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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eaglets 1920-

   

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EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon after I had written my letter for the Medford Mail Tribune Fred Pettegrew came in and enjoyed a bed for the night, and a little later Roy, Ralph and Thomas Stanley came in and called for supper and then in the morning came in for breakfast. They are three out of about six or seven brothers, all in the stock business, that are counted among our most thriving stockmen and farmers, and among them they have a quantity of stock of different kinds to look after, but their stock consists mostly in cattle and hogs. They sold a lot of about 40 large hogs a short time ago and now have about that many more up feeding for the market.
    Sunday morning was another one of our gloomy mornings, as it was cold and foggy--we don't have perpetual sunshine here, but every winter have our regular visitations of foggy weather and while that is rather disagreeable, nevertheless it is a great benefit to the country as it keeps the ground from freezing and thawing, for when we have cold, clear weather and the sun shines out warm, as it sometimes does, that causes the ground to raise and freezes out the grain and grass that has started to grow and has not become sufficiently rooted to stand the sudden changes and the result is it dries out and dies. But while the fog is disagreeable it proves to be a great blessing to the farmers.
    We had our regular Sunday school service Sunday morning and there was no preaching. We went home and there Met Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cassey and family of Talent, who came over to visit Mrs. Cassey's sister, Mrs. Graydon Childreth, and after dining and spending a few hours visiting returned to their home. Mr. Trovato preached for us at night and announced that he would be here again next Sunday, January 4th at 11 o'clock.
    Harry Lewis, who is running the auto stage between here and Medford at present, came in Sunday evening and is still stopping here up to the present time, Wednesday afternoon.
    Monday was rather a quiet day in our town, as there was very few people in from the country, although there was a few, among them was G. W. Sanders of the Antelope orchard and A. G. Bishop, another one of our leading orchardists.
    In talking with Mr. Bishop with regard to the snow storm that we had on the night of the 11th inst., I inquired as to the damage done to his fruit trees, and he assured me that there was none of any consequence, but that everything was progressing finely. Mr. Hamilton, the foreman on the F.L. Company's ranch, was in town, but I did not speak with him, as he was just going out as I saw him.
    B. A. Nason of Prospect came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday morning and went on up home as far as Derby on that line.
    We had four young men, who were out duck hunting, who came in a little late, and called for dinner. They were Harold Grey of Medford, a student of the University of Oregon, Paul Reddy of Medford, a student of the University of Santa Clara; Roy Hill, Medford, Stanford University, and our own Bobby Pelouze of Eagle Point, a student of Stanford University. Bobby says that he expects to finish his course in the Stanford this year and then thinks of taking a four year course in the Harvard University. We, at least, many of us Eagle Pointers, feel rather proud of the achievements Bobby has made and is making, and are hoping that, as he is striking high, he may reach the topmost rung of the ladder.
    James and William Merritt of Reese Creek, E.P. P.O., W. P. Haley and Carl Nickel were among the business callers Monday.
    George Holmer and Clem McDonald are fixing up the old store building opposite the Eagle Point bank building for a garage and are planning to do considerable business the coming season.
    L. J. Macks and Charles Feller of Trail came in Monday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Roger Sears of Butte Falls came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning and went on up home the same day.
    Mrs. Artie Nichols, a daughter-in-law of our town mayor, John M. Nichols, paid them a visit and Wednesday went on the L.C. stage to visit her mother.
    William Martin and F. F. Nichols drove in Tuesday and in the afternoon Mr. Nichols went to Medford with William Perry.
    Mr. and Mrs. Russ Moore of Lake Creek were business callers Tuesday.
    Mr. L. E. Armstrong, his two sons, W. E. and F. M. and daughter, Miss Agnes E. Armstrong, motored in Tuesday from their home in the Lake Creek country, the old Charles Newstrom place, and after stopping here long enough to procure and put on a new tire on their Maxwell, went on to Medford.
    Fred Chartrow and his brother, William E. of Gold Hill, and J. W. Berrian of the fish hatchery, Butte Falls, and George Albert, also of Butte Falls, were diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    Tuesday afternoon was the time set to hold what might be called a water ditch meeting. There was a good attendance, mostly of people living north of our town, although we had Mr. Beebe of Central Point, William Lewis, the sheep men of Central Point and Mr. C. M. Thomas, attorney of Medford. And after discussing the P's and C's of the case in the street until some time after the hour appointed, we met in Brown's hall and the meeting was called to order by W. E. Hammel and after stating the object of the meeting, introduced Mr. Thomas, and after he had explained more fully the object of the meeting and the law governing it called for anyone who wished to ask any question bearing on the subject. There was quite a number asked questions relative to the elimination of poor land and then Mr. Rhoades, the civil engineer, reported that the ditch would be 19½ miles long to bring water this side of the hill so as to water the land, at an approximate cost of $150,000. There was considerable discussion as to whether the water right could be secured on account of the prior claim of the O.&C.P. Co., but Mr. Thomas expressed the opinion that there would be no trouble on that score.
    Lloyd Stanley of Butte Falls and P. E. Sandoz came in Tuesday night for supper and Mrs. Sandoz stayed all night and Lloyd came in for breakfast this morning.
    Mrs. Sears of Medford and Mrs. Thomas Todd of Trail came out on the stage this morning and Mrs. S. went on up to Butte Falls and Mrs. Todd went on the Trail stage up home on Elk Creek.
    Mrs. B. H. Bryant, who has been out visiting friends in this neighborhood went to Medford on the stage Tuesday morning.
    W. D. Roberts has moved into the old home now owned by Mrs. James Owens.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    D. J. Steiner and Wm. Smith, who are living on the Medford-Central Point road and R. J. Steihl of Portland were here for late dinner Wednesday afternoon. Mr. Steihl was on his way up on the headwaters of Reese Creek to look at a place that is for sale. John Seiler, formerly of Medford, and Thomas F. Nichols and Ed Hensley were also here and took supper and Ed Hensley commenced boarding here again.
    January 1st was one of those lovely days such as we often have in Southern Oregon, and almost everyone either went to Medford or stayed at home and enjoyed New Year's dinner at home although J. E. Jackson and wife and Harry Young and wife came in and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Chauncey Florey, our popular county clerk and family, and his brother-in-law, Mr. Raymond Reter, and family came out and took dinner with his father, A. J. Florey, Sr.
    Carl Childreth, a son of Henry Childreth of Ashland, Lester Abbott and wife, Mr. Vernon Jones and Miss Bernice Edmondson of Butte Falls came in and spent the night and all went on to Medford the next morning.
    M. Heckenberg and Charles Chrear came out on the Butte Falls stage. Mr. Heckenberg went out to Hamilton Watkins and Mr. Chrear went on up to Trail on the stage. And Wm. Chamber's little girl, a little tot, came out on the stage and went on up to her home at Butte Falls. Wm. Heckathorn also went up to Trail on the Persist stage.
    There was a meeting of the directors of the First State Bank of Eagle Point here on December 21st, when all of the directors of the bank were present except two and held their annual election, re-electing all of the old officers, and elected Miss Hazel Brown as assistant cashier. Miss Hazel had been acting in the capacity for some time past, but only by appointment, but now is the regular elected assistant.
    On account of her mother's condition, just recovering from the effects of an operation, Miss Hazel is staying home, caring for her mother at present, and S. B. Holman is acting as assistant cashier in her place.
    All of the directors of the bank at the annual meeting expressed themselves as in favor of increasing the capital stock on account of the increase in business and the future prospect. There has been a very material increase in the business in the bank as under the management of J. V. McIntyre one person did about all the work, whereas now under the management of Mr. H. J. Deveney, the present cashier, the business has increased to such an extent that is requires an assistant cashier.
    Miss Elizabeth Deveney, a sister of our banker, who is teaching in the high school of Cottage Grove, has been here visiting her brother, H. J. Deveney, during the holidays, left on New Year's Day for Cottage Grove.
    A. C. Spence, the official road supervisor of the Brownsboro road district, was doing business here Friday.
    Hamilton Watkins and wife came in Friday morning. Mrs. Watkins is engaged taking the census in this neighborhood.
    Robert Merritt and his sister, Miss Maud, were among the business callers Friday.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammel and her sister, Mrs. Sam Courtney called at the Sunnyside Friday afternoon and took the stage for Medford.
    Mrs. R. Helle also made a business call Friday, settling up her business preparatory to starting for Idaho to visit her father, who is said to be in poor health. She thinks of remaining there and caring for him for an indefinite length of time.
    James Riley, formerly of this neighborhood, but more recently of Talent, was a guest at the Sunnyside Friday night.
    J. R. Clark of Butte Falls, Walter Bradshaw of Brewster, Wash., one of the fruit men of that section, W. E. Walker of Standard Oil Co., Medford, and Ernest Peachey of Ashland, one of the timber cruisers, and two strangers were here for dinner Saturday, and later in the day H. H. Williams of Medford at present, but formerly of Idaho, and Wm. C. Pierce, machinist for Hubbard Bros. of Medford, called for dinner.
    Eli Dahack, one of the principal advocates and boosters for the project to bring water from Big Butte into the valley, was in town Saturday. There seems to be some considerable trouble over the project as there appears to be considerable misunderstanding as the question of the elimination of the land unfit for irrigation or inaccessible to the water, and then there is an element among the farmers who seem to want the water brought in but are fearful of the title to the water right, and I would suggest that someone who is versed on the subject write a concise statement of the facts with regard to the claim of the O.&C. Power Company's right to the water in Rogue River and its tributaries as it is claimed by a number that the aforesaid company holds a title to all of the water in said river and it tributaries and if the company hold that title to the water, etc., it is a matter of record and if the title has been tested in the courts that also is a matter of record. In order to enable the voters to vote intelligently on the subject if someone would write an article covering these points and publish it in the Mail Tribune, the most of the voters would understand how to vote on the subject a week from next Saturday, Jan. 17, 1920.
    Owing to Thursday being a holiday the creamery men laid off and took a rest and did not come here until Saturday for the cream.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday evening James Riley and John Mayham came in and spent the night.
    Sunday morning at the close of our Sunday school, Rev. Trovato preached for us, and at night Rev. J. C. Stille of Indian Creek preached one of his characteristic sermons, taking for his text Heb. 3, "How shall we escape if we neglect so great salvation." He is one of the old style preachers and if he finds the word "Hell" in his message, just says it right out, and by the time he got through there were but very few in the audience but began to think that he meant the message expressly for them, and there was a degree of seriousness pervaded the congregation such as hasn't been witnessed here before for some time. Revs. Weikes and Greer have been holding meetings here now for about three weeks, and by special request by Rev. J. Trovato, the stationed Presbyterian minister for Eagle Point, Brownsboro and Butte Falls. Mr. Stille preached that Sunday evening. Mr. Stille has been preaching for us regularly during the fall and early winter, but owing to the condition of the roads between here and his place, it was thought best for him to discontinue until the mud was dried up as there is about 6 or 7 miles of genuine sticky between here and his place. However, he still has his regular appointments at Reese Creek Sunday school every Sunday and seems to be meeting with some success.
    Messrs. Weikes and Greer are still carrying on their meeting, but I am not apprised of how much longer they intend to continue here.
    Sunday Wm. H. Lewis, the sheep man, and W. W. Winfrey of Louisville, Kentucky were here for dinner and so was Wm. von der Hellen of the von der Hellen Hardware Co., and wife and brother-in-law, A. J. Florey, Jr., and Thomas and Roy Stanley.
    Glen Haley, one of our regular boarders, has been employed as a machinist in the garage of McDonald and Holmes of this place. They are getting their new quarters fixed up in good shape and seem to be doing considerable business for this time of year.
    Henry Thornton of Persist, who has been down to Ashland to visit his father, one of the old pioneers of Jackson County, returned Monday and took passage on the Persist stage for his home. He reports that his father is very feeble and almost helpless.
    Thomas and Roy Stanley drove a band of cattle down to the John Singleton farm to be fed, last Monday, they having bought Mr. Singleton's hay.
    Speaking of Mr. Singleton, I understand that he has sold his fine farm and his stock, etc., to a man by the name of Esch of Ashland, consideration $20,000, $3000 for the personal property and $17,000 for the ranch. It was a cash deal, I understand. Mr. Esch has bought one of the best farms in this section of the country and we are hoping that he will prove to be as good a citizen as Mr. Singleton has been. He and his family will be greatly missed from the community.
    Charles Hanscom and Roy Stanley were among the diners Monday.
    Our teachers, Misses Lansing and Young, were at their posts Monday morning, and our school is going on just as though there had been no break in the term.
    F. S. Bailey, one of the U.S. land cruisers, came in on the stage Tuesday, ate dinner at the Sunnyside, procured a saddle horse of S. H. Harnish and started up about Climax to inspect two tracts of land that are wanted as homesteads and has not returned at this time, Wednesday afternoon. Besides having Mr. Bailey as a guest Monday for dinner, we had W. W. Cottrell, John W. Smith and family who are living on the north edge of Big Sticky, Roland Hubbard of Medford, Carl Brainerd, John Iseli of Butte Falls, on his way to Portland, and Nick Young, our road supervisor.
    I met Clifford Hickson limping along on the street Monday afternoon and on inquiry learned that he had stepped on a nail and run it almost through his foot about mid way, but he says that it is getting along very well.
    I also met Cecil Culbertson of Lake Creek. He was trying to stop a leak in his carburetor and was having the time of his life.
    Mrs. Theron Taylor nee Elsie Adamson, a daughter of the mail carrier between here and Persist via Trail, was doing business in town Tuesday.
    Wm. Brown of the firm of Geo. Brown and Sons, who has been confined to his home for some time past with rheumatism, went to Medford Tuesday to consult a specialist.
    Dorsey Coy, Pete Young, A. A. Betz, and L. L. Conger were among the business callers Tuesday.
    A. L. Haselton, one of our old school teachers has been employed to teach a school near Rancheria Prairie.
    Mr. Turner, who is living three miles above the fish hatchery on Elk Creek, and August Bray of Newburg, Ore., were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday night. Mr. Bray was on his way up to see a farm that he has just bought, unsight and unseen. It is situated near the mouth of Indian Creek.
    Al Mayfield and wife are stopping with her brother-in-law, Wm. G. Knighton.
    W. A. Hutchinson and John Greb came out on the stage Wednesday morning and Mr. Hutchinson went on up home on the Trail stage.
    Sam Courtney, our painter and paperhanger, is here papering some of the rooms in the Sunnyside Hotel. He carries a fine assortment of wallpaper and furnishes his patrons with what they want in that line.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 10, 1920, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    H. Denney, representing the Boye Needle Company, San Francisco, Cal., was here Wednesday for dinner.
    Rube Johnson and Walter Wood drove in with a team Wednesday and took passage on the Lewis jitney for Medford, and remained there overnight, coming out on the mail auto.
    Mrs. F. J. Ayres of Reese Creek, and her daughter, Mrs. Roy Smith of Medford, came in Wednesday. Mrs. Smith has been out visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayres, and other relatives and friends for the past few days, and Wednesday afternoon started for home on the Lewis jitney.
    Among the business callers Thursday was Geo. W. Stowell. He came in to bring his cream and eggs for the creamery men. He had two cases of eggs and two cans of cream.
    C. E. Bellows brought in his cream and the creamery men had brought out for him a lot of beaver board, to used in the place of lumber or plastering in finishing up his house. He said that lumber was so high and so hard to get that it would cost him more than the material he has and this is equally as good as either the lime plaster or the wood for ceiling. Henry French also came in and brought in his eggs and cream, but not so many eggs as Mr. Stowell. When I asked Mr. Stowell how many hens he was keeping he replied, "Oh, about 500." Who wonders that he has two crates a week to bring to market.
    Speaking of Mr. French, the creamery men brought out a National Vacuum washing machine for his wife. He intends to attach it to his gasoline motor and save his wife the brunt of the work in washing. When one can attach those machines to an electric or gas motor power it saves a very large part of the labor in washing.
    F. S. Bailey, of whom mention was made in my last, who has been out on Antelope Creek cruising timber, returned Thursday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the 2 o'clock jitney.
    Al Mayfield of Ashland, who has been here with his wife, who is caring for her sister, Mrs. William G. Knighton, went to Medford with Will Lewis, and so did Mrs. Roy Smith.
    John Rader, on of our well-to-do farmers and stock men, was among the business callers Thursday.
    William Messal of Lake Creek came in Thursday and brought a whole beef and two hogs dressed. He let one of the creamery men have one-half of the beef and the two hogs, and in addition to the two hogs, the creamery men had three more dressed hogs that he had procured from Lemon Charley. These creamery men! There are two trucks, representing the two creameries in the Jackson County and the Independence, that make their regular trips through here every week and buy up almost anything the farmers have to sell, in addition to the eggs, cream, chickens, hides, green or dry wood, mohair and almost anything else that the farmer has to dispose of that they can haul in a truck.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Long passed through our town Thursday evening.
    J. F. Maxfield, who lives north of here near Hay Creek, was a business caller Friday and so was Pete Young and his sister, Miss Clara Young, who own and operate a fine farm just west of town.
    Mr. and Mrs. George B. Brown and a part of the family, of Brownsboro, were here Friday, and Mrs. Brown's brother, O. V. Bell, on their way to Medford, but were having tire trouble and stopped here for repairs.
    Messrs. George Summers, Harold Peyton and his brother Ralph Peyton of Flounce Rock came out on horseback and took dinner at the Sunnyside Friday.
    Charley Plummer of Chehalis, Wash., who has been visiting his cousins, Mr. and Mr. J. R. Thornbrue, the past week, left Monday for Central Point, accompanied by Mr. Thornbrue.
    Carlyle Natwick was in town Friday, having a team shod up. He said that he was going to start for Union Creek camp this, Saturday, morning with a four-horse team.
    C. J. Kafer, the Brownsboro merchant and meat deliverer, and George Joe Mayham were among the business callers Friday, and so was Mrs. Fred Dutton, and J. L. Robinson, one of our big farmers. He is farming this year 400 acres of land and has bought a Fordson tractor and expect to put in this spring 100 acres of land in corn. He and his boys are rustlers.
    W. W. Parker of Butte Falls came out Friday to try to untangle his tax business. He has sold a section of timber land northeast of Butte Falls and in making out the abstract was notified that there was a part of the land on the delinquent list on the tax list of 1907 and 1908, and he has his receipts to show that his taxes were all paid up to and including those two years. But he has to go to the expense and trouble to go clear to Jacksonville to straighten out the blunders, or worse, of incompetent county officials.
    Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Cummings started this Saturday morning for San Francisco, Cal., to visit her daughter.
    Carl von der Hellen of Wellen was a business caller this morning and so was E. G. Harding of Lake Creek. Mrs. H. went on to Medford with Wig Jacks.
    Artie Nichols came in this morning on the Lewis jitney to meet his wife, who has been visiting her mother, Mrs. McDonald of Brownsboro, and other relatives, and to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols. Miss Myrtle Minter also came out on the same jitney.
    Hamilton Watkins was also a business caller this morning.
    Welborn Beeson of Talent, and W. W. Cottrell of Trail, were here and took dinner at the Sunnyside today.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mc. F. (Han) Lewis, who is working for the Brittsan brothers on the P. S. Anderson dairy ranch, on Rogue River, about six miles above here, was a business caller Saturday afternoon. In speaking of the Anderson ranch, for years it was considered as one of the many ranches up Rogue River and in the foothills as being of little consequence, but since it was purchased by Mr. Anderson and he has placed the Brittsan brothers in charge of it and has perfected a ditch to bring the water of Rogue River onto the land and under their management it now is considered one of the best ranches in this section of the country. And if I was asked what has made the change, I would answer, work and water. For when I first knew the place 50 years ago--the old Reese place--it was about all that could be done to raise feed to keep a team to do the work, and a few cows. But now it is a thriving dairy ranch and bringing in to the owner a handsome return for the investment. And that is not an isolated instance, but there are hundreds of cases all through that section of the country where, if they succeed in bringing in the water from Big Butte as is contemplated where thousands of tons of hay and grain will be produced. I hear the stockmen telling of the wonderful change that has taken place in the production of especially hay, where the increase, on account of water, has been from one to three hundred percent. And still there are a few of the "old mossbacks" who are fighting the project to put water on the land.
    George Givan was also another business caller Saturday afternoon, and he can add his testimony in favor of bringing in the water onto the land.
    Mrs. J. E. McDonald, at present the hostess in the Elks' Resort, came out Saturday afternoon on the stage and spent the night at the Sunnyside on her way to Medford, taking passage on the Sunday morning stage.
    L. F. McCabe and daughter, Miss Ellen, drove in Monday morning and Mr. McCabe went on to Medford in the Lewis jitney and Miss Ellen took the team home.
    Benj. Brophy, one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen, was in town Monday and in talking with him on the subject of using water and referring to an article in the Daily Mail Tribune where it was suggested that a farmer could afford to pay $125 per acre for the use of water on the land, he affirmed that that was correct, and cited to a place where there was a fine crop of alfalfa growing on ground that would not grow "blackeyed beans" without water.
    Thomas F. Nichols was in town Monday and reports that he has sold his cattle to the Stanley brothers. He met his wife here, who had been in Medford, having her teeth extracted.
    Mr. Adamson, the present mail carrier between here and Persist via Trail, went to Medford Saturday and his daughter, Miss Ella, has been carrying the mail in his place, but she is fully competent to fill the position. Mr. A. returned today, Wednesday, and took charge of the business again.
    Robertson and Patton of Medford brought out a Fordson tractor Monday for J. L. Robinson, and Tuesday Benj. Garnett brought out a lot of distillate to be used in the place of gasoline on the tractor. Mr. R.'s many friends are hoping that he will make a success in the undertaking and he surely will if push and continuance will accomplish it.
    George W. Senders of Wellen was a business caller also Monday.
    W. E. Butler was in town Monday afternoon. He had a load of dressed hogs on his hack, and was retailing them out to customers in quantities to suit. What he could not sell here he was taking to Medford.
    John Holtz of Sams Valley, W. C. Daley of Lake Creek, William Martin and L. F. Nichols were diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday. Mr. Daley had been to Medford and on his way out broke a spring in his Maxwell and took to our old reliable, W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith and auto repairer, for repairs, and called one of his neighbors, James Culbertson, to come for him. And John Holtz also left his car at the same shop for repairs.
    A. Meyer of Lake Creek came out from Medford and went on up home with Mr. Culbertson.
    Benj. Whetstone and his brother-in-law, Thomas Riley, were also business callers Tuesday.
    Mrs. John D. Singleton and her daughter, Miss Sarah, and Mrs. Carl Esch were doing shopping here Tuesday. Mrs. Esch is the wife of the man who bought the Singleton farm.
    Among the business callers Wednesday were A. C. Spencer, Gus Nichols and wife, and a strange young man. They all came out from Brownsboro on the E.P.-L.C. stage and Gus Nichols and wife went on out to Medford.
    Mrs. Sarah Hall and Mrs. J. R. Satchwell were also business callers. Mrs. Satchwell was working earnestly for the Southern Oregon Club, who are trying to secure legislation that will put a stop to the state paying out the taxpayers' money to propagate fish for the benefit of millionaire cannery men and leave us poor mortals to eat whatever happens to slip through their nets. To this end she was giving the Oregonian just what it deserves for its treatment of the people of Southern Oregon in killing our normal school, our fish industry--in fact, almost every move that has been made to develop the southern part of the state. And while she was working for the above she also was soliciting for the Evening Telegram. She seems to be meeting with considerable success and several of the subscribers of the Oregonian dropped it and have subscribed for the Telegram.
    J. F. McCabe and his daughter, Miss Ellen, were visitors this Wednesday morning.
    Thomas, Ralph and Roy Stanley, three of our prominent cattle men, took supper Tuesday night and breakfast this morning at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. L. Robinson, our boss farmer, and William Lewis, our boss sheep man, were in town Wednesday afternoon, and Mr. Robinson reports that he has his Fordson tractor at work and that it was doing fine work. After experimenting with it, they (he and his boys) got it started Tuesday morning and the two boys kept it running night and day for 30 hours, and later in the week he reported that they were still plowing night and day, plowing about half an acre an hour, and that the machine done the work all right, plowing the ground about eight inches deep. The ground is frozen about five inches deep, and that the plows go right under the frozen ground, turning it completely over, and when the sun comes out and thaws the ice it will leave it in fine shape for his corn crop. He intends to keep on plowing night and day so long as the ground keeps so that he can, and he is hoping that it will not rain at least for a few days, so that he can get his 100 acres plowed ready for corn.
    J. C. Brown, real estate dealer of Medford, and Roscoe Hulse of Arizona called for dinner Thursday. They were on their way up Butte Creek to look at a farm that was being offered for sale. Mr. Hulse is in the cattle business, and Mr. H. and Mr. B. were inquiring particularly about some of the fine farms up in that section of the county, and looking at it from my viewpoint there is some of the best farms in the county located in the Lake Creek country, and since the farmers have learned the value of the commercial fertilizers and learned that by a judicious use of them that the crops can be increased 100 percent, they feel perfectly at ease so far as this high cost of living is concerned. M. L. Lewis, one of our rustling young men, was also here for dinner Thursday and so was Mr. Robert Schultz, who lives near San Bernardino, Cal. He came to look over a tract of land that he was interested in but found that the roads were so bad that he concluded to postpone his trip until later in the season.
    Mr. E. D. Schrader of Wellen, a goat dealer and mohair raiser, was also a diner Thursday at the Sunnyside, and so was William Martin and Thomas F. Nichols and Chris Bergman and wife here for dinner that day.
    Sam Courtney, our painter and paper hanger, was also in town Thursday. He had come in to see about a portable woodsawing outfit they had ordered from Portland. He says that he has several jobs of work in the painting and paper hanging line engaged, but that the roads are so bad that he can't get around in his car, so is going to cut a lot of wood and have it ready for the market next summer.
    Rev. Mr. Brittsan and wife of Medford came out on the Lewis jitney and were met here by his son, E.V. Brittsan, and went out to the Anderson ranch.
    Jacob Monia and wife of Brownsboro were doing business here also Thursday.
    Earl Hays, one of our rustling young farmers, was in town Thursday, and asked me to send in for the Daily Mail Tribune for him, but I told him to just send in his check to the office as I had no receipt book and was not taking subscriptions for the paper now, but simply writing for it, as they were doing business on a cash basis, no credit. Pete Young was another business caller and made the same request, and I gave him the same answer. Although I am working to get subscribers for the Daily Mail Tribune all the time, am not authorized to take subscription for it.
    J. B. Rayborne of Medford came in Thursday evening and spent the night and in the morning went on up to Trail on the stage on his way to Prospect.
    Mr. Gains of Trail, a cattle dealer, spent the night with us on his way out to Medford.
    Late Thursday evening W. E. Cooper, his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. E. D. Cooper, and Mrs. M. A. Cooper and Mr. Dressler of the firm of Page-Dressler, real estate dealers of Medford, came in and called for supper, going on to Medford that night.
    John Goin, our agate man, who has been spending the past month up around Albany, Portland and Newport visiting relatives, returned Thursday to his room in the Sunnyside.
    Last Friday Milo Conley and his mother, Mrs. Hessler of Brownsboro, were doing business in out town and when they went out he had about 100 feet of flooring and about 80 rods of wire fencing and a lot of other things in the wagon.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno and her two sons, Carl and Wallace, were doing business with our leading merchants, George Brown and Sons.
    Speaking of the Brown firm I was very agreeably surprised Friday as I was making my rounds looking up Eaglets for the readers of the Daily Mail Tribune to see William H. Brown, a member of the firm, sitting in his accustomed seat, the bookkeeper's, in the store. He has been confined to his home for several weeks with rheumatism, but is so now that he can walk on crutches. I was also agreeably surprised to meet Mrs. Royal G. Brown, the wife of another member of the firm in the store, for she has been a patient in a hospital in Medford for some time where she had to undergo two operations, but was regaining her strength.
    Charles Klingle of Lake Creek was a business caller also Friday, and so were Mr. and Mrs. Joe Wattenburg. I understand that Mr. W. has taken charge of the Joe Rader farm on Antelope.
    George Givan, one of our prosperous farmers, was a business caller Friday.
    Rev. Hoyt, the Presbyterian Sunday school missionary, was in town Thursday to meet Rev. Joseph Trovato, the pastor of the Presbyterian church of Butte Falls, Brownsboro and Eagle Point, and has made an arrangement to give a stereoptic lecture showing scenes taken from the foreign lands on Sunday evening, February 22, 1920.
    We are to have two elections in this section, one at Reese Creek school house to vote on bonding the district (water) to raise funds to cover the expense of bringing in the water from Big Butte for irrigating purposes, and the other is to be held here to elect officers in the Eagle Point Ditch Company, for the coming year.
    The two traveling evangelists, Messrs. Weikes and Green, who have been conducting services here for the past month, closed their meeting last Friday night. They are surely stayers as they have had services every night except for two Sunday and four Saturday nights. They seem to be rather out of the ordinary line as they claim to be non-denominational and seem to ignore all other evangelists, although they seem to set forth good Bible truths, so far as I could understand, for I am hard of hearing and Mr. Weikes being a Scotchman and having a very distinct brogue it was very hard for many of us to understand. Their congregations run from two to 14, generally about eight or nine. Mr. W. said they were going from here to Trail to commence services tomorrow, Sunday, January 18th.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. W. Holt of Portland came in this noon for dinner. They came down to look at a place on the north fork of Reese Creek, but when they learned that there was no water for irrigation on the place returned to Medford to go to Lake County to look for land there.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman, her sister, Mrs. Pete Betz, and Miss Agnes Schoudland, who is teaching in the Laurel Hill district, came in for dinner today. And later in the day Mrs. Joe Casey and two children and brother-in-law, Graydon Childreth and wife of Talent, and Mr. Cross of Butte Falls.
    J. H. Cooley of Medford, Mr. Norris, farmer on the Wilfley orchard, and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby called.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 20, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday night there was a general dance here and I understand that there was a very good attendance. As a matter of course there was a goodly number of young folks at the Sunnyside for supper, beds and breakfast, among whom were Fred Middlebusher and Miss Eula Houston, Henry Trusty and Miss Enid Middlebusher, all of Trail; Wallace Bergman and Miss Vida Bradshaw of Wellen; H. Bruggeman, a traveling salesman, Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, and F. B. Rayborn of Medford, besides quite a number of our young people who came in after the dance and took beds and did not get up until after I had gone to Sunday school.
    We had a very interesting session of Sunday school, we have some new members coming in and some old ones returned who had dropped out during the cold weather. After Sunday school, Rev. Joseph Trovato preached for us, taking for his text "Am I My Brother's Keeper?" presenting some fine thoughts. He will preach for us next Sunday, Jan. 25, at 7:30 p.m.
    There were two carloads of people came out from Medford Sunday for dinner, among them were Helen Silliman, H. B. Silliman, Mrs. H. B. Silliman and Howard Silliman and J. W. Wakefield and family, all of Medford. Mr. Wakefield is agent for the Continental Insurance Company. We also had Henry Trusty and Miss Enid Middlebusher, Fred Middlebusher and Miss Eula Houston here for dinner. Also Rob Harnish and wife and Ernest Albert of Butte Falls. Later in the day Miss Marie Myers who is teaching in the Reese Creek school district and Miss Josephine Koppes who is teaching in the Debenger Gap district and Miss Minter and her brother, Marshall Minter. Mr. Minter came with a buggy to take the two teachers, Miss Koppes to Jasper Hannah's where she is boarding, and Miss Myers to W. E. Hammel's, her boarding place, and Miss Minter went to Medford with an auto driver.
    Rev. Richard Weikes, one of the men who has been holding evangelical services here for the past month and went to Phoenix last Saturday, returned Monday to gather up some of their belongings they left and to attend to some other matters. In my last letter I stated that they had gone to Trail to conduct services, but I had misunderstood him and he told me on Monday that they had not decided just where they would go but would try to find someplace where they could go and try to do some good. They seem to be very devoted and earnest in their efforts to help to bring people to a knowledge of sins forgiven. While here they lived in rented, furnished rooms and seemed to pay their own expenses.
    A. C. Spence, the Lake Creek road supervisor of Brownsboro, was a business caller Monday morning and so was P. W. Haley.
    In my last letter I spoke of there being two different elections Saturday, and Monday learned the result. The first election, the one to vote on the bonding of the district for money to build the ditch to bring water from Big Butte Creek into this valley, resulted in carrying for the bonds 28 for and 8 against. There was but very little opposition to the bonds and that was confined almost entirely to one family and relations, and those who have been keeping tab on the question as to who was in favor and those who were opposed report that there were quite a number who were in favor of bonding who were unable to be at the polls to vote. The other election was simply the annual election of the Eagle Point Ditch Company to elect officers for the ensuing year and to levy an assessment to enlarge the present ditch, as it is too small to carry the amount of water needed on the land under the ditch. The election resulted in re-electing the old officers, J. H. Cooley of Medford, president, and Wm. Perry as ditch superintendent.
    John Iseli of Butte Falls, who had just returned from a trip to Portland, came in Monday evening on the Harnish jitney, spent the night and Tuesday here and Tuesday evening J. W. Berrian of the Butte Falls fish hatchery, and Mr. and Mrs. Austin, one of the Butte Falls merchants, came out and took supper and after supper they all four went on to Butte Falls.
    George W. Sanders, the foreman on the commercial orchard, was here for dinner Monday. He was trying to find someone to help him repair his telephone line.
    Other business callers Monday were Mr. Radcliff, Wm. Smith and wife of Medford, who were on their way up the country to visit relatives, Gus Nichols and wife of Lake Creek, Roy, Ralph and Thomas Stanley. During the time that Mrs. Roy Stanley is up in the Willamette Valley visiting, the Stanley brothers have acquired the habit of dropping in at the Sunnyside, sometimes for supper and sometimes for breakfast or dinner, and they came so thick and fast that I have left their names out of my little book and count them as regular boarders.
    Mr. Vernon of Trail, came in Monday afternoon to have his horses shod and reported that someone had borrowed his doubletrees, neck yoke and other appendages of his wagon while it was standing under a shed and had neglected to bring them back, and he would like to have them returned. Some people are so forgetful!
    Martin L. Hurst was here representing a Portland firm selling the portable drag saw. He spent the night here and took passage on the 7:30 stage for Medford Tuesday morning.
    W. A. Livingston, representing the American Tobacco Company, of Medford, was here for dinner Tuesday, and so was F. M. Lewis and A. S. Bliton.
    E. V. Brittsan of the P. S. Anderson dairy farm came in Tuesday and was having our blacksmith and auto repairer work on his auto.
    Mrs. F. Trefine of Butte Falls, came out Tuesday and went on to Medford.
    W. H. Newstrom, wife and mother, Mrs. A. C. Newstrom, formerly of Lake Creek but now of Grants Pass, and Mrs. Stedum, a sister of Mrs. A. C. Newstrom, passed through here Tuesday on their way up to their old home.
    L. W. Smith of Idaho, came out from Medford Tuesday and went up to Lake Creek on the Lake Creek stage. He is here visiting his daughter, Mrs. Stubblefield.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1920, page 5


DERBY FAMILY IS BURNED OUT, AID FUND IS STARTED
    Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Van De Mark and three babies, aged two, three and four years respectively, are in this city entirely destitute as the result of a fire which completely destroyed their home, food, clothing and winter supplies near Derby last Thursday. The fire caused by a defective flue started while Mrs. Van De Mark was alone in the house with the children, and she had a narrow escape from death in effecting the rescue of all three of them.
    S. M. Hawk, who operates the Hawk sawmill nearby and is the father of Mrs. Van De Mark, was soon on the scene but the fire had already gained such headway there was no hope of saving the building. Mr. Hawk was painfully burned trying to get out a few belongings.
    Until fruit boxes can be sold next summer the family will be entirely without money, so a number of friends headed by Dillon R. Hill have started a relief fund. Mr. Hill gave $20 in cash this morning. Contributions in cash will be received at the Mail Tribune office or contributions in clothing, particularly baby clothing, food or other articles may be sent to 701 West Eleventh Street, where the family is now residing. There is no residence telephone.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 26, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Simon, formerly foreman on the A. Corbin orchard, but now living on their own place, near Wellen, were in town Wednesday afternoon trading.
    H. B. Tronson and Mrs. Ward, wife of his foreman, were also trading at the same time.
    R. E. Morris, our school supervisor, came in Wednesday afternoon and invited me to go with him out to the Reese Creek school house, which invitation I gladly accepted and the result was that after enjoying a five-mile ride with Mr. Morris we reached the school house just after the little folk were dismissed, but we met them at the door before they had dispersed. Miss Marie Myers, the teacher, was just commencing to hear the class in civil government recite and the way she handled the subject evidenced that she was fully competent to fill the position. Then came the spelling classes, but as the recitation was in writing it was not so interesting as what it would have been if they had spelled orally. After the school was dismissed we were entertained by Miss Myers in giving Mr. M., the superintendent, an idea of how she was conducting the school and then she showed us the stock of goods they had on hand in the store that she uses to give the children practical lessons in business affairs, having them purchase a number of different articles on different plans. For instance, one would buy a bill of goods to run a certain length of time at a certain price and so much discount for cash, thus giving them actual experience in doing business and by that means she would enable them to secure a better idea than could be obtained otherwise. After spending a while in that way we then visited the camp of the men who are inspecting the different routes for the Crater Lake Highway. They had come down on the east side of Rogue River and were just establishing their camp. But of course, knowing as much about the working of civil engineering as we did we wasted no breath asking questions, but we will know where the road is going to be, possibly, when the contract is let for building it. Retracing our steps we reached the Sunnyside before dark and Mr. M. spent the night with us, going up to Lake Creek the next day.
    Mr. J. L. Robinson, Sr., walked into town from his farm to try to catch the Lewis jitney, but arrived just five minutes too late, and then while waiting for a car to come along so that he could ride to Medford, and talking to friends he let two cars pass unnoticed, and when I saw him last was still looking for a car.
    Raymond Bergman and Roy Watkins were diners at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    There was the usual number of visitors in town Thursday, those who bring in their chicken, eggs and cream. George Stowell brought in three crates of eggs, 90 dozen at 40 cents per dozen, and 20 gallons of cream, and I heard him tell the creamery men to bring more crates as he would have four crates next week. He keeps the White Leghorn hens, and keeps no cocks, but simply keeps the hens to lay and sends off for his new supply of hens, and I heard him say that the last lot of pullets he sent for, 3,000, but he could only get 250 on account of the demand. [See correction, next column.] Perry Foster, one of the old standbys of the Debenger Gap country, was in town Thursday. He reports that he has been laid up with rheumatism for the past two weeks, but is all O.K. now.
    Mrs. Monia of Brownsboro was also a business visitor, bringing in a crate of chickens for one of the creamery men, and then she took passage on the Lewis jitney for Medford.
    I noticed in the Table Rock Items that some hard-hearted person has been leaving a poor old horse to starve over in his neighborhood, and die by inches and suggest that someone ought to report such owners to the Humane Society. Well, last winter we had two old horses here that had been turned out to "root hog or die" and after hanging around all winter, one of them disappeared and the other was taken up and put in the pound, and after keeping it there for several days the owner notified the town marshal that they would make the town a present of the old horse, and the next morning the horse was seen in the lane about four miles this side of Medford. There is now four or five head of horses running around town and starving to death, and I would suggest that someone gather them all up, as they did in the Butte and Lake Creek country and drive them off to Medford and have them put in the pound and then someone would buy them, if for nothing else, for chicken meat, and have them put out of their misery.
    H. C. Mechem of Ashland and Thomas Spencer of Prospect spent Thursday night with us, and Friday morning took passage in the E.P.-Persist stage for Trail.
    A. L. Boggs and H. Dolf of Medford were here Friday for dinner. They were here with a new wood saw that Mr. Boggs is placing on the market. It is fastened onto the front end of an auto and is run by having a drum fastened onto the hind end of the auto with a belt running to the wheel on the saw frame. It cut up quite a lot of wood for William von der Hellen while it was here and when they got through simply lowered the hind wheel of that contained the drum and started right off for another job. Mr. H. Wolf has accepted the agency for the machine in this country.
    Ed Cowden, Fred Luy, Mrs. Thomas Cingcade, Mrs. Lynn and daughter were shopping in town Friday. Mrs. Lynn is the lady who lives on the Egenbury place they bought last spring.
    Friday evening G. Albert, Harold Patton, Ernest Abbott, Sam Hughes, Ora Abbott, Wilson O'Brien, Prof. H. P. Jewett and Fred Fredenburg, all of Butte Falls, came out and took supper at the Sunnyside and then secured passage to Gold Hill on the big Hudson mail coach, where they were engaged to play a game of basketball against the Gold Hill ball team, all returning to the Sunnyside that night about midnight, except Prof. Jewett. He went to Medford and came out on the stage, going on to Butte Falls that night.
    Welborn Beeson of Talent spent Friday night at the Sunnyside.
    W. C. Daley and Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek were early callers Saturday morning. Mr. Daley was on his way to Medford on business.
    Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby came out on the E.P.-B.F. stage and went up home.
    Word came Saturday morning that the residence of S. M. Hawk near Butte Falls was burned Friday night, but I have none of the particulars.
    P. E. Sandoz of Elk Creek, Trail post office, came in Saturday for dinner. He had just returned from Nebraska, where he had been combining business with pleasure, looking after business interests and visiting two of his sons and a sister. After dinner, he started right on up home.
    H. A. Hauser, representing Failing, McCalman Company, Portland, Ore., was here for dinner Saturday.
    Mrs. McGill of Medford came out Saturday morning and spent the day at the Sunnyside.
    John Holtz of Sams Valley and A. C. Spence of Brownsboro were business callers Saturday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1920, page 5



TRAIL ITEMS
    A. L. Peachey of Ashland is in our vicinity, taking the U.S. census.
    A. F. Poole visited his home over Sunday, going to Medford Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Clark Drake have moved to Trail and live in one of Asher's rooms.
    Mrs. A.T. Poole joined her husband at Medford Tuesday.
    There will be a neighborhood dance at the Trail hall Saturday night, January 31. Basket supper.
    Oscar Stewart took about 40 beef cattle through Trail Tuesday.
    The Sunday school at Trail has a very good attendance this winter. They meet at 11 a.m.
    Ed Ash made a business trip to Medford the first of the week.
    Fred Sturgis is expected home from Susanville, Cal., where he went to attend the funeral of his mother, Mrs. Jones, who passed away January 20, 1920.
    Fred Middlebusher made two trips to Medford the first of the week. He reports the roads very bad.
    Irwin Howe and Howard Ash are drawing logs to Hall's saw mill.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 28, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Pete Thurman of Elk Creek came in on the Persist stage Saturday and spent the night at the Sunnyside, taking passage on the Sunday morning stage for Medford.
    Sunday was one of those quiet balmy days such as we often have in the latter part of January, and during February that reminds one of an April morning and makes us almost forget that a short time ago we were shivering with the unusually cold snap that visited our Southern Oregon country, and made us feel thankful that our lot has fallen to us in such a lovely climate.
    We had our usual Sunday school exercises Sunday morning and at the close of the school our janitor, Heath Childreth, tendered his resignation and now it devolves on us, as a Sunday school, to secure the services of another. We regret very much that Master Heath decided to resign as he has been rendering good service and has given general satisfaction. We had no preaching services at 11 o'clock a.m. but Mr. Trovato preached for us at night and had what might be called a fair-sized congregation, but not near so large as it ought to have been. He gave us a very good discourse on the history of Jacob, from the time he cheated Esau, his brother, out of his birthright up to the time of his seeing the vision of "The ladder that reached into the heavens."
    There were but few came in for dinner Sunday although in the evening Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Jerome of Medford called for dinner and so did Lawrence Luy of Wellen. Mr. Jerome is interested with the Standard Oil Company of Medford. G. E. Pierce and wife, who are now located on the Charley Terrill farm near Brownsboro, also took supper with us.
    Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, was here Sunday night and Monday he and Wig Jacks were surveying out a ditch running from the main ditch that is taken out of Little Butte Creek just above the Pelouze place, to water the tract of land he purchased from F. M. Stewart, and Wm. G. Knighton, known as the Grover tract.
    Sam Courtney was a business caller also Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    F. G. Thomson, one of the firm of Thomson Brothers of Lake Creek, came out on the Lake Creek stage Monday and went on out to Medford that afternoon. J. F. Johnson also came in and went to Medford Monday.
    Wm. Smith and wife, who own a small farm on the Medford-Central Point road, came out Monday and went on up to Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, to visit Mrs. Smith's daughter, Mrs. Gus Nichols, returning Tuesday and taking with them their granddaughter Muriel Smith. Miss Muriel has been attending school here during the school term but her grandmother took her home so that she will be greatly missed from our school, for she was one of the brightest pupils in our school.
    Mrs. Charles Nichols and two of her sons, Otto and Carl Nichols, were doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thornbrue were transacting business with George Brown and Sons Tuesday. Mr. Thornbrue is the foreman on the Pelouze farm.
    R. A. Petty was also a business caller Tuesday.
    Ira Tungate of Butte Falls came in Monday night, took supper, went to Medford to attend the Page Theater, came back and the next morning went on up home.
    Ed Frey of Lake Creek, and Miss Haynes of Ashland came out from Medford Tuesday morning and took passage on the Lake Creek stage for Mr. Frey's home.
    Wm. Perry and wife went to Medford Monday on business, remaining overnight, and while there attended the Page to see and hear the performance.
    S. R. Snapp of San Francisco, representing Royal Baking Powder Co., was here for dinner Tuesday.
    I see that our new garage men, McDonald and Holmes, are getting their garage fixed up in good shape as they bought out a garage firm in Central Point and are moving the tools and machinery out here. They are also putting in a new gasoline pumping plant and a lathe, drill and other machinery. They are expecting to do considerable business the coming season.
    Mrs. H. L. Vandenburg of Butte Falls came out Tuesday and went on to Medford on the stage.
    P. W. Haley, one of our rustling farmers, was in town Tuesday having our blacksmith make him a hoe of a peculiar make, to cut the rushes and tough grass out of his ditches. He stood right by Mr. Childreth all the time he was making it and was constantly borrowing trouble for fear he would not make it just right, but when it was completed pronounced it O.K.
    Sam Coy, another one of our rustling farmers who bought his farm on the installment plan and is making good, was in town Tuesday.
    Hamilton Watkins and wife were also in town Tuesday. Mrs. Watkins is taking subscriptions for the Oregon Journal.
    The Dodge brothers are starting to drill a well for Mr. McDonald, the man who bought the Hensley place in the lower end of town.
    Miss Humphrey of Derby came out this Wednesday morning and went to her home on the stage, and Miss Veva Loun of Lake Creek also came out at the same time and went up home on the Lake Creek stage. She is attending the Medford high school and was through with her examinations for the week, was excused and has gone home to spend the weekend with her parents.
    F. G. Thomson of Lake Creek came out this morning on the stage and went up home.
    Frank Rhodes and John Grieve, the old reliable road builder, spent the night at the Sunnyside last night and Mr. Rhodes started for Derby and Mr. Grieve for Prospect.
    There were two strangers came in last night and called for beds, stating that they wished to start early on their journey this morning.
    I see in my letter published Tuesday the 27th that there is a big mistake made either by myself or the typesetter. In speaking of George Stowell's hennery and of his sending off for his young hens I am made to say that he sent an order for three thousand pullets when I intended to say three hundred. While Mr. Stowell is keeping quite a lot of hens he is not going quite that strong into the business. The mistake was possibly made by my using numerals instead of letters to express the number and it is very easy to add an extra cipher, making a difference of twenty-seven hundred in the statement.
    John Rader, who owns and operates one of the best farms in this section and is also one of our leading stockmen, was in town Tuesday to have his plow shears sharpened and to attend to other business matters.
    In spite of the high prices for dishes Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants and the only one in town who handles dishes, has had a fine lot of cups and saucers placed on his shelves.
    Rev. Trovato will preach Sunday, Feb. 1, at 11 o'clock a.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Al Sturgis, one of the leading citizens on Elk Creek, passed through town Wednesday and went on up to his home.
    Joe Wattenhouse, who is living on the Joe Rader place, and a friend were doing business with our merchants and blacksmith Wednesday evening.
    John B. Martin and A. Stockford of Derby came out Wednesday afternoon and report that they were almost four hours coming from the Ayres place on the Derby road to the Reese Creek school house, a distance of about two miles, with a good team and wagon with about five hundred pounds, Mr. Martin's tool chest and a few other things. The piece of road referred to is a strip of sticky that has been a source of trouble to almost everyone who has to travel over it. I heard the mail carrier remark the same afternoon that he had been carrying the mail over the same road for the most of the time for fourteen years and he had never seen it so bad before as it was that day. And while our county authorities are spending thousands of dollars on what are comparatively good roads the people of rural districts are left to plod through sticky mud, and this road is along an old mail route that has been used for years to carry the U.S. mail over, and yet is neglected from year to year with the promise "Well, we will try to do something next year."
    G. T. Wilson of Medford came in and spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside on his way up to his ranch near Derby station on the P.&E. John Mayham was also a lodger at the same time with us.
    C. J. Kafer of Brownsboro was among the business callers Thursday.
    Carl Bieberstedt, one of our well-to-do citizens, was canvassing our town Thursday morning with a petition to Governor Olcott requesting him to use the executive clemency to keep W. E. Butler from going to the penitentiary. There is a very strong sentiment here in his favor as the mitigating circumstances seem to be greatly in his favor. Mr. Butler was indicted by the grand jury about two years ago for shooting a young man by the name of Stewart and after lying in jail for a long time was finally brought to trial and if my memory serves me right was convicted of manslaughter with a recommendation to the court for leniency. The case was appealed to the supreme court and after pending in said court for a long time the sentence of the district court was sustained by a divided court. But his friends, and they seem to be numerous, are asking to have the governor give him a free pardon. I understand that there are several petitions being circulated in his behalf.
    Prof. G. W. Ager, county school superintendent of Jackson County, was out Thursday visiting our school and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Mr. McGuirk, the cigar manufacturer of Medford, and while here was looking after that branch of business in our town.
    James Archibald of Brownsboro passed through our town with a fine registered bull he had purchased at the stock sale in Medford. He also had a fine boar hog that he had purchased in the same place. Mr. Archibald prides himself on keeping up-to-date in that line. He believes that it costs no more to keep a cow that will give ten or twelve quarts of milk than it does to keep a cow that will hardly raise a calf, and if our stockmen would pay more attention to the quality and less to the quantity they might find it to their advantage.
    Our creamery men were a little mixed Thursday as some of them who supply the Jackson County Creamery with cream came in and found that they had phoned out [sic] that he could not come out on Thursday as their truck broke and was out of commission, but the Independent Creamery man was on hand and met his customers, but the other man did not reach here until Friday and got his cream and eggs just the same. While here Thursday I overheard a conversation between two of our dairy men with regard to a contest or that had come out to teach the dairy men how to tell a good cow from a poor one and Mr. A. remarked to Mr. B. that he had in his herd a large Holstein cow and Mr. G., the tester or teacher, remarked that she was good for beef but good for nothing for milk or cream, whereupon Mr. A. told him that she was among the best milkers he had, but the teacher said she had such a small udder. Yes, remarked Mr. A, her udder is small but it expands and she will give over eight quarts at a milking. The teacher then thought that he would save himself on the cream or butterfat supply so he remarked that she was no good for butterfat, but Mr. A. assured him that her milk tested from four and a half to five points or percent. (I don't fully understand the full meaning of their terms.) The teacher then started in a different direction and pointed to a large roan Durham cow and remarked that there was the best cow in the herd fully expecting that Mr. A. would confirm his statement, when lo and behold, he was told that that cow would make good beef but was no good for milk or butterfat. So Mr. A. derived but little benefit from the professional teacher and Mr. B. remarked that that was about his experience in the same line. Although there are some who have studied and partially mastered the subject, it is not everyone who goes to school and gets a smattering of the business who make a success in that line.
    R. M. Conley and G. C. Cottrell of Butte Falls were here for dinner Thursday.
    Ed Cowden, who is living on the old J. M. Nichols place, and C. A. Hanscom of Brownsboro were also in town Thursday.
    W. A. Nessler, a member of the fire department of Portland who has been here visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Knighton of this place, left yesterday (Friday) for his home.
    Mrs. R. M Richardson of Butte Falls went up home Friday.
    Pliney Leabo, one of our old boarders who has been away for a few weeks, returned to his room Friday.
    C. H. Obenhaus, of Portland, was here for dinner Friday.
    Grant Mathews and wife and son-in-law, J. F., and his brother Frank Johnson were in town Friday.
    There have been some changes in real estate out this way in the past few days. W. C. Daley has sold his fine farm on the north fork of Little Butte to a man by the name of Dundus and W. C. Daley has bought the George von der Hellen place just above town. While the community in the Lake Creek country are losing one of their best citizens, we as a community will be the gainers.
    We hope that Mr. Dundus may prove to be equally as desirable a citizen in the Lake Creek country and that he will not only prove a blessing to that neighborhood but to the surrounding country.
    J. L. Robertson brought in a lot of hogs Friday to ship to Medford today, Saturday, for the Portland market.
    Nick Young, our road supervisor, was here for dinner yesterday.
    Mrs. Wm. Nickel of Lake Creek was here yesterday.
    Messrs. Dodge and Sage, the men who are drilling wells in this neighborhood, have been lodging with us for the past few nights while they were drilling a well for Mr. McDonald, and Mr. Dodge was here for dinner today while Mr. Sage was taking the drill, etc., out to John Greb's to drill a well for him.
    Mr. H. Bruggeman of Lake Creek spent the night with us Friday and so did M. C. Mahoney of Butte Falls, and was met here this morning by his daughter and Mrs. J. L. Vanderberg of Butte Falls.
    Jimmy Dugan was an early caller this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 2, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett

    Mrs. S. B. Fry of Trail came out on the Persist stage Saturday afternoon and spent the night at the Sunnyside, going on to Medford Sunday morning on the Medford stage.
    Mrs. M. L. Cadzow and her son Robert and Mrs. H. P. Jewett of Butte Falls also came out on the stage, took supper at the Sunnyside Hotel and went on up to Butte Falls that night. There were quite a number of our young men and boys went to Butte Falls that night to attend a dance that was given that night.
    At the close of our Sunday school, by special arrangement and invitation by the pastor of the Presbyterian church, your Eagle Point corresponded preached here in place of the said pastor, Rev. Joseph Trovato. There was a rather small but very attentive audience. Mr. Trovato expects to preach here next Sunday, Feb. 8th, at 7:30 p.m.
    Mrs. Henry Meyer and her two sons, Audley and Vernon of Lake Creek, came out Sunday to attend services at the Catholic church and came to the Sunnyside for dinner.
    Wm. Lewis, who owns two or three ranches and a large band of sheep, was doing business here Monday morning.
    Miss Hazel Brown, the assistant cashier in the First State Bank of Eagle Point, who has been off duty at the bank on account of the health of her mother, who has had to submit to two operations, has resumed her duties in that institution, as her mother has gained sufficient strength to partly attend to the duties of the household.
    Fred Matz, one of the forest rangers, came in Monday from Trail and took dinner and so did Charles Boussum, an orchardist who has been engaged in the J. M. Wilfley orchard.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. Hardman of Lake Creek, and A. C. Spence of Brownsboro, were among the business callers Monday.
    Mrs. David Smith, whose husband is helping to care for a part of Mr. Lewis' sheep, came in Monday and did considerable trading with our merchants, Geo. Brown and Sons. She was met here by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Sherman Wooley.
    Charles Drexler, who is feeding his cattle out on the desert north of here, was doing business Monday and so was Owen Conover, Frank Johnson and a number of our citizens who are interested in the cattle business, and while they were here were discussing the possibilities of having the Crater Lake Highway pass through here or whether it would go up Rogue River, crossing Little Butte near the mouth of that stream, and the consensus of opinion seem to be that it would pass through or near Eagle Point, because if it went on the route up Rogue River about all of the scenic beauty discernible would be occasionally a view of the river and the trees along its banks on one side and on the other side a row of low hills covered with scrub oak and chaparral brush, whereas if it was brought through or near here it would pass through one of the richest valleys in Jackson County, and after the new ditch that the good people of this district have decided to make--they have already voted to bond the district for $200,000 to pay for its construction--yes, after that ditch is completed and the water brought in and put on the land there will be thousands of acres of land brought into a state of cultivation and will produce thousands of dollars of produce and have new homes established, that will add to the scenic beauty of the route.
    The many friends of Mrs. Roy Stanley are glad to see her once more on our streets. She has been visiting her relatives for some time past.
    Miss Alice Humphrey of Derby came out Monday and went on to Medford to resume her studies in the high school.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. Frutzling, who have a farm on Reese Creek, Derby road, came out Monday and Mrs. Frutzling went on up to Portland to settle up some business that they had left unsettled last spring when they moved out here.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nygren and Mrs. Nygren's brother, Ralph Bieberstedt, were business callers Monday.
    S. S. Michel of Ashland, and Mr. Harley Dunn of Talent, two cattle men, were here Tuesday looking over the situation and while here took dinner at the Sunnyside. Mr. and Mrs. Robert Harnish and S. H. Harnish were also diners with us and so were C. A. Rekel and Earl May. Messrs. Rekel and May came out tightening up the electric wires along the different routes in this district.
    Mr. Esch, the man who has bought the Singleton farm a couple of miles below town, was a business caller Tuesday.
    There is a lot of wire fencing been dropped off at the corner next to the Childreth shop, and I learned that it was for Carl Bieberstedt. He seems to be fencing quite a tract of land.
    S. H. Harnish and sons and the Sunnyside Hotel are placing a lot of sand and gravel on the street leading from the wagon bridge up to the Sunnyside, thus greatly improving the street. We call it a street although it is really a county road, but the powers that be have more than they can do to care for the roads entirely outside of our town.
    Wm. von der Hellen is having the rocks taken off of the tract of land lying between the city hall, not the dance hall, but the place where our mayor and the city dads meet occasionally to look after the interests of the town, the city hall and the new garage. The rocks were once used as a foundation for a large barn and some of them were used in making the forges for a blacksmith shop that was burned down, and is going to cultivate the land. The tract contains a number of lots of good land that no one has received any benefit from, no, not even the town, for the taxes on the land have not been paid for a number of years. Speaking of the non-payment of taxes, there is a farm in our town that the state school board has a mortgage on and the taxes have not been paid on the land for ten years and now the school board have commenced foreclosure proceedings and will probably have to take the property, and our little town as a corporation, has a claim for back taxes, and the question comes up, if the state has to take the property will it, the state, have to pay the back taxes, or will the county and town have to lose it? There is an old saying that there are two things that we never miss, that is death and taxes, but it looks as though there is a case of at least a strong liability of the county and town losing the tax money this time.
    L. K. Hawk and his two children were there Tuesday and he was buying quite a lot of nails of Wm. von der Hellen and I inquired if he was building, and he replied he was, but not much; as long as lumber is as high as it is we cannot afford to do much building.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1920, page 5



REESE CREEK RIPLETS
    Now that the enumeration of the fourteenth census of the United States is at an end, everyone is wondering how many inhabitants our beloved country contains. Some of the enumerators had quite an experience getting through the sticky, but that is all in the work.
    Word has been received from Mr. Crandall and family, who are visiting in California this winter, that Mrs. Crandall and son Edison are down with the flu.
    Hattie Johnson, who is a student in the Medford high school, is in the hospital with the flu.
    Mrs. C. E. Bellows is still in the Sacred Heart Hospital.
    Andrew Lonchard departed a few days ago for Portland where he expects to work at his trade, the tailoring business, for a few months.
    The government surveyors surveying for the Lake Creek highway are still at work in this section of the country.
    The winter has been so dry that most of the farmers have improved the opportunity to get their spring plowing done, and some are putting in their early spring crops. However the rains are badly needed.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Cummings and wife, who went to San Francisco a few weeks ago to be gone a short time, have decided to remain there for the winter if not longer and he has returned and is arranging his business here accordingly and packing up some of this household goods to take to the Bay City with him.
    P. W. Haley, one of our leading citizens and a constant reader of the Mail Tribune, was a business caller Wednesday, and so was Ernest Peachey, one of our forest rangers, and have been staying at the Sunnyside since and is still here at this writing, Saturday.
    C. E. Bellows, another one of our hustling farmers and dairy men, was in town Wednesday afternoon. He had been to Medford to bring his wife out. She had to undergo an operation at one of the hospitals but had so far recovered as to be able to ride out home again.
    A gentleman by the name of Norton and wife, of Medford, who is traveling in the interest of the Olympic Milling Co., were here for dinner Wednesday. He gave me his card but I misplaced it so lost his Christian name.
    Henry Meyers and wife of Lake Creek were also here for dinner the same day. They are counted among the leading citizens in that community.
    One of the pure food inspectors was out and served notice on our merchants that they must not handle or offer for sale any country-made butter unless it has the name of the maker stamped on the wrapper. It would not do to write the name on the wrapper with pen and ink or pencil but before the farmer's wife can sell her homemade butter she must procure a rubber stamp with her name and address, and the prevailing opinion seems to be that is just another one of the schemes to force the farmers to sell their cream to the creameries, giving them almost complete control of the butter market so that they can fix the price of the cream and butterfat both, giving them a complete monopoly, and one of our merchants here denounced it as an outrage and branded it as another move to crush the small fry and enrich the trust.
    H. T. Pankey of Sams Valley, one of the fruit tree inspectors, was in town Thursday, but he was not doing [omission] as two young men, or rather boys, just out of the O.A.C., who were out in this section some time ago. They said that they were sent out to mark the trees in the various orchards where there was blight so they went through the orchards in this neighborhood and tied strips of calico of different colors, the colors indicating the nature of the disease of the tree and the result was that they had almost all of the trees decorated, but the owners or the foremen paid no attention to their inspecting of the trees but simply tore the strips off and let the trees grow, but the boys drew their pay as fruit tree inspectors from the taxpayers' pockets. But when the state or county sends out men of mature years to attend to these duties it is all right but when it comes to boys who want a vacation being sent out and drawing salaries for the taxpayers it is not much less than robbery.
    Mrs. Sample, wife of the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was shopping here Thursday.
    F. J. Ayres, one of our prosperous farmers, was in here to get some oats that had been brought out for him, and in the run of conversation he remarked that he paid at the rate of $100 a ton for them, and still that very day I heard a farmer remark that they, the farmers could not get anything for their produce--only $1.60 a bushel for oats.
    J. E. Edmiston and C. A. Myers, two fruit men of Medford, W. C. Daley and wife, formerly of Lake Creek but now of Eagle Point, were here for dinner Thursday, Mr. Daley having sold out his farm in Lake Creek and bought the George von der Hellen place just above town was moving out, but Carl Jackson and family were living on the place and had not moved out so they came to the Sunnyside to stay until today, Saturday. Mr. Jackson moved yesterday into the house with his parents, J. B. Jackson, and Mr. Daley took possession this morning.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our prosperous farmers who has been with his family visiting friends and relatives in Los Angeles, returned Thursday.
    Mr. Shaffer of Prospect came out Thursday and went out to Medford, returning this morning and going on up home on the stage.
    Theo. Florey, who is working at a mine near Gold Hill, came out to visit his father and sister Thursday.
    There have been several changes in real estate in this neighborhood in the last few days. In addition to those already mentioned Wm. Perry has sold 320 acres of land to Wilbur Jacks lying just north of town, and about 40 acres are under a ditch. Mr. Jacks also bought a one-half interest in a 40-acre tract of land a little further north of Wm. von der Hellen.
    Mr. and Mrs. James Archibald were here for dinner today and report that they sold their fine farm just above Brownsboro to a man from Mexico by the name of Roscoe Hulse.
    Roy Kyle, the man who has the J. W. Grover farm, was here Friday and reports that his brother, Harry, from Applegate, had been over visiting him and his brother.
    Jack Schooler, who has a homestead east of Round Top, was in town Friday and so was Eli Dahack and W. C. Pool and I learned this morning that he had his leg broke and Dr. Holt was called to reduce the fracture. No particulars.
    The report reached me Friday that George Henson of Brownsboro had a fire in the roof of his house that morning. C. J. Kafer of Brownsboro was my informant. Damage slight.
    Ralph Tucker, Albert Gipson, and Green Mathews were also visiting our town.
    O. C. King, the Medford grocery man, was here and took dinner Friday.
    George Myers of Portland, who has been visiting G. E. Pierce of Brownsboro, returned to Portland Friday.
    Dolph Kent of Wellen, and Carl Asch were patronizing our blacksmith Friday.
    Mrs. Myers, who lives with her husband on the old Schneider place, went to Talent Thursday and bought a lot of fine turkeys for breeding purposes, returning Friday.
    Mrs. Irvin Culbertson of Ashland called at the Sunnyside Friday and took supper, going up home later in the evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 9, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Dee Bradshaw of Brownsboro and Miss Agnes Johnson, who is teaching in the Antelope district, went up to Butte Falls Saturday to attend the teachers institute, returning in the afternoon, and report they had a very interesting meeting and well attended, especially considering the difficulty in getting there.
    Our Sunday school was very poorly attended last Sunday, as there was quite a number that stayed away on account of being afraid of the "flu." Although there is not a case of the dreaded disease in our town, Dr. Holt reported that there was one case, his daughter, Helen, in our town and up to Thursday he reports that there are no cases in town. His daughter Helen resumed her studies in school again last Monday.
    Mr. E. G. Trowbridge and daughter, Miss Florence, and Mrs. H. Borden of Medford and Mr. Lawrence Luy of Wellen and Mr. and Mrs. Joe Cessy and two children and Graydon Childreth of Talent were here for dinner Sunday.
    George A. Hollenbeak of Prospect came in on the Butte Falls stage Monday morning and went on up home. Mr. Hollenbeak was just returning from a trip to Redding, where he had been to visit a brother who he had not seen for forty-five years.
    L. W. Smith, who has been spending the winter with relatives in the Lake Creek district, was here on his way to Grants Pass. He came in last fall from Idaho and has about decided to remain in Southern Oregon on account of the climate and the general healthfulness of the country.
    A. C. Spence, our efficient road supervisor of Brownsboro, was a business caller Monday and the last that I saw of him he was on a deal for an automobile, but whether he succeeded or not I have not learned. I understand that our townsman, David Cingcade, treated his good wife to a new auto last Saturday. They are getting to be almost a necessity nowadays.
    Mike Hecenburg, who has purchased the Morrison place on Reese Creek, was in town getting several pieces of very long iron pipe. He is putting in a water system on his place.
    Mrs. Van der Mark and her three little girls were here for dinner Monday. They had started for her home near Butte Falls and were detained on account of something going wrong with the machine. The reader will remember that Mrs. Van der Mark is the lady who was burned out a short time ago. And at that time I reported that S. M. Hawk, her father, was burned out, but it proved to be Mrs. Van der Mark, although the house belonged to Mr. Hawk and he was living with her at the time.
    W. E. Hammel was also here for dinner Monday. He seems to be very optimistic over the prospects of having the water brought in from Big Butte onto the land in his neighborhood and feels that it will add very materially to the wealth of the community.
    Ed Higinbotham motored through our town Monday forenoon, headed for his old home section near Derby.
    Fred Pettegrew and R. A. Petty were business callers Monday, and so was George McDonald, the foreman on the Rhodes farm, and Alex Vestal of Reese Creek.
    Ira Tungate and his mother came out from Butte Falls Monday evening and Mrs. Tungate spent the night with her sister, Mrs. Nancy Watkins, and Ira spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Jeff Brophy and son, James, accompanied by Mr. C. D. Thomas of Grants Pass, came out from the Brophy farm near Peyton, stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner and went on to Medford.
    Clarence Robinett and wife, nee Fay Perry, came down from near Glendale to visit their parents, Mrs. W. L. Childreth and Wm. Perry. Mrs. Robinett was suffering from a felon on her finger.
    Wm. Nickel of Lake Creek was a business caller Tuesday.
    Tuesday afternoon as I was making my rounds in search of items of interest to the general reader, I met a group of men, mostly farmers, discussing the actions of our legislators and the principal topic seemed to be the, as one man expressed it, "the fool dog law." They were giving the poor unfortunate members of the legislature a general roundup, and in the course of the remarks which were not at all complimentary, they decided that they simply had to do something and did not know what else to do, and about this time another farmer joined the group and announced that he saw in the Weekly Oregonian that Governor Olcott had vetoed the bill, and then the question came up as to what would be done with the twelve or thirteen hundred dollars that had been paid in for dog licenses and whether the county would be repaid the money paid out for the collars and tags that have been sold to the dog owners. And then they gave the same legislators a general roundup for passing a law forcing the farmers to brand their butter or turn it over to the creamery trust. And finally they decided that we had better leave all of the old party leaders, do away with the senate entirely, as a fifth wheel to a coach, quit electing lawyers and bankers to the legislature, lower house, and elect no one except plain, old-fashioned farmers to enact our laws. I see in the Oregon Journal where one writer makes the statement that out of the bills passed by the last legislature that 50 percent were either useless or in the interest of the trusts. The people are getting exasperated along these lines.
    Miss Florence Pool, our county demonstrator, Mrs. Emma Sheets and D. M. Lowe of Ashland called for supper last Tuesday night. They had been up to Lake Creek to hold a meeting in the interest of the Farm Bureau and came down here for supper and then went back to Brownsboro, where they were booked to hold a meeting that night. Mr. Lowe gave us a very interesting fireside talk on the way he managed to raise such a variety of greens, vegetables, grass and fruits such as he has been exhibiting at the county, state and national fairs. They are to hold a meeting here tomorrow, Thursday, night and in the afternoon Miss Pool is to hold a meeting with the mothers and daughters and give them some hints on cooking, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 14, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wednesday afternoon, after I had finished writing my letter to the Medford Mail Tribune, I took a stroll around town to see if there was anything of interest to be seen, and I soon found ten of our enterprising citizens of the town and community engaged either in pitching horseshoes (quoits) or else enjoying the sport looking on, and soon our painter and paperhanger, Sam Courtney, drove up, but didn't tarry long, but procured some gasoline for his machine and went on his way looking after business.
    In the course of the afternoon Mr. John Dixon of Trail came into the Sunnyside to spend the night, remarking that he expected to remain until Friday, as he wanted to go up on the Adamson stage, and that stage does not go only three trips a week. Later on Mr. H. T. Galey of Ashland, a traveling insurance agent, came in for the night and about the same time, Mr. S. W. Tracy, a traveling salesman for the Ball Brand Rubbers, came in and spent the night with us.
    Mrs. A. H. Haselton has gone over into California to visit her two daughters, one at Hornbrook and the other at Chico. She took her son, Bobbie, with her, expecting to remain for an indefinite period, as her husband is engaged teaching near Rancheria Prairie.
    Mrs. Walter Myers came in Thursday morning bringing her cream and eggs. She said that she was hatching out chickens and that Mr. Myers stayed at home to plow and look after the incubator while she came to town. She is the lady mentioned in a former letter as having bought a number of turkeys at Talent for breeding purposes. They expect to be in the poultry business quite extensively this season.
    There has been another change in real estate in our little town. Mr. W. P. Morgan, who owns the old Pool hotel property, having bought a three-acre tract of the von der Hellen-Brown Real Estate Company and a lot joining his hotel property and the old A. J. Florey lot lying between Main Street and the creek.
    Rev. Mr. Hoyt of Ashland, the S.S. missionary for the Presbyterian Church, called on your correspondent Thursday afternoon. He was working in the interest of the drive for the Armenians, appointing soliciting agents and notifying the different sections of the country the amount that each was expected to raise for the cause. In the hum of conversation, he mentioned the fact that he expected to give a stereoptic exhibition entertainment in the church here on the evening of the 22nd of this month. There will be about ninety different slides portraying scenes over the seas. The exhibition will be free, but at the close there will be an offering for the benefit of the destitute Armenians.
    Thursday evening there was a meeting here at the opera house in the interest of the Farm Bureau, and Miss Florence Pool, the home demonstration agent, came out in the forenoon to make the necessary arrangements for holding the meeting. There was not near the number in attendance that would have been, had the roads been so that people could have come in their cars, but the horrible roads kept a number away, for in talking to the farmers who came in to dispose of their cream and eggs, and they all expressed a strong desire to attend, but could not on account of the bad roads, not so muddy but so rough, and by the time they milk their cows, it makes it too late to drive with a team into town after dark. But there was quite a number who could and did attend and Mr. Cate, our county pathologist, gave us a talk setting forth the object of the organization and told of what they had done to help the farmers, by forcing the middleman to sell at a more reasonable price, and the bureau furnishing the farmers with the necessaries of farm life, such as sulfur and other fertilizers as well as feed, as many of them have to buy at greatly reduced prices. There are quite a number in this neighborhood who have expressed a desire to become members of the bureau. Miss Pool also gave a short talk on the subject of preparing food, especially on canning vegetables, as well as fruit. And then Mr. Cate resumed his talk, inviting the farmers to assist in the organization. There is quite a number in this community who are favorable to the move and expect to give in their name and pay their initiation fee.
    There was quite a number of people here for dinner Thursday. Among them, William Lewis, sheep king of this section, and his man, Geo. Ford, J. A. Ware, P. S. Anderson and J. S. Pierce, of Trail.
    Mr. Nason, one of the forest rangers, came in on the Medford stage and went on up to Trail.
    Wm. Stanley, father of the five or six Stanley boys who are interested in the cattle business, was a business caller Thursday.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Friday was Mrs. Carl von der Hellen, of Wellen, Mrs. George von der Hellen and son, Donald, of Medford and her sister Mrs. S. Whitley Richardson of Portland; Mr. Charles Horton of Klamath Falls; C. V. Loosley of Fort Klamath and his father, Geo. W. Loosley of Ashland; three cattle buyers and Walter Wood, another cattleman of Eagle Point.
    Mrs. John Greb, wife of one of our leading farmers, passed through our town Friday p.m. on her way to Brownsboro to bring her daughter home, who is teaching in that district.
    Bert Clarno, wife and her son, Carl Bergman, passed through town on their way to Medford this Saturday morning.
    H. T. Chachno of Chicago, E. J. Murphy, wife and son of Wellen, Ernest Peachey, who is engaged counting the stockmen's cattle for U.S. range, R. M. Conley, John Cobleigh, Butte Falls; G. W. Berrian, the fish hatchery superintendent, Butte Falls; M. F. Lewis and Harvey Smith were among the diners Saturday and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Kleinhammer, W. K. Zeidler of Applegate called for dinner. They each have farms on Little Applegate and are engaged in the cattle business.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sunday morning we had our regular Sunday school exercises and at the close Rev. Trovato preached, but the attendance was very small although Rev. Trovato preached one of his very best sermons.
    By the time I reached home the company from the surrounding cities and country began to arrive at the Sunnyside for the chicken dinner, and then the job of securing names of the visitors began. The first ones on my register were Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Wise and family, P. S. Anderson, Misses Phena and Helen Anderson, J. W. Snider, wife and children, C. V. Loosley of Fort Klamath and Charles Horton of Klamath Falls; J. G. Pierce, Trail; Master Hugo and Joyce von der Hellen, Lloyd Stanley, Howard Silliman, Mrs. H. B. Silliman, Mrs. J. Silliman, Roy Wakefield, Mrs. C. W. Wakefield, Mr. J. W. Wakefield, Hester Wakefield and Charles Wakefield. The ten last named had phoned from Medford the day before that they were coming, so as to have Mrs. H. prepared. A good idea. Y. R. Wise, A. B. Shively, Miss Stella Anderson and her sister Ethel. They had spent the night at the Sunnyside. Glen Haley and A. J. Florey, Jr., were also guests during the night, and Miss Florence Lansing and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, besides a few whose names I failed to secure. The visitors from Medford report that the road between here and Medford is in fine condition and the most of them expressed a determination to come out again in the near future.
    Mrs. E. Y. Strong of Trail came out on the M.-E.P. stage and went on up to her home Monday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ray Harnish were favored Monday morning with the arrival of another plow boy weighing about nine pounds.
    W. H. Eddy and son Harold Eddy of Portland were here for dinner Monday. Mr. Eddy was canvassing the town selling a medicine to cure all complaints of the feet.
    William J. Johnson of Coshocton, Ohio, and Wm. Lewis, our sheep king, were also here for dinner. And so was Edgar Johnson, representing Johnson Hide and Wood Company of Brownsboro, and J. W. Scott of Medford, representing the Singer Sewing Machine Company, Fred Neil of Ashland were all here for dinner and so was Charles Loveday and Charles Horton and Charles Cingcade, three cattle men. Messrs. Loveday and Horton had just bought a lot of steers of Charley Cingcade and they all three came here for dinner. Harvey Smith was also one of the diners Monday.
    J. L. Robertson, who is in the habit of coming to town every day in a buggy, he has his boys plowing and running his Fordson gang plow, harrow or spring tooth harrow, and it seems to keep him busy most of the time. He came in Monday in an auto bringing the shafts of his buggy with him for repairs. He said that he let the boys have the buggy and that when they drove into the driveway one of them about the first thing that he did was to pull off the bridle, and the horse supposing that he was loose turned square around and the result was both shafts and the crossbar were smashed, but our blacksmith soon had them repaired and ready for use again. The next time they intend to unhitch the horse before they take off the bridle.
    Mrs. H. F. Pech of Bend, Oregon came out Monday on the 11 o'clock jitney, but was not early enough to catch the L.C. stage so went to the Sunnyside and remained overnight, taking the E.P.-L.C. stage for her grandfather's place--Mr. Damons, who owns a farm near Lake Creek. She intends to spend a while visiting him before returning home.
    Harry von der Hellen was among the business callers Monday also.
    W. E. Hammel, one of the leading promoters of the ditch from Big Butte to the section just north of town, was here on his way to Medford. He seems to be greatly encouraged over the project and is planning to put a large part of his place in alfalfa and clover. He is satisfied if he can succeed in putting water onto his land that he will be able to raise several hundred tons of hay, besides other kinds of crop. He is one of our progressive men who believes in going ahead and doing instead of doing as some of the oldtimers are doing--throwing cold water on every move toward the advancement for fear that the taxes will be increased.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby came out on Monday on the stage, went to Medford, returning Tuesday and going on up home.
    C. R. McDonald, the man who came in from Idaho a short time ago and bought the W. E. Hensley place, started for his old home in Idaho Tuesday afternoon to attend to business interests, expecting to be gone a few weeks. He will tell the people of that frozen region about our Southern Oregon climate.
    Ed Morgan has moved into the Wamsley house.
    In my rounds Tuesday I called at the new garage and found they had it fixed up in good shape and were doing some business. I also called at the old garage--the W. L. Childreth blacksmith shop, and found them busy. Mr. Childreth has engaged the services of Glen Haley, an expert machinist, to help him in his garage work, and we speak for both places, expecting to be able to report that both places are crowded with work.
    J. B. Jackson, one of our farmers, was in town Tuesday and speaking about the Farm Bureau told how when he wanted to procure sulfur to put on his alfalfa that the dealers in Medford and Central Point said that it could not be sold for less than $80 a ton, and how he and William Perry had theirs laid down at their doors in Eagle Point for $47 and $30 a ton and other fertilizers in the same ratio. He is boosting for them.
    Sam Courtney, Marshall Minter and Mr. Hoagland of Central Point were business callers, Mr. H. taking out with him several rolls of barbed wire, going towards his farm above Brownsboro.
    William Perry is engaged in pulling up about half of the fruit trees on the Roy Stanley place.
    O. P. Calef, agent for Knight Packing Company, was here for dinner Tuesday, trying to get the farmers to engage in the production of tomatoes, offering to pay $20 a ton delivered at the plant in Medford.
    Miss Florence Lees and Mr. L. O. Turner of Trail, who have been working in the fruit dryer that was burned in Central Point, came out and spent the night at the Sunnyside Tuesday night.
    William Moore of Butte Falls and Ethel Cook of Medford were here for dinner Tuesday on their way to Medford. Mr. Moore returning Wednesday morning and going to B.F. on the stage.
    Mrs. John Rader and her daughter, Mrs. Harry Stanley, were business callers Tuesday.
    William von der Hellen, accompanied by J. P. Goin and J. G. Pierce, started for Round Top this morning to tear down a large barn that Mr. von der Hellen had bought. He intends to put it on his farm on Reese Creek.
    Remember the stereopticon entertainment Sunday night, February 22, for the benefit of the helpless Armenians. Free for all.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday attorney William F. Briggs of Ashland and his client, Ross Spence, also of Ashland and Mr. J. M. Small, a prominent cattle man of Eastern Oregon, called for dinner. They were here looking up necessities in a case now pending in the circuit court, wherein Albert Clement is the plaintiff and Ross Small is the defendant in a suit for damages in the sum of $6,000 for personal injuries and four hundred dollars damage to his machine. The collision occurred last June as Mr. Small was coming from Ashland to Medford and Mr. Clement was coming in from an intersecting road. A boy about fifteen years of age was with him, who received a slight cut on his head and also a cut on his leg. The boy has been living at the Sunnyside Hotel for the past four years, but I refrain from making any comments on the merits of the case, as both Mr. C. and the boy were here either that day or the next.
    James Leabo of Portland, Ore., was also here for dinner the same day and so was W. E. Trensher and W. S. Campbell. They were representing the Trigonia Oil and Gas Co., of Medford, Mr. Campbell being the vice-president of the company. They were selling shares in the company and while here they sold a lot of shares to Dave Pence and W. E. Horn of Trail, who happened to be here for dinner at that time and Mr. Joseph Geppert of Butte Falls was also here for dinner the same day. He has been appointed as supervisor for the Butte Falls road district and went on to Jacksonville that afternoon.
    J. T. Adams, the merchant at McLeod, came in with a wagonload of groceries and gasoline and spent the night with us. Mr. and Mrs. Charles Gottlieb came in for supper the same evening, going on to Medford that night. Mr. Gottlieb was also representing the Trigonia Oil and Gas Company. The representatives of the company say that they are selling quite a lot of shares and that the company expects to start drilling by the first of next month. They will begin work in Fern Valley, east of Phoenix.
    While Dave Pence was here Thursday, meeting the two representatives of the oil and gas company, one of them seemed to be well acquainted with him, and conversation naturally turned to the subject of the roads in his district and he said that he had them all well dragged and in good shape and that led to mentioning the Morgan Hill road, just this side of Trail, and Mr. Campbell remarked that Morgan Hill will be a standing monument to the credit of Dave Pence as long as it stands, as it is one of the finest pieces of work in the country.
    Mr. H. L. Vanderburgh of Butte Falls came out on the stage Thursday and went on to Medford the same day.
    John Cadzow of Butte Falls came out Thursday afternoon, went to Medford the same day and returned to the Sunnyside that night, going on home the next morning. Fritz Compson of Trail also spent the night with us. Mr. Compson is an aged man, living alone back on the upper part of Elk Creek. His physical condition is such that he should be looked after by his friends.
    Arthur Mulholland, a man from Eastern Oregon, came in Friday morning on the Medford-Eagle Point stage and inquired for Roy Stanley, and later they two took a trip up above Trail to look at a farm returning that evening, staying overnight at the Sunnyside. He spoke in the highest terms of the country, but did not think that the place would suit his wife, as she has always been used to having a great deal of company and religious and social privileges, as she has been living near a city and also a town, but he thinks that the country is all O.K.
    John Mayhorn, who has been breaking a young horse to ride for S. H. Harnish, has been stopping the past few days at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. H. L. Pech, who has been up in the Lake Creek country for the last few days visiting her grandfather, Mr. Daniels, came out Friday on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage, took dinner here and started for her home in Bend.
    Meryl Garnett of Medford came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Friday morning and went on up to Lake Creek to bring out a car.
    Mr. Welch of the Medford Grocery Co., Medford, came out on the stage this Saturday morning and went to Butte Falls.
    I understand that the surveying crew who are working on the prospective Crater Lake highway, have moved into the S. H. Harnish house.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Sample were doing business with our merchants this morning. Mr. Sample is foreman on the Altavista orchard.
    J. D. Arnes, the foreman on the Coburn-Edgell orchard, was also a business caller this morning.
    A man by the name of Peterson from Portland has bought a half interest of Mr. Adamson in the mail carrying route from here to Persist. Mr. Peterson expects to carry the mail in a Ford, and Mr. Adamson is to run his truck wherever he can get a job.
    Miss Bernice Hargrave of Butte Falls, one of the teachers in the school, came out this morning, took dinner and went to Medford in the Lewis jitney. Sam Courtney and H. C. Drews, head timekeeper on the O.W.R.&N. out of Portland, came in for dinner today and expect to remain a few days.
    As Mr. Joseph Geppert was coming out from Medford Friday p.m., with a county truck, about three miles this side of Medford he was met by two men in a small car and after he had pulled out as far as he could to give space for them to pass, they ran into his truck, striking a point of the hub on a front wheel, knocking the steering wheel out of his hand and causing the machine to turn crossways in the road, throwing it into the ditch and then drove right on, not even offering to help him out. Fortunately, there was no damage done, except tearing a tire off a front wheel, but he thinks at least they could have stopped to help him out, but they were probably afraid that there might be a damage suit, but they showed a cowardly spirit and that they were men of no principle. Mr. Geppert came on to the Sunnyside that night, going on up to his home Saturday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday morning just as we were preparing to open our Sabbath school, Rev. J. W. Hoyt and his son Arthur came in to take part with us. Mr. Hoyt is the traveling evangelist working in the interest of the Sabbath schools for the Presbyterian Church. I, as teacher of the Bible class, requested him to take charge of my class, but he declined but after the regular exercises were over we invited him to address the school which he did, giving us some very interesting suggestions. As we had no preaching appointment for that day we repaired to our homes. Owing to the inability of our regular Sunday school superintendent, Mrs. J. L. Robertson, to attend, Mr. Carl Esch, one of our new members, who has recently bought a fine farm just below town, acted in that capacity. At night Mr. Hoyt, who is at present working on behalf of the Armenians, gave a stereopticon entertainment and took up a collection for the benefit of that downtrodden and persecuted race of people, resulting in an offering of $8.97 and after deducting $1.50 to pay the express charges on the slides from Portland and back, $7.47 cents was handed to Mrs. Robertson to be forwarded to the proper official of the drive. The entertainment was quite interesting and we had a very respectable-sized audience. Mr. Hoyt was somewhat handicapped during the exhibition on account of him not getting the slides he had expected and consequently was not familiar with the accompanying explanations.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday noon for dinner were James Archibald, C. H. Hargadine of Ashland, Wm. von der Hellen, wife and son Hugo, W. C. Clements and wife, Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Brown and John Foster, now of Lake Creek. At night Mr. Hoyt and son Arthur were here for supper and Miss Bernice Hargrave who went on to Butte Falls that night.
    Mrs. M. L. Pruett, who owns and operates a fine farm a short distance below our town and has been visiting relatives in California, returned last Saturday but I did not learn of her arrival until Monday when her son, Guy, was in town.
    Mrs. Ernest Peachey, wife of one of the forest rangers, came out Monday on the Eagle Point stage and went on up to her home in Butte Falls.
    Green Mathews and his son Verne were in town Monday.
    I noticed in last Sunday's Medford Sun among other very interesting things a poem written by B. F. Dowell, entitled "The Old Brick House," and the reading brought vividly to my mind the scenes of my first introduction to Oregon in October, A.D. 1861, and while I was in Jacksonville, then a thriving mining camp, my attention was called to that brick house as being the only brick residence in Southern Oregon. It was erected by Mr. Dowell's father, B. F. Dowell, Sr., who at that time was one of the leading attorneys in the state and while he was making his home in Jacksonville, he spent a good part of his time in Washington, D.C. practicing law in the supreme court. I well remember having my attention called to the marble mantlepiece and its surroundings that was brought in from Crescent City on pack mules and the fine furniture that was also brought in from there in the same way. And about that time was erected the Methodist church that was built by donations contributed by the sporting class of the town, for while many of them were professional gamblers many of them were men of refinement and culture but had drifted into vices so prevalent in the day, but they were liberal to a fault and always ready to lend a helping hand to the needy.
    Mrs. A. C. Spence, wife of the Brownsboro road supervisor, was trading here Monday.
    Wm. Holman of Lake Creek was also a business caller Monday, coming in on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mrs. H. M. Morgan of Sams Valley is here visiting her husband's parents, W. T. Morgan, who now own the old hotel property known as the old Pool hotel, but the venerable couple have closed the hotel and are enjoying the pleasure of private life.
    Mr. and Mrs. Stuart McKissick of Klamath Falls came in and engaged room and board for Mrs. McKissick and after eating his dinner Mr. McKissick joined Mr. Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, and went up in the Big Butte country. Mr. McKissick is a civil engineer and is expected to assist in the work of building the irrigation ditch that will bring water into this valley. Mr. McKissick has engaged the von der Hellen bungalow to live in.
    Mrs. Ernest Dahack and children, who have been visiting in San Francisco, visiting relatives, returned last Saturday, Feb. 21.
    T. C. Drews, head timekeeper on the O.W.R. and N., mentioned in my last, remained with us until Monday afternoon, returning on No. 16 for Portland. [While] he was here he spent a good part of his time looking for agates, securing some fine specimens.
    A. R. Leovett of Klamath Falls, and E. L. Beeson of Talent, and C. S. Plymale, also of Klamath Falls, and H. C. Stoltze and J. E. Edmiston of Medford, organizers of Fruit Growers corporation and Frank Rhodes were here for dinner Monday.
    Nick Young, formerly our road supervisor, who has been on the sick list, was on our streets Monday and so was George Albert who lives at the Dupray saw mill. He reports that Mr. Dupray has resumed operations again and intends to supply lumber to the needy.
    Robert Harnish was dragging the road between here and Reese Creek Tuesday.
    T. F. McCabe and daughter Ellen were business callers Tuesday.
    The surveyors working on the Crater Lake Highway between here and Prospect have finally reached our town and set the stakes for the road between the von der Hellen hardware store and the Eagle Point Bank. I heard Royal Brown remark that they had been just six months surveying 36 miles of road, but perhaps they were not all of the time running on the same route. I understand that when they started to run through a field north of here they were stopped but that is all foolishness. There is strong pressure being brought to bear to have the new road cross Little Butte some distance below the old bridge and change the road so as to leave all of the old part of the town out entirely.
    There was a man here for dinner Tuesday representing the Arthur Boomhower Corporation of New York.
    H. E. Webb of Derby came out Tuesday on the stage and went to Central Point, returning this Wednesday morning.
    D. R. Patrick, W. C. Daley and W. S. Chappell, our shoe men, were here for dinner Tuesday.
    W. E. Butler, wife, father and daughter-in-law were here in town on business Tuesday.
    C. V. Loosley, a cattle buyer of Fort Klamath, spent Tuesday night with us and was met here this Wednesday by Ben Brophy and the two went up on Big Butte together.
    Alex Betz, Alex Vestal, W. W. Winfrey, a sheep man, Edgar Johnson, a hide buyer of Medford, Edward Shroke, a meat buyer of Medford, were here for dinner today and while out here the two last named bought six calves for veal of J. B. Jackson and son, and Mr. Szugger of California, was also a diner at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Marion, of Derby, was a business caller Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1920, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thomas Harris of Lake Creek was among the callers Wednesday afternoon.
    The Misses Sadie and Ethel Anderson of Medford, in company with A. J. Florey, Jr., came out from Medford Wednesday evening and took supper at the Sunnyside.
    Jack O'Conner, wife and two boys of Phoenix, came out Wednesday evening on business, remaining until bed time with Mrs. Howlett. Mr. O'Conner having business with one of the mail contractors in this section.
    Mr. J. H. Heener of Brownsboro came on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage Thursday, bringing with him two large coyote skins, taking them to Medford to sell. He reports that he has been quite successful the past winter catching them. He says that they are very cunning and quite hard to catch in a trap and related of one instance where one was caught in a trap by the hind leg and he had laid on a large stone on the chain attached to the trap and after the coyote worked the stone off of the trap, picked it up and carried it quite a distance before he dropped it and then it got fast in the brush and was finally captured. In former days the coyote skin was of but little value, but now they are bringing from $8 to $15 each owing to the condition of the fur, and some of our lady citizens prize them very highly for wraps.
    Professor H. P. Jewell, principal of the Butte Falls high school, was a passenger on the stage Thursday on his way home. He said that the school board had closed the school on account of the prevalence of the flu. At that time there was about 15 cases, but this Saturday morning the report came that there were 30 cases and Mrs. S. A. Wheeler, a trained nurse, was on her way up there to help Mrs. Lee care for the sick. Mrs. Lee went up on Thursday morning.
    Master Richard Vanderbaugh of Butte Falls came out on the stage Thursday and walked into the Sunnyside Hotel and inquired if he could have dinner, and being answered in the affirmative, inquired where he could wash. He is a little tot, but as bright as a new minted dollar and on being asked to register his name, wrote it in a neat legible hand, and I could not help but contrast the present methods of teaching, for when I was a boy, to find a child of 14 years of age that could write his name was a rare thing, much less a child of 7 or 8, but we are surely living in a progressive age. After Richard had eaten his dinner, he paid for it and went on to Medford on the stage.
    Ira Tungate of Butte Falls was also a business caller Thursday, and so was P. S. Anderson of Medford. Mr. Joy and Lonnie Bless of Elk Creek, Pete Betz, one of our farmers, C. E. and Ora Bellows, Henry French and E. V. Brittsan, some of our enterprising farmers and dairy men were in on Thursday to meet the two creamery men, who run the Jackson County and Independent creamery trucks. They were both here at the same time, and both trucks were loaded. The next morning I saw the Jackson County Creamery truck pass through here again and he seemed to have a good load on again. They gather up hundreds of gallons of cream and hundreds of dozens of eggs besides dressed hogs and calves and chickens, thus leaving hundreds of dollars in cash with our farmers. I was talking with a man this morning who keeps 500 hens and he told me that he was getting 300 eggs a day and that by the middle of March he would get a great many more. He said that the price of eggs had dropped, that he only received 31¢ a dozen Thursday so he was not going to sell any more, but put them in cold storage until the price comes up.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Robertson, Rube Johnson, Alex Mathews, who live out north of our town, and Mrs. Ed Tucker and daughter of Brownsboro, were dealing with our merchants here Thursday.
    Ray Harnish came very near being seriously hurt Thursday. He was riding a horse that he had just broke to the saddle, which became unmanageable, and in attempting to make him go as he wanted him to he reared up, falling over backward and Mr. Harnish's foot being in the stirrup, so that he could not free himself from the saddle, the result was the horse fell on his leg, but fortunately there was no serious damage done.
    Mort Daley of Medford and Frank Bagley, one of the U.S. timber inspectors, spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Beale of Butte Falls were here Friday morning and Mrs. Beale went up home on the stage, but William remained here. He has had a paralytic stroke but is so that he can walk by using one crutch.
    Jack O'Conner of Phoenix came out Friday morning on his way to Butte Falls, but on arriving here found a telephone call to return to Medford on urgent business, so he called a taxi and went back to Medford.
    R. L. Walton, representative of the Ajax Rubber Co., Inc., of New York, was here for dinner Friday and so was James Owens, our county commissioner, D. A. Houston, an internal revenue officer, hunting up the poor fellows who have an income of $1000 or more to relieve them of part of it. He remained here until today, going to Grants Pass this afternoon.
    A. A. Betz, Arthur J. Mugg of Portland, G. L. Buckner of Medford, Charles Terrill, sheriff and deputy and two strangers came in late for dinner while I was out hunting Eaglets so I didn't see them.
    Geo. Stowell and little stepson came in this morning and the little boy went out in the country on the jitney.
    Carl Hays, our new road superintendent, and Bob Harnish were dragging the roads this morning, but now the rain has come at last, and will put a stop to road work, we all hope, for awhile. The rain is about the most welcome visitor we could have and we hope that enough will come this time to start vegetation, for the long drought has seemingly damaged the growing crops and kept back the grass so that the stockmen have had to feed longer than usual.
    J. F. McCabe, F. J. Ayres, Ed Spencer, from Fort Klamath, were business callers today.
    Mrs. E. J. Murphy, daughter Thelma, and Mrs. Murphy's sister, Miss Ethel Holman of Wellen, J. E. Garner, formerly of Brownsboro, but now of Medford, Mrs. Ernest Peachey, wife of one of the forest rangers and Wm. A. Hauser of Portland, representing Failing-McCalman Hardware Co., Portland, were here for dinner today.
    Walter Wood and wife were in town on their way to Medford today.
    Charles Klimvle of Lake Creek was also a business caller Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 4, 1920, page 5



