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Medford News: 1890

No Medford newspapers from 1890 survive. Below are Medford-related news items from 1890, gleaned from other towns' papers Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.

O. F. DEMOREST,
R E S I D E N T   D E N T I S T,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


R. PRYCE, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office in Williams' Brick Building, upstairs.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


J. B. WAIT, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office on Main Street, in Childers' building.
Calls promptly attended to, day and night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


DR. S. DANIELSON,
Physio-Medical
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Special attention given to Chronic Diseases.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


E. P. GEARY, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office in Hamlin's Block. Residence on C Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


E. B. PICKEL, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Calls Promptly Attended to Day or Night. Office on B Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


Medford Roller Mills
MEDFORD, OREGON,
DAVIS & FRANCE,   -   -   -   -   Proprietors.
WE HAVE NOW ONE OF THE BEST EQUIPPED FLOURING MILLS IN THE STATE and the
ONLY FULL ROLLER PROCESS MILL
in Southern Oregon. These mills are now manufacturing the best grade of flour ever offered to the trade in this section and are prepared to fill all orders for flour, mill feed, etc., on short notice. All orders by mail or in person will receive prompt attention.
Test the Flour and You Will Use No Other.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER 1, 1888.
Jackson County Bank,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Does a General Banking Business, and Buys and Sells
Eastern, Domestic and Foreign Exchange.
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
M O N E Y   L O A N E D   O N   F A V O R A B L E   T E R M S
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


A. GARRICK,
Merchant Tailor
And Importer of
Foreign and Domestic Woolens, Etc.,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
A FULL LINE of the best and most fashionable cloths, finishings, etc., constantly kept on hand, and nothing but first-class work turned out.
    All orders filled promptly at reasonable rates and satisfaction guaranteed.
A. GARRICK.   
Medford, May 13, 1889
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


WRISLEY & CO.,
Pioneer Real Estate Firm.
TO ACCOMMODATE the growing demand for real estate, we have opened an office in the town of
Medford, Jackson Co., Ogn.
We claim to have as fine a line of property, and to be able to furnish as reliable information concerning real estate in Southern Oregon, as any other firm now doing business.
    Correspondence solicited.
WRISLEY & CO.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 1


Medford, Or., Nov. 16, 1889
STAVER & WALKER, Medford, Or.:
    Gentlemen:--Having used one of your Evans' steel tubular lever harrows, I have no hesitation in saying that I believe it to be the best harrow on the market.
JESSE RICHARDSON.   
----
Medford, Or., Nov. 11, 1889
STAVER & WALKER, Medford, Or.:
    Gentlemen:--Having used one of your J. I. Case plows for the past year in "sticky," I can safely say that it is the best plow for that kind of soil I have ever seen. It does the work perfectly.
W. M. SLY.   
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 2


Seed!! Seed!! Seed!!
    Choice seed wheat, oats and barley for sale at Medford Farmers' Warehouse. Also rolled barley and mill feed. Baled hay in carload lots or less. Apply to
                        H. E. BAKER
                            Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 3


    The prevailing topic of conversation at Walla Walla, Wash., is the prosecution of a case against Ward Douglas, well known in this section as an insurance agent, now charged with rape alleged to have been committed upon the person of a certain Miss Turner, on the 13th day of last December. The evidence so far elicited shows that the affair took place in the private apartments of Douglas, and it will probably be difficult to secure a verdict against him on that account.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. Shideler has become a resident of Medford.
    Influenza seems to have found its way into Medford.
    T. R. North arrived from Adel, Iowa, yesterday and will stay awhile.
    E. G. Hurt was up from the Briggs Creek mines for several days last week.
    John Perdue, the pioneer shoemaker, is paying his old home in Douglas County a visit.
    Miss Fannie Simpson put in the holidays at Roseburg, visiting her sister, Mrs. Dr. Minnis.
    Barr & Galloway have dissolved partnership. Frank Galloway will continue the business.
    Orra Angle also keeps a full line of domestic, Key West and imported cigars. They can't be beaten.
    S. H. West's mare, "Nellie Woody," won the trotting race at the Central Point races on Christmas Day.
    Mrs. Melinda Barkdull of Pelican Rapids, Minn., is visiting her sister, Mrs. Frank Davis of Medford.
    Misses Jessie Worman and Ora Adkins, who are attending the University of Oregon at Eugene, came home for the holidays.
    The News very sensibly warns parents to watch their wandering girls at night. Parents in Jacksonville should also take the hint.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    G. C. Noble, Thos. Morine and John S. Miller are the candidates announced, so far, for the office of marshal of Medford. The election takes place on the 14th.
    Wm. T. Shores, late of Minnesota, last week bought ten acres of land from L. M. Harvey and has outfitted with a team and wagon and gone to work to develop his purchase.
    Medford's school entertainment before the schools closed for the holidays was a grand success. The pupils all acquitted themselves well and reflected great credit upon their teachers.
    G. W. Howard, the agent of the State Insurance Co. in this section, says that the report that his company intended to contest the payment of W. G. Cooper's policy is incorrect, as it carried no risk on the property.
    A coal oil famine raged here for several days during the past week, there being none in the market. A carload, which arrived Tuesday night, relieved the wants of all, however.
    W. G. Cooper, proprietor of Medford's pioneer harness and saddle shop, has resumed business in B. W. Powell's building on 7th Street, where he is displaying a complete and first-class stock of goods in his line. He keeps the best and sells at quite reasonable rates.

    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    The shoot of the Medford Gun Club on Christmas Day was very interesting and some good shooting was done. Shoots Nos. 1, 3 and 7 were won by Mr. Enyart, who also divided shoot 5 with Skeel; No. 2 was divided between Whitman, Skeel and Young; No. 4 between Skeel and Nicholson; No. 6 was won by Nicholson. J. R. Smith of Phoenix won the cow, his string measuring 1¼ inches from center for the three shots.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890, page 3


J. C. Vannoy to Ethel Holden, lot 15, blk 22, Medford; $100.
Same to Simeon Rosenthal, lot 12, blk 36, Medford; $50.
B. W. Powell et al. to Wm. Slinger, undivided two-fifths of lots 5 and 6, blk 19, Medford; $218.
H. E. Baker to Wm. Slinger, lots 5 and 6, blk 19, Medford; $120.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890, page 3


Jacksonville to Medford.
    Patronize the only wagon that connects with every train, rain or shine, and carries the U.S. mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. Satisfaction guaranteed.
JOHN DYAR, Driver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 4


$500,000, to loan, $500,000,
    By J. H. Whitman of Medford, on improved farm security in Jackson County, at the best rates of any loan agency in the county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 3


To Hog Raisers.
    I wish to say to the farmers of Jackson County that I imported several head of full-blood Poland-China hogs from Minnesota last year, and now offer them for sale. They are fine, and received first premium at last September's fair held in this county. Will be sold at reasonable rates. Can be seen by calling on A. A. Davis, at the Medford Roller Mills, Jackson County, Oregon. Also have some oak lumber and wagon tongues for sale.
A. A. DAVIS.   
Medford, Or., Nov. 13, 1889.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 3


Trees! Trees!
HAMMON BROS.
NURSERIES!
    We have removed our Nurseries to Medford, where we have secured New Ground, the soil of which is a sandy loam, enabling us without irrigation to grow healthy, thrifty trees with an abundance of fibrous lateral roots without heavy tap roots, to be cut away in digging. We offer
                                     1000 Prune,
                                         10000 Apples,
                                             5000 Peach,
                                                 5000 Pears,
                                                     10000 Grapes,
And a good assortment of all the leading varieties of fruits.
Trees as Low as any First-Class Nursery.
GIVE US A CALL.
Nurseries at East End of Bridge.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1890 et seq., page 4


    From Prof. Newbury, of the Jacksonville public school, we learn that the teachers' institute held at Medford last week was unusually interesting and pleasant. Sixty teachers were enrolled, and the attendance throughout was good, almost every section of the county being represented. Medford's hospitable citizens were courteous and obliging, and all had an interesting and pleasant time.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 3, 1890, page 2


    Jesse Enyart, a former resident of this city, but at present of Medford, Ore., distinguished himself in a recent contest of the Medford Gun Club. He won nearly everything offered, getting thirty-two birds out of thirty-three sent up.
"Additional Items," Logansport (Indiana) Pharos, January 4, 1890, page 3


AN UNENVIABLE REPUTATION.
    Ashland Tidings: Ward Douglas, the life insurance man who wrote up many policies in this county, and was for a time in the real estate business at Ashland, Medford and Central Point, is in serious trouble at Walla Walla. He has figured on the edge of social or domestic trouble almost everywhere he has been in the Northwest.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 5, 1890, page 2


NEW FURNISHING STORE.
--IN--
MEDFORD, OREGON.
wish to inform the people of Southern Oregon
that I have opened a

COMPLETE STOCK
--OF--
Gent's Furnishing Goods,
in the building formerly occupied by J. Goldsmith,
Medford, consisting of

Men's Fine Shirts, Underwear, Hats, Caps, Gloves,
SUSPENDERS, NECKWEAR, ETC.
ALL THE LATEST STYLES in COLLARS and TIES.
Bushby's Double-Welted, Hand-Sewed Gloves; for both
Ladies and Gents. Every Pair Guaranteed.
------------
I buy for cash, thereby insuring my patrons of
THE LOWEST PRICES.
Call and see me. I guarantee satisfaction.
ORRA E. ANGLE, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 1


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890 et seq., page 2

HAS AN ORGAN AT LAST.
    Our esteemed fellow citizen, C. C. Beekman, anent whom the Republican press of the state has been saying some very complimentary things of late, with reference to the approaching gubernatorial contest, is to be congratulated upon having secured an "organ" in the Medford Mail, which last week hoists the Beekman colors to its masthead, and "thus early and before the campaign" indulges in "some plain talk, candidly spoken," which is calculated to place Mr. Beekman in the vanguard of Pennoyer's possible opponents. There is nothing sadder in this world than to see a worthy and deserving aspirant for office buried beneath the wreck of his hopes, all for lack of an organ. The situation was becoming so serious for our fellow townsman, as the convention crisis approaches, that we had almost concluded to lease him a column of the Times for the purpose of urging his cause before the people. His claims for preferment at the hands of his party at this time are certainly paramount to those of any other Republican in this section, and in view of the fact that the leaders of his party seem to have a tacit understanding that southern Oregon shall be recognized on their ticket, Democratic admirers of Mr. B., in common with his own partisan following, were loath to see his chances go glimmering solely for lack of an "organ" to nurse the incipient boom. "Worth in these degenerate times to envied honor seldom climbs," and we were beginning to fear that each of our able but sectional Republican molders of public sentiment had gone off in advocacy of some little local political deity's claims to such an extent that Mr. Beekman's boom would suffer for want of the nurse's tender care. Our fears have vanished now, for the exigencies of the occasion have raised up a champion who recognizes the fact that our fellow citizen combines in his person "all the necessary elements of strength"--that he is able, deserving and brilliant; and we trust that through the kind offices of Brother Harlan the goal may be reached and that worth will meet worth, when Beekman is called upon to face Pennoyer.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 2


I. J. Phipps to Calista P. Phipps, lot in Phipps' reserve, Medford; $153.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 2


    Hon. Willard Crawford, late of Medford, was last week reported to be sick with blood poisoning in the hospital at Walla Walla, Wash.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


    Cash paid for produce at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Goldsmith, wholesale and retail grocer, Medford.
    An immense line of hanging lamps at Goldsmith's, Medford.
    Business is quite dull, owing to the cold and stormy weather, as the people will not stir about any more than is necessary.
    Bad colds never were so prevalent as now. Those who have escaped the epidemic are as few as they are fortunate.
    A. H. Sunderman received 28 votes for the nomination for marshal at the citizens' convention held at Medford last evening.
    For the first time in many long years there is sufficient snow on the ground for sleighing, but sleighs are so few in this section that not many are indulging in the sport.
    Railroad prospects seem to be interfered with by the refusal of F. B. Converse, who got a franchise from the council of Medford and Jacksonville to build an electric road in the town limits, to turn over the papers. It transpires that Converse is an adventurer, who got up his railroad scheme simply to sell the franchise for the best sum possible. It is too bad that he should be able to even temporarily block the wheels of our railroad enterprise.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


    Hon. Willard Crawford, late of Medford, was last week reported to be sick with blood poisoning in the hospital at Walla Walla, Wash.
    Judge North, Hon. J. D. Whitman and postmaster Howard of Medford were here on Monday and interviewed our citizens on the railroad question.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Elma Young is quite ill and confined to her room.
    Medford Roller Mills flour is becoming very popular in Eugene city.
    Work on the new water system is progressing. The mains are now being laid.
    Miss Belle Hoyt was the lucky winner of the premium cart offered by C. W. Palm.
    D. T. Pritchard of Roseburg will open a stock of jewelry in Medford in a short time. [Pritchard advertised in the Eugene City Guard of January 19, 1884, page 8.]
    John W. Curry and wife spent the holidays at his father's farm in Table Rock precinct.
    Miss Lizzie White of Salem has been visiting her aunt, Mrs. H. A. Borden, during the past week.
    Don't fail to vote for John S. Miller for marshal. He has made an exceptionally good official.
    F. Hubbard, Sr., has bought the lot adjoining the hay scales and will build a business house in a short time.
    There was a wordy discussion between two of our prominent citizens one day last week, but it fortunately ended there.
    The contract for laying the water mains, from the soda works on C Street to the Baptist Church, has been let to Harvey Rancier.
    J. W. Dowell and family of Morris County, Kansas, are stopping with Mrs. W. F. Sharon, and will probably remain in this section.
    The New Year's edition of the Mail was a creditable 8-page issue, filled with interesting reading relative to Medford, its business and citizens.
    The opening of the new opera house by the Marsells Company was generally regretted, for while the attendance was good the performance was snide.
    Ed. Childers, who worked on the opera house last summer, passed south for Santa Rosa one day last week, and will remain in California during the winter.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H .Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    It is rumored that there will be a "Union-Amalgamated" ticket put up next Tuesday at the municipal election, in opposition to the citizens' ticket nominated yesterday evening.
    R. H. Harper made the successful bean-jar guess, winning the prize offered by Orra E. Angle. He also won a dressing case raffled off by Chas. Wolters. Lucky Harry.
    The News has inaugurated the pay-in-advance policy, and subscribers are trembling in their shoes at the prospect of being cut off from their weekly rations this cold winter.
    Several members of the Medford Gun Club are attaining to great proficiency in the art of breaking glass balls and clay pigeons, "straight strings" being nothing uncommon.
    It is said that Wes. Johnson wants to be marshal and is going to run independent. Our citizens should not fail to re-elect the present incumbent, as he has been tried and not found wanting.
    Wilkinson & Hanley are well fixed for the manufacture of bacon, lard, etc., of which they are selling a great deal. They supply several shops down the road with both fresh and salt meats.
    The installation of officers of Chester A. Arthur Post No. 1 will take place at the opera house this evening. A musical and literary entertainment will follow the installation ceremonies.
    Prevailing bad colds and influenza have prostrated many of our citizens within the past week. Among the sick during the week we note John B. Wrisley, Prof. Crawford, D. T. Sears and T. A. Harris.
    The attendance was so large at the citizens' convention held last evening that it was found necessary to adjourn to the opera house before nominations were made. Much interest was taken in the proceedings.
    The citizens of this place welcome the prospect for a realization at last of the motor road to Jacksonville. The transfer of the franchise to the company represented by Mr. North would be a most fortunate circumstance.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    The hunters of Medford expected to have a soft snap in hunting geese on Big Sticky, it having been reported that the bipeds could not fly off with the load of adobe which they accumulated in walking in the wheat fields. The snow relieved the embarrassment of the squawkers, however, and enabled them to fly.
    The new Presbyterian bell from the McNeely West Troy bell foundry was placed in position in time to ring in the new year on the evening of January 1st, and now regularly calls members of the congregation to prayer and worship. The bell weighs about 600 pounds and is of unusually fine tone.
    The skating rink has been suspended for the present, the skates which were used having been removed to Jacksonville. Messrs. West and Talbott were victimized by a couple of rascals named Wolff and Armstrong, who sold them property which did not belong to them.
    The citizens of Medford held a meeting last night and nominated the following ticket: Mayor, G. W. Howard; councilmen, A. A. Davis, F. M. Plymale, Frank Galloway, I. L. Hamilton; recorder, D. T. Sears; treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, John S. Miller. The election takes place on the 14th inst.
    That prince of good fellows, William Clark, is now conducting the Gem Saloon and billiard hall at this place in the most approved style, and has built up a fine business. He keeps the best of everything in his line and never fails to please. All who call are treated in the most cordial manner and always repeat their visit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD
Is the second town in Jackson County in enterprise and population [after Ashland]. It appears to have made greater strides during the past season than those to be credited to Ashland, and the number of stores, residences and solid business blocks that have just been built prove that Medford is alive to the great chances that are in store for the wide-awake towns of Southern Oregon.--[Oregonian.
Excerpt, "Jackson County," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 10, 1890, page 1


    J. S. Howard and Hon. J. D. Whitman, of Medford, and T. R. North, of Iowa, were in Jacksonville Monday, on business connected with the building of a railroad between this place and Medford.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 10, 1890, page 3


Medford and Jacksonville R.R. Co.
    Articles of incorporation of the Medford and Jacksonville Railroad Company were filed in the office of the county clerk last Tuesday. The incorporators are D. Linn, A. L. Reuter and Jeremiah Nunan of Jacksonville and S. H. Hull and John D. Whitman of Medford. The capital stock is placed at $10,000, to be divided into shares of $100 each; the amount of which stock may be increased by majority vote of the stockholders. The principal office of the corporation will be at Medford. The object of organization is to acquire, construct, own and operate a line of railroad for freight and passenger traffic from the town of Medford to the town of Jacksonville. Only the preliminary organization has been effected as yet, and we learn that the books have not been opened for subscriptions to the capital stock. Assurance has been given that the same or equally advantageous franchises will be granted the company by the town councils of this place and of Medford as were given to the men purporting to represent the Seattle company, which crawfished on its contract. Both Jacksonville and Medford are to be congratulated on the formation of a local company composed of reliable business men who will put the proposed railroad through to speedy completion.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1890, page 3


A Fortunate Conclusion.
    The franchise granted to F. B. Converse some time since by the town councils of Jacksonville and Medford were by him recently assigned to Mr. Francis Fitch, the Medford attorney, and that gentleman has since reassigned them to the respective towns, thus leaving the matter where it was before action was taken. While some delay in the construction of the road has resulted from the Converse fiasco, no particular harm has been done, and as our people are still unanimously in favor of the project, there can be no doubt that the road will eventually be built. The additional advantage of having a standard gauge road instead of a narrow gauge will more than offset any inconvenience resulting from the delay, and all are now satisfied that the former style is the only kind that will fill the bill. It is quite probable that the capitalists represented by Mr. North, of Adel, Iowa, will at once take steps looking to an early consummation of the project.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1890, page 3


    The snow broke down a number of old sheds, roof and awnings in this vicinity.
    J. C. Tolman intends prospecting for coal on his lands near Medford in a short time.
    John Dyar of the Jacksonville-Medford stage line now handles the ribbons over four horses.
    Trains were never so irregular as now, and may become still more so before the season ends.
    A. J. Weeks, of Phoenix, who purchased P. W. Olwell's upper mill site, has the machinery in place to carry on an extensive box factory next summer.
    Stock, where well fed, is still doing well. However, if the snow should lie on the ground a considerable length of time, many head will die, as they were poor when winter began, and hay is not any too plentiful in most places.
    Ward Douglas, formerly of this city, charged with ravishing the daughter of Dr. Turner, of Walla Walla, has been placed under $2,500 bail to appear for trial at the next term of the superior court. The Sunday Welcome says that he will never be convicted.
    A flood of considerable dimensions next spring now seems inevitable, for, with the immense amount of snow accumulated in the mountains and foothills even our ordinary rains would insure high water, and it is evident that we will have no ordinary season in any line this year.
    The southbound train, which should have arrived this morning, lies at Glendale, being unable to come further south on account of some bridges having been washed away. The streams in that section rose eight feet in a short time, a warm rain melting some of the vast amount of snow which had piled up.
    Before the storms of the past week sensational stories began to come in of the great depth of the snow up Rogue River, it having been reported 36 inches deep at Flounce Rock, 49 inches at Dean's, 51 inches at Deskins, 81 inches at Union Creek and 102 inches at Skookum Prairie. Since the unprecedented storms of the past week these figures may in many instances be doubled ere this.
    The deepest snow reported inside the town limits was on the north hill slopes south of the courthouse, where the depth on Sunday evening was just 24 inches. There was more old snow on the ground there than elsewhere in town, and the actual precipitation Saturday night and Sunday did not exceed 18 inches. The snowfall varied in different sections, but about 8 inches falling at Uniontown, while on the divides at the head of Forest and Jackson creeks the new snow measured fully 26 inches in depth. The people who have been praying for years for a heavy fall of snow in the mountains now have their hearts' desire, for it is piled up anywhere from five to forty feet in every direction.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1890, page 3


    Frank Galloway, who is now sole proprietor of the Medford Fence Works, visited our town one day last week, accompanied by his daughter.
    Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford was last week called to hold a consultation with Dr. DeBar, the attending physician on Mrs. John Miller. The patient is improving.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Lots of improvements are contemplated for 1890, and many will be made.
    John Perdue returned from a month's trip to the Umpqua Valley one day last week.
    A. D. Dodson last week visited old friends and relatives in the Willamette Valley.
    The Baptist Society of Christian Endeavor will establish a reading room in a short time.
    If you want the best cigars and nicest gents' furnishing goods in the market, call on Orra Angle.
    A sneak thief robbed Wilkinson & Hanley's butcher shop at Medford of several buckets of lard one day last week.
    The Gem Saloon continues a popular resort, because only the best is kept there and Billy and Mark always treat the public well.
    Work on the water works continues despite the inclement weather, and the contractors propose to complete their work at the earliest possible moment.
    One of the most pleasing and satisfactory results of the recent town election is the reelection of Marshal Miller. He has made a popular and efficient marshal.
    The Medford public school building now boasts of a fine bell, recently bought in Cincinnati at a cost of $100. The weight is 500 pounds and the tone is excellent.
    Mrs. R. T. Lawton has recently been suffering from rheumatism in her knee, which was injured so severely when she was thrown from a carriage last summer.
    Geo. W. Howard was elected mayor of our town by a large majority. He is an enterprising and reliable business man, and will no doubt fill the office acceptably to all.
    Miss Couthoi, the distinguished elocutionist, will give a reading under the auspices of the Young People's Society of Christian Endeavor at the opera house on the 22d.
    Look out for lively times whenever work on the motor line starts. This enterprise will be a big thing for Medford, as it will virtually make it the business center of the county.
    The Medford Roller Mills sent their numerous customers a handsome new year card, with compliments of the season. A great deal of flour is being constantly manufactured there.
    Hon. T. R. North returned to his home in Iowa last week. He has left his business in this section with Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, who will no doubt transact it satisfactorily to all.
    C. K. Fronk last week received a handsome new office desk from the S.P. Co.'s headquarters. Charley is a clever, painstaking agent, and deserves such recognition of his services.
    The most fashionable tailor in southern Oregon is A. Garrick of Medford, who is always kept busy. He keeps a nice line of cloths, trimmings, etc., charges reasonable prices and never fails to give satisfaction.
    As might have been expected, the Republican press of Medford makes a savage attack on Professor Rork and his effort to organize the Union-Amalgamated party. The Republicans are terribly afraid of a third party in any guise, and its bitter feeling toward the Prohibitionists is openly expressed on all occasions.
    A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M., recently installed the newly elected officers of the Medford lodge of Odd Fellows, to wit: W. I .Vawter, N.G.; E. B. Pickel, V.G.; H. E. Baker, Sec.; B. S. Webb, Per. Sec.; B. F. Adkins, Treas.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; T. W. Johnson, L.S.N.G.; F. Amann, Ward.; S. Rosenthal, Con.; S. B. McGee, I.G.; D. S. Youngs, O.G.; C. Strang, R.S.S.; H. F. Wood, L.S.S.; J. G. Gore, L.S.V.G.; I. A. Merriman, R.S.V.G.
    At the municipal election on Tuesday last the ticket nominated at the citizens' convention held last week was successful throughout. Much interest was shown in the election and considerable buttonholing of voters indulged in by several of the candidates. The best of order prevailed during the day. The total number of votes cast was 261, of which G. W. Howard received 216 for mayor. Of the successful candidates for town trustees, F. M. Plymale received 255 votes; I. L. Hamilton, 210; A. A. Davis, 160; Frank Galloway, 157. For recorder, D. T. Sears received 209 votes; for treasurer, Chas. Strang, 155; for marshal, John S. Miller, 135.
    The citizens' railroad meeting on Wednesday of last week showed a unanimous desire to have a railroad constructed between this place and the county seat as soon as possible. Hon. T. R. North of Adel, Iowa made a proposition to construct a standard gauge road, to be operated as a motor road, between the two places, provided a bonus of $20,000 is raised, right-of-way secured and the necessary franchises granted by the respective towns. It was concluded that the proper method of procedure would be to organize an incorporated company to take up the old bonus notes executed and secure new ones. Conference committees were appointed, and it is evident that definite action will be taken in a very short time looking to the early construction of the road.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1890, page 3


    The snow has reached a prodigious depth upon the high mountains of Southern Oregon, and the coming season will be a lively one in the dryer placer mines. There will be more gold dust washed out of Jackson and Josephine county ground this year than for many years past. Good summer pasture on the ranges, and plenty of water for all crops and for irrigation next summer are among the assurances of the deep snows, too.
    Railroad prospects seem to be interfered with by the refusals of F. B. Converse, who got a franchise from the council of Medford and Jacksonville to build an electric road in the town limits, to turn over the papers. It transpires that Converse is an adventurer, who got up his railroad scheme simply to sell the franchise for the best sum possible. It is too bad that he should be able to even temporarily block the wheels of our railroad enterprise.--[Times.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 17, 1890, page 3


NEWS FROM SALEM.
    SALEM, Jan. 17--Also by the Medford & Jacksonville Railroad Company, D. Linn, A. L. Reuter, Jeremiah Nunan, A. H. Hull and John D. Whitman incorporators, object to build a railroad from Medford to Jacksonville, principal office Medford.
Excerpt, Morning Oregonian, January 18, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. D. Dodson of the News was quite ill at Salem last week.
    Many of our citizens have been ill with influenza during the past two weeks.
    Medford has but one paper now. We learn that the News suspended publication indefinitely last week.
    J. C. Corum, who did considerable business in selling meat here last summer, has moved to Meadows precinct.
    L. F. Cox and family removed last week from Medford to their farm near Woodville, where they will reside in the future.
    A life-size portrait of Archie Hazel, in the act of climbing a forest tree, is the chief attraction in the Grand Central Hotel parlor.
    The effort to organize a company of the O.N.G. at Medford should receive encouragement from the citizens of the Bear Creek metropolis.
    Olwell's mills at Phoenix will hereafter be operated in connection with the Medford Roller Mills. The combination will prove a strong one.
    Revs. Barden and Van Tassel conducted a successful series of meetings at the Baptist Church in Medford during last week, which have resulted in several accessions to the membership.
    J. H. Redfield, whose advertisement appears in this issue, has opened a blacksmith shop in the building formerly occupied by W. H. Turner. He will doubtless build up a good trade, as he is an excellent mechanic and a very clever man to do business with.
    The town needs a better calaboose for the detention of tramps and vags, who could be made to do much work on the city's streets if proper accommodations were provided. The night watch is kept busy watching the tramps at night when his single cell is full.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    The installation of officers of Chester A. Arthur Post No. 47, G.A.R., took place at the opera house as announced, and the following will fill the chairs during the ensuing year: Commander, R. T. Young; S.V. commander, G. C. Noble; J.V. commander, D. A. Huling; Q.M., W. G. Cooper; surgeon, Wm. Turner; chaplain, D. J. Lumsden; officer of the guard, J. R. Erford; officer of the day, Isaac Woolf; adjutant, J. H. Faris.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


To the Farmers of Jackson County.
    Having found it impracticable to operate our mill at Medford as an exchange mill, we have purchased the Washington Mills of Phoenix, and will continue to operate them on the exchange plan. As soon as practicable we will overhaul the mill and place it in first-class repair. So bring on your wheat and we will prove to you that you will be treated as well by the new firm as the old.
Respectfully yours,
        Davis & France.
Medford, Or., Jan. 20, 1890.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


    L. G. Goodall of Medford precinct was in town several days this week.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


    Medford's dollar weekly has "gone where the woodbine twineth," as might have been expected. No large, first-class paper can be printed in the interior for less than $2.50 a year. Publishers of city papers issue weeklies for less money, but they make use of reading matter that has already been printed in the daily editions. Otherwise their prices would not be so liberal.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


Simon Rosenthal to David Lipman, lot 12, block
36, Medford; $50.
W. S. Barnum to E. P. Hammond, lots 6 and 7, block
32, Medford; $250.
E. P. Hammond to B. S. Barnum, lot in Medford; $300.

A. Childers to same, lots 6 and 7, in block 32; $80.

G. H. Baker et al. to E. W. Starr, lots 5 and 6, block 9, Beatty addition Medford; $151.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1890, page 3


JOHN WARD BOYLE.
The Mercury Shows Up Some of His Nefarious Practices.
"A BIGAMIST AND A PERJURER."
His Shortcomings Are Nothing New--He Is an Oldtimer.

    The [Portland] Sunday Mercury says, "A man known at Walla Walla and throughout Oregon as Ward Douglass is at present figuring in a rape case at Walla Walla. He is charged with raping the daughter of a Dr. Turner, of the Garden City. Miss Turner and Douglass were engaged to be married. The lady called at his room to talk the matter over. While there she alleges he succeeded in raping her. Her person was lacerated and her garments torn. After escaping from the fellow, she said, she went to the home of a friend, arranged her clothing and told her story. She next related the circumstances to her parents and arrest followed.
    At the preliminary examination Douglass was held to the grand jury for the sum of $2500.
    On Sept. 17, 1887, the Mercury contained the following, in substance, concerning the man:
    "An apparently unprovoked assault was made by a strong, able-bodied man upon a tall, slim, dudish-looking fellow at the corner of First and Morrison streets Friday night. After the first blow was struck the irate man was prevented from following up the attack. Upon investigation it was learned that the dude escaped a thrashing that he well deserved.
    "The dude was Ward Douglass, a traveling insurance agent, and the other was a mechanic who lives in East Portland.
    "Among the friends of the family was one Ward Douglass, a tall, sallow-complexioned man, of pleasant address and oily speech. The mechanic was necessarily away from home during the entire daytime. During his absence the contemptible, snake-like fiend Douglass began plying the lady with many flattering and assiduous attentions. It was not long before the oily-tongued schemer succeeded in accomplishing his nefarious plan and despoiled the sanctity of his friend's home. About two months ago Ward Douglass and the woman stole away together and have since been traveling about the state. With the usual gall of his profession, he and the woman returned to Portland Friday. The husband found that the couple were stopping at the St. Charles and determined to see his wife, and that she should not again go with Douglass. He accordingly watched the hotel all night, but the woman was soon made aware that she was under surveillance and concocted a plan whereby she could escape and rejoin Douglass. On Saturday morning a furniture express wagon drove up to the side door of the hotel, and the woman jumped in beside the driver, who gave the horse a cut and dashed pell mell up First Street, hotly pursued by the irate husband. The [illegible] two blocks of the Failing school, where the husband quietly jumped into the rear of the express wagon and rode the rest of the distance, the persons on the seat never looking to see if they were pursued. When the school house was reached the husband quietly jumped from the wagon and hid behind a streetcar standing at the end of the First Street line, unobserved by the woman. She sat down on the school house steps. In a few moments a horse and buggy containing Douglass drove up and stopped where the woman was waiting. The husband then quitted his hiding place and rushed over to the spot.
    "Having both parties together, a lecture was read to them that will not soon be forgotten. The dude Douglass soon showed fear and begged that he be not hurt, and as soon as opportunity afforded he cut his horse with the whip and dashed out of sight. The wronged husband and wife boarded a streetcar and came back downtown. Later a warrant was sworn out charging Douglass with adultery, but the wily bird could not be found. Some time ago he had been discharged from the employ of Eugene D. White, on account of some questionable proceedings on his part."
    Between two dash lines in the columns of the Mercury containing the above article is a picture of one A. Ward Boyles, which is recognized in this place as a perfect likeness of an insurance agency who visited Heppner some eighteen months ago, under the name of Ward Douglass. Appended is the affidavit of W. D. Burr, of Leflet Division No. 62 of the Order of Railroad Conductors, denouncing J. Ward Boyles as a "perjurer, defaulter and bigamist," and under oath, says: "That he has proven to all the utter absence of anything like principle in his composition, and he now stands before the world as a defaulter, perjurer and bigamist. A man to be shunned by all his fellow creatures."
    Again Bridget Boyle, of Syracuse, N.Y., makes affidavit that she is the wife of James Boyle, which is corroborated by Julia Curtin, a witness to the marriage, and also James A. O'Hara, D.D., pastor of St. Mary's Church of that city, who swears he performed the marriage ceremony.
    Then again Mary B. Fitzer claims to be the wife of J. Ward Boyles, and a Wyoming minister also testifies that he performed the ceremony.
    A man by the name of Ward Douglass, a life insurance agency, visited Heppner some eighteen months ago and cut a big dash. He occupied rooms in a private house, where there was a young and handsome servant girl. While stopping there he was taken ill, which compelled him to remain in his room most of the time for many days, always being waited on by the girl. The lady of the house, thinking everything might not be straight, gave him notice to vacate the premises, which he proceeded at once to do, his "illness" suddenly leaving him, and he was daily seen on the streets apparently as well as ever. After a short time he left this city accompanied by the girl, who, it is said, has been abandoned by him and now is an inmate of an infamous dive.
    A Gazette reporter has been informed, by those who pretend to know, that one John Ward Boyle was at one time a conductor on the main line of the Union Pacific, and while acting in the capacity, under the name of some accident and life insurance corporation, had swindled his fellow conductors out of about a thousand dollars. He turned spotter after this, hence the circular containing his photograph and the affidavits as to his character.
    Whether this J. Ward Boyles, John Ward Boyles, Chas. B. Ward, John Boyle and Ward Douglass are one and the same man, we are not prepared to say, but the portrait of J. Ward Boyles, which appears in the Mercury, bears so striking a resemblance to the individual to whom we have referred as having visited Heppner that we cannot avoid drawing a conclusion that it might be the same person.
    As the crime for which he has been bound to appear before the grand jury at Walla Walla to answer, we are not in possession of facts sufficient to warrant a positive conclusion, but being guilty of gross improprieties within the personal knowledge of our citizens, and being charged under the oath of good citizens with numerous other and greater crimes, we cannot but be prejudiced to a certain degree.
----
    In the Sunday Mercury of Jan. 18 appears a copy of a circular issued by the Order of Railway Conductors in regard to J. Ward Boyles, a synopsis of which is here appended.
    "The subject of this circular entered the Brotherhood * * * and was sent as delegate to the ninth annual session of our grand division and was elected a member of the executive committee, to serve three years.
    "Before the year had passed way he had removed the editor of our magazine and appointed himself instead, although other names had been suggested, and then had the audacity to claim that he was the wronged one. Again at the session held at Chicago, he was shown to be an arrant rascal, and stood face to face with his associates, convicted of deliberate falsehood. The ended his public career as a member of the order. * * *
    "Since 1881 he has been in the employ of the C.M.&S.P.R. for a time, but was soon discharged, and was next found with the N.P., and there are several employees of that company that can trace their discharge directly to his acts.
    "D. W. Barr, a member in good standing, certifies on his honor that he did 'pay to Brother J. Ward Boyles the sum of $18, at various times and places on account of the Old Reliable Insurance Association which he failed to remit to said association, and that I was therefore debarred from any benefit of said association, and was stricken from the roll of said association as a delinquent member.'"
    Following this is a complete record of his marriage with two different women, also a statement that he has been expelled from the order and warning others to give him a wide berth.
Heppner Weekly Gazette, January 23, 1890, page 2


Medford Election.
    Medford's annual municipal election occurred last week, and the total vote cast was 261, an increase of 86 over the vote last year. A prohibition ticket was put in the field against the regular union ticket nominated in mass convention, and its strength was about 25 votes. Mayor-elect Howard's majority over G. S. Walton was 191. Following named are the officers elected: Mayor, G. W. Howard; Trustees, F. M. Plymale, I. L. Hamilton, A. A. Davis, Frank Galloway; Recorder, D. T. Sears; Treasurer, Chas. Strang; Marshal, J. S. Miller.
Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24, 1890, page 3


Snow Damaging Buildings.
    The snow of the present winter has reached a depth in this valley unknown for many years, if it has ever averaged so great a depth since the settlement of the country. The buildings, generally, are not constructed with a view to sustaining such an immense weight as this snow made on the roofs, and the consequence is that numerous breaks and damages to buildings are reported--more at Jacksonville and in the Butte Creek country than elsewhere.
    At Medford, the Mail of last week says: Many shed roofs gave way beneath the enormous pressure, among them being a shed at C. W. Skeel's lumber yard, a woodshed at the Grand Central and one of W. B. Powell's.
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, January 24, 1890, page 3


    A. J. Weeks, the orchardman, who has the fine fruit farm between Phoenix and Medford, will manufacture fruit boxes next season at the shop he has fitted for the purpose in the old or upper mill at Phoenix.
    The traveling between the railroad and the county seat was better this week than at any time during the past year--almost equal to the railroad line of the future--a smooth track of snow and ice for the sleighs.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24, 1890, page 3


The Thaw.
    A south wind sent the mercury up to 40° Wednesday evening, and the snow began to settle rapidly. The wind brought a storm, and it was raining most all day yesterday. The snow had disappeared from the west hillsides east of Bear Creek, but the streams had not begun to rise last evening. Rogue River was reported booming, however, and fears are entertained of damages from high water. It is supposed to be snowing in the Siskiyous. Thermometer still stood at 40° in Ashland last evening.
Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24, 1890, page 3


    Mayor-elect G. W. Howard, of Medford, was in Ashland Monday and Tuesday of this week. His election was about unanimous, and there will be no contest over the office this time.
"Personal," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 24, 1890, page 3


    There is some meat to the following soliloquy by Peter the poet: "Will Oregon ever conclude to lay her own eggs? Here's the teachers' institute to be held at Medford the day after New Year's, and an Iowa egg for our own teachers! How long must our noble schoolma'ams, submit to a foreign yolk? It is hard--oh it is hard boiled and horrid, and some different course of study must be adopted for our chickens."

