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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eaglets 1922-23

   

Click here for more news from the Upper Rogue. Transcribed by Rene Forncrook, Dale Greenley and Janet Monti.



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Timmie Dugan, formerly one of our prominent farmers, just west of our town, but now living on the old Thomas McAndrews place on Bear Creek, on the Crater Lake Highway just outside of Medford, was smiling on some of his old friends in our town the first of the week.
    Charles Cook, representing the Connor Manufacturing Company of Dayton, Ohio, was here for dinner Monday.
    Roy Spencer and John Burns of Butte Falls were here for dinner Wednesday and Earl Miles of Butte Falls came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Chris Beale, who is working on the Edsall contract on the laterals for the canal being built from Butte Falls to Eagle Point, has been spending a few days with friends in Medford, came out Wednesday and went back to work on the job.
    Ralph and Lloyd Stanley called for supper Wednesday evening.
    John Norris, the superintendent of the Wilfley orchard, was in town Thursday morning on business with our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth.
    Mrs. Alice Ferguson and her two children, who have been stopping at the Sunnyside since last fall, started Thursday for Redding, California, to be with her sister, who lives some twenty miles out from Redding.
    Thursday morning Charley Manning came out from the Manning farm on Rogue River near Peyton and brought his father, Frank Manning, his mother and sister Delcy, and after eating their dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel Charley returned home and Mr. Manning and wife and daughter took passage on the Medford-Butte Falls stage for Medford, intending to take passage on the train for Los Angeles, Calif., to visit a sister of Mr. Manning and other relatives. Frank Manning is one of our well-to-do farmers and stockmen and believes in enjoying life as he goes through it.
    Mr. A. E. Hildreth of Oakland, who passed through here about a week ago on his way to Butte Falls to visit his two brothers, Al and Buel Hildreth, came out Thursday on the stage and took dinner. He reports that they had a special election in Butte Falls Wednesday to elect a set of officers, including mayor, treasurer, recorder and town councilmen, but he only mentioned that his brother, Buel, was elected mayor, a good selection. Mr. A. Magasen also came out at the same time and took dinner. He says that he has a contract for grading a part of the way for the railroad and that they have twelve miles of the way graded beyond Butte Falls but have had to suspend work further on account of snow but intend to move camp back to within four miles of Butte Falls and continue work placing ties and rails, and he expressed the opinion that the work would not stop until they crossed over the divide into the Pelican Bay country.
    Glenn Haley and wife of Gold Hill, and her sister, Mrs. A. G. Florey and baby of Eagle Point, were pleasant visitors at the Sunnyside Thursday afternoon. Glenn is working in Gold Hill and he is taking a little layoff, visiting his parents in Central Point and his wife's sister and old-time friends here.
    Mr. Hansen, the foreman on the J. H. Cowley orchard, and Mr. Ward, the foreman on the H. B. Tronson orchard, were trading here Thursday.
    Mr. H. R. Bush and two of his assistants, Fred and H. A. Smith, who have a contract for clearing the right of way on the canal from Big Butte to Eagle Point, were in town Thursday having their stump puller repaired. They seem to have considerable trouble as that is the second time they have had to bring the same part, the main shaft, to the shop for repairs, but when it comes to pulling up the stool of white oak grubs, each as large as a man's arm to the size of his leg and even larger, it requires a very strong machine. They report that they are getting along nicely with the work and will soon have the ground cleared ready for the heavier machinery to do its part. Although there seems to be a hitch in the movement up at Salem with the state board as they seem to have found a flaw so as to postpone confirming the contracts and have decided to readvertise all of the canal for bids, although Mr. C. H. Natwick has his camp fixed, his hay on the ground and has done some considerable work on his unit of the canal.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Friday noon were C. H. Natwick, Ralph Cowgill, Fred Pettegrew and a youth by the name of Morton, who came in on the stage from Butte Falls.
    Gordon Childreth and a young man by the name of Mitchell of Medford came in for supper and C. H. Natwick came in and spent the night and Chris Beale came in for dinner.
    The continuous rain since Monday night has been such that your correspondent has been closely confined to the house the most of the time, and the result is that items of general interest are not as plentiful as they might be, and it appears to a close observer that I am not the only one who is kept at home but when I am on the street there seems to be a scarcity of men, women and babies, and another reason for the scarcity of news is that the most of the young men are off at work on the different jobs that are on hand in the way of improvements.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 2, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. J. Esch of Ashland has been up visiting his son, Carl, who is now the owner of the old John Singleton farm, and the present owner is surely a live wire when it comes to business, for a friend of mine visited him and his wife the first of the week and reports that they are milking nine cows and feeding about seventy hogs, getting them ready for the market, and have also forty-seven young pigs still sucking, beside having a fine flock of hens, and in addition to looking after all these things take time to attend church and Sunday school every Sunday and help very materially support the Sunday school and the expenses of upkeeping the church.
    Mrs. John L. Robinson, Sr., the grandmother of Miss Cleo Emma Robinson, who passed on to her reward December 20, is now caring for her grandchildren at the home of her son.
    "Agate Jack" Goin has finally arranged to have his house he has rented from Mrs. Nickell wired up, Ernest Dahack doing the wiring of the house and shop for him, and now is about ready to begin business the first of the year, 1922. I heard him telling parties who were here for dinner that he had already on hand about four or five hundred pounds of choice agates all ready to work on, and while he is resting he will replenish his stock by spending a few hours each week gathering more agates.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Reid and two children made a business trip to Medford recently. Mr. Reid is the man who has had charge of the steam roller on the Crater Lake Highway and is now staying here, sending their children to school.
    Mrs. Thomas Abbott has been spending the Xmas holidays with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Russ Moore, who live just this side of the Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    I understand that Benj. Brophy, one of our rustling farmers and stock men, has unexpectedly had to take over eleven more cattle and has bought fifteen tons of hay of Ralph Tucker, Brownsboro, to feed them and has been hauling it to his home this week, the last in the year.
    Miss Viva Bradshaw, who is teaching in Talent, has been spending the holidays with her parents near Brownsboro.
    Speaking about the Christmas holidays reminds me that the Brown families had a family reunion Christmas Eve and Christmas Day. They had a Xmas tree at the home of Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and there were twenty-seven of the relatives present and the next day they all took dinner at the home of Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. W. H. Brown reports that they had a very pleasant reunion. Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Carlton of Wellen, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holmes of Medford and Mr. and Mrs. John Moffatt, nee Mary Holmes of Medford. As near as I can learn they were all related by blood or marriage.
    The reader will excuse the way I am recording the incidents of the past few weeks, as while I have not been very sick I have been so that I could not make my regular rounds and have had to gather items as I could and jot them down in my little book and the result is I have to give them as I find them, but thank the good Lord, I hope to be able to start in the first of the [year] A.D. 1922 on my regular beat again.
    Mr. Walter Marshall and his sister were here on business Wednesday.
    Mrs. S. H. Harnish, who went over to Medford to spend Xmas with her daughter, Mrs. Thomas Corney, has returned to her home again.
    Mr. J. H. Murphy of Medford, who is interested with J. S. Owen in a large tract of timber land in the Big Butte country, was a passenger on the stage for Butte Falls about the middle of the week. He said that he was going up to look over the country to see the damage the windstorm had done and see if he could not save a part of the down timber by having it cut up into wood and sell it to the people of Medford, as quite a lot of it is near the railroad track.
    I see in my last letter, published the 28th, that the printer has made me say, I hope that I will not have to be "angered again by having the ladies wear their large hats on an occasion of that kind," when it should have read annoyed, etc. I know I am too old to be angered by a trifling little thing like that.
    George Hilton, federal bank appraiser, and Ed E. Dunning, a traveling companion, were here for dinner Thursday, and so was Charley Terrill, our efficient and accommodating sheriff.
    J. R. Porter and S. H. Olson of Medford came out Thursday evening and spent the night and the next day went to work on the P.&E. railroad. The new company has three gangs of men on the road now and are pushing the work right along so they can move the steam shovel out to the cuts and repair the damage the elements have done in them.
    Joe Phipps and Nelson Nye of Prospect also stayed here Thursday night.
    Mrs. Martha E. Potter, a sister of Mrs. R. C. Farrier of Lake Creek, who is teaching school near Gold Hill, was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Friday on her way to Derby to visit the family of W. E. Webb, where she taught last year, and returned today, Saturday, and went on to her present home. Chris Beale also returned on the stage to take charge of his mail route again, also O. Adams, also a passenger [omission] Falls, but now of Medford, was also a passenger.
    Lucius Kincaid, the newly married man, came out Friday evening on the stage, spent the night here and went back to Medford this Saturday morning on the stage.
    W. F. Hoagland of Central Point came out from his ranch near Brownsboro, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1922, page 3



TRAIL ITEMS
    P. E. Sandoz went to Medford Monday, Dec. 26, on a business trip.
    Elmer Imeg was a dinner guest of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis Christmas, also spending Monday at his grandmother's place, Mrs. F. A. Whitley.
    L. A. Whitley and wife visited Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis. Andy Pool and wife were also guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis.
    Miss Frances Greb returned from taking examinations at Jacksonville.
    Miss Inez Willits and pupils gave a program at the Elk Creek school house Friday, Dec. 23. Saturday she went to Portland to attend the teachers convention. We will have a two weeks' vacation starting Dec. 26.
    Persist school has started again after a week's vacation.
    Trustys had company Christmas. They were the Childreth family.
    Amos Willits is visiting his mother.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1922, page 5



TRAIL ITEMS
    The friends of Mr. and Mrs. Pritchett gave them a pleasant surprise Thursday evening. The evening was spent in playing games, music and dancing. A bounteous supper was served at midnight after which they departed for their homes. All enjoyed the evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. V. E. Peterson and little daughters Mildred and Viola and Miss Frances Greb of Persist were New Year's guests at A. T. Poole's; also attended the dance at Trail New Year's Eve.
    Raleigh Mathews of Eagle Point was in our vicinity Monday buying steers.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. Middlebusher returned to Prospect Tuesday after spending the holidays with relatives near Trail.
    Frank Holmes spent part of last week on his ranch above Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Ash and little daughter Betty spent the holidays with the former's parents at Trail.
    The dance New Year's Eve in Trail Hall was well attended and greatly enjoyed by all, as the "scrappers" stayed away. There will be another Feb. 4th.
    Mrs. Lewis Thomason and Miss Velma Avery of Drew attended the New Year's dance at Trail. Mrs. Thomason carried away the ladies' prize while Howard Ash was the lucky man.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Blaess were pleasant callers at the latter's parents' home, Mr. and Mrs. Zimmerlee, Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 6, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday J. R. Averill of Los Angeles came in for dinner. He had been up in the hills near Butte Falls to visit his brother whom he had not seen for about 20 years, George W. Averill, who has spent the most of his life in the U.S. Navy. He finally settled on a homestead on Round Top, a prominent landmark on the east side of Rogue River Valley, and so his brother J. R. Averill located him and succeeded in finding him, and reports having had a very pleasant visit with him and his family.
    Lester L. Smith and Ray Parker of Butte Falls were also here at the same time for dinner. Mr. Parker was on his way to Forest Grove to resume his studies in the Pacific University. Frank Netherland, also of Butte Falls, and C. H. Natwick of Medford and Mrs. Martha E. Potter, who is now teaching near Gold Hill, and four strangers were here for dinner the same day.
    Jack Kerby, one of our old boarders who was stable boss for Charley Delin while he was grading the right of way for the Crater Lake Highway, came from Brookings where he had been in charge of the Delin horses on his contract on a logging railroad near Crescent City, Calif., came in and engaged board for a month.
    J. H. Murphy, one of the timber men referred to in my last letter, was also here for dinner the same day but I did not ask about the damage done by the windstorm as I did not know that it was him until after he was gone, owing to my poor vision.
    Mrs. Thomas Cingcade went to Medford to pay a visit to some of her friends living there.
    Mrs. Sam Coy also paid a visit to relatives in Ashland the same day.
    Those interested in the irrigation project in this section met in the Brown hall last Saturday but owing to my inability to get the facts will say nothing more on the subject at this time but may later.
    Wm. von der Hellen returned Saturday from a business trip to San Francisco.
    George, Henry and Isaac Childreth, all of Ashland, were here Saturday visiting George and Henry's brother, Wesley L. Childreth, Isaac being a son of Henry. Henry tells me that he is troubled with a growth of a bony nature forming in his nose, and that he went to San Francisco to have it removed and on his way took the erysipelas and had to come home without having it done so has to make another trip in the near future.
    Saturday night there was a grand masked ball, given with the usual prizes, etc., but I have heard but little about it as such little things as that do not seem to act very effectively on the public mind in Eagle Point anymore, although I understand that Ernest Dahack, our barber, took the prize for being the most grotesquely dressed man in the company. I did not learn who took the best prize among the ladies but learned that Mrs. T. F. Nichols and one of the Walch girls each took prizes but was unable to learn who took the first prize. Since writing the foregoing I have found a lady who reports that there was a perfect "mob" there, that they were so thick that they could not dance.
    There was a reunion of the Edsall-Bishop families at the residence of Mrs. Jack O'Conner, nee Cecil Edsall of Phoenix, a sister of the mail contractor of this place, last Sunday, Jan. 1st, 1922. There were 31 present and all were related by blood or marriage except three, and one of them was a brother-in-law to one of the Bishops, Truman McClelland. They had a very fine social time as well as a fine dinner and after dinner the group was taken in different bunches and three of the twelve children were taken in a separate group. They made as fine picture as anyone could wish, the twin boys of Mrs. O'Connor showing in them to good advantage.
    We had a very fine Sunday school Sunday morning. The Bible class was led by our new minister, Rev. H. G. Adams, and he after Sunday school went to Sams Valley and preached. He had a good audience, about 60, to hear him and then preached again at night here, but as it was so disagreeable I did not venture out, but he said that his congregation was not very large, owing perhaps to the weather. He will preach here again next Sunday evening at 7:30. His subject will be "War or Peace." Everybody is invited to come and hear him. He will also preach at Brownsboro at 11 o'clock a.m.
    There was also another shooting match here for chickens, and so far as I know everything passed pleasantly.
    There were only a few people came into the Sunnyside for dinner Sunday, but Raymond Reter and family, Mr. Chauncey Florey, our county clerk, and C. L. Cofer of Sacramento, Calif.
    E. A. Hildreth, Jr., and his brother Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls came in a little later for dinner and went on to Medford. Hildreth was on his way to Cottage Grove to be at the bedside of his father who was reported as being very sick, and Buel returned to the Sunnyside to await word from his brother as to his father's condition, and the next day the message came that he was improving and Buel went on up to Butte Falls.
    Lucius Kincaid and wife came out Monday morning and in the afternoon Mrs. Kincaid went up to Dupray's mill to resume her duties in the Crater Lake school. There were four other teachers and a teacher's wife went up to Butte Falls at the same time on the George Albert motor on the P.&E. railroad.
    Miss Hay, who is teaching in the Brophy school district, was a passenger on the stage on her way to her school Monday.
    Mrs. John Allen of Derby was here for dinner Monday and so was Geo. M. Lane and James Hansen of Medford. They were here posting bills for the Foster & Kleiser, successors to Klum & Co.
    O. W. Depasent of the Medford post office force was also here for dinner. He was simply taking a little joyride over the mail route from Medford to Derby over our beautiful muddy roads with the mail contractor.
    Mrs. Geo. W. Averill of Round Top also came in for lunch and went on out to Medford.
    Millard Robinson and Buster Mathews came in for late dinner.
    Lewis Robinson and family have moved into the house with his brother, John L. Robinson, Jr., to help to care for the two children he has left on his hands.
    Fred McPherson, Mrs. Fred Dutton, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Haskins and wife and her sister, Miss Velma Hannah of Trail, were in town Tuesday. Miss Hannah took passage on the stage for Butte Falls, where she is attending the high school.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1922, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. F. Downes of Butte Falls, who has a homestead on Four-Bit Creek, came out on the stage Tuesday afternoon, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on in the stage that same afternoon. He says that he has a fine body of yellow pine timber on his claim and that the extension of the P.&E. railroad will run very close to his home; in fact there is as fine a body of sugar pine, yellow pine and fir in that section of the county as can be found anywhere.
    Mrs. S. Albright, formerly of Trail but now of Medford, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Wednesday on her way up to her old home near Trail, and Ezra Whitley and Frank Netherland of Butte Falls, and Marshall Minter of Eagle Point and Inez Willits of Persist were also passengers on the same stage on their way to their homes or places of business. Miss Inez Willits was just returning from Portland, where she had been to attend the teachers' state convention and reports having had a very interesting and profitable association.
    Messrs. Carey, Faber and Robert Edmondson and wife of Butte Falls were among the callers Wednesday for dinner on their way to Medford.
    J. W. Johnson of Medford, who is the representative of the Kirtland farm situated on Bear Creek between Central Point and Gold Hill, came in Wednesday evening on the stage and spent the night and Thursday hired a car and chauffeur and canvassed the country above here on Little Butte Creek. His object was to dispose of a fine imported Percheron stallion that they have used on the farm as long as advisable. He spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside Hotel and reported that he thought that the prospect was good for disposing of him.
    We have had a little excitement in our little town. Deputy Sheriff I. B. Millard of Medford came out Thursday afternoon and arrested Mark Winkle, a young man who has been raised in this vicinity, and took him to Jacksonville, but came out later in charge of the same deputy to try to secure bondsmen for five hundred dollars but failed and returned again Thursday and to last accounts failed in his efforts to secure the necessary bondsmen. I see in the Medford Mail Tribune that he is listed as Jack Winkle. There seems to be more than one charge against him, for issuing a check for money when he had no money in the bank and forging a check with Jack Mayham's name. The deputy sheriff turned him over while here to our town marshal while he was here trying to secure bondsmen and Mr. Millard and Mr. C. W. Sarrett, who was with him, and Mark's wife and sister Ethyl were here for dinner.
    Mrs. G. W. Averill, who lives with her husband on their homestead, came out on the Butte Falls stage Thursday and went on up home. She says that after staying up there awhile she gets lonesome and then comes out and visits Medford but soon gets tired of city life and longs for her good mountain home.
    Eli Dahack and son Everett came in Thursday morning from Seattle, Wash.
    The Ladies' Civic Improvement Club met at Mrs. J. F. Brown's Thursday instead of Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen's on account of the sickness of her daughter Miss Joyce who has been confined to her bed for the past week or so, but I am glad to be able to state that she is recovering, and hopes are entertained that she will soon resume her place in her classes in the high school in Medford again.
    Ray Harnish and family have been spreading a few days visiting Wm. Holman and family. Mrs. Holman is a sister of Mrs. Ray Harnish and are now living on the Gus Nichols ranch on Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office.
    Robert Harnish and family of Phoenix have been visiting his father, S. H. Harnish of this place.
    A. C. Spencer of Brownsboro was transacting business with our merchants Thursday.
    Foster and Kleiser, the successors to Klum & Co., of Medford, have had a force of five men out here putting up bulletin boards in different parts of our town, and the prospect is that they will do quite an extensive business in that line as they claim that they have all kinds of advertising on their lists. All five of them were here for dinner Thursday.
    Brennan Welcher was here for dinner Thursday. He is a representative of Gates Auto Co., Medford
    O. Adams, formerly of Butte Falls, but now of Medford, came out from Butte Falls on the stage Friday, took dinner here and went on to Medford.
    J. M. Hurley, O. A. Manning and Mark Perry, all of Medford, were here for dinner Thursday. They are the land appraisers for the Federal Farm Loan Association and were on their way out in the country to look at a farm. They report that they are doing considerable business in that line.
    William Holman of Lake Creek came in Friday morning to have his saddle horse shod.
    T. T. Taylor and wife, who are looking after the interests of Marsh Garrett on his Lake Creek ranch, came in Saturday and they took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    The railroad company have had to lay off their force of men who have been relaying line on account of the scarcity of time, although they expect to resume operations again Monday. Mr. Whaley, the section boss, went up to his home in Butte Falls Thursday afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1922, page 3



CONSOLIDATION OF SCHOOLS PLANNED AT BROWNSBORO
    BROWNSBORO, Jan. 12.--(Special) Friday evening at 7:30 at the Brownsboro school house the county school superintendent, with a speaker from Douglas County, will talk to the taxpayers and patrons of this and surrounding schools on "Consolidation."
    There are four districts around here keeping up small schools and a number of the voters have been considering consolidation for several years.
    These school people will talk on the cost, the saving of money and energy, and the efficiency of the proposition. The consolidated schools are proving a success all over the state, and everyone is invited and urged to come and hear the talks.
    Rev. Adams of the Congregational Church held services here Sunday. One of the largest crowds that has ever been to Sunday school attended. There were a good many men present. They decided to have choir practice every Friday night. Will those interested in it come out next Friday night? They will have choir practice here next Friday night, and while here they will decide where next to have it.
    We have been having hot lunches at school since cold weather set in. The school board are going to help us out. They are going to buy the material which we need.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Myers of Lake Creek made a business trip to Medford Saturday.
    Mrs. R. E. Tucker, who has been in Medford for medical treatment, returned Saturday.
    Mr. L. D. Tucker, who has been running the East Side meat market in Medford, has closed it up and returned to his home in Brownsboro.
    Miss Kubli went to Medford Friday and returned Saturday.
    Henry Myers is in Medford taking medical treatment.
    Mr. and Mrs. Orin Maxfield of Ashland have decided to stay with his brother, Joe Maxfield, for the rest of the winter.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1922, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    The surprise on Mr. and Mrs. Joe Hall Saturday night was a great success. A large crowd attended and spent the evening dancing and playing games. All report a fine time.
    Mr. Ragsdale and family were Sunday guests at the Poole home.
    Wayne Ash spent the weekend with his brother Howard and family on Elk Creek.
    Mr. C. Mathews is visiting Dan Foeller and family.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Pritchett and family visited Saturday and Sundy at Joe Hall's.
    Irwin Howe and Denzil Middlebusher were Medford callers Wednesday.
    Henry Thornton of Persist went out on the stage Saturday for a few weeks' visit with friends in the valley.
    There was a good attendance at church Sunday.
    Mrs. Ellen Albright of Medford is visiting her old home near Trail this week.
    H. Ash Jr., wife and daughter Betty returned to their place on Elk Creek, which they are rapidly improving.
    Miss Inez Willits returned home Wednesday after attending the teachers' association at Portland. She also visited relatives. She reported having had a good time while on her visit.
    Ezra Whitley went to Medford on a business trip Saturday, December 21, returning to his place at Persist Wednesday.
    Fred Sturgis went after cattle Monday, 9th, returning the same day to his home.
    Elmer Ivey, Hazel [Pence,] Paul Sandoz, Peter Sandoz were registered for examinations to be held at Elk Creek school house January 12-13.
    Elmer Ivey and Hazel Pence were registered to take the complete eighth grade examinations; Paul Sandoz and Peter Sandoz will take examinations in physiology, as they are in the 6th and 5th grades.
    George Trusty went to town Saturday, January 7, and returned Monday, 9th. He has also traded his old Ford for a newer model, which is a 1921 model. It seems to run very nicely.
    Mr. W. Willits of Persist was in this vicinity looking for cattle Sunday, January 8.
    The Miller boys have bought the Messenger cabin and have been wrecking it and hauling the lumber to their place for a barn they intend to build.
    Mr. I. M. Miller returned home last week after visiting in Medford.
    Claude Moore, wife and baby were visiting P. E. Sandoz and family Sunday, the 8th.
    Elmer Ivey spent Sunday afternoon visiting the Sandoz boys.
    Lee Whitley has built an addition to his house.
    George Hall made a trip down Elk Creek road with an empty barrel in his wagon the other day. Don't anybody come up this way till we find out what was in it. He claims it was hot air. Someone will have a hard time drinking hot air.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday evening Mrs. Joseph Geppert of Butte Falls came in answer to a telephone call from Medford and took supper and went to Medford in order to be at the bedside of her little grandson, who was reported to be very sick at the time.
    Fred Thomsen also called and took supper.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. M. Conley of Butte Falls came out on the Sunday morning stage from Medford, where Mrs. Conley had been and underwent an operation at the Dow hospital. She was on her way home making short drives, remaining here until Monday morning when she went on the auto stage as far as the John Allen place where she remained overnight and her husband went on up home for a team and sleigh to take her the rest of the way.
    Mr. Conley reports that he had sold his sawmill back to Mr. Hawk and with the deal also sold 8,500,000 feet of standing timber. That when he bought the mill from Mr. Hawk he simply bought it to secure the Clark Creek water right, that Mr. Hawk has moved the mill onto the tract of timber he sold to him and is getting ready to cut timber in earnest.
    Rev. H. G. Adams started up to Brownsboro on foot Sunday morning to preach for the people up there but was picked up and taken on to his destination and after attending Sunday school preached to an attentive congregation of about 30 people, retuning in the afternoon in about the same way, walking and riding reached his room in time for supper and then preached here at 7:30 p.m. to a fair-sized congregation. He will be at Butte Falls next Sunday with Rev. C. C. Hulett and they expect to hold services there all of the following week.
    Sunday evening Geo. Lewis, Louis Marton and Adin Haselton came in for supper.
    J. H. Cooley, one of the big lumber dealers of Medford, came out and took dinner on his way up to his ranch and orchard.
    There have been and are being made several important business changes in our little town. The first of note is the transfer of the old G. W. Grover place that has changed hands several times since it went out of his hands and now Mr. Muskopf, the last owner, has disposed of it to one of the Medford attorneys, Mr. Newman, and Mr. Muskopf after selling out his farm located a house belonging to a Mr. McQuoid of Oakland and on preparing to move into it was notified by the agent here, Mr. Wm. Perry, that the property had been sold to Fred Thomsen and that he would have to hunt another home, so his next move was to interview Mr. Sheibley, our school janitor, and succeeded in renting his house, where he is living, and he intends to move into the house with James Jordan, and by having two old widowers live together succeeded in arranging business so as to keep all parties here in our town.
    The next move of interest is a deal whereby Wm. von der Hellen has sold his hardware and drug store to our other hardware man, Roy Ashpole and Thomas F. Nichols, and they will consolidate the two stocks of goods and carry on the business in the old von der Hellen building as that went with the goods and fixtures. Mr. von der Hellen has not given out for publication his plans for the future.
    Last week the train on the P.&E. railroad had considerable trouble trying to haul ties over the road to repair the weakest places on the road and the result was that the section boss, Mr. Whaley, discontinued operations on the road on Thursday afternoon with the understanding that they would resume work again Monday, and some of the men who have homes in Medford went home and returned Monday morning to be informed that there was a serious shortage of ties and that they had had trouble in getting them down from Butte Falls and that they would have to lay off until Tuesday, so Tuesday morning came and the section boss informed them that he could not get ties enough to keep them all, sixteen, at work so laid off seven of them and started to work again. The trouble seems to be that the company cannot get men to get the ties out, hew them out of small trees so as to make them 7 x 9 in. by 8 feet. Another thing that is working against the company is that there is a kind of epidemic going through the country and several of the men who have been making ties have been on the sick list and had to lay off on that account, but we live in hopes that when the weather changes and the sunshine comes back that we will all improve in health, in feelings, and that the work will progress right along.
    George W. Averill of Round Top, Butte Falls post office, came in Monday night on his way to Medford and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Theodore Florey, a brother of our townsman, A. J. Florey, was a business caller the first of the week.
    Mrs. M. E. Richardson, Everett Abbott and Harry Heryford were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning on their way to their homes in Butte Falls and vicinity.
    Mr. Phipps, who owns a farm and orchard four or five miles north of Medford and is engaged in the sheep business to a limited extent, was here to the Muskopf ranch to recover a few head of sheep he lost on the road and had been cared for by Mr. Muskopf.
    Chas. Browne, representing Leslie-Judge Co., New York, was here for dinner Tuesday.
    Born to the wife of J. D. Arnes, foreman on the Edsall orchard, Jan. 11, a fine baby boy.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. W. G. McDonald of the Elk Resort on Rogue River, who had been looking after business interests in Medford, came on the Butte Falls stage last Wednesday and went up home on the Persist stage. Mrs. McDonald reports that they have had a very good run of business during the summer and fall and are anticipating another prosperous season as there will likely be more work done on the unit of the Crater Lake Highway between Trail and Prospect.
    Hern Thornton was also a passenger on the same stage at the same time,; he going on up to his home in Persist. He had been down to Ashland to visit his folks. He reports that the senior Thornton, a near relative, is in very critical condition as he is quite aged, over ninety years of age.
    T. Taylor, who is on the Marsh Garrett farm on Lake Creek, went up on the Lake Creek stage Wednesday, and his wife, who has been visiting relatives in the valley, went out Friday morning.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt, formerly of this place but now of Medford, called for dinner Wednesday noon. He reports that he has still considerable business in Butte Falls, one of his old fields of operation. The doctor is quite popular here although as a rule it is so distressingly healthy right around Eagle Point, looking at it from a professional man's viewpoint, that he thought he would do more business in Medford and vicinity than here so moved to Medford some time ago.
    L. B. Talken, a hardware salesman of Grants Pass, Wm. von der Hellen and his wife's brother, Theodore Florey of Jacksonville, were here for dinner Wednesday.
    Mrs. H. E. McNichol, the woman who lost her husband last fall, was around Wednesday afternoon bidding her old neighbors farewell as she has left us and gone to California, intending to stop off and visit friends and relatives along the route to Los Angeles.
    Wm. Lewis, son of our confectionery man and the Eagle Point-Medford jitney driver, who went to visit his sister, Mrs. Dr. Arbell of San Jose, California, about a month ago, has returned to the parental roof and reports that times are fairly good down there but living is high, but speaks in high terms of that locality.
    Nick Young, another one of our progressive and well-to-do young men, who has been visiting different parts of California to see more of the world has returned home to his farm. I have not seen him since his return so can say but little on the subject, although suppose that he is like almost everyone who has [been] living here in the "Italy of the Pacific Coast" for a year or more, when they go away almost always return.
    Business has quieted down again, the two stocks of hardware have been invoiced and Ashpole and Nichols (I don't know if that is the way the firm will be known) are now doing business in the old von der Hellen hardware store, and Mr. Muskopf has moved into the Sheibley house and Mr. Sheibley has moved into the house with Mr. James Jordan, and all are happy and contented to all outward appearances.
    Clarence Robinett, a son of Mrs. W. L. Childreth and son-in-law of Wm. Perry, is here visiting relatives.
    J. W. Johnson, representative of the Kirtland farm of Medford, was here Thursday on his way up beyond Brownsboro. He seems to be quite sanguine that he will make the deal so as to have another fine stallion in that section of the country. He came in Friday and spent the night.
    Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby and Mrs. Carson of Butte Falls came out on the Butte Falls stage Thursday and after taking dinner at the Sunnyside went on to Medford on the same stage.
    Edward Frey of Lake Creek came in from Medford on the Butte Falls stage Friday morning and went on up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mr. Cox, the superintendent of the work on the P.&E.R.R., and Mr. Burman, the general manager of the entire work under the supervision of Mr. Olds, the head of the whole concern, were also here for dinner Thursday and also a man and woman who were selling cigarettes, tobacco, etc.
    J. Jordahl, a traveling salesman for the Independent Cracker Co., Portland, was here for dinner Friday. He seemed to be soliciting for cookies exclusively, and in conversation on the subject I remarked that there must be a very large profit made on cookies to justify the expense of employing a man to travel over the country and in addition to his wages or commission his traveling expenses and other incidentals such as cigars, cigarettes, etc., but he claimed that the sale was so extensive as to justify the expense. It seems to be a fact that our modern housewives have drifted into the habit of buying not only cookies but everything else in the eatable line already prepared, and still cry hard times and high cost of living. It is not an uncommon thing here in our little town to see from three to five traveling salesmen in a day soliciting for the sale of all the necessities of life.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 16, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday forenoon Miss Alwell Randall, Miss Ella Pettyman and Miss Anna Ray Conley, three of the Butte Falls teachers, called for dinner on their way to Rogue River to witness a game of basketball between the Butte Falls team and the Rogue River teams, and on Monday forenoon there were four young men came in, Prof. Ward Lawrence O'Brien, Ernest Abbott and Harold Patton, members of the Butte Falls high school, and remained until about noon and then went to the railroad track to meet Mr. George Albert, who is running an accommodation train for the benefit of people who wish to travel in that way. He has a small motor car that he uses in that way and the people of Butte Falls and vicinity find it a very great convenience. They report that the Butte Falls team carried off the honors of five of the games out of seven, and in addition to other pleasures connected with the trip they had a very social time while in Rogue River.
    It seems as though S. H. Harnish, one of our neighbors, has his share of troubles, for just a very short time ago I had to record the loss of a dwelling house by fire. He had it rented to two young men and he supposed that they were living in it, and no insurance, but he has not heard of or seen either of them since. And then last week he got up a cow to furnish milk for the family and tied her up by the neck, leaving the calf beside her with a partition between them, and in the morning when he went out to milk [and] found her tumbled over with her neck broken.
    In looking around for items of interest to write up for the readers of the Mail Tribune, I met Ray and Robert Harnish, just going over to their father's to move two mammoth Chester White hogs, taking them to better pasture. They are surely fine specimens of hogs, but the most attractive part of the outfit was the nine little rustling white pigs that Mr. Harnish had just weaned. I should judge that they would weigh about 25 or 30 pounds each and were as round as a barrel, but not so large. I am glad to see that the farmers are waking up to the necessity of raising a better breed of stock of all kinds, for a few years ago if a man wanted a hog to fatten he would buy one a year old or such a matter and have to feed it for weeks or perhaps months before it would be ready for the block, whereas one can take one of almost any of the improved stock, the Chester White, Duroc Red, Poland China and after feeding it properly for a week or so can make it take on from two to three pounds of flesh a day. I know of one instance when the late John W. Smith, who lived on Big Sticky on the edge of the desert on the Eagle Point-Phoenix road, took a small Duroc Jersey pig and made it gain at first ¾ to a pound a day and then two pounds and later three pounds a day until he got to be as large as he wanted him to be, weighing him every day. With a little care and attention one can improve their stock, I care not what kind or breed it is, and by crossing and breeding up can soon get rid of the old razorback breed of hogs, or the old degenerate stock of cattle and bring out a breed of beef or dairy stock.
    Thomas Vestal and wife of Reese Creek were transacting business with our merchants Saturday, and so was Fred Arnes and W. C. Pool.
    J. W. Johnson of Medford, the business manager of the Kirtland farm, came in and spent Monday and Tuesday at the Sunnyside. He seems to be on a deal with parties above here on Little Butte Creek to introduce a fine Percheron stallion in that section of the country. He went back to Medford this Wednesday afternoon.
    Mrs. Thomas F. Nichols went to Medford Saturday and her husband took his supper at the Sunnyside and so did Adin Haselton.
    I understand that the dance was not very well attended and there was evidence that there was some moonshine around, as it became necessary for our town marshal to use his billy on one man who became too boisterous. This is the second time the same man has had trouble at a dance at Trail and been knocked on the head for his conduct. He may learn to behave himself properly after a while. Ladies who wish to take part and enjoy a social dance don't want to be harangued by a half-crazy drunken nuisance. There were a few dancers came to the Sunnyside to spend the latter part of the night, and among them was Mr. Hayman, formerly on the J. H. Cooley orchard but now of Phoenix, and Hurst Charley and Miss Nora Pankey of Medford.
    G. E. Merrill of Derby also spent the night, went to Medford, returning Tuesday night, and left here on the Butte Falls stage for his home. He is doing some trapping up in his neighborhood and meeting with some success.
    The railroad men are having some trouble in repairing the road, as when they ran over it a short time ago with their small locomotive they found the old ties were so rotten that the rails gave way, with the result that when they were coming out with two or three small flat cars behind a Ford loaded with ties the rails gave way the second time and the result was they had to leave the ties and one of the flat cars and go to the repair shop, but they put on some more cars and are pushing the work right along and hope to be able to secure ties soon so that they can put on a full force.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 20, 1922, page 10



TRAIL ITEMS
    Eugene Howell, superintendent of Rogue River Fisheries, and his wife entertained at a sumptuous dinner Friday evening. Guest were Mr. and Mrs. W. G. McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Todd, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. McDonald, and Miss Gladys McDonald. The occasion was most enjoyable.
    Last Saturday being the birthday of our neighbor, Geo. Weeks, a surprise was tendered him in the evening. A goodly crowd of friends gathered in, and games played, and dancing occupied the evening. Generous refreshments were served and when the guests departed all expressed themselves as having a splendid time.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. G. McDonald of the Rogue Elk Resort entertained some friends and neighbors Monday evening around the big fireplace. There was music and games and fun galore. At a late hour ice cream, cake and coffee was served.
    Mrs. J. E. McDonald, who was ill with pneumonia, is recovering nicely.
    Mrs. L. N. Phillips left Monday for a visit with her son and daughter at Eugene.
    J. E. McDonald visited Medford this week on business.
    We learn with sincere regret of the illness of Ralph Dunlop and hope he will recover soon and come back again.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There seems to be a general lull in business here from what I can learn from persons who come and go, as that seems to be about the only way I have to gather items for the readers of the Mail Tribune, as I have been confined to the house and yard now for over a week and have been unable to go out on my regular beat for considerably longer than that and consequently find it hard to get up a readable article but am living in hopes of being able to go around again in a few days.
    Last Tuesday afternoon Lee Farlow, formerly of Lake Creek but now of Jacksonville, came out on the Butte Falls stage from Butte Falls and took dinner here and went on home on the same stage. The same day Misses F. Perry, J. Hurley and O. A. Manning, representatives of the Federal Farm Association, were here for dinner on their way up to the Lake Creek country to set a valuation on land in that section. They report that they are doing considerable business in that line. I know of several farmers who are taking advantage of the opportunity to secure money at a low rate of interest on long-time loans and have it arranged so that they can pay the interest and a part of the principal at the same time and the first thing they know they have the debt paid and hardly know how it was done.
    William P. LaRito of Trail and G. E. Merrill of Derby came in and spent the night. Mr. LaRito has taken up a homestead on the headwaters of Elk Creek and had come out to the valley to try to get work. The section boss, Mr. Whaley, who boards here said that he could not use any more men at present, so he started up to where the Fish Lake Ditch Co. are enlarging their canal to try to find a job, and Mr. Merrill went on up home.
    Henry Trusty, one of our prosperous and progressive young men at Elk Creek (Trail), was a pleasant caller for dinner Thursday. He had come out on a business venture and returned home the same day.
    Miss Falldine, the county public health nurse, called for dinner the same day on her way from Butte Falls where she had been on official business.
    D. Brown of Chiloquin, Klamath County, and H. S. Pond, salesman for the Remington Typewriter Co., were also here the same day for dinner.
    Frank Ditsworth and Uriah Vaughn of Peyton called for dinner the same day. Mr. Ditsworth heard of one of his cattle being at Ed Dutton's so came out with his truck to take him home, a very handy way to move a cow instead of taking two days and two men and a dog and tiring the animal out on a long journey.
    Mrs. Carl Jackson, who had been spending a few days in Medford, came out Thursday evening on the Eagle Point stage and spent the night at the Sunnyside and the next morning went on up home at 9:30 on the same stage.
    J. W. Johnson, the manager of the Kirtland farm, has been here for the past few days and employed Sherman Wooley to handle and care for the stallion referred to in a former article and has brought the horse out here as there seem to be quite a number of men around here who wished to see him but did not feel justified in riding four miles below Central Point to look at him.
    C. H. Natwick, one of the leading contractors, especially on road, ditch or railroad work, was here and spent Friday night with us.
    Rev. H. G. Adams, the minister who has charge of this field, spent last Sunday till Tuesday at Butte Falls. He was to have been met here by Rev. Chas. C. Hulett but when he reached there found that he was somewhere else so had to conduct the meeting without him but reports that he had very good congregations and also good attention. He started from there on Thursday afternoon, visiting on his way, and reached his room Friday evening.
    Miss Burr, one of the school supervisors (if there is more than one), called for a few minutes Saturday and reported that they had had a very interesting and enthusiastic meeting of several of the school districts at Brownsboro Friday night at which Miss Holmes, our county school superintendent, was present and discussed the question of consolidation of the Little Butte, Wellen, Antelope and Brownsboro schools and have the children transferred from their homes, an expensive luxury, to the central school, but no decision was reached.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 23, 1922, page 3



BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Miss Holmes and Miss Burr talked to quite a representative crowd of voters from the three districts, Brownsboro, Antelope and Butte Creek, Districts 39, 12, and 65 respectively, recently. The two speakers had actual figures to illustrate to the crowd that by the three districts consolidating schools they could build a new two-room school house, pay two teachers and convey the teachers from and to school and this could all be done by only a levy of a six-mill tax, while all of the districts but 12 are paying more than that now. This was planning on a nine-month school and at present districts No. 65 and 12 only have eight months' school.
    In Miss Holmes' figures she did not count one hundred dollars interest that Brownsboro has coming in every year.
    At Sunday school Sunday they decided to have choir practice every Sunday after services.
    Mrs. Stalkford came to Brownsboro Monday after her son Carl, who has been staying with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Henry.
    Mrs. Ella Maxfield went to her sister's home at Eagle Point Sunday. Her sister, Mrs. Lillian Cingcade, is going to the Sacred Heart Hospital at Medford to have a serious operation and Mrs. Maxfield is going to stay there until her sister returns.
    Mr. Walch is dehorning his cattle this week.
    Mr. Adams of the Congregational church held services after Sunday school Sunday.
    William Staub made a business trip to Medford Friday.
    Miss Olga Bieberstedt went to Medford Saturday.
    Carl Stanley has returned from the mountains, where he has been riding for cattle.
    Tom Stanley was a visitor at Carl Stanley's home Thursday.
    Maggie McDonald, who has been ill, is getting along nicely.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Richard Muskopf made a business trip last Saturday to Medford.
    J. W. Anderson and family called Saturday morning in quest of a jitney to take them to Medford. They had been up on Little Butte Creek visiting his brother.
    Miss Elizabeth Burr, school supervisor, was also here at the same time and went on up to Butte Falls as near as I could learn.
    E. R. Tedrick, I understand, has moved onto the farm recently occupied by Richard Muskopf in the lower end of our town.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Caveally, representatives of R. J. Reynolds Co., Eugene, were here for dinner Saturday.
    Mr. Pickett, meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Co., was here for dinner Saturday and while here told us of the proposed plan of the company to put in another power plant on Rogue River, some five miles below the one near Prospect, then they will extend the electric line to Eugene of 110,000 volts. The plant will be located at the Hole in the Ground just after leaving the Flounce Rock grade, where they will have a perpendicular drop of 1000 feet. They expect to take the water from the reservoir at the Prospect plant and bring it down in an eight-foot iron or steel pipe, having a tremendous fall from the reservoir to the Hole in the Ground and there with a drop of a thousand feet to the river one can hardly imagine the amount of force or power they can control. There is also another thought connected with the undertaking and that is the amount of labor that will be necessary to accomplish the job and how it will help the men who are now looking for employment.
    Roy Ashpole, of the Eagle Point Hardware Co., was also here at the same time for dinner and reports that his wife is in Medford caring for their little son Donald, who at that time was quite sick with pneumonia but is at this writing improving very materially. Roy is taking his dinners here regularly.
    Wm. T. La Rita, Wm. von der Hellen and son Boyd and Mr. Rynning, formerly chief civil engineer on the Crater Lake Highway but now of Medford, were here Saturday night for supper and so was George Holmes, our garage man, and his brother-in-law, Thomas Riley of Wellen, and Mrs. Lucius Kincaid, who is teaching school in the Crater Lake school district. After supper she went on out to Medford, returning the same night, and the next day went back to her school.
    Sunday morning was one of those lovely, cool, crisp mornings such as we so often have here in January and February, here in Southern Oregon, such as makes one thankful that their lot has fallen in such a desirable place.
    There was nothing remarkable going on. Rev. H. G. Adams had an appointment to preach in Brownsboro and started out on foot thinking that perhaps he would meet with a chance to ride, but no such luck, so he kept on walking until he reached the school house and after preaching to a small congregation--he said that they had had a dance the night before, and a school meeting the one before that so there were not many out--so after partaking of dinner with some of his friends started on the return trip with the same result, walked all the way, and had a real taste of what some of us older ministers used to undergo in our mountain charges, but he came through all OK and went to the church and fired up, just as we used to do in bygone days, and when time came for preaching found that he had to be organist, chorister, leader and preacher but he will get used to our way soon. He will preach in Butte Falls next Sunday, Jan. 29, morning and evening.
    Among those who called Sunday for dinner and for other reasons were J. D. Patrick, one of the carpenters who is in the employ of the Fish Lake Ditch Co., Planey F. Leabo, Thomas Lewis, Thomas F. Nichols, wife and half-sister, Miss Myrtle Smith, J. W. Smith, who lives on the old J. W. Smith farm on Big Sticky, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Hinman and daughter June Hinman, and Mrs. L. B. Rawley of Medford, the four last named coming for supper and an evening's visit with the hostess and family. Also Wm. von der Hellen, son Boyd and Mr. Rynning.
    Gus Ditsworth and two of the Vaughn men, Roy and Uriah, were here for dinner Monday. They came out from their Flounce Rock homes with a truck to take some cattle home.
    Mrs. C. H. Natwick was also here for dinner and informed me that her husband had secured a contract to do a lot of grading on the new railroad from Butte Falls to the Four-bit country and expects to put his teams and men at work right away.
    We have lost one of our pleasant and entertaining boarders, Mr. Whaley, the section boss on the railroad. He has been transferred to Butte Falls, his home, to take charge of another gang of men, but his place has been filled by another man, J. A. Durnfew of Central Point, who has taken charge of the men in this section.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George F. Fendall, formerly of Hilt, Calif., but now of Butte Falls, came in on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday afternoon on his way to Medford to meet his son-in-law, Buel Hildreth and wife, who were coming from Cottage Grove with the body of his father, E. A. Hildreth, who passed away at his home there, Jan. 23, 1922, aged 80 years and a half. He was with two of his sons, A. E., Jr., and Buel and wife who went from their homes in Butte Falls to care for him. He leaves a wife and the two sons referred to above and his oldest son Delbert of Oakland, Calif., and a number of friends in Ashland, Central Point and Butte Falls, where he made his home for some time. The funeral was held Thursday afternoon in the Central Point cemetery.
    Friday morning word came to me over the phone that Mrs. Mary Severance had passed away in Merrill, Calif. [sic] at the home of her son, Alfred Stricklin, aged 95 years. Mrs. Severance was for a number of years a citizen of our town and after selling their property here to James Jordan, who is still living here, she and her husband moved to Central Point, and after the death of her husband, H. T. Severance, she was taken care of by her son until death came at the ripe old age of 95. She had quite a number of very warm friends here and at Central Point who esteemed her very highly on account of her Christian virtues.
    Last Tuesday in addition to Mr. Fendale being here for dinner we had Frank Netherland and Mrs. M. E. Richardson of Butte Falls, and her daughter, Gladys, who was afflicted with an abscess on the underpart of her knee and that seemed to be caused by a simple chafed place on her heel. Mrs. Richardson and daughter remained here overnight as the stage was so full that the driver refused to take not only them but another lady who wanted to go to town the same afternoon, but Mrs. Richardson went Wednesday morning on the 7:30 stage.
    Sam H. Oeser, one of the men who is boarding here and working on the section gang, took a layoff Wednesday and made a business trip to Medford, and Friday the whole gang was laid off in the morning on account of the snow as it made it so very disagreeable removing old rotten ties and replacing them with new ones, so he made a business trip up to Lake Creek that day.
    Rev. H. G. Adams went to Medford to attend the Sunday school convention last Tuesday.
    J. W. Johnson, who is here in the interest of the Kirtland farm and seems to be attracting considerable attention among the horsemen, is not the manager of the Kirtland farm as announced in a former article, but a salesman for the blooded horses on the farm.
    Frank Rhodes, who has a contract to do some grading on the road from Grants Pass to the Oregon Caves, moved a lot of his machinery up there about the middle of the week to go to work.
    Benj. Whetstone, who worked all summer and fall for Charley Delin, has come in to visit his father-in-law, Joe Riley and family.
    George Turnbow of Central Point, a son of the present section foreman, came out Thursday and joined the force of railroad men and also took board and lodging at the Sunnyside.
    O. C. Eblen came in Thursday evening some time after dark with a bunch of work horses on his way to Butte Falls to work on the extension of the P.&E. railroad and when he reached our town he met midnight darkness with the exception of what light our street lamps afforded, and in addition to that we were having a driving snow storm and about the first thing he did was to inquire where he could get hay and stable room for his horses and he phoned to the Sunnyside about hay, etc., and was informed that we don't feed horses, but finally he found hay and stable room with W. P. Morgan and then came to the Sunnyside for supper and bed. It seems that there is no one here in our town to accommodate the travel in that line and persons coming here to stay overnight or who wish to feed their horses at noon, to be on the safe side better bring their feed with them. It appears that Mr. Eblen has a contract to do a lot of work for the P.&E.R.R. Co., in the way of getting out and delivering ties along the old track and the new right of way, as well as clearing the right of way of the saw logs along the track.
    Thursday afternoon after the funeral of Mr. E. A. Hildreth, Sr., his son Buel, wife and her father, Mr. Fendale and the widow of the late E. A. Hildreth came in to spend the night on their way home to Butte Falls.
    Frank Manning and Percy Boothby of Flounce Rock came up from Ashland where they had been to visit Percy's parents, A. H. Boothby and wife and were on their way up home but stopped here for dinner Friday.
    F. S. Brandon of the Snowy Butte mills, Central Point, was also here for dinner the same day. He and his brother George own the old original Snowy Butte mills here and came over to look after their property. He intends to move back and operate the mill here as soon as the P.&E.R.R. is opened up for business again. The only reason for their shutting down was the P.&E. suspending business so that they could not bring wheat in or ship the flour out.
    John Allen of Derby came out Friday to look after some of his cattle but turned aside long enough to take a look at the fine black Percheron stallion that Mr. Johnson has here for sale and seemed to be very favorably impressed with his appearance. Mr. Allen is a horseman and knows a good thing when he sees it.
    C. H. Natwick, the railroad contractor who has a contract to do some grading on the Butte Falls extension of the P.&E., took his tools, etc. up on the P.&E.R.R. Friday and expects to start in on his contract the first of the week.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 30, 1922, page 2


TO SPEND $300,000 ON TRAIL PROSPECT ROAD THIS SUMMER
    "The state highway commission is committed without reservation to the completion of the Crater Lake Highway between Trail and Prospect, every foot of it, with a standard grade and rock macadam surface," reported Ben C. Sheldon upon his return from Portland yesterday. This piece of construction will be a "cooperative contract" between the state and the Forest Service.
    There are several circumstances at both ends of the matter--the state and the federal government--that have made it difficult to work this project out satisfactorily. The state highway commission is near the end of its present authorized finances. Next year's work will practically scrape the bottom of the pot. And we all feel that the time has about come for a letup in expenditures and to keep taxes at the lowest possible point until conditions in the state have undergone a radical improvement. The members of the commission agree to this.
    But with the bottom of the pot in sight, there comes an immense pressure from every section of the state for a little more work in that locality. The commission has ten demands for every dollar at its command. But they have promised that our Crater Lake road will be among those to be finished.
    On the forestry department's end of the question, there is a very sharp, determined controversy at Washington over the question of a policy for the department respecting the expenditure of the forestry road funds. One faction wants the bulk of these funds spent within the forests, having in mind the protection of the timber from fires. The other faction says that the policy should recognize the fact that these immense federal forest areas pay no taxes and that the forest road funds should go on state roads leading into the forests, somewhat in the nature of a compensation for the lack of taxes on the forest lands. While this controversy is running, Mr. Cecil and his superiors are unable to say just how far they can go toward cooperating in these projects.
    However, the agreement worked out is as follows: There will be a contract or contracts let this spring for all the grading of the road between Trail and Prospect, covering the expenditure of a bit more than $300,000. That work will be done during the coming summer. They have agreed to require of the contractors such a handling of the work as will interrupt the travel, especially during the Crater Lake season, to the smallest extent possible. The matter of the federal cooperation for the rocking of the road is left up in the air temporarily, but the highway commission has obligated itself to see that the work is done.
    Both the highway commission and the forestry bureau evidence a disposition to go as far as they possibly can to help us with this road, and I feel certain the road will be completed promptly and in fine shape.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 30, 1922, page 6


FRANK TREFREN OF BUTTE FALLS KILLED BY TREE
Falling Limb Crushes Skull of Timber Worker--Rushed to Medford and Operation Is Performed--Conscious for Hour After Accident.
    Frank E. Trefren of Butte Falls died this morning at nine o'clock as a result of injuries received yesterday afternoon when he was struck by a falling limb while working in the timber near Butte Falls.
    The injury occurred about 3 o'clock yesterday afternoon and after being hurt Trefren was conscious for more than an hour and was able to converse with friends. He then lapsed into unconsciousness and a doctor was called from Medford to attend him. Trefren was brought to this city via the Pacific and Eastern railroad and arrived about 10 o'clock last night accompanied by several friends and a brother, George Trefren of Butte Falls. He was immediately rushed to the Sacred Heart Hospital where it was discovered that he had suffered a very serious fracture of the skull, extending from the top of his head to the base of the skull in front of and beneath his eye.
    An operation was performed in an effort to save his life but due to the seriousness of the injury practically no hope of his recovery was entertained. He died without regaining consciousness.
    The body is in charge of Weeks and Conger of this city. Funeral arrangements will be announced later.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1922, page 1



BROWNSBORO NEWS
    The school board had a meeting at the school house Thursday.
    Claus Charley spent the weekend in Medford.
    Lou Walch was a visitor at the Tucker home Sunday. While there he purchased a horse.
    Mrs. Lewis Rohrer of Lake Creek spent several days with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hansen, Sr. While here she visited the school and led us in singing.
    Raymond Hoagland fell on a rock and cut his leg at school Monday. He has not been able to come to school.
    Mrs. Charles Cingcade, who is in the hospital at Medford, was very low as a result of an operation. She is better now.
    Mr. C. E. Stanley went to Medford Friday to work in his butcher shop.
    Our school had 98 percent in attendance last month and there were thirteen who were neither absent nor tardy.
    Stella Adams, who is ill, has not attended school lately.
    Mr. Ralph Bieberstedt and Mr. Ed Cowden are gathering cattle from the range.
    Mr. Sam Hoagland bought some hay from Ralph Tucker.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl Stanley and son Merrill visited our school Thursday.
    Roscoe Hulse butchered his hogs Monday.
    Mr. William Hoagland returned to his home in Central Point last week.
    Mr. Dupray was a visitor at the Tucker home Saturday. He returned home Sunday.
    Mrs. Roscoe Hulse and two sons, John and Cecil, visited the Hansen, Jr., family Sunday.
    Mr. Simmons made a trip to Medford Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday, Dr. Holt was summoned from Medford to the bedside of William Lewis and the result was that he was taken to Medford and upon examination I understand the case was pronounced a serious case of kidney trouble, but I have not heard further particulars, but hope that it is nothing very serious.
    Mrs. Dupray, the wife of the owner of the Dupray & Son mill on the line of the P.&E., came in Friday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the 7:15 stage.
    C. H. Natwick, the contractor, after shipping a part of his outfit for road work to Butte Falls last Saturday, remained here at the Sunnyside until Monday, looking after getting his teams shod up and getting ready to go to work on his contract. He and his son, Carlyle, have been here for their meals up to this writing.
    Buel Hildreth and his father-in-law, Mr. Fendale, who were here after the funeral of Mr. Hildreth, Sr., went on up home Friday on the stage, but his wife and mother have remained here up to this writing, as the weather has been so inclement that it was not thought prudent for them to undertake the trip by stage as the auto can only go as far as Derby and the rest of the route is in an open hack.
    Clarence Charley of Brownsboro called Saturday for dinner and remained overnight to attend the Saturday night dance.
    In addition to Mr. Charley, Roy Conley of Butte Falls and Charley Hanscom, J. W. Isbell, Planey Leabo and Charley Winkle were here for dinner Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Pete Betz and a neighbor of theirs, Mr. Chris Bergman were also in town the same day, but I did not see them as I am still confined to the Sunnyside of the creek.
    There was some four or five of the young men who attended the dance came in to spend the last end of the night and some of them took beds and breakfast while others simply enjoyed the good warm room and laid on the lounge and rockers, but that was better than leaning against a lamppost.
    Jack Kerby, who has been boarding at the Sunnyside for the last month, resting up, for he has been for the past year or more in charge of Charley Delin's horses as stable boss, has been making several trips to Medford recently, but he is a man who keeps his own counsel, but a more pleasant companion will be hard to find in any country. A great reader and seems to be well informed on all general subjects.
    Albert Hill, who is working for Mr. Natwick, came in Monday noon for dinner and spent the night. He has been having some of the Natwick horses shod up, getting ready to start moving dirt as soon as the snow is gone at Butte Falls.
    Sam H. Oeser, the young man referred to in my last letter as having gone to Lake Creek on business, returned Monday and went to work again on the railroad station.
    W. G. Smith, who has been living here in town and a constant reader of the Mail Tribune, came in Monday evening and enjoyed room and board for a few days, while his wife is visiting her parents out in the country. He is working on the railroad.
    J. J. Simmons of Trail came in Monday evening and spent the night.
    Robert Harnish and Carlyle Natwick came in for dinner Tuesday on their way to Butte Falls with a truckload of fixtures for the Natwick road work.
    In addition to the above we had as guests for dinner Thos. F. Nichols, one of the new firm of the Eagle Point Hardware Company, as his wife was away visiting her relatives, and Clarence Luy of Wellen, Alfred Robinson of Trail, Buster Mathews and Mrs. J. Doubleday of Butte Falls. Mrs. Doubleday came out on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage and after dinner went on to Medford.
    Mrs. Sam Coy was also a visitor at the Sunnyside the same afternoon.
    W. D. Butler and E. E. Wilson, representatives of the Medford Furniture and Hardware Co. of Medford, called for dinner and left one of their beautiful, large calendars for 1922.
    The P.&E. railroad company are still pushing away, although they occasionally meet with a little setback, on account of the condition of the track, as many of the ties are among the first that were placed in the roadbed and of course are badly decayed and every once in awhile the track spreads and lets the engine go through, but then they raise it up, repair the break and go on and now are getting out a nice lot of ties and expect soon to have a good force of men at work repairing the old track [and] will soon have it in shape so as to work to advantage and soon have the road in shape to get their machinery in place along the route.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 4, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the noted arrivals Wednesday at the Sunnyside were Mr. and Mrs. James Grieve and son Heston. They were on the return trip from Portland and Astoria, where they had been combining business with pleasure. They traveled in their own car and when they came in after the first greeting James remarked that they had just come from Portland and that he was almost starved, that he had been gaunting up in anticipation of a good square meal at the Sunnyside. And as he made the remark I naturally run my eye over the immense frame, at least 190 lbs. avoirdupois, and mentally measured his girth and decided that it would require, at that time at least, a sixty-inch belt to encircle that bread basket and wondered how long it would have to be if he was not gaunted up. He related his experience on the road and speaks in glowing terms of the great Pacific Highway that is now almost completed from the northern to the southern line of our great state. As it is it is not completed as yet, although the most of it is and hard surfaced, with the exception of a few places. But he does not think that the cooking along the route will compare with our hotels in Southern Oregon--the reader will bear in mind that the hostess of the Prospect Hotel is recognized as one of the best cooks in the state. They did not have any time to spend visiting as they were homeward bound and the nearer they got to their destination the more eager they were to get home. But they promised to come again when James was not so gaunt.
    Fred Pettegrew was also a diner at the Sunnyside at the same time and owing to the fact that he was here afoot concluded to remain overnight.
    Thomas F. McCabe also was here for dinner and so was George Albert. Mr. Albert is a very important factor in his line of business as he has a small motor car that he runs on the track of the P.&E. and by that means renders good service to the people back in the hills who wish to come out or are out here and wish to go to their homes in Butte Falls or beyond. When he came out he took Mrs. Buel Hildreth and her mother-in-law up with him to their homes in Butte Falls. They had been stopping at the Sunnyside for a week waiting for the weather to moderate, as there was and still is considerable snow along the track.
    Mrs. James Watkins of Central Point was out the middle of the week to visit her sister-in-law, Mrs. N. E. Watkins, and daughter Anna.
    R. D. Henson and E. J. Thomas were here for dinner Thursday. They are in the employ of Foster and Kleiser, successors to Klum & Co., in the advertising business. Mr. Henson under the old company was acting as general superintendent and seems to be occupying the same position under the present company. His field extends from the California and Oregon line to beyond Roseburg.
    Mrs. C. R. Farrier of Lake Creek came out on the Lake Creek stage Friday morning and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Friday morning when the men who are working on the P.&E.R.R. went to work they were informed that their services were not required as there was so much snow on the track that they could not run the motor car to move the ties from where they were unloaded along the track to where they were needed, so they began to scatter. Mr. W. G. Smith went to join his family out on the Crater Lake Highway about eight miles out, and Sam Oeser procured a job splitting stovewood and others went to their homes, but when the snow melted off and the foreman decided to go to work in the afternoon he found that he was short several men.
    The continued showers that we are having greatly interfere with the work not only on the railroad but to a great extent with all kinds of work, and where men are depending on their day's wages to keep up expenses, paying board, and then have to lay off every few days it works a great hardship on them. On the other hand it is hard on the railroad owners or contractors as they are also losing on their jobs, but it appears as though the employers are doing their best, and hopes are entertained that there will be a change for the better soon.
    Fred Frideger, who owns a twenty-acre orchard just east of our town, came in Thursday night for supper and bed. He is cleaning up his orchard and getting ready for the spring work.
    Lawrence Luy of Wellen, one of our prosperous and promising young men, called Friday night for supper.
    Rev. H. G. King, the Sunday school evangelist who is looking after the interests of the American Sunday School Union, called on your correspondent this Saturday morning and told me that Rev. F. A. Phelps of Talent would conduct services here tomorrow. I am glad to learn that our little town is attracting attention in that direction.
    Today C. H. Natwick, the railroad contractor on the Butte Falls extension of the P.&E. railroad, was here for dinner and tells me that he is getting his tools, machinery and teams all ready to go to work on his contract in a few days. We also had John Butler and F. W. Reid, who have been employed on the job enlarging the Fish Lake Ditch Co. canal to take water up the valley above Medford, and they report that the continuous showers of rain and snow interfere greatly with the work as the ground is so soft that they have difficulty in carting the dirt away from the steam shovels.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1922, page 4


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. Henry Morgan has been very ill. He was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital January 23. We all hope he will recover, as nothing definite has been learned of the origin of his illness, except a bad cold and a run-down condition.
    Seems as though quite a few people living along Elk Creek have been stricken with the cold that is going around.
    Howard Ash hauled a load of hay the other day.
    Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ashcraft visited their homestead Monday. Their dog does not take to motoring, as it makes him sick. Wonder what he would think of aviation.
    Weston Miller and his brothers are making shakes with the intention to cover a barn they intend to build.
    Hazel Pence attended the party at Hutchinson's.
    Mrs. W. Willits returned from a visit of two weeks in Medford Sunday. Her son, Merrill, brought her up in a car.
    It has been kind of nippy up along the creek. It has been zero at the school house. That's the lowest we have found yet. People are not anxious to ride such mornings. We have had some snow. Four inches is about the deepest along the roads.
    A slight tremble was felt at Persist and Trail between 5 and 6 o'clock Tuesday morning.
    P. E. Sandoz rode after cattle Wednesday, February 1. His son, Peter, helped him.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1922, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    Edna Petersen returned to her home at Persist after a couple weeks visit with friends near Trail.
    We are glad to say Mrs. Chester Pritchett is better at this writing.
    Miss Frances Greb and Miss Dorothy Peterson of Persist attended the dance at Trail Saturday night.
    Mrs. Irwin Howe and Miss Wanda spent a few days last week with friends near Central Point.
    Charlie Dunlap cut wood for E. E. Ash this week.
    There will be a parent-teacher educational meeting at Trail Saturday. Everyone invited. Bring your dinner and enjoy yourselves.
    Enid Middlebusher is a Medford visitor this week.
    Mr. Meacham of upper Trail went to Ashland last week and was operated on. He is doing nicely.
    Geo. Fisher returned to Sugar Pine Tuesday.
    Mrs. Howard Ash and Mrs. Joe Heberling had dental work done in Medford Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 8, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sunday morning came warm and pleasant, considering that it was the first Sunday in February and there was nothing unusual occurred. It had been announced the day before that Rev. F. A. Phelps would preach at the close of Sunday school and also at night, but an announcement of that kind does not cause any special excitement in our quiet little town and there were only about the usual number that attend Sunday school present, and during the afternoon he and Rev. H. G. King, the Sunday school evangelist for the Sunday school union, called on your correspondent and inquired something about Rev. H. G. Adams, the minister in charge of the work here. They only remained a short time, but the next day I learned that there were abut the usual number of people out Sunday night. Mr. Phelps represented himself as a traveling evangelist from Idaho, but I did not learn anything of his plans or purpose, as I was not in a condition to entertain company.
    Last week J. W. Johnson, who has charge of the selling of the blooded horses on the Kirtland farm, bade farewell to your correspondent and family, took the stallion, Ketab, that he brought over here to sell, back to the farm as he had failed thus far to accomplish a sale, although there were quite a number of horsemen around here who wanted to have an interest in him but could not agree in the organization of a company, so he gave it up as a failure, but after he took him home Fred Pettegrew, after trying to secure a third interest in him, concluded to buy him himself so went over to the farm and made the deal and Monday the horse was brought back, the deal perfected and now Fred Pettegrew has him on his own place. It seems to be a general opinion among horsemen that it is a fine thing for the entire community that he is left in this section of the country, as his colts are said to be among the best in the country. I heard Mr. Pettegrew say the day he received him that he had quite a number of mares already engaged and anticipates having all that he can serve.
    Last Monday I mustered up courage to try to go to the post office for the first time in five weeks, lacking one day, and after crossing our wire suspension bridge I began to look around to see what I could that would be of interest to the general reader of the Medford Mail Tribune and the first place of interest that I came to was the old Eagle Point hardware store, where so many of the farmers resorted to, not only to buy what they needed in that line, but to spend a few minutes with the genial proprietor, Roy Ashpole, it being one of the old landmarks where hundreds of autos stopped en route to the different parts of the country for gasoline, oil and other things necessary for their outfit, but when I reached the old store building found it locked and looking through the windows saw only a few of the many articles that were on exhibit a few weeks ago as the rest had been sold or moved to the new headquarters of the new firm of Ashpole and Nichols in the old von der Hellen hardware store. And it was with a feeling of sadness that I look around and think of the changes that are continually taking place in this busy world of ours.
    Passing on my way, but somewhat worried with my work, in passing the Lewis confectionery store I began to meet some of the old timers but hurried on as best I could to the next station, W. L. Childreth's blacksmith shop. I squared myself on the end of a horseshoe keg about tired out. While en route to my resting place Frank Brown, one of our prosperous and affable merchants, passed me and expressed his joy on seeing me on the street again, and at the shop I found our old standby, W. L. Childreth, hammering away on horse shoes, and one of Charley Delin's young bustling teamsters, Dale Shelley, who was working on the Crater Lake Highway, having him fit the shoe just to his notion and he was putting it on a horse for Ed Dutton, but there was quite a group around the shop who seemed to be there for the same reason that I was, to see and be seen, although there were some who were on business. But it looked good to see so many of our old neighbors and friends enjoying the warm sunshine.
    Among those I met there was our old road supervisor, Wm. Perry, and W. P. Hurst and another man sitting on a pile of lumber outside of the shop enjoying the morning sun, and L. P. Terrill of Big Sticky, who was having his horses shod, and Frank Roberts, also of Big Sticky, looking as though he was enjoying his usual health, and John Smith, the old standby, who reported that his son Polk while working on the railroad had had one of his fingers badly jammed, besides several others. After resting awhile I started again for the post office and after inspecting my post office box turned across the street for Nichols' store and on the way met the saleslady who has charge of the store, Mrs. R. A. Weidman, rushing to the post office to mail a package by parcel post, and soon was seated by a warm stove taking a good and much-needed rest, and as I entered the store found our old reliable creamery and egg man, C. E. Bellows, interviewing the creamery truck driver regarding more cream cans, and Mrs. Weidman about that time was calling on him for egg crates, which he failed to have on hand. I did not feel strong enough to proceed on down to the Brown store or to visit the Ashpole & Nichols new stand but soon started on the return trip for home.
    R. H. G. Adams, the preacher in charge of this field, started for Butte Falls the 28th of last month to hold a meeting there and the only word from him up to date, Feb. 8th, was that he was to continue the meeting over last Sunday, Feb. 5th, and that he would preach in Brownsboro in the forenoon next Sunday and here at night the same Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. E. J. Murphy and daughter of Wellen came in early Tuesday morning, calculating to take passage on a jitney for Medford, on their way to Ashland to be at the bedside of her mother, Mrs. E. B. Holman, who had the misfortune to be thrown from a buggy and had her leg broken between the ankle and the knee and some of her ribs broken, but how many Mrs. Murphy did not know. After she reached here, she learned that the jitney service had been discontinued, owing to the high tax that has been exacted since the passage of the new law enacted by the special session of the legislature. Mr. Frank Lewis, who has been operating a jitney between here and Medford for some time, told me that he could not afford to pay $290.00 tax in addition to the other taxes, license as the business will not begin to justify the expense. So Mrs. Murphy had to wait until 2:25 p.m. before she could go out on the regular stage. It appears that Mrs. Holman was riding in an old buggy and that some parts of it were wired together and the wire had given way and the horses pulled her over the dashboard and dragged her some distance. There was another person, I think her granddaughter, in the buggy with her, but she escaped unhurt.
    Oliver Holmes of Wellen came in town also Tuesday on his way out to look after his sheep.
    W. L. Valentin, who has been working in one of the banks in Klamath Falls, was here for dinner Tuesday. He reported that the bank where he had been working had been forced to close its doors on account of the slump in the stock market.
    Among the guests Wednesday noon for dinner were Mr. G. Faske and Eleanor Faske, Mrs. Chester Flury, H. L. Heryford, all of Butte Falls. They came out on the motor truck on the P.&E. railroad and after dinner went on to Medford on the stage. We also had as diners at the Sunnyside, Mr. Guy Trunte of Medford, who came in from Butte Falls on the motor truck, W. L. Merritt of Reese Creek and Dale Shelley, recently from Brookings, Oregon and E. J. Murphy.
    Thursday Mr. E. J. Murphy of Wellen came in expecting to meet his wife and daughter here from their visit to Ashland, but owing to there being no jitney service they could not come unless they came out on the 8:30 a.m. stage from Medford, so he had to stay until the 5:15 p.m. stage. Miss Margaret Mansfield of Portland and Hobart Ditsworth of Flounce Rock and Denny Hall of Derby were here for dinner Thursday.
    Kay Loosley of Fort Klamath came in and after supper disappeared and the next I heard of him he had bought eight dairy cows of Brittsan Bros., and five of Wm. Butler to take to Fort Klamath. He says that he has twenty-five hundred sheep out there and wants milk to feed the young lambs when they need attention. He kept his cows at the R. A. Weidman dairy ranch just in the west side of our town. He took them on to Ashland Friday.
    We had some excitement in our quiet little town the other day. The soot took fire in Gus Nichols' flue and that caused the smoke to fill the house, and Mr. Nichols and wife were both sick in bed with the flu and snow on the roof of the house, but notwithstanding the orders from the doctor for them both to stay in bed, Gus jumped out of bed, climbed onto the roof and tore off a lot of the shingles, when he discovered that it was nothing more than the flue burning out. Whether the exposure caused any damage or not I have not heard. And while on the subject of the flu, will say that there is considerable of sickness here just now and the directors closed the school Thursday on account of it.
    Another item of news I have picked up since I have been able to go over to the post office is that Mrs. George Holmes has purchased the P. H. Daley property, one of the neatest residences in our town. Mrs. Holmes is the principal of our school and her husband, George Holmes, is our garage man, who owns and operates the Eagle Point garage.
    Another item [is] that Mr. R. A. Weidman has had his electric light system extended from his dwelling to his cow and horse barn, three lights in the barn and one midway from the house to the barn, thus having light to and from the barn, as well as in the barn, a great convenience, without the risk of fire from lanterns.
    A. M. Gay of Butte Falls has been out looking after his pear orchard here.
    John Gore was out buying up hogs [that] Green Mathews and the von der Hellens of Wellen had for sale.
    The next meeting of the E.P.C.C. will be on Thursday February 16, at the home of Mrs. Mittelstaedt, Mrs. Macdonald as assistant hostess.
    Ed Cowden, Fred McPherson, Charles Mathews, Earl Campbell of Medford, Lester Bradshaw, Brownsboro, Jeff and Alvin Conover were business callers on our merchants Wednesday and Thursday.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. David Smith February 8, a daughter. Mr. Smith is our town marshal and believes in replenishing the earth.
    Mrs. Wiley Jones of Talent is here visiting her grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
    Carl Bergman, Adin Haselton and Buster Mathews were here for supper Thursday evening and Adin Haselton and Carl Bergman remained here overnight, and Kay Loosley of Fort Klamath was here for breakfast Friday morning and Carl Bergman went on down to Ashland in the car with Mr. Loosley.
    Mrs. A. L. Simmons of Central Point, who has been spending a month in Butte Falls, and Mrs. M. E. Richardson of Butte Falls came out on the stage Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside. They had quite an experience on the way out, as the roads from Derby are so very bad that it is to say the least of it very difficult to get through with an auto, so have to carry the mail from Derby to Butte Falls in a hack, and on the new road. The Vestal cutoff, the ground has frozen and then thawed and the result was that the horses and hack broke through axle deep and the ladies had to get out and walk up the hill as they were both large women, but they didn't mind that, but took it as a matter of no consequence.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 14, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday Pearl Stowell and Thomas Givan called in for dinner and when the Butte Falls stage came in there was an elderly lady came in on it and after taking dinner went on her way to Medford. She was on her way to her home in Portland and had been on a business visit to Butte Falls. I did not learn her name as she was very much averse to talking
    Saturday afternoon Rev. H. G. Adams came in from Butte Falls where he had been holding meetings the two weeks before, at least the two Sundays before, and the most of the time during that time he reports that he had a good attendance although there was no special interest manifest. He expects to preach here next Sunday, Feb. 19, both morning and evening at the usual hour. He preached at Brownsboro last Sunday morning and here at night but his congregations at each were not very large owing, perhaps in part, to the prevalence of the flu.
    F. A. Phelps and H. G. Kinney, who were mentioned in my last letter as having held services here from Sunday, Feb. 5th, continued until Thursday night, but I understand that the last night they had no one to attend, but Mr. Phelps remained until Sunday and preached to a very small crowd and left for other parts in the afternoon thinking that Eagle Point was a hard place to tackle.
    I omitted to state in my last letter that Truman (Buster) McLellan came in last Thursday and is here at this writing.
    Sunday we had quite a number of people here for dinner although most of them were people who live here and near town that come in quite often for a meal. But later in the day John Foster and Mrs. True of Medford called for supper. Mr. Foster, who is working at carpentering for the Fish Lake Canal Company, had been up to one of the camps along the canal for his tools and the lady simply went along for the ride and to see something of our fine Little Butte Creek country and stopped from force of habit at the Sunnyside for supper and to renew acquaintance.
    Monday afternoon I ventured out and went as far as the post office for my mail and on, and in my rounds met John Long of Derby. He had come out with a team for a few necessary supplies and was just ready to start for home and someone asked about what time he would get there and he said about 11 o'clock, and it was then near 2 p.m. Only think of a man having to take nine hours to travel over fourteen miles of one of our county roads when the U.S. Mail is carried over six days in each week.
    He was the only man from the country I met that day. I also met Mr. Muskopf and Clifford Hickson and Mrs. Radcliffe, who lives just above town, and her son passed me as I was on my way. I also met Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley. I also met Mrs. J. Rigsby formerly of Brownsboro, in T. E. Nichols' store. Mr. Rigsby and family were just in from Eastern Oregon, where they had been for the past few years. Mr. Rigsby, wife and six children have moved into a suite of rooms in the upper part of the Nichols store building and are planning to settle in this part of the country and we give them a cordial greeting, as they seem to be people who will help build up the country.
    Among the callers Monday night for supper and bed was Ira Tungate of Butte Falls. He had been to Medford and came out this far on the afternoon stage, spent the night and went on up home Tuesday morning. We also had Sam Courtney, our paperhanger and painter. He is engaged at this writing in repapering the Sunnyside Hotel. He has adopted a novel plan to secure business; he buys his wallpaper in quantities at wholesale prices and sells it to those who patronize him at cost, thus saving the profit of the middleman. Mr. William Coy, a brother-in-law of our banker, H. E. Campbell, was also a guest for supper Monday night.
    W. H. Roch, who is the traveling agent for Watkins remedies and extracts, came in for dinner Monday and supper and spent the night.
    F. J. Ayres and wife, who live on the P.&E.R.R. about six miles from here, drove in with his team Tuesday to look after his interests here and do some trading with our merchants.
    As I was crossing our footbridge Tuesday I met Mr. Turnbow, the section boss on the P.&E., and Wayne Moore, and Mr. Turnbow told me that they had moved their camp up the track about five miles and that they were pushing the work right along. Mr. Moore said that he had left his car in the old Daley barn and that some sneak thief had broken the lock on his toolbox and taken all of his tools and taken the radiator off his car, but that he had a clue to who it was, and unless he returns them right away that he will be prosecuted. I hear of several instances where people have had articles taken without leave, and more than once where machines have been robbed of the gasoline out of their machines.
    Among the guests here Tuesday for dinner were George Holmes, our garage man, and on inquiry learned that his wife was away on a visit, but he didn't say where. We also had a traveling agent for the Standard Oil Co., but I did not learn his name.
    Mr. Peterson, the present mail contractor carrying the mail from here to Persist via Trail, came in Tuesday evening with the mail, ate his supper and started back for Trail to take Mr. Chappell up as he had been sent for to come up and care for one of his large work horses. He is interested in a sawmill with Mr. Adamson and another man and Mr. Adamson had charge of the team but he and his wife and some of the children were sick in bed with the flu and the horse had been down in the barn and could not get up so Mr. Chappell was called to care for him, necessitating his going up in the night, but before he reached there some of the neighbors had come to the rescue and got him up.
    Mr. Peterson also brought me two dollars to pay for the subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune for George F. Hall of Trail.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 17, 1922, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Jack Kerby, who came in from where he had been looking after the horses of Mr. Charley Delin, on his contract for grading a logging railroad near Brookings, Oregon near Crescent City, California, came in and engaged a month's board at the Sunnyside December 31, left us last Wednesday, going to Spokane, Wash., to meet Mr. Walt Hurst, who will be remembered as one of our Eagle Point-raised boys by many of our old settlers, who has a contract to put up a large power line for an electric power company in British Columbia, and Mr. Kerby, having had five years' experience in that line of work, will assist in the work. Mr. Kerby leaves a number of warm friends in this section of the county.
    Henry Morgan, a man who lives alone on his homestead on the headwaters of Elk Creek, [and] was taken out to the Sacred Heart Hospital some time ago by his neighbors, came in on the Medford-Eagle Point stage and spent the night on his way home. He has greatly improved in health but is far from being in a condition to live alone in the wilds of the Elk Creek hills.
    Mrs. J. Monia and son of Brownsboro came in Wednesday, and Mrs. Monia went on up to Butte Falls on the regular stage and her son returned home in his car.
    Mr. Stuart McKessie, the civil engineer who has been employed on the survey and location of our irrigation project to bring water from above Butte Falls through the Derby District to Eagle Point and vicinity, passed through here Wednesday on his way to Derby to try to secure a few hundred acres of land, so as to have an abundance to be sure to satisfy the bond buyers. He seemed to think that he could secure four or five hundred acres with very little trouble, but I have not heard the result of his undertaking as yet.
    Frank Lewis, our confectionery and billiard and pool man, appears to be doing a lively business, as he has just installed another billiard table, making two billiard and two pool tables in the upper part of his confectionery store.
    Charley Brown, salesman for C. E. Gates, Ford cars and Fordson farming implements, was here for dinner Wednesday and so was Dale Shelley.
    We have had a wonderful transformation in our post office here. Last Wednesday our popular and accommodating post office clerk, Miss Nellie Coy, tendered her resignation to our postmaster, W. C. Clements, although she had given him notice some time before of her intention to resign, and her resignation was accepted and she retired from the service and our townsman, S. B. (Gov.) Holmes was employed to fill the vacancy. Mr. Holmes has had considerable experience in that line and is considered fully competent as he is a thorough accountant and no doubt will fill the place and serve the patrons of the office satisfactorily.
    O. Adams, formerly of Medford, but now of Butte Falls, where he has lived for several years, went up to Butte Falls on the stage and I heard today, Saturday, that he had secured a business position there.
    W. L. Childreth's blacksmith shop has been closed most of the time the past week, owing to the prevalence of the flu, but I am glad to be able to say that, so far as I can learn, in most of the cases, they are improving and many of the patients are able to be out in town, although there is scarcely anyone from the country comes in, owing to the sickness in the country, and fear of taking the disease while here in town.
    Wm. Nickell of Lake Creek was a passenger on the Lake Creek stage coming here on business.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wyant came in Thursday night from Eugene City and spent the night and the next morning was met here by his brother-in-law, Eugene Bellows, Mr. Wyant being a brother to Mrs. Bellows, and was taken to the Bellows home. Mr. Wyant expects to go to work on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, but I did not learn if he was to act as foreman or not.
    D. R. Patrick, who has been working for months, if not years, for the F.L.D. Company, came in for dinner Thursday and so did a stranger from Butte Falls. Mr. Patrick found a job here at the Sunnyside in his line, carpentering, and was kept busy until noon the next day and Mr. Sam Courtney is still busy paper hanging and painting on the interior of the hotel up to this hour, 4 o'clock p.m. Saturday.
    Mrs. Nettie Grover of Medford has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton and helping to care for Mrs. Knighton, who has been on the sick list for years.
    Sam H. Oeser, who has been working on the P.&E. railroad, came in Thursday evening with his eye bandaged up and on inquiry learned that when he was cranking his car, the crank flew back and struck him just below the eye on the nose, inflicting a painful would. He had just received a telegram from Berkeley, Cal., announcing the serious illness of his sister and was on his way to be with her, but later in the evening, received another telegram telling of her death--notice already in the Daily Mail Tribune of the 17th.
    Mr. Eblen, now of Butte Falls, came in on the stage Friday evening and spent the night. He has a number of horses at work on the P.&E. railroad in Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 20, 1922, page 5