REESE CREEK RIPLETS
    Mrs. W. Isbell, who was confined to her bed a few days last week, is able to sit up some again.
    Mrs. C. E. Bellows is gradually improving since her operation.
    Mrs. Frank Johnson is still confined to her bed from the effects of the flu, but is improving slowly.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joe Noonan and little daughter spent Sunday at Mr. Isbell's.
    Mrs. B. Clarno has been spending a few days with her daughter, Mrs. W. H. Crandall.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. Watkins visited at the Stilles' last week.
    Mr. Ora Bellows and family expect to move to Weed, California in a few days.
    H. Watkins has a thoroughbred Plymouth Rock hen weighing about ten pounds, which he prizes very highly. He has trained [her] to sing while he carries her in his arms.
    The first day of March this year was blustery, having snowed the most of the day, but it melted as fast as it fell.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 5, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night Henry Trusty of Elk Creek and Sam Courtney of Reese Creek spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Sunday morning we had our usual attendance at Sunday school, but did not have any preaching, as our minister Rev. Joseph Trovato, instead of coming out from Butte Falls to fill his regular appointments at Brownsboro and Eagle Point, remained in Butte Falls helping to take care of the sick and needy. There has been a regular epidemic of flu in that city and Mr. Trovato volunteered his services to help the needy. The result was that there was no preaching in Brownsboro or this place either. I am not prepared to say whether there will be preaching Sunday or not, but I hardly think that there will be, as if Mr. Trovato should decide to come out and preach, the people here would hardly venture out to hear him for fear of taking the disease themselves.
    Sunday noon we did not have very many here for dinner, as we had had a little snow and rain, with a prospect for more. Although it proved to be a fairly nice day considering that it was the fifth Sunday in February, something that does not happen very often and will not occur again until February, 1938, if I am correctly informed. But we did have quite a number as it was, among whom was Mr. and Mrs. McGill of Seattle, Wash.; Miss Hineman of San Francisco; D. B. Worson of Portland, Oregon; Wm. von der Hellen, wife and son Hugo, and daughter Joyce; A. J. Florey, Jr., and Miss Ethel Anderson. The two ladies are from Medford and enjoy coming out here and partaking of a good chicken dinner. Laurence Luy of Wellen; Art Smith, who is a part owner in the old J. W. Smith home and orchard, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Joe Casey and two boys and Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Childreth of Talent.
    Monday morning when I got up I found J. W. Sanders, the superintendent of the Commercial orchard, was here for breakfast, and suppose that he had come from home that morning as he is a man that is generally up and doing. Carlyle Notwick and Jack Florey were here for beds also Sunday night and breakfast Monday morning.
    Mrs. Fred Sturgis of Elk Creek and George Strong, also of Elk Creek and Mrs. Ernest Peachey came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage. Mrs. Sturgis and Mr. Strong went up home on the Eagle Point-Prospect stage, and Mrs. Peachey went up to her home in Butte Falls.
    P. W. Haley, one of our enterprising farmers, I understand, has sold his farm and is moving into Central Point. We don't like the idea much of having our old standby farmers selling out and moving away, but it has come to that point where an old man like Mr. Haley, for he is around 60 or 65 years, is not able to do the work on a farm and to attempt to hire the ordinary laborer who is in the market for hire and depend on him for help when he will lay in bed until just time to wash his face and eat his breakfast before 8 o'clock, and if the team is fed the employer will have to go out to the barn and feed it and get it ready to go to work or else the hired man puts in a good part of his eight hours that he is expected to work getting the team ready and then if he is left to himself--well, he won't hurt himself working, and he will be sure to be in in plenty of time for supper. That is about the way that it is represented by those who have to depend on hiring men to work on the farms, and the farmer has to keep up his teams and have them do only about half the work they should have done, so the older ones are leaving the farms and the newcomers are introducing the tractor and Caterpillars to do the farm work instead of spending so much on hired help. And yet if an employer says a word about bringing in foreign help he will be shouted down as "un-American."
    Speaking about work in general and on the roads in particular, I heard two taxpayers discussing the proposition as to using the tractor Caterpillar to do a great deal of the grading, leveling, scraping and ditching on our county roads instead of using horses. When the horses are used, as a rule, they are stopped every short distance to rest, and the owners are careful not to overwork them, and the man who handles the plow or grader is careful not to set it too deep, but with the iron horse, one can hitch onto the plow or grader, set them as deep as desired and it will walk right along and do more work in one day than they can in two days with the teams and at a great deal less expense.
    Miss Mae Greb came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Monday morning.
    J. P. McAuliffe of Fort Klamath and S. S. Mitchell of Ashland, two cattle buyers, C. W. Walton of Portland and Hamilton Watkins, on the free ferry road, C. V. Loosley, Fort Klamath and Fred Neil of Ashland, Mrs. S. A. Wheeler of Medford, who went up to Butte Falls as a trained nurse, came out on the stage Monday. All took dinner here.
    S. M. Hawk of Butte Falls came out on the stage Monday and went on to Medford.
    W. H. Crandall and "Brig" Whetstone were also business callers Monday.
    Thomas Cingcade came in with his wood-sawing machine to have it sharpened up a little by our blacksmith and machinist, W. F. Childreth.
    B. H. Willison, representing L. Dinkelspiel, San Francisco; H. B. Stephenson, jitney chauffeur and E. L. Potts of Medford were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Mrs. Ed Marstersen and Mrs. Elvin Roberts of Dufur, Oregon, sisters of W. P. Morgan, who have been here visiting their sister, started for their home Tuesday.
    Green Mathews, one of our prosperous cattlemen, made a business trip to Medford Tuesday.
    James Dervis, Jr., one of the deputy county assessors, who is appointed to assess the Brownsboro, Lake Creek and Climax districts, was with us Tuesday night on his way to his district.
    H. L. Hayes and wife were in town this Wednesday morning on their way home near the free ferry. They had been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Riley.
    Carl Taylor of Portland, a son of Mrs. R. G. Brown, who is a sister of Mrs. W. H. Brown, is here visiting his mother and family.
    J. M. Spence of Kerby, Ore., who has been visiting his cousin, A. C. Spence of Brownsboro, came out on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage this morning and went on to Medford on his way home.
    H. Bruggeman of Seattle, Wash., came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage today and went up to Brownsboro on the Lake Creek stage.
    C. H. Nordwick and son Carlyle, John Greb, Jr., Irvin Grey and his brothers George H. and Otto, and A. C. Edler of Lake Creek and Miss Lorraine Armes of Ashland were in town today. The five last named were on their way to Medford.
    Mr. E. Szugger of Banning, Calif., a mule buyer; Frank Neil of Derby; Wm. von der Hellen, one of our hardware men, and Mr. Jess McNeil of Alameda, Calif., were here for dinner today. Mr. McNeil was soliciting subscribers for some twenty different magazines and by that means working for a free pass to college. He served over two years in France and was gassed, which incapacitates him from heavy work. He seemed to be meeting with success in his undertaking. He seems to be a bright young man and has undertaken a laudable project, trying to finish his education.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 6, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday after I had written my Eaglets for the Mail Tribune, Mr. E. Szugger of Banning, Cal., a mule buyer who had been around Northern California and Southern Oregon, came in for supper and bed. He was on a deal with one of the Stanley brothers for some mules. I heard one of the boarders that happened to be in Medford say that he had bought up a nice lot of mules that he shipped from Medford the next day.
    Jess McNeil, a traveling salesman, also spent the night with us Wednesday night.
    Walter Meyer and wife, who live just north of our town and are interested in the dairy and poultry business, came in early Thursday with their cream and eggs. The creamery and egg business is getting to be so immense that the trucks are now coming in twice a week, Monday and Thursday, and seem to be loaded each time they come, but I hear some of their customers complain that there is too great a difference in the price they pay and the price that is being paid in Medford and Central Point for eggs.
    I understand that the Crater Lake Highway engineers, who are looking over the different routes between Medford and Prospect to decide which route will be the most practical, have established a line running as near straight as they could across the desert. (Now gentle reader, please don't misunderstand and take for granted that the tract of land I term desert is a barren waste, for it is not, but it is a tract of thin land that by common consent has been called the desert for the past sixty years, although it will produce vegetables and berries if the proper fertilizers and water are used.) After leaving Agate station they ran a straight line to Antelope Creek, crossing it a short distance below the old bridge running through David Cingcade's place, then crossing the old road running through Mrs. Coy's, intersects the old road near a short grade, following the old road most of the time until they reached the lower end of Eagle Point, then crossing the Butte Creek run as near as they could go on a straight line to go between Geo. Brown & Sons store and the new garage, crossing the street and going between von der Hellen hardware store and the bank, then bearing off in a northeasterly direction toward the top of the hill, running north for the old road. It is to be expected that there will be some kicking, but those who object had better grin and bear it. While it will discommode a number, if we can have a good road from here to Medford so that we can travel it at all times of the year we can put up with having to go half mile or so out of our way to cross the creek. The principal objection is the location of the bridge crossing Little Butte.
    Among those who brought in their eggs and cream Thursday were Geo. Stowell, cream but no eggs; he is saving them for higher prices. Mrs. Grant Mathews and son, Ed Cowden, C. E. Bellows, and while he was here he had our cobbler repair some shoes. Speaking of shoes, the men who have to buy say that they cannot afford to pay such prices so our cobbler is doing a rushing business. Henry French, E. V. Brittsan, he brought in 35 gallons of cream beside quite a number who brought in eggs and no cream, and many of them brought in as high as 20 dozen. There are others who are planning to go more extensively into the egg business.
    I met V. E. Peterson, the new mail carrier that drives between here and Persist, Friday morning as he was getting ready to start on his route. He had as part of his load six ten-gallon cans to take up in the Trail and Elk Creek country and while talking told me of an accident he had had on his trip during the snowstorm on the 20th of last month. The grade is so narrow that there is just room for his Ford to go over it and the snow had made the ground slippery and the result was that his car turned over a steep bank breaking one wheel and demolishing the top, but fortunately he was not hurt, so he managed to right his Ford and proceed on his journey.
    W. A. Rummel of Trail was here for dinner Thursday and so was Chas. Horton of Klamath Falls, Fred Neil of Ashland and C. V. Loosley, Fort Klamath, and J. K. Schooler of Brownsboro, the last four named remaining over night and Mr. Schooler went to Medford Friday morning and Mr. Horton to Butte Falls, both returning and remaining here overnight and Mr. Horton is still here. He and Mr. Loosley and Neil are buying cattle.
    Thursday as I was crossing on our wire suspension bridge a car stopped at the end and a man jumped out and walked up to me, reached out his hand and called me by name, and it proved to be John Matney of Klamath County, one of our old neighbors of years ago. We had not met before for thirty years and still he recognized me while riding in a car. He and his son Vance and cousin Harry Welch had come out from Medford just to see some of the oldtimers here, John and L. E. Nichols, the Brown brothers and a few others he knew when he was a boy.
    John McAllister of Lake Creek came out on the Lake Creek stage Friday.
    John Nichols, our mayor, started to repair our wagon bridge Friday. The railing had been thrown down when they put on some extra planking and he concluded to repair it as it was dangerous and while I was looking for Eaglets discovered him at work so joined him and helped him out and now it is considered safe again.
    N. E. Slusser, our barber and agate grinder, has been making some changes in the interior of his agate shop.
    W. E. Hensley of Wellen, and Pete Young, one of our prosperous farmers, were here Friday. Mr. and Mrs. Ellestad of Central Point were here Friday to meet their daughter who is teaching in the Derby district.
    Herbert A. Mitchell, representing S. M. Bixby & Co., Brooklyn, N.Y., O. C. King, representing the Medford Grocery Company, Medford, Gus Ditsworth and his brother-in-law, Uriah Vaughn of Peyton, John Holtz, Mr. Nason, R. U. Cander, Geo. West, Geo. Cottrell and the three cattle buyers, and Benj. Brophy were among the diners Friday.
    Miss Maude Merritt, who lives on Reese Creek, came out on the Lake Creek stage and Miss Anna French of Talent came out on the Medford stage on her way to teach school in District No. 84 above Elk Creek on Rogue River.
    B. J. Martin and J. T. Lane of Derby came out bringing out a load of wood, selling it to Mrs. Howlett at $3 per tier.
    Died, Friday morning, at her home near Prospect, Miss Lillian Cunningham, daughter of Mrs. Nelson Nye, aged about 22 years.
    A. C. Walker, one of the deputy assessors, was here for dinner today, Friday and so was Frank Brandon, Wm. Coy, Thos. Nichols, Wm. Martin and Frank Bagley, one of the U.S.S. men.
    R. A. Petty was in town today getting the wire stretchers to put in a cross fence on the place.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 8, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    After I had written my letter for the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune, John Foster of Lake Creek, John Mayham, Jay Spitzer, Miss Margaret Riley, Frank Brandon of Central Point and five or six men who are in the Forest Service came in for supper and beds. The Forest Service men engaged rooms and meals for an indefinite time as they are engaged in putting up a telephone line between here and Trail, connecting the Butte Falls line with it north of here.
    Sunday morning we had our regular Sunday school as usual and there was an addition of three who came in but took no active part. There was no preaching as Mr. Trovato, the regular minister, did not venture out from Butte Falls where he had been helping to care for the sick, and I am unable at this date to announce when he will be here again, although Dr. Holt reports that those who have been sick are improving. He reports that there were forty cases in that place and neighborhood. We of Eagle Point have been very fortunate in that regard as we have had but three cases reported in our town.
    We had quite a crowd here for dinner Sunday. Mrs. Allie Daley, who assisted Mrs. Howlett in her work, reported that there were 53 took dinner (noon), including the family and regular boarders. Among those who came from a distance and from their homes in Eagle Point were A. J. Anderson, wife, son Harold and two daughters, Misses Ethel and Sadie, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Satchwell, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Carpenter, all of Medford, A. L. Haselton who is engaged teaching school near Rancheria Prairie, who came out to meet his wife and son Rob; Mrs. A. L. and Mrs. Frank Haselton of Eagle Point, Mr. and Mrs. A. V. Palm, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Jewell, Mr. and Mrs. Anna Avis, Mr. and Mrs. Tenett and son, Dr. and Mrs. Hart of Medford, Joe Moomaw and wife and baby, Rollen Reter, wife and child, Medford; Wm. von der Hellen, wife, son Hugo and daughter Miss Joyce, Eagle Point; Ernest Peachey, C. D. Morgan and wife of Gold Hill, G. W. Medley and wife, Medford; C. E. Gates and wife, Miss Marie Gates, Mildred Jacques, Mr. Hanford and Mrs. Whitley, Mr. Stuart Kissick. (Mr. Kissick is the engineer who has charge of the work of surveying and locating the proposed water ditch from above Butte Falls, taking the water out of Big Butte Creek, and he brought with him his crew consisting of C. G. Hegler, Wm. James, Ed James and P. McCool.) Mr. Kissick has had his wife boarding here since about the 23rd of February and the four last named engaged rooms and board for an indefinite term. There were quite a number here Sunday who were strangers to me and in the tumult of coming and going I failed to get all of the names, but in such a company it is very hard to secure all of the names but no one was intentionally omitted. Miss Anna French of Talent, who came out Saturday on the stage on her way to near McLeod to teach school, remained here at the Sunnyside until Monday morning, taking the Trail stage for her destination.
    Charles Horton of Klamath Falls, one of the cattle buyers, came in Monday and went out with Ben Brophy to look over his cattle that were on the range in the low hills near Round Top and Antelope Mountain, returning to the Sunnyside that night tired and hungry, for he had had no dinner that day.
    Cecil Culbertson and wife came in Monday morning on their way to Medford.
    George Gates of Medford and Edward Riley called for dinner Monday and so did Mrs. J. Doubleday of Butte Falls. She came out from home, took dinner and went on to Medford.
    R. E. Morris, our school supervisor, came out Monday night, spent the night with us, went to Laurel Hill and Reese Creek, visited the schools, returning to the Sunnyside that night and today. Wednesday went up to Brownsboro, Butte Creek and Lake Creek schools. Speaking about schools brings to mind an article that appeared in the Medford Mail Tribune of the 8th over the signature of W. E. Phipps, where he criticizes the action of the school board of Medford for what he calls a usurpation of power, and I will say for the encouragement of Mr. Phipps that I have heard quite a number of our citizens applauding him for his stand in the matter. I cannot see the use of having a contract signed unless it is binding on both parties, and when a teacher signs a contract to teach a given time for a specified amount, she, or he as the case may be, holds the board to that contract just the same as a corporation would hold a contractor who agrees to perform a certain job and they generally have to sign a bond as an assurance that the contract will be filled, but if a teacher signs up he or she can resign on a simple pretext and the board will generally accept the resignation through sympathy and if they don't accept they can do as a teacher did in one of our rural districts in the high hills, she came out on some pretext and married, then sent word that she was not going to teach anymore, and so left them to hunt up another teacher, and all the penalty attached was the revoking of her license to teach, but what did she care for that, for she was married and did not care how much she discommoded the patrons of the school. If they sign a contract it should not be left to the option of the board to raise a salary and if they have that right they should have the right also to lower the salary. It is a poor rule that don't work both ways.
    A man came in Tuesday and gave his name as A. T. Spacer but was very reticent as to his business, but in the run of conversation remarked that he had recently come from California. P. S. Hargood, a traveling salesman, was also here for dinner Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Nate Garrett, who live on the old Phoenix road near Roxy Ann, came in Tuesday to bring in Mrs. Garrett's sister, Miss Ellen McCabe, who has been visiting Mrs. Garrett for the past two weeks.
    M. F. Lewis, George McDonald, J. R. Beach, Frank Smith, Noble Zimmerman, who has been spending the winter in Blue Canyon trapping, and Wm. Moore of Butte Falls and Harry Smith were among the diners today, Wednesday.
    We are having some fine showers now so that the buzz of the autos is positively stopped for the present.
    Prof. A. L. Haselton, who is teaching north of Butte Falls, came out Saturday, returning Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 12, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    After I had finished my letter to the Mail Tribune Wednesday afternoon and taken it to the post office, O. Adams of Butte Falls, Mr. B. Bursch of Wellen and Thomas Edsall of Phoenix came in and enjoyed board and lodging for a few days. They are engaged in running out government lines in the Lake Creek country. They go from here in a car to their day's work and return. W. R. Hannington of Boardman, Ore., also came in and engaged a room for a few days. He is interested in the agate industry and has been engaged hunting over our agate fields in this section. While here he succeeded in securing a very nice lot of stones. He hunted up to today, Saturday, noon, and then started for his home. He promised before he left to return this coming fall and spend a while gathering up more agates. Fred Frideger of Medford, who owns a 20-acre orchard just above town, also came in for supper and a room, to remain a few days. He is out to prune up and improve his orchard. Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, was also here for supper.
    Our neighbor, Mr. Morgan, who now owns the old Farmer Hotel property, has driven the posts for a fence to enclose the property and some adjoining lots he has purchased.
    Ralph Peyton of Peyton came out on the stage Thursday morning and went on up home.
    Although Thursday is one of the days when the cream-gathering truck comes around, there seemed to be but a few farmers in town, although Henry French and his daughter, Miss Mae, came in and were accompanied by Miss Ellen McCabe. Ed Cowden and wife were also in and were doing some business with our merchants. Mrs. Fred Dutton and a lady friend were also here and so was George McDonald, the foreman on the Frank Rhodes farm, and while he was here I asked him how he liked the way the Fordson tractors work, and he replied that it was doing the work very well, but he was fearful that the heavy iron wheels would pack the ground so at to make it so hard that it would not revive again for a long time, and the next man that I interviewed on the subject was Thomas D. Singleton and he said that he had tried three different kinds of plowing machines, and that he liked the one he had fine. Said that he was plowing up his alfalfa meadow with three heavy horses and a hand plow and had worked hard for about three days, and that he then put in a tractor and accomplished as much in five hours as he had in three days and it was done well. He then hitched on to three sections of harrow and harrowed it down; then hitched onto three sections of spring-tooth harrow and crossed it, leaving it in fine shape, and that the present owner of the farm, Mr. Earl Esch, will raise a fine crop of wheat on it. I then related what Mr. McDonald had said about packing the ground and he then asked which was the worst for the land, to have a large hard iron wheel run over the land, or to have a horse weighing 14 or 15 hundred pounds tramp over it day after day and each foot measuring five or six inches across, and thus pack the ground and then the next year repeat the work again and skim off the same soil that had been moved the year before, down to the packed surface, and he was so decidedly in favor of the iron horse. After it is packed with the machine the same machine will put the plows under that crust and liven it up again and make it as good as ever, and Mr. Singleton predicts that the time is not far distant when the horse will be done away with, as a plow power and that the "iron horse" will take his place almost entirely on the farm.
    Carl Kyle, who is on the J. W. Grover farm, was here having some blacksmith work done Thursday and Robert Gordon of Fort Klamath came in, ate this dinner and went out to Medford on the jitney.
    Wig Jacks, who has bought land in our town, is fencing it, and arranging to put water on it. He has the ditch already blocked out.
    Ralph Beibersteadt was among the business callers Friday.
    Mrs. Sherman Wooley went to Butte Falls to see her mother and brothers Friday on the stage.
    Benjamin Whetstone was also among the callers Friday, and so was Harvey Roy, Lloyd and Thomas Stanley. The first three named seemed to be going to drive off cattle to the mountain range.
    Rev. Trovato came out from Butte Falls and went to Medford to enter the hospital to be thoroughly examined to ascertain if there were any of the germs of the flu hanging to him, as he had been right in the midst of it in Butte Falls while waiting on those who were sick.
    Floyd Tucker brought out the Lake Creek and Brownsboro mail for his brother-in-law, William Stob, Friday.
    Mike Sidleyson of Lake Creek came out from Medford Friday morning and went up home on the stage.
    James Owens, one of our county commissioners, was here interviewing some of our citizens, as well as A. C. Speck, the road supervisor of the Brownsboro road district, and Thomas Stanley of Butte Falls.
    Miss Hazel Brown, our assistant cashier, motored to Medford Thursday evening, returning in time to be at her desk by nine o'clock a.m. next morning.
    Horace Geppert came out Thursday, went on to Medford, returning here Friday a.m., and remained until this Sunday morning with us at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Ella Belford, who has been up in the northern country, returned to her home Friday. She was accompanied by her cousin, Miss Anna Stewart.
    A. J. Cobleigh of Butte Falls was in town Friday and so was E. E. Tucker of Brownsboro, and Thomas D. Singleton, formerly owner of the Esch farm.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wettinburg, who are running the Joe Rader farm near here, were in town Friday, and so was Thomas Carlton of Prospect and Wm. Cottrell of Trail.
    Mrs. J. H. Carlton of Wellen was here Friday visiting her sisters, Lottie Van Scoyoc, and Mrs. S. B. Holmes.
    Among the callers today, Saturday noon, were Mrs. Ed Murphy, daughter and sister, Miss Holman of Wellen, Mr. Charles E. Turner of Kansas City, Mo., J. L. Farley of Portland, J. H. Murphy of Medford and Mrs. Richardson of Butte Falls and M. T. Leneis. They were all here for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wm Cottrell of Trail, one of our leading stockmen, A. J. Florey, Jr., Miss Ethel Anderson and her sister Sadie, of Medford, came in Saturday evening for rooms and meals.
    Sunday we were favored with a fine downpour of rain and snow, and that day Mr. C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle came out from the camp that they had established a short distance beyond Prospect, and report that the snow, when they left, was fourteen inches deep and snowing like everything. Carlyle said that it snowed so hard that he had to lower his windshield to see to drive, as the snow would accumulate on the windshield so fast as to completely cover it up and the wind was blowing so hard that they were completely covered with snow. There has been a vast amount of trouble borrowed by a number of our citizens on account of the scarcity of snow in the hills and some predicted that there would be a great scarcity of water on the range for stock, but now their fears have all vanished, and now they are borrowing trouble fearing that as we have had such a fine rain and snow that it will be the last and that we will not have any more rain and the result will be a failure of crops, but I have been living in this immediate neighborhood for the past fifty-three years and have never seen a failure of crops, yet it is the case quite often that someone will have a failure of his crop, especially his corn crop, but that is generally attributed to a failure of the farmer to properly prepare his ground before planting or leaving it half worked, pulverized, after it is planted, but where the ground is properly worked before and after the corn is planted, especially if the ground is well rolled after the planting and then if it is inclined to bake, to run over it with a light harrow. That will almost always ensure a good stand and with proper care and culture a good crop.
    Owing to the inclement weather Sunday morning there was not the usual attendance at Sunday school, but nevertheless we had a very interesting time, but no preaching as Mr. Trovato failed to put in an appearance and I am not able to state whether he will be here next Sunday or not, but we will have Sunday school as usual commencing at 10 o'clock a.m.
    Miss Ethel Freeman of Ashland, who is teaching in the Little Butte district, came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage and went on up to her school on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    Clarence Middlebusher of Trail and Fred Frideger of Medford also came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage and the driver, Joe Noonan, had to leave a lady, who is engaged teaching in the Elk Creek district, Miss Edna Von Gotham of Rogue River, who came out later on the Eagle Point jitney, and remained at the Sunnyside until this Wednesday morning, and then went up to her school on the Eagle Point-Persist stage.
    J. M. Dews, one of the deputy assessors, the one assigned to assess Brownsboro, Lake Creek and Climax districts, came in Sunday night.
    Rollie Mathews, one of the stockmen of this section, was in town Monday and in talking with him in regard to the cattle, he said that they had turned out all of their cattle except about sixty-five cows with calves that were too poor to hustle for a living yet, as there is practically no grass, and I am told that among those turned out there is quite a number that have succumbed to the hard winter as quite a number of the cattlemen have fed out all of their hay and it is so scarce and high that the owners are taking chances on their pulling through on browsing on oak shrubs and chaparral.
    W. S. Chappell, our shoe repairer, was away from his shop Saturday afternoon and on inquiring the cause of his absence he said that he had been up to C. E. Bellows to put up a water tank and fix it to his engine, put in a hot and cold water system in his house, and everything nicely arranged now so that Mrs. Bellows can have everything convenient for caring for her milk and cream vessels.
    Our postmaster, W. C. Clements, received a package of sweet clover seed from the department to be given to some one of the good farmers in the neighborhood to be planted and the character of the soil and all the particulars noted and reported to Washington, D.C., and Mr. C. selected Mr. John L. Robertson to plant it, and he says that he has about an acre already plowed, the tract he experimented on with his new Fordson and that he is going to take special care and see what it will do. A few years ago the plant came up wild around here and some of the farmers cut it and reported that the cattle especially seemed to like it as well as any hay they could get. I intend to watch the result and report to the readers of the Eaglets, if I live that long.
    Mrs. Wm. Holman of Lake Creek and another lady were here Tuesday, and so was Mr. Stanford Houston of Long Branch (Trail) and Mrs. Ida Kent of Merlin. Mrs. Kent was on her way up in that country to visit her relatives. They both took dinner with us.
    Three of the gang of surveyors working with Mr. Stuart McKissick, the engineer who has charge of the laying of the route for the water ditch from Big Butte, and have been boarding here, were called to Medford to do some office work by our county surveyor, Mr. Frank Rhodes, but one of them came back Tuesday. Speaking about Tuesday brings to mind the fact that on that day 88 years ago, I arrived on this earth in Augusta, Me., and since that eventful day have seen the various ups and downs of an ordinary life, and the Good Lord has blessed me with every needed blessing, and I can truthfully say with the Psalmist David, "That I was once young and that now I am old, and that I never have seen the righteous forsaken or his seed begging bread." For our Savior said, "Seek ye first the kingdom of God." And all these things shall be added unto you, and I have fully realized the truth of that statement for I sought him while young and he has kept me all these years, praise his holy name.
    Steve Smith and wife and Perry Foster of Debenger Gap (Trail) were doing business in town Tuesday.
    Miss Pool, the county food demonstrator, spent Tuesday night with us.
    Bert Nason and R. H. Canders, two of the forest rangers, who have been stopping with us for the past week or more, started this morning for Pelican Bay to look after Uncle Sam's interest out there.
    J. F. Lozier and Earnest Feister of Medford passed through here this Wednesday morning on their way out to W. H. Crandall's.
    J. J. Schaiber and Dr. Kirchgessner of Debenger Gap were in town this morning.
    Wm. Heckathorn of Elk Creek went up home on the stage this morning.
    Wm. Lewis, our Eagle Point jitney driver, and Mr. Henry B. Pury of Medford were here for dinner today.
    Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Ayres of Reese Creek were in town this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 19, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wednesday W. W. Wilfley, who has been assisting Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, with his sheep, came in and spent the night and a part of the next day at the Sunnyside.
    Fred Frideger of Medford also came in to occupy his room after an absence of a few days layoff on account of the rain. He is getting his orchard up in fine shape.
    B. F. Fuller and wife were doing business with our merchants Thursday.
    M. M. Krantz of Butte Falls came out on the Eagle Point stage Thursday morning and went on up home on the same line of stages.
    Miss Florence Pool, our county food demonstrator, was also a welcome visitor at the Sunnyside the same night. She had spent Tuesday night with us and Wednesday went to Lake Creek to visit the schools on the route--Brownsboro, Butte Creek and Lake Creek--returning Thursday evening. She seems to be a live wire, and makes a good impression wherever she goes.
    Our road supervisor, Carl Hayes, had two road graders at work leveling down the roads Thursday; he and Mr. Ward were running one and Rob Harnish and his brother Ray the other. They were on the road between here and Brownsboro.
    Corbin Edgell, business manager of the A. Corbin orchard and owner of the Edgell orchard adjoining the Corbin orchard was a business caller Thursday morning. He had two other men in the car with him, strangers to me.
    Cecil Culbertson and wife passed through here Thursday morning on their way to Medford. Cecil says that when we get  the Crater Lake Highway finished through here that about all of the Butte Creek and Lake Creek settlement will just rush through here and go right to Medford to do their trading. It will be so nice to have a good smooth road to ride on.
    And I would not be surprised if there was not too much truth in that light remark to make it altogether a joke, for unless our business men give some inducement to them to stop they will go on through as it will not consume more than an hour more time and then they can trade where there is more of a variety and competition.
    G. E. Pierce of Brownsboro was guest at the Sunnyside Thursday and so was J. E. Edmiston, one of the organizers of the Oregon Growers Association of Medford. He says that he is meeting with remarkable success in perfecting the organization.
    Among the casual caller Thursday were P. S. Anderson, owner of a fine dairy farm on Rogue River about five miles from here, and J. D. Buchanan of Medford. He simply came out with Mr. Anderson for the ride and to see the country. J. H. French and son Lloyd came in what at first appeared to be a new car, but on close inspection showed that it was his old car, but Lloyd had repainted it, making it look almost as good as new. Eugene Bellows, another one of our enterprising farmers and dairy men, and Pete Betz, who owns one of the best farms on Rogue River, Charles Hanscomb, one of our cattle men, T. F. Nichols, owner of another fine farm on Rogue River a few miles above here, Mr. Joy of Reese Creek, Thurman Taylor, Ed Condon, who now is on the old John Nichols place, Thomas Cingcade and wife who was here for repairs for his gasoline wood-sawing outfit and had to send to Portland. His outfit has been in the Childreth blacksmith shop but it is now all up in good shape.
    Mrs. Cingcade came in to do some shopping.
    Many of the Thursday visitors brought in cream and eggs to deliver to the two truck drivers who are visiting our town every week and are leaving a lot of money with the farmers and dairymen. Geo. Stowell, our boss egg man, was in town Thursday but did not bring in any eggs but brought in his cream. He says that 30¢ a dozen is not enough for eggs when wheat is selling for 4 and 5¢ a pound.
    Mr. Slusser, our barber and one of the agate men of our town, has been making some substantial improvements in his agate grinding shop.
    W. W. Cross of Butte Falls spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside.
    John Silas of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Thursday for Medford.
    H. C. Mechem of Trail and Frank Hayes of Butte Falls were passengers for their homes Friday morning on the stages.
    Andrew Pool of Trail, one of the forest rangers, and wife, came in Friday morning and took a room at the Sunnyside. Mr. Pool came out to join the force who are putting up a government telephone line between Medford and Trail and Mr. Wm. Jones, of Butte Falls, another forest ranger, also came in to join them. He also is stopping at the Sunnyside.
    A. J. Cole, Earl Coffin and H. Lemke of Chicago were here Friday canvassing for enlarging pictures. They took dinner here and then went on out in the country. Ed Johnson, John and J. E. Brownlee of Medford, were here for dinner. They are engaged in buying hides, veal, wool, etc.
    J. P. Hardin of Eastern Oregon and Joe Brown of the firm of Brown and White, real estate dealers, were also here Friday for dinner and so was Benj. Edmondson, Jr., of Butte Falls, who remained overnight and so did E. L. Melton, deputy dairy and food commissioner, and J. D. Mickle, commissioner, of Portland.
    Mr. Taylor, one of the deputy assessors, was here Friday assessing our town.
    Henry B. Paul of Medford came out on the stage and went out to the W. H. Crandall farm this Saturday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. P. Coleman of Lake Creek were here for dinner today. Mr. Coleman is the man who bought out Wm. Holman last fall, and they seem to be well pleased with their deal.
    A. S. Bliton, our meter reader, H. J. Deveney, our banker, and Mr. Robert G. Valentine were here for dinner today.
    Mrs. Bert Clarno, Mrs. L. E. Stewart and two daughters, Miss L. E. and Miss Ara Stewart of Butte Falls, and Miss Marie Meyer, who is teaching in the Reese Creek school, Mr. Valentine and another man went out today on the Lewis jitney, and W. S. Baker, of Derby, was crowded out and had to wait for the Eagle Point stage three-quarters of an hour later.
    Mr. and Mrs. Stuart McKissick, who have been boarding at the Sunnyside for the past four weeks, have gone to housekeeping in the von der Hellen bungalow today, Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1920, page 8



REESE CREEK RIPLETS
    Miss Pool, the home demonstrator, met a few of the ladies at the home of Mrs. C. E. Bellows last Thursday; making dress forms was the order of the day. Those having forms made at that time were Mrs. Peter Betz, Mrs. W. H. Crandall, Mrs. Sam Courtney, Mrs. W. E. Hammel, Mrs. H. Watkins and Miss May French.
    The ladies took their lunch and spent a very pleasant as well as profitable day.
    The Reese Creek Sunday school expect to have an all-day meeting at the school house Easter, April 4th. Come and bring your lunch and remain all day. There will be a short program, also a sermon by Rev. J. Stille.
    The recent rains have caused the farmers to wear a more cheerful countenance.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 25, 1920, page 6



REESE CREEK RIPLETS
    R. B. Vincent made a trip to the power plant Thursday after a team and wagon which he recently purchased from Louis Pankey.
    W. A. Higinbotham was summoned to Jacksonville Tuesday to attend the Peyton trial. He returned home Thursday evening, bringing with him Ernest Hollenbeak, who has been spending the winter at Winters, Cal.
    Messrs. Tracy, Boothby, Frank Ditsworth, Chas. Manning and Wm. Lewis were also called to Jacksonville to attend court.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Peyton of the power plant motored to Medford Wednesday.
    Stewart Ditsworth of Laurelhurst, who was confined to his bed several days last week, is up and around again.
    The sad news reached Mrs. J. F. Brophy last week of the death of her brother, Thomas McAndrew of Reno, Nevada. We extend our utmost sympathy to the bereaved family.
    Lizzy Manning returned to her home Sunday after spending a couple of weeks at James E. Grieve's.
    Chris Natwick and son Carlyle came up to their camp Thursday which they have established somewhere this side of Union Creek.
    Chester Davis, Dee and Waldo Nye spent Sunday evening at the Evergreen ranch.
    Mrs. F. M. Manning and daughter Dency spent Wednesday afternoon at J. F. Brophy's.
    R. B. Vaughn, Stuart Ditsworth and sister Hazel spent Sunday at Prospect.
    Louis Pankey, from the power plant, has purchased a new Baby Overland car. He brought it home Sunday and was accompanied by his wife, Mrs. Bert Nichols and Ray Davis.
    Mr. and Mrs. Connie Clark left Monday afternoon for Portland, where Mrs. Clark's brother is very ill with the flu.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tracy Boothby and sons Ed and Frank, made a business trip to Red Blanket Monday.
    Mrs. F. M. Manning was visiting a few days last week with Joe Phipps and family.
    Miss Fern Gordon spent Sunday with Mrs. Lizzie Nichols.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    After I had written the Eaglets for the Medford Mail Tribune, Mr. Edgar Wight, one of Medford's jewelers, came in to spend the night and interest himself the next day hunting over our agate fields for agates. So Sunday morning, after eating a hearty breakfast and taking a lunch prepared by the hostess of the Sunnyside, he started in company of J. P. Goin, the agate king of this community, George West and William Jones, two of the forest rangers who are stopping at the Sunnyside while putting up a telephone line from Trail to Medford, they started out to seek their fortunes, and when they returned, reported that they had had considerable success. Mr. Wight makes a business of gathering agates, having them cut and polished and then mounting them. They succeeded in securing some fine stones.
    Misses Ethel and Sadie Anderson of Medford came out in company of Mr. A. J. Florey, Jr., and Glen Haley to attend the dance given in the dance hall here, and after the dance took rooms at the Sunnyside Hotel, remaining until after dinner Sunday.
    Professor A. L. Haselton, who is teaching out about eight miles northeast of Butte Falls, came out Saturday evening, remaining until Tuesday with his family. He has a small school, two little girls and says that he is getting along nicely with them. They, the children and teacher, have to go down a quarter of a mile to the school house, where they find an up-to-date school with all the modern conveniences including a fine modern heating furnace with plenty of wood.
    D. R. Patrick, who is working, carpentering, on the Talent ditch came in Saturday evening on the Lewis jitney and hurried on out to his home in the foothills, intending to reach there before dark.
    Sunday morning we had our regular Sunday school on time, but our minister, Mr. Trovato, did not show up and the consequence was we had no preaching. On inquiry I learned that he had gone to Medford and joined the United States cavalry, and when the Sunday Oregon Journal came out it contained quite a notice of him as being an expert equestrian and pistol shot. But he left us unceremoniously and the first that we knew of it came in a letter to Mr. and Mrs. Morgan, with whom he had boarded while here, stating that he had joined the army and was on his way to Wyoming to a fort as his headquarters. He did not seem to succeed as a minister here, as he could not get the people interested enough to turn out and hear him. I am informed that he tried, during the late war, to enlist in the army, navy and marines, but was rejected on account of his height, as he was too short to fill the standard. We wish him success in his new undertaking.
    Sunday was not as pleasant as could be wished, as it was rather chilly March weather, but we had quite a number of people here for dinner, beside our regular boarders, among whom were Nick Young and Miss Ruby Haley of Central Point, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nunan, daughter Virginia, and son, Craig, of Jacksonville, Mildred Thompson of Stanford University, Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Satcharty, Medford, Mr. G. M. Best, San Francisco, Bernard Tickrow, of Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Childreth, who have been stopping at the Sunnyside for some time past, have moved and gone to housekeeping on the Wilfley orchard, Gordon going to work there for the summer.
    Monday morning there was some stir on the street, as some of the dairy people came in early to bring their cream, and among them I noticed Mrs. Walter Meyers. She is making a specialty of the dairy and poultry business and when she asked the creamery man the price of eggs and he replied 28¢ a dozen, she replied that they better keep the eggs and eat them than sell at that price. With wheat at four and five cents a pound that it would not pay to sell.
    Ed Cowden was another who brought in his cream but the most of the dairymen are waiting until Thursday.
    Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby was a passenger on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Monday and went on up home.
    Mrs. Ida Lee Bush, representing Washington, D.C., was among the guests Monday at dinner. She is one of those affable characters that seem to make friends wherever she goes and soon has people interested in her work.
    Mr. W. B. Butler, who is making his home with his son, W. E. Butler, about two miles above here, was also here for dinner Monday. The old gentleman is quite feeble, as he is nearing his 88th birthday.
    Mr. Marshall and his two boys of Brownsboro, who bought the mills, was here also Monday.
    Mrs. Radcliff was also a business caller Monday.
    E. P. Hanby, one of our ex-soldiers, and Miss Violet Graham of Trail came in Tuesday, and remained until this Wednesday morning, when they went up home on the Eagle Point-Persist stage.
    George McDonald, foreman on the Frank Rhodes farm, took dinner and went on to Medford, returning this morning.
    Tuesday forenoon I was called to the phone by the sheriff's office and notified to be in Jacksonville by 3 o'clock that afternoon to appear as a witness in a civil suit between Albert Clements and a Mr. Small over a collision between their two cars, so after inquiring around, I found that Frank and R. G. Brown and S. B. Holmes were to go also as witnesses in the same case, so managed to get a ride with them. Otherwise, I would have had to walk, as the jitney does not leave here until two o'clock and then I would have been landed in Medford and could not get there on time at any rate. (Suggestion: The next time anyone is wanted, call a little earlier.) But I went anyway and on the way I noticed that the grain that had been planted was looking better than I expected and the alfalfa was looking fine. I could not tell very much about the case, as there is such an echo in the court house that it is very hard for one to understand what is said, but we console ourselves that when Medford gets out of debt that we will have a new one, but how long that will be puzzles a prophet to tell.
    George Loosley of Fort Klamath and Fred Neil of Ashland came in after an absence of several days and resumed their places at the table in the Sunnyside. Mr. Loosley has been in here off and on for some time, buying up cattle for shipment to his ranch in Klamath County, and now has them turned out on the range north and northeast of here and he and Mr. Neil are looking after them until he gets ready to take them across the mountains to his ranch.
    Another of our old landmarks has been removed. Mrs. Watkins, our nearest neighbor, has had her old barn that has been standing for years torn down and now the lot looks as though something had been lost.
    Allison Allen of Spokane, a half-brother to John M. Allen of Derby, came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage this Wednesday morning and went on up to visit his brother.
    John L. Lane and wife of Derby came in and spent Tuesday night with us and Wednesday morning Mrs. Lane went on down to Ashland.
    O. C. Walker, our deputy assessor, was a guest at the Sunnyside today for dinner and so was Mr. R. E. Martin of Medford, a representative of the Portland Flouring Mills, and so was Carlyle Natwick. He had recently returned from the Prospect country and reports a quantity of snow on the route of the Crater Lake Highway between there and Union Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wednesday afternoon Dr. W. W. P. Holt, our M.D., brought into the Sunnyside Hotel George A. Hollenbeak, to remain for a few days while he is being treated for blood poisoning. The doctor was called by telephone that morning to go to Mr. Hollenbeak's, near McLeod, and when he reached the place found Mr. Hollenbeak suffering with his right hand and on examination found that his hand was in a very bad condition, so after lancing it and giving it proper attention brought him out here, and at the present writing the hand, although very painful, is getting along as well as could be expected.
    Louis Martin of Trail also came in that Wednesday evening to spend the night. He had an assortment of furs that he had captured the past winter and took them to Medford, sold them to one of the Medford buyers at what he considered a good price, returned to the Sunnyside for the night and went up home the next day on the stage.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, our assistant postmistress and telephone operator, slipped off from her many friends about a week ago and went over to Weed to visit one of our old school teachers, Mr. J. C. Barnard and wife, who is now living in that city in employ of the Weed Lumber Co., returning Wednesday afternoon, and reports having had one of the most enjoyable visits of the season.
    Lester Smith of Butte Falls, who has been attending the state university, came out on the stage from Medford and went out to the Ed Cordon ranch to visit his sister, Mrs. Cordon, Thursday.
    Wm. Perry and wife, who have been in Medford and Jacksonville for several days attending court, as Mr. Perry was one of the jurors for the term, returned Thursday to their home.
    Thomas D. Singleton, one of our retired farmers, was in town Thursday.
    There were quite a number of our farmers, dairymen and chicken raisers in town Thursday and the two trucks of the Jackson County and the Independence creameries arrived here quite early so as to meet the early comers on their way up the country and several of them were here ready with their eggs and cream to meet them. Among them was Mrs. Walter Meyer, and while here she reported that she had brought off one incubator of chicks but that the incubator proved to have a leak in it and the result was that the eggs did not hatch well, although she had ninety little chicks almost large enough to fry, and another batch that will hatch the last of this week, about yesterday or today, Saturday.
    The trucks seem to be loaded both ways, as they bring out almost anything that is wanted by the farmers, even to wire fencing and furniture, grain or mill run, hogs and hides--a very great convenience.
    C. E. Bellows and wife came in and were at the Sunnyside for dinner. They were accompanied by John B. Bechan of the Jackson County Cow Testing Association. Mr. Bechan has been visiting the various dairies in this section and testing the cows for the owners.
    James E. Perry of Riddle was here Thursday night. Mr. Perry remained until after dinner Friday and while here went out to look over some of the agate fields. He was looking for large, clear, preferably white, agates but could not find what he wanted.
    Mrs. S. J. Hessler of Lake Creek was in town Friday and went on up home in the stage.
    Perry Foster of Lake Creek, who had been to Jacksonville on business returned Friday and spent the night with us.
    John Foster of Lake Creek came in Friday evening and went on to Medford the same night.
    Just a short time before supper Friday evening the representatives of the Butte Falls basketball team came in for supper, consisting of Glen Albert, Ernest Albert, Orbia Albert, Eston Ahlstrom, Theodore Fredenburg, Wilson O'Brien and Prof. H. P. Jewett, principal of the Butte Falls high school, and after eating supper they loaded into two cars with Harry Lewis to drive one. Jud Edsall the other, Mrs. Howlett and daughter Hattie in with Jud, and went to Central Point to play against the Central Point basketball team. Jud and Mrs. Howlett went on to Medford to see the show at the Page. The result of the game was the score stood 41 to 12 in favor of Butte Falls. On the return trip Jud came by Central Point and picked up the Butte Falls players and brought them out here for the rest of the night. They came out on a little car on the track, returning this Saturday morning in the same way, feeling quite jubilant over their victory.
    Miss Mildred Tucker of Brownsboro came out on the Lake Creek stage this morning and went up to Butte Falls on the stage.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. B. Howell of Boise, Idaho, uncle and aunt of Mr. H. J. Deveney, our banker, came in yesterday to visit Mr. Deveney and family and the McDonald family, relatives, who came in from Idaho last fall.
    Guy Pruett, one of our farmers, and Clarence Cox of Marysville, Calif., is here visiting relatives and also visiting his mother, Mrs. Wm. Smith, who owns a small farm between Medford and Central Point.
    John Zimmerlee, who at one time owned the Farmers Hotel, came in yesterday and was on the streets this morning.
    Ralph Peyton of Peyton passed through town today on his way to Medford.
    Thomas Singleton, Jr., drove in this morning to do some trading with our merchants.
    Wm. von der Hellen, one of the contractors on the Crater Lake Highway, came in from the camp and reports that all of the old snow was gone, that they had about a dozen men at work and that as soon as the weather settles they expect to put on a full force and finish up the job.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 1, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Carl Bergman and Alex Vestal called Saturday night for supper.
    Among the arrivals Sunday at the Sunnyside was H. C. Christofferson of San Rafael, Cal., E. G. Trowbridge and Mrs. H. E. Berdan of Medford, Mrs. Lapworth of Seattle, Mrs. J. K. Holmes also of Seattle, Ward Spatz of Hastings, Nevada, Harry Rosenberg and his brother David of Medford.
    Andrew Pool, one of the forest rangers who has been stopping at the Sunnyside for some time, made a trip up to his home on Trail Creek Sunday morning and John Holtz, another one of the company, went to his home in Sams Valley, and George West, still another one, went to Medford on the Sunday morning stage to meet his wife who came down from Portland on the Saturday night train, remaining until Monday morning when both came out on the Eagle Point stage. Mrs. West has been stopping for some months in Portland under the care of a specialist, but has so far regained her health as to be able to rejoin her husband and they expect as soon as practicable to move to Klamath County, where Mr. West expects to be engaged looking after Uncle Sam's interests in the measuring of lumber on Anna Creek. Wm. Jones, another of the forest rangers who is stopping here, spent a part of the day gathering agates but they all went to work Monday on the telephone line between here and Medford. They have been handicapped by lack of material as they have not been able to get the poles out from the Butte Falls country on account of bad roads. They also lack insulators, etc.
    When they came in Mrs. Holmes greeted me as though we had been long time acquaintances, for she said that she seemed to have known me for some time as her son had been cutting out the Eaglets and sending them to her regularly for a long time and that she looked for them regularly as the week rolled around. After eating dinner and looking around the place admiring our beautiful Little Butte Creek they settled down to make a visit and a more enjoyable time was seldom had, and they left expressing the wish that we would meet again under like circumstances. Later in the day George V. Loosley, wife and little daughter came in for supper and then went on to Ashland that night. Mr. Fred Neil and his father, I learned, later came in from Ashland to see Mr. Neil Sunday afternoon, but as there was none of our family present and Mr. Neil was out looking after the cattle that Mr. Loosely has bought and turned on the range in the foothills they did not stay long. Mr. Goin, who happened to be in the house, entertained them and reported to Mr. Neil when he came in.
    There was a lady came out on the Medford stage and went on up to Lost Creek on the Lake Creek stage, to take charge of the school there, I learned later, but did not learn her name.
    Ralph Bieberstedt was a business caller Monday morning.
    Mrs. Susan Hart, who has been in Medford working in a hospital for some time, came out on the stage Monday and went out to her farm.
    I see that Wig Jacks has the concrete pipe on the ground and is getting ready to pipe the water from his new ditch under the street near the Eagle Point Bank building.
    Our creamery men were both on time Monday, and Mr. Pickel, one of the drivers, says that the volume of cream is increasing, that he is getting fifty gallons of cream a week now from one man near Brownsboro and that he intends to add twenty more cows to his herd and that then he will be able to supply him with a hundred gallons a week, and that his business is increasing in the Little Butte Creek country. The fact of the business is there is some of the best land in Jackson County in that section and furthermore there is as fine a lot of men and women up there as can be found in the state and they are not afraid nor ashamed to work. I once in a while hear a man say, "Oh, I would not run a dairy when you have to get up and go out to milk at five o'clock in the morning and then again at night," and I notice those same persons have to run a limited store account and seldom have any cash on hand, while the dairyman has the cash to pay and can trade where he pleases. I met a man who has a fine cow ranch and asked him if he had brought in cream and he said no, that he had but one cow, but remarked that he could keep a hundred dairy cows on his ranch but that it was too much work to attend to them. But if he would put say fifty or seventy-five good cows on the ranch and lease it out on shares what an income it would bring him, and what a help to some poor family or families and to the entire community.
    Mr. Johnson, formerly one of the creamery men of Medford, passed through here Monday on his way up the country.
    Jack Grigsby, Sam Coy, Charles Hanscomb, Gus Nichols and wife were business callers Monday, and so was John Rader and Henry Stanley.
    Roderick B. Baker came out Monday from Medford with a jitney driver and was met here Monday by Bernice Edmondson, who came out on the Butte Falls stage, and they two went to Medford together, were married and the next day came out on the stage and went up to Butte Falls.
    Joe Riley passed through Monday with a road drag leveling down the roads.
    Sherman Wooley and Harry Lewis came in for supper Monday night.
    Jack Tungate of Butte Falls went out home on the stage Tuesday morning. He had his finger wrapped up and on inquiry I learned that he had had the end of his finger cut off by a pulley. I did not learn the particulars as he was about ready to start when I saw him.
    James Owens, one of the county commissioners, was here having some work done on a road drag.
    John M. Allen and wife of Derby came out Tuesday to have his horses shod and to patronize our stores.
    Mrs. W. E Hammel was here Tuesday. She had been out to Medford to attend the home gathering of the Rebekahs.
    Thomas Cingcade has finally procured the necessary repairs for his wood saw and has it started and is sawing wood for people around town.
    O. S. Frank of Roseburg and B.W. Paul of Paul's Electric store, Medford, were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Frank and Mr. Paul are both interested in the electrical business.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Webb of Derby were here on business Tuesday.
    Mr. Mims, the Medford postmaster, and Miss Florence Lansing, the principal of our school, were here for supper Tuesday.
    Mrs. Lee, the county nurse, was here Tuesday night and went up to Brownsboro, Butte Creek, Lake Creek, etc., today, Wednesday.
    Our county surveyor, Frank Rhodes, spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 5, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Mildred Neil of Derby, who is an assistant in the office of the county clerk in Jacksonville, came out last Wednesday and went on up home on the stage.
    Lawrence Cox of Marysville, Cal., was also a passenger on the same stage for Butte Falls and so was A. J. Cobleigh of Butte Falls. Mrs. Sherman Wooley of Eagle Point also went up to Butte Falls to assist in caring for her mother, Mrs. William Beale, who has been under the care of different physicians for some time.
    W. C. Clements, our postmaster and manager and principal owner of our telephone system and a gentleman, one of the post office inspectors whose name I did not learn, were here last Wednesday for dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl von der Hellen of Wellen were here on business Wednesday afternoon, and so was Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Norris, the superintendent of the J. M. Wilfley orchard. Mrs. Morris was met here by her brother, Mr. Cox, and he went out to the orchard with them to spend the night.
    John Greb, one of the leading farmers and orchardists in the valley, was also here Thursday on business.
    Our shoe cobbler is proving to be quite an acquisition to our community, for in addition to the cobbling business he can turn his hand to almost any kind of mechanical work from repairing pipes, either in stoves or where breaks have occurred, etc., and now he has inserted machinery to repair old saws, gumming them out and making them almost as good as new.
    April first came in almost as rough as March left us, cold, windy and stormy, but while the weather has been rather disagreeable for the past two weeks, we have reason to be thankful to the "giver of all good" that while we have had a little disagreeable weather, we have escaped the terrible tornadoes that have been visiting the Middle West and South. But today, Saturday, the change has come and now it is clear and warm with a prospect of a lovely day for Easter.
    Benjamin Whetston, Marshal Minter and Pete Young and his brother Nick Young, our ex-road supervisor, were doing business here Thursday.
    Among those who were callers at the Sunnyside for dinner Thursday were D. H. Mills, manager of the Butte Falls Lumber Company's business; Mr. R. H. McCurdy, of Medford; C. D. Thompson and R. A. Grant, capitalists of San Francisco, California. The two from San Francisco were out looking over the country, seeing its possibilities in the line of production. They are like the most of the capitalists that visit our valley, very reticent, but learning all that they can without imparting very much to the other fellow.
    T. E. Semple, who has been the foreman on the Altavista orchard for some time, has resigned his position and moved to Medford and Mr. Hovey, the same man who had charge of the orchard during its early history, has been reinstated. We extend to him a hearty greeting and wish him success in his stewardship in his old position.
    Mrs. Florence Lee, the county nurse for Jackson County, after leaving here Wednesday morning, went up Little Butte Creek, visiting the Brownsboro, Butte Creek and Lake Creek schools, returned and spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside, and while she was returning here visited the Eagle Point school in the afternoon.
    Mrs. John Miller of Lake Creek, who has been out to Medford on business, came out on the stage Friday morning and went up home on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    Miss Ella Adamson, daughter of the present contractor for carrying the mail between here and Persist, went up home Friday morning, taking her sister, Mrs. Sherman Taylor, with her.
    Thomas F. Nichols and Wm. Martin, two of our prominent citizens from the rural district; J. Edward Grieve, Prospect, and C. J. Seymour, engineer on [the] Crater Lake Highway and Chris H. Natwick, one of the contractors on said highway, came in Friday from Prospect and report that they have had a lot of snow fall between Prospect and Union Creek, but that it was melting very fast and that as soon as the weather settles they will put on a force of men and rush the work to completion. They were all here for dinner, on their way to Medford. Mr. W. J. Stamper, representing H. G. Brace & Co., Seattle, Washington, advertising calendars, novelties etc., was also here for dinner Friday and so was Nick Young, who was here having some repair work done on his car in the W. L. Childreth shop. Carl Brenard of Medford was here for dinner and Jake Jonas, formerly of this place, came in for dinner and spent the night with us. Mr. Jonas is now engaged in mining near Merlin and came over to take his household effects from here, where he has had them stored, to Merlin.
    Mr. Adams, who bought the McLeod business near the upper steel bridge, also spent the night with us.
    Mrs. J. D. Arnes, wife of the foreman on the Corbin Edgell orchard, was doing business here Friday.
    F. O. Austin, one of the Butte Falls merchants, J. W. Berrian, superintendent of the Butte Falls Fish Hatchery, Mr. Koontz, Butte Falls and W. S. Baker, Derby, came out from Medford on the stage Saturday morning and went on up home.
    Otto Wyss, representing Robertson Hardware & Steel Co., Portland, and Carl Farrar, formerly of Lake Creek, but now of Portland, were here for dinner today.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 6, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT AND MEDFORD I.O.O.F. LODGES TO UNITE
    The preliminary steps have been taken for the consolidation of Eagle Point I.O.O.F. lodge with the Medford lodge. Certain routine form has to be gone through before the amalgamation is entirely complete. The final ceremony will probably be accompanied by one of the social features which have become a popular conjunction with formal proceedings the present season.
    The Eagle Point lodge was instituted a few years ago and started on its career with every promise of success. Shortly afterward came the war upheaval which brought about conditions that made it practically impossible to hold regular meetings and keep up the lodge work. A suggestion to consolidate with the Medford lodge met general approval in both lodges.
    The consolidation will bring the Medford lodge membership up to 200 or more. The local lodge has been making a very substantial increase this year through its own initiations. An additional class of eleven initiates was started through the degree course last Monday evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 7, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers after I had written the Eaglets for the Mail Tribune Saturday afternoon were George Morriche and George Klingle of Lake Creek. Mr. Morriche is the man who has charge of the water pipe at the intake of the Fish Lake-Medford water system, and Mr. Klingle is one of the promising young farmers of the Lake Creek country. Wm. Holmes, Jake Jonas and A. M. Gay were also guests at the Sunnyside Saturday night.
    Easter Sunday morning broke on us rather damp, as early in the morning it was raining and then that went off with a fog that lasted for a few hours, but then the sun came out bright and clear and the day proved to be as lovely as one could have desired and we had our Sunday school as usual with the exception that our superintendent was not in his usual place, on account of a slight indisposition, but his father, the senior Mr. Esch, took his place and we had one of those interesting lessons appropriate to the occasion for our consideration.
    Among the arrivals at the Sunnyside for dinner were Elmer Nice, Hotel Medford truck driver, Sidney S. Smith and children Lloyd and Stanley of Medford, Mr. Theron Taylor, E.P., Ray Casey, wife and two boys, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. McReynolds and daughter Eva, Mr. and Mrs. N.J. Murrell, Mr. and Mrs. D. S. Simpson, Lauretta Simpson, George W. Neilson wife and two boys, Harry Lewis, Wm. von der Hellen, wife and daughter Joyce and son Hugo, and later in the day Mr. E. M. Sutton, E. Whiston and G. Whiston of Central Point and Wm. Lewis, our sheep king, also of Central Point. The McReynolds, Murrells and Simpsons after eating their dinner and spending an hour or more looking over the place and enjoying the beauties of our Butte Creek started for a drive, intending to return for supper, but on the road had a breakdown in one of their cars and the result was they, at least part of the company, came in late and reported their mishap and went on to Medford, as one of the ladies had left her children with a neighbor to care for them and it being Sunday evening could not phone so hurried on home as fast as they could. This incident illustrates the fact that there are no earthly pleasures without their sorrows.
    Wm. Heckathorn of Elk Creek (Trail), is here visiting his uncle and aunt, Frank Lewis and wife.
    Mr. Mechem of Trail came out from Medford on the stage Monday morning and went up home on the Trail stage and a young girl also came out from Medford and went up on the Trail stage.
    Miss Thelma Ellestad, who is teaching the Derby school, also came out from Medford and went to Derby on the Butte Falls stage.
    Wm. Cottrell and J. C. S. Weills were here for dinner Monday. Mr. Cottrell is one of the leading cattlemen who owns a fine farm on Rogue River this side of Trail, and Mr. Weills is a Medford stockman.
    Rudolph Pech and Henry Tonn of Lake Creek, two of our prosperous farmers, made a short stop at the Childreth shop as they passed through town Monday on their way from Medford.
    William Holman and Cecil Culbertson of Lake Creek were doing business here also Monday.
    Tuesday Jack O'Conner of Phoenix called for dinner and he had with him Roy J. Frederick, E. A. Braden of Tacoma, L. E. Bigelow of Medford. The visitors were very reticent as to their business but I would judge by their conversation that they were interested in geological business, either oil or mining.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. B. McReynolds, C. W. McReynolds and wife of the A. W. Walker Auto Company were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. C. W. McReynolds is selling the different kinds of autos for the A. W. Walker Auto Company.
    M. Schutt of Derby came out on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday and so did Miss Mildred Neil of Derby, one of the clerks in the county clerk's office at Jacksonville, who had been up home visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Neil, came out on the stage and went on to Medford the same afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Robertson came in Tuesday combining business with pleasure, Mrs. Robertson spending a few hours visiting their son John and family who live in the lower part of town.
    Wm. Dupray, who owns and operates a sawmill about five miles this side of Butte Falls, came in and spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Theron Taylor, who went up to Trail to visit her mother and family a few days ago, returned Tuesday bringing her mother, Mrs. Adamson, with her.
    There are quite a number of strangers visiting our town, and many of them simply rush through without stopping, going both ways.
    I see that Holmes and MacDonald, our new garage men, have been painting new signs and the garage is now christened the Eagle Point Garage.
    F. J. Ayres and wife drove in this Wednesday morning with a team and report the road as being in horrible condition, very rough from the Reese Creek school house to this place and interspersed with deep mud holes. He said that nobody but Jud could run a car through and then he has to take his Ford.
    Mrs. Harvey Smith has gone up to the Mill Creek camp on the Crater Lake Highway to assist Mrs. C. H. Natwick in the culinary department.
    There was a carload of lumber came out Tuesday evening for Mr. Jacob Monia of Brownsboro and Mr. Weidman of this place. Mr. Monia intends to build a home on his farm near Brownsboro, and Mr. Weidman will use his for fluming purposes.
    Wm. Stob, our Lake Creek mail carrier, after he had carried the mail to Lake Creek came back and brought out Mrs. Stockford of Brownsboro and took her to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1920, page 2