Daily Morning Astorian, January 25, 1890, page 3


E. Davis to William Davis and wife, lot in Broback's reserve, Medford; $175.
G. W. Howard to E. Davis, property on 9th Street in Medford; $2350.
Albert Johnson to Edmund Davis, property on C Street in Medford; $700.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Work has been suspended on our water system until more favorable weather.
    Dr. Adkins will put up a brick building on his lot east of Webb's furniture store.
    Mrs. L. L. Angle, who has been quite sick for some time, is recovering her health, we learn.
    Joseph Saltmarsh of Sterlingville made his sister, Mrs. Geo. Yaudes, a visit last Monday.
    The Jackson County Bank advertises money to loan on improved farm property at 8 percent.
    Bear Creek is very high this week, and hundreds of our citizens have viewed it from the bridge.
    The new city officers qualified and assumed the duties of their respective positions last Friday evening.
    Miss Josie Orth of Jacksonville, who has been paying her sister, Mrs. Ed Wilkinson, a visit, returned home this week.
    J. H. Whitman, the well-known attorney and researcher of records, has been a victim of la grippe during the past fortnight.
    Wolters handles the "Schiller" cigar, one of the best bit cigars in the market. He is always enterprising and accommodating.
    The ditch has been breaking out of its banks in several places, and considerable work has been done during the past week to repair the breaks.
    The firm of Follett & Fowler is succeeded by O. N. Fowler, the latter gentleman having purchased the interest of his deceased partner in the furniture business.
    Mrs. S. R. Follett and daughter, Miss Louise, have returned to their old home in New York, since setting up the affairs of the deceased husband and father.
    The product of our roller mill is sold in considerable quantities at Eugene, where A. Goldsmith recently received a carload. Medford flour is gaining a big reputation everywhere.
    Protracted meetings are being held in several of our churches lately, and good attendance is reported. Our town can boast or more churches than any other in the valley, and each has an excellent congregation.
    The Mail advocates the numbering of the houses on the different streets of the town in metropolitan style. It would be a good idea to do so, as it would cost but a trifle, and any locality is easily identified by this method.
    D. T. Pritchard, an expert watchmaker and jeweler, has opened a fine, large stock of watches, clocks, jewelry, etc., in Dr. Adkins' new building, and is building up a good trade. He has had 33 years' experience in the business.
    Water is standing deep in the many potholes about town, and unless they are filled up in the early spring much sickness must necessarily follow therefrom. The authorities should not overlook this matter when the proper time comes.
    Men who are well posted say that at Henderson's tonsorial parlors, adjoining S. Rosenthal's store, you can get a nice, comfortable shave, haircut or shampoo, with all the accessories of clean towels, sharp razors and gentlemanly attendants. Pete is never behind the times.
    Ervine L. Brown, who purchased Redden's blacksmith shop in Medford not long since, died last Friday of pneumonia, after a short illness. He was 33 years of age and came to the valley from Klamath County a few months ago. A wife and several children mourn the loss of a kind husband and father.
    E. W. Starr owns the patent for the Admiration Ironing Board, which commends itself to the ladies at sight. He manufactures them to order. By an ingenious device the board can be attached to the edge of a table, and stands out level with its top in a manner to ensure the greatest comfort and convenience in ironing.
    The initiatory steps have been taken for the organization of a lodge of Knights of Pythias at Medford, and it will doubtless soon be instituted with a charter membership of not less than twenty-five. The institution has no superior among the purely social orders, and will doubtless add much to the fraternal life of Medford.

    The bank safe of the Jackson County Bank is a "multum in parvo" arrangement, a regular jewel of a safe, weighing but 800 pounds, yet perfectly burglar and dynamite proof, with chilled-steel bolts, and the latest design of time locks, with dial chronometer, etc. The engraving is very fine, and the cost of the safe was $800.
    An infantry company of the Oregon National Guard was organized at Medford a few days since, with the following commissioned officers: R. T. Young, captain; Horace Nicholson, first lieutenant; George Barden, second lieutenant. Non-commissioned officers will be appointed by the captain. George Barden, Horace Nicholson, E. W. Carder and Harry Hembree were appointed a committee to draft bylaws and constitution. Medford has as fine and manly looking a set of boys as any town in the state, and with careful drill will show as creditable a military company as the best of them in a year or two.
    The snow caused a temporary cessation of trade in town, owing partially to the stoppage of traffic on the railroad and partly to the fact that many of the best customers of Medford merchants were kept at home by impassable roads, stock feeding and other duties incident to ranching. The present storms are not causing discouragement, however, as our business men are fully aware that the fertilizing influence of the snow will ensure bounteous crops next summer, and the present slackness in business but gives them an opportunity to straighten up their business, balance their books and get ready for the rush of spring trade and harvest.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3


    S. A. D. Higgins, formerly of this county, is sojourning at Bartlett Springs, Cal., for the benefit of his health.
    R. S. Dunlap, our popular sexton, was able to be about again last Monday, for the first time since his sickness.
    Miss M. M. Gallaher, the well-known dressmaker, has removed to Medford, where she will reside hereafter.
    J. H. Faris, mine host of the Medford hotel, was here one day last week. He has two men employed in prospecting for lime on his land in Jackson Creek district.
    Mrs. Robt. Kahler and Mrs. J. F. Fink, daughters of Jas. A. Cardwell of this place, arrived Sunday night from Tacoma, after being seven days on the way. They were pleased to find their father's health considerably improved.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3


Almost a Serious Accident.
    One night last week Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford was summoned to the bedside of Commodore Taylor at Eagle Point, and while on his way thither, accompanied by a driver, came near losing his life in one of the swales between Central Point and the desert. The melting snow was flooding the country and had gorged the channel in the swale just below the road, causing the water to back up in the road to the depth of several feet, and in the darkness the team became unmanageable and one of the horses was drowned, although the occupants of the buggy cut the animals loose in the endeavor to save them. It has been remarkable that more accidents of this kind have not occurred during the floods of the past week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3


    The stage which came from Medford last Wednesday morning had eleven passengers aboard.
    The roads have no bottom to them anywhere, and there will be a large surplus of mud for some time to come.
    The different roads are full of water, which makes travel more disagreeable than would otherwise be the case.
    Every stream, no matter how small, is running beautifully, and even the sloughs and swales are full of water.
    Attention is called to the new advertisement of the Jackson County Bank at Medford, of which W. I. Vawter is cashier. It is one of the leading banking institutions of southern Oregon, and is steadily growing in popularity.
    Some snow still lingers in the valley, but it is melting fast. If more does not fall, stock losses will not be so great as expected, as the grass is growing nicely under its covering of white and will afford good feed before very long.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3



    EDITOR TIDINGS:--The long anticipated thaw is upon us, making more drear the desolate situation, if possible. For days we have had no communication with the outside world, save our neighboring town of Medford, and the announcement made by the bulletin boards of a through mail from Medford seems also likely to fail us now.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 31, 1890, page 2


Death's Doings.
    Irvin Brown, son of O. T. Brown, of Plevna, died at Medford last Friday, of pneumonia, having taken cold after an attack of the grippe. Deceased was a son-in-law of John Van Horn and a nephew of Mrs. George Stephenson, of this place, and was buried in Phoenix last Saturday. He had recently gone into the blacksmithing business at Medford, and was an industrious young man, and a worthy citizen.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 31, 1890, page 2


    Medford is to have a lodge of Knights of Pythias.
    Medford agrees to stand by her offer of $7,500 toward the bonus for a railroad of Jacksonville, making the same offer to the persons now considering the project that she made in the first place.
    Davis & France, proprietors of the flouring mill at Medford, have bought the Phoenix mill of P. W. Olwell, and intend to overhaul and improve it. They will operate both mills, Mr. Joseph France taking charge of the Phoenix mill.
    The Medford News, a semi-weekly newspaper started last August by Ira A. Phelps and F. B. Ticknor, which was afterward changed to a weekly and subsequently sold to A. D. Dodson, suspended on the 9th inst., for want of patronage.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Tidings, January 31, 1890, page 3


Rainstorms and Floods.
The Rains Descended and the Floods Came.
MUCH DAMAGE TO PROPERTY OVER THE COUNTRY.
    Medford, Or., Feb. 4--Rain pouring down since Friday evening, with scarcely any intermission, and still raining. Bear Creek near town is a raging flood, and yesterday afternoon the new county bridge, built about a year ago at a cost of $1500, was washed away. Mr. Hammon's barn, near the bridge, was also washed off.
    The new water ditch has become a dangerous stream, and has been flooding the southern part of the town and covering the railroad track.
Excerpt, Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 4, 1890, page 1


    Beats the flood of '61-'62,
    All the bridges across Bear Creek below Ashland were carried away at Talent, Medford and Central Point.
    A number of men were on the west apron of the wagon road bridge at Medford yesterday morning when the bridge went down, and Jim Simpson, Ed. Wilkinson and George Kelley fell into the water, but scrambled out unhurt. The old footbridge, as well as the wagon bridge, is gone.
    E. C. Kane, railroad agent at Ashland, has received orders to put fifty men at work immediately on the railroad south of Ashland, beginning work at the first place where the track is damaged and making southward. He offers $1.80 a day and board, but had only found ten or fifteen men this afternoon. This indicates good times here when men can't be had for such work at $1.80 and board. Mr. Kane expects to get some men from Medford tomorrow. All the men who can be had are being hired in the Siskiyous.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 4, 1890, page 2


    B. W. Dean and Will Wright were in town from Willow Springs on Tuesday and report the whole face of nature changed by the flood in the lower Bear Creek valley.
    The Medford Mail was considerably exercised last week over the rumor that an experienced newspaper man in town intends putting in a $5000 weekly paper plant there in a short time.
    Sheriff Birdseye returned from his father's farm yesterday. He says that Rogue River lacked several feet of reaching the high-water mark of 1861-2, although it has never been so high since as it was last Monday.
    Bob Bybee this week had a narrow escape from drowning in Bear Creek, which he was trying to ford at the time. Adam Schmidt fell into Jackson Creek when it was at its highest and was rescued with difficulty by J. D. Wimer.
    The rainfall at Ashland was but about four inches during the first four days of February, while here we had about seven inches. During the month of January there was nearly five inches more rainfall here than there.
    The freight train of ten cars, loaded with delayed freight for points in this valley, which left Sisson yesterday morning, reached Hornbrook last evening, it is said, and there is some expectation of it reaching Ashland tomorrow.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Spring fights have already blossomed out in this place.
    Hay is retailing at $20 a ton, as a few local dealers have nearly the whole supply.
    Medford was this week visited by the biggest flood ever known in these parts, but fortunately the damage done has not been great.
    Jim Simpson, Ed Wilkinson and George Kelley were on the Medford bridge as it went out, and got more or less wet in making their escape.
    The ditch ran full of water during the late flood until the current of one of the lesser foothill streams cut across it and washed it out for a considerable distance.
    The Medford military company do not know yet whether they will be mustered in as infantry or artillery. The boys are training at their quarters in Hamlin's hall.
    Mayor Howard has sold quite a number of lots to Messrs. Slinger, Fowler, Vawter and Palm, who will probably put them on the market and dispose of them on the installment plan.
    The health of Mrs. R. T. Young is very poor, we are sorry to learn, and her daughter, Miss Elma, has returned from Jacksonville, where she has been holding a position in the Times office.
    Medford grocers had a pretty good supply of staples on hand when the blockade began, but in common with other towns of the valley will run short in some lines in a few more days.
    A fight took place between a young man who is visiting relatives here and a cowboy surcharged with liquor a few days since in which the latter came out second best. Both were arrested and each fined $10 and costs, the c.b. pleading guilty, while the other stood trial and was convicted.
    Water is standing in many places in town, the ditch having been badly broken by the great number of sloughs, springs and swales emptying into it. Unless means are employed in the early spring to remove this surplus water, much sickness will surely result in the summer.
    Telegraph linemen on their velocipedes are about the only passersby on the railroad at present. Wm. Singleton of the Western Union line passed south from Grants Pass last Saturday, accompanied by C. W. Ayers. Ed Williams and S. B. Whittle of the Postal line went north as far as Riddle's last week, returning south on Friday.
    Hammon Bros., on the east side of Bear Creek, are among the heaviest losers in this vicinity, the flood having swept away their barn, hay, pig pens and outbuildings, pigs and fowls, besides having done much injury to their growing nursery. The barn went to pieces before falling into the stream, or it would have carried the bridge out with it sooner than that structure left its moorings.
    Mayor Howard has appointed the following committees in the city council: Finance, F. M. Plymale, I. L. Hamilton and A. A. Davis; Streets, A. A. Davis, F. M. Plymale, Frank Galloway; Sanitary, Frank Galloway, A. A. Davis, I. L. Hamilton; Fire and Water, I. L. Hamilton, Frank Galloway and F. M. Plymale. The personnel of the committees is excellent and shows judgment on the part of the mayor.
    The residence of Mark Armstrong had a narrow escape from destruction by fire on Wednesday morning of last week. Miss Josie Armstrong, while engaged in preparing breakfast, discovered the room adjoining the kitchen to be filled with smoke, a mattress having taken fire from a defective flue, and but for prompt action on the part of herself and father the building would have soon been in flames. A few buckets of water quickly extinguished the flames.
    Every effort was made to save the bridge across Bear Creek at this place, but in spite of all exertions it went down on Monday afternoon, greatly to the chagrin of our citizens. It was apparently a fine bridge, but the excavations for the mud sills at the west end were not deep enough to prevent their being undermined by the insidious current. The portion of the bridge which went out became stranded a short distance below town, and much of the material can be saved.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1890, page 3


    The Medford mail is now being carried in a buggy.
    The groundhog certainly never saw his shadow last Saturday.
    The sun can now be seen once in a while, which is quite a treat.
    The agony seems to be over, and nearly all have settled down to their usual avocations again.
    Sisson is still out of the world, but snowplows are approaching there from both north and south.
    There has been a high demand for rubber boots and clothing of late, and the supply is well-night exhausted.
    The grass is growing rapidly, and where the soil is exposed it is covered with a greensward already.
    I. W. Thomas had as even and nice a forty-acre field of water as was to be seen in the valley during the last few days.
    As we go to press the weather is springlike and pleasant. It will not be long before everything will have resumed its wonted equilibrium and business progressing as usual.

    Beginning Friday evening it rained without intermission, except for three hours Sunday night, until Tuesday morning, making far and away the greatest rain storm that has ever been known in this valley.
    One of the sights of our pioneer days may be seen on the streets of Jacksonville again, i.e., packing supplies on horseback instead of hauling them on wagons, as is nowadays entirely the fashion. The flood cut out the roads so badly and swept away so many bridges that it is next to impossible to travel in vehicles.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1890, page 3


    Bear Creek made a clean sweep of all the bridges along its course, not one remaining intact.
    The bridge across Bear Creek near G. F. Pennebaker's place and the Wagner Creek bridge were both washed away.
    Hundreds of acres of growing wheat along Bear Creek were either swept away by surface water or covered up with silt and gravel.
    We learn that about thirty acres of fine land was washed into Bear Creek at the Enoch Walker place last Monday, as also some fine timber.
    The Constant ranch sustained a loss of about forty acres of splendid alluvial soil during the mad rage of Bear Creek last Sunday and Monday.
    The bridge across Bear Creek northeast of Central Point is still there, but the stream is gone, having cut another channel to the west of the structure.
    The lower Bear Creek Valley, from Central Point to the mouth, was one vast lake, water standing for several feet deep about the farm buildings from Peninger's to Tolo.
    Much choice land on Thomas McAndrew's place on Bear Creek fell a prey to the waters, the damage being variously estimated from 40 to 75 acres that was undermined and carried away by the stream.
    At the Ragsdale ranch--the old Toepper place near Bear Creek--Jackson Creek cut a new channel between the house and the barn, and did much damage by depositing silt and sluicing off surface soil and growing wheat.
    Mrs. Hoagland and family, who reside a short distance northeast of Central Point, had a narrow escape from drowning, being compelled to seek the roof of their residence in order to escape the angry waters of Bear Creek.
    For quite a distance south of Tolo the waters of Jackson Creek swept down on one side of the railroad track, while those of Bear Creek "laved" the other side in bad shape. It is needless to say that that portion of the track is in a woeful condition.
"Flood Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1890, page 3


    The water carried in upon Medford by the irrigating canal from Bear Creek, or from sources along its course during the heavy rains, flooded many cellars in town, and a few people are apprehensive that the foundations of their houses may be undermined, but it is not likely that there will be any serious damage from this source.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 6, 1890, page 2


    A strange and beautiful sight appeared in the eastern sky for a time this morning--a clear sun.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 7, 1890, page 2


Bear Creek's Damages.
    The damage done by Bear Creek to the fine farms through which it passes between Ashland and Rogue River is coming to light as the water goes down. When the flood was at its height the damage could not be noticed, but the cutting was, nevertheless, in progress, and the creek still continues to eat away its banks, and carry off the soil of the rich alluvial bottoms. From Casebeer's on down the damage is greater than the creek has ever done before, because so much grubbing and clearing has been done within the past few years. The farms of Casebeer, Helms, Alford, Pennebaker, Harvey, the Colver places, L. A. Rose, Van Dyke, and others, on down to Medford, and of Phipps, Walker, Wrisley, Merriman and others below Medford, have been damaged to the extent of from $100 to $500 or $1000 each, by the washing away of some of their choicest patches of bottom land. Up the creek near and above Ashland, the greater part of the damage is from the loss of fencing. The Frank Bauer place has lost about a thousand rails, H. True has lost about a mile of fence, and others have suffered losses to a greater or lesser extent. As reported before, all the bridges and footlogs went down toward the sea.
Ashland Tidings, February 7, 1890, page 3


BORN.
LUMSDEN--In Medford, January 22, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. H. U. Lumsden, a son.
RICHARDSON--In Medford, January 20, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Richardson, a son.
Ashland Tidings, February 7, 1890, page 3


    The Medford military company expect to be commissioned as an artillery company, so the Mail says.
    Variety is the spice of life, they say. Won't it be spicy to see a train come in from the south again?
    Bear Creek had fallen much by this morning, and a number of teams were able to cross at the fords. The fords are all reported much deeper, however, than before the high water.
    Dog salmon are reported very numerous in the small branches of Bear Creek, while in Bear and Ashland creeks the chinook and other fine eating fish are running, and the boys are having plenty of fun catching them.
    The militia company lately formed at Medford has about 60 members. By waiting till one regiment of the O.N.G. is mustered out, some months hence, the company can be mustered in the infantry branch, or it may be mustered in as light artillery now. The boys have not yet fully decided which to choose. They have secured lots near the Baptist Church in the city, upon which to build their armory.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 8, 1890, page 2


Down the Valley.
    The roads are muddy and bad between Ashland and Medford, but not worse than they have been before. The worst place is in the sticky through the Justus place just this side of Medford. The bridges are all up and safe for wagons except one little one just at south end of the Justus lane, and there is a good enough road around this.
    Temporary expedients have been in use for crossing Bear Creek, but the stream is safe to ford now in some places. At Medford a cable was rigged up across the missing bents of the bridge the other day, to which was hung a box suspended from a pulley that traverses the cable. A similar arrangement was put up by Joshua Patterson, Bell and others at Talent. E. F. Walker began today to throw a temporary bridge across the creek at his place between Medford and Central Point, in order to get John Walker's band of sheep across to green feed, as the sheep are not doing so well off dry feed as they should.
    Eggs are selling at 15 cents a dozen in Medford this week.
    The Medford bridge will probably soon be repaired. Considerable of it is standing, but very little damaged, and all the timbers of the part that went out have been saved and can be used again. The Talent bridge was damaged worse, and the people at that place are feeling bad over the loss. Many of the timbers can be saved, but the repairs will cost considerable.
    J. E. Fenton, "Boots" (the cigar drummer who stopped in Ashland for a time), Mr. Winn, an eastern stockman, and another gentleman started from Medford for Portland last Tuesday "by rail." They went with a handcar as far as Grants Pass, or farther, and have been stepping ties beyond that point. Mr. Dunn, manager of Staver's & Walker's house in Medford, heard by wire that they reached Glendale Thursday noon.
    The Tidings delivered its weekly mail as far as Medford this week by its own carrier, and expected to reach a number of other places from Medford not on regular mail routes, by the help of people willing to carry the news for their neighbors.
Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 8, 1890, page 2


IN FLAGRANTE DELICTO.
    There seems to be an uncontrollable desire on the part of our public men to indulge in "poetry" on the slightest provocation. One of our citizens, who fills a high position socially and politically, while flood-bound by Jackson Creek last week was seized with the surging longing that is not akin to pain, and while under duress of inspiration indicted the appended atrocity, which he undertook to palm off anonymously on the Times by sending it to Medford, and thence by mail, under the caption of "The Flood in Southern Oregon in 1890," composed by one from the States--tune "Beulah Land." While the fatherless waif reposed helplessly on the editorial table, its authorship unidentified, the gentleman incidentally happened in to inquire the time of day and accidentally heard the editor and subeditor caustically discussing the frailties of the effusion, whereupon the paternal instinct in his bosom became so aroused that he endeavored to rescue the child of his imagination from the pitiless clutches of the reviewer, and like the mother of Solomon's divided baby revealed its true parentage. His handwriting would have given him away if he hadn't called in to inquire of its fate. The Times will always do its utmost to expose fraud of every kind, and but for the fact that the gentleman's soul, as his friends well know, was pervaded with the saddest kind of "music" during that period of depression, we should publish his name in full. The next aspirant for spring-poetry fame will please send along full name and address and we will probably boom him for congress. Following is the poem:
I've reached the land of fruit and wine,
And all its riches freely mine.
Here are clouds that never pass away,
For it rains and rains both night and day.
 
CHORUS:
O, Oregon! Sweet Oregon!
As on the highest hills I stand,
I look away across the dale,
Where Bear and Jackson creeks prevail,
And float the people from their homes
On rafts that they have built alone.
   
The neighbors come and talk with me,
And sad communion here have we;
I gently lead them by the hand,
Far up into the higher land.
CHORUS.
A sweet perfume upon the breeze
Is borne from all the cedar trees,
But flowers ne'er desire to grow
Where winter rains unceasing flow.
CHORUS.
The voices floating up to me
Sound like the deepest misery,
And people with their gum boots on
Join in this sad and mournful song.
CHORUS.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 2


G. W. Howard to Wm. Slinger, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 15, 17 and 18, in block 46, and other lots in Medford; $1300.
Same to C. W. Palm, Wm. Slinger and W. I. Vawter, lots 1 and 2, block 28, Medford; $80.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, February 13, 1890, page 2



    As is not usually the case in winter, the road between this place and Medford is better than that leading to Central Point.
    Bridge timbers for four bridges to the north of Medford were loaded on the construction train at this place last Sunday. The work of straightening up the roadbed between this place and Cow Creek Canyon will go forward rapidly now.
    Loud cheers greeted the construction train which passed through Medford on Tuesday, and hope took the place of despondency among our citizens. The destination of the train of bunk and construction cars was Cow Creek Canyon, where the men will find employment for some time to come.
    Clutter & Co., the Medford artists, prepared a series of flood photos, showing the Bear Creek bridge when the water was at its highest and Hammon's barn still standing on the further side, and subsequent pictures showing the bridge in various stages of demolition after the barn had fallen.
"Here and There, " Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 3




Now Is Your Chance.
    Lots adjoining the city park of Medford, the most desirable in town, will be sold on the installment plan, and at very reasonable rates.
C. W. Palm               
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mayor Howard is embellishing his town property with a new fence.
    The flood widened Bear Creek channel to the dimensions of a river in this vicinity in many places.
    Bear Creek has been fordable at this point, a short distance above the bridge site, since last Friday.
    The Mail has been issuing an interesting little daily paper for the past week, which is well received.
    A freight train took several carloads of Davis & France's celebrated flour to Grants Pass one day this week.
    Miss M. M. Gallaher has secured apartments with Mrs. F. B. Ticknor, where she will continue the dressmaking business.
    An effort will be made to have a large modern schoolhouse built in Medford next spring. The increasing population renders it very necessary.
    Fred O'Bryant, the well-known jeweler, has sold his business to D. T. Pritchard, who is well equipped to do the people justice in his line.
    Beans are quoted at six cents a pound at present, and are scarce at that. We have no sugar and little coffee, while other staples are running low.
    Messrs. Wood & Whiteside rendered a genuine service to the community in rigging up their ferry for temporary use in crossing Bear Creek last week.
    Mrs. E. W. Hammon was the first lady passenger to cross Bear Creek in the suspension cradle, rigged in imitation of the lifesaving service apparatus in use along the coast. The car is dizzy-looking, but safe enough.
    The first movement of freight on the railroad from Medford was the shipment of four carloads of flour by Davis & France to Grants Pass last Tuesday, and one carload to the blockade workers in the Siskiyous.
    A Knights of Pythias lodge will be organized at Medford as soon as mail communication is established with the outside world. The charter membership will be twenty-five or more, including several from Jacksonville.
    At a stated meeting of our Rebekah degree lodge of Odd Fellows, the following officers were installed: N.G., Mrs. Geo. H. Haskins; V.G., Mrs. E. B. Pickel; Rec. Sec., Miss Helen Strang; Per. Sec., Mrs. L. Kelly; Treasurer, Mrs. Lyons.
    Loud cheers greeted the construction train which passed through Medford on Tuesday, and hope took the place of despondency among our citizens. The destination of the train of bunk and construction cars was Cow Creek Canyon, where the men will find employment for some time to come.

      Clutter & Co., the Medford artists, prepared a series of flood photos, showing the Bear Creek bridge when the water was at its highest and Hammon's barn still standing on the further side, and subsequent pictures showing the bridge in various stages of demolition after the barn had fallen.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 3


    Fred Harbaugh of Portland, who is visiting his brother, O. Harbaugh, has been quite sick, though he is better now.
    Levi Morris, who has been at Talent during the blockade, will remove his family from Winters, Cal. to southern Oregon, as soon as spring opens.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1890, page 3


    The report that the Medford water ditch was the cause of flooding cellars and injuring houses in that place is denied by the citizens. The water was shut off at the head, and the ditch was of much service, they say, in carrying off from about town water that might have done more or less damage if it had taken some other course.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 14, 1890, page 3


    Ashland and Medford are the only places within the blockaded region that have had daily papers with telegraphic news.
"Brevities," Ashland Daily Evening Tidings, February 15, 1890, page 2


    Mr. Livingstone and family, who have been residents of Jacksonville for several months past, remove their effects to Medford today, where they will remain until the blockade [landslides on the railroad] raises.
    The freighting business between this place and Medford has been suspended for some time, but will show renewed activity when the freight trains get in from north and south. The wagon road is in better condition than usual at this time of year.
    Several of the poles belonging to the Jackson County Telegraph Co.'s line, between this place and Medford, fell down during the forepart of the week, and the postal telegraph office at Jacksonville is closed for the present in consequence. Repairs are now in progress, however.
    No freight train has arrived from either way for several weeks past, and many articles of daily use are running short in southern Oregon. If no sugar arrives soon, many people will be drinking coffee and tea without their usual "sweetening." A number of other supplies are running short.
    The Valley Record was compelled to print its last number on poster paper and to issue only half a sheet besides. We suppose the philanthropic Leeds also told Bro. Kaiser he had barely enough newspaper for a single issue of the Tidings, although he has been issuing a daily dodger and several editions of his weekly since. For pure, unadulterated selfishness and smallness, the Tidings man can give anybody many points and then distance him.
"Here and There, " Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1890, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A son was born to Mr. and Mrs. John Robinson on the 13th.
    Trespassers upon Nickell's addition in Medford will be arrested and prosecuted.
    The street commissioner is busily engaged in repairing the damages done by the late flood.
    Geo. A. Webb has resigned his position in the Post Office Store and is again clerking for Adkins & Webb.
    The Noland saloon property will be disposed of at public sale on March 22, 1890. It is one of the best pieces of real estate in town.
    Trade has been resumed to some extent, and our businessmen are again talking up new enterprises. We will take a long step forward in 1890.
    Orra Angle has turned over his stock of goods to San Francisco creditors. We are sorry to hear of his embarrassment, as he is a deserving young man.
    The Monarch Saloon in Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    If Medford don't become the chief city of Rogue River Valley it won't be our fault. Already we hear of several new projects, which will help our town in its race very much.
    The social party at Howard's hall on the night of St. Valentine's Day was a well-attended and interesting event. Hamilton Bros.' well-known string band furnished the music, which was most excellent.
    Some parties have been entering Nickell's addition to Medford, throwing down the fences and stealing the timber growing there. The proprietor of said property is looking for those fellows and will prosecute them to the full extent of the law.
    It is said that Fred O'Bryant, the jeweler, has skipped for California, leaving a number of unsettled accounts. He has proven a villain of the deepest dye, and should be shunned and distrusted by all respectable people. The Times warns the public against this scoundrel.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call for he will treat you well.
    G. B. Mathews was in town from Eagle Point on Monday last after Dr. Geary, who was called to attend Miss Neil, who is quite ill. Mr. M. states that most of the stock which was not gotten up to be fed has already perished on the range. Six horses belonging to Mathews Bros., of thirteen head which they failed to get out of the mountains, are known to be dead.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1890 page 4


Now Is Your Chance.
    Lots adjoining the city park in Medford, the most desirable in town, will be sold on the installment plan, and at very reasonable rates.
C. W. PALM
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1890 page 4


To the Farmers of Jackson County.
    Having found it impracticable to operate our mill at Medford as an exchange mill, we have purchased the Washington Mills of Phoenix, and will continue to operate them on the exchange plan. As soon as practicable we will overhaul the mill and place it in first-class repair. So bring on your wheat and we will prove to you that you will be treated as well by the new firm as the old.
                                   Respectfully yours,
DAVIS & FRANCE
Medford, Or., Jan. 20, 1890
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1890 page 4


DON'T BELIEVE ALL RUMORS.
    The readiness with which people accept as true reports which are upon their face exceedingly improbable is shown in the rumor which gained general credence at Medford the first of the week that a large quantity of mail matter from the south for that place was piled up in the Ashland post office, and the Ashland postmaster refused to send it down, for some reason. Our neighbors down the valley had positive reports to this effect, they say first from the station agent at Medford and then from other people who arrived at Medford from Ashland. Believing the report to be true, they were naturally indignant and the Tidings editor was considerably surprised, upon happening into Medford Tuesday evening, at being evidently regarded as one of a whole townful of conspirators up here who were keeping Medford out of its delayed mail--just for meanness or malice or for some other inexplicable reason. Why our neighbors should be so ready to accept such an opinion of the people of Ashland is difficult to understand. The Tidings knows that there is a genuine neighborly feeling here for the Medford people, and if there had been a quantity of delayed mail here for that place which the railroad would not carry word would have been sent at once from the postmaster here, or from some of our citizens, so that wagons could have been sent up after it, just as the Medford people would undoubtedly have informed us had there been delayed Ashland mail piled up there.
    The facts about the receipt of delayed mail here are as follows: On Friday night or Saturday morning last the first mail and express matter transferred at Tunnel 9, south of Dunsmuir (the point of obstruction which prevents the trains from running through from San Francisco) left that place for Ashland. There were eleven tons of delayed mail and express matter, occupying a baggage and a boxcar. Of this delayed mail there was none for Ashland or any point in this valley, but two or three sacks for Crescent City, Cal., which were sent to Grants Pass--the point of departure from the railroad for mail directed to that point. Ashland, Medford and all other places in this valley were served precisely alike--none of them received any of the delayed mail by this first train. There was no mail clerk with that train, but when the train started back to Dunsmuir the only railway mail clerk here--A. L. Noltner--went with it, and was expected to get Southern Oregon mail, and work it for all the towns in the valley. The train stuck in the snow somewhere near Sisson, and did not reach Dunsmuir until Wednesday morning,w hen it loaded again with transferred mail and express matter at the point of transfer and started back for Ashland. Up to yesterday afternoon it had not arrived here, and we have not had a pound of mail in Ashland yet from beyond Dunsmuir since the blockade began.
    The postmaster at Ashland and the railroad agent here have done the best that could be done for the local mail service north from this place. Postmaster Farlow made up the mail here for Medford and other places, and Agent Kane had the baggageman on the train to take the lock pouches and deliver at stations as the pouches were directed. The pouches were not returned from the north for several days, however, and consequently the mail could not be sent from here for a day or two. Some pouches came back Wednesday morning, and were sent out again with mail. If the postmasters north will send the pouches back every day they will get daily all the mail here for their offices. This is the best that can be done until a mail clerk is put on to stay with the train and attend to receiving and working the local mail. Supt. of Ry. Mail Service Wilder ordered clerks of the north division last Friday to attend to the service between Glendale and Mott, saying all those south were occupied down there. As there is only one clerk between Glendale and Mott, the superintendent had better send some in here, or have one or two sworn in temporarily for the local service.
Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 2


The Rumor Spread.
    The reports that mail from the south for Medford was lying at Ashland was enlarged and elaborated and from Medford the news was taken to Grants Pass that mail for that place also was stacked up and guarded by the defiant Ashland postmaster behind the bayonets of the Ashland militia company. So yesterday morning the indignant post officer of Grants Pass sent up his office deputy to see if something couldn't be done to induce the postmaster here to let go of it. Strange the postmasters of Southern Oregon don't know one another well enough to be on corresponding terms. A question by telegram would have been courteously and civilly answered by the Ashland postmaster.
Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 3


Back to San Francisco.
    Postmaster Farlow Tuesday evening sent a telegram to postmaster Moore at Roseburg asking him how much mail there was at Roseburg for this place and if any efforts were being made to have it transferred around the obstructions between here and there. The reply stated that orders had been received that night to forward all mail for points south of Grants Pass to Portland, to take steamer from there to San Francisco. One of the principal points the people here wanted to be enlightened upon--how much mail was stored up at Roseburg for points in this valley--was not answered. At the shortest calculation, the mail thus sent around can not get here before next Wednesday from the south--if the road is open then.
Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 3


    Ashland and Medford are the only places within the blockaded region that have had daily papers with telegraphic news.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 3


    A fine prospect of coal was exposed by the flood, near the farm of Wm. Plymire, east of Medford, it is reported.
    Sugar has been ordered from San Francisco by express by Medford parties. The regular rate will make it cost three cents per pound.
    Enoch Walker, while fording Bear Creek on his farm one day last week, was thrown from his horse into deep water, and only by the timely assistance of two men who accompanied him was he saved from drowning.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 3


    Mr. F. Wagner and Miss Mina M. Barry, both of Medford, were married at the residence of Mr. E. Clutter in that place on Sunday Feb. 9th, Squire L. L. Angle officiating.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 21, 1890, page 3

L. M. Lyon to I. J. Phipps, west half of lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $135.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1890, page 2


    Fred Fradenburg, the celebrated timber locator, has arrived from California and taken charge of the property he purchased of I. B. Williams. He will be a valuable accession to our town.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Arthur Boussum succeeds Geo. Webb as Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express agent here.
    Dr. Will Jackson expects to open dental rooms in the opera house block in a short time.   
    The A.O.U.W. are making preparations to fit up lodge rooms in Angle & Plymale's brick building.
    Anderson & Wood brought a carload of wood from the north last week, retailing the same at $4.50 a cord.
    Medford merchants were out of coffee, sugar, potatoes and onions for several days last week, but have since obtained some supplies from their neighbors.
    Davis & France are doing a nail-driving business in the milling line, finding it difficult to keep up with orders for the fine product which they are daily turning out.
    Nearly the whole of our population was at the depot on Tuesday evening, to welcome the train which brought so much delayed mail for southern Oregon. It didn't arrive on time, however.
    Dr. Geary's skill as an oculist was called into requisition in treating a case of cataract on the eyes of a county charge of Josephine County a short time since. The operation was entirely successful, and while the surgical services will cost the county quite a sum, a blind man is thereby made a useful member of society.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1890, page 3


    One of the children of Frank Amann of Medford died last week and was buried in the Jacksonville cemetery next day.
    Thirty sacks of delayed mail matter will arrive today, making nearly a hundred sacks that will be Jacksonville's portion of the accumulated mails.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1890, page 3


    People going to Jacksonville will find Plymale's coach awaiting every train at Medford. Ask for the best coach--Plymale's.
Ashland Tidings, February 28, 1890, page 3


    No freight train has arrived in the valley for six weeks, and the end is not yet. Some staple goods are quite low.
    J. Goldsmith, the popular Medford grocer, has lately received a carload of fine potatoes, which he is selling in quantities to suit.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 2


    Judge Webster is in town from Jacksonville. He says that the entire mail of fifty-five sacks was distributed by 4 o'clock. Miss Pape has long been known as the "lightning distributor," a title justly earned from long practice and natural aptitude--[Medford Mail, Feb. 27.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Several fine brick buildings will be built during the coming season.
    Ralph Miller is now holding down a situation at Ed. Worman's stables.
    Wm. Cofer, lately of Montague, Cal., has become a resident of this place.
    J. W. Frazer is now located on Wagner Creek and engaged in the wood business.
    Wm. Clark replenished his stock of cigars with a consignment by express last week.
    A. H. Sunderman left here last week for Steinman, where he is working for the railroad company.
    The neat and tidy residence being constructed in southern Medford belongs to A. S. Johnson.
    Henry Flindt has sold his business to Isaac Skeeters and son and will return to Albany soon.
    Dr. Geary has gone to the Willamette Valley to look after the estate of his deceased father, but will return soon.
    Hanley & Wilkinson are supplying 600 pounds of fresh beef per day to Pratt's laborers in Cow Creek Canyon.
    Our town election comes off next Tuesday, and will no doubt prove interesting, as there are two tickets in the field.
    Foot passengers can safely cross Bear Creek on the footbridge at this place, as a good handrail has been provided.
    D. T. Pritchard, the expert jeweler and watchmaker, has removed to the brick building formerly occupied by Orra Angle.
    Orra Angle has closed his business for the present, but expects to resume at an early date with a larger stock of goods than ever.
    L. O. Dowell is now associated with Chas. Brous in the saloon business, which the latter has conducted alone heretofore.
    Local members of the A.F.&A.M. order have hopes of being able to organize a lodge at Medford during the the coming year.
    M. E. Dougherty last week returned to this place from Mexico, where he has resided for some years, and will probably relocate here.
    Mr. O'Donnell has purchased a half interest in the Railroad Saloon of Chas. Brous. Give the new firm a call, as they keep the best of everything in their line.
    Talbot, one of the parties who conducted a skating rink here some time ago, has skipped from Grants Pass, leaving everybody who trusted him in the lurch.
    Two businesslike young gentlemen, J. A. Leonard and C. F. Skeeters, last week bought out the merchandising business of Mr. Flindt of this place, and will locate here permanently.
    Some of our citizens met last Tuesday evening and nominated the following ticket: Trustee, C. Magruder, J. W. Merritt, W. J. Flippen, D. L. Newton and C. Jeffers; recorder, Anson Ford; treasurer, S. Cornutt; marshal, C. Geer; street commissioner, John Geer.
    The city fathers very wisely determined after the bridge went out to provide the town with the best possible ford, and Isaac Woolf's skill in improving the old crossing at the bridge site has been the means of satisfying the most exacting. It is now a safe ford and will be kept in good condition, says the Mail.
    Thos. McAndrew has been engaged for the past two weeks in endeavoring to make a straight channel for Bear Creek through his ranch, in the hope that in the future the stream would confine itself to its bed and refrain from sluicing away the rich alluvium that composes its banks.
    There is urgent demand for an armory for the accommodation of the militia company at Medford. The Mail estimates that $300 will procure the raw material to construct a hall 50x100 feet, amply large enough for drill purposes, and it is hoped that public spirit will induce some of the residents of our live town to provide the hall.
    The public school examinations were indicative of careful, painstaking training on the part of the teachers, and studious application by as bright a lot of pupils as ever gladdened fond parents' hearts on examination day. The urgent need of the day is a school building that will afford adequate accommodations for the ever-increasing attendance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 3


    The Point expects to have two newspapers in a short time now. A gentleman who is stormbound in the valley is negotiating for the News plant at Medford, we learn, for at this place the Times has a complete hand press outfit which it will dispose of at a reasonable figure, if a third paper at Central Point is needed to fill the field.
    P. W. Olwell is preparing to build a fine residence on his orchard ranch in the environs of town. He was singularly fortunate in getting nearly all his 12,000 fruit trees to grow last summer, dry as the season was, and if the present year proves as favorable as it now promises, his immense orchard will prove a veritable mine of wealth in a very few more years.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 3


Martha B. Howard to Marion E. Tryer, lot 12, block 40, Medford: $40.
O.&T. Co. to J. F. Tryer, lot 2, block
80, Medford; $30.
W. H. Pomeroy to Ina E. Pomeroy, lot 9, block 22, Medford; $50.
O.&T. Co. to Wm. Ulrich and T. J. Kenney, lots 5 and 6, block 70, Medford; $105.
E. L. Flindt to J. A. Leonard and C. F. Skeeters, lot 15, block
13, Medford; $1400.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1890, page 3


    Chas. Enyart has received from his brother Jesse, now in Medford, Oregon, a copy of the Daily Mail, a little shinplaster paper about 10x18 inches. It has no display ads and nearly all telegraph matter. It is a fair specimen of the rustle of a small western town that is bound to have a daily paper.
"Daily Happenings," Logansport (Indiana) Reporter, March 6, 1890, page 1


    The big house of Staver & Walker opens the season with a big ad upon the first page of the Tidings this week. The branch house at Medford carries a large and complete stock of farming implements and machinery, wagons, carriages, buggies, etc., and the farmers and others of Southern Oregon needing anything in this line are respectfully invited to call and examine their goods and ascertain prices.
    A. J. Daley, of the Eagle Point flouring mills, has let the contract for a complete set of the new patent roller process machinery, of the capacity of 50 barrels a day, which is to be put in the mill as soon as the freight trains will bring the machinery. Mr. L. Rouch, who put up the Medford mill, is to have charge of the job. Jackson County will soon be known abroad as the location of mills making the best flour in the state.
    A carload of potatoes from Woodburn, Oregon, consigned to a town down in California, was caught in Ashland by the blockage last January, and numerous persons have been negotiating for their purchase. The owner, through an agent sent here, more than half sold them several times; but always pulled the sale back just as the purchaser thought he had a bargain secured. Goldsmith the Medford grocer finally bought the carload last Saturday, paying $2.10 per 100 lbs., a good purchase.
    Commissioner J. D. Whitman, of the State Board of Horticulture, came up from Medford Tuesday on a mission of investigation and inquiry concerning the existence in this part of the county of the San Jose scale, which has done considerable damage to orchards in other neighborhoods. Mr. Whitman says the late spring will make the time for use of the caustic washes short this season, but he hopes to see energetic measures adopted and the scale thoroughly eradicated from the few places in which it has obtained a lodgment in the valley.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 7, 1890, page 3


FRANK GALLOWAY,
Medford,     -      Oregon,
MANUFACTURER OF
CELEBRATED UNIVERSAL COMBINATION FENCE!

