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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1912-1916

News from Eagle Point, Oregon and the Upper Rogue, mostly from the pen of A. C. Howlett. Transcribed by Janet Monti and Rene Forncrook.
   

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Eagle Point--Rebuilt and Progressive, Grows Rapidly
    Eagle Point and the country tributary to the town are the first beneficiaries of the Hill system of railroads in Oregon, the town having been selected as the helper station, the location for the railroad shops and round houses, etc, and ultimately will be the division town, when the Pacific & Eastern road is extended to a connection with the Oregon Trunk Line, now terminating at Bend, Ore. By a little more than a 2 percent grade the Cascade Mountains will be passed from Eagle Point, and with the wonderful development in timber industries and fruit growing in the district, there can be no question that the tonnage tributary to Eagle Point will one day be equal to that of any town on the Hill system in Oregon.
Town Well Located.
    Eagle Point is particularly well situated for residence purposes on the banks of the beautiful Little Butte Creek, one of the finest streams in the West, and in an ideal location for traffic, some of the best fruit lands in the Rogue River Valley being within a few miles. The fruit world well remembers the winning of the sweepstakes prize by Messrs. Tronson and Guthrie at the Spokane apple show of 1909. Well-informed fruit men know that the same orchard which produced this car had produced equally good fruit each year for five years previously, had the owners seen fit to place it in competition. That fine orchard in located within two miles of the depot at Eagle Point, and at any time in the future either this or the noted Dr. Coghlan orchard alongside can be counted on to win a sweepstakes prize in red apples, while the equally famous Bradshaw orchard, about as far away to the south, can be counted on for a winning car of Newtowns, for which it has for so many years been famous. Equally good young orchards of both apples and pears are to be found on every side of Eagle Point, approaching maturity. This will be one of the greatest fruit shipping stations in Oregon.
Many Small Fruits.
    Not alone in apples and pears, but also in peaches, apricots and cherries is the section to the front. There is a quality about peaches produced here which induces many to be set in apple pear orchards as fillers.
    There is something in the alluvial soil deposited along Little Butte Creek especially adapted to the growing of garden truck in a commercial way. The onions produced here are in a class by themselves in Southern Oregon. The larger towns to the west look to the Eagle Point district for their supplies of berries and green stuff during the season from start to finish. The district is particularly well adapted to poultry farming as well, and for many years the mining camps and timber districts of Northern California have looked to Eagle Point for their supplies of fresh ranch eggs. Back on the government reserves at the head of Rogue River and the two Butte creeks, thousands of cattle range and are brought down to the Eagle Point district to get the finishing touches of grain and alfalfa hay to fit them for market.
Manufacturing Sites.
    Eagle Point is destined to play no small part in the manufacturing future of the Rogue River Valley, owing to the water power available and to be transmitted or used direct from the channels of Rogue River and the tributaries above Eagle Point. The marvelous timber belt at the head of these streams, as yet untouched by the logger, is one of the main factors in tonnage producing, and is one of the many reasons why the Hill system has invaded the valley. Box factories, paper and pulp mills and woodenware shops are among the early results to be expected, and after the timber is logged off, thousands of acres of the best fruit lands on earth will be available to perpetuate the transcontinental tonnage which will distinguish this section.
    Not the least of the attractions of Eagle Point is the convenience of this location for outfitting for the summer trip to the mountains, and the close proximity to the best hunting and fishing in the state of Oregon. The traveler to Crater Lake in his machine will find here the best accommodations in the valley, and already many make it a point to stop at the excellent hotels in Eagle Point, and make the rush to the lake in the exhilarating morning air. Those coming from the lake will find it well to time their trips to make Eagle Point their stopping place for the night, as less than one hour's time will place the traveler in the heart of the valley after an early breakfast at the Eagle Point hotels.
Bank Statement Good.
    The prosperity of this section is shown conclusively in the growth of the Eagle Point Bank, in business but little more than one year. Watch its next statement. Its resources have almost doubled since its last published showing. It is all local money, and it will [omission] every dollar be used in developing the Eagle Point district. That's why Eagle Point wins out; her people pull together and assist in every progressive, worthy move. Eagle Point shed her chrysalis more than one year ago, when the town was incorporated, and during the year just closed 36 nice residences and business houses have been built, and many new ones are planned for 1912. Streets have been graded and graveled, more than 15,000 feet of cement sidewalk have been laid, and preparations are now in order for paving and sewer and water systems. Partial water systems have already been installed in the residence districts, and the beauty of residences, lawns and shrubbery arrangement is noted by all. All the conditions are right for the best success in landscape gardening, growing shrubs and roses.
    Eagle Point is rapidly winning recognition as a resort for those who are troubled with pulmonary complaints, asthma or hay fever. The altitude is just right for sensible treatment of all such troubles, and many are living in this section today for no other reason than that they are free from the inconvenience and danger lurking elsewhere. Attention is called to the "sweet summertime air" about the loungers on the hotel veranda. And yet this photo was secured on "just one of our ordinary December days," and it could be duplicated a month later in the season. Ask any man who has been in the  valley a few years, and he will tell you "this Christmas is just like the first year I came to the valley." They all tell the same story, because the first year it impresses them the more. The fact of the matter is that each Christmas in the Rogue River Valley is like a day in June elsewhere. You will come to Eagle Point ultimately; why not enjoy our fine climate right away, and make a break for liberty of enjoyment at once?
    Write to the secretary of the Eagle Point Commercial Club for full information on any topic which interests you. People who have lived at Eagle Point are its best advertisement. All will assure you that for social enjoyment, kind and courteous treatment, it has any other town in the West "skinned a mile." You want to enjoy life, fine climate and the companionship of the right kind of people. Get busy, and come to Eagle Point.
Suburban Tracts.
    It takes people to make a city, and with the idea of making it an inducement to settle in the vicinity and help in the work of building up Eagle Point THE MOUNTAIN VIEW LAND COMPANY have platted and are now offering for sale on ground floor basis a number of five- and ten-acre tracts in this subdivision, on the high ground adjacent to Eagle Point, at prices ranging from FIFTY DOLLARS per acre and up. Of course, this offer will have its limits, but for the next few months our policy will be, "First Come, First Served." We don't ask anyone to gamble on the future, but where in the West does such an opportunity exist, adjacent to a live burg like Eagle Point?
    These tracts will soon be under pipe line, and for general attractiveness are not surpassed anywhere. Get in touch with us at once, and share in the advance in prices impending.
MOUNTAIN VIEW LAND CO.,
Eagle Point, Oregon.
REPORT OF THE CONDITION OF
THE FIRST STATE BANK OF EAGLE POINT
    At Eagle Point, in the state of Oregon, at the close of business December 5, 1911.
Resources.
Loans and discounts $14,363.70
Overdrafts, secured and unsecured 54.67
Bonds and warrants 15.477.16
Banking house 4,042.67
Furniture and fixtures 2,539.74
Due from banks (not reserve banks) 100.00
Due from approved reserve banks 6,712.53
Checks and other cash items 34.00
Cash on hand 2,291.53
Expenses     1,552.48
    Total $47,168.38
Liabilities.
Capital stock paid in $  9,850.00
Undivided profits, less expenses and taxes paid 1,137.60
Due to banks and bankers 250.16
Individual deposits subject to check 34,541.24
Demand certificates of deposit 623.24
Certified checks 200.00
Time certificates of deposit 553.29
Cash over          12.85
    Total $47,168.38
    State of Oregon, county of Jackson, ss.:
    I, J. V. McIntyre, cashier of the above-named bank, do solemnly swear that the above statement is true to the best of my knowledge and belief.
J. V. McINTYRE, Cashier
    Subscribed and sworn to before me this 8th day of December, 1911.
A. J. FLOREY,
    Notary Public.
    Correct--Attest:
WM. VON DER HELLEN,
J. F. BROWN
    Directors
    The system of highways converging at Eagle Point insures extensive commercial business for the town all the time, and more or less jobbing trade, as much of the tonnage in consignments to Eagle Point is distributed to other supply stations even now. No less than four highways leading from as many bridges across Rogue River and one highway from the free ferry across that stream enter Eagle Point from the west, with a never-ending stream of traffic, to say nothing of tourist travel; and make the town easy of access from the great Sams Valley section, the important Table Rock fruit district, the stock and timber districts on Trail and Elk creeks, north of the river, and the great timber plateau at the head of the river. Everything in the line of stock, timber, fruit and farm products produced in the Little Butte Valley, the Big Butte Valley, the Antelope Valley and the great section lying east of Mount Roxy Ann, and shut off by that butte from the Bear Creek section, naturally gravitates into Eagle Point, and the Roguelands reclamation proposition will add greatly to the lands tributary to Eagle Point.
    The amount of tonnage shown in 11 months' statistics at this date on the P. & E. Railroad's books is very gratifying to the management of the new railroad, there having been consigned to Eagle Point merchants alone during that time more than 7,500,000 pounds of freight; and in addition, for residents of Eagle Point and distribution through Eagle Point to merchants of tributary towns, no less than 17,437,835 pounds of freight. When it is stated that within five years there will be shipped out from Eagle Point annually at least ten times that amount of fruit and other products, the other side of the picture looks equally good.
    The stream on which the town is situated deserves more than passing notice. It is the most picturesque stream in this section, affords the opportunity to develop power in almost every mile of its course, and not the least of its attractiveness is owing to the fact that along the stream are found so many fine building sites on the many fruit farms located there. The apple king of the world holds his court now in a beautiful bungalow on the stream and several kings of finance have secured locations close to Eagle Point, and will build beautiful homes when their young orchards come into bearing. As the highways improve hundreds of these fine home locations will be utilized.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 1, 1912, page B8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mrs. W. E. VanVactor and her son, B. G. VanVactor, returned recently to their home at Ashland, after failing to secure rooms in which to keep house here. Mr. VanVactor is acting as night watchman on the Pacific & Eastern Railway.
    Thursday morning when we awoke from our slumbers we found the ground covered with a beautiful white mantle of snow.
    Dr. Wm. W. P. Holt, our townsman, has gone to Portland to visit his parents.
    Professor P. H. Daily has been spending the Christmas holidays in Portland and his wife and family are spending their vacation in Medford.
    Heath & Diamond, the only ones who are carrying a line of general merchandise in the old part of the town, seem to be doing a thriving business, constantly adding to their general stock. They thought that they could do without the Mail Tribune, but advised me to send for the daily for them.
    Professor Charles Johnson was among the guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday night, also Fred Warner of Trail.
    G. H. Wamsley and Len Smith are engaged putting down crosswalks on the streets and intend to put down sidewalks on the main thoroughfares of the town. And as soon as material can be procured they will put a heavy floor on the new footbridge. They have already put up several street lamps in the places where they were most needed, one at the south end of the new footbridge and one in front of the church building on the south side of the creek.
    Jud Edsall and John Lester started Thursday morning for the P. C. Company's plant via Derby, where they are to load their teams for the company. They report the roads in a very bad condition in the hills, and Roy Willits reported Thursday night when he came in that the snow was about 16 inches deep at Prospect. Parties coming in from the Lake Creek country report snow some three feet deep on the Little Butte Creek hills, and the end is not yet.
    Joe Pool returned from a trip to Portland a few days ago, where he had been to see his sister, Mrs. Cole, and his father, W. C. Pool, and reported having had the time of his life. Joe has been raised in Jackson County and was never out of the county before, so the reader can imagine what a sight it would be for a boy, or rather young man, to be dropped down at the Union Depot in Portland and be surrounded by an almost solid mass of towering buildings and hear the constant noise of the hotel runners, see the street cars--"no horsie pullie, no horsie pushie"--and to be surrounded by a sea of strangers. I tell you it was somewhat bewildering to your Eagle Point correspondent seven years ago, and he had seen cities before, but not on so grand a scale.
    The Brownsboro new merchant is having lumber hauled from here to put up a store building and get ready for the spring trade.
    Marian Trusty came in Wednesday night, spent the night with us and the next night visited his nephew and niece, Mr. and Mrs. Henry Childreth.
    Two of the Trusty boys, Rufus and Henry, came out from their home on Elk Creek and spent the night with their brother-in-law, Henry Childreth, the first of the week.
    Mrs. Wm. Smith, formerly of this place but now of Medford, who owns a lot in the Ulrich addition to Eagle Point, sent money to have a sidewalk put down across the lot. She is looking ahead to the time when property will be worth much more than it is now.
    Carl Cably, Clay Corum and Phillip Stadro, all of Phoenix, came in last Thursday night on their way to the Big Butte country.
    Mrs. Fred Porter of Eugene and Miss Addie Herdman of Iowa came in Friday morning, procured a rig at the new livery barn and went on up to look at a tract of timber land on Butte Creek.
    Prof. W. G. Russell of Aztec, N.M., came in on the train Monday night and took a room at the Sunnyside. He is canvassing the country to sell school supplies.
    Mrs. W. E. VanVactor and her son B. G. VanVactor came up from Ashland Saturday to spend a part of the holidays with her husband who is night watchman on the P.&E. Railway at this place. Monday and Tuesday he had charge of the engine, and they both accompanied him to Butte Falls Tuesday.
    Jud Edsall and John Foster came out from the Prospect Consolidated Company's plant Monday and report the work progressing very well.
    Miss Hattie Weiss expects to start for her home tomorrow (Wednesday). She has been helping her sister and brother-in-law in the Model Variety Store through their rush of business before the holidays.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Irvin Tyrrell of Lake Creek came out Thursday night for the box in which the casket came in which the late Mrs. Herman Myers, who died December 26, 1911, was buried, the hearse having taken the casket up already. The remains were interred in the Brownsboro cemetery Friday afternoon. I have not the particulars of her death, but know that she had been in very poor health for several years. The family have the sympathy of their many friends in these parts.
    Our Christmas festivities are all over and we have settled down to the regular routine duties of life again. The public Christmas tree and entertainment was a grand success. It was participated in by not only the school but by many of the older ones, such as Professor N. L. Narregan and his son Carl, Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mr. and Mrs. Salter, our new hardware merchants, Mr. Bryant, etc., with Prof. P. H. Daily as master of ceremonies, assisted by his estimable wife, teacher of our primary department, and Miss Nellie Morris, teacher of the intermediate department. The exercises were simply superb, every one of the children, and there were about a hundred of them, had their part about as perfect as possible for children to have them, and on two occasions they were encored. The first was Charles Wright, aged 7, who represented an aged man with his staff, all wrapped up in his mitts and furs. The little fellow hesitated at first, but finally came back on the stage and repeated a part of his piece. The others were Mr. McDonough's little son and daughter. They gave us another, entirely new, song. I might mention many more that rendered their parts extra well but must forbear as it would take too much space in the Mail Tribune. After the exercises were over Santa Claus put in an appearance and then the crowd of little folk were beyond control. As the names of the recipients of presents were called the excitement ran high and twice Prof. Daily had to call on the children to take their seats and keep quiet. There was not so many presents given out as there has been on former occasions, in proportion to the crowd, for it was estimated that there were about 400 in assemblage. In addition to the public Christmas tree there were a few private trees in our town and perhaps as noted and [as] interesting one as any was one at the beautiful home of F. M. Stewart. Mrs. Stewart's children were invited in to take supper Sunday night with their children and the tree was all arranged without the knowledge of the little folk and the first intimation they had was the ringing of the bells in the adjoining room and when the door was opened their surprise was beyond bounds when they saw a genuine Christmas tree loaded with all kinds of little notions for them. Among the remarkable incidents of that occasion was the eating of a nice ripe watermelon! Only think of eating watermelons on the 25th day of December, and the melons were raised in Eagle Point at that. Mr. Stewart said that he had one he wanted to send to the Medford Mail Tribune force and have them sample our December watermelons. Christmas night there was a select party and dance given by L. C. Narregan and J. B. Jackson in Spiker's hall. There were only just enough to have a real pleasant time. They dance until about midnight and all went to their homes voting that they had a lovely time and wishing the promoters of the move a happy New Year.
    There has been another deal in land here, Wm. von der Hellen having purchased the tract of land, about two and a half acres, from the Hamilton place, formerly owned by Wm. Ulrich, where the buildings stand. Consideration $10. I understand that he and his brother-in-law, Mr. E. Evans, have bought ten acres of land on the west side of the railroad track, and intend to lay it off in small tracts and put it on the market.
    Chauncey Florey came out Christmas to see the old folks.
    H. A. Sprague went to Roseburg Saturday to visit his brother and look after business there.
    Mrs. M. Srachart (Grandma) came out from her son's near Derby, Tuesday to visit her daughter, Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman.
    A. B. Zimmerman came near being seriously hurt Tuesday morning. He was working on a shed for the Sprague Lumber Company and the ladder on which he was standing slipped and he fell some ten or twelve feet, but fortunately he was not hurt.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 4, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since my last the old worn-out year 1911 has passed into the things of the past and will soon be almost forgotten by the most of us in our rush of business affairs, having our minds absorbed with the prospects of the future. And as we review the past year we can see many mistakes that we have made, opportunities neglected, but we can also see the many blessings we have enjoyed and can see great cause for thankfulness for these blessings, and now I trust that we will each of us strive to improve on our past experience and try to make our lives a blessing to others more than ever.
    Among the new arrivals at the Sunnyside since my last are Fred McClure, who owns a farm southeast of Jacksonville and also a tract of land in the town of Eagle Point. He came over to look over his interests here and to enjoy our beautiful climate, for upon his farm there is considerable snow while here at this writing (January 2) there is scarcely enough to cover the ground. He is one of our boarders and comes home every once in a while. Also F. M. Lindsey of Medford was among us. He is interested in a large contract for cutting wood on a tract of land recently purchased by the P.&E. Railroad Company, with Mr. McIntyre of Derby.
    Mr. Ditsworth, his daughter Ora, one of his small boys and a son-in-law passed through here Saturday on their way to his mountain home.
    The men who have been employed to move the old store building of von der Hellen Bros. have succeeded in getting it out into the middle of the street and left it there. I understand that Mr. von der Hellen intends to get a house-moving crew from Medford to come out and try their hands at it.
    In a former article I alluded to a deal that was on and promised to tell more in the future, as I was requested to say nothing on the subject at that time. It was a deal whereby William von der Hellen sold his residence to Thomas Farlow; consideration, $3000; a fine bargain for Mr. Farlow, as the house cost more than that amount. In the deal Mr. Farlow turned in two lots he had purchased prior to that and on which he intended to build, but liked the other location better.
    Last Saturday night Mrs. Howlett and our daughter Hattie gave a birthday party at the Sunnyside, it being the birthday of each of them, as Hattie was born on her mother's 40th birthday. I would be glad to be able to give the names of the guests who were present. There were 76 invitations sent out, just around town, and there were 63 present and all of them young people, that is, unmarried except eight and they had not been married very long. I confess that I was surprised to see such a crowd of boys and girls ranging in age from 14 to 25, but most of them between 14 and 18. They played games, had music and at 10:30 p.m. light refreshments were served with coffee and then the fun commenced with the beginning of the candy pulling. They remained until about midnight and then most of them started for their homes. Among the most interesting incidents of the evening was "pinning the tail on the donkey." One of the party would be blindfolded and given a piece of paper with a pin in it and after being turned around three times would be told to pin the tail on the donkey. It looked quite simple and they would start for the donkey and perhaps put the tail on the other side of the room.
    New Year's Day Mrs. A. N. Thomas gave a dinner and invited the following; at least there may have been more invited, but the following persons were present: Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pierce of Forest Creek and their two children, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Jonas and his mother, Mrs. Jonas, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thomas and three children and your Eagle Point correspondent and wife. Mrs. Thomas had planned to have her son, Baxter Grigsby and family of Klamath County, with them, but he was unexpectedly called home on business, so they, we and his mother were disappointed. But we had a very enjoyable time and after partaking of dinner--as good a one as anyone could wish--we spent the afternoon socially, just as old-time acquaintances should do.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Eugene O. Seeley, representing the Toppenish Nursery Company of Toppenish, Wash., was here this week making engagements for fruit trees, etc.
    Floyd Pearce, wife and two children came over during the holidays to visit her parents, J. J. Fryer, and wife.
    Peter Young, one of our energetic young farmers, was in town Wednesday last buying hardware to finish his new barn.
    Benj. Fredenburg, wife and son B.F., came out the first of the week to consult Dr. Holt and have an operation performed on the son's mouth, and also to have Mrs. Fredenburg treated. Dr. Holt just came home from San Francisco the same day, Wednesday. Mrs. F. and her son are guests at the Sunnyside at present writing, Saturday.
    On the arrival of the mammoth edition of the Mail Tribune of January 1, 1912, there was a general rush for a copy and the next day there was a large number of them went through the Eagle Point post office on the way to Derby, Peyton, Butte Falls, Trail, Persist, Prospect, Brownsboro, Lake Creek and Wellen, besides scores of that number was sent east through this post office by the business men of the town. The edition is highly spoken of by the people of our town, who unhesitatingly pronounce the Mail Tribune the best of the newsiest paper in Southern Oregon or Northern California.
    Prof. Charles Johnson of Derby has been a guest at the Sunnyside for the last few days, looking after his interests in the line of school matters. He started for his home Saturday morning.
    Miss Rose Ayres has been visiting at the Sunnyside during the past week.
    The Ladies' Aid Society met in the parlor of the Sunnyside last Wednesday and laid plans for future work. Among other things they did they authorized one of their members to correspond with Mr. Hamilton, the owner of a tract of land lying between the old county road, now Main Street, and the creek just above the wagon bridge, and reaching to Owings' store, to see what terms he would give them and the price of the tract, so that they could clear it up and have it set apart for a town park. They plan to have bazaars every few months and thus earn money to pay for the land and beautify it.
    Scott Bruce and Mr. Hess, two of the carpenters who have been working on the new buildings in our town this summer, and have been taking an outing in the hills, came in Thursday and went on to Jacksonville, returning to the S.S. the same night.
    I omitted to state in my last that Miss Maggie Daley had been to Ashland to visit the Peachey family and that Bert Peachey has been, since that time visiting the Daley family of Eagle Point.
    J. T. Meyers, recently from Wisconsin, spent the night with us on his way to go to work on the Corbit orchard, the old Bradshaw.
    There was quite an excitement in our town Thursday afternoon on account of the flue in the Eagle Hotel burning out, after the fire had subsided the smoke began to come out from under the shingles and then the excitement began to run high, but there was no damage done of any consequence.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. Salter, our new hardware merchant, is quite a genius in the way of attracting the attention of the public. This time he has taken two heating stoves, placed them together endwise, taken a joint of stovepipe for the neck and two elbows to make the framework of a horse, used two wire dishcloths for the ears and put a set of single harness on and placed the horse and harness in his show windows.
    Prof. P. H. Daily and his brother, M. L. Daily, went to Medford last Saturday.
    W. J. Phillips, one of the conductors on the P.&E. Railroad, has moved his family from the old Ulrich house into the upper part of Brown Bros.' store, and Mr. Stowell has moved onto his ranch from the same building, and William von der Hellen has taken possession and moved his family into the building. I understand that he intends to have the house entirely remodeled and use it as a family residence. It will be the home of our new town mayor.
    As already reported in the Mail Tribune, Governor West passed through our town last Saturday, in his special car, which consisted of the noted "One-Spot" locomotive, en route to Westville to visit the camp of men he is trusting on the highways, known as West's honor men. He was accompanied by Engineer Harmon, Commissioner Owens, Westville Commissary Agent Charles Gay and George Putnam, editor and publisher of the Mail Tribune. The company only stopped long enough for the engineer, Mr. VanVactor, to take on a supply of water and then hurried on to Derby, where five saddled horses were waiting for them on which to ride to their destination. While they waited for water they all got out of the car and the governor shook hands with the few who had assembled to meet him. It was not generally known that the party was coming out at that time, so there were only about 25 men and two ladies to meet them. One lady, Mrs. Phillips, said that she came to see the governor as he was a Canadian and that was her native home. The next day, however, there was a large concourse of both men and women who met them at the depot, where they had the pleasure of their company for about an hour. The governor made a fine impression on the minds of some who had never seen him before, and I think that some who have been reading only the Oregonian changed their opinion of the man and his motives.
    Rev. Father O'Farrell of Medford came out Sunday morning and conducted religious services in the Catholic church, and after services he, with Mike Sidley, Jr., and his sister Helen drove to the Sunnyside and took dinner. He tells me that he intends to hold services in Eagle Point the first Sunday in each month.
    Dr. Holt and his brother-in-law, Mr. L. D. Purdy, came in Sunday for a dinner also.
    Larkin Runnels and Donner Marsh came out with the intention of building a section house here for the section men of the P.&E. Railroad. Mr. James Gillespie, on the railroad men, is also making headquarters at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since I wrote last Deputy Sheriff G. H. Shearer and Mr. Schuknicht came out from Medford and engaged a buggy. They had their own team, and started for the Prospect country. They proceeded about five miles on the way, then began to realize what it meant to pull sticky. They would go a few rods and then the horses would have to stop and rest, so they finally concluded to retrace their steps, and arrived at the Sunnyside at dark well satisfied with their experience with sticky.
    The night of the 9th inst. our new town officers were sworn in and assumed the duties of their respective offices. Among the new officers were William von der Hellen, mayor; S. H. Harnish and Frank Nichols as aldermen and Ed Cingcade as marshal. The old marshal asked me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that he would not have the office again under any circumstances. There was nothing of especial interest done at the council meeting except the regular routine of business.
    Lawton & Heard seem to have quite a time trying to get von der Hellen's old store building moved, as the mud and rain keep them from making much headway.
    Since the late rains the railroad men have been quite busy keeping the drift[wood] from banking up against the piers of the railroad bridge just below town, and Friday night they had to take the locomotive from the station to draw the drift away. While working at the bridge, Mr. Stout, the foreman of the gang of bridge men, met with two mishaps. The first one was to have a heavy timber fall on his foot and damage his great toe considerably, and the next thing was to fall and strike his hip on the end of a railroad tie, hurting him quite severely.
    I see that Heath & Diamond have some as fine-looking apples in their store as I have seen this season, but no one seemed to know the variety.
    Marian Trusty, who has been up at Trail visiting his brother, started for Texas last Wednesday.
    J. E. Reed of Wellen, living on his homestead on Yankee Creek, has just returned from Seattle, Wash., where he has been to visit his sick mother. He spent the night with us at Eagle Point and the next morning gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune. He said by taking that paper he would get about all of the foreign news and all of the local news.
    Mr. Newport, a son-in-law of F. J. Ayres, came out Saturday to have Dr. Holt open a felon on one of his fingers.
    W. M. Wadleigh of Chicago, Ill., came in from Newport, Ore., where he had been seeking for some of the valuable stones that are so abundant in our state. He is here now looking over our prairie lands for agates and other kinds of curios. He expects to gather and ship a lot to a firm in California near Los Angeles.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent took a trip to Medford Friday and on the car with him from Eagle Point were Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Grover, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Mrs. J. B. Jackson and daughter, Miss Gernell, who is attending the business college in Medford, and Wm. Knighton, besides several whose names I didn't know--for our town is filling up so fast that I meet lots of strangers. Thomas Nichols Jr. was also with us. He has been attending the business college in Medford but was compelled to stop on account of his being afflicted with his eyes, he having lost one of them and his having to use the other so much causes inflammation, and he said that he was going to see an eye specialist in Medford. Robert Pelouze, another of our bright youths, starts to school in the high school department the 17th of this month. Thus we have several of our bright youths going to Medford to attend school on account of there being not enough in that grade to form a class, but we expect next year to have a school here that will compare favorably with any of the schools in the valley.
    Mrs. Larkin Reynolds and her son came out from Medford last Friday afternoon to be with her husband at the Sunnyside. He is one of the railroad carpenters and is here building a house for the section men on the P.&E. Railway. She expects to return to Medford Sunday so her son can go to school.
    Last Friday night there were two of the street lamps taken from their stands and this (Saturday) morning the new marshal authorized me to say that if they were returned there would be no questions asked, but if not the guilty parties would be arrested and punished according to law.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 16, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mayor William von der Hellen, having purchased the house and lots standing on the site on Hamlinton Avenue, known as the Ulrich house, and moved his family into it, has had the workmen tear away the old fence and some of the outbuildings and is preparing to make the place one of the ideal places in Southern Oregon. He is having plans drawn to have the house remodeled so as to make it an up-to-date residence. He is one of our thoroughgoing citizens and if we had a dozen more such men things would pop in our town.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. William Percy gave a quilting party at her home near Edsall station last Friday and some of the young people of our neighborhood went up and took part in the quilting bee. They report having had a fine time, if it did rain all day.
    Miss Maud Miller, who is engaged in teaching school in Laurel district, came into the Sunnyside Sunday night and took the Prospect stage Monday morning for her school. She is one of the fortunate ones in the late examination for certificates.
    Henry Tonn of Douglas County came in the last of the week and spent the night with his mother-in-law, Mrs. A. N. Thomas.
    George West and wife came out from Medford to their old boarding house, the Sunnyside, Sunday morning and spent the night with us, taking the train Monday afternoon for their home in Medford. They have purchased a home in the city and gone to housekeeping.
    Mrs. James Gillespie, wife of one of the firemen on the P.&E. Railroad, came out Saturday afternoon from Medford and spent the night with her husband at the Sunnyside, returning Sunday morning.
    Rev. Lamar, the pastor of the Baptist church at this place, preached for us Sunday morning and then went to Brownsboro to continue a protracted meeting being held by Rev. Haynes, Rev. Holmes and Rev. Lamar.
    Uriah Gordon of Medford spent Sunday night with us and took the Prospect stage Monday morning for Trail.
    Mrs. Larkin Reynolds and son of Medford, who have been spending a few days with her husband at the Sunnyside, returned Sunday afternoon, so as to have her son attend school Monday morning.
    Mrs. McKelvy, who went to Medford last Friday, returned Monday morning.
    Mike Sidley and a lady who has been teaching school in the Lake Creek district whose name I have forgotten, stopped here for dinner Monday. The lady was on her way to Nebraska.
    M. A. Williams of Forest Grove, one of the candidates for congress from the First Judicial District, was a pleasant caller Tuesday noon.
    Messrs. Rex H. Lampman and O. U. Newell of the Gold Hill News were pleasant callers Tuesday noon. Later they were closeted with our new mayor, William von der Hellen.
    Mr. Haley, one of our progressive farmers, had the cylinder to his bean threshing machine at W. L. Childreth's blacksmith shop for repairs Tuesday afternoon.
    Charles A. Brown and wife of the Talent Drug Company of Talent spent Sunday with their old friends, A. H. Weber and wife of the Eagle Point Drug Store.
    Charles Daily, a brother of the principal of our school, and M. L. Daily of the Model Variety Store is visiting his brothers in our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1912, page 12


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Oscar Wright, agent for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company here, and Mrs. Wright left for Fresno, Cal., last Tuesday. Mr. Brown, brother-in-law of Mr. Bacon, the conductor, has taken Mr. Wright's place. They expect to be absent about a month, having gone to visit Mrs. Wright's mother.
    Mr. Washburn, the Table Rock orchardist, was visiting Eagle Point last Wednesday. He was here on business with H. B. Tronson, the "apple king," but Mr. Tronson had gone to Medford that day and he had to wait until the afternoon train for him.
    It is understood that while Mr. Lampman, editor of the Gold Hill News, was here he prospected the outlook for the installation of a printing plant, but leading business men thought the move premature so there was nothing done in that line.
    F. Salter, the new hardware merchant, visited Medford last Tuesday.
    E. D. Rose, of Yankee Creek, was a guest among us Wednesday, also Mr. Heiff, formerly of Lake Creek but now of Medford, was a pleasant caller. The same day Miss Maggie Tyrrell of Lake Creek was a guest at the Sunnyside. She was on her way to catch the train for Medford.
    Mr. Newport, a carpenter on the Pacific & Eastern force, is having a time with a felon on his thumb. He is stopping at the Sunnyside, but went up to his father-in-law's, F. J. Ayres', last Thursday, and Friday morning telephoned down that his thumb was as bad as it could be and he was afraid he would lose it to the first joint.
    E. O. Zimmerman and J. F. Burch of Portland are in the valley working in the interest of the Anti-Saloon League, and they are to be at Eagle Point next Thursday night, the 25th, with a stereopticon and a large number of fine views to exhibit, all free, in Spikers hall at 7:30 p.m. Everybody is invited.
    Died, at the residence of her son, Andrew Clarno, January 17, 1912, Mrs. Mary F. Clarno, aged 57 years and 16 days. The deceased was born in Yreka, Cal., and after living in California with her husband, G. W. Clarno, for several years and raising a family they came to Jackson County and settled about six miles north of Eagle Point, where they remained until death separated them, he having died August 2, 1911. She leaves four children, three boys and one girl, and three grandchildren. They were all with her at the time of her death. She was a member of the Methodist Episcopal Church and lived a consistent Christian life. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on the 19th. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett at the grave.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 23, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Just as I went to the post office last Friday I found our town all astir over the advent of three convicts who had betrayed their trust and attempted to escape from the honor camp at Westville. They had been captured by Superintendent Bolts and our town marshal, Ed Cingcade, as they were coming into town, hungry, tired and disheartened, but not so bad off but their advent caused quite a commotion among us--but as this has been already sifted, not only by each individual in our town but by all the leading papers in the state, I will not take time or space for further comment on the subject.
    Mr. Shaffer and a friend of his from Medford were among us last Saturday.
    I. C. Moor and his son William of Ashland spent the night here Saturday on their way to the farm on Elk Creek.
    Mrs. VanVactor of Ashland came in from Ashland to visit her husband, who is stopping at the Sunnyside. He is the night watchman for the P.&E. Railway Company of this place. She returned to her home Monday morning.
    Thomas Cingcade and wife were doing business with our merchants last Saturday.
    Miss Rosa Ayres was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside Saturday afternoon and attended the dance here that night. Speaking of the dance it appears that an arrangement is made to have an ordinary dance every two weeks in Spiker's hall and an occasional dance for invited guests on Tuesday evenings. There is to be one tonight (Tuesday), and the musicians are to come from Medford.
    Gus Rosenberg is drilling a well on his place with a hand drill.
    H. A. Sprague of Sprague Lumber Company has moved into the Thomas Farlow house, recently purchased of William von der Hellen by Mr. Farlow.
    William von der Hellen has put in a gasoline pump and air pressure reservoir in his yard to carry water into the tavern and to supply that part of the town with water for domestic use, as the well water in that part of town is so strongly impregnated with sulfur, salt, etc., that it cannot be used for drinking purposes.
    Mr. and Mrs. Fred Salter and Mr. and Mrs. John W. Smith and Miss Dottie Stowell were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday for dinner.
    Chalmers Ringer, who is working for Mr. Natwick in Medford, came out Saturday to attend the dance and visit his father at the Sunnyside Hotel, returning Sunday afternoon.
    Since the rain has ceased Messrs. Lawton and Head are getting along very well with moving von der Hellen's old store building.
    There is some real estate changing hands in these parts. H. F. Brown has sold 20 acres off his place for $2,000 to Mr. Tobin, who expects to put out 15 acres in fruit this spring.
    I understand that A. L. Haselton has sold one acre to R. C. Lawton off of the east end of his place for a consideration of $400.
    James W. Penn of Ashland came up Monday to visit some of his old-time friends, among whom are David Cingcade and your Eagle Point correspondent.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Newport came out Monday to have Dr. Holt dress his thumb, he being afflicted with a felon and having had a serious time with it.
    There was quite an excitement in the new part of our town Monday on account of Mr. Peters having a fine mare take sick. It was feared she would die, but Tuesday morning she was able to be taken home.
    M. L. Daily of the Model Variety Store wants to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that they have on hand a variety of valentine and birthday cards.--(Adv.)
    Heath & Diamond shipped out on the P.&E. a load of 80 goods boxes last Tuesday.
    I omitted to report that Mr. McKelvy has gone back east to be a witness in a railroad suit, and Mrs. McKelvy was in Eagle Point Tuesday trading with Heath & DeArmond.
    H. W. Brooks of Medford was out Tuesday soliciting for the Oregon Journal.
Medford Mail Tribune, Jan 25, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mrs. Grover Cook and her two children of Butte Falls spent the night with us last Tuesday.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our progressive farmers of Reese Creek, came out to enjoy the dance Tuesday night and was a guest at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Swihart, the Derby merchant, came out Monday, went to Medford and Tuesday afternoon came as far as Eagle Point and spent the night with us, taking the train the next day for home. He reports business lively in his section, considering the season of the year.
    Mrs. Howlett started last Wednesday for Klamath Falls to visit our daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt. She expects to remain in Klamath Falls for about two weeks and on her return trip stop off and visit friends in California and Ashland, Ore.
    The friends of Austin Green and wife are glad to greet them among us once more. Mr. Green has been confined to his bed, in and out of the hospital in Medford, for about six weeks and now he has [to] go on crutches, as one of his legs is paralyzed so that he cannot walk without them. They were accompanied to the home of his grandfather, J. J. Fryer, by a sister of Mrs. Green, Miss Mabel Maltby.
    Mr. Ager, one of the county school superintendents, came out Thursday, procured a saddle horse at the Sunnyside stable and went on up to Brownsboro to visit the school there and the one just above known as the Lone Charley school. He don't seem to stop for rain, mud or shine.
    Some time ago a move was started to secure the tract of land lying between the county road and the creek between Owings' store and the wagon bridge by the Ladies' Improvement Club of Eagle Point, and word has been received by the secretary of the club that the tract of land will be donated to the town of Eagle Point by the owner, Mr. Hamilton, for a town park if the town will have it surveyed and deed made out, and also Mr. Hamilton proposes to let the Baptist Church have the lot that one-half of the church stands on for $50, and the cash will soon be raised for the purpose.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    William Knighton and wife returned from Talent a few days ago, where they had been to attend the funeral of Mr. Goddard, one of their old neighbors.
    Miss Lois Smith, musical director and lecturer of Oregon W.C.T.U. and state secretary of the L.T.L., gave us a song and story entertainment in Spiker's opera hall Thursday night. She had a good-sized audience and entertained them for over an hour. Sometimes she would have them on the verge of shedding tears and then they would be clapping their hands with glee, interspersing her lecture with songs suited to the occasion. While she was ostensibly working in the interest of the W.C.T.U., she also impressed on our minds the advisability of giving the women the right to vote and illustrated the thought by telling an incident in her childhood days. She said that herself and mother went away from home once and left her father and brother to keep house and when they returned they found things all topsy-turvy and that since then she has had an idea that men were never designed to keep house. She then said that Uncle Sam was an old bachelor and didn't know how to keep house and that he needed a helpmeet, as he had attempted to legislate on the liquor question and the more the men legislated on the subject the more mess they made of it. She thought the best way was to give the women a chance to clean up the disordered and unsanitary establishment. She is a very fluent and pleasant speaker and at the close of her remarks asked how many men there were who would vote for the women to try their hand at assisting in the governmental affairs, and almost every man in the house rose to his feet. She seems to be very sanguine that the women of Oregon will join with the women of California, Washington and Idaho in helping to straighten out the tangle in the country in general next November. So might it be.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 30, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    I omitted to mention that A. W. Bradshaw, superintendent of the R. R. Commercial Orchard Company's orchard on Dry and Yankee creeks, was in our town looking at some of the property with a view to buying and locating among us and thereby take advantage of our excellent schools.
    G. W. Wamsley and the Smith brothers have put in a fine heavy plank floor in our footbridge and now it is considered perfectly safe, as all the old broken boards are taken out and a new floor complete is put in the place.
    There was a man here Saturday representing the Remington Arms Company, who was showing some of the old marksmen how to shoot. He would shoot at a marble or anything thrown up in the air and before it could reach the ground he would hit it with his bullet or shot as the case might be.
    Mrs. Charles Cingcade and her mother, Mrs. Gresham, of Chimney Rock precinct were doing business in our town last Saturday.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy was a guest of the Misses Hattie and Agnes Howlett last Sunday.
    Quite a number of Odd Fellows met in the new hardware store on the night of the 25th and took steps to effect the organization of a lodge here. They think that they will be able to organize by the 15th of February. They are having the upper story of the bank building fitted up for a lodge room, but think that they will build a lodge room of their own in the near future.
    William von der Hellen is having a house built on Hamilton Avenue on the tract of land he recently purchased of Mr. Hamilton.
    Last Monday as the car pulled in from Medford Deputy Sheriff Roy Ashpole arrested John McKee of Big Butte and then went to Medford in the afternoon and arrested Ed Andrew Coffman. They are charged with killing cattle not their own. They were taken before Judge Watkins and waived an examination and were placed under bonds of $500 each. John Higinbotham and Mr. Swihart of Derby went on the bonds. The deputy sheriff is out after another man who is said to be implicated with them and is expected to be in with him tonight or tomorrow.
    Chas. Terrill and wife of Brownsboro were here last Monday looking over some property that is for sale, with an eye to locating among us, as he thinks that the prospect for Eagle Point is very bright.
    Omer Murphy came out from Medford last Monday, bringing with him Carl Beeson, a brother of Mrs. H. C. Cole of this place, in his auto. He found considerable mud along the route.
    Herman Meyers of Lake Creek was doing business with our merchants Monday.
    E. F. A. Bittner, one of Medford's live boosters, and a man by the name of Young, formerly of Kansas but now of Medford, were out Monday looking over a tract of land lying just north of our town belonging to H. F. Brown.
    G. W. Wamsley and William Louis were putting down a board walk along the side of the bank building last Monday.
    Mrs. G. Allder, who bought the old Pat Ryan place, joining the Young and Dugan places; E. O. Seeley, who is soliciting for a Washington nursery; E. W. Gibbard and L. H. Pickel engaged rooms at the Sunnyside last Monday. They are engaged in putting the aforesaid tract of land out to fruit.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 31, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    W. W. Willits and wife of Persist were guests at the Sunnyside the night of the 30th of January. They had been to Medford on a business trip and were on their way home. The next morning Mrs. Willits took the Eagle Point-Prospect stage for Trail with her son Roy, while Mr. Willits took a slower gait with his rig. Mr. Willits reports that the company has a small force at work in the Elk Creek mine and are getting ready to open up in earnest in the spring.
    Deputy Sheriff Roy Ashpole went to Butte Falls on Wednesday and arrested William Coffman, the third one of the cattle rustlers, and he was taken before Judge Watkins and waived examination, and Thursday, after he had tried in vain to give bail for his appearance in court, he was committed to the custody of the sheriff and taken to Jacksonville to jail. Wednesday afternoon four men came to our town to appear as witnesses against the accused man, but that expense was avoided by the accused all waiving examination here.
    C. S. Hays of Cape Town, Wash., arrived at his father's in Central Point last Tuesday.
    Miss Hattie Cingcade, a daughter of David Cingcade and wife of this place, arrived the first of the week at the parental home. She has been spending several years in California, Mexico and Arizona.
    Mr. and Mrs. Grissom of Chimney Rock precinct have been visiting their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cingcade.
    Mr. Hoefft, Sr., called for dinner last Thursday on his way from Medford to his farm in Lake Creek country.
    Mr. Baldwin of Round Top, who sold his timber and homestead right to the P.&E. Railroad Company, came out and spent the night with us Wednesday. Also the superintendent of the schools, Mr. Ayres, spent Wednesday night with us.
    H. F. Brown was doing business with our merchants Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 3, 1912, page 7



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mrs. M. L. Daily started for Portland last Thursday to visit her mother. She expects to be gone two weeks. Her sister, Miss Hattie Weiss, is helping in the Model Variety Store and the telephone office during her absence, and this morning Mr. Daily asked me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that he had an assortment of men's working gloves at the Model Variety Store.--Adv.
    P. W. Healy, who owns a fine tract of land just below town, is planning to put in a pumping plant so as to be able to irrigate the land from Butte Creek.
    Henry Simon Daley came near getting seriously hurt last week by having a heavy crosscut saw fall on him, striking him on the head and wrist. Fortunately, it struck straight and simply made a smooth cut, the teeth going in without tearing the flesh.
    E. M. Ward and Frank Murphy were out last week soliciting for a farm journal and offering a number of premiums with it. They also took photos of the most of the buildings separately and of the entire town.
    Isaac Smith, wife and sister-in-law Miss Mae Skeen, of Siskiyou County, California, were pleasant callers one day last week on their way to visit his brother Aaron.
    Since I last wrote I have learned that Prof. P. H. Daily entertained his Bible class of 27 in Sunday school on Sunday evening, the 28th ult., at his house.
    Heath & Diamond recently purchased the products of one-eighth of an acre of onions from Ralph Tucker of Brownsboro, amounting to the neat little sum of about $100, and they are some of the finest specimens of onions I have seen for a long time, but the general reader knows that the Butte Creek country is noted for the production of onions.
    D. S. Clark of Medford spent the night with us last Friday. He is a real estate dealer and still boosts Medford and Rogue River Valley. He has great hopes for the future of the county.
    Mrs. R. C. Lawton and her mother, Mrs. V. Rowe, have returned from Oklahoma, where Mrs. Lawton has been visiting her sister and grandmother and superintending the publication of a new book she has been putting out and will soon have in the market.
    Steve Smith has returned from Eastern Oregon and is now visiting his brothers here.
    James Ringer has been doing some painting for Dr. W. W. P. Holt on outside buildings.
    Von der Hellen Brothers have had a store room put up back of their store.
    Mr. St. James of Medford was out last week putting the roof on a new house that Wm. von der Hellen is building on Hamlinton Avenue.
    H. A. Sprague, our lumber merchant, is having a new house put up for a family residence near Hamlinton Avenue.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Frank Brown of the firm of George Brown & Sons took dinner at the Sunnyside Sunday. Also George W. Wamsley and daughter, Miss Mabel, and Mr. Mike Sidley of Lost Creek took dinner with us.
    Miss Mae Lawrence of Gold Hill came in on the Pacific & Eastern on Sunday afternoon on her way to McLeod school district, but learned here that they were not to have any school there just now, so returned Monday morning to her home.
    George West and wife came to the Sunnyside Sunday night. He was on his way to the government reserve to cruise some of the timber, and Mrs. West will return to Medford Tuesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1912, page 7
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since my last T. Harvey has sold his property on Main Street in our town to Mr. N. Wolory, father-in-law of Grant Matthews, consideration $1400. There are two acres in the tract with a water right, as well as a good dwelling house and outbuildings.
    Mrs. V. Rowe has decided to locate among us, having purchased a lot on the corner of North Main and Hamlinton Avenue, and expects to build in the near future.
    E. B. Edwards, who has been stopping above Brownsboro this winter and been engaged building a stone building in Brownsboro for Messrs. Morey & Hefter, spent the night with us Monday on his way to Ashland.
    Eugene Scrable is building a new house in Eagle Heights. Eagle Heights is situated on the hill just above and southeast of Eagle Point.
    Von der Hellen brothers have finally located their old store building on a lot just opposite the town hall.
    Wm. von der Hellen has had his yard, on the old Ulrich place, plowed and leveled and is having a neat wire fence put around it. He is also having the old barn that stands on the place torn down to make room for neat family residences.
    G. W. Wamsley is reroofing the Catholic church.
    The members of the Baptist church have raised the money, $50, to pay for the extra lot the church building stands on.
    Mrs. Joseph Moomaw wishes me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that she is opening a fine assortment of millinery goods and that she will announce the opening day in the near future.--Adv.
    Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Callahan, who are interested in the Blue Ledge mine, were visiting Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen last Sunday.
    Freeman T. Newport, who has been afflicted with a felon on his thumb, has so far recovered the use of his hand so as to be able to go to work again. He is finishing up a building for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company near the depot. He has taken a room at the Sunnyside.
    Mike Sidley Jr. and Ivan Tyrrell of Lake Creek spent the night at the Sunnyside Tuesday night.
    Grover Cook and family of the Rancheria country, east of Butte Falls, came out last Tuesday and spent the night with us. They were on their way to Medford.
    The I.O.O.F. has arranged to organize a lodge here and has leased the upper story of the bank building for a lodge room for three years. Workmen are arranging the rooms for that purpose. They expect to organize about the first of March.
    John Newstrom of Lake Creek came out Monday on the Lake Creek stage, went to Medford, returning Tuesday evening, spent the night with us and Wednesday took the stage for home.
    W. W. Willits and daughter, Miss Inez, came out from their home, at Persist Monday, spent the night here and Tuesday morning went on to Medford. Miss Inez was on her way to Ashland.
    Our J.P. Hon. John Watkins is rounding [up] all voters he can to register.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 8, 1912, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Carl Hoefft and Henry Fry of Lake Creek were callers Wednesday for dinner and in the run of conversation Mr. Hoefft remarked that the Seventh Day Adventists represented by Elder Bruch and the missionary Baptists represented by Rev. Holmes of Medford were to have a debate on the points of difference between the two church organizations, but the main point of difference would be the question of which day to observe as the Christian Sabbath. The debate is to be had at Brownsboro in the course of the next three weeks. During the course of the meeting that has just closed the two ministers had some exchanges of opinion on the subject.
    Mr. Hoefft also told me of having a large steer attacked in his neighborhood by two large gray wolves and almost killing him, but he received help from other cattle and thus made his escape.
    There was a company of surveyors out Wednesday and Thursday surveying off the tract of land to be donated to the town for a park by Mr. Hamlinton of San Jose, Cal., the owner of a large tract of land adjacent to Eagle Point.
    Mr. Swihart of Derby came out Wednesday evening on the train, spent the night here, went on to Medford the next morning. He speaks very encouragingly of the prospect of this part of the country and predicts lively times this summer.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Timmie C. Dugan, February 8, 1912, a ten-pound daughter.
    Senator H. von der Hellen and his son-in-law, Mr. Evanston, were doing business among us Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, nee Cora Brown, of Medford, and her sister, Miss Sarah Griesen and son Frank of Portland came out Thursday to visit their brothers and sisters, Frank, Will, Royal and Merritt Brown and Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. Van Scoy.
    Carl Jackson, the meat market man of Butte Falls, Ira Tungate and Mr. Boughton came out from Butte Falls Thursday evening and the first two went on to Medford to play basketball with the Medford team Thursday night.
    J. F. Ditsworth and wife, Miss Hazel and Master Stewart Ditsworth and Mrs. D. F., son and daughter Lester and Ida Lee Lyell came in from Medford about 8 p.m. Thursday on their way to the Cascade Gorge. The Cascade Gorge is situated at the top of the old Flounce Rock grade, commonly known as the Hole in the Ground, a place where the water from a small mountain stream rushes over the precipice a distance of about 200 feet. Mr. Ditsworth has built a home on his place and is moving his family from Medford to their future home. Mr. Ditsworth has been living in Medford for the past year or more, so as to take advantage of the good schools there. He firmly believes in educating his children and as an evidence of that he has now five daughters who are or have been school teachers
    O. N. Nelson, one of the Jacksonville live insurance men, came out Thursday and spent two nights with us. He is looking after the interests of his companies in this section.
    Wm. Perry passed through town Friday morning on his way to his home near Butte Falls.
    It has been suggested to me to say that a man might do well here by opening a bakery here, as there is considerable money sent from here to Medford for breadstuffs.
    Mr. Kirshow, one of Medford's business men, was here for dinner Friday looking after the tombstone and monument business.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 12, 1912, page 4
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Last Saturday was a lively day in our town, and among the arrivals were Thomas Riley, Jr., Alex Betz, Nick Young, Timmie Dugan, Mr. Hitchcock, Frank Johnson, Mrs. Conover and son Fred, John Rader, Henry French, Grant Mathews and wife and Mrs. Mathews' mother, Mrs. N. Wolory. I met all of the above named persons in the course of about half an hour at Heath & Diamond's store, and if the other stores were doing business in the same ratio I feel that I am justified in saying that Saturday was a lively day among us.
    Since my last, Mr. T. Harvey has given possession of the property he sold last week and Mr. Wolory has moved into the place. Mrs. Barr has taken rooms with Mr. Jordan. Mr. and Mrs. R. C. Lawton have engaged and moved into a room over Brown & Son's store and other things are changing around quite lively.
    Last Saturday Mrs. Belle Smith and her daughter, Miss Ethel, accompanied by Prof. R. H. Swank, principal of the Gold Hill school, called at the Sunnyside for dinner and to visit our two daughters. Mrs. Howlett is still in Klamath Falls.
    E. M. Ward of Medford was a pleasant caller with his son. He had been here a week or so ago and had taken photos of our town in general and also views of the principal business and dwelling houses, "and has placed them on sale in the Model Variety Store." (Adv.)
    Died, February 9, 1912, at the residence of his son, Mr. Joseph Singleton, aged 64 years and some months. I have not been able to hear the particulars, but understand that he died very suddenly. He has been afflicted with Bright's disease.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 14, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. Porcel, one of the leading mechanics who has been working on the Prospect power plant, came out on the Prospect-Eagle Point stage Saturday evening and went on to Medford Sunday morning.
    Among the old souvenirs that James Ringer has is a letter written by his grandfather to his father, dated April 3, 1843, and a tax receipt dated 1845. The writing is just as plain now as though it had been done but a short time ago.
    Last Thursday Herbert Grissom, living near Climax, undertook to ride a cow and in the windup he came out second best, as when he got off the cow he landed against the side of a barn and received a severe cut on the forehead, besides having his face badly scratched. He was about three miles from home at the time with a brother feeding the sheep when the accident occurred, and was unconscious for nearly an hour. His brother started for home and phoned for Dr. Holt to dress the wound. On Sunday he and his brother, William, came out to see the doctor and Herbert reported he was all right, but the next time he wants to ride he will try something else besides a cow.
    A week ago last Sunday Dr. Holt and his brother-in-law, Mr. Purdy, who are "batching" now while Mrs. Dr. Holt is away on a visit, gave a dinner and entertained Mr. and Mrs. Heath and Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre, and they report having had a very fine dinner and an enjoyable time.
    Rev. F. C. Parker, general missionary of the state for the Missionary Baptists, was with us last Sunday, both morning and evening, and in the afternoon preached in Brownsboro. The two sermons he preached here were of the old Bible kind and some of his hearers thought that he was a Methodist, and I am glad to note that the preachers of the different denominations are dropping some of their old sectarian ideas and preaching straight gospel. He had a good-sized audience in the forenoon and in the evening he had the church house full. It will be some time before all of the people forget all that he said in those two sermons.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    W. E. Van Vactor, sometimes engineer on the Pacific & Eastern railroad, and sometimes night watchman, returned the first of the week from San Francisco, Cal., where he had been to attend the funeral of his brother, who died in Michigan a short time ago, and to visit his mother and sister. He brought with him some fine photos of the scenes on the fairgrounds for the Panama Pacific Exposition to be held in 1915. He also brought considerable literature setting forth the advantage of the dollar-by-dollar plan for visiting the city at that time. He is very enthusiastic over the prospect.
    Mr. and Mrs. I. C. Moore of Ashland came in on the car Monday evening, on his way to his farm on Elk Creek, expecting to meet the Eagle Point-Prospect stage here Tuesday morning, but when he reached here learned that the stage leaves on here on Monday, Wednesday and Friday, so they had to stop over Tuesday, but they seemed to pass away the time nicely looking over our town and noting the marked changes for the better, he taking the stage Wednesday morning and Mrs. Moore returning to Ashland, as they only expected to come as far as Eagle Point with him.
    Jud Edsall and Charley Thomas, who have been to Nevada to look up a contract to do heavy hauling, as they each have heavy teams and wagon, returned Tuesday night, coming out from Medford in a livery rig. Mr. Edsall reports times remarkably dull there as the mining business is shut down on account of the extreme cold weather, as the power plant, furnishing the electric power, is blocked with ice.
    S. B. Spiker, one of our progressive citizens, informs me that he has drawn the plans for a two-story brick to be erected by our meat market man, Artie Nichols, and his uncle, Thomas E. Nichols, the building to be used for a meat market, cold storage plant, etc. It is to be located near the town hall opposite the new blacksmith shop.
    Benj. Fredenburg, Carl Jackson and Howard Boughton of Butte Falls were passengers on the cars for their homes Tuesday morning. And Mr. Tungate and wife of Jacksonville also came out to visit Mrs. Tungate's brother-in-law, John Watkins, and family. John M. Allen of Derby came out on the evening train Tuesday evening and went on up home that night on horseback.
    Dr. Wm. W. P. Holt, our local M.D., informs me that Mrs. Lee Bradshaw of Brownsboro has had to have a surgical operation performed, Dr. Holt doing the work assisted by two professional nurses; one of them was Miss Earhart and the other the doctor had forgotten her name, and reports that Mrs. Bradshaw is getting along nicely.
    George Nichols Jr. spent the night with us Tuesday. He was on business with L. E. Smith.
    G. W. Ager, one of our county school superintendents, came out Monday night, and on Tuesday spent the day visiting our school. He reported confidentially that our school was in a fine condition considering the manner the teachers were handicapped, that the principal, P. H. Daily, had his room packed full and had more to do than any one man can do and do it right, that in the intermediate department, Miss Morris' room, she had her hands full but was getting along as well as could be expected under such crowded conditions, and that in the primary department, Mrs. P. H. Daily's room, every one of the little folk were as busy as little ants, that she had the faculty of keeping everything moving, but that we need another good teacher. On Wednesday he visited the Reese Creek school and reports that Mrs. Edwards, the teacher, has her hands full with a good-sized school, but that she labors under some difficulty on account of her surroundings, but she is full of energy and keeps everything moving.
    Yesterday, the 14th inst., I was called upon to attend the funeral of Joseph Singleton, who passed away on the 9th inst. The deceased was born in Woodplumpton, Lancashire, England, August 9, 1848. He leaves a wife, three sons and one daughter. He was a member of the Protestant Episcopal Church. The funeral services were conducted at the family residence and the remains interred in the Central Point Cemetery. The remains were kept awaiting the arrival of a son from Los Angeles, Cal.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 17, 1912, page 6



TABLE ROCK ITEMS.
    While the Middle West is in the grip of winter, the farmers of Table Rock are plowing for corn in their shirt sleeves.
    S. C. Collins contemplates planting 10 acres to onions.
    Emmett Nealon and Frank DeFord are making may substantial improvements on the Ray place.
    Lee Vincent and son Ed are driving a well for J. H. Lydiard.
    E. W. Carlton is returning home from the East by way of the Isthmus and incidentally will see the big canal.
    C. O. Dickey brought out a large incubator of standard make yesterday, and will get two or three more if the one he has proves satisfactory.
    Mr. Connor is having some unique stonework done on his place.
    Professor Henry, supervisor of public schools for this district, gave an interesting and instructive lecture at Table Rock school on Wednesday evening.
    Rev. R. B. Schoun of Central Point conducted services at Table Rock Sunday afternoon.
    Miss Mae Nealon, who has been at Corvallis attending school, has returned to her home at Table Rock.
    Miss Eva Hall, who is teaching near Trail, spent Saturday and Sunday with her parents at Table Rock.
    A good deal of merchandise and farm machinery is coming into this country from the big mail order houses. It is up to our local merchants.
    The truth about that "diamond" picked up on the desert will be announced later.
    The people of the north side are watching the game being pulled off by way of resignations and appointments. It is easy to guess which shell the pea is under. There will be open season for candidates about the 11th of next November.
    Our general and enterprising merchant, Mr. Hauptman, reports business good.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 19, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Miss Mamie Wright, daughter of Mrs. Ringer of this place, is engaged in teaching school on Elk Creek.
    T. F. Hutchason of Medford, one of our live insurance men and a regular booster for our valley, was out and spent Friday night with us. He is working in the interest of the dollar-by-dollar plan to have people attend the Pacific-Panama Exposition in San Francisco, Cal., in 1915.
    The masque ball given by Mr. Spiker in his new hall on the 14th was quite a success and those who attended report that they had a fine time and good music.
    There is some excitement among some of the leading ones in our town over the question of moving the county seat. As has been stated in the Mail Tribune, the sheriff's office is entirely too small for the transaction of business and that room has had to be provided in the court room on the second floor for collection of taxes. It is generally understood all over the county that we will have to have a new court house in the very near future. Some of us believe that Eagle Point is the coming business center of Rogue River Valley, and the fact that Eagle Point will be the division point on the railroad when the P.&E. and Oregon Trunk become united, and with our immense farming country around us, as well as the mining interests; the fact that the town of Eagle Point is only about two miles from the geographical center of the country; with our constantly increasing population, for we are now planning to build another school house to meet the demand, and everything taken into account, we think that we have a good prospect to get the county seat located here. We already have two county commissioners in our precinct and the county judge is largely interested in the building of Eagle Point. We think that our prospect is very good for the change.
    Mr. Stought, the foreman of the bridge gang for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company, came in from Butte Falls and conditionally engaged a room Friday, but on account of the heavy rains and the rise in the waters of the creek he was compelled to spend the night at the railroad bridge to keep the drift[wood] from lodging against it and carrying it away. The company had the engine go from here and they used it drawing the drift away from the bridge. The water was higher than it has been for several years.
    Oscar Wright, son of our railroad agent, accompanied by his wife, returned from a visit in California last Tuesday.
    Cephno [sic] Moorman and wife came up from Josephine County to visit her people and his sisters and their families.
    Mrs. M. L. Daily of the Model Variety Store, who has been visiting relatives in the Willamette Valley, returned Wednesday and they wish me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that they have "just received a new line of ladies' spring underwear, also misses' and ladies plain and fancy hose at the Model Variety Store." (Adv.)
    Speaking of the Model Variety Store, I see that they have Mrs. R. C. Lawton's new and latest book, The Maid of the Whispering Hills, by Virgie E. Roe. The authoress is one of our town's women and there has been such a demand for the book that Mr. Daily had to wait until the second edition was published. Mrs. Lawton is one of those fascinating writers that get the reader interested at once and anxious to see what is coming next.
    Bert W. Reed, Elmer Spencer and John Winningham came in Friday night about 7:30 o'clock, wet, tired and hungry, but finding a good fire at the Sunnyside they soon were in their normal condition and we spent the rest of the evening very pleasantly.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 20, 1912, page 4
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    G. H. Tranna, the man who is superintending the water system of Medford, called Monday afternoon at the Sunnyside for dinner. He had just returned from the intake of the Medford water pipes and reported that everything was all right again; that some drift had lodged so as to endanger the intake and that the man in charge had shut off the water until the debris could be removed but that everything was all right at that time.
    It is now definitely understood that Artie Nichols and his uncle, Thomas E. Nichols, will build a two-story brick on the lots south of the town hall near the old county road, 60x47 feet, and that Heath & Diamond have contracted for one of the rooms, 20x60, with an addition of sixteen feet on their part of the building for a storehouse, thus making their part of building 20x76 feet. The other part of the lower story will be used as a meat market and cold storage room, while the upper part will be used as a tenement house for roomers. They expect to begin work on the building in a few days and have it ready for use by June 1. The store building now occupied by Heath & Diamond is entirely too small for their business, and the present meat shop used by Nichols, Jackson & Co. being altogether too small for their business.
    Miss Hattie Weiss, sister of Mrs. M. L. Daily, who has been stopping at the Model Variety Store during her sister's absence, started home today (Wednesday).
    G. M. Fountain of Klamath Falls is here visiting his cousins, M. L. and P. H. Daily.
    The workmen have about completed the room over the First State Bank, and the I.O.O.F. expect to organize their lodge here next Tuesday, February 27. They expect to organize a good strong lodge, as there is quite a number of old members who will go into the organization and several have expressed a desire to take the degrees. They are expecting to have with them members from all of the surrounding towns and Grand Master Bowersox of the state lodge with them, and of course are looking for a large crowd of people here that night.
    Mrs. Roe tells me that she has changed her mind about building on the north side of the creek and thinks of building on a lot near the wagon bridge and turn her attention to raising fancy poultry.
    The city dads have had Lawyer Neff of Medford draw up a charter for our town, and it was read Tuesday night in the town hall and will be read again tonight, and then it will be submitted to the people for approval.
    When I was in Medford Tuesday I learned that the railroad bridge across Butte Creek was washed out and I wish to say that I rode over it twice Tuesday and found it all intact. We have to go away from home to learn the news.
    John Singleton of Los Angeles, and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Singleton, of Eagle Point, were passengers on the train Tuesday for Medford.
    Miss Hattie Cingcade, who has been visiting friends in Ashland, returned to the home of her parents in Eagle Point Tuesday, and George Nichols, Jr., was also a passenger out from Medford.
    T. Harvey, who sold out a short time ago, started for California the first of the week.
    A. H. Vitzthrom and D. M. Reed came out from the Prospect plant Tuesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside on their way to Medford. They have been engaged at carpenter work on the plant. They report that everything is working nicely up there.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    R. A. Newland and his son Wilbur came out from the Edsall place, where Mr. Newlands has been spending the winter, being on his way to Medford, the rest of his family having gone on the train. He brought his car along with him, for he says that he don't know how a family of six can live without a car.
    Prof. Charles E. Johnson came out Friday afternoon to do some trading with our merchants, returning to his homestead. He has a contract to teach school in the Dardanelles district for nine months.
    The dance given by the ladies of Eagle Point last Thursday night is said to have been quite good, but the ladies complain that there were too many there for comfort, although Spikers hall is about 40x80 feet.
    Mr. John Edsall of Phoenix came over last week and spent a part of his time visiting Wm. Taylor and a part of the time at the Sunnyside. He is thinking of coming here to live.
    Mrs. Howlett returned last Saturday morning from her visit to Klamath Falls, having spent three weeks in Klamath Falls and one week visiting friends in Ashland.
    Harry Carlton and wife came out from their farm north of Medford, to attend the dance and spent a day or two with Mrs. Carlton's brothers and sisters, the Brown brothers, Mrs. S. B. Holmes and Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy.
    Ed Wolfer tells me that he has the job of plumbing the new house that Mr. Sprague, our lumberman, is having built. At this writing they are putting on the roof.
    Mr. Croff, who has been teaming on the road between here and Prospect on the river road, had the misfortune to have one of his horses drowned in Rogue River last Saturday. He was overtaken by the Eagle Point-Prospect stage and had to pull out of their road a little to let the stage pass and just after the stage passed he got into a mud hole with his horses and had to unhitch them and as one of them attempted to get up in his struggling he fell over the bank and rolled into the river and drowned in spite of all that could be done. It works quite a hardship on Mr. Croff, as he depends on that kind of work to make a living.
    Mrs. George West came out from Medford last Saturday with Mrs. Howlett and spent the night, returning Sunday evening.
    Roy Willits is laying off now for a while and Mr. Ommell is driving the stage in his place.
    Messrs. Newport and Larkin Reynolds, who have been doing carpenter work for the P.&E. Railroad at Butte Falls, returned last week to the Sunnyside for a few days and have been working on the railroad bridge.
    Mr. and Mrs. Stought, their son Fletcher Stought and Miss Ora, of Jacksonville, came out and took dinner at the Sunnyside last Sunday. Mr. Stought, Sr., is the boss of the bridge gang for the P.&E. Railroad Company, while his son is a druggist in Jacksonville. They were accompanied by Mr. Wood, the timekeeper for the P.&E. Railroad.
    Our Sunday school is growing in size and interest. Last Sunday there were 93 in attendance and at the close of the school Rev. Lamar gave the children an interesting talk on the subject of the traps set for the young, and dwelt particularly on the subject of drinking and card playing. After Sunday school he preached a sermon on the text "Neverless," rather a novel subject.
    Next Sunday Rev. Lee will preach here at 11 o'clock a.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 1, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    C. L. Carlton and wife of Jamestown, N.J., is visiting E. L. Warnstorff for a short time, intending to locate among us. Mr. Warnitorff came among us a few months ago and bought property, built on the land and is now trying to get his friend to follow his example. He is interested in the advancement of Eagle Point and vicinity.
    John Owens of Dry Creek and Jerry Bishop of Phoenix called for dinner last Tuesday on business with Jud E. Edsall.
    Jud Edsall has been moving a house for Gus Rosenberg, the later putting it on the lots he purchased of A. J. Daley.
    Dr. W. H. Nowdring came out Tuesday morning intending to take the train for Medford but was just one minute too late so spent the day with your correspondent taking the afternoon train. He was going out east of Medford to plant a lot of trees on his farm there.
    Mayor Wm. von der Hellen has had a beautiful fence put around his yard on the old Ulrich place and is planning to have a fine lawn. He is a stayer.
    Tuesday evening was quite a busy time around here. Mr. J. C. Moore and Mr. Lake of Eugene drove in just at night. Mr. Lake is an old timber cruiser and has been up in the Elk Creek region cruising timber and Mr. Moore was on his way from his farm on Elk Creek to his home in Ashland, and Mr. Lake was on his way to Medford. A. D. Moore of Upper Elk Creek was also a guest. A. few minutes later the Prospect-Eagle Point stage drove up with Miss Enyart and Mrs. Colwell. They have been stopping up on Rogue River, Mrs. Enyart at her father's farm, and Mrs. Colwell has been in the neighborhood of Prospect during the winter. They both took the P.&E. car for Medford Wednesday morning. About the time that Mrs. Howlett was ready to announce supper the visiting Oddfellows began to come in and in the first bunch were twenty-nine, then seven, then three, then they came single and double until I heard Mrs. Howlett say as the stage driver sat down to the table that he was the sixty-sixth that had eaten supper. Why, they were as thick as flies around a molasses barrel.
    It is not necessary for me to try to give a write-up of what was done, as that has already gone to the public, but I must add there there were at least three hundred visitors here that night. At midnight, after the lodge of I.O.O.F. was organized and the officers installed, supper was announced to be given in Spikers hall. The Ladies' Improvement Club gave the supper, the victuals being donated by the families, and when they wanted a place to serve supper Mr. Spiker just threw the doors open and told the ladies to take possession and they did, to the entire satisfaction of all who partook of the repast. One man remarked that he had attended a great many banquets in his life but that he had never attended any that would compare with that one. Medford please take notice! The lodge as it now stands numbers thirty-six members. A good strong lodge for a small place like Eagle Point. There were members from all over the county in attendance here that night.
    The workmen have commenced work on the new brick building for Artie and Thomas E. Nichols. Mr. S. B. Spiker has the contract for putting up the building and the Medford Brick Building Company have a subcontract for the brick work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 2, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Ray Ashpole has been hauling gravel from where the builders of Nichols & Nichols' new brick block is going up, in front of his billiard room, filing up an ugly mud hole and making the place more attractive.
    Mrs. Lon Moomaw wishes me to say "that she will have her grand opening of her new millinery goods on Thursday, the 7th inst." (Ad.)
    Mrs. Barrett of Butte Falls, one of the teachers of the Butte Falls school, came out Friday with her little baby girl to have Dr. Holt treat her little arm. The child fell and struck on the elbow and the bruise seems to have injured it so that she is unable to use it.
    Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mrs. Wm. Brown, Mrs. Van Scoy, Mrs. F. Pelouze, Mrs. J. Moomaw, Mr. Wm. von der Hellen and wife went to Medford on the evening of the 29th to see and hear the noted Madame Schumann-Heink, and of course they returned sounding her praise.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Henry Meyers of Lake Creek, Feb. 27, a seven-pound girl, so Dr. Holt reports.
    Mrs. Roe, mother of our townswoman, the authoress, is building her a residence on a lot she purchased of S. B. Holmes, as she could not get word from Mr. Hamilton with regard to the lot she wanted on the south side of the creek. The house is 20x22 feet, bungalow style.
    I started out from home this Saturday afternoon, in search of items for the Eaglets and about the first man I met was J. A. Howard, who lives on the road from here to the ferry. He had been to Medford and was on his way home, then crossing the street. I saw Prof. and H. Daily and Wm. Knighton going with G. W. Owings into his, Owings', store so I followed them and found Mr. Daily with his books ready to assess the property in our town, he having been appointed deputy assessor for this neighborhood. Passing from there I met at West Childreth's blacksmith shop with A. H. Peachey of Ashland, having his horses shod and he told me that his daughter, Miss Maud, who is teaching school in Brownsboro, had come down, that he and his wife and Maud were guests of Mr. and Mrs. George Daley, that they were going Sunday afternoon to Brownsboro with their daughter, and would visit her school there Monday, and while in that region would look after his stock and ranch on Yankee Creek.
    While there I also met W. W Taylor, Henry French, Jimmie Dugan, J. A. Hovey, Charles Thomas, H. B. Tronson, the apple king, and George Fisher and Mr. Childreth was trying to wait on all of them. Just as I was leaving there Mrs. Mayhorn passed. She had been to Brown & Sons' store and had her hands full of goods. Passing on down the street I found that Mr. Spiker, the contractor for Nichols' new building had a gang of men at work laying foundation for the building with concrete and just pushing the work right along. From there on down I met in one bunch four men whom I didn't know--in fact we are getting a number in our town now that I don't know Then I passed two of the Stowell men passing on down to Brown & Sons' store, found quite a number there buying goods and loading into their rigs. Went on across the street to von der Hellen Bros.' and found them all as busy as ants. There I met county commissioner Frank Brown and he told me that he had been up on the road to Hole-in-the-Ground at head of the grade to look over the roads and found them better than he had expected; said that the new part of the road was very soft yet on account of it being new but the most of the road was very good considering.
    While I was there at von der Hellen Bros.' store Messrs. Halstrom & Berquist's team drove up and put on a part of a load of wire fencing.
    Mrs. Chauncey Florey came out Saturday from Jacksonville to visit her husband's parents. She expects her husband tonight or Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 6, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    R. C. Lawton and E. Hurt have completed the job of moving two houses for Fred Pelouze, on his farm about three miles above town and are now working on Mrs. Lawton's house on Eagle Heights. Mr. Hurt has decided to have the Daily Mail Tribune sent to him so that he can keep posted on the current events of the day.
    George W. Allen, one of the carpenters who worked on the buildings here last summer, has come out and has taken charge of the work of building the big brick store building for Nichols & Nichols during the absence of Mr. Spiker who has the contract for the building. Mr. Spiker is at this writing engaged on a cottage building in Medford that he has a contract to build.
    A. T. Pool, one of the rangers, has just come in from the Trail Creek country in company with George West. Mr. West went on to Medford to his home while Mr. Pool stopped at the Sunnyside.
    Sunday morning your correspondent drove to the Antioch school house to attend church, where he met Rev. M. C. Davis, and after a few minutes consultation it was decided I was to preach, which I did to a good and attentive congregation after Sunday school. The Sunday school there is well attended and the superintendent, Mr. E. H. Thombrue, proves to be the right man in the right place as he is a fine singer and knows just how to interest the young folks. After preaching we went to Agate, where Rev. Davis preached to a congregation of about forty or more; then to Table Rock. He preached again at night, spending the night with the family of Mr. W. T. Deford. They are both regular Oregonians, having been born in this state and know just how to entertain strangers and make them feel at home. The next day we went to Sams Valley, where Rev. Davis had an appointment to preach at the residence of Mr. Holtz. There was a nice little interested audience, and at the close of the services Mr. Cooper, a citizen of Moonville, kindly offered the use of his hall for a meeting place which offer was gratefully accepted and the next time, the Monday after the first Sunday in April, Rev. Davis will hold services in the hall. Leaving there Monday morning we took across the valley to Eagle Point via the Dodge-French bridge. During my rounds I was always on the lookout for items of interest for the readers of the Mail Tribune.
    I noticed as I was jogging along that there had been quite a large tract of land on the desert that has been plowed and set to fruit; also a large tract that was in the course of preparation for fruit; also along the route that I traveled that there had been a large amount of land put to fruit since my last trip over there. I also noticed that there is considerable substantial improvement in the line of building and especially in the line of fencing and the general appearance of things would indicate that the farmers in that section were on the progressive order.
    When I reached home I found Mr. J. F. Cole and George W. Gelwicks, who were at the Sunnyside gathering data to write the Centennial History of Oregon and taking subscriptions for the new work. They were meeting with good success in their undertaking.
    I also found J. W. Meyers, the fruit tree inspector who was looking out for the microbes, etc., in his line. Also Mike Sidley, who was here looking after the interests of the Catholic Church in this section. I also learned that there were three young men who came out Sunday morning to exhibit their ability to ride outlaw horses, and I understand that one of the young men got his face somewhat cut in the performance while trying to hold one of the horses. Just as the rider attempted to get into the saddle the horse gave a lunge and dragged him, and Dr. Holt said he was either kicked or fell on something sharp so as to cut his lip and chin, so that he was unconscious for some minutes. Some say that the man that tried to ride was thrown off and some say that he did not get into the saddle and jumped off, but at any rate he did not ride any more as his ankle was badly hurt. This ended the sport for that day.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 8, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The finishers are at work on Wm. von der Hellen's new building getting it ready for our druggist, Mr. A. H. Weber, to move into.
    Last Tuesday evening the 5th inst. Mr. Spiker, the contractor, came rushing into town on a spanking brand new motorcycle and either he or his motor attracted as much attention as a band of monkeys, but he has to have it so that he can visit the different places where he has work going on. Mr. Allen, his foreman here, had to lay off Saturday afternoon on account of being disappointed in getting lumber, but expects to have it on hand by Monday morning. At this writing the men are unloading a car of brick and the work will be pushed along as fast as possible.
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune was Tuesday evening just as I arrived from Sams Valley. On Wednesday morning Rev. M. C. Davis and myself started for Elk Creek to conduct religious services, going via the Dodge-French bridge on account of the condition of the roads between here and the ferry, and while Mr. Davis was driving along I was taking items for the Mail Tribune. We found the roads on the west side of the river anything but good, although I have seen them much worse, but I noticed that the people are changing the road in a great many places and by that means straightening the roads. Also tearing away the old rail and brush fences and replacing them with woven wire fence; also taking in large tracts of land that heretofore have been lying out in the commons. While on the way we met Messrs. Jack Hustin and Austin Green. Coming out to Eagle Point, Mr. Green is the man, a grandson of J. J. Frazer, who accidentally shot off the most of the toes of one of his feet, and later had to go to the Medford hospital for treatment and while there had a stroke of paralysis in one of his legs so that for a long time he was unable to walk but he has so far recovered as to be able to walk around a little. He is at present stopping with his grandparents. As we passed through Trail I noticed that Mrs. Middlebusher has been making some substantial improvements around her hotel and store. I also learned that there is a joint stock company being formed in that neighborhood to open up a new store. There are eight shares of twenty-five dollars each, making a total of two hundred dollars to be invested in the concern. They have rented the old dance hall of Mr. Allen and expect to open up on the 11th inst. Mr. Dennis will be the business manager. They expect in the near future to have the capital increased so as to be able to handle all kinds of goods.
    Passing on up Elk Creek we found Mr. McCalahan, the owner of the saw mill, at work putting in rollers in his mill and had the engine painted. He has men cutting logs and getting everything ready to have a good summer's run. Passing on we stopped with Mr. Ed Pence and after partaking of a good supper we went to the school house where we found everyone in a radius of three miles except three, and they had not heard that there was to be preaching. The next day we visited some of the families and at night I preached to about the same audience.
    Friday morning we started for home, but were held up by Dave Pence. He had put in a three-mile stretch of wire so as to have a phone in his house and had attached his wire to the Prospect line instead of the Trail and could not talk with Trail, but Mr. Davis soon discovered the trouble and Mr. Pence went down to the connection and changed the wire, but put it on the other Prospect wire and did not discover his mistake until he came home. After dinner he had to take Miss Thomas of Medford up to McLeod where she is to commence to teach school Monday, the 11th, and on the way stopped to put his wire on the right line, and now he can talk to his friends along the line.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 12, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    There is another dwelling house in course of construction in our little town. James Ringer is putting up a neat little bungalow on his lots in the Ulrich addition.
    I omitted to state in my last that among the many farmers who were in our town Saturday were Charles Siefield and wife of Lake Creek, Mrs. Singleton and daughter, F. J. Ayres and daughter, Miss Rosa, the latter at present assisting at the Sunnyside.
    Grandma Heckathorn started last Saturday for Woodville to visit her daughters, Mrs. Meagley and Mrs. Simpkins.
    Sunday was quite a day at the Sunnyside, as there seemed to be a kind of concerted movement on the part of some of our townspeople, as there were Mr. and Mrs. Frank Salter, one of our hardware merchants; Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Weber, our pharmacist; Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Brown, one of our merchants; G. H. Wamsley and daughter Miss Mabel; Mr. and Mrs. Bolt, general manager of the Pacific & Eastern Railway; Dr. Wm. W. P. Holt and brother-in-law, Mr. Purdy; Mr. Wood, timekeeper for the P.&E. Railway, besides quite a number of strangers who just came in for a good dinner, and they all seemed to enjoy themselves very much and all threatened to come back again in the near future. I tell you Mr. Editor it makes one feel that life is worth living to see such cheerfulness and brotherly love among neighbors as was manifested here last Sunday.
    There was a young man came out last Sunday to try his fortune riding bucking horses, but there didn't seem to be anyone who had unruly horses that cared to have them ridden that way, so he had to take his saddle back to Medford again without using it.
    George West and Wm. Fruit, two forest rangers, came out from Medford Sunday evening on the P.&E. cars, spent the night at the Sunnyside and took the Trail stage Monday morning for the big timber.
    Wm. Spencer came out Monday evening to look after a job of carpenter work on some one of the new buildings, but found that he was most too early in the season, as there will be but little doing in the line of carpenter work until the first story of the big brick that is going up is completed and then the carpenters will be ready to go to work. Mr. Spencer said that by that time he could get quite a number of jobs, and it is apparent that there will be considerable work in all branches of mechanical work here this summer.
    Everett Culbertson of Lake Creek took a room at the Sunnyside Sunday evening. He is working for Mr. Heak, one of our prosperous farmers just above town.
    Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Allen surprised the people of the Sunnyside last Sunday evening by putting in an appearance, although Mr. Allen has been a regular boarder here for some time, but he excused himself Saturday and went to Medford on the ground that he did not have the lumber to do the work that was to be done, so went to Medford and was married to Eveline Stone of Ashland in Medford by the justice of the peace Mr. Taylor, and they are now planning to live in this section for the summer at least. Their many friends are tendering their congratulations.
    F. M. Findley, an insurance agent of Medford, is here with us for a few days looking over the situation with an eye to business. Also Mr. Paul Opitz, a timber specialist of Medford, was a guest among us Tuesday.
    Elmer Spencer and B. Reed of Dudley spent the night with us on their way to their home in the hills.
    Our school board met Monday night and among other things in the line of business entered into contracts with W. L. Suddarth and wife to act as principal and intermediate, and Miss Mamie Wright as primary teacher in our school. Mr. and Mrs. Suddarth are from Josephine County, but Miss Mamie Wright has been a resident of this neighborhood for several years, and while I was on Elk Creek I had the pleasure of visiting her school there, where she has a nice little school and a host of warm friends not only in the school room but among the patrons.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 14, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    G. W. Nickell of Seattle, Wash., has a carload of household goods, horses, wagons, etc., come in on the P.&E. Railway the first of the week and has the goods stored until he can haul them to his future home on Salt Creek, near Lake Creek. Mr. Nickell is a cousin of the Walsh boys, who have been raised in this country. He has bought off the homestead right of a man by the name of Grigsby.
    Miss Emma Stewart and Mrs. N. R. Wiley of Seattle were among us Wednesday of the last week soliciting subscriptions. They visited every family in our town, but found some of the housewives away from home, as that was the day the aid society meets and they were away on that account.
    C. E. Reed of Seattle has had a lot of household goods shipped out here on the P.&E. and stored them in the Sunnyside warerooms until he can get them hauled to his homestead on Osborne Creek. He has to reroof his house before he takes his family into it. They are now in Medford.
    The Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company is unloading a large steel bridge at our depot onto another car and it is supposed that it is designed for the new crossing of Butte Creek, as it is thought that the company intends to make a change in the route and cut out the big curve they have to make north of the present crossing of Butte Creek and save quite a distance in travel, as well as do away with the old wooden structure that they have in use at this time.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, our banker, came over and took supper at the Sunnyside last Thursday evening. He reports his bank in a flourishing condition and business quite lively.
    M. L. Daily, proprietor of the Model Variety Store and our phone man, tells me that there is to be a new line connected with our central office from up on Rogue River, on the east side, and that there will be eighteen phones connected, which will enable us to talk all along the line up the river.
    Mrs. Newport, wife of one of the bridge carpenters on the P.&E., came into the Sunnyside Friday afternoon to meet her husband, who is boarding there.
    Miss Dottie Harnish, one of our promising young misses, was purchasing some jewelry at the Model Variety Store Friday last.
    I see that M. L. Daily and wife have a new cash register in their store and Mert says that business is quite lively and constantly looking up.
    County commissioner James Owens came over to our town last Friday to bring his father so he could register as a voter.
    Jud E. Edsall made a trip to Central Point Thursday and Friday went to Medford.
    There is a quantity of fruit trees being taken out from here and loads of spray dope.
    Brown brothers are having the show windows in their new store building rearranged, greatly improving their appearance.
    The most of the material is on the ground for the big brick building that is going up and the masons will commence laying brick Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 19, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    One of the remarkable incidents that I heard of while on my recent trip to the Trail and Elk Creek country that I had overlooked in making my report was that a lady teacher who had passed the necessary examination and secured her certificate applied for a position as teacher in the Trail school district and on receipt of her application one of the directors notified her that before the board would act on her application she would have to appear in person and be examined by him, which she did, at an additional expense of not less than $5 or $6, but she got the school all right.
    Mrs. George Forg and her little daughter Velma came down from Grants Pass last Friday evening, where they had been to see Dr. Findley and have the little girl treated for deafness. They were met here the following day by her husband and went to their home on Rogue River below Trail.
    George Wehman, a recent arrival from Portland, has opened a harness repair shop in the rear of the Eagle Point hardware store and taken a room at the Sunnyside. He expects to have a new stock in a few days and will do all kinds of harness work.
    F. L. Putman of Ashland came in Saturday evening with a load of household goods for Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Allen. They have gone to housekeeping in a tent adjoining the Sunnyside. The same evening Miss Evans, a daughter of Mrs. Allen, came in and is visiting them for a few days.
    Last Saturday, March 16, being my 80th birthday, was quite a noted day at the Sunnyside. For a few days prior invitations had been sent out to the following persons to come in and take dinner and help to celebrate that day: Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer and grandson, Austin Green, Mr.. and Mrs. John Ashpole, Mr. and Mrs. D. Cingcade, Mr. and Mrs. James Jordan, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Knighton, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, our postmaster; G. H. Wamsley, Mrs. A. W. Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daley and Mrs. E. Jonas. They all came except Mr. and Mrs. Daley, Mr. Nichols and Mr. and Mrs. Florey. The first were detained on account of sickness and Mr. and Mrs. Florey on account of the post office business. Those who were invited were all old neighbors of advanced age except one and he was visiting his grandparents and a special friend and so the rule to invite none except the older ones was excepted in that one instance. Mrs. Howlett had prepared dinner expressly for the occasion and we all ate to our hearts' content. The average ages of the men present, not counting our regular boarders, was 71 years, and the average age of the women was 62 years, so you see that we had a regular old people's party. The old ladies could not entertain the thought of sitting and holding their hands, no sir, they must be doing something, so they rustled a set of quilting frames, hunted around and found the necessary material to put in a quilt and went to work, at least some of them did. They could not find thimbles enough for all nine of them but the rest amused themselves looking at the pictures, etc., and all voted that they had had a fine time and wished me many returns of the 16th day of March. Quite a number of the ladies remembered me with nice little tokens of friendship and two of them actually took hold of me--my wife said that they put their arms around my neck--and pinned a beautiful stickpin in my necktie. And when we parted we all expressed the hope that we may all meet again on the 16th of March, 1913.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 22, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Jud Edsall and Charley Thomas returned from a trip to Eugene the middle of the week.
    A. G. Bishop and wife were doing business with our merchants the first of the week and, by the way of a change, came over and took dinner at the Sunnyside. Mr. Bishop is the owner of the Greenwood orchard, on Rogue River, near the mouth of Butte Creek. He has recently finished a beautiful bungalow on his farm.
    Mrs. Jess Spencer, the postmaster of Dudley, came out last Monday on the P.&E., spent the night with us, went to Medford the next day and there met her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Martin Spencer, who was in her return trip from a visit to her old home in Pennsylvania. While in the East she had a fine son born, and Grandma assured me that it being their first grandchild that they were extra fond of it. It is a fine specimen of a baby.
    Since my last report there has been some more real estate changing hands. S. B. Holmes tells me that he has sold three lots on Cameron Avenue to a man by the name of DeWolfe, consideration $900, and F. L. Heath, of the firm of Heath and Diamond, two of our merchants, has sold a lot joining the Eagle Point hardware store to Fred Salter.
    J. W. Hancock and wife, grandparents of our banker's wife, Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, is here from Illinois, visiting their grandchildren. Mr. Hancock seems to be very much pleased with the appearance of our little town.
    Mrs. J. L. Gardner of Prospect came in Tuesday afternoon on the P.&E. and spent the night with us. She was accompanied by her little nephew. She had been summoned to Idaho on account of the death of her sister, and at her request brought her little nephew home with her. They took the stage for Prospect Wednesday morning.
    Last Saturday Miss Maud Peachey of Ashland, who has been teaching school at Brownsboro, came out on the Eagle Point-Lake Creek stage and spent Saturday and Sunday nights with George W. Daley and Mrs. Howlett. She closed her school last Friday, March 15.
    Among other things our town council did last Saturday night was to pass an ordinance that all kinds of stock and fowls must be kept off the streets and alleys of our town, and it was also decided that it would be unlawful for anyone to ride a bucking horse inside of the corporate limits. There was quite a crowd came in from the neighborhood north of here last Sunday with their horses, but there was no riding done, and I hope that the time is not far distant when our merchants will either voluntarily or by law close their places of business on Sunday.
    Professor Charles E. Johnson and Miss Mary Good, both of Derby, came in late in the evening Tuesday. They had been up to the Black Oat school district to try to secure a school for the latter and found the roads in rather a bad condition.
    A. H. Weber, our pharmacist, has moved into a new house William von der Hellen built on Cameron Avenue.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 23, 1912, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen in commemoration of the birthdays of their two children, Joyce and Hugo, aged five and six, gave a party Sunday. There were invitations sent out and between forty and forty-five responded to the call. Light refreshments were served and the most of the afternoon was spent in having a good time all around, and it will be a long time before the little tots of Eagle Point forget the fun they had on March 24, 1912.
    Mrs. David Cingcade had a partial family reunion last Sunday to commemorate the birthday of her husband David Cingcade and an old-time friend Mr. James W. Pew, Mr. Cingcade being sixty-seven on the 24th and Mr. Pew sixty-seven on the 25th of March. There were only the members of the family invited except Rev. La Mar, your Eagle Point correspondent and wife. Among those present were Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Cingcade and son Thomas, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cingcade, Ed Cingcade, our marshal, Rev. La Mar and A. C. Howlett. Mrs. Howlett fully expected to be on hand, but just as she thought that she was about ready to start the company began to come in, among whom were attorney Briggs and family from Ashland. They take a run up from Ashland two or three times every summer. Mrs. J. F. Brown and Miss Morris, one of our teachers, Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Knighton, Mr. F. L. Heath and family. Mr. Heath is one of our merchants. Mr. O. N. Nelson and wife of Jacksonville, besides quite a number of strangers. Mr. Nelson is manager of the Silas J. Day Abstract Company of Jacksonville, and he remained while his wife drove back to their home in Jacksonville. After partaking of an excellent dinner, Rev. La Mar started for his appointment in Brownsboro and the remainder spent the afternoon in a good old-fashioned social visit and about 4 p.m. we bade the good people adieu and went to our homes feeling that we had not spent the day in vain. In conclusion will say that for the past twenty years David Cingcade and Mr. Pew have celebrated their birthdays together with the exception of one year and that year Mr. Pew was away on business and could not be with the Cingcade family. Mr. Pew is a bachelor.
    Mrs. Van Vactor of Ashland came up Friday evening to visit her husband, who is night watchman for the P.&E. locomotive here and has a room at the Sunnyside, returning Monday morning.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Stinson and son Willie and Miss Bertha Daily were guests of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Daily of the Model Variety Store Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 28, 1912, page 5



