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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Mining Notes 1891-1897
Refer also to the general news reports, and:
Mining Notes 1851-1870
Mining Notes 1871-1890

Mining Notes 1898-1905
Mining Notes 1906-1957


MINING NEWS.
    Notices for the location of placer and quartz mines, etc., for sale at the Times office.
    The Sterling Mining Co. has a small supply of water and is cleaning up some ground stripped heretofore.
    Unless the weather changes soon few miners will be able to do much this season, owing to the scarcity of water. Poor weather for miners.
    A company is erecting a mill at the quartz ledge of Oscar Swacker, in the Foots Creek district. There is plenty of ore in sight, which promises well.
    The American Mining Code, standard authority on all subjects pertaining to all mining, water rights, etc., is kept for sale at the Times office.
    With the arrival of Dr. Flannagan's new concentrator this week, he will remove his quartz mill out to the Exchequer mine on Applegate, where he has about 400 tons of rich ore on the dump.
    The Yreka Journal says that it is currently reported that the English capitalists forming a syndicate have been making overtures toward purchasing a number of the blue gravel claims at Cottonwood Creek in Siskiyou County.
    Manager McGee reports that smelting furnaces will be in operation at the Cinnabar mines next spring. It is a pity that there is not a better road from the valley to that section, as there is danger of the trade of the mines being diverted to Yreka. if no more easily traveled route is opened to Jackson County towns.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 2


MINING NEWS.
    Notices for the location of placer and quartz mines, for sale at the Times office.
    It is reported that H. T. Hutchins has discovered a very promising quartz ledge on the divide between Jackson Creek and Foots Creek.

    The American Mining Code, standard authority on all subjects pertaining to all mining, water rights, etc., is kept for sale at the Times office.
    While the miners generally have had a very discouraging winter so far, much prospecting will be done during the coming few months, and, as the hydraulics are nearly all ready to take advantage of every drop of available water, the output will probably not be very far short of the average season. A wet spring would prove a veritable bonanaza to some of the miners on the lower hills.
    It is reported from the Applegate section that two tenderfeet, who became excited over the observation of some old miners regarding some particularly rich diggings of early days, concluded they would see if they could not rediscover the old drift; that such marked success attended their efforts that they took out over $65 in dust the very first day they went to work, and that they have done remarkably well ever since, which but goes to show that the mines of this section by no means are entirely worked out yet.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


    WATER SUPPLY.--Jacksonville Times, March 21: There is still a good supply of water and the miners are making the most of it. There is plenty of water at Ennis & Cameron's mine at Galice Creek and three giants are busily employed there. A. W. Sturgis of Forest Creek made another cleanup last week which netted him many hundred dollars in gold dust. J. T. Breeden of Applegate, who purchased Kiesling Bros.' interests, is now engaged in putting up the large wheel which will furnish power. John Henry has sold his interest in the quartz ledge on Applegate to his partner, S. Messenger. It promises well, several good cleanups having been made by means of an arrastra. The Cinnabar mine, operated by J. B. McGee, is being rapidly put in shape for handling the output, a ditch being in course of construction for sluicing and the iron on the ground for the works.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 28, 1891, page 197


    MINING ITEMS.--Times, May 15: T. P. Judson of Grants Pass has bonded the Swacker quartz mine in Foots Creek district and has put a mill on it, which is kept busy crushing ore. Considerable prospecting must be going on in Southern Oregon, as a large number of location notices and mining guides are being purchased at the Times office. J. A. Harvey of Foots Creek has discovered a well-defined quartz ledge which prospects very well. He crushed some of the ore and realized $5 from a single pan. The extensive mines of Simmons, Cameron & Co., after several years of preliminary preparation, are now being operated on full time. A good season is expected there. The Sterling M. Co. has a good supply of water and two pipes at work. It is expected a good cleanup will be made at the end of the season, which is several months hence. The Wimer mines will probably be operated for several months this season, as the Circuit Court has dismissed the receiver, which action will probably allow Wadleigh and Co. to take possession again and work the property. Zach Cameron of Uniontown, who is interested in the Simmons-Cameron mine near Waldo, made them a visit this week.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 23, 1891, page 325