SCHOOL CHILDREN BROWNSBORO GIVE TEACHER SURPRISE
    Brownsboro, Feb. 24.--The pupils of this district, number 39, gave a delightful surprise party on February 22, in honor of their teacher, Edith Kubli.
    In the forenoon the school gave a Washington Day program and after the program was over Miss Kubli went home. The children found a pretext to have Miss Kubli return in about an hour, and they had tables set for a full course dinner.
    The ladies who served were Mrs. Roscoe Hulse, Mrs. Walter Marshall, Mrs. W. P. Hansen, Nellie Butler, Mrs. W. M. Hansen and Mrs. Hessler.
    Mr. Hulse and Mr. Hansen were toast masters.
    After the dinner, outdoor games were played, followed by an exciting arithmetic match in which Viola Hoagland proved to be champion.
    Mr. Wm. Hansen, Sr., made a business trip to Medford last week.
    Miss Velka Monia spent the weekend at home.
    Mr. Walter Marshall went to Eagle Point Saturday.
    Mr. Henry Mayor came to Brownsboro last week after supplies.
    Mr. J. F. Maxfield went to Eagle Point Sunday to see his wife, Mrs. Ella Maxfield, who is staying at her sister's, Mrs. Lillie Cingcade.
    Lewis Walch and wife spent the weekend with the latter's parents, in Lake Creek.
    Walter Radcliffe was a visitor at the Brownsboro school Monday.
    Mr. Dupray of Butte Falls came down to Mr. Carl Stanley's Sunday.
    Mr. Carl Stanley made a business trip to Lake Creek Monday.
    The roads up this way are good considering the weather we have been having. The Antelope Hill road is in bad condition. Several machines have been stuck in the mud along there.
    On up toward Lake Creek the roads are not being traveled with automobiles. Mr. VanDyke, in charge of the mail route, drives his car only from the Lake Creek store and makes the rest of the trip up Lake Creek on horseback.
    Mrs. Nygren and Olga Bieberstedt visited Mrs. Nygren's mother last week.
    Mr. McCallister, who is butchering his goats, is marketing them at the Medford butcher shops.
    William Hoagland returned to Brownsboro Tuesday.
    Mr. Floyd Charley went to Ashland Saturday.
    The people on the sick list are Mr. Roscoe Hulse, Mr. Ahrens, Mr. Wm. Staub, John Stanley, the Tucker and George Hansen families.
    The Lost Creek and Eagle Point schools have closed on account of so much flu. There are at present 17 going to school. We are in hopes that the rest will be able to be with us soon.
    Sunday school was not held at the school house Sunday because of the prevailing epidemic.
    Rev. Adams of the First Congregational Church was a visitor at the Brownsboro school Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1922, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    M. E. and Denzil Middlebusher motored to Medford Monday.
    Miss Maud Rose of San Francisco arrived Thursday for a few weeks visit with her father Sam Rose. This is her first trip up here and she is enjoying many new adventures.
    There will be an entertainment and box social at Trail Hall Friday night, for the benefit of the school. Everyone invited.
    We have had a very small school the past two weeks on account of the flu, but the scholars are all on the mend now and gradually coming back.
    Mr. Jones, our new ranger, is making the annual round of counting the cattle.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ray Vaughn and little son Donald of Prospect are visiting Mrs. Vaughn's parents on Elk Creek.
    Mrs. A. T. Poole and Mrs. R. R. Dawson are among the flu victims.
    Mrs. T. Todd returned home from Medford last week, where she underwent an operation. She is improving rapidly.
    Fred Warner is looking for cattle for sale these days.
    C. Owings was a Medford visitor a few days this week
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1922, page 7


ELK CREEK
    Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Miller have returned home after a long visit to Medford, where their daughter resides.
    Miss Frances Greb, teacher of Persist School District 80, and Miss Inez Willits, teacher of Elk Creek School District 74, attended the O.S.T.A., which was held at Trail. There will be a field meet in April.
    L. A. Whitley and his stepsons have been leveling the field he intends to plant this spring.
    Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Flame have been ill with the flu. Also Wayne and Irma Ash have been stricken. They claim they have a "dickens of a headache," but are recovering.
    Claude Moore is sawing wood for P. E. Sandoz with his gasoline draw saw.
    The attendance of the Elk Creek school has been very good for this month.
    Howard Ash hauled a load of hay Friday.
    Jim Miller made a trip to Persist.
    The roads are very muddy up this way. It is like plowing through a small river to get through. It has been mild and raining frequently. The snow has mostly all melted along the lower part of the creek. But up at Persist it is pretty deep.
    George Hall has built a very good-looking shed for his horses. He is also interested in the Mail Tribune.
    P. E. Sandoz has caught quite a number of varmints in his traps.
    Miss Inez visited Mrs. Deliah Wagner overnight Tuesday 14.
    A few pupils have enrolled in club work of District 74.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday just after noon Prof. Chester L. Ward, athletic coach of Butte Falls basketball and teacher of the sixth and seventh grades in the Butte Falls school, came in on the regular stage from Butte Falls and took dinner and went on out to Medford on his way to Portland to be gone for a week, and I have heard since that he had gone to receive medical treatment by nerve specialists.
    Millard Robinson, the young man mentioned as having cut his hand quite seriously, was here for supper the same day. He says that his hand is very sore yet but thinks that he will be able to use it again in the course of a few weeks.
    Mr. P. F. Leabo, who left the hotel some time ago and started in to batch, has returned to his room in the Sunnyside.
    Last Saturday night there was the regular dance here and there was only a very few in attendance and there was, according to reports, one of the most disgraceful affairs we have had here for some time. I heard one of our prominent business men, in speaking of the conduct there, say that almost every one of the young men and larger boys were drunk and that moonshine was there in abundance and another reported that one of the boys put a bottle of moonshine in the center of the room and commenced to dance around it, but finally one of them kicked it over, spilling it over the floor. The conduct has reached the point where many of our young people treat our laws as a burlesque and defy our officers and make sport of the idea of enforcing any of the prohibiting statutes. For instance, I saw a small group of young men busily engaged at something on the sidewalk and I heard them laughing after the gathering dispersed, and one of them remarked, "Well, I skinned him out of six dollars," but who the man was who spoke or who he referred to as having been skinned I do not know. But what else can we expect of our youths, when men are arrested and brought to trial for violation of the law and men are selected to sit as jurors to try a case and will hang a jury and then admit that they were satisfied that the man was guilty, but that the principal witness for the state, in a bootlegging case, assigned as a reason that the witness was drunk himself. It is a common thing to hear men and in some instances women express their approval of the fact that certain ones are acquitted of a charge of crime simply because they object to certain laws that have been enacted by our representatives in the lawmaking bodies of our country.
    Last Sunday was rather a disagreeable day for people who have been troubled with or exposed to the flu or grippe and the result was that our minister, Rev. H. G. Adams, reports small attendance and there was not the usual number of guests for dinner at the Sunnyside, although, while there is considerable sickness, [with] many of those who have been afflicted with it there seems to be some improvement, but the universal complaint seems to be a general weakened condition. But we had Lyle Van Scoy and Thomas F. Nichols, George and Harry Lewis and Carlyle Natwick as diners and late in the afternoon, Mr. R. B. Parkham, head railway clerk, O.W.R.&N. Co., Portland and F. C. Drew, chief timekeeper, O.W.R.&N., Portland, came in to remain until this Wednesday afternoon. They have been in the habit of spending Washington's Birthday, Feb. 22, with us, this being the fourth year. They came down here to gather agates and have them cut and polished and through exchange with friends in different parts of the country, thus securing a fine selection of stones of all kinds
    W. P. Holbrook, who owns a small farm and orchard west of town, about a couple of miles, has returned from Oakland, California and was here Monday.
    Last Monday morning when I went to the post office as I passed the Childreth blacksmith shop I found that it was open again. Although the proprietor, W. L. Childreth, was able to be out again, he was very weak and did not attempt to do any work, but it looked good to see him around again.
    I also noticed that there seemed to be quite a demand for wood, as our town is being filled up, and there seems to be no empty houses, although there has been several changes in the line of moving. A. M. Gay and Ed Spencer, who have been living in a house belonging to Mrs. M. S. Woods, have moved out and are going to Butte Falls. They have leased a tract of Beaverdam land from Mr. Stanley for three years and intend to clear it and turn their attention to raising garden truck and Mr. Groves vacated the house recently purchased by Mrs. George Holmes and moved into the house, and Mr. Holmes is putting in a water system so as to have plenty of good, pure water, both hot and cold, in their house, and also have water to irrigate a garden and Mr. J. Rigsby, mentioned in a former letter as having moved into the upper part of the T. E. Nichols store, has moved to Butte Falls, where he expects to work on the C. H. Natwick contract on the extension of the P.&E. railroad.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Hotel Monday were C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle, Everett Dahack, George Holmes and wife and Ed Spencer.
    J. H. Carlton of Wellen was among the few business callers Monday.
    Rev. H. G. Adams expects to preach here both morning and evening next Sunday, the 26th.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. J. Monia and son of Brownsboro were among the business callers last Tuesday. The same day the stage from Medford was loaded to capacity this far and four passengers went from here on up toward Derby, Prospect and Butte Falls.
    J. L. Robinson, Sr., one of our leading farmers in this section, and one of our frequent visitors as a general thing, for he acts as chore boy, running to the blacksmith shop and keeping things in place, was in town about midweek, the first time for some time. He has several boys helping with his work but the flu had kept him at home as it has most of the people in the country for the past month or six weeks.
    W. S. Hoagland, who owns a farm and orchard near Central Point, and another farm near Brownsboro, was a passenger on the stage Tuesday from Medford and went up to Brownsboro on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mrs. Cadzow was also a passenger for Butte Falls on the stage Tuesday and so was Roy Davis of Derby and son. Our town mayor has been helping their way home
    Mrs. Mattie Brown, one of the members of the town council and a member of the street commission, has been putting out or rather replacing those trees that were put out last season and died, not for want of proper attention, but on account of having too much water, as where the water has been taken across the street it has been necessary to dam it up in some places and that caused the water to stand in ponds and seeped through onto the roots thus causing the damage, but she trusts that she will be able to obviate the difficulty this season [omission] along in the good work. Her attention has been called to a needed improvement on the street running from the main street past the post office to the railroad track.
    J. W. Isbell, who lives on the Wm. von der Hellen farm and stock ranch on Reese Creek, went to Medford Tuesday and came out in the night with Wm. von der Hellen and spent the latter part of the night at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. A. L. Simmons of Central Point came out on the Butte Falls stage Wednesday morning and went on up to Butte Falls where her husband is working on the extension of the P.&E. railroad.
    Miss Rose Whaley, who has been working as an assistant in the Sunnyside Hotel, also went up to Butte Falls Wednesday morning to visit her parents for a few days and expects to be back again today, Saturday.
    George Holmes, who has moved into their new home, has laid water pipe and connected with the Sunnyside water system as his well does not furnish enough water at all times.
    Sam Coy was among the business callers Wednesday.
    J. Jordahl of the Independent Cracker Company, Portland was a diner at the Sunnyside Hotel Wednesday.
    W. G. McDonald, proprietor of the [Rogue] Elk Resort, was here Wednesday morning on his way up home.
    C. E. Bellows and son and his brother-in-law, W. H. Wyant, were here for dinner Wednesday and so was Carlyle Natwick. He reports that the snow at Butte Falls interferes with the work on their contract very materially.
    In speaking of Mr. Rigsby moving to Butte Falls in my last letter I stated that he was going to work for Mr. Natwick on the extension of the P.&E. railroad, etc., but in that I was misinformed and since have learned that he had taken a contract of Mr. Cowley to cut sawlogs for the Hawk mill near Butte Falls.
    W. E. Lewis, with H. S. Brack Co., Seattle, calendars and stationery, was here Thursday for dinner. He reports that there has been from 9 to 21 percent gain for January 1922 over January 1921. These are facts secured from the post offices, banks and other sources in his investigations throughout the state.
    Dr. J. E. Spatz and wife of Fairfield, Nebraska and son, Ward, of Medford, called on your Eagle Point correspondent Thursday forenoon simply to meet him and assigned as a reason that the doctor and his wife had been reading the Eagle Point Eaglets regularly for the past five years and wished to meet him. The doctor asked how long I had been writing for the Mail Tribune and being told that it was about 36 years, first it was the Medford Monitor, the first paper started in Medford, and then the name and ownership was changed to Bliton and York, and the name changed to the Medford Mail and later sold again to a company and several papers consolidated and the name changed to the Medford Mail Tribune under the editorial management of George Putnam, now of the Capital Journal of Salem and under the business management of S. S. Smith and now under the editorial management of Robert W. Ruhl, and that I had continued to write regularly all the time. He then inquired how long I had been in the business as a newspaper correspondent and I told him 63 years last September and that I had not missed a week but that I had written from one to four letters each week for 45 years. He then asked my age and was told that I only lacked less than a month of being 90 years of age and Mrs. Spatz remarked that my appearance so far as longevity was concerned was a recommendation for the healthfulness of the country. I then told her that I had just been in company with three men who were each past 85 years of age.
    Arthur Pool of Trail, one of the Forest Service men, came in and spent Thursday and Friday nights at the Sunnyside Hotel. He has been up in the Lake Creek district counting the stock to be turned on the reserve and spent Friday and a part of today, Saturday, Feb. 25, in this section
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1922, page 6



BOYS AND GIRLS CLUB IS FORMED AT BROWNSBORO
    Brownsboro, March 2.--Monday the boys and girls of this district organized a Boys' and Girls' Industrial Club and are counting on taking up projects with the idea of a complete school exhibit at the Jackson County Fair next fall.
    Harold Dallas was elected president and Viola Hoagland secretary.
    Ellen Tucker was named girl's leader and Edward Stanley boy's leader.
    They have not decided yet what project they will take up but are considering corn raising and canning. Already they have started work on a school garden and have quite a large plot spaded and fertilized ready for planting early garden truck.
    Gwendolyn Brophy, who has been ill in Eagle Point, is able to be back home now.
    Stella Adams, who has been absent for about a month with the flu, is with us again.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hulse made a business trip to Medford Monday.
    Vida Bradshaw, who is teaching school at Wagner Creek, spent the weekend at home.
    Dr. Holt was called to attend Mildred Hansen, who was quite ill with the flu. Others on the sick list are Mr. William Hoagland and the Brophy family. Most of the people are better now.
    Mr. Joe Maxfield went to Eagle Point to help Mr. Cingcade, who is sick with the flu.
    Fred Stanley helped Carl Stanley take some of his cattle to Eagle Point Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Marshall and son, Bill, went to Medford Monday.
    Mr. William Staub, Mrs. R. E. Tucker and Stella Adams went to Medford Tuesday.
    Mr. C. E. Stanley went to Medford Monday.
    Glenn Marshall was enrolled in the Brownsboro school Monday. This makes a total of 21.
    Mrs. Roscoe Hulse entertained with cards Wednesday night.
    Mrs. Ed Myers, who teaches at Lake Creek, came down to the teacher's council that met at Eagle Point Saturday.
    Mrs. Lee Bradshaw gave a birthday dinner in honor of Lester Bradshaw Friday evening, February 24.
    Ralph and Olga Bieberstedt made a business trip to Medford Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1922, page B1



TRAIL ITEMS
    The school program was a splendid success and was greatly enjoyed by all present. There was not a very large crowd on account of so much sickness in the neighborhood, but the program was fine and also the pictures shown by Miss Burr, our supervisor, were splendid and we all enjoyed and appreciated her part very much.
    Mrs. H. L. Ash and little daughter, Betty, of Elk Creek spent a few days visiting at Trail this week. Mrs. Ash is improving rapidly and hopes soon to be able to attend to household duties again.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson were Medford visitors Tuesday and little Olive visited with the Middlebushers during their absence.
    We are glad to say our mail carrier, Mr. Peterson, is on the gain and expects to be able to carry the mail again in a week or so.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Blaess of Medford were Sunday guests at the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. Zimmerlee.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher spent the weekend with relatives at Trail.
    Lowell Ash visited at the Cushman home a few days this week.
    Lewis Blaess is hauling hay these days.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1922, page B6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. E. Hammel, Fred Pettegrew, Mike Hyenburger were among the business callers Saturday.
    Mrs. Walter Marshall and two children of Brownsboro came in on the Lake Creek stage on her way out on the Crater Lake Highway to visit some of her husband's relations Saturday.
    Professor Chester L. Ward returned from Portland Saturday and went directly on up to Butte Falls to take charge of his school Monday morning. He was intending to remain here and take part in the teacher's council, but owing to the lack of means of transportation from here to Butte Falls or from Butte Falls here and other reasons, he concluded to go on via the stage that only makes one trip each day and then leaves here about ten o'clock in the forenoon, except Sunday, and leaves there in the early morning, and the two mail carriers meet at Derby and exchange mail and passengers, so he wrote a treatise on "Home Reading By the Pupils," and had it read to those who attended. There was none of the teachers from Butte Falls and vicinity for the reason assigned above. It seemed unfortunate that the time set for the meeting here was at a time when the roads are almost impassable in the rural districts and the result was that only a very few were in attendance from the country, although I understand from Rev. H. G. Adams [omission] Simmons, who assisted me by taking notes of the proceedings. Among the teachers, including our county school superintendent, Miss Susanne Holmes and our school supervisor, Miss Elizabeth Burr, were Mrs. Bessie Murphy of Long Mountain district; Miss Vida Bradshaw, Wagner Creek school; Mrs. Alma C. Meyer, Lake Creek, and Miss Edith Kubli, Brownsboro.
    The program:
    Report of Oregon State Teacher's Association, by County Superintendent Miss Holmes.
    Club Work, by Miss Elizabeth Burr, county school supervisor.
    Recess for luncheon.
    Afternoon session:
    Song by those present.
    Roll call as to standardization of different districts.
    Announcement as to Arbor Day, April 14 and Jackson County School Day, May 27.
    Demonstration uniform Jackson County drill.
    The next was a discussion as to the best method for teaching spelling led by the principal, Mrs. Josephine Holmes.
    Organization of teacher's council, Miss Edith Kubli, chairman; Miss Alma Meyer, secretary-treasurer.
    Paper, "Physical Education," written by Prof. Chester L. Ward of Butte Falls. Remarks on home reading of the pupils.
    Distribution of flower and vegetable seed.
    Teaching geography, by Mrs. Bessie Murphy. Although there was but a few of the teachers from the district which embraces quite a number of schools, there seemed to be considerable interest taken, and I met Miss Elizabeth Burr last Monday on her way to Butte Falls, and she expressed the opinion that the meeting proved to be a grand success.
    The reader will bear in mind that I was unable to be present and have not been able to give as thorough and complete an account of the meeting as though I had attended the proceedings myself and hope that the next one we have here, I will be able to attend and take my own notes.
    Mrs. E. J. Murphy and her daughter of Wellen, Mrs. Sam Coy, and her sister, Mrs. Ray Harnish, were among the business callers Saturday.
    Among those who called at the Sunnyside for supper and beds were Bruce Hayman, C. C. Hayman and Sam Gordon. They came in to attend the dance Saturday evening and report that there was a very good time and good behavior.
    Ed Germez, who is working on the P.&E. railroad, came in Monday morning from Medford where he had been to look after a lawsuit he has in the divorce court.
    J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the fish hatchery business in this section, was also a business caller Monday and so was Mrs. Susan Hart. Mrs. Fellows of Trail came out on the Eagle Point-Medford stage on her way home and when she reached here found that all the room on the Eagle Point-Trail-Persist stage was engaged, as Miss Francis Greb, who is teaching the Persist school, had already engaged a seat, but as Mrs. Susan Hart only wanted to go out home, about two miles, she made arrangement with Mr. John Greb to take her out and by that arrangement Mrs. Fellows secured a seat and went home. Mrs. Phillips of Trail was also a passenger on the Trail stage.
    John Nichols and wife of this place, who have been spending the winter with their son, Artie, and family, near Ft. Klamath, came in last Saturday and reports that they have had a very pleasant winter, especially for that section.
    Mr. L. Walter, who has been spending the winter on Reese Creek, was a business caller Monday.
    Robert Harnish and J. O. Patrick were here for dinner and so was Charley Brown, salesman for C. E. Gates, Fordson, G. W. Badyston of Central Point, Pearl Stennett, Charles Foeller, H. L. Wright, Buster Mathews, Geo. Albert and J. H. George of S. Francisco were also here.
    Carl Norris, one of our progressive youths, has installed a shoe polishing parlor in a part of the Ernest [Dahack] barber shop, [and] although he does not keep open all the time, only on Saturday nights, he seems to be doing quite well.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1922, page B6



Elk Creek
    Mr. and Mrs. L. A. Whitley were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence Saturday, February 25.
    Geo. Hall is finishing digging on his ditch.
    L. A. Whitley is repairing his fence on the old Nelson place.
    Inez Willits was a dinner guest of Mrs. J. M. Miller, Sunday, February 26.
    We celebrated Washington's Birthday by singing a few songs, then we had a basket dinner, then we put up a swing and a teeter-totter.
    The young and old joined in an indoor baseball game, which netted very much fun. Mr. Pence was our champion bat breaker, as he broke three bats. We will have another rally like this one some Sunday if the weather will permit. Announcement will appear a few days before date. Everyone is invited to join in the fun. Those who attended were Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence, Alberta Pence, Mrs. J. Miller, Mrs. W. Wagner, Mrs. Lucy Moore and boy, also all the pupils were in attendance.
    Claude Moore has been sawing wood for Mr. Miller with his drag saw.
    P. E. Sandoz made a trip to town Monday, returning Wednesday.
    Mr. Peterson, our mail carrier, is ill with the flu. Raymond Schermerhorn is carrying the mail now.
    Mr. Schermerhorn hauled a load of hay the other day.
    Elmer Ivey has an increase in his rabbit industry, as five little rabbits were born Friday, February 24. They are all healthy and the mother rabbit is doing fine. We're going to have some feasting next summer.
    William Ivey visited his relations at Persist, Saturday.
    The Miller boys are completing their job of grubbing for Mr. Fred Sturgis.
    We have had fine sunny weather this week, but at this writing it turned stormy with a little snow and the sun trying to break through the rifts in the clouds. The roads are drying off.
    Mr. W. Wagner has been ill with the flu.
    Antone Ring went down the road the other day and returned Friday. I was not informed as to his destination.
    Howard Ash has built a barn on his place.
    A few strangers passed by on horseback last week. Also the new forest ranger has been visiting these parts counting cattle.
    Hazel Pence and Daisy Wagner have joined a sewing club.
    Lincoln Pence has joined a pig raising club.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 6, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    P. S. Anderson of Medford, who owns what is known as the Brittsan brothers ranch on Rogue River about six miles north of here, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage aiming to go on up on the Trail stage, but found that it was too much crowded so started on the Crater Lake Highway by the walkers line, hoping that someone would pick him up and save a long walk.
    Frank Farlow of Lake Creek also came out on the same stage from Medford, where he had been to visit his brother, William Lee Farlow, who was at that time in a very critical condition but passed away Wednesday and was buried in the Brownsboro cemetery today, Saturday.
    Charles M. Gilmore of Paul's Electric Store, Medford, Oregon, Mr. Henselman, also the machinist of the same firm, and J. C. Herring, Central Point, deputy assessor for Jackson County who was here assessing the town, were here for dinner last Wednesday and Mr. Herring was here in town for dinner up to and including the time until after noon Friday. While he was here in the discharge of his official duties, just after assessing Mr. Grove's dog the dog grabbed him by the calf of the leg tearing a piece out of his pants and drawers but did no other damage, but he said that he felt his teeth as they scraped against the skin.
    J. W. Hunt and C. Natwick were also here for dinner the same day.
    George Hunter and S. R. Farrell were also here for dinner the same day. They were here in the interest of the Farm Loan Association.
    H. L. Heryford and son George, a boy about 12 or 14 years of age, were here for dinner the same day. They were on their way to their home in Butte Falls where they are living during the term of school, although Mr. Heryford owns a fine farm in Rancheria Prairie some eight miles east of Butte Falls. They had been out to Ashland to have the boy's arm set where he had the misfortune of breaking it. This is the third time he has broken the same arm, the first time he fell off of a low shed and I don't remember how he broke it the second time, and this time he simply fell down and struck it on a rock. He seemed to be suffering considerable with it and complained of suffering very much while he had to ride over the rough road in a wagon, but when he came out and returned he traveled on the P.&E. railroad. S. R. Johnson, a subcontractor on the extension of the P.&E. railroad of Butte Falls, was with Mr. Heryford and son here for dinner.
    George Holmes, our garage man, was also here for dinner the same day, also George Albert, who runs a motor car on the P.&E., was among the diners that day.
    Roy Conley of Butte Falls was here with a four-horse load of rolled barley and other kinds of feed on the way to his home four miles from Butte Falls, the Hawk mill, where he is interested in some way in a timber deal with Mr. Hawk, and that night Mrs. Conley came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside and the next day went on up home.
    Mrs. Joe Moomaw was also a diner at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    There were quite a number of ladies from the country nearby came in to attend the Improvement Club of Eagle Point. Among them were Mrs. Thos. Cingcade, Mrs. B. F. Fuller, Mrs. Wm. Perry and Mrs. Roy Stanley and Mrs. J. P. Moomaw. They met at the home of Mrs. Mittelstaedt and I understand had as usual a pleasant time.
    Eli Dahack, one of our prosperous farmers, came in Thursday on his way to Medford to consult an eye and ear specialist, as he was suffering with a severe attack on the rim of one of his ears.
    George Fausby came in about the middle of the week from Butte Falls with his team. He had taken a job hauling ties for the P.&E.R.R. but owing to the continuous snow and rain and the difficulty in procuring hay for his teams had to give up the job. He brought Mrs. M. Lammey and her son George out with him and they are all stopping at the Sunnyside.
    Sam H. Oeser and Rob Davison, two young men who are working on the P.&E.R.R., came in this Saturday morning and went on to Medford. They report that there was so much snow on the track that they had to stop work for the day but expect to resume work Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 7, 1922, page 4



BROWNSBORO FIRE EXTINGUISHED BY PEOPLE OF TOWN
    BROWNSBORO, Mar. 8.--Mr. William Hansen, Sr.'s house caught on fire last week during a heavy wind storm. A spark blew out of the chimney and set the roof on fire. The fire had gained quite a headway before Mr. Hansen saw it. The neighbors seeing it came and helped put it out. It was extinguished before much damage was done.
    A stranger who has been working near Butte Falls came through Brownsboro Saturday on his way to Eagle Point. He left camp early Saturday morning and got lost in the low range. He tramped around in the snow all day, and it was late Saturday evening when he arrived in Brownsboro.
    Mrs. R. E. Tucker and daughter Ellen and William Staub went to Medford Saturday.
    George Hansen made a business trip to Medford Saturday.
    Merrill Stanley was enrolled in the Brownsboro school. This makes a total number of 22 pupils.
    Mr. S. L. Hoagland made a business trip to Central Point Monday.
    Mr. Earl Tucker is helping Walter Marshall haul barley to Fish Lake Ditch Company.
    Mr. Carl Stanley went to Medford Saturday.
    Mr. Spence and son, Archie, came up from Medford Saturday to get some things from their ranch.
    Mr. Walter Marshall went to Lake Creek Sunday.
    Four pupils at the Brownsboro school have received their Palmer Method button. They are now trying for a higher button. They are Edward Stanley, Mary Stanley, George Hoagland and Viola Hoagland.
    Mr. William Hoagland, who was ill, was taken to Central Point Saturday, so he would be near medical treatment.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 10, 1922, page B1


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    We are having our regular March weather now, wind, snow, sunshine and heavy freezing all about the same time, for one can get up in the morning and find the air cool and bracing and will conclude that our disagreeable weather is about over, and perhaps in the course of two hours there will be a change and a man will need an overcoat and the next change will be warm and he will begin to think of leaving his coat and about that time here comes a snow squall and the next morning the ground will be covered with snow, and the poor old cows who have been anticipating a warm spell and the starting of the grass will droop their heads and almost give up in despair. But then this is our regular March weather, and while it works a hardship on the poor stock that have, if not neglected, not been properly cared for, and on the owners who have been so eager to accumulate a band of stock at small expense and anticipate a warm spring and trusting to Providence instead of forethought, instead of management, but we are glad to state that the most of the cattle have been kept so that they will come out fairly well, although I hear the reports from different directions of quite a number of cattle on the range who are in a very bad condition.
    Mrs. John Allen of Derby came out about the middle of the week and went out to Medford, returning Wednesday, and spent the night. She seemed to have trouble finding a way to get up home as the stage was so loaded that there was no room as there were three passengers who had already engaged passage ahead of her and the driver had all the mail including parcel post that he could put on his car, but she finally went with a friend part way and had her husband meet her with a gig.
    B. H. Williams, a salesman of San Francisco, was here Wednesday for dinner and so was O. Adams, S. King and I. A. Hill, the two last named homesteaders from Butte Falls and William Bunch and wife.
    C. L. Parker of Berkeley, Calif. came in and spent the night. Mr. Parker said that he was just looking over Oregon again as he had been here through Oregon some time ago.
    Joe Pool and family of Butte Falls came in and spent the night. Mr. Pool has been confined to the hospital in Medford for the past six weeks with pneumonia and was on his way home.
    J. W. Berrian, superintendent of the fish hatcheries in Southern Oregon, was here for dinner and reports that he had just taken a fine lot of fish out of the two traps he has in this section, one in Antelope and the other in Butte Creek, and that he had taken 54,000 eggs that day.
    Mrs. Pete Betz, near Trail, and Mrs. Israel Patton of Butte Falls, were here for dinner and Mrs. Patton went on to Medford on the stage, returning Friday morning.
    Benj. Whetstone and W. P. Holbrook were business callers Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson, formerly of Eagle Point, passed through here from Tijuana, Mexico on their way to Yakima, Wash.
    Mrs. F. Stearns of Medford came out Wednesday and remained until the next afternoon with us.
    Died, March 9th, 1922, Mrs. Julia Ann Knighton, at her home in Eagle Point, after a lingering illness of several years. Mrs. Knighton was born in Missouri, Feb. 27, 1846, and died at the advanced age of 76 years and 10 days. About a year after her birth her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas [sic] Dawson, joined a company of forty families who came to and settled in the Willamette Valley near where Forest Grove now stands, in 1848, where she lived until some time in the early '60s. She was married to William Green Knighton September 20, 1860, where they lived until after two children were born, Charles and Arivilla. Shortly after that they moved to Jackson County and settled in Trail, where they kept the travel of what is now known as the Crater Lake Highway, then known as the Fort Klamath road. Their third child, Edward, was born there.
    Disposing of their property there they settled in Talent and later bought property here where they have lived up to the present time. Their three children came to a sudden and tragic death, Charles while working in his shop on what was then the farm, the Evergreen ranch near Flounce Rock, was blown to pieces by dynamite, Arvilla was killed by being thrown from a buggy, and Edward was drowned, so that the poor woman has had her share of trials in this life, in addition to her continuous sickness for the last several years. She was a consistent member of the Baptist Church up to the day of her death. She leaves her husband, a sister, Mrs. A. Mayfield, and three grandchildren, Charles Knighton, Lydia Jones and William Nessler, and a host of friends to mourn her demise. The funeral services were conducted at the home by Rev. H. G. Adams, Saturday forenoon and interment in the Phoenix cemetery.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1922, page 3



VON DER HELLEN GETS CONTRACT TALENT DITCH
    What is said to have been one of the first free and open bidding contests for irrigation work in Oregon for many years was held in Talent yesterday, when the contract for building the Talent Irrigation District dam was awarded to D. M. Stevenson of Portland for $78,595 and the contract for the construction of the 18.3 miles of canal to Wm. von der Hellen of Eagle Point for $67,444. The following 12 contractors from all parts of the coast offered bids.
    C. E. Adams, Los Angeles, Calif., Johnson Contract Co., Portland, Ore., Grant Smith Co., Portland, Ore., Soleim & Gustavson, Astoria, Ore., John Hampshire, Grants Pass, Ore., Wm. von der Hellen, Eagle Point, Ore., Wolke & Schroeder, Grants Pass, Ore., Pacific Coast Paving Co., Tacoma, Wash., Albert Anderson, Grants Pass, Ore., E. J. Cheatham & Sons, Spokane, Wash., V. R. Denis Const. Co., McMinnville, Ore., D. M. Stevenson, Portland, Ore.
    Heretofore the contracts have usually been controlled by the bond houses taking the securities. Both awards were made to the lowest bidders.
    Work is expected to start on the canal about April 1st and on the dam about May 1st. There will be 8,600 acres in the district and the final success of the project comes after years of fighting against heavy odds and a series of disappointments.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 15, 1922, page 1



TRAIL ITEMS
    Miss Frances Greb of Persist, spent the weekend with her parents in Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Tucker and son William, Jr., were Medford visitors Saturday. Mrs. Tucker has been quite ill with the flu but did not give up teaching. She is much improved at this writing.
    Irma Ash spent Sunday with Gladys McDonald at the Rogue Elk.
    Harvey Morgan hauled a load of grain from Medford Saturday
    Mr. and Mrs. Jess Ragsdale were called to Medford Saturday by the illness of the former's mother, Mrs. Jane Ragsdale. She was reported a little better Sunday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher attended the funeral of Mrs. Knighton at Phoenix Saturday.
    The Misses Dorothy and Edna Peterson were weekend guests of Miss Minnie Poole.
    The dance at Joe Hoskins' Saturday evening was well attended and enjoyed by all.
    S. Rose was a Trail visitor Tuesday.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher returned home with Fred Middlebusher Sunday and will visit at Prospect a week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Galarneau and two sons, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ash and little daughter Betty and Irving Hutchinson of Elk Creek attended the dance Saturday night.
    Ed Cushman visited in Trail Saturday and Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. S. Chappell, our shoe cobbler, has closed his shop again and gone to Trail to look after his sawmill interests.
    Among the callers Saturday for dinner was J. Jordahl, representing the Independent Cracker Co., of Portland, and L. Polder of George Lawrence Co., harness.
    Art Smith, one of our prosperous bachelor farmers, who has a fine farm and orchard on Big Sticky on the Eagle Point-Phoenix road, was here on business last Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Fred Frideger, another one of our prosperous bachelor friends who owns a fine pear orchard, came out to work in it, getting it ready for spraying Friday and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and so did Mr. Gaines, one of the prosperous stock men of the Trail section. He is one of those men who believe that it pays to feed his cattle and consequently has had a part of his cattle on the A. G. Bishop (Hollywood) orchard and ranch and had that day brought out the rest of them, as his feed was running low at home. He reports that there are now about 400 head of cattle being fed on that ranch besides two bands of sheep belonging to different parties and that they are looking fine. Our stockmen living back in the hills who have small farms and keep considerable stock but have not the necessary amount of cultivated land to raise hay to feed the whole amount arrange during the summer or fall to have them fed and calculate to have to feed them until about March or perhaps a little longer, and by that means have them ready to turn out on the foothills where the grass starts early, thus having the cows in good condition for bringing their calves and having plenty of milk to give them a good start and getting them ready for the more nourishing grass in the higher hills.
    Roy Davis of Derby came out on the Butte Falls stage and went on out to Medford and Wm. Merrill of Reese Creek came in Saturday evening and remained until Tuesday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. Eldon Fauke of Gazelle, Calif. came up to see Roy Stanley about cattle and Mrs. Fauke visited Mrs. Stanley, thus combining business with pleasure.
    A. B. Shelby, a traveling salesman, Carlyle Natwick and his sister, Mrs. Gladys Cooper of Medford and Mr. Clayton, bookkeeper for C. H. Natwick, railroad contractor of Butte Falls, and M. F. Coleman of Medford. Mr. Coleman came out to see J. D. Patrick on business who was working at the Sunnyside doing some repair work.
    Frank Brandon of Central Point, L. M. Case, C. W. Rose and Frank Haselton, all of Wellen, were also here for dinner Sunday. Mr. Haselton is the foreman on the Antelope orchard. Also Misses Ruby and Mabel Tedrick, who were the guests of Eden Haselton, one of our regular boarders. In addition to them we had quite a number of our town young men here for dinner and supper.
    Benj. Edmondson and wife of Butte Falls came out on the railroad truck Monday, took dinner and went on to Medford in the afternoon to visit her mother, Mrs. John Obenchain, formerly of Butte Falls but now sick in Medford. They returned Monday morning and went up home reporting that her mother was improving.
    John Greb came in Monday morning to bring his daughter Frances in to meet the Persist stage. Miss Frances is teaching the Persist school and came out to see her parents. I mentioned in a former letter that she was here at the time of the teachers council but did not mention her as being present and learned Monday that she came out to attend but found her mother sick so remained with her.
    H. L. Heryford and his son George and his two cousins, Mrs. Ira Tungate of Butte Falls and her two children and Mrs. Ed Cowden, who lives on their farm about three miles out of Eagle Point, came in for dinner Monday. Mr. Heryford and son were on their way to Ashland to have George's arm dressed. The reader will perhaps remember that I mentioned some two weeks ago his passing through here with a broken arm and now he was on his way to have the old cast taken off as his arm had shrunk so as to require a new one. Mrs. Cowden had come in to meet her sister's children and take them out home with her for a visit.
    J. Silas, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Central Point, and Miss Hannah, daughter of Jasper Hannah on the road via the French-Dodge Bridge to Trail, were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning. Miss Hannah is attending the Butte Falls high school.
    J. W. Berrian, superintendent of the fish hatcheries in Jackson County, and his assistant, Thomas Cingcade, passed through here Tuesday morning on their way to the Butte Creek fish trap, and Mr. Berrian called for dinner Tuesday and reports that he has had a good catch and up to date has secured 1,000,000 steelhead eggs and 35,000 cutthroat eggs. He shipped a box of eggs to the Butte Falls hatchery Tuesday morning on the stage.
    J. Wattenburg and wife came in Tuesday morning to meet a party who came out on the stage from Medford.
    E. A. Denton and family, who lived here last season for a while and bought the property that belonged to the late A. J. Daley but moved back to Ashland to look after business interests there, have returned to their old home in Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vestal of Reese Creek and Walter Parr, also of Reese Creek, Alex Mathews and Benj. Brophy were also business callers on our merchants Tuesday.
    Our new merchant, F. J. McPherson, has been cutting some of the old war prices he found in the T. E. Nichols store when he took charge of it, and reports business looking up, although it is not so lively as it might be, as there seems to be but very few people coming in from the country.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1922, page 10


ELK CREEK
    Mrs. Fred Sturgis entertained Frances Greb Saturday.
    L. A. Whitley hauled a load of hay from Mr. Steward's; also Mr. Schermerhorn and Howard Ash have been hauling hay from different parties.
    Earl Hutchinson is working for P. E. Sandoz.
    Howard Ash, Irvin Hutchinson, Earl Hutchinson and Mrs. H. Ash, also Hazel Pence attended the dance at Trail, Saturday, March 11.
    George Trusty went to town on a business trip in his car last week.
    Weston and Gordon Miller are working for Fred Sturgis.
    Those who were on the Eagle Point-Persist stage Monday, Mar. 13, were: Miss Frances Greb, Mis Viola Peterson and Miss Edna Peterson.
    Harvey Morgan of Coquille, Ore. is taking care of his uncle's place, Henry Morgan, who was stricken with some malady. He was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital and was brought back after a few weeks there. Then he had a relapse and had to go back, so Harvey Morgan has been kind enough to take care of his place.
    Lee Whitley visited Geo. Hall Monday, Mar. 13, to sharpen a few tools
Medford Mail Tribune, March 18, 1922, page 3


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Floyd Charley went to Ashland last week and bought some thoroughbred cattle.
    The Fish Lake Ditch Company have moved another steam shovel to work on the ditch back of Earl Tucker's farm.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cann of Montana are visiting Mrs. Cann's brother, Roscoe Hulse.
    S. L. Hoagland made a business trip to Eagle Point Monday.
    Harold and Thelma Dallas spent the weekend with Cingcades of Eagle Point.
    Carl Stanley came out to his ranch Friday and returned to Medford Saturday.
    Milo Conley is hauling hay from the Loma Linda ranch.
    Vida Bradshaw spent the weekend at her home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Campbell of Eagle Point were visitors at the Tucker home Friday.
    Mrs. R. E. Tucker, Mr. and Mrs. Staub went to Medford Wednesday.
    Ralph and Olga Bieberstedt made a business trip to Medford Saturday.
    Mrs. Yanty Marshall and daughter, Meada, were visitors at the Walter Marshall home Sunday.
    Mrs. Ed Cowden went to Eagle Point Monday.
    Leland and Claus Charley went to Medford Friday.
    J. Monia went to Los Angeles Friday to attend to some business. Later he is going to Long Beach to visit friends and relatives.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 18, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thomas Grigsby of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Wednesday.
    M. S. Woods, one of the old veterans of the Civil War, was a business visitor to Medford about the middle of the week and while there had a sinking spell and fainted while in the Nash Hotel and while on his road home was in a serious if not a critical condition, as he is almost quite helpless at times. A few nights before he went out to the woodshed near morning to gather some kindling to start a fire, as he could not sleep, and fell down and lay there for about an hour and his wife missed him and became uneasy, got up and went to look for him and when she found him, was not strong enough to get him to the house, so had to go and rouse Mr. R. A. Weidman to help him to bed again. He still persists in going around alone, but one of his neighbors remarked as we saw him tottering along the sidewalk that if he should fall down he could not get up without help. But he is still as plucky as he was while in the army fighting for the preservation of the Union.
    H. H. Fox of Lake Creek, the milk goat man of that country, was a business caller. He reports that he is still in that line of business and reports that his neighbors, some of them at least, thought last fall that they would have hay enough to carry them through with their stock and have a hundred tons of hay left but are now putting their cattle on half rations and that the outlook is not good for feed, as the ground is covered with snow almost every morning, and that the past winter has been the hardest we have had up there for years on stock.
    Wm. Cottrell and D. L. Rummel were among the diners Wednesday, beside two strangers whose names I failed to secure who went away on the stage to Medford, and that night Walter Parr, who lives on Reese Creek, came in and spent the night.
    Wednesday afternoon the landlady of the Sunnyside Hotel--she doesn't like to see her name in a newspaper--started for Oregon City and Portland for a visit to her two brothers in Oregon City, two in Portland and one in or near Damascus and our son-in-law and family, Grant Shaw, wife and four children, to be gone until she has her visit out, and take a much needed rest.
    Ernest Dahack, our barber, has been making some substantial improvements on the tract of land where he has his barber shop, by removing the old low wire fence and putting up a neat four-foot Page fence in its place.
    Miss Ira Tungate of Butte Falls, who has been visiting relatives in Medford, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and was met here by her sister, Mrs. Ed Cowden, and taken out home with her for a visit before going home.
    Mr. Rynning, the civil engineer, who, I understand, is appointed by the county court to look after and superintend the work on the roads in the rural districts, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Thursday. He was armed with quite a bundle of survey equipment, as though he was to lay out some work on a road in the hills. I understand that there is to be considerable money applied on the rural routes this season.
    J. Zimmerlee of Trail was a business caller Wednesday, but did not learn anything from him, as I learned some time ago that he had disposed of his interest in the Adamson-Chappell sawmill.
    R. D. Hanson and Gus M. Lowe were here for dinner, they are in the employ of Foster & Kleiser in posting ads on the six bulletin boards, Thursday. And so were Alfred and Westy Robinson of Oregon City, who have been employed up in the Lake Creek country and were on their way to their home in Oregon City.
    Ed Dutton and Ed Cowden were also business callers.
    Mrs. John Rader, who has been here visiting her daughter, Mrs. Roy Ashpole, returned home Thursday.
    Mrs. George W. Averill of Butte Falls, who has been out to Ashland and had some dental work done, came out Friday afternoon and spent the night at the Sunnyside and so did a lady and little boy of Ashland, who was on her way up to Derby to visit friends. For reasons best known to herself, she requested me to withhold her name. They both went up on the Butte Falls stage.
    Mrs. W. G. McDowell and Mrs. T. F. Todd of Trail came out on the Butte Falls stage and went on up home on the Eagle Point-Trail-Persist stage. Mrs. McDowell is the hostess of the Rogue Elk Resort on the Crater Lake Highway on Elk Creek.
    Mrs. F. J. McPherson, the wife of our new merchant in the T. E. Nichols store, made a business trip to Medford Friday.
    The Ladies' Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point called out the forces of able-bodied men to make some decided improvements in our town park, under the direction of our town mayor, H. E. Campbell, our banker and our lady councilwoman and one of the street commissioners, Mrs. W. H. (Mattie) Brown, and with eight good horses and about sixteen men, some of the men seemed to want to be boss of the job, accomplished quite a lot of work, although the ground was rather wet to work to advantage. They were leveling off some of the high places and filling in some of the low. The work was volunteer work and the ladies gave the men an old-fashioned chicken dinner that was said to be up to date.
    One of our new merchants, Thos. F. Nichols, has been making some decided improvements around his home, having removed the old and rather dilapidated fence and replaced it with a new one.
    There seems to be a scarcity of news as there are but very few people from the country come into town and they who do come, don't brag on our roads. But after the equinox, we are expecting a change in the weather for the better.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1922, page 6



HAUL GRAVEL TO PUT ON C. LAKE HIGHWAY CONTRACT
    The firm that has the contract for part of the work on the Crater Lake Highway between Agate Station and the Cingcade ranch have moved their camp to the gravel bar below lower Butte Creek bridge and are making preparations to haul considerable gravel and rock to place on the road.
    Luther Davis and Orville Hamilton, two of our enterprising young men, who are living on the Hamilton ranch near Bybee bridge, are intending to raise a large number of turkeys the coming summer.
    E. G. Whiteside intends to move back to his place soon. T. E. McGraw and family, the present occupants, will move to Medford where Mr. McGraw has purchased a couple of lots and is building a house.
    Messrs. Lemen and Hood and their families have rented the Orr place and have moved thereon.
    On account of the late spring most of the surplus stocks of hay are used up and the stock men are turning their stock on the pastures. The price of hay still ranges from eight to ten dollars a ton.
    There was born to Mr. and Mrs. T. E. McGraw a nine-pound baby boy, on Friday night at the home of Mrs. McGraw's parents, Mr. and Mrs. C. J. McCay.
    Mr. Roberts, foreman at the old Davis ranch, which now belongs to the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co., is making preparations to sow one hundred and fifty acres to alfalfa this spring. This will make about 300 acres of alfalfa on the ranch, which will be one of the largest alfalfa ranches in this part of the country.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1922, page 7



ELK CREEK
    Miss Burr was visiting our school (Elk Creek) Wednesday. We were all glad to see her, as it has been a long time since we saw her last
    We have earned nine stars for our card entitled "Requirements for a Standard School," which gives rules for a standard school. We have five more points to secure.
    Miss Burr also visited the Persist school, No. 80.
    Mrs. P. S. Sandoz made a business trip to town Saturday, 18th, returning Wednesday, 22nd. Somebody is going to have a toothache as I noticed a pretty good-sized sack of sweetmeats.
    Arthur Moore went to Trail Monday, 20th. He returned Tuesday with two incubators. Looks like Persist is getting up in the world. Mr. Moore also has a few new lambs.
    Harvey Margard also made a trip to Trail the same date.
    Mrs. Lois Clement and her two children were visiting Mrs. J. M. Milles Tuesday. She came all the way from Medford and intended to stay a little longer than she did but had to rush away before the roads were too slick from the rain we are having. The weather decided her as the sun was shining when she came and it rained during the night, so disappointed her and her relatives.
    Miss Inez Willits visited Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence Wednesday, March 22.
    We have a volleyball outfit at our school and have already derived an abundance of fun out of it.
    L. A. Whitley visited his mother and relatives, Wednesday, March 22 at Persist.
    I was visiting one of my neighbors last week and noticed that one of his calves was sick. I inquired what the trouble was and he replied that it had the colic. I asked him where it was and he said the calf was down in the hay. It sure was, as he was lying down and couldn't get up as he was lying down fairly deep in the hay. Very interesting?
    Irwin Hutchinson attended the dance at Stewart's. People along the creek are getting short on hay on account of the grass not growing as soon as we expected. So consequently we have to feed longer than usual, which makes it bad for those who run out of hay as it has to be hauled pretty far.
    The news is pretty dry to be read but the season is pretty wet to fret.
    Elmer Sperry was a visitor at Mrs. Dave Pence's place Wednesday the 15th. He enjoyed his visit.
    One of the features of the Trail meet will be a game of volleyball, weather permitting.
    Miss Inez Willits visited Mrs. Deliah Wagner last week. She enjoyed her visit.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1922, page 8



TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. W. Zimmerlee and children returned home with Mrs. C. Blaess Sunday and will visit at their home in Medford a few days.
    Miss Edna Petersen is a guest at the Poole home this week.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher was a Sunday caller at J. Zimmerlee's.
    Miss Houston of Central Point spent the weekend with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Houston.
    There was a large crowd at the dance at Stewart's Saturday night but they adjourned early.
    Erving Hutchinson visited Lowell Ash Saturday and Sunday.
    The farmers are sure pleased to see the warm days and hope to see more of them follow.
    R. W. Thomasen of Drew is looking after mining property near Trail.
    Art Moore and Harvey Morgan of Persist made a trip to Trail Monday, hauling potatoes down and grain back. They report the Elk Creek road is very rough.
    Mrs. P. E. Sandoz of Elk Creek was a Medford caller Saturday.
    Uriah Vaughn of Prospect passed through Trail on his way to Eugene Saturday, where he has employment.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1922, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. A. Petty and W. P. Holbrook were among the business callers Saturday morning and J. P. Clayton, the bookkeeper for C. H. Natwick, one of the contractors on the extension of the P.&E.R.R. from Butte Falls to near the base of Mt. McLoughlin, and Carlyle Natwick, Buster Mathews, Chris Beals, the mail carrier from Derby to Butte Falls, Mr. Beals came out on the stage and went on to Jacksonville as he had been summoned to serve on jury duty, were here for dinner Saturday.
    John Miller and family, who bought the Dr. W. W. P. Holt property, has moved from his farm on the S. Little Butte Creek into our town.
    After I finished writing my last letter for the Daily Mail Tribune I learned that the ladies E.P.C.I.C. of E.P. concluded that as they had succeeded so well in improving the park that they would hire men and teams and do a lot more work, so had a lot of new soil hauled in and having the ground properly prepared for the planting of trees and I understand that one of our county commissioners, James Owens, has proposed to donate the trees necessary to supply the demand and the prospect now is that if our present mayor and lady street commissioner live that we will soon have a park to be proud of.
    A. Mayfield and wife, who have been here helping to care for Mr. Mayfield's sister, the late Mrs. Wm. G. Knighton, have gone to Ashland to live in their old home.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Reid of this place went to Grants Pass Saturday and to Ashland Sunday. Mr. Reid is the engineer who ran the steam roller on the C.L.H. last summer and says that he expects to run a roller on the road from Grants Pass, putting on the hot stuff, the finishing touches, this season.
    Mrs. W. Mills, who is living on the Fred Pelouze farm, was in town on her way to Ashland, her old home, to visit her daughter, who is there taking lessons in music. She said that her husband was now in the Southern Pacific Hospital, that he had been in the employ of the S.P.R.R. Co., and while in the discharge of his duties was hurt in his spine and while working, moving onto the farm, hurt himself and as a result was taken to San Francisco to be treated. They have a five-year lease on the Pelouze farm.
    Among the callers Sunday for dinner were Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, shoe dealers of Medford; Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Feldman, also of Medford; Wm. Merritt of Reese Creek; Anton Ring of Trail, he and Mr. Merritt spent the night; I. P. Clayton; B. F. Natwick and his sister, Mrs. Gladys Cooker; A. B. Shelby, a traveling salesman for Baker Hamilton Pacific Co., Portland; Wm. Lewis and two brothers, Thomas and George; Thomas F. Nichols and wife; Wm. von der Hellen; Louis Martin and Miss Mabel Tedrick.
    Monday among the business callers were W. E. Hammel, Marshall Minter, Fred Pettegrew, John Blaess, Wm. Butler, J. H. Carlton and his brother Lyle Carlton, Wellen; Benj. Brophy, Ed Cowden, Lem Courtney, our painter and paperhanger, he is now employed in painting and papering for J. F. Brown on his home. Sam is introducing an oilcloth to be used instead of paper, especially in the kitchen and rooms exposed to smoke and slopping of water.
    I met Jesse Hartman, our old bridge builder, and S. M. Hawk at the post office Tuesday morning on their way up to the Big Butte country. Mr. Hartman was on his way to take the measurement and order the timber for a new bridge across Big Butte, so that Mr. Hawk can haul out his lumber. He says that he has a fine lot of lumber ready to haul out as soon as the bridge is completed.
    John Lane of Derby drove in Tuesday morning and while here was giving his listeners an account of some of the hardships of the people in that section on account of the roads. He told us that during the last two years the county have paid out $42,000 on the road between the Reese Creek school house and the Frank Neil corner (Derby) and that there is only one short space but is covered with deep mud from six to sixteen inches deep, and that last year the supervisor spent $1,000 on a piece of road, and then it all had to be dug up and made over in a different way. He said that he helped to build it and helped to dig it up. How long will it be before the authorities will learn the folly of having the county road work done in the way it has been done, instead of letting it out by contract. It is estimated that there has already been money enough appropriated by the county and citizens to make a good road from Reese Creek to Butte Falls, and still the people up there are hemmed in with mud.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. T. Hoefft of Butte Falls, and little son, came out Tuesday on the Albert car on the railroad track, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the stage.
    Wm. Nickell of Lake Creek was a business caller Tuesday.
    S. A. Croshel and E. A. Russell of the Jackson County Creamery were here Tuesday. They were out soliciting for three different makes of silos and claimed that they were quite successful.
    Roy A. Conroy, Butte Falls, came in Tuesday and spent the night and to dinner at the Sunnyside today, Wednesday. He had been out to Medford for a few days having his hand treated where he bruised it, for blood poison. He spent this Wednesday forenoon looking after a load of beef cattle he has being fed on the George Givan ranch and went up home this afternoon.
    Mr. S. King, who has a homestead on the Obenchain mountain, spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
    H. G. Adams, the minister in charge here, will preach here Sunday, March 26, both morning and evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1922, page 10



ANTELOPE ITEMS
    Mr. Roscoe Hulse and Mr. Cann made a business rip to Medford last week
    Mr. Roscoe Hulse took Albert Hoagland to the Dow Hospital at Medford Saturday and brought him back Monday.
    The eighth grade students are working on an Arbor Day program, in which the entire school will take part.
    Mr. E. C. Stanley returned home Thursday.
    Elmer Hoagland visited school Monday.
    Mrs. Jacob Monia made a business trip to Medford Thursday.
    Mrs. R. E. Tucker and William Staub went to Medford Tuesday.
    Carl and Fred Stanley brought a bunch of cattle down from Rancheria and turned them loose on the low range.
    Mrs. Hulse and Mrs. Cann were visitors at the Brownsboro school Friday.
    Mr. C. E. Stanley made a business trip to Eagle Point Monday.
    Ernest Fluharty of Talent took a horse to Butte Falls Wednesday and spent Wednesday night at the Hoagland home.
    Mr. Ralph Tucker is shearing goats this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Charley and family are moving to the Bradshaw ranch.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Lewey have taken up their ranch in the Antelope District.
    There was a good attendance at Sunday school Sunday and it was voted to give an Easter program. Mrs. Hulse and Mrs. George Brown were appointed to arrange for the music. They would like to have all interested out next Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 25, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Berrian, the superintendent of the fish hatcheries in Southern Oregon, has had an electric pump put in near the fish trap on the L. R. Hawk place for the purpose of pumping water to be used in developing the fish eggs to prepare them to be carried to the hatchery near Butte Falls.
    Perry Foster of Beagle, one of the pioneers of Jackson County, was a business caller last Wednesday and so was Marsh Garrett, who has a fine stock ranch near Lake Creek and another on the headwaters of South Little Butte.
    Mrs. Willard of Ashland was visiting Mrs. W. Miles on the Fred Pelouze place the first of the week.
    Mr. J. F. Maxfield of Brownsboro passed through here Wednesday and stopped a short time to have our blacksmith do a little repair work on a piece of machinery and then went on to see one of our prominent farmers and stock men, Charley Cingcade, who I understand is afflicted with the rheumatism.
    Mr. Cadzow, one of the leading merchants of Butte Falls, passed through here Thursday on his way up home.
    John Rader, another one of our prominent farmers and stock men, was here on business. I understand, from what I consider good authority, that he is talking of giving up the farm work and purchasing property here in our town.
    J. L. Hovey, foreman on the Alta Vista Orchard, was a business caller Thursday. He reports that he has two families and two single men working most of the time pruning the orchard and was burning the brush when the big rain storm came Wednesday night and Thursday, one of the finest rains we have had for a long time. Mr. J. L. Robinson, one of our leading farmers, was in Thursday and in commenting on the benefits to be derived from it remarked that it would be worth thousands of dollars to this end of Rogue River Valley, although some of our pessimists are predicting that now the rain is over and that we will have no more rain until fall, but who ever heard of a crop failure in Oregon, especially in Rogue River Valley!
    William Burg and son, who are living on the old Caton place between here and Trail near the Crater Lake Highway, were in town Thursday and report the ground thoroughly soaked and prospects fine for a big harvest this season.
    Miss Ella Armstrong of Medford is here visiting Miss Muriel Smith.
    Mr. Wm. L. Hurst and son Louis started for the oil fields of California the first of the week on a prospecting tour, leaving the rest of his family here.
    D. R. Patrick, our general carpenter, came in Thursday and engaged board and room at the Sunnyside for a while. He has been engaged by our postmaster, W. C. Clements, to do a lot of work on the post office and telephone building and make some decided and much-needed improvements in the appearance and comfort, as well as convenience of the two offices.
    Loris Martin, who has spent most of the winter trapping, made a business trip to Medford Thursday and spent the night, returning Friday morning.
    Glen Curtis of Chicago came out from Medford Friday morning and went up to Lake Creek on the stage.
    Ray Davis and his brother Roscoe of Derby came out Friday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on out to Medford.
    Henry Trusty of Elk Creek, Trail post office, was a business caller Friday.
    George Albert, the man who runs the accommodation car on the P.&E. Railroad from Butte Falls to Eagle Point, came in Friday bringing a full load of teachers and others from Butte Falls and vicinity, among whom were Miss Alvkeld Romtnedt, Miss Ella Prettyman and Mrs. Everett E. Hara [Dahack?] of Butte Falls, Mrs. Lucius Kincaid, who is teaching in the Crater Lake School District, Mrs. Graydon Childreth, not a teacher, and five or six others, whose names I omitted to secure, and Mr. S. King, a homesteader. The teachers, all except Mrs. Kincaid mentioned, came to the Sunnyside and rested until their car came to take them to Medford and Mrs. Kincaid met her husband here, and after supper both went on out to Medford. It appears that the Butte Falls teachers are taking a vacation of three days Monday, Tuesday and Wednesday.
    Mr. S. L. Kidder, one of the post office inspectors, came in Friday evening and spent the night and this Saturday morning examined the books, etc., in our post office and went back to Medford.
    Mrs. D. M. Davis of Ashland came in this morning and went up to Lake Creek to visit her son-in-law, one of the Gresham boys, and family near the summit between Butte Creek and Antelope Creek.
    R. A. Petty was the only man I met in my rounds from the country this forenoon, so I guess that the farmers and stock men are getting busy.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 27, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. George Brown of Brownsboro and daughter were transacting business with our merchants last Saturday.
    Walter Wattenberg was here also Saturday and so were Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Fuller.
    Alvin Murso of Auburn, Calif. is here visiting his sister, Mrs. Ernest Dahack. He said that he was simply looking over the country and seemed to be favorably impressed with its appearance, although the cold backward spring has kept vegetation back so that the country does not show to advantage as usual.
    An item I picked up Saturday afternoon: The Eagle Point baseball team met Wednesday, March 22nd and organized by electing Fred J. McPherson manager and Lyle Van Scoy as treasurer and secretary and are so anxious to show their skill in that line that they are ready to meet any baseball team north of the Equator outside of New York state. The boys are feeling their oats and are anxious to show their prowess. Suggestion: Suppose that the Medford and Ashland teams unite and re-elect a team out of the two teams and come over and meet the Eagle Point boys and learn a few tricks.
    Wm. Perry, our road supervisor, was here Saturday and reports that his road district has been enlarged so as to take in the country up Rogue River to near Trail, and that he had two graders at work, one on the Persist road by way of the lower bridge across Little Butte Creek up Rogue River to the Dodge-French Bridge, crossing that stream to Trail and the other on the boulevard in the Antelope country and that he did not know how large his road district was until the county court sent him a blueprint of it. But Will is capable of filling the position; in fact, there are a lot of people out here who think that he is good material to make a county commissioner of.
    James Pew of Rogue River came in last Friday to make his annual visit to Mr. and Mrs. David Cingcade to take their birthday dinner together, he being 78 years old on Saturday and Mr. Cingcade being 77 years old on the day before, March 24. They have made it a rule to have a birthday dinner together on either one or the other's birthday for the last thirty-eight years, with one exception, and that was when Mrs. Cingcade was in the hospital some years ago.
    John A. Miller and wife and Mr. Wilson Martin, better known as Bill Martin of Lake Creek, were here Saturday night for late supper. Mr. Miller had just got in with his last load, moving out from his ranch on the south fork of Little Butte into our town and Mr. Martin was helping Mr. Miller move, so came in late for supper.
    Sunday morning was warm and pleasant and I ventured out to take my place in our Sunday school for the first time since the 1st of December, to return home before preaching. I noticed that there was quite an addition to the number of scholars, although I was informed that there were not so many as there had been attending, and on looking out of the window I saw quite a company engaged playing baseball and suggested that was the reason for the falling off. But we had a very interesting session and at the close a sermon by our minister, Rev. H. G. Adams. I noticed a very important addition to the literature of our Sunday school and that was a nice large map of the two kingdoms of Israel and Judea hanging on the wall. Rev. Adams will preach next Sunday morning and evening, April 2nd, in Butte Falls.
    Sunday noon when I reached home I found that dinner had already been announced and that there were fourteen busy trying to satisfy their appetites and quite a number in the sitting room and parlor so that I did not succeed in securing the names of many of them, besides many of them were people of our own town and so just left all of them except those from a distance. Among them were L. Deuel, merchant of Medford, Carl Jackson and wife of Butte Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Charles N. Davis of the Medford Auto Co. and son Charles Davis, Jr., Mrs. J. D. Jackson, Mrs. Anderson, Sidney F. King, Miss Gertrude Fredenburg and Geo. Taylor of Medford.
    Charles Pennington of Butte Falls was here and went on to Medford Monday morning and Ralph Bieberstedt, Raleigh Mathews and Paul Janney of Prospect was on his way to his home on the stage.
    J. Monia of Brownsboro came in on the stage Monday morning. He had been on a business trip to California and was just returning. He went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, March 26, a boy baby.
    C. E. Bellows was here Monday circulating a petition for signers to have George Alford's name put on the Republican ticket as a candidate for county commissioner.
    E. G. High and Kelly Paris of Ashland were among the business callers Monday. They are in the auto business.
    R. B. Faffer came in on the stage Monday from Medford and took passage on the Lake Creek stage for his home at the Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    Mrs. Ed Cowden came in Tuesday morning to bring her sister, Mrs. Ira Tungate of Butte Falls, in so she could go home on the stage.
    Perry Foster and one of his granddaughters, Miss Cora French, and Miss Lillian Cottrell of Debenger Gap were transacting business in our town Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 31, 1922, page 10



NEW OIL-BURNING ENGINE BOUGHT BY P.&E. RAILROAD
    The Pacific and Eastern Railway has recently received from the Porter Bros. shops in Pittsburgh, Penn., a new, prairie type, 62-ton, oil-burning locomotive. The new engine was shipped from Pittsburgh via San Francisco and arrived here via the Southern Pacific several days ago.
    A test run was made with the new locomotive about the first of the week and the functioning was above the highest expectations of the officials of the road, the engine having drawn 25 cars from this city to Eagle Point and passing over the grades in the steepest places without difficulty.
    It is understood that a number of men have been employed all winter getting the road in condition for operation this spring and that the work is nearing completion. It is expected that the transportation of logs from the Butte Falls timber district will soon begin and that the mills will start operation in the near future.
    The Medford sheet metal works has constructed a galvanized iron tank of 7000 gallons capacity for the storage of the fuel oil to be used in the locomotive.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 31, 1922, page 6


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    The North Teachers' Council meets at Brownsboro April 8 and they will have an all-day program with a picnic dinner. All those interested are invited. Twenty-five teachers are in this council and several talks on the educational problems of this section will be given. Keep the date in mind and come out.
    Our school had an attendance percentage of 99 last month, and nineteen were neither absent nor late.
    A large crowd was out for Sunday school and the church services here Sunday.
    Will those interested volunteer their services for the Easter program.
    Mr. Joe Maxfield made a business trip to Eagle Point Thursday.
    Walter Marshall and family went to Eagle Point last week.
    Mr. Mayon came to Brownsboro Monday to get supplies.
    Mrs. Ed Cowden visited our school Thursday and led us in singing.
    Mr. Irving Bieberstedt is ill with a cold and is under medical care now.
    Carl Stanley drove about three hundred head of cattle from Medford, where they were fed all winter. He took them to Eagle Point.
    Rev. C. C. Hulet was a visitor at the Brownsboro School Friday. He gave a short talk and announced that he would hold services here Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hulse and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Cann went to Trail Sunday.
    Mr. Brown and two daughters, LaVerne and Francis, were visitors at the Hoagland home Sunday.
    Vida Bradshaw spent the weekend at her home in Brownsboro.
    Miss Velda Monia and Miss LaVerne Brown are spending this week at home. They are students of the Butte Falls high schools.
    Mrs. Rhorer of Lake Creek visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Hansen, Sr., Sunday.
    Business callers at Medford last week were Mr. George Hansen, Mrs. J. Monia, Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hulse, Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Cann, Frank Simpson, Mr. W. N. Staub and Mr. L. D. Tucker.
    Mr. and Mrs. Simmons and mother were visitors at the Staub home Sunday.
    The last heavy rain has done a great deal of damage to the irrigation ditches.
    Visitors at school last week were Mrs. William Hansen, Sr., Mrs. Geo. Hansen, Mrs. J. Monia and son, Vernon and Mrs. Kubli.
    Miss Velda Monia was a visitor at school Monday and while here she led us in singing.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 1, 1922, page 4


TRAIL ITEMS
    Miss Ester Meacham spent the weekend with friends at Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jess Ragsdale and children, Mabel and Burton, spent Monday with the former's mother near Medford, who is very ill.
    The dance at McDonalds' was well attended and greatly enjoyed by all present. We all appreciate all the trouble Mr. and Mrs. McDonald went to for our benefit and the lovely supper.
    Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Howe and little daughter, Wanda, and Lowell Ash were Medford visitors Friday.
    Harold McDonald of Eugene is spending his spring vacation with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. McDonald.
    There was a large crowd at the Matlock dance Saturday night and all report a fine time.
    Hay hauling is still in vogue around Trail. The farmers are all hoping for good weather soon.
    The Misses Frances Greb, Edna, Dorothy, Viola and Mildred Peterson, Henry Trusty, George Trusty and Clarence Whitley of Persist were among those at the dance at Rogue Elk Saturday night.
    Fred Sturgis and Ezra Whitley made a trip to the valley Tuesday.
    The Misses Edna Peterson and Minnie Poole were Sunday visitors at the Pritchett home.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ash, Dorothy Peterson, Lowell Ash and Irvin Hutchison were Sunday guests at Irwin Howe's.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 1, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Ed Murphy of Wellen was in doing her shopping about the middle of the week.
    There seems to be considerable travel over the road between Medford and Butte Falls and Prospect, as it is not an uncommon thing for the stage to have three and sometimes five passengers on the way to different points above either Lake Creek or Trail, Derby or Butte Falls, and it is getting quite often that there will be as many come out. For instance, last Tuesday there were five ladies came out on the stage, one of them stopping here and starting right off as soon as she could toward Geo. Brown and Sons store and one Mrs. McDaniel, hostess of the Elks resort on Rogue River, changed stages and went up home on the Eagle Point-Persist stage and three went on up to Butte Falls and the same day there was a man and two ladies and two children came out from Butte Falls or Prospect, stopped here for dinner and went on out to Medford.
    Mrs. W. L. Childreth, the wife of our blacksmith, who has been visiting friends and relatives in Medford for a few days, has returned to her home.
    I omitted to state in my last letter that Rev. J. E. Day and wife of Butte Falls came out Monday on their way to Medford, and as she was getting out of the hack that brought her from her home to Derby to take passage on the auto stage she made a misstep and fell, hurting her wrist, and at first fears were entertained that her wrist was broken. Frank Neil, who lives near where the stage changes from the auto to the hack, was just starting away and seeing the accident turned back to his home and procured some cotton, arnica and a splint, dressed the wound and they came on out here for dinner and went on to Medford. On consulting a surgeon, he decided that one bone of the wrist was cracked and reduced the fracture, if there was one, and they both came out to the Sunnyside Wednesday afternoon, spent the night and had George Albert come out Thursday morning with his railroad motor and take them home. Mrs. Day complained but very little, as she seemed to suffer but very little on account of the accident. This is the second time that they have been here during the past few months on account of a broken bone. The other time Mrs. Day had a broken or dislocated shoulder, caused by a fall. Mrs. Day is quite heavy and advanced somewhat in years and not so spry as she was when younger.
    Mrs. H. E. Campbell, the wife of our banker, and Mrs. C. L. Parker of Berkeley, California, called in for dinner Wednesday. Mr. Parker, her husband, was here for a few days visiting Mr. and Mrs. Campbell a short time ago and Mr. Parker gave such a pleasant account of our town and its surroundings that she concluded to come up and see it for herself.
    There was quite a stir in the railroad circle of Eagle Point about midweek when the new locomotive and a train of eighteen flat cars and a box car came out over the road and passed on up onto the desert. The engines used heretofore on the track have been small compared to this one, it weighing sixty-two tons empty, and seeing one so large made us begin to think that there was something going to happen in Eagle Point yet. I understand that Mr. Olds, Mr. Buhrman and Mr. Brownlee came out on the train. They only took it up the hill onto the desert, I understand, to test its capacity for service and returned to Medford the same day.
    Mrs. Lyle Carlton, nee Nellie Coy, our accommodating post office clerk for a long time before her marriage to Lyle Carlton, was a business caller Wednesday.
    E. V. Brittsan and his brother, J. A. Brittsan, made a business trip to Medford Wednesday and stopped here on the way home to do business with T. J. McPherson, our new merchant in the T. E. Nichols store.
    Horace Geppert of Butte Falls, who had been out to Medford on business, came out and spent the night at the Sunnyside, going on up home on the George Albert motor car Thursday.
    Mrs. W. T. Clark and baby of Weed, Calif., came in Thursday morning on the stage and were met by her father Mr. A. L. Young and a younger sister and taken out to the Frank Rhodes farm. Mr. Young is operating the farm this season.
    Mr. W. G. Knighton and Cliff Hickson made a business trip to Medford Thursday.
    John Laton and Mike Spencer and three ladies with two children and a strange man were here for dinner Thursday. The ladies and children came out on the Butte Falls stage.
    Ira Tungate, Mrs. Barker and her two children of Butte Falls came out on the stage Friday and went from here to their home on the G. Albert motor car.
    In making my rounds Friday morning in search for something to write up for the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune, I met K. T. Matthews, a salesman of Del Monte can goods, and Mr. Apika Hanson of Medford in the old Nichols store, now under the management of F. J. McPherson and I noticed that he gave them quite an order before they left. They claim that business is looking up in our part of the country.
    H. E. Armstrong, livestock inspector, was here for dinner. While here he inspected our little bunch of sheep and pronounced them all OK. W. C. Pool was also here trading and so was Charles Mathews.
    The latest sensation was this Saturday morning when I started on my rounds. I saw a group of men standing in front of Lewis' store and on arrival learned that the store had been burglarized the night before and $3 in cash and $25 or $30 worth of cigarettes and canned goods taken. The thieves had cut a hole through the back door large enough for a hand to be put through and the spring lock sprung so as to open without any trouble. It is supposed that it is the same gang who have been doing the store breaking and other work in that line in Central Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1922, page 4


ELK CREEK
    Fred Sturgis made a trip to Medford [on] horseback.
    Miss Frances Greb return to her home at Eagle Point Friday, March 31. She went on horseback.
    We are going to have a school program Friday, April
7. Miss Burr will show slides.
    Mrs. L. A. Whitley visited her mother-in-law at Persist this week. She combined business with pleasure.
    Ezra Whitley was a Medford visitor last week. He also visited the following points: Eagle Point, Ashland, Jacksonville and Central Point.
    L. A. Whitley hauled a load of hay from the valley last week. He had to go that far, as the hay up this way is almost gone.
    George Trusty hauled grain from Trail Friday.
    Inez Willits visited Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence Wednesday.
    George Hall visited Medford last week. He walked part of the way.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1922, page 4


ASK FOR BIDS ON FOREST ROAD TRAIL-PROSPECT
    Sealed proposals for constructing the Trail-Prospect National Forest road project located adjacent to Crater National Forest, state of Oregon, county of Jackson, will be received by the district engineer, Bureau of Public Roads, U.S. Department of Agriculture, at Portland, Oregon, until 10 o'clock a.m. on the 20th day of April, 1922, at which time and place they will be publicly opened and read. The right is reserved to reject any and all bids, and none will be considered except those from contractors ascertained to be experienced and responsible.
    The length of the project to be constructed is approximately 13.6 miles.
    The work embraced in this contract shall be completed within 120 weather working days following the execution of the contract by the Secretary of Agriculture.
    The contract form and maps, plans, specifications and estimates of quantities may be examined by responsible contractors at room 316 Post Office Building, Portland, Oregon and at the office of the forest supervisor at Medford, Oregon.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1922, page 3


