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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1878
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton County, Oregon
        Jan. 8th 1878
Sir,
    Owing to the absence of flour for Indians, it has been necessary for us to run the grist mill four days during the month of December, and thus far one day during the present month. To do this, I have been compelled to employ a man to keep up steam and manage the engine. Wages paid for such service is three dollars per day while employed. It will probably not be necessary to run the grist mill more than three or four days more to complete the grinding of the last year's crop now in the hands of the Indians. I respectfully ask your approval of my action and ask to be allowed to pay the same out of money allotted this agency for pay of employees for the quarter in which such service has been or may be rendered, not exceeding in all thus paid thirty dollars.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley, U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington, D.C.
        [January 11, 1878]
    We, the Indians of Grand Ronde Valley, Polk and Yamhill counties, Oregon, most respectfully invite your attention to our deplorable situation; and we most humbly beg of you to consider our wants and our actual necessities, praying that you will take immediate action on this petition. Whereas the government treaty with us expired some 2 or 3 years past and that we are self-supporting people, sometime last spring we went to the county seat of Polk Co. and employed one Judge Collins to write a letter to President Hayes, setting forth our grievances, &c. and rec'd. an answer, but nothing being done to our knowledge, we now state our case to you.
    Whereas on the 14th of Oct. last, Inspector Watkins held council with us, we stated our grievances to him, demanding out citizenship. We now propose to make a statement of some of the principal reasons why we want to be free. The government has already contracted through the influence of the agent or some other misrepresenting to teach our school, where there is not to exceed twenty scholars, and pays the enormous sum of $4,000 per year. We are furnished with two Canadian Sisters of Charity as teachers. We had four, but Inspector Watkins had to of them discharged. Our children does not learn anything compared with other free schools. Those women teaches a broken French and a jargon that is of no use to our children. We want the English language taught in our school. We want free schools on the American principle; we want a voice [in] whom our teachers shall be and in fact we don't want to be kept in ignorance like a priest-ridden people. We wish to live under the laws of the U.S. govt. We want to govern our own local affairs. We want to pay taxes. We want to assist the government. We don't want the government to assist us, only to give us our freedom. Another misfortune prevails: the sutler store at this place manages to get everything we raise. Whether there is an understanding between him & the agent we do not know, but it is 15 miles to the nearest village or store from the sutler's store. That would make thirty miles travel either on foot or horseback to trade or buy one dollar's worth of goods, so you see what a serious loss we labor under by not being allowed to invite competition with other merchants.
    We consider our demands reasonable.
    First, we want our citizenship and a title to our land.
    Second, we want the government property sold to the highest bidder & give us an equal show with the white people in the purchase of it. Our grist mill & saw mill are built together. There was at the time the treaty was made 23 or 24 years ago, 40 acres of land set apart for the benefit of the miller. By selling the land in connection with the mill, the property will fetch more money. If the government thinks proper to appropriate the money arriving from the sale of such property for the benefit of our school, we would like it very much & make a free school of it for the benefit of the white people as well as us, and if not make such disposition as the government thinks proper.
    Third, we want titles given only to actual settlers or to those Indians or their descendants named in the treaty by Gen. Palmer 23 or 24 years past. We hope and trust in your honor in arranging our affairs, that every Indian belonging rightfully to this reserve should have a certificate from the co. judge with two or more responsible persons as witnesses as to their belonging & rightfully owning their different tracts of land.
    No more at present.
Most respectfully,
    Solomon Riggs, Agent
Or. representative for the Indians of Grand Ronde Reservation,
Polk Co., Ogn.
N.B. You will please write me a line & direct it to the care of I. L. Collins. Dallas, Polk Co., Ogn.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Grand Ronde Agency
    Oregon, Jan. 12, 1878
Sir,
    In reply to your letter of the 20 Nov. 1877, marked "AGR" directing me to inform your office of Inspector Watkins' reasons for discharging Mr. J. Munroe, I am unable to fully give the Inspector's reasons for the discharge.
    There was some misunderstanding between Mr. M. and the Hon. Inspector regarding the appearance of Mr. M. at the agency when so ordered. Mr. M. disclaimed any intention of disrespect. While the Hon. Inspector informed me that he did not consider Mr. Munroe a suitable man to be on the agency and directed me to at once dismiss him from the service. He did not fully explain to me his reasons for so doing, and upon examination of the mills, the inspector expressed his surprise at finding the mills, both saw and grist, in such good condition and repair.
    I am constrained to believe that the Hon. Inspector, though acting in good faith & for the best interests of the Department, in his judgment was from some source misinformed as to the character of Mr. Munroe.
    It will be impossible to secure the services of a miller who will give satisfaction to the Indians, as they are of a suspicious nature and are unable to discover the reason why one bushel of damp, foul wheat cannot be made to yield the same number of pounds of flour as a bushel of clean, dry wheat, but invariably attribute the waste to the dishonesty of the miller.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Ogn.
        Jan. 25, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr., Ind. Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir,
                In my quarterly accounts you will see that I have been transporting wheat from Ashland to the Agency before the contract for wheat was approved. At this time I will make a statement of the matter, and after the wheat is received I will make a full report of my transactions in connection with the whole subject; and I will have the report supported by statements from others.
    I feel confident that you will approve the course I have taken when all the facts properly come before you. It having become evident that if I waited until the contract was approved I would not get a pound of wheat over the mountains this winter, and it being just as evident that if I did not get wheat here, many of the Indians would suffer & become dissatisfied and unmanageable. And the Snake Indians having no supplies for the winter whatever, I consulted with Capt. McCall, with whom I had made the contract and who has been connected with this service and knows all about the circumstances connected with it and the utter impossibility of transporting supplies to the agency in the winter. Capt. McCall made the proposition to let me take his wheat in, and after the contract was approved I could then receive it; and if the contract should not be approved, we would make a frank and open statement of the matter and make the best of it we could. Everyone acquainted with the circumstances advised that I must get the wheat in to prevent suffering and dissatisfaction among the Indians. We went out after wheat in November; took a number of Klamath and Modoc Indians with us and brought in about fifteen hundred bushels of wheat at an expense of only about seventy-five dollars. In the summer time, at the lowest rate of freight, the transportation of the same amount would have cost fifteen hundred dollars. I now refer to the trip of L. M. Nickerson and myself as shown by Voucher No. 4 to Abstract C. of Account Current 4th Quarterly Returns, and Voucher No. 3 to same abstract &c. About the middle of December there came a thaw, and I built a small boat of about ten tons capacity, and with the aid of the boat, by which I shortened the distance about one half, I brought in about one hundred and twenty-eight bushels of wheat for the Snake Indians, at a cost of only four dollars as per Voucher No. 3. On Jan. 8th, 1878, I received yours approving the wheat contract. I at once requested Capt. Jackson, commanding at Fort Klamath, to detail an officer to go and assist me in receiving the wheat.
    I have explained the matter to Capt. Jackson so that he will be able to satisfy himself that the wheat has been handled with regard to the best interests of the Indians and of the government.
    In this connection, permit me to say that if the Department at Washington knew all the circumstances by which this agency is surrounded, certainly there would be no such delays in regard to supplies as to make the transportation cost three or four times more than the original cost of them: besides endangering the service by starvation and dissatisfaction.
    It is more than probable that the balance of the wheat will have to remain at Ashland with storage expenses until next summer. And the same is true with regard to the supplies bought at San Francisco, and which are now at Redding, Cal.
    I must close this communication by saying that it would kill any man of honesty, philanthropy and sympathy to run this service unless there can be a change in the time and manner of getting in supplies.
    It is now after ten o'clock at night and my work is not yet done.
Yours truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Jan. 29, 1878
    Estimate of the cost of material for construction of buildings suitable for a boarding or manual labor school for the benefit of the Indians of Siletz Agency, Oregon, of capacity sufficient to accommodate fifty pupils.
39200 ft. Rough lumber @ $6.00 per thousand 235.20
60800 ft. Dressed lumber @ $20.00 per thousand 1216.00
7344 no. Brick @ $22.00 per thousand 161.57
52 " Windows (glazed) @ $3.00 each 156.00
40 " Common panel doors @ $3.00 each 120.00
2 " Heavy double panel doors @ $7.50 each 15.00
42 " Door locks @ $2.00 each 84.00
84 per Door butts @ $1.00 per doz. 7.00
6 gross Asstd. screws @ $1.75 per gross 10.50
10 kegs Asstd. nails @ $7.00 per keg 70.00
12 no. Door bolts .25 each 3.00
Transportation of material:
    Lumber $411.80
    Brick 186.51
    Doors, windows, nails &c. 80.00    678.31
Total 2756.58
Remarks
    It is expected that the agency will be supplied with a good corps of employees who will, with the help of Indian labor, be required to perform all the work of building, hence no estimate for work has been made.
    Dressed lumber can be had at Yaquina Bay and estimates for same are based on the supposition that it will be there obtained.
    Could we purchase a planing machine costing six hundred dollars (delivered in San Francisco or Portland) and attach the same to the saw mill power, we might dress all the lumber here at a very small expense, and the saving in this item would be sufficient to pay the cost of such a machine, which is much needed here.
    Bricks are brought from San Francisco to Newport by sail, thence 15 miles to depot mill by lighter, thence by wagons six miles to the agency.
    By employing a practical brick maker for a few months, a kiln could be burned here, the only expense to the Department being his pay and a small amount for subsistence of Indians working at the kiln and on the yard, as they would gladly work for brick.
Very respectfully submitted
    By your obedient servant,
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.

 

Office, Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or. January 29th 1878
Sir
    In compliance with instructions contained in your office letter of 20th "ultimo" marked E, I herewith enclose plan and estimate for the construction of a house for a boarding school sufficiently large to accommodate fifty pupils, and in relation thereto I desire to respectfully report the following:
    The progress in their studies made by the pupils in the day school, irregular as their attendance has necessarily been, is sufficient evidence of their ability to learn, and that a boarding or manual labor school is the one best adapted to the wants of the Indians is a fact too well authenticated to need proof.
    The objections to the day school are many, not the least of which is the fact that when the pupil leaves the school room and returns to his home, his English books and conversation are dropped and are not again taken up until his return to the school room.
    There being no provision for clothing or subsisting the pupils, many who would attend regularly are kept from doing so by being compelled to work, hunt or fish for their subsistence, and some who are naturally bright are ashamed to appear in the school room in their ragged and dirty condition. Thus, many who are anxious to attend the school regularly are often necessarily absent for weeks, and in some instances months. Those who attend most regularly advance rapidly in their studies, some of whom work difficult exercises in intellectual arithmetic, and are also rapidly learning geography.
    Now could these pupils be kept at all times under the immediate instruction of good teachers and required to carry on their conversations in English, I see no reason why they should not make the same progress in their studies as so many white children of the same age.
    Another objection to the day school is the fact that quite a number of those who attend live on the side of the river opposite to the school house and during the high waters of the rainy season, they cannot possibly attend without endangering their lives in crossing. Others desire to attend who cannot because of the distance intervening between their homes and the school house.
    Several efforts have been made to establish a boarding school, and in some instances such efforts have been successful for a short time, but have each finally failed because of the failure of Congress to provide funds for the erection of suitable buildings or to supply necessary books, &c. or clothe or subsist the pupils.
    Situated as this Agency is, being entirely dependent upon the appropriations for contingencies (there being no funds regularly provided by virtue of any treaty stipulations with the Indians) the amount annually received for incidental expenses is so variable as to render it impossible for an agent to lay his plans or make his calculations for a greater length of time than for the fiscal year in which he lives.
    In August last I sent to your office an estimate of funds necessary to conduct a boarding school for thirty pupils for a term of six months, intending if the same could be complied with, to move together two of the old Agency buildings, one of which is occupied by the teacher as a residence, and thus make room for that number of pupils. This, though not what was really needed, was the best we could hope for at that time.
    Within the limits of this reservation are something over three hundred and sixty square miles of territory, not more than forty of which can ever be available for settlement by whites. More than one half the latter is within a radius of seven miles from the Agency, the other half being distant by routes now traveled from seven to fifty miles, making this, though not the geographical center, the most eligible place on the reserve for such a school.
    The proposed site is a slight elevation of the plain surrounding the Agency, with good drainage and a very healthy location. Adjacent thereto is a plat of ground of sufficient size to produce all the vegetables necessary for the school, the soil being of the best quality. Also, within the proposed grounds are from forty to fifty bearing apple trees, and the entire grounds will contain from fifteen to twenty acres.
    In behalf of two hundred and sixty-three Indian children belonging to this Agency, I respectfully ask that if possible, the amount called for in these estimates be furnished this Agency at an early date and that as soon as practicable orders be issued by you for work on the same to commence.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
    I find it impossible to enclose the plan in an envelope and mail it as a separate package.
W.B.
    Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




OFFICE OF
Theodore Wygant
Portland, Oregon
Portland, Oregon, January 31, 1878
To the Honorable
    Secretary of the Interior
        Washington, D.C.
Sir--
    I take the liberty of calling your attention to a matter of gross injustice in the Department of Indian Affairs.
    A. F. Hedges was Supt. of Indian Affairs for Oregon and Washington Territory from October 1st 1856 to April 30th 1857. I was his secretary. His accounts were promptly made up and forwarded showing disposition of all funds and property. Letters were received from the Department calling attention to errors of a few cents, against Mr. Hedges, and not a word further until a few months since when letters came from the Office [of] Indian Affairs charging that his property accounts were deficient twenty thousand dollars and that his money accounts were deficient a considerable amount.
    After a silence of twenty years to bring up a matter of this kind is an outrage. I know that there was no deficiency in his accounts either of money or property but he is a plain old farmer. The people who were connected with Indian affairs in his district twenty years ago are scattered, many of them dead, and it will be next to impossible to collect such evidence now as the Department may require.
    If the Office of Indian Affairs had any fault to find with Mr. Hedges' accounts, why was it not attended to within one or two years after he was relieved? All evidence desired could then have been easily obtained.
Very respectfully,
    Theodore Wygant
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.