    FROM THE MINERAL DISTRICTS.--Times, May 22: The mines of Baker County will yield handsomely this year. Prospectors are leaving the city daily for the various mining districts. Another rich pocket has been struck in the Blackwell district near Willow Springs, which bids fair to prove a bonanza. Full particulars are not yet furnished the public. M. L. McCall of Ashland has located a quartz ledge in the neighborhood of Gold Hill, which bids fair to prove valuable, samples of the ore showing free gold to the naked eye. G. W. Houck returned from a trip to Southern Oregon the forepart of the week. He showed us a fine quartz specimen taken from the ledge of his son, Jesse, in the Gold Hill district. He also bad some specimens of iron ore unearthed near Monroe in this county, which promises to be of great value. W. F. Davis left for Cornucopia Monday morning. He goes to examine the remains of his mill, which was destroyed by a snowslide last winter, with a view of putting it on its feet again.
    CINNABAR.--The capitalists who are interested in the development of the quicksilver mines in the Cinnabar region made them a visit last week and were delighted with the prospect. We are informed that they will soon put a large force to work and make arrangements to operate on a large scale. It is the general opinion that those mines will yield big returns, if worked property.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 30, 1891, page 341


    ARRASTRA.--Jacksonville Times, May 29: Provolt Bros. are preparing to put in an arrastra soon at their ledge in Murphy precinct. Selph & Taylor's arrastra is running at the March & Selph quartz ledge in Sams Valley, on excellent ore. The Patton mine near Talent has been running out some very promising ore lately, which has been hauled to Anderson's mill for reduction. Miners on Applegate are encouraged in their search for the precious metals by the sound of two steam whistles, one of them belonging to Bailey's steam arrastra, the other to Flanagan's quartz mill. Harry Lewis and Dr. Kremer of Grants Pass have bought out Schrimp Bros.' interest in the North Start mine in Josephine County, and will at once proceed to develop the property to the fullest capacity. Simon Messenger of Josephine County is succeeding nicely with his arrastra this season, but will put in a Huntington mill this fall in order to be able to handle the entire output of his mine with the least loss. The tested rock from the ledge located last week by Messrs. McCall and Porter, near Gold Hill, promises exceedingly well, and as the ledge seems to be almost without limit, big things may be looked for from that neighborhood. Mr. Porter has had many year's experience in mining in the Idaho diggings, and is of the opinion that the main ledge, of which the pockets heretofore discovered in the vicinity of Gold Hill are but spurs, has at last been found. The ore does not show anything fabulously rich, but the rock carries a great deal of gold.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 13, 1891, page 373


    NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, June 19: The mineral resources of Southern Oregon are attracting much attention from a number of prospectors from abroad. Work has been resumed at the Swinden mine near Gold Hill by parties whom Dr. Braden has interested in the enterprise. Band & Deneff have finished cleaning up at the Miller mine on Farmers Flat, but made only a fair run. owing to the scarcity of water. The mines at Diamond Peak, Klamath County, are attracting numerous prospectors already, and the indications are that it will prove to be a camp of importance. Most of the small placer mines have closed down for the season, but those operated by hydraulic process are generally running yet. The wet spring has greatly extended the season, much to the benefit of the miners. Since the discovery of the chrome deposit near Etna, two mineral claims have been located there, in order to secure control of the paint mine, which will doubtless prove valuable in time, the deposit being remarkably pure and free from foreign substances. The Patton ledge, located in Talent precinct, which was partially opened some years ago but never extensively worked, has yielded considerable high-class ore since being leased not long since by Messrs. Hawkett & Co. A yield of $30 to the ton for surface ore is not to be sneezed at anywhere, especially when there is plenty of the rock in sight for a long run.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 4, 1891, page 5


