether she is a Miss or Mrs. The principal told me last night that he thought she will fill the place creditably, and Mrs. George von der Hellen as primary teacher.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 9, 1914, page 7


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. John Fry went to the valley Monday.
    Will Houston and Miss Eula were Eagle Point visitors Friday.
    Miss May French spent Saturday night with Miss Mary Robertson.
    While cutting a bee tree Tuesday, Pearl Stowell's ax glanced and cut the end of his brother Jack's nose. Jack went to Eagle Point and Dr. Holt dressed the wound.
    Jack Daw took his first deer hunt last week. There were two in the party and Jack killed two fine deer.
    Miss Rosa Ayres and Roy Smith were guests of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bellows Sunday.
    Mr. Gill and Otto Kershaw were out from Phoenix fishing this week. Mr. Kershaw lived here as a boy 20 years ago, and his old friends were glad to meet him again.
    Miss Howe is teaching an eight months' term in the Trail district.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz went to Central Point Friday after peaches.
    Charles Skyrman and Miss Clara were in Central Point recently.
    Mrs. Daw and Mrs. Hannah were at Beagle Saturday after fruit.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller returned home with Miss Ora Raimey for a few days' visit.
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock will begin a three months' term of school in the Lone district the 14th, and Miss Florence Kincaid of Agate will begin teaching in the Debenger Gap district on the same day.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnson and Miss Polly Johnson returned from Klamath County Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. French and Miss Cora called on Perry Foster Sunday.
    Jack Houston and Miss Ida were to the valley one day this week.
    A. A. Hall has rented his place to Mr. Belcher of Central Point and has moved his family to Linn County.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 10, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had to stop short on account of my letter being so long, and gave scarcely any Eaglets in the line of news items in and around Eagle Point, so this time will start in with home news, even if I have to postpone writing other items of interest until some future time, so will commence by telling of the arrival of Mrs. E. E. Bond of Lakeview here to visit her mother, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, and daughter, and after spending several days here with her mother and daughter, Mrs. Jacob Jonas, they both, Mrs. Bond and Mrs. Jonas, started for Lakeview this Thursday morning.
    Mrs. Arglee Green has had Ed Dutton, the boss road worker, to level off a part of her ground and put it in shape to irrigate it, and is having the place fenced with new fence and fixing it up in fine shape, but I am sorry to have to say that she and her son, Austin, are planning to go to California to spend the winter.
    Miss Katie Buchanan, second daughter of Professor W. E. Buchanan, the principal of our school, had a birthday party Saturday afternoon, September 5, and entertained a number of her little schoolmates, it being her tenth birthday. Her grandmother, Mrs. Kee, of Butte Falls, was out visiting her daughter and family during the week.
    L. R. Galliher of Anita, Ia., is here visiting his father-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan, and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Ed Wolfer.
    W. W. Willits brought in another load of hogs last Wednesday morning for Mr. Burdick. Mike Sidley of Lake Creek also took another load of hogs to Medford Tuesday. I should have said in my last that while I was there at Mr. Sidley's that he renewed his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Harrison Hess, one of our solid citizens, has moved to Corvallis, Or. He is a bachelor.
    A lady by the name of Lebo, with three children, moved into our town Wednesday and occupied the house known as the Robinett house, so as to send her children to school.
    Speaking about schools, there are four of our promising misses going from here to Medford to attend the Medford high school. They are: Maud Corlies, Lenore Walker, Gladys Natwick and Hazel Brown.
    Mrs. Maud Stickel of Gold Hill is at this writing in company of Mrs. A. M. Thomas visiting Mrs. Howlett.
    Dr. Thomas J. Korinek and N. C. McConnell of the Korinek Veterinary Institute of Medford were here for a chicken dinner last week. They pronounced it first class. They were accompanied by Messrs. Charles Tschirge of Medford and W. E. Barnes of Waukesha, Wis. And on Sunday we had fourteen here for dinner (noon) and I learned that Mr. and Mrs. Burdette Dodge were among the guests, but as I was away from home, failed to learn the names of the others. W. Hart Hamilton, who is for the present boarding at the Sunnyside, accompanied Mr. and Mrs. Dodge to their home on the Riverside Ranch, on Rogue River, and after spending a few hours on the ranch was brought back by Mr. Dodge late in the afternoon, and on his arrival found G. W. Keller and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Hugh Campbell of Crescent City and Mrs. S. Pattison of Portland. Mr. Keller is manager of the interests of Hobbs, Wall & Co., comprising timber land, saw mills, railroad wharfs, ranches, etc., and Mr. Campbell is the engineer in chief of Hobbs, Wall & Co.'s railroad lines. They had come out from Crescent City to Grants Pass to be present at the opening of the Grants Pass-Crescent City railroad, and rode up here to visit Mr. Hamilton, who is not only a business associate, but personal friends. They returned to Grants Pass Sunday night.
    Tuesday, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Reed of Lake Creek and Mr. and Mrs. Robert Seymore and their daughter, Miss Roberta, of Everett, Wash., were here for dinner. They have been visiting the family of Mr. Reed for about two weeks.
    W. A. Cornitius, representing Stine & Kendrick, San Francisco, Cal., and George E. Boos, vice-president of the Jackson County Taxpayers' and Wage-Earners' League of Medford, called at the Sunnyside Wednesday for dinner and to learn how your correspondent felt with regard to the statewide prohibition amendment, and it took him just about fifteen seconds to learn how I stood on that question. He tried hard to make me see that it would ruin the state and everything else if the state went dry, but I told him that we would try it for once and see. He did not mention the subject of taxpaying or wage-earning, but his whole soul seemed to be absorbed with the thought of the ruin that prohibition would accomplish if the state went dry.
    F. W. Root, a cement and brick contractor of Medford, called for dinner Thursday on his way up to the neighborhood of the intake on the Medford ditch and pipe line.
    William Gresham and a neighbor of his, of Climax, spent the night here, and so did John Higinbotham and a stranger from Prospect, whose name I did not learn.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 15, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In writing up an account of my visit to the Lake Creek country I omitted to state that there were a number of the children in the four districts in that immediate vicinity who have been raising farm produce to take to their school fair. The fair will be held September 21 in the South Butte (Lake Creek) district, and they expect to have some of the prominent educators of the state to take part in the program. It was voted last season to hold the school district fair at the Lake Creek school house, but on account of the scarcity of water and the lack of other conveniences, the good people of the district decided to hold it at the South Butte school house, as they have a nice, large hall nearby the schoolhouse and expect to have, in addition to the exercises of the school fair, a good old-fashioned country dance, where everybody can have a good time. There will be on exhibition some as fine corn, potatoes, canned fruit, preserved fruit, jellies, etc., as can be found in the country, and if possible your correspondent will be there to give the whole thing a good write-up.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school man, expects to hold services at Agate on Sunday, September 21, at 11 o'clock a.m., at Yankee Creek the same day at 3 p.m., and at Table Rock at 7:30 p.m.
    The farmers are still bringing in their hogs for Mr. Burdic. Green Mathews brought in another lot last Saturday of forty-seven head, and W. W. Willits has brought in two loads since I last wrote of the farmers bringing in their hogs, besides several others whose names I failed to secure. Walter Wood told me that he had bought 165 head of hogs last Thursday, that since it is known that he is buying hogs the people come to him to sell.
    W. Hart Hamilton and his foreman, R. M. Whitman, have been riding over the valley buying up a lot of fine blooded brood sows, and he is calculating to go into the hog business on a somewhat extensive scale. Mr. Hamilton started this (Monday) morning for his home in San Jose, Cal.
    Mr. Cadzow, one of the prominent business men of Butte Falls, was a guest at the Sunnyside Thursday night on his way to Medford.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent took a notion to spend the day, Friday, in Medford, and spent a part of the day visiting the county fair, and on the car with him, in addition to his wife and daughter, Hattie, there were W. E. Hammel, Miss Jessie Minter, W. Hart Hamilton, R. M. Whitman, H. Painter, Miss Maud Corlies, Miss Hazel Brown and Miss Gladys Natwick, beside quite a number of strangers.
    I omitted to state that a lecturer by the name of Rowell came in on last Wednesday night, the 9th inst., and gave us a very interesting lecture on "Portland After Dark." He had a good audience and kept them interested for over an hour.
    Mrs. Lon Moomaw, who has been living for some time in Yakima, Wash., came in on her friends on Thursday eve, and so did her father, James Ringer, arrived from Klamath County, via the Rogue River route, the same evening.
    William Gresham of Climax has been making regular trips hauling lumber from here to build a new house on his place. Speaking about lumber, there seems to be quite a lot of lumber taken away from the lumber yard here this fall.
    Professor C. E. Johnson, who is teaching school in the Table Rock school district, came over Saturday on the P.&E., spent the night with us and while here gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune so that he could keep in touch with the outside world and keep posted on the war news.
    Audley Meyer and his cousin, Eddie Meyers, of Lake Creek, came out from Medford Saturday afternoon and spent the night with us at the Sunnyside. Audley Meyer took the first prize at the county fair on potatoes. He is one of the contestants in the Lake Creek school district in the industrial fair to be held in South Butte, on the 21st inst., and Lee Charley took the first prize on corn. He also is one of the contestants in the district fair.
    Roy Ashpole, one of the leading merchants, paid me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune this morning, and so did Thomas E. Nichols, the Democratic and prohibition candidate for the state senate, also paid me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and James Owens paid me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune last Friday. The people find that they must have the Daily Mail Tribune to get all the news all the time.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 16, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Howard will spend the winter on the Graham place. Mr. and Mrs. Graham will leave for the east in a few days to spend the winter.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno entertained Mesdames Mathews, Dick Johnson and Eugene Bellows Thursday.
    Mrs. Daw was a Medford visitor the last of the week.
    Edwin Peile returned from Klamath County Wednesday.
    Among those who attended the fair in Medford were Mr. and Mrs. Gaines, J. C. Hannah, Joe and Miss Mima and Ellen Raimey.
    Schuyler Hammond was down from Elk Creek a few days ago.
    Mr. Backus of Portland was the guest of Henry French Saturday night.
    The frost did quite a bit of damage to gardens.
    John Walker made a trip with fruit to the lake a few days ago.
    Will Houston began making sorghum Monday.
    Monday was a busy and interesting day for a number of the children, as several schools opened that day. John Nealon began in the Central; Miss Rose Nealon in the Reese Creek, Miss Ida Houston in the Long Branch and Miss Florence Kincaid in the Debenger Gap.
    Mr. Price and family of Medford autoed out to Wallace Coffeen's Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Morgan and Mrs. Murray have just returned from Crater Lake. Mrs. Murray visited her son while there.
    John Robertson and family are visiting his parents.
    Mrs. Henry French called on Mrs. Pettegrew Sunday.
    Eugene Bellows took a load of fine hogs to Eagle Point Tuesday.
    Fred Pettegrew has built a nice addition to his house.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 17, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune when I got as far as I thought the patience of the editor would permit, I just stopped short and left quite a lot of items that I thought might be of interest to the readers, so I will commence just where I left off.
    E. D. Briggs and wife, Miss Nellie Briggs, his daughter, and son, M. E. Briggs, and wife of Ashland, were here on Sunday for dinner on their way to Brownsboro; also a gentleman by the name of Cornell were here at the same time.
    Miss Inez Willits of Persist started on the 12th for Monmouth to attend the normal school. She has already passed the examination for her state papers as a teacher, but concluded to attend the normal and thereby comply with a technical requirement of the school law.
    Murt Daily of the Hillcrest orchard was here last week on a hunting excursion with George von der Hellen and others whose names I failed to secure. They brought home the goods.
    George West and wife and James Stevens came in from the Prospect country on the 14th inst. Mr. West is one of the forest rangers and Mr. Stewart has been out during his vacation from the Washington University, Seattle, Wash., securing a practical knowledge of the forester's life. They came in in George's car and just stopped long enough to eat dinner and went on to Medford.
    Miss Cora Buchanan entertained a number of her little friends on Monday, the 14th, it being her sixth birthday, and among the guests were Misses Doris Hoogerhyde, Gwendolyn Brophy, Mary Boltz, Allis and Dorothy Strong and Melva Simmons.
    Miss Loretta Childreth and Howard Painter have gone to Pendleton, the former to visit her uncle and attend the roundup.
    On Wednesday, September 16, the county convention of the Women's Christian Temperance Union met in the Baptist church of Eagle Point. The time announced for the meeting was 10 o'clock a.m., but owing to the rain they did not arrive until afternoon. Nineteen of them started in one of Medford's touring cars, and from all accounts had quite a time getting here, but you know that when women undertake to do anything that all opposition may as well quiet down and wait for the results, for they always succeed, and especially these W.C.T.U. women, for they never say fail. On their arrival they found that dinner was already prepared--a basket dinner--and after attending to the wants of the inner man they all repaired to the church to begin business. The delegates were: From Talent, Mesdames Vogeli, Wolgamott, Backus, Cook and Sleppy: Medford, Mesdames MacCullough, Howell, Manning, Jenny, Fleming, Godlove, Ponting, Scott, P. H. Daily, Woods, McDonald (of Trail) and Miss Velma Woods; Ashland, Mrs. Ashcraft: Phoenix, Miss Cope: Eagle Point, Mesdames Bryant, T. E. Nichols, A. J. Florey, L. L. Simmons, W. E. Buchanan, H. O. Childreth, Hoogerhyde, Painter and Curtice.
    Mrs. Howell, the county president, presided, and Mrs. McDonald was chosen a secretary. The exercises were opened with singing, scripture lesson and prayer, and then the regular routine of business was attended to, but this was interspersed with an occasional song, and the singing was worth a trip from Medford to Eagle Point to hear, and a short address or a reading. Among the visitors was Miss Lois E. Smith, the state evangelist for the W.C.T.U., and she favored us with some short talks and songs that always would bring down the house. She was encored several times and would always give us something new and spicy. During the afternoon she slipped out and visited our school and entertained the children and later they came in a body, and she rendered her story of "Fritz and Jacob Schneider," and singing some of her favorite songs, such as "Mollie and the Babies." She seems to be especially adapted to the work among the children. During the afternoon the ladies visited the business part of our town in their big touring car, singing some of their patriotic and temperance songs. They were welcomed by quite a number of our business men.
    One of the saloon party showed up and he came to the window and appeared to be drinking out of a bottle. At night Miss Smith gave us another short talk and then Mrs. N. T. McDonald of Trail favored us with a rendering of "The Reason Why the Judge Refused to Drink," and then gave us a very interesting talk on "The Reason Why We Should All Vote for the Dry Amendment November 3." There was a good attendance, and the different speakers and singers kept the people interested until about 10 p.m., when Miss Smith gave us a short negro sermon, took up a collection and we were dismissed by Rev. MacCullough.
    Owing to the inclement weather, dark night and slippery roads the delegates concluded to remain the rest of the night, so they scattered around and found beds and the next morning started in their big car for Medford, and the last that I heard of them they were plowing through that new grade that Ed Dutton made between here and the Antelope bridge, and most of the ladies were out walking through the mud. The grade has not been finished yet, as Mr. Dutton is going to gravel it as soon as possible.
    Dr. Holt reports that the stork has visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Storm on Elk Creek on September 12 and left a fine boy.
    Mrs. Ernest Cole of Los Angeles, Cal., is here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wert Pool.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 21, 1914, page 3


W.C.T.U. COUNTY CONVENTION HELD AT EAGLE POINT
    The W.C.T.U. county convention was held at Eagle Point Sept. 16. It was well attended considering the weather. There were about thirty delegates from different auxiliaries of the union represented at the convention. Those coming from Ashland, Talent and Phoenix were delayed by the rain, but after partaking of the hot lunch that was waited to be served to them, they were soon ready for business.
    Devotional exercises were first on the program. Then the roll call and the election of officers and the reports of different unions, which was very encouraging for the dry campaign. What the issue will be no one can tell, but in God we trust.
    The afternoon was practically all taken up with business with only a few side issues. The school children came in and were entertained by Miss Smith with some of her never-to-be-forgotten comic campaign songs and Mrs. McDonald gave the children one of James Whitcom Riley's readings in elocution. An hour was spent in exchanging thoughts and discussing the different problems that were up before us, after which adjournment was taken for dinner.
    The evening meeting opened at 8 o'clock, called to order by our county superintendent, Mrs. Howell. Devotional exercises followed.
    Campaign hymns sung by the choir, prayer by the Rev. Mr. Simmons.
    Miss Smith was again called for and responded with a comic song. Then she sang "My Mother's White Ribbon," which was very pathetic, winding up with "Little Fretty," and a comic darkey song which brought down the house.
    Mrs. McDonald was called for and responded by giving us one more of her readings, "The Judge at the Bar," which was listened to with rapt attention. Her effort was much appreciated by the ladies of the Union. The Rev. Mrs. MacCullough gave an address citing many things that should be kept in mind and inspired enthusiasm for the work in hand.
    Last but not least I wish to extend the president of our union, Mrs. Minnie Bryant, our most heartfelt thanks for the untiring efforts and hard work she so generously contributed which made it possible for our White Ribbon convention to be such a grand success.
PRESS CORRESPONDENT,
    Eagle Point W.C.T.U.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 22, 1914, page 6