View of Fence in Position.
It's Especially Adapted for Farms, Ranches, Orchards, Gardens and Lawns,
NEAT, DURABLE, STRONG AND CHEAP.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890 et seq., page 1


AN OPEN LETTER.
TO THE EDITOR OF THE MAIL:
    DEAR SIR:--I am not in the habit of trying lawsuits in the newspapers. In fact, I have always supposed that all newspaper men of standing in the profession conceded that it was a gross impropriety (if not contempt of court) for newspapers to comment on the merits of any case while pending in court; and I should not now appear in print had you been content to stop at a commission of such impropriety in the unfair and unjust manner in which you week before last commented upon the merits of the case of F. Hubbard vs. the town of Medford, then pending before the Circuit Court. But, in your apparent eagerness to display the Mail as defender of the public authority, you are not satisfied with attempting to influence judicial action by such comment, but return to your attack last week, after the decision, with misrepresentations, through gross insinuations, and that without even taking the trouble to ascertain what are the facts in the case; and I now resort to the press only in the interest of justice to my client and the public. What are the fact? Simply these: Last season Mr. Hubbard was doing business on a leased lot on the principal business street in Medford, in a wooden building of his own; but unfortunately later in the fall, a fire starting in an adjoining shop destroyed his building and property. He subsequently asked of members of the then board of trustees for permission to erect a new building upon the site of the old, provided he could obtain a renewal of his lease, and was told by two of the members at least to procure his lease and they would do what they could for him. But failing to procure the lease, after conversing with numerous citizens and being advised by them that if he purchased the lot he afterward purchased in block 2 (which now has a wooden building on every lot thereof but one fronting on Main Street), and erected an addition to the wooden building already thereon, they did not believe he would be disturbed; and being unable to erect a brick or rent a suitable building at rates he could afford to pay, and believing and being advised by his counsel (an opinion they still entertain) that the ordinance was invalid and exceeded the chartered powers of the town, he, as a last resort to reestablish his business in the town, bought the lot and proceeded to extend the building thereon, and was at once notified by the marshal to desist. His friends, on consideration of the circumstances, appealed to the town board to permit him to proceed, which the board refused. His only remedy then was an appeal to the court to determine his rights; and that he proceeded to do in an open, fair manner, in the method greed upon between himself and the town authorities, even going to the trouble of informing the marshal when he would commence work on his building, that he might arrest him; and it is for making that appeal to the courts that you denounce him by insinuation as an outlaw and not entitled to any protection of the law. There was no constitutional question in the case, as you assert. The only question aside from one of pleading was whether or not the charter of the town conferred upon it authority to establish fire limits therein and prohibit the erection of wooden buildings within the same. You profess to be a lawyer, an old practitioner at the bar. Will you now please tell the public for what courts are established and maintained at great expense by the public, if it is not to determine such as well as other legal controversies about their rights between citizens and the public authorities? Will you also please tell us of what extraordinary sacred material the authorities of the town of Medford is composed that its ordinances and demands are infallible and beyond the right of the citizen to appeal to the courts for redress from real or imaginary interference with his rights thereby. You, as an old practitioner, ought to know that municipal corporations are subject to the law, and bodies of limited power possessing only such powers as are expressly conferred by their charters or necessarily implied therefrom or absolutely essential to the purposes of their creation. Will you also please tell us by what authority you so positively announce in advance the decision of the Supreme Court even before an appeal is taken thereto? You have had much to say in your paper about what the Mail was to do toward building up Medford, Jackson County and the Rogue River Valley. Is it by denouncing the business men of your pale of legal protection (when in fact you are wholly unable, as you are in this case, to cite a single instance where they have violated any law or ordinance from any other motive except in good faith to test its validity in the courts) that you expect to build up the town and county? Is it by such intolerance, misrepresentation and denunciation as your editorials in the above-mentioned case contain, and through the columns of your paper impressing the world with the idea that such are characteristics of the community in which you live, that you expect to accomplish your purpose of building up the country and induce the desirable immigrant and capitalist to locate in your midst? Do you imagine that intolerance, misrepresentation and abuse are more potent in the building process than liberality and justice? Yours truly,
J. H. WHITMAN.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Potatoes have been retailing at four cents per pound here.
    John Edwards, who has been quite ill, is convalescing.
    Eli Wood, late of Sams Valley, has become a resident of this precinct.
    It is stated that the converts at the recent revival now progressing number thirty.
    The Workmen are now occupying the new hall in the opera house building, and have pleasant quarters.
    The Noland property will be sold on April 12, 1890, instead of March 22d as previously advertised.
    Rev. Mr. Aleridge is assisting in the revival at the M.E. Church, and making a good impression.
    Medford merchants received a big supply of sugar, coffee and other groceries on Monday, and there is an abundance of everything again.
    The Roller Flouring Mills are now running both day and night to supply the demand for their superior flour and mill feed.
    A lodge of the order of Knights of Pythias was organized in Medford last Tuesday night. Some of our prominent citizens are members.
    Thomas Harlan of the Medford Mail this week left for a visit of some weeks to his old home in Nebraska. We wish him a pleasant trip.
    The railroad between Jacksonville and Medford is an assured fact, we are glad to say. When work commences these towns will improve fast.
    Contrary to all expectations Medford is enjoying the best of health, although her physicians are kept busy attending calls from out-of-town patients.
    At the school meeting on the 3d instant, P. B. O'Neil was elected a director of Medford district, and D. S. Youngs was elected clerk for the ensuing year. Both are excellent selections.
    Medford will make great progress during 1890. Your correspondent learns that several brick edifices are in contemplation, to say nothing of the numerous other buildings which will be built.
    A. L. Reuter and J. Nunan, two of Jacksonville's most prominent citizens, visited our town on Wednesday. They came on business connected with the proposed railroad between this place and the county seat.
    Work on the water works is suspended until the railway company can deliver material necessary for their construction. The framework for the tanks is up and most of the necessary piping is on the ground.
    The name of M. Purdin has been freely mentioned in connection with the office of county assessor. He would make a most excellent official, and we therefore are sorry to learn that he cannot possibly allow his name to go before the convention, as his business interests require his entire attention.
    The circuit judge has dismissed the case of the town of Medford vs. F. Hubbard, thus affirming the judgment of the recorder's court. This decision clinches the fact that there will be no more wooden buildings put up within the fire-limits district. As will be remembered, Mr. H. was fined $50 and costs for attempting to put up a wooden building in the district where the erection of such structures was prohibited by ordinance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 2


I. J. Phipps to Sam McGee, lot 1, block
40, Medford; $50.
O.&T. Co. to Addie
B. Colvig, lots 7, 8 and 9, block 53, Medford: $250.
J. C. Cowles to
William R. Callahan, lot 15, block 6, Park add. to Medford; $250.
C. Mingus to W. H. Barr, lot
13, block 44, Medford; $160.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 2


All Subscribed.
    The entire stock of the Jacksonville and Medford Railway Company has been subscribed; an arrangement will be made at the two towns to secure terminal facilities for the construction companies. The work will prove somewhat of a drain upon our resources just at this time, and the alacrity with which our public-spirited citizens have undertaken the task of putting the scheme through to immediate completion is but an indication of how thoroughly in earnest our people are in this matter, and will do much to gain the confidence of capital seeking investment here. The building of the road will infuse new life into the community and will add fifty percent to the worth of every lot in Jacksonville, not to speak of doubling the value of every foot of land for half a mile on each side of the right-of-way. We are assured that the land owners along the proposed route intend to be equally as liberal in the matter of granting right-of-way as the townspeople have been in subscribing the bonus, and we trust that no obstacle will be thrown in the way of a happy solution of the question of quick transportation to the railroad.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 3


    The blockade is over and everybody is happy.
    There is a superabundance of mud everywhere. The roads are in a sad plight.
    Spring fights have already blossomed out in good style in different parts of the country.
    The merchants of southern Oregon are patronizing San Francisco jobbers almost exclusively now, as freight trains are not running farther south of Portland than Myrtle Creek.
    Trains are running regularly again, the only hitch being at the slide in the Cow Creek Canyon, where mails and passengers must be transferred, which causes a delay of one day.
    The live cattle feeder, Fred Barneburg, last week shipped fifty-two head of beef cattle to Portland that averaged 1380 lbs. each. He is one of the most judicious and successful feeders in the state.
    The ground is drying fast and will soon be ready for plowing. Farm work has been delayed very much, and unless the weather continues favorable the acreage will be considerably shorter than usual.
    A dweller far up in the foothills was asked a few days since by a valley farmer what he would charge to deliver potatoes at the latter's farm. "Fifteen cents per pound," was the reply; "come to the ranch after them and you can have plenty for two and a half cents." There is a whole sermon on bad roads in his reply.
    To dwellers east of the Cascades the mention of Jackson County is synonymous with a dream of wealth. The Lakeview Examiner says: Frank Lewis won another foot race at Central Point a few weeks ago, defeating Cameron, and winning a purse of $1,800.
    A. Z. Sears of Medford a short time ago received the sad intelligence of the death of his aged father, Christopher Sears, who died at the residence of an only daughter, Mrs. Chas. Riley, at Harney City, January 11th last, at the advanced age of 88 years. Deceased came to Oregon in 1852, and had been an inhabitant of the state ever since. He left this place last October to visit his daughter at Harney City, and the rigors of the winter proved too much for his weakened constitution. He was a lifelong Democrat, and it was his boast that he had voted for every Democratic nominee for the presidency from Andrew Jackson to Grover Cleveland, excepting only Buchanan, for whom he could not vote, as he was then a resident of a territory.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 3


    R. T. Young, commander of Medford's post of the G.A.R., was in town on Monday for the purpose of making arrangements to secure county aid for indigent soldiers, as prescribed by law, whenever it is necessary.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 3


The Railroad Obstruction.
    From parties who have just returned from the front we learn that it will be nearly a month before trains will be running uninterruptedly between San Francisco and Portland. A large force of men are still at work on the big slide, but the most of it still remains and the pond caused by it is still two miles in extent. It will be necessary to build a track around that huge obstruction, as it completely covered up one tunnel, and it will be impossible to put the road where it formerly ran. One of the largest trains of cars passed down the road last Friday night, en route to the front, loaded with material of all kinds, including the timbers (which were framed at Sacramento, Cal.) for some of the bridges that will replace those spanning Cow Creek before the flood. It will be a few weeks at least before repairs will be finished, and until then passengers and mail matter must be transferred by teams between Glendale and Riddles.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 3


    Plymale is again running his stages between this place and Medford regularly.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890, page 3


J. H. REDFIELD,
COR. 6TH AND C STREETS,
MEDFORD,  -  -  OREGON.
---
GENERAL
BLACKSMITHING!
----
    None but experienced shoers employed and satisfaction in all cases. General repair work, plow sharpening, tire setting, etc., carefully attended to at reasonable rates.
Horseshoeing a Specialty!
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1890 et seq., page 4


Almira Wilson to Ransom R. Dunn, lot 9, blk 24, Medford; $150.
Orra E. Angle to
E. F. Walker, bond for deed to 3.74 acres in Medford precinct.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. E. Enyart, of Medford, is assisting J. H. Whitman in the abstracting business at present.
    It gives us pleasure to learn that Orra E. Angle will soon be in business again, with a nice line of clothing and gents' furnishing goods.
    Frank Galloway keeps on grinding out combination fence at the rate of thirty-five rods per day, and finds a ready market for all of it.
    The Mail says that the water bonds were to have been floated last week at 95 cents on the dollar. Outside parties were the purchasers.
    The Mail reports that fifteen young men in Medford have mutually agreed to keep out of the saloons. We could name fifteen whose abstention from loafing the saloon keepers would joyously note.
    H. H. Wolters refuses to pay billiard hall license, as he does not charge for games played in his establishment, and the trustees were in a quandary as to what to do about it last week.
    Mrs. A. Alford, of Talent, is stopping with her son-in-law, C. W. Wolters and his family, undergoing medical treatment. She has been suffering recently with rheumatism, we are sorry to learn.
Sugar Pine Door and Lumber Company mill, Grants Pass
    The lack of dry lumber is delaying building operations seriously in Medford, even work on the water works tower having been suspended until the new dry kiln of the Grants Pass S.P.D.&L. company is in operation once more.
    The following is a list of the officers of the Knights of Pythias lodge lately instituted at Medford: Francis Fitch, past chancellor; C. W. Wolters, chancellor; Dr. E. P. Geary, vice-chancellor; C. I. Hutchison, prelate; M. Purdin, master of exchequer; J. E. Enyart, keeper of record and seals; M. S. Damon, outside guardian; John Curry, inside guardian; Lake France, master at arms; A. Merriman, W. I. Vawter and P. Henderson, trustees.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890, page 2


FOR THE
Choicest Potatoes!
--GO TO--
GOLDSMITH,
THE GROCER!
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890 et seq., page 2


Getting in Readiness.
    Our citizens have all come to time promptly in the matter of executing the promised notes to the Jacksonville and Medford railway company, and everything is now in readiness to close negotiations with the construction company as soon as right-of-way is secured. It has about been decided to run another preliminary survey, after which property holders will at once be waited on relative to the matter of granting the right-of-way.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890, page 3


    Fruit trees are later in blooming than ever known here before, not even an almond blossom as yet braving the light.
    A carload of Rogue River Valley apples taken to San Francisco last week by Benj. Eggleston realized $8 per box and upwards in the bay city.
    Special dances were given at Medford and Ashland on the evening of last Monday, St. Patrick's Day. They were well attended and passed off pleasantly.
    It is reported that through trains will be able to run over the new railroad track in Cow Creek Canyon by April 1st. About 800 men have been employed there for a number of weeks, including 250 Chinamen.
    Jos. A. Crain, of Medford precinct, is feeling comfortable over having carried his cattle through the winter with scarcely any loss, and congratulates himself that he had the feed with which to stand off the weather.
    Many farmers have already begun to plow, but in sections where the soil drains slowly it will be a week or two before much can be done in that line. There will be less ground sown to wheat than usual, and more corn will be planted, in consequence of the late season.
    The roads in the lower valley are beginning to improve, but some of the highways are still almost impassable for loaded teams. A farmer near town, who took his family to church at a neighboring schoolhouse last Sunday night, was obliged to leave his hack in the mud and walk home after the service was over.
    It is said that the water during the recent flood was much higher at the Gold Hill mill site than in 1861. It was on a level with the ground floor of Mr. Lamb's residence and was over the first story of his mill. The wild shoot of the driftwood and timber under the two bridges was awe-inspiring. It is thought that if a single tree had made the passage sideways both bridges must inevitably have gone. The immense suction in the narrow channel straightened everything out before the final plunge in the rapids, however, and the county was saved a heavy bill of expense.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890, page 3


BORN.
GOLDSMITH--In Medford, March 16, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. J. Goldsmith, a daughter.
DIED.
DOUGHTY--At Medford, March 19, 1890, of dropsy, W. C. Doughty of Brownsboro, aged about 48 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1890, page 3


    We have received a letter from Mrs. C. E. Damon, Medford, Oregon, but hardly feel warranted in printing it since it is mostly concerning the great snows in that vicinity, descriptions of which have several times appeared in The Freeman. Friends of Mrs. Damon will be glad to know that she is apparently well and prospering.
Waukesha (Wisconsin) Freeman, March 20, 1890, page 4



    Sheriff Birdsey, who has just returned from a tax-collecting tour, reports collecting $7,347 in three days. Over $6,500 were collected in Ashland in two days, and the balance in Medford in one day. Pretty good work for our rustling, wide-awake Sheriff, and a good showing for our county these hard times; [with] that rate our delinquent tax list will be small, for the disastrous year of 1890.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1890, page 2


An Artistic Work.
    The "Orchard Home Association," Henry Klippel president, Medford Or., has issued the most expensive and handsomest illustrated pamphlet ever prepared as a land advertisement for any part of Oregon. It is a genuine art souvenir of Southern Oregon, which any visitor will be glad to carry away and preserve among other artistic publications upon a library or parlor table. It contains seven full-page views of Southern Oregon scenes, all of which, and likewise the letterpress, are upon the finest paper and of the most perfect workmanship. The illustrations consist of landscape scenes, birdseye and foreground views of Medford and Jacksonville, orchard and native oak grove vistas, etc., and the public will see that the camera and the press show Southern Oregon to be as attractive as the much-advertised, climate-vaunted regions of California with their semi-tropic glamor. The Tidings has never received before so handsome an advertising pamphlet from any source, and its issuance is a new departure for Southern Oregon. The many natural beauties of our valley will bear any amount of such picturing.
Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1890, page 3


    Jacksonville people are again sure the branch railroad scheme is to be a success.
    Medford and Ashland each had a dance Monday night in celebration of St. Patrick's Day. Neither was largely attended.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1890, page 3


    Rev. Mr. Aleridge, the Carolina evangelist, has concluded to make his home in Medford for some time. As a result of the series of revival meetings just closed in that city, in which he took a leading part, there have been thirty-five conversions reported, and a large accession to the membership of the several churches. Mr. Aleridge will move upon the unrepentant sinners of Ashland sometime in the near future, it is expected.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1890, page 3


    J. D. Whitman, of Jackson County, is mentioned in the Portland World, (Dem.) as a candidate for Congressional honors.
"Political Gossip," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Thos. Harlan has returned from his trip to Nebraska.
    Charley Wolters has a very fine display of confectionery and fancy groceries.
    One of Geo. W. Isaacs' boys fell from a woodpile a few days since and broke his collar bone.
    A couple of fellows from Jacksonville were arrested and fined for beating Phil Riley this week.
    Medford has a new brass band of eleven pieces, which will soon furnish our citizens with excellent music.
    Miss Carrie Sackett is teaching 30 pupils of the primary department of our school in the Episcopal Church. Our schoolhouse is entirely too small.
    We are glad to announce that the late W. C. Doughty was a member of the A.O.U.W. at the time of his death, and his widow will receive the usual sum of $2,000 in due course of time.
    The Jackson County Bank is now under the management of W. I. Vawter and G. W. Howard, two of our most reliable citizens. They will no doubt be well patronized, as they deserve it.
    A. Elksnat of this precinct, a competent surveyor, and who has one of the finest instruments in southern Oregon, will be a candidate for surveyor before the Democratic convention to be held at Jacksonville on May 3d.
    John Robinson, familiarly known as "Dad" Robinson, died at Medford last Friday, after a painful illness with kidney troubles. His familiar figure will long be missed on our streets, for he was an upright and industrious citizen.
    We regret to learn that the Coker orchard north of Medford, now owned by Mr. Murrey, was almost ruined by rabbits during the time when the snow was on the ground. A large number of the trees in the 40-acre tract were girdled before the rodents were discovered to be at work.
    The authorities have very sensibly concluded to abandon the town cemetery west of town and will lay out a new cemetery on land procured from F. Barneburg on the east side of Bear Creek, where no evil effect can result to the town from the drainage or proximity of the burying ground. A beautiful site has been secured for the new location.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 2


Card of Thanks.
    I desire to thank my friends and acquaintances on Butte Creek and vicinity for their kindness during the sickness of my husband, also to those of Medford who were so kind during his last days. Their kindness will ever be remembered.
DORA DOUGHTY.   
Medford, March 22, 1890
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 2


The Laundry Queen.
    The sole agency for Jackson County for the celebrated Laundry Queen washing machine is now held by J. H. Brown of this place. This labor-saving machine is now such a universal favorite with good housewives that Mr. Brown has decided to keep its merits before the public. Those desiring to inform themselves as to its workings are referred, by permission, to Mrs. Hudson, Mrs. Livingstone, Mrs. Henry Klippel and Mrs. H. Wendt, of Jacksonville, and to Mrs. James. H. Howard, living on the Daison place near Medford. For terms and prices apply to J. H. Brown, at the Bilger residence, Jacksonville.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890 et seq., page 2


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890 et seq., page 2

Fruit! HOMES IN ORCHARDS. Fruit!
    We challenge the reader to successfully controvert the assertion that an acre of thrifty, well-cultivated, producing orchard trees in the valley of Rogue River will yield a net yearly income of $100. It will average 100 trees to the acre, and the estimate is based upon the demonstrated fact that each fruit tree will produce $1 in value, net, of marketable fruit each year.
That is Legal Interest at 10 Per Cent. on $1000.
    In other words an acre of producing fruit trees has a valuation of $1000. It is better than any bank--for the bank is sometimes carried into Canada by the cashier. Dame nature--a trustworthy guardian--takes care of the principle, and the dividends never fail. Of course if you plow your orchard once in twenty years, and rob the trees of their nourishment by making a cornfield of the orchard ground, and invite the birds and orchard pests to make a restaurant of your orchard, you must not complain that your horticultural methods have precipitated a foreclosure of the mortgage on your orchard.
CULTIVATE YOUR ORCHARD
With half the care you give wheat fields, and it will yield an income on a valuation of $1000 an acre. There is not a wheat field in this county which yields such an income, and EVERY orchard does.
    We propose to sell you an acre of fine alluvial soil, within cannon shot of five growing towns, close to the steel rails of a transcontinental railroad, in the most beautiful valley on the slope of the Pacific, with one hundred growing, thrifty producing fruit trees, to be selected by you. Buy it for a home to shelter you if adversity or the winters of old age overtake you and find you penniless.
IT IS WORTH $1,000.
    We give away the land. Pay us $10 a month, 10 cents a tree, for two years, and we will present you a warranty deed of the acre, and GUARANTEE it to have a thrifty, growing, producing orchard.
    Despite these facts the farmers of the country continue to value their land high, and rob its soil by sowing it with wheat and competing in the markets of the world with the serfs of Russia and the slaves of India. "Export the wheat of a country and you ship away the vitality of its soil," says a great economic writer. The people of Jackson County should learn this as an axiom.
    Every breadwinner at the forge or near the cutting saws, or in sound of the hum of the shuttles, or the thunder of the factories, or toiling late over desk and counter, should study our plan well. It means a home for a lifetime out of the meager savings of 2 years' work. A more beautiful and a larger home than ninety percent of the population of the civilized earth can claim to own.
    Write to us, and we will send you our illustrated book of this great valley and our Orchard Home.
The Orchard Home Association.
Medford.      -      -      -      Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890 et seq., page 2


A. J. Wilcox to D. W. O'Donnell, lots 3 and 4, block 6, Medford; $115.
C. Mingus to Frank
Leet, lot 2, block 75, Medford; $75.
O.&T. Co. to Edwin Brown, lots 11 and 12 in block 76, Medford; $110.
S. W. Speas to A. J. Wilcox, lots 3 and 4, block
6, Medford; $75.
S. F. and G. T. Sly to Wm. L. Sly, lots 1 and 2, blk
36, Medford; $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 2


    W. F. Shores and family of Medford precinct are in town today.
    Wm. W. Cardwell has hung out his shingle at Burns, Harney County, where he is practicing law.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 3


DIED.
ROBINSON--In Medford, March 21, 1890, John Robinson, aged 74 years, 6 months and 10 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 3


Important Notice.
THOSE KNOWING THEMSELVES indebted to the late W. C. Doughty will please settle immediately. All having accounts against the same will favor me by sending their bills or accounts, or calling at my residence in Medford, and I will settle the same. By so doing will save me time and trouble.
MRS. W. C. DOUGHTY.   
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1890, page 3


    A brass band of eleven pieces has been organized in Medford, with G. W. Connell as leader.
    A movement is on foot to open a new county road between Medford and the Rogue River bridge, and a petition to that end will be circulated for signatures in a day or two. The proposed road is important enough to be already an assured fact, as it will dispense with long distances of sticky, which makes travel at this season almost impossible. The road will follow the present one as far as Enoch Walker's, then angling a little north of east for half a mile, again turns and goes almost due north to the bridge.--[Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1890, page 3


    The last railroad news is rather discouraging to the people of Jacksonville. The company who had the enterprise under advisement, and to whom a 60-foot right-of-way had been granted, now ask a 100-foot right-of-way. The possibility of obtaining this amount of land through the fine farms between this place and Medford seems so remote that there is general depression in the R.R. boom at present.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1890, page 3


DIED.
DOUGHTY--At Medford, March 19, 1890, of dropsy, W. C. Doughty of Brownsboro, aged about 43 years.
Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1890, page 3


    Sheriff Birdsey, who has just returned from a tax-collecting tour, reports collecting $7.347 in three days. Over $6,500 was collected in Ashland in two days, and the balance in Medford in one day. Pretty good work for our rustling, wide-awake Sheriff, and a good showing for our county these hard times; [with] that rate our delinquent tax list will be small for the disastrous year of 1890.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 28, 1890, page 3


    H. T. Chitwood has been appointed to institute the new lodge of Knights of Pythias at Medford on Wednesday evening, April 2. A large crowd of Knights will be in attendance from this place [Ashland].

"Notes from Jackson County,"
Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1890, page 9


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    There were 231 pupils in the public schools here last week.
    W. H. Barr and T. A. Harris were at the county seat yesterday.
    E. W. Starr is about once more after his illness, we are glad to say.
    A. Garrick is preparing to build a neat residence in west Medford.
    Lindsay troupe at the opera house Monday and Tuesday evenings.
    The Medford public schools will observe Arbor Day in approved fashion.
    Geo. Miller is proud over the advent of a 12-pound boy at his home last week.
    Trespassers upon Nickell's addition to Medford will be arrested and prosecuted.
    A hose company for Medford is next on the programme. This is a first-class idea.
    D. J. Lumsden and Mr. Hutchison made the county seat a visit one day last week.
    At the school meeting last Saturday A. A. Davis was elected director and I. L. Hamilton clerk.
    The Medford teachers' reading circle meets every two weeks, to discuss subjects of professional interest.
    Mrs. C. J. Armstrong of this precinct was called to the bedside of her aged father last week, who has since died.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    Now that spring is here is the time to give your orders to Garrick for a neat suit of new clothes. He is a first-class tailor and never fails to give satisfaction.
    The John S. Lindsay dramatic troupe [will be] at the Medford opera house next Monday and Tuesday evenings. Don't fail to attend, as it is one of the best troupes on the road.
    Prof. J. G. Clark will sing at the M. E. church in this place next Monday evening. The admission will be only 25 cents. Everybody should turn out, as it will be a musical treat.
    The new school library case has been placed in position and a number of choice reference and historical works have been ordered. Citizens are requested to contribute such suitable works as they can spare from their own libraries for the use of the schools.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    Henry Smith carries one of the largest and best stocks of goods in southern Oregon and sells at the very lowest rates. F. L. Cranfill is the clever manager of the establishment, and is ably assisted by his estimable wife. Neither spare any pains to please their customers, which is why they are enjoying so extensive a trade.
    About 60 Knights of Pythias kept the banquet board warm and the hall lively in initiating nineteen neophytes into the Pythian mysteries last night. They woke the echoes and the neighbors until about six o'clock this morning. The initiates number among them many of our best citizens. Numerous Ashland Knights were in attendance.
    The bridge across Bear Creek at this place, it is thought, can be repaired at an expense of a few hundred dollars, and we learn that the county board will order the work done in a short time. The business interests of this place are too important to tolerate much delay. The timbers washed away have been hauled back to the bridge site, and we trust will soon be in place again.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1890, page 2


O.&T. Co. to J. F. Kelley, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 4
8, Medford; $155.
O.&T. Co. to Geo. W. Isaacs, lots 5, 6 and 7, blk 78,
[omission]; $130.
C. C. Beekman to Sarah M. Root, quitclaim to lot 1, blk 55, Medford; $1.
O. N. Fowler et al. to Ella McLean, lot 6, blk 71, Medford; $89.
O.&T. Co. to B. F. Cummons, lot 2, block
30, Medford; $30.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1890, page 2


Southern Oregon's Resources.
    Hon. R. A. Miller, secretary of the Southern Oregon board of agriculture, arrived in Salem by the delayed overland last night and will be here for a few days. He brought with him the copy of the edition of the "Resources of Southern Oregon," for the publication of which an order was made by the last legislature. This volume will be published at once by State Printer Baker. The appropriation was for 21,000 and the books will be ready for distribution at an early day and will be nearly as large as the volume of Resources of Oregon. This district embraces the counties of Coos, Curry, Douglas, Josephine, Jackson, Klamath and Lake.--[Statesman.
Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 1


K. of P. Lodge at Medford.
    Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., was instituted at Medford Wednesday evening with -- charter members. Following is a list of the officers: Francis Fitch, P.C.: Chas. W. Wolters, C.C.; Dr. E. P. Geary, V.C.; C. Hutchison, Prelate: M. Purdin, M. of E.; H. Lumsden, M. of F.; J. E. Enyart, K. of R. and S.; Lake France, M. at A.; J. Carry, I.G.; C. O. Damon, O.G..
    H. T. Chitwood, Grand Chancellor of Granite Lodge, the installing officer, and --- members of Granite Lodge, went down from Ashland to take part in the ceremonies. They come home full of the hospitable entertainment of the Medford people, and tell of the spread at the midnight supper. After supper speeches by Messrs. Bowditch, Fitch, Chitwood, Logan, [illegible] enlivened the occasion. A good time, with no rebate, was enjoyed.
Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 3


    Henry Mensor and family, now of Centralia, Wash., were on yesterday's train going to 'Frisco. They will stop in this valley on their way north.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 3


    Mayor G. W. Howard, of Medford, has succeeded to Thos. H. Bentley's interest in the bank at that place.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 3


    The Masons of Medford, Or. are very desirous of organizing a lodge of A.F.&A.M., but since there is some objection by the nearest lodge, it is feared that an appeal will have to be taken to the grand lodge of that body. There are some thirty-four who would go in as charter members.
"Among the Fraternities,"
Oregonian, Portland, April 7, 1890, page 8


MEDFORD IMPROVEMENTS.
Many New Business Houses and Residences Going Up this Year.
    MEDFORD, Or., April 3.--(Special Correspondence.)--There will be considerable building and improvements here this year. Our town has experienced a steady and healthy growth, but has never been cursed with a boom. Several brick structures were erected last year, also a large number of residences, and the indications at present point to an increase in the number of substantial bricks and fine dwellings over the record of last year. W. G. Cooper has let the contract for the erection of a 25x76-foot two-story brick on his lot at the corner of Seventh and B streets, to cost $2500. M. Purdin will also erect a one-story brick in place of his present wooden blacksmith shop. Thomas McAndrew will build a brick on Seventh Street on the vacant lot west of the fence works. Numerous residences are being contracted for, and others are contemplating building, which is bound to make things pretty lively here this year. Material is very scarce, and as soon as lumber can be had building operations will be carried on at a lively and unprecedented rate.
    The new system of water works will be finished about the 1st of May. The large tower, fifty feet high, on which the two huge cisterns, calculated to hold 33,000 gallons each, are to rest, is being pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. Until a larger well can be dug, the water will be pumped by steam from a cistern some 500 feet away, which will be supplied with water from the large ditch dug last year, into the two cisterns from which the water will be carried in pipes all over the city for fire and irrigating purposes only, as the water is not fit for domestic purposes. The town is to be congratulated on its providing means by which it can be guarded against fire. Should a fire start now in the center of the town nothing could save it from utter destruction. But with a well-organized fire company and plenty of water, such as the new system will provide, the place will be perfectly safe and insurance will be greatly reduced.
    Our people are waiting patiently for the county court to do something toward repairing the bridge across Bear Creek. It is quite an inconvenience to the people who have hauling to do, and it is a matter that should be acted upon without delay.
    The farmers around here are busy plowing and seeding. This has been a very backward spring, and there will not be the acreage sown this year as formerly.
Oregonian, Portland, April 8, 1890, page 12


    BROTHER HARLAN is justly indignant at the Republicans of Medford precinct because they deliberately strangled his pretensions to a seat in their convention yesterday. We learn that he will protest, in today's issue of the Mail, against the unfair treatment to which he has been subjected. It certainly is unfair and unjust to the gentleman who has borne the brunt of the fight in Medford precinct, and time and again upheld his party's cause by the sweat of his brow and the coinage of his intellect, that he should thus be subjected to the ignominy of being relegated to the background of even local precinct politics. We warn the Republican bosses right here that it will not do to trifle with Brother Harlan's feelings in this manner. He is too old a war horse to risk arousing his opposition, and too much of a gentleman to tolerate being treated as a churl by his inferiors.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Lindsay dramatic troupe was not very well patronized in Medford.
    Keep your eyes on Medford. It will improve more rapidly than ever this year.
    A. J. Merritt has gone to Oregon City, where he will probably reside permanently.
    G. C. Noble has sold his five-acre tract in Barr's addition to M. A. Ganey of Eugene for $800.
    Miss Laura Starr has gone to Salem to accept a clerkship in one of the mercantile houses in the capital city.
    The Noland saloon property will be sold at public sale tomorrow. There will doubtless be a number of bidders.
    Real estate is looking up again. C. C. Beekman has sold eleven lots in the northwestern portion of town for $500.
    Chas. Wall and wife of Flounce Rock precinct are sojourning at Medford. Mrs. W. is quite ill, we are sorry to say.
    Rosenthal has received a fine lot of clothing during the past week, and has a heavy run of custom in consequence.
    B. W. Powell, one of our most enterprising citizens, has removed to Brookfield, Wash. We wish him success wherever he may go.
    The demand for lock boxes at the post office has been so great that the number has been doubled. Our town is still growing rapidly.
    Geo. Lynch of Trail Creek precinct is assisting H. H. Wolters at the Monarch Saloon, where the best of wines, liquors and cigars are kept.
    J. A. Hazel has retired from the management of the Grand Central Hotel and will leave this place before long. He is succeeded by H. T. McClallen, lately of Roseburg.
    Staver & Walker's branch house has sold nearly $10,000 worth of farm machinery this week. They shipped a carload to northern California points last week, and are rapidly extending their business.
    Chas. Wolters was somewhat startled to find a lively centipede in a bunch of bananas received by him one day last week. It is about two inches long and may be seen in alcohol at Miller & Strang's drug store.
    R. L. Knopf and wife of New York spent a few days in Medford last week visiting Mr. K.'s uncle, Mr. Rosenthal. Mr. K. is a wholesale linen and lace merchant of New York and thinks of investing in Medford real estate.
    Wood & Whiteside have nine men employed in pushing the new water tower to completion, and expect to have the tanks in position ready for use by May 1st. They will be of redwood, with a capacity of 33,000 gallons each, and will rest on a platform 50 feet above the ground, giving sufficient pressure to carry water to the top of any building in town.
    Among the brick buildings contemplated in Medford during the coming season are a 25x76-foot two-story business house on the corner of Seventh and B streets, to be erected by W. G. Cooper, work on which has already begun; a two-story business house which Thos. McAndrews will build on the north side of Seventh Street; also two store buildings to be erected by Dr. Adkins and Mrs. Dennison respectively on the south side of the same street.
    Medford's voice in the Republican convention yesterday was given greater attention from the fact that five delegates were sent up instead of the apportionment of four by the county committee. Although it was an unusual proceeding, the credentials of all five were recognized, as the convention was well aware that the increase in Medford's population at this time entitles her to the extra delegate. The delegation consisted of W. I. Vawter, I. A. Webb, J. W. Short, J. H. Faris and J. A. Whiteside.
    The following is a list of officers of Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., which was instituted at Medford Wednesday evening, April 2d, with over twenty charter members: Francis Fitch, P.C.; Chas. W. Wolters, C.C.; Dr. E. P. Geary, V.C.; C. Hutchison, prelate; M. Purdin, M. of E.; H. Lumsden, M. of F.; J. E. Enyart, K. of R. and S.; Lake France, M. of A.; J. W. Curry, I.G.; C. O. Damon, O.G.  H. T. Chitwood, senior past chancellor of Granite Lodge, was the installing officer, and twenty-two members of Granite Lodge went down from Ashland to take part in the ceremonies.
    The action of the editor of the Mail, in assailing such of our enterprising tradesmen as are not fortunate enough to own and transact business in a marble hall or a brick block, is certainly reprehensible, to say the least. It is all very well to encourage enterprise in the substantial building-up of the town, and those who occupy their own buildings are sure to receive their share of public patronage; but when the local newspaper asserts that "no dweller in a tent or rented apartment * * * should get support in Medford," it touches a sensitive spot in the breast of every honest tradesman whose necessities have made him a tenant of one able to build a palace of trade and lacerates the feelings of all who have done their share in attracting trade to the valley metropolis while temporarily occupying wooden buildings or even tents as makeshifts. A stranger might infer that Brother Harlan was a devotee at the shrine of wealth.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 2


O.&T. Co. to J. S. Cummons, lots 14 and 15 in block 47, Medford; $50.
J. S. Cummons to Elizabeth Cummons, lots 14 and 15, blk 47, Medford; $1.
Nannie Barr to Lucinda V. Carder, lot 6, blk 4, Barr's add. to Medford; $500.
Goodman Noble to Mahala Ann Gainey, lot 2, blk 2, Medford; $300.
P. H. Oviatt to Sarah C. Oviatt, lot 1, blk
60, Medford; $1000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 2


    Cameron, the foot racer, is in town. He is probably looking for a speed contest.
    Feed ran so short that many farmers are doing their spring work without having either hay or grain for their stock.
    It is reported that W. G. Kenney has been awarded the contract for carrying the mails between Jacksonville and Medford for four years from July 1, 1890.
    The railroad depot eating houses in this valley are grumbling over the change in time on the railroad. The new schedule will not be in effect long, however.
    A survey of the proposed route for the Medford and Jacksonville railroad was made a few days since by surveyor Howard, and grade stakes were set on an air line from the Neuber property in the lower part of town to the corporation line of Medford. The route can be graded from town to town for about $5000, it is thought.
    We hope that the county board will see to providing scrapers and other suitable tools in the several road districts of the county this spring, in order to insure good work on the demoralized highways. There is but a short period in which to do the work before the road get too dry, and every facility should be afforded residents of the various districts to make their labor count to the utmost. Many days' time is practically thrown away by reason of there being no tools at hand to work with.
    The managers of the Southern Pacific have posted up a new order at the depot, which says the ticket office must positively be opened for the sale of tickets at least thirty minutes before the arrival of each train. It also says that the baggage maser will not be allowed to check any baggage that does not arrive at least ten minutes before the arrival of trains. All traveling with baggage should take special notice of this change and govern themselves accordingly.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 3


    J. S. Backus of Medford precinct called yesterday. He is in charge of Fred. Barneburg's cows, and will soon drive them toward the upper Rogue River country.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 3


    A. Z. Sears, Medford's efficient night watch, was called to Jacksonville on Tuesday by a subpoena requiring his attendance as a witness before the grand jury.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1890, page 3


    In the lodge society columns of the Oregonian is the following:
    The Masons of Medford, Or., are very desirous of organizing a lodge of the A.F.&A.M., but since there is an objection by the nearest lodge, it is feared that an appeal will have to be taken to the grand lodge of that body. There are some thirty-four who would go in as charter members.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 11, 1890, page 3


    Jesse Enyart, formerly of this city, is prospering in the West. He is at present holding down the position of bookkeeper in a bank at Medford, Oregon.
"City News," Logansport (Indiana) Pharos, April 14, 1890, page 4



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Bashford has established himself in the lumber business at Medford.
    A hose company was organized by the young men of Medford last Friday evening.
    It is rumored that F. H. Rowe will establish a box factory and planing mill at this place in a short time.
    J. A. Hazel has gone to his old home in Minnesota to settle up some business he left there, when he will return to Rogue River Valley.
    Arbor Day was celebrated in becoming fashion at the Presbyterian Church in Medford last Friday, with addresses, essays, music and songs.
    Considerable interest was taken in the Democratic primaries last Saturday, but the best of feeling prevailed, and an excellent delegation was elected.
    The Masons of Medford are very desirous of instituting a local lodge in this place, but owing to having failed in securing permission to organize from the nearest neighboring lodge, will take the case into the grand lodge, we learn. There are quite a large number belonging to the fraternity in this section.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1890, page 2


    G. Elksnat of Medford is a candidate for the Democratic nomination for county surveyor, and elsewhere gives notice to that effect.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1890, page 3



    Wm. Merriman, formerly of Medford, has charge of the depot here.
"Central Point," Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1890, page 2


    The Y.W.C.T.U. of Medford gave a most enjoyable entertainment Tuesday evening at Howard's Hall. The program was the first appearance of the Hatchet Family cutting down the great tree of intemperance, and it was excellent in all its parts.
    The solo by Mollie Grant Hatchet and recitation by little George Washington Hatchet were parts of unequaled merit. The Hatchet family of Medford ought to give an entertainment in every town in the county.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1890, page 3


    Mr. Harry Wortman and Miss Ella Gore, of Medford precinct, were married at the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. M. A. Williams, near Medford, last Sunday afternoon, April 13th. Mr. Wortman is a promising young man, highly esteemed, and the bride, a daughter of E. E. Gore, has many friends and acquaintances all over the valley who will wish the newly married couple much happiness. Only members of the families of the contracting parties were at the wedding, which was a very quiet one. Mr. and Mrs. Wortman will for the present reside at the farm of Mr. Wortman's father near Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 18, 1890, page 3


    You can't always tell a footracer by his looks. At least that is what some people in Grants Pass and Central Point are reported as saying. A great big six-foot-four fellow, humpbacked and of a general clumsy appearance, arrived at Grants Pass a short time ago and bantered the town for a foot race. Of course the boys there put up their money on Pete Windom against the big fellow, but he is said to have distanced Pete in two races. He next went to Central Point and "did up" the best man there. But another race was made up and lots of money was staked on it. It seems that there was more money in it for him for the big footracer to lose the race than to win it, and of course he lost it, as any "business" man would have done. The last seen of big "fleetfoot" he was bound for Medford, and one of his losing backers was after him with a cocked revolver.