REESE CREEK RIPLETS
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Will Merritt April 12th, an eight and a half lb. daughter. Mother and daughter are doing nicely.
    Tom Vestal and wife have been visiting in Medford for a few days prior to going to housekeeping on their ranch above Reese Creek. Tom expects to work on the Butte Falls road.
    Miss Marie Meyers and a few of her friends came out from Medford Sunday morning and spent the day with Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Hammel.
    Mr. Hammel and Marshall Minter are working on Mr. Hammel's windmill, raising and placing it in position.
    Rev. John Stille preached Sunday after Sunday school. Mr. Eli Stille and Rev. J. Stille sang a duet, "Cast Thy Bread Upon the Waters."
    C. E. Bellows was soliciting for the Farm Bureau last week.
    Mr. Lewis of Central Point, the sheep man, was out this week looking after his flocks.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 16, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. P. Goin, our agate man, has been turning his hand toward making some improvements around the Sunnyside Hotel in the line of fencing. He has removed the old dilapidated wire fence and put in its place a neat picket fence, besides making some other much-needed improvements in the carpenter line.
    J. Henry French and wife were in town and reported that they have installed a water system so that now they have water running in the kitchen and will soon have a hot water tank so as to do away with the old inconvenient was of doing business, and have hot and cold water in the house, so as to lighten the work of caring for the milk cans, cream separator, etc. A family who has a few cows and hens and will strictly attend to business soon reach the point in life where it can have the modern conveniences and sail through life, if not on flowery beds of ease, [they] can greatly improve on the old system.
    John Radar, one of our leading farmers and stockmen, was among the early callers Thursday morning and so was Charley Cingcade, another of our stockmen.
    Mr. J. Wattenburg and his daughter, who are living on the Joe Rader place, were also callers Thursday morning.
    Mrs. William Brown gave me the following news item Thursday for the Eaglets: There will be a clothes fitting and clothes-repairing meeting at the Red Cross rooms over George Brown & Sons' store on next Friday and Saturday, April 16 and 17, and a general invitation is extended, especially to the ladies and girls in their "teens" to come and receive instruction free and learn how to cut, fit, and make their own clothes and to economize in the line of wearing apparel. Miss Pool, our county demonstrator, and Miss Beles, a trained lecturer from the O.A.C., will be there to render all the assistance they can. All the ladies in this section of the county are cordially invited to attend, and in addition to receiving instruction in that line of housekeeping, have a royal good time in a special way.
    J. L. Hovey, the present superintendent of the Altavista orchard, was in town Thursday shaking hands with his old-time friends.
    Mr. Gitzen, one of the Medford veterinaries, was out Thursday to doctor a fine cow for William Perry, but he did not reach here in time and as a result, she died, quite a loss to Mr. Perry.
    W. E. Hensley of Wellen was a business caller Thursday.
    Corbin Edgell was a passenger on the Lewis jitney for Medford Thursday.
    Mr. C. C. Carter of Seattle, a cousin of William C. Daley, was also a passenger on the Lewis jitney. They had not met before for several years, and Mr. Carter accidentally heard of his being here, as he recently bought the George von der Hellen property just above town, and came out and met him here.
    The management of the forest reserve men have been making some changes in the arrangement of the men, as two of them, who have been stopping here, have been called over to Klamath County, Mr. George West and John D. Holst, and Mr. Fred Matz has come to assist the other two, Mr. Andrew Pool and Wm. Jones, in finishing up the telephone line connecting Trail with Butte Falls and Medford line. They expect to have the line completed by Monday or Tuesday.
    Floyd Pearce, who had one of his legs badly crushed several years ago in a runaway, and had it patched up by the doctors of Jacksonville at that time, has been to Portland and had it overhauled and the bones reset, came home last Tuesday and has bright hopes of regaining the use of his leg again, and his many friends here are rejoicing with him and his family over the successful operation.
    W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith and auto specialist, met with an accident the other day. He was trimming one of his fruit trees and in trying to get out of the tree his foot stuck between two limbs and he had already let loose of the tree with one hand, so in trying to extract himself, he wrenched his knee and ankle so that he has had his shop closed since Wednesday, but he thought that he would be able to resume business by the first of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Sam Courtney came in Thursday afternoon and Mrs. Courtney is staying here assisting with the work in the Sunnyside for a few days.
    Among the callers for dinner Friday beside the regular boarders were Dr. J. L. Helms, veterinary of Medford Horse Hospital; Wm. Meyer, Albert Peters, Fred and Ralph Stanley, Clifford Hickson, and Charles Laven. The Stanley boys had sold a lot of mules and horses to Dr. Helms and he was out to receive them.
    Later in the day John Foster, S. Peranks and J. P. True called on their way to the Fish Lake ranch. They had been up the creek working on a flume to bring the water across the south fork of Little Butte Creek on the Fish Lake ditch and had completed the job and were on their way to headquarters.
    Herb Carlton of Prospect was here in town Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Campbell of northwest Washington came in Friday evening, and are still here at this writing, Saturday evening . They are interested in the agate business.
    Mrs. Stoeford and baby of Brownsboro, who went to Medford last Tuesday, returned this Saturday morning and went up home on the stage.
    Mr. Guy E. Gane of Grants Pass, who has been up in the Lake Creek country looking after his farm, the Daniels place, came out today, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went to Medford this afternoon.
    W. H. Buskirk of Portland, who stopped here last fall on his way to Los Angeles, came in today noon and this afternoon went out to hunt agates, and I should have said that Mr. and Mrs. Campbell are putting in their time hunting agates.
    Friday evening the following members of the Butte Falls basketball team called for supper: Miss Foley, Norma Stewart, Nora Williams, Ellen O'Brien, Alta Stewart, Ernestine Fredenburg, Sam Hodges, Milton Hammersley, Lawrence O'Brien, Theodore Fredenburg, Orby Abbott, Earnest Albert, Eston Ahlstrom, Prof. H. P. Jennett and Glen Albert. They were on their way out to Central Point to play basketball against the Central Point team. It will be remembered that a short time ago the Butte Falls team went out and done up the Central Point team good and hard and this time they were going to finish the job, but the scale turned and the score stood 22 to 5 in favor of Central Point. But they had a very fine time, large crowd and the Butte Falls team took their defeat heroically.
----
    Sunday morning was one of those lovely mornings such as is seldom seen except in Southern Oregon, where people who have been living up in the northern part of the state and Washington, Idaho and Montana are entirely unacquainted with such weather, but when they come here, can fully appreciate such a day. For instance we had Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell of Fernville of northwestern Washington, and W. H. Buskirk of Portland, and they could hardly realize that it was the 11th day of April, but so it was.
    When the church bell rang for Sunday school we found not only the regular attendants, but also quite a few additional who came to enjoy the Sunday school exercises. On my way to church I noticed quite a number of autos whizzing along the highway headed for the different camping places for picnicking and by the time I reached home the guests began to arrive for dinner. Among the first to arrive were Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Satchwell, Miss Wilson, Richard Pierce and Mr. and Mrs. Stickel of Medford. Then came Judge TouVelle and wife, and Gus the Tailor and wife, L. V. Luce and wife, E. G. Trowbridge, Mrs. H. E. Boyden, Miss Florence Trowbridge and Albert Tarbow, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Wakefield, Mrs. W. B. Silliman and Viola Silliman, Mr. and Mrs. T. B. Silliman, Howard Silliman, Vivian Brown, Charles Wakefield, Hester Wakefield, Mr. and Mrs. E. M. Dakefield, Effie Taylor, Olive Bessett, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rader, Grace B. Dye, W. S. Summer, the manager of Potter Palmer business at Table Rock, D. P. Wood, Mrs. D. P. Wood, A. B. Clayton and wife of Portland, Mr. and Mrs. Kahlstrom, Mr. and Mrs. Gammill, Mr. Bloom, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. McReynolds and daughter, Miss Eva. Miss Eva came out to celebrate her tenth birthday with her parents at the Sunnyside. Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell of Fernville, Wash., making just fifty transient guests beside seven of the regular eaters.
    Sunday morning Andrew Pool and Fred A. Matz, W. H. Buskirk and J. P. Goin, our agate men, took their lunches with them and went out to look for agates, remaining most of the day, and when the came in had quite an assortment of stones of different varieties and some of them were seemingly very good.
    Fred R. Neil went up in the Trail Creek country Sunday.
    Wallace Bergman and family were visiting Mrs. N. E. Watkins Sunday, and Mrs. Knaps, who lives on the old Harbaugh farm, and the Misses Reed were visiting the family of John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. J. Ellis and Hugh Darice of Ashland spent Sunday night at the Sunnyside on their way up to visit W. S. Baker who has a homestead on the Derby road.
    There was an election held in the Climax district last Saturday to vote on the herd law to decide whether stock should run at large or not, and the result was that those who favored the enforcement of the herd law won out by a majority of ten, and now after sixty days there will be no stock allowed to run at large at all, thus requiring all the cattle men who have been using that range for the last fifty years to either herd them off the entered land or take them away to other ranges, and where cattle have been raised on a range it will be very hard to hold them in certain bounds and about all that the land is fit for is for range purposes. But I understand that the few settlers who live in that section are interested in sheep and goats and they have to herd them and now they will have a complete monopoly of the range.
    While Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell were here last Saturday and Sunday Mr. Campbell bought out the interest of H. J. Deveney, our banker, in the First State Bank of Eagle Point and started back to his home in Washington Sunday evening, expecting to return and take charge of the bank by May 15th next. It is with regret that we have to chronicle the change, for during the time Mr. Deveney has been among us he has made a host of friends and it is with reluctance that we give him up, but we are assured that Mr. Campbell is an all right and up to date man and the short sojourn of himself and wife made a very favorable impression on all of those who met him.
    Among the business callers Monday were John Rader and wife. Mrs. Rader has been here for several days stopping with her daughter, Mrs. Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants. Ed Fisher of Indian Creek, W. E. Hammel, Marshall Minter, Sam Courtney and Charles Houston were also callers.
    When the Persist mail truck went out the driver, Mr. Adamson, had a large bundle of long cane rods cut off at the small end, and on inquiry as to the purpose of such rods Mr. Adamson said that they were for Mr. P. F. Johnson of Trail and that they were to be used in making "fruit thinners." Mr. Johnson has invented and patented a contrivance for thinning fruit. Standing on the ground with these light poles and a cutting machine on the end a man can reach to any part of the tree and thin the surplus fruit without the risk of falling from a ladder and eliminating the work of carrying a ladder around in the loose and often sticky ground.
    Prof. H. P. Jewett of Butte Falls came out on the stage Monday morning and so did Miss Nydah Neil. She came out from Medford to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank R. Neil of Derby, and Jack Tungate was also a passenger on the Butte Falls stage.
    S. L. Stewart of Salem, a traveling man who keeps his business to himself, came in Monday morning and spent the night with us, going to Butte Falls on the stage Tuesday morning.
    Other diners at the Sunnyside Monday were Geo. Cottrell and R. M. Conley of Butte Falls, Mr. Conley having bought the John Higinbotham place and Mr. Cottrell has bought the Hack sawmill on Clark Creek. T. E. and H. E. Edler were also here for dinner Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Irvin Daley of Lake Creek, were also in town Monday on their way home. They had been out to Medford and rented a house and were going home to move out.
    I see that the Independence Creamery Company have a new truck and have made a change in the name of the company. The truck bears the name of Eldridge Dairy Produce Company.
    Ed Cowden and family and Fred Pettegrew were in town Monday.
    T. W. Sanford of Ashland came in and spent Monday night at the Sunnyside, and Tuesday he and Fred R. Neil, also of Ashland, spent part of the day trying to catch some fish out of Rogue River, but failed owing to the water being so muddy, they said.
    There were two strangers came in Tuesday for dinner, but I failed to learn their names.
    Thomas F. Nichols, wife and half sister, Miss Naoma Smith, were among the shoppers Tuesday.
    George Hollenbeak, the man mentioned some two weeks ago who was here having his hand treated by Dr. Holt for blood poison and was taken to the hospital in Medford, returned Monday and while Dr. Holt was here Tuesday to dress his hand he reported that the stork had visited the home of W. L. Merritt, on the H. Watkins place, and the result was a fine daughter was added to the family on last Sunday.
    Today, Wednesday, is one of those showery days and the result is there seems to be no one coming to town as the roads are too slippery for cars and too muddy for horses.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 19, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company have been digging a well near their large water tank close to the depot, as their pump froze up and bursted last winter and I understand otherwise injured their water system and now they are putting the well and pump nearer the depot so that the agent, if they have one stationed there, can look after the plant. As it was, they had to pump the water from Butte Creek and carry it through pipes for several hundred yards. They have a fine gasoline engine to use in pumping the water.
    Mr. and Mrs. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek passed through town Wednesday afternoon on their way from Medford.
    George V. Loosley called Wednesday evening for supper and to meet Mr. Fred Neil, who is stopping at the Sunnyside, caring for a lot of cattle Mr. Loosley bought some time ago, and are now running on the range in the foothills.
    Joe Riley, one of the pioneers of this section, was a business caller Thursday morning and so was Mr. A. C. Spence of Brownsboro. Mr. Spence is the road supervisor in the Brownsboro district and seems to be looking after the interest of those who have to travel over the roads.
    Earl Hays, the road supervisor of the Eagle Point district, was also in town Thursday. He seems to be so busy all the time that he can work on the roads and I hear those traveling over his roads speak very commendably of his work, but the continuous rains we have been having for the past few weeks make it hard to keep them in anything like a good condition.
    Jack Hickson, the foreman on the A. G. Bishop orchard, was in town Thursday having a large span of horses shod.
    Lewis Bloss, who is stopping on the John Rader farm, was a business caller Thursday.
    Mrs. George Avery, of Medford, who had been up near the Dupray sawmill, with her husband on their homestead, came out Thursday with George Albert on his motor car, and reached here just in time to miss the jitney and stage both for Medford so had to wait until the afternoon jitney, but she went to the Sunnyside to rest, and went out with Will Lewis on his 2 p.m. jitney, but George Albert rushed around and went back home for dinner.
    Mr. and Mrs. Orn Cass were shopping here Thursday.
    W. T. Normile and Frank Rhodes were among the diners at the Sunnyside Thursday, and so was Watt Beebe of Agate, and Ralph Severance, recently from California. Mr. Beebe was having Mr. Severance take a small bunch of cattle up to his ranch above here.
    Fred Aimes and Joe Pool motored through town in a new Ford Mr. Aimes had recently purchased.
    Jack Tungate of Butte Falls and "Shorty" Allen of Wellen were also here Thursday.
    Pearl Stowell, who left here last season for Washington, returned and was shaking hands with his friends Thursday.
    Mrs. McDonald of Brownsboro came in on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage Friday morning, talked a few moments with Dr. Holt and then Mr. Stob started toward Medford with her and a young man.
    Frank Neil, Geo. Koeksen and Joe Kidd, who was formerly with J. M. Vogeli in the tavern that burned down near the Pacific & Eastern depot, came out on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Frank Johnson of Indian Creek and Lawrence Luy of Wellen were also business callers Friday.
    Ott Nichols and his brother-in-law Bob Harnish, and W. S. Baker of Derby, who are engaged putting up a lot of wire fencing out near Happy Camp, were here for dinner Friday and Mr. Baker is here up to this Saturday evening.
    Miss Florence Pool, our food demonstrator, and Miss Jessie Biles, assistant state home demonstrator of Oregon, were here for dinner Friday and Saturday. They are holding meetings with the ladies of the town and surrounding country, giving instructions how to economize in the making and remaking of clothes. I dropped in Friday to see and be seen and found a baker's dozen, all ladies, intently listening to what Miss Biles was explaining with regard to her work, but owing to the extremely disagreeable day and bad roads and the lack of advertising, there was but very few in attendance, but today there was a very nice attendance, for some of the ladies came from a distance in the country, among whom was Mrs. Ed Cowden, Mrs. Carl Esch, Miss Elsie Singleton, Miss Margaret Singleton, Mrs. Pete Petros, Mrs. Charles Klingle of Lake Creek and Mrs. George B. Brown of Brownsboro. Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Klingle dined at the Sunnyside.
    While in conversation with Mrs. Brown I naturally inquired whether Mr. Brown was developing his quicksilver mine on his farm and she said that he was and the result so far is that the rock assayed $3.00 in gold and about the same in silver and a still larger percentage in quicksilver to the ton, and that he feels greatly encouraged over the prospect.
    Thursday as Mr. Adamson, who carries the mail from here to Persist via Trail, was coming out with the mail in a truck, in crossing one branch of Elk Creek the water was so deep that it came up on the car so as to stop his engine right in the middle of the creek and then he had to get out to get a team to pull the truck out of the water, it being about two feet deep and the result was that he did not arrive with the mail for some time after the usual hour, and it will be remembered that Thursday was one of those cold, stormy blustery days such as we seldom have as late as the 15th of April. To say that he suffered with the cold, as he was wet considerably above his knees.
    There was quite a large band of cattle went through town this Saturday morning on their way to the Sacramento Valley. It was a lot of cattle that Green Mathews had sold, but I did not learn the name of the purchaser.
    Wm. Holman, Benj. Brophy, W. E. Butler, Corbin Edgell and Green Mathews were among the business men who were in town this forenoon.
    Shorty Allen and Roger von der Hellen of Wellen, W. S. Baker and W. T. Normile were here Saturday for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1920, page 5



TRAIL ITEMS
    Dave Pence has purchased the George Storm place, which he will run in addition to his own place.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Todd spent Sunday visiting J. E. McDonald and family, who are staying in the Rogue Elk hotel during the owner's absence.
    Mrs. Van Heffner, who has been seriously ill, is improving rapidly.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson of the Bar 8 ranch spent Sunday afternoon visiting Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart on the Rogue River ranch.
    W. G. McDonald, owner of the Rogue Elk hotel, is in Medford and is expected home soon.
    Mr. Engle passed through with a small bunch of sheep on his way to the Evergreen ranch.
    K. E. Hutchinson spent Sunday visiting with Mr. Will Houston and family.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 22, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday evening after I had written the Eaglets Mr. George Loosley and family of Fort Klamath; Harry Lewis, who had been out to Klamath County and W. S. Baker of Derby came in to spend the night.
    Sunday morning broke on us, not as gloomy as we have had during the past few weeks, but rather dismal for one who had anticipated going out and having a good time on the banks of our beautiful Southern Oregon streams, but nevertheless, it was not so disagreeable but what quite a goodly number of the pleasure-loving citizens of the towns and cities came out for a ride and dinner. Among the first of those who stopped at the Sunnyside was Miss Lena H. Wilson, Mrs. Fred Neil and her two boys, Joe and Kay of Ashland. They had come to meet Mrs. Neil's husband, who was here looking after Mr. Loosley's cattle. Then Mr. and Mrs. C. B. McReynolds, Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Merrell and daughter, W. A. Summers, D. R. Wood and wife; Miss Dye, Fred Arnes, Miss Ethel Anderson of Medford and A. J. Florey, Jr., Miss Jane Hinman, Mr. and Mrs. S. E. Hinman and Mrs. R. A. Gill of Medford. Instead of the usual greetings, when our guests arrived Sunday morning, about the first thing was "What has become of the Eaglets? Have you quit writing for the Mail Tribune? Why were there no Eaglets in the paper last week??" etc. And the only explanation that I could give was that the Medford Mail Tribune was getting so popular and has such a wide circulation that the leading business men and women are demanding space for advertising so that the Eaglets were simply crowded out, but that I wrote regularly every Wednesday and Saturday. It is a matter of history that that is the first week during the last two decades and more but what the Eaglets have [not] made their appearance in the Daily Mail Tribune or its predecessor under a different name, for I have written regularly every week almost since the paper was first published as the Medford Monitor.
    Mrs. Adamson of Trail, the wife of the mail carrier on the Eagle Point-Persist route, came out Saturday and spent Sunday with her husband and daughter, Mrs. Theron Taylor, and went up home on the stage Monday morning.
    John Warner, formerly of Trail, but now of Portland, came out on the stage from Medford and went up home to visit his mother, Mrs. John Warner of Trail.
    Mrs. Ralph Stanley of Lake Creek and Mrs. Ira Tungate and her sister, Mrs. Ed Cowden, were shopping and visiting friends here Monday morning.
    Mrs. Walter Meyers of Hay Creek came in Monday morning to bring her cream and eggs and reports that she has not had as great success with her chickens as she anticipated, as after they were hatched, disease got among them and she had lost quite a lot of them, but that her turkeys were doing fine and that the first hatching were well feathered out and were very large for their age and that she also is raising a quantity of ducks. If Mrs. Meyers don't make a success in life with her cows, hens, turkeys, ducks and then as a side product, pigs, with her husband to help with all their energy and perseverance I don't know where some of those who sit around and take the world easy and say that they won't milk cows because they have to get up too early in the morning and won't care for chickens because they are liable to die after they are hatched, etc., will come off.
    William E. Butler and his father, W. C. Butler, were transacting business in our town Monday. W. E. Butler was having some repair work done on his auto in the Holmes and MacDonald garage.
    H. T. Pankey and E. R. Oatman, the two fruit tree inspectors, were out last Monday inspecting the trees and looking over the fruit prospect. They report the prospect good for a crop of fruit but that the crop will not likely be as heavy as it was last year.
    Pete Young and W. C. Pool were among the business callers also Monday.
    C. H. Toney, who owns a fine farm on Rogue River, near McLeod, who has been spending the winter in Oakland, Cal., came in to the Sunnyside Monday and remained until this Wednesday morning and went up home on the Eagle Point-Persist stage, and J. H. Shaw of Aberdeen, Wash., came in on the jitney Monday, on his way from Los Angeles, and took a room at the Sunnyside and is here at this writing. He is considerably interested in the agate business.
    N. J. Hodges and son, Newbern of Medford, were here for dinner Monday. They had started to go to Butte Falls in their car, but on learning the condition of the road between the Reese Creek school house and Vestals', they concluded not to try to make the trip.
    Floyd Pearce was on the streets Monday for the first time for months. He has to use crutches, but has high hopes that he will eventually have the use of his leg that was mashed, set and rebroken. Now both legs seem to be the same length. While he was here he asked me to send his subscription in for the Weekly Mail Tribune, and so did C. H. Toney, and I am sending in both subscriptions with this letter.
    C. E. Bellows and Sam Coy were both in town Monday on business, and so was Mrs. Hamilton Watkins and Mrs. Merritt of Reese Creek.
    Mr. Milo Conley commenced to haul lumber from the P.&E. depot for Mr. Jacob Monia. Mr. Monia is hauling lumber to replace his house that was burned down some time ago.
    Charles, Dorsey and Ruth Givan were in town Monday to register so they can vote at the primary election on the 21st of May. Roy Ashpole does the registering.
    F. D. Dills of Yakima, Wash., came in Monday evening, took a room and the next day went to work helping to put up a lot of fencing for Frank Rhodes.
    George Hollenbeak, who has been here and at the hospital in Medford for the past month with blood poison in his hand, has so far recovered as to be able to go home to Prospect Monday.
    Pliney Leabo, who has been working in a box factory at Hilt, came in and took a room Monday night. He was laid off on account of the strike on the railroad.
    Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro and Nobel Zimmerlee came in on the stage and Nobel went on up to Butte Falls on the stage.
    The P.&E. railroad seems to be doing some business. They brought out five cars of saw logs Tuesday for Medford.
    William Holman and family have moved into the house belonging to Mrs. Marvin Wood and this morning went, or rather started for Derby, but it is a question whether they can get through, for the road is almost impassable.
    Misses Ella Belford and Juliana Hornik were attending to business in town Tuesday.
    I have a few more items but they will keep through for my next, as this letter is too long already.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    As the weather is so fine many Medford faces are expected to be seen along the river soon.
    The Jackson County Creamery truck made its first trip to McLeod last Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart and Will Stewart spent the day in Medford Tuesday.
    The deputy assessor, S. S. Aiken, has been down from Prospect as far as Elk Creek.
    Mr. Tom Carlton made a trip out to the valley after a load of hay yesterday (Friday).
    The Sunday school at Trail was exceptionally well attended last Sunday.
    Mr. Van Heffner of the U.S. fisheries is putting in the racks to hold the chinook salmon until fishing time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart, Miss Anna French and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson and daughter, Olive, spent Thursday evening at the Bar Eight ranch.
    Mr. Ditsworth has hauled several truckloads of potatoes to the valley. We are wondering if he is going to start a bank.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the items I omitted to write up for the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune last Wednesday was that A. S. Bliton, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Company, had made his regular rounds and was inquiring for the residence of certain parties who had been added to the list of those who were patronizing the power company.
    J. A. Weills of Medford was also a caller at the Sunnyside and so was Nick Young, our ex-road supervisor.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our leading farmers and a genuine good roads enthusiast, was a business caller and while here did not fail to speak encouragingly of the great project to have our country roads materially improved, i.e., to have us vote to bond the county for a half million and have the state give equally as much and then the general government appropriate equally as much to build roads outside of the main thoroughfares. Our experience out in this part of the county, where the roads have been so very bad that the contractor had to hire two sets of men with pack horses to carry the mail over a road that has been used for over fifty years, it seems as though almost everyone who is at all interested in the subject will vote for the bonds.
    Mrs. Fred McPherson of Portland has come down to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Nichols.
    Mrs. George Brown and her neighbor, Mrs. Hectner of Brownsboro, were also business callers.
    A. H. Dougherty, traveling salesman, was here and spent Tuesday and Wednesday nights. On account of the condition of the roads in the outlying districts he had to change his plans and postpone his visit in those neighborhoods.
    J. L. Hovey, the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was a business caller Wednesday and so was John Rader, L. K. Hawk and Shorty Allen and wife of Wellen and Mrs. Allen's brother, Ed Hensley, also of Wellen.
    Fred Neill, who has been off duty as carer of the Geo. Loosely cattle for a few days, returned to his room at the Sunnyside Thursday evening. J. H. Tyrrell and his grandson, Loren Farlow of Lake Creek, passed through here Thursday morning on their way up to Mr. Tyrrell's Lost Creek ranch. It will be remembered that Mr. Tyrrell sold his ranch of 320 acres to the Tacoma [probably Takilma] Metal Company on account of the manganese mines located there and at the close of the war, when the demand for the ore stopped, that the company turned the place back to him again and now he has two homes, one in Medford and one on Lake Creek and he has his hands full caring for both places.
    J. H. Shaw of Aberdeen, Wash., who stopped here last week to look for agates, started for his home via Portland, Thursday. And Pliney Leabo, who has been working in a lumber mill in Hilt, started for Medford the same day.
    Wm. Beale of Butte Falls was brought to the Sunnyside and remained two nights under the care of Dr. Holt, has been moved across the street where his wife and daughter are caring for him. He has had a severe stroke of paralysis but is improving.
    John B. Wimer, one of the candidates on the Republican ticket for the nomination of sheriff, was here Thursday for dinner and so was R. L. Burtrick and son R. L. Jr. Also Geo. D. King of Seattle. They all took dinner at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    Sherman Wooley, wife and her father, John Smith, Ed Spencer and Harry Smith took supper together at the Sunnyside Thursday evening. Prof. R. E. Maris, our school supervisor, was also here and spent the night.
    Joseph Geppert, the Butte Falls road supervisor, was in town Friday morning and went up home on the Butte Falls stage.
    M. A. Simon of Wellen was a business caller Friday and so was A. C. Spence, the Brownsboro road supervisor.
    J. C. Pendleton, one of the deputy assessors, was here Friday.
    Henry Meyer and son Auburn of Lake Creek came out and went on to Central Point.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Schutt of Derby drove out Friday.
    One of the Johnson brothers, who bought the P. W. Haley farm here, was a business caller Friday.
    Charles Horton of Klamath Falls, and Harley Dunn of Ashland, two cattle buyers, were here for dinner Friday.
    J. M. King and Sam Courtney were here for dinner Friday and Sam is stopping at the Sunnyside while he is painting R. G. Brown's house.
    Frank Swingle and son of Ashland called this morning on business. They were on their way up the creek.
    There was a jolly crowd went through here this morning on their way up the creek to have a picnic dinner. The company was composed of Elmer Vipps, Miss Barr, Miss Kingsley, Lewis Clark, Richard Singler, Glen Leach, Ruth Grover, Dorotha Newman, Frank Buchter, Katherine Lindley, Josephine Hartzell, C. McReynolds, Helen Holt of Eagle Point, and Edith Lumsden, the freshman and sophomore classes of the Medford high school. As they drove through town some of them spied your correspondent and stopped and about the first request was to give them a write-up in the Mail Tribune, and the result was that they soon gave me their names. They were surely bent on having a good time and appeared to be as happy as "clams at high tide."
    J. Wattenburg and daughter, Miss Evelene, were shopping here this Saturday morning.
    P. W. Haley of Central Point, R. M. Conley of Butte Falls, Wm. Jones, one of the forest rangers, Perl Davis and J. G. Davis of Medford were here for dinner today. The two Davis men are hauling lumber from Medford to Brownsboro for Ralph Tucker. He is building a large barn. He is one of the dairy men of that section.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 27, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Fay Middlebusher, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Middlebusher, has been quite sick but is improving rapidly.
    A baby girl arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Howard Ash of Trail.
    Fred Middlebusher took a number of men to Prospect to work on the road Sunday evening.
    There was preaching services at the Trail school house Sunday evening, Rev. Glazer of Grants Pass speaking.
    Ermal Ingram of Medford visited over Sunday with Keva Hutchinson of the Bar Eight ranch.
    Mr. and Mrs. Tom Carlton, also Mrs. Vincent and family, were unable to attend the basket dinner Sunday at the Rogue River Ranch. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Sam Hutchinson of the Bar Eight; Miss Anna French of Talent and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson and daughter Olive, of the Buckhorn farm.
    This is the last week of Miss Eula Houston's school.
    The Free Methodists held their quarterly meeting at the Elk Creek school house Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 29, 1920, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Misses Ethel and Stella Anderson of Medford came out and spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside.
    Glen Haley of Central Point and A. J. Florey, Jr., were also among the lodgers Saturday night.
    Sunday morning was one of those lovely bright mornings that would cause almost anyone, no matter how much they objected to stirring around, to go out and take in a good portion of fresh, healthful morning air and with the lovers of nature and pleasure, would naturally prompt them to get out, especially out of the towns and cities and go out into the open and break the monotony of routine life. And judging from the number of cars that passed through our town that morning, there must have been hundreds of them that took advantage of the time and started out joyriding and pleasure seeking. I heard one lady remark, in the afternoon, that almost everybody had gone out picnicking as the roads and streams seemed to be lined with cars and people and still there was a goodly number stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner from different parts of the valley, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. V. V. Mills and Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Briggs, Bert R. Greer and wife and daughters Ethel and Lillian of Ashland, and Mrs. Viola Hail, a sister of Mrs. Greer, of Los Angeles. Bert Greer is the popular editor of the Ashland Tidings and for years has made it a rule to come up and take dinner at the Sunnyside among the first real lively Sundays in the spring or early summer. Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Nicholson, Floyd Nicholson, Clause B. Gay and wife, N. S. Campbell and wife of Portland, S. Hughes, T. Hughes of San Jose, California, R. Campbell and Virginia Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Porter and son, Jack; "Gus the Tailor," and wife of Medford; Miss Hazel Antle of Corvallis, acting cashier and assistant cashier of the First State Bank of Eagle Point; E. J. Kaiser, the postmaster of Ashland and formerly editor and proprietor of the Valley Record; W. H. Mowat and G. R. Satchwell, Mr. and Mrs. R. L. Burdic, Dr. and Mrs. R. C. Burdic and child of Ashland; W. A. Summers, Miss Dye, D. R. Wood and wife, Mr. and Mrs. T. C. Mann, Medford; Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley, recently of Astoria; Roy Stanley, wife and son; Mr. and Mrs. William Perry, John W. Smith, J. C. Mann and family of Medford; Farmer Mavol, O. H. Johnson, wife and child of Ashland and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Johnson of Medford. After they had all eaten their chicken dinner and rested a short time visiting and having a good social time they started out for a good joy ride and to enjoy the beauties of nature along the different routes.
    Mrs. Petersen of Trail, wife of one of the mail carriers on the Eagle Point-Persist route, came out Saturday evening with her husband, to do some shopping among our merchants and went home Monday morning.
    Miss Thelma Ellestad, who is teaching in the Derby district, came out from Medford Monday morning on the stage and went on to her school. Miss Ellestad arranged to have a friend take charge of her school Monday morning while she is coming out from Medford.
    J. M. King, who owns a farm on what is known as the Conover Camp, was a guest at the Sunnyside Monday and so was Mrs. Marie Ownby of Klamath Falls, Mr. E. P. Fox, formerly interested in the milk goat industry and Mr. Ray Jillson, the baggage man in the Ashland depot, S.P.R.R. He was taking a few days layoff and came up with Mr. Fred Neil to spend a few days with him at the Sunnyside, remaining until today, Wednesday.
    Mrs. Tungate of Jacksonville came out to visit her sister, Mrs. Anna F. Watkins, and also to visit her nephew, Wm. Beale, who is sick at his stepdaughter's, Mrs. Sherman Wooley.
    Mrs. C. E. Bellows came out Monday and went out to Medford on the Lewis jitney.
    There was about the usual number of our dairy men and chicken men in with their cream and eggs Monday as usual, and among them was Mr. Bickhen, the cow tester, who has been testing the cows for them. He went to Medford that afternoon on the Lewis jitney.
    I met Monday afternoon Miss Helen Holt, once of the company of high school pupils, who were in the company mentioned in my letter published Tuesday in the Mail Tribune, and she reported that they had one of the times of their lives and further that there were two more loads of the same pupils followed them, making about sixty altogether, and per necessity they had to have a good time fishing, romping and laughing and why shouldn't they, for they started out to have a good time and had it.
    Mr. E. R. Jones, who married Mrs. Ragsdale of Lake Creek some time ago, passed through town Monday with a registered Jersey bull in his wagon weighing 1300 pounds. Mr. M. D. Bowles, also of Lake Creek, was with him and while here wanted me to take his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune, but I told him to send his check into the office, as I was not taking subscriptions for the Medford Mail Tribune.
    Everett Abbott, formerly of Butte Falls, but now of Portland, passed through here Tuesday on his way to Butte Falls to visit his mother.
    Charley Humphrey and wife of Derby came out Tuesday and brought out two long pitchforks for our hardware man, Mr. von der Hellen.
    Geo. W. Stowell, our chicken king, was in town Tuesday on business.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton was also shopping here at the same time.
    Dr. Kirchgessner of Beagle was called in council Tuesday to see Wm. Beale. Dr. Holt is the attending physician.
    F. D. Dills, who has been here for a week, started Tuesday for California.
    James Watkins, Central Point; Chris Beals and John Mayham, L. D. Cranford of Ft. Jones, Calif.; M. E. Southern of Etna Mills, Calif.; and Bert Brown of Ft. Jones, Calif. were also here and spent the night. They had come over with a truck to move the machinery in the T. E. Nichols building, used for making ice, to be taken to Dunsmuir, Calif. The machinery was purchased by Mr. Lenthan. Later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Harry Isbell, Mr. H. F. Hardwick, Misses Helen and Phena Anderson, all of Medford, called for dinner and still later our popular sheriff, C. Terrill, and candidate for renomination and his old opponent, W. O. Garrett, called for supper.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. L. Robertson, our boss farmer, was in town Wednesday afternoon and reported that he had fifty acres of corn planted and was pushing business so as to get a hundred acres more planted. He does business on a large scale.
    J. Wattenburg, who has charge of the Joe Rader farm on Antelope Creek, brought his auto in Wednesday to the Childreth shop to have it repaired.
    Wm. Lewis, our sheep king, took a band of about 800 sheep through here, going south to the range so as to save the grass north of here for his sheep while shearing next week, about May 4 or 5.
    George Loosley of Ashland and his son Kay of Fort Klamath came in Wednesday, took dinner, had a talk with Fred Neil, who has charge of his cattle, and went back to Ashland that evening. While here Mr. Kay Loosley made arrangements with J. P. Goin, our agate man, to go out to Fort Klamath and assist in caring for his stock, and Mr. Goin started Friday morning. Mr. Goin has been a regular boarder at the Sunnyside the most of the time for over a year and the people of the Fort Klamath country will find him an all right fellow.
    H. J. Deveney, our banker, took a trip up into Idaho looking over the field for business and returned Thursday to his post in the Eagle Point Bank.
    In my last there was a mistake as to who was assistant cashier in the Eagle Point Bank; it should have been that Miss Hazel Brown was assistant and that she had charge of the business of the bank during Mr. Deveney's absence.
    Mr. Mary A. Wright, formerly Mrs. Mary A. Wright Ringer, now divorced from James Ringer, was here Thursday packing up her furniture and preparing to take it to her home in Albany, Ore., as she has sold her house and lot to Mr. Mittelstaedt.
    Miss Nydah Neil was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Thursday on her way home.
    Dr. J. L. Holmes, the Medford veterinary, and Elmer Peters of Medford called for dinner Thursday and so did Victor Bursell, a popular candidate for county commissioner, and Dr. Kirschgessner.
    There was a fair representation of the Elks went from here Thursday evening to Grants Pass. They were Fred Pelouze, R. G., J. F. and Wm. Brown, J. B. Holmes and Roy Ashpole, and they started to have a good time and report that they had it.
    D. E. Whitley of Persist and D. L. Von Needa came out from Medford on the stage Thursday and Mr. Von Needa went to Medford.
    Mrs. Ed Tucker and daughter of Brownsboro were shopping here Thursday.
    Charles Nickel, who has been the foreman on the J. H. Cooley orchard for some time past, resigned his position and expected to move to Phoenix today, Saturday.
    Ellis Davidson of Applegate, and W. G. Bailey of Medford, came in and spent Thursday night with us. Mr. Bailey was canvassing for a silo company.
    There seems to be considerable travel on the roads now but they are still very rough out in the hills. There were three men went up to Butte Falls Thursday on the stage and one man was left for want of room on the car on account of the heavy mail and parcel post.
    We had a very interesting entertainment by our school Friday and the attendance was unusually large; in fact after the folding doors had been opened so as to throw the two lower rooms into one and the seats and chairs had been placed so as to fill all available space, leaving the most of one room for the children to perform their parts, about every seat was filled and several sat on the window sill. The exercises commenced with the usual singing, led off by Mr. R. G. Brown and Dr. Holt singing "Whispering Hope." Then "Kentucky Bell" by the 8th grade students. This was followed by recitations by the students of the different grades, and then the grammar grade gave an exhibition of physical culture that was very fine.
    This was followed by "Pied Piper," a story told by Dorothy Pierce, and dramatized by primary pupils. Little Miss Dorothy is a little tot and went through with her long part of the play without a breakdown and I may say that the primary pupils carried off the laurels, considering their ages. This was followed by character building by six little girls. These were followed by different recitations by pupils in the lower grades.
    Then we had a history drill that was fine, by the 8th grade. It was remarkable with what promptness they answered the questions and such a quantity of them. This was followed by story and pantomime by Jane Van Hardenburg and Dorothy Coy. We then had the Indian club work that was fine, given by the grammar grades. These were followed by recitation by Kenneth Jack. We then had a fine display of physical culture by the primary grades followed by the May Day dance by six little girls that was well rendered.
    This was followed by a spelling contest by the 8th grade. They spelled 100 words and at the close of the hundred words the judges called off the number of those who missed spelling one or more words and they took their seats, leaving five who had not missed and then the principal, Miss Lansing, resumed the work to see who would win out, and for some time it looked as though we were going to be kept there for some time, but finally they began to drop out until the class was reduced to two, Cyril Hawk and Miss Cleo Robertson, and for quite a while it was nip and tuck between them, but finally Cyril Hawk missed a word and Cleo spelled it, making her the champion speller of the school, but I must say that the spelling was fine and they all deserve credit for the work they have accomplished. This was followed by folk dances by the grammar grade, "Little Red Riding Hood" by primary grade and then song by grammar grade. Owing to the length of the program I have had to abbreviate on account of space, but taking the entertainment all through it was simply fine and the teachers, Miss Lansing and Miss Young, are entitled to a great deal of credit for the great pains they have taken in instructing their pupils.
    C. H. Natwick came out from the work on the Crater Lake Highway and reports that they have about forty men at work at present and are pushing the work right along.
    Fred Neil came in yesterday for dinner and so did O. D. Herbert of Portland.
    John Holts, one of the forest rangers, came over from Pelican Bay Friday.
    Mrs. C. L. Schieffelin, secretary of the Red Cross of Medford, was here to attend the school entertainment.
    Misses Helma and Bessie Hanna and Percy Foster came in from the Debenger Gap neighborhood today, Saturday.
    George Laidley and H. L. Cox came in on the stage from Medford and went up to Butte Falls. They are both Forest Service men.
    Wm Marion of Derby came in this morning to have Dr. Holt dress his hand. He had it caught in a saw at the Dupray mill and cut off the end of one of his fingers.
    Mr. Thom, a solicitor for the Western Farmer, was here for dinner today and so was Thomas Fuson, Mrs. R. I. Stuart and Miss Isabel Stuart of Medford. Mr. Fuson represents an insurance company.
    Mr. Isabel who has charge of the Wm. von der Hellen farm on Reese Creek, was in town today and reports that they are shearing Mr. von der Hellen's goats.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 3, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Frank Middlebusher of Trail is working on the road up by Prospect.
    Dave Pence was up to see Bert Higinbotham Wednesday.
    Fred and Denzel Middlebusher took a truckload from town to Prospect for Jim Grieve.
    A crowd of young people went to Prospect to attend the dance Saturday night. Those from Trail were Miss Spencer, Miss Eula Houston, Merrel Houston, Miss Enid Middlebusher, Miss Minnie Pool, Hazel and Zella Pence, Keva Hutchinson, Miss Anna French and Sanford Houston.
    The Trail Sunday school had a picnic dinner at the home of S. W. Hutchinson Sunday. Those partaking in the good time were Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Pence and children, Zella, Hazel Lincoln and Alberta, Miss Enid Middlebusher, Mr. Sanford Houston, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson and daughter Olive, Mr. Ralph Dunlap, Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and family, Miss Eula, Miss Givan and Merrill, Mrs. Jo Canutt of Medford; Miss Spencer and Fred Middlebusher.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher was unable to attend the Sunday school picnic on account of having her hand operated on, Dr. Kirchgessner taking a large splinter out Sunday morning. Her friends all wish her hand to be all right soon.
    Mrs. Van Heffner has been ill again, having had to call the doctor.
    Mrs. Vincin, of Table Rock, spent Sunday visiting with her sister, Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher of Trail.
    A joint school officers' convention and teachers' institute was held at the Ash hall Saturday. The people from the surrounding districts met in the morning, bringing their lunches making a basket dinner of the affair. There was a program from the Central and Trail schools, beside the speaking, several speakers taking part.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    D. L. Flynn and wife of the People's Electric Store, Medford, were here for dinner Saturday afternoon.
    Polk Smith and wife, John Mayham, John Foster and Wm. Jones, one of the F.S. men, were here and spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside, and Mrs. Sherman Wooley and children were here for breakfast.
    Wm. A. Beale died at the home of Sherman Wooley, Sunday morning and the remains were taken to Medford the same morning by Mr. Perl, Medford undertaker, and burial took place Tuesday afternoon in the Central Point cemetery. The religious services were conducted by your Eagle Point correspondent. There has already been a notice of his death published in the Mail Tribune so will not add more. There was an error stating his age, it should have been aged 50 years, one month. There was a large company attended the funeral.
    Our Sunday school was unusually well attended as there were more in attendance than for several Sundays before.
    By 11:30 a.m. Sunday morning the company began to collect at the Sunnyside and inquire as to the prospect for satisfying the appetite, and it kept your correspondent busy with his little book and pencil registering the names of the people as they came and I am quite certain that I missed some but I tried to treat them all alike, but many of them came and registered without my asking, as a very large majority of the people who came out from the towns and cities appear to like to see their names in the Medford Mail Tribune as well as to read the names of others who have been enjoying a ride out in the morning air and having dinner away from home.
    Among the first names on my list are Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Mann and children, Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Barrison, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Davis, Mrs. Kerr, J. W. Snyder and family, Ethel Ausan and daughter Genevieve, Mr. and Mrs. R. P. Moran, J. E. Moran, of Medford; Mr. and Mrs. Herman Meyer, Sr., of Lake Creek, Dr. Henry Hart, wife and son Robert of Medford, Mrs. H. V. Hart and son Everett of Quincy, Ill., A. S. Rosenbaum, Portland, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pelton, Gold Hill, Gus the Tailor and wife of Medford, Mrs. Carrie Ryan of Ashland, Mr. and Mrs. Dave Peterson, Grants Pass, Mr. and Mrs. Don Simpson and daughter Laurett, Mr. and Mrs. C. B. McReynolds and daughter Eva, Mrs. J. W. Meyers, Miss Alice Hanley and her niece Miss Clara Hanley of Jacksonville, Mr. and Mrs. Merrill and daughter of the A. W. Walker Auto Company, Medford, Chris Bergman, B. L. Dodge, Medford, Sherman Wooley and family, Polk Smith and wife, F. E. and Mrs. French, Wm. O. Dickinson, Donald Dickinson, Helen Dickinson and Wilbur Dickinson of Ashland, Harry Smith, Miss Joyce von der Hellen and her brother Hugo and cousin Judge Florey, W. O. Roberts, and son-in-law, H. A. Hutton and wife and D. R. Patrick.
    D. R. Patrick engaged room and board as he is engaged in making some alterations in Roy Stanley's house and doing other carpenter work for him.
    D. L. Van Neede came out from Medford and went up to Butte Falls Monday morning and there was a strange lady on the stage at the same time going up the country.
    V. E. Brittsan of the firm of Brittsan Bros., who have charge of the P. S. Anderson dairy farm, came in Monday with his auto to have W. L. Childreth overhaul, clean and repair it. The garage men here seem to have quite a lot of work to do already this season.
    Charley Seefield and wife came in from their home near Lake Creek and were trading with our merchants Monday.
    Mrs. Sam Courtney and sister, Miss Mina Minter, who have been in Medford, came out Monday morning and went up home.
    Sam Courtney, who has been engaged papering Roy Ashpole's house. Sam is a good workman and seems to be kept busy either painting or papering somebody's house.
    Fred Chaney of Kansas came in Monday too late to catch the stage for Butte Falls so stayed at the Sunnyside. He came out to see the country and visit a relative he has in Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thom, solicitors, were here for dinner Monday, and so was Ralph and Mrs. Roy Stanley, Clifford Hickson, Dr. J. L. Helms, veterinary of Medford, and Henry Trusty of Elk Creek.
    When Bert Brown, one of the men who have been stopping with us while taking the machinery out of the ice plant, went to look after his horses he found that they had broke loose and started for Fort Jones, Calif., so starting on the trail he found them in the pound at Medford with a charge of $4.40 against them. Paying the bill, he returned just in time to help put on the last of the heavy machinery on the truck. Speaking of the machinery, Messrs. Crawford and Brown finished up shipping it to Medford Monday to be taken to different points in California, a part for Dunsmuir and a part for Fort Jones.
    Other business callers Monday were Charles Givan, A. C. Spence, Brownsboro road supervisor, James Culbertson, Ed Spencer and N. A. Loucks.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Campbell, the men who bought out the interest of our old banker, Mr. H. J. Deveney, came in Monday afternoon and is now getting acquainted with the patrons of the institution. They drove from Washington in their car.
    Thomas Farlow of Lake Creek was a business caller Monday.
    J. T. Adams and son, O. D. Adams, of McLeod, spent Monday night at the Sunnyside.
    Edward Dale and wife are here visiting our postmaster, W. C. Clements, and wife.
    Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek drove through Eagle Point Tuesday morning.
    Mr. Bassett, the old Butte Falls shoe cobbler, came out Tuesday morning and went up to his old home.
    Mr. and Mrs. McReynolds and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Miller of Medford, E. Stone of Portland and Miss Janet Pendergrass, Miss Burnett, pastor of the Free Methodist church of Medford, and Sheriff Charles Terrill were here for dinner Tuesday. Miss Pendergrass is state lecturer for Pacific Coast Protective Society. The three were out looking after the interests of the rising generation.
    Geo. Skeio of Butte, Montana came in Tuesday and remained until this Wednesday morning. He was on his way to Trail looking for government land to locate on.
    Miss Catherine Foley, one of the Butte Falls school teachers, Ernest Peachey and wife called for supper Tuesday evening and went on to Butte Falls that night.
    J. H. Dunaway of Medford, was a business caller Wednesday morning.
    Mrs. Miller of Trail and little grandson came out on the stage from Medford and went home this morning and Polk Smith and wife and two others went to Butte Falls on the stage this morning.
    Frank Johnson and family of Indian Creek were in town this morning.
    Mark Winkle and Glen Haley and Mr. and Mrs. A. E. Kinney of Ashland were here for dinner today. Mr. Kinney is one of the candidates for county commissioner. W. D. Welch of Medford, candidate for county treasurer, also on the Republican ticket, and A. E. London of Medford were here for dinner today. Mr. London has traded for a small orchard, two lots, and house known as the old Peachey place in block 8 in our town. He procured it from P. H. Daily.
    There is a deal on hand whereby one of our prominent citizens sells his farm to one of the Medfordites, but as I cannot get either of the parties on the phone will not give it out today, although money has been paid down to secure the trade.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 8, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I referred to a deal that was on where I withheld the names of the contracting parties because all of the papers had not been signed. I always try to keep everything that I write for the press as near as possible straight. The deal to which I referred was where J. B. Jackson and wife sold their fine farm in the upper edge of our town to Leroy A. Smith and wife, who have been living in Medford for the past year or two, but formerly of this place. Mr. Smith bought with it what cattle Mr. Jackson had. While we regret very much to have Mr. and Mrs. Jackson leave us we feel that we are compensated to a great extent by having Roy and his family take their place. Mr. and Mrs. Smith are young and as steady and reliable as an old town clock and we predict that in a few years they will build up a business that will bring in quite a revenue. I understand that Mr. Jackson has not fully decided where they will go but seem to favor going to the state of Washington.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Koontz of San Francisco and F. B. Rayburn were here Wednesday eve for supper and then went on out to Medford.
    K. D. Jones was here on his way to his home in Butte Falls, while his wife was visiting their relatives in Gold Hill. He and Chris Beale were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Thursday morning.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton was shopping in our town Thursday.
    Buel Hildreth and wife of Butte Falls passed through here Thursday on their way from Central Point to their home in Butte Falls.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, our new banker and wife, were here for dinner Thursday, and he tells me that they have formally taken possession of the bank and are making some changes in the management of the institution; one very important and convenient change Mr. Campbell has made is to keep the bank open during the noon hour. The way the business has been conducted before was to have the bank close at noon and not open until 1 o'clock p.m., thus forcing a person who was working by the day to lose a part of a day's work in order to do business with the bank for it does not open until 9 a.m. and close at 3 p.m., but with the bank being open from 12 noon until 1 p.m., a laborer can attend to his business and still be on time to go to work. Another change that he wished to make it is to arrange the business so that he can close the bank at noon on Saturday so as to correspond with the custom of the other banks in the country.
    R. P. Neil wrote to Mrs. Howlett requesting her to be ready to serve dinner about 1 o'clock Thursday for five or six, so Thursday afternoon he came in bringing with him his wife, Mrs. Wm. Denton, John Denton, Mrs. C. A. Bara and Charles Bara, all of Ashland, and after satisfying their appetites they spent some time enjoying the sights along the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek.
    D. L. Van Needa was on the stage going to Butte Falls again Thursday morning. He is very reticent with regard to his business but he seems to be a stirring business man and appears to be interested in the timber business around Butte Falls. Ray Watkins and Mrs. P. W. Tungate were also passengers on the stage Friday morning..
    Mr. Peterson, the man who is assisting in carrying the mail from here to Persist via Trail, came out Friday morning to bring two passengers so as to catch the jitney for Medford. He and Geo. Adamson are carrying the mail between them. Mr. Adamson runs a truck and carries the mail, passengers and freight from here to Trail, and Mr. Peterson takes what is left after passing Trail on up to Persist. Sometimes Mr. Adamson has a full load of over a ton of mail and freight besides his passengers.
    Glen Owen of Central Point, and W. D. Spencer of Portland, were here for dinner Friday. Mr. Spencer represents a tank and pipe company of Portland.
    T. F. McCabe was in town Friday and took out two rolls of wire fencing.
    Mrs. Ed Murphy and her sister, Miss Holmes of Wellen, were shopping here Friday and visiting their brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holmes.
    Sam Courtney, our painter and paper hanger, has just finished papering Roy Ashpole's house and today, Saturday, is doing some work for T. E. Nichols.
    J. H. Cochran and wife of Medford were here for supper Friday evening. Mr. Cochran was inquiring particularly about J. V. McIntyre, Mr. Deveney, our banker who has just gone out of the bank, and Mr. Campbell, our new banker, and upon inquiry learned that he was one of the Medford insurance men and that our bankers were handling the business for the same companies he is interested in.
    D. S. Hall of Radley, Colo., came in and spent the night Friday and went on up to Butte Falls this Saturday morning. He seemed to be looking for a location where he could secure a small tract of land, get himself a few dozen hens and a few cows and live like a prince.
    We had a genuine runaway in our little town, and it was not somebody's girl and boy but Wm. Perry's fine bay team. The neck yoke broke, letting the tongue of the wagon drop down and as quick as a flash both horses dashed forward and jerked the driver, Leroy Smith, off of the seat onto the doubletrees and at the same time jerked one of the lines out of his hand, thus leaving him helpless so far as stopping the horses, so, bracing himself against the end of the wagon bed and throwing the line he held away, jumped clear from the wagon unhurt. It was a very narrow escape, for in a short time the wagon collided with a telephone pole breaking the wagon and harness and freeing the horses from each other, one of the horses dashing to town and the other going in an opposite direction.
    Thomas Lewis, one of our young men, who was taken about two weeks ago to the hospital in Medford to be operated on for appendicitis, has so far recovered as to be able to be on the streets this morning.
    T. C. Gaines and wife of Trail drove out from Medford this morning, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on up home this afternoon. Geo. Spooler of near Los Angeles, and Orville Jones of Oklahoma, were here for dinner also today. Mr. Spooler had been up to the old Obenchain place to visit his brother, and Mr. James accompanied him. They were headed for Hood River Valley.
    Jacob Geppert and son Horace came in from their home near Butte Falls on their way to Jacksonville. Mr. Geppert is the road supervisor in his district and was going after powder to use on the road.
    I understand that Mr. Deveney has moved into the Wamsley house to remain until the close of our school, the 21st inst., and that Mr. Campbell, our present banker, has moved into his own house he bought from Mr. Deveney.
    Walter Painter, who has been away from here for several months, came in on the Trail stage.
    Mrs. Chas. Blass and Miss Spencer, who is teaching the Trail school, were business callers in our town this morning.
    W. H. Crandall motored into town this afternoon and so did Thos. Stanley and wife.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1920, page 6


SCHOOL SEASON CLOSED, REESE SCHOOL DISTRICT
    Reese Creek, May 10.--Miss Marie Meyers closed a very successful eight months term of school, Friday, May 7th, with a picnic dinner, quite a number of the patrons and friends of the school bringing their dinner and participating. Those present besides the pupils and teacher were: Mr. and Mrs. H. French and Miss May, Mr. and Mrs. Bellows, Mr. and Mrs. Crandall and children, Mrs. Merritt and Miss Maud Merritt, Mrs. Pettigrew, Miss Ethel Ewen, Charles and Leland Pettigrew, M. Heckenberg, R. R. Minter, Marshall Minter and Miss Mina, Mrs. Sam Courtney, Mrs. W. E. Hammel, Mrs. H. Watkins, Miss Ellen McCabe. Those attending from Laurel Hill were the Misses Stella Conover and Hattie Johnson. After dinner the young people played games while the older people visited.
    Miss Meyers expects to return Thursday and Friday for the eighth grade examinations.
    Paul Robertson is still quite sick. The rest of the family have all been sick but are getting better. Almost everyone is having an attack in some form of bad colds or flu.
    The farmers are rejoicing over the fine rain that fell Saturday night, which was much needed.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 12, 1920, page 8


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson went to Medford Tuesday to stay the week out, returning Sunday.
    Fred Middlebusher took a truckload of distillate to the Mansfield ranch.
    Mrs. F. L. Hutchinson spent Friday night with Enid Middlebusher.
    Dave Pence has his teams working on the road at Prospect.
    Miss Tressie Pence and Roy Vaughn were married Saturday, May 8. Their many friends wish them a long and happy wedded life.
    Oscar and Will Stewart lost one of their horses Sunday evening. The animal took sick suddenly and died before morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 13, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday Sam H. Harnish gathered up his little family, consisting of his daughter, Dot Dutton, and her husband, Fred Dutton, his son, Ray Harnish, wife and two children, and Sam Rob and wife and his brother-in-law, wife and baby and went up to Williamsburg to visit his old father-in-law and mother-in-law, J. P. Moomaw, and other members of the family. Elder Moomaw lived for several years in this neighborhood and has quite a lot of friends here who realize how he and his wife would enjoy such a visit from their children and grandchildren. They returned Sunday night and Monday morning Sam was ready to start with his load of high school children for Medford.
    Word came to me Sunday morning that the day before Miss Marion Nye, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Nelson Nye of Prospect, had fallen over an almost perpendicular precipice some twenty feet and was very badly bruised, and had her leg broken between the knee and thigh. She was taken, after having her leg attended to by a doctor from Medford, to Medford and was resting easy at last accounts at her aunt's home, Mrs. Raymond Pettis'.
    We had another one of our fine spring showers Saturday night and while it interfered to some extent with the prearranged plans of some of the pleasure seekers in stopping them from going out picnicking or otherwise enjoying themselves, although there was a few who ventured out to take dinner at the Sunnyside, and a few went out and took their lunch on the banks of the streams. Among those were Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Morgan, Mr. J. Bardwell, Mrs. Sarah Orett and Mr. and Mrs. Grover East of Ashland.
    Among those who were guests at the Sunnyside were Mr. and Mrs. W. M. Davenport, Mr. and Mrs. F. C. McReynolds, Mr. J. Dye, Dr. Wood, W. A. Summer, superintendent of the Modoc Orchard, Mr. and Mrs. Glasgow, Mr. and Mrs. Marian Merrill and daughter, Miss Jess, little Miss Jess was out celebrating her birthday, Gus, the Tailor of Medford. There were some others came in, but in their hurry to get to the table I failed to secure their names.
    Miss Inez Willits, who has been teaching in Sherman County, came in on the Monday morning stage from Medford and went on up to her father's on the Eagle Point-Persist stage.
    Fred Pettegrew and one of his boys were in town Monday morning and the boy went on up to work on the Crater Lake Highway, on the stage from Prospect.
    Mr. Fred Pelouze, one of our leading farmers and dairy men, was in town Monday morning. He had just returned from Eugene, where he had been to witness a ball game between the Stanford and the University of Oregon ball teams, in which his son, Bob, had taken a very active part, he being a member of the Stanford team, the victors in the game.
    Sherman Wooley has moved his family up on the Crater Lake Highway, where he will work this summer.
    G. W. Medlow of the California-Oregon Power Co. was here for dinner Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. M. Goss were in town Monday. Mr. Goss has decided that he will not build this summer, as the prices of lumber are prohibitive.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carl von der Hellen were callers Monday morning and so was Mrs. Sam Coy and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Theron Taylor.
    Eugene Bellows, wife and Mr. Joy were also business callers Monday.
    E. V. Brittsan was also a business caller Monday, but went on to Medford to procure seed corn, as that is a scarce article in this section.
    Miss Hazel Brown, who has been the assistant cashier in the First State Bank of Eagle Point, has, since the bank changed hands and management, accepted a position in the Medford National Bank of Medford.
    L. E. Walker, a cattle man of Klamath Falls, came in Monday night, took a room at the Sunnyside and is working for Mr. Kay Loosley with his cattle, getting them together to start over the mountains for Fort Klamath.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. J. W. King, in Chico, Cal., a ten-pound boy, May 1. Mrs. King was formerly a resident, in fact a native of this place, being formerly known as Miss Genette Haselton, a daughter of our old professor, A. L. Haselton, and her many friends and schoolmates are congratulating her on her arrival to the state of motherhood.
    Mr. J. C. Mahoney, Jeff Brophy and Amos Ayres and a stranger went up to Butte Falls Tuesday.
    John Howard, one of the old vets of the Civil War, came in Tuesday and went on up to his home on Rogue River. He has been traveling the past year and reports that he has been in 15 states since he left here. He spent the winter in Los Angeles.
    L. K. Hawk and daughter, Miss Winifred, were among the business callers Tuesday.
    Jeff Conover and W. H. Crandall were also here Tuesday. Mr. Crandall had been to Medford and was on his way home.
    Fred Neil, Kay Loosley, Frank Hoover of Klamath County and Geo. H. Wehman and J. P. Hayes of Butte Falls came in Tuesday night for room and meals. Mr. Wehman was formerly a citizen of our town, the harness maker, and made the Sunnyside his home most of the time for seven years. He left here about two years ago and went to Pendleton, where he has been working at his trade ever since.
    Married in Medford, Tuesday evening May 11, Mr. Walter Painter, formerly of this place, but more recently from Washington state, and Miss Ella Adamson of Trail, Ore. The groom and bride came out this Wednesday morning on the Medford-Butte Falls stage, and went up to Trail.
    Mrs. K. D. Jones and daughter, and J. P. Hughes of Butte Falls, were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage this morning, and so was Roy Watkins and two strangers.
    J. Hickner, our coyote trapper of Brownsboro, was in town this morning and so was Dee Bradshaw, also of Brownsboro, and Wm. Haskell of Lake Creek.
    Frank Johnson, wife and daughter, Miss Hattie and Alvin Mathews and family were business callers this forenoon.
    Frank Henner, Industrial Accident Commissioner, Salem, Ore., Ralph Stanley, and Alex Vestal, were among the diners today.
    G. A. Hanson of Brownsboro was doing business this forenoon with our merchants.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Painter came out on Wednesday's stage for a short visit with the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Adamson, leaving Thursday for Washington, where they will make their home.
    R. R. Dawson, R. D. Watson, E. E. Ash, Lowell Ash, Johnnie Warner, C. Cushman, Claude Ragsdale and Frank Middlebusher all spent the weekend at their homes near Trail, returning to Union Creek Sunday evening, where they are working on the highway.
    Little Ethel and Alma Inlow have recovered from their colds sufficient to resume their school duties again.
    Miss Edna Peterson left Monday for Portland where she will visit relatives and friends for a couple of months.
    There will be a big dance at Trail hall, Saturday night, May 22. Orchestra music from Medford. Come everyone and bring your supper and have a good time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston and Mr. and Mrs. Ed Houston and children were Sunday visitors at Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Hazelwood and family left Wednesday for Klamath County in their new Ford, where Mr. Hazelwood has employment for the summer.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wednesday afternoon after I had finished and mailed my letter for the Mail Tribune, Geo. Cottrell of Butte Falls, the man who bought the Hawk sawmill on Clark's Creek, came in and spent the night. The next day he left his four-horse team at the Sunnyside barn, employed Mr. Morgan to take his truck and go to Medford for his load of supplies for his family and mill including two barrels of crude oil. After spending another night with us he loaded up and went home expecting to start up his mill in a short time and supply our local market with what lumber is needed.
    Everett Abbott, formerly of Butte Falls, but more recently of Portland, came out on the Butte Falls stage Wednesday afternoon, spent the night here and continued his journey to Butte Falls to visit his mother and family for a few days.
    R. A. Weidman, husband of the manager and saleslady in the T. E. Nichols store, who bought the T. E. Nichols farm joining our town and is greatly interested in the dairy business and Thursday attended the meeting of the dairymen's convention. He seems to think that the time spent in going to Medford and listening to the lectures given on the subject of the dairy business is well spent and that the information obtained through that source more than compensates for the loss of time.
    Thursday morning a man giving his name as Berderman, who is interested in the development of a cinnabar mine near Brownsboro, came out on the Eagle Point stage, [and] took passage on the Lake Creek stage for the mine. Jeff Brophy of Peyton was also a passenger on the Butte Falls stage.
    C. J. Freeman and C. L. Beeson of Talent, C. M. Roberts, the district attorney, C. E. Terrill, our sheriff, both candidates for re-election, Ralph Cowgill and little boy, candidate for representative, J. B. Jackson and wife and Charles Horton of Klamath Falls and Dr. Kirchgessner of the Debenger Gap country were here for dinner Thursday.
    J. D. Arnes, the foreman on the Corbin-Edsall orchards, was doing business with our merchants Thursday.
    Mrs. L. K. Hawk was visiting our school Thursday. She is one of the directors in this district and said that she felt so much interest in the result of the examinations of the eighth grade pupils that she attended the school so that she could see the papers before they were sent off. I inquired as to how the examinations were rating and she replied that they were very good. Mrs. Hawk has always taken a great deal of interest in our school and is now serving her sixth or seventh year as director, and while there seems to have been some criticisms of her course in the management of the school affairs, she still goes right ahead and I can't see but she is about as good material for school director as we have among us, and I can't see where we could improve by making a change in the directorship.
    Our school board have secured as teachers for the next term Miss Josie Riley as principal and Miss Young, the present primary teacher, as primary teacher conditionally. Miss Young came from the Middle West bearing a certificate to teach in her home state, but owing to the uncharitable and selfish law in this state, her certificate will not allow her to teach in this state without taking an examination and procuring a certificate here, so she has been teaching on a permit from our county superintendent. Prof. Ager and the board are so well pleased with her work that they have employed her conditionally on her securing a certificate at the next examination.
    Robert Harnish and wife were business callers Thursday and so was Pete Young, another one of our prosperous farmers.
    Mrs. W. C. Clements made a business trip to Medford Thursday in the Lewis jitney.
    Gus Ditsworth of Peyton, and his sister, Mrs. Ida Heidbreid and Mrs. Arthur Yerkes of Goldendale, Wash., passed through here Thursday for Peyton.
    T. E. Nichols has had the old meat and ice sign taken down.
    Marshall Minter was trading here Thursday.
    Walter Wood was in town Thursday and reports that he has put in one hundred twenty-five acres of corn this spring. He bought a Fordson tractor and went to work to put in a crop and summer fallow on his land. He has rented several hundred acres beside the 120 acres that he owns. He adopted a novel plan to get his land in corn in a hurry, so running his tractor night and day--his son ran it in the daytime and he himself ran it at night--by that means he plowed ten acres a day and while he was plowing his ground he harrowed it at the same time by placing a timber across the plows and fastening the harrow to the timber so that the end of the harrow would just miss the unplowed ground, it followed the plow and that gave it the first harrowing and then the harrow would continue to reach out onto the plowed ground, thus repeating the work until the ground was thoroughly pulverized and then he had a man follow up with a corn planter and by the time he was done plowing his corn was all planted. He claims that he has done the work of 16 horses with his tractor.
    Perl Stowell was among the business callers Friday.
    Our stage from Medford to Butte Falls, since the roads have dried up so that cars can run over them, seems to be doing a lively business.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Friday for dinner we had H. G. Bolton of St. Louis.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1920, page 10


GEORGE WEEKS' HOME AT TRAIL BURNED DOWN
    Trail, May 20.--Mr. George Weeks' house burned last week, destroying everything. Mrs. Weeks first discovered the fire just smoldering on the roof but being alone was unable to reach it with water. After saving their papers and a few clothes she took the baby and ran half a mile to a neighbor's for help. By the time the men got to the burning house it was too late to do any good. The children are staying with neighbors until Mr. Weeks decides what to do.
    The Franklin fire insurance man was out Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Blass entertained Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson at dinner Sunday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart and Will Stewart spent Tuesday in town.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Saltzman were out Tuesday to spend the day with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    There was a public speaking at Trail Wednesday on the road question. Gus Newbury and other speakers took part.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 21, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry Childreth and wife of Ashland came up Saturday evening to visit his brother, W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith.
    Charles Klingle and wife were here Saturday afternoon on their way home in Lake Creek.
    There was a meeting of the directors of the Eagle Point ditch company and among other business transacted elected John L. Robinson as ditch boss.
    There was a meeting of the town council and among other things attended to appointed our mayor, John M. Nichols, to order material for a new floor on our footbridge, with proper bed pieces, and make any other alterations necessary to secure the safety of the bridge.
    Among the other business callers Saturday afternoon was L. K. Hawk and daughter, Miss Winifred, Geo. Givan and son Charles, Mike Sidley, Sr., Mike Sidley Jr., and Miss Helen Sidley of Lake Creek, H. D. Mills and family of Butte Falls passed through here on their way to Butte Falls.
    Carl Esch received by parcel post Saturday evening two crates of day-old chicks from Portland.
    We had a very interesting session of our Sunday school Sunday morning and among those who have been members of our bible class was Miss Margaret Singleton, and at the close of the school bid farewell to her teacher stating that she expected to start for Kentucky today, Wednesday. Her presence will be greatly missed and her many friends are wishing her a prosperous journey and a happy home in the state of her adoption. Miss Singleton and her brother, John D., have been the joint owners of what is known as the Singleton farm, now owned and occupied by Carl Esch and his father, and while among us have been among the leading business people of the community and they will be greatly missed by those who have been their near neighbors.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Satchwell, Mrs. Will G. Steele, Miss Jean Steele of Medford, L. W. Campbell, Portland, Mr. and Mrs. R. C. McGill, D. B. Morrow, Medford, Dave Burdic, R. L. Burdic, Morgan Anderson, Mr. and Mrs. O. H. Johnson, Otis Johnson, Belle Johnson, Joyce Johnson and Perline Johnson of Ashland, Dr. and Mrs. C. C. Van Scoyoc, Eugene Vilm, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Moffatt, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Moffatt, Miss Alberta Moffatt, Eugene and D. Moffatt, Mrs. Mary Wright of Albany, Ore., Gus the Tailor, Medford, Frank Meyers, Derby, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Neil and sons Donald and Herbert and Miss Matney of Medford, W. A. Sumner, Miss Grace Dye, D. R. Wood and wife, R. P. Neil and wife, Alta Norcross, Gretchen Kraemer, Ashland, Lester Bradshaw and Earl Tucker, Brownsboro, Fern Donaldson, Mrs. R. Bruce Keown, Nellie Donaldson Keown of Medford and A. A. Betz.
    Mr. Hovey, the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was a business caller Monday morning and in speaking of the shower we had that morning said that he thought these little showers, that most of the farmers and orchardist welcome, were a detriment to the fruit instead of an advantage, as he claims it draws the moisture from beneath the surface and then the dry wind dries it up with what moisture comes from the showers--a novel idea to me, but it may be so, who knows?
    Mr. Adamson, the Trail mail carrier, took up to the free ferry a 3½-inch centrifugal pump for Charley Blass to use in pumping water from Rogue River to irrigate his land. People are beginning to realize that with water on the land they can make it produce twice as much hay or grain and without water they cannot raise a garden.
    Benj. C. Sheldon, one of the promising candidates for the house of representatives, was out here Monday for dinner but as usual was in an awful hurry, but perhaps after next Monday his nerves will not be under such a strain.
    Mrs. Myrtle von der Hellen and her daughter, Miss Dorotha, motored into town today.
    Among other callers Monday were Mr. Joy, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bellows, Vern Mathews, Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, Everett Abbott who was on the stage coming from Butte Falls going to Sams Valley to work in a sawmill, Robert McCabe and family, Fred Pettegrew, Harvey Stanley and Dr. Kirchgessner.
    There was a small force of men working on the irrigation ditch, the water of which runs through the grist mill, a limited amount, said water being used for irrigating some of the gardens around town, under the direction of the new ditch boss, John L. Robertson, and he had to throw up the job and go home about noon to see a baby boy that had arrived that forenoon and John feels quite proud that it is a boy.
    The intelligence came over the wire Monday morning that Edward Hensley had passed of Sunday night. The funeral was held at the Antelope cemetery, religious services conducted at the grave by Rev. Millard of Medford. There was a fine attendance and the floral offerings were very beautiful. The remarks by Mr. Millard were very appropriate and impressive. As there has already been a notice given in the Medford Mail Tribune it is not necessary for me to add more on the subject.
    L. F. Ivenhoe and family arrived here Monday afternoon from Oakland, Calif., and engaged a room for the night, moving into Mrs. Van Scoy's house Tuesday, temporarily.
    Frank Neil, the bookkeeper for the Eagle Point Construction Company on the Crater Lake Highway, was in town late Monday afternoon on his way to the Union Creek camp. He said that they had about 50 men on the payroll and forty horses at work. That just before he left they were demonstrating with a tractor and had ordered a large tractor which would go up Wednesday. I understand that the tractor expects to do the work of three three-horse fresnos in a day and if that is the case they will be able to finish up a strip between Silver Camp and Whiskey Creek without the expense of establishing another camp. This last information I received from R. G. Brown, one of the firm.
    Mrs. L. A. Belle of San Francisco spent Monday and a part of Tuesday at the Sunnyside. She is a representative for the Designer Publishing Company.
    Mrs. Anna Rice, nee Anna Matney, one of our old neighbors from 50 down to 25 years ago who moved to Washington about 1893, came down to visit some of her old friends and is going out to Klamath County to visit her brothers and sisters. She is stopping at present at the Sunnyside. She has one of her little granddaughters with her.
    Thomas Anderson, a young man, came in Tuesday on the jitney and engaged a room at the Sunnyside and is still here.
    J. M. Wilfley was in town Tuesday; he recently arrived from California.
    Thomas Collins, Mrs. Findley, Mr. and Mrs. Jap Andrews and B. E. Haney of Medford, Sam Courtney, Ray Harnish and W. C. Clements of Eagle Point, were guests at the Sunnyside today. Mrs. Clements and Mrs. Ray Harnish went to Medford so their husbands rounded up at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 22, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday afternoon John Allen and family of Derby passed through our town. They had been to Medford in the forenoon and returned home. Owing to the rapid way we have now of traveling, the farmers who live twenty-five or thirty miles from "The Hub" can jump into their cars, spin out to Medford in the morning and attend to their business during the forenoon, eat dinner, go to the theater or picture show, or visit friends a few hours and go home in time to do their chores, and thus spend the day and take some comfort out of life, instead of the old routine of trudging over rough roads with a team, attending to business as fast as possible, not taking time for dinner, and hurrying home to try to do the chores before dark. And after we have the two million dollars invested on the roads that was voted on Friday applied to our county roads, why then it will be almost like flying in an aeroplane. I don't pretend to be a prophet or the son of a prophet, but will venture the prediction that then our country stores will be almost a thing of the past, and that 85 percent of the country people will go to the large towns and cities to do their trading.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton, who lives in the Wellen district, was a business caller Wednesday.
    Mrs. R. A. Weidman, who is the manager and saleslady in the L. E. Nichols store, made a trip to Medford to have some dental work done.
    The Holman Brothers of Antelope Creek were doing business here Wednesday afternoon.
    Ed Phipps passed through here Thursday morning on his way out to his sheep camp. He reports that his sheep are doing fine.
    John Grieve, the veteran road builder of Prospect, Ira Tungate of Butte Falls and two young men came out on the Medford-Eagle Point stage Thursday morning and went on up the country for their homes. The Medford-Persist-Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage seems to be doing a thriving business in the line of passenger traffic, as it seems to be well loaded each way every day.
    Earnest Carpenter, A. S. Bliton of Medford, J. W. Ager, our county school superintendent and W. G. Morrow of Grants Pass were here for dinner Thursday.
    Albert Williamson, a young man without a home or relations in the country, came in Thursday to the Sunnyside, and is now working on the Tronson farm for a man he calls Martin.
    Mrs. B. H. Bryan and Mr. and Mrs. Louis E. Gilbert came out from Medford Thursday to visit friends in our town.
    Mr. V. Hill and family have moved into the Thomas Boltz home.
    Gus Edler of Lake Creek came in Thursday with his mohair for Geo. Brown and Sons, and while here lost his goat dog, but did not miss him until he was almost home, so came back the next morning for him, finding him where he had fed his horses. He claims that he is very valuable, as he stays with his goats most of the time not allowing anything to disturb them.
    Dr. Kirchgessner, Frank Smith and Mrs. Roy Ashpole were here for dinner Friday and later Roy Ashpole, John Greb, S. B. Holmes, Thomas Vestal and Wig Jacks, the election board for the day service, were here for dinner. While Roy Ashpole was on the election board, his wife was confined to the store and came here for dinner. Harvey Smith and son were also here for dinner Friday.
    Early Friday morning the people from the country began to arrive so as to vote and get out home to work and by seven o'clock in the morning there was quite a gathering in front of the town hall, where the notice said the election would be held, but the powers that be ruled that it should be held in the old stand in the Brown hall, where there are already ten booths ready for use, and by 8 a.m., a crowd had already collected anxious to use their right as American citizens to help select the future candidates for office. There seemed to be but very little interest in the nominations of the county offices, unless it was the sheriff and district attorney, but there were a few who worked hard to defeat all the measures and amendments where there was any likelihood of our taxes being higher, but they all came out ahead in spite of the opposition and the vote for the $500,000 for good roads was carried about three to one. There was a very good turnout, as there was 180 votes cast, about 50 percent of the registration, but there are quite a number whose names are on the list who have moved away since the last election.
    There was quite a number of people here from Medford that just came out for the ride or perhaps on business. Among them was P. S. Anderson, Mr. Roberts, J. C. Barnes and C. Westman.
    Charles Humphrey of Derby came in early this Saturday morning to bring in the ballot boxes from his precinct, as he had orders to bring them to Roy Ashpole's and deliver them to a deputy sheriff, another saving of several dollars expense to the county. He reports that there were 22 votes cast in Derby and that every one was cast for the county bonds. The people up there know how to appreciate good roads.
    Bert Grigsby and wife came out from their home this Saturday morning with a load of wood for the Sunnyside. He and Mr. W. S. Baker have bought a Ford truck and expect to deliver quite a lot of wood this summer.
    Among the diners today were John W. Smith, who is part owner of the old J. W. Smith farm on Big Sticky; Chas. Humphrey and W. A. Hauser of Medford, a traveling man for a hardware firm in Portland.
    James E. Hughes of Butte Falls passed through here this morning with a large-sized gasoline engine, to be used in cutting shingles.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. H. McCurdy of Medford passed through here this morning on their way to the mouth of Clark's Creek, where they expect to camp and picnic a few days.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 24, 1920, page 6