    CINNABAR.--Jacksonville Times, July 7: The construction of the furnaces at the cinnabar mines is giving employment to about 25 men and Mr. Sinn, the new superintendent, is pushing the work, A large party of eastern capitalists is expected through this region in a short time, with a view of investing in the many mines hereabout. Mineral experts think that the period of development of the quartz mines in this section has just begun. There are over 200 miners reported as being at the Diamond Peak mines already, and before the summer is over many anticipate a genuine boom. There seem to be paying mines there, and those who are first on the ground reasonably expect to secure the best locations. The Anderson mill has been running the past fortnight on a 50-ton prospect from the Pilgrim mine on Wagner Creek, and if it pans out as much as $3 to the ton of rock it is understood that the mine has been sold to a stock company of which supt. Brand and manager Koehler of the O.&C. railroad are the principal stockholders.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 18, 1891, page 37


Freight Rates on Ores.
    San Francisco ought to be the Swansea of America; ought to be, but is not. The whole regions of country east, north and south of the city abound in mines of every kind and description. Every variety of ore is available, and available in quantity. From Mexico and the Central American countries ores can be brought by sea, as they can from Oregon, Washington, British Columbia and Alaska. But those regions of our own country not on the coast line, from which the bulk of the ores must come, are dependent on the railroads.
    And here lies the difficulty of making this a great smelting center. The railroad companies which control entrance to this city have not yet realized that they can build up the mining industry and make a large business for themselves by charging a much smaller rate on ores than at present prevails. Their schedules on ores need an entire revision and intelligent investigation.
    By encouraging the development of mines and shipping of ores, one-quarter of the business of the Union Pacific railroad is now from the mines. The Northern Pacific Company, with this experience before them, are beginning to fall into the same line. But our own local roads have not yet given the matter the attention it deserves, and maintain rates which are to a certain extent prohibitory and calculated to discourage rather than encourage mining.
    The Union Pacific, which has built up an immense mining business for itself, charges about three-quarters of a cent per ton per mile on ore. The Central Pacific charges three, four and five cents for the same service; and, moreover, it charges a much higher rate on rich ore than it does on poor. It does not seem to realize that rich ores are scarce and costly to extract, since the very rich ledges are usually small and more expensive to mine. When the high expense of mining and of freight are considered, together with the comparatively small quantity obtainable, the miner quits work in disgust, for he finds little left for himself. We ought to have a freight rate from Grass Valley to this city of not over $5 per ton, and that on ores from Arizona should not be more than $7. With those rates thousands of tons would come here. The mining industry of Nevada is languishing because the miners cannot ship their ores for prices which would leave them any profit. There [are] a hundred districts in that state which would be actively developed and support a large population could the miners ship their ores, but which are now practically abandoned and worthless. Arizona and New Mexico would send their ores here if they could, and their mining resources would be developed if freight rates were reduced.
    Ores from Chile, Central America and Mexico now all go to Europe for beneficiation, which would come here by sea, were there an extensive plant where ores would be bought as abroad. The plant should be one with a large capital to advance on any quantity of ore that might be offered. The Grant smelter at Omaha and the Globe at Denver think nothing of having 16,000 or 18,000 tons of ore on hand at a time, all purchased from miners. Agents go in all directions to buy up the ores. South of us from the one port of Mazatlan, some $4,000,000 worth of ore goes every year to Europe to be worked, which we ought to get in this city. But we do not reach out for these distant ores. In fact, the ores nearby do not come in the quantities they should by reason of the freight rates.
    We have fuel, climate, mines and all conveniences; an ocean in front of us and mines on the other sides. The region, for instance, in Northern California and in Southern Oregon could alone furnish an immense quantity of ore, could it be shipped at reasonable rates. The Northern Pacific charges $20 per ton for taking ores from Grants Pass mines, Oregon, to Portland. It depends on the value what the charge is for bringing ore from any camp along the line of the Southern Pacific roads to this place.
    It is high time that the roads centering in this city should make an intelligent examination into this question of ore rates, with a view to enliven the mining industry in this and adjacent states and territories. The companies have it in their power to increase fourfold the output of the mines of the coast, and relatively increase their freight business in this direction. Hundreds of camps would start up again if it were possible to ship the ores to advantage. The smelting works now being operated here could increase its plant and its capacity, and would doubtless do so, and there would be business for others as well; but under present conditions there is not much chance for enlargement of the ore-buying or smelting business of San Francisco. There is no place in the United States with the geographical advantages for a smelting plant that this has, yet we have seen the ore business slip away from us and go to other places where competing railroads brought rates to a point to encourage instead of discouraging the miner.
    It is, however, by no means San Francisco alone which would be benefited by lower rates on ores, but other places in California as well. Custom mills, reduction works and chlorination works have been established at different points, which would find their business more than doubled could the low-grade ores of the country be shipped from the mines. Concentrating plants would multiply, and wherever erected the surrounding region would be developed. Many of the interior towns of the state already have works for the beneficiation of ores, and they would all be given more business were freight rates cheaper. In fact, the railroad company has it in its power to greatly assist not only the miners, but the interior towns, and make better times all around if they would investigate this subject and put the rates on a basis which would admit of more mines being worked than there are at present. Colorado and Utah are working thousands of tons of ore annually which are shipped to the reduction works from small mines. There are hundreds and hundreds of unworked mines on this coast which would again be operated could the miners ship their ores without seeing all the profit go for freight.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 18, 1891, page 40