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Office, Siletz Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon Feb. 4th 1878
Sir
    I desire to respectfully report that as this agency is situated on nearly the extreme western part of the continent and is so isolated from the white settlements as to render it impossible to get from your office authority for the purchase of articles necessary to enable the Indians to plant crops in their season, to protect govt. property from damage from storms or to prevent actual starvation among the Indians belonging to this agency, and also that "excepting medicines" no supplies whatever have been furnished the agency within a period of more than two years, excepting also the few purchases by me in open market from funds allotted this agency for incidental expenses, it becomes necessary to purchase in open market such articles as the exigencies of the service require, and in some instances I have made such purchases without waiting to obtain your authority in each such case, reporting the sum to you and asking your approval.
    No purchases have been made excepting such as were required by a pressing exigency, and I have been careful not to exceed the amount of funds allowed for incidental expenses for present fiscal year.
    I therefore respectfully ask that you will as soon as possible signify by letter to this office your approval of the purchases which have already been reported to you and grant permission to purchase for use of the Department and the Indians belonging to this agency the following articles, "viz"
100 bushels seed wheat costing $112.50
100 bushels seed oats costing 62.50
200 bushels seed potatoes costing 200.00
150 lbs. garden seeds asstd. costing 100.00
10 kegs nails costing 70.00
20 Bbls. flour costing 300.00
300 lbs. sugar costing 50.00
100 lbs. coffee costing 25.00
10 2-horse plows costing 150.00
24 mattocks costing 27.00
24 garden hoes costing 16.00
24 chopping axes costing 36.00
24 spades costing 32.00
24 shovels costing 32.00
6 picks costing 9.00
6 sets of harness costing 150.00
6 sides of harness leather costing 36.00
1 lot of harness tools, &c. costing 20.00
Total 1425.00
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Fort Klamath, Ogn.
    Feb. 9, 1878
The
    Assistant Adjutant General
        Mil. Div. of the Pacific & Dept. of Cal.
            San Francisco, Cal.
Sir:
    In accordance with the requirements of circular from your headquarters dated May 17, 1877, I have the honor to report that on the 2nd ultimo, in compliance with Post Orders No. 1, c.s. I proceeded to the Yainax Indian Sub-Agency on this reservation and on the next day, in conjunction with J. H. Roark, U.S. Indian Agent for the Klamath Indians, inspected thirty-eight head of beef cattle, presented by Thatcher and Worden of Linkville, Ogn., under contract for acceptance by the agent mentioned and found the cattle to be all that was called for by the terms of the contract. The weight of beef contracted for was 20,500 pounds. There were no conveniences at hand to ascertain the average net weight of the cattle, but having had some experience with cattle, I was satisfied that the average net weight of the 38 head--539+ lbs.--as called for by the contract was much less that the actual average.
    I accepted the cattle and made a certificate of the facts of the case. I have since learned from the agent that the smallest steer of the lot, when dressed, weighed considerably over the average.
    Under Post Order No. 11, c.s. I inspected with Mr. Roark at Jacksonville, Ogn., on the 20th ult. twelve pairs of work oxen presented under contract by J. D. Hanks of Rock Point, Ogn. for the agent's acceptance.
    In this case also I found that the terms of the contract had been complied with, in that the oxen were of the proper number, young, well broken and in as good condition as could be expected at the season. I next proceeded, under the same order, to Ashland, Ogn., and inspected eight hundred seventy-three bushels and three pounds of wheat--offered, under contract, by J. M. McCall of that place, for acceptance by the Indian agent. I found it to be of good merchantable quality as required by the contract. The amount contracted for was twenty-five hundred thirty-four (2534) bushels. The difference between this amount and that which I inspected it is claimed, by Mr. Roark and Mr. McCall, had previously been transported by the former to the agency. I have no doubt as to the truth of this statement. The reason for this procedure, as given by the agent, is that the contract had been made in the early part of November last and sent on to Washington for the approval of the Commissioner, but had been returned for some technical informality. The correcting of this and forwarding it again caused so much delay that the agent felt it necessary to get the wheat in without waiting for the approval of the contract in order to prevent otherwise unavoidable distress among the Indians for whose subsistence this wheat was intended. Upon my return to the agency, I examined what was shown to me as a portion of the wheat brought to the agency and found it to be of good quality.
    In all of the above inspections, I made certification in accordance with the facts of the respective cases.
I am, sir, very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        H. D. W. Moore
            1st Lt. 21st Infy.
Headqrs. Mil. Div., Pac. & Dept. Cal.
San Francisco, Feby. 25, 1878
Respectfully forwarded to the Adjutant General
Irvin McDowell
    Major General
        Comdg. Div. and Dept.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Siletz Indian Agency, Or.
    Feb. 10 1878
To Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner, Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to address you through our agent, Hon. Wm. Bagley, respectfully calling your attention to the necessity of employing an assistant teacher in the Siletz Ind. day school.
    In addition to the assistance required in the daily routine of drilling Indians on their lessons and hearing regular recitations, we aim to spend much time in training them in declamations, dialogues and singing.
    We find public concerts of great utility in our work. The Indians learn English much more rapidly in preparing for a concert than in any other way that we have tried.
    This so stimulates their ambition that they will submit to severe drill.
    We find it very hard to hold their attention and secure cheerful submission to necessary training in the regular lessons. They are so impatient to get on.
    We have had four concerts in which the Indians performed their parts in reading, declamations, dialogues and singing, that we thought our public exercises would have been considered quite passable anywhere.
    Most of the exercises [are] being performed by the Indians--not a few trained favorites--but by nearly all in the school. Being so successful in these instances, we wish to devote more time to this kind of drill than we have been able to do without assistance. It is an enormous task to prepare pupils who do not understand much of our language for appearing well in public.
    They can't take their parts and learn them as our children do. They must each have personal drill in every word, syllable and letter till they can read their parts correctly, and then constant assistance till they are committed.
    Still more especially, our school needs an assistant who can teach these girls sewing and needlework.
    They have never had such instructions, simply because we have had no teacher for this department.
    We now have one at our command, if you will allow us to employ her. The object of this letter is to insist respectfully that permission be granted our agent to make such appointment immediately.
    The person to whom I refer is Miss V. A. Bagley, daughter of our agent. She is well qualified for the position.
    Being our organist here now and for four years, she has already had much experience in training these pupils in vocal music and in otherwise training the classes for our concerts.
    She also commands the entire confidence and the utmost respect of the pupils.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        T. F. Royal
            Teacher
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.


Petition of the chiefs and
head men in council at
Siletz Agency, Oregon
February 12, 1878
    We hear that our Great Chief at Washington is now talking of opening the Siletz Reservation to settlement (by whites) and removing our people to the Grand Ronde Agency, Or.
    This makes our hearts sad. Many years ago, we gave up our homes to the white men and the government agents promised us that the Siletz Reserve should be our homes while we lived.
    Thousands of our people have died and are buried here. We claim the land as ours while we live and would rather die here and be buried with our fathers. Some of our people are able to take care of themselves but not all.
    We do not want our families separated and cannot consent to a removal to another country.
    We want our children educated but are not able to do so without the aid of government.
    We are not as yet capable of running the saw mill or grist mill without instruction. But few of us can work in iron, wood or leather like white men.
    Most of us can plow, make nails, hoe, dig, cut wood and do other rough work, but we want more of our young men to learn trades before we are ready to become citizens.
    We were promised many years ago that we should be provided with teams, seed, wagons, plows and such other things as we would need to place us in a condition to provide for ourselves like white men.
    Now we are poor. Many of our people want to plow, but have no teams nor plows.
    We want such things in the hands of our agent so that he can help us to take care of ourselves, and we are willing to do this work.
    We do not now get our living from hunting or fishing but from cultivating the land, and all we ask is a good start and a good title to our lands.
    When George Harney was our head chief and visited Washington, Hon. E.P. Smith was the Commissioner and desired us to make known our wants to your office, and he promised to listen to our pleadings.
    Now we ask you to help us in the things we so much need. Let us have our agent here until we have our lands allotted, our houses and barns built, and our children educated, at which time we will be ready to become citizens and you can close up our agency as soon as you please
Done in the presence of
    W.E. Royal
    Louis Shogren
Signed
Name Name
(R.R.) [Rogue River] George Harney Old Klamath (his X mark)
(Toot) [Tututni] Charley Shellhead Old Shellhead (his X mark)
(Toot) Ben Hardin Old C.C. (his X mark) John
(C.C.) [Cow Creek] George Mann Old Chetco (his X mark) Charley
(Nalt) [Naltunnetunne] Alec Ross Old (his X mark) Joshua
(R.R.) John Adam Wm. (his X mark) Hensey
Robt. (his X mark) Metcalf
Wm. (his X mark) Smith Charley (his X mark) Long
Alsea (his X mark) Jackson John (his X mark) Chapman
Klamath (his X mark) Bob Jake (his X mark) Cook
Old (his X mark) Harvy
Klamath (his X mark) Charley
Nolt (his X mark) Jim
Sam (his X mark) Long
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        February 12th 1878
Sir
    I herewith enclose a request from our teacher, Reverend T. F. Royal, for an assistant teacher in the day school. In relation to the necessity of such an appointment I fully concur and respectfully ask that if possible you will permit us to engage the services asked for by him.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        February 15th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir,
            Allow me to make a special communication to the Department with regard to the purchase I was authorized to make under contract for the benefit of Klamath Reservation; and also with regard to the purchases made by order of the Department by the Hon. E. S. Woog, your agent at San Francisco.
    I desire to make such a statement as shall show the exact condition of all these transactions at the present time.
    I would here most thankfully acknowledge the receipt of your office letter dated Jan. 16th 1878, marked P in which the Department allows my request that the funds designed for the purchase of winter grain &c. be used in the purchase of garden seeds and of axle grease for the use of the Indians and also that the funds set apart for the purchase of lumber and office materials be used for the purchase of the same in open market.
    I will endeavor most faithfully to fulfill these trusts.
    On August 4th 1877, I received a communication from Capt. Bell of Portland, Ogn., Inspector of Ind. Supplies, from which I copy the following: "I am instructed by the Comr. of Ind. Affairs to direct you to forward immediately, direct to his office in Washington, your estimate of Indian supplies for the fiscal year." Supposing that the object of such haste was to enable him or myself to make the purchases at Portland in time to get them to the agency before the roads should become impassable, my estimate was hurriedly made and was made on the basis of Portland prices, with this difference, however, that remembering former instructions not to overgo the amount of funds known to be allowed, the estimate was a little above Portland prices. I thought I was safe in doing this, and that the interests of the service would not suffer from it, from the fact that a variation of twenty percent in quantity is allowed by the terms of all contracts. But I see from the way that the purchases were made in San Francisco, that I made a mistake. In order to have secured to the Indians the benefit of all the funds allowed this reservation, I should have under-estimated rather than over-estimated.
    I am encouraged, however, by your recent action in regard to the funds not expended for the purchase of winter grain, lumber &c. to hope & believe that you will recommend the allowance of the requests at the close of this communication
Klamath and Modoc Annuity Fund
    I will commence my statement by giving the transactions with regard to this fund. It amounts yearly to $3,000. To expend this amount, I was allowed to advertise for 2642 bushels of wheat, estimated to cost $1500, 12 yoke of work oxen, estimated cost $1,000; 2,000 lbs. of beef estimated to cost $80, and 50 bushels of winter rye, 20 bushels of winter barley and 5 bushels of timothy seed. The estimated [cost] of these three articles was $80. I was thus allowed to purchase out of the annuity fund by contract articles estimated in all to cost $2580. The actual cost of the wheat contracted for was $1500, of the oxen $1008 and of the beef $69.80/100, amounting in all to $2,577 80/100, leaving of this fund unexpended $2.20/100. The remaining $340 was to be expended in San Francisco. The estimate covered just that amount. The actual cost of the articles purchased [was] $255 14/100, leaving an unexpended portion amounting [to] $84 86/100, which added to the $2 20/100 before-named makes in all of the Klamath and [Modoc] annuity fund unexpended $87 6/100. One article, a water cask for use in the hay field, was not purchased. It was estimated to cost $2. I will now state that I got the cost of the articles bought at San Francisco from the bills of purchase sent by your agent at San Francisco.
Snakes Annuity Fund.
    This fund amounts annually to $1200. From this fund I was allowed to purchase by contract as follows: 500 bushels of wheat, estimated to cost $350, and 10,000 bbls. of beef, estimated cost $400. The amount of wheat purchased cost $350 and of beef bought $349. Estimated cost of both $750, actual cost of both $699. Unexpended portion $51. $450 of this fund was allowed to be used in the purchase of articles at San Francisco. The actual cost of the articles bought was $374 37/100, leaving unexpended $75 63/100, which added to the above $51 makes a total of $126 63/100.
School Fund.
    Assuming that the allowance for the expense of the boarding school would not be less than last year, I asked for the purchase of articles which were estimated to cost $500. I was authorized to purchase by contract 8500 lbs. of beef. The actual cost of the beef was $296 65/100, leaving unexpended $43.35/100. The remaining $160 was covered by estimates for school supplies. They cost in San Francisco $131 57/100, leaving unexpended $24 43/100. The articles which were asked to be purchased and which were not purchased were 2 gross of pantaloons buttons, estimated to cost one dollar, and 200 lbs. of fine salt, very much needed in the school for salting beef and fish during the summer. The estimated cost was $4 13/100, making in all not purchased $5 10/100. The entire amount of unexpended school funds is $67 78/100.
Mill Fund.
    This fund amounts to $1000 per year. In the estimate I sent you then, now reserved for repairs in mills & mill flumes $200. The amount to be expended at San Francisco was $800. Estimated cost of articles to be bought at  San Francisco $800. Actual cost of articles bought at San Francisco 587 60/100. Articles asked for and estimated but not bought by the agent at San Francisco are 90 rolls wall paper. Estimated cost $28, 2 saddles for Leffell's water wheel, size of collar 4½ inches, with 6 pinions to match. Estimated cost $6.
    Total of articles not bought $34. Total amount of unexpended mill fund, aside from the $200 reserved for repairs, $212 40/100.
Shop Fund.
    This fund amounts to $1500 yearly. $72 was allowed with which to purchase lumber by contract, leaving $1428 to be expended in San Francisco. Estimates covering that amount now sent to Washington and to San Francisco. The actual cost of the articles purchased was $983 20/100, leaving unexpended $444 80/100. Of this amount, articles estimated to cost $55 50/100 were for some reasons unknown to me not purchased. These articles and their estimated cost were as follows: ½ doz. oil cans, 3 no. pint cans & 3 ½ pint, estimated cost $1 50/100. 1 doz. cherries, estimated cost $1 50/100, 1 doz. dogs for guns, estimated cost $1 50/100. 1 doz. gun triggers, estimated cost $2. 5 gallons castor oil, estimated cost $7 50/100. 2 doz. mainsprings for guns, estimated cost $4. 1 doz. feather gun springs, estimated cost $1 50/100. 400 lbs. wagon tire estimated cost $16. ½ doz. trigger double gun, estimated cost $3.00. 1 dozen gun tumbler estimated $2, 3 emery wheels with fixtures estimated $15.
     Allow me to speak now definitely in regard to the need of some of the articles asked for but not purchased. The 300 lbs. of salt is a great necessity for the use of the school. It is especially needed in the summer to salt beef in order to save it from spoiling before it can be used. I had intended during the fishing season to salt down several barrels of fish for the use of the boarding school. In the spring, fish are very abundant in some localities. I have not the salt for this purpose. I could borrow it now [if] I [am] sure of having it to repay. I also asked for the purchase of two gross of pantaloon buttons. The Matron has furnished all that has been used in the school for nearly a year. I also asked for five gallons of castor oil to be used in oiling the various kinds of machinery. During the haying season we have several mowing machines in daily use for about six weeks. This takes a large amount of oil. Castor oil is the only kind of oil we get now that is well adapted to this work. It is also much the best to use upon wagons with iron axletrees. We have several of this kind of government wagons in use.
     My request for five gallons was too small. We need and can use to advantage twice that amount. I also asked for 90 rolls of wallpaper to be used upon the agency buildings. Most of the rooms are unfinished and uncomfortable. The slazy cloth purchased for the lining of rooms is no protection against the wind and the cold. Most of the houses are sided and sealed with unmatched, rough green lumber, which has shrunk so as to make them uncomfortable to live in. I also desired to line and paper the school building and thus teach the school children the benefits and ways of civilization. I also asked the purchase of two saddles for 23-inch Leffell's water wheels, size of collar 4½ inches with six pinions to match. One of those we are now using broke last winter and it required the work of two men for two days to repair it. Our mills are liable at any time to be thrown out of use for want of these saddles. I also asked the purchase of ½ a dozen oil cans for the use of the mowing machines & the shops. We really need one dozen. I also asked the purchase of 400 lbs. of wagon tire. One of our wagons is unfit for use because the tire is worn out. I recommended the purchase of 3 emery wheels with fixtures, one to be used in the shops and one each at the agency and at Yainax for the purpose of grinding mowing machine sickles in the hay field. Such emery wheels would be a great convenience.
    The purchase of several articles to be used in gun repairing was asked. None of them were purchased. This reservation is not and never will be a good country for grain raising. The Indians cannot depend upon tilling the soil for a living. They are obliged to subsist largely by hunting and fishing. There are an abundance of deer, antelope and other game in this region. If deprived of the means of hunting, it will work a hardship towards them and cause suffering, especially in the winter.
    The estimated cost of all the articles asked for but not purchased is $95 63/100. The amount of each kind of unexpended fund is as follows:
Klamath and Modoc Annuity  Fund $  87.06
Walpahpe Snake Annuity  Fund 126.63
Mill Fund &c. 212.40
Shop Fund &c. 444.80
School Fund     67.78
Total unexpended     $938.47
    Since the estimate for the goods purchased at San Francisco was made, we have used up the greater part of our shop and other material. Our nails are nearly all gone. Our iron, for most purposes, is also gone. The miscellaneous articles for carpenter's and blacksmith's shops is pretty well used up. Every day Indians come for repairs and work which cannot be done for want of material. We feel this embarrassment greatly. My plans are to do all we can for the Indians in the line of new building for dwellings and of buildings for public use.
    I want to build a school house and a court and church house at Williamson River. The Indians are beginning to be willing to help in these and other needed enterprises and improvements. In order to accomplish this work, we will need a large amount of nails, glass &c. &c. To fulfill our purposes and plans for the civilization of the Indians, I might say to do only what is imperatively necessary will take every dollar of the fund allowed them by treaty and by the Acts of Congress. Even then we can but imperfectly meet their necessities.
    I therefore most respectfully recommend and ask that the articles embraced in the accompanying additional estimate for Indian supplies for this reservation for the present fiscal year be purchased at San Francisco, either by myself or by your purchasing agent at that place. These articles can be purchased and shipped to Redding before those that are there can be brought to the agency.
J. H. Roark
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton County, Oregon
        February 18th 1878
Sir
    During the past week an unusual number of Indians have visited the agency from different parts of the Reserve to make inquiries relative to the matter of their being soon driven from this to the Grand Ronde Reserve, they having heard that such was the intention of our government.
    Being constantly annoyed by their inquiries, at their request I permitted them to meet in council on the 12th instant and there assured them that it was not the intention of the govt. to drive them from their homes, that no such law had yet passed the U.S. Congress, and that when (if ever) such a law or order as would be necessary to discontinue an agency on this or any other reserve in Oregon, provision would be made in that law or order whereby those of the Indians who were actually making improvements on the lands of the reserve would be allowed to remain and hold their homes. Only such as were dependent upon govt. or their friends for support would be required to go.
    I also advised them to improve the present opportunity to send their children to school and be prepared to dissolve their tribal relations whenever the govt. thought best to abolish their agency.
    During the council, many of the Indians present spoke, and all were united in saying they did not desire the agency abolished until more of them were placed in possession of teams, seeds, tools, &c. so that they might provide their own living.
    At the close, the leading men desired me to send a petition with their names subscribed thereto to you. The petition is herewith enclosed and will explain itself.
    In this connection, I desire to say that the Indians are all peaceable, but from past experience, are not hopeful or happy.
    I should like to see these Indians placed in a condition to support themselves. Their lands allotted them in severalty and then the agency abolished.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        Feb. 20th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Yours of Feb. 4th inst. giving directions relating to the medical supplies bought of H. P. Wakelee & Co., and shipped Jan. 10th 1878, has just come to hand. In answer, I have to say that the only information I have of these supplies is that I received the bills of the goods, and of shipment on the 17th of January, but have had no word in regard to their arrival at Redding. The storms commenced about the 10th of January, and it may be that the supplies have not got to Redding. If they are there, it is certain that they will not reach us before summer. It is impossible to get goods from Redding to this agency now for less than twenty-five cents per lb., and even for this sum freighters will not agree to bring them until the roads get better. I cannot bring them with the Department teams, for the reason that they are not able to go. As I have heretofore stated, the agency mules and horses are small and old, many of them having been condemned by the Military Department before coming into this service.
    The summer price for freighting from Redding to this place is 4 cents per lb. Mr. Edmund S. Woog wrote December 31st 1877 referring to the supplies you are requested to make arrangements for their transportation from Redding to your agency, & again on the 10th of January Mr. Woog wrote you will make such arrangements for their transportation as the best interest of the service may require & no payment is to be made to the Central Pacific R. Rd. for transportation. You will receipt for the stores, carefully observing the printed rules on the bills of lading & direct the company to forward their accounts to Washington for settlement in accordance with Act of Congress & Jan. 28th I received the following dispatch from you, "Receipt to railroad for goods at Redding, and arrange to transport them to agency with your own teams is possible, as I have already said it has been, and will be impossible to transport the goods with the Department teams, and it has been next to impossible for me to go to Redding. Besides, I am in doubt as to their being at Redding for the reason above stated. Now I would suggest that the very best way to get the supplies here is to wait until the early summer and then get freighters to bring them at four cents per lb. And if I am required to advertise and make contracts &. it will cost more. Besides, I may not get the goods until late in the fall. As I am in pressing need of these goods, I respectfully ask for authority to hire freighters to bring the goods to the agency as early as they can be brought for four cents per pound.
Very respectfully
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office, Siletz Agency, Or.
    Mch. 13, 1878
Sir:
    In compliance with your instructions contained in circular number 6 (Accounts), dated Jan. 23, 1878, I herewith transmit to your office a list of names of all Indians of this agency who are entitled to supplies &c. with number in each family belonging.
    I have made strenuous efforts to obey your instructions as far as possible by securing, in addition to their English (if I understood rightly) the Indian name with English translation.
    I am happy to inform you, however, that but very few Indian names are now in use, having been dropped long ago, and English names substituted, except among some of the very old.
    Many are without names, while others have more than one.
    Those belonging to the Klamath tribe, when asked to give their Indian names, replied, "We have many names in our own language, but none are correct, and therefore of no use to you. We feel ashamed and cannot tell you, for really we have none. We claim none other than our English names & want nothing else. We are trying to become civilized. Does the Commr. of Indian Affs. think that we are still wild? Does government expect improvement while under the yoke of 'old fashion'? We have names given to us for sport but these would be of no use to you."
    How could I under such circumstances compel them to give their names? I think it would have been unreasonable on part of the Department to require it.
    But, perhaps, your instructions were misunderstood, and nothing more than their known or common names were required to be given; if so, I have made a great blunder in performing that which seems to be a needless task and great slaughter of time.
    All Indians (except very few) are known and called by their English names & none other, as will be seen by reference to the census roll forwarded to your office July, 1877.
    Please advise me if the list proves satisfactory.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
E. A. Hayt
    Commr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Walters Station, S.P.R.R.
    San Diego Co., California
        March 16th 1878
Sir
    On the first of April, 1873, I assumed charge of Siletz Indian Agency, Oregon, and remained, discharging my duty to the entire satisfaction of the Department, till sometime in the autumn of 1875, when my health having become much impaired, I was assured by the resident physician (Dr. Carter) that a further residence in that excessively damp climate would undoubtedly prove fatal, and I forwarded my resignation, which was accepted, my successor (Mr. Bagley) relieving me on the 1st March 1875.
    The state of my health rendered it imperative that I should seek some milder climate and I removed to California, leaving all the records of the office &c. at the agency.
    As my papers had been promptly forwarded quarterly, my accounts had been transmitted for approval and in case any should require explanation, I arranged with my former clerk, Mr. M. N. Chapman, to notify me of the fact and furnish the required data from the papers in the office.
    I have lately learned that Mr. Chapman has removed from his former residence, and I am anxious to learn the exact condition of my accts. There is also a balance of some $250, balance of salary yet due me. I respectfully ask information respecting the state of my accounts and whether the balance of my salary (for which I have given an order to a bank in Los Angeles, Cal.) can be paid?
    My address is "J. H. Fairchild, Walters Station, Southern Pacific Railroad, California."
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            Late U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. Commissioner Indian Affairs
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Siletz Indian Agency, Oregon
    Mch. 26, 1878
To Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington, D.C.
Sir,
    I would respectfully ask permission to purchase the buildings here, consisting of dwelling, store house, &c. belonging to William Chambers, formerly sutler at this agency. Said buildings are situated at the agency, are comparatively new, and in good condition. They are suitable for a dwelling for the farmer, for new quarters for our office, apothecary shop and commissary stores and can be had for less than half what it would cost to erect such buildings.
    The whole will not cost to exceed $250, which I propose paying out of the funds now on hand for agency building & repairs.
Respectfully yours
    William Bagley
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
By W.E.R. [William E. Royal]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