COMMUNICATION.
    To the editor: Dear Sir--In your issue of the 22nd inst, your Eagle Point correspondent records among his list of "remarkable incidents" one which never occurred.
    We are made to appear as an oppressor of innocent maids and as setting ourselves up as a dictator in educational matters.
    The facts are: A lady came here to apply for our school, having sent word she was coming. We met her, took her home with us, entertained her overnight and took her back the next day.
    We questioned her as to her training and experience and ability to teach.
    She was a stranger in the state, never having taught or taken an examination in the state and had no certificate valid in this state. We called up Superintendent Wells by phone and he said he would grant her a permit, till next examination.
    We found she had both a university and normal training. The school board had left the hiring of a teacher entirely with me, with the instructions to engage a competent teacher. We pay wages above the average, to secure what we want.
    Why remarkable that we should desire to see, and talk with, a person to whose care we are to entrust the training of the minds of our children? We are through engaging teachers who have nothing to recommend them.
    Because a person can pass the required examination he is not necessarily fitted to teach. We have no schools to properly train teachers for this work. We supposed we were doing our duty carefully and guarding the interests of the people whom we serve. Should this be held up as remarkable? Better try again.
Very truly,
    M. H. CUSICK
Medford Mail Tribune, March 30, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Coming back again, Eagle Point Opera House Friday and Saturday, April 12 and 13, the popular Milburn Kenworthy company supporting Miss Helen Duffy, in the rural comedy drama "Betsy of Clover Farm." More fun than a circus. New songs. Saturday, the great four-act play, "St. Elmo." Better than the book. All special scenery. Popular prices. Children 25¢, adults 50¢.--Adv.
    There has been quite a run here the past few days and among the new arrivals there have been E. C. Van Harden of Seattle, Wash. He is representing Bowser & Co. of San Francisco.
    Fred J. Cummings, manager of the Rogue River Valley Canal Company, states that business is opening up nicely this spring and that they are just getting started again but expect to rush business from now on. He further said that when he got off the train at the local depot he hardly knew which way to turn as the town had improved so much since he was here last he hardly recognized the place. The last time he was here was to attend the good roads meeting last fall, and since then great changes have taken place.
    George G. Augustin, representing the Fisher Flouring Mills Company of Seattle, has been taking orders from about all of our merchants for millstuff as well as from Messrs. Morey and Helfner of Brownsboro. I took Mr. Augustin up to Brownsboro and he seemed to be greatly pleased when I pointed out to him so many farms hid away in the hills of Little Butte, and when I told him of the number of school districts there were above us along Little Butte and its tributaries he was still more astonished.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. Reed of Auburn Creek, who had his household goods stored in the Sunnyside wareroom, had them taken to his home last week by Drake Walch of Wellen.
    S. B. Spiker has bought a lot of Wm. Ulrich on North Main Street and had his residence moved from back of his opera house to said lot.
    Art Allder and Wm. Beveridge, two young men who are attending school in Medford, took advantage of the spring vacation and came out, they said, to do some grubbing and tree planting on Mr. Allder's place, just below town, but they were always on hand in time for supper at the Sunnyside. When they left Saturday afternoon they said they had had a fine time, and they surely enjoyed the vacation.
    The select dancing club had a dance last Friday night and there seemed to be rather an overplus of ladies, for one of the young men came out and invited the above named young men to take part in the pleasures of the evening.
    Almost everybody seems to be busy gardening and getting ready to do garden work.
    The Nichols brick building is being rushed to completion so far as the brick work is concerned, for by the time this article is in print the masons will have their part of the work done, and Mr. Spiker, the contractor, is pushing the rest of the work along as fast as he can.
    Mrs. Daisy Evans, who has been here visiting her mother, Mrs. G. W. Allen, started for Ashland Sunday afternoon.
    August Edler was among the callers Monday. He came out to register as a voter before our justice of the peace, Judge Watkins.
    George Phillips has put a neat wire fence around the lot he purchased from J. J. Fryer and is planting it to garden. He expects to build on it this summer.
    Prof. C. E. Johnson and Miss Mary Good, of Derby, came in Saturday evening and Sunday morning he procured a rig and took her to Wellen, where she is engaged to teach school this summer.
    Miss Mamie Wright, who is teaching school on Elk Creek, came out last week to visit her mother and brothers. Speaking about Elk Creek, Rev. Mark E. Davis and your Eagle Point correspondent expect to commence a protracted meeting in what is known as the Pence school house on Elk Creek on the evening of April 8 to continue over the next Sunday, at which time there will be a picnic dinner and in the afternoon the ordnance of baptism will be administered.
    Last Saturday night some of the young folk of our live little town met at the residence of Mrs. Sarah Coy and had a candy pulling party, and in addition to that the mischievous ones did not forget that the first day of April was close at hand. They had lots of fun.
    Messrs. Wood and Murphy, photographers of Medford, were callers Sunday about noon. They had been to Brownsboro and had done some work and brought their pay to Eagle Point to dispose of it, which consisted of chickens and eggs. Mrs. Howlett secured the chickens and one of our merchants received the eggs. Anything to keep up business.
    Rev. Paddock, D.D., of Portland, state superintendent of the work of the Congregational Church of Oregon, came out to visit your Eagle Point correspondent last Sunday, and preached in the Baptist Church by special invitation of Rev. Lee. Rev. Lee preached in the evening, and Rev. Paddock took the train for Medford the same day.
    F. Salter has had a neat sidewalk put down along the side of his store so that people can get into the new harness shop just opened by George Wehman.
    Miss Abbie Watson, recently from Michigan, came in Sunday evening on the Pacific & Eastern and after spending the night with us started Monday morning for Asbestos, where she is engaged to teach school.
    Mrs. Loar of Medford spent the night Sunday with us and took the 7:45 a.m. train Monday morning.
    Lee Steers, of Portland, a nephew of R. R. Minter by marriage, came down and is looking over our country with a view to locating among us, for he likes our climate.
    Elmer Spencer of Butte Falls came out the evening of the 25th on his way to Medford, returning Tuesday on the P.&E.
    Our school closed Tuesday, the 26th, owing to the death of a niece of the principal, P. H. Daily, who was drowned in Bear Creek.
    William Beveridge and Art Allder are stopping at the Sunnyside while they are grubbing out some land belonging to the latter's father, known as the Pat Ryan place, west of here.
    Bert Scranton of Medford spent the night with us the night of the 25th on his way to Trail.
    The Ladies' Aid Society of Eagle Point is having a good solid stone foundation put under the Baptist church of this place.
    Mr. Hutchason, living near the country road from here to the free ferry, was a pleasant caller Tuesday last. He is one of the old veterans of the Civil War and said he had to come out to see what changes had taken place in Eagle Point.
    Aaron Smith and family were out from their home last week on a trading expedition with our merchants.
    Chris Wooley was in our town last week exhibiting a fine young colt.
    Sam Harnish & Son have had a shed put up in addition to their livery stable and an enclosure arranged for the use of our town marshal to be used as a town pound. The marshal was gathering up the town cows this Friday morning, but only succeeded in locking one up as the owners were on the lookout and took possession before they were locked up.
    Miss Hattie Weiser, a sister of Mrs. M. L. Daily, came over to assist in the Model Variety Store and telephone office while Mr. and Mrs. Daily attended the funeral of their niece in Medford.
    F. M. Stewart, our town treasurer, was in Jacksonville on Tuesday of last week on business with the sheriff's office.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 5, 1912, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since my last Gus Nichols has moved from our town onto his farm on Rogue River, just below the French bridge, and Mr. Vogeli has moved into the Nichols house.
    Our daughter Hattie and Agnes have returned from their trip to Ashland where they spent a few days visiting friends.
    Miss Bell Findley has returned from the Eastern Oregon country, where she has spent the winter with her parents.
    Mr. Fryrear, who has been carrying the United States mail from the depot to the post office, has resigned his position in favor of the Haselton brothers, and has moved his family to Medford. They will be missed by their neighbors and the children's schoolmates.
    The brick masons finished the brick work on the Nichols building last Wednesday and by next Wednesday the plasterers will be ready to begin their work, as the lathers are rushing the work right along, and by Saturday the roof will be laid so as to rush the finishing work along. William Spencer and G. W. Allen are pushing the work along and contractor S. B. Spiker says that he will have it ready for occupancy by the last of May. A. de Wilde has started another house. This is the second one he has started, the first a dwelling house and the next one is to be a bakery. He says that he intends to have a regular baker's oven and keep a first-class bakery. The building is being erected near the Model Variety Store.
    Mr. and Mrs. Reed of Dudley came out the first of the week and Mr. Reed returned to his home in a day or two, Mrs. Reed remaining at the Sunnyside until Friday morning, when she also took the train for her home. They are getting ready to start for their old home in Pennsylvania in a few days on a visit.
    Elmer Spencer made a hurried call Wednesday morning, transacted business with Mrs. Howlett and took the train for Butte Falls the same morning.
    Coming back again, Eagle Point Opera House Friday and Saturday, April 12 and 13, the popular Milburn Kenworthy Company supporting Miss Helen Duffy, in the rural comedy drama "Betsy of Clover Farm." More fun than a circus. New songs. Saturday, the great four-act play, "St. Elmo." Better than the book. All special scenery. Popular prices. Children 25¢, adults 50¢--Adv.
    W. W. Willits of Persist came out the first of the week and was met here by his son Amos and daughter Inez. Miss Inez has been attending the O.A.C. at Corvallis, but her health became so poor that she thought it best for her to come home. They started on their way home Wednesday afternoon.
    S. S. Akin of Prospect came in on the P.&E. Tuesday evening on his way from the Fresno country, California, where he has spent the winter visiting with his brother. He remained here until Friday morning, taking the stage for Prospect.
    Mrs. George West came out Thursday from her home in Medford, and Friday morning took the stage for Trail to meet her husband.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1912, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    W. A. Koch, an agent for the Western States Insurance Company, has taken a room at the Sunnyside and is doing business in our town.
    The evening of the 4th I. V. McIntyre, Eagle Point banker, and wife, and George A. Butz, manager of the Hotel Holland, Medford, called for supper at the Sunnyside and to enjoy a short visit with your correspondent and family. At the same time Dr. W. W. P. Holt and his brother-in-law, Mr. Purdy, and Mr. Koch were guests at the same hostelry.
    Water Longwell, a young man from Medford, came out to visit his sister, Mrs. Howard, and she bring ill asked him to try to get her some fish to eat, so he started out, having his license with him. He met a deputy warden, Mr. Hayse, who loaned him his fishing hook and line and then watched him, and after he had caught a few fish went to him and asked to see the fish that he had in his bag, and on searching it found a fish that was a fraction of an inch short of the standard, so placed him under arrest, took him before Judge Watkins. He pleaded guilty but said he thought the fish was six inches long, and the judge was compelled by law to place a fine of $25 on him. Later, on hearing the facts of the case, the judge remitted the fine and let him go, and the people thought that the justice did exactly right. This statement I received directly from the justice of the peace himself and know what I am writing.
    We are having another new building going up at Eagle Point. Mr. de Wilde is putting up a house near the Model Variety Store, where he expects to keep a bakery. He says he intends to have a first-class bakery in every respect.
    Jud Edsall returned to his home, the Sunnyside, last Friday from a wild goose chase out in Eastern Oregon. He doesn't seem to be very favorably impressed with some parts of that country.
    The Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company has unloaded a large steel bridge bridge near the depot and the question is what are they going to do with it?
    George A. Gardner, one of the candidates for the nomination for county clerk, was among us Thursday, the 4th, and seemed to make a favorable impression. Judge Dunn, E. S. Briggs and son Billie Briggs, L. L. Mulit and B. R. Greer, editor of the Ashland Tidings, all of Ashland, were guests among us Friday, the 5th.
    Fred Findley has been putting an addition on his house recently.
    There is a movement on foot to organize a baseball club and purchase four acres of land on the south side of the creek for a permanent baseball ground. It is estimated that it will cost about $2000 to buy the land and fence and prepare everything for a first-class ball ground, and quite a number of citizens have subscribed for stock. It will be a joint stock company, divided into shares.
    If it will not be telling tales out of school I will say that there is a movement on foot to establish a Masonic lodge here, as there are quite a number of Masons among us.
    On Friday the 5th, Mrs. Ed Foster closed her school at Reese and the patrons and friends came in and had a picnic dinner. She had arranged to have a program which was well rendered and those who were there report having had a fine time.
    I am writing now from Elk Creek and next time will have something to say about our trip, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    When I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I was in my home in Eagle Point, but today (Tuesday, April 16) I am in Grants Pass, and so have not much to write about Eagle Point, but before I left there on Sunday morning I discovered that the ladies of Eagle Point had made extensive preparations for the Easter festivities on Sunday evening and I have no doubt but that they had a fine entertainment, as we have some of the best talent there is in the county.
    Taking the P.&E. car at Eagle Point for Table Rock station at 7:25 Sunday morning I was met at the station by Rev. M. C. Davis and taken to Table Rock schoolhouse, where the young folk had made every preparation for a grand entertainment in commemoration of Easter Sunday. They had the schoolhouse decorated with various kinds of flowers, evergreens, etc., and had all the arrangement to have a joyful time and make the hearts of the parents glad. The program was well rendered and everything went off in first-class style. After the exercises were over a picnic dinner was served and it takes more of an expert in the culinary department than I am to describe it. There seemed to be nothing lacking that was calculated to tempt a man to do violence to his stomach, for everything that this bountiful land of ours produces was there, even colored eggs for the benefit of the little folk. After the entertainment was over Rev. M. C. Davis had the people assemble on the front part of the schoolhouse and took a photo of the whole crowd, then took one of the class of little girls that were among the prominent actors in the exercises, and then took a photo of the inside of the building as it was decorated. There were representatives from the Agate, Chaparral, Sams Valley, Antioch Sunday schools and many of them took part in the exercises. At 2:30 p.m. Rev. M. C. Davis preached to a large and seemingly appreciative congregation and your correspondent preached at night. Taking the day altogether it was a day that will be remembered for a long time by many who were present.
    The next morning we started for the Elk Creek country, stopping on the way for dinner with our old-time friends, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Hannah. After dinner we continued our journey, stopping at the Central schoolhouse long enough to greet the teacher, John Newland, and the children and have a photo taken of the school. This is Mr. Newland's first school and he seems to be the right man in the right place, for it seems as though the Newland family are particularly fitted for school teaching. Passing on we stopped and paid our compliments to mine hostess Mrs. Middlebusher and family, then went on up Elk Creek to the Pence schoolhouse, where Rev. Davis preached to about all that there were in the neighborhood, and he and I went to George Lynch's to spend the night. And the next day was spent visiting in the neighborhood and I preached that (Tuesday) night. But I must stop for this time and go to see Dr. Findley, who is treating my eyes. The next time will tell more about the trip.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    When we arrived on Elk Creek we found that McCalahan & Son had their saw mill all rigged up and ready for business and already had a large quantity of logs in the yard ready for the summer's run. They anticipate a big run this summer. Going on up the creek a little further we came to the residence of Dave Pence. He has built for himself a neat residence and is clearing more land and getting his farm in good shape. He was just getting ready to go to work on the county roads, he having been appointed supervisor for this year. We next stopped for a few moments to call on Ed Pence who is one of the prosperous farmers of that section but he was away from home working on a new house that Mr. Reynolds was putting up. Mr. Reynolds is the man who was burned out a few weeks ago, and during the fire Dave Pence came in such close contact with the fire as to singe one side of his mustache off, so had to shave off the other side and that makes him look as sad as a preacher in the pulpit without a coat.
    From there Rev. Davis went up to Mr. Miller's where we could get horse feed, for at this season of the year hay is very scare in the Elk Creek country, and I went to Mr. George Lynch's for headquarters. They have a fine school in this neighborhood. Miss Mamie Wright is training the young people how to develop their ideas and make useful men and women. During our stay there Prof. D. E. Henry, one of the school supervisors spent the day in the school and was trying to plan to have a central school established at Trail and have all the children of the five or six districts attend one school and have that school embrace the high school branches and thereby save the expense of about three teachers, but the trouble of that move is the children going from home to the school house and in order to obviate that difficulty his plan was to have someone go in the morning and take them to school and then in the afternoon take them home again, but in that case the team from that district would have to travel thirty-six miles each day and would have to start from home by 6:30 a.m. to reach the school house by 9 o'clock a.m. and then would have to start promptly at 4 p.m. to enable them to reach home by 6:30 p.m., so the idea did not take well with the Elk Creek people.
    Owing to Rev. M. C. Davis' name being drawn as a juror in Grants Pass we did not continue the meeting as we anticipated but closed on Wednesday night and bade farewell to the good people of that section. In looking around in my rounds I find that nearly all of the people in the mountain regions are readers of the Mail Tribune, and seem to be satisfied with the paper. There is considerable work done in the line of improvement on the farms. Mr. Miller is extending his alfalfa field by clearing more land. Mr. Cal. Pence has a fine tract of alfalfa and is clearing more land. He has already built a neat residence and has things up in shape so as to live comfortably.
    Mr. M. Pence has the lumber on the ground to build a new house.
    George Lynch has one of the nicest little homes and is planning to build in the near future, so it seems from appearances that the people on Elk Creek are among the progressives in the way of improving at any rate. Leaving Elk Creek Thursday morning we went to Trail where Rev. Davis had an appointment to preach that night, and during the time between our arrival at Trail and preaching time we spent with the family of Mr. John Warner. Mr. Warner had the misfortune to get his leg broken some months ago while planting the electric light poles from the Prospect works to Gold Ray and is just getting around so that he can do light work. He has made great improvements in the way of clearing land and fencing since I was there last.
    Thursday night we had a full house the preaching being in the school house, now occupied by a lady by the name of Nash who has a very interesting school of about twenty pupils. We spent the night at the Middlebusher hotel, and the next morning we started for Sams Valley where we had an appointment for preaching Friday night. But I am making this letter too long. The next time will tell of our trip through Debenger Gap, through sticky, what I saw in Sams Valley, Gold Hill, Dardanelles, Grants Pass, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1912, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    After being away from home since April 14, I am once more seated at my stand in my own room and starting to take up the work of reporting the doings of Eagle Point and vicinity. Since I left home there has been several important changes taken place in our town. Among them two new buildings have gone up, although one of them, the new bakery, was started, but when I reached home Tuesday evening I found that Mr. de Wilde had the roof on, the partitions in and was nailing on the laths as fast as he could, and from present appearances we will soon have a bakery in full blast in our thriving little town. Another building is H. O. Childreth's blacksmith shop that has been erected about opposite the new livery barn of S. H. Harnish & Son. Another progressive movement is the way S. B. Spiker has improved his little home, he having put rustic and made a square front with a neat door that shows good taste. Another thing that I notice is that Mr. Spiker, the contractor on the Nichol brick, is [illegible] the work right along and expects to have the room ready by the first of May for Heath & Diamond, two of our leading merchants, to move into by the first of May instead of the first of June, as per contract. Mr. Heath has moved into the old William von der Hellen house now owned by Thomas Farlow. Mr. Sprague has moved into his own house he has finished since I was away. Mr. Bryant has moved from the old Robinett house into the old Coy house now owned by Mrs. James Owens, and Scott Bruce is moving out of the mountains near Dudley and is going into the house formerly occupied by Mr. Heath, so the reader will see that we are changing around considerably.
    And now to cap the climax S. B. Spiker is going to give a dance on the first of May and has prevailed on Mrs. Howlett to give the supper for the dancers, and he says that he intends to make it the grandest ball of the season. The supper will be served at the Sunnyside Hotel. The best of music will be secured and a rousing good time is expected. Tickets, including supper, $2.00.--Adv.
    Dr. Holt reports the arrival of a nine-pound boy in the family of Mr. and Mrs. Kelso of Derby, on the 13th inst.
    When I reached home last night (Tuesday) I found the house full, as every bed was occupied. Among them was Mr. Frank A. Grisez, our county surveyor, and H. M. Coss, Mr. Grisez is out platting a tract of land for Mr. Coss, north of our town. Mr. J. E. Hutchinson, who has a homestead on the road from here to the free ferry; M. Y. Estes, who has charge of Mr. Bonny's horse; Scott Bruce and wife, beside several strangers whose names I did not learn. I also found a number of mechanics who are working in town on the different buildings that are in the course of construction.
    Revs. Lamar and Holmes of Medford came out Wednesday morning on the car and I understand went to Brownsboro to assist in the organization of a Baptist church there.
    The Baptist association will meet in our town on April 30 to continue four days. It is expected that there will be about thirty delegates and ministers present and they are anticipating a good time.
    After leaving Trail on our trip to the hills we turned our course from the Rogue River route and went through the Debenger Gap. The road supervisor had just dragged the road and that pulverized the stick mud. The rain softened it up just enough to make it stick a little to the wheels, but we succeeded in getting through without much trouble.
    This is the first time I have been through the Debenger Gap for a number of years and I was greatly surprised to see so many fine farms along the route, for the country has been fenced up and several fine farms made and the houses along the route show that the farmers are in a prosperous condition, as they all seem to have good houses and fences.
    We went on the Simsville, where I preached to a good congregation at night, and the next day went to Gold Hill, where Rev. Davis preached for the pastor of the M.E. church at that place and in the afternoon I went on and took dinner with the family of Mr. Volney Stickel, and in the afternoon held a meeting at the Dardwell schoolhouse, and the next morning we took the train for Grants Pass, where I remained for over a week under the care of Dr. M. C. Findley and had my eyes treated. While there I took the train for Three Pines, a little town on the S.P. about fourteen miles north of Grants Pass, and Rev. Davis preached in the forenoon and I preached at night. So while I was gone I saw quite a number of people and had a very pleasant time.
    Thomas Vestal and L. A. Williams, who are working for the Oregon Improvement Company, called for dinner Wednesday and Bobbie Petty, son of Mr. Petty, who is working on the Corbin place, is boarding here.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 25, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Senator Hugo von der Hellen started the first of the week to meet the board of regents of the O.A.C. in Corvallis.
    During my absence the interested parties have put down a cement sidewalk from the county road to connect with the sidewalk in front of the town hall, so as to enable the people to reach the new meat market and Heath & Diamond's store in the Nichols block. The plasterers finished up their job Friday and it is the calculation that the part to be occupied by Heath & Diamond will be ready to be turned over to them by Tuesday evening, the 30th instant. S. B. Spiker is receiving all kinds of compliments for the manner in which he has pushed the work along during the construction of the building.
    Mr. S. B. Spiker wishes me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that from the present appearances they are going to have one of the finest dances May 1st that has ever been had in Eagle Point and that Mrs. Howlett has planned to accommodate eighty at a time at the supper table and that both time nor labor will be spent to make it a grand success.--Adv.
    While I was away from home recently, G. E. Wehman, our harness maker, has put up two signs to show where to go to for work done in that line.
    One of our next county commissioners, W. C. Daley, was doing business in our town last Wednesday.
    Ed. S. Wolfer, our plumber, is plumbing Mr. Sprague's new house.
    Our city dads have bargained for a chemical fire engine for our town.
    Brown Bros. have been putting in more shelving in their store, making room for more goods.
    Mr. Natwick has a force of men at work on the new road from the Dodge-French bridge across Rogue River.
    Parties are at work opening up the country road over the hill, from here to Rogue River near the old Newman place.
    During my absence Mrs. Dr. Holt returned from San Francisco where she has been visiting her mother for several weeks. On my return as I was walking past the Model Variety Store I was amused to see several ladies inspecting some new mirrors that Mrs. Daily had placed in the show window, but such is life.
    Heath & Diamond have bought a lot nearly opposite their new store and have also bought the store building they now occupy and intend to move it onto the lot for a general warehouse as their new store building, although it is 27x76 ft., will not be large enough for their business.
    H. O. Childreth moved into his new blacksmith shop last Wednesday.
    I understand that Mr. Veatch has leased what is known as the Ryan tract of land north of our town and is fencing in about 1600 acres for pasture.
    Jud Edsall and Charley Thomas are fixing up their wagons to go to Scotts Valley, Cal., to haul quartz this summer for a quartz mill.
    A. D. Walters, wife and little daughter came into the Sunnyside Thursday night about 9:30 from Elk Creek, where he is working on the county road.
    Quite a number of members of the I.O.O.F. went from here to attend the meeting at Ashland on the anniversary of the order.
    Rev. Wm. R. Winans of Medford Missionary District American Sunday School Union was a pleasant caller last Friday.
    E. L. Warnstorff has moved his real estate office into the rear end of the bank building. It is also the headquarters of Eagle Point Commercial Club.
    E. R. and L. F. Robinson, two young men who have been doing the plastering in the Nichols building, and A. H. Roberts and J. H. Robinson, the two helpers, got through with their job Friday and left Saturday morning for Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since I last wrote, Mr. Watson, of Butte Falls, secretary of the Eagle Point and Butte Falls Telephone Company, spent the night with us on his way to Medford. C. A. Newstrom, wife and son, and Mrs. M. B. Bowles of Lake Creek took dinner last Saturday, and on Sunday T. B. Turner of Medford called for dinner and stated that he was on a deal for a part of the barber business in our town.
    Last Sunday Mrs. Howlett had quite a number of townspeople take dinner with her. There were 35 besides our own family. Among the visitors were Mr. and Mrs. F. Salter, of one of our hardware firms; Mr. and Mrs. Royal G. Brown and daughter, Miss Hazel; Mr. Brown is a member of the firm of George Brown & Sons; Mr. and Mrs. E. B. Weber, the pharmacist of the firm of von der Hellen Brothers; Mrs. Charles A. Brown, wife of the Talent pharmacist, of Talent; Mr. and Mrs. William Brown, another member of the firm of George Brown & Sons; Mr. and Mrs. Carl Narregan, one of our thrifty farmers; Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Moomaw, the mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Peyton route; Miss Lulu Martin, Carl and Chalmers Ringer, Ray Harnish, Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre, the banker; S. B. Spiker, the building contractor; Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bruce, carpenter and contractor; G. W. Foss of Kansas; Miss Emma Holt, besides a number of strangers whose names I did not learn. Mr. Foss remarked after dinner was over and the crowd had partly retired that he never saw a company assembled at a hotel before that seemed to enjoy themselves as they did.
    It is understood that T. B. Turner succeeded in making the deal for the barber shop in the Ashpole building and is to open up tomorrow, Wednesday, May 1. A good barber that can devote his time to the profession, I think, will do a good business here in that line. We have had a good barber here, Mr. McDonough, but he has had to divide his time between painting, paper hanging and barbering so that he could not always be found.
    Scott Bruce and wife have gone to housekeeping in the house recently vacated by Mr. Heath. Mr. Bruce has taken the contract to put in an ice plant in the part of the new brick building erected by Thomas and Artie Nichols, where they intend to manufacture ice. They will be able to turn out a ton a day and be able to enlarge the plant as circumstances require.
    A company of surveyors came in last Monday to grade another one of our streets. C. Frank Rhodes, civil and mining engineer, had charge of the work.
    Mr. St. James of Medford came out Sunday evening on the train to finish the house James Ringer is building.
    The Rogue River Baptist Association met at the First Baptist church of Eagle Point Tuesday morning and organized by the election of John Cornell as moderator, Rev. F. C. Lovett secretary and Mrs. J. W. Grover as treasurer. Rev. F. C. Lovett preached in the church on Monday night before the meeting of the association on "Petering," a very interesting discourse. Quite a number of delegates and pastors were in attendance. The ladies serve dinner in the house formerly occupied by Mr. Kelso and citizens entertained them the rest of the time.
    Mrs. A. N. Thomas reports the arrival of her son, Baxter Grogsby, and family. Mrs. L. Harvey, a relative of Mr. Thomas, of Douglas, is expected to arrive Wednesday, also H. Conn and family of Klamath and Mrs. Grimes of Douglas County.
    Last Sunday was the birthday anniversary of Chalmers Ringer and he invited a number of his young friends to dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 3, 1912, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Since my last, George Phillips has started to build a new house on the lot he recently purchased from J. J. Fryer.
    E. R. Salter and wife of Milaca, Minn., arrived on Wednesday last and are visiting Mr. Salter's brother Fred, one of the Eagle Point hardware merchants.
    E. C. Piper and son Charles, and A. J. Hand of Portland arrived May 2 and have moved into R. C. Lawton's house on Eagle Heights. Mr. Piper expects his wife to join him today (Saturday). He intends to build a dwelling house on his tract of land on Eagle Heights.
    i understand that Mr. Purdy is taking orders for electric lights in our town. This item of news has just come to me as I go to writing so cannot give the particulars.
    Mrs. Argalee Green arrived at the home of her parents J. J. Fryer and wife last Wednesday from her trip to Europe, and her son Austin came out from his home on Long Branch to see her and to receive medical treatment from Dr. Holt.
    Mr. Ditsworth and his two stepchildren, and Leslie Lytle and his sister, Miss Emma Lytle, were in town Friday morning on the way to Medford.
    Ray Harnish started with a load of tools, etc., to the intake of the Fish Lake ditch last Friday morning. The company is to build a bridge to support its pipe line across Little Butte Creek.
    Emerson Wheeler and E. H. Watson of Butte Falls spent Friday night with us. They have been repairing the telephone line between Butte Falls and Medford.
    This week has been rather a remarkable week in Eagle Point, not only on account of the delightful rain we have had but on account of there being a meeting of the Rogue River Baptist Association, which convened on Tuesday, April 30, and continued for four days, but also on account of there being two grand balls or dances here on the night of May 1st. S. B. Spiker had announced for several weeks that he would give a dance in his opera house on May 1st and a few days before that time Mr. Vogeli, who owns the tavern and saloon connected with it, and one or two others took a notion that they would have a dance and supper at the same time, so they rented Brown's hall over their store, posted bills around town, sent word to the country announcing the dance and the result was that a few of the select ones met in Brown's hall and had a very nice time and the general public met at Spiker's opera house and they also report having had a very pleasant time. One notable feature of the dance at Spiker's was that there was no smell of liquor on any of the dancers, so I heard several of the ladies say. At the close of the dance Mr. Spiker announced that he would give a free dance on the evening of May 24 and that the arrangement was made for Mrs. Howlett to serve the support at $1 a couple.
    But the most interesting feature of the week's doings was the meeting of the association and the religious exercises connected with it.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 7, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    I unintentionally omitted to mention the names of Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Bennett, Mr. and Mrs. H. H. DeArmond, Mrs. J. Loder, Miss Emma Wallace, Ossomedley Berch Daily, Miss Elgent Bratney, Earl Kiser and Maud Reed. These names were written in a little book by one of the party and the rest of the names I had transcribed from the minutes of the association. The above named persons came out in a rig from Medford to take part in the program on Friday afternoon and Lewis Bennett led the young people's exercises during the afternoon session of the association.
    O. S. Nelson, the Jacksonville insurance man, came out Sunday and has been a guest at the Sunnyside up to the present time, Tuesday afternoon. He has come in contact with poison oak and the result was he has been unable to attend properly to business.
    Rev. Wm. R. Winans preached last Sunday at Roosevelt and the Reese Creek school houses and organized a Sunday school in each place.
    Rev. Campbell of Wyoming preached here last Sunday both morning and evening, and at Brownsboro in the afternoon.
    The Catholic chapel car arrived last Saturday and they conducted services in the car Saturday night and Sunday, and will remain for the week.
    Your correspondent went to Antioch and there met Rev. M. C. Davis and held a meeting there and at Agate, but he was called on urgent business to go north so had to call in his appointment for Table Rock. During my rounds I noticed that the prospect was fine for an abundant crop of everything in the crop line and that the farmers were cheerful over their prospect.
    Mrs. E. C. Piper joined her husband here last Sunday evening from Portland, and on Monday they moved to their home on Eagle Heights.
    Scott Bruce is pushing to completion the rooms in the Nichols building for the ice plant, and men are digging the well to furnish water. By this time next week contractor S. B. Spiker will be ready to turn the building over to the owners, all completed. Heath & Diamond have already moved their stock of goods into the space designed for their store and are stocking up with a full line of general merchandise.
    The bakery building is so far completed that George Riley, formerly of Medford, has taken possession and Monday turned out his first batch of bread. He tells me that he intends to keep a full line of goods in his class.
    William von der Hellen's two children were playing together Monday and the little girl was holding a nail for her little brother to drive into a small board. Just as he was ready to strike the nail slipped so as to penetrate her finger and he drove the nail through her finger fast to the board. It was necessary to get a claw hammer and her Uncle Carl had some difficulty drawing it out of the board.
    George W. Owings, proprietor of the Eagle Hotel, has gone to Klamath County to look at a farm he is talking of trading for.
    W. A. Clark spent the night with us Monday. He is traveling for Fairbanks & Co. of San Francisco, selling Cottolene.
    Robbie Jonas, of Wallowa, came in Saturday evening to visit his mother and brother Jake.
    Mr. Buster, while working in an orchard on Antelope, had his leg broken Monday. Dr. Holt was called and set the bone.
    Everett Culbertson of Lake Creek has organized a farmers' telephone company and is putting up a line from Eagle Point to McAllister's saw mill on the north fork of Little Butte.
    The shares are about all taken. The new line will leave Little Butte about one mile above here and bear to the north, leaving Brownsboro a mile to the right. The line will accommodate 20 families.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 9, 1912, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    E. R. Salter and wife who have been visiting his brother Fred and wife, returned to Milaca, Minn., last Wednesday. Mr. Salter is auditor for the N.P. Railroad, and his time was limited. They expect to visit Los Angeles on their return trip. Mr. Salter seemed to be well pleased with our country and promised to return in the future.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey and her son Jack have installed a water plant in her yard. Her husband, A. J. Florey, our genial postmaster, says that he has enough to do in the post office to keep him busy, so he has nothing to do with it except to eat the lettuce and radishes. She has had a tower built, a reservoir put up, pipes laid, a sprinkler installed and a gasoline engine in the working order and she feels well satisfied that they will have garden truck this summer.
    Speaking about water systems, Mrs. Howlett has had pipes laid all through her garden and eight hydrants placed in her garden. Berry bushes, lawn, etc., are all arranged so as to be sure of something good to eat this summer. Many of the people of Eagle Point are arranging to have water on their ground this summer; although the soil will produce very well without water, still it does better with it.
    Wm. Sears of Butte Falls was a pleasant caller Tuesday night and so was a lady and gentleman whose names I did not learn. They were from California.
    Mrs. Mills and Mrs. James of Butte Falls came out and were guests of Mrs. J. B. Jackson and family.
    J. B. Jackson while shearing his sheep had the misfortune to have a fine lamb in trying to get to its mother butt its head so hard against a fence as to cause its death, either breaking its skull or neck.
    E. L. Cooley has been engaged the past week as supervisor, attending the eighth grade examination in our school. There is a class of twenty taking the examination and Mr. Cooley speaks very favorably of the class. Their names will be given later.
    Mr. Purdy reports that he is getting along nicely with his organization of the electric light and power company and thinks that they will be ready to go to work on the plant soon.
    Friday noon Messrs. P. J. O'Gara, our county horticulturist, J. W. Myers, fruit tree inspector, Mr. S. B. Hall and J. B. Aiken called for dinner and said that they were hunting "bugs." They had been to the old Bradshaw orchard and report that the orchard is simply loaded with fruit, and that the outlook for fruit this season means the income of one million dollars for this valley this season. While they were here Mr. Myers stated that King George of England had placed an order for forty-five boxes of Bosc pears with the Hanley orchard on Little Butte Creek about twelve miles above here. All our Butte Creek country is noted for its famous pears, peaches and apples; in fact our foothills are the natural localities for that kind of fruit.
    Heath and Diamond, since they moved into their new store building, have bought a fine new delivery wagon and the driver seems to be kept busy.
    Since I last wrote I made a trip to Grants Pass to visit Dr. M. C. Findley to have my eyes treated and while I was there I met one of our old pioneer neighbors, Mr. Gregory, who is afflicted with his eyes so that he can hardly see, and Miss Lee Middlebusher of Trail who was also visiting the doctor on the same business.
    Since my last letter Mrs. Sophia Robinett has moved from her brother-in-law's, G. W. Dale, to Central Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mrs. Klingle of Lake Creek, who has been a guest at the Sunnyside for a week, returned to her home last Monday. She has been here attending meetings in the Catholic church during the stay of the missionary car.
    S. B. Spiker has had his residence painted and is fixing things up in good shape.
    William Spencer, a carpenter who has been at work on the Nichols building, went to his home near Dudley last last week.
    James Ringer, town marshal, has commenced to "keep batch" in his own house, and says he wants the Mail Tribune to read.
    Ralph Salisbury and Granville Van Vactor came up from Ashland on their wheels Saturday morning to visit Granville's father, who is night watchman for the P.&E. Railroad Company at that place.
    S. S. Akin of Prospect came in Saturday afternoon, remaining until Sunday afternoon, when he went across Rogue River via the new bridge to help to assess that part of Jackson County, he being one of the deputy assessors.
    E. D. Watson, a Medford photographer, and his wife came out last Sunday to try one of Mrs. Howlett's Sunday dinners.
    Nineteen members of the Eagle Point lodge of I.O.O.F. went to Jacksonville last Saturday night to take part in the work in that lodge.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 18, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Henry Meyers and his family came out from their home near Lake Creek to attend services in the Catholic church, remaining over Sunday. Mike Sidley and his two sisters, Misses Helen and Julia, also came out Sunday morning, remaining until after services Sunday night. They were all guests at the Sunnyside. Miss Marguerite Florey, deputy postmistress, and Miss Marguerite Betty were guests with us last Sunday, also Mr. and Mrs. Weber, the pharmacist; Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre, Mr. and Mrs. Sprague, Dr. and Mrs. W. W. P. Holt, Mr. Purdy who is working up the plan for an electric plant here; Mr. and Mrs. Bolt, Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wright, G. W. Wamsley, H. C. Barney and brother, P. A. Barney, a farmer and stockman of Lake Creek, and Dr. W. E. Harrison, veterinary surgeon, of Medford. There was quite a company and all hands seemed to have enough to eat and a good time generally.
    The Misses Ethel and Gay Webb came in from Tolo Monday evening on the Pacific & Eastern, spent the night with us, and took the train Tuesday morning for Derby, to meet their brother, H. O. Webb, who lives on Rogue River about nine miles from the Derby station.
    Monday night Mrs. Jackson Silbaugh of Seattle, national lecturer and organizer for the W.C.T.U., delivered a lecture here. She had a fine audience, considering that it was Monday night, and such a busy time. She spoke for considerably over an hour and at the close took quite a number into the organization, the local union. She is a forceful speaker and one noticeably good trait in her lecture was that she had no hard words for the saloon keeper or its product, but spoke as a true Christian lady would speak. She wound up her lecture by speaking very encouragingly of the prospect for prohibition in 1914 and woman suffrage next November.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 20, 1912, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The evening after I last wrote parties phoned out from Medford requesting Mrs. Howlett to have supper for a party of nine ready by 7 o'clock and about 6:45 an auto came up with one of the jolliest crowds I have seen for some time. It was composed of Mr. and Mrs. Gray, Mr. and Mrs. Harmon, ex-county civil engineer, Mrs. Helen Gale and her two children, Rowena and Winsor Gale, Peter Watson and George Roberts. After enjoying the fine scenery around the Sunnyside they filed into the dining room and spent a---- I was going to say an hour, but perhaps not quite so long, at the supper table, and after they were through with the repast they voted that they would come out some Sunday and partake of one of Mrs. Howlett's chicken dinners.
    George Phillips has finished his house sufficiently to live in, and moved into it Thursday. He says it beats paying rent, if it is not completed.
    George Fisher has gone to work in the blacksmith shop belonging to W. L. Childreth. Mr. Childreth is afflicted with sciatic rheumatism and is unable to do the work himself, but George does very well as a substitute. He worked last summer for Mr. Childreth in the shop.
    T. L. Balcom spent Wednesday night with us on his way home from the Riverside ranch, where he had been to put up 200 rods of Page wire fence.
    In the contest among the schools in this county, in spelling and arithmetic, Professor P. H. Daley states that the Eagle Point school is one of three that came out at the top of the list, and these three schools will now compete with each other for the prize. Mr. Daley says the children are working hard to try to win out. The contest is between the fourth and eighth grades, and our boys and girls propose to have some of the Jackson County schools take notice that we are still on the map.
    Mayor William von der Hellen is having his residence reroofed, and intends to have several changes made in the interior. He is also having the old barn torn down. This barn has stood as a monument of the progressiveness of some of our old settlers. It was one of the largest barns in this section of the county, but as about all the land nearby is being put to fruit and the building stands in what will be the heart of our thriving little town, it had to give way to the still more progressive element.
    The project to purchase four acres of land off the Jones tract for a baseball ground is still on tap. The company has taken an option on it and made a sufficient payment to cover the value of the growing crop. The ground is being prepared for a big game about the first of next week. In case the company buys the land, it is understood, the payment already made is to be applied on the purchase price. The company has $1000 worth of shares sold and those interested are confident of raising the balance needed.
    George W. Owings, proprietor of the Eagle Point Hotel, returned last week from a trip to Eastern Oregon. He states that prospects are good for a bountiful crop, and that near Merrill hundreds of acres are being planted to potatoes.
    A party of surveyors passed through here last week, going on up the creek. They kept their business to themselves.
    Machinery for the ice plant came last Wednesday and Nichols & Nichols are going to rush the work right along.
    Mr. McClanahan of Elk [Creek] and Rev. E. A. Lee, head sawyer in the Elk Creek saw mill, came out the middle of last week to have a part of one of the heavy castings mended that had broken. Henry Childreth did the job.
    R. H. Bullock of Medford was here Friday. He is traveling in the interests of an eastern correspondence school.
    C. A. Hough of Medford was with us Friday and Saturday, working in the interest of the Oregon Life Insurance Company.
    Chauncey Florey, son of postmaster A. J. Florey and office deputy in the assessor's office, came out Thursday night to visit his parents and shake hands with his many friends in these parts.
    William Ulrich and three young men called for dinner Saturday on their way up the country.
    S. B. Spiker has had a sign painted on the front of his building letting the people know that he is still contracting. He says that he has sent out 172 invitations to his free dance on the 24th inst. and Ma Howlett is preparing to feed 250 persons.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 21, 1912, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    There seems to be but little going on in our little town since the ground has got dry enough for farmers to plow and plant corn, and still there is considerable travel on the road, judging by the number of transients stopping with us.
    In a former letter promise was made to give the names of the pupils who were taking examination for eighth grade certificates, and herewith is sent a list of names of those who passed: Charles L. Givan, Walter Williams, Edward Williams, Earl Zimmerman, Ralph Owings, Clinton McDonough, Floyd Charley, George Wolf, Doris Coy, Glenn Haley, Mabel Taylor, Neva Taylor, and Lenore Walker. Dottie Stowell, Frances Greb and Ragnar Bergquist were conditioned, having passed in all but two branches. There were no flat failures from here. Not a bad showing to have a class of 14 out of 20 pass with an average of 82⅔ percent and to pass conditionally. There were those who took the examination for the educational advantage to be gained, not expecting to pass. A noticeable feature is the fact that of the 14 who passed, 11 were boys, making a good showing for the boys.
    Last Sunday the baseball boys had a practice game on the new ball ground, and are getting ready to have a big game in the near future.
    Last Sunday we had quite a crowd of visitors at the Sunnyside. Among them were Mr. Shepard and Louis Smith of Ashland, who came in Saturday with a piano. They represent the Shepard Piano House of Ashland, and remained here until Tuesday morning. Mrs. George West of Medford and J. Hall of Prospect were here. They took the stage for Trail. Mr. Hall going to his home and Mrs. West to meet her husband at Trail. T. Shattuck of Missouri Flat on Applegate, Ed Higinbotham, road supervisor of this district, and a stranger with him were also here Sunday. Mr. Higinbotham is working on the new road between here and the French-Dodge bridge. Wallace Bishop, Thomas Carlton, J. E. Reed of Yankee Creek, and 15 townspeople and four strangers also called for chicken dinner that day.
    E. J. Dillon, who has been working on the Nichols brick building, finished a week ago, and left Monday morning to take up work elsewhere.
    Monday afternoon, while looking after the interests of the Mail Tribune, I dropped into the Model Variety Store to look at some fine ivory granite ware, and Mrs. Daily, proprietress of the store, took a receipt for $2.50 on subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. Mr. Daily's brother and wife of Trail, Mr. and Mrs. Tim W. Daily, are visiting here.
    W. W. Willits and his son Amos and wife came out from Elk Creek, Persist, Monday. Mr. Willits Sr. went on to Medford, while Amos and wife remained here, taking the early train the following morning for Medford. They are on their way to Michigan, combining business with pleasure.
    Mr. Shepard, Sr., came out Monday morning in his auto from Ashland, puncturing a tire and stopping here for repairs.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 22, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    John Simon, who has been stopping during the winter with his sister, Mrs. C. W. Daley, has gone to Central Point for a short stay.
    In a former letter I stated that W. L. Childreth was so badly crippled up with sciatic rheumatism that he had given up work in his blacksmith shop but in a day or two I was at his shop and found him hammering away as though nothing was the matter, and I am glad to be able to state that he is still at work.
    Miss Lillian C. Mullen of Medford came out Tuesday and spent a part of the day with us at the Sunnyside. She was canvassing for the George W. Glover Co. of Philadelphia.
    John Forester of San Francisco came out Tuesday to put up the machinery for the Nichols & Nichols ice plant they are putting up in the new Nichols brick.
    W. W. Willits of Persist and Frank Therton were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday night.
    We had quite an exciting time in our quiet little village Tuesday afternoon. Ray Harnish was hauling a load of lumber from Sprague & Co.'s lumber yard and just as he was passing Henry Childreth's blacksmith shop the horse took fright and both jumped at once, breaking the whiffletree and jerking the driver off of the wagon. For a moment they kept the wagon going by the neck yoke hanging to the end of the tongue and Ray saw that he was in danger of being run over by the wagon, so turned the horses loose, each one having a singletree hanging to him. They started to run in a northeasterly direction when they soon ran into a barbed wire fence, one horse falling and here they parted by breaking the lines and one ring off the neck yoke and one horse ran across the railroad track and the other across the creek, heading for the desert between here and Medford, but fortunately he turned into a lane between the Knight place--the old Page place--and Joe Riley place--and was captured by some of the men on the ranch. The horses were both cut considerably but not seriously and Ray complained that night of his head being sore, but not so sore that he was [not] able to go to the dance that night.
    Speaking about the dance; it was a special entertainment and dance given for the benefit of the Catholic church, at which time they had lunch served in the hall. The dance was given in Brown's hall over George Brown & Sons' store, and those present reported that they had a fine time. Quite a number of people from the country were in attendance, among whom were Mike Sidley and his two sisters, Misses Julia and Helen, Wert Pool and wife, Mr. Herrin and wife, Timmie Dugan and his sister-in-law, Miss Maggie Sidley and others whose names I did not learn.
    Henry Tonn of Lake Creek was in town Tuesday and when he went home he rode in a new Spaulding hack that he bought from a traveling agent that has been canvassing this part of the country.
    Heath & Diamond have had a neat new sign placed over their new store door. They are taking time by the forelock and have a carload of stove wood brought from the Butte Falls country.
    A young man by the name of J. H. Aten of Gold Hill came in Tuesday evening on the train, took supper with us and went on over to the Corbin orchard--the old Bradshaw--to work in the fruit. I understand that they will require a number of hands to thin the fruit this year for the crop is truly immense. Mr. Corbin passed through our town Thursday morning on his way to his farm and Mr. Frank Poyser of Medford brought out a load of groceries, etc., for him from Medford.
    Roy Willits, the main contractor for the Eagle Point-Prospect route, came out Monday with the mail and is having his rigs fixed up by Henry Childreth for the summer's run.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 27, 1912, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Among the visitors coming in last week not mentioned in my last was Mrs. Ditsworth of Peyton.
    Mrs. Herron of Illinois is visiting [her sis]ter, Mrs. Ruben Peyton.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Ruben Peyton, May 16, a daughter.
    Mrs. Davis of Jacksonville has moved onto the old Jacks place, joining the Tronson place.
    There was a lot of furniture brought out for George McDonald recently from Chicago and taken to the Hitchcock place.
    Everett Culbertson came in Wednesday to go to work on his telephone line again, leaving this Monday morning to complete the line to the McAllister sawmill.
    Fred Salter, delegate to the grand lodge of the I.O.O.F., went to Pendleton last week and attended the meeting of the grand lodge, returning Saturday morning. He reports that they had a fine time while there, but had quite a fight with the Roseburg delegation to get the next meeting of the grand lodge to meet in Medford.
    Mrs. Harvey Smith, who is teaching in the Mt. Pitt school district, came out last Wednesday, met her husband at the Sunnyside and they went out to Medford to see the show. There was quite a few from here to Medford to the 23rd inst. to see the show, but not near to so many as one would expect.
    Our school closed last Thursday and the children had a picnic dinner at the school house and report having had a lovely time. The school children in the primary department, Mrs. P. H. Daily's room, presented their teacher with a beautiful purse and in the principal's room presented Prof. P. H. Daily with a beautiful oak rocking chair.
    Fred Findley has bought out the draying business of Haselton Bros. and put on a good substantial covered delivery wagon with a good team and is now doing the delivering of goods, etc., for the town.
    The two county commissioners, Frank Brown and James Owens, went up to the honor camp and expected to examine the roads between here and Prospect while on the trip.
    Mrs. W. J. Phillips started last Friday for an extensive visit to her old home in Canada.
    Henry Meyers and wife of Lake Creek were among the visitors in Eagle Point Thursday.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent started Friday morning for Grants Pass to have Dr. Findley treat his eyes again and while there met Mrs. Fry of Debenger Gap with her little girl who is receiving treatment from the doctor for her hearing. While I was gone S. B. Spiker gave a free dance in his opera house and Mrs. Howlett gave the supper. Those in attendance reported that they had a very pleasant time and the most of them took supper at the Sunnyside. Mrs. H. arranged so as to feed one hundred at a time. There were seventy-four couples took supper.
    The ball team has been putting their ground in good shape and Sunday had a game among the home folks and I understand that they had a fine time.
    Rev. Lamar, our Baptist minister, preached here yesterday both morning and evening.
    Word came here last week that one of the McClanahan boys of Elk Creek had one of his hands cut off by the cutoff saw in the sawmill but it proved that he had a part of one of his fingers cut off. Dr. Holt was called and dressed the wound and at last accounts he was doing all right.
    Mrs. Hoagland and Mrs. Ingram spent Monday in Tolo.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 28, 1912, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mrs. Grant Mathews and Miss Henderson were shopping in our town a few days ago.
    Mrs. Charley Thomas and her mother-in-law, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, were in Heath and Diamond's store the last of the week getting things ready for Mrs. Charley Thomas to start for Scott's Bar, Cal. to meet her husband who is engaged hauling quartz from the mine to the mill.
    Marion Charley, who has been in Nevada for several years, has returned and has been visiting his relatives above Brownsboro.
    Mrs. Rhodes, whose husband is foreman on the Pelouze farm, made a business trip to Medford the last of the week.
    Mr. Mathews of Butte Falls, who has been back East visiting relatives and looking after his business interests, returned to Butte Falls Monday, stopping over Sunday in Eagle Point. He speaks in high terms of the soil of Illinois, but, Oh! the climate.
    Robbie Jones, who is in business in Medford, came out Saturday evening [omission] are stopping at the present with his mother to spend Sunday with his family, who are stopping at present with his mother, brother and family.
    Mr. and Mrs. Pool of the Forest Service, now located on Trail Creek, came out from Medford Sunday evening and took the Eagle Point and Prospect stage Monday morning for their home. Mr. Pool has been in Medford having some work done on this teeth.
    Mrs. John Ashpole made a hurried trip to Medford and back Saturday afternoon.
    The many friends of Mr. H. Corbin, the man who bought the old Bradshaw orchard, are glad to see him among us again. He has been in New York during the past winter.
    Henry Childreth, one of our blacksmiths, has had another forge put in his shop. G. H. Wamsley did the work.
    The people in the neighborhood of the Antelope school will give a basket social on Saturday evening, June 8th, the proceeds to go toward buying an organ for the Sunday school.
    Mr. McLeod and one of Mr. Natwick's men, from upper Rogue River, and F. B. Higinbotham came in Monday night and Tuesday morning Mr. Higinbotham went to Medford to look after his water rights on Rogue River. He thinks that there is a lot of "red tape" connected with the management of the water system in these parts.
    Prof. Charles Johnson was among us Monday and Tuesday on business.
    Dr. Goble's wife and Mrs. Ward of Medford took supper with us Sunday evening.
    Mr. Charles H. Reed of Lake Creek came out the first of the week and bought a lot of wire fencing of one of our merchants and a lot of general merchandise from the other merchants and then gave me his subscription for the Mail Tribune. He says that he wants all the news, so subscribes for the Mail Tribune.
    Our Eagle Point ball team are getting their new ball ground in good shape and expect of have a big game here next Sunday with the Phoenix ball team.
    A mass meeting was held here last Monday evening to take steps to have a grand celebration here and $147.50 was subscribed on the spot to get it started. More about it in my next.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 30, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The last time I wrote I simply mentioned the fact that a meeting was held here on Monday night and the preliminary steps were taken to have a grand old-fashioned celebration of the Fourth of July, and that a purse of $147.50 was subscribed. The next day S. B. Holmes, Dr. Holt and Mr. Vogeli started to canvass the town and that night another meeting was held in the town hall and they reported that the amount had been swelled to $340. The money to be applied toward clearing out the tract of land that Mr. W. Hart Hamilton had donated to the town for park purposes, and to prepared the necessary stand, seats, etc., for the accommodation of those who wished to join with us in celebrating our great national holiday. The following committee was appointed to have charge of the arrangements and disbursement of the funds: Artie Nichols, J. Frank Brown and Mr. Vogeli, and Mr. F. M. Stewart was appointed secretary and Mr. J. V. McIntyre treasurer, and these five were empowered to appoint the subcommittees and to have full control of the management of the affairs of the celebration. That we will have a fine time is self-evident, as we think that we will have an ideal place, along the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek, where we will have lovely shade, green grass and pure cold water. The committee proposes to spare no pains to make the first celebration since we were incorporated a grand success. There will be further notice of the plans given in the Eaglets, and by posting bills on the telephone poles.
    There was a company of twelve surveyors passed through here the first week for Butte Falls under the direction of the officers of the Pacific & Eastern Railway Co., but their destination and plans are as usual under their hats.
    W. C. Daley of Lake Creek, candidate for county commissioner, was in town Tuesday, but he was not electioneering any, but says that if the people want him to serve that he will do his best for them.
    Mrs. Burke, a sister of Mrs. Chauncey Nye, of Prospect, and a niece of Mrs. Nye's, Miss Brown, came in Tuesday evening to visit their relatives, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside since I last wrote are I. C. Moore and Henry Thornton of Elk Creek, S. S. Aiken of Prospect, T. B. Higinbotham of Upper Rogue, Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze and son Bobbie, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner and daughter Clara of Lake Creek, Mr. Coss of Butte Falls, besides several strangers.
    Mrs. M. L. Daily, Mrs. Fred Salter, Mrs. A. F. Florey and Mrs. Norman McQuade took it into their wise heads to have memorial exercises here on Wednesday evening, and S. B. Spiker kindly tendered them the use of his opera house to be used for the occasion. With the assistance of a number of the youths and lasses to assist in securing flowers, ferns, etc., to decorate the stage, they had it all artistically arranged most beautifully with flags, trees, shrubbery, etc., and in addition to all that they secured the assistance of the following persons who took an active part on the program. The exercises opened by the audience singing "America;" prayer by Dr. W. W. T. Holt, recitation, "Bay Billie," by Cora Owings, address by Prof. P. H. Daily (the ladies had, as they supposed, secured Prof. B. F. Mulkey for the address, but just at the last moment he phoned that he could not come, so Prof. Daily was pressed in as a substitute). Song, "Battle Hymn of the Republic," by the children; recitation, "Bereft," by Miss Fern Daily; pantomime, "Star Spangled Banner," by Miss Lula Martin, Miss Mabel Taylor, Miss Marguerite Florey, Misses Lena and Maud Lewis, Miss Hazel Brown, and Miss Lenore Walker; recitation, "The Veterans," by Isaac Childreth; Lincoln's Gettysburg Address by Carl Ringer; reading, "The Power of Prayer," by Mrs. Norman McQuade; recitation, "Our Dead Heroes," by Florence Lake; song, "Little Boy in Blue," by Miss Marguerite Betty; recitation, "The Little Green Tents," by Thelma Nichols; reading, "Music of Rappahannock," by Mrs. M. L. Daily; recitation, "The Tribute Bearer," by Miss Ina Borden; quartet, "Tenting on the Old Camp Ground," which was beautifully illustrated on the stage by the literal fore. The opera house was filled and everyone felt that they had been well repaid for their trouble and the audience was highly pleased. Our old townsman, J. J. Fryer, declared that we had just as good talent in Eagle Point as there was anywhere.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1912, page 6







LIBERTY SCHOOL AT WELLEN CLOSES WITH PROGRAM
    The Liberty school, Wellen, Oregon, C. D. Schell, teacher, closed Saturday, May 20th, with a program and community day. The people assembled about 11 o'clock and enjoyed some lively games with beanbags and basketball. A contest in the chinning exercise was held before dinner. A substantial picnic luncheon was provided by the ladies of the neighborhood.
    The programme for the afternoon began with an exciting race in arithmetic by Hubert and Jeff Bradshaw. This was enjoyed so thoroughly by both contestants and visitors that it was repeated later. The next number was a reading, "The Little Red Hen" by Jeff Bradshaw. The question, "Resolved, That women have done more good in the world than men," was debated by the pupils. Golda and Alta Bradshaw defended the affirmative and Harold von der Hellen, Ben Oswald and Baxter Bradshaw the negative. The speeches showed a great deal of research in preparation and were delivered with much spirit. After the debate the discussion became general. The program closed with a speech by J. P. Wells, county school superintendent. After his address the company went outdoors and watched the pillow fights, paper fights, apple-eating contests and other games.
    Among those present with their families were Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Wells, of Jacksonville, Mr. and Mrs. Harry von der Hellen, Mr. and Mrs. Bradshaw, Mr. and Mrs. John Owens, Mr. and Mrs. James Owens, Mr. and Mrs. Dolph Kent, Mrs. Oswald, Mrs. Kate Walch and daughters, Mrs. Tou Velle and daughter, Henry Owens, Mr. Bishop, Mr. Luy, Mr. Oswald.
    The pupils were anxious to continue the meetings of their literary society through the summer and voted to meet Saturday evenings twice a month. This society is part of their industrial club in which they all take much interest. Several of them are planning to take prizes at the state fair on sewing, cooking and corn raising.
    During the fall term Mr. Pitman of the state normal school visited Liberty school with Supervisor Chase and the pupils cooked a dinner at school. They have had a cold frame near the school house and raised a variety of vegetables.
    In the winter they gave an entertainment and box supper. With the money so raised they bought a basketball, a map of the United States, paid the freight on a set of books from the state library, bought an encyclopedia and a set of reading books selected by the individual pupils. As a result of having this reading material the grammar grade pupils have read on an average twenty books during the year besides their school books.
    The Liberty school won second place in the field and track meet at Eagle Point, April 27. They were first in girls' basket throwing, class C; boys' standing broad jump; running broad jump and shot put, and won second place in boys' chinning, unlimited class and class A, the dash, and tied with Reese Creek for second place in basket throwing, class B.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1916, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. B. Roberts and wife, who are living on the old Joe Rader place, were doing business in our town last Saturday evening.
    Mrs. Bryant and Mr. and Mrs. Norman McQuade returned from Roseburg, where they had been to attend the convention of the Odd Fellows and Rebekahs the last of the week.
    The Odd Fellows and Rebekahs gave Miss Mabel Wamsley, one of their number, who is in poor health, a surprise party last Saturday night. Each visitor brought in some memento to try to cheer her up and also brought in light refreshments, and they had one of those joyful times that are so characteristic of this community.
    The Eagle Point Amusement Company had their movie picture show and a midnight dance and report having had a fine time.
    Sunday morning broke on us bright and clear and the ladies had previously decorated the church with flags and flowers and had everything in readiness for the memorial services to be held at 11 o'clock. There was an unusually large attendance and Rev. L. L. Simmons delivered the address. About all of the old veterans were in attendance and were reminded of the scene in their younger days.
    At the same time Sunday there was quite a number of our citizens autoed out to different parts of the country. Some went upon the Siskiyous, while others went on to Hornbrook, and quite a number went to visit the Ashland park and drink from the world-renowned springs, and a few of the citizens of Medford came out here to get dinner and while away the time fishing in our beautiful Little Butte and Rogue River, among whom were our County Judge Tou Velle and wife, and Mr. and Mrs. E. R. Oatman and wife. Mr. Oatman is the fruit tree inspector of the Medford district, and Mrs. Jud Kennedy and daughter, Miss Marcella, of Medford.
    In the afternoon there was a select party autoed, or rather Forded, over to the Table Rock district and ascended the lower rock. They were Henry Trusty, Miss Claire Zimmerman, [and] Miss Ethel Roosevelt. Miss Roosevelt is a near relative of ex-President Roosevelt, and also a friend of Miss Claire Zimmerman, George Wehman and Carl Ringer. They climbed to the plateau, where they had a fine view of the entire valley.
    Miss Edith Oliver from Seattle, Wash., and Miss Rummage, of Grants Pass, have been here visiting Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy the past week.
    A party of our citizens consisting largely of the Brown family, Frank and Will. Royal, Mrs. Holmes, Mrs. Van Scoy and a few others autoed to the Wagner Springs Sunday p.m. and Mr. and Mrs. John Rader and their two daughters, Mrs. Harvey Stanley and Mrs. Ray Ashpole and Harvey Stanley visited Ashland park. Some of them had never been there before, and they were perfectly captivated with the beauties of the city, park and surroundings.
    Miss Vera Kershaw of Climax, Mrs. Owner Grigsby and her two children, Charles Manning, and a stranger by the name of Tanna, were here for dinner Monday.
    Mr. Cox, the milk goat man, was doing business here Tuesday.
    C. E. Johnson, who has been teaching in Laurel Hill district, is now engaged in canvassing for scenes around the world, Billy Sunday's sermons, etc.
    Floyd Overholt, of Lodi, California, is here the guest of Prof. W. G. Wheeler, who came in Tuesday from Talent.
    Tuesday night we were left in darkness as the electric station on the main line from Prospect went out of commission about ten o'clock and just afterward the alarm of fire was sounded and there was a general stampede among the housewives to find the old coal oil lamps, but the fire was only the burning out of the chimney (they have a fireplace) of the F. L. Heath residence. There was no damage done, but some of the neighbors were almost wild over the incident. The next morning Mr. Stimson and his helper started out and located the trouble at the station where the E.P. line connects with the main line. They followed up the line to here and after dinner started to go up by the French-Dodge bridge to follow the line through to Gold Ray.
    J. L. Bradshaw, wife and son were at the S.S. for dinner Wednesday.
    George E. Brandon moved into the old von der Hellen building they used to use as a warehouse before they moved into the store building, now the post office, away [sic]. They fixed it up for some railroad men to live in before George E. Johnson moved them to Medford. Mr. Brandon is at work tearing [out] some of the old machinery and getting ready for the coming crop. When George W. Daley Jr. was running this mill the flour commanded a good price, five cents higher on a sack than any other flour in the valley, and with the putting in of the new modern machinery we expect to have as good flour as can be made anywhere. The starting of that mill, the old Snowy Butte, will revive business and can be an incentive for the farmers to pull up their orchards, that have to be sprayed during the warm weather, and heated, smudged in cold, and cut and trimmed, pruned--and then cut out the blight and after all not receive enough off of their orchard to pay the expense of the upkeep, etc.
    There was a moving outfit passed through here Wednesday morning on the way to B. H. Brophy's farm, the old T. E. Nichols place, to move one of the large barns.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 3, 1916, page 5

EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    James Ringer has been engaged papering and fixing up the old Robinett house getting it ready for someone to occupy.
    Miss Lula Martin, one of our promising young ladies, is visiting her mother, Mrs. Saintjames, of Medford.
    Miss Hattie Weiss of Medford is here visiting her sister, Mrs. M. L. Daily, and helping her to attend to the business of the telephone.
    Many of the traveling community are glad to hear that Mr. Jo Moomaw has put his hack on the road again, as there is considerable travel over the route between here and Peyton.
    There was quite a number of our citizens went to Central Point on last Thursday, Memorial Day, to decorate the graves of departed loved ones.
    Our Eagle Point ball team went to Phoenix on Thursday to play against the Phoenix team, and the game ended in favor of Phoenix, the score standing 9 to 11.
    Our two daughters, Hattie and Agnes, started for Klamath Falls last Wednesday to visit their sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hart.
    S. A. Carlton and family of Ashland, and Mrs. Jane Plymale of Medford were out visiting Mrs. Carlton's and Mrs. Plymale's brothers, Thomas and John Nichols, Memorial Day. They have a family burying ground on the old Nichols farm, and while here visited the family graves.
    Mr. C. E. Hutchison and his mother came out on Thursday last and the next morning took the Prospect stage for Trail, where she expected to meet her niece, Mrs. George Tool.
    Mrs. Ed Bond of Lakeview, a daughter of Mrs. Art Thomas, came in a few days ago to spend the summer here. She had been so afflicted with rheumatism that she came to Eagle Point thinking that this is good enough for her. She brought with her her little daughter.
    The two Walch twins, Misses Clara and Clarada, were visiting their sister, Mrs. Charles Thomas last Friday.
    John Daley, formerly of this place, but now of Medford, came out from the Buzzard mine Thursday and brought some specimens from the good.
    Mr. A. B. Zimmerman has leased the Vatch farm on Rogue River and is thinking of moving his family there in the near future.
    I am requested to say that the Ladies' Aid Society will have a sale of the many articles that they have made during the latter part of the winter and spring on Wednesday, June 5, and that they will also serve lunch at noon for the accommodation of the hungry. The proceeds to go to improve the town park.
    Last Friday morning several of our townspeople met and began to clear out the underbrush on the park ground and get it ready for the grand celebration on the Fourth of July.
    I see by this evening's Mail Tribune that there is a mistake made in the report of the actors on the program during the memorial exercises. It should read, "Bay Billie," by Theodore Florey, instead of by Clara Owings, and "Decoration Day," by Clara Owings. I wish you to make the correction on account of the children and the truth of the statement. They both did remarkably well and should be credited.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 4, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    When I last wrote, Saturday evening, I omitted to mention that Mr. and Mrs. W. E. Gode, formerly of Medford but now of Maddeal [sic], Cal., were out and took dinner with us on that day. They were out to look at a tract of land lying southeast of Eagle Point that he had traded for in a deal. They were accompanied by Mrs. Mary Swinden of Wilson Springs and Mrs. Anna Higinbotham of Kanes Creek. Mrs. Higinbotham was telling me some of her experiences in the newspaper work, and what a job it was gathering up items to write, and to write a readable article for the papers, but how she enjoyed that kind of work. We spent a few hours together very pleasantly taking over the work, trials and perplexities of the correspondent's life.
    O. L. Irvin, one of the electricians of the Prospect plant, spent the night with us Saturday and reports that everything is working satisfactorily at the Prospect plant and that they can make quite a lot more electricity than they are using, and seemed to think that we stand a good show to become attached to the main line and got our light and power from that source.
    On Sunday morning the people began to gather at the Sunnyside quite early and by 10 o'clock or sooner Mrs. Charles Stacy of Medford and her two children, Miss Opal and Master Obed, accompanied by Mrs. Salter, a lady who is teaching school near their home on the old John Norton farm. Mr. Stack has charge of the orchard on the tract of land, I have forgotten the name of the orchard. They came in to witness the ball game between the Phoenix and Eagle Point teams, young Master Stacy being one of the Phoenix team. Shortly after that George King and Mr. Furry of Phoenix came and engaged dinner for the Phoenix team and said that they thought that there would be about 30 others from Phoenix that would want dinner and there was, for in all there were just 85 took dinner but they were not all from Phoenix, for among them were John Nussbaum, wife, son and mother of Lake Creek, and Mr. and Mrs. H. U. Lumsden of the firm of Hutchison & Lumsden, and son Treve Lumsden, who is engaged in the Fruitgrowers' Bank of Medford, E. Watt and wife, one of the directors of the First National Bank, D. W. Luke and wife, one of the Medford orchardists, and Miss Ethel Graham, a niece of Mrs. H. U. Lumsden, all of Medford, and Mrs. Larmus of Pittsburgh, Penn. Also Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Benson of the firm of Geo. Brown & Son, and daughter Miss Hazel Brown, and they were accompanied by Mr. Engel, a traveling salesman who is interested with Mr. Brown in some land in this section of the country. Mr. and Mrs. F. Salter, one of our hardware merchants, Dr. W. W. P. Holt, wife and daughter, Miss Helen, and brother-in-law, Mr. Purdy, Mr. and Mrs. McIntyre, our banker and wife, Oscar Wright and wife, besides a large lot whose names I did not learn.
    After dinner was over the most of the crowd, except the party of 10 from Medford, and they went out up to Brownsboro, repaired to the ball grounds, where the team had already prepared a grandstand for the accommodation of the visitors, and the game commenced and I understand that the game was hotly contested until the sixth inning, when the Eagle Point boys began to take to the lead and the result was the game was decided in favor of Eagle Point by 8 to 1. But if the Phoenix boys were defeated they had a fine time and expect in the future to contest again for the honors. I understand that the arrangement is made for the Medford team to come out next Sunday and try their hand at the bat with Eagle Point, and those who don't wish to attend a Sunday ball game can come out and picnic under the shade of our trees along the bank of our beautiful Little Butte Creek.
    A company of surveyors came out this Monday morning to survey off the ball grounds, four acres, and it is the intention of the committee to enclose it and have a good covered grandstand and arrange so as to make the place attractive and pleasant. I tell you Eagle Point is coming to the front quite rapidly.
    I understand that our mayor and marshal have arranged with R. R. Minter and he has brought in a band of 2500 sheep and is herding them in that part of our town where the foxtail is the thickest to try to destroy it to lessen the danger of fire this summer, but whether it will or not remains to be seen, for they pack it down so that it will burn the better. But, O, the scent. More anon.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    C. L. McPherson of Grants Pass is here trying to work up a revival for the old lodge of the A.O.U.W. He seems to think that he will succeed as the lodge is starting out on a different system.
    Mr. Henderson of Reese Creek is tearing down the old Simon Ulrich barn, one of the old landmarks of the past in our thriving little town, to make room for dwelling houses as this is one of the most desirable places to live--out of sticky.
    Verna Mathews and George Fisher have bought out the blacksmith shop and business of W. L. Childreth and are carrying on the business as usual, consideration $1600. We trust that they will succeed in their undertaking, but regret that Mr. Childreth was forced to close out his business on account of something like appendicitis, but hope that he will not leave our town, for he is one of our best citizens and an active member of our town council.
    While I was trolling around town Monday and Tuesday afternoon looking for Eaglets, I had the pleasure of meeting with Miss Donnie Rader and Mrs. Elmer Keys, who are living on the Hitchcock place and they report that they have a flourishing Sunday school in their neighborhood, in the Antelope school district and that everything in the crop line looks fine. While I was on my rounds I found that our merchants were so busily engaged that they did not have time to talk politics or religion, but business I did talk to Mr. Heath of the firm of Heath & Diamond, but he had to talk to two ladies at the same time and Mr. Diamond was so busy selling shoes to another so I went on to Henry Childreth's blacksmith shop and found that he had his new forge in operation and was trying to hold a horse's hind foot still so as to put on a shoe, repair one of Roy Willits' hacks and get it ready to go to Prospect the next day, and so went to Mr. Salter's hardware store and found him talking to S. B. Spiker about filling a bill for him to build a large packing house 50 by 96 feet and two stories high on an entirely new plan for Mr. Corbin, as he had taken the contract to not only build the packing house but also a two-story addition to the dwelling house on the orchard now owned by Mr. H. Corbin--the old Bradshaw orchard. Mr. Spiker having secured the contract to build both houses and had the teams go right to work hauling the lumber which is furnished by the Sprague Lumber Company of Eagle Point and while talking to Mr. Sprague about the lumber for those two houses learned that the same company was furnishing the lumber for the home that Mr. Piper is building on Eagle Heights, a suburb of Eagle Point. I dropped into the new bakery conducted by George Riley, recently of Medford, and per force of habit asked him for news for the Mail Tribune and while I was there discovered that he had a fine lot of bread, cakes, pies, etc., and he assured me that business was fully as good as he could have expected and while there I wrote out a receipt for his subscription to the Mail Tribune, and as I was passing Brown's store saw that they were too busy to talk as they have to keep adding to their clerical force and they are kept busy most of the time. I was going into the Model Variety Store but saw they were busy so I passed on by and on my return trip home found that Frank Lewis had quite a number taking refreshments and Sam Harnish seemed to be doing a good business in his livery stable. Found at Ashpole's billiard room quite a number interested in the pleasures of that house. I also discovered that G. W. Owings has had a new sign painted across the front of his store "groceries, confectionery and cold drinks." Stopping at the post office, I got my Mail Tribune and went home.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 7, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Curtis Nichols has moved his family into one-half of the upper story of the new brick that he and his uncle Thomas Nichols have just completed, and Thomas Nichols expects to move into the other half of the same building soon after haying.
    Mr. Forester, the machinist who has charge of putting in the machinery for the ice plant for Messrs. Nichols, says that he thinks that he will have the machinery ready to test by next Tuesday the 11th, and in a few days more they will be making ice for sale.
    B. U. Cambers and Bert Peachey, two of the forest rangers, left here Thursday morning to go to work on the government telephone line between Butte Falls and Prospect. Bert's sister Miss Bertha Peachy and Miss Maggie Daley accompanied them on their trip for an outing.
    The Sunnyside has a new sign painted on the side of the water tower next to the creek so that it can be seen by people passing along the street from the depot.
    I am requested to say that on Sunday, June 16, at 2 p.m. sharp the Gold Hill team will play here on the new ball grounds and by that time they will have the grandstand covered so as to make the visitors more comfortable than they were the last time they played.
    There is a big lot of lumber being hauled out from here to different parts of the country, a carload of it going to the fish hatchery and several different lots going to the farmers around here and quite a lot goes to Eagle Heights. Mr. Sprague, our lumber man, tells me that he is kept busy most of the time as he furnishes about all of the lumber that is used in this section.
    Mrs. A. H. Weber, our pharmacist's wife, has gone to Ashland to visit relatives.
    The Ladies' Aid Society had a sale and gave a dinner last Wednesday in Spears' Opera House and the net proceeds was from the sale of articles "made in Eagle Point," by the ladies amounted to $30, and the receipts for dinner was $30.50 and per agreement one-half of the money goes toward improving the park and the rest toward improving and beautifying the church. The provisions were all donated by the citizens and Mr. Spiker gave the use of his opera house, and the ladies seemed to appreciate his act of kindness. It is not necessary for me to add one word as to the quality or quantity of the dinner, for whenever the Eagle Point ladies undertake to do anything they do it right.
    Married in Jacksonville on Wednesday, June 5, by Hon. Judge Neil, Mr. J. B. McNichol of San Diego, Calif., and Mrs. Harriet E. Davis of Milwaukee, Wis. Mr. McNichol is an expert miner, having spent some years mining on the Colorado and Mahor [Mohave?] deserts and Mrs. Davis was an attractive widow of about 35. They expect to move from the Jacks place where they are now living to San Diego during the summer.
    This is Friday afternoon and today has been a high day in Eagle Point for we have had two different birthday parties today. The first was at the residence of C. S. Pointer and the dinner and party was a joint affair, it being Mrs. A. N. Thomas' 72nd birthday and Mrs. J. A. Curtin's 83rd birthday. There were present Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, Mrs. May Bond, of Lakeview; Mrs. James Jordan, Mrs. Rebecka Jonas, Mr. and Mrs. William Knighton, Mr. M. S. Woods and his sister, Miss Cecelia Woods, Mrs. A. N. Thomas and your Eagle Point correspondent. But Oh, the dinners for old dyspeptics! We all had a fine time and about three o'clock I started home and on my way ran into another birthday party. This time it was the birthday of little Miss Garnett Nichols, youngest daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols. As I come opposite the beautiful family residence I discovered a number of ladies on the veranda and a group of little girls in the yard and my curiosity led me to inquire what was going on and I was told that it was another birthday party, and [was] invited in, but business, well I'll tell what, I had to come home and write for the Mail Tribune so that the letter will go out tomorrow morning. Will tell about the W.C.T.U. social and reception next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 11, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. Howard, our accommodating brakeman on the P.&E. Ry., has been giving his residence a new coat of paint and fixing it up in grand style.
    In my last I promised to give an account of the W.C.T.U. social and reception for the new members. The reception was held at the residence of Prof. P. H. Daily on Thursday evening, June 6th, and special invitations were sent to the members and especially to the new members, your correspondent being among them, but owing to the constant strain on his mind to keep the Eaglets always ready for the printer and perhaps a little carelessness on his part, it slipped his mind so he had to depend on others for the necessary information to enable him to write it up, but owing to the kindness of some of his lady friends, he was able to find the following acts: There were about twenty of the members attended the reception and among them was Robert Harnish, Walter Painter, Joseph Moomaw, H. B. Bryant, Dr. Holt, Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mrs. Joseph Moomaw, Mrs. G. W. Owings, Mrs. W. L. Childreth, Mrs. M. L. Daily, Mrs. P. H. Daily, Miss Louise Blass, Miss Loretta Childreth, Miss Carrie Owney, Miss Verta Grover and Miss Fern Daily. Cake and ice cream was served, a few short speeches made and the younger members engaged in some of the innocent games and about 10:30 p.m. the company bade the host and hostess good night and repaired to their respective homes, realizing that they had spent another evening profitably.
    By the time this reaches the reader, Mrs. Argie Green and her mother, Mrs. J. J. Fryer, will have started for Seattle to visit Mrs. Green's sister, and her mother to visit her daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. Charles Jones.
    Mr. J. Edsall, who is engaged hauling quartz at Scott's Bar, California, made a flying trip to Eagle Point last Friday, stopping only one night.
    Mrs. Charley Thomas started last Saturday to join her husband at Scott's Bar, where he is engaged hauling quartz with J. Edsall.
    Haying is getting well under way in these parts and everybody is busy.
    Benj. Edmondson and his little son Benjamin spent the night here Friday.
    Our city dads have ordered the old wagon bridge refloored and some new timbers placed under the approach on the north end.
    Miss Bulah Burleson of Lake Creek, had the misfortune to fall off her horse a short time ago and hurt her arm quite badly. It was not a break, but Dr. Holt, who dressed the wound, says that the bones in the lower part of the arm were bent so that he had to straighten them.
    Dr. Holt was called on to go out and see Everett Dahack, and upon examination found that he was troubled with appendicitis so he had to be taken to the hospital in Medford and there the appendix was removed and the young man seems to be getting along nicely.
    F. J. Ayres was doing business with our merchants last Saturday.
    The Eagle Point ball team went to Gold Hill last Sunday and played against the Gold Hill team. The result was the game stood Eagle Point 5, Gold Hill 7. The Gold Hill boys are expected to play the Eagle Point team next Sunday at Eagle Point and then we will see how it comes off.
    The Sunday school picnic Sunday was fine and I will give the account of it next time I write.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 12, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    In my last I promised to give an account of our Sunday school picnic at Table Rock, it being an annual meeting of the different Congregational Sunday schools in the neighborhood of Table Rock.
    The picnic was held on the north bank of Rogue River about a mile south of Table Rock schoolhouse and the following Sunday schools were represented: Agate, Antioch, Chaparral, Trail, Table Rock and Dardanelles, although there were representatives from Sams Valley, Debenger Gap; in fact there were people from all the surrounding country. When I arrived at the place selected, I found Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary, and Rev. Howard N. Smith, the state superintendent of the Congregational Sunday schools and a large number of the citizens of that vicinity and just after my arrival, in came the Antioch-Debenger Gap stage. It consisted of a heavy four-horse wagon with a flat hayrack on it with four fine dapple gray horses hitched to it and the hay rack was filled with boys, girls, young men and a few of the more elderly ladies to chaperone the younger ones. As jolly a company as one would want, and among them was the Debenger Gap Orchestra with their musical instruments, to assist in the festivities of the occasion, for although we had religious services, it was designed for a time of joy and pleasure. It was estimated that there were about 300 or 350 persons present. The services were opened by Rev. M. C. Davis and after singing a couple of appropriate songs, prayer was offered by your Eagle Point correspondent and then Rev. Howard N. Smith was introduced and delivered an address from the text, "Suffer the little children to come unto me," and in the course of his address he read a poem entitled "The First Children's Day," that was based on the scene in India calling forth the language in the text. At the close of his address we had a number of songs and recitations by the Sunday school scholars and then we adjourned for dinner. Well, we had a dinner, a big dinner, and lots of it. After dinner we had the exercises of the program resumed and the first on the program was the rendering of some fine music by the Debenger Gap Orchestra, which is composed of the Misses Gage and their mother, and when they left the platform they were encored and then have us another beautiful selection, then a quartet by Misses Eva Hall, Hazel Byrum and Misses Vincents, and they were also called back to the stand, then a song by Mrs. Chase's class of Antioch Sunday school consisting of 41 pupils, and they showed talent and training, then the Agate school came in for their part and Chaparral school, etc., but the best part of the whole program was to hear the smaller members of the schools perform their part. It was a time long to be remembered by both young and old and we all hoped that the most of us may live to celebrate Children's Day again on the second Sunday in June, 1913.
    Robert Neil of Lake Creek, and his brother, Edward, recently from New York City, were pleasant caller Monday. Edward Neil is on his way back to his New York home.
    Miss Alice Nygren of Lake Creek, came out Tuesday, went to Medford to have some dental work done.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey, who has been up to her mother's, Mrs. Chauncey Nye, to attend the wedding of her sister, Miss Elsie Nye, and Joe Phipps, has returned but I have not been able to secure the particulars of the wedding.
    Our two daughters have reached home again, and I am glad, for it is so lonesome at home without them. That means that the boys--well, I was a boy myself once.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 13, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Austin Green and wife of Trail have moved out and are now stopping with Mr. Green's grandfather, J. J. Fryer, while Mrs. Fryer has gone to Washington to visit her daughter, Mrs. Charles Jones.
    Artie Nichols has the machinery in place and by next Monday will be turning out Eagle Point-made ice.
    Mrs. Floyd Pearce of Forest Creek came over to Eagle Point the first of the week to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    C. D. Stout, the foreman of the bridge carpenters on the P. and E. Railroad, brought his wife and daughter, Miss Ora, out to spend a few days at the Sunnyside the first of the week. They remained until Friday morning. While here they made a trip to Butte Falls and spent one day roving through the woods near the bridge on the P. and E. R.R.
    Last Saturday evening the Antelope Sunday school gave a basket social in the Antelope school house and on account of my not being able to attend in person, and being anxious to get the details of the occasion I secured a promise of a written report of the affair by Miss Donnie Rader, but when the time came to write it up for me to send to the Mail Tribune her heart failed her, so she sent the Sunday school superintendent, Mr. Cooley, over to give the main points, but he being like myself somewhat advanced in age could not see the funny points, like having the boys try to bribe the girls to designate in some way the name of the owner of the basket that was offered for sale, and how much fun the boys had in running the basket up on some young fellow who was almost dying to get to eat with his best girl, or how the hearts of the girls would flutter when they saw that some young man, or perhaps older man, whom they didn't want to get their basket, was persisting in bidding on their basket, or how disappointed some boy would be when he saw some other fellow eating out of his girl's basket. Oh, I tell you, us old folks sometimes omit to see these little things that go to make up some of the pleasures or disappointments of life. But to the report. There were about thirty or forty in attendance, but there seemed to be quite a scarcity of baskets, and the result was there was considerable sharp bidding and quite an amount of excitement over the question as to who would come out second best in the race for the best girls basket.
    The social was gotten up to raise funds to purchase an organ for the Sunday school and the receipts of the evening amounted to $21.05. The committee has already procured an organ, second hand, for $15.00, leaving a balance of $6.05 in the treasury. It is not necessary for me to add that they had a joyful time, for they have the material in that neighborhood to make everything pleasant that they undertake.
    P. H. Daily is engaged assessing in the county out east of here.
    Sheriff W. A. Jones, wife, daughter and a young lady friend came out Tuesday. His business was to serve papers on Commissioners Frank Brown and James Owens in the Medford bridge injunction suit, and some of the old hayseeds out here are wondering if that suit won't result in the people of the county repudiating the $504,000 illegal indebtedness. Who can tell.
    Henry French and wife were doing business with our merchants the first of the week.
    On my return from Grants Pass last Thursday I found everything lively around town as usual. I had been to Grants Pass to have Dr. Findley treat my eyes and while there met Mrs. Jack Hustin of Trail, who was also there to consult the doctor. I also had the pleasure of meeting Miss Hazel Cox, a daughter of one of our old settlers, Mr. True Cox. She was consulting the doctor with regard to her hearing, and another one of the descendants of one of our old acquaintances of Siskiyou County, Cal., Miss Daisy Hight. She was also in to see the doctor with regard to her throat. Grants Pass is quite a lively little place, not so large as Medford, but larger than Eagle Point. They are hustlers in that town and have some beautiful residence buildings and their school houses will compare with either Medford or Ashland.
    O. L. Irwin and bride of Prospect spent the night with us last Tuesday, taking the Prospect stage Wednesday morning. Mr. Irwin spent the night with us about two weeks ago on his way to Seattle where he was married, and has taken his wife to their home near Prospect. He is one of the electricians who has charge of the electric plant in that region.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 15, 1912, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    S. S. Aikin of Prospect was a pleasant caller Thursday night.
    Larkin Reynolds, F. T. Newport and James Gillespie were among the guests Thursday night. The first two named are of the carpenters crew of the P.&E.R.R. and Mr. Gillespie is one of the brakeman of the same company.
    Mr. J. Cadzow, E. Wheeler and Ed Watson were with us Thursday night. They were here working in the interest of the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Telephone Company. They were starting in to place another line on the poles between here and Derby, as there are so many phones already on the line that it does not do good service and there are five more applications for new phones between here and Butte Falls.
    H. H. Miller and O. S. Lawrence of Medford came out Thursday to lath William von der Hellen's house that he has been having remodeled.
    E. L. Warnstorff has been putting an addition to his residence.
    Fred Pelouze, wife and son Robbie were pleasant callers Thursday night for supper. The whole family seem to be enthusiastic over baseball and Robbie is one of the main players in the Eagle Point team.
    Speaking about the ball team reminds me that the committee have roofed the grandstand and made everything comfortable for the spectators.
    Our new bakery is proving quite a success as well as a great convenience for those who wish to procure victuals in that line and we predict a good business for him in the future.
    Mrs. J. B. McNichol has an ad in the classified list today.
    Rev. George S. Paddock, the state superintendent of the International Sunday School Society, of Portland, will preach at Antioch Sunday, June 23 at 11 a.m., Agate 3 p.m. and Table Rock in the evening. Mr. Paddock is the state superintendent of the Congregational Churches of Oregon and one of the leading preachers of the state. He is making a tour of this part of the state and will during the week preach at Dardanelles S.H. 17, Sams Valley 18, Trail 19, Elk 20, Peyton 21.
    Wilbur Ashpole was out Friday to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Ashpole. While here he inspected our park ground, and remarked that it could be made one of the most beautiful parks in the country.
    The committee have been to work on the ground clearing away some of the underbrush leveling the ground and getting it ready for the grand celebration of the Fourth of July. The committee intends to spare no pains, but will do everything in their power to make it as pleasant as possible for all that come.
    Heath and Diamond are having a cooler attached to their new store where they can keep eatables cool and fresh.
    A lady friend of mine who has been sick for some time met me Friday and gave me a good scolding for not putting in the Mail Tribune that she was sick and on another occasion a man found fault with me because I inquired of him every time we met how his wife was, when she was sick, and I told him the same reason, that is that I thought it would make their friends uneasy to read that they were sick, and for that reason I have refrained from mentioning cases of sickness in the neighborhood, and I am glad to be able to truthfully say that there is generally very little sickness in this neighborhood--for I don't like to report hospital news.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 17, 1912, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Thomas E. Nichols has moved his family into the new brick store, meat market and residence building. He and his nephew Artie who built the house had it so arranged that they each have rooms upstairs so that everything is as handy as a pocket in a shirt.
    Our enterprising citizens who live on First Street in the Ulrich addition have had a part of the street graded and it is now ready for the gravel to be placed on it. The property owners did the grading and the town is to do the rest, according to reports from headquarters.
    Miss A. C. Murphy, daughter of one of our old boarders, and for some time section boss on the part of the P.&E.R.R. in this section, and Mr. Wene Pashek of The Dalles, were pleasant callers Saturday morning on their way up to "Dick" Slinger's, where Miss Murphy taught school for some time.
    John Daley, one of our old citizens who has been interested in the Buzzard mine, came in Saturday to visit his parents and brother.
    W. L. Childreth in conversation with your correspondent remarked, "If I have sold out my blacksmith shop I don't know where I could go to find a more desirable place than Eagle Point for a home, although I would like to have my boys on a farm." Mr. Childreth has been in Kansas, Missouri, Oklahoma, Dakota, etc., and says that Eagle Point, Jackson County, Oregon, is good enough for him, and his head is level on that point.
    W. F. Hoffman of Lake Creek was here for dinner Saturday and reports the death of his infant son, aged six weeks, on the 14th of this month. Interment was made Sunday in the Brownsboro Cemetery, religious services were conducted by a Seventh Day Baptist whose name I didn't learn.
    Word came to me Saturday that the daughter of Len Jones of Dudley fell and broke her arm last Friday.
    Last Saturday morning the family was aroused at the Sunnyside by the arrival of Mr. Murphy of Medford with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Allen. Mrs. Allen's father had died in Ashland that morning and Mr. Murphy came out with his auto to the Corbin orchard for them and they came here, as all of her things were here and took the train for Medford. Her father, Mr. H. E. Stone, has been a resident of Ashland for a number of years and was the owner of considerable property there. He was aged 74 years.
    Last Sunday was quite a day in Eagle Point as the Gold Hill ball team came up and played against the Eagle Point team. The score stood Eagle Point 11, Gold Hill 15, but the boys had lots of fun and all passed off pleasantly. We had the usual crowd here for dinner and just as Mrs. Howlett was preparing to put dinner on the table she was called to the phone by Mr. Bert Harmon of Medford and asked if she could serve a chicken supper at six o'clock, in the screened porch, for a company of fifteen, to which she responded that she could. Promptly at 12 noon dinner was announced and the Gold Hill party were invited to the table on the screened porch and that table was soon filled and the rest of the Gold Hill company were invited to the dining room proper and they entered on the duties of the hour as though they enjoyed it. There were not so many as there were two weeks ago but enough to have a good time, and they had it. Among those who came in addition to the people who came to see the ball game were Dr. Martin C. Barber, wife and children, Mrs. Osborne and Dr. Grant, recently from the East. After dinner they went on up to Brownsboro.
    About 5:50 p.m. three autos came in and the following persons marched to the supper table: Mr. and Mrs. L. Perkins, Mr. and Mrs. H. A. Grey, Jr., Mr. and Mrs. Bert Harmon, Mrs. LaClaire, Mrs. George Roberts, Mr. P. W. Watson, Master Windsor Gale, Mrs. L. W. Remi of North Bend, Wash., and Master Jos. Hackins, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma. After supper they took a walk around town, came back and visited for an hour or so and went on their way rejoicing, vowing that they would come back occasionally and have another good time. Mrs. Grey and Mrs. Harmon were the hostesses of the occasion, superintending the company and settling the bills.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 19, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The Eagle Point Sunday School celebrated their annual anniversary last Sunday evening, and although I did not have the pleasure of attending, the report comes to me that there was an immense crowd for a small place like Eagle Point, the church building was simply packed, seats brought in, was filled and quite a number had to stand. The exercises were conducted entirely by the small children. I understand that there was one girl took a part that is about fourteen years old, and all of the rest of the entire program was carried out by the smaller children and in some instances they brought down the house. I would send a copy of the program but it was destroyed before I could or either did see Mrs. P. H Daily, as she was on the committee who had charge of the arrangement, and here I wish to say that the friends of the Sunday school seem to feel a great degree of gratitude to Mrs. P. H. Daily, Mrs. Bryant, Mrs. Moomaw and Mrs. Grover for the unceasing efforts they put forth to make the entertainment the grand success it was.
    During the time the boys were playing ball last Sunday Mrs. Charles Brewett spent the time visiting Mrs. Howlett, she said that it would not look well, or she would not feel right for her to go in the forenoon and teach a Sunday school class and in the afternoon go and spend the time watching a ball game.
    Mr. and Mrs. Walters, who are spending the summer upon Rogue River, spent the night with us Sunday taking the E.P.-Prospect stage Monday morning.
    Our school meeting passed off quietly last Monday, there seemed to be an unusual interest taken in the meeting as almost every merchant and business man in town was there. The result was Fred Pelouze was elected director for three years and J. V. McIntyre, our banker, as clerk. The report of the outgoing clerk showed that there had been paid out during the past year thirty-four hundred dollars.
    The annual school meeting for the Antelope district elected Mr. Frank Derrick as director and Miss Bonnie Rader as clerk.
    Ed Cornell, U.S. guard for the timber, and George West came in Tuesday afternoon and spent the night with us, starting for the Prospect country Wednesday morning.
    For fear I get another scolding for not reporting bad news, I will have to report the news that our old and highly respected townsman, J. J Fryer, had the misfortune to fall into an irrigating ditch last Monday and had considerable difficulty in getting out as he is quite advanced in age, being 84, and the result is that he is in rather a serious condition. Dr. Holt, who is in attendance, phoned for his daughter, Mrs. Floyd Pearce of Forest Creek, and she came over Tuesday. Mrs. Fryer having gone to Seattle to visit her daughter Mrs. Charles Jones.
    Wm. Gregory, one of our oldest pioneers, was over from Central Point Tuesday visiting Mrs. A. N. Thomas and while here visited his old friend J. J. Fryer.
    Wm. Daley, the man who is to be our next county commissioner, and was assaulted some time ago by an Italian up near his home on the north fork of Little Butte Creek, came riding into town Tuesday forenoon on horseback on his way to Medford, he says that he is a great deal better but not well by a considerable [omission]. His many friends here gave him a cordial greeting.
    I am requested to say to the readers of the Eaglets that the Medford baseball team will come out Sunday the 23rd, and play against the Eagle Point ball team.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 20, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    There is a whole lot of kicking on the part of some of our taxpayers in these parts on account of there being notices sent to them after they had paid, as they supposed, their taxes and taken a receipt for the same, that there was still the taxes due on their personal property and the interest, penalty, etc. The question is asked and reiterated, when will the tangle about our taxes be unraveled? In many instances people have sacrificed in order to raise the money to pay their taxes, and then after they supposed that they were all clear for another year, to have a dun come for more, it is provoking. It looks as though after a man has gone to the sheriff's office and offered to pay his taxes and pays what is due and demanded, takes his receipt, and then months afterward have another bill, with interest and penalty attached, presented that there is a great deal of carelessness somewhere.
    Fred Frideger, his nephew, J. R. Frideger, and F. J. Rippy, who have been out here plastering Wm. von der Hellen's home, have got through their job and Fred has been putting in his time clearing out his orchard just northeast of town, while the other two returned to Medford.
    The traveling salesmen are coming in to do business with our merchants and occasionally one of them drops in for a meal and a night's lodging. Among them since I wrote last were S. G. London of San Francisco, selling dry goods and notions, and W. C. Thurland of San Francisco. They seem to think that Eagle Point is a good field to operate in.
    I unintentionally omitted to state in my last that Ed Cowden of Butte Falls was among us on Monday night.
    In my last I mentioned that William Gregory of Central Point was visiting among us, but omitted to state that his wife and Mrs. Susan Miller (nee Susan March), a cousin of Mrs. Gregory's, were with him.
    It becomes my duty to chronicle another accident. This time it is old Mr. N. Woolery, father of Mrs. Grant Mathews, living on the old John Black place. He has been almost helpless for some time and during the pleasant spell of weather we had a few days ago he walked out in the yard and in trying to step up into the house fell and broke two of his ribs loose from the spine. Dr. Holt was called and he seems to be resting easy, but it will be a long time before he is able to go around again.
    Mrs. Ed Bond of Lakeview and her little daughter are at this writing visiting Mrs. Howlett and the girls. She came in from Lakeview to be treated for rheumatism, and I am glad to be able to say that she has so far recovered that she can go around without any trouble.
    Mr. Van Vactor, one of the old engineers on the S.P. railroad and more recently on the P.&E. Railroad, and has been acting watchman for the P.&E. at this place, has had his wife move from Ashland and they have gone to housekeeping in the von der Hellen brick. He has been boarding at the Sunnyside for several months.
    Mrs. Claudius Pearce of Forest Creek came over last Wednesday to help take care of her father, J. J. Fryer, and I am glad to be able to say that he seems to be improving some, but it will be some time before he fully recovers.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Singleton of this neighborhood, in the city of Los Angeles, June 14, a daughter. Mr. Singleton informs that his wife and the babe are doing fine.
    Orvil Tarbell of Ashland was with us Thursday night on his way to Trail.
    Brooks Spencer phoned out to Mrs. Howlett to have her prepare a lunch for a company of ten to be sent up to the Antelope orchard on Friday, as there was to be a company consisting of that number come out there for a picnic dinner that day.
    W. Hart Hamilton, the man who bought the old Ulrich place, took dinner at the Sunnyside Friday. He is here looking after his interests in these parts. He owns quite a large tract of land close to Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 25, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    County Commissioner James Owens was among us last Saturday.
    Mrs. Middlebusher and her son Clarence of Trail were business visitors among us Saturday.
    Gus Nichols had a runaway last Saturday; his horse took fright and went dashing down the street toward the depot, breaking the shafts and harness considerable.
    Frank Johnson and his son were also among us last Saturday.
    Nichols & Co. have completed their ice plant and are turning out about 1600 pounds a day. They have built a wood building on the rear of their brick to cover their gasoline engine and a part of the machinery and have things fixed up fine.
    O. C. Davis reports that he butchered a 10 months old calf that dressed 424 pounds. That is some calf for its age.
    The dance given by the Eagle Point ball team last Friday night was a grand success. I heard one man say that there were so many there that they could hardly find room to dance. There were about ninety tickets sold, I understand, although I have not been able to learn definitely the number.
    W. E. Hammel attended the dance and the next morning went to Medford.
    Merrill and Marvin Goode, twin brothers, were pleasant callers last Saturday.
    Mr. (I understand that his initials are J. R.) Henderson, who has a homestead on Reese Creek, was badly hurt last Saturday morning. He was helping Mr. Ed Conley raise a barn, the two men were working together, and Mr. Conley was on top of the framework about twenty feet high and let an eight-pound hammer fall, it striking Mr. Henderson in the back about half way between the neck and the hips, and he, Mr. Conley, rushed to town for medical aid but I have not been able to learn the particulars as to the result, as I have been away to Agate and Table Rock Sunday afternoon and Monday forenoon, but if I can learn more will give it next time.
    Henry Meyers and son of Lake Creek were pleasant callers Saturday.
    T. F. Ayres, wife and daughter, Mrs. Newport were visiting their daughter and sister Rosa Saturday while in town.
    T. L. Cromwell of Grants Pass called Saturday evening to make arrangements to have his wife stop at the Sunnyside for a week so that she can recuperate her health.
    Rev. Lamar preached his farewell sermon Sunday; he has been pastor of the Baptist Church here for the last three and a quarter years and in making his closing remarks Sunday morning, spoke of the strong ties existing between himself and his charge, and how with regrets he was leaving them, and also paid his church a compliment by stating that they had contributed more toward the maintenance of the church, in proportion to their ability than any other church in the bounds of the Rogue River Baptist Association. Mr. Lamar, while not what would be called a fluent preacher, is looked upon in these parts as a good devoted Christian gentleman and is a good pastor, and leaves many warm friends behind him. He goes from here to take charge of the Central Point-Merlin work. He will be succeeded by a man by the name of Simmons.
    Thomas and Lyle Carlton of Ashland were pleasant callers Sunday.
    Owing to the rain the ball boys did not play last Sunday.
    The next time I will tell of the Table Rock meeting.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 26, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    In my last letter I promised to tell something of the meeting at Table Rock. I started from home at 1:30 p.m. to go to Agate school house where I was to meet Rev. M. C. Davis and George E. Paddock, D.D., of Portland, the state superintendent of the Congregation of Churches of Oregon and also state superintendent of the International Sunday School Society. When we reached the school house I was a little ahead of time and found no one there; in a few minutes, however, the two ministers arrived and then we spent a few minutes together, still no one came and we began to think that our preacher would have but two to preach to, but in a few minutes they began to come in sight and before long we had a good-sized audience and Rev. Paddock preached. I may be permitted to mention in this connection that we had some very fine singing in connection with the service.
    At 7:30 p.m. the bell in the Table Rock school house rang to notify the people that it was time to assemble for services and at 8 o'clock the house was called to order by Rev. Davis. About this time the people from Agate began to come in, and by the time thirty-seven had come in a hay wagon and they were seated, the crowd amounted to about one hundred and twenty and then the services began by having a quartet by two young men and Miss Hazel Byrum and Miss Effie Hall, followed by two songs by the congregation, with Miss Byrum at the organ. By way of digression I will say that when you get the singers of Agate and the singers of Table Rock together and Miss Hazel Hyrum at the organ you will always have good singing. Dr. Paddock announced his text from Ps. 84 and in less than a minute had the attention of the entire audience, and in the course of the sermon told how God was shaping the affairs of this world for its evangelizing, referring to the general uprising in the political affairs of the United States, the awakening of the Orient, and the establishing of a great republic among the Chinese, the general unrest that exists throughout the world on the subject of Christianity, the efforts being put forth by the Roman Catholics to colonize the Willamette Valley, etc., and wound up by urging on Christians to redouble their efforts for the evangelizing of this coast.
    Dr. Paddock is one of the recognized leaders in the work on the Pacific Coast. He has just finished a tour of the field in Southern Oregon and says that we have truly a wonderful country in Southern Oregon and promises to try to put more laborers in the church work in the near future.
    While at Table Rock it was announced that the young people will have a basket social next Saturday night in the school house to raise funds to pay for a hundred chairs they have bought for use when they have public gatherings. They have a fine program prepared for the occasion.
    While in Table Rock I had the pleasure of meeting a brother of your Table Rock correspondent, Mr. Hail [sic].
    Senator H. von der Hellen was smiling on his friends in Eagle Point last Tuesday.
    F. B. Higinbotham of Prospect and his daughter Mrs. J. W. Fallis of Alberta, B.C., were pleasant callers Monday night. She came out to interview Dr. Holt.
    W. P. Whitman has reopened the basket [barber] shop in Eagle Point.
    Miss Mamie Wright, who has been teaching school on Elk Creek has finished her school and returned to her home in Eagle Point.
    The rain stopped the ball game last Sunday but the Eagle Point boys expect to have a game next Sunday with the Woodville team.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 27, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. and Mrs. John Rader were doing business with our merchants about the middle of the week, and so were Mr. and Mrs. Keese of Antelope Valley.
    Miss Mamie Wright, the young lady who is to take charge of the primary department in our school this fall and has taught a term on Elk Creek this summer, returned home last Saturday. When I was up in the Elk Creek country where she was teaching I had the pleasure of visiting her school, and from what I saw of her ability as a teacher feel proud that she is to have charge of the little folks of our school.
    Rev. Holmes, pastor of the Baptist church in Medford, left Eagle Point on the car for Medford Wednesday morning.
    W. T. Hoffman, wife and little daughter, spent the night with us on Tuesday last.
    Arthur Moeller of Portland came out Wednesday evening on the P.&E. to help our Eagle Point boys play ball. He is a professional pitcher and is to pitch for the boys next Sunday and also on the Fourth of July.
    Next Sunday's game is to be between the Woodville and Eagle Point boys and they expect to have in addition to their own team three new basemen and two new fielders. They are expecting to have a big crowd here on the Fourth and the people are making big preparations. F. M. Stewart, who has charge of arranging the park, will have it in fine shape--a beauty. A large platform is already established and seats arranged for the accommodation of all that come, and the committee is building a large platform for the dancers to use who do not want to go to Spiker's opera house, where there will be dancing both day and night, and Lou Jones has opened a shooting gallery and baby knocking establishment, where the young folks will have a chance to enjoy themselves. And the hotels will set up the best meals they can and picnickers can have lovely shade in the park, where they can eat their lunch, and Mrs. Howlett is preparing to feed all that come between the hours of 11:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m., and I understand that arrangements have been made for a minister by the name of Eldridge to come out and deliver the oration so we are looking for a high old time and expect to have a large crowd here. One of the interesting features will be the ball game in the morning and afternoon between the Eagle Point and Talent teams. The Talent team is No. 1 and the Eagle Point team, with the accession of the pitcher, three base men and two outfielders, expect to let the world know they can play ball.
    M. R. Koontz and wife (nee Ollie Smith), of Butte Falls, who have been visiting friends in Ashland, returned and spent the night at the Sunnyside Wednesday, taking the train Thursday morning for their home. Mr. Koontz is one of the U.S. guards to watch the timber to keep it from burning.
    The electric storm that passed over the Rogue River Valley Wednesday was unusually severe in this section and the Reese Creek and Rogue River country. When I reached home from Medford, word was sent to me over the phone by Mr. A. B. Zimmerman that the lightning had struck the team that he was driving on the Vatch ranch on Rogue River and killed them both instantly and shocked himself and his two sons and one of the Bergman boys so that it was some time before they all recovered. They were hauling hay and were all four on the load going to the barn. The team belonged to Mr. Vatch. The lightning also struck an oak tree that was standing near Joe Moomaw's home and tore it all to pieces, striking three telephone poles near his home. It also struck in the street near the old Daley blacksmith shop but did no damage.
    The next time I will tell about the organization of the Rebecca lodge of I.O.O.F. etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 29, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I promised the readers of the Mail Tribune an account of the organization of the Rebecca Lodge of Eagle Point, Oregon, on June 27. On the arrival of the train about 10 o'clock a.m. the following ladies came marching into the Sunnyside and called for dinner, announcing that they were here for the purpose of organizing a Rebecca lodge; that they were a kind of advance guard: Mrs. Helen Haskins, Miss Phoebe Vinson, Mrs. Ada B. Beach, Mrs. Josephine F. Clark, Mrs. Ava L. Miller, Mrs. Nannie Woolf, and Mrs. Nellie King. They were accompanied by Mrs. M. L. Daily and Mrs. Minnie Bryant, and soon after their arrival Mrs. Blanche Slater arrived. A part of the ladies were closeted with her until dinner was announced. After dinner they repaired to the lodge room of the I.O.O.F., where they organized the lodge, getting everything ready for the initiation of the new members. When the afternoon train arrived there was another company arrived, and a part of them went to the Eagle Point Hotel and the following named persons came to the Sunnyside: Mr. and Mrs. Lin O. Howard, Mr. and Mrs. George W. Howard, Mrs. C. P. True, Mrs. J. A. Pew, Mrs. C. Noe, Mrs. J. L. Damnes and Mrs. C. Hitzler, to take part in the work of organizing. While waiting for supper we had some fine music on the organ and talking machine. After supper the company repaired to the hall and perfected the organization by electing the following officers: Blanche Slater, N.G.; Effie Daily, V.G.; Minnie Bryant, Fin. Sec.; Lottie McQuade, Rec. Sec.; May Painter, Treas.; Catherine Nichols, I.G.; Hattie Howlett, O.G. The following are the charter members: Blanche Slater, Minnie Bryant, Lottie McQuade, Lutia Daily, May Painter, Frank Salter, Charles Painter, Norman McQuade, P. H. Daily and M. L. Daily. The following members were initiated into the new lodge: Nettie Grover, Margaret Daily, Hattie Howlett, Annie Bacon, Charles Bacon, Fannie Cole, Clay Cole, Rosa Ayres, Louis Smith, Manty Minter, Robert Minter, Catherine Nichols, Art Nichols, Mabel Pruett, James Binger, Harrison Hess, Louisa Blass, Mamie Wright, Mary Ringer, Varian Jones, Jacob Jones, Ed Cingcade, Grace Childreth, N. L. Childreth, Mary Zimmerman, Letta McDonough, Burton Bryant, Minnie Bryant, Mabel Wamsley and G. W. Wamsley.
    After the initiatory ceremony was completed and all the lodge work finished lunch was served, and I heard one of the members remark that there was enough left after to feed a small army. They served cake, sandwiches and ice cream, and about midnight they adjourned and the people from Medford returned on a special train. Some of the young folks seemed to think that they had spent one of the pleasantest evenings of their lives. They have started off with a membership of forty and there will be several more likely join before long.
    I failed to mention in my last that Mrs. Abe Weiss, mother of Mrs. M. L. Daily, and her daughter, Mrs. Clarence Boussum, came out last Wednesday, and after visiting their daughter and sister, were visiting the family of William Taylor.
    Ed Cingcade, who has been over to Scott's Bar, Calif., helping Charley Thomas to haul quartz, returned home the past week. He says that Charley and Jud Edsall are doing good work, but, oh! the road. It is so steep that it takes three hours for six horses to draw the empty wagon up one and a quarter miles, and Mrs. Thomas wrote her mother that she could not find a spot of level ground big enough to whip a dog on. So it must be somewhat hilly over there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Farlow and Thomas Kenny called for dinner Friday on their way to Medford.
    Mrs. Henry Meyers and her mother, Mrs. Sam Klingle, were guests with us Friday.
    Friday night Ed Cowden of Butte Falls and Ed Higinbotham, the road supervisor of this road district, stopped with us. Mr. Higinbotham, in speaking of the recent rain, said that it didn't rain at his place on Big Butte but simply poured; that the water on nearly level land was about one foot deep, but he admits that he was scared.
    Last Friday P. H. Daily's little son Orris, about eight years old, fell off a horse onto his head and shoulders, and at this writing, Saturday noon, is in a serious condition.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 2, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday after I got through writing for the Mail Tribune I took a stroll around town for the same reason that dogs go to church, to see and to be seen, and while on my stroll, although it was rather a dull day and there seemed to be but few people in town, I noticed that there were six teams tied at the rack back of Geo. Brown & Son's store, so I went in there and found Mrs. Wilfred Jack and Mrs. Gorman and while there Mr. Wood and wife. They have a homestead on the foothills northwest of Eagle Point and in a short time there were four lassies (that is a class of children between the girls and young ladies), so I decided that they were doing a fair business. I then went to Heath & Diamond's and there both were busy waiting on customers as fast as they could and there I found Mr. Gorman and Mrs. Quackenbush, and shortly Mrs. Jack and Mrs. Walter Henderson came in and I concluded that if I wanted to do any business with them I would have to come early in the morning or late at night.
    Wilbur Jacks came in later in the evening and while he was away from his team for a few moments they took fright and started to run. A man by the name of Fisher, I understand, was in the covered hack and when the horses started to run threw him out but did not hurt him seriously but turned the hack over and the top caused it to upright itself again. They did considerable damage to the hack and harness. Mr. Jack was bringing some hens to the Sunnyside to use on the Fourth.
    Miss M. A. Kaiser of Ashland, a sister of Ed Kaiser, formerly editor and publisher of the Valley Record, accompanied by Mrs. Van Vactor, were callers on Mrs. Howlett and the girls Saturday afternoon.
    John McDonough, who is working up above Lake Creek, came down on business last Friday, remaining at the Sunnyside until Sunday morning.
    Sunday morning S. S. Aikin of Prospect came in to the Sunnyside and in the evening was joined by his daughter, Miss Frances, and she was accompanied by Miss Mae Nealon, of Table Rock. The next morning Mr. and Miss Aikin took the Prospect stage for their home near Prospect. Mr. Aikin has been engaged assessing the Sams Valley country and after he got through took a trip to California to visit relatives. His daughter Miss Frances has been attending the Oregon Agricultural College and is on her way to her old home.
    While Miss Nealon was here she gave me some points with regard to the basket social at Table Rock which I mentioned in the Eaglets last week. There was a fine turnout and they had a fine program. They always do at Table Rock. Among the most attractive things was the singing--they had quartets, solos and miscellaneous singing and recitations, and they have some of the best talent there is to be found outside of Eagle Point. There were thirty boxes sold and there was a surplus of girls and young ladies. The boys are a little bashful but there were enough boys and men to buy the boxes and they brought the nice little sum of $54.50, lacking only about two dollars of having enough to pay for the chairs they had bought for the school house. I tell you whenever the ladies of Table Rock take a notion to do something for the general good of the community they just go ahead and do it. That is the kind of folk that planned and built that fine school house they have to hold school in and for their social meetings. When they were building a school house they made it large enough for all purposes.
    The Eagle Point ball team went to Gold Hill Sunday and played against the Woodville team as they could not get rigs to come up here. Result, Eagle Point 7, Woodville 5.
    The next time will tell who and what was here Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 3, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry Daily and Harry Stinson of Medford came out Sunday on their wheels to visit their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Daily, and later in the day Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stinson, his brother-in-law and wife, and another one of his brother-in-laws, Mr. James Bearch. While I have Mr. Daily in mind I will add that his son who fell off his horse is able to go around again.
    Saturday evening looked gloomy and Sunday morning broke with the weather still foreboding and the Woodville baseball team had telephoned that they could not come up to Eagle Point as had been announced, and the Eagle Point ball team had gone to Gold Hill to meet them and have a game there and Mrs. Howlett concluded that she and the girls would have an easy time Thursday, and when dinner was announced there was not quite enough to fill one table of fourteen and I was just in the act of going to the table when I heard an auto come up to the gate, and on going out met Attorney E. D. Briggs and wife, Miss Nellie Briggs, and Montie Briggs and wife from Ashland and before they had got fairly in the house two more autos came rushing up and Messrs. W. M. Offin, Nick Kime, Mrs. Nick Kime, Mr. and Mrs. C. R. Heimroth, Mr. P. Heimroth, and Mr. C. E. Estar of Medford called for dinner, and in less time than it takes to write it another auto came in and Mr. Bert R. Greer, editor and owner of the Ashland Tidings, and wife, and W. E. Barnes, the business manager of the Tidings, called for dinner, besides five young men whose names I failed to learn, so the reader can see that the life of a hotelkeeper is very uncertain when it comes to counting noses in advance. In addition to the above named persons Mr. and Mrs. Frank Salter and Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Weber and Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Wright were guests at the Sunnyside that Sunday.
    I omitted to state in my last letter that Mrs. W. H. Bradshaw and Mrs. Rosie Phipps of Medford were guests of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart last Sunday.
    Geo. Riley, our baker, made a business trip to Medford last Saturday.
    Irwin Pool, who has formerly lived in our town but has resided in Jacksonville for the past several months, came out to visit his sister, Mrs. Frank Brown.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gorman and Mrs. Quackenbush were doing business with our merchants the last of last week.
    Mrs. Julia Vernon, a sister of our town baggageman, Fred Findley, is here visiting her brother.
    Edward M. Koenig and Reuben Hill of Derby; Ray N. Vaughn of Peyton and F. H. Sweat and his sister Miss Millie S. Sweat of Brownsboro, and C. E. Johnson of Derby entered their names on the Sunnyside register last Monday.
    Robert Lewis and wife of Persist were doing business in our town last Monday.
    A call was made by someone to all who felt an interest in cleaning up the park to come Tuesday morning with their hoes, rakes, etc., to go to work and by the time that some of the ordinary city ladies get dressed, there was a company of women collected and were just making the debris fly and by 3 o'clock p.m. had the park looking as though it never was a wet, swampy tract of land that was considered by some of the old hayseeds as being fit for nothing but a duck pond or a pig pasture. I tell you the ladies have made it a beauty spot, although Mr. F. M. Stewart, who has had charge of the work, deserves a great deal of credit for his persistence in arranging and planning the work. The ladies, you know, always put on the finishing touch.
    In a former article I wrote that Mr. Whitman had reopened the barber shop and the printer made me say that Mr. Whitman had reopened the basket shop and several inquiries have come to me over the phone and orally to know where it is and from the interest manifested it might be well for someone to engage in that kind of business in our town.
    Our town is decorated all over this afternoon, July 3, and I will try to tell about the 4th in my next.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 5, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday afternoon when I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I promised the readers that the next time I wrote I would give an account of some of the happenings in Eagle Point at the Fourth of July, but before I begin on that subject will mention some of the things that happened that day. One important incident being the increase in the family of Mr. and Mrs. von der Hellen. Dr. Holt reports that a new baby girl came into the family and that the new arrival is fine and healthy and that the mother is doing finely, and we all know that Grandpa von der Hellen is just as proud as he can be.
    That same evening a man giving his name as M. W. Pratt, a traveling lecturer, representing himself as a Free Methodist minister, lectured to a few of our citizens, taking for his subject "From the Home to the Gutter and from the Gutter to the Pulpit." In his lecture he gave a sketch of his life, telling how he fell into the habit of drinking, gambling and other forms of vice, and blamed our system of family government for it to a great extent, for his fall. After which he told us that we ought all of us vote the prohibition ticket and incidentally remarked that he paid his own way, paid full fare on the railroads, etc., and suggested that if any of us had a mind to we could hand him what we saw fit to help him along in his work, and although he gave a plain talk and said some good things, some of us thought that it would have looked better for him to have come with properly accredited credentials and then we would have been guarded against being imposed upon by a stranger
    Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth Sr., of Butte Falls, and Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Nelles and daughter, Miss Alma, spent the night of the third with us and on the morning of the third started for their home on Flounce Rock Mr. Nelles now owns what is known as the Flounce Rock ranch, one of the lovely spots in Southern Oregon.
    Prof. Charles E. Johnson and Miss Mary Goode also spent Wednesday night at the Sunnyside.
    Rev. Simmons, our new Baptist minister, arrived on Wednesday to take charge of the church here. He has a wife and three children and expects to fill the pulpit here every [omission] charge of the work at Brownsboro in connection with this station.
    Now, here I am with my letter half completed and not a word written about what happened on the Fourth. Well, the morning broke on us as an ideal morning and by the time the cocks were notifying the people of Eagle Point that another day was breaking some of our progressive young men had climbed the high point after which Eagle Point was named, with a bountiful supply of dynamite and the necessary tools to cause it to make a noise and the first thing we knew the echo was ringing in the distant hills that the glorious Fourth of July had arrived again, and calling us to be stirring and getting ready for that great events of the day. In a very short time all was bustle and hurry and in the wee morning hours the keen whistle of the P.&E.was heard in the distance notifying us that the people of Butte Falls were on their way to join with us in our celebration, and then in a short time more the farmers began to arrive and before I could get shaved and fixed up--you know that we have to fix up on such an occasion--the teams began to come into the Sunnyside stable, and by 10 o'clock every available space was taken for teams and I inquired if there was not room at the livery stable and was told that everything was "chockablock." By the time I had all the horses cared for the man that generally attends to the barn was ill so I had to take his place. By the time mentioned the crowd began to gather for dinner, for Mrs. Howlett had announced that she would commence to serve dinner at 11:30 a.m. and I was kept busy entertaining the guests and answering the question, how long until dinner. Well, by the time 225 guests had eaten and I had eaten my dinner it was time to go to the ball grounds, where Eagle Point team and the Talent team were to play their second game for they had played one game in the forenoon, which resulted in the Eagle Point team winning out 7 to 5. Well, when I reached the ball grounds the crowd was simply immense, the grandstand was well filled and a large crowd were standing around waiting the commencement of the game. Everything passed off very pleasantly, and the boys strove hard and for some time the game stood 1 to 1, but, as one of the boys expressed it, when the Eagle Point boys get wound up then they began to play in earnest and the result was Eagle Point by 4 to 1, but they acknowledged that they had to work for it for the Talent boys are game to the backbone, but the Eagle Point boys could, apparently, excel them on the bases. It is estimated that there were over 2,000 people here and they all seemed to enjoy themselves hugely. I have not been able to procure a copy of the program but they had some exercises by the children and Carl Riger spoke a piece that was highly spoken of. The oration was delivered by Rev. Eldredge of Medford, and is generally highly spoken of, but some thought it was rather lengthy for an oration on the Fourth. They had all kinds of amusements. Harvey Smith caught the greased pig, and Dave Smith, his brother, hit the man in the face four times with eggs that looked through a hole in the canvas. The driving was a very tame affair, and the horse racing was not much of an attraction. The barbecued meat seemed to go a-begging; not many liked it and the free meats did not take, for most of the people who did not go to the hotels brought their lunches with them or went to private families to eat. The celebration has been a grand advertisement for Eagle Point, as hundreds of people were here for the first time. The different places were well patronized and the Spikers opera house was simply packed most of the day and night both, while at night the platform was well patronized at night. More anon.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 8, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On the Fourth there was quite a number of people come in from the different parts of the country to join in the festivities of the occasion. Several of the Pence family and Mrs. Lynch and her family of Elk Creek, and several from Trail, quite a number from Butte Falls, among them being Charles Edmondson and family, Bill Hildreth and wife, William Perry and family, Howard Dowden and a number from Medford; among them was Shorty Garnett and Mr. Kidd, the shoe man, they had an eye to business.
    Among the arrivals was enough of the Trusty family to have an unexpected reunion when they were collected enough to form a group of nine, and Henry Childreth hunted around to find someone with a camera to take a photo of the group and finally he found our daughter Agnes and she took a picture of the group and they are anxious to learn the results but at this writing Monday, she has not had them developed. It was a very agreeable surprise to have them all come in on Henry Childreth and wife, the first time they had all been together for several years.
    I forgot to mention that Jud Edsall came over from Scott's Bar on the third to celebrate the Fourth with us.
    Chauncey Florey and family also came over on the evening of the third to join in the pleasures of the Fourth. Chauncey is one of our town boys that we may well feel proud of; he has been deputy assessor for the last term.
    George Davis, president of the Fruit Growers Bank at Medford and one of the principal officers of the Eagle Point State Bank, came out the evening of the fifth.
    Frank Brown, one of our merchants, went to Portland Saturday and his brother Merritt went to Medford and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Frank Brown, told me that he and Miss Morris, who taught the intermediate department of our school, were to be married that afternoon in Medford and that they were going to Southern Illinois and that he was going onto her farm. If it is the case the congratulations of their friends follow them.
    S. B. Holmes and wife started last Saturday to visit relatives in British Columbia.
    Extra trains were run from here to Medford to accommodate those who wanted to go, and could, to see the races last week. There was quite a number went over Saturday evening and among them were Roy Smith and Miss Rosa Ayres, L. E. Smith, Mrs. Frank Brown, Jud Edsall and Miss Hattie Howlett and Mrs. Howlett. They returned on Sunday morning at 12:30.
    T. C. Moore and a man by the name of Lindsey of Ashland were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday night taking the E.P.-Prospect stage Monday morning for Elk Creek.
    Mr. Walters and his little boy of Elk Creek walked in Saturday evening from Elk Creek and the next morning went on to Medford.
    Just about the time Mrs. Howlett had her dinner dishes washed and put away who should come up and ask for dinner for four but Mike Hanley. His party comprised Mrs. C. J. Riley and her daughter Miss Lane and Mr. Joseph Reynolds and Mike himself. He had been up to his place with Mrs. Riley and her daughter and when I asked her how she liked the Butte Creek country she said, "I have always lived in a level country and those mountains are so high that one has to look right straight up to see out," and we speak of them as the foothills. Mr. Joseph Reynolds is one of the old pioneers of Butte Creek, he said that he was the first one that ever took a ditch out of Little Butte Creek. He has lived there long enough to raise a family and now has his grandchildren around him.
    I have a lot more to write but will keep till tomorrow.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 10, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the items I had left over from my last are the following: Mrs. May Bond of Lakeview, who has been here for some time taking advantage of our healthful climate to try to be cured of rheumatism, and she has so far recovered as to be able to return last Sunday.
    George Hacker and wife of Medford called for dinner last Monday. Mr. Hacker was soliciting for the Valley Employment Office business and his wife for their rooming house in Medford.
    Mr. Eiker of Agate has been supplying our neighborhood with a fine lot of loganberries the past week and he seems to find a ready market.
    Mr. and Mrs. Suddath, the lady and gentleman who are engaged to teach our school, were here the last of last week looking over the ground and making arrangement with Professor P. H. Daily to move into their home. They expect to be here by the last of this or the first of next week. Mr. Suddath is employed as principal and his wife is to have charge of the intermediate department, and Miss Mamie Wright will have charge of the primary department. It is not decided as yet whether the school board will elect a teacher for the high school department or not, but as there will be considerable many children who have passed to the high school grade it is thought that perhaps it will be necessary to open up the fourth room.
    P. H. Daily, our former principal, moved to Medford on Tuesday. He has been elected to take charge of the Washington School in Medford. While perhaps it may be for the best that we change teachers, still Mr. Daily has during the two years he has taught proved himself to be not only a good school teacher, but a good citizen and a faithful worker in the church and Sunday school, and it is with regrets that we have to tell him farewell, but we have hopes that he may return and live among us again.
    B. W. Reed of Dudley, who, with his wife, has been on a trip back to the eastern and middle states visiting friends and relatives, returned last Monday, leaving his wife among her people. She expects to return in September or October. He says that they had a very pleasant trip and found things cheerful, that he missed the most of the extreme hot weather on his return trip.
    J. C. Hain of Medford called Tuesday for dinner. He is in the advertising business.
    Last Saturday night, the 7th, the Eagle Point Lodge of I.O.O.F. installed their new officers as follows: C. S. Painter, N.G.; B. H. Bryant, V.C.; C. A. Bacon, secretary; W. L. Childreth, treasurer; Homer Hass, R.S.N.G.; Norman McQuade, L.S.N.G.; Clay Cole, R.S.V.G.; W. J. Phillips, L.S.V.N.; G. H. Wamsley, W.; R. G. Brown, C.; Scott Bruce, R.S.S.; Jake Jonas, L.S.S.; Dr. W. P. Holt, chaplain; James Ringer, I.S.G.; R. R. Minter, O.S.G. They were installed by Frank Salter, D.D.G.M., assisted by T. B. Diamond, D.G.M. The lodge is in a flourishing condition and they have a fine set of officers.
    Rev. Mr. Simmons has gone to housekeeping in one of the James Owens houses and will preach here next Sunday morning and evening. He expects to preach at Brownsboro and I am authorized to announce an appointment for him next Sunday, July 14, at 3 o'clock p.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 11, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Manty Minter came out from her home north of town to attend the meeting of the Rebekahs Tuesday night.
    John McIntyre and wife of Derby went to Medford Wednesday morning.
    J. S. Quackenbush was in town early Wednesday morning.
    In my last items I spoke of S. B. Holmes and wife going to British Columbia and Frank Brown going to Portland, etc. It proves that Mrs. Holmes was to [go] no further than Portland and Mr. Holmes and Mr. Brown were to go to British Columbia to be gone about a month. S. B. Holmes, Frank and William Brown having bought a two-thirds interest in a large tract of land in that country, they have to gone to look after [it], they having shipped a carload of wire fence there for the purpose of fencing the entire place.
    Mrs. Frank Brown and her sister-in-law Mrs. William Holmes went together to Ashland last Wednesday to attend the Chautauqua.
    Last Wednesday morning your correspondent started from home for Grants Pass to visit Dr. Findley and have his eyes treated again but it seemed as though fate was against me, for when I reached the depot I found that the train was marked ten minutes late, and then thirty-nine minutes late and so on and at noon we started and everything went along nicely until we reached Woodville, called Rogue River, and then we came to a halt and stayed an hour or more and then the wrecking engine gave the signal to come on, for the wrecking crew were clearing away the debris where No. 11 had been wrecked on Monday morning and there we came to another halt and we all without dinner, and finally we started and reached Grants Pass at three p.m. and I started at once for Dr. Findley's office and there learned that he was in Ashland attending the Chautauqua, so was doomed to another disappointment, but was told that the doctor would be at his office at 9 o'clock in the morning so I hurried down from my boarding house early next morning so as to register among the first, as there is always a crowd there, registered and waited until eleven o'clock and then we were told, we, for there was quite a number had collected, that the doctor had started from Ashland in the morning, punctured a tire in his auto and would not be there until after dinner. After dinner I was on hand and the first one to register and about 1:45 he came but by the time he got through with me the 2:21 train was gone and me left, but it was all right for I have a fine place to board and this time good company. Here I met Miss Etta Johnson of Los Angeles who is one of the doctor's patients, she is at present stopping with her parents in Ashland, although she is, or rather has been, teaching in Los Angeles, Cal., for the past several years and while together she told me her experience in an electric storm while she and a party of friends were on top of Mt. McLoughlin. She said that they could look down on the heavy black clouds and see the lightning flash and hear the thunder roar, while the storm was raging and the torrents of rain were descending below them but no rain where they were but finally they began to hear a kind of sizzling noise and first one would inquire what it was and then another, when finally a young man who was wearing spectacles remarked that the air was full of electricity and just then he jerked his spectacles off claiming that it had burned his ear and just then the ladies who had steel hair pins in their hair began to pull them out and try to get away from there, they having an experience never to be forgotten. There also I met a Mrs. Thompson of Central Point, who was waiting to have her throat treated, but the most remarkable case was a gentleman by the name of Williams from Weed; he had got cinders in his eyes from a traction engine and came there almost blind, after the local doctors of Weed had done their best to relieve him. I noticed along the route between Medford and Grants Pass that the grain was looking fine and the hay crop was extremely heavy although there was a considerable amount of the wheat had fallen down but think that the most of it can be saved.
    While at the doctor's I also met Rev. Sweet recently of Kansas, he was contrasting the hills of this country with the scenes of his old surroundings on the prairies and although there was a great change he could not but admire our lovely hills, valleys and mountains.
    H. E. McNichol has a tract of land advertised in this paper among the assorted ads.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 16, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Joseph Moomaw, Mrs. Fred Findley and Miss Carrie Owings were passengers on the P.&E. last Friday. They had been to Medford on business.
    Neal Willits of Persist came out from Medford last Friday evening and Sunday he and his brother, Roy, took a trip to Ashland.
    The following incident will illustrate the advantage of advertising in a live paper. Some time ago Mrs. Moomaw lost her watch and her husband suggested to put an ad in the Mail Tribune, but she thought that would be a useless expense, so two weeks after the aforesaid Mrs. Moomaw was talking to one of the young ladies of our town and in the run of conversation remarked that she had lost her watch, whereupon the young lady asked what kind of a watch it was, and on describing it discovered that the young lady had found the watch soon after it was lost and had been watching the papers for the ad for the watch. See?
    W. E. Hammel's father and brother came out Friday and were met at the depot by their son and brother.
    Mr. Natwick has a force of men and teams making a road for A. Corbin, the man who bought the old Bradshaw place, from the creek up to the house. Mr. Corbin is one of the newcomers in this section and shows his good judgment in fixing up his place in modern style. He is making a good road across the sticky land between the house and creek.
    Thomas Lewis and Wes Childreth have each of them had severe cases of blood poisoning in the hand.
    C. K. Carey and wife of Talent have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. W. Knighton of this place.
    A. P. Barron of Medford called for dinner Saturday. He has several hundred cords of wood along the P.&E. railway and was here trying to dispose of a carload.
    Misses Anna and Gertrude Ulrich of Medford came out Saturday to visit friends, and among them were Mrs. John Ashpole, Mrs. William von der Hellen and our two daughters Hattie and Agnes.
    J. B. Edsall and John Foster came in last Saturday with a part of Jud Edsall's teams from the quartz mines near Scott's Bar, Cal.
    I herewith send an account of the ball game that was played here last Sunday between the Eagle Point team and one of the Medford teams, the score standing 1 to 11 in favor of Eagle Point.
EAGLE POINT
AB. R. PO. E.
Ashpole, 2b. 5 2 0 0
Simpson, c. 5 2 14 0
Carlton, cf. 5 2 0 0
H. Smith, 1b 5 0 10 0
Harnish, ss. 4 0 1 2
Aiken, lf. 4 1 0 0
Jonas, 3b. 4 1 0 0
Pelouze, rf. 4 1 0 0
Moeller, p. 4 2 0 0
__ __ __ __