Daily Morning Astorian, April 20, 1890, page 3



    Our neighbor on the railroad doesn't like sympathy on an empty stomach. Our bowels yearn for Brother Harlan in his endeavor to wrestle with the scheming whatness of the which, while having to bear the spurns that conscious merit of the unworthy takes at the hands of his mossback Republican confreres.

"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 2


For Sale or Rent.
    A livery stable, in a good location, for sale or rent. Terms reasonable. For further particulars apply to
                            H. E. BAKER
                                Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890 et seq., page 2


            A Carload of
GLIDDEN WIRE
PLAIN AND BARBED.
Just received by
STAVER & WALKER.
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890 et seq., page 2


A Thrilling Episode.
    Last evening as the passenger train from the south, drawn by freight engine No. 26, was nearing Medford, the wood in the tender took fire and the breeze caused by the rush of the train soon resulted in a wild conflagration in that car. Turning on a full head of steam the engineer ran for water, coming into Medford with the fierce flames rolling up, and the train running at a 59-miles-per-hour gait. Pausing at the depot the trainmen succeeded in uncoupling the tender from the mail car, and the engineer soon had the blaze subdued at the water tank. The mail car was beginning to blaze, and the stoppage was made none too soon. Two tramps riding on the bumpers between the tender and mail car were badly scared and somewhat scorched. When the alarm was given at the depot a terrified stream of passengers poured from the cars. The mishap occasioned little delay, but only the prompt action of the engineer averted a catastrophe.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


    J. O. Johnson of Medford advertises some personal property for sale in another column.
    The carpet-beaters make music on every side. House-cleaning time is at hand.
    It is reported that quite a number of farmers living along the line of the proposed Jacksonville and Medford railroad have deeded a 100-foot right-of-way to the company. Others signify a willingness to give a fifty-foot right-of-way.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ye Hatchet Family at the opera house tomorrow evening.
    Thos. Harlan and wife visited Portland during the time the Republican convention was held.
    A stone pavement in front of Adkins & Webb's place adds greatly to the appearance of the premises.
    Mrs. A. Merriman is visiting relatives in Montana and Wyoming, and will not return to Medford for some time.
    A pleasant surprise party was held at J. B. Montague's place one day last week, the occasion being the 49th birthday of Mr. M.
    Chas. Brown last week sold his property on the corner of Seventh and D streets to a gentleman from the East, consideration $2,828.
    J. A. Hazel and family, who formerly conducted the Grand Central Hotel, last week departed for their old home in Alden, Minnesota.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    Much of the early fruit was killed in the orchards along Bear Creek by the frosts of last week, but it is thought there will be an abundance left. The late fruit was not damaged at all, it is said.
    W. R. Stammers and family of Cheyenne, Wyoming, arrived in Medford last week and intend to make this place their home. Mr. S. is a practical jeweler, and will open a shop at an early day.
    The Lindsay dramatic company gave a performance at the opera house last Monday, under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias. The well-known play of Damon and Pythias was admirably presented.
    A paper was circulated during the week to obtain funds for digging a well near the center of town to obtain a supply of drinking water, the town agreeing to contribute as much as was raised by private persons.
    An effort to secure a straight road to Rogue River will be made during the coming summer. Much of Medford's prosperity is owing altogether to the foresight of her leading citizens in securing a good road system early in the city's history, and we are glad to see the same policy pursued at present.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has reopened the saloon formerly kept by A. H. Carlson, thoroughly refitting it and making many improvements. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


    A Sunday school was organized at Eagle Point last week with Mr. Johnson, formerly of Medford, as superintendent.
    The county clerk elsewhere calls for proposals for repairing the Medford bridge across Bear Creek and for building a new bridge at Talent.
    W. H. Parker is preparing to build a fine residence on his farm near town. The contract has already been let to C. W. Skeel of Medford, and the building will be ready for occupancy by mid-summer.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


Ye Hatchet Family.
    The entertainment of Tuesday evening, April 16th, will be reproduced by request at Howard's Hall, Medford, Friday evening, April 25, 1890, under the auspices of the W.C.T.U. of Medford. Admission 25 cents.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
WORTMAN-GORE--At Medford, April 13, 1890, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Harry Wortman and Miss Ella Gore.
DIED.
CONNELL--At Medford, April 15, 1890, of congestion of the brain, Norma Connell, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Connell, aged 4 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


Auction Sale.
NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that I will sell at public auction on Saturday, May 3, 1890, at 12 o'clock P.M., for cash in hand, the following personal property: Two 2-horse wagons, second hand; one good milch cow and calf, three horses, a lot of dairy cans, pans, churn and fixtures, one 14-inch sulky plow, one cook stove and fixtures, one new ash folding-leaf table, and a varied assortment of useful articles, too numerous to mention.
J. O. JOHNSON
Medford, Oregon, April 20, 1890.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1890, page 3


$100,000 TO LOAN.
AT EIGHT PER CENT. PER ANNUM. For particulars enquire of
J. O. JOHNSON
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24 et seq., 1890, page 4


A Surprise.
MEDFORD, Or., April 23, 1890.
ED. TIDINGS:--
    The dispatches announce the appointment of Thos. Harlan, proprietor of the Mail, as timber agent with headquarters at Seattle, Wash. The Republicans of this county do not take kindly to this appointment, considering the fact that Mr. J. B. Wrisley, an old pioneer, an earnest and influential Republican, esteemed by all his neighbors, irrespective of party, and who has been endorsed and recommended by all leading Republicans of this county for the same place, should be shelved by Mr. Harlan. To state that Harlan's appointment is both a surprise and a disappointment to the people of Southern Oregon in general and to the Republicans of Jackson County in particular, is stating it mildly. Mr. Harlan is, comparatively, a carpetbagger, and certainly knows nothing about this country or the timber that grows in it. However, what he lacks in knowledge he makes up in "cheek." He made a personal canvass for delegate at the primary meeting recently held at Medford, and got just one vote. In all seriousness this appointment does not meet the approbation of twenty Republicans in Jackson County.
D.W.O.
Ashland Tidings, April 25, 1890, page 2


    Thos. Harlan, of Medford, has been appointed a government timber inspector, it is said, and left with his wife for Puget Sound the first of the week to hunt for tall timber.
    Rev. Robert McLean, of Grants Pass, and his brother, Rev. E. McLean, of Medford, were both in Portland last week. The former was en route for Washington City, to attend the annual meeting of the General Presbytery. Rev. E. McLean was called to Portland to deliver the annual address at the young ladies' Presbyterian seminary of that city.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 25, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Milton and Newell Harlan are now sole proprietors of the Mail.
    Geo. Noble has returned to Medford from Washington reside permanently.
    E. Ogan and wife have moved from town to spend the summer on their firm.
    Free reading rooms will be established by the ladies of the W.C.T.U. of Medford at an early day.
    Ye Hatchet Family's entertainment at the opera house last Friday night was well attended and much of a success.
    Improvements during the coming season in Medford bid fair to surpass those of any other year in the history of the town.
    Francis Fitch of Medford, who has been at Salem on business before the supreme court, returned home a few days since.
    Don't fail to call on Ham Wolters at his new place on Front Street. He has one of the coziest saloons in southern Oregon.
    The Medford hose company has organized, with a membership of about twenty, and will equip for active service in a short time.
    The hose cart house will be built next to the calaboose, probably with corrugated iron, as it is within the fire limits, says the Mail.
   
The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    The water pipe system is found to work admirably and to stand a heavy pressure. The pump can easily throw water higher than the brick blocks in the business portion of town.
    S. E. Redden, formerly of Medford, passed through the valley on his bridal tour last week. The bride is a resident of Fresno, California, where Mr. R. has been teaching for some years.
    It is expected that Medford will contribute liberally to the fund for establishing the proposed Presbyterian academy at Jacksonville, as our citizens are vitally interested in all that pertains to matters educational.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    Our people, irrespective of party affiliations, were gratified and pleased to learn of the appointment of Thos. Harlan to the office of U.S. timber agent and inspector, with headquarters at Seattle. While in losing Mr. Harlan as a neighbor our citizens realize that one of the staunchest pillars of progress is removed from our midst, we fully understand that he has but gone to a wider field of labor, where we trust his indomitable enterprise and vim will be duly appreciated.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1890, page 2

O.&T. Co. to Jos. Dame, lots 17 and 18, blk 23, Medford; $125.
O.&T. Co. to John H. Brantner, lots 7 and 8, blk 10, Medford; $125.
I. J. and C. P. Phipps to Geo. H. Haskins, lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 11, Medford; $150.
Wm. L. Sly to Andrew H. Simpson, lots 1 and 2, blk 38, Medford; $150.
John H. Brantner to John O'Brien, lots 7 and 8, blk 10, Medford; $350.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1890, page 2


    R. R. Dunn, Staver & Walker's live agent at Medford, was the county seat on Monday. He reports business good in the agricultural implement line.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1890, page 3


    The Ashland "kid baseball nine," composed of boys from ten to twelve years old, received a challenge from the Medford "kid nine" a short time ago and went down there last Saturday to accept it. They returned in the evening in victorious spirits, having downed their Medford competitors by a score of 31 to 24. It is not announced yet when the return game will be played.
    Medford has ordered a supply of hose for fire protection from a San Francisco firm, and has also ordered a fine hose cart, the latter being furnished by the well-known firm of Staver & Walker.
    Mr. Hill, representing a New York company of dealers in timber lands, is bonding a number of timber claims east of this valley owned by persons in Ashland and elsewhere. He is bonding them at the rate of $1000 per quarter section. Mr. Hill, who is an old friend of J. N. Phillips, spent some time in the valley last year, with headquarters at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 2, 1890, page 3


    Cameron, a Corvallis sprinter, says the Ashland Record, and another professional named Edwards ran a foot race opposite the fairgrounds Sunday. It was a "chuck" race, and came near ending in bloodshed. A man named Elrick Ireland lost $242.50 on Edwards, who is the fastest man, and partly carried out his threat that if he failed to come in first he would shoot him. When the runners passed the line Ireland pulled out his revolver and shot two loads at Edwards, who was then about 150 yards distant. They failed to take effect, but Edwards kept on running to Central Point, where he immediately took a team and drove to Medford. Cameron also cleared out.

Daily Morning Astorian, May 6, 1890, page 3


    We have an angry reply from Mr. R. O. Spear, of Medford, to the protest of the Methodist ministers of Portland against the performances of the "faith and mind healers." The effect of a discussion like this is not to establish "faith healing," but to upset the whole doctrine of miracle cures in all ages. The logic has a retroactive effect. Mr. Spear sees no reason why "faith cures" cannot as well be performed now as in the days when the Bible was made. This is sound; but, since these are not performed now, the inference becomes irresistible that they were not performed then. Credulity growing out of misdirected religious fervor and neglect of natural law is the soil in which ideas of this sort take root. The primary condition essential to the spread or survival of any delusion is a disposition of mind to receive and cherish it. The ministers of today, or many of them, are between two difficulties. They reject current impostures, yet are annoyed by the method of the preachers of these impostures, who assert that they have just as good a stock of faith cures as any recorded in the scriptures, which the ministers insist should be accepted and believed. The plain consequence is that, while these faith cures and other current miracles cannot be upheld by appeal to the miracles of old, belief in the miracles of old is overthrown or weakened by observations of the modern delusion.
Oregonian, Portland, May 6, 1890, page 6


Wm. Angle et al. to Thos. Harlan, lot 6, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford; $200.
G. W. Howard to J. E. Enyart, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 3, Medford; $700.
T. Harlan to M. Harlan et al., south half of lot 6, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford; $100.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1890, page 2


Ladies' Bazaar at Medford.
    The ladies' guild at the Medford Episcopal Church will have a bazaar containing useful and ornamental articles at Angle & Plymale's opera house on Thursday and Friday evenings, May 8th and 9th. On Friday the bazaar will be open during the afternoon, for the benefit of those who cannot attend in the evening. Besides the many articles which have been made by the guild, there will be for sale a quantity of expensive fancy work made and sent to Medford by ladies of Philadelphia, New York and Portland. In connection with the sale a lunch will be served, and a concert by leading home musicians will be given for the entertainment of the patrons.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1890, page 3


    Quite a number of residents of Jacksonville will go to Medford tomorrow evening to hear "Pinafore," which will be presented by the students of the Ashland normal school..
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    "Pinafore" at the opera house tomorrow evening.
    Medford will have a grand 4th of July celebration.
    John A. Hanley and family have become residents of Medford.
    Immigrants are beginning to arrive and will soon be numerous again.
    C. D. Walrath has returned from his trip east and will remain awhile.
    Prof. Speer delivered an entertaining discourse in Medford one day last week.
    The Union labor party will meet here tomorrow (Saturday) to nominate a full county ticket.
    Chas. Wolters' store presents a handsome appearance, having been enlarged and thoroughly renovated.
    Do not fail to hear "Pinafore," by the Ashland amateurs, tomorrow, Saturday evening. Satisfaction is guaranteed.
    W. H. Barr and Mr. Ford arrived from Briggs Creek, Josephine County, this week, where they are engaged in mining.
    Medford will soon have a fine hose cart, purchased through Staver & Walker, and will equip it with 500 feet of rubber hose. A first-class idea.
    Real estate is looking up, and we expect quite a number of transactions to take place during the season.
    Numerous shipments of cattle from this valley and the Sacramento country pass north over the railroad each week.
    W. I. Vawter was visited last week by his brother-in-law, E. C. Pentland, of Polk County, who was accompanied by his family.
    There will be a celebration here on the 4th of July, and our people propose to make it one of the grandest ever held in the county.
    We are glad to learn that Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, the Democratic warhorse, will soon take the stump in behalf of the Democracy.
    The Ashland state normal students, assisted by first-class talent, will present "Pinafore," with a chorus of 30 voices and 10 soloists, tomorrow, Saturday, May 10th.
    W. A. Carroll has removed to Linkville and will conduct a branch of the soda water business so long maintained by W. L. Webster at Jacksonville and Medford.
    O. P. McGee, John B. Williams, S. L. Bennett and others of this precinct have sowed quite extensive areas in flax seed this year, which is looking very promising.
    The boring of the town well at Goldsmith's corner was found to be a difficult piece of work, owing to the loose gravel formation. The entire well will have to be cased.
    T. A. Harris and Ed. Worman have taken charge of the Grand Central Hotel, as well as the saloon in the same building. Harry McClallen will conduct the hotel for the present.
    Abstractor Whitman has been deterred from working for several days with an affection of the eyes, which he finds very annoying. We trust he will soon be himself again, however.
    M. Purdin, who would have made a most satisfactory justice of the peace, is compelled to decline the nomination tendered him for the position, on account of not having leisure to attend to the duties of the office.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1890, page 3


    The Ladies' Guild of the Medford Episcopal Church will have a bazaar, or sale of useful and ornamental articles, at the Opera House on Thursday and Friday evenings, May 8th and 9th. On Friday the bazaar will be open during the afternoon for the accommodation of those who cannot attend in the evening. Besides the many articles which have been made by the Guild there will be for sale a quantity of exquisite fancy work made and sent to this Guild by ladies in Philadelphia, New York, and Portland. In connection with the sale, a lunch will be served, and a concert by leading home musicians will be given for the entertainment of the patrons.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 9, 1890, page 3


A FRIEND TO SOUTHERN OREGON.
    Medford Mail: D. P. Thompson has done more to develop Southern Oregon than any other one man. He spent $75,000 on the Sterling mine before a dollar was taken out. This money was paid in liberal wages to men in the valley, which went at once into circulation, making times good for many months. Thompson is emphatically a man of the people, and he is no summer friend. He is as thoroughly glad to see an old acquaintance with a sawbuck or a kit of tools on his back as a railroad magnate. His characteristic of starting poor but worthy men in with a little capital and good business advise has made him famous.
Oregonian, Portland, May 12, 1890, page 6



    Of course it's all [fair] in politics, but it is funny to see young Harlan of the Medford Mail and Leeds of the Tidings harping on the same string in the campaign, while the knowing ones behind the scenes are aware that Leeds is encouraging the callow youth to do his utmost for "the party" and patting him on the back with one hand, while with the other he is knifing Mr. Harlan's father, recently appointed to a fat government position, and by using the influence of the Tidings, the professed "leading Republican journal of southern Oregon," against the old gentleman, he has about succeeded in throwing him over. It is not nice business for Leeds to engage in, but he is doing it, all the same.

"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Chas. Pierce has returned from a trip to Washington and Alaska territory.
    The Democratic ticket gives excellent satisfaction and will receive a big vote in this precinct.
    D. H. Miller, C. G. Brous and John Griffin spent the week "bar hunting" in the Siskiyous.
    Harry Harper left for his old home at Detroit, Mich., last Thursday, where he will hereafter reside.
    The people of this place and vicinity should not fail to turn out and hear Gov. Pennoyer and State Treasurer Webb next Monday evening.
    Wm. M. Mitchell, of Mitchell, Lewis & Co. of Portland, spent several days in Medford during the week. The firm is building up a fine business here.
    The fire company boys propose giving a grand Fourth of July ball at the opera house on the approaching natal day, and the citizens generally will turn out to patronize them.
    F. M. Mingus, assisted by Wallace Wheeler, is handling a fine line of vehicles for Mitchell, Lewis & Co. of Portland and meeting with great success. The boys are excellent salesmen.
    Important ceremonies will be held at Medford on Decoration Day, May 30th, by the Grand Army post. The graves of deceased soldiers in Jacksonville Cemetery will be decorated by detail.
    Edward Brace, who has been stopping in Medford for some months, this week returns to Minnesota to rejoin his family, whom he intends bringing to Oregon sometime in the immediate future.
    A son of John Redding and wife, aged about nine years, died on Wednesday of last week, and was buried the following day. The parents have the sympathy of many friends in their bereavement.
    The citizens of Medford have donated $500 for a grand 4th of July celebration. All committees have been appointed, and we expect a rousing time. Everybody is invited to attend and make the day glorious.
    B. Wistar Morris, of the Episcopal diocese of Oregon, presented a most interesting sermon in Rev. F. B. Ticknor's pulpit, at this place last Saturday. He is always greeted with enthusiasm by his numerous friends in this section.
    The Medford fire company have ordered handsome dark blue uniforms, caps and shirts with leather belts lettered "Protection" behind and "M.F.D." in front. The emblem on the front of the shirts will be the figure 1 on a shield embroidered with spanner and nozzle.
    D. T. Pritchard, the veteran watchmaker and jeweler, keeps one of the largest and best stocks of jewelry, watches and clocks in southern Oregon. As a workman he has no superior in this section. His prices are reasonable, and he deserves a liberal patronage.
    Adkins & Webb completed the Medford waterworks this week, and have executed their contract in a satisfactory manner. There is a pressure of over 200 feet, which is sufficient to throw the water a considerable distance over the highest house in town. We may well be proud of this system, as it affords much protection against fire.
    Hon. S. S. Pentz and bride arrived home from San Francisco last Thursday, and at once began housekeeping in the cozy cottage which the groom had built and furnished, ready for occupancy, before he went to San Francisco to "attend court." They will permanently reside in Medford, where citizens heartily congratulate them on their newfound happiness.
    The citizens of Medford decided at a mass meeting held one day last week to hold a monster Fourth of July celebration at this place with music, speaking, racing and games, and committees of arrangements, etc., were appointed and have already gone to work to ensure the success of the undertaking. There will be a large fund raised by our citizens to defray expenses, and nothing will be left undone to make the occasion memorable.
    "Pinafore" was presented at the Medford opera house last Saturday evening by the Ashland amateurs to a fair but delighted audience, and the ladies and gentlemen who have taken so much pains to prepare the opera for the boards have their thanks for a fine evening's enjoyment. The roles of "Little Buttercup," "Jack Ryestraw" and "Dick Deadeye" were particularly well carried out, though all participants acted well their several parts.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 2


M. L. Damon to Lucy A. Clark, lot 10, blk 16, Medford; $100.
John P. Worley to Sara A. Van Dyke, quitclaim to 12 44/100 acres in Medford; $1.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 2


    One of the handsomest residences in the valley will be that now in course of erection on W. H. Parker's place in this precinct. C. W. Skeel of Medford is the contractor.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 3


Going to Medford.
    The local "Pinafore" company are announced to play in the new Opera House at Medford tomorrow, Saturday evening, May 10th. There is a first-class talent composing the performers, and the Medford people will no doubt be pleased with the opportunity to see their Ashland friends in a  popular opera. The opera has been rehearsed for some time and should be well prepared.
Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1890, page 3


Trap for a  Train.
    As John B. Wrisley was walking up the railroad track from his home to Medford, Tuesday morning early, he found an obstruction apparently arranged for the purpose of ditching a train. A stout stick of timber was wedge in solid between the rails, and against one of them in such a manner that in all likelihood it would have ditched a train striking it from the north. Mr. Wrisley removed the timber with some difficulty. He is satisfied that it was the work of tramps who had been put off a train, somewhere.
Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1890, page 3


    I. L. Hamilton, of Medford, who is nominated for county assessor, is a gentleman who stands high at home as a perfectly reliable, honorable man and a public-spirited, active, progressive citizen. His fellow townsmen know him to be fully qualified for the office of assessor, and they have shown their appreciation of his capacity for public affairs by making him a member of the city council and clerk of their school district. Furthermore, he is able to get around and attend to business before the day of judgment arrives. His intimate friends, taking advantage of his stature, dubbed him "Shorty" Hamilton, and that name is the only one by which he is known to many people throughout the county. He is not running on his name, but as some people who know him well and will vote for him don't know him as I. L. Hamilton, we want it understood that it is "Shorty" himself who is the nominee.
Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1890, page 2


    There will be abundance of 4th of July in the valley this year from present indications. Ashland is making preparations for a big day, as is also Medford, and Central Point and Jacksonville are also talking of celebrating, with other places yet to hear from. Medford had over $300 subscribed to its celebration fund last Tuesday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1890, page 3


    S. S. Pentz, the Medford attorney, arrived home from California last Tuesday with a surprise for his friends in the person of a handsome bride, who now brightens his home.
    Messrs. D. T. and --. --. Lawton, of Medford, were in town last Saturday, after some of their fine horses which had started for California and been caught in the city pound here.
    There are many people who know "Shorty" Hamilton of Medford, the wide-awake and popular livery man and stage agent, who may not know that he is the Republican candidate for county assessor, for everybody in Medford calls him "Shorty," and many of his friends and neighbors hardly know him without that handle to his name.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 16, 1890, page 3


    Times were never so hard in southern Oregon as now. Money is exceedingly scarce, prices of produce very low, and a stagnation of business in general. Why is this? Simply because the national policy of the Republican party is unfriendly to the best interests and welfare of the people and in favor of the monopolists and corporations. A vote for the Democratic ticket will go far toward correcting the existing evils.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 2

From an 1881 Empire Catalog.
From an 1881 Empire catalog.

Harvesting Machinery of Every Description.
OUR STOCK COMPRISES THE CELEBRATED
EMPIRE MOWERS
EMPIRE AND TRIUMPH REAPERS AND BINDERS.
Daisy, Famous, Hollingsworth and Gazelle Hay Rakes.
BARNES' - REVOLVING - HORSE - RAKES.
STERLING HAY TEDDERS.
Myers' Hay Forks and Carriers,
Randolph and J. I. Case Headers.
Staver & Walker,
BRANCH HOUSE,                  MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890 et seq., page 2


Farmers!
In buying Machinery and Implements
it always pays to buy Standard Goods
from a First-class House; one that is
thoroughly responsible, and whose
guarantee can be relied upon.
STAVER & WALKER,           
Medford, Oregon.           
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890 et seq., page 2


Decoration Day.
    The following programme will be carried out on decoration day, May 30, 1890, by Chester A. Arthur Post of Medford. At 7 o'clock A.M. the detail will leave Medford for the Jacksonville Cemetery to decorate the graves of deceased soldiers and sailors. On their return at 10 A.M. the Post will meet in their hall, after which they will march to the opera house, where the exercises will be held as follows: 1. Music by the cornet band of Medford. 2. Music by the choir. 3. Prayer by the chaplain. 4. Address of welcome by Commander Young. 5. Music by the choir. 6. Reading of orders. 7. Solo by Miss Lumsden. 8. Address by Prof. Crawford. 9. Song by choir. 10. Benediction by Rev. Walton, and adjournment until 1:30 o'clock P.M. At that hour the Post will meet in front of the opera house at tap of drum and march to the park, headed by the Phoenix martial band, followed by 42 young ladies representing the several states. On reaching the park the service laid down in the G.A.R. service book will be followed, after which the monument will be decorated with flowers by the young ladies, followed by decorations from soldiers and citizens. By order of
        R. T. YOUNG, Commander.
        J. H. FARIS, Adjutant.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 3


    James Guerin, a 14-year-old boy, killed two large bears a few days ago, near Ellensburg.
    Road Supervisor Harbaugh has a force of men engaged in improving the road between this place and Medford, and is doing good work.
    When in Medford don't fail to call on D. T. Pritchard, the jeweler. He will take pleasure in showing you his mammoth stock of jewelry.
    "Pritchard" can't make a new watch out of an old one, but he can make it run like a daisy. Remember the place, near the Grand Central Hotel, Medford, Oregon.
    Don't fail to see that fine, large stock of clocks, watches and jewelry at D. T. Pritchard's. He is constantly receiving new supplies at his old stand on Main Street, Medford, Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 3


    W. J. Howard and family of Medford precinct visited us yesterday.
    C. H. Wallace and family of Medford made our town a visit a few days ago.
    We are sorry to learn that J. O. Johnson of Table Rock has been quite ill. He is much better now.
    Prof. G. G. I. Newbury this week succeeded in obtaining a state teacher's certificate. Gus. has made an excellent record for himself, both as pupil and teacher, and, as we regard him as a native product in one sense, we are correspondingly gratified at his success.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Chas. Hollingsworth has gone to the Illinois Valley on a prospecting expedition.
    S. Rosenthal keeps a large and first-class stock of goods and should receive a liberal share of public patronage.
    Geo. J. Wrisley and his newly made wife left for Coos County this week, where they expect to make their future home.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has gone to Josephine County, where he will make a lively and effective canvass for the Democratic ticket.
    The water works have been completed and give the best of satisfaction. Our town is to be congratulated upon its enterprise and foresight in the matter.
    Fred Barneburg has started three hundred head of cattle for Langell Valley, where they will be kept until winter. He was accompanied by his two sons and Mr. Backus.
    Creed Bros. are having good success with their well-boring apparatus and doing the best of work. They finished a well at the corner of J. Goldsmith's store and obtained a large supply of water.
    The celebration in Medford will be one of the grandest ever held in southern Oregon. A large sum has been subscribed for the occasion, and preparations are already under way. No doubt a vast crowd will be in attendance.
    The largest gathering that ever assembled in a hall in Medford listened to Governor Pennoyer's speech last Monday evening. Angle & Plymale's opera house was crowded to suffocation, many being unable to obtain admission.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
WRISLEY-CAMPBELL--At Medford, May 14, 1890, by Elder Geo. S. Walton, George J. Wrisley and Miss Mary E. Campbell.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 3


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890 et seq., page 3

Fruit Farm for Sale.
    Good location for fruit raising, about 200 acres of good land, within three miles of Ashland, for sale. Address
                    R. R. DUNN
                        Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 23, 1890, page 4


    Medford is making preparations for a grand celebration on the 4th.
    Jas. Howard, who has been on the Davison farm near Medford during the winter, started with his cattle for his Dead Indian ranch last Monday.
    The executive committee of the 4th of July celebration in Ashland received a letter from the Medford executive committee, asking the Ashland people to forgo a celebration in Ashland and join with Medford. Arrangements had been proceeded with too far, though, and we will celebrate here. Ashland people thank their Medford friends for their invitation, and would like to reciprocate the neighborly spirit which brought many citizens up to Ashland from that place last 4th of July, but it seems that things are in such shape that the celebration will have to go ahead here this year. It will be a nice thing if our towns in the valley can agree upon alternating celebrations, having a rousing big one at one place one year, then everybody go to another place next time, and so on in regular order. The Tidings would like to see this done.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1890, page 3


Baseball Match.
    Baseball matters, while not lively here with the older players, have not been slow with the young boys this season. The "little kids" won a game from Medford competitors at the latter place a few weeks ago, coming out easily victorious. Last Saturday, the "older kid" nine went down to Jacksonville to have a game with a nine of that place who had challenged them. The Ashland boys were too strong for their rivals, and won the game by a  score of 35 to 13. The game was pronounced a pleasant one, and the Ashland boys said they were treated nicely. Chas. Harris went down from here as umpire.
Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1890, page 3


    I. L. Hamilton, of Medford, the candidate for assessor, was in town Wednesday. He makes friends wherever he goes. And the best feature of his case is that "Shorty" is one of the men who are strongest when they are best known.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
WRISLEY-CAMPBELL--At Medford, May 14, 1890, by Elder G. S. Walton, Mr. Geo. J. Wrisley and Miss Mary E. Campbell, both of Medford.
Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1890, page 3


    In begging for votes for Prof. Merritt, the Mail, with a sort of intuition of defeat, requests the Republicans of Medford precinct to "let the dead bury the dead." This is almost diabolical in its suggestiveness. The Professor has been a political corpse for so long that to request him to bury himself at this stage of the game savors of sacrilege. He has been engaged in digging his political grave recently, however, by trading off "Shorty" Hamilton for votes for himself, and it would not be surprising if he should happen to get interred in the mire of his political scheming.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1890, page 2


    J. H. Stewart is our leading orchardist, and a thoroughly qualified man for the office of legislator. Vote for him next Monday.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel is a genial, courteous gentleman, an da good physician. Give him a cordial support for coroner. He will make an excellent official.
    Levi H. Mattox of Medford is teaching a spring term of school in Mt. Pitt district. This is getting to be quite an important district, having 46 children of school age within its bounds.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford will soon organize a baseball nine, and as there are two "curve pitchers" in town, it will be a good crew that can beat them.
    Much interest was taken in the speeches at the opera house hall by Messrs. [J. H.] Stewart and [Francis] Fitch. Both are cogent reasoners and forcible talkers and held the attention of their hearers throughout.
    The Mail calls our Union party fiends "Pintos," and speaks very naughtily about them. The Republicans are becoming foolishly vituperative, but then their alarm over the prospect of defeat is so great that anything is excusable.
    The Mail says that J. S. Howard and Sam Rosenthal each staked off a mining claim on C Street, Medford, pay dirt having been taken off the bedrock to which the new well on the corner was sunk. It is rumored the dirt was salted, however.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    Hon J. H. Stewart and Francis Fitch, Esq., delivered telling speeches to a good audience, at the Medford opera house, in the interest of Democracy and reform, on Wednesday evening last. Both were listened to with profound attention and their remarks went right home to their hearers.
    The Medford branch of the Y.M.C.A. recently elected the following officers: president, J. R. Erford; vice-president, G. W. Webb; secretary, E. A. Johnson; treasurer, B. F. Wilkinson. The usual committees were appointed, and also a soliciting committee to procure funds to enable them to fit up and furnish a room in the opera house building for a free reading room.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1890, page 3


A Falsehood  Branded.
    It having been reported in Ashland and elsewhere that the G.A.R. post at Medford was opposing James G. Birdsey as a candidate for re-election to the office of sheriff, members of the post have demanded the statement that such report is a base slander, without the least foundation in fact; and that, while the order, as an organization, eschews politics entirely, yet it is a fact that in this case every member of the Medford post, with possibly two exceptions, will vote for Birdsey with a hearty good will.
Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1890, page 3


    Cochran, the California sheep buyer, was fitting up a pack train and camping outfit at Medford last Monday, preparatory to starting southward with the sheep he has bought in this county.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1890, page 3


    Medford people are preparing to observe Memorial Day in a fitting manner. The G.A.R. post have had a beautiful floral monument erected in the city park, and the chief ceremonies of the day will take place there. A detail of members of the post will go to Jacksonville to decorate the graves of soldiers in the cemetery there.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 30, 1890, page 3


    JACKSONVILLE, May 31.--Decoration Day was appropriately celebrated in Jacksonville and Medford by Chester A. Arthur post, No. 47, of Medford. A detail from the Medford post came over at 8 o'clock a.m. and decorated the soldiers' graves in the Jacksonville cemetery, where a general gathering of neighbors and friends had already assembled to wreathe with flowers the graves of soldiers and civilians. At 10 a.m. the post assembled at the Grand Army hall in Medford under R. T. Young, post commander, where the ritual service of the G.A.R. was appropriately rendered, and at the conclusion the post with citizens and friends repaired to the Medford cemetery and wreathed with flowers a monument erected to the memory of our noble dead.
"Additional Reports," Oregonian, Portland, June 1, 1890, page 3


Want Him to Remain.
    MEDFORD, June 2.--Total vote cast gives Pennoyer a majority of 21.
Daily Morning Astorian, June 3, 1890, page 1



    Mr. T. W. Hutchinson and wife, of Denver, Col., who have been visiting Mr. and Mrs. D. L. Metzger, of Clay Township, departed yesterday for Medford, Ore., to visit their son Clarence.
"City News," Logansport (Indiana) Pharos, June 3, 1890, page 4


    Miss Nettie Tice of Medford was solemnly baptized and received into the Catholic Church in this place last Sunday morning, and was married in the afternoon to T. A. Harris of Medford, Rev. Father Clark officiating.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1890, page 3