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Two houses on the range near Brownsboro have been broken into and quite a bit of damage done. At present neither house is occupied. One house was on Mrs. Belford's homestead. She is at present in Florida for the winter months. The front door was completely smashed in and had been pried open with a heavy timber. Window lights were broken.
    Blood was on the floors and furniture. Some of the local people think that a hunter or trapper might have spent the night here and the blood was from some dead animal.
    The Thomas homestead was also broken into and a great deal of damage done. Some of the outbuildings were knocked down. There was a small chicken house which was dragged away from the house.
    Some people are of the opinion that some of the cattle men who are opposed to sheep on the range might have done the damage.
    Mr. Anderson is now living in the Thomas house and is ranging five hundred head of sheep on this range. Heretofore the Butte Creek range has not been grazed by anything but cattle except when Mr. Phipps ran about a thousand head on the same range a few years ago. Objections to sheep in this district seem to be very strong.
    Lewis Walch and wife visited the latter's parents Saturday.
    Carl Stanley, who has been in Eagle Point, returned home Saturday.
    We had a surprise birthday party last Friday, March 31. It was on the children whose birthdays are in March. They were Gladys and Robert Cowden, Donald Bieberstedt and George Hoagland.
    Miss Velda Monia returned to Butte Falls Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nygren were up to the Brownsboro Butte Sunday looking for some cattle.
    Clarence Cann was riding for Roy Stanley last week.
    Miss La Verne Brown returned to Butte Falls last week.
    The teachers institute will be held here April 8 as before announced and everyone interested is invited. Keep the date in mind.
    R. E. Tucker and William Staub made a business trip to Medford Saturday.
    Walter Marshall made a business trip to Medford Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Karberg and Mrs. May Underwood were visitors at the Maxfield home Saturday.
    Walter Ratcliffe was a visitor at the Maxfield home Sunday.
    Walter Marshall and family went to Eagle Point Saturday.
    Miss Mildred Tucker went to Eagle Point Saturday.
    Miss Pool will hold an all-day sewing school here Wednesday, April 11. Watch the paper for the details of the meeting.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 5, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last letter for the readers of the Mail Tribune I omitted to tell of the wonderful improvements that have been made in our town park. The Ladies' Civic Improvement Club donated quite a sum toward the cause and some of the patriotic citizens also donated work and cash and the work is being superintended by our street commissioner, with the result that now our town park begins to look as though there were others besides "old hayseeds" among us, for it is quite well covered with a fine selection of ornamental trees neatly planted, and many of the river boulders that were scattered over the surface have been wheeled together and arranged so as to enclose the trees and shrubbery so that it looks very attractive, and being situated along the bank of our beautiful Little Butte Creek and on the other side by the boulevard, and that connected with the Crater Lake Highway will attract the attention of the tourists as they are on their way to and from Crater Lake and also be right in line for those going and coming from the different soda springs that are becoming pleasure resorts during the summer and fall seasons.
    Mrs. Hessler, Mrs. George Brown and Miss Monia, all of Brownsboro, were among the visitors last Saturday. Miss Monia and another young lady started on the stage for Butte Falls to resume their studies in the high school.
    Herman Meyer and wife of Lake Creek and Herman Meyer, Jr., passed through here Saturday with two cars, each having dressed hogs and veal for the Medford market.
    J. F. Brown is having quite a lot of improving done on his residence, he having the house repainted inside and out and new floors laid. He is doing the carpenter work himself, as that is or rather was in his line of business, but now is a member of the mercantile firm of George Brown & Sons.
    There were four passengers on the Butte Falls stage Saturday going to Butte Falls.
    Saturday afternoon there was a company composed of Mr. and Mrs. Hagen, Mrs. Hagen's mother, Mrs. Kanoff, and four or five children passed through here on their way to beyond Butte Falls with two-horse teams and a one-horse buggy leaving here about 5 o'clock and Mrs. Hagen was carrying a babe only three weeks old and no shelter and the weather cold and damp. The next I heard of them they were trying to pull up Rocky Hill about 14 miles from here, Tuesday, a part of four days, and it raining a good part of the time up there. Mrs. Kanoff is a woman sixty years of age and has a homestead four miles beyond Butte Falls and had been up a few days before, walked out to her homestead where she had left plenty of provisions and horse feed, but when she reached there found that the house had been broken open, the grub all taken and the horse feed left exposed to the rats and mice and that about destroyed, so had to walk back to Butte Falls, spend the night and the next day here and two of her children walked out to Talent. That experience tells something of the hardships the homesteaders have to undergo out in the hills. Mr. and Mrs. Hagen are from San Francisco and Mrs. Hagen has been a magazine and movie writer, quite an experience from city life to homesteading in the Butte Falls mountains.
    Mr. W. Burg and daughter, who are on the old Caton Place near Rogue River about six miles above here, were here trading and having his team shod Saturday.
    The Stanley Bros. brought in quite a bunch of mixed cattle Saturday. There were quite a number of young calves among them and they all looked fine.
    Messrs. Ralph Tucker and Staub of Brownsboro were among the business callers Saturday. Mr. Staub is the present mail carrier on the Lake Creek route but he has arranged with Mr. Van Dyke to fill the contract for the rest of the time till June 30th.
    Alex Vestal of Reese Creek and Clarence Robinett and wife of Medford also came in to visit Mr. Robinett's mother, Mrs. W. L. Childreth and family, and Mrs. Robinett's father and her stepmother, Mr. and Mrs. William Perry.
    W. L. Hurst and son, who went down to the oil fields near Bakersfield, Cal. a short time ago, have returned and report that times are good and plenty of work, also plenty of men to do it.
    Sunday was a passably pleasant day and there was a good attendance at the Sunday school. We had no preaching, as the pastor, H. G. Adams, was holding services in Butte Falls but expects to hold services here both morning and at night next Sunday, April 9th, and the following Sunday, April 14. Easter Sunday there will be a union Sunday school service, as the Reese Creek and Brownsboro schools have been invited to meet with us and have a picnic dinner.
    Among the guests here for dinner Sunday, not counting those of our town who came in for dinner, were H. A. Van Scoyoc, Vera Van Scoyoc, Margaret Van Scoyoc, of Medford, Isabella Wattenbarger, Ashland, Mrs. W. E. Tumy, Mrs. Vilas and son Edward Vilas of the Vilas Ranch on the Eagle Point-Medford Road via the old Big Sticky Road, Carlyle Natwick of Butte Falls and Miss Ruth Nichols.
    Mrs. Vilas and her son were on their way to Wellen to visit the von der Hellen families and came by here for their dinner.
    Earl H. York, of the force in the distributing department in the Medford post office, came in Monday to spend a few days recovering his health. He had an attack of the flu and is taking a week's vacation.
    E. A. Hildreth of Butte Falls came in Monday for dinner, left his horse with Sam H. Harnish, went out on the stage to Jacksonville via Medford to procure the assessor's books, etc., to assess his district, returned this Wednesday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and started assessing along the foothills via Reese Creek.
    E. T. Hoefft of Butte Falls came out on Saturday's stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on out to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 7, 1922, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Gus Pech of Lake Creek, A. Wines, the coal and petroleum prospector of Medford and Chris Beale of Butte Falls, who has been out to Jacksonville as a juryman, were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning. Mr. Beale has been engaged carrying the mail from Butte Falls to Derby, meeting the auto there and exchanging the mail, he taking the mail back to Butte Falls by team.
    G. W. Averill, who is living on his homestead on Round Top, came out Tuesday, spent the night at the Sunnyside, went on to Medford, returning Thursday evening and Friday morning went up home with his load. A. H. Dougherty, representing Rawleigh's Remedies, was with us Wednesday night.
    J. C. Herring, the deputy assessor, was also here for dinner.
    Mr. L. H. Swink of Butte Falls, who had been out to Medford or Jacksonville on business, was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner, and so did J. W. King and G. M. Lowe of Foster and Kleiser Advertising Co. He was posting new bills on the bulletin boards.
    "Bum" Neuber of Jacksonville was a passenger on the stage. He had been up in the timber belt for several days, looking over the situation, and stopped here for dinner on his way home. He reports a lot of snow a few miles back of Butte Falls.
    Wm. von der Hellen and wife and two of her brothers, A. J. and Judge Florey, were also here for dinner Thursday. Mrs. Florey has been stopping in Medford the most of the time during the winter and sending her son and daughter to the high school, while William spends part of his time here and in Medford and the rest looking after his contracts.
    John Norris and Mr. Swink were among the passengers coming out from Medford Thursday and there were three strangers also among them.
    Alex Betz, George Holmes and wife and four strangers were among the diners putting in the posts on the Crater Lake Highway between the Agate station and the Cingcade Hill and reports that everything is ready for the fencing wire. Mr. Holmes is our garage man and Mrs. Holmes is the principal of our school.
    I have noticed that there has been an auto standing in front of our school house the last three days and my curiosity led me to make inquiry as to why it was there, who were the persons that were coming and going in it, etc., and the principal gave me the following information: The Misses Leavell and Myrtle Nordwick, who are students in the Medford high school, have been observing in our school Wednesday, Thursday and Friday. She did not explain the object they had in view, but we infer that they are preparing themselves to teach and have adopted that plan to procure some idea of the different ways with the different teachers of imparting instruction in the different schools and summing them all up and then selecting what they consider the best and using them singly or combining two or more and using them.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Murphy of Wellen, Guy Pruett and his mother, M. L. Pruett, and Harry von der Hellen of Wellen were among the business callers Thursday.
    Geo. W. Averill, when on his return trip from Medford, spent the night at the Sunnyside and informed me that when I spoke of his wife being out in the valley and having some dental work done, that I made a mistake and stated that she had it done in Ashland, when she stopped in Medford and had it done.
    C. H. Natwick and his son, Carlyle, were also guests Thursday night at the Sunnyside, and Mr. Natwick, who has a contract for grading a short distance on the extension of the P.&E. Railroad, reports that he expects to finish his job in a week or more.
    Russell Harris of Central Point came out Thursday evening and engaged board and room at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Albright of Trail was one of four passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and she went on up home on the Trail stage.
    We have had another change in real estate, John Daley having disposed of his land joining town to his cousin, Linn Daley of Medford.
    Mrs. J. Hodson and two children of Rushmore, Minn., came in Friday, took dinner and went on to Butte Falls. She is on a visiting tour via Los Angeles, where she visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. William Spencer, one of the pioneer settlers of the "unsurveyed country" northeast of Butte Falls, and is going up to Albany, Portland, etc., on her return trip home.
    John Rader, one of our leading stock men, was doing business here Friday.
    Professor C. L. Ward of the high school, Butte Falls, and H. P. Rasmussen and Isadore Einstein, special prohibition agents from Washington, D.C., came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday, ate dinner and went on to Medford.
    Mrs. Horn, one of the Butte Falls teachers, came here Friday and was met by her husband and went on to Medford.
    Sam Williamson of Talent came in and spent the night, Friday, and so did Adin Haselton, who has been working on the P.&E. extension for C. H. Natwick.
    Mrs. Sarah Guerin, a sister of the Brown brothers, and Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy of San Francisco is here visiting her relatives.
    There was another case or rather two cases of housebreaking and burglary in our little town Friday night.
    Ashpole & Nichols' hardware store and Geo. Brown and Sons' general merchandise store were broken open and robbed. Ashpole and Nichols' was opened through the back door and but little taken, a few knives and some cheap watches and no damage was done, but the Browns did not fare so well, for there was hundreds of dollars' worth of goods taken off the shelves and thrown on the floor, hats loose and in boxes, shirts, coats, underwear, shoes, groceries, etc. and they even emptied sacks of stuff out on the floor and walked over everything in their sock feet and not satisfied with that, threw water on the goods. They tried the safes in both stores but did not succeed in opening either of them. Frank Brown, one of the firm, estimates that the loss will amount to at least five hundred dollars. Our sheriff, C. Terrill and deputy sheriff, S. Forncrook and a fingerprint detective, Mr. R. B. Markland of Los Angeles, came out but did not tell anything. They all took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Mr. Twinbow and his son, George, and Mr. David Wicks. Mr. Twinbow is the foreman of the section gang repairing the P.&E. railroad and thinks that he will have it patched up in two weeks' more time.
    Mr. W. P. Hawk, who is operating a sawmill about four miles from Butte Falls and Mr. S. T. Maefa were among the passengers to Butte Falls and Rob Harnish also went with them.
    Amos Young and wife, recently from Prospect, were trading here this Saturday morning and so was Harry Hawse and wife. He says that he has bought the Stiles Bros. sawmill and is moving it lower down the creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1922, page 10


ELK CREEK
    Our program, which was held at the Elk Creek schoolhouse Friday the 7th, was a complete success. About 55 persons were in attendance. We did not expect that number as it was storming off and on during the day. The program consisted of a few songs, recitations and three dialogues. After the program Miss Burr showed slides on Oregon scenery, which was interesting as the slides were colored and looked real. She also gave a lecture on each slide.
    The last event of the evening (or morning) was a basket supper which was enjoyed by all.
    A few were unfortunate enough to arrive at the end of the program, as the rain delayed them. But were on time to see the slides and help eat the goodies.
    Dave Pence made a trip to Medford last week. His conveyance was a team and wagon. He also visited Trail during the latter part of the week.
    P. S. Sandoz visited Medford last week.
    Mrs. Deliah Wagner and children Daisy and Elbert visited Mrs. P. E. Sandoz, Sunday the 9th.
    Mr. Fred Sturgis hauled a load of baled hay from Trail Monday the 10th.
    Mrs. Deliah Wagner visited Mrs. J. M. Miller Monday.
    Miss Burr was a guest of Mrs. Dave Pence Saturday.
    Remember that the Trail meet will be held at Trail Saturday the 15th. Everyone try and come.
    Some people along the creek are planting their spring gardens.
    Hazel Pence entertained a few guests Saturday and Sunday, 8-9.
    L. A. Whitley has been sowing alfalfa.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 14, 1922, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    There was a dance at the Hoskin home Saturday night and was enjoyed by a large crowd.
    Mr. and Mrs. Claude Moore of Elk Creek were Medford visitors Monday.
    Enid Middlebusher is visiting with friends and relatives near Prospect this week.
    We are glad to report our teacher, Mrs. Tucker, much improved and expect to have school going again in a few days.
    Mr. McConnie and Mr. James of Seattle and Mr. Reynolds of Medford are in our vicinity looking after mining interests.
    Hoyt Smith and R. Yocum came out from Medford Monday and went on to Prospect Tuesday.
    Claude Ragsdale is hauling wood these wintry days. Guess people will need wood all summer this year.
    Mr. Pritchett and family are enjoying a visit with the former's brother from Nebraska.
    Mrs. S. E. Albright returned to Medford Tuesday after a few days' visit at her home near Trail.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 15, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Mamie Brown, a daughter of M. S. Wood, arrived last week from Los Angeles, Calif., to visit her father and stepmother.
    Another one of our popular young ladies, Miss Ruth Nichols, has made the hazardous step and joined in wedlock with one of our Eagle Point boys, Carlyle Natwick, in matrimony last Friday. They were so still about being married that but very few knew of the event, or even where they were married or who solemnized the marriage. I understand that they are spending their honeymoon in Portland. Their friends here are waiting to congratulate them.
    The Ladies' Civic Club will meet at the home of Leroy and Rosa Smith on Thursday, April 13th, and begin in earnest to make different kinds of things to put on the market at the bazaar on primary election day, May 13.
    Mr. F. W. Reid and family started last Sunday for Portland to visit friends and attend to business affairs.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our prominent farmers and orchardists, was doing business with our merchants Saturday.
    The school boys have organized a club and are turning their attention to raising different kinds of animals. Heath Childreth is trying his hand at raising purebred pigs. Ralph Herst, thoroughbred chickens, and Rudolph Weidman, purebred Jersey heifer. They have agreed to go strictly according to instructions from the O.A.C., and the professors are to send the boys special instructions as to what to feed and how to feed. Everything is to be weighed or measured that they feed, even to weighing the milk and grain that is fed. That is a fine arrangement, as it teaches the children to be exact and methodical in not only that one thing, but in other acts of life. We wish the three boys whose names I have secured success in their undertaking, but will be glad to have each of them receive a handsome prize.
    Mrs. G. W. Harvey and four children came in Saturday night at a late hour from near Klamath Falls on foot. They had come as far as Medford on the train and started out from there with someone in a car but got bewildered on the way and found themselves at a large white house in the night. I did not learn whose house it was, but they could not get accommodation for the night, and was directed how to come to the Sunnyside, where they remained for the rest of the night, and after breakfast she tried to explain how she came in but all that she knew was that they came over the hill. There is a man boarding here, Loris Martin, who has a house rented and was sleeping in it; it belongs to George and Wm. Lewis, so he proposed to take his things out and let her have it, it being the only available house in town, so she moved into that. Knowing that they had no baggage with them, I met the largest boy and inquired how they managed to sleep and he said, "Oh, we all bunched up together and used our coats to wrap up." They want to get work.
    Henry Edwards of Idaho came in Saturday night and the next morning started for Butte Falls on foot as there is no stage on Sunday. Chas. Manning of Peyton also came in and spent the night, went out to Central Point, returned for dinner and went home the same day. Clarence Pruett was also a guest Saturday night.
    Among the guests Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Drew of the California-Oregon Power Co., L. M. Carr, Olive Hay, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs of the Hub Shoe Store, Medford and Mrs. G. A. Fields, Medford.
    Mr. R. D. Watson and Florence Adamson of Trail were business callers Monday morning. Mr. Watson is the husband of the noted candy manufacturer, and when I asked him if Mrs. Watson had not been engaged in the business a few years ago, replied that she had, and was talking of going into the business again. She gave up the business so they could locate on a homestead up in the Trail country.
    Mr. Ervin McCall, one of the pioneers of Prospect, having lived there for about thirty-five years, and says that he expects to live there as long as he lives anywhere on this earth, came out on the stage Monday, ate dinner at the Sunnyside, went on to Medford, the same day, returned today, Wednesday, and went on up home. While here he met Mr. Wm. G. Knighton, another one of the venerable pioneers, who was at one time a near neighbor, or lived in the same range of country in an early day, a few miles distance between neighbors did not amount to much, so they could get together and take a hunt or meet at the social gatherings. They were neighbors and they had a very pleasant visit together while the stage driver was arranging his mail and lashing on his parcel post and baggage for he had three or four passengers and their baggage, and with only a Ford car--for that is about the only car he can use now between here and Derby. It takes close packing to get it all on and he often has to leave passengers on account of the horrible condition of the roads. In addition to Mr. McCall being here for dinner, we had three others here for dinner.
    We have had another big cattle deal in this section. The Stanley brothers, all except Harvey, and he was not in the company, have disposed of their band of cattle, fifteen hundred head to one of the Dixon brothers of Fort Klamath. I did not learn the price per head or conditions of the sale.
    Mrs. Wm. Burg and her son, who live about six miles from here, near the Crater Lake Highway, was doing a lot of trading with George Brown and sons Saturday. I also met Mr. Moore, the man who had the tools and radiator stolen off of his car some little time ago. He was getting supplies for the culinary department of the P.&E. Railroad camp near Derby. I understand that he is the cook at that camp.
    Mrs. F. J. McPherson, the wife of our new manager of the T. E. Nichols store, went to Portland the first of the week to attend to business affairs. Her sister, Mrs. Benjamin Brophy, was a business caller Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Compton of Wenatchee, Washington, came in Monday afternoon from Los Angeles, Calif. to spend a few days gathering agates. They had been spending the winter in Los Angeles and are on their way home. About the same time C. B. Ryckman of Newport, Ore., and James Corscut of Albany, Ore., came in to spend a few days in the agate fields and about the same time Charles E. Hart an agate cutter and manufacturer of jewelry of Newport, Ore., came in and they are all here at this date, Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Curtis and Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Clark and their families spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Glen L. Terrill, son of our sheriff, was also here for supper. He was on his way up to his father's ranch just above Brownsboro.
    Remember that this Sunday is Easter and that there will be union services and picnic dinner. Sunday school meets at 1:30  p.m. After Sunday school a short address by the superintendent, H. E. Campbell, and followed by a short address by Rev. Mr. King the Sunday school evangelist.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 15, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the business callers Tuesday were one of our staunch farmers and stockmen, John Rader, and he brought in some of his homemade side bacon for the new manager, F. J. McPherson, at the F. E. Nichols store.
    Walter Allen, son of another one of our prominent stock men of Derby, came in with one of his father's mammoth teams to have them shod, and in speaking of the team the subject came up as to the value of the horses and six hundred dollars was mentioned as a fair price and Mr. Childreth, the man who shod them, remarked that he did not suppose that Mr. Allen would take even that price. He has been devoting his time and attention to raising good stock, both cattle and horses, and the result is he has some of the best horses and cattle in the country if not in the state, and the span referred to is only a small part of them. Mr. L. K. Hawk, another one of our prominent farmers and orchardists, who also turns his attention to the dairy business and keeps some of the best dairy cows in the country, was a business caller Tuesday.
    J. M. Conley and E. J. Clark of Butte Falls, and Mrs. J. Hodson and H. A. Haygood were among the diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    Dick Vaughn and his son Ray and wife and baby of Peyton called for a few moments at the Sunnyside but did not stop for dinner as they were trying to meet someone en route.
    Mrs. Steve Rumble of Macdoel, Cal., and Messrs. Selhony, Malaki and Thomas Brocks spent Tuesday night here on their way up near Brownsboro to look after a homestead that Mr. Brocks located some years ago. After spending the night here they went on up on the Lake Creek stage.
    Charles Humphrey of Derby, one of the rustling farmers and stock men of that region who has been hauling hay up home to save his stock, was here for dinner Wednesday.
    J. O'Brian and daughter Mrs. Albert Jack of Butte Falls, Mr. Al Schmidt representing J. E. Haselton & Co., of Portland, and two strangers whose names I failed to procure were also here for dinner Wednesday.
    Thomas Riley and his sister, Mrs. J. C. Hayes of Gold Beach, Ore., were business callers.
    Charley Cingcade, one of our prominent farmers and stockmen who has been afflicted with rheumatism for some time was a business caller Wednesday. And so were Mrs. Jasper Hannah and Mrs. J. F. Mathews of Debenger Gap, and while here handed me the following item: Mrs. Jasper Hannah and son Master Everett and daughter, Mrs. Ralph Haskins and two friends, Mrs. J. F. Mathews and daughter Miss Lillian Cottrell were visiting their friends, Mr. and Mrs. Florence Ferguson of the C. F. Rhodes ranch, Wednesday, April 12.
    I also received the following: Wednesday evening, April 12th, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols were agreeably surprised by fifteen of their friends coming in for the evening. Cards, music and dancing were enjoyed by all. Refreshments were served at midnight and soon all departed having had a very enjoyable time and all hoping to participate in many more such evenings. Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs. Thos. F. Nichols, Miss Beth Farlow of Lake Creek, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley, H. S. Dixon of Fort Klamath, Mr. and Mrs. George Nichols and Miss Lee Halley of Medford, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brown, Lloyd Stanley, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols, mine host and hostess and daughter Miss Muriel. Before leaving the subject your Eagle Point correspondent wishes to thank the parties who furnished the two items for the Eaglets and express my appreciation of such favors.
    Henry French and his son Lloyd were doing business with our merchants Thursday, which was the first time that I have seen them for a long time, and when the subject was mentioned Henry said the roads were so bad that they could not get out via Eagle Point, so crossed on the Dodge-French bridge and went to Medford to do their trading.
    Sam Courtney was in town Thursday and reports that in addition to having his car stripped of everything that was loose, that W. E. Hammel and John Caster and Marshall Minter were treated in the same way. It appears that they all four, living as they do off the Crater Lake Highway and the road from their homes being so soft that they could not run their cars from home to the Crater Lake Highway, concluded to leave them parked along the thoroughfare, not thinking of anyone molesting them, but they found out to their sorrow that it is not a good place to leave valuables.
    I met J. W. Berrian Thursday just as he was getting into his car going to the fish trap on Butte Creek, and he excused himself for rushing off as he was going to get a lot of fish eggs to send them up to the Butte Falls hatchery by the railroad truck in charge of Mr. Cox, the head foreman of the construction work on the P.&E.R.R. Mr. Berrian said that he would reach the million mark soon.
    Mr. Cox reports that they are getting along very well with the work of repairing the road, that the new locomotive went over it all right with quite a train of cars, and if I remember right, eight loaded cars and three empty cars.
    Wert Pool, one of our farmers, was here having some new parts put on his plow.
    Mr. Coleman of Climax was here Thursday trading with our new merchant, F. J. McPherson in the old T. E. Nichols store.
    Fred Pettegrew had his fine thoroughbred stallion out here Thursday having him shod. He says that he is waiting for the weather to settle before he starts to make his regular rounds.
    M. E. Hess of Fort Klamath was here for dinner Thursday. I understand that he is in the cattle business and that there is a very great scarcity of cattle in the Klamath country as the cattlemen have been selling off their young calves for veal in the California market.
    H. L. Moore, recently from Wisconsin, came in from Medford on horseback and spent the night and started on the next morning for Butte Falls. He not being used to horseback riding and not used to our cowboy saddles complained of being very sore; said the saddle held him like a vise.
    Minor Jones of Butte Falls came out on the stage Thursday, took dinner and went on to Medford.
    Charles Dexter of Lake Creek was a business caller Thursday.
    Mrs. Flora Kanoff, the sixty-year-old lady mentioned in a former letter as having such a time going from here to Butte Falls, and her granddaughter came out on the stage Friday morning, but owing to the load of mail, parcel post and baggage they decided to go up on the railroad motor. Miss Alice Humphrey of Derby was also a passenger on the stage going up home, and two strange men.
    D. R. Patrick has gone to Benj. Brophy's ranch to do some work for him as he has finished his job on the post office building.
    Alex Vestal came out Friday to do some trading and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Rolland Conley has been hauling a lot of hay up to the sawmill on his place near Butte Falls and that makes the roads still worse than they were.
    T. T. Taylor, who is in charge of Marsh Garrett's stock ranch on Lake Creek, came out and made a trip to Medford Friday.
    Word came in this Saturday morning that Harvey Smith died last night at the home of his brother, Corbett Smith, near Butte Falls. Further mention later.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1922, page 4


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Mr. and Mrs. Tom Stanley went to their home near Rancheria Sunday. They have been at Eagle Point during the winter.
    The Fish Lake Ditch Co. have put a double shift or night and day crew on the steam shovel.
    Yantz Marshall and family visited the former's son Walter Marshall Saturday.
    Mrs. Ed Cowden made a business trip to Eagle Point Monday.
    The Stanley Bros. have sold their butcher shop, the City Meat Market, at Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Hansen, Jr. and family were visitors at Walter Marshall's home Sunday.
    L. D. Tucker made a trip to Medford Wednesday.
    R. E. Tucker sold some dairy cows to Mr. Valentine Wednesday.
    Ralph Bieberstedt made a business trip to Medford Monday.
    Miss Frances Greb, who is teaching at Persist, spent the weekend at her home in Eagle Point.
    Carl Dressack and friend from San Francisco is here visiting friends and while here is looking after his homestead.
    Mr. Monia, while doing his chores, heard a coyote nearby and upon looking he discovered one chasing the sheep. He got his gun and killed the animal.
    The Brownsboro and Butte Creek schools gave an Arbor Day program Friday. There was a large crowd and after the program Miss Homes, the county superintendent, talked to the patrons about consolidation of rural schools.
    Lloyd Stanley, who has been in Klamath Falls, has returned home.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1922, page 7


COMMUNITY SING AT ELK CREEK IS PLEASANT AFFAIR
    ELK CREEK, April 19.--The field meet at Trail which was to be held April 15 was about a failure on account of the bad weather. But Mrs. Ash kindly loaned the hall to the public. Miss Holmes called a meeting which all attended. The first number was community singing. Then Mr. Wood, who agreed to take charge of the events, gave a lecture on "The Work and Health of Others." Mr. Wood is secretary of the Y.M.C.A. of Medford. We all enjoyed his speech, as he added a touch of humor once in a while.
    After Mr. Wood's' speech we had a basket dinner which was enjoyed by all.
    In the afternoon Mr. Wood instructed the pupils of the different schools on how to get a good start in foot races. Then all played volleyball.
    While the volleyball game was proceeding Miss Holmes called a council to discuss and decide various subjects. One was to postpone the track events until May 13 to be held at Prospect. It is rumored that a citizen of said vicinity will give prizes to the winners, besides the regular prizes offered by the county. So we hope that everyone possible will be there to witness the fun and take part in the afternoon games. A basket dinner as usual.
    Miss Faldine, the county nurse, examined the pupils of this district Mar. 17. Conditions in the school are fairly good. We are going to have our drinking water tested, which comes from Elk Creek.
    Fred Sturgis has been hauling hay. He secures it from the valley.
    Hazel Pence was the guest of Gladys McDonald Saturday, April 15.
    Lee Whitley visited his mother, Mrs. F. A. Whitley, March 17. He also secured some berry roots from Mrs. Fred Sturgis and Harvey Morgan.
    A high school has been prepared at Prospect and all districts that want to join may do so. We hope it will be a success as there will be plenty of children to attend from the outlying districts. The results will be known at the meeting to be held in the near future.
    Those who attended the Trail meet Saturday the 15th were: Miss Willits, chairman of the council; Miss Greb, teacher in Persist District; Elmer Ivey and Hazel Pence, pupils of Elk Creek School.
    Dave Pence, the chairman, visited Elk Creek school Friday the 14th. He also witnessed a ciphering match, with Hazel Pence the victor.
    Miss Inez Willits enjoyed a visit at the Dave Pence place Tuesday the 18th.
    Some person was mean enough to steal some alfalfa hay from the Nelson cabin, which was stored there last summer. It didn't amount to much but was picked hay saved for a lot of little rabbits. This mean person should have his conscience prick him to show him right from wrong. The place was not broken into by cattle, as certain signs indicate different. The place is owned by L. A. Whitley.
    The weather seems to be changing with the moon as it is pure sunshine all day long.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Just received a note from my wife who is visiting our daughter in Portland in which she said that one of our old neighbors and at one time a student in our school, Robert Pelouze, had called on her while she was in Portland and had a very pleasant visit with him and how glad he was to meet some of the old Eagle Point friends. He sends his regards to his host of old Eagle Point admirers, for notwithstanding the fact that the Medford scribers for the Mail Tribune used to try to make it appear that he was a Medford boy because he was so bright and beat the champion swimmer in a contest when he was a mere boy in his teens, he always claimed Eagle Point as his home. He is now married and the head of a family of three, and his many friends here and elsewhere are glad to hear from him.
    J. W. Hovey, the superintendent of the Alta Vista Orchard and his nearest neighbor, R. A. Petty, were here on business Saturday.
    Mr. Muskopf, one of our enterprising citizens, was patching up the roof of our blacksmith shop Saturday and the next day was helping Rudolph A. Weidman put up some more wire fence. He seems to be able to turn his hand to almost anything to keep things moving.
    Thomas Cook, formerly of Eagle Point but now of Butte Falls, was a passenger on the stage for home, and Sam Oeser, one of the P.&E.R.R. men, was also a passenger on the stage for Derby.
    Lucius Kincaid and wife came out from Butte Falls on the Geo. Albert motor Saturday, took dinner and went on out to Medford to see Mrs. Kincaid's parents, returning Sunday morning and Mrs. Kincaid went on up to Dupray's mill to take charge of her school. Her husband remained until Tuesday.
    J. F. Johnson of Reese Creek was also a business caller Saturday.
    Easter Sunday was a passably fair day and the exercises were well attended, although there was not the general union of the schools that was anticipated as the Brownsboro school failed to unite with the Brownsboro and Eagle Point schools owing in part to the inclemency of the weather and bad roads, but there was a good attendance and the program was very good. The ladies with the assistance they could get from the men and boys had the church beautifully decorated and after the usual Sunday school exercises was followed by a short address by the pastor, Rev. H. G. Adams, he taking for his subject, "Life." This was followed by a bountiful lunch served by the ladies and it is not necessary to add that the only trouble with the lunch was that it was too good, taking in the thought of health and comfort immediately after, for there was more than one person felt like loosening their belt.
    The program: A short address by the superintendent, H. E. Campbell, and this was followed by an address by Rev. H. G. King, the Sunday school evangelist for the American S.S. Union. Song by Eagle Point school, song by four boys, "Easter Blossoms." Then we had a duet by Mrs. R. G. Brown and Mrs. R. A. Weidman. Recitation by Reese Creek school. This was followed by two recitations, one by the Reese Creek school and one by four boys. Then a recitation by Miss Lois Robinson, then another by the Reese Creek school, besides several short exercises by the Reese Creek Sunday school. A song, "Shout and Sing," and a quartet by H. E. Campbell, Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and Rev. H. G. Adams. This was followed by a few remarks by the superintendent and the benediction.
    It was universally agreed that the Easter exercises were a glowing success.
    When I reached home at the close of the morning services there were twenty-three seated at the dinner table and among them were several townsfolk, among them Mrs. R. G. Brown, Wm. H. Brown, wife and two of his sisters, Mrs. Sarah Guerin of Oakland, Calif., who is here visiting her brothers, Frank, William and R. G. Brown and her sisters, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. West and Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Hubbs, Medford, Mrs. Alina Boland, Miss M. E. Lemmon, Mr. I. B. Walther and S. M. Scott of Medford.
    The funeral of Harvey B. Smith, who died at the home of his brother Corbett near Butte Falls, took place at the Butte Falls cemetery Sunday afternoon and the services were conducted by Mr. Jones at the grave. Mr. Smith was 35 years old and leaves a wife and two children besides his father and several brothers and sisters. He has been in very poor health for the past several years.
    Mr. McDougal and A. J. Florey of Medford were among the diners at the Sunnyside Hotel Monday.
    There has been another change in the business management of the T. E. Nichols store. Something like a month ago I announced that F. J. McPherson had taken charge of the store; at that time he took it over with a view of purchasing the stock of goods provided the business proved to be such as would justify the move, and after a month's trial and at the end of the specified time Mr. McPherson decided that he would be justified in making the investment, so took over the stock of goods and entered into the entire management and control of the business on Monday, April 17. He tells me that he has already ordered a full line of groceries and dry goods.
    Mrs. Amos Ayres of Medford came out Monday morning on the Butte Falls stage and went up to Elk Creek to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trusty, on the Persist stage.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, who own a farm and orchard on the P.&E.R.R. on Reese Creek, were business callers Monday.
    A. L. Young and his son-in-law, L. V. Ferguson, were among the business callers Monday. They have leased the Frank Rhodes ranch for a term of five years and intend going into the dairy business on quite an extensive scale.
    Everett Culbertson of Lake Creek was trading with our merchants Monday.
    V. Johnson of Medford and George Smith of Derby, C. H. Natwick, the contractor on the Butte Falls extension of the P.&E.R.R. and A. E. Hildreth of Butte Falls, the deputy assessor who is assessing the stockmen north and east of here, were here Monday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday I took a stroll down into the lower end of our town to visit one of the old veterans of the Civil War and when I entered the house, who should I meet but one of his daughters, Mrs. Ora Henderson, who spent her girlhood days here but is now a resident of Portland. She had just come in to make her father and stepmother, and her own mother, Mrs. Susan Hart, a visit, also her sister Mrs. Mamie W. Brown of Los Angeles, who came up about a week before. While I was there Mr. Woods took me out to show me a large Poland China sow and her litter of eight pigs. She had thirteen at first, but five of them were killed by the mother lying on them and from other causes, but the eight that she had left were surely beauties. He said that he was going to push them along, feed them all that they could eat until fall and then take them to the county fair, the mother and all, to show what fine pigs can be raised in our section of the country. The sow is two years old and is almost as large as a yearling calf that has been well cared for. I also noticed three large piles of sand and fine gravel in front of his yard and inquired what he was going to do with that and he told me that he was going to have cement walks made back and in front of his house and have the place fixed up; that he and his wife are both getting old, he about 85 and his wife about 80, and that they intend to simply spend the rest of their lives in pleasure.
    Writing about pigs brings to my mind the item that V. E. Peterson, the mail carrier on the Eagle Point-Persist route, came out Tuesday with five fine Hampshire hogs from the McDonald ranch, taking them to a man living on the Jacksonville road, Mr. E. B. Fleming. They are beauties.
    G. W. Isbell, V. E. Peterson and G. M. Lowe were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Lowe is advertising agent for Foster and Kleiser advertisers.
    Charley Patton of Butte Falls came out Thursday evening on the stage, took supper and after supper went on to Medford to consult a doctor about a badly bruised, if not broken, finger. In working with a washing machine, he had his finger caught in the machinery with the result that the doctor thought that he might have a slivered bone. He came back and spent the night here, going back to Medford to see the doctor the next morning.
    George McDonald was in town on his way to Butte Falls to do some rock work for C. H. Natwick on the extension of the P.&E. Railroad last Wednesday. George W. Sanders, formerly foreman on the Antelope Orchard, but now on his own farm near the mouth of Big Butte, was also in town Wednesday.
    A. E. Hildreth, Sam Courtney and a man and a woman were here for dinner Wednesday. Mr. T. A. Whaley of Butte Falls came in the same afternoon, bringing his wife here for medical treatment as she is in poor health. They are both here at this writing. Mrs. Whaley seemed to improve in health as soon as she was comfortably fixed in bed.
    Mr. W. P. Morgan, who owns the old Pool Hotel property and about three acres of land beside in our town, is making some decided improvements in the line of fencing. And Mr. E. A. Denton, who bought the A. J. Daley house and land adjoining it, has been replacing the old fencing on his property.
    As I was looking around for something to write for the Medford Mail Tribune Wednesday, I discovered some stock in the pond, so going across the creek around by the old grist mill, I counted twelve head of cattle there of different marks and brands, that the "powers that be" had gathered, that had strayed inside of the little incorporation for that does not include all of the town, but the next morning noticed that there was none left and then learned that the marshal could get no hay to feed them so had to turn them out again. In one of my recent letters I spoke of Mr. D. R. Patrick putting some new rustic on one side of the post office and telephone building and building a very neat building that will be handy to use as a garage and a place where Mr. Clements can put his fixtures for his telephone, as well as making some very neat changes on the interior of the building and now Sam Courtney, assisted by E. A. Nuting, has covered the new as well as the old with a fine coat of paint, so that one hardly knows "where he is at," when he goes to get his Mail.
    Mrs. Marguerite Reter of Medford came out Wednesday afternoon with her sister, Mrs. Fay von der Hellen, to see some of her old friends and neighbors.
    Mr. Andrew Pool, Trail, one of the Forest Service men, was a business visitor Thursday morning and so was Wm. Coleman on his way up the country. There was a man and woman came into the hotel on business with one of our boarders Thursday noon but went on. They were headed for Butte Falls and were from Central California.
    Bert Clarno and brother, John Brittsan, Ivan Conover and wife and aunt, Mrs. Pukard of Stillwater, Ore., Mrs. Walter Wood and R. Conley of Butte Falls were among the business callers Thursday.
    A. G. Bishop, Wm. Holman, Lake Creek, Perry Foster, Mr. and Mrs. Mathews and Miss Lillian Cotteral were in town Thursday, and Perry Foster remained here for dinner, while Mr. and Mrs. Cotteral went on out to the Frank Rhodes ranch to visit Mr. Young and family.
    L. G. Polman, Butte Falls, and G. F. Little, Klamath Falls, and Mrs. J. F. Colas of Newberg, Ore., who was returning from a visit to her daughter, who is teaching in Butte Falls school, were here for dinner Thursday.
    H. Ditsworth of Medford and Miss Elizabeth Burr, rural school supervisor, were also here for dinner Friday. Miss Burr was on her way to Reese Creek school and was exhibiting some interesting and instructive pictures to the schools, as well as lecturing to the children.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 25, 1922, page 5


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Miss Della Hard, who has been in California and New Mexico for the last three years, is here visiting friends and relatives. She has spent the last three weeks at the Hanscom home in Eagle Point. She is looking after their homestead.
    Miss Faldine, the county nurse, visited school Tuesday and examined the pupils.
    Miss Burr visited the Brownsboro school Friday and talked about club work. Eldred Monia and Robert Cowden have taken up goat raising. Harold Dallas has taken up corn raising. A sewing class was also organized; those enrolled were Thelma Dallas, Ellen Tucker, Stella Adams, Mary Stanley and Viola Hoagland. These people are official members of the Boys' and Girls' Industrial Club.
    Mrs. J. Monia and son Vernon went to Medford last week.
    Mr. William Hoagland has gone to the Old Soldiers' Home in Roseburg to spend a few months.
    Mr. Carl Stanley made a business trip to Medford Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Earl Tucker made a business trip to Medford Saturday.
    Mr. Lester Smith, who has been attending the University of Oregon, came back last week. He is going into the Forest Service.
    Mr. Rader of Medford, who owns a ranch back of Earl Tucker's farm, brought some cattle out Sunday to put in his pasture.
    Dr. Barber called on Mr. Monia today. Mr. Monia has a serious case of flu.
    Miss Della Hard and Roy Hanscom were visitors at the Stanley home Saturday.
    Miss Kubli spent the weekend at her home on Applegate.
    Harvey Stanley went to Ranch Rea last week, where he will stay for a few weeks.
    Floyd Charley and Lee Bradshaw went to Eagle Point Sunday to separate some cattle.
    Mr. and Mrs. Geer and two children visited their old home now owned by Hoaglands. They were coming from California en route to Canada.
    Our pupils are gong to take part in the field meet at Talent Friday.
    Vida Bradshaw spent the weekend at her home in Brownsboro. Miss Bradshaw is teaching at Wagner Creek.
    Eleven of our children have earned their knight bannerette or gold pins in their health crusade work. All of the pupils have their first pins and several others are working for the gold pins.
    Ellen Tucker, Viola Hoagland and Harold Dallas have completed their Curtis practice work.
    Miss Kubli, who has taught here for the last year, has accepted a position in the Applegate school for next year. She says she has enjoyed her year here, but that she is taking the school at Applegate because it is her home.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Nygren and her mother, Mrs. Ralph Gardner of Lake Creek, were here trading with our merchants.
    Geo. McDonald, C. H. Natwick, C. A. Pickel, the electric meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Co., Chris Beale, the man who has been carrying the mail during the time of the winter schedule, three traveling salesmen and two strangers who came in on the Butte Falls stage were here for dinner Saturday.
    Sunday morning as the mail carrier from here to Medford and back (while we have a daily mail from here to Medford and back twice a day we have only one service each way from Eagle Point to Medford), as the car was coming in from Medford just before it reached the Crater Lake Highway, it took fire and the driver had all that he could do to save the mail from the flames. The car, a Cole, was completely consumed. It was partially insured. When W. G. Night [Knighton?] and A. J. Florey were going up the Cingcade Hill they discovered the smoke and hurried on up to see what it was and met the mail carrier with the lock sack on his shoulder, picked him up and went on to where the car was burned, took in the rest of the mail and brought it on to the post office. There was but very little damage done to the mail sacks, two of them being scorched a little. It was fortunate that it was on Sunday morning instead of Monday because the Sunday mail is always light on account of his not bringing out the mail for the other post offices: Butte Falls, Prospect, Trail, Derby (way mail), Persist, Brownsboro, Lake Creek, Wellen and Climax, beside the Eagle Point mail.
    When he has the mail for all of the post offices he has to lash it on often over the front part of the car and on each side with ropes and then packs the mail in the car often so that the passengers could not get out without moving it. We all feel sorry for him, for he has had a hard time getting through with the mail the past winter. He started on his summer schedule last Monday morning for the round trip of 100 miles and seemed to get along very well as he came into Eagle Point post office on time.
    Sunday morning broke upon us bright and clear and we had our regular Sunday school and preaching services with a very fair attendance.
    In the afternoon the Antelope baseball team came over and played a game with the Eagle Point ball team and took the word home with them that they came out second best with the score standing 18 to 7 in favor of Eagle Point.
    There were quite a number of people called for dinner at the Sunnyside. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Hissing and son Carroll of Medford, Miss Olive Calnest of Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Albert Moore, Medford, D. B. Churchill, Miss Grace Churchill, Sioux Falls, South Dakota, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Neff, Mrs. Nichols, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Pruett, Thomas F. Nichols and two children, C. H. Natwick, son Carlyle and wife and our postmaster, W. C. Clements.
    J. H. Carlton and his brother Lyle and Drake Walch of Wellen were also here taking part in the ball game
    Two of our regular boarders who have been with us for a long time left us Monday morning, Geo. H. Wehman and Loris Martin, Mr. Wehman to take charge of the bookkeeping department of the road work from Hole-in-the-Ground to Prospect, and Mr. Martin to have charge of the rock work on the same road for William von der Hellen, the subcontractor. Planey Leabo and F. A. Whaley went back to resume their jobs on the extension of the P.&E.R.R. Mr. Whaley came out with his sick wife from Butte Falls and stopped at the Sunnyside and remained here with her until Monday and as she was gaining so rapidly he thought that it would be safe to leave her in the care of her daughter, Miss Rosa, who has been assisting in the duties in the hotel. Dr. Holt of Medford was called in to see the patient. It appears that the principal trouble with her was the altitude of Butte Falls, as she commenced to improve as soon as she got here.
    Ed Cowden, Leroy Smith, Carl Stanley and Mrs. Fred Dutton were among the business callers on our merchants Monday.
    Wm. Perry, our efficient road supervisor, was in town and while here I had a short interview with him and learned that he is keeping teams on the roads all the time trying to put them in shape so as to be traveled. He spoke of a change to be made on the road between the Crater Lake Highway and the Dodge-French Bridge, a new survey from the bridge to go by the Fred Pettegrew place and thus avoid the Hog Creek Hill and a bad lot of sticky. He said that he did not know whether that piece of road would be built by the county or by contract but seemed to think that it would be a good change as it would be on so much better ground and but very little further.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton of Wellen was a business caller Monday.
    Alex Vestal and Geo. McDonald were here for dinner Monday.
    John Long of Derby came out with a team Tuesday and took back a load of hay and grain. He is planning to go to work on the county road in a short time. John Allen, the road supervisor for the Derby district, has a force of men with teams working on the roads trying to get them in shape so that people can travel them with some degree of safety. There are a few who are running over the Butte Falls-Eagle Point roads now but report that they are very rough, but the scraping that is being done on them is helping them, they say.
    We have had another change in real estate in our town, Wm. Green Knighton having sold his home place to John Rader, one of our leading stock men and farmers. They took formal possession Tuesday but do not expect to move onto the place until fall. We regret to have Mr. Knighton leave us but resign to the will of Him who does all things right. Since Mr. Knighton has lost his wife he has decided that it will be better for him to go and live with his grandchildren than to try to live alone, as he is now in his eighty-sixth year.
    A. J. Florey, who has had his wife in Medford, has moved back into his home again with their new baby.
    Miss June Hinman of Medford and A. G. Irish of Spokane were here for dinner Tuesday. They are working in the interest of the Earl Fruit Co.
    Rev. H. G. Adams will preach in Brownsboro on Sunday morning and in Eagle Point in the evening at 7:30.
    Warren Lammey, who has been working on the P.&E. Railroad extension, came out Tuesday. He is suffering with an attack of tonsillitis. His mother and younger brother have been living in the house known as the Robinett house.
    Mr. McKissic, the civil engineer who has charge of that line of work on the proposed canal from Big Butte, has moved into the J. F. Boltz house.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1922, page 12


ELK CREEK
    Geo. Hall and Earl Hutchinson were Trail visitors Sunday. George is still pegging away on his ditch.
    Fred Sturgis has hauled several loads of hay the past week for his stock.
    Gordon Miller brought his sister, Mrs. B. Sement, to see her mother, who resides on Elk Creek. They came in his Ford, which has been recently purchased.
    Inez Willits visited Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence Wednesday the 26th.
    The Elk Creek school has sent a sample of their drinking water which is obtained from Elk Creek to the State Board of Health.
    Mrs. P. E. Sandoz with a few of her boys went to Trail Saturday the 22nd.
    Mrs. Sandoz and Mrs. Wagner were visitors at the school last week.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 29, 1922, page 4


NEW SAWMILL ON INDIAN CREEK
    A new sawmill with a capacity of 10,000 board feet per day has been set up by Harry Hayes on Indian Creek, one mile from the Crater Lake Highway at a point just this side of the new concrete bridge over Rogue River near Trail. The mill is about 18 miles from this city.
    The timber in which the mill is situated is nearly all yellow pine, according to the owner Mr. Hayes, although there is some Douglas fir included in the timber surrounding the mill.
    The mill has just been set up and is now in running order. A small crew of men is at work at present and sawing of logs will begin tomorrow morning. As the work progresses Mr. Hayes intends to enlarge the number of men at work. The lumber will be brought to this city by truck and will also be for sale at the mill. The entire process, from the woods to the finished product, is being handled by Mr. Hayes, the logging and mill crews being under his direction.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 1, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Houston of Trail were among the business callers Wednesday morning on their way to Medford.
    J. D. Patrick, who has been doing some carpentering around town, was engaged Wednesday putting in some shelving in the residence of F. J. McPherson, making it more convenient for Mrs. McPherson, and now he is engaged putting in some flumes in a irrigating ditch on Thomas F. Nichols' farm on Rogue River a short distance below the Dodge-French bridge.
    Stanley G. Jewett of Portland and L. A. Jones of Medford were here for dinner Wednesday. Mr. Jewett is predatory animal inspector of the U.S. Biological Survey.
    Judge E. D. Briggs of Ashland, Ralph Cowgill of Central Point and V. H. Vawter of Medford were also here for dinner at the same time. They were out working in the interest of our soldier boys. J. D. Jones and son, M. J. Jones, F. A. Hill and H. H. Smith of Butte Falls were here for dinner Wednesday and so was J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the fish hatchery. He reports that he has already seven hundred and fifty thousand fish hatched out of the eggs he has taken out of Little Butte Creek here and that they are doing fine.
    F. J. Ayres and wife, who live on their farm on the P.&E.R.R., were visiting their niece and nephew, Mrs. and Mr. George Phillips of this place Sunday, April 23.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. Conover were trading here Wednesday.
    J. W. Hover, superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, was also here on business and tells me that the prospect for a fine crop was never better. That he has it well pruned up and in fine shape. That he has also been making some substantial improvements in the line of new buildings and is getting it up in fine shape again.
    Mrs. J. Wattenberg and her daughter, Miss Evelyn, were also among the business callers Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. Wattenberg are the lessees of one of the best farms along the banks of Rogue River, belonging to Thomas F. Nichols and his sister, Mrs. Carlyle Natwick and Mr. Wattenberg is considered one of the best farmers in the county and that is saying a great deal. The ditch and flume will soon be completed so as to put water all over it, and a large part of it is already set in alfalfa.
    Harvey Stanley of Wellen was here with his team cultivating a part of the place his father-in-law, John Rader, bought of Wm. G. Knighton. It was already set to alfalfa and was plowed up just a few days before the deal was made with John Rader and I predict that there will be a fine crop next season if not sooner.
    Frank Haselton, the foreman on the Antelope orchard, was in town Thursday morning and reports that the prospect is bright for a big fruit crop this season and that the frost had done no damage so far.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Wood of Medford passed through here on their way to Butte Falls Thursday morning, and the lady walked through the town and distributed religious literature as she went and some of it was very interesting. They were accompanied by a man named Hughes.
    I received a note from Rev. C. C. Hulet, the Sunday school evangelist for the Presbyterian Sunday School Society, Thursday too late for my Wednesday letter requesting me to announce that he and Rev. Harrison would hold services in Butte Falls Sunday, April 30 and each day up to and including May 12th.
    There were two strangers here for dinner Thursday whose names I failed to learn and later Pearl Stowell, F. Myhre, Emil Myhre, Oscar Smith and Wm. Cottrell came in for dinner.
    J. L. Robinson, one of our prominent farmers, who is generally up to date with his work, was here Thursday and I asked him if he had his corn ground plowed, for he generally puts in quite a lot of corn and he replied he was plowing it now and dropping it as he plowed. He is using his tractor and has his harrow attached behind it, thus finishing it up as he goes--quite a departure for him for he generally plows his corn land in December, but the past season has been so wet he could not get on the land so is trying it "the lazy man's way."
    There have been two or three small changes in real estate that I had not heard of in time for my last letter. Wm. G. Knighton sold a small tract of land, a little over an acre, to Floyd Pearce, and the rest of the tract joining the old F. M. Stewart property to Clifford Hickson, about four acres, all of both tracts set in alfalfa and under the irrigation ditch, both good buys. And I understand that there has been a lot sold to a woman but am not able to report it as yet until I learn more definitely.
    George Holmes, our garage man, made a business trip to Portland Wednesday night.
    S. J. Smith of Butte Falls came out Thursday on his way to Medford but stopped at the Sunnyside over night until after dinner and went out then to Medford.
    There were four young men came in for dinner Thursday, Messrs. J. L. Hughes, Ernest O'Riley, Gus Anderson and Ira Love of Berkeley, Calif. They are representatives of International Distributing Co. of choice paintings, of that city, Berkeley, Cal.
    Henry French and son Lloyd went to Medford Thursday and returned via Eagle Point to do their trading.
    Shorty Allen of Wellen was a business caller Thursday and Ralph Tucker and wife and their son-in-law, Wm. Staub of Brownsboro, were transacting business at the Eagle Point State Bank.
    Inez Whillock came in Thursday with the expectation of finding a jitney to take her to Medford but soon learned that there is no jitney service here as our legislature passed a bill exacting a tax or license fee of something like $350 for carrying passengers--a bill worked through by the railroad company--and now the stages are not allowed to carry anyone, but just after she had made the discovery a car came along with only three men so she secured a seat with them and went on, but S. J. Smith was not so fortunate, so had to remain overnight.
    G. E. Merrill of Derby, who has been spending a few days in Medford, came out Friday and went on up to his home.
    Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, who spent the most of her time at their home at the Dead Indian Soda Springs, came out Friday and went out to her farm on the Eagle Point-Phoenix Road. Her husband is unable to live with any comfort in the valley on account of the altitude and the result is they live together in the hills.
    G. M. White of Medford passed through here Friday on his way up to George B. Brown's with three large brood sows of the Poland China breed that Mr. Brown had purchased on Applegate. Mr. White said that he was to move Mr. H. L. Young out to Medford on his return trip.
    Miss Carmen Wilson of Medford, R. L. Dixon, a cattle buyer of Fort Klamath, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley and son Bertland and J. Jones of Butte Falls were here for supper Friday, and Mr. Jones was here for dinner and remained overnight.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Spencer, Dr. Wolf, Bessie Burkhart, Ida Magerle of Rogue River, spent Wednesday hunting gates above Eagle Point. They were the guests of Mrs. Frank Lewis.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 1, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT MEN START HERD FANCY HOLSTEIN HEIFERS
    Carl Esch and S. T. Johnson of Eagle Point have purchased some gilt-edge Holstein heifers for a nucleus from which to build up fancy herds of par excellent dairy stock. These men intend to discard all their grade and scrub stock and go into thoroughbred Holsteins exclusively, and they have a start that is surely encouraging.
    These young cattle come from the famous herd of Piet Bergsma at Ferndale, Washington who has produced some of the finest records of dairy production in the world. The dam of one of these heifers produced last year over 21,000 pounds of milk and over 800 pounds of butter fat, and she yielded her owner over $262 clear profit after paying for her feed--not counting her calf.
    H. E. Campbell, the banker at Eagle Point, has purchased a sire for these herds from the same Piet Bergsma herd, and he will be maintained at the farm of Carl Esch at the mouth of Antelope Creek two miles this side of Eagle Point. The grandmother of this bull is the famous cow that three years ago gave over 105 pounds of milk per day for thirty days and sold to the Carnation Milk Products Company for $1,100. A half sister of this bull sold as a yearling to the same people for $1,000.
    The American breeders have much improved this breed of cattle, and the Puget Sound dairymen have some of the finest records in America. The Carnation Milk Products Company of Seattle has one of the finest herds of Holsteins in America and they think enough of the breeding of Piet Bergsma that they have purchased breeding stock from him more than once.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1922, page 3


Y.M.C.A. PLANS A BIG SUMMER CAMP NEAR ELK CREEK
    Careful plans are being made by Jackson County Y.M.C.A for a big summer camp for boys and men. With the almost ideal conditions existing in the county, there is every prospect that the camp will be largely attended. Different locations are being looked over and early season arrangements attended to so that definite information can be given as soon as possible. A location somewhere on Elk Creek looks promising, as some of the most necessary requisites for a successful camp are to be found there.
    The camp will be extended over a period of at least ten days. The cost of provisions and other expense will be carefully prorated among the campers. Literature accurately designating the necessary equipment of each boy will be put in the hands of the prospects in ample time for them to make all arrangements.
    Quite a number of men have signified their desire to go and to help in the conduct of the camp. Cash Wood, county secretary of the Y.M.C.A., will act as camp director.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 4, 1922, page 3


G. BROWN'S HOME, BROWNSBORO, IS BURNED DOWN
    BROWNSBORO, May 4.--Friday evening George Brown's house caught fire and burned to the ground. The fire started on the roof early in the afternoon, but it was put out before it got much headway. Mr. Brown stayed up on the roof most of the afternoon watching to see if it would start again. After he left it broke out again and got such a start that it could not be put out. They got most of the household goods and furniture out before it burned down. The woodshed also caught fire and a thousand feet of lumber which was in it had to be moved. They got the lumber out in time to save it. The house was insured for $3300.
    Someone broke into Mr. Jim Jackson's house Monday, while he was herding sheep. They left the door open and tore up some of the furniture, pulled his bed clothing into the middle of the floor. Sunday afternoon they came again. His dog, hearing them around the house, ran to where they were. They took the dog and locked him up in the house and then left. No damage was done on the last visit.
    Mrs. Orin Maxfield and Mrs. A. E. Karberg of Ashland visited the Maxfield home Wednesday and returned Friday.
    Miss Velda Monia spent the weekend at her home.
    The Brownsboro school was expecting to go to Talent to the field meet. But as there were not many people going, we could not get there. Only three got to go, those being Gladys and Robert Cowden and Donald Bieberstedt.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hulse and Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Cann went to Medford Monday.
    Miss Della Hand was a visitor at Mrs. Mary Charley's home Sunday.
    Vernon Monia and sister, Velda, went to Medford Saturday.
    Mrs. Ed Tucker's daughter, Mrs. Morse, and son from California, are visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Tucker.
    Rev. Adams of Eagle Point held services here after Sunday school Sunday.
    The Lake Creek pupils gave an all-day May party Saturday, April 29, to all the Butte Creek people. There was a large crowd and everyone reported a good time.
    Carl Stanley went to Rancheria Friday and returned Saturday.
    Mr. Anderson brought ninety more sheep to the Thomas homestead, which he has leased.
    Miss Kubli went on a fishing and camping trip Saturday and Sunday to Squaw Lake.
    Mr. Grigsby of Central Point came through here Thursday on his way to Butte Falls. He returned home Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Tucker and William Staub went to Eagle Point Thursday.
    The Tucker family and Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Staub went to Trail on a picnic Sunday.
    Mr. Berry, who has been working in Medford, came up to his homestead near Brownsboro to spend a few days.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    By a little carelessness on my part I neglected to report the arrival of a son to Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements, our postmaster, on the evening of April 26, 1922, at the hospital in Medford. The fond parents with their many friends are rejoicing over the birth, as it is their first child. Also to know that the proud mother is resting easy and on the way to recovery of normal health.
    H. A. Houston and George Findley of Medford passed through here Saturday morning, Mr. Findley on his way to the Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our leading orchardists, who has been away all winter, returned to his Jackson County orchard home last Thursday.
    E. R. Oatman and H. E. Warner, two of the orchard inspectors, were here for dinner Saturday.
    Mrs. L. A. Sprague of Medford and N. E. E. Case of New York City were here for dinner Saturday, and Mrs. Bert Clarno and Mrs. Wm. Perry, the wife of our efficient road supervisor, were trading with our merchants.
    Saturday afternoon after I had finished my letter for the Mail Tribune, while I was on my way to the post office to mail it, J. L. Hovey met me and asked me to take a ride out to the Alta Vista orchard as I had not seen it for some time, and I gladly accepted the invitation. So jumping into his car off we went and as I rode along the old road on the west side I noticed how systematically he had arranged the pear trees along the side hill but when we raised the hill so that I could look over the whole of the orchard, almost two hundred acres set to pears and apples, it was truly a grand sight, the pears being in full bloom and the apples getting ready to bloom, it was surely a grand sight.
    I also noticed that since he has returned to take charge of the orchard again, for he was away some four years, and while he was there he did considerable work in the line of improving the buildings, but when he took charge of it again saw that he was cramped for room so has built another dwelling house and several changes for the better.
    He says that the prospect for a fine crop of fruit was never better. He is planning to put in a ram into Butte Creek to carry water up to the house, as the spring does not furnish water enough for spraying, and has men at work now digging the ditch to lay the pipe, about a half mile in length. But I expect to have more to say on that subject later.
    Sunday morning was just as bright and lovely as the most fastidious could have desired, and the announcement that the Jacksonville baseball team was coming out to play against the Eagle Point ball players brought out a large crowd and many of them came in the morning so as to take dinner at the Sunnyside. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. Glen Terrill and baby, Leonard Osborne, Connie Hanna, Dalton Terrill, J. B. Coleman and wife, C. E. Mitchell, Ray Coleman and wife, Miss Elva Coleman, Geo. A. Hyde, Earl Hyde, Wm. Blake and wife, Nasada Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, Mr. and Mrs. Royal G. Brown, Mrs. Margaret Reter and brother, Judge Florey, Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Bell and son of Gold Hill, Miss Mabel Tedrick and Adin Haselton, Olive Calvert of Chicago, Vera Jones of Medford, Miss Hattie Johnson, Charles Winkle, Estella Conover, Earl Mathews. There are some mistakes in a few of the names for some of them are written so dim that I am unable to make them out as I am so near blind that it is very difficult for me to read writing at all and I am satisfied that there were some whose names I omitted to secure.
    Later in the afternoon Mrs. Leonard Williams and her daughter, Miss Nora Williams of Central Point, called to visit Mrs. F. A. Whaley of Butte Falls, who is sick and has been here for some time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley called in for supper.
    R. H. G. Adams, who preached in Brownsboro Sunday morning, came in in the afternoon and reported that George B. Brown's house took fire Friday afternoon and they thought that they had succeeded in putting the fire out but about 9 o'clock that night it re-kindled and when it was discovered the roof was all afire. They managed to save considerable out of the house but he could not tell the amount. It was insured but the amount of insurance I did not learn.
    Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley came in for supper Sunday evening.
    The baseball game Sunday afternoon was said to have been very interesting and both teams, the Jacksonville and Eagle Point are said to have done some good playing and the result was our Eagle Point team came out second best and some of the boys seem to think that the umpire had not done them justice in his rulings, but that is not an uncommon thing, but I think they will live over the defeat and be ready for the next game. The score stood 11 to 7 in favor of Jacksonville.
    It was rather remarkable that the Blaess family should meet with two auto wrecks the same day on our Crater Lake Highway. The first was Charles Blaess and his wife and another woman who were riding along when the front wheels seemed to turn under the car causing it to turn over catching the woman's feet, but so far nothing serious, when Mrs. Blaess crawled under the car to help the woman, and just then three men came along and started to raise the car up and in raising it up threw it onto Mrs. Blaess' breast, bruising it quite badly, but not seriously hurt.
    The same evening Lewis Blaess, a brother of Charles, was coming down the Crater Lake Highway and meeting a car said the light from the car blinded him so that he could not see and the result was he ran off a culvert and had his car smashed up considerably and causing him to have an ugly gash in his forehead. He was on his way to the Modoc orchard where he is working. He came to the Sunnyside to spend the night. Mr. O. Adams of Butte Falls also came in Sunday night and started on up home the next morning. Mr. Adams reports that he had leased the hotel building in Butte Falls for two to five years and intends to keep a lunch and confectionery stand below and lodging rooms above, a much-needed establishment.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1922, page 10


ELK CREEK
    Mrs. Sturgis, one of our prominent society ladies, visited Medford last week. Mrs. Sturgis has also had her sheep sheared.
    Mr. W. Willits and Antone Ring visited Medford Tuesday and Wednesday, May 2 and 3. They also went to Al G. Barnes' circus and report that they had an enjoyable time.
    Jim Miller visited the L. A. Whitley place Monday, May 1.
    A field and track meet will be held at Prospect Saturday, May 13. Events will start at 9:30 a.m. About 13 districts will try and be present. We expect a large crowd, so all try and come so to boost your own district.
    Mrs. Greb came up to get Miss F. Greb, Friday, May 5, and returned to their home at Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis journeyed to Medford in their Baby Grand Chevrolet, Saturday. Mrs. Sturgis obtained a few dozen tomato plants, which were sturdy and had strong thick stalks. They returned the same day.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 9, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Vera Kershaw, who is engaged with her brother on their farm on Antelope Creek near Climax in the dairy business, called for a late supper the first of the week and wished to get in the post office, but found that it was closed as it closes at 6 p.m. and could not remain overnight on account of her dairy work.
    T. G. Thompson, at one time the leading merchant at Lake Creek, who bought one of the McQuoid places in our town on the south side of Butte Creek, is going into the poultry business quite extensively and has put up a modern hennery, and we predict that he will make a success of his venture.
    T. C. Barry of Brownsboro, who is improving a homestead in the hills between Brownsboro and Butte Falls, was a passenger through our town the first of the week on his way home from Medford.
    Nick Young, one of our prosperous farmers, who seems to have been either too busy to come to town or away from home, has been in town during the first days of the week on business.
    George Holmes, our garage man, was here for dinner one day about midweek as his wife is the principal of our school, and for some reason best known to herself and since he married such a good cook does not fancy the idea of eating a cold lunch or cook his own dinner, came to the Sunnyside for lunch.
    Jack Doubleday and Joseph Geppert of Butte Falls were passengers for Medford during mid-week.
    Arthur Brown, the traveling agent for the Morning Oregonian, was here also soliciting subscribers and renewals for that publication. He only remained a short time, as he seemed to be in a hurry to get through.
    Mrs. J. B. Plymire and Mrs. Wm. Ellis of Medford came out to bring Mrs. Plymire's mother-in-law, Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, who had been out to visit her son and family on her farm so as to catch the Lake Creek stage here so she could go up to her home at the Dead Indian Soda Springs.
    Wm. Martin also came out from Medford and went on up to his home in the Lake Creek country.
    E. C. Silliman, the Sugar Bowl man of Medford, and Frank Stoddard, representing the Crescent Mfg. Co., Seattle, were here for dinner and so was F. Garrettson of Medford and C. A. Cornelius of Ashland. They came up to try their hand at fishing but found the water was too muddy, as the fish would not bite. They were here for dinner.
    Later in the day, past the ordinary supper time, our sheriff, Charlie Terrill and two of his deputies, George Alden and L. D. Forncrook, came in for supper and hurried off as they were headed for Gold Hill that night.
    Perry Gibson, wife and son of Butte Falls passed through here Wednesday on their way home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls and Mrs. Hildreth's father, Mr. Fendall of Hilt, Calif., passed through here on Wednesday going south.
    Lee Bradshaw and family passed through here going on toward Medford.
    Alex Betz was also a business caller Wednesday and so was Mr. Meyer and family who are living on the Fred Pelouze farm.
    Thomas Lewis took the mail from here to Butte Falls for the contractor Wednesday.
    J. H. Cooley, proprietor of one of the lumber yards of Medford, and a man by the name of Ward passed through here Wednesday. They came from Mr. Cooley's orchard a short distance above town.
    Carl Esch, one of our prosperous farmers and dairy men, received two purebred Holstein heifers and his near neighbor, Samuel Johnson, two, and H. E. Campbell, our banker, a thoroughbred Holstein bull, the first of the week. Our farmers are waking up to the fact that it pays to keep the very best kind of stock if they are to keep any at all.
    H. A. Bayward of Medford and Walter O'Brien and his brother, Thomas O'Brien of Butte Falls, came in from the Hilt logging camp Thursday morning on their way home.
    Alfred B. Shelby, salesman for Baker, Hamilton Pacific Co., San Francisco, was here Thursday for dinner.
    Mr. Shaffer of Prospect, one of the prosperous farmers of that place, and three men from Butte Falls passed through here Thursday going to Medford and Mr. Shaffer passed through here Saturday morning on his way home.
    Arthur A. Hersph, Mrs. A. F. Green and two ladies from Los Angeles came in the middle of the week and are located in Mrs. Green's house, the old J. J. Fryer house; they think of remaining all summer.
    J. J. Johnson, who has moved into the house recently vacated by H. L. Young near Brownsboro, was in town Thursday laying in a supply of food at the F. J. McPherson store.
    Geo. W. Averill of Butte Falls came out from Medford and spent Thursday night on his way home.
    C. A. Jelley of Portland and A. J. E. Haseltine's hired man were here for dinner Friday.
    Wm. Coy is painting the picket fence in front of Geo. Holmes' residence.
    Two of the boys at school, Fred McPherson and Harold Denton, became engaged in a quarrel Friday noon and Fred threw a stone at Harold, striking him on the lip, cutting an ugly gash and loosening three of his teeth. I am told by witnesses the Denton boy was taken to Medford for medical treatment the same day and I have not heard anything later. I understand that Mr. and Mrs. Denton started the first of the week for Montana and the boy is staying with his grandmother.
    George Brown and Sons, our leading merchants, shipped 3500 pounds of mohair to Portland Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1922, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Ash moved to Trail Sunday from their home on Elk Creek. They expect to camp this summer near Mr. Ash's work.
    The road work is starting up on all sides of us and gives the idle men around here employment.
    Irvin Hume and H. Ash are digging ditch for William Cottrell.
    Miss Minnie Poole is visiting this week with friends and relatives near Drew, Oregon.
    George Weeks and Mrs. Emery were business callers in Medford Monday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher and daughter Enid were callers at the Bergman home Friday. Mr. Bergman is very sick and not much hopes for his recovery.
    J. L. Ragsdale hauled wood to Eagle Point and the new road camps this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ash and Mr. and Mrs. Eli Galarneau visited the road camp Monday.
    Mrs. Ragsdale and sons Buster and Glen were pleasant callers at the Howe home Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 12, 1922, page 7


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    The Girls' Industrial Sewing Club will hold a meeting and a sewing class tomorrow, May 13. It will be held at the home of Mrs. Wm. Hansen, Jr.
    Wm. Staub and Mrs. R. E. Tucker made a business trip to Medford, Saturday.
    Mr. Anderson is taking his sheep off the Butte Creek range where he has been ranging them for some time. He is taking them to Tom Riley's ranch near Eagle Point where he will keep them until the reserve range is open.
    Joe Henry made a business trip to Medford Tuesday.
    Isolee Brown and Neita Johnson were enrolled in the Brownsboro school Monday making a total of 24.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Hansen, Sr. went to Hornbrook Friday to visit their daughter, Mrs. Bloomingcamp and returned Monday.
    Mrs. Walter Marshall and three sons, Lester, Glenn and Bill, visited the latter's grandparents at Eagle Point over the weekend.
    Mr. and Mrs. Earl Tucker made a business trip to Medford last week.
    The Fish Lake Ditch Co. have finished working on the ditch and have turned in a large stream of water.
    Mrs. Ed Tucker and daughter Mildred went to Medford Monday.
    The school garden is getting along nicely. We have had radishes for lunch twice.
    C. E. Stanley went to Medford Friday and returned Sunday.
    Miss Kubli spent the weekend in Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Leland Cantrall of Applegate visited the Johnson home last week.
    Donna Brown has been staying at Reed Charley's for the past week.
    Two eighth grade, two seventh grade and three sixth grade students are going to take the state examinations Thursday and Friday.
    Carl Stanley returned home from Eagle Point Sunday.
    Ralph Stanley went to Fish Lake Sunday to get some horses.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 12, 1922, page 12


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Cecil Culbertson of Lake Creek was among the business callers Friday afternoon.
    Mrs. Ernest Dahack and Earl Mathews made a business trip to Medford Saturday morning.
    Alex Betz and Pearl Stowell were among the patrons of our merchants Saturday.
    Joe Rader and wife and adopted daughter, Miss Twila Rader of Phoenix, were here Saturday for dinner and so was E. H. Carter of Jacksonville.
    Timmy Dugan and wife were also business callers. It is seldom they are seen on our streets; they are living on and own one of the best sticky farms in this section and are generally too busy to spend much time away from home unless on business, as they always seem to have enough to do to employ all their time. They are in the poultry and dairy business and have partly raised a family of nice children who bid fair to become prominent and useful citizens.
    Mrs. W. E. Butler was in town Saturday but I did not have an opportunity to speak to her as she drove down to the bank and Geo. Brown & Sons' store. I have been waiting ever since I heard of the death of her father-in-law, Wm. C. Butler, one of our pioneer citizens, so that I could state definitely where he died, for one report said that he died in Ashland, while another was that he died at his home near Eagle Point. The last time I saw him he said that he was going to a hospital to undergo surgical treatment. He was a man who was highly respected in this community, where he has lived with his son, Wm. B. Butler.
    Mrs. Radcliff was also a caller or rather passed through our town, going on to Medford.
    Mr. Turnbow, the foreman of the section gang repairing the P.&E. railroad, was also here Saturday headed for Medford.
    Guy Hillman, the mail carrier from Climax to Eagle Point, in coming out Saturday had trouble with his car and had to stay until Tuesday morning to have it fixed at our garage, having the mail brought out by someone else. He ate and slept at the Sunnyside while here.
    The Eagle Point baseball team went across Rogue River Sunday and played against the Sams Valley team and there were quite a number of our citizens went over to witness the game, and the result was that some of our baseball fans were almost wild over the result, 38 to 4 in favor of Eagle Point. I heard one of our boys remark that it looked as though everything seemed to go against the Sams Valley boys, but they must not be discouraged, for they have some good players.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Royal G. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. McPherson and son Fred, John Foster of Medford, George and Harry Lewis, F. A. Whaley of Butte Falls, J. D. Patrick, Brownsboro, George Neilson, wife, two sons, Donald and Herbert, and Mrs. Neilson's mother, Mrs. S. F. Moore, and Mrs. Amy Hatch, all of Medford. And later for supper Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols and daughter, Miss Myrle and our primary teacher, Miss Alice Train, Geo. Holmes and wife, Clarence Pruett of Wellen, one of the ball players, who had his ankle badly sprained during the game.
    John Rader, the farmer who bought the Wm. G. Knighton home place, was here Monday looking after his interests. He said that town life did not suit him and he was going home and go to plowing. Although they expect to move to town in the fall, I predict that John will spend the most of his time on the farm or riding after his cattle. He will not be content to spend his time in town although he is about sixty years of age.
    We have had another change in the management of our post office. Mr. S. B. Holmes has resigned the clerkship and accepted a position as bookkeeper for Wm. von der Hellen on his contract on the Talent ditch and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and Mrs. Estella Haley assisting in the post office and Miss Dorothy von der Hellen assisting in the telephone office, while W. C. Clements, the postmaster, is busy putting up new telephone lines, and Sam Courtney and Ed Netting are making the old post office building look like a new city structure, with putty and paint.
    Mrs. F. M. Tungate of Butte Falls is here and has been for the past few days visiting her sister-in-law, Mrs. Nancy Watkins.
    George Klingle of Lake Creek was a business caller here Monday.
    Geo. B. Alden, one of our deputy sheriffs, was here Monday on professional business and for dinner.
    George Alford of Phoenix, Republican candidate for county commissioner, was here for dinner Monday and interviewing the voters.
    D. M. Lowe, the bill poster for Foster and Kleiser, was here also and so was Ed Netting.
    R. G. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons reports that they have shipped 2100 lbs. of mohair on Friday, 2400 lbs. Monday and 6500 lbs. on Tuesday.
    Charlie Delin, one of the contractors on the big jobs, was here for dinner Tuesday.
    John Howard, one of the aged veterans of the Civil War, came in Monday night and remained at the Sunnyside until this Wednesday morning.
    George Zanesby, who has four large horses working on the road between the Cingcade hill and Medford, was here for dinner Tuesday. He was having his horses shod by our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth.
    There will be preaching on Sunday, May 14th, both morning and evening.
    I just learned Tuesday of the death of a former citizen of our town and a Jackson County-raised girl, Mrs. Emma Stine nee Emma Perry, born June 5, 1871, of Oakland, Calif., who passed away May 3rd at her home. She leaves her mother, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, for several years a resident of Medford and later of Eagle Point, one brother and six sisters, Wm. Perry, Mrs. Harriet Allen, Seattle, Nellie Boles of Spokane, Wash., Libby Weathers of Oakland, Nellie Grover of Medford, Lottie McQuoid, Libby Day and a number of friends to feel their loss.
    Thos. L. Olson was here for dinner and supper Tuesday and breakfast Wednesday. He is caring for Dr. Helms' horses.
    H. J. Moore of Butte Falls, recently of Wisconsin, was here Tuesday night and so was another man, a stranger.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 12, 1922, page 12


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. M. Gay, who with Ed Spencer has taken a five-year lease of a tract of land in a piece of marsh land near Rancheria Prairie, beyond Butte Falls, is here on business. They have agreed to clear and put in cultivation the entire tract for the use of it for five years. It being close to the route of the extension of the P.&E. railroad they are intending to turn their attention to raising vegetables and berries to feed the men who will be working in the logging camps and will be otherwise employed in that line of business.
    George Pierce of Medford was here on business Wednesday.
    Chief of Police G. S. Timothy, wife and little granddaughter of Medford, were out here on business last Wednesday, to interview Fred Frideger, who is stopping at present at the Sunnyside while he is looking after his orchard and planting the part that is not in fruit trees in corn. His business seemed to be with regard to a town lot that Mr. Frideger had sold some years ago, because he did not think then that it was worth what the street and water assessments on it would amount to, so he sold it at a nominal price, one dollar, and it appeared to the other fellow that it was a good buy so did not have the deed recorded, and so it became delinquent in Mr. Frideger's name, the very thing that Mr. Frideger was trying to avoid. So I guess that the City of Medford will have to take it over for the taxes, the very thing that is happening to a number of our little incorporated towns.
    Hamilton Patton of Medford and C. F. Hamilton of Portland were here for dinner and overnight at the Sunnyside Wednesday. And George Holmes, our garage man and wife, and W. G. Smith were here for dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Royal Brown and Miss Gertrude Wiley of Central Point, who have been elected to act as primary teacher during the next school year, were here for dinner Wednesday. Miss Alice Train, who has been in charge of the primary department of our school and has been giving such general satisfaction that the school board was anxious to have her take the school for another year, decided not to accept the offer as her mother, who is living in California, requires her services at home. But Miss Wiley looks as though she might fill the position satisfactorily as she is an experienced teacher and comes well recommended. The school board has also employed our present principal, Mrs. George Holmes, as the principal for the coming year.
    I met a little boy Wednesday walking on a crutch and cane and upon questioning him learned that his name was Jerry Fay and that he had a broken leg, caused by the breaking of a hayrack, that he was living with his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Young, who are in charge of the Frank Rhodes dairy and poultry farm about two miles from town.
    And speaking of the Young family brings to mind another incident. There are two families together, Mr. Young and his son-in-law, Mr. Ferguson, on the place and they were so crowded for room that they have divided up and have rented the Frideger house that he recently moved out of town--the James Ringer house. A part of them are living there. I also met three boys in their teens here in town with a mule team that I recognized as belonging to the Rhodes farm and in conversation with them learned that they were sons of Mr. Young and that they had come to town with the team to take out 2100 wee chicks that were coming out from Medford that morning to be taken out to the ranch and that they already had 1000 young chicks hatched out there. And speaking about chicks brings to mind another incident last Sunday. We missed Mrs. Carl Esch from her class in our Sunday school and inquiring of her husband the cause of her absence learned that she had just brought off 500 little chicks and had to stay and care for then, so the reader will see that everybody in this section is not asleep, but Eagle Point is waking up and expects to be up with the foremost.
    I see that Sam Courtney has painted three signs for F. J. McPherson where the old T. E. Nichols signs were and Mr. McPherson is trying to bring about a little revolution in the mercantile business.
    Mrs. Ed Wolfer, daughter of our townsman, James Jordan of Hubbard, Ore., came in about mid-week to visit her father. Her husband, Ed Wolfer, was for some time in the tinner's business in Medford and later went into the strawberry business in this neighborhood and finally married and moved to Hubbard, Ore., where he is now in business.
    Among the diners Thursday were J. W. Snider of the Independence Creamery, Medford, and he reports that he receives during the ten months the grass is green an average of 6500 pounds of cream each week from the Lake Creek country. And the reader will remember that that is only a narrow strip of country up and down Little Butte Creek, and the people in this Butte Creek country are waking up to the necessity of improving their breed of cows and using fertilizers, with the result that the land is producing double the amount of hay and other kinds of cow feed that is enabling them to increase the size of their herds.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Markland of the Medford Sheet Metal Works and D. A. Langacher, San Francisco, representing a cream separator company, were here for dinner and so was Chris Beale of Butte Falls.
    Mrs. P. E. Sandoz of Elk Creek came in on the Eagle Point-Persist stage, took dinner and went out to Medford in the afternoon. There were also two strangers here for dinner.
    J. C. Pendleton of Table Rock was a business caller, he being a deputy assessor, was to meet Mr. Herring, another deputy assessor here on business connected with their business.
    A. E. Hildreth of Butte Falls spent Thursday night here and went on up home Friday morning.
    The Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point will give a dinner and bazaar at the opera house Friday, May 19. Many useful articles including aprons, pillow cases, bureau scarfs, luncheon sets, library scarfs, handmade underwear, handkerchiefs, etc., will be on sale. The public is cordially invited. Dinner will be served at noon, 50¢ per plate.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    F. R. Frey and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Fred Adler of Lake Creek were here Friday for dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walker of Gold Hill were among the business callers Friday and so was Ed Cowden, one of our enterprising farmers and dairymen.
    Last Friday was a very busy day at our blacksmith shop as there were a bunch of saddle horses brought in to be shod by some cowboys who are getting ready to start across to the Klamath country with a band of cattle for R. L. Bixon Bros. of Klamath County. They finished up the job Monday and expect to start across the mountains as soon as the snow is settled sufficiently.
    I was very agreeably surprised Friday afternoon as I was sitting in the parlor alone, away from the company of men who were waiting for supper, when who should walk in but Misses Bertha Emerick and Mildred Heine. I did not recognize either of them at first but it soon dawned on me that one of the faces looked quite familiar and I ventured to inquire of one of them if she did not at one time work in the Medford Mail Tribune office, and she said she did and finally she asked if I remembered "Mildred," and all at once it dawned on me that she at one time was the bookkeeper in that office. They were on their return trip from a two weeks camping trip on Union Creek. They had quite an experience while going out. They said that they ran their car to within about three miles of the camp and then the road was blocked with snow, so they took what they could, things necessary for camping purposes and walked into camp and later returned and carried in the remainder, so established their camp where they spent two weeks' time in the full enjoyment of camp life. They related one incident that will give the reader some idea of what it means to be out in a snowstorm in that wild region. They were out hunting for something exciting, they did not say what, when they were caught in a driving snowstorm and had to face it for three miles, but like girls of the right kind of stock they marched right on through it and made camp. And when they came in that afternoon they looked the very picture of beauty and health. They were in a hurry to go on home so I did not have the pleasure of their company but a very few minutes as supper was called and they didn't mince over the victuals but ate as though they really enjoyed the meal and hurried off for home, so I did not have an opportunity to learn more of their camp life except that the had one of the finest times of their lives.
    Mr. Adamson, a member of the Trail Lumber Co. of Trail, came in with a load of lumber for Geo. Brown & Sons and three others Friday and spent the night at the Sunnyside and had his team shod. He reports that they are getting out a fine lot of lumber ready for the market.
    W. T. York came in Friday afternoon and engaged room and board until Tuesday morning. He had been employed by the authorities to take account of the traffic across the Little Butte Creek bridge on the Crater Lake Highway and was required to remain there from six a.m. to 10 p.m. so had to take his dinner and supper with him. He was not prepared to state the results of his work as he had not finished up his report but reported that there were 470 vehicles crossed the bridge Sunday. In many instances the same one crossed twice, as probably a very large majority were driven by pleasure seekers from the towns and valley. He took account of teams, autos, motorcycles, in fact everything run on wheels. He went out home Tuesday morning on the stage.
    J. A. Lovelady of Klamath Falls came in on the stage looking for employment for his team on some of the contracts and spent the night at the Sunnyside. There were also three other men, strangers, here for supper Friday night.
    George Albert of Duprays' mill came out Saturday on his railroad motor and reports the arrival of a baby girl at his home May 9th and took dinner.
    Mrs. Lucius Kincaid, who is teaching the Crater Lake school, came out on the railroad motor Saturday, took dinner and went out to Medford to visit her parents and was met there by her husband who is working on the Crater Lake Highway near Prospect, returning Sunday.
    Rev. G. N. Edwards, the traveling Sunday school evangelist for the Congregational Church, came in Saturday morning on the stage and took dinner at the Sunnyside and preached here after Sunday school and went to Sams Valley and preached in the evening to a good-sized audience. He returned to the Sunnyside Monday and started north on the 2:45 p.m. stage. Rev. H. G. Adams preached Sunday evening here and expects to preach here next Sunday, May 21st, both morning and evening.
    Thos. Vestal of Reese Creek and wife were here Saturday but went on out to Medford.
    E. D. Rose, one of the prominent farmers and stockmen of Yankee Creek, was here Saturday having his team shod.
    Mrs. Amy Brown reports that she has had a hardwood floor put in her house and had it repapered and repainted inside and out so that it looks quite citified. I asked her if she made Frank take off his shoes when he reached the door before entering.
    I met Mrs. Lewis Robinson and her sister, Miss Hattie Hannaford, Saturday afternoon at the Eagle Point public library.
    I understand that A. L. Young and son-in-law intend to plant several acres of sunflowers for ensilage. Speaking of Mr. Young, in my last letter I reported that his boys were in town with a team waiting for 2100 wee chicks but learned later that there were only 1500 came as the eggs did not all hatch. A clear case of counting the chicks before they are hatched, but Mr. Young says that the 2500 they have are doing fine.
    Wm. Bigham, who is on the Joe Rader place, was here Saturday.
    Charley Humphrey of Derby was hauling wood to town Saturday.
    Sunday morning the Eagle Point baseball team went to Antelope (Wellen) to play against the Antelope baseball team and came home Sunday afternoon almost crazy with excitement, for they were on the winning side, the score standing Eagle Point 10 and Antelope only 8.
    Mrs. M. H. Kentner and Mrs. A. F. Green of Los Angeles, who are members of one of the Bible schools there, who arrived here over a week ago, attended our Sunday school and made a start toward starting a Bible class.
    I did not reach home Sunday in time to meet the guests who came in for dinner, but learned that there were quite a number and among them was Charley Clark of the Modoc orchard, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown, and they had as their guests Mr. and Mrs. [Virgil] Strang of Medford. And later in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Phipps of Medford, Edward Vilas and his mother, Mrs. Vilas of Medford, Geo. Holman spent Sunday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1922, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Thomas F. Nichols, a member of the firm of Nichols and Ashpole, has been taking his meals at the Sunnyside lately and on inquiry I learned that his wife had gone on a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farlow, on the south fork of Little Butte Creek.
    Mr. J. G. Hannaford, who is living on the Chris Natwick farm northeast of here, was a business caller Monday.
    Wm. Coleman and another man passed through here Monday morning on their way up the creek, but did not stop, but I understand that he is connected in some way with the fishery business, either in the state or U.S. government. He always has a soft job, and that is no crime.
    Pete Betz, who owns and operates a fine farm on Rogue River near the Crater Lake Highway, came in early Monday to our garage man, George Holmes, to have his auto doctored up and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Ralph Young of Medford passed through here the first of the week on his way to Prospect.
    Bud Obenchain of Lake Creek came in the first of the week and went on out to Medford.
    Mrs. Schmitt, one of the rustling women of the Crowfoot country near Derby, brought in her produce the [omission].
    O. J. Blackledge and wife and J. M. Fodren and wife of Corvallis, who have been here for the past two weeks, camping in the house known as the Robinett house, and spending their time gathering agates, started for their homes Tuesday morning, well loaded with a fine selection of various kinds of agates and other kinds of stones, among which were several fine specimens of petrified wood, and Mr. Goin, "Agate Jack," has polished up what will compare favorably with some of the best to be found. I suppose that there has been at least over a thousand pounds of choice agates gathered off this section of the country and hauled north to Eugene, Albany, Newport, Marshfield, to say nothing of the amount that has been shipped to Portland.
    Wm. Moore, formerly of Elk Creek, but now of Butte Falls, a professional saw filer, was visiting our town on his way to Medford about the middle of the week.
    Mrs. H. Hinman and her daughter, Miss Jane, were visitors at the Sunnyside Monday.
    George Nichols, Jr. and wife of Medford, who own one of the finest stock farms in the Lake Creek country, were visiting relatives in our town Monday afternoon.
    Bert Clarno, who owns a fine farm on Rogue River about six miles from here, near the Crater Lake Highway, was a business caller Tuesday.
    Mr. P. S. Anderson, owner of what is known as the Brittsan farm, came in on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Tuesday morning and went on up on the stage.
    E. G. High and wife, nee Bessie Haselton, of Ashland, were here Tuesday afternoon combining business with pleasure. Mr. High is in the aviation business in Ashland.
    O. B. Williams of Medford, who is engaged in selling supplementary school works, was here for dinner Tuesday.
    George Cottrell of Beagle was a business caller Wednesday.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our leading orchardists in Rogue River, who has one of the largest and best orchards in the valley, was in town and reports a fine prospect for one of the best crops of fruit ever. The pear crop bids fair to be fully up to date, but the prospect for a bumper apple crop is not quite so good, nevertheless it bids fair to be a heavy one.
    Among the diners Tuesday at the Sunnyside were Nick Young, Cliff Hickman and Thomas Abbott.
    Mr. De Ford of Sams Valley was here on business on his way to Antelope Valley.
    Among the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Thursday was H. Stills of the firm of Stills Bros., of Indian Creek, who have been engaged in the saw mill and dairy business but have sold their saw mill out and are preparing to move over into California where their two brothers are living.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton of Antelope Valley was a business caller Thursday and reports that she has already 63 young turkeys hatched out and several hens setting on turkey eggs and that those already hatched are doing fine.
    Fred and Carl Stanley of Lake Creek were also business callers.
    Seth Dixon of the firm of Dixon Bros. of Klamath County, who have been in this neighborhood for some time buying up cattle, while riding one of the horses designed to be used in driving out the cattle they have bought, was thrown from the horse and was quite badly bruised up and his face badly scratched up, but no bones were broken.
    Mrs. Lammy, the lady who went from here to the von der Hellen camp on the Crater Lake Highway near Prospect to cook for the men, came in to the Sunnyside about ten o'clock Thursday night with her little boy, taking him to Medford to have him treated for a bad cut by an ax. She left here Friday morning very early for Medford.
    I met our road supervisor Thursday and in speaking of the prospective water canal from above Butte Falls, he said that everything was about ready to advertise for bids on the bonds, that there was a little more work to be done yet before they were advertised, and he predicts that the canal will be ready for the water to be used next season.
    Mrs. K. Hixon of Butte Falls and Mrs. Johnson of Brownsboro were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage, Mrs. Johnson going up home on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    Roy Conley, the owner of the old Hawk saw mill near Butte Falls, came out Friday with a hind wheel of his logging truck for repairs, having broken down. He took dinner here and took it on to Medford, as our wagon maker did not have in stock material heavy enough. F. A. Whaley was also here for dinner.
    Friday morning was just the kind of a morning that most of the farmers were wishing for, so that they could go to the election and have a good time. Although there was quite a number of them did not vote as the Democratic ticket had so few names on it, often only one for an office and he would be the nominee. In fact, there seemed to be but little interest taken and what little there was, was to decide who would be the nominee for circuit judge, and the result here was Thomas 59, Newbury, 15, pretty near four to one for Thomas. But the dinner the ladies of the town put out was said to be fully up to date. Drs. Holt, Green and Stearns of Medford were among the guests and promised in case the ladies of Eagle Point ever gave another dinner they were coming out and bring the ladies with them. As near as I could learn the receipts from the dinner were $45, and from the sales of aprons and other things the ladies had made to sell was about the same or a little more, not far from $100. But the whole affair proved to be a grand success.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 24, 1922, page 6