SCHOOL FAIR AT LAKE CREEK SHOWS FINEST EXHIBITS
    L. P. Harrington, state field worker, Supt. J. P. Wells, and Supervisor A. R. Chase took a trip up to Lake Creek school house Monday where a local school fair was held. Sixty-nine exhibits from the boys and girls in the four districts were on display.
    Mr. Harrington pronounced the display of corn the best he had seen at any school fair this year. There were seven varieties of corn exhibited and Claus Charley and Tommy Ragsdale took the premiums. Claus' corn yielded 111 bushels to the acre this year. Twenty dollars were distributed among the winners of the contest.
    Theodore Kinney exhibited a pig that has gained about 230 lbs. since the first of May. The girls, too, exhibited some fine aprons and other examples of household art. Cecil Moore carried off the honors on canned fruit and the best prepared school lunch.
    A unique feature of the day was a corn judging contest conducted by the supervisor in which 18 boys participated. This is probably the first event of the kind in the state.
    Addresses delivered by Mr. Wells and Mr. Harrington met with enthusiastic response. The subject of a union high school at Lake Creek was mentioned and will probably be acted upon in the near future. Mr. Harrington spoke in part as follows:
    "I believe in country schools for country boys and girls such as I see possible here. The people of this community will make no mistake if you decide to build a union high school, which will bring to your children advantages which at present they must leave home to secure. Let us educate our boys and girls so that when they leave school they shall know how and be willing to do things that are worthwhile.
    "Efficiency in life should be the result of well-directed school work. This school fair and industrial club movement has been made a part of the educational work Oregon is leading. The young people who have stuck to their project and carried it to completion have won the best kind of a prize. We want more of this good work next year and I feel sure the teachers will do their part.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 23, 1914, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I quit off writing my last consignment of Eaglets I was just ready to tell about E. J. Lewis and Shorty Dodge spending the night of the 16th with us. They had been to Medford after a load of supplies and reached here just in time to spend the night.
    William Compton, formerly a citizen of this place and once the owner of the now famous farm belonging to Dr. W. H. Nuding, is now traveling in the interest of a land company, making his headquarters in Los Angeles.
    The farmers still continue to bring in their hogs for shipment to California, and they are going at a good price, from 7 to 8 cents per pound live weight. After they are all delivered I will try to give the sum total of all, and one thing we know is that Mr. Burdic is leaving quite a lot of money, for I saw him draw a check for one lot for the snug little sum of a little over $900, while others received considerable more than that.
    Last Saturday Mike Hanley, Frank Isaacs and a stranger whose name I did not learn were here for dinner on their way to the Hanley ranch, on the north fork of Little Butte Creek, and while they were here Carl Bieberstedt and his son Alvin and Mrs. Thompson of Lake Creek and later Orin Turrel, also of Lake Creek, came in for dinner.
    Mrs. Charley Pruett, whose husband owns one of the best farms on Butte Creek, was in town last Friday.
    Misses Louisa Blaess and Samantha Minter, who have been spending the summer out in Klamath County, returned a few days ago.
    Miss Rosa Nealon commenced her school in the Reese Creek school district on the 14th inst.
    Last Sunday we had at the Sunnyside for dinner Mr. and Mrs. Fred L. Heath, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Boltz and family, Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, our banker, and a stranger whose name I did not learn.
    Sunday morning we had the regular services at the Baptist church, and at the close Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor, suggested that we all come to the evening services promptly at 7:30, and that he would try to get through with his services by 8 o'clock, and suggested that we all go to the opera house to hear Mr. Crandall, a noted lecturer that was sent in here by the wet side of the controversy on the question of whether the state of Oregon shall be wet or dry or whether we shall vote for or against the dry amendment. So we all, about sixty, met at the church and he preached one of his best sermons in just twenty minutes, and at the close we all, I think every man, woman and child, went to hear the lecture, showing the wets in our little town that we are not afraid to hear their side of the question, as they all seem to be. By the time we all arrived and were seated the house was pretty well filled, and by the time the speaker arrived, about 8:15, the seats were all filled and many were standing. He commenced by referring to the present European war and quoted a prophecy by Hon. Shaw, formerly one of President McKinley's cabinet, commented on that for quite a long time until he had got his audience interested and then he began to tell of the failure of prohibition in Kansas and denying the statements that the governors and statesmen of that state had published, but as he drew near the close of his lecture he seemed to lose his zeal and began to act as though he had no hopes of turning or changing the opinion of any of his audience. But he is a fine speaker and a man that is calculated to influence an audience if he has the right side of the question.
    Monday morning I started for the industrial fair on Butte Creek and spent the day there, and will tell about it in my next.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    George Lynch sold his ranch on Elk Creek to a Mr. Johnson and has moved to Central Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston went to the valley Monday.
    Dave Pence and road crew returned to their home Sunday, having finished the road to the mines on the Umpqua mountains.
    Mrs. Kirchgessner was called to San Francisco Friday by the severe illness of her sister.
    Elmer Murray returned home from Crater Lake via California a few days ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Field, Miss Benton, Lee Weaver and Dave Smith passed en route for Mount Vernon. They have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Jack Stowell.
    Robert Kincaid came up Friday evening and his daughter, Miss Florence, returned home with him and spent the weekend.
    Mrs. Graham was the guest of Mrs. Eugene Bellows Sunday.
    Steve Smith of Medford was out to Henry French's last week.
    Mrs. H. Howard and Mrs. G. Fry were Eagle Point visitors Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Walker and Lloyd French came down from Crater Lake the last of the week.
    Frank Hammond has moved to near Medford. Henry French took him down the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lindley of Medford spent Sunday at the Merriman home. Mrs. Hammond and Mrs. Merriman returned home with them.
    Harry Merriman took a load of hogs to the valley Saturday.
    I. J. Hanson and Jim Vincent were looking for hogs here Saturday.
    A fine son arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Storms a few days ago.
    T. C. Gaines and John Klippel of Portland left Sunday on a hunting trip.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sorrel have moved to Agate.
    Mrs. Daw and Jack spent Saturday night with Mrs. Skyrman.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chris Bergman were guests at the Fisher home Sunday.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno visited her brother, Wallace, a few days ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dick Johnson were Eagle Point visitors Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. John Howard.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the readers of the Mail Tribune I mentioned that I was going to attend the industrial school fair at the South Butte school house on Monday, September 21. So, starting out at 8:30 a.m. and jogging along, looking over the fine fields of corn, orchards and meadows, I had traveled about twelve miles when a car passed me containing Professor J. P. Wells, A. R. Chase and L. P. Harrington, on their way to attend the fair also, and while they dashed along so fast they could but get a glimpse of what they passed, I could take it all in as I passed the fine alfalfa fields, some cut and laying in the swath curing and some still standing, while some would be in the shock, and then could see the sacks of onions and occasionally a few sacks of potatoes and the piles of corn laying in the fields already shucked out. It made me really proud to think that I lived on Butte Creek, and when I reached the fair grounds and saw what a grand display the boys and girls had on exhibition it made me feel still prouder that I lived among such an intelligent and progressive people.
    After we had viewed the different articles that were on display and greeted scores of old-time friends we were called to order by Professor A. R. Chase, school supervisor for this subdivision of the country. With a short and appropriate speech he introduced Professor J. P. Wells, county superintendent of schools, and he also gave us a neat, but short--rather short, I thought, but he said that it was dinner time and excused himself on that ground, but his speech was fine. He spoke of the necessity of having the combination of the three, the head, the heart and the hand, in any of our undertakings and especially in the educational lines, emphasizing the necessity of intellectual development in connection with the farming industry.
    He then gave way to Professor L. P. Herrington, and he impressed still more strongly the importance of systematizing the work on the farm and told of the great good that was being done through these industrial fairs. He further stated that they had the best exhibit of corn he had seen anywhere in the state. There were sixty-nine different articles placed on exhibition from lunches fixed up for school dinner to mammoth cabbage heads as well as the entering of fat hogs that had made a marvelous growth. But I will send with this a list of the names of the contributors, the articles exhibited, the class, prize-winners, and the prizes. Each contributor received the sum of 25 cents each, in addition to the prizes. The list has been furnished me by Miss Blanche Miller, who is teaching in the South Butte district, district No. 42:
    Class B--Adolph Pech, yellow corn.
    Class A--Cecil Moore, lunch, first, 40¢; tomatoes, first, 40¢; canned fruit, first, 40¢; jelly, first, 40¢.
    B--Ruth Kinney, Hubbard squash, first, 40¢; yellow corn.
    B--Bessie Farlow, lunch.
    A--Bessie Ragsdale, lunch; bread, first, 40¢.
    B--Celia McAllister, apron, first, 40¢.
    B--Veira Tonn, bread, second, 20¢; fancy work, second, 20¢.
    B--Thelma Moore, bread, first, 40¢.
    A--Eva Kinney, lunch, second, 20¢.
    A--Myrtle Meyers, flowers.
    A--Myrtle Miller, apron and caps, first, 40¢; lunch; towel, first, 40¢.
    A--Myrtle Farlow, cake, first, 40¢; apron, second, 20¢.
    B--Verna Charley, pillow, first, 40¢, pincushion.
    B--Henry Meyer, jelly, first, 40¢; popcorn, second 20¢; tomatoes.
    B--Vernon Meyer, chicken, first, 40¢; tomatoes, second 20¢; doughnuts, first, 40¢.
    A--Rudley Meyer, corn, oats and barley; potatoes, second, 20¢.
    B--Theodore Newstrom, popcorn, first, 40¢.
    B--Henry Pech, squash, first, 40¢.
    B--Theodore Kinney, Poland China pig, first, 40¢.
    B--Tybo Ragsdale, white corn, first, 40¢.
    A--Thomas Ragsdale, white corn, second, 20¢.
    A--Claus Charley, potatoes, first, 40¢; corn, first, 40¢; cabbage, first, 40¢.
    B--Leland Charley, Berkshire pig, first, 40¢.
    B--Dalton Terrill, watermelon, first, 40¢.
    B--Adon Meyers, Wonder berries.
    B--Albert Meyers, Japan beans.
    B--Olive Clark, towel.
    B--Ida Clark, towel.
    B--Blossom Clark, towel, first, 40¢; centerpiece.
    Well, after the various articles were duly examined and commented on, dinner was served, and then the awards were decided on by the judges, and while all this was going on your correspondent was writing out receipts for the different subscribers of the Mail Tribune whose time had expired, and among them were J. A. Miller, C. A. Newstrom, M. D. Bowles, J. L. Ragsdale, and T. F. Farlow. Bidding adieu to the many friends in the Lake Creek country, I spent the night with my old friend, L. C. Charley, of Brownsboro, and before I left receipted him for a year's subscription to the D.M.T. From there to the home of Mrs. McDonald, found her brother, J. D. McCraig, and receipted him for $3 on subscription to W.M.T. and on reaching home met Harry Frey of Lake Creek and he renewed his subscription to the W.M.T., and when I reached home found our son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt and Miss Edna Norris, all of Fort Klamath, who had come in on Monday, remaining until this Saturday morning. The next day, Wednesday, I started out for the Corbin orchard, but as my letter is so long I will leave that for my next, with some local town items.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 28, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday when I left off writing for the Mail Tribune I was just ready to commence to tell about my trip up to the Corbin orchard and so will commence just where I left off. After my return from the Butte Creek industrial fair and spending a good part of Tuesday riding around looking for subscribers both new and old, I reached home and that afternoon put in my time around town and the next morning started for Mr. Corbin's orchard and shortly after my arrival met him in company with Fred Balch, the general superintendent of the fruit association of Jackson County. He was there inspecting Mr. Corbin's fruit and without any hesitancy he remarked that Mr. Corbin had the best crop of apples in the Rogue River Valley and he said that he knew, for he had visited all of the orchards in the valley. Well, the reader knows by this time that I am some what inquisitive, and I asked Mr. Corbin why it was that his fruit was so much better than the rest of the valley and in answer to my question he remarked, "Water." He then took me up above the water ditch and called my attention to an apple tree standing near the ditch on the upper side, say some eight feet off, and the apples on the tree were a fairly good size and pretty well colored. "Now" said he, "this tree has absorbed water from the ditch and they are very good considering everything, but just look at this tree." They were Spitzenbergs. One row above, on the same kind of soil, they are not worth gathering and so they were not. Then I went through his orchard and found the reason why Mr. Balch had said that he had the best crop of apples in the valley, for while the ground was well covered with apples that had fallen off on account of the wind, there were tons and tons of as fine apples still on the trees as I have ever seen here or anywhere else. Then Mr. Corbin remarked that he had paid the ditch company $2000 to put the water on his orchard and $2.50 an acre for the use of it, that he had every dollar of that money back in this year's crop of apples. While I was there he paid me a six month's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and while I was there J. S. Quackenbush, the foreman on the place, also paid his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. Going from there on to Mr. Edgell's orchard I found him out in his cornfield. He was just finishing up husking it out and he had a fine lot of it drying out, getting ready to put away for winter use. He also renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. Returning home in time for dinner, I spent the rest of the day working the town. The next day, Friday, I had arranged to go to riding out with our townsman and candidate for the state senate on the Democratic and out-to-win tickets, Thos. Nichols, and just as I was ready to start, in a hurry of course, in came Mrs. B. G. Smith, W. A. Cornitius and Mrs. E. B. Hanley, and they hardly got seated before Mrs. Ed Hanley, Mrs. Ed Andrews, Mrs. John F. Reddy and Mrs. John M. Root, all of Medford, came in and per force of habit I had to pay some attention to them, although I was in a great hurry. Mrs. Hanley soon informed me that they were over to form a ladies' Bill Hanley club and she wanted me to write up a nice little article boosting Bill Hanley for the U.S. Senate. Well, I drew a long breath and remarked that she would have to see George Putnam about that as that would come under the head of advertising. Well, in the meantime I handed her my pencil and asked her to register the names of the party and excused myself on the ground that Mr. Nichols would be waiting for me and when I returned found that my pencil had gone off to write the names of those who joined the Bill Hanley club, but I have not been able to learn the number or the names of those who joined it. But talk about the men electioneering, well, some of that party can teach Geo. E. Chamberlin to electioneer. But I got off with a whole scalp and I trust that we will all live over the event.
    In spite of the hard times people will travel and eat. On Sunday just before I started for Medford on the P.&E. railroad, Paul Wright and George West came in from Prospect for dinner and about the same time A. Slover and wife, W. C. Cartwright and wife, Mrs. C. Bellinger and Carl Newberg of Medford and Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Rader and Miss Juanita Furry of Phoenix called for dinner and bidding them bye-bye I started for the train to hear the debate in Medford between E. A. Cantrell and E. A. Rowell on the subject of prohibition.
    Mrs. W. W. Willits of Persist returned from Portland, where she has been visiting for some time, on Tuesday the 22nd.
    O. E. Reynolds has been out superintending the loading of Mr. Corbin's apples in the car. He is shipping them to Medford to be repacked for shipment east.
    C. L. Hansen, the sealer of weights and measures, was in town Monday.
    D. R. Patrick was here for dinner and while here gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Rudolph Pech, one of our live German citizens of Lake Creek, and Harry Frey and Carl Bieberstedt were here for dinner. Mr. Bieberstedt is running a wood saw in our town. There were also several strangers here today.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 30, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Al Chittenden of Agate went to Elk Creek Saturday.
    F. C. Gaines of Trail and Perry Foster were Medford visitors Monday.
    John Nealon and sister Miss Rose spent the weekend at their home at Table Rock.
    Miss Mima Hannah was the guest of Miss Murl Coffeen Friday night.
    George Fry has built an addition to his house.
    Henry French is hauling wood for Mrs. O. Nichols of Medford and hauling it on a car and will ship it to Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Fry were Medford callers a few days ago.
    Mesdames Bellows, B. Clarno, McCabe and Miss Ellen McCabe called at the French ranch Sunday afternoon and in the evening Misses Mary and Anna Robertson, John Caster, Everett and Zera Dahack, Elmer and Louis Robertson came and spent the time in music.
    M. Cusick has traded his property on Trail for property near San Francisco.
    Mesdames Martin and Skyrman went to Central Point Thursday.
    Mrs. Etta Wharton began a fall term of school in the Laurel district Monday.
    Mr. Graham sold his turkeys to William Crandall.
    E. E. Ash was at Eagle Point a few days ago.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 30, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I spoke of the fine crop of fruit that A. Corbin had on his orchard, and should have added that he at that time had a large force of men and women at work picking and assorting the apples, and that on the day I was there one of Medford's big motor cars came out and commenced to haul them to the depot, and now they are loading from one to two cars a day.
    I met F. M Corlies, the foreman on the Alta Vista orchard, Tuesday, and he told me that they would not commence to pick apples for another week yet, but that they had a fine lot of them together. Frank Nichols commenced to gather his apples on Tuesday morning and has his packers at work in the old Holmes warehouse and by another week the apple picking will be under full headway, and the Pacific & Eastern railway will be able to do considerable business in that time. I hear favorable reports from most of the orchards that are on sticky land, but the showers of rain that we have occasionally interfere with the picking business, for I heard a man remark just after the last rain that his feet got so large that he could not climb the ladder.
    Ed Foster of Beagle was doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    W. H. Crandall and his brother, Bert, of Los Angeles, Cal., were in town Tuesday. Bert Crandall came up from Los Angeles in his auto with his family and are now visiting with W. H. and his sisters.
    Mrs. "Colonel" Roberts, who lives on Big Sticky, and two of her friends were doing business in our town Tuesday.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols, formerly of this place, but now of Medford, was in town the first of the week visiting friends and attending to business.
    H. H. Lord, who is living on the George Stevens place, was in town Wednesday morning.
    Messrs. Larkin Reynolds and J. W. Wright and two strangers passed through our town this (Wednesday) morning on their way to the Lake Creek country to build a house for Anderson and Tumy. The Edler boys have been hauling the lumber this week.
    Mrs. S. T. Stine, daughter of Mrs. McDonald of Brownsboro, and her sister, Miss Minnie McDonald, were at the Sunnyside for dinner today on their way to Medford, and Mrs. Stine expects to go on to San Francisco, Cal., to spend the winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chris Bergman were here for dinner also, and so was J. A. Howard, who has a homestead on the Eagle Point ferry road. While Mr. Buchanan was here he gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune. He said that he wanted to get the war news.
    Quite a number of our citizens are going to the Elk Creek hatchery for fish since the last rains. I understand that at one time there were forty or fifty persons there securing a supply of fish.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 2, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. P. Fox of Lake Creek passed through our town last week with a thoroughbred Swiss Toggenburg milk goat; he was of the black variety. Mr. Fox has quite a number of the milk goats and has secured this one for breeding purposes. He anticipates going into the cheese business in the near future.
    Rev. N. T. McDonald of Trail came out last Wednesday and met Rev. Childs and wife of Ashland to take them up to his home. He was expecting to have met Rev. Glasier of Grants Pass and Rev. Dodge, the presiding elder of the district for the Free Methodist Church. The latter were to come on to Trail via the Bybee bridge route. They anticipate holding their quarterly meeting commencing on Thursday, September 30, and continuing for some time.
    Frank Neal and wife of Nevada are here visiting the new proprietor of the Eagle Hotel, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Downey.
    Art Nichols has moved to a place on the north side of Big Butte Creek, and his son-in-law, Frank Abbott, has moved into his mother's house in Eagle Point. Frank brought in a fine lot of chickens for our freight agent, Mr. Newport, at the P.&E. railroad, one day last week.
    When George von der Hellen came in for dinner last Friday he brought in a gentleman by the name of Goat, who is a traveling salesman for a Portland firm.
    Eugene Bellows and wife and J. D. Graham and wife were here for dinner Friday. Mr. Graham is the man who bought the Fred Pettegrew place a little over a year ago, and he has rented it to Mr. Hutchason, who has recently proved up on his homestead along the foothills between here and the free ferry. Mr. Graham and wife were on their way to California to remain until after the fair of 1915 in San Francisco.
    Mr. Goule of Medford was here Friday for dinner. He has been up to Henry Meyers' for the past two weeks. His daughter, Miss Maud Goule, is teaching in the Lake Creek district. While Mr. Goule was up in the Lake Creek district he helped to dig the prize potatoes of the state and shuck the corn that took the second prize at the state fair. He said that the corn yielded at the rate of 88 bushels to the acre. We still say hurrah for Butte Creek.
    Mr. Cabe of Weed, who was for some time foreman on the Tronson orchard, but has been working at Weed, Cal., came in Friday evening and went up to the Tronson orchard, returning to the Sunnyside about 7:30 for a bed. Mr. Cabe says that at the mill where he works they work about 1600 men, and the most of them are Greeks, Austrians and Italians.
    S. E. Goff and family came in Saturday morning on the P.&E. They are the guests of Prof. W. E. Buchanan, the principal of our school.
    J. J. Summerville, one of the U.S. forest men, also came in at the same time.
    Mrs. Painter and her mother, Mrs. James Curtis, have gone to visit relatives in the state of Washington.
    David W. Pence, the boss road builder of the Elk Creek country, and his daughter, Miss Ollie, had been to Medford to an eye specialists to have her eyes treated. While Mr. Pence was here he paid me a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Last Thursday I started out to see what I could do for the Medford Publishing Co., and the first place I stopped at was the home of G. P. Stoell and found all hands and the cook out in the barnyard husking corn and Walter Wood putting the fodder away for future use. Mr. Stowell has some as fine corn as there is in the valley and it seemed to be yielding very well, although I did no business with Mr. Stowell. From there I went to Mrs. Susan Hart's and she paid her subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune up to date. She also was husking out her corn and from the looks of the quantity on the ground, it was turning out quite well. From there I went to Mr. Gordon Cox's but could find no one at home, they were probably in the field or orchard. From there I went to Green Mathew's but found no one at home. He has a big lot of corn. I then went to the farm and orchard of Mr. Lyman O. Orton, but learned that he was in Medford, but met Mr. and Mrs. Henderson. He was packing a few apples, and on my way home met J. M. Wilfley and he paid me up for his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and told me that he was going to California to spend the winter.
    The Eagle Point Ladies Aid Society met at the home of Mrs. Bryan and among other things elected the officers for the coming year as follows; President, Mrs. J. W. Grover; vice president, Mrs. W. E. Buchanan; secretary, Mrs. L. L. Simmons; treasurer, Mrs. Thomas F. Nichols.
    F. J. Ayres and wife and Miss Rose Nealon came in Saturday morning. Miss Nealon is teaching school in the Reese Creek school district.
    Mr. John Edsall came in to see his son Jed, who is stopping at the Sunnyside Friday night, remaining overnight.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 5, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Minnie Givan and Mrs. Timmie Dugan were in our town on business last Saturday.
    Perry Foster, one of the pioneers of the Rogue River Valley, was in town also last Saturday. I asked him to subscribe for the Mail Tribune and he excused himself on the ground that he is so busy in the day time that he doesn't have time, and that he can't see to read at night, and so he has to do without the news.
    Mr. and Mr. Leburt Smith, who live on the Hollywood orchard, were doing business in our town also the same day.
    C. A. Newstrom and family of Lake Creek were guests at the Sunnyside Saturday.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, was called to go to Trail the last of the week to weigh a bunch of cattle for Ashpole & Nichols of Medford.
    Jasper Hannah and wife were in town to have an aching tooth treated Saturday.   
    Miss Lorene Grigsby of Central Point came out last Saturday to go to the moving picture show and attend the dance. While here she was a guest of the Sunnyside. L. E. Smith saw her safely home Sunday afternoon.
    H. R. Nye and wife, Mr. Wood and wife and children of Gold Hill were guests of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey Sunday.
    John H. Trusty of Elk Creek, Trail post office, came out the first of the week after a load of apples.
    One of the teams from the Riverview ranch came out Monday and took out a load of water pipe. They have an electric pump on the ranch, and no doubt the pipe is to extend the water system to other parts of the farm.
    Two wagons with several Indians passed through here Monday morning from Klamath County on their way to Medford.
    J. W. Grover and W. G. Knighton went out last week to take a hunt, returning Monday. They secured one deer.
    Born--October 5, to Mr. and Mrs. William Nickel, near Brownsboro, a seven-pound boy. Dr. William P. Holt was in attendance at the time.
    J. T. Fry of Trail came out Monday and brought out with him Mrs. Broomfield of Medford and Rev. Childs and wife of Ashland, who have been attending the quarterly meeting of the Free Methodist church, and while he was here renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    J. C. Mathews of Central Point and John Conover of Round Top were here for dinner on Monday. Mrs. Broomfield also took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    G. H. Wamsley and his daughter, Miss Mabel, are helping Frank Nichols with his apples.
    Miss Mae Trusty, who has been helping in the telephone office, has resigned her position and has resumed her studies in Professor W. E. Buchanan's room, and Miss Clara Zimmerman has taken her place in the phone office.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee C. Port of Jacksonville, who have been out in the forest reserve this summer, he being one of the forest rangers, came in Monday evening on their way home.
    Jerry O'Connell of Portland, a traveling salesman for the Napatan Shoe Company of Napa, Cal., was here Tuesday for dinner.
    Monday afternoon your correspondent took a spin out in the country to do a little canvassing for the Mail Tribune, and the first place I stopped was at the beautiful orchard of J. M. Wilfley, and there I met his foreman, Thomas Vestal, and his sister, Mrs. Wilfred Jacks, and in a very short time he had a receipt for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and one of those abstract maps that the Mail Tribune is giving to yearly subscribers. From there I went to the farm of Green Mathews. While I did no business with him in the way of subscribing, I saw some as fine corn as I have seen anywhere in the valley, and it was raised on sticky. From there I went to the home of Gordon Cox and found him hauling in his apples, and in a few minutes he had a receipt for $1.50 on his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, and turning my course for home found W. A. Higinbotham there on his way to Medford for his winter supplies, and in a short time his brother, John, came in for L. E. Smith to go and weigh a load of hogs he had brought in for Ben Brophy.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 8, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. Merricle [Merritt?] moved Mrs. Andy Klum to Medford from Trail Tuesday.
    Jesse Ragsdale of Trail took his son Johnnie in to Central Point Tuesday to take the train for Salem to go to the blind institute to school.
    L. J. Mareks is doing some repair work on the Trail telephone line.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bellows took Mr. and Mrs. Graham to Eagle Point to take the train for the East to spend the winter.
    Henry French loaded a car of wood for Mrs. Nichols of Medford.
    Mrs. George Fry entertained Mrs. Howard and Mrs. Foster at dinner Tuesday.
    Mrs. Jasper Hannah was in Eagle Point Sunday having some dental work done.
    Mr. and Mrs. Skyrman were in Central Point Saturday.
    T. C. Gaines attended the auction sale at Tolo Tuesday.
    Mrs. Daw has rented the Oliver place in Trail and is moving her household effects up to the place.
    Miss Mima Hannah returned from Medford the first of the week.
    Jasper Hannah went to Central Point Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 8, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Eagle Hotel has changed hands again, Mr. Denny having rented it to Miss Louisa Blaess for a term of three months.
    Jerry Phillips and his two little children spent Tuesday night with us. He is from Josephine County and was on his way up to Trail, where he expects to send his children to school this winter. A gentleman by the name of Cornell was also here the same night.
    Tuesday night was rather a noted night in our little town. That night was the night for the regular meeting of the town council, and notices had been posted that James Vogeli would apply for the renewal of his license to sell liquors, etc., and the way the council stood two of the resident members were for and two against the renewal. There was and is but four of the members of the council living in the town, as George Fisher has sold out his interests here and been in Klamath County working this summer and Art Nichols had moved up on Big Butte, but by some means or other they both happened to be in town that night and took their seats in the council and the license was granted. Among other things the council did was to cut the salaries of the town officers all to giblets. The recorder's salary they cut in half, allowing him $10 a month, and the town treasurer's from $5 a month to $10 a year and the town marshal from $15 to $5 a month and now they threaten to resign and leave us without any officers except four councilmen and the mayor and as the present members of the council stand, two dry and two wet, and if each side should contend for men to fill the vacancy on their side, they may have trouble getting the tangle unraveled.
    On the same night there was a meeting of the friends of our minister, Rev. L. L. Simmons, for the purpose of contributing to his worldly wants. There was about 30 or 35 persons present and the evening exercises was opened by a prayer by Rev. McKee and then the chairman called on your Eagle Point correspondent to give a talk on "The experiences of a minister in the early history of the church work on the Pacific Coast." And he gave a brief account of his experiences in California and Oregon as a "circuit rider," after which we had instrumental music by Miss Goff of Kansas City, and then her father, Mr. S. E. Goff, entertained us with a recitation of a German comic piece and when he was encored he responded with another comic piece. Then his wife was called on and she rendered a poem on the subject of temperance and when encored related an incident caused by a young lady giving a young man his first glass of wine. Then came the singing which continued until after 10 o'clock when the various contributions were given which amounted to $10 in cash and $7.70 in useful articles, after which the audience was dismissed by a short prayer by the writer. Our visitors remarked that the event was one of the most pleasant occasions in their travels.
    Mr. Goff and family started the next day for Seattle, Wash., but they said that they will long remember the pleasant day they spent in Eagle Point.
    John Higinbotham of Butte Falls and his brother W. A. Higinbotham of Prospect and George H. Stannard of Ashland spent the night with us last Tuesday and while here John Higinbotham paid up a little of an arrear on his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune and another year in advance and secured one of those nice maps of the United States that goes as a premium.
    Born, October 6, to Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Meyer of Lake Creek a 7½-pound girl, and Grandpa Herman Meyer is as proud as a grandpa can be.
    Mrs. Arthur Pool and Mrs. S. J. Day were out Thursday visiting friends in Eagle Point.
    Mr. Knight, the owner of the Alta Vista orchard, came out on the P.&E. Thursday morning and went over to the orchard. He says that he has a fine lot of apples and that he intends to keep his Newtowns for a while until the market opens.
    The school children are building a work shop in connection with the school and are going to take lessons in manual training. They are doing the building themselves with what help they can get out of the principal, W. E. Buchanan.
    Mrs. Mollie Franer, nee Mollie Davis, of California, is visiting friends in town.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 12, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Earl Craft, the foreman and manager of the Cooley orchard, was in town last Friday and while here renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Fred Dunlap and wife of Derby were here on business the last of the week and while here took dinner at the Sunnyside, and also renewed his sub to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Dr. Withycombe, the Republican candidate for governor of the state of Oregon, was in town last Friday and spent a very short time among us. He met and shook hands with the few standpatters there is in our town and when he got as far as the New York Cash Store kept by Geo. W. Daley, his driver asked him if he wanted to go any further up the creek and he said, "No, we will go on to Medford." Although there was the school house with nearly a hundred children and three teachers, who will probably vote November 3, and nine families on the streets, still he did not look for many votes among them, owing to the reception he had received thus far, for from what I can gather the most of the people of our town are going to vote for Dr. Smith for governor this fall for he seems to be a general favorite here.
    We have had another change in our business in our town. Henry O. Childreth has sold out his interest in the blacksmith shop to his partner and brother, W. L. Childreth. We greatly regret that Mr. Childreth has thought best to make the change, as Henry is one of our substantial citizens and a good workman, but we can console ourselves with the thought that we have a first-class mechanic left us yet.
    While our minister, Rev. L. L. Simmons, is doing good work in the ministerial line, he is also some gardener, especially in the line of squashes, for he brought one to Mrs. Howlett last week that weighed forty and a half pounds and has one at home that weighed sixty-nine pounds and other garden truck in comparison.
    Henry Zenny has been wiring the school house last week so that the extra room can be used by the ladies' aid society and for public meetings in general where the parties don't feel like paying for the use of the opera house.
    Last week I made two trips out to the Lewis Bros. farm to try to see two men but failed in both instances as they were both away each time, but I met the Lewis brothers and they were working their corn up into silage. He has tested the silo and says that it has proved to be a grand success, says that he can put more fat on a beef steer in the same length of time with ensilage than with any other kind of feed and by the use of the corn in this way he can utilize the whole of it, stock, blade, shucks, as well as the corn and save the expense of husking the corn.
    He said furthermore that by sowing red clover in their orchard that they had cut more hay off of twenty acres this season than they had ever cut off the whole farm altogether any one season before.
    Mr. A. Corbin has finished gathering his Newtown and Spitzenberg apples and has shipped them to Medford. I understand that he had about 5,000 boxes of Newtowns and 2,500 boxes of Spitzenbergs and has two different varieties to gather yet.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neal of Nevada, who have been here visiting the family of Mr. Denny, started Saturday for Glendale to visit Mrs. Neal's mother.
    Miss Minnie Taylor, our intermediate teacher, and Miss Anna Gould, who is teaching in the Lake Creek district, and Miss Rose Thomas, who is teaching in Brownsboro, all took the car Saturday for Medford to attend the teachers' institute, and Professor W. E. Buchanan and Mrs. George von der Hellen went in Monday morning for the same purpose.
    Thomas E. Nichols and Rev. L. L. Simmons have been out on a tour, Mr. Simmons to register some of the voters and Mr. Nichols to look after his interests as a candidate for state senator from this district on the Democratic and out-to-win tickets.
    Senator von der Hellen, the Republican candidate, was in Eagle Point Monday morning shaking hands with the voters.
    Jack Florey, who has been spending some time up Prospect way, returned last week. He is looking after the interest of his brother, Chauncey Florey, Republican candidate for recorder.
    John Foster, who has been working this summer out in Klamath County, returned last week.
    Mrs. Nellie Skillman of Grants Pass came in Saturday evening to visit her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Dave Pence returned from the valley Monday.
    Eugene Bellows made a business trip to Medford Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jake Moore of Evans Creek went up to the hatchery Sunday.
    John Foster spent a couple of days with his sister, Mrs. Henry French, this week. He has just returned from Chiloquin and visited Mrs. Arthur Morrison on his way over.
    Schools are closed and the teachers are attending the institute in Medford. Among those who attended are Misses Howe, Dottie Sholtz, Florence Kincaid, Eula and Ida Houston, Rose Nealon, Mrs. Wharton and John Nealon.
    W. P. Morgan and Mr. and Mrs. Warner of Trail went to the valley Monday.
    Mrs. Bellows called on Mrs. Pettegrew Tuesday.
    The quail hunters are a nuisance. They disregard the notices put up by the farmers and enter the fields by them. When they see a team coming they jump into their autos and hurry away. They kill chickens and on one ranch a hog and a goat.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno and Wayman Bergman went over to Evans Creek Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgan started for the valley Sunday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made professional visits to see Mrs. Jack Walker on Saturday and Sunday.
    Frank Zuccala was smiling on friends Sunday.
    Ed Ash will be the next Trail postmaster.
    Hunting parties are getting more numerous each day.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 16, 1914, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    S. B. Tarbell and his brother, of Trail, brought in three large crates of fine turkeys on Monday for Mr. Newport, the railway and express agent.
    Mrs. Lulu Moomaw, formerly of this place, but more recently of Yakima, Wash., has been out here looking after a divorce suit that was pending in the circuit court, but has now gone to Los Angeles to spend the winter. She was accompanied to her train by Mrs. Frank Brown and Miss Mabel Wamsley.
    Miss Fay Perry of Butte Falls has been spending a few days with her aunt, Mrs. F. T. Newport.
    I see by the Mail Tribune of the 14th that the printer has had me to say that Mr. Henry Zenny had been wiring the schoolhouse, etc., when it should have been that Mr. Harry Young had been engaged wiring the school house, etc. Mr. Young is one of our promising young married men, having captured the amiable and accomplished daughter of our townsman, J. B. Jackson, and is now opening up a profitable business in our town.
    Vaughn and Carl Quackenbush, the two sons of J. S. Quackenbush, foreman on the A. Corbin orchard, went to Medford last Monday, October 12, and so did Mr. Knight, the owner of the Alta Vista orchard, and while on the train with me told me about his apple crop, saying that he had one of the best crops this year ever raised in the valley. He had a force of fifteen working in his orchard at that time and was keeping his crop at home for a while at least. He seems to think that he has selected just the right time to pick his apples, as they seemed to be just ready to fall off the trees.
    As the reader will see by the foregoing, I was on the car going to Medford on Monday, the 12th, and on my arrival paid my respects to the Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun offices and at 5:30 p.m. had my ticket for a trip to Salem on the S.P. railway, and soon after I started it became so dark that I could not see any of the surroundings, so quietly contented myself in sitting and waiting for the morning sun to drive away the darkness, and while I waited I slept just as soundly as though I was in my own bed in Eagle Point. At 5 o'clock the brakeman cried out Salem, and I gathered up my suitcase, overcoat and umbrella and alighted into the darkness, and that intensified by a heavy fog. I found the proprietor of the depot hotel and he gave me one of his cards, and after taking out of my suitcase some empty bottles and depositing my suitcase with the baggage man I started out for the hotel, but the darkness was so dense that I could not see to follow the trail, or I suppose I should call it a path, as there was no lamps to lighten up the depot grounds, so after wandering around for a while, retraced my steps and waited until daylight. I confess that I was very much surprised to find such a depot in the capital of the great state of Oregon. It is an old wooden structure that looks as though it might have been built some forty years [ago]. The outside is covered with the old-fashioned thumb latches that have been out of date for a quarter of a century, and in fact, the only thing that looked at all modern was the electric lights and the water system.
    Well, after awhile the darkness disappeared so that I went to the depot hotel and ate my breakfast, and by 8 o'clock I started out to find a doctor's office. I started on foot, so that I could see the city, for I was not favorably impressed with what I had seen thus far, and as I walked along I could not help but notice that all of the residence buildings that I passed were of wood, until I had gone several blocks in fact, the first brick building that I noticed was the Willamette University, and then the city seemed to change in appearance, for then I began to see some very fine brick buildings, and there seemed to be considerable business going on, but I finally found the office. The doctor and his partner occupy five rooms in the building and although I had called the doctor up over the phone and fixed a date with him, it was nearly noon before he could reach my case. But I see that I am getting this letter too long, so will try to tell something of what I saw later in the day in Salem.
Fairview, Ore., Oct. 15.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 17, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I gave an account of what I saw in Salem and had just gone to dinner with my friend Dr. Findley. After dinner we started out for his office but he concluded to take me around the city for a few minutes before going to his office. So starting out from his home, which is just outside of the city limits, we took a spin out by the state prison and as we passed we saw about 150 of the female inmates of the prison sitting on the curbing and on the sidewalks that seemed to be taking their noon hour in the sun and open air. Passing on we next passed the asylum for the insane but saw but very few people around. The two buildings, the prison and the asylum, are beautiful structures and reflect credit on the managers of the institutions. Passing on about eight or ten blocks from there we met a company of about 40 women, inmates of the asylum, that two of the lady guards had out exercising. They were marching along two and two looking as carefree as it was possible to look, but they were a pitiable-looking company. They were led by an old lady that looked as though she might be 60 years of age. Shortly after passing them we turned our course to go to the state fair grounds, but about the time we had gone perhaps a half a mile the doctor discovered that his gasoline was out and then I had to sit in the machine until he went and brought five gallons of that very necessary article and by the time he got back it was then time for him to be in his office, but during the short ride I took with the doctor I saw some very fine buildings, and the streets have been greatly improved since I was there some four years ago.
    After one gets away from the S.P. depot and its immediate surroundings, the whole city presents altogether a different appearance, for they have some as handsome residences surrounded with all kinds of shrubbery and ornamental trees and the streets are wide and clean, and the business houses would indicate that the occupants were having their share of the business, although I did not have time to make any investigations as I had to start for Oregon City on the 5:00 o'clock train. Although I did take time that afternoon to ride around the city a little on the street car. Taking the S.P. car at 5:00 p.m. for Oregon City I saw but very little along the route as after 5 o'clock it was so dusky that I could see but very little except the immense gardens and the quantity of vegetables. Arriving at Oregon City about 7 o'clock I phoned to my brother-in-law to meet me at the depot but found that he was out in the country electioneering for the office of county judge and would not be home until after midnight, so I mustered up courage to start up that long hill with a suitcase that weights 16 pounds, an overcoat and an umbrella, but just as I started a young man, an employee of the S.P. Co., stepped out of the depot and said: "Here, old man, I had just as soon walk up to Mr. Cook's as not and will carry your suitcase for you." Now perhaps I didn't feel relieved, so I had not only a guide but a very material help toward getting my belongings to their destination.
    As I am about ready to start for Gresham I will have to close this time and the next time will try to tell the readers of some of the things I have seen in Oregon City and Portland and what I am about to see in Gresham.
Fairview, Oregon, Oct. 19.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 21, 1914, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote for the Mail Tribune the last time I was telling something of what I saw in Oregon City. The residence portion of the city, that is that part of the city that is on the tableland, or up the hill, has grown very materially during the past two years and in the place of the old shacks that were eyesores to the visitors now stand fine large residences and business houses, and instead of the streets being filled with noxious weeds they are nicely graded and graveled and everything would indicate that the city is in a prosperous condition. The next morning, that is Thursday morning, I took a stroll through the main business portion of the city and up to where the Oregon City Falls used to be 50 years ago, and talked with quite a number of the business men with regard to the city and they all, with the exception of one man, spoke as though business was in a normal condition at least and the most of them spoke quite encouragingly of the prospect. I inquired particularly with regard to the effect that the city going dry had had on the business and the most of them claimed that, looking at it from a purely business standpoint, that business had been improved in many respects, that the laboring classes, and there are about 700 or 800 men, women and girls employed in the various factories and mills, that they would have the cash to pay their bills when they came due and in many instances the wives and children of the laboring men were better clothed and appeared to be more happy and contented.
    They have in Oregon City one of the largest woolen mills on the coast and two or three large paper mills where they use up hundreds of cords of white fir wood that is converted into paper every 24 hours, besides one of the largest electric light plants on the coast, and what little I talked with the men, they seemed to be well satisfied with their lot.
    Leaving Oregon City on the 2 o'clock electric car for Portland and arriving there about 3 p.m. I spent a few hours visiting and transacting business. I took a car for Fairview where I was met by my two grandsons with a lantern and piloted to the home of my daughter.
    Fairview is a small town, incorporated but dry, where they have two churches, a store and a fine town hall where they have the post office, city council chamber, etc., a hotel, school house with three rooms and although it is not what would be called a prosperous city, still everyone seems to be well provided for and contented. The few days that I remained there, there were two singular accidents happened, the first one was a head-on collision of an auto and a wagon. There was a man moving a load of household goods on the Sandy road and on that road is a long narrow bridge that is not wide enough for two teams to pass and just as the man with a team got about half way across the bridge along came two men in an auto running at the rate of about 20 miles an hour facing the team, and the teamster stopped and yelled but to no avail and when the horses saw that there was no way of escape they reared up as high as they could and on came the auto full speed until it came in contact with the doubletrees on the wagon and the horses came down onto the front of the auto smashing it all to pieces and cutting the two men quite badly as well as cutting the horses' legs considerable. The two men had been in Portland and had been looking through glasses, so could not see a wagon piled with household goods and a span of horses.
    The next remarkable accident or incident was the case of a woman who had been washing a garment in gasoline and after wringing it out as dry as she could she put in in a clothes boiler of boiling water and the moment it touched the water the gasoline exploded and took fire, burning the woman's eyebrows and hair quite badly, and also burned her on the face and neck. She said that she started to run out of the room and by the time she reached the door the room seemed to be completely filled with the blaze, but it did no other damage than what I have related.
    The last time I wrote I finished up by saying that I was ready to start for Gresham which I did and found a neat little city of about 3000 inhabitants, but the weather was so stormy that I did not go around very much although I saw enough to satisfy me that there was considerable business carried on. Among other places I visited was the office of the Gresham Outlook, a live little newspaper with a subscription list of about 800. Gresham has a surrounding country that will compare favorably with almost any part of the Willamette Valley for productiveness, and the farmers have as a rule good dwellings and barns and seem well supplied with the necessities of life.
Damascus, Oregon, Oct. 21.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 23, 1914, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Saturday, October 14, Lloyd Stanley, Audley Meyer and Vernon Meyer went to Eagle Point to do business with the merchants of that town. While there they attended the lecture given by Governor West. They also took dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel and met the Lake Creek school teacher, Miss Alma Gould, who was on her way to Lake Creek, after spending a week at the institute.
    Bill Martin was in Medford Monday, doing business.
    Henry Meyer, Jr., was in Medford last week, having his eyes treated.
    Thompson Bros. of Lake Creek put a new coat of paint on the front of their store building last week.
    Audley Meyer stated that he saw a forked-horn buck deer run across his father's stubble field as he was coming to school Tuesday morning.
    Mr. Chase, the county school supervisor, was out visiting our school last Friday. He gave us a lesson in penmanship.
    Otto Meyer of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller at our school Friday afternoon.
    Claus Charley, who was visiting Medford a few days ago, reported that about 300 Indians had invaded the city. Although no desperate fighting had yet begun.
    Two members of our ninth grade are to receive free trips to the exposition at San Francisco. Claus Charley received first prize on corn at the state fair and Audley Meyer on potatoes.
    C. E. Terrill is at Medford as juryman in the federal court.
    Our schoolmaster was well pleased with the teachers' institute.
    R. C. Moore was doing business in Eagle Point last week.
    W. M. Stanley returned home Monday, having been in Klamath County visiting his relations.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 24, 1914, page 7


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Gene Bellows went to the Central Point cemetery Thursday.
    Mr. Collett and family of Josephine County have moved into Mrs. Daw's house.
    Harry Howard and family were Central Point visitors this week.
    Dave Pence was down from Elk Creek to Jasper Hannah's Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Houston and Mr. and Mrs. Green went to the valley Friday.
    Frank Houston has returned from Klamath County.
    Mr. and Mrs. James Cornutt of Central Point spent the weekend at the W. Houston home.
    John Minter is very sick at the home of Walter Wood.
    Mrs. Jack Walker, who has been sick for two weeks, is very much better.
    Mrs. Wharton's three children returned with her from the institute and are at Grant Mathews'.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz were in Eagle Point Thursday.
    Frank Zuccala has just completed a fine new barn.
    Mr. Tarbell has moved to Agate from Trail.
    Tom Dawson was over to Eagle Point after a load of corn.
    Ike Merriman returned home after a visit with his son Harry.
    Mrs. Middlebusher is hauling in her winter supplies.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ash made a business trip to the valley a few days ago.
    Mrs. Jesse Ragsdale and children were valley visitors last week.
    The Minter and the Lewis sheep were brought out of the mountains a few days ago.
    Harry Merriman has just completed a fine barn. His brother from the valley helped him.
    Fred Pettegrew is being visited by a nephew and a friend from the East.
    The hunters are bringing a great many deer from the mountains.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1914, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I was at Damascus, Ore., and while I was there my brother-in-law took me in his auto around the country to note the changes that have taken place during the past fifty-two years. When I first came into that part of the country fifty-two years ago, about the middle of October, it was then a vast forest with a few farms dotted here and there, with a small opening of cleared land, and that consisted of having the most of the trees being chopped, sawed or burned down and the rest of them girdled, where the early settlers could raise a little wheat, oats and potatoes, depending largely on their guns for their meat, although they raised some hogs, but bear and deer were then very plentiful during that period. We had to go to Oregon City, seven miles, or Portland, fourteen miles, for our mail, and in many instances the settlers had to go twenty or thirty miles for their mail and groceries, which consisted principally of sugar, coffee and tobacco, but they soon adopted the plan of raising that necessary staple, and in many instances used parched wheat as a substitute for coffee, and the farmers generally kept a few sheep and from the wool made their socks and stockings, and in many instances they made their own clothing. The houses were generally built of logs; some of them would be hewed, but generally they were simply put up without taking off the bark, and they were nearly always in a hurry to get a roof over their heads, but under what we would now call such trying times they were the most contented and happy people I ever met. But I started in to tell about the changes that had taken place in the country itself. Now, where then stood an occasional log cabin and a small piece of cleared land, it is a vast prairie, and the farms, instead of containing from 160 to 640 acres of land that was of no value except to look at, and then you would have to go all over it to see it, for in very many places one could only see straight up for the brush and timber, now consist of tracts of from three to forty acres. I heard of one man that had a tract of 100 acres, but that is the exception to the rule, and on these small farms they have good, neatly painted dwellings and barns; they keep a few cows and hogs and seem to be supplied with about all of the comforts of life. They have fine roads up in that section of the country and the whole country shows signs of thrift and plenty. Quite a large proportion of the citizens are Germans, and they generally are good farmers and build up the country.
    After spending a few days with my friends and relatives, I came to this place, Portland, and the next time I write will tell of what I saw in this big city.
    The following items have been sent me from home for the Eaglets:
    Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton and her niece, of Grants Pass, and Mrs. A. N. Thomas were visiting Mrs. Howlett on Wednesday, the 21st.
    Mrs. Jacob Jonas, who has been out to Lakeview visiting her mother and brother, returned to their home in Eagle Point last week.
    The Rebekah lodge of Eagle Point have been quilting out a quilt to be sent with other things to the I.O.O.F. home of Portland.
    Mrs. Sarah Guerin of Portland, a sister to the Brown Bros. of Eagle Point, has been visiting them.
    Ed Hoyt of Fort Klamath came over on the 21st on a hurried trip, returning the 22nd.
    Mrs. S. H. Harnish and her brother, Joe Moomaw, went to Josephine County to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. Y. P. Moomaw.
Portland, Or., Oct. 26, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 28, 1914, page 7


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Miss Alice Nygren has entered the ninth grade, making five pupils in the class.
    The Butte Creek school has received a set of library books from the state library in Salem.
    N. Homalka of Medford is out visiting his friend, Carl Drsek, who lives about four miles east of Brownsboro, to improve his health.
    The farmers of this vicinity are very busy putting in grain, and doing their fall plowing.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Meyer were doing business with Medford merchants last week.
    Reed Charley, accompanied by his mother and sister, were in Eagle Point last Saturday.
    Thompson brothers of Lake Creek were up to the M. F. Hanley ranch last Saturday buying some apples.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 29, 1914, page 7