    A PREHISTORIC TUSK.--At the Sterling hydraulic mine in Jackson County a tusk of mastodon was washed out a few days since from under a depth of 50 feet of gravel. The tusk was four inches in diameter and was porous and crumbling. Other bones of the same prehistoric animal have been found in this mine at different depths. Just how 50 feet of gold-bearing gravel came to be deposited atop of this tusk is a question for the geologist to decide. It may be that the gravel was washed there by some prehistoric hydraulic miner, who took out all the big nuggets of gold and left only the fine scales for this day and generation. The mammoth did not become extinct so long ago as some other animals, for carcasses of a number of the huge beasts have been found in a frozen condition in Siberia, in a very perfect state of preservation, and their bones have been found in Missouri in the same stratum with human bones, and one great hunter and still greater liar has given out that he has seen living specimens of the animal in the wilds of the Olympic Range.--Portland Oregonian
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 8, 1891, page 82


    CLEANUP.--Jacksonville Times, Aug. 1: The annual cleanup is now progressing at the Sterling mines. E. Sanderson Smith, the well-known mining expert, has been in Josephine County looking for asbestos, and brought home several specimens. Asbestos is being searched for by many in Southern Oregon, and if a large deposit of a merchantable article is discovered, it will be a big thing for all concerned. The San Jose capitalists who recently bonded the Pilgrim ledge on Wagner Creek have concluded not to take the property, although they admit that it must prove valuable when developed. They are looking for property that is already opened up for work. The great nickel-silver mine near Riddle station is beginning to attract general attention, the vast body of ore to be there found exceeding anything of like character to be found in the state, or perhaps on the Pacific Coast. The entire mountain seems to be one mass of high-grade ore, which teems with undeveloped wealth.
    ASBESTOS.--Daniel Reynolds of Evans Creek, one of the original discoverers of the asbestos mines, is in town. He informs us that Mr. Tyler, in the interest of a Tacoma company, has located a large quantity of ground in that vicinity and will soon work it on a large scale. Mr. R. has located claims with several others, and showed the reporter a handsome specimen of the material. There seems to be every probability that the asbestos has been found in extensive and paying quantities.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 8, 1891, page 85


    The quicksilver mine on the West Fork of Beaver Creek, Siskiyou County, Cal., has 30 men at work building furnaces, condensers, etc. Castings have to be packed in to the mine from Jacksonville, Oregon, there being no wagon road.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 15, 1891, page 97


    JOSEPHINE GALENA.--Rogue River Courier, Aug. 27: Messrs. Davidson and Bailey have discovered a splendid silver lode of Althouse Creek, about 40 miles from this city. The galena carries lead and silver at the surface of the ground which will assay $70 to the ton. As galena always gets richer as the lead is followed down, this is a splendid strike. They have mountains of iron and extensive copper fields. This galena is just what is needed as a flux for other minerals, and the opportunity for a large smelter is a splendid one. The boys have four or five men at work on their new find, sinking a shaft. The ore will be shipped for the present to Tacoma or San Francisco for smelting.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 5, 1891, page 149


