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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


1853 Rogue River Indian War Claims


Oregon T.
    Pacific City
        July the 30th 1852
Mr. President Fillmore
    Sir, notwithstanding you fill the highest station of any individual on Earth, yet the most humble individual may approach you and ask redress for wrongs done him.
    In view of this fact I venture to present my case before you.
    On the 30 or 31st of August 1849 on Rogue River in this Territory I was robbed by Indians of gold and horses worth about twenty-five hundred dollars. I immediately complained to Governor Lane, who at that time was Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon [to] prove up my account before Judge Bryant to the satisfaction of the Indian agent, and things looked like I would get my money. Some time since that time Lane has gone out of the office, and Dr. Dart filled his place. Last spring was a year [since] I wrote to Dr. Dart on the subject, and he wrote me in answer that it was a matter he had nothing to do with that. L. A. Rice was the man for me to apply to now. L. A. Rice is an officer created by the legislature of Oregon to adjust claims against the provincial government of Oregon in consequence of the Cayuse War who had no more to do with my claim than the man in the moon, and I have no doubt Dr. Dart knew it at the time.
    I wrote to Mr. Rice and also Mr. Spalding, who was the sub-agent for that district, but he, Mr. Spalding, did not answer. He soon went out of office, and A. A. Skinner was appointed in his stead. Last fall I wrote Mr. Skinner, citing him to an act of Congress of the 30th June 1834 (as I did all the rest), the 17th section of which provides if the Indians have an annuity it shall be paid out of the first due them, and if they have none it shall under certain regulations be paid from the Treasury of the U.S. of any money not otherwise appropriated.
    He, Mr. Skinner, was not at liberty to pay me without instructions.
    The law I think makes it the duty of the President to direct the pay of such claims. I hope you will give this matter a moment's considerations, and if [it] is the duty of the President to direct the payment of such claims I hope you will do it immediately. It is almost three years since I lost my money, and if I [am] entitled to it by law I want it, if not I wish to know it, and you will much oblige your humble servant by informing me.
    Here allow me to say I am 45 years old, and on my return from California, at which time the above misfortune befell me, I have been in delicate health and ill able to labor and consequently I would try my fortune speculating. I soon invested the major part of my remaining means, 28 hundred dollars, in town lots in this place, and all of those lots are embraced in the reserve made by the government on Cape Disappointment. For this miscarriage I have no claim on the government, but if I must leave here I would be glad [to know] how soon the government would pay me for my improvements and let me go.
    It is rumored here on pretty good authority that the government will put a lighthouse on Cape Disappointment this fall. If so I would be glad to get the appointment of keeper of it, inasmuch as I am here and must do something to support my family and am ill able to do hard labor. I could send on a petition signed I think by every man in the county, but I do not know where to send it or who has the appointment power. I am a Whig and am doubtful Whig administrations will leave after the 4th March; you will much oblige me by the above due consideration and let [me] hear from you.
I am sir your humble servant
    John Meldrum
Mr. Fillmore
    President of the
        United States
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 607 Oregon Superintendency 1842-1852, frames 1262-1266.


Office Superintendent of Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. Nov. 12th 1853
Sir
    Frequent applications have been made to the Superintendent of Indian Affairs by citizens of this Territory for information as to the mode of procedure to enable them to recover for losses sustained by Indian depredations, and as I am so frequently importuned upon this subject, and the amounts involved in many instances being large, I would ask instructions to enable me to give the required information.
    These applications are likely to become quite numerous, and if a policy be adopted encouraging the presentation of all claims for injury or loss of property to act retrospectively with a view of being deducted from the amount allowed the Indians for their country, it is believed that in many cases the entire amount of the value of their possessions would be thus absorbed, as claims would doubtlessly be raked up, real or factitious, commencing as early as 1843. It is very likely there are instances in which the persons designated to negotiate treaties with the Indian tribes in Oregon would be warranted in pressing claims against them, but if the relinquishment of Indian title to their lands, and their consent to remove to such points as may be selected for them, rests upon the contingency of their agreement to allow such claims to be deducted from the price of purchase, it will inevitably be a serious obstacle to the accomplishment of that object.
I am sir very respectfully
    Your obedient servt.
        Joel Palmer
            Superintendent
Hon. Geo. W. Manypenny
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington City
            D.C.
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 608 Oregon Superintendency 1853-1855, frames 483-484.


    The cost of the Rogue River War, exclusive of the pay of soldiers, is said to have been $93,511.25.
"Oregon," New York Times, March 13, 1854, page 3


33rd CONGRESS, EX. DOC.
     1st Session.        No. 99.  
[HO. OF REPS.]
EXPENSES OF ROGUE RIVER WAR.
LETTER

FROM

THE SECRETARY OF WAR,

TRANSMITTING

Estimates of the expenses of the claims for supplies furnished to the volunteers
engaged in suppressing Indian hostilities in the Rogue River valley,
in the Territory of Oregon.

----
MAY 1, 1854.--Read, and referred to the Committee on Military Affairs.
----
WAR DEPARTMENT,
    Washington, April 28, 1854.
    SIR: In compliance with a resolution of the House of Representatives of the 5th instant, I have the honor to transmit herewith estimates prepared from muster-rolls and vouchers filed in this department, principally by the delegate in Congress from the Territory of Oregon, showing the amount of claims for services of volunteers, and for supplies furnished for their use, &c., in suppressing Indian hostilities in Rogue River valley, in that Territory.
    The pay and allowances of the volunteers are estimated according to the rates prescribed by the act of March 19, 1836--the only general act fixing the pay and allowances of volunteers and militia when called into the service of the United States.
    The amount of claims for supplies is stated according to the bills presented, of which an abstract is submitted, showing in brief the quantities furnished and prices charged.
    I also submit copies of reports from Captain R. B. Alden, late of the army, who was in command of United States troops engaged on that occasion, stating the circumstances under which the volunteers were organized, and the mode in which supplies were obtained.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    JEFFN. DAVIS,
        Secretary of War.
HON. LINN BOYD,
    Speaker of the House of Representatives.
----
ABSTRACT OF PAPERS AND MEMORANDA RELATIVE TO THE EXPENSES
OF THE ROGUE RIVER WAR.
General staff and volunteer companies in service.
Staff and companies. Length of service. Strength. Aggregate No.
of days in
service.
General staff Major 112 days, others 35 to 40 days 29 1,615
Fowler's co. infantry About 21 days 66 1,442
Miller's mounted Officers 80 days, men 54 days 118   6,643
Owen's mounted About 25 days 33 825
Goodall's mounted Captain 114 days, men 37 days 100   3,277
Williams' mounted About 29 days 35 986
Lamerick's mounted About 35 days   64   2,186
441   16,974
    The horses of the above mounted men were in service, in the aggregate, 13,822 days.     The estimates for the pay of the volunteers under existing laws, prepared by the Paymaster General, and herewith submitted, amount to--
For pay and allowance to officers and men $9,016.03
For use and risk of horses   6,374.05
    Amount 15,390.08
NOTE.--The same items, according to the rates which Captain Alden agreed to recommend for payment, would amount to--
For officers and men $11,962.37
For horses   46,560.00
    Amount   58,522.37
    Number of rations furnished in kind, exclusive of meals furnished.--Meat, 26,437; flour, 25,089; beans, 22,230; sugar, 21,676; candles, 29,100; soap, 19,600.
    Rations of forage furnished in kind, 25,017.
    Rounds of ammunition--powder, 14,432; lead, 10,184. Cost of supplies as per abstracts herewith, numbered 1 and 2, $106,718.63.
----
Estimate of the amount required to pay the Rogue River volunteers,
under the act of 19th March, 1836.
Staff officers $2,579.80
Captain Fowler's company, infantry 627.37
Captain Miller's company, mounted 5,607.07
Captain Goodall's company, mounted 2,992.41
Captain Williams' company, mounted 871.12
Captain Lamerick's company, mounted 1,930.19
Captain Owens' company, mounted      782.12
15,390.08
    The roll of the seventh company is not furnished, and therefore not estimated for.
    The above is a true copy from the original in this office.
BENJ. F. LARNED, Paymaster General.
PAYMASTER GENERAL'S OFFICE, Nov. 13, 1854.
----
WASHINGTON, D.C., March 19, 1854.
    SIR: I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt yesterday, at 4 p.m., of your communication, dated the 17th instant, requesting me to state what understanding I had with the volunteers organized to repress Indian hostilities in Rogue River valley, Oregon, in August last, or what representations I made with regard to their pay and expenses.
    In reply to your inquiries, I have to state that I informed the captains of companies that I had no authority to enroll volunteers, and that a special appropriation of Congress would be required to meet all the expenses of the war. I assured them, however, that as there was ample evidence of the existence of a dangerous Indian outbreak, I would represent to the government, in my official capacity, the state of the case, and should strongly urge the justice of the claims of volunteers for payment.
    These are the only representations made to them in regard to the mode and prospect of their payment.
    I assured them further, that I should recommend their pay to be that of dragoons, at the highest rate of pay received by such troops in California and Oregon.
    I enrolled the troops for fifteen days, or during the war, and was compelled to fix upon four dollars a day as the price I would recommend to be paid for the use of each horse for the first fifteen days. For the remaining time, it was understood that the hire of the horses should be settled by commissioners whom the Secretary of War would probably appoint.
    After examining the volunteer rolls, I had proposed to file in the Adjutant General's office, on the 15th instant, a statement in full of my remarks upon them, when, unfortunately, I was attacked with a severe fit of illness, which confined me to my bed until yesterday. If such remarks are now desired by the Secretary of War, I can prepare them.
I am, sir, very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    B. R. ALDEN.
Hon. JEFFERSON DAVIS,
    Secretary of War, Washington, D.C.
----
Remarks on certain accounts and bills presented by citizens of Oregon and California for services and supplies furnished during the Rogue River war of 1853; also remarks concerning muster-rolls if volunteers in that war.
    Of the muster-rolls of volunteers in the hands of the Secretary of War, to the best of my belief and knowledge, the following are substantially correct--as correct as could be expected under the circumstances--viz: Captain Goodall's, Lamerick's, and Miller's.
    Captain Fowler's company was enrolled by the commissioners of military affairs in Rogue River valley, as a guard for the defense of the town of Jacksonville. When they advised with me on the subject, I suggested the enrollment of thirty men. I suppose the muster-roll in the hands of the Secretary to be correct.
    Captain Owens' company was enrolled by my authority--twenty-five men--but was soon after disorganized. The men quarreled with the captain, and drove him off at the risk of his life. I would suggest that an estimate be made for the company, but that special instructions should be given to the board ordered to make payments to this company.
    Captain Rhodes' rolls have not yet come into my hands. I enrolled his company of mounted men--about fifty-five men; the average term of service being thirty days.
    Of the other companies I have no knowledge. Captain Williams' and Terry's companies cannot, I suppose, expect as high allowance for the hire of mules and horses as those that I enrolled. The staff-roll appears to be correctly made out. I would recommend it to be adopted as it stands.
    About August 20, 1853, I hired a mule pack-train, at $4 a day for each mule while kept in service, and to be discharged at the pleasure of the commanding officer. At that time mules could not have been hired at a cheaper rate. I did not suppose that it would be necessary to retain the train in service more than thirty days. Before the month expired, however, the pack-train was sent by General Lane to the emigrant trail with a company of volunteers to furnish supplies to the suffering emigrants, and to protect them against the Indians in that quarter. I would suggest consultation with General Lane to determine the rate at which these packers shall be paid while on this service; and also whether the expenses of that movement shall be included in the bill for defraying the expenses of the Rogue River war.
    The blacksmith bills for shoeing horses of volunteers should properly be deducted from the pay of the men; but as the captains were unable to present correct lists of the names of the men who had their horses shod, I would suggest that one-half of the horse-shoeing bill at least should be deducted from the hire of mules and horses.
    I consider the forage a little too large, and would recommend a general deduction of one-third on all bills for forage over $300.
    I would suggest that the prices of articles of subsistence be regulated so that different merchants shall not be paid different prices for the same article: this to apply to merchants in northern California (in the vicinity of Yreka) and in Rogue River valley.
B. R. ALDEN,
    Late Captain Fourth United States Infantry.
WASHINGTON, D.C., March 24, 1854.
----
Memorandum of amount of claims for supplies, &c.,furnished volunteers engaged in suppressing Indian hostilities in Rogue River valley, Oregon,
in August and September, 1854.
1. For transportation, including hire of horses, mules, wagons &c. $18,198.00
2. For forage, consisting of oats, barley, and hay 29.675.68
3. For ferriage 167.50
4. For quartermaster supplies 7.996.20
5. For subsistence in kind and meals 32,241.57
6. For ordnance, including guns and ammunition 1,862.97
7. For medicines and hospital purposes 9,136.90
8. For miscellaneous objects and items not so specified
         as to be classed
    8,008.38
107,287.20
Ex. Doc. No. 99, 33rd Congress 1st Session, Expenses of Rogue River War


Copy.
War Department
    Washington 29 Sept. 1854
Sir
    I return herewith the report from your office of the 7 inst. upon the claim of Jesse Robinson for supplies furnished the troops engaged in the Rogue River War, for which provision is made by the act approved 17 July 1854.
    This report, in recommending the allowance of certain items, proceeds on the assumption that the quantity of forage for which claims have been presented is not more than the troops were entitled to under the regulations of the U.S. army. On the other hand, by computations made in the office of the Quartermaster General, it appears that the quantity for which payment is claimed is greatly in excess of the quantity required for issue, and the same is true in respect to the subsistence. I shall however regard the certificate of the quartermaster & commissary appointed by Capt. Alden & Genl. Lane as evidence of the quantities of supplies delivered to him and now to be paid for, but as regards their value, which is not like quantity a question of measure & weight, but one of skill and judgment, a discretion is to be exercised in the settlement, and I send a copy of a report of Capt. Alden upon this point for your information, as well as a copy of the report of this Department, in answer to a resolution of Congress calling for information in regard to these claims.
    With reference to the mode of reporting these claims for the action of this Department under the act above titled I would prefer a general statement of all the claims exhibiting the name of each claimant, items claimed, prices charged and prices recommended for allowance, omitting the evidence in support of the claim, and other particulars, which will have been fully considered by you before making your report.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        Jeffer. Davis
            Secretary of War
Hon. Robt. J. Atkinson
    Third Auditor

Joseph Lane Papers, OHS Mss 1146, Oregon Historical Society Research Library


    Know all men by these presents--that I, George L. Snelling, for divers good causes and considerations me thereunto moving, have to me noted, constituted and appointed, and by these presents do now note, constitute and appoint James Mandeville Carlisle, of the city of Washington, counselor at law, to be my true and lawful attorney in fact, for me and in my name to ask, demand and receive of and from the United States of America, and of and from the proper departments, agents and officers of the government thereof all moneys which are or may become payable to me by reason of my claims growing out of the Indian disturbances commonly called the Rogue River War, out of the appropriation heretofore made by Congress, and particularly by the act of August 1854 for defraying the expenses of the said war, which said claims have been recently examined by the board constituted for that purpose; and for me and in my name to sign all the documents, papers, acquittances, receipts and vouchers which may be necessary for the payment and receipt of said moneys at the Treasury of the United States, or elsewhere, the same may be payable; and for me and in my name and that to do all and every other lawful act which may be required in the premises and which I might or could do if personally present, to the end that all such moneys may be paid over to and received by my said attorney; hereby ratifying and comprising all and singular to the lawful acts of my said attorney in the premises.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand & seal this twenty-first day of December anno domini one thousand eight hundred and fifty-four.
Signed, sealed &    )
delivered in             )                           Geo. L. Snelling
presence of            )
B. K. Morsell
   
District of Columbia      )
    Washington County    )  ss.
On this 21st day of December 1854, before the subscriber, a justice of the peace in and for the county aforesaid, personally appears George L. Snelling and acknowledges the aforegoing instrument to be his act and deed.
    Given under my hand & seal
        B. K. Morsell, J.P.
Scan in Truwe collection


Rogue River Indian Spoliation and Reservation Indemnity Claims.
    Notice is hereby given that L. F. Grover, A. C. Gibbs and Geo. H. Ambrose have been duly appointed to act as a Board of Commissioners, under the provisions of the Treaty between the United States and the Rogue River Indians--entered into the 10th day of September, 1853--to audit and adjust all claims of individuals, growing out of Indian Spoliations, committed by said tribe, or their allies, during the continuance of the Rogue war of 1853; also, to make allowance for all improvements made by settlers, on lands taken and set apart by said Treaty, as an Indian reservation.
    Said Board will organize and commence its session at Jacksonville, Oregon, on the first Monday of January, 1855, and continue in session thirty days.
    All persons having claims, as aforesaid, are urged to present them promptly, with their proof, to secure an early adjustment.
JOEL PALMER,
    Supt. Indian Aff. in Oregon.
Salem, Dec. 9, 1854.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, December 19, 1854, page 3


INDIAN WAR CLAIMS.

NOTICE is hereby given that L. F. Grover, Esq., Dr. Geo. H. Ambrose and A. C. Gibbs, Esq., have been appointed Commissioners to appraise the property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians during the late Indian war. All persons having claims for property so destroyed are required to present the same to the said Commissioners, with proper proofs, on the first Monday of January next, at Jacksonville, Territory of Oregon.
JOEL PALMER,
    Supt. Indian Affairs.
Umpqua Weekly Gazette, Scottsburg, December 30, 1854, page 3



Jacksonville Oregon Jany. 4th 1855
To Gen. Joel Palmer
    Superintendent Indian
        Affairs in Oregon
            Sir
                Enclosed please find the certified oaths of the commissioners appointed by you to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River tribe of Indians during the war of 1853, also to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the treaty of 10th Sept. 1853, consummating those qualifications as such commissioners, in accordance with the instructions from your office, dated Dec. 24th 1854.
Yours obediently
    L. F. Grover
    A. C. Gibbs
    Geo. H. Ambrose
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, page 114.



Jacksonville Jany. 10th 1855
To Genl. Joel Palmer
    Superintendent of Indian
        Affairs in Oregon
            Sir
                As requested by Mr. Geary, at the time I left Salem for this place as a commissioner to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by Indians during the Rogue River war of 1853. I now write informing you [of] the organization of the board on the 1st inst., according to notice. The commissioners have taken the oath required by instructions and proceeded to business by renting a room for [an] office, heated and lighted for the rent of $75.00--the cheapest to be had, and small at that. On our first arrival here there was a large fall of snow accompanied with exceeding cold weather, which has stopped mining, raised the markets, compelled cattle to be driven in for shelter and feed--hay is now worth $50 per ton, horse feed of all kinds in proportion. Our board at the hotel is $20 per week, and horse keeping at the stable $4 per day, which we have to pay or let our horses starve. One large stable here has been crushed by snow. Expenses of traveling this side of the Calapooia average $4.00 per day.
            My vouchers reach $    90
Board of the comm.
5 weeks at least @ $20 300
3 horses 40 days @ $4 480
Room rent & fuel 75
Stationery 35
Handbills 100 & posting 50
Dr. Ambrose salary 150
A. C. Gibbs      250
$1430
    In coming here we found that no adequate notice had been given of our meeting, owing to the fact that the northern mails had failed, and from Yreka only one notice had appeared in the Herald; in fact the people did not know of our appointment and duties. We immediately ordered handbills to be printed at Yreka and posted up there, in Scotts Valley, at Cottonwood, at the head of the valley, at Sterling, Illinois Creek, Althouse and at Crescent City, also inserted [a] notice in Crescent City Herald and [Yreka] Mountain Herald.
    The board became satisfied that general and immediate notice must be given or the object of the session would entirely fail. I do not know what the expenses of the advertisements will be.
    You may think the bill I send is high, but we were paying what others are paying here now at this crisis of hard times. I wrote you a letter from the Canyon--which [I] hope you have received--I sent this letter by private hand to Umpqua. We have had no mail from the north since my arrival here. Owing to want of notice we cannot get through with claims this month. The prices for board and horse feed are cash prices here now and our men expect the money. If possible I hope you will send me $1000--as I can't get along with less--and leave my own salary unaccounted for.
    Mr. Gibbs and Dr. Ambrose say that they accepted their commission only on condition that all expenses should be promptly paid, and salary forthcoming. Mr. Dunn, member from Jackson, will leave Salem for this place so as to arrive here before the commissioners close. Please send money by him; if not send by Genl. Drew who will leave Salem at the close of the session. I do not with to leave here without paying these bills. I hardly think we can complete our duties in less than thirty days from date--we have audited thirty claims.
Yours with much respect
    L. F. Grover
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, pages 114-115.



Jacksonville O.T. February 10, 1855
Gen. Joel Palmer
    Supt. Indian Affairs
        Oregon Territory    Dear Sir
            This day the commissioners close their labors in Jacksonville, and you may expect a communication from me. I feel disposed to write for a number of other reasons.
    1st. I took a trip to Sailor Diggings, a distance of 60 miles, to circulate notices of our meeting, and gained considerable information concerning Indian affairs in that direction and am sorry to say they are in an unsettled state. Large amounts of property have been destroyed by the Indians and that they are continually stealing something. This provokes the settlers and they wish the Indians kept in check or removed, and pay for what property has been destroyed.
    Some settlers say the Indians are obliged to go on the reserve--the Indians say not. Considering all the facts and circumstances, I think much care and attention will be required on the part of agents during the coming spring and summer to keep down open hostilities between the whites and Indians.
    I learn with pleasure that Robt. B. Metcalfe has been appointed sub-Indian agent and I hope he will be stationed in the Rogue River country, as I believe there will be more to do here than can be accomplished by any one person.
    Dr. Ambrose's appointment is well received here, and all agree that he will make an efficient officer.
    I think of taking up my residence in this country next summer, which perhaps makes me feel a rather deeper interest in the subject.
    We were much disappointed in not receiving the money to pay our expenses and salary, and have been obliged to borrow money.
    I hope you will pay Mr. Grover the balance due me at your earliest convenience, and he will forward the same to me.
Very respectfully your friend
    and obedient servant
        A. C. Gibbs
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, pages 141-142.



Shasta July 2nd 1855
Dear Sir
    Enclosed I send you a power of attorney [illegible] according to instructions, which I trust will be sufficient. I wish you would send me the $500 for the amount allowed me as soon as possible as I am much in want of money, which will be in full for my interest in the same. I also wish you to send me at the same time the balance due me on our private deal & oblige
Yours truly
    F. Noseret
    John Anderson
P.S.
    I have made & sent to Yreka a power of attorney to collect the amount due for services & use of horses. Please send by return of express if possible. I understand that I have 2 letters at Jacksonville either in the express or post office which I wish you to send to me.
Yours &c.
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 345-346.  This letter was sent to Madison B. Morris.

Testimony of Col. J. E. Ross in Relation to the
Commencement and Termination of the
Rogue River War of 1853.

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being first duly sworn says--I resided in Jackson County aforesaid during the summer and fall of 1853. I was engaged in the Rogue River War so called. I acted as col. commanding. The first act of hostilities was committed on the second day of August 1853, by Indians called Tipsey's band--killing a white settler by the name of Edwards, and the shooting of cattle. I have learned during the continuance of said war, from a conversation with an Indian called "Jim," a principal chief of the Rogue River Tribe, that there was a difficulty between Jim and one of "Tipsey's" band in regard to a squaw. It appeared that a Spaniard among the whites had the squaw and Jim charged the wrong upon the whites. The Indian of Tipsey's band then left the camp of "Jim" declaring that he would cause a general war of extermination against the whites in Rogue River Valley. This was on the night before the killing of Edwards. From this time all the Indians in Rogue River Valley assumed a hostile attitude towards the whites and carried on an aggressive war by murdering citizens, burning houses and other improvements and property, killing and driving off stock &c., in all which acts of hostilities the Rogue River Tribe of Indians were either actors in the first instance or accessory as allies to straggling bands of neighboring tribes.
    This war continued from the date before mentioned up to the battle in the mountains in which [Pleasant] Armstrong was killed on the 24th of August 1853, when an armistice of seven days [was] declared, which was only a temporary suspension of immediate hostilities with the principal band of Rogue Rivers until a council could be held by them with the subordinate chiefs to settle upon the provisions of treaty if such should be made, or if not to determine what negotiations should be made. But hostilities did not cease, except by the band immediately entering into the armistice, until after the treaty of the 10th September 1853.
    "Jim" told me that the Indians about Grave Creek belonged to the Rogue River Tribe, and that in the difficulties in that quarter the Grave Creeks and Applegate bands were united, and acted together. I think that the Indians on Cow Creek, the other side of the Grave Creek Hills, had no connection with the Rogue Rivers in the war of 1853.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 3rd day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public



Testimony of Capt. John F. Miller in Relation to the
Commencement and Termination of the
Rogue River War of 1853.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John F. Miller of said county being first duly sworn says--I resided in the Rogue River Valley during the summer and fall of 1853, took part in the Rogue River Indian War of that year. I acted as Captain of Company "A" of Oregon volunteers in that service. I would say from what I know of the circumstances of said war that actual hostilities commenced on or about the 2nd day of August 1853 by certain Indians belonging to "Tipsey's band" so called killing one Edwards, a settler on the public lands in said valley, and shooting cattle &c. Tipsey's band was understood to be acting at that time in concert with the other Indians of the Rogue River Valley in commencing and carrying on an offensive war of extermination against all the whites of said valley.
    Actual hostilities continued from the 2nd day of August mentioned, up to the 10th day of September following, when a formal treaty of peace, and for the purchase of Indian lands, was entered into with said tribe. The hostilities mentioned were characterized by the murder of white settlers, burning their houses and other property, killing and driving off stock &c.
    I am of opinion that all the bands of Indians from Grave Creek to the head of Rogue River Valley were implicated together in their hostilities and were all under the influence and in the council of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians proper, during the period from the 2nd day of August 1853 to the 10th day of Sept. 1853 above mentioned. I have learned the facts here stated relative to the combination of various bands of Indians in said war from conversation with the principal chiefs of said Rogue River Tribe.
John F. Miller
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 3rd day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.



Price Current of the Market of Jackson County, Oregon Territory
from 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853
During the Actual Hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.

Flour per # .40     Axes @ 5.00
Oats   "  bushel 3.60 Sheeting per yard .30
Barley   "        " 4.60 Drilling   "      " .30
Potatoes   "        " 6.00 Duck   "      " 1.50
Onions   "        " 7.00 Cigars 8.00
Bacon   "    # .75 Buckets, tin @ 2.00
Ham   "    " .75 Brooms 1.50
Butter   "    " 1.00 Shirts--wool per doz. 36.00
Beans   "  bushel 24.00     "        cotton ticking   "      " 15.00
Sugar   "    # .50     "        white   "      " 36.00
Rice   "    " .40 Pants med. wool   "      " 80.00
Salt   "    " .50     "     buckskin per pair 16.00
Coffee   "    " .75 Blankets   "      " 10.00
Tea   "    " 1.50 Hats per doz. 60.00
Candles   "    " 1.50 Shoes   "      " 36.00
Dried apples   "    " .75 Boots   "  pair 8 to 10.00
     "     peaches   "    " .87 Hay   "  ton 60.00
Soap   "    " .75 Cabbages per doz. 3.00
Saleratus   "    " .75 Squashes   "   # .05
Tobacco   "    " 2.00 Oats in sheaf per doz. 6.00
Brandy   "   gal. 8.00 Wheat   "   bus. 10.00
Whiskey   "    " 8.00 Corn   "     " 5.00
Molasses   "    " 4.00 Fry pans @ 2.00
Vinegar   "    " 4.00 Knives & forks per set 3 to 6.00
Mining shovels 4.00 Tumblers per doz. 8.00
Picks 4.00 Camp kettles @ 2 to 6.00
Pans, tin 1.50 Cooking stove @ 150 to 250.00
    "     sheet iron 3.00 Rifle guns @ 10 to 75.00
Nails per # .40 Revolvers, navy @ 50.00
Lead   "    " .75         "          small @ 40.00
Shot   "    " .75 Oxen per yoke 200 to 350.00
Powder   "    " 2.00 Milch cows @ 75 to 150.00
Rope   "    " 1.50 Steers, 2 yr. old 75.00
Heifers, 2 yrs. old each 75.00 Chickens @ 1.50
Calves, yearling    " 50.00 Fence rails per 100 10.00
Horses @   75 to 300.00 Rails made in timber 4.00
American mares @ 200 to 500.00 Beef per lb. .30
Mules @ 100 to 250.00 Pickles per gal. 4.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--I am, and was during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, a merchant in the town of Jacksonville in said county and trading in the general merchandise of the country. I have examined the foregoing list of goods with the prices severally affixed thereto and believe the same to be an average price current of such articles, as they were sold in the county of Jackson at the time of said war between the 2nd day of August 1853, and the 10th day of September 1853.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John F. Miller of said county being duly sworn says--I am and was during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 a farmer residing in the county of Jackson aforesaid, was captain of Company "A" of Oregon volunteers in said war, knew the prices of stock, country produce, and goods generally. I have examined the foregoing list of articles with the prices severally annexed thereto and believe the same to exhibit a fair and just price current of the same during the said war from the 2nd day of August 1853 to the 10th day of Sept. 1853.
John F. Miller
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William L. Gaylord of said county being duly sworn says--I am and was during the Rogue River Indian War a merchant, doing a general mercantile business at Jacksonville in said county. I have examined the foregoing price current and think the prices annexed to the several articles therein stated are a just exhibit of the state of the market in Jackson County during the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.
William L. Gaylord
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.


Report of Commissioners on Rogue River War Claims.

Joel Palmer Esqr.
Superintendent of Indian Affairs O.T.
        Sir
                Pursuant to the special instructions issued from your office at Dayton O.T. bearing date December 20th 1854 to us communicated, the undersigned Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribes of Indians during the war with said tribe in 1853, also to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the Treaty of the 10th September 1853, beg leave most respectfully to report
    That on the first day of January 1855 they commenced at Jacksonville in said Territory and after being duly, by taking the proper oath of office, certified, copies of which are forthwith forwarded to you by mail, they proceeded to the discharge of their duties.
    They determined, by the most available and reliable testimony,
    1st, the date of the commencement of the war, to wit the 2nd day of August 1853
    2nd, the date of the termination of hostilities to wit, the 10th day of September 1853. Said testimony was reduced to writing and is herewith accompanying, marked "A" in envelope.
    In relation to claims for property destroyed as aforesaid, the Board made the following order.
    That all claims presented, as far as practicable, shall be based on the affidavit of the claimant, setting forth
    1st The destruction of property for which payment is claimed.
    2nd That such property was destroyed during the actual hostilities of said war.
    3rd That such property was destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies.
    4th Such description of the property destroyed as will enable the Commissioners to assess its just value.
    In addition to the above basis of proof the Board will require the same to be represented by the testimony of two disinterested witnesses when practicable. If such testimony cannot be procured claimants must present such circumstantial or other evidence as may satisfy the Commissioners of the justice of their claims. If the claimant cannot be personally present, claims may be presented by agents, and prayed by any kind of competent testimony.
    The Board then proceeded to receive and entertain proofs of claims as aforesaid, reducing the substance thereof to writing, which will be found herewith accompanying each claim, numbered from "1 to 73" inclusive--in envelopes.
    After claimants had closed their testimony, the Board proceeded to make awards in the several spoliation claims in such amounts as the proofs and circumstances of the cases would warrant, basing their estimates of the value of all property of a current commercial rate during the war, on a price current established by the testimony of several merchants and farmers of Jackson County, in said Territory, the substance of which was reduced to writing and is herewith accompanying marked "B" in envelope, as to kinds of property not therein contained, the value of the same was established by testimony offered by claimants--always varying the estimate made according to the description and location of the property destroyed.
    Certificates of such awards made accompanying the claims and proofs numbered from "1 to 73" inclusive seriatim. The Board also issued to each claimant a duplicate certificate of the award made in each case.
    The following catalogue exhibits the result of the labors of the Board in the matter of spoliation claims as aforesaid.
    Statement of the number and names of claimants for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war with said tribe in 1853 and the amount allowed to each, annexed--
No. 1.  Daniel and Ephraim Raymond $3,144.25
2.  Clinton Barney 249.00
3.  Davis Evans 1,755.00
4.  Martin Angel 200.00
5.  Michael Brennan [sic] 32.75
6.  Albert B. Jennison 1689.65
7.  William J. Newton 1600.00
8.  William Thompson & Henry Rowland 1029.00
9.  John W. Patrick & John R. Hardin 1315.00
10.  Pleasant W. Stowe 450.00
11.  Jeremiah Yarnell 100.00
12.  William S. King 250.00
13.  Cram, Rogers & Co. 250.00
14.  Edith M. Nickel 230.00
15.  John Benjamin 316.00
16.  David N. Birdseye 211.50
17.  Louis Rothermel 225.00
18.  Mary Ann Hodgins 80.00
19.  George H. C. Taylor 668.50
20.  John Markley 80.00
21.  Sigmund Ettlinger 130.00
22.  James C. Tolman 175.00
23.  Henry Helms 108.00
24.  William M. Elliott 560.00
25.  Silas & Edward Day 421.00
26.  James Triplett 500.00
27.  Nathan B. Lane 669.00
28.  John Agy 85.00
29.  James Bruce 475.00
30.  James J. Fryer 544.00
31.  William G. T'Vault 270.00
32.  Hall & Burpee 628.50
33.  John Penniger 263.00
34.  John E. Ross 4,176.00
35.  John S. Miller 477.00
36.  D. Irwin 920.00
37.  Burrell B. Griffin 1,277.00
38.  Marcena McCombs 1,020.00
39.  William N. Ballard 468.50
40.  Freeman Smith 382.25
41.  Nicholas Klopfenstein 227.50
42.  Daniel F. Fisher 173.50
43.  Thomas D. Jewett 317.25
44.  Sylvester Pease 300.00
45.  McGreer, Drury & Runnels 450.00
46.  David Hughart 90.00
47.  James Mooney 500.00
48.  John Gheen 840.00
49.  Theodore Cameron 30.50
50.  James Abraham 825.40
51.  Francis Nasarett 1464.00
52.  Galley & Oliver 500.00
53.  T. B. Sanderson 400.00
54.  Frederick Rosenstock 450.00
55.  Dunn & Alberding 2500.00
56.  Asa G. Fordyce 200.00
57.  Obadiah D. Hoxie 50.00
58.  James L. Loudon 200.00
59.  Samuel Grubb 300.00
60.  William Kahler 144.45
61.  Samuel Williams 474.00
62.  Hiram Niday 898.50
63.  John Anderson 1093.00
64.  Elias Huntington 80.00
65.  Sherlock Abrams 213.25
66.  Thomas Frizzell 476.00
67.  Miller & Rose 850.00
68.  Robert B. Metcalfe 86.00
69.  Charles Williams 67.00
70.  John Swinden 475.00
71.  James R. Davis 35.00
72.  Isaac Woolen 750.00
73.  William M. Hughes         275.    
$43,040.75
    In further pursuance of instructions the Board visited from time to time as the labors would permit the lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of the 10th of Sept. 1853 as aforesaid, the same lying in the vicinity of Jacksonville, and made inspections of permanent improvement made by whites on said lands previously to said treaty, with a view to assessing their value. In several instances they found the same partially removed or destroyed by said Indians. They therefore deemed it expedient to take the statement of the claimants on oath and such other testimony from disinterested sources as could be obtained, to assist the Commissioners in arriving at a just estimate of the value of the said improvements at the time such claimants were dispossessed thereof by the act of the government. The amounts allowed are in a very slight degree only compensatory of the real damages sustained by settlers who were required to remove from said Indian reservation occupancy of agricultural lands in a district furnishing the best market for farming produce on the Pacific Coast, being in most instances of tenfold greater value than the improvements on the same. But the Commissioners regarded their instructions as strictly limiting their duties in the premises to the assessment of the value of the improvements on said lands, alone, and governed themselves accordingly. The awards in cases of reservation claims number from "1 to 10" inclusive--certificates accompany the process, and duplicates of the same have been issued to claimants in manner as heretofore reported with reference to spoliation claims.
    The following is a statement of the numbers and names of claimants for permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th 1853, with the amount awarded to each claimant, and the sum total thereof--to wit:
No. 1.  Davis Evans [penciled: $250 too high] 350.00
2.  Matthew G. Kennedy 250.00
3.  John J. Cooke 390.00
4.  William Hutchinson [penciled: This and Hutchinson own the same claim you double what the sum should be] 311.25
5.  Chesley Gray [penciled: does not belong here 286.00
6.  Robert B. Metcalfe 350.00
7.  Jacob Gall 120.00
8.  Geo. H. C. Taylor 75.00
9.  Jno. M. Silcott [penciled: does not belong to this class] 100.00
10.  James Leslie [penciled: this claim is too high by 225.--]      300.00
$2,832.25
    In making awards on claims for spoliations during said war, the object of the Board has been to ascertain in favor of each claimant the just value of property actually destroyed without considering resultant damages, or endeavoring to cramp claims with the view of reducing them within the fifteen thousand dollars reserved from the Indian annuities for the purposes of liquidating such claims, believing that more ample and equal justice could be attained by pursuing such course.
    Some few claims of slight amounts for Indian spoliations during said war probably remain unpresented, but the Commissioners have spared no pains in obtaining testimony and making awards in all practicable cases, where they had reason to believe existed just claims.
    Considering the floating character of the population in the mining districts of Oregon, and the numerous casualties incident to life on our frontiers, it is believed that further time spent in session by the Board would not be expedient for the final adjustment of all claims against the United States properly cognizable by said Commissioners, all of which is most respectfully submitted.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855

No. 1--Claim of Daniel & Ephraim Raymond        (award) $3144.25

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I, Daniel Raymond, being duly sworn, says that on or about the 27th day of August 1853 Ephraim Raymond and myself were residents of Jackson County, Territory of Oregon, and joint owners of the "Crystal Spring Ranch," so called, together with the following described property, to wit,
    One sod [sic. The house is later described as a log house. Nineteen-century capital "L"s are easily misread as "S"s.] house 32 by 28 feet one and a half story high--floored with dressed puncheons. Said house was divided into three rooms and of the value of $700.00 One barn and stable 30 by 22 feet containing a trough for feeding 12 animals, no roof on either, value $120.00. There were burned in the house the following articles 2500# flour worth $1000.00. One gross matches $3.00. 10# powder $20.00. 15# lead $11.25. 2000 percussion caps $10.00. 30# soap $22.50. 30# nails $12.00. Two sets cups & saucers $10.00. 3 sets plates $12.00. 2 sets knives & forks $6.00. 1 set table spoons $1.00. 50# butter $75.00. 40 gallons liquor $320.00. 10 gals. vinegar $40.00. 1 cook stove and furniture $150.00. 15 pack saddles and ropes $120.00. 10 saddle blankets $10.00. 5 pairs heavy mackinaw blankets $50.00. 3 water buckets $6.00. 1 grindstone weighing 90# $25.00. 3 chopping axes $12.00. 3 tons hay $180.00. 6 dozen bundles oats $36.00. 2 decanters $8.00. 1 large sized pitcher $10.00. 1 doz. glass tumblers $6.00. 5 augers $8.00. 1 brace and bits $16.00. 2 hand saws $16.00. 1 pr. buckskin pants $6.00. 6 wine glasses $4.00. 6 milk pans $9.00. 3 shovels $12.00. 10# saleratus $5.00. 50 gunny sacks $12.00. 2 prs. boots $8. 3 vests $9.00. 4 prs. pants $12.00. 6 shirts $9.00. 3 prs. drawers $4.50. 1 pr. gold scales $4.00. 2 pr. spring balances $4.00. 1 large camp kettle $3.00. 2 frying pans $4.00. 1 buffalo robe $8.00. 2 sets tea spoons $2.00. 5 gallons pickles $15.00.
    Which property was of the value above mentioned. Deponent further says that on the night of the 27th of August 1853 the above described property was destroyed by fire, which fire was kindled as this deponent is informed and believes by Taylor's band of Indians--a branch of the Rogue River Tribe. Deponent further says that he has not received the above mentioned property for his own use or benefit, or any part thereof, since the time last above mentioned, and that he has not received payment from any source for the above mentioned property or any part thereof.
Daniel Raymond
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 4th day of January A.D. 1854 [sic].
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being first duly sworn says
    I know that on or about the 27th day of August 1853 Daniel Raymond & Ephraim Raymond were joint owners of a log house and stable situated on the road leading from Jacksonville to the Canon through the Umpqua Mountains--about 33 miles from Jacksonville--that I passed by the premises soon after and found that both of said buildings had been burnt. The house was, I think 32 / 28 feet on the ground, a story and a half high, with three rooms in the ground floor, the house was new had been built about 18 months. I would think that $700 was a low estimate for the value of the house. The stable was 30 / 12 feet, also built of logs--unfinished when destroyed. I would estimate its value when burnt at two or three hundred dollars.
    I was well acquainted with the premises, having resided there for nearly a year next before they were destroyed. I have heard the affidavit of Daniel Raymond read, am acquainted with the list of property therein set forth as having been destroyed, and know that those articles were in the house and stable at the time they were burnt, except the 40 gallons of liquor and saleratus mentioned. I know that there were liquor and saleratus, but not how much. They were using some and selling some. I know there was a large quantity of flour then but not how much. To the best of my knowledge and belief, the whole bill presented by Mr. Raymond is just and true.
    Messrs. D. & E. Raymond were at that time keeping a place of public entertainment on the road and also kept goods--such as groceries &c. for sale.
    I heard the daughter of "Taylor," a chief of the Rogue River Tribe, say that her brother, "Jim Taylor," set Raymond's house and stable on fire. I have no interest in the claim before mentioned.
Giles Kinney
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 4th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin Halstead of said county being first duly sworn, says,
    I was a neighbor of the Mr. D. & E. Raymond at the time their house and stable were burnt by the Indians about the last of August 1853. I was frequently in and about the premises while the Raymonds lived there, was well acquainted with the size and kind of the buildings--was there when they were first burnt up, was as well acquainted with the articles of furniture and merchandise in the house and stable as a neighbor might be, and believe the list of goods and chattels as well as the general description of the property burnt, sworn to by Daniel Raymond, as well as the prices of the same, are just and true, to the best of my knowledge and judgment.
    All that I know about the burning of the premises by the Indians is that they were destroyed by fire during actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and "Martha Taylor," a daughter of old Chief "Taylor," one of the Rogue River chiefs, told me that her people set the house and stable on fire--and I saw fresh Indian tracks about the premises when I first went there, while the buildings were yet burning--I have no interest in this claim.
Benjamin Halstead
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
(  seal  )
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--I know that the dwelling house of Messrs. Daniel & Ephraim Raymond in said county was destroyed by fire, on or about the 27th day of August 1853 together with its contents--being burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I believe. I was one of the last persons to leave said house during the war, and knew what was left in the house. I have read the statement of Daniel Raymond in the matter of his claiming for property destroyed and know the same to be just and true.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
    Ephraim and Daniel Raymonds "Award" No. 1 3144.25. This may certify that the board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Ephraim Raymond and Daniel Raymond claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of three thousand one hundred and forty-four dollars and twenty-five cents.
$3,144.25 L. F. Grover
Jacksonville, Oregon A. C. Gibbs
January 30th 1855 Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
       
No. 2--Claim of Clinton Barney        (award) 249.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 27th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, said Indians burnt the house of Messrs. D. & E. Raymond in said county in which I had destroyed the following articles of property to wit,
woolen coverlets worth 26.00
linen tablecloths     " 20.00
towels     " 6.00
linen shirts     " 10.00
calico dress     " 4.00
silk worsted dress     " 12.00
worsted cloak     " 10.00
buckskin vests (new)     " 20.00
pair buckskin pants     " 12.00
buffalo robes     " 30.00
blankets     " 16.00
pack saddles     " 40.00
lap robes     " 12.00
cans for packs     " 9.00
hand saw     " 2.00
Collins axes     " 6.00
water pails (wood)     " 4.00
pairs women's shoes     " 4.50
shovel     "        3.50
$249.00
    I have never reclaimed said property, nor received payment therefor, from the United States, nor from anyone.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
United States
        To Clinton Barney                                     Dr.
For property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the Indian war of 1853, as follows to wit--
new pack saddles & lash ropes 40.00
saddle blankets 5.00
pair buckskin pants 6.00
# stocking yarn 6.00
pair women's shoes 5.00
ladies' dresses 9.00
towels 6.00
tablecloths 8.00
coverlets 20.00
water pails 4.00
bake oven 8.00
hand saw 4.00
drawing knife 3.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
     Daniel Raymond of said county being duly sworn says that the above named Clinton Barney resided with his wife in my house which was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on or about the 27th day of August 1853 and had resided there three or four months next preceding the destruction of the premises. He had at the time of the fire a quantity of household goods, clothing and saddlery which was destroyed when my house was burnt. I know that the foregoing bill by him presented is a true list of articles destroyed at that time, belonging to Clinton Barney with the exception of the articles of female apparel and use, and as to them I believe the list is true, and that the valuation affixed thereto is a just one.
Daniel Raymond
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says that I resided with Messrs. Daniel and Ephraim Raymond about a year next preceding the destruction of their house and stable by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians about the 27th day of August 1853. Clinton Barney lived with his wife in the same house some three or four months next preceding the burning of the premises. I know that the foregoing bill of goods and chattels by him presented were in the house at the time it was burnt, and were destroyed by the fire as I verily believe. I cannot be positive about the articles of female wearing apparel and use but know that there were articles of that character there. In my judgment the prices fixed to the goods are reasonable and just. I have no interest in the claim.
Giles Kinney
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day January A.D. 1855.
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
No. 2 Clinton Barney's "Award" $249.00
    This may certify that the board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Clinton Barney, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and forty-nine dollars.
$249.00 L. F. Grover
Jacksonville, Oregon A. C. Gibbs
Jany. 30th 1855 Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