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    After an absence of over a week from my headquarters, at the home of my daughter's, Mrs. G. H. Shaw. I am once more seated at her table to write to the readers of the Mail Tribune. Before I left home I ordered and paid for a month's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, so that I could keep tab on what was going on at home, but the reader can perhaps imagine my disappointment to find that two or three copies of the Mail Tribune had been lost in transit so that I have lost the connection and cannot tell whether all of my letters have reached their destination or not, but trusting that they have (it may be the wastebasket) I will try to write this morning again. The last time I wrote I promised to tell something about what I saw in and around Portland.
    Well, on my arrival in the city for a few days' stay, for I had passed through on my way to this place, after greeting some of my relatives I began to look around to see what I could find that would be of interest to the readers of our live and progressive paper, the Mail Tribune, and the first thing that particularly attracted my attention was the public market, something the laboring class has needed for several years. So leaving Third and Yamhill streets I started out through the market, for it is at present under temporary booths along the edges of Yamhill Street and the sidewalk and reaches along both sides of the street to Fifth Street where one can find almost anything that is raised in this country in the vegetable line with the price attached so that there is no necessity of asking any questions but simply order what you want, pay the price, and if the article or articles are too heavy or bulky to take with you, order them delivered, giving the number and street of your residence and the goods will be delivered. There seemed to be an arrangement made for one party to deliver for several different booths, and as all such work as that is done with auto trucks, it can be done in a very short time. The reader will wonder why the vendors of the products of the soil should have to have their booths out on the street, but the reason is that the public market building is not yet completed but is in the course of completion and when it is completed and the various stalls arranged, it will be one of the finest on the coast and will prove of great benefit to the general public. The next place that I visited was the Rose City Park out in the northern part of the city, where I went to visit an old friend and brother minister, Rev. G. E. Paddock, D.D., where I spent a few hours visiting and looking over that part of the city. This was on Friday and on Sunday I went out again in company with the celebrated J. R. N. Bell, D.D., and heard him preach a fine sermon. Rose City Park is a beautiful suburb of the city although it is really a part of the city proper, as it, the city, has taken in about all of the small towns around it thus making it a big city, and now one can ride from Lents Junction in the southwest part of the city to St. Johns, a distance of about 20 miles for five cents by taking one transfer, although on some of the lines they have short attachments, as they had, until very recently, from Lents to Lents Junction, where after riding 15 or 20 miles on a five-cent fare they held you up for five cents for a ride of eight blocks on the direct line to Linneman, but now the city has taken in that part so that one can ride from Lents Junction to the Portland Heights or Kentnor, that is in the northern part of the city and on the direct line to the Union stock yards, and when I reached Kentnor I was informed that I would take another car there and pay another nickel for a ride of about two miles to the stock yards, but that was all right for one can walk and it is good walking, but I could save time by riding, so I paid my five cents and visited that noted place. The Union stock yards cover over a large tract of country, that is several acres, and it is cut up into a lot of small pens for the purpose of handling the sheep, hogs and cattle that they are butchering every day, thus supplying the country with meat of all kinds. They have a ready up-to-date plant, and where everything is kept in a sanitary condition and everything is utilized in some way or other, what they cannot turn into food they turn to other purposes and what is left they use to make fertilizers.
    During my rounds, for I have taken in a good part of the city, I visited Arleta and there found several of our old Jackson County friends and among them was J. E. Stepp and family, who was one of the owners of the Round Top saw mill that was burned down a few years ago and his son-in-law Rudolph Isler and his wife, nee Maggie Stepp, who used to have a millinery shop in Eagle Point, and another of the Stepp girls, Mrs. Charles Obenchain, whose husband was raised in the Big Butte country. I did not see Charley as he was at his garage down in the city. I also met his sister Bertha, who is married but I have forgotten her name. I also met Mrs. Isler, whose husband was part owner of the Round Top saw mill but Mr. Isler was downtown; he is talking of coming out to live again in the Big Butte country. But I see that I am getting this letter too long again so will close for this time.
    The next time I will try to tell what I saw at the public library, the city museum, etc.
Fairview, Oct. 31, 1914.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 2, 1914, page 7


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. Wyant arrived at his daughter's, Mrs. Eugene Bellows', Friday evening. He drove through from Springfield.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joe Caffey are the proud parents of a tiny daughter, who arrived the 23rd.
    The Trail post office was moved Saturday from Mrs. Middlebusher's to Ed Ash's house.
    Jack Daw was to Central Point Friday after a load of winter supplies.
    Henry Morgan is hauling wood to Central Point.
    Tom Raimey and Miss Ora went to Central Point Sunday. Miss Ora will remain and pack fruit for a while.
    Mrs. Ed Morgan is the guest of her sister, Mrs. Kent, in Medford.
    Anthony McCabe is visiting home folks.
    Charles Coffeen returned from Medford Tuesday.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher came home from the valley Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Albright went to the valley Wednesday.
    Miss Jennie Maultby and Mrs. Austin Green made final proof on their homesteads in Medford last Saturday.
    John Houston is a petit juror at Jacksonville this week.
    Elton Raimey was to the valley the middle of the week.
    Frank Houston was in Central Point Saturday.
    Among the Eagle Point visitors this week were Mrs. J. and Mrs. B. Clarno, Eugene Bellows and wife, Henry French, T. C. McCabe and Edward Foster and wife.
    Dave Pence made a business trip to Medford Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 2, 1914, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I was at my daughter's in Fairview, but this beautiful sunshiny morning finds me in my own home in the quiet little town of Eagle Point, where I arrived Tuesday evening in time to cast my vote.
    On looking over the Sunnyside Hotel register I find that quite a number of the prominent citizens of Jackson County have been here during the past few days, and among them were George A. Stannard of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. C. F. Young, Medford, Mrs. Robert Hammond, Master Robert Hammond, M. L. Edwards, Medford, Mrs. E. O. Rease, Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Knighton, Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Wolfer, Miss Lenore Walker of Eagle Point, O. C. King, Medford, J. Pardee, Grants Pass, James G. Chinnock, Rhea Soper and R. P. Cowgill. And a little later Mrs. Howlett had the Bill Hanley club, at least a part of them as follows: Mrs. J. F. Reddy, Mrs. C. L. Schieffelin, Mrs. J. M. Root, Mrs. Ed Hanley, Mrs. Platt, Miss Josephine Root, Miss Venetia Hamilton, and Mr. J. M. Root. Although Mr. Root's name was not embraced in the list of members of the Bill Hanley club, so I inferred that he came along with the club as a kind of chaperone and if he did he has our sympathy, for they are about as lively and intelligent company of ladies as can be found in the state. And while on this subject I wish to express my sincere thanks to the Bill Hanley club for the nice present that they left with Mrs. Howlett for me. The reader will remember that just before I left for the Willamette Valley that they were here and that when they left my pencil disappeared, but that caused me but very little inconvenience as I soon procured another, but on my arrival home Mrs. Howlett presented me with a neat little shoe box neatly wrapped in a large sheet of costly paper and securely tied. Upon opening the package I found that the box contained a parcel that looked as though it might be a neck tie or a pair of fine gloves or something of a very rare nature, so taking off the next wrapper I found that there was still another so taking that off as carefully as I could with my trembling hands found still another wrapper and on removing that, lo and behold, I was presented with a neat folding lead pencil, but it came too late for me to write a big boost for the Bill Hanley club before the election so I give it now as it is never too late to do good. Many thanks to the ladies.
    Among others whose names I found in the register were Mr. and Mrs. Herrin, Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Sample, Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Schell, Wellen, Mrs. Etta C. Wharton, Laurel Hill, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Reed and son, Wellen.
    I also found when I reached home the money to pay for the renewal of A. B. Clarno's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, and also the cash for a three month's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune for Hamilton Watkins, both of Eagle Point. Mr. Watkins is engaged in selling aluminum ware and was greatly disappointed on his arrival in town to learn that his goods had been delayed on the way.
    I also learned that the Eagle Point Sunday school had had a grand rally on Wednesday the 25th inst. and a picnic dinner. [And] that Mr. John Fisher, who has a homestead on Indian Creek, had had the misfortune to have his arm broken by the kick of a horse, Dr. Wm. P. Holt was called and reduced the fracture.
    Well here I am on my fifth sheet and have not said a word about what I saw in Portland, Forest Grove, etc. On Wednesday the 28th I took the electric car out of Portland for Forest Grove and I was much surprised to find so much land that is still uncultivated, for there are acres of as fine land as anyone could wish to see that is still covered with brush and undergrowth, although the heavy timber as a rule has been taken off and utilized for fuel. Another thing that I noticed was the scarcity of orchards. They say up there, especially in the north end of the valley, that they have not gone crazy on the fruit question as we have down south, but the country shows that it is in a prosperous condition, for the farmers generally have good substantial houses and barns and in most places have the silos and almost all of them keep what cows and pigs they can on the farm and consequently are able to keep their store bills paid up. But I intended to speak more particularly of the city of Forest Grove. It is situated in the midst of a thriving farming community and the houses as a rule are neat and well kept. The business houses seem to be in a very prosperous condition and there is but little complaint of hard times. The principal attraction is the Forest Grove College; the building is quite large and built of stone and brick with a cement basement. They have about 135 in the college proper and about 350 in all, including the musical department, and the citizens claim to have one of the cleanest towns on the coast. But I see that I am getting this letter too long so will stop for the present.
    After writing the foregoing my attention was called to a lot of extra fine apples that had been presented by F. M. Corlies, foreman on the Alta Vista orchard. They are as fine a lot of apples as anyone could wish to see and demonstrates the fact that Southern Oregon can and does produce as good and nice-looking fruit as can be found in any part of the coast. Thanks to Mr. Corlies for the favor.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 5, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry O. Childreth, one of our leading citizens as well as one of our blacksmiths, has moved to Freewater, Ore., he having sold out his interest in the shop here to his partner, as well as his brother, W. L. Childreth, and bought out a shoeing shop at the above-named place. His family followed him last Tuesday. He was a member of the town council and he and his wife were members of the Baptist church of this place, and it will be some time before the vacancy will be filled.
    Mrs. J. B. Jackson, who went to Yakima, Wash., about the first of September to superintend the packing of the fruit on a large orchard, returned to her family while I was gone up north.
    Died, Nov. 2, 1914, Mrs. May Jane Spencer, aged 40 years and 23 days. She was married to J. E. Spencer Sept. 10, 1911. She leaves a husband, son, father, four brothers and one sister to battle with the trials of life.
    Thomas Ladd and wife were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Thursday for dinner. Mr. Ladd is a part owner of what is known as the McDonald place on Rogue River near the mouth of Elk Creek, formerly owned by Reuben and Jeff Johnson. They were on their way to Medford.
    Thursday night Mr. Wallace Cushman of Trail, and Mr. P. E. Sandoz, also of Trail P.O., but who owns the old A. J. Daley farm on Elk Creek, was here at the same time. He was on his way to Nebraska to look after his land interests in that section.
    G. W. Wamsley of Eagle Point and Ed White of Ashland were at the Sunnyside for dinner Friday. Mr. White is a member of the Ashland band and handles the big bass drum. He is one of the old vets of the Civil War.
    Mrs. Minnie Bryant, Miss Dottie Harnish, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Knighton, Mrs. Howlett and our daughter Hattie went up to Grants Pass last Thursday to attend a meeting of the district convention of the Rebekahs. Mrs. Howlett and Hattie report that they had a very pleasant time and that there was about one hundred and fifty members present. Mr. and Mrs. Knighton are not members, but went to take Miss Harnish and Mrs. Howlett and Hattie, and to visit their niece, Mrs. Skillman.
    Our town council met last Tuesday evening and filled the vacancies caused by the resignation of Art Nichols and Henry O. Childreth, who have moved away. They appointed G. W. Wamsley and James Jordan to fill the vacancies. They also made out the town budget, fixing the levy at 11 mills. Roy Ashpole tendered his resignation as town treasurer but the council could not act until his books had been gone over and passed on by the auditing committee. They also took steps to have the notices posted calling for a town election in December to elect new councilmen, etc.
    Well, our election is over and we are trying to settle down to normal state again, but there is quite an element that are so jubilant over the returns all over the coast on the wet and dry question that it is hard work for them to quiet down.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 9, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Robert Lewis of Persist was to Central Point after supplies this week.
    Grandpa Walker and daughter visited John Walker and family a few days ago.
    Election day passed quietly and the voters went to Trail, Antioch and Eagle Point to vote. Only part of the women appeared at the polls.
    W. W. Willits and son of Persist took some fine beeves to Medford Tuesday.
    Tim Daily and wife came out to spend the winter with her father, J. C. Hannah, and family.
    Frank Zuccala and Frank Messina have rented 100 acres of Mr. Russell of Beagle. Frank Messina has moved out from Medford to the farm.
    Mr. Sandoz of Elk Creek started Thursday for Nebraska on a business trip.
    Claude Moore has gone to New York for a visit.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Fry were Central Point visitors Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller and Miss Ora Raimey came out from Central Point Sunday and spent the day with Mr. and Mrs. J. Hannah.
    Mrs. Jane Smith Spencer died November 2 and was buried Thursday afternoon in the Smith cemetery. She was born on the old Smith place and has spent almost her entire life near Eagle Point. She has been sick for two years and all that could be done was to try to relieve her suffering, which even death did not take the traces from her face. She leaves a husband, Ed Spencer, a son, Mike Wooley, and aged father, Dave Smith, several brothers and friends to mourn her loss. A large crowd followed her to her last resting place. There were a great many handsome floral pieces. Rev. Simmons of Eagle Point conducted funeral services at the grave.
    Mr. Fisher, who is nearly 80 years of age, was leading young horses to water Sunday morning when the horse began to prance and play, jerking Mr. Fisher to the ground and broke one bone in his forearm and another dislocated. Dr. Holt was called and dressed the fractures.
    Fred Bellows brought out his children from Medford to his brother Eugene's Sunday. Monday Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Bellows took the children to Harry Howard's to make an indefinite stay.
    T. C. Gaines and wife returned from Medford Friday.
    Mr. Wyant went to Ashland Saturday.
    Charles Skyrman returned home Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tom Raimey went to Central Point Saturday.
    Jasper Hannah is on the sick list.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 9, 1914, page 5


A Camping Expedition
    Three years ago last September two friends and myself went out on a camping expedition. Our intentions were to be gone about a week.
    Early one Monday morning we started on our 30-mile journey, each carrying a gun or a fishing pole. We took a pack horse along with us to carry our tent, bedding, grubstake and other miscellaneous notions. After keeping up a steady walk like we did, one can imagine how we felt when night overtook us.
    It was almost dark when we pitched camp, and it was just good daylight when we started on our way next morning.
    We arrived at our destination about 2 o'clock in the afternoon. But before we got there we noticed that it was getting awful smoky. We discussed the matter and decided that it was a homesteader clearing up his farm so we never thought anything more about it until that night after we had pitched camp and were eating supper when a forest ranger rode into our camp and reported that a bad fire had broken out, about three miles from our camp. He wound up his story by wanting to know if he could get us to fight fire for a few days. We all looked at one another for a few seconds, which seemed to me like an hour, but finally one of the boys said, "I guess so," and then I felt better.
    The ranger rode away saying that he would be back for us early in the morning.
    We did not like that very well, for we knew that there were plenty of men besides us in the neighborhood that would like to get the job. We realized that if we stayed our food supply would be exhausted when the fire was put out, so next morning by daylight we were on our way in search of a new camping place out of that part of the country.
By REED CHARLEY,
    Ninth Grade Butte Creek School.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 11, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Benj. Brophy was in our town last Saturday.
    Fred Pelouze, one of our progressive farmers, was in town after a load of commercial fertilizer. He tried the compound on his alfalfa last season and found that his yield was about doubled. I noticed that quite a number of our farmers are hauling it out to put on the land, and they expect fine crops next year as the result. While the soil in these parts is generally good, the reader must remember that a great deal of the land has been in cultivation for the past thirty to fifty years, and in many instances no rotation of crops, but instead it would be planted to wheat or oats and the product cut for hay, and then perhaps left to volunteer and again cut for hay, so that about all of the substance of the soil is extracted and nothing put back. And in many instances the old-fashioned farmers would throw the manure out of the stable and let it stand there until it would rot away [on] the side of the building instead of putting some of it back onto the land, and the result is that considerable many of the farms need rest and rebuilding up. But with new men and new ideas that antiquated method is being done away with, and soon our soil will be restored to its original value.
    George M. Childreth of Medford, a brother of our blacksmith, came out and spent the day with his brother, W. L., and family.
    D. J. Singleton, who is a part owner with his sister and brother in the Singleton farm, was in town Saturday and I think took out a lot of fertilizing compound.
    E. R. Peterson, one of the rural school supervisors, was a guest with us last Saturday. He has been visiting the schools in the Big Butte country and was on his way to Brownsboro.
    Mr. and Mrs. Quackenbush were doing business with our merchants Saturday, and so was P. W. Haley, the Butte Creek bean raiser.
    Roy Willits, he who for four years had the contract for carrying the mail from here to Persist and a part of the time to Prospect, and during all that time never failed to deliver the mails, has just returned from a trip to Alaska. He reports that he had a very pleasant time, and saw a big country, as well as a fine ride on the Pacific. He reports that business up there is very dull; that while there may be occasionally a job that there are four men ready to take it; that the English capitalists have large investments in the copper mines; that when the European war broke out that they all shut down and left thousands of men out of employment. But he speaks in high terms of the country and thinks that in the course of two years that business will be so arranged that one can do well in that country; that this year they have raised a fine crop of potatoes, but there is no market for them, but he feels well satisfied with his trip and feels that it is money well invested.
    Miss Loretta Childreth, who has been up in the Umatilla country, returned on the same car with Mr. Willits from Portland, although they neither knew that the other was on the car until they almost reached Medford.
    I understand that the moving picture show here last Saturday night was a fine exhibition and that those who enjoy such sport indulged in a social dance. Speaking of the moving picture shows brings up to my mind another thought, and that is the continual cry of hard times. While I was in Portland and would get tired walking around I would occasionally drop into one of these places, and almost always found the room well filled, and still the very ones who attend will comment that we have such hard times and that money is so scarce that it is hard to buy a postage stamp, and just stand around any of the theaters in Portland, and even in Medford, and see the crowds that go night after night, and then talk about hard times. It is all a mistake. There may be some that have hard times, but it is not of that class.
    Miss Eula Houston and a Miss White went out on the Eagle Point and Persist stage Monday for the William Houston farm, just below Trail, on the Rogue River. There was another lady on the stage, but I did not learn her name. Roy Willits also took passage on the stage with Mr. Trusty, the new contractor.
    Chauncey Florey, our county recorder-elect, was out Saturday night with his wife and daughter shaking hands with his Democratic friends who helped to elect him.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 1, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Monday, November 9, there was a company of about 35 or 40 assembled at the home of R. R. Minter for the purpose of having a poverty or poor man's party, and the arrangements had been made to award prizes to the ones whose outfit best represented the outcasts of the world. The costumes were made of almost every conceivable kind of material from old tattered garments to genuine sackcloth, for many were made of old burlap sacks and then patched with different kinds and colors of material. They played the different kinds of games that have been invented for the last century and have been handed down from one generation to another until late bed time and then dispersed, but not with empty stomachs, for they had a feast of good things served before the company dispersed. The first prize was awarded to Elma Robinson, and the lady's prize was awarded to Mrs. Jettie Clarno.
    There was quite a number of the young folks of our town went out. It is about four miles, and they report that they had a very pleasant time and that everybody seemed to be satisfied.
    There was a change in real estate took place while I was gone up north that I did not learn of in time for my last, so will give it now. Mr. J. D. Downey, who traded for the old Eagle Hotel property, had traded it to Mr. V. J. Palmer of Medford for a tract of 26 acres of land in the neighborhood of Phoenix.
    Miss Lottie Simmons of Santa Margarita, Cal., a niece of Mrs. G. W. Daley, is here visiting her aunt and uncle. Miss Lottie is a daughter of Edward Simmons, who was raised in this place and for some years was interested in mining around Gold Hill.
    Fred Dutton, one of our enterprising young men, has rented the old James Matney place and in making preparations for the winter has given me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune, as he wants to keep posted on the general affairs of the world, and while I was writing out a receipt for him Mr. George Phillips came and paid for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    G. W. Frey, wife and oldest son, George, of Lake Creek, called for dinner Wednesday and while here Mr. Frey paid me a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, so you see that the people are becoming more and more interested in good reading and so are subscribing and renewing their subscriptions to the leading newspaper in Southern Oregon.
    Another change that took place while I was gone was that Clay Cole, the engineer on the P.&E. railroad, has moved out from Medford and is keeping house in the part of the Nichols block formerly occupied by Art Nichols and family.
    Robert Neil, who owns a fine farm in the foothills up Little Butte, came out the first of the week and brought a fine lot of honey for one of our merchants, Fred L. Heath. It appears that those who are turning their attention to the bee industry are making a success of the undertaking and it looks to me as though it was an easy way to make money.
    There seems to be considerable building going on around here judging by the amount of lumber that is being taken away from the yard here; on Monday and Tuesday there was over 10,000 feet hauled out of here and Thursday morning I saw another load of about 2500 feet go out besides several small lots. T. W. Daley has been having a lot hauled up on Rogue River to build a summer resort where he and his friends can go and spend a few days fishing. Mr. Whitman, foreman of the W. Hart Hamilton farm, is building houses suitable to care for about 25 fine brood sows, and in fact business seems, since the depressing influence of the general election has passed, to be improving.
    F. J. Ayres, one of our well-to-do farmers, brought in 15 fine turkeys Thursday morning to our express and railroad agent, Mr. Newport, and G. A. Pech and his cousin Fritz Pech brought in a lot of chickens for the same party.
    Carl Jackson and D. C. Brophy came in Thursday morning. Carl remained here to visit his parents, but Mr. Brophy went on to Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 14, 1914, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    A. R. Chase, rural school supervisor for district No. 3, made a visit to the Butte Creek school last Friday.
    D. W. Myers was in Eagle Point on business last Friday.
    Thomas Stanley has been graveling the road near the Butte Creek school last week. The members of his crew were Dean Terrill, Mike Conley, Clay Barker, Reed Charley and Claus Charley.
    Tom Kinney of Lake Creek is building a new house. He has several men assisting in the work.
    The people of South Butte gave Lee Farlow a surprise party Saturday night, November 7. About thirty-five of his neighbors were present.
    William Stanley of Brownsboro has been very ill for the past few days, but is now recovering.
    Dean Terrill, a resident of South Butte, was in Brownsboro visiting his mother last week.
    Mr. and Mr. C. E. Terrill were in Medford upon business last week.
    Carl Stanley is building a new house. He has it nearly finished and is rushing the work right along.
    Carl Drsek, one of our progressive homesteaders, has entered the Butte Creek school. He will take up some of the studies of the eighth and ninth grade.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 16, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Minnus Pence and babies of Central Point returned home Wednesday from a visit with her mother, Mrs. Middlebusher.
    Wallace Cushman took up a load of furniture Thursday.
    Tim Daily is building a neat little house.
    Mrs. Harry Merriman spent a week with relatives in Medford.
    Eugene Bellows was a business visitor to Medford Wednesday.
    Several members of the I.O.O.F. of Eagle Point visited Jasper Hannah this week.
    Jasper Hannah is somewhat better, we are glad to say. Mrs. Miller and Miss Ora Raimey came out from Central Point to help their sister, Mrs. Hannah, care for him. Dr. Chisholm of Gold Hill came out for a consultation Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Houston and Grandpa Houston spent Sunday with Jasper Roger and wife. Grandpa remained for a visit.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 16, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Humphrey, formerly a merchant at the Derby station, was a visitor in our town last week, also Mrs. Charles Pruett and her daughter Miss Mabel, were shopping here. Pete Stowell and his little son, Mrs. Sam Coy and Miss Dottie Harnish were doing some shopping among our merchants.
    Oliver Gaines of Trail came out the last of the week on business.
    The report came in last week that the coyotes had been among a band of sheep on the desert north of here and succeeded in killing three of them.
    Wm. Winkle was in Saturday having some blacksmith work done.
    Last Thursday night the lodge of the I.O.O.F. met at their usual time and after the regular routine of business was gone through had another big feed and invited in the Rebekahs to participate with them. Judging from the time the folks from the Sunnyside reached home they must have had an extra fine time. One of the leading dishes was oyster soup, made on the old-fashioned plan with good cows' milk.
    A. L. Young, representing Rasmussen & Co., paint and oil dealers of Portland, called on the von der Hellen Bros. hardware company on Friday and took dinner with George von der Hellen and family at the Sunnyside. And at the same time W. A. Cornitius, district representative of Stine & Hendrick of San Francisco, and Clarence Pierce of Medford were here for dinner. They had come out to look over a tract of land near our town and they had just got through with dinner when Dr. C. F. Hodge of the University of Oregon arrived. He had come to fill the place of Professor Reddy, who was to deliver an address to the school children and the Parent-Teachers Association of this place, and after eating his dinner we went to the school house and during the time we had to wait for the exercise at 2 o'clock we visited Prof. W. E. Buchanan's room and heard his class in grammar and in ancient history, and at 2 o'clock the house was called to order by Mrs. Gertrude Hawk, the president of the Parent-Teachers Association, and after attending to some routine business the following committees were appointed. Program committee, Mrs. Nellie Simmons, Mrs. E. S. Wolfer and Prof. W. E. Buchanan.
    Visiting committee, Mrs. Minnie Bryant, Mrs. W. E. Buchanan, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and Mrs. George von der Hellen.
    Advertising committee, Floyd Pearce.
    Committee on constitution and bylaws, the executive committee and chairmen of the other committees.
    The Parent-Teachers Association abridged their program as much as possible so as to give Dr. Hodge all the time they could for his talk. Dr. Hodge was introduced and after explaining why he was there in the place of Professor Reddy he gave us a fine talk on the subject of Birds and Gardens, but before he fairly reached this subject proper he called the attention of the children, and the older ones as well, to the necessity of knowing how to do a thing and illustrated the thought by telling us that there is annually a waste of millions of dollars in our country simply because we don't know how to prevent it, or rather do not use the means at hand to prevent the loss, and then began to tell about the advantage there is by saving the birds, telling us how they destroy the various insects that infest our gardens and orchards, and in this connection showed us how our great institutions of learning were developing plans to destroy the various pests by preserving the little birds. He then told of the possibilities of the vegetable kingdom how by using the proper means we are making our soil produce two blades of grass where before only one grew and how a boy 14 years old made one hill of potatoes to yield 42 pounds of spuds by using the proper fertilizers and a systematic treatment. He spoke for about an hour and seemed to have the attention of even the small children as well as the adults. Professor Peterson, one of the rural supervisors, was with us at the time but did not give us a talk but the next time will expect him to give us some points on raising cane and spuds.
    Arrangements are being made to have another lecture between now and the holidays and have it delivered in the opera house and have it illustrated on the canvas.
    C. B. Holt, a brother of our Dr. Holt, and family of Portland are here visiting the doctor and family.
    Arrangements are made to have an entertainment Tuesday night, November 24, given by the school, at the opera house and a small admission fee will be charged to raise the money to provide those who are taking manual training with some of the necessary outfit, like a grindstone, bench, vise and other things for general use, as the boys will be expected to furnish their own tools. Let everybody turn out and help along the good cause.
    J. O. Grey, representing Gaddis & Dixon, Page wire fence men, and Ed White of Climax were with us Saturday night. Mr. White came out after a load of wire fencing. R. A. Pech of Lake Creek was also there the night.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1914, page 6


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Last Tuesday afternoon D. W. Myers was driving a span of colts to a buggy when they became frightened at a bicycle and ran away. Nobody was seriously injured although the buggy was turned over and the tongue broken out.
    There is going to be an entertainment at the Lake Creek school house November 27.
    Louis Hestler has been very ill for some time.
    The people of South Butte have built a large barn near their school house and dance hall. The barn has enough stable room to accommodate about 30 horses.
    Miss Nellie Cole of Medford is visiting friends on South Butte.
    There will be no school at Lake Creek Friday on account they are going to erect a Waterbury heating and ventilating system.
    Mrs. George Smith of Wellen, who has been very ill, is on the road to recovery.
    John Walsh of South Butte has recently had a phone put in his house.
    George Nichols and Lee Bradshaw have gone back to the mountains to look after their cattle.
    John Walsh and Henry Tonn have been on a big bear hunt in which John lost one of his fine dogs.
    Chas. Terrill and son Glenn went up to their mountain home on North Butte Creek last Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my last that Mr. and Mrs. W. F. DeWitt of Ashland were here with his cousin and family, Mr. and Mrs. Albert E. Walker, and their daughter, Miss Sarah Emma Walker, of Redding, Cal., and Uncle John McAllister of Lake Creek, last Monday. Mr. Walker and family came up to visit Mr. DeWitt of Ashland and started to motor up to Mr. McAllister's on the north fork of Little Butte, but found that the road just above Brownsboro had been recently graveled, so phoned to him to meet them at Brownsboro, and thus they all met and took dinner together at the Sunnyside. The visitors were delighted with the Rogue River Valley.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Carpenter of Medford came out Tuesday and was met at the depot by W. H. Crandall, and motored out to his home farm, where they spent a few days very pleasantly with Mr. C. and his sisters.
    G. W. McAllister of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. and was met at the depot by Dr. W. W. P. Holt with his auto and taken to the Sunnyside for medical treatment. His trouble seems to be an old chronic complaint of the kidneys. He was able to return home again Thursday morning.
    Game warden Hubbard and two other men came out Tuesday and brought three contrivances to be placed in an irrigation ditch to prevent the fish from going into the ditch and being washed out onto the land, to place them in a ditch here as an experiment and for the owners of the different ditches to select the kind they prefer to buy to put in their ditch.
    H. C. Barker of Brownsboro was in town the first of the week, and while here gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and William Newstrom was also here and renewed his mother's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Senator H. von der Hellen was in town receiving congratulations from his many friends over his success in the late election.
    Joe and Hunter Stickel of Gold Hill were here the past week visiting Joe's daughter, Mrs. Jacob Jonas.
    J. M. Corlies, foreman on the Alta Vista orchard, was in town Wednesday and reports that they have all of their Spitzenberg apples packed and shipped and are ready to begin on their Newtowns. They had a fine lot of fruit this year and no irrigation.
    Quite a number of the members of the I.O.O.F. lodge here made a visit to Jasper Hannah, who is on the sick list.
    J. P. Feaster of Weed, Cal., was here this week trying to organize a class in penmanship.
    Last Wednesday the Ladies' Foreign Missionary Society met at the home of Mrs. Frank Nichols and had one of those pleasant times that are so common in Eagle Point. There were fourteen of the members present. The exercises were opened by reading a scripture lesson, singing and prayer, and after a few preliminaries were gone through, Mrs. George von der Hellen, our primary teacher, was introduced, and she gave an account of her experience in the Philippine Islands as a teacher among the natives and a short account of the missionary work in that field. She said that they had to travel for five days into the interior and during the trip encountered some of the most gruesome sights imaginable, among which was a company of head hunters that were in search of their victims. She said that the schools were divided and that the pupils were taught as far as the fourth grade in the primary department and then they were turned over to her department. She gave a brief account of the work of the missionaries in that country, stating that the most of them were of the Catholic faith, but that they were doing good work among them.
    Light refreshments were served and a charge of 10 cents was made, the money going into the foreign missionary fund, which amounted to $1.90.
    Mrs. J. W. Grover and her daughter, Verta, favored them with a song and Miss Loretta Childreth entertained them by asking questions and having those present answer by a quotation from the Bible.
    Those who were there report that they had a very fine time and that Mrs. von der Hellen's talk was extra fine. I was unable to attend, so had to get my points from someone else, and consequently the account is very meager.
    Thomas Vestal, foreman on the Wilfley orchard, has been shipping quite a lot of fine dressed turkeys to the Portland market.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 23, 1914, page 5