TRAIL NEIGHBORS RAISE BIG PURSE FOR FIRE VICTIMS
    Trail, May 25.--The neighbors of George Weeks took up a very substantial subscription for them which amounted to about $175, owing to the family losing everything by fire a few days ago when their house burned down. The neighbors wished to show their sympathy and good wishes in some way besides words.
    Floyd Hutchinson, who had his teeth severely injured quite a while ago by an auto rim flying off and hitting him in the face, spent Wednesday in Medford having dental work done.
    Mr. Verbick of Union Creek took a business trip to town the last of the week.
    Mrs. Jennie Hutchinson left Wednesday evening for an extended visit in Pomeroy, Wash. She will visit her brother and sister, Omar Fitzsimmons and Mrs. Dora Burt, and other relatives while there. While there she will attend Pioneer Day which is the 4th and 5th of June.
    The dance at Trail was a decided success Saturday night, May 22. An unusually large crowd attended. It was a basket lunch, with only hot coffee served.
    There were several cars stopped at the Rogue Elk Hotel today. From present appearances the tourist travel will be very heavy this year.
    Tom Weeks and Ralph Dunlap have started to work at Prospect on the Union Creek road.
    Dave Pence made a business trip to Union Creek Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson spent Wednesday in Medford shopping.
    There were very few attended the meeting on good roads Wednesday evening.
    The Ash truck brought down a load of men who wished to attend the election Friday. Only a few people voted Friday morning, but during the afternoon the board was kept busy.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 26, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Judge G. A. Gardner and wife called for supper Friday evening. They had been out riding over the different roads out this way trying to discover what was needed and how best to do the work.
    Theodore Fredenburg, Miss Norma Stewart and Glenn Albert of Butte Falls came out Saturday evening on the stage, took supper at the Sunnyside and went on up home that night, the stage driver taking them, making the round trip that night.
    Harry Lewis, one of our hustling young men who is working on the Crater Lake Highway, got something in one of his eyes and came out Saturday night to have it extracted, spending the night at the Sunnyside.
    Wilbur Ashpole came out Sunday morning bringing with him his father and mother, Mr. and Mrs. John Ashpole of Medford, to visit their son Roy and family.
    E. A. Hildreth, Jr., of Butte Falls, C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle came in from the Crater Lake Highway Saturday night and took rooms at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. L. L. Simmons, wife of the last pastor of the Baptist church, Rev. L. L. Simmons, and her sister, Mrs. Hudson of Valley Forge, Wash., came in Saturday evening to visit their father, Mr. Shively, who is on the sick list.
    Our Sunday school is becoming more and more interesting, although the number in attendance is not so large as is desired, but we trust that the number will continue to increase, and interest will remain also.
    There were services conducted by the same two men who were here last winter, and held services in the church building last winter, at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. Slusser, our barber, Sunday morning.
    Now come the names of the teachers, their husbands, wives and close friends of said teachers, and their husbands and wives of the Lincoln School, Medford. It was a birthday party for Miss Kate Stine and Nellie Donaldson. There were in the party Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Hanby, Mr. and Mrs. W. Franklin, Mr. and Mrs. Amos Willits, Mr. and Mrs. W. D. West, Misses Agnes Robinson, Nellie Donaldson, Kate Stine, Cecil, Crude [sic], Margarite Andrews, Mrs. Mary Williamson, Ruth Derniel, Mr. John Deaver, Neil Franklin and Merle Willits. They had sent out word the day before that they were coming and the arrangement was made to have them all eat together. They surely did have a royal time and seemed to be satisfied with their entertainment.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Rader, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Culver and two boys, of Phoenix.
    In addition to them there was Gus the Tailor and wife, Lois Whitley, Albert Clement, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, Mr. and Mrs. Deveney and children, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, Mrs. George von der Hellen and son Donald and June von der Hellen, Mrs. J. F. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Vahn, Dr. and Mrs. Barber, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. McDonald, Mr. and Mrs. H. J. Deveney and three children, Mrs. J. Dunbar, John Dunbar, Sr., John H. Dunbar, Jr., D. P. Dunbar, Mrs. C. Gallagher, the five last named were from San Francisco; Nick Young, Clifford Hickson and Ed Spencer.
    Your correspondent took a trip to the Hub Monday morning to consult Dr. Emmens, the leading oculist in Medford, with regard to his eyes, and although he was there in the doctor's office quite early in the morning found that he was so crowded with work that he requested to defer treatment until a future date. As I was passing along at the rate of--well I won't try to say as the speedometer was disconnected so that it didn't work, but we went just fast enough so that I could see that everything in the vegetable line looked lovely and I discovered that the prospect of an abundant crop of alfalfa hay was fine but too fast to even see if there was any fruit on the trees or not, but it does one good to break loose from the home surroundings and just see how beautiful Rogue River Valley does look while everything is green and lovely.
    S. S. Aikens of Prospect came out on the Eagle Point stage Monday afternoon and spent the night with us on his way up home, taking passage on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning.
    Mrs. Abbott, Sr., of Butte Falls, who has been visiting Ashland, came out Tuesday morning and went up home on the stage and Charley Bacon and wife were also passengers but Mrs. Bacon stopped off and spent the day with Mrs. Howlett but Charley went on to Butte Falls, and Joseph Geppert was also a passenger Tuesday, on the stage. Speaking of the passenger traffic on the Butte Falls stage, this Wednesday morning when it came in from Medford there were 11 passengers and one more got on here, although several of them were children, and in addition to the passengers there was a very large mail. He had to leave one man who wanted to go to Prospect very much, but there was no room.
    Mr. and Mr. F. J. Ayres came in Tuesday morning to do some work on their place here in town.
    Mrs. Dennie Zimmerlee, who went up some months ago, has returned and is the guest of Mrs. Walter Wood.
    W. P. Gray of Portland represents the Goodrich Rubber Co.
    W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith and auto machinist, is taking his dinner now at the Sunnyside as his wife is attending the meeting of the grand lodge of the I.O.O.F. and Rebekahs as a delegate from the Eagle Point lodge.
    Messrs. C. F. Moran of Medford, T. Y. Cronin of Seattle, and P. Nelat of Spokane, Wash., were diners here Tuesday and Miss Elizabeth Whiting of New York spent Tuesday night here, going on to Prospect to take a vacation and rest. She has been connected with one of the large hospitals of New York City for some time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hamilton Watkins of Reese Creek passed through here Tuesday on their way to Eugene, Ore., where they expect to remain indefinitely. The readers of the Mail Tribune will miss the Reese Creek items, as Mrs. Watkins was the compiler of them, but she will be missed more by those who are in the habit of attending the Sunday school in that district as she has been the superintendent of that school for several years, and they both will be missed by the community in general as they were foremost in almost every move for the good of the community.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 28, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote my last letter for the Mail Tribune and had reached what I thought was about the limit of the editor's patience on account of its length I just stopped and so will give in this some of the happenings of the day I wrote, Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Norris, the foreman on the J. M. Wilfley orchard, were business callers.
    Mr. and Mrs. Woods of San Francisco were among the diners at the Sunnyside and so was W. L. Childreth and A. C. Menece [A. C. Marion?].
    G. Stubblefield of Lake Creek was a business caller and went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    Wednesday evening C. H. Natwick, one of the contractors on the Crater Lake Highway, and son Carlyle came in from the works, bringing with them Charley Pettegrew, one of the boys working on the road, to go to Medford to have his eyes treated. He said that he thought it was some of the pumice dust that had settled in his eye. This is the second one who has come in from there troubled with the same complaint.
    Mrs. R. C. McGill and Mrs. George West and R. D. Patrick came in and spent the night and William Holman came in and took supper. Mrs. McGill and Mrs. West remained a few days and Mrs. McGill returned to Medford Friday morning, but Mrs. West is here at this writing, Saturday.
    Mrs. Rebecca Jonas, who has been stopping with Mrs. W. H. Brown for the past few months, started for Merlin to keep house for her son.
    Mrs. Jack Tungate and family of Butte Falls, Mrs. Jack Doubleday and H. B. Terrill were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Thursday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols of Lake Creek came in Thursday morning and were joined by his mother, Mrs. T. E. Nichols, and went to Medford.
    H. E. Deveney, who recently sold out his interest in the First State Bank of Eagle Point to H. E. Campbell, started for Idaho Thursday where he expects to make his home in the future. He went by railroad and will be joined by his family in the near future. Although Mr. Deveney has been with us but a short time he has made a number of warm friends here who regret very much to lose him and his family.
    Mrs. Earnest Dahack was a business caller Thursday, shopping with our merchants.
    Judge George A. Gardner and County Commissioner Owens drove through our town going toward Medford. They had been out looking after our roads.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. E. Schutt of Derby drove in Thursday with their cream to meet the creamery trucks.
    Mr. Maxwell, who is living on a farm just north of Eagle Point, was doing business here also Thursday.
    Thursday noon T. E. Cronin of Medford, J. C. Spangler of Spokane, and Harry Wallingworth of Seattle stopped here for dinner. They were on their way up to Fish Lake with a truckload of tools, bedding, etc. They said they were going up as far as they could with the truck and were going to repair and build the road so that they could go all the way to the lake. The arrangement is to put a force of men and build another dam and tap Four Mile Lake, so as to furnish water sufficient for irrigation purposes around Medford and vicinity. Mr. Cronin and Mr. Wallingworth were here again Friday and said that they went as far as G. W. Frey's Thursday and were on their way with another load. I understand that the company intends to make a first-class road up to the lake, and then it is but a short drive from there to Pelican Bay and Fort Klamath, and if that is done it will shorten the route to the Klamath country very materially.
    J. D. Arnes and family motored through our town Thursday afternoon, on their way from Medford. Mr. Arnes is the foreman on the A. Corbin Edgell orchards.
    Fred Neil of Ashland, who is interested with Kay Loosley of Fort Klamath in the cattle business, came in Thursday evening and spent the night with us.
    Mrs. Watson and daughter of Trail and Mr. Austin, one of the Butte Falls merchants, and three strangers came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday morning and Mrs. Watson and little daughter went home on the Trail stage and the rest went on to Butte Falls.
    The members of the I.O.O.F. lodge and the Rebekahs had a special meeting Thursday night and another of their big feeds. There were about 30 members present and a few of the visiting members, among whom was Prof. A. J. Hanby and W. L. Miller, secretary of Medford lodge.
    J. B. Bichan, the cow tester for Jackson County, and L. D. Tucker of Brownsboro, were here for dinner Friday. Mr. Bichan had been to the Tucker dairy testing his cows. Messrs. Ralph and L. D. Tucker have added to their herd and now are milking 30 cows and the creamery men from Medford are getting a large supply of cream each week, in fact he gets so much cream, eggs, etc., up Little Butte Creek above here that he has to have a trailer attachment and then by the time he gathers up what the farmers and dairymen bring here for him he has about all he can put on his truck and trailer, and as soon as the Eagle Point-Brownsboro ditch is completed and the thousands of acres of good hay land are brought into use some enterprising company will erect a creamery here and save the extra expense of having a truck come out from Medford.
    Harry Smith, who is caring for the C. H. Natwick ranch while Mr. Natwick is superintending the work on the Crater Lake Highway, was also a diner Friday.
    Miss Ethel Ewen and her half-brother, Mr. Pettegrew, passed through here Friday evening, and so did Mrs. Stewart and son of Reese Creek, and while Mrs. Stewart was in Ashpole's hardware store I was interviewing the boy and among other questions I asked how they were going to get along in the Sunday school now that the superintendent, Mrs. Watkins, was gone and he very quickly informed me that his mother was the superintendent, and I am assured that the Sunday school will get along all O.K. with Mrs. Stewart as the superintendent, and the help of a few noble Christian women that they have in that neighborhood.
    This Saturday morning as I was making my regular rounds gathering items of news for the readers of the Mail Tribune I met H. Hayes of Trail and he gave me a piece of agate that he had taken out of a ledge where he claims that he can get any quantity for commercial purposes. It is situated about a mile from the mouth of Indian Creek and if it proves to be of any value will be but a short distance from the Crater Lake Highway and may become a leading industry. The rock is very hard and clear.
    Gus Pech and Emmett Klingle of Lake Creek were in town trading this morning.
    John Greb and son were in town this morning and report that they have completed their well going to a depth of 150 feet through very hard rock and have an abundant supply of water.
    C. F. O'Connor of Portland and L. C. Falkanhagen of Grants Pass were here today for dinner.
    Mrs. Green, formerly of Eagle Point, but now of Los Angeles, is here visiting her sister, Mrs. Lloyd Pierce, and looking after her property here.
    C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle and Roy Watkins came in today from the Crater Lake Highway for a late dinner. They report the work progressing finely on the road.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 31, 1920, page 2


TRAIL ITEMS
    A carelessly thrown cigarette stub or match set fire to an old stump near the bridge crossing Elk Creek just above the Rogue Elk Hotel. When discovered the fire had spread, catching an old tree, and the bridge itself had just started to burn. The fire was started and was burning fiercely within fifteen minutes time. No damage was done, however, as attention was called immediately.
    Mr. Vincent, road supervisor from Prospect to Elk Creek, has been working on the lower part of his division filling in chuckholes and improving the road in general.
    George Weeks went to the mill on Butte Creek Wednesday to see about lumber for the rebuilding of his home, which burned recently.
    There were several out to the last day program given at the hatchery school. The program was enjoyed very much. Mrs. Eph McDonald gave a reading and Mrs. Oscar Stewart helped in a dialogue. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. Sumner and infant son Vernon, Mr. and Mrs. Van Heffner and Gertrude Heffner, Mrs. Howe, Mrs. Eph McDonald, Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson and Olive Hutchinson, Mrs. Anna McDonald, and Mrs. Oscar Stewart.
    Miss Anna French, whose school closed Friday, returned to her home on a ranch near Phoenix Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart went to Medford Saturday to spend the day shopping.
    There has been a slight frost for the past three or four nights. In some places the bean crop was ruined and in others it wasn't touched. Today it acts as though it were trying to rain, which would certainly be welcome to those with corn just coming up.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Blass of the ferry crossing below Trail have been seriously ill with the flu. Mr. Blass took sick first, then his wife and mother came down, all three being confined to bed.
    There have been several cases of the flu up about Prospect.
    Mrs. Ash's Sunday school class spent Sunday in Central Point. There were about 25 people attended from here. After church they enjoyed a picnic dinner at Bybee bridge.
    Mr. and Mrs. Watson entertained S. W. Hutchinson at dinner Sunday.
    Oscar and Will Stewart enjoyed a brief visit from their sister, who has been spending a few months in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after I had written and mailed my letter to the Mail Tribune, Thomas Carlton and wife and his brother, Herb, were business callers in our village.
    J. Wattenburg and son, who are managing the Joe Rader farm on Antelope, were business callers Saturday afternoon.
    Sunday morning was one of those lovely cool mornings such as makes one feel thankful that we are here instead of in the Middle West, where one can swelter with the heat on the one hand and shiver with the cold on the other and early in the morning we could see and hear the autos rushing through town for the different camping places along the streams and highways, bent on having a good time fishing, or romping through the woods--in fact there was quite a number of the citizens of our larger towns and cities passed through here Saturday afternoon on their way to the hills to have a two days outing, having their tents, beds and bedding along, and when they began to come back Sunday evening and Monday morning told of what a fine time they had had.
    There was not the usual crowd here for dinner Sunday owing perhaps to the fact that the Elks of Medford were having about their first picnic dinner on their new Elks resort on the banks of Rogue River, where it was expected that all of the He Elks and She Elks, Jenny Elks and Elkettes, without reference to age, color or for condition in life were urgently invited to attend, and the invitation had been extended through the columns of the Mail Tribune so that almost everybody in the country, and Northern California and Southern Oregon had perfect knowledge of the fact that they were expected to be on hand and join in the pleasure of an old-fashioned picnic, and then another reason perhaps was that Sunday was Memorial Day and hundreds were engaged in paying tribute to the loved ones who had gone before.
    But there were a few who in connection with some of those duties and pleasures, already referred to, added visiting the Sunnyside and partaking of a good chicken dinner to the list. Among those who were here for dinner were Mr. and Mrs. Karl Knapp, Mrs. L. Hall and daughter Bertie, and son Eddie B. Hall, Gus the Tailor and wife, Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Morrill and daughter Floss of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, John W. Smith, wife and two children, James Donahue of Medford. Mr. Donahue was the guest of one of our regular boarders, old-time acquaintances in the old States.
    Later in the afternoon Roll Smith, wife and daughter-in-law of Tolo came in and spent the afternoon. Still later our popular sheriff, Charlie Terrill, wife and son Glenn and wife came for supper.
    Married, in Portland, May 20, 1920, Clement McDonald of Eagle Point and Miss Ruth Gibbs of Portland. Mr. McDonald is a member of the firm of Holmes and MacDonald, proprietors of the Eagle Point garage, and returned with his bride Sunday, May 30, and Sunday evening a number of his friends met and welcomed him by giving them an old-fashioned serenade and after spending a while in tendering congratulations the serenaders retired, wishing them a long and prosperous life.
    Among the callers Monday morning was Thomas Cingcade. He reports that his hay crop is good and that he was rushing to try to get it put away before it rains.
    W. E. Hammel, wife and sister-in-law, Miss Minter, were early callers Monday morning on their way to Medford.
    Mrs. Amos Ayres and two children came out from Medford on the stage Monday morning and went on up to Elk Creek on the stage to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trusty.
    Mrs. Pechy Hagen of Applegate also came out Monday on the Butte Falls stage and went up to Lake Creek to visit friends.
    Mrs. Walter Meyer and her granddaughter Miss Violet Calhoun were here on business. Mrs. Meyer is not only interested in the dairy business but also in the poultry business, chickens, turkeys and ducks; she seems to be making a specialty of ducks and says that she has young ducks as large as the old ones.
    D. W. Roberts, who has been out in the Ft. Klamath country helping his son-in-law build a barn, returned the first of the week and reports everything lovely out there.
    William Stanley of Lake Creek was a business caller Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. A. Gitzler of Ashland were among the callers Monday for dinner.
    Clarence Robinette and wife, who have been working in a sawmill, have returned to our town again but intend to go to Medford soon to live.
    Mrs. C. E. Bellows, Miss May French and Miss Myrtle Minter came in Monday and Miss Minter went to Medford on the Lewis jitney, she being one of the high school pupils.
    John Cox, formerly of Fort Klamath but now of Oakland, Cal., and wife and niece, Mrs. M. E. Pruett, were business callers Monday.
    Ralph Stanley, John Rader and David Cingcade, three of our leading stockmen, were here Monday.
    D. B. Gillette, Mrs. A. M. Hayes, Miss Bernice Hayes, Mrs. Dolph D. Halley and Miss Lee Halley, who had been out taking a little pleasure riding in the open air, called at the Sunnyside Monday afternoon to interview your Eagle Point correspondent.
    W. H. Crandall and family and Bert Clarno and wife, who had been out to the Central Point cemetery, passed through here Monday afternoon on their way home.
    Miss Zelpha Jackson, Mrs. George Armstrong, Thomas Ragsdale and Mrs. Thomas Ragsdale of Medford stopped Monday evening for supper and so did Robert B. Warner and Albert C. Meyer and two boys, Albert C. Meyer and Malcolm Meyer of Ashland, and A. L. George, representing a Portland seed company.
    Tuesday morning Joe Riley was here getting his team shod ready to move a rock crusher from near Beagle to Antelope Creek where the county will do some road work.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hayes of Trail passed through here Tuesday.
    J. W. Sanford and wife, C. W. Klum and wife, C. J. Anderson, representing Ward's goods, Mrs. Bessie Coffman, nee Bessie Chambers, were diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    Mrs. Guy Pruett, nee Verta Grover, was a business caller Tuesday.
    Louis G. Ramey of The Meadows was in town Tuesday exhibiting specimens of rock taken out of the cinnabar mine near his home.
    Miss Nydah Neil of Derby passed through here Tuesday afternoon on her way to Medford, returning this Wednesday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. Monia of Brownsboro has been hauling lumber from our depot to build a new barn on his place.
    Thomas Farlow and Wm. Nickel of Lake Creek were visiting our town Wednesday.
    H. D. Mills of Medford, formerly the business manager of the Butte Falls Lumber Company, passed through here Wednesday on his way to Butte Falls.
    Wednesday about noon Roy W. Findley, L. E. Walker, the two Brandon brothers, the owners of the Snowy Butte flour mill of this place but now have the Central Point mill leased and are letting their own mill remain idle, were here for dinner Wednesday and so were Mr. and Mrs. Roy Stanley and his father, Wm. Stanley, Harry Smith and Albert Conley were here for dinner Wednesday.
    Graydon Childreth has moved into the Arglee Green house.
    J. H. Heckner of Brownsboro, who is in the employ of the United States, spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside and so did Jay Davis of Derby, Mr. Davis going to his home on the stage.
    John Esch, one of our staunch farmers, was in town having his team shod getting ready to haul in his hay. Mr. Esch and son Carl are the owners of what is known as the J. D. Singleton farm and report that they had their first cutting of alfalfa down and that it would take about a week for them to haul it in, that there would not be as much hay on the place this season as there has been, as last year Mr. Singleton plowed up quite a lot of the alfalfa land and sowed it to wheat, and that the young alfalfa was not matured as yet. They have one of the best places in this section and are assured of an abundant harvest.
    Dr. Conroy and wife of Medford called Wednesday evening for supper on their way home.
    Thursday was one of the busy days in Eagle Point, it not only being the day that the Eldridge Creamery & Produce Company have their truck visit our town and community, but we had on that day Miss Lydia Doolittle, millinery specialist, O.A.C. extension service, among us and word had been sent out to each one of the surrounding country that she was coming to give free instructions to all who desired to learn as to how to make, trim, or remodel their old hats and the consequence was that by noon she found that she had not come to our town in vain. She held her meetings in the Red Cross room over Geo. Brown & Sons' store.
    Among the arrivals at the Sunnyside that day for dinner were Miss Lydia Doolittle, the lady just referred to, Mrs. Bergman, J. H. Murphy and four men, all strangers, who ate their dinner and left before I procured their names.
    In addition to those who came in for dinner there were Mrs. Charles Klingle of Lake Creek, Mrs. Geo. Brown of Brownsboro, Mrs. Herman Meyer, Mrs. Ed Meyer, Mrs. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, Miss Mae and her father, J. H. French, and son Floyd and Mrs. French's father, Perry Foster. While sitting talking with Mr. Foster he incidentally remarked that he had just received a letter from Ed, his son, who left a few years ago and went to Pennsylvania to live but before he left went to the Mail Tribune office in Medford and subscribed for the daily so that he could hear from home through the Eagle Point Eaglets, and that whenever he received the Mail Tribune he always looked for the Eaglets for news from home. I had about made up my mind to stop writing as there is but little in it financially and there is a lot of work in it, and other reasons, but when he made that remark the thought occurred to me how much good I am doing in carrying the good news to the thousands of readers of that little paper way off out in Southern Oregon. I simply changed my mind and concluded that I would try to keep at the work a while longer. And that is one reason why I mention so many names so that their friends who are scattered not only over the state of Oregon but over the entire civilized world, for I have received word from so many telling me of the comfort they derive from reading that class of news in the Eaglets.
    Jack Tungate of Butte Falls came out Friday with a truckload of shakes on his way to Central Point.
    Friday Leon E. Reynolds, agent for Case tractors, Portland, Henry L. Emstrom, representing J. E. Haseltine Co. of Portland and Noah Frederick, representing an oil company of San Francisco, were here for dinner. They all seemed to be doing considerable business and looked as though they were faring well.
    Mr. Hamilton, superintendent on the Fish Lake ranch, took about four hundred head of mixed cattle from the ranch to the range near Rancheria Prairie Thursday and Friday, and Ed Dutton, who gave me the item, reported that they had a hard time driving them through the brush, as they were not used to being driven, having been kept in a pasture and that the young calves were a fright to handle in the timber and brush. Many of them were the fine imported stock that the Dutton Company have brought from the East. During the time they were in the timber one of Mr. Hamilton's little boys became separated from the rest and became bewildered and was lost; it took about four hours before he was located.
    Vernon Cottrell and Edward A. Nichol of Clarks' Creek mill--the old Hawk mill--came out Friday and spent the night with us, and so did George Lewis, Medford, and Claud McKee, Applegate. They had two five-ton trucks to load with steel for the Eagle Point Construction Company to take to Union Creek camp to be used in the construction of the Crater Lake Highway. After they had loaded--the steel was brought out last season on the P.&E. railroad, and has been here ever since--after they were loaded they had to cross Little Butte Creek here and the question came up as to whether the bridge was safe, but they made it all O.K. They had to go by the Bybee bridge route as the Dodge-French bridge is considered unsafe under a heavy load.
    Wm. Lewis had a truckload of wool pass through here for Central Point this Saturday morning.
    John Grieve, Chris Beale and Mr. Guano [Clarno?] came out on the stage today.
    M. C. Mahoney of Butte Falls was in town today and so was ex-senator H. von der Hellen. He and Postmaster W. C. Clements went to Medford to attend the funeral of the late Geo. P. Mims, the Medford postmaster.
    Chris Bergman and wife were here for dinner and so was Chris Beale and John Mayham.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 7, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Middlebusher left Sunday to spend a few days on Applegate visiting relatives.
    The Jacksonville Creamery made their first trip with their new truck, which is a great improvement over the old one.
    At last the rain has arrived. Although a few farmers have their hay down, the majority are very glad to see the steady downpour.
    Two large G.M.C. trucks, loaded with bridge irons for the Union Creek road, mired down in front of the Bar 8 ranch owing to sub-irrigation.
    The dance at Trail Saturday, June 5, was very well attended, a basket supper being in order. Heine's orchestra furnished the music.
    Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson has been real sick this last week, but is improving rapidly.
    The minister who was to preach Sunday at Trail failed to arrive.
    There was a fair attendance at the Union Sunday school, the lack of attendance due, no doubt, to the dance the night before.
    There will be preaching next Sunday at Trail by Rev. Griffith.
    There was a school meeting Saturday night at Trail, to consider the consolidating of the school districts.
    Lucy and Eula Fellows, who have been attending school at Medford, were out to the dance Saturday night.
    The fishing is unusually good just now, owing, no doubt, to the weather conditions.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 10, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There are quite a number of men working on the road between here and Fish Lake and on the water ditch leading from the lake to the valley, and the Rogue River Canal Company are preparing to build an extensive dam at the outlet of the lake so as to hold a very large volume of water for irrigation and domestic purposes, and us poor mortals below the prospective dam are hoping that the governmental authorities will take the matter up and see that it is so constructed that there will be no danger of another Johnstown flood as even the near approach to a flood such as we had four years ago the 4th of June when the water came so near to breaking through the dam that was then the outlet of the lake, when it did considerable damage to the various places along the valley of Little Butte and caused a number of the families to have to move out and remain on the higher ground all night, and gave some of our citizens here such a scare that they kept their automobiles standing ready at the door to carry them to the hills.
    But one of our contractors who is to build the dam assured me that the dam would be made as strong and safe as possible. But when it comes to building a dam to hold such a vast volume of water as will accumulate in Fish and Four Mile lakes during our heavy storms such as we sometimes have in this country, it will require one that will be almost absolutely unbreakable.
    Saturday after I had mailed my last letter for the Mail Tribune, Sherman Wooley came in from the Crater Lake Highway camp at Union Creek and spent the night and Chris Beale of Butte Falls and James Donahue of Medford were also guests at the Sunnyside.
    The arrangement had been made by that accommodating mail carrier, J. E. Edsall, to take Mr. Donahue and George Wehman out to the Blue Canyon on the northeast side of Mt. Pitt and spend the day having a good time fishing. They went within about four miles of the place with his Ford and then had to walk the rest of the way up the hills through the brush, over rocks and logs. Oh, it was lots of sport. They had had everything arranged the night before and so started at 4 o'clock a.m. in high glee with bread, butter, potatoes, preserves, frying pans and coffee pot and went out to beyond Butte Falls before they stopped for breakfast. Eating a bite they rushed on to get fish to eat, but by the time they reached the fishing ground they began to realize that there was some work as well as sport, but they had a good time and caught a nice lot of fish, but found that they were about a month too early in the season. It was quite a trip for Messrs. Donahue and Wehman, for they are not accustomed to that kind of exercise, but they stood it fine and are planning to go again later in the season and go Saturday evening and spend all day Sunday.
    Sunday morning was rather gloomy and there was not the stir on the road and consequently not very many at the Sunnyside for dinner, but those who did come had a pleasant time and a good old-fashioned chicken dinner. Among those who honored us by their presence were: Mr. and Mrs. Cole Hall, Medford, Albert Clement and Mrs. Louis Whitley, Prof. R. E. Morris, school supervisor, Mrs. C. W. Palm, Mrs. J. W. Keane, Mrs. Ida Stewart, Mrs. S. J. Emerick, Medford, Dr. and Mrs. J. W. Robinson, Mr. and Mrs. Herbert Hanna, Jacksonville, Mr. and Mrs. John Reter and daughter Miss Bernice Reter, Miss Ruth Agee, Mrs. Ella Kane, Ashland, Miss Joyce von der Hellen, Eagle Point, Gus the Tailor and wife, Carlyle Natwick, Mr. and Mrs. W. N. Muirhead of Gold Hill and Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, Eagle Point. Later in the day John Warner and Charles Cushman of Trail came in and spent the night.
    Sunday evening and night the farmers and stockmen were made glad by a gentle downpour of rain that continued all day Monday and it is estimated to be worth thousands of dollars, not only to this valley but all over the coast. Although the rain stopped the boys and girls as well as the men who are working in the orchards to have to lay off for a short time, but that little inconvenience amounts to nothing compared to the amount of good it has done.
    Among the callers Monday morning were Miss Estella Conover, Miss Hattie M. Johnson, Miss Maurine N. Stille, Miss Mona Minter, Mrs. Mary Beale. Mrs. Beale has been stopping with her son Harvey and was on her way home to Butte Falls. J. H. Heckner is engaged in the U.S. department to rid the country of the rodents.
    Harry Hayes called on your Eagle Point correspondent and among other things told of the Stille Bros. starting up their sawmill on Indian Creek about 12 miles from Eagle Point.
    Herman Meyer, Jr., and little daughter were business callers Tuesday.
    Mrs. McDonald, who owns a farm a few miles above Brownsboro, drove into town Monday and remained until in the afternoon getting her buggy repaired.
    Mrs. L. L. Simmons of Valley Forge, Wash., and her sister, Mrs. Watson who have been stopping here with their father, Mr. Schneeley, started for their homes Monday.
    Sam Courtney, our painter, came in Monday evening and spent the night and the next day did some painting on the Sunnyside.
    A. G. Bishop and Corbin Edgell, two of our leading orchardists, were in town Tuesday and so were Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Spence of Brownsboro, and Eli Dahack, who was here having some repair work done on his spraying machine.
    Pete Young, one of our thrifty farmers, and W. C. Pool were also among us.
    Mr. Losia of Medford came in Tuesday. He had been up above here on the creek on business.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Berst of Portland, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Cox, Mrs. Jas. Stokan, Miss Lenore Stokan of Medford, and Mrs. Gus Brey of Lake Creek. Mr. Brey has bought a place just above the soda springs on the south fork of Little Butte and reports that they had a fine rain up there Friday until Tuesday morning. They were all here for dinner; the two from Portland and the four men from Medford just came out for a drive and to take dinner.
    Among others who were here on business were H. E. Hensley, Cecil Culbertson, E. V. Brittsan, Fred Pettegrew and son, Ed Condon, Mrs. Ed Murphy.
    [omission] that they had fine rain up there Friday until Tuesday morning. They were all here for dinner, thw two from Portland, and the four from Medford just came out for a drive and to take dinner.
    June 8th, 1920, to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cingcade, a girl baby. Mother and child are doing fine.
    Mrs. Henry Tonn of Lake Creek, who has been stopping with Mrs. Cingcade, came in this Wednesday morning and went up home on the stage.
    Two of the Stille brothers, J. C. and another brother whose name I have forgotten, passed through here this morning on their way to Medford with a cast iron wheel to have it mended; it had a piece broken out. It was one of the large belt wheels in their sawmill.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 10, 1920, page 7



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday while I was at the post office waiting for my mail, Mr. McKissick, the civil engineer, drove up in his auto, came into the post office and taking me by the arm remarked "Come out here, I have something to show you," and on our arrival pointed to a large rattlesnake with eleven rattles and a button, that he had killed that day while he had been at work, just outside of our town in what is known as the Hamilton place. It was a fine specimen of a rattler and about as large as I have seen for several years, in fact it being the first I have seen for a long time, for they are not very plentiful around here, as the hog [is] a natural enemy of his snakeship, for while the bite of the rattler is very poisonous and very often results in the death of the victim, the hog can be bitten by them and even eat them, with impunity and receive no harm.
    The same evening while I was sitting reading the Mail Tribune, Mr. Chauncey Florey, our popular and accommodating county clerk, came in and introduced me to R. B. Blodgett of Los Angeles, Cal. They had come out to try their luck at fishing and take supper at the Sunnyside.
    The same afternoon W. H. Crandall and family drove in from Medford where they had been to procure spray dope to be used on his orchard out three miles north of our town.
    Charles Winkle also came in that afternoon for supper, and Mrs. Sherman Wooley, who has been visiting her brothers Corbett and Polk Smith near Butte Falls, also came in and spent the night.
    Thursday Mr. and Mrs. L. W. Pomerenz of near Central Point came in for dinner. They were looking for Mr. Frideger who had been stopping with us while out here working in his orchard. They said that they were building on a farm north of Eagle Point and wanted to find a plasterer to do their work in that line.
    Albert Clement and L. C. Taylor, who are working for the county, were here for dinner. They had been taking two truckloads of cement tiling up to be used on the road above here, and they were also here again today, Saturday, on the same business. Rob Harnish, who was engaged at the time dragging the road, was here for dinner.
    Thursday there were eight passengers on the auto stage passed through here from Medford to Butte Falls and Prospect; two of them were for Prospect, that is Frank Ditsworth and bride. When Frank got out at the post office here he had his head way up and walked right by me as though he didn't see me but I thought nothing of that but in a few minutes he passed me by again with a high head and finally I climbed up so that I could reach his shoulder and grabbed him to let him know that I was still on top [i.e., above ground; alive], wondering what had come over him, but finally learned that he had the responsibilities of a family resting on his shoulders and then the whole incident was explained. He had just been married and his many friends around here are wishing them all kinds of success through their future life.
    Ira Tungate of Butte Falls was another one of the passengers on the stage; he had been to Medford with his mother to see her off for Portland and was returning home.
    Mrs. Maxfield, who had been stopping for a few days with her sister, Mrs. Charles Cingcade, was also in town on her way home.
    Mrs. F. J. Ayres, Mrs. John Rader and her daughter, Mrs. Harry Stanley, were among the business callers Thursday.
    Grant Wortz of Rogue River motored through our town Thursday and so did J. W. Berrian of the Butte Falls fish hatchery. He reports that they had 1.35 inches of rainfall last Sunday and Monday up there.
    Gus Nichols and wife were among the business callers Thursday. He reports that his prospect for hay is not so good as it was last year.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher of Trail, who had been out to Medford visiting relatives, came out on the Eagle Point stage Thursday and spent the night at the Sunnyside going up home Friday morning on the stage.
    Friday morning our community was shocked by the announcement that William Taylor, one of our old and valued citizens, had died very suddenly the night before. He leaves a wife and several children and grandchildren to mourn his departure. He is of old pioneer stock, his parents having settled in an early day east of Medford near the foot of Roxy Ann. I have not the data to give further notice, but understand that the remains will be interred in the family burying ground at Phoenix.
    Mrs. Nora Kelly, son Robert and daughter, Miss Marjorie Kelly, and Mrs. Ella Bush nee Ella Hanley called for dinner Friday and to renew old acquaintances, for that is the first time I have seen Ella for about forty years.
    A. McDonald of Medford, Mrs. Cross, formerly the hotel keeper of Butte Falls, and W. W. Green of Jacksonville were passengers on the stage Friday from Butte Falls.
    Mrs. George O. Gorhan and Mrs. Taylor and daughter Miss Josephine, J. H. Hecknor, Mr. Adams, formerly of McLeod but now of Portland, and his friend were here for dinner Friday. Charley Blass of Trail was also a business caller Friday.
    Kay Loosley of Fort Klamath called Friday afternoon on business and while here reported that that morning he had had his auto stolen and up to the time he was here had no word from it.
    David Rosenberg of Medford and Miss Georgia Crape of Columbus O., a relative of Mr. Rosenberg, stopped at the Sunnyside a few minutes before noon and decided that they were not hungry but liable to be later in the day, so had Mrs. Howlett put up a lunch for them to take on the road. They wanted to go up as far as Lake Creek. While here the subject of sheep came up and he remarked that he had just bought a buck that is warranted to shear forty pounds of wool at shearing. Some sheep!
Medford Mail Tribune, June 14, 1920, page 4