CHOSEN FRIENDS
AB. R. PO. E.
Coffeen, 3b. 3 0 1 1
White, ss. 4 0 0 1
Diday, c. 4 1 6 1
Roseberry, 1b. 4 1 11 0
R. Keiser, lf. 4 0 2 1
Nick, 2b 3 0 2 1
Waldron, cf. 3 0 0 0
C. Keiser, rf. 2 0 0 0
C. Martin, p. 3 0 0 0
__ __ __ __
Totals 30 1** 28 5
  *C. Keiser out, hit by batted ball.
**Aiken out, hit by batted ball. Ashpole out for interference.
    Saturday evening Mr. Nicholson of Medford phoned over to Mrs. Howlett to know if she could have breakfast ready by 6 o'clock a.m. Sunday for a company of nine or ten, and of course she answered yes. So Sunday morning about six a car came up with four persons and they announced that the rest would be along in a few minutes, but she had to wait breakfast and still she waited then finally the second car arrived. They had tire trouble on the road and had the wheel wrapped with rope. The company consisted of S. T. and H. D. Howard, J. H. Butler, W. C. Courtwright, H. G. Helwig, C. F. May, M. A. Rader and C. W. Conklin. The man who wrote the names forgot to write his. They were on their way up to Rogue River to fish. These all took breakfast and the following persons went on without stopping, H. Butler, George Dow, F. W. Hollis, L. F. Kirkpatrick, H. G. Dick, F. W. Payne, H. Starr, E. E. Wilson, W. H. Brown, Charles Brown and Sailor Wright. They were a jolly crowd and started out to have a good time.
    Among the guests at the Sunnyside last Sunday were Rev. and Mrs. L. L. Simmons, their three children, Miss Bernice, Miss Melva and Master Redford, that constitutes our new Baptist minister and his family. After dinner your correspondent hitched up a team and took the minister and family to Brownsboro where he preached to a small-sized congregation. He will preach next Sunday morning and evening in Eagle Point and at three p.m. in Antelope school house.
    In addition to our usual company for Sunday dinner we had G. H. Wamsley, Miss Mabel Wamsley, Carl von der Hellen, Thomas Abbott, Thomas Riley, Jr., Thomas and Herbert Carlton besides a few strangers whose names I failed to learn.
    Baseball benefit dance in Spiker's hall Saturday night, July 20, at Eagle Point. Come help make this a big success.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 18, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Louis E. Smith and Mrs Daisy Evans went to Ashland the first of the week to visit her mother.
    Miss Christiana Hoefft of Medford called last Monday. She is canvassing for a book, "Past, Present and Future."
    Mrs. Owings is having the interior of the Eagle Point hotel changed. Messrs. Cole and Bryant are doing the work.
    Mr. Jewel, of Elk Creek hatchery, was in our town Tuesday.
    Mr. Eiker of Agate has been selling loganberries in our town the past week.
    Mrs. Ollie McPherson, nee Ollie Nichols of Portland, is here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Nichols.
    Jack McQuade is to start Thursday for San Francisco.
    The committee of arrangements for the G.A.R. met here Tuesday and made the arrangements for the reunion of the four division of the order to meet here September 23, Commander V. S. Grant of Grants Pass, Lieutenant Colonel Morris of Rock Point, and quartermaster John Watkins were the principal officers present, and Isaac Wolf of Medford, were among the visitors that I know of, besides quite a number of our local members. A general committee of arrangements was appointed consisting of John Watkins, A. J. Florey and G. H. Wamsley and they are empowered to appoint subcommittees. There was also a committee of five ladies appointed to have general supervision of the culinary department--that is to see that everybody has aplenty to eat--and take general supervision of and management of the entire affair such as appointing committees to bring in victuals for dinner [and] look after the musical program. The committee is composed of Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mrs. Frank Salter, Mrs. G. W. Owings, Mrs. Frank Brown and Mrs. M. L. Daily and now if these five ladies can't attend to the affairs of a little thing like having eight hundred or a thousand old soldiers on our hands for about a week, why it's not worthwhile for any set of ladies to undertake the job, for I tell you they will do it and do it right.
    The visiting committee when they came to look over the ground for the encampment decided that our park was just the proper place to meet. They expect to have a program for every day and among the most interesting attractions will be the speeches by the commanding officer and our town mayor.
    The P.&E.R.R. company have put another force of met at work on their road and are going to place it in good condition.
    Mr. Ovenmel, one of the stage drivers on the Eagle Point-Prospect route, came out Tuesday evening so as to drive the trip Wednesday and Thursday while Roy Willits, the contractor and driver, went to Medford on business.
    Miss Anna Purucker and Miss Zelda V. Clifford of Medford came out, spent the night at the Sunnyside and took passage on the Eagle Point-Prospect stage for the Enyart ranch to take an outing. Miss Purucker came from Pennsylvania about a year ago and is engaged as one of the teachers in the Medford schools, and Miss Clifford is also from the same state but has been here for two years. They both talk as though they may go back but seem to like this country quite well.
    J. D. McArdle and H. M. Goss stopped Tuesday evening for supper, Mr. Goss is circulating a petition to have a new road opened up through or near his land north of Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Gus Peterson, a recent arrival from New York, has taken a position with Fred Pelouze on his farm.
    Fred Edsall returned to the Sunnyside Tuesday evening and Chas. Thomas and family returned at the same time to their home in Eagle Point. They have been enjoying themselves at Scott's Bar, California.
    Mrs. Wm. Knighton has been visiting her granddaughter, Mrs. Jones of Talent.
    Henry French, Robert R. Minter and W. E. Hammel were among us Wednesday. I noticed quite a number of rigs, wagons, etc. hitched to the public rack Wednesday evening as I was strolling around town.
    O. J. Tarbel of Talent was among the guests Wednesday night.
    Wednesday afternoon about [omission] the members of the Eagle Point Aid Society began to come in to the Sunnyside and station themselves along the shady side of the large screened porch, but too late to get into the last Eaglets, so will mention it today. As they began to file in they took seats and began to work as though the fate of Eagle Point depended on their effort. They were Mrs. A. J. Florey, Mrs. Bryant, Mrs. Owings., Mrs. Lottie McQuade, Mrs. Demmy, Mrs. Warmstorff, Mrs. R. G. Brown, Mrs. Frank Nichols, Mrs. McNichol, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Mrs. James Jordan, Mrs. L. L. Simmons, Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mrs. Amy Brown and Mrs. Lottie VanScoy. And to see these ladies work one would think that everything depended on their individual effort. They are making things to sell for the benefit of the town and when they get a lot ready they pick a time when they know there is likely to be a large crowd in town and then they sell them to the highest bidder and one-half goes toward fixing up the church and the other half toward improving the town. I tell you they mean business.
    Charley Howard, one of our railroad men, was made happy on the 16th by the arrival of a fine son. The child was born in Medford, but this is his home.
    A man by the name of C. H. Martin, recently from California, has gone to work in Fisher & Mathews blacksmith shop, and W. L. Childreth is helping his brother, Henry O. Childreth, in his shop.
    Thursday afternoon the following named ladies, Mrs. J. F. Reddy, Mrs. Charles Schieffelin, Mrs. J. D. Heard, Miss Gladys Heard and Mrs. Jane Smyth called at the Sunnyside and inquired for me, and Mrs. Howlett called me and said that there were some ladies in the parlor who wanted to talk with me on the subject of woman's suffrage. As I entered the parlor Mrs. Heard introduced herself and the other ladies and they remarked that they had been reading the Eaglets for some time and had a curiosity to see the man who wrote them, and one of them remarked that she had drawn an idea that the writer of the Eaglets was a tall slim gaunt-looking fellow and here she was confronted with a short, stout old man. I didn't get mad because she added "old man," although I am still among the boys--well the business they had with me was to try to make arrangements here to hold a meeting Monday night in the church for the purpose of organizing a woman suffrage club in our town. Results in my next.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 23, 1912, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Grace Colby of Brownsboro, who has been teaching at Beagle, spent the night with us last week on her way to Trail. She reported that her brother Roy had fallen and broke his arm.
    Rev. George E. Paddock D.D., of Portland, came out last Friday to visit your correspondent. Dr. Paddock is state superintendent of the Congregational churches in Oregon and president of the International S.S. Society; he was out in this part of the state looking after the interests of his church.
    Miss Mamie Chatman, recently of Glendale, spent the night with us on her way to Lake Creek.
    J. V. McIntyre and wife, accompanied by Mrs. P. J. Neff of Medford, called for supper at the Sunnyside Saturday evening.
    Mrs. J. Frank Brown, accompanied by Mrs. W. A. Robbins of Medford, called for dinner last Saturday. Mrs. Robbins said that she had been reading the Eaglets for some time and had a curiosity to meet with the author, said that she had pictured him as an elderly, tall, slim man with a long flowing beard and lo, when she found him he proved to be a man past 80 years of age with no beard and about 5 feet, 1½ inches tall and wearing pants 42 inches waist measure.
    Word came to me Monday that Mr. Bradshaw, who has charge of the Commercial Orchard, has had two serious accidents in his family. First one of his children by some means got hold of a bottle of carbolic acid and had his face badly burned, and the next day or two his little girl aged three years was lost. Last Saturday the little girl went to her mother about eleven o'clock and asked for something to eat, but was told to wait until dinner, whereupon she went out and when dinner was ready she failed to come in and the parents thought that perhaps she had gone to sleep, but later when she failed to put in an appearance, search was begun by all hands. There are several men working there and the first place to look was the irrigating ditch that runs hear the house, they dragged that and finally turned the water out; not finding her there they went to another ditch lower down from the home, fished out the well, all without any success; by that time it was getting late in the afternoon and the alarm was given in the neighborhood when about thirty persons, men and women, with lanterns and searched all night, still with no clue, then men started out on horseback and about eleven o'clock a.m. she was found I think by Mrs. von der Hellen, near the Walch place. She had torn all her clothes off crawling through the brush, and was taken to Mrs. von der Hellen's and taken care of. She had slept under a tree Saturday night. She did not seem to be frightened and now the wonder is how she kept from chilling that cold rainy night. The parents of the child were almost wild over her disappearance. I omitted to state that they had been hauling hay that afternoon and had filled a shed with hay and the thought occurred to them that perhaps she had gone into the shed and gone to sleep and been covered with hay, so they went to work and moved all the hay out of the shed in their search.
    Well here I am at the close of my ninth sheet and have hardly commenced but the next time will tell something about what was done and who was here Sunday and about the suffrage meeting to be held tonight.
    Our daughter Hattie was called Saturday over the phone to go to Klamath Falls to care for her sister, Mrs. Millie Hoyt, starting Sunday morning. A letter just received states that she is better.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 25, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday morning about ten o'clock there were seven motorcycles came dashing up and stopped under the boughs of a silver poplar tree between the Sunnyside and the Sunnyside barn and the following person filed into the Sunnyside and informed Mrs. Howlett that they would be on hand for dinner: Mr. and Mrs. Clyde Plymire, O. G. Vroman, Mr. and Mrs. Carl Fichtner, W. T. Wilson, O. P. Vroman and F. P. Hicks, all of Medford. After they had made sure that they had secured an interest in the three large turkeys that were in the oven, they took in the town, seeing the various places of interest and spending some time in fishing in our beautiful Little Butte Creek. After dinner was over they reassembled in the large screened porch and one of the party took a picture of the company. In addition to the foregoing, there was also at the same time the following persons took dinner with us, A. H. Weber and wife. Mr. Weber is our druggist in von der Hellen's store. He had just returned from Portland the Friday before, where he had been to attend the Elks' convention and reports having had one of the times of his life. Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen and her two children, Miss Marguerite [omission] two children, Miss Margaret Florey, Mr. Frank Salter and wife, one of our hardware merchants, Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen and child, Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Moomaw, Chalmer Ringer, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze and son Robert. Robert is one of the leading players in the Eagle Point baseball team and his father is one of the leading promoters of the game while Mrs. Pelouze is very enthusiastic over the game. Dr. and Mrs. J. M. Keene and Mr. and Mrs. Mathews, auditor of the Medford National Bank, Mr. and Mrs. Bert Harmon of Medford also called and spent the latter part of the [afternoon] with us, taking an early supper. Frank Morine of Washington called for the night. He is one of the young men who has been raised in our town but is now an engineer on the Great Northern. He was on his way to Klamath Falls to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Morine. Prof. C. E. Johnson of Derby also spent the night with us.
    On Monday there was nothing of special note occurred, as there were very few persons came into our town until late in the evening, when Senator H. von der Hellen and his son, Carl, came in company with Mrs. J. D. Heard, Miss Gladys Heard and Mrs. Charles Schieffelin and two more ladies and a gentleman, whose names I failed to learn. They all came to attend the woman's suffrage meeting that night. There was but a small attendance as there was all told only about thirty-five persons present. Mr. von der Hellen opened the meeting by reading a paper setting forth a few of the reasons why the woman should have the vote--the paper was published in the Mail Tribune of the 23. Then Mrs. Schieffelin explained the importance of thorough organization in the effort to secure the object of their move, and the meeting adjourned to meet in the park this Wednesday afternoon at three o'clock.
    One of the ladies remarked in conversation with me that every time Mr. Whistler spoke or published an article against woman suffrage that it helped the cause along just that much. Thus it is, and thus it will be.
    O. N. Nelson of Jacksonville, the insurance man, came out Tuesday evening on his wheel and spent the night at the Sunnyside. Also Miss Mabel Pruett came up Friday evening to attend the lodge of Rebeccas and so did Miss Manty Minter.
    Miss Doll Parker of Butte Falls was a pleasant caller Tuesday evening. She is visiting Mrs. George Daley.
    Mrs. T. L. Trunnell of Grants Pass came down Tuesday evening and engaged a room at Sunnyside for a while. She is trying to recuperate.
    Mrs. H. O. Childreth and children have gone to Elk Creek and spend a month or so with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Trusty.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 26, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Whitman, our barber, has bought the barber business here and has erected a tent and moved his family into it to spend the rest of the summer.
    John Fisher and wife came out from their home on Indian Creek Wednesday to visit Mr. Woolery, who is confined to his bed with paralysis.
    Occasionally we see parties passing through here on their way to Crater Lake. Last Wednesday afternoon William von der Hellen and family, Miss Marguerite Florey, Mr. and Mrs. McPherson started in an auto for the Crater.
    Mr. High, formerly of Ashland or rather of Vancouver, Wash., has gone to work in Fisher and Mathews blacksmith shop.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey made a trip to Jacksonville the early part of the week to visit her son Chauncey, who is office deputy in the assessor's office.
    Mrs. Schermerhorn and her sister, Miss Minerva Naylor of Medford, were out last Wednesday visiting friends and among them was Mrs. A. C. Howlett.
    Mr. von der Hellen reports having cut fifty loads of hay off the 3½ acres of land. It was sown to wheat and vetch, a big yield, but this is Oregon.
    Born July 24 to Mr. and Mrs. Winkle, a daughter. Mother and child are doing well.
    James Ringer, our town marshal, is putting an addition to his home to cover his well.
    George N. Smith, our Yankee Creek bee man, was in town Thursday with a fine lot of honey.
    John Rader, F. J. Ayres and wife and William Winkle were in town Thursday.
    Mrs. Charles Lewis and his sister-in-law Mrs. Lewis were in from their place for a load of supplies of Heath and Diamond.
    Mrs. Howlett and Mrs. T. L. Trunnell of Grants Pass drove to Medford Thursday afternoon.
    Miss Catherine Crawford from Chicago and Mrs. Evon Brown and her daughter, Miss Lucile Crandall and Miss Marion Brown from Cheyenne, Wyoming, are visiting Mrs. Nora Horn and W. H. Chandler for a few weeks. They are simply delighted with our country and climate and are having one of the most enjoyable times of their lives. Mr. Chandler says that Judge Carpenter, who owns a farm joining his about four miles north of here, expects to start from Chicago about the first of August for this place.
    Roy Ashpole and Miss Dornie Rader, while coming from the Rader farm Thursday afternoon to attend the shower party given in honor of the prospective marriage of a prominent young couple in our town, had the misfortune to have their team run away throwing them both out and tearing the buggy and harness up considerably. Mr. Ashpole had his ankle badly sprained and Miss Dornie had her hip and shoulder blade severely bruised, but no bones broken.
    George Trusty, who has been working north of Glendale, took the stage for Elk Creek Friday morning.
    S. B. Spiker has taken a contract to build a water tower and enlarge a house for T. B. Noyes of Tolo.
    Well here I am on my eleventh sheet and not a word about the woman's suffrage meeting Wednesday or the show party Thursday evening. An account will be given next week, also about the wedding.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 29, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I promised to tell about the shower party that was given in honor of the approaching wedding of Mr. E. S. Hock and Miss Mamie Wright. Last week there were invitations sent out to almost every one of the citizens of Eagle Point to attend a shower party at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover on Thursday evening and with the invitation a request to bring something that would be useful to the couple who were to be married and the result was that there was simply an immense crowd gathered and each one brought something that would be useful--this was all done without the knowledge or consent of the bride to be and one can well imagine Miss Mamie Wright's surprise when she was marched out on the porch in the presence of that vast crowd to be called on to make a short speech tendering her thanks etc. The arrangement was all made to keep her at Miss Mabel Wamsley's until the crowd had collected with the presents and they were safely "corked" then the arrangement was to have two little girls take a little express wagon and deliver the goods to her. When the first load came Miss Mamie started to tender her thanks when someone checked her by saying "hold on, that ain't all" and then another load came and then she started to speak again when she was stopped again and another load was brought and finally she broke down and womanlike wept but soon recovered herself and made a nice little speech expressing her thanks. Then Mr. Hock was called on for a speech and he said, "Oh, let my wife do it." Well to make a long matter short they had one of the little enjoyable times that are so common in Eagle Point, and the following Sunday, July 28, Mr. Ed. S. Hock and Miss Mamie Wright were joined in wedlock by Rev. L. L. Simmons at the home of her mother in the presence of the following witnesses: Mrs. Joseph Moomaw, Carl Ringer, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, Mr. and Mrs. Jake Jones, Henry Daley, Miss Loretta Childreth, Miss Louise Blass, Miss Matwin, Miss Lord, Miss Wood, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover and two children, Verda and Ruth, Grandma Heckathorn and Grandma Thomas, and several others whose names I was unable to learn as I was in Medford at the time.
    Well the next thing is the woman's suffrage meeting in the park on Wednesday, July 24. The women's aid met that day in the park and the Medford ladies had a good opportunity to meet a number of the leading ladies of the town. They talked the matter over but did not organize a W.S. club, but I understand made a very favorable impression and this coming November we expect to poll a goodly number of votes in favor of the ladies' movement.
    I unintentionally omitted to report in my last that Senator von der Hellen was made extremely happy on account of the arrival of a new granddaughter in the family of his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Ed. A. Evanson, on July 22 in Medford, Oregon.
    Miss Mabel Thomas spent the night with us last Friday on her way to the Ed Higinbotham neighborhood to teach a three months' school.
    Mr. M. S. Coss and our county surveyor Mr. Frank A. Grisez called for supper Friday evening. They are surveying off a tract of land for Mr. Coss.
    R. H. Dopp, who has been working in the Buzzard mine, came out and reports that the company is having a lot of ore hauled out to have a thorough test of it made.
    Mr. McClanahan and Dave Pence came out last Saturday to bring Mrs. Alfred Reed, Master Bachard Reed, and Miss Macina Orana of Pittsburgh, Pa. They took the evening train for their home.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 31, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In a former epistle I omitted to mention that Mr. and Mrs. Kincaid, their daughter Miss Kay and son Howard spent the night with us on Friday of last week on their way from Medford to their home near Peyton. Also that Mr. Louis Alt and Mr. and Mrs. Charles F. Stowell spent the night with us on their way to Butte Falls. They were looking over the country. Mr. Alt is in business in Klamath Falls and Mr. Stowell is from California although he started from Klamath Falls to look over the country. Mr. Alt is very favorably impressed with our town and talks of buying property here and going into merchant tailoring business.
    On Monday last Rev. Conrad Wilker of the Lutheran Church of Medford and Mr. D. W. Frey of Lake Creek called for dinner. Rev. Wilker had been up in the Lake Creek country to hold services, and they were on their way to the train for Medford. He has charge of the congregation up in that neighborhood.
    M. S. Centers of Medford came out Monday morning on the P.&E. to talk business with Mr. Tronson, our apple man, and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    W. T. Hoffman and wife of Lake Creek came out Monday night so as to have Mrs. Hoffman interview our M.D., Dr. Holt. She seemed to be troubled with neuralgia. They returned home the next day.
    Thomas Grigsby came out from the Butte Falls Cemetery Tuesday with a load of shakes for parties in Central Point.
    L. E. Whiting and wife of Portland were here for dinner last Monday on their way to their home. They own a tract of land northwest of Eagle Point and had been spending his vacation on it. He was formerly an employee in the Medford Mail Tribune office but is now working in the Oregonian office.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Grant and their little girl called for supper late last Saturday evening. They started in their auto from Woodland, Cal., and traveled to Redding, from there to Klamath Falls then to Crater Lake, down Rogue River to Eagle Point without a mishap and while the auto was standing still and he was getting some gasoline one of the tires blew out and Mr. Grant spent some three or four hours before he could find and remedy the defect, but he finally succeeded and went on the Medford that night. They are satisfied that Crater Lake is among the wonders of the world.
    Mr. and Mrs. McPherson, nee Ollie Nichols, returned to Portland Sunday evening. They returned from Crater Lake Saturday night.
    Your correspondent spent last Sunday in Medford so is unable to tell who was here that day but I learned when I got home that there was quite a crowd here for dinner from different parts of the valley. I went to Medford to join in a meeting to take steps toward organizing a Congregational church there, but as about all that was done has been published already, I will not take the time and space to repeat it, but I may say that the prospect looks quite favorable for an organization.
    The following persons went from here to Butte Falls last Sunday on the excursion train: Mr. Sam Coy, Miss Ethel Taylor, Fred Dutton, Miss Dottie Harnish and Mrs. Trunnel of Grants Pass. She was stopping at the Sunnyside and went up to see the town and timber. Miss Rosa Ayres and her sister Mrs. Freeland Newport also went to Butte Falls from Ayres station.
    Mrs. Charles Bacon, who has been visiting her relatives in Golden, returned home last week accompanied by her sister Miss Meda McIntosh.
    J. B. Jackson and George von der Hellen started for the Mt. McLoughlin country last Monday on a hunting expedition.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 2, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I omitted to mention that Prof. Suddarth and wife accompanied Rev. L. L. Simmons to Brownsboro on Sunday the 28th. Prof. Suddarth and wife are the principal and teacher of the intermediate department of our school who have recently arrived from Josephine County.
    S. B. Holmes and wife and Frank Brown, the two gentlemen have been up into British Columbia to look after their land interests there and Mrs. Holmes have been visiting relatives in Portland.
    Jake Jonas and J. W. Grover have gone out in Blue Canyon country on a hunting expedition.
    W. W. Willits and W. H. Morgan of Elk Creek spent the night with us Tuesday last. They had been to Medford to attend the funeral of Mr. Morgan's father, who died in Medford on Sunday, July 28.
    Mr. Ormel of Elk Creek spent the night with us, taking the Prospect stage Wednesday morning.
    We came very near having a first-class fire in our town one day this week. I heard of it last Wednesday, the day I last wrote. It appears that James Ringer had been doing some painting and staining in his house and had been using a compound of kerosene, benzene and alcohol and had been using a cloth to wipe off the stain so as to make the wood have the appearance of the grain of the wood and had laid the cloth, all crumpled up, down by the gasoline can and had gone off on a trip up Rogue River. Mr. Wamsley, having been to work there, had left some of his tools in the house and when he opened the door he saw the cloth smoking and soon discovered the cause. He stepped to the door and called Mr. Bryant and when he came Mrs. J. W. Smith and her sister came to see the strange sight, so Mr. Wamsley attempted to pick the cloth up and found that it was too hot so took two pieces of a shingle and picked it up, intending to take it out and show it to others when lo, it burst into a flame. Mr. W. says that if he had been thirty minutes later the house would have been burned and there would have been another mystery to solve to tell how.
    Mrs. Vivian Jones and her cousin, Mrs. W. A. Marvin of Gold Hill, spent the day visiting Mrs. Howlett and family Thursday.
    Mr. F. Salter, one of our hardware merchants, has gone to Seattle on a business trip.
    Talking about fruit, well last Thursday your correspondent took a trip over in the valley on the east side of Bear Creek after some fruit and it looked like a willful waste to see the bushels of fruit lying on the ground that had to be picked off to save the trees and make the fruit grow larger, for there was hundreds of pears absolutely going to waste, and talk about peaches, why there is just thousands of them.
    Mrs. Vogeli, mother of the owner of The Tavern, came up from California to visit relatives this week.
    Mrs. C. W. Wright of Los Angeles has been up to Lake Creek visiting her sister-in-law Mrs. Hosler. Mrs. Wright is a sister-in-law of Mr. Horton, owner of one of our fine orchards. She came up on a visit but is so taken up with this country that she intends to return and make her home among us. She says that all of her interests are in Los Angeles but she intends to draw some of her money out and invest it here. She thinks that the country is ahead of anything in California and says that she has traveled all over the state but found nothing to compare with this country. She was on her way home when I met her Friday morning going to the train.
    The next time I will tell about the grand social Thursday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 5, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
     The last time I wrote I believe I promised to tell this time about the grand social we had last Thursday night at the parsonage of the Baptist minister. There had been some special invitations given out to almost everyone in our valley with the instruction to be sure to keep it a secret, to a pound social at the parsonage, with the understanding that the people were to meet at Mrs. Owens' and march in a body, each one being requested to bring something that would be useful to the family. About the time for the people to begin to gather Mrs. Suddarth, one of our new teachers, took the notion to invite the minister and his family to take a walk up the hill near town and by that means keep them from seeing the crowd collecting at the Eagle Point Hotel as per agreement, and also give them a chance to get in and take possession of the parsonage. The plan worked like a charm and about 8 o'clock the company that had formed on that side of the creek began to march across the bridge and your correspondent joined them just as they were entering the yard gate, and I began to wonder if I was going to be in an old H.W. ladies' party all alone but at the rear of the procession I began to see a few men and felt quite relieved. But when we reached the house the door was unlocked and the company marched in and deposited the goods in the kitchen, lit up the house and began to look around for some of the inmates, for they have three children and we naturally supposed that they would be at home but lo there was no one there and then some of them began to feel as though they had been sold and would have no fun in the line expected but soon someone was seated at the organ and Frank Nichols had his violin and Harold Simpson had his horn so the music commenced and we were being entertained in that way when here came the minister Rev. L. L. Simmons and family, and Mrs. Suddarth as innocent as a little lamb. Well now talk about anyone being surprised, they hardly knew what to say or what to think and when they went into the kitchen and saw the stack of things on the table and floor they came to the conclusion that the preacher was being pounded sure enough. Well after the first excitement was over we then had some fine singing interspersed with instrumental music which was kept up until late bedtime when we quietly retired hoping that we may all live to enjoy another such a time.
    The following persons were present and each tried with the other to see who could make the occasion one of real pleasure and solid enjoyment. Mrs. A. J. Florey, her daughter Miss Marguerite and little boys, Judd and Theodore, Mrs. J. W. Grover and daughter, Mrs. Painter, Mr. and Mrs. F. W. Stewart, Grandma Heckathorn, Mrs. Suddarth, Mrs. S. H. Harnish, Mrs. Frank Brown, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Daley, Mrs. M. L. Daily, Mrs. F. Salter, Mr. and Mrs. Warnstorff, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Bryant, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Wolfer, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, Mrs. James Ringer, Mrs. W. L. Childreth, Mrs. D. C. Cuisade, Harold Simpson, Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Owens, Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, Miss Louise Blass, Miss Genett Haselton, Miss Bermuda Lewis, Mrs. Wm. Knighton, Mrs. J. Moomaw, Mrs. Jessie Vernon and Mrs. Lottie McQuade.
    I have written the above names from memory and may have omitted some but think that I have given all of them and let me tell you when you get all of them folks together with the minister and his family, and your correspondent to report, you may rest assured that there will be something doing.
    Well here I am at the bottom of my 11th page and still have a batch of Eaglets long enough to make another letter as long as this, but the next time [I] will tell who was here Sunday and what was done and who is to present the Catholic church with a new hall.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 8, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday after I finished writing for the Mail Tribune I took a stroll around town and while on my rounds dropped into Heath & Diamond's store and among the first things I noticed was that Mrs L. A. Diamond, wife of the brakeman on the P.&E., had accepted a position in the store as a saleslady and also that Mr. Diamond, one of the proprietors, had been out on Rogue River fishing and brought back eight fine fish, three of them being steelheads, weighing from three to nine pounds each. Also learned that arrangement had been made for Rev. L. L. Simmons, our Baptist minister, to surrender the pulpit next Sunday morning the 11th to our Episcopal minister, who will conduct service at 11:00 o'clock a.m. I also noticed that there was quite a number of persons were in; among them was Old Uncle Dave Smith and his son Aaron, Mrs. Clay, wife of one of the engineers on the P.&E., Mr. White, foreman on the Cooley orchard just above town, Miss Marguerite Florey and Miss Hazel Brown, daughter of one of our merchants of the firm of George Brown & Sons, Mr. Strong and wife, foreman on the old Moomaw place, Mr. Hitchcock, owner of the old Harry Carlton place, Mr. and Mrs. Suddarth, James Watkins, beside a number of others that I passed on the street. I noticed as I was passing along by the park that there were a number of ladies assembled there and afterwards learned that it was the Ladies' Aid Society, and Mrs. H. and our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, joined them. Mrs. Hoyt said that they were sewing as though the future destiny of the town depended on their efforts.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Loran Gregory, August 8th, a daughter.
    Married at the residence of John N. Hayes, by Rev. A. C. Howlett, August 8th, Mr. Hugh Hayes and Miss Jessie Bailey. After the marriage was performed and the congratulations were extended ice cream and cake was served and an hour or so was spent socially. In the run of conversation the subject of raising apples on the "Desert" soil was brought up and one of the family went out and brought in an apple that was raised on desert ground that measured 10½ inches in circumference, also brought in a peach that would come up to the standard in size and quality.
    This Friday morning I took a trip up to Ed Wolfer's garden. Well, talk about a truck patch--he has corn that will measure some seven or eight feet in height, pie plant, the leaves as large as half the page of the Mail Tribune, but his tomatoes they are simply immense. He has something like an acre and a half and has them so arranged with sticks so as to keep the vines up off the ground so that the tomatoes are exposed to the sun and air, and talk about bearing the vines are simply loaded and he has had ripe tomatoes now for the last two weeks.
    We have had another transaction in real estate, E. L. Warnstorff having traded his place in the lower end of town to Rev. L. L. Simmons for property in the state of Washington, consideration $1,631.75. There is 2½ acres in the tract.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 12, 1912, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Carl and Henry von der Hellen were callers at the Sunnyside last Friday.
    Mrs. Thomas Blair and her son Teddie, wife and son of one of the railroad builders, came in from Albany to the Sunnyside and took a room with her husband. Mr. Blair is one of the mechanics who are working on the new bridge that the P.&E. Railroad is putting up in place of the old one across Butte Creek. They are replacing the old one with a steel bridge and raising it some four feet higher than the old one was.
    J. C. Moore, wife, daughter and son spent the night with us last Thursday night on their way to their farm on Elk Creek. Mr. Moore has been living in Ashland and was burned out August 2nd while the family was away from home. Everything was destroyed. He carried $1,500 insurance but the loss amounted to over $3,000. He has no idea of how the fire originated but fears that it was the work of an incendiary.
    Mrs. C. D. Stout of Jacksonville came out Saturday to be with her husband. He is the superintendent of the bridge work on the P.&E. Railroad and is superintending the construction of the new bridge on Butte Creek, just below town.
    Mr. Piper, who owns twenty acres of orchard land near here, has gone to Portland to remain for a while.
    Mrs. Howlett took a business trip up on Salt Creek near Lake Creek last week and on her return brought back a load of nice Red Astrachan apples.
    O. O. Alenderfer and H. N. Coss were with us last Friday night. They were working up a business in the electric line, taking orders for lights. They represent the California-Oregon Power Company and agree to have the electricity in here within ninety days from the date of the contract. They have take a great many orders for lights and power
    G. W. Ager, school supervisor for this school district, spent the night with us last Thursday and I omitted to mention it in my last.
    Rev. M. C. Davis came in Friday evening and spent the night with us, then went to Sams Valley and preached Saturday night, and Sunday preached at Agate and Table Rock, and while on the subject of Table Rock will remind the readers of the Mail Tribune that there will be an ice cream social in the Table Rock schoolhouse next Saturday evening. The object is to raise money to pay the balance on the chairs they have bought and to buy a stove to put in the spare room in the schoolhouse so they can have a suitable room to hold religious services and also to have their socials during the time that they have school in progress. Every assurance is given that they will have a good time.
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt reports that there has been a new arrival at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls--a ten-pound boy last Friday, Aug. 9, '12.
    Bert Higinbotham spent the night with us last Friday.
    Next time will tell what I saw and heard on my trip to Agate and Table Rock Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 14, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something of what I saw and heard on my trip to Agate and Table Rock. I started for Antioch school house, expecting to meet Rev. M. C. Davis there according to previous arrangements, and just as I was coming out of the gate near the Bybee bridge I saw him running full speed to intercept me to inform me that there was another appointment ahead of his at Antioch and that he had phoned over [to] the neighborhood that he would preach at Agate. But before I go any further on my story I wish to tell what I saw on my way across the desert, for I confess that I was greatly surprised. There were just acres and acres of as fine looking corn growing as anyone could wish, although there were occasionally spots that the corn looked less healthy than the rest and in addition to the corn were vines that looked like squash vines, beans and other vines of a smaller variety and I learned later that they were cantaloupes, but talk about that desert ground bringing garden truck, why, it done my eyes good to see such a growth on land that has always been considered worthless. Well after I was met by brother Davis, I turned my course and went to Agate and there we had a very interesting Sunday school after which Davis preached, and he and I went to Mr. Beebe's for dinner, well it is not best to say much about the dinner but Mrs. Beebe said that the chickens were all ready before she knew that we were coming. Well while dinner was being prepared Mr. Beebe invited us to walk out into his orchard and garden, well, talk about garden truck he had almost everything that the soil of Jackson County can raise and that means almost anything that will grow in our latitude, but his fruit, apples, pears, berries, etc. of all kinds and in abundance, when we went back to the house the freezer was about ready for business and Mr. Beebe and Davis worked the freezer and your correspondent bossed the job, well to make a short story of it we had a feast of as nice ice cream as anyone could wish. After the feast was over Rev. Davis started for Table Rock to meet the Sunday school there and your correspondent went by a slower mode of traveling, in a buggy, but Rev. Davis has one of the latest improved motorcycles and he now can travel at the rate of--well he goes so fast that I can't keep in sight, however I arrived at Mr. DePort's, the place agreed on, when we separated in due time and he preached again to a good-sized audience. While in the neighborhood of Table Rock, I noticed that the young orchards were looking fine and the older ones were just loaded with fruit; in fact, if they don't thin the trees more they are likely to break all to pieces. I also noticed that there was a quantity of grain being stacked ready for the thresher and everything looked prosperous.
    Well ,Monday afternoon after I was through with writing for the Mail Tribune I took a stroll over town to see what I could find that would be of interest to the readers of the Mail Tribune and I soon discovered that there was quite a number of our farmers had come to town, and as I entered Brown's store there I met Gus Edmondson of Derby and he informed me that he and his father Leo Edmondson were running their sawmill near Derby and with him were Ray and Fred Shatrean also of Derby, Mrs. K. Quackenbush and Mrs. Gorman beside two others that were strangers to me, and at Heath & Diamond's I met Mr. Quackenbush and his sister-in-law Mrs. McKaffery. The Quackenbushes, Gormans and McKafferys all live on Mr. Corbin's orchard and as I understand it the three ladies are all sisters, they were all getting supplies from the two general merchandise stores of our town, although we have several other stores in our town besides them. While in Brown's store I learned that Frank Brown, one of the firm, also one of the county commissioners had gone out on the Crater Lake road with the other county commissioner, James Owens, in company with Wm. von der Hellen to inspect the work.
    Our new baker tells me that he used to run the Model Bakery in Medford and that he had to ship Tuesday morning one hundred and fifty loaves of bread to Medford and that it just keeps him jumping to keep any stock on hand. That speaks well for Eagle Point to have to ship bread to the great city of Medford.
    George von der Hellen has gone to Prospect to take a hunt.
    Gus Rosenburg lost one of his horses Monday evening with pneumonia.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 17, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ray Smith, Rosa Ayres, John Smith and wife, and Roy Ashpole and Miss Donnie Rader started last Monday, August 12, for Crater Lake and Klamath Falls to be gone about two weeks.
    Mrs. Engle and Mrs. J. F. Brown took dinner at the Sunnyside on Monday last week.
    C. J. Howard of San Francisco, representing the J. A. Folger & Co., was among us last week doing business with our merchants.
    Mrs. Henry Childreth, who has been visiting her parents on Elk Creek, returned to her home in Eagle Point last week.
    Fred Findley, who has been to Roseburg to visit his sick father, returned last week bringing his father with him. He has so far recovered as to be able to go around the home and yard.
    Last Tuesday Rev. M. C. Davis came in from Yankee Creek where he held services on Monday night and organized a Sunday school of forty members. He left an appointment to preach there again the first Sunday in September at 2:30 p.m. He will preach at Antioch at 11 o'clock a.m. and go from there to Yankee Creek--the Black Oak school house--and at night at Table Rock. E. Frey is the superintendent and Bessie Wenn is secretary of the new Sunday school.
    George Childreth of Medford and J. W. Ferren of Oakland, Cal., representing Perkins Horseshoe Company of Valley Falls, R.I., called for dinner last Wednesday.
    Next Thursday afternoon, August 21, the Ladies Aid will give a social when refreshments will be served in the town park, the proceeds to go towards raising the minister's salary.
    Since I last wrote I have visited Ed Wolfer's truck patch again and he laughed at the idea of my saying that he had corn eight feet high, when he had it standing eleven and twelve feet high. He was picking ripe strawberries off of his vines for Mrs. Howlett and he told me the reason he had such success with his tomatoes was that he sticked them and kept the vines trimmed the same as an apple tree, so that the sun could reach them.
    There has been considerable complaint to me, although I am not the road supervisor, county judge or commissioner, about the condition of the county road as you come up the hill from the old Linksweiler lane just north of the Antelope bridge. It is washed out so deep that it is difficult for two wagons to pass and especially hard on automobiles. It should be fixed if we expect to have travel go through our town.
    We had a very serious accident happen near here Thursday. While a gang of men were working on the new bridge Wm. Vinson was acting as foreman and had a gang of men driving piles and Mr. Vinson was on the old bridge holding against the timber, while it was being raised to its place, with his hand and knee and he signaled to one of the men to swing it around, thinking that he would be quick enough to get out of the way, when the piling caught him on the back part of the knee, throwing him off among the piling and some say that the timber fell on him and others said no, but the timber had to be lifted off of him. He was taken immediately on the handcar and carried to the tavern in Eagle Point and as soon as the train came in he was placed on the baggage car and taken to Medford, our local doctor having done all that he could to relieve his suffering. On his arrival at Medford he was met by his wife and talked with her for a few minutes and quietly breathed his last. Mr. Vinson was raised in Jackson County--Sams Valley--where I understand that his mother still lives. He was raised an orphan, his father having been killed while coming down one of the hills with a lead of poles, having been thrown off the wagon, the wheel running over him. He was a quiet, sober, industrious man and was quite popular with his men. I understand that he leaves in addition to his wife and mother a son, about 12 years old.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Thursday morning I started from home for Grants Pass to visit Dr. M. C. Findley, the Grants Pass eye specialist. On my arrival in Medford about the first place I found myself was the Mail Tribune office to get a new list of the Eagle Point subscribers to that paper and to secure a copy of the latest. Then I repaired to the S.P. depot and sat down and read the Mail Tribune until train time. I boarded the motor car and started and was soon absorbed with what I was seeing along the route. What few bearing orchards there were along the route were simply loaded with fruit of all kinds, and one would judge by the appearance of the stubble and the stacks that the crop had been fully up to date. There was considerable alfalfa hay being cut and stacked and one unfamiliar with this country would wonder what is to become of all the hay that is stacked along the line.
    I also noted that there is a vast acreage of young fruit trees all along the route and some that looked as though they were about four years old that looked as though they had been simply molded all in the same mold, they were so even. As I passed the Ray dam I noticed that there were quite a number of men fishing just below the dam, notwithstanding the law says that they shall not fish nearer than 600 feet of the dam, but such is life in the far West.
    When I reached the doctor's office I found that there were only two persons ahead of me, as I came in and registered as No. 13 on the register. While there I had the pleasure of meeting with G. A. Tebbe of Yreka who was there receiving treatment for his hearing, and Harry McGee, son of O. P. McGee, formerly of this place and later of Medford, but for now near Dallas, Oregon. He was there being treated for his throat.
    As I did not remain in Grants Pass but a short time, returning the same day, did not see much of interest to write.
    R. C. Lawton, our electrician, who has been out in the Crater Lake country for the past week or ten days, returned last Saturday. He reported having had a fine time but had some stormy weather to contend with.
    The Butte Falls and Eagle Point Telephone Company have had another line of wire stretched from Butte Falls and to this place and will probably extend it on to Medford so as to give us a metallic circuit all the way. There are now so many phones on the line that a ground wire does not give satisfaction.
    Our city council at its last meeting ordered the owners of the property along Main Street to put down sidewalks from one end of the town to the other. From the wagon bridge up the the sidewalk is to be five feet four inches wide and one and one-fourth inches in thickness and from the bridge down one inch thick. That will be a big improvement, as in the winter the walking is quite bad on account of the sloppy mud.
    Last Saturday forenoon Dr. Brower and family of Ashland passed through here on their way to Rogue River; I mean the stream called Rogue River, not the little city that the S.P. calls out as a station along the line from Medford to Grants Pass. They went to the river to fish. They had been up the country visiting friends.
    Mrs. J. B. Jackson started last week for the state of Washington to visit relatives, to be gone several weeks.
    Last Saturday I took a trip up to Trail and in the meantime took Miss Louisa Blass up to visit her parents at the free ferry. Rev. M. C. Davis had arranged to have a basket meeting at the Trail school house on Sunday and administered the ordinance of baptism by immersion and the result was that there was quite a crowd assembled. Rev. Davis preached at 11 o'clock and then we all went down to Trail Creek and he here baptized John and Katie Warner, and at the close of the services we all partook of the basket dinner. There was quite a number who came from Elk Creek and some from the neighborhood of Central school house, and after partaking of as fine a dinner as anyone could wish I preached to a house full of attentive listeners.
    As I was away from home on Sunday I cannot tell of all that transpired that day as Mrs. Howlett seldom asks anyone their name, but among the visitors were Mr. and Mrs. George Garrett and her mother, Mrs. Clara Rader. Mrs. Rader is one of our old neighbors with whom we have been acquainted for almost fifty years, and her daughter, Mrs. Garrett, and our girls were associated together in their childhood days, they having lived within a half of a mile of each other for about twenty years.
    But I see that I am making my letter entirely too long, so will stop right here and will try next Wednesday to tell the readers something else that will be of interest to them.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 21, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I had so much to write that I had to postpone writing some of my items until today, Wednesday, and now will start off just where I finished Monday.
    About the most notable incident that has come to my knowledge is so much out of the ordinary that I hesitated about writing it up, but on the advice of two of our prominent citizens have concluded to give it to the public. On Thursday of last week there was a man by the name of R. N. Cote put in his appearance and commenced to deliver pictures that he had taken to enlarge and it appears that he had taken one of our mayor's wife, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, and the charge is that he R. N. Cote, went to the store of von der Hellen Bros. and collected his pay and then went to the residence of the mayor and collected the amount of Mrs. von der Hellen, whereupon the aforesaid mayor learned of the act, went to the home of Mr. Henry O. Childreth, Mrs. Childreth being there alone except her small children, to find the said R. N. Cote, and finding him there asked Mrs. Childreth to retire to the kitchen as he had some business with the man, and then made a demand on Mr. Cote for the money, using language that is not fit to put in print, but informed Mr. Cote that he was the mayor and that if he did not deliver the money he would beat him to death and with the threat grabbed him by the throat, with the result that some of the neighbors hearing an unusual noise ran to the house and found the two men in a regular knock-down and drag-out fight. The marshal was among them but he made no arrests, for the reasons best known to himself. When Mr. Childreth heard of the affair he went to the recorder to have the mayor arrested, but he, for reasons best known to himself, declined to interfere. He then went to Judge Watkins and secured a warrant for the arrest of the mayor charged with assault on one R. N. Cote and the mayor was duly arrested by the marshal, pleaded guilty and was fined five dollars and costs. This was Monday morning.
    Mrs. C. D. Stout and daughter, Miss Ora, came out last Sunday to spend a while at the Sunnyside with her husband, who has charge of the construction of the new steel bridge across the Little Butte.
    Last Monday Mr. J. T Summerville, wife and son Lee, W. V. Tower and wife, and F. D. Tower, all of Medford, came in from Crater Lake for dinner. They report having quite a time on account of the snow and rain, but felt that they had been repaid for all their troubles and hardships they underwent. They report that there are just hundreds of people going to the lake this season in automobiles.
    Albert Anderson of Grants Pass, a member of the firm of Albert Anderson Co., who are in the concrete paving business, called for dinner Monday. He has a young orchard in the edge of our town and came out to look after it.
    At a meeting of the school board they employed Mrs. George von der Hellen to teach the primary department at a salary of seventy-five dollars a month.
    Last Monday evening Mr. T. L. Benson, wife and two children, and Mrs. Benson's brother, Victor Burrett, and wife called for supper. Mr. Benson is living on the old France Plymale place and Mr. Burrett is living on the old Chambers place.
    Monday afternoon Mrs. Howlett received a message over the phone ordering a chicken dinner for a company of eight at one o'clock Tuesday and promptly at the hour designated two autos came dashing up to the Sunnyside and Mrs. J. A. Westerlund, Mrs. Julia Perl, Mrs. A. A. Davis, Miss Aileen Perl, Miss Dorothy Wicks, Miss Marjorie Westerlund and Miss Lillian Westerlund, all of Medford except Miss Marjorie Westerlund, who is from Chicago visiting her aunt and uncle. They were accompanied by Budman Taylor, who was driving the auto for Mr. Perl. Talk about a time, they surely had it and [it] was with great reluctance that they finally tore themselves loose from the table and began to get ready for the return trip. Of course, they all had to be introduced to the writer of the Eaglets and it almost made me blush to hear the compliments they paid me.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 23, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Thursday Mr. J. C. Moore of Elk Creek and W. B. Dennis of Ashland drove up to the Sunnyside and called for dinner. Mr. Moore, who was recently burned out in Ashland, has moved out on his farm on Elk Creek and Mr. Dennis is one of the Ashland butchers. They were just from Elk Creek, where Mr. Dennis had been attending to business in his line.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mr. W. E. Hammel, who owns a large tract of land about four miles north of here, was in town last Wednesday, also Henry French, who has a fine farm at the new bridge across Rogue River about five miles north of here. He reports that he has a fine lot of peaches this year.
    Uncle Dave Smith and his son, Isaac, have been doing business with our merchants within the last few days. Also Fred Pettegrew, who has a farm at Reese Creek.
    Mr. A. C. Allen and family of Medford, who were on the return trip from Crater Lake, called for dinner Wednesday. Mr. Allen is the man who owns the park on the road between Medford and Jacksonville, and he tells me that he has at present three elk as he has a young one this season added to his number. He had a kangaroo among his list of animals but the hot spell just after its arrival and the flies were too much for it and it died. While here he was talking about the condition of the country and remarked that he had run his car from here to San Francisco, from there to Humboldt County and back 900 miles and from home to Crater Lake and around to Eagle Point and that during the whole trip in California he had not found as much bad road as there is between the Bybee Bridge and Trail, that the road is simply a fright and that after he passed Trail he found that the people let the water from the irrigation ditches run over the road and in many places it is with great difficulty that one can get along with a car. In addition to the above he told of a company at Klamath Falls that was running seven or eight cars, taking passengers from the boat landing on Klamath Lake to the Crater and back, and that if we expect to hold the travel we must fix our roads so that people can ride over them with some ease and degree of safety.
    A. B. Zimmerman and his son are moving the old store building formerly occupied by Heath & Diamond down in the vicinity of their new store to be used for a warehouse.
    T. E. Blackburn of Central Point and Irving Worthington of Medford called for dinner last Thursday. Mr. Blackburn owns an orchard near Central Point and Mr. Worthington is the chief engineer for the Rogue River Irrigation Company. He was here looking after the interests of the company. They are putting in a fish ladder in the Little Butte Creek so that the fish can go up the creek over the old mill dam.
    J. R. Simmons and family came out down Washington to visit his brother, Rev. L. L. Simmons, last Wednesday and started Friday morning for Oklahoma.
    Last Thursday night the ladies of the Baptist Church gave an ice cream social for the purpose of raising funds to meet the minister's salary. The social was given in the park, and judging by the amount of money raised there must have been quite a nice assemblage. They raised $16 dollars, and all hands had a good time. They had vocal and instrumental music, ice cream and cake besides other good things that made the hours pass off pleasantly.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 26, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    As an illustration of the advantage of advertising in a live paper, will remark that A. J. Daley put an ad in another paper for a week for a lost auto tire, with no results, and finally he was talking to me about it and in the run of conversation asked me to put it in the Mail Tribune for a week; and the result was that he soon found his tire. The ad had been read and reported and he was notified to call at one of the garages in Medford and take his property.
    Last Friday J. S. Howard and his grandson, Bernard Roberts of Medford, took a spin out to look at some property he had sold near our town, and called at the Sunnyside for dinner. The old gentleman has many friends in this section of the country.
    One of Herman Myer's sons and a young Mr. Frey of Lake Creek were pleasant callers last Friday after I had written for the Mail Tribune.
    George Childreth is here at present helping his brother Henry in his blacksmith shop, and his wife came out from Medford to visit her husband and brother-in-law's family.
    Miss Ruth Holmes, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Holmes of Medford, who has been visiting Miss Hazel Brown, returned home last week.
    Parties have been at work putting up another wire on the line from here to Brownsboro, and another company is putting up another line from here to intersect the line running from Medford to Upper Little Butte.
    G. H. Wamsley has finished putting in a fish ladder in the dam just above the grist mill.
    Last Friday was rather a warm day and while I was striding around town in search of Eaglets for the Mail Tribune I fell in company with Ed Wolfer, our tomato and strawberry man, and in speaking about the temperature he remarked that he had been picking tomatoes that day and had been picking them green for shipment and that the sun was so hot that it turned them red before he could get them to the house, but that he has some that are so yellow that they can't turn red. (adv.)
    Judge Carpenter and Mr. Chandler, who have orchards about four miles north of Eagle Point, were in town last Saturday. Mr. Chandler brought in some as fine looking clingstone peaches as I ever saw. Judge Carpenter of Laramie, Wyoming, is taking his vacation on his orchard.
    W. W. Taylor, who owns a part of the old J. J. Fryer place, was smiling on his friends in our town last Saturday.
    M. S. Woods has been supplying the people of Eagle Point with a fine variety of peaches this season.
    Mrs. Eva Ahans, nee Eva Pool, of Portland, is here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Pool.
    Rev. Sheerin, rector of the Episcopal church of Medford, is camped on the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek and conducted services here last Sunday afternoon in the Baptist Church.
    Messrs. Bryant and Stonny and their families returned from a trip to Klamath County last Friday. They report having had considerable bad weather on the trip. Also the three Smith brothers, Lon, Roy and John and wife and Roy Ashpole and Misses Rosa Ayres and Donnie Rader returned the same time. They encountered considerable snow on the trip and one of those mountain rain storms such as we never have in the Rogue River Valley.
    The next time will tell about the change in the lumber yard, etc., and who was here Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 29, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the callers last Sunday were Dr. Harry Hart and wife, Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Ellis of Medford and Miss Cora E. Clannon of Quincy, Ill. The two named gentlemen own orchards near Medford, in Eden Valley, and Miss Clannon is visiting Mr. and Mrs. Ellis. When they first arrived at the Sunnyside the ladies walked through the sitting room into the parlor and Dr. Hart and your correspondent stopped and were in conversation in the sitting room when Mr. Ellis came in and said that the ladies wished to meet the author of the Eaglets, so as a matter of course I had to march in and when they told me of having read my Eaglets for the last three years and how interested they were, I felt quite elated. Well, we had a very pleasant visit and they all seemed to enjoy their dinner as well as the visit to the Sunnyside.
    There were also two other parties stopped for dinner. One was composed of Mr. and Mrs. Chinnock, Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Taillandier and Mrs. Catherine Mears, all of Medford, and after I had secured the names of the party one of the ladies looked into my face so beseechingly and asked me not to forget her dog, Ene. They were just on their way to Crater Lake, going with team and one on horseback. They were a lively crowd and bent on having a good time on the trip. There was also another company here but I did not meet them in time to find out who they were or where they were going.
    Mr. H. Wiener, a young man who came out from Medford to take charge of the lumber business here in the lumber yard formerly owned by Sprague Lumber Company, but now known as the Eagle Point Lumber Company. The Sprague Lumber Company sold out their business to the same company that bought out the Big Pines Lumber Company, the Central Point Lumber Company and the lumber business in Talent. I understand that they are negotiating now to secure all the timber in the Butte Falls and Mt. Pitt country.
    Mrs. Argalee Green has gone to Seattle and her father, J. J. Fryer, who went to Forest Creek last week on business, returned home. He says that he has greatly improved in health and feels better than he has felt for some time.
    The Smith brothers, at least a part of them, have sold the old John W. Smith place on the edge of the desert, on the sticky. John Leroy, Lewis and Arthur sold their parts but their brother Roland kept his ten acres. They sold the seventy acres for $1,100 to J. W. Torrey.
    I see there is published in the Mail Tribune several pages of what Sheriff Jones advertises as delinquent taxes and among the list there is so many glaring mistakes that I think that if Sheriff Jones and Assessor Grieves expect to be re-elected they had better explain in the public press how so many mistakes were made. For instance, Mrs. Sophia Emery is charged with some twelve or fifteen lots in Eagle Point when in fact she has not owned any land in Eagle Point for the last twelve years, and they have me charged with three lots that I do not and never did own. And I for one don't like to have my name paraded before the public as a delinquent taxpayer, for I never in all my life allowed my taxes to become delinquent.
    Our school will commence on Monday, September 9th, Mr. Suddarth, principal; Mrs. Suddarth, intermediate department and Mrs. George von der Hellen having charge of the primary department.
    Mrs. George W. Daley, living just across the street from the Sunnyside, has a fine watermelon patch and last Tuesday night she found two bicycles in her yard where they had been "cached" and placed them in safe keeping and says that the owners can have them by proving property.
    Mr. Lawton, our electrician, is engaged at this writing, wiring the Sunnyside. He is engaged to wire about all the homes in our town. The town council will meet Tuesday, September 2, and at that time the subject of granting the company a franchise will probably be settled and I understand that the company expects to go right to work and put up the line connecting us with the main line from Prospect.
    There will be services in the Baptist Church Sunday, September 1st, at 11 a.m., 3 p.m. and 8 p.m. The Rev Sheerin will preach in the afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 30, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Quackenbusher, foreman on the A. Corbin orchard, the old Bradshaw orchard, has been engaged the past week with two teams hauling box material to be used in shipping their fruit. He is said to have a very heavy crop of apples this season.
    I omitted to state in a former article that James Gillespie, engineer of the traction engine that is used on the construction of the new railroad bridge, has moved his family from Medford and has moved into the old Robinett house.
    J. W. Diamond, a brother of one of our merchants, was out to visit his relatives the first of last week.
    Pete Stowell, one of our hustling farmers, has been selling some fine peaches in our town. In fact, we think that Eagle Point and vicinity can produce as good fruit as the world produces. This is not egotistical, is it?
    Chris Bergman and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Bergman, were doing business with our merchants last Wednesday.
    Mrs. Benjamin Brophy, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Nichols, was doing business with our merchants last Wednesday as well as visiting her mother, who resides in the upper part of the Nichols block.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. R. Ulen and their son, H. E. Ulen, wife and two daughters and single son, W. A. Ulen, in company of A. H. Peachey, all of Ashland, drove in last Wednesday evening and camped just above the Sunnyside for the night. They had gone from Ashland via Lake of the Woods and Pelican Bay to Fort Klamath and Crater Lake and drove down Rogue River. They had taken in all the sights and felt well repaid for their trouble, declaring that the sight of Crater Lake was worth all of the trouble and expense of the trip.
    J. B. Andrews, Edward Soutter, Earl S. Tumy and H. Soute, all of Medford, came in for dinner late Wednesday afternoon. They were on their way home from a trip in the hills.
    From present appearances there will be no scarcity of wood in our town the coming winter, as there seems to be an abundant supply being laid in by the families generally, but the merchants are laying in a large stock, for I see that Geo. Brown & Sons have a large lot of cordwood, Heath & Diamond have a lot of stove and block wood and von der Hellens have a good supply of oak grub wood that they have taken off of their land where they have been clearing.
    Miss Anna Watkins, daughter of our justice of the peace, who has been out in the hills with her uncle, James Watkins, returned last Wednesday evening. She brought home a nice lot of huckleberries that they picked on Huckleberry Mountain.
    Mr. Sweat and wife were in town Thursday afternoon selling green corn. They live above Brownsboro.
    Mrs. Wm. Winkle and one of her sons were doing business in town Thursday.
    J. A. Torney, wife and son Jack, and O. P. Ellis and wife, arrived at the Sunnyside Thursday evening just in time for late supper, off of a trip to Crater Lake, tired, dirty and hungry. About the first thing after being assured that they were not too late for supper they inquired for water, soap and towels. They said that they had had a very pleasant trip except that it was very cold out near the lake.
    Miss Ruth Merrick of Medford and Miss Selvy Fish of Talent have been visiting Miss Frances Heath the last week.
    Robbie Jonas and family and Ernest Peachey, wife and sister-in-law, who have been out with a party repairing the government telephone line to Fish and Four Mile Lake, came in Thursday night.
    Get your school tablets, composition books, pencils, inks and etc., at the Model Variety Store.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 2, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Holly, the insurance man representing the McMinnville Mutual, was out Friday looking after the interests of his company.
    Mr. T. L. Trunnell of Grants Pass called for dinner last Friday. He was here looking for a location. His wife was here a few weeks ago and so fell in love with our town that they are thinking of locating among us.
    The lumber for the sidewalks has been distributed along the route and the work commenced to put it down, but there seems to be a hitch as to where to put it, as there is a party that wants to make some change in the route so as to make it straight and have it come close to the new fences that have been built.
    Mr. E. F. Lake, who is living just outside of the incorporation, brought in a fine lot of melons and cantaloupes last week.
    Rev. Hicks, formerly of Ashland, but no having charge of the First Baptist Church of Albany, will commence a series of meetings here on the 16th of this month and continue until and including the 20th. Mr. Hicks is a very forceful preacher, as well as a very popular one, and we expect to see good results.
    Rev. Hayes, a Baptist minister who has been preaching in and above Brownsboro considerable the past spring and summer, returned from Klamath County last Saturday.
    F. F. Anderson and his sister-in-law, Mrs. E. Good of Medford, came in last Saturday and took dinner at the Sunnyside. They and Mrs. E. Good and another son-in-law of Rev. Good had been out on a hunting and camping trip in the hills on the headwaters of the Umpqua and Rogue Rivers for about three weeks traveling on horseback and camping out with a tent. Mrs. Good said that they had a fine time and among them killed eleven deer and that they had a quantity of jerked venison.
    Last Sunday morning your correspondent took a trip to Antioch where he met Rev. M. C. Davis, our Sunday School missionary, and after he had conducted the Sunday school invited me to preach, which I did to a small congregation. Quite a number of the people from that section had gone to the Huckleberry Mountain and some were off with the threshing machine, etc. I understand that there will be as much grain threshed in Sams Valley and vicinity as has ever been threshed for a number of years, and owing to the high price of sacks many of the farmers are repairing their old granaries or building new ones. In the afternoon Rev. Davis went to the Black Oak school house on Yankee Creek and preached. He reports having had fifty-two persons to preach to, a good audience for a country school house, and at night preached at Table Rock. He is a hustler.
    C. H. Picket, traveling salesman for a Salem and Portland hardware company, was a caller Saturday among our merchants and took supper at the Sunnyside.
    Died on Sunday, September 1, at the residence of his son Fred, Mr. Isaac Findley of Roseburg, aged 70 years and 8 months. He leaves a wife, second wife and eleven children, six daughters and five sons. The remains will be taken to Grants Pass for interment tomorrow, Tuesday.
    Get your school tablets, composition book, pencil, inks, etc., at the Model Variety Store. (Adv.)
Medford Mail Tribune, September 4, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Joe Cassady, son and partner, Mr. Sherman, all of Medford, came out to the Sunnyside last Saturday evening, spent the night, and the next morning started up Rogue River on a fishing excursion, returning on Monday morning. They had "fisherman's luck"--caught nothing.
    Henry Myers, his brother's son and Charles Klingle called for dinner last Monday. Mr. Klingle was on his way to Jacksonville to serve on the jury and the two Myers were here after shakes they procured at the E.P. lumber yard.
    Jud Edsall and his father, John Edsall, were called Monday evening by phone to attend the funeral of the infant child of John Carter of Phoenix, it being Mr. Edsall's grandchild.
    J. C. Moore, wife and daughter spent the night at the Sunnyside last Monday and Tuesday morning went on up to Ashland, where Mrs. Moore and her daughter will remain and the little miss attend school.
    There is quite a lot of lumber being brought into town for the E.P. Lumber Co. just now, and Mr. Wiener, the manager, is kept busy most of the time.
    Mrs. Lottie Rippey, nee Lottie Taylor, a daughter of Mrs. R. G. Brown, of Portland, [is] here visiting her mother and sister, Mrs. W. H. Brown.
    Mrs. Libby Eickmeyer, Mrs. Hattie Allen and Mrs. Nellie Simpson, daughters of Mrs. F. M. Stewart and sisters of Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mrs. Frank Nichols and William Perry, arrived the first of the week from Washington and Eastern Oregon. Mrs. Stewart is expecting another daughter, Mrs. Emma ------ (I have forgotten her surname) and a son of Mr. Stewart in a few days to have a grand family reunion. They had a reunion here about five years ago, when they all (except the son) came to the Sunnyside to a quilting and rag tacking [when people made rag rugs together] and there met sixty of the neighbors and had a big feed.
    Our school board is having the interior of the school house painted and fixed up for school next Monday.
    The funeral services over the remains of Isaac Findley were held at the church yesterday, Tuesday, conducted by Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the church here. I am requested to offer a card of thanks to the many friends of the family for their kindness and sympathy during their hour of bereavement. The remains were taken to Grants Pass for interment. His five daughters attended the funeral.
    Tuesday there seemed to be a general rush to the Sunnyside for there was something like a dozen transients besides our regular boarders here for dinner, and at night there were about forty took supper and we had every bed full. Eagle Point is coming to the front.
    Get your school tablets, composition books, pencils, inks, etc., at the Model Variety Store. (Adv.)
    Marsh Garret, Thomas Farlow and two more men whom I did not recognize came to town Tuesday in an auto.
    Bert and John Higinbotham spent the night at the Sunnyside Tuesday.
    James Riley was in town Tuesday engaging wood for different families.
    Mrs. Fred Pelouze went to Medford Tuesday afternoon. Her son Robbie is attending the high school in Medford.
    Floyd Pearce and family have come over from Forest Creek and expect to remain here and take care of Mrs. Pearce's father, J. J. Fryer, and send the children to school.
    Mr. McIntyre and wife and a friend of the family took supper at the Sunnyside Tuesday night, and Chris Bergman and wife spent the night with us. Also a young man by the name of Tarbell. He is a book agent and is delivering books he has sold.
    Joseph Rader and wife took dinner with us Wednesday.
    Thomas Nichols is hauling a quantity of lumber to his farm from the E.P.L.Y.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 7, 1912, page 7



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Mitchell, a daughter of Wm. Patterson of Ashland, and her twin babies have been visiting Mrs. A. H. Weber, wife of our pharmacist, the first of the week. While here she also visited several of her mother's, Mrs. Bessie Clift's, old friends.
    Mrs. Eddie Korring of Derby came out last Thursday.
    Mr. J. V. McIntyre, our banker, and wife started Wednesday afternoon on a trip to the eastern states to be gone several weeks. Mr. Lumsden of the Fruit Growers Bank of Medford came out the first of the week to take charge of the business of the bank during his absence.
    On Friday of last week in the Eaglets I made mention of the fact that there was published in the Mail Tribune what was supposed to be a list of the delinquent taxpayers, etc., and stated that there was quite a number of names, and lots of property that were incorrect and suggested that Sheriff Jones and the assessor might do well to explain how it comes that there are so many errors in the list, as there was property situated in our town that was assessed to parties who have not owned property here for the last twelve years etc., and the evening after I last wrote, Wednesday, I received a very polite note from Sheriff W. A. Jones stating that he had read the aforesaid article and explained that the tax list was made up in the office of the assessor, complete and turned over to the sheriff for collection and that he, the sheriff had nothing to do with the making out of the list, and as I do not wish to make this correction, and in talking with the Assessor Wm. Grieve, about the time the taxes were being paid I asked him how it happened that such mistakes were made, for at this time I called his attention to the fact that I was assessed with three lots that did not belong to me, and he explained that the county court had been trying to arrange a list of the present ownership of all the land in the county and that it was through [this] means that the mixup was made, and I simply made the suggestion in the Eaglets, being a friend to both the present incumbents, thinking that if they would make a satisfactory explanation it might help them both in their reelection.
    Sam H. Harnish started Wednesday, with his wife, daughter Miss Dottie and son Bobbie, for Williams Creek in Josephine County to visit Mrs. Harnish's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Vrooman.
    Dr. Holt reports that the stork has visited the family of our old lumber dealer, Mr. Sprague--it is a girl, born September 2, and that the mother and babe are doing well.
    Miss Leta Peelor of Butte Falls came out Thursday evening on the P.&E. and spent the night at the Sunnyside taking the Eagle Point-Prospect stage this Friday morning for Elk Creek, where she is to teach school this fall.
    Heath & Diamond have had their old store building moved and placed alongside of their new store building and are fixing it up for a general warehouse.
    Mrs. Henry Meyers phoned down last night and asked me to say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that there is a bay mare at their place near Lake Creek P.O., with mane roached and no brand and weighs about eleven hundred pounds.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 9, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINTERS BACK GOV. WEST
    Resolutions commending Governor West's stand in regard to the enforcement of the anti-vice laws of the state and his "cleanup" campaign were adopted Sunday by the Baptist Church of Eagle Point. The resolutions are said to express the views of a large majority of the citizens of Eagle Point. They follow:
    "Be it resolved, by the congregation of the Baptist Church in Eagle Point, Oregon, assembled for the worship of God on the morning of September 8, 1912:
    "First, that we extend to Governor Oswald West our unqualified endorsement of his efforts for the enforcement of the laws of this commonwealth and for the moral and civic betterment of our state.
    "Second, that we pledge to Governor West our undivided support as a body of Christian citizens.
    "Third, that a copy of these resolutions be sent to Governor West and given to the press for publication."
Medford Mail Tribune, September 11, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to mention in my last that Thomas Stanley and Herbert Carlton were callers last Friday for dinner.
    We have been having so much rain the past week that the railroad men who are working on the new bridge had to lay off Saturday and the section boss who had charge of one of the gangs of men quit his job and the result was that several of the men laid off Saturday and Sunday.
    M. W. Jones, an old schoolmate of our depot agent, Mr. Woods, called with him for dinner last Saturday. He is a traveling salesman of San Francisco for the Long Syrup Company.
    Harry Star of Portland also called last Saturday. He is representing a hardware firm of that city.
    C. Frank Rhodes, a civil and mining engineer of Medford, has been at work the past few days setting stakes for the sidewalks so as to level up the ground as well as to get them in the proper place, for of all the crooked sidewalks that Oregon has ever produced, they absolutely take the cake. The houses and fences along Main Street--that is, the street running up and down the creek--have been just to correspond with the ideas of the owners and now each one wants the sidewalk to run along his or her fence, and there is strong talk that before the job is done that Judge Calkins will have to settle the damages, for Mr. G. W. Owings, the proprietor of the Eagle Point Hotel, says that they want to make a cut for the sidewalk in front of his property three feet deep and remove a large shade tree that stands in front of the hotel.
    Mrs. Daisy Evans went last Saturday to Ashland to visit her mother, Mrs. Geo. Allen.
    Jud Edsall started last Saturday morning with his eight horses for the Fort Klamath country. He took with him his father, J. B. Edsall, Jack Foster and Irwin Pool. He has a contract to haul a lot of logs for a sawmill in that section.
    Pete Stowell was delivering some as fine peaches Saturday as I ever saw. Roy Willits, our mail contractor and stage driver from here to Persist, procured some three hundred pounds to take up to his home.
    Mr. R. C. Lawton and a man by the name of Scott have been engaged wiring the houses in our town, getting ready for the electric lights when the juice gets here.
    Get your school tablets, composition book, pencil, inks, etc., at the Variety Store. (Adv.)
    F. J. Ayres and wife were in town Saturday. They came in to bring the belongings of their son-in-law, Mr. Newport. They have moved into the house formerly occupied by Mr. Wolf, the old John Lewis house.
    Rev. Hicks of the First Baptist Church of Albany will commence a series of meetings next Monday to continue until and including Friday night.
    Miss Eva Colahan of San Jose, California, who left here a few months ago for her old home and then was called to Seattle, returned to the Sunnyside Sunday evening and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage Monday morning for the home of her uncle, W. W. Willits. She has been engaged in teaching school for some time and proved to be quite proficient as a teacher.
    Fred Puhl of Medford, Mrs. C. A. Newstrom, her daughter Mera, sons Herman and Theodore, called for dinner last Sunday on their way from the Newstrom farm near Lake Creek to Mr. Puhl's farm near Medford where Miss Mera expects to remain for a while.
    Another one of the Perry girls, Mrs. Emma Stine, arrived Monday morning, and a son of F. W. Stewart, John H., also arrived last Saturday. In one of my letters I omitted to name Mrs. Norman McQuade as one of the six sisters of the Perry family. I understand that they and their brother, William Perry of Butte Falls, are contemplating having a grand reunion at their mother's, Mrs. F. M. Stewart. The family has been raised on the farm now owned by the son, William Perry, and every few years, by mutual agreement, they all come home to see each other and their mother, and it is not necessary for me to add that they always have a royal good time.
    Ed Higinbotham, our road supervisor for this district, and a friend of his called Sunday on their way to the valley.
    Ed Outen was shipping a lot of oats to Butte Falls Monday for Art Nichols.
    Our new lumber man, Mr. G. H. Wiener, reports that he is kept busy but thinks that perhaps he will have a little time to read so he has subscribed for the Daily Mail Tribune so he can keep posted in the business and political world.
    I understand that the business has increased on the telephone lines so as to necessitate putting in a new switchboard, and raise the salary of the owners of the Model Variety Store, who have charge of the business. One thing is sure, that we have had faithful service during the past year.
    J. C. Moore of Elk Creek and W. W. Drake of Ashland came up from Ashland Monday and spent the night with us on their way to Elk Creek.
    Speaking of Elk Creek reminds me that Roy Willits said that the lumber was being hauled to build two new bridges across Elk Creek, something badly needed.
    John Turrell and his daughter-in-law, Mrs. John Turrell Jr., stopped for dinner Tuesday on their way up to his farm on Little Butte Creek, near Lake Creek. Mrs. Turrell was going up for an outing and to take a needed rest from the routine duties of keeping a boarding and lodging house.
    Dick Bessie, formerly of Central Point and for years stage driver on the Central Point-Eagle Point route, but now doing business on the old Thomas Kavanaugh place near Gold Hill, was a pleasant caller Tuesday for dinner, where he met several of his old-time friends and acquaintances. He says that he always reads the Eaglets.
    Mr. Wheeler, the president of the Butte Falls-Eagle Point Telephone Company, and Wm. Beale, who has a farm east of Butte Falls, and Fred Warner of Trail were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday noon.
    Our school was organized Monday with Prof. W. L. Suddarth as principal, Mrs. W. L. Suddarth as intermediate, and Mrs. George von der Hellen as primary teacher. There were sixty-four in attendance. There is quite a number of the children that have not been enrolled yet but will be later on.
    I see by looking over my notes that A. H. Weber and wife, C. T. Sabin and family and Prof. W. L. Suddarth and wife were also here for dinner last Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 12, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday morning I started from home to take the morning train for Medford intending to go to Grants Pass and just as I was passing the Harnish livery stable I met Mr. Coss and a friend of his by the name of Haynes of Seattle. They were looking over the country as Mr. Haynes was so well pleased with it that he had serious thoughts of locating among us, and you know that if there is a good place for sale Mr. Coss knows it. Going a little farther I met one of the old pioneers, John X. Miller, who has just returned from Arkansas and Missouri. Taking the train I met Mrs. B. W. Bryant and Miss Francis Heath. Miss Heath is attending the Medford High School and goes from here every morning on the P.&E. Railroad, arriving in Medford about 8:15 a.m. About the first place I went was to the office of the Mail Tribune, to pay my compliments and attend to a little business for the Medford Printing Company. Taking the 10:21 train or rather the motor, I proceeded on my way to Grants Pass to have Dr. M. C. Findley examine my eyes again, and I had hardly taken my seat before A. W. Clemens, formerly of this place and later of Central Point, grasped my hand. He and his wife were on their way to Grants Pass to meet their son, John, who lives about twelve miles from that city. Mr. Clemens is now living in Stockton, California, and is in the chicken business and they say they are doing well. They came up to visit their children.
    On the way to Grants Pass I noticed that the crop in the Rogue River Valley was not a failure, for there were just stacks of grain along the route that had not been threshed yet and the trees in the orchards were simply loaded with fruit and the cornfields made me think of my boyhood days in the state of Missouri where they raise corn. The ears looked as though they were about as full as they well could be and the blades still green and lovely. Arriving at Grants Pas at 11:40 I hurried to Dr. Findley's office and when I was about to enter the thought came to my mind that it was so near noon that there would be but a few there but when I opened the door and entered I found seven in that room. Going into the operating room I found one in the chair and one on the reclining chair. After shaking hands with the doctor and his assistant, Miss Young, I was informed that my case could not be considered until after dinner. Taking dinner at a nearby eating house, I went back early so as to be registered among the first and there I found Mrs. M. Black and her daughter, Miss Jessie, waiting for treatment. Miss Jessie is one of Medford's music teachers and was there to have her eyes tested to ascertain if she needed glasses. I also met Mrs. Frye, formerly of upper Sams Valley. She is having her daughter treated for deafness. I also met Mr. and Mrs. Orson Sween of Illinois. They had come all the way from their home to have her treated for a mastoid abscess. She had been treated for the same complaint by Dr. Findley three years ago on her other ear and come all the way to be treated again. She is cured and expects to start for home in a few days.
    I also met Mr. James East, a prominent miner of Siskiyou County, California. When my turn came it took the doctor but a short time to get through with my eyes as they are getting along nicely but I had him treat my ears for my hearing so that I will not have to ask a person for the second or third time for their name.
    Well on my way home I fell in company with a man by the name of Lee who used to live in our town and bought the old Daye saw mill on Round Top of Mr. Daley. He is living now in California, working at his trade. On reaching home I found Miss Enid Peelor, a sister of Leta Peelor, who is now teaching school on Elk Creek. Miss Enid was on her way to Central school house about two miles below the free ferry on the north side of Rogue River. I also found Mr. Delroy Getchell, president of the Farmers & Fruitgrowers Bank of Medford and R. F. Antle, assistant cashier of said bank and Mr. F. B. Lumsden, at present our banker in the First State Bank of Eagle Point. They had called for supper and the two first named went back to Medford that night.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 16, 1912, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, a pastor of the Baptist Church, has moved into his new home and E. L. Warnstorff has moved to Medford.
    G. Edgar Hollenbeck and family called for dinner last Friday. He was hauling barley from the Dodge ranch for S. B. Holmes.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Trowbridge, Mrs. N. Palmer and C. P. Danielson of Medford stopped at noon last Friday on their way to Crater Lake, returning Monday and stopping again for dinner on their way home. They report having had a most enjoyable time.
    W. H. Crandall, who owns a farm about four miles north of here, was in town last Friday evening. He reports that his friend and near neighbor, when he is at home, Judge C. E. Carpenter, has gone to California on business, but that his permanent home is in Olympia, Washington.
    Fred Pelouze and wife were doing business in our town last Friday. They had been to Gold Hill and were on their way home. They had some beautiful specimens of watermelons and tomatoes they brought from the demonstration farm on the desert.
    H. Maxwell, a man who has been working on the new railroad bridge and was laid off for a few days on account of the right kind of lumber not arriving, has, while resting, been putting in his time doing some painting. He has painted H. O. Childreth's blacksmith shop and painted a neat sign for him. He has also painted the front of the lumber shed for the Eagle Point Lumber Company and painted a big sign on the side of the Solter Hardware Store and one for the harnessmaker and says that he has several other jobs of painting in our town.
    Von der Hellen Bros. have their wood-sawing machine in town cutting a lot of wood for Wm. von der Hellen.
    Clark Rippy, one of the mail clerks running out from Portland, arrived here last week to join his wife, nee Lottie Taylor, a daughter of Mrs. R. G. Brown.
    I have learned since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune that Mr. and Mrs. D. W. Meyers of Lake Creek lost a son on the 10th inst. and that there was a birth in the family the same day. The boy had been afflicted for a considerable time. He was about twelve years old according to reports.
    Our postmaster, A. J. Florey, does not seem to be afraid of the hoodoo, for last Friday night after dark he went to work and moved to the post office, and it was the 13th day of September at that, into the building that Heath & Diamond had moved in between their store and the town hall and Saturday morning there was a general stampede among us to try and find the post office and when we did we found Jack in his new quarters as cozy as could be, all ready to deliver the mail as usual.
    J. S. Howard and his grandson, Mr. Roberts, came out last Saturday for a ride and to take dinner at the Sunnyside.
    We also had Mrs. J. Frank Brown and Mrs. L. C. Enyart--Aunt Leucretia--here for dinner at the same time, and Aunt L. entertained us with some fine music, both vocal and instrumental. She is a fine singer.
    Last Sunday was rather a noted day, for we had Rev. McKee to preach for us in the forenoon and in the afternoon Rev. Sherner, the Episcopal minister of Medford, and at night, Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist Church, preached and the same day we had Mrs. Dr. Holt and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Louis Mischler, Mrs. Emma Cline, Mrs. G. L. Arnold of Medford, Miss Elizabeth Johnson of Minneapolis, Minn., Mr. and Mrs. Carl Narregan of Eagle Point, Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stewart, Mr. and Mrs. J. E. Stewart, Miss Helen Seohl of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. L. M. Daily, Miss Bertha Daily, Robbie Pelouze of Eagle Point, Agnons Brown of Medford, John W. Smith, wife and sister-in-law, Miss Dollie Stowell of Eagle Point, John Higinbotham, John Cobleigh of Butte Falls, Henry Daley and Miss Genetta Haselton of Eagle Point here for dinner and at night in addition to the regular young people's meeting Mr. and Mrs. McDonough and their son and daughter took an informal leave of the Y.P.M. by singing "God Be With Us Till We Meet Again," and while they were singing there was quite a number of handkerchiefs applied to the eyes, and at the close of the Y.P.M. Mrs. Joseph Moomaw offered a resolution of thanks to the family for their assistance in the church and Y.P.M. during their stay among us. They have always taken an active part in anything that was for the betterment of the community. The resolution was adopted unanimously, and they will be remembered for a long time by their host of friends in this community.
    We are making big preparations for the encampment of the G.A.R. next week.
    Joseph Miller, the old pioneer school teacher, is teaching in the district west of here--the Givan district.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 18, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote I gave an account of Sunday's doing pretty well I thought but on investigating found that I had more to write yet or else leave out things of note in our quiet little village. On Monday morning W. L. Childreth came marching up to our house in company with his wife and we and many of his friends here thought that he was in Missouri visiting his sister but instead of being there he came out on the P.&E. Railroad, went to his home and found that his wife had gone to church leaving some of the children at home, so when she came she saw the children quietly reading and asked why they had not gone to bed and one of the boys remarked that they wanted to read and just then Mr. C. came marching out of the bedroom. He says that he has traveled one thousand miles since he left here to look for a better. He had visited several states and had taken pains to see what was to be seen but has concluded that Jackson County, Oregon is the best place in the world and intends to stay here. Among the things he tells about those places he has visited he found a great deal of sickness and hot weather and here in this country they have good health, he also stated that [when] he [was] in Kansas that there is a disease among the horses something like spinal meningitis among the horses and that during the past year that there has been twenty thousand horses died in that state alone with the disease and that up to the time he left there they had found no remedy for the disease.
    I also learned when too late to put it in my last letter that the Perry children had had a family reunion at the residence of their stepfather and mother, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, on Sunday, Sept. 15, 1912, and in connection with the reunion they had a birthday first as there were four of the family that were born during the month of September; they were Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Mrs. Nettie Grover and Mrs. Harriet Allen. The company consisted of Mrs. Harriet Allen of Seattle, Wash., Mrs. Nellie Simpson, Mrs. C. B. Eckmeyer of Spokane, Wash., Mrs. Imogene Stine of Oakland, Cal., Mrs. Nettie Grover and children, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Nichols and children, Mr. and Mrs. N. C. McQuade and children of Eagle Point, Miss Eva Eckmeyer of Spokane, Wash., Wm. Perry, wife and children of Butte Falls and John H. Stewart of San Diego, Cal., a son of F. M. Stewart. Mrs. Stewart had the tables so arranged on the large porch so as to have all seated at once, the children having a table to themselves. It is not necessary for me to add that they had one of the finest times of their lives and while I am on the subject will remark that this morning when I started out to get the above facts to write for the Mail Tribune Mr. Stewart took me around to take a look at his garden and yard and I remarked to him that if the scientists who were running through town at the time could take a view of the lawn and flower garden they would have something to go home and talk about except the wonders of Crater Lake and the sights along the route. Mr. Stewart has laid the yard off in the most beautiful artistic manner with cement walks all through and these walks are lined with some of the choicest varieties of flowers and shrubbery with a fountain in the center, and everything to correspond so as to make the entire place, house, yard, lawn and garden all correspond.
    The seven Perry girls above mentioned all went to Butte Falls Wednesday to visit their brother, Wm. Perry, and to look over the old home place where they were raised. The four members of the family who have come from a distance and Miss Eve Eckmeyer expect to remain until after the reunion of the old soldiers next week.
    Mrs. Trunnell of Grants Pass came up to the Sunnyside last Monday evening and Tuesday bought the building now used as the Model Variety Store of Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Daily. Mr. Daily expects to continue doing business in the same place for some time yet and are undecided just what they will do in the future.
    G. W. Allen, wife and Mr. J. C. Peyter of Ashland came up and stopped here on their way to the hatchery to try to get some fish.
    Mr. J. C. Cooley, who has been in the region of Fish Lake during the summer, came in a short time ago and has moved into one of P. H. Daily's houses in Eagle Point.
    The following persons were guests at the Sunnyside last Monday: A. M. Tyrrell and Marguerite Tyrrell of Lake Creek and Mrs. J. R. Tyrrell of Medford., Mrs. Charles Pruett and her daughter Miss Mable Pruett of Eagle Point, Mr. Howard of Beagle, Mr. J. W. Mackenzie and Jacob Klippel of Medford. Mr. Klippel is a brother of our old county clerk, sheriff, etc., of Jackson County, Henry Klippel.
    Mr. Basin of Phoenix was also with us Monday night; he was looking for cattle to buy.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 20, 1912, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Balty were in town last Thursday doing business with Heath & Diamond. John Rader, one of our leading stock men and farmer, was in Eagle Point Thursday. Charley Thomas started for Eastern Oregon the first of the week.
    F. J. Ayres, wife and son were in town Thursday and on Friday Miss Rosa Ayres and her brother came in and Miss Rosa and Roy Smith went to Medford to see the fair.
    R. R. Minter and a part of his family came in on Wednesday and met his daughter, Miss Jessie, at the depot. She has been under the care of a doctor for some time but now seems as spry as a cricket and as happy as a lark.
    S. M. Noland of Table Rock came over last Wednesday evening to look over our town and see what the prospect was for a camping ground in our park. He was greatly surprised to find that we had one of the finest parks in the country and that the committee who has charge of the management of affairs had already begun to pitch the tents and get things in readiness for the old veterans. He met your correspondent on the street while he was looking for Eaglets and remarked, "Well, Mr. Howlett, I have been reading your Eaglets for some time and I thought that you were exaggerating in your writings about Eagle Point, but you have not told half there is to tell about Eagle Point, for I tell you that I never was so surprised in a place as I was when I came and looked over your town. Here you have some as fine houses as there is anywhere and you have your streets up in good shape, good sidewalks and are putting down more, and your town has grown so that I hardly knew it, and your park it is just fine, and I always thought that that was a swamp. I am surprised to see such a town."
    Now gentle reader, I can't help but feel a little proud over such a compliment as that, and especially coming from such a man as Mr. Noland.
    Speaking about sidewalks. Some of our enterprising citizens are taking time by the forelock and putting down cement walks in front of their lots instead of boards and Mr. Wamsley is pushing the work along as fast as he can to complete the building of the sidewalks before the wet weather commences.
    Dr. Holt, our M.D., has been kept quite busy the last few days. He was called to go up on Trail Creek to see Mrs. R. R. Dawson and reports that they were visited by the stork and Mrs. D. presented her husband with a fine boy on the 18th inst., and that just before that occurred there was born on the 17th to Mr. and Mrs. Simerville of Butte Falls a daughter.
    I have just heard that some of the electric light men were in town today (Friday) planning to dig the holes and set the poles for the electric lights and power in our town and community.
    Today (Friday, Sept. 20) being the 52nd anniversary of the marriage of Wm. and Mrs. Knighton, quite a number of their friends gave them a surprise party today, some bringing in the necessary material to have a good dinner. There were present on the occasion Rev. L. L. Simmons and wife, Rev. C. H. McKee of the Baptist Bible Society, Rev. E. H. Hicks, pastor of the Baptist Church of Albany, Rev. A. C. Howlett and wife, correspondent for the Mail Tribune, Mr. and Mrs. Painter, Mrs. G. W. Owings, Mrs. J. A. Curtis, Mrs. A. J. Florey, Miss Margaretta Florey, Mrs. Mary Wright, Mrs. J. W. Grover and two children, Mrs. Lottie McQuade, Mrs. Rebecca Jonas, Mrs. Charley Thomas and Mrs. A. N. Thomas. After dinner was over we all repaired to the parlor and Rev. McKee favored us with the old song, "There Were Ninety and Nine," and after that there were a few more songs interspersed with the conversation and about three o'clock we began to move for our homes with your correspondent for his writing material. It is useless for me to add that we had a pleasant time and when we separated all wished Mr. and Mrs. Knighton many returns of their wedding anniversary.
    Notices are posted calling for an election to be held on the 28th inst. to vote on the question of granting a fifty-year franchise to the California and Oregon Power Company in Eagle Point free. The election will be held in the afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 21, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charley Klingle of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller last Friday.
    Miss Newstrom of Lake Creek came out from Medford last Friday and was met by her father here and went on up home and on Sunday returned to her temporary home, Mr. Puhl's near Medford.
    Bert Reed of Dudley, who has been one of the fire rangers for Uncle Sam, came out Friday, spent the night at the Sunnyside and Saturday morning went to Medford. His wife has been back East to visit relatives in Pennsylvania and is at this writing on her way home.
    Mr. Nelson of Medford spent the night with us Friday.
    Miss Alma Gould, who is teaching school in Lake Creek district came out last Friday on the stage took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Ashland to the teacher's institute which convenes Wednesday.
    Herman Meyer, Jr., and Miss Margaret Tyrrell of Lake Creek took dinner here on their way to Medford last Saturday.
    Mr. Maxwell, our new painter, has been kept busy the past week, painting signs and other work in that line. The last job he did here was to paint signs on each side of Fred Lindley's transfer wagon. He started for Central Point Saturday where he has a job painting the sheds of the lumber company and making some signs for some of the business men at that place.
    C. E. Wood of Medford, who has been assisting in the arrangement of the lumber in the lumber [yard] here, went to Medford Saturday, but expects to return in a few days.
    Mrs. Gus Nichols has moved from the ranch on Rogue River to Eagle Point. She is for the present stopping with her uncle, John Nichols, until her home is vacated by the present occupant, Mr. Vogeli.
    W. B. Jones of Talent, a grandson-in-law of Mrs. and Mrs. Wm. Knight, came through here Saturday night, stopping at the Sunnyside with a fine band of goats he had purchased in the Willamette Valley about forty miles north of Eugene. He was accompanied by Joe Broad of Jacksonville.
    The meeting in the Baptist church last week closed Friday night. Rev. Hicks of Albany did the preaching, and while there was considerable interest manifested there was no special move on the part of the people, although the members of the church seemed to take more interest than usual and a serious feeling was manifest on the part of several who are not members of the church. Sunday morning there was one man came forward and expressed a desire to join the church and it is planned to have him baptized next Sunday afternoon.
    The guests at the Sunnyside beside our regular boarders Sunday were Frank Miller, Miss Maud Nichols, Marsh Garrett and wife, all of Lake Creek. Dr. W. W. P. Holt, wife and daughter, Miss Helen, Mr. and Mrs. F Slater, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Weber, our pharmacist, Guy Pruett, of Eagle Point, H. E. Holeway of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pelouze, Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Daily, of Eagle Point, J. H. Johnson, of Applegate, agent for Dr. Hock's remedies; John Winningham, Thomas Guan, they were moving out, Mr. Enyart from the Enyart ranch on Rogue River to Medford, and Mr. A. B. Schuster, advertising clerk in the Mail Tribune office spent the night with us and talked as though he might stay forever. He seems like a nice clean boy, and bright, too.
    The old soldiers are arriving this Monday morning and [I] will try to tell something about them next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 24, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    August Edler of Lake Creek was in town last Monday after I wrote to the Mail Tribune.
    In looking around town for Eaglets I found Mrs. Quackenbusher and W. H. McKelvy buying supplies. Mr. McKelvy says that they are going to commence packing apples the 1st of October on the Corbin orchard and that this fall he expects to move to Table Rock and take charge of a part of the Washburn orchard that has recently been sold.
    Pete Betz brought a fine lot of hogs for our market last Monday.
    George Smith of Medford came out and was the guest of our lumber man, Mr. Wisner, Monday.
    Ben Brophy and family were in town visiting Mrs. B.'s mother, Mrs. L. E. Nichols, last Monday.
    Mr. Gregory, the county road boss, came in Monday with his force to grade our main street.
    When I closed my last letter I said the the members of the G.A.R. had began to arrive, and that day and the day following the following named persons registered at the Sunnyside: B. F. Pike and wife, post commander department of Oregon; Wm. Lindsey, Ashland, Ore., 51st Wis.; W. W. Newton, Ashland, 86th Ills.; John B. Renault, Jacksonville, Ore.; A. J. Smith, Gold Hill; Rev. W. C. Reuter, Newburg, Ore.; J. J. Grimm, Central Point; Abe Thomson, Jacksonville; W. S. Hoagland, Central Point; Geo. Lemon, Gold Hill; J. W. Hicks, Ashland; S. M. Nealon, Table Rock; Himes Strus, Jacksonville.
    The following were from Central Point and on Tuesday a part of them rendered a play entitled "The Suggles Family." The following named took an active part in the play. Rev. H. N.. Aldrich, pastor of the Methodist church of Central Point; Miss Holmes, Audrey Holmes, Gladys Holmes, Verda Timmins, Inez Austin, Miss Dunter, Miss Gleason, Fern Beebe and Sadie Beebe and W. C. Leever, Miss Mee, Mrs. Elliott, Mrs. Rostel, Helen Price and Wm. Abbotts came along to have a good time with them.
    Tuesday was the day for the encampment set apart for Central Point. In the afternoon Rev. Aldrich gave us a fine address and at the close of it was requested to render one of the comic pieces that he is noted for rendering, and he gave us one that was simply fine and his manner of rendition showed conclusively that he knew something of the art of elocution, for he kept the audience laughing most of the time. He was encored and then he gave us another, but the crowning act was in the evening. The Central Point brass band came out and before the meeting was called to order played several fine pieces. They were invited to seats on the stand and the program commenced with music by the band. Then we had the "Star Spangled Banner" by the audience, etc. Mrs. J. B. Holmes gave us a recitation, then singing by Rev. Aldrich, etc., followed by the play of the evening. When the play was announced the "Widow Suggles" marched onto the stage with her nine daughters, with all their paraphernalia and they soon brought down the house. The operetta was as well rendered as anyone could wish. Rev. Aldrich was called and recalled, each time giving us something to keep us awake. When he told us of the old maid, and history of the cow he simply brought down the house and there was one old couple, though, that felt badly hurt. The old lady said: "Well, did you ever, to think that a preacher would get off such stuff as that. Why, he can't be a Christian, and him a preacher. Why, he can never get to heaven. Well, I never heard of such ridiculous conduct in my life. Why, he can't never go to heaven. Well, well!" and she and her poor husband seemed so badly hurt over it that some of us soft-hearted folk felt sorry for them.
    But I must close for this time and try to catch the mail with this letter.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 26, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I promised to tell in my next something about the fine time we had Tuesday when we had the Stewart-Perry family with us at the Sunnyside, but before I proceed with that I wish to refer to some things that occurred on Monday that I omitted. During the day there was not much done in the daytime but at night we had the address of welcome by the mayor Hon. Wm. von der Hellen. I did not have the privilege of hearing him but those who did thought that he did fine, his speech was like the old Clackamas County preacher, "short and right to the point." He told an incident or two and extended an invitation to the members of the Southern Oregon Association of Soldiers and Sailors to accept the hospitality of the town and feel at home among us. He was responded to by Col. Commander U. S. Grant in a neat and appropriate speech. The rest of the evening was spent in short speeches by the different members of the association. I have already given an account of the exercises of Tuesday, but will add that the association held the election of its officers on Tuesday morning and the following named persons were elected: Colonel, I. P. Sayles; Lieutenant Colonel, J. B. Renault; Major, G. W. Wamsley; Chaplain, Mrs. John Patrick; Quartermaster, Jessie Adams. Among the amusing incidents that occurred was the arrest of D. E. C. Adams, Acting Officer of the Day, charged with the theft of a gooseberry pie. It appeared that one of the ladies who was stopping at the Sunnyside remarked to Mrs. Howlett that she was very fond of gooseberry pie, whereupon Mrs. H. gave her a pie--she having already eaten her dinner, took it to her tent and in a short time she missed the pie and upon a search being instituted, the complaining witness avers that the pie was found in the aforesaid Adams' suitcase. He was arraigned before a court martial and the decision of the court was that he was to be reduced to ranks and--but before the court had finished pronouncing sentence, some of his guard commenced to take off his badge but just then came a change in the proceedings, the women's corps began to take a hand in the fray and literally took the prisoner away from the guard and turned him loose and the guard began to slink away in good shape.
    Well, I started to tell about the Stewart-Perry family reunion at the Sunnyside last Tuesday. Mrs. Howlett and I have known quite intimately the Perry family for several years and as they seem to make it a rule to come "home" to see their mother about once in every five years they concluded to come this good year of our Lord 1912, and as we have always entertained them in some way every time they come, Mrs. H. chose last Tuesday for the renewal of old acquaintances and sent out invitations to Mrs. Harriet Allen, Mrs. Nellie Simpson, Mrs. E. B. Eckmeyer, Miss Eva Eckmeyer, Mrs. Imogen Stine, Mrs. Nettie Grover and children, Mrs. Delia Nichols and Mrs. Lottie McQuade. These are what are known in the camp of the association as the seven sisters, of whom I will have occasion to write more in the future. We also invited their brother, Wm. Perry, and family of Butte Falls but they did not honor us with their presence. We also invited Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, the stepfather and mother of the seven sisters and Mr. John H. Stewart of San Diego, Cal., a son of F.M.S. The company came in due time and although Mrs. Howlett had some fifty-five for dinner beside the special guests we found room and dinner for all. The seven sisters are somewhat noted for their musical talent and while they were here we had some singing that would almost cheer a half-dead heart. Well, to make a long story short we had a very pleasant time and all wished that we would all live to enjoy another reunion in the next half decade.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 28, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    During the week that has just passed we have had such a general hubbub here, and I have had so many things to think of and attend to and have so many notes of doings of the crowd that has been here in our usually quiet little village that I hardly know what to write first or where to begin, for we have had a wonderful time here.
    The encampment broke up Saturday morning although quite a number left the ground on Friday p.m. owing to the fact that the weather was so threatening, and in fact it did sprinkle a little on Friday. There were ninety old veterans enrolled as members of the association, and about two hundred enrolled as the wives, sons and daughters and grandchildren of veterans of the war with Mexico, the Civil War and the war with Spain. The ages ranged from sixty-four to eight-seven, and on the last day, Friday, a beautiful cane was presented to Mr. Hoomes [sic] Edmeades, of Medford, he being the oldest member of the company. The presentation speech was made by Mr. Froman of the Tavern and Mr. Edmeades replied with a neat, appropriate speech.
    The last day was set apart as Grants Pass day but there was but little done until the evening when there were some exercises, and among them the accompanying poem was read. It was composed during the time of the encampment by E. E. White of Ashland, and a committee of ladies called on your correspondent, handed him the copy with the request that he would have it published in his Eaglets, and now it is up to the editor to do the rest.
    But I see that I am getting the cart before the horse, for I have not reported the doings of Wednesday or Thursday yet. Well, Wednesday was Ashland's day and the city was well represented as there was quite a number of citizens of Ashland and vicinity among us. The speaker of the day was Professor Vining of New York City, formerly an Ashland boy, a nephew of C. C. Beekman of Jacksonville. Mr. Vining gave us a very fine, patriotic address, one that was full of good suggestions and historic incidents. At night he was also the main actor reciting several interesting comic pieces, and the exercises were interspersed with songs and recitations. The seven sisters were invited onto the stand to sing and they were encored. They sang some of our old patriotic songs that makes the old blood run with renewed activity through one's veins.
    But I must stop telling about the encampment and tell something of other incidents of that day and will tell more about the doings of the camp and about the presentation of the flag to the school, etc., in my next.
    Last Wednesday we had quite a representation from Medford, Clarence Reames, Mr. Kelly, Dr. Lane of Portland, Mayor Canon of Medford, Ed Pottenger and Mr. Tou Velle, candidate for county judge on the Democratic ticket. I suppose that they were simply escorting Dr. Lane around, as he is the Democratic candidate for the United States Senate.
    Among the visitors at the Sunnyside last Wednesday were Mrs. Pursell and son Donald, Miss F. Newman of Jacksonville, Rev. J. Powers of Grants Pass, Rev. J. M. O'Farrell of Medford. They had been up to Mr. Sidley's to hold religious services and stopped for dinner on the way home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth and son of Butte Falls were also guests at the Sunnyside. They had come out to attend the association. Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth were married before the war and there was another couple, Mr. and Mrs. M. M. Morris, that were also married before the Civil War.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cary of Talent came up to visit Wm. Knighton and wife and while here visited Mrs. Howlett.
    Mr. and Mrs. Joe Rader, two Misses Fish and Carl Newbury, a nephew of Mrs. Rader, also called [for] dinner Thursday and so did Mrs. Mamie Hock and her sister-in-law Miss Hoefs. Miss Hoefs told Mrs. Hock that she wanted to go there and see the author of the Eaglets and Miss Haley.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Vogeli in Eagle Point Sept. 26, a 7½-pound boy.
    But I see that I am on my fourteenth page and still have more to write but will tell that next time about Eagle Point and Medford day.
    By the time this is in type I expect to be on my way north to visit our daughter and to attend the Congregational conference at Hood River but will write occasionally.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 2, 1912, page 5