United States Senate Chamber
Washington, April 11, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Indian Affairs
Sir:
    On the 8th February of this year, J. M. McCall, Esq. of Ashland, Oregon, forwarded to your office vouchers issued to him by J. H. Roark, Esq., Indian Agent at Klamath Agency, for about 2,500 bushels of wheat sold to him for the use of the Klamath Agency. His partner, Mr. Baum, is now in this city and is very desirous of knowing whether the same has been allowed, and the exact status of the claim at this time.
    I send this to you by a riding page and will be obliged if you will have the matter looked into at once and return answer to me.
Very respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Grand Ronde Agency, Oregon
    April 19th 1878
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of Feb. 23rd '78, with letter R.G.R. in right-hand corner in regard to the subject matter thereof. I have to say J. W. Blake was discharged on receipt of your letter, he not being a suitable person.
    I employed D. J. Fouch as miller temporary at $3.00 per day for such time as is actually necessary grinding wheat, sawing and dressing lumber for Indians. A miller can turn the mills with the assistance of one Indian. A competent and suitable person cannot be secured to perform the duties of sawyer and miller for a lower compensation than $1,000 per annum.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
    Apr. 24, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of March 26th marked "F" informing me that before any action with a view to the approval of open market purchases of March 1st 1878 in amount of $148.95/100 can be taken, you require me to explain what seems to your office as exorbitant prices for the nails & flour, particularly the latter, when wheat is worth but $1.25 per bushel.
    In reply, I have to inform you that most of the nails referred to were of a smaller size than I had been purchasing heretofore, being No. 4. I have made several purchases of nails & received approval @ 8¢ lb.
    These nails, being of a smaller size than the nails formerly purchased @ 8¢, are necessarily sold @ 8⅓. Shingle nails are sold at higher rates than those of larger size.
    The Indians needed these nails for use in covering their houses; although I might have purchased at a lower figure at Newport, 15 miles distant, when transportation is added, the total cost of the nails would exceed the price paid as above referred to.
    In regard to the price of flour, I have to inform you that I purchased it at the very lowest rates. At Newport it was selling at the same rate, $12 per Bbl.
    I did purchase wheat at $1.25 per bushel, but the supply of wheat was at that time very scarce and I have been unable to obtain since then more than 10 bushels on which to support the sick & infirm Indians under my charge.
    There was no real good clean wheat to be had & had I purchased for grist what little the Indians had here on the agency, saved over from their last year's crop (for seed) I think it would have been doing an injustice to them, and I know would have cost more to have the same floured than it would to pay for flour at the rate of $12 per Bbl., and have but an inferior article.
    Had there been plenty, I would have had the same ground, but as there was none to be had, I hope my action in making said purchase will be approved.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        April 29th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir
I think [it] would have a good influence over my Indians if some of them could go out and see how our people do things, with a view to giving them a chance to go out and learn what they can. I ask authority to take a select number of the principal men and women and also a select number of the scholars of the Indian school to Salem, Oregon, when the Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church meets in August next. And I ask to be allowed to use a sum of money from the incidental fund not to exceed fifty dollars for the above purpose.
Yours very truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
    April 30, 1878
Sir
    In compliance with instructions contained in your office letter of 1st inst. marked E. Oregon B 211 '78, I have the honor to herewith transmit estimates for stationery &c. necessary for use of Siletz Indian day school and for necessary repairs to school house & teacher's house. By my request, our teacher has carefully prepared these estimates with the full understanding that such estimates must be the lowest possible for the successful conduct of the school.
    I fully approve his report and the estimate made by him and desire to respectfully report to you that unless these repairs are made, we shall be compelled soon to withdraw from the school all the white children now attending, excepting such as may be retained as assistants.
    The condition of the school house and teacher's house is such as to render them positively dangerous to the health of their occupants, being so open and leaky as to allow the wind and rain free passage through their walls and roof.
    The Indians were never more anxious to send their children to school and keep them there than at the present time, and it is to be regretted that we cannot give the pupils sufficient clothing to make them comfortable. The cheapest and best way to provide such clothing is to purchase the material and under the direction of a female assistant-teacher, require school girls to make the clothing necessary for the school. Vocal music is now taught in the school and I am surprised to see the Indians learn to read notes so rapidly. Only a few lessons in the rudiments of vocal music have been given them, though they have been learning to sing tunes since the organization of our Sabbath schools in 1873.
    I respectfully ask permission to employ a female assistant teacher, at a salary of forty dollars per month, who is competent to teach vocal music in the school and plain sewing, cutting garments, &c.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Siletz Indian Agency
    April 28, 1878
Hon. William Bagley
    Agent Siletz Indian Reservation
Sir, In compliance with your request, I have the honor to submit herewith a statement of the present condition of the Siletz Indian day school, its absolute wants and an estimate for necessary repairs and requisites.
    Our seating room is full and running over, and other pupils expect to enter next week. Hence the building should be enlarged immediately. It should also be sided and painted on the outside and painted inside.
    And other improvements on the premises are greatly needed as woodshed and water closets. The teacher's house also needs a thorough repairing throughout. Being the old mill building of the Agency fitted up temporarily for the teacher's residents, it has become still more dilapidated and unfit for occupancy. The roof leaks in every part, and the walls of all the rooms but one are bare, rough lumber and only one room floored comfortably.
    I therefore submit the following as only an approximation of actual necessities, but sufficient to render the school much more comfortable and attractive and the teacher's family surroundings more agreeable.
Estimate
  2 doz. Bibles @ 25¢ each $6.00
1 Clock 5.00
1 Abacus or Numeral Frame 2.50
1 Globe (Terrestrial) 10.00
1 Wall Map of Oregon 5.00
1 Wall Map of U.S. 5.00
1 set Wilson's Charts for Com. Schls. 18.00
1 set Wilson's Outline Wall Maps 10.00
1 Adam's Chronological Chart 12.00
2 doz. Writing Books No. 1 Spencerian `3.00
2 doz. Writing Books No. 2 Spencerian 3.00
1 doz. Writing Books No. 3 Spencerian 1.50
1 doz. Writing Books No. 4 Spencerian 1.50
1 doz. Easy Reading Lessons for Ind. Schools
1 doz. Slates @ 25¢ 3.00
1 gro. Slate Pencils 1.00
2 doz. Lead Pencils 1.00
2 doz. Penholders .50
½ rm. Paper, Cap & Letter 2.50
1 Register 1.50
3 doz. Songs for Today 9.00
2 doz. Gospel Songs, P. P. Bliss for S.S. 7.500
2 doz. Child's Pictorial Paper for S.S. 3.60
1 lib. "Five Dollar Library" for S.S. 5.00
1 doz. Scripture Cards for S.S. 2.00
4 boxes Crackers for School Lunch 28.00
150 yds. Calico for Girls' Dresses (for School) 16.00
Thread, Lining & Buttons for Same 5.00
100 yds. Ky. Jeans @ 30¢ for Boys (School) 30.00
Buttons, Thread & Trimmings for Same 5.00
Needles, Thimbles &c. for Girls to Learn to Sew 2.50
2 Water Buckets for S.H. 1.00
1 Dipper for S.H. .50
1 Wash Pan for S.H. 1.00
20 yds. Toweling @ 20¢ 4.00
2 doz. Combs 3.00
1 box Soap 2.00
1 Bbl. Quicklime for Sch. H. & Teach. H. 4.00
Salary, Asst. Teacher 2 mo. @  $40 80.00
2 Bo Stoves for S.H. with Pipe 30.00
Brick Flue 20.00
4000 ft. Common Lumber for Addition to S.H. 24.00
2000 ft. Siding Lumber for Addition to S.H. 16.00
4000 Shingles @ 4M 16.00
1 keg Nails 5.00
4 Windows 12.00
2 Doors 10.00
100 lbs. White Lead 12.00
10 gal. Linseed Oil (Boiled) 12.00
2 Locks & Keys 2.50
2 doz. Marriage Certificates 3.00
260 yds. Cotton Lining for Teacher's House 12.50
35 rolls Wall Paper for Teacher's House 7.00
9000 Shingles for Teacher's House 36.00
500 ft. Flooring (Dressed) for Teacher's House 4.00
2 Doors with Locks for Teacher's House 10.00
2 Windows for Teacher's House 8.00
2000 ft. Siding (Dressed) for Teacher's House 26.00
1 Parlor Stove for Teacher's House 12.00
1 Office Chair for Teacher's House 4.00
Brick Flue for Teacher's House 30.00
1 keg Nails for Teacher's House 5.00
150 lbs. White Lead for Teacher's House 18.00
15 gal. Linseed Oil (Boiled) 15.00
2 Whitewash Brushes (General Use) 2.50
4 Paint Brushes (General Use)       6.00
$659.60
Respectfully,
    T. F. Royal
        Teacher, Siletz Indian Day School
Approved April 30th 1878
    William Bagley
        U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