BROWNSBORO NEWS
    Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Best and Miss Brunson from Los Angeles are visiting at the Cowden home, where they expect to stay a few weeks.
    Mike Hanley passed through here Monday with his bunch of thoroughbred Hereford cattle. He is taking them to ranch to pasture through the summer.
    Ralph Stanley made a trip to Fish Lake this week to see if they can get across the mountains with cattle. Recently there has been too much snow to cross.
    Visitors at school last week were Mrs. Butler and daughter Nellie and Olga Bieberstedt and Mrs. Wm. Hansen, Jr.
    Ed Cowden was a business caller at Eagle Point Saturday.
    Drake Walsh is spending a few weeks with his brother Len Walsh of Antelope.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Stanley visited Roy Stanley of Eagle Point Thursday.
    Business callers at Medford Monday were Mr. and Mrs. George Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Roscoe Hulse and Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw.
    Mrs. Henry's brother, Mr. Frideger and family, were visitors at the Henry home Sunday.
    Mrs. McDonald of Lake Creek was a visitor at Ed Tucker's home Sunday.
    Miss Edith Kubli spent the weekend at her home on Applegate.
    Miss Velda Monia spent the weekend at her home in Brownsboro.
    Mr. and Mrs. Everett Miller of Applegate and Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence Luy of Wellen visited at Brownsboro Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 26, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday while in my rounds I met our popular and thoroughgoing road supervisor, William Perry, and inquired of him as to how the Big Butte-Eagle Point water canal project was progressing and in response to my question he said all right, that they were about ready to place the bonds on the market, that they had a little more work to do yet and then the bonds would be offered for sale. That the prospect was very encouraging, the few in the district who had refused to be included in the district and who had begged to be left out were now wishing that they had taken more stock since they had realized the advantage of having water to irrigate, and he cited me to a tract of land he sold to the late Wilbur Jacks, quite a large tract and only a small portion of it under the ditch that is taken out of Little Butte Creek about the upper end of the Fred Pelouze place and runs through the tract referred to, that when he sold it to Mr. Jacks he told him that he considered that he was simply giving him the largest part of the land as that above the ditch was scarcely worth the taxes and labor to cultivate and in connected with the subject related to me his experience with it.
    He sowed the tract below the ditch in clover and sowed a part of the land above the ditch in grain and the result was three-quarters of a ton of hay to the acre on the dry land and that he cut two crops the same year off of the land sown to clover and realized an average of five tons of hay to the acre, or two and a half tons to each cutting. He now owns a tract of land that when Dr. Whitney bought it nearly forty years ago and paid twenty-five dollars an acre for it and the general impression in the community seemed to be that he was badly stung, for it was simply a chaparral thicket on a gravel bar that the original owners did not consider worth fencing, but the doctor brought in a small ditch and planted a part of it to fruit and berries, built a neat little house on it and then sold it and moved away. Finally it fell into the hands of Mr. A. L. Haselton, one of the school teachers of some thirty or more years ago, now living in Ashland, and he being a practical gardener and an indomitable worker cleared the rock off of it and made of it one of the finest garden spots in Rogue River Valley and turned his attention to raising beans and onions and soon his onions began to attract attention, many of them three and even four pounds, the land yielding as high as 7200 lbs. to the acre. Finally Mr. Haselton sold about half of the tract to Ed Wolfer and he put a large part of it out to strawberries, which proved a success, but he married, sold out and it fell into the hands of the present owner, and he being a farmer turned about all of the tract into an alfalfa meadow and it is now bringing him an average of eight tons of hay to the acre, the result of work, water and scientific cultivation.
    He told me that he paid three hundred dollars an acre for the Wolfer part in cash and today would not take five hundred dollars an acre for it.
    While some old croakers are lying awake nights and sympathizing with the poor farmers who are having the water put on their land and reaping three-quarters of a ton to the acre, the far-seeing farmers are preparing to care for the bountiful crops the water will enable them to produce.
    I might cite the reader of the Mail Tribune to a number of instances that have come under my observation where the use of water and proper energy has made the farmers independent.
    Dave Rummel, formerly of Trail but now of Big Butte, and Roy Conley, owner of the Conley mill four miles from Butte Falls, and Ed Gomez, now of Butte Falls, were here for dinner Saturday.
    Last Sunday we had our regular Sunday school and Rev. H. G. Adams preached for us both morning and evening. At the Sunday school it was decided to change the time of meeting of the Sunday school from 10:30 to 10 o'clock a.m. Mr. Adams will not be here next Sunday as he has gone to Corvallis to visit his son who is attending the O.A.C. but expects to be here the first Sunday in June.
    It was arranged last Sunday for Mrs. Arglee Green and Mrs. M. H. Kentner of Los Angeles to conduct a singing, praise and prayer service next Sunday, May 28, in the church at 8 o'clock p.m. There will be special song service by some of the noted singers of our community.
    The ball players won their game on the Eagle Point ball grounds between the Sams Valley and the Eagle Point teams and the score stood: Sams Valley 2 and Eagle Point 33.
    When I reached home from church the dinner table was full and about enough in the sitting room to fill it again, so I was unable to secure the names of the guests, but learned that among them was Charley Terrill and wife and Mrs. Smith, a cousin of Mr. Terrill, I. C.  Moore of Ashland and son William of Butte Falls, Mr. Moore, Sr., formerly of Elk Creek but now of Ashland was on his way to Butte Falls to try to recover his health, for he has been afflicted all winter with the flu, having had two sieges, or a relapse. Also there were Buel Hildreth, John W. Smith, wife and two children of Big Sticky, S. K. Amy, wife and three children, Millard Robinson, Henrietta Scheez, Velma Wright, Lester Bigham, besides quite a number of the townspeople who came in for dinner.
    J. Rigsby, who has been cutting saw logs for Roy Conley of Butte Falls, has finally moved into the house formerly occupied by Agate Jack Goin and he (Jack) is sleeping in an outhouse but still eating at the Sunnyside.
    Charley Wilkinson of Dead Indian Soda Springs passed through here Monday on his way home. He says that he has a concession from the U.S. government to keep a supply store at the springs and that it, the government, plans to make a good road through that country on to Lake of the Woods and that will be a near route to Klamath County.
    Mrs. O. M. Goss and daughter were here on business the first of the week and says that they intend to remain in Butte Falls this season.
    In my last letter I stated that the receipts for the dinner, apron sales, etc. amounted to around $100, but I had not learned the result of the sale of homemade candy, the grab-bag, and since I wrote I learn that the total amounts to $179.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. M. E. Inlow Albright of Trail, and three men besides the driver, came out Monday on the Butte Falls stage and Mrs. Albright went on up to her husband's homestead on the Eagle Point-Persist stage.
    C. H. Natwick, the principal contractor on the extension of the P.&E. railroad from Butte Falls to Fourbit Creek, was also here Monday morning.
    C. A. Pickle, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Co., and S. M. Bullis, who is also interested with the same company, were here for dinner the same day and so was Charles Pettegrew.
    Charles Hanscom, who is living on the old J. P. Moomaw farm southeast of our town, was in town.
    Mrs. Cal Thomason, who has been camp cook in the C. H. Natwick camp at Butte Falls, came out on the stage Monday on her way to Medford to spend a few days.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Farlow of Lake Creek came in Sunday afternoon with her granddaughter, Mrs. Thos. F. Nichols, who had been up visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farlow.
    J. F. Thompson of Oakland, Ore., came in Monday with a dump truck to be used to haul crushed rock onto the Crater Lake Highway between the top of the Cingcade hill and Medford, to have some repair work done by our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, and while here spent two nights at the Sunnyside. He said they expected to be able to start putting on the crushed rock by Friday, May 26th.
    When the road from here to Medford is completed it is predicted that many of the country people who have been used to riding over our rough, muddy, rocky roads, when they strike the smooth hard-surfaced highway, will keep right on and will hardly know when or where to stop.
    R. T. Seaman also spent the night here on his way to Butte Falls. Mr. Seaman is one of the civil engineer corps who were engaged on the Crater Lake Highway last summer and expects to move his family here to remain during the season. He did not say where he expected to work but went to Butte Falls to see about it as there is now considerable work in his line, the Big Butte-Eagle Point water canal and the work on the railroad extension.
    Rev. H. G. Adams and James Corsant, the first the Congregational minister here and the latter a retired capitalist who has been stopping at the Sunnyside Hotel for some weeks past gathering agates, left here for Corvallis and Albany, the former to visit his son who is attending the O.A.C., to be gone until the latter part of the first week in June, and the latter to his home in Albany. He succeeded in securing several hundred pounds of fine agates and specimens of petrified wood.
    Guy Pruett was a business caller Tuesday and so was J. B. Cooper, formerly of Trail but now of Butte Falls. He came in on the Butte Falls stage and remained until after dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Mrs. Arglee F. Green, recently from Los Angeles, has two men tearing down a part of her father's old house, the J. J. Fryer house, and making several changes in it and intends to use the lumber to build another house and small barn on land she owns on the opposite side of the creek on the Riverside boulevard.
    L. M. Harris, sales manager for the John Boelman Co., San Francisco, Calif. and C. P. Clouse, representing the same firm, were here for dinner and so was H. H. Connelly of San Joaquin, Cal., and Guy Holman, the mail carrier from Climax to Eagle Point.
    J. H. Hughes of Medford was here putting in a fish screen in the irrigation ditch below the old grist mill.
    I met Mrs. G. R. Brown at the post office, a sister of Wm. Butler, recently from Taft, Calif. She and her husband drove in from Taft making a continuous drive of thirty hours to reach here so as to attend the funeral of her father, William C. Butler, who passed away a short time ago. They have decided to remain and are living on a tract of land she owns between here and Brownsboro.
    Ernest Dahack, our barber, went up to Butte Falls with the mail Wednesday morning.
    Horace Geppert of Butte Falls was among the diners at the Sunnyside Hotel Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Wymore of Derby came out with a truckload of wood for sale and while here transacted business with our merchants.
    Wm. Pruett of Wellen, who is on the George Stevens farm, was having work done in our blacksmith shop Wednesday.
    I understand that Chris Bergman, who had a stroke of paralysis a short time ago, was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital for treatment a few days ago.
    Fred Pettegrew, our horseman, went to Medford Thursday to look after his interests in that section.
    Wm. Sears, formerly of Butte Falls but more recently in California, came out from Medford on the stage and went up to his old home. He has been away for about three years.
    Our school closed Thursday with a picnic dinner for the children and it seemed to be greatly enjoyed by them. Mrs. Lucius Kincaid, who has been teaching in the Crater Lake district, four miles from Butte Falls, also closed her school the same day and came to the Sunnyside for supper. She was accompanied by an elderly lady whom I did not know who I understand was selling little trinkets and notions. They both went to Medford with one of the Brown brothers.
    Frank Simpson, one of the early pioneers of this valley, was also a visitor here.
    Horace Pelton, another one of the pioneers of the valley and one of the well-to-do farmers and stockmen of Sams Valley, who is also interested in the stock business with his brother James of Fort Klamath, was here for dinner Thursday.
    There was a man came out on the stage who wanted to go up in the Lake Creek country to visit his cousin, Wm. Nickell, but Mr. Van Dyke, the driver, had such a load he decided that he could not take him, so he came to the Sunnyside and remained until Friday morning. When asked his name, after telling that I was a newspaper correspondent, he declined to give it, so I will not give it, although Will's many friends would have been glad to have seen it in the Medford Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 31, 1922, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Arthur Moore made a trip to Medford last week on business.
    Ezra Whitley was helping Elmer Ivey plant his potatoes.
    Geo. Hall is building a flume to carry water to his alfalfa.
    Weston Miller is working for Miss Inez Willits.
    Elmer Ivey and Hazel Pence of the Elk Creek school have successfully passed the eighth grade examination prescribed by the Oregon State Board of Education.
    Mrs. Sturgis visited Mrs. L. A. Whitley Friday.
    Dave Pence has charge of the teams which are working on the road from Trail to Prospect. L. A. Whitley, Howard Ash, George and Harry Trusty are also working on the road. All are from Elk Creek.
    Ezra Whitley and Elmer Ivey made a trip to Ashland to attend the Union County meet, where the certificates were given out in person by Miss Homes.
    W. Willits and Henry Thornton went to Medford Monday.
    Marcel Sandoz has ended his visit at the Willits place and returned to his home Monday. He has had a long visit and reports that he had a good time.
    Ezra Whitley and Elmer Ivey are burning slashing.
    Henry Trusty and George Trusty visited their folks on Elk Creek Saturday. Miss Frances Greb also was visiting at the same time.
    The Persist school is busy fulfilling the directions on their club work, which is camp cooking, as they have made several camping trips.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis have journeyed to town several times in the past week.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Miller returned home after a long term of prospecting. They have a very bad cold.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 31, 1922, page 6


MAY OPEN NEW ROAD AT HEAD OF ELK CREEK
    Road work pending in Jackson County and now under consideration by the county court includes the opening of a road that will open up the territory at the head of Elk Creek. It will cost approximately $5,000 and will run from the Crater Lake Highway via the Earl Ulrich ranch to Persist. It will be built under the supervision of the forestry service with the county and the California-Oregon Power Company cooperating. Road District No. 9 levied a special tax to build the road. The lines of the California-Oregon Power Company tap the district. The road taps new country and opens up new timber resources. County Commissioners Bursell and Owens visited the section today.
    Bids for the building of the road from the summit of Rocky Hill to Butte Falls and down Reese Creek from the Reese Creek school house to the Crater Lake Highway will be opened June 8th. Some improvements have been made on this road and residents of that section have beseeched the county court for months for relief, claiming the road was impassable in winter.
    The county court Wednesday afternoon journeyed to Coleman Creek in search of a gravel [deposit] with which to repair the mail route road west of Phoenix and finally decided to use the Bear Creek gravel.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday morning I started for Medford with one of our old pioneers, Wm. Green Knighton, to consult our family doctor, Mr. Holt, on professional business, and after calling him on the phone and waiting a few minutes met him at his office where I met two men and a lady, each waiting their turn. After a careful examination he decided what was the ailment and prescribed what course to follow and, as might be expected of a doctor, prescribed something that would make me sicker but left hope for favorable results, and this Tuesday morning I am able to resume my daily task writing the Eagle Point Eaglets for the Mail Tribune.
    While in Medford I met a few of my acquaintances from this part of the country, but they were too busy to stop and talk and my time was also so limited that I had to hurry up as we were expected to start by 12 o'clock noon but took time to visit the office of the Mail Tribune and have a little chat with the editor and his bookkeeper, Mrs. Blakeley, and congratulated her on her escaping the clutches of the gang of outlaws who appeared to be trying to convict her of wrongdoing to cover up their own doings in the Jacksonville Bank case.
    After my return home I started out to gather material for this letter and found that there were but few people had been in that day and among them was Earl Tucker of Brownsboro and he made a hurried trip in the afternoon to our blacksmith so as to be ready to commence to cut his hay. I also met Wort Pool and he was here on the same errand and while with them learned that the new canal, or rather the old one that has been enlarged, was in some instances causing considerable trouble along the lower side by leaking and more especially from the Bradshaw Drop on, as in one instance the water burst out several feet below the ditch and tore a large piece out of the side of the mountain flooding the land below, and I heard that it had done considerable damage to the Antelope orchard and to the fruit but at a later date I met the foreman, Frank Haselton, and inquired of him and he said that about all the damage done was flooding the orchard so much that he could not do the plowing, but no serious damage.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Weidman, who own a farm and orchard on the Crater Lake Highway, were in town, and as they are interested in the dairy and poultry business to a considerable extent the question naturally came up as to cow feed, and he said in addition to his splendid hay crop they have planted five acres in sunflowers to make ensilage. Mr. Weidman believes in keeping the very best breed of stock and in having the very best of feed to bring results.
    Miss June Hilman and her mother, Mrs. H. H. Hilman, who is working in the office of the Earl Fruit Co. in Medford, were callers at the Sunnyside Hotel Friday afternoon.
    I received a card from Rev. H. G. Adams, the pastor of this circuit, announcing that he expects to be here and preach both morning and evening, 11 a.m. and 8 p.m., next Sunday June 4th.
    There were quite a number of strangers here for dinner last Friday and later in the afternoon four came in late for dinner, but I was not at home to get their names.
    G. A. Hansen of Brownsboro was here Saturday and so was J. M. King of Butte Falls and James Culbertson of Lake Creek. They both came out on the Butte Falls stage and Mr. Culbertson went on up home in the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    Mr. Aiken, the superintendent of the water system in Medford District, and four other men and a woman were here for dinner Saturday.
    J. D. Patrick, our boss carpenter, has taken a job tearing away some of the old buildings and a part of the rest on Mrs. Arglee F. Green's place that belonged to her father, the late J. J. Fryer. John Miller, another carpenter, who has been employed on the same job while tearing off the roof of one of the old buildings, fell through the roof, it being so rotten that it would not bear his weight, and hurt his side so that he is unable to work at present.
    I notice that Miss Belford, the lady who has charge of the Stewart Farm about 2½ miles northeast of here who has been spending the winter in the East, has returned to our midst.
    Corbett Smith and his mother, Mrs. Mary Beale of Butte Falls, have been here visiting her daughter, Mrs. Sherman Wooley.
    Charlie Cingcade and family, L. Charley, formerly of the Brownsboro country but now of Medford, and his daughter, Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro, passed through here Saturday afternoon for the old home place.
    Herbert L. Sutland of Fort Jones, Calif., was a diner at the Sunnyside Hotel Saturday.
    William Pruett, wife and son Lawrence of Wellen, F. J. McPherson and family, George and Jerry Lewis were among the diners Sunday. Louis Daley, wife and baby and his father, John Daley, all of Medford, were out here Sunday afternoon visiting Mrs. Allie Daley.
    Sig Skavlin, with Wadhams & Kerr Bros. of Portland, was here for supper, and so was Roy Stanley and family and Nick Young.
    There was quite an interesting ball game here Sunday afternoon between the Eagle Point team and the Gold Hill team. The game was closely contested from start to finish and the result was Eagle Point came out with their feathers drooping again as the score stood 8 to 9 in favor of the Gold Hill team.
    O. C. Eblin and family and F. E. Bechdoldt and N. Campbell, Mrs. Chas. Wilkinson of Dead Indian Soda Springs, Ed Netting, A. M. Gay of Butte Falls, were here for dinner Monday and so was Charley Brown, who says that he is selling Fords, Fordson tractors and Ford supplies for the C. E. Gates Co.
    Miss Elsie Whaley of Butte Falls came out Tuesday morning to visit her mother, who has been on the sick list under the treatment of Dr. Holt for several weeks, and sister Rosa, who is assisting at the Sunnyside. I am glad to be able to say that her mother, Mrs. F. A. Whaley, has greatly improved and seems to be on the road to recovery.
    Our town was almost desolated Memorial Day so I only made two trips across to the post office and the first time saw only one man and he was the Butte Falls stage driver who came in, but later in the afternoon Mrs. George Trefren, Mrs. William Abbott, her daughter, Mrs. William Welch, her son, Orbie Abbott and a young man by the name of Beck. Miss Elsie Whaley went home with them.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 2, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. A. E. Hildreth and two sons, A. E. and Buel Hildreth, and wife of Butte Falls, who had been out to Central Point, Medford and Phoenix Memorial Day, called on the Sunnyside family Tuesday afternoon on their way home.
    Henry French, one of our prosperous farmers, poultry and dairy men, was in our town Tuesday and in commenting on the article I wrote on the advantage to be derived from the proper use of water, fertilizers and scientific farming, gave me a little of his experience in that department of agriculture. He said that he had a small farm of forty acres on the bank of Rogue River, about thirty acres in cultivation, where he has been living and has been farming without water to irrigate, for it is not everyone who lives on a running stream who can use the water to irrigate, for it often costs quite a sum to make a ditch so as to take the water out and raise it up so as to utilize it in the way as it did in his case. He said that he had one small piece, about an acre, that looked very good, so he sowed it to grain and it produced about three-quarters of a ton of hay. He next used fertilizer and planted it in potatoes but the result was no more satisfactory, so he went in to a project with some of the neighbors to take water out of the river and the result was he planted it in clover and now cuts two crops a year of five good loads of clover hay a year. And remarked that if he had only 40 acres of land, without water, he would gladly give one-half of it to have the other half supplied with water.
    Another incident occurred a few years ago up in the Lake Creek country, when Herman Meyer, Sr. was telling his experience in using fertilizers on his alfalfa. It appeared that he had his orchard set in alfalfa and the land outside of the trees between the trees and the fence was also set in alfalfa, but he did not realize that the lime and sulfur he was using to spray his trees would prove beneficial to the alfalfa, so omitted to extend the spraying to the fence and the result was that when he cut his hay that stood next to the fence was not more than half as good as that among the trees, so the next year he sprayed it all alike and the result was an increase of about 50 percent in the production of the hay crop next to the fence.
    Speaking of raising alfalfa, I received a letter the other day from Mr. Joseph Mayer, Ephrata, Washington, in which he said that he was reading my Eagle Point Eaglets every week and asked me to give him some idea how we sow and cultivate alfalfa here in Oregon, and if I understand him, he seems to think that the seed is "set out," whereas I use the term "set to" alfalfa. If Mr. Joseph Mayer will write to the O.A.C., Corvallis, he can secure all the information necessary on the subject, although I found when I was up in Northern Oregon and Washington that they were having trouble in some localities with their alfalfa.
    Professor A. L. Haselton of Ashland came up here to meet his son, Frank, who is the foreman on the Antelope orchard Tuesday and went out home with him.
    George Givan, one of our prosperous farmers and dairy men, was here Wednesday morning.
    Dr. J. L. Holmes, a veterinary surgeon, formerly of Medford but now of Grants Pass, and W. A. Scott, also of Grants Pass, were here for dinner Tuesday and so was W. F. Wymore of Derby. They were on their way down below Sacramento, California with a two-ton truck to engage in hauling in fruit.
    S. W. Tracy of Portland, Oregon, representative of Mishawaka-Wesleyan Mfg. Co. and Lucius Kincaid of Prospect were here for dinner and bed and breakfast Tuesday. Mr. Kincaid has the contract for carrying the U.S. mail from here, three times a week, to Persist for the next four years from July first, 1922, also the contract for carrying the U.S. mail from Medford to Crater Lake and back daily during the months of July, August and September for the next four years from July first, next.
    Among the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Wednesday were Mr. Hoagland of Central Point on his way to his farm near Brownsboro, Frank Neil, Derby and a stranger.
    Lemon Charley, recently of Medford, was here for dinner Wednesday and he tells me that he has purchased the F. M. Stewart home here in our town and is moving in and Mr. Time, who has been living on the place, has moved on to his farm again.
    One of Henry Meyers boys of Lake Creek and O. M. Tremblay, general agent, representative of Reliance Life Insurance Co. of Pittsburgh, of Portland were here for dinner.
    W. P. Holbrook, Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of the Dead Indian Soda Springs, Charley Humphrey and wife, Chris Beale and J. B. Cooper of Trail were among the business callers Wednesday. Mr. Cooper stopped at the Sunnyside and is here up to the present time, Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Anderson and three children of Brownsboro were here for dinner Thursday on their way to Medford.
    W. E. Hammel and Fred Pettegrew were here for dinner Thursday. They were looking over the points of the Fish Lake ditch where the company had made some mistakes so as to avoid them in making the canal from Big Butte to Eagle Point.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton of Wellen and Mrs. Oscar Higinbotham of Butte Falls, Mrs. J. H. Carlton of Wellen and two girls and Mrs. Herbert Carlton, C. H. Oliver of Ontario, California, were business callers Thursday.
    J. H. Cohnsen, representative of the Pacific Mutual Life Insurance Co., Medford, was here for dinner Thursday.
    E. V. Peterson, the mail carrier from Persist, and wife spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside.
    A young man giving his name as near as I could understand as Booby of Grants Pass was here Thursday night, canvassing for a Seventh Day Baptist book.
    Mr. E. C. Fawcett, who had a contract with Mr. Campbell to clear the right of way on the Crater Lake Highway on the Eagle Point unit, came in Friday on the stage on his way to Butte Falls.
    Herman Meyer, Sr., of Lake Creek, was a business caller Friday.
    Wm. Cottrell of Eagle Point post office, who lives near Trail, went through here Friday morning with about two hundred head of cattle, taking them to new range.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 6, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the business callers in our town last Thursday was Joe Riley, one of the early settlers of this community, he having been born on the place where he is now living. Another visitor was Mrs. William Perry, who lives with her husband on their lovely home just outside of our town. She spent the day visiting at the Sunnyside Thursday. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek was here on business and took dinner, and Jack Kerby, one of our old boarders, recently from Spokane, but who spent the winter here, he having secured a job on the von der Hellen contract near Prospect. Mr. C. E. Barr of Medford and Wm. Phillips, also of Medford, representing Dennis, Kimball & Pope were also here for dinner and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro was a business caller Friday.
    Wm. E. Butler was also here on business and in speaking of his sister, Mrs. G. R. Brown, who recently arrived with her husband from Taft, Calif., remarked that they were busily engaged building on their new home back of the Stewart place.
    W. E. Alexander of Freeman Co., Central Point, Wm. G. Knighton, Geo. Albert and Mrs. Clara Spangler of Trail, W. Vose Adams and his father, Rev. H. G. Adams, came in from Corvallis for dinner. Mr. W. Vose Adams had started to take his vacation, having just closed his term in the O.A.C. at Corvallis, and came out with his father and went right on to Butte Falls to commence work on the P.&E. Railroad.
    Ralph Cowgill, at one time civil engineer for the Fish Lake Ditch Co. but now a nominee for the legislature, was also here for dinner, and two strangers were here for the night.
    We had about the usual number in attendance at Sunday school and church but when it came to dinner there was a perfect jam as the ball game in the afternoon was between Eagle Point and Butte Falls teams and from the reports given me the game was very closely contested, the score standing 3 to 4 in favor of Eagle Point. They commenced to eat dinner a few minutes after 12 noon, and came with such a rush and kept coming so fast that I didn't try to secure the names and many of them were strangers from Butte Falls and the surrounding country. I did not even try to keep count of the number who ate dinner as I was so unwell that I simply gave it up as a bad job, but I remember that there was Geo. Barker, wife and two daughters, the Butte Falls banker, Mrs. J. P. Hughes and daughter Viola and son Samuel. After I had written the foregoing I asked Miss Rose Whaley, who has been an assistant in conducting the affairs at the Sunnyside Hotel for the past year and more, and she from memory gave me the following list from Butte Falls: Mr. Johnson, Gus Edmondson and wife, Alice and Charley White, Glen Albert, Essie Whaley, Ernest Albert, Ray Spencer and wife, Charley Patton and wife, Rod Baker, wife and daughter, Elgie Abbott, Ernest Abbott and wife, Prof. Ward, Manuel Poole, Milton Hammersley, Claude (Shorty) Miles, Willard Heryford, Everett Faber, Slim Palmer and wife, Bob Edmondson and wife, Ira Tungate, Chris Beale, besides O. McDonald of Medford and Aden Haselton, F. J. McPherson and family, successor to T. E. Nichols, Thomas F. Nichols and wife, William Perry, wife and his mother, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Guy Pruett and mother, Mrs. M. E. Pruett and quite a number of others were here to see the ball game, but am not sure [who] were here for dinner. They had a very interesting game, the score standing 5 to 3 in favor of Eagle Point.
    There was preaching service at the church last Sunday morning and evening, and next Sunday, June 11th, there will be a Sunday school picnic at the Reese Creek school house and it is expected that the Trail, Brownsboro, Derby and Eagle Point Sunday schools will be there and all take part in the exercises in the forenoon and there will be preaching in the afternoon. Everybody is cordially invited. Big feed again.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the popular Sunday school evangelist, formerly of this district but now of Wolf Creek, is to preach here in Eagle Point on Sunday, June 17th at 11 o'clock a.m. and 8 o'clock p.m. and at Trail in the afternoon at 3 o'clock the same day.
    Mrs. M. H. Kentner of Los Angeles has opened a Bible school here for the children. They meet at the church every morning and she gives instruction from the Bible, teaching them biblical accounts of incidents, short bible stories, etc. The first meeting was held Monday morning and there were eleven enrolled, the next seventeen and this morning (Wednesday) there were twenty. The children seem to take considerable interest in the teaching. Mrs. Kentner expects to keep the meetings up most of the month of June.
    Joe Moomaw is having his home papered and painted.
    Lucius Kincaid and four others were here for dinner Monday.
    J. A. Lowther of Agate was here Monday and Tuesday shearing sheep.
    Miss Vida Bradshaw of Brownsboro, one of our popular teachers, called Monday afternoon to visit Miss Rose Whaley.
    Oren Zimmerman of Butte Falls, who has been working here in the valley, went up home Tuesday on the stage and so did Frank Neil of Derby and Charley Eden of Lake, who came out on the stage and went up home on the Lake Creek stage. He was inquiring where he could purchase a place in or near Eagle Point of a few acres with water to irrigate as he wants to move out of the hills.
    C. C. Cate, county agent, his son Leland, and Fred Pettegrew were here for dinner Monday. They were out setting a valuation on the land under the proposed ditch from above Butte Falls to cover the land near Derby, Eagle Point and to cross Little Butte Creek just above the Fred Pelouze place and cover several fine farms and orchards on the south side of the creek including the Alta Vista Orchard of 196 acres.
    Frank Smith of Grants Pass was here for supper Tuesday night and went on to Medford.
    H. L. Evans of Medford was here for dinner Monday and Tuesday. He was engaged plumbing the house for Mr. Mittelsteadt.
    Sam Coy, the new mail contractor for carrying the mail from here via Wellen to Climax, has moved his family up to Climax.
    Sam Harnish was a diner at the Sunnyside Tuesday, and his son Ray Harnish was here Wednesday.
    C. Humphrey and E. M. Schmitt were here Tuesday.
    O. M. Goss has sold his orchard just outside of our town on the Crater Lake Highway to John W. Smith and he expects to build and move onto it this fall.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Clifford Hickson, a daughter, date not known by writer.
    The Ladies' Club are to meet at the home of Mrs. Amy Brown Thursday, June 15.
    Mrs. Merritt and son of Reese Creek were transacting business here Tuesday.
    Richard Muskopf has been papering Joe Moomaw's home.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1922, page 28


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed Cowden, one of our far-seeing and enterprising stockman-farmers and dairymen, was in town Wednesday and so was Charley Humphrey, who brought in wood for our townspeople to supply the demand for the coming winter. And while the two were here in town they happened to meet and Mr. Cowden jumped on Mr. Humphrey's truck and had a fine ride over the unspeakable road to Charley's home beyond Derby, and while there made a deal for twenty-one pigs that had just been weaned, and the result was the pigs were transferred from the pen into two large boxes, put onto the truck, and in order to economize in time the truck was moved to a rick of stovewood and two tier of wood put in and the whole load brought out, the wood to the Sunnyside and the pigs to the Cowden farm to be converted into hogs for the fall and winter market. Thus the city folks can see the way the country people have to shift things around to procure money to buy the necessary things of life and pay the taxes to support the higher-ups who ride around in their fine cars, inspecting what the farmers raise, gathering samples of what the farmers raise for exhibition at the county and state fairs to help to boost our country and build up the towns and cities so that the farmers can find a market for what they raise and thus keep the ball moving. The question is often asked how so many people can keep up; we see [them] riding over the country in their fine automobiles, wearing fine clothes, smoking good cigars and not producing a thing, for it is not an uncommon thing to see two or four, for they generally go in pairs, "agents" and hear them telling of their selling four or six autos in a week, thus showing that our country is in a prosperous and healthy condition, and it is all brought about because of the brain work of the farmers.
    Wm. Almy and his mother, Mrs. M. D. Bowles of Lake Creek, were among the business callers Wednesday.
    Our Vacation Bible School is progressing finely under the management of Mrs. M. H. Kentner of Los Angeles, and I had the privilege of attending the session Friday and was surprised to see and hear the progress the children are making in memorizing and repeating the incidents related in the Old Testament and the interest most of the children seem to take in the move.
    Remember that on Sunday, June 18th, that Rev. M. C. Davis, at one time popular and efficient Sunday school evangelist, now of Wolf Creek, is to preach here on Sunday morning, 11 o'clock and in the evening at 8 o'clock and at Trail at 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Those in Trail and vicinity who see this notice tell their friends of the Rev. Davis' coming, as he has a host of friends in that community.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday were Wm. Gibson, B. F. Oatman and H. E. Warner, who are working now in the interest of the county and state fairs gathering the different kinds of grasses, alfalfa, clover, timothy, vetch, etc. to be cured properly and placed on exhibit to let the world know the wonderful productivity of Jackson County, Oregon. Ray Harnish and Lloyd Harvey, Ralph Cowgill, who is the civil engineer working on the water canal from Big Butte, beyond Butte Falls to Eagle Point and beyond, and F. A. Deputy, Talent, Oregon.
    Miss Maude Allen of Eugene, a niece of Mrs. A. R. McDonald, is here visiting her uncle and aunt.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Silliman, of the Sugar Bowl Candy manufacturing establishment of Medford, were here for supper. Mr. Silliman makes his own candies but sells at wholesale and delivers. He had been to Trail and Butte Falls that day to deliver a lot of his goods and stopped here on his way home for supper. Claude (Shorty) Miles and his mother, Mrs. J. Doubleday, and James Degan of Beagle were also here for supper.
    Thursday W. Blake of the biological survey, U.S. Dept. of Agriculture, was here for supper and Wm. Lichtenberg of Wolf Creek, salesman for North Ridge Brush Co., spent the night. He canvasses a town or community, takes orders and the next week delivers.
    A. G. Bishop, one of our prominent orchardists and farmers, was a business caller Thursday and so was Andrew Poole, one of the forest rangers of Trail.
    Gary Garrett of Medford and Marsh Garrett of Lake Creek, Henry French and son Lloyd passed through here in the morning and went to Medford and returned in the afternoon.
    Mrs. S. R. Johnston and Mrs. G. W. Averill and Charles Martin of Butte Falls were passengers on the stage from Butte Falls Thursday and Fred Arnes of the Edgell orchard was a business caller Thursday.
    Mrs. S. A. Richter of Trail, who lives just beyond the divide on the Douglas County line, came out on the Butte Falls stage Thursday and went on up home on the Persist stage. In speaking of his health remarked that he had the flu last winter but his nearest neighbor was eight miles away and the snow was so deep that he could not get out, and he had no phone so had to get along the best he could alone.
    Mrs. R. McDonald of Brownsboro, Mrs. M. D. Bowles and son, Wm. Almy of Lake Creek, also came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday evening and went on up home.
    Walter Wood, one of our prominent stockmen, was here for dinner Friday.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of the big orchardists of Rogue River Valley, was here Friday afternoon and so was Mrs. Herbert Carlton of Wellen.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 13, 1922, page 6


Elk Creek
    Mr. and Mrs. W. Willits went to Medford last week. Mr. Willits returned but Mrs. Willits remained to visit awhile.
    Miss Francis Greb, teacher of Persist school, assisted by Miss Inez Willits, the misses Dorothy and Edna Peterson and Mr. Elmer Ivey, gave a school program Friday. Miss Burr showed slides entitled "Views of Mexico," and "The Bread Industry of Oregon." Both proved to be interesting. The program was appreciated by all who attended, for it was difficult to try to get up a program with such a small school. In general opinion the pupils did very good. Those in attendance were Mrs. Ashcraft and children, Mr. Willits, Miss Inez Willits, Dorothy Willits, Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Whitley, Ezra Whitley, Elmer Ivey, Harvey Morgan, Henry Thornton, Mr. and Mrs. V. Peterson, Edna Peterson, Dorothy Peterson and Miss Burr. After the program we had a bountiful basket supper and dispersed to our respective homes at an early hour in the morning.
    Miss Burr visited Mrs. F. A. Whitley Friday the 9th. Elmer Ivey was also a visitor.
    Those who are haying on our creek are as follows: Mr. George Hall, Mr. P. E. Sandoz, Weston and Boyd Miller. The rain came at the wrong time for the above farmers but did not ruin the hay.
    Mr. Hall has escaped the rain so far.
    Mr. P. E. Sandoz has been shopping in town.
    Miss Inez Willits and Mrs. Fred Sturgis are kept busy boarding the surveyors who have been surveying a right-of-way for the California-Oregon Power Co.
    We are having quite heavy traffic for this mountainous section lately, as people are coming from town to fish.
    Antone Ring has bought an iron horse (motorcycle) and seems to be enjoying himself, by the looks of things.
    The construction work on the road is going on smoothly.
    There will be an annual school meting at the school house Monday, June 19. All are urged to attend.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 16, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Hessler of Brownsboro and Myrtle von der Hellen of this place went to Medford Friday to attend the graduating exercises of high school.
    W. H. Crandall and George W. Daley, Jr. were here Friday trading with our merchants.
    Butte Falls is announcing their program for July 3rd and 4th. A barbecue, ball game between Eagle Point and Butte Falls teams, and dance in the evening are among the attractions advertised.
    Mr. Dupray, who lives on the P.&E. railway near Butte Falls, spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside. He reports that he cannot get cars for the delivery of his lumber, of which he has a quantity on hand.
    Russell Harris, returning from California, spent the night here. Also Lloyd Welch of Lake Creek.
    George Fauerby, who has been working with his teams on the highway between here and Medford, has gone to Prospect for highway work.
    Among those who took supper at the Sunnyside Sunday were Earl Mathews, Eli and Everett Dahack, Wm. Knighton, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Holmes, Geo. Wehman, bookkeeper for Wm. von der Hellen, and Lucius Kincaid.
    A. L. Haselton and Mrs. A. L. Haselton of Ashland were here Monday accompanying V. W. Haselton of Everett, Wash., a son of A. L. Haselton by his first wife, and who had not seen his father for forty years. They had been trying to locate each other for years and Chauncey Florey, our county clerk, was instrumental in helping them find each other's address. They quickly planned this pleasant reunion. Mr. V. W. Haselton was accompanied on his trip by his wife and his daughter, Miss Julia Haselton. He is a dairyman and could spend but a short time in this county.
    Miss Ella Belford was at the Sunnyside Tuesday noon, also Charles Manning and his mother, Mrs. Frank Manning from Peyton, Roy Vaughn and Charles Foeller were here also.
    H. L. Evans of Medford is putting in the plumbing for Mr. Mittelsteadt.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Morris from California are visiting Dr. and Mrs. W. H. Nuding. Mrs. Morris and Mrs. Nuding are sisters.
    Prof. W. L. Powers of the Soils Department of O.A.C., Corvallis, C. C. Cate, county agent, Ralph Cowgill of Medford, chief engineer on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point irrigation project, accompanied by Fred Pettegrew of Reese Creek were here for dinner Wednesday. They were here to levy an appraisement on the land which is to be under the ditch to be presented to the bondholders.
    Jas. E. Humphrey of Ocean Beach, Calif. is visiting his nephew, Chas. Humphrey of Derby.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 16, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Another reader of the Eagle Point Eaglets heard from. I received a long letter the other day from G. E. Dennison, Carrollville, Wis., in which he says that he has been a constant reader of the Eagle Point Eaglets for a number of years and that he has a timber claim in the Lake Creek country, and that he has a number of friends there who wish to locate on homesteads or on government timber land and were thinking of going to Montana and that he suggested to them that he thought that it might be better to come to Oregon and wanted to know about homesteads and timber claims here. There is a good chance for the Medford Commercial Club to distribute some of their literature to advantage.
    Lucius Kincaid and wife, who have been at Prospect, took dinner here and went on to Medford.
    Miss Edith Fredenberg, who has been teaching school east of Butte Falls, was here and spent the night on her way home from taking the teachers examinations at Jacksonville.
    Luke Henderson, J. J. Hoagstraat and Norman Merrill of Medford were in Eagle Point last Friday in behalf of the new compulsory education bill and appeared to be succeeding very well as they secured the names of every voter that was at the hotel with the exception of one who left the dinner table before the petition was passed to him.
    L. Ataltanhugen of Grants Pass was here for dinner.
    C. J. Rose and B. J. Oswald of Medford took supper at Sunnyside Saturday on their way home.
    C. E. Terrill, sheriff, and J. A. Cave, night policeman at Medford, stopped here for dinner on their way to Butte Falls on official business.
    John W. Smith of Big Sticky took supper and spent Saturday night here. He was here working in his orchard on the edge of town and getting ready to build.
    A. J. Florey returned Saturday from Portland where he had been to receive medical treatment.
    I took a stroll down toward the railroad track and noticed that Geo. Brown & Sons had a nice pile of lumber which they had shipped in and placed on the market. I also met E. C. Faber, the new Butte Falls merchant who bought out J. P. Hughes of Butte Falls, and while there learned that Mr. Faber had made arrangements with the Geo. Brown & Sons Merchandise Co. here to furnish them with shakes from the vicinity of Butte Falls and to handle their eggs in his store at Butte Falls. Mr. Faber also informed me that they were making elaborate preparations for their celebration July 3 and 4 at Butte Falls, and they are anticipating having a good time at the barbecue and at the ball game between Eagle Point and Butte Falls teams and at the dances.
    Lem Charley is making some changes in the Jacks property, which he recently purchased, and is preparing to move into it.
    Geo. Holmes has bought a fine two- to four-ton White auto bus for the mail route between Medford and Butte Falls.
    Five strangers took dinner here Saturday on their way to work at Fish Lake.
    Rev. Mark Davis and wife of Wolf Creek, Ore. arrived Saturday afternoon and remained until Monday as guests at the Sunnyside and while here favored us with two strong sermons Sunday forenoon and evening at the Eagle Point Church, and in the afternoon we took a ride over the Crater Lake Highway to Trail where he preached to an appreciative congregation at 3 p.m. Rev. Davis and the writer used to preach regularly at Trail for many years until about 1914. He was very much pleased with the new highway. He recounted pushing first his bicycle and later his motorcycle over the almost impassable sticky roads between Eagle Point and Trail.
    I made a trip to Medford Saturday afternoon to have my eyes treated but found Dr. Emmens to be absent. I also called at the Mail Tribune office. The editor was out but I had a pleasant chat with the ladies of the office.
    Mrs. M. L. Pruett was in Eagle Point Saturday.
    Mrs. Will Welsh of Central Point was on the stage Saturday on her way to Butte Falls to visit her mother, Mrs. Abbott.
    Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro was in Eagle Point Saturday on business.
    Rob Harnish has moved his family from Phenix to Eagle Point to keep house for his father, S. H. Harnish.
    L. L. Conger was in town having work done by W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith.
    J. W. Isbell of Reese Creek had the misfortune to get his hand caught in some machinery, losing one finger. He was fortunate in finding Dr. Wm. Holt here in Eagle Point and had the injured hand dressed very promptly.
    A. N. Townsend of Eugene, Ore. with the U.S. Rubber Co., was here for dinner Saturday.
    A ball game between Eagle Point and Butte falls was played here Sunday, resulting in a score of 3 to 20 for Eagle Point. There were about sixty at the hotel for dinner Sunday, the majority of them being from Butte Falls.
    Rev. H. G. Adams will preach at Eagle Point next Sunday, June 25, both morning and evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 23, 1922, page 11


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John L. Robertson, Sr., Jack Mayham and two strangers were here for dinner Monday. Mr. Robertson is one of our thoroughgoing and extensive farmers and reports that the hay crop is fully to date and that the prospect for a good crop of grain is very good.
    H. Charley and Miss Bertha Ford of Medford were here for supper Monday evening.
    Mrs. F. A. Whaley and family of Butte Falls came in as guests at the Sunnyside Saturday the 17th and remained until Tuesday afternoon and were taken out to Medford where Mr. Whaley had secured a house and had brought their household goods. Mrs. Whaley has been an invalid at the hotel for several weeks owing to the high altitude at Butte Falls.
    C. A. Pickel, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Co., was here on his regular monthly round Thursday for dinner and so was Charley Brown, salesman for C. E. Gates & Co.
    When the Medford-Butte Falls stage, the Hudson Six, arrived at our post office Wednesday morning it was loaded to its capacity, three men on the rear seat, four on the middle and three, including the chauffeur, on the front and two on the hood over the lamps, beside the mail, parcel post and baggage, and they all seemed to be comfortably seated; they all went on to Butte Falls.
    Our annual school meeting was held at the school house Wednesday and the regular order of business gone through and in addition Mrs. T. E. Nichols tendered her resignation as a member of the school board and it was accepted and the contract was let to haul the high school pupils to and from the Medford high school to the last year's contractor, Sam H. Harnish, for the next year.
    Mrs. R. G. Brown was re-elected to follow herself, and Mrs. Grover was elected to fill the vacancy caused by the resignation of Mrs. Nichols, and the old clerk, Mr. John Linn, was re-elected as school clerk.
    H. B. Tronson, one of our leading orchardists, was a business caller Wednesday and reports that the prospect for fruit is fine.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Rader and their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stanley of Antelope Valley, made a business trip to Medford Wednesday.
    The following persons were appointed a committee to arrange the school budget for the coming school year: Mrs. F. W. Reid, Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mr. F. J. McPherson.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Singwalt, nee Hattie Cingcade of Oakland, Calif., came in Monday to visit Mrs. Singwalt's parents and her many old-time friends and schoolmates, for Hattie, as many of us still call her, was educated as far as and including the ninth grade here, she then by her persistent efforts attended the business college of Ashland, finishing her course there, then went to San Francisco where she attended night schools until she secured a position in the S.P. Railroad office, and kept climbing until she is capable of filling almost any position in the business world and her folks have reason to feel proud of having such a daughter. Mr. Singwalt is in business in Oakland, Calif., preparing the types to print pictures for books and newspapers and has a force of ten men employed at the present time in his office.
    We have had another change in real estate in our town, John L. Robertson Jr., having bought what is known as the Charley Painter property, a good roomy residence and three acres of choice garden land with water right and a good roomy barn.
    J. D. Patrick, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside Hotel most of the time this spring and summer doing odd jobs carpentering, has gone to work on a job for Frank Rhodes.
    A crew of three men have been at work placing caution and distance signs along the Crater Lake Highway the past few days and making their headquarters a part of the time at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Charley Humphrey was here Wednesday with a load of wood. With him were Mr. Graham of Reese Creek, who owns the old Fred Pettegrew place and J. W. Isbell, who had his finger caught in machinery about a week ago and cut off with the exception of a very small piece of skin. The doctor placed the two parts of the finger together here intending to redress it the next morning when he went to Medford. On examination there he found that they were growing together nicely, so that he will not be under the necessity of losing the finger at all though it will probably be stiff.
    Mrs. J. L. Hanna nee Annie Pankey, formerly of Central Point, and two daughters, Helen and Harriet of U. of O. campus, Eugene, are in the valley visiting her brother and two sisters and friends and called at the Sunnyside where we had a pleasant visit.
    Wm. Cottrell of Eagle Point post office, one of our prominent stockmen, was here for dinner Thursday, also W. H. Brown and wife and B. H. Williams of L. Dunkelspiel & Co., San Francisco. Also G. W. Frey and wife and son J. W. Frey of Lake Creek.
    H. L. Whited and Miss Marjorie Whited of Visalia, Calif., with Mrs. Laura Hosler of Ashland and Mrs. Cora Reimers and Mrs. Sarah Ganiard, both of Alameda, Cal., took dinner at the Sunnyside. E. M. Hosler is superintendent of the water system in Ashland. H. L. Whited is a jeweler in Visalia, Calif.
    Dr. and Mrs. E. G. Riddell of Santa Barbara, Calif., and children Dorothea and Nelson are here visiting Mrs. Riddell's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis.
    Dr. W. W. Holt was here for supper Thursday and reported the birth of a son that morning to Mr. and Mrs. Earl Tucker of Brownsboro. Mrs. Earl Tucker, nee Winifred Hawk, was formerly a school girl of our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 26, 1922, page 3


$400,000 EAGLE PT. BONDS APPROVED
    SALEM, June 28.--Certification of $400,000 in bonds for the Eagle Point irrigation district in Jackson County was approved by the state irrigation securities commission yesterday. The issue will be used in the improvement of the district, including the construction of a canal 18 miles in length, through which water will be diverted from Big Butte Creek to the 6200 acres included in the district. No storage of water will be required.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 28, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Foster, who has been in the employ of the Fish Lake Canal Company as a carpenter for some time, was a guest Saturday night and Sunday at the Sunnyside.
    Noble Zimmerman of Butte Falls came out Friday and spent the night at the Sunnyside and went out on the Eagle Point-Persist stage on his way over to Tiller to work for the U.S. government.
    John Hoogstrat and Howard J. Hill of Medford were here for dinner Friday circulating a petition to recall our sheriff, Charley Terrill, but so far as I know failed to secure any names, but possibly may have secured a few as there are always some old croakers who are willing to try to tear down anyone who is trying to do his duty. The only complaint, or the principal one, against Charley has been that he don't catch the bootleggers who attend the Saturday night dances out here, while it appears that as soon as he, himself, or any of his deputies come to town, word is sent by phone, by signs or monosyllables and the booze is all cached or carried out of town and so of course, he finds none.
    Mr. W. M. Rinsol of Medford and Mrs. S. E. Williams of Portland were here Thursday for dinner.
    Charley Clark, the traveling salesman for the Watkins products, was here and spent Friday night.
    Our street committee has had Mr. Muskopf tearing up the old, dilapidated sidewalk between Main Street and the opera house and replacing it with new lumber, a much-needed change.
    Saturday afternoon I met Mr. Macdonald and Mr. Ledwick as they were trying to raise a force of men to repair the dam that forces the water into the old mill race, as it is running to waste while their gardens need it.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her daughter, Joyce, who have been living in Medford during the latter part of the high school term, have returned to their home in Eagle Point, but expect to go to Prospect to spend the summer in a short time. They were diners at the Sunnyside Saturday and so was Charles Humphrey.
    Saturday morning Mr. W. G. Averill, who had spent the night at the Sunnyside, started bright and early for home with a one-horse buggy, and just after noon came in again in a furor of excitement, stating that he had lost his coat and in one of its pockets was money, checks, etc., worth two hundred and fifty dollars, and just then the question came up as to being able to get an ad in the Mail Tribune that afternoon. It so happened that I was just ready to start for Medford to see Dr. Holt, who has been treating my case. Hurriedly he wrote out an ad and off we started, and soon I was in the Mail Tribune office and was told by the affable clerk, Mary, that I was too late, as they were ready to go to press, but nothing daunted, I visited the editor and stated my case to him, and the result was in a few minutes it was in type. After visiting Dr. Holt and having him make out a prescription I then called on Dr. J. J. Emmens to have him treat my eyes, and waited my turn, met the doctor, had him treat my eyes, went on my way and in the course of the afternoon met Mrs. Geppert of Butte Falls, one of Mr. Averill's neighbors, and she told me that she had found the coat and that everything was all safe. On reaching home I found Mr. Averill there, as he thought that his horse was too tired to drive up home that afternoon, and I informed him of the result, greatly to the relief of his mind.
    While I was in the office of Dr. Holt he announced the birth of a fine boy in the family of Theron Taylor of Lake Creek June 23, and I remarked that he seemed to be doing quite a business in that line out in our country, and asked for a list of the births in our neighborhood during the month of June, so he gave the following list: Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vestal, boy, June 12, R. Creek; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Merritt, boy, June 14, R.C.; E. L. White, June 15, girl, Derby; Earl Tucker, boy, June 22, Brownsboro and Theron Taylor, Lake Creek, June 23, as above stated. Quite an increase in a thinly settled community for one doctor, and at last accounts the mothers and babies were doing well.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Cope of Medford were here for supper Saturday.
    Among the guests who came in Saturday night for beds were J. M. Spencer, a member of the engineering corps on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point irrigation canal, Russell Harris and Earl (Shorty) Miles, beside a few whose names I omitted to secure.
    Sunday there was a ball game here between the Ruch, Applegate, and the Eagle Point team; they seemed to [be] pretty well matched, as the score stood 14 to 20 in favor of Eagle Point. Among the diners were Mrs. Sarah Kentner, Ashland, Mrs. Ida T. Ward, Oakland, Calif., Stanley Ward, Mrs. Carmine Ward, also of Oakland, Calif., and Mrs. Ann Fouts of Alameda, Calif., J. M. Spencer, J. F. Brown and wife, T. G. McPherson, wife and son Fred, two of our prominent merchants and their families, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and daughter Miss Joyce, Mrs. R. Reter of Medford and her brother, Judge Florey, Russell Harris, Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Lane and Miss Ermine Danford, Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. Jessie Richardson, Central Point, and the ten members of the Ruch ball team.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 30, 1922, page 7










TO SPEND $400,000 ON EAGLE POINT PROJECT
    Barr and Cunningham, consulting engineers of the Eagle Point Irrigation District, report in part as follows:
    "The Eagle Point Irrigation District is one of a group of projects which has been organized in the Rogue River Valley to supply the demand for water upon old settled well-developed farming lands. The experience and success of the Medford and Talent districts have to a great extent brought about the organization of this district which immediately adjoins lands receiving their supply from the Medford District system.
    "To permit following of legal subdivisions and property lines and to make an inclusive district before undertaking any surveys a total of 19,790 acres were included within the boundaries. The securities of the district are an obligation against all of the land, though only the irrigable land is assessed to pay costs.
    "The property owners of the district have voted bonds in the amount of $400,000 for the construction of the project. The lands of the district are mainly between Big Butte and Little Butte creeks, immediately adjoining the towns of Eagle Point and about 13 miles northeasterly from Medford.
    "The source of water supply is Big Butte Creek, mainly fed by springs which give it a notably large and uniform flow. The water will be diverted from the creek just below the falls. The main canal will follow the slopes above Big Butte Creek to a saddle where it will enter the McNeal Creek watershed. It will cross McNeal Creek by means of an inverted siphon. The balance of the canal will lie generally parallel to and above the railway, following the slope south of McNeal Creek and Reese Creek, reaching a saddle known as Nichols Gap which lies directly above and east of the main body of irrigable land. From this point the principal laterals will drop down to all land which it is proposed to irrigate.
    "It is estimated that 60 percent of the land to be irrigated is now producing crops. The remaining 40 percent is largely used for pasturing purposes.
    "Drainage conditions of the district are especially good and there does not appear to be any danger of alkali trouble. Mr. Dillard has based his estimates upon a canal having a capacity of 70 second-feet at an intake. This would seem ample for the irrigation of 6,600 acres.
    "An estimate of the cost of construction has been made by Mr. F. C. Dillard. For an irrigable acreage of 6,213, this will amount to $56.78 per acre exclusive of bond discounts and interest during construction."
    The state has guaranteed interest on the bond issue for two years.
    G. E. Miller & Co., of Portland, have purchased the $400,000 bonds of this district and are anticipating a sale of the bonds somewhat in line with their sale of the $475,000 Talent District bonds which were all placed on the day in which they were first offered to the public.
Medford Clarion, August 4, 1922, page 4












EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the readers of the Mail Tribune, I was in Ashland attending the meetings conducted by Rev. Dr. Price of Lodi, California, and about all of the Eaglets I have at this time, Friday p.m., have been picked up and jotted down for me by a good friend, whose name is withheld at his request. And by that means I can, to a certain extent, keep posted on what is going on in and around Eagle Point.
    Mr. Ralph Cowgill, the chief engineer of the Eagle Point-Butte Falls project to make a canal from Butte Falls to bring water for irrigating purposes in the country north, northeast and south of our town, [omission] in the company's office Tuesday the 26th inst., and took supper at the Sunnyside and Chris Natwick, one of the contractors of this section, was also here looking over the project with an idea of trying to secure at least a part of the job.
    In speaking of the recital of Rip Van Winkle by Mr. Wm. Lee Greenleaf, I unintentionally omitted to state that he donated a part of the receipts of the evening to our school, thus helping along the cause of education.
    Mrs. Robert Harnish has been spending a part of the week visiting her mother the past week at Butte Falls, and during her absence Robert and his father S. H. Harnish have been taking their meals at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Palmer of Butte Falls came out and went to Medford to have his eye treated that he had the misfortune to have hurt. On his way he spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Harry Howard of Ashland and his helper drove over a band of one hundred sheep from Johnson's Prairie to Roy Stewart's Tuesday and Wednesday of this week, spending the night at the Sunnyside Hotel. Frank Simpson took supper here.
    Prospective judge C. M. Thomas of Medford, one of the prominent candidates tor circuit judge of this judicial district, was out here on business connected with the opening of bids on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point irrigation project Thursday, and took dinner at the Sunnyside. Horace Geppert was here also.
    The foregoing items were gathered up for me during my absence from home from Monday morning until Friday morning, quite a help.
    On arriving at the post office here, among the first men I met was Dr. Kirchgessner of Debenger Gap, but I was too near worn out from being up four nights in succession and attending religious services three times a day. for I came up from Ashland Thursday morning and attended the three services the divine healer held in Medford, but I am getting ahead of my story again.
    Before I try to give a few points of interest with regard to the meetings, I will give a few items I have picked up here since my return. There was quite a number of people here for dinner Friday, but I was too much exhausted to try to gather items or ask names but noticed that there was two men and their wives and one little girl beside several men and among them was Ralph Cowgill and he informed me.that Wm. von der Hellen had secured the contract to dig the canal from Butte Falls to its end, not counting the laterals or flumes. He told the amount of the bid, but as I did not write it down, will not try to give it but it was something over one hundred and forty thousand dollars, some six hundred dollars less than his former bid, but I have not learned when he will go to work on the job.
    Mr. S. C. Bond. of Seattle and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Clarence Pruett, were also here for dinner.
    An ambulance passed through here this Saturday going toward Medford, and I understand from Mr. Culbertson of the Lake Creek-Eagle Point mail contractor, that it was Ray McComie, the wife of the track walker along the pipe line of the Medford water system.
    Herb Grissom of Lake Creek came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and went up home on the Lake Creek stage. I noticed that Lemon Charley, who recently bought the Wilbur Jack place, has in the course of construction a quite commodious barn.
    I notice that S. H. Harnish has made a very decided improvement in his car that he was to carry the high school pupils to and from Medford, having put a step and door on the back part of the car so that there will be no climbing over the front seat to get in and out.
    I also noticed that George Holmes, our garage man, after he has torn away his water tank and the water tower, has moved his woodshed up close to the residence building, greatly improving the appearance of the place.
    And now I will resume my writeup of what I saw and heard and enjoyed while in Ashland.
    First, I met quite a number of old friends, notably the Ashland postmaster, E. J. Kiser, for whom I wrote regularly for eight consecutive years once a week [for his Valley Record, 1888-1895]. There was no daily newspapers in Southern Oregon that I knew of south of Portland. I also called on another old newspaper man, Mr. Bert Greer, the publisher and editor of the Ashland Tidings, but he was out at the time, although I met him later and had a little social chat with him. Also I met Mr. Day, who contributes daily in the Medford Mail Tribune besides quite a number who are not so prominent in the business and literary world, but when I entered the Chautauqua building I seemed to enter a different atmosphere, a religious atmosphere where it seemed as though the spirit of love prevailed, and after the first service I began to see and feel the effect of the services, men and women telling of what the Christ had done for them and seeing some of the remarkable cures wrought through the agency of man for the minister insisted that it was not through any power he had but simply that the work was done through Christ Jesus, and in order to derive any benefit the applicant must be a believer in the Christ and know him as a sin-pardoning savior, and the result was that there was a host who submitted and gave their hearts to God. But I see that my letter is already long enough and I wanted to say something about the kind of preaching we had. It was just the kind of preaching we had in the days of John and Charles Wesley and Whitfield and Knox and Spurgeon and Gough and Moody. and a host of others who preached Christ and his power to save from sin, but also to heal their bodily diseases and anyone who was there and could see men and women who were bent over with rheumatism, or with palsy or cancer or female troubles or almost any complaint, made whole and testify to the power of Christ to heal, timid women stood up and told an audience of four or five thousand about how they were healed. But I must call a halt but the next letter will try to give some idea of Dr. Price's manner of preaching, a severe undertaking.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 2, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr, and Mrs. J. H. Stella and three children, recently from Lake County, were doing business with our merchants the last of the week. They have settled on a tract of land northeast of our town belonging to Eli Dahack.
    They have revived the custom of having dances in our town on Saturday night again, and last Saturday night there were a few of the young folk came in for supper and among them were Clarence Pruett of Wellen, Miss Viola Hughes and Miss Venita Fox, Sam Hughes and Harold Patten of Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dwight Tinker of Ashland came in about 10 o'clock p.m. and spent the night at the Sunnyside. They came on business and not to attend the dance.
    We did not hold our regular Sunday school and preaching service Sunday morning, but the county Sunday school association and Christian workers band of Ashland came up and according to previous announcement took charge of the meeting and the result was that a very interesting program was rendered, consisting of songs and instrumental music, five instruments; prayer, reading the Scripture and several addresses by different members of the band. The meeting was led by Mr. W. W. Robison, the secretary of the association. Mr. F. A. Taber of Central Point reviewed the Sunday school lesson and introduced Rev. G. C. Birtchet of Bogota, Colombia, South America. The names given me by one of the workers are as follows: Miss Edith Robison, Misses Minnie and Eva Poley, Miss Edith Plummer, Miss Lenore Angell, Miss Evelyn Hulet, Misses Margaret and Eula McCoy, Miss Josephine Barber, Miss Ruth Freheld, Miss Lucile Gilmore, Mr. J. O. Rigg, Mr. Wallace Maxwell, Howard Gear, Ralph Robison, Frederick Johnson, Marshall Barber, Chester and Marcus Weeds, Luther McCoy, Raymond Carson, Floyd and Gene Putnam, William R. Clary, Paul Koehler. Accompanying them were Mr. and Mrs. G. C. Cary and daughter of Medford. When Mr. Faber introduced Rev. G. C. Birtchet of Bogota, Colombia, he gave us a very interesting account of his labors as a missionary in that far-off land. He has spent six years of his life there, and among the difficulties he labored under was the gross ignorance there is among the people, as there is about seven out of every ten of them who can neither read nor write, and are completely under the control of the priests, and what little education they give them is to learn to read and write, add and subtract, etc. They are not allowed to read the Bible and if the priest finds one in a house he takes it to the public square and burns it, but he has succeeded in organizing a school and is teaching them about the Lord Jesus Christ. He is now visiting his brother in Central Point while his wife is trying to recover her health. At the close of the services it was announced that dinner had been prepared and would be served in the park. So the most of us repaired to the park and found the tables already spread with what shall I say--well, it is the same old story when it comes to picnic in or near Eagle Point. There was almost everything that was good, but us poor creatures who have to leave such things as cold boiled ham, hard-boiled eggs, beans, rich pastry, and to be pitied on such occasions, but it did us good to see others who could eat and enjoy such a feast of good things.
    After the dinner was over there was quite a number of the band went out to Reese Creek Sunday School and conducted services there. Some of the band intend to go to Butte Falls next Sunday, October 8th and hold a service in the forenoon and return to Derby and hold another at 2:30 p.m.
    There were about 30 guests at the Sunnyside for dinner Sunday, but as I was not at home did not try to learn who they were. At night there was Lucius Kincaid, Everett Dahack, Earl and Nye Mathews here for supper.
    Mrs. G. H. West of Medford came out and took dinner at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Lyle Van Scoy was also among the diners Monday noon.
    In my wanderings around town I met William Perry, our road supervisor, Monday, and he told me that he had just finished repairing a piece of road along the William Cottrell farm that has been a vast amount of trouble to the traveling people, especially to the mail carriers, using shale in the place of crushed rock. He says that there is a vast quantity of it near there and that it is first-class for road work; as soon as it is packed a little it becomes hard like cement and makes a first-class road. Lloyd Stanley, recently of Fort Klamath, was in company with Mr. Perry.
    Mr. Carl Stanley and her sister of Lake Creek were also in town at the same time.
    James Hannaford, recently from Eastern Oregon and his cousin, Philip Hannaford of this section, were in town Monday, and James had his arm in a sling and on inquiry [I] learned that last spring his horse fell with him and broke his arm, and that one of the doctors out there set the arm but in such a shape as to bring his hand in a twist so he came in to Medford and had the fracture rebroke and reset, and it seems to be getting along all right now.
    Orvil Childreth, son of our blacksmith, came in Monday evening from Salem to visit his parents and old friends and neighbors.
    M. V. Newell of Clackamas County and J. Cadzow, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, came in Monday night for supper, beds and breakfast. Mr. Cadzow was on his way to Medford to act as a juror, but he was excused by the court when he reached there and returned here for dinner and went on up home that afternoon. Perry Farlow of Lake Creek and his friends, J. D. Johnson of Brownsboro were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday for dinner, and so were E. E. Dinnert and J. C. Williams of Rogue River; also Charles Pennington of Butte Falls and a stranger whose name I failed to learn.
    I see that Charley Hanscom has brought his wood saw to town and is sawing wood for a number of people.
    Word came over the phone Tuesday that one of our highly respected citizens, W. S. Baker, who lived on Reese Creek near Derby, had been crushed with his truck that forenoon. He had the truck standing on a slight slope at Mr. King's place where he had unloaded some hay for him and when he cranked the truck the ratchet that held the brake gave way, the truck starting, knocking him down, running over his body, breaking his spine and dislocating his neck, paralyzing his lower parts. Dr. W. W. P. Holt was called and he was taken to Medford where he passed away. He leaves a wife and four children and a number of friends.
    I did want to say something more about the healer's meeting at Ashland, but find that my letter is already too long.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 6, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John A. Brittsan and his brother, V. E. Brittsan, passed through here Wednesday morning on their way to Jacksonville to settle their account with the county for the privilege of living in our beautiful Rogue River Valley. They returned and were in our town Thursday morning and report that there was a crowd lined up in the sheriff's office waiting to pay their taxes and take their receipt therefor.
     Mr. and Mrs. Charley Humphrey and Mrs. O. M. Schmidt of Derby also passed through here Wednesday on their way to Medford.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday were Cecil M. Jennings, who was also a great at the dinner table on Thursday, and Everett Dahack and Lawrence Pruett, who has become a permanent boarder, Glen Holstock and R. Cook, G. W. Flink and W. J. James of Portland, who said they were down here looking over the country, also Charley Brown of Medford.
    An item of interest I had failed to record is that Roy Stanley has sold his home place, the old John Mathews place, just above our town to Frank Ditsworth of Peyton, and he expects to move his family onto it about the 10th of this month, and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley and little son are stopping at the Sunnyside until they can get settled again. Mrs. Stanley is engaged teaching the school in Brownsboro, but [they] have not decided where they will locate as yet. Roy is engaged at present buying sheep, principally lambs, and shipping them to Idaho to feed.
    There was a large crowd attended the funeral of W. S. Baker, who was run over and killed near his home in the Derby district last Tuesday. It was in the Presbyterian church in Central Point, Thursday. The funeral was conducted by John Perl of Medford and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. E. P. Lawrence, the pastor, of Medford. Almost everyone in the vicinity of Derby and along Reese Creek was in attendance. The bereaved wife and four children have the sympathy of all who knew him, for he was a good citizen and Christian, and met his fate with Christian fortitude and was conscious up to the last moment.
    Thursday evening Clarence Robinett, a son-in-law of our neighbor, Wm. Perry, and one of our town boys, who is now a citizen of Medford, came in for supper. He was the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley, Mrs. Estelle Haley being a stepdaughter by his first wife, and while he is a guest of Mr. and Mrs. Haley he also was visiting his father-in-law and stepmother. His wife was at Roseburg on business at the time.
    Mrs. Thomas Smith and a man whose name I failed to learn were passengers on the stage headed for Butte Falls Friday morning.
    Earl Taylor, a son of Mrs. Royal Brown by her first husband, of Portland, came down Thursday and met his wife in Medford, who had just arrived from the southern part of California where she had been visiting relatives, and came out and visited his mother and relatives. They started home Friday afternoon.
    Wm. Cottrell of near Trail was here for dinner Friday, and so was Cecil M. Jennings of Medford, who is out here overhauling a tractor.
    Ray Davis, one of the ranchers and stockmen of the Derby section, came in Friday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside. He was bringing out a bunch of beef cattle for Ashpole and Nichols meat market of Medford. He was accompanied by Earl Ulrich and one of the Carltons who live on Rogue River above Elk Creek.
    Now I will resume my task of trying to tell the readers of the Eaglets in the Mail Tribune of what I saw, heard and enjoyed while I was in Ashland the three days I was there. If I remember right in one of my letters I promised to tell something of Dr. C. S. Price's style and manner of preaching. About the time appointed for preaching he comes onto the platform right in the midst of the prayer and praise services and his very presence seems to put new life into almost everyone and he changes the exercises somewhat and puts more enthusiasm into the people and they seem to sing with more energy and spirit and after a few minutes spent in singing someone will lead in prayer. He then reads a short scripture lesson and announces his text and commences to unfold its meaning. He never seems to take a long text, sometimes only a word or two, enlarging on and developing until he makes one feel astonished to find so much in it. He always seemed to have but the one idea and that was to confine himself to the word of God, not dealing with generalities but confining his preaching to the plain teaching of the word. I remarked to a friend that I had heard more real gospel preaching the short time I was in Ashland than I had heard within the last five years. One of his main points was to have a certain absolute knowledge of sins forgiven and then have the baptism of the Holy Spirit. In the meantime he urged upon the ministers the necessity of a whole-souled consecration to the work for God to save sinners. While he would teach and insist on those who wanted to take advantage of the occasion to be healed of their bodily infirmities, he insisted on their entire consecration to the service of God and a personal knowledge of sin forgiven before they could expect to be healed, for it is done through faith in Jesus Christ. And when in conclusion of his sermon and he would call for penitents the altar would often be filled with those who were seeking not relief from bodily ailments but release from sin, and there were scores who testified to the power of God to save. One beautiful feature in his preaching is he never finds fault with anyone or tries to tear down any church organization but insists that we love one another as Christ loved us and gave himself for us.
    Among the diners Friday were Charley Manning of Peyton, Ray Davis of Derby, C. E. Moore of Elk Creek, and S. W. Newell of Seattle, who is interested in the machinery business.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 10, 1922, page 5


EDGEWOOD PARK ON THE ROGUE
    People who like outdoor life and are interested in securing location for a summer home, or rather an all-year-round home away from the city, should read the announcement of Edgewood Park in this paper.
    This park is located 20 miles from Medford, and only a quarter of a mile off the Crater Lake Highway, making about an hour's trip on this splendid highway. It is about a half mile this side of the big new cement bridge across the Rogue and is located on one of the most beautiful stretches of this famous stream, with good fishing and nice bathing.
    There is plenty of nice fir and pine timber on the lots to erect log cabins if the purchasers desire, and leave plenty for shade.
    The property is owned by D. E. Millard, who is selling the same with restrictions that will make it pleasant for those who buy.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1922, page 3