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
Cleone, Oregon, 10-2-12.
To the Editor:
    In my last I promised to give the readers of the Mail Tribune a further account of what happened in Eagle Point at the time of the reunion of the Soldiers and Sailors Association at Eagle Point, but before I commence on that subject will mention a few things that happened in Eagle Point and vicinity.
    I omitted in my last to report that our teachers, Mr. and Mrs. Suddarth and Mrs. George von der Hellen, closed their school on Tuesday and all went to Ashland Wednesday to attend the teachers' institute and were thus deprived of the pleasure of being with us on the day that was set apart as Eagle Point's and Medford's day in the grand reunion.
    Mrs. P. Reynolds, a sister of one of our merchants, Mr. Diamond, of the firm of Heath & Diamond, is visiting her brother at Eagle Point.
    The election held Saturday to decide whether the people of Eagle Point would grant a franchise to the California & Oregon Power Co., to establish their lines and for lights and power in our town, was held on Saturday p.m., and resulted in forty-three in favor and five against. The objection against granting the franchise was giving the company the right for fifty years to put up their poles, lines, etc., on any street or alley, on either side of the street or alley and cut or remove any trees, etc., that might be in their way, without paying the town any percent of the income. But there are always some to kick against anything that would be for the betterment of the town.
    A. H. Schuster, one of the Mail Tribune force, returned Thursday from a trip to Prospect and on Friday returned to his office.
    Mr. and Mrs. Caster of Derby passed through our town on their way home last Saturday.
    Thomas E. Nichols has been hauling sand and gravel in front of his new brick now used by Heath & Diamond as a general store, and by Art Nichols as a meat market and ice plant.
    Mr. Neil, living about five miles northeast of Brownsboro, was hauling lumber from the Eagle Point lumber yard the last of the week.
    Miss Inez Willits and Miss Alma Gould were with us on Saturday and Sunday on their way from the teachers' institute.
    On Sunday we had the usual routine of business. As my wife says cook, eat and wash dishes, we had that day besides our regular boarders: Mrs. J. V. Palmer, Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Trowbridge, Mrs. G. L. Schermerhorn, Mrs. Harriet Cox, all of Medford, Mrs. Fannie Mulkey of Salem and Mr. G. C. Hunter of Myrtle Creek, Oregon, G. W. Wamsley and daughter, Miss Mabel, Miss Alma Gould and Miss Inez Willits.
    As I came on the P.&E. to Medford last Monday on my way to this place, Fairview, Ore., I noticed that there was quite a number of young people on the car on their way to Medford to attend the high school and among them were Miss Frances Heath, Master Robert Pelouze, Miss Rose Newland and Miss Ella Page. The last two named are from Table Rock.
    Well, here I am on my ninth page and as yet have said nothing about the great day of all days in Eagle Point during the meeting of the association, but the next time I write I will not have so many Eagle Point items to write and will try to tell all I can about the reunion and something of my trip up here.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 4, 1912, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Well, here I am all alone, seated in the cozy little home of our daughter in the town of Fairview--post office Cleone--and have started to write once more for the readers of the Medford Mail Tribune, and this time will try to keep my promise and tell something about the doings in and around the camp of the S.O. Association in Eagle Point on the day set apart for Eagle Point and Medford, September 26.
    About 10 o'clock a.m. the school bell rang as a signal for the beginning of the exercises of the day. The children formed under the leadership of Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist Church. As before stated, all three of the teachers were absent attending the teachers' institute in Ashland. He led the procession with a drum, at the same time the members of the association formed at the camp and marched with their fife and drums via the wagon bridge and were met by the children near the wagon bridge, then retraced their steps for the school house where they divided into single file and formed in line inside the school house yard, while the old veterans formed just outside the gate and six of the children came in bearing a beautiful flag presented to the school by the S.O. Association and Mrs. Fidelia Woods, president of the Women's Relief Corps of Medford, mounted the steps and made a very impressive address, presenting the flag to the Eagle Point school in behalf of the association and Rev. L. L. Simmons responded with a short address thanking the members of the association for the flag. The children then gave three rousing cheers for the old veterans, which was responded to by them, giving the cheers for the Eagle Point school, and then all gave three cheers for Old Glory, and marched back to the encampment.
    The arrangement had been made that on Thursday the ladies of Eagle Point would give the encampment a dinner, and they had secured the building formerly occupied by von der Hellen Bros. as a store building, and had tables, etc., arranged for the occasion. There had been considerable money subscribed to defray the expense of the dinner, and several of the ladies volunteered to cook the provisions and send in and the result was that there was enough to feed all that came and then plenty left. The only trouble was that the eaters lacked capacity, as several complained that they wanted to eat more but could not find room, and quite a number complained of having a feeling of--well, what do you call it after a person has eaten all that they possibly could and had on tight clothes. Well, dinner being over they repaired to the park and had a short exercise and Dr. Lane of Portland, Clarence Reames, E. E. Kelly, etc., gave us a talk, when we disbanded until evening, when we had the evening's address by Rev. L. L. Simmons, some very interesting exercises by the children, songs by the seven sisters, etc. We also had a song by a male quartette, and a solo by Mr. Bryant with the chorus by five other male voices. We also had some fine readings, one by Mrs. M. L. Daily that was simply grand and one of Theodore Florey, a little boy. His reading was rather long for a small boy, but he went through with it without a hitch, and the exercises of the evening closed with a tableau representing an encampment scene in the army around the campfire with the soldiers around it, one reading, another writing home and another stretched out in front of his tent, etc., everything lifelike. But I forgot to mention in the proper place that Carl Ringer, one of our promising young men, delivered Lincoln's address at Gettysburg in a fine and affecting manner and was encored and when he returned gave us a comic negro piece that simply brought down the house.
    At the close of the exercises on Friday evening the association passed resolutions of thanks to the people of Eagle Point for their kindness and hospitality, and adjourned, hoping to meet again. There were several incidents that I would have liked to have mentioned, but I am afraid I am already taxing the patience of the reader.
Cleone, Oregon, Oct. 3, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 5, 1912, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Well, here I am seated in the cozy little home of our daughter, Tavia, in the quiet little town of Fairview, trying to write an account of something of what I saw and heard on my way from home to this place and something of what I have seen since I arrived. On my arrival in Medford about the first place I landed was the Medford Mail Tribune office where I transacted a little business and gave a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune for my daughter that I am visiting, so that I would keep in touch with what is going on at home, that is in Southern Oregon, as I would feel completely lost without my paper.
    Well, after visiting the office and waiting until 10:21 a.m. for the car to take me to Grants Pass, I entered the motor car and came spinning along at the rate of about thirty miles an hour. I noticed as I passed along between Central Point and Tolo that they were threshing grain and had considerable still to thresh, and from the size of the stack was led to believe that the grain was quite heavy, in fact from what I could learn from asking questions and by observations I came to the conclusion that the general crop in Southern Oregon is fully up to date. After passing Tolo there seemed to be less in the line of agriculture to attract the attention of the traveler, although there are some fine farms and orchards along the route but generally small places.
    Arriving at Grants Pass the first place I landed was Dr. Findley's office, where I went to get the doctor to examine my eyes and ears and supply me with medicine for the trip, of at least a month. I found the doctor as busy as usual and found that my number on the list was 15, and the doctor told me that my case would be attended to about 3 o'clock in the afternoon. Well, as I did not expect to leave there until 7:13 p.m. I rested quietly and looked around town for items of interest for the readers of the Mail Tribune, but failed to note anything of interest. In the afternoon I visited an acquaintance and while there he remarked that he had been up to Eagle Point and had looked over the country out north of our town and that he saw more real good land and one farm out there than there was in Josephine County, but I think that he was a little off, for I saw while strolling around Grants Pass some as fine vegetables and especially squashes there as anyone need want to see.
    Taking the car at 7:40 we started for Portland and there was nothing of special interest occurred that I know of for I was soon asleep and about the first thing that attracted my attention was the "breaky" calling out Roseburg and after satisfying the new conductor with regard to my ticket was soon lost in slumber and the next thing I knew we were at Cottage Grove. Here there was quite a number to get on the car and from that on I was awake the most of the time, but it was so dark that I could see nothing of interest. As we passed through Salem day was beginning to break, but nothing occurred of interest and we reached Portland about 7:30 a.m. and I boarded a street car and went to Powers' big house furnishing establishment expecting to find one of my brothers-in-law, who is general manager of the establishment, but I was too early for him. He soon came, however, and by 9 a.m. my daughter Tavia, Mrs. C. H. Shaw, met me and we spent the day going around town shopping and taking in the sights and at 4 p.m. took the car for Fairview--the railroad name for Cleone--and in my next will tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something of what I saw in Portland, about Cleone, my visit to the Multnomah County Fair, etc. I expect to start tomorrow morning for Hood River to attend the conference of the Congregational Church and then go on above Pendleton.
Cleone, Ore., Oct. 9, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 9, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The last time that I wrote I promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something of what I saw in Portland, Fairview and at the Multnomah County Fair. I arrived in Portland on the morning of the 1st of October, and to my surprise found that it was not raining, although it rained that day, and as I was met by my daughter, Mrs. J. H. Shaw, about [omission] a.m. and we had a little shopping to do that afforded me a good opportunity to see the city. I had not been in Portland before since the 1st of July, 1910, and about the first thing that attracted my attention was the wonderful falling off that there was in business, for I was in several stores where I am in the habit of visiting; for instance, Powers wholesale and retail household furnishing establishment, Meyers & Frank's department store, and several others, and I could not but help but notice the marked falling off of the crowds of people that are generally there and I remarked to one of the clerks that I am acquainted with what a change there was in their business. I also noticed that the thoroughfare along Third and Washington streets was comparatively empty, for when I was here last I happened to be with Perry McGee and he remarked that he saw more umbrellas there at one sight than he ever saw in all his life before. I also noticed that there was a larger number of closing out sales than usual, and there seemed to be but very little improvements going on. But enough of this. About 4 o'clock we took the electric car and started for Fairview, noting all along the route that there had been but very little improvements made, although there had been some changes for the better in the line of clearing land and a few new buildings along the route. We arrived in Fairview about 5 p.m. and I was tired enough to rest without taking in the town. The next morning I started out for the post office for my mail and there found the Medford Mail Tribune for I had taken the precaution to hand in a subscription for my daughter before I left the Mail Tribune office, and it was like receiving a letter from home.
    I can see a decided change for the better in the little town. They have incorporated, and have fixed up their streets in good shape and are just finishing a town hall that reflects credit on the enterprise of the citizens. The building when completed will cost $2500. It is two stories high and will contain the calaboose. They have a town marshal and he receives a salary of five dollars a quarter while we of Eagle Point pay the marshal thirty dollars a month, and they both do about the same amount of work--just nothing but draw their salary.
    But I promised to tell this time something of what I saw at the Multnomah County Fair. We took the electric car Friday for the city of Gresham and on our arrival started for the fair grounds and the mud was quite bad; in fact so bad that in the races the horses and drivers were completely covered with mud and of course that was quite a handicap but the part that attracted my attention the most was the agricultural, horticultural and stock display. While there was a fine display of different lines of things such as everything in the dry goods line and canned fruit and vegetables the wheat, oats, barley, potatoes, apples, pears, etc., took my eye as well as my memory serves me the display in those lines was as good as they were at the exposition at Portland in 1905. The stock show was very good, what there was there, but there was not the amount of stock, or the variety was not what I expected to have seen. There was a fine lot of Holstein cattle and quite a number of brown Swiss cattle, [but] the Jersey was conspicuous by their absence. There was a fine display of hogs, chickens and sheep but nothing of the extraordinary class. There was of course a fine lot of horses there and taking the fair altogether it was quite creditable.
    But I must close as I am making this already too long. The next time will tell of my trip up here and something of what I seen and think of Hood River.
Hood River, Oct. 9, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 11, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The last time I wrote I was at Hood River and then I promised to tell something of what I saw on the way, etc., to this place, for at this writing I am at my oldest daughter's, Mrs. James M. Lewis, near Pilot Rock, Oregon.
    Well, on the morning of the 8th, it being on a Tuesday, I took the train at Fairview for Hood River expecting to find a number of the ministers from Portland on the train, but what was my surprise when I looked around and found none that I could recognize, and on inquiry of the conductor learned that I was the only minister on the train, that the others would start from Portland on the overland train at 10 o'clock a.m. And as I had no one to keep me company had a fine opportunity to take in the sights along the route, although riding on the cars is not my favorite place to take items for the Mail Tribune. I was fortunate in having a pleasant day, for it generally rains up in that country about six days out of seven, but that day the weather was ideal, neither rain nor wind. We had but fairly started before we stopped at Fruitdale, a small town on the Columbia slough eighteen miles from Portland. Here the Union Meat Company have their slaughtering yards and there is considerable business being done. Passing on, the track runs along the south bank of the Columbia River and there is but little to see except what one can see on the water on one side and along the foot of the high mountains on the other side of the track, with occasionally a slight depression in the side of the mountain, and occasionally a small tract of bottom land where a family resides in the depressions or little niches in the hills and there is generally a little town, but how they live or what they can find to do is a question in my mind, unless they fish in the Columbia, for I see all along the river small boats, and the occupants all seem to be busy at something, but the trains go so fast that by the time I get my eyes on the object it is gone and something else comes in sight. I noticed several sawmills along the route and some of the towns seemed to have considerable enterprise judging from the neatness of the houses and surroundings. I noticed at Cascade Locks that they have a large sawmill and from the surroundings are turning out considerable lumber. I also noticed that wherever there is a patch of ground large enough to have a family orchard that it is always there and some of the looked almost as good as the small Rogue River orchards. Along the route up the river, on the cars one does not have so good a view of the beauty and grandeur of the scenery as they do by going on the boat and when the delegation arrived at Hood River that quite a number had taken the water route so as to be able to see some of the lovely sights along the river. By going on the boat, if it happens to be a clear day, one has a fine view of the Multnomah Falls and Bridal Veil Falls. These are two of the leading attractions, for they are both streams of considerable size that fall over a perpendicular precipice for several hundred feet, but on the cars one only has a slight glance at the water for a moment and then sees only about twenty foot of the tail end of it as it strikes the ground along side of the track.
    On arriving at Hood River I was very much disappointed in the appearance of the town and surprised to find no valley, in fact I was like a little boy that went to town for the first time, and when asked how he liked the town said: "That he could not see the town for the houses" and when I got off the cars and began to look around I found that I was still square up against a mountain but not so high as some that I had just passed. But the next time I will tell the readers of the Mail Tribune of the town and valley of Hood River, for I had a fine view of the valley before I left.
Pilot Rock, Ore., Oct. 14, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 19, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    The last time I wrote I promised to give a description of Hood River Valley. As I stated, from the depot I took in my surroundings and found that the town was built in the side of a hill and it mattered not which way I went. I had to go uphill, so after taking a look around from the depot platform I inquired how to go to the Congregational Church, of the ticket agent, and acting on his suggestion I started for the church and there I met Rev. Harris, the pastor of the church. After introducing myself and being introduced to Rev. Hinman, secretary of the Order of Universal Brotherhood, and two others, I wended my way back to the depot to await the arrival of the overland train, and on its arrival met quite a number of the ministers and delegates with their wives and after the friendly greetings, we went in a body to the church, but as the session of the conference did not open until 3 o'clock p.m. Rev. Davis and myself started out to find a good place to satisfy the cravings of the inner man, and after a short walk found an eating house but it did not look very inviting so we passed to the next and there we found what we were looking for. After dinner we started out to view the town, or rather city, but I soon discovered that it did not make any difference which way we went we had to climb uphill, for as I have already stated the city is built in the side of the hill, although I was told that on the top of the hill that they [have] some fine residences, a fine school house and some business houses. Many of the residence buildings are very neat and the lawns are simply made by digging away the dirt and boulders so as to level down a tract of land and there they have their lawns and flower gardens, some of which are very beautiful. The streets are simply dirt, not concrete, and the dust is kept down by a liberal use of crude oil, but along the main streets they have nice wide concrete sidewalks, but they are corrugated so as to prevent one from slipping on them. The church is new, just completed this summer, and is built of stone taken out of the hill just back of where the building now stands, and cost twenty-two thousand dollars. It is arranged on the modern plan and is very neatly and conveniently arranged, capable of seating about fifteen hundred people.
    There were twenty-nine ministers and eighty-eight delegates in attendance besides the wives of several of the ministers and delegates. In the afternoon the conference was called to order by retiring moderator Rev. Dr. Gray, and the following officers were elected for the session, to wit: Rev. W. O. Schwimley of Ashland, moderator; Rev. Perry F. Schwek of Salem, assistant moderator; Rev. F. C. Butler of Hubbard, scribe, and Rev. F. W. Garner of Portland, assistant scribe. On roll call it was found that there were an addition of nine new members to the conference who have come from other conferences during the past year. At the close of the session it was announced by the pastor that the ladies had prepared to serve dinner in the basement of the church and all the visitors were invited to partake of their hospitality which we did, and, O, such a feast of good things. Why it was almost equal to a dinner that the ladies of Eagle Point or Table Rock would serve.
    The next day it was announced that lunch would be served in the basement of the church for cash, so we all marched down and paid our thirty-five cents each. They had a good lunch, but it looked rather strange to have them charge thirty-five cents when we could get a good meal for twenty-five cents, but when it came to dinner there were several of us who went to the restaurant for our meals, saving ten cents each, and lo! when we returned to the church we found that the ladies had raised the price to fifty cents per meal, and the next meal there was a large delegation followed us to the restaurant but we had a fine time notwithstanding the fact that the ladies seemed to speculate off of their guests, although the arrangements had been made to furnish all the ministers, delegates and their wives with free lodging and breakfast.
    The Hood River Commercial Club proposed to take all of the visiting members of the conference out in automobiles and show them the Hood River Valley on Tuesday afternoon, so at 3 o'clock p.m. the autos began to arrive and as fast as they came were loaded and finally the last one came and took the remaining four persons and so by that means we all had a fine view of the valley. After crossing Hood River we ascended the hill, for Hood River Valley lies back of the town, and if one was not told of the valley it would never be suspected that there was a valley there, and after going about one and a half miles we began to come on to the orchards. But before I say anything about the orchards I will mention that soil is a volcanic ash with a subsoil of dirt and gravel much like our desert land in Jackson County. The land is very hilly, although the hills are generally low, and most of them are cultivated. The fruit trees are put very close together, and are trimmed down so that the main branches come out within from twelve to sixteen inches of the ground and owing to their being so close together and so low [it] is very difficult to cultivate between them, but the trees seemed to be loaded where the fruit had not been picked, for many of the apples had already been picked. We took a spin of about twenty miles, going around, and had a fine view of the country. The valley itself is about seven by eleven miles, but the farms are all quite small but show that there is plenty of money in circulation in that section.
    On coming down the hill from our lodging place one morning we, that is Brother Davis and I, for we were together all of the time, met a man and asked him about the town, valley, etc., and he remarked that Hood River was a good place for a man of means but unless he had ten or twelve thousand dollars he had no business there.
    But I see that I am getting my letter too long again. I am writing from Pilot Rock again and will try the next time I write to tell of my trip up to Pendleton and what I saw and heard.
Pilot Rock, Ore., Oct. 15.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 21, 1912, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    When I last wrote I tried to put in all that I had to say about Hood River, but found on looking over my letter that I had omitted several things that I might have mentioned and among them was the fact they are not cursed with a string of saloons. Another thing was the character of the buildings in the city. The main business buildings are of brick or concrete blocks and show off to a good advantage. And the hotels are generally quite large and well kept, up to date, although there are two or three along the street next to the depot that have a very woebegone appearance. The water supply is very good coming from Hood River, and that taken its supply from Mt. Hood itself. Another thing I intended to have mentioned was the fine view we had of Mt. Hood and Mt. Adams while we were riding out over the valley, for we traveled almost every direction wending our way around the valley. The city of Hood River is situated about thirty miles from Mt. Hood and about the same distance from Mt. Adams although not in the same direction; the latter can be seen quite plainly from the city while Mt. Hood is hid by the bluff that overhangs the city. The boat landing is about a half a mile above the business part of town just above the mouth of Hood River so that passengers on the boat have to walk from the boat landing to the city as there are no conveyances to the city, and one has to cross the railroad bridge or else go almost twice as far. But Hood River is a nice place and the people manifest a spirit of kindness toward strangers.
    But I promised in this letter to give an account of my trip up to Pendleton and here I am near the half way mark and not a word on the subject of my trip to the country.
    Taking the daily car for Pendleton at 10:05 a.m., we continued on up the Columbia River. Passing two small stations we came to The Dalles. This is quite a thriving place and from what I could gather from the car window and questioning one of the brakemen bids fair to be a town of some importance; they are putting a canal and locks here, the canal will be nine miles long, and by that means the boats coming from Portland can continue up the river to Umatilla, and there the railroad leaves the river. Leaving The Dalles we next came to a small station called Dune but about all that was to be seen was a small depot and a few houses. Passing on we came to Celilo. Here is where the Hill system have the bridge crossing the Columbia for the Oregon Trunk Railroad that is supposed to eventually connect with the Pacific & Eastern. As we did not stop but a moment I could not see much of the town but it appears to be a small place. The next place of importance we passed was Sherman; this seemed to be quite a thriving place and from the appearance of the cars on the track there must be considerable business done here. We are now beginning to get into more of a farming country and there seemed to be considerable wheat being shipped. I began to notice as we came east that the country was destitute of timber and that in many places the farmers had planted balm trees for shade, wood and wind brakes and along the railroad track the company had put up wind brakes of lumber for a long distance and that the sand was drifted up into small mounds and the country was literally covered with sagebrush and sand, but I am not supposed to judge the soil from the car windows, for in more than one instance I have been deceived in that line. There seemed to be a sameness all along the route although we kept passing stations every few miles, and there seemed to be short lines of railroads start out every few miles, showing that we were passing through a productive part of the country, for wherever a railroad company builds a road they always have something in sight to justify the investment.
    The next place that particularly attracted my attention was Umatilla. This is a railroad center, as the roads seem to start from here in several different directions, and there seemed to be more business being done here than any place I had passed since I left Portland, although there are eighteen stations between The Dalles and Umatilla and that is conclusive evidence that I have been passing through a productive country. Passing on, we passed through eight stations before we reached Pendleton although we had traveled only forty-four miles. But I see that I am at the end of my usual space but will in my next tell of what I saw and heard in Pendleton and the surrounding country.
Pilot Rock, Oct. 17, 1912
Medford Mail Tribune, October 22, 1912, page 5


FATHER OF EAGLE POINT DIES AFTER 60 YEARS IN VALLEY
    James J. Fryer, aged 84, known throughout Southern Oregon as "The Father of Eagle Point," died at his Eagle Point home Friday afternoon, after residing in the Rogue Valley for the past 60 years.
    Mr. Fryer was well beloved by all who knew him. Of sterling character, he made many friends and kept them. He was one of the first to recognize the superior merits of this section and during his declining years he took great pride in pointing to his early-day predictions, glad in the knowledge that he had not been a simple dreamer.
    Mr. Fryer came first to Oregon in 1852 and was actively identified with the stirring events of pioneer days. After trying his hand at mining and other pursuits he finally settled upon a donation land claim where now stands the city of Eagle Point. He lived there most of his life.
    The deceased is survived by his wife and three children, Mrs. Lelah Jones of Seattle, Mrs. Argalee Green of Portland and Mrs. Gladius Pearce of Jacksonville. Mrs. Pearce and his wife were with him in his last hours. In 1867 Mr. Fryer was married to Mrs. V. G. Lewis.
    The funeral services will be held from the family residence at Eagle Point Sunday at 10 o'clock in the morning and the burial in Central Point cemetery at 2 in the afternoon, the Rev. Simmons of Eagle Point officiating.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1912, page 8


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something of what I saw and heard in Pendleton. I arrived in Pendleton on the evening of the 11th of October after enjoying a delightful ride from Hood River, a partial description of which I gave in my last. On my arrival at Pendleton the first thing that greeted my ears was a call for passengers to ride to the different hotels in the city, but I had my mind made up to go to the Bowman, so paid little attention to their invitation to take a free ride to a stopping place for the night. After securing a room and calling up my daughter, Mrs. Lewis, on the phone I started out to see the city. Pendleton is a thriving city of about five thousand inhabitants, situated on the Umatilla River at an elevation of 1170 feet, and is the county seat of Umatilla County, and one would think to see the throngs of men on the streets that it was a city of at least ten thousand. There seems to be a vast amount of business done here as it is situated in the center of one of the finest grain belts on the coast, and there are short railroads running out from the city in several different directions. In addition to that there are hundreds of teams coming in from almost every direction loaded with grain of all kinds, for the farmers do not confine themselves to raising wheat but there is a vast amount of oats and barley raised here, and some of the land is very productive, yielding in some instances as high as one hundred bushels of barley to the acre, and on a part of the Umatilla Reservation the wheat yield averages forty bushels to the acre, but I will have more to say on that subject when I give my writeup of my trip to Eastland. Pendleton is emphatically a wet town or city. The first door I came to on my way to the hotel was a saloon, and on inquiry found that the city had only twelve saloons in it--that beats Medford, for if I remember right Medford has twelve saloons and ten thousand inhabitants, while Pendleton has only five thousand. But while they have twelve saloons they also have several fine churches and schools, a woolen mill, two large flouring mills, iron foundry, two different railway systems and several other branches of industry that help to keep up a city. The streets are broad and in fine condition and the business portion of the city contains some very fine buildings and everything in and around the city shows that it is in a prosperous condition.
    I was told by one of the advocates of the saloon that they are strictly regulated, that they are not allowed to have any chairs or tables, no back entrance, no screens, not opened over four feet above the sidewalk as it is in Medford, but absolutely open for the inspection of all passers and are required to close at eleven o'clock at night and kept closed from Saturday night to Monday morning, and that the saloon keepers would not sell any liquor at all on Sunday, but I took that part with a grain of allowance.
    They also have a fine hospital in the city that is said to compare with any in the state. They have a flourishing Catholic school that shows up to good advantage to passengers passing along the railroad. They have a very wide steel bridge across Umatilla River, so arranged as to accommodate all the travel both in vehicles or on foot for they have wide passages for footmen on each side of the main bridge. I don't know as I ought to try to say anything with regard to the Roundup as I was not here at the time, but from what I can learn it was not only a Roundup but a holdup as well for I am told that sleeping places were so scarce that anything like a bed would command a price from one dollar up to as high as five dollars a night, and in some instances men paid as much as one or two dollars for the privilege of sleeping on the floor. The moral effect of the Roundup is against the city for it is looked upon as a rendezvous for all of the toughs, and in conversation with several of the business men was told that while the Roundup brought a vast amount of money to the city, that the reaction is being felt and they seem to doubt whether it will eventually help the city. But I must close for this time. The next time will tell about my trip to Pilot Rock and a general description of the country.
Pilot Rock, Oct. 22, 1912.
----
    When I closed my last letter to the Mail Tribune I promised to tell something about the town of Pilot Rock and the country surrounding it, but before I commence to tell about the town I wish to say something about my trip from Pendleton to this place, for at this writing I am at the farm of my granddaughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. Roy L. McGowan, situated about five miles from Pilot Rock. The train that I was to take on Saturday morning Oct. 12, from Pendleton to Pilot Rock, was about an hour late and during that time I had nothing to do but simply wait, the most undesirable task I have to perform when I am traveling, but finally everything was in readiness and I started. The first five miles on the route was retracing of the route of the evening before so there was nothing new to note, simply going down a coulee, that is the name give to deep hollows in this country, they are simply ravines and are generally bounded on each side by rocky sides giving a solid foundation for the railroad track, and I discovered that most of the railroads are built on these places on account of the general soil being so soft that it is difficult to make a solid roadbed. After passing Pilot Junction we started on the branch road that leads to this place and we soon began to see some small farms, but they appeared to be very productive, for in addition to the immense stacks of hay I could see from the car window there seemed to be a bountiful supply of fruit and vegetables of most all kinds. The train is like the Pacific & Eastern train, an accommodation train, and will stop wherever one wishes to get on or off so that I had a good chance to see about all there was to see along the route. There are but two stopping places on the timetable between Pendleton and this place, a distance of nineteen miles, but there are several small farms on the route, and they show that the country is quite productive for the houses have the appearance of neatness. The reader will notice that I did not mention anything about the barns for they are generally not so inviting for where they have any at all they are simply makeshifts, shacks that will protect the work horses from the inclement weather, and the hay stands out in the weather and is covered with chaff to keep the rain and snow from penetrating the hay, for from what I can learn in this country the winters are clear and cold with but little rain. On my arrival at the station I found my daughter, Mrs. James M. Lewis, waiting for me and we were soon on the road to the hotel for dinner.
    The town of Pilot Rock is situated at the end of the railroad track at an elevation of 1815 feet, having raised, in traveling nineteen miles, 745 feet. It seems to be a thriving little village or town and there seemed to be considerable business going on as there was eighty took dinner at the hotel where we ate and at the other hotel they were crowded with guests, but at this time of the year there is a great number of people hauling grain to the depot and warehouses, as I am now in the grain belt of Oregon. They had a fire here about a year ago and it burned up quite a number of the old wooden buildings and the result is that many of the buildings present a neat, clean appearance. They have one saloon and I saw a sign Near Beer on a dilapidated shack that looked as though they were about out of business. They have a neat frame church building and are also building another of stone, but I did not learn what denominations were here. They have two general merchandise stores and a hardware store, a drug store, meat market, blacksmith shop, feed stable, two hotels, etc., and are putting in a water system, and are also building a large two-story brick for mercantile establishment. The town has a thrifty appearance and is surrounded by a rich farming country. But I find that I am at the end of my allotted space in writing and have not told of my trip out to my present stopping place. But will in my next try to tell of the country around here and out east of Pendleton in the neighborhood of Adams.
Pilot Rock, Ore., Oct. 24, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 29, 1912, page 6


Dunn Told Shut-In People To Dig Themselves Out
To the Editor:
    At the upper end of the valley they are rooting for Dunn, and for no other reason than that Dunn lives at the upper end of the valley where he owns and operates a ranch. The voters of Jackson County sent Dunn to the state legislature. What Dunn did or did not do as a legislator I am not prepared to say. Ask Max Pracht. (I hope this will not compromise Max, for he is a pretty good old fellow.)
    Then Dunn was elected county judge, and of what transpired during his administration I would like to say a word, and particularly do I want to say it to the voter who lives off the main road, or as we say in the back woods, where we ford streams, build corduroy bridges at our own expense, wallow through the mud, or any way, to get from and to our homes.
    The little burg of Butte Falls sprang into existence and a supply station was established, so the people upcountry failed to do as formerly, put in a winter's supply, depending on the home market.
    High water came and unbridged streams were almost impassable. Such were the conditions just outside of town. A man on foot could not ford it, and the only way to get to market or the post office was to coon it along a fence for twenty or thirty rods.
    A Baptist minister undertook to ford it on horseback and came near going under, horse and all. He said he didn't want any more of that, and where there is water enough to make a Baptist preacher squeal, there surely is some water. Well, we began to devise some plan to make the stream passable. One man who owned a team thought he could get his team across the creek where he could cut and haul stringers and with the use of ropes and cable we could get them in place, anchor them, cover with the poles and effect at least a temporary crossing.
    The the question arose, who will pay for it? The man with the team would donate his work. I would give mine, while others said it is a county road, and they ought to help pay. I walked from Butte Falls to Jacksonville to see Judge Dunn and ask for help. I found him in his office and proceeded to lay the case before his judgeship, telling him of the number of people that were in need of help and would be benefited by a small outlay of the county funds.
    When I had concluded my story the judge smiled. That gave me hope. Surely I had not made the trip of nearly forty miles through the mud and rain on foot for nothing. He would help us. Then turning on his office chair he said to me: "You tell me that these people are shut in?"
    I replied, "That is what I have told you."
    "Well, let them dig themselves out," was the reply.
    I looked him over. I could see the judge's chair, could see a coat and pair of breeches in the chair, but the occupant began to shrink and shrink till I lost sight of the judge entirely. I could only see Dunn.
    I remembered once hearing an Ashland man say that Dunn was an ingrate. Of course I knew what ingrate meant, but I then knew what an ingrate looked like. When I had recovered from the setback a little, I found my voice, and placing my finger as near his beak as would do without committing an assault, I said to him: "There are two ways to spell your name. You spell it D-u-n-n but I spell it D-o-n-e."
    The result of the following election shows how near I was right. I am ready to make affidavit that the foregoing statement is true. Voters of Jackson County let us spell it Doneagain.
E. A. HILDRETH, SR.
    Butte Falls, Oct. 28.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 30, 1912, page 4


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote I was giving a description of the way they farm out in the eastern part of the country, and got as far as the gathering of the weeds and burning them. After the ground is all cleaned and the weeds burned then they take a double disc harrow, twelve feet long, with eight horses and cut the soil all to a fine state, and in some instances they go over it with a twenty-four or thirty-foot smoothing harrow and then the soil is ready for the seed. This is sown with a seed sower or drill, from ten to fourteen feet long. Some of the seeders have a disc attachment that thoroughly covers the grain by having an attachment dragging on short chains with rings that follow in the track of the disc, thus finishing up the plowing. It is then ready for the rain and snow, and the more rain and snow the better the crop. The soil is of an ashy color and of a volcanic formation, and when they have plenty of rain and snow the yield runs from twelve to twenty-five bushels of wheat to the acre, but barley and oats generally yield a little more. The harvesting is mostly done here with a combine that cuts and threshes, separates the grain from the straw and chaff, sacks the grain all ready for shipment, leaving five sacks in a place. It also separates the chaff from the straw and piles it in bunches, scattering the straw over the land as a fertilizer, and the chaff is gathered up and stacked and used to feed on in the winter. Also, as before remarked, to cover the stacks of hay to protect it from the rain and snow.
    The country I have been describing lies west of Pilot Rock and south of Pendleton. After I had been at Mr. McGowan's a week my daughter and I took a trip over to Eastland, about thirty miles from where I had been stopping, to visit my son-in-law, J. W. Lewis, who is engaged on the farm of Sam Thompson. This farm is situated in what is known as the Umatilla Reservation and is one of the most productive parts of this part of eastern or rather northeastern Oregon. The soil is somewhat similar to the soil around Pilot Rock but appears to be more compact and heavier. In that section of the country they seem to have more water, for Sunday morning I took a stroll upon an elevated plateau so that I could have a good look at the surrounding country. The farms appear more homelike and in those parts the buildings are generally much better than they are around Pilot Rock, but from what I could learn the country out from Pilot Rock had been taken up by squatters who were hired to locate on the land, take a homestead, preemption or timber claim and then the land was just kept for speculation and not cultivated, and the farmers claim that the more the land is cultivated the better it yields. There are several drawbacks to the country, one of which I have already mentioned, and that is the scarcity of water. I don't remember whether I mentioned this in my Eaglets or in my letters home but will add that there is but very little water in any of this northeastern country, and the farmers have to haul water for miles to water all their stock and that accounts, to some degree, for the lack of permanent improvements, the owners of the farms generally live in the towns and rent their farms or else put the crop in and then leave until harvested. I have seen but one school house in all my rounds in these parts outside of the towns and cities, but I saw a girl, Monday morning, riding like mad and I learned she was going to school. That was the morning I was at Eastland.
    But there is one thing about this country that speaks well for it, and that is it is very productive. There is one more serious drawback to this country besides the scarcity of water and social privileges, and that is the high winds they have. I made five trips from the farm to Pilot Rock and three times of the five I had to carry my hat in my hand and keep my overcoat buttoned up close, and the dust, Oh, it was simply awful.
    One day while there at the farm the wind blew so hard that the men could not drive the teams so had to lay off; the dust was so thick at times that one couldn't see thirty feet ahead. But the way they farm there three men and with twenty-four horses and a [blank] with four can put in a large acreage of grain, and the way it generally yields can do very well until he gets a start and then he can retire.
    But I find that I am extending this letter too long so will close for this time and the next time have something more to say about what I saw on the way from Pilot Rock to this place, for in traveling over the same route I noticed several things that I omitted to mention in my former letters.
    Just as I got this far a lady from Portland by the name of Wigens came in. I had met her in Portland so she knew me and asked me if I knew a lady in Medford whose maiden name was Grace Pierce. She said that she knew me and that I wrote some of the nicest Eaglets, that she always read them the first thing when she received the Mail Tribune. So you see I am known here.
Fairview, Ore., Oct. 30, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 4, 1912, page 8


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    At this writing I am at my daughter's, Mrs. G. H. Shaw, having reached here last Friday, and I am reminded that I promised in my last to tell something of what I saw and heard after my arrival at Pilot Rock. On reaching the station I found my daughter, Mrs. James M. Lewis, waiting for me and, being prepared with a rig, we were soon on the way to the home of her son-in-law, Mr. L. McGowan, and among the first things I noticed was the height of the hill we had to climb to get out of the coulee, or hollow, in which the town is situated, for it appears to be built right in the head of a hollow, and I was wondering how they would ever get out of there with a train of cars, but I have seen so many impossibilities in that line overcome since I have been traveling that I have come to the conclusion that railroad companies laugh at the idea of impossibilities and just go right along. After we reached the top of the hill we had a fine view of the surrounding country. It is a prairie country covered with sagebrush, but very hilly; in fact there is scarcely a level spot large enough to build a house on excepting the banks of the dry creeks or riverlets, for the country is almost devoid of running water. On my arrival at the home of our granddaughter and her husband I found them waiting for us, and also my grandson, Eddie Lewis, now a full-grown man.
    Sunday afternoon Mr. McGowan hitched up and took us, Mr. Lewis and his wife and your correspondent, out to see the country. We started out in a westerly direction and traveled on and on for perhaps two and a half or three miles and came to a cornfield and scattered among the corn was a lot of small yellow squash and off quite a distance we saw a house that appeared to be inhabited. Passing on in a little while we turned south for two or three miles and discovered another home, but it seemed to be uninhabited, still traveling over a raw, hilly prairie, and although all of the land seemed to be fenced we found that hundreds of acres was still in its wild state, covered with sagebrush. Turning again in a westerly direction we traveled on mile after mile, occasionally seeing a house off in a coulee, but with little sign of life although quite a large quantity of the land had been cultivated and in some instances the stubble on the ground would indicate that they had had a fair crop of grain.
    But the scarcity of water all along the route, in fact all over the country, was simply wonderful, and the idea of a man living on a farm and having to haul water he uses for all purposes was so far from my idea of living that I could not be reconciled to the thought. Well, we had traveled around through the farms and pastures for about twenty miles and we came to a school house, but where the children came from was a question in my mind. We also found near the school house a house containing a family, and the woman appeared so glad to see my daughter and granddaughter, for to see a woman there would almost cure the sore eyes. I omitted to state that we passed one place where there was quite a good-sized orchard. The principal product in that country is wheat and barley. They farm there on a large scale, as the farms contain from 320 to as high as 2000 or 3000 acres, and they seldom use less than six horses or mules in a team, generally eight in a team. They use gang plows three in a gang and the three cut sixteen inches each. They summer fallow about all their land, plowing it up in the latter part of the winter and spring, and then cultivate it to keep the weeds down, for they are troubled with three kinds of weeds here in particular that completely sap the ground unless they are kept down, and in many instances fields had been neglected and then they have to go over the land with a kind of rake, made of a stick of timber, six by eight inches and this has harrow teeth about a foot long drove in it every six inches and they hitch eight horses or mules to this and drag over the land, having a plank fastened to it so as to have the driver stand on it and when it gets full he will jump off and then it will turn over and unload itself, and after going over the land in this way they have to bunch the weeds and burn them. But I see that I am getting this letter too long already but I must make mention of the death of my old neighbor and friend J. J. Fryer, before I close it. I received a copy of the Mail Tribune yesterday, Sunday, morning announcing his death. I was not surprised to learn of his death for when I left home on the 30th of September he was feeling quite poorly, in fact he has been failing quite fast for the past year. Although he was well advanced in age he always seemed hopeful until the past few months and then he would say when asked how he was getting along, ‘O, I am just drifting along, no special object in view.' He had realized his hopes with regard to Eagle Point, having lived to see it grow to be a flourishing railroad town, for the growth of Eagle Point and development of the country around it seemed to be his longing desire. As he was a progressive citizen he necessarily had some enemies, but his friends were numbered by the score. He will be missed by his old neighbors, for he was always entertaining and sociable with all.
Fairview, October 28, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 8, 1912, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I gave an account of what I saw in and around Fairview and then promised to tell something about what grows in the agricultural and horticultural departments, but before I begin on that subject I wish to say something with regard to the climate in this part of the state, for it is as different from our Southern Oregon climate as though it was not in the same state. The town of Fairview is situated on what is known as the Columbia Slough, a large tract of land lying between the town and the Columbia River that overflows during the seasons of the year when the Columbia River is high but in the summer is very productive and is used for meadow and pasture lands, and being situated so near the river it is subjected to severe winds that are known as the east winds. The territory east, northeast and southwest being an open prairie country, and being very windy, is so situated that the wind collects from every quarter and concentrates on the Columbia River and then has a straight course down the river, and comes with such force that at times it seems to almost take everything before it, and I noticed that on the large fir trees the limbs on the east side seemed to be broken off to a great extent, while on the north and south sides of the tree they all seemed to bend toward the west and, calling attention to it, was told that that was caused by the east wind, but before I left there I had a little experience in that line, for on Friday and Saturday before I left there on Sunday the wind blew so hard that I could hardly walk and on Saturday afternoon I was out and when it came to walking against the wind with an umbrella, it simply pushed me back and for about five minutes it was a question whether I would be able to make the trip or not, but there came a lull in the wind and I soon reached a place where the timber broke the force of the wind so I that I managed to reach my daughter's. But I started out intending to tell something about the productiveness of the soil, which seems to be very rich, although when I first came through this section of the country, forty-nine years ago, it was a vast forest except along the banks of the slough and river but now the country between here and Damascus is studded with some of as fine farms as can be found anywhere on the coast, and from what I can learn by asking questions, and the reader knows that I am an adept at that, the land produces almost everything that the farmers put into the ground, in fact, there seems to be a surplus on hand this season, for the farmers are complaining that they cannot sell what they have, and I see in the Oregon City Enterprise that potatoes are a drag on the market at fifty cents a hundred and my brother-in-law with whom I am stopping at present has been trying to sell his baled hay and is only offered from nine to ten dollars per ton for grain and clover hay and fourteen for timothy hay and some of the farmers are letting their potatoes lay in the ground while others have them dug, but don't know what to do with them, while the price of grain is so low that they are reluctant about offering it for sale. The fruit crop this season has been about as average, but there does not seem to be very much doing in that line for I see but very few young orchards up here as most of the farmers farm on a small scale and generally keep a few cows, hens and pigs and raise hay, potatoes and kale; the latter is for green cow feed. Those who have tried alfalfa in this section complain that it is difficult for them to get a stand and when they do they find that it is very difficult to get it cured as the stalks are so large and so full of sap, and they have so much rain here in the early part of the summer, but one thing I notice is that they all seem to have plenty of money and seem to live well. More anon.
Damascus, Ore., Nov. 9, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 13, 1912, page 5


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    When I finished my last letter I was telling something of the productiveness of the soil, etc., and what was the principal productions in this part of Oregon. There is one vegetable grown here that is considered a staple article and that is the potato. If a man has a patch of ground to cultivate he always sets apart a certain portion of it for potatoes, as the soil seems to be particularly adapted to it, and it is not an uncommon thing for a farmer to realize a hundred and twenty sacks off of an acre of ground and I am informed that the average yield runs from eighty to one hundred and twenty sacks, but this year the yield has been unprecedented, although the soil here is susceptible of being greatly benefited by a liberal use of manure and other fertilizers, for it is not subject to drought here as it is in some parts of Oregon and consequently have no fears of the vegetables burning up, in fact the soil in its virgin state does not produce near so well as it does where it is well manured and properly cultivated. One instance to illustrate the idea: There are two farms close to where I am visiting, with a county road between them. Mr. A---- put in seven and a half acres, and Mr. B---- put in seven and a half acres in oats, both in the spring of the year at the same time. Mr. A---- thought that it did not pay to spend time to haul and scatter the manure, so let it rot as it was thrown out of the stable, while Mr. B---- saved all of the manure, etc., from his barn and as fast as a load was secured hauled it off and spread it on his land and the result was that Mr. A---- threshed off of the eight and a half acres two hundred and twenty-five bushels of oats while Mr. B---- threshed seven hundred and twenty bushels of oats and the land in its original state was as near alike as two pieces of land could be. One farmer farmed in a slipshod way while the other studied scientific farming and was up to date in his work. The soil here is also well adapted to wheat and vetch, and some seasons corn seems to do very well here, in fact almost every kind of vegetable or grain seems to grow well here, but while the soil is so productive there are a great many drawbacks, for they have the blight in their fruit trees as well as the other pests that have been visiting other sections of this state and occasionally they have so much rain in the summer that they can hardly save their grain and hay, and it is not an uncommon thing to have the grain sprout in the shock, and it is quite uncommon for them to get their hay in without having it rained on. The winters here are much more severe than they are in Southern Oregon, as here they have the east wind and that often brings with it a sleet that covers the trees with ice and in some instances breaks them all to pieces and almost ruins orchards.
    But one thing that I have noticed is that on almost all of the farms the houses and barns are good and show that the streak of prosperity has fallen here. Another thing I noticed is that the roads are in a fine condition up here and a man with two ordinary horses will haul, now November 11, two tons of hay to Portland at a load, making the round trip of twenty-four miles in a day, and in the rain at that, for the people here never stop for rain any more than we would out in Southern Oregon for a little sunshine.
    Another thing I noticed up here is the school houses and churches all speak well for the community, but taking everything into consideration the difference in the climate, the difference in the amount of rain, and the severe sleet and snow storms and the general healthfulness of the country, I will still stay with good old Jackson County if it does not produce quite so much. We have in my home county health, wealth and contentment.
Damascus, Ore., Nov. 11, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1912, page 7