FISH SCREENS ON EXHIBIT, EAGLE POINT
    Game Warden Hubbard has installed in the Eagle Point ditch three varieties of fish screens, so that ditch owners may observe their operation and select the type they think best adapted to their own ditches to keep trout and salmon fry out of the conduits.
    The screens installed are the Aitken screen, the invention of Jack Aitken of Medford; the Forward screen, officially adopted in California, and the Bernard Schuler screen, an Eastern Oregon invention. Representatives of each screen will be present to explain operations next Saturday, and all farmers of that vicinity are asked to be on hand.
    Following the exhibit at Eagle Point, a similar exhibit will be made in the Applegate section, and later in other districts of the county, as all irrigation ditches must be screened as soon as possible.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 25, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. E. Ash, one of the Trail merchants and hotel keepers, and Mrs. Mark Applegate were at the Sunnyside for dinner last Friday. Mr. Ash tells me that he is engaged in hauling out quartz from the Buzzard mine for shipment and that the rock is sampling very well. Mrs. Applegate was on her way with her little daughter up to the mines to spend a while with her husband, who is the foreman of the mine.
    E. S. Wolfer has rented his farm just above town to a man by the name of Hart and has moved his household goods to his father-in-law's, James Jordan, place, and he expects to start for Iowa in the near future but his family will not go for some time. He has an offer of a situation as a plumber and thinks that he will be able to improve his financial situation by the change.
    W. H. Crandall was among our business men last week and he also passed through here with Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Carpenter of Medford. They had been out to Mr. Crandall's to spent a few days and while there were looking over an orchard belonging to his brother, Judge Carpenter's estate.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our prosperous farmers and stock men, was delivering wood to C. W. Clements Friday and Friday night took in the moving picture show and dance. On Saturday night, November 13, the company gave a moving picture show but something went wrong with the machine so they advertised to give a free show and dance last Saturday night, but I was unable to attend although I did attend the show the Saturday night before and what they exhibited before the machine got crossways was very good. They seem to be doing quite well and furnish amusement for the young folks.
    R. L. Hillsey and Thomas Kenny of Lake Creek and Mr. Hughes, one of the Butte Falls merchants, was with us Friday night.
    Mr. Robinson and a young man by the name of Wellen of Derby were here Saturday night.
    Last Saturday Walter Wood shipped 98 head of porkers that Pete and Pearl Stowell had been feeding for Mr. Burdic and Wood. The 98 pigs weighed 20,362 pounds and the Stowell brothers had put on about one-half that amount with about 600 bushels of corn and sold their part at seven cents per pound to the owners of the swine.
    Died, at the family residence near Brownsboro, Nov. 20, 1914, Mr. Lewis John Hessler, aged 66 years, 5 months and 4 days. The deceased was a native of Austria and came to this country in his infancy. Came to Oregon in '98 and has lived on Butte Creek the most of the time since his arrival. He was married to Mrs. Sarah Jane Wright in 1907. He leaves a wife, a niece and nephew in Ohio and a nephew in California and a host of friends in the Butte Creek country. The remains were interred in the Brownsboro cemetery on Sunday afternoon. The religious services were conducted by Rev. L. L. Simmons.
    Mrs. John Edsall of Phoenix came over last Saturday to see her son Jud.
    B. H. Bryant, who has been engaged in building a school house near McCloud, has finished his job and returned to his home last week.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 27, 1914, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. E. Butler, who bought the Benton Bowers place on Butte Creek, just above town, has opened a meat market, delivering to his patrons as they want it, and in quantities to suit the purchaser, was delivering meat in our town last Monday.
    Last Sunday morning I made a trip to Tolo, where I met Rev. M. C. Davis and attended Sunday school and preaching. He has recovered his health and is able to do his regular work again. I noticed all along the route the farmers were improving the fine weather and putting in their crops and getting ready for winter. While I was in the neighborhood of Tolo I spent the night with my old friends, Mr. and Mrs. E. H. Davis, who have charge of the Ray farm, and while there Mrs. D. presented me with three mammoth apples, the largest measuring fourteen inches in circumference, that were raised on dry ground, that is, it was not irrigated.
    Monday evening, Rev L. L. Simmons joined in wedlock Carl W. Jackson, son of our esteemed townsman, and Miss Lola Chambers of Butte Falls, and on Tuesday evening some of our young folks indulged in an old-fashioned charivari at the home of the groom's parents.
    Benjamin Brophy and A. W. Silsby of Ashland were guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday for dinner. Mr. Silsby had been out to Mr. Brophy's farm and came in for Mr. S. to take the train for Medford.
    On Monday, the 23rd instant, our school gave an entertainment for the purpose of raising funds to purchase some of the necessary outfit for their manual training. There was a very fine turnout, although the meeting was advertised for Tuesday night, but it was found that the opera house was engaged for the night, so they decided to have the entertainment Monday night. The receipts of the evening was $19.90. I would be glad to be able to give a detailed account of the whole affair, but am afraid the editor would think that I was devoting too much space for it, so will simply say that they all did their parts remarkably well, from the little tots who sang their little dolls to sleep to the more advanced pupils. But there was one play rendered by the larger pupils that reflects on them and on their teacher and that was "Jack's Visitors, or the Schoolboy's Dream." The leading character, Jack Owen, was represented by Theodore Florey, representing the boy that don't like history, and he filled his position all O.K., and the other characters were represented by Freda Lebo as Mrs. Owen, in which they two, Jack and his mother, carried on a lively dialogue showing the importance of the study of history, and then Carl Quackenbush, representing Columbus; Carl Natwick representing Sir Walter Raleigh; Bernice Simmons representing Pocahontas--she was dressed so much like an Indian that it was hard to tell the difference; then came Miss Roberta Pearce, tall and slender, representing Priscilla; then Laurence Luy, who represented Washington; then Miss Thelma Nichols, as Captain Molly McGuire. Abraham Lincoln was represented by Walter Painter, a very tall, slim youth that might well be taken for him if he was living, and John Butler filled the place of Hobson; then came the representative of the Red Cross, by Miss Mida McIntosh, and Ethel Riley filled the place of Columbia and Thos. Berry and Harry Leeves represented two soldiers, and it seemed as though each one tried to outdo the other. And then at the close of this play the different characters in their costumes appeared in pantomime, and this was followed by an exhibition of an old-time school that simply brought down the house. It is the opinion here that it was as good as any that we have ever had in our town, whether by professionals or by amateurs.
    Walter Wood took a carload of swine to the Portland market Tuesday.
    Frank Nichols shipped two carloads of apples to the London (England) market Thursday.
    Mrs. George von der Hellen gave the children in the primary department of our school a treat of sweet cider and fried doughnuts last Wednesday.
    W. P. Holbrook, who has a place just below town, near the mouth of Little Butte Creek, was in town last Wednesday afternoon.
    The many friends of Fred Heath are glad to see him among us again. He has been off all summer and fall with a surveying party in the Siskiyou Mountains, taking practical lessons in surveying.
    D. A. Sheibley, father of Mrs. L. L. Simmons, came in on the car Wednesday from Eastern Washington. He expects to make his home with Rev. Simmons and family.
    Will tell about Thanksgiving day next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    The people attended the dances at Trail, Godfrey's hall and Eagle Point and the parties at Elk Creek and Tom Vestal's. All were well attended and everyone reports having a good time.
    Steve Smith of Medford was a pleasant caller at the French ranch Sunday.
    Bennie Bellows was thrown from a horse Tuesday morning and cut a gash in his head in which Dr. Holt took two stitches to close the wound. He is doing nicely now.
    Mr. Zimmerman and family have moved to Derby from the Veightes' ranch.
    Harry Howard bought a team of horses from S. H. Harnish of Eagle Point.
    Frank Zuccala returned from the valley Friday.
    The autos have had an unusually long time this fall to spin over the mountain roads. The rains began Friday.
    We are glad to see Jasper Hannah able to be about again.
    Miss Martha Gage is on the sick list.
    Misses Hildreth and Mabel Foster were the guests of Miss Cora French Saturday.
    John Nealon and sister Miss Rose spent Thanksgiving with home folks at Table Rock.
    Perry Foster was a recent Central Point visitor.
    T. C. Gaines was a Medford visitor a few days ago.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our Thanksgiving day passed off very pleasantly and some of our citizens had the regulation turkey dinner and in most cases invited in their near friends to partake of the good things together. The most of the places of business were closed after the morning hours so that everything on the street put on the sober appearance of a blue Sunday instead of a day of thankfulness for past blessings. There was quite a number that went to the different hotels for dinner and among the guests at the Sunnyside for dinner were Mr. W. L. Childreth and family consisting of Miss Loretta, Miss Nora, Heath, Arrille and Graydon, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pearce and daughter and son Roberta and Ansel. George W. and Miss Mabel Wamsley, James Ringer, and Miss Mida McIntosh, and later Mr. Sidley and his sister, Miss Julia; the last two came from Lake Creek to attend the dance that was given Thursday night. The dance was well attended and I heard Miss Loraine Grigsby remark that the crowd was so dense that when one person would get off of her feet that another would step on her and that it was impossible to waltz in the room.
    During the past week George W. Daley has re-roofed his dwelling house. He did the work himself.
    S. P. Hammon of Trail brought his wife and three children out to have his wife treated by our doctor, but on consultation with one of the Medford doctors it was thought best to have her taken to the hospital in Medford. They were accompanied from Trail by Mrs. Hammon's father, Mr. E. O. Daggett of Davis, Cal.
    Last Friday night some of the citizens of our town met at George Daley's store and selected Messrs. Norman McQuoid, George Phillips and Charles S. Painter to go on the citizens ticket for councilmen. The same night the Parent-Teachers Association met at the school house and Mrs. L. K. Hawk presided and after the opening song, "The Old Folks at Home," Prof. W. E. Buchanan was called on to open the discussion of the subject, the best methods to promote sanitation in our schools. Dr. W. W. P. Holt was booked to open the discussion but as it was just the moment for the opening when he arrived the president asked Dr. Buchanan to open it while Dr. Holt was getting his breath.
    Dr. Buchanan spoke of several needed changes for the betterment of schools in that line and among them was the individual drinking cup. He declared that that was a failure as there was no suitable place for the children to put them. He spoke of the strips along the blackboards, but they are covered with dust. If they were put in the desk they were continually being pulled out and then they would generally roll across the room and create a disturbance and the cup would accumulate a lot of dust, etc., so he recommended the use of drinking fountains where it was practicable. Then Dr. Holt gave us a fine lecture on the subject touching on the different phases of the subject including the drinking cup, towels, playground toilets, etc. His talk was very interesting and instructive. After he was through Miss Minnie Taylor, our intermediate teacher, was called on to give a talk on her experience teaching in Mexico and she responded with an account of what she saw and heard in that semi-barbarous country. Then Mrs. George von der Hellen, our primary teacher, was called on to give some of her experiences in the Philippine Islands and in responding gave us some nice points on the sanitation in schools in that far-off land. Then Rev. Simmons, the janitor, gave a short talk on the subject of drinking cups, etc.
    A short time ago I sent in an advertisement to the Mail Tribune for Mr. Quackenbush, calling for a lost dog, and almost as soon as the ad was in the Mail Tribune, the dog came home. He was very poor and had evidently been stolen and kept tied up but the party fearing the consequences of the theft turned him loose and let him come home--it pays to advertise in a live paper.
    Thomas Riley, Jr., and Carl Roberts came in from Fort Klamath last Saturday and took rooms at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock, who is teaching school in the Reese Creek district, spent Thanksgiving with her parents, returning Sunday, securing a rig at the stable of S. H. Harnish & Son to take her out to her boarding place, the pleasant home of F. J. Ayres. Speaking of Mr. Ayres, he, as his custom is, called on your correspondent and agent and renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune today, Monday.
    Mrs. Kee of Butte Falls is here visiting [her] daughter, Mrs. W. E. Buchanan.
    Robert Foley, he who roomed here about seven years ago and organized the Eagle Point brass band, came in Sunday evening and took a room with us again.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 2, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. W. E. Buchanan gave a dinner on Friday after Thanksgiving day to a few of her friends, among whom were the teachers in the intermediate and primary departments of our school, Miss Minnie Taylor, Mrs. George von der Hellen, Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hawk, Mrs. Buchanan's mother, Mrs. Kee of Butte Falls, and Mr. and Mrs. Simmons. I did not learn the menu, but am sure that it was fine, and a royal good time was enjoyed.
    George West and J. J. Summerville came out from Prospect the first of the week and George caught the train and went to Medford, but Mr. Summerfield spent the night at the Sunnyside. The same night Paul Opdyke of Trail and two of his neighbors and Mrs. M. B. Woodward of Medford were here with us on their way to Medford.
    B. L. Dodge of the Riverside ranch brought in two loads of porkers for C. Scully of Oakland, Cal.
    Mrs. W. A. Warren of Gold Hill is here visiting her cousin, Mrs. Jacob Jonas.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, is taking a change in his mode of living and is out in the hills gathering cattle with his father-in-law, John Rader. Mrs. Ashpole is keeping store while he is gone.
    G. W. Wamsley is engaged in building a house for J. Frank Brown, one of our merchants, on his place on Dry Creek, known as the Bieberstedt place. The house will be occupied by Fred Dutton when it is completed. Albert Clements is hauling the lumber from the Eagle Point lumber yard.
    In order to let the thousands of readers of the Mail Tribune know something of what we are doing in our school, I herewith give the roll of honor for the month of November. For the primary room, Lora Buchanan, Katrina Bryant, Gwendolyn Brophy, Loretta Trulove, Vera Eckenburg, Donald von der Hellen, Heath Childreth, Johnnie Phillips, Ansil Pearce, Dennie Trulove, Howard Vogeli and Arthur Howell. In the intermediate department, Miss Minnie Taylor's room, Joyce von der Hellen, Ruth Grover, Mamie Winkle, June Robinson, Buford Simmons, Lloyd Cingcade, Truman McLelland, Edgar Buchanan, Harold Van Scoy, Judge Florey, Benj. Ayres, Ellsworth Stowell, Lyle Van Scoy, Katie Buchanan, Nora Childreth, Helen Holt, Bessie Eckenburg, Ethel Winkle, Margaret Riley and Edner Barger. And those in the first or principal's room, Walter Painter, Thomas Barry, Stella Cox and Bernice Simmons. The last named list were perfect in attendance, recitation and deportment.
    E. W. Clayville of Medford was here this week looking over a piece of property with a view to buying it.
    During the past few days I have received two letters, one from Mary E. Hughes of Olney Springs, Colo., inquiring for land to homestead, rent, buy, etc., and the price of board in Eagle Point. She said that she saw in the Eaglets that I traveled and thought that I could help her in that line, and the other was from J. V. Bennett, Deer Lodge, Mont., and he was looking for a job, I thought a soft one, where he could have a salubrious climate, good soil and make and lay up some money. If any of the readers of the Mail Tribune can help them it will be appreciated.
    Thomas Riley is at this writing engaged in papering the Charles Bacon house, and James Ringer is papering some of the rooms in the Sunnyside Hotel.
    The family of A. W. Walker, who has been visiting Mrs. Walker's parents, started Thursday for their home in Gold Hill.
    A. J. Florey Jr., came in from Prospect Wednesday and reports a foot of snow at the sawmill.
    J. H. Ditsworth and his stepdaughter, Miss Lida Lytle, came Wednesday night and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and so did C. A. Newstrom and his daughter, Miss Marea, spent the night here.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 5, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Miss Ida Houston is having a siege of tonsilitis. She had to close her school last week.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows was the guest of Mrs. Brittsan Thursday.
    Mrs. Schuyler Hammond was operated upon last week in Medford and is in a serious condition. Mr. Hammond brought the children up to Trail Thursday, but he returned to Medford Friday to be near his wife.
    Thomas Raimey and Mrs. Jasper Hannah were in Medford and Central Point Thursday.
    A pie social was given at the Reese Creek school house Friday night. Gene Bellows was the auctioneer and won the cake for the homeliest man in the house. The proceeds, $32.65, will be used for the Christmas tree. Those who stayed at home missed lots of fun.
    Uncle Johnny Mathews died Saturday morning at his home on Elk Creek. He was an elderly man and everyone spoke well of him. He was buried at Trail Tuesday.
    At the election at Trail Saturday for road supervisor, Oliver Gaines received 42 votes to David Pence's 38. The stock association held their meeting in the afternoon. Mr. Thomason of Douglas County came through two feet of snow to attend it.
    Grandpa Houston returned from a visit with Mrs. Jasper Rogers Friday and spent a couple of days with his son Will before returning home.
    Harry Merriman went to Central Point Monday.
    Fred Bellows and Mr. Radford returned from Medford Sunday.
    Pearl Stowell spent a couple of days with Lloyd French recently.
    Lloyd French visited his grandfather Perry Foster this week.
    Miss Deihless was the all-night guest of Miss May French Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and Doris Richardson went to Central Point one day last week.
    Mrs. John Fry and Eula Houston went to Central Point Sunday.
    Charles Skyrman was a passenger on Saturday's stage.
    Ed Ash has built a blacksmith shop and is putting a roof over the porch to his store. He will give a hard time dance New Year.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 10, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Farlow and John Miller of Lake Creek were in town last Tuesday after two loads of wire fencing. Mr. Farlow has a mile of fence to make and Mr. Miller has three-eighths of a mile to make so that they can utilize their land, and when they want to keep their stock where they can see them whenever they desire to do so.
    George and Charles F. Shaffer, cousins of Bert Peachy, recently from Kansas, came up from Ashland the first of the week to meet Bert and his wife, who have just come in from their station in the hills. Mr. Peachy is one of the forest rangers and came in with his wife to make a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Daley, and the same day that they came in Mrs. Daley's sister, Mrs. Sophia Robinette, and her son Clarence came in from Oregon City, so they had a kind of a family reunion, and all unexpected, for Mrs. Daley was not looking for them.
    Scott Claspill of Butte Falls was here the first of the week having some blacksmith work done.
    Clyde Plymire of Medford, who has been spending some time in the hills with his stepfather, Charles Wilkinson, at the Dead Indian Soda Springs, came out last Tuesday and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner, and while here showed us some photos of some bears that he and Mr. Wilkinson had caught in traps. One of them was so large that they did not wait to play with him, as the trap did not have a very good hold on him. The bear seemed to be quite plentiful in that section.
    A family by the name of Edwards came in from Fort Klamath some time ago and stopped in our town, but last week they started for Colorado, where some of his relatives live. They seemed to be nice people, and some of us would like to have had them remain with us, but such is life in the West. "We do move."
    Our election passed off very quietly last Tuesday. There were but four candidates, and but little interest taken in it. Although there were some scattering votes, the result was that Frank Brown, one of our merchants, was re-elected, and the new members are Norman McQuoid and George Phillips.
    During the past week there has been a petition circulated to have Thomas Cingcade appointed a road supervisor of this district, with the understanding that the present incumbent, Ed Dutton, did not want the place again, but now Ed comes around and says that he never thought but that he would hold the place, as he has given such general satisfaction, so we may expect to have something doing when the county court meets. There may be another petition out for Ed, as there seems to be considerable dissatisfaction over the way the thing has been worked.
    Last Thursday night the Rebekahs Lodge had a poverty party, and none but the members of the lodge were admitted, and so I have to get my information the best way I can, but from what I can learn, they had a high old time and some of the costumes would put an ordinary street beggar to shame. Mrs. Varian Jones took the premium as being the best dressed (worst, I mean), for I heard a lady remark that she had on every rag that she could get on, and her shoes and stocking corresponded with her dress, and John Foster won the prize among the men, so the reader may well know that he was dressed some.
    W. M. McCane, recently from Lassen County, California, has taken a room at the Sunnyside. He gives a glowing description of a night view of the volcano that is now active in Mount Lassen, describing it as throwing the melted lava or fire 2000 feet high and the smoke settling down so thick that it made everything as black as night, but he says that it has to be seen to really appreciate the scenery.
    Miss Anna Keliohor of Medford and Miss Orbie Natwick came out on the P.&E. train Thursday morning and Miss Keliehor was met at the train by our postmistress, Mrs. C. W. Clements.
    Thursday night Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Clements and Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre gave a dance and lunch in the Eagle Point opera house, and those who attended report having had one of the times of their lives. W. E. Hammel, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen, was one of the party, and he reports that they had a very nice company, and of course a fine lunch.
    Swen Berquist, who has a farm in the Rogue River bottoms, and two strange young men were here for dinner Thursday.
    J. A. Howard, who has a homestead on the free ferry road, came out from Medford Thursday evening on the P.&E.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 12, 1914, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    The Brownsboro school will give an entertainment Friday evening, December 18. After the entertainment there will be a Christmas tree.
    Gus Nichols and wife made a business trip to Eagle Point last Tuesday.
    J. Miller and Frank Farlow went to Eagle Point last week and took two big loads of woven wire fencing back with them.
    Dean Terrill is gathering up his cattle and taking them up on South Butte where he will feed them this winter.
    Mrs. L. Hestler had a load of wheat shipped out to Eagle Point. Milo Conley went to Eagle Point and hauled it up for her.
    Bill Nickell went to Brownsboro last Thursday.
    A. Walker and Guy Jeeters made a business trip up to Tom Farlow's last week.
    Tom Farlow and wife went to Medford last week on business.
    There is some talk of having a field day at Lake Creek some time next spring.
    Frank Nygren returned home last Thursday from Butte Falls, where he had been riding after some of his cattle.
    M. F. Hanley made a business trip up to his mountain ranch last Thursday.
    Manley Conley of Lookout, Cal., was visiting his mother, Mrs. L. Hestler, last week.
    Mr. Willis McDonald went to Eagle Point last week and took back a load of water pipe.
    L. L. Loomis of Medford, who is agent for the Oregon Life Insurance Company, was on Butte Creek selling policies last week.
    D. W. Myers, who has been very ill, is now on the road to recovery.
    There will be a masquerade dance at the South Butte hall Christmas night.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Charley were in Medford last week.
    C. A. Newstrom and son Herman were out to the valley after grain last week.
    A. C. Howlett was on Butte Creek last week getting subscriptions for the Medford Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 14, 1914, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    The Daily brothers of Medford autoed out the first of the week and spent a few days shooting with their brother, Tim.
    John Nealon closed another term of school in the Central district Tuesday. Kathleen Peile and Edwin Newkirk were perfect in attendance during the term.
    Mrs. John Houston is on the sick list.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah spent several days of this week in Medford and Central Point.
    Gene Bellows has moved to the old Bellows house.
    Harry Howard was a Medford visitor Thursday.
    Clarence Middlebusher returned from the valley Friday.
    John Cox is quite sick and has had several doctors, but is still in a serious condition.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows spent a couple of days with Mrs. Pete Betz the first of the week.
    Mrs. Gage was in Gold Hill Thursday.
    Chris Bergman has been busy finishing up his house on both the inside and outside and has a neat house.
    The wind has dried the roads until they are in pretty good condition again.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 15, 1914, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday after I had mailed my letter to the Mail Tribune I started out to see what I could do in the way of collecting and soliciting for the paper. I had not gone far before I met Pete Betz and he paid me a year's subscription to the weekly, and in a short time I met J. A. Howard and he also paid for his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. I also met W. O. Wing, a friend of Mr. Howard. They two had just returned from a trip to Los Angeles, where they went to spend the winter, but they concluded that the weather was most too cold for them down there, so they came back to their old home in Jackson County, Oregon, where we have such a fine climate. They complained that the air there was so damp and raw just off the ocean that it seemed to penetrate almost to the bones, and in that section they have no way to keep warm, unless it was to go to bed, as a heater is seldom seen unless it is in some of the large hotels, and there they expect those who derive benefit from their heaters to board with them and pay from $4 to $8 a day, so they thought it best to come home and enjoy our Southern Oregon climate. They also report that they roomed just across the street from the police station and that is was almost an hourly occurrence to see the police bring in someone for robbery, as there was such a crowd of unemployed, and they had reached such a serious condition that they would hold a person up in broad daylight and rob him. They don't want any Los Angeles in theirs. Well, after I had had my interview with Messrs. Howard and Wing I started out to see what I could do in a business way up Butte Creek. So, starting out the first man I met was N. Gorman. He is the foreman on the Laidlaw orchard and was busy trimming the fruit trees and getting them ready for a big crop of fruit next season, but I did no business with him, but will later. Passing on, I passed the Pelouze farm, but did not stop, as he is one of the "paid-up subscribers." The next move was for the Barker dairy farm, one mile above Brownsboro. Mr. B. has a number of hands employed clearing land and getting it ready to sow to alfalfa, but I found no one at home, so went on up to the Charlie Terrill farm, where I found him out in the field plowing, and after paying me a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and having a pleasant visit with him, he called my attention to the character of the soil he was plowing. It was a regular black loam and the stubble that was still on the ground stood about a foot high and as thick as it well could be. I don't wonder that he took the blue ribbon on his oats at the county fair, for the ground looked as though it would produce anything that would be planted in it.
    Leaving him, I turned my course down the creek again so as to stop and see a lady subscriber who lived on the Brownsboro-Medford road, but was fortunate enough to pass her on the road, but she said that she could not pay anything until after the holidays, so passing on down to the Geo. Stevens farm to see H. H. Lord, I met him in the road and he told me that he would come over and pay the next day, and so he did. Well, in my round I saw some improvements in the line of repairing buildings, fences, etc., and that the farmers had done a lot of plowing this fall and had considerable grain sowed. In my rounds that day I also met John Cooper of Trail and found he was one of the paid-up subscribers to the M.M.T.
    Last week G. H. Wamsley finished the house he was building for Frank Brown and Fred Dutton, who has the place rented, gave a dance for the young folks, and the report comes that they had one of the pleasantest times of their lives. But if all signs don't fail, I predict that there will be another housewarming there in less than--well, I won't set the time when all of his friends will join in congratulations.
    S. M. Clevenger of Butte Falls and J. E. Peyton of Peyton spent the night with us Friday, and Mr. Clevenger went to Medford and bought a fine cow and took [her] home with him.
    Henry French and Hamilton Watkins were doing business here last week.
    Jack Florey, son of our ex-postmaster, has gone to Seattle, Wash.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons baptized Mrs. Jettie Clarno in Butte Creek last Sunday.
    Last Sunday Misses Orbie Natwick and Catherine Deuel of Medford were the guests of our daughter, Hattie.
    Last Sunday by a vote of the Baptist church of this place it was decided to have Rev. Douglass of Grants Pass hold a series of meetings here after the holidays.
    Joe Riley was here Monday morning on business and ordered the Weekly Mail Tribune for his son, J. M. Riley.
    The Parent-Teachers Association met in the principal's room in the school Friday night and had a general discussion of the various topics pertaining to the school. There were quite a number of speakers and the time was prolonged past the allotted hour. As I had been out riding that day for the Mail Tribune, I denied myself the pleasure of attending, but understand that there were several speeches made and quite a lively time had.
    The arrangement has been made to have an entertainment next Friday night, the 18th, in the opera house under the auspices of the Parent-Teachers Association, when we will have dramatic reading by Miss Creepman and vocal and instrumental music by Miss Briggs. Let everybody turn out and enjoy a good social time.
    Also it is announced that Professor Riddle of the state university extension service will give a dramatic reading in the opera house under the auspices of the Parent-Teachers Association on Monday evening, December 21, free, and the patrons of the surrounding schools are cordially invited to come in and enjoy the treat. He will render "The Blue Bird."
    Thomas W. Marsh of Medford is here at this writing. He is associated with the produce association and is trying to work up an interest in the sugar beet industry. He seems to be quite optimistic on the subject.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 16, 1914, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Thompson Bros. of Lake Creek have prepared for Santa Claus by getting in a supply of Xmas goods.
    Eddie Meyer, Tom Abbott, Miss Marie Newstrom, Miss Alma Gould, Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer, Jr., and Arden Tyrrell of Lake Creek attended a dance and motion picture show at Eagle Point last Saturday night.
    William Nickel of Lake Creek went to Medford last Tuesday.
    Master Vernon Meyer of Lake Creek went to Medford last Tuesday to visit his mother, who is in the Sacred Heart Hospital.
    Glenn Terrill is absent from school this week, helping his parents.
    The stockmen of this neighborhood are busy gathering their cattle.
    O. B. Lockwood and his father-in-law, Mr. VanDorfer of Medford, were in the mountains gathering cattle last week.
    L. C. Charley and son, Reed, were doing business in Eagle Point last Saturday.
    Thomas Kinney of Lake Creek has his new house completed. The people of South Butte gave him and his family a surprise party last Saturday night.
    George Nichols, L. L. Bradshaw, John Walsh, Marsh Garrett and Floyd Charley were gathering cattle on Osborn and Yankee creeks last Monday.
    Charles Hanscom of Brownsboro hauled two loads of wood to Eagle Point last Saturday.
    John Walsh of Lake Creek was doing business in Eagle Point last Saturday.
    Floyd Charley of Brownsboro went over on the big desert to get some of his cattle last Tuesday.
    Claus Charley of Brownsboro was in Eagle Point last Saturday.
    The stockmen of this neighborhood are going to make the Ashland ride sometime before Christmas.
    Henry A. Meyer, Herman Meyer Jr., and Tommy Nichols brought home some cattle which they had found near the Antelope Mountain.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 17, 1914, page 5


GAME WARDEN A. S. HUBBARD MURDERED BY LORIS MARTIN IN ATTEMPTING LATTER'S ARREST
Notorious Poacher, Who Has for Years Defied Wardens, Kills Hubbard With Rifle at Close Range When Latter Attempts to Arrest Him After Search of Cabin Discloses Deer Meat--Only Witness Is Constable Irwin of Ashland, Who Flees Scene, So Badly Scared That He Refuses to Return--Body of Slain Officer Left in Forest All Night.
    Loris Martin, notorious game poacher, and for years defiant of game laws, slayer of Game Warden A. S. Hubbard, at his cabin nine miles east of Trail Thursday afternoon, is in the county jail, and the body of his victim lies where it fell awaiting the arrival of Coroner A. E. Kellogg of Gold Hill, en route to the scene.
    Martin was brought to the county jail Friday afternoon, and has requested that Evan Reames act as his attorney, and will make a plea of self-defense.
    Martin surrendered to Sheriff Singler this morning, after spending the night at the home of his sister, Mrs. C. T. Skyrman.
    The only eyewitness to the tragedy was Constable Al Irwin of Ashland, who accompanied Hubbard on the fatal trip and who was paralyzed with fear after the encounter.
Shot at Close Range
    According to Irwin's story to Sheriff Singler, Irwin and Hubbard reached the Martin cabin about noon Thursday, for which they had search warrants. Searching the cabin they found two hams of deer, and were on their way from the cabin when they met Martin coming out of the heavy timber, where he had been attending to traps. The following exchange of words followed, Irwin and Hubbard being on horseback:
    "Hello, Hubbard," said Martin.
    "Hello, Martin," Hubbard replied.
    "What the h--l are you doing here?" came the response.
    With these words, according to Irwin's account to Sheriff Singler, Hubbard dismounted and walked towards Martin, the affair occurring in a clearing.
    As the game warden advanced, Martin shouted:
    "Don't come any further or I'll shoot."
Shot Within Six Feet
    Hubbard in the performance of his duty continued, and when within six feet of Martin the latter fired with his rifle, the bullet striking in the middle of the breast, causing instant death. Irwin from his horse witnessed this drama, and says that just before the fatal shot, shouted to Hubbard to stop.
    When Sheriff Singler arrived Thursday night at 9:30 o'clock at the scene of the shooting, he found Hubbard lying in the ground where he fell, with his gun on the ground nearby, and the glove of the right hand off.
    After the shooting Irwin, according to Sheriff Singler, told Martin not to shoot him, and telling the murderer to look after the body, left for help. Sheriff Singler and Deputy Wilson met Irwin at Trail Thursday evening, and asked him to return with them, which he refused to do, saying he was tired and the horses had no feed. Constable Irwin was greatly excited by the shooting, and refused to return to the scene.
Sheriff Reaches Scene
    Sheriff Singler and Deputy Wilson proceeded to the scene of the crime and spent the night guarding the body of Hubbard, expecting the arrival of the coroner and the return of Martin, who after staying with the dead man until midafternoon left. The dead official this morning was still lying on the lonely hillside, everything untouched, waiting for the coming of the coroner.
    This morning Singler and Deputy Wilson left the murder spot and went to the home of the mother of Martin, asking for her son. She said she did not know his whereabouts. The two officials then proceeded down the trail, and about seven miles from his cabin met the slayer with rifle in hand.
    "Is this Sheriff Singler?" was Martin's first words.
Surrenders to Sheriff
    "I guess you are looking for me, and here is my gun," he continued, handing over the weapon with which he snuffed out a human. Martin told his captors it was loaded, and that it had better be unloaded. The authorities then went to their auto, and with the prisoner rushed to this city.
    Martin was seen in the county jail this afternoon, thirty minutes after his arrival. He was standing by the jail stove watching a white man and negro playing "coon can." He is uneducated and a specimen of the class holding that personal right supersedes all law. He is a short, thin man with grey eyes and a week's growth of reddish stubble on his face. He wore a pair of striped trousers and black coat and a new flannel shirt. He has an unusually large nose and hand, and gold fillings in his teeth that give him a striking appearance.
    "How did that shooting come off yesterday?" he was asked.
    "I don't want to say anything about that," he replied. "Don't try to make me talk. I am glad to be in jail."
    Asked why he was glad to be imprisoned, he remarked that it was a fine day. Questioned if he had secured an attorney, he said he had retained attorney Evan Reames of this city, who has the matter of defending him under consideration. After this interchange Martin refused to talk, and walked into a cell and laid down.
    Martin was born and raised in Jackson County and is about 40 years old. For years, according to acquaintances, he lived in the woods, violating game laws.
    Threats against the life of any game warden who entered his premises were hurled by him during the last summer and winter. When Game Warden Hubbard went to secure the search warrant from Justice Taylor he told him of the threats Martin had made against his life, and was warned to exercise care.
An Old Offender
    Throughout the outlying districts of the county there is a well-defined sentiment against the game laws and those who enforce them, and Martin, according to many witnesses, was one of the leading exponents in the Trail district of this view. As long as fifteen years ago he was arrested for poaching, pled guilty and paid fines. At one time the game warden then in charge resigned rather than arrest Martin.
    Sentiment in the Trail district is against Martin, neighbors claiming that he ruthlessly slew deer to secure bait for his trap. Before the coming of the game laws Martin sold venison in this city. Acquaintances describe him as being recklessly fearless and hot tempered, with a supreme contempt for law. He is a socialist, and last summer when working on the Crater Lake road created considerable comment by his fervid upholding of his theories. Hubbard arrested Martin once for violation of the game laws, to which he pled guilty. Since then Martin has cherished resentment. Martin is a crack shot and a skilled hunter.
    Prosecutor Kelly, Game Warden Sam Sandry and Coroner Kellogg are still at the scene of the shooting collecting evidence. They are expected to return late today with the body of Hubbard, when an inquest and preliminary hearing will be held.
    The murder was the chief topic of conversation in this city this morning and feeling the resentment was shown, Hubbard being well known and popular. A wild rumor was in circulation that Sheriff Singler had been shot in the leg.
Efficient Game Warden
    Game Warden Arthur S. Hubbard was 38 years old and a resident of Ashland, his home being at 343 Granite Street. He was the son of Bela C. Hubbard, a builder and contractor, also living there. He leaves a wife and two children, the wife being the daughter of Nym Long, well-known resident of Ashland. Hubbard had been in the service over two years, having succeeded George Hargadine, also of Ashland.
    Mr. Hubbard was insured for $1000 in the Oregon Life. His death is greatly regretted by all the sportsmen of Southern Oregon, as he was a most efficient warden.
    Mr. Hubbard was a carpenter by trade, and had served as a member of the Ashland police force.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1914, page 1