    ASBESTOS.--Jacksonville Times, Sept. 3: Captain Bell and his assistants are at work in the asbestos fields in the Meadows district, and important news from that source may be looked for at any time now. The fields are extensive, and before they can be worked to any extent it will be necessary to open a road into the mines, and that will occupy the attention of all hands during the next few weeks.
    QUARTZ.--E. Sanderson Smith, while on his trip to San Francisco and Portland, secured the cooperation of enough capital to ensure the thorough prospecting of the quartz mines at Steamboat and Gold Hill that he is interested in. There is no doubt but what this property is valuable, but it requires the outlay of a great amount of capital to develop it.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 12, 1891, page 165


Ozokerite in Oregon.
    We were shown this week, by Mr. Melville Atwood, some specimens of a peculiar ozokerite from a recently discovered deposit in Southern Oregon. The mineral has a very different appearance from that found in Utah. It burns very freely, with a dense smoke but no odor. If the deposit is of any extent the discovery is an important one, since it is found in only one other locality in this country. The Utah ozokerite began to come into the market in 1888, and the deposit is now producing about 300,000 pounds a year.
    This mineral wax or ozokerite in its refined form is used for nearly all the purposes to which ordinary beeswax is applicable. It possesses nearly all the properties of beeswax except stickiness, but in cases where that quality is desirable it is only necessary to wax the mineral with ordinary beeswax. Crude ozokerite, like other hydrocarbon compounds, is used to a considerable extent as an insulator for electrical wires. Ozokerite belongs to the series of hydrocarbon compounds which include marsh gas, petroleum and paraffin, it being very similar in appearance to the latter. It is colorless to white when pure. It occurs leek-green, yellow and brown.
    This Oregon mineral wax is a yellowish white. Its specific gravity is very small, it being exceptionally light for its bulk. From appearance it is a purer article than that produced in Utah. Mr. Atwood has promised us the details of his examination when it is concluded.
    We import large quantities of this material from Galicia, Austria, the amount, according to census reports in 1889, being 1,078,725 pounds, valued at $86.68. There are 35 companies at work in Galicia, where they have been mining the substance since 1862. They had a monopoly in the product until 1888 when the Utah deposit began to be worked. If there is much of the substance in Oregon it will be worth attention, as the demand for it is on the increase.

Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 12, 1891, page 168


    A BIG enterprise is nearing completion near Central Point, Jackson County, Oregon, whereby the Rogue River will be turned into a new channel for a distance of several miles and the bed mined. The ground has been thoroughly prospected and shows up in good shape.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 10, 1891, page 229


MINING NEWS.
    Notices for the location of placer and quartz mines, for sale at the Times office.
    The discovery of ore at the Rhoten ledge in Blackwell district, last week assaying about $800 to the ton, caused quite a breeze in mining circles.
    The American Mining Code, standard authority on all subjects pertaining to all mining, water rights, etc., is kept for sale at the Times office.
    Messrs. Hardy and Slover have made a cinnabar discovery in Evans Creek, Meadows precinct, which promises to be one of the richest and most extensive deposits ever found on the coast.
    An assessment of four cents a share has been levied on the capital stock of the Siskiyou Consolidated Quicksilver Co., which is operating in West Beaver district in the Siskiyou Mountains.
    Francis Fitch has had on examination at his offices in Medford during the past week some specimens of ore taken from the Golden Accident mine on Sardine Creek, in which he is interested, that surpass anything seen here for some time past.
    Many have viewed the beautiful specimens of gold brought in by John Wells of
Thompson Creek at the banking house of Beekman & Reames in this place during the past fortnight, and they are well worth viewing, even in their broken condition, the sections of the golden platter representing a piece not less than seven inches in diameter and worth at least $1,500. Just the amount yielded in the pocket is not for the public to know, but it was something worth mentioning in mining talk anywhere. It is truly demonstrated that the mining era has by no means drawn to a close in Southern Oregon.
    The Quicksilver Mining Co. this week discharged about $5 of the men who have been at work for them. Twelve or fifteen hands are still employed at their mines. It has been found necessary to remodel the furnace, which work will be finished in about two weeks. Supt. Senn has been succeeded by H. Tuttle of California, an experienced cinnabar miner, and will return to San Francisco temporarily. He has the utmost faith in the success of the enterprise and says that there is a large body of fine ore in sight. The men were laid off in order to curtail expenses, as there is nothing for them to do at present.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 3