EAGLETS ABROAD
By A. C. Howlett
    As I have just received the Mail Tribune of Nov. 15 and see that I am letting the printer run out of "copy" and as I have the house all to myself as my daughter, Mrs. Shaw, has gone out on business--you know that the women are recognized citizens now--in fact she went to register as a voter, and the children are all off attending a little party except the baby and she is asleep so you see I have the house all to myself, quite a treat, so will put in the time to the best of advantage for the benefit of the readers of my scribbling. When I last wrote I told something of the productiveness of this part of the county. Since then I have had the privilege of riding over a considerable portion of this section that I used to travel over some fifty years ago and have had a fine opportunity to notice the changes that have taken place. While I was here fifty years ago the country lying south of the Columbia River was a vast forest covered with massive fir trees, hazel brush and grass so that it was difficult for anyone to go, even on horseback, from place to place, and the farms then owned, or rather the tracts of land owned by the farmers, varied in size from one hundred and sixty to six hundred and forty acres, but now the farms vary in size from one to twenty acres for one scarcely ever finds a farm of over twenty acres and from what I can learn the majority run under twenty acres, for while riding out the first of this week I sat in the buggy and counted sixteen farms right along the road going from Damascus to Sunny Side--not the Sunnyside of Eagle Point, but Sunny Side, a thriving little village in Clackamas County--in less than a mile's travel, but notwithstanding the smallness of the farms they all seemed to have large and well-filled houses, and one man who had a thirty-acre farm that I talked with said that when he built his barn he had the posts twenty-two feet long and thought that he would have an abundance of room for everything, but found that it was entirely too small although it was twenty-four by sixty feet and he had to put an addition to it to make room. Speaking of the towns scattered over this part of the country, they nearly every one have from one to three stores, a blacksmith shop, a mill and a good school house and in most of them a church and in one of the stores they have a hall for general purposes. The election passed off where I voted very pleasantly. It was held in a hall at Damascus and I was amused to see them line up on the long bench and almost every one of them were smoking and the room was so full of tobacco smoke that one not used to that kind of atmosphere could hardly get their breath, and I heard one of the judges that don't smoke say that he was going to try to influence the county court before the next election to appoint women as judges and clerks and then they would put a stop to smoking in the room. I also noticed that a majority of the citizens there were Germans and that they all seemed to vote against women suffrage; the reason assigned was that if the women were allowed to vote that they would vote to put liquor out of the way and then they could not get their beer. There were about one hundred and eighty votes cast and it took all night, all the next day until 9:30 p.m. to make the count, that was owing to the length of the ticket and another reason was that one of the clerks was a new one and did not understand how to hurry up in the work. Well, after staying at my brother-in-law's for ten days and having as good time as possible, although it rained every day, he took me to Sycamore station on the Estacada line where I took the car for Linaman and there took the car for this place, but before I pass on to another subject I wish to tell of my experience while on the road. As we were riding along my brother-in-law pointed out the different farms along the route where I used to visit fifty years ago. He would say there is the old Sam Gillian place and that is the old Ban Johnson place and that is the old Tadago place, etc., but they were so unlike the forest-covered places that I used to visit that I could see no resemblance, and another thing was that the farms that used to embrace in some instance hundreds of acres were now cut up into small tracts and covered with neat farm houses, and most of the timber taken off, and what is standing is being cut into cordwood and used for fuel. But I find that I am making this letter too long so will close for this time and try to write again this week. I commenced this letter last Saturday but the children came in before I got through so had to finish it this morning.
Cleone, Ore., Nov. 18, 1912.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 20, 1912, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There was a meeting of the young men of our town called to be held in the church on Thursday evening of last week, for the purpose of organizing an Athletic Club. There was quite an attendance, and the organization was perfected by electing Rev. L. L. Simmons, our Baptist minister, as president, Jake Jonas, secretary, and Thomas Nichols, Jr., treasurer. There is to be another meeting Thursday night.
    I. C. Moore and wife of Ashland came up Sunday evening and Mr. Moore took the stage for Elk Creek Monday morning, but Mrs. Moore returned to Ashland.
    John McAllister and wife, who live on the North Fork of Little Butte, came out Monday and Mrs. McAllister went on the Medford, I understand, for medical treatment.
    Rev. W. J. Kenay, one of the prominent farmers and stock raisers of Little Butte, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside Monday for dinner. Also Wm. Newtown of Lake Creek and H. W. Brooks of Medford. Mr. Brooks is soliciting for the Oregon Journal, his territory embraces this and Douglas County, and he says Eagle Point is the banner town in his district for subscribers for the Journal, an evidence of progressiveness of our people, for judging by the amount of newspapers, magazines, etc., taken at this post office we must be an up-to-date class of readers.
    There was quite an excitement in our town Monday. One of our boarders came rushing in and reported that the sheriff of Klamath County was here after a horse thief, and that he was one of our most highly respected citizens, so of course your correspondent started out to get the facts for the Mail Tribune and learned that instead of it being the sheriff it was Mr. J. M. Holman, Indian agent of the Yainax reservation, and an Indian who had come in to replevy a horse that Irvin Culbertson had traded for, from a white man on the reservation last summer that had been stolen from the Indian, named Earnest George, the papers were taken out before our justice of the peace, John Watkins, and placed in the hands of our deputy sheriff, Roy Ashpole, and Mr. Culbertson was to bring the horse out today, Tuesday. Mr. Culbertson, it seems, was well acquainted with the man he traded with and I understand had loaned him considerable money that he will probably lose. Mr. Culbertson has the sympathy of his many friends in the community where he lives as well as in this place where he is well and favorably known.
    Ed Dutton, one of our wide-awake young men living on the south side of Antelope Creek, was in town Monday getting the stretchers to put up a lot of wire fence on "the Desert" as he has leased a tract off of the railroad company's land and some of the irrigation company's, managed by Mr. Cummings.
    Thomas McCabe and his son, Henry, were in town last Saturday. Mr. McCabe brought in a lot of apples and potatoes for market. His son has been living at LaGrande for some time past.
    Roy Ashpole, one of the hardware merchants, was called upon, as deputy sheriff, to go up on Salt Creek to serve subpoenas on parties in a legal action.
    Thomas Cingcade, wife and Thomas Cingcade, Jr., were among the visitors in our town Saturday.
    R. C. Rowley, who has a homestead near the Trail stage road, moved to Medford Saturday.
    Austin Green and one of the Houston boys came out from their homes on Long Branch Saturday. They took home with them a cider press and intend to make up a lot of apples they have on hand into cider.
    Green Mathews, one of our thrifty farmers and stockmen, was in town Saturday; he says that [it was] his son's nose that was broke, is getting along all right.
    Mr. Downing and family, who have been visiting his cousin, Mrs. O. E. Nichols, left for Long Branch last week.
    Jewel Cole and family, a brother of Clay Cole, one of the engineers on the P.&E. Railroad, have been visiting his two brothers here the past week or more.
    Mr. J. L. Harvey, foreman and manager of the McKnight orchard, was doing business in our town last week.
    Mrs. Conley and her daughter were calling on friends here Saturday. Mrs. Conley lives on a farm just above town.
    S. S. Aiken of Prospect came out Saturday on the Eagle Point-Persist stage and remained at the Sunnyside until Monday morning, taking the car for Medford. He says that Mr. Natwick has been doing some good substantial work on the road above Elk Creek, and speaking about the road reminds me that our two outgoing county commissioners, Frank Brown and James Owens, went up to examine that work Saturday returning Sunday and in an interview with them [I] learned that they were highly pleased with the manner and amount of work done. They also speak in high terms of the work done by the supervisor in that district, Dave Pence, and say that he is the right man for the place, that he knows every nook and knoll in those hills and knows how to handle his men so as to get the work out of them.
    James Peyton, who has been working under Mr. Natwick, came out Saturday to get supplies for himself.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 2, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the notable improvements in our town while I was gone up north that I had overlooked is the belfry that has been built on the Catholic church. I did not notice it until the other day. The fog had cleared away so that I could see more of the surrounding country and I happened to notice that. It reflects credit on the enterprise of some of the members. I understood that they had procured a bell but found that it was cracked, so had to return it and the new bell has not yet arrived.
    John Foster, who is engaged in Klamath County and came in to visit his father and other relatives, started for his Klamath County home today, January 1, 1913. He says that they all, for there are several Jackson County folks in the camp, enjoy reading the "Eaglets."
    Henry Trusty came out last Monday from his home on Elk Creek to meet his brothers, James and Rufus, who have been working over in California. Their father, John H. Trusty, has gone to Texas to visit his mother.
    Mrs. Cora O'Brian and her daughter, Miss Elison Officer, came out from Medford during the holidays and they have been visiting her brothers and sisters, the children of the late George Brown, and Mr. O'Brian came out this morning and they will spend the New Year's Day together.
    Tuesday and New Year's Eve were properly celebrated by the lovers of pleasure. Art Nichols and Mr. Vogeli got up a shooting match for turkeys and chickens and quite a crowd of nimrods were collected and notwithstanding the cold wind there was quite a crowd of interested spectators and some good marksmanship was shown. At night there was a mask ball and I understand that there was a good attendance and the young folk report having had a good time. A number of young people came from Medford and the surrounding country; among them were J. M. and J. E. Strang, Miss Susie Fry and Ivy Martin, and Clarence Middlebusher of Trail and Anthony McCabe of Reese Creek.
    Charles Pruett and his son Guy were among the visitors Tuesday and Wm. Winkle, Aaron and Isaac Smith, Peter Betz and wife, Verna Mathews, beside a number of others too numerous to mention.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McKelvey, now of Table Rock, were pleasant callers for dinner at the Sunnyside Wednesday and after dinner Misses Anna and Gertie Ulrich of Medford, Miss Loretta Childreth and Mrs. John W. Smith called to see our daughters, Agnes and Hattie.
    Mr. and Mrs. McKelvey, who were formerly on the old Bradshaw orchard but who is now superintendent of a part of the Washburn orchard in Table Rock, came over here to do some trading instead of going to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 4, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The board of school directors are having several changes made in our school house during the holidays and the rest of the time of the vacation. They have had the larger part of the partition between the two lower rooms taken out and are having folding doors put in instead, so as to have one large room in case that they desire to have the two schools, or rather the two departments, come together, and they have taken out the windows in the sides of the building and placed them so that the light will fall on the backs of the pupils instead of having them sitting so that the light falls on each side and the back, and instead of having the blackboard facing the school they will be on the sides, a very decided improvement. Another departure from the old rut is that they are having the fourth room fixed up so as to have another teacher, something that has been needed for the last four years. They are also having the interior repainted and are bringing our school and school building up to date, so that it will not be necessary to send our boys and girls away from home to school, and this being a central point for the schools surrounding us, children can come from home from the different districts and secure the benefits of a high school education.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Daily, who have been keeping a model variety store here for some time, have moved onto the Hillcrest Orchard, and it was with feelings of profound regrets that we were forced to say goodbye to them, for they have always taken an active part in everything that was for the betterment of the community and they will both be badly missed from the lodge room, for they were both active members of the I.O.O.F., Mrs. Daily having been one of the leading ones to have the Rebekah lodge started here.
    P. W. Healy, one of our progressive farmers who lives just below town, was a pleasant caller Thursday and while here paid up his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Bert Peachey came up from Ashland New Year's Day accompanying Miss Maggie Daley, who had been visiting friends in Ashland, and later in the day, Robert Peachey, a brother, came up to visit old-time friends.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 7, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. J. Coffeen and wife and Miss Eula Houston of Long Branch, who went to Medford to spend the holidays with friends and relatives, came out on the P.&E. last Friday and took the E.P. and Persist stage for their homes. Mr. and Mrs. Coffeen have taken a homestead in that section and Miss Houston is a daughter of William Houston, whose father settled in an early day in upper Sams Valley and is now living on Long Branch with his son Jack Houston, a hale and hearty man of nearly ninety years of age. He thinks that Jackson County is a good place to live.
    M. Hornbuckle, who has been living on the H. B. Tronson place, has moved to Medford.
    Miss Alma Gould, who is teaching in the Lake Creek district, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside on her way from Medford, where she had been spending the holidays, to Lake Creek to resume her work last Monday, the 6th.
    W. H. Crandall and his two sisters, Mrs. N. M. Thomas and Miss Cora Crandall, were business visitors in town Friday. Mr. Crandall reports the death of Judge Carpenter of Portland, a particular friend and during the summer a near neighbor. He died very suddenly at his home in Portland.
    R. R. Minter, the sheep man, was in town a few minutes Saturday on business.
    Ed Higinbotham, the road supervisor on Big Butte, returned from Jacksonville Saturday evening, spent the night at the Sunnyside and the next morning started for home as he said that the snow meant to him ride, gather and feed cattle as he had but a few of his up.
    J. S. Quackenbush, superintendent of the Corbin orchard, was in town Saturday with a load of fine apples, supplying the local market.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry Young of Lake Creek, an old veteran of the Civil War, came out Thursday to visit old-time friends and relatives.
    New Year's Day was properly celebrated although there was but very little doing on the streets or in the stores. Mrs. George von der Hellen gave a dinner and had the following guests: Dr. and Mrs. Holt and daughter Miss Helen, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, Miss Mary Foster of Medford, besides relatives of the family. They had a very pleasant time and of course an excellent dinner.
    Last Thursday our banker, J. V. McIntyre, had a time getting into his bank. The dampness had swollen the door and also the door sill and it was such a strain on the lock that he was unable to turn the key in the lock but finally one of our blacksmiths, Henry Childreth, came to his assistance and after the door was opened Mr. Childreth removed the cause and now he feels easy when he locks the door.
    George E. White, foreman on Mr. Cooley's orchard, Ortie Vestal, Mr. Vatchs, who owns the old Reese place on Rogue River, Thomas Carlton and his brother Lyle were among the visitors in town Thursday. Also Mrs. Carl Narregan was trading with our merchants.
    Judge John Watkins our Justice of the Peace, Wm. von der Hellen, and Thomas E. Nichols made out a new jury list for 1913 last Thursday.
    In spite of the wind, rain and fog our farmers still continue to come in and haul lumber from our lumber yard.
    Mr. J. H. Lydiard of Table Rock came over last Thursday to get a lot of strawberry plants of Ed S. Wolfer, our strawberry man, and spent the night with us, also Eddie Higinbotham and Thomas Stanley, two of our outgoing road supervisors.
    Miss Enid Peelor of Butte Falls spent the night with us Thursday. She took the E.P. and Persist stage for Central school house, where she is engaged to teach school. Mrs. Joe Ippert and her son Harris of Edsall's Station also spent the night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 9, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. Mark C. Davis of Wolf Creek, the Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church, called on your correspondent last Saturday and we went together over to Chaparral school house on Sunday afternoon where he preached to a fair-sized audience and then we drove to Table Rock and he preached again. While we were in the neighborhood we stopped with W. F. DeFord, one of the prosperous farmers, and while there I spoke a good word for the Mail Tribune, as usual, and he remarked that he wanted to take that paper and I told him that was a part of my business, taking subscriptions for the Mail Tribune, and that I would be glad to take his subscription, which I did. I find that the Mail Tribune is gaining in popularity and that the people in the valley are dropping off the other papers and subscribing for it.
    Speaking of Rev. Davis' trip here, he intended to have preached here tonight, Tuesday, but was called by phone to return home to attend the funeral of an elderly member by the name of Perkins, a neighbor of his, who used to live in this county, I think in Sams Valley, but the arrangements are made for Bro. Simmons to preach and he expects to continue the meeting all the week.
    I. C. Moore, who lives in Ashland, but has a farm on Elk Creek, came out from his farm Saturday evening and reports that they had about three or four inches of snow up there.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our prosperous farmers, orchardists and stockmen, was out last Saturday evening to attend the 500 Club dance, and I understand that they had a good time as usual. He tells me that he has had trouble with his goats and has lost several of the best ones, but that they seem to be all right now.
    F. J. Ayres, who has a farm along the P.&E. railroad track about four miles from here, was in town Saturday and called on your correspondent and paid a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    The men who have been engaged putting up the electric wires in our town have finished their job and as soon as we have the wires attached to the wires in the houses will be ready for the "juice." I understand that they have not placed the main transmitter [transformer?] in position yet. When the work is completed it will be a great help to our town and be an attraction to our visitors.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 10, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. E. McDonald of Portland, who has been visiting his cousin Mr. Ash of Trail, was a guest at the Sunnyside the first of the week. His brother was with him when he came out from Trail but went on to Medford. While they were at Trail they bargained for the farms of Jeff and Reuben Johnson. Mr. McDonald says that he likes this Rogue River Valley and thinks that he will locate among us.
    The Eagle Point Athletic Club that was organized a short time ago have rented the Holmes warehouse and are fixing it up for a gymnasium. They think that they will eventually have connected with it a reading room, so as to have a place where the young folks can meet and spend the evenings and improve their minds instead of spending their time in idleness.
    The other day as I was talking with the mayor, Mr. Wm. von der Hellen, and we were commenting on the condition of the streets in our town he remarked that he thought that it would be a wise plan to bond the town for seven or eight thousand dollars and fix up the streets in good shape before another winter, and I have been talking to some of the property owners on the subject and they seem to think that instead of bonding the town and making all of the property owners, or rather taxpayers, contribute toward defraying the expense, to have those who own the lots on the streets that are improved pay for the improvements on their property.
    Mr. Nellis, owner of the Flounce Rock Ranch, came out last Monday, left his team here and went on to Medford.
    Mr. Roy Willits, our mail contractor, reports that Messrs. Dolf and Henry Olsen have killed another cougar, but he does not know the length of it. He says that he thinks that everybody along the route from here to Persist reads the Eaglets.
    Clarence Pierce, one of the Medford real estate men and a general hustler for Rogue River Valley, came out Tuesday, enjoyed a room and went up to look over his land near Eagle Heights, returning about ten o'clock p.m.
    Art Nichols, our meat market man, has had a new sign painted and hung over his shop door. He had ice without going to the trouble to freeze it, and the result was that he was scarce of water. In fact the cold snap we have had caused trouble in several families in our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 11, 1913, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. W. Hitchcock, who owns a farm and orchard about two miles southeast of our town, who has been to Portland for some time, returned last week.
    T. D. Singleton, who owns a part of the old Lofland place along the P.&E. railroad, west of town, was doing business with our merchants the last of the week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Gorman came in the last of the week with a lot of apples from the Corbin orchard.
    The Ladies' Improvement Club of Eagle Point held their first meeting of the year at the home of Mrs. Joe Morrison Wednesday, January 8th. There were twenty ladies present. Lunch was served by [omission] Moomaw, Mrs. Frank Brown and Miss Mabel Wamsley. The next meeting will be held at the residence of Mrs. J. F. Brown on Wednesday, January 15, at 2 p.m. Every member is requested to be present on that occasion.
    Mrs. Lonira Dunnyhue and her little daughter, who have been visiting the family of Joseph Hannah near Trail, came out on the E.P.&P. stage last Thursday and spent the night at the Sunnyside on her way to her home in Gold Hill.
    J. S. Tucker, who formerly lived on what is now known as the Enyart ranch on Rogue River, but now of Carbon, Shasta County, California, was another passenger on the stage from Persist. He had been up to his old place and was on his way home. As usual he stopped at the Sunnyside overnight, taking the car for Medford Friday morning.
    G. W. Ager, one of the school supervisors, in making his monthly rounds, spent Thursday night with us.
    Died, at his home north of Eagle Point, January 6, 1913, Andrew J. Clarno, aged 36 years 10 months and 4 days. He leaves a wife and two children, two brothers and a sister. Mr. Clarno has been afflicted for several years and his death was not a surprise to any who knew him. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on Thursday, January 9, Rev. A. C. Howlett officiating. His grandfather, John Engleson, died January 1, 1913 in Curry County, making the fourth death in the family in a little over a year.
    Mrs. Jake Jonas and her mother-in-law, Mrs. Elizabeth Jonas, are visiting relatives in Gold Hill.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 14, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ella Beuika and Thomas Abbott were among the pleasant callers Sunday evening.
    Dayton Edmondson of Arkansas, a brother of one of the pioneers of Jackson County, Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls, arrived here last Monday on his way to Butte Falls. They have not seen each other for fifty-nine years, when he was a boy of six or seven years of age. He was compelled to remain here overnight, and he said that he was like a caged bear, for he expected to have been able to go right on and meet his brother that day.
    Miss Stella Betz, a stepdaughter of William Perry of Butte Falls, was a caller last Monday afternoon and when we met the first thing she said was Mr. Howlett I wish you would write more Eaglets, for that is always the first thing that I look for when I get the Mail Tribune.
    Miss Mattie Minter came out from her home Sunday combining business with pleasure, remaining over Tuesday night when she attended a meeting of the Rebekah lodge, where they installed the following officers: Ella Daily, N.G.; Lottie McQuade, V.G.; Minnie Bryant, recording secretary; Mabel Wamsley, financial secretary; May Painter, treasurer; Varian Jonas, warden; Nettie Grover, conductor; Charles Bacon, R.S.N.G.; Anna Bacon, L.S.N.G.; Mrs. W. L. Childreth, chaplain; Rosa Ayres, R.S.V.G.; Samantha Minter, L.S.V.G.; Hattie Howlett, I.G. and Louisa Bloss, O.G. After the installation of the officers light refreshments were served and another bright spot in the history of the lodge was made, to be a beacon for the guidance of future generations.
    Among the many callers on our daughter Agnes, who has been confined to the house for over four months, last Sunday was Miss Louisa Bloss, and right here I wish to remark that by some means her name was omitted in the list of those who so kindly remembered our daughter on Christmas Eve, for her present was on the tree and is cherished by the recipient.
    Mr. Anthony McCabe, who had been over to the Walch farm to visit one of the boys who has been quite sick, stopped Sunday night at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 17, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my former letter that Mrs. Scott Bruce, wife of one of our leading carpenters, had gone to Seattle to visit her sister.
    Mr. Frank Howard, recently from Texas, arrived at the Sunnyside last Monday on his way up to see his father, who has a homestead near the county road from here to the free ferry.
    Roy Davis, son of Guy Davis, who owns a farm on the road from Prospect to Trail, spent the night here Tuesday. He reports a quantity of snow in his section of the country, in fact the snow is getting to be quite a handicap to traveling.
    Mr. Gorman came out Tuesday evening to meet Mr. and Mrs. W. H. McKelvey, who have been living in Table Rock for the past few months, to take them to the Corbin orchard, where Mrs. McKelvey has two sisters, Mrs. Quackenbush and Mrs. Gorman. They expect to start for Kansas City, Mo., in a short time, where he has secured a good position.
    Carl Jackson, who has had charge of the meat market at Butte Falls for some time, came out Tuesday and is assisting in the Nichols meat market for the time being. He took Henry Daley's place Wednesday while he went to Jacksonville to attend to some legal business. Carl's many friends here gave him a cordial greeting.
    The Eagle Point Athletic Club met Monday night in the church building before preaching and transacted considerable business. Among other things [they] took steps toward raising the necessary funds to secure their outfit and fit up the room they have rented for their headquarters. There was an attendance of about twenty-five.
    Miss Rosa Ayres came out Tuesday to attend the meeting of the Rebekah lodge that night, spending the night with Misses Hattie and Agnes Howlett, returning home Wednesday afternoon so as to meet her sister, Mrs. F. F. Newport, wife of our railroad agent here, who is visiting her parent, A. F. Ayres.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 18, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Wednesday George von der Hellen, one of our leading merchants, made a business trip to Medford. Mrs. T. F. Boltz, the wife of the general superintendent of the work of the P.&E. Railway, visited Medford, and so did H. B. Tronson, owner of the orchard that captured the prize at the Spokane fair.
    Mr. W. T. Deford of Table Rock came over last Thursday after some fixtures for the men who are putting up the electric light lines in Table Rock.
    Last Thursday I took it upon myself to visit our school, entering the first room I came to which proved to be Mrs. Suddarth's room, she, having charge of the intermediate department. I found that it was examination day and was somewhat disappointed as I wished to hear some of the recitations, but I spent an hour there very pleasantly and after being called on to give the children a talk I moved into the principal's room. But before I left I noticed that there were just twenty-five children in that room. There were some absent on account of the severe weather, for it snowed, and the wind blew, and we had and have had almost all kinds of weather here for the past week, but the twenty-five children were all as busy as could be and I noticed that there was the best of behavior among the children. On entering the principal's room I was pleased to see nineteen boys and girls--there were four absent--all at work on their examination papers and Mr. Suddarth also busy showing some of the children how to overcome some of the difficulties in the way of advancement. As a rule the behavior was O.K. but I noticed two boys who took advantage of the teacher's back being turned, and I suppose they thought that they would show off before company, that did not come up to the standard in point of behavior. I was favorably impressed with the school and think that we have the right teachers in the two departments. I also was called on to give that room a talk, and I told them something of my experiences some sixty or seventy years ago, contrasting those times with their surroundings of today, and I was pleased with the marked attention the children paid to my talks in each room. I promised myself to visit Mrs. von der Hellen's room in the near future.
    There have been quite a number of our citizens engaged in making sleds, sleighs, cutters, etc., and have taken advantage of the season to have an old-fashioned sleigh ride, and those who could not have a sleigh made snow shoes, and some spent the time snowballing the passersby.
    Henry Meyer of Lake Creek phoned to me Saturday morning and wants me to say that there is a pale red steer calf there mark on upper and under half crop in the left ear, without an owner.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 20, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the visitors to our town during the past week was Mr. Fred Pelouze, one of our prosperous and progressive farmers and orchardists. He was visiting us first with an ordinary hack and two horses attached, but the next time he came was with a new-fashioned cutter, homemade. It consisted of a wide board with a box on it for a seat and another small one for a foot rest, with pieces of baling wire fastened to the front corners of the board so as to lengthen out the tugs and one horse hitched to the wires. I tell you he just went a "scooting."
    S. B. Graham of the firm of Wakeman and Graham insurance agents of Medford called at the Sunnyside Friday for dinner.
    G. W. Ager, school supervisor for some of the rural schools in this section, spent Thursday night with us. He had been up Butte Creek and visited the Brownsboro and what is known as the Charley Tyrrell School on Thursday.
    Von der Hellen Bros. were having the snow shoveled off of the roof of their store building Friday. They have a flat roof and they thought it best to shovel it off before any damage was done.
    Rufus and James Trusty of Elk Creek came out on the E.P. and Persist stage Thursday on their way to Hilt, Cal., where they are engaged to work in a large box factory.
    We have a test case in our post office here. The postmaster says that the law requires that all packages going through the parcel post department must be so that a six-foot tape line will go around it both ways, and there was a pruning shear sent from Medford that measured 66½ inches in length and the mail carrier on the Lake Creek route refused to take it because it was over the specified limits. Our postmaster, Mr. Florey, has reported the case to headquarters for instructions as what to do with the machine.
    Joseph Riley, who lives on Antelope Creek, was among the callers in our town Friday bringing in a lot of eggs to Brown Bros.
    W. C. Thurston of Napa, Cal., representing the Conklin Gloves Company, was a guest among us Friday night. He had been doing business with our merchants.
    S. W. Hudson of Butte Falls, W. E. Hammond, who owns a large tract of land north of here, and S. A. Carlton of Ashland were pleasant callers Friday night.
    Mr. and Mrs. McKelvey started for their new home in Kansas City, Mo., last Friday evening on the P.&E.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my last that Miss Hattie Cingcade and Mr. George Sinwall were married in San Francisco, Calif., on January 11th. Mrs. Sinwall is a daughter of Mr. and Mrs. David Cingcade of this place and sister of policeman Harry Cingcade of Medford, and her many friends here are wishing the newly wedded couple all the enjoyment that falls to the lot of married people.
    Mr. Purdy, a brother-in-law of Dr. W. P. Holt, who has been on a business trip up north, returned home Sunday morning. He reported the weather in Portland and the Willamette Valley generally very bad, snow, wind, rain and in some places sleet.
    Last Friday night Mr. and Mrs. Frederic Pelouze gave a social party in Spiker's hall. The invitations were sent out several days before and about one hundred responded, notwithstanding the night was very stormy, and those who attended report having had one of the most pleasant times of their lives. The music is said to have been excellent, and it being an invited company of course the behavior was up to date. About midnight light refreshments were served and about three a.m. the company began to disperse, wishing Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze many returns of such happy occasions.
    Mrs. J. H. Carlton, nee Bessie Brown, came over from their farm between Medford and Central Point to attend the ball given by Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze Friday, remaining until Monday, visiting her brothers, sisters and friends.
    Frank Johnson, one of the prosperous farmers of this section, was doing business with our merchants Monday.
    Marsh Garrett of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller for dinner Monday.
    L. K. Hawk was among the business callers Monday; also Peter Young and T. C. Dugan. Mr. Dugan reports that they have the telephone line in operation in his neighborhood and that they find it a great convenience.
    Jud Edsall, who has a contract to deliver a large quantity of saw logs out in Klamath County, came in Sunday evening on a business trip and to see his friends. He said that the Mail Tribune stopped coming to his camp and that they hurried a messenger to renew the subscription. He left the logging camp about a week ago and at that time the snow was thirty inches deep and that by this time he thinks that it is at least four or five feet deep and still coming.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 23, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Painter, one of our lead citizens, who has been working in California for the past few months, came home sick last Monday morning to recuperate in our healthy climate.
    Mr. Henry, one of our school supervisors, spent the night with us last Monday on his way to Butte Falls. He planned to go from here Tuesday morning, on foot, to the Reese Creek school, spend an hour there and catch the car at Mountain View.
    Carl Jackson, who has been here visiting his parents and friends and assisting in the Nichols' meat market, returned to his home in Butte Falls Tuesday.
    John Newstrom and Wm. Nussbaum of Lake Creek were among the callers Tuesday.
    The Eagle Point Lumber Company has received another carload of lumber and the result is that we have some more sidewalks down, but the weather has been so disagreeable that the work progresses very slowly.
    Through the kindness of Mr. Charles Bacon, the genial and accommodating conductor on the P.&E. Railway, I am able to give to the readers of the Mail Tribune a list of the officers that were installed Jan. 4, 1913, in the I.O.O.F. lodge at this place. B. H. Bryant, N.G.; N. C. McQuade, V.G.; C. A. Bacon, secretary; W. L. Childreth, treasurer; G. H. Wamsley, warden; R. G. Brown, conductor; H. C. Cole, R.S.N.G.; George Phillips, L.S.N.G.; J. W. Jones, R.S.V.G.; Scott Bruce, L.S.V.G.; James Ringer, R.G.; R. R. Minter, I.G.; Roy Smith, R.S.S.; George Fisher, L.S.S. and H. Hess, chaplain. The Oddfellows have changed the time of lodge meeting to Thursday night instead of Saturday night as heretofore.
    Mrs. C. A. Bacon and Pauline Inplett, mother and niece of C. A. Bacon, are visiting their son and uncle Charles A. Bacon in Eagle Point.
    I understand that the school board have secured the services of Miss Jane Knox to take charge of one of the rooms in our school and that she was to have arrived on today's train Thursday but have not learned of her arrival yet.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed Higinbotham, who has a farm on the Eagle Point-Prospect road, and his father-in-law, Mr. Caster of Derby, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Wednesday. Mr. Caster is one of the old reliable citizens of the Derby section and is well and favorably known by the traveling public.
    R. R. Minter, one of our prominent farmers and stock men, was in town last Wednesday; also he had been out to Charles Prewell's and purchased a lot of hay, and since that time has driven his sheep there to feed. He says that it takes about a ton a day to feed his stock. He says that he is not out of hay, has about twenty tons on hand, but is keeping that at home to feed his cattle and horses. He is one of our wide-awake citizens and would be a good man to put in as one of our county commissioners.
    The Women's Aid Society met last Wednesday at the residence of Norman McQuade. One of the men who was recently killed in a snowslide in Trinity County, Calif. Mr. Treadwell, was a cousin of our townsman, Mr. McQuade. The remains were found Wednesday.
    Ira Grigsby, who is working on the farm of R. W. Hitchcock, came over to bring Mr. Hitchcock to the train and the latter went on to Medford, while Mr. Grigsby took back a packload of supplies from our stores.
    Mr. and Mrs. Soliss, who live on what is known as the Hoover farm, were in town Thursday buying supplies of our merchants.
    The Young Ladies' Eagle Point Athletic Club met in the church last Thursday evening and elected the following officers: President, Miss Loretta Childreth; vice president, Miss Margaret Florey; secretary, Miss Fay Nichols; treasurer, Miss Hazel Brown. The club is trying to secure the services of a competent lady instructor in gymnastics and they think they will get along nicely.
    Mr. Waterman of Brownsboro came down last Thursday, took the train and went to Medford on business.
    John Nelson and wife, also of Brownsboro, were doing business with Heath and Diamond. Mr. Heath has a farm near Brownsboro.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Thursday evening when the mail came into the post office and the crowd began to collect, for that is the time when the daily and weekly Mail Tribune comes in, and there are eighty-two copies taken at this office, and nearly every one of the subscribers are on hand to get "all the news all the time," well, on this particular occasion there happened to be several young ladies, in fact the vestibule of the post office was almost packed with men and girls, I heard a young lady remark to another that the tobacco smoke was so thick that she could almost cut it out in chunks and I just thought that she was about right, for one not used to the smoke could hardly stand it, but such is life in the Far West.
    The members of the Young Men's Eagle Point Athletic Club have gone to work in dead earnest to make it a success; they are fixing up the room with the necessary bars, rings, mats, etc., and in a short time will have everything in working order. They are planning to have basketball, one of the attractive features, and I predict that they will make a grand success of their undertaking, and our Baptist minister Rev. L. L. Simmons is now organizing a scout party and getting the younger boys interested in it, and by the time he perfects his plans in organizing the young men's and young ladies' athletic clubs and the scouts and gets them all in good working order and attends to his work as pastor of the church here and at Brownsboro he will find that he has his hands full.
    Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls, one of the old pioneers of this county, was a guest at the Sunnyside Friday night. As was announced in a former letter he had a brother from Arkansas come out and visited him and they two traveled as far as Ashland together hoping to meet ex-Senator Holt of that place but were disappointed as he was away from home at the time. He reports that the snow in Butte Falls when he left Thursday was two feet deep.
    Mr. Ragsdale, who has a farm on the south fork of Little Butte Creek, had a hurry-up call Friday evening over the phone and started immediately, reaching the Sunnyside after nine o'clock p.m., taking the car to Medford Saturday morning.
    Alfred Sparrow, a horse buyer, called on your correspondent Saturday to buy some horses, but we did not trade.
    In my Eaglets Thursday I stated that our fourth teacher, Miss Jane Knox, was expected that day but she did not arrive until Saturday night and I am informed that she will take charge of her room in the school this Monday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 29, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Jud Edsall, who has a contract for the delivery of a large lot of sawlogs on the Williamson River in Klamath County, came in about a week ago to look after his interests in this county [and] returned home Sunday morning.
    The friends of Jasper Miller, one of the pioneer school teachers of this county, are congratulating him over his victory in his land contest with the government, the railroad company and the Big Pines Lumber Company. He has at last won out and secured his homestead.
    Our school board have had the school rooms overhauled, the seats rearranged so as to have the light come in on the side instead of the backs of the pupils, and, as predicted in my last, have opened the fourth room with Miss Jane Knox as teacher of the third. We are now prepared to accommodate any of the children, and older ones either, in any of the grades from the first to the twelfth, and we expect to have a school here that will compare favorably with any in the county of like grades.
    James Gillespy, who has been acting as engineer for the donkey engine for the P.&E., is now the night watchman for the company here, and like a sensible man who wants to keep posted on all subjects, has subscribed for the Daily Mail Tribune so as to keep posted.
    Chris Beal, formerly of Butte Falls, but more recently of Coos Bay, stopped off here Sunday evening but I didn't learn his destination.
    Mr. H. W. Brooks, the agent for the Oregon Journal, was interviewing the subscribers for that paper last Monday here.
    Mike Sidley of Lake Creek was a caller at the Sunnyside Monday.
    The Misses Elsie and Frances Greb were visiting Medford last Saturday.
    Mrs. C. Heren, wife of one of our leading orchardists, paid Medford a visit last Monday, and was met here at the train by her husband. He tells me that they have secured a fine large bell for the Catholic church and expect to have it hung in a short time, that they expect to have services in the church next Sunday morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 30, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Chris Wooley and David Smith were transacting business with our merchants the first of the week. Mr. Smith, or "Uncle Dave," as he is generally called, is about 83 years old and is still going around as a young man. He says that he is not old but a little aged. He bids fair to live several years yet.
    Jake Jonas has been hauling lumber from the E.P. lumber yard to finish up the sidewalks, and I understand that if the owners of property along the route for the walks do not put them in by the time set by the council that the authorities will have it done and charge it up to the adjoining property. Frank Nichols is at work now putting the walk in between the church and the schoolhouse.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our newly appointed road supervisor, was in town the first of the week and said that he had filed his bond as supervisor and sent it in to the county court. His appointment seems to meet with the approval of most of the citizens in the road district so far as I can learn, as he is looked upon as a man of sound judgment and capable of handling the job judiciously.
    Mrs. Harry Young and her daughter Miss Grace were doing business with our merchants the first of the week. Mr. Young is one of the prominent men of Brownsboro.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Wright of Oil Center, California, January 25, a son. Mr. and Mrs. Wright were married here and are well and favorably known. He was depot agent here for quite a while and left behind them many warm friends who are congratulating them on their good fortune.
    James Owens, our ex-county commissioner, was in town this week shaking hands with his friends, but he thinks that he does not want to be county commissioner again. He expressed the opinion that our new county court will come up against several things that they did not look for but seems to think that we have a pretty good county board.
    John Rader, one of our leading stock men and farmers, was in town this week. He was talking about the cattle business and remarked that he had about all of his cattle up, that he never expected to be able to get all of them up at one time, but from what I can gather the cattle men have about all of them off of the range.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 31, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. W. C. Clements, wife of our telephone operator, manager, and owner of a majority of the shares of the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Telephone Company, had a niece and nephew, Francis and Bert Spaulding, aged seven and four respectively, come out from Kansas City, Mo., on the cars in care of the conductors, and they arrived a few days ago in good health.
    Heath & Diamond requests me to say in my Eaglets to the readers of the Mail Tribune that they are in a position to furnish anyone who needs undertaking goods, such as caskets, burial robes, etc., on the shortest notice, as they have made arrangements with H. C. Shook of Ashland to keep them constantly supplied, and anything in that line can be furnished at once.--(Adv.)
    Dr. W. W. P. Holt reports that the stork has visited the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Chambers of Butte Falls on the 29th of January and the result was a fine boy now keeps them company.
    Mrs. Frederick, who lives on a farm about two miles above here on the Brownsboro road, and her niece, Miss Elna Bowers of Ashland, were in town last Friday buying a lot of goods of our merchants. In spite of "hard times," bad roads, and disagreeable weather people will come to town and buy goods.
    Miss Sarah Singleton, daughter of one of our progressive farmers, who lives on the P.&E., was shopping in town Friday.
    Henry Childreth, one of our leading blacksmiths, has been rearranging in the interior of his shop changing things around so as to give him more room, and getting ready for the spring work.
    The sidewalk is now completed so that the school children can have a clean walk from both bridges to the school house and we expect to soon have it extend from one end of the town to the other on both sides of the creek.
    Wm. Winkle received an order over the phone Friday to have a load of gravel on the ground north of the depot by Saturday noon so that the electric company could put in the transmitter [transformer?] for the use of our town and we are led to believe that we will have the "juice" here by the twentieth inst.
    Our mayor has employed Gus Rosenberg to fix the crossing in front of the Eagle Hotel and now we can cross without wading in the mud.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 4, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Nathaniel Wolary was born November 10, 1837, in Wilmington, Ohio. He was married to Rachel Gilpin September 7, 1865. To this union was born five children, three girls and two boys, one son and two daughters still survive him, Aikens Wolary, who lives at Lloyd, Montana; Mrs. Grant Mathews of Eagle Point and Mrs. Harry Copenger of Coburt, Mont., beside these he is survived by his aged wife, seven grandchildren and a large circle of friends.
    He enlisted as a soldier Sept. 17, 1861, and was mustered out Oct. 7, 1864, 40th Ohio Vol. Inf., Co. B. He was wounded Sept. 18, 1863, at Rossville, Georgia, was in the hospital at Marshall's Run eleven months. He died Jan. 29, 1913 at his home in Eagle Point, Oregon, aged 75 years, two months and nineteen days.
    He also had an adopted daughter, Mrs. James Cohnsell of Seven Rivers, Canada. The remains were interred in the Central Point Cemetery, the religious services being conducted in the Baptist church by the pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, and the interment was conducted by the G.A.R. corps. There was a very large attendance at the funeral, the school being dismissed so that the children could attend in a body.
    John Allen of Derby was in town the forepart of the week on business. Mr. Allen is one of our progressive farmers and stockmen and has been greatly interested in the stock business in general, but now seems to be more particularly in the horse business as he is raising some very fine horses at present.
    John Laden, who has a homestead on Indian Creek and is anxious for all the news all the time, has added his name to the long list of subscribers to the Mail Tribune, making the sixth new subscriber this month.
    Miss Mabel Wamsley, who has been visiting friends in Butte Falls for some time, returned home Thursday.
    Mr. Elon [Alvin?] Bieberstedt and son of Brownsboro were doing business here Wednesday.
    Verna Mathews of the firm of Fisher & Mathews, blacksmiths of this place, who have been away for some time, was in his shop again this week.
    Mr. Wm. Nichols of Lake Creek, and Mr. Bergquist of Rogue River, were getting a lot of wire fencing of von der Hellen Bros. this week.
    Miss Barrow of Elk Creek and one other lady were passengers on the E.P. and Persist stage Wednesday morning on their way to the Elk Creek country.
    The last time I wrote, Saturday evening, I was just getting ready to start with Rev. Mark C. Davis for Sams Valley, and so will give an account of our trip to that famous valley. There was nothing of interest visible until we reached the Bybee bridge, except that we saw a few new houses dotting the large prairie, commonly called the desert, but when we reached the bridge we soon discovered that someone had been cutting into the timbers to test their soundness. After crossing we began to see men busily engaged working in the orchards and found that Mr. Washburn had his cider press in operation, found some digging potatoes.
    Passing on we found that there has been quite a quantity of fencing done along the route, but very little farming being done, in fact we found considerable snow on the ground, but the people seemed to be in good spirits and seemed to think that this year was going to be an exceptional good year for crops.
    Sunday morning we went to Antioch school house, where Rev. Davis preached to a good-sized audience, and in the afternoon he preached again at Table Rock to a large audience for that section. I understand that there is some talk of building a church there but the community changes so fast that it is hard to tell what will be done. Returning home Sunday night after preaching we took the car for Grants Pass via Medford to consult Dr. Findley with regard to my eyes, but they were so much better he let me off on the 2:21 train. I found that the people were considerably elated over the prospect of a railroad to the coast.
    Mr. Ash, the man who bought the Allen place at Trail, commonly known as the Trail House, came out Sunday, spent the night with us, left his team here and went to Medford and from there to Central Point, returning Tuesday morning.
    Henry Daley, the meat cutter for the Nichols meat market, went to Medford Monday on special business.
    Mrs. Roe, mother of the authoress who writes under the name of Vingie Roe, went to Medford Monday morning, returning in the afternoon.
    Mr. Sidley, one of the old pioneers of Lake Creek, is down visiting his son-in-law, T. C. Dugan. He went to Medford and Jacksonville Monday, returning the same day.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 5, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT TO IMPROVE STREETS
    Eagle Point has launched a campaign to secure a mile and a half of improved streets. High-grade, scientific macadam is to be laid, and will be paid for by a bond issue, which is to be voted on soon by the city. Such is the proposal made by Mayor von der Hellen and Councilman Brown to the county court Thursday.
    The county court has agreed to install a rock crusher in that vicinity and allow the city to use it in order to secure the rock needed.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 6, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my last letter that L. C.Dugan gave a social dance at his home last Saturday night and I have since heard that there was a nice company and that they had a very pleasant time.
    Scott Claspil of Butte Falls was a passenger on the P.&E. Monday evening on his way home.
    Mr. Cross of Butte Falls also came out from Medford Monday evening and spent the night at the Sunnyside. He says that since he left here some time ago he has traveled over the bigger portion of the state of California, taking the coast line from San Francisco to San Diego and returning through the center of the state. He spent some time in visiting among the orange groves of California and reports that the papers have not done the subject justice in their accounts of the damage done there by the frost, that it is a great deal worse than the papers represent it. A very large portion of the orchards in the flat country are entirely killed, that many of the old trees twelve to twenty years old have burst open and that there are hundreds of acres where all of the trees will have to be dug up entirely and new ones planted, but that the trees near and in the foothills were not damaged so much, that hundreds of boxes of oranges were frozen on the trees, and he predicts that there will be the hardest times there for the next few years that they have ever seen in that country.
    Prof. Suddarth, principal of our school, says that they have the four rooms all nicely arranged now since Miss Knox has taken charge of the fourth room and they have the classes divided up so that each class can be properly attended to, that they now have ninety-two names enrolled, and the prospect is looking brighter. We are living in hopes that plans can be perfected so that we will not have to send our children away from home to be educated but have them remain here and save the extra expense of going to and from Medford five days in a week. As it is now Mr. Heath's two children, Frederic and Miss Frances, and Master Bob Pelouze are attending the schools in Medford.
    Born--Sunday, Feb. 2, 1913, to Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Smith, near Eagle Point, a seven-pound boy.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. M. Pence, at their home on Elk Creek, Feb. 2, 1913, a son. These two boys could have seen their shadow on their birthday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. H. Nelson, who has been living on the place owned by one of our merchants, Mr. Heath, came out Wednesday and took the car for Medford. He had his family, consisting of his wife and four small children, ranging from five years to four weeks in age. They started from home at 5 o'clock a.m. and reached here just five minutes too late to catch the 8:45 car. The children were almost frozen, at least three of them were, when they reached the Sunnyside. They complained of the roads being in a horrible condition--another argument in favor of good roads--when a woman and little children have to take two and three quarter hours to travel six miles.
    The Eagle Point Y.L.R.C. had an interesting game of basketball in their hall Tuesday afternoon and after a little more practice will begin to show the people what they can do in that line.
    Roy Willits, our accommodating Eagle Point and Persist mail carrier, reports that George Trusty of Elk Creek has succeeded in killing another cougar. He caught it in a trap and as his gun was somewhat out of order he undertook to kill it with an ax, but the attempt was unsuccessful and the beast was all the time trying to get away; so he had to repair his gun and at the same time fight the cougar to keep it from getting away and as it was he was all loose except one toe, when he finally succeeded in shooting him. Mr. Trusty doesn't care for any more such experiences. It measures eight feet two inches.
    Dr. N. T. and C. E. McDonald of Portland, the men who bought the Johnson place on Rogue River and Elk Creek, arrived on the train Wednesday and they stopped off here for a few days to do some work in their line, oculists.
    Arthur Smith moved his household goods from the old Pool ranch, where he has been stopping since the Smith brothers sold their farm on Big Sticky, and cached them away in an old house that used to belong to an old railroad section man who went by the name of Scottie. He and Al and Thomas Turpin took dinner with us Wednesday.
    Carl Stanley, of the firm of Stanley Bros. of Lake Creek, was doing business Wednesday evening with Heath & Diamond.
    Robert Minter took a part of his sheep back to the home range Wednesday, and there is a lot of complaint on account of the sheep running on the sidewalks in our town and thus covering them with mud, for they were in a horrible plight after they had gone through.
    Miss Gernell Jackson, one of our most accomplished young ladies, who has been spending a good part of the fall and winter in Butte Falls, returned home the first part of the week.
    Roy Willits brought down the word Thursday evening that Robert Lewis' dwelling house was burned last Tuesday evening about 5 o'clock. They managed to save their organ, sewing machine, two trunks, violin, and guitar, but lost all of their clothes except what they had on, all their bedding, in fact saved nothing in that line. They live near Persist and are in a very undesirable condition, as the snow up there is still very deep.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 8, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. McQuade, Sr., who left here some months ago to try to find a climate better adapted to his wife's condition, for she has been in poor health for some time before he came here to live, returned a few days ago, but I have not seen him as yet and therefore am unable to assign a reason for his return, but learned that Mrs. McQuade was no better. His many friends will extend to them a cordial greeting.
    Dr. Hedges is making his regular visit to the Sunnyside three times a week.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. J. Frank Brown gave a card party at her home on the evening of the 5th. There were eighteen couples present and the evening was spent playing five hundred and whist. Light refreshments were served, and my informant tells me that they had a very pleasant time, and I will venture the assertion that they were bound to have a good time, as Mrs. Brown (Amy) knows just how to arrange so as to have a good time wherever she goes.
    I see that some of our merchants are beginning to receive their new spring goods and business is looking up again.
    There is to be an election held in our town next Tuesday on the subject of selling a franchise to the Eagle Point and Butte Falls Telephone Company for thirty years in consideration of one dollar and no more.
    Corden Terrel of Lake Creek and one of the McCabe boys were guests at the Sunnyside last Thursday. Mr. Terrel was buying a lot of dishes of our hardware merchant, Roy Ashpole.
    Mr. and Mrs. Quackenbush and her sister, Mrs. Gorman, were buying goods from our merchants last Wednesday.
    Miss Grace Conley was visiting friends in town during the week.
    The telephone company have a new switchboard and expect to have it installed in a short time.
    The city council have had the town hall wired and getting it ready for the electric lights when we get the "juice."
    W. W. Taylor has had the telephone line extended to his residence on the north side of the railroad track.
    A friend of mine has sent the following clipping with the request that I insert it in my Eaglets, and as Mr. Parker was for several years a resident of Medford and still has a number of friends there I think they will be interested in the notice: "Captain M. F. Parker, master and part owner of the good ship Mazama that sails the waters of Upper Klamath Lake, and Mrs. Belle Bennett, were married at Shippington last evening. The ceremony proved the most auspicious social event of the season. Both parties have a wide circle of acquaintances, who bid them success on their latest voyage."
Medford Mail Tribune, February 10, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Herman Meyers and his younger brother came out from their home in the Lake Creek country after a load of wire fencing last Monday, and from the amount of the goods they had they intend to fence in a large tract of land.
    A few days ago we had quite an exciting time in our town. One of the teams belonging to Harnish & Son, owners of the Eagle Point livery stable, was standing hitched to a double-seated covered hack and one of the boys, Robbie, was standing in front of them holding them by the bits when they became frightened and started to run, taking Robbie on the end of the tongue and neck yoke a few feet when he fell off and fortunately both horses and the hack completely missed him and he had the presence of mind to lay still on his face and draw his coat up over his head. He got off with only a scratch on the wrist, truly a remarkable escape.
    Mr. and Mrs. Erwin, who are living on a part of the old Snider place, were in town Tuesday morning.
    Mrs. Benjamin Evans, wife of the new barber, came out Monday to join her husband. They are thinking of locating permanently among us, provided he finds that there is business enough in his line to justify his remaining.
    George Lindley, who has been connected with the Jackson County Bank for several years, came out on the P.&E. Tuesday morning and went on up to the Lake Creek country on a business trip.
    In my last I mentioned that Rev. William B. Howell, Baptist pastor, was here holding services. He attended prayer meeting on Friday night and gave a very interesting talk and then commenced the regular services on Sunday at 11 a.m. He held services again at 3 p.m. and also at night, and again on Monday night, and announced services every day in the afternoon and each evening during the rest of the week and on Sunday at 11 a.m., etc. He is a very pleasant and forceful talker and seems to be very enthusiastic, and many of us are hoping that he will be the instrument in the hands of God of doing much good in this community. There seems to be considerable interest manifested and the congregations are generally large.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ina Rader was over from her father's farm last Friday visiting her sister, Mrs. Roy Ashpole.
    George W. White, foreman on the Cooley orchard, was in town Friday dong business with our new hardware merchant, Roy Ashpole, and while here renewed his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mr. Heath, of the firm of Heath & Diamond, went to his farm one mile above Brownsboro Friday, and while there rented it to Dean Terrill and he expects to turn his attention to the dairy business.
    H. M. Coss and H. J. Westphal spent Friday night at the Sunnyside. Mr. Coss was moving his effects from the Mountain View Farm for safe keeping. He seems to think that he has about as good a mountain ranch as there is in these parts.
    Wesley Manning, at one time sheriff of Jackson County from '74 to '78 but now a resident of Klamath County, came in last week to visit his aunt, Mrs. Act Thomas, and while here took dinner Sunday with your Eagle Point correspondent. His aunt accompanied him and so did Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Knighton and we all had a great time talking over incidents of thirty or forty years ago. He is the father of Mrs. James D. Fay, for some time connected with the Medford Mail and later with the Mail Tribune.
    Benj. Evans is at present stopping at the Sunnyside. He has taken charge of the barber shop here while Mr. Whitman is gone to his ranch to visit his family.
    Rayland Smith and Miss Hazel Quackenbush of Talent came out Sunday morning and procured a rig and went out to visit her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Quackenbush, he being foreman on the Corbin orchard. Mrs. Smith returned the same day, but Miss Hazel remained to visit a while.
    Mr. Holt reports the arrival of a new baby girl in the family of C. P. Briggs of Butte Falls, February 9.
    Rev. Wilbert R. Howell, Baptist convention pastor, is here holding a protracted meeting, assisted by Rev. LeMar of Central Point, and the pastor. But I will have more to say on the subject next time I write.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 17, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Roy Willits reports that they had a cave-in in the Buzzard mine, on the headwaters of Elk Creek, and that Willis Cushman and Jasper Stacy were caught in the tunnel and were kept there from Saturday the first until Monday the tenth, and that Mr. Stacy was badly hurt but that Mr. Cushman was able to walk out to Trail, but Mr. Stacy had to be hauled on a hand sled. It is not thought that Mr. Stacy's injuries are of a serious nature.
    Harry Whittier and wife came in Tuesday from Glendale where he has been working in a sawmill and the next morning took the stage for her father's place on Rogue River near the free ferry.
    O. N. Nelson of Jacksonville, the insurance man, came out last week and spent the night with us.
    The Rebekah lodge held their regular meeting last Tuesday and took in three new members. The I.O.O.F. lodge and the Rebekahs seem to be going right ahead and are doing good work.
    Rastus Wilson, now of Medford, who has been living in California for the past year, passed through our town last week on his way up the country to look at a farm, but decided that he did not want it.
    Our town election passed off very quietly last week when the people of our town voted to give to the Eagle Point-Butte Falls Telephone Company a thirty-year franchise in consideration of one dollar. The vote stood 46 to 40 in favor of the franchise.
    There was a called meeting at the town hall last week to discuss the proposition of bonding the town for several thousand dollars to fix up the streets in this town and I suppose that it will be submitted to the people before long to decide the question as to whether we will bond the town or have the property owners along the routes pay for the work themselves.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. Howard Fox of Portland, but formerly of this place, was here last week on her way to her mother's farm on Big Butte.
    Mr. Nellis, who owns the Flounce Rock Farm and has been spending several days in Medford, came out last week accompanied by Mr. J. S. Harpole and J. E. Swining and spent the night with us on their way up to his ranch.
    A. W. Bradshaw, superintendent of the Rogue River Commercial Orchard, was in town Monday getting supplies. He reports that he has lots of work to do and that everything is progressing finely.
    We had a little excitement in our town last Monday afternoon when L. K. Hawk's team came dashing down through town at breakneck speed without a driver. He had driven up to the back door of the depot and left them "just a minute" to see about some freight when they took advantage of his absence and started for home. This is the second time they have run away from the depot I understand.
    A company of surveyors came out Tuesday morning to lay out a new county road through the A. J. Daley place, running east through the old Williscroft place, thence south to intersect the county road from Medford to Brownsboro.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. F. Wilson of Medford and their son, Irvin, of Marysville, California, he being a telegraph operator in the S.P. railroad office there, came out to look up a five-acre tract of land they had traded for, and while here called on your Eagle Point correspondent.
    Charles Pruett, one of our progressive farmers living along the P.&E. railroad just below town, was doing business here Tuesday.
    In my Eaglets published Tuesday I made a mistake in reporting the accident at the Buzzard mine and gave the name of Mr. Stacy instead of Strong as being one of the men caught in the tunnel.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt of Klamath Falls and Mrs. G. H. Shaw and her four children of Fairview came in to attend the funeral of their sister and aunt, Agnes Love Howlett, last Friday; also Rev. Mark C. Davis came from Wolf Creek to conduct the funeral services.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 20, 1913, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. Heren and Wm. C. Daley were in our town last Wednesday.
    C. H. Rolfe of Weed, California, was here visiting his aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton, Wednesday. Mr. Rolfe and his [omission] came over to visit Mrs. Rolfe's father, Mr. Reese of Table Rock, who is seriously ill with cancer of the stomach and while here in this section of the county came over to visit some of his relatives.
    Robert Dawson of Trail was also the guest of Wm. Knighton Wednesday.
    We have been having quite a time in our little town Wednesday. The whole trouble arose because there happened to be a company of book agents put in an appearance to deliver the "Centennial History of Oregon" and collect from twenty to one hundred and fifty dollars from quite a number of our citizens. The soliciting agent had been around last March and some of the good people were asked to give an account of their lives and experience in Oregon, as they wanted to write up a set of three or four volumes, and the most of them complied with the request. The agent in the meantime writing it down and after [it] was read was asked to sign the name, stating that the account given was true and correct. The agent would at the same time ask them to sign up for a set of the books to be delivered in the future, no money required in advance. In the course of a short time another man would come around and ask you to have your picture put in the book at the moderate price of from fifty to one hundred and fifty dollars, according to the apparent size of the purse of the party applied to. But when the distributing agents came around several of our good men began to kick and say they did not sign up for the books at all but simply signed the statements that what they had said was true, but some of them claim that they have been confronted with notes, and some with contracts with their real genuine signature, claiming that the soliciting agent used carbon, while others claim that he used a kind of sleight of hand maneuver, slipped the contract in unobserved for them to sign. I heard a lady say this morning, Thursday, that she heard nothing on the street but books, books, books; but I think that the most of them will conclude that they are in for it, pay the bill and the next time be more careful how they sign their names for a stranger.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 22, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There is a notice posted on the town hall calling for an election to be held next Friday, February 27, to vote on the question as to whether we will bond the town for ten thousand dollars and by that means raise money by taxation to improve the streets or certain ones, or not. There is a strong pull in favor of it by a certain class but the most of the taxpayers seem to think that the move is a premature one and that we better crawl before we try to run fast enough to keep up with Medford. Under the charter the council can create an indebtedness of $8,000 and we had the best report December 31--an indebtedness of $2,400 and the debt has not diminished any since then. It will be a hotly contested election this time and I understand that there is quite a number of the lady voters who did not vote at the last election who will come out next Friday and vote.
    C. E. Howell of Portland, traveling solicitor for the American Adjusting Association, was canvassing our town last week and secured quite a large number of notes and accounts for collection. So the people who have been running accounts with our merchants better begin to dig up, as I understand that they have members of the association in every part of the country and keep a list of the names and present residence of almost every man or woman in the United States.
    Henry French, who has a fine orchard and garden tract on Rogue River near the French-Dodge bridge, was in town Friday smiling on his many friends here, and they are numbered by the score.
    James Ringer, our boss painter and paperhanger, has been at work repainting the interior of the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Nick Young, one of our popular and prosperous young bachelor farmers, was in town last week and related his experience with his watch. Last summer while he was harvesting he lost his watch and while he was plowing a few days ago he saw something in the furrow that was remarkably bright in appearance and on picking it up discovered his watch buried in five inches of soil. The plow had broken the crystal, but otherwise it was uninjured. He said that he took it to the house that night, wound it up and it started right off to run.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. R. Minter, our sheep man, was in town the latter part of the week.
    Our athletic club is progressing finely under the direction of Professor Singleton.
    O. S. Brown, an attorney of Grants Pass, called on your correspondent last week. He was here on business with our new barber, Mr. Evans.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mrs. Cross of Butte Falls was in town last week, the guest of Mrs. J. B. Jackson, and they two called on Mrs. Howlett and the girls.
    Our city dads met, informally, last week and granted the electric power company an extension of time of ninety days in which to bring the electricity into our town. They seem to be having trouble in procuring their transmitters [transformers?] from the factory.
    Archie Wilson of Cottage Grove and T. G. Bunch of Medford passed through our town the last of the week on their way up to the Lake Creek country. Rev. Bunch was going up to try to organize a church of the Seventh Day Baptists in that neighborhood.
    George W. Wamsley, who has been visiting relatives in Los Angeles and vicinity for the past few months, returned last week to his home in our town.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cingcade of Prospect passed through town last week on their way home.
    Ed Foster, who has a farm on Rogue River below Trail, was doing business with our merchants last week--this is Monday morning and so about all of my items are week's gathering.
    George Fisher, one of our blacksmiths, has concluded to take the Daily Mail Tribune so he can get "All the news all the time."
    P. H. Daily, principal of the Washington School of Medford, called on us for dinner Saturday. He had business here with the First State Bank.
    Messrs. S. H. Harnish, Wm. Brown Sr., Mr. Heath, one of our merchants, Mrs. Roe and her daughter, Mrs. J. C. Lawton and Mr. H. B. Tronson, the apple king, went to Medford Saturday and Mr. Diamond, a brother firm of Heath & Diamond, and who was formerly in the employ of the P.&E. railroad, came out on a visit to his father and brother, the same day.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt and another one of our daughters, Miss Hattie, started for Klamath Falls last Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 25, 1913, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    For lack of space I had to omit that on last Saturday Harvey Tuttle, secretary of the Y.M.C.A. of Central Point; A. W. Moore, director of the Central Point band; J. O. Issacson, president of the Central Point Bank, and Rev. F. N. Aldridge, pastor of the Methodist Church of Central Point, came out and stopped at the Sunnyside Hotel for dinner. Their object in coming was to look over the town and ascertain the advisability of having the amateur troupe of Central Point come out and render the play entitled "A Hundred Years Ago." They said that it had been rendered in Central Point and met with such universal approbation that some of the friends thought it too good to have it drop right there, but when I saw them last they had not decided whether they would come or not.
    Miss Jennie Singleton and her brother's sister-in-law, Miss Hanby, were in town last Saturday doing business. Miss Jennie Singleton is a part owner of the farm known as the Singleton farm on the P.&E.R.R. just west of Eagle Point.
    Charles White, a brother of George White, foreman of the Cooley orchard, just above town, came in from Illinois last Saturday and when his brother George came in from work at night he was surprised to find his brother there.
    Sam Harnish, our livery stable man, reports that the roads must be getting better between here and Trail, for one of his teams, four horses, took two tons of hay from here to that place last week.
    The protracted meeting that has been going on for the past two weeks in the Baptist church, under the management of Rev. L. L. Simmons and Rev. Wilbert R. Howell, Baptist convention pastor, came to a close Monday night. The meeting has been fairly attended and as a rule the preaching was very good and in most cases very pointed. Mr. H. is a very pleasant speaker and evidently is in dead earnest. There has been no special move made and looking at it from simply a business standpoint was what would be called almost a failure but looking at it from a Christian standpoint we might say we might say that much good has been done; there were three who united with the church on profession and two of them were baptized Sunday afternoon. The closing services were on Monday night, when Rev. Howell, by previous arrangement, read an address delivered by Rev. William Edward Biederwolf, a Presbyterian minister, in one of the Chautauqua meetings in Illinois, on the subject "The Christian and Amusements." It was divided into three general divisions, viz., Is card playing harmful? Is theatre going demoralizing? And is dancing sinful? It took him just one hour and ten minutes to read the lecture and the audience, which filled a large portion of the house, seemed to be greatly interested in it, for there was unusual quiet in the house. At the close he called for all of the Christians who would pledge themselves with him to from this time on abstain from these kinds of amusements to take the front seats and almost every professor of religion came forward and took the pledge.
    Mr. Howell leaves some warm friends here who will be glad to have him return.
    Bird Johnson of Trail came in on the P.&E. Tuesday evening.
    Rev. B. R. Howell, the minister who has been assisting Rev. Simmons during the past two weeks, left Tuesday afternoon for Talent where he expects to labor for a few days.
    H. M. Coss, the hustling real estate man, was in town Tuesday on business and took the train that afternoon for Medford.
    C. E. Bailey, who is living on the old Bieberstedt place now owned by ex-commissioner J. Frank Brown and S. B. Holmes, was trading Tuesday with George Brown & Sons.
    Ex-commissioner James Owens was also shaking hands with his many friends in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    Miss Leta Peelor of Butte Falls came out on the cars from her home Tuesday, spent the night at the Sunnyside and Wednesday morning took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for Elk Creek where she is engaged in teaching school. She commenced her school last fall but there came so much snow that it was thought best to close the school for a while, but she expects to resume work next Monday, March 3.
    There are some of our industrious citizens who have already commenced to make garden. A lady friend of mine told me Tuesday that she had seed in the ground for two weeks and that they had not come up yet, and I suggested that perhaps the ground was frozen too hard, and she had never thought of that.
    Timmie Dugan came in Tuesday with a load of wheat to be shipped to Wm. Perry at Edsalls station. He is selling it at $1 per bushel f.o.b.
    Henry Thornton, who has been making his home at Persist for some time, came out Tuesday on the Eagle Point-Persist stage, spent the night here and Wednesday morning took the train for Ashland, where his parents live, to visit relatives.
    Joe Riley and wife, who live on Antelope, were in town Tuesday having work done at the blacksmith shop and trading with our merchants.
    The excitement over the bond question is growing intense, both parties claiming the best of the race, and some of the promoters are getting enthusiastic. But by the time this is in print and distributed among the readers the matter will be settled one way or the other and peace will reign again.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT VOTES $10,000 BOND ISSUE
    Eagle Point residents on Thursday by a vote of 79 to 64 authorized an issue of bonds in an amount of $10,000 with which to improve the streets of the town. One-fifth of the issue, or $2,000, is to be used to redeem outstanding warrants.
    The fight on the bond issue waxed very warm, a number of leaders, including Mayor von der Hellen coming to blows over the issue.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Elmer Hafe, who for some time was foreman for the fence gang for the P.&E. railroad company, has been spending a few days visiting the family of Mrs. Abbott on her ranch north of Big Butte Creek, came in last week on the P.&E. Thomas Abbott came in at the same time and now is working on the commercial orchard on Yankee Creek.
    Austin Green came out from his mountain home last week and has been busy getting the material on the ground to make the sidewalk along his mother's place--the Fryer place.
    Vernia Mathews of the firm of Mathews & Fisher, blacksmiths in our town, resumed work in the shop last week.
    Miss Belle Watts of Forest Grove, a niece of Wm. G. Knighton, and has been spending the winter in Los Angeles, was called home on business. She stopped off, however, to spend a few days with her uncle and aunt here.
    E. E. Stratz of Yakima, Wash., called for dinner at the Sunnyside one day last week. He was here two years ago and is here now looking for alfalfa land.
    Miss Cusic and one of the Warner girls was on the Eagle Point-Persist stage Saturday morning on their way to their homes on Trail Creek.
    D. R. Patrick has lost a mink skin glove for the left hand in our town on Saturday, February 15, and asks the finder to leave it with George von der Hellen at von der Hellen's store in Eagle Point and receive reward.--(Adv.)
    Our election passed off quietly last Friday and the result was that there were 74 votes cast for the bonds and 59 against them, making a total of 133 votes altogether. It seemed as though everybody that was old enough to vote turned out and voted, but there must be more than 133 adults in an incorporated city like this. If there is not don't the readers sympathize with us old "mossbacks" like T. E. Nichols, James Jordan, A. G. Daley, Wm. Knighton, Heath & Diamond and Cingcade and myself who have to help pay the tax to pay the interest, $600 annually, and to raise one thousand dollars a year for ten years for a sinking fund? But the promoters, two or three of them, worked hard and steady to gain their point, and we cheerfully give our mayor, Hon. Wm. von der Hellen, credit for being the shrewdest political worker in the city and being the most indominable worker, for there were but very few but what he visited and used all of his persuasive powers on to convert them to his views, using different tactics, as the case required. Yes, we are beaten in the case, but not discouraged, for we believe that, having the experience of Ashland, Medford, Jacksonville, Gold Hill, etc. before us as examples of recklessly going in debt that the people of Eagle Point will soon call a halt, for this means a prospective indebtedness of at least $16,000 and another bond issue in the near future for a water system of at least $10,000 more, with only about $175,000 worth of taxable property in the limits of the incorporation.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 5, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I had several things noted in my catch book that was forced to hold over until today, Monday, and among them was the following: The athletic club, composed of a number of our progressive boys, girls, young men and ladies, had a special meeting last Thursday night in their hall and invited in a number of their friends and neighbors to witness the performance. There were eight young ladies dressed in bloomers fastening just below the knee, with white socks. They were performing a drill when I went in and kept it up for some time after. Then Mr. Singleton, the instructor, called on the boys and men and they were, some of them at least, were dressed in a kind of uniform, but the most of them were dressed in their ordinary clothes. Some of them, who took an interest in trying to learn, for it is conducted on scientific principles, did remarkably well, but they found out that they had something to do when they kept up with Prof. Singleton, especially in the first part of the performance, the foot race around the hall, and some of the boys got very short of breath before the teacher let up and gave them a breathing spell. They then did some drill work, tumbling, jumping, rolling, etc. Then the professor called on the eight girls to perform on the bar, tumbling, and the girls could make the boys ashamed, for they took pride in trying to excel. About 10 o'clock lunch, that had been prepared by the ladies, was served and all hands went home feeling that they had been benefited both socially and physically.
    The next item of interest to many of the readers of the Mail Tribune is the annual meeting of the I.O.O.F. Lodge No. 207, on the evening of the 27th of February, it being their first anniversary, which they celebrated by giving an oyster supper in their lodge room. About 50 Oddfellows and Rebekahs were present and they report having had a very enjoyable time, the ladies of course contributing to make everything as pleasant as possible.
    Mrs. Thomas Cingcade came in from the farm on horseback last Friday to attend to business while her husband stayed at home to put in the corn.
    George W. Daley of Klamath Falls, formerly of this place, and miller in the old Snowy Butte Mills and more recently of Davis Mill of Medford, but a traveling salesman for the Klamath Falls Mill Co. of that city, was in town last Friday and succeeded in selling a carload of flour to our merchants.
    Bert Higinbotham of Flounce Rock came in Friday after a load of grain to sow.
    Miss Alma Gould of Medford, who is teaching school in Lake Creek district, 11 miles, last Friday evening spent the night at the Sunnyside and took the car for Medford Saturday morning to visit her parents, returning Sunday evening to her school.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 6, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Givan, who has a farm near the mouth of Little Butte, was in town a few days ago.
    T. L. Farlow, who lives on Little Butte just above Lake Creek, and wife were guests at the Sunnyside Saturday and settled with me for a few years subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Last Saturday afternoon I started from home in company with Rev. M. C. Davis, Sunday school missionary for Oregon for the Congregational Church and the State Superintendent Rev. Howard N. Smith, for Table Rock and Sams Valley, leaving Mr. S. at Table Rock. Davis and I went on to Sams Valley, where we spent the night with Mr. Shelly and the next morning we two went on to Antioch school house, where Mr. Davis preached to a small congregation and in the afternoon we went to the Chaparral school house and I preached to a good-sized audience, and from there to Table Rock and Rev. H. N. Smith preached a fine sermon to a very attentive audience.
    In the course of our rounds I learned that Miss L.W. Silver of Ashland was engaged as teacher at Chaparral and giving general satisfaction, that Miss Flora Stacey was to commence school in the Antioch school district the next day, that Rev. M. C. Davis had reorganized the Sunday school at Chaparral with Miss L. W. Silver as superintendent and Miss Stacey as secretary, and Miss Stella Ausberry as treasurer, and that Mr. Case has been making some substantial improvements in the way of fencing. I also noticed that there has been quite a lot of fencing done all along the route that we traveled, that there seems to be considerable work going on and that the farmers are getting their spring work well along. On my return home I learned that Hon. John Watkins, J.P., had joined in marriage Mr. Albert B. Clarno and Mrs. Elzenia Bergman on Saturday, March 1, at the home of the bride and that night had quite a gathering to celebrate the event.
    On Tuesday morning I took the car for Jacksonville via Medford and on the car I noticed Mr. and Mrs. Heath and her sister, Mrs. Williams, also the son and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Heath, Fred and Miss Francis, John Nichols, Mrs. Diamond, Wilbur Ashpole of Medford, Mr. Vogeli and Dr. Kirchgessner, who has a home above here on Rogue River, some going to Medford and some to Jacksonville.
    The members of the Catholic church have succeeded in placing the church bell in position and last Sunday morning it called the people to worship, where the services were conducted according to the rules and usages of that church.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 10, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our bond election is over for the present and our city council met Tuesday evening and passed an ordinance calling for bids for the same and also semi-officially agreed to have a committee appointed composed of three members of the council and three of the ordinary citizens to plan for the work and take supervision of it. But now comes the trouble that perhaps the promoters of the scheme did not anticipate, and that is the question as to the legality of the election and also the election of the three members of the council, for some of our knowing ones seem to think that there is a flaw in the election, not only for bonds, but also for the councilmen who were elected last December, for the charter says that none but legal voters shall vote, and that we shall be governed by the election laws of Oregon, and they say that a legal voter must be a registered voter, and all of the elections held thus far since we first attempted to incorporate the town, so far as I can see, have been held without any reference to the voters being registered, and at the last two elections, where the women voted, not one of them so far as known has ever registered as a legal voter, and there is strong talk that the bond buyers will be very careful before they invest ten thousand dollars in bonds in a town the size of this upon an uncertainty. The call for bids is until the 27th day of March, when the bids will be opened.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey, wife of our postmaster, went to Gold Hill last Wednesday to attend the funeral of her uncle, Mr. Nye of Rock Point, a brother of the late Chauncey Nye, of Flounce Rock, her father.
    John Newstrom of Lake Creek was in town Wednesday after a lot of household goods.
    R. W. Hitchcock, one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, was transacting business in our town Wednesday.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, pastor of the Baptist church here and at Brownsboro, is holding a protracted meeting in Brownsboro this week.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our road supervisor, has commenced work on the roads above town.
    Geo. Brown and sons and Heath & Diamond are receiving their sporting goods.
    A man by the name of Stewart, who has a homestead on Canaan [Kanutchan?] Gulch came in about the middle of the week after a lot of fruit trees.
    Mr. Stoddard and Mr. Martin, electric light men of Medford, were here on business connected with the electric system last Thursday.
    E. I. Ingle and A. J. Schumsler, two traveling salesmen, were taking orders from the firm of George Brown & Sons about the middle of the week.
    We had a musical entertainment here Thursday evening, given by Carl Grissen as violinist and Mrs. M. Captolia Evlyn. There was a very small attendance but some of those who attended speak very well of the performance.
    C. C. Kelso, son and wife of Big Butte passed through here with a couple of loads of hay and grain on their way to their home a few days ago.
    Mrs. Clay of Medford, accompanied by Mrs. Taylor, who keeps a rooming and boarding house in Medford, were on the cars Thursday on their way to Derby. Mrs. Taylor seemed to think that she might remain up there several days.
    Frank Neil was also on the car on his way home.
    Our accommodating stage driver and mail contractor, Roy Willits, reports the arrival of a boy baby in the home of P. E. Sandoz March 5.
    Frank Miller, formerly of Lake Creek but now a resident of California, was smiling on his friends in our town Thursday and Friday. He is, I understand, a relative of Mrs. E. Nichols.
    L. K. Hawk, one of our progressive farmers, was doing business with the express company Thursday. He and his wife are raising thoroughbred poultry and I heard Mrs. Hawk remark that she was crowded with orders.
    F. J. Ayres brought in a load of produce of different kinds Thursday for our market. The farmers complain that hen fruit is distressingly low, 13 cents per dozen.
    Thomas Carlton and Wm. Stanley were among us Thursday, and so was Wilbur Jacks, also Mr. Mathews of Butte Falls. He was on his way to Trail to visit his daughter.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 11, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I omitted to state in my Eaglets last Saturday that Wm. Nussbaum and his niece, Miss Maria Newstrom of Lake Creek, were called for dinner last Friday.
    In the contest, spelling and arithmetic, in the second room, Mrs. Suddarth's department, the entire class in the fourth grade, stood, in spelling, 100 percent, and in arithmetic they stood 99 11/16 percent, and if there are any classes in the fourth grade that excels we would like to know who they are and what school. I did not learn the standing of the other grades or the other rooms.
    Miss Edna Bowers, daughter of Benton Bowers of Ashland, who is at present stopping with her aunt, Mrs. Frederick, was visiting friends in Eagle Point Friday.
    W. H. Crandall and his two sisters, Mrs. Harris and Miss Crandall, were in town Saturday visiting friends and trading also. Mrs. L. K. Hawk was in company with Mrs. Harris.
    Mrs. S. B. Holmes, Miss Frances Greb and her sister, Miss Elsie, were doing business in Medford last week.
    Dave Pence and his brother Cal, of Elk Creek, were in town Saturday on business. Dave is the road supervisor in the Elk Creek road district and seems to be quite popular.
    Dr. Needing of Brownsboro came in from Medford Saturday afternoon. David Cingcade also made a trip to Medford Saturday and Mr. Ryans of Derby came in the same day.
    Last week Mrs. Howlett had a general house cleaning and is having the water tower and the Sunnyside Hotel painted. James Ringer and Thomas Riley are doing the work.
    Last Sunday just about the time for dinner Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements and their two little children they are raising came in for dinner and about the time that they got through R. L. Burdoc and wife, R. L. Burdoc, Jr., and lady friend, Hope Burdoc, E. D. Briggs, wife and daughter, Miss Nellie, Billie Briggs and lady friend came in for dinner, all of Ashland, and by the time they were fairly through with dinner along came Hon. Judge Wm. Colvig, Mrs. Helen Gale, W. L. Ellis, Mrs. W. L. Ellis, all of Medford, and Mrs. L. J. Simpson of Coos Bay, and called for dinner, but before the last carload arrived your correspondent had started to fill his appointment to preach in Table Rock, so did not have the satisfaction of meeting them but they got their dinner and had a good time
Medford Mail Tribune, March 12, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On my return home from Table Rock Monday morning I learned that Mrs. Ada Wallace Unruh, state president Oregon W.C.T.U., delivered her new address, "The Building of a City," to a large audience in the Baptist church of this place Sunday night and although I was not able to be present on account of having an appointment to preach at Table Rock. I had friends there who reported at least a part of her address. Among the many good things she mentioned was giving an outline of the remarkable work done by our representatives at Salem during the fifty days sojourn in the capitol, trying to put Governor West "in the hole" and how signally they failed in their undertaking and how they tried to work in the interest of the saloon men but in spite of their efforts failed, and among the many good things she said that there are now twenty thousand women in the state of Oregon who have the right to vote that belong to the W.C.T.U., and that they are watching the maneuvers of the politicians and that while she does not try to hold that fact as a club over their heads, still that it might act as a rod does on an unruly child. She spoke for an hour and ten minutes and I heard one man say that he could have sat for two hours and listened to her. She has great faith in the future of Oregon and seems to think that we as a state will soon be rid of the curses of the saloon and the white slave traffic.
    Mr. L. Barkles, a photographer of Medford, formerly of San Francisco, came out Monday morning and engaged a room at the Sunnyside and that afternoon went and took a photo of our school.
    Mrs. McAllister, whose home is on the north fork of the Little Butte, but has been up in Seattle, Wash., for some time on account of her health, returned home Monday. She is said to be in a very critical condition.
    Monday night the Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company ran a special car for the benefit of those who desired to attend the meeting of the lodge of the I.O.O.F. of Medford and the following persons took advantage of the opportunity to go: W. L. Childreth, Mr. Bryant, George Fisher, James Ringer, Roy Smith, R. R. Minter, Geo. W. Wamsley, Mr. Painter, Thomas Riley Jr., Charles Bacon, Jas. Gillespy, Clay Cole, Mr. McClenon, Mr. Hoef, Guy Pruett, Ed Cingcade, Art Nichols and wife, Mr. Diamond, Nick Young and Marshall Minter. Those whom I asked to report talked of having had one of the finest times of their lives. The second degree was conferred on some of the members of this lodge.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Carl von der Hellen has started his wood saw again and is now working on the Orton place. He has just finished up a job on the Hamilton place.
    Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, who live on a part of the old Schnider place, were in town Monday. Among other things they purchased was a small lot of lumber at the Eagle Point lumber yard.
    Henry French, one of our progressive farmers and orchardists, was doing business with Von der Hellen Bros. Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Botty were among us the first of the week. He is one of our wide-awake orchardists.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Radcliffe were trading with Heath & Diamond Monday.
    I learned Tuesday that John Ashpole and wife, formerly of this place but now of Medford, were out Sunday visiting their son and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole.
    Miss Mae Trusty, one of our accomplished young ladies, made Medford a visit last Monday, returning Tuesday morning. Also Miss Mabel Pruett was a visitor among us Tuesday, also Miss Mattie Minter and Miss Rosa Ayres.
    A family by the name of Delano have moved into the house belonging to Grandpa Harnish, father of S. H. Harnish, our livery stable man. Mr. Delano is acting as brakeman on the P.&E. railroad.
    John H. Trusty of Elk Creek, father-in-law of our leading blacksmith, Henry Childreth, arrived from Texas where he has been visiting his mother for the past four months, Wednesday morning. He likes Texas fairly well but Oregon, and especially Jackson County, better.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 14, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Elizabeth Johnson of California, an aunt of Mrs. Neil Gajo of Debengers Gap, came in Wednesday morning on the cars and took the Eagle Point and Persist stage for her son-in-law's, two miles above Trail, on Trail Creek. Mr. Baldwin of Butte Falls also came in and took the same stage for the upper country.
    W. L. Nesbert of Ohio and H. M. Coss of Medford were callers last Wednesday. Mr. Nesbert was out looking for a place to locate.
    Mr. and Mrs. Raphael Gardner, who live on Little Butte Creek above Lake Creek, were guests at the Sunnyside for dinner Wednesday. He brought out a part of a load of hides for sale.
    Mrs. Quackenbush, foreman of the Corbin orchard, was in town on Wednesday on business and while here settled with your Eagle Point correspondent for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, and the same day W. E. Hammel was in and gave me a check for a year's subscription, and the next morning Mrs. John Watkins paid for six months' subscription for the same paper. The people out in this section seem to think that they cannot do without it.
    A. J. Daley went to Jacksonville Thursday to interview the tax collector.
    Mrs. A. C. Howlett took the train for Edsalls Crossing Thursday morning to visit Mrs. William Perry for a few days, while our daughter Tavia Shaw is here to look after the affairs of the Sunnyside. She is assisted by Miss Rosa Ayres.
    M. E. Root and Mr. Fells, working in the interest of the Rogue River Canal Company, stopped with us on Wednesday night. They are canvassing this section soliciting subscriptions for water to be brought in in a big high line ditch the company proposes to construct. They say that they are meeting with considerable success.
    Just after I had written my last batch of Eaglets, as I was strolling around town looking for something to write for the Mail Tribune I saw two men, A. Schendel of Minneapolis, Minn., and one of our townsmen, Geo. Phillips, working on the bank of the creek near the wagon bridge, and my curiosity led me to go down and investigate and upon reaching the place found that they were putting in an automatic pump to demonstrate the fact that water can be raised to a certain height by its own power, but I will likely have more to say on the subject when I return home and see it in operation, for at this writing I am in Grants Pass, the patient of Dr. M. C. Findley.
    Mrs. Gorman, a sister of J. I. Quackenbush, was in town Thursday awaiting the arrival of her sister and her husband who had gone to Medford that day.
    Carl von der Hellen has moved his wood-sawing machine over onto Rogue River.
    Wm. G. Knighton and A. J. Daley went to Jacksonville Thursday to pay their taxes, and Mr. Daley thought that his taxes were pretty steep, for he has only a little over a half section of land beside his town property and he seems to think that $190 is a pretty heavy tax on that much land out in the hills.
    Miss Jennie Johnson and Alva Conover came out from Medford Thursday, engaged a rig and went on up to her home on the mouth of Indian Creek that night.
    David Smith and Sam Isaacs were in town Thursday. Mr. Smith is now nearly 83 years old and is as spry as many of our citizens that spent the greater part of their life in the old blizzard-ridden states are at sixty, demonstrating the fact that Southern Oregon is one of the most healthy and desirable places to live on the continent.
    Mrs. A. T. Poole of Trail, wife of one of the forest rangers, and daughter, came out Thursday evening on the Eagle Point-Persist stage, took the train the same day and went to Riddle to visit her mother.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 17, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I was in Grants Pass but now I am in the little village of Three Pines. When I left home last Friday morning I went directly to Jacksonville, our county seat, to pay my taxes and after that was done returned to Medford and took dinner with one of my old neighbors, John Ashpole, and in the run of our conversation Mrs. Ashpole remarked that the first thing she did when she received the Mail Tribune was to look for the Eaglets, and that when she opened the paper and found none she was always provoked, and she couldn't see why I could not write six times a week instead of only four times a week. After spending a few hours visiting with the family I took the train for Grants Pass, arriving there at 6:20 p.m. and the next morning I went to Dr. M. C. Findley's office to consult with him regarding my eyes, remaining there most of the day. Although I went there a little after 8 o'clock in the morning I found that there were several ahead of me and during the day I met with quite a number, some acquaintances and some strangers from different parts of the country, among whom were J. A. Eliason of Ashland, George Dixson of Yreka, Cal., Mrs. E. Badge of Roseburg, Ore., Mrs. C. R. Cox of Three Pines. She had had one of her eyes hurt and had a local M.D. treat it and he finally came to the conclusion that he would have to remove the eye when she came to Dr. Findley and she is now rejoicing over having her eye saved and being able to see out of it again. I also met E. E. Crawley of Sams Valley, L. B. Deen of Riddle, H. Openshaw of Roseburg, Ore., Miss Lillie McCall of Ashland, Miss Dora Parks, a teacher of Rogue River (Woodville), Matt Tapols of Galice Creek, Miss Susie Abel of Merlin, besides a number of others whose names I did not learn. The most of these persons were there to have the doctor treat them for their eyes.
    Taking the 8:41 a.m. car for Three Rivers Sunday morning I met Rev. Lamar, the Baptist minister, just as he was getting off of the car at Merlin, where he had an appointment to preach. I went on to Three Rivers where I was met by Rev. Mark C. Davis. He has a church organized here of twenty-two members. After Sunday school I preached to a good-sized audience, and one thing that I noticed was that at the close of the Sunday school all of the children remained to hear the preaching. After the sermon Rev. Davis administered the sacrament of the Lord's Supper. We had a very impressive time and at night Mr. D. preached to another good-sized congregation. The meeting will continue tonight, and the next time I write I will have something to say about who and what I saw in Three Pines.
Three Pines, Ore., March 17.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 18, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I was in Three Pines and then promised the readers of the Mail Tribune to tell something of who and what I saw in that place. But before I proceed to tell who and what I saw there I will try to give the reader some idea of the place and its surroundings. Three Pines is a small village situated on the Southern Pacific railroad about 15 miles north of Grants Pass and is surrounded with a farming country or rather a horticultural country and the soil is said to be peculiarly adapted to the culture of fruits, especially the peach, plum, pear and also to the culture of grapes. They have a large planing mill there and that is attached to a saw mill situated on the stream known as Jumpoff Joe by a flume through which the lumber is brought to the planing mill, and when the full force is on the two give employment to quite a number of men. There seemed to be considerable excitement around there over the report that petroleum had been discovered, in small quantities, in some of the wells, and I learned that an eastern company was trying to get a bond on a thousand or more acres with the understanding that they would put in modern machinery and test the ground thoroughly.
    The soil is said to be very deep, of a clay formation, mixed with enough sand to make it easy to work, and so that it will hold the moisture. While there I met a few of the old Jackson County people, among whom were William Rolfe and family. Mr. Rolfe was foreman for several years on the Burrell orchard and now has a nice farm and young orchard near the town of Three Pines.
    I also met the family of Mr. Dean, formerly a blacksmith in Medford. He himself was at that time working in one of the big mines that are so noted in Southern Oregon, at his trade, combining blacksmithing and the machinist business together. I also met Thomas Rolfe, formerly of Medford and Eagle Point. He has a small tract of land planted to berries and trees but is turning his attention to raising thoroughbred horses. He has some that he thinks are world-beaters in trotting. I also met quite a number of others whose names I failed to remember, but this much I can say for the people of Three Pines and vicinity, that they are as nice and as hospitable as any I have found in the country. Taking leave of the friends there on Tuesday morning Brother Davis and I walked up to Hugo, a distance of a mile and a half, and there took the train for home, Mr. Davis stopping off at Grants Pass. When I reached Medford I made a business call on Mrs. Zora Dahack and while there she gave me her subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. I also called on one of our townsmen, Henry Daley, who has been taken from here to Medford for medical treatment. I also met his uncle, George W. Daley, as the car came in from Eagle Point and was on his way to sit up with him that night. On my arrival home I found W. A. (Bert) Higinbotham at the Sunnyside and he paid me for two years' subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. But I find that I am getting this letter too long, so will have to wait until tomorrow to tell something more.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I had just spoken of my return from Josephine County and spoke of my meeting Bert Higinbotham here, and while he was here I learned that the stock up in his section of the country was in a very good condition owing to the fact that they had plenty of hay and good attention. The stock raisers have learned that cattle are worth so much that it pays to feed them.
    Stockmen say that the past winter has been one of the most severe on stock we have had for several years. As a rule they begin to turn their stock out on the range by the first of March, but some of them are still feeding up to this, the 20th of March.
    I also found on my arrival Mr. H. Rasmussen of Cincinnati, Ohio, here. He was here soliciting for a firm manufacturing aluminum ware. I also learned that H. B. Tronson, the apple king, Nick Young and Art Nichols of this place had visited Medford that day, Tuesday, that Hon. C. B. Watson, one of the prominent attorneys of Ashland, arrived in Eagle Point on the same car as myself, although we did not recognize each other until we met at the post office that night. The arrangements for him to deliver a lecture to the school the next morning were made, which he did, and it was highly appreciated by those who had the satisfaction of hearing him. I did not learn what business he was on or whether he had a business call or not. He was the guest of F. M. Stewart the night he stayed in Eagle Point.
    On Wednesday afternoon Prof. P. Wells, our county school superintendent, came out and visited our school and spent the night with your Eagle Point correspondent.
    Hon. John Watkins, our justice of the peace, was summoned to appear in Jacksonville with his court docket to be used in a suit pending between Fred Pelouze, but the case was settled out of court and all hands are satisfied.
    Last Wednesday our sheriff, Mr. Singler, and Don Cameron called for dinner and after dinner they started out to capture Walter Wood, who was indicted for using too freely a gun on one James Watkins, and as he, the sheriff, was riding through town he was hailed by the aforesaid Walter Wood and informed that he was the man he was looking for. He knew Mr. Singler, but Mr. Singler did not know him. They both went on to Jacksonville together the same afternoon.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 22, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In my last I omitted to state that Hosmer R. Thurmel, John H. Torney, J. R. Anderson and Rev. W. L. Ellis, all of Medford, were at the Sunnyside last Sunday for dinner, and Mrs. Howlett tells me that there was quite a number who did not register.
    Bert Peachey of the Forest Service was the guest of G. W. Daley the middle of the week.
    Wm. Newstrom of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller Thursday.
    Mrs. A. N. Thomas was visiting Mrs. Howlett about the middle of the week and Mrs. Howlett and our daughter, Mrs. G. H. Shaw, was visiting Mrs. Wm. Brown.
    James Ringer and Thomas Riley, Jr., have been painting the Sunnyside Hotel and have painted two new signs on the water tower that reflect credit of Thomas as a sign painter.
    J. L. Hovey, superintendent of the McKnight (the old Dr. Page) orchard, was in our town Friday on business.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our prosperous young orchardists, was doing business in Eagle Point Friday.
    G. W. Ager, school superintendent of this part of the county, except our town school, was a guest at the Sunnyside Thursday night. He seemed to be quite popular with the teachers in the surrounding country.
    I. C. Moore and his stepdaughter, Miss Anna Drake, came in from their home in Ashland Friday, spent the night with us and Saturday morning went on their way up to his farm on Elk Creek.
    T. L. Parton was in town Friday and while here gave me his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune. Some months ago he settled up for the Mail Tribune and ordered it discontinued, but he said that his wife was all out of sorts because she did not get the Eaglets, so he thought he had better send for it again.
    Allison Allen of Spokane, a brother of John Allen of Derby, came in last Thursday and spent the night with F. M. Stewart and while here visited the family of J. W. Grover and others and Saturday went on up to Derby to visit his brother and mother.
    Jeff Pierce, formerly of Elk Creek, who has been back to Pennsylvania to visit his mother, returned Friday and went on up to his old home.
    Friday night as I received my mail from the post office I opened a letter from Rev. Mark C. Davis, Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church, stating that his son Arthur had been blown up with giant powder in a mine that he had just contracted for. The man with whom he was working was getting supper when he heard the blast and as Arthur did not come in at 6 o'clock he went to the mine and found him unconscious and covered with rocks and dirt. Rushing to the nearest phone he raised the alarm, but when help arrived his father soon discovered he was a hopeless case. He was taken out, carried on a litter to a wagon road and taken home. A doctor was on hand, but he died in a few minutes after his arrival home. He was a promising young man of strict religious character. His father, who is well known in Southern Oregon, dearly beloved by hundreds of church workers, has the sympathy of the entire community. On receipt of his letter I had it read that night in the prayer meeting and on motion of the pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, a resolution expressing the sympathy of the body was unanimously adopted. He leaves a father, mother, two brothers and two sisters, but they sorrow not as those who have no hope.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. G. M. Jones of Medford, who have been visiting friends at Butte Falls, came out Saturday on the Pacific & Eastern train.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. Heren and family went to Medford Saturday afternoon so as to attend the Easter services at the Catholic church Sunday.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy went to Ashland Saturday afternoon to spend Easter with her husband's parents, Professor and Mrs. Van Scoy, of that city.
    Mrs. Loar of Medford, who has been visiting her son-in-law, Ed Walker, and family near Butte Falls, returned Saturday evening to her home.
    Mrs. Henry O. Childreth and part of her family went to Medford Saturday to visit relatives.
    Roy Ashpole and wife went to Medford Saturday to visit his parents and brother, John Ashpole and wife, and Wilbur Ashpole.
    H. C. Mitchell, who has charge of the fish hatchery at the mouth of Elk Creek, came out Saturday on the stage with Roy Willits.
    Carl von der Hellen and J. B. Spencer, the latter of Medford owning an interest in the Antelope Orchard, were late callers for supper at the Sunnyside Hotel Saturday evening.
    West L. Childreth, the blacksmith, went to Medford Sunday to help to care for our townsman, Henry Daley, who is sick at his Uncle John Daley's in Medford.
    The E.P.A. Club will give a public exhibition next Saturday evening in their hall, the old Holmes warehouse, to raise money to fit up the hall and get the necessary equipment. Let everybody turn out and help in the good cause.
    Easter Sunday passed very quietly here. Rev. L. L. Simmons preached a sermon on the resurrection of Christ in the forenoon, and at night the young people had a nice program consisting of select singing, reading, a scripture lesson and prayer by the pastor, selected pieces by several of the Sunday school children and a talk by the pastor. At the close there was a collection taken for the purpose of assisting to pay the expense of having little Charley Wright's feet operated on. Some months ago a purse was raised of nearly $200 to assist in paying the expense of treatment of his feet, and this call was made for more funds. How much was raised I was not able to learn but will try to ascertain before writing again.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 26, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Benton Bowers of Ashland, who owns a farm a few miles above here, came out Monday and brought a lot of fruit trees to replant where the grasshoppers had damaged the young trees last season.
    Herman Meyers of Lake Creek, who had been on the jury in Jacksonville the past week, came out Monday and was met here by his son to take him home.
    Born on Monday, March 24 to Mr. and Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, a daughter.
    Mrs. Lena Kirkpatrick of Siskiyou County, California, a niece of Mrs. Dr. William Knighton, of this place, is visiting her uncle and aunt. She has been visiting an aunt near Forest Grove and on her return another aunt, Mrs. H. A. Mayfield, of Forest Grove, a sister of Mrs. Knighton, came with her and they are both visiting the Knighton family.
    James McClenahan of Elk Creek spent Sunday night with the family of Henry Childreth, and Monday morning took the stage for his home. He has a sawmill on Elk Creek and is getting ready for the summer run.
    Mrs. Fred Eastman was shopping in Eagle Point Monday.
    William Heckathorn, youngest son of the late Jerry Heckathorn Sr., who has been living on Elk Creek the most of his life, passed through our town Monday on his way to Elkton, Douglas County, where his mother is living, and while here gave me $5 to pay for a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune. He said that he was going up there to care for his mother as long as she lives and that he wanted to hear from his old home through the Eaglets.
    G. W. Austin came out and went on up to Butte Falls. He said he did not think he would go as far as his homestead. He is one of the earliest settlers in what was called the surveyed country, lived out his time, made a nice home, proved up, got his patent and is now in business in Medford.
    Vice President Gerig of the Pacific & Eastern Railroad came out Tuesday morning and went on up the road.
    W. A. Kenney, a crockery salesman, visited Roy Ashpole's hardware store last Tuesday on business.
    L. B. Carter of Derby was a visitor in our town Tuesday, on his way home.
    C. C. Coleman, a traveling salesman for Schilling's extracts, was doing business with Heath & Diamond Tuesday.
    Tuesday afternoon the following persons passed through our town on the way to Medford: Mrs. M. Mee, Grace Donaldson, Miss Lizzie Hoefft, O. Ebe, Mildred Boyd, Miss Ethel Vanderson, the latter named young lady being a niece of James Gillespy and stopping on the way to pay them a visit, Mr. William and Till Hoefft. The party had been in the Lake Creek district assisting Rev. Burch hold a series of meetings.
    Tuesday afternoon I took occasion to visit the local school, at least three of the rooms. In the first room visited, the primary department, conducted by Mrs. George von der Hellen, only about 20 little folk were present, owing to quite a number, about half of those enrolled, being absent on account of whooping cough. But the 20 in the room were kept busy, and they every one went at their work like "cats a-fighting." It kept my old eyes and ears busy to keep track of them. While some were reading the teacher had others writing on the blackboard. Then she called on volunteers to tell some of the incidents they had read. Then came recitations, short pieces memorized, then all hands joined in physical exercise, and so on until the bell rang for recess. The teacher exacted a promise that I would return to her room and give the children a talk, which I did, and the way their eyes sparkled they seemed to appreciate it. It has been said that poets and inventors are born and not made, and I came to the conclusion that primary teachers are born and not made, for to fill the position of primary teacher properly a person requires a special gift in addition to special training, and surely our primary teacher has had both. Leaving that department, the seventh and eighth grades were visited, Miss Knox, recently of Seattle, having charge. Only about a dozen pupils were in this room, but all seemed to be interested in their work. As it was late I did not hear much except spelling and part of a recitation. The teacher seems to be well qualified for the position. One thing noticeable was that she was very particular to see that everything was in strict order and her word is law in the school room. From there I went to the second room, in charge of Mrs. Suddarth, where 21 were in attendance, only about half the enrollment. She was having an oral spelling contest and it was pleasing to see how careful she seemed to be to have each child understand the words, and to see the marked attention the children paid. While they were going through with the spelling exercises the rest of the children seemed to be as busy as they could be, and all seemed to try to please their teacher. I gave the children in each room visited a short talk to encourage them in their work.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 28, 1913, page 5