[No. 3--] Claim of Davis Evans    Award $1755.00
United States of America
In a/c with Davis Evans
For
One house burnt by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853. Said house was 30 by 36 feet one and a half stories high 1000 feet of flooring; two fireplaces with counter and shelving suitable for bar--said house worth           1000.00
    The following goods and articles were in said house and burned at the same time
tables                                   @ $4           12.00
8 benches & stools $2 16.00
1 No. 3 cooking stove and furniture 150.00
2 frying pans $3 6.00
3 shovels for mining $4 12.00
25 yds. calico 25¢ per yd. 6.25
18 yds. heavy duck $1 18.00
8 pack saddles $6 48.00
4 bushels potatoes 20¢ per # 48.00
50  # dried apples 40¢ per # 20.00
1 keg pickles 10 gallons 30.00
10 guns $5 50.00
Also burnt by the said Indians at the same time and place
one log barn 12 by 18 feet                                                   100.00

tons hay                                  
$50           200.00
75  dozen sheaf oats $3 225.00
Also one other house burnt by the Indians as aforesaid within
    the time aforesaid situated at Evans ferry on Rogue River
    12 by 18 ft. with counter bar and chimney                      200.00
Also one keg of whiskey in saw house,
    contg. 10 gallons                                         $3                    30.00

Also  100 # flour                                
40¢           40.00
Also  25 # sugar 40¢ 10.00
Also 10 # coffee 50¢ 5.00
Also 25 # bacon 75¢ 18.75
Also 1 camp kettle, fry pan, 4 plates, 4 cups, 4 knives & forks,
    one large iron kettle, 2 axes, the whole worth                  40.00
Also  blankets                               
$6           24.00
Also one large dressed elk skin                                                5.00
    "    one ferry rope 100 yards long                                     100.00
    "    damage done to ferry boat & loss of time, lumber
     & materials                                                                        500.00
    "    loss of one riding saddle                                                25.00
    "    loss of chisels & augers destroyed in same house      15.00
    "  200 # chili beans                          
40¢           80.00
    "  150 # bacon 75¢ 112.50
    " 40 # coffee 50¢ 20.00
    " 100 # sugar 40¢ 40.00
    " 50 # Indian or corn meal 40¢ 20.00
    " 30 # salt 40¢ 12.00
    " 10 # saleratus 75¢ 7.50
    " 25 # candles $1 25.00
    " 100  papers ground coffee 1" each 50.00
    " 5 # pepper $2 10.00
    " 5 # allspice   " 6.00
    " ½  dozen mining shovels 30.00
    " 5  prs. blankets $8 40.00
    " 1  canoe destroyed Indians 40.00
    " 16 # tobacco $1 16.00
    " 6 # tea 1.50 9.00
    "   about 2 acres potatoes the amount and number of
        bushels supposed to be 100 bushels                            250.00
    "   about 1 acres in corn about 25 bushels                       100.00
    "   cabbage, onions & beans                                               100.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Davis Evans, the person who presents the foregoing amount against the Indians for property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, being duly sworn says that the above and foregoing amount is just and true and that he has not reclaimed any of the property except such as described to wit--the ferry boat; that he has not been paid the destruction of said property either by the United States or any person.
Davis Evans
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Melissa Porter of said county being duly sworn says I am acquainted with Davis Evans the claimant. I lived at the house of Davis Evans on the south side of Rogue River at the time of the commencement of hostilities by the Rogue River Indians in 1853. I was taken away from this house at that time by my friends for fear that if we remained I should be killed by the Indians.
    When the family abandoned the house I was the last person who left. Mr. Evans was away with a pack train to Scottsburg at the time. There were left in the house one large dining table, one kitchen table, one card table, new oilcloths on all then, four small stools in the bar room--two or three in the kitchen besides two long ones in the dining room--two frying pans, a half dozen mining shovels--2 bolts calico, 32 or 3 yds. in each, some 60 or 80 yards of heavy duck used for covering packs and tent--also a number of pack saddles--8 at least--potatoes about 6 bushels--apples dried 100#--one 10 gallon keg pickles--don't know of any whiskey--flour between 200 & 300 lbs.--150# sugar--about 75# coffee--about 300# bacon--1 camp kettle, 4 plates--4 cups--4 knives and forks--one large iron kettle (not the camp kettle), 3 axes--five pair blankets--one large dressed elk skin--one riding saddle without macheers (Oregon saddle), a good number of augers, chisels & tools--can't tell the amount--75# chili beans--Indian corn meal 50#--30 or 40# of salt--10# saleratus--25# candles--100 weight of ground coffee put up in papers--5 or 6# pepper, 3 or 4# spice, nearly a keg of tobacco, say 16#--5 or 6 boxes of tea, one pound each. I was left in charge of the house and when I left I locked all the doors. There were 13 old guns left in the house; when I left there was a barn there filled with hay and oats--the barn was finished and covered with boards--the barn was filled from the ground up.
    I left the house on the 8th or 9th of August 1853 and returned to the place about the 10th of Sept. but found no house nor barn there. They had been burned. Saw in the ruins of the house old gun barrels--kettles & stove--shovels, broken crockery ware, some burnt tinware &c.
    The Indians came to Evans' house two or three days & nights in succession next before I left the house--they took money from the drawer about $13--liquor from the bar--all the provisions they wanted to eat and carry off--they went into the garden, eat all the melons they could and destroyed the vegetables--they told me to stay there, I should not leave. I wanted to go down to Durbin's for safety, but they would not allow me to go--said if Evans came back they would kill him and destroy all his property.
    Mr. Evans kept good groceries &c. for sale; also kept a house of public entertainment. The Indians who came to Evans' home and destroyed property and made threats were a part of the band belonging to "Jo" and "Sam," the principal tribe of the upper Rogue River.
Melissa Porter
When I came back I found the fence about the field broken down, the potatoes about two acres were pulled up and laid all over the field, potatoes scattered about, squashes and pumpkins were cut to pieces, cabbages destroyed in a manner that led me to believe that the Indians did it, corn and beans between 2 & 3 acres of each, of all destroyed. I charged the Indians who were there first with having destroyed the crops. They did not deny it but said they did not wish to talk about the matter.
Melissa Porter
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin Halstead of said county being duly sworn says, I know that after the 2nd day of August of 1853 there was a house at Evans Ferry in said county belonging to Davis Evans a log house covered with clapboards, a common sized log cabin--say 12 by 18 feet--having a fireplace and chimney--a bar counter and shelves, the last time I was in the house, a short time before the Indian difficulties. I would say that the house, bar liquor, glasses, and all were worth two hundred dollars. I mean what liquor was in sight, on the bar. There were camp kettles and blankets in the house when I was there--can't say how many--there were also provisions about the house for use of the persons keeping the ferry. I have often stopped there and taken meals, can't say how much-- (here the affidavit of claims of Davis Evans was read to the witness). From my knowledge of the supplies in the house I would think that the amount of flour, sugar, bacon &c. stated in Mr. Evans' bill was true.
    I have kept a ferry myself across Rogue River about five miles below Evans ferry. The ferry rope at Evans Ferry destroyed by the Indians was a rawhide rope--Evans' rope was about a two inch rope and would be worth seventy-five dollars, in use, as this one was when cut away.
    Evans had at the time the rope was cut away, between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, a ferry boat at his ferry--about 11 feet wide and 40 feet long--which went down the river the time that the rope was cut. The boat has been reclaimed by Evans but with what damages to the boat or at what expense I do not know.
    Mr. Evans also had a house where he resided, on the south side of Rogue River some four miles above the ferry, the house was a log house, one story and a half high, about 18 by 20 ft. on the ground--with an addition of about the same size in length--and a shed in front some 8 feet wide with an addition in the rear about 12 or 14 ft. wide and the length of the house--which had a chimney and fireplace. There were a counter and shelves in the house, suitable for a bar--the floors of this house were made of sawn lumber throughout. There was no floor above. From my knowledge of the premises at the time it was destroyed, I would think they were worth $1000. This house was burnt during the time of active hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853. I was in the house a short time before the same was burnt, and saw a lot of old guns, a cooking stove, some clothing, some flour, and all kinds of provisions--don't recollect seeing any beans or bacon the last time I was there, but Evans usually kept such things for sale.
    Evans also had a barn built of logs about 16 by 18 feet on the ground. I was there when he was building it. I saw him put hay into the barn; when I last saw the barn there was about a ton of hay in it, he was then hauling in his hay--had got it all in. Don't know whether he had any oats in the barn or not.
    I was at the place when the house and barn were destroyed, a few days after they were burnt, and would think both burnt at the same (time).
    When I saw the barn it was not finished, it was raised only 5 or 6 logs from the ground--if it had been raised to the ordinary height and covered with a roof it would have been worth $50.
    I know that Evans had a garden there--some two acres or more, had vegetables &c. in the garden.

Benjamin Halstead
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett, of said county, being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Davis Evans of said county at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. His house was built of small round pine logs. I would not think the house was worth more than $500. I went to Evans' house after his family had left it, during the war, to secure his articles from Indians. I went at the request of Evans' hired hand, took my team and wagon, found the bar with decanters &c. with some liquor &c. took the bar furniture and packed it in a box in the wagon, took all the cooking utensils I could find--mining shovels--saw no bolt of calico. I saw pack saddles there--they were old worn out saddles--did not think them worth taking, a lot of dried apples, saw some old guns there which were condemned--took one double barreled shotgun breech broke off--the barn was worth about $100, had in it 4 tons hay and 75 dozen sheaf oats--the house by the ferry was worth about $100. We took all the kegs that had any liquor in them, took all the flour, sugar and other provisions that we could find, axes and bed tick, some chili beans &c. We saw a lot of ground coffee put up in papers, which was moldy and worthless--we thought it not worth taking. I do not think the Indians destroyed the corn--the crows took most of it--the vegetables were partly destroyed during the war by someone, and part remained there after peace was declared. The ferry boat was not damaged only by the washing out of the lower planks worth about 8 cts. per foot, the boat was 11 by 40 feet.
    The property taken from Evans' house was taken to Durbin's ferry for safekeeping and delivered to Evans' hired man. I have seen several of those articles in Evans' possession since the war.

Thomas Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    David Courtney of said county, being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Davis Evans had burnt by the Indians one barn about 18 by 20 feet on the ground--story and a half high--filled with oats and hay from the bottom up about half of each--also had his dwelling house burnt filled with furniture, groceries, provisions and so forth. I don't know particularly what articles. The rope of his ferry was also cut away by the Indians and his boat went down the river some half mile below the ferry. The boat was damaged some 3 or 4 hundred dollars. The boat when built cost over $1000. I helped build it. The little house at the ferry was also burnt at the same time--worth over $100. The dwelling house above the ferry was worth $600 or $700.
    I have no interest in the claim. The rope cut away was worth $100 as made and put up. It cost some $200 to get the boat back to the ferry. The cooking stove and furniture burnt in the house was a large cooking stove--don't know what it was worth.
    Mr. Evans had a garden--a lot of corn, potatoes, cabbages &c. I passed along them about the close of the war and found them all destroyed--I should think the damages done to the vegetables was over $1000. I do not know that the Indians destroyed the garden, but have heard them say since the war that they destroyed the vegetables.
    I harvested the oats of Mr. Evans in the summer of 1853, can't say how much they were worth. I should judge there were at least 75 dozen of oats. I heard the Indians say at the commencement of the war that they would destroy Evans' property, and I have heard them say since that they did do it.

David Courtney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Daniel Raymond being duly sworn says--I was acquainted with the dwelling house and garden of Davis Evans, claimed to have been destroyed by Indians during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I passed the field and garden soon after the armistice and before the treaty, and the Crescent City volunteers camped there. The horses were in the field, the volunteers were diggin' potatoes. Some four or five men were diggin'--have no doubt they took other vegetables at the same time. It was a general practice during the war for volunteers, packers and others passing to enter gardens and fields of settlers where the premises had been abandoned or destroyed, and take whatever vegetables or other things they might wish to eat or feed their horses and mules.
    They destroyed my garden, for which I have made no claim.

Daniel Raymond
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    M. C. Barkwell of said county, being duly sworn, says--I was acquainted with the house described by Mr. Halstead, belonging to Davis Evans, situated on the south side of Rogue River some four miles above the ferry. The house in general description was as stated by Mr. Halstead. I once lived in the house.
    From my knowledge of the house, and the manner in which it was finished, I should think it could not be worth more than $1000. There was a cooking stove in the house--rather a large sized cooking stove. The stove and furniture, cooking utensils &c. I should think were worth $120.
    I saw the small house on the north side of Rogue River at Evans ferry sometime in the summer of 1853. I would think the house, bar and fixtures might be worth in the neighborhood of two hundred dollars (say $200).
    I would not think the large rawhide rope across the ferry worth $75. I should not think it worth more than $50.
    The boat was a very good boat about as Mr. Halstead described--the best boat on the river.

M. C. Barkwell
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 4th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Melissa Porter of said county, as an additional affidavit, says--That at the time of Indian hostilities of 1853, about the 8th of August 1853, Davis Evans had at his residence on Rogue River an Indian canoe--I left the home in the afternoon of the 8th to go down to Durbin's; when I came back about sundown the canoe was gone. About 8 o'clock in the evening of the same day I saw four Indians coming down the river in the same canoe. The Indians tied the canoe at the landing and came up to the house--took everything they wanted. I left the house while the Indians were there in the evening, when I came back in the morning the Indians and canoe was gone. I have never seen the canoe since. The canoe was a large good Indian canoe. I have often crossed the river in it.
    There were left in the house of Evans which was burnt by the Indians two kegs of vinegar--10 gallons each and 25# butter.
    The Indians I have spoken of were of the Rogue River Tribe.

[Melissa Porter]
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of the Rogue River War of 1853, I went down the river from Davis' ferry some half or three quarters of a mile, found Mr. Evans' ferry boat, then having found that the boat was gone from the ferry and the rope cut. One end of the boat was lying on the west side of the river--one end out of water--the upper or false bottom was gone. I do not think the water could have washed out the false bottom. I think the Indians must have torn it out. The pulleys on one side of the boat were gone. I would think it would cost $100 to bring the boat back.
Giles Kinney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Davis Evans "Award" No. 3. 1755.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Davis Evans a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of seventeen hundred and fifty-five dollars.
$1755.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855


No. 4--Claim of Martin Angel    "Award" 200.00
United States of America
    To Martin Angel                                                                 Dr.
To one mule stolen from the camp on Stuart's Creek by the Rogue River Indians during the Rogue River War between the second day of August and the 10th day of Sept. 1853.
Mule worth                                                                    $200.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Martin Angel of said county being duly sworn says--That during the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 12th & 20th day of August 1853, he lost a mule which he valued at the time at $200--that he verily believes said mule was stolen by the Rogue River Tribe, that he has not reclaimed the same nor received payment therefor, from the United States nor from anyone.
Martin Angel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5 day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas Pyle of said county being duly sworn says--Sometime between the 12th and 20th days of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I had in my possession a mule belonging to Martin Angel. The mule was then in the service in Company "A," Captain John F. Miller. The horses of the company was picketed out one night about the time aforesaid, when they were stampeded by the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe. In the morning nine of the animals were missing, not to be found, and this mule among the number. I have never seen the mule since, and verily believe he was stolen and taken away by the Rogue River Indians. The mule was a good mule; I should think it was worth at the time it was lost at least $200.
Thomas Pyle
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Martin Angel's "award" No. 4 $200.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Martin Angel a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid the sum of two hundred dollars.
$200.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
January 30th 1855

No. 5  Claim of Michael Brennan     Award 32.75

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Michael Brennan of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the 6th day of August, I had in a house at the forks of Applegate Creek the following property to wit: two pair of blankets, two pair of cassimere pantaloons nearly new, a flannel shirt, one cotton shirt, one silk sock, one pair shoes, one butcher knife, and one tin cup. Said house was burnt by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Rogue Rivers, and I verily believe said articles of property were destroyed by the fire--I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Michael Brennan
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. Duncan of said county being first duly sworn says--I was at the house in the forks of Applegate Creek about the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the 9th day of August 1853, and know that Michael Brennan left at that house certain articles of bedding and clothing, such as blankets, pants, shirts &c., such things as miners generally have about camp. After we left we saw smoke in the direction of the house and supposed it had been set on fire by the Indians. I have learned since that the house with its contents was destroyed by fire at that time.
John W. Duncan
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Michael Brennan's "award" No. 5 32.75
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Michael Brennan, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of thirty-two dollars and seventy-five cents.
$32.75

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 6--Claim of A. B. Jennison   "Award" $1689.65
The United States
        To Albert B. Jennison                                Dr.
To property burnt and taken by the Rogue River Indians during the war of 1853 between the 7th of August and the 5th of September A.D. 1853--
1 house 16/20--round logs plank floor
    stove & wood chimney                             $250.00
20 tons hay                                  $40 1200.00
4 scythes & snaths 20.00
1 cupboard 20.00
2 axes 8.00
1 hand saw 5.00
1 large camp kettle 6.00
1 tin can 4.00
1 tin churn 8.00
2 frying pans 4.00
1 coffee mill 3.00
1 tin water bucket 3.00
2 coffee pots 5.00
1 stew pan 3.00
1 brass kettle (2 gallons) 6.00
1 water bucket 2.00
1 washboard 2.00
1 set teacups & saucers 4.00
1 set plates 4.00
6 tin plates 3.00
4 tin cups 2.00
6 milk pans (tin) 6.00
8 japan canisters 2.00
1 set knives & forks 3.00
2 butcher knives 2.00
1 carving knife & fork 3.00
1 set teaspoons 3.00
1 table spoon 1.50
1 large dish pan 2.50
1 table 6.00
2 mattresses 6.00
1 linen tablecloth 5.00
1 pr. buckskin pants 8.00
1 pr. jeans pants 4.00
1 pr. shoes (men's) 2.50
1 tent 6.00
2 stone jugs (2 gals.) 4.00
1 gal. canteen 1.50
2 quilts 20.00
4 blankets 20.00
2 pillows 10.00
25# flour 5.00
5# coffee 1.65
1# tea 1.50
5# bacon 2.50
3# soap 1.50
1 [illegible] silk shawl 30.00
1 Bay State shawl 20.00
1 blk. alpaca dress 14.00
1   "    crepe      " 5.00
3 calico dresses 15.00
1 silk apron 5.00
2 gold breastpins 10.00
1 silver butter knife 2.50
4 night dresses 4.00
6     "     caps 4.00
6 towels 6.00
1 mosquito bar 4.00
7 shirts 7.00
4 lace collars 4.00
6 yds. bonnet ribbon 3.00
4   "     velvet       " 4.00
8   "     curtain calico 2.00
8   "     pillow slips 2.00
38½ yds. calico 11.50
1 blk. silk hdkf. 2.50
4 ladies' shirts 6.00
4 pr. ladies' hose 3.00
1 yd. crash linen 1.00
8 spools cot. thread 2.00
2 calico aprons 1.00
2 ladies' calico socks 3.00
1 pr. ladies' drawers 3.00
1 white shirt 5.00
1 worsted sock 3.50
1 bonnet 5.00
1 worsted dress 10.00
2 calico        " 6.00
4 aprons 2.00
2 pr. ladies' hose 1.50
2 white shirts 4.00
1 Bible 3.00
1 blk. silk veil 6.00
3 child's chemise 3.00
1      "      worsted sock 2.00
4 school books 4.00
2 child's night dress 2.00
2 prs. ladies' shoes 5.00
10 yds. sheeting 2.50
5     "     fine flannel 5.00
4     "     cotton   " 2.00
5     "     linen diaper 5.00
1 patent leather trunk 1.500
5# sugar 1.55
2 glass gilded boxes 2.00
20 bus. potatoes 100.00
100 squashes 12.00
100 melons 5.00
30 bus. corn 300.00
50# tomatoes 4.00
50# turnips 1.50
25# beets 2.00
25# carrots 2.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Albert B. Jennison of said county being duly sworn says--That the articles of property contained in the foregoing list were his property at the time destroyed, that they were destroyed sometime between the 7th day of August and the 5th day of September 1853, being burnt and taken by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war of 1853--That he has never secured any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States, nor from anyone.
Albert B. Jennison
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the 7th or 8th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of Albert B. Jennison was burnt to the best of my knowledge and belief by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. This tribe had a rancheria near the house and I saw them nearby and their track all about the ruins of the house, the next morning after the house was burnt.
    At the time the house was burnt, I think that it contained pretty much all his household effects and from the appearance of things after the fire I should think they were all destroyed with the house. Mr. Jennison's house was well supplied with household goods and furniture for this country. I am satisfied he saved nothing from the fire. The description of the house contained in Mr. Jennison's bill is correct as near as I can judge--I helped put it up. I would think the house was worth at the time it was burnt at least $250.
    Mr. Jennison had a large stack of hay burnt at the same time, I would think 30 tons. I know he had scythes and snaths, one cupboard worth $20, axes, in use, a hand saw, a camp kettle, large, a tin can, milk can 3 gallons, a tin churn, 2 frying pans, one coffee mill, a tin water bucket, coffee pots, a stew pan, a brass kettle, a water bucket, washboard, set [of] tea cups and saucers, one set plates, tin plates, tin cups, milk pans, tin, japan canisters worth 2 bits apiece, knives & forks, carving knife, teaspoons, table spoons, a large tin dish pan, one plain pine table, 6 or seven dollars, 2 mattresses straw & tick, about $4 apiece, one linen tablecloth, one tent worth 10 or 12 dollars, 2 stone jugs worth a couple of dollars apiece, a one gallon canteen. They had two beds in there with bed clothing, and other articles of wearing apparel both male and female for three persons. I don't know how much or what particular articles. I know they had provisions for family use, but not how much. I have seen a breastpin there but don't know the value. I have seen school books there, don't know how many. Mr. Jennison had a large sized patent leather trunk, some small fancy boxes belonging to Mr. Jennison's daughter, don't know what they were worth. Jennison had a field of potatoes about half acre which was destroyed then. I think the Indians dug the most of them from the appearance of the field. Indians dig potatoes different from other folks, dig with a stick. I think the Indians must have taken 20 bushels. There were also squashes in the same field which were destroyed--also melons--had a patch of corn which was also destroyed ½ acre or more. Jennison had also a good garden with various other kinds of vegetables in it all [of] which were destroyed during the war, mostly by the Indians.
    I was a near neighbor of Mr. Jennison and was frequently in and about his house before it was burnt. I have no interest in this claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas P. Bartlett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War about the 8th of August 1853, I know that Albert B. Jennison had a dwelling house situated in said county with its contents, articles of household furniture, clothing, provisions &c. destroyed by fire. I resided in the family of Mr. Jennison just before his house was burned, have read the list of articles filed by him, constituting his claim in this case, and know Mr. Jennison had those articles in his house as mentioned and that they were destroyed by fire with the house. I helped cut the stack of hay mentioned, and would think there was better than 25 tons in the whole. May have been more. There were left in the trunk which was burnt in the house one silk shawl, a good, new shawl, a large woolen shawl, one black alpaca dress, new, one alpaca crepe. There was calico dresses there also. I know these articles were then there as the trunk was opened when we left the house, and we were to take these articles with us but could not pack them, so they were left. The house was a log house I should think as large as 16/20 ft. on the ground, had a floor, fireplace & chimney, also a porch in front. I should judge it would have been worth $200 at the time it was burnt. I have no doubt the house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians from the fact that these hostile Indians were seen in that neighborhood at that time burning other houses & destroying property.
Thomas P. Bartlett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
            W. W. Fowler of said county being duly sworn says--
    Just previous to the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I sold to Albert B. Jennison a bill of dry goods in a month about $100 or $125, including sheeting, flannel, dress patterns &c., which Mr. Jennison took home a short time before his house was burnt by the Indians. I was at that time a merchant in Jacksonville ("Town of"), have no interest in this claim.
W. W. Fowler
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.

No. 7--Claim of William J. Newton        "Award" $1600.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th August 1853, I was the owner of the following property to wit:
    One log house one story high 16/18 feet on the ground, with a floor, fireplace and chimney--which I valued at $200 also about seven tons and a half of hay in a stack enclosed with a fence made of poles, which was destroyed by fire, burnt by the Rogue River Indians as nearly certain, as I saw Indians firing two other houses next neighbors to mine, and I saw tracks of Indians about the ruins the next morning after it was burnt. About the same time I lost 16 head of cattle viz. 6 cows, 6 calves, 2 oxen, 1 year old steer. The cattle were a full average lot of cattle. They were drove away by the Indians. None of said property has been reclaimed by me nor have I received payment therefor from the United States, nor from anyone. I also lost a saddle horse by the same means and at the same time valued at $100.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 10th day of August of said year, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took and drove away a bay American horse, belonging to me, worth at the time one hundred dollars, at the time said horse was at Shetler's Ranch near the Siskiyou Mountain. I have never recovered said animal, nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 31st day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was col. commanding the Oregon volunteers and was requested by William J. Newton to detail a number of men to escort him in hunting a band of cattle which he said he had ranging on Evans Creek, on what is now called the Indian Reserve. I went that day and saw cattle signs but saw no cattle--detailed some 20 men to help Mr. Newton find them. I heard John Durbin say that he had sold cattle only them to Mr. Newton. The volunteers did not find the cattle, but saw fresh signs of them. I believe from the appearance of things then that Indians were in that neighborhood and had driven off said cattle. I have no interest in this claim. We were then on a march up Evans Creek and came upon the Indians the second day afterwards.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10th day January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says--I know that in the summer of 1853 William J. Newton of said county bought of John Durbin a band of said cattle, about one hundred head, at the commencement of the Rogue River War of 1853. Said band of cattle was on Evans Creek on lands since assigned to said Rogue River Tribe as a reservation by the Treaty of 10th September 1853. During the time of hostilities I know that a large portion of that band was missing, and it was the general talk and impression in the neighborhood that they were driven away by the Indians. After the war a part of these driven away were found on the Reserve--an Indian told me that they had killed five of the Durbin cattle. I have good reason to believe from statements of those hunting for the cattle at the time that fifteen were finally lost, and not recovered after the war.
W. G. T'Vault
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 10th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    A. B. Jennison of said county being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Wm. J. Newton in said county at the time of the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I know he had a log house about 16/18 feet on the ground with a floor, chimney & fireplace worth I would think about $200. This house was burnt about the 9th day of August 1853, and I have every reason to believe it was burnt by the Rogue River Indians in the neighborhood the same night [they were] setting other houses on fire. Mr. Newton also had a stack of hay there which was burnt at the same time--I would think the stack contained six or seven tons of hay. The stack had a corral fence about it.worth $20 at least. I have seen Mr. Newton's stock; they were an average lot of stock.
Albert B. Jennison
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett of said county being duly sworn says--I know that in the summer of 1853 William J. Newton bought a band of cattle of John Durbin; at the time of the war, said band of cattle was running on the north side of Rogue River on Evans Creek--what is now the Indian Reserve. I know that the man having charge of the band got the band up about the close of the war and counted them; they said that there was fifteen head missing and not to be found. I believe from my knowledge of the band of cattle, and the circumstances of the war, that said fifteen head of cattle were driven away and destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians.
    I cannot say that all the missing cattle belonged to Mr. Newton--as a man by the name of Dodge had some cattle in the band. I never heard Dodge say that he lost any cattle.
Thomas D. Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
State of California              )
County of Siskiyou             )   Before D. Grosse justice of the peace
Township of Cottonwood   )  for Cottonwood Township--
    Personally appeared before me Jacob Shetler who being duly sworn deposes and says--That on or about the 9th day [of] August 1853 a bay horse belonging to Wm. Newton of Rogue River Valley in the Territory of Oregon was taken according to my belief by Indians belonging to [the] Rogue River Tribe or their allies during the late war. The aforesaid horse was taken at the same time that a horse [that] belonged to Cram, Rogers & Co. of the city of Yreka was taken, which latter horse carried a trail rope; and both horses were seen together the evening previous to their being taken. By means of the trail rope I was enabled to track the horses for about two miles above my house, in this state and county aforesaid and at the place where the trail was lost. I saw the tracks of Indians; the tracks were numerous, plainly showing that the Indians had come from the mountains. I value the aforesaid horse of Mr. William Newton at one hundred dollars.
Jacob Shetler
Subscribed and sworn to before me, Cottonwood Jany. 27th 1855.
D. Grosse
Justice of the Peace
for Cottonwood Township
No. 7 William J. Newton's        "Award"    No. 7  1600.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William J. Newton, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of sixteen hundred dollars.
$1600.00
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
January 31st 1855

No. 8 Claim of William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland
"Award"  $1029.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland  of said county being duly sworn says--During the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the 8th or 9th of September 1853 we were joint owners of a log house on Applegate Creek in said county--the house was 18/24 feet on the ground furnished with a fireplace and chimney, worth not far from $300 at that time. Said house was burnt near the date last aforesaid with its contents to wit--
    2 ten feet pine dining tables worth one worth $15 the other 6 or $8, 3 ten gallon kegs pickles, 6 stools worth $6, two long benches worth $3 apiece, 2 soaking pans worth $10, two kegs of vinegar, 6 gallons. Said house and articles of furniture were destroyed by fire, and as these applicants believe were burnt by the Applegate Indians--a band of the Rogue River Tribe. Certain of the Applegate Indians have since stated to applicants that they burnt the said house with its contents. We have not received payment for said property from the United States nor from anyone--nor reclaimed any of the same.
    We also had a field of potatoes growing near the house, about 2½ acres which were destroyed about the same time of the burning of the house, by the same Indians as we believe--
    When we first returned to the premises after the making of the Treaty of 10th Sept. 1853, we found Indians diggin' potatoes in this field--and from tracks of Indians in the field and from the appearance of the ground dug we believe the Indians destroyed the potatoes. We think there must have been seven hundred and twenty-seven hills of potatoes destroyed; we counted them at the time, and think this is the number. This would amount to about one hundred and four bushels, estimated according to the yield of them left in the field after the war.
Wm. Thompson
H. C. Rowland
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    George Hayes of said county being duly sworn says--Just previous to the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had been living with Mr. William Thompson and Henry C. Rowland at their house on Applegate Creek. The house was a log house about 18/24 or 26 feet on the ground, one story high with a fireplace and chimney in it. I should think the house was worth at that time in the neighborhood of $250. The last time I was there, I saw three kegs [of] pickles, 10 gallons in each I should judge--2 long pine dining tables, two long bench stools--2 soaking pans, can't say what they were worth. I know that Messrs. Thompson and Rowland had a field of potatoes growing near the house about 2½ acres I would judge--that as much as a hundred bushels had been destroyed of the potatoes, if they yielded as largely as I should think they would yield. The house with the contents was destroyed by fire about the 8 or 9th of September 1853. Several of the Applegate Indians told me after the war that they burnt the house and destroyed the crops.
    The Applegate band belongs to the Upper Rogue River Tribe. I have no doubt, from the appearance of the field, that the Indians destroyed potatoes. I have no interest in this claim.
George Hayes
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
No. 8 William Thompson & Henry C. Rowland, "Award" $1029.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William Thompson and Henry C. Rowland, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand and twenty-nine dollars.
$1029.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 6th 1855

No. 9--Claim of John W. Patrick & the estate of Jno. R. Hardin $1313.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. Patrick of said county being duly sworn says--In the last of February 1853, I entered on and took possession of a certain land claim situated in Rogue River, being the same now claimed by the widow of John R. Hardin, deceased, and commenced improving the same--built a house and made other improvements thereon. I continued to reside upon and cultivate said land claim continuously from thence up to the first day of March 1854. John R. Hardin and wife came to reside with me sometime the last of June or first of July A.D. 1853 under an agreement of joint occupancy of the premises, were in equal partnership in all our business. The house and improvements were of the character described by Amanda E. Hardin in her statement filed in the matter on this claim, also the furniture therein contained, all which were destroyed by the Rogue River Indians during the war therein stated. On or about the 1st of March 1854 aforesaid, I sold out to Mrs. Amanda E. Hardin my joint possession and left her the sole occupant and claimant of the land on which said improvements were situated immediately after the war, and before I sold my interest to Mrs. Hardin I built another house on said claim near where the first house stood inside of the enclosed improvements originally made by me and released to Mrs. Hardin after the death of John R. Hardin.
    I claim one half interest in all property destroyed by said Indians during the war except the settee mentioned, which was the property of John R. Hardin.
    The ox yokes mentioned in Mrs. Hardin's statements neither belonged to me nor to Mr. Hardin. They were left there by one Carson of Umpqua Valley.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property destroyed nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
J. W. Patrick
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. T
United States of America
    In a/c with Mrs. Amanda E. Hardin, widow of J. R. Hardin, for dwelling house with three rooms, one room 18 by 20 feet lined with unbleached sheeting, sawn lumber floor, 2 doors, one fireplace and chimney, one room for kitchen 12/16 feet, one door, slab floor, chimney and fireplace, one other room 14 by 16 feet sawn lumber floor, one door the roof [of] said building boards nailed on. Value $1000.00
Also sawn lumber and paling, value 100.00
Also one settee 5.00
Also two tables and chairs           each $10 20.00
Also two ox yokes $5 each 10.00
Also about 200 chickens      200.00
$1335.00
Amanda E. Hardin being duly sworn--Says that she is the widow of Jno. R. Hardin, deceased, that said Hardin was killed by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, and that the said Hardin and one Jno. W. Patrick were joint owners and occupying the premises above described with the exception of the settee which was the property of Jno. R. Hardin, and that the Rogue River Indians or their allies destroyed said property by fire and otherwise during the Rogue River War and between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of Sept. 1853 and that she believes the property to be the value above stated and that she claims one equal half of the value thereof in her right of dower, the house and goods being the homestead and goods of the said Jno. R. Hardin, deceased, and further this affiant has not received pay for the same from the United States or from anyone.
Amanda E. Hardin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Amanda E. Hardin of said county being duly sworn says--I am the widow of the late Jno. E. Hardin, deceased--during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on the 11th day of August 1853, he was shot by the Rogue River Indians near Dardanelles in said county, and died of his wounds on the 13th day of the same month. At the time of the commencement of said war, I and my late husband were residing in the house mentioned in the claim filed for damages to be awarded Jno. W. Patrick also resided there and was part owner of the house; it was understood that the north half was Mr. Hardin's land claim which included the house. Mr. Patrick took the other half. Mr. Patrick made the first actual improvement; Mr. Hardin furnished the means. Mr. Patrick has since sold his half, and I still claim and occupy the said north half mentioned, which never was claimed by Mr. Patrick.
Amanda E. Hardin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    The United States of America. To all persons to whom these presents shall come, greeting.
    Know ye, that whereas John R. Hardin, late of the county of Jackson, died intestate as it is said, having at the time of his death property in this Territory which may be lost, destroyed or diminished in value if speedy care be not taken of the same. To the end, therefore, that said property may be collected, preserved and disposed of according to law I do hereby appoint John W. McCully administrator of all and singular the goods and chattels, rights and credits which were of the said John R. Hardin at the time of his death with full power and authority to secure and dispose of said property according to law, and collect all moneys due said deceased and in general to do and perform all other acts and things which are or hereafter may be required of him by law.
    In testimony whereof I Thomas McF. Patton, judge of the probate court in and for the county of Jackson aforesaid, have hereunto signed my name and affixed the seal of said court at [my] office this 17th day of October A.D. 1853.
T. McF. Patton, Judge of Probate
( T. McF. Patton )
( Probate Judge )
( Jackson County )
    I hereby certify that the foregoing letter of administration is a true copy of the original letter of administration granted by the probate court of Jackson County to John McCully on the estate of John R. Hardin, dec.
A. P. Stearns
This the 23rd Jany. 1855.       Probate Judge
United States
    To Jno. W. McCully, administrator, estate of Jno. R. Hardin, decd.        Dr.
to one house, described as follows, built of hewn logs 30/20 feet one story high, roof nailed on, and also fencing around the house destroyed by the Indians in Rogue River Valley.
Valued at 1000.00
Value of fencing        60.00
$1060.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. McCully of said county being duly sworn says--John R. Hardin, late of said county, was shot by the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--he was shot on the 6th [or] 8th of August 1853. I have been duly appointed and qualified to act as his administrator. At the time Hardin was shot he owned a house in Rogue River Valley, which was burnt about the time of his death by the Rogue River Indians. The house was a log house, some 20/30 feet on the ground with some additions. There was a fence about the house. Said Hardin left a widow, Amanda E. Hardin, who now claims the land on which said house stood. As administrator of said estate I have not received payment for said property destroyed from the United States or from anyone.
J. W. McCully
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 8th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John W. McCully, being duly sworn, say I am the administrator of the estate of John R. Hardin, late deceased, duly appointed by the probate court of said county. I have been duly qualified as such administrator and have proceeded to administer on said estate and all the aspects thereof as far as the same have come to my knowledge. According to law, I have filed a claim in favor of said estate for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war of 1853. The claim I filed embraces only the house, also for a fence partly finished which was destroyed by the Indians. I do not know of said deceased ever having any other house in said county except the one mentioned, situated on public lands between Jacksonville and Rogue River on the military road, about 7½ miles from Jacksonville. I know that John R. Hardin and wife lived in said house at the time Indian difficulties commenced in 1853. The amount of dower turned over to the widow is not recollected by me, but a receipt was taken therefor & filed in the office of the Probate Court.
J. W. McCully
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--On the first of September 1852 I came to Rogue River Valley. I stopped with John W. Patrick two or three days; he was then living alone on his claim in said county, in a house which he had built. I took up a claim nearby and have lived a neighbor to Mr. Patrick ever since until he left said claim. John R. Hardin came to Patrick as a boarder as I understood it from him, on the 1st of November 1852. Hardin and Patrick has a settlement, as I learned from them both, by which Patrick gave a mortgage of certain cattle and improvements to John R. Hardin, in satisfaction of a balance found due Hardin. Hardin never made it his continual residence at Patrick's until prior [to] 1853, when he moved and took his wife there. I never saw Hardin and his wife doing anything there, while living there, but seemed to live as boarders. Mr. and Mrs. Patrick made all the improvements, and done all the work and resided there continuously from the time I first came to the valley up to the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. During said war I went with Mr. Patrick to his house on the claim on the 9th of August 1853 and assisted him to remove his articles of provisions &c. Mr. Patrick's family was the last to leave the premises during the war; they were compelled to leave for safety as several had been killed in the valley before they left. Immediately after the war Mr. Patrick returned to said claim and built another house in place of the one he had first erected which had been burnt by the Indians. I know that Mr. Patrick sold to Mr. Hardin half of the crop growing on said claim in the summer of 1853 in satisfaction of said mortgage and that Hardin was to have half of the claim if he paid for it, but I never learned that he ever paid anything to Mr. Patrick. I talked with Hardin a few days before his death; he said he was owner of half the crop in satisfaction of the mortgage, and was to have half the claim when he paid for it. The claim mentioned is the same which is now in the possession of Amanda E. Hardin and claimed by her.
    Mr. Patrick about the 1st of March 1854 sold his possession and improvements in said claim to said Amanda E. Hardin. I have no interest in this claim.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jacob Gall of said county being duly sworn says--I am the father of Amanda E. Hardin, widow of John R. Hardin, deceased. My daughter was married to said John R. Hardin on the 26th day of June 1853. I was present and witnessed the marriage ceremony. They lived together as husband and wife and occupied the premises stated in the claim here filed for destruction of property by Indians at the time of the commencement of the Rogue River War of 1853. I was acquainted with the premises and believe the description given in the account of said building to be correct, and its value a just one. I know the articles set forth as being destroyed in said house were there at the time it was burnt, and were destroyed with the rest, and believe them to have been of the value stated in said account. I heard John W. Patrick say that he and Mr. Hardin were to divide the land claim occupied by them equally between them and I know that afterwards Patrick laid claim to the east half and sold it. He has never to my knowledge laid claim to the part occupied as the homestead of Mr. Hardin.
    John R. Hardin and Amanda E. Hardin resided on and continuously cultivated said premises containing the house destroyed from [the] 27th day of June 1853 to the commencement of the war about the 1st of August 1853, and Mr. Hardin has since continued to claim and occupy said premises to the present time.
Jacob Gall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Benjamin T. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, in or about the 11th day of August 1853, I was passing near the house lately occupied by John R. Hardin and John W. Patrick on Rogue River in said county and saw said house in flames. I have no doubt that the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe set the house on fire, as our party was fired upon by Indians in that vicinity twice at that time. Two or three days afterwards I was at the place where the house had been burnt and saw feathers laying about as though chickens had been killed; there were ten or twelve chickens then still remaining alive and from appearances I believe said chickens were destroyed by said Indians.
Benj. T. Davis
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    W. B. Horn being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to John R. Hardin who was killed in the Rogue River War of 1853, was acquainted with the dimensions of his house, fencing &c. I know that at the commencement of the war he had a log house about 20/30 feet with an addition of a frame building about 15/10, finished inside with a lining of common sheeting--a plank floor, one fireplace & chimney--house was divided into three rooms, a bar counter & shelves. I would judge the value of them at the time was as about $1000. There was also a fence partly completed about the house worth $30. The house and fence described were burnt by Indians on the evening of the 11th day of August 1853. I am willing to swear according to the best of my knowledge and belief the house was burnt by Indians, and I believe by the Rogue River Tribe.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Wm. B. Horn
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 8 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jabes Kincaid of said county being duly sworn says--I was acquainted with the house occupied by John R. Hardin at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. The house as near as I recollect was as described by Mr. Horn, who has testified in this claim matter--also the fence was about as he stated. The house and fence was destroyed by fire about the 11th day of August 1853, and as I verily believe from the circumstances of the war, that they were burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
Jabes H. Kincaid
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 8th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
No. 9 John W. Patrick & the estate of John R. Hardin, decd.  Award $1315.00
    This may certify that the Board of Commissioners, appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John W. Patrick and the estate of John R. Hardin, decd., claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand three hundred and fifteen dollars.
$1315.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

No. 10--Claim of Pleasant W. Stowe   "Award" No. 10 $450.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Pleasant W. Stowe of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had a field of potatoes about 8 acres, also a garden--2½ acres of watermelons--one fourth of an acre of carrots and parsnips. Most of said field of potatoes and said garden were destroyed during the war. I know that the Indians destroyed more than five hundred bushels of my potatoes--as many as 600 watermelons worth then $600 at that time. I think they must have then taken and destroyed as many as 40 bushels of carrots & parsnips.
    I frequently saw the Indians during the war in my field & garden takin' and destroying my vegetables--did not dare to interrupt them. I had as much as I could do to guard my house. I have never received payment for said vegetables destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.

