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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1876
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.



Office Siletz Agency, Toledo
    Benton Co., Or., Jan. 1st 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to submit the following statement of affairs at this agency.
    Since my statement of Dec. 15th we have had continued storms, rain and wind, which have retarded the work on the mills as well as caused considerable extra labor in repairing fences &c.
    Twice during the time we have been compelled to rebuild fences to secure gardens, meadows and orchards from destruction by stock.
    On yesterday we completed repairs on the old French burr mill and attached the same to the saw mill power and found it to be a success for manufacturing graham flour.
    This places us in a condition to go on with the work of completing the mills and dam though we shall not be able to proceed very rapidly with the work until we get funds.
    We shall not try to do more than secure the property of the Dept. against damage until authorized by you to do so. The drenching rains have not prevented the work of getting out and delivering to the mill most of the timber for the frame, and in a short time we hope to be able to report the saw mill secure from damage by exposure.
    I most respectfully urge you to at once issue a commission to an agent for the Indians of this reservation and place in his hands the funds set apart for this agency, that he may be better able to advance the interests of the Department and the Indians.
    I have never asked for the appointment and only from a sense of duty consented to fill out and return my bills.
    Now if there is to be any delay in the matter of providing funds for completing the mills and conducting affairs of this agency I sincerely hope that as soon as practicable you will decide upon some Christian man who will labor earnestly for the spiritual and temporal improvement of the Indians.
    I would not one moment stand in the way of the progress they are making, and I feel that the present unsettled condition of affairs here is, to say the least, impeding the work of Christianizing them. Sincerely hoping you will soon be able to take action in this matter, I remain
Your obdt. servt.
    William Bagley
        Farmer in charge
            Siletz Agency
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Com. Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Washington D.C.
    Jan. 6th 1876
Hon. Commissioner
    of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Sir
                As you are aware the last Congress [passed] a law opening to settlement what is known as the Alsea Ind. Reservation and also all that portion of Siletz Reservation lying north of the mouth of Salmon River in the state of Oregon. The bill also provided that the Indians occupying said territory should be located upon what was then fixed by law the permanent Siletz Reservation bounded as follows: Commencing at a point on the coast near Cape Foulweather running due east about twenty miles, thence north to a point due east from the mouth of Salmon River, thence west to the mouth of Salmon River, thence south along the coast to the place of beginning, a distance of about thirty miles. From this permanent south line of Siletz Reservation to the north line of Alsea Reservation is about twenty miles. It was further provided that the Indians should not be removed without their consent. Consequently the Hon. Secretary of the Interior appointed a commission consisting of two Ind. agents, Fairchild of Siletz Agency and Litchfield of the Alsea Reservation. They made the effort and from some cause failed to be successful. I was afterward appointed as special agent to act with them. About the first of August I proceeded to Alsea Reservation in company with Special Agent James Brown and Mr. Chapman, the then acting clerk of Agent Fairchild. We met the Indians in council at the mouth of Alsea River. Agent Litchfield was present but took no particular part in the council. The council lasted three days without any particular result. I afterward visited the Nestucca Indians, who were living on the Nestucca River some three miles from its mouth where it empties into the ocean some twenty miles north of the mouth of Salmon River. Those Nestucca Indians number about sixty souls. They were living in their own country, had never been treated with. After three days' council they consented to give up their country and remove to the Siletz Permanent Reservation at the mouth of Salmon River. I promised them government aid and protection, which you will see by reference to my report of that council.
    Three days after this council had closed the Indians were on the ground designated for them at the mouth of Salmon River.
    In consequence of an injury I [omission] and in crossing the Nestucca Mountains I did not return to Alsea Agency as I before had anticipated. A short time after my return to my office in Portland I was informed by a letter from Mr. Sinnott, the agent at Grand Ronde, that a delegation of chiefs and head men had visited his agency and desired him to say to me that they were willing to comply with the proposition of removal which I had made to them, which was to give up their country and remove to the permanent Siletz Reservation at the mouth of Salmon River. Grand Ronde Agency is about thirty miles east of the mouth of Salmon River. I was unable to attend to the matter further than to write to other parties to inform them that all I had said to them would be complied with strictly at an early day. I am sorry to say this promise has not been complied with strictly, and I regard the failure very unfortunate, both to the Indians and the whites, and I must say it is more attributable to Agent Litchfield than anyone else. You will see by reference to the instructions of the Hon. Commission of Ind. Affairs to Agent Fairchild that he was to pay all expense connected with this commission Agent Fairchild, not having funds in his hands sufficient to comply with the instructions, informed the Commission of the fact. Agent Litchfield was then instructed to turn over to Agent Fairchild all government funds in his hands to be used for the purposes before mentioned. Agent Litchfield refused to comply with the order, and as I am credibly informed he has continued to persuade the Indians to not comply with the proposition made to them to remove to Siletz Reservation but to remain where they are. So the removal of Alsea Indians has been delayed up to this time, and Agent Litchfield still holding his position. The Alsea Reservation in extent is about forty miles along the coast and twenty miles back. There are four tribes of Indians occupying it, namely, the Siuslaws, Umpquas, Cooses and Alseas. The Alseas are living on the Alsea River; they number about sixty or seventy persons. They mostly live in a village near the mouth of the river, do not cultivate any land, except probably they may some of them have small gardens. They live principally on fish and wild game. The Umpquas and Cooses are located at the agency some eight miles south along the coast from the mouth of Alsea River. Those two tribes number not to exceed one hundred, cultivate but little land, live principally on fish, wild game and what they get from Siletz Agency and from outside.
    The Siuslaws live on the Siuslaw River near its mouth. This is about twenty-five miles south along the coast from the agency. This tribe numbers some fifty or sixty persons, they live on fish principally, cultivate no land except small gardens and those are quite limited. This reservation is mountainous and not fit for cultivation except along near the coast and small streams. It is more valued for timber and grazing purposes. I am informed that white settlers anticipating the removal of the Indians have already taken claims on the reservations. I would therefore in view of the conflict that is likely to arise between the Indians and the whites most respectfully suggest that Agent Litchfield be directed at once to turn over to the agent at Siletz all government money and property in his hands and that the agent be instructed to proceed at once to remove all of said government property to Siletz Agency and such as may be needed to transfer immediately to the mouth of Salmon River for the use of those Indians that are and may hereafter be located at that point. And to take such steps as he may deem but to remove all the Indians now residing upon Alsea Reservation to the mouth of Salmon River on permanent Siletz Reservation. And I would furthermost respectfully suggest that Congress be asked to make a special appropriation of at least five thousand dollars for the benefit of the Indians that are now and may hereafter be located at that point. Said appropriation to be used under the instruction of the agent at Siletz Agency in the construction of suitable buildings for a school and for the employment of teachers &c. And I would further state that it will require at least three thousand dollars to defray expense of removal and preparing buildings for those Indians that now are and may hereafter be located at that place. I wish again through your indulgence to urge the strict compliance with all promises made to the Indians by the government agents. There is in my judgment nothing more deleterious to the Indian service then the noncompliance with promises made to them.
    All of which I would most respectfully submit.
Your obt. servt.
    Ben Simpson
        Late Special Agent
            and Sur. Genl. of Oregon
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or.
        Jan. 13th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of Dec. 22nd with bond.
    I regret the oversight and herewith return it to you corrected.
    Should it now be approved by you and you decide to issue the commission I think it would be well to telegraph approval so that we may go on with the mill work and make preparations for coming crop. It is important that we raise a good crop of wheat this season, and some seeds and agricultural implements will be wanted by the Indians. The weather has been very pleasant for a few days past and the work on mills is in consequence progressing very favorably. I could not resist the temptation to start some plows to work today, and should the weather continue favorable will soon have sown considerable grain. I hope to be instructed to continue the work commenced until it is all completed or until someone else may be authorized to complete it.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            Farmer in charge
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
Should you conclude to send telegram please send to Hon. R. Mallory, U.S. Pros. Atty., Portland, Oregon and he will forward to me.
W.B.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.


Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    Jany. 29, 1876
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 10th inst. in regard to seven crusts of vaccine virus sent to this agency by Dr. E. E. Griffin of Fond du Lac, Wisconsin, upon an order from your office. In reply I have to state that the receipt of the same here was duly acknowledged in a communication to your office under date of June 7, '75. The report desired as to the operation & effect of the vaccine virus I have not sent, as there has been on physician employed here since its receipt, consequently have made no use of it.
    As soon as a physician is employed and application made of it, will send the report asked for.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. svt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agt,
Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affairs
     Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



To
    The Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
:
            The undersigned respectfully represent that they are settlers and citizens living in the vicinity of the Klamath Reservation, Oregon, and Northern California--and being all acquainted with the character and past history of the various tribes upon that reservation induces them earnestly to solicit an immediate settlement of the private land claims within the boundaries of the reservation, as they fully believe if it were known by the Indians tat they had not full and complete right to the reservation, and that the government hesitated in protecting that right, the consequences would be most alarming, and before relief could be had the whole of Southeastern Oregon and Northern California would be depopulated.
Steens Mountain and Warner Valley:
John Fletcher H. Homer Johnston
J. R. Johnston George D. Johnston
P. L. F. Johnston Francis H. Lane
J. P. Beebe Sam Barker
E. R. Edwards Daniel Lovegud
C. A. Miller G. D. Graham
J. P. Lusk George Williams
George White Geo. Ish
James Inbrook Samuel Webster
Joel Whitcomb R. C. Gordon
George Wilson Richard Rice
John Winters Charles Reed
Albert Wescott J. S. Whitlock
Andy Rice P. T. Sewell
Anson Peters John Catlow
Simeon Rhodus Robert Jones
Henry Thurber Aaron Welch
Joseph Quint Robert Reed
Lewis Titcomb Abel Conn
W. J. Combell R. C. Briggs
G. W. Wolfe Samuel Grimes
James Rowles Enos Harden
Jas. Eager B. E. Nelson
B. T. Sargent E. Y. Clements
F. A. Sargent A. T. Simpson
C. L. Epperson Timothy Nelson
John Masters E. O. Dana
Wm. Beekman James Decker
R. B. Bolman Amos Booth
Wm. F. Mack Richard Hall
Moses Ellys John Hall
Amos Morris Joseph Hull
Frederick Smith G. B. Bower
G. S. Grisham G. W. Park
Henry Weaver Chs. Simms
Carey Burney Anderson Rudd
A. T. Hartley John Cunningham
James Cunningham R. M. Turner
R. S. Hale J. R. Wade
H. N. Wilkinson Thos. Stendeman
Joseph Tyler Henry Miller
John Otis H. J. Cooper
C. L. Low
Camp C. F. Smith & White Horse:
J. S. O. Eim Wm. Shirk
J. W. Loverice Samuel Shirk
Sam Martin Chas. T. Bredell
John B. Miller H. Layton
Taylor Hardin James Hoy
D. Wilhoite Seaf Hofloustel
John Cameron Dan Durbin
Jas. C. Abbott Samuel Wilrel
Thomas Williams
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.  Undated, but marked on the transmittal "Recd. Feb. 4, 1876."



Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        Feb 3rd 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to submit the following report--
    The continued storms together with the absence of funds have prevented our accomplishing of such work as we had [illegible] to do up to this time. However I am able to to report the saw mill frame so far completed as to enable us to place a roof over nearly all the machinery, sixty feet in length of the mill frame in roofing. We will have to get some lumber made before we can complete the frame or enclose the sides. The attachment of the little burrs to the engine has been a great help to us in this winter in the way of supplying flour for Indians working on the mill.
    We have not been able to get in much grain because of rain. The Indians who have teams are preparing to put in seed as soon as the weather will permit. We ought to furnish them with seeds and farming implements.
    The school is in a very prosperous condition. Our excellent teacher, Rev. T. F. Royal, has commissioned a night school which is proving to be just the thing needed here, the school house being too small to accommodate the number who wish to attend. The day school is well attended also, and the pupils are making rapid progress in their studies. I hope they may be furnished with every facility for learning while they are so eager.
    Our religious meetings are also well attended, and the Indians manifest much religious interest. At our last weekly class meeting about fifty persons rose and spoke briefly, nearly all of whom gave evidence of true conversion to Christianity. The opposing forces do sometimes rally against us but the effect is to more closely unite those who are converted in their labors to persuade their people to become Christians.
    The guard house or prison has not had an occupant (excepting a lunatic) for more than four months. I have been called on to reprimand one Indian for drunkenness, and one for insolent talk during the same time. The first was George Harney, head chief, who returned from Newport while intoxicated. He promised to do better in future and I think he is keeping his promise. I would be glad to receive some instructions from your office.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            Farmer in charge
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Office Siletz Agency, Oregon
    February 18, 1876.
Sir,
    In compliance with instructions contained in your letter of the 22nd ulto. marked HD I have the honor to submit herewith an Estimate of Funds required to remove Indians and Indian Department property belonging to Alsea Agency to the mouth of Siletz and Salmon River on this agency, and to provide for and support said Indians, together with those who have already been located there through the efforts of Hon. Ben Simpson, special commissioner.
    It is firmly believed that if the sum asked for in the present estimate can be obtained, the grist mill &c. can be built out of the funds asked for in my estimate forwarded to your office upon the 9th instant calling for $11,300.00.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Office Siletz Agency
    Toledo, Oregon
        Febry. 21, 1876.
Sir,
    Acting under instructions contained in your letter of the 25th ultimo marked "H.D." I have the honor to submit the following description of the saw mill &c. lately purchased for this agency from J. R. Moores.
    The site selected for the saw mill (and the most suitable one) was in burnt timber and on very hilly ground, covered with a heavy ground of underbrush and logs. The mill was set upon a side hill, and an excavation of some six feet made.
    Twenty posts, ten feet in length and eighteen inches in diameter, were set some ten or twelve inches into the bedrock and upon these posts rests the mill; on these twenty posts were placed three timbers 12x16 inches seventy-four feet in length, and upon these are twenty-two cross beams, 8x16 inches, twenty-eight feet long, and upon these cross beams rests the floor of the mill. The frame of the mill consists of eight bents, each bent being composed of two posts 10x12 inches, ten feet long, with a plate 6x10 inches, twenty-eight feet long, resting upon the top of the posts; the posts and plates are all mortised and braced each way by 4x7-inch braces, & upon these bents rests plates the length of the mill, and upon the whole is a good gable roof.
    The mill proper is twenty-eight by seventy-four feet, and is supplied with a log way and machinery for hauling up logs, also machinery for turning logs.
    The mill has every appearance of being firm and solid, and does excellent work in every respect. Attached to the mill is a shed sixteen by thirty-two feet, covering the boiler and furnace, and no part of the mill machinery is exposed to the weather.
    A dam was built near the mill under Mr. Fairchild's administration, at a heavy expense, under the supervision of Mr. J. M. Jones, a millwright, highly recommended by J. R. Moores Esq. (the party of whom the Department purchased the mill) as a competent man, and as having twice set up this same mill and put it into successful operation, and also recommended by many others, among whom were J. H. Wilbur, of Simcoe Reservation.
    This dam was some eighteen or twenty feet in height by some thirty-five feet in length on the bottom and one hundred on the top. It was composed of timbers and dirt, but the entire structure was carried away about the 28th of October last, and was a very serious loss to the Department as besides the loss of the dam some twenty thousand feet of logs was carried away, and all mill work was thereby very much retarded, as the rainy season immediately following, it was almost impossible to get logs to the mill.
    The dam was carried away, mainly owing to a very heavy storm and unprecedented high water before the dam had sufficient time to settle. The heavy rains so filled the ground with water that it was almost impossible to haul any logs, but by the greatest efforts we have succeeded in getting the logs to the mill, sawing lumber and completing the mill, as also a good dam, and now have a pond of water some five or six feet deep, sufficiently large to hold some twenty or thirty thousand feet of logs, and a good safe dam, and the mill complete is in good running order.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Klamath Agency, Or.
    Mar. 1st 1876
Sir
    In your letter of 5th ultimo (G.W.S.) you inform me in reply to my letter of Jan. 19th in which I request to be allowed to use a certain amount of my "employee fund" in the payment of "temporary employees," that I can do so "with the understanding that the amount paid for both regular and temporary employees during the present fiscal year must not, in any event, exceed the sum of $9600.00."
    In a letter from Commissioner E. P. Smith dated April 19, 1875 (F) I received the following instructions. "The amount appropriated for pay of employees at your agency during the present fiscal year equals the sum of $9600.00, and no authority can be granted by this office to exceed that amount in making payments to regular employees at Yainax Station."
    "It will be understood, however, that the above restrictions do not apply to temporary employees, or Indian laborers temporarily employed, when the exigencies of the service require such assistance."
    The appropriation act of 1874 on this point is identical with that of 1875, and proceeding upon this authority I have already during the present fiscal year paid the sum of $350.49 to such "temporary employees" as the "exigencies of the service required" from annuity and other funds, and if I understand you aright, i.e., that I cannot exceed the $9600 in the payment of both "regular" and "temporary" employees, I shall be obliged to discharge some one of my regular employees before the close of the year.
    As I have the authority of your predecessor for my action in this matter I still request that I be allowed to expend the amount of the employee fund in excess of that required for the payment of my present regular employees in the payment of temporary laborers, and that the amount of $350.49 already paid to temporary laborers from annuity and other funds, and which is in excess of the $9600, be also allowed.
    Please instruct me fully in this matter so that I may act intelligently.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Klamath Agency, Or.
    Mar. 2, 1876.
Sir
    I am in receipt of your letter of 15th ulto. in which I am directed to investigate and report to you the facts relative to statements made in a certain petition signed by John Fletcher and others claiming to be citizens living in the vicinity of this agency.
    I would respectfully refer you to my communication on this subject dated Oct. 16th 1873 which is doubtless on file in your office, in which the facts, as I believed them to exist, were quite fully set forth.
    After a longer acquaintance with these Indians, and a more thorough knowledge of their character and feelings, as well as all the attending circumstances, I have no cause to change or abate the statements therein made.
    A short time since, a paper, doubtless similar to the one referred to in your letter as signed by Fletcher and others, was sent to me for my signature, which I added after mature deliberation and a quiet, friendly talk with some of the leading men of the Klamath tribe. In this interview I explained to them the claims of the road company, but at the same time was very careful to assure them that the govt. would protect them in their rights, and that efforts were now being made to settle the matter in such a way as to secure to them the possession of all the lands within the lines of the reservation.
    They replied that "when they made and signed the treaty, nothing whatever was said in regard to withholding any lands within the reservation for any purpose except simply the right of way for roads, and when they consented to the building of the military road, they received no intimation that any lands were claimed by the road company."
    They replied further "that if the govt. were to allow these lands, which are their main dependence for a winter range for their stock, to be taken from them, they should feel that they would have no reason to believe that they would be protected in any of their rights, that they might as well be all killed off at once, and that if they were driven to fight, although they could not expect to succeed against the whites, they could cause the govt. very great expense."
    These Indians are peaceably disposed & are entirely friendly to the govt. & the white settlers in the vicinity because they believe their rights will be protected by the govt., but should the lands claimed by the road company, and which they, as well as everyone else conversant with the matter, know to belong to them by treaty, be taken from them, I have no doubt very serious consequences would follow--
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commr. Ind. Affrs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Klamath Agency, Or.
    Mar. 3rd 1876
Sir
    In a letter to Comr. E. P. Smith dated Sept. 19th 1874 I wrote the following.
    "I am allowed $1,000.00 for 'Repair of Mills and Agency Buildings,' a large portion of which will be almost useless for that purpose unless I am allowed to employ special laborers out of that fund for that special purpose, and in addition to the regular employees, for instance, such as millwrights, carpenters on mills and agency buildings, and laborers on mills &c. because labor is principally needed in such repairs. Can I not be allowed by law to employ such extra labor?"
    In a letter dated Oct. 12th 1874 Commissioner Smith answered the above as follows.
    "Referring to your letter of the 19th ultimo I have to say that the sum of $1,000 annually appropriated under the treaty with the Klamath and Modocs for repair of agency mill and other buildings can be used in payment for labor rendered from time to time when necessary to make the repairs in question. The restrictions contained in the 5th section of the Indian appropriation act approved June 22nd 1874 with reference to pay of employees, do not, in the opinion of this office, apply in cases where the interest of the service demands that temporary engagements, of the kind above alluded to, be made."
    As the appropriation acts of 1874 and 1875 are alike on the point relating to the amount allowed for pay of employees, I have proceeded during the present fiscal year under the above instructions, and have already paid out to laborers from the fund appropriated for "Repair of Mills &c." the sum of $395.50, and shall need to use the larger portion of the appropriation in the same manner.
    I wish to know if you put the same construction upon the act of 1875 that your predecessor did upon that of 1874, and if you approve my action in thus employing laborers over and above the $9,600 appropriated in the act of 1875 for pay of employees.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Department of the Interior
    Washington, March 3rd 1876.
Sir:
    In compliance with your recommendation you are hereby authorized to discontinue the Alsea Special Agency in Oregon and to remove the Indians belonging to said special agency to the Siletz Reservation in same state.
    This removal you will accomplish as soon as practicable, and you will instruct Mr. Geo. P. Litchfield, the special agent in charge at Alsea, to turn over the public property in his possession to the agent for the Indians of the Siletz Agency.
Very respectfully &c.
    Z. Chandler
        Secretary
The Commr.
    of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



