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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Gin Lin


Notice to hold mining claims
.
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned claim and intend to hold the following mining claims situated on Jackass Creek, Jackson County, Oregon, one claim by purchase from John Buckley, being 200 yards in length, and the other by purchase from Napoleon Baker, fifty yards in length and adjoining the above named claims, also all the sluiceboxes & privileges belonging to said claims.

    January 20th, 1860.
Gin Lin & Company
    Filed & recorded January 20th, 1860 at one o'clock p.m.
Wm. Hoffman
Recorder, Jackson Co., Oregon.
   

Bill of sale from Buckley & Baker to Gin Lin & Co.
    Know all men by these presents that I have this day sold a creek claim two hundred yards in length (200 yards in length) commencing 30 feet wide in one side and as much in the other as he wishes with 15 sluices and [sluice] fork with the same privilege of water as I had for $65.

    July 22nd, 1859.
John Buckley
Witness: J. T. Williams
                                                   Jackass A 27, 1859
    This is to certify that I have this day bargained and sold to Gin Lin & Company one mining claim being fifty yards, situated on Jackass, joining a claim known as the Buckley claim for the sum of thirty-five dollars.
    Received payment
Napoleon Baker
Witness: C. Thompson
    Filed and recorded January 20th, 1860 at one o'clock p.m.
Wm. Hoffman
Recorder, Jackson Co., Oregon.

Library of Congress, Collection MSS62455, Shelving No. MMC-1189


Notice
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned claim the following mining claims situated on Jackass Creek, being 435 yards in length and one hundred yards wide, being the same claims purchased by us by bills of sale from John Buckley in 1859, William McNew in 1860 and Napoleon Baker as the same appear of record in the Recorder's Office of Jackson County in the state of Oregon.
    Witness our hands this 4th day of November 1862.
Chin, Linn & Company
Filed and recorded November 4th 1862
Wm. Hoffman
Recorder Jackson County Ogn.
   
Notice to hold mining claims on Applegate Cr.
Applegate Nov. 26th 1862
    Notice is hereby given that we the undersigned do claim eight hundred yards of the bank of this creek, running [from] this notice down.
Lane & seven other Chinamen
(Linn) [Gin Lin?]
Filed & recorded Decr. 5th 1862
Wm. Hoffman
Recorder Jackson Co. Ogn.
   
Notice to hold mining claims on Evans Creek
    Notice is hereby given that we the undersigned claim the following described mining claims situated on Evans Creek above the mouth of Pleasant Creek, commencing four or five hundred yards below the mouth of Sidass Creek [Sykes Creek?] and running down said Evans Creek 700 yards, together with the privileges belonging to the same.
    Witness our hands this 12th day of December A.D. 1862
Linn & Company [Gin Lin?]
    Chinamen
Filed and recorded December 12th 1862
Wm. Hoffman
Recorder Jackson Co. Ogn.
   
Notice to hold mining claims on Jackass
    Notice is hereby given that the undersigned claim the following described mining claims situated on Jackass Creek, Jackson County, Oregon, formerly known as the McNew and Chambers claims and by them conveyed to the undersigned by bill of sale dated June 19 1861 and recorded in the Recorder's Office of Jackson County, Oregon; the claims hereby recorded being 400 yards in length, more or less, and being creek and bank claims.
Chum Lin & Co. [Gin Lin?]
July 1863
Filed and recorded July 18th 1863
Wm. Hoffman
County Clerk J.C. Ogn.
Blossom Family Papers Mss 746, Mining Claims 1861-64, Oregon Historical Society Research Library


A Move in the Right Direction.
    We are informed that on Saturday last a number of prominent citizens of this county had an interview with the leading Chinamen of this place for the purpose of ascertaining what the Chinese were willing to do in regard to the building of the Butte Creek and Jacksonville mining ditch. The result of the conference was the appointment of a meeting today, at one o'clock, p.m. This looks like business!
    We are glad to note the general interest manifested throughout the valley in this important move. Let every man lend a helping hand and contribute his mite toward the enterprise. With a good ditch we are the richest section on the Coast; without, if our railroad stops by the wayside, we are poorer than "Job's turkey." All hail to the ditch!
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 1, 1871, page 2


    The Galice Creek correspondent of the Jacksonville Sentinel, in a letter last week, says:
    The English Mining Company have commenced operations in earnest, and their tools have nearly all arrived at their destination, and the men putting them to use to the best advantages. I believe they now have 160 Chinamen in camp. Chinaman Lynn's company of 70 men have been at work a week and have been making ditch very fast. Chinaman Con has 30 men at work for them, and a band of 60 more arrived within the past few days. I do not know the number of white men they have employed, but suppose that with contractors and all there are about 50. From this time forward work will go on lively. When men have good grub at regular hours, and know their money is ready at any time, they can turn off a great deal of work.
"Mines of Southern Oregon,"
Oregonian, Portland, September 7, 1875, page 1


    FROM GALICE CREEK.--J. E. Bowes, agent of the English company owning the extensive placer mines at Galice Creek, is now in town. He reports that digging on the ditch to convey water from the creek will soon be suspended until next summer, when it doubtless will be finished. Work by hydraulics will soon commence. Mr. Bowes also brings news of the death of four Chinamen by a tree falling on them while asleep. But for Lin, the boss, several more would have been sent to the "Flowery Kingdom," as he had awakened some in the tent for the purpose of collecting money of them, and who were standing on the outside when the tree fell, thus escaping. Three in that tent were crushed, while one in another was fatally injured and died soon after.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1875, page 3


    John G. Lanterman, formerly of this place, is engaged in putting up the hydraulic pipe for the English company at Galice Creek.