Pleasant W. Stowe
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William A. Wilkinson of said county being duly sworn says--During most of the time during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I resided in the house of Pleasant W. Stowe of said county. I know that he had a garden containing vegetables of various kinds among which was melons, potatoes, cabbages, carrots, beets & parsnips. I know that he lost during the war some vegetables of different kinds, I don't know what or how many, I should not think that there was near 600 melons stolen while I was there. I saw the volunteers there one day stealing melons. I do not know that the Indians took any vegetables, but suppose they took some while I was there. I would not think as many as 50 bushels of potatoes were taken from Mr. Stowe's garden by Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
William A. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Silas J. Day of said county being duly sworn says--I resided at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe on Butte Creek in said county at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and continued to reside there until after the Treaty of the 10th of September 1853 was ratified. I know that Mr. Stowe had a large garden containing various kinds of vegetables, potatoes, onions, cabbages, melons, squashes &c., a quantity of said potatoes not exceeding 10 bushels were taken by Indians during the war as we supposed. We saw their tracks about them. No cabbages were taken except 2 that we found, which they did not eat. About 40 melons were plugged, don't know how many were taken away. I should not think more than 50 were destroyed and taken away in all. [illegible] three or four carrots & parsnips were taken when the potatoes were taken, not more. Melons were selling for 50 cents to $2.00 each at the time. I assisted Mr. Stowe to pick all the ripe melons about the commencement of the war and sold them at Jacksonville. I have no interest in this claim.
Silas J. Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    James Lewis of said county being duly sworn says--I lived with Pleasant W. Stowe on his land claim in said county about one week or ten days during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. He had a garden with a large quantity of vegetables, containing about 3½ acres of potatoes, about 2 acres of watermelons, a lot of beets, carrots & parsnips, all in the same ground. Altogether the garden covered about 6 acres. While I lived there I observed fresh Indian sign in the garden. They would come in the night, take what they wanted and destroy what they pleased and then leave. I would judge that Indians took as much as 200 or 250 [omission] while I was there, and I was there soon after the war and found many more destroyed, as much as 450 or 500 bushels in all. I think that over 200 melons were also destroyed. Carrots, parsnips & beets were destroyed as much as a quarter of an acre, all [of] which were destroyed by Indians. Volunteers also came and took vegetables, which I have not estimated in my statements of property destroyed by Indians.
          his
James X Lewis
         mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Edward W. Day of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I resided at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe, was there assisting him to guard his premises. I know that he had carrots, beets, cabbages &c. Mr. Stowe did not lose many of his vegetables by the Indians; he sold three or four loads of melons in Jacksonville, sold some to others. Volunteers stole most of the melons which were [omission]. I think Indians did not take more than 30 melons in all, and we were not certain they took them. Indians took a few of his potatoes, not more than a row 60 to 70 ft. long, did not carry many away, but built a fire in the bushes nearby and roasted them which they did get not more than 5 or 6 bushels in all. We never missed but two parsnips & one beet from the garden during the war. There were also taken 6 or 7 heads of cabbages. I do not believe the whole damage done to Mr. Stowe's garden by Indians during said war would amount to $100. I have no interest in this claim.
Edward W. Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Tobias L. Linkwiler of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Pleasant W. Stowe had on his farm in said county a field of potatoes between five and eight acres I should judge also a garden containing about 2 acres of watermelons maybe more, also carrots and parsnips, can't say how many--never noticed them much. I know that he had a large quantity of these vegetables destroyed during the war, and I am satisfied they were destroyed by the Rogue River Indians. There may have been five hundred bushels of the potatoes and as many as 600 watermelons destroyed during the war. The watermelons were then worth one dollar each.
    I have no interest in this claim.

Tobias L. Linkwiler
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Isaac Skeeters of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was living at the house of Pleasant W. Stowe of said county until the close of said war.
    Mr. Stowe had a garden of some 8 or 10 acres of different kinds of vegetables--5 acres of potatoes--an acre of cabbage--an acre of watermelons, some onions, carrots and beets. During the war there were from three to five hundred bushels of potatoes destroyed. I would think about 500 watermelons, 50 cabbage heads--and some beets and carrots. I think that Indians did most of the destruction of said vegetables from the sign about the garden. I have seen Indians in said garden during the war. They usually came in the night. I never knew volunteers to come there but once. I have no interest in this claim.
Isaac Skeeters
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 31st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 10 Pleasant W. Stowe's "Award"   No. 10 $450.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Pleasant W. Stowe, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars.

$450.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855


No. 11--Claim of Jeremiah Yarnell   "Award" No. 11 $100.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Jeremiah Yarnell being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was a resident of Illinois Valley in said county, and owner of one ox which as I verily believe was stolen and skilled by the Illinois Tribe of Indians which at the time were allies of the Rogue River Tribe on or about the 10th day of August 1853. Said ox was worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars. I have never reclaimed said ox or received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Jeremiah Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    G. W. Stoen [sic] being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 he was a resident of Jackson County O.T. and I know that sometime in the month of August 1853 Jeremiah Yarnell was the owner of a band of cattle which were kept in Illinois Valley--I was one of the men who had charge of them--and that the cattle were missing and were tracked into Rogue River Valley in the vicinity of the mouth of Applegate Creek, where they were all found excepting one ox, which as I verily believe was killed by the Indians of said valley.
    Said ox have never been seen or heard from since, by any white man, to my knowledge. Said ox was worth one hundred dollars.
G. W. Stran [sic]
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 10th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    I, S. H. Taylor, U.S. District Clerk, and for said county and Territory, do hereby certify that Geo S. Rice, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affidavit, was at the date and still is an acting justice of the peace in the precinct of Sailor Diggin's in said county and Territory, that as such officer he is certified and by laws of this Territory to administer and certify oaths &c.
    That I am well acquainted with his signature and recognize the within as then signed to be the proper and true signature of the said Geo. S. Rice, justice of the peace, as aforesaid. Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal this 11th day of Feb. A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
(  seal  )                          Clerk D.C. "J.C."
No. 11 Jeremiah Yarnell's "Award"    No. 11 $100.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Jeremiah Yarnell, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred dollars.

$100.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 12--Claim of William S. King  "Award" No. 12 $250.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William S. King of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the day 28th of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt my dwelling house situated about 4 miles from Evans ferry in said county described as follows--a double log house built of round logs 35/16 feet on the ground--2 partitions, one fireplace and chimney, 2 doors, floor in two parts, valued at $250.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States or from anyone.
William S. King
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel S. Bowden of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on or about the 28th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, the dwelling house of William S. King of said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following description to wit: about 35/16 feet on the ground, built of round logs--floor in two parts, 2 doors, fireplace & chimney worth about $200 or $250.
    I believe that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt said house as [there was] no white man in that section of the county at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
Samuel S. Bowden
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Williams of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on or about the 28th day of August 1853, during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, the dwelling house of William S. King, situated on the road from Jacksonville to the Canyon in said county, was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following dimensions--a log house 35/16 feet on the ground, 2 rooms and a shed between, 2 doors, one fireplace & chimney--floor in 2 parts worth about 250 dollars.
    I have no doubt that the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt said house, as all whites living in that direction had left at that time, and the Indians were burning and destroying other property all about the country. I have no interest in this claim.
Samuel Williams
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 12 William S. King's "Award"   No. 12 $250.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William S. King, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars.

$250.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

[No. 13--Cram, Rogers & Co.  "Award"  No. 13 $250.00]
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Richard Dugan of said county being duly sworn says--I am a member of the firm of Cram, Rogers & Co. doing an express business in northern California and southern Oregon. During the time of actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th day of August 1853, said company has horses and mules running from Jacksonville in Oregon to Yreka in California. The messenger Joseph Rogers left one large American Bay horse at Shetler's ranch at the crossing of the Siskiyou Mountain. Said horse was taken and driven away by Indians belonging [to] Chief "Tipsey" a band of the Upper Rogue River. I valued said horse at the time of his loss at $250. The company have never reclaimed said horse nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
R. Dugan
Sworn to & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 10th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Jacob Shetler of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 9th day of Aug. 1853 I know that Cram, Rogers & Co. had at Shetler's ranch of which I am proprietor situated at the crossing of the Siskiyou Mountain, one large American Bay horse worth at that time in my judgment $250 (two hundred & fifty). Said horse was stolen and taken away by Indians belonging to the Rogue River Tribe as I have good reason to believe. The horse had a trail rope on at the time. I tracked the trail rope draggin' on the ground some distance from the ranch, and saw distinct traces of Indians there at the time. There were no other Indians in the neighborhood about that time and I believe said Indians took said horse away, as the band left immediately afterwards.
Jacob Shetler
Sworn [to] & subscribed before me this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
D. Grosse
Justice of the Peace of Cottonwood Township
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )
    I, Hiram G. Hines, clerk of said county, do hereby certify D. Grosse, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affidavit was at that date & still is an acting justice of the peace of Cottonwood township of this county; as such officer he is authorized by the laws of this state to administer & certify oaths &c. that I am well acquainted with his signature. I recognize the within as these signed to be the proper & true signature of the said justice of the peace as aforesaid.
Witness my hand and the impress of the seal of the
county court of said county at the city of
(  seal  )                          Yreka the 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
H. G. Ferris
    County Clerk of Siskiyou County, Cal.
No. 13 Cram, Rogers & Co.  "Award"  No. 13 $250.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Cram, Rogers & Co., a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars.

$250.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 14--Claim of Mrs. Edith M. Nickel  "Award" $230.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Mrs. Edith M. Nickel of said county being duly sworn says--That during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians and their allies, during the Indian war of 1853, on or about the 20th day of August 1853, she was the owner of two cows, at which time said cows as she verily believes was stolen from Illinois Valley by the Applegate Creek Indians, a branch of the Rogue River Tribe, and driven to Applegate and killed by said Indians, and that said cows were worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars each. Deponent further states that she has never reclaimed said cows or received pay therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Edith M. Nickel
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Gabriel Smith of said county being duly sworn says--That he was a resident of Jackson County during the year of 1853 & well acquainted with Mrs. E. M. Nickel, and knows that on or about the 25th day of August 1853 she was the owner of two cows, and seven other head of cattle, and that she caused said cattle to be drove up to the yard every night during the war of 1853, and that on the evening of the day above mentioned, as near as he can recollect, the two cows above described were missing from the band, and that on the following day search was made for said cows, and on examination it was found that the whole band had been driven away by Indians about three miles towards Applegate Creek, it having rained the night before, the tracks of the Indians were plainly to be seen. At which place it appeared by the tracks that the cattle then had separated and that each of the two Indians whose tracks had been seen had taken a cow and continued to drive the same on towards Applegate Creek. We followed on their trails about five miles farther, and turned back, not considering our party strong enough to go farther into the Indian country.
    Deponent further states that to his knowledge said cows never came back or never were ever after seen by the whites and that if said cows had returned he would have had abundant means of knowing the same. I think said cows were worth one hundred and twenty-five dollars each at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
Gabriel Smith
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Geo. Sam Rice
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I, S. H. Taylor, clerk of U.S. District Court in and for said county and Territory, do hereby certify that Geo. S. Rice, the person who administered and certified the oath to the within affiant, was at that time and still is an acting justice of the peace in the precinct of Sailor Diggin's in said county and Territory, that as such officer he is authorized and by laws of this Territory  to administer & certify oaths &c.
    That I am well acquainted with his signature and recognize the within as then signed to be his, the proper and true signature of the said Geo. S. Rice, justice of the peace as aforesaid.
Witness my hand and seal this 1st day of February A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
(  seal  )                          Clerk D.C. J.Co.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James McDonough of said county being duly sworn says--I know that during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on [or] about the 25th day of August 1853, Edith M. Nickel of said county had cows missing on Deer Creek in Illinois Valley in said county, about the date aforesaid. Indians of the Rogue River Tribes stampeded all the cattle on that range. Said cattle, some came back to the range, with the exception of two cows belonging to Mrs. Edith M. Nickel, which were drove away by said Indians. I with two others pursued said cows, tracked them into the mountains, as they were driven by said Indians, but failed to recover them after a whole day's pursuit. I never knew said cattle to leave the range. I think they were killed by said Indians. The cows were worth $100 each. I have no interest in this claim.
James McDonough
Subscribed and sworn to before me [at] Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 14 Mrs. Edith M. Nickel  "Award"  No. 14 $230.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Mrs. Edith M. Nickel, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and thirty dollars.

$230.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 5th, 1855

No. 15--Claim of John Benjamin  "Award"  No. 15 $316.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Benjamin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took and killed an ox belonging to me which was a fine beef animal and would [weigh] say 750#. They also robbed my house situated in Rogue River in said county and carried away and destroyed the following articles of property to wit: 2 cast iron bake ovens worth $15, 2 frying pans $5, 2 iron camp kettles $6, 1 wooden bucket $2, 200# onions $30, 50# potatoes $5, 25# beets $2, 100 head cabbages [omission]. I have never recovered any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Benjamin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Geo. H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 9th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, I know that John Benjamin had an ox running in my band of cattle which was missing when Indians attacked said band and drove off several cattle. I have no doubt that Indians stole said ox, as several of said band were shot with arrows. The ox would weigh about 750#. I know that the Indians broke into Mr. Benjamin's dwelling house and took or destroyed several articles of property of household furniture &c., don't know what or of what value.
    I heard the Indians say that they went there in daylight and robbed the house. I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert Hill of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 8th or 9th of August, I know that an ox belonging to John Benjamin of said county was missing. Said ox had been running with the band of Dr. Ambrose on Rogue River, which was attacked, some wounded with arrows, and some run off and were never found, this ox of Mr. Benjamin's among the missing. I have no doubt the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe stole and destroyed said ox. Said animal was fat enough for beef and would weigh between 7 and 800#. I was at the house of Mr. Benjamin when he left at the commencement of the war. I know that he left then several articles of property to wit: 2 cast iron bake ovens, 2 frying pans, camp kettle, 1 wood bucket, a lot of onions, potatoes, cabbages &c. When I returned to said house a short time after the war closed, and found said articles gone. I have no interest in this claim.
Robert Hill
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
No. 15 John Benjamin's  "Award"  No. 15 $316.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Benjamin, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and sixteen dollars.

$316.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 5th, 1855

No. 16--Claim of Daniel N. Birdseye  "Award"  No. 16 $211.50

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Daniel N. Birdseye of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime between the 15th of August and the 10th day of September 1853 I lost the following property to wit: One American cow, one breeding sow, 9 months old, 1 scythe & snath, 2 log chains, 1½ inch auger, 1 spokeshave. Said cow was a first class American cow. I left her on my claim 17 miles from here down on Rogue River; when the war was over, she was not to be found anywhere. She had never been from the range while running there, and I believe she was taken away from there by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. The sow I also believe was taken by them. The other articles above mentioned were loaned to Wm. N. Ballard at the time of the war, and was burnt at the time the Indians burnt his house, within the dates aforesaid. I also had one pack saddle worth $8 and a mattress worth $8. These articles were stolen from my house during the war by the Rogue River Indians.
    I have seen the remnants of the mattress and a part of the pack saddle in their possession since the war. I have not reclaimed any of the property heretofore mentioned, nor received payment for the same from the United States nor from anyone.
D. N. Birdseye
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William N. Ballard of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Daniel N. Birdseye had on his claim on Rogue River one first class American cow, one breeding sow 9 months old or about that; after the war I assisted him to look after said cow and sow but they could not be found. I have reason to believe the Rogue River Indians drove them off, and had also at my house, which was burnt, one scythe & snath, 2 log chains, inch & half auger, one spokeshave, which were burnt with the house as I believe by said Indians.
    I know that Mr. Birdseye also left a mattress and pack saddle at his house at commencement of the Rogue River War. After the war I saw a part of the mattress in an Indian camp, some 2½ miles from this place.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William N. Ballard
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or.Ter.
No. 16 David N. Birdseye's  "Award"  No. 16 $211.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to David N. Birdseye, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred & eleven dollars & fifty cents.

$211.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Feby. 5th, 1855

No. 17--Claim of Lewis Rothermel  "Award"  No. 17 $225.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Lewis Rothermel of said county being duly sworn says--At the time that Edwards was killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on the 2nd day of August 1853, said Indians shot several animals among which was an ox belonging to me. Said ox was a work ox, good beef at the time and would weigh 750#. He was shot dead with two balls.
    I have never received payment for said animal from the United States nor from anyone.
Lewis Rothermel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Napoleon B. Evans of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 2nd day of August 1853, I know that Lewis Rothermel of said county had a large work ox, which was good beef at the time, and would weigh as much as 750#. Said ox was running with my band east of Butte Creek in said county. I drove said cattle up that day to my corral and turned said ox outside. I started out with my team, and this ox went across Butte Creek. In about an hour I heard a gun fire in that direction, in the evening of the said day I found said ox dead in the prairie about 400 yards from my house having been shot by Indians as I believe, as the place was near where Edwards was killed by Indians the same evening. I have no interest in this claim.
N. B. Evans
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 17 Lewis Rothermel's  "Award"  No. 17 $225.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Lewis Rothermel, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and twenty-five dollars.

$225.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 18--Claim of Mary Ann Hodgins  "Award"  No. 18 $80.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Frederick Heber of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 21st day of August 1853, I know that Mary Ann Hodgins lost an ox killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians, when they attacked the party at Dunn's on the morning of the 21st August aforesaid. Said animal at the [time had] just arrived at the head of Rogue River Valley from the plains, and was worth at the time it was killed about $80. Mrs. Hodgins made some mention of losing some other property at the same time but I cannot say what. I have no interest in this claim.
Frederick Heber
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    G. W. Barnett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 21st day of August 1853, I know that Mary Ann Hodgins lost one ox killed by the Rogue River Tribe, worth $80. I also heard her say at the same time of the attack on our party that she lost a quilt and some blankets--don't know how many--also a pocketbook $20 and a note for $30. I have no interest in this claim.
G. W. Barnett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this the 16th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 18 Mary Ann Hodgins'  "Award"  No. 18 $80.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Mary Ann Hodgins, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty dollars.

$80.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

[No. 19--]Claim of G. H. C. Taylor  "Award"  $668.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. C. Taylor of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had certain property at the house of John M. Silcott in said county to wit: ten tons of hay in a rick, 2 mowing scythes worth $16, one pack saddle and rope worth $8, one sheet iron camp kettle worth 4.50, 20# sugar, 75# flour. Said property was destroyed by fire on or about the 12th day of August 1853, and as I verily believe was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. I have never received any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States or anyone.
G. H. C. Taylor
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )  s.s.
    John M. Silcott of said county being duly sworn says--I know that during actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 12th day of August 1853 G. H. C. Taylor had at a house owned by me in the county of Jackson, Oregon Territory, a certain amount of property to wit: ten tons of hay in a rick, 2 mowing scythes worth $8 apiece, one pack saddle and rope worth 8 dollars, 1 sheet iron camp kettle worth 4.50--20# sugar, 75# flour, all of which was destroyed by fire, on the date last aforesaid, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe.
John W. Silcott
Sworn to and subscribed before me
a notary public in and for said county
the 13th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & notarial seal
H. G. Ferris
(  seal  )                               Notary Public
No. 19 G. H. C. Taylor's  "Award"  No. 19 $668.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to George H. C. Taylor, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and sixty-eight dollars and fifty cents.

$668.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 20--Claim of John Markley  "Award"  No. 20 $80.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Markley of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 14th of August 1853, I lost a horse on Applegate Creek in said county, which was stolen and taken away by the Rogue River Indians as I verily believe. All the whites in that section of the county had left; our company were the last to leave. I sent a man out to get my horse which was running in a band nearby. That day the Indians attacked the man who was out after the horses, shot down two of the horses in that neighborhood and ran off the balance, and mine among the rest. The horse was a Canadian animal and worth at the time $100. I have never recovered said animal nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
        his
John X Markley
       mark
Witness to signature A. C. Gibbs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Bishop of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 14th day of August 1853 I know that John Markley was the owner of a horse running on Applegate Creek in said county. In the morning of that day I saw said horse. About noon men came to our place and told us that the Indians were shooting down men and animals all through that part of the country, so we were compelled to leave. A party of men were sent out to get the horses. They returned and reported two horses killed, and the rest driven away. I have no doubt that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took said animals. The horse of Mr. Markley was a roan half Canadian horse, worth at that time 75 or $80, might be more. I know that he was offered $100 for it a short time before lost.
    I have no interest in this claim.
James Bishop
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 20 John Markley's  "Award"  No. 20 $80.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Markley, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty dollars.

$80.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6th 1855

No. 21--Claim of James C. Tolman  "Award"  No. 21 $175.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James C. Tolman of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on the 3rd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe shot a mule belonging to me. The mule was in possession of James Davis at the time who was riding it just above Griffin's ranch in said county. The mule was shot in the side with an arrow and lived but three days afterwards. The mule was a first class riding animal worth at the time $175.
    I have never received payment for said animal from the United States nor from anyone.
James C. Tolman
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James R. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I know that James C. Tolman of said county lost a mule shot by said Indians worth about $200. It was a large fine American mule. I was riding said mule at the time it was shot some two or three miles from the town of Jacksonville in said county. Said mule was shot on the 3rd day of August 1853. I have no interest in this claim.
Jas. R. Davis
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 21 James C. Tolman's  "Award"  No. 21 $175.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James C. Tolman, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and seventy-five dollars.

$175.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 22--Claim of Sigmund Ettlinger  "Award"  No. 22 $130.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sigmund Ettlinger of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War sometime early in August 1853 I had a Spanish horse killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said animal was running at the time at Griffin's ranch in charge of Mr. Griffin.
    The horse was a dark roan Spanish animal, about 7 years old, and worth at the time $130. I have never received said animal nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
S. Ettlinger
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Joseph Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, about the first of August 1853 I know that Sigmund Ettlinger of said county had a Spanish horse running at Griffin's ranch. Said ranch was attacked by the Indians as I suppose and several animals killed. Mr. Ettlinger's horse was shot dead at that time. I saw said animal after it was killed. I have no doubt from appearances that it was done by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said horse was about 7 years old, of a roan color and worth as much as $130 at the time killed. I have no interest in this claim.
           his
Joseph X Lane
          mark
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
No. 22 Sigmund Ettlinger's  "Award"  No. 22 $130.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Sigmund Ettlinger, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and thirty dollars.

$130.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 23--Claim of Henry Helms  "Award"  No. 23 $108.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Henry Helms of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 sometime between the 2nd and 10th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke open my dwelling house, situated on the east side of  Bear Creek in said county and carried away or destroyed the following articles of property to wit:
10# nails 1 camp kettle
50# flour 7 blankets                            (worth) $35.00
12# bacon 2 bed ticks 7.00
1 can powder 1# 1 pr. buckskin pants 6.00
1# lead 2 hickory shirts 3.00
1 box per. caps 1 gold pan
2 frying pans 40# corn meal
    I have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
     (Dutch)
Heiny Helm
          his
Henry X Helms
         mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Low of said county being duly sworn says--Sometime between the 2nd and 10th day of August 1853, during the Rogue River Indian War, I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed the dwelling house of Henry Helms of said county, taking away or destroying the following property belonging to him to wit:
50# flour 1 can powder
12# bacon 1# lead
1 box per. caps 1 pr. buckskin pans
2 frying pans 2 hickory shirts (worn once)
1 camp kettle 1 gold pan (just bought)                    4.00
7 blankets (1 pr. new, rest good) 40# corn meal
2 bed ticks (nearly new) 10# nails
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Low
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 23 Henry Helms'  "Award"  No. 23 $108.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Henry Helms, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and eight dollars.

$108.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 1st 1855

No. 24--Claim of William M. Elliott  "Award"  No. 24 $560.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the 2nd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt the ricks of hay belonging to me situated on my land claim near Griffin's ranch in said county. Said ricks contained between 8 and 10 tons of hay. They were entirely destroyed by fire. I have no doubt the Indians burnt said hay, as several whites were killed by them at that time in the vicinity and other property destroyed in the same manner.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
William M. Elliott
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public,  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that William M. Elliott of said county had two ricks of hay on his land claim near Griffin's ranch in said county containing about 10 tons I should think. Said ricks of hay were burnt by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe on the night of the 2nd of August. I judge the Indians burnt the hay, as I saw the tracks of them about when the hay was burnt.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 24 William M. Elliott's  "Award"  No. 24 $540.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William M. Elliott, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and eight dollars.

$540.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 25--Claim of Silas & Edward Day  "Award"  No. 25 $421.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Silas Day and Edward Day being duly sworn say--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 11th day of August 1853, we had at our claim on Butte Creek in said county the following articles of property: One leather trunk, a large new trunk worth $20, 2 razors, one hone, 1 razor strop, together with $10, 1 medical diploma in a tin case worth fifty dollars, an assortment of medicines worth $50, 1 Webster's unabridged English dictionary worth $12, Neill's Compendium of Medicine worth $12, Wilson's Anatomy worth $8, a violin instructor worth $1, 3 pairs broadcloth pants--new--worth $30, 2 messaline vests worth $15, 2 black cloth vests worth $8, 1 black satin vest $5, 2 black broadcloth coats worth $60, 6 linen shirts some worn worth $18, one brown cloth Mexican shirt worth $5, one silver alarm watch $30, 3 black silk cravats new worth $2, 2 lawn cravats worth $1, 1 panama hat worth $8, 2 cloth breeches worth $2, one hair brush coarse and fine comb worth $2, 2 toothbrushes worth $1, 2 pair yarn stockings worth $4, 2 pair black kid gloves worth $4, one pair colored silk gloves worth $1, 2 white silk and one white cambric pocket handkerchiefs worth $5--1 brown line coat worth $4--2 chopping axes--1 hand saw--1 drawing knife, 1 coffee mill--2 files--2 grinders $1, one dollar's worth lead, 1 camp kettle--4 tin plates--4 knives & forks--4 iron spoons--4 tin cups--1 bottle India [ink], stationery &c. worth $1, 2 papers shoe tacks, 1 pr. India rubber boots $8, 1 India rubber money belt worth $2, one buckskin money belt $1, 1 bridle $8--1 lot garden seed $2--1 iron square--1 jack plane--1 pair iron compasses--all of said articles were destroyed or taken away by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as we verily believe, on the date last before mentioned. We have seen several of said articles of clothing in possession of said Indians since the war. We have seen fragments of the trunk mentioned as destroyed, and said Indians have since sold said axes, dictionary and other of said articles to whites and said Indians have acknowledged since the war that they took and destroyed said property. We have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.

Silas Day
Edward Day
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public,  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William A. Wilkinson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 15th day of August 1853 I visited the claim of Messrs. Silas & Edward Day in said county, found the house open with nothing in [it] of value. Saw where things had been burnt and dug up by the Indians. I am certain it was not the work of the whites, as no white man dared to go in that direction at that time. Indians sold some articles which they took from this house to a man by the name of Resson. I know that just before the commencement of the war the Messrs. Day moved onto the claim and took ten mule loads of goods there. I know they took flour then. I suppose they had various articles of goods--clothing, bedding, provisions &c.--for housekeeping. I know that they took nothing away with them at the time they left in the war but a double-barreled shotgun and a pistol.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William A. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for  O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--After the close of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I saw in the possession of said Indians certain articles of property said to belong to Messrs. Silas & Edward Day, to wit: One large Webster's dictionary--some carpenter's tools--hand saw, drawing knife &c., some cooking utensils &c. Said Indians said they broke open the Days' trunk, took the things and destroyed some and took away others. I have no interest in this claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 25 Silas & Edward Day's  "Award"  No. 25 $421.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Silas and Edward Day, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and twenty-one dollars.

$421.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7, 1855

No. 26--Claim of James Triplett  "Award"  No. 26 $500.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James H. Triplett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 1st day of September 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered my garden, situated on the north side of Rogue River in said county, and destroyed and carried away a large quantity of potatoes, as many as a hundred and fifty bushels. I am sure I saw said Indians diggin' my potatoes and carrying them away. I had two acres of potatoes which were nearly all destroyed. Soldiers took many, but from the appearance of the field I think Indians took as many as 150 bushels. I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.

James H. Triplett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert B. Metcalfe of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James H. Triplett had a garden on his claim on the north side of Rogue River in said county, containing about 8 acres of potatoes, onions, melons, corn, pumpkins &c. Tyee Jim's band of Rogue River Indians camped nearby, and I saw squaws going to and returning from said garden bringing vegetables. I also saw at their camp a large quantity of potatoes which I suppose they had got from Triplett's garden. Said garden was all destroyed during said war & I have no doubt the said Indians did most of the destruction of said vegetables. I have no interest in this claim.
R. B. Metcalfe
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th Feby. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Or. Ter.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas Thompson of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James H. Triplett of said county had on his land claim situated on the north side of Rogue River about two acres of potatoes, which would produce at least 200 bushels. I was at the place about the close of the war, and found that Mr. Triplett's garden was entirely destroyed. I believe the Indians took most of the potatoes but never saw any Indians diggin' therein, but I saw Indians going in the garden. I have no interest in this claim.
Thomas Thompson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 21st day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 26 James H. Triplett's  "Award"  No. 26 $500.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James H. Triplett, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred dollars.

$500.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855

No. 27--Claim of Nathan B. Lane  "Award"  No. 27 $669.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 8th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke into my house situated near Willow Springs in said county and took and destroyed the following articles of property in and about the house--to wit:
1 rifle, shot pouch, powder horn & saddle valued at $30.00
1 Colt's revolver navy size 40.00
3 cans of powder @1.50    4.50
9# lead 50¢ 4.50
125# flour 25¢ 30.00
1 woolen coverlet 25.00
1 calico quilt 15.00
1 woolen  " 20.00
4 blankets $4      16.00
3 sheets $2½   7.50
3 dozen shirts    "     90.00
1 fine coat 25.00
1 close body coat 20.00
1 Kentucky cloth coat 10.00
1 orn. coat 15.00
9 prs. pants $5      45.00
10 prs. socks & 2 prs. mittens 12.00
12 pillow cases $1       12.00
12 towels $1       12.00
2 table spreads $5         10.00
5 large silver spoons $3       15.00
2 razors $2½   5.00
8# tobacco $1       8.00
A quantity of sugar, dried apples & peaches 6.00
          "            household ware 25.00
30# butter $1       30.00
50 chickens $2       100.00
1 dog killed by Indians 25.00
2 chopping axes $6       12.00
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Patrick of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853, on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I was at the dwelling house of Nathan B. Lane of said county and found the house had been broke open and robbed. Saw Indian signs all about there, the pillows and beds were cut to pieces--no blankets nor clothing was left in the house--a very few articles of crockery utensils were left there. He had a splendid rifle then worth some $30 taken by the Indians. They told me afterwards they got said rifle with other things when they robbed the house. Said they killed his dog--and could have killed him but did not want to. Mr. Lane had a lot of fine linen towels, bed clothing and articles of silverware all [of] which were taken away by Indians. The dog killed was a fine dog; I once offered a horse for it. I think said dog would have sold for $50 at the time shot. I have no interest in this claim.
J. W. Patrick
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 8th day of August 1853 I was at the place of Nathan B. Lane in said county, found that the Indians had been there and ransacked the house, looked about there, found a skillet in the bushes--nearby also a paper of saleratus, some salt, coffee &c. I saw Indian tracks there. I have no doubt the Indians broke into the house of Mr. Lane and did much damage but don't know to what extent.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Danson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 8th day of August 1853 I was at the house of Nathan B. Lane near Willow Springs in said county. We had gone there to tell Mr. Lane to leave the house lest he might be killed by the Indians, when I was standing by the door a rifle shot from the bushes opposite killed Mr. Lane's dog standing by my side. I saw no Indians but have no doubt the shot was from Indians. We had been at the place an hour before but the house was locked up. When we returned found Mr. Lane there, his house had been broken open and all the articles in it of value thrown about. Can't say what were gone or destroyed. The Indians had been there I have no doubt, and done the mischief--I saw their tracks.
James Danson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand & seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 27 Nathan B. Lane's  "Award"  *  No. 27 $669.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Nathan B. Lane, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and sixty-nine & 50/100 dollars.

$669.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855            [penciled: *including one dog $25!!!
]

No. 28--Claim of John Agy  "Award"  No. 28 $85.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Agy of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue [River] Indian War of 1853, on or about the 7th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe either killed or drove away a large cayuse horse No. 1 belonging to me worth $100. Said horse was running on the right hand fork of Applegate Creek at the time he was lost. There were several other animals taken from that region the same time by said Indians, some shot and some drove away.
    I have never reclaimed said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.

John Agy
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26 day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marion McCormick of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 7th day of August 1853, I and one Jerome Dyer were prospecting on Applegate Creek in said county. We had in our possession a cayuse horse belonging to John Agy which was feeding on the range early in the morning with other animals. While we were eating breakfast, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe attacked the animals and drove them into the mountains, this one among the rest. I never saw said horse afterwards. I have since seen the skeleton of a horse in that neighborhood, which I was led to believe from certain marks near the remains of said horse said horse was a No. 1 cayuse horse 7 or 8 years old. I have no interest in this claim.
Marion McCormick
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26th Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 28 John Agy's  "Award"  No. 28 $85.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Agy, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty-five dollars.

$85.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7th 1855 

No. 29--Claim of James Bruce  "Award"  No. 29 $475.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Bruce of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the night of the 5th day of August 1853, I lost three mules and one horse from the place where they were running at that time on upper Rogue River in said county. I saw two of the mules dead, shot with arrows and a ball, another of the mules I found so badly wounded that it died soon afterwards. It was shot in the side with an arrow. The horse missing at the same time I did not find but have learned that it was discovered by Geo. W. Collins so badly wounded that it could not get up, so it died I suppose. I have never seed it since. I have no doubt that said animals were killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians--one of the band has since told me so. Two of the mules were worth $150 each, the other about $100. The horse was worth $75. I have never received payment for said animals from the United States nor from anyone.

Thomas Bruce
Sworn to & subscribed to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Collins of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 1st day of August 1853 I know that James Bruce of said county had three mules and one horse killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said animals were running on the prairie near Jacksonville when dead [sic]. I saw them when dead. They were shot with arrows. I should judge two of the mules to be worth $15 each--and the other $100 at that time and the horse worth about $75. I did not see the Indians shoot said animals but have no doubt from the manner in which they were shot that the Indians did it.
    I have no interest in this claim.
George W. Collins
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of August [sic] A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
No. 29 James Bruce's  "Award"  No. 29 $475.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James Bruce, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-five dollars.

$475.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7 1855 

No. 30--Claim of James J. Fryer  "Award"  No. 30 $544.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county described as follows: built of round logs 16/18 feet, floored, a stone fireplace & chimney, nailed roof, one door, porch 8/10 feet, nailed roof and railing, valued at $250. Said house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 20th day of August 1853. I also had destroyed in said house or taken away by said Indians at that time the following articles of property to wit:
30# coffee
30# sugar, crushed
200# flour
4# tea
4# soap
1 tea kettle, large, cast
1 oven & lid cast iron
10 tin plates
1 set tea cups & saucers
1 coffee pot (tin)
1 tea pot
6 tin cups
1 set knives & forks
1 scythe & snath (new)
2 gold pans (large)
1 camp kettle
1 pine table worth 8.00
1 chair 4.00
3 empty kegs 3.00
1 tin bucket (large) 3.00
5 gallons pickles
3      "       whiskey
1 sash plane
1 smoothing plane
1 augers (1 & 2 inch)
1 hand saw
1 hand axe (Collins)
1 hatchet
1 two inch mortising chisel
10# nails
2 bed ticks ($3 each) 6.00
4 pillows, feathers $5 20.00
3 sheets 150¢ 4.50
1 coverlet 8.00
2 shirts $2 4.00
1 settee 5.00
curtains for 2 beds, calico 5.00
1 brass kettle (5 gallons) 10.00
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I knew that James J. Fryer of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county, described as follows--built of round logs 16/18 feet, nailed roof, 1 door, porch 18/8 feet with railing worth about $250. Said house was burnt by the Indians on or about the 20th day of August 1853. Mr. Fryer also lost at the time either destroyed or taken away by Indians a large amount of household provisions and furniture, which I could not now specify. I believe from circumstances of the war that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took or destroyed them all, as none were left after the fire.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Theodric Cameron of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 James J. Fryer of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said county described as follows to wit: built of round logs 16/18 feet, one door, nailed roof, floored, porch 8/18 feet. Said house contained a large quantity of furniture and supplies, tools &c., which Mr. Fryer had laid in for the support and use of a family which he had agreed to keep a year. I have read his statement of articles lost in the war and believe it to be true. Said house and contents were destroyed by fire on or about the 20th day [of] August 1853, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I believe--I think the house was worth at the time at least $250. I have no interest in this claim.
Theodric Cameron
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 30 James J. Fryer's  "Award"  No. 30 $544.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James J. Fryer, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred and forty-four dollars and fifty cents.

$544.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 7 1855 

No. 31--Claim of W. G. T'Vault  "Award"  No. 31 $270.00
United States of America
        In a/c with W. G. T'Vault
For one ox taken by the Rogue River Indians or their allies during the Rogue River War between the 2nd day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, in the county of Jackson, Oregon Territory. Said ox was destroyed by the Indians aforesaid at the time aforesaid and would weigh about nine hundred pounds, that I have not reclaimed said ox or the value thereof or any part from the United States or anyone, that I believe beef was worth at the time said ox was taken about from twenty-five to thirty cents per pound and I further believe that the said Indians killed said ox and ate him during hostilities with said Indians.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Benjamin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I know that W. G. T'Vault of said county owned a steer which was running on Rogue River in a band which I was assisting to guard at the time about the 9th day of August 1853. Indians of the Rogue River Tribe attacked said band, killed some and drove off some. Mr. T'Vault's steer was among the missing and was never found. I believe it was killed by said Indians. Said steer would weigh about 900# at the time when lost.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Benjamin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 9th day of August 1853 during the Rogue River Indian War, at the time when said Indians attacked my band of cattle, I know that one of W. G. T'Vault's oxen running at the time with my band was missing. I have no doubt said Indians drove off said ox. Said animal would weigh about 900# I should judge.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 31 W. G. T'Vault's  "Award"  No. 31 $270.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to W. G. T'Vault, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and seventy dollars.

$270.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8th 1855 

No. 32--Claim of Hall & Burpee  "Award"  No. 32 $628.50

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Hall of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 11th day of August 1853 I was joint owner with Joseph S. Burpee of a house situated near Willow Springs in said county, described as follows: a log house 18/24 ft. on the ground, one story & a half high, one fireplace & chimney, a good floor below, and partly closed above, one door, a chicken house at one end valued at $400. We also had in the house 3 tables worth $5 each, one cupboard worth $5, 2 blankets $7, 3 woolen shirts 250¢ each, 1 pair shoes $3, 1 tent for packing, some worn, $10, three kegs empty $5, 2 pack saddles new with full riggin' worth $12 each, 3 tin pans, 2 cut glass decanters worth $4 each , 140# butter worth one dollar per pound, one leather covered trunk worth $4, all which was destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on the date last aforesaid.
    I have never received any of said articles of property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Saml. Hall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--I know that the Rogue River Tribe of Indians burnt the dwelling house of Messrs. Samuel Hall & Joseph S. Burpee on the evening of the 11th day of August 1853. I saw the tracks about the premises the next morning, and found in the ruins of the house the next morning pieces of burnt pack saddles, portion of chicken house and fragments of other articles which had been burnt in the house. I should think the house was worth at the time burnt $400 at the least. I have no interest in this claim.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nathan B. Lane of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 11th day of Aug. 1853, I know that Samuel Hall and Joseph S. Burpee owned and occupied a certain house near Willow Springs in said county described as follows: a log house 18 by 24 feet on the ground--story & half high, well floored, one fireplace and chimney, one door, worth I should think $400 at that time. I knew they had a tent there, 2 decanters, bedding, tin pans--a trunk worth about $4, also noticed there 2 new pack saddles, well rigged, worth $12 each. They had two kegs of butter, as much as 140#--I was there just before and told them how to preserve it--tables 2 or more, they also had a cupboard worth $5. Said house and contents was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on the evening of the 11th of August 1853 about 9 o'clock. I saw the Indians about the house and heard the splitting of boards to kindle the fire, heard the talk and knew it was Indian tongue.
Nathan B. Lane
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
No. 32 Samuel Hall & Joseph Burpee  "Award"  No. 32 $628.50

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Samuel Hall and Joseph Burpee, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of six hundred and twenty-eight dollars and fifty cents.

$628.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8th 1855 

No. 33--John Penniger               Award No. 33    $263

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Penniger of said county being duly sworn says--During the time of the Rogue River War of 1853 I was living at the house of William J. Newton of said county. Mr. Newton's house was destroyed by fire by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 11th day of August 1853. I had certain articles of property in and about the house and [which] were destroyed with it, to wit:
    One jeans coat worth $8, one overcoat $8, 6 shirts, factory domestic, $9, 4 lady's drawers $16, 30 yds. domestic $7.50, one pine table $10, 8 gallons vinegar $32, 2 chopping axes one $5 other 2 50/100, one pair lady's shoes $3.00, one tin bucket $1.50, 2 tin pans $2 both, 3 linen bed ticks $15, 2 bed quilts $10, one blanket $5, one vial vermifuge $1, 1 vial spts. turpentine $1, 1 vial wormseed oil $1, set knives and forks $2.50, 1 set iron spoons $1.00, 1 wash tub $9. I had 80 chickens also destroyed by the Indians at the same time. Indians of said tribe have since told me that they destroyed said property.
    I have never reclaimed any of said goods nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Penniger
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 and before I had resided at my home in said county. My house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 11th of August 1853 and Mr. Penniger had all or nearly all of his clothing, bedding and household goods destroyed with the house. I and two or three other men were at the house the night before it was burnt, and I know that all the articles (as near as I can recollect) mentioned in Penniger's claim to have been there, were there then. I recollect he had a coffee pot then also worth $2.50. He also had glass tumblers there, as many as 4. I recollect his chickens were then there and some 30 of them killed lying in a pile together. Afterwards when the house was burnt all but one were missing. I have no doubt the Indians destroyed those chickens as they did the other things.
    I have no interest in this claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Rowland Hall of said county being duly sworn says that--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 11th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of W. J. Newton was destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Indians. I had been living at Mr. Newton's some two months and a half previous to the war. I know that John Penniger and family were also living there at the commencement of said war and that he had a large number of chickens there, as many as 80 I think, 2 linen bed ticks, 2 chopping axes, one tin bucket, 30 yds. of domestic, also bottles containing spirits of turpentine and other medicines, a quantity of clothing and bedding, one pine table worth $10, I should suppose, a quantity of vinegar--as much as 8 gallons, 1 set knives and forks, 1 wash tub common size, all [of] which were left at the house and I suppose burnt with the house. I have seen fragments of many of said articles in the ruins of the house since the fire.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Rowland Hall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15 Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
John Penniger Award (No. 33) $263.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on their claims during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Penniger, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and sixty-three dollars.

$263.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855 

No. 34--John E. Ross               $4176.00

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 7 or 8 day of August 1853 I lost 18 head of beef cattle. 16 [of] said cattle were there ranging in the prairie near Stuart Creek in said county in a band which the Rogue River Indians stampeded; the next day we found said cattle and found two shot dead, others wounded, and many others missing, among which were 16 belonging to me, which as an average lot were worth as I sold cattle at that time $232 each.
    They were better than ordinary beef cattle. The Indians also took two other beef cattle about the same time running near T'Vault's on Rogue River which were very large cattle and worth full as much as the other 16. I have no doubt that the Rogue River Indians took said cattle as they were driving off cattle at that time all through the valley, and Chief Jim said his people drove off said cattle. I have never reclaimed any of said animals nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John E. Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William J. Newton of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, sometime during the month of August of said year I know that John E. Ross had a band of beef cattle running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county. I passed across the plain where I knew the cattle had been running and seeing very few cattle about there I inquired where they were. Mr. Brown, the man who had been herding the cattle, told me that the Indians had stampeded the band and that several of the cattle [were shot] with arrows the night before. Mr. Brown was hunting the cattle for several days and coming near my house he found one of the cattle shot dead with arrows by the Indians. I went and saw the animal and was satisfied it was one of Ross' cattle. I have no interest in the claim.
W. J. Newton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Hillman of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 early in the month of August of said year I was requested by George Ross to assist him in hunting a band of cattle belonging to Col. John E. Ross which had been driven away by the Rogue River Indians. He said 18 or 20 cattle were missing. I went out with him, found no cattle, but heard of two being seen on the road down on Rogue River which answered the description of two belonging to Col. Ross' band.
    Returned without getting any of the cattle. I have never heard that any of said band were ever recovered except the two head found on Rogue River; the man who described the two cattle found by the road said they were two large beef cattle.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John W. Hillman
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James L. Loudon of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 sometime between the 6th & 8th day of August 1853 I knew that John E. Ross had a band of cattle running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county. I was helping herd the cattle about that time. I saw one of the band shot on the range and some 20 head were missing when we got the cattle together again, one of which I knew he recovered afterwards. If he got others I do not know it. The cattle lost were large sized beef cattle. I would judge that they would weigh 790 lbs.at that time and beef was selling at 30 cents. I have no interest in the claim.
J. L. Loudon
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says
    In the summer of 1853 I sold to Col. John E. Ross two oxen which would weigh from 1350 to 1400 lbs. each. Col. Ross never took said animals from my house in said county.
    After the commencement of Indian hostilities with the Rogue River Tribe sometime between the 20 and 24 of August 1853, while in company with Gen. Lane's command in search of the Indian trail in the mountains, we came across the heads of said oxen which had been slaughtered by the Indians. I knew the heads of said oxen by the horns which I recollected well, having belonged to me for some time prior. I have no interest in the claim.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 7 or 8 day of August A.D. 1853 I was assisting to herd a band of cattle belonging to John E. Ross which were running on the prairie near Stuart's Creek in said county when they were all driven from the range except one shot with arrows. I saw Indians of the Rogue River Tribe in that neighborhood at that time and believe said cattle were driven away by said Indians. They were stampeded in the night time and the next day I went in pursuit of them. Did not get them. There were two of them found two or three days afterward and 18 head were finally missing which I do not know of Mr. Ross ever recovering.
    I think they were killed and eaten by said Indians.
    The cattle lost were very large beef cattle, the best in the valley at that time. I cannot say what the value of them was exactly.
    I have no interest in the claim.
George Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
John E. Ross' Award (No. 34) $4176.00

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John E. Ross, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four thousand one hundred and seventy-six dollars.