DIED.
    At his home, 208 South Ivy Street, Medford, Patrick Daily, Sunday, March 30, aged 69 years, one month. Born in County Kerry, came to America at the age of eight years. He came to Medford in 1901. He was a member of the G.A.R., having served in Company D, First Missouri Cavalry, in the Civil War. He was in Price's raid and in the battle of Wilson Creek. He leaves nine children, Mrs. E. S. Stinson, Medford; James Daily, Medford; Mrs. A. J. Zimmerman, Jamestown, Kansas; P. H. Daily, Medford; Mrs. O. E. Stinson, Medford; Charles Daily, Medford; T. W. Daily, Trail; M. L. Daily and Bertha Daily of Medford. Funeral services at the Catholic church Monday at 2 p.m. Burial Jacksonville Cemetery.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 31, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our daughter, Mrs. G. H. Shaw, of Fairview, Ore., who has been with us for the past six weeks, returned home last Thursday. Her mother accompanied her as far as Medford.
    Allison Allen of Spokane, Wash., who has been up at Derby to visit his mother and brother, John Allen, came out on the train Thursday on the way to Seattle, where he will visit another brother, Thomas Allen. Their mother is now past 92 years old, and Mr. Allen says that she looks just as well as she did four or five years ago, and that, if it were not for the little dampness we have here the old people would simply dry up and blow away, it is so healthy here.
    Mrs. James Gillespy and C. Heren went to Medford Thursday.
    Roy Ashpole, our new hardware man, has been getting a lot of plows, harrows, etc., in stock.
    Harvey Stanley and his brother Carl transacted business in Eagle Point the last of the week.
    Ed and John Higinbotham of Derby were guests at the Sunnyside Friday night and Saturday morning went on to Jacksonville to pay their taxes.
    Frank Caster of Derby was among the visitors Friday, as was also Henry French. He was on his way to Jacksonville to appear as a witness in the case of the State of Oregon versus Walter Wood.
    Mrs. Susan Hart made Eagle Point a hurried call Friday.
    Nick Young, one of our prosperous young farmers, drove into town Friday with a load of grain.
    Mrs. Woolery is having her home remodeled and a brick flue built.
    W. H. Crandall called on your correspondent and gave him the following item: Died, in Laramie, Wyo., March 27, 1913, Miss Anna Carpenter, sister of the late Judge C. E. Carpenter, without a moment's warning, of heart failure. Mr. Crandall had just received a letter from her in which she said that she was enjoying excellent health, and Friday he received a telegram that she was dead. She and her brother were out here last fall, he owning a tract of land joining Mr. Crandall's farm, and they were planning to settle up their business in Wyoming and come to this valley to live, and in just three months and one day they have both passed off. Surely in the midst of life we are in death.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 1, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night we had one of the most interesting exhibitions that we have had for a long time. Professor Jo Singleton gave an exhibition in the gymnasium, a drill contest between the women and the men, and in addition to that was given a regular performance in the line of athletic sports. The first was a dumbbell drill by the women. The class numbered 10, but two were absent on account of the grippe. Those who took part showed they had had a good teacher and that they had paid good attention to what had been taught them. They surely did fine. Then the women gave the men a challenge for a contest in a marching drill, and of course they were too gallant to decline to accept, and the result was that both sides did their best and the drill was pronounced A-1 by the audience, which consisted of 150 or 175 persons, who watched with deep interest. When it came to the decision, Miss Fay Nichols and Ralph Owings were selected as representatives of the contestants and the professor said the one who received the loudest and most prolonged cheering would be declared the victor, and out of courtesy called for an expression on the ladies' side first, not thinking that that gave the other side a decided advantage. When it came to the other side to be voted on there was a crowd of little boys who yelled on both sides, and of course they would yell as long as anyone else would, so by that means the boys won the decision. One very important incentive that might have had some influence was that in offering the challenge the ladies proposed that if the men won out they, the ladies, would serve them with a feast, and that might have had some influence in their decision.
    After that was over the next performance was a running high jump for men. They started with the bar at three feet and kept raising it two inches at a time until it reached four feet and eight inches. By that time most of the jumpers had dropped out, but the contest waxed warm after the bar reached four feet and four inches, and it was raised only one inch at a time. There were several who cleared the bar at that distance from the floor. The result of the high jump was: Harry Bryant first, A. E. Strong second and Ray Harnish third. Bryant and Strong tied and they cast lots for the prize, it falling to Harry Bryant. Then followed an exhibition of punching the bag by Harry Bryant. The next was the seven-potato race for men. This was the most exciting part of the whole performance. The contest was not long, but sharp. The winners in the potato race were: Strong first, Fred Finley second and Rev. L. L. Simmons third.
    We then had an exhibition on the bar by the ladies and they surprised the natives to see how well they performed their part. Then a series of performances on the bar by the men, but the crowning exhibition was the pullups on the bar by the men, lifting themselves, at arm's length, and placing the chin on top of the bar every time. Among the first they went as high as 15 times, and then they would go a little more and finally William Wright placed his chin on the bar 20 times; then Ralph Owings and A. E. Strong tied at 18, when the contest ended by drawing lots to decide which should have the second place on the list and the result was that Owings won the second place. There were four prizes offered for the best general performers, one gold and three silver, and the result was that A. E. Strong won the first, William Wright the second, Harry Bryant third and Rev. L. L. Simmons the fourth. The contest was so close that it would have been impossible for one unaccustomed to the gymnastic exercises to have decided, but the decision was made in conformity to the regular rules. I have made this article as short as I could to cover the ground and I wanted to give an impartial account, as I know that there are already 150 pairs of eyes watching for it in the Eaglets.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 2, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Ash, proprietor of the Trail House of Trail, came out Saturday and stopped with us overnight, then went to Medford and bought a load of supplies, returning Monday.
    John Grieve, one of our ex-assessors and now supervisor of the Prospect road district, came in Monday evening and spent the night with us. He was on his return trip from a visit to Ontario, Canada, where he had been visiting relatives. He said that on his return trip he had just kept ahead of the blizzards and floods. He took the P.&E. car for Derby Tuesday.
    I omitted to state in my last that Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Saunders, Mrs. C. A. Saunders and Mrs. W. A. Furry of Ashland were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Sunday. Mr. Saunders, Sr., was here inquiring for the location of a tract of land that he was thinking of purchasing. All that he had to do was to take the number of the section, etc., and look on the abstract map put out by the Mail Tribune as a premium for subscriptions and there he found just what he was looking for. Mrs. Furry formerly lived in this neighborhood, being the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Potter, now of Ashland.
    [illegible line of text] St. Claire Rooms of Medford and M. F. Sanders, also of Medford, were guests with us Monday night. They had come out to look at some property in this section.
    Mr. E. S. Hitzler, formerly of Table Rock but now of Medford, came out last Monday and engaged a room and board at the Sunnyside. He is engaged grafting trees for L. K. Hawk in an orchard tract about a mile above our town.
    I omitted to state that the bid for the ten thousand bonds was opened last Saturday night. There was but one bid put in and that was to take the bonds at par, but the council was asked to pay for certain legal investigations there were to be made. The bid was rejected and so will have to be readvertised.
    Prof. Henry went up to Butte Falls Tuesday on the P.&E. car to look after the interest of the schools in that section, he being one of the county supervisors.
    Scott Bruce and wife, who have been visiting in the State of Washington for some months past, returned Monday.
    George W. White, who has had charge of the Cooley orchard just above town, has resigned and moved into the front part of the old George Brown store.
    Miss Enid Peelor of Butte Falls, who has been teaching school in the Central district, closed her school last Friday, came out on the stage Tuesday and at this writing is at the Sunnyside.
    A. C. Mooney, owner of the famous Red Blanket Ranch, near Prospect, was here on his way home the last of the week.
    Mr. Hildreth, Sr., of Butte Falls passed through here Saturday on his way home.
    Joseph Arrant, son-in-law of Wort Pool and his brother-in-law, Joe Pool, were here Saturday.
    Sophie Robinett went to Medford Saturday evening to help care for her nephew, Henry Daley.
    G. H. Wamsley started the ball in motion last Saturday by planting some trees in the park and then M. S. Wood came in next, and I saw him planting some more Monday morning. We have a beautiful place for a park, and it is well shaded but will stand to have some more trees planted. It is under a ditch and the soil will produce almost anything that will grow in this climate and by a little care and labor can be made very attractive.
    A. H. Weber of Medford, formerly the pharmacist in von der Hellen Bros. drug department, was a caller last week. He is soliciting for Kirk, Geary & Company, wholesale druggists, Sacramento, Cal. Mr. Weber has a host of friends here who gave him a cordial greeting.
    Gus Nichols, one of our prominent stockmen, was among us the last of the week.
    John Rader, also a prominent stock man, was doing business here Saturday.
    Geo. A. Givan, a prosperous farmer and stock raiser, living west of our town on Rogue River, was here Saturday and while here paid me for a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Speaking of the Mail Tribune, I see by looking over my list of subscribers, and some have subscribed that have not paid up yet but will soon. The people are beginning to realize that if they want to keep posted they must have and read a reliable newspaper that gives all the news all the time.
    Henry Meyer of Lake Creek was here Saturday. He brought in a lot of truck from his farm.
    Ed Dutton took a load of lumber out from the Eagle Point lumber yard the other day to improve his place.
    W. W. Willits and his daughter, Miss Inez, came out Saturday on the stage from their home, Persist, and Miss Inez went on to Coos County, where she is engaged to teach school this summer.
    Henry French was among us Saturday evening. He came out from Jacksonville where he had been a witness in the Walter Wood case and while here paid me a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 5, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Monday night the ladies of the W.C.T.U. gave the E.P.A.C. a banquet in their gymnasium and had another of those especially interesting times. The first thing on the program was some stunts by the members of the E.P.A.C. on the bar and rings, then high jumping, etc. Then they all took part in several kinds of innocent plays and games--not card playing--but the plays that Christian people can take part in and not do violence to their conscience or violate the rules of their church. After they had played a while the supper was spread and now comes the hardest part of my task, to try to describe the feast, for I have to give it from hearsay as I was unavoidably hindered from going that particular night, but my first informant said that it was the best food he ever saw served and the next one said that the ladies simply outdid themselves, while another said that the supper was too good to talk about, so I judge by that that it must have been up to the standard and if it was then it was A-1, for the E.P. ladies are noted for getting up the very best meals of any in the country. After the supper was served and order restored the next thing was the presentation of the medals by Rev. L. L. Simmons. There were four medals awarded, but there were only three on hand. The fourth one will be presented to Rev. Simmons in a short time. The first was a beautiful gold medal presented to A. E. Strong, Rev. Simmons making a neat and appropriate presentation speech, to which Mr. Strong responded with appropriate remarks. The next was a silver prize received by William Wright. He also responded with a short speech of thanks, and then Ralph Owings came forward and responded to the presentation of another silver medal. Then the E.P.A.C. gave three rousing cheers for the W.C.T.U., to which they responded in like manner with three cheers for the Eagle Point Athletic Club. At the close of the banquet steps were taken to organize a brass band in connection with the club. Then after a rousing handshaking all around they all went home feeling that they had passed another green spot in their lives in Eagle Point.
    Last Monday the pupils in the three upper rooms of the local school took a notion in their wise heads that they would play the teachers a little April Fool trick and about the time for them to march into their rooms they ran out the back way of the school grounds and disappeared, crossing fences, fields, etc., and crossed the creek to the old wire bridge and returned about 2:20 p.m. loaded with wildflowers and reported that that had been one of the times of their lives.
    The first of last week J. T. Sullivan, manager of the Rogue River Valley Canal Company's business, and Ralph P. Cowgill, formerly construction engineer for the company, called for dinner and reported that they are doing fine in their line.
    J. H. Cooley, proprietor of a fine orchard just above town, and John Welch called for dinner the last of the week. They were on their way to the orchard.
    Last week Mr. Painter procured lumber and shingles at the Eagle Point lumber yard to put an addition onto his house. He bought the hardware at Roy Ashpole's hardware store.
    Mr. Burdette Dodge of Riverside Orchard was in our town after a load of supplies the last of the week.
    Roy Willits, the mail contractor on the Eagle Point and Persist route, reports that Homer Randall of Elk Creek had his house and contents burned on the 29th of March. This is the second time he has been burned out within the past year. He is a bachelor and has been living alone.
    Dr. Newbury, who owns a farm and orchard near Brownsboro, returned from Medford Friday, where he had been to look after a young orchard he owns near Medford, on a part of the old Barneburg place.
    J. W. Crover, who has been serving on the jury at Jacksonville, returned home last week.
    M. E. Root, who is in the employ of the Rogue River Valley Canal Company, was a pleasant caller the last of the week. He is securing signers for water rights and reports that he is succeeding very well.
    Mr. Ragsdale, who lives upon the south fork of Little Butte Creek, had a large roll of wire fencing taken up last Friday by the stage driver to Lake Creek, Mr. Culbertson.
    William and Lieal Hoefft of Lake Creek brought out a load of potatoes for the Medford market last Friday.
    John Walch and sister, Miss Clarada, were transacting business with Heath & Diamond last Friday. They brought in quite a lot of farm produce.
    George Lindley, cashier of the Jackson County Bank, passed through our town Friday. He had been up in the Dead Indian country to rest and get off of the cement walks and marble floors. We hope the change will be a benefit to him.
    Floyd Pearce and wife went to Forest Creek last Friday to visit his parents.
    G. Dahack came out from his home beyond Big Butte Creek Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 7, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    County Supervisor Henry, one of the men appointed to superintend the rural schools in the county, spent the night with us last Friday on his return trip from Butte Falls.
    A man and woman visited our town last Saturday representing the Pacific Coast Rescue and Protective Society of Portland. They were also soliciting for the "Common's Voice." They only remained in town a few hours and I judged by the way they talked that they had not met with much success. They are the editor and assistant editor of the paper and seemed to be greatly in earnest in their work.
    The Catholic priest of Medford came over and held services in their church last Sunday morning.
    Among the callers at the Sunnyside last Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Heren and their two boys. They came out from Medford with "the father" to attend church services, with their parents. Also Mrs. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek came down to attend the church services and called for dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. George von der Hellen were with us at dinner and so was Miss Mabel Wamsley, Carl Ringer, Thomas Riley Jr., Harry Young and his sister Miss Mildred of Brownsboro, and Guy Pruett. I did not learn of any more coming in that day except the home boarders, as I had to leave to fill an engagement to attend church at Agate, but found that Rev. Farquarth had changed the time of his meeting from 3 to 7:30 p.m., and as I had an appointment to preach at Table Rock at that hour I went on and met with the Table Rock Sunday school, where I found a room well filled with young and old, studying God's word. This Sunday school was organized seven or eight years ago, and they have kept it not only alive, but in a healthy and growing condition. In fact the Bible class has grown to such proportions that it was decided that day to divide the class and have the young men and ladies in a class by themselves and the more aged in another class. They elected Mr. Potts as teacher of the new class. They have also organized a prayer meeting that meets every Thursday night. On Sunday night I preached to a good-sized and attentive congregation and left another appointment for preaching on the third Sunday, being April 20.
    The contractor for the new bridge across Rogue River at the Bybee bridge has a force of men at work making the cofferdams and excavating and has part of the machinery on the ground to build the bridge. Some improvements are noticeable in the line of fencing, buildings, etc., in the Table Rock district.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 8, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Ethel Cary, a cousin of Miss Fay Nichols, has been out visiting her aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Art Nichols, returning to her home last Monday.
    Miss Nina Morris, who has just closed her school at Brownsboro, was in Table Rock Sunday visiting friends, returning to Brownsboro Sunday night after preaching, and Monday afternoon took the P.&E. for Medford on her way to her home in Ashland.
    Rube Johnson, who sold his farm on Elk Creek to the McDonald brothers, went to Medford Monday afternoon, returning to Eagle Point the same day.
    Hugh Mitchell, who has charge of the fish hatchery at the mouth of Elk Creek, came out and went to Medford Monday on the P.&E.
    Frank Johnson and wife, who have a home at the mouth of Indian Creek, were doing business in Eagle Point Monday.
    Miss Mabel Buell, who lives with her parents on the P.&E. railroad, boarded the car at Buell's crossing Monday and went to Medford, returning the same afternoon. Dr. W. W. P. Holt, our M.D., also went to Medford, and so did your correspondent, and I noticed there was quite a number of strangers on the car with us.
    The many friends of Miss Gernell Jackson, one of our promising young ladies who is making her home in Butte Falls, keeping house for her brother Carl, who is in business there, was greeting her many friends the last of the week, but the trouble with her is she does not stay long enough to meet all of them here. I noticed Tuesday that there were ten boxes of apples shipped to Carl Jackson, Butte Falls.
    Mr. C. W. Martin at the present writing is superintending the placing of the transformers on the electric line here. He says that it will take a few days to arrange and put the transformers in at Table Rock and then they will be ready to turn on the juice for lighting and mechanical work.
    Bert Dickson and the chief electrician of the Prospect power plant came out from Medford Tuesday morning.
    I understand that our school board are to meet at the residence of Mrs. Royal Brown, Friday evening, April 11, and take steps toward arranging for our corps of teachers for the next year.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 9, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Greb, owner of the El Rose Orchard, brought over a few sacks of nice corn for Mrs. Howlett last Tuesday.
    Mrs. R. A. Petty, her daughter, Miss Lillian, and son George, arrived from Texas Tuesday and was met at the Sunnyside by her husband, who has been working for several months on the A. Corbin orchard. They are planning to rent a house here and live among us.
    Henry Daley, the young man who has been sick for several months and was taken to Medford for medical treatment, was brought home to his grandfather's, A. J. Daley, Tuesday and expired today, Wednesday, April 9, at 2:15 p.m. A more extended notice will be given later.
    Wort Pool is getting ready to plant corn and has had a nice corn marker made at Mathews & Fisher's blacksmith shop.
    I wish to call the attention of the city council to the fact that we have but one bad mud hole in the corporate limits of our town and that would be such a sight in a city like New York or Medford that it would attract more attention than an Italian organist with his monkey, and the ridiculous part of it is that it is right in front of the town hall and right where the mail carriers have to drive when they bring the mail to the post office. It is a disgrace to the town and should be fixed, and as I believe every one of our councilmen and the mayor are readers of the Mail Tribune, I thus call their attention to it.
    Miss Ruth Warner of Trail went up home Monday on the Eagle Point and Persist stage. She has been stopping in Central Point for some time.
    Miss Gernell Jackson, who makes her home in Butte Falls, has concluded to remain with her parents until Saturday.
    Mrs. Birdie Gillespy of Medford, a sister-in-law of our townsmen, James Gillespy, is here visiting his family.
    Mrs. M. L. Daily came out Tuesday evening to meet with the Rebekah lodge here that night. Miss Mattie Minter also came from her home to attend the meeting of the lodge.
    George Trusty of Elk Creek came out to visit his brother-in-law, Henry Childreth, and Wednesday morning returned and took Mrs. Childreth and part of the children with him.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 11, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Carson of Butte Falls is here visiting the family of J. B. Jackson.
    Mr. and Mrs. Robert Potter of Ashland and family were here attending the funeral of their nephew, Henry Daley, Friday.
    Wm. Farlow, of Lake Creek, on hearing of the death of his mother in Pilot Rock, Wash., came out Saturday, phoned to Pilot Rock and had the funeral postponed until Sunday and started so as to be present at the time.
    Miss Mabel Gould of Medford came out Friday took the stage for Lake Creek so as to meet her sister, Miss Alma Gould, who has just closed her school in that district.
    Miss Lucia Chapman of Riddle also came out on the same car and took the same stage for the Lake Creek country, but I did not learn the object of her visit.
    Mr. and Mrs. Conroy, who have been working on the Fred Pelouze farm for some time spent the night at the Sunnyside Hotel and Saturday went back up near Lake Creek to their old home.
    Wm. Nussbaum of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller Saturday for dinner and Messrs. John Torney, W. H. Fuller, O. L. Mills and A. J. Lupton, all of Medford, were here for dinner Saturday. They seemed to be looking for some particular tract of land and were examining the Mail Tribune abstract map I have to give to subscribers to the Mail Tribune.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis, our Congregational Sunday school missionary, came in Friday morning to pay me a visit. He and I attended prayer meeting together Friday night. Speaking of prayer meetings Rev. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church here, has commenced a series of short lectures at those meetings that are proving very interesting and attractive.
    Arthur Horton of Brownsboro and another man came down to have some repairing done on his machinery that he has to clear his land of stumps and brush last Wednesday.
    M. A. Dorland of Portland was here last Wednesday representing the High Flight Flour Mills of Eastern Washington.
    Frank Smith, who is settled on the relinquished homestead of Thomas Rolph, now of Three Rivers, was a pleasant caller Wednesday.
    The E.P.A. Club is surely attracting some attention now they had an addition of six new members last Tuesday night. Professor Joe Singleton surely deserves credit for what he is doing for the young people of our town and he is not teaching them the athletic sports and exercises for gain but rather he walks two miles and back four times a week just to help along those who wish to be benefited by his knowledge.
    W. T. Andrews, who owns a part of the old Schneider place, was doing business with Heath & Diamond last Thursday.
    Bert Lockwood and wife drove down from Brownsboro Thursday and Mrs. Lockwood spent part of the day visiting her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. James Gillespy, later in the day taking the car for Medford.
    In my last I spoke of the death of Henry Daley and promised to give a more extended notice later. The young man, who has gone by the name of Henry Daley, was left an orphan by the death of his mother, Mrs. Edward Simon, at the age of five months and his grandparents took him and have raised him to manhood, and he has always gone by the name of Henry Daley, and just before he was taken sick he applied to the court to have his name changed from Henry F. Simon to Henry Daley, but sickness prevented the final action so his name is really Henry F. Daley Simon.
    The subject of this notice was born in the town of Eagle Point, Ore., August 21st, 1889 and died at the residence of his grandparents Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daley, April 9th, 1913, being 23 years, 8 months and 18 days of age. He was a young man of excellent habits and his word was considered as good as his bond. He was always noted for his politeness and especially to persons of advanced age. He was a butcher and meat cutter by trade and always was considered trustworthy. He was engaged to be married to one of our most estimable young ladies, a daughter of one of our leading blacksmiths and business men, Miss Lorilla Childreth, and expected to have been married on the ninth of February but was taken sick a short time before, and although everything was done to restore him to health that loving hands could do Miss Childreth stayed with him from the first of his sickness to the hour of his death, and his friends did all that they could, while his grandparents spared neither money nor pains to alleviate his sufferings death had marked him for his own. The lodge of A.O.U.W., of which he was a member, did all in their power to help.
    The funeral services were held in the church, the sermon being preached by the pastor, Rev. L. L. Simmons, to a crowded house and the remains interred in the Central Point Cemetery April 11 by the side of his mother. There was about all that could get conveyances followed him to his last earthly resting place. The floral offering was as fine as could be obtained. A large number of his relatives from Ashland, Medford, Lake Creek, etc., were in attendance at the funeral. The minister announced that just a short time before his death he professed faith in Christ.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 14, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Rader, one of our leading stockmen and farmers, came over Saturday and took his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Roy Ashpole, home with him to spend the night so that Mrs. Ashpole could have a visit with her mother.
    A. J. Florey, our postmaster, went to Jacksonville to visit his son, Chauncey Florey, office deputy assessor.
    A. L. Jones, A. E. Hokamon, and W. C. Cummings, three men who have spent the winter on the headwaters of Elk Creek, trapping, came out with I. C. Moore and his stepdaughter Miss Anna Drake, from their camp last Saturday and all spent the night at the Sunnyside, going on to Medford the next morning.
    There is to be a lecturer here next Saturday night to lecture on industrial work in the schools, especially agricultural and horticultural work among the children.
    Frank Brown, one of our leading merchants, and wife, Carl Ringer and Miss Mabel Wamsley were also guests at the Sunnyside Sunday for dinner.
    Misses Mabel and Edna Gould came out last Sunday from Lake Creek, where Miss Edna has just closed her school. Mrs. Henry Meyer brought them out and Mrs. Meyer's son Andy came out with them and he entered school here Monday morning. They all stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner and Andy is staying at this hostelry while he attends school. Master George Petty has also entered our school and for the time being is staying at the same hotel.
    The Eagle Point Athletic Club had an interesting time Saturday night, April 5. Professor Joe Singleton was late in reaching the gymnasium and when he reached the door he found the whole class of men lined up and waiting for him, and just as he entered someone cried out, "He is all right." Another responded, "Who is all right?" Again the response came, "Why, Joe Singleton." Whereupon Rev. L. L. Simmons walked up to him and with a neat and appropriate speech presented the professor with a neat gold watch charm, the initials of his name, "J.S.," engraved on one side and, on the other, E.P.A.C., after which Mr. Singleton responded with an appropriate speech. He was taken completely by surprise. The charm was presented as a token of their appreciation by the members of the club. Mr. Singleton can hardly express his appreciation, he is so proud of the token.
    Carl Simpson was visiting his grandmother, Mrs. F. W. Stewart, last Sunday.
    Mrs. Trusty of Elk Creek came out last Saturday to visit her daughter, Mrs. H. O. Childreth.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 16, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Benj. Dingery and his friend with whom he has been visiting, I. J. Culbertson, of Lake Creek, the mail contractor on the Lake Creek-Eagle Point route, were callers at the Sunnyside for dinner Monday.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. D. Tucker, who are living on the old Tucker place on Rogue River, the old Enyart place, and his brother-in-law and bride, Mr. and Mrs. Paul Opdyke, of Shasta County, Cal., nee Miss Tucker, called for dinner besides several strangers whose names I did not learn. Mr. Opdyke is engaged in the stock business in California and so is Mr. Tucker Sr., who now owns the old home place occupied by his son. While here at the dinner table O. D. Tucker of Trail post office asked if I could make out a receipt for a subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune, to which I answered in the affirmative, so he paid me for three months' subscription for the paper. They all expressed themselves as being much interested in the Eaglets.
    Our daughter Hattie arrived home Tuesday morning. Her health has greatly improved during her stay in Klamath Falls. Her sister and husband, Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, have moved back to Fort Klamath and reopened their hotel at that place. Mrs. Sophia Robinett and her son Clarence went out Monday morning and Mr. Robinett will have charge of the culinary department of the hotel.
    The electric light man has been around again and put in the meters in the houses in our town that want to be connected up with the power line this spring. There is quite a number that say that they will not connect up until fall, as it is getting to be too short nights now and if they connect up now they will have to pay one dollar a month anyhow and that they will not derive that much benefit from it.
    I understand that Mrs. Charles Bacon, wife of our accommodating conductor on the P.&E. railroad, is going to open a first-class bakery in the house formerly occupied by M. L. Daily as a model variety store, and many of our housewives are rejoicing over the event.
    Clarence Pankey of Central Point was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside Monday for dinner.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 17, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Mary Terrill of Brownsboro was in town the first of last week.
    Dick Johnson, Miss Rachel and Ed Mathews were trading with our merchants Tuesday.
    J. N. Dodge, the Ashland well borer, and W. Sage of Table Rock called for dinner Tuesday at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. J. V. McIntyre, our banker's wife, was out on the street Tuesday. She says that she feels fine and that the baby is just as good as it can be.
    Henry French, who owns a farm and orchard on Rogue River near the lower steel bridge, was in town Tuesday, having a platform built for his stump puller. He is clearing more land and getting ready for the electric car line that is coming down Trail Creek to Medford via Eagle Point.
    Mrs. J. D. Roach, of Lewiston, Idaho, came in Tuesday night on the P.&E. and went to the Sunnyside and there met her cousin, Roy Willits, the Eagle Point-Persist mail contractor. She remarked to her cousin that she wanted to see one man in Eagle Point and that was A. C. Howlett, for she had been reading his Eaglets for the past fifteen years and I was sitting just across the table from her, so her cousin remarked that is him sitting there, so for once her curiosity was satisfied. She took the stage Wednesday morning for Persist to visit her aunt, Mrs. W. W. Willits. She says that it looks good to get back here and see the green grass and the oak trees, for there are no oak trees where she lived in Idaho.
    E. E. Ash, proprietor of the Trail home and store, came out Tuesday, spent the night at the Sunnyside and Wednesday morning loaded up his wagon among our merchants and started for home. He seems to think that there is a bright future for this part of the country.
    Dr. Holt, L. K. Hawk, H. B. Tronson and two strangers whose names I did not learn came out on the P.&E. car Tuesday evening.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. John Gret April 14, a son; at last accounts the mother and boy were doing well.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. A. W. Bradshaw on the Commercial Orchard April 15, a daughter, and as a result Mr. Bradshaw ordered a load of supplies from Heath & Diamond.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Jesse Enyart of Medford and Mr. Grayhour of Prospect went up to Elk Creek on the Eagle Point-Prospect stage Wednesday morning.
    Mrs. Petty, her son George, and daughter Lillian, have moved on to the Corbin orchard and have gone to housekeeping, living in a tent.
    S. S. Aiken of Prospect was at the Sunnyside Wednesday for dinner, also Mrs. Charles Wilkinson of Roxy Ann, Mike Sidley, Sr. and his son, Mike Sidley, Jr. of Lake Creek, Mr. Cadzow of Butte Falls and Bert Higinbotham.
    While Mrs. Charles Wilkinson was here she gave me a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune for her son, Clyde Plymire, of Monroe, Ore.; he is working on the railroad being constructed from Corvallis to the coast.
    Roy Willits, our mail contractor on the Eagle Point-Persist route, has taken a new contract for carrying the mail, instead of going and coming by the free ferry, after the first of May he will go by the way of the ferry and return by the new, lower steel bridge, and by that means will accommodate quite a number of people along the route in addition to those already on the old route, and half of the time miss the bad road between the desert and the free ferry.
    I see by looking over my "catch book" that we had last Thursday for dinner at the Sunnyside County School Superintendent J. Percy Wells and N. C. Maris, field worker industrial fairs department of education, who is spending a week in this county in the interest of the local school fairs, as well as the state fair at Salem. He and Superintendent Wells have been visiting the different schools in the county and Thursday being the day set for this place they came in Thursday morning and after dinner visited our school. The teachers had anticipated their coming and had everything arranged in "apple pie order." During the first part of the afternoon we, for I was there to glean for the Mail Tribune, were entertained by the children for an hour or more, and I tell the readers of the Mail Tribune that the performance was up to date, and then Professor Suddarth introduced Mr. N. C. Maris and he gave us a fine and instructive talk on the subject of farm life and pointed to the necessity of the young people turning their attention to that instead of flocking to the towns and cities and trying to make a living by their wits instead of their muscles. He showed among other things that by systematic farming and stock raising we could be the most independent of any class of people in the world. He told us that through lack of proper attention to the various branches of farm industry we as a state are compelled to send out twenty million dollars to secure the necessary supplies for our sustenance every year. Calling attention to the items of butter and eggs alone that we import $12,000,000 for butter and that there were $1,000,000 worth of eggs shipped into Portland alone last year. He had an appointment to speak in the church at night, but the heavy electrical storm and down pour of rain kept the people at home, so he did not speak. After the exercises in the school room was over the children planted quite a number of fruit trees, rose bushes, flowers, etc., so as to beautify the school grounds as much as possible. Mr. Maris had a meeting with the Ladies' Eagle Point Improvement Club in the afternoon and they agreed to use their influence toward holding an industrial fair here this fall.
    I should have said in the proper place that the school children have some beautiful flower gardens around the school grounds and that they intend to make it more attractive than ever.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 21, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. E. Reed of Wellen, who has a fine homestead on Yankee Creek, was a pleasant caller last week.
    I have been requested to call the attention of our city dads to that mud hole in front of the town hall again. There was a stranger here last week that remarked that that mud hole was a disgrace to the town, and some of us who are in favor of keeping up a good appearance were rejoicing the other day that we had had a good rain that had filled it up with water so that some strangers who were looking over the town could not see it.
    George Brown and sons shipped quite a lot of goats' wool last week.
    Owing to lack of space, for ye editor requested me to try to keep inside of a half column, I had to omit inserting the following item: Thursday noon there was a six-car load of orchardmen came into the Sunnyside and called for dinner. They were Mr. Bayard Carlson, owner of the Hillcrest Orchard; A. Conro Fiero, Woodlawn Orchard, Central Point; T. S. Johnston Jr., Antelope Orchard, Wellen post office; H. Van Hoevenberg, Sams Valley; L. E. Meacham, Portland, and W. E. Guin, Portland, Ore. Mr. Guin is general manager of the Northwestern Fruit Exchange, said to be the largest fruit distributing organization of the Northwest, handling the crop of the Rogue River Valley. Mr. Guin is also making his semi-annual inspection of his orchard in this valley. They were out in this part of the valley to look over the country and see the prospect for a crop this season.
    On Sunday, the 13th, Mrs. J. L. Hovey, whose husband has charge of the Altavista Orchard, gave a dinner and the following persons were invited: Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Knighton, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey, and all accepted the invitation except A. J. Florey, he being our postmaster thought that he could not leave the office at that time, as the mail has to be sent out at 3:15 p.m., but those who were there report having had one of the times of their lives. I did not hear of it until too late to get it in my last letter, but it was too good to keep, so tell it at this late date.
    Our city dads held a council meeting last week and renewed the license of Mr. Vogeli for his saloon for another six months.
    Our school board met on the eve of the 11th and engaged the teachers for another term. Mr. Buchanan of Butte Falls was elected as principal. Mr. Suddarth will have charge of the intermediate department, and Mrs. Suddarth will have charge of the primary department. Mrs. George von der Hellen, who has had charge of the primary, declined to accept the school again. The board dropped off one room, so Miss Knox was not given a school, notwithstanding she is recognized as a first-class teacher and her many friends regret that she is left without a school.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rudolph Pech and Henry Tonn of Lake Creek were at the Sunnyside last Friday and so was Paul Edwards, Roy Vestal and U. S. Robison. They all came on business and Messrs. Pech and Tonn brought some goats wool for our merchants, and about the same time Mr. Culbertson brought out some goats wool from the Lake Creek country.
    S. H. Harnish, our liveryman, has been engaged for some time hauling lumber from the Eagle Point lumber yard to the hatchery at the mouth of Elk Creek and has about four or five thousand feet to haul yet, the teamster, John Smith, says that about fifteen hundred feet at a time is all that he can take with four horses on account of the bad roads, as the continuous rains in the hills keep them soft and interspersed with mud holes.
    The Eagle Point Lumber Company received a car of lumber last week.
    Mike Sidley of Lake Creek went to Medford last Saturday, returned the same day and went up home.
    Last Sunday I went to Table Rock in the afternoon and met with the Table Rock Sunday school. There was a fine attendance and they seemed to have studied the lesson well for there was quite an interest manifested in the investigation of the lesson. At night I preached to a good-sized audience and there seemed to be a deep religious feeling.
    On Sunday we had the pleasure of the company of Mr. H. Lindsay of Medford, Mlle. Andre of Brussels, Belgium, Miss Margaret Fern Hutchinson of Medford and Mr. R. H. McCurdy of Medford to dinner. They were somewhat disappointed because they did not have the usual chicken dinner but before they got through with dinner concluded that they had had enough without chicken, and when they learned that Mrs. Howlett was on the sick list felt perfectly satisfied and promised to come again in the near future. They came out on horseback just to see the country and for the nice ride. Just as I started for Table Rock there was an auto came up with five persons for dinner, but as I was away did not learn their names.
    A short time ago I inserted an ad among the classified ads in the Mail Tribune for some bees for J. L. Hovey and a few days after a friend of mine told me that he was heard to say that he had bought all that he wanted and could have bought a hundred stands more--it pays to advertise in a live paper.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 24, 1913, page 6