ELK CREEK
    Dave Pence and family motored to Medford last week.
    The California-Oregon Power Company has been putting a power line from Prospect to Roseburg and have nearly completed their work, but are keeping a few men busy. They are building a cabin for the winter crew who will keep the line in good condition.
    Elmer Ivey spent a week's vacation with his folks on Elk Creek. He has been attending high school at Butte Falls and is well pleased with the school.
    The Persist school opened for this term, Oct. 2nd, with Miss Inez Willits as teacher. Four pupils will attend.
    P. C. Sandoz is building a fence between L. A. Whitley's homestead and his place.
    Dave Pence and Weston Miller were looking for cattle the first of this week. Mr. Pence and Mr. Miller have been unfortunate in having their hay wet during the rainy weather.
    Ezra Whitley made a business trip to town Oct. 5.
    Miss Inez Willits motored to Medford Saturday the 7th where she will attend institute and visit her relatives.
    The Hill Construction Company is completing their construction work on the Crater Lake Highway.
    Hunters coming up the creek for deer seem to be successful as they have been seen to take out quite a number.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There is a move on foot to open up another confectionery store and pool room in our little town. The promoters of the move are Thomas F. Nichols and Clarence Pruett. They have closed the old Roy Ashpole hardware store building and are making several changes, tearing out a lot of the shelving and changing the location of some of it, partitioning off a part of the front part of it for a sales room where they will sell their soft drinks, candy, cigars and ice cream, leaving room for one our two pool tables and any other accessories they may think best to put in and they have divided up the front room and cut off a neat room for a barber shop and have proposed to our barber, Earnest Dahack, who is already established here in his own building, to have him vacate his own shop, giving him the use of the building and electric lights free, but he declines the offer as he owns the building where he is and has his hot and cold water system, bath room, tub and all the necessary equipment. Mr. Nichols is furnishing the capital for the undertaking and they are planning to have a large increase in our population in the next two or three years and have business enough to sustain two barber shops, and pay a good interest on the investment. Thomas M. Riley, our handyman, is doing the carpentering work, painting and papering in making the changes and fitting up the rooms.
    Another change noticeable is that since the town was incorporated and the promoters of this scheme contrived in every way to draw all the business away from the old town and built the three brick buildings in the neighborhood of the depot, and prevailed on Frank Lewis to move his confectionery store and pool and billiard hall down there and also prevailed on a man to build a bakery and another to build a racket store and others to build residence buildings, etc., that Frank Lewis has had his building moved back onto Main Street and he told me at the time, a short time after he moved back, that he made more in two weeks on the stand where he is than he made in two months down next to the depot, and the racket store was closed out and the building sold for a very small figure with the understanding that the purchasers were to pay the delinquent taxes, and the bakery was sold to John W. Smith, torn down and moved away, and another building that was built has been sold to the same party and is being torn down to be moved away leaving the taxes on the lots unpaid, and the principal promoter who built one of the brick stores has disposed of that and about all the rest of his property here except his dwelling. house, thus showing conclusively that it is bad business policy to listen to promoters of wildcat schemes.
    John Greb, one of our prominent farmers and orchardists, was in town last Saturday.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside last Sunday were Judge E. D. Briggs and wife, Judge Dunn, wife and son and Joe Connelly, all of Ashland, and while they were here the subject came up as to the advisability of having the recall law changed so as to require the promoters of the recall of an officer requiring them to give bonds for the cost, in case that the recall fails to pass. If we had had such a law as that, there would have been no recall election, so far as our popular sheriff, C. E. Terrill, is concerned and the taxpayers saved at least $4000, and they all three decided that it would be a fine thing for the taxpayers of the state if our legislators would get their heads together and change the law to that effect, and as Judge Dunn is a prominent candidate for the state senate and a majority in this part of the county expect to have him elected, I am glad to have the opinion of three such men as those just named to sanction the move. There were also here at the same time attorney B. F. Lindas and wife, Anna Lindas and Leonard Lindas of Medford: Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her daughter Miss Joyce, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and son Lyle, J. F. McPherson, wife and son, Eagle Point and Mr. and Mrs. Seth M. Bullis, Mr. and Mrs. Winifred Bailey and son, Ralph Jackson, Medford, Mrs. J. Kannelle, A. Lebo, San Francisco, Calif.
    I met John Rader on the street Monday and asked him if he had moved into his new home. The reader will remember that he bought the Wm. G. Knighton property here, and he said that the womenfolk had moved, but he was still on the farm, that he could not let that go, not that they are separated, but that he loves to work on the dear old sticky farm.
    Two men came in with a band of sheep, 1068, and camped here Sunday night. The sheep looked fine, but the lambs did not fare so well.
    Fred Dutton, one of our prominent stock men, was a business caller Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Brainard and two children came into the Sunnyside Hotel Monday morning about three o'clock and asked for beds. They had started from Camp 2, Weed, Calif., about mid-afternoon to go to Butte Falls to visit Mrs. Brainard's parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Parker, and were caught in a driving rain storm and had considerable trouble, so did not reach here until three a.m. but that morning went on their way to Butte Falls.
    There have been some more changes made in our town, so far as residences are concerned. Mr. J. Prillaman and his sister, Miss Prillaman, have moved out of the von der Hellen house into three rooms in the upper part of the Geo. Brown and sons store and Lucius Kincaid has moved into the one vacated by the Prillaman, he having bought the building some time ago and by the way, when you want to find a real live wire, a man that is always up and going, you need not go any farther than Engle Point, for to begin with Mr. Kincaid secured the mail contract to carry the mail to Persist via Trail, going up one day and returning the next and he soon had the route changed so as to have him make the round trip in one day, giving him an extra day to do something more, and he has been improving it by running a truck for Geo. Brown & Sons, or carrying the mail from Medford to Butte Falls, while the regular mail carrier, Harold Van Scoy, was off hunting and in the interval getting things ready for the coming winter. He will make a success anywhere he goes.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1922, page 9


FRY BOY FINDS POCKETBOOK, GETS REWARD OF $20
    Rankin Estes, local barber, had the misfortune to lose his purse containing $110 and some checks Sunday while on his way to his ranch near Trail.
    Yesterday morning he went back to look for the wallet and while on the road near Trail met the young Fry boy who resides near Trail and told him of the lost purse. The boy was on his way to school and informed Estes that he would keep on the lookout for the wallet.
    This morning the Fry boy's father came into town and returned the wallet to Estes with the contents intact. The boy found it yesterday near a small bridge on the road.
    In consideration of the lad's honesty Estes gave him a $20 reward for returning the pocketbook and considered it a stroke of fortune that the boy had found it.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 17, 1922, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ella Belford, who resides on what is known as the Stewart farm, came in Monday and remained a guest at the Sunnyside until Wednesday morning, going to Medford that afternoon on the Butte Falls stage.
    J. M. King, who has a homestead on Reese Creek between here and Derby, came in on Monday and engaged board. He went to Medford the same day, remaining overnight and Tuesday, returning Wednesday, and Thursday morning started work on the railroad bridge to repair it, getting it ready to push the work of hauling logs out from the Butte Falls timber belt. I understand that the company has quite a force at work on the extension of the P.&E. railroad beyond Butte Falls and expect to be moving sawlogs from the two townships they purchased near the base of Mt. McLoughlin, and that and the digging of the canal from Butte Falls to Eagle Point will make the two towns, Butte Falls and Eagle Point, two lively business places, and the introduction of water into the country between Butte Falls and here and the extension of the project so as to cover several hundred acres of orchard already bearing fruit and the land, now practically good for little else than grazing purposes, will make a very material difference in this part of Rogue River Valley, for with the water and the change of owners, for that will naturally come with the water, we will see as great a change as was made when Mr. Stewart bought the old Frank Ball farm near Phoenix and paid twenty-five dollars an acre for it, when it was producing five or six bushels of wheat to the acre and the old settlers called him a tenderfoot and sucker, and he, Mr. Stewart, after he had plowed it up thoroughly, let it rest a year, and then raised forty bushels of wheat to the acre and then set out the place to fruit, realizing a handsome profit on the investment, for we have just as good land in this neighborhood as they have there and some of the children of the old settlers will see and derive a benefit from the projects that are now being developed.
    Among the callers Tuesday were Carl Bieberstedt, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen.
    Frank Manning, who owns and operates a fine farm up on Rogue River, came in Tuesday for dinner and remained until Wednesday afternoon.
    J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the fish hatcheries in Southern Oregon, was out here Tuesday making some new changes in the fish trap and dam just above town and getting ready to build a house there so as to protect the men who have to work there taking the eggs from the fish and caring for them. He tells me that he is planning to put traps and dams in all the small streams that dry up in the summer so as to save the fish eggs, as the small fish die when the water dries up and are a total loss.
    Mr. Hovey, superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, was in town Tuesday and reports that he has about half of the apples gathered in the orchard, but the crop is.considerably short of the average.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Wattenberg, one of the most successful farmers in this neighborhood, were business callers Tuesday, but were too busy to spend time visiting.
    M. L. Hughes of Butte Falls was a guest at the Sunnyside Tuesday night on his way from [his] Medford home, and John Foster of Medford, who is working on the rock crusher on the von der Hellen contract to grade and rock the road between the Hole in the Ground and Prospect, was here the same night for supper and so was Earl Zimmerman of Butte Falls.
    Wm. Cottrell came in Wednesday morning with Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stanley for breakfast, Mr. and Mrs. Stanley taking their meals at the Sunnyside until they can get located again.
    Harvey Stanley and wife were business callers Wednesday. Mrs. Stanley comes over quite frequently to help her mother, Mrs. Rader, arrange her new home just to her notion. Mrs. Rader has had the house repapered, and has made several changes in the arrangement, making the whole place mere convenient although it looked about as much so as possible.
    Rube Johnson, one of our retired capitalists, Alex Mathews, who is living on the Rube Johnson farm, and Mr. J. W. Isbell were all here in town Wednesday, but I did not learn their business.
    Mrs. Israel Patton, Mrs. John Cook and Mrs. Carter, all of Butte Falls, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Thursday morning. There was a man came with them, but I did not learn who he was, and there were two strange women came out on the Lake Creek-Eagle Point stage at the same time and went up on the Eagle Point-Trail-Persist stage.
    Mrs. George Holmes, who is the principal of our school, and Miss Wiley of Central Point, who is teaching the primary department of our school, and Mrs. Roy Stanley, who is teaching in the Brownsboro school district, all went to Medford to attend the institute Wednesday, Thursday and Friday and Mrs. Staley has been coming out here in the afternoon of each day except Thursday and reports that everything is going off finely.
    Mrs. Wm. Perry and her mother-in-law, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, who is out here visiting the Perry family, and friends were at the Sunnyside for dinner Thursday.
    While I was looking around for something to write for the readers of the Eaglets, I met Mr. Charles Hanscom and Mr. Fred Armes, brother of J. D. Armes, superintendent of the Edgell orchard, and naturally asked how the fruit was on that, and the Butte Creek orchard and be replied that he guessed that it was all right but did not know, and the way he answered me led me to ask where are you living now and he pointed toward Mrs. Hanscom, remarking that he was married now, and that led to two more questions, who was the lucky girl and where were you married and he again pointed to Mrs. Hanscom, remarking his girl Hazel [was born] September 26, 1922. So the reader will see there is another item I missed while I was away from home in California.
    Mrs. John Ashpole of Medford came out to visit her son, Roy, Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 17, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Benj. Moomaw and wife of Bandon and his brother Joe and wife were here for dinner Thursday. Mr. and Mrs. Moomaw had been up in Josephine County visiting his parents and came here to visit his brother Joe and family.
    Miss Dorothy Baughman of Medford was here visiting Miss Virginia Rice, one of our school girls, during the institute week.
    W. P. Holbrook, one of our successful farmers and orchardists, was a business caller Thursday of last week looking after his business interests in our town.
    W. H. Brown and wife and her mother, Mrs. Royal G. Brown, Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and Mrs. Graves all went to Medford Friday morning on various lines of business. Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy said when she came home that she had been to visit a dentist. It is so seldom that she is away from the post office, as she has been there for the last six years, that when she is out it causes the question to come up, "Where is Lottie?" for everyone knows her and she always has a good word and a cheerful smile for all she meets. She and Mrs. Holmes are sisters of Mr. Brown.
    The passenger traffic on the stage lines between Medford is getting to be so great that occasionally, in fact quite often lately, some are left for want of room. Last Friday there were four lady passengers and one man and the next day there were just four passengers, three of them Butte Falls school teachers, and one man, and one man left.
    Although Mr. Holmes, the contractor, runs a large four-seated car to and from Medford, he does not try to take it any further than here as the road between here and Butte Falls is so bad, especially the four miles this side of Butte Faille, where it has just been graded, is almost as bad as it can be and the rest of the road is bad enough, so he has decided not to try to run the big car any further than here, and in case he has more mail and parcel post than he can take in one car he says he will take two.
    George W. Stowell, one of our successful farmers, stock and dairy men, as well as one of the poultry men, was in town Friday on business and reports that the price of hens has dropped so low that he has had a man come out from Medford and had a lot of his old hens dressed and put in cold storage waiting for better prices, that his young pullets are just commencing to lay, and that means an abundant supply of eggs this fall and winter.
    Joe Riley, who lives on Antelope Creek on the Crater Lake Highway, was also a business caller the same day.
    Samuel Greenwood, the present proprietor of the Butte Creek orchard, was also in town Friday but I did not meet him as he was on the run when I saw him, although I asked Frank Brown, one of the firm of G. Brown & Sons, who he was as he darted out of the store and he gave me the name.
    Alex Vestal of Reese Creek was also a business caller Friday.
    As Mrs. R. G. Brown was away from home, her husband, Mr. Brown, came in for dinner remarking that he was not raised to eat a cold lunch. Frank Ditsworth of Peyton also came in for dinner the same day, and four strangers whose names I failed to learn.
    There was a stranger came in with a heavy truck loaded with road-working machinery on his way to Lakeview, and called for supper and bed as he wanted to take an early start and I did not get up in time to get his name before he started at 4 a.m.
    Mrs. Baughman and Charley Manning of Peyton were among the diners Saturday.
    Mrs. Louis M. Miller of Portland came in Saturday on the morning stage from Medford expecting to find the Trail stage running that day, but on finding that it only goes three times a week came to the Sunnyside and remained until Monday.
    Saturday morning word came to us that Robert Riley Minter had died the night before very suddenly, having been sick about an hour. He was born in Hillsboro, Ore., March 25, 1857 and died Oct. 13th, 1922, aged 65 years, six months and 18 days. He was married Dec. 25, 1884 to Beatrice Wood of Alturas City. There were seven children, six girls and one boy born and he leaves one brother and one sister. His wife died 21 years ago. In addition to his children and brother and sister to feel the loss he also leaves a host of warm friends and neighbors who feel saddened by his death. He was a strict business man and was dearly loved by his family, one of the girls remarking that he was not only a father but also filled the place of a mother as but few could.
    Among the guests Saturday evening was George Turnbow and Clarence Pruett. I stated a short time ago that he had become a permanent boarder at the Sunnyside but about that time he went into partnership with T. F. Nichols and commenced to board with him. Jerry Lewis and two strangers came in for bed and breakfast.
    Among the guests here Sunday were M. C. Smallwood, Wilford Walker, Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Natwick, Miss Carlton, Thomas F. Nichols, wife and two children, Mr. and Mrs. L. G. Ward, a couple traveling through the county and representing themselves as soliciting for the cause of foreign missions, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Neilson and two boys, Donald and Herbert, Mrs. Moore, Mrs. Neilson's mother, and Mrs. Hactle. These came in after the first table were through eating as I did not get home from church until after they had eaten dinner and gone.
    Mrs. F. Watker of Central Point and Mrs. J. B. Jackson of Butte Falls came out on the stage on their way to Butte Falls. Mrs. Jackson had just returned from Yakima, Wn., where she had been to attend the funeral of her sister's husband who died very suddenly, and Mrs. Walker went up to Butte Falls to move their household goods out here so as to be with her husband, who is working on the railroad.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jones of Lake Creek came in for dinner Monday.
    John P. Gabber came in Monday evening with his effects in a one-horse buggy and spent the night at the Sunnyside and the next morning went to work on the railroad.
    Mrs. Piper is visiting Mrs. Tedrick.
    Mrs. E. Denton of Medford came out to visit her son, E. A. Denton, Sunday.
    Miss Ruby Haley of Central Point is out here visiting some of her old friends and neighbors, stopping with Mrs. Leroy Smith.
    I see by looking over my letter for the Mail Tribune that I omitted to make mention of the funeral of our highly esteemed citizen, Robert Riley Minter, so will add this as a P.S. The funeral services were conducted at the Perl Funeral Home by Rev. John Stille of Indian Creek in the presence of a very large number of his old friends and neighbors and the remains ware laid to rest in the Medford cemetery. The floral offerings were very beautiful and the sermon was impressive and a large number of his old neighbors expressed their sympathy for the bereaved.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 20, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Nichols and wife, who went up to Yakima to visit their son Frank while I was down in Colusa County, Calif., trying the baths at the Wilbur hot sulfur springs, an item I failed to procure before, returned the first of the week and report that the fruit crop up there is badly infected with worms and that the estimated loss to the orchardists on account of it will amount to millions of dollars. There are various opinions as to the cause of the fruit being so wormy, some attributing it to the quality of the preparation furnished by the officials and claim that there is a big graft and that the dope is lacking in strength, while others claim that the officer who fixes the dates when they are to spray failed to give notice at the right time, and are talking about commencing suit against the state for the damage by the mistake, if it was a mistake has caused [it].
    Last Tuesday afternoon I met John Greb, one of our leading orchardists, and asked him if his apples were wormy and he said that they were somewhat wormy but not as wormy as he had seen them other years. I then related to him what Mr. Nichols had told me about the fruit up in Washington, and he expressed the opinion that it was caused by the unusually warm weather, especially the warm nights, enabling the insects to do their work. But be that as it may, it has been a great loss to the orchardists not only there in Washington but over the entire coast, and the fact that the apple crop is falling short as there is a fearful shortage in the quantity, and that in connection with the wormy condition of the fruit brings a terrible hardship on the producer, and also on the ones who have depended on working in the orchards to secure money to tide them over a long winter, for a half crop means with them only half as many days work, all the way through from the picker on to the teamsters, packer, the man who makes the boxes, the mill men and to the railroad and commission man who sells them, and to the consumer, for they will have to pay more on account of the scarcity.
    Mrs. Dollie Jack has finally succeeded in getting a clear title to a place (the old schoolhouse property) she purchased from F. J. Ayres, and moved onto it. She had been staying on her father's place while he and wife were up in Washington.
    The stage was so crowded Tuesday that the driver had to leave one man, Chris Beale, as he had four ladies, with the understanding that he was to go up the next day, and the next day he had to leave other men. There is so much parcel post goes through the mail now that it takes up a large part of the room in the car, as a good part of  the space is taken up with boxes of bread.
    Speaking of bread, I was down to Geo. Brown & Sons' store Wednesday and noticed a large pasteboard sign with the word bread on it, so asked if they were selling bread, addressing Frank Brown, and he replied yes, that they had so many orders from the outside customers that they had to keep it for them notwithstanding there were two other stores handling it, it is not always that one can get it. And that shows how few of our citizens indulge in the old-fashioned luxury, hot biscuits for breakfast.
    J. P. Hughes, a retired merchant of Butte Falls, passed through here on his way home from a visit to his brother in California. He said that everything had changed except the old statehouse in Sacramento, that he hardly knew where anything was, the places where he used to go and hunt ducks in 1877 are now covered with rice fields and orchards with hard-surfaced roads and streets that then were covered with tules.
    T. F. Nichols, Clarence Pruett, Chris Beale, Herbert Davis and two ladies were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Rev. John Stille of Indian Creek, near Crater Lake Highway, was in town Tuesday having his horses shod.
    Rudolph Pech and wife were in town Wednesday with a load of spuds and report they are cheaper than they have been for six years.
    E. G. High of Ashland was here for dinner Wednesday. He says that he is still engaged selling autos. J. D. Patrick was also here for dinner. He had just returned from Nevada and California, where he was engaged putting in steel flumes for a contractor.
    J. I. Graves of this place has purchased a tract of land lying along the Crater Lake Highway and Riverside Avenue and is putting up a residence and intends to move into it as soon as finished. John Miller is doing the carpenter work.
    Wm. Nichols of Lake Creek, C. Humphrey, William Ness, G. H. Vinson and G. Troji and William O. Farrell, the four last named having just finished up picking apples on the Tronson orchard, were all here for dinner Thursday.
    G. A. Hansen of Brownsboro was a business caller Thursday.
    Ed Gomez of Butte Falls spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside and went up to Butte Falls on the stage Friday morning.
    Peter Fenke and wife, who have been spending the fall with their son-in-law, Mr. Wyman, came out from his home on Rocky Hill near Derby Friday morning on their way to their home in California, and Mr. Wyman brought out a load of stove wood and stored it for sale the coming winter.
    Ted Clark of Derby went up home on the stage Friday.
    T. F. Nichols and Clarence Pruett have opened up with a pool table and two billiard tables and two card tables, cigars and tobacco.
    Frank Lewis, our confectionery man, has added to his line of goods a stock of groceries and hardware. Competition is the life of trade.
    There is a family by the name of Brickman moved into the upper story of the Eagle Point hardware store building.
    Thursday night about five o'clock the roof of Thomas M. Riley's house on Antelope Creek took fire and his father phoned over here and a party of men rushed over there and put the fire out. There is a man living on the place by the name of McCoy who kept the fire down by throwing water on the roof until help came. There was but little damage done.
    Word came to me Friday evening at supper that Eleanor Hansen of Brownsboro died that day after a brief illness, aged about nine years. She is a daughter of William Hansen of that place.
    Joseph Wattenberg, who has been on the T. E. Nichols ranch, has moved off and the Davis Bros. of Derby have moved onto it.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 24, 1922, page 6


    Another sale of consequence [that] just became known is the purchase of the Frederick Pelouze ranch three miles east of Eagle Point by two well-known Medford men, George T. Collins and Dr. J. J. Emmens, who will operate it as a livestock ranch. The consideration is not made known, but large figures are involved. The present tenant has been given notice to move at once to other quarters, as the new owners will take hold as soon as possible.
    This ranch constitutes one of the finest gentleman's homes in the county with its prettily located and comfortable dwelling house, alongside a running stream, and its 162 acres of land, 72 of which are under irrigation. The water right of the property is sufficient to supply water for the entire ranch.
    Neither of the two owners will reside on the property, so far as can be learned, and it is understood that they will place a skilled manager in charge to operate it as a livestock ranch.
    Jackson County is more and more coming into prominence as a favorable livestock country, and for some time past there have been ten or eleven stockmen here from other parts of the Pacific Coast looking for locations, where there was one here on that errand last fall, the local real estate men report.
"W. Vawter Buys Dr. Page Home, Big Ranch Sold," Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1922, page 16


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There was a meeting of the members of the Red Cross Society here in the church last Friday afternoon and Mrs. Noblet, Mrs. C. R. Farrier and Miss Haines and a strange lady who was visiting one or more of the above-named ladies came out from Medford and addressed the meeting. I plead guilty to being absent as I was not feeling as well as usual and thought I would rest a while after dinner and forgot all about the meeting until my attention was called to it after I woke up so am not able to give any account of what was said or done, but learned that there was to be a drive in a day or two to raise money to help along the cause and about the first thing I knew the next day I met Mrs. R. A. Weidman and she notified me that she wanted a dollar for helping those in need; that the funds were to be used by the local society for those in our own neighborhood who needed help, so I took a receipt for the dollar with that understanding and she fastened a Red Cross pin on the lapel of my coat to keep me from being raided again.
    The same day I met Mrs. R. G. Brown, one of our school directors, and she told me that our school was growing so fast under the management of Mrs. Geo. Holmes and Miss Wiley that it had become necessary to have more seats in the primary department and at the time referred to there was one of the little girls of the primary department joined us and remarked that she had to sit on a little chair, and in connection with this subject will say that our school is getting along nicely. Mrs. Brown reports that there are now thirty-four pupils in the primary school and twenty-nine in the principal's room.
    Last Friday we had as guests for dinner O. C. Ellen of Butte Falls [and] B. M. Bush of Ashland, who is in the employ of the Paul's Electric Shop, Medford.
    Joe Pool, Claude (Shorty) Miles, and Ralph Stanley were here Friday night.
    F. J. Mansfield came out on the Brownsboro stage and went on to Medford on his way home in California.
    George Trusty also came out from his home Friday and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and John Foster, now working with the von der Hellen rock crusher, was here Saturday night.
    Perry Foster and two of his grandchildren, Lloyd French and his sister, Miss Cora French, Miss Butler and Gladys Harvey were in the barber shop having their hair bobbed and curled.
    C. A. Pickel, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Company, was making his monthly rounds Saturday and took dinner at the Sunnyside, as did Frank Ditsworth, who has bought the Roy Stanley farm just above our town, and Mrs. Gus Nichols, a neighbor, just happened to come in and took dinner and later two strangers came in.
    E. N. and O. R. Abbott, T. F. Nichols' wife and two children, and Miss Lula Carlton were here for dinner.
    Luke Ryan, formerly of Medford but now on his Big Butte farm, was a business caller Saturday.
    Edward Spencer, time clerk on the S.P. at Ashland, was here visiting his brother who is a regular boarder at the Sunnyside and is one of the civil engineers on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point canal project to bring water from Big Butte Creek into this section. He took breakfast Monday morning and started home.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday for dinner, counting them as they were seated at the tables, there were forty-five, but included a few regular boarders. When I reached home from church the sitting room was well filled and quite a number in the yard so that I could not secure all their names, as I find that I am not able to remember them. But I did secure the names of Miss Mollie Britt, her brother Emil, John F. Miller of Jacksonville, F. E. Edwards of San Francisco, George W. Neilson and wife and sons Donald and Herbert, Mrs. Neilson's mother, Mrs. M. Moore, and a friend of the family, Mrs. Hatch of Medford, Fred Pettegrew, secretary of the Butte Falls and Eagle Point Irrigation Co., and Wm. von der Hellen, our big contractor, of Eagle Point, Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Garnett, A. H. Soukup and Mrs. Soukup of Medford, and Irvin Frey of Lake Creek.
    John L. Robinson, Sr., one of our prosperous farmers, came in early Monday morning with two large watermelons, one on each arm, and took them to the post office, but forgot to put stamps on them so they fell to the care of the lady clerk, who is a special favorite of all the patrons of the office, and some of us accused him of leaving the stamps off on purpose.
    In a former letter I stated that the new firm that is opening a confectionery store, billiard and pool hall had been trying to arrange to have our barber move his shop into the room arranged for a barber shop but that he had declined to accept their offer, but since I wrote they have made him a better offer and he has accepted it and is now arranging to move into the new quarters.
    P. S. Anderson of Medford, who owns a fine farm on Rogue River some six or seven miles above here, came out Monday morning on the stage and went up to the ranch (Brittsan Bros.) and reports that everything is in a flourishing condition. G. A. Gall, B. F. Haymond, Bert Gates of Kerby and Perry Farlow of Lake Creek came out on the stage at the same time. Hugh Johnson and James Carey of Medford also came out Monday morning and went on the phone line to work for W. C. Clements, who is the principal owner and manager of our system here.
    I met W. Miles, who is on the Fred Pelouze place, and he tells me that the place has been sold to Dr. J. J. Emmens and a Mr. Collins of Medford.
    John L. Robinson was in town the first of the week and gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, as he is a live wire and wants to keep posted as to what is going on in the world and said his paper was stopped. And about the same time one of the Nygren brothers came in for me to send him the Daily Mail Tribune, as it seems hard to get along without it.
    D. B. Lyons and wife of Medford and John Holden and wife of Ontario, Cal., were here for dinner Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Slater of Ferndale, Wash., were here Sunday the guests of our banker and wife, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell.
    George W. Stowell, our chicken king, and wife were doing business with our merchants and report that the chicken business is up to date.
    Wm. Cottrell was also a business caller Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 27, 1922, page 12


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Tuesday the 24th inst. G. W. Dunn, the regular nominee of the Republican Party, was around among the voters of our town and vicinity. He does not appear to be of the mud-slinging class of candidates as he says nothing against his opponent but stands on his record as county judge, and it was so straight that the Jacksonville-Medford political ring combined to keep him from receiving the nomination again. He was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside for dinner and we spent a very pleasant hour together and then went out to see some more of his old friends, who can be counted by the score. A. H. Daugherty, the traveling agent for Raleigh's medicines, and Earl Mathews were also here for dinner the same day.
    Mr. Fernlund and wife, two newcomers who have moved into our community, were in town trading with George Brown & Sons the first of the week, and while I was there Frank Brown asked me to take a ride with him over to his Antelope Creek farm, and when we reached there found a man harrowing a large tract of plowed land that had been plowed early in the season with a tractor quite deep, sowed with wheat and harrowed down, but the ground was quite rough, but Frank told the man to keep on harrowing until it was thoroughly pulverized. He seems to have the right idea of putting in grain, but what attracted my attention most was a small tract of desert land of perhaps fifteen acres he had sowed to clover where he had cut two crops of hay, realizing about seventy tons of hay, and then pastured some eighty head of beef cattle for Frank Bybee this fall. He intends to put the entire place in hay, the desert part of some twenty-five acres in clover and the bottom land in alfalfa. And that brings another thought to my mind and that is that Mr. W. H. Hamilton, who owns a large tract of land just north of our town, came in from Crescent City a day or two ago and in conversation with him the subject of our canal from Big Butte just below Butte Falls came up and he asked what I thought of the idea of having a creamery established here and I assured him that I thought it would be a fine project, especially after we have the water in and the thousands of acres of land that is now useless except a little spring pasture was brought into cultivation and the large tracts cut up into small tracts, sowed in different kinds of grasses and grains and families settled around us, and those who can keep a few good milk cows, a few pigs and chickens will make this Butte Creek country one of the richest spots in Oregon, for the farmers here are not in their swaddling clothes.
    Wm. Holman and wife, who live on Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, passed through here the first of the week. They had been down to Ashland to attend the funeral of his uncle.
    Wm. Lewis, the sheep king of this section, was in town this week and when asked about his sheep said that they were all right now but [he] had had a hard fight to get these through but that the price of sheep and wool was looking up.
    Roy Stanley has rented one of the houses belonging to Mrs. James Owens, wife of our county commissioner, and is having it fixed up to make it more comfortable for the winter. Thomas Riley is repapering and repainting the interior.
    Our two hardware merchants, T. F. Nichols and Roy Ashpole, started out about midweek on a hunting expedition and had not returned up to Thursday evening.
    F. C. Drew, head timekeeper, and R. B. Parkman, head A.B.A. clerk of O.W.R.&N.R.R., Portland, came in for a few days Tuesday and have been looking for agates most of th» time since. They started home Friday afternoon, intending to take the train Saturday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Whitley of Elk Creek spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
    F. F. Howard, formerly of Rancheria Prairie, but now living near Sacramento, Calif., was a passenger on the stage for his farm eight miles from Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Campbell and Mr. and Mrs. John Slater, guests of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell, were here for dinner Wednesday. Earl Mathews and Mrs. Muskopf and three children were also here for dinner Wednesday.
    Mr. Hannaford, who lives on the C. H. Natwick ranch, was a business caller Wednesday.
    Mr. Conley is sending some very fine lumber from the old Hawk mill since he moved and repaired it.
    Mrs. Lawrence Ferguson and two children spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside. Mr. Ferguson was called to Medford on business for Frank Rhodes, who owns the farm they are on, and while they were here in town Mr. Ferguson was called on the phone by Mr. Rhodes so he had to leave his wife and children at the Sunnyside while he was away.
    Mrs. Hill of Derby was a business caller Wednesday, and so was O. E. Thien of Butte Falls.
    Wednesday the handbills that had been distributed around town announcing that there would be public speaking at the dance halt that night by Hon. E. E. Kelly, Judge Colvig, A. E. Reames and Miss Alice Hanley caused a large number of our citizens to collect to hear them, as almost everyone is interested in hearing the issues of the campaign discussed, especially as there were two prominent hard-boiled Democrats and one half-bolled Republican, Judge Colvig, for the first time I heard him he was advocating the election of Sam J. Tilden for President of the United States, and the next time I heard him he spent most of his time trying to explain to the voters why he had left the Democratic Party and flopped over to the Republican, and so I don't know how hard-boiled he is, and Miss Alice Hanley, also a Republican, and we had reason to believe that we would hear something worth while, but--well I will not find fault, although many of us were disappointed. Col. Kelly opened the meeting by accusing his opponent of playing dirty tricks at their meeting in Talent, and if the charge against Mr. Thomas, his opponent for circuit judge, was strictly correct he should be shut out entirely, but I see in the Friday Daily Mail Tribune the names of twenty-three prominent citizens of that section denying the correctness of the statement--that is that Mr. Thomas had packed the house with K.K.K. and hoodlums to break up the meeting, etc. Well, I confess that I was surprised to hear such a speech from such a man as Hon. E. E. Kelly, for it only added to the friends of C. M. Thomas, for I met an old hard-boiled Democrat the next morning who was a Kelly man and he told me that he and several of his neighbors who were going to vote for Kelly would vote for Thomas Nov. 7th.
    Mr. Kelly was followed by Mr. Colvig with a spicy speech telling us to scratch our tickets and vote for the best men but be sure to vote for Gov. Olcott and F. Tou Velle, the Democratic candidate for State Treasurer and for Alice Hanley for the legislature, and by way of a little pep he referred to a remark made by Ralph Cowgill, Miss Hanley's opponent, something detrimental to his standing for truth, that if he met Mr. Cowgill on the street, and he repeated it, that he would knock him down, etc.
    Mr. Colvig was followed by Hon. A. E. Reames, in his soft and polite manner, giving us an insight, as far as it was expedient, into the workings of the K.K.K., but he kept back what he wants to use in the trial, but cautioned us not to vote for C. M. Thomas and be sure to vote for Miss Hanley. Miss Alice Hanley then came forward and in a very few words told us that she was a candidate for a seat in the legislature and desired to go there. to help reduce the taxes. Everything passed off very pleasantly, and at the close the floor was cleared for a dance and your Eagle Point correspondent started for home.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1922, page 6


MRS. R. A. ROWLEY EXPLAINS WATER RIGHTS B. CREEK
    Mrs. R. A. Rowley, whose water rights on Butte Creek have come up for discussion in the city election, has through her son requested the following explanation of the matter from her point of view:
    "Having read the article published in your paper under the heading of 'Nigger in the Wood Pile' under date of October 26th, 1922, referring to the Butte Creek water right of Mrs. R. A. Rowley, would kindly ask space in your paper for my statement of the facts.
    "Some years ago my husband, R. A. Rowley, now deceased, acquired certain water rights in the waters of Big Butte Creek and received from the state of Oregon permits to these waters in over two hundred second-feet of water, part of which was under a special permit of certain of these waters solely for municipal purposes. These waters, or a part of them, is what the City of Medford now wish to secure for Medford's water supply.
    "After my husband had secured these permits from the state of Oregon, in the manner provided by law, and had become the legal possessor of these water rights, there was an arrangement entered into by the state of Oregon and the United States government whereby both the state and government undertook to investigate the water in this section for the purpose of ascertaining what water could be used for the best advantage for the greatest number of people, especially along irrigation lines. However, before the government would start active operations it required that all the waters to be investigated should be out of the hands of individuals and under the sole control of the state of Oregon.
    "These water rights secured by my husband were very valuable rights and he was actively engaged in developing the same, but in order that this section of Oregon could have the aid of the federal government in surveys and in the investigation of the water my husband turned back to the state of Oregon all of these valuable rights without any valuable consideration of any kind ever being paid to him and delivered back the permits to these waters, but the same was done upon the agreement and with the understanding and under a written contract with the state of Oregon, that these water rights which he had acquired and was possessed of before he surrendered back the permits to the state should be protected for him and that whoever sought to use these waters in the future should pay to Mr. Rowley the value of the water.
    "I am now a widow and with meager means, but my husband's rights in and to these waters were deeded to me prior to his death and I cannot see why the terms upon which these permits were delivered back to the state of Oregon should not be lived up to now, after my husband is dead, the same as they were intended to be lived up to when he delivered back the permits to the state of Oregon under the contract that they should protect him and that whoever used the water should pay for the same to Mr. Rowley."
Medford Mail Tribune, November 2, 1922, page B1


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday Carl and Jack Thomas, the Vaudeville Kids of Chicago, came into our town and announced that they would give an entertainment that night in the opera hall, four acts, taking a room and meals at the Sunnyside. During their stay they gave me the following interesting item: They started in the early part of the season with their knapsacks on their backs with their business printed on them as kid artists in the line of showmen. They reported that they had walked from Chicago to Portland, stopping on their way and giving entertainments on the way to pay expenses, but from Portland they occasionally got a ride but did not say how so the reader can do as I did, guess as to how they procured them. They made a fine impression on the citizens of our town and the result was that they had a good audience, charging forty cents for admission, so I was told, for I did not attend, and the next morning they seemed to be well pleased with the result of their undertaking so I asked a lady who boosted for them what kind of an entertainment they had and she exclaimed, rotten, but continued that she had forty cents worth of fun, and if those kids were smart enough to pull off such a stunt let them go and work their way through the world. They started on their way Wednesday morning headed for Ashland. They were headed for Los Angeles.
    Wm. Lewis of Fort Klamath and H. U. Ellis of Kerby and L. N. Heart of Portland, George McDonald of Butte Falls, who is with Frank Rhodes, the contractor on the unit of the county road from Eagle Point to Butte Falls, who has the contract for making four miles out from Butte Falls to Rocky Hill, were here for dinner Saturday and Truman McLelland, who is with the crew who are working on the Crater Lake Highway from the Hole in the Ground to Prospect came in Saturday night and stayed until Monday.
    George Wehman of the same camp, who has charge of the bookkeeping department of the camp, came in for supper and went on to Medford.
    Roy Stanley, who has been living for some time on the old John Mathews farm, and sold it, has rented what is known as the old Purdin place and commenced to move into it last Saturday, but he and his family are still boarding at the Sunnyside.
    Lloyd Stanley, who has been living with his brother Roy, but taking his meals at the Sunnyside, has been complaining of feeling unwell and was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital Monday night. His condition was reported as favorable.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our hustling farmers and orchardists, was a business caller Saturday evening.
    Sunday morning our Sunday school was unusually interesting, the subject being Prohibition, and while all who were in attendance were advocates of the enforcement of the prohibition amendment, there were some who believe that it will eventually lead up to more strict enforcement of the anti-tobacco law, or having it amended so as to have a heavy penalty for anyone to sell or give tobacco to any person, male or female, under twenty-one years of age, for it is a common thing to see boys, some of them just in their teens, smoking cigarettes or a pipe.
    We did not have as many guests at the Sunnyside as usual last Sunday but those who did come had a very pleasant time and a lovely day to ride out over our good roads. Among the guests were Mr. and Mrs A. W. Hubbs, shoe dealers of Medford, Earl Mathews and Miss Joyce von der Hellen, H. A. Fredenburg of Sams Valley, Corbin Edgell, who owns a fine orchard in this section but since his marriage lives in Medford. He was out here superintending loading a car of apples. Also Phil Butler of Medford, Jake Jonas of Merlin, John Foster, at present of Prospect, Wm. Perry and wife and three strangers.
    Charley Manning of Peyton and Charley Clark, formerly of the Modoc orchard, but recently of Fort Klamath, came in Monday and is here at this writing, Tuesday afternoon.
    John Miller, one of our citizens, came near being seriously hurt the other day; he had a cow with a young calf and he aimed to attend to her and she turned on him crowding him against the manger and catching him under the ribs, tearing his clothes and touching the skin with her horns but bringing no blood. He finally crawled into the manger and got away from her with little damage. He then dehorned her and that cooled her down, or at least made her less dangerous. He was not seriously hurt.
    Ben Brophy was a business caller Monday.
    J. W. Berrian. the superintendent of the fish hatcheries in Southern Oregon, has been making some substantial improvements in the fish dam and trap. He has built a small house at the dam to protect the men who are engaged taking and caring for the eggs, and has drilled out a place in the rock where he can keep the fish he catches and keep them until they are ready to spawn, as they often catch them before the time, and has it arranged so as to have a stream of water running so as to have it constantly changing and by that means can keep them as long as he wishes. He expects to take many more eggs than he did last season, as he has everything ready when the time comes.
    J. I. Grove, who has been building a new house on the tract of land he bought from the county alongside the Crater Lake Highway just below our town so he misses the town tax, has moved into it, thus saving paying rent, which is quite an item.
    Miss Caroline Pool, who recently secured a divorce from her second husband and took the name of her first husband again, was a passenger on the stage Friday on her way to her old home at Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 3, 1922, page B2


1 MAN KILLED BY EXPLOSION NEAR PROSPECT
Explosion at von der Hellen's Road Camp Results Fatally--
Two Other Workmen Injured, One Seriously--
Men Fail to Take to Cover.

    According to a report from James Grieve at Prospect, C. W. Drake was killed, an unknown man was fatally injured and Shorty Mann was slightly injured at the von der Hellen road camp near there this morning when they failed to take to cover while a blast was being set off.
    An emergency call was sent to Dr. R. J. Conroy and he left about nine o'clock this morning for the scene of the accident followed by Daily's Taxi and Perl's ambulance. The man who was killed died shortly after 12 today as the result of a fractured skull. The unknown man is being brought to Medford in the ambulance as quickly as possible for medical attention.
    Little is known concerning the accident as communication with Prospect by telephone is difficult, and it is not expected the injured men will reach the city until late this afternoon. Dr. Conroy returned to Medford just before press time, but knew very little concerning the disaster. He gave first aid to the injured men, but holds out little hope for recovery of the unknown worker who was seriously injured.
    Nothing here is known concerning the victims of the accident other than they were members of von der Hellen's road gang.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 6, 1922, page 1


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. C. S. Antle of Medford and Geo. L. Neale of Central Point were among the passengers on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday and Mrs. Antle went on up to Lake Creek on the Lake Creek stage to visit her son, who is the merchant at that place, and Mr. Neale continued on to Butte Falls and from there he went out to the Howard ranch to conduct an auction sale of a lot of stock, household goods, furniture, farm implements, hay etc., returning Thursday, taking dinner at the Sunnyside and going on out to Medford on the stage. He reports that the sale was satisfactory and brought good prices, the hay in the barn bringing $11 a ton. He was fortunate enough to come out from Butte Falls to Derby on a hack, as the stage auto has stopped running over or rather through that route as the roads are so bad as to necessitate putting on a team to carry the mail matter out, so from now on until the roads dry up in the spring the mail will start from Butte Falls at 9 o'clock a.m. and meet the auto stage at Derby.
    It is understood that the first unit of the Butte Falls-Eagle Point irrigation system has been let to our principal contractor, Wm. von der Hellen, about six miles, beginning at Butte Falls, and that he already has a gasoline shovel on the way from an eastern manufacturing plant and intends to commence work on the job as soon as it arrives.
    The Ladies' Improvement Club of Eagle Point met at the home of Mrs. T. F. Nichols Thursday afternoon and were the guests of Mrs. R. A. Weidman.
    Ed Coy, a son-in-law of our blacksmith, is making regular trips six times a week hauling a truckload of men from Medford to where the Fish Lake Canal Company have been working along the canal.
    Artie Vestal, one of our enterprising bachelor Reese Creek farmers, was a guest at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    R. A. Seman, who is running a truck between Medford and this side of Butte Falls, has been here for supper Tuesday and Wednesday evenings and went on up to his camp afterward.
    C. H. Natwick, one of the leading contractors of Medford, was a guest at the Sunnyside Tuesday and Wednesday. He is planning on taking a part of the canal from Butte Falls out to this section of the country.
    The following gentlemen came out Tuesday evening with the understanding that there was to be a public meeting here and have the school bill discussed, but on account of a confusion of dates there had been no notice sent out anymore than that someone had told Will Staub of Brownsboro to announce it in Eagle Point, but he must have forgotten it, so someone phoned out about 4:30 p.m. that there was to be a meeting here and that there would be five here for supper, so about 6 p.m. N. W. Borden, Medford, the Democratic candidate for the state senate, J. O. Riggs of Ashland, Democratic candidate for the assembly, W. D. Hughes, Medford [and] Wm. Bradley came in in time for supper, and after supper were asked where they were to speak etc. They soon learned that the Bradshaw hall was rented for the year and that there was not time at that hour to give notice, so two of them started out in search of W. L. Childreth and soon returned and settled down for the evening. There were a few guests remained and the visitors told us why they wanted the education bill should be adopted, and about 8:15 started for home after expressing their satisfaction at the way the evening had been spent.
    Halloween eve passed off very quietly, as there was but very little mischief done.
    Rey. J. E. Day and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Lian of Butte Falls came out on the stage Wednesday and went on up home. Mr. Day reports that he has sold his stock of goods he had in his store to Paul Calder.
    J. W. Prillaman started Wednesday on the Medford stage to go to Canada via Vancouver, B.C. He intends to go to Aberdeen and from there to North Dakota and visit friends there before he returns.
    Charley Humphrey has hauled all of the wood he had on hand and all he could buy at the stump, and now is hauling out telephone poles for our phone manager, W. C. Clements.
    Earl Mathews, Charley Winkle and Jack Mayham spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside.
    Arthur J. Weeks, formerly of Medford but now of Oakland, Calif., was a passenger on the stage on his way to an orchard he owns on Rogue River near Peyton. He remarked that forty years ago that day he planted the Bear Creek orchard.
    G. W. Nelle, the auctioneer of Central Point, came out from Butte Falls and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Thursday evening Hon. T. L. Thuemler of Grants Pass spoke here in opposition to the educational bill, but he had a small audience, I am told, but made a good, clean talk. Friday night Ralph Cowgill, the regular Republican candidate for the legislature, and Hon. C. M. Thomas, spoke here. Mr. Cowgill opened the meeting and explained how he came to be accused of being a Klansman, that it was by five members of the Loyal League who were angry because he thwarted their designs in trying to pass a resolution in the league three times and were defeated each time and finally left the hall in disgust. His speech was clean and not a word said against his opponents, no mud-slinging. He was followed by Mr. Thomas with a clear statement refuting the statements made here a few days ago by Reames, Colvig and Kelly, with regard to the Talent irrigation canal, and showed that the water taken from the Applegate River had been used in the Talent district for the last three years. He exposed the way the gang had tried to trap him into signing the statement condemning the act of someone slipping the note under Judge Calkins' door by having him put his name on the ninth line instead of the fourth. He made many friends and gained several votes that night, for he spoke as a gentleman should speak, no mud-slinging. The next morning almost every man I met was praising Mr. Thomas for his speech and several who had been boosting for Kelly were boosting for Thomas.
    I should have said in the beginning of this account of the meeting that notwithstanding it was a cold and disagreeable evening there was a large crowd, and no orchestra to call the people together, and there were fully as many as there were when the others had their meeting and it is stated that at least half of the audience came with the Reames, Kelly, Colvig speakers from Medford. We will all be glad when the election is over.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 6, 1922, page 9


TWO ARE DEAD AS RESULT OF BIG EXPLOSION
Wm. McTeague, Second Man Injured in Prospect Explosion, Succumbs at Local Hospital--Coroner's Jury Holds No One to Blame.

    C. W. Drake, about 55, and William McTeague, about 45, are both dead as the result of being struck by rocks flying from a blast at the von der Hellen road camp on the Crater Lake Highway near Prospect, yesterday.
    The accident occurred yesterday morning and Drake died at Prospect yesterday afternoon at 12:15. McTeague died last night at the Sacred Heart Hospital in this city at 9 o'clock, never having regained consciousness. Both men suffered severe fractures of the skull.
    E. R. Mann, the third man who was injured by the blast, was not seriously injured, having no bones broken, but being painfully cut and bruised. He was brought to Medford yesterday afternoon and then taken to his home.
    The men were blasting in the rock quarry, according to Wm. von der Hellen, superintendent of the camp, and as usual after lighting the fuse took refuge under the gravel bunkers, about 200 feet away. The powder, as a usual thing, blows the rocks straight up in the air and by standing under the bunkers the men secured protection from any pieces of rock that might fall from above.
    The fatal blast, however, did not blow the rock straight up. Its force was exerted in a lateral direction and evidently a weak spot in the combustion chamber was found by the expanding gases. The rock was projected sideways and pieces of it struck five men who were standing under the bunkers. Two were practically uninjured, one of them being Mr. von der Hellen, who was struck on the shin by a flying fragment. Two others were fatally injured, while the third escaped painfully bruised and cut.
    Mr. von der Hellen said this morning that he knew not how many times they had stood in the same place while blasting was going on and had never thought of possible danger.
    An inquest was held this morning and the coroner's jury, consisting of Frank Amy, Wm. Bays, J. J. Osenbrugge, John Haertle, J. H. Atwell and C. F. Bowman, rendered the verdict that the death of the men was accidental and that no one was to blame.
    No relatives of either of the men can be found, although it is understood that McTeague has a sister-in-law living somewhere in Nevada.
    Both men will be buried Thursday afternoon at 2:30 in the Medford cemetery, their pals and Mr. von der Hellen arranging the funeral and acting as pallbearers. It is expected that Rev. Father Powers will officiate at the services.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 7, 1922, page 1


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. H. George, a beef buyer of San Francisco, came in Friday and was met here by Wm. Cottrell, one of our prominent cattle men, and I learned later that he made a deal to secure a nice lot of beef stock from him. Mr. Cottrell was among the guests that night at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    In my meanderings around town looking for material to mold into Eaglets, I discovered quite a pile of iron pipe lying outside of the George Holmes garage and on inquiry learned from Floyd Pearce, the assistant in that popular institution, that it was for himself, that he already had 800 feet down to his house, that he was planning to put a ram in Butte Creek, take water out so as to irrigate his garden, berries and meadow. People are learning more and more the value of water, especially in trying to raise a garden and berries, and Mr. Pearce himself being a mechanic, can do the work between jobs and at odd times with but little expense.
    Mr. O. C. Eblen has taken a contract to carry the mail from Derby to Butte Falls and back daily except Sunday in a hack leaving Butte Falls at nine o'clock a.m. and meeting the Medford-Butte Falls auto stage at the J. R. Neil place (Derby) where also he will meet the Prospect mail earlier and exchange mail and each of the three mail carriers return to their respective post offices. One very serious difficulty they all three labor under is that there is no place where either of them can leave the mail for the other man, but will have to wait until they can all get together, and in case either of the three should get stuck in the mud or have trouble the other two will have to wait until they get together or in case two of them should meet then that would be help the case for each one is liable to leave mail for each of the offices, a very poor arrangement for the U.S. mail.
    Harty Hayes of Indian Creek was in town Friday and reports that he intends to move the sawmill from where it is now located on Indian Creek up to the Dave Pence place on Elk Creek.
    John Foster, one of the mechanics in the Wm. von der Hellen force near Prospect, came out Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside. H. A. Dunn of Portland was also a guest at the Sunnyside at the same time.
    Mr. A. Dupray, owner of a sawmill on the northeast side of Round Top, was a passenger on the Butte Falls-Medford stage on his way to Medford. He met with quite an accident about ten days ago and was confined to his bed, he having been mixed up with a lot of logs and became caught among them, fortunately not seriously hurt, as there were no bones broken.
    Mr. M. D. Rowles of Lake Creek came out Friday and spent the night with us. He had been in Jacksonville serving as a juror for some time, but was finally discharged.
    Charley Clark was here for supper Friday night. I only saw him just as he was going to supper and disappeared, going on further, I suppose to Central Point, his home. He was formerly selling Watkins Remedies but did not learn what he was doing this fall but is busy at something, for he is a live wire.
    W. E. Hammel and wife and Mrs. Hammel's sister, Mrs. Sam Courtney, were doing business with our merchants Saturday.
    Carl Hanscom and his sister, Miss Freida Hanscom of Climax, were trading with our merchants Saturday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Horace Geppert of Butte Falls came out from Medford Saturday and took dinner, going on up home that evening.
    There was a local institute held here last Saturday, November 4th, and was presided over by our county school superintendent, Mrs. Susanne Homes Carter, assisted by Miss Elizabeth Burr, rural  supervisor. Mr. E. H. French, president of the humane society of Jackson County, was also in attendance. Among the teachers in attendance were principal of our school Mrs. Josephine Homes and her assistant Miss Wiley of Central Point, Prof. Lowe and Prof. Ray Parker of Butte Falls and Prof. Glen Hale, the teachers of Reese Creek, Mrs. Roy Stanley, teacher of Brownsboro, beside a few others, whose names I failed to secure. At noon lunch was served by Mrs. Homes. They had a very pleasant and profitable meeting.
    Ed Cowden, one of our progressive farmers and stockmen, was in town Saturday and reports that he has stopped the dairy business as the price of hay will not justify feeding it to milk cows, especially where one has to feed all they can eat, and at the present price of butterfat.
    We did not have as many here for dinner last Sunday as usual, but when I reached home from church I found Mr. and Mrs. Thomas A. Nichols and two children and Mrs. Nichols' sister, Miss Beth Farlow, and a few young men, although the first table had already eaten and gone, but later in the day George West and wife and J. W. Smith came in from Medford.
    Frank Johnson, who owns a farm on Rogue River near the bridge that spans that stream, was doing business here Monday.
    Lucius Kincaid, our mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Persist route, via Trail, tells me that there is another change in that route and that there will be a daily mail to Trail beginning on Monday next, November 13th.
    F. Earl Bechdolt of Butte Falls came in for supper Saturday p.m., and someone came for him to go to his home.
    John Rader has been having a new roof put on the main building of his new home. John Miller, who bought the Dr. Wm. P. Holt property here, has been doing the carpenter work.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Lewis Sager of Trail was a business caller and took dinner and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Nick Young, one of our native sons, and W. P. Holbrook were among the guests at the Sunnyside. Mr. Young was delivering a couple of tons of corn at the Sunnyside Hotel for Mr. Holbrook that he had raised on Mr. Young's land in the Butte Creek bottom, and it is as fine a lot of corn as I remember seeing for a number of years. Mr. Holbrook reports that the average per acre was right around seventy bushels, and it was raised without irrigation. The farmers are beginning to realize the necessity of observing scientific rules for farming, not only in agricultural lines but in the line of raising fruit and in the matter of raising stock and poultry. It used to be a common thing to see the farmers come in with a load of razorback hogs two or more years old that would weigh one hundred and fifty pounds or perhaps a little more, for the market, but now one of them is scarcely ever seen and if seen at all it will be back in the hills, and when seen or if they hear you will give a boo and be off in the brush. Now we find the farmers are taking pride in raising the pureblood breeds that will weigh two hundred pounds by the time they are five or six months old. I remember that during the life of John W. Smith, who lived on the same farm where his son Art Smith now lives, that he sent back east and had a Jersey Red sent out and kept an account of how much he gained each day, weighing daily, and he reported to me that his average gain in weight for a month was three pounds daily and he finally became so fat that he could hardly get up when he was down.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. Marlan of Derby were transacting business with our merchants about mid-week.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, who is at present stopping in Medford, came and took dinner. W. M. Thompson of Grants Pass and a stranger came in for dinner from Central Point. He came in with a truckload of household goods for a man by the name of Thomas Smith who moved into the house owned by F. J. Ayres, and formerly occupied by Clifford Hickson, who has moved to Ashland. It is the rule here now if a family moves in another must move out, go to the hotel or camp out in a tent, for every house in town is occupied, even the upper part of Geo. Brown & Sons store and the hardware store. There were also five strangers here for dinner the same day.
    B. M. Bushm whose home is in Ashland, but in the employ of Paul's Electric Store, Medford, was here and spent the night, and reports that he is on a deal to extend the electric line from just above the town where the rock crusher stood up to the Lemon Charley farm about three miles above Brownsboro, and that he would close the deal very soon.
    Henry Debbs of Central Point also came in later for dinner the same day and later Mr. Luke Walker and Wm. Cottrell came in for dinner. Mr. Walker is a stockman from Klamath Falls and was on a deal with Mr. Cottrell for beef cattle.
    I see that I have omitted to say anything about our election. Well, it passed so quietly that it scarcely caused a ripple, for there seemed to be a fixed determination on the part of the voters to vote regardless of party lines, for instance in one neighborhood, where they were noted as being solid Republicans, I understand went solid for Kelly, while scores of Democrats, and many of them lifelong Democrats, voted and worked for C. M. Thomas, and it was the same way with regard to other names on the tickets. There was a general turnout, as there were two hundred and seventeen votes polled.
    We cannot tell who were elected for the town offices, as we have to wait until the council meets next Tuesday evening before the result will be known, but it is the general opinion that our present mayor, H. E. Campbell, is re-elected by almost a unanimous vote. The entire board of election officers, W. C. Daley, T. F. Nichols, A. J. Florey, H. E. Campbell and Jerry Lewis, were at the Sunnyside for dinner and made arrangements with the hostess to serve supper for them in the election hall. It took them until 5 a.m. to count the votes.
    James Jackson of Butte Falls has been spending a few days in the valley and taken a few meals at the Sunnyside.
    James McKey and Thomas Riley, Jr. came in for supper Tuesday evening. Mr. McKey is a professional poultry raiser and has charge of Thos. Riley, Jr.'s poultry yard on his farm on Antelope Creek.
    Wm. Brown and wife and B. H. Williams of San Francisco were here for dinner Thursday.
    George Averill, one of our old navy veterans, who lived on his homestead on the north side of Round Top near the P.&E.R.R., while he and his wife were away from home had the misfortune to have their home and all of its contents burned to the ground and left them with nothing more than what they had on, and all of their winter provisions destroyed.
    Among the passengers on the Butte Falls stage Thursday morning were Mr. Palmer of Butte Falls, R. V. Telfer and Frank Simpson of Brownsboro. Mr. Telfer is from Medford and is now the architect and chief mechanic on the new house being built for George B. Brown of Brownsboro.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Thursday were Earl Miles and his mother, Mrs. J. Doubleday of Butte Falls, who were on their way to Medford, and Mr. Smith, who is one of our orchardists and successful farmers on Big Sticky, and later in the afternoon Mr. Cadzow and four others from Butte Falls came in and called for dinner.
    O. C. Eblen of Butte Falls also came in later. He had just come in from Trail with a bunch of his horses that had been working on the Crater Lake Highway above Trail.
    Mr. Barker, the Butte Falls banker, came in Thursday evening and took supper, then went on out to Medford.
    There were three men came in from Fish Lake for late supper and beds and report that the snow was fifteen inches deep when they left that morning. They went on to Medford next morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 16, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. M. Wilfley, one of the big orchardists, was in town Saturday shaking hands with some of his many warm friends and bidding them farewell. He had disposed of his fruit crop and had his business here all settled up, and was on his way to Los Angeles, Cal., and to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he is carrying on an extensive business. I was talking the other day with one of our prominent farmers who had been out to his orchard to get a load of apples, and he remarked that it was the neatest kept orchard that he had seen for years. Mr. John Norris is his foreman and with his ability to keep everything in proper shape and Mr. Wilfley's fine ideas and liberality, so far as the expense is concerned, it is made one of the most attractive orchards in the valley.
    Wert Pool, one of our progressive farmers, was doing business with our business men last Saturday.
    Porter J. Neff and Prof. Emmens of Medford were out here Saturday morning on their way up to the Pelouze place a short distance above here.
    Miss Middlebusher of Trail was a business caller the same morning on her way up home.
    Frank Lewis, our confectionery man, is enlarging his business, or rather adding another line, for he has added a line of groceries, almost that is kept in any first-class grocery store and seems to be getting his share of the trade. Mr. Lewis is one of our old settlers and had been in the confectionery, soft drink and pool and billiard business for several years, and has quite a number of warm friends here.
    Claus Charley and five others who attended the dance here Saturday night came in for beds and some of them for breakfast.
    Thomas Carlton, who has a fine stock farm on Rogue River, called for dinner Saturday p.m.
    Our Sunday school coming at 10:30 o'clock a.m. and preaching at 11:30 a.m. makes it difficult for me to get the names of the people who call for dinner Sundays, as I have no way to secure them, but there was not very many here that day, although John W. Smith, wife and two children were here for supper. They had been moving the day before from the old Smith farm on Big Sticky, where they had been living with his brother, Arthur, and had just finished up Sunday afternoon and came to here for supper, so they are now in their own home.
    Since we have had such an upheaval in the political realm, our genial Democratic postmaster has been making some very much needed changes in our post office. He has cut off a small part of the old post office department of the building and attached it to the main waiting room and cut off a large part of the old waiting room by partitioning it off and adding it to a part of the old post office room, thus making a nice, large, roomy office room, and leaving the waiting room nice and convenient and having the boxes facing the entrance. In making these changes he has also made a new entrance and put in a new window in the side of the post office, part of what was a part of the old entrance to the building. He has also put in a new set of boxes for the convenience of the rural mail carriers, making everything inside much more handy, and the ladies who work in the office will feel thankful for the Republicans and few Democrats for electing Walter Pierce to be governor of our great state of Oregon.
    E. V. Brittsan and family, who live on the P. S. Anderson ranch, up Rogue River, came in from Medford Saturday afternoon. Speaking about Mr. Brittsan and family brings to mind that fact that last Saturday was Armistice Day and that there was but very few people in our little town, except as they whizzed through so fast that I could net know them.
    Perl Stowell was also helping John W. Smith move Saturday and Sunday and took supper at the Sunnyside.
    Ed Hoyt, our son-in-law of Ft. Klamath, came in on business Sunday evening and remained two days.
    I omitted to mention that Mr. Paul Robinson and Miss Nara Childreth were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday, and so were Harry Lewis and Miss Rosa Whaley of Medford. She came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Saturday and remained until Monday morning, going on up to Butte Falls on the stage. Thomas F. Nichols and his partner in the new pool and confectionery store, Clarence Pruett, and Harold Van Scoy were here for dinner Sunday, and George Holmes, wife and sister, Miss Ruth Holmes and Thomas Riley were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday eve.
    The partnership in the sawmill business between W. S. Chappell and George Adamson of Trail has been dissolved, Mr. Chappell having bought his partner out, and then Mr. Chappell sold part of the property to Mr. Harry Morgan and George Stacy, Jr., and the new firm are moving the mill up on Long Branch.
    Mr. W. G. Marshall, who lives a few miles west of Eagle Point, was a business caller Monday.
    Mr. Miller, an old resident of Elk Creek, was discovered missing by his family about the fourth of this month and search was instituted and when he was found, the first of the next week, he had unsaddled his horse and turned him loose, had taken off his shirt and shoes and was almost frozen. He was taken to a nearby house and revived. Dr. Holt was summoned over the phone and found that no serious damage was done, that ail he needed was to be kept warm and fed nourishment sparingly until he gains strength. The surprise is that he lived through the rain and snow, for he is about 70 or 80 years old.
    Died, November 13, Mr. Alva D. Hannaford, aged 53 years and one day. He leaves his wife, two sons and six daughters, Mrs. H. Jerome, Mrs. Gerdon of Lakeview, Ore.; Vivian, Esther, Ruth, Jewell, James and David, the latter aged two years. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. H. G. Adams of this place, at the residence and interment in the Central Point cemetery.
    When we held our town election November 7, we were not able to learn who were the lucky ones until this Wednesday morning, as the town council did not meet until last night. H. E. Campbell was re-elected as mayor, councilmen for one year, Roy Ashpole, L. C. Charley, T. F. Nichols, councilmen for two years, Mattie Brown, F. J. McPherson, A. H. Thompson. Treasurer, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Recorder, Floyd Pearce.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 18, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Israel Patton of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday on her way here.
    M. S. Chappell, our shoe cobbler, who has been up in the Trail country a good part of the summer and fall, engaged with his sawmill business, came out and reopened his shop, and the people of our town and vicinity were thinking that we were to have him here among us again, but as he has bought out his old partner and taken in two more, he has left us again to assist in moving the mill, so we will have to wear our old shoes unmended, go barefooted or buy new ones.
    Rev. John Day and wife and Mrs. Wm. N. Anderson, all of Butte Falls, called for dinner Tuesday and went on out to Medford that afternoon. They were on their way to Phoenix to attend a Sunday school convention.
    B. F. Fuller, one of our orchardists on a small scale, although he has a nice orchard, has just shipped 300 boxes of apples to Klamath Falls through the U.S. mail from this post office. It means business for our postmaster, but work for the mail carrier.
    I see that our confectionery man, Frank Lewis, is filling up a warehouse back of his main store building to be used for storing such goods as will be out of date such as pitchforks, shovels, nails, etc., for he is going into business all O.K., and is building up quite a trade in his new line of business.
    John M. Rennie, representing J. K. Gill & Co., Portland, Ore., and McLeod-May Co., San Francisco, Calif., was here for the night Tuesday and dinner Wednesday.
    Wednesday Roy Stanley gave me his subscription for the Medford Mail Tribune and the same day I took the subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune from Mrs. G. M. Stedman of Grants Pass, and also from O. W. Train of Eagle Point, Ore., although he lives near McLeod. The people seem to be hungry for the news and are calling for the Medford Mail Tribune to get it. I am also sending today, Friday, a card of thanks from the family of Mr. Alvah D. Hannaford, deceased, and his brother James G. Hannaford for publication.
    Wednesday we had as guests for dinner, Jack Stewart of Grants Pass, Mrs. George Stidham, also of Grants Pass and Mrs. Minnie Nussbaum of Lake Creek.
    Mrs. W. S. Baker and her brother, Wm. Pepper, were in town Wednesday afternoon on their way home with two cows in her truck she had been pasturing in Mr. R. A. Weidman's alfalfa pasture. She seems to be getting her business settled up quite well, although she says that there are a few debts that she has not been able to collect yet.
    In strolling around town Thursday I discovered a lot of timber, sand and gravel alongside and back of the offices of the Eagle Point and Butte Falls Canal Co., and found Mr. John Miller and Thomas Riley at work and approaching them, learned that they were building a garage for the company 40x20 feet with a sloping front. They had the foundation already made, blocks of cement and were sawing out the timbers, but Mr. Riley remarked that they would have to wait until the cement hardened before they could proceed, but in the meantime they would build an addition to the new barber shop, a room cut out of the old Roy Ashpole hardware store building, now fixed up for a soft drink, cigar and confectionery, pool and billiard and card room for a bathroom for our barber. They are working on it today, Friday, and in a short time, probably by the time this is in print, Earnest Dahack, our popular barber, will be giving those who desire one a good wash-off. Our carpenters are kept so busy that they have jobs always ahead.
    Lucius Kincaid, the mail contractor on the route from Eagle Point to Trail six times a week and to Persist, along the same route, has accomplished another change over his route so instead of crossing over the Dodge-French bridge going up over a dirt road with his heavy load, now goes over the Crater Lake Highway to Trail and returns via the Dodge bridge while he has but little or no load, quite a saving, especially in the winter.
    Henry Hayes and Joe Hoskins were business callers Thursday. They are living at the Haskins mill near McLeod.
    L. C. Falkenhagen, representing Marshall-Wells Company. Grants Pass, was here for dinner Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. N. E. Boraker have moved into a part of the old Pool hotel, now owned by Mr. Morgan and occupied by him, he keeping the front part of the building, as every place where a person or family can live in is occupied by someone, and I think that the advice to the people of Jacksonville by the editor of that live little paper, the Jacksonville Post, is also applicable to our own town that is for those who have a little surplus cash to use it to build more houses, for there has been a constant demand for houses to rent for the past two or three months, and now the families are dividing up so as to accommodate the newcomers.
    Mr. Mathews, who is on the Perry Foster place near Debenger Gap, was a business caller this week, working on his auto in the Childreth blacksmith shop.
    The Ladies Improvement Society met at the home of Mrs. T. F. Nichols Thursday and I understand that there was a fine attendance and had a very pleasant time as well as a fine lunch.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Maude H. Bunnell of Rancheria Prairie, Butte Falls, came out on the stage last Friday, took dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel and went out to Medford remaining until Monday. She does not seem to appreciate the kind of roads we have between here and Butte Falls as they are beyond description.
    J. H. Rigsby, who has a family living here while he is working on the von der Hellen contract on the Crater Lake Highway, came out to visit his family and took two of his boys to Medford and treated them to a new suit each. He is one of our sterling citizens that came in from Eastern Oregon about a year ago and has managed to keep busy ever since. Some people complain that they can't find anything to do but he always does. They are of the class, perhaps, such as I heard complaining a few days ago about the wages offered for work, three dollars and forty cents a day and board yourself. They would rather lay around and go in debt for their board. There is no excuse now for anyone to be out of a job, if they are able to work, for work has now commenced on the main canal for the Eagle Point Irrigation Co., and if the weather will permit, work will be obtainable for the next year or more, as not only the canal is to be dug, but the laterals, and they, several miles in length, will be dug and that is no small job, and the contractors are already at work on them.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Stille, who are living on the old Lane place west of Eagle Point, were trading with our merchants Thursday.
    Charley Humphrey and wife and Mrs. Ward Dunlap and daughter Miss Ada Dunlap, all of Derby, came out and went to Medford Thursday and on the homeward trip brought out a load of goods for the F. J. McPherson store. Charley is one of the live wires of the Derby country that never gets cold, for he is always up and going.
    Will C. Counter of Ashland, salesman for Parksmen, Portland, was here Thursday for the night and so was Millard Robinson and Earl Wood.
    Lee Edmondson of Butte Falls was a passenger on the stage on his way home. He had been out to Medford on business.
    Mr. Kingery of Antelope was doing business here last Saturday.
    Mrs. James Grieve, the hostess of the Prospect Hotel, was a passenger on the stage from Medford to her home Saturday.
    S. G. Palmer of Butte Falls was a passenger for his home also and Rev. J. E. Bay and wife were also homeward bound on the same stage. Mrs. Wm. N. Anderson, who came out with Mr. and Mrs. Day, had already gone up home the day before.
    Pearl Stowell and Joe Hoskins of McLeod were here for dinner and J. F. Johnson and family, Theo. A. Glass and Thos. L. Timmons of Kansas City, Earl Bechdolt and Ed Gomez were here Saturday for dinner.
    Among the callers Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Callaghan, agents for the Vacuette Distributing Co. Medford, Ore., John Wilkinson, B. S. Moomaw, three children, and sister Mrs. Dusic Wilkinson, Frank Worth and his brother-in-law, Carl Richardson, night and dinner.
    Charles Clark of Medford, traveling agent for Watkins Products, was here Monday for dinner, and Ed Gomez spent the night.
    The road district meeting held at the home of the road supervisor, Wm. Perry, resulted in levying a special tax of five mills. At first the proposition was to make it an eight-mill levy but that was voted down and they finally agreed on a five-mill tax. In the Butte Falls district they voted a five-mill tax, which will mean raising about $10,000 for that district.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Monday noon were Mr. and Mrs. William Perry, he being our popular road supervisor, and he reports that the work is going on quite satisfactorily although there are several places where work is much needed, but owing to the fact that the people at the last election voted down the bill to levy an additional tax of $100,000 for road work the county court appropriated as much money as usual to our roads in this end of the county, so instead of having $10,000 to apply to his district the coming year there will be but five thousand dollars plus the amount raised from the general road fund so we will have to put up with what we will get, and the reader will bear in mind that five thousand dollars will not go very far in as large a district as the one he has to care for.
    In addition to those mentioned who were here for dinner Monday there were also Mrs. Rosa Smith, Mrs. Perry's sister, W. E. Hammel, one of the directors of the Eagle Point Canal Co., and Mr. Perry, who is also one of the directors. Fred Pettegrew, the secretary of the district, Joe Hoskins, Geo. Lewis, Wm. Bigham, Perry Foster and Oliver Adams of Butte Falls.
    The contracts are being let to clear the right of way for the canal from Big Butte to the terminal, the Nichols Gap, and also the different laterals, as well as the digging of the laterals, and some of the contractors are establishing their camps. Mr. Pettegrew told me this Wednesday morning that the company was establishing a camp at the C. H. Natwick place and were going to make some of the laterals themselves, so by the time I write my next letter the dirt will be flying in earnest.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 24, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    L. J. Lee of Tillamook County, Ore., called for dinner Tuesday. He was looking over the county, and in the run of conversation remarked that he was going to spend one winter in Oregon where it does not rain all of the time. He was simply delighted with our climate as well as the general appearance of the valley, especially the productiveness of our soil.
    O. C. Eblen of Butte Falls moved his family and household goods over from Butte Falls, coming this far for dinner, then going on to Medford. He tried to secure a house here to move into but failed. There was one house that he could have rented but it required some little changes but the owner would not go to any expense in that line so he had to go on to Medford and occupy apartments in a rooming house. There is a call every day for houses to live in and none to be found. Perry Foster, one of the pioneers of Rogue River Valley, who owns a farm on Rogue River near the Debenger Gap, was also a diner at the Sunnyside Hotel Thursday.
    John Prillaman, who lives in the upper part of the Brown Bros. store building, and made a business trip up into Alberta, Canada, to look after his land interests there, returned last Tuesday morning. On his return trip he came by way of North Dakota to look after his land interests there. He reports the most of the time he was gone the weather was ideal, about like it was here, and in speaking of the crops in North Dakota he says that they were the best they have had for years, but if I should stop at that I would fail to tell what to some would be the most interesting part of the narrative, for while he tells of the bountiful crops he also tells of the failure of a market for them. He reports the corn crop is so plentiful and the price so low that the farmers simply cut it up, shock it in the field and turn the cattle to it to help themselves; that it will not pay for shucking out, and that beef is selling, when there is a demand for beef on foot, at two cents a pound, and that the choicest steaks are selling in the shops at 11 cents per lb.; and that the potato crop is almost beyond description, that they grow to an enormous size but also the very best quality, and so far as quantity is concerned the ground is covered with them, but no market. He stated that the farmers were giving them away to anyone who would dig them. That he saw a forty-acre field just covered with them and the owner offered to give the entire crop to anyone who would dig them and take them away, and that hay was offered for four dollars a ton in the stack, but no buyers. He also was giving an account of how the grafters manage who are speculating in the oil fields up in the Montana country. The promoters of the scheme will lease a farmer's land and have him pick the place where he wants the well bored, and they will go to work and bore the well until they strike the sand; that is a sure indication of oil, and then stop and tell the owner that there is no sign of oil, and so give it up, and as the land is good for nothing without oil, some agent will come along and offer to buy the land for a low price and after he or one of his pals have bought up all the land they can they will reset the machinery and bore a little deeper, strike oil and thus rob the owner and make a fortune.
    There was a family by the name of Cowgill came in Tuesday looking for a home, so I am informed by one of our merchants, F. J. McPherson, and he seemed to think that they wanted to buy a farm, in fact there are quite a number of inquiries for places to rent or buy, and a number of strangers who are simply inquiring about the price of land, and when the water will be ready to use in the new canal, but that is a question that is easier asked than answered, although the promoters seem to think that if it is an open winter that the canal will be completed early next season, as the contractors are already starting up their work. The von der Hellen gasoline shovel is already up at the head of the canal, and Chris Natwick is ready to push his job there and the contracts are let to clear the brush and timber off of the right of way. H. R. Bush of Colorado, and H. A. Smith of Sams Valley were here for dinner Tuesday and reported that they had a contract to clear the right of way on a good part of the laterals. There is about fifty miles of that kind of work to be done.
    S. A. Pickel, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Company, was here for dinner Wednesday and later in the afternoon Dr. W. H. Heckman and wife of Central Point called for dinner. They had been up to the T. F. Nichols place on Rogue River to examine one of the Davis boys so that he could take out a life insurance policy.
    H. A. Hanscom, father of our townsman Charley Hanscom, and son W. V. Hanscom, R. Waddell and C. E. Redden, all of California, were here Wednesday visiting H. A. Hansom's son Charley.
    The Cowgill brothers, three of them of Lakeview, came in on the stage from Medford Wednesday morning and started right off in search of Lewis Robinson, so I did not learn the particulars but learned later that there were three families of them and that they were seeking homes here among us.
    Mrs. T. F. Nichols, wife of one of the hardware merchants, who has been up above Lake Creek visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farlow, returned the first of the week.
    Owen Conover, Edward Cook and F. E. Bechdolt of Butte Falls went out to Medford Wednesday with a bunch of beef cattle, returning to the Sunnyside Hotel that evening to spend the night.
    Wm. von der Hellen, Ralph Cowgill, Fred Pettegrew and Alex Betz were here for dinner Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 27, 1922, page 4