War Department
Washington City
May 1st 1878
Sir:
    I have the honor to invite your attention to the enclosed copy of telegram from General McDowell, recommending, in view of the probability of a bill being introduced by the Congressional Committees on Public Lands, granting prior rights of pre-emption to settlers on the Klamath Indian Reservation, that the removal of these settlers, fixed for the 10th of the present month, be postponed until Congress has either acted upon their petition or has adjourned without action.
    An early answer is requested.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Geo. W. McCrary
            Secretary of War
The Honorable
    The Secretary of the Interior
   

(Copy)
Telegram
    San Francisco, April 29th 1878
Received Washington, D.C. 6:10 p.m.
To
    Adjutant General
        Washington, D.C.
            Newspapers announce that the Congressional Committee on Public Lands are about to introduce a bill giving settlers on Klamath Indian Reservation prior rights of pre-emption--this in connection with your letter of December nineteenth, referring to probable action of Congress on the question of the removal of these settlers induces me to recommend their removal, to go into effect May tenth (10) be postponed until Congress has either acted upon their petition or has adjourned without action.
    Notification of the action of the Secretary of War hereon requested by telegraph.
(signed) McDowell
    Major General
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



May 7th 1878
Mr. William Bagley
    U.S. Ind. Agent
        at the Siletz Reservation
Dear Sir,
    Enclosed please find a report of the condition of Nestucca Indians at the mouth of Salmon River (viz):
    Met the Nestucca Indians in council at one o'clock p.m. May 4th 1878 with the following result. They positively refuse to pack any articles from Salem but would receive whatever the government issued to them at the mouth of the Siletz River.
    That before they would consent to leave their homes at Nestucca and move to the Salmon River country, Hon. Ben. Simpson (acting for the government) made them the following promises (viz)
10 pair of work horses
10 sets of harness
3 yoke of oxen
10 wagons
1 cow for each family
Hogs and chickens for all
Hats, coats, pants and boots for the men
Calico, shawls and shoes for the women
Three good carpenters to build their houses
One sutler's store
    Further, that the person that will see that the above promises are fulfilled will be their agent.
Articles on Hand
One set chain harness
Two hoes and one shovel
Saddle Horses
William 1
Bob 4
Baxter 1
Dick 2
Collen [sic] 3
Levy 2
Jake 1
Peter 1
Old Man Dick 2
Martha 2
    One man, Dodson (white), hired pasturage of them for sheep at $12.00 per month; after three months, he took them away and refused to pay them for the same. They wish the agent to assist them in getting their pay.
    Also that one white man living on the other side of Salmon River owns cattle that crosses over to their side of the river and causes them trouble. Chief Samuel went to him and told him to take his stock off the reservation. He told him to go to hell.
    Chief Samuel wishes to know where the reservation line is and what the law is upon the subject.
    Furthermore, that his people are willing to work and improve their lands and make permanent homes, but in order to do this they want some help from the government.
    They are dissatisfied and want Agent Bagley to visit them at as early a period as possible.
    On Monday 6th at the mouth of the Siletz, I issued seeds to the following named families (viz)
    Salmon Dick, Charley, Samuel, Old Man Jack, Baxter, Big John, William, Coller [sic], Peter, Levy, John, Old Man Bob, Tenas William, Frank, Old Man Dick, Tenas Jack.
    Chief Samuel requested that the agent would take him three bushels of oats and some nails.
    Those Indians are much in need of nails, hammers &c. with which to build their fences and houses; also other implements for garden and farming purposes.
    All of which is most respectfully submitted.
J. W. Williams
    U.S.F. [U.S. Farmer]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon May 23, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit herewith to your office a list of open market purchases made by me during this month which were absolutely required in order to keep the old, sick & infirm Indians from starving and prosecute the work in the different departments of the agency, such as Indians sowing and planting, work on roads, making fences, cutting saw logs, &c. &c.
    Had it not been for these purchases of supplies &c. there could have been nothing done, as the Indians were entirely out of food and would have had to leave the reservation to work for whites in order to obtain their subsistence.
    As long as the Department have funds for the purchase of subsistence of Indian laborers, sick &c. &c., just that long I consider my imperative duty to keep up the supply as long as the funds for that purpose are not expended or over-reached, and thus keep them at work upon their own soil.
    When I consider the condition of a great many of these Indians in regard to their present condition, I feel constrained (oftimes) to ask the Department to furnish something for the protection of their bodies from the cold & damp climate.
    There are many Indians now upon this reservation who are almost naked for want of clothing, and were it not for the fact that I am doing all in my power to keep them in food & subsistence while making their gardens & trying to secure their homes, and that the money is mostly used in this way, I would make an exigency and purchase a few yards of calico with which to clothe these poor Indians.
    These Indians are all willing to work. They come to me & beg for work; and after hiring as many as I can, many, too many leave the reservation with sad hearts to go away among whites to work & beg until a small supply of food is obtained, when they return to their country to stay until this supply of food & clothing is exhausted.
    All Indians belonging [omission] are always ready for work and could only a part of their subsistence be furnished, they would be willing to remain the entire year.
    Could the government buy all the wood the Indians would be willing to cut, they would clothe themselves & families & care for their farms.
    But as it is, I ask how can the Indians clothe themselves.
    Their grain & gardens will be a source of great relief this coming summer & I think most of their subsistence will be derived from them this winter, and I hope that I may be able to expend considerable funds this coming year, purchasing clothing &c. instead of so much subsistence which I expect will mostly be raised by the Indians themselves.
    The purchases made, as herein represented, in open market on the 8th & 22nd of May respectively, were made at the lowest possible rates that could be obtained.
    Hoping to hear favorably in reply to this special letter, I remain,
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



United States Senate Chamber
Washington, May 27, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Indian Affairs
Sir:
    Sometime last summer, Wm. M. Turner, of Jacksonville, Oregon, was appointed by the Interior Department on the nomination of W. V. Rhinehart, agent at Malheur Agency, Oregon, as an agent to aid in getting in Indians onto that agency. Mr. Turner is a most excellent gentleman. He entered upon the duties of his office, and in the surveys of the alkali deserts during last summer and fall nearly lost his eyesight; one eye is entirely blind and the other very much injured. His appointment has never been revoked and he has been in active service, I understand, until recently. He is now so disabled, however, as to be unable to continue in the service, and he has written me desiring me to hand in his resignation to the Department, which I now do.
    He also says that he has received nothing in the way of salary later than October 23, 1877. Furthermore, that the air in Jacksonville is too thin to live on long. He desires to be stricken from the rolls, but desires still more to be paid for his services up to this time.
    Please advise me as to the status of his accounts. He was to be paid out of the $10,000 appropriated specially for getting in Indians onto the reservation in Oregon. Please inform me to what date he has been paid and whether he can be paid at once the balance due him.
Very respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Newport, Oregon
    May 30th 1878
Hon.
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Sir
    I, John A. Pierce, a citizen of Alsea Bay, Benton County, Oregon, desire to call your attention to the fact that William Bagley, U.S. Ind. Agent of Siletz Agency, is exercising a control over certain Indians at Siuslaw River, that if persisted in, will produce trouble, and in my opinion cannot do otherwise that work serious injury to the Indians and produce the worst results. Will you please inform me just how far Mr. Bagley is authorized to act as an agent for the Alsea & Siuslaw Indians and confer a special favor in your
Obedient servant
    John L. Pierce
        Newport, Benton Co., Or.
To Hon.
    Com. of Ind. Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Office, Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Oregon
        May 31, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir
                I date this monthly report for May as above but it is June 18th before I could get time to write it. The delay was unavoidable, being away most of the time and pressed with a thousand cares and much labor.
    I went to San Francisco as per authority from your office to purchase supplies. The employees spent one week working on roads & a few days in sowing and planting for the Indians. The remainder of the time was spent in the shops and mills. The school has been looked after by Rev. S. M. Nickerson, the teacher, and the agent has done what he could to make the school prosper, grow in interest and benefit. I feel proud of the improvement in the school. The religious interest is increasing, and accordingly all kinds of superstition are waning. The Indians remain quiet and peaceable and I think we have the best Indians I have ever seen. I have said much heretofore in regard to the policy I would adopt in schools, civilization, industry and religion, had I means. But what can I do with five hundred dollars per year for these purposes. I hope that there will be a more liberal allowance during the incoming fiscal year. Our hearts were made to rejoice by an intimation from your office some time since that we might get more help next year. I pray you do what you can for us. I learn today that the Bannocks are advancing toward us, and while I do not fear danger, I have called my chiefs together and have ordered all the Indians to come on the reservation.
    The Indians continue to ask as to the results of my communications in regard to the boundary lines and what they claim as encroachment upon their lands. You will see that this communication is more to meet the demands of a report that a real report, but it must suffice for this time as it is too late and the mail goes early in the morning.
Yours very truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon June 5th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. Ind. Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to herewith transmit to your office a few exigency purchases which I have made without your permission.
    10 Bbls. flour @ $6.00 $60.00 purchased of Jacob S. Felger on the 8th & 22nd of May last
    550½ lb. beef @ 6½¢ 35.78
    457 lb. beef @ 6¢ 28.50 purchased from Indians of the reservation. Owing to the superior quality, 550½ pounds were purchased at 6½¢.
    500 posts 8 ft. @ $2½ $12.50
    Total--$136.78
    During the month of May, every Indian upon the reservation was expected to work the roads two days each and I am pleased to know that but few have failed to do the work required.
    I purchased this flour & beef especially for subsistence of the laborers on roads, and had there been twice the amount furnished, it would have been consumed, some having worked on half rations.
    Where the Indians are so anxious to perform labor, I think it is the duty of the government to feed them, as it is impossible for them to obtain subsistence in any other way while remaining upon the reserve.
    There are now upon the reserve many more Indians that at this time last year.
    They are at home taking proper care of their gardens & farms, keeping up fences &c., and on every Saturday, when supplies are issued for the week, many return home with nothing (but for the old, sick &c.) on which to subsist the coming week.
    And it is just that that drives so many of our Indians off the reserve to go among whites to obtain a livelihood.
    I purchased these articles at the very lowest rates and therefore expect the immediate approval of the same, as the articles purchased were absolutely necessary for immediate use.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Klamath Agency
    June 15th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Ind. Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir
Yours of May 23rd 1878 (A) informing me that the salary of Indian agent at the Klamath Agency for the fiscal year commencing June 1st 1878 is fixed by law at $1,100 per annum instead of $1,500.00 as heretofore is received.
    I have to say that this is a great injustice. It takes the faithful work of from twelve to sixteen hours each day to do what this service demands of an agent.
    One man cannot do the clerical work alone of this service in less than eight or ten hours per day. Besides, an agent has enough to do without touching the office work. With all this forced upon an outpost, very difficult to manage on account of its remoteness without clerk, and strict promptness and correctness demanded in reports, returns and instructions is more than demanding brick without straw, and all this for a salary less than a mere clerk at Washington, without responsibility, without the care of a thousand Indians and the management of a reservation fifty miles square
     I will state to you frankly that on the receipt of the information that the salary was reduced, that I determined to resign at once, and accordingly wrote out my resignation. After reflection, I found that I had been compelled to neglect much of the office work on account of the press of outside work and business, that no one could do or attend to but myself, and that I had commenced a work of civilization, Christianity, that should not be left just now. I concluded to wait until I caught up in the office and until I wrote to you upon the subject. I remain here at present only from a sense of moral and religious duty and not for the salary.
Yours very truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
[P.S.] I have no member of my family in the service.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.  Penned in a furious scrawl.