TRAIL ITEMS
    A large bunch of sheep belonging to Ford & Wilson passed through on their way to the range until time for them to go on the reserve.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher has been in town for the last few days having dental work done.
    Mr. Ace and George Weeks have been hauling lumber for the rebuilding of the house of George Weeks, which burned recently.
    Mr. S. W. Hutchinson arrived in Medford Tuesday after a visit of three weeks in Pomeroy, Washington.
    Mr. Tom Weeks has been sick with the "flu," but is up now, the other children all coming down with it. The baby has been seriously ill.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart spent Saturday night in town. Jim Stewart, son of Oscar Stewart, returned with them, having finished his course at O.A.C.
    Again it has rained in time to save lots of work in irrigating. There was some hay down, but the good the rain did to the corn offset the damage to the hay.
    Rev. Griffith preached Sunday afternoon. There was a basket picnic after Sunday school, which, as usual, was very well attended.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Middlebusher left for their home in Washington after an extended visit with Mr. Middlebusher's mother.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 16, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon after I had written my letter for the Mail Tribune as I was on my way to the post office I met Thomas Lewis and he told me of an experience he had had that day with a large rattlesnake a short distance above town. He was walking along through Roy Smith's pastures, the old J. B. Jackson place, and discovered a huge rattler, so securing a piece of a rail he made for it but missed it and his snakeship ran into a squirrel hole, when he secured a pick and shovel and started to dig him out, but as soon as the rattler discovered what was going on he commenced to make battle, and the attack was so unexpected that the first pass the snake made came very near reaching him, but he jumped back and recovering himself, struck him with the edge of the shovel, cutting his head nearly off. He, in relating the circumstance, said that the snake was as large around as his arm just below the elbow and Thomas is not a small man, but I suppose will weigh in the neighborhood of 140 or 145 pounds. He had seven rattles on his tail and Tom said that when he did rattle it was simply terrible. He did not say whether he was excited or not, but suppose he was. The rattler is on exhibition in Lewis' confectionery.
    Frank Johnson and wife of Indian Creek and his brother Rube, and Alex Mathews were also here in town Saturday afternoon and so was Mrs. Thomas Farlow and son Earl of Lake Creek.
    Miss Zelma Roberts, a daughter of our townsman W. D. Roberts, who has been teaching school in Crook County, returned home last week.
    Sunday morning broke on us as though it might be anything but lovely although it proved to be a very pleasant day but threatening rain, but the faithful few who are in regular attendance in Sunday school were on hand and we had a very interesting Sunday school session, John Esch leading the Bible class, Mr. Campbell the young people and Mrs. Carl Esch the primary class, and I am glad to say that we are once again favored with the assistance of Miss Nora Childreth as organist. While she was attending the Medford high school she could not always be with us, but now we have reason to hope that she will be able to be with us and take an active part in our Sunday school.
    Among those who were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. G. R. Satchwell of Medford, G. M. Best, and G. W. Griffin of San Francisco, guests of Mr. and Mrs. Satchwell. Gus the Tailor and wife of Medford, Albert Clement and Mrs. Lois Whitley and her brother D. G. Miller, Medford, Pliney Leabo who came in Saturday night about midnight and remained until Monday afternoon, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Andrews, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Findley, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Stone and Miss Marie Earhart, all of Medford. R. L. Burdick and wife of Ashland, Mrs. Roy Stanley and little son, Mr. Nick Young. Later in the afternoon Geo. McDonald and C. H. Natwick. And while we were all gone to Phoenix to attend the funeral of our old neighbor, Mr. W. W. Taylor, two others came in, ate their dinner and left the cash on the table for "Ma Howlett." I may say that owing to the fact that the funeral services were to be in Perl's chapel at 2 o'clock that the table was left about as the guests left it and the strange visitors found everything on the table to eat. There were quite a number of our citizens went from here to pay respect to the memory of the departed, and including those who joined the procession by the time we arrived at the cemetery at Phoenix there was a very large attendance. The services at the chapel and also at the grave were conducted by Rev. L. Myron Boozer of Medford and very appropriate and impressive. The floral display was very grand, covering the grave completely, as well as the graves of other members of the family.
    Miss Zelma Roberts, daughter of our townsman, who has been teaching in Crook County, returned to the parental roof last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Spence of Brownsboro were among the business callers Monday. And so was Benj. Brophy and E. V. Brittsan. They came in to bring in their cream for the Eldredge Produce and Cream Co. of Medford.
    Tuesday morning Luther L. Clark, Frank Hicks and Charles Donahue came in from the Fish Lake road camp for breakfast. They had been working on the road between the intake where the water enters the pipes for the Medford system and Fish Lake, but became dissatisfied with the situation and quit to hunt another job. The same day there was a whole truckload of men passed through here headed that way. It is always the case where a number of men are employed on any public work that there is a certain element that become dissatisfied and are thus going and coming. They report that there were about forty men at work on the job.
    Charles Givan, one of our promising young farmers, was attending to business in our town Tuesday.
    There seems to be considerable travel on the road between Medford and the surrounding country out this way as the Butte Falls stage is quite well loaded each way, having from four to eight passengers each way. Of course some of them change stages here and go out on the Trail or Lake Creek stages and some go as far as Derby and go on the Prospect stage, but it shows that the people are on the move.
    Joseph Geppert, the Butte Falls road supervisor, came in Tuesday morning with one of the Jackson County road trucks to have some repair work done, and then went on to Medford, returning in time to go home that night. Those of us who are interested in good roads are anxiously waiting for the time to come when the "powers that be" will start work on that three miles of sticky between the Reese Creek school house and the Vestal place so that the good people around Derby and beyond will not be forced to remain at home as they have been for the last ten or twelve years.
    Among the diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday were S. H. Harnish, his son Rob and wife, Mr. R. D. Flaherty, manager of the Farm Bureau Exchange, Medford, and Fred Robinson, representative of the livestock business.
    Louis Gibson of Reese Creek was in town Tuesday and so were Mrs. John Rader and Mrs. Harvey Stanley.
    Among the passengers on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday evening en route to Medford were A. Dupray, Mrs. Averill, Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman and her daughter, Miss Violet, and one or two others.
    Ed Higinbotham motored through out town headed toward the Prospect country and Joe Pool went to Medford on the Lewis jitney this Wednesday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 17, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. George Singwald of Oakland, Calif., came in Wednesday evening to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. David Cingcade. Mrs. Singwald is the daughter of our townsman, Mr. Cingcade and Hattie, his daughter, was raised and educated here until she passed the tenth grade when she went and took a regular business course, including stenography and typewriting, and for several years followed that branch of business in different cities in California, but finally she was married to Mr. George Singwald, who is now engaged in the art business, preparing plates to make the pictures and engravings in newspapers and magazines. They came up in their car and are now visiting Mr. Thomas Cingcade and her old schoolmates and old-time friends. They expect to return about next Wednesday.
    Dr. Kirchgessner came out last Wednesday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Hill, who has quite a tract of land planted in onions on the Tronson place, was in town Wednesday having our blacksmith make little shovels to use in transplanting onions.
    Mr. J. H. Gay of Central Point and his son, Louis D. Gay and wife of Seattle, Washington, were business callers, or rather visitors, for they were simply out looking over the country, and the visitors seemed to be very well pleased with the appearance of things in general.
    Wig Jacks, John Nichols, et al., have been building a flume so as to bring the water from the ditch. Mr. Jacks has already built into a part of the town that the ditch could not reach.
    Mrs. Arglee Green of Los Angeles and her sister, Mrs. Floyd Pearce, called on Mrs. Howlett Wednesday afternoon, and J. H. Heckner, the rodent exterminator, and Chris Birdsman and wife were here Wednesday for supper and Mr. and Mrs. Birdsman spent the night with us.
    Jack Bittson, one of the truck drivers on the Crater Lake Highway, also spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    There were seven passengers came out on the Medford-Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage Thursday morning. Two got off here, and Mrs. E. R. Harper of Portland took passage on the same stage, and the two who got off, Gus Edler and his niece, Miss Lorraine Hagnes of Ashland, went on the Lake Creek stage for Lake Creek.
    Miss Zelma Roberts went to Medford Thursday.
    George W. Barker, the Butte Falls banker and family, stopped here Thursday evening for supper and then went on home that night.
    Wm. C. Johnson of the firm of Johnson Bros., who bought the P. W. Haley place, was a business caller Thursday.
    County Judge Gardner and the two county commissioners, James Owens and Thos. H. Simpson, accompanied by Jack Washer, the man who is superintending the road work on Dry Creek, passed through here to Butte Falls Thursday, looking over the road and looking for a suitable place to put the rock crusher to crush the rock to go on the road between Reese Creek and Butte Falls.
    The Beeson brothers and one of the lady employees took supper and breakfast at the Sunnyside Thursday and Friday. They came in Thursday morning with their show outfit, consisting of bears, dogs, birds, etc., and entertained the people, and I understand had a good crowd, and the entertainment was said to be very good for a small place.
    Thomas Stanley and wife of Butte Falls and his brother, Carl, of Lake Creek, were here on business Thursday.
    Mrs. W. S. Baker, who has been a patient at the hospital in Medford, was brought out here Thursday afternoon and will remain here for a few days until she recuperates a little. She is getting along fine. Dr. Holt is her physician.
    W. H. Crandall and family were here Thursday afternoon. They came in to celebrate his oldest boy's, James Edison Crandall, birthday anniversary with ice cream and cake.
    Israel Patton of Butte Falls, who has been over on the coast working, came in on the stage and went up home Friday morning.
    John Allen, one of our leading stockmen of Derby and son, Walter, were in town Friday having a team shod to work on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls road. They took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did J. H. Murphy of Medford and later in the day we had Mr. H. Feldenheimer, J. B. Williams of the Union Meat Co., Portland; J. H. McDuff, Montreal, and J. N. Smith, Chicago, Ill. and still later Mr. and Mrs. N. B. Stoddard and two children and W. S. Baker and two children. He came in to visit his wife referred to in this letter and spent the night. Mr. and Mrs. Stoddard were on their way from the neighborhood of Los Angeles, where they had been spending the season. They brought with them two milk goats and came in from Medford Saturday morning. They had three little kids. Mrs. Stoddard and the children went up to Butte Falls on the stage and Mr. Stoddard took the goats and their trunks up on the P.&E. train.
    Mrs. H. M. Daniels and son, Horace, and daughter, Miss Margaret Daniels, passed through our town Friday afternoon on their way to visit Mr. and Mrs. George Givan and family.
    Mrs. J. H. Deveney, wife of the banker, who recently sold out his interest in the First State Bank of Eagle Point to Mr. H. E. Campbell, and children, started Friday for Midvale, Idaho.
    Mrs. Dr. W. W. P. Holt and two daughters started today, Saturday, for Berkeley, Calif., where they expect to remain during the summer. Mrs. Holt and children are visiting her mother, Mrs. Perdue.
    George Klingle of Lake Creek started this morning in a car for some point in California to spend the summer.
    Herman Meyer, Sr., Lake Creek, Mr. Adams, merchant of McLeod, and four strangers were at the Sunnyside today for dinner, and later in the day Mrs. R. Kyle, Gertrude Jean and Ross P. Jean and Dr. Holt were among the diners.
    Thomas McCabe, one of our former orchardists, and C. Edgell, an orchardist, were doing business here today.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 21, 1920, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    The annual school meeting of district No. 84 was held Monday afternoon at the school house. Oscar Stewart was re-elected as director and Mrs. Oscar Stewart as clerk. A 5-mill tax was voted in order to pay off some of the back debts. Also the school was voted to be closed for two years on account of the financial condition of the district. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart, Ace Week, Will Stewart and Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Hutchinson. Will McDonald, the chairman of the board, was not present. Neither was Mr. Van Heffner, who has four children of school age. On account of being alone at the store Mr. Adams was unable to be present.
    Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and family and Miss Enid Middlebusher spent Sunday afternoon visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    There was preaching at Trail Sunday by the new minister, with basket dinner and afternoon meeting.
    Mr. Vincent has been hauling bridge lumber from Hall's mill below Trail.
    Mrs. Oscar Stewart broke one of the hubs on their car on her way to Trail one evening. Leaving the car along the wayside, one of the neighbors kindly took her on as it was a business trip, later taking her on home.
    Never has the weather been so perfect for haying. Hot, yes, but it makes good hay.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred McDonald and three children will be at the Rogue Elk Hotel this summer.
    Miss Eula Houston has gone to California to take a course in summer school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ash came down from Union Creek Saturday evening, in order to be home for school election. They spend Sunday at Sturgises'.
    Merle Houston has been home several days on account of an ulcered tooth. He had to have it pulled and his cheek lanced.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 23, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Arglee Green, who has been here visiting her sister, Mrs. Floyd Pearce, and looking after her property, started for Los Angeles last Wednesday in her auto to look after her interests there, expecting to return in about six weeks, expecting to make some decided improvements on her place in our town.
    Mrs. Walter Bales of Kansas City, Missouri, a sister of Mr. J. M. Wilfley, one of our big orchardists, and Miss Bessie Spencer, niece of Mr. Wilfley, also from Kansas City, came about the middle of the past week to make him a visit. Mr. Wilfley came in Thursday and brought them with him, so that they might see our town and meet some of his many friends here. Mrs. Bales seems to be very well pleased with our country, and especially with our climate. Asking him, with regard to his prospect for a fruit crop, he said that the prospect was quite good. With regard to the blight, he said that when he looked around and saw how other orchardists had been treated that he felt that he had been treated quite well, although there was some blight in his orchard.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols and daughter, accompanied by Miss Bertina Gardner of Lake Creek, came in Thursday. She had come out help thin out the fruit in one of the orchards.
    There seems to be but little trouble in securing help to thin the fruit, but the farmers are having some difficulty in getting help to cut and care for the hay crop, although they are offering good wages. There is one man in this neighborhood who is offering eight dollars a day for a man and team. But the smaller farmers are exchanging work, helping each other and in some instances women are turning out to help, the price being so high, forty cents an hour, that it is quite an inducement to them to work and it is not an uncommon sight to see a man running a mower and his wife using the rake. But the question comes up, what is to be the result of these high prices for labor? For every one who has given the subject a serious thought knows that the farmer cannot afford to pay such prices as are demanded and the result will be that there will be a large portion of the farming land go uncultivated, with the result that there will be a falling off in production and the same class that is now holding up the farmer, will find that he will be left without employment and be very liable to go hungry himself.
    Rev. W. C. Reuter, formerly pastor of the M.E. church in Medford, but now of St. Maries, Idaho, came in on the stage Thursday and went to Mr. John Greb's, who has had charge of his landed interests here.
    Mrs. Eber Emery of Gold Hill, who is traveling for the Ward Remedies Co., was a business caller Thursday. She has taken the place formerly occupied by Mr. A. H. Peachey.
    Mrs. T. E. Nichols, made a business trip to Medford Thursday.
    Mr. Adams, our sub mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Persist route and is now doing considerable freighting, brought in a truckload of fence posts from Medford for George Stowell. The posts were shipped from the state of Washington to Gaddis & Dixon and then shipped out here and by the time they are hauled from here to the Stowell ranch, the cost of transportation alone will amount to no small item, for they average fifteen pounds each.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. S. Hessing and son Carrol of Talent, were here for dinner Thursday on their way up the creek for a fishing excursion.
    Wm. Moore, the saw filer for the men who are engaged getting out saw logs near Butte Falls, was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Thursday going to Medford and so was Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Marion, formerly of Derby, on their way to Medford, and they were all three of them on the same stage Friday going back up the country. Mr. and Mrs. Marion were going to Derby to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Allen. They expect to go to Bandon soon.
    John Norris, the foreman on the Wilfley orchard, was in town Thursday and Friday, having Mr. W. L. Childreth work on his auto.
    Thursday afternoon, while I was looking for items to write in Eaglets, Dr. Holt, our M.D., came along and asked me to ride with him out to John Owens', where he had a patient, Mrs. Owens out there, who had been operated on and brought home, so jumping into the car we went over the hill and into Dry Creek Valley, passing through some of the fine farms, and I noticed that the farm products, especially the wheat and corn, looked fine. I also rode a part of the way over the new road that the county officials have been making. They have done a fine job for a summer road, but it lacks the finishing touch for winter. When we arrived at the John Owen home, I found that since I was there last he has put himself up a neat frame residence, and made other improvements. But the house is of little consequence compared to the housekeeper, but we found her in fine condition and doing as well as could be expected.
    W. E. Hammel, another one of our wide-awake farmers and orchardists, came rushing into town to have his mower repaired.
    Thursday evening, Mrs. J. P. Svenson of Grants Pass, Mrs. Sandoz of Elk Creek and Miss Ellen Hanson of Minneapolis, and Mr. T. F. Throwell of Weed, California, came in to spend the night at the Sunnyside. They all went up on the Trail stage. Miss Hanson is a niece of Mr. Svenson and they were on their way up to his farm on Elk Creek, where they expect to remain during the summer.
    Robert Pelouze motored through town Thursday afternoon on his way home.
    Everett Edsall, who has been working on a railroad in Nevada, came in Friday morning on the Medford-Butte Falls route and came up to visit his mother, sisters and brothers. He is a patient now in the railroad hospital, he having been thrown off the water tender on the train and had his shoulder blade broken some weeks ago, and is here on leave of the doctor until July 1, when he must report for treatment. He went from here to Phoenix Friday night to visit his mother and sister. He also went to Butte Falls, his old home, with his brother, Jed.
    Laurence Luy of Wellen was a lodger Friday night, and Wm. Perry and wife of Eagle Point, Nettie Grover of Medford and Mrs. Harriet Allen of Seattle were here for supper. Mrs. Allen is a daughter of Mrs. F. M. Stewart and sister of Wm. Perry, and Mrs. Grover is on her way from California, where she has been visiting her mother and sisters, to her home in Seattle.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 28, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday while John W. Smith was here getting some repair work done on his mowing machine, he and Harry Stanley met and in the run of conversation were speaking of the difficulty in procuring help on the farm and the manner they would slight their work, and Mr. Stanley related how he had gone to Medford and brought out four men to help on the farm. He was to pay $5 a day and board. This was on Thursday afternoon, so Friday morning after the four men were well filled up one of them started off for Medford and the three went to work, and at noon after dinner another quit and the next morning after breakfast the third man left for Medford but the fourth man stayed until Monday morning after breakfast and he left so he had to go hunt more help. There is no way the farmer can protect himself for it is not as though they were in town where they could board at a hotel, but the farmer has to board his men and the consequence is the farmer is simply at the mercy of that class of men and they will engage to work for a man, get well filled up and then he, like an Esquimaux, can eat enough at two or three meals to last him for two or three days, and then hunt another job. The result is that the farmer will have to exchange work and get his work done the best he can and next season cultivate no more of his land than he can handle himself and let the rest of his land go uncultivated.
    There seems to be a great deal of travel through this section of the country as the stages seem to be loaded each way, and it is not an uncommon thing to see six to ten passengers on the Butte Falls stage going and coming, and in addition to that there are dozens of cars dashing through our town going each way to and from Crater Lake, although those who stop here caring enough to talk report that there is a quantity of snow all around Crater Lake yet.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday were Mr. and Mrs. F. A. Dixon of Los Angeles; they had come in via Klamath Falls, Ft. Klamath and Crater Lake, expecting to camp at the lake, but there was so much snow they were obliged to come on to Prospect. They were simply traveling through the country for pleasure on their way up into Canada. In addition to them we had Jack Schooler, who lives on the old Obenchain place, on the hill above Brownsboro, and Mr. and Mrs. Ernest Peachey, who are in the Forest Service stationed at Butte Falls.
    J. H. Tyrrell and wife, formerly of South Butte-Lake Creek post office but now on their farm between Medford and Jacksonville, John Swenson of Grants Pass and his niece, Miss Ellen Hanson of Minneapolis, who has been up on his place on Elk Creek although they are boarding with W. W. Willits, V. E. Peterson, the Eagle Point-Persist mail carrier, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Royal, formerly of Montague, Calif., but now living on the place formerly owned by Mr. Tyrrell, the one he sold to the Tacoma Metal Co. of manganese mining fame, were all here for dinner on Thursday, Mr. and Mrs. Tyrrell and Mrs. Royal to make out the papers transferring the farm on South Butte from Mr. and Mrs. Tyrrell to Mr. and Mrs. Royal. They have one of the best farms in the Butte Creek country, and we wish them abundant success in their new home.
    Later in the day we had as dinner guests Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pelton and daughter Miss Gladys, of Gold Hill, Mrs. Frank Neil and Miss Neil of Portland, and J. P. Kelly of Sebastopol, Calif. They had just come in from Crater Lake on their way home and stopped for dinner.
    During the afternoon I met Mrs. B. S. Baker of Douglas County, who lived several years ago on Trail Creek. I also met Mrs. Hill of Derby, who owns the old Castor place. She was on her way to Medford and later returned and spent the night at the Sunnyside going up home Friday morning.
    There was a man here Thursday afternoon by the name of B. F. Skillman, representing the Mutual Creamery Company of Portland looking over the business.
    There was a general gathering here Thursday afternoon of the stockmen of this section of the county to meet Mr. Rankin, the forest supervisor, who was here to apportion to each one the tract of land assigned to them for their summer range. Among the stockmen here that afternoon was John Allen of Derby, Wm. Stanley and four or five of his sons, two of Herman Meyer's boys, Milo Conley and several others whom I do not know.
    Mrs. Mansfield was also attending to business in our town Thursday.
    Friday C. E. Bellows and family, Mrs. Robert McCabe, James Yyant [Bryant?] and Mr. Blankenship were here on their way to Medford.
    There were seven passengers came out Friday morning on the Butte Falls stage, among whom were Mrs. Charles Wilkinson and her two grandsons on their way to her home at the South Butte soda springs.
    J. E. Edmiston, Sr., and son were here for dinner Friday. Mr. Edmiston is with the Oregon Fruit Growers association estimating the fruit crop.
    Lee Edmondson and family and Mrs. Edmondson's sister, Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman of Butte Falls, passed through here Friday on their way to Derby. Mr. Edmondson was formerly in the sawmill business at Derby but now comes from Hood's Center.
    Among the arrivals at the Sunnyside Friday evening were James Dorothy of Medford, C. H. Natwick and wife, Truman McClelland, Henry Trusty and Harry Lewis.
    Mrs. Frank Lewis, who has been visiting relatives in Portland during the Shriner convention, has returned to her home unable to tell the wonders she saw while in Portland.
    This Saturday morning Jud Edsall ran his big Hudson Six out of the garage and in a few minutes had the baggage and necessary equipment for satisfying the inner man stored away for a trip to Crater Lake, Fort Klamath and home via Green Springs mountain road via Ashland home, loaded Mrs. Howlett and daughter Hattie, George Wehman and James Dorothy into it and started at 4:35 a.m.
    Mrs. Walsh and family of two boys and a girl of Klamath Falls, and C. W. Cline, came in from Crater Lake this morning for dinner and so did Herman Meyer, Jr., and little daughter, S. H. Harnish, Dr. Holt and Clifton Hickson. Mr. Meyer reports that on the headwaters of Little Butte they had a regular downpour of rain and caused the creek to overflow its banks, doing considerable damage to the hay and grain in the lowlands.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been working over in California this summer, came in on the stage from Medford.
    During Jud Edsall's absence Joe Moomaw is carrying the mail from Prospect to Butte Falls.
----
    I had so much to write about last Saturday, the day that I wrote my last Eaglets, that I thought best to stop and save some of the items for this letter, and among the items was the fact that Carl von der Hellen of Wellen was in town looking as though he had been at work. I hope he will pardon me for mentioning such a thought, but he was attired as though he was, or had been, running a mowing machine, and if my memory serves me correctly, he had brought in a part of a mower to the shop for repairs.
    J. L. Robertson, our boss farmer, was in town the same day, talking about his one hundred and twenty acres of corn he has growing, and the thought seemed to trouble him as to how he was to care for all that corn and clear the land, so that he can sow it in wheat this fall. He was on a dicker with Marshal Winter to assist him in disposing of some of the product of the land. He is looking for a bumper crop and every indication points in that direction.
    Mrs. Montgomery came in Saturday morning and spent the day, assisting Mrs. Howlett in her work, and Mr. Shively was also a helping guest at the Sunnyside.
    There was a truckload of men and their baggage stopped here Saturday noon and two of them took dinner here. They were on their way up to where the R.R. Co. are opening the road to Fish Lake.
    We had an unusually interesting session of Sunday school last Sunday morning. The Bible class was led by Mr. John Esch, and the boys' and girls' class by Mr. H. E. Campbell, our banker and the primary by Mrs. Carl Esch. There was some of the children absent, but we expect a prompt attendance after the 4th.
    There was not the usual number of guests at the Sunnyside Sunday for dinner, but those who did come seemed to be well satisfied and some of them remained all afternoon. Among those who came out for dinner were Mrs. J. M. Williams, Miss Issie McCully, Miss Lulu Williams of Jacksonville; Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Lowry, and six children, five boys and one girl, a lively, healthy, happy family. They were seated at a table by themselves and had dinner served family style, and a happier family I have seldom seen. Mr. Lowry is the foreman on the Bear Creek orchard, about two miles south of Medford. The family remained until the cool of the evening and started to go home via Brownsboro. We also had Mr. and Mrs. C. S. Lee of the Eden Valley orchard, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vestal and Mr. and Mrs. G. Schermerhorn, Miss Alta Naylor, Mr. and Mrs. F. E. Hayes of Medford. Later in the afternoon, John W. Smith, wife and two children, who live on the edge of the desert and Big Sticky, and Mrs. Joseph Geppert and son, Charles, of Butte Falls.
    William Lewis, the jitney driver between here and Medford, who went to Portland with his mother a week or more ago to see the Shriners, Rose festival, etc., returned last Saturday night, but Mrs. Lewis remained to visit relatives. He reports that "Like the Queen of Sheba, the half has not been told."
    John Allen and wife of Derby and their son-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Marion, passed through town on their way to Medford Monday. Mr. and Mrs. Marion were on their way to Bandon, where they expect to make their home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Daniel Hilkey of Aromas, California, and Fred Cummings, the water boss, were here for dinner Monday.
    Glenn Haley, who has been up to Portland, returned Monday and two of the Hughes boys of Butte Falls, came out and one of them went to Medford on the Medford-Butte Falls stage.
    James Weill and Noblit of Medford and H. E. Campbell and wife took supper at the Sunnyside Monday night and Messrs. Weill and H. L. Noblit remained overnight.
    Our barber, N. E. Slusser, has been making some material changes in his shop. He has lined it on the walls with checkered white oilcloth and painted the wainscoting and ceiling white and greatly improved the appearance of the room.
    Mrs. R. A. Weidman reports that they have lost a valuable cow from "bloat" since I last reported. It was quite a loss to them as they have recently purchased a farm from F. E. Nichols and were getting it stocked up with good dairy cows.
    Mrs. Fred McPherson and son, Fred, Jr., came down from Portland, and are visiting her parents, T. E. Nichols and family.
    Fred and Ralph Dunlap, Fred Owen of Trail and V. E. Peterson, the mail carrier between here and Persist, were all here for dinner Tuesday and later Dr. Kirchgessner of Beagle came in.
    Harris Bros., a colored troupe, came in Tuesday morning, called for breakfast and beds. After eating, they went to bed. Before coming here they had billed the town for an entertainment for Tuesday night. The troupe consists of three men and two women and a little boy. They had a good attendance, but--well, I didn't go so will make no comments, but I heard a man and woman talking the next day and the woman denied being there and the man said "yes you were," and she finally owned up that she was.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Overton of Owasso, Okla., came out on the stage Tuesday morning and tramped over our town until 3 p.m., and went back to Medford on the same stage. They said they were just looking around.
    Corbett Smith of Butte Falls was a business caller Tuesday evening.
    J. M. Wilfley, accompanied by his niece, Miss Bessie Spencer, of Kansas City, Mo., were in our town Tuesday evening.
    J. H. Best of Medford came in with a load of hay, taking it up to the logging camp near Butte Falls, where he spent the day.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 6, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon after I had finished my writeup for the Mail Tribune, Thomas Abbott and family of Lake Creek and Howard Fox of Albany, Ore., passed through here on their way to Butte Falls to visit Mr. Abbott's mother, Mrs. L. E. Abbott, where it was planned to have a reunion of the family on the 4th.
    The same evening Mr. Furnish of Albany and N. E. Mooney of Prospect passed through here on the way to Medford. And that evening Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Natwick, one of the contractors on the Crater Lake Highway between Prospect and Crater Lake, came in and spent the night and Roy Stanley and wife called for supper. J. M. Hill also called for bed and breakfast the night of the 4th.
    July 4th coming on Sunday and as Mrs. Howlett was off taking an outing in Ft. Klamath she had secured the services of Mr. Alice Daley to take charge of the Sunnyside Hotel during her absence, and as it was to be one of the big days at Ashland we did not expect to have very many guests here for dinner that day, but there is no telling who might come so Mrs. Daley prepared dinner as usual for all who might come and among those who did visit us at that time were Dr. and Mrs. C. W. McColin, New Market, Iowa, Jack Cameron, Mrs. Esther Cameron of Medford, Mrs. Dr. McColin is a daughter of Kendall Cameron, one of the early pioneers of Jackson County. We also had Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Haney and his niece Miss Blanch Haney of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Speck, Gus the Tailor and wife, Geo W. Neilson, wife and two boys, G. H. Swope of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Vern Marshall and daughter Marjorie of Medford.
    And later in the day W. D. Roberts, Miss Lalo Roberts, Miss Zelma Roberts of Eagle Point and Miss Rowena Roberts and Donnie Myers of Ashland, Sherman Wooley, wife and two children, Mrs. Chris Natwick and John Mayham. There were two persons whose names I failed to get on my list. Sometime during the night Henry Trusty and Harry Lewis came in and took beds and the next morning took breakfast, and J. M. Hill came in and took a bed and Monday morning he and Mr. Adamson, the Persist mail contractor, took breakfast.
    Mr. and Mrs. Merle Kilgore and family of Klamath Falls passed through our town Tuesday on their way home, they had been over to attend the celebration at Ashland and were returning by the Rogue River and Crater Lake route.
    John Howard, one of the veterans of the Civil War, Mr. and Mrs. Pete Betz, George Stowell, Harry Lewis and Mr. Adamson were among the diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    Mr. Willard Heriford of Santa Cruz, Calif., who had been up to Butte Falls visiting his aunt, Mrs. E. E. Smith and other relatives, came out on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday afternoon. He was accompanied by his cousin, Mrs. Ed Cowden and her two children. He intends to remain and help Mr. Cowden through his harvest.
    T. F. McCabe was also in town Tuesday.
    Marsh Garrett, one of the big stockmen of the Lake Creek country, was in town Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Miller and family of Lake Creek, Mr. and Mrs. H. Crawford, a son-in-law and daughter accompanied them. They had been to Ashland and were on their way home.
    Mrs. W. Wagner of Trail, came in and spent Tuesday night with us and went up home this Wednesday morning.
    B. J. Anderson and C. E. Terrill, our sheriff, called for supper Tuesday evening.
    Mrs. Laura E. Abbott of Butte Falls and her son-in-law, Howard Fox and wife of Albany, came in for supper Tuesday evening on their way to Butte Falls.
    W. D. Roberts and family started today, Wednesday, in their auto for Central California to remain indefinitely.
    Henry Thornton of Persist came out on the stage this morning and went up home on the Persist stage.
    J. L. Robinson, our boss farmer, went to Medford this morning to buy a large disc plow as he has several hundred acres of land to plow. He intends to plow up his land as soon as he gets his grain off of it and have it ready to sow this fall. He expects to weigh it down with sufficient old iron and rocks to force it into the hard ground and with his tractor as the propelling power will tear up the ground and have it all ready for the wheat in time to catch the early rains.
    Today, Wednesday, we had as diners Mrs. A. L. Haselton and son of Butte Falls, Sherman Hamilton of San Jose, Calif., Mrs. J. F. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Edgar Johnson and two children of Medford, and a strange man.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent, after staying home the 3rd and 4th, took a trip down to Ashland to hear Mr. Gerard speak and you can imagine my disappointment when going to the place where it had been announced that he would speak, the Chautauqua building, and there learn that Mr. Gerard was not to be there and that Bishop Shepherd would speak in his place at 2:30, in the park. It was a great disappointment to hundreds of people who went from all over the country, including Klamath County, especially to hear him speak. The substitute was very good and the speaker gave us a fine short address but he was laboring under a severe handicap trying to fill the place of another, especially one so noted as Mr. Gerard. It appears that the change in the place of speaking was made so as to rent the building to five traveling negroes who were billed to fill the hour, 2:30. But this life is full of disappointments, and about all that we can do is to accept this one in good grace as coming in the ordinary course of life.
    We reached Ashland just in time to see the tail end of the parade, but what we saw was very good. One thing that particularly attracted my attention was the quantity as well as the quality of the hay and grain all along the route. But there are others better prepared to give a writeup of the three days celebration, for I was only there a few hours. But I was not the only one who was disappointed in my trip to Ashland on account of the speaker failing to come.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 9, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wednesday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. Coleman, who bought the Wm. Holman place in Lake Creek precinct, were in town and report that everything is lovely up in their section, that the prospect is good for crops, and that they are still well pleased with their buy.
    Mrs. Anna Corum of Butte Falls was one of the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Thursday morning on her way home. There were several other passengers on the stage, but all strangers to me.
    George Hollenbeak, formerly of Prospect, but now living near the steel bridge, near the mouth of Big Butte, who had such a siege with blood poisoning in his hand, was in town Thursday. He had taken up a marked sow and four unmarked pigs and posted them and was looking for a justice of the peace so he could have them sold, but as we are so peaceable in our neighborhood that we don't have to have a peace officer, he has decided to go to Central Point or Medford to have the business properly attended to.
    Alex Mathews, one of our hustling farmers and stockmen, was doing business Thursday with our merchants.
    When E. V. Peterson, the Eagle Point-Persist mail carrier, came in Thursday, he brought in with him Mrs. George Adamson, Mr. George Weeks and son, Asie Weeks of Trail and John Howard, who makes his home with Mr. and Mrs. Pete Betz and brought them all to the Sunnyside for dinner and beside them we had Dewey Hill of Derby and Dr. Kirchgessner as guests at dinner.
    Among the business callers Thursday, beside those referred to, we had Mr. and Mrs. Bert Clarno, Mrs. Mayfield, Mr. and Mrs. French, beside quite a number of strangers and autoists, who dash through town so fast that one can scarcely discern who they are.
    Gordon Childreth reports that he killed a large rattlesnake, as large as his wrist, having 14 rattles, and he reported that he had had more, but had lost them off. He killed the rattler on Pete Young's ranch. There seems to be more of that species of snakes around the country than I have heard of before for several years.
    Mr. Gus Bray of Newbury, who is here looking after his interest on Indian Creek, just north of here about nine miles, spent Thursday night with us, and went up to his ranch Friday morning on the Eagle Point stage.
    Joseph Geppert, the road supervisor of Butte Falls district, drove into town Friday. He is working on a cutoff on the Eagle Point-Derby road on the Vestal ranch.
    Mr. J. T. Adams, who owns a store at McLeod on the Eagle Point-Crater Lake Highway, called for supper Thursday evening and went on up home that night.
    A man giving his name as G. V. Jennings came into the Sunnyside Hotel Thursday night about 11 o'clock and asked for a bed. He said that he had started that afternoon, from a ranch said to be about eight miles distant, for Eagle Point and missed the road and had been wandering around in the dark. He could not tell what direction he had come. He seemed to be considerably bewildered. He said that he stopped at a house and asked the host to permit him to lie down on the carpet and rest the rest of the night, offering to pay two dollars for the privilege, but was turned away. He was well dressed and was carrying a heavy suitcase and an overcoat. He said that he was 74 years of age, and not very strong. The next morning he took passage on the stage for Medford.
    Mr. McDonald of Klamath Falls, a cousin of Mrs. Wm. Knighton of this place, came in to make Mr. and Mrs. Knighton a visit Thursday.
    J. M. Riggins, wife and daughter, formerly of Derby, but now of San Francisco, in company of Gus Edmondson and wife of Butte Falls, passed through here Friday on their way to Derby. Mrs. Riggins is a sister of Mrs. Swihart of Derby and Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman of Butte Falls and is making them a visit.
    Mrs. Ernest Peachy and Mrs. R. M. Robinson of Butte Falls were here for dinner Friday and so was an elderly lady, whom I did not know. We also had three doctors as diners Friday, Dr. Holt, Dr. Kirchgessner and one other who did not wish to have his name published. He is from San Francisco and was looking over the country for a location to settle and practice his profession, and later in the day Mr. J. H. Heckner, the rodent exterminator, called for dinner.
    Noble Zimmerman, who has been up beyond Butte Falls visiting his parents, came out on the stage and went on to Doris, where he is working in a lumber camp. There was also two boys on the same stage, they were hunting work, and had been to Butte Falls trying to find it, but said that they were only offering four dollars and board, and that they would not work for that. A lady, thinking to help them, sent them to Roy Stanley and he offered the same price, and the last I saw of them, they were sitting on the sidewalk watching for a chance to ride to Medford. I suggested to them that inside of twelve months they would be hungry and begging for work at considerably less wages than four dollars and board.
    It becomes my painful duty to record the death of Mrs. John L. Robinson, Jr., who passed away last Friday night about 11:30, leaving a babe about three weeks old, her husband and two little girls, about 10 and 15 years of age. The death has caused a spirit of sadness over the entire community, for she was not only a loving and lovable Christian woman, but a devoted wife and mother and has been one of the most active members of our Sunday school, and up to shortly before her confinement, the superintendent of our Sunday school.
    Alex Vestal of Reese Creek was a business caller this Saturday morning.
    George W. Frey and son, Edward, of Lake Creek, called for dinner today and later H. C. Pardey, agent for the Chemical Fire Apparatus Company of Portland, called for dinner. While here he established an agency with the Eagle Point Garage Co.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 12, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon while I was talking with W. L. Childreth with regard to the funeral of Mrs. John Robertson, and as to who would officiate he remarked that Rev. John Stille was to conduct the services and that Mr. Stille said that he would have to borrow a suit of clothes to wear on the occasion. And on further inquiry learned that about two weeks ago the home of himself and his brother Eli was burned to the ground with its entire contents including all of their money, books and accounts and left them with nothing but the clothes they had on, while they were working in their little sawmill, and left them without even a hat to wear. They were living on their homestead and the fire left them entirely destitute. Some of their friends are doing something to help them to get a start by donations.
    Rev. John Stille has been doing considerable evangelistic work in this section of the country up to the time that the sticky roads go so that they--for he and his brother Eli went together; he assisting in the singing--giving their service to help to build up society. They both came and took part in the funeral services.
    The funeral services were conducted at the residence and there was the largest attendance I have ever seen at a funeral in this neighborhood and the floral offerings were very fine. The Eagle Point Sunday school procured a beautiful selection as evidence of their high appreciation of her services as superintendent of the school up to the time of her illness. The remains were interred Sunday afternoon in the Central Point cemetery.
    There were a large number of autos passed through here Sunday morning headed for different parts of the country on picnicking expeditions, some going to Crater Lake, some to Prospect, while others were going along the banks of Butte and Rogue River to fish and enjoy life in that way. We had the fewest number here at the Sunnyside for dinner Sunday that we have had this season, but those who did come seemed to enjoy themselves just as well as though there had been a large crowd. Among the guests were Mr. Charles Applegate and Fred Neil of Ashland, Gus the Tailor and wife, Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Haselton and son Rob, now of Butte Falls, A. W. Hubbs and wife and Miss Sibena Frazier of Medford. And later in the day Horace Geppert of Butte Falls and Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Leidman of Los Angeles, Cal.
    Mr. and Mrs. Leidman are making their annual visit to this country. Mr. Liedman is a professional fruit packer and has been going from Imperial Valley in Southern California as far north as Rogue River Valley packing fruit along the route as the fruit ripens and finishes up their itinerary here in the fall packing apples. They took a room at the Sunnyside Hotel but this Wednesday morning went to Butte Falls on the stage to visit Mrs. Leidman's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman, who live about eight or ten miles beyond Butte Falls, to be gone a few days.
    Dr. T. T. Shaw and wife and Miss or Mrs. Corinne Laubon and O. M. Murphy of Medford, came into the Sunnyside about 8 o'clock Monday morning from off the south fork of Rogue River where they had been picnicking and fishing, and called for breakfast. They reported that the weather was very cold up there and when they reached here were so cold that the Dr. and his wife stayed close to the cook stove.
    M. C. Mahoney, wife and daughter Ailene and Mr. Brainard of Butte Falls passed through here with a new Ford Monday on their way home.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our big orchardists, was a business caller Monday. He seems to think that his fruit crop is A1, but the labor question seemed to bother him.
    Hamilton Fox of milk goat fame of Lake Creek came in Monday after a road grader to use in that part of the county that had been brought here a few days ago for repairs.
    J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the Butte Falls fish hatchery, passed through here Monday afternoon on his way to Medford.
    R. Hulse, who is living on the old Heath place just above Brownsboro, was here getting repairs for a hay net he had broken Monday.
    Charles DeLinn, contractor on the Fish Lake dam project and his manager, Mr. Pearson, were here for dinner Monday. They report that the work on the project is suspended on account of some legal trouble in the bonding move.
    W. J. Parr of Los Angeles was a passenger on the stage Tuesday on his way to near Derby to look over a tract of land he had recently bought of a Mr. Hill. He found the land all right and returned on the same stage in the afternoon.
    Mrs. Agnes Stewart of Medford was also a passenger on the same stage and went from here on the Lake Creek stage to visit friends in the Lake Creek country and attend a school picnic next Friday.
    Mrs. E. Van Duesler of Montana, state university instructor in home economics, came out with Miss Pool, our county demonstrator and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Lyle E. Butler of Sutherlin, Douglas County, was here Tuesday for dinner. He is working on the health and sanitation board. He spent the night here.
    Gus and Ed Edmondson of Butte Falls were also diners at the Sunnyside and so was Harry Lewis, who had come in from the Crater Lake Highway camp and is stopping here for a few days. R. P. Dopp was also here for dinner Tuesday.
    Fred Pettegrew was in town Tuesday.
    Mrs. Carl Cobleigh of Butte Falls and her sister, Mrs. Thomas Jones and two children of California, came out on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday and went out to Medford.
    Ed Cowden was among the business callers Tuesday and so was Rev. H. G. King, who has charge of the Union Sunday school department in this district.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Fender and family of four children came in from the Modoc Lumber Co. mill on Williamson River, Klamath County, Tuesday night about 8:30 and spent the night at the Sunnyside on their way to Jacksonville to visit relatives.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 16, 1920, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    Tom and Herb Carlton and Will and Jim Stewart took their cattle to the mountains last week, making the trip together.
    Keva Hutchinson was in Medford last week from Thursday to Tuesday of this week. He was working at the Medford Hotel.
    L. L. Holmes was visiting his sister, Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson, at Trail last week. He returned to Reedsport, where he is working.
    Mr. Adams of McLeod started Wednesday night for Medford. He started late in order to make the trip in the cool of the night. He spent Thursday in Medford purchasing supplies for his store, returning home Thursday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Saltzman were visiting Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson. They came Saturday and left Sunday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart and son Jim and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson and daughter Olive spent Saturday evening visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    Mrs. Weeks and children spent Sunday at Conley's mill visiting her son Tom, who is working there.
    Dr. Sweeney and family are camping about three miles above Trail.
    Dr. Van Scoy and family have moved into their summer cottage above Trail. They intend to spend the summer there.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 16, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Steve Smith of Beagle was a business caller Wednesday afternoon and Pete Young, another one of our prosperous farmers and stockmen, was here early Thursday morning.
    When the Medford-Butte Falls auto stage came in Thursday morning from Medford, there were seven passengers and among them was Sherman Hamilton of San Jose, Calif., who came up to look after his father's business.
    Wm. and Harry Lewis and Ed Spencer started Thursday to go to Diamond Lake for an outing and to fish in the lake. Will Lewis, who has been running a jitney from here to Medford the past few years, has concluded to lay off for a while and rest up. He expects to go to Crescent City, after he returns from Diamond Lake, and enjoy the sea breeze while visiting his aunt and other relatives. Owing to Mr. Lewis' suspending his jitney work every morning, those who desire to go to Medford by public conveyance in the morning will have to go on the 7:15 stage.
    Henry Town, wife and daughter of Lake Creek passed through here for Medford Thursday.
    John Mayham, who is looking after the interests of Benjamin Brophy on Big Butte, came out Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Thursday morning Mr. M.D. Bowler, Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Jones, Mr. M. M. Ragsdale, Raymond Ragsdale of Lake Creek came in to look after their business interests here and while here took dinner at the Sunnyside, and in addition to them Mrs. E. L. French of Medford and Mr. D. S. Sawyer, Medford, were among the guests and at night Mr. and Mrs. C. L. Corey of Medford spent the night with us. They were on their way to Crater Lake and expect to spend some time in the hills enjoying camp life.
    Thomas F. McCabe, one of the pioneer orchardists, was also a visitor in town.
    Bert Clarno and wife also passed through here Thursday afternoon on their way home, out north of here a few miles.
    Carl Bieberstadt, one of our prosperous farmers and orchardists, called on your Eagle Point correspondent Friday morning on business.
    I omitted to state that George W. Stowell and stockmen returned from a trip up north, where he had been, and purchased eight head of Guernsey heifers. He is not only a good farmer but is as well interested in the dairy business and of course is prospering in business. He keeps about five hundred hens and the product in eggs is such that when the market drops too low for him, he simply puts them in cold storage and keeps them until there is a raise in the price and thus realizes all there is in the business. I saw a statement in the Oregon Journal of a recent date that the eggs laid by the Oregon hens are worth annually practically as much as all of the fruit produced in the state. And that the poultry industry in Oregon is nearly half the livestock industry, and still the cost of caring for cattle, sheep, hogs and horses amounts to hundreds of thousands of dollars. While the cost of caring for poultry is comparatively trifling and the amount of cash that the eggs alone in our sparsely settled state amounts to $3,150,000,000 [sic]. And still when we look around to ascertain the number of persons who are really interested in the poultry business, we find that they are very few. To be sure, every farmer keeps a few hens on the farm, about enough to eat up what would otherwise be wasted, and they are let run at large with no special care as to the grade of hens or the laying qualities or kind of breed they have, and still Oregon is credited with her 15,000,000 head of poultry, valued at $16,000,000 and 98,000,000 dozen eggs, valued at $58,000,000. And if we would add to the above statement the thousands of eggs that are used in the families on the farms, we would find that the amount would increase very materially.
    Friday noon, J. M. Remen and George S. Potter, two traveling salesmen of Eugene, Ore., Chris. Bergman and Jeff Conover were among the diners.
    H. Berg of Newport, who owns a farm on Indian Creek, was here having his driving horse shod, getting ready to start today, Saturday, for his home in Newport, Ore.
    Rev. Father Maher of the Catholic hospital, Medford, was out here Friday, the guest of our postmaster, W. C. Clements.
    J. M. King, who has a homestead on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls road, was in town Friday, having his team shod to work on the road between here and Butte Falls, when the "powers that be" get ready to go to work on the main road. They have had a force working on a cutoff for some time, but the big job, grading and rocking the three miles of sticky, is still untouched where the mail carriers have such a time in the winter getting through.
    O. C. Boggs, wife and mother and family passed through here yesterday evening on their way to Crater Lake.
    A. R. Zimmerman of Butte Falls came out yesterday, went to Medford, bought him a new Ford, came out here and took supper and took his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Leidman, and went up home. I stated in my last that Mr. and Mrs. Leidman had gone up, but when they reached Butte Falls, they found that their father had not arrived, so came back to their room in the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Frank Netherland and Mrs. Doubleday were passengers on the Butte Falls stage this Saturday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher has gone for a visit with her daughter, Mrs. Dolf Olsen, who lives at Bend, Ore. She intends to be gone several weeks.
    Mr. Griffith preached again at Trail Sunday. There was a large attendance. There was a basket dinner after Sunday school and preaching services in the afternoon.
    The Free Methodists are preparing for their camp meeting again this year. Their tent is a mile or so above Trail along Rogue River.
    Several of the Trail young people went up to the swimming pool in Elk Creek Sunday. While they were in the water someone got busy and tied their clothes up into many hard knots, causing some trouble and no hurrying in dressing. Those who enjoyed the swim were Miss Enid Middlebusher, Orgu, Merle and Given Houston, Keva Hutchinson and Minnie Poole.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cunningham from Neosho Rapids, Kansas are visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson. They will only be here a week or so, as business engagements call them home.
    Mrs. George Weeks took her son, Tom, up to the Conley mill Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart spent Sunday afternoon with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 23, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday after I had written my letter for the Medford Mail Tribune, I took a ride out to "The Hub" of Jackson County, the city of Medford, but before I started I lingered long enough to eat my dinner and besides myself there were W. E. Genack, of R. L. Polk & Co. of Portland, Nick Young, one of our prosperous young farmers and stockmen, Harold Grey, Luther Tisdale, Margaret Mansfield, Thelma Nettles of Medford, on their way to Butte Falls. They were simply out for a little pleasure ride and anticipated enjoying the dance at that place. Carlyle Natwick who had come in from the Crater Lake camp on Union Creek reports that the work is progressing finely on the highway.
    In my last I unintentionally omitted to mention what happened to one of our promising young men, Robert Harnish. While he was stacking hay, in handling the hay fork in pushing it around so as to dump the hay just where he wanted it, the fork turned after it dumped just so that the point of one of the prongs struck him on the throat inflicting quite a severe cut, but his wife applied local remedies and he was soon at his post in the hay field again.
    Speaking of accidents or mishaps, we had a very serious mishap some weeks ago when our fellow citizen, Fred Pelouze, was very seriously hurt by falling 30 feet from the comb of his barn. The trip used in unloading hay needed some adjusting and Mr. Pelouze went up to make the necessary repairs when something gave way and he dropped the 30 feet lighting on his feet, on the hard ground, and it is unnecessary for me to say that he was seriously jammed but fortunately no bones broken. It so happened that I did not hear of the accident for over two weeks after it happened, but now that I can state that he has so far recovered as to be able to be around again I will record the incident and [am] glad to say that there is no more serious results than what there was, for Mr. Pelouze is one of our best and most progressive citizens.
    Sunday morning Charles Law, Alva Stallsworth, Clarence Long and Lester Cash of Medford came in from Lake Creek, where they had been attending a dance, for breakfast and reported having had a very pleasant time.
    Sunday morning we had a very interesting session of our Sunday school, although our banker and wife, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, he being one of the teachers, was absent. He had gone to Ashland to attend the Chautauqua. Owing to the death of our former superintendent, Mrs. John Robinson, who was acting corresponding secretary, it became necessary to elect another so Miss Nora Childreth was elected to fill the vacancy.
    By 11 o'clock Sunday morning the guests began to arrive at the Sunnyside for dinner and by the time that dinner was over, for they continued to come until after the first table was served, we had with us H. B. Nye and wife of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. J. G. Gregory and son Roy, Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Gregory and sons Eugene and George, all of Dinuba, Calif., Gus the Tailor and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Oaterson of Capital Hill, Mrs. O. T. Oaterson, Chicago, Mrs. C. M. Speck, Ida May Piper, Medford, Dr. A. R. Hedges, Dr. Louise G. Hedges, Mona Hedges, Ruth Hedges, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Jackson, Butte Falls, Mrs. Pelton, Oscar Higinbotham, Mr. and Mrs. Semple and two children, Eden Valley orchard, Mrs. Florence Melegan and daughter, Mrs. Nona Peater and sons of Kenilworth Hotel, Medford.
    Monday when the Butte Falls auto stage came in there were seven passengers and among them Mrs. J. W. Miller and little grandson of Trail on their way home from Medford.
    A. J. Florey and Miss Ethel Anderson of Medford were out visiting friends Monday and while here took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Thomas Farlow, one of the progressive farmers and stockmen in the Lake Creek country, and wife passed through our town Monday evening on their way home.
    A lot of machinery, a roller, a pulverizer, two road graders, a truck, wagon and another machine that I can't name and a 125-H.P. Caterpillar came in Monday afternoon on the way to the Reese Creek country to be used on that sticky road that has been such an eyesore to the traveling public. The machinery was so heavy that it all had to be taken through the water to cross Butte Creek and Mr. Thrasher, the foreman, had what I would call a hard time getting across but he didn't seem to think it was much of a job. They managed to get [the] roller across that afternoon and took the Caterpillar back to pull the rest of the machinery across but put that off until the next day and Mr. Jack Thrasher, the foreman of Rogue River, and Mr. Royal Haymond of Gold Hill, one of the company, took supper and breakfast at the Sunnyside but slept with the machinery.
    Monday afternoon our daughter Hattie had a call to go to W. S. Baker's on the Derby road and I went along for company and got a glimpse of where J. Geppert and his gang of helpers are working opening up the cutoff on the Vestal place. It appears that they have done considerable work there but there is a lot of rock to be removed before it is completed.
    Ralph Bieberstedt, who lives on the Bieberstedt farm between here and Brownsboro, was in town Tuesday having some repair work done on his auto by W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith.
    In my last I mentioned that Will Lewis was going off on a trip and that there would be no morning service but since then his father has concluded to run the jitney.
    Tuesday noon J. F. Adams, the McLeod merchant, A. S. Bliton, the meter reader for the California-Oregon Power Company, John Mayham and Miss Ella Belford were here for dinner.
    Miss Bessie Harnish went to Medford on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday afternoon.
    J. P. Coleman and wife, D. R. Patrick, Lem Charley and wife, Mr. Barker and family of Butte Falls passed through our town Tuesday afternoon.
    Mrs. Guy Pruett was a business caller Tuesday.
    Mrs. McGill and two young ladies came out from Medford Tuesday afternoon to visit Mrs. Howlett.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our hustlers, was hustling around town Tuesday afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. Gilhovson of Harbor City, Cal., came in Tuesday, took dinner and remained overnight with us. They were on their way to Trail to visit Mrs. Gilhovson's sister, Mrs. John Warner.
    Homer Randall of Trail, also spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
    Robert R. Minter came in on the stage this Wednesday morning from Hillsboro, Ore., and so did Mrs. A. W. Short and daughter Ruth of Phoenix, and Clarence Holmes of Ashland. The three last named and Mr. Randall and Mr. and Mrs. Gilhovson went up to Trail on the stage this morning.
    J. G. McAllister, formerly of Ashland, has moved into the A. J. Daley house that he has purchased.
    Shorty Allen and H. Simons of Wellen were business callers this morning.
    W. H. Buskirk of Portland, one of the agate men who was here last spring, came in this morning to gather a few agates while on his way to Arizona. Geo. W. Stowell was also here for dinner today.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. Sorrels of Phoenix is visiting with her son, Elie Oliver, and family this summer.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher is visiting with her daughter, Mrs. A. Olsen of Tumalo, Ore., for a few weeks.
    There will be a big dance at Trail Hall Saturday night, July 31. A basket supper. Music by Medford Orchestra, come one, come all.
    Mrs. J. T. Zimmerlee was a Trail caller Monday.
    Mr. Dollarhide and family of Ashland joined the camp meeting above Trail Monday, and expect to spend the rest of the week.
    Frank Holmes is putting up his hay this week. He expects to return to his work near Union Creek next Monday.
    R. R. Dawson, E. Cushman, C. Frye and Amos Ayres spend Sunday at their homes.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 28, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday afternoon Mrs. M. L. Pruett, one of out enterprising lady farmers, was transacting business in our town.
    The same afternoon there was a company came in from Los Angeles and had the misfortune to break something about their car and on taking it to the Holmes and McDonald garage found that in order to have it repaired they would have to send to Medford for a piece to replace the break. The company was composed of H. G. Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Hamilton, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Gootee. They were touring the Pacific Coast visiting all of the national parks and were on their way from the eighth wonder of the world, the Crater Lake park, and Mrs. Hamilton emphasized the statement that of all the places they had visited so far that Crater Lake park was the most wonderful, grandest and most sublime of all. They had visited the Rogue River Gorge, Natural Bridge, Mill Creek and Barr Creek Falls and said that Crater Lake and the scenery between the lake and here was simply wonderful. While they were getting their car repaired they took supper at the Sunnyside, going on their way north the next morning.
    Among those who visited the Sunnyside and took dinner Sunday noon were R. A. Petty, who is on the Vernen place and his son R. A. Petty, Jr., Medford, Gus the Tailor and wife, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Moomaw, J. E. Mason, Mrs. Clarence and two daughters, Frances and Harriett, and Miss Mathews from the Kirkland farm. Mr. and Mrs. Forte, Miss Forte, Mr. and Mrs. McGill, Mrs. von der Hellen and her son Hugo and daughter Joyce, Mrs. Fred McPherson, Mr. and Mrs. Sam Potter and daughter, Mrs. Edward Pleason, Ashland, and later in the day Captain A. J. Vance and wife, Medford, Dr. and Mrs. F. P. Burton, Jr., of Stockton, Calif., Mr. and Mrs. S. Morrow of Portland, O. B. Morrow, Medford, Miss Cavender of New York, Lester Lytle and his mother, Mrs. J. F. Ditsworth of Talent. The last ten named came in the evening from Crater Lake and Eastern Oregon for supper on their way to their headquarters.
    W. L. Childreth and family took a trip up in the hills some 15 miles beyond Butte Falls in the neighborhood of Blue Canyon. They were accompanied by Mrs. Alice Daley.
    Miss Emma Lovett and Miss Ruth Sharpe of Medford came out on the stage Monday morning and went up to Trail on the Persist stage to attend the camp meeting that is in progress this week. There were two other passengers on the stage going to Trail the same day but I did not learn their names.
    Arthur Brown, who is soliciting for the Oregonian, came out and spent the day at the Sunnyside.
    Monday morning Mrs. William von der Hellen and her two children Hugo and Joyce and her brother Jack Florey and wife and Mrs. Fred McPherson started for the Union Creek camp on the Crater Lake Highway to rusticate for a few days or weeks as the spirit moves them.
    The Fruit Dealers Association have been using the P.&E. depot as a workshop to make up fruit boxes to be used in this section of the county and during the past few days quite a number of orchard men have been hauling them to the different orchards preparatory to packing pears.
    Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, was a pleasant caller Monday and took dinner and so did J. F. Davis of Medford.
    Mrs. George Brown of Brownsboro drove into town Monday forenoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Leidman, who have been making the Sunnyside headquarters for some time, have rented furnished rooms and moved to Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Parr, who have purchased a tract of land near Derby station, went out on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning so that Mrs. Parr could see their future home, returning the same day. They were going to San Francisco to work for a while as they are both trained nurses, I understand, and expect to build on the land this fall.
    W. Pool and his son-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Arnes, who is foreman on the A. Corbin Edgell orchards, were business callers Tuesday.
    T. F. McCabe and Miss Ethel Ewen were among the business callers Tuesday. And so was Lloyd French and J. Waterbury.
    Fred Drews, head timekeeper in the Portland office of the O.W.R.&N.R.R. Co., came out Tuesday and engaged a room at the Sunnyside for a few days. He is taking his annual vacation, and as he spent his vacation here last year concluded to come back again this season. He is spending a part of his time hunting agates; he went out this Wednesday morning on the Medford stage, hunted agates and returned on the same stage by 2:30 p.m.
    H. E. Campbell and wife, our banker, and John Foster of Medford were here for supper Tuesday evening, and Mr. Foster spent the night here.
    F. J. Ayres and wife were among the business callers Tuesday and so was Jimmy Dugan and son. While here I learned, I think, the straight on the fire along the track of the P.&E.R.R. There was a man, I did not learn his name, walking down the track and he noticed a small fire in the end of one of the rotten railroad ties, but thought nothing of it and cared less perhaps, and after the fire was over he told one of Mr. Ayres' neighbors about seeing the fire on the railroad. The supposition is that it caught from sparks from the locomotive. Mr. Ayres said that he was hoeing in his garden when he saw it and ran to put it out but the wind raised and he then ran back to the house to phone to catch the train men at the depot here and succeeded, but by this time the fire was running in all directions. It burned about a half mile of board fence for Mr. Ayres, quite a lot for Mr. Vestal, Mr. Wilfley and Mr. Natwick but burned no buildings.
    W. D. Roberts, who started a week or more ago for California, returned last Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 31, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Friday, Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson took their guests, Mr. and Mrs. C. M. Cunningham, on a tour up the Rogue River hoping to convince them that Oregon scenery is by far the better than that of Kansas. Among the various points visited was the Natural Bridge.
    On account of the illness of Mrs. C. M. Cunningham, they were unable to start on their return trip home. They had intended visiting Pomeroy, Wash., for a few days.
    The camp meetings of the Free Methodists have been very well attended.
    Mrs. George Weeks spent Wednesday visiting with Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson.
    Clarence Holmes is visiting with his sister, Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson. He intends to spend the summer here.
    The tourists still are traveling more every day. Most of them carry camp outfits, but the hotel has had a good run.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 31, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. S. Baker and family and Mrs. Sears of Derby called at the Sunnyside on business and then went on to Medford.
    Mrs. Jane O. Gleason of Medford came out on the Butte Falls stage Wednesday and went to Butte Falls to spend the summer, to try to work off her trouble, the hay fever.
    Miss Delia Steiver of Medford came out on the same stage and went up to the Lake Creek country to visit Mr. and Mr. Gus Nichols.
    Thomas Stanley and wife of Butte Falls were business callers Wednesday.
    P. L. Toon of Aberdeen, Wash., came in and spend a day or two at the Sunnyside. He is interested in the agate business and came up from Ashland, where he had been detained on account of his baggage being misplaced on the S.P., to spend a while here in the agate fields.
    Wm. von der Hellen, F. E. Furry of Phoenix, Mr. and Mrs. Mahlon Purdin were here for supper Wednesday evening. Mr. Purdin and Mrs. Furry were out here settling up the estate of the late W. W. Taylor.
    Thursday morning John Silos and family, accompanied by Mrs. Stewart of Butte Falls, came in on their way to Medford.
    R. A. Petty was in town Thursday morning on business. He said that he was having his wheat cut that day with a binder and that the prospect was good for a good crop.
    Last Thursday J. W. Mitchell, the Christian Science healer of Medford, came out accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Wyncoop, Mrs. E. A. Dyke, Mrs. C. D. Carlton, all of Medford, to take dinner at the Sunnyside and to spend the day. After dinner Mr. Mitchell went out and visited a number of his friends in our town while Mr. Wyncoop and the ladies remained at the hotel enjoying the cool shade of the screened veranda. Mr. Mitchell reported that he had spent the afternoon very pleasantly and if I am not mistaken those of us who remained enjoyed the afternoon equally as well. At any rate, they all promised to return in the near future and Mrs. Dyke assured me that she was coming out before long to take a Sunday chicken dinner. In addition to them we had A. J. Mitchell of San Francisco, H. J. Pankey, C. C. Cate, Mrs. Pete Betz and Nate Slusser, our barber, here for dinner. Mrs. Slusser has gone to Ashland to spend a few days visiting and Mr. Slusser occasionally takes dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson of the Bar Eagle ranch at Trail called. Mr. and Mrs. Hutchinson have purchased the old Johnson place joining the Elks Resort, having purchased all of the tract except five acres where the Elks Resort hotel stands. They had been out to Medford and stopped here for supper.
    Wm. Lewis of Flounce Rock, and Mrs. Chas. McKinnis of Rock Point, and three children came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday morning and Mrs. McKinnis and children were on their way to Butte Falls to visit her relative, Mrs. R. D. Jones.
    C. E. Clark of the Northwestern Turpentine Company of Portland, Or. also went up on the stage Thursday. He is establishing camps in the timber in the Butte Falls country to extract turpentine, pitch, etc. to manufacture the various products of our forests except the timber.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. S. K. James of Medford passed through here Friday on their way to Crater Lake. Mr. James say that he has been in Medford for the past two years and that he has never been in Eagle Point before. What he has missed.
    H. T. Findley of the Union Oil Co., Medford was here for dinner Friday and so was Chas. F. Jones and C. M. Gilmore of Paul's Electric Store, Medford.
    Mrs. Carl Esch, wife of one of our prosperous farmers, who with his father owns the old J. D. Singleton farm, was doing business here Friday.
    Miss Fern Lewis, daughter of our confectionery man and jitney driver, went to Medford Friday afternoon.
    Walter Marshall and little boy of Brownsboro were in town Friday and took out with him a lot of wire fencing.
    There have been two large loads of lumber passed through our town from Medford for one of our big orchardists, J. M. Wilfley. He is building a bunkhouse for the benefit of his men working in the orchard.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bresser and son Chester and Mrs. Fred Jeffrey of San Francisco passed through here Friday evening on their way to Crater Lake.
    J. M. Whillaman and other relatives, of Portland, are here visiting his daughter, Mrs. McKissick.
    Friday evening Judge G. A. Gardner, James Owens and T. H. Simpson, our county judge and two county commissioners, called for supper. They had been out all day riding over the roads, inspecting them, and report favorably--but wait until about the first of February and it will be a different report.
    Mr. Stoddard and John Swanson of Butte Falls, and E. W. Frey, F. R. Frey and wife of Lake Creek were also here for supper. They had been to Medford and were on their way home but were hungry and stopped long enough to eat.
    Edwin D. Hill, of Napa City, Cal., was on the stage this Saturday morning on his way to visit his daughter, Mrs. Fred Hill of Derby. He is canvassing for patriotic history designs.
    In addition to Mr. Hill there were nine others on the stage and two passengers here to go and the result was that the contractor had to send an extra car as far as Derby.
    We had as diners today, Saturday, H. H. Williamson, salesman for Hubbard Bros., Medford, Miss Grace E. Long, who has just returned from Monmouth normal school where she has been taking a course in teaching, and has a homestead near Derby. Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, son Hugo and brother A. J. Florey and wife, Mrs. Fred McPherson and son Fred Jr., who have just come in from the Union Creek camp on the Crater Lake Highway, Albert Clement, Nate Slusser, our barber, and J. T. Oard of Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 2, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    The Rogers and Houston families spent Sunday in a family reunion. Mr. Keva Hutchinson was a guest.
    The Free Methodist camp meeting closed Sunday evening. A large crowd attended. The meeting has been a real success.
    They are going to start fishing at the U.S. hatchery today and will continue for a couple of months.
    Miss Eula Houston is home from Sisson, Calif., where she has been attending summer school. She will teach at Trail this winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Ash spent Sunday at home at Trail. Mr. Ash is working on the Union Creek road.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson took lunch with Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart in honor of their fifth wedding anniversary.
    The dance at Trail Saturday night was very well attended.
    Fred and Denzel Middlebusher spent Sunday with their sister Enid Middlebusher.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Clary and Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Hale spent Saturday and Sunday up the Rogue River stopping on their way home to visit with Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after I had written for the Mail Tribune readers, among the business callers was Nick Young, Herman Meyer, John Lester, O. E. Frey and his brother J. W. Frey, the two last named of Lake Creek, and took supper here, and so did John Lester.
    Sunday morning we had a very interesting session of our Sunday school, although the teacher of the intermediate class and his wife, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, were absent.
    There was a vast number of autos passed through here Sunday morning and later in the week Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of Dead Indian Soda Springs, and her daughter-in-law Mrs. Clyde Plymire, of Portland, called and reported that there were 150 names registered at the Dead Indian Soda Springs that day and besides that there were a large number scattered along the banks of our little Butte Creek and Rogue River besides a host of sightseers went to Prospect and Crater Lake, and still we had here for dinner Mr. and Mrs. Wilson Clay, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Rawley, Galva, Illinois, J. S. K. James and wife, Miss Lizzie Ranter, Miss Mollie Britt and Mr. E. Britt of Jacksonville, Carl Jackson of Butte Falls, C. H. Natwick and Harold Van Scoy from Union Creek, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cunningham and son William of Medford, and Miss Roxie Helen of Sacramento, Mr. and Mrs. Alenderfer of Medford, C. J. Rickert, Joe Clements, transients, and J. D. Welch of Portland, Coast Livestock Company, who were passing through with a band of sheep taking them to Ben Brophy's to pasture, Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Shady and son, jeweler in the Martin Reddy shop in Medford, Miss Lillian Noben and Everett Nash, Medford. Quite a number of those who were here for dinner remained the most of the afternoon enjoying the cool veranda. Later in the day James Juland, Portland, came in and remained overnight, also Captain A. J. Vance and wife, Ralph Hayman, Rock Point, Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Merriman and son Francis of Medford, Miss Margaret Mansfield and Miss Edith Creede of Medford.
    Monday morning Sam Coy and Thos. Cingcade were among the early callers and Sam Coy tells me that he has leased his mother's farm for five years and expects to move onto it this coming fall.
    A. J. Anderson, wife and son of Medford and his son-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, Jr., passed through here Monday morning on their way to Union Creek for a two weeks' outing.
    Pete Young and his sister, Miss Clara, were here on business Monday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Hubbs of Medford, and Miss Saben Frazier of Oskaloosa, Iowa, were callers Monday afternoon on their way to Crater Lake.
    Monday morning I took passage on the Butte Falls stage for the F. J. Ayres farm to see some of the Jackson County road machinery work on that sticky road on Reese Creek, but when I reached the place where I expected to find them working with the big Caterpillar I found that they had to lay off and the men were engaged opening up a rock cut, so did not see the machine work but had a fine visit with Mrs. Ayres, as Mr. Ayres had gone to Medford with a load of hogs but he returned by noon. Jumping into an auto stage that is used to haul the men to and from their work, I rode out to where the men are working with the plow and fresnos. I remained until the stage returned. In the meantime I noticed what the men were doing under the direction of our road supervisor, Mr. Hayes, and he is doing a fine job and if our county court can manage to get the rock crusher up there in time to cover it with crushed rock before it gets wet the work will prove a great benefit, but if they fail to rock it this fall the work will be of little use as when it gets wet and is used as a road it will be of but little use as it will be flattened out as bad as ever, but we hope for the best.
    Frank Johnson, who owns a farm where it is contemplated to put the Crater Lake Highway bridge across Rogue River at the mouth of Indian Creek, and family passed through here Tuesday morning on their way to Medford.
    Wm. Smith, formerly of this place but more recently living between Central Point and Medford, was here. He has sold his place on the Central Point road and bought property in Ashland and Medford both. He expects to make his home in Medford. He has been visiting his daughter, Mrs. Gus Nichols, on Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, as he does not get possession until about the 10th of the Medford property.
    J. W. Prillaman, his mother and sister, Miss E. Prillaman, are here visiting his son-in-law and family, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart McKissick, the civil engineer who has charge of the survey and locating the water ditch from Big Butte to this neighborhood. Their grandmother, Mrs. Catherine Prillaman, is now in her 79th year of age. Mr. and Mrs. Frank Walker, one of the Ashland civil engineers, and children, W. E. Hammel and wife were visiting Mr. and Mrs. McKissick, taking lunch (dinner) with them and my informant reports that they had a very nice time as Mr. and Mrs. McKissick know just how to entertain company so as to have everything pass off pleasantly.
    D. S. Simpson of Central Point was a business caller and diner Tuesday, and so was John Hoskins of Trail and E. V. Peterson, the sub mail contractor of Trail.
    Henry Tonn and family of Lake Creek were in town Tuesday and while here in his auto at Geo. Brown & Sons' store, our shoe man, Mr. Clappell, not noticing that the car was behind him, backed his truck into the front of Mr. Tonn's Ford, breaking one light and mashing a shield but hurting no one.
    One of the Brittsan boys came in Tuesday to visit the two brothers who are on the P. S. Anderson farm.
    T. F. Nichols, wife and half-sister Ruth Smith was in town Tuesday.
    Mrs. Slusser, who has been visiting in Ashland, returned home Tuesday.
    Robert Harnish and his father-in-law and family, Mr. and Mrs. Nickel, returned home from Fort Klamath Sunday night.
----
    Gus Ditsworth of Peyton was a business caller Wednesday.
    Dr. W. S. Holt was here Wednesday with his son, Dr. W. W. P. Holt, our local M.D. Dr. W. S. Holt was formerly a missionary to China in the interest of the Presbyterian board of missions, but since then has resided in Portland but now is assistant secretary of the board of ministerial relief and sustentation of the Presbyterian Church of Philadelphia. Dr. Holt lived in Portland prior to 1913, then he was elected to his present position. He has come back to Portland in the interest of the board and expects to remain until about December. He has traveled through almost every state in the union. He only remained long enough with his son to take dinner at the Sunnyside with him and went on to Portland Wednesday night.
    George W. Neilson and Vernon Edwards, a civil engineer in the service of the S.P.&S.R.R. of Portland, stopped off Wednesday to get dinner as they wanted [waited?] to make their regular trip for that day. Mr. Neilson is the superintendent, manager and conductor of the P.&E. and is one of those hustlers who keep things moving.
    Dave Phipps and his brother Henry Phipps of Richmond, Virginia, were also here for dinner. Dave said that he had taken a contract to make a quantity of irrigation ditches for Mike Hanley on his north fork ranch and was on his way up there with a load of the necessary outfit for the job.
    Frank Lewis brought in five passengers Wednesday afternoon and among them were Herman Meyer, Sr. and his little granddaughter of Lake Creek.
    Corbin Edgell and Fred C. Bell, recently of Chicago, were here for supper also Wednesday and in inquiring as to their business--as a newspaper correspondent I have acquired the habit of asking questions, natural result of that business--and learned that Mr. Bell had very recently bought the Corbin orchard. I also learned from Mr. Edgell that the prospect for fruit was good this season.
    Sam H. Harnish and George Gehman started Thursday for the Cinnabar Springs in California. They are both afflicted somewhat and have gone there for their health, intending to camp out and have a good time.
    Mrs. Dee Bradshaw and her daughter were here Thursday.
    H. H. Williams, salesman for Hubbard Bros., Medford, was here Thursday for dinner and so was Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Burke of Ashland. Ed Spencer of Union Creek was also here.
    Dr. Holt, our M.D., reports that the stork visited the home of H. W. Wade and the result is they have a seven-pound girl in the family. Mr. Wade is the foreman on the Tronson orchard.
    Cliff Hickson is employed as driver of the truck for our shoe cobbler, W. S. Chappell, and is engaged hauling wood for different parties in our town. He has taken a room and board at the Sunnyside.
    J. F. Maxfield, Mrs. Bert Clarno, Harvey Stanley and wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. John Rader, George von der Hellen, Walter Marshall and wife, Shorty Allen of Wellen, Gus Nichols and wife and her daughter Myrtle Smith were all here on business Thursday.
    Al Young of Sheridan, Wyo., came in Thursday evening and spent the night. He is traveling alone seeing the wonders of the Pacific Coast. He left here Friday morning for Crater Lake. He is taking his time and stopping along the route; he says that he wants to see all that there is to be seen as he passes through the country.
    Miss Ella Belford, who has charge of the Stewart farm, was a business caller Friday morning.
    Thomas Ward, who formerly had charge of the King brothers place on Big Butte but now is located about four miles from Medford, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Friday morning and so was Peter Simpson of Trail and S. D. Hill and his daughter, Mrs. James McCord and daughter of Napa City, Calif., on their way to Derby to visit his son Frank Hill and family.
    Alex Vestal and F. Davis, one of our agate men who is in the employ of the Agate Products Co., San Francisco, and Levi Murphy of Medford, were among the diners at the Sunnyside Friday noon. Mr. Davis is a civil engineer and agate expert who was here some months ago in the employ of the same company. He is located at this time in the Lake Creek section looking for agates.
    Later in the day Mr. and Mrs. V. F. Stater of Portland, and Miss Grace B. Dye of Medford, called for supper. They were on their way to visit Crater Lake and intending to go as far as Prospect that evening.
    Gus Ditsworth and wife of Peyton drove in from home this Saturday morning to the Sunnyside for breakfast. They were on their way to Medford, and wanted to reach there early, attend to their business and return home tonight.
    This morning I met J. M. Hayman, who has charge of the J. H. Cooley orchard and reports that this is the first day he has had time to lay off since he took charge of the place in May, working seven days in the week, but said that today he procured the services of a man to care for the irrigating so he was going to Medford on the Lewis jitney this morning to receive orders for the future, as next week he will have the irrigation to look after, alfalfa to cut and care for and care for the pears. He doesn't have much to do, does he?
    Charles M. Gilmore and M. H. Nichols of the Western Electric Company, Portland, were here for dinner today.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 9, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. James Stewart, son of Oscar Stewart, left Saturday for Richfield, Utah, where he has been appointed as ranger. He has been spending the summer with his folks on the Rogue River ranch.
    The fishing at the U.S. fisheries above Trail has been exceptionally fine this year. There have been visitors every day to see the unusual numbers of fish.
    A large touring car headed for Medford got stuck in the mud (due to subirrigation) Sunday evening. They worked until one o'clock Monday morning and finally spent the remainder of the night at the hotel. They were rescued Monday morning. Mr. S. W. Hutchinson, owner of the ranch, has been trying to have the roads fixed, but so far nothing has been done.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart and Will Stewart spent Sunday and Monday in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 11, 1920, page 6


WORK ON CRATER LAKE-TRAIL ROAD TO BEGIN SOON
    It begins to look like business in the matter of the proposed improved Crater Lake road between Medford and Trail, which improvement will be shared jointly by the post roads department of the government and the state and county. The estimated cost of the grading and macadamizing is over $500,000, the government to contribute 50 percent and the state and county 25 percent each. Work will be begun just as soon as the route is chosen.
    C. L. McKesson of Portland, government engineer, C. C. Kelley and C. B. McCullough of Salem, assistant state highway engineer and state bridge engineer respectively, spent Monday and today with Kenneth Hodgman, the state highway district engineer in inspecting the two routes, the one by way of Eagle Point and the other by way of the Rogue River. The decision is expected to be made soon and the improvement work may be begun by fall. The county court favors the Eagle Point road.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 17, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday Dr. F. G. Thayer of Medford took dinner with Dr. W. W. P. Holt at the Sunnyside. They were on their way up to the Lake Creek country on professional business.
    H. H. Williams, salesman for Hubbard Bros., Medford, was also a diner at the Sunnyside and so was F. W. Metcalf, representative of R. L. Polk & Co., publishers of directories, Portland.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. J. Matherson of Chicago came in Wednesday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside. They were on a trip visiting all of the national parks in the country and had a little break in their car, so were detained a short time here. They had spent several days in the Yellowstone park and were on their way to Crater Lake park when they broke down. While here they related some amusing incidents that had happened along the route and especially in Yellowstone park. In speaking of the various animals to be seen there he related one incident where a large bear was looking around among the camps and discovered a can of honey and was helping himself. When the owner of the car discovered the bruin he waged war on him with a frying pan, driving him away, but having already had a taste of the honey he became very persistent in his search for more so made a raid on a tent nearby where the family was eating dinner and the result was the family retreated, leaving the preserves for the bruin, with the result that from that day on they were without preserves until they could procure another supply. They report that the different animals in the park are so tame that they pay no attention to the approach of a man. Perhaps every reader of the Eaglets does not know that the carrying of firearms is strictly forbidden in all of the national parks over the country.
    They were on their way to Crater Lake and were going from there to see the big trees in the Yosemite park and from there on to San Diego, California, and then to the Grand Canyon in Arizona, expecting to reach their home in Chicago about Nov. 1st. He is the proprietor of a large printing establishment in Chicago. They have fallen greatly in love with our country and think that Southern Oregon is one of the lovely spots of the West.
    W. S. Baker and Fred Dunlap of Derby motored through our town Thursday morning on their way to Medford.
    T. F. McCabe, one of our prosperous farmers and orchardists, was doing business here Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Charles Henstromb and son, and George Givan and son Charles were among the callers Thursday.
    Frank Swingle and family of Ashland were here the guests of Mr. and Mrs. McAllister, recently from Ashland, the past few days.
    Thursday evening a man came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside giving his name as Jonas and claimed to be a traveling evangelist and said that he was just traveling through the country preaching in the school houses, where the directors would permit it. When I inquired with regard to his church relation he said that he was raised a Roman Catholic and had left them and was exposing the ways of that church, that he did not affiliate with any church and was not ordained or licensed to preach by any body or church. That he had but very little money but never took up a collection. I suggested to him that there was a great demand for laborers and that he might go to work and get money to pay his expenses. He went from here to Brownsboro Friday.
    Our cobbler, W. S. Chappell, has been over on Applegate for the past few days interested in mining.
    Fred Luy of Wellen was a business caller Friday.
    When the Butte Falls stage came in Friday morning, Grandma Parker of Butte Falls and her daughter, Mrs. H. Heriford of Rancheria Prairie, Mr. E. D. Hill of Napa City, Mr. O'Brian of Butte Falls were passengers.
    An effort was made about a year ago by J. D. Singleton to have a rural route established so as to take in the settlement along the edge of the desert and I understand that Mrs. M. L. Pruett and John and Carl Esch have finally succeeded in having their names placed on the route that has been used from Medford out to that neighborhood.
    E. E. Barnes of Burns, Oregon, and family were here for dinner Friday. They have sold out their farms and stock in that section and bought a farm near La Center, Wash., and were on their way to their new home. They left here in the evening to go to Central Point to visit with Mrs. Barnes' mother, Mrs. Ann Thomas of Central Point.
    Herman Meyer, Sr., and wife of Lake Creek were doing business here Friday.
    Frank Johnson, wife and daughter Miss Hattie were patronizing our merchants Friday.
    Joseph Geppert, the road supervisor of the Butte Falls district, came out from Medford on the stage Friday evening, took supper at the Sunnyside and then went and spent the night with his daughter, Mrs. Graydon Childreth, going home on the stage this Saturday morning.
    Robert R. Minter was a business caller this morning having his team shod.
    Notwithstanding the excessive hot weather that we are having now, 106 to 110, the farmers and orchardists are so busy that scarcely anyone takes time to come to town and when they do they come in on a run and go back home to cool off. Today we had a few come in for dinner and among them was Horace Geppert and Everett Abbott, Alex Vestal, J. E. Sumner, F. H. Ross and E. V. Peterson, the mail carrier from here to Persist. The three last named were from the Trail and Elk Creek country.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 16, 1920, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the business callers Saturday afternoon after I had written my letter for the Medford Mail Tribune was Mr. Carl Berryman, Ed Cowden, Mrs. M. L. Pruett and Mrs. Carl Esch, and Andrew Pool of Trail. One of the Forest Service men was at the Sunnyside Friday night, but failed to register, so I omitted to mention it in my former letter.
    Saturday evening Miss Marguerite Mansfield and Miss Thebua Nettles called for late supper while on their way to the Mansfield home on the Crater Lake Highway.
    George Holmes and Thomas Anderson were also guests at the Sunnyside for supper. Mr. Holmes is a member of the firm of Holmes & McDonald of the Eagle Point garage.
    Notwithstanding the fact that there was 160 people at the Dead Indian Soda Springs on Sunday, August 8 and an immense crowd at Prospect and Crater Lake, and the McAllister Soda Springs, we had among us at noon that day the following named persons: Mrs. C. V. Stabby and Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Clark of Ashland; Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Williams, Master Vernon Williams, Walter and Donald Williams and Miss Lacy May Williams of Central Point, and Dick Bessa, formerly of Central Point, but now out near Klamath Falls; Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Gustine (Gus the Tailor and wife) of Medford; Thomas Lowry of Climax; Wm. von der Hellen and wife, Mrs. J. F. Brown, Mrs. Fred McPherson, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Graydon Childreth, Lynn W. Smith, Gold Hill, Earl Crossman, Carlyle Natwick, Mr. and Mrs. B. J. Palmer, piano man of Medford, Esther and Eleanor Palmer; Mrs. Isaac of Red Bluff, Cal.; G. C. Wing, Eureka Cal.; and later in the day D. R. Patrick, who has taken carpenter work for Mr. Mittelstaedt; W. C. Vance, Miss Allie Caten, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Vance, Lynn Wilson, H. C. Scousen, Charlotte Widell and M. M. Widell of Medford.
    Sunday afternoon we had one of those terrific thunder storms in the hills beyond here that was accompanied by hailstones as large as nutmeg that did considerable damage to the fruit, corn and gardens. Mr. F. G. Ayres was here Monday morning and reported that it had almost completely stripped his fruit trees of pears and apples beside almost ruining his garden. He reports that it was the worst storm he had ever witnessed in his life. It rained as well as hailed over an extent of several miles including the Dead Indian country and from there on north and west for several miles. Our townsman, W. L. Childreth, and family were among the visitors to the Dead Indian Soda Springs and had the full benefit of the storm although it did not hail anywhere he was, but rained and made the roads so slippery that it was difficult for him to travel. The next morning, Monday, Thomas Merriman, Nellie, Francis and Merle Merriman, came in from the McAllister Soda Spring and called for breakfast. They went up to the springs Saturday, intending to return to Medford Sunday night, but the storm made the road so slippery that they thought it best to remain until morning, but they reported they had neither supper or breakfast and were blessed with a fine appetite, but when they left the Sunnyside they were refreshed and ready for another move.
    Among the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday morning were William Heckathorn of Trail, W. M. Lewis of Flounce Rock ranch and Mr. E. S. Florey. Mr. Florey went out in the country a short distance, returning in the evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    George W. Daley, Jr., and wife of Scotts Valley, California, were in town last Monday. They were here visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Daley. Mr. Daley is engaged in making flour, etc., in Scotts Valley.
    Pete Barneburg and wife and Wm. Gregory and wife passed through here Monday on their way to Union Creek for a two weeks' outing.
    Mrs. Merritt and daughter of Reese Creek were in town and Marsh Garrett and wife of Lake Creek passed through here Monday on their way to their stock ranch in the Dead Indian country.
    Our sheriff, Charles Terrill, and Oliver Adams of Butte Falls were among the diners Monday and so was Clarence Martin, Carl Nelson and Bud Fristo, these young men who were on their way to Crater Lake with six horses to work. Mr. E. N. Warmoth from the Motor Sales Co., Medford, and B. A. Daws of the McCracken Motor Co., Medford and Frank Thompson and wife of Central Point, Walter Kaiser and H. W. Conger of Medford and O. R. Campbell were also diners Monday. Mr. Conger is now in the undertaking business with Mr. Orr.
    Rev. John W. Hoyt, representative of the Sunday school interests of the Presbyterian Church, and Rev. J. W. McVeigh of Rogue River passed through here Monday afternoon on their way home. They had been out to Crater Lake and held services in the Crater Lake hotel. They report that this is the third annual service that Mr. Hoyt has held at the lake and that they had about seventy-five listeners.
    Georg W. Warner of Cedarville and J. E. Warner of Hilt and his little girl stopped here Monday night on their way to the Big Marsh, Klamath County.
    Lyle Van Scoy, son of Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, who has been living with his uncle, William Holmes, since the high school closed in Medford, came out on the stage Monday to visit his mother.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. E. Tillston of Ashland spent Monday night at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. A. C. Koppes, Miss Josephine Koppes, Mrs. H. C. Richling and Mrs. F. L. Sherman of Medford were here Tuesday for dinner and so was Wm. Marx of the Portland Music Co., and E. S. Redpath of Medford.
    Dr. W. W. Holt, our M.D., reported Tuesday that Mrs. S. J. Hessler, an elderly lady living in Brownsboro had fallen and broken her arm above the elbow about a year ago, and now has met with a similar accident with the other arm. It seems as though she is having her share of trouble.
    Mr. Bennett Gardner, who lives on the headwater of Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, was doing business with our merchants Tuesday.
    Mrs. Clyde Plymire, who has been up to the Dead Indian Soda Springs with her mother, Mrs. Charles Wilkinson, came out Tuesday and spent a short time at the Sunnyside.
    Fred C. Bell, the man who bought the A. Corbin orchard, was here for supper Tuesday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Cummings, who have been in Oakland, California since last season, returned to their home in Eagle Point a few days ago, but expect to spend some time in Central Point.
    Mrs. Walter Meyer and three grandchildren came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage this Wednesday morning from near Phoenix, where she has been visiting her sister.
    Miss Ruth Henry of Phoenix also came out and went up to Brownsboro to visit her sister.
    George Holmes, member of the firm of Holmes & McDonald, garage men, went to Butte Falls on the stage today.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 16, 1920, page 6


BUTTE FALLS IS FULL OF RUMORS ON P.&E. SALE
    BUTTE FALLS, Aug. 19.--The citizens of Butte Falls are anxiously waiting for the 24th of the month to roll along, as we hear so many rumors flying over that there are several prospective buyers of the P.&E. and are wondering if there is a breath of truth in any of it.
    Mrs. Carl Cobleigh is stopping in town this week while Mr. Cobleigh is delivering wood at the depot.
    Mrs. Mary Heriford arrived home Friday, after closing up her business in California. She is a sister to Mrs. Ella Smith and W. E. Parker, having moved her household good here earlier in the season and is located in the Dr. Goss house.
    The large fire on Buck Creek is still running at large and this afternoon several other fires were reported giving some trouble, and men are very scarce around here. Some have been sent up from Medford already.
    The hot weather the past four days has been going from 98 to 103, but today, Monday, is some cooler.
    The Barker and Heriford families are in the mountains camping this week. The huckleberries won't be ripe until about the first of September.
    J. Doubleday sold his timber claim above the falls last week to the Olds company.
    Al Hildreth came in on the stage Tuesday from Central Point, where he has been helping his parents pack up, they having sold their property there and are contemplating moving to California.
    Essie Whaley visited home folks over Sunday, returning to Medford Monday where she is working.
    W. S. Kee came up Saturday from Ashland with a load of goods for the store.
    Those who attended the Eagle Point dance Saturday were Bill Welch, Everett Abbott, Hilda Abbott and Hildred Smith. Most all of the men and boys are out on the fires at present, which are all under control at this date.
    What a glorious cool climate we have up here, anyway, the last few days. There was a slight frost Tuesday evening.
    Sam and Luther Hughes with Pat O'Brian are enjoying a camping vacation this week at Blue Canyon.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Marsh Garrett and wife were among the business callers Saturday on their way home to their Lake Creek ranch. They had been out to their stock ranch on Dead Indian Creek and were just returning.
    Benjamin Brophy, wife and her sister, Mrs. Fred McPherson, were also business callers the same afternoon on their way from a business trip to Medford.
    Saturday evening Miss Marguerite Mansfield and Miss Caroline Greaves of Medford called for supper on their way to the Mansfield farm on the Crater Lake Highway.
    Later in the evening Mr. D. M. Holdman and son, Lee Farlow and wife and Mrs. Don Tyrrell called for supper on their way to Medford to see the show. They live about 12 or 15 miles above here in the Lake Creek country and after taking in the show returned home. The advantage of owning a car.
    Mrs. James Finley of Grants Pass also called and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Sunday morning bid fair to be one of the hottest days of the season and some of our citizens went to the different places in the hills. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, and Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, our bankers.
    There was [not] the usual number of people passed through here Sunday morning or came to the Sunnyside for dinner, but among those who came here was Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Vaupel of Ashland, on their way to Crater Lake, although they only expected to go as far as Prospect that day; Gus the Tailor and wife were also on hand for dinner; Wm. von der Hellen, wife and son Hugh, and daughter Joyce; Mrs. Fred McPherson, Florence Milligan, Jake Milligan, Medford; Nora Porter, Mrs. Charles L. McWilliams, Klamath Falls, S. A. Sanders of Wellen and his brother, H. E. Sanders of Nashville, Tenn., who is out here visiting, and looking over the country with a view to locating here; R. M. Cowley and his brother, J. M. Cowley, of Butte Falls. These two and A. J. Florey, Jr. and wife spent the night and Mr. and Mrs. E. G. High and Mr. and Mrs. Cecil B. Norton of Ashland called and spent the evening.
    Mr. Monia Jr., of Brownsboro was in town getting the nails to build a barn on his father's farm.
    Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson of Trail was a passenger on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday on her way home.
    Last Monday morning while Mrs. Wesley Butler, who has a baby about three weeks old, was out on the bank of Butte Creek washing out some clothes and her little brother was sitting in a wheelbarrow holding the baby, by some means the wheelbarrow turned over spilling both into the water, but fortunately the mother was close enough so that she caught the baby before it washed away, and the boy crawled out. Although the baby was so young, no damage was done, though Dr. Holt was called and after making an examination decided that there was not a serious result, although it was a close call for the baby.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Morgan and children of Trail came out the first of the week to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Morgan, and Mrs. Morgan's sister, Mrs. Anna Stevenson from Mitchell, Wheeler County, Oregon, who is here visiting.
    Last Monday G. S. McKesson of Portland, G. G. Kelly, Salem, C. B. McCullough, Salem, and K. E. Hodgman, Medford, the first three named being, as I understand, the three U.S. road commission, were out here looking over the prospective Crater Lake Highway. They all took dinner at the Sunnyside. They gave out nothing more than that they were looking over the route for the road.
    Mrs. Fred McPherson and son, Fred, Jr., started for their home in Portland Monday.
    Mrs. Thomas Harrocks and daughter, Miss Gladys of Portland, came up Monday to visit her sister, Mrs. R. A. Weidman, who is the business manager in the store.
    James Owens, county commissioner, was among us Monday.
    C. P. Combest and two sons of Applegate spent Monday night at the Sunnyside on their way to Butte Falls, where Mr. Combest has a contract for getting out some logs for a mill in Medford.
    Verna Mathews was in town Monday and left with me a check for $1.50 to pay a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Cecil B. Norton and Edward G. Hyde of Ashland came in Monday evening and have been here since. They are selling the Columbia Six car, headquarters Ashland, Ore.
    Tuesday Mr. and Mrs. Goodman of Coos Bay were guests at the Sunnyside on their way from Crater Lake. They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. C. C. Darby of Medford.
    Irwin S. Watson, state agent for the Phoenix Insurance Co. of Hartford and H. E. Campbell of the First State Bank, Eagle Point, were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Fred C. Bell and Carl von der Hellen took supper at the Sunnyside Tuesday evening.
    Tuesday afternoon Mrs. Howlett, our daughter Hattie and I took a ride out to Jimmie Dugan's farm, and although the ground is cut over on the farms along the route, the shocks of hay and the stubble still standing and the stacks of straw clearly show the productiveness of the soil, and the fruit trees loaded to the breaking point show the quantity and quality of the fruit that our soil produces. We did not find Mr. Dugan at home. He is too busy to stay indoors, but we found Mrs. Dugan at home and I really enjoyed my visit hearing Mrs. Howlett and Hattie and Mrs. Dugan, and occasionally some one of the children, talk and visit.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of the big orchardists, and Mr. J. L. Hovey, foreman on the Altavista orchard, were in town this Wednesday morning and to hear them tell the havoc the wind and hail and rain done with the apples and pears was enough to make a man of less nerve shudder, but they did not seem to take it to heart at all. Only a few thousand boxes of apples and pears knocked off and the trees badly bruised, as a matter of no consequence.
    Harvey Stanley and wife passed through here this morning on their way to Rancheria Prairie. They had their saddles along and intended to procure horses and go to the huckleberry patch before they came back.
    Today we had among the diners Mrs. J. D. Hoag of Ashland and Mr. Hutchinson, the man who bought the Johnson place near the mouth of Elk Creek. Mrs. Hoag has been up there visiting for a few days. Mr. G. F. Wilson of Derby, who has a homestead on the P.&E. railroad track, was doing business in our town Wednesday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Mr. R. M. Conley and Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Brooks of Ashland.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 20, 1920, page 6


SWISS AMBASSADOR TO UNITED STATES VISITS ROGUE ELK
    ELK CREEK, Aug. 20.--Mr. W. Kortenaum, Swiss ambassador to the U.S., accompanied by his physician, Dr. R. Schoepfer, and chauffeur were weekend guests at the Rogue Elk; also the La Pearl opera company, who are on the Orpheum circuit.
    Mr. and Mrs. T. K. Burnham of Martinez, Cal., are again registered at the Rogue Elk Hotel for the remainder of the season.
    Mr. Van Heffner, superintendent of Rogue River Fisheries, motored to Medford to meet Mr. H. Mitchell, head of the state fisheries.
    Mrs. J. E. McDonald was in Medford for two days shopping.
    Mrs. Eugene Howell, who has been visiting her people near Portland, is expected home tomorrow.
    Mr. D. G. C. McNeil, British consul to Mexico, his wife and daughter, are staying at the Rogue Elk for a few weeks.
    Dr. C. C. Van Scoyoc and family, who have been spending their vacation at their summer home here, returned to Medford to care for their fruit.
    Many people from Medford and surrounding country are enjoying the splendid swimming pool in Elk Creek.
    U.S. Senator Chamberlain, Mr. R. Watson of the Portland Journal, and D. C. McPherson, all of Portland, sojourned at the hotel.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. E. McDonald entertained Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Eads of Medford for lunch Wednesday.
    Mr. Sandoz, of the upper Elk, drove to Medford on business Tuesday.
    W. F. Isaacs and party stopped for breakfast at the Rogue Elk, on their way to Crater Lake.
    The new refreshment pavilion at the hotel is receiving a liberal patronage from thirsty travelers.
    Dave Pence is busy haying.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 20, 1920, page 5






NEW ROGUE ELK RESORT ON UPPER ROGUE RIVER IS POPULAR
    The new Rogue Elk Resort hotel, located on the Crater Lake Highway, at the mouth of Elk Creek and Rogue River, where the best of hunting and fishing can be had. Guides and horses are furnished for hunting parties, fine natural swimming pool. The building is one of the finest in Southern Oregon and represents a large investment. An ideal place to spend vacations. A great feature of the interior is a large landscape art exhibit to be shown perpetually, comprising Oregon's most famous scenery. Two huge fireplaces also adorn the interior, built of native rock. Estimated weight ninety tons. A rare feature is a number of pieces of furniture, also designed by the artist, W. G. McDonald, consisting of heavy oak and Indian-tanned deer hides.
    L. E. McDonald, the manager, is sparing no means in making every comfort possible for the guests and extends a welcome to all en route to Crater Lake to stop and look through. The roads are in good condition and the river road scenic route will take you directly by the new enterprise, which is a credit to the Rogue River Valley.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 31, 1920, page 3


RECEIVER'S SALE PACIFIC-EASTERN HELD TOMORROW
    Much interest is being manifested in the sale of the Pacific & Eastern Railroad at auction at 2 o'clock tomorrow afternoon at the depot under orders from the federal court of this district, by Robert F. Maguire of Portland, who is expected to arrive in the city today.
    According to rumors there will be several bidders for the property. The most prominent probable bidder is M. D. Olds of Sheboygan, Mich., who arrived in Medford on Sunday and is stopping at the Hotel Medford. Mr. Olds and his agents have spent much time here during the past year buying up timber along the route of the Pacific & Eastern. His main representative stated this noon that neither he nor Mr. Olds had anything to say about the big sale Tuesday, which means so much to the future welfare and development of Medford and the towns along the P.&E. railroad.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 23, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Dick Daley of Scotts Valley, Cal., is here visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Daley, and aunt and other relatives.
    Wednesday afternoon your correspondent took a trip out to where Mr. Thrasher and his crew were grading the right of way for the county road over the Reese Creek route. They are following the old route the most of the way but cutting off some of the rocky points so as to straighten out and level up the way. It is astonishing to see the work they are doing with their 125-h.p. Caterpillar and other appliances to correspond. They simply go right through anything they come across that is movable, pulling up and dragging out of the way large trees or stumps and plowing through rocks and dirt the same as one would plow loose alluvial soil. They have four or five teams to use on the fresnos, but the most of the plowing they do with a machine called a pulverizer; it weighs about six tons and is constructed of a very large beam or bar of steel, with a row of spikes about 3½ or four inches square, that are set in such a way that the spikes will naturally go into the ground, and all this is mounted on four wheels and so arranged that they can be put in the ground any depth up to say 18 or 20 inches, and sometimes it will come in contact with large solid rocks where dynamite will have to be used to shatter it, and sometimes will dislodge a rock so large that it will have to be removed before the machine can go on, but there seems to be no limit to the strength of the Caterpillar.
    While I was there they were plowing off a steep rocky point. They have a plow that weighs six hundred pounds and they attach a fifty- or sixty-foot cable to the plow and attach the other end to the Caterpillar, but before it starts another chain or cable is attached to the end of the beam and a heavy team of horses is hitched to the chain about ten or twelve feet from the plow and that keeps the plow from slipping down the hill and the plow goes into the ground a foot or more and simply tears everything loose before it. When they want to take the plow back to the starting place they simply hitch the team to the back end of the plow and drag it back with the cable attached so there is no dragging around by hand and the machine simply backs up and is attached to the plow and in a very short time the work is done and ready for the fresnos.
    The county court has established a rock crusher on the Rogue River on the C. E. Bellows place and will begin to put crushed rock on the road that has been finished, ready for the roller, so we are greatly elated over the prospect of having a road that can be traveled all winter.
    Wednesday afternoon T. P. Coleman and wife of Lake Creek, and mother, Mrs. J. E. Coleman and brother Dr. H. P. Coleman of Portland passed through here on their way from Medford to Mr. Coleman's home. The doctor is looking for a location where he can enter the practice of his profession. Mrs. Coleman, Sr., is very much pleased with our valley and seems to think that Medford is quite an attractive city.
    W. W. Parker of Butte Falls, who has been visiting relatives in and around Sacramento, Cal., and Mr. Barry of Brownsboro came in Monday morning on the stage and went on home.
    Mrs. M. L. Pruett of Eagle Point and Mrs. Anna Cole and son Kenneth of Roseville, Cal., called at the Sunnyside for a short visit Monday. Mr. Cole was formerly an engineer on the P.&E.R.R. here but when the change in business took place he entered the service of the Southern Pacific Company.
    We have been favored during the past week with automobile agents from Monday night to Friday morning. We had Mr. Norton and Mr. High of Ashland and while they were here they sold two Columbia Six autos and a Maibohm, and Thursday H. H. Noel of the Treichler Motor Company of Medford, sold a (I think) Dodge, and at the same time we had Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Lange of the Motor Sales Co. of Medford.
    Mrs. Martha McCord of Napa City was here Thursday. She and her sister, Mrs. Owen of Walla Walla, are visiting their brother, Frank Hill of Derby.
    Mrs. E. S. Raymond and two sons of Crescent City, Calif., came in Thursday from Crater Lake for dinner on their way home.
    Among the business callers Friday were Ray Parker and Ira Tungate of Butte Falls, Jeff Conover and daughter of Trail, John W. Smith of Medford, J. E. Moran of Medford, T. G. Bushong, meter reader, in place of A. S. Bliton, for the California-Oregon Power Company, Amy Brown, of Eagle Point, Bert Higinbotham of Flounce Rock, Prospect P.O., L. O. Dragg of Evanston, Ill., were here for dinner and for supper Geo. Cantrall, R. M. Conley, Butte Falls, Mrs. Dora Plymire, Portland, Marion Plymire, Medford, and Dorothy J. Anest of Roundup, Mont. They had been out to Crater Lake and returned in time for supper.
    Among the callers Saturday morning were A. C. Spence, our Brownsboro road supervisor, and son and Mrs. Spence's brother, W. E. Spence of Orland, Calif., who is here visiting his brother.
    There were eight passengers on the stage Saturday morning for Butte Falls. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth, Sr., of Ashland.
    Miss Kershaw of Climax, who is interested with her brother, James Kershaw, in the mail contract between here and Climax, came in this morning in a one-horse buggy.
    Word came this morning that Sadie Mathews had died in the hospital in Medford last night of appendicitis, aged nine years. She is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Green Mathews, who live about four miles from here on the French-Dodge bridge road to Trail.
    D. R. Patrick, who has been remodeling the house Mr. Mittelstaedt bought, has got through with his job, for a while, bought him a Maibohm car and went out to his ranch today.
    Cecil Culbertson of Lake Creek and Ralph Bieberstedt were business callers this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 24, 1920, page 5


SIX BILLION FEET OF PINE AND FIR TAPPED BY P.&E.
    Now that the Pacific & Eastern Railroad has been sold all the Medford and Jackson County public is wondering what the new owner's plans are in connection with the operation of the road, and when he will start it. But M. D. Olds won't talk.
    However the fact he has for the past year or more been busy buying up timber holdings and leases in the territory contiguous to the road, and the fact that at least one new large mill is in contemplation for Medford, leads to the general belief that he will operate the road partly in connection with this contemplated project.
    Another patent fact to the well informed is that there are six billion feet of the best timber in Oregon, 60 percent fir and 40 percent pine, in the country east of Medford, mostly in the Butte Falls section, which would be tapped by the operation of the Pacific & Eastern.
    While there have been and are many rumors in connection with Mr. Olds and his ownership of the road, some of which, if true, would have a stupendous bearing on the future welfare and development of Medford and the valley, nothing will be known until the Michigan lumber man's plans are perfected. The fact that Mr. Olds refuses to rush into print is taken by many as a good sign showing that he is not the type of hot air promoter which led the people of Medford to entertain false hopes so often in the past.
    As it is now the people of Medford, Eagle Point, Butte Falls and the general residents along the P.&E. line are happy that Mr. Olds has bought the road and the strong probability that he will put it in operation within the next year.
    But about the sale yesterday. Notwithstanding the rumors that there would be several probable bidders and the fact that until a few hours before the auction the Miller Grier Construction Company of Portland contemplated bidding and had their first payment check of $15,000 deposited, the Pacific & Eastern went under the hammer to M. D. Olds, who was the only bidder for $190,600, of which $15,000 was to be paid at once and the balance in 60 days.
    The sale was conducted by Attorney Robert F. Maguire of Portland, special master for the United States court in conducting this transaction, before a crowd of about 100, and Mr. Olds' bid was just the exact amount set by the court as the minimum price which would be accepted at the sale.
    The Pacific & Eastern had an estimated scrap value of $438,000, according to W. E. Turner, its receiver, who is vice president of the Spokane, Portland & Seattle Railroad Co. and System Lines, who after the sale before departing for Portland last night with C. H. Hart, attorney for the receiver, said that the Hill railroad interests favored the sale at auction at the minimum price set by the court, rather than to see the railroad torn up and scrapped.
    The rolling stock of the P.&E. went with the sale, consisting of two engines, two passenger cars, one box car and six flat cars. The road also had been using for years six S.P.&S. railroad cars which will probably be taken over by the new owner.
    The Miller Grier Construction Company's failing to enter a bid at the sale yesterday is a mystery, as during the forenoon G. M. McDowell, its secretary and treasurer, while in the Mail Tribune office with Receiver Turner stated that it would try and purchase the road, and that if it was successful at the sale the company would see that it was operated in the interests of development of the great timber territory east of Medford.
    The Pacific & Eastern was built in 1909-1910 by John F. Stevens, the famous engineer, now in Siberia, and was then intended to complete the link of the Hill system between Bend and California.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 25, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mrs. Hoag, who has been visiting at the Bar Eight ranch, returned home Wednesday.
    Mr. S. W. Hutchinson made a business trip to Eagle Point Wednesday and Mr. Weeks and Mr. Hutchinson made another trip to Medford Monday of this week.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher returned home Saturday from a five weeks' visit with her daughter. She returned with Mr. and Mrs. Merriman.
    Mrs. A. F. Beardsley left Monday for home, after a few day's visit with Mrs. Oscar Stewart. Her home is in Salem, Ore.
    Mrs. Will Houston entertained Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson and Keva and Enid Middlebusher and Hazel Pence at dinner Sunday.
    Will and Oscar Stewart and Floyd Hutchinson took a bunch of cattle to the range intending to be gone three days.
    Messrs. F. L. and S. W. Hutchinson made a business trip to Vincent's.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 27, 1920, page 5