TRAIL ITEMS
    The new concrete bridge at Trail is nearly completed and is certainly a fine piece of work.
    Mr. J. L. Ragsdale returned from Medford one day last week with a new Ford.
    Ester Mechem of upper Trail spent the weekend with Irma Ash.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Fry and son, Earl, were Sunday guests at Irwin Howe's.
    We are glad to hear Mrs. M. Middlebusher is improving rapidly and expects to return to her home soon.
    Mrs. A. T. Poole, daughter Minnie and Claude Ragsdale returned home Monday from a few days visit on the Umpqua side.
    The teacher and pupils will enjoy a few days vacation this week, as there will be no school for the week after Wednesday on account of Thanksgiving.
    Wallace Cushman was in town selling turkeys Saturday.
    The work on the highway above Trail is progressing rapidly. They expect to have it completed in a few weeks, if the weather doesn't get too bad.
    Mr. T. L. Ragsdale and sons Claude, Wilmer and Wesley were repairing fence on their place in Upper Trail district the first of the week.
    Enid Middlebusher and Irma Ash were Eagle Point callers Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 1, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Guy Pruett, Henry French and his son Lloyd were among the business callers last Thursday. Mr. French, before the Crater Lake Highway was established, used to bring his eggs, cream and other kinds of marketable farm products to our little town, but now since he has a nice smooth road to travel and it takes but a few moments to run the ten miles, for since the new highway was laid out across what is improperly called the desert, it has shortened the distance from here to Medford, so that it now takes but a few minutes to make the run to Medford, and it is such a pleasure to ride over a smooth road, especially  after riding over some of our dirt roads is mixed with water enough to make it soft. I heard a man who was here at the Sunnyside Hotel telling about how the people of Butte Falls had had to cut out a new route to get out of that city since the contractor had plowed up the main street from near the Butte Falls bank building out toward Derby and the people had wallowed through it until it had become with the utmost difficulty that the light hack with a heavy team could hardly get through with the mail. If our county court or the state commission would let the contracts to make the market roads in the winter and have them commence working in the spring and have the contractors bonded to have the job finished by the first of December there would be none of the trouble of wallowing through the plowed ground after the fall rains.
    There was a report came to me that there was a collision on the Cingcade hill between an auto and a wagon last Thursday but no serious damage done that a woman had her face scratched up some but fortunately no special damage done.
    I am sorry to see that the work on our railroad is getting along so slowly, for I see the men who have been working on the track around town and report that they are laid off on account of lack of material, especially ties. One of the men was here the other day and reports that they have the grading about completed out as far as Four-Bit Creek, about into the large (two townships) body of fine yellow pine and sugar pine timber equal to any body of timber on the coast, for the timber further north is mostly fir while this is considered the very best timber for manufacturing purposes to be found anywhere, and still they have to lay off for want of ties and rails.
    The work on the Eagle Point irrigation canal is getting started, the gasoline shovel is already unloaded from the car and by the last account was moving on its way to commence digging its way through the roots, rocks and dirt to open up a way for the water to come from Big Butte Creek to the alluvial soil around Eagle Point, and strangers are coming in asking all kinds of questions about the price and quality of land in this section.
    Our old contractor, C. H. Natwick, who has a contract to dig 19,000 yards of the main canal, is establishing his camp at the Thomsen homestead and started up with. two loads of machinery; and Jud Edsall, another contractor, who has a contract for digging 10,183 yards of laterals, has established his camp at the Ernest Dahack homestead and I have not learned just where the Wm. von der Hellen camp is being located yet.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Humphrey of Derby and Mrs. James Merritt of Reese Creek came out Friday and went out to Medford, Mr. Merritt taking a fine lot of turkeys to the market.
    Chris Beale, a prominent citizen of Butte Falls, who carried the mail from Butte Falls to Derby last winter, came out last week and has gone to work on the contract with Jud Edsall.
    J. M. Conley and Jesse Marshall of Butte Falls were here for dinner Friday on their way to Medford.
    Fred Pelouze, formerly of this neighborhood, but more recently in California, was here Friday and called on your Eagle Point correspondent on his way up to Portland to visit his son Bob and family. When asked where he was living, [he] replied that he had been living in California but they expected to live in Portland near Bob, as life was too short for them to live apart.
    E. W. Frey and Mrs. Thomas Abbott, both of Lake Creek, were here Friday evening on their way home. They had been out to see a doctor, as Mrs. Abbott's baby was ill. While they were here Mrs. Abbott gave me her subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Geo. W. Avrill of Butte Falls, near Round Top, was here the last of the week to spend the night. It does look as though his troubles don't come singly, for shortly after he had his house and contents burned, including their entire winter supplies of provisions of all kinds, their year's supply of canned and preserved fruit, clothing, etc., then when they returned they found that some dogs had been left in the neighborhood to starve and they had killed forty blooded White Leghorn and Plymouth Rock hens and ducks and left them scattered over the yard, and a few days later he found his best horse dead and the other so lame that it took him all day to bring him down this far, on his way to Medford to see a veterinary. Now if anyone can report a longer string of misfortunes just let me know and the account will be duly reported.
    E. M. Best of Medford and Uriah Gordon of Fort Klamath, Lois Martin, who has had charge of the rock work (blasting) on the von der Hellen contract, on the Crater Lake Highway, G. H. Wehman, the bookkeeper on the same job, and Truman McClelland were here for dinner, supper and beds last Friday and so were J. H. and W. W. Jones of Portland.
    F. J. Ayres and wife of Reese Creek passed through our town Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 1, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A short time ago I gave an account of John Prillaman's trip up into Canada where has a land interest in the Alberta section and also of his experience in North Dakota and of the wonderful crops they raised there the past season, etc., and in speaking of the price of beef cattle, I made a mistake and stated that the price of beef cattle there had dropped down to two cents a pound. gross or live weight, where it should have been that the drop in cattle was in the Alberta country. Mr. Prillaman called my attention to the mistake and remarked that as soon as the new tariff law went into effect so that the Canadians could not ship their cattle into the United States, that the price dropped to two cents a pound, remarking that he could not see as that had raised the price of cattle here, for they are so low here now that it will not pay to feed twenty-dollar hay.
    I see that I am getting behind in my writing so far as dates are concerned.
    Mrs. L. Jennings and Mr. F. C. Johnson of Medford came in for late supper Sunday evening. They had started to go to Butte Falls, but took the wrong road and traveled for a long time before they discovered their mistake. Mrs. Jennings is a daughter-in-law of the man by that name who was in charge of the Sterling mine when it was in its prime and her husband and his brother have it leased at the present time, but the mining ground has reached such an altitude that they do not have the necessary drop for the water so as to wash the dirt off from the gold so that it is not producing the gold it did in former days, for it was at one time producing as much, if not more, gold than any other mine in Southern Oregon.
    Mrs. James Fry of Trail came out on the stage Monday and went on up home on the Eagle Point-Trail stage. She had been visiting in Ashland.
    Miss Edith Turnbow of Butte Falls came out on the P.&E. train Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel and so did Mr. R. Cummings of the Earl Fruit Co., Spokane, Wn., and Mr. A. G. Irish, also of the same company of Medford; Mr. S. Stephenson, Medford; W. L. Jones, Butte Falls of the forest reserve service; R. C. Cambers, H. A. Smith, H. L. Buck, George West, F. Pettegrew, Ralph Cowgill, two of the officers of the Eagle Point Irrigation Company, C. H. Natwick, one of the contractors on the Eagle Point canal, H. L. Cox, manager of the construction work on the extension of the P.&E. railroad, and he reports that they have the new roadbed graded as far as Four-Bit Creek, ready for the ties and rails; Mr. Trikham Abbott, Salem, or assistant bank examiner and C. M. Sims, state bank examiner, Salem; George Gray and H. Down, the two last named for dinner and overnight and Mr. Dusham.
    R. M. Conley and a stranger of Butte Falls were here for dinner and so was Mrs. Raymond Phillips of Squaw Lake, Jacksonville post office, was here for dinner. She had been up to Butte Falls to visit her daughter, who is attending school at that place.
    C. H. Natwick, who is arranging his camp on the Eagle Point canal, has been stopping here for a few days.
    Mrs. Ralph Gardner and son, Ralph, Jr., brought out some beef for the Sunnyside and took dinner Tuesday.
    Miss Viola Zimmerman, of Butte Falls, who makes her home with her parents near Blue Canyon, went up home on the stage Tuesday.
    H. B. Tronson, one of our prominent orchardists, was horse trading with F. J. McPherson, one of our successful merchants, last Tuesday, and while here said that he had disposed of all of his marketable apples, but has some of his culls left on his hands, that he had bargained them off to one of the cull buyers, but he found that he was getting so many from the packing houses that he refused to take any more, and he thought that it was a dirty trick. S. M. Hawk and A. L. Hildreth of Butte Falls and Frank Miller of Medford were here Wednesday for dinner.
    Fred Dutton, one of our successful farmers and stock men, was here last Wednesday trading with our garage man, George L. Holmes.
    Mrs, Alvah Hannaford, who lost her husband a short time ago, passed through here with her household goods, moving from the old Moomaw place that her husband had rented a short time before his death, to her brother-in-law, James G. Hannaford. She expects to live with her mother this winter.
    Alvin Bieberstedt, one of our successful German citizens, who lives back of Butte Falls, near the foot of Mt. Pitt, was here on business last Wednesday. Charley Givan and a younger brother were also business callers Wednesday, and so was W. O. Johnson of Wellen. He was trying to buy loose hay.
    Fred Frideger of Medford is out in these parts, pruning his orchard and stopping at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Laura C. Atkins, who is teaching school in the Lost Creek district, came in early Wednesday morning for breakfast, on her way to her home on Applegate River.
    George F. Fendall came in from Hilt, Calif., on his way home above Trail.
    John Foster of Medford was here to dinner Thursday and reported that his father, Perry Foster, has gone down to Gates, Calif., to visit his daughter, Mrs. Arthur Morrison.
    Other guests who were here Thanksgiving day were Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Ralston and Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Houston, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, one of the principal shoe dealers in Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Holmes, Mrs. Robert Harnish and her sister, Esther Nichols of Phoenix. Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Perry, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley, Mr. S. H. Harnish and later in the day Perry Haley and wife, Mrs. Clarence Robinett and Miss Ruth Grover.
    Word reached here Thursday that another one of our prominent citizens, James Jordan, had passed away on Wednesday at the home of his son-in-law, Ed Wolfer, in Hubbard, Ore., aged 30 years, 8 months and 10 days. He has been a citizen of our town for several years, but his health failed him and he finally consented to go and live with his daughter. I suppose the remains will be shipped back to Iowa, his old home, to be buried by the side of his wife. He leaves several children and many friends to bear the loss.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 5, 1922, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Poole, Minnie and Luther Poole, were Thanksgiving guests of Mr. and Mrs. Fred Colvig of Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher of Prospect spent the weekend with relatives at Trail.
    R. R. Dawson laid off a few days this week from his work on the crusher to gather his cattle.
    Mr. and Mrs. Stalley Watson of Attalia, Wash., are visiting at the home of Mr. and Mrs R. D. Watson.
    The Misses Nina Blakeley and Minnie Pool and C. Ragsdale were Medford visitors Sunday.
    Mr. James and Mr. Reynolds of Medford were in our vicinity Thursday looking over mining interests.
    The Dale brothers from Central Point are boarding with Ashes at Trail and working for Hill Construction Company.
    W. R. Thomason and E. E. Ash were transacting business in Medford Saturday.
    Miss Mae Mordoff, teacher at Trail, spent Thanksgiving with her parents in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 6, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Swink, one of our prominent business men of Butte Falls, Miss Lorena Lowe of Central Point, A. S. Turnbow of Eugene, Ore., and Amos Turnbow of Butte Falls came out from Butte Falls to the Sunnyside for dinner. All of them had been up to Butte Falls combining business with pleasure, and came out on the stage as far as here and took passage on the stage for Medford.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Friday, Dec. 1st in addition to those named above were Millard Robinson, Buster McClelland, George Lewis and the Smith boys, who are located at Four-Bit Creek where they have located on homesteads.
    H. C. Meacham of Trail was here on business Saturday.
    There were four young men came out on the Butte Falls stage Saturday on their way to Medford and one of them, Barney Hogan, was on his way to Seattle to work in a hospital until spring, when he expects to return to his old job in Butte Falls.
    Since the work has been suspended on the von der Hellen canal contract on an irrigation project above Talent, where S. B. Holmes was bookkeeper, he has resumed his place in our post office as clerk.
    It is a good thing for the readers of the Eaglets that the author does not attend the dances here, for if he did he might be compelled to record incidents that take place Saturday nights that would be considered a disgrace to our town; for instance, Sunday morning as one of the late sleepers came into the sitting room another one of the boarders asked, "You had lots of moonshine over there last night, didn't you?" And that after there were several ladies called and in the run of conversation one of them related how she was disturbed by their drunken carousals and could see small groups of men and women walking along the sidewalk and one of the men would take what appeared to be a bottle out from under the sidewalk and he would apparently take a drink, and then they would take a drink all around, ladies and all, and soon act as though they were drunk, at least they seemed to be very boisterous. But what I started in to tell was about someone stealing Eli Dahack's car and running it off of the old wagon bridge. It appears that the man or men or women, for there is no clue to who it was, at any rate the party who did the act deliberately tore the  railing off one side of the bridge and took a long pole and stretched it quartering across the bridge so that when the front wheel would strike it would hit the car so as to run it off the side of the bridge where it would drop twelve or fifteen feet, but whether that can be attributed to the moonshine or to some other cause is a question to be settled, but the car was not so badly damaged as one would suppose. The top was badly smashed, the radiator and shields were badly bent up but the machinery was but little damaged. I would suggest that if this defiance of law is not stopped that when the new council is organized the first of January they repeal the ordinance allowing the promoters of the dancing here to continue the dancing after midnight, for the opinion is very prevalent that some of the people who are doing the mischief go to the dances in Medford and get steamed up and then after the dances close in Medford and Central Point come out here and do their dirty work where they can keep up all night. "A word to the wise is sufficient."
    There were but few guests at the Sunnyside Sunday, but those who ventured out seemed to enjoy themselves. Mr. and Mrs. Earl Van Leewin and Mrs. Anna Hinman of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Carlyle Natwick, also of Medford, besides a number of our neighbors.
    Monday was one of our lovely winter days, just cold enough to make a person feel comfortable when out of the house, in fact the first four days of December proved to be ideal, but Monday night the December rain began to come down in earnest and this Tuesday afternoon the rain is coming down in sheets and the ground is covered with water and Butte Creek is beginning to make us think of the kind of winters we used to have back in the seventies when where the Crater Lake Highway crosses Butte Creek the water was spread all over the lowlands and where the embankment on the north side of the creek and where the railroad bridge now stands was all over the banks, but since the channel is deeper and wider perhaps there is not so much danger, at least we hope that there will not be such a flood again, for there is no telling the amount of damage that may be done, but those of us who saw the floods of the winter of '61 and '62 always dread to see the heavy December rains and snowstorms.
    Robert Neile, who has a stock ranch near the head of Salt Creek, was a business caller last Monday and remarked that he wanted to sell his farm and move to Eagle Point, as he thought that it has a bright future, and in the run of conversation asked if I knew how many retired farmers there were located in our town, and when I come to think of it I am surprised to see how many there are.
    Monday when the Butte Falls stage came in from Medford there were three lovely, sweet-looking girls and three extremely happy-looking boys came out as passengers and the boys acted as though they were afraid that the girls might get away from them and get lost in our city, and they succeeded so well that I did not learn their names or residences, but I hope that they succeeded in reaching their destination all O.K.
    Thomas Stanley and Charley Cingcade were business callers Monday.
    Mrs. Ella G. Barnes of Derby, but formerly of Shelton, Wash., who is stopping at the Hill Hotel on the Butte Falls road for her health, came out on the stage Monday and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner on her way to consult her physician. Chas. Brown, Roy Ashpole, one of the firm of Nichols & Ashpole, Harold Van Scoy, our mail carrier between Medford and Butte Falls, Leland Pettegrew, Clarence Pruett were here for dinner and breakfast, and later in the afternoon Hon. Judge Geo. Dunn of Ashland, our representative in the state senate, and Arthur Kleinhammer of Little Applegate and Mr. Dunford, also of Little Applegate, came in for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 8, 1922, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday there was quite a rush of hungry people collected at the Sunnyside about noon, and among them was W. E. Hammond, one of the directors of the Eagle Point Irrigation Company, Fred Pettegrew, the secretary of the company; Ralph Cowgill, the chief engineer of the company and W. L. Jones, N. Cowski, R. Cambers, Mr. Nason, G. H. West, C. H. Natwick, Mr. Matz, J. H. Faswell, Cliff Heckman and Harold Van Scoy.
    We have been called upon to consign another member of our community to her last resting place in the Central Point cemetery, Mrs. Eliza E. Stille, wife of J. H. Stille, who passed away December 4 at her home near Eagle Point, aged 35 years, 7 months and 25 days. Mrs. Stille has been a devoted Christian for the last 35 years. She is the mother of five children, two boys and three girls, one of her granddaughters being the wife of Mr. Lewis Robinson of this place. She leaves her husband, two sons and three daughters. Interment was solemnized Wednesday, December 6, Rev. Hurburt G. Adams officiating.
    Miss Mable Clary was a passenger of the Medford-Butte Falls stage to Eagle Point and went on up to Rogue Resort on the Trail-Persist stage Wednesday morning. Al Hildreth came out on the same stage and went on up to his home in Butte Falls.
    Arthur J. Anderson and Steve Parif of Medford were here for dinner Wednesday.
    Mrs. Charles Paige of Butte Falls came out on the Butte Falls-Medford stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford the same day.
    Thursday morning I received two copies of the Pacific Record Herald, editor, Delbert Fehl, associate editor, B. F. Lindas, in which is published a part of a very readable article by the editor-in-chief boosting Medford as the center of the universe, which was very proper, but then on the next page was an anonymous article, "Thoughts from the Chimney Corner," giving Medford such an overhauling as if it was true would make those who live there feel a terrible nausea of the stomach on account of having to drink the water that is brought from Fish Lake after it has been spread over the land above the dam, that is, contaminated. After the arrangements were made to supply Medford with pure water from Little Butte Creek it was discovered that a company had practically preempted the water supply of Medford and was building a dam across Fish Lake and when too late to remedy the evil the citizens of Medford discovered that the dam was backing the water over the adjacent country, covered by "old barns, manure piles, discarded garbage, decayed trees and other vegetable matter, and this polluted water was going into the pipe that supplied the city with drinking water." In a short time after this was discovered a howl was raised, but soon the administration in the city affairs was changed and everything went on smoothly, but now there is another change in the political affairs of the city and who knows but the "Old Pioneer" who wrote the article may not be an old sorehead that has been disappointed by the election the 7th day of November. But at any rate the publication of such an article will not be an drawing card for Medford. I suppose that the author thinks that he can hide behind a nom de plume and go unsuspected, but "murder will out."
    J. W. Hovey, the superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, was in town last Wednesday and reports that he is getting along nicely with his work, that he had quite a tract of land that had not been cleared of stones and that he has been clearing them off and used them to build a good road over a low place over the route they have to travel from the house out to the county road, the Crater Lake Highway, and that he has put dirt from the side of the newly built road over the rocks and gravel over that so that now he has a good graveled road all the way out.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry Morgan came in from their home near Trail to visit his parents Thursday and Mrs. W. P. Morgan and Mrs. A. J. Florey were already in a car ready to start for Medford to visit a sick friend of theirs so they talked the matter over and Mrs. Morgan went in with her father-in-law and the two ladies went on to Medford.
    I see that we have another sign up in our town, Nichols and Pruett having a neatly lettered one in front of their pool room. From all appearances they intend to attract the attention of the public.
    L. E. Neuber of Jacksonville came out on the stage Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside. He had been up to the Butte Falls country looking after his homestead and Mrs. Nellie Trefren, also of Butte Falls, came out on the same stage and took dinner. They were both on their way to Medford.
    John E. Rinehart and Fred Frideger came in to spend the night. Mr. Rinehart is an old friend of Mr. Frideger from Ohio and concluded that he wanted to see some of the West so came out to visit his old friend. They have been stopping at the Sunnyside for several days. He seems to be well pleased with our country, but is rather reticent when it comes to expressing his opinion.
    Paul Jennings and Paul F. Anderson of Big Applegate came in Thursday night and called for supper, bed and breakfast, and horse feed, but as we do not keep horses, sent them to our neighbor, Sam Harnish. They had come over to gut a lot of Jersey cows at the Fred Pelouze farm.
    Al Clements of Medford came out on the stage and went up on the Trail stage, and Mrs. Sherman Wooley of Butte Falls also was here and went up home on the Medford-Butte Falls stage the same day.
    Benjamin Whetstone was in town Friday morning, having his horses shod up, as he has a job of hauling lumber out from the Hayes sawmill on Indian Creek out to the Crater Lake Highway.
    Our popular sheriff, Charley Terrill and wife, were here for dinner and they were accompanied by Miss Mabel R. Haynes, secretary of the Red Cross of Jackson County. They were on their way up to see a family in the Derby region who were reported as needing help, as the husband was in the county jail.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 12, 1922, page 6


ELK CREEK
    Dist. 74 has been in fear of losing a few weeks school, as the teacher who contracted to teach this school was forced to resign on account of illness Mr. Davis has taken the school. He came from Medford in a taxi yesterday (Sunday) in order to teach school Monday. There are clever pupils. Our efficient chairman was responsible for securing a teacher immediately without interruption of the school.
    The coming of a sawmill will be a great boon to "little ol' Elk Creek," as Mr. Hayes has been busy establishing a sawmill on Dave Pence's property. We have been in need of a sawmill for a long time as lumber is a long way off, and it isn't very easy to haul it on roads which are not in good condition.
    Persist is having their dose of Old Man Winter, as it was reported that 8 inches of snow covered the ground up to Sunday morning the 10th.
    Mr. MacDonald, who runs the confectionery store at the Rogue Elk Resort, is selling out his stock of groceries and periodicals.
    Harvey Morgan went to town last week in his limousine (horse power).
    L. A. Whitley went to Eagle Point Monday for a load of hay.
    Mrs. P. S. Sandoz was a visitor at the school Thursday.
    Claud Moor went after his horses, which were on his homestead at Persist.
    Wm. Ivey visited at his home for a few weeks; also at his grandmother's place, Mrs. F. A. Whitley. He returned to his work Sunday.
    Howard Ash and family returned to their place on Elk Creek Saturday. Mr. Ash was accompanied by Wayne Ash, his brother.
    Elmer Ivey has been spending a short visit from high school.
    A postal inspector was up in this territory inspecting the post office.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 12, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A few days ago Charley Terrill and wife accompanied by Miss Mabel Haines, the secretary of the Red Cross Society, stopped on their way up to Derby to look after the condition of a family whose husband and father was confined in the county jail for bootlegging, and in the run of conversation Charley remarked that he had only eighteen in the jail at that time, although he had had twenty-one in there a few days before but that some of them were turned out, that they come and go, and that they were mostly in for violating the prohibition law, and that brought up the subject of the expense of their keep. It is a very common thing to hear one remark that one can bootleg a little, while there is good money in it and if they get caught that the justice of the peace will fine them only about ten dollars and ten to twenty days in jail where they will have good warm quarters and free grub during the winter and that there is no disgrace to go to jail for breaking that law, and we don't wonder at their making such a remark as that when the older ones are teaching them that very idea, especially when they can spend the winter in jail and save the expense of board, come out in the spring and get a job and go to work again. While their reasoning is very good so far as the upkeep and comfort of the jail is concerned, there is a way to meet just such cases, and by that means act as a motive for them to look on that kind of a life from a different standpoint altogether.
    Our legislature is to convene in Salem in a short time, about three weeks, and if it be not considered out of place I would suggest that the law regarding such cases be so amended as to add to the jail sentence the provision that the convicted persons be required to work at least eight hours each working day at some kind of labor that will pay the taxpayers for their board and keep. I notice almost every week in the Oregon Journal accounts of men being sent to the rock pile to work out their sentence for misdemeanors, and why can't we have some provision similar to protect the taxpayers of our county.
    I don't intend by making the suggestion to inflict a heavier penalty on the poor unfortunates, but it might prove a blessing to them, for you take a man who has been living an active life or perhaps accustomed to labor and confine him where he would have but little exercise and his system will soon be disordered and all out of sorts, whereas if he were required to saw a certain amount.of wood each day, that would give him an appetite so that he would relish his meals, and furthermore if he should happen to have a family that needed help, and that often happens, let the county court allow a certain amount per day and apply it toward the support of the family. As we have no rock pile for them to work on I would suggest that the county buy a lot of cordwood and have it delivered at a convenient place and then put them to work, if not at that then at something else, so as to occupy the mind and keep them healthy. But the objector says, how would you make them work? That would be an easy matter. Adopt the Scripture rule, "He that worketh not neither let him eat," and that would soon bring him to his senses. I knew of a case in Siskiyou County when I was teaching school on Greenhorn Creek about three miles from Yreka when the county required people of that class to work on the roads. A man by the name of Ned Schwaky was the boss of the "chain gang" and that was composed of all kinds of the lesser criminals, and one man he had turned over to him decided that he would not work, and he was a young giant to look at. Ned Schwaky was a man who weighed right around two hundred pounds (he had a deputy who also was some scrapper by the name of Nels Morey), and he reasoned the case with him for a moment, and finally walked off; in a few minutes he came back and the young giant was still standing where he left him, and when the boss came be brought with him a bunch of ugly-looking hazel switches and he addressed the giant thus: Now you can go to work or take a flogging and then go to work. He stood and looked at the boss for a moment and remarked, "Well I guess I'll go to work," and he went to work and had no more trouble.
    Another amusing incident that occurred while I was there was close to where I lived. Mr. Schwaky had in his chain gang at the time I refer to fourteen Chinamen and as it was most too far to take the prisoners to Yreka to the jail he secured a log house to keep them in, it having a partition and only one outside door, so he put the whole bunch in the back room and left his helper and son to guard them. They made their bed on the floor in the outside room so that the door could not be opened without pushing them both out of the way, and Mr. Schwaky went down to "his wife's house" resting easy, but when you get ahead of a Chinaman you have done something. Mark you, they each one had a chain about for feet long and a ball of iron attached to it, and that fastened around the ankle. Well, while everyone was resting nicely, by some means the fireplace was torn out and two of the Chinese, the worst ones in the bunch, got out and the next morning the giant missed them. Well, that day they went to work as usual but that night when they went to bed Mr. Schwaky took a heavy padlock and ran the clasp through each Chinaman's chain and securely locked it, putting the key in his pocket, and went as usual home leaving all of them prisoners fastened together. The next morning when the guard called them to get their breakfast, for they had do their own cooking, he found that the key was in Mrs. Schwaky's pocket and the scene was so laughable that Tobe, one of my school boys, came and called my wife and I to witness the performance. When one wanted water the whole bunch went; when one made bread they all took a hand at it, the same way cutting meat, making tea, etc., and when Ned woke up and found that he had forgotten to leave the key with the guard he laughed and remarked that Nels would have a time with them getting their own breakfast, but that didn't bother him, so after he had eaten his breakfast he came on up and found they were all ready to go to work, but the next time he left the key with his helper.
    Well this is quite a digression, but will add a few smaller items of interest to the general reader. Mr. and Mrs. Scott Boyer of Reese Creek, Mr. Anderson, P. W. Trefren of Butte Falls, J. A. Black of the Medford Grocery Co. and H. Campbell of Butte Falls were among the diners last Friday.
    Wm. Pierce, the master mechanic for Hubbard Bros., was out here assisting in arranging for the funeral of a sister Rebekah who died in Medford.
    Miss Susan Cornell, who is teaching in the Brophy district, came out with Charley Manning and they both took dinner here Saturday.
    Mrs. E. Northrup and her daughter, Miss Nellie Northrup, came out from Butte Falls on the stage Saturday and took dinner. They are recently from Yakima, Wash. They went on out to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 15, 1922, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside last Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Royal G. Brown of the firm of George Brown and Sons, and Mr. and Mrs. John Moffett and Miss Jane Moffett, guests of Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown; H. E. Campbell and wife, our banker, for they both work in the First Bank of Eagle Point; T. B. Scroggs and S. D. Balch of Arizona. They are engaged in the real estate business and were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Campbell; Mrs. Fort Hubbard and Mrs. Murt Daily, Mrs. Nettie Grover and her daughter, Mrs. Guy Pruett and Leland Hutchins.
    Miss Susan Cornell, who is teaching in the Brophy district and came out last week with Charley Manning, went out to Medford the same day, returning Monday morning on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and went back up to her school Monday via the Prospect stage that connects with the stage from here at Derby.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. C. Coghill, who have rented the old J. P. Moomaw farm, were business callers in our town.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Hannaford, the lady who recently lost her husband while on the Moomaw place, has traded a span of horses to W. P. Morgan for a house and lot known as the Finley place and will become a resident of our town, adding to the list of school children in our school.
    Thomas Stanley, who with his wife are spending the winter with his mother-in-law on her farm a little below our town, and his brother-in-law Guy Pruett, were in town having some repair work done on their hay press.
    We are glad to see the smiling face of Lloyd Stanley, who was confined to the hospital in Medford for some six weeks with typhoid fever, on our streets again.
    T. C. Barfry, formerly of Brownsboro, but now the janitor of the M.E. church in Medford, was in town Thursday on his way to Medford. He had been up to his homestead looking after his interests there.
    I learned through the grandfather of the bride, William C. Daley, that his granddaughter, Miss Dorothy von der Hellen, of this neighborhood, and Harold Zundel of Lake Creek, were married last Friday, Dec. 8th, and by that arrangement we have lost another one of our popular telephone girls, as well as society one of its popular members, and for me to say that she will be greatly missed will hardly express the idea. We, as a small part of our community, are wishing them a long and happy life and joyful reunion in the realms of eternal bliss.
    George Albert of Butte Falls, and L. F. Picket and O. C. Holmes of Central Point, were here for dinner Tuesday and Mr. Albert remained overnight.
    A. M. Gay of Butte Falls also came in and spent the night, attending to business here Wednesday and Thursday, went to Medford and had his teeth extracted and is still here at this writing, Friday afternoon.
    George McDonald, who is one of the leading rock workers on the highway job, came out from Medford Thursday and went up to the Jud Edsall camp.
    Henry Meyer and wife of Lake Creek came out Thursday and went on out to Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown and Sons were here for dinner Thursday. They were accompanied by B. H. Williams, salesman of San Francisco.
    Mrs. Cadzow and daughter of Butte Falls and J. H. Husch of Medford were here Wednesday.
    Mrs. George Nichols of Medford was out here visiting her sister, Mrs. Thos. E. Nichols, wife of one of our returned capitalists Thursday, returning home in the afternoon.
    Alex Vestal of Reese Creek came out Thursday afternoon and went to Medford, returning Friday morning, and Mrs. Cadzow, wife of one of the Butte Falls merchants, was also a passenger on the same stage.
    A. J. Krock of Medford came in Thursday night inquiring for the Edsall camp, and spent the night.
    Guy Pruett was also an early visitor Friday morning. 
    Charley Hanscom went to Medford early this, Friday, morning on important business.
    Friday morning in making my regular rounds looking for items of interest to the readers of the Mail Tribune, I called at the office of the Eagle Point Irrigation Co., as I heard what appeared to me as the sound of a hammer, and on entering found John Miller and Thomas Riley busily engaged putting in the work for a cement vault for the company so as to have the books and papers safe in case of fire. I also met Miss Edna Watkins, the stenographer for the company, as busy as a cricket, Ralph Cowgill, the chief civil engineer for the company and John W. Cunningham, consulting engineer of Portland and F. C. Dillard of Ashland, also one of the consulting engineers on the same job, William von der Hellen, one of the contractors on the canal and Fred Pettegrew, the secretary of the company, all having a friendly talk so I retired as I thought that my room was more desirable than my company as I would likely get all the news that would be for publication in the proper time.
    I noticed when Frank Lewis and his daughter, Mrs. Verbick, returned home from Medford yesterday afternoon, that he had his car well loaded with hardware and other kinds of merchandise. He is laying in quite a stock of different kinds of goods including several varieties of medicines so that his shop begins to look like a general grocery and hardware store.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1922, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside last Friday were George Stevens, formerly a resident of this community  but now living on a part of the old Col. Ross place on Ross Lane. He was at one time quite an orchardist in this section, and if I am not mistaken now owns considerable land near Wellen. John Howard, one of the old Civil War veterans, who makes his home with one of his old neighbors, Pete Betz, was also here for dinner and remained overnight, going up home Saturday morning on the Trail stage. Thomas F. Nichols, principal owner in the Eagle Point hardware store and the Eagle Point pool room, and his partner in  the pool room, Clarence Pruett, and two strangers, and I learned that one of them was a representative of the Medford Grocery Co.
    Saturday was a remarkably dull day so far as business is concerned as there was scarcely anyone in from the country. Late in the afternoon I met Mrs. Sam Klingle, and her son George, who live on their own farm on Little Butte Creek between Brownsboro and Lake Creek.
    I also noticed that Eli Dahack and his son Everett were at work raising the old store building standing between the F. J. McPherson store building and the town hall, getting it ready to move. I understand that they are going to move it onto a lot joining the new pool building, but what use they intend to turn it to I am unable to say at present.
    I understand that Lawrence Stowell, a half brother of George W. Stowell, arrived in town Saturday from Canada and went on out to visit his brothers. I did not have the pleasure of meeting him as he had gone on out in the country before I reached McPherson's store.
    Mrs. Allen Underwood of Grants Pass, a daughter of our townspeople Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Reid, has been here visiting her parents during the past week.
    There were four strange men came in for dinner Sunday. It seems as though the weather is most too inclement for the people to venture out unless they have urgent business as we have rain, a little sleet but no snow up to today, Monday, but we can't tell what kind of weather we will have before I finish this letter but up to this time our winter has been very fine, a little wet but not enough to cause any trouble.
    The last time I saw Royal G. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown and Sons, he told me that he expected that he and his wife would start for San Jose, Calif., to visit their daughter Hazel, to spend Christmas with them and I suppose they are there by this time as they intended to start last Friday, the 15th.
    Wm. Perry, who has charge of W. Hart Hamilton's business here, reports that he has just put up a half-mile of new wire fence on his place along the Crater Lake Highway, and that J. L. Groves has been appointed to care for said highway and keep it in repair as in some of the soft places it needs to have more crushed rock put on it to fill up the places where it is giving way.
    Charles W. Long, who is in charge of a dump truck and a grader attached, called for dinner Monday noon and remained overnight, is employed by the state to look after the Crater Lake Highway to keep the soft places filled up and to look after the road generally and keep it in repair, a very judicious provision.
    Among the passengers on the stage Monday were J. M. Hawk, who is operating the Conley sawmill about four miles beyond Butte Falls, and one other man. Mr. Hawk was on his way up home.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Brittsan, who are living on the P. S. Anderson place on Rogue River, were among the business callers Monday afternoon and Mrs. B. told me that her father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. John Long of Derby, were spending the winter at Long Beach, California.
    Among the lodgers at the Sunnyside Monday night were L. C. Farris, of Grants Pass, Arthur Dailey, Burns Ferry, Idaho, George Slagle of Medford.
    There were five passengers on the Butte Falls stage Monday morning on their way to Butte Falls and Prospect. Among them was a man by the name of Joe Gablis from Montana, and while he was waiting while changing the mail I engaged him in conversation and he gave me an account of the kind of climate they have up where he came from. He spoke of one morning they had just before he left when at 7 a.m. the temperature was 7 below zero, by 9 a.m. it was 14 below, at noon 20 below and a heavy wind with it and that when he started there was a heavy storm raging and that it lasted until he reached Portland and was greatly surprised to find the vegetation looking so fresh and the grass still green.
    Monday as I was making my regular rounds looking for items of interest to the readers of the Mail Tribune I dropped into the Brown Bros. store and Frank Brown, one of the first, remarked that he was just putting up a bill of goods for a family out in the hills at the expense of the Red Cross Society, whose husband and father was spending his time in jail for bootlegging, and he remarked: "Say, Mr. Howlett, that article you wrote for the Mail Tribune, suggesting that a provision be made to have the convicted prisoners who are kept in jail be put to work and thus help to defray the expense of their keep while in jail instead of being kept up at the expense of the taxpayers, while it would be a benefit to the taxpayers it would also be a benefit to the prisoners themselves, and another advantage would be that those who are sentenced to pay a fine and decide to 'eat it out' at the expense of the county, and are turned out because the county can't afford to feed them if they had to work the fine out would look at it in a different light, and not make a joke of law violations."
    Mrs. W. L. Childreth, wife of our blacksmith, went to Medford last Monday shopping.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 22, 1922, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    P. E. Sandoz of Elk Creek was here for dinner Tuesday. He came out with some fresh meat to sell.
    E. H. High of Ashland and Mrs. Frank Stone, one of the teachers in the Butte Falls school, and Oliver Adams, also of Butte Falls, were here for dinner also.
    Judge Florey (Judge is his given name; he is not a judicial officer) took the mail from here to Trail Tuesday for the contractor, Lucius Kincaid, and Mr. Kincaid drove a truck for George Holmes, the garage man, and made five trips to Medford for flour for George Brown and Sons.
    Ira Hensley, who was here a few years ago and went from here up into Washington, has returned and is stopping with his brother-in-law, Shorty Allen, near Wellen, was trading at the McPherson store Wednesday. He was accompanied by G. E. Barnes.
    Fred Frideger of Medford, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside Hotel, and his friend, John E. Rinehart, recently from Ohio, who have been working in Mr. Frideger's orchard, finished up the job Wednesday and returned to Medford. Mr. Frideger has put out five acres more of the Bosc variety of pears, and when he left Wednesday morning said that if his friend who had returned to Medford the day before a little unwell was able to stand the trip they were both going to Mr. Frideger's old home in Ohio to visit his old mother. They intend to go up through Canada so that they both can see that country and have taste of the Canadian climate. They will experience quite a change in that respect, from around 36 degrees above zero to, well, judging from the reports in our own country along the Canadian border, around twenty to thirty below zero. They won't find any green grass up there, I suppose.
    C. P. Thomerson of Idaho came out from Medford on the stage Wednesday afternoon and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and Charles W. Long, mentioned a few days ago as being here with a state truck keeping the Crater Lake Highway in repair, has taken up board by the month as he expects to be here most of the winter.
    John Foster of Medford was among the diners Wednesday.
    R. A. Petty, who lives south of here, W. E. Webb of Derby, Wm. Nickell, who lives on Salt Creek near Lake Creek, were business callers Wednesday, and Messrs. Thos. L. Timmons of Portland and Theo. A. Glass were late diners at the Sunnyside Hotel Wednesday. Mr. Glass is the district manager of the R.C. Life of Central Point.
    F. E. Bechdolt of Butte Falls, and O. L. Samuelson, a salesman from Portland, and Wm. Lewis, now of Medford but formerly of the Flounce Rock ranch, were passengers on the stage Thursday. Mr. Lewis was on his way up to his former home to look after his interests there and Mr. Samuelson remained and took dinner here.
    Wm. Holman of Salt Creek passed through here late Wednesday afternoon, and Fred Nolan of Klamath Falls came in on the stage from Medford and spent the night at the Sunnyside Hotel, going on up to Butte Falls Thursday morning.
    In making my rounds Thursday morning I met Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Smith in the Geo. Brown store laying in their Christmas supplies and I noticed that they seemed to be kept quite busy waiting on customers although most of them were our townspeople as there seems to be but few of our country people coming into town, or if they do they go on through to Central Point or Medford, and they go so fast that I cannot recognize them.
    A. J. Florey and wife, who have been absent for a few days, he having been up to Portland on business, and his wife was staying with her parents to Medford during the absence of her husband, returned to their home Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, two of our prominent citizens who live on the line of the P.&E.R.R., were doing their Christmas trading here Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Huson and daughter, who live on the J. M. Cooley orchard, were laying in their their Xmas supplies at the McPherson store Thursday afternoon.
    J. C. Gaines and wife of Trail Creek came out Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford. They have a beautiful home up on Trail Creek where he is engaged in the stock business. I asked how his cattle were doing this winter and he replied all right, that he had been feeding them for about a month; he don't believe in letting his stock go hungry.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 26, 1922, page 3


TRAIL GIRL BURNED BY FALLING INTO BOILING WATER
    TRAIL, Dec. 28.--(Special)--Little Wanda Howe had the misfortune to get badly burned with boiling water Sunday evening of last week. The worst burns are on her forehead and head and is, of course, very hard to treat, but is doing as well as could be expected.
    Miss Ester Mechem of Upper Trail spent the weekend with Irma Ash, and also attended the school program Saturday evening.
    Denzil Middlebusher and sister, Enid, were shopping in Medford Wednesday of last week and returned with a fine Victrola, which was much appreciated by their mother, who is as yet unable to walk without crutches.
    Elmer Moore of Tiller, Ore., is spending the Xmas holidays with friends near Trail.
    Miss Evans left Saturday for Roseburg to spend her vacation with friends at that city.
    Kenneth Blumkall returned from California Monday, where he has been visiting friends and relatives the past week.
    The Misses Lucy and Eula Foeller were pleasant callers at the Howe home Saturday evening on their way home, where they will spend the holidays.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Sturgis attended the banquet in Medford, given by the Copco.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher of Prospect spent the holidays with relatives in and near Trail.
    The school program given by Miss Mordoff's school was not as well attended as we expected, owing to so much sickness in our vicinity, but was greatly enjoyed by all present.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Porter left Sunday for Grants Pass, where they expect to spend the balance of the winter. We are all very sorry to see them leave our vicinity.
    The Misses Eileen and Lorraine Mordoff of Medford spent the weekend with their sister at Trail, Miss Mordoff returning home with them for a vacation of two weeks.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ash and Irma and Wayne Ash spent Christmas with Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Howe.
    Mr. and Mrs. D. Foellers and daughters Lucy, Eula and Sadie and son, Charles, motored to Medford Christmas.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 29, 1922, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside last Friday were J. A. Black of the Medford Grocery Co., Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor and one of the leading contractors, John Howard, one of the Civil War veterans, who stayed overnight and went up to his home on the stage the next morning; Loris Martin of Trail, one of the leading stock workers in the force engaged in the canal and laterals now being constructed by the Eagle Point Irrigation District; Miss Lorena Law of Central Point, and Miss Irene Green of Butte Falls, two of the high school girls who came out to spend their vacation.
    The Eagle Point enterprising citizens, assisted very materially by the school children under the direction of our two teachers, Mrs. Josephine Holmes and Miss Ruth Wiley, gave a Christmas entertainment Friday evening. Although I was unable to be there myself through the kindness of a friend I secured a copy of the program, and from what I can learn from friends who were present and judging from the program that lies before me, they must have had one of the finest entertainments we have ever had here, and we have had some that would have put to shame some of the larger towns. Omitting the introductory part of the program will call attention to the play, Mrs. Santa Claus' Christmas Reception.
    Verna Mathews and family, one of our well-to-do farmers and stockmen, were here trading Friday afternoon. Charles Pettegrew was here for supper and bed.
    Act 1, Children's Home. Act 2, Mrs. Santa's Workshop.
    Cast of characters: Mrs. Santa Claus, Virginia Reid; Good Will, Gwendolyn Brophy; fairies, Lois Robinson; Bertha Winkle, Margaret Brophy, Reva Davidson and Loomis Davidson. Brownies: Rudolph Weidman, Dorothy Pierce, Dorothy Tedrick, Ira Winkle, Hall Reid, Myrtle Rigsby, Zetta Rigsby, Wilbur Jacks and Kenneth Jacks. After the play which was greeted by signs of approval, there was unveiled the Christmas tree and the numerous presents distributed by five girls. The whole school joined in singing Silent Night and the audience was dismissed. Those who were there report that it was one of the finest entertainments we have had in our little town for several months.
    Among the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Saturday were A. E. Hildreth of Oakland, Calif., a brother of Al and Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls. He was on his way up to visit his two brothers and family. Other passengers were Mrs. Caroline Pool, Mrs. Maymie Tucker, one of the teachers in the Butte Falls school. The following were in Eagle Point on business: Elsa Betz, W. C. McKinnis of Butte Falls, W. W. Driscoll, Butte Falls, Fred Nolan of Butte Falls, Claud Hutchinson, Thomas Givan and Pearl Stowell, W. P. Holbrook. Miss Susan Cornell, who is teaching in the Brophy district, came out on the stage [and] took dinner on her way to her home on the Applegate to spend her vacation.
    Last Saturday evening as I stepped out of the post office, it was a little dark so that I could not see to distinguish who they were. I was met by a group of boys and young men and a tall young man approached me with the remark: Say, Mr. Howlett, those fellows over there in the jail in Jacksonville say that they want you to quit writing about having them put to work, for sawing wood would make them tired and Mr. ------, one of the inmates of the jail, says he wants you to quit putting his name in the paper, calling him by name, and after reflecting a moment I replied that I had made the suggestion to have those who were convicted of a violation of the law put to work on account of their health, for a husky young man, especially those who are accustomed to work, to lay in jail for any length of time with little or no exercise, they would become unhealthy, and so far as Mr. ------ is concerned that I had never mentioned his name in any of my letters, out of respect for his family, and for the same reason withhold giving the name of the young men who delivered the message, as I considered him an object of pity and entitled to our sympathy, and sincerely hope that the experience that he and his associates have had will influence them to change their habits and in the future become law-abiding citizens.
    George A. Sanders, who for several years was in charge of the Antelope orchard but now living on his own place near McLeod on Rogue River, came out Saturday to spend the Christmas holidays with his sister, Mrs. Muskopf and family.
    Mr. and Mrs. Leutha Hazelwood of Central Point were among the guests Sunday and so was J. D. Patrick, formerly of this section but now of Ashland, who came up to look after his landed interests here.
    Sunday morning the teachers and superintendent of our Sunday school treated the school to candy and oranges as a Christmas present.
    Among the guests Christmas Day were A. W. Hubbs and wife, shoe dealers of Medford, Loris Martin, Geo. H. Wehman, Nye Matthews, Chas. Winkle, Mrs. Harvey and family, Mrs. Laurel Davis, one of the high school teachers of Butte Falls, John Simon and Mr. McCoy of Butte Falls.
    W. E. Boraker and wife gave a Christmas dinner to the following personal friends: S. E. Cowgill of Eagle Point, Howard Cowgill and family of Medford, Leonard Cowgill and family of Medford, J. F. Stille and J. H. Stille of Eagle Point, making twenty-four in all. These six families just named came in last fall to settle here, but two of them went to Medford on account of being unable to secure houses here to live in.
    As we had a Merry Christmas I will finish this letter by wishing the readers of the Mail Tribune a happy New Year.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 30, 1922, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Timmie Dugan, formerly one of our prominent farmers, just west of our town, but now living on the old Thomas McAndrews place on Bear Creek, on the Crater Lake Highway just outside of Medford, was smiling on some of his old friends in our town the first of the week.
    Charles Cook, representing the Connor Manufacturing Company of Dayton, Ohio, was here for dinner Monday.
    Roy Spencer and John Burns of Butte Falls were here for dinner Wednesday and Earl Miles of Butte Falls came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Chris Beale, who is working on the Edsall contract on the laterals for the canal being built from Butte Falls to Eagle Point, has been spending a few days with friends in Medford, came out Wednesday and went back to work on the job.
    Ralph and Lloyd Stanley called for supper Wednesday evening.
    John Norris, the superintendent of the Wilfley orchard, was in town Thursday morning on business with our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth.
    Mrs. Alice Ferguson and her two children, who have been stopping at the Sunnyside since last fall started Thursday for Redding, California, to be with her sister, who lives some twenty miles out from Redding.
    Thursday morning Charley Manning came out from the Manning farm on Rogue River, near Peyton, and brought his father, Frank Manning, his mother and sister Dency and after eating their dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel, Charley returned home and Mr. Manning and wife and daughter took passage on the Medford-Butte Falls stage for Medford, intending to take passage on the train for Los Angeles, Calif., to visit a sister of Mr. Manning and other relatives. Frank Manning is one of our well-to-do farmers and stockmen, and believes in enjoying life as he goes through it.
    Mr. A. E. Hildreth of Oakland, Calif., who passed through here about a week ago on his way to Butte Falls to visit his two brothers, Al and Buel Hildreth, came out Thursday on the stage and took dinner. He reports that they had a special election in Butte Falls Wednesday to elect a set of officers, including mayor, treasurer, recorder and town councilmen, but he only mentioned that his brother, Buel, was elected mayor, a good selection. Mr. A. Magasen also came out at the same time and took dinner. He says that he has a contract for grading a part of the way for the railroad and that they have twelve miles of the way graded beyond Butte Falls, but have had to suspend work further on account of snow, but intend to move camp back to within four miles of Butte Falls and continue work placing ties and rails, and he expressed the opinion that the work would not stop until they crossed over the divide into the Pelican Bay country.
    Glenn Haley and wife of Gold Hill, and her sister, Mrs. A. G. Florey, and baby of Eagle Point were pleasant visitors at the Sunnyside Thursday afternoon. Glenn is working in Gold Hill and he is taking a little layoff, visiting his parents in Central Point and his wife's sister, and old-time friends here.
    Mr. Hansen, the foreman on the J. H. Cowley orchard, and Mr. Ward, the foreman on the H. B. Tronson orchard, were trading here Thursday.
    Mr. H. R. Bush and two of his assistants, Fred and H. A. Smith, who have a contract for clearing the right of way on the canal from Big Butte to Eagle Point, were in town Thursday, having their stump puller repaired. They seem to have considerable trouble as that is the second time they have had to bring the same part, the main shaft, to the shop for repairs, but when it comes to pulling up the stool of white oak grubs, each as large as a man's arm, to the size of his leg and even larger it requires a very strong machine. They report that they are getting along nicely with the work and will soon have the ground cleared ready for the heavier machinery to do its part. Although there seems to be a hitch in the movement up at Salem with the state board, as they seem to have found a flaw so as to postpone confirming the contracts and have decided to re-advertise all of the canal for bids, although Mr. C. H. Natwick has his camp fixed, his hay on the ground and has done some considerable work on his unit of the canal.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Friday noon were C. H. Natwick, Ralph Cowgill, Fred Pettegrew and a youth by the name of Morton, who came in on the stage from Butte Falls.
    Gordon Childreth and a young man by the name of Mitchel of Medford came in for supper and C. H. Natwick came in and spent the night and Chris Beale came in for dinner.
    The continuous rain since Monday night has been such that your correspondent has been closely confined to the house the most of the time and the result is that items of general interest are not as plentiful as they might be, and it appears to a close observer that I am not the only one who is kept at home but when I am on the street there seems to be a scarcity of men, women and babies, and another reason for the scarcity of news is that most of the young men are off at work on different jobs that are on hand in the way of improvements.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 2, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Art Smith, one of our progressive farmers, orchardists and stockmen, was a business caller at the Sunnyside last Saturday. He was accompanied by Vernon Turpin.
    Robert Schleichert of Medford was visiting at the home of John Robinson Thursday and Friday during the holidays.
    Harry Brown of Medford was a guest at the Sunnyside Saturday, Dec. 30th.
    L. K. Hawk, one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, made a trip to Portland last of the week to visit his father and two brothers to be gone about a week. His father, I understand, is in poor health. During the heavy rains we have had for the past few days the water came dangerously near the Hawk residence, but so far as I can learn did no damage, but I understand that it undermined the ends of the railroad bridge that crosses Butte Creek a short distance below town. The bridge was built in a low bottom where it was a common thing to see the water flow all over the entire flat and if the civil engineers had looked along the banks of the creek a little more closely they could have found plenty of evidence that it was not a suitable place to build a railroad bridge. If my memory is correct, it was planned to move the location of the bridge and put it up higher on the creek near where the Crater Lake Highway bridge is located, before the road went from under the management of the old P.&E. company, and probably the change will be made sooner or later, for the managers of the road have always had more or less trouble with the bridge whenever we have our old-fashioned rains such as we had years ago.
    Our new year came in with a bright sunshiny morning, and the prospect was that we were going to have a time of clear warm weather, and New Year's Day was one of the loveliest days of the season and most of the business houses were closed and the day was given up to the pleasures of life, but that night it commenced to rain and it rained just like it used to in the '50s and '60s and even later until the last few years when we have had a shortage of rain. The little downpour of the past few days brings vividly to my mind my first year's experience in Oregon. I was at that time a circuit rider in the Methodist Church, South and a member of the Pacific Conference and was sent as a missionary from California to take charge of Eugene City circuit with a young man, a local preacher by the name of John Smith as a helper. I reached my field of labor in October, after a long, tedious ride on horseback of some six hundred miles, and when I arrived at Eugene found Mr. Smith already at work in the field, and arranged to make my headquarters with a family by the name of McCord, although I soon found that I had but little time to devote at any one particular place for I found that the men who preceded me had laid out a circuit embracing about one hundred and fifty miles, counting the zigzags, with thirty-two regular appointments to be filled each month beside the pastoral visiting. But by the time I had gone over the field a few times I made several changes in the list of appointments and cut them down from thirty-two to sixteen, and by this time Mr. Smith decided that he could not live on the meager income that we were receiving, for the man who laid out the work told the people that the gospel was free, just like the salvation he preached and by going from house to house we got our board and lodging and the sisters did our washing free, but what I started in to tell about the rain was my experience in an Oregon storm. It so happened that I was in Eugene the night of the beginning of the first flood in the latter part of December, 1861, and about 11 o'clock p.m. the night watchman called Mr. McCord to get up as the water was covering the town so we got up and he waded and I climbed along on the fence to the barn and found the horses standing in water about knee deep. Mr. McCord harnessed his team and I saddled my horse and started out to relieve those who needed help, I carrying a lantern and going ahead of the team so as to have them miss the driftwood, moving the families into the courthouse as a house of refuge, keeping that up until daylight and then I started to go to the Matlock schoolhouse where I had an appointment to preach at 11 o'clock, but when I reached the schoolhouse found no one there and going to a nearby house inquired why there was no one out to church and learned that everybody had gone to the river to rescue the people in the river bottom lands, so changing my plans, for I had another appointment for the afternoon and also for night, for in those days it was customary for a man to preach three times on Sunday. I see that I have omitted to tell my experience in getting out of Eugene to the Matlock schoolhouse. Before I got fairly out of Eugene I had to swim two sloughs, but it so happened that my horse proved to be a good swimmer and he took me through all right. I had supplied myself with a rubber suit so that I kept dry and when I had to swim I took my saddlebags on my shoulders and got up into the saddle on my knees and got along all right without getting wet. During that flood it was a common thing to see houses going down the stream with chickens on the roof, and one house went by with a dog on the roof, and it was a very common thing to see cattle and occasionally a horse floating down. It was one of the most distressing scenes I have ever witnessed.
    Leaving the Matlock settlement the next day I wended my way through the foothills preaching in the schoolhouses in the foothills, for the bottom lands were swept almost clean and the next Saturday found me down near where Junction City now stands.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1923, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    The Misses Eula and Lucy Foeller returned to Medford and their school duties Monday evening after spending the holidays with their parents near Trail.
    We were sorry to hear of the death of Mr. Wm. Cushman, one of our oldest residents. He passed away at the home of his daughter, Mrs. Joe Roe at Gold Hill.
    We were glad to see Mrs. Sam Geary again after so many years. She arrived at her brother's (Dave Pence) Wednesday evening from Canada. She expects to settle in our community again. Her daughter, Clara, and little grandson accompanied her.
    Mrs. Irwin Howe is slowly recovering from her illness and hopes to soon be up again.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher attended the dance at Eagle Point Saturday night and was a guest of Miss Frances Greb.
    We are glad to say Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher has recovered sufficient to discard her crutches.
    Claude Ragsdale left Saturday for Corvallis to attend school. He plans to take up forestry work.
    K. V. Blunkall left Saturday for Chico, Cal., his old home, after spending the past six months in Southern Oregon.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Poole and daughter, Minnie, were Medford callers Monday. Minnie expects to attend high school at that place the balance of the year.
    Enid Middlebusher, Mrs. Owen, and Mrs. E. E. Ash were very pleasant callers at the Howe home Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 6, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside New Year's Day for dinner was Nick Young, one of our Jackson County native sons, who cultivates a fine farm on the Butte Creek bottom and is one of our prosperous bachelor citizens; Ralph Cowgill, the chief engineer on the irrigation canal from Big Butte to this section; E. Summer, the engineer who has charge of the construction work on the unit already allotted to Wm. von der Hellen; Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Soukup, Mr. and Mrs. Ben Garnett, C. Garnett, Mrs. L. Bernard, all of Medford; W. C. Clements, our postmaster as well as our telephone owner and manager, and wife, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. George W. Austin and wife of Medford and Mrs. M. L. Pruett, who lives on and owns one of the fine farms on Little Butte Creek, and among the business callers were Shorty Allen, who a few years ago purchased a twelve-acre tract of timber and brush land off of the von der Hellen tract of Antelope Creek bottom when it was simply a jungle, and he now tells me that he has it all cleared, plowed and sowed to winter wheat. A year or so ago he told me that he was working for Mr. von der Hellen his regular eight hours a day and cutting the wood off the land, clearing the brush out at intervals while he was resting. Such men as that never become a burden on society. His brother-in-law, Ira Hensley, was also in town with him.
    Henry Trusty and Wesley Miller of Elk Creek were among the guests Monday night. Mr. Trusty was bringing out a bunch (sixty-four head) of cattle, taking them down to the neighborhood of Talent to feed and Mr. Miller was helping him. C. H. Natwick also spent Monday night with us. Mr. Natwick is one of our contractors and was here looking after his interests in that line.
    Among the business callers last Tuesday were Jeff Conover, one of the pioneers of Rogue River Valley, W. H. Crandall, one of our hustling farmers, orchardists and general wide-awake citizens, who called at the Sunnyside to try to dispose of some of the products of his farm. He seems to be considerably disappointed over the way the new road has been laid out and opened from the Dodge-French bridge to intersect the Crater Lake Highway, as there is nothing to be seen on the entire route expect chaparral brush and desert land; not a house or fence to be seen, but by making the change a very bad hill is avoided. Wert Pool and Alex Anderson, who is living on the Charley Terrill place near Brownsboro, was among the business callers and he reports that he has a band of 1200 sheep and that he has not had to feed any so far, and that on the second day of January, 1923 and that the grass was good, fresh and green. What will the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune up in Idaho or Montana or even the state of Washington think of hearing [of] a band of twelve hundred head of sheep living and doing well on the range the first of the year, but so it is this year in Southern Oregon.
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside Tuesday for dinner were Mrs. C. H. (Nick) Caster of Butte Falls, who came out on the stage and came here for dinner. Her husband is engaged in the meat market business in Butte Falls and Mrs. Caster was on her way out to Medford.
    W. E. Hammel was also among the diners and so was E. Ross, state irrigation accountant. Mr. Ross and Mrs. Hammel were here attending a meeting of the board of directors of the Eagle Point Irrigation District. Charley Clark, who is selling the Watkins products, also called for dinner and J. A. Turnbow, the foreman on the repair work on the P.&E. railroad, and J. P. Niles, his assistant, were here for the night. They were repairing the railroad bridge on Butte Creek where the high water had undermined the approaches, and so was E. Summer, the engineer who has charge of the construction work of the unit allocated to Wm. von der Hellen to build.
    As my health is not as good as it was years ago and I am not able to get out and hustle for news, I in my last letter inserted a chapter of my experiences as a circuit rider the first year I was in Oregon, and as the obliging editor graciously admitted it to the columns of the Mail Tribune I will venture to trespass on his good nature again.
    When I closed my story I was located for the night with a family by the name of Caughman and there I met my co-laborer, and if it will not be considered out of place will remark that Mr. and Mrs. Caughman had two very attractive daughters, about sixteen and eighteen years of age, and Mr. Smith was not unlike the rest of the young men of his age, [and] did not object to good company. Well, after spending the night with the family when we got up for breakfast we found that it was raining in torrents and I had an appointment to preach at the Liberty school house on the north side of Long Tom Creek, a stream about as large as Butte Creek, and the prospect was good for another freshet. We decided that we would try to meet the engagement, as Mr. Smith was familiar with the country. The reader will bear in mind that the flood of a week before had washed the fences and bridges all away but we heard that the Taylor bridge was still so it could be crossed, so we started, but we soon found that we were in the midst of the second flood, but we kept on our course, swimming the sloughs as we came to them, and finally we reached the bridge, or rather was was left of it, for the water of the first flood had washing the approach to the bridge off, leaving the timbers intact on the southern side; but how were we to to get our horses across [was] the question and the water had raised so that there was no retreat. Our only alternative as to go ahead, so we tied our ropes together and took one horse at a time and made them swim across below the bridge and by that means got our horses across and we walked on the stringers and were safe so far as this bridge was concerned, but there was yet an ugly little stream to cross and when we reached it found the bridge was gone, but Mr. Smith knew the country and he suggested that we go up the creek a few miles and he thought that we could cross, which we did, but we had to swim our horses but we had succeeded in making the trip so we rode along leisurely until we finally reached the house where we intended to go and when we reached there found not only the house but the yard full of people, for the man and wife who lived there had a family of sixteen children and many of them were married and had children of their own and they were all or about all who had come in from the low bottom land and when we rode up we met scores of faces wondering how we had ever reached there, for by that time the water was as high or higher than it was at the place a week before.
    I see that I have not given the name of the family but it used to be a familiar name in Southern Oregon. The name was Baird, and he was killed on Grave Creek by a grizzly bear.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1923, page 3



FORMER PIONEER WOMAN JACKSON COUNTY CALLED
    Of interest to many in this valley is the news of the death at her home in Victoria, B.C., of Mrs. R. H. Brown, familiarly known to early settlers of Jackson County two decades ago as "Aunt Charlotte," relict of Robert H. Brown, an uncle of Brown Bros., of Eagle Point, still engaged in business there. The Daily Colonist of Victoria give the details of her later years, she having lost her husband nearly 25 years ago. She and her husband parted with their holdings at Eagle Point to a brother, the late George Brown, about 1886, and at once removed to Victoria, Mr. Brown later being quite prominent in business circles there.
    When the recent war broke out, Aunt Charlotte was for a time confined to her bed, but proved to be one of the most patriotic citizens of the Dominion and unceasingly knitted socks for the soldier boys, completing many hundred pairs of this useful portion of the war supplies. As she wrote to friends here, the war was very cruel in its treatment of her, and her means were dissipated, securities became worthless and no interest was paid her on several loans. With a fortitude and cheerfulness characteristic of her earlier years, she enjoyed life to its close as few, pioneers or moderns, are able to do. A woman of singular force of character, able to adapt herself to changing conditions and cherishing the correct ideas of service to her fellow man, generous and just in her judgment, all who knew her will drop a tear of regret at her demise even though it be at the close of a well-spent life.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Prof. Ray Parker, one of the teachers in the high school of Butte Falls, C. Brown, Medford; Mr. E. Ross of Portland were among the diners at the Sunnyside last Wednesday and the next day there was with us as guests Mr. Dillard of Portland, one of the civil engineers connected with the irrigation project to bring water from Big Butte Creek to this section of the country, C. H. Natwick, a prominent contractor of this section and H. Stevenson, who is helping Mr. Natwick on his contract on the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal here for dinner Thursday and Paul S. Schaubel of Portland was here for the night Thursday. He is a machinist and came out here to try to secure employment in the Eagle Point Garage but Mr. George B. Holmes, the proprietor, decided that there was no business at this season of the year to justify the employment of another man as he already has a good machinist, Mr. Luke Kincaid, the mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Trail-Persist route, and he has so arranged his work that he only takes about one hour one day, the day he goes to Trail, and when he has to take the mail to Persist he has a man bring the mail down as far as the Trusty ranch and he meets him there and that trip only consumes about two and a half hours, leaving him all the rest of the days to do something else.
    George McDonald, a professional road builder, who is in the employ of Jud Edsall, working on the laterals of the Eagle Point irrigation canal, was here and spent the night Friday and so did Mr. Edward B. Nichol of B.F.
    Rev. Herbert G. Adams, who has been preaching for us during the past year and has been boarding at the Sunnyside during the time of his stay here, left here last Friday afternoon for Corvallis to visit his son who is a student in the Corvallis college. We will add that Rev. Adams is one of the pleasantest men we have met for a long time and makes friends wherever he goes and will be greatly missed by his many friends here. Since writing the foregoing I have received a card from Mr. Adams dated Corvallis, Jan 7th, before breakfast. He says "I got here safely in the rain, came yesterday p.m. and there was still some land in sight though the Willamette was raising a foot every three hours." His many friends will be glad to learn that he has got safely through.
    There were five strangers came out on the B.F. stage Friday and report that the road between Reese Creek and B.F. are in a horrible condition.
    Lester Batcher, Carl Bergman and his mother, Mrs. Bert Clarno, were among the business callers Saturday.
    Among the passengers on the M.-B.F. stage were Prof. Ray Parker of the B.F. high school and Miss Lorene Green, one of the pupils of the B.F. school, an elderly lady and two young ladies, and one of them went out on the Trail stage and the rest went up to B.F.
    Wm. Butler, one of our prosperous farmers, made a trip to Medford Saturday.
    I see that our townsman, W. P. Morgan, has been making some decided improvements in the sidewalk along his property.
    Ray Warner and Louis Martin, Trail, Alex Betz were business callers in our town Saturday.
    There was quite an interesting shooting match here Sunday; the prizes were chickens, turkeys and geese.
    The last time I wrote for the Medford Mail Tribune found Mr. Smith and I at the home of Mr. Beard surrounded by a host of his children and grandchildren and the question came up in our minds how we were going to arrange for all of us to sleep, for the house was not very large and it looked to us as though there was already more people there without us to cover all of the available space, but it was a case of necessity so we rested contentedly waiting results, but ample provisions were made and we all got along nicely and the next morning we were up and ready for another day's work. But before I make another start I must make a change in the story and give an account of the miraculous escape of the family of what proved to be later several of our prominent citizens, Mr. John Lewis and family, wife, five children and Mrs. Lewis' mother. They were living on their farm not far from where the town of Independence is located and he told me that the farm was assessed the summer before at $4,000 and he was feeling quite independent, but the flood of 1861 and '62 came and the first intimation of any real danger was when he woke up and discovered that the water was already in the house, so he jumped out of bed and found that the floor was all afloat and he went on through into a hole that he had dug to get dirt to make his chimney, a mud and stick chimney, a thing that was quite common in those days, so he was thoroughly wet to start with. He then managed to get his wife and five children upstairs and Frank, one of his boys now one of our merchants, is here and although a child remembers the circumstances quite well and Mr. Jeff Bell of Talent is another one of the children, but after getting his direct family out of the water he had his mother-in-law and she was a helpless invalid at the time and remained so until the day of her death, but he managed to get her upstairs, but the water kept rising and when daylight came he saw that the prospect was that the water would soon take the house. He tore a hole in the roof and took the bed cord off of the bedsteads; in those days there were no bed springs but a small rope was used woven across the bedstead each way to lay the beds on. So after he had taken the cords off of the beds he crawled out on the roof and taking the rope wove a platform for a floor among the branches of the trees and then he tore up the floor and took the lumber to make a platform and put his family all of them on it and in the course of a very short time the house was washed away and the eight persons were left to the raging elements for about twenty-four hours when a rescuing party came to their relief, and Mr. Lewis told me in relating the circumstances that when the water would press the trees down he could see that they were giving way and but a short time after their deliverance the trees gave way and washed away and the next spring as I rode over the place that was once a beautiful farm was a sand and debris-covered waste.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1923, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Vera Brophy and Horace Geppert came in from Butte Falls Monday to have their horses shod.
    Eli Dahack started in the first of the week to move the old store building formerly used as a store by A. J. Daley and later by Mr. Heath, now in the drug business in Medford, and later moved from the upper end of town down to the business part of the town and used by Mr. Heath after he moved into the T. E. Nichols building as a warehouse, and was afterwards sold to the Dahacks, and they started in several weeks ago to move it, but never got really started at the job until the first of the week. They are moving it back up the street again and intend to place it on the lot joining the Eagle Point pool room. What they intend to use it for, they have not given out as yet.
    Among the business callers last Monday were W. H. O'Brien, Charles Flint, Frank Nolin of Butte Falls; J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the fishery business in Southern Oregon, and he reports being quite successful in catching fish for their eggs.
    Ray Davis, formerly of Derby, but now located on the T. F. Nichols farm on Rogue River, was a business caller Tuesday.
    Perl Stowell, who is living just outside of our town, was in town, and reporting finding the skeleton of a man in a gravel pit where he was working in the Butte Creek bottom. He said that the body had the appearance of having been simply thrown in a hole, as the legs were doubled up and crossed, and this brings to mind, to us old settlers, a circumstance that took place some sixty years ago. There was a family lived a few miles below town, and for the sake of any relatives who may be living, I will designate as Mr. and Mrs. B., and they had considerable stock and owned a large donation claim. There was a stock buyer, a stranger, came in, and went to the ranch to buy cattle and was known to have considerable money with him for in those days there were very few banks and people often carried considerable money with them. Well, this man was seen to go to Mr. B.'s just about dark and was never seen afterward. There was nothing thought of that, and the result was it was soon out of mind. In the course of a few years Mr. B. was taken sick and word went out to the few neighbors he had, for in those days one man could own from 320 to 640 acres of land, and the result was neighbors were scarce. Well the result was that there was a gathering of those who were disposed to lend a helping hand and there was Moses Tinkham, an old bachelor; Nick Young, Peter Simon, Charley Linksweiler, myself and wife had collected there to render any assistance we could, and while we were earnestly watching to the the result Mr. B. seemed to rouse up and remarked; "Old woman," addressing his wife, "Jack and me are going hunting and I want you to fix up some bread and meat and a bottle of whiskey," and just then he changed and said, "Why you can find him easy, for Jack and me buried him over there by that big cottonwood log," and just then his wife went to him and shook him, remarking, "What are you talking about, old man; shut up that foolishness," and that broke the spell and we heard no more. The whole family had a hard name. Jack, his oldest son, seemed to be his main helper, and after living the life of a genuine crook in Oregon he went to California, and the word came back here that he was serving a twenty-year sentence in the penitentiary there for robbing a stage, and later that he had died in prison, and Jim was hung out in Harney County, Oregon, by a vigilance committee for horse stealing, and the younger boys were sent to the home for the feeble minded. There were two girls who have married, and I suppose they have passed away by this time, but I never heard of them being accused of any wrongdoing. Mrs. B. died shortly after the death of her husband, and thus ended the career of one of the toughest families in Southern Oregon, and perhaps reveals the last resting place of the stranger who disappeared so mysteriously from this section of the country.
    Among the business callers Tuesday were Grant Abbott, Butte Falls; J. A. Flon, U.S.N., San Diego, Calif., and Wilton Grigsby, Butte Falls; and Wednesday Mr. Palmer, Butte Falls; Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Page, Butte Falls; they came out on the stage and went on to Medford. Walter Woods and R. Mathews and Thomas Stenly, also of Butte Falls, but is spending the winter in the valley.
    I see that my letter is so long that I will not renew my account of the hardships that a circuit rider had to undergo during the winter of 1861 and '62.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1923, page 4



Eagle Point Bank Makes Steady Progress
    The First State Bank of Eagle Point has made steady progress during the last year.
    The officers recognize that progress must depend on the general prosperity of the community and they are trying to encourage enterprise and ambition among their friends the farmers.
    The First State Bank is prepared to assist any responsible and enterprising farmer tributary to Eagle Point in getting started in really choice dairy cattle. The officers believe that if the dairy farmers of Puget Sound can afford to ship alfalfa hay from Montana and California, the Eagle Point farmers can afford to feed their alfalfa at home.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 17, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Thursday, January eleventh, Mr. and Mrs. O. P. McGee, formerly of Eagle Point and then of Medford, old pioneers of Jackson County, but later settled on a large farm near Glendale, selling out there moved to Washington and bought a farm, living there a few years, selling out again and had started out on a tour visiting his children and friends made us a short call; he was accompanied by his daughter, Mrs. Shelby Golhem, and her husband and little boy and his wife's sister, Mrs. W. E. Church nee Mrs. George Conley at that time living on Antelope Creek on what is known as the Antelope Orchard of Medford. They only remained a short time as Mr. McGee and wife wanted to visit the old friends who were at that time holding a meeting of the E.P.I. Club at the home of our banker, H. E. Campbell, and by that means they could see a great many of their old neighbors and friends. They had not decided definitely where they will locate.
    Mr. Hoagland, Sr., of Central Point, was here on Saturday on his way up from his ranch two miles out from Brownsboro.
    Ernest Albert of Butte Falls was out to attend the dance Saturday night.
    There were four passengers on the stage Saturday going to Butte Falls and one passenger on the Trail stage.
    Among the business callers were Walter Smith, Robert Neil, who is located on his farm on the headwaters of Salt Creek, S. P. Jackson of Portland; he was on his way to Butte Falls to look after his interest there in the timber industry; he was traveling in his own car and there was four passengers went out on the stage for the same place.
    John Owens and family were also among the business callers Saturday. Mr. Owens is among our prominent farmers and stockmen living on Dry Creek near Wellen.
    Mr. McKissick, C.E., formerly having charge of the C.E. department of the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal and located here, but now located in Jacksonville, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Monday.
    Rose Whaley came out Saturday to spend a few days visiting here.
    Mr. and Mrs. Glenn Albert of Butte Falls came out with his father on his motor car on the railroad track and later in the day Glenn had a taxi come out and take himself and wife to Medford.
    Mr. C. Tucker of Portland was a business caller Sunday p.m.
    Mrs. Katie Swinden Waldron of Medford called Monday morning looking for a situation as a cook in a hotel or camp. She had just come from the Elks resort on Rogue River.
    Nick Young, Marshall Winter, Mike Sidley, Lake Creek; Water Marshall, Brownsboro; Artie Vestal, Frank King, Mr. Goade, who has located a homestead near the Reese Creek school house and Ed. Morgan of Elk Creek were business callers Monday.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Stoner, January 13th, in Santa Barbara, Calif., a son. Mrs. Stoner is the daughter of one of our leading merchants, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown, and there seems to be general rejoicing in the Brown family over the safe arrival of the youngster. Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown are with their daughter in Santa Barbara and not San Jose as I stated in a former letter.
    Since writing the foregoing I have been asked by some of the old settlers who the people were that I referred to as Mr. and Mrs. B. in my letter in the Mail Tribune of the 15th inst. and this Wednesday morning I received a letter from a man in Central Point asking me to reveal to him confidentially the name of the party referred to as Mr. and Mrs. "B" and gave me the name of the party he thought it was and added another chapter to the history of the family and stated that he had an old clock that came from the family that would start off and strike a hundred times, and that the party from whom he got it, Jim's mother-in-law, and she claimed that the clock was "haunted" so it seems that he is a pretty good guesser this time for he guessed it the first time.
    The last chapter I gave the readers of the Mail Tribune on the experience of a circuit rider I was at the home of my friend, Mr. Beard, with a large collection of his children and grandchildren and many of them left destitute by the floods that had swept the bottom lands of the Willamette River and its tributaries and especially the Long Tom Creek, many of them like the case of John Lewis mentioned in a former letter. Among the most serious losses was that of the feed to keep the stock they had left alive during the rest of that long and severe winter, for it proved one of the hardest winters ever experienced in that section of the country, for a short time after the water had subsided there came a heavy snow storm, the snow being sixteen to twenty inches deep, and that was followed by a heavy sleet and formed a crust on the snow not quite hard enough to bar a horse, but an ordinary man could walk on it with ease making it almost impossible to travel outside of the main traveled roads and hay so scarce that it commanded any price. The stage company who was carrying the mail from Portland on to San Francisco, Calif., paid as high as one hundred dollars a ton for hay to feed their horses. I saw one man in Eugene City make the statement that he had three hundred head of cattle around his barns that he would gladly give to anyone who would take them away and feed them, but his neighbors were in the same condition and had no hay and could not get it. It was not only a scarcity of hay and grain but of many of the necessities of life, sugar, coffee, and in many cases bread and meat. I remember making my meal on boiled wheat, and pounded wheat was a luxury.
    I thought when I commenced this letter that we, Smith and I, would have gotten away from Mr. Beard's, but when I start in to write of the terrible hardships the people had to undergo I find so much to write that the first thing I know I am going beyond the limits of prudence.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There were five passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning, headed for Butte Falls and other points and among them was Glenn Abbott of Butte Falls. He had been to take his wife out to visit her mother, Mrs. Whaley, Medford, and was on his way home again. Mr. O. C. Eblen, the subcontractor on the Butte Falls end of the Eagle Point-Butte Falls mail route from Derby to Butte Falls, Artie Vestal was a passenger from here to Medford, returning the next day. Wert Pool was also a business caller in our town Tuesday and so was J. H. Carlton, one of the prominent farmers and stockmen of the Wellen district.
    Mr. O. Anderson, a transient, came in and remained until Friday morning. He went up to the C. H. Natwick camp on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point canal where he secured a job, as he was known by Mr. Natwick, as he worked for him on a former contract.
    Herbert Davis and J. W. Holk, one of the Butte Falls sawmill men, were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Wednesday on their way home.
    John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, was a business caller. He came in to have a little job of work done by our blacksmith last Wednesday.
    Mr. R. J. Stewart of Medford and a stranger who was with him, whose name I failed to learn, were out here the same day.
    Raymond Schermerhorn of Trail, who was for some time assistant mail carrier on the Eagle Point-Persist route, came out on a business trip Wednesday.
    The three highway commissioners were also business callers in our town. I did not meet them, as just as I saw them, they were starting away, so did not learn their names or destination.
    A man giving his name as Dan Swift from the state of Washington, came in on the stage and inquired for the hotel and then inquired for William Winkle and proved to be an old friend of Mr. Winkle, stopping with him for the time being.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hanscom came out from Medford on a jitney Thursday to visit his brother, Chas. Hanscom, and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    When the stage came in Friday morning from Medford, Mr. Frank Manning, wife and daughter, Dency, of Peyton were passengers on their way home. They were just returning home from Los Angeles, where they had been to visit his sister. He reports that building is going on, not only in Los Angeles, but in all of the surrounding country. They went up to Trail on the Trail stage, where they will be met by his son, Charles, and taken home.
    Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, who lives with her husband at the Dead Indian Soda Springs, also came out on the stage from Medford on her way home. She has been spending a couple of weeks visiting her children on the farm east of Medford and at Talent.
    Mr. McKissick, one of the civil engineers who moved from here to Jacksonville, has brought his family back here and is stopping with his brother-in-law, John Prillaman, and he has been engaged dividing up a farm that was left to T. E. Nichols and his sister, Ruth, now Mrs. Carlyle Natwick of Medford, by their mother, and he is now engaged doing some surveying up near Butte Falls for a company.
    I understand that our townsman, Wm. von der Hellen has secured the contract for building another unit of the Eagle Point Irrigation Company Canal, consisting of about eight miles making a total of about fourteen miles altogether that he has contracted for.
    George B. Holmes has purchased the two lots joining the F. E. Nichols store, where now he has his garage and is having it leveled off with gravel and intends to have the most of the ground covered with concrete. He has also bought two lots adjoining his home place, where Wm. Winkle is now living.
    The last time that I gave an account of the experiences of a circuit rider in the early sixties. I had drifted off and told of the sad trials of some of the citizens of that region of the country and still left us, Mr. Smith and I, at the home of Mr. Beard. I have forgotten his given name, but he was one of the most prominent citizens in that section, a true southerner and delighted in rendering assistance to anyone who needed help, and was always ready to help a Southern Methodist preacher and always made them feel at home and Grandma Beard was just as motherly as he was good. I emphasize the word southerner, for I remember that the time of which I am writing was about the beginning of the Civil War and the lines were being drawn and in some future letter I will try to give a hint of what it meant to be a southern minister in those days. Well, after the waters had subsided, Mr. Smith and I concluded that we would try to get back on the Eugene City side of the Long Tom, so we bade our dear friends farewell and started, and inquiring, learned that there was a bridge up the stream several miles, but how we were to get there was a leading question, for all or about all of the bridges had been washed out or damaged so that they were unsafe, but were set on going somewhere where we would feel that we were not a burden, for we were there with those poor people who had been washed out and for some of them had their little stock that they had saved but nothing to feed them on and our two horses were eating the feed that we knew was needed for them, so we started, and after going miles up the creek we found a bridge that was so that we could cross and in a short time we were on the south side of the creek and we headed for the Spencer Creek hills, but found that our troubles were not ended, for before us lay a desolate waste, fences about all washed away and everything the picture of desolation and two large sloughs between us and the hills, but one we went, swimming our horses as we came to the two sloughs and finally we reached the desired haven, the home of another true southern gentleman from Tennessee, Uncle Zara Dunken, where we received a hearty greeting, a hospitable home and plenty of horse feed, where we rested for the night.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 22, 1923, page 3



TRAIL ITEMS
    Miss Burr and Miss Mordoff of Medford and Mrs. Carter of Jacksonville attended the teachers' meeting at Trail Saturday.
    Mrs. Stewart is driving a new Chevrolet these days.
    Miss D. Peterson was called to Fort Klamath suddenly by the sickness of her sister, Mrs. C. Hutchison of that place.
    Minnie Poole spent the weekend with her parents near Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Pritchett and two little children and Mrs. Cushman and son Charles were visitors at the Hall home Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher and Enid Middlebusher attended a show in Medford Saturday evening. They reported the fog so dense that it was quite difficult to see to drive.
    Mrs. Ralph Watson was a Trail visitor Thursday. Her friends were glad to see her able to be out again.
    Mrs. A. T. Pool is back on the sick list.
    Mr. M. Sienes was a pleasant caller at the Owens home Tuesday.
    Charlie Foeller is hauling hay from Eagle Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Ragsdale are recovering from the flu.
    The Pence children are all sick with the whooping cough, also the Morgan children and the Sandry children on Elk Creek.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Vaughn and little son, Donald, of Medford were callers at Mrs. Vaughn's parents on Elk Creek Tuesday.
    The work on the Trail Creek bridge was resumed this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, who live about six miles out from Eagle Point near the P. and E. R.R. to Butte Falls, were here trading the last of the week.
    Thomas M. Riley finished up the job of putting in the shelves in the new concrete vault that was put in the office of the Eagle Point Irrigation Company and repainting the building and thus improving the appearance of everything around the place.
    Mrs. Ernest Dahack, wife of our popular barber, made a business trip to Medford last Friday coming out on the stage in the afternoon. There were also two boys came out on the stage at the same time; one of them was a son of Mr. John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, and the other was a schoolmate who came out with him; they were met at the post office by Mr. Norris, who took them out to the orchard.
    Gus Ditsworth of Peyton was a business caller Saturday afternoon, and so was Mrs. McDonald of Brownsboro, and Joe Haskins, who has a sawmill near McLeod on Rogue River. There went up a large circular saw on a car just before I met him and I asked if it was for his mill and he said it was. Joe Hittson of the A. G. Bishop orchard was also a business caller and so was Mr. R. A. Petty and Florence Terwilliger and John Blaess, who lives at the old ferry landing. Miss Terwilliger is engaged in teaching school at Trail. Geo. Adams, who is engaged on the Frank Rhodes farm, were all business callers Saturday. There were five passengers came in on the stage.
    Mr. Oscar Anderson, H. C. Davis, C. W. Rose, W. M. Ness and W. K. More came in and spent the night on their way up to go to work on the Natwick unit of the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal from Big Butte to the Nichols gap, where the canal will end and empty into the laterals to irrigate thousands of acres of land in our vicinity. They have taken a subcontract from Mr. C. H. Natwick to dig about a half mile of the canal for him.
    Among the callers Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Hubbs, shoe dealer of Medford, and Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Feldman, an accountant of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. T. F. Nichols, hardware merchant of Eagle Point and family, besides a few of the young men of Eagle Point. A. W. Leebaard, manager of the Columbia Tire Company, Medford, and Everett Dahack. He and his father, Eli Dahack, are fixing the old store building that they moved up beside the Eagle Point poolroom and say they are going into business there handling auto tires.
    Mrs. Ira Tungate, Butte Falls; Miss Alta Allen and Mr. Erb Bechdoldt of Derby came out on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point stage Monday and C. A. Pickle, the meter reader for the California and Oregon Light and Power Company, was on his monthly round last Monday.
    Lemon Charley and wife, formerly of Brownsboro but now of Eagle Point, made a business trip to Medford last Tuesday.
    C. H. Natwick one of the contractors on the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal started a truckload of eatables up to his camp Tuesday that he had purchased at one of our local stores, but the train had hardly started before the "tender" jumped the track and the crew and the local road gang were kept busy until ten o'clock the next day getting it back onto the track again to stay, for the roadbed is in such a dilapidated condition that when they would get it back on the track again the rotten ties would give way again and down it would come again. I noticed one place where it had slipped off that the wheel on the back end of the tender cut right through the ties, shaving the ends off just as smooth as though they had been cut off with an ax, and there was one place where everything like ties was pushed from under the rails for a space of four or five feet, but they finally got over the space about thirty feet and started on for Butte Falls and I heard one of the railroad men say that they would likely get off the track again in the next two miles. The ties are so rotten that if they are on a curve the spikes are drawn out and the rails are spread and the result is another wreck. Fortunately there was no special damage done. It appears that the trouble is that they cannot get ties to repair the old road, at least that is the reason the men give for not fixing the road and making it safe to run on. Another difficulty they labor under is the heavy rains we have had this winter has made the ground so soft that that causes the rails to give way with but little trouble.
    Mrs. Walter Marshall of Brownsboro was a business caller Tuesday.
    Word reached here Monday morning that Rev. J. P. Moomaw, who lived here for several years and preached in this community for us, passed away about midnight Monday at his home near Williamsburg, Josephine County, Oregon. He was highly respected wherever he lived and was one of the lead elders in the Dunkard Church. He was about 85 years of age and leaves a wife and five boys and three girls and quite a number of grandchildren beside a host of friends to continue the trials of life. Blessed are the dead who die in the Lord.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1923, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Klingle of Lake Creek was a business caller last Thursday.
    Mr. Sam H. Harnish and Robert Harnish, Roy Harnish and Joe Moomaw and wife, and Mrs. Fred Dutton went up to Williamsburg to attend the funeral of Elder J. Moomaw, he being the father of Mr. S. H. Harnish's first wife and Joe Moomaw and grandfather of the Harnish children, last Thursday.
    Mrs. Thomas Stanley and her mother, Mrs. M. L. Burdic, were business callers Tuesday.
    Mr. H. L. Heryford and his mother Mrs. M. L. Heryford of Butte Falls came out with a team Tuesday, via the Obenchain road, via Brownsboro and report that the road is far superior to the road via Reese Creek. They went on to Medford the next day on the stage, leaving the team with S. H. Harnish, returning the same p.m., and spent the night on their way home.
    Mr. J. L. Harvey, who has charge of the Alta Vista orchard, a short distance south of our town, was a business caller Tuesday and in conversation with him, in speaking of the exceptionally warm and pleasant winter, expressed his fears that this warm spell would result disastrously to the fruit men, for the fruit buds were swelling entirely too fast and that unless we had a change to colder weather soon, that the blooms would come out in time to be caught with the spring frosts. Although we are having a little change and there is a little snow in the surrounding hills, and we still have hopes, as I have been here in Rogue River Valley nearly fifty-six years permanently, and most of the time since 1861, and have not seen an entire failure in the fruit crop during my stay here, and never expect to see it in our "Italy of the Pacific Coast."
    M. L. Jones, formerly of Butte Falls, but now of Medford, George Wirt and Mr. Nason, three of the permanent Forest Service men, came out Tuesday from their camp back of Butte Falls with their camp outfit and went on out to Medford.
    George W. Sanders, who has a homestead above McLeod, has been spending a few days visiting his sister here, Mrs. Muskopf.
    Harry Hayes and wife were doing business with our merchants Wednesday. He has his sawmill located on the Dave Pence place on Elk Creek, and I understand that he has taken a contract to furnish the Southern Pacific and a large quantity of ties and I also learned today, Friday, that Joe Haskins, another sawmill man, has taken a contract to furnish the same Southern Pacific Company with several thousand ties. It begins to look as though our Oregon forests were going to be soon stripped of their timber, but it seems as though the S.P. Company could get all the ties they want along their own tracks without going back into the mountains thirty miles off their own road and twenty miles from the P.&E. Railroad and it is as yet not in a condition to do much service for anyone.
    Charley Brown and Carlyle Natwick of Medford were business callers. Charley was trying to sell the stock of Fords that C. E. Gates has on hand and seems to be succeeding quite well, as he sold one last week.
    W. E. Hammond and Fred Pettegrew, one of the directors and the secretary of the Eagle Point Irrigation Company, were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Roy Conley, who owns the J. W. Holk sawmill about four miles out from Butte Falls, was here on his way home last Wednesday. He had been to Ashland to attend the funeral of his father, who was for a long series of years a resident of Sams Valley, who died at Ashland at the home of his daughter last Monday, aged ninety years, nine months and sixteen days.
    While I was making my rounds last Thursday, I dropped into the store of the Brown brothers and the first ones I met were Henry French and his son, Lloyd, just as they were getting into their car, starting for home, and they were in a hurry to get home, and the next ones were Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw and her father, Lemon Charley, and they were just ready to start for home. Mr. Charley lives in our town, but he is stopping on his ranch above Brownsboro, at present looking after some of his stock, and cutting his wood for next winter. Mr. Bradshaw was here attending to business with our banker, H. E. Campbell and our hardware merchants, Nichols and Ashpole. I also met Harry Hayes, the sawmill man, referred to in the first part of this letter and he was rushing around, and was taking orders from Frank Brown, one of the firm of George Brown & Sons, for a lot of freight to bring from one of the wholesale houses in Medford and off he went. I also met Pete Betz and his wife and her sister, Mrs. Chris Bergman and Mr. John Howard one of the old Civil War veterans who makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. Betz and they were just packing their goods into their car, getting ready to start home. The great trouble with me gathering items is I am too slow, for if I had been a little faster I might have seen Mrs. Thomas Cingcade, Mrs. John Smith, Mrs. Fred Dutton and Alex Anderson, for they were here trading, but I was too slow.
    Horace Geppert of Butte Falls and Mr. and Mrs. Vern Brophy of Wellen called at the Sunnyside Wednesday evening on business remaining until about bedtime and went on to Mr. Brophy's home that night, so the reader can see what a time I have gathering my Eaglets together.
    I received a letter from Mr. E. C. Faber, secretary-treasurer of the Jackson County Sunday school council announcing that there will be a meeting of the Sunday School Institute here in the Eagle Point church Thursday, February 8, 1923 when there will be a very fine program rendered morning, afternoon and evening, by some of the best talent in the county. Make it a point to have your business arranged so that you can attend and hear something new.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1923, page 4