THINK MARTIN BUILT UP EVIDENCE
OF SELF-DEFENSE AFTER CRIME

DEAD GAME WARDEN HAD NOT DRAWN GUN WHEN POACHER SHOT HIM DOWN AT CLOSE RANGE WITH A 30-30 RIFLE
    That Loris Martin, the game poacher who murdered Game Warden A. S. Hubbard, lay in ambush for his victim with his 30-30 rifle, murdering him in cold blood, and then sought to build up a defense for himself by taking out the slain warden's revolver and placing it near the prostrate figure of the dead officer, is the belief of those who picked up and brought back the corpse from the lonely cabin nine miles from Trail near the head of Trail Creek. The coroner's inquest will be held Monday at Perl's parlors, when the story of the crime will be rehearsed in detail.
Lay in Wait for Victim
    Game Warden Hubbard's presence in the Trail district was known to Martin, if customs of the past were observed by the residents who phone ahead of the coming of the agents of the law. He may have known that a search warrant had been issued for his premises, and watched Hubbard and Constable Irwin on the tour that ended in their finding contraband meat in his cabin, knowing that his arrest was inevitable. When the victim and his companion first saw Martin he was standing on the trail about ten feet away. Greetings were exchanged, and Hubbard dismounted from his horse.
    This act indicated that Hubbard realized his danger, and when the fatal shot was fired was trying to grab the barrel of Martin's rifle. Martin stepped off the trail according to Irwin, and at all times had the official covered, shooting from the hip, as was usual with Martin. Aside from the apparently friendly salutation at first sight no words passed, but the slain official may have read the intentions of the notorious poacher, and hoped by a fearless advance to cow him.
Warden Drew No Weapon
    Constable Irwin says that at the time of the shooting, Hubbard wore both gloves, that his coat was buttoned from top to bottom and that his revolver was in a holster covered by his coat, and strapped to his shoulder.
    When Sheriff Singler arrived the coat was unbuttoned, the glove of his right hand was off, and his pistol lay under a bush ten feet away. These three points are the keys of Martin's self-defense plea, and are refuted by testimony setting forth that there was no mark in the snow under the bush indicating the gun had been thrown, and that Hubbard, had he been in the act of reaching for his gun, would have had his arm and hand shattered by the bullet that killed him. Martin claims Hubbard was in the act of drawing his gun when he fired, and is refuted by Constable Irwin.
Martin's Story Contradicted
    Investigations by Deputy District Game Warden Sam Sandry show that Hubbard in falling, had he drawn his gun, would have heaved it back or to the right. He was standing on a slope when killed. To have thrown the gun where it was found would be to the left and across the body. There is also the medical theory that the reflex action of the muscles by a swift, sudden death would have tended to cause an object to drop, instead of being hurled any distance.
    Martin when first arrested was careful to announce that the gun was under the bush. After the shooting he ordered Irwin to leave, and had ample opportunity to arrange details favorable to himself. Martin possesses the subtle cunning of the woods, and from the start to finish of the bloody tragedy dominated the situation. Though uneducated he is crafty, and long dodging of the game laws gave him artful experience.
Seeking Sympathy
    Though firm until arrested, he then began casting for sympathy. On the way to this city he cried bitterly and told Deputy Wilson he was sorry for his act and shot on impulse. He said he would not have shot had Hubbard tried to reason with him, instead of advancing. Martin aroused considerable sentiment in the captors.
    In the county jail last night the slayer slept soundly, and his first request this morning was to see attorney A. E. Reames.
    The body of Hubbard was taken to Ashland, his home, Friday night, and held until funeral arrangements are made.
    Only his tact saved Irwin from a similar fate to that of his associate. He did not return to the scene of the crime the night of its commission because he was physically exhausted. The sheriff made no effort to reach the scene of the crime until Friday morning.
    The following is an interview with prosecuting attorney Kelly, who visited the scene of the tragedy:
    "Martin in custody by his own act claims to have a defense. We intend that he shall have a fair trial, and we have nothing at this time to say of the merits of the trouble between Martin and Hubbard. I am glad that I made the trip and had an opportunity to look the ground over, and the impressions that I gathered at first hand will be of no inconsiderable value to both the state and the defendant in presenting the matter.
    "There are two impressions that are current, however, that I desire to offer an opinion upon. The first one being the conduct of Officer Irwin, who has been in the police service in Jackson County for a number of years and bears a reputation for honesty, judgment and nerve that is well known in Ashland, where the greater part of his services have been rendered, and his conduct on this occasion vindicates his record as a careful, cool officer. Irwin accompanied Hubbard on this occasion without knowledge of the country or any intimation there was to be any serious or desperate conflict with anyone. At the time of the homicide he was mounted a little in the rear of Hubbard. He did not know Martin or his reputation and his sudden and tragic appearance was entirely unexpected. Nor was there anything in the manner in the meeting of Hubbard and Martin to have aroused the slightest suspicion of the impending tragedy.
    "It appears that there was a friendly salutation on the part of Hubbard and a not unfriendly reply on the part of Martin. Before Irwin could dismount or prepare himself for any such contingency the fatal shot had been fired and the slayer was dominating the situation with a 30-30 rifle, which had been reloaded in the twinkling of an eye. It was here that Irwin's long experience as an officer saved the situation for himself and for Martin, who would have unquestionably opened fire on him had it not been for his coolness. And it is perhaps due to this fact that Martin has not another victim and is not a dangerous fugitive.
    "Irwin is not a woodsman and [is] unused to riding over rough trails on horseback. That he did not return to the scene of the tragedy in the morning was due to physical inability. He is the sole witness to the tragedy, and his keen observations taken at the time will be invaluable in determining the merits of the matter.
    "The other impression to the effect that Martin is a dangerous and desperate character, I believe, will be more or less shattered when the evidence is fully presented. I do not know him personally but think that his reputation is due largely to his unerring skill with firearms and more or less to his boisterous and boasting manner. He readily surrendered himself to the sheriff and gave this impression out over the phone that it was his desire long before the arrival of the officers. The sheriff and deputy are entitled to credit for the prompt and sane manner in which his apprehension was accomplished. In the face of the existing circumstances and the man's local reputation this was a task well calculated to occupy their full time and attention.
    "The purpose of my visiting the scene was to secure evidence, and the result of my visit in this light has been entirely satisfactory from my standpoint. Coroner Kellogg and District Game Warden Sam Sandry were both at the scene of the tragedy and the result of their efficient evidence I am sure will be evident in the final investigation of the matter.
    "The defendant is in custody upon his own initiative and is entitled to a fair and impartial trial and the gravity of the charge against him should entitle him to the benefit of any reasonable doubt. Any statement as to his character in previous difficulties he may have had with authorities of the law, if he has had any, should now be passed. The jurors of the ensuing term should not be biased by any prejudicial statement for or against him."
Medford Mail Tribune, December 19, 1914, page 1


HUBBARD MURDER DEEPLY DEPLORED BY STATE AUTHORITIES
    PORTLAND, Dec. 19.--When informed of the murder of Deputy Game Warden Hubbard at Trail by Loris Martin, the poacher, State Game Warden W. L. Finley stated:
    "I am deeply grieved to hear of this crime, as I always considered Hubbard one of the best men we had in the service. He has been in the employ of the game department for the last three years and was a forest ranger previous to that time."
    "Hubbard was particularly fitted for the work he was carrying on, as he was absolutely without fear, but was not hotheaded, and always handled affairs of this kind in the best possible manner."
Most Efficient as Warden
    "I have known him ever since he has been in the employ of the state, have taken trips with him and know that he was not only careful, but efficient. He never looked for trouble, and I know that on one occasion he went up to man who had threatened to kill him on sight, talked to him for awhile and finally accomplished his purpose without bloodshed. In other cases, even in the wild country in which he worked, he has been highly regarded, even by violators of the law whom he has been obliged to arrest.
    "While I do not know Martin personally, I know him by reputation, and he has the record of being a gunman, always carrying a weapon with him. I think the fellow became hotheaded and didn't realize what he was doing. The case is particularly sad, on account of Hubbard leaving a wife and two small children at Ashland, where he made his home."
    Following the news of the murder, the state fish and game commission, which was in session here, adopted the following resolutions:
Resolutions Adopted
    "Whereas, the commission has heard, with the deepest regret, of the killing of Deputy Game Warden Arthur S. Hubbard in Jackson County, Oregon; and,
    "Whereas, the deceased has, since his employment in the service, been regarded as a careful, honest, painstaking and conscientious deputy; therefore, be it
    "Resolved, That we sincerely deplore the untimely death of Deputy Game Warden Arthur S. Hubbard, and hereby extend the sympathy of the members of the members of this board to his bereaved family in their affliction; and further
    "That State Game Warden William L. Finley and Sam L. Sandry, district warden, of Rogue River, be instructed to lend the proper authority of Jackson County every available help in bringing the slayer to justice."
Medford Mail Tribune, December 19, 1914, page 8


MRS. CLARA RADER PIONEER OF '52 CROSSES DIVIDE
    Died, at her late residence, 105 N. Oakdale, Sunday, December 20th, Mrs. Clara Rader, born in St. Louis, Missouri, April 10th, 1835, and started for Oregon from St. Louis by way of team in April, 1852. She arrived in Jackson County October 1852, which has been her home ever since.
    Mrs. Rader's maiden name was Clara Ida Louise Camp, and she was married to Andrew Jackson Rader, December 12th, 1852, at Jacksonville, Oregon. Mr. Rader, known as "Honest Jackson Rader," was elected representative from Jackson County in 1870 and it was while serving in this capacity that he was suddenly taken ill with smallpox, died and was buried before home folks knew of his illness.
    Mrs. Rader was left with a family of small children, all of whom are living except the oldest son, who died soon after the father's death. The children are Mary Pool and John Rader of Eagle Point, Clara Phipps and Francis Garrett of Medford and Joseph M. Rader of Phoenix, Oregon, and eight grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.
    The Raders first lived on what is known as the old Love place between Jacksonville and Central Point. Six years later they moved out to what is known as the Rader ranch near Eagle Point, at which place Mrs. Rader lived until July 5th, 1902, since which time she has made her home at Jacksonville and Medford.
    Funeral services will be held at the Catholic church, Tuesday, December 22, at 9:30 a.m., Father Powers officiating. Interment in Jacksonville cemetery.
    Mrs. Rader leaves a large circle of friends in all parts of the valley to mourn her loss.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 21, 1914, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. R. Milan of Portland came down last Tuesday and spent the night with us. He was on his way up to his son-in-law's, William Nichols, above Brownsboro, and Wednesday Mr. Nichols came out for him. He expects to make his home with him for a while at least.
    Professor C. E. Johnson, who is teaching school in Table Rock, came over Tuesday and spent the night with us, taking the P.&E. for Medford Wednesday morning. He is going to take the teachers' examination on a part of the studies for a life certificate.
    Elder T. Tib Thuember of Hubbard, Ore., called here for dinner on Wednesday on his way to the Hoeft farm in the Lake Creek country. He expects to remain over Sunday and hold services there for the Seventh Day Adventists.
    Miss Francis Heath, daughter of one of our leading merchants, who has been attending the state university at Eugene, came in Wednesday evening on the P.&E. to spend her vacation with her parents and her brother, Fred.
    Allison Allen of Washington state came in Wednesday and went on up to Derby to visit his brother John.
    Mr. Nealon of Butte Falls, a brother-in-law of Rev. Day of that place, spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside.
    Bert Crandall, a brother of W. H. Crandall, started for Los Angeles on Wednesday.
    Wednesday night we had a quiet little wedding at the home of David Cingcade, when Leroy A. Smith and Miss Rosa Ayres were united in marriage by Rev. A. C. Howlett. There was no one present except the contracting parties, David Cingcade and his wife, and her father, Grandpa Moore, and the officiating minister. I would like to describe how the bride and groom were dressed, but I am such a poor hand at describing the "outward adorning" of the ladies, but will simply say that the bride was neatly dressed in blue silk and the groom in the conventional black. There was no lunch served and after visiting with the good people until 10 o'clock I bade them good night. Their many friends Thursday morning were showering them with congratulations. They will be readers of the Mail Tribune for the next twelve months.
    Irvin Culbertson and wife of Lake Creek were in town Thursday morning interviewing our merchants.
    Our teachers are planning to give the school children a Christmas tree entertainment on Wednesday evening, December 23, and the little folk are contemplating a fine time.
    The Ladies' Aid had their semiannual sale Tuesday and today I inquired of the treasurer, Mrs. T. E. Nichols, of the amount received up to date, Thursday afternoon--and it was $33.50, but there was some to collect, which would run it up to $35 or $36, and the Aid still has some of the things on hand for sale. This money is to be applied on the salary of the pastor of the Baptist church.
    Mrs. E. G. Roberts and her mother, Mrs. J. A. Montgomery, were in town Thursday on business. Mrs. Roberts says that her husband has gone out to Burns to look after his deceased brother Robert's property.
    Charley Cole, the engineer on the P.&E., is taking a layoff and Mr. McClennan, the fireman, is taking his place, and Jud Edsall is acting fireman in McClennan's place, and Dick Diamond is laying off and Norman McQuoid is taking his place.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 22, 1914, page 3


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Last Thursday Charles Terrill went up to Frank Farlow's sawmill on South Butte after a load of lumber.
    Last Thursday James Culbertson went to Eagle Point on business.
    Mr. Thuember, an Adventist minister at Grants Pass, delivered an interesting sermon at the Butte Creek schoolhouse last Thursday evening concerning the European war.
    William Daley was at Eagle Point last Thursday on business.
    Charles Seefield and Mike Hanley, Jr., drove a large band of cattle down to the valley last Friday.
    An agent for the Dr. Kotch Vegetable Tea Company was up the creek selling remedies last week.
    Thomas Carlton has been gathering cattle and taking them to Charles Terrill's ranch, where they will be fed for the winter.
    The city linemen were up the creek inspecting the telephone line and water system last Friday.
    T. L. Farlow was at Medford last Friday.
    The entertainment and Christmas tree at the Brownsboro schoolhouse last Friday evening was attended by a large crowd. There was an abundance of candy and nuts and everyone had a good time.
    Rudolph Pech's little boy, Emil, has been very ill for some time. Dr. William W. P. Holt was called last Friday.
    The Butte Creek Industrial Club and Literary Society will hold a meeting Friday. There will be a program and they will elect new officers. They will also elect a health officer.
    The Climax post office, which was formerly at William Holman's, has recently been removed to Matthew Thompson's place.
    R. H. Bradshaw has just returned home from Portland, where he has been for some time. He was accompanied by Jess Allen of that city.
    Roy Stanley and Herb Carlton have just went to the mountains to bring out some more of their cattle.
    Arden Tyrrell was in Medford last Saturday.
    Frank Nygren and Ralph Bieberstedt brought a large band of cattle out of the mountains Monday.
    George Nichols has bought some hay out on the desert, where he will feed his cattle for the winter.
    William Nickel of Lake Creek was in Eagle Point last Saturday on business.
    Mr. Colby and son Lloyd were in Medford last Saturday. While there Mr. Colby purchased a new hack.
    Miss Alma Gould, the Lake Creek school teacher, returned to her home in Medford to spend the holidays.
    A. R. Chase, E. R. Peterson and J. Percy Wells have went to Eugene.
    Audley A. Meyer was in Medford last Saturday. He accompanied his mother to Eagle Point Saturday evening, where she will spend a few days before returning home.
    Miss Blanche Burleson of Lake Creek was visiting Miss Alice Nygren last Saturday.
    Thomas Stanley went to Eagle Point Monday on business.
    C. R. Moore of South Butte is building a new house.
    Lee Farlow and mother were at Medford last week.
    Floyd Charley has been laid up with a blood-poisoned hand, caused by a barbed wire cut.
    Mike Sidley, Sr., went to Medford to attend Mrs. J. Rader's funeral.
    One of the greatest necessities of Butte Creek is a high school. Lake Creek is beyond all question the ideal location for it. It is connected with the surrounding country by about four different highways and is the central point of about six different schools. At the present time all the schools of higher learning are in towns some distance away, and as a result girls and boys of this community have to get an education the best way they can or else go without. They generally do the latter for these reasons: First, because their parents haven't the means; second, because most people hate to send their children away from home, and third, because most children don't take an interest in something that is so far away. A high school would also do a great deal toward building up this community. Where children have to go away from home to school, they are likely to get attached to city life, and that way the country loses a great many of its most valuable citizens. The community would also be more attractive because people would think that if it could support a high school it must be prosperous. Many others would be likely to move into a community where their children could get a high school education. It would also enable boys and girls to take up industrial training.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 23, 1914, page 3


HUBBARD BEST OF STATE WARDENS
(Roseburg Review)

    That Deputy Game Warden Arthur Hubbard, who was late Thursday shot and killed by Loris Martin, on Trail Creek, in Jackson County, was one of the most efficient and fearless officers in the state was the statement made here this morning by District Attorney George M. Brown. "If I were to choose two game wardens, Mr. Hubbard would have been one of my selections," said the district attorney. "He was quiet, fearless and believed in enforcing the laws. I have had considerable experience with game wardens during my career as district attorney, and I always found Mr. Hubbard a man in whom you could impose trust. In his death the state of Oregon has lost one of it best officials.
    "District Attorney Brown had known Mr. Hubbard personally for a number of years, and through business dealings they had been brought close together upon a number of occasions. No one in Oregon regrets the death of Mr. Hubbard more that does District Attorney Brown."
Medford Mail Tribune, December 24, 1914, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune we have been favored by having Prof. F. A. Haight, professor of instrumental music. He has a class in our town that some of them, at least, are surprising their friends by their advancement in that line.
    W. E. Hammel is taking advantage of the good roads and pleasant weather and is bringing in a fine lot of stovewood for some of our townsmen.
    Geo. Austin, the mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Climax route, had the misfortune to break the pole of his buggy but W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, soon repaired it, so he went on his way in time.
    L. A. Smith, who was recently married to Miss Rosa Ayres, has gone to housekeeping in their own home.
    Chris Natwick took a lot of wire fence and some yew posts to put on his place that he recently purchased from Frank Brown.
    Thomas Hampton, foreman on the Pelouze farm, was in town a few days ago and renewed his sub to the Daily Mail Tribune, and about the same time James F. Johnson was in and gave me a sub for the W.M.T. for his wife. Thus new subscribers kept coming in and old ones renew.
    G. W. White and wife of Climax were here for dinner last Friday. They brought in some of the products of their dairy.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, has put in a big lot of dishes on his shelves.
    A. J. Nicholson of Rogue River, agent for Dr. Koch's remedies, spent the night with us last week.
    Master George Klingle of Lake Creek came out to have some dental work done Saturday.
    Miss Rose H. Thomas, who is teaching in Brownsboro, and Miss Alma Gould, who is teaching in Lake Creek district, came out on the Lake Creek-Eagle Point stage, took dinner and went to their homes in Ashland and Medford to spend the holidays.
    F. J. Ayres and wife came out the last of the week to visit their new son-in-law, Roy (L. A.) Smith.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols of Medford came out the last of the week to look after business and visit friends in our town, her old home.
    The school girls and some that were not school girls were out in force last week holding everyone they met, raising money to pay the expense of the Christmas tree, and I understand that they succeeded quite well.
    Thomas Stanley of Brownsboro was doing business with our merchants last Saturday and so was Timmie Duggan and Nick Young.
    Mrs. Walter Wood and her sister were shopping in our town last Saturday.
    Last Sunday we had for dinner Rev. L. L. Simmons wife, son Reford, and two daughters, Bernice and Melva, Henry Trusty and his sister, Miss Mae Trusty, Amos Ayres and Miss Lee Middlebusher of Trail, Prof. C. E. Johnson of Table Rock, and Jas. Ringer, and for supper Charles Bacon and family, Carl Ringer, Miss Nina McIntosh and after supper they remained until bed time, and I suppose had a good time, but I went to church and heard Rev. L. L. Simmons preach to a good-sized and apparently appreciative audience.
    West C. Pool, one of our progressive farmers, came in Thursday and renewed his subscription the Daily Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 26, 1914, page 5


UPPER ROGUE RIVER
    Mr. and Mrs. Jim Cornutt of Central Point spent the weekend with W. T. Houston and family. Miss Eula Houston came up home with them.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgan spent Christmas at George Stacey's.
    The Christmas tree at the Reese Creek school house was well attended and Santa Claus remembered everyone. The program was fine and was greatly enjoyed by all. It was a credit to Miss Rose Nealon's management.
    Miss Nealon went to Table Rock to spend the holidays at home.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Houston and Miss Ida were in Central Point several days last week. One of their horses became sick and detained them.
    Warren Bergman and bride came Tuesday and are visiting his mother, Mrs. B. Clarno. Warren's friends treated him to a serenade by the tin pan band the evening he arrived and all wish them a happy life.
    John Foster spent several days last week with his sister, Mrs. Henry French.
    Mr. Wyant and son Ben of Ashland are spending the week with Mrs. Eugene Bellows.
    Miss Rena Ash and brother, Lowell, returned from the valley Christmas.
    An auto went up the river Christmas.
    The snow of a week ago is still lying in patches. The freeze of the last week has frozen the water and ground and is hard on the stock, and the rain is now welcome.
    Mrs. Schuyler Hammond returned home Wednesday from Medford. She is greatly improved in health.
    A number attended the mask ball at Godfrey's hall, Beagle.
    Charley and Wesley Coffeen returned home for Christmas dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cox of Eagle Point spent Christmas with his father, John Cox, and family.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fry of Medford were Trail visitors this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1914, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I omitted to state that there was quite a number of our citizens went from the surrounding country to Medford to attend the funeral of Mrs. Clara Rader last Tuesday. Mrs. Rader lived in this immediate neighborhood while she was raising her family, and leaves a long list of friends with whom she associated in her younger days.
    I also wish to acknowledge the receipt of money from W. H. Crandall of Eagle Point, H. C. Barker of Brownsboro and T. C. Duggan of Eagle Point since my last. I also omitted to state that Mrs. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, who has been in the hospital in Medford and had an operation performed, was brought out here on Sunday, the 20th, remained here until Tuesday and then went on up home and at last accounts she was getting along quite well.
    Our teachers and the friends of our school had an entertainment in the opera house last Wednesday eve and in connection had a Christmas tree. The exercises were not very elaborate; some of the children took part in the exercises and they had some good vocal and instrumental music, but the most interesting part of the program was the distribution of the presents. A sack of candy and nuts for each child and a number of presents to the favored few. At the same time the citizens of the Reese Creek school district had a Christmas tree entertainment and my informant, one of the young men boarding with us, reports that they had one of the most enjoyable times they have had in that section for a long time. They don't do things by halves out there, but go for it by the wholesale, and they made their candy sacks large enough to hold about a quart of candy and nuts and an orange each, and each person received a sack besides a quantity of other things. In fact, he said that the tree was simply loaded, and a big lot stacked on the floor, so of course they had a fine time. But I heard one of our leading thinking young men from the country commenting on our Christmas tree; that he did not like our system of holding such festivities, for he said while the most of the children will enjoy it, especially those whose parents and friends are able and willing to purchase the presents for their children, there are always some of the little folks whose hearts ache when they see their little associates or neighbors receive nice presents, such as a nice doll for a little girl or a trinket for a little boy, and they have to go home with feelings of disappointment to think of their sad condition. And perhaps there is at least grounds for thought on the subject.
    Mrs. George Weeks and four children of Trail came out Wednesday to visit her mother, Mrs. Leabo, spending Christmas with the family.
    Sam Coy and W. H. Isbell, who live on Reese Creek, were here for dinner Thursday and while here I asked them to subscribe for the Mail Tribune, as I did not see their names on the list, but they both told me that they read that paper, as Mr. Coy lives with W. E. Hammel and so has it first hand, and Mr. Isbell said that he had been cutting wood for Mr. Hammel for the last year, and so he got the Mail Tribune through Mr. H., so I failed to get my game that time. I might say in this connection that Mr. Hammel has gone back to Missouri on business.
    Wig Jacks was in town Thursday and reports that the cold weather has frozen up about all the water in the hills so that the stock is suffering for water to drink.
    J. W. Corlies, the foreman on the Alta Vista orchard, was doing business in our town Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Winkle were in our town getting Xmas presents for their children Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno, who have a farm on or near Rogue River, were among us Thursday, and so was Frank Dimmick, who lives on one of the George Stevens places.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware men, and wife went to Medford on Thursday evening to spend Christmas with his father and mother. Gladys Natwick accompanied them.
    Mrs. Ollie Bell of Medford came out and went to Brownsboro to visit her son-in-law, George Brown and family, and her granddaughter, Miss Mabel Culbertson, went to Medford.
    Miss Rosa Nealon, who is teaching in the Reese Creek district, came out on the car Thursday and went on to Table Rock to spend Christmas with her parents.
    Mr. Harrison, our agent at the Eagle Point lumber yard, is in Medford at this writing.
    Jeff Conover, who has a farm on the Eagle Point and ferry road, was in town the 24th.
    Christmas Mrs. Howlett had among her guests for dinner Ed Coy, Miss Loretta Childers, W. L. Childers, and his two small children, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Smith, C. W. Clements, James Ringer, Charles Sherman, Tony McClennan, Fred Pelouze, wife and son, Robert, Mrs. Menzner and Gus Rosenburg, besides our regular boarders. The bookkeeper in the Mail Tribune office was booked to come, but she got sidetracked somewhere else.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1914, page 4


COMMUNICATIONS
To the Editor:
    Having read some articles in your paper recently relative to the killing of the game warden, Mr. Hubbard, by Loris Martin, I want the opportunity to call your attention to the fact that while we greatly deplore the killing of Hubbard ourselves, you must remember that there are two sides to this affair. I am not justifying the killing, by any means, yet at the same time there can be conditions connected with the affair that would justify it, and I hardly think your paper is doing the correct thing or the fair thing in publishing the articles that have recently appeared in its columns. It is not giving Mr. Martin a square deal by any means whatever. Those article I allude to have the tendency to prejudice the minds of the people, making it a difficult matter to secure an impartial jury, or to give him any kind of a fair trial whatever. You have sentenced him, virtually without a trial.
    Now, I would like to say this: That I am acquainted with Mr. Martin and all the Martin family; have known them for eighteen years. I know them to be peaceable and hard-working and honest people. They regret this as bad as anyone could. Loris Martin, in all my years of acquaintance with him, made me know that he is not the kind of man you would have the people believe. He is honest and truthful in his dealings with his neighbors. No man ever left his cabin hungry. His temper was as even as the common man, and his friends are numerous among those who know him. His purse was always open to his friends. His aged mother is loved by all who know her; has a niece teaching school up the country in this county, and I hope the people who have read your articles are willing to hear all sides, then decide. I am writing this above my name and stand ready to prove every assertion. That there was justification in his act shall be my contention, regardless of your publication.
Very respectfully,
    SIMPSON WILSON
Central Point, Ore.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1914, page 4


CORN GROWING, AND WHAT BOYS CAN DO
    In the corn contest for 1913, Francis Winn of Wellen, Jackson County, won first prize. As a result of his winnings at the fairs, he was enabled to attend high school during the entire year of 1914. The prize won at the State Fair, a full-blooded Poland China pig, under good care, came to maturity and produced ten young pigs, which sold for a good price. The money earned enabled Francis to pay his way in school the past year.
    This year the first prize again went to Jackson County, Claus Charley of Brownsboro being the successful contestant at the State Fair. We give herewith his own story and his figures, showing the cost and returns:
Claus Charley's Own Story
    "After manuring the ground I plowed it as soon as it was in good shape, which was March 17, letting it lay up rough for about three weeks. This was after a rain, and I worked it down with a spike tooth harrow. In about ten days I repeated the example with a disc harrow, and about four days before planting I ran over it with a pulverizer, which left the soil in fine shape for a seed bed.
    "I planted the corn April 25, with a two-row horse corn planter, planting it about three inches deep with about three grains to the hill.
    "I again used the harrow about a week after planting to loosen up the packed places made by the planter, and also to hold the weeds in check until the corn was large enough to cultivate. After this I used a two-horse hoe cultivator, cultivating it May 18, and June 1, each time a few days after a rain, so as to prevent capillary evaporation. Then I put the final finish and touch on it with the old hoe June 19, cutting the weeds and now and then breaking off a sucker."
COST OF CORN CROP
Rent of land, at $5.00 per acre $ .63
Two loads of manure at $2.00 4.00
Seed .10
Plowing and harrowing, 4 hours .90
Planting, 1 hour .20
Hoeing, 1 hour .10
Cultivating, ½ hour .10
Harvesting, 5 hours    .50
    Total $ 6.53
YIELD AND PROFIT
5.87 bushels common corn, at 90¢ $ 5.26
8 bushels seed corn, at $3.50 28.00
    Total receipts $ 33.26
Cost   6.53
    Profit $ 26.73
Profit per acre $ 212.14
ANOTHER BOY WINS TRIP TO SAN FRANCISCO
    Audley Meyer also won a corn prize, being one of the few boys who carried two projects through to completion. His eighth of an acre of potatoes, however, won him the trip to the Panama-Pacific International Exposition at San Francisco. He raised his potatoes on land that had been cultivated for thirty years, proving beyond all question that new land is not required to produce good potatoes. Audley attended school and lost no time on account of his work--taking care of his corn and potatoes on Saturdays and evenings after school. He plowed his ground May 1, and double disked and harrowed it well. His ground was plowed deep, about 12 inches, and his potatoes were planted deep. He planted one piece with two eyes in a hill and eighteen inches apart in the row. The rows were three feet apart. One hundred and twenty-five pounds of seed were used, which Audley bought of his father at 50 cents per hundredweight. The ground was hoed twice, cultivated twice and irrigated three times.
    The yield from this eighth of an acre amounted to 4,136 pounds, which, at the market price at the time, brought him $62.94. The cost of production was $14.00, which included wages to himself for all work done, leaving a net profit of $47.98 on one-eighth of an acre, or at the rate of $383.84 per acre, not including the small potatoes, which were of considerable value. How many farmers beat Audley Meyer the past year, and how many Oregon boys will be able to get into his class the coming year? How many will try, not only to do as well, but to excel Audley Meyer in the production of potatoes for the 1915 State Fair?
Industrial Club Work of Oregon Boys and Girls, 1915, pages 12-13  Photos of the prize winners are in the original.


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Minter returned from Portland last week and brought his sister, Mrs. Clearwater, with him and they two have moved into her place near Reese Creek. Ed Spencer came in on the same car and went out to his mother's, Mrs. Chris Wooley.
    Quite a number of our citizens have been having trouble with their water pipes on account of the cold snap we have had. In many instances the pipes would burst and let the water flow over the rooms, and in several instances the pipes froze up so that they could get no water at all and then they would have to carry their water from the creek or nearby wells. Our coldest weather was so that the thermometer registered six above zero, but that is the first time for a great many years that it has been so low.
    Prof. C. E. Johnson, principal of the Table Rock school, came over Saturday eve, spent Sunday here and attended church and Sunday school, and Monday went up to his homestead along the P.&E.R.R. to spend a few days there.
    Speaking about church brings to my mind the fact that Rev. L. L. Simmons and family were not forgotten by their many friends on the occasion when we had our Christmas tree exercises and wishes me through the Eaglets in the Mail Tribune to express their high appreciation of their kindness.
    C. E. McDonald and S. E. McDonald, his brother, came in on the car last Monday and took the E.P. and Persist stage for their brother's ranch near the mouth of Elk Creek on Rogue River. Dr. C. E. McDonald has been in Alabama during the past season and has come back here to stay; says that this Rogue River Valley has the finest climate of any country he has ever found, and he has traveled over a very large portion of the United States and Canada. Says that in Alabama the weather is suffocating and the air seems to be so stifling that one can hardly breathe and that the mosquitoes are a fright up to about Christmas. He is surely boosting Jackson County.
    James Culbertson came out last Monday from his home in the Lake Creek country after his daughter, Miss Mabel, who has been spending Christmas with friends in Medford.
    Frank Lewis, who is keeping a pool room and confectionery store in our town, has been taking advantage of the cold snap and has put up a quantity of ice for summer use, but a few days ago he had the misfortune to run a nail into his foot, but at last accounts was getting along well with it.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Witther of Spokane, Wash., arrived here last Saturday the 26th to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart. Mrs. Witther was formerly Mrs. Libby Elkmeyer nee Libby Perry, one of the seven sisters known at the time of the reunion of the G.A.R. here a few years ago as the Perry girls that favored us with such fine vocal music, and her many friends here gave her a warm greeting.
    Sherman Wooley brought in last Tuesday three crates of chickens for our local R.R. agent, F. I. Newport.
    Mrs. Fred Lewis, hostess of the Lewis Bros. farm near Wellen, who has been spending a few days on the farm with her children during the holidays, went to Medford Tuesday p.m. She has been spending most of the time during the winter in Medford so that her children could take advantage of the good schools there. She left the two older boys on the farm, as they wanted to remain as long as they could but will return to their studies by the 4th of January.
    Tuesday we had among us Wm. Gore, Geo. B. Carpenter, S. Storey, J. W. Collins and I. E. D. Bundel, who were out here in the interest of the sugar beet industry, and there was a company of about fifty met them in Geo. Brown & Sons' hall and heard the subject discussed from the standpoint of the industry. Mr. Gore was the principal speaker and he went into the details explaining approximately the cost of production, and some of the advantages the farmer would derive if the project would succeed. There were six of the farmers that signed up for a little over thirty acres and there is quite a number who will take an interest in the move after they have had time to think over and examine into the matter. As there are many of the readers of the Eaglets that were not here to hear Mr. Gates talk, and I would have been glad to have had every farmer in this section of the country to have heard it, I will give a few points he presented. In the first place he did not try to make us believe that we could go right to work and raise sugar beets on any kind of soil but that the soil must be passed upon by an expert, for the company does not want to have a big lot of land signed up that will not produce what they want, and this testing is free of charge. Then after the soil has been approved it is to be plowed very deep and still better to go still deeper and tear up the under strata or subsoil and he figured that expense at three dollars an acre and then the harrowing and leveling, etc., he placed at two dollars more, then the planting, weeding, etc., making a long story short he estimated at $35 an acre. That is supposed to include all of the expenses from the first to last. And there was another difficulty appeared and that was that one man could not tend to a very large tract and would have the means to hire, and then the company would furnish the necessary help and charge it against the crop, and that an acre of land would produce $75 worth of beets and all of the expense would amount to only $35 an acre so that the producer would realize $40 an acre clear for his work. He then told of some of the other benefits to be derived from the move and one item was 18,000 cords of wood that they would have to have and a vast quantity of lime, and all of these would require the labor of a large number of men and thus be of benefit not only to those in the immediate vicinity of the plant but would help the business in the entire valley. But I see that I am getting this letter entirely too long but will perhaps have more to say on the subject later on.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1915, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I was trying to tell something about what the sugar beet men, who had come out from Medford last Tuesday, had to say in favor of the enterprise but found that my letter was getting too long, so that I think it best to stop short, but I will add at this time that there seemed to be a lot of deep thinking along that line and after having talked with Frank Brown on the subject had concluded that there is more interest taken in the subject than would appear on the first of the move. I find that the people are taking interest enough in the project to begin to talk it over among themselves, and that is a good sign. I was talking to one of our citizens on the subject, and he is a man of means, and he remarked that if the plant was established that foreigners would have to be brought in to do the work so he could see no advantage in trying to promote the move. But let us admit for the sake of argument that foreign labor would have to be brought in to do the work. Those who are already here would surely derive some benefit from it for it would cause money to be put into circulation and create a demand for more of the products of the soil, as well as cause more of a rotation in crops and a greater demand for what we produce in other lines of business. One thing the move cannot do any special damage and bids fair to bring good results.
    Carl Narregan and wife, Miss Hazel Brown, Miss Lorene Taylor and Mrs. Howlett went to Medford Tuesday afternoon on business.
    Tuesday night Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Knowles of Medford, W. E. Coleman of Phoenix, W. T. Walden of Medford, O. G. Maxfield of Edgewood, Cal., and Mr. G. W. McCallister of Butte Falls spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Sam Jackson of Yakima, Wash., came in last Wednesday to visit his brother, J. B. Jackson, and was given a cordial greeting by his old-time friends. He was formerly in business here and was burned out.
    Last Wednesday Mrs. A. N. Thomas, one of our old-time settlers, gave a dinner in honor of the arrival of Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Welther. Mrs. Welther is one of the seven Perry sisters, and on the occasion invited Mr. and Mrs. Norman McQuoid, and daughter Miss Norma, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols and their two daughters, Thelma and Garnett, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover and two daughters, Verta and Ruth. The last three married ladies named are sisters of Mr. Welther. She also invited Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Wolfer, Miss Lorene Taylor, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton and Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Howlett. Perhaps it is not best for me to try to describe the kind of a time we had, for I am sure I could not do the subject justice, for we had one of those good old-fashioned times when dull care was cast to the winds and all were bent on trying to enjoy life and help the neighbors to take part in the enjoyment, and so far as the dinner was concerned Mrs. Thomas is celebrated for her perfection in the culinary art.
    Wednesday evening, our regular prayer meeting night, we had an unusually good turnout, and at the close of the meeting the members of the Baptist church held their annual business meeting and among other things in their business line elected the trustees for the church for the coming year, namely W. G. Knighton, Dr. W. W. P. Holt, W. L. Childreth, Charles Painter and A. C. Howlett.
    Thursday Miss Alma Gould of Medford, who is teaching in Lake Creek, returned to her school and Prof. C. E. Johnson, who came out from his homestead on Wednesday, went on to Medford on the P.&E.
    Thursday, December 31st, being Mrs. Howlett's and our daughter Hattie's birthday and while we spent the day in regular routine of duties about 7:00 o'clock p.m. while everything was quiet and I was sitting in the parlor talking to Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Gray of Medford, who had come out to attend a masque ball that was given that night, all at once I heard a company come marching into the room and on looking over the company discovered that it was a company of our neighbors coming in to tender congratulations to my wife and daughter Hattie on their birthday, led by M. A. Thomas, and right along behind him were Charles Painter and wife and son Walter, M. S. Wood and wife, W. B. Bryant, wife and son Harry and daughter Katrena, Rev. L. L. Simmons, wife and daughter, Miss Bernice, Dr. W. E. Buchanan, son Edgar, Carl and Vaughn Quackenbush, Miss Fern Daley, Mrs. E. S. Wolfer and G. W. Wamsley. Well, after congratulations were extended and all hands were made welcome, M. A. Thomas, Mrs. Howlett and a few of the more sedate ones quietly disappeared and the rest of the company settled down to enjoy the evening, some playing checkers, some dominoes and the younger ones rook and the rest engaged in conversation. Suddenly M. A. Thomas came in and began to count noses and found that there were just 24 and in the course of a few moments the order came for all hands to retire to the kitchen to pull candy. They had brought with them a lot of sugar and had made a big kettle of candy. Well then the fun commenced, and after pulling candy for a while they returned to the parlor for music. I should have said that different ones kept the phonograph going the most of the time during the evening, but now we managed to get Miss Bernice Simmons to the organ and with her father, Mr. and Mrs. Bryant and son Harry, Mrs. Wolfer and a few others we had some choice singing, and thus the time was spent until someone announced the advent of the year 1915. Then Mrs. Howlett invited the company out to take ham sandwiches and coffee and at 12:40 a.m. the company began to disperse, but before they went stopped long enough to tender congratulations to Mrs. Charles Painter, as New Year's Day 1915 was her 47th birthday. So thus ended the year 1914 and began the new year 1915, and as we parted they all wished Mrs. Howlett and Hattie many returns of the 31st of December.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 4, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Boyd Tucker and family returned home New Year's Day from a fortnight's visit with Sams Valley relatives.
    The Trail telephone line, No. 16, held their annual meeting at the Central school house Monday. John Houston was elected president, Dave Pence vice-president, and Edwin Peile secretary-treasurer.
    Alex Vestal and Pearl Stowell were pleasant callers at the French home recently.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry French were shopping in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    E. E. Ash took up a load of supplies a few days ago.
    Joe Phipps and Mr. Boothby of Prospect were down to Ed Foster's Sunday.
    Bird Johnston was in Medford Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper spent several days in Central Point this week.
    Mr. Croft is visiting his parents.
    Miss Velma Hannah is the guest of her aunt, Mrs. Frank Miller, of Central Point this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Houston were Medford visitors the last of the week.
    Mrs. Van Dyke, Mrs. Daw and son Jack and Harry Skyrman made a business trip to Medford a few days ago.
    T. C. Gaines went to the valley Tuesday.
    Harry Coffeen and wife returned home to Sisson, Cal., Wednesday after spending a week with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Coffeen
Medford Mail Tribune, January 4, 1915, page 5