"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1876, page 3


    Some persons were a short time ago arrested for stoning Lin, a Chinese boss, while he was returning from Applegate in a buggy; but, upon being examined before Justice Kent, they were discharged for want of evidence to hold them.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1877, page 3


    Gee Lin, the Chinaman who has been all winter employed in constructing his ditch to cover ground bought by him near the mouth of Little Applegate, has got to work, and is filling the creek with his tailings. He has a ditch of 6 or 7 miles in length, carrying about 2,000 inches of water, and a fine giant hydraulic of the largest size. His piping is a 15-inch and 1500 feet long, constructed by K. Kubli of this place.
"Mining Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1877, page 3


    The hydraulic mines lately set in operation at the mouth of Little Applegate have got down to square work and muddy Main Applegate to its mouth, we are informed. Their ditch carries 1500 inches, which will all be used when available and the mine in full blast. As soon as the winter season furnishes sufficient water they will put on another pipe in a different place. The boys about town have been visiting this new wonder and are emphatic in their pronunciations of its grandeur. Several wagonloads paid the mine a visit on Sunday last.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1877, page 3


    Going out to see the big hydraulic on Applegate is still a favorite pastime; but they'll be so common around here soon that curiosity will cease.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1877, page 3


    The hydraulic of Lin, near Uniontown, is attracting considerable attention, quite a number from town having visited it. It works to perfection, but, playing against a bank of great hardness, makes little headway.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1877, page 3


    Work has been suspended on Lin's hydraulic near Uniontown, the water supply being insufficient.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 3, 1877, page 3


    Chinaman Linn took a drove of hogs to the Sterling ditch the other day.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 26, 1877, page 3


    The hydraulic near Uniontown, managed by the Chinese, has been started again.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1877, page 3


    Ithamer Reynolds has transferred to R. J. Cameron and Gin Lin certain water ditches, mining claims, etc., near Uniontown for $2,400.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1878, page 3


    Gin Lin is running his hydraulic near Uniontown on apparently first-class gravel.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 1, 1878, page 3


    Gin Lin made a cleanup at his Uniontown diggings recently, realizing about $1,000 in a ten days' run.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 8, 1878, page 3



    The hydraulic claim of Gin Lin on Little Applegate is still being worked. We presume it pays or Lin would discontinue. 

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 9, 1878, page 149


    China Lin & Co., on Big Applegate, who are working their claim with a small hydraulic power, have also lately had a cleaning up after a ten days' run. Result: over $1,000.
"Mining Items," Ashland Tidings, March 29, 1878, page 3


    Gin Lin cleaned up 100 ounces of gold in his hydraulic claim near Uniontown the other day.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 5, 1878, page 3


    Chinaman Lin's ground is evidently better than it was last year when it paid over a hundred dollars per day to the pipe.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 9, 1878, page 3



    Chinaman Lin made a cleanup at his mines on Applegate last week after a twenty-four days' run and secured 134 ounces of gold dust.
"Random Jottings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1878, page 3


    The Sentinel learns that Chinaman Lin made a cleanup of his mines on Applegate last week, after a twenty-four days' run, and secured 134 ounces of gold dust.
Ashland Tidings, May 3, 1878, page 3


    On last week Chinaman Lin worked up in his hydraulic claim on Applegate $2,600, the result of one week's run.
"Local Intelligence," Ashland Tidings, July 5, 1878, page 3


    Piping continues at the mines owned by Chinaman Lin, on Applegate, and from present appearances they can work for some time yet, and their supply of water may last until the winter rains begin. They generally clean up once a month at these mines, and they have realized upwards of $100 a day during the season.
"Mining News," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 7, 1878, page 3


    Gin Lin has ceased operations at his diggings near Uniontown, to give the farmers of that section an opportunity to irrigate, but will resume piping ere long.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1878, page 3


    Gin Lin has been piping since the rains of a few weeks ago, but the recent cold spell has been quite unfavorable for extensive operations.
"Southern Oregon Mining Notes," M
orning Oregonian, Portland, December 3, 1878, page 1


    Gin Lin is repairing his ditch and getting ready for the winter rains. The late wet spell enabled him to do a little cleaning up, from which he is said to have realized a handsome sum.

"Mining News," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, December 14, 1878, page 3



    The pipe for Gin Lin's second hydraulic is now in position and almost ready for active work.
"Mining News," The Douglas Independent, Roseburg, December 21, 1878, page 2


    Gin Lin's ditch is now filled with ice, he having neglected to turn the water out when the cold snap came.
"Mining News," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, December 28, 1878, page 3


   Gin Len commenced piping on this claim on Monday last and is promised a long run.
"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 15, 1879, page 3


    A JACKSONVILLE, Oregon, paper says: "A flock of geese flying rather low over Gin Lin's claim the other day, the man in charge of the hydraulic pipe turned it on them and succeeded in bringing down two of the birds, one of which was secured."
"Jolly Jokers," Geneva Lake Herald, Geneva, Wisconsin, January 18, 1879, page 4


    Gin Lin, at his Uniontown diggings, is running one giant and will soon be able to start the other.

"Mining Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1879, page 3


    Eckleson, Kahler & Co. started their pipe on the Palmer Creek claim on Thursday last, working only one day and night. Their giant worked splendidly, washing off a large piece of ground and making them still more anxious for water.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 29, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin is running one pipe in spite of the cold weather.
"Mining Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin is making the dirt fly at his hydraulic claim on Little Applegate.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 12, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin has repaired the break in his ditch and is piping again.
"Mining Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1879, page 3



    Palmer Creek mine, Kahler, Eckleson & Co., everything working to a charm and dirt melting before the pipe like snow. Supply of water good.
    Gin Lin is running two pipes at his hydraulic mine on Little Applegate, and the ground is paying as usual. There will probably be no interruption at this mine until June or July.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 19, 1879, page 3


    Chinaman Len is running two pipes on Little Applegate and his ground looking fully as well as when it averaged $100 per day.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 26, 1879, page 3



    Palmer Creek the boys are at piping night and day with two shifts. They only expected to test their mine but will now have a paying run.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 26, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin made a partial cleanup at his Uniontown diggings last week. The result was satisfactory, as over $800 was washed out.
"Mining News," Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1879, page 3


    ROBBERY.--Gin Lin's cabin, near Uniontown, was entered one night last week and robbed of about $400 in specimens, coin, etc. He was in Jacksonville at the time of the robbery. Some of Mr. Hayes' moon-eyed wards are suspected of the robbery.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1879, page 3


    HOW HE FOUND IT.--A few days since when Gin Len, the boss Chinaman of Applegate, was on a visit to Jacksonville, his box of jewelry, containing also a small sum of money, was stolen. On his return Len was informed of the fact and he and his steward made up their minds that the thief was in their own camp. That evening the Chinamen, numbering about twenty, were gathered in a large room of the cabin, the occurrence mentioned, and all enjoined to assist in recovering the missing box from the evil "joss" who was accused of taking it. First some incantations were gone through with that were of very imposing nature. Next every light was extinguished and the men marched in single file several times around the outside of the cabin, on each round passing through the darkened house. Strange to say, after this performance had been repeated a number of times the relighting of the lamps revealed the stolen box on the table and yet none of the boys knew which one had been in communication with the devil. Len is satisfied, he got his valuables and some thieving rascal in the camp saved his credit and queue.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 9, 1879, page 3