Grand Ronde Agency, Or.
    June 20, 1878
Sir,
    During October last my agency was visited by Indian Inspector Watkins, and while here among other official acts, he sent for the Nestucca and Salmon River Indians who live at the mouth of Salmon River on the coast some twenty-five or thirty miles from here, and during his conversation with them he informed them that they would thereafter be placed under my charge and under the control of the agent at this (Grand Ronde) agency. I was also informed of this fact in the presence of Capt. Wilkinson--who accompanied the Hon. Inspector--and afterwards in the presence of Agent Bagley at the Siletz Agency. Mr. Watkins informed that agent in my presence of the fact of his placing these Indians under the agent at Grand Ronde Agency. When a short time ago I was at the scene of the late trouble, I was informed by Mr. Bagley that he had received money for these Indians and had no information from the Department of the Indians being placed in my charge.
    Will you have the kindness to inform me if these Indians are now under my control or that of Agent Bagley, and if not under mine, will you have the kindness to notify Agent Bagley and thus avoid a conflict of authority between Agent Bagley and myself.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner
        Ind. Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Salem, Oregon
    June 21, 1878
Sir,
    I have to inform you of a shooting affray which occurred upon the reservation upon the 15th instant near the mouth of Salmon River, and about twenty-five miles from the Grand Ronde Agency proper. My first intimation of the difficulty was the arrival of some Indians at the agency from the scene of the trouble & I immediately mounted a horse and in company with them and taking one Indian with me, arrived at the mouth of Salmon River just five hours after I received intelligence of the difficulty, and from the best evidence I could obtain from both parties concerned in the affray, the difficulty arose about as follows:
    Some whites names Dodson have settled in my opinion upon the agency and have stock running upon the reservation, and these parties had gone on the reservation to drive off some of their cattle, when some bulls belonging to the government were taken also, and these bulls having been placed in the charge of the Indians by the agent at the Siletz Agency, and they objected to these animals being taken away, and in the quarrel, the white men drew a pistol upon the Indians and struck one of them with a club, to which the Indians made no resistance, when on the 15th instant (the day following), the Indians--some five men and three squaws--were met on the beach by these three white men, two of whom were named Dodson, when the Indians requested them to say when they would bring back the government bulls that they had driven away--they replied it was none of their business & from that a general quarrel began, and one of the Dodson brothers struck or kicked one of the Indians in the breast or stomach, when the Indian caught hold of the man Dodson, who immediately drew a revolver and shot the Indian through the heart & he immediately died & an Indian standing close by then had the pistol snapped at him several times by this man Dodson--but the pistol failing to fire, the Indian struck Dodson with a small hatchet which he drew from his belt and knocked him down and, as he attempted to get up, the Indian grabbed from the hands of another Indian standing by a shotgun and fired, killing Dodson at once.
    The other Indians who were present made no attempt to injure the remaining two white men, but held them, saying they did not wish any fighting and after the Indian & Dodson were both killed, they released them and started at once for the agency & as before stated on their arrival I returned with them. The third day after I arrived upon the scene of the difficulty, Agent Bagley from the Siletz Agency arrived and can I think corroborate my statements.
    I will here say that my timely arrival in my judgment averted a serious difficulty, as I am informed that the remaining two white men attempted to procure the white settlers to assist them in whipping out the few Indians who live at the mouth of the Salmon River & it was with the greatest difficulty that I kept the Indians from about the agency from congregating at that point & had the slightest collision taken place during the excitement among both the Indians & the few whites who have settled in that locality, I fear the most serious consequences might have been the result before assistance could have arrived.
    At present, however, the excitement has abated and I do not apprehend any more trouble for the present, but it is imperatively necessary that the lines of the agency should be established & surveyed and that all whites if within the lines should be removed. 
    I came to Salem as soon as I could safely leave my agency and have consulted with the U.S. Dist. Attorney in regard to this matter.
    Upon Mr. Bagley, agt. from the Siletz, stating that he had rec'd. funds for those Indians (the Nestuccas) at the mouth of Salmon River, I induced them to go with him to the Siletz Agency & those who were engaged in the difficulty did so.
In haste
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon June 21st 1878
Sir
    I desire to respectfully report that on Monday morning, at an early hour, Sam, Chief of the Nestuccas of Salmon River, came to the agency and reported that one of his men had been shot and killed by a white man, and that in turn one of his men (a brother to the one killed) had shot and killed the white man. The Indian was much excited and seemed to fear an attack from the friends of the white man. He said he had been to Grand Ronde Agency and informed Agent Sinnott before coming here.
    I proceeded with haste to the scene of the difficulty, arriving there on Tuesday morning. Found Agent Sinnott at or near Sam's house, and in company with Mr. Sinnott went to the house of Mr. Elon Dodson, a brother of Perry Dodson, who had been killed. Also to the houses of some of the Indians, and to the ground upon which the fight had occurred, making all possible inquiries concerning the affair, with the object of learning its cause and probable final termination, from which I obtained the following information, "viz"
    1st: that the Dodson brothers were and had been very much prejudiced against Indians, though they were their nearest neighbors with whom they had been trading and trafficking for two years past. From Elon Dodson I learned that the Indians were not human but brutes and incapable of improvement, hence had no rights in land which ought to be respected, though he claimed to be a law-abiding man and would treat the Indians well because the laws of our country required it. He thought the Indians came to kill his brother, though he admitted his brother had commenced the combat which resulted in his death.
    He had many friends who would render assistance but had sent to Salem for a warrant to arrest the Indians who had been guilty of murder. He was well armed and prepared to defend himself, and intended to do so. He went with me to the place where the fight occurred and showed me the positions of the combatants, where they fell &c.
    2nd: from the Indians I learned that the Messrs. Dodson had ever been overbearing in their manner toward them and that their lives had been repeatedly threatened by them. That on Friday, the 14th inst., Sam had been informed that two bulls belonging on the reserve and placed in his hands by me for Indians who were here (at the agency), were being driven off the reserve by the D. brothers, and that he proceeded forthwith to endeavor to prevent their being driven off and that when he protested and attempted to return them, Messrs. D. swore at him and threatened his life if he did not go away, and he returned without them. Saturday morning, Sam and two other Inds. went across Salmon River to see Messrs. D. about the cattle, met the D. brothers and another white man.
    Hard words passed between them for some time when Perry D. kicked an Indian in the breast. [The] Indian clinched with him, when P.D. drew a revolver from his pocket and shot him through. He fell and called to his friends to kill D., as he had shot him. An own brother of the wounded and dying Indian went to his relief and struck D. three blows with a hatchet, then, seeing a gun in the hands of another Indian, took it and shot D.
    There were at the time a few camps of settlers in the Willamette Valley who had come to the coast for health or pleasure, who were immediately informed by the Indians of what had occurred, and assured that no danger attended their remaining in their camps, as the Indians did not nor had they at any time desired to fight. Knowing the feelings of many whites in Oregon and fearing violence might be attempted, I deemed it prudent to bring the leaders near the agency, where I may prevent further trouble.
    When an effort is made to arrest them by legal process, I will render assistance to the officers making the attempt, but should mob violence be attempted, I cannot restrain the Indians from defending themselves on their own soil.
    To subsist, these Indians must make some purchases not authorized by you, but required by the exigency above shown. While these Indians [are] kept here they will be required to work for themselves, driving lumber we issue to them down the river to be used in building their houses at Salmon River.
    In my telegram of this date, I have requested you to order a survey of the north line of the reserve, and in relation to this matter would respectfully say that until we know positively where the territory of the reserve terminates and that of citizens begins, it will be impossible to prevent collisions. I herewith enclose a rough diagram in pencil showing the mouth of Salmon River and surroundings as seen by me, and though only made from observations with the naked eye, some idea may be formed of the difficulty attending the matter of keeping stock on or off the reserve at that point.
    I respectfully ask that you will, if possible, order the immediate survey of this line and that it be plainly marked for a distance of six miles east from the coast. Lasting stones should be planted solidly in the ground and plainly marked so as to be seen by settlers who may desire to obtain land in the vicinity.
    I also respectfully enclose an estimate of supplies that will be required to subsist these Indians until July 4th and ask that you will approve their purchase in open market.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Jacksonville, Oregon
    June 22nd 1878
Major W. V. Rinehart
    U.S. Indian Agent
        Malheur Agency
Sir
    In obedience to your order under date of June 7th, I at once proceeded to this point and now submit my final report. The band of Piutes under Chief Ocheho whose removal I desired to accomplish have been quiet and peaceable during the past winter, but have recently shown signs of uneasiness, and I am satisfied that a few of Ocheho's men have joined the hostiles east of Steen's Mountain.
    It is a matter of regret that I was not authorized to remove this band to your agency and I still hope for the interest of the settlers and also of the Indians that the Department will soon deem it expedient to remove them either to Malheur or Yainax.
    In severing my official connection with the Dept., I feel that I have discharged my duty and have to acknowledge the courtesy with which I have been treated by yourself as well as the uniform correctness of your suggestions.
    I will only add for the information of the Department that the removal of all the straggling bands of Piutes can in my opinion only be accomplished without bloodshed by guaranteeing to them actual subsistence and a faithful observance of all promises made to them. This opinion is founded on frequent contact with the Indians, who seem to fear starvation in case of removal to a reservation, and I feel assured that time will prove it correct.
I am very respectfully
    W. M. Turner
        Special U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Carlin, Nevada, June 23rd, 1878
John Corning, Esq.
    A. General Superintendent, C.P.R.R.
        San Francisco
Dear Sir,
    I have just returned from a trip down the road among the Indians, and believing you are anxious to know the facts in regard to the big scare, I thought it my duty to write.
    I saw and conversed with many Indians I have been intimate with for the last nine (9) years and some for a much longer time.
    Quite a number of the Piutes belonging south of the road have been for the last few days going north--they say to Duck Valley. The most of them are well mounted and arrived with Henry, Spencer and Winchester rifles and with more or less ammunition.
    My belief is that the majority of them start out simply to find out what is going on and to trade guns, horses and ammunition with the Bannocks. I also believe that they would easily be induced to join the Bannocks.
    These Indians should be turned back to where they came from and be obliged to remain. Many of them are men who have been working on the ranches south of the road for years. Many of them speak English and are young, active men. I also find that some of them have been buying guns (rifles) and ammunition at Eureka, of some trader there, but [I] could not learn his name.
    The Shoshones are all right; some few have also gone north to see "what's up." They, too, however, should be made to return to where they belong and made to remain.
    I have been and am still looking for a white man whom I drove away from the Indians here, some ten days since, a long-haired villain who speaks Piute and Shoshone and is endeavoring to make trouble.
    There is not the least danger on the line of the road.
    All the reports are very much exaggerated; the story of an Indian shooting a horse from under a white man at Evans' Ranch is a lie. The man shot his own horse, this I am satisfied of after conversing with all the parties; besides, Indians do not cut up saddles when they can just as well carry them away.
    I shall keep among the Indians during the excitement and keep posted as to their movements. You perhaps are not aware that recently I have been superseded in my position over the Indians by a young man from Washington. What I am doing is on my own responsibility. I have no authority over the Indians but am still their friend when they do right.
Respectfully yours
    John A. Palmer
P.S. You can make whatever use of this letter you see fit.
J.A.P.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




San Francisco, Cal., June 28, 1878
    Rec'd. Washington June 28, 1878 9:31 p.m.
To
    General Sherman
        Washington, D.C.
Governor Chadwick of Oregon sends following dispatch from Linkville, Oregon, June twenty-sixth (26th) Seventy-eight (78).
    "Portion Indians Klamath Reservation hostile. Settlers Sprague River Valley driven off. Settlers Klamath Basin, Lost River Valley, moving into Linkville. Five settlers Warner Valley murdered. Need protection. Troops Ft. Klamath should not be removed. Indians east working this way. Please send arms here. Authorize enrollment three companies mounted militia protect settlers this section and prevent outbreak. Indians on reservations. (signed) George Nurse."
    Am ready to call for volunteers whenever you think it necessary and will authorize it. Do you need any such assistance? If not, can I procure guns and ammunition from Fort Klamath in case of necessity to arm settlers. (signed) Chadwick, Governor.
    Have telegraphed the Governor as follows:
    "In respect to arms and volunteers, arms for the state can be issued only on your requisition upon the Secretary of War as directed by joint resolution of Congress approved June eighth (8th) Seventy eight (78). General Howard does not call for volunteers. If called by you, the Secretary in respect to their status in telegram of June fourteenth (14) as follows--There is no authority in law to accept service of volunteers. If the Governor organizes volunteers on his own responsibility, they may cooperate with the regular force and in great emergency may be furnished supplies absolutely necessary, but no assurance can be given of military service by volunteers being recognized by the United States."
McDowell
    Maj. Genl.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Ogn.
        June 28, '78
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir
            Mr. Roark is absent upon the eastern boundary of the reservation in the direction of the scenes of Indian hostilities. He is riding night and day visiting every point on the reservation and along the boundary line where excitement prevails and danger seems imminent. The excitement among the whites along the boundary line has risen to a fearful height.
    Many families have fled in great haste toward the denser settlements. All sorts of wild stories are afloat about Indians in large bodies being seen almost in every direction. Somehow I can't help but think that there is a method in this madness and that the excitement is dangerously fostered by a few bad men around the agency who would delight in an uprising among this people, hoping that they would be driven off from the reservation. Ocheho's band of Snakes, who are about 100 miles east of us and who number about 150 in all, without doubt are hostile. The Snakes upon this reservation seem quiet, though a few of them are said to be missing. A few Modocs are also away. There are suspicions that they have gone over to the Bannocks. The chiefs are all apparently loyal to the government and say that if the "wild Indians" come here they will all help the whites.
    Unless matters are complicated by some brainless or base whites commencing hostilities by attacking the Indians when peaceable, there is little or no danger from thid people. They all say that they desire peace and friendly relations with the whites. I fully believe that the unsettled boundary question contributes largely to the fears of the white settlers living upon the disputed territory, and if there should be hostilities it will undoubtedly grow out of there first.
    Mr. Roark's fidelity to the rights of the Indians in regard to their boundary question has made for him enemies especially among some of those interested. I think I state the exact fact, however, when I say that all the chiefs consider him as a just man and a true friend of theirs and would feel much afflicted if he were to leave them. Capt. Jackson at the military post is invaluable as a counselor and as a guardian of the Indian rights.
Yours respectfully
    L. M. Nickerson
        Acting Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



    Old Schonchin, chief of the Modocs, was among the Indians that came into Ashland from the Klamath reservation after supplies a short time since. He was during the early Modoc war a terror to the whites, but since he made his "mark" to the treaty of 1864, has been their unswerving friend.
"News Items," The New Northwest, Portland, June 28, 1878, page 2



Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        June 30th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir,
Circular, Accounts 1878, No. 22, July 9, 1878 is at hand and I have to say in answer to the reduction in wages that it will cause much dissatisfaction, and some changes. Just as soon as I can ascertain what changes will take place, I will give you a descriptive list of employees. If the list sent a month or more since is not sufficient, I will only ask that you change the wages or salaries of two positions, and I do this because I know it to be right.
    This service is so arranged that the farmer is at Yainax Station, forty miles distance from the agency, and has charge (under the agent) of about one third of all the Indians of the reservation, and in the absence of the agent (which of course is most of the time) he acts as agent, supt. of farming and farmer and has the most responsibility and the most laborious position in this service except for my own. Yainax was once a sub-agency, and you will notice that there is a Yainax list of property still carried on my property accounts.
    On account of the above facts, I most respectfully ask that the farmer be allowed $800 instead of $720 as per your list; I fear that I cannot get a responsible man for less.
    The other change I desire to make is in the sawyer's position. I wrote to you in regard to this last quarter, and you authorized me to pay at the rates of $700 per annum during the remainder of the quarter. As I did not find a man that I thought worth the money, I did not raise the wages. I can now get a man for $800, which I think will do, and I know that this is as low a salary as should be offered to a sawyer in this country.
    It is my determination to cooperate with you in everything that will honor and dignify the service and elevate the Indians in all the civil pursuits of life as well as education and true religion, but to do this I must have good and capable men in every position. I see no reason why each and every position named in the treaty except physician and asst. teacher should not be paid a uniform price, and if it is necessary in order to bring up the salaries of the farmer and sawyer, I would suggest that as this service is conducted and as it must be on account of it being impossible to do much in the way of ordinary farming, that the supt. of farming be allowed the same as the others, $800.
    In view of the justness of the changes I propose and the desire to get matters settled in regard to employees and salaries, I ask an early answer.
Yours respectfully
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