ELK CREEK
    Mr. and Mrs. Heffner and family and Mr. and Mrs. Howell spent a very pleasant weekend at Crater Lake.
    Mr. and Mrs. I. Coleman of San Francisco are registered at the Rogue Elk resort for the remainder of the season.
    Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Parkhurst of Crater Lake took breakfast at the hotel on their way to Medford.
    The stages continue to be well loaded with passengers for the lake.
    Mrs. McNeil, wife of the British consul in Mexico, her daughter, Dorothy, Mrs. T. K. Burnham, and Mrs. T. Coleman, who are all guests at the Rogue Elk, motored to Medford Tuesday for shopping and the theater.
    Employees of the fish hatchery are busy with the annual salmon catch.
    Mr. C. Chancey of Portland, one of the managers of the state fair, accompanied by a party of friends, are stopping for a few days at the Rogue Elk. Mr. Chancey is looking after exhibits for the fair.
    Mr. T. B. McDonald went to Medford on business Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 27, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon Herb Carlton drove in from the Carlton ranch on business.
    Saturday afternoon our banker and wife, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell, Mrs. Amy Brown, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and family, A. J. Florey, Jr., and wife, started for the huckleberry mountain and part of them returned Sunday evening. Some of the party went to within three miles of the berry patch and one of the party reported that the fifteen of them all together gathered but a few gallons. Between the bears, Indians and pale-faced pickers is quite a contest as to who can get the most berries, but they have the fun of climbing the steep hills and enjoying the fragrant air in the high mountains.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her children and Mrs. von der Hellen's brother, A. J. Florey, and wife expect to remain in the neighborhood for some time, probably until school commences in Medford.
    Our school in Eagle Point will be opened on Tuesday, September 8.
    The printer in my letter of the 18th inst. had me say "that the attendance at the Sunnyside for the Sunday dinner was about as usual" leaving out a "not" changing the meaning altogether, for then was only sixteen here for dinner that day. Last Sunday morning, Mr. and Mrs. Lee Watkins and his son-in-law and family, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Pearson of Medford came out for breakfast on their way to Dead Indian Soda Springs, and at noon we had E. G. High and C. B. Norton of the E. N. Norton Motor Co., Ashland and Robert Norton also of Ashland, Gus the Tailor and wife and J. W. Rorick and wife who has recently bought an interest in the business with Gus, and Mr. Howard Lanman, a representative of Ed V. Price & Co., Chicago, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Noonan, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Gates, Miss Laura Gates and Mr. J. E. Kerr of Medford, John M. Allen and wife and daughter, Miss Alta Allen, Evelyn Swihart,, and Walter Allen, William Perry and wife and Ray Smith and wife and D. R. Patrick and Gus Nichols and wife of Lake Creek.
    John Foster of Medford came out on the stage, spent the night and returned to Medford Tuesday morning.
    Mr. F. A. Smyley of Nebraska, who is visiting his son and family in Medford, went up to the Dead Indian Soda Springs Sunday and had a mishap with their car, so had to leave it at the garage for repairs, while Mr. Smyley spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ira Tungate of Butte Falls were doing business with our merchants Monday.
    J. H. Heckman, the man appointed to rid the country of rodents and other destructive animals, such as coyotes, wolves, etc., was here Monday. He has been arranging his traps, etc., for the fall and winter run. He did not stop long enough to eat his dinner at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Mr. Davis and son of Ashland were also here. Mr. Davis and son had been up to Dead Indian Soda Springs and had trouble with their car and had to stop at the garage for repairs. They both took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did two young men who were out here reopening the electric light plant, as the current had been shut off since Sunday.
    There was also two young men and two young women or girls came in for dinner Monday. They had been fishing Rogue River and were on their way to Prospect.
    Thomas Farlow and wife of Lake Creek were among the business callers Monday and so were Mr. and Mrs. J. H. French and Rev. Mr. Brittsan, wife and daughter-in-law. They were on their way out to the Brittsan dairy farm. I understand that Rev. Brittsan has a son who has recently come in from the East and that he and the two brothers, who have been tending the farm and dairy, have gone to the hills for an outing.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro passed through town on Monday evening.
    Mr. Thomas Horrock of Portland came in the first of the week to visit his wife's sister and family, Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Wiseman. Mrs. Horrock and little girl were already here and Mr. Horrock came to join them. He will remain a few days and while here will assist Mr. Wiseman in putting up a silo on his dairy farm.
    August Edler and daughter, Mrs. Louisa Betz and daughter-in-law, Mrs. Frances Edler and little girl of Lake Creek came out on the stage Monday afternoon, took supper at the Sunnyside and later were met here by his son with a car and went home that night.
    D. R. Patrick is engaged putting up a silo for Carl von der Hellen at Wellen. He still keeps his room at the Sunnyside, riding to and from his work in his Maibohm auto.
    Ralph Bieberstedt and his sister were here getting some work done on his truck. They were on their way to Butte Falls to deliver some fencing. They had several rolls of wire fencing.
    J. B. Jackson and wife, who sold their ranch to Roy Smith some months ago, and have been traveling throughout Oregon and Washington, returned Monday and are visiting some of their old friends and neighbors. They and Mrs. Roy Smith and Wm. Perry and wife were visitors at the Sunnyside Tuesday and Mr. Bernice Edmondson, one of the Cook brothers, who are in the Forest Service and two young men or boys in their 'teens were also here for dinner Tuesday.
    Carl Stanley of Lake Creek was in town Tuesday and met two ladies who came out on the evening stage, supposed to be his wife's mother and her daughter. They did not stop, but walked right on to a waiting auto and started for his home above Brownsboro.
    Mrs. Benny Edmondson of Butte Falls, who has been visiting relatives in California, returned Tuesday in her own car, with her children.
    Tuesday afternoon J. P. Coleman and wife of Lake Creek and his mother, Mrs. J. E. Coleman and son, Dr. H. P. Coleman of Portland, passed through here on their way to Lake Creek. They had been out to Medford and while there Mrs. J. E. Coleman bought property, as she had fallen greatly in love with the Southern Oregon city and Dr. Coleman has decided to locate in Medford and practice his profession. The whole family seem to be highly pleased with our country, as a short time after his arrival here, J. P. Coleman went up to where he is now living and bought Wm. Hillman out, and now the doctor and his mother have come and purchased their home and no wonder, for they found one of the loveliest spots on the Pacific Coast.
    Among those formerly mentioned as going to the huckleberry mountain was R. G. Brown and wife and his sister, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy. Mr. Brown is a member of the firm of George Brown & Sons, and Mrs. Van Scoy is one of the "hello girls" in the telephone office and post office clerk.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 27, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I mentioned that the Brittsan brothers had gone to the hills for an outing, but before the letter reached the printer, one of the brothers was at the Sunnyside for dinner. They had gone as far as the Evergreen ranch and there found that one of the small cog wheels was broken so had to stop and one of them, E.V.B., returned with a couple who were coming in from Crater Lake, brought the broken part to the Eagle Point garage and all came to the Sunnyside for dinner, but I did not learn their name; it was a man and wife from California.
    B. F. Cummings and wife, who have been in Oakland, Calif., for some time past, came in Wednesday. They expect to remain in Central Point the coming fall and winter.
    Fred Luy, one of the leading citizens of Wellen, was among the diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday noon.
    Lloyd Stanley, who has been in California for some time, has returned to our town.
    Verna Mathews, one of our leading stockmen, and family were in town Wednesday afternoon.
    Nick Young, one of our promising young farmers, was in town Wednesday and took supper at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. W. Hamill and children of Medford came in from Prospect and took dinner on their way home Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Rohrer, James E. Rohrer, Miss Helen Rohrer, Miss Ida Champion and Miss Helen Champion, all of Yreka, Cal., came in from Klamath Falls via Crater Lake Wednesday and spent the night. Like everyone else they speak of the wonderful beauties of the scenery along the route and Crater Lake.
    Frank Ditsworth of Peyton passed through here Wednesday with a new motor truck.
    There seems to be general rejoicing over the way the P.&E. Railroad has been disposed of and the prospect of having the route re-established.
    P. B. McDonald, who has charge of a Medford service station, was here Thursday for dinner.
    Ira Tungate, of Butte Falls, was transacting business here Thursday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Charles Humphrey, wife and daughter of Derby, were here Thursday. They have recently returned from a visit to Iowa to visit their old home and relatives. They made the round trip in an auto and report having had a very pleasant time.
    S. L. Kidder of Roseburg, one of the post office inspectors who had been in this vicinity inspecting the different post offices, was with us Thursday night and Friday went to Butte Falls, inspected the post office and returned to Medford the same day.
    Cecil Culbertson of Lake Creek was a business caller Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Morgan, who own and occupy the old Eagle Point Hotel, went to Central Point Friday.
    B. O. Davis, representing the McCracken Motor Co. of Portland, was here Friday for dinner and showing his autos.
    Dr. Helms, the veterinary surgeon of Medford, and Tex Higgins and his little boy were here for dinner Friday. Dr. Helms was out looking after some of his horses and mules, which have been running around here this summer.
    Walter Painter, formerly of this place but now of Washington, and wife nee Ella Adamson of Trail, passed through here Friday on their way to her former home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Corson of Butte Falls came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday on their way to California.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Peterson of Coos Bay and C. Hopp of Portland, passed through here Friday afternoon on their way to the manganese mine of Lost Creek. Mr. Hopp seemed to be taking them up to show them the country or it may be to sell them the mine.
    John Norris and Clarence Fox were here having W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith and auto machinist, repair Mr. Norris' Ford.
    Perry Farlow, who makes his home in the Lake Creek country but has been on the coast the past season, came in Friday evening and spent the night with us.
    F. M. Maxwell, who is living on the Bert Clarno place eight miles above here, was here this Saturday morning on his way to Medford. He went out with Mr. Adamson.
    Mrs. George Richardson and three of her children and Mrs. Ernest Peachy and Mrs. Heriford, all of Butte Falls, came out on the Butte Falls stage this Saturday morning.
    John McAllister and D. R. Patrick came out on the Eagle Point stage and Mr. G. H. Schermerhorn and Mrs. Louis Whilley of Trail came out with Mr. V. E. Peterson on the Persist stage and took dinner at the Sunnyside Saturday.
    Mrs. Susan Hart visited out town on business this Saturday morning.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our promising orchardists, was a business caller also.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen came in from the Union Creek camp on the Crater Lake Highway last night and took dinner with her daughter at the Sunnyside.
    Miss Ruth Grover of Medford was visiting Miss Nora Childreth today.
    Ed Dutton brought in a load of stove wood for one of our townsmen this morning.
    Other callers today were George and Charles Givan and Shorty Allen.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 1, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    H. D. Mills and wife of Butte Falls passed through here Wednesday afternoon on their way home. They had been up on Wagner Creek and were taking home about a hundred pounds of very fine peaches. The reader who has not experienced how well six or seven peaches taste can have no idea until after they are preserved in 25¢ sugar. It is like eating money.
    Mr. Hawk, the old sawmill man who owned the mill on Clark's Creek now owned by R. M. Conley, was in town Wednesday afternoon trying to find someone who wanted to kill a deer to go hunting with him. How well he succeeded I did not learn.
    C. W. Brown and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Emmens, the Medford oculist, came out Wednesday afternoon, stopped and took supper and then started to go to Prospect that night. They were going out for a ten days' outing.
    Henry Gordon of Fort Klamath came in the same evening for late supper. He had had trouble with his car coming in, had broken eight leaves out of ten in one of his springs, but he took it to Holmes & McDonald's garage and the next forenoon was on his way home, the springs all O.K. The new garage men seem to be kept busy about all of the time and this Saturday they seemed to be rushed with business and at the W. L. Childreth shop he had to run one car out to make room for another to come in.
    A. H. Dougherty spent Wednesday night with us and reports doing a good business.
    Gus Nichols has moved into town and has moved into the T. Farlow house.
    W. L. Childreth, who dropped out of sight so mysteriously a week ago last Friday night after locking up his blacksmith shop, put in an appearance again last Thursday morning greatly refreshed and invigorated and reports that he felt like a new man. He had been up in the hills of Josephine County hunting and the change of exercise and the mountain air has wrought a wonderful change in him. He succeeded in killing one deer.
    J. W. Berrian, superintendent of the Butte Falls fish hatchery, was among us Thursday morning.
    There was a voting contest here Wednesday night to decide who was the most popular young lady in our community and the winner was to be presented with a diamond ring by the show men, Hoyt Bros., and the choice fell on Miss Mae Greb, who lives about two miles out of town, although she attends school here.
    F. S. Davis, the agate man who is in the employ of a San Francisco firm, was a business caller Thursday.
    Walter Wood, one of our leading stockmen, went to Butte Falls on the stage Thursday.
    Harry Hayes and wife of Trail came out to visit her parents Thursday.
    Ernest Peachey of Butte Falls, A. A. Gleason of Medford, Mrs. Peter Betz of Trail, and Henry Trusty of Elk Creek, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Owen of Applegate, and V. E. Peterson, the Persist mail carrier, were among the guests at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    Charles Brophy of Klamath County, Mrs. K. O. Jones of Butte Falls, were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Thursday. Mr. Brophy was going up to his brother's, Jeff Brophy's, place and then take passage on the Crater Lake stage for Fort Klamath.
    H. J. Vondermark of Butte Falls came out Friday to have Dr. Holt dress his hand. When I asked him what ailed his hand he said that he caught hold of a saw in the Hawk mill when it was running and when he felt it strike the bone he jerked his hand away. Two fingers were badly cut.
    Mr. Schooler of Brownsboro was trading here Friday.
    R. A. Arnold and daughter, Miss Reva Arnold, of Central Point, were passing through here on their way home Friday. They had been out to Reese Creek to meet the school board with a view to Miss Reva taking the position as teacher, but they found that the board was not at home.
    Friday morning T. J. Maxwell, Jewel Wattenberg, T. B. Rayborn and another young man came in with a hack and on the outside of their load they had the horns of two deer in sight. Mr. Rayborn, who came to the Sunnyside for dinner, reported that they had killed four deer among them.
    Dr. S. L. Lee of Carson City, Nev., and E. D. Stephenson, real estate man of Grants Pass, came into the Sunnyside about 11 o'clock a.m. to inquire about the time for dinner and then went up to the sulfur spring just above the house to drink sulfur water. They said they were here to try to find some nice agates. They went out to look in the afternoon and came back in and spent the night. They had gathered about half a bushel of stones and probably some very good ones. Everett Abbott and Mrs. Ernest Smith and child of Butte Falls also spent the night here, taking passage on the stage for home this morning.
    O. D. Wingfield of Weed, Calif., also spent the night with us. He was over here visiting friends. He left for home on the early stage.
    There were two young men came in from Trail, Friday, with stove wood, a very scarce article, and was selling at $3.50 a tier or ten dollars and a half a cord--a big price for pine wood in a timber country, but there seems to be a scarcity of stove wood and quite a number of people here have not secured their winter wood yet.
    Lee Edmondson and wife passed through here this Saturday morning.
    Scott Boyer was procuring a force pump at the von der Hellen hardware store this morning.
    Mrs. H. J. Vandermark of Butte Falls (Hawk's mill) was in town this Saturday morning with her three children on her way to Medford to visit her mother, Mrs. Hawk, and have her baby receive medical treatment.
    Alex Vestal, of Reese Creek, R. M. Conley and Geo. Cottrell of Butte Falls, Pete Young of Eagle Point, and Oliver Gaines of Trail were in town today, the latter dining at the Sunnyside.
    A. J. Anderson of the Standard Oil Company came out this morning to bring three barrels of oil out for our Eagle Point Garage.
    A report is going the rounds that our school janitor, Mr. Shively, has sold his place here to Ed Morgan.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 2, 1920, page 9


MANY NOTABLES AT ELK CREEK
    Elk Creek, Sept. 3.--Mr. C. William Kolb of Kolb and Dill fame, accompanied by his wife, and Perry Bronson on the Orpheum circuit were guests at the Rogue Elk this week.
    Dr. C. C. Van Scoyoc has returned for the hunting season.
    Phillip N. Westcott, son of [Edward Noyes] Westcott, the author of David Harum, will spend the remainder of the season at the hotel.
    Mr. and Mrs. Van Heffner motored to Medford on Tuesday.
    The Oregon Bureau of Mines party of one hundred and twenty-five people will stop at the Rogue Elk on their way to the lake.
    Mr. J. T. Johnson of Medford stopped at the hotel for lunch.
    Many cars of hunters are on their way to the hills.
    Mr. D. Seibert, Mrs. T. Davis, Mrs. G. Hasbrouck, and chauffeur, are guests at the hotel.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1920, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    Miss Enid Middlebusher and Miss Eula Houston are spending a few days camping at Prospect.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart went to Medford today.
    Miss Eula Houston is just back from a week's stay in Portland.
    Mr. Ace Weeks and Mr. Dunlap are helping Mr. George Weeks put up his new house.
    Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson dropped a boiler of boiling water on her foot, scalding it quite severely. It is improving rapidly, but is still very sore.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1920, page 5

EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon, after I had written the Eaglets, I gathered the following items: Mrs. John Rader and Mrs. Sam Klingle, George Stowell and wife, Mrs. Engelhardt, Gus Nichols and family are preparing to move into our town, into the Thomas Farlow house, and have Mr. D. R. Patrick doing some carpenter work, making some changes in the arrangement of the house. That Mrs. Arglee Green, who owns the old J. J. Fryer place in town, had arrived from her home near Los Angeles. Also that Miss Anna Swensen was in town; she and her brother lived on a farm now occupied by Mr. Long and now are living near Beagle. Dee Bradshaw, who lives between Brownsboro and Wellen on the Brownsboro-Medford road, Dr. Helms, the Medford veterinary, called at the Sunnyside for supper and Harry Lewis also came out from Jacksonville and stopped at the Sunnyside until Sunday evening. Herman Meyer, Sr. of Lake Creek, came in and brought in his auto to the Holmes and McDonald garage to have it overhauled.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. G. High and little daughter, Mr. and Mrs. A. F. Enders, Mrs. Jessie Ferris, Mildred Ferris and Gladys Norton of Ashland came in Saturday evening for supper, spent the night and took breakfast and dinner, Sunday. Mr. High is working in the interest of the E. N. Norton Motor Co., Ashland, and they all came up to attend the dance and to enjoy a visit at the Sunnyside.
    In addition to the eight just mentioned, we had as guests at the Sunnyside Hotel Sunday, Mr. Emil Britt and his sister, Miss Mollie Britt, Dr. J. A. Renter and Elizabeth Renter of The Dalles, Ore.
    Dalton Terrill of Jacksonville also attended the dance and remained until Sunday evening. Gus the Tailor and wife, Dr. and Mrs. Clancy, Robert Clancy, Winifred Clancy, Marie Hillis, Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Munn, Mrs. Gertrude Booth, Margaret Mary Mann, Garrett Mann, Medford; Thos. H. Simpson, one of the county commissioners and wife, H. V. Simpson, Mrs. A. Hargrave, of Ashland; Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Westerlund, Miss S. Holenbery, Mrs. James Burman of the Hotel Holland, Medford. I consider it quite a compliment when such a man as Mr. Westerlund will remark that when he receives the Mail Tribune he always looks for and reads the Eagle Point Eaglets.
    Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, was one of the guests Sunday and so was Mr. and Mrs. Donegue, son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cunningham and son Wilbur, Miss Florence Wakeman, who came in Saturday night from Iowa via Colorado to visit her brother, George Wehman, one of our regular boarders, remaining until Tuesday, when she started north on the early train. Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Hesler, Fred Frideger of Medford, Frank Haselton, Bernice Sdetzler, Eva Emely Sdetzler and Mrs. E. S. Sdetzler, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and daughter Joyce. In addition to having these for dinner, before the diners were through with dinner, Rev. M. C. Davis, wife and granddaughter, Miss Inez Howard and Mrs. Caroline Thomasson called, but had dined before coming.
    Wm. von der Hellen, one of our hardware merchants, went to Portland Sunday morning, returning Tuesday.
    Monday was quite a lively day in our town. Among the business callers was Mr. C. Hepp of Portland and Mr. W. H. Peterson. They had been up to the manganese mine and reported that the mine will be opened in the near future, but no telling when.
    Our postmaster, W. C. Clements, has been making some material improvements in the post office, as someone has broken out the glass in the front door, 36½ x 26½ inches, and two panes out of the windows, letting in the cool air in the mornings and evenings. He has filled the holes with new lights, greatly to the comfort of the clerks in the office.
    Rudolph Gardner came in from his home in Lake Creek with a load of hogs for parties in Central Point.
    Corbett Smith and his half-brother Earl Smith, of Butte Falls, were among the guests at the Sunnyside Monday noon, and so was Thomas Farlow and wife of Lake Creek.
    Sherman Wooley, who has been working on the Crater Lake Highway, came in Monday to look after his interest here and to have his family visit her mother at Butte Falls while he goes out and takes a hunt.
    Mr. W. W. Green of Butte Falls came in Monday with a load of shakes and sold 500 to Mrs. Anna Watkins and Mr. J. Monia of Brownsboro went through town with a load of shakes to cover a large barn he is building.
    Henry Meyer and family of Lake Creek went to Medford Monday morning.
    Charles Humphrey and W. S. Baker of Derby are engaged delivering wood to some of the families of our town. There seems to be quite a demand for wood here and those who have been delivering wood say that they have already promised more than they can supply and leave any for themselves and the prospect is that there will be a wood famine here this winter, as there is quite a number of families here who have not secured their wood for winter yet. Charles Givan brought in two loads Tuesday for two different families, a cord for each family.
    Frank Smyley of Ashland came in Monday to help Mr. McAllister with his furniture, bringing in his piano and Tuesday Mr. McAllister brought in another load on a truck attachment to his car.
    G. R. Robinson of Talent passed through here Tuesday with his family and household goods on his way to Butte Falls.
    C. M. Speck and wife stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner Tuesday and so did Mr. Thrasher, the foreman of the workers on the road work on the Reese Creek-Butte Falls road. He had come out to assist in taking the rock crusher across the creek here. The crusher weighs about five tons and in order to take it over the wagon bridge he drew it to the edge of the bridge, then detached the truck and attached a long cable and went part way across, leaving about fifty feet of space between the truck and the crusher, thus dividing the weight and by that means taking no chances on bringing down the bridge. He then took the large, self-propelling engine through the water all O.K. I stated some two weeks ago that this crusher was already on the ground on the C. E. Bellows place and that it would be crushing and distribute the crushed rock on the newly made road in a few days, but in moving the engine it was discovered that an important part of the engine was broken, thus detaining them in the work, but Mr. Thresher thinks with no mishaps they will finish up the work in about six weeks unless it would be a piece of rock work near the Reese Creek falls.
    J. H. Howard, one of the Civil War veterans, spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred Pettegrew and Ed Meyers brought their autos in to W. L. Childreth for repairs Wednesday and the same day S. A. Strolworth and family from Sacramento Valley, Calif. came to the same repair shop to have work done on their machine, showing that there is something besides pleasure in traveling in an auto. Mr. Strolworth and family had come up to visit Mrs. Strolworth's sister, Mrs. Wm. Gipson, in Lake Creek country. They soon had the necessary work done and went on their way up the country.
    H. H. Williams, salesman for Hubbard Bros., Medford, was here for dinner Wednesday and so was Mrs. Charles Painter, formerly of this place but now of Washington. She came down with her son Walter and wife to attend to business, look after their property here and pack and ship their furniture to their home about 30 miles from Vancouver, Wash., and they expect to return on the return trip in a few days.
    Harold Patton of Butte Falls came out and went to Medford on the stage Wednesday afternoon.
    Just after I had mailed my letter for the Mail Tribune and was returning home I discovered a huge volume of smoke in the west side of town and upon investigation learned that it was Wig Jacks' barn, and in less time than it takes to write it there were a bunch of us in a car and off for the fire, and when we arrived found quite a number of men and women already there to assist in saving the property. Although the barn and  chicken house were destroyed, fortunately there was only a small bunch of hay in it. Mr. Jacks saved his harness and pitchforks but lost one of his wagons that was standing with a hay rack near the building. He saved one of his wagons but was unable to pull the other out of the way. The cause of the fire was a little out of the ordinary; his two little boys were playing in the barn and a cow came in and was eating hay and the smallest boy tried to drive her away and finally concluded to burn her out so set a match to the hay and the older brother seeing what was done ran screaming to the house and just as it happened Mr. Jacks was there, so he ran and the first thing was to save the child, for he was so scared that he did not know enough to get out of the building. After rescuing the boy he turned his attention to saving his harness and other things he could move. Just as it happened the gasoline pump was out of order but the water from the ram was available. The lawn between the barn and the residence was so green that it would not burn so the house was not in much danger and the wind was favorable. The loss was not much as it was a small barn, but unfortunately for Mr. Jacks there was no insurance on the building.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Stanley returned the first of the week from the huckleberry patch. They were there only a few hours and gathered about four gallons of the berries.
    Mrs. John Rader, Mrs. Stanley's mother, took a trip out to Rancheria Prairie for a few days' outing and returned Wednesday afternoon.
   C. H. Natwick, one of the contractors on the Crater Lake Highway, came in Wednesday morning with seven of his work horses that have been used on the construction work and reports that they expect to finish up the job about Sept. 15 or 20.
    Harry Smith, who has charge of one of the sheep camps of Wm. Lewis, came in Wednesday and has been here up to this Saturday afternoon.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Shutts and children of Ashland passed through here Thursday headed for the hills.
    Dr. J. E. Paul and family of Santa Ana, Calif., also passed through here for Crater Lake and Klamath Falls.
    Alex Mathews, Rube Johnson and Verna Mathews and family were business callers Thursday.
    Frank P. Dutton and R. W. Wilson were here for dinner Thursday on their way out to the Frank Rhodes ranch to get a corn binder. Mr. Dutton said that they could not buy one in Medford or Ashland so had to hire one.
    F. E. Hayes and M. F. Thornson, J. Seiver, travelers, and Mrs. G. H. Morgan and brother of Little Shasta, Walter Painter and wife of Washington were here for dinner Thursday.
    Other business callers Thursday were Carl von der Hellen, of Wellen, Ed Cowden, Mrs. Bert Clarno, Mrs. Pete Betz, Mrs. C. E. Bellows and Mrs. Ludson, who owns the old Bill Smith farm on Rogue River, and Tim Dugan.
    Mrs. John Obenchain, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Medford, was on the Butte Falls stage for Butte Falls Friday.
    Mrs. Don Fellows and a lady friend of Trail, came out on the stage from Medford and went out on the Persist stage.
    A. J. Florey, Jr., and wife of Eagle Point and mother-in-law, Mrs. Anderson and son of Medford, who have been taking an outing on the Crater Lake Highway near Union Creek returned Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and J. Geppert, the Butte Falls road supervisor, Mrs. Amy Brown of Eagle Point and C. Combest of Jacksonville also took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt's family arrived at their home in Eagle Point Thursday. They have been spending the summer in Oakland, Cal.
    Thos. Abbott and family and his father-in-law, Russ Moore and family came out from their home above Lake Creek to attend the funeral of his uncle, George Little, who died at Weed, Calif., Sept. 1st, and was buried at Central Point Friday, passed through town Friday afternoon on their way home.
    Mrs. Ethel Vandosen and a friend of Grants Pass, stopped here for supper Friday evening and then started home. Mrs. Vandosen was here to see a party but failed to meet him.
    H. H. Noel, of the Geo. L. Treichler Motor Company of Medford, was here for dinner Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 6, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Messrs. George and Ace Weeks and Mr. S. W. Hutchinson have gone to the mountains for a few days to look after cattle and pick huckleberries.
    Miss Eula Houston and Miss Enid Middlebusher have returned home from a few days' camping at Prospect.
    Messrs. Oscar and Will Stewart and Mrs. Oscar Stewart were in Medford last week shopping.
    The water commissioner was up to see about water rights this week. He finds lots of trouble but is confident it can all be settled peacefully.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Blass are camping at Union Creek while they rob the huckleberry patches.
    The dance at Trail Saturday night was very well attended.
    Mr. Alec Stewart, brother to Oscar and Will Stewart of the Rogue River ranch, spent Sunday with them.
    Mr. Ash brought a crowd down in his truck to attend the dance Saturday night.
    There has been considerable trouble in district No. 84 to find a place to board the children as there is no school this year. It seems the parents expect the school board to find a place and provide for the board.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 9, 1920, page 6


ELK CREEK
    Dr. C. L. Becker and wife, of Newark, N.J., were guests at the Rogue Elk.
    We regret to announce that the home of Mr. Johanson on Elk Creek burned one night this week.
    Mrs. J. E. McDonald was in Medford Saturday on business.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. J. Dougherty and two daughters, from Ashland, are registered at the hotel.
    Mrs. T. B. McDonald and children leave today for Eugene, to spend the winter. Mr. McDonald will follow soon.
    Mr. T. K. Burnham, the famous fisherman, who has been a guest at the Rogue Elk most of the summer, met a bear last week while he was landing a steelhead. Not knowing which he wanted most, he finally decided in favor of trout, and giving Mr. Bear a parting shot with a stone, let him go and landed his fish.
    Mr. H. W. Shattuck, a prominent salesman from New York City, is at the hotel for a few days.
    Mr. and Mrs. D. Pence and family motored to Medford Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 10, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday evening H. D. Mills and wife of Butte Falls, accompanied by Miss Alvhild Romstoedt of Talent, who has been teaching in that place, but is now engaged as one of the teachers in the Butte Falls school, called for supper on their way home.
    Along about 3:30 a.m. Sunday morning Hilda Abbott and her brother, A. Everett Abbott, Miss Mildred Smith of Butte Falls and Wm. Welch of Medford came in from Trail where they had attended a dance, and took beds at the Sunnyside and after sleeping for a few hours partook of breakfast and proceeded on their way up to Butte Falls. They reported that they had one of those enjoyable times, but admitted they were tired and hungry.
    Speaking of Saturday's experience coming home from the dance, when Henry French and his son, Lloyd were in town today, Wednesday, they were telling of a little incident that occurred at the east end of the French-Dodge bridge Sunday morning. Mr. French was sleeping outside of the house and he heard a car come across the bridge and stop and the lights were put out, and that created suspicion in the mind of Mr. French, as his garden is situated near the bridge, so taking his shotgun, he quietly stole down that way and could hear someone right in the vicinity of the watermelon patch, so elevating his gun, he fired into the air, holding the gun at such an angle so as to cause the shot to fall about the place where he thought they were, and then he heard them run for the auto and about the time he thought they were in the road he again fired his gun so as to have the shot fall about where they were, not wishing to hurt them, but simply letting them know that they were caught and the result was the party remained hid until daybreak when they resumed their journey for what they thought was safer ground. Henry says that the next time he will lower his gun and it is not healthy to be prowling around his watermelon patch after dark for that he is often up and around while others are asleep.
    The fact that the two couples named in the foregoing came into the Sunnyside several hours earlier than the time mentioned removes all suspicion that might be laid on them, but they were in bed before the incident occurred.
    Sunday morning we did not have the usual number out here for dinner, as it is supposed that Monday being a holiday, that there was quite a number of those who enjoyed an outing, started out on Sunday morning and spent the night in the hills, or along the banks of the streams, returning Monday evening. Nevertheless, there were a few who enjoyed the chicken dinner that had been prepared. Among them was Mr. D. W. Bradshaw, for some years editor and publisher of the Jacksonville Post, Mrs. D. W. Bagshaw, Lizzie Renter, Miss Mollie Britt and Emil Britt, all of Jacksonville, and Gus the Tailor and wife of Medford. Mr. and Mrs. Gustine (Gus the Tailor) have been customers at the Sunnyside every Sunday since the season opened, but one Sunday they went up in the Lake Creek country to visit their ranch, but stopped here for supper.
    Later in the afternoon Florence Milligan, Nona Prater, Ida Pecks, Charley Gentry and J. E. Milligan and John Foster of Medford called for early supper. In addition to them there was quite a number of the local people took dinner.
    Monday morning your Eagle Point correspondent started on the 7:10 stage for Medford to see the sights and try to attend to a little business during the early hours and in the afternoon witness the sights at the aviation grounds. I also had a little business at the Medford Mail Tribune office, but the editor was off with his family on the coast, having a good time, but while I was there I was introduced by Mr. S. S. Smith to the business manager of the Medford Printing Company, and had to almost fight my way out to keep them from pinning one of the "Harding for President" pins on my coat, but when I told them that I was too strong a prohibitionist to vote for either Harding or Cox, they quieted down and I sat and read quite a while in the office. After dinner I took passage on a jitney for the aviation grounds and had a look at the flying birds as they stood on the ground, but I will not attempt to describe them for there was such a sight to see and so many to meet and the anties the birds eat [sic], and such a multitude of people and things to see, that if I should undertake to tell it all, it would require a whole copy of the Mail Tribune to contain it, and then about all of the readers of the Tribune within a radius of a hundred miles were there to see for themselves.
    Floyd Pearce, one of out townsmen, also went out on the early stage for Medford and the next day, in talking with one of our merchants as to who was there he remarked that there was not anybody left in town scarcely, and I thought that if a fire had happened to have started that day, it would have swept the town for all who were left were mostly old men and women and but very few of them.
    F. J. Max of California, came out Monday to visit his son, who lives seven or eight miles north of here.
    Mrs. D. Bradshaw of Brownsboro and O. Adams of Butte Falls were passengers on the stage Tuesday morning and Graydon Childreth and family went up to her father's near Butte Falls.
    W. M. Lewis of Flounce Rock came out from Medford on horseback on his way up home. He has rented his farm to Carl Richardson of Peyton for one year and he and family are going to live in Medford.
    Tuesday George and Manual Leidman and John Jones and Royal Putman, our professional fruit packers, were in for dinner Tuesday. They came out looking over the prospects for work.
    J. C. Barry of Brownsboro came out with J. D. Patrick from Medford and went on up home Tuesday.
    W. C. Messal and son of Lake Creek were here Tuesday.
    Mrs. Fred McPherson, nee Olive Nichols, has returned to our town to remain indefinitely.
    Our school opened Tuesday morning with Miss Josephine Riley, daughter of our old neighbor Thomas Riley, as principal and Miss Ruth Young as primary teacher. The attendance is small at present, but will increase as the fruit season advances.
    F. J. Ayres passed through here Tuesday evening.
    George W. Barker, Butte Falls banker, and W. W. Parker, one of the pioneers of Butte Falls, were here for supper on their way home Tuesday.
    Sheman Wooley and family returned from Butte Falls and Mr. Mittelstaedt and three others, who were out hunting in the neighborhood of the Buzzard mines, came in and report that they had killed five deer.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 10, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday morning when W. L. Childreth came to his blacksmith shop and garage he found a Mitchell car standing before his shop door. The license number was 72573 and it stood there all day with nobody to claim it and that naturally created some little excitement as the gas tank was dry and suspicion pointed to a stolen auto, but Wednesday a short time before noon two youths came in and went to work on it and on inquiry as to the reason for leaving the car in that manner said that the battery gave out so that they had no light. In a short time they left without giving their names or destination.
    Mr. M. A. Fox of Corvallis, and her daughter, Mrs. Berg, a sister of Mrs. Fox of California, came out on the stage Wednesday from Medford and went up to Lake Creek on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage to visit Mrs. Fox's son who is interested in the milk goat business. A. E. Hildreth and wife of Ashland were also passengers on the Butte Falls stage bound for Butte Falls, their old home, and so was George Miller on his way from California to the tall timber.
    Byron DeFord of the Riverside ranch was a business caller also Wednesday. He has rented the place and is planning to pump water out of Rogue River to irrigate a large portion of it, using his tractor engine instead of electricity, on the ground of economy, as he claims that by using that power instead of electricity he will save several dollars in the course of the season.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, shoe dealers of Medford, drove out Wednesday evening for supper.
    Miss Mildred Patton, formerly of Butte Falls but recently from Marshfield, Ore., where she has been working in a book store, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Thursday on her way to visit her parents in her old home.
    Louis Baker of Portland was also a passenger on the same stage for Butte Falls.
    John Walch of Lake Creek was a business caller Thursday.
    Chris Bergman, who owns a farm on the free ferry road, was also trading here Thursday and so was Perry Foster and C. E. Bellows.
    Mrs. W. E. Hammond motored through town on her way to the Hub looking for fruit to put up for future use.
    Charles Clark, who has been spending the summer out in Klamath County, came in Thursday and took board and room at the Sunnyside. He owns an interest in a house and lot here in town and also owns a forty-acre tract of fine sticky land about three miles northeast of here.
    John Jones, one of the expert fruit packers mentioned in my last letter, also came in and took room and board. He is engaged making fruit boxes for the T. B. Tronson orchard.
    J. H. Howard, one of the veterans of the Civil War, who is stopping with Mr. and Mrs. Pete Betz, spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside and took passage on the Persist stage Friday morning to where he could cross Rogue River to his home in a small boat.
    Among the business callers Friday were Nick Young and T. F. McCabe, one of our prominent farmers and orchardists.
    George Phillips, one of our prominent citizens, has been making some substantial improvements around his home and prominent among them is the putting in [of] a neat and roomy porch.
    D. R. Patrick, who has been doing some carpenter work on the Thomas Farlow house, has finished his job and has gone to Brownsboro to build a barn for J. Monia.
    Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, and D. H. Thornbrue of Central Point and Charles Humphrey and wife were among the diners at the Sunnyside Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Marshall of Brownsboro were doing business with our merchants Friday.
    The Butte Falls stage has about all that it can do now to accommodate the travel. Friday morning the driver, Rob Harnish, started from here with the Ford but when he returned he had five passengers and two waiting here to go to Butte Falls beside a big lot of mail and baggage brought out the evening before, so had to call for the Hudson Six 7-passenger car, and this Saturday morning he did the same thing and brought out five passengers and left three or four in Medford, and had two here who came out Friday evening and this morning had to get his big car again and take six passengers beside all the mail he could put on the car. The two passengers brought in last night and left overnight were Mrs. W. W. Parker and her son Ray, Parker and the passengers on the stage this morning were Mr. and Mrs. Al Hildreth, Miss Nydah Neil and a stranger, and by the time the mail and baggage was on and in the car it looked as though it was full but after he started he picked up another passenger who sat on the hood.
    Ray Parker was simply going up home to bid his father, etc., goodbye and get his baggage and start for Forest Grove to start in on a two-year course in that college. The directors of the college propose to give all the young men who were taken away in the army or navy a two-year course free and Mr. Parker expects to finish as he has already taken a two-year course.
    This Saturday morning Ed Dutton met me on the street and asked me to send in his check to pay a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and of course I did it just for accommodation and to help the Medford Printing Company along. He had brought in a load of wood for one of our hardware merchants, Roy Ashpole.
    Among the guests at dinner today, Saturday noon, were Mr. and Mrs. Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls, William Lewis of Central Point, E. D. Hill of Derby, who was soliciting for the Medford-Ashland Herald; Hugh H. McManus of the Correspondence Association, Sherman Wooley, M. G. Beaver, C. B. Norton of the E. N. Norton Motor Co. of Ashland, Tim Casey of Juneau, Alaska, C. M. Delin of Medford, H. E. Armstrong and wife of Medford, U.S. livestock inspector for Washington and Oregon. His district also embraces Northern California. He reports that he has found 250,000 head of sheep in Jackson, Josephine and Klamath counties and in Northern California and that they are mostly in a very healthy condition.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 14, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after I had written my letter for the readers of the Daily Mail Tribune, there was quite a number of people came in and among them was Emmett Plymale, his sister and a lady friend from Lake Creek.
    C. B. Norton and M. G. Barber and E. G. High of Ashland, representatives of the E. N. Norton Motor Co. of Ashland, and Mr. High remained overnight at the Sunnyside, while the other two, after eating supper, went on up home that night.
    Hugh V. McManus of [the] Seattle corresponding association, who was canvassing this part of the country, remained with us until Monday morning.
    Elga Abbott, his brother, Arbia Abbott, and Verie Bell of Butte Falls came out to attend the dance here Saturday, also ate supper here and remained until after dinner Sunday and Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Armstrong, the livestock inspector, called for supper and then went on to Medford that night.
    Harry Lewis, who is working in Jacksonville and Clifford Hickman, a transient, also came in to attend the dance and spend the night and Sunday until dinner.
    Henry Trusty, one of the truck men working on the Crater Lake Highway, came in and spent the night with us here until Monday morning. He started with his truck to his father's on Elk Creek, but found the road so slippery that after going a short distance, abandoned the trip, taking an early start Monday. He reports that they are getting along nicely with the work on the Crater Lake Highway and with ordinary progress will have the road ready to turn it over to the proper authorities by the first of October, if not sooner.
    Dalton Terrill and his chum, Bill Rinabarger of Medford, also attended the dance and took rooms at the Sunnyside, remaining until afternoon.
    Owing to the heavy rain Saturday night and Sunday morning, there was but few others took dinner at the Sunnyside Sunday.
    Monday morning our neighbor, Sam H. Harnish, started out on his contract to take the high school pupils from here to Medford and the first day he had eleven and a young lady friend of one of the pupils who went along for company. Our school had been opened one week, but the attendance is rather small as at last accounts, there was only eleven in the primary department and fifteen in the principal's room. And only a few years ago we had seventy-four names enrolled and they all attended regularly under one teacher in one room and he received a salary of fifty dollars an month and performed his own janitor work. The reader will likely ask why such a falling off of children in attendance. One reason is our town is settled now to a great extent, by old people, while there are several families of two, man and wife, who have no children, and the children we used to have here are grown up and married and gone to seek their fortunes elsewhere. And at the rate we have been going, in the course of a few years, without a change, our town will be a childless town.
    Saturday morning as I was making my rounds, I found that W. L. Childreth's blacksmith shop was closed and on making inquiry as to the cause, found that no one in that neighborhood knew the cause, but Sunday learned that he had gone up to Douglas County to take a hunt, and up to this Wednesday noon it was still closed.
    Rob Harnish started Monday morning for Woodlawn, Cal., to visit one of his cousins and his wife spent the time during his absence visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Nickel of Phoenix.
    Ed Morgan and family of Trail have been out visiting his parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Morgan.
    Speaking of Mr. and Mrs. W. P. Morgan, of our town, they went to Medford the last of last week and bought a new Ford and Monday started in it to visit relatives in the Willamette Valley, to be gone about three weeks.
    Charley Clark, who has been here at the Sunnyside for the past week or more looking after his business, started Monday for Chiloquin, Klamath County.
    G. W. Neilson, the superintendent and manager of the Pacific and Eastern Railroad Company, was busy at the large water tank at the Eagle Point depot Tuesday tightening the hoops, getting ready to do something beside junk the road, but he is as dumb as an oyster on the future movements of the new owners of the road. He took dinner Tuesday and today at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. C. R. Farrier of Lake Creek brought her sister, Miss Martha E. Porter of New York, who is here visiting, in to the Sunnyside Monday afternoon and took a room to have Dr. W. P. Holt give her treatment for an abscess on her foot.
    H. W. Conger, undertaker of Medford of the firm of Weeks & Conger, stopped here for supper on his way out with the corpse of Mr. Simon Farlow, who died Tuesday, September 14, at the home of his nephew, Frank Farlow, aged 88 years. He and his brother Perry Farlow, lately deceased, have been living together for the last several years. He was never married and has for the past few years been living with his nephews. The burial took place in the Brownsboro cemetery today, Wednesday, at 3 p.m.
    A. H. Daughtery, agent for Raleigh's Remedies, spent Tuesday night with us and so did Mr. R. M. Conley of Butte Falls.
    We had one of those traveling shows here last night, but as none of us attended, do not know how it was, but I heard one man say that it was better than the Negroes' show. It is strange that our city dads will have these "catchpenny shows" come here and show and in some instances take away $100 or more and let them show without paying a cent license to help keep up the expense of the town.
    W. C. Hanson and A. C. Speck of Brownsboro passed through here this morning on their way to Sams Valley to see about getting a rock crusher to use around Brownsboro.
    Mrs. E. E. Smith of Butte Falls came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage this morning and went up home.
    Milo Conley, Charles Swem, Mr. Davis, the agate man of San Francisco, and Mr. Berry of Brownsboro were business callers.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 21, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Oscar and Will Stewart have gone to the mountains to look after their cattle. They intend to be gone three days.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Saltzman of Medford spent Sunday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    Fred McDonald, who has been running a small summer store near the Rogue Elk Hotel, is having a closing-out sale. His family have already gone to Eugene, where they will stay for the winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Blass visited with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson Sunday.
    Miss Gwen Houston, who is attending school in Central Point, visited home over the weekend.
    Keva Hutchinson spent the weekend visiting with his parents. He is attending school in Medford.
    The home of Peter Johanson burned a few days ago causing a loss of about $800, and rather than build again he sold the place to Dave Pence.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson spent Sunday hunting in the vicinity of Yellow Rock Canyon. They had no luck, not even seeing any signs of game.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 23, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after I had written my letter for the Mail Tribune I took a stroll around town to see if I could find anything of interest to write for its readers, but found that items of interest were as scarce as mice in a deserted church, but about supper time Mr. Frank Smith, one of the citizens who lives alone and does his own cooking, came in to spend a while looking over my newspapers and to have supper, and Dave Smith and family--no relation to Frank--came in to spend the night, and the next morning Cliff Hickson was here; he came in after I had gone to my room.
    Sunday morning we had a very interesting Sunday school session, although the teacher of the Bible class, John Esch, having been called away on business to Ashland and his son Carl notified us that his father was expecting to be gone to Arizona for the winter, where he has business interests that require his attention. His place as teacher of the Bible class was filled by H. E. Campbell, our banker, and the way he handled the subject, the evils of intemperance, was not only instructive but very interesting. He has a way of his own to teach a class in Sunday school that makes it impressive.
    Sunday was not too cold or too hot or too wet or too dry but simply a lovely day, and the result was we had a nice company here for dinner, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. Henry G. Gilmore and Mr. and Mrs. I. Finley of Ashland. Mr. Gilmore was born in England in 1838 and came to the United States on the Great Eastern when it came across the Atlantic Ocean to lay the first telegraph cable. We had also Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rader, Gus the Tailor and wife, Frank Rhodes, A. A. Clenson, [and] H. V. McManus, who was also here Saturday night and remained until this morning. He is distributing books on farming in this section. Also Mr. and Mrs. N. J. Merrill and son Jess of Medford, Mrs. Geo. Rebec and Mrs. Elizabeth Rebec of Ashland, Mrs. Geo. B. Canode, Mr. and Mrs. P. J. Neff of Medford, and Mrs. Elizabeth Barker of Tien Tsin, China; Miss Clara Moore and Robert Edmondson of Butte Falls, and later in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Huls, Mrs. Effie Stewart, Mrs. Marjorie McCharney and Walter Leningston of Medford.
    Monday morning Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek passed through here with a truckload of potatoes on his way to Medford.
    G. W. Sanders, foreman on the Antelope orchard, was also a business caller Monday morning and so was Miss Ethel Ewen and T. E. Gaines of Trail. He was on his way from San Francisco home. He had been to San Francisco to look over the beef market and reports that the prospect is not as favorable this fall as usual.
    P. S. Anderson, a retired capitalist of Medford, was out looking after his interests here. He owns a fine farm on Rogue River a few miles above here and has been running a dairy farm under the management of the Brittsan brothers on shares, but now he has leased to them the ranch for three years and sold them the herd of cows, and the result is they are planning to eventually buy the whole outfit. He has confidence in their making good, and their many friends here are wishing them success in their undertaking.
    Monday, Sept. 20, was quite a noted day in our little village, as it was the marriage anniversary of Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton, pioneers of Oregon, and Mr. and Mrs. Walter C. Clements, our postmaster for the past several years. Mr. and Mrs. Knighton were married on Sept. 20, 1860, in Forest Grove, Oregon, they having come to Oregon in 1847, and are now well along in years as Mr. Knighton is about 87 years of age and his wife is about the same age. They have had three children, all deceased, two boys and one girl and all lived to be grown; the eldest son was married and had a family. They have three grandchildren and four great-grandchildren. But what I started in to tell was about the way they were treated on their marriage anniversary. They were taken completely by surprise when ten or a dozen of their neighbors marched in on them last Monday just before noon with baskets and plates loaded with eatables of every kind and arranged the table for them to have a sumptuous dinner.
    Mrs. Knighton's health is so poor that she could not enjoy the eating of the food, but the aged couple were so delighted that they could not find language to express their feelings.
    While Mr. and Mrs. Clements have a host of friends here there was no special demonstration made as they are likely to live to enjoy a score or more wedding anniversaries and when they are ready to celebrate their sixtieth, if they are still living in this neighborhood, probably will have as many friends visit them at that time as the venerable couple just referred to.
    W. M. Lewis, formerly of Flounce Rock, but now of Medford, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage to take the Prospect stage for his old home. There were three other passengers on the stage for Butte Falls.
    Mack Stille, of the Stille brothers sawmill on Indian Creek, was a business caller Tuesday and so was W. H. Crandall and Charlie Cingcade, one of our stockmen.
    R. C. McGill of Medford and a friend were here for dinner Tuesday.
    Ed Houston of Trail and Guy Pruett, who has a farm southwest of here, were also business callers.
    Lewis Martin and George Fisher of Trail came in Tuesday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside and so did M. M. Chenoworth of Aberdeen, Wash., who was passing through looking for a warmer and dryer country than Washington and in the meantime looking for a job. He is a house carpenter and has his tools with him.
    Fred Pelouze, one of our substantial farmers and dairy men, was in town Tuesday. He says that he has entirely gotten over the effects of his fall.
    A. C. Edler of Lake Creek, one of the old substantial citizens of that country, was a business caller and so was C. R. Farrier and wife of Lake Creek. Mrs. Farrier's sister, Miss M. E. Porter, has recovered from the trouble with her foot and went out today, Wednesday, on the Butte Falls stage to Derby to take charge of the school in that district.
    Mrs. Allen of Wellen was in town today.
    W. H. Isbell, the foreman on Wm. von der Hellen's ranch four miles north of here, was in town today and reports that his wife's sister, Mrs. G. Wilcox, had arrived on the stage today, but did not say where she came from. His wife is in very poor health and her sister has come to help care for her.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 27, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday Jack Thrasher, R. Hayman and R. W. Knight, three of the men who had been working on the county road between the Reese Creek school house and the Vestal place, called for late dinner. They had finished the job of grading the road and were bringing the machinery out. Mr. Thrasher has been in charge of the work and the other two men are helpers, Mr. Knight having charge of the Caterpillar and Mr. Hayman seemed to be caring for the pulverizer and graders. After they had eaten their dinner they started the train, the truck taking the trap wagon across the wagon bridge, and then came the job of taking the big Caterpillar across the creek. In order to come in so as to strike the grade just right, they had to describe a perfect S starting in so as to cross an irrigating ditch near the wagon bridge and then turn up the creek so as to strike the ford just right and them make a turn at right angles so as the strike the grade, a very steep, narrow and rocky grade, just so that the pulverizer and two graders would follow exactly, but when the machines were in the right position the Caterpillar slacked up and dropped the trailer and went up the hill O.K. Then they hitched a cable to the tongue of the first trailer and attached it to the Caterpillar and they all three went up the hill as easy as Old Robin could take up a chair. It was a question whether Mr. Thrasher and his crew would be able to make the turns so as to go up the hill, but he did. There was almost every man in town that could leave his work, or loafing, turned out to see them cross the creek. Those who have passed judgment on the job of grading the road report that they have done a fine job, and now if [sic] can have two weeks of pleasant weather.
    Mr. Thrasher thinks that the rock crusher crew can make a fine road over that horrible, sticky three and a half miles of road that has been such a drawback to this and the Butte Falls sections of the county.
    It seems that Wig Jacks' troubles do not come single, in addition to his losing his barn by fire he last Wednesday went out to where he had staked his milk cow in his alfalfa and found her dead. She died from bloat caused from eating too much wet alfalfa.
    Wednesday afternoon Mrs. R. C. Ferrier of Lake Creek and Mrs. Ernest E. Smith, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Los Angeles, called and later in the afternoon Mr. Ferrier called and took his wife home. She had been to Butte Falls on business while Mrs. Smith and child remained overnight and went to Medford on the early stage at 7:15, on her way to join her husband in Los Angeles, who is in business there.
    Mr. and Mrs. George Leidman of Los Angeles passed through here Wednesday. They had been out among the orchardists looking over the fruit prospects. He is one of a company of four professional fruit packers from Southern California who have been here the past three or four years packing fruit. One of the four has been stopping here with us for the past week or two, Mr. John Jones, making fruit boxes for Mr. Tronson and today starts to make boxes on the Bell (Corbin) orchard.
    Ed Morgan, who bought the Shively place, has been stopping for the past few days in the home of his father, W. P. Morgan, who is off on a vacation in the Willamette Valley.
    J. T. Carpenter of Princeton, Ind., and his daughter, Mrs. H. J. Otto of Evansville, Ind., arrived Wednesday afternoon and called simply for a short visit as Mr. Carpenter and wife, now deceased, boarded with us for several weeks a few years ago. They were with Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crandall, who is looking after his interests here while he is away. He owns an eighty-acre orchard that Mr. Crandall is caring for.
    J. D. Pierce of Trail, L. F. Hall of Prospect, George Fisher, Lewis Martin and Henry Trusty of Trail came in and spent Thursday night and went to Medford on the early stage Friday, and Mr. Pierce and J. L. Wise of Prospect spent Friday night with us.
    J. H. Smith of Chicago, who owns a small orchard near here, called Friday morning on his way out to the orchard.
    John Smith, one of the pioneers of this section, took supper with us Friday.
    Warren Starkey, representative of Hayes Fruit Savings Bank of Chicago and sales manager of school books, Clyde E. Wilson, factory representative of a tire and rubber company and M. B. Beldon, Portland, and two men from near Phoenix were here for dinner Friday.
    J. L. Robertson was in town this Saturday and reported that his boys had started today for Lakeview in a car to go via Crater Lake and at last reports the snow was seven feet deep at the lake. They will likely have to camp this side of the summit.
    Frank Rhodes, Marshall Minter and Fred Pettegrew and son Charles were business callers.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 28, 1920, page 5


ELK CREEK
    Mr. and Mrs. D. Miller of San Francisco are again spending some time at the Rogue Elk.
    F. B. McDonald closed his business for the season, and left for Eugene. He expects to resume it next season, on a much larger scale.
    Lieutenant and Mrs. E. H. Holt and baby of the Marine barracks, navy yard, Puget Sound, are guests at the hotel for some weeks.
    Mrs. J. E. McDonald visited Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Borden of Medford.
    Dr. C. C. Van Scoyoc is spending a few days at his summer home here, enjoying the hunting season.
    Miss Gladys McDonald leaves Sunday for Eugene to attend school this winter.
    Van Heffner was a Medford visitor today.
    Mrs. Dr. Dean and Mrs. Folger of Medford were dinner guests at the Rogue Elk.
    Mr. and Mrs. Parkhurst of Crater Lake are guests at the Rogue Elk.
    H. D. McDonald left for Seattle to attend the University of Washington.
    The salmon fishing activities at the government hatchery, which was delayed on account of the recent rains, has again been resumed.
    Mr. and Mrs. T. Todd and J. E. McDonald are Medford visitors today.
    Mr. Johnson, whose home burned recently, left for the valley to work this winter.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 30, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after writing the Eaglets I took my usual stroll around town to pick up any little incidents that I might find to help make up a readable article for the Mail Tribune, and had not gone far before I met Wort Pool, James F. Johnson and Thomas F. Nichols, three of our farmers, who had come in to do a little trading and renew acquaintances.
    In a short time I met J. H. French and son Lloyd. I have occasion to mention their being in town once in a while for they, especially J. H. French, for he is one of the citizens who is wide awake and is demonstrating the fact that if a man has a small farm where he can raise a few tons of alfalfa hay so as to be able to keep a few cows and a few dozen hens, that he can not only make a good living and if he is in debt, can get out of debt and soon have a bank account of his own. But what I started out to say of Mr. French and son was that they are extending their business from a few hens to a considerable number. They had just been up in Josephine County and bought eight dozen White Leghorn hens of the O.A.C. strain and then down to Phoenix and secured three dozen more of the same kind of hens, and an incubator capable of hatching 33½ dozen chicks at a time, provided that all the eggs hatch. He has sent off and procured a fine lot of registered cocks and intends to turn their attention to raising thoroughbred chickens. Those they have just purchased added to what they had on hand runs their stock up to about 400, and with their experience in the poultry business and the careful oversight of Mrs. French to aid them we predict that in a short time they will be counted among the leading poultry men in Rogue River Valley.
    Just as I was meeting Mr. French and son, Roy Ashpole was demonstrating how his new grease gun would work by injecting auto grease into his auto, and just about that time Alex Betz and Carl Bergman joined the company.
    The lovely and much-needed rain that we have been having the past week has passed over and left the sky clear and bright for our Sunday morning duties and after attending Sunday school and going to the post office to get the mail, and getting comfortably seated and looking over the Medford Sun, just about that time the guests began to arrive and by the time they were all here and your correspondent had secured the names and residence of the guests, I found that I had just twenty-nine, although I didn't have all of their names as there were two men and a lady whose names I did not secure.
    Among them was Glen Haley and Miss Stella Anderson of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Riley D. Henson, Medford, Gus Gustine and wife, J. P. Oswald, Judge George Gardner, wife and daughter, Mrs. William von der Hellen, son Hugo and daughter Joyce, Mrs. Fred McPherson, Florence Milligan, Josephine Madden, Rena Prater, J. C. Milligan, Raymond Reter and family, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Armstrong, U.S. livestock inspector, Medford, and later C. H. Natwick, highway contractor.
    Mrs. Arglee Green of Los Angeles, who passed through here a week or more ago for Seattle, returned and stopped to visit her sister, Mrs. Floyd Pearce, and to look after her property here, and called on your correspondent Monday morning on her way home.
    Earl Ulrich and Herb Carlton of Prospect passed through here Monday morning on their way to Medford with a nice lot of beef cattle for the Medford market and returned today, Wednesday, and stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner. Wilson and Carl Stanley of Lake Creek went out to Medford Monday morning and Lewis Geppert, who has been working in the neighborhood for some time went up home near Butte Falls Monday on the Butte Falls stage.
    Speaking about the traffic on the different stage routes, especially on the Butte Falls route, the cars have been crowded and in several instances the driver, Rob Harnish, has had to leave them for want of room and then he would have five to seven passengers each way.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman came in Monday and on her way her horse shied and broke one of the shafts of her buggy, but W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, soon repaired it so she went on home that afternoon.
    F. M. Wilson, who has a ranch on the P.&E. near Derby, Mr. King, who has a homestead on the Butte Falls road and Charley Manning, who lives on the Prospect road, called for dinner Monday.
    Mrs. J. L. Robertson and Mrs. Susan Hart drove in Monday on business and remained until after the evening mail came in from Medford.
    Chris Beale, one of the forest rangers who has been stationed out in the vicinity of Lodge Pole since last June, came in on the stage from Butte Falls Monday.
    Steve Smith and family passed through here Monday on their way from Medford, where they had been to do their trading, on their way home.
    George Frey and his brother of near the McAllister Soda Springs were here Monday afternoon and so was W. H. Crandall and family; they had been to Medford on business.
    John Howard, one of the vets of '61, spent Monday night at the Sunnyside.
    W. G. Knighton made a hurried trip to Medford and back Tuesday, and W. W. Parker of Butte Falls went up home on the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning.
    Miss Lola Roberts, who has been out in Klamath County for some time, returned home last Sunday and her sister--I have forgotten her name--has gone to Merrill to teach school.
    Mrs. F. M. Stewart of Oakland, Cal., who came up with the remains of her husband, who died in their home in Oakland and was buried in Medford last Saturday, and three of her daughters, Mrs. Norman McQuoid of Oakland, Calif., Mrs. E. P. Watther of Spokane, and Mrs. J. W. Grover of Medford and her son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Perry of Eagle Point were here visiting friends Tuesday.
    George Ford of Central Point called Tuesday for dinner while on his way to the Wm. von der Hellen ranch to shear his goats.
    Mrs. Comings, formerly Mrs. George Wamsley of this place, but now of Central Point, was out looking after her property here Tuesday.
    Mr. Trowbridge and Mrs. Boyden of Medford came in from the McAllister Soda Springs and report that they had succeeded in killing a bear and one deer. Mrs. Boyden's son accompanied them.
    Wm. Nichol of Lake Creek was a business caller Tuesday.
    C. H. Natwick, Henry Trusty and F. Frideger spent Tuesday night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 30, 1920, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart spent Sunday evening visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    Mrs. George Weeks spent Sunday afternoon visiting at the Rogue Elk Hotel.
    The Sumner family have returned from an extended absence, where they were picking prunes.
    Mr. Keva Hutchinson spent Sunday visiting his parents, returning to Medford with his father, Mr. S. W. Hutchinson, Monday morning.
    There was a basket dinner for the church people at Trail Sunday. There was preaching services in the afternoon.
    Mr. Dave Pence was elected superintendent of the Sunday school and Mr. Frank Houston assistant.
    The Clary brothers of Ashland spent Sunday looking the country over, Saturday stopping for a visit with Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson.
    The rain this week caught several farmers with their hay down. However, if the sun shines for a few days no damage will be done.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 6, 1920, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I finished my letter Wednesday, I found that I was in danger of ruffling the temper of our naturally good-natured editor of the Mail Tribune if I made my letter any longer, so I just stopped writing before I used up all the little items I had jotted down, and among them was the fact that Charles Brown of Medford, who owns a fine orchard on the Medford-Eagle Point road was out in our section of the country looking over the fruit prospect, and dropped into the Sunnyside for dinner Wednesday and also that Horace Geppert of Butte Falls came in about the same time and satisfied his appetite at the same table. He was on business and stopped long enough to eat dinner, returning home that evening.
    Walter Wood, one of our leading business stockmen, was out in the country south of Ashland buying beef cattle for the California market and succeeded in securing quite a fine lot, he reports.
    Mr. and Mrs. David Ball and Mrs. Duffrey of Crescent City, brother-in-law and sisters of Mrs. Frank Lewis, have been here visiting the Lewis family and Wm. Lewis went to Salem to attend the state fair for a few days, returning Friday morning.
    Wednesday evening Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Whitehead of Butte Creek orchard called for supper. Mr. Whitehead is the manager of the business on the Butte Creek orchard (Corbin) during the absence of Mr. Fred C. Bell, the present owner. And later in the evening Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Pinse, Mr. and Mrs. N. H. Kanison of Ashland and Mrs. R. W. Baker of San Jose, California, came in for supper. They had phoned ahead that they were coming.
    Thursday morning I went to Medford on the 7:15 stage and about the first thing I did after my arrival in the city, after meeting a number of friends, was to go to Dr. J. J. Emmens' office to enter my name and an application for his services, for he is so busy that in order to have prompt attention, one must register early. After attending to that duty my next move was to go to the Medford Mail Tribune office to leave my Saturday's writeup and try to transact a little business with that ever-going S. S. Smith, the business manager of the concern, and after waiting for some time I spied him, but found him too busy to even talk business and he finally made a date for 2:30 p.m., so I went at 2 and waited until after 3 p.m., and then got the editor's ear for a few minutes and succeeded in attending to the matter with him. If one wants to do business with that man Smith he had better have a good rope or a shotgun, for he is a goer. In the meantime, between my first visit and last to the Tribune office, I reported at Dr. Emmens' office and there met one of my neighbors, Mrs. M. L. Pruett, and her sister, Mrs. Ed Pottenger, who were in the waiting room to consult the doctor and in a few minutes his assistant, a very pleasant lady, called me and stationed me in the corner of the first room and then she called Mrs. Pruett and seated her in another room, and by this time the patients began to arrive in earnest and the lady kept bringing them in and I began to wonder if I had to sit in that corner all the forenoon, but the doctor soon came around and gave me the first test, and in a few minutes more, another and finally told me what he thought of my case. It was not as encouraging as one would hope for, but he told me to come again the first of the week and he would supply me with medicine that he thought would help me, so I will have to bother him again the first of the week. But while I am thus engaged I always have my eyes open to try to find something of interest to the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune.
    While I was in Medford the first man I met from this part of the country was Mr. J. Wittenberg, who is farming the Joe Rader place about two miles from Eagle Point and in addition to working that large farm, he also went and put up the hay on the Fred Pelouze place, so the reader may know that he goes some. I also met Mr. W. P. Haley, formerly of Eagle Point but now of Central Point, and he informed me that he had sold one of his Central Point places in Central Point to one of our promising citizens. I withhold his name, for I know that he is so reserved that he shuns publicity. I also met the Brittsan brothers, who are on the P. S. Anderson dairy farm a few miles above here on Rogue River. Besides quite a number of old acquaintances, among them some whom I have not met before for fifteen or sixteen years.
    During my absence Perry Foster, one of the pioneers of this country, and Mr. Neslin called for dinner and Mr. Foster left word for me that he had rented his farm to Mr. Neslin.
    Friday Ed Cowden came in on horseback and went on to Medford in a jitney, returning the same day.
    J. L. Robertson came in town early Friday morning and reported that the wind Thursday had blown down a large silo that Mr. Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, had just put up on his place just north of town, a mile or so, and Mr. Lewis was planning to fill it with feed for his sheep as soon as Mr. Weidman got through with the cutter and engine. Mr. Weidman is filling his silo today, Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Manuel Leidman and his brother, George Leidman, and family, passed through here Friday on their way up to Mrs. Manuel Leidman's parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman, in the Blue Canyon country, the two brothers wanting to kill a deer apiece before they go back to Los Angeles. Mr. John Jones was with them, but did not go up with them, but remained here until after supper and then went up to the Butte Creek orchard.
    Grover Neil of Ashland and Wilbur Ashpole, Medford, who had been up on Butte Creek to the Stanley ranch to look at some beef cattle, stopped at the Sunnyside Friday for dinner, and Charley Winkle was also a diner at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Dollie Skeen and her son, George, of Dorris, California, came in and spent the night Friday evening on their way up to her son-in-law's, R. C. Conley, near Butte Falls. They took the wrong road and went out of their way, via Brownsboro, etc.
    We had a show, vaudeville, and dance here last night, and I asked one of the men who attended and he reports that it was very good. I understand that the manager had quite a time trying to find the recorder of our town, so he could get a permit, but he looked in vain, for since J. V. McIntyre resigned several months ago we have had no recorder and the council has not met for several moons.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 6, 1920, page 9


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Alice Humphrey of Derby, who is attending the Medford high school, came out Saturday morning on the stage and was met here by her father and went out home to spend Sunday. Miss Oatman of Talent also came out on the Lake Creek stage and went to Medford.
    H. L. Vradenburg of Glendale came out from Medford and went to Butte Falls on the stage.
    The Rogue River Canal Co. has three large trucks and a force of men hauling lumber from our P.&E. depot up along their canal.
    R. A. Weidman has just about finished filling his silo with sunflowers. He claims that it makes splendid feed for milk cows.
    W. Y. Marshall of Central Point came over to have his horse shod by our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, he being an expert shoer. He was met here by his son Walter and family of Brownsboro.
    W. E. Webb of Derby was also a business caller and while here procured a load of seed grain and took it home with him.
    A. C. Spence and wife of Brownsboro were also callers and so was G. W. Isbell.
    W. A. Hauser of Portland was here for dinner and so was Nick Young.
    F. J. Ayres and wife were in town on their way to Medford and when they returned seemed to have their Ford loaded with supplies.
    George Stowell and family, who have a fine farm on the bank of Rogue River, were also in town Saturday afternoon and while here I saw that he was having quite a lot of nails weighed out in Ashpole's hardware store, so I began asking questions and learned that they were putting up a new barn, and while Mr. Stowell was busy I asked Mrs. Stowell how many hens they had now and she replied that they did not have very many hens as they had sold off quite a lot and had bought a lot of pullets, that counting them they had about 800 altogether. They have been making a specialty of the hen business, turning their attention to the production of eggs. I asked if they raised any chickens and she said no, that they kept no cocks but that next year they would make a change and raise chickens as well as sell eggs. In addition to their egg business they are milking quite a number of cows and have to build a new barn to store away feed. In addition to what I have already referred to they have installed an electric light and power motor plant, run by gasoline motor, so that they have light all over the place, in the house, barn, woodshed, hen house and yard, and in addition to that have all the power they want for washing machine, flatiron, grindstone, pump, etc., and all this is the result of industry, economy and good management.
    Wm. Perry, wife and Mrs. Perry's sister, Mrs. Leroy Smith returned from Medford Saturday afternoon. I had notes for what I have written thus far when I wrote last Saturday so had to keep them for this letter.
    Sunday morning was a very nice and pleasant morning but there were not many came in for dinner as it seems a little late in the season, but those who did come had their regular chicken dinner just the same and among the guests was Geo. McDonald, Mrs. C. H. Natwick, Henry Trusty, who came in from the Crater Lake Highway camp Saturday evening and spent the day. In addition to them there were Mr. and Mrs. Gustine (Gus the Tailor), Mrs. Wm. Perry, Mrs. L. A. Smith, Rob Harnish and wife, Lloyd Stanley, Miss Nora Childreth, J. E. Mooney and R. Murk from Steward, Alaska, Florence Meligan, Nora Frater, Josephine Madden of Kenneth Hotel, Medford, and while the five last mentioned were here they took photos of each other standing amid the beautiful flowers in the Sunnyside garden.
    We also had as guests R. E. Nealon and Mrs. C. F. Meier of Jefferson, Ore. They were out to look over our noted agate fields. George Albert of the Dupray mill was also a diner Sunday noon and later in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Holmes of Seattle, Mr. Chincapan of Pekin, China, Mr. Gates of Portland, Mr. Chrys F. L. White of Kansas City, who represents Puts [P&G?] greaseless soap, Mrs. Andy Anderson, formerly of Patagonia, S.E., visiting the U.S.A. for the first time and Mr. Rosenberg, owner of Bear Creek orchard. They called during the afternoon simply to see and be seen. They seemed to be completely carried away with our valley and when they saw the vegetables growing in our garden they seemed to doubt their own eyes. They seemed to be guests of Mr. Rosenberg and were out for pleasure.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our leading orchardists, was in town Monday and has a force of pickers at work gathering his crop of apples. He seems to think that the hail storms did not do as much damage as he feared it would.
    Miss Mina Minter and her two sisters, Mrs. W. E. Hammond and Mrs. John Castor, were in town Monday.
    George Hollenbeck and Bert Higinbotham of Prospect were diners a the Sunnyside Monday.
    Rudolph Pech passed through our town Monday having a fine-looking white bull in his truck; as he did not stop we did not learn his destination or pedigree.
    Wm. Stanley of Lake Creek was a business caller also Monday and so was Frank Neil, who came out on the Butte Falls stage on his way to Medford. He had been spending the summer at the Union Creek highway camp, keeping the books for the Eagle Point Construction Company.
    Ralph Bieberstedt and his sister, Miss Orga, were in town Monday getting binding twine to tie up corn.
    Harry Stanley and his mother-in-law, Mrs. John Rader, were trading and looking after their banking interests here Monday.
    Dave Pence, one of the rustling farmers of Trail, and E. V. Brittsan were also among us Monday and so was James Vogeli, the man that owned the Tavern when the state went dry, who was shaking hands with his old friends. He is now, I understand, interested in the oil industry in Nevada.
    James Leabo of Trail, who has been spending the summer in Tillamook County, came in Monday and took a room, remaining until this Wednesday morning, taking passage on the Persist stage for his home.
    Everett Abbott and Wm. Welch of Butte Falls also came in the same evening for supper and then went on up home that night, and Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of Dead Indian Soda Springs called and spent the night.
    Tuesday morning your Eagle Point correspondent took passage on the 7:15 stage for Medford to have Dr. Emmens put in my new lens so as to improve my ability to distinguish one person from another, and of course I reached Medford entirely too soon to find him in his office, but when I visited the office found that the doctor was performing an operation in the hospital and on further inquiry learned that he was removing the tonsils from the throat of one of our prominent merchants, Mr. William Brown. I saw them both start out of Eagle Point that morning about 7 a.m. and learned when I met his brother of his having the operation performed. After getting my glasses arranged all O.K. I had nothing to do but visit and read, which I did all night. Among those I met that day was Geo. McDonald, who, it will be remembered, has been in charge of the rock work on the Crater Lake Highway this summer, and now he goes back up there to go to work for the U.S. government putting crushed rock on the road just graded. I also met T. C. Gaines, one of the leading stockmen of the Trail country. He was in town arranging to get cars to ship his beef cattle.
    While I was in Dr. Emmens' office I met Mrs. Sears and her daughter, who were there for treatment. I also met Harry Young, formerly of the Medford Mail Tribune force. But I see that I am getting this letter entirely too long and will have to stop to save my credit with the entire Mail Tribune force. More anon.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 12, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I had to stop before I used up the list of items I had jotted down so now I will start in where I left off and give some of the main ones.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Spence of Brownsboro were here Tuesday, Mr. Spence is the supervisor of the Brownsboro road district and from what I can learn from those who travel over his roads he has been doing some fine work up there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walter Meyer, who are making a specialty of the dairy business and raising poultry, especially turkeys and ducks, as well as raising quite a number of chickens, were in town Tuesday.
    Tuesday I made another trip to Medford to see Dr. Emmens, the oculist, and have him place the new lenses in my spectacles, and found him as busy as ever, but it took him but a very few moments to arrange them, so the rest of the day I had to look around, see my friends, visit and incidentally pick up an item for the Mail Tribune. I have already mentioned in my last several incidents among which was that Wm. Brown, one of our merchants, who had his tonsils removed by Dr. Emmens the day I was in town, is getting along fine at this date, Saturday, and soon will be eating anything he wants as usual.
    Tuesday evening when I reached home I found that the following persons were there to spend the night, the most of them to take rooms and start the next morning to pick apples in the Tronson and Little Butte orchards. Among them were Mr. and Mrs. Purinton of Portland; Wm. C. Benton, Eugene; M. C. Hill, and F. A. Hill of Yreka, Cal., W. J. Hantley and E. V. Peterson, the present mail contractor, who is carrying the mail from here to Persist. I might say that the original contractor was unable to fill his contract and he sublet the contract to Mr. Adamson and he to Mr. Peterson, up to Oct.1st, when it became necessary for the bondsmen to hire somebody to carry it for the next 21 months and they have made a contract with the aforesaid E. V. Peterson to carry it the rest of the time, and he has engaged room and board at the Sunnyside for the present at least. Speaking of the stages, they seem to have about all they can do now as it is necessary often to engage seats a day in advance.
    Mrs. Day was at the Sunnyside Tuesday night. She is the wife of Rev. Day of Butte Falls and had the misfortune to dislocate her shoulder some time ago and was taken by Dr. Holt to the hospital in Medford to set it, then came out here to spend the night going on up home Friday morning on the stage. Ernest Abbott, also of Butte Falls, who came out to work in the orchards, spent the night with us.
    Henry Trusty, who has been running a truck all summer for the Eagle Point Construction Company, has been making his regular trips, bringing out tools that have been used in building the Crater Lake Highway, has been making the Sunnyside his headquarters and had finally got through and gone up to his home on Elk Creek. The company has finished their job and the work has been accepted by the proper engineer and I understand that the work is highly spoken of by the inspectors.
    Mrs. D. Bradshaw of Brownsboro was an early caller Thursday morning.
    John L. Robinson, Jr., has been roofing the Rev. L. L. Simmons house, where he is living with his family.
    Benj. Whetstone, one of our enterprising farmers, was in town Thursday.
    Rudolph Pech, another one of our hustling Lake Creek farmers, has been and still is hauling out his crop of potatoes to Medford and also distributing them along the road. He is now making two trips a day from his farm to Medford. He and his family are goers. We tried to get him on the phone yesterday, Friday, and I was calling his attention to the fact and he said that about noon was the only time between midnight and midnight when he could be found by the hello girl as they are always busy, and the results on his farm show it. He has a fine crop of spuds this fall.
    Mrs. Sherman Wooley and two children went to Butte Falls on the stage Friday morning.
    Kay Loosley and another stockman from Fort Klamath came in Friday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and returned the same day to the Fort.
    John Howard, one of the veterans of the Civil War, stayed with us Friday night on his way to Los Angeles to spend the winter.
    Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, passed through here Friday morning on his way to his ranch to assist in rebuilding his silo. The reader will remember that we had a little windstorm about eight or ten days ago and that it blew down.
    The Stanley Bros. took out a nice lot of cows to the Medford market. Judging from appearances there were about one hundred.
    There was a party went through here Friday with a new circular saw for the Conley and Cottrell mill near Butte Falls.
    Earl Ulrich of Flounce Rock, one of our hustling stockmen, was a business caller also.
    W. J. Hartley, I. A. Richardson, Ray Dillinger of Idaho and Wm. A. Holmes of the firm known as the Rogue River Land Company called for dinner Friday morning and so did J. E. Reid of Portland.
    John Iseli, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Glendale, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage going to Butte Falls and so was Mr. McCall of Prospect.
    J. D. Pierce of Trail and Frank Ganiard of Medford and J. C. Reynolds of Washington, D.C., were here for dinner Saturday. Mr. Reynolds is in the employ of the government in the Chamber of Commerce of Agriculture, taking statistics of products in that line. He came out on the stage and hired S. H. Harnish to take him to Trail and back and he and Mr. Harnish took dinner together.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1920, page 5