Chas. Meeker to O. F. Paxton, lots 1, 2 and 3, block 3, in Meeker's addition to town of Medford; $250.
R. D. Dickenson to Ollie Brentano, lot 17, blk 20, Medford; $200.
James H. Barnum to Bertha Barnum, lot in blk 2, Medford; $1000.
Nettie McGee to C. W. Skeel, lot 11, blk 22, Medford; $65.
Wm. S. Barnum to C. W. Skeel, land in Medford; $4000.
C. W. Skeel to Wm. S. Barnum, lot 11, blk 22, Medford; $1200.
Same to same, lot 10, blk 24, Medford; $800.
Carrie Lumsden to W. I. Vawter, lot 10, blk 66, Medford; $65.
O.&T. Co. to Janet Garrick, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 76, Medford; $190.
Wm. Davis to Peter Fitch, land in Medford; $350.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Baseball this afternoon between the Medford and Central Point clubs.
    W. S. Barnum has sold his planing mill at this place to C. W. Skeel and son.
    Messrs. Wood & Whiteside are busily at work repairing the Medford bridge.
    Rev. E. McLean and family last week departed for Bandon, Coos County, where they will make their home for the present.
    The election at this place last Monday resulted in a tie for the office of justice of the peace between G. S. Walton and C. W. Skeel.
    Everybody is taking interest in the coming Fourth of July celebration, now that the election is over, and a grand celebration is in store for all who attend.
    Medford's baseball nine, with Gruby and Wallace or Angle and Wallace for the battery, will make a good showing against any club in the valley this season.
    The V.P.S.O.E. of the Baptist denomination gave a most enjoyable entertainment last Friday evening, which was highly appreciated by all in attendance.
    The many friends of Thos. A. Harris and Miss Nettie Tice tender their congratulations and wishes for a long life of prosperity and wedded bliss, in which the Times also joins.
    The pumps are working finely at the water works, the tanks leak but little, and the system is proven to be an unqualified success. Medford is well equipped now to fight fire and keep down the dust.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman delivered a stirring speech, full of the right kind of Democracy, to a large audience at the Medford opera house last Friday evening, He did valiant service for the party during the whole campaign, and the party should remember his services in the future.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 6, 1890, page 3


    Chester A. Arthur Post No. 47, of Medford, celebrated Decoration services at Jacksonville and Medford. At 8 a.m. a detail from that post came over and joined our citizens in decorating the graves of our soldiers and friends. Flags were at half mast, and our people, who had been busy for several days preparing for the occasion, were out with their choicest floral offerings to commemorate the day. Jacksonville Cemetery, ever beautiful by nature and sculptor's art, was fragrant with the delicate odor of profusions of flowers. At the conclusion of the services in Jacksonville the detail ritual services of the G.A.R. was appropriately remembered at Grand Army Hill. Afternoon the post met in front of the opera house and formed in line, headed by [the] Medford Silver Cornet Band, with muffled drums, and followed by 42 young ladies, dressed in white, with black scarfs, representing the several states, and marched to the public park where the exercises of decorating a monument in memory of our nation's honored dead was carried out in the form laid down in the G.A.R. ritual. The members of the post decorated in memory of their respective regiments, and then neighbors and friends deposited flowers in memory of their departed friends. Benediction by Prof. Crawford closed the interesting services of the day.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1890, page 2


    Anderson & Woodford, of Medford, have been awarded the contract (advertised in the Tidings) for hauling 5000 cords of wood to the railroad at Siskiyou station from points near there where it has been cut by Sisson & Crocker's men.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1890, page 3


    The Junior Band of Roseburg will furnish music for the 4th of July celebration at Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, June 6, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A thorough test of the water system made last week shows that the hydrants can be made highly efficacious in extinguishing fire.
    Wm. Slinger, one of our leading citizens, has gone to Butte Creek to look after his stock interests.
    Stewart Bros. last week took a nice bunch of young cattle to the Klamath County ranges for the summer.
    J. G. Wiley and family last week removed to Albany, where they will make their home in the future.
    The Roseburg junior band will furnish music for the Medford celebration in connection with our home talent.
    Mr. and Mrs. George L. Webb were the recipients of many congratulations at the hands of their numerous friends during the week.
    The Johnson and Palm addition to Medford has been ordered vacated, and the tract will be divided into 20-acre lots by the owner, Mr. Mingus.
    The members of the M.E. sewing circle gave a strawberry festival at the Medford opera house last Monday evening, which was well attended.
    The city council last week authorized the sale of the Medford city bonds to the amount of $20,000. It is thought outside capital will take them.
    Elaborate preparations are going forward to insure a stunning time here on the glorious Fourth. The Roseburg band will assist our local band in furnishing music for the occasion.
    The Medford baseball club issues a general challenge in last week's Mail to any club in Jackson County to play for pastime or purse on their grounds in Medford, opposing club to have choice of day and umpire.
    The contest over the office of justice of the peace was decided in 'Squire Walton's favor at the county clerk's office, last Saturday, his competitor (C. W. Skeel) having drawn the short straw in Max's lottery.
    Water rates for stables, hotels and restaurants have been fixed at $12 per year; business houses, stores and offices, $4; residences, where used for irrigation, $9; laundries, $9. Water can compete on even terms with beer at these rates.
    Mr. Perry, a newcomer, has purchased the dray and truck business of Anderson & Woodford. The latter have gone to Siskiyou Mountain, where they have secured the contract for hauling 5,000 cords of wood for the railroad company.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 2


O.&T. Co. to Mary A. Stewart et al., 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 16, 17 and 18, in block 47, and other lots in Medford; $2090.
Rebecca A. Finney to Mary A. Clark, lots 10, 11, 12 and 13, block 54, Medford; $1, etc.
B. S. Webb to Mrs. Sarah A. White, lot 11, block 15, Medford; $600.
D. J. Lumsden to H. G. Nicholson, lot 8, blk 2, Lumsden's add. to Medford; $140.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 2


    The Oregonian reports that Wm. W. Cardwell, formerly of this place, has been elected as joint representative from Grant and Harney counties.
    Our baseball club has invested in some caps and belts, and our citizens have subscribed a neat sum to buy the necessary uniforms. They will soon be ready to play a good game.
    W. G. Kenney has been awarded the contract for carrying the mails between this place and Medford twice each day. For this service the government pay the munificent sum of $4 a year.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 3


    Wm. Clark of Medford, the veteran Democrat, went to Cinnabar yesterday. We wish him a pleasant trip.
    Harry Angle of Medford, who is now in the employ of Staver & Walker, passed through town Wednesday, on his way to Applegate.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
HERBIG-LINDSAY--In Medford precinct, June 4, 1890, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Thos. Herbig and Belle L. Lindsay, both of Grants Pass.
WEBB-FOLEY--At Drain, Oregon, June 1, 1890, by Rev. I. Richardson, Geo. L. Webb of Medford and Miss Bessie Foley.
DOWNS-EDWARDS--In Medford precinct, June 5, 1890, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, J. L. Downs and Miss Mattie Edwards.
BORN.
WEBB--At Medford, June 4, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Webb, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 3


Medford Items.
    Francis Fitch, Esq., will deliver the Fourth of July oration for Medford.
    The boys are expecting a good game of baseball with the Ashland nine next Saturday, June 14th.
    Judge Willard Crawford, formerly of this place, was elected Justice of the Peace at Athena, Umatilla County, on the 2d.
    The people who have the Fourth of July arrangements in charge are preparing to make the ball in the evening a grand affair.
    Medford real estate men report a number of newcomers looking about the county for houses and farming property this month.
    Francis Fitch and a mining expert from abroad were over to the Siskiyous about Cinnabar this week, looking at mining prospects.
    G. W. Isaacs has sold 80 acres of land about five miles east of Medford to Thomas Stottler, recently from California; consideration, $1300.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. B. Roberts, of this place, started Wednesday morning for Napa County, Cal., their old home, for a visit there of two or three weeks.
    The new water works afford sufficient pressure for a fire hydrant to give an efficient means of fire protection without the aid of a fire engine.
    Messrs. J. S. Howard and J. Goldsmith went down to Portland this week on business connected with the establishment of a Masonic lodge at this place.
    The rebuilding of the Medford bridge across Bear Creek will be completed this week by the contractors, Wood & Whiteside. The bridge is in better condition than ever before.
    Anderson & Woodford have sold their city dray business here to Mr. Perry, recently from the East, and will be busy all summer with their contract to haul railroad wood for Sisson & Crocker in the Siskiyous.
    The vote for Justice of the Peace in Medford resulted in a tie between Messrs. Walton and Skeel, and in the drawing at the county clerk's office, Mr. Walton captured the office, somewhat to the relief of Mr. Skeel.
    S. W. Speas, who was at work with the pile-driver at the Bear Creek bridge, received a blow on the head from an iron bar last Monday morning which it was thought for a time would result seriously. He was on the platform at the top of the pile-driver structure and as he tripped the hammer it caught the bar he was using in such a way that it struck him on the head, knocking him senseless. Fortunately he escaped falling from the platform, and upon examination it was found that the injuries were not serious.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, whose skill and success as an oculist are so well known throughout Southern Oregon, is frequently called upon to perform surgical operations for the relief of defective vision, and has a high record of success in many difficult cases. The operation for strabismus to straighten "cross eyes" is one of the simplest to perform, and almost invariably successful. His latest case was that of Chris. Buhlmeyer, whose eyes were straightened out by the doctor one day recently.
Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1890, page 2


    Medford's new water works proves satisfactory for fire protection, after a test of the pressure from the street mains.
    In acceptance of a challenge by the Medford baseball nine, the older boys of Ashland have made up a nine to play a match game at Medford tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon. The Ashland team will include some good players, but they are all lacking sadly in practice.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1890, page 3


    Henry Klippel, of Medford, one of the two commissioners appointed to represent the state of Oregon for the great exposition of 1892 at Chicago, will start next week for Chicago to attend a conference of the commissioners of all the states.
    Mr. R. R. Dunn, the popular manager of the Staver & Walker branch house at Medford, went over to Siskiyou County this week on a business trip.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1890, page 3


Rebecca A. Finney to Mary A. Clark, lots 10, 11, 12, 13, blk 54, Medford, and other property; $1.
O.&T. Co. to C. W. Skeel, lots 17, 19 and 20, blk 45, Medford; $190.
O.&T. Co. to Spencer A. Cummons, lot 18, blk 45, Medford; $40.
C. W. Skeel to G. W. Bashford, lots 17, 18, 19 and 20, blk 45, Medford; $1000.
Spencer A. Cummons to C. W. Skeel, lot 18, blk 45, Medford; $100.
Mary A. Stewart et al. to Jennie E. Griffis, lots 8 and 9, blk 49, Medford; $180.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Webb's block on Seventh Street boasts of a new brick sidewalk along its entire length.
    W. B. Roberts and wife are visiting relatives at Napa, Cal. We wish them a pleasant trip.
    Cecil Young, who has been employed in the Times office at Jacksonville, has returned home.
    Dr. Minnis, formerly of this place, was the late Democratic candidate for coroner in Douglas County.
    Rev. G. G. Thomas and family, accompanied by C. C. Smith, have returned to their old home in the East.
    Chris Buhlmeyer had his eyes operated on for strabismus by Dr. Geary one day last week, with the best results.
    C. I. Hutchison during the week entertained his father and mother, F. W. Hutchison and wife of Denver, Indiana.
    Several accidents occurred at the bridge last week during the operation of the pile driver, but nobody was seriously hurt.
    The work of rebuilding the Bear Creek bridge is about completed. Whiteside & Wood, the contractors, have done good work.
    N. B. Bradbury was confined to his bed several days last week, owing to injuries received by a fall of about eight feet from a scaffolding at the bridge.
    Shorty Hamilton has resigned his position as manager for Ed. Worman, and now operates, with Tom Harris, the Grand Central saloon, says the Mail.
    Medford's baseball club is marching on. Last Saturday the boys defeated the Ashland nine by a score of 41 to 40, while the week previous they defeated the Phoenix boys.
    No definite steps have been taken yet towards effecting the organization of a Masonic lodge in this place. It is thought that a lodge should be instituted here, however.
    The new piling put in at the bridge by Wood & Whiteside last week was driven four feet into the hardpan, and the bridge is far more secure against high water than it formerly was.
    Medford's celebration will be the grandest in southern Oregon this year. Elaborate preparations are being made and no pains will be spared to please all who come here on the 4th of July.
    The baseball game last Saturday was a somewhat shaggy affair. Aside from the colossal score, the fact that the Ashland boys made 23 tallies in the last two innings was somewhat phenomenal. The boys all need practice.
    Mrs. E. J. Montague and family of this place frightened last week from the unpleasant effects resulting from eating of a cake purchased at the recent church festival. Some very nice flowers had been baked in the center of the cake, and their juices doubtless poisoned the dough. [See retraction, below.]
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 2


    S. W. Speas, while working with the pile driver at the Medford bridge one day last week, was knocked senseless by a blow from an iron bar as the hammer fell, but soon recovered consciousness, and the effects wore on next day.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 3


    Dr. Will Jackson and family this week remove to Grants Pass, after many years' residence in Jacksonville. It is with sincere regret that our citizens see them depart, for they have many friends here, and their place in the community will not soon be filled. Our sister town is to be congratulated upon the acquisition of such desirable citizens.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel of Medford made the Times office a pleasant visit last Monday. He is one of the best physicians in southern Oregon, and was the Democratic candidate for coroner at the last election. Although his opponent obtained nearly 400 majority in Ashland, he made such an excellent run elsewhere in the county that he almost overcame the great odds against him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1890, page 3


MARRIAGES.
DOWNS-EDWARDS--In Medford precinct, June 5, 1890, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, J. L. Downs and Miss Mattie Edwards.
Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1890, page 2


    John Wolters, the baker now of Medford, who made bread for the people of Ashland for a number of years, was in town Tuesday.
    Prof. Narregan, of Ellensburg, Was., was in Ashland the fore part of the week, looking up prospects for a position in some school in Southern Oregon. He has been superintendent of the Ellensburg schools.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1890, page 3


A Go As You Please Tie.
    There was some good track work done by the boys in the baseball game at Medford last Saturday afternoon--the score standing at the close of the game 41 to 41. The boys considered themselves in luck that the distance around the bases is not greater, as they were not in first-class training for foot racing, but did very well for amateurs on the track. Every inning counted from two to seven runs for each side nevertheless to the players and spectators, and it is a question whether there is not more real sport in a game in which there is a long score than in one where the nine innings show but two or three runs for each side. It isn't considered a good game to have a long score, but it is more real pleasure to see a ball struck away out beyond the fielders and some fine heel and toe work done around the track than to see the pitcher and catcher do all the work; at least that's the way we look at it since the game of last Saturday.
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, June 20, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Childers & Son burned 250,000 fine brick at their kiln last week.
    Hay has been as low as $7 per ton in Medford during the past week.
    John Bellinger is in charge of the Standard Oil Co.'s warehouse here at present.
    Isaac Skeeters arrived from Josephine County and will remain in town a short time.
    Geo. E. Anderson is now on Siskiyou Mountain, hauling wood for the railroad company.
    Miss Helen Strang has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Jas. Strobel, at Walla Walla during the week.
    The Mail is advocating the establishing of a thorough sewerage system in the business portion of Medford.
    Don't fail to read the programme for the 4th of July celebration at this place. It is a first-class one in every respect.
    Don't forget that the railroad rate for the round trip on the Fourth will be a single fare between all points in the valley and Medford.
    Wm. Clark is enjoying himself in the classic fields of Cinnabar. He has developed a tremendous appetite since his arrival there.
    Mr. Fronk, father of our clever railroad agent, last week unexpectedly rallied from the illness which caused his friends so much solicitude.
    Skeel & Son have about completed W. H. Parker's fine residence, and are now engaged in the preliminary work of building a neat residence for D. H. Miller.
    The Fourth of July procession will form in front of Angle & Plymale's opera house, with the Roseburg Junior Band in the lead. It will no doubt be a long and handsome one.
    We are authorized to state that the report published in the Mail, to the effect that a poisoned cake had been purchased at a recent church festival in Medford by Mrs. E. J. Montague, is utterly false and without foundation.
    The citizens of Medford have acted in a most liberal manner in the matter of subscribing to the Fourth of July fund, and the committee will reap their reward in having the largest crowd in attendance known for many years.
    A handsomely embroidered table cover, the work of Mrs. I. A. Webb, which she had prepared for a present to a sister living in Indiana, was much admired by the ladies of Medford before being shipped last week. It was a handsome specimen of needlework, says the Mail.
    The work of initiating charter members of Medford's K. of P. Lodge has been going on for some time past. The lodge will start out under the most favorable auspices. The lodge will be called Talisman Lodge No. 31, and will have about 30 charter members, a number of whom hail from Jacksonville.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1890, page 2


    If the census enumerator has missed you, let the fact be known.
    The baseball fever is raging in southern Oregon, and nearly every town and village has its club.
    Mrs. James Herely and Miss Janey Keegan acted as mail carriers on the Medford-Butte Creek route last week.
    The county is full of canvassers for different articles. The harder the times the more numerous they become.
    The Jacksonville and Medford baseball clubs will play a match game on the grounds of the latter on July 4th, for a purse of $50. It will no doubt be well contested.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1890, page 3


For Sale or Rent.
    A livery stable, in a good location, for sale or rent. Terms reasonable. For further particulars apply to
H. E. Baker
    Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1890, page 3


$500,000 to Loan, $500,000.
    By J. H. Whitman of Medford, on improved farm security in Jackson County, at the best rates of any loan agency in the county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1890, page 3


    The running horse "Bingo," owned by Clay Humphrey of Eugene, arrived in this valley last week. He will run at Medford on the 4th of July, and will probably take part in the races at the county fair ground in September.
    Says the Grants Pass Courier of yesterday: An excursion train of capitalists from Pennsylvania is expected to pass through in a few days. They will stop one or two days in this county. They are looking over the coast after timber lands. Our people, after Eastern men gobble all the desirable tracts of timber land in this county, will wake up after it is too late and realize its value. Timber land at $2.50 per acre will soon cease to be such a soft snap in the next few years.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 27, 1890, page 3


    S. P. Kilburn has removed from Trail Creek to Medford, where he will spend the summer.
    Ashland has the heaviest crop of blackberries ever raised there. The bushes are almost hidden by the fruit.
    Ed. Worman continues to carry express and passengers between this place and Medford, although he has lost the mail contract.
    There was considerable damage done to rail fences and dilapidated buildings in the valley during the wind storm of last Sunday and Monday.
    Three regular stages to Medford have been on the road since W. G. Kenney commenced carrying the U.S. mail on his contract last Monday.
    Medford and Ashland are both assured large crowds at their respective celebrations today. A great many will also attend the races at the fair grounds near Central Point.
    Pritchard can't make a new watch out of an old one, but he can make it run like a daisy. Remember the place, near the Grand Central Hotel, Medford, Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    B. W. Powell is now a resident of Castle Rock, Wash.
    Joe Pierce has returned from the East, and many of the fair sex are happy.
    E. A. Langley, while running a saw in Skeel's factory last Friday, had the misfortune to lose part of some of his fingers.
    Wood & Whiteside have finished their contract of repairing the bridge across Bear Creek, and it is in first-class condition again.
    Wm. Robinson, who has been at work at Griffis & Walker's sawmill near Gold Hill, cut one of his legs severely with an ax one day last week.
    The wife of Chas. Emblem, and daughter of S. Childers of this place, died one day last week and was buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery the following day.
    Leonard & Skeeters, who are conducting a variety store near Hanley & Wilkinson's meat market, will enlarge their stock of goods soon. They are enjoying a good trade.
    Don't fail to come to Medford on the 4th and enjoy yourself to your heart's content. The programme is an exceptionally good one, and no pains will be spared to make everybody at home.
    Messrs. Slinger, Geary, Huff, True, Barr, Howard and Johnson were among those residents of this place who attended the meeting of Warren lodge of Masons at Jacksonville Wednesday evening.
    Last Saturday, as Misses Minnie Johnson and Ray Young were riding in a cart at Medford, the horse became frightened and ran away. In endeavoring to jump from the cart Miss Young's foot caught in the slatted front and she was thrown backwards and dragged 100 yards before the horse was stopped. While very painful, her injuries are not considered dangerous.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 4, 1890, page 3


    A. H. Maegly has sold out his various business interests in this valley, and is preparing to remove his family to Portland where he has already invested largely and profitably in real estate. Mr. Maegly says his confidence in the future of Portland is increasing, and he intends to invest still further in Portland real estate. He is a reliable and enterprising man of business, and deserves the fullest measure of success.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1890, page 2


    The K. of P. lodge of Medford had a good time last Monday evening, the occasion being the initiation of new members.
    A movement has been on foot for several months to organize a second flouring mill in Medford, its stock being owned by a number of farmers of this vicinity. Seven thousand dollars worth of stock has already been pledged, the plan being to secure three thousand more in cash before purchasing machinery. A good lot has been secured near the depot.--[Mail.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1890, page 3


    Says the Mail of last week: "Mrs. G. L. Davis, Mrs. Milton Harlan and Miss Mary Davidson left in company this morning for the East. At Denver Mrs. Harlan will visit her mother, and Mrs. Davis and Miss Davidson will continue their journey, the former to Minneapolis, Kan., where she will visit her mother, uncle and aunt and other relatives. Miss Davidson goes to Indiana, where she will visit her grandmother."
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1890, page 3


    Mrs. Agnes J. Emblem died at Medford last week, of consumption.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1890, page 3


BORN.
CURRY--In Medford, Jun 27, to Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curry, a daughter.
MARRIED.
JOHNSTONE-SISEMORE--At the home of the officiating minister, near Medford, July 1st, 1890, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. W. B. Johnston, of Portland, and Miss Ada Sisemore, of Sams Valley, Jackson County.
GIVEN-YOUNG--At the residence of the officiating minister, M. A. Williams, June 25, 1890, Mr. Geo. A. Given to Miss Catharine Young, both of Jackson County.
DIED.
EMBLEM--In Medford, June the 26th of consumption, Agnes Emblem, wife of Chas. Emblem.
Ashland Tidings, July 4, 1890, page 3


    A movement has been on foot for several months to organize a second flouring mill in Medford, says the Mail, its stock being owned by a number of farmers of that vicinity. Seven thousand dollars' worth of stock have already been pledged, the plan being to secure $3000 more in cash before purchasing machinery. A good lot has been secured near the depot.

"Oregoniana,"
Oregonian, Portland, July 6, 1890, page 4


At Medford, Or.
    At the residence of the officiating minister, near Medford, Tuesday, July 1st, W. B. Johnson, of Portland, and Miss Ida Sisemore, of Sams Valley, were joined in the bonds of matrimony by Rev. M. A. Williams. The groom is a real estate dealer, of Portland, and the bride is a young lady reared in Jackson County, and well and favorably known to nearly all the residents of the valley, who wish the newly wedded pair happiness and prosperity.
    Mr. and Mrs. B. S. Cook expect to leave for Nestucca on a short visit to the coast.
    Miss Lillian Durham, of Portland, returned to her home last week, after a pleasant visit of a few days with Miss Nellie Edes.

"In the Social World,"
Oregonian, Portland, July 6, 1890, page 10

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. and Mrs. Farnham last week returned to their home at Akron, Iowa.
    The Mail wants the Medford gun club to import a few pairs of Mongolian pheasants to stock our "preserves."
    Medford may flatter itself upon having the largest crowd that ever assembled in the valley on a 4th of July. It is estimated that over 4000 people joined in the celebration here on that day. Those having the affair in charge must be congratulated upon the great success attending their efforts.
    The following are the present officers of Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P.: C. W. Wolters, P.C.; E. P. Geary, C.C.; P. Henderson, V.C.; C. I. Hutchison, P.; Lake France, M. at A.; J. E. Enyart, K. of R. and S.; C. O. Damon, M. of F.; H. U. Lumsden, M. of E.; John Curry, I. G.; F. W. France, O.G.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1890, page 2


    Prof. Crawford of Corvallis was at Jacksonville yesterday, looking after the scheme of building a railroad between Medford and Jacksonville.
    S. R. Taylor is now conducting the freighting business formerly carried on between Jacksonville and Central Point and Medford by R. S. Dunlap.
    Commissioners Taylor and Haymond inspected the new bridge across Bear Creek, just completed yesterday morning. It is a fine structure and fills a long-felt want.
    Small boys are running at large at unseasonable hours of night and making themselves generally obnoxious. They should be suppressed before they are further on the way to ruin.
    All the flags in this section fell one star short of the allotted number after all, at the recent celebrations. Idaho slipped into the galaxy without the nation generally being cognizant of the fact.
    The store of Mensor Bros. at Port Townsend, Wash. was discovered to be on fire early one morning last week, but the promptness of the fire department prevented a conflagration. The damage done was small.
    The match game of baseball on the 4th, between the Jacksonville and Medford clubs, was won by the former by a score of 30 to 22. It was an interesting, well-contested game, and we hope that it will be repeated at an early day.
    There is much talk in baseball circles since the game at Medford on the 4th. It is thought that a return game will be played soon between the Jacksonville and Medford clubs, for a considerable sum. This would certainly be interesting, as both would no doubt play a much better game.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1890, page 3


    Mrs. Webster was up from Medford on Wednesday, accompanied by her daughter, Mrs. Boze.
    Wm. Mensor of Port Townsend, Wash. passed through the valley last week, en route to San Francisco. On his return he will visit Jacksonville.
    Frank A. Huffer has gone to the Willamette Valley, where he is engaged in surveying for the S.P.R.R. Co. He spends his vacation in this manner.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1890, page 3


    Jacksonville base ball club are very enthusiastic over their success at Medford on the 4th, and their admiring friends are equally proud. Kap Kubli, the catcher, who did such fine work in the diamond field, was presented with a laurel wreath on Saturday by some of the prominent society young ladies of Jacksonville. Others equally as meritorious are quietly reflecting the smiles of the fair faces that was the beacon light of victory.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 11, 1890, page 2


    The celebration at the picnic grove near Medford on the 4th was a great success, and attracted more people than were ever gathered upon such an occasion in this part of the county. The orations by Francis Fitch and S. S. Pentz, music by the Roseburg and Medford bands, amusements in the afternoon and grand ball in the evening went to make up a great day for Medford.
    The big grizzly, "Reelfoot," was taken to Medford Tuesday by the men who are exhibiting him. From Medford they will go to Grants Pass, and after that will probably go further northward. The bear is well worth seeing--being undoubtedly the finest specimen of the big grizzlies that were common in the 'Fifties that has ever been seen in Oregon. These big fellows are of a race now almost extinct, being larger than the grizzlies most common now in the mountain regions of California and Oregon. "Reelfoot" was probably a hundred years old. His great teeth, worn down in blunt groups, show that he was one of the oldest bears ever killed in this region, and it is known that these bears live to a great age.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 11, 1890, page 3


Chas. Nickell to C. B. Rostel, lots in Medford; $660.
S. S. Pentz to Frances H. Pentz, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 3, Lumsden's add. to Medford; $1.
Volney Webster to Mary E. Davis, lots 3 and 4, block 11, Park add. to Medford; $100.
Eliza J. Warthen to A. G. and M. J. Johnston, lot 4, block 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $1000.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 2


    The hegira to the mountains, springs and sea coast has commenced.
    Every day brings a fakir or tramp of some kind. Look out for them.
    Jonas Lee, who lately arrived from the East, visited the county seat on Tuesday.
    Everybody is fleeing to the mountains and seashore, and the various towns are duller than ever.
    H. B. Reed, the "combination fence man," passed through the valley last week, en route to California.
    Veit Schutz' employees indulged in a "strike" the forepart of the week, but the trouble has blown over.
    Several hundred tons of hay have been shipped to both northern and southern points since the new crop came in.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Jonas A. Lee, late of Dakota, has established his home at Ashland and will practice law in this valley, where he has landed interests.
    A rhubarb leaf from the farm of Hon. J. H. Stewart exhibited in Medford last week measured three feet, one inch wide by three feet, ten inches long.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peyser of San Francisco tarried in Jacksonville yesterday, while on their way to Port Townsend, Wash., where Mr. P. is extensively engaged in the mercantile business. Mrs. P. is a native of this county, and is better known here as Miss Etta Coleman.
    The oration of Francis Fitch, Esq., on the Fourth at Medford was one of the best examples of that style of oratory that has ever been delivered in southern Oregon. Disdaining to soar to the heights of fanciful imagery, the speaker confined his effort to a review of existing conditions and the probable resultant effects within the next generation of the present tendency to extravagance and corruption in the management of public affairs, and the unlicensed encroachments of wealth and the corporations.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. F. Hale, the expert photographer, has gone to Grants Pass.
    Chas. Hollingsworth has taken up a land claim in the Illinois Valley, Josephine County.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has returned from his trip to Corvallis, where he attended the annual meeting of the State Horticultural Society.
    A fakir held forth on our streets Monday and Tuesday evenings and sold quite a quantity of his bogus wares.
    Medford's boys are all ready for that game of baseball with Jacksonville, whenever the county seat boys say the word.
    The ice cream stand run by the ladies of the W.C.T.U. at the grove on the Fourth netted the handsome sum of $60 for the ladies.
    W. B. Roberts visited Jacksonville recently. He is better satisfied than ever with this valley since his trip to his old home in California.
    The surprise attending Mayor Howard's winning the glass ball shoot on the Fourth has not yet altogether subsided. He is a bad man with a gun.
    Harry McClallen has retired from the management of the Grand Central Hotel, and Thos. A. Harris is in charge of that caravansary.
    The hose company have ordered belts, to be suitably inscribed, and which will doubtless add greatly to the appearance of the company on parade.
    Newell Harlan is now sole proprietor of the Mail at this place, his associate, Milton Harlan, having taken up his residence on the Sound.
    Isaac F. Williams, the new contractor on the Medford and Big Butte route, has become a resident of this place, and moved his family here the forepart of the month.
    The practice of sprinkling the streets at night with the hose makes existence much more endurable during the dusty season. The water works are a great thing for the city.
    Jas. Carr of this precinct has lately finished a neat and substantial residence and is now engaged in other improvements. He is one of our most enterprising farmers.
    Many citizens of Medford viewed the mounted remains of "Old Reelfoot," the Siskiyou grizzly bear killed last winter, while the owners had same on exhibition here during the week.
    Jos. Goslin was badly hurt by being thrown from his horse while running after cattle in McAndrew's pasture one day last week, dislocating his left ankle and right knee. He is better known as "Cayuse Joe."
    Jas. Herely, who carried the mail on the Medford-Eagle Point mail route so long, has sold his team and hack to W. H. Parker and will leave for Tacoma before long, to locate. We dislike to see him leave us.
    The school meeting, which was announced to be held on the 15th inst., for the purpose of passing on the question of building a large, new schoolhouse, came to naught, as there was some defect in the notices which had been posted. Owing to the stringent times, it is doubtful whether the people will vote in favor of the large tax which would be necessary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Maegly left for their future home, in Portland, Tuesday.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 18, 1890, page 2


    The Medford Mail is now under the proprietorship of Newell Harlan alone, Milton Harlan having returned east.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 18, 1890, page 3


Ho, for Medford.
    The undersigned has fitted up a stage, which will make regular trips, between Jacksonville and Medford, connecting with all trains and carrying the U.S. mails.
W. G. KENNEY.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890 et seq., page 2


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890 et seq., page 2


G. H. Baker et al. to Sophenia I. Baker, lot 4, block 6 and block 7, Beatty's add. to Medford; $2000.
E. F. Walker to W. L. Webster, lot 7, block 15, Medford: $150.
C. C. Beekman to Lewis Shideler, block 67, Medford: $1200.
Lewis Shideler to A. M. Geary, lots 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13 and part of lots 5 and 71, block 67, Medford; $600.
W. I. Vawter et al. to Clara C. O. Ticknor, lots 16, 17, and 18, block 47, Medford; $400.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 2


Look After the Fruit Interests.
    Hon J. D.Whitman, horticultural commissioner, is after the delinquent fruit-raisers with a sharp stick, and proposes using heroic treatment if those who have diseased trees do not see fit to attend to the matter themselves. The fruit industry is southern Oregon's mainstay, and nothing should be left undone to properly nurture it. Mr. Whitman has sent a circular, of which the following is a copy, to those interested:
    A recent examination of your premises, situated in Jacksonville, Oregon, by the commissioner of the Third Horticultural District of Oregon, discloses the fact that your trees, that were carefully inspected by an agent of the horticultural board in April last, and marked and pointed out to you, and the remedy given that you were required to use, have been neglected until the pests (pernicious scale) not only cover the tree, but the fruit also. You are hereby notified that ten days will be given you to destroy the pests by cutting and destroying such trees as are infected; or the thorough spraying of the same with the remedy here suggested. If you fail the law will be enforced, as the fruit interests of the state imperatively demands it should be.
J. D. WHITMAN.       
Com. of the Third Horticultural District.       
    The following is the law governing such cases: If the owner or owners, or person or persons in charge or possession of any orchard or nursery, or trees or places, or articles infected with said insects, or any of them, or their larvae or eggs, after having been notified as above to make application of treatment as directed, shall fail, neglect or refuse so to do, he or they shall be deemed guilty of maintaining a public nuisance; and any such orchards, trees, nurseries, or places or articles thus infected, shall be adjudged and the same is hereby declared a public nuisance, and may be proceeded against as such. If found guilty, the court shall direct the aforesaid board of horticulture to abate the nuisance. The expense thus incurred shall be a lien upon the real property of the defendant.
    REMEDY--"Four pounds of rosin, three pounds of sal soda, water to make four and one-half gallons; dissolve the sal soda in a few pints of water; when thoroughly dissolved add the rosin; heat until dissolved and add water finally. Use one and one-half pints of this solution to the gallon of water. Use at a temperature of 100 degrees Fahrenheit."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


Base Ball.
    The boast of the Tidings to the effect that the Ashland nine are the champions in southern Oregon baseball circles because they have beaten the Medford boys once and have "asked for games with both the Jacksonville and Central Point nines," is premature, to say the least. The Jacksonville nine will play any and all comers as soon as they get their men together once more. They do not like to undertake the job of beating a well-organized nine with only two or three players, but seem to have a faculty of putting "to sleep" any of the other valley nines when their full complement of players is on hand.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Call on Pritchard when in Medford and see something new in the jewelry line.
    John B. Williams of Medford precinct was in town a few days since. He is full of energy and selling considerable hay and stock.
    A large amount of lumber from Mee's mill passes through Jacksonville every week en route to Central Point and Medford.

    Miss Nellie Wood died at Tolo one day this week, of quick consumption. She came from California with J. F. Ragsdale and family.

    Jesse Richardson's place near Medford, with its new barn and fine two-story dwelling approaching completion, presents a splendid appearance from the surrounding fields.
    C. C. Ragsdale is reported to have disposed of his Tolo ranch to N. L. Narregan for $12,000, and will remove with his family to California, we trust only temporarily, however.
     If you want any repairing done call on Pritchard, one door from Grand Central, Medford. He can't make a new watch out of an old one, but he can make an old one run like a daisy.
    Dr. Stone has been very busy during the week notifying those whose fruit trees are infested with pests that radical measures will be adopted if they do not take steps to eradicate the evils themselves.

    Fakirs are getting too thick in southern Oregon and some steps should be taken to suppress them. The board of trustees should pass an ordinance licensing shooting galleries, cane racks, merry-go-rounds and the like. This would at least prevent these rascals taking all the money they get out of the country.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Attention is called to the professional card of Col. Robert A. Miller, who will practice in all the courts of the state. He has removed his office to that formerly occupied by Will Jackson, where he is now ready for business.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    W. I. Vawter, cashier of the Medford bank, visited the county seat Wednesday, accompanied by his wife.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jas. Herely and family left for Tacoma, Wash., this week to locate.
    Don't fail to see the new line of goods at Pritchard's in Medford. "Quick sales and small profits" is his motto.
    Cayuse Joe has nearly recovered from the injuries he recently received, and was at Jacksonville Tuesday, accompanying Thos. McAndrews.

    Rev. E. McLean has returned from a six weeks sojourn in Coos County and will occupy the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church at the usual time.

    Great bargains in gold and silver watches at Pritchard's, Medford, for a few days. Must be sold soon to make room for mammoth stock coming for the fall trade.
    Geo. E. Anderson and wife were in town from Siskiyou during the week. Mr. A. and his partner have ten teams engaged on a wood contract with Sisson, Crocker & Co.

    C. C. Beekman has sold his fine block on the road leading to Jacksonville, opposite the Presbyterian Church, to L. Shideler, who in turn deeded half of it to Mrs. Dr. Geary. The total consideration was $1200.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Hon. J. D. Whitman, of Medford, a member of the State Board of Horticulture, in company with Dr. E. B. Stone, local fruit inspector, visited the orchards in Jacksonville last week, and found the scale bug alarmingly present. Mr. Whitman notified them that he would proceed according to law to abate the nuisance.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1890, page 2


    Ashland is still the metropolis of Southern Oregon and please don't forget it.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Medford Mail: Thos. Shattuck, the watermelon king of Josephine County, was in the valley during the week and while here made arrangements to handle Hon. J. H. Stewart's melons grown on his fine farm near Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Hon. J. D. Whitman, of Medford, a member of the State Board of Horticulture, in company with Dr. E. B. Stone, local fruit inspector, visited the orchards in Jacksonville last week, and found the scale bug alarmingly present. Mr. Whitman notified them that the would proceed according to law to abate the nuisance.

"Oregoniana,"
Oregonian, Portland, July 27, 1890, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Cassie Plymale is visiting her aunt, Mrs. L. Zigler, and family at Roseburg.
    Notwithstanding the dull times, prices of real estate in this place keep up quite well.
    Isaac Woolf holds over as constable in this precinct, E. A. Langley having failed to qualify.
    J. A. Whiteside will soon take possession of his new $2500 residence, which is a handsome one.
    G. W. Coulter has sold his paint shop to C. O. Damon, who will continue the business at the old stand.
    S. S. Pentz officiated in the Medford Episcopal pulpit last Sunday, in the absence of the regular ministry.
    T. J. Kenney of Jacksonville has purchased W. G. Cooper's harness and saddle shop at Medford, and will take charge at once.
    Miss Mollie Merriman is home for her vacation, but will resume the study of stenography and typewriting at Portland in September.
    E. Clutter, having raised the required $300 to pay for the work, will soon issue the book of lithographic views of Medford which he has been preparing.
    A lawn tennis club has been organized at Medford with John Beek as president and Miss Carrie Van Dyke as secretary. The tennis court is on the lawn at W. H. Barr's place.
    Rev. F. B. Ticknor has given up the charge of the Medford Episcopal Church and last week went to Portland, whither his family will follow him about September 1st, says the Mail.
    Someone recklessly riding a horse through the streets of Medford one day last week caused serious injury to little Frank Sowell, who was standing with his father on the crossing, and the latter was also quite badly bruised while snatching the child from under the horse's hoofs.
    The following officers of Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., will serve during the ensuing six months, having been installed last week by D.D.G.M. R. R. Morris, of Grants Pass: W. I. Vawter, P.G.; E. B. Pickel, N.G.; H. E. Baker, V.G.; T. W. Johnson, R.S.; B. S. Webb, P.S.; Frank Amann, Treas.; D. S. Youngs, W.; G. L. Webb, Con.; A. C. Nicholson, I.G.; B. Hobson, O.G.; B. F. Adkins, R.S.N.G.; D. A. Huling, L.S.N.G.; R. R. Dunn, R.S.V.G.; S. B. McGee, L.S.V.G.; M. Purdin, R.S.S.; E. P. Geary, L.S.S. The lodge meets every second and fourth Friday evening of each month at their hall in Adkins & Webb's building. Since the new regalia arrived renewed interest is taken by the members.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 2


    Dr. Will Jackson has bought the Geddes property on 7th Street and will soon occupy the place with his family.
    E. Clutter of Medford was in Grants Pass recently endeavoring to get our citizens interested in publishing lithographic views of the place.
    E. E. Redfield, late of Linkville, has located in Grants Pass, and this week opens out in the jewelry business in Arthur Conklin's building.