    PROPERTY RECOVERED.--Gin Lin, the Chinese boss, who lost a box of valuables some time since, recovered it last week in a novel manner. He had occasion to suspect certain parties in his employ and hit upon a plan to regain the stolen property which proved as successful as it was ingenious. He accordingly assembled his minions in a cabin and, after some preliminary remarks, informed them that he intended to give the guilty an opportunity of returning the missing articles. The lights were then extinguished and the doors opened, the Mongolians marching about the building in single file and passing through the room on the completion of each circuit. After this ceremony had been repeated several times, the candles were relit and, sure enough, there stood the box with its contents, minus a portion of the money. Gin Lin is well pleased with the success of his trick, but, having more confidence in locks and safes than Chinese honesty, has provided himself against a recurrence of this incident.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin cleaned up 151 ounces of gold dust Tuesday, the result of three weeks' run with two pipes.
    The "Little Giants" are proving to be just the thing that has been wanted by the miners of Southern Oregon for years past. Many will next season discard the old-fashioned hydraulics and invest in the new, which are a decided improvement in every way.
"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 18, 1879, page 3


    Gin Len, the boss China-man of Little Applegate, cleaned up on Wednesday after twenty-one days' run and washed out one hundred and fifty-eight ounces of dust, worth $2,677.00., or $127 per day. Len has plenty of such ground left.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 23, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin's last run of three weeks paid him nearly $3,000 gross.
"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 25, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin made another cleanup last week and realized 136 ounces of gold dust, or about $2,200, from a four weeks' run.
"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin, the boss Chinese miner, has cleaned up $2,200 after a four weeks' run.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 28, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin, the Chinese tyee operating extensively in the rich mines near Uniontown, cleaned up 192 ounces, or over $3100, the other day, the result of a three weeks' run.
"Southern Oregon Mines,"
Grant County News, Canyon City, June 28, 1879, page 4


    The Sterling Company and Gin Lin are piping with two "giants" and a full supply of water. Heavy cleanups are anticipated.

"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1879, page 3


    Gin Len [is] still running two pipes on Little Applegate. Plenty of water and good pay.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 9, 1879, page 3


    VISITING THE MINES.--The hydraulic mines on Little Applegate and Sterling are very popular now as Sunday jaunts. Last Sunday a party went there, some of them lady strangers visiting friends here. They had a balky horse that balked in Little Applegate and came near giving the whole party a sitz bath, but the ladies were gallantly lifted ashore and saved. Then the lightning came and the rain fell and the horse balked and kicked alternately till a wagon came along, took part of the load, and a new horse was hired and the party returned in broken doses like drowned rats perfectly satisfied that hydraulic mining was just splendid in dry weather.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 16, 1879, page 3


    The Squaw Lake and Sterling companies and Gin Lin are busily piping away with a supply of water that promises to hold out for several weeks to come.

"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1879, page 3


    Gin Len last Sunday cleaned up twelve hundred dollars after two weeks' run. An attempt was made to rob his sluices a few nights since, but it was foiled.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 16, 1879, page 3


    Several miles further on in the mountains, and we reach the famous placer beds on the lands of the Camerons, which are leased for operation to Gin Lin, an enterprising Chinaman, who is mining with machinery quite equal to that in use at Sterling, and, we believe, with like satisfactory results. Here our party spent a half hour in sightseeing, and then we retrace our steps, viewing as we come down the mountain gorges a magnificent thunderstorm on the adjacent heights, its fresh breezes filling the air with the balmy odors of Araby the blest.
Abigail Scott Duniway, "Editorial Correspondence," The New Northwest, Portland, July 17, 1879, page 2


    Gin Lin cleaned up over seventy ounces of gold last week, which is the result of a two weeks' run. He will clean up more frequently than formerly, fearing that his sluices may be robbed at any time, an attempt at which having already been made.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin has furnished each of his men with a Smith & Wesson pistol as a precautionary measure against flume-robbers, who threaten to become both numerous and troublesome. He also proposes insuring the lives of the Mongolians against the probability of killing themselves with their newly acquired playthings.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin is prospecting the red hills on Palmer Creek, probably intending to become interested in the enterprise inaugurated by the Palmer Creek Mining Co.
    Gin Lin makes weekly cleanups, fearing the depredations of flume robbers. Water is failing and only one pipe is operated, and he intends building a reservoir soon.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin made a cleanup the other day, from which he realized over $1,000. This was the result of a
sixteen days' run with one pipe. Water is failing fast, and he will be obliged to suspend operations soon.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin will close down his diggings in a few days, water having about failed. He has done very well, having taken out many thousand dollars during the season now ending.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin made a cleanup the other day from which he realized over $1000. This was the result of a sixteen days' run with one pipe. Water is failing fast, and he will be obliged to suspend operations soon.

"Southern Oregon,"
Grant County News, Canyon City, August 23, 1879, page 1


    Gin Lin is still piping away with one pipe and expects to be able to continue operations for several weeks to come.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin, the Chinese autocrat of Southern Oregon, is still piping at his claim on Little Applegate. The water will soon fail him, but he is still making money.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 3, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin has closed down for the present, but will resume operations on a more extensive scale than ever when water becomes abundant again.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin, the richest Chinaman in Southern Oregon, has bought out his partners and now owns by himself the Little Applegate mine.
"News of the Week," Pacific Christian Messenger, Monmouth, October 17, 1879, page 8


    The Sterling Company and Gin Lin are piping with two "giants" and a full supply of water. Heavy cleanups are anticipated.
"Mining Notes," Oregon Statesman, Salem, October 24, 1879, page 3


    The season being favorable and water plenty, Gin Lin has commenced working his claim on Little Applegate with two giants.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin is operating two "Little Giants" at his mines near Uniontown.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1879, page 3



    FORFEITED BOND PAID.--Gin Len and Wang Kee, sureties of Ching Fook, who was indicted by the last grand jury for attempting to pass counterfeit money, paid yesterday to District Attorney Neil the amount of the bond, $200.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 17, 1879, page 3


    Gin Lin has about twenty men employed at his mines near Uniontown and is operating both of his "Little Giants" at present.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1879, page 3



    Gin Lin is operating two "Little Giants" at his mines near Uniontown.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Willamette Farmer, Salem, December 19, 1879, page 3


    Gin Len on Little Applegate is steadily at work day and night with two pipes.

"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 14, 1880, page 3


    Theo. Cameron reports the hydraulics in the vicinity of Uniontown all busily engaged, with favorable prospects.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1880, page 3



    Gin Lin has two pipes in operation, and soon makes a cleanup.
"Mining News," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, January 24, 1880, page 3


    The Kahler & Lackland claim on Applegate are now running night and day. The pipe is tearing up ground that prospects exceedingly well.
    Gin Len's mine on Little Applegate is being worked constantly, with two pipes in operation. That "heathen" has one of the best mines in Jackson County.