MARTIN FAVORITE WITH JAIL BIRDS
    Jail life and jail fare is agreeing with Loris Martin, held in the city jail accused of the slaying of Game Warden A. S. Hubbard, last December. He is gaining weight. This is not surprising, for most of his life has been spent in the vigorous exercise of tramping over snow-clad hills attending to his widely scattered traps. His detention is a rest. Apparently Martin is not worrying over the outcome of the trial. His plea will be self-defense. Martin is a great favorite with his fellow prisoners. He has a bank account and is able to buy tidbits not on the jail bill of fare, such as sugar.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1915, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I have noticed during the past few days that the people are discussing the possibility, probability and advisability of going into the business of raising sugar beets in Rogue River Valley. Some of them of the more conscious kind say they think that it would be a fine thing for the valley if everything works O.K., but whether we can make it a success or not in this section is the question. Since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I have, in a sly way, been noting what has been said on the subject and find that quite a number of our citizens have been not experimenting but growing the sugar beet in their gardens and some on a larger scale for stock feed and some claim that they have raised them as large as a stove pipe, six inches in diameter, while others claim that they can be raised to profit simply to feed their cows, and we all know who have had any experience with sheep that the beet is one of the best plants grown for sheep. While I call attention to the articles in the two leading papers in the country, the Medford Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun, some of the wiseacres will say, oh, that is only newspaper talk, but when it comes to talking with men who have had a practical experience of ten or fifteen years, and that have made good money out of it, this should be considered positive evidence in the case, and if the company is willing to invest half a million dollars in the venture I can't see how the farmer is taking a very great risk in planting a few acres, for even if the sugar plant proves to be a failure the beets can be utilized as food for stock, but there seems to be no grounds for fear as our soil will produce almost anything that we put into the ground. In concluding this part of my letter I will suggest that the authorities offer a special prize to the boy or girl who will raise the best one hundred pounds of sugar beets to be exhibited at the school fair next fall.
    Miss Hattie Riley, living near the lower Antelope bridge on the E.P.-Medford road, lost a ladies' satchel containing $27 and a gold ring with an old-fashioned English W on it.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons announced last Sunday night that Rev. Douglas of Grants Pass would commence a series of meetings here in the Baptist church on Monday, January 18 at 7 p.m.
    Welden Sage, who has been engaged with Mr. Dodge in the well boring business, came in Monday morning for breakfast.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nunan of Jacksonville were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen last Sunday.
    T. F. McCabe, one of the wide-awake farmers and orchardists, who owns a farm on Rogue River about five miles above here, was here for dinner Monday and took the P.&E. for Medford.
    Last Sunday we had services in the Catholic church, Rev. Wm. J. Meagher officiating.
    Gus Smith, who has been working over in California for some time, came in and spent a few days at the Sunnyside and on Monday went out to the country.
    Henry French, one of our hustling farmers, orchardists and gardeners, was in town last Monday, and while here renewed his sub to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Gus Rosenberg, the Eagle Point well digger, gave me his sub to the Daily Mail Tribune last Monday. He wants to start the year right, so begins with reading the leading newspaper of Southern Oregon.
    Green and Grant Mathews, who have farms on the routes between here and Trail, were in town last Monday.
    V. E. Baitson, who lives on the Vatchi farm on Rogue River, was in town trying to sell some hides to our local buyer, Jake Jones, last Monday.
    Wig Jacks, son-in-law of our mayor, John Nichols, was doing business with our merchants last Monday.
    W. H. Crandall brought in a lot of apples last Monday and traded them to Mr. Echenburg for a fine fat hog.
    The mask ball proved to be a grand success, I am informed. There were over a hundred tickets sold and everyone, so far as I can learn, was satisfied unless it would be that the hall is too small for the crowds that attend; there is a complaint that they were so crowded that they trod on one another.
    Miss Cora Crandall is the guest of Mrs. Wm. Brown at this writing.
    Mrs. Thomas Cingcade was doing business last Monday with our merchants.
    Word has just come Tuesday 11 o'clock a.m. that Wm. Messal's little boy had his arm broken. It is not the one who was here so long getting over an operation for appendicitis, but an older one. It does seem as though their troubles do not come single.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1915, page 7


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Lee Farlow went to California last week to visit friends.
    R. H. Bradshaw and Jess Allen have rented Frank Farlow's sawmill and will begin to saw this week.
    O. Tyrrell of Hornbrook, Cal., is visiting his brother, John Tyrrell.
    The dance at the South Butte hall was attended by a large crowd.
    Mike Sidley was at Eagle Point last Tuesday.
    Gus Nygren went to Eagle Point on business last Tuesday.
    A. R. Chase, accompanied by Mr. Pitman of the State Normal, will visit the schools of this vicinity during the latter part of the week.
    Theodore Hoeft hauled a load of wood to Medford last Monday.
    Miss Eva Kinney spent Christmas with Miss Blanch Burleson.
    Miss Fay Slinger of Medford attended the dance at South Butte hall New Year's Eve.
    Mr. Colby of Lake Creek went to Medford last Monday on business.
    Floyd Charley, Bill Holman, Tom Stanley and Helen Sidley attended the dance at Eagle Point New Year's eve.
    Miss Margaret Schell started to high school Monday.
    Miss Marie Newstrom and father went to Medford last Tuesday.
    Samuel Randles, an old residenter of Butte Creek, after being away for many years, has returned on a visit.
    The oldest son of Willie Messal's while playing fell and broke his arm. He was taken to Medford to have it set.
    The neighbors of this community got together Saturday evening, December 26, and went and surprised Tom Farlow and family. The party was a great success and everybody had a very enjoyable time.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1915, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Ed Tucker and her daughter Mildred spent the last of the week with James Martin's family of Rogue River.
    Mrs. C. B. Stout and daughter Ora have been out here from their home in Jacksonville visiting some of their friends, among whom were Mr. F. F. Boltz, W. G. Knighton and Mrs. Howlett. This is the first time they have been out here for a year and they found quite a number of changes had taken place.
    Mike Sedley, one of the Lake Creek farmers and stock raisers, came out with a fine lot of ducks for our railroad and express agent, F. Newport. He has been doing quite a business this fall in the poultry trade and causes several dollars to be scattered around.
    Rudolph Pech, also of Lake Creek, came out and when he returned had some new furniture in his wagon.
    Our school is progressing finely under the management of Prof. W. E. Buchanan, assisted by Miss Minnie B. Taylor and Mrs. George von der Hellen. I herewith give the roll of honor for the month of December.
    First room, W. E. Buchanan, teacher, John Greb, Nellie Coy, Lawrence Luy, Nina McIntosh and Walter Painter. These were all perfect in deportment and were neither absent nor tardy.
    Room two, Miss Minnie B. Taylor, teacher, Miss Ruth Grover, Mamie Winkle, Rufort Simmon, William Coy, Lloyd Cingcade, Bon Buchanan, Harold Van Scoy, Elsworth Stowell, Lyle Van Scoy, Judge Florey, Nora Childreth, Kee Buchanan, Margaret Riley and Freda Lebs.
    Room three, Mrs. von der Hellen's department, Lova Buchanan, Katrina Bryant, Loetta Truelove, Gwendolyn Brophy, Nelva Simmons, Alvin Greb, Clarence Greb, Donald von der Hellen, Hugo von der Hellen, Dennis Truelove, Ansil Pearce and Johnny Phillips.
    John Smith, of the Harnish Livery Stable, has been taking a layoff and went to Butte Falls to visit his children and grandchildren and while he was gone they had a masque ball in our town and of course quite a number of horses to look after and the question came up, "How are we to run this stable without John?" But they did and no one was hurt and they all had a good time, and John says that he had the time of his life.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rader were out last week visiting his brother John, his niece and nephew Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, Fred Dutton and shaking hands with old-time friends.
    P. M. Kershaw, representing the Oregon Granite Co. of Medford, was out here for dinner Wednesday and while here took an order for a monument from W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. W. E. Buchanan had returned from her visit to Butte Falls.
    Owing to the scarcity of rain the wells and springs are failing and John Greb has gone to work to dig his well down deeper. He has to blast, and the rock is the hard granite.
    Some of our people out this way are very much interested in the Medford charter but several of them say they will be glad when the election is over so that we will have more news in the Medford papers and not so much of a strictly local issue.
    Earl Croft, the foreman of the Cooley orchard, was in town Thursday and renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. Taking the Daily Mail Tribune is like some of the bad habits, say smoking or chewing tobacco; once they form the habit they seem to want to keep it up, at least it seems that way out in these parts.
    Fred Dutton was here smiling on his many friends about the middle of the week.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 11, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    The annual telephone meeting of Eagle Point line 5 was held at the residence of Eugene Bellows January 2. Henry French was elected president: Peter Betz, vice-president; and Ed Foster, secretary-treasurer. The Mrs. O. Nichols phone share was sold to Green Mathews. An assessment of 50 cents a share was voted. Next annual meeting each shareholder is to bring his better half and a lunch.
    Dave Pence, road supervisor of district 14 for 1914, attended commissioners' court at Jacksonville this week.
    John Houston and M. Slusser attended the telephone convention at Central Point as delegates of Trail line No. 16.
    Mesdames French, Howard, Betz and Foster called on Mrs. Bellows Saturday.
    Gus Smith of Sams Valley called at the French home a few days ago.
    Mr. and Mrs. Grant Mathews spent several days with his brother, Green Mathews, this week.
    Everyone has been sorting out the frozen potatoes and giving piggie an extra feed.
    Mr. and Mrs. Warren Bergman returned to their home in Irving Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Howard called at the Slusser ranch Saturday.
    Miss Murl Coffeen spent Saturday with Mrs. Wallace Coffeen.
    Misses Helen and Margery Coffeen were the guests of Miss Margaret Howard Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 11, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. P. Chase, one of our school supervisors, and W. S. Pitman, a member of the faculty of the normal school of Monmouth, were here last Friday evening for supper on their way to Brownsboro, where Mr. Pitman was booked for a lecture that night.
    Last Thursday the lodge of I.O.O.F. had their regular meeting in their hall and installed the following officers: Harrison Hess, N.G.; W. L. Childreth, V.G.; W. E. Buchanan, secretary, G. H. Wamsley, treasurer; George Phillips, warden; Floyd Pearce, conductor; E. Coy, I.G.; L. E. Smith, O.G.; Roy Ashpole, R.S.N.G.; Ray Harnish, L.S.N.G.; Nick Young, R.S.V.G.; John Foster, L.S.V.G.; Jud Edsall, R.S.S.; Roy Smith, L.S.S.: L. L. Simmons, chaplain. They also initiated Professor C. E. Johnson and Thomas Vestal into the order. From all appearances we have one of the best lodges, or rather two of the best, for we must not forget to mention the Rebekahs, in the country, and from what I can learn as an outsider, they have as fine times there as anyone could wish.
    J. F. Lewis of Prospect was out and spent the night here last Friday.
    J. L. Kershaw, who is living on Antelope Creek, was in town on business last week.
    Mrs. Mary Terrill of Brownsboro was also doing business with our merchants at the same time.
    In conversation with one of our leading business men last week on the subject of the sugar beet industry, I remarked that there were acres of fine beet land up on Little Butte, and I thought that the people up there would take hold of an enterprise of that kind, but he said, yes, he was sure they would if it was not for that Nygren hill. There is one of the greatest drawbacks to that fine country, that is peopled by a class of citizens that would be a credit to any country. That Nygren hill is a long, very rough, steep hill that can be cut out of the way with but little expense, but as it is now, the farmers living up on Little Butte say that if it was not for that hill they could bring out 3000 to 3500 pounds easier than they can now bring out 1500 to 1800 pounds. But I suppose that the authorities think that the road, originally a deer trail, has always been there, and so will just have to let it stay.
    George Lytle, a brother-in-law of Mrs. D. Cingcade, who has been in San Francisco, Cal., being treated for a cancer, has returned and is now a guest of Mr. Cingcade. He seems to thing that he is all right now.
    John Downs of Butte Falls and Matthew Hawkinson of Medford called Sunday for dinner, the former on his way to Butte Falls and the latter to Joseph Hannah's, on Rogue River.
    Mrs. Carter of Ashland, a sister of Mrs. Clay Cole, has been visiting her sister and took the P.&E. car Saturday for her home.
    C. E. Hammond of Phoenix came out on the car from Butte Falls Saturday with his two blooded hounds. He went up to try to catch a panther that was prowling around the country, but he said that the deer tracks were so thick that he was afraid to turn them loose, as he does not want them to learn to run deer.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Wetther, who have been visiting her brother, William Perry, returned to our town on Saturday.
    Mrs. Frank Tungate of Jacksonville came out Saturday and went on up to visit her sister, Mrs. F. J. Ayres. Mrs. William Perry also came out to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres.
    Miss Hazel Brown gave a birthday party to her cousin, Miss Allison Officer, last Friday evening. There were only a few invited guests, and besides her, Miss Officer's mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien were Miss Gladys Natwick and Miss Maud Corlies.
    I took a little spin around last Friday and Saturday to see what I could do in the interest of the Mail Tribune, and among the first I met was Charles Cingcade, who renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune; then Joe Moomaw, he also renewed his subscription to the Weekly M.T., and on Saturday I interviewed F. T. Newport, and he renewed his subscription to the Daily M.T., and then Mrs. Jude Mayham, when she paid me $1.50 for a year's subscription to the Weekly M.T., and later in the day secured the subscription of C. Hoogerhyde, our shoe cobbler. He has been reading the Oregonian, but stopped that paper for one that he thinks is more reliable. And then Saturday night I took in the picture show that is open every Saturday night. There was a nice audience and everyone seemed to be well pleased with the performance. After the show was over the seats were removed and those who felt so disposed spent a while in a social dance. One redeeming feature of the dances here is that there is a man kept at the entrance who is to keep anyone out who is under the influence of liquor. I noticed among the attendance quite a number of the people from the country, and among them was Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Quackenbush, who have just returned from a visit to his parents in Michigan. He had a little experience with the cold weather back there when the thermometer registered 30 below zero. Mr. and Mrs. Henderson (Mr. H. is the foreman on the Orton orchard, north of town) and Guy Bishop of Butte Falls were also in attendance, beside others too numerous to mention.
    There was a little social party at Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Clements' last Saturday night, when by mutual consent Mrs. J. V. McIntyre and Mrs. George von der Hellen prepared some refreshments and the two families met at the Clements home and had a royal feast and a splendid social time, one of the little bright spots in life.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1915, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Last Thursday and Friday, Mr. Chase and Mr. Pitman visited the schools of the vicinity. The chief purpose of Mr. Pitman's visit was to get an idea of what the rural schools were doing and what their requirements were. This way he could get an idea of how the teachers should be prepared at the state normal. He seemed to be especially interested in the arithmetic classes.
    He gave some very rousing lectures while visiting several of the schools, the first being made at Brownsboro, where there was quite a crowd present. He spoke on the subject of standardizing rural schools, telling what the schools should be and how the teachers should be prepared. The most interesting part of his speech was the comparison of the schools and school teachers of the present time with those fifty years ago. He not only aroused great [omission], but his lecture was mingled with a countless number of jokes and toasts which brought the whole house down with laughter.
    Everyone was pleased with his lecture and said that he was the best speaker that they had ever heard.
    Mr. Chase and Mr. Pitman visited the Butte Creek school Friday, January 8. They got here just as school was taking up in the morning. They heard the arithmetic class recite.
    About 10:30 o'clock Charles Terrill brought his thoroughbred Belgian stallion up to the schoolhouse. Mr. Chase then took charge of things and they had a horse judging contest. Each of the pupils had a score card and judged according to the specified items on the card. The horse scored all the way up from 80 to 90.
    This horse is a royal Belgian, raised by the king of Belgium. He was imported to Oregon by the Denver Horse Importing Company. The horse will be 8 years old in February and weighs about 1800 pounds.
    Mr. Pitman made a speech to the school, which made all the scholars nearly kill themselves from laughing. They left about noon, and you may be assured that the school was very sorry to have such a fine speaker leave.
    Friday evening, January 8, Mr. Chase and Mr. Pitman made a speech in the Lake Creek schoolhouse. Mr. Chase was the first on the program. He talked about the improvement of country schools and the need of a union high school in this vicinity. He talked about the attendance in the Lake Creek school, stating that in the past three months there was a gain of 4 percent over the term of six months' school last year.
    Miss Julia and Helen Sidley were pleasant callers at the home of Mrs. H. A. Meyer last Thursday.
    Gus Edler of Lake Creek returned home after spending a few days in Medford.
    There was a dance at the home of Charles Terrill last Saturday night. A good time was reported.
    When he finished speaking Mr. Pitman came to the front and began his speech, which consisted of a good variety of jokes that brought to view some important points in school life. He told of the use of a normal school in instructing teachers, the need of supervisors and the assistance of the school board. He told how the parents could aid in keeping a good attendance in school and why the school board should pull together in building up the school and making it more interesting for the teacher and pupils.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Ringer, one of our old-time citizens, has disposed of his property here and gone to Portland to live. His many friends here regret to lose him from our midst. He has been one of the standbys in the I.O.O.F. lodge here and I heard more than one remark how they missed him.
    Chris Bergman, one of our progressive farmers who has a farm on the Eagle Point and free ferry road, came out the first of the week with a lot of dressed chickens and shipped them to the San Francisco market. He found the mud so heavy that he concluded to remain overnight with us.
    Paul Vandyke, who is farming the Stone House ranch on Rogue River, the old J. E. Enyart ranch, was here for dinner the first of the week.
    J. M. McAllister of Butte Falls passed through here Tuesday, the 12th instant, in company of his oldest son on their way to his old home in Oklahoma. The old gentleman has been afflicted many years with Bright's disease and he wanted to go back to his old home before he dies. Fears are entertained that he will not survive the trip.
    E. G. Hughes, one of the Butte Falls merchants, and J. A. Howard spent Tuesday night with us on their way to Medford and Mr. Hughes returned to the Sunnyside the same night but Mr. Howard remained in Medford one night but spent Thursday night with us.
    Benjamin Fredenburg of Butte Falls also came out and went to Medford Tuesday but came back here Wednesday night.
    Henry French and wife were doing business with our merchants last Tuesday.
    Our town council met last Tuesday evening and the finance committee of the old council made their report but it was not acted on as the report had to go through the hands of the new finance committee, so we are still at sea as to how our finances are in our town.
    D. A. Lyons of Central Point and N. O. Larking of Los Angeles, Cal., came out Wednesday and took the Eagle Point and Persist stage to go up in the neighborhood of the Buzzard mine.
    Tuesday, January 12, the Rebekah lodge of Eagle Point had their regular meeting and initiated the following officers: Miss Mae Trusty, N.G.; Mrs. Minnie Bryant, V.G.; Mrs. Lottie McQuoid, recording secretary; Mrs. Sarah E. Howlett, treasurer; Mrs. Varian Jonas, financial secretary; Miss Samantha Minter, warden; Miss Loretta Childreth, conductor; Mrs. Nettie Grover, chaplain; Miss Hattie Howlett, R.S.N.G.; Mrs. Rosa Smith, L.S.N.G.; Mrs. Anna Bacon, R.S.V.G.; Mrs. Rachel Wood, L.S.V.G.; Mrs. Mae Painter, I.G.; and Miss Mabel Taylor, O.G. After the ceremony was over they had lunch served and their usual good time. It seems that the most of the members of the I.O.O.F. are also members of the Rebekah lodge, so they all have a good time together.
    Mrs. I. L. Greenwall of Washington is here visiting her sister, Mrs. J. R. Jackson.
    Mrs. Rebecca Jonas made the trip Thursday up beyond Big Butte Creek to spend a while with Mr. and Mrs. Art Nichols.
    Mrs. John Terrill of Lake Creek was here for dinner Thursday and took the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage for her home on the same day.
    Mrs. George Nichols, Jr., of Lake Creek came out from Medford Friday and proceeded on her way up to her home the same day.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 18, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Mary Martin and Mrs. Charles Skyrman were Central Point visitors this week.
    A bouncing baby arrived last week at the home of Mr. and Mrs. George Storms of Elk Creek.
    Dave Pence was appointed road supervisor of district 14.
    Miss Florence Kincaid of Agate has been engaged to teach the Debenger Gap school for the spring term.
    Dr. Kirchgessner made a professional visit to northwestern parts of the state this week.
    Harry Merriman was a Medford visitor Wednesday.
    Norman and Miss Martha Gage are visiting the valley towns.
    Mrs. Daily and Miss Ina Hannah are visiting friends on Elk and Trail creeks.
    Dr. Conroy of Central Point came out in his auto Tuesday to Frank Johnson's to visit Miss Janie. Miss Janie was taken to the hospital in Medford.
    Miss Pollie Johnson returned home from Medford Friday.
    Miss Ora Raimey spent the week with her sister, Mrs. Frank Miller, of Central Point.
    Dr. Holt was called to the George Storms home Monday.
    John Cox is very low at his home below Trail. His son, of Eagle Point, stayed with him to help care for him.
    Miss Eula Houston was a Jacksonville visitor a few days ago.
    Mr. Croft's house caught fire from the stovepipe and burned the roof pretty badly and but for the quick and effective work of his sons the house would have soon been in ashes.
    Eugene Bellows was in Medford Friday and Mrs. Bellows visited with friends in Eagle Point.
    A valuable hound belonging to C. C. Gilchrist was found dead on a hill a few days ago. It had been shot.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 18, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred W. Davis of Portland spent the night with us last Friday and Saturday morning was met here by Rev. W. E. Smith of Medford and they went out to the Reese Creek school house where Mr. Smith has been holding a protracted meeting. Mr. Davis is known in the logging camps and railroad centers as Haywire Davis. He advertises himself on his cards as Haywire Davis D.D. (Devil Driver), the loggers' sky pilot of the Pacific Coast. He preached in the Reese Creek school house Saturday night, and Sunday during the time there was some interest manifest.
    James Kershaw of Antelope came out last Saturday with a quantity of cream for the Independence creamery. It seems strange that the dairymen of Southern Oregon should send their cream to those distant creameries while we have creameries in our own county and then the merchants send off to those far-off places for our butter. And still we cry, "Keep your money at home and don't send off for your goods!"
    J. B. Findley accompanied Mr. Kershaw on his trip to town.
    Benjamin Brophy, one of our prominent stockmen, was doing business with our merchants last Saturday and so was N. Gorman, the foreman on the Laidlaw orchard.
    A. A. Betz, one of our progressive citizens, was in town the last of the week and while here paid up his arrears on the Weekly Mail Tribune and also paid a year's subscription in advance.
    Pete Young, who owns a fine farm just southwest of our town, was also in town interviewing our merchants. He has a large tract of land that I think would prove to be good sugar beet land if it was tested. Speaking about the sugar beet, I notice in my intercourse with the people that they are still talking about it and some of them that seem to be greatly interested in the subject are simply hanging back waiting to see what the other fellow is going to do about it.
    Wm. Sears of Butte Falls spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside. He had been to Medford to get a contract for supplying one of the school houses with wood for next season. He went on up home Sunday morning.
    John Goodwyn of Medford and John P. Bowen of Illinois came out from Medford Sunday and took dinner at the Sunnyside. And so did Amos Ayres and Miss Mae Trusty, Mr. and Mrs. Clay Cole, Mr. Cole is the engineer on the P.&E., also Guy Bishop and a lady, a friend of Mrs. Cole, whose name I did not learn, and Wolden Sage and Mr. Holman, who lives near Climax, were with us Saturday night.
    J. R. Robison and his son were in town the last of the week and while here renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Last Monday Mrs. John Terrill of Medford, who went up to the Lost Creek country to visit her husband's parents, returned to her home in Medford. She was accompanied by her father-in-law and while he was here renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. Susan Hart and Mrs. John Stowell were doing business in our town Monday.
    Rev. Stephen A. Douglas, the pastor of the Baptist church of Grants Pass, commenced a series of meetings in the Baptist church of this place last Monday and expects to keep them up indefinitely. He is a very pleasant and forceful speaker and bids fair to accomplish some good here.
    One of my neighbors in commenting on an editorial in the Daily Mail Tribune of a recent date on the subject of prohibition in Russia asked me to inquire if the editor would advocate that kind of prohibition in Oregon.
    Mrs. W. E. Buchanan and children spent the evening with Mrs. Howlett while her husband was attending a meeting of the I.O.O.F. lodge.
    The weather is simply delightful out in our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1915, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Last Saturday Charles Terrill and son Dalton went up to their mountain ranch to repair their fences. They stated that the snow was 12 inches deep at McCallister's saw mill.
    Last Sunday there was a large crowd of people from Medford gathering agates near Brownsboro.
    Lee Farlow of South Butte, who has been on a trip to California, returned home last week.
    Wm. Messal's little boy, who had his arm broken, is getting along nicely. They brought him home last week.
    Lloyd E. Stanley, a member of the Butte Creek school, took the final eighth grade examination last Thursday and Friday.
    Glen Terrill is absent from school this week, as he is helping his father put up a shed.
    Otto Meyer and Herman Meyer, Jr., went down to Clay Barker's last Friday to have some blacksmith work done.
    Claus Charley was in Medford last Monday on business.
    Reed Charley returned from Eagle Point last Friday with a load of wire fence.
    Otto Meyer attended Sunday school at the Lake Creek school house last Sunday. When Sunday school was over he went up to Mr. Colby's. Here he spent the rest of the day.
    Mrs. Wm. Hoeft and Maude Miller were pleasant callers at the Lake Creek school last Monday.
    Walter Charley of Climax went to Eagle Point Tuesday to send off some more of his patents.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 22, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed S. Wolfer started for Anita, Ia., last Wednesday, but before he started he paid up a little balance on his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and renewed his subscription for another year, so that when he is resting from his labors he can read about the happenings around his old home. His family will remain here with Mrs. Wolfer's parents until the school closes in Medford, as his stepdaughter, Miss Lorene Walker, is attending the high school there. Mr. Wolfer expects to spent the time until about the first of February in the Willamette Valley with his parents before proceeding on his journey to Iowa.
    The same day, Wednesday, Frank Manning, who has a fine farm on the Rogue River near Peyton, started to visit his father in Wyoming, whom he has not seen for twenty years, and his father is now past 80 years of age.
    Miss Pearl Gould of Medford was with us Thursday for dinner on her way up to the Lake Creek country to visit her sister, Alma, who is teaching in the Lake Creek district.
    A man who gave his name as N. N. Lewis of Ashland passed through here with a small bunch of goats last Thursday, remaining overnight. I understood that he went while here to see Peter Young to try to buy his goats, but as to what success he had I cannot say.
    We have finally succeeded in having an electric light put over the door in front of the Baptist church, something that has been greatly needed for some time.
    George Owens and wife of Wellen were doing business in our town on Thursday. I forgot to say that I was in Medford on Wednesday, so cannot chronicle the events of that day.
    P.J. Parton, the owner of the famous Joe Rader farm, was in town on Thursday on business, and while here in conversation on the subject of the sugar beet remarked that if that project proved a success that it would be worth $5000 to him. That is the way the far-seeing men look at the venture.
    Jack Stowell and Peter were doing business with our merchants last Thursday.
    Thomas Riley, Jr., was in from his farm on Antelope Creek Friday after a load of lumber to put an addition on his father's house.
    Last Friday I overheard a conversation between two ladies, in which the principal speaker was relating her experience during a drive out in the country. The speaker is naturally quite nervous, and it appeared that she was going out riding with a lady friend and on their arrival at Mr. C.'s the lady friend proposed to tie the horse, and in so doing left the rope a little too loose, and when they came out to start home the horse had backed the buggy around, and in the changing of position the horse had got down in the black sticky mud, and the first thought was that the horse was dead, so what should the nervous lady do (we will call her Mrs. X.) but commence to scream for one of the neighbors, who finally was attracted by her cries, so he ran with all haste to her assistance, not knowing what the trouble was, and about that time the neighbor's brother and wife came in, and they also came to the rescue of the lady, and by the time the neighbors got close enough to talk to Mrs. X., exclaimed, "What is the matter with him, G.?" and his laconic reply was, "I not see him yet," but when they reached the horse he was lying quietly with his head under his side, and when straightened out stood and tried to shake the sticky off of him. During the time that G. was coming she ran to the phone and called up her brother and told him that C. was dead, so had the whole family excited over the pony getting down in the mud, but she drove him home, and while she was telling of the incident laughed as though she rather enjoyed the occurrence. But hereafter she will always tie her own horse.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Harnish, who have been up in Josephine County with Mrs. H.'s parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Moomaw, returned Thursday. They used to live in this neighborhood. The old gentleman is one of the Dunkard preachers of that settlement. They have a Dunkard colony in that neighborhood and are all perfectly contented.
    John Meyer and wife of Lake Creek were here for dinner Friday, and I am glad to be able to say that Mrs. Meyer is gaining strength quite rapidly. She underwent an operation in Medford a few weeks ago.
    William Newsbaum, one of the progressive citizens of the Lake Creek country, was also here for dinner at the same time.
    William Daley, also of Lake Creek, was smiling on his friends Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Swen Berquist, who have a nice farm just west of town, about three miles, was here for dinner Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 25, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. T. Raimey and daughter, Miss Ora, were the guests of Miss Mima Hannah Friday.
    Everett Dahack gave a candy pulling as a farewell party Monday night. Quite a crowd was present and a merry time was had by all. Everett is going to Medford to live.
    Perry Foster sold 25 head of cattle to the Cottrell Bros. of the Meadows Friday.
    Mr. Wyant of Ashland spent a couple of days with his daughter, Mrs. Eugene Bellows, this week.
    Two daughters of John Cox have arrived from Texas and are helping to make his time pass as pleasantly as possible.
    Miss Eula Houston was a successful applicant at the last teachers' examination. She will teach in the Long Branch district.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Fry spent Wednesday evening with Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Howard.
    Pete Betz was an Eagle Point visitor Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Central Point spent Tuesday at the Raimey home.
    There were religious services at the Reese school house every night last week.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 25, 1915, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Floyd Charley was in Medford last Friday and Saturday on business.
    Ralph Stanley went to Eagle Point last Saturday after a load of wire fence.
    There was a surprise party at Mrs. Clay Charley's place last Saturday evening. There was quite a crowd present, everyone having a good time.
    W. B. Milam, who is spending the winter with his son, James Milam of Lake Creek, received a letter from his youngest son in Portland inquiring about the vacant land in Jackson County. His father gave him the following information: "There are plenty of hills and coarse sand, scrubby timber and sticky land."
    Otto Meyer of Lake Creek was in Eagle Point last Saturday having some dental work done.
    Miss Pearl Gould of Medford is spending a few days at Lake Creek visiting her sister, Miss Alma Gould, who is teaching the Lake Creek school.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Meyer of Lake Creek were in Eagle Point last Saturday on business.
    Ben Kingery is visiting J. D. Culbertson and family of Lake Creek this week.
    There was a dance at the home of Gus Nichols last Saturday night. Among those present were Tom Abbott and Miss Marie Newstrom, Mr. and Mrs. Will Nickell, Mr. and Mrs. Hayworth, Will Holman and Miss Geneva Taylor.
    Thomas Stanley of Brownsboro has been reappointed road supervisor in this district.
    Mike Sidley, Jr., took a load of sheep to Jacksonville last Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. S. Baker of Derby came out from Medford, where he is engaged in the employ of Gaddis & Dixon, the Page fence men, and spent the night with us last Saturday, going on up home before breakfast.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno, who owns an interest in a farm near the Eagle Point and ferry road, came out last Saturday to have some dental work done on her little boy, spent the night with us, while her mother, Mrs. Bert Clarno, went over to spend the night with her son, Mr. Bergman.
    Last Saturday there was a petition circulated in our town to the members of the legislature asking them to vote for the house bill No. 1, to enable the people of the state to enforce the prohibition amendment and was generally signed by the people, and on Sunday the question was submitted to the congregation in the Baptist church and endorsed by a unanimous vote. In addition to that, there were several wrote to our representatives at Salem urging them to vote for the measure with the Porter amendment.
    Frank Johnson, who has a fine farm on the Rogue River at the mouth of Indian Creek and his daughter, Miss Susie, who has been in the hospital for the past week in Medford, and William Grieve, our efficient assessor, and B. E. Hoffman and Mrs. Julius Bedrock of Montague, Cal., came out on the P.&E. Monday morning and took the Eagle Point and Persist stage for the Elk Creek country. Messrs. Grieve and Hoffman were going up to the Elk Creek country to clear up some of the timber, so that the land can be properly placed on the assessor's book and try to unravel some of the tangles that are now filling the Medford papers, and Mrs. Bedrock is a sister of Louis Martin, who is now in the county jail on the charge of killing A. S. Hubbard, the game warden of Ashland. She was on her way up to visit her mother.
    Jack Florey, who has been up in Washington, returned the last of the week, and his mother, Mr. A. J. Florey, went to Jacksonville to see her new grandson that the stork brought to our county recorder, Chauncey Florey.
    Lyle Carlton, who is running his father's farm near Wellen, was in town Monday on business.
    Carl Murphy of Ashland was a visitor in our town the first of the week.
    Harry Conroy and Bert Higinbotham of Prospect drove into the Sunnyside Monday night for the night, and the next morning went on to Medford after two loads of grain for Bert. He never stops for rain, snow or mud, but keeps on going all the time, and that is the way he manages his business so well. He has two fine farms near Flounce Rock.
    Last Sunday we were honored by the company of Mrs. Mary E. Yockey and her daughter, Miss Helen, and Miss Ethel Curry, all of Medford. Miss Helen is the main guy in the office of the Medford Publishing Company that publishes that live newspaper, the Mail Tribune. They came out on the Pacific & Eastern so as to take dinner at the Sunnyside and have a good time generally.
    Henry Trusty, the accommodating mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Trail and Persist route, Orville Childreth and Guy Bishop and Miss Lorene Grigsby of Agate were also here Sunday, and Mr. Holman, Mr. Thornton and Mrs. Keyes were also with us.
    W. E. Bell of Portland, the state inspector of drugs, was with us on Tuesday, and so was Miss Perl Gould of Medford. She had been up in the Lake Creek school district to visit her sister, Miss Alma, who is teaching in that district.
    George von der Hellen while at dinner Tuesday told me that his father, our state senator, was preparing a bill to be introduced to have all the public highways that pass through the small incorporated towns like Eagle Point, Talent, Phoenix, Gold Hill, Rogue River, etc., become county roads, and if he succeeds in working that through so as to become a law we may want to send him back again to Salem.
    Miss Hazel Brown and Robert Pelouze entertained a few of their Medford friends last Saturday evening, among whom were Margaret Souther, Laura Gates, Earl Hubbard and Bill Mitchell, and the latter part of the evening they took part in the social dance given in connection with the moving picture show by Messrs. Newport and Ringer.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 28, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday Messrs. Ragsdale and Pech of Lake Creek brought out some beef cattle and were met here by Messrs. Bennett and John Dennington of Jacksonville and taken to the latter place. They spent the night with us at the Sunnyside.
    Charles Weldon of Lake Creek came out on the P.&E. and started immediately for his home.
    J. C. Carpenter of Medford came out Wednesday and took the stage to go out to W. H. Crandall's. He is out here looking after a young orchard that belonged to his brother, the late Judge Carpenter of Ohio.
    L. J. Greenwalt of North Yakima, Wash., came in Wednesday to meet his wife and little boy who were visiting her sister, Mr. J. B. Jackson, and after staying one day started for San Diego, Cal., to attend the exposition there and later expect to visit the fair at San Francisco. They expect to be gone until fall. Mr. Greenwalt at one time lived in Phoenix and cultivated the Colver farm.
    On the same day, Wednesday, Mrs. J. B. and Mrs. Carl Jackson and Mrs. Greenwalt and her son took dinner with Mrs. Howlett.
    Just after I had mailed my Eaglets the following item [arrived] with the request that I put it in my Eaglets.
    On the evening of January 23 a party of young people gathered at the home of Gus Nichols and his charming wife. They indulged in the pleasant art of Terpsichore until Morpheus claimed them. Supper was served at the bewitching home. The guests were Mr. and Mrs. C. Hayworth, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Nickell, Miss Marie Newstrom, Miss Neva Taylor, Mr. Thomas Abbott, Mr. Will Holman, Robert A. Neill, C. W. Cox, Thomas Nichols, Jr., and John Foster.
    Harry Ash, a son of Mr. Ash, one of the Trail merchants, came out last Wednesday after a load of goods for his father's store. He spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Wm. Grieve, the wife of our county assessor, motored out Wednesday afternoon to meet her husband and B. E. Hoffman on their return from a trip to the Elk Creek country. The same day, according to previous arrangements, all of the really industrious people in the neighborhood who could spare the time--I was very busy that day--gathered at the home of J. W. Grover for the annual wood-cutting bee, to provide wood for the church for next winter and from all accounts prepared wood enough to last all next winter. I heard one industrious man express his regrets that he could not be there but he was promptly told that the wood had to be hauled and that he could lend a hand in that line when the road dried up. Dinner was served by Mrs. Grover, assisted by the ladies. Well, Wednesday night we all went to the church and heard a fine sermon from Rev. S. A. Douglas of Grants Pass. He has been preaching here now for over a week and expects to continue all of next week. He is a very interesting speaker and is attracting considerable attention. The interest is increasing and the congregation is growing in size and interest.
    Wm. Nickell of Lake Creek was with us on Thursday, and he had planned to go home but was called over the phone to Medford on business on Friday.
    Friday morning Rev. Douglas and your correspondent visited our school and the folding doors were opened and all three of the rooms were invited to meet together and meet us. Mr. Douglas was invited to give the children a talk and in response he related several pleasing incidents in his life and at the close of his short talk I was requested to tell the children something of my early school days experience. Our school is progressing finely under the management of Prof. W. E. Buchanan, assisted by Miss Minnie Taylor and Mrs. Grace von der Hellen.
    Fred Klippel of Portland came out Friday and took passage on the stage for Trail to visit his mother and sister who are living on their farm about two miles above the town of Trail.
    Last Friday we had here for dinner Messrs. H. M. McIntyre, H. N. Moe, J. E. Green and Thomas H. E. Hathaway, all of Medford. They had motored out to try to influence the farmers to take hold of the sugar beet movement. They were joined by Wm. von der Hellen in the afternoon and he visited with them several places but they found that the farmers had their land already sown in wheat and were unwilling to plow the wheat up. They succeeded in having three and a half acres signed up.
    C. H. Willison of Ashland, Ore., a traveling salesman for Wadham and Kerr Bros. of Portland, was among our merchants Friday. He said that he has not been in our town for about nine months.
    Mrs. L. C. Etta Worthen, who is teaching school in the Laurel Hill district, was a pleasant caller Saturday. She was accompanied by Ray Watkins.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 1, 1915, page 4