"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 2


    Creed Bros. of Medford have bored two wells on W. H. Parker's farm near Jacksonville, which furnish a large supply of excellent water.
    Keep your hands in your pockets and bolts on your doors while the circus is in the valley. It is always accompanied by a gang of thieves of different stripes.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3


    G. W. Staver, senior member of the well-known firm of Staver & Walker, Portland, inspected the local branch of the house at Medford last week, and found affairs in fine shape under the management of R. R. Dunn.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3


    The milling firm of Davis & France, operating the Phoenix and Medford mills, was dissolved this week, Mr. France retiring.
    C. B. Carlisle, editor of the defunct Transcript at Medford for some time, is now pastor of a Congregational Church at Escondido, Cal.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 1, 1890, page 3


W. C. Noon et al. to E. P. Geary, lots 1 and 2, blk 18, Beatty's add. to Medford; $150.
H. E. Baker to W. C. Noon & Co., undivided half of lots and blocks in Medford; $50.
E. P. Hammond to G. M. Pierce, lots 6 and 7, blk 32, Medford; $200.
G. W. Howard to C. W. Palm, undivided one-third of lots and blocks in Medford; $350.
J. C. Cowles to W. G. McCubbin, lots in Medford; $10.
J. C. Cowles to Wm. R. Callahan, lots 9, 10 and 11, blk 6, Park addition to Medford; $90.
A. P. Talent to S. S. Martin, lots 1 and 2, blk 15, Medford; $1000.
Fred Weinhard to G. W. Bashford, six lots in blk 70, Medford; $575.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 2


FRANCIS FITCH,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890 et seq., page 3


    Mrs. M. E. Kellogg and children of Portland arrived at Medford Tuesday morning, and are the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Lawton of that place.
    Chas. Howard, the railroad land appraiser, was up from Grants Pass visiting relatives in Medford one day last week. He is at present engaged in appraising in Douglas County.
    Attention is called to the professional card of Francis Fitch of Medford, attorney at law. He is one of our brightest legal luminaries, and has met with much success during his residence here.
    There are over twenty trotting and running horses in training at the Yreka race track, including a number of standard bred trotters, by such great sires as Antevolo, Altamont and others. They will make a fine showing at both the Southern Oregon and Mount Shasta District Association meetings.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


    F. Meinhard of Medford left for his old home in Illinois not long since, but will return in the near future.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Harry Angle, accompanied by her mother, arrived her one day recently.
    Several new residences are contemplated at this place within the next few months.
    F. Barneburg of this precinct will this year thresh about 4000 bushels of high-grade wheat.
    Wm. Clark, the well-known mixologist, has succeeded Frank Kasshafer at the Monarch Saloon.
    Mrs. J. Goldsmith accompanied her daughter home to Eugene last week for a protracted visit there.
    J. R. Erford was at Eagle Point during the week engaged in building a barn for A. G. Johnston at that place.
    E. O. Johnson is building a nice stable and also an addition to his residence on the Palm property in Medford.
    A. Garrick maintains his lead as an artistic tailor, and is constantly receiving the very latest in men's suiting.
    Staver & Walker's agent, R. R. Dunn, shipped a complete J. I. Case sawmill plant to California parties last week.
    Thos. McAndrews' new brick building is rapidly assuming proportions, and will be ready for occupancy before many weeks.
    C. W. Palm and family and C. W. Skeel and family will spend the next few weeks at McAllister's soda springs on Butte Creek.
    C. Mingus and his son Frank now own the Baker warehouse and will handle the bulk of the wheat crop of this section this season.
    The sign painter has recently embellished the show windows of Charley Wolters, Miller & Strang and others, much to their improvement.
    Numerous hose contests have taken place here since the hydrants were placed. The rivalry is not to get water first, but to keep from getting it--down one's back.
    Chas. Wolters and wife were greatly alarmed about their little daughter Eva one day last week, the child having had a narrow escape from death with cholera infantum.
    Messrs. Geary & Shideler have had men and teams engaged in grading and leveling the surface of the building block they now own together near the Presbyterian Church, for several days past.
    Harris & Hamilton last week succeeded H. T. McClallen in charge of the Grand Central Hotel at this place. The popular house will doubtless continue to grow in favor under their management.
    A. A. Davis now has sole charge of the Medford Roller Mills and is prepared to handle the wheat crop of the lower valley, either on the exchange plan or by purchase for cash during the coming season.
    Skeel & Son, contractors, have turned Dave Miller's new residence over to the painters and it is almost ready for occupancy. Frank Galloway has enclosed the premises with his superior combination fence.
    The lithographic views of Medford to be issued by S. E. Moore, the San Francisco lithographer, will be very fine and will do much to advertise this section. They will appear sometime towards the end of August.
    Teams were engaged on Monday and Tuesday in removing the stock of harness and saddlery from the Cooper building at Medford to Jacksonville, T. J. Kenney having concluded to continue business at his old stand.
    Town lots continue to bring good figures in Medford and its neighborhood. Values were never inflated here and the consequence is that the public has confidence in our stability and the permanent character of our improvements.
    The Jackson County Bank at Medford will soon be turned into a national bank, with D. P. Thompson at the head of it. This will make it one of the strongest banking institutions in the interior, W. I. Vawter will continue to act as cashier.
    C. B. Carlisle, formerly engaged in the newspaper business at Medford, is pastor of the Congregational Church at Escondido, Cal. He is one of the most versatile hypocrites we know of, and did not have a very savory reputation while here.
    The following Knights of Pythias of Medford attended the institution of the new lodge at Yreka on the 30th ult.: Chas. Damon, F. W. France, Lake France, L. C. Gruby, Peter Henderson, Geo. Merriman, D. T. Sears, C. W. Wolters and H. Wolters. A fine time was had, and the Yreka lodge started off under the happiest auspices with a charter membership of about 40.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1890, page 3


    T. J. Kenney has bought the saddlery shop at Medford, and Central Point, and will remove his family to Medford, where he will have his business headquarters.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1890, page 2


    W. J. Vawter, of Medford, Oregon, and associates, have applied to the Comptroller of the Currency for authority to organize a National Bank at that place.
"Washington Notes," San Francisco Daily Record-Union, August 13, 1890, page 1


    T. J. Kenney, who has bought the harness shops of W. G. Cooper at Medford and Central Point, will make his business headquarters at Medford hereafter.
    Messrs. Vawter and Howard, of the Medford bank, have arranged with D. P. Thompson, of Portland, for the capital necessary to establish a national bank at Medford, with a capital of $50,000. This will be the second national bank to be opened in Southern Oregon, the first being at Grants Pass.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 8, 1890, page 3


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890 et seq,, page 2

Attention, Capitalists!
    The attention of capitalists is once more called to the branch railroad project between this place and Medford. There never has been a more attractive field for capital to be invested than right here and now. With the citizens' bonus of $20,000 assured and the right-of-way virtually guaranteed, it would seem unnecessary to do more than merely call attention to the situation to have dozens of proffers to build the road. It is no wildcat venture; all the elements of permanent prosperity are here, the land along the proposed route is unsurpassed in fertility and especially adapted to division into small tracts for orchard purposes, the passenger traffic alone would make the road self-supporting from the date of its construction, while the immense possibilities in our foothill fruit lands, our limestone and building stone quarries, as elements in the matter of transportation or freight patronage, give assurance of regular and unfailing dividends through all time to come. Now, when labor is plentiful and cheap and the landowners along the route are in the humor for it, it is time to build and equip the road, pocket the bonus, and enjoy the fruits of the enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890, page 3


    Seventeen sacks of wheat in Tom McAndrews' field, near Medford, were stolen one night this week, and at last report the tidings had, an officer was on the track of a man who was suspected, with good proof too, of the theft.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1890, page 3


Fruit Items.
    J. H. Stewart will not have pears enough on his young orchard between Medford and Phoenix to make carload shipments to the East this year, but will have about 400 or 500 boxes to sell. Next year he will no doubt be making carload shipments to Chicago, and when his 160-acre orchard comes into bearing he will send to Illinois some of the finest Bartletts the people there have ever seen.
Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1890, page 3


    Tramps are infesting the railroads more than ever, to the great disgust of the trainmen.
    Vegetables have done comparatively well in southern Oregon, and there is an abundance of most kinds.
    T. J. Kenney has removed the goods he purchased of W. G. Cooper of Medford to Jacksonville, and will soon open a large first-class stock of saddles, harness, etc., in Solomon's brick building.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890, page 3


    Jos. France and his son Lake will start for Portland in a few days to seek a new location. They are good, enterprising citizens, and we are sorry to lose them from among us. We wish them success.
    Prof. Crawford and Mr. Howell of Corvallis were in town last Wednesday, looking after the branch railroad our people would be so glad to have built. Wm. Slinger and S. H. Hull accompanied them from Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. T. Sly and family last week removed to The Dalles to reside.
    When the ditch and dam are in order Medford's water supply is good.
    Wm. A. Leonard of Grants Pass visited his brother in this place one day recently.
    H. J. Little, a temporary resident of Medford, has gone to McMinnville to reside.
    Mrs. M. Morris, formerly of this place, now of Portland, visited friends here during the week.
    A. A. Davis has purchased Fred Barneburg's entire wheat crop for the Medford Roller Mills. It is of excellent grade.
    I. M. Harvey and family enjoyed the society of Mrs. Bently of Yolo County, Cal., a sister of Mr. H., during the past week.
    A number of Medford G.A.R. men saluted the trainload of eastern-bound veterans which passed through the valley last week.
    The hose company is greatly pleased with its new cart, which is equipped with 500 feet of hose, and is now indulging in regular drills.
    The proposed new road to Griffin Creek from this place is of much interest to some of our citizens, as it will shorten the distance about two miles.
    G. W. Howard entertained his uncle Thos. Lamb of California a few days last week, the latter having dropped off at Medford while en route to Walla Walla.
    Thos. McAndrews was seriously cut by falling in front of the sickle bar of his mowing machine while cutting alfalfa one day last week, and was laid up for several days. He is recuperating at present, however; we are glad to learn.
    Extensive improvements have been in progress in the Medford Roller Mills under the supervision of head miller J. S. Johnson during the past week, and when the new crop comes in these popular mills will make a finer grade of flour than ever.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890, page 3


Notice
Is hereby given that the State Board of Horticulture of Oregon will permit no person whose yard or orchard is infested with pernicious or San Jose scale to spread the pest by selling or otherwise scattering their infested fruit.
J. D. WHITMAN,       
Commissioner of the 3d Horticultural District.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 15, 1890 et seq., page 3


Town of Medford to Conrad Mingus, Palm Park in Johnson's add.; $1.
Town of Medford to same, ordinance, etc., vacating part of Johnson's add. to Medford.
Catherine Crystal to Oliver Harbaugh, lots 3 and 4, blk 15, Medford; $600.
John W. Curry to S. Tomlinson, lot 11, blk 1, Cottage add. to Medford; $150.
Wm. Ulrich to Edward Wilkinson, lots 4 and 13, blk 1, Lumsden's add. to Medford; $420.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 2


    The hum of the threshing machine is heard everywhere.
    Mountain fires are raging in many portions of southern Oregon.
    The Burns Herald has the following: W. W. Cardwell, while assisting his wife in laying carpet, slipped a knuckle on his knee joint, which has since given him some trouble by slipping out of place at will.
    Parties from abroad are now in southern Oregon for the purpose of purchasing the fruit crop. Owing to the unfavorable circumstances of the forepart of the year, there will not be so much fruit as usual.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart expects to ship an enormous quantity of Bartlett pears from his large orchard next season. The  young trees are just coming into bearing and will yield something over 500 boxes of luscious fruit this season.
    Clutter & Moore, who have taken the contract to furnish handsome lithograph views of Grants Pass and Medford, were last week engaged in working up Ashland citizens to the point of investing in ten or twenty thousand views of the granite city.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Judge Walton is recuperating from her recent malarial troubles.
    A. H. Simpson has sold his lots in this place to Grace Skeeters for $300.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart this week ships a carload of mixed fruit to Portland.
    Messrs. Roberts & O'Neil are rusticating on the coast, near Crescent City, Cal.
    The Medford flouring mills paid 55 cents per bushel in cash for wheat during the week.
    Jos. France and his son Lake started for Portland on Sunday evening, to look for a location.
    Thos. Morine now attends to the Medford drayage business, having bought out Robinson.
    W. G. Cooper is putting up a one-story brick structure on the site of his former frame building.
    Did you hear the news? Pritchard has marked his goods down to bedrock prices. He is bound to sell.
    Miss Elma Young, formerly of his place, is holding a position in one of the San Francisco printing offices.
    The new machinery in the roller mills works to a charm, and they are running 15 hours per day at present.
    Mrs. I. L. Hamilton returned home from Riddle sooner than expected on account of the serious illness of her baby.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Brown had the misfortune to lose their little infant, of summer complaint, during the week.
    Wallace & Sons of this place have taken the contract for the brickwork on the new national bank building at Grants Pass.
    D. A. Huling last week returned from his trip to the mouth of the Coquille River. He reports the weather very cool there.
    Mrs. Bently of Yolo County, Cal., returned home last week, after a pleasant visit with her brother, I. M. Harvey, and his family.
    D. H. Miller is selling the assigned stock of Kurth & Miller at the Powell store building in Medford. H. U. Lumsden is acting as salesman.
    We are sorry to learn that the infant child of "Shorty" Hamilton is dangerously ill with what is known among children as summer complaint.
    Miss Gibson of Central Point is filling the position as operatress for the Postal Co., Miss Kate Van Dyke having gone to San Francisco to take a course in stenography.
    Indian School superintendent Dorchester visited his cousin, Mrs. H. Hubbard, with his wife while passing through the valley last week, after an official trip east of the mountains.
    Our town's national bank will be open for business about Oct. 1, 1890. It will succeed Vawter & Howard's bank, and D. P. Thompson of Portland will be one of the most prominent stockholders.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


    The prospects that Jacksonville and Medford will be connected with a branch railroad are better than ever.
    We inadvertently neglected, in the last issue of the Times, to announce that Wm. H. Walker, the junior member of the widely known house of Staver & Walker, had been accidentally shot and killed for a deer by a young man named Powers in the vicinity of the McKenzie River, Lane County. Mr. W. was one of the leading business men of the Pacific Coast, enterprising and honest, and his death is generally mourned. He was only 35 years of age and leaves a family.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


BORN.
HUTCHISON--In Medford, Aug. 10, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. C. I. Hutchison, a daughter.
HEMBREE--In Medford, Aug. 9, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Hembree, a daughter
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


    Will Whitman, of Medford, has brought several wagonloads of watermelons up to Ashland this week.
    Mr. France, recently of the milling firm of Davis & France, of Medford and Phoenix, is up on Puget Sound, and is contemplating building a flouring mill at Fairhaven.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 22, 1890, page 3



    Miss Katy Van Dyke, of Medford, started last Monday for San Francisco, to enter upon a course of study in one of the business colleges of that city.
    Frank Brandon has gone to Medford to make flour in the roller mill at that place. Frank is a good miller, and has had experience with the roller process.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 22, 1890, page 3


    The subscriptions to the Medford-Jacksonville short line are being paid in and the prospect for connection with the main line has assumed at last a tangible form.
    The death of W. H. Walker, of the firm of Staver & Walker, of Portland, is a public calamity and the agonizing grief of his wife and only son radiates out from the home circle into the labyrinth of business life, where country enterprise and generosity have made the name of this great firm a household word. In sincere sympathy with the bereaved family a host of Southern Oregon record the wish that he may rest in peace in the beautiful Riverview Cemetery, while fadeless flowers bloom in beauty o'er his grave, and softest zephyrs breathe in solemn sympathy through the whispering foliage above, a last sad requiem.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 22, 1890, page 3


Jacksonville Railroad
    Again there is prospect of the proposed railroad between Medford and Jacksonville being built, it is said. A party of six responsible men of Corvallis and Oregon City have proposed to construct a standard gauge road, equip it and have it in operation by Jan. 1st next; and enter bonds to keep it in operation for at least two years, if the citizens of the two places will give them a cash bonus of $20,000 upon the completion of the road. The gentlemen, or some of them, have been out looking over the ground, and they say they are ready to begin work at once, upon the proffer of the bonus upon a cash basis. Jacksonville people think they can succeed in raising the amount.
Ashland Tidings, August 22, 1890, page 3


A. H. Simpson, Sr., to Grace Jane Skeeters, lots 1 and 2, blk 36, and lots 9 and 10, blk 39, Medford; $300.
Ella L. Short to Lucy D. Williams, 1 6/10 acres in Medford; $320.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 2


    The weather continues to be quite warm, and the atmosphere is getting thick with smoke.
    Oliver McGee of Sticky called one day this week. His health is improving very slowly, we are sorry to say.
    H. E. Baker of Medford has taken charge of Griffis & Walker's sawmill in Sams Valley and is now conducting it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    David Crosby has returned to Medford after an absence of over a year.
    Henry Smith, the Wolf Creek merchant, spent Wednesday in Jacksonville.
    I. F. Williams, the mail contractor on the Medford-Butte Creek route, was in Jacksonville last Saturday, accompanied by his family.
    Judge Day and Jerry Nunan were along the proposed line of the branch railroad for the purpose of securing the right-of-way and succeeded admirably.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Purdin & Ulrich removed their shop and reset their forges last week.
    Dr. Pryce returned home from Colestin last week, much the better for his trip.
    Tom Harris of the Grand Central was quite ill last week with malarial fever, but is better now.
    The little child of I. L. Hamilton and wife, which was so sick, is recovering, we are glad to say.
    Mrs. W. I. Vawter has been enjoying a visit from her mother, Mrs. J. M. Hill of Eugene, last week.
    Bert Whitman is preparing to take a business course at a San Francisco college during the next few months.
    Medford schools will reopen September 8th, under the superintendency of Prof. Crawford and an able corps of teachers.
    A special school meeting, called for last Saturday, August 23, was attended by a number of interested patrons of our public schools.
    The bonds issued by the town for internal improvements have been negotiated at par in Chicago, and the money will be forwarded here soon.
    I. L. Hamilton, school clerk, went to Jacksonville a few days ago and collected over $1000, being this district's share of the last apportionment.
    F. W. Harper of Siskiyou County, Cal., visited Medford in the interest of I.O.O.F. benevolent insurance last week. He appointed M. Purdin agent.
    Carpenters are at work on the roof of McAndrews' new brick building, which will soon be ready for occupancy. It will be a handsome structure.
    Frank Brandon of Ashland has taken the night watch at the Medford Roller Mills. Being overloaded with grain, Mr. Davis is now running both day and night.
    One department of the Medford public schools will be accommodated in the basement of the Christian Church during the coming winter. It will be a kindergarten.
    The yellowjackets in the neighborhood of Medford have reformed and now are active allies of the state board of agriculture, engaged in eradicating the green aphis from our orchards.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


    A number of orchardists have been notified to clear their orchards of insect pests within 15 days, or the trees will be cut and burned by the State Board of Horticulture at their personal expense. It is now or never with the fruit business in this country.
    S. B. Galey is preparing to ship two carloads of onions from J. P. Walker's orchard on an order from Montana. Hurrah for southern Oregon fruit! It is confidently believed that the onion will never be molested by the codling moth or the San Jose scale.
    Mr. Nebauer, a representative of the Oregon City fruit and vegetable cannery, was in the valley last week, looking for fruit of any kind that would bear shipment. As the price of fresh fruit is unusually good here this season, he found none for sale at any price.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 3


Exchange!! Exchange!!
THE MEDFORD ROLLER MILLS will give in exchange for sixty pounds of clean milling wheat as follows: Thirty-eight pounds straight flour in [the] farmer's sacks, or thirty-four pounds of sacked flour. Exchange will apply at the Phoenix mill by adding two pounds. I am now ready to buy or store, or take in store on exchange, any amount offered.
A. A. DAVIS,       
Successor to Davis & France.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890 et seq., page 3


    OREGON FRUIT.--Orders have been sent to parties in this vicinity to purchase all the Bartlett pears that can be found. The demand for green fruit of all kinds for shipment promises well this season, and when the farmers learn that the lack of market for their fruit is occasioned by the lack of fruit to supply the demand this valley will be one vast orchard, and thrift and prosperity will be at every farmer's door. Pears are reported worth from $6 to $8 per bushel in Chicago at this time, and with fast freights four or five days would place Oregon's products there; but unfortunately we have none to speak of for shipment. Anyone who will take the pains to ride out a few miles in the country in any direction cannot fail to be forcibly impressed with the productiveness of this state for fruit--to see large apple and pear trees heavy laden with fruit growing wild in the fence corners and in the forests and brush-thickets, coming from the seeds that have chanced to fall in the fertile soil. The day is not far distant when the man who has a deed to ten or twenty acres of good fruit land in Oregon will have a lucrative business. Fruit has canceled more mortgages in California than gold mines, and in a few years the new orchards that are being set out in this state will write "canceled" across the face of many pages in the recorder's books.--Albany Herald.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1890, page 4


    Judge S. J. Day and Jerry Nunan have been busy this week securing the right-of-way for the Jacksonville-Medford short line. They report their efforts successful and the future outlook for the new enterprise favorable.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1890, page 2


    Mrs. Dr. Geary and children, of Medford, are visiting the lady's mother, Mrs. McCornack, at Eugene.
    David Loring, of the legal department of the O.&C.R.R. of Portland, was in Ashland Tuesday, accompanied by his wife.
    T. A. Harris, of the Grand Cen. Hotel, Medford, who has been sick for a week or more past, went over to Colestin yesterday, to stay a week or more.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1890, page 3


    To Mr. and Mrs. Clarence Hutchison, of Medford, Oregon, a girl. Mr. Hutchison was formerly a Logansport boy connected with Keller, Troutman & Co. Clarence is so highly elated over the advent that he proposes to start a chin beard at once.
Logansport (Indiana) Journal, August 31, 1890, page 5


Nannie Barr to H. U. Lumsden, lot 3, block 1, Barr's add. to Medford; $545.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    In view of the large shipments of fruit now being made from this valley, especially the shipment of peaches from Ashland averaging over a thousand boxes per day, it is with very little semblance of justice that the Salem Journal and other Willamette papers persist in reiterating that "southern Oregon has no fruit this season and is not a fruit country." This section is content to rely purely on its merits for fruit production, and our Willamette cotems might use their space to better advantage than in attempting to decry the fairest portion of Oregon as well as the most fruitful in many respects.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 2


MARRIED.
JOHNSON-PLYMALE--At Medford, Aug. 31, 1890, by Rev. R. C. Oglesby, E. S. Johnson and Miss Nora Plymale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 2


 A Big Inducement.
    The citizens of Jacksonville and Medford have deposited twenty thousand big gold dollars in bank, which will be given as a bonus to any responsible individual or company who will build and operate a railroad between the two towns; besides which a right-of-way will be guaranteed . This certainly ought to be inducement enough for capitalists to invest, especially as the country over which the railroad will run is comparatively level and no heavy work must be done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    Road supervisors cannot be too careful about eradicating the dagger cocklebur from the waste places and roadsides. The law commands it, and there is already considerable complaint of their negligence from property owners in some parts of the county.
    Our brethren of the Baptist denomination also contemplate the erection of a church school somewhere in southern Oregon during the coming year, the location to be determined at their state convention to be held at Medford October 16th next. We have room for another such institution here.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    Frank Kasshafer and family will return from Medford next week.
    Our market is being furnished with first-class sweet potatoes from Hon. J. H. Stewart's fine farm near Phoenix.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Isaac Skeeters and his son Joe last week returned to Waldo.
    J. H. Stewart and D. R. Hill shipped a carload of melons to Portland last week.
    Mrs. J. R. Cunnyngham of Ashland visited her sister, Mrs. Peter Henderson, last week.
    A carload of Bartlett pears and other fruit was shipped by Hammon Bros. last week.
    A tax of three mills was levied in Medford district at a recent meeting of school patrons.
    C. P. Cottrell of Eden precinct will hereafter run a beef wagon into Medford once each week.
    Miss Nannie Goodell this week leaves for Portland, to make her home with a sister living there.
    J. M. Harvey of Talent sold a load of fine fruit from his ranch on our streets a few days since.
    L. L. Angle and his son Orra have returned from their northern trip well satisfied with Medford.
    Geo. Merriman and J. H. Redfield, who are first-class blacksmiths, will soon form a partnership and open a blacksmith shop here.
    Medford's increasing population demands imperatively that some manufacturing enterprise should be inaugurated to give employment to the idle.
    This place loses a good citizen in the person of C. Huling, who this week removed to Myrtle Point to assume charge of a hardware store at that place.
    Tunis Bever, formerly of Medford, was killed in the state of Washington not long since, while engaged in loading a log wagon with his brother Elmer. Full particulars will be given in the next issue of the Times.
    Olive Rebekah Lodge No. 28 last week appointed Isaac Woolf, Geo. Webb, Dr. E. B. Pickel, Mrs. I. A. Webb, Mrs. L. L. Angle and Miss Ada Barr a committee of conference on the Odd Fellows' orphan home work in the county.
    Chas. W. Stanfield, who formerly conducted the Central House, next door to Rosenthal's store, was drowned near Sedalia, Missouri, on the 11th of last July, while engaged in seining with a party of friends. He was a young man and leaves a wife and two children.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    Some of the little folks who sell fruit at the Ashland depot make considerable money, and save it, too. Ferd Million, ten years old, bought two lots in Medford about two years ago for $160, and now has them all paid for, having made the greater part of the money by selling fruit at the depot last year.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
JOHNSON-PLYMALE--At the home of the bride's parents, in Medford, August 29, 1890, Mr. E. S. Johnson and Miss Norah, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Plymale.
Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1890, page 3


A Frightful Fatality.
    Letters and papers from Centralia, Washington, tell of the distressing death of Tunis M. Bever, 22-year-old son of Joseph Bever, a former citizen of Medford, which occurred a few days ago. He and his brother Elmer were engaged in hauling logs. The Centralia News tells how the accident occurred: "Two monster logs lay side by side. The wagon was driven alongside the logs, skids put down and preparations made to roll a log onto the wagon. Elmer fastened the 'dog,' or hook, into the center of the log, hitched a team to the rope and started to pulling the log up the skids. Tunis stood by being ready to block it, so that another pitch could be taken with the 'dog.' As it started up the incline away from the other log, Bever grabbed a chunk and dropped on his knees between the two logs, and just as he was about to place the block in position the 'dog' slipped and the log started back. Not doubting but that the block would stop it, he shoved it in place. Not so, however; the log bounded over the chunk and in an instant struck the other log with poor Bever's head between them. Death resulted instantly. Tunis was a highly respected young man, and leaves a wife and one child. The sympathy of the many friends of the family in this county will be extended to Mr. and Mrs. Bever in this terrible loss, the second bereavement they have sustained since leaving Iowa.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 1


BORN.
BAKER--In Medford, Sept. 3, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Baker, a son.
KILBURN--In Medford precinct, August 19, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. S. P. Kilburn, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 2


Mary A. Stewart to C. W. Palm, quitclaim to lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12 and 13, blk 47, lots 5, 6 and 7, blk 49, blks 51 and 72, lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12 in blk 74, Medford; $300.
Jackson Deflannay to Nathan Stidham, 5-foot strip off each side of lot 21, blk 4, Medford; $20.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 2


    Hurrah for the branch railroad.
    Look out for the railroad when the bell rings.
    Clean up!! Fix up!! Wake up!! The railroad is coming.
    Now that the branch road is assured, property in town will resume its normal value.
    The railroad boom seems to have struck Oregon, and we may look for the building of many new roads within the next two years, including the Jacksonville-Medford branch.
    It seems highly probable that Jacksonville and Medford will be joined by a railroad in a short time, when this section will take a new lease of life, for it will be of great benefit to both towns.
    After all, the hills and forests of southern Oregon are full of fire and the atmosphere heavy with smoke, something that we thought would be spared us in a considerable degree this season.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 3


    J. Nunan of Jacksonville and S. H. Hull of Medford, who were appointed a committee to confer with Crawford & Howell of Corvallis in matters relating to the Jacksonville-Medford railroad, are entitled to much credit for the good work they did in behalf of our people.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Redfield is hunting and fishing at his old home near Glendale.
    Wm. E. Oliver, formerly of this place, is now at New Westminster, B.C.
    Lake France has returned from his northern trip, but will not remain long.
    Dr. C. Minnis, formerly of Medford, has located at Marshfield, Coos County.
    Mrs. C. W. Palm entertained her brother, Al. Flue from Denver, during the week.
    Do you want a watch you can depend on? See Pritchard's patent dust-proof cases.
    E. W. Starr has temporarily removed to Salem, where several members of his family reside.
    Mrs. D. J. Lumsden is in Kansas, having been called thither by the serious illness of her father.
    W. R. Stammers, the jeweler, last week preceded his family to San Francisco, their future home.
    D. H. Miller last week removed his family to his neat new residence near the Episcopal Church.
    A handsome boy baby made his appearance at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. H. E. Baker on Wednesday morning of last week.
    I. F. Williams, the Butte Creek mail carrier, has almost completed a 16x24-foot barn, with a 14-foot shed all 'round, on his Medford property.
    Everybody is well pleased with our branch railroad prospects. This enterprise will prove of great benefit to both this place and Jacksonville.
    Dr. Geary's new residence will soon be ready for occupancy, no less than four carpenters having been busily engaged on the building during the week. It will be a handsome one.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 3


Grand Entertainment.
    The Chilian Medicine Co., now playing at Medford, give the best entertainments that have been seen in this part of the state for years. They will give three entertainments here on Sept. 18th, 19th and 20th. The first is free, and the other two 25 cents each, children under twelve, 10 cts. Beautiful songs, wonderful fire-eater, the most laughable of musical artists playing upon so many different instruments. The rollicking faces and really fine elocution all tend to make their show a good one. Our advice is do not miss this treat.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1890, page 3


    The telegraphic correspondent at Jacksonville sometimes has to rustle for news. While the railroad negotiations were pending the business was conducted very quietly, with a view to keeping it out of the newspapers until the enterprise was assured. Messrs. Hull and Nunan went to Corvallis last Friday night to complete the contract, and on Monday, just as everything was ready to furnish the reporters there the items, the news boys came around with the Sunday Oregonian, with "Jacksonville to the Front," and the whole business squarely written out. The contractors, it is supposed, told the boys to see the Oregonian; there was nothing more to tell.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, September 12, 1890, page 2


    Orchardists estimate that in a very few years fully 100,000 boxes of early fruits will be shipped out of the county every season.
    The peach shipments for one week from Ashland reached over 5,000 boxes, 1500 boxes being the heaviest single day's shipment to date. These shipments will continue for a while yet, but the heavy output is now over.

    McConnell & Eubanks of Ashland have received one of the wonders of the age--Edison's phonograph--which talks, sings, plays all kinds of instruments, and tells some useful information. One of the pieces is the park band of San Francisco.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3

    J. W. Hockersmith shipped a carload of Ashland fruit to New York last week. It was shipped for Porter Bros. of Sacramento, Cal., and was consigned to E. L. Goodell, New York City. The carload was made up of peaches, Bartlett, Beurre d'Anjou and Seckel pears, prunes and apples. The car was one of the refrigerator kind, and after the fruit was all loaded the chests were filled with ice and the car sealed with cotton batting. On the outside of the car were four large placards containing the words "Selected fruit from Ashland, Oregon."--[Tidings.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3


    A vigorous protest has been forwarded to Washington against the proposed change of the terminus of the Butte Creek mail route from Medford Central Point.
    Archbishop Gross dedicated the new churches at Ashland and Medford this week in his usual impressive style. He also held services at Eagle Point on the 16th instant.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3


    MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Forest France is at Gold Hill, assisting Jacoby Bros. in the mercantile business.
    Mrs. High of Ashland visited her parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. Barneburg, who reside near this place, during the week.
    Mr. Milligan and his sons, who have been residents of this place for some time, have gone to the northern part of the state.
    Jay Darneille broke his arm by falling from a tree, and S. S. Cooper cut his leg badly with an adz about the same time last week.
    Rev. H. A. Barden preached his farewell sermon at the Baptist Church last Sunday, before leaving for the Willamette Valley with his family.
    The county teachers' institute will be in session at Medford tomorrow, and will no doubt be a well-attended and successful event. A general invitation is extended.
    S. Childers has returned from his ranch on Dry Creek and is employed on W. G. Cooper's brick building, which will be one of the handsomest in town when it is completed.
    The Chilean Medical Co. has been giving entertainments at the opera house for some time past, and have been greeted by crowded houses. They give an excellent performance and spare no pains to please.
    Much interest was taken by our citizens in the G.A.R. rally last Tuesday evening, when a fine bean spread and oyster supper was given by the veterans of Chester A. Arthur Post. It was a very pleasant affair.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1890, page 3


   W. P. Hammon, the Oakland nurseryman, formerly of this valley, was at Medford the latter part of last week. He reports the nursery business better in California this year than he ever knew it before, as the big returns from orchards this season are to be followed by extensive planting of young orchards. California nurserymen have been scouring Oregon for young prune trees, having exhausted their own stock already.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 19, 1890, page 3


G. W. Howard to Wm. Slinger, lot 8, blk 52, Medford; $70.
Wm. S. Barnum to C. W. Skeel, deed of correction to fraction of land in town of Medford; $4000.
W. I. Vawter to S. S. Pentz, land in Medford; $150.
S. S. Pentz to Frances H. C. Pentz, land in Medford; $1.
G. W. Howard to James Gilbert, lot 9, blk 52, Medford; $70.
J. O. Johnson et al. to Nathan P. Phipps, lot 20, blk 21, Medford; $4000.
Rosa Milton to Sarah A. Bateman, quitclaim to lots 1 and 2, blk 31, Medford; $50.
E. P. Hammond to William L. Wallace, lot 11, blk 36, Medford; $50.
Wm. L. Wallace to Martha A. Chappel, lot 11, blk 36, Medford; $50.
O. N. Fowler to Welcome Fowler, interest in lots and blocks in Medford; $1000.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1890, page 2


    W. T. Anderson went to Colusa, Cal. recently, to visit two sisters from Missouri, whom he had not seen for years.
    Messrs. Brantner and Brunson of Medford passed through town Wednesday on their way to the Applegate country, where they will fit up some mines for the winter season.
    The producing capacity of the pear trees of this valley is well known. Geo. W. Dunn of Ashland picked and shipped 1350 pounds of choice marketable Vicar of Wakefield pears from one tree recently.
    W. P. Hammon, the Oakland nurseryman, formerly of this valley, was at Medford the latter part of last week. He reports the nursery business better in California this year than he ever knew it before, as the big returns from orchards this season are to be followed by extensive planting of young orchards. California nurserymen have been scouring Oregon for young prune trees, having exhausted their own stock already.--[Tidings.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The finishing touches are being put on the McAndrew block.
    D. A. Huling and family have removed to Myrtle Point, Coos County, their future home.
    Mrs. Dr. Jones last week returned from attending at the deathbed of her mother at La Grande.
    Dodge Bros. have been drilling for coal for Hon. J. C. Tolman at his place near Roxy Ann during the week.
    D. Reynolds of the Meadows intends to spend the winter in Medford to take advantage of our educational facilities.
    C. W. Coker is now a resident of the citrus belt of Florida, studying the habits of the sand flea and raising oranges and lemons.
    J. O. Johnson, formerly of this place, has gone north to engage in the real estate business in one of the cities of the Sound or in Portland.
    Hammon Bros. received a carload of box material last week, to be in readiness for the late apple crop, much of which they handle this year.
    Our local band furnished the music on the fair grounds last Wednesday and acquitted themselves creditably and to the satisfaction of all.
    John Perdue's friends have been congratulating him over a bequest of $1000 left him by Mrs. Margaret Durland of Douglas County, who died recently.
    Bert Whitman is shipping melons and tomatoes by the carload northward, and [will] continue until the season closes. He shipped six tons of tomatoes lately.
    An overturned lamp in Ham Wolters' saloon caused an alarm of fire one day last week. The damage was slight, the flames being smothered with the billiard table cover.
    Mount Pitt is on canvas at last, Angle & Plymale having had the grand peak, with Fish Lake in the foreground, painted as the center scene on the fine drop curtain at their opera hall.
    We now have a first-class water system, which is a great protection against fire; hence our citizens feel that the Pacific Insurance Union is not treating them right in not lowering the rates of insurance.
    Robert Coker stopped here after leaving the railroad hospital at Sacramento, where he has been for some months recuperating for his broken leg, and goes north to accept a safer position with the company.
    Geo. F. Merriman, one of the best blacksmiths in southern Oregon, has taken charge of Purdin & Ulrich's blacksmith shop, on 7th Street. Of course, he will do a big business, for he never fails to give satisfaction.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1890, page 3


    Bert Whitman is shipping melons and tomatoes to Portland from Medford.
    Staver & Walker have placed fifteen wagons in Linkville the past month and this morning they sent Thomas Morine to Ashland with five more.--[Mail.
    It is believed that the Southern Oregon Sunday School Convention to be held at Medford in October will be the best ever held in this section. Noted workers from abroad are expected to be in attendance.
    A fire in H. H. Wolter's saloon at Medford one day last week, caused by a broken lamp and burning oil, came near starting a conflagration. When the alarm was given, the door of the hose carriage house was found to be locked, and the fire had to be put out without assistance from the water works. A hose cart behind a burglar-proof door is a queer combination for fire purposes.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 26, 1890, page 3


    The Baptist state convention meets in Medford October 16, when the location of the Baptist school for Southern Oregon will be discussed and determined upon.