"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 28, 1880, page 3


    Since the first experiment of the "English Company" in Josephine County five years ago we believe over thirty "giants" have been put in operation in Jackson and Josephine counties, and we do not know of any working unsuccessfully.

"Changes in Mining," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 4, 1880, page 2



    Lackland & Co. of the Palmer Creek claim are piping in ground that prospects handsomely and making the dirt fly night and day.

"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 4, 1880, page 3



    Gin Lin made a cleanup one day last week which yielded him ninety ounces of gold, or nearly $1500. When it is considered that Lin has been unable to operate his pipes steadily but a short time since his last cleanup, it will readily be seen that he has done quite well.
"Southern Oregon Mines," Oregonian, Portland, February 10, 1880, page 1


    Gin Lin cleaned up $1,500 last week in one of his mines in Jackson County.
"News of the Week," Pacific Christian Messenger, Monmouth, February 20, 1880, page 8


    Jacksonville Times: Some of the hydraulic claims are in operation but others are not. Little has been done at the Sterling mine so far. Chappel, Eckelson & Co., Gin Lin and the Centennial Company, near Willow Springs, have been more fortunate. Should the cold weather ever cease all hands will soon be at work. A little sunshine would furnish enough water for all practical purposes.
"The Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, February 24, 1880, page 4


    Eckelson & Chappell and Gin Lin are running day and night, as also are most of the other hydraulic claims.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1880, page 3


    Eckelson & Chappell and Gin Lin are running day and night, as also are most of the other hydraulic claims. Superintendent Lackland, of the Palmer Creek diggings, will make a cleanup this week, and we expect to hear a good report from him.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 13, 1880, page 172


    Gin Lin has completed the cleaning of his ditches and is again piping. He will make another cleanup soon.
"Mining News," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, March 27, 1880, page 3


    Sam Lackland of the Palmer Creek mine is piping night and day, gravel looking well and water flush.

"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 7, 1880, page 3



    Sam Lackland of the Palmer Creek mine is piping continuously. He made a partial cleanup last week with a fair result.
    Gin Lin, the Chinese mining sharp, is said to be working in richer ground than he has yet worked. He made a cleanup of over $2,400 for about twenty days' run.
"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 28, 1880, page 3


    Gen Lin, the Chinese mining sharp of Jackson County, cleaned up $2,400 last week. His name ought to be Ging-ling.
"State News," Eugene City Guard, May 1, 1880, page 1


    Gin Lin, the Chinese mining sharp, made a cleanup at his diggings near Uniontown this week, from which he obtained about $2,400 in gold dust. This is the result of only a short run, and is evidence that he has some of the best diggings in Southern Oregon.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 15, 1880, page 308


    Eckelson, Chappel & Co., Gin Lin and others will make a cleanup this week.

"Random Jottings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 21, 1880, page 1


    Gin Lin is now engaged in making a cleanup.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 9, 1880, page 3



    Gin Lin made a cleanup the other day. We have been unable to learn how much money he obtained, but it was considerable.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 16, 1880, page 3


    Gin Lin made another good cleanup the other day and is still engaged in piping. He has little or no dump, but with the aid of a pipe he drives the tailings in such a manner as to pile them up in great heaps many feet high. Thus he is enabled to run uninterruptedly until water fails.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 13, 1880, page 3


    Gin Lin is still at work and will continue the season through, as he has an abundance of water.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1880, page 3


    Gin Lin is still piping.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 15, 1880, page 3



    CORN AND HOGS.--Michael Hanley is fattening several hundred head of hogs from corn raised by himself this season. He cultivated 60 acres of corn, yielding upwards of 3,000 bushels. We inspected the corn and find it fully as fine as that raised in Western Missouri. Some of the ears measured 12½ inches in length, and we doubt whether any other farmer in Rogue River Valley can equal it. Last week Mr. Hanley sold to Gin Lin 30 hogs which averaged 273 lbs. a head, at 4¼ cents a pound.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1880, page 3


    The prevailing weather has curtailed the supply of water at Gin Lin's diggings, and he is unable to operate more than one pipe.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1880, page 3



    S. W. Lackland has sold his interest in the Palmer Creek diggings to Gin Lin for $1,500.
"Oregon," 
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 9, 1881, page 229


    Gin Len is still working two giants on his Little Applegate claim, but what the heathen is making is known only to himself. There is no doubt the ground is paying handsomely.

"Mining Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 7, 1881, page 3


    The Grand Applegate Co.'s diggings have been started up again by Dan Silva and the Chinese who have leased them, and piping is progressing. Most of the miners have either cleaned up or are in the act. The unusually short spring run will cut off the gold product considerably. Considerable prospecting for quartz is now being done in Willow Springs and Blackwell districts. Late discoveries have infused new life into the miners there. Gin Lin proposes running a ditch to the red hills of Palmer Creek, utilizing the waters of that stream and Applegate. Its length is about five miles and will be completed this summer, we learn.
"Oregon," 
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 21, 1881, page 325


    Gin Lin cleaned up some boxes the other day. How much gold dust he got none but the Mongolian himself knows, but those doing business with him say it was considerable.
"Oregon," 
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 28, 1881, page 341


    The Sterling mine, owned by Capt. A. P. Ankeny, of Portland, and Mr. Frank Ennis, the latter gentleman being superintendent, is without doubt the most valuable placer mine in Oregon.…Another large hydraulic mine, paying handsomely, is owned by a Chinaman on Applegate Creek; and still another owned by the Squaw Lake Mining Company on the same creek will soon be in working order, and promises handsome dividends.
"Our Mines," Oregon Sentinel, November 5, 1881, page 2


    Operations are entirely suspended at Sterling and at Gin Lin's hydraulic mine on little Applegate on account of the freeze.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, November 26, 1881, page 3



   
Gin Lin attempted to force the water through his ditch, which was filled with ice, damaging it considerably.
"Mining Matters," Oregonian, Portland, January 31, 1882, page 3


    Gin Lin attempted to force the water through his ditch (which was filled with ice), damaging it considerably.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 4, 1882, page 77


    Gin Lin will build a ditch several miles long to bring the water from Palmer Creek to the red hills.
    The cold snap does not seem to have prevailed continuously over the entire county, as Chappel & Co., Gin Lin and other miners along Applegate have been busily at work for some time past with a good supply of water.
"Mining Notes," Oregonian, Portland, February 22, 1882, page 3