    QUICKSILVER.--Receipts the past week were 466 flasks Californian and 400 flasks Spanish, via China, en route for Mexico. The market is very strong at full figures. Oregon advices report a favorable outlook for opening the mines in Southern Oregon.
"Local Markets," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 7, 1891, page 297


    NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Dec 11: Piping has commenced at Ennis & Cameron's mines in Galice Creek district. The Sterling Mining Co. has an abundance of water and is taking advantage of it. Messrs. Bailey, who now own the Orme diggings in Foots Creek district, have commenced operations for the season. A. W. Sturgis is cleaning up the balance of the ground he stripped off last season. He has one of the best pieces of mining property in Oregon. J. T. Breeden and Mr. Anderson have struck very rich ore in their quartz ledge in Josephine County, and the prospects are first class for a permanent ledge. John Miller has rigged up his Farmers Flat mines, and has good prospects for a profitable run. He has built a first-class flume and made a number of other improvements. An important discovery is reported from Sardine Creek district. It is said that some newcomers have found a good-sized vein of rich ore, but we have not learned the particulars. Dr. Flanagan's Huntington mill is kept busy crushing ore from the Messenger ledge in Josephine County, and first-class results are promised. The doctor has done much for the mining interests of Southern Oregon, and is deserving of success. There is a fair supply of water already, and if the stormy weather continues awhile longer, an abundance is assured for some time. Miners are consequently elated, as the season promises to open considerably earlier than usual. The deal has been closed, we are informed, whereby the Patton ledge and its numerous extensions near Ashland pass into the hands of a Portland syndicate, who intend to develop the mines in the immediate future. The recent tests of the ore from these claims are satisfactory to the owners.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 19, 1891, page 399


MINING NOTES.
    The Alex. Watts mine in Josephine County is being worked by W. M. Richards, who is making a good showing.
    There is an abundance of snow on the highest mountains, which augurs well for a protracted mining season.
    Crawford & Co. of Medford have their five-stamp mill at work at the Willow Springs mine, and will make a long run during the next few months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 2



MINING NEWS.
    The frosty weather of the past fortnight has diminished the water supply considerably.
    John Ralls and Jas. Dodge, who have rented the old Ralls diggings in Willow Springs precinct, not long since unearthed a nugget which weighed 17 ounces. There was some quartz in it.
    Green Bros. of Galice Creek district have struck a four-foot ledge of rich quartz in their new tunnel. Their perseverance deserves success.
    The Sterling Mining Co. is running on half time, the freezing weather having almost shut off the supply of water.
    Two brothers, who are strangers in this section, have made an important discovery in Sardine Creek district, Rock Point precinct. The quartz is said to be very rich in free gold.
    C. B. Watson has bonded the old Forty-Nine mines above Phoenix, together with a large area of other placer ground in the vicinity, and will endeavor to place it advantageously in the hands of capitalists, who will develop the rich property during the coming months.
    The five-stamp mill which Messrs. Crawford, Oviatt and Baker have put up at their ledge in Willow Springs precinct, known as the Oregon Comstock mine, is kept steadily at work. The ore prospects well, and there seems to be every indication of a paying and permanent vein.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