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. Hollenbeak has been hauling sorghum cane this last week.
    Mr. Thomas and family are moving into the Ryan place. Mr. Summer, who was living there, moved to the valley.
    Tom Spangler, who has been lookout on Bald Mountain since June, returned Monday, Oct. 4.
    Mr. Adams, who owns the store at McLeod, returned from Medford with a load of gasoline.
    Dave Pence and Fred Sturgis made a trip to Medford to see about their beef.
    Ed Phillips made a business trip out to Eagle Point.
    Ace and George Weeks were helping at the Bar Eight ranch with the hay. S. W. Hutchinson, who owns the ranch, will have about 175 tons of hay this year.
    Charlie Fellows passed through here on his way to the mountains to gather his beef.
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart made a business trip to Medford last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson have been helping his father, S. W. Hutchinson, with the hay this week
Medford Mail Tribune, October 15, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday afternoon after I had finished writing my letter for the Medford Mail Tribune, I met Mr. Corbett Smith, one of the Butte Falls stockmen, but found that our streets were about cleared of the visitors, but in a short time there was a company of five came in for supper, i.e., Fred Mears, Charley Terrill, J. B. Coleman, A. C. Walker and H. A. Canaday of Medford, all on their way to Lake Creek to hold a Republican rally, but they stopped long enough to take supper and tend to a little campaigning for Harding. And they had hardly got under way before Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Snider and Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Norton of Ashland, representatives of the E. N. Norton Motor Company of Ashland. They came up to take supper at the Sunnyside and attend the dance that was given that evening in our opera house. In the course of a half hour, Mrs. Eugene Thompson of Jacksonville, Miss Susanne W. Homes, our present county school superintendent and F. S. Carter of Gold Hill called for supper. They were also on their way to Lake Creek to take part in the exercises in the grand rally. It was the arrangement to have Mr. Mears, Mr. Canaday and Miss Homes act as the principal speakers, but if they kept Messrs. Coleman and Terrill still they would have accomplished wonders, for they have so many friends in that section that it would be hard for them to keep quiet. Miss Homes is also a candidate for election to fill the office she is now filling by appointment. I have not heard what kind of a crowd they had or the success they had.
    That same evening Mr. and Mrs. Thomas D. Laws and family of three children came in to spend the night. They had come from their home in Philadelphia, Pa., through the Yellowstone park, Idaho, Washington and through Oregon this far, coming from Medford to Crater Lake, and in coming from Crater Lake, when they reached Elk Creek they took the wrong road, turning up the stream instead of following Rogue River down, and before they discovered their mistake found themselves with three miles of Persist and there they had a break in their auto and had to call a man from Eagle Point garage to come to their relief and the result was they had to have their auto "towed" out, getting to the Sunnyside about 8 p.m. They had the break repaired and after eating a Sunday dinner at the Sunnyside started for Los Angeles, where they expect to spend the winter.
    There was quite a good attendance at the dance Saturday night, and those who took part report that they must have sold at least a hundred tickets and the result was that the beds in the Sunnyside were about all occupied.
    Sunday morning was one of the most delightful mornings we have had for some time, warm and pleasant, and the result was a goodly number of people from different parts of the country were among the guests for dinner. Among them was Mr. and Mrs. P. B. Harrison, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Davis, Mrs. H. H. Kerr of Medford and Mr. E. L. Hogan of Detroit, Mich.; Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Hittson and Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Gannaway and R. Gannaway of Medford.
    Rathburn S. Willing from Moose Jaw, Sask., Canada, at present one of the teachers in Gold Hill, also Marguerite Grayson, also from Canada, Miss Nellie Meaver, Ashland, Mrs. Lynn Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Lynn Smith of the Gold Hill bank, Mr. and Mrs. Horace Pelton, Sams Valley, and Gus the Tailor of Medford were also here.
    Mrs. R. A. Richardson of Hilt, Calif., came in on the stage Monday and went up to her former home on the Trail stage.
    J. W. Miller of Trail, who has been in Medford for the past few days, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and spent the night at the Sunnyside Monday night.
    J. W. Maxfield, W. E. Hammond, Fred N. Armes, were business callers Monday and Earl Tucker of Brownsboro came in to have his horse shod.
    John Iseli of Glendale, who has been up to Butte Falls on business and to visit one of his countrymen (a Swiss), came out in the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday.
    Mr. Joyce, Rube Johnson, Alex Mathews, Nick Young, Thomas Cingcade and E. V. Brittsan were also transacting business in Eagle Point Monday.
    Al Hildreth of Butte Falls came in Monday evening and engaged a room. He is engaged picking apples on the Tronson orchard. The continuous showers of rain that we have been having greatly interferes with the apple picking and Tuesday there were a number of the pickers went up to their homes near Butte Falls, but returned today, Wednesday.
    Elijah Hurd, one of the Medford attorneys, came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday from his farm near Prospect.
    Clarence Clark, who has a homestead near Derby, was also a passenger on the stage for Medford.
    J. P. Hughes, the principal merchant of Butte Falls, came in Tuesday evening from Medford and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and so did Mrs. Day of Butte Falls, the wife of the Presbyterian minister of that place. She had dislocated her shoulder some time ago and let it go without having it set and when Dr. Holt set it, it became necessary for her to have it treated so she came out and spent the night with us and went to Medford this morning.
    Miss Ethel Holman of Wellen, a sister of our townsman, Mr. Holman, was dealing with our merchants on Tuesday.
    Mr. O. M. Goss, one of our leading citizens, went to Medford to have Dr. Emmens perform an operation on his nose, having a malformation removed a few days ago, and I learned Tuesday that he was getting along nicely.
    Miss Ruth Young, our primary teacher, has had quite an addition to her room, as she now has a regular attendance of nineteen and Miss Jose Riley, the principal, has sixteen in attendance.
    Wm. Coy, a brother of Mrs. H. E. Campbell, our banker's wife, came in Tuesday night for supper and bed. He is from Kansas and expects to remain here during the winter. He is visiting his sister.
    George Trusty of Elk Creek also spent the night with us and so did Mr. E. V. Peterson, the Eagle Point-Persist mail carrier and his daughter Edna. She carries the rural mail from Trail to Reese Creek on the east side of Rogue River when the roads are bad.
    Miss Lorine Walker of Hubbard, a granddaughter of our townsman, Mr. James Jordan, is here during her vacation visiting her "grandpa." She is a daughter of Mrs. M. S. Wolfer, formerly of this place, but now of Hubbard, Ore.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 21, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    The Stewart brothers of the Rogue River Ranch brought their beef out of the mountains last week. Mr. Will Stewart and Mr. Neil Olsen were riding for them.
    Mr. Hollenbeak is to make a trip soon to Houston's to get his sorghum.
    Mr. George and Ace Weeks brought their beef out of the mountains.
    Buyers for beef complain that not any of the beef in this section of the country is up to standard. That none of them are in good condition.
    Mr. Dave Pence, after some trouble finding a mount for him to ride, brought his cattle down out of the mountains.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 23, 1920, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday Miss Hilda Abbott and Mrs. Hildred Smith of Butte Falls called for dinner on their way up home. They had been working in the Edgell orchard, but the continuous showers made the sticky mud so that they could not lift their feet to the rungs of the ladder, so they concluded to suspend operations until more pleasant weather.
    Earl Ulrich and Thomas Carlton of Flounce Rock and Prospect were business callers also Wednesday afternoon.
    Sam Coy, one of our hustling farmers, who has leased his mother's farm and moved onto it on the Medford-Eagle Point road, has rented his own farm to Wm. Wright, and he has taken possession.
    W. P. Houston and George Cottrell of Butte Falls were passengers on the stage Thursday morning, and so was Graydon Childreth and family passengers on the stage for Butte Falls. Graydon was off for a hunt.
    Eli Dahack and his son, Earnest, came in early Thursday morning to W. L. Childreth's shop to have him do some repair work on their auto, and it was but a short time before C. E. Bellows came in with his auto for repairs and in the afternoon Mr. John Norris, foreman on the G. M. Wilfley orchard, brought his in, making three cars in one day. In fact, Mr. Childreth has about all the work that he can do in that line.
    John L. Robinson, Sr., one of our leading farmers, was in the same morning and reported that he had 20 or more tons of corn already shucked out, laying on the ground, where he had spread it out to dry in the sun on account of it being too damp to put in the bins, and that it was, and has been, exposed to all this rain, and fears are entertained that he will lose it all, as some of it that is lying next to the ground is already sprouting. The rain has also caught considerable of the last cutting of the alfalfa in the swath or shock. These showers that we have been having for the past month, while they are making the grass grow for the stock on the ranges, are doing considerable damage in that line, but will be a big help to the stockmen, for it will leave the cattle in fine shape for the coming winter, thus saving hundreds of tons of hay that otherwise would have been fed out.
    R. F. Muskopf, formerly of Prospect, but now the owner of what is known as the Grover place, was a business caller Thursday and Friday and Friday went through our town with a fine-looking combination of grain drill and disc cultivator.
    C. E. Bellows and wife, Fred Pettegrew, Mrs. Merritt and one of her sons, J. H. French and wife and Sam Coy were among the business callers Thursday. Mr. Bellows, who has been boarding the men who have been working with the rock crusher and hauling crushed rock onto the newly graded road on Reese Creek, reports that they have had to stop work altogether on account of the rain. When Mr. and Mrs. French came in to bring in their cream and eggs, I noted that they had only a few dozen eggs, and I naturally asked the cause of there being so few and he said that they had sold off their old stock of hens, and that those they had bought from Grants Pass were mostly molting, but that in a short time they would go to laying and then he would bring in eggs in abundance.
    Miss Susanne W. Holmes, our county school superintendent and candidate for the office for the next term, Miss Fuller--I did not learn her Christian name, or official position if she has one--and Mr. F. S. Carter of Gold Hill called for dinner and supper. They had been up in the Butte Falls country visiting some of the schools and were on their way to Medford.
    H. E. Campbell and wife and her brother, Fred Coy, recently from Kansas, were also guests at the Sunnyside Thursday evening for supper.
    Mr. W. Wagner of Elk Creek-Trail post office spent the night at the Sunnyside Thursday night.
    Rawles Moore, the Democratic candidate for district attorney, was out here for dinner Thursday and Friday. He seems to be very popular out here among the farmers as well as among the business men and ladies of our town and bids fair to carry this precinct.
    F. J. Maxfield of California, who has been visiting his son, F. J. Maxfield, Jr., came in and passed through here in company with his son on their way to Medford Friday morning.
    Mr. J. R. McMichell of Los Angeles, Cal., came in Friday forenoon for a room and meals for the day and night, as he wanted to go up on Round Top to look over a tract of timber land that belongs to his wife, formerly Mrs. Clark of this neighborhood.
    Mr. E. Hariranton of San Francisco was also her for dinner Friday with Eugene C. Bartlett of Ashland.
    Pete Young, one of our staid farmers, was a business caller Friday afternoon.
    J. W. Hovey, foreman on the Altavista orchard, made a hurried call on one of our business firms Friday.
    Mrs. Koontz of Butte Falls was visiting Mrs. Sherman Wooley Friday.
    Lucius Kincaid of Prospect came in with one of the tractors belonging to the Eagle Point Construction Company that had been used in building the Crater Lake Highway, and spent the night with us. And John Jones of Glendale came in Friday evening for a bed and breakfast. He has been out on the agate field gathering agates, and had quite a lot. He continued his hunt until about 1 p.m., going to Medford on the Medford-Butte Falls stage.
    Clifford Hickson was also with us Friday night.
    About 9 o'clock Friday evening, John Allen, his son, Walter, Benjamin Fredenburg, Theodore Fredenburg, Raleigh Conley, Dewey Hill and John Cobleigh came in and called for supper and beds. They had just brought a bunch of beef cattle from Butte Falls, and left them in Roy Stanley's pasture, and came to the Sunnyside, and complained of being hungry. Of course, they got their supper, beds and breakfast and went on their way rejoicing.
    Harry von der Hellen and little boy motored into town this Saturday morning, and so did John Owen. W. E. Hammel was also a business caller.
    W. E. Buell, Seattle; W. A. Johnston and H. A. Jerome of Portland called for dinner today. They seemed to be making special inquiry with regard to the irrigation projects around here and as to the value of our prairie land.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 25, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Saturday evening J. T. Whitehead and wife called for supper. Mr. Whitehead is the business manager for Mr. Fred C. Bell on the Butte Creek orchard. And about eight p.m., W. W. Willits of Persist, Dale Bonney, Drew; Fred Sturges, Trail; A. S. Tison and E. P. Hamlin, Drew, and Clifford Hickson, local, came in and called for supper. They had just come in from the Trail and Elk Creek country with a lot of beef cattle for Mr. L. Neil of Ashland.
    Mr. A. Von der Mark also came in and remained until Wednesday morning.
    I unintentionally omitted to state in my letter of Saturday, October 16, that Mr. and Mrs. Sam Coy of Eagle Point are the happy recipients of a baby boy on the 14th of October.
    Sunday morning was rather gloomy and the general rainy weather indicated that there would not be many guests come to the Sunnyside for dinner, but still the usual chicken dinner was served, but Mr. and Mrs. Norman Merrill and their two children were the only ones who came from Medford to enjoy it.
    Monday Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Ulrich of Jacksonville were here for dinner. They were out arranging for a meeting to be held on Monday evening at 8 o'clock in the opera house for the purpose of hearing Colonel H. H. Sargent speak on the subject of moving the county seat from Jacksonville to Medford.
    In addition to them we also had Mr. E. V. Brittsan, one of the leading dairy men in this section of the country, and in addition to his work in the dairy business he is also interested to a considerable extent in the chicken industry, as he raises quite a lot of chickens for the Medford market. After he had eaten his dinner he gave us, the family, a very interesting account of how he managed his dairy and poultry business. Wm. Welch and Miss Hilda Abbott of Butte Falls also came in for dinner.
    The continuous rains have interfered very much with the fall work among the farmers and orchardists, as the pickers could not pick, and in many instances the pickers became discouraged and have quit and gone elsewhere to find work, and in some of the orchards where the ground is sticky they are not able to haul the fruit out of the orchard and I understand that in the Butte Creek orchard that they have 2000 boxes already picked that they are not able to haul to the packing house, and on account of the rain, there is great danger of having the fruit fall off of the trees, especially if we should have a brisk wind.
    Eli Dahack was in town and reports that he has 8 or 10 tons of squashes out in the field that he is unable to get in on account of the continuous rain, but we have been now without any rain for almost two days, Tuesday and today, Wednesday, so we live in hopes of a letup for a few weeks so that the orchard men and farmers can get their fall work done up. But we are not the only ones who are thus troubled, for I see by the Portland papers that in the Hood River country they are having the same trouble.
    Perry Farlow of Lake Creek came in and spent the night Monday, and so did A. A. Belisle, who has a homestead near the McAllister Soda Springs. He was on his way to Portland.
    Mr. R. A. Weidman, one of our leading dairymen, went to Medford Monday to attend the meeting held there in the interest of the dairy business. He is one of our enterprising citizens, who believes in getting all of the information possible on the subject.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, Thomas F. Nichols, one of our leading farmers, and Alex Betz started for the hills to get their quota of venison last Monday.
    E. C. Bartlett of Ashland was here for supper Tuesday evening.
    Mr. J. R. McNichols, recently of Los Angeles, who owns a tract of timber land on Round Top, went to Medford, returning Monday evening, and has decided to settle among us, has sent for his family and rented rooms of Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy.
    Thomas Anderson of Reese Creek spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Bartlett of Ashland had a band of about 1500 sheep pass through our town this Wednesday morning on the way to Ashland.
    Harry Hayes of Indian Creek was in town this morning, buying supplies for winter.
    Mrs. John Norris was visiting her sister, Mrs. Gus Nichols, this morning, it being her birthday, and she reminded her of the fact by making her a nice present of a cake dish.
    Mr. Barker, the Butte Falls banker, came out over the new Reese Creek road and says that he has been traveling it for the past nine years, and that it is in a worse condition now than he ever saw it, notwithstanding there has been $20,000 expended on it already.
    W. H. Crandall and L. L. Conger were here Tuesday and word came this morning over the phone that Mr. Conger was stricken with a paralytic stroke, but have not heard how seriously he is stricken.
    W. E. Hammel was in town getting batteries for his gasoline wood saw.
    Today noon Buel Hildreth and wife came in for dinner. They were on their way from Crescent City, where they have been working for the past two months to their old home, Butte Falls.
    Henry Meyer and wife were business callers this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Thos. Anderson of Reese Creek spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside.
    Thos. Cingcade, who is operating a wood saw in this neighborhood, had the misfortune to get his hand caught in the saw and badly cut. Dr. Holt, our local physician, dressed the wound and he thinks that he will soon be able to resume his usual place again.
    Frank Netherland of Butte Falls was among the passengers on the Butte Falls stage Thursday.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, and two or three others who went out hunting have returned and report that they captured one deer.
    R. C. McGill and W. H. Hooker of the Earl Fruit Co., Medford, were out Thursday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Lucius Kincaid, Mrs. F. Coy and the man who reads the electric meters for the California-Oregon Power Company.
    Robert McCabe came in Thursday on his motorcycle and took out a lot of hardware with him.
    J. H. French and his father-in-law, Perry Foster, were in town Thursday and reports that a company has been organized consisting of Miss Ruth Nichols, her brother, Thomas F. Nichols and himself, and have let a contract to Frank Rhodes to make a canal to take water out of Rogue River to irrigate their farms, and that the camp had been established and they expect to have sufficient water the coming season to put their whole farms under water, and they expect to be able to raise an abundant crop of alfalfa the coming season.
    John Zimmerlee of Trail has been hauling stove wood in for Roy Ashpole since the rain ceased to fall.
    Dave Smith has moved into the Wolfer house, now owned by Wm. Perry.
    F. W. Crane and his son, H. H. Crane of Tillamook County, Oregon, are here visiting their uncle, M. S. Wood, one of the veterans of the Civil War.
    Mr. Myron S. Hermann, a traveling salesman of Eugene, was here for supper Thursday evening and went on to Medford that night.
    R. M. Conley and Everett Abbott of Butte Falls were guests at the Sunnyside Thursday.
    George Holmes, S. B. Holmes, Harold Van Scoy and J. W. Prillaman went out for a hunt and up to Saturday noon had not reported.
    Mrs. Reeder of Ashland has been visiting the family of Gus Nichols.
    Lucius Kincaid of Prospect, who has been working for the Eagle Point Construction Company on the Crater Lake Highway, has been engaged the past few days bringing out a large tractor for the company and had considerable trouble on account of the condition of the roads. He finally took a large truck up to where he left it, loaded it into the truck and finally succeeded in bringing it out.
    George Givan and son Charles were here on business Friday. They are among our leading farmers and stockmen and are up-to-date dairy men.
    Fred Anderson, Ray Moore and S. Steadman of Medford, and Carl Spence of Kerby, a cousin of A. C. Spence, the Brownsboro road supervisor, was in town Friday having some repair work done on one of the county trucks by our blacksmith and machinist, W. L. Childreth.
    Dave Phipps of Medford, who has been working with his team on the Rogue River Canal Co.'s ditch, came out Friday and stopped to have his team shod by our expert horseshoer.
    Mrs. Thomas Stanley of Butte Falls, and her sister-in-law, Mrs. Roy Stanley, were shopping with our merchants Friday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thos. Carlton of Prospect brought out some fine beef for some of our citizens Friday.
    It was published in the Medford Mail Tribune and by handbills and passed by word of mouth that there would be a grand Republican rally in the dance hall of Eagle Point on Friday evening at 8 o'clock and on the same evening at 7 o'clock there was to be a meeting of those who were interested in the Big Butte ditch in Brown's hall, and the result was that the grand Republican rally was almost a failure. The next morning I asked Roy Ashpole how many there were out and he said about twenty; the next one I asked said about fifteen, the third man said about a hundred and when I told him what the others had said he began to count, from memory, and made it about thirty-five, and ten or twelve of them were the speakers and booster who came from Medford, and later I asked B. F. Lindas, one of the speakers, and he said about twenty-five. There seems to be less interest taken in the political campaign than any I have ever witnessed. The general feeling seems to be that it makes no difference which one of the two prominent candidates is elected, that Wall Street will be the guiding power, and that the President, whoever he may be, will be but a figurehead or tool for the interests.
    Miss Probers of Ashland, who has been teaching in South Butte district, came out on the Lake Creek stage Saturday morning to try to catch the 8:30 jitney but was a little late, but finally succeeded in finding a way to go to her home.
    F. Wynn of Portland was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage going to Butte Falls. John Grieve, the veteran road builder of Prospect, was also a passenger on the same stage.
    There are some changes taking place in the real estate business. Wm. Lewis, the sheep king, sold a tract of land just north of town to Raleigh Mathews.
    Mr. Lewis reports that his son had the misfortune to have his leg broken when his horse slipped on the pavement and caught him under his body.
    Harry Hayes has been hauling hay from here to Indian Creek for Stille Bros.' saw mill.
    D. R. Patrick came in for dinner Saturday and reports that he has just completed a barn, 56x80 feet, for Mr. Meier near Brownsboro and also reports that the shakes to cover it cost more than the lumber.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 27, 1920, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Word came to me a few days ago that Mrs. Hessler, who lives near Brownsboro, had fallen and broken her arm. Not over a year ago she fell and broke her other arm.
    Last Saturday Mr. Sears and Mr. Kinney, who live on Reese Creek, were in town and called for dinner at the Sunnyside. W. E. Phipps and wife and H. H. Rowley, W. H. Gipson and wife and Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Whitehead of the Butte Creek orchard, Miss Ruth Nichols, Mrs. Norma Reeder and Miss Smith were also at the Sunnyside for dinner. Mr. Phipps, being the Democratic nominee for the legislature, was out interviewing the voters on the subject.
    Green Mathews, local, and John Toney of Derby were business callers Saturday.
    Wm. Brown and wife started Saturday for Los Angeles to spend the winter. Mr. Brown is a member of the firm of George Brown and Sons and they have gone to Los Angeles for his health.
    W. O. Garrett, B. F. Garrett and our sheriff, C. E. Terrill, passed through here Saturday afternoon to take a hunt and have a little recreation.
    The foregoing list of items I had to leave out of my Saturday's letter for fear that I would trespass on the good nature of ye editor.
    Sunday morning was one of the most delightful mornings ever experienced by mortal man; if the most artistic creature had had the making and arranging of it, it could not have been improved. Cool and bracing and yet warm enough so that one could be perfectly comfortable riding out, with a cloudless sky and all creation rejoicing in the beauties of nature. And the roads in the valley in fine condition for auto riding and just breeze enough to give a person a good appetite, was perhaps the cause of so many of the citizens of Rogue River Valley to start out to ramble and quite a few stopped at the Sunnyside about noon to satisfy that appetite, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. R. C. McGill, representing the Earl Fruit Company, I. B. Morrow, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. John W. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs, shoe dealer of Medford, Mrs. K. S. Miller, Mrs. Carrie Larson of Medford, Gus the Tailor and wife, Mrs. Myrtle Bradford, B. F. Lindas and wife and daughter Anna, new Medford attorney from Washington, D.C., Dr. and Mrs. B. R. Elliott of Medford, formerly dental surgeon in the U.S. Army, and Miss Amy Elliott, J. G. Taylor, formerly of Medford, and his son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Pierce, now living on the Charley E. Terrill place near Brownsboro, Mrs. Minnie Bryan of Medford and D. R. Patrick of Brownsboro. Mr. Patrick remained overnight.
    W. S. Parker, formerly of Derby but now on the Frank Rhodes place, was in town with his two boys Monday morning.
    John Spence of Kerby was also a business caller Monday.
    Orville Tarbell of Rogue River, and two strangers, were here for dinner Monday.
    J. B. Jackson, wife and daughter and husband, Mr. and Mrs. Harry Young, formerly of this place, who have been combining business with pleasure, visiting in the Willamette Valley and Washington, were here Monday on their way to Los Angeles to spend the winter.
    J. M. Wilfley, one of our big orchardists, was here and went to Medford on the Lewis jitney Monday.
    Rev. Brittsan of Medford and son E. V. Brittsan were among the business callers Monday and while here Rev. Brittsan was planning to arrange so that he could have an appointment to preach for us in the near future.
    Mrs. Schutt of Derby drove out from home Monday in a one-horse buggy to bring her cream and buy supplies. She says that the road is so badly cut up that it is hard to travel in a rig of that kind as the trucks have cut the roads up so that it is very difficult to get over them, but we live in hopes of sometime having an improvement as the trucks came out this Wednesday morning to go to work on them again, but the sky would indicate that they will not be able to do much more work on that sticky road this fall as it looks now as though it would rain again before morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Humphrey of Derby were business callers Monday. Mr. Humphrey brought in a load of stove wood and was taking back his winter supplies. He came in for late dinner today. He was hauling wood from the von der Hellen farm at Wellen for Dr. Holt, and taking a load of hay back with him for Mr. Schutt, one of his neighbors. He is a hustler.
    W. P. Morgan, one of our townsmen, and wife, who have been up as far as The Dalles, returned to their home Monday. They went in their Ford, took their time and had a very pleasant visit with their relatives.
    Hayd Leve, a young schoolmate of Robert Pelouze, is here visiting the Pelouze family.
    Born in Medford, Oct. 13th, to the wife of Mr. and Mrs. T. P. Cameron of Lake Creek, a seven-pound daughter. The mother and child came out through here Monday on their way home, both feeling fine.
    Henry Meyer and part of his family and Thos. Farlow of Lake Creek passed through here Monday evening on their way home.
    Our old townsman, A. J. Florey, one of the veterans of the Civil War and for years our postmaster here, who has been stopping in Jacksonville with his son Chauncey, our county clerk, came out Saturday afternoon to hear Col. Sargent speak on the subject of moving the county seat, had the misfortune to fall. He is very feeble and quite aged, past 80, and as he was getting out of the car he fell and dislocated his hip. Dr. Pickel was brought out and replaced the joint and the result is that he is now at his son's, A. J. Florey, Jr., but is getting along as well as could be expected. His many friends here sympathize with him in his affliction.
    Speaking of Col Sargent, it was announced that he would speak here on Monday night on the question of moving the county seat from Jacksonville to Medford and he was greeted by a fine audience and he held them so intensely interested that there was a deathly silence except the voice of the speaker for considerably over an hour, and by the time he was through speaking there seemed to be but very few who would vote to move it at this time, especially under the circumstances. He is a very clear and forceful speaker and seemed to have a fund of matter to draw from. But by the time this is before the readers, the die will be cast and the question settled, at least ready for the lawyers to begin to reap their harvest.
    Messrs. N. Anderson and C. Pennington of Butte Falls came in Monday night and remained until after dinner Tuesday. They had come in to have their team shod and get a load of apples to take home.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 2, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. A. Y. Moen and two sons from Decorah, Iowa, came in last Saturday for dinner. They had made arrangements by phone to have Mr. J. H. French or C. E. Bellows meet them here and take them out to one of their homes. Mr. Moen had conditionally engaged to teach the unexpired term of school out in their district, so they went out to Mr. Bellows', and Mrs. Moen commenced to teach Monday morning, although they had not secured a house to live in up to Tuesday noon. It seems fortunate that they have succeeded in getting a school and that the district secured the services of a competent teacher.
    Miss Bessie Violl came out on the stage Saturday morning and went out to teach school in the Laurel Hill district, and Tuesday came out and went to Medford to attend the teachers' institute.
    Mrs. Chris Bergman came in in a buggy to take Miss Violl out with her Saturday but she found one of her neighbors in town with a car, so had her go with him, as she could go much quicker and more comfortably.
    A. H. Peachey and M. F. Taylor of Ashland and Russ Moore of Lake Creek came Saturday evening for a late supper, and Mr. Peachey remained overnight, but Russ Moore and Mr. Taylor returned to Mr. Moore's that night. Mr. Peachey and Mr. Taylor had been out on a hunt and when they started on the return trip Mr. Taylor discovered that his battery had gone dead on him so engaged Mr. Moore to bring them and his battery out, taking the battery to the Eagle Point garage to have it recharged. Mr. Taylor was taken violently ill Saturday night after he had rode back up to the Moore ranch and had to drive his car out the best he could without his battery Sunday morning. And when he reached Dr. Holt's residence was almost past going. He is afflicted with kidney trouble, but so soon as possible Dr. Holt relieved him and he remained at the Sunnyside until Monday morning before going to his home in Ashland.
    C. H. Natwick, wife and son Carlyle came in Saturday evening to spend the night. Mrs. N. had been up to one of his camps on the Pacific Highway, where her husband has contracts to do some work on said highway.
    The younger element of the E.P.S.S. had a Hallowe'en party at the home of our banker and Bible class teacher, during the temporary absence of the regular teacher, Mr. Esch. Our banker, H. E. Campbell, is not only acting as teacher, but is leading in singing and is an all-round Sunday school man. After the Hallowe'en party had enjoyed themselves in a social way and partaken of light refreshments, they, properly attired in Hallowe'en costume, visited several families adding a lot of fun to the other enjoyments.
    John Miller and wife of Lake Creek came out Saturday to procure the necessary supplies for winter and spent the night with one of their old neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. Ray Stanley, and owing to Mrs. Stanley being quite unwell that morning and Mrs. Miller suffering with the sick headache, they came to the Sunnyside for breakfast. Note: They both possibly sat up and talked until long after their usual bedtime, being the cause of them both having the sick headache.
    L. F. Ferguson of Ashland and W. G. King of Seattle and D. R. Patrick of Brownsboro, Mr. and Mrs. Guther, Floyd von der Hellen and Mrs. Fred McPherson and Gus the Tailor of Medford were among the visitors Sunday for dinner.
    John Zimmerlee of Trail was a visitor Nov. 1st, and so was W. S. Baker.
    W. A. Rummel, who is living with Mr. Cottrell on the old Joe Housh [Hoskins?] farm, was a passenger on the stage from Medford and went up home on the Trail stage.
    F. J. Ayres came in Monday morning to get a road drag to drag that part of the Reese Creek road to try to make it passable until it rains and then we will see what comes next.
    Al Hildreth, who has been working in the orchards around here and boarding at the Sunnyside, went up to his home, Butte Falls, as he is a member of the election board.
    George Schermerhorn of Trail, who came out to run E. V. Peterson's truck and was stopping with us, had the misfortune to have his arm caught by the crank while cranking his truck and so nearly broken that he had to give up the job and go home.
    Clem MacDonald reports that he and Gus Nichols succeeded in killing one small deer.
    Judge G. A. Gardner and County Commissioner James Owens were out Monday securing the right of way for the Crater Lake Highway that runs along the side of the hill west and northwest of our town.
    There was quite a number of people here to arrange a satisfactory settlement and it looks as though the most of the injured parties are willing to settle quite reasonably, and the judge and county commissioner seem to want to do the fair thing by both the tax payers and the injured.
    Alvin Mathews brought in a fine lot of about six dozen chickens Monday for the Medford market.
    Earnest Dahack, the new barber, took possession of the shop Monday and opened up for business.
    N. R. Korst and S. G. Conley of Medford, G. E. Pierce, Medford, and William Lewis, Central Point, were at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Robert McCabe came in Monday to assist his relative, Mrs. Gooch, his wife's grandmother, and other members of the family. They were going to Medford.
    Noble Zimmerman and his brother came out from the Blue Canyon country with a quarter of beef for the Sunnyside Monday.
    Thos. Riley, Jr., S. B. Holmes, Mrs. Roy Ashpole, Roy Ashpole and son Donald, George Phillips, John Greb and Thos. Vestal were here for dinner Tuesday, election day. There were quite a number of the voters came in, but the most of them seem to have come in the afternoon. There were 226 votes cast and up to 2 o'clock this Wednesday afternoon the statements had not been made public and the E.P. ballot box had not been opened, but the vote for the presidential candidates, state and county offices had been sent in to the Mail Tribune office. I was surprised to hear so many express their choice for Debs.
    Alex Vestal, C. H. Natwick, N. E. Slusser, Lewis Martin of Trail were here for supper Tuesday night. Mr. Slusser had started for Los Angeles, but came back for his overcoat.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 4, 1920, page 3


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart and Will Stewart were in Medford Thursday. Will Stewart stayed several days.
    There was a Hallowe'en party and program at the Elk Creek school house Saturday evening. It was well attended and everyone seemed to be enjoying themselves.
    The Sunday school at Trail was well attended last Sunday, where it was announced that Mrs. Barnett will speak at the Trail school house next Sunday.
    Miss Enid Middlebusher spent Saturday night with Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    Miss Given Houston spent the weekend at her home.
    Westinghouse Automatic Ranges. People's Electric Store.
    Thor and Eden washers. People's Electric Store.
    Simplex Hedlite heaters. People's Electric Store.
    Do your Christmas buying early at the People's Electric Store.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 5, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote the last time, Wednesday, I wanted to give the names of the new town officers, but when I left the voting place about 2 o'clock they had not finished making the statements, etc., and had not opened the Eagle Point ballot box so had to put off that item until today, but it is better late than never. There was no ticket made out for district or municipal officers. The following officers were elected: For justice of the peace, S. B. Holmes, and for constable, Roy Ashpole, but he declines the honor and I heard one of our prominent business men offer to bet five to one that Mr. Holmes would not accept the office. For mayor of our town, H. E. Campbell, our banker, was chosen; for recorder, Mrs. Clement MacDonald; treasurer, Roy Ashpole and he refuses the honor; for city or town council, J. F. Brown (he was a member and his time expires Jan. 1st), Mrs. W. H. (Mattie) Brown (her husband is a holdover), and Mrs. W. C. Clements. The members of the council as it now stands including the newly elected ones, is Dr. W. W. P. Holt, chairman, Wm. von der Hellen, Wm. H. Brown, J. F. Brown and Mattie Brown, but Wm. H. Brown and wife Mattie are in Southern California for his health and it is very uncertain when they will return. Our old mayor, John M. Nichols, has served for, I think, three terms, and some of our best citizens would have been glad to have kept him in but he threatened vengeance on us if we voted him in again. It is a thankless office and he has managed it so that he has kept down expenses and in most cases has given general satisfaction, but it is a question whether the newly elected mayor will accept the position or not and if he does not qualify that will leave us just where we were before the election so far as the mayor is concerned.
    Wednesday among the business callers was Geo. Hanson and wife of Brownsboro, F. Neil of Derby, who was on his way out with the ballot box for Derby, Charley Humphrey, also of Derby, on his way to Medford with a load of wood for Misses Neil, Mrs. Schutt of Derby, who was also on her way to Medford, and J. M. Loorck of Medford.
    G. E. Brinell of Elk City, Idaho, G. W. Frey and two of his sons, Irvin and Edward W. Frey, F. L. Stevens of Seattle and A. A. Slausen of Medford were here for dinner.
    Bert Peachey, wife and two children came in Wednesday to her parents to remain for a while, perhaps all winter.
    Mrs. C. H. Natwick and Mrs. J. E. Day of Butte Falls came in Wednesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Whitehead, Mr. Bell's business manager on the Butte Creek orchard, came in for supper.
    Corbin Edgell, Frank Arnes, John Jones, one of the crew of apple packers with Geo. and Manuel Liedman from California, who has been making apple boxes for the Tronson and Butte Creek (Corbin) orchard now owned by Fred. C. Bell of Chicago, came in Thursday and remained overnight and so did C. M. Gardner of Portland. Mr. Gardner is one of the stock inspectors and came down from Portland to superintend dipping Wm. Lewis' sheep of Central Point for the scab. Mr. Wm. Lewis and A. M. Gay also came in for supper but went on to Central Point that night, returning the next morning for breakfast. J. E. Hughes of Butte Falls also spent the night with us and so did O. Burnwell.
    A. C. Spence, the road supervisor of Brownsboro, and Thos. Abbott of Lake Creek were patronizing our merchants, and Rudolph Pech was also here; he has raised a fine crop of spuds this season and has been hauling them out and disposing of them at a good price.
    R. C. McGill of the Earl Fruit Co., Medford, and W. A. Hooker, also of Medford, were guests at noon at the Sunnyside Friday.
    Chauncey Florey came out and brought his sister, Mrs. Margaret Reter, to visit their father who is confined to his bed with a dislocated hip, and at the same time brought out Miss Orbia Natwick of Forest Grove, Ore. She met her mother, Mrs. C. H. Natwick, at the Sunnyside. They expect to start in a short time for Los Angeles where they will visit a daughter and sister and Mrs. Natwick's twin grandchildren.
    Among the passengers on the stage from Butte Falls was Mrs. Mabel Hildreth.
    Frank Swingle of Ashland was here visiting one of his old neighbors and family, Mr. and Mrs. McAllister of this place.
    Miss Wiley, who is teaching above here, was met here Friday night and taken up to the Bradshaw farm near Brownsboro by one of the Bradshaw boys.
    This Saturday morning when the stage came in from Medford among the passengers were Miss Philena Evans, A. L. Haselton, Mrs. Leutzen and Mrs. Nasdent of Prospect. Some of them had been out to attend the teachers institute.
    T. F. Nichols and wife were in town this morning and he reports that Frank Rhodes is getting along nicely with the ditch that his sister, Miss Ruth, and J. H. French are having made.
    John Dixon, T. F. Throwell and T. C. Gaines of Trail came out from Medford this morning, took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Mack Winkle, Frank Brown and wife, Frank Neil and W. C. Clements.
    Mr. Adamson, the old mail carrier, passed through here today with a part of the machinery for a sawmill that he, John Zimmerlee and W. S. Chappell, our shoe cobbler, are taking up to Trail to put in Mr. Adamson's timber near the town of Trail.
    Mrs. A. M. Robertson and Mrs. J. A. Montgomery went out to Central Point this afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 9, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Owing to there being no jitney or stage going from here to Trail Saturday afternoon Messrs. Gaines and Dixon of Trail, mentioned in my last letter as going home that day, did not go but remained at the Sunnyside until Sunday morning, and during the night there were five or six young men came in and had beds and breakfast, who had been here to attend a dinner given Saturday night.
    Rev. H. G. King, the evangelist missionary for the Union Sunday schools in this district, also came in and spent the night with us, and attended Sunday school and assisted in the work and preached for us at 11 a.m. and 7:30 p.m. The congregations were rather small, as his coming was not advertised, but we had very interesting services that seemed to be highly appreciated, as it was the first preaching services we have had here for several months, but he has promised to visit us again in the near future.
    We did not have very many to call for meals Sunday, but among those who did come was Mrs. C. H. Natwick and daughter, Miss Orbia, who had just come from near Forest Grove to join her mother and the two started Sunday afternoon for Los Angeles, Calif. to visit Mrs. Natwick's daughter. Mr. Natwick arrived from Portland and joined his wife and daughter. He was accompanied by his son, Carlyle, so they were all together for Sunday dinner.
    Among the diners also was Perry Foster of Trail, his son, John, of the R.V.C. Co. ranch and Miss Viola Hogan, Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs and his mother, Mrs. E. D. Hubbs, Medford. Miss Viola Hogan is teaching school in the Crater Lake district, this being her fourth school in succession in that district. She seems to be very popular both with the people and the children. Later in the day Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Pierce of Brownsboro and Mr. C. B. Watkins and Miss Jean Smith of Medford came in and took supper.
    Miss Inez Willits of Elk Creek and Mrs. Caroline Thomason of Butte Falls were among the passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning. Mrs. Thomason was going to Butte Falls and Miss Willits to her school on Elk Creek.
    Lawrence Conley of Butte Falls and Gus and Fritz Edler were among the business callers and were diners at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    Other business callers were Geo. W. Stowell, who is extensively engaged in the chicken industry. He now has on hand 800 hens and pullets and says that his pullets are just beginning to lay, that he is getting 300 eggs a day, and that they are increasing every day in laying.
    Rudolph Pech was also a business caller. He came out to bring a thousand pounds of spuds for George Stowell. He had just about completed his delivery of his crop and is now ready to prepare for another crop for next year.
    Robert Neil of Lake Creek was also here on business.
    Ed Phipps passed through here Monday with his sheep. He was taking them over on Rogue River to pasture.
    E. D. Cook, Al Hildreth, Joseph Geppert, J. P. Hughes, B. F. Merchant and Jack Doubleday were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday, and John Foster also came out with his car. The continuous rains have made the road, especially in the timber, very muddy so that it is difficult to get through with a car, unless the chauffeur is an expert car handler.
    B. F. Fuller and wife passed through here Monday on their way from Medford to their orchard.
    J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the Butte Falls fish hatchery, was here Monday afternoon looking over a location for a hatchery in this section. The project is to catch the small fish, mostly steelheads, in Antelope Creek and bring them to this stream, as Antelope Creek goes almost dry, leaving the young fish to perish in the stagnant pools that are formed in the bed of the creek. A few years ago Mr. Sandry, who was at that time a fish commissioner, gathered up several thousand of the young fish, brought them over and turned them loose in Little Butte Creek, but it was thought the sudden change from the warm pools to the cold water of this stream was too much for them, so that a great many of them died, but by bringing them here and properly caring and feeding them, it is thought that they will greatly add to the supply of fish in this stream and its tributaries.
    John Allen of Derby, one of the leading stockmen of the Derby and Butte Falls section, passed through here Monday afternoon with a fine-looking buck sheep in his wagon, taking it out to the valley.
    R. D. Caffe of the Dead Indian Soda Springs came out from Medford on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and went up home on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage Tuesday and J. R. Silas of Butte Falls also came out and went on up home on the stage.
    J. Waterbury, who is farming the Joe Rader farm on Antelope Creek, was a business caller Tuesday and so was Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, and Mrs. O. M. Schutt of Derby.
    Since our barber shop has changed hands and Earnest Dahack has taken possession; he has been making several important changes. He has installed a hot and cold water system so as to have an abundant supply of hot water and is planning to add a bath room so as to accommodate any who would desire a good warm bath, and has also installed an electric hair clipping machine and is arranging to have a complete up-to-date bath establishment.
    Jan Andrews, the financier of Medford, was out Tuesday to look after his different farms and other interests, and so was Mr. Sears of Reese Creek, and they both went to Medford Tuesday afternoon on the Lewis jitney.
    Irvin Daley, formerly of Lake Creek, but now, I think, of Medford, was a business caller Tuesday.
    When the Butte Falls stage came in it was well loaded and so was the Eagle Point-Persist stage. Among the passengers going to Medford was Mr. Willard Heriford and his sister, Mrs. Hildred Smith and Everett Abbott and Lyman McCord, all except Mr. McCord from Butte Falls, and he had been up to Rancheria Prairie to visit his sister, Mrs. A. L. Haselton, and was going to Prineville, his home.
    Manuel Leidman and wife of Covina, Cal., and B. F. Putman of Porterville, Cal., were here and Mr. and Mrs. Leidman spent the night with us, and so did Mr. Geo. H. Schermerhorn and E. V. Peterson of Trail. They are the present contractors for carrying the mail from here to Persist, via Trail. They also spent the night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Tuesday evening Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols entertained at their home, 7:30 p.m., to dinner J. M. Wilfley, one of our leading orchardists, Mr. and Mrs. John R. Norris and family. Mr. Wilfley was just ready to start for Salt Lake City.
    Wednesday Mrs. Harvey Stanley and Lewis Blass, who is working on the John Rader farm, motored into town on business. Mrs. Stanley is the youngest daughter of Mr. John Rader, and she and her husband are living with her parents.
    Mrs. A. S. Carlton of Ashland has been here visiting her brother, Thomas E. Nichols, and other relatives for the past few days.
    V. F. Slater, representing the firm of Waterhouse & Lester Co., and O. O. Gooch with Munnell Sherrill, Portland, Ore., were dinner guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday, and so was Dennie Zimmerlee, a recent arrival from Washington state. He was formerly a resident of Trail and has purchased his father's interest in a sawmill that has recently been purchased by Messrs. Adamson, Chappell and Zimmerlee, and is being put up near Trail. Dennie was on his way up to Trail.
    Ira Hensley, who has just returned from Washington, has rented what is known as the old Abgor place near Wellen and moved onto it, so his brother-in-law, Shorty Allen, who was in town Wednesday reports.
    Mede [Monte?] Venham of Trail was here also Wednesday having his team shod.
    Mr. and Mrs. Clement MacDonald, one of our garage men, who has rented what is known as the Ringer house, has been to Medford and they have bought their future and are moving in today, Saturday.
    Earnest Dahack, our new barber, has rented the P. H. Daily home and is moving into it at this writing.
    F. A. Hill, S. J. Conley, N. B. Karr, Mrs. Hildred Smith and L. A. Whitley and wife were at the Sunnyside Wednesday night for supper and all remained overnight except Mrs. Smith, who went out to the Edgell orchard and remained two nights, taking the stage for her home in Butte Falls Friday morning. Mr. and Mrs. Whitley had come out from Medford that night intending to go to their home on Elk Creek (Trail), but their lights went out so they concluded to remain here overnight.
    Messrs. Victor Parton and Labe Sannevast of Portland were here for dinner Thursday, and so was Dr. J. F. Reddy of Medford, and W. J. Crane of Portland. They were out looking over some of the work on the Crater Lake Highway and while here Dr. Reddy engaged board and rooms for five or six men who expect to commence work on the proposed route.
    There were several of our sport-inclined citizens went to Medford Thursday night to witness the encounter between some of the artistic combatants and some of them seemed to be well satisfied with what they saw, while others pronounced it a badly trumped-up game to get the people's money, but if they will bite at such bait as that they may not be surprised if they get caught.
    Fred Arnes was among the early business callers Friday morning, and Jack Doubleday of Butte Falls was a passenger on the stage for home. He had been on the jury but had been discharged.
    A. F. Morris, one of the U.S. officers of public roads, and K. E. Hodgman, the head civil engineer on the Crater Lake Highway, were here for Friday and so was A. M. Gay, Miss Olga Bieberstedt and W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith. Mrs. Childreth had gone to Medford and their daughter, Miss Nora, was attending Medford High School, so Mr. Childreth came here for dinner.
    Mrs. Reeder of Ashland, who has been visiting Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols and others in the neighborhood, returned home Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Campbell, a brother of our banker, H. E. Campbell of Kansas, are here visiting his brother and Mrs. H. E. Campbell's brother, Wm. Coy.
    Ezra Dahack, who lives in the hills near the Dead Indian Soda Springs, came in Friday and went on to Medford.
    Lloyd French came in Saturday to consult Dr. Holt with regard to a hurt he had received by too heavy lifting, but the doctor decided that it was nothing more than a strain of the muscle.
    Frank Batcheller of Portland came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside. He was on his way up to his son-in-law's, Mr. Wymore, near Derby.
    W. A. Nessler, a grandson of W. G. Knighton, is here visiting his grandparents on his way to Arizona.
    Friday evening, H. E. Campbell, our banker and wife, gave a dinner at the Sunnyside to a few of their friends so as to have them meet and become acquainted with his brother and wife and Mrs. Campbell's brother Mr. Coy. Among the guests were Mr. Campbell's brother and wife, Mr. and Mrs. A. M. Campbell, and Mrs. Campbell's brother, Wm. Coy, Mr. and Mrs. A. R. MacDonald and son and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Clement, Mr. MacDonald, retired capitalist and garage man, Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown and Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Brown of the firm of George Brown and Sons, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements, our postmaster, Mr. and Mrs. Gus Nichols, retired capitalist, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, wife of one of our hardware merchants and road contractor, and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, a sister of the aforesaid J. F. and R. G. Brown. The dinner was served at 7:30 p.m. and they all seemed to fully enjoy the feast as well as the social functions.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Whitehead of the Butte Creek orchard were Medford visitors Friday and stopped at the Sunnyside for supper on their way home.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1920, page 7


TRAIL ITEMS
    Miss Enid Middlebusher took a load of fat hogs to Medford in her truck for Mr. Floyd Hutchinson, stopping on her way home to pick up Mr. Keva Hutchinson, who is working at Woolworth's in Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Watson at the Modoc and Miss Eula Huston, who has been attending the institute in Medford.
    Floyd Hutchinson shipped his fat hogs through the Farm Bureau at Medford.
    Oscar Stewart has made two trips to Medford this week with dressed beef. Monday Mrs. Stewart accompanied him and Wednesday he went alone.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson spent Friday of last week visiting with Mr. and Mrs. George Weeks, incidentally digging potatoes.
    Billie Mansfield with the tractor from the Mansfield place was over to Brophy's last week helping to fill a silo.
    Mr. Heffner of the U.S. Fisheries has made arrangements to send his boys to the Elk Creek school, having purchased a gentle horse from Mr. Olsen for them to ride.
    Thom. Todd is hauling lumber for the hatchery.
    Will McDonald is putting a rustic fence around the lawn in front of the hotel, for the winter. Mr. and Mrs. McDonald intend to spend the winter in Ashland.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 16, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Clement MacDonald family received their furniture Saturday afternoon and have moved into their new home and gone to housekeeping just like "old folks."
    Henry and George Trusty, who live on Elk Creek about eight miles above Trail, came in Saturday noon for dinner.
    Fred Pettegrew and son Charles were business callers Saturday afternoon.
    Mrs. George Brown, her daughter Miss Verne Brown, and Miss Leida Spence of Brownsboro were also trading with our merchants.
    Wm. Perry, who owns a small farm just above town, has been busily engaged with his wood saw cutting up pole wood the past few days. He seems to have about all the work in that line here there is to do. He has a good outfit and is reliable.
    George Givan, one of our prosperous farmers living a few miles west of town, was a business caller also Saturday and so was F. Y. Ayres and family including two of his daughters, Mrs. Leroy Smith and Mrs. Wm. Perry.
    Mr. W. A. Bishop, who has been the engineer on the road roller on the Reese Creek-Butte Falls road, and also the engineer on the rock crusher located on Rogue River, where the county was crushing rock for the Reese Creek-Butte Falls road, came in Saturday night for supper and bed. He had trouble with his car, so had to spend the night here, but the next morning soon discovered the trouble and had his car ready for business again. He had just completed taking the rock crusher to pieces and covering it for the winter.
    Raymond Garrett and Vern Danford of Jacksonville came in Sunday evening for the night. They were on their way up to the Charley Terrill place just above Brownsboro with a tractor, a binder and a wagon, quite the combination. They have rented the farm and were moving onto it.
    J. P. Hughes, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, who was in Jacksonville doing jury duty, came out Sunday and spent the night, he having been discharged, going up home on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday morning.
    Frank Johnson and family, who live at the mouth of Indian Creek, were business callers Monday. His son, J. F. Johnson, and family were also business callers and so was Mr. Jay and Mr. Isbell.
    W. E. Hammel passed through Monday morning on his way to buy a load of corn of Sam Coy. There seems to be quite a quantity of corn in this section of the country and still it is selling at $40.00 a ton, dear hog feed.
    W. F. Webb of Derby was here having his team shod by our smith Monday.
    Mrs. Carl Gibson of Lake Creek, a daughter of Mrs. Gus Nichols, was combining business with pleasure, visiting her mother and trading at the same time.
    Mrs. Anna Robertson and daughter, who have been living with John Robertson's family since the birth of his baby and death of his wife, has moved to Central Point.
    Monday noon John L. Robertson, Sr., Lawrence Conger, Roy Ashpole, Lloyd Stanley and Mrs. Floyd von der Hellen were guests at the Sunnyside for dinner.
    Frank Dressler and Owen Conover were also in town Monday.
    Mrs. Roy Ashpole, wife of our hardware merchant, has gone to Medford to have some dental work done and Roy is taking his dinner and supper at the Sunnyside while she is gone.
    Miss McCabe and two of her sisters-in-law, Mrs. Robert McCabe and Mrs. Albert McCabe, drove in Monday, and Mrs. Albert McCabe went on out to her home in Phoenix. She had been out to the T. F. McCabe farm on Rogue River, visiting.
    Fritz Pech of Lake Creek, E. V. Brittsan, Wm. Hiatt, Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, Joe Pool, the foreman on the Butte Creek orchard, Timmie Dugan and Nick Young were among the business callers Tuesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wymore of Derby were also business callers Tuesday.
    Percy Haley and wife, who have been visiting Mrs. Haley's mother, Mrs. William Perry--Mrs. Haley, nee Estella Betz. is a daughter of Mrs. Perry by her first husband--spent Monday night and Tuesday at the Sunnyside. They are thinking of locating in our town.
    J. Waterbury and Charley Winkle were business callers Tuesday and while here Charley complained that the ground was not wet enough to plow good yet, that the plow would dig up dry dirt, and on inquiry found that even in the free soil the plow would strike hard soil, but the prospect is there will be no more complaint about a shortage of moisture.
    Ira Tungate, John Silas, Butte Falls, and Judge George A. Gardner of Jacksonville came out on the stage Tuesday morning and went on up to Butte Falls. Judge Gardner was on his way up to the Crater Lake S.H., where there was to be an election to levy a special road tax. The result was a levy of a five-mill tax. About all the road districts have voted from five- to seven-mill taxes for road work next year, although there were four who voted against levying a tax at all in the district.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt, our local physician, started Tuesday for San Francisco, to be gone a month. He went to take a course of lectures on his line of medical practice.
    Mr. E. V. Peterson, the present mail contractor who carries the mail on the Eagle Point-Persist route, reports that Mr. Anton Ring of Persist has killed a large bear a few days ago.
    Judge Gardner and George Albert came in Tuesday evening from the Crater Lake school house in an open car on the P.&E. railroad, through driving rain, and by the time they reached the Sunnyside they were thoroughly wet, but they found a warm room and hot supper and in the course of the evening got dried out.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart made a business trip to Trail.
    Mr. Floyd Hutchinson has been riding after a runaway cow several days this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson spent Sunday afternoon visiting their son Floyd and family.
    There will be a special tax meeting at Adams store Tuesday afternoon at 2 p.m., for voting on a road across the river.
    Mr. George and Tom Weeks went up the river after a load of shakes Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 22, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charles Edmondson and Mrs. L. H. Smith of Butte Falls were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Wednesday on their way home.
    Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor and one of the contractors on the route for the Crater Lake Highway between here and Trail, was a business caller Wednesday.
    Thomas Cingcade, Lloyd Stanley, Pete Young and Wm. Martin were among the business callers Wednesday. The three first named are among our stockmen in this section of the county.
    F. W. Hutchinson of Roseburg was a business caller and spent the night at the Sunnyside Wednesday. The next morning he started for a stroll over our agate fields and Friday came in again for a late dinner and reported that he had tramped over the field north of here, been to Butte Falls and done the best he could to see that country but said that it rained so hard that he could not examine the country to advantage but intended to come back later, as he was looking for a place where he could locate as a homesteader. After dinner he started off to explore the agate fields south of here, intending to return to the Sunnyside again that night, but after he had walked through sticky until dark he returned to the Sunnyside, gathered up the rocks he had left here and started for Medford on foot. He found that walking over the sticky ground in a rainstorm was anything but a picnic.
    Thomas Cook and wife and his sister-in-law, Miss Dunlap, called Wednesday night for beds at the Sunnyside and Thursday morning started quite early for Derby.
    H. E. Campbell and wife went to Medford Wednesday to take his brother, A. M. Campbell, and wife so as to take passage for Los Angeles where they will visit other relatives.
    C. H. Natwick, the road builder, spent Wednesday night with us.
    Harry Lewis, who has been working out in Klamath County during the summer and fall, came in Thursday and commenced boarding again at the Sunnyside.
    Ira Tungate of Butte Falls, who went to Medford a few days ago, returned on the Butte Falls stage Thursday for his home.
    Nick Young and A. M. Gay were business callers Thursday and so was Miss Maud Merritt. She was accompanied by her brother and while in town she planned to make her little nephew happy by purchasing of Roy Ashpole a neat express wagon for him.
    Mrs. John Rader, wife of one of the leading citizens in the Antelope district, spent several days in Medford having some dental work done. She was accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. Roy Ashpole. She was also having dental work done, but Mrs. Ashpole returned Friday evening on the stage.
    Among the business callers Thursday was Mrs. Thomas Cingcade, Joe Kidd--Mr. Kidd is the foreman on the Nichols-French ditch on Rogue River--J. H. and Lloyd French; Lloyd says that the hurt he was complaining of last week has not proved as serious as was feared; Joe Riley, Harry Stanley, Walter Meyer, Richard Muskopf, the present owner of the J. W. Grover place just below town, Alvin Mathews, Ed Cowden and Miss Ella Belford were visiting town. Miss Belford spent the night at the Sunnyside and is on her way to one of her homes in Florida. Miss Belford has been in charge of what is known as the Stewart place and has left it in the charge of Mr. Ed Cowden during her absence.
    Mrs. J. A. Anderson, wife of the Standard Oil man of Medford, has been out visiting her daughter, Mrs. A. J. Florey, Jr., who had his hip dislocated some time ago; he has had a hard time as he is quite aged and with a dislocated hip has suffered quite severely.
    John Swanson of Elk Creek, Trail post office, came out on the stage Friday morning and went on up home on the Persist stage.
    Fred C. Bell, the present owner of the Butte Creek orchard, who has been back east for some weeks, returned Friday and was met by Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Whitehead, Mr. Bell's business manager during his absence, and taken to the Butte Creek orchard.
    Ed Coy, son-in-law of our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, came out from his home in Medford on a business venture.
    Fred Dunlap of Derby came out on horseback Friday for a few supplies. The roads are so bad that it takes a stout heart to tackle them with anything more than a horse or on foot.
    A. J. Moen, the husband of the lady who is teaching school in the Reese Creek district, was a business caller Friday.
    Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby came out on the stage Friday, took passage on the stage on her way to Medford to visit her daughters, one of whom is working in the clerk's office in Jacksonville, while one of them is working in one of the banks in Medford, stopping at the Sunnyside for dinner.
    S. H. Harnish, his daughter Mrs. Fred Dutton and his daughter-in-law Mrs. Ray Harnish went to Medford Friday.
    Prof. G. R. Robinson, principal of the Butte Falls school, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Friday going to Medford, and Mrs. Roy Ashpole came out on the stage Friday evening.
    Miss Ruth Young, our primary teacher, went to Medford Friday afternoon.
    John P. Goin, our agate man, who has been out in the Fort Klamath country the past six months, returned Friday. He came in with two of the Klamath County stockmen.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 24, 1920, page 9


TRAIL ITEMS
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston spent Sunday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S.W. Hutchinson.
    Mr. Will Stewart and Mr. Floyd Hutchinson took a bunch of cattle to Medford Friday. They were gone three days only, going as far as the Riverside ranch Friday evening.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Train spent Sunday visiting with her mother, Mrs. Hall, who lives below Trail.
    It has rained almost continuously for a week here, Saturday being the only decent day in the week. The river has been quite high, but has fallen about five feet the last few days.
    Mr. Jim Lebeau has almost finished his cabin on the other side of the river, a short distance above the hatchery.
    There has been a good run of silverside at the hatchery during the last rise of the river.
    The work on the right of way for the new road is progressing rapidly, although the rain is making it very difficult to work.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 26, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers Saturday not mentioned in my last were Harry Heriford and M. E. Niccoll of Butte Falls.
    C. E. Bellows and T. F. McCabe, who own and operate fine farms along the banks of Rogue River a few miles above Eagle Point, came in Saturday. They each of them brought in a load of fine fat hogs and were met here by a truckman and both loads were loaded onto the truck and sent to the Farm Bureau of Medford for shipment. Mr. McCabe had a lot of apple boxes brought out on the same truck and took them from here to his orchard.
    W. H. Crandall, another one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, brought in a fine lot of large dressed turkeys for the Eldridge Creamery and Produce Company of Medford, and Mr. J. F. Maxfield also brought in another lot of turkeys for the same firm. Turkeys are so high in price this season that it is almost prohibitive, 45¢ a pound, but it is good for those who have raised them.
    F. J. Ayres and wife were also callers Saturday.
    Mrs. Pete Betz, wife of another one of our energetic farmers on Rogue River, was a business caller Saturday.
    Carl Bergman of Trail and Ed Tucker of Brownsboro were here for dinner Saturday. Mr. Tucker brought out a dressed beef for the people of Eagle Point.
    Thomas Vestal and wife were also among the callers Saturday afternoon. So was Rev. H. G. King, the representative of the American Sunday School Union, and Rev. A. Werdon, the pastor of the Free Methodist church of Ashland, who called to make arrangements for Mr. Werdon to preach for us on the following Sunday evening, and also to try to arrange for him to include Eagle Point in his field of labor. He and Mr. King went out to Reese Creek and met with the people of that neighborhood and Mr. Werdon preached for them. He also preached here Sunday evening and owing to the heavy rainstorm and general disagreeableness of the weather there was only a very small congregation and so there was nothing done about making arrangements for him to come and preach for us regularly, but he arranged to come and preach for us again the first Sunday in December, it being the 5th day of the month, at 11 o'clock a.m. and 7:30 p.m., at which time all who are interested in having preaching services here are especially invited to be present. There will be Sunday school at 10 a.m.
    There was a dance in the hall Saturday night but I am not able to report as to the attendance, but from every indication there were not as many in attendance as usual. That night Carl Bergman and his brother C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle and Harry Smith spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    There were but very few outside of our regular boarders here for dinner Sunday but we had Lawrence Luy of Wellen, Harry Smith, Mrs. Florence Milligan, Mrs. Florence Manning, D. S. Faroner and James E. Lowe of Kenilworth Hotel, Medford.
    W. L. Jones, one of the Forest Service men formerly of Butte Falls but now of Central Point, and Miss Alene Mahoney of Butte Falls were passengers on the stage Monday morning going up the country, and Mr. Chatman of Lake Creek came out and went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mr. and Mrs. Teffer of the Dead Indian Soda Springs came out with Russ Moore Monday but too late to catch the Lewis jitney, but after dinner they went on their journey to Medford with I. B. Millard, an auto salesman for the Pruett-Myers Co., Medford, who was here for dinner.
    Rev. J. F. Brittsan and wife of Medford came out Monday morning and were met here by their son, E. V. Brittsan, and taken out to the P. S. Anderson ranch that the Brittsan brothers have leased.
    J. F. Maxfield and his neighbor, Mrs. Pete Betz drove in Monday morning, and so did Mrs. Walter Myer.
    Russ Moore of Lake Creek also took dinner at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Mrs. Walter Marshall of Brownsboro was a business caller Monday.
    I see in looking over my notes that I have omitted to state that Albert Clements and Mrs. Lois Whitley of Medford and another lady and little boy were here Sunday for dinner.
    K. D. Jones of Butte Falls came in Monday for dinner and so did J. C. Aiken, the inventor and distributor of the fish screens used in the ditches to prevent fish from entering the irrigating ditches, and he was accompanied by J. W. Berrian, the superintendent of the Butte Falls hatchery. They are planning to put in a plant in Antelope Creek to take the eggs and then bring them to the plant to be built here, for hatching and feeding.
    Wm. Perry and wife went to Central Point Monday to take Mr. and Mrs. Percy Haley to their home. Mrs. Haley is a daughter of Mrs. Perry and they have been out visiting the Perry family.
    Steve Smith and wife were among the business callers Tuesday.
    Mr. Heiff and wife of Lake Creek came in Tuesday and left a lot of fine-looking spuds for the Altavista orchard.
    Irvin Daley and a stranger came out from Medford Tuesday, went up above here and returned late in the afternoon for home.
    G. E. Merrill of Derby was a guest at the Sunnyside for dinner and so were Mr. and Mrs. R. B. Pierce and L. E. Hartwig. The three last named came in and enjoyed board and room for a few days. Mr. Price is in partnership with Frank Rhodes in the contract to open up and grade the Crater Lake Highway from Hay Creek to the bridge site at the mouth of Indian Creek. They are engaged in wrecking the large building formerly used as a lumber shed by the Butte Falls Lumber Co. and later used as a packing house by some of our orchardists. They intend to use the lumber to put up camps on the Crater Lake Highway for their men and horses who will be employed on the road.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 1, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Pete Stowell, the chicken king of this section, and wife were among the business callers Wednesday afternoon. He is greatly encouraged over his prospect in the egg production business, and seems to think that he soon will be getting seven or eight hundred eggs a day.
    There is a man by the name of Rose living on the north side of Round Top, who comes into town driving four jennies abreast and claims to be able to compete with any of the two-horse teams in the country when it comes to hauling a load, although none of them are very large and one is quite small, but he makes his drives into town with his loads of wood, and when he starts for home starts off on a trot the same as one would with a span of horses. In addition to his jennies he keeps twelve dogs and spends a good part of his time hunting. When asked how he fed so many dogs he replied that he fed them on mill run and what wheat he could kill.
    Perl Stowell, a brother of Pete, was also in town Wednesday.
    T. F. McCabe, one of our successful farmers and orchardists, came in Wednesday afternoon and brought in his daughter, Miss Ellen, and his daughter-in-law, Mrs. Robert McCabe, and her two children and the ladies and children took passage on the stage for Medford. They were going to Grants Pass to visit Mrs. Robert McCabe's mother and grandmother and enjoy Thanksgiving dinner together.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. H. French, Alvin Conover and two boys, Charles Fellows of Trail, Mrs. Carl Esch, and Wm. Stanley of Lake Creek were among the business callers also Wednesday. It being the day before Thanksgiving, that being on Thursday and that being the day for the Jackson County Creamery men to come to town, he came on Wednesday instead and that was one reason why so many happened to be in town, and some came to procure some of the extras for the Thanksgiving dinner.
    Pliney Leabo, formerly a citizen of Eagle Point, but who has been working at Hilt the most of the time for the past two years, came in Wednesday evening to pay his compliments to the Sunnyside Hotel and Thursday morning went to Ashland on the morning stage to take dinner with his sister at her home in that city.
    Thanksgiving day passed without any special interest manifest, as the continuous rains for the past--I am afraid to say how long, but I heard a man say this Saturday morning, that it had been since some time in September, but the rain had made the roads sloppy and slippery, and it rained some that day so that there was but very little stirring around, in fact it was about the deadest day I have seen for some time, as all of the business places were closed except Frank Lewis', even the blacksmith shop, and there was scarcely a man or woman to be seen on the streets. It was worse than a "blue Sunday" in Massachusetts, under the old blue laws. Nevertheless there were a few who found their way to the Sunnyside to partake of turkey dinner, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs and mother of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Whitehead, the business manager on the Butte Creek orchard, Harry Smith, Mr. and Mrs. James Owens, and later in the day John Swanson of Trail. He and Mr. Smith remained overnight. I have not heard, but suppose that there were quite a number of families had their Thanksgiving dinners and many of them really felt thankful for the blessings of life, but from what I can learn very few had the regular turkey dinner as the price of turkeys was almost prohibitive.
    Friday Frank Rhodes, one of the contractors on the Crater Lake Highway, Walter Allen of Derby, Charles Winkle and Earl Mathews were here for dinner.
    J. B. Bichen, the official cow tester, was here Friday and went to Medford on the afternoon stage.
    Guy Pruett and Lawrence Conger were also among the business callers Friday.
    Wm. Moore and F. A. Hill of Butte Falls, and Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby, were passengers on the Butte Falls-Medford stage Friday.
    Wm. Holmes has been moving his household goods up onto the Gus Nichols place on Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, and Friday morning had his wagon already loaded to start but the rain Thursday night and Friday morning was so heavy that even after he started he concluded to take the advice of his friends and run his wagon under a shed and wait until better weather.
    Friday evening Chris Beale, one of the forest rangers, Sam Rose and Mr. and Mrs. L. H. Swink, merchants of Butte Falls, were guests at the Sunnyside, Mr. Beale and Mr. and Mrs. Swink going up on the morning stage to their homes Saturday morning.
    Mrs. J. W. Anderson, wife of the Standard Oil man of Medford, came out to visit her daughter, Mrs. A. J. Florey, and so did Mrs. Raymond Reter Friday afternoon.
    John Allen, one of the Derby stockmen, came out this morning with a load of hogs and went on toward Medford with them.
    Geo. Schooler, recently from Hood River, and Jack Schooler of Brownsboro were business callers this morning.
    There were three passengers went out this Saturday morning on the stage for Butte Falls. It seems that as the roads get bad the more people want to travel. There were six passengers went to Medford yesterday afternoon on the stage, and six on the jitney this afternoon and among them were Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hawk.
    Dan M. McFarlin and J. C. Dean of Grants Pass, Percy Haley of Agate and his brother Glenn of Medford and A. Dean Butler and Charles DeLin, contractor of Medford, were at the Sunnyside for dinner today.
    James W. Miller, now of Trail but [who] for some time past has been up in the Alberta country, was in town on business today.
    Geo. Adamson and son of Trail drove in today with a team. Mr. Adamson is one of the party who is putting up a sawmill on his land near Trail. He says that the continuous rain has greatly interfered with their work, but they expect to have the mill ready for logs very soon.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 3, 1920, page 11


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Haak, who went to Medford Saturday morning. returned to Eagle Point on the Eagle Point stage Saturday afternoon.
    Mrs. Robert McCabe and her two children and Miss Ellen McCabe, who had been to Grants Pass visiting relatives, returned Saturday evening and went out to the McCabe farm that night.
    John Norris, the foreman on the Wilfley orchard, was also a late visitor Saturday evening and so was George Lewis of Jacksonville, out visiting his parents.
    H. Spangler, for a number of years a resident of Prospect but living near McLeod, came in Sunday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside and so did Irvin Frey of Lake Creek. He came in to be ready to go to work on the Agate-Trail section of the Crater Lake Highway and went up to the Lewis sheep camp Monday morning to go to work for R. B. Price, one of the contractors who is interested with Frank Rhodes to clear and grade the unit between Hog Creek and Rogue River at the mouth of Indian creek.
    G. C. Fredrick, C. L. Redpath and Bursell Redpath, recently from Klamath County where they have been working in the logging camps, also came in and engaged rooms and board. They are working in the H. B. Tronson orchard.
    George McMullen of Grand Ronde was also a caller Sunday evening.
    Marshall Minter, one of our enterprising homesteaders, was a business caller Monday.
    The Butte Falls stage when it came out Monday morning was loaded to its capacity and most of them went to Derby, Prospect and Butte Falls. Since the roads have become so sloppy and muddy those who have autos of their own prefer to pay stage fare to running their own machines. Among the passengers was Mr. E. E. Smith, Mr. and Mrs. Polk Smith, John Siler, J. W. Berrian, a civil engineer who was going up to the Conley place near Butte Falls to do some work in his line.
    B. F. Fuller and wife were transacting business Monday morning in our town.
    I. B. Millard, a salesman for the Pruitt-Myers Motor Co., Medford, was here for dinner Monday.
    Frank Rhodes and Wm. Kidd were among the diners at the Sunnyside Monday and so was Pliney Leabo and Miss Humphrey, daughter of Charles Humphrey of Derby.
    Marsh Garrett of Lake Creek passed through town Monday on his way to Medford. He was moving out for the winter.
    R. B. Price, the contractor, finished wrecking the old B.F. Lumber shed Sunday and Monday morning, started two or three teams to hauling the lumber out to the Lewis sheep camp, where he is establishing headquarters camp to work on the Agate-Crater Lake road--that is the name decided on by the road commissioners before they advertised for bids on the route--and put a few men at work putting up suitable quarters for the men and stock.
    Mr. Price seems to be quite a rustler and with the assistance and management of his wife will, no doubt, make a success of the undertaking.
    Ralph Haskins and wife of Trail were in town Monday and laid in their supplies for housekeeping for the winter. Mr. Haskins expects to work this season on the unit between where the Agate-Crater Lake Highway will cross Rogue River and Trail.
    R. A. Weidman went to Medford Monday to attend the fruit growers association meeting last Monday.
    Earl Hayes, the road supervisor in this district, went to Medford Monday.
    E. V. Brittsan, of the firm of Brittsan Bros., who are interested in the dairy business, started into town Monday morning and had the misfortune to break something about his auto and had to call on the Eagle Point garage men to haul him in and the result was he was compelled to remain overnight at the Sunnyside, something he very seldom does as they have about all that they can do running a big farm and milking and caring for about twenty cows besides other stock, and that includes feeding by hand twenty calves and tending to other stock.
    W. C. Daley, formerly one of the leading farmers and stockmen of the Lake Creek country, who bought the Geo. von der Hellen property just above town, has been making some changes in his fences and putting in some new fence on different lines, making some important changes.
    M. H. Simmons, formerly foreman on the Butte Creek orchard but now located on his own farm near Wellen, was a business caller Monday and so was Charley Cingcade, another one of our prominent stockmen, and Ed Dutton, one of the practical road builders of this section.
    Master Heath Childreth, son of our blacksmith, spent Thanksgiving visiting the family of Joseph Geppert, near Butte Falls.
    There has been another change in real estate in our town. Mr. Shively, our school house janitor, has purchased the property known as the Roe property and is now putting it in shape so as to make it his home.
    P. H. Daily, one of the game wardens, came out on the stage Tuesday morning and went on up into the Butte Falls country.
    Mr. Chatman of Lake Creek also came out from Medford Friday morning and went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    There were also five other passengers came out Tuesday morning and went to different places.
    Rudolph Pech of Lake Creek was a business caller Tuesday. He has quit hauling out spuds but says that he has about 150 sacks still on hand buried up that he expects to sell in the spring.
    Mrs. Heriford of Butte Falls came out from Medford Tuesday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside going on up home this Wednesday morning.
    W. H. Crandall, one of our leading farmers and orchardists, was in town Tuesday and reported that the stork had visited him again and this time it was a nine pound boy, born Nov. 29th. The mother and boy are doing fine and the prospect is that Mr. Crandall himself will live through the event, as he appears to be one of the happiest men living.
    John Rader, one of our leading farmers and stockmenm was in town Tuesday and reports that his wife, who has been seriously afflicted for several weeks past with an ulcerated tooth and after having it extracted had to have an operation performed to relieve the situation, is greatly improved.
    J. W. Sanders, foreman on the Antelope orchard, was in town Tuesday evening and also Wednesday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 6, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote last time and had written up the items as far as Wednesday noon, I concluded that I better stop and save what I had jotted down in my "little book" for the next time, if I wanted to keep the editor in a good humor, so I will commence just where I left off.
    Mrs. Ralph Gardner and daughter, Miss Bernice, of Salt Creek, drove in Wednesday morning, bringing in the produce from the farm and getting supplies, and after doing their trading with our merchants and attending to other business matters, dropped into the Sunnyside for dinner, and while they were there Mr. J. H. Johnson of Medford came in. He had been up to Prospect extending an electric power line from the power plant to where the men are working on the road that was graded up last summer leading from Prospect to Crater Lake, putting on the finishing touch, hard surfacing it.
    Dr. J. F. Reddy and Ralph Clark, who are interested in the contract to grade the unit of the road from the north edge of the desert at the David Cingcade ranch to Hog Creek on the Agate-Trail road, were also here for dinner and they were accompanied by Mr. W. J. Crane of Portland, a salesman for the Clyde Equipment Company of Portland, who will furnish the necessary machinery to be used on that unit of the road. There seems to be considerable stir in that line of business, and our town is being visited lately by all kinds of people, looking over the different propositions that are being offered.
    John Walch of Lake Creek, one of the leading farmers and stockmen of that section of the country, was here also Wednesday afternoon.
    Messrs. K. Dean Butler and Charles M. Devlin were also here Thursday. Mr. Devlin is a general contractor to do almost any kind of work on roads, ditches or railroads. He was here at the time to arrange for the keeping and feeding of twenty-seven head of horses and to have about fifteen head of them shod ready for use on the construction work on the above-named road, as he has rented out to Wm. von der Hellen 20 head of them to be used on the unit between the site for the new bridge across Rogue River and Trail, and the remainder he did not say what he would do with them. It was a busy day at the Childreth blacksmith shop Friday and kept Mr. Childreth and his son Gideon busy about all day getting them shod.
    Among the busy callers Thursday were Messrs. R. A. Petty, Guy Pruett, Alex Bates, Wm. Kidd, D. Bradshaw, J. H. French, one of our farmers who is directly interested in the poultry and dairy business, and while I naturally asked him how his hens were behaving, as he was one of the men who went to Grants Pass and bought quite a lot of registered hens, and he said that they were not behaving very well, as the contractor was making the irrigation ditch near his hen house and they have to blast the rock out and that now whenever a man cries fire that every hen starts for the brush for shelter, as the rock flies in every direction and the noise and confusion keeps them so excited that they don't lay very well, but he says that they are getting along nicely with the irrigating ditch and when they get through with that the hens will settle down to business and go to work in earnest.
    J. W. Hovey, the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was also a business caller Thursday.
    Ralph Bieberstedt was also a business caller Thursday.
    P. H. Daily, one of the game wardens, and Mr. Charles Lear of Medford came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage and went up to the higher altitudes and when they returned the next day said that they had been to the end of the road.
    Poke Smith and wife, who went to Butte Falls for Thanksgiving, returned Thursday.
    Thomas F. Nichols, Harvey Stanley, Fred Arnes and Wm. Martin were among the business callers also on Thursday.
    Frank Rhodes, one of the contractors on the Agate-Trail-Crater Lake Highway, was in town having his team shod up to use on the road work.
    E. S. Thompson and G. C. Beck of Medford came in from Trail on the Eagle Point-Persist stage Thursday evening and have been here since but expect to go to work on the road the first of the week and Chris Beale of Butte Falls has also been here for the past few days.
    Mrs. Roy Willits and child came out from Medford Friday morning and went up to Persist on the stage.
    Mr. Heckner, the official trapper and hunter, also came out on the stage Friday morning, and there was seven others came out beside the chauffeur, making nine passengers. Among them was Mrs. Theo. Hoefft of Lake Creek, who went out on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage.
    Mr. and Mrs. Larry A. Smith, who bought the J. B. Jackson farm just above town, went to Medford Friday morning.
    Elvin Abbott of Butte Falls, who recently returned from Portland, spent Friday night here and went on up to Butte Falls this Saturday morning..
    G. F. Coday and wife were in town Friday on their way up to the Riggings place near Derby.
    Born December 3 to Mr. and Mrs. Earnest Dahack, an eight-pound boy.
    Dr. J. F. Reddy and Ralph L. Clark were here Friday afternoon interviewing Charles Delin with regard to road work.
    The Brittsan brothers sent 25 large fat hogs to the Farm Bureau, Medford, this Saturday morning and they and Pete Betz and Edward Bellows were here for dinner today.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 7, 1920, page 6


TRAIL ITEMS
    Oscar Stewart was in Medford Wednesday after his mother, who will make them a visit on their ranch above Trail.
    Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson spent several days visiting with her mother in Ashland last week.
    Dick Vincent is hauling hay from the Bar Eight ranch.
    Gene Howell of the U.S. Fisheries has been transferred to Clackamas and will leave about the first of the year.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson made a business trip to Medford Wednesday returning Thursday.
    They are having considerable difficulty in taking a steam roller to Prospect. The roads are so slick that it is almost impossible to guide the roller, which weaves from one side of the road to the other. The man refused to ride it across the bridge crossing Elk Creek just below the hatchery. On my way to town we had to wait for it to be turned around, as it had skidded and was crossway over the road. It will be dangerous work going up the grade above McLeod.
    A new city is going up in Zimmerlee's back yard. Several bunk houses and a large cook house for the road camps have been erected on the new highway. The camp could justly be called Swedenburg.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 7, 1920, page 6


ELK CREEK
    Van Heffner has gone over on the Applegate to fix the government dam. He will be gone about a week.
    Mrs. Stewart is visiting her sons Oscar and Will Stewart of the Rogue River ranch. She will probably stay about two weeks.
    Mrs. Ash of Trail has been making the rounds of all her neighbors for miles around in the hope of interesting them in a Christmas tree the school is going to give. The plan is to have donations of small sums in order that everyone who comes has a gift.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gene Howell spent Sunday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 9, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    At the close of our Sabbath school Rev. A. Werdon, the pastor of the Free Methodist church of Ashland, preached for us and although he had been here the day before and visited many of the families of the town, he had a very small congregation to preach to and he also preached again at 7:30 p.m., but there were but a very small number to hear him, owing perhaps in part at least to the fact that the night was very dark and the streets and roads muddy. He preached two very good sermons, one on the subject of Christian Perfection and the one at night on The Second Coming of the Lord. If the weather had been more favorable no doubt there would have been more out to hear him, but the people of Eagle Point will have to have a different kind of minister, one that can wake them up and make them think before they become interested enough in the subject of religion to go to church.
    George Lewis, who has been running a truck hauling saw logs around Medford, came out Saturday afternoon and took supper with his brother Harry at the Sunnyside Sunday evening. John W. Smith and family, who are interested with his brother Artie in a farm and orchard on Big Sticky, were visiting at the Sunnyside Sunday afternoon.
    There have been some changes in real estate in our little town. Wilbur Jack had sold twenty-one acres of land inside of the corporate limits of the town to Allen Denton of Ashland, and G. C. McAllister has traded his home place here, the A. J. Daley residence, to the same man for Ashland property, and J. F. Brown has purchased a plat of land joining his home place of Mr. Rose Patter of Ashland. There are two more deals on where real property has been sold and money paid to close the bargain, but as the deals have not been closed and the deeds given I am not at liberty to make the matter public as yet. In making the deals referred to as already closed, we are going to lose one of our highly esteemed citizens, Mr. McAllister, as he expects to move in the spring, but we will have in his place Mr. Denton, who is of one of the finest families in this or Klamath Falls county, and he will be permanently settled, while Mr. McAllister had already bought a small farm near Central Point where he had planned to live as soon as he could dispose of his property here.
    A. G. Bishop, owner of the Hollywood orchard, was a business caller Monday morning and so was J. Simmons of Trail. He had had the misfortune to cut his foot with an ax and was stopping here with friends a few days while the cut was healing.
    Prof. G. R. Robinson, the principal of the Butte Falls high school, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Monday morning and so was A. Wyne, the oil and coal promoter.
    Mrs. Walter Meyer and her brother, William Wright, were callers also Monday. And so was Irvin Bieberstedt and his nephew, Ralph Bieberstedt. Ralph was hauling lumber from here up to the Nygren place on Salt Creek to build a house for one of the Nygren boys who married his sister.
    Walter Marshall of Brownsboro, was also among the business callers and so was Mrs. McKissick, formerly of this place but now of Medford. She had been out Saturday and had taken her father, J. W. Prillaman, and his sister, Miss Prillaman home with her and had brought them back Monday.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our leading business men, a hardware merchant, has been making some material improvements in front of his store. He has hauled gravel in and leveled up the side of the street where the water was standing so that when people ride up in their cars they don't have to jump to avoid getting their feet wet or wade in the water.
    Robert Merrill, his mother and brother were transacting business here also Monday.
    Ed Spencer, who has been out herding sheep all summer and fall, was here Tuesday and while here gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune, as he says that he gets lonesome without it to read when he is out in the hills.
    Benj. Whetstone was also a hurried business caller Tuesday. And Herman Meyer, Henry Tonn, A. C. Spence, Cecil Culbertson and Charles Spence came in with three of the Jackson County road trucks, taking them to Jacksonville from the Lake Creek road district.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cady of Derby came in Tuesday and Guy Pruett, Messrs. Lloyd French, C. E. Bellows, Alex Betz, C. Delin, Ralph L. Clark of Portland, Chris Bergman and wife, I. B. Mallard, representative of the Pruitt-Meyers Auto Co., Medford, and W. B. Lull of Portland were here for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Lull is the man who took the contract to build the Agate-Trail road from the edge of the desert to Hog Creek.
    M. S. Stutt of Derby came out on horseback Tuesday to have him shod. He says his roads are so bad that that is the only way to get out except to walk.
    Mrs. J. Montgomery and Fred Robbins went to Medford Tuesday afternoon in the Lewis jitney.
    Lewis Martin of Trail came out on the Persist stage Tuesday.
    A man by the name of Winters of Yakima, Wash., came in Tuesday morning, walked around town until 3 p.m. and went to Medford to catch the S.P. No. 16 for Portland.
    Chas. Fellows of Trail and Marshall Minter were business callers Tuesday evening. He said that his sisters, Mrs. Sam Courtney and W. E. Hammel, had bought a small cannery and were canning up the pears that were spoiled for the market by the hail storm last summer.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 10, 1920, page 9