$4176.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855

No. 35--John S. Miller              No. 35 $477.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John S. Miller of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indians on the 3rd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe shot an ox belonging to me which would weigh 850 lbs. Said ox was killed on my claim on the east side of Bear Creek [sic] in said county. I also lost about that time 95 chickens worth a dollar apiece; also some 400 melons. I cannot say who destroyed the chickens or the melons, as they were taken in my absence.
    I have reason to believe that Indians took and destroyed many of said melons as they were seen in the garden during the war. I have not reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
J. S. Miller
Sworn and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John E. Ross of said county being duly sworn said--On the 3rd day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War when I was returning from an inquest held over the body of Edwards, who was shot by Indians at the commencement of the war, I saw John S. Miller examining an ox of his which had been shot in the head as we supposed by the Rogue River Indians. He was chopping the ball out of his head. Said ox was a large animal something over 800 lbs. I should judge. I have no doubt said animal was killed by the Indians.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John E. Ross
Sworn & subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 that John S. Miller of said county had on his land claim in said county a garden containing a large number of watermelons--400 or 500. Also a lot of chickens near 100 I should suppose. I know that when they drove up the cattle of Mr. Miller after Indians had been in this neighborhood about 7 or 8 August 1853 one ox was missing. I heard the boys say that said ox was lying dead on the other side of the creek, had been killed by Indians. Don't know how much said ox was worth. I have no interest in the claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
        John S. Miller's Award (No. 35) $477.
No. 35
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John S. Miller, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-seven dollars.
$477.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

No. 38--Davidson & Erwin              (Award No. 36)  $920.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin of said county being duly sworn say--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 we had a log house situated on Applegate Creek in said county 18 by 30 feet on the ground, nailed roof, two doors, one partition through the middle, 1 fireplace and chimney, worth about two hundred dollars.
    We also had a rick of hay about 12 tons. Said house and hay were burnt on or about the date last mentioned, by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue Rivers, as we believe. Said Indians have since the war stated to us that they burned said property. We have never received payment from the United States nor from anyone for said property destroyed.
Gideon B. Davidson
Robert L. Erwin
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 13 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John P. Baker of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War I lived a neighbor to Messrs. Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin of said county on Applegate Creek. I know that they owned and occupied a log house about 18 by 30 feet on the ground, story & half high, two rooms, 1 chimney and fireplace, nailed roof, worth at least $200 at that time. They also had a rick of hay. I should judge as much as 12 tons. Said house and hay were burned by the Indians on or about the 10th  or 11th August 1853. I saw the house in flames at the time. There were no white men in that neighborhood at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
John P. Baker
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 13 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award
No. 36
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Gideon B. Davidson and Robert L. Erwin, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of nine hundred and twenty dollars.
$920.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Burrell B. Griffin              (No. 37)  $1277.00
Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Burrell B. Griffin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853, on or about the 5th day of August 1853, I was the owner of a log house situated in said county described as follows: 18 by 18 feet on the ground, hewed down on the inside and outside, a fireplace and chimney built of rock halfway up--2 doors & shutters, a floor, with an addition on the gable end of 10 by 18 feet frame and weatherboarded and floored--also a porch the full length of both, framed & floored, the roofs were nailed. Valued at $450. In the house were three bedsteads worth $4 each, one large worth $6 a small table worth $3. Said house and contents were burned about the date last mentioned by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe. I also left about 100 chickens big and little, which were destroyed during the war by the Indians as I believe, as arrows were found under the chicken roost.
    I had also one large American mare and 1 Indian horse lost during the war. The mare was killed by the Indians. I found her near where the house was burnt with an arrow stuck in her side. I pulled the arrow out myself and the mare died of the wounds about three hours afterwards. I found one of the Indian horses dead on the ground with several other dead horses belonging to the miners. The American mare was a first class animal worth $400, at least--a blooded animal.
    I also had in the field near the house 30 dozen sheaves [of] oats, [and] a stack of hay containing 1½ tons. I also had 6 pack saddles with rigging hanging on a pole near the house worth $6 apiece.
    Said oats and hay were destroyed at the time the house was burnt, and said pack saddles were cut to pieces & destroyed by the Indians as I believe--it looked like their work. I have never reclaimed any of said property, nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Burrell B. Griffin
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county, being duly sworn, says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that the Rogue River Indians burnt the house of Burrell B. Griffin situated in said county, described as follows, as nearly as I can recollect, to wit: 18 by 18 feet on the ground, made of hewed logs containing a fireplace and chimney made of rock halfway up, 2 doors, the house was floored throughout, with an addition on the gable end 10 by 18 feet, framed and weatherboarded, a porch the full length of both framed & floored, the roofs were nailed. I would estimate the value of said house at that time at $450. I was at the place on the day afterwards and have no doubt from the appearances that said house was burnt by the Indians. I know also that Mr. Griffin lost during the war an American mare worth $400. She was a first class animal--and an Indian horse worth $100. I should judge said mare was killed near Griffin's ranch. The Indian horse was missing and I have never heard of him since. I have no doubt the mare was shot by the Indians and the Indian horse stolen by them.
    I live a neighbor to Mr. Griffin and know all the circumstances of this claim.
W. M. Elliott
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James R. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--On the 3rd day of August 1853 during the Rogue River Indian War Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered my dwelling house in said county, took away and destroyed several articles of property belonging to me--and a rifle gun belonging to Burrell B. Griffin of said county worth at the time about $40.
    I have no interest in the claim.
James R. Davis
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 3 day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River War I know that Indians of said tribe burnt the dwelling house of Burrell B. Griffin, of the description given and worth about $450 in my judgment. I know that he left in the house bedsteads, tables &c. which were destroyed with the house.
    He left a lot of chickens at his house--don't know how many [of] which were killed by the Indians as I judge from appearances. The Indians also killed a fine American mare worth between 400 & $500. I did not see the Indian kill her, but she was shot with an arrow and I heard the Indians hallooing at the time she was killed. There was an Indian horse missing at the same time--have no doubt Indians took him--he was worth $100 or $125.
    Mr. Griffin also had destroyed by the fire about 1½ tons hay [and] as many as 20 doz. [omission] oats. Indians also tore to pieces several pack saddles belonging to Mr. Griffin--can't say how many. I have no interest in this claim.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 37) $1277
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Burrell B. Griffin, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand two hundred and seventy-seven dollars.
$1277.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Marcena McCombs                $1020.00
No. 38

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Marcena McCombs of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt 2 ricks of hay belonging to me on the land claim of Wm. M. Elliott in said county. There were about 16 tons in said ricks, all which was destroyed, also 250 rails--
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone. Said Indians also shot an Indian mare belonging to me, crippling him for life. Said mare was worth $100 before shot, but is not now worth anything for business. I think she was damaged $100.
Marcena McCombs
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Elliott of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853 I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt two ricks of hay belonging to Marcena McCombs which was on my land claim in said county. Said ricks contained at least 16 tons if not more. I also know that McCombs had a mare shot in the shoulder with a large rifle ball so that she is crippled and is worthless for use. I think the Indians shot the mare. She was worth before he was shot $100 at least.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William M. Elliott
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Merritt Bellinger of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--on the evening of the 2nd day of August 1853 I know that two ricks of hay belonging to Marcena McCombs of said county were destroyed by fire being burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I believe. Said Indians had been committing similar depredations on the same day in that neighborhood.
    Said ricks contained some 15 or 16 tons of hay I should judge. Mr. McCombs also had a mare shot in the shoulder supposed to be shot by Indians. The mare was crippled by the shot & I think she was injured the value of her. Said animal was worth one hundred dollars before [being] injured.
    I have no interest in this claim for damages.
Merritt Bellinger
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 38) $1020.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Marcena McCombs, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand and twenty dollars.
$1020.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of William N. Ballard                $468.50
No. 39

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    William N. Ballard of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I had on my claim on Rogue River one log house about 16 by 18 on the ground--round logs with a floor--fireplace and chimney doors and shutters, worth $200. One stack of hay--3 tons. Corral fence about worth $25. One 2 inch auger, one inch auger, one chopping axe, one broad axe, one hand saw, one drawing knife, one frying pan, one camp kettle, one pack saddle and rope worth $12, one steel fork for hay $5, one padlock $3, one tin bucket, one plane $5, one pick, one shovel, one coffee pot--
    All of said articles and property were destroyed by fire during said war between the 15th day of August and the 10th day of September 1853, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor anyone.
Wm. N. Ballard
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of Jany. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Birdseye of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Wm. M .Ballard had on his claim on Rogue River one log house about 16 by 18 feet on the ground with a fireplace and chimney, door & shutter worth about $200. A stack of hay with a fence about it--3 or 4 tons--a corral fence 8 rails high. I have heard the list of articles in Mr. Ballard's claim read over and recollect that he had these articles in and about his house at the time he left it during the war.
    This house and contents were burnt with the hay by the Indians as I have reason to believe sometime between the 15 day of August and 10 day of September 1853.
    I have no interest in this claim.
D. N. Birdseye
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 at the time when said Indians burnt the house of William N. Ballard in said county, I know that the broad axe mentioned in said Ballard's claim for property destroyed was one which I let him have.
    I paid $24 for it in the spring of 1852 at Oregon City and packed it to Rogue River which was worth $5.00 more. I consider that said axe when destroyed was worth $30. It was an extraordinary shop carpenter's axe.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 39) $468.50
No. 39
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William N. Ballard, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and sixty-eight dollars and fifty cents.
$468.50
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners

Claim of Freeman Smith Jr.                $382.25
No. 40

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Freeman Smith Jr. of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, during the month of August 1853, I had the following property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians--to wit: One brindle ox killed on Rogue River and eaten by said Indians worth $100, one ox shot by said Indians with several arrows so that he was crippled and unfit for beef, damage $100, one red ox shot with three arrows rendered unfit for service three months, damage $25.
    One roan ox shot with three arrows and severely wounded, rendered unfit for service for three months, damage $25, one roan ox shot with two arrows, damage $25.
    The following articles of property were taken away to wit:
2 No. 1 Collins axes 10.00
1     "           "       hatchet 3.00
1 large cowbell & strap 11.00
3 large frying pans 10.00
6 tin plates 4.50
6 tin cups 4.00
1 set knives & forks 4.00
2 coffee boilers 7.00
1 coffee mill 3.00
1 iron bound patent pail 3.00
1 large mill file 3.50
1 mill square file .75
1 oilstone for plane bits 5.00
1 pine table 10.00
4 dressed deer skins 14.00
10 undressed  do.  do. 10.00
10 gallons vinegar 40.00
2 iron bound kegs 4.00
1 oilcloth suit 15.00
2 pr. satinette pants 10.00
1  "   cassimere  do. 10.00
6 shirts 18.00
1 cloth overcoat 16.00
3 large tin pans 10.00
1 set table spoons 3.00
2 shovels 5.00
50# flour 10.00
1 camp kettle 3.50
    I have never reclaimed any of said articles except by purchasing them from said Indians after the war. Nor have I received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Freeman Smith Jr.
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I owned & occupied a dwelling house on Butte Creek in said co. which was burnt by the Indians in the month of August 1853 during the war. When said house was burned it contained a large lot of household goods, clothing, mechanic's tools &c. belonging to Freeman Smith Jr. which were either taken away or destroyed with the house by said Indians. I have read the statement of articles lost by Mr. Smith and believe the same to be true. I know that Mr. Smith lost one ox about that time and believe the same to have been killed by Indians. I know that two or three oxen [were] wounded by arrows--no doubt the work of Indians. I have no interest in the claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities in the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Freeman Smith Jr. of said county had on Butte Creek a large number of articles of household goods and furniture, also carpenter's tools, clothing &c., all [of] which were taken away or destroyed during the month of August of said year by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe.
    I have heard the statement of articles lost read and know the same to be true. I know that the Indians killed and ate one of his oxen worth at the time $100 and that they crippled three others by shooting them with arrows so that they were rendered unfit for service for three months or more--one of which was almost worthless being now when I last saw him unfit for beef or work. He was probably shot with poisoned arrows so that he now has his large sores upon him. The ox was worth $100 when shot. The damage done to the other two mentioned I would estimate at $25. The articles mentioned as taken away or destroyed were in the dwelling house of James Fryer which was burnt by the Rogue River Indians.
George W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 40) $382.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Freeman Smith Jr., a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and eighty-two dollars and twenty-five cents.
$382.25
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs

Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Nicholas Klopfenstein                $227.50
No. 41

Territory of Oregon    )
County Jackson            )  s.s.
    Nicholas Klopfenstein of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 the Rogue River Indians entered my garden situated in said county and destroyed and carried away a large quantity of garden vegetables, to wit: one acre of corn about 30 bushels, 2 acres of potatoes half destroyed about 30 bushels, many pumpkins, cabbages, turnips, &c.
    Also ½ acre of onions all destroyed-- as many as 10 bushels. I think the Indians took and destroyed said vegetables because I saw their tracks in the field afterwards.
    I also had a dozen chickens taken by the Indians as I suppose--white men might have taken a part of said property.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Nicholas Klopfenstein
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John W. Johnson of said county being duly sworn says--I lived a neighbor to Nicholas Klopfenstein during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853.
    I know that his garden was destroyed by Indians as I believe. It contained potatoes, cabbages, turnips and other vegetables. I should judge that as many as 40 bushels of potatoes were destroyed, 50 cabbage heads, some 60 or 70 pumpkins, a lot of onions, some 15 or 16 bushels--about an acre of corn, and ¼ acre of turnips, all destroyed. Also a dozen of chickens.
    I think Indians had a hand in destroying the garden as I saw their tracks--there were also white men's tracks--the volunteers might have taken some of said vegetables and chickens.
    I have no interest in the claim.
              his
John W. X Johnson
             mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 41) $227.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Nicholas Klopfenstein, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and twenty-seven dollars and fifty cents.

$227.50
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8 1855

Claim of Daniel F. Fisher $173.50
No. 42
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
Daniel F. Fisher of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 on or about the 4th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe broke open my house situated on Bear Creek in said county and took and destroyed the following articles of property--to wit:
    2 chopping axes, 5 frying pans, 3 tin plates, 1 inch & half auger, 1 half inch auger, 1 inch & half chisel, 1 pair buckskin pants worth $15, 1 cloth pair pants $7, 1 cloth overshirt worth $8, 1 Oregon saddle tree worth $20, 1 pair saddle bags worth $10, 5 camp kettles, 6 knives & forks & tin plates, 6 tin cups, 6 spoons--britannia, padlock $1.50, 1 weeding hoe $4, 1 hand saw, 1 woolen bed cover $10, 1 branding iron $5, 1 coffee mill, 1 dressed buckskin, 1 dressed otter skin, 1 pair (new) men's shoes, 10 lbs. beans, 2# soap, 4# lead, 1 tent worth $10, 8 canvas pack covers, good, 4 yds. sailcloth in each--and two wooden water buckets--
    I have never recovered any of said articles nor received payment therefor from the United States or anyone.
Daniel F. Fisher
Subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 18 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Hultz [sic] of said county being duly sworn says--I was at the house of Daniel F. Fisher on Bear Creek in said county on the day of the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. He had in his house at that time cooking utensils, bedding, tools and articles of furniture such as a bachelor would have in his house--I cannot specify the articles. Mr. Fisher left his house with said articles in it--the same day when I left. I returned to the house a few days afterwards and found the house broken open and said articles were all taken away. I suppose they were taken by the Rogue River Indians as I had a small pocketbook among the articles and afterwards got it from these Indians. I have no interest in this claim.
John Hulse [sic]
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Hughes of said county being duly sworn says--I knew that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Daniel F. Fisher had at his house on Bear Creek in said county chopping axes, cooking utensils, augers, clothing, bedding, pack covers &c. I can't say what he left there--exactly. I know that during the war the house had been broken open and things taken out and taken away.
    I have heard Indians of the Rogue River Tribe say since that they fired into said house to shoot those in it then went in and robbed it. I believe from the circumstances those said Indians took and destroyed Mr. Fisher's goods. I have no interest in the claim.
Wm. M. Hughes
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. [1855].
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 42) $173.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Daniel F. Fisher, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred seventy-three dollars and fifty cents.

$173.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Thomas D. Jewett $317.25
No. 43
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas D. Jewett of said county being first duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 28 day of August 1853--I had a log house situated on my claim on Rogue River in said county described as follows: 16 by 18 feet on the ground, one story high, round logs, one door, valued at $125. In said house I had one bedstead, corded, worth $10, one axe, 1 pr. macheers worth $10.00, 1 pack saddle & rigging $9, 1 pine table worth $5, 4 benches $4--3 tin plates--2 tin cups, 3# cream of tartar 75¢ per #, 13# Oregon bacon, 1 hand axe worth $1.50. Said house with its contents was destroyed by fire on or about the date last mentioned, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe. I saw the house in flames and saw said Indians in the immediate vicinity the same night. I have never reclaimed any of said articles or property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Thomas D. Jewett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Waldo Jewett of said county being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 20 day of August 1853 Thomas D. Jewett of said county had on his claim on Rogue River one log house one story high 16 by 18 feet, round logs--one door, nailed roof, worth in my judgment at least $150, one corded bedstead worth $8, 1 pair macheers worth $12, 1 chopping axe, 1 pack saddle & rigging--good, 1 pine table worth $5.00, 4 benches worth $8.00, 1 tin plates--and tin cups don't know how many, 3# cream of tartar worth 75 cts. per #, a piece [of] dried bacon--one lot clapboards about 3000--a splendid lot worth $40 per thousand. All said property was burnt on or about the date aforesaid by a band of the Rogue River Indians. I saw the house in flames and the Indians nearby at the time. I have no interest in this claim.
Waldo Jewett
Sworn and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January 1853 [sic].
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 43) $317.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Thomas D. Jewett, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and seventeen dollars and twenty-five cents.

$317.25

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Sylvester Pease $300.
[No. 44]
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sylvester Pease of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I had a land claim situated on Antelope Creek a tributary of Upper Rogue River in said county on which I had a field containing about 3 acres under cultivation containing potatoes, corn and garden vegetables generally; at the close of said war I returned to said farm which had been abandoned during hostility and found my potatoes all destroyed, I think as many as 40 or 50 bushels, also corn about 12 bushels and melons about 1000 destroyed--also tomatoes 20 or 25 bushels. I believe the Rogue River Indians destroyed said crop, from the Indian signs in the field, and from their acknowledgments after the war. They said their "papooses" destroyed my garden.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Sylvester Pease
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William Thompson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I knew that Sylvester Pease had on his claim on Antelope Creek in said county a garden containing potatoes, corn, melons and other vegetables which were destroyed during the war. He lost I should judge between 40 and 50 bushels of potatoes. He had an acre and a half of corn which I should think was half destroyed and he gathered 12 or 13 bushels from it after the war. He had about ½ an acre of melons which were about one half destroyed also. I could not estimate the number. I should judge he lost between 20 & 25 bushels destroyed. I know that the Indians were all about the premises in the time of the war, and no whites lived there at the time. I believe the Rogue River Indians destroyed the property.
    I have no interest in the claim.
William Thompson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16 Jany. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Ty.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Engleman [sic] of said county being duly sworn says--Near the close of hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--
    I was at the land claim of Sylvester Pease situated on Antelope Creek in said county. There I observed that he had had a garden of considerable extent a little the rise of three acres I think, which had been mostly destroyed. I was there twice during the war and saw Indians in said garden. The garden seemed to have contained vegetables of all kinds grown in the valley at that time, and from appearances I should judge that it had been destroyed by Indians--there were any quantity of Indian signs all about--I would say that as many as thirty bushels of potatoes had been destroyed, a lot of cabbages, between 800 & 1000 melons--between 12 & 15 bushels of corn & 15 bushels of tomatoes--
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Engelman [sic]
Subscribed & sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public
Award (No. 44) $300.
No. 44
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Sylvester Pease, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred dollars.
$300.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8 1855

Claim of Wm. H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels (No. 45)
$450.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William H. McGreer of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 8th day of September 1853 Indians of the Applegate Band belonging to the Upper Rogue Rivers burnt the dwelling house situated on Applegate Creek in said county belonging to William N. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels who were joint owners of the premises. Said house was built in two parts described as follows: One a log house 16 by 18 feet, the other built of boards 18 feet square with counter and shelves--three doors, nailed roof, one fireplace and chimney, no floors, valued at $500.
    I have no doubt said Indians destroyed said house, as they had been known to destroy property of that kind during the war all through Rogue River Valley, and there were no whites in the vicinity of said premises at the time it was destroyed. Said parties have not received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
Wm. H. McGreer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Agy of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 8th day of September 1853 I know that Indians of the Applegate Band belonging to the Upper Rogue Rivers burnt the dwelling house belonging to William H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels as joint owners. The premises consisted of a log house and a frame house. The log house was about 16 by 18 feet and the frame about 18 feet square to the best of my knowledge.
    The frame house had a nailed roof--don't recollect whether the log house had or not, 1 chimney and fireplace, 3 doors, a counter and shelves in the frame house. I should judge the value of the premises to have been $450. Am satisfied that they could not have been built for less than that.
    I have no interest in the claim.
John Agy
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 26 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Yarnell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 in or about the middle of August of that year I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt the dwelling house of Charles Drury situated on Applegate Creek in said county described as follows: a log house 12 by 16 and a frame addition about 16 feet square, 1 fireplace and chimney, 2 doors, nailed roof, a bar and shelves, all worth about $250. I don't know whether there were any articles of furniture or goods burnt with said house or not. I have no interest in this claim.
David N. Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 45) $450.
No. 45
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William H. McGreer, Charles Drury and Ithamer Runnels, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars.
$450.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

No. 46    Claim of David Haggart     Award $90.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David F. Fisher of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 that David Haggart of said county had a cayuse Indian horse running on my land claim on Bear Creek in said county, which was taken away during hostilities by the Rogue River Indians as I have no doubt and has never been found. I have learned that said animal was afterwards seen in the camp of said Indians and have no doubt they took said horse away.
    I have no interest in this claim.
    The horse was worth at the time about $100.
Daniel F. Fisher
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 46) $90.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to David Haggart, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of ninety dollars.
$90.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855

Claim of James Mooney     (No. 47)    Award $500.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Mooney of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I lost three mules and three horses which were taken by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue River Tribe. Two of said animals were subsequently given up by said Indians after the close of the war. The other four were never recovered. Said Indians have since stated that they killed and ate them. 2 of the lost animals were Spanish mules worth $150 each, one American mule worth $150, and one horse worth $150 each.
    I have never recovered payment for said animals from the United States nor from anyone.
S. Mooney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Osborne of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 I know that Samuel Mooney lost 3 mules & one horse taken by the Applegate Indians, a band of the Upper Rogue River Tribe. I was engaged three days in hunting said animals.
    We took a trail of the Indians who stole the animals and followed them to the headquarters of Old "Jo," the chief of the Rogue River Tribe.
    He told me that the Indians had got said animals with two others which he would return, but that the four mentioned had been killed. I think that the mules at that time were worth $150 each, the horse was a Canadian animal worth $100 at least. I have no interest in this claim.
John Osborne
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 47) $500.
No. 47
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James Mooney, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred dollars.
$500.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of John Gheen     (No. 48)    Award $840.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Curtis Davenport of said county being duly sworn says--I resided at the house of John Gheen situated on Applegate Creek in said county some three months just preceding the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I left them on or about the 12th of August 1853 and came to Jacksonville when I heard a day or two afterwards that Gheen's house was burned by the Indians. When I left said house there was in it a bar and shelves--a dining table of pine worth $8, 1 bar table worth $4, 3 or 4 benches, 1 rocking chair worth $5. When I left there was also a stove, cooking utensils, a fine lot of dishes &c. He kept a boarding house. Whether any of them were removed I don't know. Gheen had also a stack of hay containing at least 4 tons which I understood was burnt with the house. I would estimate the value of said house at about $500. It was a log house 20 by 16 feet with a kitchen, sleeping apartment, canvased--a good bar and shelves.
    I have no interest in said claim.
Curtis Davenport
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John O'Brien of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 12 day of August I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen of said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was built of logs and worth about $300 as wages were at that time. I think there were a considerable number of articles of household goods and furniture in said house and destroyed with it--can't specify what. I also know that Mr. Gheen had a stack of hay burnt--can't say how much it contained when burnt.
    I believe from what I know of the circumstances of said Rogue River War that Indians of that tribe destroyed that property. I have no interest in this claim.
John O'Brien
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas Gill of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 12th day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen situated on the north side of Applegate Creek in said county was burnt by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe as I suppose, as at the same time said house was burnt there were three others burnt in that neighborhood and no whites were in the vicinity.
    Said house was about 20 by 16 feet, built of round logs, 2 doors, nailed roof, 1 fireplace & chimney; also another house near, about 13 by 12 feet built of logs, 2 doors, one fireplace and chimney, a bar and shelves, valued at $300. In said house was a quantity of crockery, cooking utensils, 2 kegs of beef pickled, 10 gallons each, tables--pine, benches--2 or 3, bedsteads & chairs. Also a stack of hay containing about 2 tons of hay--all of which were destroyed with the house by fire. I have no interest in this claim.
             his
Thomas X Gill
           mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Yarnell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the middle of August of said year I know that the dwelling house of John Gheen situated on Applegate Creek in said county was burnt by the Rogue River Indians. Said (house) was worth as much as $300 at the time burnt. There were in the house and destroyed with it 2 barrels pickled beef, 1 large dining table, 1 small table, counter & shelves, 1 sofa, several benches & stools, 7 or 8 hammock bedsteads worth $2 each. He also had a stack of hay burnt at the same time. I should judge from appearances of the stack that there were 12 tons.
    Said Indians also set fire to a pile of charcoal and destroyed it all--about 400 bushels--said coals were worth 25 cts. per bushel.
    I have no interest in said claim.
David N. Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 48) $840.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Gheen, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eight hundred and forty dollars.
$840.

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8 1855

Claim of Theodric Cameron     (No. 49)    Award $30.50
No. 49
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Theodric Cameron of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 20th day of August of said year Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed my dwelling house situated on Butte Creek in said county. They took or destroyed the following articles of property, to wit:
1 sack flour, 50 lbs.
1 coffee pot, tin
1 frying pan
1 Collins axe
1 tin pan
1 small camp kettle
    I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Theodric Cameron
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James J. Fryer of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that said Indians entered and robbed the dwelling house of Theodric Cameron situated on Butte Creek in said county.
    They took or destroyed one sack flour 50 lbs.--a coffee pot, frying pan--1 Collins axe--1 tin pan and a small camp kettle. I know Mr. Cameron had said articles stolen, as I lived with him at the time.
    I have no interest in this claim.
James J. Fryer
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Ludlow of said county being duly sworn says--
    During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Theodric Cameron had at his house on Butte Creek in said county the following articles of property, to wit:
1 sack flour
1 coffee pot, tin
1 frying pan
1 Collins axe
1 tin pan
1 small camp kettle
    Said articles were stolen and taken away by said Indians as I believe on or about the 20th day of August 1853.
    I have no interest in this claim.
George W. Ludlow
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 49) $30.50
No. 49
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Theodric Cameron, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of thirty dollars and fifty cents.
$30.50

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of James Abraham     (No. 50)    Award $825.40
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Abraham of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on [or] about the 7th day of September 1853 I was the owner of the following property in said county to wit: one log house made of round logs 18 by 25 feet on the ground with a floor, a fireplace and chimney worth $500, 7 bushels peas, 4 bushels oats, 2# saleratus, 2# black pepper, 50# flour, 50 bushels onions, 2# tea, 3 augers worth $6, one axe worth $2, one hand saw $5, one jointer plane $5, one smoothing plane $3, one razor $2.50. There were also in the house cooking utensils worth at least $10. I have a garden of ¾ of acre of turnips & one ½ acre of cabbage worth at least $45. My house with its contents was destroyed by fire on or about the 7th day of September 1853 and as I verily believe were burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Certain of them have frequently since the war told me so. My vegetables also were destroyed by the same Indians. I have seen them during hostilities pulling and carrying away turnips, cabbages &c. My garden was entirely destroyed at the close of the war. I also had garden seeds of various sorts purchased and laid away for the coming year. These seeds were in the house when burnt and destroyed with the rest. They were worth at least $10. I also had in the house which were burnt bed clothing as follows 2 good quilts worth $10, 2 blankets $3 each, 2 sheets $3 each, one mattress worth $9, one settee worth $5, 4 stools 50 cts. each, 6 shirts $1.25 each, all destroyed by the fire also one new plow worth $50 at least.
    I have never reclaimed any of said articles or property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
James Abraham
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sherlock Abrams of said county being duly sworn says--I resided with James Abraham at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. He had a log house 18 by 25 feet on the ground, with a good floor, a fireplace and chimney. I think the house was worth at that time at least $500. I know that James Abraham had in his house 7 bushels peas--4 bushels oats--2# saleratus, 2# black pepper--50# flour--50 bushels onions--2# tea--3 augers worth $2 each--one axe--one hand saw--one jointer plane, one smoothing plane, one razor--also cooking utensils such as 2 frying pans, camp kettles, tin dishes &c. worth $10 at least, one plow worth $50 cast steel--a quantity of garden seeds various kinds--2 good quilts--2 blankets, 2 sheets, one mattress--one settee worth $5--4 stools or homemade chairs--two coats some worn but not bad, 2 pairs trousers--same--six shirts--same. Said house was burnt by the Rogue River Indian Tribe of Indians with all of said articles in it on or about the 7th day of September 1853. Several of said Indians have told me since the war that they burnt said property.
    They also destroyed the garden near the house--containing some ¾ acre of turnips, ½ acre cabbages, with some other vegetables--I would think the garden vegetables destroyed by said Indians worth $45.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Sherlock M. Abrams
Sworn and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 7 day of September 1853 I know that James Abraham owned a log house in this county--a medium sized house--don't know how well it was furnished--he had articles of household furniture and family supplies in his house before the war.
    The house was burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I have good reason to believe on or about the 7th of September 1853.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Giles Kinney
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 50) $825.40
No. 50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James Abraham, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eight hundred and twenty-five dollars and forty cents.
$825.40

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 8, 1855

Claim of Francis Nasarett     (No. 51)    Award $1464.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nicholas Klopfenstein of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 8 day of August 1853, I was at the house of Francis Nasarett situated in said county.
    His house was a log house two stories high, about 19 by 25 feet on the ground--floor above and below--2 doors and sealed outside with plank--worth I should think about $500. In the house Mr. Nasarett had three kegs of whiskey about 8 gallons in each--1 keg of brandy same size--a large quantity of flour about 100#--cooking utensils--1 cooking stove--many pie plates--some blankets and other bedding--clothing--3 tables worth $15 each--4 benches $8--an axe--three or four augers and two handsaws--1 Oregon saddle $25. One dragoon saddle $25. One dozen chickens. He also had a stack of hay near the house, about 7 or 8 tons, surrounded by a fence about five rods square worth $30. The day after I was there, mentioned, said house and property were all destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I verily believe--signs of Indians [were] all about there after the house was burnt. I have [no?] interest in the claim.
Nicholas Klopfenstein
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Burrell B. Griffin of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Francis Nasarett, then [a] resident of said county, owned and occupied a log house described as follows--built of hewed logs--about 19 by 25 feet on the ground--two stories high--floor above and below--2 doors and shutter--sealed outside with plank. In the house Mr. Nasarett had a cooking stove, small size, with a good supply of household furniture for this country--and family supplies.
    The house was worth I think $500.
    This house with its contents was destroyed by fire on the 8th or 9th day of August 1853. I believe it was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians, as they had been seen in that neighborhood at that time. There was near the house a stack of hay--about 8 tons I think, also a kind of log pen and corral worth $30. These were destroyed with the house. I have no interest in the claim.
Burrell B. Griffin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 10th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 51) $1464.00
No. 51
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Francis Nasarett, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand four hundred and sixty-four dollars.
$1464.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

William Galley and Alfred Oliver's Claim     (No. 51)    $500.
Yreka Jan. 13th A.D. 1855
    William Galley & Alfred Oliver would most respectfully represent to the honorable Commissioners sitting at Jacksonville, O.T. that during the war that existed between the citizens of Jackson County, O.T. and the Indians of said Jackson County and vicinity, your petitioners were citizens of said Jackson County and residents on a farm in said county at the commencement of said war to wit A.D. 1853.
    And your petitioners would further represent that they sustained the following losses owing to the existence of the aforesaid war, by the hand of the Indians who were then at war with the citizens of the aforesaid Jackson County, to wit:
    Three and one half acres of potatoes, worth two thousand dollars, one acre of onions worth five hundred dollars, twenty-five hundred cabbages worth six hundred & twenty-five dollars, two and a half acres of melons worth four hundred dollars, one half acre of Indian corn worth one hundred dollars and four tons of hay worth one hundred dollars, making in all the sum of thirty-seven hundred and twenty-five dollars. Your petitioners would further ask the honorable Commissioners to investigate the facts as above set forth, and after they have duly considered the same that they allow the aforesaid sum of thirty-seven hundred & twenty-five dollars, and your petitioners in duty bound will ever pray &c.
William Galley
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )  s.s.
    William Galley one of the above named petitioners being sworn on oath says that the facts set forth in the above and foregoing petition are true.

William Galley
Sworn to and subscribed before me
a notary public in and for said county
the 15th day of February 1855. In witness
whereof I have hereunto set my hand
and affixed my notarial seal.

H. G. Ferris
(  seal  )                               Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Andrew M. Cowen of said county being duly sworn says--
    About the close of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I was at the land claim of William Galley situated in said county. I observed that he had an improvement of 12 or 14 acres of land enclosed and about eight acres under cultivation. About 8½ acres of potatoes about one and a half acres of onions--about 2 acres of melons--about a half acre of corn.
    I also saw where a large number of cabbages had been taken away and destroyed. There was a stack of hay there about a ton, should think that as much as three or four tons of hay had been destroyed by the cattle, the fences had been thrown down and the hay had been scattered about and destroyed. From the appearance of the garden I should judge that as much as six hundred bushels of potatoes had been destroyed--nearly all the onions were taken away--and the melons were all destroyed or taken away. I should think from appearances that 25 hundred heads of cabbages had been destroyed. I know that part of said destruction was done by cattle, and some by white men during the war, but have no doubt that Indians did the greater portion of the damage.
    I should judge what Indians did as they dug potatoes with sticks and whites dig with hoes. I have no interest in this claim.
Andrew M. Cowen
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 52) $500.00
No. 52
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William Galley and Alfred Oliver, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred dollars.
$500.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of T. B. Sanderson     (No. 53)    $400.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David N. Yarnell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the middle of August of said year I know that Indians of the Rogue River tribe burnt the dwelling house of T. B. Sanderson situated on Applegate Creek in said county together with a lot of furniture as follows--one large dining table worth $10, a dozen stools, 6 bunks worth $2 each--a bar and shelves worth $8.
    I was there soon after the house was fired and seen it burning--the house was built of logs hewed in the inside 16 by 24 with a board kitchen 12 by 16 feet--half floored, 1 fireplace and chimney--3 doors--nailed roof. Valued at $400. It cost that to put it up.
    I have no interest in this claim.
David N. Yarnell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 30th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Rankin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 10th day of August 1853 the dwelling house of T. B. Sanderson situated on Applegate Creek in said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following dimensions, biz:
    A log house 25 or 30 feet square, one story high, 2 doors, nailed roof, with a frame addition 10 or 12 feet wide running the length of the house--nailed roof & boarded with one room floored--a bar and counter. Said house was worth at the time destroyed not less than $500. I do not know what there was inside said house at the time when destroyed. From the circumstances of the war and information from others I believe said house was destroyed by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe. I have no interest in the claim.
John Rankin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William Thompson of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 10th day of August 1853 during hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, I know that the dwelling house of T. B. Sanderson situated on Applegate Creek in said county was destroyed by fire. Said house was of the following dimensions, to wit: a log house about 22 by 30 feet, one story high, nailed roof, 2 doors, a fireplace and chimney partly made--a bar counter and shelves with a board addition in the rear about 12 feet wide running the length of the house, worth about $350. There was a long table in the house at the time burnt and perhaps a small square table, both worth about $15. Don't think there was anything else left in the house. I have every reason to believe that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt said property, as they destroyed other houses and property in the neighborhood at the same and the premises had been abandoned by whites during the war. I have no interest in this claim.
Wm. Thompson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 53) $400.00
No. 53
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to T. B. Sanderson, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred dollars.
$400.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9th 1855

Claim of Frederick Rosenstock     (No. 54)    $450.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Frederick Rosenstock of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I had a claim situated on Rogue River in said county where I had a garden containing melons, cucumbers and a general variety of vegetables which were destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. I had destroyed by Indians as many as 350 melons, 20 gallons cucumbers, 10 gallons beans, 1 bushel tomatoes, 2000 beets weighing 2# each--¼ acre of corn, 100 head cabbage and an acre and a half potatoes.
    Said Indians also killed 23 of my chickens during the war. When I first went to my place near the close of said war I saw an Indian in the garden taking vegetables, and from the general appearance of the premises I have no doubt said Indians did said damages to my garden.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
F. Rosenstock
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Ty.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John B. White of said county being duly sworn says--I was at the land claim of Frederick Rosenstock on Rogue River in said county about four days before the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853. I saw that he had a garden containing a large number of melons, cucumbers, beans and other vegetables. I was there about the close of the war and found nearly all destroyed. I should think as many as 350 melons and more had been destroyed as much as 20 gallons of cucumbers pickled, 10 gallons of beans, 1 bushel tomatoes, 2000 beets weighing 2# each, one and a half acres potatoes--as many as 200 bushels--100 heads cabbage and one fourth acre of corn, as much as 100 bushels. I judge from the appearances that said destruction was the work of Indians. I have no interest in the claim.
J. B. White
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 54) $450.00
No. 54
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1854, have awarded to Frederick Rosenstock, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and fifty dollars.
$450.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Patrick Dunn & Fredk. Alberding     (No. 55)    $2500.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Madison B. Morris of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was at the residence of Patrick Dunn and Frederick Alberding, who were joint owners and occupants of a land claim and improvements situated near the head of Bear Creek in said county, and was there on or about the 22nd day of August 1853 when Indians of the Rogue River Tribe made an attack upon the premises, shot 6 men, of whom 4 died. I was wounded with an arrow myself. Said Indians killed several animals at the same time, among which was a mule killed and one crippled belonging to Dunn and Alberding worth $200 at least--it was a large American mare mule, one of the best in the county. Said Indians also set fire to and destroyed a stack of oats containing something over one thousand sheaves, a stack of straw--about a ton and a half. This was oats and barley straw, and good for feed--also a pile of threshed oats about 200 bushels, and of barley 300 bushels, destroyed by the fire.
    There were also a lot of rails burnt at this same time which had been laid up into fence about said grain, about 200 I should judge.
    The attack was made just after daybreak & so many of our party were killed and disabled by the shots of the Indians that we could not extinguish the fire, which was set to the stack just as the Indians were leaving the premises.
    I have no interest in the claim.
Madison B. Morris
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Frederick Heber of said county being duly sworn says--During the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 22nd day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe set fire to and destroyed a stack of oats containing not less than 1000 sheaves, also a stack of straw about 2 tons. They also burnt a pile of threshed oats between one and two hundred bushels, also a pile of barley as much again as oats--say between 300 and 400 bushels. There were a number of rails burnt also which were laid up as a fence 'round the grain, all situated on the land claim of Patrick Dunn and Frederick Alberding and belonging to them. I was at their place near the head of Bear Creek in said county when said Indians attacked the house and shot several men and animals. They killed a very large mule belonging to Dunn and Alberding worth $200 at least at that time, perhaps more. I have no interest in the claim.
Frederick Heber
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
( seal )                            Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 55) $2500.00
No. 55
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Patrick Dunn and Frederick Alberding, claimants for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of twenty-five hundred dollars.
$2500.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Asa G. Fordyce     (No. 56)    $200.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Asa G. Fordyce of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 21 day of August 1853 I saw several of the Rogue River Indians shooting into my band of cattle which was ranging on Bear Creek, a branch of the upper Rogue River. They killed 2 cows worth $200, and wounded one other ox which did not die.
    I never reclaimed any of said property destroyed nor have I received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Asa G. Fordyce
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    G. W. Barnett of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 21st day of August 1853 I know that Asa G. Fordyce had some 17 head of cattle at the head of Rogue River Valley in said Territory just arrived from the plains. The Rogue River Indians made an attack on the company and killed four men, wounded Mr. Fordyce and killed several cattle, among which I saw two of Mr. Fordyce's oxen lying dead after the attack, shot with arrows and bullets. Said oxen were large work oxen and worth in my judgment $200, the way cattle were selling at that time. The cattle were in good condition for emigrant cattle. I have no interest in this claim.
G. W. Barnett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 13th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Frederick Heber of said county being duly sworn says--
    During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 21 day of August 1853 I was of the party in which Asa Fordyce was when wounded by the Indians. The Indians of the Rogue River Tribe made an attack on our party in the morning, killed one man dead and mortally wounded three others--and two more slightly. They also shot several animals at this same time among which were two oxen belonging to Asa Fordyce--good work oxen in good condition for emigrant cattle, worth at that time $200. I have no interest in this claim.
Frederick Heber
Sworn and subscribed to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 56 $200.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Asa G. Fordyce, a claimant for property destroyed, the sum of two hundred dollars.
$200.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Obadiah D. Hoxie     (No. 57)    $50.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Obadiah D. Hoxie of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--on the night of the 18 or 19 day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered my garden situated on Bear Creek in said county and dug and carried away a large quantity of potatoes and dug and carried away as many as 500#--the next morning we observed the tracks of the Indians, and the manner in which they were dug showed that they were dug by Indians.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Obadiah D. Hoxie
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George W. Hoxie of said county being duly sworn says--During the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 18th of August 1853 the garden of Obadiah D. Hoxie was entered and a large quantity of potatoes destroyed--as many as 500#. Said potatoes were taken by Indians as I would judge from the manner in which they were dug and from the tracks of Indians all about the garden at the time. I have no interest in this claim.
George W. Hoxie
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Charles F. Jones of said county being duly sworn says--During the war of 1853 with the Rogue River Indians, on or about the 20 day of August 1853 I was at the land claim of Obadiah D. Hoxie on Deer Creek in said county and observed that a large quantity of potatoes had been taken from the garden by Indians. We judged at that time that 600 or 800 lbs. had been dug by Indians. The work of Indians differs from whites in digging potatoes. Indians pull up the tops all about and use sticks to get the potatoes out. I have no doubt that Indians took away the potatoes lost by Mr. Hoxie.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Charles F. Jones
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 57) $50.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Obadiah D.Hoxie the sum of fifty dollars.
$50.00

L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of James Loudon     (No. 58)    $200.

Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James L. Loudon of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 7th day of August 1853 I had a mule running on the ranch of Burrell B. Griffin in said county.
    That morning the Indians made an attack on the ranch and that several animals were taken away; my animal was among the missing, and I have never seen or heard of it since.
    I have no doubt that said Indians took it away. The mule was a good American mule worth $200 the way mules were selling at that time. I have not received payment for said animal from the United States nor from anyone.
J. L. Loudon
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 16th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Burrell B. Griffin of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 7th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe made an attack on my ranch in said county and killed and took away several animals, among which was a mule belonging to James L. Loudon which was killed by said Indians at that time, as we found the bones and shoes of a mule nearby after the war, which corresponded to the description of Mr. Loudon's animal. Said  mule was a large American animal worth at that time as much as $200 in my judgment. I have no interest in this claim.
Burrell B. Griffin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George Ross of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on the morning of the 7 day of August 1853, I know that the Rogue River Indians made an attack upon Griffin's ranch in said county and killed and drove away several animals. I sold James L. Loudon a mule a few days before this which was running on the ranch and was driven off by the Indians with the rest.
    The mule was a good American mule and was valued at $200 at that time. I have no interest in this claim.
George Ross
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 58) $200.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James L. Loudon, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred dollars.
$200.00
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Samuel Grubb     (No. 59)    $300.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Asa G. Fordyce being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 21 day of August 1853 I know that Samuel Grubb of said county had a large bay American mare hitched at the corral where our party was stopping at the time we were attacked by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians.
    The next morning after the attack the animal was missing and I have no doubt said Indians took her away as several animals were taken away and killed at the same time.
    The mare was worth $300. I have no interest in this claim.
Asa G. Fordyce
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 13 day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    G. W. Barnett of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on or about the 21 day of August 1853--I know that Samuel Grubb of said county lost a large bay American [mare] worth $300. Said animal was killed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I believe. They made an attack on our party at that time and killed several animals. I saw said mare lying dead near the place of attack a short time afterwards. I have no interest in this claim.
G. W. Barnett
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 19th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 59) $300.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Samuel Grubb, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred dollars.
$300.00
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of William Kahler     (No. 60)    $144.45
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William Kahler of said county being duly sworn says--
    During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on the 2nd day of August of said year I had certain articles of property at my house in said county, to wit--1 rifle gun--shot pouch--500 caps percussion--a quantity of lead and bullets valued at $75, 1 riding saddle, bridle, martingale and blanket worth $50, 1 copper kettle (4 gal.) worth $10, 1 drawing knife, 1¾ inch auger and 3# sugar, also three knives and a spoon, all of which were taken away by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on date last aforesaid as I believe, from the appearance of premises. I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Wm. Kahler
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Thomas Pyle of said county being duly sworn says--
    During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853 I know that William Kahler of said county had at his house certain articles of property, to wit: 1 rifle gun, shot pouch &c. worth I should judge $75. Also one riding saddle, bridle, blanket, martingale &c. worth at least $50. I know also that he had certain other articles there of value but I cannot specify what. His house was robbed by the Indians about the 3rd day of August 1853, and said articles were taken away by them as I believe. I have never known him to have any of them since. I have no interest in this claim.
Thomas Pyle
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George T. Vining of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War on or about the 2nd day of August 1853 I know that the dwelling house of William Kahler situated about 6 miles southeast of Jacksonville in said county was entered and robbed of its contents by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe as I suppose. I saw Indians in that vicinity at that time. I know that Mr. Kahler had in his house a rifle gun worth 25 or 30 dollars, one riding saddle, bride & martingale, a Spanish tree and macheers, I think--a large copper kettle--1 drawing knife, augers &c. I visited said house the next day after, and found nothing of said articles remaining there. I have no doubt the Indians stole said property. I have no interest in the claim.
George T. Vining
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 6 day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 60 $144.45
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William Kahler, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and forty dollars and forty-five cents.
$144.45
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Samuel Williams     (No. 61)    $474.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Williams of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War of 1853--on or about the 21st day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt my dwelling house on Rogue River below Evans Creek being in said county; said house was built of frame and boards 30 by 35 feet on the ground, nailed roof, 2 doors, 2 fireplaces and chimneys, 1 partition, a bar and shelves, valued at $350. There were in the house 2 frying pans, 1 tea pot (cast), 1 camp kettle--1 set small pewter spoons, 2 sets plates (earthen), 4 glass tumblers, 3 large decanters--1 coffee pot (tin), 6 pack saddles & rigging (2 new, 4 old), 1 buffalo rug, worth $8, 2 sets tea cups and saucers--1 set big spoons (iron), 1 hand saw, 1 drawing knife, 1 box cigars $5.00, 1 skillet & lid--1½ bushels onions, 2 sets knives and forks, 1 common pine table--$4--1 water bucket (wood), all which were destroyed in said house or taken away by Indians. I have never reclaimed any of said articles or received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Samuel Williams
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William S. King of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 28th day of August 1853 during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I know that said Indians burnt the dwelling house of Samuel Williams in said county, described as following to wit:
    A frame house 30 by 35 feet on the ground--nailed roof, floored, 2 doors, 2 fireplaces, bar and shelves, worth as much as $350. I know that he had in his house at the time the house was burnt and destroyed with it the following articles, to wit:
2 frying pans
1 teapot
1 camp kettle
1 set small spoons
2 set of plates
4 glass tumblers
3 large decanters
1 tin coffee pot
6 pack saddles & rigging (2 new & 4 old) new ones worth $6, old ones worth $3
1 buffalo rug worth 8 or $9
2 sets tea cups and 2 saucers
1 set big iron spoons
1 hand saw
1 drawing knife
1 box cigars worth $5
1 skillet & lid
1½ bushels onions
2 sets knives and forks
1 common pine table worth $4 or $5
1 wooden water bucket
    I have no interest in this claim.
William S. King
Subscribed and sworn before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Giles Kinney of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 Samuel Williams of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house situated on Rogue River about 4 miles below Evans Ferry described as follows: A frame house about 30 by 35 feet on the ground, floored, nailed roof, 2 doors, 1 partition, 2 fireplaces & chimneys, bar & shelves; worth about $350. Said house was burnt by Rogue River Indians on or about the 28th day of August 1853 with the contents. Mr. Williams had in his house a few days before it was burnt: cooking utensils, bar furniture, a table &c., household furniture, which I have no doubt was burnt in said house, as I saw the remains of many of said articles in the ruins of the house a short time after it was destroyed.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Giles Kinney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 23rd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 61) $474.00
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Samuel Williams, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred & seventy-four dollars.
$474.00
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Hiram Niday     (No. 62)    $898.50
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Hiram Niday of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 15th day of August 1853, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt my dwelling house situated on Rogue River at the mouth of Applegate Creek in said county described as follows: Hewed log house 18 by 20 feet on the ground 1½ story high, nailed roof, 2 doors with one addition of round logs hewed on the inside of 13 by 20 feet, valued at $400. Also had in said house and destroyed with it a quantity of clothes worth about $30. I cannot specify the articles--also 1 hand saw, 2 hoes, 1 auger 1½ inch--1 ox yoke worth $3.00.
    Said Indians destroyed a quantity of my vegetables--about 50 bushels of potatoes, as many as 10 bushels beans, 600 heads cabbage, and some squashes. I think Indians destroyed my garden, as I saw Indian tracks in the garden, and no white persons came that way during the war. I know no volunteers were on that road during the war. I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Hiram Niday
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Benjamin Tufts of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 15th day of August of said year I know that the dwelling house of Hiram Niday of said county was destroyed by fire, being burnt by the Rogue River Indians as I believe. Said Indians told me after the war that they burnt said house. The house was about 18 by 20 feet, built of hewed logs with an addition of about 13 by 20 feet. I would judge the house to have been worth about $400. I know that Mr. Niday had a garden of about 6 acres fenced in. I do not know whether it was destroyed during the war, as I have not been close to the garden since the war. I cannot state what was destroyed in the house.
    I have no interest in this claim.
Benjamin Tufts
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James P. Frizzell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I know that the dwelling house of Hiram Niday of said county was destroyed by fire on or about the 20th day of August. I know that he had a garden containing a quantity of potatoes, cabbages and other vegetables but don't know how many.
    A short time after the war I was past there and saw that the potatoes were all gone. Don't know who destroyed them. I think his house was worth $450 or $500 at the least. I have no interest in this claim.
James P. Frizzell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 62 $898.50
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Hiram Niday, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eight hundred and ninety-eight dollars & fifty cents.
$898.50
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of John Anderson     (No. 63)    $1093.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Anderson of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War, on or about the 11th day of August 1853, the Rogue River Indians burnt my dwelling house situated near Willow Springs in said county described as follows: 18 by 24 feet on the ground--a fireplace and chimney--one door, a porch 10 by 24 feet--a partition--with a chicken house attached to one end. In the house were one table & two bedsteads. All worth $350.
    I also had at the house about 75 chickens, one stack of hay--6 tons, 20 doz. oats, ten bushels barley with corral built of 100 fence rails--also one tent worth $10, an old riding saddle worth about $20. All which were destroyed by fire at the burning of the house. I also had a cow running in the prairie near the house, which I found dead soon afterward, shot by the same Indians, I have no doubt. I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Anderson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Samuel Hall of said county being duly sworn says--John Anderson owned and occupied a house near Willow Springs in said county on or about the 11th day of August 1853, described as follows--a log house about 18 by 24 feet, one partition, one fireplace and chimney, one porch about 10 by 24 in front--had in the house one table and two bedsteads.
    House and fixtures I should think worth at that time $350. He had a stack of hay, about 6 tons, a stack of oats as much as 20 doz., a pile of oats & barley, as much as 10 bushels. I know he had a lot chickens. I was there and helped Mr. Anderson thresh his grain. I was there on the morning after the house was burnt and know that all of said property mentioned was destroyed by fire. I saw the Indian tracks all about and have no doubt the Rogue River Tribe of Indians burnt the house and property.
Samuel Hall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 15th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 63) $1093.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Anderson, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of one thousand ninety-three dollars.
$1093.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Elias Harrington     (No. 64)    $80.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Elias Harrington of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 7th day of August, Indians of the Rogue River Tribe took and drove away an Indian horse belonging to me, then running on Applegate Creek in said county. I was mining there at the time and said horse was turned out to graze near the camp when said Indians attacked the band of horses and drove them into the mountains and I suppose killed several of them, as several carcasses of horses were found there afterwards. I have never recovered said animal nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone. Said animal was worth at the time when lost about $80.
Elias Harrington
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David Linn of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on or about the 7th August 1853 Elias Harrington had an Indian horse on Applegate Creek in said county which I would value at about $80, which is said to have been run off by the Indians during the Rogue River War.
    I have never seen or heard of said horse since and have no doubt from my knowledge of the circumstances of said war that said Indians drove away and killed said animal.
    I have no interest in this claim.
David Linn
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 5th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 64 $80.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Elias Harrington, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty dollars.
$80.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Sherlock Abrams     (No. 65)    $213.25
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Sherlock M. Abrams of said county being duly sworn says--I had in the house of James Abraham in said county which was burnt by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on or about the 7th day of September 1853 the following articles of property: 100# flour, 25# dried apples, 15# sugar, 10# coffee, 50# bacon--12 knives & forks--2 sets spoons--12 plates--12 tumblers--1 broadcloth coat (new) $20, one double barreled shotgun $30, 2 pack saddles and ropes worth $5 apiece, one tin reflector worth $5.00--two frying pans, one large dictionary $8, one Bible, small, gilt edged--one gold ring worth $5, all of which were destroyed by fire. I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Sherlock M. Abrams
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Abraham of said county being duly sworn says Sherlock Abrams had at my house which was burnt by the Rogue River Indians on or about the 7th day of September 1853, the following articles of property, to wit: 100# flour, 25# dried apples, 10# coffee, 50# bacon, 12 knives & forks--2 sets spoons, one large and one small size, good, britannia metal; 12 tin plates, 12 glass tumblers, one new broadcloth coat worth $20 at least, 2 pack saddles with rope worth $5 each and more, one tin reflector worth $5, 2 frying pans, one large Webster's dictionary, one gold edged Bible, small, with several other books--histories &c. which I do not recollect of--one gold ring which his brother gave him when he left the States worth five dollars--all of which articles were burnt with the house. I have no interest in this claim.
James Abraham
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 65 $213.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Sherlock Abrams, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and thirteen dollars and twenty-five cents.
$213.25
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of the estate of Thos. Frizzell dec.     (No. 66)    $476.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    The United States of America to all persons to whom these presents shall come, greeting.
    Know ye that whereas Thomas Frizzel, late of the county of Jackson, died intestate as it is said, having at the time of his death property in this Territory which may be lost, destroyed or diminished in value of speedy care be not taken of the same. To the end thereof that said property may be collected, preserved and disposed of according to law, I do hereby appoint James P. Frizzell administrator of all and singular the goods and chattels, rights and credits which were of the said Thomas Frizzell at the time of his death with full power and authority to secure and dispose of said property according to law and collect all moneys due said deceased and in general to do and perform all other acts and things which are or hereafter may be required of him by law. In testimony whereof Thomas McF. Patton, Judge of the Probate Court in and for the county of Jackson aforesaid have hereunto signed my name and affixed the seal of said county at office this 18 day of October A.D. 1853.
T. McF. Patton
    Judge of Probate
    I certify that the above is a true copy of the original letter of administration granted to James P. Frizzell on the estate of Thomas Frizzell dec. by the Probate Court.
A. P. Stearns
    Probate Judge
This the 7th of February 1855.
    I hereby certify that James P. Frizzell is the duly authorized administrator of the estate of Thomas Frizzell dec. that said estate is not fully administered and that said James P. Frizzell is held by proper security until such time as he shall be discharged by the Probate Court. This the 7th of February 1855.

A. P. Stearns
    Probate Judge
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James P. Frizzell of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 28th day of August of said year Indians of the Rogue River Tribe killed my brother Thomas Frizzell of said county on Rogue River below the mouth of Applegate Creek. At the time of his death he had about his person a large amount of gold, to wit: an amount over $300, to my knowledge, and some more, but I do not know exactly how much. At the time the Indians shot him I understood that they stripped his body of everything valuable, clothes and all. I believe he had a Colt's revolver worth $50 at the time he was shot which the Indians took. Thomas Frizzell had his ferry rope cut away by Indians a short time before they killed him about the 12 day of August 1853. Said rope was damaged $50.
    I have been duly appointed administrator of the estate of Thomas Frizzell deceased and am now acting as such.
    Said estate has never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
James P. Frizzell
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Hiram Niday of said county being duly sworn says--A few days before Thomas Frizzell was killed by the Rogue River Indians during the war of 1853 I let him have $60 in gold dust. On the morning of the 28th August 1853, the day Frizzell was killed I saw him have in his possession a quantity of gold coins, could not say how much. When I let him have the $60 he said he was fixing to go to Scottsburg for a pack train load of goods and said he had about money enough to load his animals.
    I have no interest in the claim.
Hiram Niday
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Benjamin Tufts of said county being duly sworn says on or about the 28th day of August 1853 during the hostilities of the Rogue River War I was at Benjamin Halstead's in Rogue River, about 10 o'clock of that day.
    Thomas Frizzell started from Halstead's in company with a halfbreed Indian by the name of Menego [?] and a California Indian. They went down Rogue River in search of horses.
    Frizzell's mule coming back to Halstead's about 3 o'clock p.m. without its rider, I soon afterward learned that Frizzell had been shot by Indians and stripped of everything valuable about his person. When he started that morning he had a Colt's revolver worth $50 at that time. Frizzell usually carried with him all the gold dust and coin which he had. He told me the day before he was murdered that he had $226 worth of gold dust, and a short time before he told me he had a hundred and fifty dollars in coin & I do not know of him having any opportunity nor necessity of spending or exchanging any of said money. I believe from the circumstances that the Indians took all of said property from his person at the time they shot him.
    I have heard Indians say that they took the revolver and money. I know also that Indians cut away a ferry rope belonging to said Thomas Frizzell--damage $50.
Benja. Tufts
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853--on or about the 28th day of August 1853 I was in company with Thomas Frizzell, late of said county, on Rogue River below the mouth of Applegate Creek. Said Frizzell left our party about noon and went on down the river to hunt some horses; a friendly California Indian went with him. In about an hour the Indian returned and reported that Frizzell had been killed by the Indians. I went down and found him lying dead shot through the body in several places, also through the head; his body was stripped of everything except his shirt and boots. When he left us at noon he had with him 1 Colt's revolver--Navy six--worth $50 at that time. He told me a few days before that he had some $300 in gold, but whether he had the money with him at the time he was killed I don't know. I have no interest in this claim.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 25th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 66) $476.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Thomas Frizzell dec., a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-six dollars.
$476.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Peter Miller & estate of Wm. R. Rose dec.     No. 67    $850.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Nelson Knight of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 25 day of August 1853, the dwelling house owned and occupied by Peter Miller and the late Wm. R. Rose situated on Stony Creek in said county was entered by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe and robbed of various articles of household furniture and goods, provisions &c., to wit:
13 hundred lbs. flour
300# cheese
100# lard
100# mackerel
1 3 plied brass kettle
1 1     "    copper kettle
12 milk pans
25 bushels potatoes in the ground
12 bottles of Stoughton's bitters @ 1.00
1         "           pepper sauce
3 bar decanters
1 keg of brandy 10 gallons
1 keg of whiskey 10 gallons
15 lbs. saleratus
200# sugar
100# coffee
50# beans
1 drawing knife
1 Collins chopping axe
5 pack saddles & lash rope used about 3 months
1 riding saddle, Spanish, cost $45
4 blankets @$4
2 pair pants new @$6
3 coats, 2 new, 1 worn $25
1 pair boots, calf skin $8
4 doz. pr. socks, wool @$1
2 bottles of medicine, quinine
6     "            lemon syrup
150# salt
8 hams @$15 each
100# bacon
1 bolt calico
1 table spread
2 frying pans
12 cups & saucers
2 large pitchers
12 plates
12 knives and forks
12 glass tumblers
16# tea
6 cans powder @$1 each
13 boxes percussion caps
7# lead
2 camp kettles
1 large tin churn
    I was the last person who left said house when it was abandoned during the war, and distinctly recollect all the articles hereinbefore mentioned were left there at that time. I had been at work in and about the house for Miller & Rose before the war and know what they had in their house.
    I left said house about 10 o'clock in the morning of the 25th of August, and returned to look after the premises about 4 o'clock in the afternoon of the next day, and found the house broken open, the provisions all taken away, and other articles destroyed or carried off--and the floor of the house torn up--where knives and forks and a few other articles had been secreted when we left. I saw fresh Indian tracks all about the house, and have no doubt from appearances that said robbery was committed by Indians. I have seen since the war several articles of said clothing in possession of said Indians, and they have acknowledged that they broke open said house and spoiled the goods. Rose and Miller had their oxen driven away from said ranch during the war which were never found--the oxen were good beef, and would weigh from 900 to 1000# each (2 of these). The other would weigh from 800 to 900#. Indians have confessed that they drove off and killed said oxen during the war. I have no interest in this claim.
Nelson Knight
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
United States Dr. to
Peter Miller Jr.
Aug. 1853 3 head of beef cattle 300.00
400# of flour @200 cts. per # 80.00
300# cheese       75   "        " 225.00
11 gals. of liquor     $4 gal. 40.00
12 tumblers 9.00
2 decanters 10.00
12 milk pans 18.00
4 hams of bacon 16# each, 64# @60 cts. 38.40
30# of other bacon 18.00
10# tea @$2 per # 20.00
3 coverlets $10 apiece 30.00
3 pr. blankets 30.00
12 knives & forks 8.00
1 can of lead, 12½#
12 plates 8.00
12 cups & saucers, 6 each 8.00
30# sugar 30 cts. per # 9.00
1 acre potatoes, 20 bushels @$3 per bushel   75.00
934.40
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Peter Miller being duly sworn says at the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was possessed of the foregoing articles of property at the claim in said county called Rose's place.
    That during the month of August 1853 said property was taken away or destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians as I believe, as I know that Indians of said tribe [were] hostile at that time and were in that neighborhood. I saw fresh Indian tracks there on the day when I discovered the loss. I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States or from anyone.
Peter Miller
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Peter Miller of Douglas County in said Territory being duly sworn says--On the 11 day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 William R. Rose was murdered by the Rogue River Indians. His body was stripped as I learned and all the personal property which he had about his person was taken away. He had with him when he left home between $600 and $700 which he had taken for purchasing mules. At the time of the treaty said Indians gave up to the administrator of the estate of said Rose the sum of $120 only, saying that said sum was all that was found on the body of said Rose.
Peter Miller Jr.
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Clinton Barney of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War the dwelling house of Peter Miller and Dr. Rose was entered by some persons & property taken away and destroyed, such as flour, lard, patty pans and so forth--don't know how much--I think Indians took the goods. Miller and Rose missed three oxen during the war. I knew the oxen--had used them once a half day and saw them frequently before the war. After the war I think I saw two of said cattle in the Umpqua Valley; they were represented as stray cattle at the time, and when I returned I told Miller that I had seen his lost oxen in the Umpqua Valley. I don't know whether he ever went after them or not.
Clinton Barney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 24th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Douglas County            )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before me an acting justice of the peace in and for Douglas County, Canyon precinct, Fanny Rose who being duly sworn says that she was living with William R. Rose on or about the time that he was shot by the Indians which took place the 11th day of August A.D. 1853, that they were at Dr. Ambrose's house on said day and that when he left he took with him between five and eight hundred dollars.
Fanny Rose
Sworn to and subscribed before me a justice of the peace of Douglas County, Oregon Territory this 25 of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
Samuel B. Briggs
Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Benjamin Halstead of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Peter Miller Jr. had certain property at the place called Rose's in said county to wit: beef cattle, don't know how many, flour & cheese, don't know the amount--various kinds of liquors for furnishing a bar both in kegs and decanters, don't know how much--tumblers--I don't think I saw a dozen--some bacon--I don't know how much. The above named articles I saw at Rose's in the house after Mr. Miller left the house in time of the war. I also saw a garden of potatoes--did not examine it. I was at the place some seven or eight days after this during the war and found the house open.
    The foregoing articles were all destroyed or taken away. From my knowledge of the circumstances of the war I would think it more likely that Indians took said goods than that whites did.
Benjamin Halstead
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 11th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 67 $850.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Peter Miller and the estate of William R. Rose the sum of eight hundred and fifty dollars.
$850.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Robt. B. Metcalfe     (No. 68)    $86.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert B. Metcalfe of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I had at my house situated on the north side of Rogue River on what is now called the Indian Reserve the following articles of property, to wit: 100# flour, 40# sugar, 2 axes, 1 Indian rubber overcoat $12, 1 buffalo robe, worth $8. Said goods were taken from said house on or about the 1st day of September 1853--by Indians of the Rogue River Tribe as I believe.
    I saw one of said Indians about that time running away from the premises with what I thought a sack of flour on his shoulder, and I found two squaws of said tribe hid nearby with some nails, saleratus and other articles stolen from the house, which I took from them. They said that Indians had taken away the other articles which I had lost. I have never reclaimed any of said articles nor received payment for the same from the United States nor from anyone.
R. B. Metcalfe
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 68 $86.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Robert B. Metcalfe, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of eighty-six dollars.
$86.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of Charles Williams     (No. 69)    $67.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Charles Williams of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the tenth day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed my dwelling house situated on the north side of Bear Creek in said county, taking away or destroying the following articles of property, to wit:
50# flour
2 pr. blankets
1 camp kettle
2 frying pans
4 tin plates
4 knives & forks
1 butcher's knife
1 calico shirt
1 gold pan
1 set tea spoons
1 History of Texas (400 pages)
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Charles Williams
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Henry J. Klippel of said county being duly sworn says--During the actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe entered and robbed the dwelling house of Charles Williams situated on the north side of Rogue River in said county, carrying off & destroying various articles of property. I have read the statement of the said Charles Williams in this claim and believe the same to be true. I lived in the house with Mr. Williams previously to its being robbed and know that he had the articles mentioned. I have no interest in this claim.
Henry J. Klippel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 69 $67.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Charles Williams, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of sixty-seven dollars.
$67.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9, 1855

Claim of John Swinden     (No. 70)    $475.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Swinden of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 11th day of August 1853 Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt my dwelling house situated near Rogue River in said county described as follows: a frame house 16 by 24 feet, with  porch 12 by 24. Said house was boarded and nearly all floored and lined with calico, one fireplace and chimney, one door, valued at $400. There were in said house and destroyed with it the following articles of property: one new plank table worth $10, wash tub $4, one Collins chopping axe, one shovel (steel mining shovel), one cast iron bake oven $10, one bed quilt $6, one slate $2, ½ doz. razors @ 1.50, 12 chickens, a set of bits $4, one coffee mill $2, one Windsor chair worth $4. I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Swinden
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 29th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Geo. H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--I know that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe burnt the house of John Swinden of said county on or about the 11th day of August 1853 during actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War. Said house was a framed house and boarded, about 16 by 24 feet on the ground worth 400 dollars or 450.
    I was present when said house was burning.
    I know that there was burnt in said house several articles of household goods & furniture, but don't know what or of what value. I have read the statement of said John Swinden and believe the same to be true. I lived and still live a neighbor to Mr. Swinden. I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 70) $475.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to John Swinden, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of four hundred and seventy-five dollars.
$475.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9 1855

Claim of James R. Davis     (No. 71)    $35.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James R. Davis of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River War on the 3rd day of August 1853 in a skirmish with the Rogue River Indians I was thrown from my mule and dropped my rifle in my fall. The Indians came upon us and I had no time to recover the gun without falling into the hands of said Indians. I was seriously wounded by an arrow, so that I did not return to the spot for several weeks afterwards. When I returned there I could find nothing of the rifle gun. The Indians I learn and verily believe have since been seen in possession of the gun. It was worth $35; I paid that sum for it. I have never reclaimed said rifle gun, nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Jas. R. Davis
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 71 $85.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to James R. Davis, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of thirty-five dollars.
$35.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 9 1855

Claim of Isaac Woolen     (No. 72)    $750.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Isaac Woolen of said county being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, I was the member of a partnership in which Isaac Woolen & Thomas W. White were owners of a lot of cattle running at that time in the Upper Rogue River. On or about the 9th day of August 1853 the following cattle of our band were missing from their usual range, to wit: 1 yoke work steers, large--6 years old--worth $300, also one cow worth $150. I was living at that time some 20 miles from said range, but have reason to believe from the circumstances of said war and from information derived from the neighbors that said cattle were taken by the Rogue River Indians. I have never reclaimed any of said cattle nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone nor has my partner.
Isaac Woolen
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Isaac Woolen of said county being duly sworn says--The animals I lost during the Rogue River Indian War were good beef at the time lost.
    The two steers would weigh 1000# each--the cow would weigh 600#.
Isaac Woolen
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Ty.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John Benjamin of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, on or about the 9th day of August of said year I know that Isaac Woolen and Thomas W. White, joint owners of a lot of cattle running on the Rogue River, lost from their band one yoke work steers 6 years old, and of large size, worth $300. Also one cow worth $150, a very fine cow. I was assisting to herd the cattle at the time--the Indians attacked the band and shot some with arrows and drove away several which were not recovered to my knowledge.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Benjamin
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 72) $750.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to Isaac Woolen, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of seven hundred and fifty dollars.
$750.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855

Claim of William M. Hughes     (No. 73)    $275.
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William M. Hughes of said county being duly sworn says--During actual hostilities of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 on or about the 7th day of August 1853 I left two large work steers on my claim near the junction of Bear Creek and Rogue River. I looked after said steers frequently during the war but never found them. Chief "Jim" told me that Indians of the Rogue River Tribe had taken and killed said animals. I have no doubt the Indians took them, as my claim was near the headquarters of Jim's band of Indians. Said steers were fat, fine cattle and would weigh at that time at least 1000# each.
    I have never recovered said cattle nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
    I also lost [blank] mill--3 files, 1 hand saw, 1 tent canvas--worth $8, which was taken by the Indians at the same time. I had a grindstone broken which Indian Tom of the Rogue River Tribe said he broke. This grindstone cost $30. It was split but not wholly destroyed
W. M. Hughes
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 17th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Daniel F. Fisher of said county being duly sworn says--I know at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 that William M. Hughes of said county had cattle on his claim on Bear Creek near Rogue River, that two steers from his band were lost during said war and were never found. I know that the Indians of the Rogue River Tribe were frequently in that neighborhood during the war--taking and destroying property. After the close of the war, Tyee "Jim," a chief of the Rogue Rivers, told me that the Indians drove away and killed said steers. Said steers were in good condition, work steers about 7 years old, and would weigh 900 lbs. each I should judge. I have no interest in the claim.
Daniel F. Fisher
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 73) $275.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians or their allies, during the war with said tribe in 1853, have awarded to William M. Hughes, a claimant for property destroyed as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and seventy-five dollars.
$275.
L. F. Grover
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
Febry. 8, 1855
Dardanelles O.T.
    Febry. 19, '55
Friend Grover,
    In looking amongst the rubbish in our room Casey found the claim of W. M. Hughes, of the justness of which I have no doubt. I send it in hope it may not be too late.
Yours in haste,
    George H. Ambrose
    The foregoing will explain why Award No. 73 was not signed by Mr. Gibbs.
    L. F. Grover



Claims of Citizens
        for Permanent Improvements
                on Table Rock Indian Reserve

Reservation
[Claim] of Davis Evans    (No. 1).

    United States of American in acct. with Davis Evans--
For 2500 fence rails laid up on the Reserve of the           $250.00
Rogue River Indians as per treaty made
10th day of September 1853 $10 [per hundred]
2500 fence rails made and not laid up on the Reserve
of the Rogue River Indians as per treaty made 10 day
of September 1853 worth $7 per thousand [sic]   175.00
Making $425.00
    Davis Evans being duly sworn says that on the 10th day of September 1853 he had five thousand fence rails on the Indian Reservation made for the Rogue River Indians by [the] treaty made [the] 10th day of September 1853--that about 2500 of said fence rails were laid up in a fence on said reserve and about 2500 were made and lying on said reserve without being laid up--that the rails that were laid up he believes to be worth ten dollars per hundred and the rails that were not laid up to be worth seven dollars per hundred and that the United States are due and owing him that amount for said rails taken from him by the said treaty--that he has not received pay for said rails from the United States or from any person and that he has not reclaimed said rails nor any portion thereof.
Davis Evans
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    W. G. T'Vault of said county being duly sworn says--I know that Davis Evans of said county had a land claim in the spring and summer of 1853 on land a part of which was assigned as a reservation to Indians by the treaty with the Rogue River Tribe of 10th September 1853. I know that he made certain permanent improvements on the part of said claim assigned, such as making, hauling and laying up into fence a large number of rails; but cannot state what the value of said improvements was at the time for making the treaty. I have no interest in this claim.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    David Courtney of said county being duly sworn says--In the spring and summer of 1853 I worked for Davis Evans in making, hauling and laying up rails on lands since assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of 10th September 1853. I made about five thousand rails there. I hauled and laid up into fence about 2500 of the same. The rails made and not laid up were worth $10 per hundred--those hauled and laid up were worth $20 per hundred. I have been on the ground since the treaty and have seen the improvements there with the exception of what have been destroyed by fire. I have no interest in this claim.
David Courtney
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Reservation Award No. 1 $350.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th 1853 have awarded to Davis Evans a claimant for improvements as aforesaid the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars.
$350.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10, 1855
[penciled: This claim is $250 too high--there was never over one thousand rails cut and they were mostly round jobs. It consisted in one string of job fence.
]

Reservation Claim of Matthew G. Kennedy     (No. 2)    $250.
United States
        to M. G. Kennedy          Dr.
To one house on the Indian Reserve described as follows: On the Reserve in Rogue River Valley 18 by 20 feet--hewed logs one and [a] half stories high--roof nailed on--cost of building house $250.00
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Matthew G. Kennedy of said county being duly sworn says--At the time of the making of the treaty with the Rogue River Tribe of Indians of said Territory called the Treaty of the 10th of September 1853 I was the owner and occupant of a dwelling house described as follows, to wit: Size 18 by 20 feet on the ground--one story & a half high with a nailed roof--a fireplace and chimney partly built, with sleepers on the ground to lay the floor. I value said house at the date aforesaid at $250. It was situated on the north side of Rogue River--on lands [set aside] as a reserve to said tribe of Indians by the terms of said treaty. I have never reclaimed any of said improvements nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Matthew G. Kennedy
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 8 day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Geo. H. Ambrose of said county being duly sworn says--I was acquainted with the permanent improvements made by Matthew G. Kennedy on lands assigned as a reserve to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of 10 September 1853.
    These improvements consisted of a hewed log house about 18 by 20 feet--story and a half high, a fireplace &c. I would estimate the value of the same at the time of making the treaty at $250. I have no interest in this claim.
Geo. H. Ambrose
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 8th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Reservation Claim Award No. 2 $250.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated September 10th 1853 have awarded to Matthew G. Kennedy, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of two hundred and fifty dollars.
$250.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 6 1855

Reservation Claim of John J. Cooke     No. 3
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John J. Cooke of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September A.D. 1853 I owned and occupied a dwelling house situated on land reserved as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of 10th September 1853 described as follows:
    A log house 12 by 14 feet on the ground, one fireplace and chimney, one door, which I value at $50. I also had about 2000 rails laid up into fence worth $240, and five hundred hauled on the ground to lay up worth $50, and about 3500 in the timber where made, worth $125, a well worth $5. Some five acres of land broke and crop of turnips, cabbages & other vegetables sowed, all together worth $100. I also had cut cedar timber enough to make 3000 rails 2.50 per hundred--all of which I was dispossessed of by said reservation. I have never reclaimed the same nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John Jos. Cooke
Sworn and subscribed to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of Jany. A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Collin McCord of said county being duly sworn says--I know that on the 10th Sept. 1853 John J. Cooke of said county owned and occupied a dwelling house and had other permanent improvements made on land assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Indians by the Treaty of the 10 September 1853. His house was a log house 12 by 14 feet, one fireplace and chimney worth $50 at least--had a fence about a half mile long--as much as 2000 rails worth $240, a lot hauled ready to lay up, about 500, worth $50, and a large number made in the timber as many as 3500, worth $5 per hundred--he also had as much as five acres of land broke and sowed in vegetables--cost as much as $100 at that time. He also had a corral built near the house. Cost as much as $75 I should judge. Mr. Cooke also had a stack of logs there about one ton worth $40, all which as I understand passed out of his possession to the Indians by said reservation.
    I have no interest in the claim.
C. McCord
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Reservation Claim Award No. 3 $590.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th, 1853 have awarded to John J. Cooke, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of five hundred and ninety dollars.
$590.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10, 1855

Reservation Claim of William Hutchins     No. 4
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    William Hutchins of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September 1853 I owned and occupied a land claim on land now designated as a reservation to Indians by the treaty with the Rogue River Tribe made on the 10th day of September A.D. 1853 embracing the following permanent improvements: 3000 rails made, some 2000 of which were hauled only and laid up into fence worth $12 per hundred; the balance lying in the timber where they were made, worth $5.00 per hundred. There was also timber cut for 2000 rails not split worth $2.50 per hundred. Also 2 tons of good hay in a stack, all which passed into the possession of said Indians by said reservation.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone. I also had a set of house logs cut and ready to build worth $40.
William Hutchins
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John J. Cooke of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September 1853 I know that William Hutchins of said county had a land claim on the land now assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of the 10th day of September 1853 with said tribe, on which he had made the following permanent improvements, to wit:
    He had cut a set of house logs sufficient to build a dwelling house of ordinary size ready to put up--worth at least $40. Also about 2000 rails laid up into fence worth $12 per hundred and one thousand in the timber where made worth $5 per hundred. Also timber cut for 2000 more rails but not split worth $2.50 per hundred. He had a stack of hay on his claim as much as 2 tons--all of which passed to said Indians by virtue of said reservation.
    I have no interest in the claim.
John Jos. Cooke
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 22nd day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 4 $311.25
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th, 1853 have awarded to William Hutchins, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and eleven dollars and twenty-five cents.
$311.25
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10 1855

Reservation Claim of Chesley Gray     No. 5
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert B. Metcalfe of said county being duly sworn says--I know that at the time of making the treaty with the Rogue River Tribe of Indians on the 10th day of September 1853 Chesley Gray owned and occupied a house on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by said treaty--described as follows:
    A double hewed log house each room 18 by 12 feet on the ground--2 doors--one chimney and two fireplaces--a porch in front; worth about $350 at that time; he also had a well dug by the house about 18 feet deep, cost $36. Mr. Gray did not remove any of his permanent improvements after the treaty. I have no interest in this claim.
R. B. Metcalfe
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
[penciled: This building was burned during the war and should be closed under the 15 thousand dollars appropriated and not taken from that allowed the Indians.
]
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    John J. Cooke of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Chesley Gray and Christopher Thompson owned and occupied a certain dwelling house situated on land that has by the Treaty of 10th September 1853 been assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. Said house was of the dimensions following--a log house one story high about 16 by 32 feet on the ground--a nailed roof--2 fireplaces and chimneys--2 doors--one partition; worth at that time $200. There was also a well dug near the house about 14 feet deep, cost $30.
    There were also logs cut to build another house, nearly all hewed, worth as they were left as much as $30, all which passed out of the possession of said Chesley Gray and Christopher Thompson by said reservation and have been burnt by said Indians.
    I have no interest in this claim.
John Jos. Cooke
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 20th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 5 $386.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th, 1853 have awarded to Chesley Gray, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and eighty-six dollars.
$386.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10, 1855

Reservation Claim of Robert B. Metcalfe     No. 6
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Robert B. Metcalfe of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September 1853 I owned and occupied a certain house built by me on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians in said county by the treaty with said tribe made the 10th day of September 1853 described as follows:
    A hewed log house 18 by 20 feet on the ground one story and a half high, with a porch in front, nailed roof, one door--worth $350, which said permanent improvements have never been reclaimed by me nor have I received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
R. B. Metcalfe
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 12th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 6 $350.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th, 1853 have awarded to Robert B. Metcalfe, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred and fifty dollars.
$350.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855

Reservation Claim of Jacob Gall     No. 7
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Jacob Gall of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September 1853, I owned the following permanent improvements made on land assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the treaty with said tribe made on the 10th day of Sept. 1853 to wit: a parcel of hay cut and put in cock containing about two tongs.
    I have never reclaimed said hay nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
Jacob Gall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 6th day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Walter S. Gall of said county being duly sworn says--At the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I know that Jacob Gall had cut a parcel of hay near his land claim in said county on land now assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Indians by the treaty with said tribe dated September 10th 1853. There were about 2 tons of hay cut and put in shocks--ready to be stacked. Mr. Gall never reclaimed said hay nor received payment therefor to my knowledge.
Walter S. Gall
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 7th day of February A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 7) $120.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe in 1853 have awarded to Jacob Gall, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred and twenty dollars.
$120.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855
[penciled: and unjust allowance a fraud upon the Indians there was no hay on the ground at the time of the treaty
]

Reservation Claim of Geo H. C. Taylor     No. 8
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. C. Taylor of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of Sept. 1853 I was the owner of certain permanent improvements situated on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of 10th September 1853 described as follows: Timbers for building a log house 18 by 24 feet, cut and hauled ready for raising--the bottom timbers laid--also boards partly made for completing the house--say 400--and lumber sawed for making the balance. I estimate the value of the timber & labor expended there at $75. I have never reclaimed said timber nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
G. H. C. Taylor
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award (No. 8) $75.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th, 1853 have awarded to Geo. H. C. Taylor, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of seventy-five dollars.
$75.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10, 1855

Reservation Claim of John M. Silcott    No. 9
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )  s.s.

    John M. Silcott of said county being duly sworn says--At the time of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 I was the owner and occupant of certain permanent improvements made by me on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the Treaty of the 10th day of September 1853--described as follows, to wit:
    One hewed log house 14 by 16 feet on the ground covered with a nailed roof--as to the balance remaining unfinished. I valued said improvements at $100. I have never reclaimed any of the same nor received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
John M. Silcott
Sworn and subscribed before me a notary public in & for said county of Siskiyou Cala. the 13th day of January A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and notarial seal
H. G. Ferris
(  seal  )                          Notary Public
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    George H. C. Taylor of said county being duly sworn says--That at the commencement of the Rogue River Indian War of 1853 John M. Silcott was the owner and occupant of a certain house situated on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the Treaty of the 10th day of September 1853 of the dimensions following to wit: 14 by 16 feet on the ground--built of hewn logs--covered with a nailed roof--as to the balance unfinished. Worth in my judgment at least $100.
    I have no interest in this claim.
G. H. C. Taylor
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 9th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
Award No. 9 $100.

This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th 1853 have awarded to John M. Silcott, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of one hundred dollars.
$100.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10, 1855
[penciled: this building was burned during the war and should be closed under the fifteen thousand dollars appropriated instead of the five thousand
]

Reservation Claim of James Leslie     No. 10
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    James Leslie of said county being duly sworn says--On the 10th day of September 1853 I owned and occupied a land claim on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by the treaty with said tribe of the 10th of September 1853 wherein were made the following permanent improvements:
    A log cabin of round logs--about 12 by 13, one story high. Also house logs cut in the timber and partly hauled to build a house 16 by 20 feet--also timber cut enough to make 4 or 5 thousand rails--all valued at $300.
    I have never reclaimed any of said property or received payment therefor from the United States nor from anyone.
James Leslie
Sworn to and subscribed before me at Jacksonville this 7th day of February 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover
(  seal  )                          Notary Public for Oregon Territory
[
penciled: The full value of labor done by this claimant would not exceed $45 nothing was done but a pole cabin and about 10 logs cut for another cabin 20 feet long no rail timber was cut      refer to Metcalfe]
Award No. 10 $300.
This may certify that the Board of Commissioners appointed to assess the value of permanent improvements made by the whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River Tribe of Indians by treaty with said tribe dated Sept. 10th 1853 have awarded to James Leslie, a claimant for improvements as aforesaid, the sum of three hundred dollars.
$300.
L. F. Grover
A. C. Gibbs
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Commissioners
Jacksonville O.T.
February 10th 1855



Report of L. F. Grover Esq.
Disbursing Officer of Board of Commissioners
to examine and audit Rogue River Spoliation Claims &c. &c.
To Joel Palmer Esq.
    Superintendent of Indian Affairs
        In Oregon Territory
        Sir,
                The undersigned, one of the Commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims of citizens for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians during the war with said tribe in 1853; also to assess the value of permanent improvements made by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to said Indians by the Treaty of the 10th day of September 1853, having been by your instructions assigned the duty of disbursing officer for the payment of all necessary expenses of said Board of Commissioners, herewith most respectfully submits the following report.
    It was made the duty of said Commissioners by the instructions issued from your office at Dayton dated December 20th 1854 to  convene at Jacksonville, Oregon, on the first day of January 1855 and proceed forthwith to the discharge of their official duties. The residence of the undersigned, one of the Commissioners, was at Salem in said Territory, a place distant from the place designated for holding the session of said Board about three hundred miles. The season being one of great inclemency during the year, and the road never having been made good, being very muddy and in many places flooded by continuous heavy rains, it was deemed expedient to undertake the trip as early as the 18th Decr. 1854. The undersigned consequently hired a horse for the stipulated price of two dollars per day during absence, which was the lowest cash hire to be negotiated in the town of Salem at that time for a serviceable animal equal to such a journey.
    He proceeded to your office at Dayton, procured instructions and funds to defray in part the expenses of the Board, and thence southward to Jacksonville, where he arrived in company with Mr. Gibbs, who joined company in the Umpqua Valley, on the 31st Decr.
    Mr. Ambrose, the third Commissioner, who resided in the Rogue River country near Jacksonville, was present on the 1st Jany. 1855, and the Board was promptly organized as advertised.
    The undersigned took duplicate vouchers for his traveling expenses which are herewith accompanying. Mr. Gibbs also while traveling separately took duplicate vouchers for his expenses, which are engrossed in voucher No. 39 to the amount of fifty-nine dollars and fifty cents, supported by subvouchers in package marked "A" herewith accompanying, numbering from 1 to 25 inclusive.
    On the organization of the Board it was ascertained that the notices previously published in several newspapers of the sitting of said Board at Jacksonville had not proved sufficient to inform those interested of the opportunity of securing their rights, owing to the very limited circulation of any of the public journals in that section of country. It was therefore ordered by the Board that a hundred large handbills be printed and posted in all the places of public travel and congregation in that section of country which was done, and with satisfactory result. A copy of said handbills is herewith accompanying, marked "B." The expense of printing the same was twenty-five dollars, proved by voucher No. 24.
    On the 2nd day of January 1855 it commenced snowing at Jacksonville, and continued for three days, covering the ground to the depth of more than a foot of snow, which lay some three weeks before it melted away. The adjacent mountains of the Coast and Siskiyou ranges were rendered impassable by pack trains or other means of transportation usually resorted to.
    Snow of any considerable amount being unusual in those latitudes at any season of the year, it is not customary for farmers to provide feed for their cattle nor for stable owners in town to anticipate more use for their stalls than will suffice the current travel of the day. There were but two stables in Jacksonville when the Commissioners arrived there, one of which was crushed by the weight of snow soon after the storm, to wit, the stable kept by Hunter & Miller, at which the lowest cash price for forage was two dollars and a half per day, as exhibited by voucher No. 25. The other kept by Joseph H. Davis having previously charged three dollars per day for horse feed immediately raised his price to four dollars per day, which was his charge when the Commissioners ordered their horses to be taken to his stable. But considering the length of time that the horses were kept at Mr. Davis' stable he discounted a settlement one dollar per day for each horse, as exhibited by voucher No. 22.
    Times being extremely hard and the market high by reason of a temporary interruption by snow of the ordinary means of transportation, several boarding houses had been closed, so that there was but one public place of entertainment in Jacksonville on the first of January 1855, to wit, the "Robinson House," at which the lowest cash price for board and lodging at that time was $20 per week. This house was kept part of the time during the session of the Board by Alexander & McGee as exhibited by voucher No. 27--and the balance of the time by Richard Williams, as exhibited by voucher No. 28.
    The room occupied by the Board was rented of Charles Casey; its use, warming and lights for six weeks being obtained for the sum of eighty-five dollars as per voucher No. 20.
    Other items of the expenses of the Board might be referred to in the way of explanation, if deemed necessary, but it is hoped that the vouchers accompanying will be sufficient in themselves to explain their own propriety.
    Each of the other Commissioners furnished their own horses and were allowed by me the same hire as was stipulated to be paid for my own, to wit, two dollars per day, which is less by one half than could have been negotiated for anywhere in southern Oregon at that time. All the horses were in frequent use during the sitting of the Board, in visiting, from time to time, as other duties would permit, the Indian Reserve, for the purpose of gaining all information necessary to enable the Commissioners to make a just assessment of the permanent improvements made by whites on said Reserve previous to the Treaty of the 10th September 1853.
    The full expenses of the Board for which vouchers were taken and the money actually paid by me amount to the sum of twelve hundred and thirty-eight dollars and one cent, as set forth in account herewith accompanying marked "B" and authenticated by vouchers in package marked "C" accompanying--numbered from "one" to "forty-one" inclusive, comprising the actual and necessary expenses of
    L. F. Grover from Decr. 18, 1854 to March 1st, 1855
    A. C. Gibbs from Decr. 19, 1854 to Febry. 19, 1855
    Geo. H. Ambrose from Jany. 1, 1855 to Febry. 11, 1855
the same being the several terms of service of said Commissioners on official duty.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
    I remain sir your most obt. servant,
L. F. Grover
Commissioner & Disbursing
Officer of the Board
Salem Oregon
March 1st, 1855




Claim No. 1 . . . Jacob Comegys
Territory of Oregon     )
County of Yamhill        )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before me Jacob Comegys who being duly sworn says that on or about the 1st day of April 1848 he commenced to reside upon and cultivate a tract of land in the county of Yamhill aforesaid that he has continued to reside upon and cultivate the same from that time to the present and has claimed the same as a donation under the act of Congress passed the 27th day of September 1850 creating the office of Surveyor General of the public lands n Oregon and to make donations of the said public lands to settlers that he has in all respects complied with the provisions of the said act so as to entitle him to the said tract of land as a donation. And this deponent further says that after he commenced to reside upon and cultivate the said tract of land a tribe of Indians known as the Yamhill Tribe have almost constantly been residing on the said tract of land and have committed trespass on the same by destroying large quantities of valuable timber the value of which has been estimated at one thousand dollars, which amount deponent believes to be reasonable and just.
    And deponent further says that about two thirds of the said amount of damage was incurred within the two last years and after deponent had resided on the said tract of land more than four years and that the said damages were all incurred while the said tribe was in amity with the United States. And deponent further says that on the 25th day of November 1852 he applied to Anson Dart, Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon, for redress of the wrong suffered by him and that the said Superintendent on the 27th of the said month replied to deponent and assured him that he should ultimately recover all the damages sustained by him by reason of the depredations of the said Indians.