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Miss Myrtle Farlow and Miss Blanche Burleson, the Lake Creek correspondents for the Mail Tribune, were at the Lake Creek post office some time ago.
    Gus Nygren was at Eagle Point last Wednesday on business.
    F. S. Charley went to Medford last Wednesday, after a thoroughbred Hereford calf which he shipped from Eugene.
    Ralph Bieberstedt was at Eagle Point last Wednesday on business.
    Last Sunday Mrs. Minnie Stapleton was out visiting her daughter who is going to school at the Butte Creek school.
    Claus Charley was at Eagle Point last Wednesday on business.
    Tom Abbott was visiting Charles Newstrom of South Butte last Sunday.
    Mrs. Margaret Meyer and Miss Alma Gould were visiting Mrs. John Tyrrell last Saturday and Sunday.
    Arden Tyrrell attended a motion picture show and dance in Eagle Point last Saturday evening.
    John Tyrrell of Lake Creek bought some hay of Herman G. Meyer last week.
    Tommy Ragsdale and Henry Towne went to Jacksonville with a bunch of beef cattle last Tuesday.
    James Milam was buying hay of Mr. Burleson last Tuesday.
    Miss Maggie Sidley, who has been working for Mrs. H. A. Meyer, returned home last Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mr. T. L. Farlow of North Butte Creek went to Medford in their auto last week. This is the first winter that autos were ever able to manipulate on Butte Creek as late in the season as this.
    Mr. Burleson has rented T. L. Farlow's ranch on South Butte.
    Lloyd Stanley, who took the eighth grade examination at the Butte Creek school, received his diploma Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Medford Mail Tribune I omitted to state that John Greb, C. W. Clements and Benj. H. Brophy had renewed their subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and just after I had mailed my letter Saturday afternoon Robert A. Neill of Brownsboro renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Miss Grace Conley, who has been spending some time in Medford came out last Saturday evening on the P.&E. train to visit her people.
    Arden Tyrrell of Lake Creek was a guest with us Sunday, and so were Mr. and Mrs. Norman McQuoid, G. H. Wamsley, Mrs. E. S. Wolfer and daughter, Miss Loreen Taylor, Waldon Sage and Rev. Steven G. Douglas.
    Last Saturday Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church of this place went to Grants Pass to fill the pulpit of Mr. Douglas, and Mr. D. remained here to fill the pulpit for Mr. S., simply a change, and Mr. S. returned Monday evening and reports having had a very pleasant time, but not so large congregations as he had expected in such a place as Grants Pass. Mr. Douglas had a very fair congregation both morning and evening, and he preached two fine sermons, but at the close of the evening service he announced that the series of meetings would close, as there seemed to be so little interest manifested, or rather that the people seemed so reluctant to change their course and accept Christ.
    James Trusty, who has been working in a sawmill at Weed, Cal., came in Monday morning on the P.&E. and took passage with his brother on the Eagle Point-Trail-Persist stage for the Trusty home on Elk Creek. He had had the misfortune to fall and dislocated his elbow, so had to lay off for a while.
    Hamlinton Watkins and wife came in on the P.&E. from Medford Monday and took the stage for their home.
    E. S. Wolfer, who started from here about ten days ago for Anita, Ia., but stopped in the Willamette Valley to visit his parents, started Monday for his future home.
    After all of the complaining at a kind Providence on account of the long dry spell, we are at last favored with as fine rain as anyone could wish, so now we are assured of a fine crop this coming season.
    In looking over the Oregon Journal I see that the Washington legislature has a bill before it, if it is passed, [that] will be of great value to the taxpayers of that state, and that is to allow no one to vote on a question in an incorporated town, city or county where a tax or bond issue is to be decided. As it is now, under the law, anyone who is of legal age and entitled to the right of franchise can vote and by that means a few men who wish to vote a bond or tax in a town or county can round up the loose element and influence them to vote for a tax or bond and thus inflict a heavy burden on the few taxpayers and they themselves, the non-taxpaying part of the community, will not have to pay one cent, while only a very few of the taxpayers will be benefited by it. So I would suggest to our representatives at Salem that they introduce a law to allow no one but bona fide taxpayers to vote on any question where a tax or bond issue is at stake. I know of a small incorporated town that was incorporated by a vote of that kind and then afterward voted a bond of several thousand dollars on the taxpayers of the town.
    Mrs. Jettie Clarno, Thomas Vestal and his sister, Mrs. Wilbur Jacks, attended church here Saturday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Downey of Medford came out Saturday to visit friends and to transact business. Mr. Downey is the man who bought the Owings Eagle Point hotel property and then sold the hotel property to a Medford man. I have lost his name, and I learned that they, the man that bought the hotel, and Mr. Downey were out to try to arrange a sale of the property where Smith Bros. have their soft drink and confectionery store, but have been unable to learn any of the results.
    Last Monday night, just about the time that the most of the people in our quiet little town were going to sleep for the night, we heard a most unearthly noise, the reports of guns, the war whoop of the savage Indians, the clashing of arms, and we began to think of the prediction of that great and wise Senator in the United States Senate, who predicted that the Jap would make a raid on our coast, but in a few minutes quiet was restored and we resumed our dreams, and Tuesday in looking around for the dead and dying and to ascertain the fearful result of the engagement, I learned that it was all over the marriage of Fred Dutton and Miss Dottie Harnish by Rev. L. L. Simmons. They had slipped down to Mr. Simmons' home after dark, in company of Roy Ashpole and his wife, and were quietly married and returned to Mr. Ashpole's to spend the night, thinking that they were unobserved, but someone found out what was up, so a few of their many friends, and they are counted by the score, in spite of the rain and wind, turned out to give them an old-fashioned charivari, and after they had had what fun they could out of doors Mr. and Mrs. Dutton invited them in and they were invited to partake of some nuts, candies, cigars, etc., that Mr. D. had already provided, and this (Tuesday) morning everything is in its normal stage.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our progressive farmers and stockraisers, who has been back to St. Louis, Mo., to visit his parents, returned this (Tuesday) morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 4, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    James Wallace Cox was born in Fayette County, Texas, November 19, 1850 and died at his home near Trail February 3, 1915, aged 64 years 3 months, 14 days. He died of cancer of the liver.
    He was married in 1874 to Miss Elizabeth Gordon of Hood County, Texas. He was a member of the Methodist Church, joining about 1884. Since his sickness began he often expressed himself as "I have no fears of death." He has spent all his life except the last 16 months in Texas.
    He leaves his wife, three sons, O. M. Cox, Miami, Texas; Gordon Cox, Eagle Point, Oregon; Smith Cox, of Trail, Oregon; five daughters, Mrs. Muriel Mitchell, Elbert, Texas; Mrs. Betty Jones, Arabella, New Mexico; Mrs. Alla Parker, Round Timber, Texas, Mrs. Della Holmes, Weston, Texas; Miss Lucile Cox, Trail, Ore., and 19 grandchildren besides many friends in Texas and Oregon to mourn his death.
    He was interred in the Central Point cemetery Thursday afternoon and funeral services [were held] at the grave.
    Mrs. Cox and children are very thankful to the friends and neighbors for the many kindnesses shown them during their husband and father's illness and especially George Croft for his faithful help.
    Lee Black of Forest Creek was a recent visitor at the homes of his sisters, Mrs. Chris Bergman and Mrs. Peter Betz.
    Mrs. H. L. Howard called on Miss Ely Saturday.
    Mrs. Eugene Bellows and Miss Mattie Minter were Eagle Point visitors.
    Miss Zella Taylor of Sams Valley brought her uncle, S. F. Smith, over to the French ranch Wednesday.
    At the telephone meeting of Trail line No. 16 Saturday, it was decided to reconstruct the line to the Antioch road.
    Dr. Holt removed the adenoids for Miss Mina Minter last Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 8, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT TAVERN DESTROYED BY FIRE
    Fire destroyed the Tavern Hotel at Eagle Point early Wednesday morning, causing a property damage estimated between $6000 and $7000, covered by insurance. Hotel and bar fixtures and household effects were destroyed. The building and contents were owned by James Vogeli, who was in this city when the fire started. The structure was built in 1911. Defective electric light wiring is supposed to have been the origin of the fire. The insurance is $6000.
    Serious damage to the business district of Eagle Point was averted by the fact that no wind was blowing, otherwise the lumber yard and P.&.E. depot would have been menaced. The hotel property is practically an entire loss. Mr. Vogeli's plans for the future have not been decided upon.
    The Eagle Point fire department and bucket brigade battled the flames and protected adjacent property.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1915, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ruby Haley, daughter of one of our progressive farmers, who is greatly interested in the move to have a sugar beet plant established in the Rogue River Valley, who has been visiting friends in Jacksonville for some time, returned to the parental roof last Tuesday.
    G. W. Frey, who has a farm on the north fork of Butte Creek, passed through town Tuesday on his way from Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Riley were doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    Last Tuesday, February 2, the friends of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dutton concluded they would give them a little surprise party, so the following persons met by mutual agreement at the home of Mrs. Dutton's parents, Mr. and Mrs. S. H. Harnish, where the newly wedded couple had come to spend the second night of their married life. Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Daley, Mrs. Sophia Robinett, Mrs. A. C. Howlett, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, Mrs. Loretta Childreth, Miss Mabel Taylor, Hattie Howlett, Roy and Robbie Harnish, John Simon, Ed Coy, Jud Edsall and Clarence Robinett. There was just enough old ladies there to make the meeting interesting, so they put their heads together to devise a plan how they could keep the young folks out of mischief, so what should they do but hunt up the old quilting frames, resurrect a comforter and tack it out. Candy, nuts, and popcorn were served and about 11 o'clock the company dispersed after wishing the newlyweds all the happiness to be realized in married life.
    The following is the different rolls of honor in the three departments in our school:
    Principal's Room--Ruberta Pearce, Lawrence Lily, Bernice Simmons, Walter Painter, Albert Conley, John Butler, Verta Grover, Thelma Nichols, Ethel Riley, John Gries, Carlyle Natwick and Charles Winkle.
    The following pupils passed at the eight grade examination: Bernice Simmons, Nida McIntosh, Albert Conley and John Butler.
    Intermediate Department--Elsworth Stowell, Lyle Van Scoy, Judge Florey, Fern Lewis, Katie Buchanan, Nora Childreth, Ethel Winkle, Kee Buchanan, May Greb, Myrtle Greb, Margaret Riley, Freda Leabo, Joyce von der Hellen, Lillian Findley, Dorner Nichols, Ruth Grover, June Robinson, Ruford Simmons, Lloyd Pearce, Truman McClelland, Harold Van Scoy, Bon Buchanan.
    Primary Department--Lova Buchanan, Katrina Bryant, Loretta Trulove, Letha Findley, Melva Simmons, Donald von der Hellen, Heath Childreth and Ansil Pearce. The foregoing were neither absent nor tardy during the month of January.
    John Tyrrell of Lake Creek took dinner with us Thursday. He had been to Jacksonville to interview the county court with regard to the road from Lake Creek on up Butte Creek, endeavoring to have it located permanently on suitable ground or else put it back on the old survey again.
    Fred Pelouze has had a lot of lumber hauled out to his farm; he is one of our farmers who believes in improving and keeping up his farm.
    H. P. Berlison of Lake Creek and wife were in town Thursday. Mr. Berlison had come in after a load of oats and alfalfa seed for Thomas Farlow and while here subscribed for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Jeff Brophy passed through our town Thursday on his way to Medford.
    Ray Spencer and wife of Butte Falls spent the night with us Thursday and Friday morning went on to Medford.
    Some time ago I mentioned that Miss Riley had lost a purse containing $27.00 and a gold ring. The purse was found by one of her neighbors and the finder spent a part of the money before it was discovered that he had found the purse and steps were taken to prosecute him, but F. M. Stewart, justice of the peace, gave him a chance to get the money so he dug it up and the girl secured the money, ring and purse.
    Bert Dunken of Los Angeles, Cal., spent the night with us Friday on his way up to Elk Creek to visit his brother-in-law, Mr. Miller.
    Rufus Trusty came in from Dunsmuir Friday morning and took the stage for the Trusty farm on Elk Creek.
    Charles Klingle and wife were doing business with our merchants on Thursday.
    Mrs. O. E. Nichols of Medford was out visiting friends and looking after business in Eagle Point the first of the week.
    E. A. Moore, salesman for a Seattle firm, was here for dinner Wednesday.
    Thursday morning Mrs. C. Hoogerhyde, the wife of our shoe cobbler, called and paid $2.50 on their subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    J. E. Garner, recently from Gold Beach, Cal., spent the night at the Sunnyside. He is a brother-in-law to Mr. A. H. Horton, who owned a farm just above Brownsboro and went last winter to G.B. to try to find a better country but Mr. G. tells me that they have about concluded that they missed it in selling out, for they now believe that Jackson County, Oregon is one of the favored spots on the globe.
    Miss Bessie Simpson of Medford came to the Sunnyside for dinner Wednesday on her way to Brownsboro to take charge of that school. She took the E.P. & Lake Creek stage.
    Rev. Albert H. Gammons, Presbyterian minister of Butte Falls, and wife came out from Butte Falls on the P.&E. Tuesday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside and Wednesday morning Mr. Gammons went to Jacksonville, returning the same day, and that night, Wednesday, attended prayer meeting here giving us an interesting talk on Christian fellowship.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 11, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday night Mrs. Fred Pelouze, Mrs. J. Frank Brown and Mrs. Carl Narregan gave a dance with refreshments in the opera house and I understand that they not only had a good attendance but a very pleasant time. Those three ladies know just how to conduct an affair of that kind so as to make a success of it. W. E. Hammel was one of the participants and reported the result to your correspondent.
    Last Saturday B. J. Blankinship of Medford came out and took dinner and the next Monday returned to the Sunnyside in company with L. E. Troxel, a mining engineer of Medford. They were trying to get in touch with someone who could put them onto a lode of copper or silver ore. Mr. Troxel claims to have had several years experience in that line of business and just as the war in Europe broke out was on a deal to sell a mine to an English company for one and a half million dollars.
    Miss Rose Nealon of Table Rock, who is teaching school in the Reese Creek district, called for dinner Saturday on her way to her home to take part in the rehearsal of the play that is to be rendered the latter part of the month.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres were visiting their children, Mrs. Laura Newport and Mrs. Rosa Smith, Saturday.
    Grandma Heckathorn, who has been up on Evans Creek visiting children and grandchildren, returned home the last of the week.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hawk and Mr. and Mrs. C. Hoogerhyde spent Sunday, Jan. 31, with Mr. W. H. Crandall and his sisters Mrs. Harris and Cora Crandall, and Mrs. Hoogerhyde reports having a lovely time.
    Last Saturday one of the town boys came out after a load of wire fencing to take up to the Tonn home in the Lake Creek country.
    Arthur A. Smith, who has a fine farm on Big Sticky, brought over a half dozen of guinea fowls for Grant Mathews, who lives on the free ferry road about eight miles from here, last Saturday and while here gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Frank Johnson came out last Saturday from his home on Indian Creek and Rogue River to bring his daughter, Miss Jennie Francis. She had been in the hospital in Medford and the doctor wanted her to come in so he could see if she is all right.
    Tom Hampton and wife were in town Saturday interviewing our merchants.
    Last Saturday we had a citizens meeting in our town to select delegates to attend a larger gathering to be held in Medford on Monday and Messrs. T. E. Nichols and Frank Brown were chosen. James Owens, one of our prominent farmers and stockraisers, was in attendance at the meeting.
    Last Sunday was rather a noted day in this community, for it was the fiftieth anniversary of the marriage of Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan and on the occasion Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton and your correspondent and wife were invited to take dinner with the aged couple and their daughter, Mrs. E. S. Wolfer, and her daughter Miss Lorena Taylor. They received some handsome presents, and in the evening just before church time quite a number of their neighbors and friends called on them to tender their congratulations.
    Another incident that will likely be remembered for some time is that the wind blew about as hard as it ever blows in this favored spot in Oregon, and while it was blowing it left its mark in its wake; it wrecked several buildings, flues, etc., and among them will mention that it took the pipe off the top of our kitchen flue but did but little damage. It blew down the barn on the old Storey place belonging to the Hoovers of Medford, a part of the fire wall on T. E. Nichols' new brick building, Mr. McQuoid's smoke house, broke two large panes of glass out of Dr. Holt's office in the upper part of the von der Hellen building, moved one of the large sheds on the Cingcade barn on the edge of the desert, tore down P. J. Parton's hog scale house, unroofed the barn and buggy shed for Ed Dutton, blew off the roof on the old Matney place where Fred Dutton lives, tore two of the chimneys off of Senator von der Hellen's residence, picked up the garage off of Harry von der Hellen's auto and tore it to pieces leaving the auto unhurt, played havoc with the telephone wires, uprooted one of the ornamental trees in George von der Hellen's yard besides leveling fences without number.
    The same day we had for dinner at the Sunnyside a gentleman by the name of Barnes, wife and two sons, J. V. McIntyre and family, W. I. Mapes, wife, son and his wife of Medford, W. E. Coleman of Phoenix, the latter five came out together and after dinner, leaving the ladies at the Sunnyside, the men went up on the north desert to look for agates, remaining until the afternoon train on Monday before going home. Paul Opdyke, who has a farm on Rogue River, also spent the night with us. Mr. Vogeli also closed his Tavern Sunday; he asked permission of the council to let him keep his saloon without keeping this Tavern, as that was a losing business, and they granted his request. Sunday night, before preaching, there was organized a young people's society, to be known as the Christian Endeavor Society. They elected Miss Loretta Childreth, president; Bernice Simmons, vice-president and Ruby Haley, secretary and treasurer.
    Jeff Conover and his son were in town Monday and so was A. G. Bishop and P. W. Haley.
    On Tuesday P. W. Haley called and renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Clay Cole, Roy Ashpole and wife motored to Talent Sunday to bring home Mrs. Cole, who has been visiting her brothers the past few days.
    Wig Ashpole, one of the prominent meat market men, came out Monday and bought 83 head of steers from Walter Wood.
    I understand that there are quite a number of our citizens congratulating themselves over the appointment of ex-County Commissioner Smith as road master, as he is said to be a fine man and a good road builder.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 12, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I mentioned the fact that Mr. Vogeli had made application to the town council for permission to close his hotel and run the saloon on the grounds that the hotel was running behind all the time and they granted his request and on Sunday he closed the hotel, and Monday afternoon took his family and went to Medford, and that night the hotel, "The Tavern" took fire and burned down and some of our people thought that would be the last of the saloon in Eagle Point as we have a dry mayor and four out of the five remaining councilmen were elected on the dry ticket, but Lo like Banquo's ghost it will not down, for I understand that he has gone around and interviewed the councilmen and mayor and they have concluded to let him move into another building and run the saloon for the rest of the time for which he has paid his license, April 5th, and those whom I have talked to, of the city authorities, seem to think that he will apply for a renewal of his license in March, so as to enable him to run on until the first of the next year and then if the liquor interests can succeed in the senate in killing the house bill No. 1 so at to prevent the enforcement of the prohibition amendment we can have a saloon indefinitely. I see that Mr. Vogeli is having the old bakery building fitted up in anticipation of the council granting his request.
    In spite of the hard time and dry weather there seems to be quite a number of our traveling salesmen visiting our town. On Wednesday we had here for dinner R. T. Perkins representing a wholesale tea and coffee house of Portland, F. A. Dunlap of Derby and R. S. Sinclare and wife to spend the night and on Thursday we had C. M. LaValley of Portland, J. E. Reid of Portland, R. A. Taylor, T. West, and just as the men had registered in the Sunnyside register in came George von der Hellen all out of breath and told me that G. A. Pech was down at his hardware store and wanted to pay me his subscription to the Mail Tribune so off I started and just then another salesman came in but I was off so did not learn his name. Well, on arriving at the store I met Mr. Pech of Lake Creek and he told me that the day before he had his leg hurt so that he could not walk to see me so sent, but he renewed his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune all right. Another incident [that] occurred Tuesday morning about the time of the fire in the Tavern was the arrival of a fine baby boy at the home of Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Strong, and on the arrival of the youngster Mr. Strong gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. Dr. W. W. P. Holt was in attendance.
    The following items were sent to me from Medford by letter and the sender signed the name "Subscriber":
    Mr. Nate Messenger of Agate is working at the Alta Vista orchard.
    Mr. and Mrs. Everett McArthur of Medford spent Sunday with Mrs. McArthur's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Corlies.
    Mrs. Frank Corlies left Tuesday to spent the rest of the week visiting relatives and friends in Medford.
    The W.C.T.U. of Eagle Point will hold memorial services in the Baptist church on Saturday, February 20th at 2 o'clock in commemoration of Miss Francis E. Willard's birthday.
    Last Wednesday Carl and Harry von der Hellen shipped a fine lot of bacon hams to Portland.
    J. E. Howell spent the night at the Sunnyside last Thursday. He came out after a load of goods for Mr. Ash's store at Trail.
    Archie Turpin, who had the misfortune to have his barn blown down on Sunday, the 7th, came in for a load of lumber and shakes to repair the damage last Thursday.
    R. H. Toft, who owns a farm just above Brownsboro, was in town on Thursday and in speaking of his farm said that he had about 100 acres sown to alfalfa and clover and that he expects to cut this season 200 tons of hay off the place.
    Fred L. Heath, one of our merchants, has adopted the plan suggested in an editorial in the Daily Mail Tribune, and has one of his show windows well filled with lard and other canned goods marked "Made in Eagle Point," "Made in Lake Creek," Made in Talent," etc., showing that he believes in patronizing home industry.
    Another change in real property has taken place in our town; John Downey has traded his property just across the street from the Eagle Hotel for property in Josephine County.
    T. H. Veghte, L. A. Neil, Charles H. Willison and wife, Miss Alma Gould and Albert Anderson were at the Sunnyside for dinner Friday.
    Fred Pelouze and wife took passage on the P.&E. for Medford last Friday afternoon to attend the big blowout on Lincoln's birthday.
    Last Friday afternoon George West and wife motored out from Medford accompanied by Mrs. E. C. Maasdam and Mrs. W. E. Merrill and visited Mrs. Howlett.
    The Parent-Teachers Association met in the school house Friday night and had a very interesting program and among other things an old-fashioned spelling match.
    Perry Foster, one of the pioneers of the valley, who has a fine farm on Rogue River, was with us Friday night.
    Mrs. Charles Painter has gone to Gold Hill to visit her daughter, Mrs. Walker.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Jack Houston of Trail was in town last Saturday and reports that everything is flourishing up on Long Branch. That his daughter, Miss Inez, was to commence teaching school in the Wellen district on the 15th of this month and that his niece, Miss Eula Houston, is to commence her school on March 1 in the Long Branch school district.
    Chris Bergman and Rube Johnson were both doing business in Eagle Point Saturday.
    W. E. Hammel made a business trip to Medford Saturday afternoon.
    Harvey Stanley, one of our prominent stockmen, and wife were in town Saturday. Mrs. S. was seeking someone to do some dental work.
    C. E. Johnson, who is in charge of the Table Rock school, came over and went to Butte Falls Saturday, returning the same day to Eagle Point, and spent the night at the Sunnyside. He reports that the Arrow Literary Society of Table Rock are preparing to have a grand entertainment at the Table Rock schoolhouse on the evening of the 27th of this month. Your correspondent expects to be present and tell the readers of the Eaglets something about it.
    Last Sunday was quite a busy day at the Sunnyside, and among those who took dinner that day were Florence Trowbridge, Ed, Ben, Alice and Mrs. Ed Trowbridge, Ione Flynn, May Trowbridge, all of Medford, Mr. Towers of Portland, John Owens, wife and two sons, Miss Ida Bishop, Guy Bishop, Miss Nina McIntosh, Miss Lorene Grigsby of Agate, Howard Painter, Orville Childreth, Professor C. E. Johnson of Table Rock, George West and wife, Miss Violet Cook of Medford, L. A. Stagg, Ray Coleman, T. Saum, George Boeump of Talent and Weldon Sage of Medford, and in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. George W. Loosely and two sons, son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Neil of Ashland.
    Last Saturday night our council met in special session and granted James Vogeli permission to open his saloon in the old bakery building, and on Monday morning it was formally opened, and those who are craving that kind of goods can have their appetites satisfied, provided they have the price, but we live in hopes that after the first of January, 1916, that our boys and girls will not have the temptation so prominently before them. But it was a question before the council what they were to do, for Mr. Vogeli had already conformed to the law and paid his license money, $50, for six months, and he had about two months license money paid and they did not like the idea of digging up the $80 and refunding to him, and they did not feel that it would be altogether right to force him to put up a house where the Tavern stood just for a short time, and so they kindly let him run the saloon, and I have good conclusive evidence that if he wants to run the saloon on up to December 31, 1915, the council will allow him the privilege.
    John D. Holst, one of the forest rangers of Sams Valley, came over in his car and stopped at the Sunnyside Tuesday. He expects to remain in the neighborhood for a few days. Bert Peachy, another forest ranger, and Mr. Holst went out riding Tuesday afternoon.
    Leslie Ossman and Louis Anderson of Trail came in for dinner Tuesday, and George von der Hellen brought in Mr. Bagger of Portland, who represents Mason, Ehrmann & Co. of that city.
    Miss Louisa Blaess, proprietress of the Eagle Hotel, gave me her subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune so that she and her boarders can keep posted as to what is going on in the world.
    H. G. Meyer, who has the contract for carrying the mail from here to Lake Creek, renewed his subscription Tuesday for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Just as I was looking at my receipt book to see if I had reported everything, I see that F. T. Newport has paid me for the ads he ran in the Daily and Weekly Mail Tribune. He reports that the masked ball was well attended and that they had a very pleasant time.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1915, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    B. Dawson made a business trip to Central Point Tuesday.
    School will start again next Tuesday, the 23rd, with Miss Dewie Howe as teacher.
    Miss Mae Trusty returned home Monday after a few days visit with friends in Eagle Point.
    Sheriff Singler, Mr. Irving and Mr. Saunders made a business trip up Trail Creek Friday.
    J. H. Trusty of Elk Creek went to the valley Sunday bringing a large load of grain home with him Monday.
    B. Dawson and Irwin Howe moved Boyd Tucker and family up to Mr. Grieve's road camp the last of the week.
    Middlebushers are making some fine improvements on the hill back of their house, clearing and burning all brush.
    The people are all looking forward to a good time at the dance at the power plant Saturday night.
    Dennis Zimmerlee and his brother-in-law M. Evans left Sunday for Yreka, Cal. They will drive through. Mrs. Evans will stay and Dennis will return home.
    Mr. Dunlap has recovered sufficiently to resume his work in the blacksmith shop again.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher has been visiting relatives and friends at Table Rock the past week.
    We notice several hauling hay, although we have had a fine open winter.
    L. Z. Poole is much better at this writing. Lewis Thomason is staying with him, during Mr. and Mrs. Poole's absence.
    F. Klippel of Portland is visiting with relatives near Trail. His health is improving fast.
    Mr. Bingham, Mr. Gaines, Mr. and Mrs. Vandyke, Mr. and Mrs. Poole, Boyd Tucker, Ed Ash, J. Warner and L. Middlebusher went to Medford Monday. Some of the former were subpoenaed for witnesses by the grand jury.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. Cushman entertained the Misses Hazel and Mae Warner, Gertrude Shoults, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Warner and little son, Mrs. Daw and family, O. Gaines and Frank Middlebusher at their home Sunday. The afternoon was spent in a game of ball.
    L. L. Mareks, T. C. Gaines, W. Houston and Dave Pence finished surveying the new telephone line Friday.
    J. Embry, lineman of Prospect, made a tour of inspection over the line between Trail and the power plant Friday, and found the line in fine order after the big wind storm.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1915, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    How we spent Friday afternoon. A few of the farmers living close to our school decided on having a social dinner with us at our school house on Friday, February 5th. Among those who were present were as follows: Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Myers, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Terrill, Mrs. C. Charley and son Flody, Mrs. Wm. Stanley, Mr. Chase, the school supervisor, Alice Nygren, Leo and Emmet Klingle, Henry Meyer, Jr., Irvin Fry, Lloyd and Edward Colby, Jim and Simon McAllister. While the ladies prepared dinner the men and boys played ball. After the dinner was over, was the opening of the society. The first thing of the meeting was the election of officers. Those who were elected are as follows: Lloyd Stanley, president; Dalton Terrill, vice-president; Claus Charley, secretary; Myrtle Meyers, treasurer, and Audley Meyer health officer. After the election we had our program as follows: Violin solo, Carl Dresk; Composition, Dalton Terrill; Speech, Audley Meyer; recitation, Anna Nygren; Speech, Mr. Sehell; Talk, Claus Charley; Recitation, Albert Myers; Talk, Leland Charley.
    Debate, Resolved That a Silo is More Benefit to a Dairyman Than a Field of Alfalfa. Affirmative, Claus Charley; negative, Audley Meyer.
    After the program was the judging of dairy cows under the direction of Mr. Chase.
    The Lake Creek school ball team has challenged this school for a game.
    Miss Maude Terrill, Miss Myrtle Farlow and Miss Blanch Burleson were pleasant callers to the Butte Creek school Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. I.L. Bradshaw and son went to Medford last Saturday on business.
    Thos. Ragsdale and his younger brother went to Eagle Point Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Stanley were visiting Wm. Stanley's Monday.
    Miss Myrtle Myers spent Sunday with Miss Verna Charley.
    Charley Edler and Harry Fry just returned from a trip to Klamath County. Mrs. Harry Fry is down visiting her mother.
    Wm. Stanley is helping Carl Stanley with his house.
    George Brown and family spent Sunday at Mr. Barker's.
    The Klingle children and Lloyd Stanley were visiting H. A. Myer and family Sunday.
    Mrs. Wm. Bradshaw has returned to her home in Medford from a visit to Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Bradshaw.
    Thos. Stanley is smoothing the roads down this week with a road grader.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 19, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    A nine-pound valentine made his arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Conover.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz, Mr. and Mrs. Slusser, Miss Piele and Harry Daily were the Sunday guests of Mr. and Mrs. Harry Howard.
    Steve Smith has rented 50 acres of Perry Foster.
    Fred Bellows is spending a few days with his brother Eugene and family.
    Wilfred Jacks came in from Lake County this week. His family and children came in last fall and spent the winter here.
    Miss Florence Kincaid of Agate opened the spring term of school in the Debenger Gap district Monday.
    Howard Rogers and family of Beagle were the guests of the W. T. Houston home Sunday.
    Miss Nellie Ely has been on the sick list.
    Mary McNott was born in Wisconsin in 1848 and was married to Mr. Schaffer. One child, Hiram, was born and her husband died. In January 1866 she was married to Mr. Fisher. To this union four sons and two daughters were born. She joined the Methodist Church when a young girl. She was sick about 20 minutes but suffered untold misery for that time. She died February 17, 1915. An aged husband, two sons, George and Ed Fisher and two granddaughters, Mrs. Tessie Robinett of Eugene and Miss Fisher survive her. She was buried Thursday at Trail cemetery. Rev. Simmons of Eagle Point conducted the funeral services at the grave. The handsome flowers given by Mrs. W. Brown of Eagle Point were greatly appreciated.
    Among the Medford visitors this week were Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah, Mr. and Mrs. T. Raimey, Norman Gage, T. C. Gaines, Mr. and Mrs. A. Pool, Mr. Bingham, Eugene Bellows, Green Mathews and John Warner.
    Miss Janie Johnson is a guest at the Grant Mathews home.
    Mrs. B. Clarno entertained Mrs. Grant Mathews, Mrs. J. Johnson, Miss Janie Johnson and Mrs. J. Clarno Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Caster and wife were doing business with our merchants last Tuesday.
    Walter Wood drove a fine bunch of beef steers through our town last Tuesday for the Medford market.
    Thomas Riley, Jr., was smiling on some of his friends Tuesday.
    S. J. Howell, representing Blumauer & Frank of Portland, spent the night at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    F. D. Hougham of Seattle, Wash., representing Fidelity-Phoenix Insurance  of New York, took dinner at the Sunnyside Wednesday. There was another traveling salesman also took dinner with us the same time, but he just came in, sat down to his dinner and disappeared as soon as he finished, so I did not learn his name or business. But I notice that there is getting to be quite a number of gentlemen of that profession visiting our town recently which indicates that our merchants are doing considerable business, and there is getting to be quite a number of strangers on our streets; that would indicate that Eagle Point is regaining her place on the map of Oregon.
    It becomes my unpleasant duty to chronicle the death of two of our fellow citizens, both dying on the same day.
    The first one to die was Matthew (Bud) Thomson of Climax, who died on the morning of the 17th at the residence of his brother-in-law, W. W. Taylor. He leaves a wife, brother and sisters to feel their bereavement. He had had an operation performed in Ashland and never fully recovered. He was just in the prime of life, being only 40 years, 3 months and 4 days old. He was a man who was highly respected by all who knew him and one who will be greatly missed in the neighborhood in which he lived. The remains were interred in the family lot in the Antelope cemetery. Religious services were conducted at the grave by the pastor of the Baptist church, Rev. L. L. Simmons.
    Died--February 17, 1915, at her home on Indian Creek, on the Eagle Point and free ferry road, Mrs. Mary Fisher, wife of John Fisher, one of the veterans of the Civil War. The deceased was born in Wisconsin, August 12, 1848, and came to Jackson County in 1901. She leaves her husband, a son, George, and daughter, Mrs. Walter Robinett, of Eugene, Or. The remains were placed to rest in the Laurel Hill cemetery.
    Thursday as I was on my rounds looking after the interests of the Mail Tribune and picking items to write in the Eaglets, I met R. M. Whitman, the foreman on the W. Hart Hamilton place, and he invited me to go up with him and see his hog pens, but that was rather far for me to walk in sticky, but on inquiry I learned that he had succeeded last fall in procuring about thirty brood sows and that among them they have now about fifty fine blooded pigs and that they are doing well.
    Grant Mathews was in town Wednesday, and his brother, Green, came out from Medford the same evening on the P.&E. He had been to Jacksonville to look after a lawsuit he has pending in the circuit court, a foreclosure proceeding in bankruptcy in the Art Nichols case.
    Court Hall of Medford came out Thursday, bringing a Hupmobile for George von der Hellen. George says that it is a present for his wife, and if she can handle that as well as she does the little folks in the primary department of our school she will have but little trouble.
    I also met G. H. Wamsley, and he paid on his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, and in conversation remarked that he had received a letter from his daughter, Mabel, and in that letter says that she is getting so fleshy that her clothes are too tight; that she has filed on a homestead out there at Bend and has started in on a new lease on life. She went from here to Arizona for her health last winter, and this fall went to Bend for a change, with that result. Her many friends here in Rogue River Valley will be glad to learn of the change for the better.
    Mrs. James Stewart, who has been visiting her cousin, F. M. Stewart, took the car for Medford Thursday afternoon.
    Last Wednesday H. H. Lord had a runaway and his feet became entangled in the lines, throwing him out of the rig and bruising him up quite badly, cutting a gash on the side of his head and injuring one of his eyes. But Dr. Holt, who reports the case, said that he could not decide how badly until the swelling was reduced.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 19, 1915, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Orin Wakefield made a business trip to Butte Creek last week.
    Tom Dawson is spending a few days with relatives and friends in Medford.
    E. E. Ash brought in a load of grain from Central Point Wednesday.
    Miss Hazel Warner left Saturday for Medford.
    Miss Dewie Howe spent Sunday with the Misses Enid and Lea Middlebusher.
    Mrs. A. Albright has been sick for the past week, but is better at this writing.
    J. E. McDonald and R. R. Dawson went to the valley Monday, the former being selected as one of the jurymen.
    Miss Dewie Howe returned to Trail Friday after a two months visit at her home in Centralia, Wash.
    Mrs. F. I. Todd is in Medford visiting Mr. and Mrs. C. E. McDonald, who are proud parents of a baby girl born Thursday, February 18.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher was summoned to Jacksonville Wednesday to appear before the grand jury.
    Mrs. Fisher, aged 74, residing between Eagle Point and Trail, died suddenly Wednesday morning. She had been ailing for some time, but up until the time of her death was able to be about the house. She was laid to rest in the Trail cemetery at 2 o'clock Thursday afternoon, Rev. Simmons officiating.
    Last Saturday evening Paul Opdyke was agreeably surprised by a number of his friends, it being his birthday. The evening was spent in playing games, singing and various other kinds of entertainment. A delicious lunch was served about 1 o'clock, after which the guests departed. Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. McLeod and family, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. McDonald and sons, Wesley and Harold, Messrs. Norman, Lester and Fred McDonald, T. I. Todd, Mr. and Mrs. Ossman and sons, Leslie and Ernest, and daughter, Effie; Mr. and Mrs. Capell and little daughter Genevieve, Byron Leabo, Alf Weeks, Leif Anderson, Irwin Howe, Miss Dewie Howe, Miss Rena Ash, Miss Alice Cromer, Howard Ash and Otto Tucker.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. T. G. Todd, wife of T. G. Todd, who, with N. T. McDonald, bought the Johnson place near the mouth of Elk Creek, was with us the last of the week on her way to Medford.
    C. D. Huffman and A. P. Davis of La Grande, Or., were with us last Saturday. They were out here to see what prospect there was to organize a grange. They were both deputy grange organizers for this state.
    Mrs. L. H. Deweese, formerly of this place, who left here a year ago last November for Missouri, arrived last Friday morning. Her husband is expected by the middle of the week. His health failed him, so he thought that he would return to Jackson County and regain it.
    Clarence Cox, formerly of this place, but more recently from Portland, came down to attend the funeral of Matthew Thompson last week and spent the night with us. He also visited his half-sister, Mrs. Gus Nichols, on Salt Creek.
    Mrs. W. J. Austin of Climax visited our town for the first time, although she has been living on Antelope Creek for a number of years. She was quite favorably impressed with our town.
    Mrs. A. J. Hatch of Berkeley, Cal., a sister of Mrs. Dr. W. W. P. Holt, is making her sister a visit.
    Mrs. L. Hessler of Brownsboro was in town on business the last of the week.
    Gus Nichols and wife of Brownsboro, who has a fine farm on Salt Creek, came in on business last Friday.
    Last week B. H. Brophy sold forty head of yearling calves to Paul Anderson of Applegate.
    Matthew Hawkinson, who has been engaged on the Hillcrest orchard, took a layoff for a month and instead of lounging around and blowing his money foolishly, took a trip up in the hills on Rogue River, making headquarters at Joe Hannah's, and spent his time in fishing and pruning orchards and making himself useful, and so came out with as much money as he took in and had a good time generally. He returned to the Hillcrest orchard to go to work last Monday.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Elvin Conover, February 14, a son.
    W. E. Hammel has just had a spray tank made in the Childreth shop, Mr. Bryant doing the carpenter work. The tank is made of sugar pine lumber and the lumber cost in Medford 12½ cents a foot, and that right in a timber country where we have millions of feet of sugar pine timber standing waiting for someone to saw it up ready for use.
    Friday night the Ladies' Missionary Society met at the home of Mrs. W. E. Buchanan. There were twenty-eight present. After the regular exercises of the meeting were over, cake and tea were served. There was an interesting program and quite a number of pieces read on the subject of mission work.
    On Saturday afternoon the W.C.T.U. of this place had a special meeting to commemorate the birth of Miss Frances E. Willard, one of the moving spirits in the organization of the work for the overthrow of the liquor traffic. There was a good attendance and several pieces read touching on her life work. Among the readings was one read by little Jud Florey entitled "Five Cents a Glass" that made quite an impression. The piece was well rendered. At the close of the business session the ladies served cake and coffee.
    The Ladies' Aid Society will have their semi-annual sale and serve oyster soup and cake the afternoon of February 27.
    Miss Frances Greb, who is attending high school in Medford, came out last Saturday to visit the old folks at home.
    Will try to tell about the school exercises last Monday in my next.
    Mrs. A. M. Thomas has an ad in this week's Weekly Mail Tribune offering a lot of household goods for sale.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 26, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Milton and Miss Eula Houston spent Sunday as the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Peter Betz.
    Henry French came out home from Medford for a couple of days this week.
    Paul Opdyke bought two tons of oats of Theo. Glass and hauled to his home on the Tucker place.
    Frank Zuccala made a business trip to Central Point this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Houston spent Tuesday night with their daughter, Mrs. James Cornutt, of Central Point.
    Steve Smith and Ed Foster were buying seed oats of William Jones of Beagle Wednesday. They also called on Mr. Rogers, the Beagle merchant.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ray Whitley have gone to Portland to make their home. Her mother, Mrs. Mary Gage, and Bird Johnston accompanied them as far as Roseburg.
    Dr. Holt was called to Elk Creek to attend Grandpa McDonald Tuesday.
    Mrs. Fry has been on the sick list this week.
    Miss Mia Hannah was the guest of her sister, Mrs. Tim Daily of Medford, the middle of the week.
    M. Slusser and H. L. Howard were in Medford this week. Mr. Slusser took down a fine porker.
    Dr. Kirchgessner spent the weekend at his Riverside ranch.
    Mrs. Daw of Trail was the guest of the Hannah families the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston were valley visitors the last of the week.
    There was a telephone meeting on Line 16 to draw lots for construction of the new line.
    Miss Rose Nealon spent the weekend with home folks at Table Rock.
    Gene Bellows and little daughter Mildred were on the sick list the last of the week.
    Mrs. Wallace Bergman was on from Eagle Point to her mother-in-law's, Mrs. B. Clarno, Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah and Miss Ora Raimey were in Eagle Point Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote for the Mail Tribune I found that my letter was too long to add all that I had to write so stopped off just as I got to the place where I was to give an account of our school entertainment on the 22nd. The exercises took place in the forenoon and there was but very few of the patrons of the school attended as it was not generally known that it was to come off in the forenoon. The two lower rooms were thrown together and all of the children were assembled in that room and after singing "America" and prayer led by Rev. L. L. Simmons we had the exercises by the primary department. It is not necessary for me to particularize but they had a song by the little folk, then the hatchet brigade, a drill exercise by five little boys and five little girls that would have reflected credit on large children. Then we had the intermediate department and they, as a rule, did remarkably well, some reciting pieces and some reading. While listening to the rendering of the different parts that were rendered I could not help but notice the difference there was in the way the boys and girls rendered their parts. As a rule the girls went through their parts without a bobble while the boys were troubled with defective memories, and I have about come to the conclusion that that is the reason that the women are forging ahead so in all branches of business and will soon be taking their places in the legislative and judicial branches of our government as they are now in the educational branch. We then had several pieces read or spoken by the pupils of the first room, and that took up the time to 12 noon and we all went to dinner.
    J. E. McDonald and Robert Dawson were here the first of the week after a seeder for the McDonald and Ludd place near the mouth of Elk Creek, formerly owned by Jeff and Rube Johnson.
    John D. Rockafellow and Major Anderson of Medford were at the Sunnyside last week for dinner.
    Gus Nygren of Brownsboro, who owns a fine farm on Salt Creek, came out last week with a fine lot of hens for our railroad agent F. Newport.
    Misses Sarah Singleton and Ruby Haley drove in from their homes west of here the first of the week to do trading with our merchants.
    Joe Pool and wife were in town buying an outfit for housekeeping from our hardware, drug and furniture merchants, von der Hellen Bros., the first of the week.
    J. S. Quackenbush and wife were here getting supplies from our merchants Wednesday.
    There were three four-horse teams with a lot of men and their outfit passed through our town Wednesday on the way up to the intake to go to work on the Fish Lake ditch.
    Perry Foster and his grandson were in town Wednesday.
    While on my rounds among the business men of our town I met Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Silliman at F. L. Heath's store. He is traveling for the Romana Candy Co., of San Francisco, Cal.
    Last Wednesday night, it being our regular prayer meeting night, some of the good people--the ladies--concluded that they would have a change in the program without consulting the pastor Rev. L. L. Simmons, so they put their heads together to get up a surprise party for him at his own house, so they let his father-in-law into the secret, and he very innocently started off to go to light up the church, build the fire, ring the bell, etc., but got no farther than one of his neighbors and about 7:15 p.m. Rev Simmons and family started for the church and just as they had turned off the electricity they met a number of their neighbors going to the parsonage so of course they turned back, still not full realizing what was up when he happened to think that it was lacking but one day of his 37th birthday and his friends knew that he would be at the annual celebration of the organization of the I.O.O.F. the next night so they planned to catch him at that time, and so they did and we had the prayer meeting all right and in addition one of the most pleasant times in our history. There was about 25 persons present and most of them contributed something they thought would be of use to him or the family. There was $7 in money and quite a lot of little presents such as neckties, handkerchiefs, etc., and Grandma Thomas presented him with two beautiful silver napkin rings. The company remained until about 11 o'clock and dispersed wishing many returns of the happy event.
    Bert Higinbotham of Prospect came out Tuesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    H. J. Stewart of Central Point, who owns a farm northeast of here about three miles, passed through here Thursday on his way home.
    In making her report of the meeting of the W.C.T.U. commemorating the birth of Miss Frances E. Willard, the press reporter made a mistake and signed the name of Etta Florey to the report when it should have been the name of the reporter or left without a name. The article that was read and published was written and read by Mrs. Florey, and by a unanimous vote the request was made to have it sent to the Mail Tribune for publication, but the report of the proceedings was written by someone else.
    J. P. Feaster, of Medford, a teacher of penmanship, has organized a writing school here and is giving three lessons a week.
    Frank Frederick of Portland was here for dinner Wednesday. He is selling blacksmith supplies.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1915, page 5