United States Senate Chamber,
    Washington, Mch. 7, 1876.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
Sir:
    Enclosed please find [a] very lengthy letter from H. W. Shipley, who has been engaged in building [a] mill at Siletz Agency, Benton County, Oregon. The letter is voluminous and will explain itself fully on the various topics upon which it treats. It contains a great deal of good sense and his idea of matters and things are in the main, in my judgment, right. Perhaps, as it contains some private matters, it is not exactly a proper letter to remain on file at the Department. Therefore I ask that it be returned to me with your answer in relation to the subject matter on which it treats--particularly the money matter. He ought to have his pay without any further delay. An early answer is desired.
Very respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office of Catholic Commissioner
    for Indian Missions
        Washington, D.C., March 24, 1876.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir:
            In relation to the Nestucca Indians I would desire, in addition to the map I handed to you yesterday, to call your attention to the report of Agent Sinnott to be found on page 346, in the report of your bureau for the past year.
    In this report Agent Sinnott says:
    "On the 11th instant, at the request of Hon. Benjamin Simpson, special commissioner to arrange with the Nestucca Indians for their removal, I accompanied him to that country. After a council of three days, the Indians consented to remove to the mouth of Salmon River, now included in the Siletz Reservation. Leaving the details of the negotiations made with them to be reported by Commissioner Simpson, I will state, as relating to this agency, that the Indians first desired to come here, if not, and they located at Salmon River, they wanted the jurisdiction of this agency extended over them. Before their consent was obtained, they were promised that they could have the benefit of the schools of this agency; have the same privileges of the saw and grist mill as the Indians living here, and that efforts would be made to have that portion of country to be occupied by them attached to this agency. Their reasons are--
    "1st--Their location, at the mouth of Salmon River, is but six or eight hours' drive from here, over a good wagon road, when to reach the Siletz Agency they have ten miles to go to Siletz River, thence by canoe forty miles to the agency, a journey of two days.
    "2nd--They have, since the establishment of this agency, been accustomed here, are acquainted with the Indians, and have to come here to get their supplies and find a market for their products.
    "Under the circumstances their wishes are very reasonable, and as the promises have been made to them they should be complied with."
    I would respectfully submit that these promises to the Indians should be complied with, and the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde Agency be extended over them, and would ask that early action be taken upon this matter.
I am, sir,
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servant
             Charles Ewing
                Com'r.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Agency
    April 8, 1876.
Sir,
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt on yesterday of [a] letter from your office marked "G.W.A." and dated the 15th ultimo, in which I am ordered to reply at once in order that the Department may know that I fully understand the gravity of the situation and am applying the proper remedies.
    In reply I would state that I have today dismissed every white employee from the service, and have now only the Indian interpreter to assist me. I very much regret this state of affairs but am compelled to adopt this course and stop all work, in order to so far as possible comply with the instructions contained in your letter. I would respectfully ask that the order requiring me to reserve a sufficient amount to pay "whatever balance may become due him (Mr. Shipley) of his contract" may be rescinded, for the following reasons, in the work on which the final payment will become due Mr. Shipley viz: the bridge across the Siletz River cannot be commenced before July 1st 1876, hence it cannot become a deficient account during this year. Also, every dollar of the amount applicable to the service at this agency, as stated in your letter, viz., $9,300, will have been consumed when the accounts due up to the present date are paid, hence I cannot obey the instructions to move the Alsea Agency and keep within the funds allotted unless the Department can furnish funds for that purpose, in addition to the amount already mentioned.
    I find there is due the employees six months salary instead of the first quarter 1876 as your letter would seem to indicate.
    In extenuation of the embarrassed condition of this agency, I would say that I have used every endeavor to make all the preparation for the reception of the Alsea Indians, as I have been repeatedly informed by the Department that it was the intention to move them at no distant day, and to do this it was necessary in the middle of the winter season to complete the saw mill and provide lumber for the contractor, Mr. Shipley, to go on with the grist mill structure and also to get some lumber sawed for houses &c. for the expected Indians and have now some fifty thousand feet of lumber on hand. I have also, up to this time, notwithstanding the continued rain storms, succeeded in having a larger acreage in grain, by assisting the Indians to seed &c. and keeping all the available teams at work, than has at any time previous been done at this agency for a number of years.
    If the Department can't rescind the order before referred to, and possibly furnish an additional thousand dollars to remove the Alsea Indians, I shall use every effort in my power to comply with every requirement contained in your letters, but it is absolutely impossible to do so otherwise.
    I very much regret the hardship that the dismissal at this time of the employees works upon them, as they have all been faithful and efficient, and they will now have to await the receipt of the salaries due them before they can remove their families, and the roads at this time are impassable for teams, hence they will be permitted to remain a few weeks--and will in the main continue in their labors without pay until they can get out into the valley.
    The closing of the school at this time is ruinous to this branch of the service (the attendance yesterday being larger than ever before) and is much to be regretted.
    I shall leave the agency on Monday next for a few days for the purpose of getting the new bond referred to in your letter filled, and will, if successful, forward it to your office at once.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Alsea Indian Agency, Oregon
    April 10th 1876
Sir
    I desire to know what disposition will be made of the government buildings at this agency. I see by the Revised Statutes, page 32, sections 2122 & 2123, that you are empowered to sell buildings and to give title to land &c. If you should adopt that plan I would like to know soon that I might avail myself of the opportunity of purchasing, should they be sold soon and at a reasonable price. The only building of value is the agent's house that was erected last season. The stables and other buildings are quite old and dilapidated and nearly valueless to be sold. The agency farm proper consists of about two hundred acres situated between two creeks, one on the north and one on the south, the ocean on the west and the Coast Mountains on the east. If a title to the land and buildings can be given I would like to know soon, and the manner of the sale &c. This reservation will not pay for surveying, as there are only a few spots fronting on the river of any value. The balance is mountainous and broken & will be valueless for the next fifty years. Several Indians belonging to this agency will take up land and become citizens and support themselves, while many others are unwilling to remove, especially the Alsea tribe of Indians, who have always claimed this country. The plans that I had in view for their removal (peaceably and willingly) was by reimbursements at a small expense, were frustrated by the removal of the funds in my hands to the Siletz Agency Feb. 12th 1876, which funds I had purposely economized and retained for that purpose, and by taking from me the means rendered me powerless to act. I refer you to my letter of Oct. 30th 1875 to ex-Commissioner Smith for explanation of my intentions. If the Indians persist in remaining on the reservation, which it appears they are fully determined on, can the reservation be thrown open until some plans are taken to effect their removal. I expected to have turned over the government property to the Siletz agent on the first of April, but owing to his absence for the purpose of giving new bonds, it will cause a delay of several weeks before he can make an appearance, receive property & give receipts &c. and so unavoidably prolong the existence of this agency. Hoping to hear from your shortly on these matters, I am
Yours respectfully
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Alsea Ind. Agency
            Drift Creek P.O.
                Benton Co.
                    Oregon
Hon Z. Chandler
    Sec. of Interior
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Ind. Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Apr. 28th / 76
Sir, I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 6th ult. marked J.T.B. directing me to inform Hon. Benj. Simpson that it will be necessary for him to send to your office accounts of expenses incurred as special agent to negotiate with Alsea and Tillamook Indians for their removal to this agency, for your approval.
    I have this day complied with your order by writing to him.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servt.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Ind. Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or.
        April 29, 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to submit the following in answer to your letter of date March 31st marked CCR/L and enclosing printed copy of letter from Gen. Charles Ewing, Catholic Commissioner. From a careful perusal of all the correspondence on file in this office between Hon. Benjamin Simpson and my predecessor, I cannot find an intimation of a desire on the part of Nestucca Indians in council with Special Agent Simpson to have that part of this reservation set apart for them [and] brought under the jurisdiction of Grand Ronde Agency. By perusal of a copy of a letter of my predecessor to Hon. E. P. Smith, Com. Ind. Affairs, dated Sep. 30th 1875, I see that he did not know of such a desire on their part. About the 20th of Dec. last a deputation of five of the leading men, including Bill, chief of Nestuccas, and John, former chief of Salmon Rivers, visited this agency, and I held a long consultation with them before issuing supplies, and during that time not one word was said in my presence which would indicate such a desire.
    Deputations from three tribes frequently visited the agency during the winter. Some of them were employed to work on the mill, and never did I hear such a desire expressed by any of them. The last time Chief Bill came here, however, he said that it was the desire of Agent Sinnott that he should look to him as his agent, but that he (Bill) preferred to consider this as his home. He also expressed a desire to have some of the heads of families belonging to his tribe secure their homes up near the agency when they might raise wheat and thus contribute to the necessities of those tribes at the mouth of Salmon River, as that country is not well adapted to the culture of that variety of grain, though it cannot be excelled for vegetables and will produce very good oats.
    Now permit me to offer a few reasons why this transfer should not be made.
    1st. The Coast Range of mountains, which will not be occupied either by whites or Indians, lies between the Grand Ronde Agency and the mouth of Salmon River, and though connection of the two points by wagon road in summer is perfect, it is broken by high water in winter, and it would require a heavy outlay to make it even possible during a great part of the rainy season.
    2nd. The Grand Ronde Reservation is immediately adjoining a populous portion of Yamhill County, and isolated from other tracts occupied, or that will be occupied, by Indians.
    3rd. The Indians living on that reservation have had their land allotted them for several years, have had their mills, and ought to be prepared very soon to provide for themselves. While making this transfer would create a reason why that agency should be continued for an indefinite period, I see no reason why there should long continue two Indian agencies so near to each other.
    4th. There are now settlements of Indians for a distance of about ten miles up the Siletz Valley above this agency, and this may be one connected settlement from that point to the mouth of the Siletz River.
    Thence north along the coast to the mouth of Salmon River, south of the Siletz along the coast to south line of reservation there is room for many Indian homes of the best soil for grass and vegetables. There are also several places that might be made profitable fishing points for the Indians.
    Hence this section of country should all be embraced in one reservation with one agency.
    5th. The Siletz Reservation contains sufficient good land to support and furnish homes for all the Indians now between the Cascade Range of mountains on the east and the Pacific Ocean on the west and between Puget Sound and the California line north and south, who are at present not sufficiently advanced in civilization to become citizens and take care of themselves.
    There is not another place on the west side of the Cascade Mountains so perfectly adapted to the use of Indians as this, and it ought by all means be reserved as their home while there are uncivilized Indians to occupy it.
    6th. The Siletz Reservation is isolated from white settlements, being separated from them by [a] high range of mountains that will not be occupied for twenty years, and if ever very sparsely settled, there being but one point where the lines of land occupied by whites will adjoin those occupied by Indians.
    Should the present humane policy continue, those occupying the reservation, at present, will be, in a few years, in a condition to need no government aid--except perhaps school teachers--and for a portion of the year a miller, sawyer and engineer to run the mills.
    I have perhaps already written too much on this subject, but my earnest desire for their temporal, moral and spiritual improvement of these Indians must be my excuse for so doing.
    When properly educated and truly converted to Christianity, they are able to take their places as citizens of our Republic.
    I earnestly hope that you will take no action in the matter of division, at least until you have the matter thoroughly investigated by disinterested persons.
    Enclosed please find a rough map of this and Grand Ronde Reservation, from which you may see the condition of the country.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Agency
    May 3, 1876.
Sir,
    I have the honor to transmit herewith a copy of contract entered into this day with H. W. Shipley, hoping that the same may meet with the approval of the Department.
    For the information of the Department and that it may clearly understand the necessity of entering into this agreement, I will say--
    The grist mill machinery receipted for by me from J. H. Fairchild is now at Corvallis, Oregon, sixty miles distant from the agency, over a mountainous road, little used, and less worked, and as the contract made by my predecessor stipulates the "machinery &c. is to be delivered at the site, at Department expense."
    Also there is yet lacking a small amount of lumber to complete the grist mill and all of the bridge timber and lumber, and the contract entered into by my predecessor stipulates that the lumber and timber &c. shall be furnished, delivered at the sites at Dept. expense. It will require from 90 to 100,000 feet of lumber & timber to build the bridge, and this should all be delivered at an early day to enable the contractor to build the bridge before the fall rains set in, and the very limited amount of means set apart by the Department for the use of this agency for the balance of the present fiscal year necessitated the immediate dismissal of all the regular employees and work hands. I was obliged to shut down the saw mill at once and before any of the bridge lumber was sawed, hence it is not possible for me to comply with the part of the contract before referred to and furnish lumber for the bridge and deliver the grist mill machinery, as I am prohibited from incurring liabilities by your letter of the 10th of March 1876, and I am unable to think of any other means by which the Department may comply with its part of the contract than the way set forth in the accompanying agreement herein & I am satisfied that the rates are reasonable, both for the transportation and the sawing and delivering of the lumber, and I earnestly hope that it may meet with your approval.
    Please notify me of the action you may take in this matter at the earliest day possible.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



San Francisco, Cal.
    May 18th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to transmit by mail the final accounts of my administration as Indian agent at Siletz Agency, Oregon, being property and cash accts. for the fractional part of the 1st quar. 1876, previous to being relieved by my successor Agent Bagley. My post office address will be Box 737, San Francisco, Cal., where I have resided some months, having received permission to do so, in consequence of ill health, from Hon. E. P. Smith, former Commissioner of Indian Affairs. In reference to the unpaid liabilities turned over to my successor in office, I respectfully ask leave to refer to letters from Hon. E. P. Smith, then Commissioner of Ind. Affrs.
    1st. Notifying me of the amount allotted to Siletz Agency for the fiscal year ending June 30th 1876--viz--for incidental purposes including purchase of supplies, pay of employees &c. $14,000.00 for pay of agent, and interpreter $2000.00 and for the erection of mills $10,000.00, making a total of $26,000.
    2nd. In reply to my earnest request for an additional sum to enable me to complete the saw and grist mill, informing me that in consequence of my representations an additional sum of $3,300.00 would be allotted that agency to complete the mills, making a total allotted for the present fiscal year of $29,300.00. On these statements I based my estimates. Of the above amount $18,000.00 was placed in my hands for the 3rd and 4th qrs. 1875, leaving the amount of $11,300.00 to be expended during the balance of the fiscal year. If this amount has been allotted to Siletz Agency, for the 1st and 2nd quarters of 1876 ( as the Commissioner in his communication assured me would be done), I feel confident it will enable my successor to carry on the service at that agency till July 1st without serious inconvenience, unless other services (such as moving the Alsea Indians &c.), not contemplated at the time the allotment was made, shall be required of him. Should such extra service be required, the amount necessary to perform it ought, in justice, to be added to this sum. I have also the honor to enclose affidavits to accompany my cash accts., omitted from the package.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            Ex-U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. Jno. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Klamath Agency, Or.
    May 27, 1876
Sir
    The Indian apprentices in the shops at this agency were, in accordance with the regulations in force at the time when they commenced service, promised a small compensation when they should have so far mastered their trade as to be deserving of it.
    They are now capable of earning small wages and are holding me to my promise, and in accordance with Article 14 of the "Instructions" of your office dated Apr. 1st 1876 I respectfully ask that I be permitted to pay them a small compensation in money, to be increased in proportion to their service rendered.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        June 1, 1876.
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit to your office the following report of the condition of affairs at this agency for the month of May.
    Very little work has been done during the month.
    There being no employees to make reports, and no work having been done for the Department, except as was necessary to protect the crops &c., I have little to report on Department account.
    The work on the grist mill contract has progressed as fast as could have been expected under the circumstances. There being none of the machinery on the ground, the contractor, H. W. Shipley, has been compelled to work to considerable disadvantage. I regret that we are still unable to transport it. I believe it would be possible for a loaded wagon to pass over the roads from Corvallis here now, but, for want of funds, we dare not contract for its removal. It would be a matter of serious consequence if we fail to complete the mill in time for present crops.
   