Jacob Comegys
Subscribed & sworn to before me this 1st day of January A.D. 1855.
E. S. Stone, Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon     )
County of Yamhill        )
    Personally appeared before me the undersigned and being first duly sworn deposed and says that he has been a resident on the public lands in Oregon since the year 1848 continuously & is now entitled according to act of Congress to a donation of six hundred and forty acres of said lands which he claims by virtue of residence and cultivation and he further says that since his residence on said claim of land the Yamhill Nation of the Calapooya Tribe of Indians has continuously resided on or about said claim of land since the year 1851 [and] have damaged him the amount of five hundred dollars in the way [of] killing his pigs and shoats & stealing vegetables and he also says that in January 1854 he made a demand for the payment of said damages on J. L. Parish, then sub Indian agent, and said agent postponed any action on the same for want of forms in making out such accounts. And he further says that they have constantly kept a large number of dogs with but little means of support for them & that he has frequently caught them killing his hogs and has been obliged to watch them almost continuously.

Jacob Comegys
Subscribed and sworn to before me this first day of January A.D. 1855.
E. S. Stone, Justice of the Peace
Territory of Oregon     )
County of Yamhill        )
    Personally appeared before me the undersigned and being first duly sworn deposes & says that he knows the claim belonging to Jacob Comegys and is acquainted with the situation of the timber on the same he also states that the Yamhill Indians have resided in and about said timber continuously since his acquaintance with them for three years past and that two large groves of timber mostly fir have been nearly ruined by the said [Indians] since that time and also that much damage has been done to other timbers on the same place by the same Indians and also that damages done to the same in his estimation is full one thousand dollars and were the same timber his he would not be willing to have the same damage done to it for that amount. He also states that good timber is scarce in the vicinity of said claim and consequently very high in price.

            his
George X Billings
           mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 25th day of December 1854.
E. S. Stone, J.P.
Office, Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. March 3rd, 1855
    Personally appeared before me Joel Palmer Supt. Indian Affairs for Oregon Territory George Billings who after being sworn says that he is familiarly acquainted with Jacob Comegys and with the situation of his land claim and is acquainted with the number of hogs usually kept by said Comegys he also knows that the Yamhill band of Calapooia Indians have resided on said land claim continuously since the fall of 1851 up to the present date and that they have constantly kept around them a pack of dogs and without providing any visible means of subsisting them that he has noticed their dogs attack the hogs and pigs of such Comegys with every apparent intention of killing them and have driven them away and that one time he saw the Indians running after the dogs with clubs evidently intending to kill one and that seeing him they desisted. He further states that in his opinion the said Comegys had lost within the time mentioned by the hands of those Indians and their dogs, hogs & pigs amounting in value to four hundred dollars.
            his
George X Billings
           mark
Attest: Joel Palmer
Sworn and subscribed the day and year above written.
Joel Palmer
Supr. Ind. Affairs
Office, Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. February 10th, 1855
    Personally appeared before me, Joel Palmer Supr. Ind. Affairs O.T., Joseph Sanders Esq. who after being sworn says that he has been acquainted with Jacob Comegys since 1851 and that he is acquainted with his land claim that he moved onto the said Comegys' claim in September of that year and continued there until April 1852 and then took an adjoining claim where he has since continued to reside that is he familiar with the damages done the timber on said claim by the Yamhill Indians who reside in that vicinity that he has often seen the Indians cutting oak and ash timber and peeling bark from the large fir, all of which is valuable on account of the scarcity of timber in that neighborhood. That he estimates the damage done the timber since September 1851 to more than one thousand dollars he further states that he knows the Indians residing in that neighborhood had a large pack of dogs and that he has frequently seen their dogs attacking and killing the said Comegys hogs and pigs, and that he is sure there has been killed and injured within the last three years in this way hogs and pigs to the value of one hundred dollars & he believes they have destroyed [illegible]. He further states that he believes the damage done said timber was in securing fuel, building lodgings and making corrals for feeding horses, in accordance with their usual customs.
    To the truth of which avers
Joseph Sanders
Sworn to before me this tenth day of February A.D. 1855.
Joel Palmer, Superintendent
Office, Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. February 14th, 1855
    Personally appeared before me Joel Palmer Supr. Ind. Affairs O.T. Edward S. Stone Esq. who after being sworn says that he has been acquainted with Jacob Comegys since 1849 and that he is acquainted with his land claim being an adjoining claimant to said Comegys and that he is familiar with the damages done the timber on said claim by the Yamhill Indians who reside in that vicinity that he has often seen the Indians cutting oak and ash timber and peeling bark from the large fir timber, all of which is valuable on account of the scarcity of timber in that neighborhood. That he estimates the damage done the timber since Sept. 1851 to be one thousand dollars he further states that he knows the Indians residing in that neighborhood had a large pack of dogs and that he has frequently seen their dogs attacking and mangling the said Comegys' hogs & pigs and that he verily believes there has been killed and injured within the three last years in this way hogs and pigs to the value of three hundred dollars. He further states that he believes the damage done said timber was in securing fuel, building lodges and making corrals for keeping horses, in accordance with their usual customs.
    To the truth of which he avers
Edward S. Stone
Sworn to before me this 14h day February 1855.
Joel Palmer
Superintendent Ind. Affairs O.T.
Office, Superintendent Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. February 14th, 1855
    On this day before me Joel Palmer Supr. Ind. Affairs O.T. appeared Jerome B. Walling Esq. who after being duly sworn says that he has been acquainted with Jacob Comegys since the year 1848 and knows that with slight omissions resided upon and cultivated his land claim since that period to this date that he has examined the extent of damages done his timber by being barked and chopped into that the location of this claim is such that the timber is of great value in consequence of being surrounded by extensive prairies that a band of Yamhill Indians reside on said claim and from the manner in which the timber is barked and chopped he has doubt it is the work of said Indians and that he estimates the amount of damages done to the timber on this claim within the last three years to be one thousand dollars.
Jerome B. Walling
Sworn to before me this 10th day of Feb. 1855.
Joel Palmer
Supr. Indian Affairs
Oregon Indian Superintendency
    Nov. 27th 1852
Sir
    Yours of the 25th inst. date at Portland is at hand. In reply I have to say that you will ultimately be able to recover damages sustained by Indians. The Champoeg treaties are not yet rejected by the U.S. Senate but probably will be in which case new treaties will be made. Your claim will be good against the first payment made to that band of Indians.
I am sir, your obt. servt.
Anson Dart
Superintendent
Jacob Comegys
South Yamhill P.O.
Champoeg May 2 1851
Dear Sir
    We have just concluded a treaty with the Yamhill Indians by which they agree to remove to the valley on Deer Creek which I went up to examine. As soon as the treaty is confirmed & the government can build houses for them in their new home we have given Thomas and the other chiefs an abstract of the treaty from which you can learn the terms of the treaty. It will probably be something like a year before the government will be prepared to remove the Indians to Deer Creek Valley and in the meantime they will remain where they now are, and we hope the people in the neighborhood will continue to treat them kindly and endeavor to get along without difficulty. We have also concluded a treaty with the Luckiamute Indians for all of their lands except a small reservation on the south side of the South Fork of Luckiamute immediately above the old California trail, three miles in width and five miles in length.
    Please give my respects to Messrs. Stone & Culbertson.
In haste, truly yours &c.
A. A. Skinner
Hon. Jacob Comegys
Yamhill, O.T.

Claim No. 2. John Meldrum
    This day personally appeared before me John Meldrum and being first duly sworn said he and his comrades were robbed by Indians on Rogue River on the thirty-first day of August 1849 of money and property to the amount of twenty-three hundred and ninety-five dollars under the following circumstances:
    I was on my way home from California in company [with] Arthur Saltmarsh, Mr. Gage, Mr. Wilkinson, Mr. Kellison [apparently Achilles "Kellis" Grigsby], Mr. White and Mr. Mulkey. Saltmarsh and I had an Indian boy [with] us which we had taken with us to California. During the day before we were robbed, Indians frequently showed themselves to us and appeared surly. We stopped for the night three miles above the point of rocks on the road [Rock Point] and thinking there might be danger we left two on guard at a time. I was on the first guard; all was quiet until after daybreak when the guard turned loose the horses to find after they walked off fifteen or twenty steps they made signs of fright when the guard called out "There are Indians about." Just when I had got on my feet the Indians commenced firing and hallowing. I think they fired about thirty times our horses frighted and ran, when they were two hundred yards off Indians on horseback ran in behind them & drove [them] off. Those were the first Indians we saw for those that were shooting at us we could not see they were in the brush and it was foggy in the direction [where] they were. They were not dangerous though it kept us busy to dodge their arrows; they fell like a shower of hail about us. White ran after his horses but did not come back nor catch them. Mr. Kellison after firing his gun also ran. I saw Mr. Gage standing a few steps from our bed loading his gun. Mr. Wilkinson was standing by him who had no gun. When the arrows were not falling thick and after firing my gun I backed off towards Gage & Wilkinson to reload. Mr. Saltmarsh remained standing on the bed. Mr. Mulkey was sick, covered up in his bed an arrow fell on him cutting through the blankets and wounding him slightly. At this he and Saltmarsh come running toward me. I wheeled and ran 60 or 80 yards but as soon as I found I was running halted and said we could whip them. Saltmarsh and Mulkey who were with me halted. Standing a minute we saw Indians raise up near our baggage, I think about 150 of them. They ran in on our baggage until it was literally covered at this Saltmarsh said to me "John now is our time" and he fired. At the crack of this gun the Indians all fell on their faces and bounded up bringing something with them blanket or something else and began to make off. At this Saltmarsh and I hallowed loud and ran right at them when we arrived to where our beds were we found all were gone. Standing a few minutes we were joined by all of our party when we soon commenced our journey for home on foot some of us barefoot and I with no hat. After we had traveled about one mile the Indians began to collect on the opposite side of the river. They dogged us for about 7 or 8 miles shooting at us occasionally when we sat down on the road for Mulkey to rest. They crossed over on our side of the river and one showed himself within 2 or three hundred yards of us. Saltmarsh said to me "You take that side & I'll take this and we'll get him." The Indians seeing us coming began to run from tree to tree one of them watching Saltmarsh within 60 or 80 yards of me exposed his back to me and I laid my gun up of a tree took good aim and fired he took one step afterwards and fell. The remaining Indians being nine in number ran into a clump of bushes about 20 steps from the fallen Indian I reloaded my gun and says "Boys I guess we had as well go." We then walked on and soon crossed the river. After this we were troubled no more by the Indians and on the third day we met the wagons in the Canyon and got something to eat. The above mentioned money eighteen hundred dollars was gold dust and two hundred dollars was coin part gold & part silver. My horses and blankets and other clothing was worth four hundred dollars. The remainder of my comrades except Saltmarsh were strangers to me. Saltmarsh and I had left home together and had worked together all the time, consequently I know what money he had and he also knew what money I had. He had fifteen hundred and between 20 and 40 dollars his horses and rigging I think something better than my own say four hundred and fifty dollars. Our Indian boy had one horse and his rigging was worth two hundred dollars. I think he also had one hundred and seventy-five dollars in gold dust that he lost. It is impossible for me [to] designate the Indians inasmuch as I never was in that country but the once going to & coming from California. 500 dollars of the above named money as claimed by me belonged to David Waldo and 75 dollars John Roe.
John Meldrum
Chinook January 11th 1854
Victor Monroe
Associate Justice W.T.
1853
Pacific City Washington Territory
November the 12th
Mr. Palmer
    Dear Sir
        I have lately learned that a treaty and purchase has been made with the Indians on Rogue River Oregon Territory. I have an account against those Indians I think mine was the first that was legally proven up against those Indians. I will state some of the particulars and desire to call your attention to it. On the last day of August 1849 I was robbed by Indians on Rogue River 3 miles above the point of rocks on the road of money and property the amount of 24 hundred dollars, it was principally gold a little silver, and two horses. I went directly to Governor Lane at that time the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, complained to him and agreeable to his direction proved my account before Judge Bryant and was told by him and Gov. Lane that when the government made a treaty with those Indians I would get my money. I grew impatient tired waiting [for] the treaty and believing I was entitled to my money by the provisions of the 17th section of the act of Congress of the 30th June 1834 and accordingly I wrote to Judge Skinner but he screwed and twisted for a year when I asked Dr. Dart to call on him to do his duty in the matter. He Dart equivocated nearly another year and at last he wrote that [the] case had been neglected and he would send my account to Washington to our delegate in Congress. I wrote him not to do it and then I wrote to the President politely asking him to dismiss them both, to this I got an answer from Mr. Lea Secretary of the Interior.
[Luke Lea was Commissioner of Indian Affairs.]
    Sir,
        You will please inform me whether my account is of that class that is paid out of the first annuity and in fact you will oblige me very much by informing me all about my claim on those Indians.
    It would suit me remarkably well to learn that my money was ready for me.
    Sir, I remain yours
John Meldrum
Pacific County, Washington T.O.
March 2nd 1854   
Mr. Palmer,
    Dear Sir
        Yours of the twenty-ninth of Nov. was duly received and I have complied as far as is in my power down here to do. You will see in my account that Arthur Saltmarsh knows what money I lost by the Indians and I think likely he has laid in his account to you & has stated the amount I lost. He lives in Linn County O.T. I [have] not seen him for three years but I will now write to him and if he has not laid in his account I will urge him to do it and also state what I lost. I am much pleased at your being disposed to give my claim a hearing for my account is just and I have no doubt will be paid. But if such men as Judge Skinner and Dr. Dart had remained in office I think it would have been a century or two before I would have got it. I hope you will write to me as soon as you get instructions whether my account can be paid out of the money due those Indians or not and so doing you will much oblige your humble servant
John Meldrum
Joel Palmer
    Superintendent
        Indian Affairs
Pacific County W.T. 1856
    January the 25
Mr. Palmer,
    Dear Sir,
        I wish to inquire of you whether there is any probability of me getting my money that I was robbed of by the Rogue River Indians the last day of August 1849. It has been a long time since I lost my money once you have been in office a good while and I have no doubt you know whether I can get my money or not and if it can be had you know what it is necessary for me to do to obtain it. I have done all that I know how to do that is proved my account and asked the Superintendent to pay it but he has no money that can be applied in that way and I have waited six years and can see no prospect of my ever getting it. The account is [a] just one and the knowing ones all tell me I will get my money someday. The question is how and when? If you can answer the question I will be much obliged to you if you will do it and if I can never get it you equally oblige me by saying so. Please excuse my bluff manner of getting off my story and I hope you will answer the above and I remain yours

John Meldrum
Joel Palmer, Superintendent
        Indian Affairs
O.T.

Claim No. 3    Arthur Saltmarsh
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Marion        )
    Before me personally appeared the within named Arthur Saltmarsh

    On or about the last of August A.D. one thousand eight hundred and forty nine John Meldrum, Mr. Kellison, William White, Cyrenius Mulkey, Mr. Wilkinson, William Gage, myself & an Indian boy (Calapooya) being upon our return from the mines in California we camped in the valley [of the] Rogue River about three miles above what is commonly known as the point of rocks there being no disturbance during the night just as the light of day appeared the guard turned the horses loose to graze a body of mounted Indians charged and drove them off. The Indians the main body charged our camp after firing upon [us] with several guns besides a shower of arrows wounding Cyrenius Mulkey.
    Having but three or four serviceable guns and being so few in numbers we were compelled to make precipitate retreat--leaving all to their mercy. Our provisions blankets and all of our clothing except what was on our persons. My loss consisted as follows
Eighty seven & ½ ounces of gold dust ounces 87½
One hundred dollars in coin $100.00
Two horses & saddles worth each $225.00 450.00
Four blankets worth eight dollars each $32.00
    I worked in company with John Meldrum in the mines; he knew that I had the above named articles and that I was robbed by the Rogue River Indians. I also knew that Mr. Meldrum had with him two horses and saddles, fourteen hundred dollars in dust and coin besides five hundred dollars in gold dust which a young Mr. Waldo sent by Mr. Meldrum to his Waldo's father, all of which he lost at the same time.
    U. States of America
        to Arthur Saltmarsh    Dr.
to the above specified items
Eighty seven & half oz. gold dust worth 17 dollars per oz. $1522.50
One overcoat 28 dollars 28.00
4 blankets 8 dollars each 32.00
My provisions at the time of being robbed by the Rogue River Indians worth 50.00
One hundred dollars in coin 100.00
Two [horses] and saddles worth each $225.00 450.00
One overcoat        28.00
$2182.50
Territory of Oregon     )
County of Marion         )
    Before [me] personally appeared the within named Arthur Saltmarsh and made solemn oath that the statement therein made is true and the articles there mentioned was taken from him at that time and the within account made out by items were each and all of them taken from him at the time mentioned and no part of the same has ever been recovered.
Arthur Saltmarsh
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 14th day of June 1854.
Chester N. Terry
Judge of Probate
Linn County      )
Oregon Ter.       )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before me a justice of the peace in and for the county of Linn Royal Cottle who being duly sworn deposeth and says that he was acquainted with John Meldrum & Arthur Saltmarsh and was acquainted with them in California and worked with them in the mines during the summer of 1849 and was with them at the time they started to the Willamette Valley and I am known to their having eighty seven & a half oz. each in gold dust and Arthur Saltmarsh had one hundred dollars in coins and I am known to John Meldrum changing some one or two hundred dollars of gold dust for coin before starting home. Mr. Meldrum and Mr. Saltmarsh had two horses and saddles each Mr. Saltmarsh had one overcoat and each of them had blankets the number I do not know. I also know of John Meldrum receiving five hundred dollars gold dust from a young Waldo to carry to his father living in Willamette Valley.
Royal Cottle
Sworn to and subscribed this 7th day of June 1854.
John W. Bell
Justice of the Peace
In and for the County of Linn
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Linn           )  s.s.
    I John H. Lines clerk of the District Court for said county do hereby certify that John W. Bell whose signature appears to the within affidavit was on the day of the date thereof and now is a justice of the peace in and for said county, duly elected and qualified and that full faith and credit are due and should be given to all his official acts.
    In testimony whereof I hereto set my hand and office of said court at my office at Takenah this 13th day of June A.D. 1854.
Charles [sic] H. Lines
(  seal  )                           Clerk of said court
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Lane           )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before [me] the undersigned clerk of the District Court in and for said county Cyrenius Mulkey and being first duly sworn doth depose and say that he is personally acquainted with Arthur Saltmarsh, John Meldrum and traveled in company with them and four others in the year 1849 from California to the Willamette Valley in the Territory of Oregon and was with them at the time the company was attacked and robbed by the Rogue River Indians about three miles above what is commonly called Rock Point on Rogue River and knows the above named Saltmarsh and Meldrum were robbed at that time by the Indians of two horses saddles bridles and rigging for said horses, cash, together with their blankets and provisions.
Cyrenius Mulkey
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of June 1854.
Witness E. F. Skinner clerk
and the seal of court at office
in Eugene City this 9th day of June A.D. 1854
E. F. Skinner
(  seal  )                          Clerk

Claim No. 4  Cyrenius Mulkey
List of property stolen by the Rogue River Indians in the month of August A.D. 1849 of Cyrenius Mulkey.
                Dr.
Two horses saddles & bridles $400.00
50 oz. gold dust $17 850.00
1 brace pistols 75.00
3 Spanish serapes $20 60.00
4 prs. pants $10 40.00
½ doz. shirts $3 18.00
1 hat $8 8.00
2 sashes $8 16.00
2 prs. boots $16        32.00
$1499.00
    Cr.
1 horse $200.00
1 brace pistols 75.00
5 16/17 oz. gold   101.00   376.00
1123.00
    The above amount of three hundred and seventy six dollars was received by me at the time Gen. Joseph Lane treated with the Rogue River Indians in the summer of 1850.
Cyrenius Mulkey
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of June A.D. 1854 at Eugene City Lane County, O.T.
E. F. Skinner
Clerk District Court
Lane County O.T.
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Lane           )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before the undersigned clerk of the District Court in and for the county of Lane and Territory of Oregon James M. McCuller who being duly sworn says that he is personally acquainted with Cyrenius Mulkey who says that he was robbed by the Rogue River Indians in August 1849 and knows that at the time that he left Redding's Springs in California in 1849 on his way to Willamette Valley in Oregon Territory that he (said Mulkey) had two horses saddles and bridles fifty oz. in gold dust one brace of pistols three Spanish serapes four pairs of pants six shirts two sashes one hat and two pairs of boots worth at the time he left me at Redding's Springs the amount charged in the annexed account fourteen hundred and ninety nine dollars.
                his
James M. X McCuller
               mark
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of June A.D. 1854.
Witness E. F. Skinner
Clerk and the seal of Court
at office in Eugene City this 9th
day of June A.D. 1854
(  seal  )                           E. F. Skinner, Clerk
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Lane           )  s.s.
    Personally appeared before the undersigned clerk of the District Court Arthur Saltmarsh who being first duly sworn says that he is personally acquainted with Cyrenius Mulkey and traveled in company with him and five others in the year 1849 from California to the Willamette Valley in Oregon Territory and was with him at the time the company was robbed by the Rogue River Indians about three miles above what is commonly called Rock Point on Rogue River and knows that the Indians took from him at that time two horses saddles & bridles one brace of pistols three Spanish serapes one hat and two pairs of boots.
Arthur Saltmarsh
Subscribed and sworn to before me this 9th day of June 1854.
Witness E. F. Skinner
Clerk and the seal of Court
at office in Eugene City this 9th
day of June A.D. 1854
(  seal  )                           E. F. Skinner, Clerk

Claim No. 5   Wm. W. Wilkinson
    To the Honorable James A. Palmer [sic] United States agent for Indian affairs in the Territory of Oregon.
    William W. Wilkinson your memorialists would most respectfully represent that he is a sufferer by Indian depredations commenced upon him and his property at Rocky Point on Rogue River in Jackson County Oregon on the twenty-ninth day of August A.D. 1849 by the Rogue River Indians and that the facts and circumstances are as follows.
    That he in company with William Gage, William H. White, William Kellison, John Meldrum, Cyrenius Mulkey and a Mr. Saltmarsh and an Indian boy of the Calapooya nation returning to Oregon from the California mines and on the said 29th day of August aforesaid at said Rocky Point they were attacked by the said Indians to the number of one hundred or more armed with bows and arrows and some guns and commenced their attack between daylight and sunrise by an advance from a concealment in the brush and a canyon within twenty steps of our camp and rushed into camp with a discharge of their guns and arrows, accompanied with whooping and yelling in savage style. At the first onset Cyrenius Mulkey was severely wounded by an arrow and the rest of our company excepting Kellison & White who were out after our animals defended ourselves until resistance became impossible and after a struggle of some two hours and after the Indians had robbed the company of their clothing blankets provisions cooking utensils horses and money excepting the clothes on our backs and each man a rifle and the ammunition attached to our persons and some of the company a small amount of change in their pockets. We retreated and the Indians followed us and commenced a sort of running fight until two o'clock in the afternoon that he your memorialist was at the time some two hundred miles from home and after being robbed without even a hat coat vest or shoe to his feet and compelled to travel by night and conceal ourselves in the daytime and one time three days and nights without any kind of provisions. That your memorialist William Wilkinson had taken from him at the time of the encounter by the Indians
One horse of the value of $300.00
The one half of a horse owned by me & Mr. Gage 87.00
62½ ounces of gold dust worth 16 dollars per oz. 1000.00
One hundred dollars in silver 100.00
Two hundred dollars in coined gold 200.00
Ammunition clothing provisions and cooking utensils hat boots & shoes all worth   218.00
1950.00
And your memorialist would further represent that in consequence of said robbery he has been subjected to serious inconvenience and had to make a living for himself and family by hard labor in bad weather obtaining a small pittance for the support of himself and a sick family and often packing on his own back the groceries and provisions for his family a distance of one hundred miles and suffered other privations and inconveniences too severe to be thought of without calling forth sensations of grief and your memorialist would most respectfully call your attention to the subject and earnestly request that you in your judgment make such an arrangement of the claim of your memorialist as shall guarantee to him the benefits of treaty stipulations entered into between the United States and the said Rogue River Indians and your memorialist in duty bound will ever pray.
William W. Wilkinson
In support of which your memorialist makes the following affidavit.
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    William W. Wilkinson of Benton County being first duly sworn says that in relation to the foregoing memorial the facts therein stated are correct and these and the value set to the property taken from him by the Indians is in his judgment the actual cash value at the time.
Wm. W. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me Feb. 19th A.D. 1855.
James Taylor judge of probate for Polk County Oregon
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    William Gage of Polk County being first duly sworn says that he was present at the encounter with the Indians stated in the foregoing memorial and knows that the statements therein made as to the time manner of attack duration of the fight and the taking of the property is correct and true.
              his
William X Gage
             mark
Subscribed and sworn before me this Feb. 19th 1855.
James Taylor, judge of probate for Polk County
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    I, James Taylor judge of probate court within and for Polk County Oregon do hereby certify that the within affidavits of William Wilkinson and William Gage were subscribed and sworn before me at Luckiamute in said county, Feb. 19th 1855.
    The testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said court at Luckiamute in said county the 19th day of February A.D. 1855.
James Taylor judge of probate

Claim No. 6    William Gage
To the Honorable James A. Palmer [sic]
United States agent for Indian affairs in Oregon
William Gage your memorialist would most respectfully represent that he is a sufferer by Indian depredations committed upon him and his property at Rocky Point on Rogue River in Jackson County Oregon on the 29th day of August A.D. 1849 by the Rogue River Indians and the facts and circumstances were as follows: That he in company with William W. Wilkinson, William H. White, William Kellison, John Meldrum, Cyrenius Mulkey, a Mr. Saltmarsh and an Indian boy of the Calapooya nation. Entering from California to Oregon and on the said 29th day of August at Rocky Point aforesaid they were attacked by the said Indians to the number of one hundred or more armed with bows and arrows and some guns and commenced the attack between daylight and sunrise by advancing from a thicket and a canyon within twenty steps of our camp and a discharge of their guns and arrows accompanied with whooping and yelling in savage style. At the first onset Mulkey was wounded severely by an arrow and the rest of the company except Kellison & White (who were out after the animals) defended ourselves until resistance became impossible and after a struggle of some two hours and after the Indians had robbed us of all our clothing blankets provisions cooking utensils horses and money excepting the clothes on our backs and each man a rifle the ammunition attached to our persons and some of the company a small amount of change in their pockets we retreated and the Indians followed and continued a sort of running fight until two o'clock in the afternoon that he your memorialist was at the time some two hundred miles from home and compelled to travel by night and conceal ourselves in the daytime and at one time three days and nights with[out] any kind of provision and sick with the ague all the time. Your memorialist Wm. Gage had at the time of the encounter taken from by the Indians
One horse worth $200.00
One half of a horse the other owned by Mr. Wilkinson 87.00
Clothing provisions saddles bridles ropes blankets cooking utensils and camp equipage worth 162.00
449.00
Your memorialist would most respectfully call your attention to the subject and earnestly request that you in your judgment make an arrangement of the claim of your memorialist as shall guarantee to him the benefit of treaty stipulations entered into between the United States and the Rogue River Indians and your memorialist in duty bound will ever pray.
              his
William X Gage
             mark
In support of which he makes the following affidavit.
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    William Gage of said county being duly sworn says that in relation to the foregoing memorial the facts and circumstances therein stated are correct and true and the value of property above stated is in the judgment of the affiant the actual cash value of said property at the time and place of the encounter with the Indians at Rocky Point.
              his
William X Gage
             mark
Subscribed and sworn before me Feb. 19th A.D. 1855.
James Taylor, judge of probate for Polk County Oregon
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    William W. Wilkinson of Benton County Oregon being duly sworn says that he was present on the 29th of August A.D. 1849 at Rocky Point as stated in the foregoing memorial of William Gage and knows that the skirmish was commenced and continued and resulted as is stated in his said memorial and further saith not.
William W. Wilkinson
Subscribed and sworn to before me Feb. 19th A.D. 1855.
James Taylor judge of probate for Polk County Oregon
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Polk           )  s.s.
    I James Taylor judge of probate court within and for Polk County Oregon do hereby certify that the within affidavits of William Gage and William Wilkinson were subscribed and sworn to before me at Luckiamute in said county Feb. 19th A.D. 1855.
    In testimony whereof I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed the seal of said county the 19th of Feb. A.D. 1855.
(  seal  )                          James Taylor judge of probate

Claim No. 7     Virgil Quivey
    Account of property stolen and destroyed by the Rogue River Indians belonging to Virgil Quivey in the month of May A.D. 1851.
One horse worth ninety dollars $90.00
Four pack saddles worth eight dollars each in all thirty two 32.00
One riding horse and bridle worth thirty dollars 30.00
Four lariats worth five dollars each 20.00
Two pairs of blankets worth ten dollars per pair 20.00
Two pairs of pantaloons worth eight dollars each 16.00
One pair of boots worth eight dollars 8.00
One gun worth thirty dollars 30.00
Ten lbs. of salt worth one dollar per lb. 10.00
Five lbs. of saleratus one dollar per lb. 5.00
Three shirts worth two dollars each 6.00
One coat worth five dollars 5.00
One hat worth two dollars 2.00
Twenty dollars in gold dust 20.00
One tin pan worth three dollars 3.00
One frying pan worth two dollars 2.00
One coffee pot worth one dollar and fifty cts. 1.50
One horse worth one hundred and ten dollars 110.00
One mule worth one hundred and thirty 130.00
Eight hundred lbs. of flour worth seventy five cts. per lb. 600.00
Ten lbs. of butter worth one dollar and twenty five cents per lb. 12.50
Ten lbs. of sugar worth one dollar per lb. 10.00
Personally appeared before me the undersigned and being first duly sworn deposes and says that he knows the contents of the above account by him made out and that it is just and true of his own knowledge and that he has recd. no payment on the same or any part thereof.
Virgil Quivey
Subscribed and sworn to before me a justice of the peace in and for the county of Yamhill and Territory of Oregon this 31st day of May A.D. 1854.
E. S. Stone
Justice of the Peace
Personally appeared before me the undersigned and being first duly sworn deposes and says that some time in the month of May A.D. 1851 the precise day he cannot state but thinks on or about the 13th, himself and two comrades were camped in the Rogue River Valley on a branch of the Rogue River [Bear Creek] in the Territory of Oregon on their way to the California mines with provisions, and before daylight on said day while they were asleep they were attacked by the Rogue River Indians and one of his said comrades whose name was David Dilley was shot dead by his side while sleeping the other one John Ernest and himself were compelled to flee whereupon the said Rogue River Indians took or destroyed all that he had consisting principally in gold dust provisions clothing cooking utensils saddles and riggings horses and one mule to the amount of eleven hundred seventy five dollars or more - - - $1175.00
Virgil Quivey
Subscribed and sworn to before me a justice of the peace in and for the county of Yamhill and Territory of Oregon this first day of June A.D. 1854.
E. S. Stone
Justice of the Peace

Claim No. 8   R. W. Bragg
United States of America   )
Territory of Oregon            )  s.s.
    On the 11th day of June A.D. 1852 before me A. A. Skinner Indian agent for southwestern Oregon personally came Richard W. Bragg who being duly sworn says that he together with Thomas C. Bragg and James McClenny and ------ Elliott on or about the first of March last came into the Rogue River Valley with about one hundred and forty five hogs the property of Turner Crump and William Cox that the hogs were placed in my care for the purpose of being butchered and sold at the mines in Rogue River Valley. That on or about the first of April last thirty six of said hogs were missing and a few days subsequent to the time when the hogs were missing I was informed by an Umpqua Indian that twenty one of said hogs had been killed by the Indians living on Rogue River above Table Rock. That about the 15th of April last twenty five of said hogs were missing that discovering the fact he immediately started in pursuit of the hogs and soon discovered a trail where a large number of hogs had been driven. That he followed said trail into the hills about six miles above the Indian agency that after entering the hills the trail turned to the left and ran in the direction of Rogue River in the vicinity of the village of the Indians who were said by the Indians to have taken the first lot of hogs herein referred to and that he followed said trail about twenty five miles but could not overtake them, and that about the tenth of May last seven more of said hogs were missing, that immediate [sic] he [went] in pursuit and discovered their trail and followed it and found three of said hogs and discovered the trail where from appearances the balance of said seven had been swum across Rogue River nearly opposite to Table Rock. That on the day subsequent to that on which he found the three hogs above referred to he discovered in the woods east of Mr. Thompson's ranch where a hog had been killed and eaten apparently by the Indians, that a part of the head and bones of a hog were still remaining at the place. And that he verily believes that all of the hogs herein mentioned as missing were stolen by said Indians residing on Rogue River above Table Rock.
    That at the time the hogs herein referred to were taken he was selling hogs out of the same drove at $.35 & $.40 per lb. and that he believes that the hogs stolen would have averaged at least two hundred pounds each.
R. W. Bragg
Subscribed and sworn to the date here mentioned before me.
A. A. Skinner
Ind. Agent
United States of America   )
Oregon Territory                 )  s.s.
    On this 11th day of June A.D. 1852 before me A. A. Skinner Indian agent for south western Oregon personally came James McClenny who being duly sworn says that on or about the first of March last he came into the Rogue River Valley in company with and in the employ of Richard W. Bragg who had charge of about one hundred and forty four hogs the property of Turner Crump & William Cox. That he remained with said Bragg from the said first of March until about four days since. That on or about the first of April last thirty six of said hogs were missing, that as soon as that fact was discovered R. W. Bragg & himself went in pursuit and discovered a trail where hogs had been driven that they followed it to where it crossed the Rogue River a short distance below Table Rock but were unable to follow it any further. That at the place where the trail crossed the river there were a great many tracks of Indians & also along the trail before they came to the river. And that about the 10th of May last seven more of said hogs were missing that a few days subsequent while looking for said hogs he discovered the head of a hog which he believed to have been the head of one of the hogs which were missing that on the succeeding day he discovered at an Indian camp which was at that time deserted the bones of a hog which appeared to have been killed and eaten by the Indians at that place, that some ten days subsequent to finding the bones of the hog at the Indian camp above referred to he found three of said seven hogs between the Willow Springs and the Indian agency. That three or four [days] after finding the hogs last referred to four other hogs were missing that he went in pursuit and found three of them on the creek about [omission] miles below the Indian agency near where some Indians had been encamped but that the Indians had left their camp before he found the hogs. And this affiant further says that on or about the 25th of May last while R. W. Bragg & himself were driving said hogs together they [saw] an Indian attempting to drive off a portion of the hogs belonging to the herd of which they had the charge. That Mr. Bragg started in pursuit of said Indian but could not overtake him and that the Indian ran in the direction of Table Rock and that he verily believes that all of the hogs herein referred to as missing from said herd belonging to Messrs. Crump & Cox were stolen by the Indians living on Rogue River above Table Rock & that the hogs stolen would have averaged at least one hundred and seventy-five pounds each.
James McClenny
Subscribed and sworn to this 11th day of June A.D. 1852.
A. A. Skinner
Ind. Agent
Rogue River Valley
    Nov. 27th 1854
B. F. Harding Esqr.
    Dear Sir,
        Some time February or March [1852] while I was acting Indian agent Mr. Richard W. Bragg came to my house in Rogue River Valley for the purpose of obtaining my permission to bring some hogs which he had in charge into that portion of the valley near Jacksonville. So far as I can now recollect I informed him that it was not the intention of the Indian Department to enforce that portion of the Intercourse Law which prohibited persons not licensed so to do to pass through the Rogue River Valley (it being then Indian country) and that if he chose to bring his hogs into the valley I as Indian [agent] should be so much opposed to his doing so as to endanger the peace of the valley. At the time Mr. Bragg came to see me about the hogs the chief Sam was at my house I informed him of the wish [of] Mr. Bragg and explained to him as far as practicable the consequences which would probably result from bringing hogs into the valley that they subsisted upon acorns camas and other roots and would be likely to interfere with provision of the Indians.
    Sam told Mr. Bragg and myself that as he had never seen any hogs and was unacquainted with their habits he could not say whether the Indians would be willing to have the hogs brought into the valley or not.
    And so far as I can recollect neither consented or objected to their being brought into the valley. So far as I now recollect the Indians never made any complaint with reference to the hogs.
Respectfully
A. A. Skinner
The original of this letter is transcribed among the loose papers, below.
Jackson County            )
Oregon Territory         )  s.s. 
    Before the undersigned a justice of the peace in and for said Jackson County personally came Alonzo A. Skinner and made solemn oath that the facts contained in the foregoing statement are true according to the best of his knowledge and belief.
A. A. Skinner
Sworn to and subscribed before me this [omission] day of Nov. 1854.
S. H. Taylor
Justice of the Peace
Department of the Interior
    Office Indian Affairs
        August 18, 1854
Sir
    Your letter of the 11th instant enclosing a communication from B. F. Harding Esq. of Salem Oregon with accompanying affidavits respecting Indian depredations has been received. In compliance with your request I have examined said papers and herewith return the same that they may be forwarded to Superintendent Palmer or Samuel H. Culver agent of the Rogue River Indians that such action may be taken in the premises as indicated by the 27th Section of the Intercourse Act of the 30th of June 1854.
Very Respectfully
Your Obt. Servant
Charles E. Mix
Acting Commissioner
Hon. Joseph Lane
    Washington
        D.C.