BLIND BIG AT PROSPECT HOTEL
    "Jim Grieve, who owns the hotel at Prospect, has a blind pig," states County Commissioner J. N. Smith, who has returned from an inspection trip over Rogue River roads.
    When County Assessor William Grieve heard the news he wrote his brother a hot letter, calling him down for being all kinds of a fool to take a chance by violating the law, and expressing his sentiments in strong and vigorous language. In short, he commanded that the pig be closed.
    After the reprimand had been mailed Commissioner Smith was pledged to secrecy by the assessor, who promised that law violation would cease at once and staked his reputation on it. Meanwhile he was anxious to maintain secrecy lest District Attorney Kelly hear the news and start prosecution.
    When Mr. Smith reached Medford on his homeward trip he added some more information regarding the Grieve blind pig at Prospect, which he strangely forgot to tell the assessor. The pig was born blind and deaf, is a black one and is three months old. Notwithstanding its afflictions it seems to be thriving.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 24, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The firm of Heath & Diamond, one of our principal business firms, has changed the name, at least, Mr. Diamond having sold his interest in the concern to his partner Fred L. Heath, [who] will continue to carry on the business at the old stand. I understand that Mr. Diamond contemplates moving to Medford and going into business with his brother.
    Mr. Waterman of Brownsboro, who has a farm in that section, was doing business with our merchants Monday.
    W. J. Winkle was in town Tuesday and while here called on your correspondent and paid a year's subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. A. Horton of Brownsboro, whose husband owns a farm just above the town above named, was a caller at the Sunnyside for dinner Tuesday on her way to Medford and while here stated that her husband was clearing a lot of land to put out to trees, and that he contemplates putting in a wagon bridge across Little Butte Creek on his place.
    Miss Mae Trusty of Elk Creek, a sister of the wife of one of our leading blacksmiths, Miss Eula Houston of Trail and Miss Mattie Minter came in on the E.P.-Persist stage Tuesday.
    W. E. Hammel, one of our progressive orchardists, came in town Tuesday after a lot of fruit trees to plant.
    G. W. Ager, of Talent, one of the county school supervisors, came out this Wednesday morning, procured a saddle horse and started up the creek to visit the Gresham and Climax schools.
    John Rader, wife and daughter Miss Inez came in Tuesday and were doing business with Fred L. Heath.
    Tuesday afternoon the California-Oregon Electric Company turned the electric current on so that those of us who have connected up had electric lights that night. There is a few who had their houses wired that have not connected up as yet, for if they connect up they will have to pay one dollar a month at any rate and they think that they will not use that much juice during this season of the year.
    Everett Abbott, a young man who was working for the Butte Falls Lumber Company, had quite a serious mishap Tuesday. He was assisting in drawing in logs with a donkey engine when the cable became foul and caught on two stumps and when it slipped off struck him on the jaw, breaking it in two places. Dr. Holt was called but the fractures were of such a nature that it became necessary to take him to the hospital in Medford. W. W. Parker brought him out Tuesday night to the Sunnyside, arriving about 9:30, and Dr. Holt arranged the bandages for the night and Wednesday morning he took the train for Medford.
    J. L. McIntosh, F. Dunlap and O. W. Train called Tuesday evening for supper and then started for their homes near Derby.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 25, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    O. L. Irwin of Prospect came out Tuesday night, arriving at the Sunnyside about 8:30 p.m. He was on the way to Medford to be with his wife, who is in the hospital there. Mr. Irwin is working at the power plant near Prospect.
    Mrs. Elsie Van Dyke of Trail came out on the P.&E. car Tuesday morning and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for her home. She had been at Medford with her daughter, who has had an operation performed in the hospital there. She reports that she is getting along nicely.
    A. C. Frederic of Oakland, Cal., came out Wednesday morning and procured a team and driver at S. H. Harnish & Son's livery stable and took a trip up above Lake Creek to look at some railroad land. He returned the same day and spent the night at the Sunnyside, returning to Medford Thursday morning.
    Wednesday noon Professor P. J. O'Gara of Medford, chief among the fruit and orchard men in the valley and county superintendent of the fruit interests of the valley; Clyde Barnum, deputy fruit tree inspector; N. S. Bennett of the Eden Valley Nursery and J. W. Meyer, also fruit inspector, called at the Sunnyside for dinner. They were looking after some of the orchards in this part of the county.
    Mr. and Mrs. Andrews, who formerly lived in Medford, but now are living on a part of the old Schinder place, were in town Wednesday.
    Miss Lorena Riggins of Derby, who has been visiting her aunt, uncle and cousins, the A. B. Zimmerman family, took the train for home on Thursday morning.
    C. E. Marvin, a representative of Hale's Piano House, came out on the train Thursday morning.
    Thomas E. Nichols, one of our progressive farmers, stock raisers and capitalists, bought for himself, or rather his good wife, a Ford automobile. He says she can run it and he will have to stick to his saddle horse.
    W. E. Farsher, a representative of the Mail Tribune, called Thursday for dinner. He is canvassing for the vacuum cleaner and the Mail Tribune and engaged a room for Thursday night with us.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Miller of Medford were visiting their uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas E. Nichols, Thursday and Friday of last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wig Jacks were doing business and visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Nichols, Friday.
    F. F. Allen, formerly of Trail but now of Medford, called for dinner Friday. He was out buying a carload of hogs for shipment. He said that he was succeeding quite well.
    J. T. Swanson of Elk Creek came out Thursday evening on the Eagle Point and Persist stage.
    J. H. Trusty came out from his home on Elk Creek Thursday, spent the night with his son-in-law, Henry O. Childreth, and Friday took a load of things up home with him.
    Mr. King, a representative of the Medford Grocery Company, was taking orders from Fred L. Heath, one of our leading business men.
    William Coffden and William Houston of Trail were visiting our merchants Friday. Mr. Coffden has a homestead about five miles below Trail and Mr. Houston is one of the old settlers in that neighborhood.
    Last Friday C. M. Kidd, the shoe man of Medford, J. A. Perry, the fruit commission man and F. E. Merrick, one of the progressives of Medford, were callers for dinner at the Sunnyside. They were working in the interests of the big irrigation movement in Rogue River Valley. They report they are getting along fairly well, but that it takes lots of talking to make some of the farmers understand that it is to their interest to put water on their land through that means but seem to think that they will eventually succeed in the undertaking.
    While F. E. Merrick of Medford was here he suddenly disappeared from the Sunnyside and after the other guests had eaten their dinner came marching in, in company of Miss Knox, teacher in our school in the third room. It appeared that while the company was waiting for dinner he took a notion to visit our school and there met Miss Knox, who was a schoolmate of his daughter in the University of Eugene, and while they were eating their dinner had a fine visit and I think that the arrangement was made for Miss Knox to accompany them to Medford and have her visit Saturday and Sunday with Mr. Merricks' family.
    S. V. Hamlin of Medford, one of the old pioneer stock, was also a caller for dinner at the Sunnyside Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Henry Meyers of Lake Creek, who has a son attending school here, and boarding at the Sunnyside, came out last Friday afternoon to take him home and while here met Mrs. E. Packard and son of Medford, and they went up home with her to spend a few days.
    Last Friday Mr. and Mrs. Perkins, Mr. Earl S. Tumy and Miss Horton, all of Medford, called Mrs. Howlett up on the phone and ordered dinner for about five p.m. and about that time put in an appearance, spending an hour or so at the Sunnyside and along the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek. They seemed reluctant to leave the place and after paying a compliment to the author of the Eaglets, promised to come back again in the near future. Speaking about the banks of our Little Butte Creek, I see that some of those who are in the habit of fishing in the stream are meeting with considerable success in that line of sport.
    Prof. George O. Henry, who is engaged in teaching school in the Ed Higinbotham district, and has a homestead in that neighborhood, was a pleasant caller Friday night and so was Prof. George W. Ager, one of the school supervisors, here the same night. They had a pleasant meeting, both taking the train Saturday morning for Medford.
    Alex McCabe and D. R. Patrick were callers at the Sunnyside Saturday for dinner and so was Herman and William Nussbaum of Lake Creek.
    Thomas Vestal was among us Saturday doing business with our merchants.
    I am sorry to have to announce that Mr. L. Kelso, who has been living for several years on Big Butte Creek on the Prospect road for several years, had the misfortune to have his home and its contents burned last Tuesday, April 21. There was no one at home except his wife and she was not able to save much of anything from the fire.
    The J. J. Fryer Ditch Company held their annual meeting in the town hall last Saturday and elected Floyd Pearce as president, G. W. Wamsley business manager, and Norman McQuade, secretary.
    Among our visitors to Medford last Saturday are Mr. and Mrs. Wm. G. Knighton, Mrs. A. C. Howlett, Thomas Abbott and H. O. Childreth.
    Visitors from Jacksonville were Mrs. Chauncey Florey and her little daughter, J. N. Dodge of Medford and Wesley Sage of Table Rock; the latter two came in Saturday morning for breakfast. They are engaged at this time boring a well on a part of the old Bradshaw place. I failed to learn the name of the owner.
    Porter J. Neff of Medford came out last Saturday afternoon to try to help our city dads to attend to the business of our town.
    There was a man by the name of Snyder, who has been working on the River View Ranch, brought in town Sunday afternoon to Dr. Holt's office who had accidentally been shot in the leg by a boy. I did not learn the particulars of the case or the name of the boy who shot him; he was taken on to Medford that evening after Dr. Holt had dressed the wound.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 30, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. W. Hitchcock, who owns an orchard about two miles and a half southeast of here, was here and gave me the following item that I thought of enough importance to be inserted in the Eaglets: Fred Lewis, who bought a part of the old A. S. Carlton place, is going to try an experiment in the way of utilizing his orchard land and at the same time fertilizing it. He is sowing the 20-acre tract that he has in old or fruit-bearing trees, in clover, and his 60 acres that he has planted in young trees and intends to sow that in clover and alfalfa also, and as the land is under the ditch, intends to put water on it and by that means will obviate the necessity of continually cultivating the soil and secure a quantity of fine feed. He thinks that it will be a good plan to plow the clover up about every four years and thus enrich the soil. I can see but one difficulty in that plan and that is, if he uses the ordinary spray for his trees there is danger of the stock that eats the clover, either green or in hay, being poisoned, as it is said that several horses have been killed in the valley by that means, but that the clover is a fine fertilizer no one will question. He intends to try a part of his orchard land with alfalfa and timothy.
    Another item that has just been handed to me by my neighbor, B. H. Bryant, that will be of interest to the readers of the Mail Tribune is that on last Wednesday, April 23, evening, a number of our musically inclined citizens met in Brown's hall and organized a brass band of 16 pieces, with Frank Nichols as director; A. E. Strong, secretary and treasurer; F. T. Wilfley, Herbert Weimer and A. E. Strong, managing committee. The names of the pieces and names of players are as follows: Cornets, Frank Nichols and Herbert Weimer; clarinet, Herbert Carlton; piccolo, A. E. Strong; flute, Joseph Singleton; baritone, F. T. Wilfley; slide trombones, B. H. Bryant and Frank Newport; alto, Chalmer Ringer and Merritt Martin; tenor, Carl Ringer and Ray Harnish; b flat bass, William Wright; tuba, Frank Brown; snare drum, Joe Moomaw; bass drum, Thomas Riley. As most of the members are old players, they will be making music in a short time.
    Quite a number of our young folk had planned to have a picnic dinner upon the banks of Rogue River last Sunday, but the day was so cold and windy that only part of them went and they divided, some of them going up to Peter Betz' on the Rogue River, and some of them to F. J. Ayres', but they report having had a fine time even if it was a cold day.
    In a former article I spoke of the action of the school board in employing the teachers for the next year and yesterday morning I had a talk with F. Pelouze, one of the directors, and he tells me that they have not secured the services of Professor Buchanan of Butte Falls, as announced. He had put in his application and the board had decided to employ him and so notified him, but as he has not notified them of his acceptance of their offer they are looking for another man. I also spoke of one of our teachers, Miss Jane Knox, who has charge of the third, next to the highest, room, being left without a school, and I wish to state that she did not apply for a position here, as she has a school engaged near Portland.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 1, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Fred Pelouze, one of our progressive orchardists, was doing business in our town last Monday and while here visited our school. He is one of the directors. He took dinner with your correspondent and while here gave me his idea as to how to conduct the business of the district. He is in favor of levying a heavy tax and having everything on a high plane.
    I learned this Thursday morning that there is talk of trying to bond the school district, pay off the indebtedness, and some are talking of building another school house, but from what I can learn by listening on the street to what is said, a majority of the taxpayers are opposed to both moves.
    Scott Bruce has moved to Portland with his family and Mr. Diamond, who has been in partnership with Mr. Heath in the mercantile business, has moved to Medford.
    John Rader and his daughter Miss Inez brought in a lot of butter and eggs for Mr. Heath Wednesday.
    Mrs. E. Packard and son, who have been visiting Mrs. Henry Meyers on Lake Creek, came out Wednesday and returned to their home in Medford.
    Mr. Bertison of Lake Creek was in town Wednesday doing business with our hardware merchants and Henry Childreth, one of our blacksmiths.
    Lyman O. Orton, who owns the old Erwin place just north of our town, called at the Sunnyside for supper Wednesday night, and Harold L. Hardwick, a traveling salesman for the Pacific Hardware and Steel Company of Portland, was here doing business with our new hardware man Roy Ashpole Wednesday and spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Fred Heath spent Wednesday in Medford.
    L. H. Deweese and his brother J. L. Deweese, who are settled on a tract of railroad land near the site of the old Jacobs sawmill on the Obenchain road, were in town Wednesday having some repair work done on their wagon.
    George Fisher, one of our blacksmiths, has been spending a few days with the "old folks at home" on Indian Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 3, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. S. Coulton of Ashland, who formerly lived in the Antelope country near Wellen and owns a fine farm there now, was in our town last Wednesday. He has been stopping on his farm for the past two weeks cleaning it up around the home and barns.
    Harry Stanley of Lake Creek was among us Wednesday.
    Mrs. St. James of Medford, who has been out here visiting her sister, Mrs. Joe Moomaw, returned home Wednesday.
    Mr. and Mrs. Froman, who have been keeping the Tavern for the past year and a half, have moved to Springfield and a man and his wife by the name of Barber came out from Medford Thursday to look over the situation but at last account had not decided as to whether they would accept the position or not, but I will probably know by the next time I write.
    When Roy Willits came out from Persist, he is the mail contractor, he brought out quite a quantity of iron strips from the fish hatchery to have H. O. Childreth work over for the new machinery they are putting in at the mouth of Elk Creek.
    Mrs. Howard Fox and her two children of Altese, Marion County, called at the Sunnyside for supper Thursday evening. She has been up in the hills north of Big Butte Creek visiting her mother, Mrs. Wm. Abbott, and while here met her two brothers Thomas and Everett. Speaking of Everett Abbott, he is the young man of whom I spoke a short time ago who had his jaw broken while hauling logs in a mill camp, and I am glad to be able to say that he is getting along as well as could be expected.
    Lemon Charley and family, including his married daughter, Mrs. Lee Bradshaw, were among the visitors in our town Thursday afternoon.
    Some of those who attended the dance Thursday night report having had a very pleasant time and speak well of the refreshments served by Frank Lewis.
    The delegates who went from here to Grants Pass, to represent the Baptist church of this place, at the Baptist Association, were Miss Loretta Childreth, Mrs. Painter and Rev. L. L. Simmons and wife.
    James Ringer is at this writing engaged repapering the Baptist church of this place.
    Thursday night Mr. A. B. Saling, a real estate dealer of Medford, and two ladies, Mrs. C. H. Smith and her daughter, Miss Zada, stopped at the Sunnyside, also Mrs. W. W. Willits of Persist spent the night with us on her way home. She had been out as far as Medford to accompany her niece, Mrs. Roach, of Idaho, who went up to visit her a few weeks ago.
    Mr. F. L. Wendt of Medford, a traveling salesman for The Rosenfield & Smith Company, called Friday for dinner. He is engaged selling Bunte's world-famous chocolates and Mr. J. W. Hanners, also of Medford, representing Armour & Company. Mr. Hanners spoke of the interest he took in reading the account of my trip last fall up in Multnomah, Clackamas and Umatilla counties.
    Jack Florey, our deputy postmaster, has gone to the mountains to recuperate.
    While the pastor of the First Baptist church of Eagle Point was attending the association at Grants Pass some of the members of the church stole a march on him and had the church building repapered, the floor scrubbed, and everything fixed up in fine shape. He, with the rest of the delegates, returned Friday morning.
    When I wrote yesterday, Friday, I spoke of A. B. Saling, Mrs. C. H. Smith and her daughter, Miss Sadie, staying here and going out to look at a farm, and on their return trip they were just late enough to miss the car so spent Friday night with us.
    There have been some changes in real estate in our town and also in the line of moving. Toney McClennan has bought the Diamond property and moved onto it, and Charles Vaughn has rented and moved into the Heath house. Aaron Smith has quit the L. O. Orton orchard and is going to Coos Bay and W. J. Henderson is moving onto the Orton place, so they are having a change all around.
    A. J. Daley has been turning his attention to the duck business and seems to think that he is going to make a success of it. He says that he has two ducks that have laid an egg every day since in December with the exception that one of them stopped just long enough for her to shed her feathers and then went to laying again. He has quite a flock of young ducks now on hand and is selling the duck eggs quite rapidly.
    I understand that a man and his wife from Medford by the name of Barber are coming out the first of the week to reopen the Tavern.
    J. L. Hovey, who has charge of the McNight orchard--the Altavista Orchard--was in town Saturday and reports that the frost has done but very little damage as yet to the fruit on the place he has charge of.
    Mrs. A. E. Searl and children of Medford were on the car this Saturday morning on her way to Butte Falls. She was going up in company of Mrs. Mary Wilson to Mrs. Wilson's homestead near Dudley. Mrs. Wilson has been living in Medford for several months but has decided to return to her old home in the mountains, as she thinks that is the nicest place of all, and Mrs. Searl and children are going up to enjoy the fresh mountain air for a short time.
    C. W. Austin, John Higinbotham, his sister, Mrs. Schartreau, of Derby, and Mr. Briggs of Butte Falls all came out from Medford and went on up. H. B. Bryant of Eagle Point also came out and Everett Abbott went up to Butte Falls on a short business trip.
    O. A. Bailey, who lives on the old Matney place, brought in a lot of cream to be shipped to the Ashland Creamery Saturday morning.
    L. J. Hessler of Brownsboro called for dinner Saturday.
    Al Hall of Trail and his daughter were trading with our merchants Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday your Eagle Point correspondent took a trip to Sams Valley and in the afternoon preached in the Chaparral school house and at night attended services at Table Rock and Rev. M. C. Davis preached and while on the way was passed by some of the Mail Tribune force, how many I cannot say, but I recognized Miss Helen Yockey, the bookkeeper for the concern, and how many more I could not say for they passed me so quick that I barely had time to think, and they were gone. While I was gone on Sunday the following persons called for dinner: J. T. Sullivan and wife, Miss Dora Sullivan, Miss Irene Sullivan, Master Jack Sullivan, Harry Fields, Arthur Hodgeman and W. E. White. Mr. Sullivan is the business manager for the Roguelands Irrigation Company, but as I was away from home did not have the pleasure of meeting with them but hope to have the pleasure of their company here again in the near future.
    Saturday night W. E. Hammel came out to attend the dance given by the E.P.D. Club, spent the night with us and left an ad for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    While I was in Sams Valley and Table Rock I learned that the frost had done considerable damage to the fruit and corn crop, one man reporting that he had 17 acres of corn bitten down and he expected to have to replant the whole of it. I also met A. J. Lupton and three others whose names I did not learn. They were out for a ride in their auto and had stopped to close up a puncture. The crops look really well as a general thing along the route, but I noticed quite a number of wheat fields that were badly mixed with wild mustard. Returning on Monday I found that Jack Florey, our deputy postmaster, who had been to the Prospect country to visit his grandmother, Mrs. Chauncey Nye, had returned to his post again.
    Joseph Riley was doing business with us Tuesday and about noon an auto came up with the following persons that called for dinner at the Sunnyside: Mrs. J. C. Dodge of Perryville, Ore.; Mrs. L. M. N. Clarke of Sporich, Mass.; Thomas Barns of Salem, Ore.; Bernard Dodge of New York City and R. T. Johnson of Skowhegan, Maine. They came out for a ride, a good time and a good dinner. As I was called away on business immediately after dinner I do not know if they went a-fishing or not, but they inquired of me about the fishing, and I told them that I saw the boys were catching considerable many.
    Senator von der Hellen and his son Carl were smiling on their friends Tuesday forenoon.
    The Tavern has opened up for business again under the management of Mr. Barber.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 8, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Givan, who has a farm and orchard on Rogue River near the conjunction of Little Butte Creek and that river, was in town on business last Tuesday.
    G. H. Johnson, formerly of Medford but a contractor and builder in Sacramento, California, came out from Medford Wednesday to visit some of his old friends. He did intend to have gone on up to Butte Falls while out here but learned when he arrived that he had to be in Sisson, California on Saturday, so took the car for Medford again the same day. He has just returned from a visit to his old boyhood home in Portland, Maine, and says that things have changed wonderfully since he left there.
    Dr. C. E. McDonald, formerly of Portland, Oregon, but now of Medford, and his brother, S. E. McDonald, were pleasant callers Wednesday. The doctor is an ocultist and is doing considerable business in these parts.
    Miss Mabel Culbertson of Lake Creek called for dinner the other day and while here met with an old friend, a lady that she seemed to be glad to have met.
    The W.C.T.U. met in the Baptist church Saturday, May 3, and after attending to the regular routine of business had tea and cake served by Mesdames Bryant and Florey. Whenever you hear of a social of any kind in Eagle Point you may always set it down that they have had a good time, for [of] all the sociable people in the world the Oregonians, and especially the people of Eagle Point, are noted for being up to date in that line.
    Mr. Corman, who is working on the Corbin orchard, brought in some apples for Fred L. Heath, and Mrs. Quackenbush, wife of the foreman on the orchard, and Miss Lillian Petty were with him.
    Mrs. Ervin, mother of Fred Ervin of this valley, arrived from California a few days ago on a visit to her son.
    We had a little legal breeze in our town the past week. J. A. Mayhorn brought suit in Judge Watkins' court against David Smith of Butte Falls to replevin a horse, and his mother Mrs. Mayham went on the bonds for the cost, damages, etc., but when the case came up Smith did not appear, and the horse was recovered but Mrs. Mayham had to pay the cost, and the justice said that the horse was not worth as much as the cost of the suit amounted to, eight dollars.
    A committee of ladies have set Saturday, the 24th of May, as the day for all persons interested in the fixup of the Antelope cemetery to meet at the cemetery at 9 o'clock a.m. for the purpose of cleaning it up, replacing the old fence with a neat wire fence and wire gate, fixing up the graves of those who have been neglected, etc. A basket dinner will be served on the ground. Let everybody turn out that is interested and those who cannot come and wish to help send the funds to Mrs. Alice Daley and Mrs. A. C. Howlett.
    L. K. Hawk, owner of a fine farm and orchard in the suburbs of our town, called on your Eagle Point correspondent and handed him a year's subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune.
    W. E. Hammel brought in for shipment a little over one thousand pounds of goat's wool last week.
    Our daughter, Miss Hattie, went to Grants Pass last week to have Dr. M. C. Findley treat her eyes.
    Miss Ella Parker of Butte Falls came out last Thursday evening on the P.&E. and spent the night with us on her way home.
    Tim Daily came out from Medford last Friday morning and took the Eagle Point-Persist stage for his home near Trail.
    Last Saturday morning your Eagle Point correspondent took the car for Grants Pass to consult Dr. Findley with regard to his eyes. Arriving at noon we found the doctor as busy as an ant in a sugar barrel, and he fixed the hour for treating my case at 1:30 p.m.; so after dinner I was on hand of course, and he asked me if I couldn't wait until later as he had some patients that wanted to go away that afternoon, and to make a long matter short, he reached my case at 4:30 p.m. but found that my eyes were greatly improved. About the first man I met in the office was D. H. Barneburg. He was there with his wife and daughter, Miss Mary; also Mr. and Mrs. H. G. Mathers, all of Ashland. They had come from home that morning in their auto and had had quite an experience. Mr. Barneburg said that as they were riding along down the Applegate River they ran into a soft place and the first thing he knew his machine was headed for Ashland instead of Grants Pass but he finally succeeded in backing out and with the aid of of a man and shovel [and] soon reached a dry spot where he put on his chains. They had all come for medical treatment except Miss Mary; she just came along with her parents. I also met at the doctor's Mrs. Jack Houston of Trail. She had been there several days but expected to be able to return home by Wednesday. I also met Mrs. W. H. Farlow, formerly of Phoenix, and Wm. Pickens of Montague, California. He is one of the sons of Hon. Pinkney Pickens, who at one time owned the famous Pickens farm of Table Rock. We knew each other when he was a little boy, and I was a "circuit rider" on the Jacksonville circuit in 1865-66. I also met Mr. Schell and wife. Mrs. Schell was being treated for her hearing. Mr. Schell is a member of the firm of Schell & Schell, contractors in street and concrete work. I also met Miss Mabel Peart of Central Point.
    Sunday morning I took the car for Three Pines where I was met by Rev. M. C. Davis, our Sunday school missionary. A meeting had been called by the Three Pines Congregational Church for the purpose of receiving them as a church organization into the East Willamette Association, and we are soon joined by Rev. George E. Paddock, state superintendent of the church work, and Rev. Howard N. Smith, state superintendent of the Sunday school work for the Congregationalists. We four went to the school house where the children had already commenced to gather for Sunday school, and after Sunday school Rev. H. N. Smith preached a fine sermon. We had no services in the afternoon as the railroad company had arranged to load the cars that day with ties, but the agreement is that that will be the last Sunday when the men will have to work. At night we had a good audience again, and the council was organized by making Dr. Paddock moderator and Rev. Davis secretary. After the preliminaries Rev. Smith made the address of recognition; Rev. Howlett the address on "Fellowship"; Rev. Davis, the prayer; Dr. Paddock, the sermon, and it was a masterly effort by a great man, but he had a great subject.
    I must close for this time, but the next time will try to tell about the contest last Saturday night by the members of the Athletic Club and what went on here on Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 15, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday night, May 10, the E.P.A.C. had another contest, and although I was not there I have a full account given by the director and will try to give a brief account of what happened. My informant says that the gymnasium was simply filled and about the time for them to commence the exercises Frank Nichols came marching in with his brass band and rendered several fine pieces of music, and they were received with rousing cheers. The first event was the 17 potato race for men, announced by Mrs. G. W. Owens, who acted as chair lady. The first contestants were Rev. Simmons, Ralph Owens and Glen Haley. The excitement began to be intense by the time they had run one-third of the distance--350 yards--Glen Haley winning the first race. The second race was by Harry Bryant, Ed Coy and Frank Houston, Harry Bryant being the winner. Then came the final run between Harry Bryant, Glen Haley and Carl Ringer. At first the silence was simply intense but by the time they made the first turn the audience simply broke loose and the noise was simply deafening, and in addition to the excitement of the crowd the band started up an inspiring tune, Bryant and Haley ran neck and neck, but when all but three potatoes were taken, Haley slipped, giving Bryant an advantage which he kept all through. The next was a potato race by the ladies, six rounds--about 125 yards. The first heat was by Miss Hazel McClellan, Miss Blass and Miss Carrie Owens, Miss Blass and Miss McClellan ran neck and neck, but Miss McClellan won out on the first heat. The next heat was run by Miss Grace Conley, Miss Marguerite Florey and Miss Mabel Wamsley, Miss Conley first and Miss Florey second. The result was five points each for Miss Conley and Miss McClellan. Then came the standing hop, skip and jump, for the men. The game was hotly contested, and the result was Harry Bryant first, jump 26 feet, six inches; Ed Coy second, with 25 feet, nine inches to his credit. Then came the ladies' three-legged race. Two ladies, Miss Blass and Miss Conley, had one of their legs tied to each other's leg and ran thus tied together; in this position they ran three times around the gym and just as they were nearing the home line some mischievous boys turned off the light and they were left in darkness to finish the race and the darkness was so intense that the timekeepers could not see the time so after Miss McClellan and Miss Hazel Brown had run their three-legged race Professor Singleton had them to run it over again, this heat in 26 seconds. Then Miss Blass and Miss McClellan started on their final by circling the gym in 22 seconds. Now Miss Florey had no partner, and the professor gave her the privilege of choosing any lady she wished so she chose Miss Blass. Their time was 26 seconds, so the race ended by Miss Blass and Miss Conley first and Misses McClellan, Florey and Brown second. Then the ladies had a spoon race, running around the hall carrying an egg in a spoon, which was won by Miss Blass in the short time of 43.5 seconds. Thus ended the program with the following results: Miss Louisa Blass first, a gold medal; Miss Grace Conley second, silver medal; Miss Hazel McClellan, third, silver medal.
    Then came the exercises on the parallel bars by the men, Rev. Simmons making 48 out of a possible 50, Ed Coy second, and Ray Harnish third.
    Then came the dipping on the parallel bars with Carl Ringer, 16 times; Rev. Simmons, 10¾ times, and Ralph Owens, 9¾ times.
    The winners were: Harry Bryant, first, 10 points; Simmons, second, 8 points; Carl Ringer also second, 8 points, and Ed Coy third, 6 points.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I told the story of how the athletic club performed on Saturday night, May 10, and had no space for any items of local interest during the past week. On Sunday, the 11th, quite a number of Medford people took dinner at the Sunnyside and among them was Miss Helen Yockey, the bookkeeper and general caretaker of the interests of the Medford Mail Tribune Publishing Company, and her mother, and Miss Geraldine Rukes, assistant to Miss Yockey in the Mail Tribune office, and her mother, Denver A. Marsh of Jacksonville, Willard Chase, Medford, Mr. and Mrs. L. S. Beveridge, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Trowbridge of Medford, Mrs. A. A. Bird and daughter Miss Helen of Medford, besides some others whose names I failed to get, as I was away from home, at Three Pines. I met the two young ladies first mentioned on my return in Medford and they said that they had such a good time and good dinner that they were coming back again.
    William Newstrom and Henry Tonn of Lake Creek were out the first of the week after two loads of wire fencing for Mr. Bollo.
    Mr. and Mrs. Austin Green of Trail came out and Mrs. Green went to Medford.
    Carl Jackson, who has been doing business in Butte Falls during the past season, came out to spend a few days with his parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson.
    Dr. W. P. Holt went to Grants Pass to attend the meeting of the medical association that met there May 13.
    R. R. Minter came out to bring his daughter, Miss Samantha, so she could attend the Rebekah lodge.
    E. L. Cooley, town marshal, was taken to the Sacred Heart Hospital during the week.
    Mr. Hughes, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, and Mr. Cross, also of Butte Falls, spent the night here May 14.
    Wilbur Ashpole, one of the Medford business men, came out and spent the night with his brother Roy and wife.
    Rev. Carter, who has established a mission in Medford, called last week on his way to Reese Creek school house to try to organize a Sunday school.
    Mrs. Henderson and Mrs. Aaron Smith were doing business in our town last Friday. Mrs. Smith said that her husband and family expected to start for the coast today, Monday.
    Since Fred L. Heath has bought out the interest of his partner, Mr. Diamond, he has had Thomas Riley, Jr. paint signs on both ends of his store building.
    R. A. Hirsch of Portland, a railroad inspector, came out and spent a few days with us and passed the time fishing in our beautiful Little Butte Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 21, 1913, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote I was telling about who had been in our town and what they were doing, how parties were here fishing and looking over our beautiful country but did not have space to tell all that I had in store for the readers of the Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. Thomas Cingcade was in town the last of the week, not visiting, but attending to business.
    A traveling salesman by the name of Kinney from Portland stopped in just long enough to take dinner, pay his bill and was off to attend to business.
    There was one item of interest to some of our readers that I should have mentioned before: that is that Mr. and Mrs. Coyle and their two daughters arrived from Willamette Valley to visit Mrs. Coyle's sister, Mrs. J. W. Nichols. They have not met before for about forty years.
    Quite a crowd went from here to Medford to attend the opening of the Page Theatre Monday night, but only twenty-five went on the cars, returning the same night.
    Monday night quite a number went from here to Medford to attend the meeting of the Grand Lodge of I.O.O.F., but Tuesday morning there was but a few on the car to Medford and your Eagle Point correspondent was a passenger, but not particularly to meet those who were in attendance to the Grand Lodge, but to meet his daughter, Mrs. J. M. Lewis of Pendleton, Washington.
    The delegates to the Grand Lodge from here were P. H. Daily and Mr. Painter, the latter to represent the Rebekah lodge.
    Green Mathews, one of our prosperous members of the blacksmith firm of Fisher & Mathews, was in town Wednesday morning and while here gave me his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Our E.P.A. Club is anticipating a fine time here Saturday night. They are going to give us an entertainment and I happened to get on the good side of one who heard them rehearsing and it surely will be fine to anyone who enjoys a good hearty laugh.
    Tuesday afternoon Mr. and Mrs. W. R. Mace and J. E. Sendelback of Newport, Oregon, came out and engaged rooms at the Sunnyside for a week. They are looking over the agate fields to satisfy themselves as to the quantity and quality of the stones found in these regions.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 23, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Dr. Browers of Ashland passed through Eagle Point last week on the way up the river.
    Mr. Natwick has moved one of the county rock crushers from the desert to a point just above town.
    Alvin Marian, whose wagon turned over with a load of cordwood near the bridge on the Pacific & Eastern railroad and whose ribs were broken in the accident, took dinner at the Sunnyside one day last week.
    School closes May 29.
    S. H. Harnish, while his wife was absent on a visit to her parents in Josephine County, took advantage of her absence and had the upper part of the house finished up and papered, electric lights installed and things fixed up generally, but cautioned me to say nothing about it in the Eaglets until her return, as he knew that she would see it, for the Mail Tribune is taken up there, and he wanted to take her by surprise.
    Art Nichols has reopened his meat market so that those wishing can get meat again.
    Merle M. Willits of Persist came out last week and went to Medford to see the parade of the I.O.O.F., returning Thursday night to the Sunnyside so as to take the stage Friday morning for home.
    Alex Heisler of Newport came out and joined his friends, Mr. and Mrs. Matco and Mr. Sadlerback, who were stopping with us gathering agates. They had gathered quite a lot of stones and Mr. and Mrs. Matco talk as though they would come back again this fall and invest in town property and go into business here.
    G. H. Wilber, a traveling salesman of Chicago, and Fitzmaurice, another traveling salesman of New York City, spent the night with us.
    Buel Hildreth of Butte Falls also was with us the last of the week.
    William Winkles' daughter was thrown out of a buggy last week and her arm broken between the wrist and elbow. Dr. Holt reduced the fracture and at last accounts she was resting easy.
    Mrs. Nora Cooke of Oregon City, a sister-in-law of Mrs. Howlett, came out on last Friday morning to make a short visit, returning Saturday afternoon.
    Saturday night the E.P.A.C. gave an entertainment in the Spiker hall that was truly interesting to anyone who can enjoy a good hearty laugh. I did intend to give a copy of the entire program, but Rev. Simmons destroyed it before he thought of my wanting it, but the different actors performed their parts well, especially the suffragette march led by Mrs. Lulu Moomaw. The music of the band was up to date, also on the piano by Mrs. Cora O'Brien and her daughter, Miss Allison. Miss Allison O'Brien also gave an exhibition of the highland fling that was simply grand. Pieces were rendered by Mrs. Moomaw and her brother, Carl Ringer. But the crowning act was a dialogue between Joe Singleton and Carl Ringer, the new servant, that brought down the entire house. If I had more space I would be glad to be able to particularize, but I have already gone beyond my limited space. Receipts of the evening were $25.10. The next time will try to tell who were here Sunday, what I did, where I went, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Oliver McCabe started last Wednesday for the state of Washington.
    Mrs. George von der Hellen, who has so successfully handled the primary department of our school, has gone to Los Angeles to spend the summer.
    The Eagle Point band gave a dance last Tuesday and I understand that they had a pleasant time, although they were somewhat crowded. The dance was given to raise funds to buy the uniforms for the members of the band, which amounted to over $100.
    Our school closed yesterday (Thursday) and Mrs. Suddarth, the teacher of the primary department, gave the children of her room a picnic dinner at her residence, and the children say that they had a very enjoyable time, but express their regrets that they have to part with her.
    Last Sunday as I was on my way to church J. M. Beauberry came dashing along in an auto with J. A. Smith, his daughter, Mrs. Sarah Hall, of Medford, and his niece, Miss Madge Gulberson, of Petaluma, Cal., on their way to the Sunnyside for dinner, and when I returned from church found Mr. and Mrs. Fred Engle and ex-Senator L. L. Mulit, wife and little son, of Ashland, and a few minutes later attorney E. D. Briggs and wife and daughter, Miss Nellie and son, Billie, and J. C. McNair of Ashland and George Davis, wife and daughter, Miss Hazel, and Dr. J. M. Keene and wife, besides Mayor von der Hellen, wife and two children and a stranger whose name I failed to remember, beside several of the citizens of Eagle Point, who just came in for a good chicken dinner.
    Sunday afternoon I got into the auto with Mr. Smith and his daughter and went to Medford, attended the Baptist church and the next morning took the 7:30 train for Grants Pass to have Dr. Findley treat my eyes, arriving at his office at 8:40 a.m. and was fortunate enough to be the seventh name on the list that morning. During the forenoon I was there I had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. W. S. Rader, Mrs. R. J. Pool, Mr. and Mrs. Bird, Mrs. T. Williamson and Miss Kate Coburn, all of Yreka, Cal., and Mrs. W. J. Bary and Mrs. J. F. Haight of Broy, Cal., and Mrs. J. W. Pardee of Canyonville, Ore., beside several others whose names I did not learn. When I met them, as soon as they learned my name they would say; "Howlett; Oh, you're the man who writes the Eaglets for the Mail Tribune," and when I would answer in the affirmative they would generally say: "Oh, I know you, for I have been reading the Eaglets for a long time.
    Died--May 27, 1913, on his homestead, near Trail, Reuben P. Daw, of typhoid pneumonia, aged about 48 years. He leaves a wife and several children to battle alone in this world.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 31, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Corbin Edgell, a prominent orchardist who bought a tract of land off the old Bradshaw place, was a pleasant caller last week.
    Irvin Daley and a young man by the name of Stewart, who had been visiting W. C. Daley on the north fork of Little Butte Creek, returned to Medford last Friday.
    Memorial Day was properly commemorated here; many who have relatives buried visiting the different cemeteries, and quite a number of the old veterans went to Central Point to join their comrades there.
    Last Sunday morning your Eagle Point correspondent started for Trail to be on hand and join with the people in that section in the children's day exercises on Sunday, June 1. It was planned to have Rev. M. C. Davis and Rev. H. N. Smith, the state Sunday school missionary and state superintendent of the Congregational Church of this state of Sunday schools, to be there and conduct the religious exercises, but owing to Rev. Davis having a mixup with a dog while riding on his motorcycle, and having his foot badly bruised, he was unable to come and Rev. Smith was detained in Portland, so I had to go alone and do the best I could. There was a large crowd assembled, about 110 or 120, and after the entertainment by the Sunday school children in the forenoon we had a picnic dinner in the shade of a large ash tree on the bank of the creek, then returned to the ball, where W. H. Merriman led in the Sunday school exercises and then I preached to a large and seemingly appreciative audience. At that time, at the request of quite a number of the citizens of Elk Creek, I announced that I would preach on Tuesday night in the Pence school house, where I was met by all in the neighborhood except about five or six who could not attend. During Monday and Tuesday I spent most of my time canvassing for the Mail Tribune and collecting what I could from delinquent subscribers, and I found quite a number who seemed to be much surprised to learn that they were in arrears from a few months to a few years and in some instances they would look for an hour for their receipt for the last payment and finally conclude that they had misplaced it, and in some instances would pay up, while others would say, "Well, I will be in town and see that editor and make him straighten it up." And while I am on that subject will remark that it would be a good idea for all of the subscribers to the weekly and Daily Mail Tribune to hunt up their receipts for I expect to visit the most of them who receive their mail in the following post offices: Wellen, Brownsboro, Lake Creek, Butte Falls, Derby, Sams Valley and Eagle Point, in the near future and try to straighten up their accounts with the paper, and would suggest further that those who know themselves to be in arrears to keep a little cash on hand for the occasion.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 6, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday morning your correspondent started for Sams Valley to try to find some more subscribers for the Mail Tribune and have those who were in arrears pay up, renew, etc., but I did not have the success I anticipated, as almost every man I met that I asked to subscribe told me that he was already a subscriber. But as I did not have near all of the subscribers on my list I could do but little business. The trouble was that they have a star route from Gold Hill to Sams Valley and a rural route from Central Point, and all along the two routes receive their mail through that means, but I saw some fine country and met quite a number of fine people but am sorry to say that I met one man who refused to pay on the ground that "they had no business in sending the paper after the time it was paid for." I found quite a number were busy haying and am sorry to say that I found quite a number cutting away the blight from their trees and in some instances they had cut away almost all of the branches.
    Returning to Table Rock Sunday morning I found that the rain Saturday night had caused the good people to change their plans for a picnic on the banks of the Rogue River, deciding to have it, and the Sunday school exercises, in the school house, and there I was met by Rev. George E. Paddock, state superintendent of the home missionary work in Oregon, and Rev. Howard N. Smith, state superintendent of the Sunday school interests of the Congregational Church of Oregon. There was a good attendance, a remarkably good one, considering that the day was rather cool and showery and that there was one family who had the measles and another who had the whooping cough, but they had a fine program and after the program was completed, and a fine lunch was served, Dr. George E. Paddock gave us a very interesting talk on the subject of "How Christ Labored to Assist and Elevate Those with Whom He Mingled."
    After spending the night with kind friends, Monday morning started out to try to finish up my work for the Mail Tribune in Sams Valley, and before I left the house where I was staying collected a subscription, or rather a renewal. Steering my course toward Sams Valley I stopped at a house to speak to a friend and there received another renewal; passing on through the valley up Sams Creek I met with fairly good success and about 10:30 a.m. started to climb a hill, I won't call it a mountain, for it only took me a little over an hour to climb it, and by inquiring along the route found the place, and when I opened the gate was met by two ugly-looking dogs that snapped and barked, but I kept on in spite of them to the door and knocked and presently was met by a very nice-appearing lady, and on inquiry learned that Mr. ------ had gone out to look for a cow that had strayed off from the others, and the lady did not know when he would be home. I then inquired if I could get dinner and my horses fed, whereupon I was told that there was not hay in the barn and as I saw no preparations made for dinner I turned my course and drove back down the hill to C. E. Miller's place where I had a sumptuous dinner and my team fed.
    Next Monday, June 16, is our annual school meeting day, and it stands those interested in a careful and economic management of our school to be present. I understand that there is a move on foot to bond the school district for ten thousand dollars to build a large new brick school house and that with our ten thousand dollar bonds for a water system sounds big for a little village like Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 11, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I told of some of my experiences in trying to collect for the Medford Mail Tribune and got as far as Mr. Miller's where I took dinner and the next move was to drive to the mouth of Sams Creek to see a man who was in arrears some two or three years and found that he had gone to Central Point, but I saw as fine a tract of land as there is to be found in Jackson County. Cutting across lots I found a few who were in arrears and ready to pay. On reaching home I found that on Sunday my wife and daughters had been kept busy most of the day as there was quite a number of people from Medford and the surrounding country among whom were Marguerite Bailey, Mollie Jones, Jane Watt, Dorothy Brownhall, Louisa Farmer, N. W. Shusser, who came out for a good time and to take dinner at the Sunnyside. E. P. Price and F. W. Harleigh, who are in the hardware business in Medford.
    Robbie Harnish and his sister, Miss Dottie, have gone to Josephine County to visit their grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. J. P. Moomaw and other relatives.
    Ivan Culbertson, our mail carrier from here to Lake Creek via Brownsboro, was around Tuesday with a petition praying the honorable county court to have the road repaired between here and Brownsboro, especially, and on up to the McAllister Soda Springs.
    Mike Sedley and Thomas Stanley called for dinner Tuesday, and while here Mike settled with me for his subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune. Mr. Stanley is the road superintendent on the above-mentioned road and has been doing some fine work above Brownsboro; what work he is doing he does well.
    Aaron Smith has moved to Coquille County with his family.
    Quite a number of our citizens have gone to Bandon to work this summer.
    Raphael Gardner, wife and son, came out Tuesday with some beef for our market and to have Dr. Holt lance an abscess on the boy's neck.
    Mrs. Howlett and our two daughters that are at home now, Mrs. J. M. Lewis and Miss Hattie, drove into Medford Thursday morning.
    Rev. H. N. Smith, state superintendent of Sunday schools of the Congregational Church of Oregon, is at this writing a guest at the Sunnyside. He is to preach in Trail and Elk Creek next Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 14, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune I have been traveling around the country working for that paper and meeting with fairly good success. On Friday I secured four new subscribers and the renewal of quite a number and the people generally seem well pleased with the paper but occasionally I find one that is in arrears from one to three years that don't like the paper and are going to town to blow up that editor for not stopping the paper when the year was up, but you know that there is always a class of people that would grumble to be hanged.
    On Saturday morning I started in company with Rev. Howard N. Smith, the state superintendent of the Congregational Sunday school of Oregon, to attend a meeting at Trail Sunday morning and at Elk Creek in the evening, reaching Trail at noon and taking dinner with mine hostess, Mrs. Middlebusher. Then we went on up the creek to John Warner's where we had the privilege of inspecting his poultry house and especially his contrivance for protecting his young turkeys. He had sixty-five come off just as the big snow storm came and the question came up "How are we to save them?" So he cut off a part of his hen house--about ten feet--dug a trench through the center and build a furnace about eight inches deep. He then cut off a space about four feet wide and eight feet long, divided into different compartments, making the covering of boards, leaving a space about two inches deep between the boards and the dirt floor, and by keeping a fire in the flue during the day, and then just at night placing two or three dry oak sticks in the flue that would keep up the warmth all night and the young turkeys would have a warm dry place to sleep and in the daytime would have the rest of the heated part for exercise. The result was that he now has some five dozen fine young turkeys that will be ready for market by Thanksgiving.
    On Sunday we had the school house packed and quite a number had to remain outside. They are talking of building a larger school house. After preaching we took dinner with mine host and hostess, Mr. and Mrs. Ash of the Ash Hotel, where we had the pleasure of meeting with two of the McDonald brothers who have, with another brother, bought the Rube and Jeff Johnson farms, one of whom the next day gave me his subscription for the Mail Tribune. After dinner we started for Elk Creek to fill our appointment for preaching, where we were met at the school house by about all the people in that section. Rev. Smith preached a very impressive sermon, he spending the night with Mr. and Mrs. M. Price, and your correspondent spending the night with the family of George Lynch, returning home Monday noon.
    When we reached the Sunnyside we found some eight or ten there for dinner, some from Medford and some from other parts of the country, but as it was just dinner time I did not have time or opportunity to learn their names. After reading my letters and eating my dinner I asked Mrs. Howlett, who was here Sunday, and she said, "Oh, I don't know, they kept coming in until 8 o'clock and I was too busy to try to keep track of them; there was a Mr. Brown and a Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence and their families of Medford and some from Ashland, etc., but I don't remember their names."
    Our school meeting passed off very pleasantly Monday and Ed S. Wolfer was elected director and A. J. Florey, our old standby, for clerk.
    Claud Wamsley, who has been back East and South for about four years, came in Monday afternoon on the P.&E.
    I learned over the phone that another of our old pioneers, John Obenchain, passed off Monday night, but I suppose your Butte Falls correspondent will write a notice for the Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 18, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Cort Nichols has reopened his meat market and has his ice plant in operation, but the cold weather creates a call for wood and heavy clothing instead of ice.
    F. L. Wendt of Medford, who is representing Bunte Bros. candies of Portland, was visiting the various confectioneries in our town the first of the week and called for dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    C. A. Newstrom and wife, of Lake Creek, were in town on business last Tuesday and while here paid up a year's subscription to the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Last Tuesday a young man, a nephew of Mr. McCarthy, while cultivating corn, stepped on the tongue of the cultivator to properly adjust some of the harness, frightened the horses and they ran away, throwing him off and cutting his head quite badly. Dr. Holt was summoned and dressed the wounds, and at last accounts he was doing well.
    Born in Eagle Point to Mr. and Mrs. Floyd Pearce, June 14, a daughter weighing four and three-quarters pounds. At last accounts, the child and mother were both doing well.
    Last Tuesday and Wednesday I took a spin around to find some new subscribers to the Mail Tribune and collect from those who are in arrears in their accounts, but the first day met with poor success. Some were frank and candid enough to admit that they did not have the money, while others would say, "Oh, well, I will be in town in a few days and will hand it in to the office," but when I would explain that I was paid for my trouble riding around over the country, by a commission, one man was so conscientious that he said that he didn't think that it was right to pay me a commission when he could hand it in to the office and save the company that much, instead of saying that he didn't have the money on hand.
    While out Wednesday between Dry Creek and Antelope Creek, as I was riding along I saw a team coming down through the field on the old Kent place as fast as they could run, hitched to a hay rake, and as they aimed to go through the gateway one of the wheels came in contact with one of the large gateposts and the sudden stop threw one of the horses, and presently I saw Fred Dutton come running after them. It appeared that Mr. von der Hellen had broken his hay rake and sent over to borrow Mr. Dutton's and shortly after they were hitched up to the rake, one of the horses shook his bridle off, as it had no throat latch, and they both started to run, and when Fred saw the situation he simply rolled off behind the rake and let the horses go. The result of the runaway was that the tongue was broken out of the rake and one tooth broken and a badly frightened man and team.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 20, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry O. Childreth, one of our leading blacksmiths, has built a barn on his lot.
    The farmers and orchardists in the section adjoining the desert are gathering all the turkeys they can find to place in their corn and orchards to stop the ravages of the grasshoppers, and in some cases are meeting with considerable success.
    George Dean, a son of one of the old pioneers, who lived south of Ashland and at one time was one of the largest sheep raisers in the county, spent the night with us last Thursday.
    The remains of John A. Obenchain, who died in Butte Falls on the 17th, passed through here on the way to Jacksonville last Thursday. They were accompanied by quite a number of the citizens of Butte Falls besides his wife and four children, Charles Obenchain and wife and Bud Obenchain, Mrs. Charles Edmonson, Mrs. Harry Cingcade and Frankie, I do not know her surname. They were met at the Eagle Point depot by quite a number of old-time friends of the family, carrying floral offerings as a token of remembrance.
    Mrs. T. A. Betty and her daughter were doing business with Fred L. Heath last Friday.
    John Rader and family were also exchanging farm produce for goods with Mr. Heath.
    Mr. McCloud and family were trading with our merchants last Saturday. Mr. McCloud had a small store on Rogue River near the upper steel bridge.
    Mrs. Libby Eickmeyer of Spokane, Wash., one of the Seven Sisters who took such an active part in making everything pleasant at the time of the encampment of the G.A.R. here last fall, and daughter of Mrs. F. W. Stewart of this place and sister of Mrs. J. W. Grover and Mrs. Norman McQuade, was married in Spokane last Saturday, but I failed to learn the name of the lucky man.
    The L.I.C. of E.P. had their semiannual sale and dinner last Friday. They served dinner at the E.P. Hotel. The receipts of the day were for dinner $28.60 and the sale of their wares was $29.40, making a total of $58.00, and they had sold a few things for which they had not received the pay and that will swell the amount to over $60.
    John Ashpole and wife of Medford are here visiting their son Elroy.
    Miss Gretchen Purdy of Berkeley, Cal., is here visiting her brother and sister, Lawrence Purdy and Mrs. W. W. P. Holt.
    Miss Nora Daley of Medford is here visiting her cousin, Miss Maggie Daley, and other relatives.
    Last Sunday Dr. W. W. P. Holt, wife, daughter Helen, brother-in-law and sister-in-law, Mr. Lawrence and Miss Gretchen Purdy, Mrs. Roe and daughter, Mrs. J. C. Lawton, Mr. and Mrs. W. C. Clements, George W. Wamsley, son and daughter Claud and Miss Mabel, J. W. Dodge, C. W. Sage and James Pen took dinner at the Sunnyside.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, who has been conducting a series of meetings at Peyton during the past week, returned home last Saturday and reports that he had a very good attendance and a good meeting although there was but one conversion reported.
    Prof. Good, who has closed his school at Prospect, was a guest at the Sunnyside Sunday night and took the P.&E. car Monday for Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 24, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. J. H. Lee, wife of the foreman in charge of the Cooley place, just above town, went to Medford last Monday on business and was met here by her husband in the afternoon with three interesting little children and while here gave me his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mr. Kelly, who was formerly superintendent of the government hatchery at the mouth of Elk Creek, on Rogue River, and has for some time been in South America, paid our town a visit last Monday. He expressed his surprise at the growth and improvements in our town.
    Last Tuesday our oldest daughter, Mrs. James M. Lewis, who has been visiting us for a few weeks, returned to her home near Pendleton. Mrs. Howlett, Hattie, Miss Loretta Childreth and myself accompanied her as far as Medford, and after I reached that city I decided to accompany her as far as Grants Pass and let Dr. Findley give me another electrical treatment for my eyes. On my way down the river I could not help noticing how well everything in the vegetable line, including the fruit, looked. There was considerable hay cut, some in the swath, some in the windrow and some in the shock, and in some cases the new crop of alfalfa was almost covering the shocks along the route that is likely to be badly damaged by the continuous rain, but the standing grain surely looks fine.
    While I was in Grants Pass I, as usual, met quite a number of Californians at the doctor's office that came in for treatment for eyes, ears, etc., among whom were Miss Irene and Miss Ethel Ackerman of Yreka, Mrs. George Haight of Little Shasta, California, Mr. and Mrs. O'Conner and daughter Miss Phoebe of Montague. Miss Phoebe was there having an operation performed for mastoid.
    While I was in Medford I was shown a beautiful monument of green marble that Mr. O'Conner was having made in the Oregon Granite Company marble works to be placed over the grave of his daughter, who was drowned near Corvallis a few months ago.
    I also met F. A. Dougherty of Talent, who was having his eyes treated at the same time I had mine treated, for Dr. Findley had us stacked around the room. Also met a family of three by the name of Smith of Montague and a Miss Cuba Arnich of Corvallis, Ore., besides several whose names I did not learn. I always have a good time when I go to Grants Pass, for I meet so many familiar names whom I knew in years gone by.
    While I was in Medford I was met by a gentleman who was circulating a petition asking the county court to call an election to vote road bonds and he suggested that I mention in my Eaglets that we all will have to register before we can vote or sign a petition and as we are going to have a school meeting before long to vote on the tax question it would be a good idea for us all to register so as to be ready.
    James Vestal, a young man who has been attending school at Central Point, but lives on Reese Creek, was in town Wednesday. He says that he is going to the top of the ladder before he quits school. Good for Jimmie.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 27, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Cingcade has had a time finding range for his sheep; he has had them grazing along the right of way of the P.&E. railway until the grass and weeds are all gone, and finally he has had them grazing, by permission, on the open space south of the depot. He intends to start with them to the summer range today, Monday, if it don't rain.
    Chris Natwick has moved into the Zimmerman house and expects to go to work on either the streets of our town or the county roads.
    Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, the wife of our town mayor, has gone to Newport with her two children to spend the summer; she was accompanied by Miss Grace Conley.
    C. Hoogerhyde from Grand Avenue, Mich., has moved in the house of A. J.  Daley, between the Daley residence and the old blacksmith shop.
    Claude Wamsley came near meeting with a severe accident last week. The wind had broken a limb partly off on one of the mulberry trees on his father's place and he climbed up and sawed it off, thinking that it would drop down but instead it swung around and caught his ankle between the limb and the body of the tree, bruising it quite badly, but I am glad to be able to say that he is so as to be around again.
    Elmer Spencer, who formerly lived in the Dudley settlement but now in Portland, was a pleasant caller last Wednesday, taking the train for Butte Falls Thursday morning.
    The following announcement was sent to me from Portland with the request that I see that it was put in the Mail Tribune just as it is. "A little stranger arrived in Portland, Ore., on June 26, 1913, weight nine pounds, name Ruth Marian Rippy." The parents of the little stranger are C. Rippy, formerly of Central Point, but now one of the mail clerks on the O.W.R.&N. Railway, and the mother is one of our Eagle Point raised ladies, daughter of Mrs. Royal Brown by her first husband, Charles Taylor, and a sister of Mrs. Wm. Brown of this place, and I am glad to say that the mother and child are both doing well.
    Mr. Vogeli has moved into the house he bought of Mr. Sprague.
    Last week Alvin W. Wheeler and Peter L. Spencer of Ashland came in and engaged rooms at the Sunnyside for a few days; they were canvassing for some books and advertising the Chautauqua at Ashland.
    E. N. Henselman of Medford was a guest with us last Saturday.
    On Sunday Mrs. A. Keliehor and her daughters, Misses Arnie, Kittie and Elizabeth, Mr. J. D. Sinnott and wife, Mr. Cooley, and a friend of his whose name I did not learn, all of Medford, Mrs. George von der Hellen, Mrs. Rose, Mr. George Wamsley and son Claude of Eagle Point, Mr. I. C. Moore and Miss Anna Blake of Ashland, were guests at the Sunnyside.
    Sunday morning just as Rev. L. L. Simmons, the pastor of the Baptist church, was ready to announce his text Dottie Harnish came rushing into the church and cried out Mrs. Florey your house is on fire and in less time than it takes for me to write it the house was empty, and all headed for the fire but by the time the crowd reached the scene the whole building was wrapped in flames. There were a few things saved by breaking in one of the windows, but almost everything went up in smoke. I have not learned the amount of the loss, but it was considerable. They had insurance on the house for four hundred dollars and on the furniture for two hundred. Mr. Florey was sitting in the sitting room making out his quarterly report for the post office department and his single daughter, Marguerite, was sitting on the porch reading at the time. He says that he cannot account for the fire unless it was caused by a defective flue. His many friends here sympathize with them in their loss.
    The next time I will try to give an account of the contest Saturday night in the Eagle Point A.C. hall.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 2, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry French and wife were in town on Monday of last week and took out a small load of lumber to use on their place.
    Mrs. E. O. Nichols and daughter started for San Francisco last week.
    Thomas McCabe was in town last week looking for a man to help him in his orchard.
    Drake Walch of Yankee Creek, wife and sister, were doing business with our merchants last week.
    Frank Johnson and wife and his brother, Rube, were doing business here last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hurin, mother and father of Mrs. John Gret of San Diego, California, came out and spent a few days with the Gret family on their farm near Eagle Point.
    The last time I wrote for the Mail Tribune I promised to try to tell of some of the events that transpired at the contest in the E.P.A. Club on Saturday night, June 28. There was a nice crowd present, and they had a fine time. The different stunts were well performed by the contestants, and everything passed off pleasantly. The first was a high jump for men, won by Rob Pelouze being four feet and two inches. Rev. Simmons was second and Ralph Owings third. The next was climbing the ladder hand over hand 18 feet and was won by Ralph Owings; time 8 seconds. The next was the running high jump won by Miss Carrie Owings, height 3 ft. 4 in., with Miss Clara Zimmerman second. Then came the 20-yard dash for men, Rob Pelouze winning the first, Painter second, Ralph Owings third. Then came the contest between Miss Owings and Miss Zimmerman, Miss Owings winning. Then came the work on the parallel bars. The contest was so sharp between the contestants that the judges gave a tie between Rev. Simmons and Ralph Owings, with Glen Haley second and Rob Pelouze third. The winners were Ralph Owings 17 points, Rob Pelouze 13 points, and Rev. Simmons 11 points. The ladies are Miss C. Owings, 15 points, C. Zimmerman 6 points; Miss Owings made a perfect score, 3 points in three events. There was also a very interesting game of basketball. During the intervals Frank Nichols favored the audience with some instrumental music and all hands went to their homes feeling that they had been well repaid for their trouble and expense of attending the contest of the E.P.A.C.
    Last Tuesday your Eagle Point correspondent started up Little Butte Creek to interview the people on behalf of the interests of the Mail Tribune, and the first place I stopped was at the beautiful farm of the Lewis brothers, being a part of the old S. A. Carlton place, and after paying me for a year's subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune, Mr. Fred Lewis took me out to show me his fine garden and surroundings; also gave me some points on farming that think are very good, and one was with regard to plowing, instead of keeping a band of horses and having them tramp and pack the ground until it is so hard that neither light, air nor heat can penetrate it, to have it torn up by steam plows and plowed deep enough to get under the hard crust that has been formed by the constant packing of the horses' feet. He seems to be a very practical man and think that he will make a success of farming on his place. But I see that my letter is already beyond the prescribed limit and will close for this time, but next time will tell of my trip up above the intake on the North Fork and how I spent the Fourth on the South Fork, and about the celebration on the Fourth that they had at the South Butte school house, near Lost Creek.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 7, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday, July 1, I started on a trip up Butte Creek to visit the good people in that section of the country in the interest of the Mail Tribune, by trying to collect from some of the old subscribers and have them renew and get new ones on the list. One great trouble that I labored under was not finding the men at home and in case they were not at home as a rule the good wife would almost invariably think that there must be some mistake as "It has not been but a little while since Mr. ------ went to town and paid up but they had misplaced the receipt." And then about all that I could do was to try some turn to convince the lady that the books must be right for they had one of the best bookkeepers in the country in the Mail Tribune office, but it would generally wind up with "Well I haven't got no money in the home and you will have to wait and see. . . ." but as a rule I was quite fortunate in meeting the men and in some instances the lady would pay up and declare that they can't do without the Mail Tribune, and while on that subject I wish to state that I found on that route, taking in the Wellen, Brownsboro and Lake Creek post offices, that I think I never found a community that seemed to be more interested in reading than I found on that trip, for as a rule I found that if they did not take the Mail Tribune, and they generally did that they took the Sun, so as to keep in touch with the doings of the county. The first place I stopped was at the beautiful home of F. T. Lewis, who bought 230 acres off of the Carlton place and after spending a few minutes in conversation with his better half, Mr. Lewis came in from the field, paid me a check on his subscription, then took me out and showed me how he planned to cultivate his place, his garden, etc. His idea is to do away with the old-fashioned way of plowing and do more of his work by machinery, especially the steam plow, and have the ground broke up about eight or ten inches deep and by that means get the crust broke up. But passing on I passed through the rich fertile valley of Little Butte Creek and at night stopped with our old friend Marsh Garrett, who has succeeded in the last thirteen years in securing a good wife, a good farm of over two hundred acres, about two hundred head of cattle, and last but perhaps not least an automobile, showing what a young couple, for I give the wife credit for her part, can do in Jackson County. The next morning I started, stopping along the route, took dinner at the Hanley ranch where I expected to find another old-time friend, Charley Seefield, but saw him later and learned that he and his good wife had a neat home on the south fork of Little Butte, passing on up the creek over some of the worst road I ever traveled over, at last came to the residence of G. W. Frye, one of the pioneers of Jacksonville who went to the Butte Creek country for his health, where he has taken a homestead and seems to have everything around him to make him comfortable and happy. Starting out in the morning I took dinner at the home of Mrs. Edler and that afternoon started up the south fork of Little Butte and reached the S.B. school house, near Lost Creek, just as the men were gathering up their tools to go home, they had been fixing up the old school house for a hall and getting the ground ready for a celebration the next day. Going home that night with John Tyrrell [I] had a good night's rest to get ready for the celebration on the Fourth, an account of which I will give the next time I write.
Wolf Creek, Ore., July 8, 1913
Medford Mail Tribune, July 10, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I was at the home of my friend and brother minister, Rev. M. C. Davis of Wolf Creek, and at that time promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something about the celebration at the South Butte school house, known as the Lost Creek school house.
    After spending the night with my friend John Tyrrell and being shown many of the attractions of the place, we went to the school house and found quite a number of the citizens had already arrived and that everything was about in readiness for the exercises to commence. John Miller was appointed marshal of the day and the exercises were opened by singing "America," which was followed by prayer by Rev. Kenny. Then they had two more songs the "Star-Spangled Banner" and "Sherman's March Through Georgia," and then the most interesting part of the program commenced--the entertainment by the children--which proved to be one of the best I ever heard. They had their pieces well memorized and delivered them with clear strong voices, from the smallest to the greatest. At the close of the children's program your Eagle Point correspondent was called on for a speech, but it was so near dinner time that I thought it best to cut my speech short, so only talked about fifteen minutes, and then the tables were prepared, and dinner was served, and such a dinner! If I could have about two columns of space in the Mail Tribune I might give, perhaps, a faint description of that dinner, which consisted of all kinds of meats, salads, cakes, pies, pickles, sweetmeats, many kinds of vegetables, knickknacks and notions, and the quantity! They had come prepared to stay and attend the dance at night so brought enough to last all night. In the afternoon they had foot races among the children for prizes, and various kinds of sport and at night a genuine old-fashioned social dance, and those who remained reported that they had one of the best times of the season.
    On Saturday night the friends of Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey gave them a surprise party. The reader will remember that they were burned out the Sunday before, but they had the old post office building left and so the friends arranged to have Mr. and Mrs. Florey go and take supper with Mrs. Wolary and while they were out of sight made a raid on the old post office building and the result was that when they returned they found the room well filled with their neighbors and each one had brought something of value to assist them in going to housekeeping--bedsteads, beds, sheets, quilts, dishes, dress goods, blankets, etc. Mr. Florey stood for a moment speechless and his wife, womanlike, took a little cry and then they expressed their appreciation of the act, and the donors realized that it "is more blessed to give than to receive."
    Harry Young and his sister called for dinner one day last week.
    G. N. Smith, the honey man, was in town last week.
    Mrs. Wm. Winkle and her daughter were doing business with our merchants last week.
    Mr. Florey has moved his old post office building onto the spot where the old house stood and is having an addition put to it for a residence.
    Miss Nevah Taylor, one of our esteemed young ladies, has gone to Ashland, and Miss Ruth Warner of Trail has gone to Grants Pass to remain for a while.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 14, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our city dads have gone to work on our streets at last. Chris Natwick, the road contractor, has charge of the work and has nine teams and about a dozen men employed, they are grading the streets and getting them ready for the crushed rock when the C.&O. Power Company get the electric line extended to the crusher. They have not commenced to work on the line yet and today is Tuesday, July 15, but we live in hopes if we die in despair.
    Miss Hattie Pence of Elk Creek came out on the stage last Saturday and Sunday went to Butte Falls, in company with Roy Willits, the mail contractor on the E.P. and Persist route. While here she was a guest at the Sunnyside. She returned home Monday morning on the stage.
    J. E. Reed and wife of Wellen were here for dinner last Saturday and his brother-in-law Mr. Charles Reed was with them. J. E. Reed has a fine homestead on Yankee Creek and Charles has one on Asburn Creek. Mr. and Mrs. Reed went from here to Medford.
    Carl Jackson, one of our most popular young men, who has had charge of the meat market at Butte Falls, is now the meat cutter in the Nichols meat market here.
    I understand from Mr. Ed S. Wolfer, the newly elected school director, that the school board have contracted with the teachers for another year. I have not learned the names of all of them but understand that Professor Buchanan of Butte Falls is to be the principal and a lady from Merlin to have charge of the intermediate, and a sister of Mrs. George von der Hellen the primary department, and everyone here is wishing that she may prove as good and efficient a primary teacher as her sister proved to be.
    Monday afternoon the fire alarm was given over the phone and in a few minutes a crowd of men, women and boys had collected at the residence of Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, the old George Brown residence, but by the time the crowd reached there the fire had been found and extinguished. It appeared that some of the men working on the street had gone to the pump for a drink, it is the back part of the house, and thrown a match or stub of a cigarette down on an old sack and when it was found was well under way, burning under the floor. Fortunately, it was discovered before any damage was done.
    A. J. Averill of Los Angeles was a guest with us Saturday night and Sunday, going up to the Tronson orchard to help him to fight the blight in his orchard.
    Frank O. Barnhill of Butte Falls and a gentleman from Prospect spent the night here Monday. Mr. Barnhill was on his way to Ohio to his old home to try to recuperate his health.
    I did think that I would be able this time to tell of my trip to Grants Pass and Wolf Creek but find that I am now encroaching on the space allotted for other purposes so will have to wait until some other time when I want to tell of my visit to Dr. M. C. Findley's hospital situated in the suburbs of Grants Pass, also my trip to Wolf Creek to visit Rev. M. C. Davis.
    Miss Mae Nealand of Table Rock went up to Prospect Tuesday, going as far as Derby on the cars.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 17, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Joseph Rader, wife and nephew, called for supper last Sunday at the Sunnyside.
    Allen W. Stewart of Sacramento, Cal., was a passenger on the P.&E. one day last week on his way to visit his father-in-law above Brownsboro.
    N. C. Maris of Portland, state organizer of the school district fair, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside Wednesday night; he was here looking after the interest of the school fair for this district. He was here last spring and took steps to organize a fair but there seemed to be a lack of interest in that tine on the part of some of those who had charge of the matter and Mr. Maris has decided to let the matter drop for the present at least.
    There seems to be considerable travel over this route for Crater Lake just now.
    John Greb, one of our most prosperous farmers and orchardmen called on your correspondent last night and said that he wanted to pay me for the Daily Mail Tribune, for he said they have stopped my paper and we are lost without it.
    Mrs. G. W. Owings, Mrs. J. Frank Brown and Miss Mabel Wamsley have been spending a few days in Ashland attending the Chautauqua.
    W. W. Taylor one of our prosperous farmers is installing a large hydraulic ram so as to water his land above his ditch.
    The carpenters are busily engaged working on Mr. Florey's new house. Mrs. Florey went to Medford last Wednesday and bought another outfit for housekeeping.
    The last time I wrote I promised to tell something of my trip to Grants Pass and Wolf Creek.
    I left home on the morning of the 7th and took the 10:21 train for Grants Pass, arriving there at 11:45 a.m. and went directly to Dr. M. C. Findley's office and found that I was number twelve this time, and while I was waiting for my turn, for there we do as we used to when I was a boy going to mill, each one took his turn. I mingled with the patients and among them met Mrs. A. Wallbridge and her granddaughter Miss Alice Hart of Ward, Cal., Miss Hart was undergoing a treatment for mastoid and said that she was getting along fine. I also met Miss Francis Alley of Roseburg, Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Wimer of Holland, Cal., Mrs. E. V. Carter, Mr. George G. Eubanks and son Archie, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Provost, Mr. and Mrs. John Patty and daughter of Ashland besides several others whose names I did not learn. After the doctor had reached my case at 12:45 p.m. we went to dinner, the doctor took me in his auto for a visit to the hospital, about a mile out from the business center of the city, located in a beautiful grove interspersed with roses and flowers making it look more like a residence of a retired capitalist than the abode of the afflicted, but the interior corresponds with the exterior as everything was arranged for the comfort and convenience of the patients. I met there an old acquaintance from Trail, a Mrs. Murray; she had just been operated on for a cataract and after the doctor had removed the bandages she looked up at me and extending her hand said that I looked as natural as life. But I see that I have already made this letter too long so will try to tell something of my trip to Wolf Creek and what I saw on that trip of interest to the readers of the Mail Tribune next time.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday J. B. Jackson, wife and son, Carl, Mr. Boltz the traveling superintendent for the P.&E. Railway and family, Mr. Carl von der Hellen, G. H. Wamsley, son Claude, and daughter, Miss Mabel, Miss Gales King and Mrs. W. Gray of Medford were guests at the first table at the Sunnyside and I did not get the names of those who came in later as I had to go to Table Rock that afternoon to attend Sunday school and to preach at night.
    Born on Saturday, July 19, to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cingcade, a boy, and I am sorry to say that the mother is in a very critical condition.
    Died, July 19, at his home in Eagle Point, Elmer J. Cooley, aged 64 years. The deceased came from New York State about five years ago and bought a ten-acre tract of land near Eagle Point and made his home on it until within the past year he has been living in town and up to the time he was taken sick acted as marshal of our town and janitor of our school house. He mad many friends here, was a man of strict integrity. Some four years ago he united with the Congregational Church, and later united with the Baptist church of this place and always had the confidence and esteem of the members. The remains were interred in the Central Point Cemetery on Tuesday, the 22nd, religious services were conducted by the Rev. L. L. Simmons. Quite a number of his old friends followed the remains to their last resting place. His son Elmer J. Cooley arrived from the northern part of the state of New York on Saturday before his death to comfort him in his last hours. He leaves a wife, two sons and two daughters to mourn his loss.
    After assisting in the Sabbath school at Table Rock Sunday afternoon and preaching Sunday night and spending the night with my old friend Captain Nealon, Monday morning, after giving him a receipt for his subscription to the Daily Mail Tribune I started on around to see what I could do in the way of securing new subscribers and renewals for the paper and after spending the day riding from house to house and renewing acquaintance with old friends and forming new ones, I found myself at the home of my old friend John Bigham in Sams Valley and there I met Mrs. Bigham's sister, Mrs. J. O. Hedge, and her husband of Portland, Mrs. Hedge was raised in part in this valley and was known by your correspondent and many others years ago. Mr. and Mrs. Hedge are on their way to San Francisco and stopped off to make a visit. The next day, today, I stopped at several places and among them was Mr. Scott's where I met with his wife and spent a half hour with her at their beautiful home on the Fort Klamath road. Meandering my way through the fine farms, I reached just before noon the Arrowhead Orchard and there met Mr. L. Harry Wilcox and his mother and while there he gave me a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Passing on I stopped at the Palmer orchard for dinner and there met Mr. J. Samuels the foreman and he assisted me in finding my men. I fed my horse and took dinner and after dinner looked after the subscribers to the Daily Mail Tribune, took a new subscription and after spending a short time visiting with the men went on my way feeling refreshed, and here I want to say that I have seldom met a more quiet and gentlemanly set of men than I found there. But I see that I am getting my letter too long again but will say that I reached home tired and hungry about 5:00 p.m.
----
    The time before last when I wrote I promised to say something about my trip to Wolf Creek to visit Rev. M. C. Davis, who was badly hurt in a mixup with a dog and his motorcycle. Leaving Grants Pass on the morning train I reached Wolf Creek on time and found him waiting for me at the depot with a rig to take me to his home where we arrived on time and found Mrs. Davis and the children all well. On the way we passed by, not through, fields of growing grain and orchards, although that is not an orchard country but a mining district, but along the creek bottoms they raise considerable grain and hay and where they can irrigate they raise large crops. In this region is located the noted "Ruble Mines" and the "Greenback Mine," two of the oldest mines in Southern Oregon and in addition to that they have some very rich placer mines. The two mines spoken of have been tied up by litigation and that has been a great hindrance to the development of the country.
    I found Mr. Davis was able to go around without his crutch or cane but was not able to walk on his foot but had to walk on his heel but was improving quite rapidly. There is not much to be seen from the car window along the route except a few small towns and occasionally a farm or orchard, for the route runs through the high mountains.
    There was a young man here last week looking for a location for a camp meeting to be conducted under the supervision of the Church of God (the Nazarenes), but as the mayor Wm. von der Hellen was away from home to Newport that has charge of the tract on which he wanted to place the tents, the move was not carried out.
    Mrs. Katie Walch and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Neil Walch, were visitors at the Sunnyside last week.
    Robert Lewis and daughter Miss Beatrice E. Lewis of Persist came out last week, went to Central Point and on their return spent the night here. Mr. Lewis, the readers of the Mail Tribune will remember, was burned out last winter and he was around gathering up things to use in housekeeping.
    Mrs. Della Nichols and two daughters started for Fork Klamath last Saturday to work for our daughter, Mrs. E. E. Hoyt, in the Hoyt Hotel.
    Claude Wamsley started back to his home in Texas last Tuesday. He has been here for a short time visiting his father, sister and a host of friends.
    W. T. Dozier, who has taken the place of Clay Cole, as engineer on the P.&E. railroad, has taken rooms for himself and wife at the Sunnyside.
    Mrs. Chauncey Florey, wife of our deputy assessor, came out last week to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis, and parents-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    Elmer J. Cooley, son of the late E. J. Cooley, starts today, Thursday, for his home in Fort Niagara, N.Y.
    Mrs. Sam Kingle of Lake Creek spent the night with us last Saturday.
    A. J. Daley offers his Ford for sale--see classified ads.
    During the electric storm last Monday the lightning killed a mare and colt for Mr. Bergman between here and the free ferry.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 25, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Irvin Daley and wife came out on the P.&E. train last week and went on up to visit his parents on the north fork of Little Butte.
    E. S. Wolfer, our boss gardener and strawberry man, went to Medford to do a job of work in his line as a plumber and tinner and before he left renewed his subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mrs. Fielder of Medford was on the car last Thursday coming out from Butte Falls.
    Corbin Edgell, one of our prominent orchardists, went to Medford last week.
    Professor Charles E. Johnson came out from his homestead Thursday, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford that afternoon.
    Misses Painter and J. W. Grover, who have been to Bandon working this summer, returned last week.
    Jack Florey, son of our postmaster, who has been working in Klamath County for some time, returned last week.
    W. Hart Hamilton of San Jose, Cal., who owns a large tract of land in and adjoining our town, was a guest at the Sunnyside last week. He owns in addition to a tract of agricultural land here one of the most beautiful orchards in these parts. He is also interested in a copper mine on the headwaters of the South Umpqua River.
    Mrs. J. J. Fryer went to Medford last week to have an operation performed by Dr. Pickel. She was accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. Floyd Pearce.
    George White of Derby came out last week, spent the night with us and went on to Medford, returning the same day.
    Fred Bellows and family came out from Talent last Friday, took dinner at the Sunnyside, procured a rig here and went on up to Wm. Winkler's for a short stay.
    Elmer J. Cooley, who came out from Fort Niagara, N.Y., to be with his father in his last hours, returned to his home Friday.
    F. M. Stewart, one of our enterprising citizens, is putting in a hydraulic run in Butte Creek so as to give him an abundance of water for his garden and strawberry patch.
    A. Walker has moved into the home recently vacated by Mrs. Roe, who went with her son-in-law and daughter to Los Angeles, Cal.
    Henry Ball and Ed Ingersoll of San Francisco are visiting the family of Frank Lewis.
    Mrs. Chauncey Florey, nee Jennie Lewis, has decided to remain another week and visit her relatives and friends. While she was out last week they had a reunion of the Lewis family, as all of the children were at home and together at one time.
    Last Saturday while I was on my rounds looking after the interest of the Mail Tribune I stopped at the home of Lane Wyland and while I was there had an invitation to come the next day, Sunday, and join with the family in celebrating the fifteenth birthday of their twin daughters, Misses Melma and Thelma, but owing to previous arrangements was forced to deprive myself of the pleasure of being with then.
    Last Thursday A. J. Daley gave me an ad for the sale of his Ford and Sunday morning he told me that he had already received three letters of inquiry and had one man come out to see it and an offer to trade it for Medford property. It pays to advertise in a live paper.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 30, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Henry Tonn and Thomas Kenny of Lake Creek were out repairing the telephone line between here and Lake Creek last Saturday, spending the night with us.
    Last Sunday the Eagle Point Sunday school passed a resolution to try to raise funds to purchase a library for the Sunday school, to be named the Cooley Sunday School Library, in honor of the late Elmer J. Cooley, as for some time he was superintendent and secretary of the school and devoted a large part of his time to advance the interest of the school.
    Dr. F. G. Thayer and wife of Medford came out last Sunday to visit Mr. and Mrs. Dozier, who are stopping at the Sunnyside.
    William von der Hellen and family, who have been spending a few days at Newport, returned to their home Sunday morning.
    Lost--A gold chain and pendant. Return to Fred L. Heath and receive reward.
    While on my rounds I learned that ex-Commissioner James Owens and wife expected to start for Idaho this week to visit his brother Calvin and intended to visit the Yellowstone Park while gone.
    F. J. Ayres and wife were in town last Monday and while here were visiting their children, Mr. and Mrs. [omission].
    Miss Martin of Trail and Miss Nora Daley of Medford came out on the car the first of the week, took the stage for Trail, where Miss Nora intends to spend a while roaming the hills.
    Mr. Bennett and family, who have been living on the Hawk place for some time, have moved into the Geo. Garrett place, near Medford.
    Miss Grace Colby, formerly of Brownsboro, but now of Medford, came down from her former home on Tuesday and took the afternoon car for Medford.
    Joe Moomaw, one of our hustlers, has been shipping strawberries to Butte Falls.
    James Jordan, one of our prominent citizens, went to Medford last Tuesday, the first time he has been in Medford for over a year and a half.
    There is quite a number of people passing through here now going to and from Crater Lake and along the route. Wednesday Mr. Root and wife and another family from Medford came in from the lake, and they report having had a very fine time, and at night Mr. and Mrs. C. D. Hoon and G. P. Stiles, wife and son Carl, stopped here for supper on their way from the natural bridge. They report the road in fine condition.
    Last night (Wednesday) the ladies of the Baptist church gave an ice cream social and at the same time the medals were presented to the winners in the athletic contest. They were awarded as follows: Gold medal to Miss Carrie Owings and silver medal to Miss Clara Zimmerman, and the gold medal for the men was given to Ralph Owings and the silver one to Rev. L. L. Simmons. They were presented by Mr. Hess. There was no speechmaking. The receipts of the evening from the ice cream, cake and coffee was $16.60. They had a very pleasant time, but not so large a crowd as was expected. The proceeds went to Rev. L. L. Simmons and family.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 1, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Marian Bowan of Seattle, Wash., is here visiting the family of Frank Lewis.
    E. J. Kaiser, for years editor and proprietor of the Valley Record, now the Ashland Record, came dashing in to the Sunnyside last Friday afternoon, said that he just ran in to say, "How do you do," as he did not have time to stop but we, that is my wife and I, were glad to see him once more as your E.P. correspondent wrote regularly for his paper for eight years and we had many happy hours together.
    The Ladies' Improvement Club have had the park cleaned up and now it looks quite attractive.
    C. H. Natwick is superintending the street work in this town and has a small force of men and teams at work, but after O.&C.P. Co. get the line up so as to furnish power for the rock crusher they, the city dads, will probably put on more force.
    Mrs. E. O. Nichols, who has been visiting relatives and friends in San Francisco, returned to her home last week and says that she is glad to be back to good old Rogue River Valley once more.
    Miss Gernell Jackson, who has been on business in Butte Falls, returned home last week and last Saturday had the company of Miss Edna Bowers.
    Miss Caster of Derby attended church here last Sunday.
    Last Sunday Mr. John Pelton and wife of Douglas County, his mother-in-law Mrs. Granger and daughter Miss Marvin Granger of Ashland drove up in his auto and called for dinner. Mr. Pelton was elected sheriff of this county some years ago and when he left the office left it with a clean record and a host of friends.
    We also had Mrs. Arjlee--that is the way she spells her name--Green [Arglee Fryer Green], daughter of the late J. J. Fryer, who has been stopping in Seattle for some time, here for dinner. She was on her way to Los Angeles where she was formally in business. She was accompanied by her sister-in-law, Mrs. Ada Hicks, and Mrs. Hicks' daughter, Mrs. B. A. Freeland of San Francisco; they were all here Sunday for dinner. Mr. and Mrs. C. Hurn and their two boys, Lee and Joe, Miss Mabel Pruett, Miss Mabel Wamsley and her father, G. H. Wamsley, Mr. and Mrs. Joe Moomaw, W. D. Knighton and wife, Clay Cole, J. H. Colby of the Medford lumber yard and Jud Edsall were also guests at the Sunnyside for dinner. Jud Edsall came in from Klamath Falls Saturday night. He has been engaged in the logging business out there this past season.
    Clay Cole, the engineer on the P.&E. railroad, who has been up in the Willamette Valley on a vacation for the past two weeks, returned to his post Monday morning, and Mr. Dozier, who has been serving in his place, left the Sunnyside Sunday afternoon after making the run to Medford and back, going to Medford in his auto. He and his wife have been stopping at the Sunnyside for the past two weeks.
    E. J. Olson of Dubuque, Iowa, F. H. McClure of Portland, Ore., and Walter Doe of Oakland, Ore., came out last Saturday and spent the night with us. They are interested in orchard land in this section, as also a farm west of Jacksonville.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 6, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Two young men that gave their names as Grover Schaadt and R. F. Scott of Portland came to the Sunnyside last Monday and asked me concerning a tract of land that is lying northeast of here that they had been sent to see with an idea of taking as a homestead, and I, not knowing that they had been sent by one of Medford's real estate men, naturally told them that it was not worth anything, that it was simply a piece of hillside desert land, and then one of them told me that he had deposited $50 for the man who was to locate them, and wanted to know if there is not any law to protect strangers from the grasp of such men. This is not an isolated instance, but such occurrences happen every little while, and is, I think, a great drawback to the settlement of our country, for while this valley is one of the beauty spots of the earth, still we all, including the real estate men of our towns, know that there is scarcely a place in the county where one can take a homestead that would be worth the money that you'd have to be paid out for homesteading and proving up on the same.
    J. F. Ditsworth stopped here last Monday night on his way out to Ft. Klamath with a load of truck for the people to eat. Mrs. Ditsworth came out on the train Tuesday and met him at Derby.
    Ralph Owings and Harry Bryant, I am told, supplied themselves with a rifle, revolver and hunting knife apiece, took a roll of bedding and started for the hills to kill deer and bear, and the neighbors will look with considerable interest for the result of the trip. They are both novices at the hunting business.
    W. C. Clements and George von der Hellen started last Monday for the tall timber on a hunt, and while he is gone Miss Maggie Daley is assisting Mrs. Clements at the switchboard.
    Last Tuesday morning Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Carpenter of Indiana came out and engaged rooms at the Sunnyside, returning to Medford the same day, and Wednesday returned with their baggage and settled down for business. Mr. Carpenter is a brother of the late Judge Carpenter, whose death I announced a short time ago in the Mail Tribune, who owned a farm just north of our town, and Mr. C. has come out as agent for the administratrix, his sister. Mr. C and wife expect to remain for some time so as to look after the business of the estate here.
    Mr. Nason, the man who, with Mr. Hess, built the P. H. Daily house, was here for dinner Tuesday.
    The wild west show men were here Tuesday billing the town for the show next week.
    R. G. Brown went to Portland to meet his wife, who is there assisting in caring for her son, Carl, who has been sick, but I am glad to say is convalescing.
    Mrs. Fred Luy, who has been in the hospital in Medford for some time, returned Tuesday evening and spent the night with us, being met here by her husband the next morning. She is greatly improved in health.
    Clyde Plymire came out Tuesday afternoon with the steam roller to roll our streets and Thursday morning the sprinkler started, so from all appearances we will soon be having the crushed rock placed and business will be lively again.
    J. T. Sullivan, manager of the Rogue River Valley Canal Company, and another gentleman whose name I failed to get, were here for dinner Wednesday.
    Mrs. W. C. Clements, her little nephew and Miss Elizabeth Blackford, a friend of Mrs. C.'s, were here for dinner Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 11, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last week there was quite a rush through our town for Crater Lake, the Soda Springs, etc., and among those who I happened to meet were P. O. Bonney and wife of Medford, Miss Jones, Mrs. and Miss Norris, Mr. Packer, J. K. Rowe, all of Seven Oaks, Mr. Samuels and family of Medford and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Bellinger of Medford. There were, I think, five wagons and they seemed like a jolly crowd and were bent on having a good time. They intended to go to the lake and then make the round trip via Pelican Bay, Lake of the Woods, Ashland, etc. Frank Swingle of Ashland, who also has large interests in Eastern Oregon, called last week, having his niece, Mrs. Anna Nichols, and her daughter, Miss Ella Nichols of Stevenson, Cal., also another niece, Mrs. James Stewart, and her three daughters of Medford. Mrs. Nichols and her daughter went on up Little Butte Creek with Mr. Culbertson to visit their aunt, Mrs. James Culbertson, returning Monday and taking the train for Medford. Mrs. Nichols, nee Anna Kilgore, is a native of Jackson County and has lived in Eastern Oregon and California for several years, and Mrs. Stewart is a daughter of the late George Rotery, an old pioneer stockman.
    Ed F. Brown, a young man recently from San Francisco, called to inquire about the price of land. He had fallen in love with our climate and valley and talked as though he would like a home among us.
    R. L. Wilson, who owns an orchard west of Central Point, was out last week looking for a tract of good alfalfa land. He said that his son back East had married and wanted to come to Oregon. His father told him about our climate, soil, etc., procure a tract of alfalfa land and go into the cattle business.
    Mrs. Wm. Holmes has been out here for a few days visiting her sister, Mrs. S. B. Holmes, and brothers, Wm. and Frank Brown.
    There is to be a grand Sunday school picnic Thursday in the park and a good time is expected and the preacher, Rev. L. L. Simmons, told the people to fill the baskets full and said something about chicken. They expect to have a nice program.
    Sunday afternoon Rev. Simmons and myself went up to Brownsboro to his appointment for preaching, but on the way he asked me to preach for him. There was a very small congregation so that I felt that there was not many disappointed if they did not hear him preach. On the road I noticed that the grasshoppers had played havoc with the orchards along the route and the alfalfa looked like it was all dead.
    I see that they have the rock crusher about ready for operation but understand that it is likely to be some time before they can get the transformer placed as the company is having trouble getting them from the East.
    Sunday was quite a busy day with us, and just as I was ready to start for Brownsboro Mr. B. L. Dodge of Medford, J. Korinek of Medford, Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Dodge of Akron, Ohio, and Mrs. W. K. Ingersol of Akron, Ohio came in and called for dinner and later in the afternoon Mr. and Mrs. L. K. Hawk, one of our progressive farmers and Mrs. Harris, a sister of W. H. Crandall, another one of our progressive farmers called to visit Mr. and Mrs. J. T. Carpenter, who have rooms at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 13, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    William Knighton and wife, who have been up on Trail visiting their relatives, returned last Monday.
    John W. Smith has been engaged putting up a stone fence for A. J. Daley in front of one of his lots, greatly improving its appearance. The fence is built of small cobblestones and cement.
    J. F. Hutchason, who has a homestead on the county road between here and the free ferry, spent the night here Tuesday.
    Miss Inez Willits of Persist came out with her brother, Roy, on his stage Tuesday and was initiated into the Rebekah lodge here; also the wife of our night watchman, James Gillespy, on the P.&E., was also initiated the same night. They have a very flourishing lodge here of about sixty members, and occasionally have a big feed in connection with their meetings, and when they do they report having had a royal time, for all of the young lady members are good cooks.
    Last Tuesday afternoon Rev. D. D. Doyle and his brother, Walter E. Doyle, Mr. and Mrs. M. J. Pilcher, one of the second-hand merchants of Medford, and family, and Miss Viola Fiester, one of the teachers in the Washington School, passed through here on their way to Crater Lake with a two-horse team, bent on having a good time.
    W. C. Daley of Lake Creek was in our town on business Wednesday.
    Henry French and Perry Foster were in town Wednesday. They report that there is a large number of campers all along the river from the French-Dodge bridge up, and that they are catching a fine lot of fish and having a good time generally.
    Mr. Mannus and Cal Pence of Elk Creek came out from Medford, where they had been to see the show Wednesday, to our place Thursday, and after dinner went on up home.
    Mr. Meyers, W. F. Backus, Mr. and Mrs. Bowman of Portland have been camped at Henry French's for the past few days fishing and having a good time generally. They took the 2:25 train Wednesday for their homes in Portland.
    George Givan was in town for sacks, preparing for threshing his grain.
    Tim Duggan and Charles Pruett are doing the threshing for their neighborhood.
    Will try to tell about the Sunday school picnic next time.
    George von der Hellen and W. C. Clements, who have been out in the hills on the headwaters of Elk Creek taking a hunt, returned last Saturday. George reports that they killed meat enough for camp use but did not go as much for a hunt as for a good time in the high hills and that they surely did have a good time.
    Mr. Gorman and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Quackenbush, and son were in town Wednesday trading with our merchants.
    W. H. Frulon, one of the conductors on the Southern Pacific, and Fred L. Dodge of Ashland, a brakeman on the Southern Pacific, and Professor P. H. Daily of Medford, who have been out in the hills on a hunt for the last week or more, came in Thursday, stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner and when I asked what luck they had, reported that the company, four altogether, killed nine deer, but reported them very scarce and hard to kill, and Mr. Frulon said that he had got tired of deer meat and wanted a change.
    J. T. Sullivan, the manager of the R.R.V.C. Co., and Roguelands, and another gentleman stopped here for dinner Thursday and left some copies of the list of premiums for the coming county fair on September 9 to 13.
    O. N. Nelson, manager of the S. J. Day Abstract Co., and his little daughter came out on their bikes Thursday and took rooms at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 16, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote I promised to tell the readers of the Mail Tribune something about the Sunday school picnic that was held last Thursday in the park. About 10:30 o'clock a.m. the people began to gather at the park and bring with them their baskets, boxes, etc., and in a short time everything was astir. They had a short program, but the little folks had the time of their lives. The committee has arranged swings, jumping ropes, etc., so that the children could have a good time, but all that was thrown into the shade when dinner was announced. The preacher had urged his congregation to be sure to have the baskets well filled and they heeded his request, and they were not only well filled, but there was a lot of them. I heard one man say that he never saw so many good things all together in his life, and when I reached home I saw one of our boarders lying on the lounge and groaning like a dying calf, and I asked, "What is the matter, Carl?" and he exclaimed, "Oh, I have been to the picnic and am so full I am almost dead, and one of our blacksmiths complained the next day that he had almost killed himself at the picnic. But I have long since learned that it is not safe for such people to go to a picnic on Butte Creek unless they have a guardian.
    John W. Smith and George Lewis took a trip up on Salt Creek for a hunt last Thursday, and that night one of their horses got away and Friday evening John came out after another horse to hunt that one, but while they were hunting the lost horse she came home and by the time I reached home from Elk Creek Monday morning the horses and hack were all safely at home and the big hunt had been called off.
    Last week Robert Lewis of Persist came out and stopped a few minutes at the Sunnyside, then proceeded on his way to Central Point, where he expected to meet his father from Spokane, Wash.
    Mr. Waterman of Brownsboro came to town last Friday and took home with him a load of fruit box material.
    The farmers are getting along very well with their threshing in these parts, and they report that the grain is turning out full as well as usual.
    The sightseers who are traveling the road to Crater Lake are thronging the road now in almost every kind of a conveyance from an ordinary donkey with his long ears to the highest power auto, and a day or two ago a man passed through with nine persons in one wagon besides himself, and all of their baggage. I tell you, they looked as though they were simply packed in.
    Fred Bellows, who has been living in Medford for a short time, decided that a country life would suit him best, so moved out last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. G. Brown, who have been in Portland for a few weeks, returned home the first of the week, their son, Carl Taylor, coming some time before them. He is here to recuperate his health and visiting relatives.
    Carl Ringer, one of our live young men, has secured a position as brakeman on the Pacific & Eastern Railway.
    Last Friday evening Rev. M. C. Davis, our Congregational missionary, came in on me, the first time he has been out in these parts for some months, owing to him being crippled in a mixup with a dog on his motorcycle, and the next morning we started in a buggy for Trail, reaching there about 2:30 p.m. We had picnic dinner on the way, and the next day had a meeting at the Trail school house, but the house was too small to hold the congregation, and that night we went on up to the Pence school house on Elk Creek, where we had all there was in that section to preach to except five or six.
    Tuesday afternoon Mrs. Howlett started at 4:30 o'clock for Fort Klamath. She was accompanied by our daughter, Hattie, Miss Mabel Wamsley and Miss Loretta Childreth. They went in a Spaulding covered hack and had provisions enough to last them for four days, besides apples, pears, cabbage, beans, corn, etc. They are going for a time, and they will have it. Miss Rosa Ayres has charge of the Sunnyside while she is gone.
    Mrs. Charles Brown and Miss Maud Nortridge of Ashland were pleasant callers Tuesday noon. They were accompanied by Irvin Culbertson, the mail contractor from here to Lake Creek. He has an auto to carry the mail and passengers.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 21, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. T. J. Carpenter, who have rooms at the Sunnyside, spent a couple of days visiting W. H. Crandall and sisters, Miss Crandall and Mrs. Harris, the first of the week.
    There is a small force of men at work getting out rock at the quarry just above town, getting ready for the rock crusher when the dynamo comes, but when that will be here is a question that no one seems able to answer.
    The crowds still seem to be going to Crater Lake and the Soda Springs above here. Last Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. J. Hoagland and Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Fox of Central Point passed through on their way to the lake. Mrs. Fox is a cousin of the wife of the engineer, Mr. Clay Call, on the Pacific & Eastern Railroad.
    Our marshal had a spirited race the other night with a half-drunken individual who managed to give him the slip and succeeded in getting outside of the corporate limits of our town and made good his escape.
    We seem to be well supplied with representatives of the different religions just now, as we now have two representing the Mormon Church who have been here several days, and a Mr. McGinnis has secured the use of the lower rooms of the school house for a Mr. Green to hold meetings in commencing Saturday night, to continue next week. They represent "The Church of God" and we have regular preaching and prayer meeting services in the church every Friday night and Sunday morning and evening by the pastor of the Baptist church.
    W. E. Hammel, who owns a large tract of land north of our town and a band of goats, was in town Thursday trying to find a pair of hounds to fight off the coyotes from his goats. He reports that he has lost ninety goats recently by the coyotes and some of them were very valuable. He reports that he sold the fleece off of one goat for three dollars a pound and that he sheared fifteen pounds, bringing forty-five dollars for one fleece. The hair or wool was fifteen inches long.
    Mr. Quackenbush took two loads of pears to Davis Station yesterday for shipment from the A. Corbin orchard. He reports that the apple crop this season is fine.
    Fred Pelouze started for Crater Lake in a hack and broke down a hind wheel near Prospect and had to send it back by the stage and P.&E. train for repairs, and I heard the blacksmith say, "A stitch in time saves nine."
    Mr. Buchanan, the principal of our school, and family came out from Butte Falls Thursday and expect to open our school the first of September. Miss Mabel Huff, sister of Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen, our last year's primary teacher, arrived a few days ago and will have charge of the primary department. I understand that the other teacher is to come from Merlin but has not arrived yet.
    Wm. Newstrom of Lake Creek was doing business in our town Thursday.
    T. L. Trunnell of Grants Pass, the party who bought the Model Variety Store building, has moved into it with a stock of harness, saddles, etc., and expects to open up in a short time.
    Next time will try to tell about our Boy Scouts trip to Dead Indian Soda Springs and who went to Phoenix to attend the W.C.T.U. convention and what they did while there.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 25, 1913, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time that I wrote I promised the readers of the Mail Tribune to give an account of what the Boy Scouts did on their trip out in the hills. On Monday morning, August 18, Rev. L. L. Simmons and family and the following scouts started for the Dead Indian Soda Springs: Ralph Owings, Walter Painter, Orvill Childreth, Graydon Childreth, Robie Harnish, C. Natwick, Isaac Childreth, Theo Florey, James Jackson and Harry Lewis and Miss Clara Owings. There was nothing of special interest along the route. Mr. Simmons walked with the scouts and Mrs. Simmons with her family and Miss Clara Owings rode in the wagon, so about all that they had to look out for was to keep from stepping on rattlesnakes. The first day they camped at James Culbertson's place and spent awhile fishing, then went on up to the springs where they remained until Friday, arriving at Eagle Point at 8:30 p.m. The boys report having had a fine time and that they caught lots of fish and had a good time generally and they will remember their first hike as a body of scouts for years to come.
    I also promised to give an account of the W.C.T.U. convention at Phoenix last week. I did intend at that time to give a detailed account of the proceedings, as a member of our local union had written it up for me, but when I called for it she was out, and I saw in the Mail Tribune of the 23rd a report of the proceedings by the committee, so will be content with giving the names of some of the temperance workers that went from our town: On Wednesday morning Thomas E. Nichols took his Ford and in it Mrs. Minnie Bryant, Mrs. Nettie Grover, Mrs. Etta Florey, and his wife, and started for the county convention at Phoenix. They report that there was considerable business transacted and that they feel greatly encouraged over the prospects of driving the saloon curse out of not only this county but the entire world since the women are allowed to take a hand at the ballot box, and they are laughing [up] their sleeves at the old-line politicians that have always fought the woman suffrage movement to see how they tumbled over the line just before the last November election. They intend to put in new men and men that have been tested and found true to the cause instead of the old "hacks" whitewashed over. They report having had a very pleasant and profitable time.
    I understand that J. L. Hovey, the foreman on the McKnight orchard, the foreman on the McKnight orchard, the old Dr. Page place, expects to ship this season 1200 boxes of pears and John Greb, who bought a thirty-acre tract off of the same piece, will have 400 boxes of pears to ship.
    Since I last reported Henry Reis of Port Angeles, Washington, and Earl S. Tumy of Medford spent the night here and on Sunday Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Stewart of Medford, one of the pioneer orchardists, came in from Lakeview via Fort Klamath. On his return trip he stopped at the Stewart orchard on Rogue River near Peyton and reports a fine crop of fruit this season. The same afternoon Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Blodgett and Mr. and Mrs. Powell of Medford called for dinner; also O. C. King, a Medford salesman for the Medford Grocery Company, wife and mother-in-law, Mrs. C. E. Smith, Mrs. Mae Fraser and Miss Berth Blackford, all of Medford; Mr. Scott Davis, wife and child, Mr. and Mrs. Hicks, the tombstone man, and still later Mr. and Mrs. Ira J. Dodge of Perrydale, Mr. and Mrs. B. L. Dodge of Akron, Ohio, B. L. Dodge, Jr., of Medford, Mrs. Ingersoll of Akron, Ohio, Clarence Adams of Griffin Creek, Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Clark of Perrydale, Mr. and Mrs. W. A. Folger of Medford. The last twelve ordered dinner at 6:30 p.m. but arrived a little later but not too late to enjoy a good chicken dinner and then spent an hour or two with music and social converse. They surely had a good time.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1913, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The autoists traveling from here to Crater Lake complain of a short piece of road going up the hill through the Mathews lane and say that it is the roughest piece of road on the entire route. It should be fixed.
    G. W. Wamsley, John W. Smith and Mr. Hess have taken the contract to build a new schoolhouse in the Wellen district and are now at work on it.
    J. B. Jackson has gone to Yakima, Wash., to visit relatives and meet his wife.
    Mrs. Mary Wright Ringer went to Ashland to take her son, Charles, to the doctor to have his feet treated again.
    J. J. Good and daughter spent the night with us the first of the week. They were on their way to their schools. Mr. Good will teach the Lake Creek and his daughter the Brownsboro school this season.
    Charles E. Johnson will teach the school in the Larvell district.
    C. E. Johnson lost his spectacles last Thursday while riding in an auto with two strangers between Mr. Vestal's and Eagle Point. He thinks that they slipped out of his coat pocket in the auto. If found, notify J. E. Johnson, general delivery, Ashland, Oregon.--Adv.
    There was quite a severe windstorm in the vicinity of the Antelope Cemetery Wednesday evening, doing considerable damage. I understand that it uprooted nineteen fruit trees for Mr. Hitchcock and done considerable damage for Thomas Riley.
    Rev. J. L. Green of Grants Pass and C. W. Wallumix of Medford commenced a series of meetings here last Saturday night, the 23rd, and continued until the 26th, when they returned to their homes.
    J. H. Cooley, one of the Medford lumber dealers, has been out here for a few days looking after his orchard interests here. He makes his headquarters at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Hughes, one of the Butte Falls merchants; John Higinbotham, Professor C. E. Johnson, J. H. Cooley and a stranger sojourned with us last Thursday night.
    The Ladies' Aid and Improvement Club met at the home of Mrs. George von der Hellen last Wednesday afternoon. The meeting was planned so as to have as many of the ladies of the town meet Mrs. von der Hellen's sister, Miss Mabel Huff, who is to be our primary teacher this term of school. The occasion was also, to a certain extent, to commemorate the birthday of Miss Lorene Walker, stepdaughter of our strawberry man, E. S. Wolfer.
    Light refreshments were served, and a royal good time was had. The L.A. and I.C. will meet next Wednesday at the home of Mrs. W. G. Knighton.
    Thursday evening Mrs. Rachel Woolery entertained a number of her lady friends, it being her birthday, as well as the birthday of one of her friends she entertained. The party was a complete surprise to Mrs. Woolery. It appears that Mrs. A. J. Florey's birthday came on the 27th and Mrs. Woolery's on the 28th, so their friends arranged for a surprise for both. So Mrs. J. W. Grover managed to visit Mrs. W. just in time to keep her from visiting Mrs. Florey, and Mrs. F. was kept at home so as not to get to Mrs. W.'s too soon, and when Mrs. F. arrived at Mrs. W.'s she was just in the act of starting to go to Mrs. F.'s with a nice cake for Mrs. F.'s birthday dinner, and Mrs. F. was loaded with presents for Mrs. W. So that both of the ladies were completely surprised, but they had a fine supper prepared by the visitors and one of those joyful times such as they always have on such occasions in Eagle Point. There was quite a number of presents given on the occasion.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 30, 1913, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The Eagle Point school will open on Monday, September 8th, under the management of Prof. Buchanan, who has been principal of the school at Butte Falls for the past three years. There will be no necessity of the children going from here to Medford to school as the arrangements are already made to have the ninth and tenth grades taught here.
    I am roving around the county in the interest of the Mail Tribune. I see that Mr. Narregan has replaced a part of the old fence along the county road with a neat wire fence, greatly improving the looks of his place.
    The C.&O.P. Company have at last succeeded in getting the dynamo established at the rock crusher and expect to be able to commence to crush rock for our streets tomorrow, Tuesday, and the trains will soon begin to haul and for a short time our town will be a lively place.
    Chauncey Florey, office deputy in the assessor's office, came out last Friday evening with his family to spend a few days. He went with his brothers-in-law, the Lewis boys, upon Rogue River fishing Saturday night. Their many old friends give them a cordial greeting.
    C. K. Morris and wife of Stockton, California, were pleasant callers Saturday for dinner. Mrs. Morris is a sister to Mrs. Dr. Needing, whom they have been visiting for the past few weeks. They were returning to their home and stopped here for dinner on the way.
    Last Saturday night Carl von der Hellen drove up with his car in company of Dr. Coglin, owner of the Crater Lake Orchard, and a friend by the name of Guerin of Portland, and called for supper and later engaged beds for the two, Carl intending to return home with the visitors and have them visit his father and the family, for Carl, Harry and the Senator all live close together on the farm, and then return to the Sunnyside, but they became so interested in conversation that they did not return until after sunrise. You know Carl is such good company that it is hard for one to tear oneself away from him.
    Miss J. M. Dennis, a granddaughter of Mrs. A. N. Thomas and a friend of Miss Nora Persell, came in on Mrs. Thomas last Friday night from Montana, and while they were there Grandma Dennis of Medford and Mrs. Dennis of Ashland came in and then came her son-in-law, Henry Tonn, and family of Roseburg, making in all a group of sixteen of her relatives and their friends. She said that she had a houseful but would have been glad if I could have been with them, and some of them expressed regrets that I was not there too, for I have known some of them for the last forty years, and we would have enjoyed the renewal of old-time associates.
    Last Sunday was rather a quiet day in Eagle Point as there seemed to be but very few people passing through our town and but few visitors at the Sunnyside. Among those who did come were Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Clements and nephew, Herbert Carlton, Miss Edna Bowers, James Bowers, Miss Gernell Jackson, Earl Taylor, son of Mrs. R. L. Brown, and Carl Jackson.
    Rev. L. L. Simmons, pastor of the Baptist church of this place, preached twice yesterday and at the close of the meeting last night told me that he expected to go to Crater Lake this week but did not say what day he would start, but we hope that he will have a good time and after he returns he will say with the queen of Sheba with regard to the glories of Solomon, "The half has not been told."
Medford Mail Tribune, September 3, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. H. Crandall and his brother Bert, recently from Los Angeles, were doing business in our town Tuesday. Bert Crandall is here visiting his brother W. H. and his sisters, Miss Crandall and Mrs. Harris.
    Ed Foster and family, who have a farm on the north side of Rogue River above the long steel bridge (that is what I heard one of the autoists call it this Wednesday morning) were in town trading Tuesday. Henry French, who has a fine farm and orchard near the long steel bridge (it is about three hundred feet long, containing the approaches), was in our town the same day.
    Robert R. Minter, our boss sheep man, was in town the same day with three of his daughters, and Miss Samantha remained with Miss Rose Ayres at the Sunnyside up to the present writing.
    We thought that the work on the streets had commenced in earnest Tuesday as they had three teams hauling crushed rock, but the dynamo got cranky this morning and Mayor Hon. Wm. von der Hellen seemed to think this afternoon that it will soon be righted and work will be resumed.
    There were nine autos passed through our town this Wednesday morning with a lot of scientific visitors on their way to Crater Lake. They were a fine-looking group of men and women. They were accompanied by Shorty Garnett and Prof. P. J. O'Gara.
    Died, September 2, at the residence on the Cingcade farm, the infant son of Mr. and Mrs. Charles Cingcade. Further mention will be made later.
    Miss Aletha Emerick of Medford came out Wednesday morning and spent a part of the day visiting Miss Frances Heath. We regret to announce that Miss Frances expects to start for Eugene to attend the state university about the tenth of this month, as she has completed her high school course in Medford.
    F. J. Ayres, one of our progressive farmers, was in town on Wednesday.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 5, 1913, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. J. F. Cartsen of Butte Falls has been visiting Miss Gernell Jackson.
    Miss Ethel Siglinger, who has charge of the intermediate department of our school, arrived in town last week and took charge of her classes Monday morning.
    Died, Wednesday, Sept. 3, 1913, the infant son of Charles and Lillie Cingcade, aged six weeks and three days. The interment took place in the Central Point Cemetery on the 4th; religious services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett.
    T. A. Betty and wife, accompanied by Rev. L. L. Simmons, wife and daughter, Miss Bertha, autoed to Crater Lake last week.
    Last Friday Mr. W. A. Kenney of Portland, traveling in the interest of Sellers & Co., was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside, also Mr. H. M. Coss and Harry C. Johnson of Medford. And while they were here Dr. W. W. Holt, our physician, and a friend of his, Prof. Harry Means Crooks, president of the Albany College, also called for dinner. The professor was out in this section looking after the interest of the college.
    The street work is progressing under the supervision of Chris Natwick. They have the rock crusher running night and day and a force of ten or twelve teams hauling.
    Mrs. Howlett and the three young ladies who accompanied her to Fort Klamath, and daughter, Hattie, Miss Loretta Childreth and Miss Mabel Wamsley returned last Thursday evening. The girls report that they had more fun than they ever had in all their lives; it was a continuous round of pleasure from the time they started, but they were interrupted occasionally by coming in contact with a broken-down auto. They say that they will always take the good old-fashioned mode of traveling, a good span of horses and a covered hack.
    Charles Gay and George Porter, one of the city dads of Medford, passed through here last Saturday on their way to Crater Lake and got about two miles out of town with their auto and broke a spring so had to return and have the damaged spring repaired. Geo. Fisher did the work.
    In the proper place I omitted to state that last Thursday attorneys Mulkey and Colvig and Mr. Gore were out trying to persuade the citizens of our town that it was to their interest to bond the county for money to make good roads, but as that has already been reported over the wire it is unnecessary for me to take up space for further notice.
    Mrs. W. W. P. Holt and daughter, Miss Helen, started for Berkeley Saturday to attend the wedding of her sister.
    Married, on Sunday, Sept. 7, 1913, at the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. L. L. Simmons, L. Frank Abbott and Miss Fay Nichols. The bride and groom are well and favorably known in our town and their many friends wish them a smooth and happy journey over life's sea.
    Our school was opened this Monday morning and a further notice will be given next time I write
Medford Mail Tribune, September 11, 1913, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    H. I. Todyhom of the O.A.C. was a visitor among us last Saturday. He was soliciting for the volume library.
    William Newstrom and Henry Pech of Lake Creek were smiling on our citizens the last of the week.
    James Ringer has just finished painting the Lake Creek school house.
    Mrs. Ella Cauley and her sister, Mrs. Pool, have been visiting Mrs. A. N. Thomas.
    H. L. Rasmussen, a traveling salesman for the Wearever Aluminum Cooking Utensil Company, attended church here last Sunday.
    T. L. Tummell has a for sale ad in this issue of the Mail Tribune; also an advertiser wants three horses.
    There is quite a number of the advanced pupils in this district attending school in Medford this fall who have passed the tenth grade. Among them are Harry Bryant, Miss Lawrence Walker, Fay Givan, Raegnor Berquist, Robert Pelouze, Miss Frances Greb, Clara Zimmerman and Miss Hazel Brown.
    I asked the principal of our school, Professor Buchanan, how many pupils he had enrolled, and he said that he did not know, that they had so many things to look after that he had not noted the number, but he knew that there were forty and one room to hear from.
    Thursday forenoon as young Mr. Bailey and his father were riding along Roosevelt Avenue in our city in a buggy the team became frightened, ran away, turned the rig over and threw the occupants out, demolishing the buggy and the horses went dashing toward home at breakneck speed. Dr. Holt reported today at the dinner table that the old gentleman was very badly bruised, but he did not think that he was seriously hurt. He is 84 years old.
    Last Tuesday the election passed off very quietly, the vote standing 56 majority in favor of the bonds.
    Tuesday afternoon T. J. Parton, the man who bought the Joe Rader place on Antelope and Dry creeks, invited me to ride home with him, as he wanted me to see how he had rearranged the place since he bought it. So, getting into his surrey with him and his wife, we started and on our arrival after helping his wife out he said, "Now, I want to take you over the farm, as you used to be so familiar with the place, as you have cut almost all over it with your binder." So we started, and the first thing that I noticed was the perfect system with which he had everything arranged. Passing through a lane on the one side was a large pear orchard set out in an alfalfa field. He had already cut two crops and now he had about 250 hogs from six weeks up to full grown. He is turning his attention to raising thoroughbred Poland China hogs, never allowing them to inbreed. He explained how he managed his hogs. He seems to do everything systematically. He keeps about thirty brood sows and arranges the breeding so that the pigs will come in all about the same time, and during the first six weeks he fed the sows but little, but feeds the pigs, and by the time they are six weeks old he weans them, then commences to feed the sows again, and in about ten days they will become pregnant again. He has thirty separate pens for his sows, so when they farrow each one can have a home of her own. After looking over the hogs and the different places he had provided for their comfort, we went to look at his corn. He had a wagon load slip shucked at the feeding place, for he feeds the ones that are in the alfalfa field. We took a sack of sixty-nine ears from the wagon, and it weighed seventy-three pounds. We then measured the piece of ground he took the load of corn from, and it measured 216 yards