Many of the Indians have obtained passes to go off the reservation to work. There being no work for them here, and they being without means of subsistence, I could not refuse to grant them leave of absence, that they by laboring for the whites might obtain such means. Firmly believing that the reservation is in general the proper place for the Indians, I very reluctantly granted so many passes. Nothing but their extreme hunger here, and my inability to furnish them either labor or subsistence, induced me to do so.
    The school has been continued without expenses. Although many of the former pupils are off the reservation, the attendance has been larger than we could have expected.
    I am constantly receiving inquiries from those who have been patronizing the school, and who are now off with passes, concerning the future prospect for the school, and earnest pleadings urging me to use my influence with the Department to have it continued. I sincerely hope that such a misfortune as has happened [to] the school this year may never again recur, viz: failure of funds to properly continue the school and give all who wish an opportunity to attend. Five hundred dollars judiciously expended in enlarging and improving the school house, and one hundred dollars in furnishing it with necessary maps, charts, globe, books &c. would greatly benefit the school. The noon lunch is indispensable.
    Notwithstanding the fact that up to the 8th of April more grain had been sown than in any previous year, still the acreage crops for the season will be small, and much seed will have to be furnished those who are without. It will be remembered that, at the above date, we were compelled to cease all work. Could we have had a thousand dollars furnished at that time to assist us in putting in crops, it would have saved many thousands that will be needed to successfully conduct the affairs of next year.
    As I am required to purchase by contract, it will be necessary to purchase all our supplies for fiscal year ending June 30th 1877 during the third quarter 1876, so that they may be transported before the rainy season, thus saving much money to the Department in the expense of transportation.
    I wish to call your attention to the Indians living on this reservation, especially those near the agency who have had the advantage of instruction in agriculture: They are truly an agricultural people. By that, they live. When they fail to obtain their food in this way, they fail in strength and in health. If driven to their old habits of hunting and fishing and digging roots for a subsistence, they would very soon become extinct. With a little encouragement now in this critical transition period in the history of this people, and a little further assistance by way of allotting their lands, completing their mills, furnishing them seed to begin with, and giving them a little more confidence in the permanence of their school, I see no reason why they may not become nearly self-supporting in a few years. I therefore respectfully ask that their lands be allotted to them at the earliest practicable date.
    While in this connection I desire to call your attention to petitions now being circulated in this country to Senators and Representatives in Congress from this state, asking their influence in Congress to secure the removal of the Indians from Siletz Reservation to Siuslaw, and open this country to settlement by whites. I will only say that the petition contains so many base falsehoods that it is unworthy the consideration of anyone. The statement that "There are not now more than two hundred and fifty Indians on the reservation" may be answered by saying that I have within the last two months issued more than three hundred passes, that there are many out on longer passes and many more outside without passes. (All such shall be returned to the reservation as soon as I shall have funds for that purpose.) There are also many remaining on the reservation attending their crops and gardens and fishing and hunting. There may not be more than one fourth of the Indians belonging here, now on the limits of the reservation, but they are coming and going and in a few weeks they will, nearly all of them, [have] returned to their homes.
    From many of those outside on passes I receive good reports, their employers highly commending their conduct as laborers, and asking an extension of their passes. Please see also the enclosed article from the editorial of the Corvallis Gazette [below], in which the editor speaks of some of our young men in his vicinity and of the civilizing influences that have been brought to bear upon them in highest terms of commendation. But those who are out without passes [and] are causing some trouble and should by all means be attended to and returned.
    On the Fourth of July next, I propose assisting them to hold a celebration, which will induce nearly all to return. About the 5th or 6th of same month we shall hold a council and I shall give them to understand what will be expected of them. This will be by far the cheapest plan, to return most of them to the agency, and, if they return in this way, they will be more likely to remain contentedly. To this celebration and reunion we propose inviting the Tillamooks and the tribes formerly belonging to the Alsea Reservation. Such a concourse of people, on such an occasion, will necessarily involve us in a trifling expenditure for a 4th of July dinner, for which I would respectfully ask your permission to purchase supplies in open market. (Request No. 1.)
    (No. 2) I would ask permission to purchase in the same way also, actual necessities for many sick, aged and destitute Indians, who for months have been fed from my own table, at personal expense.
    From the urgent nature of these requests, I most respectfully ask an immediate reply by telegram.
    I regret that I cannot at once remove the Alsea Indians and Department property from the Alsea to this agency. As soon as funds are in my hands applicable to this purpose, I shall proceed to carry out your wishes in this matter.
    I must further very respectfully ask instructions in regard to the allotment of lands to Indians. Am I authorized to make such transfers, granting to each Indian as many acres of land as he is capable of cultivating, subject to your approval? If so, could you furnish me a form for warrants for the same.
    Quite a number of allotments were made by my predecessor, but I am not aware that they were reported to your office.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
To J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
A WORD TO CHRISTIANS.
    BRO. CARTER: I desire, through your paper, to call the attention of all Christians to our Indian brethren who are now seeking employment in different parts of the county. We give certificates of church membership to all who belong to the Church, but they may, through diffidence, hesitate to present them. We hope Christians will speak to them kindly, and invite them to Church services, and save them from falling into the company of low and vicious persons.
    Many noble young men have gone from here to spend a few months outside, earning money. Our prayers and sympathies go with them.
T. F. ROYAL
    Siletz Agency, May 5th 1876.
    (We take pleasure in publishing the above note. Having met some of the young men referred to, we can bear testimony to their good character, and would urge Christians to extend to them a "helping hand," and a kind word. Some of these young men are at work for Mr. Isaac Moore, just across the river, and give good satisfaction. They are perfectly reliable and trustworthy; some have made marked development in their studies, and bear pleasing record of the power of Christianity as a civilizing agent. Speak kindly to these "children of the forest," and thus prove to them that Christianity is something more than a mere name.--ED. GAZETTE.)
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Klamath Agency, Oregon
    [June 6, 1876]
Sir:
    On yesterday morning, the 5th instant, the body of Tecumseh, a Klamath Indian, was found in a small creek between this agency and Fort Klamath, and appearances indicated that he might have been murdered. The Indians immediately fixed upon Thomas McKay, a half-breed, as the perpetrator of the deed, and to allay the intense excitement and also believing it to be best for Mr. McKay's safety, I took him in custody at once, and gave him an opportunity in the presence of the Indians to prove an alibi, which he did to my entire satisfaction, when I set him at liberty.
    The Indians are not satisfied with my decision in the matter, still insisting that McKay is guilty, and they wish to bring the case before you.
    The peculiarity of the circumstances connected with the case makes it seem advisable that I should turn the whole matter over to you, as I now respectfully request you accept the responsibility and proceed with the case as you may deem proper.
Very respectfully yours
    L. S. Dyar
        U.S. Indian Agent
To
    Captain John Q. Adams
        Commanding Fort Klamath
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