"What the Churches Are Doing," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, September 27, 1890, page 4



AN ASSURED FACT.
    It is with no small degree of satisfaction that we announce this week that the branch railroad from this place to Medford will be built, and that without delay. The contract for its construction has been duly executed and returned by Crawford, Howell & Co., who have assured our citizens that their order has been placed for new steel rails and contract signed for the delivery of the same at Medford, which is also confirmed by Honeyman, DeHart & Co., who will furnish the rails. The former also pledge themselves that grading will commence as soon as arrangements can be made for it. The unequivocal manner in which they announce: "We will build the railroad," is refreshing to those of our citizens whose hearts were almost sick with deferred hope. This little five-mile connecting link between our foothill belt and the overland railroad is of far more consequence than the casual observer would suppose. It means that the county seat and its environs will once more be placed on an equal footing with other sections that have heretofore thriven largely at our expense. It means that every vacant house in Jacksonville will be tenanted before spring. It means that the county seat question will be settled forever; that the Presbyterian academy will be established here beyond cavil; that our public schools will fill up, and that the hundreds of people over the coast who have a warm spot in their hearts for the old mining town of Jacksonville will feel a yearning to return that they cannot resist, and that many prosperous horticulturists from California and the East will avail themselves of the opportunity to sit in the shade of their own vines and fig trees in the frost-proof section that stretches for miles on either side of the town. It means that every acre of this favored foothill belt will in less than ten years approximate in value the fairest portions of California. With the railroad an assured fact, the development of the sandstone, limestone and quartz ledges of Jackson Creek will follow as a natural consequence. There is not a citizen of the shire town but feels that a new era of prosperity has been inaugurated and that he can prosecute his calling with brighter hopes of success. Scarcely lesser, perhaps greater, benefits must result for our neighboring town of Medford, and for the next several months the chief topic of interest to strangers passing through the valley will be the Medford and Jacksonville branch railroad. Now would be a good time to "boom" this incomparable fruit section; but it doesn't need booming. Its intrinsic merits will so recommend it to discriminating investors that if the owners of large holdings near town will be subdivide their farms and place ten- or twenty-acre tracts upon the market at a fair valuation they can rest assured of willing investors ready to set out vines or trees.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 2


    In a communication from Medford, Hon. Henry Klippel, world's fair commissioner, makes an earnest appeal to the citizens of southern Oregon to make systematic preparations for a grand display of the products and industrial resources of this section at the great exposition in 1892. In some products we could demonstrate beyond cavil that we lead the world, while perhaps in every line, save manufactures, we could make a most creditable showing. Systematic, energetic work will be necessary, however, and an organization with the end in view to have a complete and perfect exhibit cannot be effected too soon. There should be a general stir in this matter before another season rolls 'round. We have able commissioners to look after the interests of the state at the exposition, and their every effort should be cordially and heartily seconded.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 2


The Glorious Rain.
    A heavy rain commenced falling Monday afternoon and continued nearly twenty-four hours. Fully two inches of water has fallen during the week, and, while a little damage has been done in some instances, it pales into insignificance compared with the benefit that has accrued. The smoke which has hung over the valley like a pall has been cleared away, the dust effectually laid, while much good has been done in many other ways. The rain was quite general, every section receiving its full quota.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


    Hurrah for the railroad!
    We can almost hear the whistle on the branch railroad already.
    A railroad between Jacksonville and Medford will now surely be built. No foolishness this time.
    With the lifting of the smoke cloud Rogue River Valley once more becomes a little paradise on earth.
    George Isaacs, Jr., of Medford, was thrown from his horse while riding after cattle one day last week and had his collarbone broken. Dr. Geary repaired the injury.
    Preparations for planting large numbers of fruit trees are being made in the valley this fall. The ease with which everything marketable has been disposed of this and last seasons has been very encouraging to fruit growers.
    Crawford, Howell & Co. have signed a contract with the Jacksonville & Medford R.R. Co. to complete the road by the first of January, and the rails have already been ordered. This shows that business is meant. Hurrah!
    The travel over the C.&O. road is very heavy at present, every train being uncomfortably crowded. Last Sunday's train contained thirteen coaches as far as Redding, and still it was impossible for many to get seats.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


    John Cunningham and family of Phoenix last week returned to their former home in Iowa, to reside, though they have not sold their land near Medford.
    The condition of John Cantrall, who has been quite ill for some time past, is not improved very much. Dr. Jones of Medford made him a visit on Wednesday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Forest France has gone to Whatcom, Wash., where he will locate.
    Miss Josie Merriman returned home last week from teaching a successful school at Flounce Rock.
    Our people are happy over the railroad news. The railroad will make Medford the commercial center of the valley.
    Quite a number of nice buildings have been put up in Medford this year, and several are now in course of construction.
    O. N. Fowler last week disposed of his furniture business here to I. A. Webb and went to Los Angeles County, Cal., to reside.
    The Medford mills may lose some little trade from the building of the new Montague flour mills, but have little cause to fear any competition from any source.
    It is confidently expected that the Southern Oregon Sunday School Convention, to be held here in a short time, will be the most largely attended one ever held in this valley.
    A carload of hogs were shipped to San Francisco last week from this place. We import Sacramento bacon, but ship the hogs from which it is made. This is "the Oregon style," we suppose.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


BORN.
WAGNER--In Medford, Sept. 24, 1890, to Frank Wagner and wife, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1890, page 3


Looking for a Location for a Distillery.
    Mr. F. V. Medynski, who was the superintendent of the big distillery at Des Moines that was run out of the state of Iowa by the prohibition laws, is now on the Pacific coast looking for a location for a distillery, in the interests of a large and wealthy company now operating in Illinois. He has been at Walla Walla, Wash., and at various places in Oregon, and stopped at Grants Pass, Medford and Ashland. The company which he represents, when a location is found that is satisfactory, proposes to go into business on a large scale, using as much as 60,000 bushels of corn and a lesser quantity of rye and barley every year. The location sought is one convenient to prolific corn fields, abundance of water, oak timber for barrels, and where the transportation facilities are good. He seems much pleased with this valley, and with the neighborhood of Ashland.
Ashland Tidings, October 3, 1890, page 3


    Articles of incorporation were filed with the secretary of state [for] . . . Protection Hose Company of Medford, G. F. Davis, H. F. Wood, H. G. Nicholson, J. W. Curry and D. T. Lawton, incorporators; capital stock, $1000.

"Incorporations," Oregonian, Portland, October 4, 1890, page 3


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890 et seq., page 2

D. W. O'Donnell to T. F. West, lots 3 and 4 in blk 6, Medford; $127.50.
W. G. Kenney to J. H. Hoffman, lots 8 and 9, blk 14, Medford; $100.
D. T. Lawton to Geo. H. Haskins, lots 6, blk 14, Medford; $800.
Geo. S. Briggs to S. G. Wortman, lot 3, blk [illegible], Park add. to Medford; $50.
L. L. Angle to Orra E. Angle, 2 lots on J St., Medford; $200.
Same to Alice W. Angle, lot in Medford; $200.
D. T. Lawton to Francis Fitch, lots 1 and 2, blk 54, Medford; $575.
P. H. Oviatt to Susanna S. Ferguson, lots 1 and 2, blk 64, Medford; $200.
S. A. Bateman to F. M. Rowland, title bond to lots 1 and 2, blk 31, Medford; $200.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. J. Wilcox, the plasterer, has removed to Rigney, Wash.
    Bert. Whitman is shipping a large quantity of pears to northern markets.
    The McAndrews building is about completed and will be an ornament to the town.
    Mrs. Eneas McLean, who is at Bandon, Coos County, is much benefited by the salt sea air, we learn.
    The great original Rosenthal and his partner, Levi Ulrich, were in Jacksonville a few days since.
    Mrs. G. E. Anderson has returned from her visit to Klickitat County, Wash., where her parents reside.
    George Merriman, having leased the Purdin & Ulrich blacksmith shop, is doing the best of work in his line.
    Rain last week caused operations to be temporarily suspended on the Cooper and other buildings going up in town.
    P. B. O'Neil dropped a sharp mattock on his foot one day last week, cutting it to the bone and temporarily disabling him.
    M. Purdin is taking a course in law with Francis Fitch and probably will prosecute his studies to admission to the bar in the future.
    Hamden's colored minstrels had a fair audience at their entertainment at the opera house on the 4th instant. They do good work.
    John Gallagher had the misfortune to break his collarbone while riding to town after Dr. Pickel one day recently, but is now rapidly recovering.
    Ira A. Phelps disinterred the News plant here one day last week, to ship the remains of the reminiscence to Junction City, where he will try to do it over again.
    The engrossing topic of interest at present is the great Sunday school convention to be held at Medford, beginning Tuesday, October 28th, and continuing three days.
    Medford's lawn tennis and archery club has resolved itself into a debating society for the winter. A most interesting programme has been prepared for next Tuesday evening.
    Bert Skeel saved a drunken man from getting under the car trucks one day last week, by dragging him from the track at the right time. The act showed rare presence of mind in one so young.
    The case of the city of Medford vs. F. Hubbard, which was decided in the lower courts in favor of the corporation, has been appealed to the supreme court by the defendant. Messrs. Hanna and Whitman represent Mr. Hubbard, while Francis Fitch, Esq., will appear for the city.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


Looking for a Location.
    F. V. Medynski, who was the superintendent of the big distillery at Des Moines that was run out of the state of Iowa by the prohibition laws, is now on the Pacific coast looking for a location for a distillery, in the interests of a large and wealthy company now operating in Illinois. He has been at Walla Walla, Wash., and at various places in Oregon, and stopped at Grants Pass, Medford, Jacksonville and Ashland. The company which he represents, when a location is found that is satisfactory, proposes to go into business on a large scale, using as much as 60,000 bushels of corn and a lesser quantity of rye and barley every year. The location sought is one convenient to prolific corn fields, abundance of water, oak timber for barrels, and where transportation facilities are good, says the Tidings.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


Pamphlets Completed.
    The "Resources of Southern Oregon," composed of 154 pages in pamphlet form, has been completed by State Printer Baker, and the whole number has been boxed and shipped to their destination--Robert A. Miller, secretary of the Southern Oregon State Board of Agriculture, at Jacksonville. The work is gotten up by the board and is a collection of statistical and descriptical data relative to the agricultural and other industrial interests of Oregon, calculated to benefit those industries and to encourage immigration. It is mostly devoted to the counties of Lake, Klamath, Jackson, Josephine, Douglas, Coos and Curry, says the Statesman.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


    Considerable plowing is being done in different portions of Oregon; also some sowing.
    E. G. Cameron won another foot race recently in southern Oregon, defeating a man by the name of Davis.
    The Earl Fruit Company is buying most of the apple crop of southern Oregon, and continues to outrage the feelings of our orchardists by labeling their boxes "California Fruit."
    The Medford Mail says that Dr. Pickel probably has the most complicated and perfect electrical battery in Jackson County, if not in southern Oregon. It is designed for either a galvanic or Faradic battery, and may be changed to either at a moment's notice by a perfectly arranged system of insulated wires. He also has attachments to the battery for the purpose of burning out warts, moles, etc.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


BORN.
BENNETT--In Medford precinct, Sept. 28, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. S. Bennett, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1890, page 3


Jacksonville-Medford Railroad.
    A Jacksonville dispatch of Oct. 2d says: Crawford, Howell & Co., of Corvallis, have entered into a contract with the Medford and Jacksonville Railway Company to build a railroad between Medford and Jacksonville. The contract was received at Medford this morning, duly signed by the contracting parties, and work will be commenced immediately. Jacksonville gives a bonus of $12,500, which is deposited in the bank of Beekman & Reames, and Medford gives $7500, which is deposited in the Medford bank. Steel rails have been ordered, and grading begins without delay.
Ashland Tidings, October 10, 1890, page 3


    Orra E. Angle and wife of Medford started last Saturday for New York, to remain at their old home until next spring.
    J. D. Whitman, of the state horticultural board, came up from Medford Saturday with State Fruit Inspector Varney, and spent the day with him examining Ashland orchards.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 10, 1890, page 3


A MEDFORD FRUIT-GROWER.
    It was the good fortune of the writer to meet yesterday another Southern Oregon visitor, Mr. J. D. Whitman, of Medford, Jackson, a member of the State Board of Horticulture, and the fortunate owner of from sixty-five to seventy acres of growing orchards, comprising, say, 3500 apple trees, including the Ben Davis, Newtown Pippin. E. Spitzenburg, Northern Spy and Red-Cheeked Pippin; 1300 peach trees, early and late, their yields running through three months of summer and fall, and some 500 pear, prune and cherry trees, the latter planted, Mr. Whitman says, for himself and family and the birds, although if he had not covered some of the trees this year the birds would have got them all. Four years ago he planted his first 800 trees, apples, and some have already borne good crops; the remainder were planted three years ago. Good results are expected next year, and in 1892 Mr. Whitman hopes to exemplify his theory that the proper way to raise and ship fruit in Oregon is in carload lots.
    In reply to a series of interrogatories Mr. Whitman furnishes the following interesting data: Good fruit land in his section ranges from $50 to $100 per acre; perhaps $50 had better be considered the minimum for choice land. The cost of planting and setting trees may be placed at from $8 to $10 per acre. A great deal of work is being done in this direction.
"Oregon Fruit Pests," Oregonian, Portland, October 13, 1890, page 8


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Wm. Ulrich shipped a carload of barley north this week.
    W. K. Davis of this place has had his pension increased.
    John Bellinger last week sold out his dray business to Isaac Merriman.
    Jas. Carr continues to make improvements on his farm in this precinct.
    Palm Bros. recently purchased a number of town lots from Welcome Fowler.
    John Redfield now wears a blacksmith's apron in Merriman's shop. He is an excellent mechanic.
    Orra E. Angle and wife are visiting their old home in New York, but expect to return in the spring.
    The government preliminaries will defer the opening of the First National Bank of Medford some weeks.
    Miss Daisy Tucker of Dead Indian will reside in Medford this winter, making her home with Mrs. Fordyce.
    The total number of pupils enrolled in our public schools is 205 at present, with a daily attendance averaging 170.
    W. F. Taggart of Big Butte broke the record one day last week by hauling 25,000 shingles into Medford on one load.
    Mrs. W. T. Vail of Portland was here last week for the purpose of disposing of her property, and returned Tuesday.
    The departure of Rev. Mr. Barden and wife for Salem, to remain permanently, is a source of sincere regret to Medford's citizens.
    Our local debating society met at D. J. Lumsden's pleasant residence last Tuesday evening, it being their initial meeting for the season.
    The city park was plowed up during the week, preparatory to sowing it in grass next spring. With plenty of water for irrigation it can be made a beautiful place.
    Bert Whitman a few days since shipped two carloads of choice pears to a Chicago consignee. He has shipped in all seven carloads of choice selected fruit from this station this season.
    The Protection Hose Company, of Medford, has filed articles of incorporation, with G. F. Davis, H. F. Wood, H. G. Nicholson, J. W. Curry and D. T. Lawton as incorporators. Twenty years is the term designated for the company to exist. $1000 is the capital stock, divided into 500 shares.
    Rev. Robt. Ennis of Jacksonville will preach at Medford every third Sunday morning in each month, the Presbytery having declared the Presbyterian pulpit at this place vacant. As Mr. E. is a logical reasoner and an able, interesting expounder of the gospel, our citizens are to be congratulated. Rev. E. McLean, the former pastor, is now located in Coos County.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 2


    Hammon Bros. of Medford are handling much of the Applegate apples this year, among others having purchased John Devlin's entire crop for shipment.
    Fred Barneburg has brought in his entire band of cattle from the Klamath ranges, numbering 212 head, and will have the finest lot of Christmas beef this year that he has ever turned off.
    Bro. Harlan of the Medford Mail committed matrimony one day last week, and is receiving the congratulations of his brethren of the press, as well as those of his numerous friends. The happy couple also have the best wishes of the Times.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 2


Geo. T. Sly to Francis Fitch, 1.62 acres in twp 37S, R2W, near Medford; $270.
D. T. Lawton to J. West Lawton, lots 11 and 13, blk 13, and lots 10, 11 and 12, blk 12, Medford (subject to liens); $1.
Same to same, part of lots 11, 12 and 13, in blk 2, Medford; $175.
J. West Lawton to Jason Kellogg, lots 10, 11 and 12, blk 12 and lot 11, blk 13, in Medford (subject to liens); $1500.
C. W. Palm et al. to Emma Bloom, lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 46, Medford; $210.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 2



An Embryo Artist.
    One of the exhibits at the late district fair which attracted universal attention was that in the art department made by Vintie Beall, who was left in a deaf condition after his attack of spinal meningitis last year. Naturally of an artistic temperament, prior to his illness he had developed considerable musical talent, and his chief source of amusement was in practicing with the Central Point cornet band. When his deafness deprived him of musical solace he seemed inconsolable, until his parents diverted his mind with the study of painting and drawing, under the skillful tutelage of Mrs. West of Medford. In this field he is once more happy and contented. His exhibit shows unmistakable signs of a fine artist in time to come.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 3


    Large quantities of apples and pears are now being shipped to northern and southern markets.
    Much improvement is taking place in southern Oregon, notwithstanding the dull times.
    The advertisement of M. Purdin, assignee of the estate of Magruder Bros., will be found in another column.
    Thousands of fruit trees are now being planted in southern Oregon. Too many of the right kinds cannot be set out.
    Our carpenters are all busy now, a large number of roofs and additions to buildings being constructed. A number of other improvements are also being made.
    Staver & Walker have a large and first-class assortment of plows suited to the soil of southern Oregon, especially sticky land, which they sell at the most reasonable rates.
    Geo. W. Dunn of the upper valley recently bought five promising young cattle from the herd of Galloways belonging to H. C. Lewis of Medford, paying $800 therefor. They will doubtless form the nucleus of a fine herd in a few years.
    Edwards Bros. of Medford report that some miscreant removed and stole the halters with which their team were hitched at a rack in this place recently. The authorities should investigate and promptly punish such petty thievery.
    The fruit season is pretty well over in this section, with the exception of the shipment of winter apples, which has hardly begun as yet. The branch house of Page & Son shipped four carloads of fruit from Ashland last week, made up of apples, pears and peaches.
    There is already getting to be a scarcity of houses to rent in town. The assurance of our railroad, the splendid public schools we now enjoy and the certainty that St. Mary's Academy will soon reopen are opening the eyes of the people abroad to the merits of the county seat as a place of residence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 3


Preparations Commencing.
    Some people are very anxious to see work commence on the Jacksonville-Medford railroad, being fearful that something may yet happen to blast the success of the enterprise. To those we will say that the fact that the contract for getting out the ties was let this week to Henry Klippel and C. W. Skeel of Medford is evidence that business is meant by Crawford, Howell & Co. There will not be much grading necessary; and as the company has until Jan. 1, 1891 to finish the road, they still have enough time to complete their contract. The right-of-way has been secured along the whole line, D. H. Whetstone having last week given his deed. The steel rails are probably on the way here by this time. In less than three months Jacksonville will be connected with the O.&C.R.R. by rail and a new era of prosperity will begin.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
HARLAN-PEERS--In Medford, Oct. 8, 1890, by Rev. H. A. Barden, Newell Harlan and Mrs. H. Peers.
BORN.
ULRICH--In Medford, October 4, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 17, 1890, page 3


    The latest concerning the Jacksonville-Medford railroad is that work upon it was to begin this week or the first of next, and the people generally are satisfied that the cars will be running by Jan. 1st. Some difficulty over right-of-way negotiations with that liberal, public-spirited citizen, Mr. Grindstone, were reported, however.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 17, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Everybody feels happy since the branch railroad is an assured fact.
    Cooper's brick building adds greatly to that part of town. It is being finished in fine style.
    Rev. Mr. Goodwin, our new Baptist minister, arrived from Kansas with his family one day last week.
    Frank Mingus was at Portland during the week, on business connected with the machinery and implement trade.
    We are sorry to learn there is a probability of Staver & Walker discontinuing their branch house at this place.
    G. W. Howard and wife are entertaining their relatives from Walla Walla, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Lamb and Mrs. Johnson.
    Mrs. I. J. Phipps is enjoying a visit from her sister, Mrs. J. Brown of San Francisco, who will probably remain all winter.
    Mrs. W. R. Stammers and her daughters last week joined Mr. S. at San Francisco, where he is plying his avocation [sic].
    Our real estate offices exhibit some splendid specimens of field corn and small grain in their windows. It has been a most favorable year for corn.
    D. J. Lumsden was at the county seat on Wednesday, accompanied by Mr. Whitehead of Umatilla County, who may become a resident of this section.
    D. A. Huling greeted his Medford friends at the depot as he stepped from the southbound train one day last week, en route for the Bay City to buy goods for his new store at Myrtle Point.
    Hon. G. S. Walton and family are rejoicing over news of the restored health of their daughter in Idaho, who visited them last winter and spring.
    Last Sunday the local Y.M.C.A. listened to a most interesting address delivered by Hon. S. S. Pentz on the subject of "Manliness." Much interested is taken in the weekly meetings of the order.
    Nickell's addition to Medford is again commanding attention since the branch railroad, which will run through it, has become a certainty. It contains many choice lots, which will be sold at reasonable rates and on the most favorable terms.
    If ever a man ought to appreciate the truly poetic, it is during the honeymoon, and yet Brother Harlan calls the spectacle of a lady drawing on a nice clean pair of hose--"socks" he calls 'em--a "brazen and disgusting procedure." Fie on you, Harlan! You have fallen in our estimation.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 2


A. R. Childers to Spencer Childers, Sr., 23.22 acres near Medford; $1700.
Nannie Barr to D. J. Lumsden, lot 1, blk 1, Barr's add. to Medford; $590.
S. Childers, Sr., to A. R. Childers, 23.22 acres near Medford; $5000.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 2


    Hurrah for our branch railroad.
    R. S. Coker, who lost his foot while in railroad employ recently, has been given an office position under the company at Sacramento.
    Two of Staver & Walker's representatives were in town [i.e., Jacksonville] Wednesday for the purpose of establishing a branch agency. This is one of the first effects of the proposed branch railroad.
    Thousands of boxes of apples and grapes from the Applegate section and the foothill regions, that are now hauled to Medford for shipment, will hereafter be loaded on the cars at this place.
    E. W. Hammon of Medford has been shipping some choice apples and pears to Montana markets and to San Francisco during the last ten days. He had about 6000 boxes in stock this week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 3


    W. H. Parker has sold his typewriter to Col. Miller and bought one of the latest improved pattern to take its place.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 3


    Mayor Howard of Medford was here Saturday, accompanied by his father-in-law, Mr. Lamb.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 3


Pamphlets Completed.
    The "Resources of Southern Oregon," composed of 154 pages in pamphlet form, has been completed by State Printer Baker, and yesterday the whole number was boxed and shipped to their destination--Robert A. Miller, the secretary of the Southern Oregon State Board of Agriculture, of Jacksonville. The work is gotten up by the board and is a collection of reliable, statistical and descriptive data relative to the agricultural and other industrial interests of Oregon, calculated to benefit those industries and to encourage immigration. It is mostly devoted to the counties of Lake, Klamath, Jackson, Josephine, Douglas, Coos and Curry. [Salem Statesman, Oct. 10.
Ashland Tidings, October 24, 1890, page 2


    The Jacksonville and Medford railroad is now so far along on the road of certainty that the doubters are quiet. The locating survey was begun Tuesday by J. S. Howard and party, and the route will be about as described heretofore, but we will give a definite description of it hereafter. The contractors came out from Corvallis this week to select the depot grounds, which they did on Wednesday. The contract to furnish the ties has been let to Klippel & Skeel, of Medford, and the rails are reported to be already on the way from the East. The road is to be in operation in time for a New Year's celebration in Jacksonville, to be reached by an all rail route from Yreka, Ashland, Medford, Central Point, Grants Pass, New York and other places. The grading will be light almost the whole distance, but work is to begin at once.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, October 24, 1890, page 3


BORN.
ULRICH--In Medford, October 4, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Ulrich, a daughter.
MARRIED.
HARLAN-PEERS--In Medford, October 8, 1890 by Rev. H. A. Barden, Newell Harlan and Mrs. H. Peers.
Ashland Tidings, October 24, 1890, page 3


    Bert Whitman, of Medford, went down to San Francisco this week, to enter upon a course of study in one of the business colleges.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 24, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Ida Cook of Applegate has become a resident of this place.
    Lewis Palm has gone to Salem, after a pleasant visit with relatives here.
    Davis' warehouse sports a new sign of large size, "Medford's Merchant Miller, A. A. Davis."
    Bert Whitman will put in the winter months at Heald's business college at San Francisco.
    Hazen Little, who was a resident of this place during the spring months, is now engaged in the real estate business at McMinnville.
    J. H. Faris has returned contented from his northern trip and will continue to reside in Medford.
    W. J. Ward of the railroad force left Medford Saturday last for a residence in California.
    Chas. Wilkinson of this precinct spent the week near San Francisco, visiting his brother who resides there.
    Hon. Willard Crawford will soon return to Medford from Athena to reside, having already rented a residence.
    Don't fail to buy a lot in Nickell's addition to Medford. The tract adjoins the west boundary of our town.
    Mrs. D. J. Lumsden returned home last week after attending at the deathbed of her father at Topeka, Kansas.
    W. G. Cooper was among Medford's visitors to the Portland exposition last week, as was also Johnny Bellinger.
    J. D. Whitman, after inspecting southern Oregon's display of fruits at the Portland exposition, last week returned home better satisfied than ever that we have here the fruit section par excellence of the coast.
    J. W. Enyart proved to be the boss hunter of the deer-slaying expedition to the Umpqua divide, in which he was accompanied by Messrs. Palm, Robinson, Reddin and Hutchison, last week.
    Nickell's addition to Medford is again commanding attention since the branch railroad, which will run through it, has become a certainty. It contains many choice lots, which will be sold at reasonable rates and on the most favorable terms.
    The district Sunday school convention is in session, and Medford is entertaining quite a number of delegates thereto from Klamath and Josephine counties, as also different parts of Jackson County. Much interest is being taken, and everything is passing off nicely.
    Arthur Langell of Klamath County was in Medford lately to see his little son. He reports the hay crop so large on his ranch in Langell Valley that he had to quit cutting before he had touched half of it. Last winter's snow was a good thing for Klamath County, in this way, he says.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 2


    J. P. True of Medford, one of our leading citizens, called today. He informs us that the infant child of J. M. Guches died day before yesterday.
    D. Linn, who owns one of the best orchards in this section, has been hauling a large quantity of the finest apples we ever saw to Medford for shipment.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 2


Sarah F. Sly to Martha J. McNames, lot 10, blk 40, Medford; $44.
J. N. Fanning to Isabel Fanning, lots 10, 11, 12 ,13 and 14, blk 45, Medford; $500.
Henry Klippel and Francis Fitch and L. H. Maxwell, interest in Orchard Home contract; $1.
Klippel, Fitch and Maxwell to Orchard Home Association, a corporation.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 2


The Old Gentleman Wondered.
    In a moment or two Jackson and Josephine's exhibit at the industrial fair was reached; and here the visitor's "wonder grew." The Indian corn caught his pleased eye; in fact, the whole display attracted him "powerfully." B. F. Miller, the agent in charge, stepped up and in a moment two Illinoisans were in close confab. The visitor was evidently charmed, and asked question after question, which were sympathetically answered. When he came to the fine display of native woods he became enthusiastic. Now, Mr. Miller was an Illinoisan in the prehistoric ages and found his way, as an emigrant, to southern Oregon long before many a man now eligible to a seat in the United States Senate, so far as ages are concerned, was born. And there he has lived for forty or forty-five years, hemmed in by the Siskiyous, the Calapooias, the Coast and Cascade ranges, until the railroad pierced his mountain-surrounded home and brought him out "willy nilly" with a carload, more or less, of "world beaters" in the shape of products of the soil and fruits of the orchard, and ores from the mine and woods and forest to glorify his section with. And now what wonder is it, if, after a chat with his old tillicum from the Sucker State, he stooped down and, from a mysterious receptacle under his tables, brought forth some fine pears and peaches and slyly dropped them into the capacious side pocket of his visitor's overcoat? And if the fruit was not technically his and, in taking it, he was guilty of as "flat a burglary as was ever committed," does anybody suppose that in that particular case, as he is said to have done on another occasion, the recording angel will not "drop a tear upon the records and blot it out forever."--[Oregonian.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


Already at Work.
MEDFORD, Oct. 28, 1890.           
TO THE EDITOR OF THE TIMES;
    Dear Sir: Yesterday being a bright, clear day, I took a stroll through my orchard, to determine to what extent the eggs of the green aphis had been deposited for next year's crop of aphis. They are a very small, black, shiny egg, and where present can readily be detected on a clear day. On some trees I found a single twig only with them on, in some cases two or more, in others nearly every twig contained them; but only a few trees of the last.
    After some experiments I became fully satisfied that the eggs were not attached to the bark, as are the San Jose scale and some others, but are laid upon and attached to the natural mould of the twig, and that anything that would remove the mould would also remove the aphis eggs with it. To determine the question more fully, I cut several twigs with eggs on them, and after removing the foliage rubbed them with a dry cloth that readily removed both the mould and the aphis eggs. I believe this method of removing the aphis eggs from our young orchards of one, two, three and even four years old, will prove to be both practical and profitable.
                Respectfully,
                    J. D. WHITMAN.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


WHY PAY $50 AND MORE FOR A CHEAP LOT
    When you can get an ENTIRE ACRE of the best fruit land in Nickell's Addition to Medford for the SAME price?
    Nickell's Addition joins Medford's western corporation line, is situated in a beautiful and healthful location, and is within a stone's throw of the Medford schoolhouse. The land is particularly adapted to horticulture, and great returns would be realized there from a few acres planted in prunes, peaches, grapes, etc.
    Two of its best features are that it is free from city taxes, although not lying a great distance from the business portion of Medford, while the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will run through the land near the northern boundary.
    It has been laid out in tracts of five acres and less, and will be sold at very reasonable rates on the most favorable terms, viz: one-third in cash, one-third in one year, and balance in two years.
    For further particulars apply to any reputable real estate dealer, who will take pleasure in showing you the addition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890 et seq., page 3


Our Apples Against the World.
    Southern Oregon is entering into direct competition with Maine and New Brunswick in the matter of supplying the old world with apples. While E. W. Hammon was preparing some Applegate apples for shipment last week, an agent of Lumis & Co. of New York observed them, and at once declared that they were the finest apples on the coast, and engaged a carload of yellow Newtown pippins to be specially prepared for shipment to England, where they will doubtless prove a revelation to our transatlantic friends.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


Will Make Regular Visits.
    A. Garrick, merchant tailor of Medford, will be in Jacksonville next Monday, and regularly every week thereafter, for the purpose of taking orders for clothing. As he is a first-class mechanic and carries a large line of goods, he will give the fullest satisfaction. Give him a trial, for his rates are reasonable.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890 et seq., page 3


    Mrs. H. G. Shock, Miss Amy Safford and Miss Sophie Simon of Little Butte precinct are all on the highway to health after attacks of typhoid fever. Dr. Pryce was the attending physician in each case.
    There will be many more trees planted in the Rogue River Valley this year than last, and the nurserymen are beginning to receive large and numerous orders already. As for prunes, the large acreage to be planted with them, both in Oregon and California, is understood to have exhausted the supply by this time everywhere. Winter apples and peaches are the principal selections for planting in Rogue River Valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


Our Railroad.
    Work is progressing nicely on the construction of the Jacksonville-Medford railroad. A large number of ties have already been scattered along the route, the right-of-way has been cleared and some grading done. The depot has not been located, but from present appearances the road will run up C Street, past the Times office, and all buildings will be put up on the block now owned by W. J. Plymale. A large majority of our people favor this site, as it will be convenient for the mails, express and parties receiving goods, to say nothing of those who wish to embark for other points. The road will be in operation by the first of the year at latest. The weather is favorable for this work.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


BORN.
HOCKERSMITH--Near Medford, Oct. 21, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. John Hockersmith, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1890, page 3


SOME OF LAST WEEK'S ITEMS.
    At last the Jacksonville-Medford short line is an assured fact. The contract has been let for the ties and grading and the contractors have been looking for suitable terminal grounds in Jacksonville. To say that our people are delighted would but inadequately express their feelings; visions of a city that will reach from here to Mount Roxie is filling the brains of anxious speculators, and land will probably jump to fictitious values, but we expect to survive the anticipated boom and come down to terrestrial figures before any serious losses are sustained.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, October 31, 1890, page 2


    Geo. W. Webb and wife, of Medford, have become residents of this place.
"Central Point Items," Ashland Tidings, October 31, 1890, page 2


"Orchard Home Association."
    The "Orchard Home Association" filed articles of incorporation last Monday, Henry Klippel, Francis Fitch and L. H. Maxwell, incorporators. Principal place of business, Medford, Oregon, capital stock of $50,000, divided into 1,000 shares of $50 each par value. The object and purposes of the incorporation is to buy, bond, sell, mortgage, hypothecate, receive by gift, improve, plant and cultivate land within the state of Oregon in general, and the county of Jackson in particular; and for such purposes to construct and build irrigating canals, take and receive or buy or sell or mortgage any and all kinds of personal property incidental to such land enterprises; and to contract concerning the same or said land in any way or form.
Ashland Tidings, October 31, 1890, page 3


L. L. Angle to John C. Angle, two 50-foot lots on J Street, Medford; $200.
J. C. Angle to John A. Miller, same property; $200.
Will Jackson to Wm. Ulrich, lot 4, blk 70, Medford; $75.
Roberts & O'Neil to Alice M. Hammon, lot 1, blk 18, Medford; $500.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    Immigrants are arriving in large numbers by nearly every train, mostly from Kansas and Nebraska, says the Albany Democrat. Thursday forty-five arrived from Nebraska, with two cars of freight, coming for the purpose of locating. The Willamette Valley is destined to be the Mecca of farmers fleeing from crop failures.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The new brick building of Mr. Brandenburg is beginning to show up.
    Mrs. M. Purdin entertained her mother, Mrs. Worlow, from upper Applegate one day last week.
    Lake France, late of this place, is now keeping books for the Buckley Lumber Company of Buckley, Wash.
    John A. Miller of Brownsboro this week traded for a desirable piece of Medford property, with a view to removing here.
    Agent Fronk has been empowered by the S.P. authorities to sell tickets over U.P. connections to any point out of Portland.
    Considerably more interest is being taken in real estate matters here since work was begun on the Medford and Jacksonville railroad.
    A very pleasant social was participated in by many of Medford's young people one evening last week at the private residence of A. S. Johnson.
    The ladies of the M.E. congregation at Medford are preparing to give a grand old-fashioned Thanksgiving dinner for the benefit of the church on the 27th instant.
    A line was run last week for a switch from the main line of railroad to A. A. Davis' roller flouring mills to accommodate his extensive and rapidly growing business.
    The railroad people are making preparations to build a very large warehouse at Medford in a short time. The freight business from this point ranks well up with the leading towns on the line.
    While the report is true that after the busy season is over Staver & Walker may discontinue their branch establishment here, that enterprising firm will still retain a live agency at this point.
    A San Francisco traveling man last week invested in four desirable building lots in Medford, at the same time expressing the opinion that this is destined to be the leading town in the Rogue River Valley.
    Angle & Plymale's opera house is being artistically painted and decorated, and the beautiful drop curtain which Le Compte has designed will combine to make it one of the finest public halls in southern Oregon.
    Among shipments billed from Medford during the fruit season, not yet closed, were 73 carloads of melons, 41 of apples, 3 of tomatoes and 2 carloads of pears. Each year shows a pronounced advance in the list, and the world is open for a market.
    Frank Clayton, late of this place, was the jeweler who endorsed Chas. Weinerich's order for $2000 worth of bridal presents at a large Seattle establishment where Mr. Clayton is now employed. Fortunately the young blood was nabbed in time and made to disgorge, and Mr. Clayton escaped serious damage.
    Eastern parties have offered to locate a big distillery here if the people of this section will subscribe a bonus of $4000 and other privileges. S. H. Hull is circulating a subscription list and has succeeded in raising the larger portion of this sum, although considerable still remains unsubscribed. We cannot permit this magnificent chance to benefit ourselves to pass, especially as it can be procured for so small an inducement. Not only would this enterprise give direct employment to a large number of men, but it would furnish a ready market for thousands of bushels of corn, rye and other kinds of grain. The incidental benefits to be derived therefrom would also be great. Let our citizens consult their best interests and not allow this opportunity to go by.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
GORE-ISH--In Medford, November 5, 1890, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Wm. H. Gore and Miss Sophenia J. Ish.
The Times tender congratulations and wishes the worthy young couple long life and endless happiness. The bride and groom departed on the evening train for Portland, their future home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    No final action has yet been taken by the town trustees relative to the selection of a depot site, but it is probable the negotiations for the Plymale property will be closed, subject to the approval of the railway folks.
    Work on the Jacksonville-Medford railroad continues to be pushed rapidly. The grading will be finished in a few days, when the ties will be laid. A carload of steel rails will arrive soon, which will be followed immediately by the balance. It will not be long before track laying will be under way.
    A. Garrick, Medford's popular merchant tailor, was here last Monday with a large number of elegant samples of fall and winter goods. As Jacksonville has no tailor at present, our citizens should patronize Mr. G., as he is a first-class workman, charges reasonable prices and guarantees satisfaction.
    The great highway nuisance the dagger cocklebur seems to have been suffered to get almost beyond control in this county, owing to the laxity of our road supervisors in enforcing the statute providing for its destruction. While this fine weather is prevailing, the seed stalks that have not yet scattered their seeds should be gathered and burned.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    Rev. Mr. Edmunds of Oakland, Or., visited Jacksonville one day last week. He may assume charge of Medford circuit in a short time.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1890, page 3


    The railroad--our railroad--is progressing slowly, but satisfactorily toward early completion. Grading is going steadily on, but the all-important location of the Jacksonville depot is still held in abeyance, and the possible location of it near the lime quarry on Jackson Creek will probably boom real estate in that locality next.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1890, page 2


Steam Plowing.
    Mr. Cox passed through Medford on Monday with his steam engine, on his way home from the Beekman & Reames farm, where he has been turning over the soil for cultivation at the rate of sixteen acres per day. He pulls eight plows with the engine, which is certainly showing that steam plowing is a success, as the cost for running is not over $5 per day.--[Medford Mail.
Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1890, page 2


Fruit Shipments.
    The following shipments of Jackson County produce was kindly furnished us by Agent Fronk. Seventy-three carloads of watermelons. Forty-one carloads of apples. Three carloads of tomatoes. Two carloads of pears. Besides the above about thirty carloads of mixed fruit have found their way from Medford to foreign markets. Ashland has doubtless shipped as many more and on the whole, Jackson County certainly advertises herself this year.--[Medford Mail.
Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1890, page 3


    R. H. Dunn, manager of Staver & Walker's business in Southern Oregon, was in town yesterday. In consequence of a change of the business policy of the firm, brought about by the death of Mr. Walker, the branch house at Medford is to be closed this month, and stock shipped to Portland.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 7, 1890, page 3


    Mr. Cox passed through Medford on Monday with his steam engine on his way home from the Beekman & Reames farm, where he has been turning over the soil for cultivation at the rate of sixteen acres per day. He pulls eight plows with the engine, which is certainly showing that steam plowing is a success, as the cost of running is not over $5 per day.--Medford Mail.
    The following shipments of Jackson County produce were kindly furnished us by Agent Fronk: Seventy-three carloads of watermelons; forty-one carloads of apples; three carloads of tomatoes; two carloads of pears. Besides the above about thirty carloads of mixed fruit have found their way from Medford to foreign markets. Ashland has doubtless shipped as many more, and on the whole, Jackson County certainly advertises herself well this year.--Medford Mail.

"North Pacific News Notes," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 10, 1890, page 4


    DEMOREST-SHREVE.--At Dallas, Polk County, Wednesday, November 12, 1890, Dr. O. F. Demorest, of Medford, and Miss Retta Shreve, of Dallas, Rev. Fulton officiating.
    Dr. Demorest is a successful dentist at Medford, and was a former pupil of Dr. I. T. Mason, of this city. Miss Shreve has been one of the most charming of the society belles of Dallas.