Claim No. 9     Washington L. Riggs
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Washington L. Riggs being duly sworn says on or about the first of August A.D. 1855 I had one hundred and thirty two head of cattle belonging to me which were being herded on Cottonwood Creek near the Oregon line which I believe were stolen by the Indians and driven off to the mountains. I believe the theft to have been committed by the Rogue River Indians. I found four head of my cattle on Butte Creek in Rogue River Valley on the 8th day of October. Two men in my employ went herding cattle and saw some Indians shoot one, and I have no doubt they killed or destroyed all the others. The cattle were all good beef and would weigh six hundred and fifty pounds each and were worth seventeen and a half cents per pound in the market at the time when they were driven away. I have never recovered payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone.
    That neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge. This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
Washington L. Riggs
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Table Rock Reserve this 9th day of Oct. A.D. 1855.  [The 9th was the day after the Lupton Massacre, the same day as the Indian attacks from Evans Creek to the Harris cabin.]
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    James H. Butler a resident of Lane County Oregon Territory being duly sworn, says,
    I was assisting Mr. Riggs in herding his cattle. His cattle were missing on or about the first of August and diligent search has been made for them but they could not be found. I was looking for cattle on the Butte Creek in Rogue River Valley, on the eighth day of October A.D. 1855 and found four all together saw the Indians kill one and believe they got all the others. Said cattle were herded on Cottonwood near the Oregon line and were worth at the time they were driven off seventeen and a half cents per pound. I have no interest in said cattle.
James H. Butler
Sworn to and subscribed before me at my office on Table Rock Ind. Reserve this 9th day of October A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Abraham S. Cannon a resident of Umpqua County Oregon Territory being duly sworn says
    On or about the 10th of August last I was looking after Mr. Riggs' cattle was employed by him to do so. I saw fifty or sixty head of his cattle being driven off by persons who I took to be Indians. I was within a quarter of a mile of them and was satisfied from their appearances they were Indians. They were driving the cattle very fast, I thought it to be unsafe to approach any nearer them. On the next morning I missed one hundred and thirty head of cattle. They were doubtless driven off during the night as I saw Indian tracks the next morning. I was induced to believe they were taken by Indians. I know that Mr. Riggs has never recovered his cattle nor found any signs but what have the impression that they were stolen by the Indians.
    I have no interest in this claim.
A. S. Cannon
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Rogue River Valley this 2nd day of November A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Henry Clifton of Douglas County Oregon Territory being duly sworn, says on or about the first of August A.D. 1855 as I was passing from Rogue River Valley to Cottonwood Creek immediately after I have crossed the Siskiyou Mountains I observed what I took to be Indians driving some cattle. There were five or six persons and I supposed at that time there were about one hundred and thirty head of cattle. They [were] driving them quite fast and from appearances & the gait which they [were] driving induced me to believe they were Indians. This was in the neighborhood where Mr. Riggs' cattle were being herded and I have but little doubt said cattle were said Riggs'. I have no interest in this claim.
          his
Henry X Clifton
         mark
Attest--A. S. Cannon
Sworn to and subscribed before me at my office in Rogue River Valley this 2nd day of November A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Clisby Landreth of Jackson County being duly sworn says
    I am acquainted with Washington L. Riggs who resides on Cottonwood have known him since last spring know that the said Riggs brought about one hundred and fifty head of halfbreed Spanish and American cattle onto Cottonwood last spring and established himself in the butchering business. I am engaged in the cattle trade myself and am herding my cattle within eight miles of Cottonwood north on the road leading into the Willamette Valley, have frequently seen Mr. Riggs' cattle straying or running off in small bands [of] from three to twenty apparently making their way back to the Willamette Valley. Saw Mr. Riggs frequently in search of his cattle and saw him at times returning from Rogue River Valley with some of his cattle and have also seen several of his cattle in Rogue River Valley while out hunting my own.
    I experienced considerable trouble in keeping my own cattle from straying off with all the care I could use. I have lost several head by straying. I cannot say what Mr. Riggs' cattle would weigh did not examine them very closely. Beef cattle were worth [at] Cottonwood and Yreka 10 cts. per pound on foot which is the highest price I know of being paid at any time during the past summer.
Clisby Landreth
Sworn to and subscribed before me at my office in Rogue River Valley agency this twenty fourth day of October A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Eli B. Moore of said county being duly sworn says,
    I have read the statement of Mr. Landreth and believe it in the main to be substantially correct, to the best of my knowledge. I am partner with Mr. Landreth and engaged in the cattle business. We herd our cattle within about eight miles of Riggs' and have had frequent opportunity of seeing Mr. Riggs' cattle straying off. I do not of my own knowledge know how many cattle Mr. Riggs bought then but have heard it stated at one hundred and fifty head. I know of no beef cattle being sold for more than ten cents per pound on foot during the past summer.
Eli B. Moore
Sworn to and subscribed before me at my office in Rogue River Valley O.T. this twenty fourth day of October A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William Gerke of said county being duly sworn says--I know that Mr. Riggs had a lot of cattle on Cottonwood Creek near the Oregon line and that they were missed on or about the first of August A.D. 1855 and believe the Rogue River Indians drove them off. I was assisting Mr. Riggs hunt his cattle on Butte Creek in Rogue River Valley. I found four immediately after I saw the Indians shoot one when I left. I believe the Indians got all the missing cattle one hundred and thirty two in number. Said cattle were good beef at the time and would weigh six hundred and fifty pounds each and were worth seventeen and a half cents per pound.
    I have no interest in this claim.
William Gerke
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office on Table Rock Indian Reserve.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 10   Edith M. Nickel
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Edith M. Nickel of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the seventeenth day of October A.D. 1853 two head of beef cattle and one mule belonging to me were driven off & destroyed by the Deer Creek band of Indians. I was residing in Illinois Valley at the time. The cattle were taken out of the corral near the house. I was living at the house of Dr. Smith at the time, and said cattle were in the same corral with the Dr. and were driven off with his. The mule was at large prairie and was missing the same night and the Indians afterwards said they had killed the mule. I have no doubt of the fact of their having done so. Said cattle were worth at the time one hundred and twenty five dollars per head and said mule was worth two hundred dollars. I have never received payment for said property from the United States nor from anyone nor have I applied in any other manner that neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge.
    This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
Edith M. Nickel
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Rogue River Valley June 26th A.D. 1855.
Geo. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Samuel Mooney of said county being duly sworn says--I know that Edith M. Nickel was the owner of two head of cattle and one mule that was stolen driven off and killed by the Deer Creek band of Indians on or about the 17th day of October A.D. 1855 from her house in Illinois Valley. I followed the trail of the Indians and saw where they had slaughtered said cattle and I saw the mule in their possession and know they (the Indians) got both cattle and mule. I have heard the Indians say that they had done it it was done the night of the attack on the house of Dr. Smith. Said cattle were worth at that time one hundred dollars per head and the mule was worth two hundred dollars. I have no interest in the claim.
Samuel Mooney
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Rogue River Valley this day, June 26th 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 11    William B. Hay
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    William B. Hay of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 31st day of May A.D. 1855 three head of beef cattle belonging to me were driven off and killed by the Deer Creek band of Indians. Said cattle were running at large in the range in which they usually run near my claim in Deer Creek Valley. Said cattle were missed in the evening and pursuit was immediately made. The trail was followed into the mountains to an Indian camp and the remains of the cattle were found & recognized. I have no doubt whatever of the Deer Creek Indians having stolen the cattle. Said cattle were worth at the time they were driven off one hundred and twenty dollars per head. I have never recovered payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone, nor have I applied for remuneration therefor at any other time or in any other manner that neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge. This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
William B. Hay
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville, Oregon this 21st day of June 1855.
As witness my hand & seal.
G. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Joseph H. Dickerson of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 30th of May A.D. 1855 I know that William Hay was the owner of three head of cattle worth one hundred and twenty dollars per head that were driven off by the Deer Creek band of Indians on the day above named & I followed the trail of the cattle where they had been driven by the said Indians into the mountains to their camp. I saw where they had been slaughtered and have no doubt of the fact of the Deer Creek Indians having done the act. I was staying at the house of Mr. Hay at the time.
    I have no interest in this claim.
J. H. Dickerson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office on Rogue River this 26th day of June A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
    Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 12    Gabriel Smith
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Gabriel Smith of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the twenty sixth day of February A.D. 1855 I had belonging to me a Spanish horse worth eighty dollars. Said horse was running in the range in the vicinity of my house situated in Illinois Valley. On the evening of the 25th Mr. Guest a neighbor of mine drove up some mules and this horse was with them. After he caught the ones he wanted to use the horse belonging to me and two mules were turned out in their usual range. A few days after the mules were found distant five miles the horse was missing and I never saw him since. I have no doubt but he was stolen by the Deer Creek Indians. I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone, that neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge. This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by Indians.
Gabriel Smith
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
G. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Gabriel Smith of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 27th day of October A.D. 1853 about fifteen tons of hay belonging to me was destroyed by fire. Said hay was in stack near my house in Illinois Valley and was set on fire in the night time as also was my dwelling house, and I have no doubt it was done by the Deer Creek band of Indians. I saw the Indians very plainly. Hay of the quality of that destroyed has been selling for one hundred dollars per ton during that whole winter in that section of the county. Also I lost at the same time by the said Indians two head of beef cattle. Said cattle were driven out of my corral and run off. I afterwards saw where they had been slaughtered. Said cattle were worth at that time one hundred and twenty five dollars each. I have [not] received payment for said property destroyed from the United States or from anyone. That neither myself representative attorney or agent has ever violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge. This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
Gabriel Smith
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
Geo. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 13    David W. Beckley
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    David W. Beckley of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the twelfth day of May 1855 I had stolen from my house situate in Illinois Valley the following articles by the Deer Creek band of Indians, one hundred pounds of flour worth fifteen dollars, also thirty five pounds of beans worth seven dollars, ten pounds of coffee worth two dollars and fifty cents, one frying pan worth two dollars, one pound of tea worth one dollar. My house was entered again on the twentieth day of May A.D. 1855 and I lost at that time fifty pounds of flour worth seven dollars and fifty cents and twenty five lbs. of bacon worth eight dollars and seventy five cents and two pairs of pants worth ten dollars, two flannel shirts worth four dollars, one coat worth ten dollars, one frying pan worth one dollar and fifty cents. On the same evening by said Indians I had driven off and killed one ox belonging to me worth at the time one hundred and ten dollars. I have no doubt the above stated depredations were committed by the Deer Creek Indians from the sign and track I saw about the house. Said ox was driven off at the same time one belonging to Mr. Philpott was taken. The Indian trail was followed into the mountains and I saw where said ox had been slaughtered. I knew the head and horns of said ox, which remained on the ground.
    I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone. That neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge.
    This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
David W. Beckley
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
Geo. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 14    George Philpott
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    George Philpott of said [county] being duly [sworn] says
    On or about the twentieth of May A.D. 1855 a work ox belonging to me was driven off and killed by the Deer Creek band of Indians. Said ox was running at large in the range where my cattle usually range. Search was immediately made and the place where the ox had been slaughtered was found, the head of the ox was recognized. Said ox had been driven a few miles north of my house in the mountains west of Illinois or Deer Creek Valley, and I have no doubt that the Deer Creek band of Indians stole said ox. Said ox was worth at the time ninety dollars. I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone. That neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge.
    This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
George Philpott
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
Geo. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    David W. Beckley of said county being duly sworn says--On or about the 20th day of May 1855 I know that the Indians belonging to the Deer Creek band drove off and killed an ox belonging to George Philpott a resident of Illinois Valley. I was sent in search of the ox and saw where Indians had been driving cattle, followed the trail some five miles north of Mr. Philpott's house into the mountains and saw where the ox had been slaughtered knew his head by brands on [and?] his horns. I have no interest in this claim. Said ox was worth ninety dollars.
David W. Beckley
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
G. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 15    Charles Ward
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Charles Ward of said county being duly [sworn] says
    On or about the twentieth day of May A.D. 1855 I had stolen from my house in Deer Creek Valley by the Deer Creek Indians, as I believe, one hundred pounds of flour worth fourteen dollars also thirty five pounds of bacon worth twelve dollars and twenty five cents. Four pairs of blankets worth six dollars per pair. My house was entered in my absence while I was out at work and I have no doubt it was done by said Indians from the signs and tracks which I saw in the house.
    Also on or about the first day of June A.D. 1855 I lost one horse and one mule. Said animals were taken from the range in which they had usually run for some time previous. I followed the trail of said animals to within a short distance of the Indians' camp in the mountains and I have no doubt said animals were stolen by said Indians. The said horse was worth at the time eighty dollars and the said mule one hundred and twenty five dollars. I have never received payment for said property destroyed from the United States nor from anyone. That neither myself representative attorney or agent has violated any of the provisions of the intercourse laws by seeking or attempting to obtain private satisfaction or revenge.
    This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property destroyed by said Indians.
Charles Ward
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville Oregon this 25th day of June A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
G. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 16    George Collins
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    George Collins of Siskiyou County California being duly sworn says
    That sometime during the month of July 1853 I was the owner of certain articles of property which I had about 20 miles from Longs ferry on Rogue River to wit:
50 lbs. flour valued at $50.00
80   " beans     "        " 20.00
25   " bacon     "        " 12.00
12   " coffee     "        " 3.46
25   " sugar     "        " 8.25
4   " tea     "        " 5.00
12 ½   " tobacco     "        " 9.00
4 mining picks     "        " 8.00
1 axe     "        " 4.00
5 shovels     "        " 18.00
4 blankets     "        " 16.00
1 tent     "        " 5.00
3 gold pans     "        " 6.00
2 camp kettles     "        " 4.00
All of which were taken away from me or many of them [I] saw [taken] in my own presence by the Rogue River Indians and were securely escaped with over the river. I have never recovered any of said articles nor received payment thereof from the United States nor from anyone.
George Collins
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Jacksonville this 18th day of January A.D. 1855.
Witness my hand and seal
L. F. Grover Notary Public
For Oregon Territory
State of California
County of Siskiyou
Yreka Township
Grape Brand Tobacco vintagraph.com    Before Geo. P. Porter J.P. personally appeared before me one of the justices of the peace in and for said county and state James Laferty who being duly sworn on oath says that during the summer of 1853 he was living and working with George Collins on Rogue River about 40 miles below Long's ferry. That during the month of July in that year they were driven from their camp by a party of Indians who had assembled around them and were forced to leave their tent tools & provisions. That to the best of his knowledge & recollection the following named were amongst the articles left viz. 1 tent $10, 4 picks, 4 shovels, 1 axe, 3 frying pans, 3 gold pans, 3 camp kettles, 300 lbs. flour (20¢ per lb.), 30 lbs. bacon, 50 lbs. bacon, 30 lbs. beans, 45 lbs. sugar, 25 lbs. salt, some tea and coffee, ½ box Grape brand tobacco and numerous other small articles which he cannot enumerate. That he afterwards as soon as it was considered safe to do so went back to the said camp and found that all the property has been destroyed or carried off by the Indians. And he further states upon oath that he has no interest of any kind in the claim made by the said George Collins to the Hon. Board of Commissioners or in the issue thereof.
James Laferty
Sworn & subscribed before me this 17th January 1855.
Geo. P. Porter
J.P.

Claim No. 17    Obadiah Wheelock
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    Obadiah Wheelock of said county being duly sworn says--That during the months of January & February A.D. 1854 two hundred bushels of potatoes belonging to me was stolen by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians. The potatoes were valued at one dollar and a half per bushel by Gen. Joel Palmer. Also about the 15th of June 1854 the same Indians stole one horse belonging to me. Said horse was valued at one hundred and fifty dollars at that time. I have never received payment for said property which was stolen from the United States nor from anyone nor have I applied for remuneration or sought revenge in any way therefor at any time or in any other manner. This affidavit is made for the purpose of obtaining from the United States payment for said property stolen by said Indians.
Obadiah Wheelock
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in the Table Rock agency this 8th day of May 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
Geo. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John D. Mason of said county being duly sworn says--That I know on or about the 15th of June 1854 the Rogue River Indians or some one of their number stole a horse belonging to Obadiah Wheelock, that I had frequently seen said horse in their possession and had no doubt of the fact of their stealing the horse. The horse was worth at the time he was stolen one hundred and fifty dollars.
J. D. Mason
Subscribed and sworn to before me at Table Rock Indian agency Oregon this 8th day of May A.D. 1855.
As witness my hand and seal
G. H. Ambrose
(  seal  )                               Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    John Watson of said county being duly sworn says--I know that during the months of February and March A.D. 1854 Obadiah Wheelock was the owner of a lot of potatoes as much as two hundred bushels which was stolen from him by the Rogue River Indians. I saw the Indians frequently carrying potatoes away from his place and have no doubt they took as many as two hundred bushels.
John Watson
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Table Rock Indian agency O.T. this 8th day of May A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
                                              Ind. Agt.

Claim No. 18    James M. Claymer
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )  s.s.
    On this 14th day of June A.D. 1855 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace in and for said county J. M. Claymer who being duly sworn on oath says that on the 8th day of May A.D. 1854 he with his partner Daniel Gage left Crescent City with a pack train of fifteen mules, thirteen of which were loaded with goods for Yreka. That [on] or about the 18th day of May they were attacked by a band of Indians on the north side of the Siskiyou Mountain about one mile below the summit. The attack was made suddenly and took them by surprise and at the first fire as near as he can judge, Daniel Gage was shot dead. That deponent who was there left alone, with difficulty made his escape and got to Cottonwood that night. On the next day he started back to the place where they had been attacked and found the goods had been moved about a quarter of a mile where some were scattered around and destroyed and found the carcass of a mule that had been killed. That afterwards [he] found ten of the mules in Lyttle & Head's train. That the following is a correct and true list of the goods & property lost them at the time and that the prices were those of the market in Yreka City and what the goods were worth on the ground, viz.
24 pounds cream tartar @ 72¢ 17.28
60 " saleratus @ 30¢ 18.00
285 " sugar @ 24¢ 68.40
60 " salt @ 17¢ 10.20
150 " dried apples @ 27¢ 40.50
300 " flour @ 19¢ 57.00
5 gallons gin @ 3.25 26.00
1 doz. socks 9.00
200 lbs. sugar @ 25¢ 50.00
50 " flour @ 19¢ 9.50
70 " tea @ 75¢ 52.50
4 shirts 5.00
20 gallons molasses 40.00
1 doz. pants 36.00
2 " shirts 24.00
300 cigars 15.00
100     " 5.00
2 yds. sheeting .50
1 dozen wool shirts     36.00
$519.88
Amount [of] the following property
(2) two mules $240.00
(1) one     " 225.00
2 riding saddles and bridles 80.00
13 pairs of blankets 80.00
7 pack saddles and rigging 63.00
Cash which was on the saddle of his riding mule 565.00
1 Colt's revolver 6 shooter dragoon size     55.00
Total         1807.88
That he brought the remainder of the goods into Yreka and delivered them to Murray & Thomas commission merchants to whom he had been in the habit of delivering goods and that with them he compared the goods saved with the original invoices & bills and found that he was the loser of the above mentioned articles. The attack and robbery was committed in Jackson County Oregon.
James M. Claymer
Sworn & subscribed before me this 14th June A.D. 1855.
George P. Porter
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )
    On this 14th of June A.D. 1855 personally appeared before me a justice of the peace in & for said county, Pembroke Murray who being duly sworn says on oath that on the 22nd day of May 1854 J. M. Claymer delivered at the store of Murray and Thomas (of which firm he is a member) to be sold on commission the remainder of a cargo of goods. That said Claymer informed him that his train had [been] attacked by Indians on the Siskiyou Mountain & his partner Daniel Gage killed & that the train had been robbed. That at the request of the said Claymer he compared the goods delivered with the original bills & invoices and knows that the goods mentioned in the foregoing affidavit were lost & missing and that he believes on oath that the said affidavit is true and correct and that the property was lost as therein mentioned.
Murray & Thomas
per P. Murray
Sworn & subscribed before me this 14th June A.D. 1855.
Geo. P. Porter
J.P.
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )
    On this 21st day of July A.D. 1855 personally appeared before me A. B. Little who being duly sworn on oath says that on or about the 18th day of May A.D. 1854 he camped on the north side of Siskiyou Mountain about 3 hours behind the time that Claymer & Gage's train had passed and found that accident had happened by their mules coming into his camp with their saddles cut & cargo scattered. That he made an examination in the neighborhood and became satisfied that the train had been attacked by Indians both from general appearances & from finding the body of Daniel Gage and the carcass of a mule which had been shot and also from the trail left behind by the Indians. That upon making this discovery he ran his stock down the mountain to avoid having it driven off. That two days after he returned to the ground with Mr. J. M. Claymer and assisted him to pack up and remove the scattered remnants of his cargo and assisted in bringing them into Yreka. That he has seen the affidavit of J. M. Claymer and believes from his own knowledge that it is true and correct & that the goods & property mentioned therein were actually lost by him at the time and carried away and destroyed by the Indians. That he had been in Crescent City with them at the time they bought their goods and had a pretty [good] knowledge of what they bought and had started with & know that the prices mentioned or charged in Mr. Claymer's affidavit were the market prices at the time.

A. B. Little
Sworn & subscribed to this 21st of July A.D. 1855.
Geo. P. Porter, J.P.
State of California     )
County of Siskiyou    )
    I, H. G. Ferris, clerk of said county hereby certify that the foregoing named George P. Porter is an acting justice of the peace of Yreka township in said county duly elected and qualified as the law directs & that the foregoing is his signature. Witness my hand & the seal of the county court this 24th day of July A.D. 1855.
H. G. Ferris Clerk
(  seal  )                          By A. C. Clark, Deputy

Claim No. 19    James Bruce
    United States to James Bruce       Dr.
    To one hundred and fifty bushels of $[blank] cts. wheat stolen from my place during the months of July & August 1854 by Jake's band of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians with whom a treaty of purchase was made on the tenth of September 1853 by Joel Palmer Supt. Indian Affairs Oregon Territory. The market price of wheat was $4.50 per bushel making - - - -$675.00

Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    James Bruce of said county being duly sworn says that the above account is correct & just and that he knows the Indians mentioned in the account to be the identical ones who committed the offense. And that he has never recovered any portion of the property stolen & furthermore he has never taken any personal revenge.
James Bruce
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Jackson County O.T. this 15th day of December A.D. 1855.
G. H. Ambrose
                                             Ind. Agt.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    George W. Collins of said county being duly sworn says
    He was living with James Bruce at his farm in Jackson County during the months of July & August A.D. 1854 and that he saw thirty or forty Indians in Mr. Bruce's field several times stealing wheat and saw them packing off large quantities in the sheaf and the portions of the field where they were frequently seen there were three acres entirely destroyed before harvest. And he believes from what he saw there were one hundred and fifty bushels stolen which was worth at that time $4.50 per bushel. He also says he knew them to be Jake's band of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians with whom a treaty of purchase was made on the 10th of September A.D. 1853 by Joel Palmer Supt. Indian Affairs Oregon Territory and that he has no interest in the claim.
George W. Collins
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Jackson County O.T. this 14th day of December A.D. 1855.
Wm. Hoffman J.P.
Jackson County O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I hereby certify that William Hoffman before whom the within affidavit was made and who has thereunto subscribed his name was at the time of so doing a justice of the peace in & for the county & territory aforesaid duly commissioned and sworn and that his signature thereto is genuine.
    Witness my hand and the seal of District Court for the county aforesaid this fifteenth day of Dec. A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
Clerk Dist. Court
(  seal  )                          Jackson County O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    E. C. Pelton of said county being duly sworn says
    He was living on a claim near James Bruce's in Jackson County O.T. the months of July and August 1854 and that he saw at different times about thirty Indians in Mr. Bruce's field gathering wheat and from what he saw he believes they must have taken one hundred and fifty bushels which was worth at that time $4.50 per bushel and he furthermore says he knew [them] to be Jake's band of the Rogue River Tribe of Indians with whom a treaty of purchase was made on the 10th of September A.D. 1853 by Joel Palmer, Supt. Indian Affairs Oregon Territory and that he has no interest in the claim.
E. C. Pelton
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Jackson County O.T. this 14th day of December A.D. 1855.
Wm. Hoffman J.P.
Jackson County O.T.
Territory of Oregon    )
County of Jackson       )  s.s.
    I hereby certify that Wm. Hoffman before whom the within affidavit was made and who has thereunto subscribed his name was at the time of so doing a justice of the peace in & for the county & territory aforesaid duly commissioned and sworn & that his signature thereto is genuine.
    Witness my hand & the seal of District Court for the county aforesaid this 15th day of December A.D. 1855.
S. H. Taylor
Clerk Dist. Court
(  seal  )                          Jackson Co. O.T.

Claim No. 20    Wm. G. T'Vault
Indian Department of the
Territory of Oregon
        To
                Wm. G. T'Vault              Dr.
1851
Sept. 14th for services rendered from Augt. 21st to Sept. 14th in the Indian department 24 days at $5 per day $120.00
" " six horses lost during service valued at $150 each 900.00
" " five pack saddles and fixtures valued at $25 each 125.00
" " one American riding saddle valued at 75.00
" " nine guns lost in service valued at $25 each 225.00
" " one Sharps rifle valued at 100.00
" " dragoon Colt's revolver 50.00
" " one pair pistols        50.00
Total           $1645.00
Territory of Oregon
    Be it remembered that on the 17th day of April A.D. 1856 personally appeared before me Joseph G. Wilson clerk of the Supreme Court for the Territory of Oregon the undersigned W. G. T'Vault and made oath that on the 21st day of August 1851 he started from Port Orford on the Pacific coast in Oregon Territory that he had with him six horses five pack saddles & fixtures one American riding saddle nine guns and Sharps rifle one dragoon Colt's revolver, one pair of pistols, that he proceeded south along the coast to the mouth of Rogue River notifying the Indians as requested by Dr. Dart Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon Territory, from thence up Rogue River twenty five miles to the north bend from thence to the Coquille River thence down the Coquille River near the coast notifying the Indians on the route of said request of Dr. Dart, when near the mouth of the Coquille River himself and his party of men were attacked by the Indians & five of his men were killed and himself and four others making their escape severely wounded, which attack occurred on the 14th day of Sept. 1851 the said Indians having committed depredations on the whole line of march and finally capturing all the property contained in the foregoing account. And that said property was taken by the Indians while he was performing the duties as required by him in the amend [i.e., appended] letter of Dr. Dart Superintendent &c. and that the value put upon the services and the property taken by the Coquille Indians is a fair and just value in cash and that he is justly entitled to receive for the same the sum of sixteen hundred and forty five dollars.
W. G. T'Vault
Subscribed and sworn to before me at my office in Salem, O.T.
In witness whereof I have hereunto set my hand and affixed
the seal of our said Supreme Court this 17th day
of April 1856 at Salem
J. G. Wilson
(  seal  )                Clerk of the Supreme Court of Oregon
Office, Superintendence Indian Affairs
    Oregon City Aug. 14th 1851
Dear Sir
    Enclosed is a letter to James Gamble Esq. at Port Orford in which you will see I have requested his aid in taking the first steps towards attempting to negotiate with the Rogue River Indians for their lands in Oregon. Knowing you desire to restore peace and harmony in that country as well as extinguish the Indian title to the lands I am induced also to ask your cooperation in the attempt to collect these Indians for treaty purposes at Port Orford. Your extensive knowledge of the country will enable you to render us essential aid in this matter without interference, I would hope, with any other business in which you may have embarked in their country, I have sent an express to the crossing of Rogue River to notify the chiefs and headmen there, to come down to Port Orford to attend this treaty. It is our wish to treat if possible with the whole tribe at that place, therefore should it become necessary for you to step out of the line of your other business to promote this much desired object you will be remunerated for your trouble.
I have the honor to be
    Very Respectfully
        Your Obt. Servt.
            (Signed) Anson Dart
                Superintendent
Wm. G. T'Vault Esq.
(The foregoing is a true copy from the letter book page 155, Supt. Office O.T.
Edward R. Gray
    Clerk)
Salem 17th April 1856
Joel Palmer,
    Superintendent Indian Affairs for Oregon Territory
Dear Sir,
    Yours of January 11th has been received. And you are correct in your recollection of my desire to present a claim for losses sustained by the Indians when acting under the direction and request of Superintendent Dart in the year 1851 and I thank you for your suggestion in relation to presenting my claim against the department for allowance and I here will avail myself of doing so. Accompanying this you will find an account which I have made out for the several losses and the value of each item with my affidavit accompanying. I wish you to instruct me if anything more will be required and if so what testimony will be required. My losses and my defeat at the Coquille are matters of public notoriety. The gen. government sent troops immediately to chastise the Indians; this is a matter you know personally yourself. The claim should have been presented long ago but my situation was such I could not attend to it in fact I really did not know how the matter could be reached in any way short of a memorial I would be glad if you would pass on it at an early date. Please to write me by return as Mr. Hayward takes this to you. Please to write me by mail and if you should want of further testimony (which I hardly think you will from the notoriety of the affair) please say what particular fact or circumstance needs further evidence. By your attention to this for me at this time it will much oblige me, as I have to leave tomorrow for Jacksonville, or immediately on the return of Mr. Hayward, by his bringing your letter, it will expedite my business much.
Yours Respectfully
    Wm. G. T'Vault

Claim No. 21   E. A. Vaughn
Oak Point
    May 31, 1852
    A bill of property destroyed by fire in the burning of E. A. Vaughn's house which occurred on the 29th day of May 1852.
One log house $200.00
One rifle gun with accoutrements and ammunition 20.00
One double barreled shotgun 20.00
Bedding, blankets etc. 10.00
One sack of flour 3.50
⅔ of ½ barrel of pork 12.00
3½ gals. syrup with cane 3.00
20 lbs. sugar 2.50
3     "    coffee 1.00
1½  "    tea 1.00
½    "     cheese 3.00
Butter 4.00
2 wooden & one tin buckets 1.50
Pots & kitchen furniture 5.00
One barrel with vinegar 3.00
2 qts. of oil for lamps 1.50
Shirts & other clothing 10.00
1 pair hip skin boots 4.00
1 saddle & bridle 20.00
2 axes and a hatchet 6.00
1 scythe & stick 5.00
1 handsaw 2 augers & 1 drawing knife 4.50
Books & papers 10.00
One steel spade 2.00
One hoe 1.00
One coffee mill 1.00
1 pair of oars 4.00
Medicines 10.00
1 belt with scabbard and knife 2.00
500 shingles      5.00
375.50
Traveling expenses of agent coming to Oak Point from his office to take testimony     15.00
Total Bill           $390.00
Oak Point October 21st 1852
    Personally appeared before me L. H. Judson Sub Indian Agent for the Indians near the mouth of Columbia River E. A. Vaughn of Clatsop County and after being duly sworn says that the within and accompanying bill of house and articles were destroyed by fire on the 29th of May last, said fire originating as deponent believes either in the willful neglect or carelessness of Indians known as the Skookum Tillicum whose place of residence and country is on the Columbia River between this place and the mouth of said river. And that the articles mentioned in the aforesaid bill are estimated as deponent verily believes at their just and proper value.
E. A. Vaughn
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 21st day of October A.D. 1852.
L. H. Judson
Sub Indian Agt.
Oak Point October 20th 1852
    Personally appeared before me L. H. Judson sub agent for the Indians near the mouth of the Columbia River Clement A. Bradbury of Clatsop County and after being duly sworn testified that on the 28th day of May last a canoe with several Indians known as the Skookum Tillicum came up the Columbia River and camped at night somewhere in the neighborhood below the residence of deponent that witness saw said company of Indians at Samuel Boynton's claim about two miles below his deponent's residence on the afternoon of said day and that said Indians were traveling up the Columbia River and further witness saith that on the forenoon or about noon of the following day the 29th of May aforesaid the house adjoining claim above witness' residence on the south bank of the Columbia River was discovered to be on fire and that said house with all its contents was consumed by fire on said 29th day of May aforesaid and deponent further saith that according to the best of his judgment said house was worth when standing one hundred and fifty dollars and deponent further knows that there were articles in said house at the time it was burned and which were destroyed by said fire among which were a rifle and a double barreled shotgun some cooking utensils a lot of pork a scythe and some other articles and that said claim and house upon it was there reputed to belong to E. A. Vaughn of said Clatsop County aforesaid.
C. A. Bradbury
Sworn to and subscribed before me this 25th day of October A.D. 1852.
L. H. Judson
Sub Indian Agent
Oak Point Oct. 20th 1852
    Personally appeared before me L. H. Judson Sub Indian Agent for the Indians near the mouth of the Columbia River Mrs. Ann Bradbury, wife of C. A. Bradbury of Clatsop County and after being duly sworn testified that on Saturday the 29th of May last early in the morning a company of Indians known as the Skookum Tillicum came up the Columbia River in a large canoe and called at the residence of witness, and that soon after said Indians went on up the river about half a mile in said canoe, and stopped and kindled a fire near a house claimed by and believed by deponent to belong to E. A. Vaughn of Clatsop County aforesaid, and that in a short time after said Indians left where they kindled said fire said house and all its contents were destroyed by fire, witness further said that [it] was evident the fire run along the ground and dry shavings from said Indians' fire to the house and that said house was destroyed in consequence of fire being near said house by said Indians also that said claim upon which the burned house stood is immediately adjoining the claim of witness and her husband and the house was about half a mile from the residence of witness.
Ann Bradbury
Sworn & subscribed before me this 20th day of October A.D. 1852.
L. H. Judson
Ind. Agt.




LOOSE PAPERS RELATING
TO ROGUE RIVER CLAIMS
May 31, 1852 - November 18, 1856




Rogue River Valley
    Nov. 27, 1854
B. F. Harding Esqr.
    Dear Sir,
        Some time in February or March 1852, while I was acting Indian agent, Mr. Richard W. Bragg came to my house in Rogue River Valley for the purpose of obtaining my permission to bring some hogs which he had in charge into that portion of the valley near Jacksonville.
    So far as I can now recollect, I informed him that it was not the intention of the Indian Department to enforce that portion of the Intercourse Law which prohibited persons not licensed to do so to pass through the Rogue River Valley (it being then Indian country) and that if he chose to bring his hogs into the valley I as Indian agent should not interfere, unless the Indians should be so much opposed to his doing so as to endanger the peace of the valley.
    At the time Mr. Bragg came to see me about the hogs, the chief Sam was at my house. I informed him of the wish [of] Mr. Bragg and explained to him as far as practicable the consequences which would probably result from bringing hogs into the valley--that they subsisted upon acorns, camas and other roots, and would be likely to interfere with provisions of the Indians.
    Sam told Mr. Bragg & myself that as he had never seen any hogs, and was unacquainted with their habits, he could not say whether the Indians would be willing to have the hogs brought into the valley or not., and so far as I can recollect neither consented or objected to their being brought into the valley.
    So far as I now recollect the Indians never made any complaint to me with reference to the hogs.
Respectfully
    A. A. Skinner
Territory of Oregon    )
Jackson County            )  s.s.
    Before the undersigned a Justice of the Peace in & for said Jackson County personally came Alonzo A. Skinner and made solemn oath that the facts contained in the foregoing statement are true according to the best of his knowledge and belief.
A. A. Skinner
Sworn to & subscribed before me this [omission] day of Nov. 1854.
S. H. Taylor
Justice of the Peace


    Statement of the number and names of claimants for property destroyed by the Rogue River Tribe of Indians, during the war with said tribe in 1853, and the amount allowed to each, together with the amount to which each claimant is entitled, out of the $15,000 appropriated by the treaty of Sept. 10, 1853, applying a "pro rata" of $34 77/100 per cent [sic] on the whole amount claimed, which is $43,140,75. See report of Commissioners transmitted by Joel Palmer, Supt. Indian Affairs, per letter of March 30th 1855.
No. of Claim Names of Claimants Amount Allowed by Commissioners Net Amount at 34 77/100 "Pro Rata"
1     Daniel & Ephraim Raymond 3,144.25       1,093.25      
2     Clinton Barney 249.00       86.57      
3     Davis Evans 1,755.00       610.21      
4     Martin Angel 200.00       69.54      
5     Michael Brennan 32.75       11.39      
6     Albert B. Jennison 1,689.65       587.49      
7     William J. Newton 1,600.00       556.32      
8     William Thompson & Henry Rowland 1,029.00       357.75      
9     James W. Patrick & John R. Hardin 1,315.00       457.22      
10     Pleasant W. Stowe 450.00       156.46      
11     Jeremiah Yarnell 100.00       34.77      
12     William S. King 250.00       86.92      
13     Cram, Rogers & Co. 250.00       86.92      
14     Edith M. Nickel 230.00       79.97      
15     John Benjamin 316.00       109.87      
16     David N. Birdseye 211.50       73.54      
17     Lewis Rothermel 225.00       78.23      
18     Mary Ann Hodgins 80.00       27.82      
19     George H. C. Taylor 668.50       232.43      
20     John Markley 80.00       27.81      
21     Sigmund Ettlinger 130.00       45.20      
22     James C. Tolman 175.00       60.85      
23     Henry Helm 108.00       37.55      
24     William Elliott sent to 2nd aud. Dec. 31, '57, see letter to P. G. Washington same date 540.00       187.76      
25     Silas & Edward Day 421.00       146.38      
26     James M. Triplett 500.00       173.85      
27     Nathan B. Lane 669.00       232.61      
28     John Agy 85.00       29.55      
29     James Bruce 475.00       165.15      
30     James J. Fryer 544.50       189.32      
31     William G. T'Vault 270.00       93.88      
32     Hall & Burpee 628.50       218.53      
33     John Peninger sent to 2nd aud. Dec. 10, '57 263.00       91.44      
34     John E. Ross sent to 2nd auditor Dec. 31, '57, see letter to P. G. Washington, same date 4,176.00       1,451.99      
35     John S. Miller sent to 2nd auditor Dec. 31, '57 477.00       165.85      
36     D. Irwin 920.00       319.89      
37     Burrell B. Griffin sent to 2nd aud. see letter to P. G. Washington Dec. 31, '57 1,277.00       444.01      
38     Marcena McCombs 1,020.00       354.66      
39     William N. Ballard 468.50       162.90      
40     Truman Smith 382.25       132.91      
41     Nicholas Klopfenstein 227.50       79.10      
42     Daniel F. Fisher 173.50       60.33      
43     Thomas D. Jewett 317.25       110.31      
44     Sylvester Pease 300.00       104.31      
45     McGreer, Drury & Runnels 450.00       156.46      
46     David Haggart 90.00       31.29      
47     James Mooney 500.00       173.85      
48     John Gheen 840.00       292.07      
49     Theodric Cameron 30.50       10.60      
50     James Abraham 825.40       286.99      
51     Frances Nazareth [Francis Noseret] 1,464.00       509.03      
52     Galley & Oliver 500.00       173.85      
53     T. B. Sanderson 400.00       139.08      
54     Frederick Rosenstock 450.00       156.46      
55     Dunn & Alberding 2,500.00       869.25      
56     Asa G. Fordyce 200.00       69.54      
57     Obadiah D. Hoxie 50.00       17.39      
58     James L. Loudon letter to P. G. Washington Dec. 31, '57 200.00       69.54      
59     Samuel Grubb 300.00       104.31      
60     William Kahler sent to 2nd aud., see letter to P. G. Washington Dec. 31, '57 144.45       50.23      
61     Samuel Williams 474.00       164.81      
62     Hiram Niday 898.50       312.41      
63     John Anderson 1,093.00       380.04      
64     Elias Huntington 80.00       27.82      
65     Sherlock Abrams 213.25       74.15      
66     Thomas Frizzell, dec. 476.00       165.57      
67     Miller & Rose 850.00       295.55      
68     Robert B. Metcalfe 86.00       29.90      
69     Charles Williams 67.00       23.30      
70     John Swinden 475.00       165.16      
71     James R. Davis 35.00       12.17      
72     Isaac Woolen 750.00       260.78      
73     William M. Hughes         275.00                 95.62      
$43,140.75       $15,000.00     
NARA Series M2, Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 28.  This page was transcribed from the 1850s transcriptions on M2, but some of the originals of the above documents are now available online in NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 670+.
    Spelling of names has been "corrected" and made consistent as much as feasible. Edith M. Nickel is spelled Edith M. Nichol throughout in the original; George Collins is called George Cullen. James Abraham and Sherlock Abrams are spelled James Abrahams and Sherlock Abraham, as well as other spellings. 
Note that Samuel H. Culver was a different person than Samuel Colver.
    Beginning with Jacob Comegys' claim the affidavits begin to bear the hallmarks of being actual dictation--false starts, repetitions and cross-outs--rather than transcriptions of polished documents. This suggests that the penciled objections earlier in the book were added in Jacksonville or at the Table Rock Reserve. The penciled handwriting resembles that of Edward R. Gray on page 329 of the volume. The attribution of the penciled notations to Joel Palmer, as asserted on the introductory frames of the National Archives microfilm, is incorrect.
   

    Original affidavits for McClenny and Bragg can be found on
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 607 Oregon Superintendency 1842-1852, frames 1256-1261.



    LETTER FROM GEN. LANE.--We find in the Yreka Herald of the 31st the following letter from Gen. Lane, which we publish for the benefit of all who are interested in the Rogue River war claims:
WASHINGTON CITY, Feb. 18.
    G. W. TYLER, ESQ.:--Dear Sir: You will not think hard of me for not writing. I am and have been constantly busy.
    I have finally succeeded in procuring an adjustment of the expenses of the Rogue River war. Some vouchers have been returned for certificate and proper authentication. By this mail drafts to a considerable amount will go out to the care of the Governor of Oregon, for the benefit of the parties concerned. By next mail the balance will go out, except such as have, as above stated, been returned. In a few days the rolls for payment will be forwarded to a paymaster, who will proceed to Jacksonville and Yreka, and pay the troops, officers and men.
    This matter has been a most troublesome affair, but I have at last succeeded in obtaining justice, and the people will ere long have their pay.
Your friend,
    JOSEPH LANE.
Umpqua Weekly Gazette, Scottsburg, April 14, 1855, page 3



    ROGUE RIVER WAR ACCOUNTS.--A
correspondent of the Mountain Herald writes from Jacksonville (O.T.) that General Lane is of the opinion that the Governor of Oregon will soon disburse drafts at the capital to liquidate the accounts of the Rogue River war.
    Some of these drafts have already arrived, and the remainder are shortly expected to arrive. The Herald says furthermore that the troops of the different companies will be paid in coin by the United States Paymaster, who will shortly travel through Oregon to Jacksonville and Yreka for that purpose, and it is said that Major Alvord is likely to be the disbursing officer.
    This will be a great convenience to the troops who served, who can, at no expense, draw and receipt for themselves. Otherwise, they must draw by giving duly attested powers of attorney which it is better to do here than at Washington, where the receipt payrolls will probably be sent, whether paid or not paid.
Sacramento Daily Union, May 11, 1855, page 3



    ROGUE RIVER WAR.--
Major Alvord, paymaster, U.S.A., announces that he will pay the volunteers engaged in the Rogue River War, at the following places, at the specified time:
    At Yreka, on Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday, July 3rd, 4th and 5th, to pay Capt. Goodall's company.
    At Yreka, on Friday and Saturday, July 6th and 7th, to pay Capt. Rhodes' company.
    At Crescent City, on Monday, Tuesday, Wednesday, July 16th, 17th and 18th to pay Capt. Terry's company.
    The heirs of deceased men are referred to the Second Auditor of the Treasury, at Washington City, for payment. Those who furnished horses, clothing, etc., and whose claims are acknowledged on the muster and pay rolls, will be paid at the same time.
San Joaquin Republican, Stockton, California, June 2, 1855, page 2



    LIVELY.--
The Yreka Union says that Major Alvord has been engaged making payments in that town to various companies engaged in the Rogue River war. This has made money more plentiful, and an increase of business has been observed during the last week.
Sacramento Daily Union, July 13, 1855, page 3


Salem August 23rd 1855
Dear General
    I write to advise you that I have in my hands a claim of John Gheen for property destroyed by the Indians in the Rogue River War. Gheen came here to get his draft for services in said war, but it had been delivered to some unknown person by the Governor upon a forged receipt. Gheen was here penniless and unable to get back to California and I advanced him $300 on his said claim for damages and took from him the duplicate certificate with a full power of attorney to receive and receipt for anything that may be paid on said certificate.
    I present these facts so that in case you have the disbursement of the $15,000 reserved in the treaty, I may get the amount due on said certificate, or as much thereof as you may feel at liberty to pay me under the circumstances.
    The certificate is for $840.
Yours very truly
    Geo. H. Williams
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, page 288.



Supt. Indian Affairs
    Dayton O.T. Sept. 1st / 1855
Dear Sir,
    Your letter of the 23rd ultimo, which came to this office during my absence, informing me that you had in your possession a certificate of John Gheen given by the commissioners appointed to audit claims for spoliations committed on the citizens by the Rogue River Indians in the war of 1853, has been placed on file in this office. The duplicates of certificates, with the report of the commissioners and the papers connected therewith, has been transmitted to the office of the Commissioner of Indian Affairs. An acknowledgment by that officer of the reception of those papers has been received at this office, but no instructions given by which I am able to judge of the final disposition to be made of them, or the time and mode of paying the several claims. So soon as information is received upon that subject you shall be duly advised.
    I have the honor to be
        Dear sir
            Your obt. servant
                Joel Palmer
                    Superintendent Ind. Affrs.
Hon. George H. Williams
    Chief Justice
        Salem O.T.
Microcopy of Records of the Oregon Superintendency of Indian Affairs 1848-1872, Reel 5; Letter Book D, pages 288-289.