    Investigation of the circumstances of the death of "Tecumseh," an Indian, charged by the Klamath Indians to have been killed by one Tom McKay, a half-breed, June 7, 1876.
    Statement of witnesses for the prosecution:
    S. Kellog:
"I asked George when [sic] he first saw Tecumseh's horse tied, and he said up by the little bridge. When I first got down off my horse at the place I saw a little blood on the ground, & it looked as if something had been dragged on the ground, toward the creek & under a willow bush hanging over the stream. I found the body lying in the stream. When I first saw him I could see his boots, and along up his back. I was the first one who found the body. I told George and Ben that I had found him. The body was lying face upwards. The other two were a little ways from me when I found the body. The other two Indians pulled the body out, while I was gone to tell the other Indians."
    Ben's statement: "George told me to go in the creek and take the body out. I took it out on the bank. The shirt was pulled up and torn--this was Monday morning. I turned the body over, and saw where it was cut on the lip & on the chin. I put a blanket and coat over him and went after the wagon. When I found him there was a handkerchief tied around his neck. When Tecumseh started from home he had no handkerchief around his neck."
    Ball's statement: "I came up the road towards the fort, Sunday morning, about the time I heard the big gun fired; went on out towards the brickyard, and met Tom McKay--who told me that the bridge was gone, and I couldn't get across. Tom told me, pointing in another direction, where there was deer. When I came back about 3 o'clock in the afternoon, I saw Tecumseh's horse tied, near where the body was. I thought when I saw the horse tied that Tecumseh had gone for another one, and didn't think much about it. I went on home and was skinning two deer that I had when some other Indians came to where I was. Tecumseh's mother came to me and told me that Tecumseh had [been] gone all day. She didn't know where he was and was crying. I told her I saw his horse, and she came up to where the horse was and got it. Three other Indians saw the horse and told me the horse had been sweating badly. The same night I went and told the Indians that Tecumseh was killed or something, and I didn't see anything but the horse. After they found the body I went around and made it known to all the Indians. Monday--a little before noon I went to Mr. Dyar, who told me Tom McKay was going to Linkville and to go after him and catch him. Mr. Dyar told me to take some Indians with me, and if Tom McKay had not killed Tecumseh he would come back with them all right, but if he had he would resist them. And the man, Bob Beall, went on ahead; his horse outrun the rest. We saw him first just below Pit River Charlie's, and when we saw him Bob's horse outrun the rest of us. When we came up, Tom asked if they were running after him or running a race. The Indians then all got up to where Tom was and told him they wanted him to go ahead to the agency with them. Tom asked then, 'What will I do at to the agency when I go back.' Indian Captain told him, 'Tom, come back.' Tom came back a few steps, and asked if Mr. Dyar was coming--Tom said if Mr. Dyar was at the house, he wouldn't go with them, but if he was a piece this way he would go. Tom told them he wasn't going to the agency, that he was going to Linkville. I then took hold of Tom's horse, and told him he had to go back to the agency. Captain told the Indians to take hold of him, for maybe he wouldn't go back to the agency. Jackson jumped from his horse and took the rope of Tom's horse and Tom struck at him twice; once he hit him. Jackson caught Tom's horse by the head and Tom spurred the horse and Jackson still held on to the horse. Tom made a motion as if he was going to draw his pistol, but didn't do it. Jackson stopped the horse then, and Tom drew the pistol. I caught Tom by the shoulder and Jackson took the pistol away from him. Captain says, 'What is the matter, Tom? You don't go along good.' Tom said the cinch was loose and he wanted to fix it. I forgot to say, when Captain told the Indians to take hold of Tom's horse, the horse threw his head up, and hit Tom on the face, making his nose bleed. When I caught Tom by the shoulders, I pulled him off his horse. I did not tear Tom's shirt when I pulled him off. I did not tear that shirt. (Note: The shirt mentioned was McKay's shirt and was produced for this investigation.) Tom told the Indians to let him go; they could get behind him and he would go in front of them; he was no slave and would go with them. Captain said, 'We won't let you go. You done it yourself and not us.' I walked and led Tom's horse to the agency. Tom left his old shirt at the agency and bought a new one at the store there. An Indian, Bob, got the old shirt. Charlie Moore at the store saw Tom throw the shirt off and the Indians all said, 'Take that shirt, take that shirt, we want to show it to Captain Adams.'"
    Half Nigger's statement: "Sunday morning I met Tecumseh's loose horses coming down the road. I came along about two (2) hundred yards and saw Tecumseh's horse tied to a tree. I was on the other side of the little creek next the mountain, between here and the agency. Me and another Indian come on up pretty near the fort to where his mother was, and stopped there to have something to eat, and then come on to the store. I first saw Tom McKay and his brother George McKay and Cook coming up the road to the store. Tom was on his horse; George and Cook were walking. Tom rode down to the creek and tied his horse, and after this I saw George and Tom and Cook and a soldier, going around to the end of the store and have a great deal of talk there. Toward evening met the other Indians, started back. We got as far as the first bridge when I met Tecumseh's loose horses coming back and Tecumseh's horse was still tied at the same place. When he saw the horse tied he said to the other Indian, 'Maybe someone has killed Tecumseh; let us go and see.' I found the horse tied by the bridle and the rope done up on the saddle the same as if he had been riding. I looked around then for tracks, and then looked in the creek to see if I could see him there. I couldn't see him in the creek and then got on my own horse and called twice, 'Hallo! Tecumseh! Tecumseh! Where are you?' I then went on to the agency and Tecumseh's mother came after that to the agency and asked them where Tecumseh could be, that he had went off to get her horses and was in a great hurry to get back, as he wanted to start to where they were going to get roots. I told her I had seen his horse twice, where it was tied, but did not know where Tecumseh was. Tecumseh's mother said perhaps some Boston had tied him and took him off in a wagon and killed him. She told me first to go and get the horse and look and see if there was any wagon tracks. I said I did not see any wagon tracks and did not go after the horse. Tecumseh's mother went and got the horse. I looked at the saddle on Tecumseh's horse, but did not see any blood or anything. It had been raining."
    Captain's statement: "I saw Tom McKay just before they arrested him. When I saw him first the shirt was torn before any of the Indians put their hands on him. I wondered if he had a fight at the fort or what tore his shirt that way and what could be the reason of his going off that way with a torn shirt. I saw the shirt torn as it is. What was the reason Tom didn't want to come back to Mr. Dyar for? Then I wondered what was the reason Tom came to be afraid of me. I thought we were friends and both of the same color; then I saw that Tom got afraid and wanted to go to Linkville, that Tom's heart was afraid about this affair. When I saw Tom going to get the pistol I thought he wasn't doing right and I told them all to take hold of him. The law of Mr. Dyar and of white men here is that if a man would go to get a pistol you would arrest him, and they done the same. Then I hurried up and went to Mr. Dyar and told him about the thing, also about the shirt. I also made known to the chiefs that Tom's shirt was torn. Mr. Dyar told me that Tom was scared of me for no cause. I said then to Mr. Dyar that Tom wasn't afraid of me. Tom knew the heart of the whites and wasn't afraid."
    Hood's statement: "I was coming from Williamson River up to the agency on Monday. I was coming along near Pit River Charlie's house when I saw Tom coming down the road. I was a little piece from Tom and asked Tom where he was going. Tom said he was going to Linkville. Tom and I stopped to talk; his horse and my horse had their heads turned toward each other. I saw then that Tom's shirt was torn in the breast. Tom turned around to try and secrete the shirt where it was torn and asked me where Mr. Dyar or Sykes Warden was. Then I came on and Tom went on his way. I came on about sixty or seventy yards and Tom was about the bridge near Pit River Charlie's, then I saw the Indians come running after Tom. I stopped when I saw the Indians coming. Then a little Indian came to me and told me to come on. I said, 'What will I go for?' Then they ran on. I then turned round and followed on after them and came up to where Tom and the other Indians were and Indian Jackson took hold of Tom's horse's bridle. Then I saw Ball take hold of Tom by the shoulders and I asked what they were going to do to Tom, what they were catching him for. They told me and I saw the shirt where it was torn. Then Captain went up to Tom's horse and took hold of the cinch strap and went to tighten it and Tom didn't offer to do anything or offer any resistance anymore. Then they took Tom on."
    Ex-Chief Allen David's statement: "I saw Tom's shirt with a tear in it, and then we found the little piece there, near where Tecumseh was found. When I found Tecumseh was killed I couldn't think who it was that done it, whether it was a Pit River Indian, a soldier, or who it was. I thought first I would go to where he was killed and see if I could find any tracks. While doing this I found the piece of a shirt, which was Tom McKay's, and I thought Tom killed him. I then went to Mr. Dyar and told him I thought Tom killed him, and Mr. Dyar said I must be crazy for thinking Tom killed him. Mr. Dyar said he knew Indians well enough. If I had found this piece of a shirt first, he would have believed it. I found the piece of shirt after we had been up here to the fort. I told the Indians at the agency store after we had gone back from the fort not to go back to Williamson River, for Mr. Dyar told me the Indians lied, and we wanted to have it all straight before they left the agency. I was asking the Indians at the agency store what they thought about it, and they said Mr. Dyar thought a horse had kicked him. The Indians all made up their minds at the store that Tom killed him because they found that piece of a shirt there. It was only Mr. Dyar that didn't think so. This was at the agency store in the afternoon, after going back from the post. All the chiefs and the officers know Tom is a bad man, beats and nearly kills his wife."
    Chief of Klamaths Blow's statement: "It was my mind that Tom killed Tecumseh, and when we found the price of a shirt then it made my mind stronger. It was my mind that Tom killed him, that it was nobody else, not [a] soldier, not anyone else. It is not my mind that the horse killed him, or that it was a stone, for if it had been we would have found him on the ground where the horse killed him. They know that it was not the Indians done it, for it would soon come out, they are all black skin and one color, and I know it wasn't the Indians done it. It was Sunday that Tom got whiskey, and it was Sunday that he wanted to go to Linkville. The soldiers know that Tom was here (Fort Klamath) on Sunday, and got whiskey and was drunk and that it was but a little way and it would take but a little while to go there and kill Tecumseh and come back."
    (Note: Celia is Tom McKay's wife.)
    Kitty Brown's statement: "Celia was stopping at my home about a year ago, and Tom came one morning and had a great deal of talk, and wanted to take Celia back to the fort with him. I left them both in the house and went off to get a bucket of water to cook dinner. I came back and sat down outside the tent and Tom and Celia was in the tent, and Celia asked Tom why he didn't bring her horse down. Tom said it was no use to bring one from the agency; if she wanted, he would bring her one from the fort. Celia said what do you talk that way for, you got my horse all the time. Celia wanted to know if he had got the horse for all the time, and Tom said he was going to keep that horse. 'You think you are a good man. I have known you a long time.' Tom said, 'What am I bad about?' Celia said, 'If you think you are a good man I will tell all the tyees and Mr. Dyar. If I told on you they would soon make law on you.' Then I came into the house and there was nothing more said. Then Tom went out and then I asked Celia, 'What is that you said, did you say that Tom has killed a little girl or anybody at any place.' Then I said to Celia, 'You tell me the truth, what Tom had done.' Celia said, 'No, I will not. Tom might kill me, or Che-kas-ka-ne, or Toby Kelly. Celia said, 'Kitty, don't you tell Dave Hill, he might be vexed over it and kill Toby Kelly or me for helping Tom.' 'Well, tell me, I will not tell Dave Hill.' 'After I will tell you that Tom killed that little girl, but you must not tell, as Dave might kill some of my friends, Toby Kelly or some of them.' Celia said, "Well, I will tell you now. Tom was at Linkville and got a bottle of whiskey. He came home and he heard his little girl crying. He went out where his little girl and the other one was and took up a stick of wood and hit the other little girl on the head and killed her.' Celia went out and saw the little girl about as far off as that tree out there (pointing out of the window). She didn't say anything and went back into the house. After she went into the house, Tom took the little girl and perhaps he throwed her into the creek. She went out afterwards and didn't see her where she was first. I told this all to my own man, but not to anyone else."
    Blow says: "This is the first I have heard what Kitty says. A long time ago, Tecumseh told me something about it, and Dave Hill. Then after Dave Hill and Tecumseh went east, I went to Mr. Dyar and told him, and Mr. Dyar sent a letter to Dave Hill, telling him that it was so, that Toby Kelly knew it. Then when Dave Hill came back he told me that Toby had told him that she knew it, and I came and told Mr. Dyar."
    Allen David says: "I didn't see them, both Kitty and Celia, having the conversation. If I had seen them both together talking I would know it was so. I see straight. I think I can see good when I am talking. There is just three tyees here. One Klamath, Mr. Dyar, and soldier tyee. We heard what Kitty said and can judge whether it was correct or not. I don't know anything about that other affair, but only have an opinion from what I hear them say. All I thought about it, Tecumseh had become a Boston, had a house and wagon and other things, the same as any Boston, and I did not like to see him go in that way. See, the Big Tyee in Washington has paid to me so many thousand dollars to have become Boston. The Big Tyee is all the same as my father. If I am killed it would be the same as any other Boston killed. Long time ago my brother was killed at Gasburg. I didn't do anything. My mind was the same as any white man's after my brother was killed. I wasn't chief then. Lalake was chief and George his brother was chief. They were big men. I was the same as a little boy. You see me here today. I want to see this whole thing straightened up. I don't want to get mad over it or anything of that kind. See! Lalake is dead a long time ago. He was a big chief. Now Tecumseh is dead. I don't want to do anything."
    Blow says: "We have all talked a good deal and whatever Tom may say, I shall still believe that he killed Tecumseh. I saw Tecumseh was dead, found him in the creek. If I had found him off in the woods dead, then I would still think Tom killed him; finding him as we did we think Tom killed him. When this paper goes to Portland and you (Capt. Adams) hear what they say about it I want to talk more and know what Big Tyee says. Boston law is slow, and I want to proceed the same as Boston law, take plenty of time. What I have been saying in this matter is no small thing, it is strong talk, for several days now. I don't know what the decision of the tyee at Portland will be, but maybe he may make a mistake, may miss it. I think we have made it plain that Tom committed the deed. We all know, Bostons and soldiers, that Tecumseh is dead. When the tyee learns all that has been said, I think he will make it all straight. I don't want to talk any more. I know Tecumseh is dead and don't want to talk anymore."
    All the evidence on the part of the Indians having closed, the defense submitted the following:
    Mr. Dyar's statement:
    "While I was eating breakfast Sunday morning about eight o'clock--possibly as late as half past eight--Tecumseh came to my house on a little matter of business; he stopped a few minutes and went out. After I got through breakfast I went over across the creek of the saw mill and I saw Tecumseh riding up this way toward the fort in the road. I saw and heard no more of him until sometime in the afternoon, when one of the Indians told me that Tecumseh's horse was a little ways toward the fort and had been there most all day and wanted to know what I thought about it. I told the Indian I didn't know, though they had better search for him. I heard nothing more about it till a little after sunset when Indian George came to me again and asked what I thought about Tecumseh; I inquired more particularly about it and the Indians said they had searched and could not find him. I asked the Indian particularly where the horse was tied; he told me the horse was tied by the little creek or spring near the bridge. I told the Indian to go to where the horse was tied and look closely in the creek; maybe Tecumseh had been sick and fainted and fallen in there. The next I heard about it was early next morning, when I saw some Indians riding up that way and asked if they had seen Tecumseh; they told me that they had found him that morning in the creek. I then told the Indians to go up and bring the body down to the agency. In the course of an hour or so they brought him to the agency. With some of the employees I examined the body--found no marks of violence except a cut on the chin and lip. I thought it was done with a sharp stick or stone, and not with a knife--was talking with the Indians about how it could have been done and they thought Tecumseh had been murdered; they thought he had been choked to death, strangled, by twisting a handkerchief around his neck; they were much excited. They were talking and much excited, asking who I thought had done it and telling me who they thought had done it. Some said they thought Tom McKay had done it. While we were talking some Indians came in, riding very fast, and said Tom McKay was just passing down the road past the agency toward Linkville, and wanted to know what I thought about arresting him. I asked them (the chiefs Allen David and Blow) what they thought about it; they said it was just as I said--they thought well of it, if I thought so. I thought it would be better that Tom should come back as there was such strong suspicion of him, and have the matter fixed right up. I told them to have their watchman to go and tell Tom to come to the agency. They asked what they should do if Tom resisted and wouldn't come; I told them I thought Tom would come; if Tom wasn't guilty he would come right along without any trouble. It was all done in a hurry, and in a short time Tom was brought back with them.
    "As he rode up to near where the body was, when we were all gathered, McKay asked what was up. I told him Tecumseh was dead and the Indians thought he (Tom) had killed him, and thought it was better for all concerned for Tom to come right back and fix the matter up. Tom said: 'How can that be, Tecumseh was one of the best friends I had among them.'
    "I asked Tom if he could prove where he was yesterday, all day--He said he could--said he was at the fort, at the store, or about the store all day. I told Tom we had better go right up to the fort and straighten it out. Tom agreed to it. My attention was called to it by the Indians that Tom's shirt was torn. I think some of the Indians asked Tom how his shirt got torn. Tom said the Indians tore it in arresting him. The Indians said they didn't, and commenced some dispute about it, when I stopped them and told them not to talk about it anymore. I then sent an Indian to catch my horse, and while waiting Tom went into the store and changed his shirt for a new one. I sent word to Tom that I was ready to go and Tom came out; we came up to the fort. I with one or two Indians rode on ahead to where the body was found to see what we could discover, and the Indians showed me where the horse was tied.
    "The ground was tramped around where the horse was tied, and the grass trampled down; there had been a good many Indians there, and tramped around so much that I could form no opinion as to how it appeared at first.
    "I asked some of the Indians to show me how it appeared where the grass was trampled down when they first found the body. The way they represented it, it was trampled down only to a short distance away from the horse. They showed me where it looked when they found it as though a body had been dragged to the bank of the creek. I examined the ground and found at the edge of the creek a little blood on the weeds; they thought that was the place where the body was thrown into the creek. I thought it was probable from the appearance that it fell in or was dragged and thrown in there. They pointed out the place where the body was found, which was about twenty feet downstream below. It appeared to me that it might have floated down and lodged against some brush in the creek, and under some slimy mossy substance that was on top of the water lodged against the brush.
    "I then told Blow that he better have one of the Indians take off his clothes and go in the water and search around under the brush and see if he could find anything there; they wanted to know 'Find what.' I told them 'a piece of clothes, shirt or anything.' The Indians had said they thought Tecumseh had had a squabble with Tom McKay and that was why Tom's shirt was torn--that Tecumseh had torn it.
    "I told them that if they should find a piece of cloth, or a piece of that shirt, it would indicate that Tecumseh did tear it. One of them took a pole and poked around for some time, but didn't find anything. I examined the ground around for some distance, and looked around considerable, but found nothing that would give any clue whatever to Tecumseh's death.
    "We then came on to the fort and went into the sutler store. I told Tom McKay that he could send for any persons he wanted, and to prove where he was the day before. He (Tom McKay) had quite a number of men called and proved to my satisfaction that he was at the fort from seven o'clock in the morning until ten or later, and from what I could gather from the Indians and knew personally, Tecumseh must have died somewhere between seven and ten on Sunday; furthermore I didn't think the wounds found on Tecumseh indicated murder. I told the Indians the same--that I thought Tom had proved himself at the fort at the time Tecumseh was killed, and told McKay that he was at liberty to go on to Linkville and vote. Before getting through with the investigation at the sutler store, some of the Indians went out and started back toward the agency. After getting through with the investigation I rode along down toward the agency; when I came to near where the body was found, about eleven o'clock in the forenoon, I found Indians there, and stopped a little distance from where they were to examine the ground and some brush about there and small stubs where brush had been cut, to see if Tecumseh had been thrown on any sticks or anything of that kind. The Indians then called me to them. I rode up where they were and they showed me a piece of checked cotton drilling, and said that was a piece of Tom's shirt and showed where they found it. It was about forty feet from where the grass was trampled down, and where they first thought Tecumseh and Tom had a fight. I told the Indians that was not good evidence; if they had found that piece of shirt there when we first went up it would have been evidence--that they had Tom's shirt in their possession, that I thought some Indian had torn off that piece and gone and put it there as they came back from the fort.
    I talked to them but little--told them that I didn't want to act foolishly about it in prosecuting Tom; if Tom didn't kill Tecumseh I didn't want to have him prosecuted; I wanted everything straight, no underhanded work about it. I then rode on toward the agency. In a short time the Indians came to my office and wanted to talk more about it. They brought Tom's shirt and the piece they had found. I found it was a piece of the shirt and thought I found the place where it came off. I still told them it was not good evidence and wouldn't be taken in any court, because they had the shirt in their possession, and whether they did or not they could have put it there.
    They told me they were not satisfied with my decision--with what I had done--they wanted the officers at the fort to take hold of it and wanted me and them to look into it further. I told them all right, if they wished it we would come right up to the fort and see Captain Adams, commander of the fort. We did so, and it was arranged that the fort physician should go down the next day and hold a post mortem examination on the body, the agency physician being away to the election at Linkville.
    "Circumstances having transpired, I judged it best to turn the whole matter over to the post commander."
    Mr. Powell's (citizen blacksmith) statement):
    "I met Tom McKay about half past seven o'clock Sunday about a mile west of the post. Tom's wife and his children were with him; he was coming this way, toward the post."
    Sergeant Cahen's (commissary sergeant) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning before inspection between eight and nine. Tom was with Mr. Cooke and Mr. Lewis in front of the sutler store. After that I saw him between nine and ten about the sutler store; then I saw him just before dinner going past Mr. Lewis' house. I saw him several times between the hours of two and four in the afternoon."
    Farrier Quinn's ("B" Company 1st Cavalry) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning a little before inspection. Then after inspection at the store, quarter past nine: I left there at half past ten o'clock and he was there yet."
    Private Ryan's ("F" Company 21st Infantry) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning between seven and half past seven up at the hospital; I saw him again at nine o'clock, or a little after guard mount at the store. About half an hour after I saw him walking toward the commissary, and going back again toward the store."
    Hospital steward Schaefer's (U.S. Army) statement:
    "I first saw Tom McKay Sunday morning about fifteen minutes past nine at the sutler store; he was there about fifteen minutes. In the afternoon about fifteen minutes before one I saw him coming from the sutler store going toward the stables on foot."
    Private Colvin's ("F" Company 21st Infantry) statement:
    "I first saw Tom McKay Sunday morning about half past seven coming past the hospital on his horse. He went from the hospital down to the store. I saw him at the store about an hour afterwards."
    Private Shaw's ("F" Company 21st Infantry) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay pass the hospital about half past seven Sunday morning, accompanied by his wife and two children. I saw him again twenty minutes past five in the afternoon sitting on the steps of the sutler store."
    Private Courandy's ("B" Company 1st Cavalry) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay and his wife pass the hospital Sunday morning about thirty or forty minutes past seven. I saw him again between ten and eleven at the sutler store. Him and Barnhart were talking about the election at Linkville."
    Private Bowers' ("F" Company 21st Infantry) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay between nine and ten Sunday morning going from Fields' house over to the store."
    Mr. Cooke's (clerk at store) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay the first time between eight and nine o'clock Sunday morning; I was on the outside of the store at the time. I unlocked the store and entered. He was anxious that I should wait on him, stating that he was in a hurry and was going to take breakfast with Mr. Fields. He remained in the store probably ten minutes or thereabouts. About an hour afterward he returned to the store accompanied by his wife and two children. He was in and around the store until 12 o'clock; at that time I closed the store and went to dinner. On returning to the store about half an hour afterward, I remained but a few minutes and then went to Mr. Fields' house. A few rods north of said house, Tom McKay was standing leaning on his horse--his hand on the saddle and his back to the north. I asked him what the chance was to borrow a horse. He said he thought it would be good, but did not propose to loan me one. I then went over to the quarters of 'B' Company, then to the cavalry stables, then returned to the store. As I passed Corp'l. Stewart's house, Tom McKay was seated on a log at the north end of that building. I went on to the store and into the billiard room--locked the door--nobody was with me--I read for some time, probably fifteen minutes, looked out the window and saw Tom McKay on his horse. I next saw him about half after six in the evening; that was all I saw of him that day. Between 11 and 12 Sunday Tom wanted to buy a coat, put on one but it didn't suit him. He tried on another; it didn't suit him. My impression is the shirt he had on was not torn. I do not know whether it was 'this' shirt he had on or not. I saw Tom in the store Monday morning; I don't think his shirt was torn either time."
    Citizen Fields (citizen wheelwright) statement:
    "The first I saw of Tom McKay Sunday morning was between seven and eight o'clock. He came to my house, himself and wife and two children. He said he came to take one of his children to the Doctor--it was sick. I told him he would have to wait till guard mount, as the Doctor would not be up till about that time. Tom said he would have to wait then. About fifteen minutes after that he went out and said he was going to the sutler store. I think he was away about ten or fifteen minutes and then returned to my house and said he wanted some breakfast and waited in the house till about guard mount. He asked me if it was about time the Doctor was up; I told him it was. He took his wife and children and went to the Doctor's; he was gone about fifteen or twenty minutes and returned by my house going toward the sutler store with his family. He said he would go to the sutler store and send his family home and then get Barnhart and George, his brother, and go to Linkville and wanted me to go with them. I went to work about the carpenter shop and I think about 11 o'clock he came back to my house and said he had been trying to buy a coat at the store to wear to Linkville and said he couldn't get one to suit him. I looked at his coat and told him I didn't think he needed one; his coat was good enough to wear anywhere. He said then he would get his brother and Barnhart and start right away for Linkville. I saw him walking around the sutler store several times after that. About half past twelve he came back with his horse to near my house. He stayed there about ten minutes and then said he thought Barnhart had hid somewhere and didn't want to go to Linkville; he would go and find them and start right away. I didn't see him again for about half an hour when I met him near Stewart's house; he said he couldn't find Barnhart and said he would wait till he found him, for he didn't want to go without him. I didn't see him again till about five o'clock, when he came to my house and said he had given up going to Linkville that night, but would start very early in the morning. He wanted to go to the sutler store a few minutes and would come back to get some supper if I would let him have it. He came to my house again about 6 o'clock, brought Barnhart with him and both eat their supper. He arranged with Barnhart to stay with him all night and they were to start at daylight for Linkville. McKay got on his horse and rode around on the further side of the parade ground and Barnhart went across and met him, and the last I saw of them they were going toward Wood River--Tom and Barnhart together. That is the last I saw of him till Monday morning, when he came in my house before sunrise and said he was going to Linkville to vote and would have to ride pretty fast. He then left. I did not see him any more till I saw him in the store with Mr. Dyar."
    Mr. Lewis (citizen) statement:
    "I first saw Tom McKay Sunday morning over at Sam Paine's shop. Tom, Mr. Cooke and myself went over to the store. I left him at the store and went home. It was fifteen minutes before nine when we went into the store. Fifteen or twenty minutes later I left. I saw Tom and his wife going into Mr. Fields' house--afterward, a few minutes before twelve, he was sitting on my porch.
    Private Hughes ("B" Company 1st Cav.) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning between seven and eight o'clock about half a mile west of the post. He was coming toward the post."
    Private Lewis ("B" Company 1st Cav.) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning about two hundred yards this side of Wood River bridge about half past seven o'clock; he was coming toward the post."
    Barnhart (citizen) statement:
    "Between seven and eight Sunday morning Tom and his wife and two children come on horseback and stopped by Mr. Fields, got breakfast there and went to the Doctor with his children. I told Tom, 'I will go along with you.' I went into the Doctor's kitchen, asked the Chinaman if the Doctor was up. Chinaman said, 'No.' I went out and told Tom the Doctor wasn't up. Tom and his wife & children went into Mr. Fields' house and I left them there. About 10 o'clock I saw Tom again at the store. I went back from the store with Tom to Mr. Fields' house and then he said he wanted to go to Linkville to vote. I told him if he would furnish me with a horse I would go 'long with him; he said he would. I felt as if I didn't want to go. I went then over to the hotel and stayed till dinner was ready. Between two and three I went home--saw Tom lying asleep about Beach's stable, his horse tied alongside of him and his dog alongside of him. I went home and as I came back Tom was gone from where he was asleep. I found his horse again tied up behind Beach's corral. I found Tom behind the store sleeping, and his dog. I went there to the hotel for my supper and went then to Mr. Fields' house. I saw Tom with Mr. Fields at his house. Fields got supper for Tom and his wife. Tom had some whiskey, about a quart, in a vinegar bottle. Tom, Fields and myself took a drunk. I stayed then till about nine o'clock and Tom all the time wanted to go to Linkville. I told him it was too late and he better wait till tomorrow morning. Next morning he came to my house with two horses. I was asleep; it was very early. I told him I did not feel like going; I had to go to work. Tom sat down in my house about ten minutes and then went off with his two horses to the store. That was the last I saw of him till Mr. Dyar sent for me. I think that is Tom's shirt; when I saw him in the store Sunday trying on a coat the shirt was not torn as much as it is now. Monday morning I did not notice his shirt."
    Charles Moore (clerk at agency store) statement:
    "On Monday morning I went out to the creek in front of the store to get a drink. The Indians were there talking to Tom. I then went into the store and Tom came along behind. As soon as we got into the store, he asked me if I had any shirts. I said 'Yes' and went around the counter to get the shirts to show him. While I was getting the shirts Tom took up his shirt and dropped it on the floor. He then found a shirt that suited him and put it on. While he was putting it on Indian Bob picked up the old shirt and walked out of the store with it. Tom then waited in the store till Mr. Dyar called for him. This is the same shirt that Tom pulled off in the store." Witness, asked by the Indians, states: "When Tom took off his old shirt I noticed three or four drops of blood on Tom's undershirt. There was also blood on Tom's nose."
    Private Miller ("B" Company 1st Cav.) statement:
    "I saw Tom McKay Sunday morning about half past seven going towards Mr. Fields' house; saw him again an hour after taking a drink of water at Mr. Fields' water barrel; saw him again about 10 o'clock talking to some soldiers near the buzz saw--saw him again at five in the afternoon near the sutler store."
    George McKay (Tom's brother) statement:
    "Sunday morning about seven o'clock I saw Tom at Paul's house across Wood River. I came over here at half past nine and saw him at the store, then I saw him every few minutes till about one o'clock, then he went to sleep above the sutler store. About two or three o'clock I went home and Tom came home after sundown. I did not notice the shirt he had on Sunday particularly, but it was not torn."
    Celia (Tom's wife) statement:
    "You all know how the women talk that run around the fort. I did not tell Kitty that Tom got whiskey at Linkville or that he killed that half-breed girl. I saw Kitty and talked with her, but I never told her any such thing as that. Chiloquin is here, he knows, and Chiloquin Mose, that she did not want to take that little girl in the first place, because she was a bad girl. 
Che-kas-ka-ne's mother told this little girl's mother that I did not want to take the girl with me, then the little girl's mother said to this old woman, 'What, will she eat anything?' 'No, she won't eat much. I want you to take her with you as she will be with you and keep you from being lonesome.' When she was ready to start in the morning, this little girl's mother put on the saddle for her, got a dress and gave it to the girl. She wanted her to go with me and I told the little girl's mother all right and I gave the little girl a blanket. I took this little girl with me and slept about four miles from Linkville on [the] west side of the lake. Next day went to Bob Whittle's and camped there; the little girl said she did not want to go on. It would be lonesome down there. After I got where we were going to in three or four days I had a little baby born. Next morning Frank Picard come up to the house to get some venison. The little girl was in the house that day. Tom told Frank that he was going out to hunt and would be gone all next day. Tom went off hunting; the little girl was in the house when he left. The little girl was swinging her bonnet around, and I told her not to do that, because the dog might bite her and she went outside. I went out a little after and called for the little girl, but no answer. Pretty near sundown I heard Tom shooting on the opposite mountain. The little girl hadn't been back all day. Tom came back after sundown. I told him the little girl had been gone all day. Tom asked me what I had been doing to her. Tom said maybe you have been scolding her. Tom got up in the morning and did not wait for breakfast, went off to hunt a horse. Tom found Lee Bird's horse and fetched him in. It was near noon and he wanted to start off to hunt this little girl. Tom went off on the road and found tracks on the road, but did not find the little girl. Tom said that was a poor horse he had. He didn't look all day, for he couldn't get the horse along. Tom hunted for several days and sent word in different directions but did not find the little girl. This is the same shirt Tom had on Sunday morning about ten o'clock. When I left Tom at the store the shirt was not torn. It was not torn Monday morning when Tom left home; if it had been I would have asked him how it got torn. Since Tecumseh was dead, Ally (Tecumseh's brother) sent Che-kas-ka-ne to me to tell me that Ally said he would give me three horses if I would lie a little in their behalf. I told Che-kas-ka-ne I did not want to do that, that God would see me, but if Tom had done anything I would tell it. I told Che-kas-ka-ne I did not want to lie about Tom and have him hung as Captain Jack was. I told Che-kas-ka-ne to tell Ally not to talk that way. I did not want to see everybody laughing about such a thing as being hung like Captain Jack on account of my lying."
    Che-kas-ka-ne's statement:
    "Ally told me to tell Celia that he would give her three horses if she would tell everything she knew about Tom straight. I don't know anything Tom has done. If I knew anything I would tell."
   