War Department
Washington City
July 1st 1878
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit for your information a copy of telegram from Major General McDowell, communicating one from Governor Chadwick of Oregon, reporting that the Indians on the Klamath Reservation are hostile; that they have driven settlers from Sprague River Valley and murdered settlers in Warner's Valley, and requests that arms be sent him and authority given to raise three companies of mounted militia to protect settlers.
    A copy of General McDowell's reply to the Governor of Oregon is also transmitted herewith.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Geo. W. McCrary
            Secretary of War
The Honorable
    The Secretary of the Interior
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Headqrs., Fort Klamath, Oregon
    July 1st 1878
Actg. Asst. Adjutant General
    Department of Columbia
        Portland, Oregon
Sir:
    The settlers in the adjacent valley have been much disturbed and alarmed by rumors of an intended outbreak of the Indians on this reservation and have applied repeatedly for arms and ammunition, which of course could not be given. Every effort has been made by the Indian Agent and myself to quiet their apprehensions for it is believed that there is no disposition, on the part of the Klamaths at least, to make any trouble.
    Some of the "Snakes" belonging to the Chochite's band at Yainax Sub-Agency (about 17) have left the agency and it is supposed have gone to join Ocheho, who by the best information that can be obtained, has turned hostile and raided the Warm [sic--Warner?] Valley on his way to join the "Bannocks."
    A company of sixty volunteers has been organized at Goose Lake with a view to protect that settlement and the settlers of the Warm Valley. Lieut. Adams with a det. of twenty-five men of "B" Company 1st Cav. is making a scout through the Valley to the east and will proceed as far as Goose Lake, returning by the Summer and Silver Lake valleys if any hostiles appear in that section of the country. It is thought that the presence of this detachment will have a good effect in quieting the apprehensions of the scattered settlers of these valleys.
    At a council with the Klamath chiefs, they assured me that no hostile would be permitted to come on their reservation and that prompt information would be given the Indian agent and the military of the presence of any hostiles in the vicinity. The Klamaths have shown in their actions and talk a disposition to be very friendly and to have no trouble with the whites at all during the continuance of hostilities in Eastern Oregon. The chiefs have especially desired me to inform the Department commander of their good intentions.
I am, sir, very respectfully
    Your obdt. servant
        Captain 1st Cavalry
            Comdg. Post
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878



THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Siletz Agency
    Corvallis, Oregon
        July 9th [1878] (1250 PM)
To Comr. Ind. Affrs.
    Washington, D.C.
    In reply to your telegram third inst., three hundred & eighty 380 off working, including those at Siuslaw. Seven hundred on reservation. Trouble at Salmon River reported to you on twenty-first ult. by wire & mail. I hold Nestucca Indians here. Permit me to purchase open market subsistence for Indians indigent or at work, not exceeding five hundred dollars, hardware, tools &c. not exceeding said amount & to manufacture one hundred thousand feet more lumber Indian houses not exceeding one thousand dollars & I can keep the Indians peaceably employed. No Siletz Indians hostile.
Bagley
    Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Portland, Oregon
    July 20, 1878
Sir:
    Your careful consideration is invited to the enclosed slip.
    Is it any wonder that the citizens of this state feel the present policy of dealing with the Indians to be erroneous when the church appoints such men as the Grand Ronde agent. The facts are that the number of Indians on that reservation does not exceed 500. He proves himself a liar as well as very ignorant & should be dismissed from the service at once. The writer has an agreeable recollection of once having a fishing trip with you at Waterton, Wis. about the year 1852.
Yours respy.
    Alfred Pitts
To Honl. Schurz
NEWS FROM GRAND RONDE AGENCY.
    Following is a verbatim copy of a letter posted on a bulletin board in this city.
"GRAND RONDE, July 12, 1878.
    "My Indians is attending to there daily work as usual the don't simpatize with those in Eastern Oregon they are willing to form a company and assist the whites and the Government which is very Comendaibile for my Indians under my charge here on Reservation 900."
"P. B. SINNOTT,
    U.S. Agent"
    The forbearance of the Grand Ronde Indians under this infliction is certainly remarkable. Pages, or even volumes, could not present a more striking commentary on our Indian system and service than is furnished by this original and unique writing. Where very high and important interests are entrusted to ignorance and incompetency, there is always danger.
    If the Indian service is to be continued as a gift enterprise for the church organizations of the country, the several denominations should at least be required to furnish men of experience and culture as well as honesty for the positions to be filled. A piece of writing like the above is a disgrace both to an official and to the service. No argument could convince anybody of the fitness of the writer for so important a trust. He may be entirely honest, and among the most well-meaning of men; but in this note there is manifest a total want of qualification for the place. The Indians of this reservation are happily protected against temptation to outbreak by the seclusion of their position and in consequence continue quiet and peaceful; but this good fortune is not common to all reservations and where weak agents are in charge the Indians cannot be kept under control.
    Sometimes dishonesty on the part of an agent takes the place of imbecility, and then even worse consequences follow. It is now well established that at one of the Bannock reservations in Idaho the man who was placed in charge as agent more because of his membership in the denomination to which the agency was assigned than as a fit representative of the government, managed his trust scandalously, and much of the discontent which inflamed the present outbreak was directly produced by the agent's malversations.
    We are not insisting nor would we intimate for a moment that persons who may be members of the religious denominations are not or may not be proper persons for this or any other department of the public service. But it is a great error and would be ridiculous were it not too grave a subject for any manner of levity to select public servants mainly with a view to such membership. On peculiarity of hair or stature a better rule to qualifications of appointees might be established with less trouble.
    Fortunately, the Indians at Grand Ronde are entirely harmless. Many are decrepit or imbecile, and there are no discontented, resolute and active young men among them who could give any trouble. It was not necessary for the agent to sound his own praises by assuring the public that "my Indians under my charge is all quiet." Perhaps it would be worth inquiry to learn how the agent counts them so as to make their number nine hundred. This is a much larger number than heretofore officially returned for that reservation. But we make allowance for a vivid imagination. A fervid mind, producing such a composition as that above printed, would naturally run into some exaggeration.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878. The clipping was printed on page two of the July 17 Oregonian. An unknown hand wrote the following on the transmittal forwarding Pitts' letter to Washington: "Respectfully returned to the Hon. Secretary of the Interior with the remark that the correspondence of Agent Sinnott with the office would indicate that he is not only a gentleman of intelligence and fair literary merit but a successful agent. Inspector Watkins in his report of the agent's management of the agency stated October 15, 1877 says, 'It is marked with much practical sense and a knowledge of Indian character he (the agent) is entitled to great credit for keeping up the best fences and roads I have ever seen on an Indian reservation where the work was all done by Indians without pay.'  The printed letter, endorsed by Mr. Pitts, purporting to have been written by the agent, I am inclined to believe is a forgery."



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
    July 26, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
Sir
    I have the honor to address you through our agent, Hon. William Bagley, calling your attention to the necessity of an appropriation for the immediate relief of our orphan and poor pupils. The fifty dollars given us last quarter was divided in the most judicious manner possible among about sixty pupils. So you see but little could be given to each; while others almost as needy and worthy received nothing. We have on the register for this month over one hundred names with an unusually good average attendance, but very many of these will be compelled to leave school soon unless we can furnish them clothing soon. Most of these children would remain in school if they can be clothed and fed. More than half will remain if we furnish them cheap clothing, and continue the lunch at noon. We therefore respectfully urge an immediate and liberal appropriation for the relief of our orphan and destitute pupils.
    While on this subject, we cannot refrain from renewing our plea for a boarding house. But whether you grant us this or not we hope you will give us at least five hundred dollars for clothing.
Respectfully yours
    T. F. Royal
        Teacher, Siletz D.S.
I concur in the above
William Bagley
    U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Olex P.O.
    Wasco Co., Or.
        July 26th '78
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Com. Ind. Affs.
        Dr. Sir--Through Mr. Bagley, U.S. Agent at Siletz, I have been negotiating for the sale of the sutler buildings built by me in 1873 while sutler at Siletz.
    Mr. Bagley informs me that he is not allowed to purchase because a part of the lumber in the dwelling house was manufactured on the agency.
    The facts are these: the buildings consist of store building & ware room 24x30 main building & ware room 10x30, all double wall & floor, ceiled overhead & sides with cloth, shelving, counters &c., all complete and was erected by me before there was any saw mill on the agency & at a cost of not less than $800, one log barn about 18x24 cost me $50 and the dwelling, a snug little house, the best on the agency, was built by me. About 2500 M of the lumber in this building was manufactured on the agency & exchanged for a small building now occupied by the agent as office which contains about the same amount of lumber & was built by me in 1873. The dwelling is 14 ft. x 14, 12 feet story with an L 10x30 ft & 8 foot story, all clothes & papered containing 7 doors & 6 windows--doors & windows were made in Corvallis & transported a distance of about 55 miles--none could be had nearer at that time nor at the present. The buildings all together cost me no less than $1200 owing to the distance we had to haul lumber at the time & could not be built at the present time for less than 6 or $700. These are the facts in the matter as nearly as I can state them, and as the buildings are of no use to me, I would like to dispose of them at a great sacrifice. All the lumber in the dwelling manufactured on the agency will not exceed 2500 M & would not be worth more than $25 at the most & was exchanged as before stated for the office building which was built by me of lumber & material from Oneatta mills on Yaquina Bay, about 20 miles from the agency.
    I would also be pleased to know what has been done in regard to my vouchers--hoping to hear from you soon, I am
Yours truly
    Wm. Chambers
Address
    The Dalles
        Wasco Co., Or.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.


War Department
Washington City
July 27th 1878
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit an extract from a communication of the 1st instant from the commanding officer of Fort Klamath concerning the condition of affairs on the Klamath Indian Reservation; sees no disposition on part of the Klamaths to join the hostiles; at a meeting, the chiefs assured him no hostiles would be allowed on the reservation, and the presence of any in the vicinity would be immediately reported.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        C. H. Carrington
            Acting Chief Clerk
                For the Secretary of War, in his absence.
To the Honorable
    The Secretary of the Interior.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office, Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        July 30th 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir,
    In reports and communications heretofore, I have spoken of the worn-out and worthless condition of the horses, oxen and wagons carried on the property accounts of this agency. Many of the horses and oxen were old and condemned before they were bought for this service. As you will see by my accounts, these animals are dying off, and I am not allowed anything to purchase feed for them. The only way I have to feed them is to cut wild hay, which will not average a ton to the acre, and this must be cut, hauled and put away with the few employees. We cannot get enough hay to keep this stock through a severe winter with the force I have and the shortness of the grass. It will take the employees two months to put only a limited supply of hay for what stock we have on the papers, and there is not more than one third of it worth keeping. Some of the other property is worthless to this service. All the wagons are old and have been mended until they are patchwork. I ask instructions what to do with this expensive and worthless property.
Very respectfully
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.




Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon
        July 31st 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir
Am I allowed anything for pay of Indian apprentices? See 6th paragraph, Circular No. 22, July 9th 1878. I should have them in saw mill, carpenter shop, blacksmith shop and harness shop. In Sect. 5th of act, March 3rd 1876, in the above said circular, "and when Indians can perform the duties they should be employed," and first clause of 6th, "It is the policy of the Department to employ the Indian in every capacity in which he can be use." It is not quite clear to my mind from Circular No. 22, July 9th 1878, just in what capacity I can employ Indians. Can Indians be employed in any of the regular treaty positions of this agency? I might have tried two Indians had there been no doubt.
Yours very truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
[P.S.] Since I have been in charge, I have had no irregular employees.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Siletz Ind. Agency
    Aug. 7th 1878
To Rev. P. M. Starr
    Chairman of the Committee P.E.
        We the Indians in council assembled petition for a change in the management of this agency.
    Our complaint against Bagley is his inefficiency. He is too slow in the management of the business of the reservation.
    Through his negligence one of our people was killed and also a white man. We sent repeatedly for him to come and settle the difficulties then existing between us and some white men at Salmon River but he paid no attention to the matter. We have no confidence in his word; he will promise us one thing today and tomorrow forget it.
    Bagley and some of his employees are raising stock on the reservation and selling them to government for less than we can.
    We the Indians on the Siletz Reservation have lived here since 1856 and have given the general government no trouble.
    We think it is time now to be allowed a voice in regard to our ruler.
    We will send a delegation to Salem to attend conference and can state more against Agent Bagley. We will prefer more charges.
    We want Mr. J. S. McCain for our agent. From what we see of him we believe he will make us a good agent.
Names
Nestucca Tribe Tutuni Tribe
Samuel Chief Wm. Strong Chief
Dick Wm. Hansey
Jim Jim Hansey
Bob Antone
Old Man Peter Frank
Old Man Dick Bensell
Frank Captain
Joe Bowers Old Man Shelhood
Pedro Charley Shelhood
Old Man Jack Rogue River Tribe
Salmon River John George Harney Chief and
Johnson     U.S. Interpreter
Charley Evens Bill
Sixes Tribe Old Man Bill
George Chief James Buckhannon [sic]
Scaley Jack
Logan Billie
Wallace Thompson
Bill Samson
Jim Solomon
Charley Bill
Dick Hunter
John Wallace Frank
George Thomas Tecumseh
Wislow Shasta Costa Tribe
John Mackay John Chief
Klamath Smith Jakey
Moses Cain
Nat Samuel
Jack Harvey
Hugh Frank
Dave Captain
Galice Creek Tribe Jim
Jim Chief
Simmons
Peter
Captain
Bill
Jimmie
Batteace
Coquille Tribe
Jim Chief
Dick
Charley
Jake
Joshuway Tribe
Old Joshuway Chief
Depot Charley
Chickman
Bob
Henry Clay
Jim
Catfish
Ela Catfish
    The above names were all written by the consent of the Indian themselves without anyone influencing them.
    We want Mr. J. S. McCain for an agent. No one asked our opinion; it is our choice.
Joe Howard, writer
    The above is a true copy of the petition sent by the Siletz Indians to the M.E. Conference held in Salem the last of August 1878.
F. M. Carter
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton County, Or., Aug. 8th 1878
Sir
    Referring to your circular letter of July 9th with list of authorized employees, I respectfully ask that you will allow an increase in the amount of salary of carpenter for the following reasons, viz:
    Louis Shogren, who is at the present filling the position, is a first-class mechanic, capable of filling the place of carpenter, miller, blacksmith, sawyer, or any other position requiring like mechanical skill. He has been long in the service of this agency, is thoroughly acquainted with the Indians and commands their confidence and esteem, wielding an influence for good.
    It would be hardly possible for me to secure the services of another to fill his place for any salary which might be offered and it would be a great detriment to the progress of civilization among the Indians to at this time be deprived of his services. Enough can be saved from the amount of funds allowed by you for pay of employees for present fiscal year to make up the difference between the amount authorized by you and the amount proposed to be paid by me, and no serious detriment to the work will be caused thereby. He cannot be longer retained in the service at the salary allowed by you. I therefore respectfully ask that you will permit me to employ him at a salary of one thousand dollars per annum.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. of Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Linkville, Lake Co., Oregon Sept. 2nd 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt, Washington, D.C.
    I feel it my duty under the convictions of my mind at present to write to you about matters on the Klamath reservation.
    The last of July, I was discharged from service at the agency. I have no complaint to make, only that I proposed to quit a month sooner and gave notice to that effect a month before, but the agent was away at the end of the quarter and when he returned, only stayed long enough to get ready to go out prospecting for gold in the mountains.
    Now what I want to say is that if the government wants the Indians managed so as to prevent trouble hereafter and prevent the destruction of the government property on the reservation, it would be best to have an agent with some judgment and discretion instead of a fananical [sic--fanatical?] lunatic. He (the agent) is not fit to have charge of any institution. There is times he does not know his own name.
    Don't understand me that I did not want to quit, for I really did want to quit and I will say that the man he has put in my position is no part of a miller, only 21 years old, and never had any experience in milling in his life and none in sawing except his father run the mill at the agency some years ago, he being no sawyer.
    There has been no inspector here for some years. I think if you will send one out to Klamath you will [find] things in a terrible, mixed-up condition.
    I have written this in all good conscience, hoping it may be the means of saving some trouble.
I subscribe myself
    Your obedient servant
        R. M. McTeer
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Siletz Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Sept. 5th 1878
Sir:
    For the month of August I have the honor to report that during the five and one half years of my connection with this agency, first as an employee under Agent Fairchild, and afterward as an agent, never have the affairs of the agency been in so prosperous a condition as now. The only interruption to the progress of harvest has occurred from breaks in the well-worn machinery. The weather has been delightful, and the crops are yielding more to the acre than was expected before the harvest was commenced. All the Indians on the reserve who are able to work are engaged in some profitable employment. The Alsea Indians have during the month constructed a fish trap over two hundred feet in length across the river, which has been put up in a very substantial manner. The only assistance they have received from the agency has been subsistence while at work, and for this assistance they grant the privilege to catch at this trap to all the Indians belonging to the reserve. I now propose to furnish lumber and nails for them, out of which they may construct drying houses for their fish, and the result will be tons of dried salmon put up by the Indians for their own subsistence.
    With all this prosperity, under the influence of misrepresentations made to them by a discharged physician, a disappointed aspirant for a position as farmer and a defeated candidate for head chief (in an election held by the Indians) a petition has been sent to the annual conference of the M.E. Church held at Salem, Oregon for a change of agents. Many of the Indians who consented to allow their names to be placed on this petition have since come to me and confessed to having been persuaded to allow their names to be used, and express regret at having done so.
Very respectfully submitted by
    Your obt. servt.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.