    Gin Lin and other miners along Applegate have been busily at work for some time past with a good supply of water. The cold spell is about over, and the miners will all soon be busily at work, as the ground, which is full of moisture, has thawed out and water is beginning to be plentiful. A favorable spring, with plenty of rain, is also anticipated, and the unusually large amount of snow in the mountains will prolong the mining season. The prospects for a good run are certainly not as gloomy as they might be. The Applegate Gravel Co. is piping, and expects to make a cleanup soon. Some of the large hydraulic companies are now cleaning out their ditches. The Squaw Lake Ditch Co. is completing its reservoir and getting ready for active operations. Gin Lin will build a ditch several miles long to bring the water from Palmer Creek to the red hills.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 25, 1882, page 125


    Chas. J. Howard, accompanied by S. M. Hubbard, started yesterday to survey a ditch for Gin Lin. It will carry water from Palmer Creek to the red hills and will be several miles long.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 10, 1882, page 3



    Gin Lin has about 20 Celestials employed in digging a ditch from Palmer Creek to the red hills, several miles distant.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 11, 1882, page 157


    Chas. Howard is engaged in a survey for the large ditch being constructed by Gin Len, from Palmer Creek to the red hills.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 11, 1882, page 3


    Gin Lin is running two pipes on his claim on Little Applegate in good paying ground, and one pipe on his Palmer Creek claim. Fifteen Chinese began work this week on the ditch from Palmer Creek to the Red Hills. It will be nearly eight miles in length, and is being built by Gin Lin. 
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 1, 1882, page 213


    Gin Len cleaned up $1,500 last week after a run of twenty-two days.

"Mining Notes," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 1, 1882, page 3


    Gin Lin is still running 2 giants. His ground is as rich as formerly but not so profitable on account of increasing difficulty in moving it.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 15, 1882, page 245


    Gin Lin is still piping, but not regularly, as water is light. He has done well this season.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 2, 1882, page 149


    Wm. Cameron, of Uniontown, informs us that Gin Lin has both his pipes at work with a full head of water.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 28, 1882, page 277


    R. J. Cameron informs us that Gin Lin has a good supply of water and is running two pipes. The ditch leading to his Palmer Creek diggings is nearly completed, and that piece of property will also soon be put in shape for work.
"Mining News," Corvallis Gazette, December 1, 1882, page 3


    Gin Lin seems to be the only miner in Uniontown precinct who has an abundance of water.
"Mining News," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, March 10, 1883, page 3


    Gin Lin seems to be the only miner in Uniontown precinct who has an abundance of water. Many of the miners are busy, but some have no water at all. The mining season does not promise well. Miners who have reservoirs are in better luck than ever this season, for without them they could not run at all.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 10, 1883, page 165


    We have two bands of Chinamen cutting wood in the vicinity of Irving, Ah Foo, Gin Linn [sic] & Co. constituting one band, and Oph, Off and Kitch Nim the other. But we allee same Melican man. Heap sabbe.
"Irving Items," Eugene City Guard, March 31, 1883, page 5


    Gin Lin is still piping away at his claim in Uniontown precinct, though with a diminished head of water. He has also cleaned up some.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1884, page 2


    Gin Lin is piping away at his diggings in Uniontown precinct, and seems to be doing well. 
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 9, 1884, page 89


    Gin Lin of Uniontown has a fair supply of water and is busy piping.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 3, 1885, page 9


    One of Gin Lin's partners, while mining at Uniontown precinct, was caught by the bank against which he was piping last Tuesday and killed almost instantly. A leg and an arm, as also his back, were broken, and he died a few minutes after the accident. Several other Chinese were at work in the same location, but made their escape.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, January 26, 1885, page 4


    A Chinaman, partner of Gin Lin in the mines over near Uniontown, was killed by the caving of a bank of gravel one day last week.
Ashland Tidings, January 30, 1885, page 3


    A high-toned Chinese funeral, with Gin Lin's partner acting as corpse, passed through town this week. The Chinaman was killed in the mines by a bank caving on him while at work on Sterling Creek.--Sentinel.
"Here and There," Roseburg Review, January 31, 1885, page 3


    We learn that a Chinese company, of which Gin Lin is a member, has purchased the English company's mines at Galice Creek, which have lain idle for the past few years.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


    Gin Lin of Uniontown precinct received a new giant from California recently and is piping day and night.

"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 25, 1885, page 3



    Placer miners want more water at once. Gin Lin has had a full head of water for the past month at his Uniontown diggings and is making the most of it.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 26, 1885, page 424


    Gin Lin of Uniontown precinct received a new giant from California recently and is piping day and night.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 2, 1886, page 13


    The Record says China "Bow" had difficulty to obtain food or lodging in Crescent City a few days ago on account of the feeling there against the Chinese. "Bow" is a noted cuss anyway and can stand all that. He once cut off his queue that he might marry a young half-breed, and after he got her at such a great sacrifice she "lit on him" and almost scratched his eyes out, simply because she saw him in possession of a bottle of "bug juice," whereupon Bow broke loose and said, "See here, you hap bleed son-i-k-b----c forst you don't sabbe I cut your throat."
"Local and Personal," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, June 25, 1886, page 3



    On Wednesday of last week a Chinese lady, the affianced bride of a partner of Gin Lin, arrived direct from China, and was met by Gin Lin and conveyed to the residence of the groom in Medford (a custom followed in China) and married in high style: heepee blande, plesants, alle same as Melican man. She cost her lord $1800.
"News Paragraphs," Corvallis Gazette, October 1, 1886, page 9


    Gin Lin, the Chinese miner of Uniontown precinct, is already engaged in piping.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 4


    Gin Linn has a mine on Palmer Creek, on which he has expended about $5000 for improvements; this mine is considered valuable, the output unknown.
Ashland Tidings, January 7, 1887, page 1


    Rain has been falling off and on during the past week, which has so increased the water as to allow the Ankeny, Gin Lin and other hydraulic mines to be worked with a full head of water.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 8, 1887, page 25


    Gin Lin of Uniontown precinct has two pipes at work, which are kept busy, notwithstanding the frosty weather.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 2


    R. J. Cameron vs. Gin Lin, suit for injunction. Dismissed.
"Circuit Court Proceedings," Democratic Times, June 10, 1887, page 3


    R. J. Cameron to Gin Lin, lease to water right; $500.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 2


    Ordered by the Court that Gin Linn be allowed the sum of One and 20/100 Dollars ($1.20) for acting as Interpreter for the examination of Gum Wau, an Insane Chinaman.
Jackson County Commissioners' Journals, page 294, October 5, 1887