Statement of the Accused
-- Tom McKay --
    "On Monday morning on my way to Linkville, after I had got about a mile beyond the agency I saw a lot of Indians behind me running towards me, and when they came up to within a hundred yards or so of me they were running so fast I thought they were running a race amongst themselves. I was going in a fast lope then, and I struck out. I thought they were running races and I would see how far I could go before they could overhaul me. While we was running I heard my name mentioned two or three times and I checked up. I asked the nearest one to me if they were running after me or running races. One of them spoke up and said, 'Dyar wants you to come back.' I asked if Dyar was coming; they said he wasn't coming. I said, 'What does he want me to turn back for,' and they wouldn't tell me. I told them if they wouldn't tell me I would go on.
    "As I turned my animal, they gathered around and two or three got hold of her and she went to bucking. There was a fellow pulling on my clothes and my saddle turned. I had a pistol in a scabbard fast to the horn of the saddle by a string. As my saddle turned they gathered on to the pistol as quick as they could. The animal knocked the blood out of my nose with her head, I suppose in turning over of the saddle. My animal's head was towards Linkville, and the Indians were behind me except two or three that had hold of the animal. In the scuffle they tore my shirt. I then came back to the agency with them. If they had told me what was up and what they wanted with me, I would have come back. I thought it was some of their foolishness and I wouldn't stop.
    "My child was sick and I told my wife I was coming back Monday evening, is the reason I was traveling so fast."
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Headqrs. Fort Klamath Ogn.
    June 14th 1876
Asst. Adjut General
    Department of the Columbia
        Portland, Oregon
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to transmit the proceedings in the investigation of the death of Tecumseh, a Klamath Indian. I consented to make this investigation at the request of Mr. Dyar, the Indian agent, and commenced by having a post mortem examination of the body, a report of which is submitted with the proceedings. I found the Indians in a very excited state over the death of Tecumseh, who was a prominent Indian among them. The deceased was one of the Indians taken east about a year or so ago by Mr. A. B. Meacham. I was satisfied that in the enraged and excited condition of the Indians at the time Mr. Dyar requested me to investigate the matter, and take it off his hands, if I refused to do so, the result would be that Tom McKay would be killed the first time he appeared amongst them, which event would in all probability lead to further acts that would require a strong military force to suppress.
    At the beginning of the investigation the Indians were informed that anything they wished to say and all that Tom McKay would say would be put in writing and submitted to the Department Commander for his decision that unless this was perfectly satisfactory to them and unless they would abide willingly and peaceably by such decision I would have nothing to do with it. They expressed themselves as being perfectly satisfied with this arrangement.
    By the time these proceedings can receive a reply their angry and revengeful state will have in a measure subsided, the delay to effect this is about the only good result expected from the investigation. The opinion of the Department Commander in the premises is respectfully requested and also instructions concerning future proceedings if any are considered necessary.
I am, sir,
    Very respectfully
        Your obdt. servant
            Jno. Q. Adams
                1st Lieut. 1st Cavalry
                    Commanding
A True Copy.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Fort Klamath, Oregon
    June 14, 1876
    At the request of Lieutenant John Q. Adams, 1st U.S. Cavalry, commanding post of Fort Klamath, Ogn., on the 6th instant I made a post mortem examination of the body of Tecumseh, a Klamath Indian. The examination was made on the second day after the body had been found and was held at the house where the Indian had formerly lived, a few miles below the Indian agency. I was assisted in the examination by Doctor Quivey, physician at the agency, who arrived from Summerville just as I was commencing the examination. Lieut. Adams, Mr. Dyar, Indian agent, and the Indian chiefs were present in the room during the examination.
    The only marked lesion found sufficient to account for death was excessive engorgement of both lungs. The substance of the lungs when cut into gave exit to a frothy fluid. There was considerable emphysema of both lungs but no ecchymosis of either organ, such as usually accompanies death from strangulation. There was some hypostatic congestion of the brain.
    There were two cuts about the face. One had irregularly divided the upper lip a little to the right of the median line. The edges of this cut were ragged. Neither the teeth nor gums beneath the cut were in any injured. The other cut was through the integument fascia and muscles about an inch and a half in length along the border of the chin to the right of the median line. This cut was also somewhat irregular in form and had ragged edges.
    Although carefully sought for, the skin being dissected up for the purpose, no traces of any marks or contusions could be discovered about the neck.
    From the results of this post mortem examination I am of opinion that this Indian, Tecumseh, came to his death by drowning, and this opinion was concurred in by Doctor Quivey.
Henry McElderry
    Asst. Surgeon, U.S.A.   
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



June 15th 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith Comr. of Indian Affairs
    Washington D.C.
Dear Sir: Won't  you please instruct Agent Bagley of Siletz Reservation to haul in the grist mill machinery from Corvallis with the government teams. There are two good horse teams and wagons on the reservation that are now idle, and six yoke of work cattle. He has all the facilities on the reservation necessary to haul in the machinery, and there is no reason why it should not have been hauled in long ago. But he will not haul any machinery without implicit instructions. If the government part of the contract had been complied with, my work would now all be completed.
    Agents Fairchild and Bagley have made a large indebtedness at the sutler's store, and there is no money that they can pay it out of, except the mill money. They have managed so as not to haul the machinery in, which prevents me from completing my contract.
    If the machinery had been hauled in as per contract the grist mill would now be running and the mill money paid me as per contract.
    They have not hauled in the machinery on purpose to prevent me completing my contract till after July. Which would enable them to use the mill money in paying old debts. Agent Bagley informed me that he would telegraph to you for instructions to allow him to pay out the mill money on old debts. As I understand if any part of the mill money is misapplied there is not any money to replace it, and it would require an appropriation to be made before I could get my pay. I hope you will take immediate steps to relieve me of this unpleasant mill affair and enable me to complete my work. Please answer as soon as possible. The grist mill structure is up, enclosed, floors laid, grist mill work nearly all completed ready to put the machinery in place when it comes. It will take about 20 days to complete the mill after the machinery arrives at the mill.
    I think that I am clearly entitled to a payment of $2000 dollars as per contract.
    I hope you will order that amount paid to me.
    Please answer as soon as possible; address me at Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon.
Yours respectfully
    H. W. Shipley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.




Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or.
        July 10th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to submit the following as the condition of affairs at this agency for month of June 1876.
    Owing to want of funds and consequent lack of necessary regular employees I have little to report in the way of improvements. Much of my own time has been employed in preserving the crops &c. and in holding what we have done until such time as funds may be furnished for making further improvements necessary. Many of the Indians have been off the reservation on leave of absence working for farmers in various places in the Willamette and Umpqua valleys.
    With very few exceptions their conduct while absent from the reservation has been highly commended by their employers.
    Most of them have returned to attend their celebration on the 4th of July, and many bring requests from citizens asking that they be permitted to return to work as soon as they can be spared from the agency.
    A few through the influence of evil-disposed white men have been guilty [of] being intoxicated, but every such instance has been promptly reported at the agency by other members of their tribes, who feel the disgrace attaching to their people from the bad conduct of a few.
    The work on the mills and elsewhere, having been stopped, has somewhat depressed them, but I have endeavored to cheer them with the assurance that it was the intention of the Department to immediately resume work on all improvements commenced.
    They have also been told by persons off the reservation that efforts were being made by some of the citizens of Benton County to have them removed to some other place and their present home thrown open to settlement by the whites, and they requested me to call them in council that they might send to your office their united protest against any such action on the part of their friends in Washington. I accordingly convened a council on the 6th inst., a copy of the proceedings of which I herewith transmit to you.
    I very much regret that circumstances over which I had no control have compelled me to grant leave of absence to so many of them, thus bringing them in contact with whites of bad character, who were so void of conscience as to ridicule any efforts at their improvement and who would encourage them in their old vices and superstitions and throw every obstacle in the way of their advancement toward civilization or Christianity.
    I sincerely hope this agency may soon be placed in such a condition that it will not be necessary for any of the Indians to go away from home to obtain subsistence for themselves or their families, as such a necessity will always retard the work of moral and Christian improvement among them.
    Our religious meetings continue to be well attended, and many are anxiously asking when the school will be reopened.
    The enthusiasm manifested at the council on the 6th inst. in regard to the completion of the mills & bridge, and the earnest desire for the allotment of land in severalty, induced me to commence the work of furnishing lumber to H. W. Shipley, "contractor," for completion of the same. This work can be done now for from seventy-five to fifty percent less than it will cost after the fall rains set in, and ought by all means to be pushed on to completion.
    I am confident it would be useless to try to persuade the Alsea Indians to come to this reservation unless we can assure them that the mill will be ready to grind the present crop of wheat. As soon as this can be positively assured them I think most of them will voluntarily come with very little expense to the Department. Some work must be done on the road until it will be safe to attempt the transportation of the heavy machinery from Corvallis to the agency, and the expense of making and delivering lumber for bridge will be considerable, though it will be done at the least possible expense.
    I have not yet found time to visit the Indians at the mouth of Salmon River, though they continue to visit the agency often and desire me to urge the Dept. to fulfill the promises made them by Special Agent Simpson by which promises they were induced to leave their native country and come to their present home. I hope, however, before the close of [the] present month to visit both them and the Alseas.
    I would respectfully call your attention to the fact that harvest is upon us, and I have no funds with which to secure the crop. I must incur indebtedness or the Dept. must lose the crop. And unless otherwise instructed by you I shall choose the former course. The crops look very well, and I think will pay for labor and expense of producing them.
    I wrote you some time since for instructions in regard to the allotment of land to Indians, asking for a form of deeds that I might with your approval proceed to fully satisfy the Indians as to have in their possession the deeds to their homes.
    The sanitary condition of the Indians is not as good as formerly, probably in consequence of the lack of medical attention, there being no physician borne on the list of employees. Neither have we been able to visit and care for the sick as much as their helpless condition would require. More deaths have occurred during the past six weeks than has been usual at that season of the year.
    In consequence of the lack of clerical aid office work is somewhat delayed, though with present efficient aid I hope soon to be able to close up this work for fiscal year ending June 30th.
    I respectfully ask that as soon as appropriations are made I may be informed of the amount allotted to this agency so that I may be able to accomplish as much as possible during the dry season, thus saving money to the Department.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affrs.
        Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Department of the Interior,
    Washington, August 1, 1876.
Sir:
    In compliance with your recommendation of the 28th ultimo, and for the reasons therein stated, Department order dated March 3rd, 1876, authorizing the discontinuance of the Alsea Special Agency, and the removal of the Indians belonging to said special agency to the Siletz Reservation, is hereby rescinded. You will remit the pay of Agent Geo. P. Litchfield and his interpreter for the second quarter of this year. The discontinuance of said agency will be deferred until the Indian appropriation bill for the current year shall have been passed by Congress.
Very respectfully &c.
    Chas. T. Gorham
        Acting Secretary
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Portland Oregon
    Aug. 5th 1876
Rev. F. N. Blanchet
    Archbishop of Oregon
        Rev. Sir
            Yours of recent date is received and contents noted.
    In reply I have to say that as one of the U.S. comrs. appointed to treat with the Nestucca Indians then residing on Nestucca River and now pursuant to treaty being located at the mouth of Salmon River, that there was no definite understanding in the treaty as to what reservation or agency they were desired to belong to. They were informed, however, that the place designated for their location was at the mouth of Salmon River on Siletz Reservation, to which they finally agreed. They were promised a school for their children under the appropriation for that purpose at Siletz Agency and also that they would have the privilege of sending their children to Grand Ronde school if they desired. I also promised them to use my influence to have them allowed the privilege of settling their difficulties at Grand Ronde Agency, as it is much easier of access than Siletz Agency, and I presumed that matters could be arranged by the two agents in charge.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        Ben Simpson
            Late Ind. Commissioner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



The Nestucca Indians assembled at Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or. Aug. 11th 1876 represent that at a council held in their country in the month of September 1875, at which council the United States was represented by Benj. Simpson, they agreed to and did vacate their country and locate at the mouth of Salmon River. As an inducement to their speedy and peaceable abandonment of their country the following promises were [made] to them by said Benj. Simpson on behalf of the United States.
    That as the country they were to move to was within the boundaries of the Siletz Indian Reservation and as an appropriation had been made by Congress, to be expended for their benefit in their new location by that agency, they were promised that the agent of the Siletz Reservation should have the supervision of them; that carpenter, lumber, nails, etc. etc. would be furnished forthwith; that oxen, plows & seed would be given to them in the spring. They were also promised that after these promises had been fulfilled the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Or. should be extended over them for the following reasons: Their new location at the mouth of Salmon River is but six or eight hours' drive at all seasons of the year over a good wagon road, when to reach the Siletz Agency they have ten miles to go to the Siletz River, thence by canoe forty miles to the agency, a journey of two days, and during the winter months very dangerous. That since the establishment of the Grand Ronde Agency they have been accustomed to go there, are acquainted with the Indians and now have to go there to get their supplies and find a market for their products. They now state that none of these promises have been fulfilled, that they waited patiently for the aid promised them in building their houses but none came; that they suffered all winter from exposure and want of food, & that at the time they left their country each family was provided with comfortable board houses which they were obliged to abandon, that in their new location they have no shelter but that afforded by the bushes. They represent that they are willing and anxious to follow the pursuits of civilized industry but are without implements of agriculture or means to buy & are dependent upon the promises made by the United States for both; when these are provided & they are properly instructed in their uses they will try and support themselves without the aid of the government.
    They now respectfully petition that the promises made them be fulfilled so that they may have means provided them to live during the approaching winter without exposure and hunger, and as one of the strongest incentives to their acceptance of their new location was that the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde Indian Agency should be extended over them, they urgently request that they be placed under the supervision of that agency.
Signed in the presence of: Nestucca Bill his X mark
    A. J. Croquet, Cath. Mry.* Priest Dick his X mark
    Alex Day George his X mark
    C. D. Folger Big John his X mark
    P. B. Sinnott, U.S. Ind. Agent Baxter his X mark
William his X mark
Old Man Dick his X mark
Sam his X mark
Culler his X mark
for and in behalf of themselves and all Nestucca Indians
   

    I hereby certify that I interpreted the foregoing petition to the parties signing the same and that they fully & plainly understood it & that they signed it voluntarily.
    Witnesses: C. D. Folger Dan Holmes
P. B. Sinnott     his X mark
    U.S. Ind. Agent     Interpreter
    Sworn to and subscribed this 11th day of August A.D. 1876 before the undersigned.
H. C. Rowell
    Justice of the peace
   

We the undersigned Salmon River Indians respectfully petition that the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde Indian Agency be extended over us for the same reason as those given in the petition of the Nestucca Indians this day executed.
Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or.
    Aug. 11, 1871
  Signed in presence of Signed
    A. J. Croquet, Cath. Mry. Priest     Salmon River John, chief
    Alex Day         his X mark
    C. D. Folger     Utica [?] John
        his X mark
for and in behalf of all Salmon River Indians.
   