COW TESTING IN THE EAGLE POINT DISTRICT, MONDAY
    The tuberculosis drive is progressing northward, the territory east of Bear Creek being cleaned up as far as Eagle Point.
    Activities will be centered around Central Point and the territory north as far as the Tolo bridge starting Monday.
    Wednesday forenoon between 8:30 and 10 the people of Central Point within the city limits will have a chance to get their cows tested by bringing them to the place of Will Wright near the highway south of Evans' store.
    The percentage of infected animals is still below or near one percent, and everyone should test diligently to dispose of even these few before a greater spread takes place.
    Condemned animals will be shipped to Portland next Tuesday, the car starting for the Farm Bureau Exchange in the afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 1, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. P. Holbrook, one of our successful farmers and orchardists, who has a fine farm and an orchard on the road from the lower Butte Creek bridge to Trail via the Dodge-French bridge, was a business caller last Friday.
    We are anticipating a regular religious and literary treat in our little town on Thursday, Feb. 8, when we are expecting some of the brightest and brainiest men and women in the county to be with us at the Sunday School Institute.
    George W. Averill, who is living on his homestead on the north side of Round Top, came out to get a fresh supply of groceries and horse feed and to have his team shod up, as he expects to go to hauling saw logs to the railroad track very soon.
    J. H. Cooley, one of the leading lumber merchants of Medford and also one of our leading orchardists of this section, called for dinner last Saturday and while here the subject came up in conversation with regard to the lumber business in general and getting out ties for the railroad and he remarked that he had considerable time out in the hills, some in the Big Butte country and some in the hills on the north and west side of Rogue River, and that he was thinking of putting a portable sawmill and cutting it up into lumber and having it hauled to Medford.
    Mrs. William Perry, the wife of our popular road supervisor, who has been visiting her brother Amos Ayres in Medford, returned Saturday on the stage and reports that he is improving in health.
    Leland Charley of Brownsboro was among the guests Saturday night attending the Sat. night dance. Charley Winkle, one of our occasional boarders and lodgers, also attended the dance Sat. night.
    R. S. Dixon, Fort Klamath, and Miss Carmen Hittson of Medford were our here visiting the family of Roy Stanley of this place Sunday evening.
    Frank L. Johnson, who has a fine farm on the Crater Lake Highway near the concrete bridge across Rogue River, was here Monday concerning his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, for he said it had stopped coming and I suggested that perhaps it had stopped on account of it not being renewed, and on looking over the stub on my receipt book found that he was in arrears, so he paid up the amount due, renewed his subscription and went on home contented. I find that when the subscription expires of almost anyone for Mail Tribune they begin to look around to find the cause of the stoppage and renew.
    Mrs. Thomas R. Nichols, the wife of one of the firm of Nichols & Ashpole, hardware merchants, is up on the south fork of Little Butte Creek visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farlow, and Thos., and his partner Clarence Pruett, in the poolroom are taking their meals at the Sunnyside during her absence.
    In my rounds Monday gathering in the Eaglets I met Mr. and Mrs. Ben. Brophy; they had a wreck of their buggy and had it at the Childreth shop for repairs. I also met Eugene Bellows, another one of our enterprising farmers, poultry and dairy men. Also J. H. Carlton of Wellen, also one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen; he is engaged in the sheep business and when I walked into Nichols & Ashpole's hardware store I asked Roy Ashpole about his business and reported that Prof. Engelhardt, Frank Nygren, Brownsboro, Carl Brittsan, Carl Bergman, Frank Ditsworth, John Norris, Robert Rose, Carlyle Natwick and Wm. Perry had been in but I was too slow to meet them.
    Crossing the street, I visited John W. Prillaman, his mother Mrs. Catherine Prillaman and his sister Miss Ella Prillaman; they have been residents of our town for two years or more and they informed me that they expected to start for Ashland Wednesday, Jan. 31st, to make it their home. We dislike to lose them from our community, as they are among our best citizens.
    I also met Mattie Brown, wife of W. H. Brown, one of the Brown Bros., in the store helping Frank Brown, as she expressed the idea, cleaning up the store. It is about the first time she has been able to be out for weeks, for she has been under the treatment of Dr. J. J. Emmens, the oculist. She was troubled with an ulcer in the head, but is now cured and well and we are all glad to know it and trust she will remain well. I should have said that Dr. Emmens is not only an oculist but a specialist in the ear, throat and eye.
    There were four strangers, men, came in Tuesday for dinner who gave their names as Grover Ridley, assistant superintendent of the California Oregon Power Company, Stanley Jones, inspector People's Electric Company, Hendline and W. A. Cormany, also of the People's Electric Company. They had been up to the state fish hatchery installing an electric pump.
    H. L. Cox, who is a general superintendent of the construction and repair work on the P. and E. R.R., was here for dinner Tuesday. He seems to be considerably encouraged over the prospect of getting the railroad straightened up and thinks that by the middle of February they will be ready to start their mill up and run regularly cutting ties and then they will put on a force of men and repair the whole road and put it in shape to do business.
    Frank Neil of Derby was a passenger on the stage Tuesday on his way home.
    Tuesday afternoon I met young Radcliffe, who lives with his parents just above town, and he told me that his father, A. C. Radcliffe, met with an accident recently. His horses became unmanageable and in trying to hold them the front end gate gave way and he was pulled out of the wagon and bruised up quite badly.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1923, page 5


SAWMILL STARTS ON ELK CREEK
    TRAIL, Feb. 2.--The people on Elk Creek and above Trail along the Rogue are glad to hear the sawmill on Elk Creek is running now, and that they will be able to purchase lumber without having to haul so far. We have long felt the need of a mill in this vicinity.
    Several of the rangers are working on [the] telephone line below Trail.
    Keva Hutchinson of Medford spent the weekend with his parents of the Bar Eight ranch.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher was a pleasant visitor at the Meacham home Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Vaughn are spending a few days with Mrs. Vaughn's parents, Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Pence on Elk Creek.
    Rev. L. M. Phillips has been attending quarterly conference in Ashland, the past few days.
    If anyone reading these items has lost a sorrel horse about 8 or 9 years old, weight about 1000 lbs., one white hind foot and slightly blazed face, unbranded, they may find him at Irwin Howe's near Trail. He seems to be unknown to everyone around Trail.
    Mr. Oscar Stewart, who has been in Medford the past few days, under the doctor's care, is some better at this writing.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Watson, Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Blaess, Miss Velma Whitlatch and Keva Hutchinson were guests at the Hutchinsons' Sunday, Jan. 14.
    Miss Bernice Phillips, who has been in Portland the past few months, is expected home soon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Howe were Medford visitors Monday, Jan. 29, and were among those to consult Dr. Mellenthin of Minneapolis at the Holland Hotel that day.
    Walter Oliver of Upper Trail transacted business in Medford Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I did think that when I got through January, 1923, that I would resign my position as the Eagle Point correspondent for the Mail Tribune, but when I talked with several of the readers of the Eaglets and they protested so strongly against it, I concluded that I would try to hold out for another month at least, although when it comes to a man of my age tramping over our town and go into a store and inquire of the proprietor about business and he will draw a long breath and reply: "Well, there were a few people in today from the country, but I don't remember who they were. They only stayed a few minutes and went home." And so I have notified some of the business men and women that if they don't put on their thinking cap and help me to gather items for the Eaglets, that I will have to throw up the sponge and quit. And I don't want to have to do that, for that kind-hearted editor, who always meets me with a smile, might not like it and I would not displease him for anything and there is another thought and that is if I should quit I would have nothing to do to occupy my mind or prompt me to move around and I would soon be like an old friend of mine, who is not as old as I am by several years, just sit around and soon be so I could not go out and become helpless and that thought is exceedingly repulsive to me. But I would appreciate very much a little help along that line, especially during the winter.
    J. W. Chester and Lee Edmondson and a stranger, both of Butte Falls, were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage last Wednesday on their way home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ned Vilas, who live on the Vilas farm on the old sticky road from here to Medford, were here Wednesday for dinner and he was inquiring where he could get yew posts, so I suppose he is going to do some fencing on his farm. He reports that his mother is spending the winter in California. Thomas Farlow, formerly of Lake Creek, where he owns one of the best farms in the country, but now has become a citizen of Medford, was also here for dinner Wednesday. H. L. Cox was also here the same day. While here the subject came up of an article that was in the Daily Mail Tribune, speaking of the work in the timber and the addition of a branch line out from the P.&E. Railroad, extending out north into a heavy body of timber, and spoke of a man by the name of Adams being interested in the move and he seemed to think that it was a sensational story, but I was talking with Frank Brown of the firm of George Brown and Sons and he said there was a Portland man by that name, Adams, who had been corresponding with him with regard to buying the firm's timber out northeast of Butte Falls and that he had sent him the names of several timber owners who own timber in that section, so there may be more in it than a simple rumor.
    F. J. McPherson, one of our popular merchants, reports that H. U. Ellis and Frank Hill of Derby were trading in town Thursday and that George Barker and Frank Carson of Butte Falls were business callers the same day and that J. Harry Carlton was also here and that he had taken a contract to clear the right of way on one of the laterals to the canal coming from Big Butte, running from the Butte Creek (the Corbin) orchard to the Alta Vista orchard and on through and that the Robison brothers have also taken a contract to clear the right of way on another section of the laterals.
    Thursday was a noted day for the commercial travelers in our little town, for in making my rounds I came to no less than seven, so there must be some business going on here. The first was A. B. Shelby, who is representing Baker, Hamlinton and Pacific Co., San Francisco, Calif. He brought his mother-in-law, Mrs. C. H. Natwick of Medford, out and she had a fine visit with the hostess of the Sunnyside and her daughter. They both took dinner here and so did Walter D. Oliver, formerly of Trail, but now of Portland. He had been spending a month visiting his mother, Mrs. C. Kachy Fiernol of Trail.
    Mrs. Sarah Waldron of Medford, who had been up to the Anderson camp to do the cooking for the men working on the Eagle Point Irrigation Company's canal, but was taken sick and only remained a few days, came out on the stage Thursday.
    I also met Mr. H. L. Buck, who had just finished up his contract to clear the right-of-way on a unit of the canal referred to above.
    While I was in the George Brown & Sons store Thursday looking for Eaglets I met Mr. and Mrs. Masey and Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brady, and while the ladies were patiently waiting for their husbands, for they were both commercial travelers, the first one representing Walter N. Moore, dry goods company, San Francisco, and the other Berning Height and C.S.F.J., engaged them in conversation and found them to be very agreeable and interesting entertainers. Mrs. Massey claimed Medford as her home and Mrs. Brady said that she was homeless, as she traveled all the time with her husband. I also met A. G. Knapp, representing Allen and Lewis, Portland. That made three of the salesmen, and Mr. Shelby made the four, and two hardware men, beside Mr. Shelby and a cigar man. That shows how many of that class of men the people who buy the goods have to help keep up.
    When I went to the post office Friday to get my mail I found the following list of items left there by a kind lady friend, and I assure her that I appreciate the help very much and will be glad to receive any suggestion from any of my friends in the community: Those from Eagle Point who attended the Elks Lodge in Medford Thursday night were Thomas F. Nichols, W. C. Clements, Wm. Brown, Roy Ashpole, Gus Nichols, Frank Brown. All report a very enjoyable entertainment.
    Mrs. Frank Brown, Mrs. Leroy Smith, Mrs. Gus Nichols, Mrs. Allen Denton attended the movie "Dr. Jack," and did some shopping in Medford Thursday evening.
    The Ladies Improvement Club met at the home of Mrs. Wm. Brown Thursday evening. Several members were present. A very pleasant time was enjoyed. The old officers were re-elected. Miss Groves was hostess with Mrs. Mattie Brown.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry French and his son Lloyd were here last Thursday. They had been to Medford to take their cream and eggs and then returned to our town to do their trading. They seem to be under the impression that they can do just as well trading here, where they have been trading for years, as they can in Medford.
    Joe Haskins, one of the sawmill men from near McLeod, was also here trading with our merchants the same day.
    Mr. L. A. Richter, who lives on the divide between Rogue River and the South Umpqua River, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and went on up as far as Trail on the Eagle Point-Persist stage last Friday, and Miss Bernice Phillips of Trail, who had been up to Portland visiting friends and relatives, came out on the same stage and went on up to her home on the Trail stage.
    Mr. Lloyd A. Moss, County Club agent of Medford, was here visiting our school Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    The cow testers are expected out here this week to test the dairy cows in this section of the county.
    George McDonald, who has been working on the Jud Edsall contract on the laterals for the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal Co. canal, was laid off with the rest of the crew until the weather changes for the better and the ground settles, was here for dinner Saturday and went on out to Medford on the stage.
    I see that the printer has made a mistake in my letter giving an account of Mr. John Prillaman and his mother, Mrs. Catharine Prillaman and his sister, Miss, not Mrs., Ella Prillaman. The mistake was made in beginning Mrs. and Miss Prillaman with a B instead of a P and the prefix Mrs. instead of Miss before Ella Prillaman. It was probably due to my bad writing.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her daughter Miss Joyce and Mrs. V's sister, Mrs. Raymond Reiter, and her two children came to visit their brother Jack Florey.
    Roy Ashpole of the firm of Ashpole and Nichols, hardware merchants, report that among the business callers Saturday were Nick Young, R. M. Conley, Butte Falls; Peter Betz, Irene Frey, Lake Creek; Charles Manning, Guy Pruett, Graydon Cox and Wm. Butler were business callers Saturday, and I crossed the street, it was in the afternoon, and met at the Brown store Stacy Hayes.
    The same day I met Mr. A. C. Kent and his brother Dolph Kent, and Lawrence Luy, all of Wellen, at Childreth's blacksmith shop.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro were also in town the same day.
    W. W. Robison and son Ralph Robison, Dr. Joseph B. Webster and Donald Wright of Phoenix were here also advertising the Sunday School Institute to be held here Thursday, Feb. 8th. W. W. Robison is the president of the Jackson County Sunday School Institute and Dr. Webster is the president of the Medford district. They were all here for dinner but failed to meet our Sunday school superintendent, the Eagle Point banker, as he closes the bank at noon Saturday and we could not get him on the phone. Dr. W. W. P. Holt and June Earhart, his professional nurse, came in late for dinner. They had been up to the H. B. Tronson orchard to perform a minor operation on Mrs. Ward. They only stopped here long enough to eat their dinner as the Dr. was called to his office by phone so I did not get to visit with him but a few minutes.
    Eugene Stowell, formerly of this section, but now of Canada, called Saturday afternoon just as I was finishing up my Eaglets for the daily Mail Tribune and we had a fine visit. He came down last fall to spend the winter as he says that 60 degrees below is too cold for him. He is making his home with his brother, George W. Stowell, the chicken king of these parts. He reports that his brother has seven hundred laying hens and takes off several crates every week to Medford. He called the next day, Sunday, to see my wife and daughter, as they had gone to Medford that p.m., and took dinner with us.
    Robert Harnish and family, who had been down to Phoenix to visit Mrs. Harnish's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nichols, returned Sunday.
    Among guests at the Sunnyside Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Schuchard, Mr. Schuchard is the manager of the Rialto Theater in Medford, Mr. and Mrs. N. Pringle, one of the high school teachers of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. C. T. Stewart and son Richard, all of Medford, C. H. Feldman, St. Peter, Minnesota, A. H. Hubbs and wife, Medford.
    Mrs. Wm. Holmes was also out Sunday to visit her brothers, the Brown boys, and sisters, Mr. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoyoc.
    Ralph Cowgill and wife, one of the Jackson County representatives, were out Sunday afternoon.
    Mr. T. F. Nichols, who has been visiting her parents, Frank Farlow and wife, returned Sunday afternoon.
    I received another list of Eaglets by mail from someone, but the writer failed to give the name. We appreciate the act very highly, but anyone sending items please sign your name as it is a rule with newspaper men or correspondents to receive nothing in that line without knowing who the party is. That is for our protection.
    Allen Denton and his brother-in-law, N. Humphrey, spent Saturday afternoon in Medford on business. Mr. Humphrey is from Roseburg.
    There was a good attendance at the Sunday school last Sunday. Mrs. J. L. Robinson from Eagle Point and Mrs. Denton of Medford, who was out visiting her son, were in attendance at the Sunday school and there were several in attendance last Sunday who have not been attending regularly.
    There is one of the teachers who has charge of the little tots who seems to be specially qualified for that duty.
    Carlyle Natwick of Medford came out the first of the week, and he and Charley Winkle are leveling off a tract of land he and his wife have upon Rogue River about six miles from here.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1923, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    The snow has nearly all disappeared again around Trail and stockmen are wearing smiles once more.
    Mrs. J. T. Zimmerlee, who has been in Medford the past two weeks to be near her daughter, Mrs. C. Blaess, during her sojourn at the hospital, has returned to her home. Mrs. Blaess' many friends will be glad to learn she has recovered from her recent operation sufficient to return to her home in Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson had as Sunday guests Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Houston and Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Freeland spent the weekend visiting friends in Grants Pass.
    J. L. Ragsdale and son Wilmer were Medford visitors Monday. Mr. Ragsdale also visited his mother that day, who is very ill.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Young, who camped near Rogue Elk last summer, are now at Mills City, Ore., on location work. Their many friends around Trail are hoping they will return to this part of the country in the spring.
    Keva Hutchinson and Miss Velma Whitlatch of Medford spent Sunday at the Bar 8.
    Miss Bernice Phillips is staying with the Stewarts, caring for baby Lee, while Mrs. Stewart is in the school room.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Pritchett visited at the Howe home Wednesday and Thursday.
    We are sorry to learn Mrs. E. E. Ash is again on the sick list.
    Mrs. Poole entertained Mr. and Mrs. Pritchett, Mr. Simms and Minnie Poole at their home near Trail Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. L. Freeland spent a very pleasant evening at the Hutchinson home on the 28th. Homemade candy and popcorn was a treat which all enjoyed.
    Mr. and Mrs. Brown of Sheridan, Ore., who are spending the winter here for the benefit of their little son's health, report him greatly improved.
    Mrs. Sanburg and Mrs. Tony arrived from Portland during the snow storm Sunday. They came to join their husbands who are engaged in helping construct the bridges on Elk and Trail Creek.
    Miss Mae Mordoff and Irma Ash spent the weekend with the former's parents in Medford.
    Johnnie Ragsdale was a Sunday guest at the Adamson home.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1923, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    O. C. Eblen, Lloyd Stanley and a stranger came out Monday morning on the stage and Mr. Eblen, who owns quite a number of large horses, went out to the J. E. Edsall camp and got five of them that had been used in making the laterals for the Eagle Point-Butte Falls canal company, as the camp has shut down on account of the cold weather.
    Cliff Hickson of Ashland was a business caller the same day.
    Charlie Skeeters and wife of Medford were out the same day combining business with pleasure and visiting old friends and attending to business as well.
    There were quite a number of our newcomers met here at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Barker and took dinner last Monday.
    H. L. Cox of the Pacific & Eastern Railroad was a diner at the Sunnyside also the same day and so was Carlyle Natwick of Medford.
    Mr. Bond, who lives a short distance from Eagle Point, was here with five others whose names I failed to secure, as they were all just in the act of getting into the car to go home as I came up to them. Too slow again.
    W. O. Johnson was also a business caller Monday.
    In making my rounds looking for Eaglets and subscribers for the Medford Mail Tribune I called at the home of W. P. Morgan, and there I met Thomas Murray of Trail, and Mrs. Kate Chipman of Payette, Idaho, as well as Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, and while talking with them about writing the Eaglets Mr. Morgan asked the price of the Weekly Tribune and being told only two dollars a year she gave me her subscription, and then Mrs. Chipman decided that she would subscribe and send it home to her family, as she used to know me some forty-five years ago and used to read my letters then to the Valley Record of Ashland.
    Tuesday morning I met Alex Anderson of Brownsboro, who is on the Charley Terrill place, and in speaking of his sheep, he said they were doing fine and that he had just commenced to feed them the second day of this month, and that they were doing fine. He had just come in on the Lake Creek stage, and turning round I met Mrs. George B. Brown, also of Brownsboro, who came out with him on the stage. I also met Pete Betz, John Howard, a Civil War veteran who lives with Mr. Betz, Ed. Cowden, J. L. Robinson, Sr., two of our prosperous farmers who were here on business.
    A. H. Daugherty, who is selling the Rawleigh products, Perry Foster, W. E. Hammel and Fred Pettegrew were diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    C. W. Conn, who has charge of the Fred Pelouze place now owned by Dr. J. J. Emmens and Mr. Collins, was here having the team of thoroughbred Percheron mares shod, and he reports that in addition to these two he has another mare, that they have fourteen head of thoroughbred dairy cows besides other kinds of fine stock. Such men as these are what build up our country.
    J. H. and Lyle Carlton and J. R. Ahrens, the foreman on the Corbin Edgell orchard of Wellen, and P. S. Anderson of Medford were business callers Tuesday.
    Mr. Dillard of Ashland, consulting civil engineer for the Eagle Point Irrigation Company, took supper at the Sunnyside Tuesday evening. He was here to see Mr. Spencer and Mr. Summer, two of the civil engineers on the canal.
    H. L. Heryford, the road supervisor of the Butte Falls road district, came out from his home at Butte Falls Wednesday, spent the night here, went to Jacksonville to meet the county court, returned and spent another night and went home Thursday morning.
    Mrs. Leroy J. Buckingham and what I took to be her husband of Medford came out Wednesday in a spanking new Star car and she said had started out as the saleslady for that car, and she could almost convince a man against his will that that was the best car on the market. It is a fine car to ride in, for she took me and her husband out riding in it and it made me feel young again and almost want one myself, but how good it is I cannot say for I know nothing about a car myself.
    Henry Caley, an insurance agent of Ashland, called for supper Thursday and went on down home, and V. E. Peterson of Trail also came in and spent the night, went out to Medford, returned and spent another night and went up home on the Trail stage this Saturday morning.
    Our Sunday School Institute proved to be the best one of the series so far as the numbers is concerned; there were just fifty persons in attendance from Eagle Point and vicinity not counting those from Ashland, Medford, Phoenix etc. Those from Ashland were S. D, Taylor, W. W. Robison, Miss Edith Robison, Rev. C. F. Koehler; Central Point, E. C. Faber; Portland, Miss Georgia Parker, Rev. F. M. Jasper; Oregon City, Rev. A. J. Ware; Medford, Rev. E. P. Lawrence. The morning session was opened with singing, reading scripture lesson and prayer by one of the visiting ministers, and then singing, etc., and Rev. F. M. Jasper gave us a regular soul-inspiring talk on the value of vacation Bible schools setting forth the advantages derived from these schools, but pardon the suggestion, for while he told of the many fine things derived, there was one thing I noticed last summer during the vacation Bible school, conducted by a lady from Los Angeles, which was that she managed to get interested children who had never attended Sunday school and they became so interested that they were anxious to be there among the first. Mr. Jasper's lecture was followed by a lecture by Rev. A. J. Ware of Oregon City, on Organized Classes, giving some statistics showing how the work of the Sunday school workers had grown and developed until now it had become a great national institution and the members were now counted by the thousands. At the close of his lecture there were several questions asked and answered and the morning session closed and a sumptuous meal was spread by the ladies.
    The afternoon exercises were opened in the usual way with another good attendance, and Miss Georgia Parker gave us a remarkably interesting and instructive lecture on "Our Objective," holding the audience with her fine flow of language and her appeal to the parents to look after the welfare of the children in early life, and she looked so motherly that I thought the printer had made a mistake and used the wrong prefix, Miss instead of Mrs., so at the close of the services I went to her and asked if it was a mistake and she said no, that she was really an old maid.
    This was followed by another fine lecture by Rev. E. P. Lawrence of Medford, the subject being "Teaching the Word." This was followed by a general discussion.
    The means of reaching our objective, with Miss George Parker as leader. This was followed by a talk by Rev. F. M. Jasper on "Keep the Sand in Place." And then Rev. A. J. Ware followed with one of his soul-cheering talks on "Organized Class Work," and this was followed by another fine talk on "Teachers Training," and this by Miss Mary Spencer. That closed the afternoon session.
    In the evening the exercises were opened in the usual way and Rev. A. J. Ware gave us another one of his fine lectures on "The Adult and Law Enforcement," and this was followed by Rev. P. M. Jasper's crowning lecture on "Perfect Fellowship with the Ever Present Father," and that seemed to be the best of all, for he brought us into such close fellowship with our Heavenly Father that we seemed to be really in the bosom of the Father in deed and in truth.
    I see that my letter is already too long but I cannot close without saying something about the lunch and supper service by the ladies of Eagle Point. Well, all that I can say this time is that there was a bountiful supply of everything that is good to eat, and one of the ladies remarked, after all had eaten supper, that there was enough left to feed twenty more people. In conclusion I will say that the whole institute was a crowning success and the lectures will be remembered for years by the interested audience.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 12, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. M. L. Pruett, who owns a fine farm a few miles southwest of Eagle Point, attended the Sunday school institute here last week and was a guest of Mrs. Roy Stanley, who is teaching the Brownsboro school but living here in Eagle Point, and they both came over to the Sunnyside for breakfast Friday morning.
    Albert Swain, U.S. biological survey, and Mr. Lloyd A. Moss, county club agent, were here for dinner Friday noon.
    Edward Guches, wife and son Edward of Medford spent Friday visiting Mrs. Guches' mother, Mrs. N. E. Watkins, and sister Anna Watkins in Eagle Point.
    Edward P. Nochel and a stranger from Butte Falls were here for dinner Friday.
    J. W. Wyman, wife and son of Portland came in Friday evening and engaged rooms, remaining until Monday morning when they moved into one of the houses belonging to the ex-county commissioner, James Owens and wife. Mr. Wyman is a railroad section man and went to work on the P.&E.R.R. Saturday morning. Mrs. Harvey, who has been living in the Owens house, has moved into a small house just across the street.
    Chris Beale, who has been under treatment for stomach trouble by Dr. Swedenburg of Ashland, came out on the stage Saturday morning and went to the Sunnyside where he remained until Monday, returning to Medford. Mrs. Col. Pool also came out Saturday morning with Mr. Beale and went on up to Butte Falls the same day.
    F. J. Jackson, one of the timber owners in the Butte Falls country, of Portland, came in Saturday for dinner on his way up to Butte Falls to look after his timber interests there.
    Ella G. Barnes of Derby came out on the Butte Falls stage, went to the Sunnyside for dinner and continued her journey on to Medford, returning Tuesday morning and went on up to her home.
    S. E. Cowgill, who has been living on the old Moomaw place on the hill above town, has moved into the James Jordan house where it will be much handier for the children to attend school.
    Nothing special took place here Sunday as the weather was rather inclement, and Sunday we had some snow on the ground and Sunday night we had a regular old-fashioned snow storm, leaving us with four inches of snow with a hard crust of sleet between the first and second courses.
    I received a copy of House Bill No. 77, the anti-moonshine bill, from Portland Saturday, and in talking with our popular sheriff about it he said that he thought that every newspaper in the state should print it and let those who are inclined to violate the prohibition law can see what they are up against, for it is no trifling matter for a man or woman, for I see by the papers that some of the women are proved guilty of a violation of the law, and now what used to be punished by a light fine and jail sentence is a fine of three thousand dollars [nearly $50,000 today] and a term in the penitentiary. He suggested that by publishing the bill that it would probably keep someone from violating the law and keep some good family from being disgraced. If any reader of this item wishes to procure a copy of the bill they can procure it free by sending to the Anti-Saloon League of Oregon, 805 Broadway Building, Portland, Oregon.
    Dewey Stowell and Alex Betz, two of our promising young men, were here on business last Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Our school, under the management of Mrs. Josephine Holmes as principal and Miss Ruth Wiley primary teacher, observed Lincoln's Birthday in an appropriate manner. In speaking of our school we feel proud to be able to say that we have one of the best schools here in the county, and the teachers are beloved by all of the children and are proud of the advancement they are making in their studies.
    Lucius Kincaid, our popular mail carrier on the route from here to Persist via Trail, was here for supper Monday evening. Mrs. Kincaid had gone out to Medford to visit her parents and Lucius said that he didn't like to get his supper after working all day, or eat a cold lunch, so he came back to the Sunnyside. I met Mrs. Kincaid Tuesday in the McPherson store so I know that she has returned.
    Lloyd A. Moss of Medford and Dr. George D. Bishop, Salem, federal agent for tuberculosis testing cows, came in Monday and Dr. Bishop engaged a room and board for a week. He has been testing the cows in the valley and reports that out of the five hundred cows he tested in and around Central Point he only found two that were troubled with the disease, and that throughout the state of Oregon so far as tested there was only one percent found so far, a fine showing thus far. He has just commenced in this section of the county, and is here writing up his reports and waiting for some more serum. He will probably be in this neighborhood for several days yet.
    Claud Hutchinson and George Adams, who are on the Frank Rhodes place, came in Monday with 129 dozen eggs that they had gathered since the Thursday before, and Benj. Brophy came in with 90 dozen and three large cans of cream for the Snider Creamery of Medford. By the time our new canal from Big Butte is in operation there will be enough dairy cows in this section of the country to justify the opening up of a creamery here, for with our water power and electric power a creamery could be operated very cheaply, for with the addition of the large volume of water from the canal and the addition of thousands of acres of land that will be brought into use there will be thousands of tons of alfalfa and clover hay added to the already liberal supply we have here.
    Among the business callers I met besides those mentioned were George and John Berg, who are living on the Clarno place between here and Trail near the Crater Lake Highway.
    Wm. von der Hellen, one of our big contractors, has moved his family back here from Medford.
    Lou Walch of Wellen was also a business caller Monday and so was Mrs. Frank Johnson, who lives near the new concrete bridge across Rogue River, and Wm. Marshall, who is on the Timmy Dugan farm below here on Butte Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 19, 1923, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. George Weeks and children were callers at Mrs. Hart's Thursday.
    Geo. Fisher is down from Elk Creek, helping Mr. Ash cut wood this week.
    Mr. Brown of Fisheries Station, Mr. W. G. McDonald and E. E. Ash were Medford visitors Friday.
    We are glad to report Mr. and Mrs. Sanford's infant baby much improved.
    Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Pence were Trail visitors Saturday. Mr. Pence has recovered from the whooping cough sufficient to be out again.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison were pleasant callers at Middlebushers' Friday.
    Enid Middlebusher and brother Denzil were Medford callers Saturday.
    The rain is sure welcomed by all around Trail, as it is taking the balance of snow fast.
    Mrs. A. T. Poole and Wilmer Ragsdale motored to Medford Saturday. The former's daughter, Minnie, returned with them.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Pritchett were visitors at J. J. Hall's Friday.
    The Stewart brothers and I. Howe were looking after cattle down the river Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 20, 1923, page 8


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson spent the weekend in Medford shopping and visiting with friends.
    Mr. John Hill and Burt Gage of the Hill Construction Co. are expected here this week to arrange to remove their rock crusher and settle up their business here.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher and son Denzil have returned from the Applegate where they have been visiting the former's daughter, Mrs. M. Pence and family
    S. W. Hutchinson has been hauling lumber from the Elk Creek sawmill to build a small house for the renter on his ranch.
    The steel work on Trail Creek bridge being completed, the men are busy placing the steel on the Elk Creek bridge. The public will be glad when these two bridges are completed as the detours are very muddy to have to travel.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Houston had as Sunday guests Mr. and Mrs. Tom Raimey, Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and Mr. and Mrs. S. Houston. A bountiful chicken dinner with all the goodies to go with it was served, which was greatly enjoyed by all.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1923, page 6


BUTTE CREEK
    Our school has an enrollment of six pupils. Five girls and one boy. Our teacher's name is Frances Greb. We are getting along fine in school.
    We have been making a number of improvements in our school. The floor has been oiled. We have two new pictures, new shades and white curtains, and our supplementary readers.
    A surprise party was given in honor of Virginia Anderson, January 20th, that being her 9th birthday. Games and music furnished the evening's entertainment. At midnight dainty refreshments were served. There were about twenty-five present. Everyone departed in the wee hours of morning, after having a delightful time.
    Mrs. Jacob Monia was up last week to visit her daughter, Mrs. Floyd Charley.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw motored to Eagle Point Tuesday on business.
    Isolee and Frances Brown are taking up sewing in club work and like the work very much.
    Leonard Bradshaw is talking up pig raising.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Brown gave a house party in the opening up of their new bungalow, on Friday evening, February 16th. A large program was given by the pupils and people of the community. Miss Greb supervised the program. A large crowd was present. After the program, games were played until midnight after which dainty refreshments were served. A few games and a number of musical selections were rendered after luncheon. Everyone departed in the wee hours of morning, after having had a delightful time.
    We are sorry to learn that Mrs. Alex Anderson is ill at the Sacred Heart Hospital. It is the hope of everyone in the community that she will recover and be able to be with us in a short time.
    Emogene Charley and her sons, Floyd, Claus and Leland, went to Medford Wednesday, February 21, to attend the funeral of Fred Hurst.
    We are glad to learn that Irene Charley, the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Charley, has recovered from her illness. She was very ill with bronchitis.
    With sunshiny days and warm weather the farmers are commencing their spring work.
    We have had four 100 percent in attendance this year, and we are going to try and keep that record the rest of the term.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Benj. Whetstone, one of our well-to-do farmers and stockmen who lives on a farm on Antelope Creek, was a business caller last Thursday and so was Roy Conley of Butte Falls, who owns the old Hawk sawmill, and I asked if he was cutting much lumber now and he said no, that he was feeding his cattle, that he had plenty of hay and that he was just poking it into them and they looked fine.
    Sam H. Harnish, who has the contract to take the high school children to Medford and back, was on the sick list last week so had his son Robert drive in his place, but is now back on his old job again.
    Carlyle Natwick of Medford was here for dinner Saturday and reports that he is building a house on the tract of land that fell to his wife in the division of what is known as the Nichols farm, some six miles north of here on Rogue River. After it was divided between his wife, nee Ruth Nichols, and her brother Thomas F. Nichols, they mutually agreed on the division, had a surveyor run out the lines without the aid of a lawyer, and everything was settled as it should have been between a brother and sister.
    L. G. Palmer of Butte Falls was out Saturday and reported the death of Mr. and Mrs. Ed Spencer's infant son aged 13 months, who died Friday.
    Last Friday, Feb. 16th, being the 49th birthday of our popular road supervisor, just about the time when he was about to retire, having taken off his shoes and everything as quiet as a death chamber, all at once he and his wife were startled by one of those unearthly yells that few could give except Gus Nichols, broke the stillness of the hour, when in rushed about 20 of his neighbors to join with him and his family in celebrating his birthday. So after the excitement was over they all settled down to spending the evening in visiting and social games until bedtime when lunch was served and the visitors retired wishing William many happy returns of Feb. 16th.
    Wm. Butler, one of our well-to-do farmers, and Mr. Van Allen, who is living with Mr. Butler, were in town on business with our postmaster and manager of our telephone business, W. C. Clements.
    Saturday afternoon just as I was starting down to the post office to get my mail, Wm. G. Pierce, the machinist for Hubbard Bros., Medford, drove up on a business errand, and when through drove off and I started right off for the post office again and my daughter called me back saying that someone wanted to know if I was authorized to perform the marriage ceremony and she replied yes. It appeared that he stopped at the McPherson store and asked him if there was a minister in town, being told that Mr. Howlett was a minister he thus called on the phone. He then wanted to know if I could marry a couple about eight o'clock that evening. Being told that I could, not giving any names he again called up and wanted to know if I could go out in the country about half a mile. Again I answered in the affirmative, as he proposed to come after me and bring me home so, that being settled, I again started for the post office and got thirty rods on my way when who should drive up and stop, and I supposing that he had forgotten something I inquired the cause of his returning. He said that he had come after me and I looked at him inquiringly and asked if he was the man who wanted to be married and he said he was, and wanted me to get right in the car, but I protested that I wanted to change my clothes. Finally I thought of my fountain pen and said I would have to get that to fill out the certificate so we started back to the house and I changed my clothes and got ready and we started, and after we started I asked the name of the lady he was going to marry and he said the name was Mrs. Hannaford, and after we had rode a mile or two I remarked that his half mile was rather long then asked where the lady lived and he said on his place, a part of the Everett Dahack place (it was four miles but he was too excited to think). Well, we went on through the sticky mud and finally came to a place near the foot of a hill where the ground seemed to be softer and soon we stuck fast. He tried to back up, but the more he tried the deeper we went into the sticky, so Mr. Pierce took the load off and tried again but every move made it more difficult to get out, so he finally asked if I had on rubbers. I told him I had. Well, said he, I guess we will have to walk and I asked how far it was over to the the house and he replied: O, two or three hundred yards. I still had a mind the length of his "half mile" and figured accordingly, and so we started. Of course I could not walk very fast, especially through the sticky, and after we had walked about three-quarters of a mile and by this time it began to get quite dark for a man past ninety and almost blind. We finally reached the house and on entering met Mrs. Elizabeth Hannaford, her sister-in-law Mrs. Hannaford, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Stille, and ten children, Mrs. E. Hannaford's five, one of the other Hannaford family, and four little Stilles, and in the course of a short time Mr. Pierce was ready and brought in the prospective bride and in less time than it takes me to write it, the happy couple were joined in wedlock. And then he and Mr. Stille started to extricate the car from the mudhole.
    But then I came up against another difficulty. I had been used to electric lights, but we were off the line and consequently had to depend on a coal oil lamp for light, and I was unable to see to write or read, but I secured the assistance of one of the ladies and dictated to her and finally managed to make them out. Then supper was called and after partaking of a hearty meal Mr. Pierce announced that the car was at the door ready to take me home. So we, that is Mr. Wm. G. Pierce, his bride and myself started and in a short time I was landed at the Sunnyside safe and sound. So bidding the happy couple good night they went on their way rejoicing.
    Among the Sunday visitors were Dr. M. C. Barker and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Lynn W. Smith, all of Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1923, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. A. Cooper of Trail, George Lindley, one of the timber cruisers and George Wood, one of the timber owners of San Diego, Calif., were passengers on the Butte Falls stage last Monday. Mr. Cooper went to Trail on the Trail stage and the other two went on up to Butte Falls.
    Eli and Everett Dahack are fixing up the building they moved from between the McPherson store and the town hall for a garage and are installing a gasoline pump and air and water plant and expect to put in a supply of tires and tubes and the necessary accompaniments for a first-class garage and Ernest Dahack, our popular barber, has installed a water system in his dwelling with hot and cold water, bath tub, and in connection with it an irrigation system for his garden and berry vines. He also has the lumber, cement and shingles on the ground to put up a house to install an electric pump in the place of his old gasoline pump and have it arranged automatically so as to ensure a good supply of water for his barbershop and bath room, as well as for domestic use at his home. By the installation of the Dahack gas pump and garage it secures for the town a bountiful supply of gas and auto supplies, as Ashpole & Nichols have a gas pump with their hardware store, F. J. McPherson has one in connection with his general merchandise store, and George B. Holmes has one with his garage and there is also a pump at the Eagle Point pool room, though it is not in operation at present although one of the firm told me when they first opened up that they intended to keep gas when the travel opened up.
    George B. Holmes, our old garage man, has the wires up for a radio plant in his residence and has ordered the necessary machinery so as to be able to hear what is going on in the outside world. George is quite a genius and will soon be able to manipulate the wires.
    Mr. Sheibley, the janitor of our school, who is living at the present in the James Jordan house with Mr. and Mrs. Coghill, took dinner Monday and Tuesday at the Sunnyside. He was helping Ed Wolfer pack up and crate some furniture and household effects that were left of his in the house when his father-in-law, Mr. Jordan, died. Mr. Wolfer remained at the Sunnyside until Thursday afternoon when he started for his home at Hubbard, ten miles north of Salem.
    Frank Carson, the Butte Falls barber, came out on the stage Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Among the business callers Monday were J. E. Haskins and he reports that he has his sawmill about ready for operating. J. H. Carlton, who came in from working on his contract, looking for a barber, for he had a two weeks growth of beard on his face and looked as though he had been working in sticky. Elmer Robinson, another one of our progressive farmers, was also in town Monday and Bert Clarno and Mrs. Tillie Bergman were here trading with our merchants.
    Mrs. Herb Carlton and Ira Hensley of Wellen were here trading with Fred McPherson and Rosa Smith and her sister, Mrs. Lizzie Perry, were trading with George Brown and Sons and Ed Cowden came in the same day to bring in his cream.
    The friends of George Brown and family of Brownsboro gave them a surprise party on Friday, Feb. 16th on the completion of their new house and moving into it, and some of their friends in this community went up to congratulate them on their success in having it completed. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell and Leonard Charley and wife. There were quite a number of their old neighbors as well as some of the new ones joined in the company and after spending the evening until toward midnight lunch was served and the company dispersed after wishing a pleasant good night.
    Among the passengers on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday were Alex Vestal of Reese Creek, A. W. Gay of Butte Falls and D. T Cornell of Dunsmuir, Calif.
    The following gentlemen were here for dinner Tuesday: Fred Pettegrew, president of the Eagle Point Irrigation District; F. C. Dillard, the consulting engineer of the company, E. G. Rice of Portland, a salesman of machinery for making canals and ditches, and B. W. Paul of the Paul's Electric Store, Medford.
    Dan Swift of Seattle, who has been here visiting, returned home Tuesday. W. S. Chappell, our shoemaker, who has given up the business here and gone into the sawmill business near Trail, came in Tuesday morning. He and his partners have been moving the mill from just above Trail to Long Branch, some four miles below Trail.
    S. M. Hawk, Butte Falls, one of the pioneers in the sawmill business in this country, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage on his way home, and Wm. Palmer, also of Butte Falls, was also a passenger on the same stage. W. T. Wellfanny, also of Butte Falls, was a passenger on his way home.
    Jessie Morris, who is in the employ of George W. Averill, who is getting out saw logs for the Olds & Brownlee Company, was here for dinner Wednesday and so was S. A. Pickle, the meter reader for the power company.
    W. O. Johnson and wife of Wellen, and Ed. Chartsaw, George Adamson of Trail, W. H. Season of the Dodge ranch were business callers Wednesday.
    J. B. Jackson and wife of Butte Falls were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols and Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith the mid week. Mrs. Pearl Nichols and her sister Blanche Davis were also visiting Mrs. Lizzie Perry.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith of Eagle Point were visiting his brother, Lou Smith and family of Central Point, Wednesday.
    John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, was a caller Wednesday.
    Roy Ashpole of the firm of Ashpole and Nichols, hardware merchants, gave me the following names of people who came in Wednesday: Wm. Merritt, Robert McCabe, Scott Bayer and wife, Harvey Stanley, Wellen and Roscoe Hult.
    Mrs. Wm. Butler, Roy Davis, who is on the Thos. F. Nichols farm on Rogue River, Lee Bradshaw and wife, and F. J. McPherson report that Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Stille, Jas Hannaford, Thos. Abbott and family of Lake Creek were also business callers.
    There seems to be a general cleaning up around town, taking out the old stalks in the gardens, removing the old rubbish and making things look nice, and it is a common thing to hear people say that the lovely sunshine makes them feel as though they were taking the spring fever.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 27, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Theodore W. Finley, formerly of this neighborhood, but now of Klamath Falls, called Thursday for dinner and so did Frank Tralton, also of Klamath Falls, and A. B. Shelby, a hardware salesman, and Ed Welch of Medford, who is selling fruit trees and vines, shrubbery, berry vines, etc., for a nursery in Washington, were here for dinner Thursday.
    Frank Hill of Derby and Wm. Lewis, a sheep herder, E. H. Oliver of Trail and Jas. Hannaford, Mrs. Fred Dutton of Wellen, Mr. Cushman of Trail were trading here Thursday.
    I met B. H. Sears of Reese Creek in the McPherson store Saturday afternoon, and I also met John Gabler and he renewed his subscription with me for the Daily Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun.
    Among the guests Sunday for dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel were Mr. and Mrs. Hartrell from Three Oaks, Jackson County, Mrs. Hart from Quincy, Illinois, Mr. and Mrs. Speck and little daughter Catherine of Medford, Buel Hildreth, James O'Brien, O. Adams and Mrs. Mary Clevenger of Butte Falls, Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Derby and family, Leo J. Miksche, a representative of the Monarch Seed and Feed Store, Medford, and J. D. Bell, proprietor of the Nash Hotel, Medford, Esther Ashcroft, Medford, Miss Joyce von der Hellen, Eagle Point, Geo. W. Austin and wife, Medford, and Loris Martin, formerly of Trail.
    Ray Warner of Trail came out the next day, Monday, and he and Mr. Martin spent the day at the Sunnyside and went up to the Edsall camp to go to work on the laterals for the Eagle Point Irrigation Canal to do some rock work, as the sticky is too wet yet to work to advantage.
    The following list of interesting items was handed me by a lady friend last Monday afternoon to be inserted into the Eaglets, and I am satisfied that the readers will appreciate the favor as much as I do:
    Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. John Rader entertained twenty-five of the members of the Civic Improvement Club at the home of the former, Feb. 15th. The meeting was called to order by the president, Mrs. H. E. Campbell, and quotations from our beloved ex-President, Abraham Lincoln, were read by the members. The club has decided to have a booth at the county fair the coming fall and are already making plans, the president having appointed the following committee on fair work: Mrs. A. R. Macdonald, Mrs. Charles Pruett, Mrs. Mittelstaedt, Mrs. L. K. Hawk, Mrs. Wm. Perry and Mrs. Cora Smith. The ladies on the visiting committee are Mrs. Allen Denton, Mrs. J. Frank Brown and Mrs. Thomas F. Nichols. Committee for cleanup day, Mrs. George B. Holmes, Mrs. Weidman and Mrs. Grove. The mayor will set the date for cleanup day and everyone will be expected to clean up their yards, alleys, and around their places of business.
    Monday I met our schoolhouse janitor and he gave me his subscription to the Medford Mail Tribune for three months. The reading public are becoming more and more satisfied that in order to get all the news and get it quick they must take the Mail Tribune. It is amusing to notice the crestfallen expression on the faces of the strong of men, women, boys and girls who flock to the post office about 5 o'clock in the afternoon when it is announced the Tribune didn't come, for once in a while by some means the papers fail to reach the post office here, but very seldom.
    Among the business callers I met Monday on the streets and different business places were Carl Bergman, Benj. Brophy and wife, James Jones and Earl [sic] (Shorty) Miles of Butte Falls, and Ralph Cowgill, our representative in the lower house of the legislature: Mrs. W. Gagner of Trail, Gordon Cox of Medford, who was moving some of the personal property of the late James Jordan from the house where he lived into the bank building for disposal, and what he didn't sell to store away to be disposed of later. I also met Mr. and Mrs. Fred Dutton and they were trading with George Brown & Sons when I first met them but later they were buying some of the furniture, bedding, etc. that the banker had brought to the bank for safekeeping. I also met Fred's brother Ed, and Ray Ashpole reports as business callers at the Eagle Point Hardware Store Henry Tonn of Lake Creek, John Walch, Lake Creek, Mrs. Wm. Bigham, John Norris and Mrs. Clarno, and F. J. McPherson reports D. L. Zimmerlee and S. W. Reed of Trail and Herb Carlton of Prospect is doing business in his store.
    Mr. Muskopf, one of our prominent citizens, has gone to the Big Butte country to work in a logging camp.
    Mrs. Lorne B. Warren of Medford and her cousin, Mrs. O. S. Chapin of Calgary, Alta., Canada, were out driving looking over the country and took a spin from Medford up as far as the new steel concrete bridge four miles this side of Trail and stopped here for dinner on their way back and seemed to be delighted with the country and the Crater Lake Highway.
    C. H. Natwick, one of our big contractors, came in Tuesday morning intending to go out on the Butte Falls stage, but he was either too slow or the stage was too fast so he was left so spent the night at the Sunnyside and went out this Wednesday morning.
    J. J. McMahon, the state traffic officer and Mr. Tex C. Higginson, both of Medford, called Tuesday for supper and went on their way there is no telling where, for their speed cop is hard to keep track of.
    As Robert Harnish's wife has gone to Central Point to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nickel, Robert and his father, S. H. Harnish, took supper at the Sunnyside Tuesday evening and Chris Beale spent the night here and so did Messrs. J. N. Rennie and his brother of Eugene, traveling salesmen.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 2, 1923, page 8


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. Johnson, superintendent of Hill's construction company, has been here for a few days greeting his many friends in the community. He will leave soon for Klamath County where he has charge of some work.
    Mrs. S. Geary and daughter Clara and grandson Jimmie of Canada are visiting with Mrs. E. E. Ash this week.
    James Wilson's father has arrived from Portland to spend the summer with his son on the Bar-Eight ranch.
    Mr. E. E. Ash and C. Owens, also Mr. Mechem, were Medford visitors Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ash and little daughter Betty and son Gene, Mrs. E. E. Ash and daughter Irma, Mrs. Geary and Miss Mordoff were pleasant visitors at the Howe home Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. George D. Saltzman of Medford spent Sunday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison.
    Mr. Charles L. Phillips, who has been spending the winter in Los Angeles, is here visiting his brother, L. M. Phillips, and family. He will go from here to his home in Montana.
    Mr. Dave Lynch of Upper Trail was a Trail visitor Wednesday.
    There was an error in the items of last week. Instead of Mr. and Mrs. S. "Houston" it should have been Mr. and Mrs. S. "Hutchison" visiting at Frank Houston's.
    R. R. Dawson is working on the crusher this week.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 2, 1923, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. N. B. Stoddard, the hardware merchant of Butte Falls, was a passenger on the stage on his way home last Wednesday morning.
    Dick Daley and little son of Fort Jones, Siskiyou County, California, was over here visiting his relatives Wednesday.
    Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, who spends the most of her time with her husband, who has to stay the most of his time at the Dead Indian Soda Springs on account of his health, came out on the Lake Creek stage Wednesday and went out to her farm east of Medford to visit one of her sons, who is running the farm for her.
    Among other callers were Rube Johnson, a retired capitalist, and his nephew, Alex Mathews, John Minter, who came in with his gang plow to have it fixed by our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, who was off to Jacksonville on jury duty. It works a great hardship on our farming community to have to come in from one to twenty-five miles to have work done and find out that our blacksmith had been called on to act as a juryman when a large community like this are depending on him to do their work. It does seem as though if our Hon. Judge but knew the number of farmers who are depending on him to do their work so they could do their farming that he might excuse him from jury duty under such circumstances. But I have such faith in his wisdom and justice that he will do what is right in such cases.
    Bert Peachey and family of Ashland have been here for the last week or so with Mrs. Peachey's parents. Her father forbid me putting his name in the Mail Tribune, so I withhold it. And Mr. Peachey has been overhauling his auto in the absence of the blacksmith, as he is an uncle of Mrs. Peachey and so has free access to the shop during Mr. Childreth's absence.
    W. T. Otenglot and F. G. Edsall were here for dinner Thursday.
    Pete Betz and wife and John Howard, an old veteran of the Civil War, George Hanson and Frank Nygren of Brownsboro; Carl Bieberstedt, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen, who lives on the Eagle Point-Brownsboro road; C. W. Conn, who lives on the Meadow Lark ranch, were doing business here Thursday.
    Roy Stanley, who has been down in California in the Alturas country buying cattle for Pauley and Walker of San Francisco, returned to his home here a few days ago and reports that cattle are very low in price, that the bankers have advanced the money for the cattlemen and as the price has dropped are demanding their money and the result is disastrous with some of them.
    Henry Wahler, who lives out about six or seven miles on Dry Creek, came in Thursday to have his horse shod, but had to go home without having it done.
    As I was making my rounds Thursday, I met Mr. Roy C. Wilkensen of Starrriger, Norway, representing the Morse Crown Cannery Co. He is strictly a fish salesman and had his samples on plates, spread on the counter in McPherson's store and they looked good enough to eat. I also met at the same time, A. G. Knapp, distributor of the great Henry George Cigar, two great, large husky men, either of them would pull down 180 lbs., but they were riding over the country in autos, while men of near half their size have to dig out a scant living by the sweat of their brow, simply because they improved their time when young and secured an education and consequently use their brains instead of their muscles. (This is for the benefit of the boys and girls who read the Eaglets.)
    This is moving day in our little town. Mr. Bush, who was living in Mr. S. M. Woods' house, moved away and Will Winkle moved into it. Mr. John L. Robinson, Jr., moved out of the Rev. Simmons home into his own home that he bought of Charley Painter, now of the state of Washington, and Mr. W. L. Hurst moved from the Robinson house into the Cummings house (Wamsley) and D. A. Sheibley moved from the James Jordan house into the Simmons house.
    In my rounds the other day I met one of the members of the council, Mrs. W. H. (Mattie) Brown, and she and our townsman, John Miller, the carpenter, were putting trees along the sidewalks from Main Street to the railroad. If the other five members of the council took as much interest in beautifying our town as Mattie does, we would have one of the most beautiful towns on the Pacific Coast. Our mayor also takes a great deal of pride in beautifying our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 7, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Gus Nichols and wife made a business trip to Medford on Wednesday of last week, and Mrs. Gus Nichols took dinner at the Sunnyside Thursday, March 1, and so did Carley Manning of Peyton.
    Among the other business callers Thursday were Mrs. Ed Condon, Mrs. John Miller and Wert Pool; also the Hayes brothers, two of the sawmill men who are operating a sawmill upon Long Branch, and Joe Haskins, another sawmill man. The millmen were trading with Brown brothers.
    Henry French and his son Lloyd, who had been to take their eggs and cream [to] Medford, came back here to do their trading and put their checks in our Eagle Point bank. They were also taking out a lot of fertilizer to use on their alfalfa. What we used to call one-horse squirrel ranchers are, since they have gone into the dairy and poultry business, have developed into genuine four-horse farmers and are developing their squirrel ranches into valuable farms and have their bank accounts and are independent so far as money is concerned, and it is not one individual case but I can name several in this district who a few years ago had to go out and work for wages who turned their attention to the poultry and dairy business, and worked and put water on their places who are now independent, and I predict that in the next few years, after our irrigation project is completed and some of the old "mossbacks" have died off or sold out and the large tracts of land that will then be under irrigation, and enterprising men and women take hold of the land, that the Eagle Point District will be one of the beauty spots of the Pacific Coast. But I don't expect to be able at that time to write it up for the readers of the Mail Tribune, for I am now looking around to find someone who is willing to undertake the task.
    Fritz Edler, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen of the Lake Creek country, was here Thursday for dinner with Jack Holloway.
    Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls, who had been out to Jacksonville on jury duty, and was excused for a few days, came out on the stage Friday morning and went up home. Mrs. Miles, also of Butte Falls, was also a passenger; a strange lady and two men went up on the stage at the same time.
    There were nine men came in Friday for dinner but I failed to get the names of any of them; so far as I could see they were all strangers.
    F. J. McPherson, one of our popular merchants, reports that Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Wymore, Mr. and Mrs. Guy Pruett and Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Frey, the latter of Lake Creek, were buying goods in his store Friday.
    Mrs. Laura C. Atkins, who is teaching in District 42 in the Lake Creek country, came out and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    The following account of the Parent-Teachers meeting that was reorganized here was handed in by a lady friend: A number of the mothers of Eagle Point met with the teachers at the school house Wednesday afternoon for the purpose of organizing a Parent Teachers Association. Mrs. R. A. Weidman was elected president and Mrs. Allen Denton secretary-treasurer for the ensuing school year. It is hoped every parent will give this association loyal support.
    Last Saturday the teachers in the Eagle Point-Butte Falls zone met for the second time in the Eagle Point school house.There were many helpful suggestions given. A delicious lunch was served by the newly organized Parent-Teachers Association. Those present were Mrs. Susanne Holmes Carter, the county school superintendent, and her assistant Elizabeth Burr, Frances Greb, Gertrude Wiley, our primary teacher, Mrs. Josephine R. Holmes, the principal of our school, Mrs. Gertrude Stanley, the teacher of the Brownsboro School, Olive Hogan, Nita Johnson, Sylvia Hukill, Miss Furry, Mrs. Laura C. Atkins and Mrs. Ed Monson. The last meeting of the organization will be held either at Butte Falls or Eagle Point in April. The foregoing report was furnish by the popular principal of our school.
    J. P. Hughes, a retired merchant of Butte Falls, who had been out to Jacksonville on jury duty, and P. E. Sandoz of Elk Creek were here Friday night, going home Saturday morning.
    A. E. Hildreth of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage Saturday morning on his way home.
    J. L. Robinson, Sr., one of our prosperous farmers, was also a passenger on the stage. He had sold a horse to a man and he paid down ten dollars and was to pay the balance in monthly payments of ten dollars each so taking the horse he skipped out and that was the last he heard of him for some time, so he started out in search of him and heard he was up on the Applegate River near the California line. So off he went and finally found him, and fortunately the horse also and when the man found that Mr. Robinson was going to take the horse he promptly paid the balance and kept the horse.
    E. V. Brittsan, who is on the P. S. Anderson farm with his brother, was in town Saturday having our blacksmith do some repair work.
    Carl von der Hellen of Wellen and A. J. Anderson, the Standard Oil man of Medford, and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro were business visitors here Saturday.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Saturday were Glenn Haley, Gold Hill, and wife, A. J. Florey and wife and their mother-in-law, Mrs. A. J. Anderson, and at night Frank Simpson of Medford came in and spent the night.
    On Sunday there was no one from Medford but quite a number of our regular comers and goers, among whom were George and Harry Lewis, who bought the A. J. Jonas farm, and Harry told me that they had rented the Allen Denton alfalfa field, twenty acres, of Mr. Denton, had been covering it with fertilizer, had taken his six milk cows to milk for one year and that they had procured a registered sow of the Red Duroc breed and with their sheep, cows and hogs expected to come out on top--and so do I, for they are hustlers.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 10, 1923, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Pritchett had as Sunday guests Mr. and Mrs. Charles Fry and little son, Earl, Mr. and Mrs. Seimes, Oren Adamson and Wesley Ragsdale.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher and daughter Enid spent Sunday p.m. with the former's daughter and family on Elk Creek. Mr. and Mrs. M. Pence just recently moved to Elk Creek from Applegate. They were accompanied by Mrs. S. Geary and daughter, Clara.
    R. R. Dawson and I. H. Howe were branding their cattle Wednesday preparatory to turning out.
    Mrs. W. Stewart motored to Medford Saturday. She was accompanied by Mrs. L. M. Phillips and daughter Bernice.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison were very pleasant callers at the Howe home Sunday.
    Mrs. Viola Peterson returned to her home at Persist after a few days' visit at the Poole home.
    N. C. Vaughn and C. Whitley were Medford visitors Thursday.
    Mrs. Sadie Applegate of Medford is visiting her friends at Trail this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. Hutchison motored to Medford Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 10, 1923, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. D. Henson and son, James Henson, were here for dinner last Monday. They are in the employ of Foster and Kleiser in the advertising business. They were out with their new auto, all equipped for the business. In commenting on their new rig, Mr. Henson remarked that the company had had two others of the same kind put up and that all three of them were kept busy posting advertisements. They have now six advertising or bulletin boards in our little town and about five-sixths of the space is used in advertising tobacco in its various forms of putting it on the market.
    Thomas Riley, one of our prosperous young mechanics, was here Monday and reported that he was turning his attention to painting, as he had the contract to paint John Rader's house and W. C. Daley's house and the bankers', H. E. Campbell's, house. Beside painting, Mr. Riley works at the carpenter business considerable of his time and during his leisure hours has helped his brother-in-law, George B. Holmes, put up a radio system at his residence or rather over it, and they have installed the machinery and have it in operation. They were assisted in putting it in place by one of our high school boys, John Phillips, who has been taking a course in that branch of science, and has so far proceeded in his studies that he has installed a radio of his own, doing all the work himself, except the part that is manufactured in the factory.
    Frank Smith, who lives a short distance from town, told me a few days ago that he called and listened to it and heard a woman preaching in Los Angeles, Calif., heard a basketball game going on in Seattle, Washington, could hear them clap their hands and cheer, and also heard from Denver, Colorado, and he thinks that by the time Johnnie graduates, that he will be complete master of his profession. After Mr. Holmes had his radio installed, he invited a number of his neighbors and they were delighted to hear the different kinds of songs, music, speeches, etc., that were caught on the wire.
    Mrs. G. W. Averill of Butte Falls (Round Top) came out on horseback, about the only way she could come comfortably, to do some trading and took dinner at the Sunnyside. Also Roy Stanley and family who live here in town, but Mrs. Stanley is teaching the Brownsboro school although she has been so unwell as to be unable to meet her school this present week, so far March 10th.
    George B. Holmes and wife, the principal in our school and Rev. J. E. Day of Butte Falls were here for dinner the same day and Mr. E. Summer, civil engineer, who is in charge of the construction of the Butte Falls-Eagle Point Canal, and O. Adams, also of Butte Falls, were here overnight.
    Among the diners here Tuesday were Mr. H. L. Heryford, Chris Beale, Ralph Cowgill, chief engineer on the canal, Fred Pettegrew, secretary of the canal company and Mrs. Miles of Butte Falls and M. M. Willits of the Union Oil Company, California of Medford. Mr. Willits is of the old pioneer stock of Jackson County, being a son of W. W. Willits of Persist, who has resided on his homestead ever since he and his wife, and I think that she was a daughter of Mr. Wrisley, a pioneer of Central Point, were married and they have raised their family and are now grandparents.
    C. R. Stewart, with J. B. Calt Co., New York City, carbide lighting and cooking system, and Henry Morgan of Persist, came in and spent the night and so did George Trusty of Elk Creek. Mr. Stewart engaged room and board and intended to canvass the country out east and north of here, but was unexpectedly called Wednesday afternoon to Grants Pass, but expects to return the first of the week.
    The following report was handed in but too late for my Wednesday's letter. Mrs. Mittelstaedt and Mrs. A. R. MacDonald entertained twenty-three of the members of the Civic Improvement Club at the home of the former Thursday, March 1. The fair committee had a meeting following the regular business meeting, at which it was decided to fence the city park, the park committee made a report of the work in the park, after which a dainty two-course lunch was served by the hostess.
    Lyle and J. Harry Carlton, George Daley, Jr., and Sam Vestal were business callers Wednesday, and Mrs. L. H. Swink of Butte Falls came out on the Butte Falls stage and took dinner at the Sunnyside the same day. William H. Brown, one of our popular merchants, and B. H. Williams, San Francisco, Calif., representing Dinkelspiel Co., Inc., and Earl W. Moore, salesman for Mason Motor Co., selling Star and Durant cars, were here for dinner Wednesday. Mr. A. Anderson of San Francisco came in from Butte Falls Friday noon and took dinner and so did Chris Johnson, who is working on the new Rocky Hill road for Wm. von der Hellen and reports that they are getting along very nicely with the job and that it will be completed by the first of June.
    In my rounds Friday I met Mrs. Frank Lewis, who was confined to her room at her daughter's, Mrs. Ted Wick, in Medford for several weeks and was brought out home about the first of January, and she said that that was the first time that she had been out in town since she came home, and she showed the effect of her long confinement, but says she feels quite well now and her many friends hope that she will soon regain her normal strength.
    In my meanderings yesterday, a friend of mine, Mr. F. J. McPherson, handed me a subscription to the Mail Tribune that had been left with him by one of his customers, Mr. Huson, the foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard, for his father-in-law, H. W. Ward, who lives above him on Butte Creek, and this Saturday morning I met our blacksmith W. L. Childreth and he renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune for another year and today we had some friends call and one of them was from Portland and he remarked that the first thing he looked for in the Mail Tribune was the Eaglets and a lady asked why I did not write oftener and I referred her to the editor and another explained that she liked to see the names of the people who come and go, as she knew so many of them although they came from the "four corners of the earth."
    T. Nichols, one of our popular merchants, is having a radio put up in his residence.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1923, page 6


STRYCHNINE SAVES PAT DAILEY FROM DEATH ON TRIP
    Patrick L. Daily, district game warden of Jackson County, is at the Community Hospital recovering from a very serious attack of ptomaine poisoning, and owes his life to having had some emergency strychnine tablets in his pockets which he swallowed just before becoming delirious.
    Mr. Daily in the course of his duties far up the Rogue River late last Tuesday started for home in his car and then decided to stop at Kelley's Island and eat a meal, before continuing his journey. After eating some canned food along with other edibles he became very ill--so sick he could not leave.
    Becoming worse he swallowed the tablets which he always carries in case he should run across some coyotes swimming in the river, and made himself as comfortable as possible, lying down. All that night, whenever rational, Pat expected almost every minute to be his last, and ever and anon kept repeating his Elks' oath--too sick to think of anything else eligious.
    Late Wednesday forenoon he had recovered sufficiently so that by exerting all his will power he feebly entered his car and drove to this city, where he was at once taken to the hospital and attended by physicians. This noon he was reported out of danger.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1923, page 6