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Conger of Butte Falls, who is interested in the old Hawk sawmill on Clark's Creek with Mr. Cowley, was a business caller Wednesday and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    William Brown of the firm of George Brown & Sons, who, with his wife, have been spending some weeks in Southern California, on account of Mr. Brown being troubled with rheumatism, have returned home greatly improved in health.
    Sam Courtney and wife, who have been in California for several months, he working at his trade, painting and paper hanging, have returned to their home north of our town.
    Carl Stanley of Lake Creek, one of our leading stockmen and ranchers, was a business caller Wednesday.
    Allison Allen of Spokane arrived here Wednesday on the stage and went on up to Derby. He is an uncle of John Allen of Derby and is making his annual visit to his nephews, Wallace Bergman and J. W. Berrian, superintendent of the Butte Falls hatchery and other fishing interests, were also passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage.
    Harvey Stanley brought in a fine lot of dressed hogs and distributed them among the citizens of our town Wednesday.
    Thursday morning Fred Pelouze, J. L. Robertson, Sr., and Mr. McNichols went to Medford in the Lewis jitney.
    J. W. Sanders, superintendent of the Antelope orchard, was a business caller Thursday morning.
    Benjamin Kingery and wife of Antelope motored into town Thursday with a load of produce for our merchants.
    Robert McCabe and his father, T. F. McCabe, drove in the same day and took out a small lot of lumber with them for repair work.
    Charles Delin is having the old Daley barn fixed up so that he can care for a part of his horses that are to be used on the Antelope-Trail unit of the Crater Lake Highway. He sent two teams up to the Mike Hanley ranch on the north fork of Little Butte after a lot of feed troughs, and from all appearances he will soon have a force of men and teams moving dirt and rock along that route. The incessant rain is hindering the men in their work along the route of the highway, as the ground is so soft and muddy that they cannot work to advantage, even in clearing the right-of-way, as a considerable part of the route is "sticky," but I understand that Mr. Price is doing considerable work clearing away the rock on the route and that Wm. von der Hellen is getting along nicely with his unit between Rogue River and Trail, as about all of his contract is on sandy, gravelly and rocky land.
    Our enterprising school teachers, Misses Josie Riley the principal, and Ruth Young, are training the children in their departments to take part in a community Christmas entertainment in the opera house on Thursday evening, December 23, and the plan is to have one of the best times we have had in Eagle Point for years. We have the talent here to compete with any of the towns in that line. Everybody is invited to come and help make it a glowing success.
    Speaking about our school, I had a little business with Miss Young the other day, and called at recess time, not intending to visit the school at all, but after I had obtained the information I desired, Miss Young insisted on my going in and looking over some of the work of the little tots in their line, especially in the line of decorations, and I was surprised to see the amount and kind of work they are doing.
    C. H. Natwick, a contractor, who has had two different jobs above Ashland on the highway, came in for dinner Thursday and reported that the rain was interfering very much with his work as the men cannot work to advantage while it is raining and the ground is so soft and wet.
    John McAllister of Lake Creek was also a diner here Thursday.
    Mrs. J. L. Davis and her two children and Miss Sophia Cooley of Roseville, Cal., nieces of Mrs. Walter Meyer who have been visiting their aunt and uncle, came in Friday and went to Medford on their way home on the Lewis jitney. Mr. and Mrs. Meyer accompanied them as far as Eagle Point.
    Mr. Luke Ryan of Medford came out from his farm near the mouth of Big Butte Creek Friday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did John Smith.
    H. E. Hensley of Wellen, formerly of Eagle Point, came in Friday on business.
    Mr. Wm. Johnson and his father, who own the farm formerly owned by W. P. Haley, just below town, were business callers Friday.
    J. P. Coleman, of Lake Creek, was in Eagle Point on his way home from Medford, where he had been to take his brother, Dr. Coleman of Medford, who came out to treat J. P. Coleman's baby, who is troubled with indigestion.
    Joe Poole and family and Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Whitehead, the foreman on the Butte Creek orchard and the business manager for Mr. Fred C. Bell, owner, Thos. O'Brian of Butte Falls and Miss Ruth Young, our primary teacher, went to Medford Friday afternoon on the stage.
    Mrs. Wm. Perry and her daughter, Mrs. Percy Haley, were shopping in town Friday afternoon.
    Mr. Gilmore of Paul's Electric Store called on business Friday evening.
    Mrs. J. E. Gleason was on the Medford-Butte Falls stage for Butte Falls to visit relatives, and also on her way to Michigan to be with her son, who is attending the university there.
    U. R. Scott of Medford was a diner at the Sunnyside today, Saturday, and so were Paul B. Rynning, state highway engineer, and R. T. Seaman, department engineer, both of Medford. They are working on the route between the Cingcade ranch and Trail, and R. C. Johnson and P. Silverton of Medford. They were looking over the route between the Cingcade place for the first four miles, with a view to contract for clearing the right-of-way.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 14, 1920, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Late Saturday afternoon R. A. Petty and W. H. Crandall, two of our enterprising farmers and orchardists, were in town, a thing rather out of the ordinary, for they are both men who are supposed to be at home, at least, by chore time, but one of them, Mr. Crandall, was looking for one of his neighbors he was expecting in from Medford.
    C. E. Bellows and Mrs. Bert Clarno were also here late the same afternoon. They had been to Medford and were just returning home.
    Mrs. D. Bradshaw of Brownsboro was also a late business caller Saturday afternoon.
    Still later in the evening Dr. Pickel and Wm. Budge, both of Medford, came in for supper. The doctor had had a call to go out about five miles beyond here to see Mr. Joyce and on the road had the misfortune to rip open a tire on one of the front wheels of his car by striking a sharp rock on the desert, and was detained for some time on account of having started from home without a flashlight and his transferable light was out of commission so they had to put on a new tire as best they could by the light of matches and what light they could get from the lights of the car. But after supper they, by the use of the phone, got the parties and arranged to have them meet them at the Reese Creek school house and proceeded on their way.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. A. Weidman, who owns a farm and orchard just at the edge of town and are interested in the dairy business, and Mrs. Weidman is the saleslady in the Nichols store, went to Medford last Saturday on business.
    Charles Nickel and family of Phoenix and a relative of the Nickel family came over and spent Sunday with Mr. and Mrs. Nickel's daughter, Mrs. Robert Harnish.
    There was a little more stir in our town Sunday than usual; there were quite a number of people came in during the day, among whom were D. H. Slead, George W. Jacobs and L. R. Raymond of Gold Hill, who were investigating the prospects for work on the Agate unit of the Crater Lake Highway. Also Glenn Haley and Miss Sadie Anderson, George Cottrell, Ira Tungate of Butte Falls, Lewis Martin, who were all at the Sunnyside for meals, and several stayed overnight and Lewis Martin remained until Wednesday morning, going up to his home on Elk Creek. He had brought out a lot of furs that he had taken from animals he had caught and taken them to the Medford market.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bryan Leabo of Grays Harbor, Wash., came in on the Butte Falls stage Monday and went on up to Trail on the Persist stage.
    Mr. Thomson, one of the firm of Thomson Bros., Lake Creek, came out also on the Butte Falls stage and went up home on the Lake Creek stage the same day.
    J. P. Goin, our agate man, who is now engaged with the Price-Rhodes workers on the unit of the Agate-Trail [road] between Hog Creek and Rogue River, came out Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and took out a load of scraps of lumber that was left from the building that Mr. Price tore down and moved out to fix camps, etc., for his men.
    Corbin Edgell, one of our orchardists, and Lee Farlow of Lake Creek also came out and went on to Medford Monday morning, returning this Wednesday morning.
    J. W. Hovey, the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was also a business caller Monday, as was Alex Vestal, Artie Vestal and their brother Thomas Vestal, all of Reese Creek.
    Mrs. David Cingcade was out on the streets shopping Monday, and so was Pete Young and his sister Miss Anna Young.
    Buel Hildreth and wife, who have been working on the Crater Lake Highway near Prospect, came in Monday night and stopped at the Sunnyside until Wednesday morning and started for their home in Butte Falls.
    W. G. Averill, C.B.M., U.S.N., R.L.--these are all the appendages he put to his name--came in and spent Monday night at the Sunnyside, taking passage for Butte Falls on the stage.
    Ralph Gardner and wife of Lake Creek were in town Tuesday and so were two of the Misses Nygren of Brownsboro, and their wives, also several others whose names I could not recall. They seemed to concentrate at the bank as though there was some deal on hand but I did not inquire. Alex Mathews was also a business caller.
    Pete Betz, who owns a fine farm on or near the new Crater Lake Highway on Rogue River, drove in Tuesday and was accompanied by the young lady who is teaching in the Laurel Hill district.
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside Tuesday were Charles Delin, E. C. Fawcett, W. B. Campbell, Ralph Clark, Dr. J. F. Reddy, Miss Martha E. Porter, who is teaching in the Derby district, Mr. Allison Allen, a brother of John Allen of Derby. In my last letter I mentioned him as an uncle instead of a brother. He has just make his annual visit to his brother and is now going to Los Angeles to spend the winter.
    When the Persist stage came in Tuesday there were as passengers from Persist, Elk Creek and Trail, Mrs. Roy Willits and little boy, J. W. Miller, John Oleson, Antone Ring, who had a large bundle of furs and among them were a number of coyote skins and bear skins besides the skins of smaller animals. After the mail carrier had delivered his mail he went on to Medford that afternoon and took his passengers on into town.
    Miss Eula Norris, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John Norris, foreman on the Wilfley orchard, who has been visiting friends in Medford, also came out Tuesday.
    Among the Sunnyside callers Tuesday were Mr. and Mrs. Price, the contractor on the Agate-Trail road. They were on their way to Medford and later in the day Miss Enid Middlebusher of Trail, John Cadzow of Butte Falls, Geo. McDonald and Mrs. Moen, who is teaching in the Reese Creek district, who all spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    John Calhoun of Baker County, who has been here visiting his son-in-law Wm. Wright, came in the Wednesday morning and went to Medford.
    Rev. J. E. Day of Butte Falls was among the passengers from Medford this morning.
    Mrs. N. E. Watkins has had a new roof put on her dwelling house.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 17, 1920, page 7


ELK CREEK
    Mr. Van Heffner has returned from a business trip over on the Applegate.
    Benny Zimmerlee has taken up a homestead on Trail Creek.
    Mrs. George Weeks and children made a trip to Medford Friday, returning Sunday.
    Mrs. Stewart, mother of Oscar and Will Stewart of the Rogue River ranch, returns home tomorrow after having made a visit of several days.
    Thomas Carlton and Will Stewart have been riding up Elk Creek after cattle.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1920, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When the Butte Falls stage came in Thursday morning, Prof. G. W. Wilson, formerly of Derby but now of Portland, and C. D. Cader of San Francisco were among the passengers. Prof. Wilson was going up to Derby to look after his interests there and Mr. Cader was going up to Derby to visit his parents who are living on the Riggin place. There were several other passengers on the stage but I did not learn their names.
    Wm. Hanson and his father of Brownsboro, Harry von der Hellen of Wellen, Marsh Garrett of Lake Creek, one of our leading stockmen, were also among the business callers Thursday.
    Our new barber, Ernest Dahack, since he has taken possession of the shop has been making so many changes in the building, both inside and outside, that if the old proprietor should happen to come in he would hardly know the place. He has rearranged the inside, put in a water heating apparatus, cut out the old agate cutting machinery, cut off a nice room for a bath room, put in a neat settee where his customers sit and read, etc., and painted the outside, at least the front part of the building, white and the windows and doors green so that it is quite attractive.
    I. B. Mallard, the representative of the Pruett and Meyer Motor Co., and R. D. Patrick, our carpenter, who has been working for the Rogue River Canal Company during the fall and winter on their canal, came in Thursday for dinner and so did Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her aunt, Mrs. Richter of Dresden, Germany. Mrs. Richter is the sister of the wife of ex-Senator von der Hellen of Wellen, who is here visiting the von der Hellen family. She was born in England but was married some thirty years ago to a German and has lived in Germany since.
    Ed Frey of Lake Creek was in town Thursday and reported that his brother Ortin had had the misfortune to have a horse fall on him and break his wrist, and they were both in town Friday on their way home from Medford where they had been to have the fracture dressed. Our doctor, Mr. Holt, had not returned from San Francisco up to that time, but arrived here Friday morning, and I can assure the reader that judging by the way he was greeted, was welcomed by about all who met him.
    Thursday afternoon E. C. Fawcett and W. B. Campbell, two mining men, came in and engaged board and room. They have taken a contract to clear the brush and timber off of the right of way on a four-mile unit running from the edge of the desert to Hog Creek.
    And that same evening L. S. Atmond of Portland, Frank Willeke, Everett Abbott and John Logan came in to spend the night.
    Miss Hazel Brown, daughter of one of the firm of George Brown & Sons, who has been working in a bank in California, has returned home to spend the winter.
    W. C. Butler, one of the pioneers of the valley, came in Friday morning on the Lake Creek stage and there were five passengers on the Butte Falls stage.
    John Miller of Lake Creek was also in town Friday and also was here today, Saturday, and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did D. R. Patrick.
    N. W. Cather, salesman for Goodyear Rubber Company, and P. B. McDonald, also of the same company, Medford, and so was Fred W. Peters of Portland and A. Joseph of Aberdeen, Wash., here for dinner Friday.
    Frank Neil and John Allen of Derby passed through our town with a load of furniture Friday.
    Mrs. John L. Robinson was shopping here Friday and so was Mrs. Susan Hart.
    Mrs. Robert Harnish, who has been spending a few days visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Nickel of Phoenix, returned home Friday afternoon.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Guy Pruett, Dec. 17, a nine-pound boy.
    Nick Young, one of our promising young farmers, spent Friday night at the Sunnyside.
    Joe Moomaw, who lives just outside of our town, was here Friday evening and reports that he has been working on the Agate-Trail highway on the Price-Rhodes part and that they have about two miles of the right of way cleared of brush and timber and have been blasting away on the rock work and are getting along fine with the work.
    This Saturday morning there were so many passengers and so much mail matter that the contractor had to use two cars to carry the load and the passengers, among whom were Mrs. Joseph Geppert and Miss Edith Fredenburg of Butte Falls and Miss Lavena Brown of Brownsboro.
    W. H. Crandall and Raleigh Mathews came in this Saturday forenoon and Mr. Crandall brought in some fine-looking apples for Geo. Brown and Sons.
    Pete Betz also was a business caller and Lawrence Conger brought in a load of live turkeys and took them to Medford.
    Geo. Holmes of the firm of Holmes and MacDonald, our garage men, who has been working on a house on Griffin Creek, has returned to his place in the garage.
    Wm. Perry is putting up the fence along the right of way on the Crater Lake Highway through the W. Hart Hamilton place that he has charge of, and R. A. Weidman is getting the material on the ground to put the fence through his place, but the ground is so soft and sticky that it is hard to work on it as he cannot get a team on it but is simply bringing the posts home.
    John Rader, Lloyd Stanley and John Miller were among the business callers, and Mr. Stanley took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did Mr. D. R. Patrick of Brownsboro.
    Wesley Butler and family, his sister, Nellie and his brother-in-law, Arthur Brophy, came in this morning and brought the trailer to his auto to the Childreth's shop to have it mended.
    A Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year to the readers of the Eaglets.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 21, 1920, page 9


ELK CREEK
    Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Merriman spent Saturday and Sunday visiting with Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher and family.
    Fred Middlebusher has just returned from a few weeks visit in Centralia, Washington.
    There was a surprise party on Frank Holmes at his homestead last week, about 25 persons being present.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dick Vincent stopped at Mrs. Middlebusher's on their way home from Medford Sunday.
    Miss Mary Weeks, Tom Weeks and Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson took dinner with Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson Sunday. In the afternoon they went to Trail to visit with Mrs. Middlebusher.
    Oscar and Will Stewart have been riding after cattle the last few days.
    Fred and Dan Middlebusher went to Prospect Monday.
    Richard Mieth, a bridge contractor from Portland, who has the contract for the bridge across Rogue River, is spending a few days at Mrs. Middlebusher's.
    Jack Walker and son have been hauling hay from the Bar 8 ranch. Also Nick Von hauled a load up to the old Storm place for Mr. Peterson, the mail carrier.
    Mr. Byron LeBeau and bride are spending a few weeks with his sister, Mrs. George Weeks.
    Ralph Watson is sawing wood for George Weeks with his power saw.
    Ace Weeks was called to Trail Friday to doctor a sick horse.
    Nearly everyone in the vicinity has been sick with a cold.
    O. R. Train made a trip to Medford Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 23, 1920, page 3


BOBBY PELOUZE IS CALLED CARDINALS' GREATEST ATHLETE
    Regarding Bobby Pelouze, a former high school star and one of the best-known young men in Southern Oregon, the San Francisco Call of recent date has the following to say/ Mr. Pelouze arrived Thursday evening to spend the Christmas holidays with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Pelouze, of Eagle Point.
    "Graduation will rob Stanford of one of the greatest athletes that ever donned a Cardinal uniform. This is Bobby Pelouze, the little guy who played end on the Stanford football team this year, and although he tips the scales at only 150 pounds, he holds his own against the best opposition. Bob has been at Stanford four years, and during that time has won his letter in baseball, football, basketball and track and field. Bob was the star pitcher of the Cardinal nine for three years and has played football ever since his freshman year, and was a star quarter miler on the cinder track and plays forward on the Cardinal basketball five. Some man!"
Medford Mail Tribune, December 24, 1920, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. O. Pierce of Prospect came in Saturday evening and remained until Monday at the Sunnyside.
    Polk Smith has moved into what is known as the Coy house, formerly occupied by W. D. Roberts and family.
    Carlyle Natwick came in Saturday night from the Natwick camp on the Pacific Highway south of Ashland, where his father has a contract to do a certain job on the highway.
    Mrs. Harry Herriford of Butte Falls and Wm. Hughes also of Butte Falls, spent the night at the Sunnyside. Miss Herriford went to Medford Monday morning and returned the same day, taking the Butte Falls stage Tuesday morning.
    Roy Watkins was also a guest at the Sunnyside Monday night.
    One of the real estate deals referred to in a former letter was the sale of the Dr. W. W. P. Holt home here to John M. Miller of Lake Creek. We are very sorry to have to lose Dr. Holt and family, as they are among the best citizens of our town and the doctor stands very high in his profession and will be greatly missed from not only our community, but entire neighborhood including Butte Falls, Prospect, Derby, Trail, Lake Creek and all of the surrounding country, but while we are losing a number-one citizen in the person of Dr. Holt, we feel that the vacancy will be filled by Mr. and Mrs. John Miller and we sympathize with the neighborhood on the south fork of Little Butte in their loss of one of their best men and his wife, but such is fate, the loss of one is the building up of another.
    Bert Peachey, one of the forest rangers of Ashland, and family have come in to spend the coming Christmas with her parents.
    J. W. Berrian and J. W. Caven were here Monday morning looking over the different sites for the erection of a fish hatchery where they can care for the young fish after they are hatched, and after looking over the different places have decided to build it a short distance above here on L. K. Hawk's land and Mr. Berrian has had the lumber brought out from the Butte Falls country on the P.&E. railroad and has a team hauling it out today, Wednesday, and will have the carpenters at work arranging to hatch out and care for the young fish.
    Mrs. Robertson and O. Adams came out on the Medford-Butte Falls stage Monday morning and went up home.
    Carl Stanley of Lake Creek and Theron Taylor went up to Lake Creek on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage Monday morning and Miss Etta Grieve, daughter of Wm. Grieve, formerly our county assessor, came out from Medford and went to her home near Prospect.
    Frank Rhodes, our county surveyor, and Sam Courtney, our painter and paper hanger, were business callers Monday.
    Mr. J. Waterbury, one of our hustling farmers, and G. H. Stowell and wife were doing shopping here with our merchants Monday and Mr. and Mrs. Stowell brought in 150 dozen eggs for the Farm Bureau. While they were at the Sunnyside for dinner, your correspondent inquired about the number of eggs they were getting per day, and they report about 25 dozen a day, a nice little income at 52 cents a dozen. They also brought in their week's cream from four cows, and in the run of conversation, speaking about hogs, Mrs. Stowell remarked that they did not try to keep more hogs than enough to make their meat, but fed the milk to the hens. They seemed to think that when all of their 800 hens went to laying, as some of them are fully matured hens, not old, but laying hens, and following the course of nature, they stop laying the winter and rest, while quite a number are pullets and not old enough to commence to lay yet, but by early spring they will about all go to laying.
    There were two truckloads of wire fencing came out to Wm. Perry Monday to be used for the county to fence the right of way on the Crater Lake Highway, as Mr. Perry has taken a contract to put up two miles of fence, one mile on each side of the right of way, and has already quite a lot of the posts set and the holes dug for the anchor posts. By the first of the year, if the weather will permit, there will be quite a force of men and teams working on the job.
    Fred Pelouze, one of our progressive farmers and dairy men, was in town Monday having some repair work done on one of his wagons at the Childreth shop.
    Mrs. M. R. Koontz of Butte Falls has been here visiting her brother, Mr. Polk Smith, and his family.
    Gus Nichols has leased his farm and stock ranch on Salt Creek, Lake Creek post office, for a period of five years to William Holman, a good deal for Will, and his friends predict that he will make good, for he and his wife are both rustlers when it comes to farming and handling stock.
    The following were guests at the Sunnyside Monday for dinner: B. O. Applegate, Westco Chautauqua Co., Portland; Edgar Johnson, Farm Bureau, Medford; D. O. Frederick, Snider Dairy, Medford; George McDonald and T. F. McCabe.
    J. L. Robinson, Sr., shipped fifteen large fat hogs through the Farm Bureau, Medford, to Portland Saturday.
    Later in the day Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Bellows, the Brittsan brothers, Mrs. Merritt, Miss Ellen McCabe and Dave Phipps of Medford, were in town.
    Monday evening we had Mrs. C. R. Farrar of Lake Creek, Lester Swink, one of the Butte Falls merchants and Mrs. Herriford of Butte Falls and John H. Simon of Gold Hill.
    Mrs. Herriford, Butte Falls, and Mrs. Farrar, Lake Creek, went to Medford Monday morning, returning that night, going to their homes Tuesday morning.
    Chris Bergman came out Saturday and went to Jacksonville, and came in Tuesday morning and went home on the Derby stage.
    D. W. Shelbley, our school house janitor, was here for dinner Tuesday and reported that he was moving into his new home that day. Thomas Long was also a diner at the Sunnyside, and so was Ralph Hayman and W. G. Purdge, the two men who brought out the two loads of fencing for Wm. Perry.
    Roy Watkins and Frank Johnson were also here Tuesday and Wednesday morning. Two of Frank's nieces, Miss Lucy Foeller and Miss Eula Foeller of Trail, and Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of Lake Creek, who had been out to her farm near Medford, came in on the stage and the two young ladies, Joe Haskins and Mrs. David Smith took passage for Trail and Mr. Watkins went on the Lake Creek stage.
    J. W. Donhea and Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby and J. W. Hovey, foreman on the Altavista orchard, were here for dinner today, Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 27, 1920, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. W. Hovey, the foreman on the Altavista orchard, was here on Wednesday trying to arrange for the right of way through a twenty-acre tract of land that belongs to myself and wife, to put in a ditch so that they could carry water from Butte Creek to the aforesaid orchard. He said that Mr. Knight, the owner of the orchard, had been trying for some time to have the Rogue River Canal Company put water on his orchard, but had failed so far and now he is trying to arrange to take water out of Butte Creek near the Snowy Butte mill dam and pump it to an elevation of 90 feet and then carry it in ditches and pipes across the country about a mile and use it to irrigate his orchard. Mr. Hovey said that they had not surveyed out the route yet but were satisfied that the water can be carried over that route. The plan is to install a pump with sufficient power and capacity to raise seven thousand gallons a minute and have it forced through an eight-inch pipe and after reaching that elevation would be able to procure sufficient water to water his entire orchard. It has been demonstrated that with the use of water in an orchard that the production will be at least doubled and the variety increased at least one hundred percent.
    There has been some talk of our town putting in a pumping plant and making a reservoir on the hill referred to so as to furnish our town with water to irrigate our gardens and for domestic purposes and it probably will be done when we get a different class of citizens here, but at present we have too many of the old pioneer stock living here.
    Wednesday evening John Grieve, the veteran road builder of Prospect, came in on the stage from Medford and spent the night at the Sunnyside. And Miss Josie Riley, the principal of our school and Miss Myrtle Smith came in for supper.
    When the Butte Falls stage came in Thursday morning it was simply loaded down, not only with passengers but with mail matter, for the driver had it packed not only inside but all that could well be lashed on was piled on the outside and when making the return trip brought out Miss Edna Gore and Miss Romwedt, two of the Butte Falls teachers, on their way to Medford to spend Christmas with the folks at home.
    There was a meeting of the directors of the First State Bank of Eagle Point held here on Dec. 16, being their annual meeting, and all of the directors were present and adjusted their accounts for the current year, and they expressed their approval of the present management. From the current year's earnings they declared a dividend of 12 percent and carried about 5 percent more to "depreciation" and to surplus. Besides this they carry over a liberal amount of undivided profit. Eagle Point has a good bank and a very careful manager.
    Wm. Hughes of Butte Falls also spent Thursday night with us.
    Ray Parker of Butte Falls, who is one of the students of the Forest Grove college, and his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Crabtree, also of Forest Grove, were here for dinner Thursday on their way to Butte Falls to visit Mr. Parker's parents, W. W. Parker and wife, and other relatives, going on up in the afternoon.
    J. P. Oswald and Guy Holman and Charles Manning of Peyton were also here for dinner and Charles Manning remained overnight, and R. A. Petty, who is now on the Vermeren place, and T. F. Coger of Derby were among the diners.
    Thursday evening, as announced in a former letter, our school, conducted by Misses Jose Riley and Ruth Young, principal and primary teacher, gave a fine entertainment in the opera house and a community Christmas tree.
    The first thing on the program was The Bird's Christmas Tree prologue. The Christmas Baby Finds a Home. There were quite a number of 7th and 8th grade pupils engaged in this play and they carried out their parts well. It was played in three acts. The first act was the home of the birds. The different acts were quite lengthy, but the children did themselves credit and also the way they performed reflected credit on their trainers. Between the different acts the primary pupils performed their parts, but I am afraid if I undertake to give anything like an outline of the play I will try the patience of the editor, but the entire performance was well rendered and everyone I have heard speak of it speaks in highest terms of the entire performance.
    Mrs. Fred Dutton was among the business callers Thursday and so was H. D. Mills of Butte Falls, and Wm. Grieve of Prospect was a passenger on the stage on his way home.
    Robert McCabe came in Friday and brought his father, T. F. McCabe and sister, Miss Ellen, and they two went on to Medford on the jitney and so did Miss Bertha Haymond and Jennie Florey and J. B. Beckner, the cream tester.
    J. F. Maxfield and son, Herman Meyer and daughter and Miss Bessie Farlow of Lake Creek and John Norris, the foreman on the Wilfley orchard, were shopping here Friday.
    Christmas morning broke on us bright and clear and all nature seemed to join with the angelic host in singing praises to the giver of all good and as I meditated on the great contrast between our surroundings, the weather warm and vegetation green and the grass fresh and plentiful, while our brothers in the Middle West and along the northern Atlantic coast are freezing with the cold, we of Southern Oregon are enjoying what seems to be an April day.
    S. H. Harnish, who has been confined to his room and a good part of the time to the hospital for several weeks, returned home Friday greatly improved. His trouble seemed to be blood poison caused by a simple scratch with a sliver of wood so slight as to be scarcely noticeable but in the course of a few hours it began to pain him and in spite of all the local remedies it proved to be a very serious scratch.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 28, 1920, page 3


ELK CREEK
    Everyone has an exceptionally good time at the program and Christmas tree at Trail Christmas Eve. The Trail school gave the program while all helped on the tree. Everyone received a sack of candy and nuts. A large crowd attended and the program was very good.
    Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson spent Christmas in Ashland with her mother, Mrs. W. B. Holmes. Mr. and Mrs. Newton Ward returned with them Sunday for several weeks visit. Mrs. Ward and Mrs. Hutchinson are sisters.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charlie Blaess are visiting her mother, Mrs. Zimmerlee, during the holidays. They spent Monday visiting with Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson.
    Mrs. M. E. Middlebusher and Enid and Denzel Middlebusher and Mr. and Mrs. S. W. and Keva Hutchinson took Christmas dinner with Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Stewart.
    Mr. Keva Hutchinson spent Christmas with folks returning Sunday.
    Oscar and Will Stewart rode after cattle today across Rogue River.
    Miss Given Houston is home from Central Point, where she is attending school, for the holidays.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1921, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Medford Mail Tribune was on Christmas Day, and when I had written what I thought would make about a column in print, although I had at that time quite a number of items that I had collected, that I thought would keep until today, Wednesday.
    Among the items kept over was the one where Mr. and Mrs. Leroy Smith, who are living on the old J. B. Jackson place, gave a Christmas dinner and had a reunion of the Haley family, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. P. W. Haley, Mr. and Mrs. Perry Haley and Miss Ruby Haley and Mr. Nick Young and Mr. and Mrs. William Perry, Mrs. Smith's sister. They not only had a fine dinner but a very pleasant time.
    At the Sunnyside we had, by special arrangement, Mr. and Mrs. George H. Stowell and Mrs. and Mrs. John W. Smith. Mrs. Smith is a sister of Mr. Stowell. We also had Mr. and Mrs. B. F. Lindas and Miss Anna and Master Leonard Lindas of Medford. Mr. Lindas is one of the Medford attorneys and was out here last summer to dinner one Sunday.
    There were no special Christmas reunions here of any other families as the weather was so moist and the roads so sloppy that it was a great undertaking for anyone to even try to get out from home. Christmas Eve Mr. and Mrs. Ray Harnish gave a supper and had S. H. Harnish, his son Robert and wife and daughter, Mrs. Fred Dutton.
    Miss Falldine of New York, Jackson County nurse, Miss Florence E. Pool, home demonstration agent, Miss Witzner, high school librarian and Miss Martha E. Potter, the Derby teacher, all spent the Christmas holidays with Miss Potter's sister on the C. L. Farrar farm in the Lake Creek district, and Miss Potter spent Sunday night at the Sunnyside and went up to her school Monday morning on the Butte Falls stage.
    Arthur Ellison of Portland went up to Butte Falls Saturday to join in a partial reunion of the Tungate family. He is a brother-in-law of Mr. Ira Tungate of Butte Falls.
    Steve McAllister of Lake Creek was a passenger Monday morning on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mr. Hensley, who is living on the place formerly known as the Abger place, was doing business here Monday. He left here some five years ago and went up north but has returned and may settle here permanently.
    Thos. F. Nichols was also a business caller and reports that owing to the continuous rain that they have had to suspend work on the ditch which he, his sister Miss Ruth, and J. H. French are having made, until the weather settles.
    W. E. Hammel and his brother-in-law, Marshall Minter, passed through town Monday morning on their way to Central Point where they were going after 20 head of ewes Mr. Hammel had bought. Mr. Hammel while talking about sheep, cows and hogs related that he had just killed an eleven-month-old pig that weighed after he was dressed 304 pounds. It was a motherless pig and was raised on the bottle. Another argument in favor of prohibition--use the bottle for pigs and not for men.
    Mr. McMartin, who has been looking after Wm. Lewis' sheep north of here, spent Sunday night here and went out to Central Point Monday morning on the Lewis jitney.
    Geo. H. and his brother, Pearl Stowell, came in Monday morning and brought in five cases of eggs and 30 gallons of cream, and George remained and went in to Medford with Mr. Johnson, who came out for the eggs for the Farm Bureau.
    Nick Young and Wm. Merrill were among the diners at the Sunnyside Monday.
    Lawrence Conger came in Tuesday morning, took the jitney and went to Medford, returning the same forenoon.
    L. D. Fry of Phoenix, F. J. Fry and W. D. Stillman of Medford were here Tuesday and took dinner at the Sunnyside, and Mrs. Wm. Perry and her sister, Mrs. Leroy Smith, also spent the day visiting the Howlett family; that includes me.
    Thos. Cingcade, who has been hauling the lumber from the depot for the new hatchery to be built on the Hawk farm, reports that it is all hauled.
    One of the Medford trucks came out Tuesday loaded for some of our merchants and our blacksmith. The driver scattered his load. leaving a little for T. E. Nichols, quite a lot for Geo. Brown and Sons and some for Wm. von der Hellen hardware store and the rest for W. L. Childreth the blacksmith.
    R. E. Moore, who is farming the farm on Antelope Creek belonging to George Brown and Sons, was transacting business here Tuesday with the firm.
    John H. Simon and Arthur Ellison went out to Medford on the stage Tuesday afternoon.
    Polk Smith and wife, Mrs. Sherman Wooley, and two children, Dave Smith and family and John Smith, who have been off spending the holidays among relatives, have all returned and are settling down to business again.
    Tuesday evening Miss Florence E. Pool, our home demonstrator, and C. C. Cate, county pathologist, C. J. Breman and F. E. Holibaugh called for supper. They had an engagement to have a meeting here Tuesday evening in the interest of the Farm Bureau. Carl Brommer is the representative of the Farm Bureau and is supposed to be the principal speaker and Mr. Holibaugh is a visitor. Their object seems to be to enlist the entire community in the Farm Bureau movement. Owing to the night being so dark and disagreeable your Eagle Point correspondent failed to attend and hear the lectures and I am informed that there were but very few in attendance, as the roads are so bad outside of the Medford-Eagle Point road that it is hardly safe for anyone to venture out with a car and worse still to try to go with wagon or horseback. No doubt if the weather had been pleasant and the roads passable there would have been a good attendance, for the entire community is becoming greatly interested in the movement and many of our farmers are already taking advantage of the offers made, for I see that our principal poultry raisers are shipping their eggs to Portland and San Francisco through that organization. I would have been glad to have been able to have attended and reported what was done, but perhaps Mr. Cate or some one of the others will report to some of the local reporters for the Mail Tribune.
    In addition to those already mentioned as being here we had Buel Hildreth, C. H. Natwick and son Carlyle, and L. H. Hanson of Los Angeles, another agate hunter, here overnight.
    Mr. and Mrs. Scott Boyer and Geo. McDonald came out on the stage this morning and Mr. and Mrs. Boyer went out to Derby on the stage. I did not learn their destination.
    A. J. Moen, husband of the Reese Creek school teacher, Wm. Merrell, H. F. Butcher and Wm. Stinson of Medford, who are in the employ of the Eagle Point Co., were here today for dinner. Messrs. Butcher and Stinson came out to connect up the home of Mrs. Mittelstaedt to the main line.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1921, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. C. Spence and son of Brownsboro were business callers Wednesday. Mr. Spence had finished up his road work and was simply waiting to see what the coming county court was going to do in the way of appointing road supervisors in the various road districts in the county, or in other words was on the anxious seat.
    Misses Ruth Short of Phoenix and Evelyn Wattenberg, whose home is on the Joe Rader farm on Antelope Creek, were in town trading with our merchants Thursday morning. Miss Short has been spending the holidays with Miss Wattenberg.
    Mr. Berrian, the fish hatchery superintendent of Butte Falls, has succeeded in getting the lumber out and on the ground to make his fish propagating plant, but says that the continuous rains keep the water so high that he is unable to accomplish very much except take care of what he has already done on Antelope Creek.
    Charley Clark, formerly of this place but recently of Chiloquin, came in Wednesday evening and has been stopping at the Sunnyside since, and Wm. Moore of Butte Falls and Mr. MacMartin also came in and spent the night.
    R. D. Henson and son James of the Klum Adver. Co. were out Thursday posting ads and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did R. D. Flaherty of the Farm Bureau force and W. H. Parker and Susie Jones of Ashland.
    John Rader, one of our prominent farmers and stockmen and heavy taxpayers, was a business caller Thursday. He reports that the stock is doing fine on the range.
    Mrs. Ida Magerle and her daughter Miss Myrtle of Rogue River were here during the week visiting Mrs. Magerle's sister, Mrs. Frank Lewis. Miss Myrtle Magerle is one of the students attending the state university at Eugene and has been home during the vacation visiting her mother and other relatives.
    Talking about the stock doing fine, whoever heard of stock, cattle, horses, sheep and hogs living out on the range up to and including the last day of December and coming in, many of them fat enough to butcher with a very little feed to harden the flesh, but there is quite a lot of stock around here now that is in fine shape that have not had any feed except what they have gathered off of the range.
    Lawrence Luy of Wellen and Misses Zeama and Lola Roberts, formerly of this place but now of Medford, were doing some shopping here Thursday.
    Jeff Brophy of Peyton, and Miss Tonn of Lake Creek came in from Medford Friday morning on the stage and Mr. Brophy went on up to connect with the Prospect stage and Miss Tonn went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    L. H. Hanson of Los Angeles, who came in from Elk Creek Tuesday and has been spending a few days looking over the agate fields, started on his journey Friday morning for his home.
    Chris C. Beale, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside for the past few weeks, started for Medford Friday morning, to be gone a few days.
    Wesley Butler and J. F. Maxfield and son were doing business here getting ready to greet the incoming New Year Friday and so was J. Wattenberg and J. L. Robinson. While in town I asked Mr. Robinson how he came out with his hogs that he shipped through the Farm Bureau and he said that they all but one brought him ten cents a pound and that one only brought him eight cents per pound and that she, a spayed sow, neat and trim, made and what he considered as good as any in the bunch and that the fifteen hogs shrunk two hundred pounds between Medford and Portland, and that he could have sold the corn that he fed them for more money than he realized for the hogs.
    George Brown and George Lynch of Ashland were here for dinner Friday and so was Wig Jack of Eagle Point. They seemed to have some deal on here.
    One of the Johnson brothers who bought the Haley place just below town was trading with Geo. Brown and Sons Friday.
    Pete Young and his sister Clara were also patronizing our merchants Friday.
    Charley Terrill, our efficient sheriff, and one of his deputies, Mr. J. J. McMahon and W.W. Johnson of the soil department, Oregon Experiment Station, Corvallis, Ore., came in Friday evening for supper and Mr. Johnson took a room and is expecting to stay some days as he has been appointed to inspect the soil that will be under the contemplated ditch that is being planned to be built from Big Butte Creek beyond Butte Falls to irrigate the land along the route from there to the north boundary of Eagle Point and including the country adjacent northeast and northwest as well as east and west of the town. He is inspecting the soil and will report to the commission who will decide whether it is sufficient security so that the state will be justified in becoming security to the bondholders for the interest on the bonds to secure the necessary cash to build the ditch.
    There was a masquerade ball given here Friday night and I heard one man say that everybody in town was there except "Dad Howlett," but I think that he was mistaken, nevertheless there was evidently a large crowd for a small village like this. I have inquired of several who were there and tried to find out how many tickets were sold but no one seemed to know, but it is estimated that there were at least a hundred tickets sold and some place the number at one hundred and fifty. At any rate there was a good attendance and the different costumes were very attractive and some of them were very pretty. Some of the young men dressed as school girls and that caused considerable mirth when after they had removed their masks it was found that the girls had been sitting in the boys' laps and vice versa. Lunch was served in the hall and I judge by the amount of stuff thrown along the sidewalk, especially the tamales, for there were quite a lot of them thrown along the street that had never been opened, that the "splendid supper" that had been advertised was not up-to-date, but all speak of the affair as a good dance and everything passed off quietly. Along about 4 o'clock this Saturday morning the dance broke up and as the bunch of young folks came into the Sunnyside it sounded to me as though a large part of the crowd had come over to sleep in the hotel.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 4, 1921, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday Mrs. R. C. Brophy of Peyton was a passenger on the stage going to Derby to catch the Derby-Prospect stage for her home. She is engaged teaching in her home district and had been out to Medford during the holidays visiting friends.
    M. C. Mahoney was also on the stage going up to Butte Falls, and so was Prof. Robinson, the principal of the Butte Falls school. He had been out to consult a doctor with reference to an attack of blood poison in his hand.
    George H. West, one of the forest rangers in the service of the government, and wife, were here New Year's day to take dinner. Mr. West has been employed at a sawmill stationed on Anna Creek about six miles from Fort Klamath scaling saw logs for the government.
    Saturday evening A. J. Florey, Jr., handed me $3.50 to pay for six months subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, which I sent in Sunday morning. The people here seem to think they cannot do without the Mail Tribune.
    R. J. Rowen and family, wife and two bouncing boys, called Saturday for supper. Mr. Rowen was out as an agent for the Medford Auto Co. of Medford and while here in town was interviewing the prospective auto purchasers in our town.
    W. C. Clements and wife and Rev. Wm. J. Meagher, the Catholic priest of Medford, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and son Hugo and daughter Miss Joyce and Mrs. Fred McPherson were guests Sunday at the Sunnyside. Rev. Meagher was out and conducted services in the Catholic church Sunday.
    Mrs. H. J. Gordon of Fort Klamath was a passenger on the Eagle Point-Butte Falls stage Monday morning on her way to Butte Falls to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Edmondson, Sr. Henry Thornton of Persist was also a passenger on the same stage and from here he went out on the Persist stage for home. He had been up to Ashland to visit relatives and old-time friends.
    Mr. Price, the contractor, who has the contract with Frank Rhodes to clear and grade the unit of the road between Hog Creek and the point on Rogue River where the new bridge is to be built, was in town Monday and reports that he had shut down for the time being, on account of the constant rainfall as the ground is so wet and soft that he cannot work to advantage.
    Lawrence Conger and Fred Pettegrew were doing business with our merchants Monday and took dinner at the Sunnyside and so did E. V. Brittsan and Carl Bergman.
    H. D. Mills, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Medford, was here Tuesday morning headed for Butte Falls.
    Thos. Stanley of Butte Falls and wife were among the business callers Monday.
    A. R. McDonald and wife are visiting friends in Eugene. Mr. McDonald is the father of our garage man here.
    Walter Meyer and wife came in Monday and Mrs. Meyer went on to Medford, returning this Wednesday morning on the stage.
    Miss Ellen McCabe drove in with her sister, Mrs. Garrett of Medford, Monday and Mrs. Garrett went out on the Lewis jitney.
    Mrs. H. W. Cappenger of Central Point, a daughter of Mrs. M. S. Wood, who has been out here visiting her mother, went to Medford Monday on the Eagle Point stage on her way home.
    Miss Myrtle Minter, one of the high school girls from Reese Creek school district, went out to Medford Monday afternoon on the stage.
    Pearl and George H. Stowell were also business callers Monday and Geo. Stowell brought in six cases of eggs for the Farm Bureau of Medford. W. H. Crandall also came in Monday afternoon with his produce, and Thos. Cingcade was also in town the same afternoon.
    Miss Ailene Mahoney, who has been out to Medford, was on the Butte Falls stage on her way home. She was accompanied by Miss Arline J. Burner of Medford. Mrs. K. C. Jones was also going to Butte Falls on the same stage, and Earl Ulrich of Prospect and Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby were passengers on their way home on the same stage. Sometimes the stage is behind time on account of having so many passengers and baggage besides the mail matter, on account of the roads being so rough.
    O. M. Goss, formerly of this place but now of Butte Falls, came out and has been spending a few days in this vicinity.
    Dr. Helms, the Medford veterinary, was out looking after some of his stock he has out in these parts Tuesday, and he and George McDonald took dinner at the Sunnyside, and Jack Goin, who has been working at the Price camp, came in to his old room Tuesday.
    Ed Cowden, one of our hustling farmers and dairy men, drove in Tuesday and met the Butte Falls stage and took a man and woman out with him.
    W. S. Chappell, our shoe cobbler, George Adamson and Dennie Zimmerlee, who are engaged putting up a sawmill near Trail, came in Tuesday afternoon and Mr. Adamson and Mr. Zimmerlee went on to Medford the same afternoon to procure some of the necessary outfit for their mill. They report that they will have it in operation in a very few days as it is all complete except putting in the engine.
    Charles Fellows of Trail was here Tuesday afternoon to get his horses shod. Wm. Neaderman of Medford came out on the stage, spent the night here and went up to Trail Wednesday morning on the Persist stage, and Raymond Schermerhorn of Trail came out on the stage and went to Medford this morning on the 7:15 stage and Alex Vestal came out from home on Reese Creek and caught the same stage for Medford.
    Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls, Bert Higinbotham of Prospect, and Mrs. Walter Meyer of Eagle Point post office came out on the Butte Falls stage this morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1921, page 3


ELK CREEK
    Mrs. Oscar Stewart has gone to Medford, to be absent several days.
    Mrs. Lloyd LeBeau is visiting with Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson for a few days.
    This cold weather is greatly appreciated by the farmers who have hogs to butcher. S. W. Hutchinson butchered six last Wednesday for home use. Oscar Stewart will butcher sometime this week.
    On account of the snow up here the farmers with hay and no cattle are greatly in demand by the cattlemen with more stock than hay.
    Mr. Hall, who owns the mill by the old free ferry, was knocked unconscious while helping his son drive posts last week. The sledge flew off the handle, hitting Mr. Hall, who was holding the posts. He was unconscious for several minutes.
    Floyd Hutchinson made a trip to Hall's mill for lumber for the U.S. fisheries. The high water tore out part of the new water wheel, also causing considerable damage in the hatch house.
    Will Stewart started for Medford Saturday with a bunch of beef.
    Mr. and Mrs. Newton Ward, who have been visiting her sister, Mrs. Floyd Hutchinson, for the past two weeks, returned to Ashland Saturday, where they will visit with Mrs. Ward's mother, Mrs. W. B. Holmes.
    Ralph Watson has been sawing wood for Mrs. Middlebusher of Trail.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1921, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Lloyd and Harvey Stanley have been building feed racks on the Sam Coy place so that they can have their cattle fed. Sam Coy has the job of hauling the hay out and feeding them. Thus far it has not been necessary to feed as the warm rains have kept the grass growing so that the stock generally look very well.
    Paul Wright, who has been assisting in the rock work on the Agate-Trail road for Rhodes and Price, contractors, was in town patronizing our merchants.
    Henry French, one of our poultry men and his son Floyd came in Thursday and brought in quite a lot of eggs for one of our Medford Creamery men, but he says that his hens do not lay so well as they would, and will when he gets his new hen house built. As it is, the old one is shot all to pieces where the men working on the irrigation ditch have been blasting. They have had to suspend work on account of the continuous rains, in fact it has rained so much and so long a time that it has about caused all kinds of work to stop, even the men working on the highway.
    J. C. Freeley of Portland, Miss Edna Petersen and her father, E. P. Petersen, Henry Trusty of Elk Creek and C. C. Beale were among the guests at the Sunnyside Thursday night.
    Thursday evening when I went to the post office for my mail I noticed that Miss Nellie Coy, one of the deputy postmistresses, was trying to open a mail sack with one hand and on close inspection discovered that she had her left hand wrapped up and upon inquiry learned that she saw someone's horse saddled and bridled in the street so went and tied him up, and just as she was about through tying him he jerked back and caught her hand, bruising it quite badly, and at first it was thought that her little finger was dislocated but the next day, after more careful examination, it is thought to be nothing more than a bad bruise and cut through the skin.
    When the Butte Falls stage came in Friday morning there were five passengers on the car and they were all strangers here looking over the country.
    Charles Brown of Medford, who owns what used to be known as the Maule place four miles this side of Medford, was here for dinner and spent a part of the afternoon extolling the good qualities of the Fordson tractor among the listeners.
    Messrs. Campbell and Terrill, the two men who left here two weeks ago and are clearing the right of way between the Cingcade place on the edge of the desert and Hog Creek, returned to their room Friday noon and started in to finish up the job this Saturday morning.
    W. S. Baker, who has a homestead on the Derby road and now is on the Frank Rhodes places, was a business caller Friday.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt, who has been practicing as a physician here for several years and has had an extensive and very successful practice, not only here but throughout the surrounding country, started Friday to move his office fixtures to Medford. He is moving onto the fourth floor in the M.F.&H. building.
    He has not moved his family but expects to as soon as he can secure a suitable house to live in. It is not necessary for me to state that there is a general feeling of regret here that he has decided to leave our community, for while he has not only been our M.D., he has always taken an active part in our education and municipal affairs, he having been elected several times as school director and has been president of the town council for a number of years.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Watson, formerly of Butte Falls but now of Santa Cruz, Calif., were in town Thursday. Mrs. Watson went to Medford and Friday Ed Watson met his mother-in-law, Mrs. E. E. Smith of Butte Falls, here and they went on to Medford on the stage.
    Roy Ashpole, one of our hardware merchants, brought out a portable wood sawing machine to saw logs, wood, etc., for the Merritt Bros. of Reese Creek.
    M. C. Mahoney of Butte Falls and Alex Vestal came out on the stage this Saturday morning. Mr. Mahoney has been going over the stage route quite often of late and I inquired the cause and he told me that he was having his eyes treated by Dr. Emmens of Medford, and that they were greatly improved.
    John Patten and George Cottrell of Butte Falls came out on the Butte Falls stage Friday afternoon.
    James Culbertson of Lake Creek came out Friday and spent the night with his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Kingery, who are living near Wellen.
    Mrs. Mary Simpson of Iowa came in and spent the night at the Sunnyside on her way out to Reese Creek to visit her daughter, Mrs. Moen, who is teaching in the Reese Creek district.
    W. D. Steadman of Medford and T. F. Nichols were diners at the Sunnyside. Mrs. Nichols came in with her husband but went out on the Lake Creek stage to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Farlow.
    Carl von der Hellen was a business caller also and so was Leland Pettegrew and Mr. Kingery of Wellen.
    W. E. Hammel, Charley Delin, D. R. Patrick, Wm. G. Pierce of Hubbard Bros. of Medford, Ed Burgess of Iowa, W. F. Kinslow of Coquille, Ore., were here today, Saturday, for dinner.
    Joseph Riley and Ed Dutton were business callers today.
    Mrs. Mabel Harnish was trading in town today and said that she is stopping with her mother, Mrs. W. W. Taylor, while her husband is feeding their cattle on Antelope near Climax.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1921, page 7


ANDREW J. FLOREY OF EAGLE POINT DIES, AGED 81
    Andrew J. Florey died at his home at Eagle Point January 12, at the age of 81 years. Mr. Florey was born at Decatur, Ill., in the year 1830. He served four years in the Civil War, came to Oregon in 1884, settling at Eagle Point, where he served as postmaster for 20 years. He was married Dec. 25, 1886 to Ettie A. Nye. To this union was born seven children, 6 of whom survive and reside in Jackson County.
    They are Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, Chauncey Florey, Andrew Florey, Jr., Mrs. Raymond Reter, Theo. Florey and Judge Florey.
    Funeral services will be held at the parlors of Weeks-Conger Co., Friday, January 14, at 2 p.m., with Rev. Millard officiating. Interment will be in Central Point cemetery.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1921, page 8



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. N. G. Neil of Ashland, Henry Childreth and son Isaac Childreth of Ashland, Lewis Martin, Trail, and Roy Jain, Medford, were transients at the Sunnyside Saturday night. Isaac Childreth had been up on Elk Creek visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. Trusty, and his father had been up to visit them also and to take his son home. Lewis Martin is one of the renowned hunters and trappers and found that the price of furs was so low that it didn't justify spending the time and energy to bother catching the varmints and concluded to come out and spend a while in the valley, and Mr. Jain came out to see Mr. C. C. Beale who was then in the Butte Falls country but was expected out that day but failed to come out until Monday afternoon so Mr. Jain remained at the Sunnyside until Tuesday afternoon and both of them went out on the Butte Falls stage.
    J. D. Pierce, who has been a regular boarder at the Sunnyside for some time, went to Medford to look after his business interests there and to attend the movies a few times, remaining until Monday evening.
    Died--Friday morning, Jan. 7, at a hospital in Medford, Mrs. Anna Corum, aged about 28 years. She leaves father, mother, two daughters, two sisters and three brothers beside a number of warm friends to sustain the loss. The remains were taken to Butte Falls country for interment Sunday. The funeral services were conducted at the grave by Rev. J. E. Day, the Presbyterian minister of Butte Falls, in the presence of about the largest congregation that has ever attended a funeral in that section.
    While I was writing the above sentence, word came to me that our old citizen and for years our postmaster, A. J. Florey, had just passed away. He was about 82 years of age and leaves two daughters, Mrs. William von der Hellen of Eagle Point and Mrs. Raymond Reter of Medford, and four sons, Chauncey Florey, our county clerk, A. J. Florey, Jr., Theodore and Judge Florey. Mrs. A. J. Florey passed to her reward some two years ago. He also leaves three grandchildren, Joyce and Hugo von der Hellen and Mr. and Mrs. Reter's child.
    Mr. Florey was one of the old veterans of the Civil War. A further notice will be given later as I have not the data to particularize.
    J. L. Robinson, Sr., came in early Monday morning with a pair of geese to be sent out on the jitney but it did not go out until afternoon, and Mr. Hayman, the superintendent of the Cooley orchard, also came in and could not go. The jitney is not very regular or prompt these cold mornings.
    Mike Hanley, one of the pioneers of the valley and a prominent farmer and stockman, came in Sunday evening and spent the night.
    Other business callers Monday were W. C. Pool, Mrs. Fred Dutton, Lawrence Conger, Peter Young and W. E. Hammel. Mr. Hammel had been over to Table Rock to get another load of old ewes that he bought cheap.
    W. E. Buck and S. R. Costello of Medford passed through town on their way home. They had been up to Lake Creek to get two milk goats.
    Mrs. Wm. Shoestring, a niece of Mrs. J. Montgomery of Applegate who has been visiting her aunt, returned to her home Monday and was accompanied by her aunt.
    K. D. Jones of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage for Medford Monday.
    Lewis Gipson of Reese Creek [and] Mrs. Myrtle von der Hellen were also business callers Monday.
    M. Barnard and his sister came out Monday on the stage for Butte Falls.
    Miss Falldine, the county nurse, also came out and went to Butte Falls Monday and there were three young men came out and went out on the Butte Falls stage.
    Miss Charlotta Patton, traveling solicitor for a Medford concern, came in Tuesday morning on the stage and took a room at the Sunnyside and up to 4 o'clock Wednesday afternoon was still canvassing the town.
    Mrs. Peter Betz was also a diner at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    There was a meeting of the stockholders of the irrigation ditch company, who aim to bring water from Big Butte near this section, held at the Reese Creek school house Tuesday to elect new officers for the ensuing year.
    Born--January 11th, in Medford, to Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Vestal of Reese Creek, a seven-pound daughter, and Thomas is the happiest man in the country.
    Mrs. Carl Narregan of Beagle, formerly of this place, was here meeting old time friends and trading at Geo. Brown & Sons store.
    Ira Tungate and Oliver Adams of Butte Falls came out Tuesday and went to Medford.
    Mrs. Price, wife of the contractor who is working on the Hay Creek-Rogue River unit to the highway, was in town Tuesday on her way to Medford to procure a cook for their camp. She reports that they have ten men at work on this road and are getting along fine, as much of their work is rock work.
    Chauncey Florey and his oldest daughter,  Miss Dorothy Florey, were here for supper Tuesday evening, and W. G. Averill spent the night here on his way to Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1921, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wm. Kidd, who has charge of the construction of an irrigating ditch on Rogue River for Thomas F. Nichols and his sister Ruth and J. H. French, was in town last Wednesday and reports that they have gone as far as they can in their work until the water subsides, and that they don't expect to be able to complete the job until spring.
    Mr. Barker, the Butte Falls banker, passed through here Wednesday on his way from Medford home.
    H. E. Sanders, a brother of J. W. Sanders, superintendent of the Antelope orchard, was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage to Eagle Point and then took passage on the Persist stage for Trail.
    Benj. Klingle of Lake Creek was doing business with our merchants here Wednesday afternoon.
    Rudolph Pech, the hustling potato grower, was also transacting business here Wednesday afternoon.
    F. J. Carstens of Medford came out Wednesday evening on the stage and engaged a room and board at the Sunnyside. He is helping Messrs. Fawcett and Campbell on their contract to clear the right of way on the Agate-Trail highway.
    Ira Tungate of Butte Falls also spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Pearl Stowell, a brother of George Stowell, the chicken king of this section, came out from a Medford hospital where Dr. W. W. P. Holt had performed an operation for him and he reports that he is getting along fine.
    Mr. Hayman, the superintendent on the J. H. Cooley orchard, John Norris, superintendent of the Wilfley orchard and Miss Clea Robinson went to Medford Thursday. Miss Robinson went in to have some dental work done.
    John Walch of Lake Creek, the new road supervisor for that road district, was a business caller Thursday and so was Robert R. Minter of Reese Creek, also J. Wattenburg of the Joe Rader farm on Antelope and Jeff Conover, who lives on the free ferry road eight miles from Eagle Point, and Wesley Butler and his brother-in-law, Arthur Busby.
    Jack Tungate of Butte Falls was a passenger on the Butte Falls stage Thursday. There were other passengers on the same stage but strangers to the writer.
    Fred Pelouze, the hustling farmer and dairyman, was transacting business with our banker, H. E. Campbell. It appears from the number of persons who visit that bank that it must be doing considerable business.
    Wm. Henderson and L. A. Whitley of Prospect spent Thursday night at the Sunnyside.
    Mark Applegate and his brother-in-law, name unknown, of Applegate, came out Friday morning on the Butte Falls stage and went up to Trail on the Persist stage. Mrs. J. Doubleday was also a passenger on the Butte Falls stage on her way to her home near Butte Falls.
    L. K. Hawk, one of our leading orchardists and dairymen, made a hurried business call Friday. In speaking on the subject of raising fruit in the valley he spoke quite encouragingly of the pear business, but seems to think that there will have to be a cut in the cost of caring for the orchards before there is much profit in the apple business.
    John Greb, another one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, was a business caller Friday.
    A. J. Moen, whose wife is teaching in the Reese Creek school district, was doing business here Friday and so was W. Pool.
    N. G. Brown, Thomas C. Miller and Wig Jack were diners at the Sunnyside Friday.
    There was advertised to be public speaking here Friday afternoon by George H. Mansfield, the president of the Farm Bureau, and there were quite a number of farmers came in Friday afternoon to hear him, but were disappointed although the members who live close enough to town to get their mail at night (the mail generally arrives here about 5:15 p.m., but since the roads are so rough and muddy it does not always reach here that early), but there were cards sent out Friday evening notifying the members of this, but people living out in the country do not receive their mail until the next day by rural delivery, so they did not get word. Among those who were here that day to hear the speaker were George Given, B. F. Fuller and wife, Ed Dutton, Timmie Dugan, Lester Throckmorton, in addition to some who came in and learned of the change and went right back home. The people out in this neighborhood seem to be well pleased with the working of the Farm Bureau and if the time set for the next meeting should be when the weather is pleasant and the roads half decent there will be a large attendance.
    Mrs. J. F. Maxfield and daughter came in this Saturday morning on the Lake Creek stage. Mrs. Maxfield had been up in the Lake Creek country visiting her mother. She was met here by her husband and went out home about eight miles north of here.
    A. J. Weeks, who owns the old Stewart orchard near Peyton on Rogue River, was a business caller this morning.
    J. L. Hovey, foreman on the Altavista orchard, was in town this Saturday morning and reports that there is nothing doing about that irrigation project yet, as they have been busy building another house on the orchard so as to be able to employ married men and have them live on the place as they are more reliable.
    Fritz Pech of Lake Creek came out this morning on the stage from Medford and went up home on the Lake Creek stage.
    Mrs. Merritt and daughter of Reese Creek drove in with a one-horse buggy this morning.
    Scott Bayer, Wm. Holman, Harry and Carl Stanley and Frank Caster were business callers this forenoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, Mon., January 17, 1921, page 5












VAWTER AND BILL ISAACS 'ALMOST' FOUND BRUMFIELD
    The chase for Dr. R. M. Brumfield, the Roseburg dentist arrested near Calgary, Canada, last week, after a month's flight, for the murder of Dennis Russell, hermit-laborer, found an echo in the hills adjacent to Prospect last Friday. The hardy mountaineers, 20 strong, were organized into a posse by Jim Grieve and were all ready to start out with their Winchesters oiled when a telegram came from Canada saying that the much-wanted dentist was in jail there.
    The clues that excited the natives and mayor of Prospect were furnished by William F. (Toggery) Isaacs and William Vawter, cashier of the Jackson County Bank, who are on a hunting and fishing trip to Eastern Oregon. They showed up at Jim Grieve's place Friday morning with six fish, and the startling information that Dr. Brumfield had been at their camp. This news was whispered to Jim Grieve in a mysterious whisper, and he telephoned Sheriff Terrill. The sheriff instructed that a posse be formed, and to await his coming.
    The six fish were fried and devoured by Messrs. Isaacs and Vawter, and they went on their way. Mr. Grieve telephoned to Roseburg to verify the description of Dr. Brumfield. The mountaineers, their rifles glistening in the sunshine, anxiously waited the coming of the sheriff. Then came the message from Medford that Dr. Brumfield was caught plowing a wheat field 2700 miles due north of where Messrs. Vawter and Isaacs thought they saw him.
    The posse went back to their cabins. The mountain air was blue with smoke from forest fires and other causes.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 17, 1921, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I stopped writing last Saturday, I was trying to describe the modern hen house, and had gone as far as to tell about the size of the house and how the sides were arranged for comfort and convenience. The roosts are arranged so that the hens do not have to fly very high to sleep, about four or five feet, and they are arranged along the center of the building lengthways the whole length of the building in rows of about five roosts about sixteen inches apart, having a partition between the two rows of roosts so as to keep them all separate, and under the roosts there is an inclined floor so arranged that all the droppings light on it and every morning the manure is cleaned off, as the roosts are made of pine scantling 2x2 inches and they are so arranged that they are stationary but easily removed for cleaning purposes, and these platforms are arranged so a man takes a box on a wheelbarrow and sweeps everything into it.
    In order to prevent the hens from roosting on the crosspieces used to tie the rafters together there is a strand of chicken wire fencing nailed underneath them. Running all along the length of the house on both sides of the partition he has arranged under the dropping boards rows of electric lights, also electric lights arranged about the center of the room above the roosts, so that when he wants to wake the hens up he simply turns a button and thus turns on the light and the hens will leave the roosts and go to scratching for food. After the hens have gone to roost he goes in and scatters wheat all around on the floor, ready for the birds to commence their daily task. His idea is to keep the hens busy all the time and instead of placing their breakfast before them so that they can gulp down all they can eat at once he has them work for it a grain at a time. Before they go to roost they are fed about all the shelled corn they can eat. During the interval between the breakfast and supper they have free access to all the cracked wheat and oats they want.
    In addition to what I have already mentioned they also have free access to all they want of oyster shell and charcoal and occasionally they are fed a ration of ground bone.
    The house I have been describing is supposed to accommodate about three hundred hens. The other hen houses are not quite so modern but are arranged for the comfort and health of the birds. At the time I was there he had only about 460, as he had sold off some two hundred hens that had accomplished their purpose.
    Mr. Stowell has his ditches so arranged that he has running water in every department so that the fowls can have at all times plenty of good cold pure water to drink. I should have said when speaking of feeding his hens that he gives them a regular ration of curdled milk every day.
    Mr. Stowell has an oil-burning motor that he uses to generate his electricity that enables him to have lights not only in his house but also in his barn, hen houses and yards so that he can turn on or off the lights while in bed. He usually aims to turn on the lights about 6 a.m. in winter. He not only [omission] hennery but all over the barn and other outbuildings.
    After I had seen all there was to see in that department and seen the four hundred and sixty hens, all white Leghorns, fed all in one flock we turned our attention to the dairy department. He is keeping fourteen fine dairy cows besides a fine blooded Guernsey bull and seven thoroughbred heifer calves. These all run on fine pasture in the daytime and at night are put up and fed. Each cow goes to her stanchion and after being fed and milked are turned out again to pasture. Mr. Stowell complains of not having barn room enough, as he has his barn full of hay and another cutting of alfalfa to cut and put away, probably fifty tons.
    I have taken considerable space in giving an account of my visit to the Stowell chicken and dairy ranch, but if the reading of the above proves to be as interesting to the reader as the visit was to me I will feel that I have not written in vain.
    Harry L. Heriford and son George and daughter of Butte Falls came out from Medford a week ago this Wednesday morning on their way home. The little boy, George, had broken his arm and they had been to Medford to have it treated.
    George A. Sanders, formerly of the Antelope orchard but now of Prospect, was a business caller the same day.
    Ralph Dunlap and wife of Trail were also here on business the same day.
    Mrs. L. A. Gibson and son of Nevada, who had been up to visit her brother, Mr. Parr of Derby, came out on the stage on her way to Portland.
    Leland Charley of Brownsboro came in and spent the night. He was on his way to Reese Creek with one of the county rock crushers.
    George W. Daley, Jr., has been getting out lumber from the Dupray mill to build a barn on the place he recently purchased.
    J. Frank Brown and wife started Thursday on a trip to Canada intending to go to. Vancouver, B.C., and from there to Chicago and other cities in the East.
    Mr. Lyons of Yakima, Wash., and Mr. and Mrs. Farris and daughter Clara were here for dinner on their way from Crater Luke.
    W. H. Fields and C. C. Pierce of Medford were also guests at the Sunnyside.
    Born, Aug. 6th to Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Johnson, a son.
    Thomas Pullen and family of California are here visiting Mrs. Pullen's parents, John L. Robinson and family.
    John W. Smith of the old J. W. Smith farm was here on business.
    Ed Cowden, one of our busy farmers and dairy men, went to Medford.
    Mrs. Applegate of the Buzzard mine on Elk Creek was a passenger on the stage Friday morning going home.
    Miss Agnes and Irene Stewart of Medford were passengers on the Eagle Point stage and went out on the Lake Creek stage for Lake Creek.
    Eugene J. Dietz and R. Charles Barrett of Salem came in Aug. 12 and took rooms. They are here running the sprinkler on the Crater Lake Highway.
    Mr. Chaney, Sam Courtney and Miss Ella Belford were guests Thursday noon at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Hubbs of Medford, Miss Cabanier Frazier of Oakland, Calif., Miss Esther Silverman of Portland on her way to Honolulu, guests of A. W. Hubbs, were here for dinner Sunday. Also Mr, Guy Mattoon, Mrs. Albert Clements and son Richard Whitley of Prospect, J. W. Frey and O. Ethely of Lake Creek and W. Miller and brother Gordon Miller of Trail.
    I omitted to state in the proper place that our depot here at Eagle Point was burned to the ground Saturday night about 10 o'clock. There is a mystery as to the cause of the fire but it is generally supposed to have been caused by accident. There has already been mention made of the incident in the Mail Tribune so that it is not necessary for me to add more, but we the citizens of Eagle Point and vicinity feel that it is a great loss to the town and community.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 18, 1921, page 5


RIVER AT TRAIL NOW CROWED WITH TOURISTS
    TRAIL, Ore., Aug. 19.--A small fire, started no doubt by careless hunters and fishermen, was fast making its way into the big timber across the river from Floyd Hutchinson's place. The early arrival of Mr. Poole and several helpers put an end to it.
    Every nook and corner along Rogue River from Trail to Prospect are occupied by campers. Many are catching good-sized steelheads and cutthroats.
    Wednesday evening, August 10, a wedding took place in the parlors of the Rogue Elk, when Rev. J. E. McDonald joined in wedlock Mr. Ralph Dunlap and Miss Dolly Hayes, both well-known Trail people.
    Friends and acquaintances extend best wishes for a long, happy and useful wedded life.
    The Thomas family left for a few days' outing. Expect to visit Crater Lake and places of scenic interest along the way.
    Mr. and Mrs. Farrar and daughter were looking over property in this locality. They expect to locate in Jackson County.
    Superintendent Howell of the U.S. Fisheries began taking salmon eggs Thursday. 
    A: party from Roseburg en route to the lake will present the scalp of a coyote for bounty on their return, which they killed in the Rogue River ranch meadows.
    Guests for dinner at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson Sunday were: Mr. and Mrs. O. R. Stewart and daughter Winifred Lee and Miss Enid Middlebusher.
    We are glad to announce that Mr. and Mrs. Roy Vaughn are the proud parents of an eight and a half pound boy.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jack Houston are enjoying a visit with their daughter and new granddaughter, Helen Loraine.
    Mr. and Mrs. Will Houston and daughter, Gwyn, were pleasant callers at the home of Mr. and Mrs. S. W. Hutchinson Sunday.
    A jolly bunch gathered with Mr. and Mrs. Jess Clary Saturday evening. Games and good "eats" were enjoyed.
    The Rogue Elk is a lively place these days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Haseltine of Southern California left for Portland after six weeks' camping here. They were delighted with Jackson County.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hall and twin sons, Mr. Johnson of Weiser, Idaho, after traveling ever since last December, have decided to make Jackson County their home. They were looking over property in our county Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1921, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. W. Abbott, Ernest Abbott, Thos. O'Brien and Walter O'Brien. all of Butte Falls, were passengers on the Butte Falls stage Saturday of last week on their way to Blue Canyon for an outing and intend to catch what fish they can eat, as that is said to be one of the best places to fish around here, and after John Allen, the road supervisor for that road district, gets good roads built in that section, will be as great a resort as any of the noted camping grounds in the county.
    Ed Steep and wife stopped here for dinner on their way up Rogue River for an outing.
    R. B. Price, one of the contractors on the unit on the Crater Lake Highway between Hog Creek and the new Rogue River bridge, was in town and reports that they are about through with their part of the road work, and speaking about the road work on the Crater Lake Highway, the work of putting the crushed rock on it is progressing quite well, but the force of sprinklers is entirely too small, as there is but one sprinkler, and although that is kept running twenty hours a day it can hardly make an impression, as they have to haul the water so far, two miles, and the ground and rock is so dry that it hardly makes an impression. There ought to be at least two or three sprinklers in use all the time. I understand that somebody is paying the men who attend to pumping the water and filling the tank for sprinkling six dollars a day and he could just as well fill tree or four of them as the one he does fill and thus save the taxpayers that much extra expense. And while I am on the subject I will call the attention of those who have charge of the job to the condition of the Cingcade hill, for it is so that it is very difficult for two cars to pass, as as soon as either of them gets out of the beaten road so as to pass, the crushed rock and sand and fine gravel simply gives way under the car wheels and they simply spin around, and.the car stands still.
    There was two truckloads of shakes came out from Butte Falls Saturday on their way to the valley, and about the same time Mr. Hughes brought out a truckload of shingles, a part for Earnest Dahack, our barber and the rest for David Cingcade, to be used to reroof his house on his farm.
    Sunday was one of those delightful days, as the electric storm in the hills and at Fort Klamath has cooled the air and made it pleasant to ride out and the result was that there was quite a number took advantage of the weather and started out for a ride or fishing excursion. Among those who stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner whose names I secured, for often people come in, eat and after paying the bill start right off so that I do not secure the names, were Mrs. Cook and her daughter, Miss Cook of Jacksonville. Miss Cook is the bookkeeper in the foresters' office in Medford. Frank Rothrock and wife of Central Point; Mrs. C. S. Hall of Albany, Ore.; F. O. Stinson and son, Benjamin, E. G. Finnie, T. E. May, Wayne May and J. H. Jones of Medford, Jerry Lewis, Eagle Point; Mr. Hash, Jr., of the Fred Pelouze place and Ralph Zimmerman of Butte Falls; F. F. White of Ashland and Thomas Long of Climax.
    Mr. and Mrs. East were passengers on the Medford-Butte Falls stage last Monday on their way to Peyton to visit her brothers and families, Frank and Gus Ditsworth and Mrs. Carl Richardson.
    Mr. W. W. Parker and Mrs. M. L. Richardson of Butte Falls spent Saturday night at the Sunnyside, going on up home Sunday morning.
    Mrs. S. E. Inlow, Albright and her granddaughter, Miss Ethel Inlow of Trail, were also passengers on the Medford-Eagle Point stage, bound for home, going on the Eagle Point-Trail stage.
    Fred Stanley of Lake Creek, a brother of Roy Thomas and Carl Stanley, was in town in company with his brother Carl and wife on business Monday.
    John M. Allen, wife and daughter Alta and one of their neighbors, Mr. Marion, all of Derby, were here Tuesday on their way to Medford, Mr. Allen is not only one of the prominent stock men and farmers of Derby, but is also a rustling good road supervisor for the Butte Falls road district.
    Mr. George V. Janis and Lulu Hewlett of Ashland called for supper Tuesday evening.
    C. D. Thomsen, Medford and C. M. Alexander of Corvallis, D. M. Watts and wife were diners at the Sunnyside Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. Adams and sister, Mrs. Minnie Potter and son Roscoe and daughter Minnie and Mr. Leo Watson of Modoc County, California, were over here Wednesday afternoon visiting some of their old-time neighbors. Mr. Adams and his sister, Mrs. Potter, lived some twenty or thirty years ago on the place now owned and occupied by our county commissioner, James Owens. They had been visiting a sister now living in Medford, and took a run out to hunt up the writer of the Eagle Point Eaglets, as they were neighbors in an early day. They noted quite a change in our valley since they were here before, and when they began to inquire about their old neighbors found that they had about all passed off or moved to other places, as they could find only Mr. and Mrs. Joe Riley, now living on the old Linksweiler place at the auto camp bridge.
    Last Wednesday I made a trip to Medford and when I had attended to what business I had, while standing on the sidewalk, I heard my name called and on looking around found that it was Mr. John Gore and wife, who are living on the old Gore farm near Phoenix and they invited me to ride out to my home with then, as they were going out to the Fred Pelouze place, so I gladly accepted the invitation and started and had a fine visit with them, talking over the incidents of the past fifty years, and recalled incidents that passed when we were all young, and in the prime of life.
    Born, August 15 to the wife of W. G. Smith, a bright baby girl, and when Mr. Smith gave me the item he also gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun.
    The same day Earnest Dahack, our barber, gave me his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune and the Medford Sun.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 22, 1921, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr, and Mrs. S. B. Woodson of Seattle, Wash., was here last week visiting at the home of our neighbors, Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Campbell.
    Mrs. R. A. Weidman, the efficient lady saleswoman in the Nichols store, made a business trip to Ashland last Thursday.
    Mrs. Lewis Robertson of Eastern Oregon was here Thursday on business.
    Last Thursday, while Mr. Eugene J. Dietz, one of the men employed running the sprinkler on the C.L.H. now in course of construction, was sprinkling the crushed rock that is being put on it, something gave way about the motor and he had to send to Salem for a new part, delaying the work until Saturday noon.
    Thursday afternoon, as I was sauntering over town in search of items of interest to write for the Daily Mail Tribune, I met Mr. E. G. Eames and brother H. Eames of Chico, Calif, and Cadon Wilson of Gilroy, Calif., Mr. and Mrs. Spratt, Gilroy, Calif., and Dr. Wallace and wife of Pomona, Calif., on their way to Crater Lake.
    The travel to see that seventh wonder of the world seems to be increasing, although for a while it seemed to slack up, but now it seems to be on the increase again and people who live on the Bybee bridge road seem to think that most of the travel is on that route. There is quite a number of tourists pass through here who never stop at all unless it happens to be very warm and then occasionally some of them stop to get a soda or ice cream at F. Lewis' confectionery or at Ashpole's hardware store for gas or oil and quite often they stop on their way to Medford at the Sunnyside for supper.
    J. A. Clauson, the Dalles, Oregon, farmer. came in Thursday p.m. to visit his brother, who is boarding and rooming at the Sunnyside. and spent a few days with him. Mr. C. is the engineer who has charge of the construction of the bridges on the C.L.H. including the Antelope, already completed, Little Butte Creek, Hog Creek, Reese Creek, Indian Creek and Rogue River bridges.
    Carl Richardson, wife and son John of Flounce Rock came in Thursday evening and remained until Saturday afternoon. They came out to go to Medford, but had trouble with their car and had to stop here for repairs.
    Miss Viva Town of Lake Creek, who has been working in Medford, came out on the stage and went up home on the E.P.-L. C. stage.
    Ray Parker of Butte Falls was a passenger on the M.-B.F. stage on his way home. He has been working at the Weed mill, California, and is taking a vacation. He reports that another one of our Butte Falls citizens who is working over there, Everett Abbott, met with a minor accident, having been caught in the cable in dragging logs, and was scratched up considerable, but not seriously hurt.
    C. E. Bellows was in town Friday of last week, and among other things he purchased was several feet of pipe to be used in bringing water from a spring down to the house.
    Among the tourists passing through here Thursday was Mr. A. Stertman of Merced, Calif., on his way to Crater Lake.
    Henry Childs, the timekeeper for Charles Delin, has been here off and on at the Sunnyside for several days looking after the finishing up the job of the grading of the C.L.H. There is a lot of little things to look after, like finishing up the grading at the end of the bridges, that cannot be done until after the bridges are completed, and he is here to see that that job is properly attended to.
    Thomas F. Nichols and family have moved off of the farm owned by himself and his sister Ruth and moved into his own house, formerly occupied by Mr. Van Hardenburg, and I understand that the farm is now in the care of Clifford Hickson.
    Mrs. Victoria Musso, a sister of Mrs. Ernest Dahack, the wife of our barber, has been visiting the Dahack family.
    Mrs. W. L. Childreth made a business trip to Medford last Saturday.
    Wm. Perry and wife made a business trip to Seattle, Washington, last week.
    W. S. Chappell, who owns and for some time operated a shoe shop here, but finally invested in a sawmill on Trail Creek, came out Saturday to spend a few days and reports that they are disposing of all the lumber they can saw.
    The report reached me Saturday that last Friday, August 19th, the barn and hen house of Mrs. John Warner, living about two and a half miles above Trail, on Trail Creek, was burned and quite a number of chickens were burned in the hen house. Mrs. Warner, the widow of the late John Warner, is living on the old home place with her younger children, and her son John Jr. is managing the affairs of the family. I did not learn the particulars as to the origin of the fire or the amount of the loss.
    E. D. Rose of Wellen, who lives on Yankee Creek, was in town Saturday, having his team shod. Mrs. Harvey (Susie) Smith, and her two children, moved her household goods from here to Rogue River last Saturday.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Heckner of Brownsboro were here Saturday on their way home.. They had been to Medford preparing poisoned grain to be used to destroy the digger squirrel. He is the agent employed by the U.S. government to destroy the rodents on government land, and also supplies the farmers with the prepared grain at cost, to be used on the farms.
    Miss Vera Kershaw and little Miss Theodosia von der Hellen of Wellen drove in with the mail last Saturday, and while here Miss Kershaw was taken with a fainting spell, but Mrs. Mack Applegate of Elk Creek, the Buzzard mine, was with them, waiting for a way to get to Medford, and administered to her wants and she soon was able to proceed on her way with the Wellen mail.
    M. L. and Dwight Linker, two teamsters from California, passed through here to Crater Lake Saturday.
    Mr. Burdick, formerly of Ashland, but now of California, passed through here with Walter Woods Saturday. Mr. Burdick is a stockman and a few years ago was here considerable buying hogs and cattle.
    Saturday there was quite a number of people at the Sunnyside for dinner, but the most of them were strangers, but among them known to me were Mr. Rynning, the civil engineer who has charge of the road work on the C.L.H., B. R. Price, one of the contractors on the C.L.H., with Mr. F. Rhodes and five strangers.
    Carl Taylor, son of Mrs. Royal G. Brown, and family came in Friday to visit his mother and sister, Mrs. W. H. Brown of this place.
    Donnie McGee and family, including his wife's mother, Mrs. R. Manon, of Glendale, came down to look over his old home and its surroundings. Donnie McGee lived in our town when a youth for several years, and later lived in Medford. He was very much surprised to see such remarkable changes as have taken place in the past 10 or 12 years since he left here. While here inquiry was made about his sister Stella and he said that she has a family and [is] living on Snake River in a canyon where they have to pack in everything except when the boats are running, that they were in the cattle business, and that occasionally they lose a few head when they get too close to the edge of the cliff and the dirt gives way and they tumble over down into the canyon.