Regarding the conditions under which the Nestucca Indians agreed to leave the country occupied by them and locate at the mouth of Salmon River, as an incentive to their removal.
    1st. That the jurisdiction of Grand Ronde Agency should be extended over them.
    2nd. That they should have the benefits of the schools of Grand Ronde Agency.
    2rd. That they should have the same privileges of the saw & grist mills of Grand Ronde Agency as the Indians of Grand Ronde.
    4th. That they should have their troubles settled at Grand Ronde Agency by the same laws that govern the Indians of that agency.
    The undersigned certify that they were present at a council held with the Nestucca Indians at Nestucca, Oregon, Sept. 12, 13 & 14th 1875, at which council the United States was represented by Hon. Benj. Simpson, Special Commissioner, and the Indians were promised by him that if they would vacate the Nestucca country and locate at the mouth of Salmon River, the above-mentioned stipulations should be granted to them.
  Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Or. P. B. Sinnott
    August 7, 1876     U.S. Ind. Agent
C. D. Folger
Alex Day
    I certify that I was present at the council referred to, employed as interpreter, and that the foregoing stipulations were demanded by the Indians before giving their consent to removal, and that the same was promised to them.
  Witness: Loui Lipisink, Indian
    A. J. Croquet, Cath. Mry. Priest     his X mark
    P. B. Sinnott
        U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.  *Missionary




Klamath Agency, Or.
    Aug. 17, 1876
Sir
    On the 23rd ulto. an Indian belonging to this agency was shot by one Terrance Quinn, a white man, while upon the reservation, resulting in his death.
    A preliminary examination has been had before a commissioner and Mr. Quinn committed for trial before the next session of the U.S. Dist. Court at Portland, Oregon, which convenes sometime next fall.
    It is probable that several Klamath Indians will be summoned as witnesses in the case, and also our interpreter, but the fees and mileage allowed by law to witnesses is not sufficient to pay the actual necessary expenses of a trip from this place to Portland.
    I therefore ask that I be allowed to pay from funds which are, or may be, appropriated for the service at this agency, such amount as is actually needed for the expenses of such Indian witnesses and interpreter above what they may receive as fees and mileage.
    I also request that I be permitted to pay, from funds which may be placed in my hands for use of this agency, the necessary traveling expenses of two head men of the Klamath tribe of Inds. to witness the said trial.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



    By request of the chiefs of the various tribes of Indians on Siletz Reservation a council was held at the agency, the object of which being to give an expression of the feelings of the Tribes in regard to their lands. After opening of council the first to speak was George Harney, Chief of the Rogue Rivers and Head Chief of all the Indians on this reservation.
    He spoke as follows: To the Commissioner Ind. Affairs, and to the President of the U.S., Our Fathers in Washington. We are now happily enjoying the homes you gave us on this reservation when some of us laid down our arms in our native country and by your request came here. We gave up the land of our natural fathers in exchange for this.
    Now we desire to keep this. Here, most of our people who were once enemies of the white man have died and are buried. We have given up our old ways of getting our living and many have their teams, plows, wagons & tools. We do not want our old homes and hunting grounds that are now occupied by whites. Our people know how to work, and all they ask is that they may have their papers for their lands and some of them will want seeds to sow and some tools, harness, teams &c. and then we can live.
    We are glad you are making our mills, so that we can have flour to eat all the time.
    We want schools for our children and we want them all to learn the ways of the white people, and, become Christians. We want you to help us in this.
   

    Coquille Charlie, spoke as follows:
    Harney has told you what he thinks and I think the same as he has told. I have my own team, wagon, plows, harrow and plenty of wheat, oats, apples, potatoes etc.
    I want but little from you as a gift but would like for you to give me a paper for my farm so I will not be afraid the whites will get it away from me. And I would be glad if you would send clothing, and such food as I cannot raise, so that I could work for it, or buy it with wheat and oats.
    I want all my people to work and get independent so that they will not have to beg for anything.
   

    Aleck Ross Chief of the Naltunnetunnes said,
    I will say but little. I am glad you are writing it down to send to the great Chief. The whites at Yaquina say some of our people want to leave Siletz.
    (Addressing his people) How many of you want to go to another country? Is there one man, woman or child? If so, tell us, I want to say to the President that I have not two hearts or two tongues so as to talk two ways. I want to keep my home here and don't want any other home while I live, and my people are all alike. I do not believe you want us to to give up our homes. You have given us our saw mill & the grist mill is now in Corvallis, and I think they are intended for us. I beg you, do not grant the petition of those who would drive us from our homes. I am trying to be a Christian and I believe God will take care of us and let us keep our homes.
   

    Old Arjesse Chief of the Euchres,
    It is hard for me to hear any of my people talk of such things as this you are talking about.
    Most of my people are dead, and buried here, and here I want to die and be buried. I am now an old man and do not expect to live long.
    There are but few of my people now, but we will try to do all the work we can, and want our papers for our homes.
   

    Old John Chief of the Shasta Costas
    Who says I or my people want to leave our homes? I want you to write to President. I want to live and die here. Our younger men are raising hay, grain and gardens, and we have houses, barns and some of us good orchards. Why should we be asked to leave them? I am happy to see the mills being built here so we will soon be able to get all our subsistence here, and not go outside to work. We are happy when we can live at home all the time.
   

    Jack, Chief of the Mikonotunnes,
    When I first came to this country, it was not a good country, there were no houses, barns, orchards, fields, or other improvements. We have helped to make this change, and now we want to keep them. Why has the mill been built? Is it for the whites? I think not. No, I once left my home and came here, and now I want to stay here while I live, and when I die, I want my children to have my home.
   

    Sam
    I go outside to work for subsistence, clothing, horses, wagons &c., not to quit my home. I do not want to be driven away from my home.
   

    William Strong Chief of the Tututnis.
    I have just arrived from the funeral of another of my people. We have been burying them here for 20 yrs. past and want to continue to do so. When we are all dead we want our children to live here. I exchanged the home of my fathers for this when we quit fighting the white soldiers. I am now glad I did so. I cannot go outside and buy land of the white man. I am glad government has given me my home. I want to improve it. Bad white men are always trying to get our land away from us. I wish they would quit going so, as it makes our people unhappy. What our agent is trying to do for us is right, and I hope the President will help him. Our children want to go to school and we want them to go. We want to be Christians all the time. When I was outside some white men wanted me to give up Siletz and come outside and be a citizen. I do not want to do so. I want to educate my children here, and let them be citizens when they can get homes like the whites. Now we have a good school house, and hope we may soon have it made larger and filled with our children with Brother Royal as our teacher. We have many good Christians, and I hope soon all our people will become such. And now I want to say to our High Chief at Washington, we do not want to give up our lands.
   

    Joe, Chief of the Klamaths:
    White men want to take our homes from us. I told Mr. Fairchild I did not want them to talk that way. The white people of Oregon did not give the lands to us. We exchanged our fathers' lands with the Great Chief of the white men for this home, and now we have lived here more than twenty years.
    I am ready to do what the Great Chief tells me, but I don't want to leave my home. My people all want to live and die here, I don't care what the Oregon whites say about getting our land and driving us to another place if the Great Chief will not hear them.
    He was followed by Coquille Jim, Evans Bill, 
Naltunnetunne Captain, Ben Harding, Old Klamath John, Long Prairie Charley, Mister Charley, Jim Meacham, Jerry Cass & others, when George Harney Head Chief arose and very eloquently urged his people to work to improve their places, and thus convince the President of their determination to be civilized.
    He reviewed the past, showing them how different their circumstances are now from what they were when they were dressed in skins and many of them were entirely naked.
    Now they were clothed, most of them were in their right mind, and he hoped they would all soon see that it was best to send their children to school and church where they might improve faster than they had ever done before.
    His speech is too long to copy.
    The Council then discussed the best plans for the completion of the mills, harvesting the crops, improving the road etc. etc.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876-77.  Not dated, but stamped as received in Washington August 23, 1876.



Portland Oregon
    August 29th 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
Sir:
    After an apology to you for this intrusion, I will say, entertaining as I always have a deep feeling of interest in the success of the Indian service, I would most respectfully suggest the consolidation of the Siletz and Alsea Indians reservations at the mouth of Salmon River, such of them, at least who are incompetent to become citizens or unable to support themselves--without aid from the general government, and place them under the control of the agent at Grand Ronde, and those of them that are eligible to citizenship or are self-sustaining should be given homesteads where they are if they desire. And I am satisfied a large number of them would take the benefit of this proposition, and also that they are fully capable of taking care of themselves. I am aware, however, that this proposition would meet with some opposition from the church now having the religious care of these reservations referred to, as they are under the control of the M.E. Church, and the Grand Ronde under the Catholic. There is already a contention going on between these denominations as to who shall control the few Nestucca Indians, now located at the mouth of Salmon River. I have frequently been called upon by both parties to make statements as to what was promised the Nestuccas in the late treaty made with them prior to their removal, the substance of which I give here before proceeding further with the proposition of consolidation.
    By reference to my instructions from the Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs, it will be seen that I was instructed in negotiating a treaty with these Indians to procure their consent to removal to the mouth of Salmon River, which is on the Siletz Reservation, or to the Grand Ronde Agency. But it was particularly desired that they should be located at the mouth of Salmon River. They were informed by me of the facts set forth in my instructions; some of them suggested that they would prefer going to Grand Ronde. This the Agent Mr. Sinnott, who was present at the council with me, informed them that this was impracticable, as there were no vacant lands on the reservation suitable for them for settlement. The question of schools was then raised, and I informed them that if they went to the mouth of Salmon River that a good school would be provided for them there out of the fund for schools provided for Siletz Reservation, and they were further informed by Mr. Folger, Chief Clerk of Agent Sinnott, who was there at the time representing Mr. Sinnott, that if they desired they could send their children to the Catholic school at Grand Ronde, and furthermore he informed them that they would have free access to the Grand Ronde flouring mills, with free passage over the toll road from the mouth of Salmon River to the Grand Ronde Agency. They then wanted to know where they were to settle their local difficulties, which are very frequent. I told them that I would see Agent Fairchild and gain his consent to their referring these matters to the agent at the Grand Ronde if they desired. As it was easier of access, I supposed at the time this arrangement could be made by the mutual consent of the two agents, and it no doubt could have been done without difficulty, were it not for the religious prejudices existing between the two agencies, which I am sorry to say is greatly detrimental to both the Indians and government. An important argument in favor of my proposition of consolidation is that it would do away with two agencies and the expense of their machinery, and the government aid would be greatly facilitated by being concentrated at one place, and owing to the compelled economy of the service I should regard this as a very important item. I am confident the consent of the Indians to this place could be obtained by a proper commissioner being appointed to negotiate with them. And I have no hesitation in saying that it would result greatly to the benefit of both the Indians and government.
    Referring to the proposition of consolidation, I would make the south boundary of the Salmon River Reservation an east and west line, starting at a point on the ocean two miles south of mouth of Siletz River where it empties into the ocean, and from thence a due east course to the eastern boundary of the present Siletz Reservation. You will see by the rough diagram which I forward here with this that it would give for the permanent Salmon River Reservation a distance of eleven miles along the coast, and include for fishing purposes the bays of the two rivers Salmon and Siletz and would also--see diagram--give them some 17 or 18 sections of good open land, the principal portion of which is suitable for cultivation. Trout Lake is a beautiful sheet of pure, clear water, which abounds with excellent fish. At this point should be established a good manual labor school for the benefit of all Indians located on the proposed reservation and should be under the supervision of the Grand Ronde Agency. The distance from the mouth of Salmon River to Grand Ronde Agency is about thirty miles, over which there is a good wagon road.
    Let me say in conclusion that in submitting this letter I do it from the most uninterested motives except for the best interest of all concerned. All of which is most respectfully submitted.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        Ben Simpson
            Late Special Ind. Comr.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Agency
    Toledo, Oregon
        Aug. 29th 1876
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your telegram of the 21st inst., viz:
    Four thousand allowed for fiscal year ending. Telegraph indebtedness incurred since July. Incur no other expense.
    Alsea Agency abolished.  Go down and receive gov. property. Telegraph indebtedness since July first, not including employees.
    The first order was complied with yesterday, and will require some more explanation than could be profitably sent by telegraph. This indebtedness consists of the following claims.
L. S. Shipley--temporarily employed by the day as sawyer to manufacture lumber for bridge &c. $  84.00
H. W. Shipley help to raise bridge as per contract, est. 100.00
Stanton Graham and Mackey for labor delivering saw logs to mill, delivering timbers and lumber to bridge and getting out and delivering cords for bridge 378.00
Byron Brundage temporarily employed as engineer and as carpenter in Dept. shop 136.00
M. Stanton freight on mill and supplies, weight not all in, estimated 137.64
R. Hamlin freight on flour 26.66
W. Chambers supplies, bills rendered 264.70
S. H. Thomson supplies, bills not rendered, est. 23.00
H. W. Shipley amt. due and to become due on completion of mill & bridge as through contract   3040.00
Total     $4190.00
    Your second order cannot be complied with except by disobeying the third, as it is not possible to travel without expense; though believing the interest of the Department would be better advanced by compliance of third than second. I have written to Agent Litchfield, who is not at his agency, the contents of your telegram relating to his agency, and requested him to return immediately and turn over the property.
    As soon as he returns I will proceed to Alsea, receive the property and leaving it in charge of an employee of this agency await further instructions from you.
    I herewith transmit a copy of contract with H. W. Shipley for the erection of grist mill and bridge for the Department and respectfully ask you to compare the same with the one on file in your office and inform me of the result. Mr. S. demands of me that I furnish him with laborers to make excavations for bridge and also for moving timbers which will require an outlay of from fifty to one hundred dollars, alleging that the copy of the contract on file in the office is not a true copy of the original, bearing the signatures of himself and Agent Fairchild which I suppose is on file in your office.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



    The Indian shot by Quinn near Fort Klamath died last week.
"Oregon," Eugene City Guard, September 2, 1876, page 2



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Sep. 5th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of August 21st "ult.," marked J.H.S.
    I herewith transmit Report Changes in Employees. Immediately on receipt of your letter I directed H. W. Shipley to stop work on the mill and bridge which he refuses to do, alleging that he has already lost money by failure of Department to comply with their part of the contract and he now proposes to complete the work and demand his pay. Please instruct me as to what further steps I shall take to compel him to stop work and thus fully comply with your instructions in relation to incurring indebtedness. Your instructions in relation to the property of the Dept. at Alsea Agency contained in your telegram of same date will be carried out as soon as I ascertain that Agent Litchfield has returned to his place.
    Grateful for the interest manifested by you in our work and for the very liberal share "of the small appropriation" by Congress that you have allotted this agency, I am
Your obedient servant
    William Bagley
        U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Alsea Agency
    Sept. 12th 1876
Sir
    I herewith acknowledge the receipt of your telegram and letter of Aug. 21st and also blanks for Annual Report &c. At the time of the arrival of the telegram I was absent from the agency on business, which caused the delay of a few days. Prior to being absent I had just recd. your letter of Aug. 3rd stating that all previous orders were rescinded &c. On the 11th inst. Agent Bagley received and receipted for the property at this agency. In my telegram the indebtedness that I gave was from July1st until Sept. 11th $434.00, includes agent's salary and all expenses up to date. I have now been in charge of this agency since June 7th 1873. The first thirteen months that I was in charge I have not recd. my salary or for the expense of carrying on the agency, which up to July 1st 1874 during this time I was special commissary, not agent. The cause was neglect on the part of officers that are ex-officio now, and the effect of which I deeply feel at present as this agency should have had its pro rata of funds for the year and also of the deficiency fund, but it did not get one dollar--but within the last few months some of the vouchers that I certified to for the first month's service have been collected by claim agents, which they get at a discount. I do not feel disposed to favor claim agents if I can avoid it. I have tried to keep my troubles quiet and at the same time keep the Department informed upon the subject. Last year I had arrangements made, provided I could have got the Comr.'s permission to go to Washington to use my influence with my friends in Congress to get the deficiency bill passed and some other matters of importance looked after, but he objected to giving me permission even at my own expense, but there were government officials from Oregon in Washington absent from their offices near six months working against the present policy and trying to settle some of their old defaulting claims, which I understand were settled and ex-Indian agents at that (but not of the present policy). With all the neglect and coldness that I recd. the first year I am a true friend to the present policy and ever expect to be as long as it lasts. And I feel a little proud of my success with these Indians amid all opposition. I feel as though these Indians will compare favorably with any on this coast considering their advantages and upon that line they will excel most for good behavior and have been more neglected in the past than any Indians in Oregon, as you will perceive by reading past reports for years from this agency, and I think that the Siletz agent should have instructions to look after the interests of those that are trying to avail themselves of the privilege of the land law. It will be very difficult for the Indian to hold land with the whites without trouble arising from very slight causes, as there is hardly room for both close together in any state and particularly in Oregon. I have in the past few years sent the amount of indebtedness several times. If a new one is required please inform me and I will forward a list of vouchers without delay, as I am very anxious that the matter shall be fully and clearly placed before Congress at the coming session. It is a matter of great interest to me. Address me in future at Salem, Oregon. Thanking you for your kind letter and the kindness that you have shown me since we have been associated together, I am in hopes whether we ever meet or not that nothing but kind feelings will ever exist between us, and I am in hopes that you will always find me upon the side of justice and defending the weak & downtrodden, whether white, black or red. I have been for years on that line, and I expect never to deviate from the already beaten track whether in civil or political life. As this letter is a sort of a valedictory you will excuse its length. At any time you can feel free to correspond with me upon the interests of the Indian police, and I will gladly give counsel or assist in any way that I can to help the cause to succeed.
Yours respectfully
    Geo. P. Litchfield
        Late Ind. Agent
            Salem
                Oregon
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    U.S. Ind. Comr.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        September 15th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to transmit the following report of my late trip to Alsea Agency for the purpose of receiving the govt. property belonging to that agency. Leaving this place on the 7th inst., on arriving at Newport same evening I learned that Agent Litchfield had not yet returned to the agency. Visited Oneatta and other points, talking with Indians and attending to business connected with this agency, during the 8th Mr. L. arriving in the evening. On the 9th proceeded to the mouth of Alsea, when with considerable difficulty Mr. L.'s team was ferried across and he reached the agency late in the evening, while my team was not ferried until morning. Arrived at the agency before noon. It being Sabbath nothing was done in the way of transferring property until the eleventh. After examining the property belonging to the Department signed receipts in triplicate, and after making arrangements for the transportation of such of it as is movable and not worthless to Yaquina Bay returned to Siletz.
    At mouth of Alsea saw quite a large village with comfortable lumber houses, but not an Indian to be found. At the agency there were two or three Indians. Here also were quite a number of very comfortable houses, but the former occupants were gone. At Yachats is another deserted village. It is very evident that the intentions of government in regard to their removal have been misrepresented to them, and that they did not want to see me. The only two whom I saw on the reservation appeared to be entirely ignorant of the intentions of government. On returning at Yaquina I learned the whereabouts of one of the principal chiefs of the Alseas, and finding him held a short conversation on the subject of removal. Found him also entirely ignorant of the intentions of govt. I informed him that I was about to remove the Dept. property to Siletz, that the Alsea Agency was abolished and that it was your desire that they remove to the Siletz Reservation. He only seemed to dread the prospect of forcible removal, and promised to call his people together in council in one month for a talk with me on the subject. I promised to retain for use of such Indians as would remove to Siletz within a few months such of the property of Alsea Agency as would be of service to them.
    Much of the property transferred is of a very inferior quality, some being entirely worthless, and should have been expended as such. One of the wagons specially will not pay cost of the necessary repairs to make it serviceable.
    I respectfully ask instructions as to what disposition shall be made of the flatboat and such other property as is not worth the expense of moving.
    Owing to the perishable condition of the improvements on the agency farm I think it would be a saving of expense to the Department should the Hon. Secretary of the Interior order the sale of the same as soon as practicable, thus avoiding the expense of an employee to take care of it.
    I think at least four hundred acres should be sold with the improvements.
    I herewith transmit a list of the property received.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
    List of Indian Department property transferred by Geo. P. Litchfield, Special U.S. Indian Agent, to William Bagley, U.S. Indian Agent, Sep. 11th 1876.
Quan. Dis. Quan. Dis. Quan. Dis.
1 No. Anvil 1 No. Dictionary, Web. 1 No. Press, letter
1 No. Ax, broad 1 No. Dividers 1 No. Pail, deck
1 No. Ax, hand 1 No. Eraser, pencil 1 Pr. Pincers, shoeing
3 No. Augers, C.S. 2 No. Eraser, ink 3 No. Planes
17   No. Books, misc. 400     No. Envelopes, large 1 No. Plow, breaking
1 No. Books, record 2 No. Folders, paper 1 No. Plow, steel
1 No. Books, copying 1 No. File, letter 1 No. Plow, Moline
1 No. Bellows, smith 1 No. Flag 1 No. Pot, marking
1 No. Brand, I.D. 2 No. Forks, manure 1 No. Punch
1 No. Brace & bit 1 No. Grindstone 2 No. Rakes, hay
1 Set Bits, auger 1 No. Gauge 1 No. Revolver
1 No. Brush, W.W. 1 No. Hammer, B.S. 1 No. Ruler
2 No. Brush, paint 1 No. Hammer, sledge 1 No. Ruler, 4 fold
8 No. Bows, ox 1 No. Hammer, nail 1 No. Scale, letter
1 No. Bell, ox 4 No. Horses 30   Lbs. Steel
1 No. Boat, flat 2 No. Harrows 2 No. Swedges
1 No. Bull 2 Set Harness, wagon 2 No. Saws, hand
20   Lbs. Blue vitriol 1 No. Hoe, garden 1 No. Shave, spoke
4 No. Chairs, office 1 No. Knife, 2 y. old 1 No. Stone, oil
1 No. Clip, letter 2 No. Ink stands 1 No. Screw, bench
175     No. Contracts, blank 30   Lbs. Iron, asstd. 1 No. Saw, keyhole
1 No. Case, paper 30   Lbs. Iron, Norway 21   No. Sash, window
3 No. Chisels, mortise 1 No. Knife, farrier's 6 No. Stones, scythe
1 No. Chisels, socket 1 No. Lamp 1 No. Shovel, grain
1 No. Compasses 1 No. Level, spirit 1 No. Saw, C.C.
5 No. Chains, ox 1 No. Map 1 No. Sprinkler
1 Pr. Cuffs, hand 1 No. Mirror 6 No. Sacks, grain
7 No. Cutter, straw 1 No. Mule 1 No. Stove, cook
2 No. Cradles, grain 1 No. Mattock 1 No. Stove, office
5 No. Cows, milk 6 No. Oxen, work 1 No. Screw plate
1 No. Scale, platform Remarks
6 No. Scythe & snath The following named articles of the foregoing
2 No. Spades, L.H. list are not worth the cost of transportation to
1 No. Tongs this agency
1 No. Tape measure Quan. Dis.
400   No. Vouchers, blank 1 No. Broad ax
1 No. Vise 1 No. Brand, I.D.
1 No. Weight, paper 1 No. Boat, flat
3 No. Wagons 2 No. Chairs, office
1 No. Wrench, monkey 1 No. Case, paper
1 No. Weights & scales 1 No. Lamp
6 No. Yearlings 1 No. Mattock
6 No. Yokes, ox 1 No. Plow, breaking
1 No. Wagon, entirely worthless
1 No. Wagon, ox, hardly worth repairing
William Bagley
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Fort Klamath, Oregon
    22nd Sept. 1876.
L. S. Dyar Esq.
    U.S. Ind. Agent
        Klamath, Oregon
            Dr. Sir:
                Your enclosed "Circular Letter to Indian Agents" containing instructions regarding Indian traders is received. I had about decided before its receipt not to ask for reappointment as your trader, the business being so small that it will barely pay the hire of an additional clerk at the agency store. Those of your Indians, however, as are fit to come here and trade with me can purchase their goods as they always have done at the same prices which their white neighbors pay; in fact, I find them quite as competent to "drive a good bargain" as any of my customers. They are equally shrewd in regard to the value of the furs and skins they have to dispose of and owing to the many varieties, qualities and conditions of such goods, as well as the merchandise which I am selling, I hold that my own judgment from personal observation and experience is better than any other persons can be from a report. The same cause would make it a very difficult and perplexing task indeed to make out such lists as the Commissioner requires, and should such a report cause him to lower my prices, I could not sell my goods, while if the result would be higher prices on them, the Indians would not buy them, as in either case I would have had my tedious and expensive task for nothing.
    If I could carry on my business here, in connection with my other, I should feel grateful for the trade, but as I understand the existing laws from the Commissioner's letter, I must respectfully decline to be an aspirant for reappointment.
Very respectfully
    Your obdt. servant
        Jay Beach
            Ft. Klamath
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.