Washington Correspondence of the Statesman.
Washington, D.C.
    Oct. 3, 1855.
    Dear Sir: Your letter in answer to mine is received, and I hasten to give facts and figures relating to some of the accounts of the Rogue River war. You may rely upon their accuracy, and they cannot be contradicted.
    In publishing them, the people of Oregon will be able to judge somewhat of the policy that "Clarendon of Forest Dale" [Charles S. Drew] has successfully carried out heretofore, and which he is so desirous of inaugurating for the future, especially in that war of '54 "upon the emigrants."
    He might have achieved all this except for the fact that Gov. Curry "bowstrung" [garrotted] him and placed a good officer (Miller) in his stead, who took possession of the official papers in Dugan's office--but the next morning early, "Charley" got a duplicate key of Ettlinger, and the "emigrant war" papers, and the duplicates of the Rogue River war accounts "vamoosed the ranch."
    No man except Gen. Lane could have so successfully terminated the Indian difficulties in Rogue River Valley in '53 and promoted the quiet, peace and prosperity of the valley. In all this he was aided by Superintendent Palmer, who opportunely arrived on the ground with full power to act officially in carrying out these objects. Since then, I am credibly informed, every influence has been brought to bear ("by a certain set") to get up a disturbance with the Indians, in order, doubtless, to do a little more speculating.
    A gallant and hardy band of men, under some efficient and determined officers, will then be required to hunt down and beat these savages, as they can only be hunted down and beaten, in the mountains, by toil, fatigue, hardships and courage. $98,500 was the amount of accounts received at Washington for expenses of the Rogue River war. I understand the "Walker expedition" accounts amount to some $100,000. Enclosed is a statement of both the Rogue River war and the Walker expedition, in relation to the number of troops, and days' service in each. It will be seen by that that the Walker expedition costs "Uncle Sam" about $10 for each day's service, and that the Rogue River war cost about $4 [sic]--including some $10,000 for hospital, accounts that did not occur in the Walker expedition, as I have never heard of any killed or wounded. Besides these hospital bills, some of which are pretty tall, there are several other little bills, such as the one of Drew's clerk for hay $1,680--furnished at the classic shades of "Forest Dale"--during the war. I saw this pile of hay, and it was worth, at 6 cents, about $600; another bill of Geo. Pierson's, for hay at 6 cents, amounting to $2,250. I saw his pile of hay too, and it was about four wagonloads. They call a load of hay a ton in Rogue River Valley, but I call it about 1200 pounds; $500 would have paid George Pierson amply for his hay. Then there is the bill of Mr. George L. Snelling for about $10,000, which was paid to him here. Mr. Snelling was a partner of C. S. and B. J. Drew in packing--about $4,000 of his bill was for forage, and the other $6,000 for provisions &c. Among his forage items is a pretty tall one for shelled oats, at 20 cts. per lb. Now the troops never got, in the whole Rogue River war, 200 lbs. of shelled oats, nor did Mr. Snelling ever furnish a pound of forage of any kind. Everybody in Rogue River Valley knows this, at least all the knowing ones do.
    And among Mr. Snelling's items on his provision bill is one for 150 gallons of vinegar at $8 per gallon. "Angels and ministers of grace defend us," but the troops never used 150 gills of vinegar during the whole war, hospital included, although they were some on beans when they could get them. Snelling's item of beef, too, for about $900 is preposterous. Why, sir, he did not furnish any provisions at all, that any of the knowing ones know of. C. S. Drew had a bill of some $4,000 that covered all and a little more than the whole concern furnished during the whole war.
    With all these LITTLE charges, including hospital, the whole expenses of the war was not certainly more than $5 per day, for each day's service, and yet the "Walker expedition," of less than 100 men, for about three months, costs $10 per day, or some $100,000.
    Let a few more such affairs be got up, and won't the officials here at Washington think this is ROGUE River with a vengeance, and even the U.S. Treasury and mint too can't stand under the DREW that will be made upon it. That it is good to protect and aid the emigration is true, and very proper, and that all just expenses should be paid, no just man will deny; much of what was furnished should be paid; if all that is charged is paid, there should be a little scrutiny exercised in regard to the accounts. The time when, and the place where, they were actually furnished, as well as the exact article furnished and by whom furnished.
ROGUE RIVER WAR.
    No. Men No Days Service Total
Lamerick's Co. 59 about 35           2065
Miller's 114   from 35 to 86 5230
Goodall's 88 33 2904
Rhodes' 62 33 2046
Terry's 44 25 1100
Williams' 32 20    928
Owens' 29 25    725
Fowler's Infantry 63           20 about   1260
16258
    This gives a result of about 16258 rations of subsistence charged in the Rogue River war, and 14998 rations of forage, including in this estimate neither rations nor subsistence for the staff of Gen. Lane.
    The hospital bills of $10,000, and some $2000 for flour supplied to the starving emigrants, is all included in the 98,500 of Rogue River war accounts. Now let us compare this with the Walker expedition of about 96 men, for 3 months: No. men, 96; No. days, 90; total, 8,640, but say for short 10,000 days service, and the result is that it costs more than $10 per day for each day's service.
    These are pretty all figures even for Northern California and Southern Oregon, and I know of several high privates that would like to take, on such terms from government, the contract of quelling all Indian disturbances, and of protecting the emigrants, too.
    I see you have published a bill of Dowell's, in a former number of the Statesman, as being furnished to the "Walker expedition." I send you a copy of Snelling's little bill as being furnished to the Rogue River war. It is on file in the Auditor's office here, and has made the Treasury squall to the tune of nearly $10,000.
United States to Geo. L. Snelling Dr.    
To 2070 lbs. flour @ 40 c. $   828.00
219 lbs. bacon @ 75 c. 161.25
3187 lbs. bacon @ 75 c. 164.25
3187 lbs. beef @ 30 c. 956.10
598 lbs. beans @ 50 c. 299.00
588 lbs. rice @ 75 c. 441.00
205  lbs. coffee @ 75 c. 153.75
117 lbs. sugar @ 50 c. 58.50
119 lbs. salt @ 50 c. 59.50
520 lbs. soap @ $1 520.00
200 lbs. candles @ $1.50 300.00
150½ gals. vinegar @ $8    1204.00
$5074.80
         FORAGE BILL.
649 lbs. sheaf oats @ 12 c. $   77.88
12727 shelled oats @ 20 c. 2345.40
17000 lbs. of hay @ 6 c.  1020.00
3643.28
      RECAPITULATION.
Provision bill 5074.10
Forage bill 3643.28
    Total 8717.38
    I certify on honor that this account is correct &c.
C. S. DREW, Acting U.S.Q.M.&C.S.*
    The elections down south, as far as heard from, show a clear gain of the Democracy over the Know Nothings. We are looking for some exciting times during the coming session, and some new phases in politics are expected to turn up.
    Santa Anna has taken another stampede, wooden leg and all, and is expected to lionize it here among the Los Yankies. Poor Mexico can never get along till she is annexed, or filibuster-ized. They want Kinney or Walker down there. More anon.
HIGH PRIVATE OF ROGUE RIVER WAR.
    *Note.--Acting U.S.Q.M.&C.S. means United States quartermaster and commissary of subsistence.
    The publication of this bill, which is an exact copy, will open the eyes of some of the high privates of the Rogue River war to the quantity of vinegar, rice, candles and soap they used in fighting, bleeding and dying for their country--and the forage bill will light up the farmers of Rogue River Valley on the value of hay and oats, especially shelled oats, in time of war.
    In anticipation of a general Indian war of extermination, is it better to turn soldiers or plant oats? In case the latter avocation is decided upon, it would be well to get one of these patent threshing machines. Let us have war by all means, and let the cry be "viva la bagatelle" soldiers and cognac.
HIGH PRIVATE.
Oregon Statesman, Corvallis, December 1, 1855, page 3


MEMORIAL
To Congress, asking liquidation of certain spoliation claims.
To the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America:

    Your memorialists, the Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Oregon, most respectfully represent that, during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, a large amount of property was destroyed by Indians; that on the close of said war a treaty was made, of the date 10th Sept. 1853, by which the sum of sixty thousand dollars was allowed to said tribe for the purchase of certain lands within their bounds, of which fifteen thousand dollars were reserved to liquidate the claims of citizens for the spoliation of property made by said Indians during said war; that said reservation of fifteen thousand dollars was made on an estimate made at the time of making said treaty by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs in Oregon. But said spoliation claims have been audited and ascertained by a board of commissioners duly organized under the directions of the Indian Bureau, which amounted in all to nearly forty-three thousand dollars.
    Therefore, your memorialists would urge that a law be passed making an appropriation to cover the balance due to the citizens of Rogue River Valley, in said ascertained spoliation claims, amounting to nearly twenty-eight thousand dollars, and as in duty bound will ever pray.
Oregon Statesman, Salem, March 11, 1856, page 1


Jacksonville Oregon
    April 4th 1856
Sir:--
    Congress made an appropriation of fifteen thousand dollars in 1854 to pay the Indian spoliations during the Rogue River Indian War of 1853, and Ambrose the Indian agent and two other gentlemen were appointed commissioners to audit the claims soon afterwards, yet up to this time not a dollar has been paid the claimants.
    I wish to know the reason why these claims have not been paid, and when the claimants may expect to be paid.
    Would drafts drawn on the auditor by the claimants be paid like drafts drawn by contractors for services on mail routes?
Yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 122-123.



Office Superintendent Ind. Affrs.
    Dayton O.T. April 27th 1856
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit, enclosed herein, twenty one claims (numbered from one to twenty one inclusive) presented by citizens of this Territory for alleged spoliations committed by Indians, and which have been accumulating in this office for some time. A portion of these claims were found among the files of miscellaneous papers when I entered the service, and, in a few cases, the items were mentioned to the Indians at the time of negotiating treaties with them, but in most cases the circumstances were such as, in my opinion, to render it inadvisable to urge their allowance in negotiating. The lapse of time intervening between the commission of these offenses and the dates of negotiations were so great, and the constant rambling and migratory character of portions of the alleged perpetrators, as well as the absence of all satisfactory evidence in their greater portion of the claims, induced me to omit making any specific provisions to cover them in the treaties. The meager amounts allowed those Indians (the Rogue Rivers) would not warrant the payment of these claims from their annuities even if found equitable, and the only remedy, in my opinion, is by direct application to Congress.
    The claim of Jacob Comegys
(No. 1) for timber destroyed and hogs killed by the Yamhill band of Calapooya Indians was presented to the chiefs at the time of negotiating the treaty of purchase for their country, but they would not allow it, alleging a right to the occupancy of that tract as having existed with them from time immemorial, and averring that they had only used timber for the accustomed buildings and for fuel, and denied having wantonly destroyed the property of others. It was admitted as possible their dogs might have killed some pigs, but that the high waters and ravages of wolves had doubtless done what was alleged against them. Judge Comegys is a meritorious citizen, and would not be likely to urge a claim which he believed to be unjust, but there may be a difference of opinion as to any legal right he has against the government on account of those Indians. I submit the claim, however, with the others, so that if the evidence be found sufficient to warrant its allowance by the Department, the necessary steps may be taken for its payment.
    The claims of John Meldrum (No. 2), Arthur Saltmarsh (No. 3), Cyrenius Mulkey (No. 4), William Wilkinson (No. 5), and William Gage (No. 6), who were, in August 1849, attacked by a band of Indians in Rogue River Valley, are believed by those conversant with the facts to be meritorious claims. The two latter, however (Wilkinson and Gage), failed to present theirs within the time specified by the 17th Section of Act of 30th June 1854; yet, should they be found legitimate as against the government that fact might not, perhaps, to be held as a bar to their allowance and payment.
    It has been, and still is, a matter of question as to the particular band of Indians who perpetrated these outrages. No treaties had then been made with any of the tribes in that portion of Oregon up to the date of the alleged offenses, and these claimants were merely traveling through the country.
    The tribes through that region, up to 1846, had generally been regarded as hostile, but during that season, and the two following, evidences of friendly feeling were abundantly shown by them. The attraction of a numerous class of persons passing through their country to and from the California mines often led to disputes and bloodshed. I am personally cognizant of the general feeling of hatred and animosity that existed against the Indians in the latter part of '48, by those traveling through that district, and the but too common practice of firing upon all [Indians] who might venture in sight. It cannot, then, be considered surprising that retaliatory steps, such as these, should sometimes occur against a people whom they regarded as natural enemies, and upon whom they were impelled to revenge the wrongs committed against them whenever opportunities to do so might be presented.
    At the time of negotiating the Rogue River treaty in 1853, it was deemed inexpedient to bring up these old claims and make their allowance a condition of its terms. Had it been understood that all such claims would have been considered, I think it probable an amount so great would have been presented as to swallow up the entire annuities allowed them for their country; besides which, the condition of the country was such as not to afford the time requisite for a due and proper investigation of the claims.
    It may be proper here to remark that the claimant William Gage belongs to a family proverbial for its hostility to Indians, and that they have been engaged in attacks upon them subsequent to treaties of peace, and that, too, against the Rogue River Indians alleged as the perpetrators of this outrage.
    The claim of Virgil Quivey (No. 7) appears unsupported by other testimony than his own affidavit; the fact, however, so far as regards the loss of life of David Dilley is well known but it is not known as committed by these Indians--save so far as the claimant's affidavit may reach. I regard the claim as of a doubtful character, and think it needs additional and positive testimony.
    The claim of R. W. Bragg (No. 8) for the loss of hogs--an account of which had been previously transmitted your office--I regard as unsustained by the evidence accompanying it. It is possible the Indians may have stolen some of them, but I think it more than probable the greater number were destroyed by wolves. It is well known that Indians are averse to hog meat, and with some few exceptions will not use it. The claim I think requires additional proofs.
    The claim of Washington L. Riggs (No. 9), for the payment of one hundred and thirty head of beef cattle, I regard as a grand, though but poorly supported, scheme to swindle the government. The point at which they are said to have been grazed, and from which, it is alleged, they were stolen, is in California, and there is in my opinion but little doubt that, if his cattle were taken away at all, they were driven off by white men, and at the instance of interested parties. A claim involving such an amount as is here set up should be fortified with every character of evidence as would clearly show all the points in the case from the time the cattle came into the hands of the claimant, and in what manner up to the actual commission of the alleged depredations.
    The claims of Edith M. Nickel (No. 10), William B. Hay (No. 11), Gabriel Smith (No. 12), David W. Beckley (No. 13), George Philpott (No. 14), Charles Ward (No. 15), George Collins (No. 16) and Obadiah Wheelock (No. 17) may be provided for, if found equitable, by the provisions contained in the last clause of Article 3, Treaty of 18th November 1854, with the Shastas, Scotans and Umpquas, as the Indians alleged to have committed these depredations were parties to that treaty.
    The claim of J. M. Claymer (No. 18), for merchandise &c. said to have been taken from him by Indians in the Siskiyou Mountains on the 18th of May 1854, was undoubtedly the work of a lawless band which has been infesting that district for many years, and whose residence has usually been in California on the waters of the Klamath River. Not the least shadow of evidence has been adduced to show that the robber was committed by any band with whom treaties have been negotiated within the limits of this Territory--or by parties with whom we are likely to negotiate--but by remnants of predatory bands alternately collected and scattered for plunder and flight.
    The claim of James Bruce (No. 19), $675 for one hundred and fifty bushels of wheat, alleged to have been stolen by "Jake's" band of Rogue River Indians, is regarded by me as having been forfeited, even if the fact of the theft be substantiated. In November 1854, whilst at Rogue River, Mr. Bruce complained to me that the Indians had stolen his wheat. I informed him that, by submitting his claim properly authenticated, it would be acted upon in accordance with the 17th Section of the Intercourse Act of 1834, but no such claim was presented and the matter rested. on the 8th or 9th of October last. I am informed Mr. Bruce was one of a party of armed men, under the command of Mr. Lupton, who attacked this same "Jake's" band of Indians whilst on their way to the Reservation near Table Rock, and killed between twenty and thirty men, women and children. Notwithstanding he states under oath, on the 15th of December, that "he has never taken any personal revenge."
    The claim of William G. T'Vault (No. 20), for loss of property whilst in command of a party of men exploring the country along the Coquille River, has for its support the affidavit of the claimant only; still, the fact of his party having been attacked is well known, but until the presentation of this claim, I had no knowledge of the assumed position of the claimant that he was acting under a letter of advice from an officer of this Department, but understood he was exploring the country for objects wholly disconnected from the public service. From a careful perusal of the letter of Superintendent Dart addressed to the claimant (a copy of which is attached to the claim) I cannot view its construction as employing Mr. T'Vault, or giving him any directions as to his course, route, or in any manner having to do with his trip. It does not appear from the affidavit that the property stolen was his own, and I presume it belonged to the persons jointly composing the party, but have no knowledge of any [of] the facts in the case beyond what is set forth in the affidavit.
    The claim of E. A. Vaughn (No. 12) for property destroyed by fire on the 29th May '52 I do not consider a legitimate one as against the government. It appears to me, from the testimony adduced, to have resulted purely from accident. The Indians were traveling in their canoes, and at night stopped near the home of Mr. Vaughn and built up their usual campfire, which, it appears, spread after their departure. There is no evidence whatever that it was the work of design.
    In the consideration of most of these claims a question arises in my mind as to whether the government is bound to indemnify citizens for loss of property sustained at the hands of Indians prior to any treaty of peace or purchase of their country. My own opinion is averse to such indemnification.
    It is unquestionable that the frequent commission of offenses by Indians against the persons and property of the citizens, and the long delays consequent upon seeking proofs and obtaining indemnity for such losses, has tended materially to induce those bitter feelings of animosity which exist against the red man on this coast. These considerations may possibly sustain the policy of the organization of some tribunal by which claims of this character may be adjusted more speedily than under the present system; or the passing of an act by Congress authorizing individuals aggrieved to commence suits in the supreme or circuit courts of the Territory where negative as well as affirmative testimony could be obtained, eliciting all the facts & attendant circumstances, usually so vague and indefinite in the claims as presented.
    These suggestions I respectfully submit for your consideration.
I have the honor to be
    Most respectfully
        Your obedt. servt.
            Joel Palmer
                Supt. Ind. Affairs
To
    Hon. Geo. W. Manypenny
        Commissioner Ind. Affrs.
            Washington D.C.
Frames 668-678, National Archives Microfilm Publications Microcopy No. 234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency, 1856.



Spoliation of 1853.
    It will be remembered that the treaty made with the Rogue River Indians in 1853 appropriated fifteen thousand dollars, a part of the Indian annuity, for payment of the spoliation committed by the Indians in 1853. During the winter of 1853-4, that treaty was ratified by the United States Senate. Joel Palmer, Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon, appointed L. F. Grover, A. C. Gibbs and Dr. Geo. H. Ambrose a board of commissioners to assess the damages. They met at Jacksonville in the spring of 1854, and made an assessment of spoliation, giving to each person a duplicate, stating the amount of damages he had sustained on account of the Indians.
    Since that time nothing has been heard of the fifteen thousand dollars that was set apart by the treaty to pay for spoliation. The Indians have received a part of their annuity and have been removed from Rogue River to the reservation on the head of the Yamhill.
    The fifteen thousand dollars in all probably would not pay more than about thirty-five percent on the dollar of the amount the board of commissioners assessed. Be the same more or less, those entitled to receive it want it, or they wish to know what has become of the appropriation.
Table Rock Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 24, 1856, page 2



Pine Grove Iron Works Augt. 17 / 56
Hon.
    Robt. McClelland
        Allow me to trouble [you] with a matter of business which I believe belongs to your department. The enclosed power of attorney was sent to me by my brother-in-law, J. H. Reed, who resides in Jacksonville, Oregon, and is practicing law. He wrote to me that our appropriation had been made to pay the damages referred to in the instrument, but did not know how it was to be got at. I suppose the report of the commissioners to assess the damages has been made to the proper office and will show the names of claimants and the sums to which they are entitled &c. Please give your attention to this and direct me so that I may be able to carry out the object of Mr. Evans as set out in the power of atty. I am very anxious to aid Reed in his professional pursuits in that remote region, and I think his speedy settlement of this claim for his client would commend him to favor of his neighbors.
Ever your friend
    Wm. M. Watts
        Carlisle [Pa.]
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 978-979.



Carlisle [Pa.] Sept. 21st [1856]
Dear Sir
    Several weeks since I wrote to ask information in regard to the appropriation for payment of damages by Indian depredations on Rogue River, Oregon and enclosed a power of atty. to me from one of the claimants; if I recollect, his name was Davis [Evans]. I presume your multifarious engagements have so occupied your time and attention that you have scarcely a moment of leisure. The subject of this appropriation is very interesting to my brother-in-law J. H. Reed, atty. at law, Jacksonville, Oregon, and for him I am very anxious to get the most reliable information in regard to it and the forms &c. &c. which will be acceptable to the Department in the transaction of the business. Please let me ask your earliest attention and I shall esteem it a very great favor.
With high personal regard
    Wm. M. Watts
Hon.
    Robt. McClelland
        Sect. Interior
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 975-976.



No. 80 Beekman Street
    New York Dec. 15th 1856
To the Department of the Interior
    Office of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                Herewith I beg to hand you a draft drawn by T. B. Sanderson of Roseburg, Douglas Co., Oregon Territory, dated May 12th 1856 on your office for $400 (four hundred dolls.), the same having been assigned to me by the said Sanderson. I also enclose the power of attorney which constitutes me the attorney of Sanderson and also the certificate in duplicate of the commissioners appointed to award such claims.
    Have the goodness, if you please, to honor said draft and remit me the amount for a draft on New York, and much oblige.
Yours most respectfully
    C. W. Thomas
    pp J. A. Hall
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 609 Oregon Superintendency 1856, frames 971-972.



Phelps [New York] Jan. 7 1857
Commissioner of
    Indian Affairs--
        Dear Sir--In July last I forwarded to James G. Austin of Washington copies of some papers (orders or certificates &c.) of the commissioners appointed to examine and audit claims for damages done by the Rogue River Indians in Oregon. He presented those papers to the Department on Indian Affairs, and I have the communication of the Commissioner to Mr. Austin dated September 20th 1856 sent to me by Mr. A. in which the Commissioner states he intended to dispose of the matter as soon as practicable. The claimant, Mr. Henry C. Rowland, for himself & William Thompson, is desirous to learn what has been done in the matter, and requests me to write to the Commissioner directly. Mr. Rowland has learned through Gen. Lane, Delegate from Oregon, that monies had been set apart to pay a portion of each of such claims, and he is very desirous of learning the present state of the matter of his claim. Please inform me in regard to same & oblige
Yours &c.
    D. Stephenson
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 1254-1255.



No. 215 Pearl Street
    New York April 8th 1857
To the
    Department of the Interior
        Office Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
                On the 15th day of last December I forwarded to the above office the enclosed claim for $400 of T. B. Sanderson, Roseburg, Douglas Co., Oregon, for property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians during hostilities in 1853. The papers accompanying said claim were returned me on the 5th day [of] January with a letter from Hon. Geo. H. Maury stating that the claim could not be acted upon, at least at that time. I now beg to again enclose said claim with the accompanying papers which you will please to give your attention to, and if allowed, remit me the amount for a draft on this city, or if otherwise return me the papers.
With respect I am
    Yours most truly
        C. W. Thomas
            pp. Jno. A. Hatt
   

No. 215 Pearl Street
    New York, Mch. 28th 1857
To the Department of the Interior
    Office Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                Enclosed I beg to hand you the draft of Hon. Joel Palmer #53 dated Dayton O.T. August 15th 1856 on your office for $1000 (one thousand dolls.). Please have the goodness to honor said draft and remit me the amount per draft on this city, and oblige.
Yours most respectfully
    C. W. Thomas
        per Jno. A. Hatt
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 1284-1290.



No. 215 Pearl Street
    New York April 18th 1857
Hon. J. W. Denver Commissioner
    Department of the Interior
        Office Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
                Dear Sir
                    I am this morning in receipt of your esteemed favor of the 17th in answer to my letter of the 14th inst. I am surprised to learn from you of the non-receipt of my letter of March 25th with the draft of Hon. Joel Palmer for $1000 at your office. The writer distinctly recollects enclosing same to the address of your office, and the employee remembers depositing the letter in our P.O. May it not be possible that it is mislaid in your office, and will you have the kindness to cause an examination to be made. I enclosed you a duplicate of my letter 28th Mch.
    On the 8th April I enclosed to the address of your office the claim of T. B. Sanderson for $400, with the accompanying papers, which I trust came safe to hand. Will you please advise me of these two matters at your convenience and oblige
Yours most truly
    C. W. Thomas per Jno. A. Hatt
   
No. 215 Pearl Street
    New York March 28th 1857
To the Department of the Interior
    Office Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                Enclosed I beg to hand you the draft of Hon. Joel Palmer #53 dated Dayton O.T. August 15th 1856 on your office for $1000 (one thousand dolls.). Please have the goodness to honor said draft, and remit me the amount per draft on this city, and oblige
Yours most respectfully
    C. W. Thomas
        pp. Jno. A. Hatt
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 1291-1293.



Winchester Oregon
    May 18 1857.
Hon. Commr. of Ind. Affairs
    Sir:
        I herewith enclose you the award of the commissioners in the case of Mrs. Amanda [Hardin] Shelton for spoliations in [the] Indian war of 1853.
    The report of the commissioners now on file in your office will sufficiently explain in connection with these papers the nature of her claim upon the government, and you will oblige me by your attention to the case.
Very respy.
    Your obt. servt.
        Joseph Lane
   
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Jackson     )
    On this 15th day of January one thousand eight hundred and fifty-seven personally appeared before me, clerk of the district court for the County of Jackson and Territory of Oregon, it being a court of record, Mrs. Hawkins Shelton, aged 18 years, a resident of said county, who being duly sworn according to law declares that she is the widow of John R. Hardin, deceased. That her said former husband John R. Hardin was killed by the Rogue River Indians during the month of August A.D. 1853 and his property destroyed by said Indians as evidenced by proofs thereof taken before the commission appointed to audit spoliation claims, particularly referred to by the certificate of said commissioners, of which the annexed is a certified copy. That she was married to the said John R. Hardin in said County of Jackson on the 26th day of June A.D. 1853, by which marriage she has but one child, which at this time is two years and ten months of age. That your affiant makes this application for the payment of said claim on the United States to your affiant, or as much thereof as may be due to the heirs of said Hardin your affiant and said child, of which your affiant is the custodian. Your affiant prays that a draft for said amount allowed to said John R. Hardin may be issued to your affiant.
Amanda E. Shelton
    Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written. And I hereby certify that I know the said Mrs. Hawkins Shelton to be the identical person who is described in the foregoing application.
J. B. Sifers, Clerk D.C., J.C.
   
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Jackson     )
    C. C. Gall, of the County of Jackson and Territory aforesaid, being duly sworn according to law, says that he is personally acquainted with Mrs. Hawkins Shelton, knows she was the wife of John R. Hardin at the time of his death. That the said Hardin was killed by the Rogue River Indians on the 11th day of August A.D. 1853. That said applicant was lawfully married to the said John R. Hardin on the 26th day of June A.D. 1853, by which marriage they had one child, of whom the said applicant is the custodian. That the person who signed the foregoing affidavit is the identical widow of the late John R. Hardin, and the person referred to in the said application. That this affiant has no interest whatever either directly or indirectly in the application of Mrs. Hawkins Shelton for the payment of said claims due to her former husband.
C. C. Gall
    Subscribed and sworn to before me the day and year above written. And I further certify that I know the said C. C. Gall to be a truthful man.
J. B. Sifers, Clerk D.C., J.C.
   
Territory of Oregon   )
County of Jackson     )
    W. S. Gall, of the County of Jackson and Territory aforesaid, being duly sworn according to law, says that he is personally acquainted with Mrs. Hawkins Shelton and knows she was the wife of John R. Hardin at the time of his death. That the said Hardin was killed by the Rogue River Indians on the 11th day of August A.D. 1853. That the said applicant was lawfully married to the said John R. Hardin on the 26th day of June A.D. 1853, by which marriage they had one child, of whom your applicant is the custodian. That the person who signed the foregoing application is the identical widow of the late John R. Hardin, and is the person referred to in her said application. That this affiant has no interest whatever either directly or indirectly in the application of Mrs. Hawkins Shelton for the payment of said claim due her former husband.
W. S. Gall
    Sworn to and subscribed before me the day and year above written. And I hereby certify that I know that said W. S. Gall is a truthful man and a respectable citizen.
J. B. Sifers, Clerk D.C., J.C.
   
Jacksonville Jackson Co. O.T.
    Jan. the 18th 1857
Honorable Joseph Lane
    Dr Sir
Enclosed with this I send you some affidavits which we have had made out in favor of the heirs of John R. Hardin, who was killed by the Rogue River Indians in the summer of 1853 during the war of the same year, calling for six hundred and fifty-seven dollars and fifty cts., of which is due them from the government on a spoliation claim or in other words for damages done them by the Indians. At the same time we wish you to present them to the house of Congress and ask the payment of them if you please. The heirs holds a voucher given by the commissioners in favor of said heirs, and J. W. Patrick as in partnership of which you will see a copy annexed to the affidavits for $1,315.00, but we only apply for the amt. due the heirs, which is six hundred and fifty-seven dollars and fifty cents. Please ask the payment of it as speedy as possible, but that I know you will do. I am not sure that all things are done up exactly right for you to proceed, but if there is anything lacking write back to me and I will have it attended to, and instruct me how to proceed. When you write, direct your letters to Evans Ferry on Rogue River. If you succeed in getting the debt paid address the draft in the name of my wife, Amanda Ellen Shelton, who was the former wife of John R. Hardin.
Respectfully your friend
    Hawkins Shelton
        Evans Ferry Rogue River
            Jackson Co. Oregon Tr.
Honr. Genl. Lane
    Washington City
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 487-497.  Appended to the documents were also a copy of Patrick and Hardin's certificate No. 9, above, and Sifers' affidavit attesting to the accuracy of his copy.



Bellefontaine, Logan County, Ohio
    June 1st, 1857
Hon. Charles E. Mix
    Commissioner ad interim
        of Indian Affairs
            Sir,
                I address you for the purpose of ascertaining whether the original papers have been received by you in the case of Hiram Smith, who makes application under the act of Congress of 30th of June 1834 for property carried away, destroyed & damaged by the Rogue River and Cow Creek tribes of Indians in the Territory of Oregon. Also the papers of George E. Cole, who makes application for himself and jointly with E. S. Joslyn for indemnification under the same act for property destroyed &c. by the Klickitat tribe of Indians engaged with the Yakimas and other tribes in general hostilities against the whites in Oregon & Washington Territories.
    I would kindly remind you of a promise made when I visited your Department in the early part of last month and solicit its fulfillment which was that you would if you could possibly do so furnish me with a printed copy of the act above referred to and the several regulations adopted by your Department for the prosecution of such claims.
Respectfully &c.
    Y. A. Smith
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 1259-1261.  Copy on frame 1271.



Findlay Hancock Co. Ohio
    June 5th 1857
Hon. Wm. Medill
    Dear Gen.
        I have received from Oregon a duplicate certificate of damages offered Isaac Woolen for losses sustained by him from the Rogue River tribe of Indians in 1853, signed by the commissioners who appraised the damages & dated Jacksonville O.T. Feb. 10th 1855 (No. 72). I have also the power of attorney authorizing me to attend to the matter. The amt. is $750.
    Will you please inform me if there was an appropriation made to pay these damages. If so, can I collect it by forwarding the power of attorney--without going on personally. Please give me all the information in the matter which you deem proper. The papers are I believe in proper order. I do not know who is the proper person to correspond with & have taken the liberty to trouble you with it. Hoping your usual kindness will prompt you to give it attention. I sincerely hope that your position is pleasant & profitable & should be gratified to learn that your health has improved.
Very respectfully yours
    John Ewing
P.S. I have established a bank in Sheboygan Wisconsin, fifty miles north of Milwaukee. It is a point of importance. My son-in-law is cashier. Now, should the government make any deposits in that vacuity we should be glad to receive them. I think I am worth from 60 to $70,000 & would guarantee in and move as would be required. The name of the bank is the "German Bank." Cashier's name J. H. Mead. Will you please inform me in this matter.
J.E.
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 9-12.



Washington City June 29th 1857
Hon. James. W. Denver
    Comr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            I beg to call your attention to the claims of a number of persons residing in Oregon Territory, for whom I am acting, growing out of the destruction of their property by the Rogue River Indians.
    On the 10th of September 1853 a treaty was entered into between the United States and the Rogue River Indians, by which the latter ceded their lands to the former, for the consideration of $60,000. Of this sum, $15,000 were to be retained by the United States and appropriated to pay for the destruction of property committed by the Indians upon the settlers in that Territory, according to the stipulations of Article 4th of a treaty of peace made on the 8th of Sept. 1853 between Gen. Lane and the said Indians. It was stipulated that the amount or value of the property so destroyed was to be estimated by three disinterested commissioners to be appointed by the Superintendent of Indian Affairs, or otherwise as the President should direct.
    The treaty was ratified and confirmed (Sec. 10 Statutes at Large 1018) and the commissioners appointed, who after investigating the amount of damages and hearing the witnesses under oath reported the amount sustained by the several claimants, all of which were duly returned to your office, and is now on file there.
    The aggregate damages amounted to in round numbers to $45,000. The amount appropriated out of the $50,000 by the treaty being only $15,000, it would pay about one-third or a pro rata of about 33 percent of the amount of the respective claims, which those claimants for whom I am concerned were ready and willing to accept and receive on account, trusting to the justice of the government for the payment of the remainder. But singular as it may appear, your predecessor refused to pay and appropriate the $15,000 or any part of the same to the claimants unless they would severally receipt in full for their claims! To demand that the claimants of $45,000, ascertained and adjusted by sworn commissioners of the government, should release and relinquish the same upon the payment of $15,000 was an exaction to which they would not submit, and the money remains in the hands of the government, and the claimants are unpaid.
    I have duplicate certificates which were furnished by the commissioners to the claimants, and powers of attorney duly executed from all for whom I am concerned, which I will file upon an intimation from the office that the $15,000 will be paid pro rata upon their presentation, without exacting a receipt in full. I enclose a list of the claimants and the amount due each respectively and ask your early and favorable attention to their cases.
Very respectfully
    Yours
        L. G. Brandeburg
   
G. H. C. Taylor, duplicate certificate No. 19 $  668.50
James Bruce, duplicate certificate No. 29 475.00
W. G. T'Vault, duplicate certificate No. 31 270.00
James J. Fryer, duplicate certificate No. 30 544.50
W. S. King, duplicate certificate No. 12 250.00
Daniel F. Fisher, duplicate certificate No. 42 173.50
W. N. Ballard, duplicate certificate No. 39     468.50
$2850.00
L. G. Brandeburg
    June 30, 1857
Geo. H. C. Taylor, "reservation" certificate No. 8 $    75.00
John M. Silcott, "reservation" certificate No. 9     100.00
Same treaty & same commissioners' report $3025.00
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 26-31.



Bellefontaine Ohio
    Nov. 5, 1857.
Hon. J. W. Denver
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        Dear Sir,
            I herewith enclose you a copy of a letter, the original of which was sent to the address of the gentleman therein named on the day of its date for answer. From some cause which I do not understand I have not had a reply. In calling your attention to the matter I do not desire to cast the least reflection upon Mr. Mix, because I think he would not willingly have left my letter unanswered. I presume it has been simply overlooked. If the papers mentioned have been received please inform me what action, if any, has been taken on them by your Department. I have powers of atty. from the parties.
Respectfully &c.
    Y. A. Smith
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 1269-1270.



South Yamhill Nov. the 22 1857
To
    General Lane
        Dear sir, after my respects to you I again mention to you my claim for depredations. Since the passage of the land law my claims were proven up before General Palmer, Superintendent of Indian Affairs in eighteen hundred and [fifty-]four to the amount of fifteen hundred dollars done by the Yamhill tribe. General Palmer informed me that he reported them for allowance. Since that time I have been informed by a friend that his secretary told him that he, Gen. Palmer, was a-deceiving of me and others that had claims of [the] same kind. The claims were sent [to] the Office of Indian Affairs at Washington City, that the General reported against said claims after telling me that he reported for allowance.
    I say to you, General Lane, to do me the kindness to examine the claim and ascertain what kind of report that is made and send me by letter, as I [am] anxious to know if Gen. Palmer has played off on me.
By so complying
    You oblige your
        Jacob Comegys
P.S.    I forgot to hail the new state of Oregon by a large majority.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 189-192.  The Oregon Constitution had been approved by a vote of the Territory, but Oregon wouldn't be admitted to the Union until February 14, 1859.



Washington City Oct. 22, 1857
Hon. J. W. Denver
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            In June last I addressed your office relative to the payment of a number of claims for Indian depredations in the Rogue River War in Oregon, which had been examined and the amount reported by a commission appointed for the purpose, but have received no reply thereto. A portion of the annuity granted to the Rogue River Indians was retained, per stipulation in the treaty with them, to pay these claims, and my letter was in regard to that money.
    I beg to call your early attention to it, as the claimants residing in Oregon have become impatient and feel much disappointed in the delay.
Very respectfully your obt. servt.
    L. G. Brandeburg
NARA Series M234, Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs, Reel 610 Oregon Superintendency 1857, frames 32-33.




Bellefontaine, Logan County, Ohio
    February 18th 1858
Hon. Charles E. Mix,
    Sir;
        Your letter of the 9th instant in relation to desired information respecting the claims of Hiram Smith, E. S. Joslyn & the said Joslyn and George E. Cole, containing laws, regulations &c. of the Indian Bureau, has been received for which I am greatly obliged. I presume it will be necessary to write you again respecting those claims when convenient. Enclosed please find joint power of attorney from John W. Patrick & Amanda Ellen Shelton, former wife of John R. Hardin, deceased of Oregon, with certificate of commissioners numbered "9" and separate power of atty. of said Patrick, attached, which I desire to have examined & if found satisfactory to the department, filed with the papers in the case and in such a manner that they will not get from the files or mislaid. Please do me the favor of acknowledging receipt of the enclosed and inform me whether there is money at the disposal of your office to pay the amount of the claim.
Respectfully your obt. servant
    Ypsilanti A. Smith
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 609-610.



Jacksonville Oregon
    May 24th 1858
Dear Sir:
    Enclosed I send you a power of attorney authorizing myself or Genl. Lane to collect the spoliation claim of Nicholas Klopfenstein for the sum of 400 dollars during the Rogue River War of 1853.
    I learn the Department has agreed to pay a pro rata to each claim amt. Please make out the draft and forward it to me by the first mail or give it to Genl. Lane and get him to receipt for it and request him to forward it to me by mail to Jacksonville, Oregon. Mr. Klopfenstein lives in this vicinity, and he is poor and needy. Send it by the first mail.
B. F. Dowell
    Atty. for
        Klopfenstein
Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington City
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 148-149.



Jacksonville Oregon
    May 28th 1858.
Genl. Joseph Lane:
    Dear Sir--I send to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs by this mail authorizing you or me to collect the spoliation claim of Nicholas Klopfenstein, for the sum of 400 dollars. I learn the departments have finally decided to pay the 15,000 dollars pro rata to each claimant. Please call on Mr. Mix and get the draft and forward it to me by the first mail. I send the power of attorney to the Commissioner because possibly you may return to Oregon after the adjournment of Congress, and before this may reach Washington.
    Friend Bush recently visited this county, and in his speeches he advocated the payment of Capt. Walker’s company and all necessary expenses. There is considerable feeling here against Bush, yet I believe the whole state ticket will be elected.
I remain your friend,
    B. F. Dowell
Joseph Lane Papers


Washington D.C.
    June 3 1858
Sir
    You will please inform me whether you have on hand money to pay the award of commissioners L. F. Grover, A. C. Gibbs & Geo. H. Ambrose No. 2 to Matthew G. Kennedy of $250 reservation claim for value of permanent improvements by whites on lands assigned as a reservation to the Rogue River tribe of Indians by the treaty Sept. 10, 1853.
Respectfully yours
    John S. Edwards
Hon. Chas. E. Mix
    Comr. of Ind. Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 163-164.



Jacksonville Oregon
    June 5th 1858
Dear Sir:
    I was legally appointed attorney for Marcena McCombs to prosecute and collect his claim for services as a private in the Rogue River War of 1853, and to prosecute and collect his claim for a thousand and twenty dollars for spoliations in the said war. I receipted for his services as a private to Major Alvord as paymaster of the United States and gave him the power of attorney, and I learn the power of attorney is filed with his accounts of the settlement of the muster rolls of said war with the 2nd Auditor of the Treasury. I wish the draft made out and forwarded to me to Jacksonville, Oregon, for Marcena McCombs' pro rata of the 15000 dollars that has been appropriated by Congress, and I will get Mr. McCombs to endorse the draft to me.
Yours very respectfully
    B. B. Griffin
Charles E. Mix
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington City
            D.C.
   

    The above signature is in the handwriting of B. B. Griffin, and he acknowledged he signed it in my presence. Mr. Griffin is a reliable and responsible man, and I have no doubt of the truth of the statements.
John F. Miller
    Indian Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 166-168.



Washington City, D.C.
    10th June 1858.
Sir:
    I enclose power of attorney from John Benjamin to Saml. Grinstead authorizing the latter to prosecute his claim for property destroyed by the Rogue River Indians & for which there has been awarded the sum of $316 on 5 July 1855.
    Mr. Grinstead has desired Mr. Farrar of Oregon to attend to the settlement of this claim, & I would therefore request that the draft therefore may be sent to the care of Mr. W. H. Farrar, Washington D.C.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. Q. Washington
Hon. Chas. E. Mix
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 732-733.



Treasury Department
    Second Auditor's Office
        13 July 1858
Sir,
    You will receive from the Treasr. U.S. the sum of $79.10/100 in payment of the pro rata of your claim of $277.80/100 against the Rogue River Indians. When the remittance reaches your hands, please advise this office.
Very respectfully,
    Your obt. servt.
        W. Mechlin
            Acting 2nd Auditor
Mr. Nicholas Klopfenstein
    Care of Hon. Jos. Lane
        City of Washington
Joseph Lane Papers


Washington City Augt. 3rd 1858
Hon. Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
        Sir
            I enclose a power of attorney from Davis Evans of Jacksonville, Oregon Territory, authorizing me to receive the amount awarded him by the commissioners for depredations committed by the Rogue River Indians in 1853 or the pro rata of the appropriation of July 31, 1854, and will thank you for a requisition for the amount.
Very respectfully
    Yours &c.
        L. G. Brandeburg
            Atty. for Claimant
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 65-66.



Jacksonville Oregon
    Aug. 30th 1858
Second Auditor--
    Washington City D.C.--
        Dear Sir:    Enclosed I send you a power of attorney authorizing myself, W. C. Griswold or General Joseph Lane to draw Sylvester Pease's pro rata distribution of his claim for Indian spoliation claim in the R.R. War of 1853.
    If you need any explanation call on Genl. Lane, and doubtless he will give you the necessary information. Wm. H. Hoffman has sent to your office a duly certified copy of his appointment, certificate signature and seal as notary public before whom the acknowledgment has been taken.
    Please forward the warrant to me by return mail to Jacksonville, Oregon.
I remain yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 157-159.



Jacksonville, Oregon
    August 30th, 1858
Genl. Joseph Lane--
    Dear Sir:    I send by this mail a power of attorney authorizing you, myself, and W. C. Griswold, or either of us, to draw Sylvester Pease's pro rata distribution of his Indian spoliation claim in the R.R. War of 1853. I have directed the power of attorney to the 2nd Auditor. Please call and explain it to the department, and have the warrant forwarded to me by return mail. Mr. Pease is poor and needs the money.
    Notwithstanding the Fraser River gold excitement, Jacksonville is improving rapidly.
I remain yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
Joseph Lane Papers



Jacksonville Oregon
    Sept. 20th 1858.
Genl. Joseph Lane--
    Dear Sir:    I received, by last mail, Mr Nicholas Klopfenstein's treasury warrant for seventy-nine dollars and ten cents for his spoliation claim of 1853. He requests me to say to you he is under many obligations to you for procuring it for him.
    You have secured his vote for life. He says it has been so long that he never expected to get a dollar.
    There is another subject that deeply interests me. I have reference to the expenses of Capt. Walker's company of 1854. I drew up a petition to Congress last fall, and had it left in Jacksonville with Mr. Burke to be signed by the claimants, and caused a notice to that effect to be published in the Sentinel. It was numerously signed and forwarded to you, but I have not heard whether you ever received the petition. I wish you to present it at the commencement of next Congress, if you did not present it last Congress. It will prevent members of Congress from opposing it on the ground of lapse of time without passing it, even if nothing is done but to refer the petition and documents to an appropriate committee. I think the committee at least would authorize the appointment of a commission to investigate these claims. If the same commission could be appointed it would be satisfactory to me, or if Mr. Grover goes out of the commission on the ground of his being a member of Congress, if Oregon should be admitted; then in that event I would be in favor of a new commission. As it is well known, Capt. Smith has spoke and wrote against the expedition. Capt. Engles has not been connected in Southern Oregon with the army in any way and I had as soon see him on the commission as any man in Oregon, and Mr. Gibbs, Judge Williams or any other good, sensible man that is unprejudiced would be very acceptable to me and I have no doubt they or any of them would give general satisfaction to the claimants.
    Write and let me know if you have received the petition, and if you presented it what was done with it. I am here practicing my profession, and I am willing to get you any documents that would assist you to get these claims paid off.
I remain yours very respectfully
    B. F. Dowell
Joseph Lane Papers



Bellefontaine, Logan Co., Ohio
    October 4th 1858
Hon. Charles E. Mix
    Com. Indian Affairs
Sir;
    Enclosed please find power of attorney from John W. McCully, administrator on the estate of John R. Hardin, deceased, to me to prosecute and receive the proceeds of Indian spoliation claim as per certificate Number 9 on file with the papers in your office.
    Please examine the same at your earliest opportunity and inform me whether anything further will be required.
Respectfully &c.
    Ypsilanti A. Smith
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859, frames 672-673.




Bellefontaine, Ohio
    October 23rd 1858
Hon. Charles E. Mix
Acting Commissioner
of Indian Affairs
    Sir;
        On the 4th instant I enclosed to you a power of attorney from John W. McCully, administrator on the estate of John R. Hardin, deceased, authorizing me to receive the proceeds due the estate on the joint claim of said estate with John W. Patrick for property destroyed by the Rogue River tribe of Indians & their allies in 1853 as per certificate of commissioners Number 9 on file in your office. A power of attorney from Patrick to me is also on file with the papers.
    Please inform me by return mail whether my letter containing the power of attorney from the administrator has been received and if so whether the same is undergoing an examination.
Very truly
    Your obt. servant,
        Ypsilanti A. Smith
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 611 Oregon Superintendency, 1858-1859,