A Good Recommendation.
    At the M.E. conference last week, a petition was presented asking for the influence of that body to be exerted to cause the removal of Superintendent Bagley from the Siletz Indian Agency. It was signed by about 80 Indians who were all either chiefs or head men at that agency. Although the conference did not as a body plainly ask for the removal of Bagley, it did that which amounts to just the same. Judge Piper, of this city, was recommended unanimously to fill the hoped-for vacancy. The conference could not have made a better choice we think, as the Judge is an honest, upright and conscientious citizen, and would treat the Indians under his charge in the manner expected by the government. Should he get the position he will very probably carry on the affairs of the reservation in such a way as to prevent people from asking for his removal--at least until the summer of 1881. After that time if he expects to hold the position of course he will have to change his politics.
State Rights Democrat, Albany, Oregon, September 6, 1878, page 4


Council held at Salmon River September 11th 1878.
    Seventeen of the leading men present.
    Object of the council--To ascertain the feelings of the Indians. Whether they desire to remain in charge of the agent at Siletz or be transferred to the Grand Ronde Agency.
    After the agent explained the object of the meeting, Sam (the chief) arose and made the following remarks--
    Mr. Bagley--You have come here today to know the mind of our people. They are satisfied now. I do not think much about it. I want to know where my agent is. I know that from you I have received a good many things and from that I believe you to be my agent. I told you when I talked with you last winter that I did not know who my agent was, and when things come to you for us I knew then that you was my agent. And I am of the same heart yet. A long time ago, before we came here, Mr. Sinnott wanted us to choose him for our agent. We wanted to come to Salmon River and made our marks to a paper stating this fact. When Colonel Watkins was at Grand Ronde Agency last fall, we had received no answer. In the winter, our chief died. After that, I went to see you at Siletz. What I said you wrote down and have a copy of it now in your hand.
    After one conference at Siletz, I thought nothing more about it until I began to receive things from you. In the spring I learned that you brought seeds to the mouth of Siletz River. Afterwards I saw the doctor here from Siletz and he told me that the Chief at Washington said that Mr. Bagley was our agent. Then I made up my mind to that effect, and since that time I have thought so. A few days ago, I was at the agency. You told me that the Chief at Washington wanted to know where I wanted my agent. Today I try to find my mind on that subject. I don't want to talk two ways. I want my agent at Siletz. (Same repeated.) Now today I have told you what I think on that subject.
Tall John--
    Mr. Bagley--We have the same mind today--that we receive our things from you and get our money from you. Sam has made up his mind that you are our agent and that is my mind too. This is all I have to say on that subject. This is my heart.
Young Dick.
    Mr. Bagley--You understand what I have to say today. You left the Agency and came to see the Salmon River people. Our chief first thought who we would have for agent.
    We have made up our minds today that you are our agent. All of us have come to this conclusion. I think it is best for us to have an agent at Siletz. This is all I have to say.
    Salmon River John (first chief of the Salmon Rivers). I am of the same mind as the rest. I want you to take care of me.
    Old Man Dick. I think like the rest. I want you for my agent.
    Old Man Peter. I have made up my mind today that I want my agent at Siletz.
    Old Man Bady. I am of the same mind as the rest of my friends.
Killum.
    Today I have come from Tillamook. I have come to be subject to the Siletz Agency. I want my agent at Siletz.
Levi.
    I am of the same mind as my chief.
William.
    As our chief has chosen you, I too choose you.
Frank.
    (The same).
Moses.
    (The same).
Young Felix.
    (The same).
Baxter.
    (The same).
Old Man Jack.
    (The same).
Johnson.
    (The same).
Alex Ross (Head chief).
    I have come to Salmon River and seen for myself. We held a council on a small piece of ground near the river. I heard them talk about their own land. I find their hearts are cold because they are so poor. They have nothing to help themselves with. My chief, I wish you would tell all your officers what is best for them; something to elevate them. I find in talking with Sam and his people the agent has at all times tried to ascertain their wishes.
    They are all of the same heart, and all say the same thing, namely, they want their agent at Siletz.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Junction City
    Lane Co., Oregon
        Sept. 11th 1878
Hon. C. Schurz
    Secy. Interior Dept.
        Washington, D.C.
            Dr. Sir
    I clip the enclosed slip from the Daily Standard, a Democratic paper published at Portland. If there is, or soon will be, a vacancy in the agency mentioned, I hereby make application for the appointment, believing that I possess all the qualifications necessary to render fidelity both to the government and Indians, which is sufficiently attested by the names of the distinguished gentlemen attached.
Your obedient servant
    A. Lee Ewing
"A Good Recommendation.
    "At the M.E. conference last week, a petition was presented asking for the influence of that body to be exerted to cause the removal of Superintendent Bagley from the Siletz Indian Agency. It was signed by about 80 Indians who were all either chiefs or head men at that agency. Although the conference did not as a body plainly ask for the removal of Bagley, it did that which amounts to just the same." [Complete clipping transcribed above.]
   

Hon. Carl Schurz,
    Secretary of the Interior
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir--referring to the accompanying application of Capt. A. Lee Ewing, of Oregon, for the Siletz Indian Agency, we would state that Capt. Ewing formerly lived in this city and was well known to us as a gallant soldier of the Union army, a faithful official in the Internal Revenue Service and a citizen of unblemished reputation. His appointment would be considered a proper and judicious one where he is known and we cheerfully recommend it should there be a vacancy.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Elk City, Oregon
    Sep. 17th 1878
To the Secretary of Interior
    Washington City, D.C.
Dear Sir
    As the delegate [of] a committee appointed by the Indians on the Siletz Reservation to go to Salem & attend [the] M.E. conference which convenes in that city August 28th 1878 to represent said Indians in presenting [the] petition for the removal of Bagley, present Indian agent, and charges against him, I attended to that duty and gave my testimony with others to [the] committee on Indian affairs & from my own personal observation, I having been resident physician on said agency for a period of 4 years, having resigned my position in the month of June 1878, I can truly say the Indians have just cause for complaint and dissatisfaction. Notwithstanding the Siletz Agency has the very best facilities for producing large crops of grain, wheat, oats, garden stuff &c., yet through negligence and bad management the reservation don't produce enough for one fourth its inhabitants. Consequently the Indians have to go to the Willamette Valley and work among the whites for something to live on and while along the river bottoms & around the towns they contract malarial fever and syphilitic complaints, causing most of the mortality among them.
    The reservation looks like some old deserted Spanish castle. The buildings and fencing are old & rotting down, not sufficient to secure what little grain they have or shelter them from the winter storms. The mountains abound with fine rail timber but there is not sufficient energy in the administration to have the rails made, land fenced & the soil cultivated.
    The land, though very rich, has grown up with noxious weeds, and many of the improvements made by former agents such as orchards, strawberry, raspberry and blackberry gardens have been destroyed through neglect.
    Farming implements, machinery &c. are allowed to lie in the fields and rot. The government property, horses, cattle &c., were issued to the Indians and they through neglect allowed them to die during the winters. The reservation instead of being self-sustaining (as it might be if it was properly managed) is a continual tax upon the government, and will be so long as the present sickly administration continues. The school is run as much in the interest of the children of the agent & employees as in the interest of the Indian children. About an average of 5 or 6 Indians and 8 or 10 white children attend school the whole year.
    The Indians have no confidence in the ability of their agent to manage the affairs of the agency.
    And as he has promised to resign and give place to someone else and as the reservation don't prosper under his care the Indians expect him to give way to a new agent. I have no doubt there will be trouble among these Indians unless the authorities at Washington look after their grievances and appoint them a new agent.
    They have petitioned the conference for a change, setting forth many of their grievances, and that body on the committee having the matter in charge unanimously recommended Hon. W. G. Piper of Albany as their agent.
    Mr. Piper is an honorable, upright citizen, a practical business man--one that conducts his own affairs successfully--and is fully qualified to make a good and efficient agent.
    I have no doubt but that the reservation would prosper under his administration & that he would give satisfaction to the Indians as well as to the government.
    The reason J. S. McCain was asked for in the petition was [that] about 18 months ago Bagley promised the Indians he would resign, and McCain was selected by the church committee to take his place, but Bagley after prevaricating for a while concluded he would not resign for a year longer. At the close of this year the first of July he still failed to pass in his resignation, so the Indians got up a petition asking for his removal and the appointment of J. S. McCain for the reason he had been spoken of to take Bagley's place. The Indians would just as soon have Mr. Piper as Mr. McCain since McCain was a member of the committee that recommended Piper and also one of the Presiding Elders in the church.
    Mr. Piper is an official member of the church and has splendid recommendations from the business men where he is known.
Respectfully submitted
    F. M. Carter
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon, Sept. 18, 1878
Hon. Wm. M. Leeds
    Acting Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your circular No. 23 Accounts, 1878, and complying with instructions therein, I proceed immediately to report "as to what arrangements" we are contemplating with a view to an increased production over the crops planted during the fiscal year 1878.
    In the first place, we contemplate saving our own seed. This will enable us to sow when the season is most favorable. In the past, our crops were necessarily consumed for the winter's subsistence. This year, the grain is more abundant and better matured. The season has been more favorable for threshing and hence the grain will nearly all be saved in good condition. Hence, we shall have seed of a good quality and enough for the early sowing at least.
    We propose starting the plows as soon as the threshing is done, while the teams are stout and feed plentiful. We shall find it easier now than formerly to induce our Indians to prepare their ground in the fall, as they are elated with their success this year--especially in the early crops.
    We aim to break considerable quantities of new land in addition to the old. This yields a large percent more to the acre and the grain is greatly superior in quality. This is really necessary to ensure good crops of wheat, as we have no fallow ground. Teams were too scarce and too weak to plow more last spring than what was actually necessary for the crops of this season. Even for this purpose we were compelled to hire some of our plowing done.
    We contemplate increased production this year, especially because we have a farmer. We have a thorough, energetic and successful farmer as a regular employee. He has good control of the Indians, is faithful in instructing them, and succeeds in inspiring them with ambition in farming. We had his services a few weeks last spring, and as a consequence we have a large increase in crops over last year, when we had no farmer.
    We have more and better fencing and shall continue improving and extending the fences, enclosing more and more land. Our saw mill is doing good execution, and we shall soon have large quantities of fencing lumber.
    The Department is furnishing us more means for the subsistence and pay of laborers.
    We have increased confidence in the working capacity of the Indian Bureau. It does not require twelve months or even six months prying to get open those drawers. Our instructions, statements of funds &c. reach us in advance, so that we are enabled to make our arrangements for future enterprises understandingly and execute them successfully knowing that we may depend on the funds to meet current expenses when they are due.
    These are some of the grounds upon which we base our hopes of increased success in our efforts to make this people self-supporting in no very distant future.
    All of which is respectfully submitted.
Very truly
    Your obt. servt.
        T. F. Royal
            Acting U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



OFFICE OF
PROBATE JUDGE
F. B. SPRAGUE, Probate Judge
Delaware, Ohio Sept. 20th 1878

His Excellency
    R. B. Hayes
        President
            Dear Sir
                The agent for the Klamath Indians of Oregon has resigned his place on account of ill health. If the place has not been filled, I would like the appointment.
    I lived among and had charge of them as commander of Fort Klamath for several years and am intimately acquainted with all of them and have every reason to believe that my appointment would be very agreeable to them.
    I present no "credentials" as your excellency probably knows my standing.
Very respectfully
    Your most obt. servt.
        Franklin B. Sprague
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Eugene City, Oregon
    Sept. 26--1878.
To the Hon. Secretary of the Interior, U.S.A.
    Washington City D.C.
        Honored & Dear Sir,
Inasmuch as there is great dissatisfaction among all the leading Indians on the Siletz Reservation with the management of Mr. Wm. Bagley, the present agent, and also with Mr. T. F. Royal, the present clerk, on account of inefficiency and want of energy in conducting the material interests of said reservation, and inasmuch as the said Siletz Reservation is under the control of the Methodist Episcopal Church so far as nominating the agent, I would therefore respectfully call your attention to the above facts.
    As Presiding Elder, or superintendent of church work on said reservation, I have had personal supervision and know whereof I speak. The state of feeling is so intense against the said Mr. Bagley that it can only be held in abeyance by promising them a speedy change. Mr. Bagley is not a bad man, but lacks decision and energy. The result is that the Indians are a large part of the time at the point of starvation while at the same time they are surrounded with the best of agricultural lands. Mr. Bagley has been asked to resign but seems inclined to hold on. I am thoroughly convinced that a change ought to be made, and fear that serious trouble will result from a failure to make it. A petition was recently placed in my hands signed [by] nearly all the leading Indians, asking for a new agent. In case such change should be made I would recommend Hon. W. G. Piper of Albany for the place.
J. S. McCain
    Presiding Elder, Eugene City
        District, Oregon Conference
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon, October 10th 1878
Sir,
    In compliance with instructions contained in your office letter of July 10th directing me to ascertain the wishes of the Indians at Salmon River in relation to their transfer to the Grand Ronde Agency (also enclosing an extract copied from the report of U.S. Inspector Watkins). As soon as the Indians could be got together, I proceeded to Salmon River and there had a council with many of the leading men (some being at the time off the reserve), and herewith have the honor to enclose the substance of their talk on the subject. Also a copy of the paper referred to by Sam (chief) in his remarks in council, as being held in my hand, and desire to respectfully report that they were left entirely free to choose between the two agencies, and when thus left they will never fail to choose Siletz as the one most convenient for them for the following reasons, viz:
    1st. Between their settlements on the Salmon River and the Indian settlements at the mouth of Siletz there is no natural boundary line, while between their settlements and those of the Grand Ronde are the Coast Mountains, in which no Indians or whites will settle for many years, and if ever there cannot be more than one or two places within a distance of twenty miles which may be made to produce sufficient food for a family. During the summer the wagon road between these two points (G.R. & S.R.) is in a passable condition for wagons, but during the winter, travel upon this road is difficult and dangerous, the route crossing Salmon River many times and a branch of the Nestucca once or twice. These streams are rapid, rocky-bottomed mountain streams which rise very rapidly during the winter rains and cannot be forded with safety to teams or persons.
    By reference to Habersham's sectional map of Oregon, you will see that, on a direct line, the distance from S. River to Grand Ronde is nearly double that from the same point to Siletz Agency though I believe the actual difference in distance between the two points is not so great as that would indicate. I am confident that a wagon road could be constructed from this Agency to Salmon River and the distance would not exceed that now traveled to Grand Ronde, but this is not the cheapest and best way to reach there. Already we have a good wagon road for a distance of seven miles from the Agency down the river. By constructing four or five miles of wagon road over comparatively level ground from the western terminus of our present one to a point on the river twenty-six miles from the mouth, we could make good use of the navigable portion of the river upon which all supplies could be transported with very little expense to the Department or Indians.
    For most part of the distance from the mouth of Siletz to Salmon River, nature has already constructed a better road than can be done by the labor of man, namely the solid beach. By this route, the land travel would not exceed twenty miles and the water twenty-six and the whole route would be through a country which may be occupied by Indian farms.
    Lumber manufactured at the saw mill at Siletz Agency may be transported in wagons less than one fourth of a mile, thrown into the river and floated to the mouth of Siletz. I have now applications from white settlers living north of Salmon River for the purchase of lumber from the Department mills to be transported in this manner and used on their farms. Being unable to make such arrangements, they said they must do without as they could not haul it over those mountains on the Grand Ronde road, and now in conclusion, I desire to respectfully [request] that you will not recommend any transfer of Indians or changing of lines for this reservation. The only apparently plausible argument in favor of this transfer is the fact of a wagon road being already constructed over the Coast Range between those two points named.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Honorable E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