BUTTE CREEK ITEMS
    Carl Drsek of Brownsboro and John Shadager of Butte Falls were naturalized at the courthouse at Jacksonville on February 23. On account of said event Carl Drsek, with the members of the Little Butte Creek society, gave an entertainment on Saturday, February 27. As the weather was very rainy, the attendance was only from the closest neighborhood. The program was as follows:
    Violin solo, Carl Drsek; recitation, Albert Myers; recitation, Leland Charley; Butte Creek, Glenn and Dalton Terrill, song, Mrs. D. W. Myers; recitations, Adon Myers, Dalton Terrill, Carl Drsek; song, Floyd Charley; recitation, Lloyd Stanley; song, Mr. Wilson; song Carl Drsek.
    After the program a supper was served and about midnight the participants departed for their homes.
    There have been a large number of cattle vaccinated for blackleg in the past two weeks around here.
    There was a dance at the Lost Creek hall February 26. A large crowd was present and a good time was reported.
    Our teacher, Mr. Schell, was very ill last week, but is now on duty.
    The ninth grade of this school has been absent almost a month.
    Mike Conley and Mrs. L. Hessler were visiting at W. M. Stanley's Sunday.
    Glenn Terrill was at Lake Creek Sunday afternoon.
    Mrs. C. Charley and son, Claus, went to Medford Sunday.
    Charles Terrill is over at Jacksonville on the jury.
    Monday, February 22, there was a ball game between the Butte Creek school and the Lake Creek teams. The score was 16 to 5 in the Butte Creek team's favor.
    Verna Charley and Karna Stapleton spent Sunday with Alice and Anna Nygren.
    Mrs. I. L. Bradshaw and son went to Medford Monday.
    Miss Maude Terrill returned home Sunday from a visit up at South Fork.
    R. A. Pech was in Eagle Point on business Friday.
    George Brown went over to Mr. Rhodes' to see about some sheep.
    Gus Nygren went to Eagle Point last week on business.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Charley returned home Friday from Medford.
    Mrs. Will Hoeft is in Medford visiting her folks.
    D. W. Myers is spraying his orchard.
    Reed Charley has been plowing some land that they have just cleared.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 4, 1915, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    John Winningham returned home from Medford Sunday.
    Don't miss the dance at Trail the 13th.
    Ray and Mae Warner spent Sunday with her sister, Mrs. R. R. Dawson.
    Mr. Lewis of near Prospect spent Monday night with us, on his way home from the valley.
    Among Trail callers Sunday were Ray and Mae Warner, Walter Cushman, Frank Middlebusher, Leif Anderson, Leslie Ossman, O. Gaines, Lester McDonald and Mr. Ditsworth.
    Minnie Poole is staying with Mr. and Mrs. Albright during Mr. and Mrs. Poole's absence.
    Jeff Pearce of Elk Creek stopped at Trail on his way to Medford and Jacksonville Monday.
    Deputy Sheriff Wilson made a business trip to Trail and vicinity last week.
    E. E. Ash drove his car to Medford Monday for the first time this season. The roads are in a pretty bad condition.
    Miss Clara Skyrman returned from Peyton Sunday, where she has been teaching the past six months.
    Miss Minnie Gaines left for her home in Medford Monday after an extended visit with relatives on Trail Creek.
    Miss Hazel Tony returned home from the valley Monday where she has been the past month.
    There will be a shadow social at Trail hall, Saturday evening, March 20th. Everybody come and bring well-filled boxes, and be prepared for a jolly good time, funds for school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Poole, Mr. and Mrs. Van Dyke, Mr. and Mrs. Cushman and sons, Ed and Charlie, and daughter Dora, T. C. Gaines, Ed Ash, Fred Middlebusher, Mr. and Mrs. Ragsdale, George Weeks, Bob Dawson, Boyd Tucker, Mr. McLeod, Eph McDonald and Mark Applegate were called to Jacksonville as witnesses on the Martin case.
    The Misses Lea and Enid Middlebusher, Dewie Howe and Rena Ash, Frank Middlebusher and Irwin Howe of Trail attended Sunday school at the Hatchery church Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 4, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The I.O.O.F. held their anniversary meeting in their hall in this place last Thursday night, and after the regular order of business was disposed of the doors were open for the admission of the Rebekahs and of course they had to have one of their big feeds, and from the reports that came in to me and the time that the participants returned to the Sunnyside they must have had a good time; in fact this little village of ours is noted for having the best little socials of any place in the country.
    On Friday night, the 26th inst., the Parent-Teachers Association had their regular monthly meeting and there seems to be a growing interest in the move and the people are waking up to the fact that there is something higher than the simple pleasures of everyday life.
    One day last week as our neighbor, Wm. G. Knighton, was walking along the street a large bulldog belonging to some of the Natwick family grabbed him by the wrist, forcing two of his teeth into the flesh, but fortunately did not result in anything very serious except causing Mr. D. to suffer from a sore wrist. The marshal immediately ordered the dog kept confined. If our town council would levy a town tax of one or two dollars on the dogs that infest our town it would help the taxpayer and rid us of a lot of dogs that are of little or no use in the town.
    D. E. Whitley, who has been up in the Prospect country visiting his parents, passed through here last week on his way to Walla Walla. He reports that his friends up in that section gave him a farewell party the night before he left.
    Lem Charley and wife, who have been in Medford on business for a few days, came out on the P.&E. Friday and so was Mr. Dunlap of Derby, A. Pech of Lake Creek, Mr. Berquist, who has a farm west of town, J. A. Howard, Horn Watkins and wife, Pete Betz and wife and J. Brittsan, foreman on the C. Veghte farm.
    S. H. Harnish & Son, our livery stable men, took a span of horses to Medford one day last week and traded them off for a Ford car and now when they have a customer who wants to go in a hurry they can accommodate him. John W. Smith, one of our local carpenters, is engaged today (Tuesday) arranging a garage adjoining their livery stable.
    Emmett Nealon, one of the progressive young men of Table Rock, came over last Friday after his sister, Miss Rose, who is teaching in the Reese Creek district.
    Last Saturday night according to previous arrangements about all of the Minter family, including Frank Caster and wife, and your correspondent, wife and daughter, Jud Edsall and two of the Minter girls, went with us over to Table Rock to witness the rendering of the play "What Happened to Jones," and when we reached there we found the large school house well filled, but my friend Emmett Nealon had reserved two seats for my wife and I so that I could see and hear all that was said and done. I would like to give the names of the actors in the play but suppose that your Table Rock correspondent will give them in his report, but I must add that it was one of the best rendered plays I have witnessed for many years. Everyone of the thirteen had their parts perfect so that there was not a bobble in the play, although it took two and a half hours to render it.
    Miss Rose Nealon, Mrs. Isaac Merriman, Irvin Daley and L. P. Harrington, one of the assistants of the state superintendent of schools, came in on the P.&E. Monday morning. Miss Nealon was on her way to her school on Reese Creek and Mr. H. was to visit her school Monday afternoon and Mrs. Merriman was on her way up to Trail to visit relatives, and Irvin went up to his father, W. C. Daley.
    In my letter published March 1st in speaking of some machinery being taken to the Todd & McDonald place on Rogue River near Elk Creek, I wish to make a correction, as they are simply renters and the place belongs to N. T. McDonald, and one of his brothers and Mr. Todd are working it on the shares. I am requested to make the correction.
    Last Saturday Miss Gertrude Shoults, who is teaching on Elk Creek, and her aunt, Mrs. Mae Dew, both of Trail, N. T. McDonald, also of Trail, Fred Crewe, Jr., of Grants Pass, H. Reed of Greenmans, Utah, and L. H. Deweese, also from Utah, arrived at the Sunnyside for the night and Mr. Crewe remained until Tuesday morning and went to Butte Falls on the P.&.E.
    Sunday Wm. von der Hellen and wife and J. V. McIntyre and wife came in for dinner and there were also two strangers came with them besides those who ate at the first table. Business is looking up.
    J. F. Ditsworth of Prospect came out Monday and brought Miss Clara Skyrman, one of the teachers on Trail Creek. She went on the train but Mr. D. remained at the Sunnyside overnight.
    Mr. Peterson, one of the school supervisors, went up to the Crater Lake school Tuesday morning and he and Mr. Herrington will spend the week in the hills visiting rural schools.
    Wm. Nichols of Lake Creek and a stranger took dinner Tuesday at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Deweese, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside, have rented rooms of Mrs. A. M. Thomas and have gone to housekeeping.
    Miss Mabel Hanson, who has just closed a six months' school in the Flounce Rock district, came out Tuesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside. She reports that they had a fine program and very pleasant time last Friday, the last day of school. The board have hired her to teach again next fall--that tells the story.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 8, 1915, page 5


ALONG ROGUE RIVER
    Mrs. Henry French returned to her home from Medford Saturday.
    There were over a dozen vehicles of people went down the first of the week as witnesses and spectators to Jacksonville to the trial of Loris Martin.
    Wm. Houston made a business trip to Gold Hill Friday. Mrs. Houston and little girls accompanied him as far as Beagle and visited relatives there.
    Among the Eagle Point visitors Saturday were Ed Foster, Henry French, Steve Smith, Perry Foster, Gene Bellows and family.
    Mrs. George Fry has spent the last week with Mrs. H. L. Howard.
    Mrs. Jasper Hannah and Miss Ora Ramsey were the guests of their sister, Mrs. Frank Miller of Central Point.
    Miss Eula Houston began the spring term of school in the Long Branch district the first of March.
    John Nealon of Table Rock began the spring term of school the 8th in the Central district.
    Dr. Kirchgessner has gone to the fair at San Francisco.
    Mrs. Edwin Piele was a valley visitor the middle of the week.
    Mrs. N. Garrett of Medford visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. McCabe the first of the week. The last of the week she spent with her brother Anthony and wife at Derby.
    Harry Merriman report the arrival of a bouncing baby boy at his home last Thursday.
    A phone meeting was held Friday at Chris Bergman's for the purpose of building a new phone line from the ferry to Eagle Point to be known as the Free Ferry line. There are to be eighteen shares, and ten were sold at the meeting.
    Steve Smith went to Medford and bought a team a few days ago.
    Among the Central Point visitors Saturday were Harry Merriman, Mr. and Mrs. Belcher and Mr. Murray.
    Perry Foster is having some wire fence put up.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 8, 1915, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among other things that I omitted to write in my last was that Senator von der Hellen was among us on Tuesday, the 2nd inst., smiling on his friends and receiving congratulations on his safe return from the state capital.
    Among the arrivals at the Sunnyside since I last wrote who registered their names were: Tuesday night, H. G. Bolton, a shoe man of St. Louis, Mo.; Wednesday, O. N. Nelson, one of the insurance agents of Medford; J. R. Kline and E. T. Stockman, deputy fruit inspectors of Medford, and H. G. Bolton of Derby; Thursday, W. H. McNair, G. S. Butler and G. W. Owen of Ashland and H. S. Stine of Medford; Mrs. L. Michl of Kansas City, Kan., and her son W. Michl, of Lake Creek; Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Hatch of Berkeley, Cal. Mrs. Hatch is a sister of Mrs. Dr. Holt, who has been here for some time visiting her sister, and Mr. Hatch after spending a short time visiting here went on up to Seattle on business, returning on Wednesday, and they concluded that they would take dinner with Mrs. Howlett and Dr. W. W. P. Holt. Mrs. Holt and daughter, Miss Helen, also took dinner with them, and after dinner they started for their home in Berkeley. Mrs. Hatch, who has been here just long enough to become attached to our country and fall in love with our climate, will tell her friends of her sister's lovely surroundings.
    F. W. Klippel of Medford was a passenger on the Eagle Point-Persist stage the first of the week on his way to Trail Creek to visit his mother and sister.
    While Miss Mabel Hanson was here we visited our school together Wednesday morning and after my giving the children a short talk by way of encouragement I excused myself and left her to visit the intermediate and primary departments, and she made a very favorable report, in fact we think that we have a model school in our little town. I herewith send the roll of honor for the month of February. The roll is not so long as it generally is, as during that month we had considerable rain and many of the children have to walk quite a distance and were occasionally late and that would keep their names off the roll. In the primary department: Katrina Bryant, Loeta Truelove, Melva Simmons, Donald von der Hellen, Hugo von der Hellen, Howard Vogeli, Donald Vogeli and Ansil Pearce. Intermediate department--Joyce von der Hellen, Ruth Grover, Ruford Simmons, Lloyd Cingcade, Foster Greb, Harold Van Scoy, Elsworth Stowell, Lyle Van Scoy, Judge Florey, Katie Buchanan, Nora Childreth, Helen Hoyt, Kee Buchanan, Margaret Riley and Freda Leabo. Principal's room--Roberta Pearce, Walter Painter, Vesta Grover, Ethel Riley and Carlyle Natwick.
    Henry French and wife came in Wednesday evening from Medford. Mrs. French has been in the hospital for some time, having had an operation performed by our local M.D., Wm. W. P. Holt, and he met them at the P.&E. depot and brought them to the Sunnyside, where she is staying for a few days. She left the hospital last Saturday, February 27, and spent a few days with one of their old neighbors in Medford, Mrs. Olie Nichols. Mr. French is one of our thoroughgoing farmers, who believes in progressive work, and he and his wife are receiving congratulations over the recovery of his wife.
    There has been quite a number of strangers in our town during the past few days, and during the first few days a number of the Trail and Elk Creek people passed through our town on their way to hear and attend as witnesses at the Martin trial.
    Mrs. Sophia Thomas, whose husband, Charles, is engaged in the logging business in Klamath County, came in Thursday morning to make a short visit with relatives.
    Our city dads, after Mr. Knighton was bitten by an ugly dog, have passed an ordinance taxing dogs $1 and a bitch $3--a g