    Amanda Bilger, guardian, vs. Gin Lin; suit to foreclose chattel mortgage.
"Circuit Court Docket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 30, 1888, page 3


    Amanda Bilger vs. Gin Lin; suit in chancery. Continued.
"Circuit Court Proceedings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1888, page 3


    Gin Lin submits winning bid for city contract to dig "Medford Water Ditch from Van Dyke's corner to J. W. Short's, 294 rods, for $323.40."
April 1, 1889, "Record of Minutes," Medford, Oregon, volume 1, page 205


    Amanda Bilger vs. Gin Lin; to foreclose chattel mortgage. Continued.
"Circuit Court Docket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1889, page 3



Administrator's Notice.
In the matter of the estate of Gee Toy, deceased.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN THAT the undersigned has been appointed by the county court of Jackson County, Oregon, sitting in probate, administrator de bonis non of the estate of Gee Toy, deceased.
    All persons indebted to said estate are requested to settle the same immediately, and those having claims against the estate will present them at the law office of C. W. Kahler in Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon, with the proper vouchers attached, within six months from the first publication of this notice.
GIN LIN,
    Administrator of the estate of Gee Toy, deceased.
Dated December 1, 1889.
Democratic Times, December 19, 1889, page 4


    Capt. Werk is developing a fine Tybault filly at the race track for Gin Lin. The dam is Lin's fine Graduate mare, and the youngster is quite promising. The Captain is also introducing to harness a nice Adrian yearling owned by John Wells of the lower valley.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 2


    Of the promising youngsters in this vicinity that will be eligible, Tybault can show three very fine fillies, one owned by Gin Lin, out of his fine Graduate mare.…
"Horses and Horsemen," Oregonian, Portland, November 16, 1890, page 7


    R. J. Cameron vs. Gin Lin & Bow--Suit in equity for an injunction: default entered against defendants and ordered that the plaintiff recover from defendants costs and disbursements of this suit, taxed at $25.
    R. J. Cameron vs. Gin Lin & Bow--Suit in equity for injunction: injunction granted and plaintiff allowed $25 for costs and disbursements.
"Circuit Court," Valley Record, Ashland, May 14, 1891, page 2


    R. J. Cameron vs. Gin Lin and Bow; injunction. Decree granted prohibiting the defendant from dumping debris into Little Applegate through the premises of plaintiff.

"Circuit Court Docket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 3



    John Slager is handling two very promising colts belonging to C. W. Kahler at the race track. Both are from Jin Lin's Graduate mare, one by Tybault, and the other by Jay B., both of which horses were sired by Altamont. The elder, a two-year-old filly, is improving rapidly in her work, and will have a show at the two-year-old purse at the coming fair.
"Central Point Items," Democratic Times, July 24, 1891, page 3


    The yearling colt by the Altamont stallion J.B., out of a Vermont mare formerly owned by Gin Lin, was last week sold by C. W. Kahler to Pomeroy, the trainer, and L. S. Smith of Grants Pass. It is handsome and quite promising.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


    Surveyor Howard has been at Palmer Creek surveying mining ground belonging to C. W. Kahler and Gin Lin.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 2


    A Chinaman working at Gin Lin's mining claim in Uniontown precinct had the large bone of one of his legs cracked last week, by being struck by the handle of a derrick he was operating. Dr. Rickenbach attended to the repairs.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3


    Gin Lin is at work at present piping off the land between Cameron's store at Uniontown and the residence of R. J. Cameron.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1893, page 3


    The site of Uniontown, which was once quite a lively little trading point in the Applegate country, is now being mined for gold. When, in early days, store buildings and residences and laid-out streets, now the miner is employed working out gold in paying quantities. The old Jen Linn Co. is known to have taken out $150,000, and perhaps more, of gold from this locality. Nearly all the members of the old firm have left there, but the original Jen Linn is still in that vicinity and mining as assiduously as in days agone.
"Mines and Mining," Medford Mail, March 10, 1893, page 1


    Again does our pen chronicle wrongdoing in our midst. Since the robbing of the post office and store at Watkins, there has been a regular epidemic of plundering. One evening, not long since, two strangers held up China Lin's camp and carried away about forty-five dollars. These men could be easily traced up and caught, as they "prospected" a day or two in the neighborhood before robbing the Chinamen. Some campers lost their bacon at Squaw Lake, but that is not strange, as anything is liable to "get lost" that is not chained securely to a tree whenever left near the lake. If the petty thief who is ever ready to plunder the larder of campers and tourists does not soon make a shift he will run against a snag.
"Watkins Waifs," Medford Mail, August 3, 1894, page 4


    It will be remembered that someone held up "China" Linn's camp, some three months ago, and robbed one of the employees of forty-five dollars. No effort was made to apprehend the robbers, and the same parties, or someone equally as daring, thought the proper time had arrived for another cleanup, and accordingly on Friday night, September 14th, they tried to effect an entrance to the quarters by forcing the door of one of the shanties, but the doors were barred and they (the robbers) failed to gain an entrance. The Mongols have armed themselves and will tender a warm reception to any brigands who apply in future.
"News from Uniontown," Medford Mail, September 21, 1894, page 4


    Gin Lin, the miner, accompanied by the Chinese barber of Jacksonville and a few other of his cousins, left Sunday for China. It is not likely that they will take part in the war going on in Korea.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1894, page 4



    Gin Lin, the well-known Chinese miner, started last Sunday for China. Mrs. Gin Lin accompanied him to Jacksonville, and took leave of him in regular American style, and returned the same day to the mine near Uniontown.
Ashland Tidings, October 11, 1894



    Gin Lin, one of the oldest Chinese residents of the state, and whose occupation has been principally mining, left Sunday for China in company with three other Chinamen. Lin will probably return to this country in the near future. His wife remained on Applegate.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, October 11, 1894, page 3


    Gin Lin, the China contractor and miner, left for China Sunday morning. Gin Lin was at one time a wealthy man, but his fortune seems to have slipped him by, and he is not now considered so much of a tyee as in former days. His wife resides at the Palmer Creek mines.
"Jacksonville Items," Medford Mail, October 12, 1894, page 2