"Married," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 13, 1890, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. J. Merritt, formerly of Medford, is now at Albina.
    John Wolters, the baker, made his friends in Jacksonville a visit last Wednesday.
    A. H. Carson was in this vicinity soliciting orders last week for Redlands nursery stock.
    Judson Carder came down from the Siskiyous last week to avoid hibernating there.
    Wm. Ulrich has let the contract for building another cottage for rent or sale in Medford.
    Davis, the Medford miller, bought a fine lot of corn from Drake Bros. of Jacksonville during the week.
    Mrs. Mary Clark has had the misfortune to become partially paralyzed, and is lying in a critical condition.
    The water works saved Geo. Merriman's blacksmith shop from destruction by fire last week, says the Mail.
    Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R., announce a grand ball at Cooper's new building on Thanksgiving evening, Nov. 27th.
    Jasper Crenshaw, formerly of this place, is doing a good business at Ager, Cal., where he is engaged in making and repairing wagons.
    It has about been definitely concluded to remove all bodies interred in the I.O.O.F. cemetery to the new burying ground west [sic] of town.
    Medford's city council has ordered a bulkhead put in at the head of the ditch, to guard against another overflow such as we had last winter.
    Leonard & Skeeters of this place were losers to the extent of $100 by the embezzlement of Sherrard & Root, the defaulting quartz miners at Gold Hill.
    This place is already feeling the impulse given by restored confidence resulting from the railroad to the county seat, and many real estate transfers are talked of.
    Hammon Bros. recently shipped a carload of fine nursery stock to Nevada. This live firm has shipped 20 carloads of apples this season, some of which go to England.
    Heeding the advice of the Times, Medford's board of trade is already making preparations for a grand southern Oregon exhibit at the Chicago world's fair.
    The Orchard Home Association's tract of land near Medford is coming into popular favor, and a large number of lots have already been sold in Portland. It will be a veritable paradise in a few years.
    Town Assessor Sears has had his list of the municipal assessment open for correction under the statute since the 3d instant, and gives notice that errors will be noted and corrected up to December 10th.
    The bonus required to secure the building of the packing house in Medford has almost been raised, we are glad to state. Our citizens certainly cannot afford to allow this magnificent opportunity to pass by.
    The entertainment given by the ladies of the Baptist congregation last evening at their church was a success in every way, the low price of admission securing a good audience, and all the performers acquitting themselves nicely.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890, page 2


T. J. Kenney to William Ulrich, undivided half of lots 5 and 6, block 70, Medford; $150.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890, page 2


Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890 et seq., page 2


    The manufacture of lard and bacon will soon commence. These commodities are very scarce at present.
    Grading on the branch railroad is nearly finished and the rails will be laid as soon as they arrive, which will not be long.
    Hammon Bros. of Medford have paid a uniform price of 70 cents per box for choice Applegate apples, delivered at Medford, and have bought a large quantity of them.
    Since the incorporation of the Orchard Home Association, the tract near the line of the new railroad, in the suburbs of Medford, has been placed upon the market and lots are selling rapidly. The first day purchasers were found for 16 future homes.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890, page 3


    The Jacksonville-Medford railroad will be completed on time--Jan. 1, 1891. Work on the same is progressing rapidly.
    Thos. Bailey raised 300 pounds from a single ear of a superior variety of field corn he introduced this season, and has had samples of same on exhibition at Medford and elsewhere during the week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890, page 3


MARRIED.
CARDER-REDDEN--At Ashland, Nov. 5, 1890, by Rev. C. A. Lewis, Eli W. Carder and Miss Cora E. Redden, of Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1890, page 3


    J. F. Ragsdale, who sold out his place near Tolo last summer and went down to the Sacramento Valley, has returned with his family to Jackson County, and will live in Medford during the winter.
    In the wedding of Mr. W. H. Gore and Miss Sophenia Ish last week two young people of widely known pioneer families of this valley were united. The marriage took place at the residence of the officiating minster, Rev. M. A. Williams, near Medford, and was intended to be as quiet as possible. There were no formal invitations issued, but a few friends of the bride and groom, who happened to be at hand were witnesses of the ceremony, there being present, besides Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Gore, father and mother of the groom, Mrs. Hoffman and Mrs. Kenney and Miss Kate Hoffman and Miss Carrie Beekman of Jacksonville. After the wedding a reception was given the couple at the home of the parents of the bridegroom and on the evening train the same day the wedded pair left for their home in Portland, where Mr. Gore is now employed as shipping clerk in the fruit house of Page & Son. The many friends of the bride and groom in Jackson County wish for them a long life of matrimonial happiness.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1890, page 3


    Woodville sent a carload of wood to Ashland and a carload to Medford last week.
    Hammon Bros. of Medford shipped a carload of mixed trees to Nevada last week. They will also ship twenty carloads of apples from Medford this season.
    Medford will furnish water for the engine tank at that place from the city water works, for which the railroad company is to pay the city $20 per month.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1890, page 3


Medford Items.
    There is on foot a project to establish electric light works in this place, and there is now little doubt that the lights will be furnished within a short time. Medford cannot afford to lag behind her neighbors in this respect.
    The building of the railroad to Jacksonville and the prospect of large business enterprises being opened here in the near future make our citizens more enthusiastic than ever before over the future of our town.
    The interior of Medford's new opera house is now being finished in excellent style, and the opera house will be a credit to the city as well as to the gentlemen who have builder it, Messrs. Angle & Plymale. On Christmas Eve, a grand invitation ball under the auspices of Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., will be held in the opera house. Everything in connection with the event will be first-class, and no pains will be spared to make it the event of the season.
    On Sunday last the little daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John W. Curry, two years old, was very seriously burned by falling with her face and hands against a stove. At last report, Dr. Pickel, who is attending her, reported her as doing well and on the road to recovery.
    The citizens of Medford are much elated over the prospect of the establishment here of a large business enterprise--something on a larger scale than anything yet attempted in Southern Oregon. It is nothing less than the large distillery and packing house which is to be moved from Iowa to the Pacific coast, and concerning which the Tidings reported a few weeks ago that the representative was looking through Washington, Oregon and California with a view to choosing the best location possible. It is a triumph for this valley that it has been selected after so wide a territory has been examined. At Seattle, Spokane Falls, Walla Walla and other places a large bonus could have been easily secured for the location of such a large business, but the conditions of soil, climate, products, water, etc., did not compare with those of this valley, and the business will come here. The distillery plant is a very extensive one, and has been operated with great success and profit in Iowa, but the prohibition laws have driven it out of that state. The company asked that it be given a deed to 22 acres of land and that 5,000 bushels of corn be given the first year. The conditions are complied with, and the company will have buildings erected within 100 days, it is understood. In addition to the consumption of large quantities of corn, rye and barley, the establishment will open a market for beef and hogs, large numbers of which will be fed, slaughtered and packed. The enterprise means a great deal for Medford, and for the valley at large. It will give direct employment to from 30 to 75 people, and will help the general business of Medford permanently.
Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1890, page 3


    Now is the time to declare war against the pests which are endangering the fruit industry of southern Oregon. Unless radical measures are adopted soon, it will be too late, as the troublesome insects have already obtained a stronger hold than they should have. We cannot understand why so many having infected orchards should delay in this matter, especially as it endangers not only their own property but that of their neighbors. Eternal vigilance is the price of our success as a fruit-raising community.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Wm. Miller, late of Butte Creek, is now running a shift at the Medford Roller Mills.
    Cooper's brick building is almost ready for occupancy. It is now being plastered.
    Much interest is already taken in the approaching Knights of Pythias ball on Christmas.
    J. E. Wilson of Central Point last week purchased a desirable building lot of C. W. Palm in southern Medford.
    C. C. Ragsdale and family, formerly of Tolo, are located at Medford for the present. We welcome them to our midst.
    Hon. Willard Crawford once more swings out his shingle to the breeze at Medford, his office being in the opera house block.
    Chas. Brous is visiting relatives at Swan, Iowa, his old home, where he will remain some weeks, and will then return here with his family.
    M. Purdin has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer. He is now prepared to indulge in legal profanity at reasonable figures.
    Dr. Geo. O. DeBar is preparing to set out a 15-acre orchard at his ranch near here in a short time--prunes and apples from Redlands Nursery.
    Our genial banker, W. I. Vawter, is the happiest man in town. The object of his solicitude arrived last Saturday, and his fighting weight is ten pounds.
    Street Commissioner Woolf has utilized the road labor and fine weather to the utmost during the past two weeks, in placing many of Medford's thoroughfares in good repair.
    On Christmas Eve a grand invitation ball will be given under the auspices of Talisman Lodge No. 31, K.P., at Angle & Plymale's opera house hall, which will be decorated in fine style by that time.
    John W. Curry's little girl had the misfortune to burn her face and hands badly by falling against a hot stove one day last week. Under Dr. Pickel's ministration she is getting along nicely, however.
    Our citizens are wonderfully cheered of late over the promising future of our thrifty town, and the early completion of the tapline railroad insures a land booming town and suburban property. Truly this town is destined to rank before long as the queen city of the valley.
    Mrs. Chas. K. Fronk returned last week from her visit to Eugene. Mrs. Fronk's father accompanied her home from the Willamette Valley, and will remain during the winter. He is still suffering from the effects of la grippe, and is unable to lie in bed, sleeping in his chair, in a sitting posture.
    The Orchard Home Association, now incorporated, is rapidly getting things arranged to place their whole "Home" tract of 220 acres on the market in lots of desirable size for small orchards, on such terms that it seems like folly not to invest. There never has been a more favorable opportunity for citizens of our growing town to obtain desirable orchard land close to their doors.
    The "Scott Family fake" at Medford was a success in attendance, there being no admission fee; but the cost of getting away was immense, the "most popular, etc., etc., balloting system" being resorted to by the management to inveigle the audience into paying a regular McKinley tariff fee to see the show. Miss Maggie Tice was voted the most popular lady present, and received a fine album.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 2


BORN.
VAWTER--In Medford, Nov. 15, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Vawter, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 2


Ida Bateman to Sarah A. Bateman, lots 7 and 8, block 18, Medford; $135.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 2


Something Should Be Done.
    The suggestion that Jackson County should do something towards securing her share of the large immigration into the state is heard on all sides. It might be a good plan to revive our county board of immigration, and establish a headquarters in Portland for the dissemination of information concerning our resources and productions, at this juncture. Capital is already eagerly inspecting our mines, timber and water power, and if the foothill fruit lands of the county are settled and developed during the next few years, in the ordinary course of events this should be the second county in the state in point of population and wealth within the next two decades. Who will take the initiative in heralding our fame abroad through a thoroughly organized immigration bureau?
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 3


    Hammon Bros. are shipping apples in carloads north and south every day or two.
    The prospects of establishing an electric light system in Medford bids fair to soon materialize.
    Grading of the Jacksonville-Medford railroad has progressed as far as our schoolhouse. Work is going on rapidly.
    Staver & Walker will soon ship their goods to Portland and abandon their branch house at Medford, we are sorry to learn.
    The Jacksonville and Medford railroad engine will be supplied with water from the Medford water works tank at the rate of $20 per month.
    There are very few empty houses in Jacksonville, and our town has filled up rapidly with a desirable population since the branch railroad became a fixed fact.
    The demand for lots in the Orchard Home Association tract has necessitated the platting of the same, and J. S. Howard was last week engaged in surveying the tract. A large number of lots have already been sold at Portland.
    Prof. Le Compte, late of the Chilian Medicine Company, may be the coming "fire king" or locomotive engineer on the Medford and Jacksonville railroad, having been in Jacksonville and Medford during the week with that end in view.
    The falling off in the shipment of hay from Medford this season, the aggregate but little exceeding 500 tons, is accounted for by shipments from all other stations along the road being much more liberal than usual, and hence the section around Medford is not called on for all of its surplus, as it was last year.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 3


    Jacksonville property has been steadily advancing in price since the railroad was started to Medford, and will reach its normal condition in due course of time.
    It is more than likely that the half block belonging to W. J. Plymale will be purchased for depot purposes for the Jacksonville and Medford railroad. It is the best location that could be selected, as it is conveniently and centrally located.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890, page 3


W. S. JONES, M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Medford, Oregon.
Office--Hamlin's Block.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1890 et seq., page 3


    Messrs. Howell and Crawford, railroad contractors, were in Jacksonville Sunday.
    There was a white pony lost between Jacksonville and Medford this week, for which no reward will be offered as the owner was kindly furnished a seat in a Medford buggy. For further particulars inquire of a prominent Medford attorney.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, November 21, 1890, page 2


MARRIED.
DEMOREST-SHREVE--At Dallas, Nov. 16, 1890, by Rev. C. E. Fulton, Dr. O. F. Demorest of Medford and Miss Retta Shreve of Dallas.
CREED-LOWDEN--At Medford Nov. 26, 1890, by Rev. M. A. Williams, George M. Creed and Miss Margaret Lowden.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1890, page 3


    John Gildersleeve [of Grants Pass] intends opening a furniture store here soon.
    E. Balterzore [Balthasar?] and wife removed to Medford from Sams Valley last week.
    The work of finishing up the interior of the opera house goes rapidly forward.
    Hon. Willard Crawford now occupies the late residence of Jos. France in Medford.
    Thomas Edson has joined S. N. Brantner's forces at the latter's mines on Applegate.
    George Merriman was laid up with a very severe felon during several days last week.
    Wm. Barnum is erecting a new residence in Medford, C. W. Skeel having the contract.
    A. J. Johnson is now canvassing the county for Galloway's combination fence works.
    Dr. Demorest is the recipient of many congratulations for his renunciation of celibacy.
    M. S. Damon last week received a new patent stitching machine at his boot and shoe store.
    Shipments of hay to Grants Pass continue. Angle & Plymale shipped two carloads recently.
    George Davis and family spent a good portion of the last two weeks rusticating in the mountains.
    Miss Ada Barr left home last week to attend school at San Francisco during the coming winter.
    Chas. Dickison and wife have removed to Redlands, Cal., where Mr. D. assumes charge of a large nursery.
    J. W. Hockersmith, the Ashland butcher, bought a number of hogs of farmers near Medford during the week.
    Horace Nicholson is erecting a neat bird cage on South C Street, to be ready for emergencies and cold weather.
    S. H. Lyon is now at Chicago running a coffee house and getting ready for the guileless visitor to the World's Fair.
    The prospects improve for the location of the distillery at this place, and the project may now be regarded as settled.
    Chas. Hall, of Staver & Walker, went to Portland last week, after spending several months collecting for the firm in this valley.
    Agent Dunn, of Staver & Walker, had a runaway at Central Point in Mr. Olwell's field one day recently, resulting in a broken buggy.
    Hammon Bros. were obliged to hold two carloads of fruit for shipment on the S.P. until repairs were completed on the Lake Labish trestle.
    Mr. Fronk of Eugene failed to obtain relief from his lung troubles in southern Oregon and returned to the Willamette Valley during the week.
    H. C. Lewis visited Roseburg during the week, says the Review. He has established his sawmill on Pass Creek in Douglas County.
    Our real estate men are preparing to do a driving business on the completion of the Medford and Jacksonville railroad. Many newcomers seeking locations are already to be seen on our streets.
    J. O. Johnson and wife returned from their summer trip behind a fine team through the Sound country last week, having traveled over 3000 miles in their hack, and are satisfied to pitch their tent here permanently, Mr. J. alleging that Medford has the brightest prospects of any town he knows of.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1890, page 2


    Mrs. Cardwell is having a large portion of the Cardwell ranch subdivided into five- and ten-acre tracts, with the intention of putting the land on the market at once. It goes without saying that it will be eagerly taken by home seekers.
    A sure cure for the whisky habit: Dr. Livingstone's Antidote for Drunkenness will cure any case of the liquor habit in from ten to thirty days, from the moderate drinker to the drunkard. The Antidote can be given in a cup of coffee without the knowledge of the person taking it. The Antidote will not injure the health in any way. Manufactured by the Livingstone Chemical Co., San Francisco, Cal., or from A. C. Marsters & Co., sole agents, Roseburg; E. C. Brooks, Jacksonville; Miller & Strang, Medford, Oregon.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 28, 1890, page 3


    The Medford national bank is to open for business about the first of December, it is understood.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1890, page 3


BORN.
FARIS--In Medford, November 22d, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Faris, a daughter.
VAWTER--In Medford, Nov. 15, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Vawter, a son.
Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1890, page 3


    Miss Annie Cameron left for Lincoln, Nebraska, Tuesday. She will be accompanied from Medford by Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Halley, who are going to Missouri.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1890, page 3


Medford Items.
    Plowing has about ceased around here, owing to the ground being too dry.
    Wm. Forsythe is running the forge for Geo. F. Merriman since George has been laid up with a felon on his thumb.
    Dr. Geary's fine new residence is nearly completed, and will soon be ready for occupancy.
    O. Holtan, Medford's first tailor, who has been absent for the past year, has returned, and may now be found in one of Adkins & Webb's offices.
    C. W. Wolters has received a large and well-selected stock of toys and fancy goods for the holidays.
    M. C. Lewis has returned from Douglas County, where he moved his large sawmill, formerly located near Central Point. The mill will begin running in about three weeks.
    Adkins & Webb have added a corrugated iron awning in front of their building on Main Street, which adds materially to the appearance of the building.
    Messrs. Hammond & Manuel have shipped several carloads of fine apples to the East this week. They have done a large business this season.
    The Royce & Lansing Company are billed here for Dec. 2d. This is one of the best companies on the road, and should be well patronized.
    The Medford-Jacksonville railroad is being somewhat delayed owing to the non-arrival of the rails. They are expected daily, however, and will soon be laid after they arrive.
    The opera house is receiving the last coat of plaster, and will soon be completed. It will be one of the best in Southern Oregon.
    The grand ball to be given in the opera house Christmas Eve by the K. of P. promises to excel all others ever given here. The lodge is sparing no pains to make it a perfect success in every respect.
    Geo. L. Davis and wife and Ed. Pettinger are taking a trip through Lake and Klamath counties, on a pleasure trip and to see the country.
    Staver & Walker, of this place, sold a large supply of farming implements, a fine carriage, harness, etc., to a Mr. Pareira, of Siskiyou County, Tuesday. The firm has a large trade in that section of the country.
Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Hammon Bros. shipped a carload of apples to Oakland last week
    C. W. Wallace delivered an address to the Y.M.C.A. at Howard's hall last Sunday.
    Adkins & Webb have improved their store front on Main Street with a neat shed awning.
    Recent real estate operations here point to extensive building operations in Medford next season.
    R. H. Halley and wife have gone to their old home in Missouri for a visit of several months' duration.
    Rufus North of Oakland, Cal., has been in town during the week looking after property interests here.
    Medford will not be satisfied until she is lighted by electricity.
    Our merchants are ready for the holiday trade, and have on full stocks, nicely displayed in their show windows.
    J. Goldsmith shipped 450 turkeys to the San Francisco market for Thanksgiving. Anybody can be thankful over a southern Oregon turkey.
    John Ocander's neat new cottage on upper C Street is suggestive. We hope to have another important announcement to make concerning Mr. O. in a short time.
    The interior of the opera house presents a very attractive appearance since the plastering was completed and the new Mount Pitt drop curtain placed in position.
    The K.P. boys intend to have their coming invitation ball at the opera house the toniest affair seen in the valley for many a day. Extensive preparations are being made.
    P. S. Enyart and wife of Logansport, Indiana, have been visiting their son, J. E. Enyart and wife of Medford, during the week. It is quite possible they may make their home in the valley.
    Rev. J. F. Edmunds of Oakland, Or., last week accepted a call from the Medford Presbyterians and in future will occupy their pulpit in this place. He has the reputation of being a very able minister.
    The opening of the Medford National Bank has only been delayed hitherto in order to straighten out the present business of the Medford Bank and enable it to accommodate itself to changed conditions.
    The following are the officers of Medford Lodge K. of P. for the ensuing year: E. P. Geary, P.C. by virtue of present office; Peter Henderson, C.C., H. U. Lumsden, V.C., M. W. Skeel, P., Newell Harlan, M. of F., John W. Curry, K. of R. and S., and C. I. Hutchison, M. at A.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 2


BORN.
FARIS--At Medford, November 22, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Faris, a daughter.
VAWTER--In Medford, Nov. 15, 1890, to Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Vawter, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 2


L. L. Angle to J. A. Edwards, 50-ft. lot on "J" Street, Medford; $60.
Angle, Plymale and Short to Delphine Goldsmith, lots 1 and 2, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford; $120.
Plat of Orchard Home Association tract was filed for record.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 2


    Choice five-acre tracts in Nickell's addition to Medford are offered on favorable terms.
    From every section in the valley come reports of good health and a cheerful outlook for better crops and prices next year.
    Jackson County can now claim to have as fine a system of public wagon bridges as any county in the state. The county has a heavy debt, but it has something to show for it.
    The plat of the Orchard Home Association tract near Medford was filed for record in the office of the county recorder this week. Lots in this favored locality will be eagerly sought after.
    Royce & Lansing were greeted by fair houses at Medford on Tuesday and Ashland on Wednesday evening. The company would have come over to the county seat, had the railroad been completed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 3


    Mrs. Mabel Brunz of Colorado, accompanied by her daughter, is visiting her parents, Hon. Geo. S. Walton and wife of Medford, her sister, Mrs. Geo. Hays of this place, and numerous other relatives and friends in the valley.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 3


    The branch line railroad will be completed in a few weeks now.
    The new national bank at Medford will open for business about January 1st, 1891.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1890, page 3


    The Plymale residence property has at last been decided upon as the terminal grounds of the Jacksonville and Medford railroad. Mr. Plymale has purchased the Linn residence on the opposite side of the street, and will take possession this week.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1890, page 2


    World's Fair Commissioner Henry Klippel returned home last Monday evening from Chicago, where he had been in attendance at the stormy session of the commission of which the daily papers gave full reports. Mr. Klippel say that so far as any conflict between the national and local board is concerned, it practically amounts to nothing, because the national commission has surrendered the management of affairs into the hands of the local board, anyhow. Mr. Klippel was gone from Medford just twenty days, but had to take the limited fast mail train for a part of his trip eastward in order to reach Chicago on time.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1890, page 3


    The Mail reports that Goldsmith shipped 450 turkeys from Medford to San Francisco for the Thanksgiving market, and employed 32 boys to pick and pack the birds for him.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 5, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
Steel Rails Yet on the Road--Electric Lights--Distillery Bonus.
    MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 6.--The steel rails for the Medford-Jacksonville branch railroad have not arrived from the East, although the same have been overdue for two weeks. Everything is now ready for the rails, and as soon as they arrive the road will be pushed to completion as rapidly as possible. It is expected that "Change cars for Jacksonville" will be heard here about the first of the year. The successful carrying out of the enterprise is largely due to the liberality and generosity of Medford's prosperous and thriving citizens who so willingly and promptly raised $7500 toward the undertaking. The land along the route of this road will be divided up into five- and ten-acre tracts, planted in choice fruit trees and owned by those who desire to make themselves homes in this, the garden spot of Oregon, and will soon be able to support themselves and families from the sale of fruits, berries, etc., from their orchards. There is no speculation about the adaptability of the soil and climate of Rogue River Valley for the raising of superior fruits; it has been demonstrated beyond a reasonable doubt.
    A. A. Davis, of this city, has secured a franchise from the city council and will soon commence active operations toward putting in an electric light plant in this city.
    There is a large increase of pupils in our public schools over last year. We need a large and commodious new schoolhouse, for the present one is inadequate to the wants and demands of the district.
    Several very fine residences are in course of completion, which will add much to the appearance of our young city.
    The bonus of $5000 for the new big distillery has been subscribed, and the contracts forwarded to Chicago. It will be known in a few days when operations will be commenced on the buildings, etc. A thirty-acre tract of land near here has been secured for the company at a reasonable figure, on account of the benefits expected to be derived from the business. It is proposed that a $30,000 plant will be put in, consisting of a distillery, a pork-packing concern, and a beef-canning establishment. This will give a market for all the corn that can be raised in the valley, and will give a new impetus to farming in this section. The gentleman representing the Chicago company, while here,  was shown several samples of corn, and he gave it as his opinion that the corn raised here is the most suitable for distillery purposes that he has ever seen anywhere, and there is no doubt but what a sufficient amount can be raised in the valley to supply their demands if a fair price is offered for it, as the soil is most suitable and it costs much less to raise it than it does grain.
Oregonian, Portland, December 7, 1890, page 2


    Rev. F. J. Edmunds has left Roseburg, Oregon, and accepted the pastorate of the Presbyterian Church at Medford, Oregon.
"News of the Various Churches," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, December 10, 1890, page 2


D. J. Lumsden to I. A. Merriman, lots 15 and 16, blk 2, Lumsden's add. to Medford; $130.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1890, page 2


Burglary at Medford.
    Last Saturday morning, just before daybreak, some daring burglars broke into Adkins & Webb's hardware store, through the front door, and made away with a quantity of ammunition, revolvers--including a large Colt's navy pistol--knives, cutlery, etc. No clue to the perpetrators has been discovered. They chose a most opportunity time for their depredations, just after the night watch had retired. It is generally supposed to be the work of tramps.
Democratic Times, December 12, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    N. A. Jacobs and family are once more residents of Medford.
    The fire company is growing, having taken in four new members during the week.
    E. P. Pickens of Table Rock has removed to Medford to avail himself of our superior schools.
    C. W. Wolters and wife entertained Mrs. W.'s father, A. Alford of Talent, on Thanksgiving Day.
    Night watch and city marshal will hereafter be consolidated into a single office, as at Jacksonville.
    The G.A.R. Thanksgiving ball and supper passed off with eclat, and all voted it a general success.
    The Medford Mail expanded into larger quarters in the Phillips & Jackson building last week.
    A. A. Davis is receiving a large amount of wheat, the good roads greatly facilitating hauling same to market.
    S. Rosenthal purchased the remainder of the Kurth & Miller goods some weeks ago, and has about closed out the stock.
    Hammon Bros.' apple warehouse was burglarized and a number of boxes of fruit taken therefrom one night last week.
    A. A. Davis was last week granted a franchise for an electric light plant, the power for the generator to be furnished presumably by the flouring mill engine.
    A telegram received here yesterday announced that the first carload of machinery for the distillery plant has been shipped and that the enterprise is now an established fact.
    Francis Fitch, Esq., has been engaged during the week in transforming the upstairs of Cooper's building into a suite of fine offices, nicely furnished, where he will be found at home in the professional line in the future.
    The invitations are out for the first annual ball to be given by Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., of Medford, at the opera house, on Christmas Eve, the 24th inst. The personnel of the committees ensure that everything will be done up in style. The music will be furnished by the Ashland orchestra, and a fine repast will be furnished at the Grand Central Hotel. Invited guests only will be admitted to the hall and will be required to exhibit invitation cards. Tickets, including supper, $2.50 per couple.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1890, page 2


    W. S. Crowell has had teams engaged in hauling lumber for a dwelling on his recently purchased ranch near town this week.
    Royce & Lansing added to their fame in this section by their performances at Medford and Ashland last week. They missed a profitable entertainment by not coming to Jacksonville, where they are great favorites.
    Hammond & Briggs is the latest law and abstract firm at Ashland. Mr. Briggs is a recent arrival from Minnesota, and the firm succeeds to the business of A. S. Hammond.
    A. Garrick, the merchant tailor of Medford, takes pleasure in announcing that he will be in Jacksonville on Monday of each week for the accommodation of those who may need anything in his line. He is prepared to do work in the latest and most approved styles. Do not fail to give him a call. Remember the time, Mondays of each week.
    The impression that the Medford school directors expel young gentlemen who dance with Central Point maidens is entirely erroneous. The case in point, where three youths were excluded from the Medford school for nine days for dancing with a girl at the other town, was owing to the fact that the young miss was smitten--with scarlet fever--the day after the dance whereat the young gentlemen exposed themselves. The able-bodied citizens of Medford or any other town in the valley would be only too glad to expose themselves in a similar fashion, for the Central Point maidens rank high in the scale of grace and beauty, but consideration for the welfare of the little folks dictated the action of the school directors at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 12, 1890, page 3


    Klippel & Lee's sawmill on Galls Creek shut down for the season on the 2d inst., after having finished cutting the 6500 fir ties for the Jacksonville-Medford railroad.
    The Medford holiday ball is to be under the auspices of the K. of P. lodge of that place, and there will be a good attendance of Knights from all over the valley. It will be on Christmas Eve.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1890, page 3


    J. S. Howard, of Medford, was in Jacksonville Tuesday, making the final survey of the depot grounds. The buildings are being removed and everything will soon be in readiness for the construction of the depot buildings.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1890, page 3


Medford Items.
    It is expected that the Medford-Jacksonville R.R. will be in running order by Dec. 25th.
    Cecil Young left last Monday morning for San Jose, Cal., where he goes to take a case on the Times of that city. Success to him.
    There are now enrolled in the public school here almost 300 scholars and others are beginning every week. We have one of the best schools in the valley, and many families are moving to town to take advantage of it.
    During the present winter Medford will have electric lights. This will be a valued improvement and will add much to the appearance of the town.
    The committee received a telegram last Wednesday evening stating that the first car of machinery for the large distillery and packing house to be erected here had already been shipped and was on its way. This will be a great thing for the entire valley, as it will furnish a market for the surplus grain, beef and hogs, as well as giving employment to a number of men.
    Burglars entered Adkins & Webb's hardware store last Friday night and stole a number of revolvers, some razors, one fine jointed fishing rod and a supply of cartridges. They effected an entrance by prying the front doors open with a heavy bar of some kind. The night watch did not leave until 5 o'clock in the morning, and it is supposed that it was done after he went off duty. They were evidently well acquainted with the premises, as nothing else was bothered in the least except what was taken. Burglaries are getting quite frequent of late, and it is to be hoped that the guilty ones may be located before they make another attempt.
Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1890, page 3
Orchard Home ad, December 13, 1890 Democratic Times
December 13, 1890 Democratic Times

    Medford is to have a distillery.

"Oregon Clips," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, December 15, 1890, page 3


MEDFORD NOTES.
Work of Laying Rails Begun--Distilling Plant--Shipping Apples.
    MEDFORD, Or., Dec. 15.--The delayed rails for the Medford-Jacksonville branch arrived Saturday night and work was commenced Sunday morning. A large force was put on today, and the work will be pushed to completion in a few days. The contract calls for the road to be completed by the 1st of January.
    The Chicago parties have shipped their plant for the new large distillery to be erected here, and the same is expected to arrive in a few days. This enterprise will prove a vast benefit to the people of Rogue River Valley.
    Hammond Bros. have shipped several hundred more boxes of apples to the San Francisco market. There is always a good demand for our superior apples.
    We have had a very copious rain, but not enough to suit the farmers, although in some sections they are speeding the plow.
    The Jackson County Bank will soon be merged into the First National Bank of Medford.
    The Knights of Pythias announce they will give a grand ball here on Christmas Eve.
Oregonian, Portland, December 16, 1890, page 1


    Miss Pearl Day last week received from Mrs. Helen Haskins, a loved lady friend in far-away Medford, Oregon, a large box of flowers which are giving her and her friends rare delight. They consist of chrysanthemums, roses, mignonette, marigold and other varieties in great profusion, and fortunately they arrived in excellent condition. Their beauty and fragrance "fills the house."
Freeborn County Standard, Albert Lea, Minnesota, December 17, 1890, page 9


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. S. Howard has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    There will be three Christmas tree entertainments in Medford this season.
    Dr. Pryce is now located at the residence of F. Galloway, with his office near Goldsmith's grocery store.
    A. Z. Sears last week bought Callahan's delivery business and has put Billy Farrier in charge of the team.
    Miller & Strang are engaged on a contract to make 5,000 lard cans for J. W. Hockersmith, the rustling hog dealer.
    Medford now has 300 pupils enrolled in her public schools, and a still further increase is looked for after the holidays.
    E. S. Johnson removed his family to F. M. Plymale's farm during the week, and will conduct the same during the coming year.
    D. T. Sears and family last week entertained the former's sister, Mrs. Caroline Clow of Junction City, during a several days' visit.
    Mitchell & Lewis will continue to have an agency here for the sale of machinery, though their large stock will probably be returned to headquarters at Portland.
    Cecil Young, formerly a typo in the Times office, has gone to San Jose to accept a position in a printing office where his sister, Miss Elma, holds a case.
    Dr. E. P. Geary will take possession of his new residence this week or next. It is one of the most conveniently arranged and prettiest cottages in southern Oregon.
    Now that the success of the distillery project is assured, our people begin with reason to anticipate a genuine boom in Medford property during the coming season.
    The city authorities will expend over 10,000 feet of lumber in the construction of sidewalks alone before the next month rolls 'round. Medford is "getting there" on both feet.
    Skeel & Son last week closed a contract with Jacobs & Cormack of Round Top for a large quantity of their superior lumber, to be used in fulfilling their numerous business contracts in this vicinity.
    R. R. Dunn is settling up the affairs of Staver & Walker in this vicinity in anticipation of leaving for Portland soon. The stock of implements was shipped back in Portland last week. We dislike to see this.
    Rev. C. Hull, Baptist missionary for Oregon, and T. B. Bronson, chief of the college at McMinnville, were interviewing our citizens relative to the establishment of a Baptist school at this point during the week.
    The following were elected at the last meting to serve Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., for the next term: B. S. Webb, N.G.; T. W. Johnson, V.G.; Chas. Strang, Rec. Sec.; I. A. Webb, F. Sec.; D. S. Young, Treas.
    The Jacksonville and Medford railroad people have built a neat depot on the city park property, near the water tank, and, if the material comes to hand all right, will have the engine running over the route within a week.
    Medford and Jacksonville merchants now vie with one another as to which can offer the best market for country produce, much to the gratification of the producer. It is the great drawing card in catching trade nowadays.
    S. H. Hull and C. C. Ragsdale have obtained control of the Clarendon Hotel livery stable and have formed a partnership to engage in the livery business at this place in future. As both are reliable, enterprising men, success will no doubt attend them.
    There is general rejoicing over the fact that the distillery and packing house is an assured fact. If operated on the scale contemplated it will afford constant employment to 50 or 75 men, besides affording a much better local market for corn and grain and giving hog and cattle raisers an opportunity to sell to local consumers. Our citizens received much substantial help from all sections of the county, which was duly appreciated.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1890, page 2


[Rufus Edwards] to Julia A. Edwards, quitclaim to lot 17, blk 23, Medford; $600.
W. B. Shoemake to Perry V. Shoemake, lots 11 and 12, blk 48, Medford; $185.
S. H. Hull to Wm. Slinger, lots 15 and 16, blk 20, Medford; $2000.
Wm. Slinger to C. C. Ragsdale, lots 15 and 16, blk 20, Medford; $2500.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1890, page 2


    Last week Mr. McCord of Portland received the following dispatch, dated St. Paul, from C. L. ("Punk") Hamilton: "What have you done? The Medford motor starts tomorrow." This seems to imply that he has not absconded, as claimed by the dailies.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1890, page 3


    S. S. Martin and daughter, Miss Carrie, late of Talent, now residents of Medford precinct, were at the county seat a few hours on Wednesday last.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1890, page 3


    The Jacksonville-Medford railroad is a fruitful subject of conversation, and rumors of track laying have reached proportions considerable enough to build a transcontinental line. The facts in the case are said to be that the ties are mostly laid and about one mile of rails down, and this report will also bear investigation. However, the railroad will be finished in the time specified in the contract and everybody will be happy.
    The buildings have been swept as clean from the terminal grounds of the Jacksonville-Medford railroad as if a Kansas cyclone had passed over them, and the next thing in order is the erection of the depot buildings.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1890, page 2


    G. F. Billings, secretary of the Ashland Board of Trade, has received from Salem a large number of the pamphlets entitled "Resources of Southern Oregon," published by the Southern Oregon District Board of Agriculture, and persons wanting copies to send away can obtain them from him free of cost.
    The Tidings editor is under obligations to the members of Talisman Lodge, K. of P., of Medford, for complimentary tickets to their grand annual ball and supper to be held on Christmas Eve. This is to be the most elaborate event of the kind ever held at Medford, and the Tidings will be glad to witness it if possible.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1890, page 3


    Ed. Gore, youngest son of Mr. and Mrs. E. E. Gore, of Eden precinct, is employed in the fruit and commission establishment of Page & Son at Portland, where his older brother, Will, has had a position for some time.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1890, page 3


    The Medford depot of the Jacksonville branch railroad is to be located near the S.P. water tank, north of the S.P. depot.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 19, 1890, page 3


G. W. Howard to G. A. Howard, deed of gift to lot in Medford.
Wm. Ulrich to W. P. H. Legate, undivided half of lot 16, block 3, Medford.
I. A. Merriman to Emma Merriman, lots 15 and 16, block 2, Medford; $130.
John H. Dolben to Katherine Roberts, lot 9, block 1, Cottage add. to Medford; $250.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1890, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. L. Dusenbury of Keno has become a resident of our town. He is industrious and enterprising.
    A building and loan association is among the probabilities in Medford in a short time. We need it.
    A carload of lumber from Lee & Klippel's sawmill was received for sidewalks and crossings at Medford last week.
    It is announced that Medford will soon have another paper, one of Democratic proclivities. The more the merrier.
    The ball given by the Knights of Pythias at the opera house on Christmas Eve was one of the most enjoyable ever held in this section. The music and supper could not be excelled and gave general satisfaction. The attendance was good.
    The Christmas tree at the Baptist Church on Wednesday evening was largely attended, and the entertainment was a great success in every way. Many farmers within a radius of five miles attended with their families, and the townspeople were out in force.
    Chas. Wall, who purchased the Noland corner, intends to erect a fine, large brick erection upon the site of the frame buildings. It is said that the structure will be four stories high and the main portion will be used as a hotel. Surely our town's future is a most promising one.
    Some sneak thief stole an overcoat, gloves and a quilt from Merritt Bellinger's hack, while he and his family were in attendance at the Christmas tree festivities last Wednesday evening. Suspicion attaches to two tramps who were prowling along the Jacksonville branch railroad and about the suburbs of town on the preceding evening.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1890, page 3


    The Knights' Ball at Medford Christmas Eve was well attended, and one of the most enjoyable social events in the history of the valley. Like the Knights here, the members of the order at Medford spare neither expense nor trouble to insure the success of their entertainments.
    The Medford-Jacksonville railroad will be in operation by New Year's Day, without doubt, it is now said. The builders seemed to be in considerable difficulty for a time, either from lack of ready funds or some other cause, and it looked as if the work would not be completed by the first of this year. The iron was held first at Portland and later at Medford, and the delay might have been costly to the men who are interested in the enterprise, for the notes of persons who subscribed to the bonus were made payable upon condition that the road be completed and in operation by Jan. 1st, 1891. A failure in this respect would doubtless have resulted in the refusal of many of the subscribers to pay the notes. Honeyman, DeHart & Co., of Portland, were interested sufficiently in the matter to take up the enterprise and push it to completion, and for a number of days past they have had a large force rushing the track-laying and other work. The rolling stock has not yet arrived, but it is understood that if it is too far away an engine from some division of the S.P. lines in Oregon may be had for use until the other comes.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 26, 1890, page 3


    The completion of the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will be celebrated in Jacksonville on New Year's Day, by public speaking and a grand ball. Every precinct is included in the program, and no doubt the occasion will be one of great rejoicing to the people of the county as well as to the two towns that are to be united by the new enterprise. Jacksonville has always been noted for its pioneer hospitality and it will no doubt excel all previous efforts on this important occasion.
    The new railroad contractors, Messrs. Honeyman, DeHart & Co., of Portland, have a large force of men at work and the trains will be running in the time specified in the contract. All other holiday festivities seem to have been forgotten in the general rejoicing with which the railroad completion is hailed, and the railroad celebration on Jan. 1st, 1891, will be the event of the season.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, December 26, 1890, page 3



Last revised January 11, 2017
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.