POST OFFICE AT TRAIL ENLARGED AND REMODELED
    TRAIL, Mar. 15--Mr. Ash is remodeling and enlarging his post office this week, getting ready for the daily mail route to Prospect from Trail.
    Mr. James and Mr. Anderson of Portland were looking after mining interests near Trail Saturday.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher had as Sunday guests Mr. and Mrs. W. T. Houston, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher, the Misses Gwen Houston, Mickey Davis and Clara Geary, Mrs. Geary and little grandson, and Mr. Rose.
    Keva Hutchinson spent the weekend with his parents at the B-8 [ranch].
    Mrs. Clara Blaess and Mrs. Lewis Blaess are visiting friends along the Rogue this week.
    We are very sorry to hear Mrs. W. Houston's granddaughter, Doris Richardson of Central Point, is in the Sacred Heart Hospital to undergo an operation, and all hope for a speedy recovery.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher, the latter's sister Gwen Houston and Miss Mickey Davis spent the weekend with their parents near Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison, Miss Mae Mordoff and Irma Ash were very pleasantly entertained at the Watson home Sunday. The chicken dinner, ice cream, and lovely homemade candy for which Mrs. Watson is noted was greatly enjoyed.
    F. Sturgis, Mr. Sandry, D. Pence, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart. Mr. and Mrs. Hutchison, Mrs. Middlebusher were Medford visitors Saturday.
    Irwin Howe and Clarence Whitley visited the Hayes sawmill on Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. D. Foellers are visiting at the Zimmerlee home this week.
    Quite a crowd from Trail attended the dance at Hoskin's Saturday evening and report a very nice time.
    Miss Minnie Poole was home from Medford for the weekend.
    Mrs. R. M. Cushman returned home Friday from Gold Hill where she has been visiting her daughters, Mrs. J. Roe, Mrs. J. Hall and Mrs. Edmondson.
    Mr. and Mrs. Graham and little son and Mr. Davis of Elk Creek motored to Medford Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1923, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. H. Isbel, Benjamin Brophy and wife, Mrs. Walter Marshall of Brownsboro were among the farmers who were patronizing our popular merchant, Fred McPherson, the last of the week.
    J. Frank Guerin of Portland, a nephew of the three Brown brothers of the firm of Geo. Brown and sons, was here the last of the week visiting the three brothers and their sisters, Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy and other relatives. Mr. Guerin is in the employ of the Southern Pacific Company and makes his headquarters in Portland, but travels a good part of his time.
    Sergeant L. Richardson of the U.S. Marine Corps of Seattle, Washington, and Theodore R. Florey of Portland, son of our late lamented ex-postmaster, J.P., etc. A. J. Florey, also one of the veterans of the Civil War and Theo's sister, Mrs. Floy von der Hellen and her daughter Miss Joyce [were] at the Sunnyside Hotel last Saturday. Mr. Florey is agent for the Commercial Co., Portland. Harold Anderson of Medford, Oscar Hansen and his brother, Carl Hansen, were also here for dinner and remained for supper, bed, breakfast and dinner Sunday and at noon were joined by two of their neighbors from Climax at dinner, Mr. Walter Charley and Ed Holman. Mr. Charley and the Hansen brothers are interested in the sawmill business near Climax and are putting up a new sawmill and report that they have a contract to cut two hundred and fifty thousand feet of lumber for the Hartman Company, who are developing a shale mining property a few miles above their mill. They report that the shale is very rich with petroleum, that they have already two steam shovels on the way and have a quantity of pipe and two retorts on the way and are planning to lay pipes from there to the nearest railroad. They seemed to think that the terminus will be about Agate or possibly Eagle Point, as they can procure a water grade from the mills to the railroad here. They already have a small force of men at work opening up the mine and getting ready for the steam shovels. Specimens of the rock are at the store of George Brown & Sons, and those who have tested it say that it burns quite freely. If it proves to be as good as the three men, the Hansens and Walter Charley seem to think it is, it will be a boom for Jackson County.
    Among others who were here for dinner Sunday were Earl Miles and George Albert of Butte Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Nate Bates, Mr. and Mrs. Jean Haskins and daughter Jeanette, and Elma Reid, all of Ashland; Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley and his brother Glenn and wife of Gold Hill, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Speck, Medford, besides several of our neighbors who call in quite frequently.
    Fred J. McPherson reports that D. L. Immerly and W. S. Smith of Trail, A. C. Radcliffe, Eagle Point, Jasper Hanna of near Trail and Herb Carlton, Wellen, were patronizing his store Saturday.
    Among the business callers Monday were J. H. Steele, who has moved into the James Jordan house with Mr. and Mrs. Cahill, A. G. Bishop, one of our leading orchardists, a part owner of the celebrated Ringwood orchard, west of here, R. A. Petty, who is on the Vermeren farm, John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard and Miss Inez Willits of Persist, one of our popular school teachers.
    Moses D. Vimard, agency manager of the American Central Life Insurance Company, and C. O. Thomas, associate representative, with offices in Medford, Oregon, were here for dinner Monday.
    Among the business callers Monday were C. E. Bellows, wife and baby and Mrs. Robert McCabe, Mr. Barney Goade, who has a homestead of Reese Creek. Ralph Bieberstedt was in with a team, getting lumber of George Brown and sons. Wm. Pruett of Wellen was getting gas of our popular hardware merchant, Ashpole and Nichols, and Roy Ashpole reports that Frank Hill of Derby had been in trading and also Pete Betz and wife, Charles Fallon and Charles Dexter of Trail; Wm. Merritt of Reese Creek; Chris Edler, Lake Creek; Lon and Henry Tonn, Thomas Vestal and family, Mrs. Boyen and Wm. Massiar of Reese Creek.
    Mr. H. G. Smith, proprietor of the Holland Hotel, Medford, was a business caller. I met him in the Brownsboro store and later he called on business at the Sunnyside, but I was out trying to rustle Eaglets for the readers of the Mail Tribune.
    Tuesday morning I met Oscar Higinbotham of Gold Hill in the McPherson store and about the same time I met Rube Johnson, one of our land owners and capitalists, and Mr. R. W. Ruse of Medford was also a business caller.
    H. C. Galey of Ashland, agent for the Mutual Life Insurance Co., came in Tuesday for dinner, canvassed our town, took supper, worked until bed time and then went home, Mrs. Israel Patton and son, Harold of Butte Falls came out on the stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on out to Ashland, Custer Brown of Derby was also here for dinner and went out to Medford. H. B. Shelby of the Baker-Hamilton and Pacific Co., San Francisco, Cal., and M. M. Willits of the Union Oil Company, California, were here for dinner Wednesday and so was Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Swink of Butte Falls. They came out on the stage and went out to Medford on their way to Yakima, Washington, where they intend to make their home. They will be greatly missed from Butte Falls as they have been in the mercantile business for some time, but sold out and went onto a homestead and now have sold out and went onto a homestead and now have sold out and are leaving many warm friends behind them in and around Butte Falls.
    Frank Lewis, our new hardware merchant, received a nice assortment of forks, rakes, etc., Tuesday.
    And now, in concluding this letter, I am sorry to have to announce to the many warm friends among the readers of the Eagle Point Eaglets that I am forced to desist from being a regular semi-weekly contributor to the Mail Tribune on account of my health, for it requires not only brain work, but a vast amount of muscle work, as well to gather, formulate and write, as I have been doing now for several years, about two columns a week for the criticisms by the public. And in concluding this letter I wish to extend my thanks to the many friends who have so ably assisted me in my labors in that time and also acknowledge the courtesies and encouragement I have received from the entire force connected with the Mail Tribune office. In all of my writing now for almost sixty-five years as a newspaper correspondent, I have scrupulously avoided writing anything that would offend anyone or mislead any. That I have made mistakes is natural, for they are unavoidable, but if I have caused anyone trouble or pain of mind, I ask them to remember that it is human to err, but divine to forgive. I don't say farewell, for if my health permits I expect to write occasionally for the readers of the Mail Tribune, for I love the work and realize that my work is appreciated, not only by the readers, but by the editor and publishers of the papers as well. So adieu for the present.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1923, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. F. D. Hill of Derby, and Owen Conover of Reese Creek were trading with our merchants Wednesday and the same day I met Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Abbott, and Mr. Abbott's father-in-law and wife in the McPherson store; they had been out to Central Point to attend the funeral of Mrs. O. R. Pankey, a near relative, who was buried the day before. I also met Charley Cingcade the same morning, Wednesday morning, at the same store getting seed potatoes, and the same afternoon I met Mrs. Thos. Cingcade and Mrs. M. L. Pruett, the latter was laying in a supply of gas and oil for her car, they were on their way to the meeting of the Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point, one of the most important organizations in this section of the county.
    Mr. A. C. Huson, the foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard, and Mr. Charles Drexler, and Mr. E. W. Frey, one of the prominent citizens of the Lake Creek country.
    Arthur Phillips, a young man who has been working for John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside and so did Miss Nettie Young, a traveling saleslady, who was taking orders for socks, ladies hose, etc., on a Portland firm.
    One of our regular visitors of Medford Fred Frideger, who has a twenty-acre orchard just outside of the town limits, came in Wednesday night and called for bed, etc.; he had returned from an extended trip back east, going by the way of Seattle, Vancouver, British Columbia, from here through that foreign country stopping off and visiting friends in Dakota, U.S.A., and going on to visit his mother in Ohio, taking a trip down to Florida and back home via the Southern Pacific route via Los Angeles, San Francisco, reaching his home in Medford Sunday, March 11th. I asked why he did not come through the Panama Canal and he said that he was not ready for that trip but intended the next time he went back to visit his mother to go thru the canal and take in all of the sights along the way. He reports that he had a very fine trip and seen some fine sights. And I predict that he will never regret the investment.
    W. H. Ward, the manager of what is known as the H. B. Tronson orchard, for it has changed hands having been taken over by a Portland firm, and I understand that the new owners are digging up all of the apple trees except a few right around the house and are planning to sow the land to alfalfa.
    Mr. Dewey Hill, who has been off in San Francisco for some time, came in on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Thursday and went on up to his father's near Derby. Mr. Hill informed me that Mr. and Mrs. James Grieve of Prospect, who have been spending the winter in Los Angeles, also returned to Medford at the same time.
    In my rounds Thursday, for when the sun shines and the weather is warm like it was Thursday, I feel pretty well and can go around quite well, I met one of our prosperous young men, Nick Young, and he looks the very picture of health and I often wonder why it is that some of our marriageable young women will let men of that class "keep batch" and they on the verge of becoming old maids.
    E. A. Hildreth, one of the deputy assessors, came in Thursday and engaged a room at the Sunnyside. He has finished up assessing the Butte Falls district and will soon start in assessing Eagle Point.
    Another prominent citizen I met Thursday was George W. Stowell, our chicken king. I asked how his hens were doing and he said that they were keeping them out of the poor house, but that it took a lot of mash and attention to keep them going. He had just bought a new Star truck to use in his business.
    Mrs. B. H. Bryant, Medford, and Mrs. E. V. Maddox of the Medford greenhouse came out Thursday to take dinner at the Sunnyside and to attend the meeting of the C.I.C. of Eagle Point. Mrs. Elmer Wilson of Medford came out with them to visit her sister, Mrs. George B. Holmes, the principal of our school.
    G. W. Medley and Henry Maust came out Thursday to connect the new garage of Eli Dahack and son, Everett, with the main electric wire and took dinner at the Sunnyside. They are in the employ of the California-Oregon Power Company. Ernest Dahack has installed a new electric automatic pump that does away with his old gas pump that has been an eyesore to the whole town for some time. It took half a day to get it started to pump.
    Mr. A. Monia of Brownsboro was in town Thursday with his team and Milton Cowley, also of Brownsboro, was a business caller and so was Charley Blaess of Elk Creek.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hanna, nee Anna Pankey, of Eugene has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Thomas Cingcade, the first of the week.
    Mrs. H. Hornby, nee Emma Matney, who was a girl sixty years ago, now a resident of British Columbia, called on us Thursday for a few moments. They were on their way home from Los Angeles, Calif., where they had been for Mr. Hanby's health.
    Charley Clark, one of the early settlers of this county but now of Chiloquin, Klamath County, came in and spent the night Thursday.
    In my next will try to give an account of the meeting of the C.I.C. of Eagle Point, as this letter is long enough.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 19, 1923, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. A. T. Poole, Miss Minnie Poole, Miss Clara Geary and Claude Ragsdale attended the dance at Harvey Morgan's near Persist, Saturday night. They report a very nice time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Middlebusher, Gwen Houston and Mickey Davis were Sunday guests at M. E. Middlebusher's.
    Little Wanda Howe had as guests on her birthday March 17th Miss Irma Ash and Wayne Ash.
    W. T. Houston is in the hospital at Medford as a result of a fall from a load of hay. We are glad to hear he is getting along all right at this writing.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wallace Cushman and little son Everett and Mrs. Mary Warner were Sunday visitors at the Dawson home.
    Mrs. R. D. Watson and Mrs. T. C. Gaines were Trail visitors Thursday.
    Mrs. Davis and son Ray motored to Prospect Saturday.
    Claude Ragsdale returned home this week from Corvallis where he has been attending forestry school.
    The Messrs. Christosen and Dale and Miss Mae Mordoff spent the weekend at their homes in Medford.
    A. T. Poole is cruising timber this week on Elk Creek.
    Miss Bernice Phillips accompanied by her brother Lester left last week for Springfield, Ore., to visit a brother and family.
    Miss Velma Whetlatch, Miss Edith Campbell, Wesley Pruett and Keva Hutchinson of Medford spent Sunday with Keva's parents at the Bar-8 ranch.
    S. Emery spent the weekend with his family on the Applegate.
    Rev. Dodge of the Free Methodist Church held quarterly meeting at the Elk Creek school house Sunday.
    Mr. Dunn, the surveyor who has charge of the construction work on the piece of road between McLeod and Cascade Gorge, was in this vicinity last week looking over the work to be done. We understand the work will begin soon.
    The people above Trail, along the river, are enjoying the daily mail service now.
    Mrs. Chas. Blaess is again on the sick list.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 23, 1923, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I found that before I reached the principal event of the day Thursday that my letter had already reached the usual limit, a column, so I will simply start off where I left off and resume the incidents of that day, for it was a beautiful day and I felt about twenty years younger than I did when I wrote that blue letter and spoke of throwing up the job of writing the Eagle Point Eaglets.
    It had been arranged among the members of the Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point to hold their meeting at the Sunnyside Hotel on Thursday afternoon, March 15th, 2:30, under the management of Mrs. Tedrick and the hostess of the hotel and by a little after noon the ladies commenced to come in, and through the kindness of the secretary of the club I was furnished with the following list of the members who were in attendance: Mrs. Seaman, Mrs. A. J. Florey, Mrs. Ashpole, Mrs. Clements, Mrs. M. L. Pruett, Mesdames S. B. Holmes, A. R. McDonald, J. W. Smith, W. H. Brown, B. H Bryant, E. V. Maddox, both of Medford; M. S. Wood, Roy Smith, Lottie Van Scoy, Weidman, Fred Pettegrew, Amy Brown Tedwick, H. E. Campbell, Thos. Cingcade, Lizzie Perry, John Rader, Gus Nichols, Lucius Kincaid, Mrs. Reid, Charley, Denton, Roy Stanley, Miss Ruth Wiley, Mrs. Geo. B. Holmes and Mrs. Elmer Wilson, thirty-one members besides five small children, and during the festivities of the afternoon Mrs. Campbell took photos of the babies.
    After spending a few hours in a social way the meeting was called to order by the president, Mrs. Campbell, and the record of the meeting was read and approved and at the close the members and visitors were invited to the dining room where a lunch was spread. My reporters says a lovely luncheon was served by the hostess and at the close it was announced that on the next day your scribe would be ninety-one years old, and congratulations were given and received from the entire company of warm friends.
    There was a truckload of powder came out for C. H. Natwick to be used on his contract on the Butte Falls-Eagle Point Canal.
    Shorty Allen of Wellen was a business caller Thursday and so was Frank Simpson and E. O. Hildreth. The two spent the night at the Sunnyside and Mr. Hildreth, being a deputy assessor, engaged a room while he is assessing this part of the country.
    There has been another change made in the mail routes; now instead of the Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage taking the Prospect mail and having to wait until the carrier arrives at Derby the mail is sent from here direct to Prospect via Trail and the man from Prospect comes to Trail and thus relieves the Eagle Point-Butte Falls carrier of the bother of having to wait until the Prospect man wallows through the mud and snow for him to make the trip.
    Mrs. O. M. Goss of Butte Falls, who has been visiting friends in Fresno, Calif., came in on the stage Saturday on her way home. George Laidley and Harold Patten were also on the stage on their way to Butte Falls.
    The Brown firm report that G. E. Neuber of Medford, who has a homestead in the Butte Falls country, called and laid in a supply of groceries to take up to his homestead. I also met W. H. Crandall at Brown's the same day.
    Among the people from the country trading with Ashpole and Nichols hardware were Robert Rose, Ralph Bieberstedt, L. K. Hawk, F. G. Ayres and wife, Alex Anderson, Brownsboro, W. E. Morgan and wife, Trail, and the same day I met Wm. Holman, wife and baby, of Salt Creek, and Mrs. T. T. Taylor of Lake Creek and Clifford Hickson of Ashland.
    Among the callers Saturday for dinner were Ralph Cowgill and another civil engineer, J. W. Cunningham of Portland, representatives of the purchasers of the bonds of the Eagle Point Irrigation District. C. Frey of Lake Creek was also a business caller.
    Among the callers Sunday were Mrs. C. J. Frey, J. L. Bell, C. F. Bell, all of Medford, and Mrs. Wallace of Everett, Wash., Gus Newbury and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Feldman, R. H. Hubbs and wife, Charles E. Terrill, wife and son Glen and Mrs. L. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Farrar, Wm. Berry and wife, and for supper James Taylor of the Valley Fuel Co., and wife, Mrs. Romley and Miss Dunham, all of Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Boraker, who are living in the W. P. Morgan house, had a birthday party, it being his 53rd birthday. There were about thirty people there and among them were the Stilles, the Coghills, the Hannafords, who came to that neighborhood last fall at the same time he did. He reports that they had a very pleasant time, all being acquainted.
    At the last meeting of the town council an ordinance was introduced and considered regulating the speed of automobiles and other motor vehicles, also regulating the speed that horses may be rode or driven on the streets; also considering an ordinance establishing a curfew.
    W. E. Boraker gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. R. Muskopf, a citizen of our town, who has been working in the neighborhood of Butte Falls, has gone to Klamath Falls to seek employment, as the climate of Butte Falls does not seem to agree with him, the altitude being too high for him. We dislike the idea of losing so valuable a family as that of Mr. and Mrs. Muskopf, but such is fate.
    Among the business callers Tuesday were Dick Johnson, Reese Creek. I also met Mr. and Mrs. H. U. Ellis of Derby, they are located on a farm near Derby. I also met Mrs. Fred Dutton, the wife of one of our hustling farmers, who married one of our neighbor girls a few years ago and since then, by their industry, has managed to secure a nice band of cattle and other stock, and the result is they are counted among the good livers in the community. Fred Waterbury, a young man who is living with them, came in with Mrs. Dutton. I also met Mr. C. B. Hutchinson. He came in to bring in a lot of eggs. He is in charge of the Frank Rhodes ranch and reports that he is getting thirty-three and a third dozen eggs a day and that he received a shipment of 100 little chicks a few days ago.
    George B. Brown, one of the prosperous farmers and stockmen of Brownsboro, was also a business caller Tuesday. He is interested in thoroughbred stock, and I am glad to be able to state that it is now a common thing among the farmers and stockmen to find them turning their attention to the improvement of their stock of all kinds, especially among their cattle, hogs and poultry, doing away with the old razorback hogs that required two years to grow large enough to market and the old dunghill breed of hens and keeping something that will lay, instead of a dozen eggs and then set and if the eggs are taken from under her, will set for another month on a piece of white china, for a breed that will lay forty or fifty eggs and stop laying and rest a few days and go to laying again.
    Lester Bradshaw and his mother, Mrs. D. Bradshaw, were also here trading with our merchants Tuesday.
    F. L. Terrill, who is located on the Bell ranch (the old sheep ranch) about a mile east of the Agate station, was trading with one of our popular merchants Wednesday, and reports that his wheat is looking fine. He had brought his gang plow in for repairs.
    H. B. Thompson, former owner of one of the orchards just above our town, was a caller of F. J. McPherson Wednesday.
    J. L. Harvey, the foreman on the Alta Vista orchard, was a business caller Thursday and reports the prospect fine for a big fruit crop, as the cold nights are keeping the blossoms back so as to miss the late frosts in April, May and sometimes in June.
    D. L. Zimmerlee of Trail was also a business caller on the McPherson store. I also met the same day H. J. Oden of Talent. He had come in with a truckload of goats and said that the man they were for was to meet him here Thursday morning, but didn't know his name, and had forgotten the man's name who sent them, but when he arrived here and stopped his truck in the street, failed to find anyone to receive them, and up to eleven forty-five a.m., the truck was still standing in the street, and no claimant, but before I got back from dinner the truck, goats and men was gone so I did not learn who sold them or who bought them. It looked like a slack way of doing business to send a man off with a truck of goats without giving him the name of the man who was to receive them, and for the truck driver to be ignorant of the man's name who sent them, but it may be all right if it ends well.
    I also met the same day Mr. Tobe Stone and his two nephews, Robert and Harry Stone of Jacksonville. They had started for Butte Falls to try to get employment.
    I also met one of the early pioneers of Jacksonville, Mr. Thomas Riley, one of our prosperous farmers and dairymen, located on his fine farm on Antelope Creek.
    I also met Mrs. B. L. Kingery, who is living on one of her father's, James Culbertson's, farms near Wellen. I also met Mr. J. Gabric [Fabrick?], Medford and Mr. Dan Seavale, Butte Falls. They were here for dinner. I also met Mr. Frank Sunderstrom of Butte Falls and Burnett Gusdner and R. Gusdner of Salt Creek (Lake Creek).
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Huckson of Ashland were here for dinner.
    Mike Hickelbery was also a business caller on Geo. Brown & Sons Wednesday.
    F. W. Walker, one of the section foremen on the Brownlee-Olds (Pacific & Eastern) railway, was taking a layoff Wednesday, as he was not enjoying his usual health, and in the run of conversation gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun. Since I wrote that letter of March 17, in which I state that I would have to give up the job of gathering and writing the Eagle Point Eaglets, I have found such a strong protest coming from the readers that I have decided to try to keep at it for a while at least, although sometimes after I have made my rounds of the business part of the town and go into first one place of business and then another, and see no one from the country and inquire, "Is there anything new today," and the reply is "nothing doing," it makes me feel a little discouraged, but then I have the promise of help in that line, as some of the business men and women have promised to help me, and some of them have helped me very much already, for which I am very thankful.
    George W. Averill, who has a homestead on the north side of Round Top, near the railroad track, came out and went to Medford to look after a carload of wood he had shipped out on the railroad and came out to the Sunnyside and spent the night on his way home.
    Thomas Riley, son of Joe Riley, whose home is on the Crater Lake Highway near the Antelope bridge, was in town Thursday. He is hauling lumber for cross arms for our telephone manager, W. C. Clements, from the Hayes sawmill on Long Branch.
    Mrs. A. C. Radcliffe was here trading and reports that her husband, who was badly hurt some months ago, is improving so that he can go around a little, but improves very slowly.
    Among the diners Thursday noon were W. C. Clements, Harold Van Scoy, our popular mail carrier on the Medford-Butte Falls route, C. A. Pickle, the meter reader for the California & Oregon Power Co., and A. J. Free [Florey?], who has been working at Butte Falls, but was hunting for a softer and better job.
    Roy Ashpole of the hardware firm of Ashpole and Nichols reports that Gus Ditsworth, W. P. Morgan, Milan Caseley, R. Hulse, Herman Meyer and John Greb were among the business callers Thursday.
    E. V. Brittsan, wife and three sons were trading with F. J. McPherson Thursday and F. M. Amy and Geo. W. Paine with O.&C. Seed Co., Medford, were here for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 28, 1923 page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Pete Young, one of our prosperous farmers, who lives on his own farm a short distance below here, was a business caller the latter part of the past week.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Dennis, who are on the Grant Mathews farm, came in to bring in Mr. and Mrs. Birch of Glendale, who had been out visiting them. Mr. Birch is one of the conductors on the S.P. railroad.
    Mrs. W. C. Daley and her daughter, Mrs. Myrtle von der Hellen, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Thursday. Mrs. Daley is somewhat aged and in poor health owing to a serious accident she met with several years ago when she was thrown from a horse and badly hurt, and her many friends were pleased to see her able to ride out and visit some of her old friends. And I notice that Mrs. von der Hellen has purchased a fine new car, a Durant.
    R. A. Petty, one of our prosperous farmers, was a business caller Thursday.
    Mrs. L. E. Hinman and her daughter Mrs. E. R. Van Leeuwen of Medford, came out Friday to take dinner and to bid us farewell.
    Mrs. Van Leeuwen said that she had her things all packed and expected to start the first of this week to join her husband in Riverton, New Jersey, who is in charge of the Japanese Beetle Laboratory in interest of U.S. Department of Agriculture. Mrs. Van Leeuwen will be greatly missed by her host of friends, not only in Medford where she was in business at the time of her marriage, but by a large circle of friends outside of Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Fuson, life insurance agents, were out Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Marsh Garrett, one of our big stock men, was a business caller the same day.
    Carl Stanley went to Prospect to arrange the Wm. von der Hellen camp so that he can start up operations on his contract on the Crater Lake Highway again.
    Alvin Conover, wife and two boys were trading with our popular merchant, Fred McPherson, Saturday, and Mrs. Conover promised me that she would subscribe for the Mail Tribune in the near future. Rube Johnson, W. H. Isbel of Reese Creek, T. E. Clark and F. R. Frey of Lake Creek were also trading with him the same day.
    Wert Pool, another one of our farmers, and W. H. Crandall, a prominent orchardist, were here. He brought in a nice lot of dressed turkeys, leaving a couple at the Sunnyside. George Givan, another one of our farmers, was in town on business. I asked him how his cows and chickens were doing and he replied that they only had about three hundred hens and a few cows but they managed to keep them out of the poor house. A few hundred such men as the Givans, Stowells, French, Bellews, Brittsan Bros., and a lot more I could mention in these parts will soon build up a community.
    The contractors on the canal and the laterals have about all resumed work and the result is that business is not so lively as it might be, as most of the men are at work, but when the water comes business will boom and Eagle Point district will be plainly seen on the map.
    Mrs. E. G. Riddell of Santa Barbara, Calif., and Mrs. G. A. Gitzen of Medford, two daughters of our soft drink man and grocery and hardware merchant, Frank Lewis, were out here visiting their parents Saturday. Mrs. Riddell only made a very short visit, two or three days, returning to her home Saturday night.
    Thomas McCabe and son came out on the stage Saturday and went on up to the McCabe ranch the same afternoon.
    Mrs. Robert Harnish and Mrs. Joe Moomaw motored to Medford last Tuesday.
    J. H. Carlton, one of the contractors on the laterals from the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Canal, was a business caller Sunday and so was Lois Martin; he was giving Mr. Carlton some pointers on the use of the different kinds of powder in blasting work in his work on the laterals, as he is considered an expert in that line of business.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. I Stuart and son Gilbert of Medford were among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday. They are among the contractors on the concrete bridge work; H. E. Campbell and wife and Rev. G. N. Edwards, the traveling Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church in Oregon, and preached here Sunday forenoon, returning to Medford Sunday afternoon; Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Trowbridge and Mr. and Mrs. John Perl, our popular coroner, and J. A. Perry and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Montgomery, the S.P. railroad agent of Medford, Lucius Kincaid and wife, the contractor who is carrying the mail from here to Persist, and A. J. Florey and wife were here for dinner.
    We also had a very interesting meeting with one of the clubs of the Presbyterian Church of Medford. It appears that there are two of them organized to go out into the outlying districts where they have little or no religious services and one of them go out one place and the other, another, wherever there seems to be an opening. There was a large congregation out and we were favored with some fine instrumental and vocal music and three very interesting talks, one by Ed Gore, who presided and read a scripture lesson and commented on it, and one by Frank Smith, who told what a desperate fight he had before he succeeded in coming off victorious over the terrible curse, the liquor habit; how his Christian wife stayed with him and prayed with and for him and after he had by the grace of God finally succeeded, how she encouraged him and bore him up at the throne of peace until now he is able to fight the battle alone with God's assistance, as he has lost his wife and now he is warning the young against the fearful consequences of the habit.
    The other two members were Dr. Elliott and D. L. Steiner, each of them taking an active part, but as I did not know either of them do not know what part each one took. They will receive a cordial welcome whenever they will favor us with another visit.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1923, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Wm. Holmes of Lake Creek was among the passengers on the stages. She had been out to Medford visiting with friends and was on her way home, taking passage on the Lake Creek stage.
    Charlie Humphrey and wife of Derby came out with a load of wool last Monday but failed to dispose of it here as everyone seemed to have a supply on hand, so they went on out to Medford with it.
    E. A. Hildreth of Butte Falls, our deputy assessor, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage on his way home.
    R. W. Rose, the noted hunter and trapper of the Round Top country, was a business caller on Fred McPherson, our popular merchant, and I understand that he succeeded in capturing forty-five coyotes during the past winter besides several bears and other kinds of game. I understand that he keeps ten or twelve dogs to assist him in his work. I met him last Monday in the store but he was in a hurry to get back home and consequently did not have the time to spare to talk to a news reporter. Among others I met the same day were George Klingle of Lake Creek. Miss Neda Marshall, Earl Croft and Henry Carrier, they were doing some work for J. H. Cooley on his orchard and came to the Sunnyside for dinner.
    F. Hill, Mrs. Walter Marshall and Mrs. Joe Arnes were also business callers the same day. Mrs. G. R. Satchwell and Mrs. Rose Schieffelin of Medford were here for dinner the same day.
    J. W. Miller of Elk Creek and Thomas Culler were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and Mr. Miller went on up home on the Persist stage and Mr. Culler went on to Butte Falls to visit the Summerville family.
    G. W. Kincaid and wife of Roseburg, the father and mother of our mail carrier from here to Persist, are here at this writing, Thursday, and they made a trip from here to Trail with their son today. They expect to start home the last of the week. While in the county they visited Ashland, as they are on a deal to trade for Ashland property as he is like hundreds of others who have lived here before who think that Jackson County is the banner county of the coast.
    Gus and Fritz Pech and George Toner of Lake Creek motored into town Wednesday and went on out to Medford. Gus said that he was going to Medford to get a registered Durham bull. He is another progressive farmer and stockman who believes in improving the stock. Anton Ring of Elk Creek also motored into town on a three-wheeled motorcycle. He had been out to Medford to dispose of a lot of furs he had taken the past winter.
    I received a note from Mrs. A. B. Clarno Wednesday notifying me of the death of her brother, William Gipson, formerly a resident of this section, Reese Creek, although he was at the time of his death a resident of Lower Lake, Lake County, California. He was the victim of an automobile accident while out riding with his family. His wife [and] stepson were also injured. He died March 21, 1923.
    As I came down from my room where I had been writing the Eaglets for Friday's paper, Wednesday, when I reached the dining room door I glanced over the dinner table and discovered that there were thirteen persons already seated and soon saw that they were too busy to be bothered with a news reporter, and I could not see who they were, but later learned that among them were H. L. Heryford and his mother, Mrs. M. L. Heryford of Butte Falls, who had come out with a team on their way to Jacksonville. He is the road supervisor of the Butte Falls road district and was on his way to Jacksonville; and his mother came out on the stage and went on out to Medford on the stage after eating dinner and resting until 2:45 p.m., but Mr. Heryford had one of his horses shod here and spent the night. B. W. Paul of the Medford electric store, and B. M. Bush of Medford, George Wehman, the bookkeeper for Wm. von der Hellen, who has been on the canal job and the contract for grading the Rocky Hill road; also a stranger and wife, and the rest I did not know except some of our neighbors who come in quite often for their meals, and among them was one of our old neighbors, Sam H. Harnish. Since his son Robert has bought a house of his own in Medford and moved his family there the father has taken several meals with us.
    Millard Robison and Alex Betz came in Wednesday with a part of a grader to have our blacksmith straighten a warped part, and he soon had it in shape again and they hurried back to work. Alex Vestal of Reese Creek was also a business caller Wednesday.
    I met L. F. Farlow and Lew Walch of Lake Creek and J. R. Linn, our school clerk, in the Ernest Dahack barber shop last Wednesday, all waiting to be served, and in the run of conversation Mr. Linn brought up the subject of the high school question, and expressed his opinion quite freely with regard to why we should have a union high school here in Eagle Point, as there are about nine or ten school districts lying right around us that could be brought into the union high school here and save the expense of the transportation of some eight or nine children from here to Medford at an annual expense of fourteen hundred dollars that this district is paying out now besides the fifty dollars per high school pupil that each child draws from the state, and another item of about a thousand dollars a year that we are, as a district, turning into the Medford high school fund each year, but I will probably have more to say on that subject later.
    W. G. Pierce, the chief machinist for Hubbard Bros., was among the business callers and so was G. A. Gitzen, a veterinary of Medford.
    Miss Edna Wisely and Miss Beth Farlow of the teachers training course of Medford high school were out taking a course in our school during the past week.
    Ray Ulrich of the Associated Oil Co. was out delivering gasoline for our new garage men, the Dahacks, Thursday.
    Mrs. Ella G. Barnes of Seattle, who has been visiting her cousin, Frank Hill of Derby, for some time, came out Thursday on the stage and took dinner at the Sunnyside on her way to her home. While here she gave me a subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune for three months, for her cousin, F. D. Hill of Derby.
    J. B. Jackson of Butte Falls, wife, son-in-law, Harry Young and wife of Yakima, Wash., were among the diners also Thursday. I also met Miss Nellie Butler Friday who lives with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Butler of Brownsboro road. Mr. George Salisbury of the Medford Center Market was out delivering meat to the people of Eagle Point and vicinity, and A. Stephenson of the Medford Grocery Co. were here for dinner the same day.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1923, page 5


BUTTE CREEK
    We have a very hard hail storm up here the 2nd of April, but no damage resulted.
    We have another point toward a standard school. We received our new flag last week.
    We are practicing hard in order to take part in the track meet that is to be held at Talent May 4th.
    Our school when to Brownsboro Friday and won eight games out of nine.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw went to town Saturday.
    Claus and Leland Charley went down to the ball game at Eagle Point Sunday.
    Jacob Monia has been ill with the flu. Mrs. Mary Charley has also been sick with the flu.
    Alex Anderson has moved his sheep down to Eagle Point in Frank Brown's pasture.
    Mr. Anderson went to Dry Creek to visit her cousin.
    Miss Lavern Brown and Miss Ester Turnbow came down from Butte Falls to spend Easter with Mr. and Mrs. George Brown and family.
    The Brown children went to Alex Anderson's Easter Sunday and they had an Easter egg hunt.
    We are sorry Mr. and Mrs. Hulse are leaving our vicinity. They have moved to Medford.
    A surprise party was given in honor of Mrs. Mary Charley at Emogene Charley's Friday eve, Mar. 9, it being Mary's 22nd birthday. Games were played until 2 o'clock. Everyone had a fine time and wished Mary many happy returns of the day.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 6, 1923, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Eagle Point Civic Club met at the home of Mrs. M. L. Pruett March 27 and after transacting the usual order of business and receiving the report of the committees partook of a delicious lunch. The committee have had the posts set and painted enclosing our town park and it is all ready for the wire fencing.
    Friday I met Mrs. J. T. Gibson of Ashland, daughter of Mrs. Gus Nicholas, who is here visiting her mother.
    Cliff Hickson and wife of Ashland have moved into the house with Sam Harnish, and Cliff will work for him and Mrs. Hickson will attend to the housekeeping department.
    Friday afternoon the Parent-Teachers Association met in the principal's room in our school house and was presided over by Mrs. R. A. Weidman, and after the reading of the minutes of the last meeting was read and approved Mrs. Glen Fabrick of Medford was introduced and favored us with a very interesting and instructive lecture on the necessity and importance of a union high school here in Eagle Point and by way of introduction spoke of the wonderful growth of the Medford high school and of the crowded condition of the school, as the building was only planned to accommodate 250 and that enrollment was now over 500, and that the school board had rented several available places in different parts of the city to be used as recitation rooms. She then told of the necessity of parents taking an interest in school work and in so doing they would encourage the teachers and thus cause the children to take a pride in their schools. She spoke of the advantage of attending and taking part in the Parent-Teachers' Association and of the amount of good that was being done through the association and how they in Medford had labored when there was but a very few who took any interest in the cause, but how the few kept on persisting until now the membership has gone up into hundreds and how they had become a power in the advancement of the cause of education and how the members were working, not only for the betterment of the schools, but for the improvement of the morals of the children in attendance by trying to induce them to read better literature and even gone so far as to try to induce the book and magazine sellers to dispense with the objectionable books and papers of questionable moral influence and help to bring their minds to a higher standard. She also spoke in strong terms of the necessity of a union high school in Eagle Point. But I see I am taking up too much space with Mrs. Fabrick's lecture, but will say that it was as fine a lecture as has ever been delivered in Eagle Point, is the universal decision of the large audience that filled the room, composed entirely of women, except two men beside myself, and when speaking to some of the men on the street about what they missed by their absence, said "Why I thought that these meetings were only for the women," just as though the fathers of the children were not included among the parents.
    Mrs B. H. Bryant of Medford was then introduced and she gave us a short but interesting talk on the subject of an entertainment that is being given by the Medford Parent-Teacher Association and proposed to the association here to have them come out here and give it for the benefit of our Parent-Teacher Association and it was decided by a unanimous vote to invite them to come out April 14 in the opera house at 8 o'clock p.m., and in behalf of the Eagle Point association I invite every man, woman and child to come.
    Mr. J. R. Linn, our school clerk, was introduced and gave us a short talk on the subject of having a union high school here, showing on a map he exhibited how our district is surrounded by some nine districts that could be brought into the union high school, increasing the valuation of the property to near a million dollars worth of taxable property so that, instead of this district turning over to Medford high school some three thousand dollars per year, that money could be used to pay teachers, [and] buy the necessary equipment for our high school. He also spoke of another decided advantage there will be, to have the children kept from the temptations there is in a city like Medford to have them "play hooky" and the parents cannot tell what kind of company they are in, making a strong plea for a union high school here on the ground of encouraging protection of morals and the general welfare of the entire community. The question was then put to the members of the association whether they were in favor of such a move and the motion carried unanimously in its favor, and since then I have talked with some of our leading business men who have not taken any interest in school affairs for the rule has been the last few years for about five or six to attend the annual school meeting and have everything be ruled by one or two persons, and they are planning to attend the next school meeting and take part and see that something was done to improve our school system.
    At the close of the discussion on that subject Miss Fern Daley of Medford was introduced and she gave us a very interesting talk describing a trip with five other young ladies to the Philippine Islands, telling of the manners and customs of the natives, how and what they ate, how they dressed, the scenery, etc., exhibiting a number of pictures, but she was so limited for time that she was forced to talk as fast as she could and then in showing the pictures only could hand them out to the audience to be passed around.
    There was nothing of special interest occurred Saturday that came to my notice and Sunday either. There was quite a number of people come in for dinner, among whom were James D. Ball, Charles F. Ball, Charles J. Fry, Mrs. Charles J. Fry, all of Medford, and Mrs. L. B. Wallace of Everett, Washington. A. H. Hubbs and wife, the shoe dealers of Medford; Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Conger, one of the leading undertakers of Medford and Mr. and Mrs. Ray Moran and child, Mr. and Mrs. Brophy, Medford and Sylvia Hukill and Nate Johnson of Wellen; E. E. Gore, wife and three children, Beulah, Rose and Dorothy and Miss Ida C. Robinson and I. A. Holmback of Medford, Wm. L. Wright and Geo. Stacy.
    Mrs. Reid, one of our neighbors, lost a brown velvet handbag on the Cingcade hill on Thursday, March 29.
    My letter is now too long, but I will have to stop for this time and rest until Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 7, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last letter I announced that there would be an entertainment given here in the opera house on the 14th inst., but since that was written and mailed Wednesday afternoon I have received a note from the president of the Parent-Teachers Association notifying me that the Parent-Teachers Association of Medford would give the entertainment on Friday, April 13th at 8 o'clock p.m. Tell your friends to come and come yourself and bring the children and have a good old-fashioned good time. Don't forget the date, April 13th 1923.
    Last Monday H. G. Wimer of San Francisco, formerly of this place, having charge of the lumber yard in the days of the Butte Falls Lumber Co., came in and is stopping with Wert Pool and J. L. Hovey, superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, and reports that Mrs. Lydia Arnold of Hood River is staying at the Alta Vista orchard for a few weeks, being an old friend of his. Other business callers the same day were Charlie Humphrey, Ed Dutton, H. W. Ward and wife, J. Wattenberg and son T. Wattenberg, Frank Ditsworth and Floyd Pearce of Eagle Point, who had just returned from Applegate where he had been developing a quartz mine and exhibited some of the ore that appeared to be very rich with gold. All of those just named I met in the store of Fred McPherson last Monday morning, and outside of the store I met R. A. Petty, who reported the arrival at his home of his brother and family, and the next morning I met him again with his brother Tom of Larkinsville, Alabama. R. A. Petty has been keeping batch for several years, and to have his brother and wife and five romping children come in on him has rendered him almost wild with joy. I asked how they managed to get along in his small house and he said just fine. His brother has come out intending to locate in Oregon and is going to stay awhile in this part of the country and look around before he decided to settle down. R. A. Petty is in the turkey business and reports that he has three hundred eggs setting now. He has sixty turkey hens to lay the eggs.
    Mr. Salisbury of the Center Meat Market and Ernest H. Benton, who is in charge of the repair department of the Medford Center jewelry shop, were here for dinner Monday and so was Thomas Farlow, formerly of Lake Creek but now of Medford selling automobiles, and so was Ed Nichols of Butte Falls.
    Ed Cowden and family came in and Mrs. Cowden and the children went up to Butte Falls on the stage to be at the bedside of her grandmother, Mrs. Parker, a venerable old lady who passed over the age of near ninety years Wednesday, April 4. I understand that all of her children and the most of her grandchildren were with her at the time of her death. She was sick only about a week and had enjoyed good health up to that time. She did not suffer any pain and said that she was ready to go, as she had outlived her usefulness. I have not learned her exact age or further particulars but one thing I do know and that is that she was loved and respected by all who knew her.
    Harry Young and wife and F. J. McPherson, wife and son Fred Jr., were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Young and wife were the guests of Fred McPherson and Mr. Young and wife were on their way to Prospect intending to start for their home in Yakima, Wash., on their return from Prospect.
    I also met Mrs. M. L. Pruett and her daughter, Mrs. Thomas Stanley and Mr. Hutchinson, who has charge of the Frank Rhodes ranch. He says that he has 600 hens on the place and is getting over 500 eggs a day. Asked if he sold all of them to our local merchant, for I saw him bring in a case of eggs, and he said no, but put them in cold storage. Mrs. Thomas Stanley reports that J. R. Kline, whose house was burned over a year ago, while occupied by some Japs, is rebuilding on his farm on the road from Medford to the lower bridge on Butte Creek.
    Ezra Whitley of Persist was a business caller Tuesday.
    Mark Barker and Lee Edmondson of Butte Falls were here for dinner Tuesday and Mr. Edmondson remained overnight with us. W. E. Hammel also was here looking after the interests of the Eagle Point Canal Co. business and took dinner here.
    In my rounds looking for Eaglets and subscribers for the Mail Tribune and Medford Sun I met Clarence Pruett, the manager and part owner of the Eagle Point pool room, who is in partnership with T. F. Nichols in the business and he gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune for six months and received his paper the next day. That shows how rapidly they do business in the Mail Tribune office.
    Other business callers I met the same day were Mrs. J. H. Carlton, W. P. Holbrook and H. Stanley.
    Ernest Smith and wife of Ashland were passengers on the Butte Falls stage on their way to Butte Falls to attend the funeral services of their grandmother, Mrs. N. E. Parker, who died at the advanced age of 88 years, 8 months and 24 days, mentioned in another part of this letter. I also met the same day John Greb, one of our prosperous farmers and orchardists and C. W. Taylor.
    Frank Manning and son Charles of Flounce Rock district were here for dinner Thursday.
    Drape Walch, Thos. Carlton of Wellen and Frank Johnson, who owns a fine farm near the new concrete bridge across Rogue River, were trading with our merchants during the first part of the week.
    W. C. Thurlow, manager of the Thurlow and O'Brien Co.'s business of Portland, was also here for dinner the same day.
    I see that I have omitted to say anything about the fine rains we have had during the past week, something we needed very much, as the farmers were beginning to feel uneasy for fear of a drought, something that we have not had for the last sixty years that I know of, but with the fine rain we also had a regular downpour of hail but from what I can learn it did but little damage except to pound up some of the early garden truck.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 9, 1923, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison, Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher, Enid and Denzil Middlebusher and Miss Mae Mordoff were among those from Trail to attend the high school play "Gypsy Rover" at the Page Theater in Medford Wednesday evening.
    Miss Burr, county supervisor, visited the Pence school Thursday. Mrs. S. Geary and little grandson, Jimmy, accompanied her as far as the Pence home and visited there.
    Mr. LeBar and nephew, Allen Jay, are in the vicinity again, after spending the winter near Portland. They are overseeing the work of finishing the highway for Hills Con. Co.
    Mr. C. Owens has been working for the Davis brothers, but has returned to his ranch this week.
    The farmers looked with delight on the rain, but all wish it could cease now that it has done its good work.
    Keva Hutchinson, accompanied by a number of friends from Medford, spent Sunday with his parents at the Bar 8.
    Miss Clara Geary is assisting with the work at the Howe home.
    The many friends of Mr. C. O. Young are glad to see him back in this neighborhood. Mrs. Young expects to soon join him.
    Mrs. Whitlatch and daughter Velma Whitlatch and Keva Hutchinson motored out to the Hutchinson home Thursday afternoon and spent several pleasant hours visiting.
    Mrs. S. Geary and daughter, Clara, returned to Trail Sunday after a week's visit with friends and relatives near Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1923, page 6


NEAT FOLDER OF EAGLE POINT DISTRICT ISSUED
    The Eagle Point Irrigation District has issued a neat folder describing, in a brief way, some of the advantages of the Eagle Point country as a horticultural, agricultural, stock and fruit raising district as well as the beautiful scenery, abundance of pure water, splendid fishing and hunting, wonderful climate.
    The folder contains a picture of an orchard and a Little Butte Creek scene while the cover page, printed in colors, shows snow-capped Mt. Pitt, and an eagle carrying a pear.
    It also calls particular attention to the increased advantages of the district under the irrigation system which supplies water for 6000 acres.
    The people of Eagle Point have a delightful country in every way and will no doubt get their share of the new settlers in Oregon because they are going after it.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1923, page 8


TRAIL ITEMS
    Ralph Watson left last week for Klamath Falls, where he has employment for the spring and summer. Mrs. Watson accompanied him, and returned on the stage later in the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Roy Vaughn are moving on Elk Creek from Medford this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchison entertained Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Young Saturday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Ash are visiting at the former's parents, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Ash, for a few days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Smyth of Gold Hill were Trail visitors Wednesday.
    Mrs. Ralph Watson spent a pleasant day at the Hutchison home Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Young were dinner guests of Mr. and Mrs. Eugene Freeland Sunday.
    Jimmie Francis and a friend from Applegate were visiting in the hatchery community Sunday.
    Fred Warner is the proud possessor of a new Ford.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 13, 1923, page 7



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    This Tuesday morning, April 10, I met H. W. Ward, who has charge of what is known as the H. B. Tronson orchard, and he gave me the following particulars with regard to a disastrous fire that took place March 31, 1923. The fire originated in the roof from defective wiring or a defect in the flue, while the foreman, Mr. Ward, and family were at the supper table. The property had been taken over by Portland parties and the furniture by H. W. Ward to satisfy his claim for services. The property was insured for $3000 on the house and $1000 on the furniture. The house was a total loss, but only a part of the furniture was destroyed. Mr. Ward said that the Eagle Point boys did splendid as firemen, for which he and his wife feel grateful. He says that he intends to pull up all of the fruit trees and sow the entire tract in alfalfa; has forty acres already in alfalfa and by next year will have seventy-five acres ready for the mower.
    I should have mentioned this incident in my letter of April 4th but Mr. Ward requested me to say nothing about it until the insurance agent had been to see the damage done.
    Mr. Ward also reports that Rev. Howe, the Christian minister of Medford, wife and Mr. Driscoll; also Prof. and Mrs. Hanby, all of Medford, were visiting him Monday of this week.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside last Thursday were Raleigh Mathews, Earl Mathews, Everett Dahack, Geo. McDonald, L. Matney and F. L. Farlow.
    The same day I met Wm. Coy, a brother-in-law of H. E. Campbell, our banker. He had just returned from Los Angeles where he had been spending the winter and Dr. Kirchgessner of Trail, who had just arrived in his car from San Francisco, and they both report heavy rains all through California, thus securing good crops in that country.
    I also met J. G. Hannaford, who is located near Derby Station on the P.&E. Railway.
    G. A. Hansen of Brownsboro was here trading with our merchants.
    A. Stevenson and wife and child, salesman for Medford Grocery Co., were here for dinner Friday, and so was C. L. Buhrman and A. T. Jondreau of Olds and Brownlee railroad. Mr. Buhrman is the general superintendent of the road.
    Fred McPherson reports that Owen Conover, R. C. and George Hansen of Brownsboro, Benj. Brophy, W. R. Johnson, W. H. Isbell, Mrs. A. C. Radcliffe, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, Mrs. M. L. Pruett and Charles Drexler were among his customers Saturday.
    Eugene Stowell, who has been working in a logging camp near Butte Falls, came out Saturday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Thomas F. Nichols, of the hardware firm of Nichols and Ashpole, his wife and brother-in-law, F. L. Farlow and sister, Miss Beth Farlow were all here for supper Saturday night.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside for dinner Sunday were Miss Jeanette Hastings, Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Hastings, Miss Hazel Smith, Harvey Clift, J. D. Bell, proprietor of the Nash Hotel, Medford, Charles Bell, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. B. Hamilton and daughter Jean, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick, William Parsons, Mrs. Fay Robinett, William Coy, T. F. Nichols and family. Mrs. Nichols has been having some changes made in her kitchen, and they have been taking most of their meals at the Sunnyside in the meantime. Wm. Perry and wife were also here for supper Sunday night.
    There was quite an interesting ball game on the Antelope ball ground between the Eagle Point and Antelope teams Sunday afternoon resulting in the Eagle Point team coming out ahead, the score being 9 to 13. There was near a very serious accident occurred during the game: the ball went wild, going through the windshield of Earl Mathews' car shattering the glass and Nye Mathews, son of Green Mathews, who was sitting in the back seat and was struck by the ball in the eye and scattered the broken glass over his face, cutting his eyelid quite badly. They phone for Dr. Pickel to come out and started with him to meet the doctor at the same time, meeting at the Butte Creek bridge. After the doctor made an examination he decided that the eye was uninjured and I saw his father this Wednesday morning and he said that his face and eye was badly cut but that he was getting along very well.
    I met E. V. Brittsan and Frank Johnson and his son Monday morning and Frank reports that parties are laying out a camp for a summer resort and putting up houses on a tract of land lying between his place near the new concrete bridge four miles below Trail, but I did not learn who the promoters are. They have named the camp Edgewood.
    I also met J. H. and L. H. Carlton in the McPherson store at the same time. They were getting supplies to take to their camp where they were finishing up their contract for clearing the right of way for four miles of laterals. I also met Mr. James McCoy, who is engaged in the poultry business on the Wm. Riley farm.
    C. E. Stille and family, the foreman on the railroad at Derby, and T. E. Clark, Derby, were here on business Sunday.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Hotel Monday were E. R. Oatman and H. E. Warner of Medford, Mrs. J. Earl of Butte Falls, C. C. Bunn and wife, Nick Carter of Butte Falls, L. A. Mass of Medford. He is engaged in organizing boys' and girls' clubs. A pig club has been organized here.
    Our meat men, Mr. Salisbury and Mr. Benton and Charley Humphrey, were here for dinner Monday. Charley is becoming quite a factor in the business community. Monday he came out with his truck from his home at Derby, made two trips to Medford, brought out five thousand lbs. for the McPherson store, went home, came back Tuesday and made two trips to Medford, another for feed, a full load, 2500 lbs., went back and brought out a part of a load for Fred McPherson and the balance for the Brown boys and other business places. The grass don't grow under his feet.
    John Greb, one of our prosperous farmers and orchardists, was a business caller Tuesday and so was Benj. Whetstone and Thos. Vestal, wife and two children.
    George Cotterall, Ed Nichols and Chris Beale were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Our town council met Tuesday night and among other business passed an ordinance we will call the speed law prohibiting anyone from riding over our streets faster than twenty miles an hour. They also passed the curfew law making it unlawful for any person to be on the streets seventeen years and under unless accompanied by a parent or guardian, in the winter after 9:30, or in the summer months after 10 o'clock p.m., and owing to the necessity of such laws they were passed under the emergency clause.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 14, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. F. M. Stewart of Medford came out on the stage the first of the week to visit her son, William Perry.
    Among the business callers Wednesday were H. W. Ward, the foreman on what used to be the H. B. Tronson orchard, but which is now being turned into an alfalfa field; Milo Conley of Lake Creek, Mrs. Walter Wood, Carlyle Natwick and A. C. Huson, the manager of the J. H. Cooley farm and orchard.
    Among the visitors at the Sunnyside for dinner Wednesday whose names I secured (for there were between twenty and twenty-five took dinner), were Mr. Willits, representing the Standard Oil Co., S. K. Peterman of the Star Meat Market of Medford, F. L. Bailey and wife, agent of the U.S. General Land Office, J. H. Carter, Harold Van Scoy, our popular and accommodating mail carrier on the Medford-Butte Falls route; Mr. Selsby, representing a Portland hardware firm; Thomas Culler of Rogue River, and B. L. Kingery of Wellen, who was over with a team to take a large 1600-gallon tank and the tower it stood on for Lyle Carlton, also of Wellen, that Lyle bought of Ernest Dahack, our barber, that he installed to furnish water for his shop and garden, as he has installed an electric automatic pump that does away with the necessity of a tank.
    We also had E. O. Thomas, agent American Central Life Insurance Co., and M. D. Vinyard, deputy agency manager, whose district office is in Medford, were here for supper, and so was Ed Gorney, who was a late arrival from California.
    E. Jones of Malene, Kansas, came in on the stage Thursday morning on his way to Butte Falls to visit his brother-in-law, J. P. Hughes, a retired merchant of Butte Falls. Mr. C. W. Newland and Mrs. F. T. Caspell of Medford were also passengers from Medford and here they took the Lake Creek stage for Brownsboro to visit J. D. Henry's family.
    W. L. Alenderfer of the People's Electric Store, Medford, and William Woods of Medford, Guy Wildey and Thomas Riley, one of our frequent visitors, were here for dinner Thursday. Mr. Alenderfer was out here trying to locate a prospective customer for a Thor washing machine and we concluded that she, Myrtle Dorson, was of Trail, so after dinner we started, for I volunteered to go with him, and in the course of about thirty-five minutes arrived at the town of Trail. It is a regular treat to ride over that portion of the Crater Lake Highway through the farms and orchards and to see the fine crops of grain and alfalfa growing along the route. On our arrival we stopped at the Trail Hotel where we were met by the hostess, Mrs. Middlebusher, an old friend, where I had a fine visit with her and her daughter Violet while Mr. Alenderfer was attending to business. But on inquiring for Mrs. Dorson found that she lived some fifteen miles further up the river, and we also learned that the party had no connection with the electric plant, so we decided that it would be useless to go farther. But while I was there of course I was looking around for Eaglets and learned that Mrs. Middlebusher had just installed a ram and put up a 3000-gallon tank and by that means has plenty of water for domestic and irrigation purposes. She also had her boys leveling up a place for a lawn, and everything looked prosperous and lovely. When I inquired why they did not use electricity she said that there were not enough people there to justify the electric company putting in a transformer, notwithstanding they have the main power line right close by. Trail is a very small village situated on Rogue River at the mouth of the creek by that name and up the creek there are several very good small farms where they raise considerable alfalfa and grain, and the most of the farmers have orchards, but the majority of them turn their attention to caring for stock and poultry, but since they are within an hour or two ride of a market many of them are turning their attention to the dairying and poultry business.
    I noticed as we were riding along a very decided improvement in the government telephone line running from Medford to Crater Lake and beyond. There were six or more of the Forest Service men at work putting up cross arms on the telephone [poles] and adding two wires, a very decided improvement to the service.
    But I see that I have got switched off from what I started in to say when I spoke about who was here for dinner in speaking of Thos. Riley and Mr. Wildey. I started to tell about them being engaged painting W. C. Daley's home, and that they are engaged to paint several others and they naturally come to the Sunnyside for their meals. There are quite a number living in town who come here quite often for their meals, for instance Mr. and Mrs. Geo. B. Holmes, Thos. Riley, Ray Stanley and family, Thos. F. Nichols and family and several others whose names I seldom write in among the Eaglets.
    Mrs. Nettie Grover of Medford came out Friday morning to visit her brother, William Perry.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Friday morning were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Brown and B. H. Williams of San Francisco; Thomas D. Riley, son of Joseph Riley, who is engaged in trucking lumber out from the Elk Creek mill owned by the Hayes brothers; Mr. and Mrs. Stephenson of the Medford Grocery Co., Charley Terrill and wife, R. G. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown & Sons and Wm. Coy, besides quite a number of strangers whose names I failed to secure.
    F. J. McPherson, one of our popular merchants, reports that Alex Mathews, F. D. Hill of Derby, C. E. Stille, W. H. Isbell and George Klingle were among the customers Friday.
    Friday evening we were favored with a fine entertainment by the Parent-Teachers Association of Medford, but my letter is too long to mention particulars in this letter, but will try to mention same in my next.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 17, 1923, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I merely mentioned the fact that we were favored with a very fine entertainment by the Parent-Teacher Association of Medford, but if I stop short with that statement I feel that I would be guilty of willful negligence, if not something worse, for we had in addition to the fine play given, some [as] fine renderings of instrumental and vocal music as anyone could desire anywhere. The music was given by the Medford ladies' orchestra and through the kindness of Professor E. C. Root, conductor, I am enabled to give the names of the members and the different instruments they played: Among the violinists were Mildred and Bernice Burger, Mrs. Maddox and Miss Whitman; clarinet, Juanita Griffin; saxophone, Mrs. E. C. Root, Mrs. J. Darby, Miss Ruth Daniels; cornets, Mrs. J. Shockley, Mrs. Anderson; trombone, Mrs. Bergman; piano, Miss J. Griffin. There was some very fine vocal music, but I failed to secure the name, but she was encored, and thus favored us with two lovely renderings. I also failed to secure the names of the principal actors, but feel safe in saying that if they will ever favor us with another visit, they will receive a cordial greeting. There was a fine attendance and the receipts of the evening were $40.80, and that was equally divided between the Parent-Teacher Association of Eagle Point and the Parent-Teacher Association of Medford. There was quite a number of the Medford people came out to attend the exhibition.
    There was a meeting of the teachers' institute here Saturday forenoon and those in attendance were Mrs. Susanne Holmes Carter, the county school superintendent, and Miss Burr, her assistant; Mrs. Josephine Holmes, the principal of our school and Miss Ruth Wiley, our primary teacher; Glenn Hale of Reese Creek; Mrs. Lee Edmondson, Professor Lowe of Butte Falls; Miss Freda Hanson, Climax; Hazel Taylor, Butte Falls; Mrs. Roy Stanley, Brownsboro; Mrs. Laura C. Atpence, Lake Creek. There was but little business transacted. It was decided to have two meetings for next year, one long and one short. Miss Holmes entertained the visiting teachers and superintendent and her assistant at lunch.
    Among the visitors at the Sunnyside Saturday were Shorty Allen of Wellen, T. E. Hayes, G. H. Buzzard, J. McKetrick and George Hiltock were the guests of Ralph Cowgill.
    I see that I have omitted to mention that the Ladies' Civic Improvement Club met last Thursday, April 12 at the home of Miss Rose Smith and busied themselves folding the leaflets advertising the country around Eagle Point, that will be watered by the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Canal. Lunch was served by the hostess, Mrs. Smith, and a fine social time was enjoyed.
    Among the callers Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. William Perry and his mother, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, F. F. Whittle and wife of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Gates and grandson, George Gates, Jr., J. D. Patrick, Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Barneburg, J. H Cooley, one of our big lumber and timber men, as well as orchardist; James Jackson, Butte Falls; Oris Cambs, Miss Mildred Nye, Miss Elizabeth Welch, Mrs. E. A. Welch, Mrs. W. W. Howard, Dr. W. W. Howard of Medford; Mr. E. J. Phillips of Jacksonville, Beatrice Dunnette and Fred Sherman, Gold Hill, Dr. W. H. Everhard, real estate dealer and J. D. Bell, the proprietor of the Nash Hotel, Medford.
    Sunday night we were favored with a visit by a part of one of the two units of the Christian workers of Medford, et al. They were Mrs. Effa Taylor, Mrs. L. A. Crane, E. E. Gore and Dr. Bert R. Elliott of Medford. They came unannounced, as through a misunderstanding by the members, or perhaps a little carelessness on the part of Dr. Lawrence and Ed E. Gore, for one depended on the other to send out the word, so neither of them attended to it, and the result was the first thing we knew of the meeting was hearing the church bell ringing, but there was some twenty or more came out and we had some fine singing, accompanying the organ. And then the services were opened by Dr. Elliott and he then called on Mrs. Taylor and she gave us a very interesting talk on the subject of the great work we have before us as Christians and then Mrs. Crane gave us a short, but inspiring address on "Christian Life," but Mr. Gore really was the principal speaker of the evening, commenting on the wonderful plan of salvation and how God brings about and perfects his plans for the betterment of his children. The arrangement was made that night for them, or perhaps some others with them to come out with them, on Sunday, April 28, 8 p.m., to hold services here again. Don't forget the date and let us see to it that we have a full house.
    Some of the enterprising citizens of this community have gotten out leaflets, setting forth some of the advantages to be derived from the use of the water that we expect to be spreading over the thousands of acres of land that have been considered almost useless, and it has been demonstrated, on a small scale, the productivity of the same class of land. I have in my mind now a small tract of about twenty or more acres that was bought several years ago by a "tenderfoot" and cost twenty-five dollars an acre that was not considered worth fencing by the original owners, that the last time it changed hands brought three hundred dollars an acre and now cannot be bought for five hundred dollars an acre with water, but without water would not bring the original cost, twenty-five, but why spend time writing about what can be derived from the use of water? And there is some of the land under the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Canal that can be bought very reasonable now, but after the water is on the land the scale will be turned and if I live five years longer and am still writing the Eaglets, I expect to be telling about that same land selling for fabulous prices and producing a hundredfold. Send to the president of the Eagle Point Canal Company, Fred Pettegrew, and get the leaflets.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In making my rounds last Monday I dropped into the Browns Bros. store and learned that D. E. Whitley of Elk Creek had brought in his clip of mohair, and that Ralph Gardner of Lake Creek had also brought in their mohair for them. I also noticed that they are getting a fine assortment of lumber, a very decided help to our little town. I also met Mr. Stacy, who was ordering a lot of supplies to be used at the Chappell-Morgan sawmill near Trail where he was employed. There are now some four or five sawmills in that section of the country, and I learned that there was a move on foot to put in another mill by one of the timber owners of Medford to cut up his timber into lumber to be used in his own yard. The lumber business in that section is getting to be of considerable importance, and I also learned that the S.P.R.R. Co. are contracting for a large quantity of ties paying $25 a thousand feet for them at the yard. I also met John Minter at the same place, also W. J. Cameron of Derby, ordering a lot of goods to be shipped up on the P.&E.R.R. Charley Cingcade was also there disposing of his eggs.
    When I reached home I found Lem Heryford of Lakeview, Oregon, and his mother, Mrs. M. L. Heryford of Butte Falls. They had come out from Butte Falls on the stage on their way to Medford. Also J. L. Hovey, the superintendent of the Alta Vista orchard, and he reports that the prospect was never better for a big crop of fruit than it is now.
    Ezra and Ray Whitney of Elk Creek and Irvin Ivy of Trail were here the same day.
    Earl Tucker of Brownsboro was a business caller Tuesday.
    W. G. Bailey and his daughter-in-law Mrs. Victor Bailey of Portland were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Bailey is engaged as a salesman for Monroe and Crisall of Portland, selling dairy supplies.
    A. E. Hildreth of Butte Falls, who is engaged assessing this part of the county and is making his headquarters at the Sunnyside, reported that Geo. W. Averill, who has a homestead on the north side of Round Top, had the misfortune to fall off of his wagon and break his leg and have the wagon run across his chest. He was taken to Medford in an ambulance the same day, but we have not learned how seriously he is hurt. It seems that his troubles do not come singly; just at the beginning of winter his house with all its contents was burned, and his best horse took sick and died and other misfortunes happened to him. He surely is entitled to our sympathy.
    I omitted to state at the proper time that John W. Smith, one of our prosperous orchardists and poultry men, gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune over a week ago and Mrs. Perry Haley gave hers last Monday and Wm. Perry gave me his Friday morning. Mr. Perry said that he had neglected to renew his subscription and although he did not read much he was lost without his Mail Tribune.
    Last Wednesday Alex Betz was among the business callers and so was John Greb, one of our prosperous farmers and orchardists, and while here informed me of the sudden death of Rev. Ritter, who several years ago was pastor of the M.E. Church of Medford. He was on his way from back east to this place to look after some land that he bought while in this country. He had bought his ticket and dropped while on the train, supposedly from heart failure. I also met R. Hulse of Brownsboro and he informed me that he had sold his farm about a mile above Brownsboro to a man by the name of W. W. Atwood, but I did not learn the conditions, etc. of the sale. Mr. Hulse since he sold has been looking around in Washington, Idaho, etc., for a better country and said that he was offered an eighty-acre tract of land in Idaho for a forty-acre tract he owns on Bear Creek, but when he took into consideration our wonderful climate, the productiveness of our soil, general health that he about concluded to remain here, although he says there is some fine land up there but the climate--it makes me shiver to think of it. He has not sold his cattle and was undecided when we met what he would do, but thinks that Jackson County is pretty good to live in.
    Mrs. Sam Coy, wife of the mail contractor and carrier, came out with her husband from Climax last Thursday to do some trading and visited with some of her old friends and relatives.
    Carl Eastman, a life insurance agent, was here Thursday for dinner and supper and F. R. Wear and F. U. Van Hooser, two traveling salesmen for Martin Bros. Piano Co., of Springfield, Mo., were here for dinner the same day, and so was A. H. Daugherty, salesman of the Raleigh Products and F. L. Lozier, representative of the Oregon Granite Co., of Medford, and four strangers were all here for dinner Thursday, and later Floyd A. Moss, county club leader, had organized the Butte Creek pig club composed of the following members: Raymond, president; Gerald Ward, vice pres., Leonard Bradshaw, secretary; Alvin Greb, treasurer; Clifford Grover, George Hoagland, Iselee and Francis Brown and Floyd Charley, who is acting as county club leader for the club meeting every three weeks.
    Thursday night Mr. and Mrs. M. T. Wire of Astoria and Judge and Mrs. Eclus Pollock of Grants Pass came in for rooms and breakfast. They came down to hunt for agates on our agate fields.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 24, 1923, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Tiny Dugan, who for the last half century has been living on a tract of land known as the old John Young place, but a year or so ago moved onto the M. C. Andrews [McAndrews?] farm just outside of Medford on Bear Creek, has moved back onto his old farm to do some plowing and get the land ready for sowing wheat the coming fall. He was raised an orphan by his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John Young, and by his industry and good management has acquired a competency, raised a bright and happy family and now is rated as among our most prosperous farmers, and has in this community a host of warm friends. The same day that I met him, last Saturday morning, I also met Mrs. Maxfield of Brownsboro. She had come out and went to Medford on business and on her way home spent the night with her sister, Mrs. Charles Cingcade, the wife of one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen who with his brother and family are operating the Cingcade farm on Antelope Creek.
    Alex Vestal, R. H. Sears of Reese Creek and David Smith, at one time marshal of our town, were here trading with our popular merchant Fred McPherson.
    J. H. Miller, at one time in the timber and saw mill business in Butte Falls, but now a resident of Grand Rapids, Mich., was here for dinner last Saturday and after introducing himself to me remarked that he had been away from here for the last 14 years and never failed to read the Eaglets in the Mail Tribune for a single week, that he had been taking the paper all these years and by that means had kept posted on what was going on around his old home town. And still people wonder how it is that the Medford Mail Tribune has such a wide circulation, and it is simply because they keep such a good corps of correspondents, and the editor, manager and their assistants are all wide-awake business men and women and know what the people want and get it for their readers.
    Among the other callers for dinner Saturday was Paul Peyton, a member of the Salvation Army of Medford. He came out Friday to announce that a number of the company would be out here that evening and conduct services on the street and in the church that evening. It so happened that evening was one of those cold, blustery times such as we occasionally have here in April and the result was they did not have as large an audience as would have been present had the weather been pleasant, but as it was there was a goodly number of our citizens as well as several from the country were there, and I understand that the services were very good and if they will come again when the weather is pleasant; no doubt they will have a full house. While I am on the subject of religious meetings, I will so announce the meeting for next Sunday night, April 29, for the Christian Workers of Medford and will urge everyone who can to turn out and give them a cordial greeting.
    I am inserting an obituary notice that was sent to me by a daughter of the deceased, Mrs. Walter F. Charley, of Climax:
    Morrison Bryan died at his home in Fairfield, Calif., April 13, 1923, after a brief illness of bronchial pneumonia, complicated by a weak heart. Aged 60 years. Moving to Jackson County from Washington with his family in the fall of 1905, he lived in the Wellen district for six years, when he again moved to Josephine County, living near Kerby for two years, thence to California, where he has since resided, being employed as deputy marshal of Fairfield, Cal., for the past two years. His wife having died January 30, 1922, he leaves three sons and six daughters, who are Maurice Bryan of Klamath Falls, Ore.; Mrs. Bertha Charley of Climax, Ore.; Mrs. Nellie Martin and Mrs. Genevieve Hair of East Stanwood, Wash.; Mrs. Bessie David of Vallejo, Calif., and Mrs. Leila McKean, Mrs. Pearl Yorton, Barney Lee Bryan and Geo. M. Bryan of Fairfield, Calif., beside 13 grandchildren. Interment at Fairfield, April 16.
    The business in our own town seems to be looking up, judging from the number of strangers to be seen on our streets and at the Sunnyside, for it is not an uncommon thing to see as many as from two to fifteen here for dinner time. Some are men who are working at different jobs, some on the canal, some on the laterals, and some in the orchards, and many are strangers looking over the country with an idea of locating, but I find that it is becoming quite difficult for me to get the names and location of many of them, owing to my difficulty in hearing and sight.
    Last Saturday morning we had 14 here for breakfast and among them was one of our neighbors, Thos. F. Nichols, and he reported that right after he and his partner in the pool room business, Clarence Pruett, had gone to bed someone came in and turned on a small flashlight that woke him up and when the would-be burglar discovered that there was someone in the house, he started to run. Mr. Nichols had no idea who it was, but there was no damage done.
    Sunday there was only a few, outside of our neighbors, came in for dinner and they, knowing a good thing when they see it, come so often that I don't like to use their names so often, but among those from a distance were Mr. W. C. Elam and Francis Connelly of Ashland; Cliff Hickson, Albert Roberts, John Foster of Medford; Mr. and Mrs. Roy Smith, L. Farlow and Lyle Van Scoy, one of our bright high school boys.
    Monday morning, while on my rounds, among the first I saw was our energetic street commissioner, Mattie Brown (Mrs. W. H. Brown) but everybody here calls her Mattie. And she had a gunnysack in one hand and a rake in the other and informed me that Monday and Tuesday were the days set as cleanup days and she was hard at it.
    I see that I have omitted a very important item in the Sunday report: There was one of the most interesting ball games played here Sunday afternoon that they have had for some time; it was between the Table Rock and Eagle Point ball teams and it was nip and tuck which one would come out ahead, but according to reports to me by Fred McPherson, the score stood 9 to 10 in favor of Eagle Point.
    Among the business callers as reported by Mr. F. J. McPherson Monday were Mr. and Mrs. C. W. Carin of Derby; Charles Brastly of Derby; Lyle Carlton, Wellen; R. W. Rose, the mighty nimrod of Round Top; A. C. Huken and Carl Stanley, whose family is here but he is working at Prospect.
    Among those I met at the Brown Bros. store were Mrs. George Wicks and her daughter and Ed Phillips of Trail.
    I have been requested by a member of the Ladies' Civic Improvement Club to ask the merchants and business men and women to burn up their waste paper, as by throwing it outside the wind scatters it over the town and makes a bad impression on strangers coming in.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 27, 1923, page 9


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among those who were here for dinner last Monday were George Stevens, one of the business men of the valley, who makes his headquarters on one of his farms on Ross Lane between Medford and Jacksonville. He was out in this district looking after his interests in this section of the country, for he also owns a fine farm and orchard in the neighborhood of Wellen.
    J. H. Carlton, another one of our live, awake farmers and stock men of the Wellen section, who is one of the contractors on the laterals for the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Canal and is now engaged on a lateral on the desert north of Eagle Point. I say the desert because it has been called by that name, but when it is properly cultivated and seeded with the right kind of seed and properly watered, there is no telling the amount of stuff that can be produced on an acre of that land. This morning I heard a man talking about his clover that he has growing on desert land and he said that it was a foot high and as thick as it could stand, but without water it is of little use. Mrs. George W. Averill was also here for dinner Monday on her way to Medford to visit her husband, who is in a hospital there on account of his having been thrown off of his wagon and having his leg broken and the wagon wheel running across his chest: C. A. Hamlin and A. E. Ricker of Medford, and eleven others whose names I did not get, or having put them in a letter very recently for lately we have had quite a number of comers and goers and many of them I fail to recognize by name.
    Mr. R. B. Taffer, who lives at the Dead Indian Soda Springs, was a passenger on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Tuesday and went up home on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    W. G. Knighton, one of the early pioneers of Oregon, who came to this country in 1867 and for several years was a resident of this section, but now is living with a granddaughter on Wagner Creek, near Talent, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and spent the night and the next day, up to 2:45 p.m., attending to business and visiting old neighbors and friends. While here he gave me his subscription to the Medford Mail Tribune, so that he could keep posted as to what is going on in this section of the country. He went from here to Portland to visit a grandson.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Piper of Portland were among the diners Wednesday and so was our popular salesman, Charley Brown, who formerly was with C. E. Gates, but now is a member of the Mason Motor Co. force. Mr. Chaps, also of Medford, was here Wednesday and John Howard, an old veteran of the Civil War, spent the night with us. He was just returning from Colorado, where he had been visiting one of his grandsons.
    Helen Karr and Ralph Cooksen, Medford, came in for supper and a little later Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Whiteman, Carl Bowman and Mr. Wm. Heiser of Medford were here for supper. They were out in the interest of radio machines.
    Wm. Pruett, one of the old residents of this valley, now located in the Wellen district, was here patronizing our blacksmith Thursday.
    B. F. Fuller and his daughter, Mrs. Titus, were business callers Thursday and so was Joe Haskins, Jr. He reports that they are turning out quite a lot of ties for the S.P.R.R. Co.
    Mrs. W. B. Watson of San Francisco, came out on the Butte Falls stage, where she had been visiting her mother, Mrs. E. E. Smith and sister, Mrs. Ira Tungate. She was met here by another sister, Mrs. Ed Condon, and taken out to her home, where she intends to remain a week visiting before she returns to her home in San Francisco. She reported that that morning the roof of Mrs. (Grandma) Berry Edmondson's house had taken fire and burned off considerable of it, but no special damage was done and that the damages would be repaired by night.
    I must not fail to mention the fact that the Ladies' Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point have done a neat job while they were at it, cleaning up in our town. I spoke in the former part of this letter about meeting Mattie Brown with her rake and gunnysack on Monday morning and working like a trooper, but the next day she had added to her force some six or eight other women and they were taking everything before them, and I called the attention of Eli Dahack to them and pointed to a lot of rubbish he had along the sidewalk next to his garage, but he did not stop for them to come, but went right at it cleaning the old lumber away that had been left when had been moving his house, and by the time I got around on my way home he had it all nicely cleaned up and put away. I noticed also that they have secured a lot of ceiling lumber and are going to finish up the half done job that the men did on our town hall, that is now used for our town library. With such women as are at the head of the Ladies' Civic Improvement Club of Eagle Point, something has to move when they get started.
    F. U. Hooser and F. R. Wear, salesmen for Martin Bros. Pianos, were here for dinner and supper Thursday and so was Thomas Swels and A. C. Shelby, hardware salesmen.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Tedwick are enjoying a visit from their daughter and children, Mrs. Steve Brumble of Klamath Falls.
    Born to the wife of Adin Haselton, April 26, a six-pound girl in Everett, Washington. Mr. Haselton is one of our Eagle Point-raised boys and his wife is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Tedwick and they are rejoicing over the arrival of another granddaughter.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1923, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Thursday Mrs. Hannah MacDonald of Toronto, Canada, selling fancy needlework, and Mrs. E. Mirge of Halifax, Canada accompanied her as her guest for dinner. Mrs. Mirge is visiting friends in Ashland, Ore. I might say that when Mrs. MacDonald came in she had a nice assortment of needles to exhibit but when she left town she had disposed of about all of her stock. The ladies of Eagle Point know a good thing when they see it.
    W. P. Morgan and wife, formerly of this place but now located on a small farm on the Crater Lake Highway a few miles below Trail, were in town on business Thursday of last week.
    W. H. Crandall and John L. Robinson, Sr., made a business trip to Medford Friday.
    Alvin Whitney of Elk Creek was a business caller Friday and so was D. K. Summerly, Charley Fuller, all of Trail, and W. H. Isbell, the goat man who has charge of the Wm. von der Hellen ranch, and A. L. Brown, one of the Medford shoe men, and A. Stephenson of the Medford Grocery Co., the two last names being here for dinner.
    Mrs. Flora Kanoff, who is located on a homestead near Butte Falls, was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage on her way home and so was Perry Farlow of Lake Creek, who was going up home on the Lake Creek stage. He had spent Thursday night here, having been to Medford, and was on his way home.
    Among the customers at the Fred McPherson store Saturday from the country were J. H. Stanley, R. H. Sears, Wm. Merritt, W. H. Isbell, C. W. Cowan of Reese Creek and E. W. Frey of Lake Creek, and D. L. Zimmerman of Eagle Point.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday noon were Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and daughter Joyce, F. J. McPherson, wife and son Fred, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Shearer, Buffalo, N.Y., Dr. and Mrs. W. W. Howard, Medford, H. H. Nichols of the Western Electric Company, Portland and Pearl Rofuden of Portland, George Albert of Butte Falls, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Walker, Miss Winifred and Miss Alice Walker, Miss Jean Kent, Mr. and Mrs. Lucius Kincaid, H. G. Wiener, San Francisco, Miss Gertrude Wiley, our primary teacher, George and Harry Lewis.
    As announced in the Mail Tribune there was a company of the Christian workers of Medford and other places came out Sunday evening to hold services for us. They were Rev. Angell, pastor of the Phoenix Presbyterian church and W. R. Rathe, also of Phoenix, George Mordoff and Mr. Smith of Medford. The services were presided over by Rev. Angell and was opened with singing with Mr. Smith as organist, and then Mr. Mordoff led in prayer and this was followed by singing and then Mr. Smith was invited to address and audience and he recited incidents along his wonderful life, showing how God uses him as an instrument to bring about his purposes. He also gave the young people some good advice, warning them against the snares and pitfalls in the cities. He was followed by Mr. Mordoff with a short talk on the power of prayer, relating some wonderful incidents of answer to prayer, and he was followed with a short talk on how God uses the birds in en the chatheir songs to call us to love and worship Him, and thirman read a lesson from Paul's letter to the Romans and to the Corinthians showing the firm purpose he had in trying to spread the good news of salvation, and gave a short comment to a good-sized and highly appreciative congregation. There was a large attendance, and if they will come often they will always receive a cordial greeting.
    J. W. Hawk of Butte Falls, who is in charge of the Conley Mill near Butte Falls, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage. There were four more passengers on the stage but all strangers.
    There were fourteen here for dinner Monday, but they were nearly all what might be called regular or semi-regular boarders except Mr. Simmons, the civil engineer who has charge of the construction of Eagle Point Irrigation Co.'s canal, and L. W. T. Faech, a traveling salesman from Portland
    But Tuesday we had in addition to our regular boarders Mrs. H. H. Carless and Mrs. J. B. Webster of Talent and Mrs. George Carless of Portland. They said they just drove over to see the place and eat at the Sunnyside Hotel. Dr. Kresse [and] Mr. Van Horne of the Southern Oregon Clay Products Co., who are interested in the establishment of a crockery manufacturing plant to be established in Central Point. They said that they wanted to locate in Medford, but the parties who owned the land in the outskirts of Medford asked such a price that it was beyond all reason, so they went to Central Point, and in looking around Mr. Con Leever donated the land for the plant, so they have decided to locate there. They have men at work opening up a road to what is known as the Joe Hannah white clay mine, where there is an inexhaustible supply of the clay and the company have secured 160 acres of land, and 80 acres of it is all of the finest quality of clay. They had some of the manufactured ware with them to show and it looked fine. It just so happened that the three ladies referred to above were here, although most of the diners had gone to work, but among those left were Ralph Cowgill, Wm. Perry, Fred Pettegrew, W. E. Hammel, the official board of the Eagle Point Irrigation Co., as they had been holding their official monthly meeting and all came in for dinner, and they all pronounced the clay A1. It is the same mine that old Uncle Joe Hannah used to haul his clay from fifty years ago, on a wagon, to use in his pottery on the place now owned by Wm. Cottrell.
    George Holmes, our popular garage man, is getting out the material to build a large shed to be used in connection with his garage business.
    The ball game last Sunday between the Applegate team and the Eagle Point team was hotly contested, the result being 18 to 9 in favor of Eagle Point. There is a move on foot by the ladies of our town and vicinity to raise funds to procure ball suits for our Eagle Point team and they are going to give a dance Saturday night, May 5th, and supper to raise the necessary funds.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1923, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    The Trail school, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Howe, Mrs. E. E. Ash and Mrs. R. I Watson, attended the field met at Prospect Saturday, where everyone enjoyed themselves to the limit.
    Irma Ash won seven firsts and two seconds for her school, for which we are very proud. All the children did lovely work and everyone went home happy, as we always do after a day at Prospect.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Whitlatch, accompanied by their daughter Velma and Keva Hutchison of Medford, spent the day at the Bar 8 ranch recently.
    Rev. L. M. Phillips and family visited at the Wm. Houston home Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Stewart and daughter, Lee, Emma Hall and George Sanders spent a pleasant evening at the Hutchison home Saturday.
    Elmer Moore, Wallace and Ed Cushman, Irwin Howe, C. Ragsdale, and E. Hollenbeak started work on the Elk Creek telephone line last week.
    Keva Hutchison, as the guest of Mr. and Mrs. R. Pruett and son, Wesley, motored to Portland in a Buick Six for the weekend.
    Miss Minnie Poole left Sunday for Elk Creek camp, where she will cook for the telephone crew.
    Mrs. Wick from Pullman, Wash., is visiting with Dr. and Mrs. Bluchner this week.
    Four large trucks from the Purple Truck Co., of Portland are busily engaged hauling gravel on the strip of road along the river this side of McLeod on which the work had to be discontinued last fall, owing to the bad weather.
    In a few weeks the above-mentioned road will be completed, also the Elk Creek and Trail Creek bridges, then we will have a perfect piece of road from McLeod to Medford, for which we all feel grateful.
    Lester Phillips has returned home, after a few weeks spent with his brother at Springfield, Ore.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Ferris, who camped at the Rogue River ranch last summer, have returned, and are camping near the Rogue Elk resort this year.
    Miss Dorothy Hoag spent a pleasant day at the Hutchison home Sunday.
    Miss Ester Mechem of Upper Trail spent the weekend with Irma Ash.
    Miss Mae Mordoff closed a very successful term of school Friday, but is kind enough to remain the remaining two weeks before eighth grade exams to review the pupils at her school, and we all appreciate it very much.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Young and Mr. and Mrs. Hutchison motored to Medford last week to see Robin Hood at the Page.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1923, page 3
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. Humphrey of Derby came out Wednesday with his truck, accompanied by one of his neighbors, Mrs. Shutt, who went to Medford. He left her there to transact business, brought out a load of goods for Mr. McPherson, took dinner at the Sunnyside, went back to Medford, brought out another load, and Mrs. Shutt, for our merchants and went home again. He pays a license to do business, and does it.
    Our stage drivers seem to be doing considerable business now that the roads are drying up, as it is a common thing for the Butte Falls stage to have from four to six passengers each way, and among them last Tuesday were Mrs. E. E. Smith of Butte Falls and Mrs. E. B. Watson, her daughter of San Francisco, and Mrs. Carson of Butte Falls.
    Mrs. B. F. Fuller, who lives on the Brownsboro road a short distance above our town, was a business caller Tuesday.
    Mr. Barrett, one of the pioneers of trail, was here the same day. And M. M. Willits, the popular agent for the Union Oil Company, was here for dinner.
    I see that our popular garage man, George Holmes, is getting out a quantity of lumber to build a large shed in connection with his garage so that his workmen will be protected from the sun while they are at work during the summer.
    Thomas Cingcade, who has been living on his father's farm on Antelope Creek, with his brother Charles, has moved into the Rev. L. L. Simmons house just below the west boundary line of our town. He has rented it for the entire season, although he expects to move his family to Butte Falls about the middle of this month, as he is employed by Mr. Berrian, the superintendent of the fish hatchery, to work at that business by the year. He will use his present home to store a part of his household goods that he does not want to take with him to Butte Falls. He has been working for Mr. Berrian for over a year and proved to be such a good hand that he now commands good wages and a permanent job. His brother Charles will continue to tend the farm as heretofore.
    Wednesday morning when breakfast was called H. L. Heryford and Ralph Stanley of Rancheria came in with Mrs. Roy Stanley and her little boy who live here but take their meals at the Sunnyside and Mr. Heryford, being the road supervisor in the Butte Falls district, went on out to the county seat to meet with the county court.
    When the stage came in from Medford Thursday morning Geo. A. Heckathorn of McCloud and Everett Abbott were among the passengers.
    The same morning I also met Mrs. Gus Nichols and she gave me the following items to help me along with my work in writing the Eaglets: Mr. and Mrs. Walt Antle and Miss Doris Kindle of Lake Creek and Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols of Eagle Point attended the musical comedy, "Struttin' Along," in Medford last Monday night.
    Mrs. R. A. Smith, Mrs. Nichols' mother, of Medford, was visiting Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols and Mr. and Mrs. John Norris, another daughter, Monday.
    Mrs. Walter Marshall of Brownsboro was patronizing our merchants Thursday.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Hotel Thursday besides our regular boarders were C. O. Thomas of the Central Life Insurance Co., Mark L. Hanna, who is running a truck hauling ties from the Haskins mill for the P.&E. railroad and made arrangements to board here during the time he is engaged on the job; R. N. Conley, who owns a sawmill four miles east of Butte Falls, and D. Rummels, also of Butte Falls, were among the guests Thursday noon.
    Charley Mathews and Moses Johnson were here trading with our new garage man, Eli Dahack, Thursday.
    Ed Dutton, one of our prominent farmers and stockmen, was here Thursday with a truck and took out a quantity of provisions to the Natwick camp on the Eagle Point Canal from McPherson's store. Our merchants don't seem to be doing very much business when I visit their stores, but I scarcely ever visit them in the forenoon but what I meet two or three and often more salesmen, and every few days they have one or more truckloads of supplies brought out from Medford.
    Wm. Holman, wife and two children and W. Mussall and son Lloyd of Salt Creek came out Friday morning, stopped here a short time and went out to Medford.
    James Jackson of Butte Falls came out from Medford on his way to Prospect. He was under the impression that the Trail stage left here at 10 a.m., but when he arrived at the post office at 9:30 found that the Trail stage had been gone over five minutes. The best way for people who want to go out on the stage, especially in the morning, is to stage close around the post office, for it depends altogether on how much mail matter the postmaster has to handle and how much help he has, for as soon as the drivers can get the mail they start on the way. Mr. Jackson started out on foot on the Crater Lake Highway, thinking that he might find a ride up to Trail.
    I called on Brown Bros. Friday morning and met two commercial salesmen and Mrs. Percy Haley, one of our popular phone ladies. She came in to dispose of her eggs and talking with Frank Brown, one of the firm, he told me that he had bought 500 lbs. of mohair of George Albert a few days before, and the same day I met Wm. Nickel of Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, and he had his crop of mohair and wool on his way to Browns' store. While I was at the store Frank said that they had sent out to Medford eighteen cases of eggs a few days before.
    Frank Caster of Reese Creek and family were transacting business here the same day.
    Geo. M. Lowe, one of the bill posters for Foster & Kleiser Co., was out Friday changing the bills on the board, and took dinner at the Sunnyside and the same day we had E. E. Jackson of Ashland, Millard Robinson and two strangers, one of them remaining overnight, but I did not learn the names, and S. W. Lucy was here and spent the night.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 7, 1923, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I see that by some means in making my report of the visitors at the Sunnyside Hotel on Sunday, April 29 that the name of H. G. Wiener was left out. He is a young man from San Francisco and is the guest of the Browns, with whom he boarded when he was in business here, having charge of the Butte Falls lumber yard at the P.&E. depot. Another mistake I noticed was I am made to say that Mr. Hanna was hauling ties for the P.&E.R.R., when it should have been the Southern Pacific, but mistakes don't make haystacks; if they did I would have hay to sell all the time.
    Last Saturday morning as I was making my rounds, among the first men I met was John Robinson, Sr., and I noticed that he had his hand in a sling and this thumb tied up and I inquired the trouble, and he explained that he had the misfortune to have his thumb cut in working with a spraying machine. There was something wrong and he started to fix it while it was running and just then he looked around and put his hand in the wrong place catching his thumb about the first joint, but it was so badly bruised that the doctor had to cut it back so as to take about the entire thumb. And while we were talking about it a car drove up and a young man by the name of Cann crawled out with a pair of crutches and on inquiring learned that while at work with a foot adz he stuck it into his leg, making an ugly wound.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Thomas, one of our prominent citizens and wife, started for Medford in their car, she going to have some dental work done.
    Charles Hanscom made a business trip to Medford Saturday and J. H. Steele, one of our newcomers, went up to Derby Saturday to visit his son, returning Monday on the stage.
    In my last letter I spoke of Mr. Lowe being out here posting bills and Saturday R. D. Henson, a foreman for Foster & Kleiser, came out with a helper and tore down the three bulletin boards that were standing on the corner opposite the blacksmith shop, as the lot had been sold to George Holmes, our garage man, and he wanted to build a large shed where they were standing, and Monday they started to put them up down by the Eagle Point State Bank building. When it was discovered that the boards were being removed there was considerable comment as to the character of the bills being posted as the most of them were advertising tobacco in its various styles of putting it on the market but mostly cigarettes, and that seemed to be the principal objection to the boards. In talking with Mr. Henson about the remarks I had heard made with regard to the display of the big ads advertising tobacco he admitted that they were very objectionable to many people and he himself would much rather have different ads, but the selection was not left to them.
    Among the business callers on our merchants Saturday were Alex Vestal, Wm. Holman and family, C. E. Wymore, Derby, and Bud Obenchain, Alex Mathews, Mrs. C. A. Pruett and J. M. King, one of the bridge builders on the P.&E.R.R. force and Mrs. Thomas Stanley, and the most of these were met either at the post office or at the McPherson store.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Saturday who are not counted as regular boarders were A. R. MacDonald, one of our retired capitalists, C. J. Semon, Medford concrete manufacturer, W. P. Cole, Central Point, A. D. Park, Fond du Lac, Wisconsin.
    Mrs. Myrtle Coleman of Joseph, Ore. came in Saturday to visit Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole.
    I met J. H. Hannaford of Derby the same day trading with our popular merchant, F. J. McPherson.
    Ray B. Sloan of Grants Pass and G. W. Rose of Medford were here for supper Saturday night.
    When our ladies start in to do a neat job is demonstrated by the way they managed to raise funds to buy ball suits for the Eagle Point ball team. They arranged during the week to give a dance and supper last Saturday night to secure funds, and from what I can learn had one of the neatest and best parties they have had for a long time, charging one dollar and ten cents a ticket, the ten cents for the U.S. revenue tax, and the receipts of the evening amounted to $208. Wherever the ladies start to do a thing they always go ahead and do it just as they did in fencing and improving the park.
    I am requested to state that the Parent-Teachers Association will meet at the school house on the 18th of May at 3 p.m., it being the last meeting when the teachers will be with them during the season. A cordial invitation is extended to every member to attend, as there will be an important business meeting held at that time.
    Sunday evening at 8 o'clock there will be a meeting at the Eagle Point church of the Christian workers of Medford and Phoenix, who will conduct religious services. An urgent invitation is extended to everyone to come.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside for dinner Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Brown, Mr. and Mrs