    Gin Lin, the Chinese mining tyee, from Upper Applegate, left for China a few days ago. From a business standpoint Gin Lin has ever enjoyed the highest esteem of all classes and races, but on leaving to visit his native heath he did one thing which would be censurable from an orthodox standpoint, i.e., it is alleged he "presented" his wife to "Bow Wow," or Bow somebody, without the usual formality of a divorce. The consideratum is not named, but it's customary for the recipient of such precious gifts to pay handsomely. It is openly asserted that Gin on his return will bring a "society lady" with him as a wife. These are hard times, and the only relief to the sad and melancholy picture of man's inhumanity to man lies in the fact that the slave is pleased with the change of masters. Slavery! Yes, slavery, in this boasted land of the free. After being a faithful wife for twenty years a poor woman is bartered away for a mess of pottage. Well did Bret Harte write, twenty-five years ago, about the lecherous, treacherous, barbarous Mongolian vandal:
"Do I sleep? Do I dream?
    Do I wonder and doubt?
Are things what they seem,
    Or merely visions about?
Is civilization a failure?
    Is the Caucasian played out?"
"The heathen Chinee," in spite of his evidences of total depravity, has champions in the land. Such men are, to a great extent, governed by mercenary motives, and their respect for the Chinese is gauged by the limit of their ability to prey upon "John" in mercantile transactions.
"News from Uniontown," Medford Mail, October 19, 1894, page 2


New China Store.
    Wong Foo has purchased Gin Lin's building in Chinatown and will make payment for the same on Dec. 10, 1894. He is now located there with a big stock of Chinese and Japanese goods and will sell the same cheaper than the cheapest.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 12, 1894, page 3


    Wm. Kinney crossed Little Applegate with a load of freight for China Lin's camp and was detained a day or two by the flood.
"News from Uniontown," Medford Mail, January 18, 1895, page 2


    Gin Lin to Wong Foo--land in Jacksonville; $500.
"Real Estate," Valley Record, Ashland, July 18, 1895, page 3


    C. W. Kahler and Gin Lin vs. C. M. McIntyre, injunction, defendant enjoined from diverting the water from plaintiff ditch; costs taxed to defendant.
"Circuit Court," Valley Record, Ashland, September 12, 1895, page 3


    Gin Lin, a Chinaman who has lived and mined successfully in the Applegate section of Jackson County for many years, has been on a visit to the Celestial Empire for nearly a year past but is to return again. The Gold Hill Miner, in the course of an excellent write-up of the Applegate mines, prints this fable on visiting Gin Lin's old placer claim: A clever story is told of Gin Lin's generalship. As the incident has never been in print, it is herewith given. One day during the cleanup season a pan containing about two hundred dollars' worth of gold was left unguarded for a few moments, during which time the gold mysteriously left. No disturbance was made on the discovery of the theft, but after supper Gin arose from the table and stated that someone had taken about two hundred dollars in gold from a pan in the diggings. He further stated that he had no desire to punish the offender, but must have the gold returned to its owner. At his suggestion they put out the lights and all marched twice around the table, singing a Chinese song. At the close of the march the lights were brought in and the gold was lying on the table. Some attribute the return of the stolen pelf to spirits, some to the music. Chinese music well executed will almost move mountains, and it could with as great facility clean bedrock.
"Mining Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, September 30, 1895, page 1  See articles of April 1879, above, for original accounts of this anecdote.


    Jim Lin, one of the Chinese store keepers of Ashland who has been here for several years, left today for San Francisco to take a steamer to China. Jim says he is going home to get a wife and will come back with her "mebbe."
Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1895, page 3  Presumably a different guy.


Gin Lin to Ray Cooke a water ditch and mining ground in Little Applegate precinct . . . 1000
"Real Estate Transfers," Medford Mail, April 30, 1897, page 4


THE CHINAMAN.
    With the departure of the white miner came the Chinaman, who took the place vacated by the former, and during the next few years took out from the various districts many tons of gold. With the exception of Gin Lin, who still operates a hydraulic on the Little Applegate, these Orientals never made a permanent improvement in the country, and it is now difficult to find a vestige of the thousands who once occupied the streams.
    It may be surmised that the advent of these leeches was not beheld with complacency by the remaining white miners. Numerous protests were made and after a somewhat heated controversy, they were finally forced out of the country. They were aliens, who had no legal right whatever to mine on the public domain, and history now approves as wise the course then taken by the miners.

"Mining in Southern Oregon," Oregon Mining Journal, Grants Pass, Midsummer Edition 1897


    Gin Lin, a Chinaman who for many years was a resident of the Applegate where he mined extensively, is reported to have died in China last June, at an advanced age. C. W. Kahler, the Jacksonville attorney, has been appointed administrator of his estate in this county.
Ashland Tidings, November 1, 1897, page 3


    Estate of Gin Lin; inventory and appraisement filed and approved; personal and real property appraised at $602.27.
"In Probate Court," Medford Mail, November 26, 1897, page 6


    The widow of Gin Lin (the Chinaman who mined on Applegate for many years) was in Jacksonville a few days ago, bidding her friends goodbye while on her way to China.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 24, 1900, page 3


    Mrs. Gin Lin, who has been in town for the past few days, bidding her friends farewell, left Tuesday morning for her former home in the Flowery Kingdom. She was accompanied to Medford by several of her countrymen.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1900, page 3


    Chaney & Cameron, nw¼ of ne¼ and sw¼ of ne¼ sec 15, and se¼ of ne¼ and e½ of sw¼ and ne¼ of se¼ (known as the Gin Lin property) (less 58 acres sold), sec 32, tp 34 s, r 3 w, con 186 acres . . . 9.36
"Sheriff's Sale for Delinquent Taxes," Medford Mail, November 16, 1900, page 4