United States Senate Chamber
Washington, Oct. 18th 1878
Hon. Carl Schurz
    Secretary [of the] Interior
        Sir
            Enclosed please find papers which explain themselves. The Methodist Church--under whom is control the Siletz Agency in Oregon--as also the leading Indians of that agency--are very desirous for a change in the agent and desire the appointment of Hon. W. G. Piper of Albany, Oregon--whom I know to be a most worthy and competent man--a member of the church.
Respectfully,
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



    INDIAN COUNCIL.--Our city has been overrun for a week past with delegates from the different Indian tribes in this locality, who have gathered here for the purpose of holding a grand religious powwow. The occasion of their meeting here at this time is the arrival of two special agents--George Harney and John Adams--sent by Indian Agent Wm. Bagley, of the Siletz Reservation, to induce them to go on the reserve at that place. Representatives of the tribes at Cottonwood, Yreka, Sacramento, Shasta and Klamath are present, including Allen David, Chief of the Klamaths, Humbug John and Tyee Jim of the Shastas and Chief Frank of the Sacramentos. The "big talk" occurred on Wednesday and Thursday of last week, when Messrs. Harney and Adams both urged them to abandon their present mode of life, and instead of running wild, as they now do, to come on the reservation, take up farms and become civilized. A number of the Indians signified their willingness to do so, and as soon as provision for their transportation is made they will start for their new home. Harney and Adams returned to Siletz Reservation on last Friday's stage.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 23, 1878, page 4



Klamath Agency, Ogn.
    October 23, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
            Sir
                Your letter marked "C" Oregon & dated Oct. 2nd 1878 came duly to hand. I accept the appointment of Indian agent at Klamath Agency, Ogn. vice John H. Roark who has resigned. Accompanying this communication you will find bonds &c. for the amount required & I think of the form required. At first I thought that it would require two sureties, each bonded for $10,000, but upon reading the letter of instructions, I saw my mistake. The letter reads, "the several sums in which sureties justify must in all cases aggregate double the penalty of the bond in real estate. This saved me a journey to Salem, a distance of 350 miles, during a very unpleasant season of the year. There are quite a number of land owners in this vicinity, but very few of them are worth $10,000.
    Should the enclosed bond be accepted, will you please telegraph to me at Klamath Agency, Ogn. by way of Ashland, Ogn., giving me immediate authority to receive & receipt for the property upon the reservation.
    The reason for this request is that Mr. Roark desires to go to Salem this fall, if it is not too late to do so when relieved.
Yours respectfully
    Linus M. Nickerson
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Department of the Interior
Washington Oct. 28th 1878
The Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
Sir:
    In reply to your letter of 11th July 1878, recommending that a survey be authorized and directed of the northern line of the Siletz Indian Reservation in the state of Oregon, and that said boundary line for the distance of six miles from the coast be plainly marked by permanent stones and that the Department designate the fund out of which the expenses of said survey shall be paid, I have to inform you that your letter was referred as the Commissioner of the General Land Offices for his consideration and such action as he might deem proper in the premises in accordance with the provisions of Section 2015, Revised Statutes, which declares that "whenever it becomes necessary to survey an Indian or other reservation or any lands, the same shall be surveyed under the direction and control of the General Land Office and as nearly as may be in conformity to the rules and regulations under which other public lands are surveyed."
    In reply to letter of the Department, the Commissioner of the General Land Office, by letter of 20th instant, reports "there is no fund under the control of his office from which the expenses of such a survey could properly be defrayed and further states, as requested by the Department, that an estimate of the expenses of such a survey has been made by his office and in view of the fact that the country through which the line will pass appears to be covered with a dense growth of timber and that it is desired that the line shall be permanently and conspicuously marked, the sum of $120.00, being $20.00 per mile, is considered as a reasonable compensation for the survey. The said estimate is made upon the calculation that it will be considered necessary to establish monuments at every twenty chains and upon the supposition that a surveyor can be employed who is operating in that vicinity, as the distance to be traveled from the Surveyor General's office is about one hundred miles."
    As there are, at present, no public funds within the control of the Department which may be used for the payment of this service, it appears that the desired object can only be attained by a specific appropriation to be made by Congress.
    I respectfully return herewith the letter of William Bagley, U.S. Indian Agent, Siletz Agency, addressed to you under date of June 21, 1878 together with the diagram enclosed therein.
Very respectfully,
    A. Bell
        Acting Secretary
2 enclosures
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



OFFICE OF
U.S. INDIAN AGENCY
Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon, Nov. 8th 1878
Sir
    I have the honor to report the following condition of affairs of this agency for [the] month of October.
    Great activity prevails in every department of our work. More than one hundred and fifteen thousand feet of choice lumber has been manufactured at the agency mills, a portion of which has been transported to the site of our proposed building for a boarding school, and the remainder to the farms of the Indians to be used in construction of houses and barns for themselves.
    The Salmon River Indians have received a considerable quantity of this, which they have formed into rafts and are now awaiting the rains to raise the river to a stage which will enable their rafts to float over the rapids between the mill and the head of tribe water, when they will float it to the mouth of the river, from which point they may easily transport it to where it is to be used.
    While the roads are in good condition, all the Indians who have teams are doing their utmost to get their lumber hauling done and hence as yet they have done no plowing of any consequence. Plowing for the next crop will commence next week and there are many of the Indians who will plow their ground two or three times before planting. From the present disposition of the Indians, it is safe to say that their manner of cultivating the soil will be greatly improved during the next year. The grist mill is proven to be a perfect success, making a very superior quality of flour from the wheat produced by the Indians on the reserve. Our only regret in this being that there is not sufficient wheat raised to supply the demand for flour.
    It is encouraging, however, to notice that there are several of the Indians who supply themselves with this necessary article by taking their own wheat to the mill. With present facilities for farming, a much larger proportion will be in this condition next fall. During the month our school house has been filled to its utmost capacity with the present seating room, and more seats are much needed. The children and youths who attend school are advancing in their studies as well as it is possible for them to do in a day school.
    On Sabbath, the house is crowded with attentive audiences, eager to hear the preaching of the Word of God. By reference to the school report you will see that the average attendance is considerably increased.
    The sanitary condition of the Indians is good and this month shows a large percentage of births over deaths. Could the Indians be kept on the reserve engaged in labor profitable to themselves, there is now no good reason why there should not be a steady natural increase in their numbers.
    During the month, I learned that there were a large number of Indians collecting at Jacksonville, Or., to engage in their warm house dance, the leaders of which are renegades not claiming allegiance to any agency but who are constantly trying to persuade those on the reservations to join them in their wild heathenish practices. Many times had word been sent to this reserve for some of our leading Indians to go and learn from their prophets. I conceived the idea of two of our leading men who were firm believers in Christianity first to ascertain if any of our Indians were among them and also to confer with them on the subject of their removal to this agency or if not desiring this, they were instructed to do their best to persuade them to throw off their tribal relations and secure homes outside of reservations. Their mission was a very profitable one and a full report of it will soon be sent you.
    There are a considerable number of Indians in that country and along the coast of Southern Oregon and Northern California who are without an agency and who are capable of doing much harm to the work of advancing the Indians of this reserve towards civilization and self-support, some of whom are tired of their manner of living and have expressed a desire to come here and confer with the agent on the subject of their removal but have not the means to pay their traveling expenses. I consider it a matter of great importance to the government as well as to the Indians themselves that someone be selected in whom the Indians have confidence to confer with them and make arrangements for their immediate removal to the reservations they may choose as most desirable for them.
    The Indians at Siuslaw who (at least many of them) have taken up land on the unsurveyed portion of their former reservation (Alsea) and built houses, planted orchards, gardens &c. will unless assisted be cheated out of their homes by failing to comply with the requirements of the homestead laws, allowing white settlers to file and prove up or enter under preemption the lands they now occupy. As soon as it is possible for me to leave the agency, I intend to go to Siuslaw and do all I can to secure them in the possession of their homes and to induce such as have not taken land to remove to the reserve.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Wm. Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Ashland, Oregon
Dated Klamath Agency, Oregon 1878
    Received at 12-57 P.M. Nov. 29th
To: Hayt Commr.
    Washington, D.C.
        I recommend that O. C. Applegate have permission to go to Ashland to be married twentieth December.
J. H. Roark
    Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Office Klamath Agency, Oregon
    December 3, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            It has come to my knowledge that leading Indians are anxious to lease a portion of this reservation to outside parties for pastoral purposes. The tract they wish thus to lease is a quite extensive but uninhabited district lying between this agency and Yainax Station at Sprague River.
    That portion of the tract mentioned which lies on the south side of Sprague River extends from the bluffs near Yainax westward to Mahogany Mountains, a distance of about twelve miles, and is about five miles in width from the river to the southern boundary of the reservation. That portion of the tract they wish to lease, lying on the north side of Sprague River, extends from that stream to the northern boundary of the reservation and is bounded on the east by the Sycan River and on the west by the Mahogany Mountains and the eastern margin of the Klamath Marsh. The extent of this district on Sprague River is about twenty miles.
    The Indians represent that there is ample range for their stock elsewhere on the reservation, that it will be many years before they will be able to use it for pastoral purposes, that if rented to reasonable and reliable white men they could hope to realize quite a sum annually for its use for grazing purposes while they would have the same privileges of hunting, fishing, digging roots etc. within its limits as now; consequently, whatever they could secure in the way of rent would be just that much more than it is now possible to realize from its use.
    The greater portion of this tract is dry and hilly, quite cold in winter, and the Indians have no fixed habitations in it. That portion lying on the Sprague River produces wild grasses, suitable for hay, and its possession would stimulate stockmen to lease the whole district, using the uplands for summer grazing and the lowlands for winter pasturage.
    Knowing well the character of this region, that it is not now a source of profit to the Indians for pastoral purposes and cannot be for many years, I readily agree with them that if they can rent this district to the right kind of white men for a period of, say, seven years, for an annual consideration of five hundred dollars in money they would be receiving a handsome income from what would otherwise be no source of profit to them whatever.
    Feeling much interest in this matter, I shall anxiously await your opinion in regard to it, hoping you may see fit to authorize me or my successor to investigate the practicability of the scheme and to negotiate with reliable stockmen with a view to the fulfillment of the wishes of the Indians with regard to the matter.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        J. H. Roark
            U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Klamath Agency, Oregon
    Dec. 5, 1878
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Sir,
            I am now endeavoring to effect an organization of the U.S. Indian police force at this agency and find myself in need of important information relative to this new branch of the service.
    1. The regulations provide that the policemen shall draw rations, but no way is indicated by which the said rations can be had. How is this subsistence to be provided?
    2. It is very likely that our small police force of say six (6) men will be necessarily on duty almost constantly and the regulations require them to be in uniform when on duty. Will the government furnish two or three suits a year so that the men may be almost continually in uniform and always appear to good advantage?
    3. Is the Chief of Police entitled to a uniform or to any badge of office, equipment etc.?
    Hoping to receive the desired information from you soon, I am,
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        J. H. Roark
            U.S. Indian Agent
[P.S.] $120 per month allowed for rationing police, see office letter of Nov. 23rd, '78.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Mission Rooms
of the
Methodist Episcopal Church
805 Broadway, New York
Dec. 6th 1878.
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                Yours of the 4th inst. is at hand in relation to the Siletz Agency. We had carefully considered your former communication of the 26th of October last. The petition of Indians we regard as somewhat unsafe basis of action, and we notice that the Oregon Conference did not recommend a change of agent but only made a personal nomination in case a vacancy were made. We had hoped ere this to have more definite information but have not.
    If the Interior Department think a change desirable we respectfully suggest the name of W. G. Piper of  Albany, Oregon as a suitable person for agent. He was recommended by the Oregon Conference as a man of ability and general experience.
Yours most respectfully
    J. M. Reid
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.



Newton, Benton Co., Oregon
    Dec. 8, 1878
Hon. E. C. Watkins
    U.S. Indian Inspector
Dear Sir:
    I wish to write a line in regard to matters at Siletz Indian Agency. Having resigned my position there as resident physician, I am at liberty to express myself as to the situation of things on the reservation.
    The business of the agency is running in the same easy slipshod manner that it was when you was there. The Indians are indulged and allowed to lie around around and do nothing, until the reservation looks like some old deserted Spanish castle.
    The Indians sent a petition to the M.E. Conference, signed by 80 men comprising most [of] the leading chiefs and Indians on the reservation, asking for the removal of Bagley and the appointment of a good man as agent. Although the conference did not as a body plainly ask for the removal of Bagley, it did that which amounts to about the same thing. Judge Piper of Albany was unanimously recommended to fill the vacancy. The committee having the matter in hand did not think they had the power to put Bagley out, but thought Congress was the proper authority to make the change. Piper is a good practical business man, and all that know him say he would make a good and efficient agent.
    The Indians are anxiously waiting for Congress to meet, hoping that Bagley will be removed and Piper appointed in his stead.
    It is a shame that such a fine reservation should be idle, producing nothing, and the Indians have to roam among the whites to get something to eat. Mr. Bagley has made a signal failure since he has charge of the reservation. In fact, he is too slow to be an agent, never succeeded in anything he ever undertook and, judging from the past, he never will.
    Bagley defies public sentiment and tells the Indians that no power but God can put him off the reservation--of course he does this to intimidate the Indians.
    I have no more interest in the matter now than any other citizen. I was on the reservation four years as physician, and I know how things are conducted there.
    Now if you will use your influence to have Mr. Piper appointed, you will confer a lasting favor upon the Indians as well as upon every citizen interested in the welfare of the reservation.
Very respectfully
    F. M. Carter
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.



Rockford Michigan
    Dec. 28, 1878.
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affs.
Sir:
    I have the honor to enclose a letter just received from F. M. Carter, formerly agency physician at Siletz, Oregon, referring to the management of the agency.
    When I was there fifteen months ago, the agency was in a dilapidated condition, and there was much to criticize in the management of Agent Bagley (see my report). It was then contemplated to remove the Indians and abandon the agency. If it is to be continued, I think it would be well to send a new man and relieve Agent Bagley.
Very respectfully &c.
    E. C. Watkins
        Inspector
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 628 Oregon Superintendency, 1879.




Last revised May 18, 2020