Portland, Oregon
    Sep. 28th 1876.
Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington, D.C.
Dear Sir,
    I beg leave to call your attention to the condition of the Indians at Salmon River, in Tillamook County, Oregon.
    These Indians include the Nestucca Indians, moved from the Nestucca River (nine miles north of Salmon River) to the Salmon River last year, when the land north of Salmon River was thrown open to settlement.
    The Indians prior to their removal to Salmon River were promised by Commissioner B. Simpson that he would use his influence that they should be placed under the Grand Ronde jurisdiction, and this promise was exacted by them as a condition precedent to their going. They were also promised by the commissioner lumber sufficient to build a few small houses and wagons and plows--none of which have been furnished them. The Salmon River Indians are living directly west of the Grand Ronde Agency. There is a wagon road from the agency to the mouth of the river, and the Indians in five or six hours at all seasons of the year can pass to and from the agency, and the request that they make to be placed under the Grand Ronde jurisdiction is eminently practical and desirable. At present they are attached to the Siletz Agency. There is no communication except by a trail. The journey requires two days, and in the winter is considered, even by the Indians, at times dangerous.
    I very respectfully recommend that a change be made placing them under the Grand Ronde jurisdiction. This plan meets with the hearty approval of Mr. Sinnott, the agent at Grand Ronde, and of all the settlers in and around them. I would respectfully request that instructions be given to Mr. Sinnott, agent at the Grand Ronde, giving him permission to furnish such lumber as he may see fit from the mill at Grand Ronde to the Salmon River Indians to build their winter shelter. With this permission and leaving them under his jurisdiction the agent at Grand Ronde will be able to prevent much actual suffering among them until such time as a suitable appropriation shall be made to meet their wants.
I remain very respectfully
    Yours
        John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



THE WESTERN UNION TELEGRAPH COMPANY
Portland, Oregon
    Sept. 30, 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Wash. City
Are there any funds old or new appropriations can be applied construction of mill Siletz if so how much answer
John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office Grand Ronde
    Agency Oregon
        Oct. 2, 1876
Sir,
    In discharging my employees I cannot in justice to the Indians refrain from remonstrating against the wrong done them and the service, as I am confident that unless I can be permitted to employ two persons, one to run the grist mill and saw mill, and another to instruct the Indians in their farming operations, to repair tools, machinery &c. and to do office duty during my necessary absence, the efficiency of the service will be so crippled and the Indians become so discouraged that the good work, well begun, will be entirely lost and the Indians wander away from their homes and by becoming so disheartened entirely relinquish their agricultural pursuits and permit their farms to become waste and desolate.
    I earnestly ask that if not an absolute impossibility I be furnished from the appropriation for contingencies of the Indian service &c., page 3 of "Appropriations," at least two two thousand dollars for employees as above and five hundred dollars to enable me to make some very necessary repairs of agency buildings, and if with this I can secure a small sum to purchase food for the old and helpless and crippled among the Indians, I can keep the Indians from suffering during the present year and prevent their deserting their homes.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. sert.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Ind. Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Portland, Oregon
    Oct. 3rd 1876.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Sir,
    I have this day received from Hon. Benj. Simpson, U.S. Surveyor General of the State of Oregon, and late special commissioner to confer with the Alsea and Nestucca Indians, a copy of his letter of August 29th last, addressed to you in relation to the removal of the scattered bands of Siletz and Alsea Indians to the unoccupied lands lying along the coast between the Siletz and Salmon River and within the boundaries of the present Coast Indian Reservation.
    In General Simpson's recommendation I most heartily concur--believing as I do that it would be to the interest of the government and the Indians, and that it would open to settlement a large unoccupied portion of the present Siletz Reservation, and it would place those Indians that are dependent upon the government for support where they could be much more benefited by government aid.
    I presume from the best information I can get that the whole number proposed to be consolidated would not exceed six hundred souls--principally Indians who live on fish, and wild game. I would most respectfully urge speedy action upon the subject, as it is altogether important if accomplished at all that it should be done before the meeting of Congress so that an appropriation could be made to carry out the plan of consolidation without unnecessary expense.
    As General Simpson has had a long experience in the Indian service, and having had charge of the Siletz Indians for eight years, I would suggest his appointment as one of the commissioners to negotiate with the Indians referred to, and for the other two I would suggest Major W. H. Boyle of the U.S. army, and Mr. Bagley, the Indian agent now in charge of the Siletz Indian Agency. In view of what I have before stated I am sure I cannot too strongly urge immediate attention and action upon the subject. Even though congressional action be required to define the boundaries of the new reservation, I earnestly urge that this commission be appointed with instructions to obtain the consent of the Indians to this arrangement. The expense will be trifling and it is a matter of great importance both to the Indians and the whites. The report of the commission, all of whom are here, would furnish a proper basis for congressional action, and as no inspector is here I earnestly ask that this course may be adopted.
Very respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Alsea Indian Reservation.
    PORTLAND, October 3.--The Alsea Indian Reservation has been abandoned. Mr. Litchfield, who was agent there some years, turned over yesterday all the government property to the Siletz Agency. The Alsea Reservation is now thrown open to settlement. Quite a number of squatters are already there, and many of the more civilized Indians have located claims.
San Francisco Chronicle, October 4, 1876, page 3



Klamath Agency, Or.
    Oct. 7, 1876
Sir
    In a letter dated May 20, 1876 I represented to you that the articles of subsistence for the Ind. boarding school at this agency would be expended by the 30th of June, and asked for instructions in the matter.
    In your reply dated June 6th--G.W.S.--you instructed me to forward a quarterly estimate of the articles needed with the assurance that, after the funds should be provided by appropriation, action would be had thereon, and the result communicated to me by letter.
    In accordance with these instructions, on June 29th I forwarded to you such estimate, but thus far have not been advised of any action in the case.
    I have reduced the No. of scholars by one half, and have--since learning of the passage of the appropriation act--purchased some flour. I was forced to do this or discontinue the school, and this would, just at this time, be seriously detrimental to the best interests of the service.
    I hope that before this reaches you some action will have been taken in the matter, but I shall await anxiously your instructions, and in the meantime will make small purchases of subsistence, such as the urgency of the case absolutely demands.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Office of
Custodian U.S. Custom House, Post Office, Etc.
Portland, Oregon
    Oct. 10th 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Dear Sir
            The contractor for building the grist mill at Siletz Agency, Oregon (Mr. H. W. Shipley) has been notified by Agent Bagley to suspend work. He, Shipley, is willing to go on at his own expense and finish the mill, which he can do in thirty days--provided that Agent Bagley is instructed to issue to him certified vouchers for the amount due him and to become due him under his control when mill is completed. I earnestly urge that this be done as the Indians, many of them, have wheat to grind, and it is absolutely essential that it will be completed this fall. I hope the Agent Bagley will be instructed to permit Mr. Shipley to go on and complete the mill now, so nearly completed, and that he issue vouchers to Mr. Shipley for amt. then due him.
Very respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
        U.S.S.
P.S. Please send Mr. Shipley a copy of the letter of instructions to Mr. Agent Bagley.
Respy.
    John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Linkville, Oregon
    Oct. 15th 1876
Hon. L. S. Dyar
    U.S. Ind. Agt.
Klamath Agency, Ogn.
    "Dear Sir,"
        I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your communication of the 10th ult. with copy of letter from Indian Commissioner J. Q. Smith, inviting proposals to trade with the Indians of your agency, and I have noted the contents of the same.
    We have the honor to transmit herewith a list of articles usually kept in a country store, embracing Dry Goods, Groceries, Clothing, Boots and Shoes, etc., etc., all of which are more or less used by the Indians of your agency.
    The cost price of goods which we have annexed is in San Francisco invoices, and at coin rates. We are about five hundred miles from the railroad, and the lowest estimate that can be placed upon the cost of our freight is five cents per lb. coin. We wish to realize 25% of profit on our goods.
We are
    Very truly yours
        Nurse and Thatcher
Dry Goods
    Prints cost per yard   6½
Bleached Muslin cost per yard 10½ to 12½  cts.
Unbleached Muslin cost per yard   8½ to 10    cts.
Canton Flannel cost per yard 15    to 21    cts.
Crash cost per yard 10    to 15    cts.
Ducking cost per yard              22½  cts.
Denims cost per yard              20     cts.
Waterford Cassimere cost per yard              85     cts.
[illegible] Cassimere cost per yard            115     cts.
Cottonade cost per yard 27    to 30     cts.
Check Flannel cost per yard              37½  cts.
Grey Flannel cost per yard              40     cts.
Medicated Flannel cost per yard              55     cts.
Scarlet Flannel cost per yard              37½  cts.
Nankeen Checks cost per yard              18     cts.
Groceries
Golden C. Sugar cost per lb.              11¼  cts.
Common Brown Sugar cost per lb. 9 to 10½  cts.
Crushed Sugar cost per lb. 12½  cts.
Crushed Cube Sugar cost per lb. 12¼  cts.
Tea cost per lb. 47½ to 60     cts.
Costa Rica Coffee cost per lb. 21½  cts.
Rice cost per lb. 5.90 to 7     cts.
Cream Tartar cost per lb. 32½ to 35     cts.
Soda and Saleratus, good brand 9    cts.
Candles 14 to 16¾  cts.
Tobacco 55 to 90    cts.
Syrup per gallon 70    cts.
Crackers cost pre lb. 7 to 9½  cts.
Soap, Bar, for ½ box (18-lb. box) 85 to 90    cts.
Castile Soap 12½ to 19    cts.
Salt 5-lb. sacks 6    cts.
Salt 10-lb. sacks 10    cts.
Dairy [Salt], sacks $18.00 per M $18.00
Clothing
Cassimere Overshirts $13.50 to $27 per doz.
Cotton Plaid Shirts $10 per doz.
Brown Linen Shirts $15 per doz.
Blouses $7 to $9.50 per doz.
Overalls $8.50 to $9.50 per doz.
Flannel Und. Shts. & Drawers $9 to $32100 per doz.
Vests, Cassimere 2½ to $4 apiece
Coats $7.50 to $13.50 apiece
Pants, Cotton $1 to $2
Pants, Cassimere & Union $3.50 to $5.50
Boots & Shoes
Heavy Double Sole Slaughter Boots, per pair $4.50
Heavy Double Sole Roper Boots, per pair $4.00
Calf Boots 5.25 to $6.00
Men's Brogans $1.62 ½
Wom. Brogans $1.50
Men's Calf, California make $1.62 ½
Boy's & Misses' sizes, heavy 87½ to $1.50
Miscellaneous
Powder per lb. 45 to 60  cts.
Lead per lb.  cts
Caps per box 10  cts. per piece
State of Oregon   )
County of Lake    )  ss.
    Personally appeared before me the undersigned, a justice of the peace in and for the above county and state, Nurse and Thatcher, who being duly sworn by me state that the figures as given above are taken from San Francisco invoices representing the first cost of goods there, and that the figures are correct in every particular.
Nurse and Thatcher
Subscribed and sworn before me
the 14th day of October 1876
J. W. Hamakar [sic--J. W. Hamaker]
    J.P.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    Oregon, Oct. 26th 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    U.S. Indian Commissioner
        Washington, D.C.
Sir:
    I would respectfully call your attention to the probable suffering among the old, blind and infirm Indians of this agency during the coming winter. We have at this agency about one hundred very old Indian men and women, utterly unable to provide for themselves, and mostly blind. Hitherto we have been able to assist these old people by issues of food. The crops this fall have proved a comparative failure--not yielding half an average crop--this renders the young men less willing than ever to assist the old, and they have never rendered them much aid. I have already, daily, urgent appeals for assistance, and then old Indians declare that unless the government renders them some assistance this winter, they will starve, and I am myself fearful of the consequence should we be unable to afford them any help.
    Under these circumstances I feel it my imperative duty to urge the Department to furnish me with the means of keeping these old people from starvation, and I would say that with the sum of one thousand dollars the greater part of this distress could be averted.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.  Attached to this letter was a note: "Cannot anything be done to help Sinnott's old Indians. [signed] J.Q.S."  An unknown hand wrote below it: "No."