    Gin Lin was a great Chinese character, a late arrival in search of gold, and was one of the fortunate ones who found it.
    In his operation he naturally employed mostly Chinese, of whom there were four or five hundred living in "Chinatown," located on California Street just across the street to the south of my father's factory.
    Gin Lin was a large, robust character, not at all like the "coolie" or laboring Chinese who constituted the laboring force in his operations; and on one of his visits to "Chinatown" he came across the street to meet Father, and introduced himself as "Gin Lin, alle same Dave Linn's cousin," and he and Father became quite friends.
    He had an extensive hydraulic operation on Applegate River, on property he purchased from the Cameron brothers, of Uniontown, who owned large bodies of land in that district; and to get the desired pressure necessary to operate two very large hydraulic giants which he installed he constructed a canal from Applegate River around the mountainside about fifteen or twenty miles long, bringing it to an elevation of a couple hundred or more feet above the land to be mined.
    The gravel deposit which he mined was thirty or thirty-five feet deep, and many of the boulders to be removed were very large, requiring large sluice boxes.
    When I was home from college for a brief visit on Christmas in 1887, Father suggested that I join him on a Sunday trip to visit Gin, as he had often asked Father to do.
    We hitched a horse to the light buggy, and started very early, as the mine was ten or twelve miles from Jacksonville, over the hills into the Applegate Valley.
    When we arrived, the operation was closed down for a "cleanup"; so we missed seeing the operation, but "Gin" surely entertained us in showing us some of the results of his week or ten days' run.
    I had seen several other hydraulic operations, but never one to equal this one of "Gin's."
    The work done, and earth removed by those huge hydraulic giants was really amazing.
    The "cleanup" was the largest of its kind that I ever saw; and the Chinese workers were carrying out the gold in small buckets full, under the protection of a couple of armed guards pacing the upper ledge or rim of the mine.
    All "Gin" would say as he glanced at the buckets and then to Father was "Putty good, Cousin, putty good."
    We had a fine visit with "Gin" and a mighty interesting day.
    Like all miners Gin and his remaining crew of workers returned to their homeland, or went into new fields after the mine was worked out, leaving nothing in the way of property development to the community. They were not like pioneers, looking for a homeland.
    Before removing from Jacksonville, the few hundred Chinese residents lived up to all the customs and traditions of their native homeland, having observed all their national holidays, and giving particular attention to their burial ceremony at the death of any kinsman.
    They had their own section of the Jacksonville Cemetery, and their funerals were all well attended.
    As they proceeded to the cemetery, they distributed ceremonial papers along the route, and the ceremony at the grave was not greatly different from that at any burial. Their one custom of "feeding the dead," as we speak of it, was unusual, and held at periods after burial. As the procession reached the cemetery for this ceremony, a beautifully roasted hog, nicely browned, would be placed amid the graves with proper ceremony, and tea, their favorite drink, sprinkled on all the graves, together with a liberal scattering of cigarettes. But the roasted hog, as 1 remember, was taken with them after the ceremony, leaving only the "tempting aroma" with the dead.
    It was a dignified and reverential ceremony, just as we pay respect of our departed on our Decoration Day.
    After several years, all the bones of their departed were removed from their graves and returned to their native China and reinterred in their homeland.
    With the removal of the bones of the Chinese miners, I do not recall a marker at any grave of any [Chinese] miner in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
Fletcher Linn, "Memories" Book 4, undated, Southern Oregon Historical Society Research Library


START WORK TO REOPEN PIONEER APPLEGATE MINE
    APPLEGATE, Oct. 26.--From all accounts, it appears that the vicinity of the Little Applegate River is going to emerge from its many years of repose into a worthy object of desire in the minds of mining men for the first time since Chinamen were prominent in the country.
    Recent prospecting has revealed the fact that the adjacent land contains a sufficient amount of gold to permit engaging in extensive mining operations in the very near future. Preparations are now under way to commence what will probably develop into a large mining concern of modern facilities, under the ownership of the Federal Mining Company, of which A. E. Kirkland, prominent mining man from Cottage Grove, is director.
    The operations will be centered in and around the Heckman place, known to pioneers of the valley as the Frank Smith ranch, which has recently been purchased by the mining company. The Buncom place, at the mouth of Sterling Creek, formerly known as the Sam Phillips place, together with the old Sterling mine, have been bonded for mining purposes.
    A large group of laborers, under the directorship of J. A. S. Kleinhammer, is now employed in cleaning and rebuilding a ditch which was used years ago by a company of Chinese miners, known as the Gin Lin Co. It is anticipated that 1500 or 2000 inches of water will be put into the ditch, providing there is an adequate supply in the creek during the winter season. A number of pieces of hydraulic pipe are being hauled from the Sterling mine to be used in connection with the ditch line, which runs back of the Heckman place at a height which will permit hydraulic pressure.
    For the present the men employed are finding board and lodging at private homes, although with the progress of the work and with an addition of workers, Mr. Kirkland anticipates providing means whereby the employees can be housed near the working center. The company has purchased a share in the Little Applegate telephone line and will be listed in the telephone directory under the company name.
    The preparations for the opening of the mine are welcomed by all the residents of the Applegate Valley as an addition toward commercial advancement in the community. A large number of local men are finding employment in the enterprise who, otherwise, would be obliged to seek work elsewhere. Everybody hopes to see the mine progress and attain the highest degree of success possible.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 27, 1926, page B1


Company to Operate Old Chinaman Mine
    Medford, Oct. 28.--After many years of repose, the old gold mine in the Little Applegate region known as the Gin Lin company is to be reopened by a group of local and Cottage Grove men, the company to be known as the Federal Mining Company. Several tracts of adjoining mineral land have been purchased, and the company already has a large crew of men at work.
Oregon Journal, Portland, October 28, 1926, page 14


    At one time [Robert] Cameron leased twenty acres to twenty Chinamen whose leader was known as Jim Ling, the big Chinaman. These men took out $500,000 in gold from those twenty acres, but Mr. Cameron preferred stock raising and general farming himself.
"Pioneer Tells of First Drive to Jacksonville," Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1932, page 4


CHARLES SMITH RECALLS 'CHINY'
    Many the time has Charles Wesley Smith, of the Pleasant Grove district west of Grants Pass, eaten dinner with the long-remembered Chinese miner of Southern Oregon, Chiny Linn.
    Chiny Linn operated a mine on the Big Applegate River near the junction with the Little Applegate. The mine was reported to be fabulously rich.
    "I don't believe Chiny Linn ever made as much money as some folks said he did," Mr. Smith declared. "And as for his honesty, he was just as straight a man as ever lived. The ditch from his mine ran through our field. His wife was a frequent visitor at our house, and we went to school with his son--we always called the boy Chiny Wi. That boy was bright in his lessons, too. Chiny Bow, foreman for Chiny Linn, said that Chiny Linn was always good to his men, and that they could get their money whenever they wanted it.
    "The family of Chiny Linn lived on the Applegate for nearly a decade, then one day they disappeared. I don't know what became of them."
    Mr. Smith was born May 13, 1867, to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Smith. Charles Wesley Smith died March 2, 1935.
    The local man came to Grants Pass in about 1885 when he was 18 years old, and has been in Josephine County ever since.
    He married Christina Murry, and they have six children, who are as follows: Mrs. Katherine Dressell of Grants Pass; Lloyd Thomas Smith, who is with the Forest Service on the coast; Mrs. Audrye McShane of Daggett, Cal., below Los Angeles; Mrs. Greta Norman of Portland; Marion Smith of Tacoma and Johnny Smith who lives at home. A brother of Charles is Dave Smith of Grants Pass.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 3, 1935, page D10

  
Last revised July 7, 2022