Office Siletz Ind. Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or.
        Oct. 30th 1876
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letters of the 14th inst., marked "L" and enclosing copy of a letter from Hon. Ben. Simpson bearing date Portland, Oregon, August 29th relative to the consolidation of the Alsea and Siletz agencies with the Grand Ronde, and instructing me to report thereon at an early day.
    In reply I would say the proposition seems too unreasonable to have been penned by Hon. Benjamin Simpson. I respectfully call your attention to some extracts from his annual reports while agent for the Indians on this reservation.
    1st. Report of the Hon. Commissioner Ind. Affs. for 1863, page 67. "I desire further most earnestly to call the attention of the Department to the necessity of confirming the treaties formerly made with these Indians. This would have a tendency to satisfy the Indians, and I am certain would be a great savings to government. From the isolated position of the farming portion of this reservation it would not be settled by whites even if thrown open for their occupation; therefore I think it could be disposed of more profitably by giving it to the Indians. There are other reasons why it should be set apart as a permanent reservation. It is a great distance from the white settlements; the surrounding mountains abound in game, and the rivers teem with fish.
    "As the harbor at the mouth of this bay (Yaquina) is a good one with an entrance easy of access, and safe, it might at some future day become very valuable. Therefore in case the Indians are permanently located here would recommend that the right of way be retained from the bay to the head of navigation on the river, such right being, however, so guarded by law as to prevent all encroachments of the whites upon the rights of the Indians."
    Again, page 104 of Comr.'s Report for 1864. "I, again, desire through you to call the attention of the Department to the necessity of confirming the treaties made with these Indians. * * * They have waited anxiously for ten years for the fulfillment of the promises made to them when they surrendered their lands to the United States &c."
    The treaties here referred to by Mr. Simpson as not confirmed guaranteed to the Indians their permanent occupation of this reservation, and they were to be left undisturbed by white settlers.
    By reference to the report of 1865, pg. 492, you will see that for reasons stated, he recommends that the Indians occupying that portion of the reservation lying on Yaquina Bay be north of the Siletz River and establishing the south line of the reservation between the waters of the Siletz River and Yaquina Bay, earnestly asking for the allotment of lands.
    In his eighth and last annual report written at Oneatta, Yaquina Bay (the site of his mills) Aug. 1st 1871, five months after the expiration of his term of office as agent, he complains bitterly of the treatment these Indians have received from government, and suggests some changes. I respectfully ask your careful perusal of his report, which may be found on page 315, Report of Commissioner Ind. Affs. for 1871.
    Now the same arguments as those used by Mr. S. in reference to the matter of the permanent occupation of these lands by the Indians, and against the encroachments of the whites upon their rights to the same, hold good today. On the south and east the same mountain ranges are seen as in 1871.
    On the north more than one hundred and fifty thousand acres of the reservation has been given to the whites. The treaties made with them have not been ratified, and it is safe to say they never will be.
    There is sufficient good agricultural land on the reservation as it now stands to give each able-bodied Indian a home, and when this is done there will be little if any good land left.
    There are belonging to this reservation (including those formerly belonging to the Alsea Agency) between 1300 and 1400 Indians. One hundred of these are sufficiently advanced in civilization to become citizens and take the benefit of the homestead law, and who might be persuaded to do so.
    Would Mr. Simpson drive all the others to this small proposed reservation and subsist them at government expense or compel them to return to their old mode of getting their subsistence from the mountains, rivers or ocean?
    For many years agents have been laboring among them to teach them to work the land on which they live and thus obtain their living, and they have learned to live on the same kind of food as the white man.
    Would it not be cruelty in the extreme to now place them in a condition in which they could not possibly by any means obtain the food they have now learned to use, and where they could not be benefited by the mills (now almost completed) for which they have so long and anxiously expected?
    Many of them have comfortable houses, and all are willing to assist in procuring logs and manufacturing lumber for buildings on the land they justly claim as their own. They have become in reality an agricultural people and now that they are being provided with a flouring mill, would it be right to deprive them of the benefit now, once obtained?
    But since it is his desire to cut down the reservation and subsist the Indian at government expense, why does he place the south line where he does? viz--"Two miles south of the Siletz River."
    Should the boundaries be thus established and the new reservation formed, the cry of the settlers in the Siletz Valley would be "We must have the mouth of the river for an outlet for surplus produce." Why does he not at once propose to have the south line of reservation two miles north of Siletz River at the mouth, as in either case the reservation would be entirely too small for the actual necessities of the Indians.
    Now as to the consolidation of the three agencies, I have to address that it would be a saving to government, as it would do away with the machinery of one more ( as the Alsea is already abolished). But why does he not propose to bring the agency machinery all here? Let us compare the standing of the two agencies and see to which the Indians are best prepared to take care of themselves. Commissioner's Report for 1875, pg. 116--There are at Grand Ronde Agency 743 Indians, 682 of whom are church members. 93 can read. They all wear citizens' cress. They have 375 homes, and on pg. 130 I see there are on the reservation 4,000 acres of tillable land, 3900 acres of which was tilled by the Indians and only 100 by government. The Indians own 650 horses, 5 mules, 100 cattle, 100 swine. Raised by Indians during the year 600 bushels wheat, 2500 bushels oats and 700 bushels vegetables. They also sold during the year 2000 dollars worth of furs &c.
    From the same Report, page 116, there are at Siletz and Alsea agencies 1325 Indians, of whom 40 are church members, 36 can read, 1175 wear citizens' dress. No. of houses at Alsea 55, No. at Siletz not given.
    Again referring to page 130 there were cultivated by Indians 610 acres. They own 220 horses, 8 mules, 80 cattle raised during the year, 2736 bushels wheat, 15000 bushels oats and 4000 bushels vegetables.
    While I would not now recommend the discontinuance of either agency, I believe that in justice to the Indians, the Siletz Reservation should not be denominated in size until after every male Indian over 18 years of age be secured in the possession of a home, and at least a majority of them are capable of becoming citizens.
    In a former communication I stated that between Grand Ronde Agency and the mouth of Salmon River the mountains would not soon be settled, and I know of no place in the state where the Indians could find a sufficient quantity of land to furnish them with homes where they would be separated from the whites.
    As soon as a majority of the adult males belonging to the reservation are prepared to become citizens, I would be glad to see the agency abolished and the Indians thrown upon their own resources. The mills, now being finished, soon will when completed go far towards making the agency self-sustaining, provided that if such Indians as are now capable of managing a farm could be provided with tools, seed, &c. for the first crop after the land is allotted them in severalty.
    Some of them should also be furnished with teams.
    In relation to the establishment of a school at Trout Lake, I agree with Mr. Simpson that this should be done, though I would recommend a day [school] in preference to a manual labor school, the school to be presided over by an earnest Christian who is capable of instructing them in agriculture &c. and who in intercourse with them would inculcate the principles of Christianity as taught in the Bible, and whose example would correspond with their profession. He should with his family reside in the immediate vicinity of the school.
    In relation to the subject of the supervision over the Nestucca Indians, I see no room for contention. According to Mr. Simpson's own statement, they were informed by the agency at Grand Ronde that it was impracticable for them to remove to that agency, and in consequence of this fact chose to come to this. And as to the matters of sending their children to the school at Grand Ronde, I would say that so long as this agency is without funds for the support o a school at or near the mouth of Salmon River, I could not reasonably interpose any objection to their sending their children to Grand Ronde school, and as to the settlement of their disputes--if it had been their desire to go to Grand Ronde for this purpose and Agent Sinnott was willing to perform such an unpleasant work I should have been very much pleased with it. In a former communication of date April 30th I gave you my reasons why this reservation should remain under the supervision of one agent, which I will here copy in part. "The Coast Range of mountains, which will not be occupied either by whites or Indians, lies between the Grand Ronde Agency and the mouth of Salmon River, and though connection of the two points in summer is perfect, it is broken by high water in winter and would require a heavy outlay to make it even possible during a great part of the rainy season.
    "There are now settlements of Indians for a distance of about ten miles up the Siletz Valley above this agency and this may be a connected settlement from that point to the mouth of the river, thence north along the coast to the mouth of Salmon River, again south of Siletz along the coast to the south line of [the] reservation there is room for many Indian homes.
    "The Siletz Reservation is isolated from the white settlements, being separated from them by high ranges of mountains that will not be occupied for twenty years and, if ever, very sparsely settled."
    Now in conclusion I would respectfully urge you in behalf of the best interests of the Indians and of the Department to have the matters thoroughly investigated by disinterested persons who may be selected for the purpose, before recommending any action looking to the immediate opening to settlement any part of the reservation as it now stands. Should it be deemed expedient to appoint commissioners for this purpose I respectfully ask that they may be selected from some denomination of Christians other than M.E. or Catholic.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Oregon Cir. W.B.H.
Depart. of the Interior
    Office Indian Affairs
        Nov. 1876
The Honorable
    The Secretary of the Interior
        Sir
            I have the honor to submit herewith copy of a letter from Hon. John H. Mitchell, dated Sept. 28th ultimo, relative to certain Indians now at Salmon River, who were removed last year from the Nestucca River, then that land north of the former river was thrown open for settlement.
    The Indians referred to, numbering about 200, are embraced in the Siletz Agency, and the proposition is made to have them brought under the charge of the agent for the Grand Ronde Agency. The reasons therefore are that they are located much nearer the Grand Ronde than to the Siletz Agency, which from that there is a good road from the mouth of Salmon River to Grand Ronde, and that in all seasons the journey can be made by the Indians from their homes to the Grand Ronde Agency in five or six or eight hours, while on the other hand they have no way of communication with the Siletz Agency except by a trail, and to accomplish the journey requires two days; moreover their removal from north of the Salmon to their present home, made necessary by the opening of that portion of the country for settlement, was conditioned that they should be included under the Grand Ronde Agency.
[unsigned]
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.  Apparently a first draft.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    November 6th 1876
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of a communication, dated "Washington Oct. 14th 1876," and marked "L," enclosing a copy of a letter from Gen. Benj. Simpson (dated "Portland, Oregon Aug. 29th 1876" and relating to the consolidation of the Indians belonging to the Alsea and Siletz reservations with those of Grand Ronde) and calling for a report of my views thereon.
    My views on this subject have already been, in a measure, made known to the Department in a letter to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, dated Nov. 14th 1874, but on receipt of your communication and copy of Gen. Simpson's letter I have given this matter my most thorough attention, and after mature deliberation am fully prepared to endorse the views of Gen. Simpson relative to the consolidation and boundary lines of the proposed addition to the Grand Ronde Reservation.
    This change will give a sufficiency of good, arable land for apportionment to the Indians of the Alsea and Siletz reservations, and a fine grazing range for their stock, and will secure to them a most valuable fishing ground on the coast or western boundary.
    The consolidation of the three agencies will also prove a great economy to the government.
    At present the Siletz Reservation is divided by a rugged spur of the Coast Range of mountains, running east from the mouth of the Siletz River, and completely cutting off the buildings of the Siletz Agency from the land now proposed to be retained for the benefit of the Indians. This spur of mountains is densely timbered, covered with a thick undergrowth, and exceedingly broken and rugged, and impassable even for a horseman. The Indians located north of Siletz River have to ascend the Siletz River in canoes, about 40 miles, to reach the Siletz Agency, and at certain periods of the year even this mode of travel is altogether impracticable. On the other hand there is a wagon road--traveled by white people every summer, who visit the seaside--from the coast between Salmon and Siletz river to the Grand Ronde Agency, a horseman being able to make the trip in a few hours.
    An important advantage to be driven from this consolidation would be the fact that by the change, and the adoption of the boundary lines proposed by General Simpson, the Indians on the consolidated reserve would be almost completely cut off from communication with white settlers, except on the eastern boundary of the present Grand Ronde Reservation, and the Indians in order to leave the reservation would be almost necessitated to pass through the Grand Ronde Agency, and thus be held continually under the eye of their agent. This, in my judgment, will be of great advantage to the moral and social progress of the Indians, as there are always many whites who, when settlement is practicable on the boundaries of an Indian reservation, locate there for purposes working great injury to the advancement of the Indian race.
    Further the Indians on the Grand Ronde reserve will hail the consolidation with joy, as they are intermarried and very friendly with the Indians on both the Siletz and Alsea reservations, and by the consolidation communication with their relatives and friends will be rendered far more easy.
    As to the Alsea and Siletz Indians, I do not consider that there will be any difficulty in obtaining their ready consent to the proposed change, for many of the Alsea Indians have expressed a strong desire to be associated with this agency, and have voluntarily stated to me that they were willing to place themselves under the control of this agency whenever desired to come, and some of the Siletz Indians have also intimated a wish to be nearer to their friends on this reservation. As an illustration of this feeling: I had to send our Indian sheriff last winter to drive between twenty-five and thirty Indians belonging to the Siletz Agency off of the Grand Ronde reserve and compel them to go home.
    It may be in place here to remark that the Indians on the Grand Ronde reserve have formed a local government of their own, making their own laws and electing their own representative and executive officers, which laws are most rigidly enforced, and doubtless should the proposed consolidation be consummated they would induce the other Indians to join with them in this matter, and thus teach them one of the most important lessons they can receive, viz: that of self-government.
    All of which is respectfully submitted, by
Your obedient servant
    P. B. Sinnott
        U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.  A typewriter copy of the letter is also on the reel, along with maps of the mouths of Salmon and Siletz rivers.



THE TERRENCE QUINN CASE.
    Yesterday the United States grand jury, now in session, had under investigation the case of Terrence Quinn, which defendant was charged with having shot an Indian last summer near Klamath Reservation, during an altercation, from the effects of which he subsequently died. After an investigation--full and complete--the grand jury returned not a true bill. Mr. Quinn was at once released from custody and his bondsmen exonerated. The circumstances of the shooting of the Indian are substantially and briefly as follows.
    On the 15th of last May, Mr. Quinn left Colusa County, California, with about 1,200 head of mutton sheep. His destination was the John Day country, in Eastern Oregon. A herder accompanied Mr. Quinn who assisted in driving the sheep, and likewise did the cooking. Mr. Quinn also had a team and wagon in which the provisions and camping outfit were conveyed. As the weather was warm they traveled by slow marches, and did not reach the Klamath Lake country until July. One day after reaching the country included within the limits of the Indian reservation, Mr. Quinn and his herder were overtaken by two Indians, who were on horseback. They volunteered their services and assisted in driving the sheep for some distance. These Indians had a dog with them which worried the sheep very much by running among the band and scattering them. The dog proved to be a great annoyance, but at length Mr. Quinn managed to get rid of the two Indians and the cur. When Mr. Quinn camped on the evening of that day, these two Indians came up and demanded half a dollar each for the services they had rendered him in driving the sheep. Quinn declined to pay them, saying that he had never asked them to work for him; that their services were unsolicited, and that they had done more harm than good. The Indians then got into the wagon and began to ransack the contents. Quinn then told them to clear out and leave the camp. Very reluctantly they went away, making threats that they would be revenged. One of them soon came back, accompanied by a young Indian named Sam May, who had the reputation of being a regular bully about the reservation. May was very abusive, and made many hostile demonstrations toward Quinn and the herder. Among other things he began to beat the mules, which were hobbled and feeding near the camp, and tried to run them off. He also tried to bully Quinn and the herder by making threats. Quinn repeatedly told May to leave the camp, as he did not wish to have any trouble with him. After bullying around for some time, May and his comrade went away. Early the next morning, while Quinn and the herder were making preparations to renew their journey, May came up and commenced the quarrel. He was armed with a large butcher knife, which he drew and began to brandish about, calling Quinn opprobrious epithets, and advancing toward him at the same time. Quinn told him to go away, that he wanted to have no trouble with him. He slowly retreated, followed by the infuriated Indian, who seemed determined to have blood. Finding that a fight could not be avoided, Quinn drew a small pocket pistol, having only a single barrel, and cocked it, still slowly retreating. No sooner did May observe the weapon than he made a lunge forward, intending to drive the knife through Quinn. Just as May sprung forward the pistol was discharged, partially by accident, as Quinn says, as in stepping back one of his feet caught, and in the excitement his finger touched the trigger. The ball took effect in the side of the head just back of the ear, severing a small artery. From the effects of this wound May died 22 days afterward. After shooting the Indian, Quinn mounted one of his mules, rode directly to Fort Klamath, and surrendered himself into the hands of the authorities. He was committed on the charge of assault with a dangerous weapon, but before the examination came off May died, and he was held to answer the charge of manslaughter.
    Mr. Quinn is strongly of the opinion that May would have lived had he received proper surgical treatment. Mr. Quinn is an old citizen of this county, having resided here off and on for the last 26 years, and his friends will be gratified to know that he has been honorably acquitted of crime at the hands of the U.S. grand jury, it being clearly a case of justifiable homicide.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, November 16, 1876, page 3



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Nov. 18th 1876
Sir
    I respectfully transmit the following report of the unfortunate destruction of the new bridge lately constructed across Siletz River by H. W. Shipley, contractor, for the benefit of this agency.
    A heavy rain set in on the night of the 5th inst., continuing through the 6th, and until the evening of the 7th the river rising very rapidly during the day, but not sufficiently high to cause any alarm for the safety of the bridge. At about 5 p.m. it was discovered that some driftwood was coming down the river. At about 6:30 the bridge was examined and appeared to be perfectly secure, all the driftwood passing clear of the supports, and the surface of the water being at least ten feet below the timbers supporting the floor. At about half past nine p.m. a crash was heard, and the Indians living nearest the bridge hurried to the spot and found the same gone, though at this time the water had not reached the floor by at least eight feet. I confess to being unable to say what was the immediate cause of its fall. The portions gone are the main span, 84 feet in length, both main supports and one bent with all that rested on them, something over 140 feet.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.




Jacksonville Oregon
    Nov. 22, 1876
W. H. Bell Esq., Capt. & C.S. U.S.A.
    Inspector Indian Supplies
Sir
    I propose to transport Indian supplies from Portland to Klamath Agency, Oregon, as per advertisement dated Portland Nov. 11/76 for the winter months November, December, January, February, March, April & May at (15 cents) fifteen cents per pound.
    For the summer months June, July, August, September & October at (6 cents) six cents per pound.
Louis Solomon
   
    We the undersigned guarantee the responsibility of L. Solomon for the faithful performance of the contract if bid be awarded to him.
John Orth
Newman Fisher
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.  Bond and articles of agreement not transcribed.




Klamath Agency, Or.
    Nov. 29, 1876
Sir
    I have endeavored to comply with instructions contained in your circular letter of Aug. 25th relative to Indian traders and have delayed the matter for a long time in order that Mr. A. Handy, with whom the Indians at Yainax Station mostly trade, might take some steps in the premises, but thus far he has failed to respond. My absence of several weeks in attendance at the U.S. Dist. Court at Portland as a witness has caused still further delay.
    The enclosed letter of Jay Beach explains itself. He has, for over two years past, been the Ind. trader at this agency, and is now post trader at Ft. Klamath, six miles from the agency.
    Messrs. Nurse and Thatcher, whose letter and list of articles are included, have their place of business at Linkville, which is 31 miles from the agency. The percentage of profit which they propose to change, is, I think, not too high--viz 25 per ct., and their statement of cost of freight is correct.
    I would add that these Indians are quite as good judges of the quality and value of goods as their white neighbors.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        L. S. Dyar
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 622 Oregon Superintendency, 1875.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Dec. 25, 1876
Sir
    In obedience to instructions given in the last paragraph of your letter dated on 9th inst. I have the honor to submit the following statement.
    I was born in Phillips, Franklin Co., Maine. Was appointed from Grand Ronde Ind. Agency, Oregon, as sub-Ind. agent for the Inds. at Klamath Agency, and took charge on May 1st 1872, my commission bearing date of Dec. 29th 1871.
    On Aug. 21st 1872 my salary as agent commenced, and my commission as agent bearing date of July 23, 1872--this having been made a full agency about that time. I was reappointed for four years from Dec. 13th 1872.

Very respectfully
    L. S. Dyar, U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. P. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.




Last revised December 10, 2020