MINING NEWS.
    Signorelli, the "Lucky Barrel" of the Nevada country, has made a rich strike on the divide between the Sardine section and Evans Creek. The ledge on which he is now down some distance has an average width of over three feet and shows free gold in every part. The find will attract a large amount of attention to the mines of this section.
    The Jacksonville Milling and Mining Co. held its annual meeting this week and elected J. Nunan, D. Cronemiller, Chas. Nickell, E. J. Harris and J. G. Birdsey as directors for the ensuing year. The directors afterward met and elected J. Nunan as president, S. J. Day secretary and T. J. Kenny treasurer. The company intends to patent its lands at an early day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    Dr. Braden's quartz mill at Gold Hill has been busily engaged for some time past, and with good returns to the owner, it is said.
    The present dry spell is discouraging to placer miners, as the supply of water has been exhausted in some places. A wet spring would help matters materially.
    If people discover placer mines in a stream they are not at liberty to cut timber from adjacent public lands, as they might do for quartz mining. This is a recent decision of Commissioner Carter of the general land office.
    Operators on the Comstock mine of Oregon (which is located in Willow Springs precinct) have been suspended for the present, owing to dissensions among the owners. A run was made on low-grade ore recently and proved satisfactory. The mine and mill have been closed by an attachment instituted by the employees of the company.
    A late Gold Hill dispatch says: On account of the scarcity of water many of the miners have abandoned their placers, and are putting in their time prospecting for quartz. "Lucky" Bart's find on Sardine Creek is attracting great attention. The extent and richness of this mine is no longer doubted. Prof. Hughes, vice-president of the Chetco lumber company, made careful examination of it, and pronounced it a first-class property.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 2


    GOOD RETURNS.--Jacksonville Times, Feb. 6: Dr. Braden's quartz mill at Gold Hill has been busily engaged for some time past, and with good returns to the owner, it is said. The present dry spell is discouraging to placer miners, as the supply of water has been exhausted in some places. A wet spring would help matters materially. If people discover placer mines in a stream, they are not at liberty to cut timber from adjacent public lands as they might do for quartz mining. This is a recent decision of Commissioner Carter of the General Land Office. Operations on the Comstock mine of Oregon (which is located in Willow Springs precinct) have been suspended for the present, owing to dissensions among the owners. A run was made on low-grade ore recently and proved satisfactory. The mine and mill have been closed by an attachment instituted by the employees of the company. A late Gold Hill dispatch says: On account of the scarcity of water, many of the miners have abandoned their placers, and are putting in their time prospecting for quartz. "Lucky" Bart's find on Sardine Creek is attracting great attention.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 27, 1892, page 149


MINING NEWS.
    Geo. Rowland and Jordan Brown have located a promising quartz ledge in Willow Springs precinct.
    Green Bros. of Galice Creek have commenced crushing excellent ore from their ledge, and the best of results are promised.
    Ed. Schieffelin, the well-known miner, recently struck a pocket near Gold Hill which yielded about $900 before giving out.
    Archie Taylor is engaged in putting up a mill at the Griffin mine in Slate Creek precinct, Josephine County, which prospects well.
    John Loftus and J. W. Rogers last week located a quartz claim inside the city limits of Ashland, and have excellent prospects for a fine body of ore.
    Chas. and L. C. Bayse of Missouri Flat have struck a rich and most promising quartz ledge, averaging over two feet in width and assaying $72 per ton.
    An extension of Lucky Bart's mine on the Sardine Creek divide was last week struck by Munden & Eaton, who think they have as rich a ledge as the original strike.
    More quartz mining is under way and prospective in Josephine County than ever before known. It seems quite probable that some good ledges have been discovered.
    Carson & Bryden, mining experts from San Francisco, last week made a thorough examination of the Lucky Bart mine, and express themselves as highly pleased with the prospects so far.
    A large amount of ore is taken out in the preliminary work being done at the Patton mine, and the prospects are said to be so flattering that the owners will soon put [in] a mill to crush it.
    Messrs. Dyer, Dunlap & Carlisle, who have bonded the old Hope mine on Wagner Creek, are getting their mill in order for a long run. They anticipate success, as the mine is undoubtedly a rich one.
    John Bolt of Applegate, who is interested in mining on Galice Creek, showed the editor of the Times some handsome specimens of asbestos from a deposit which had lately been discovered near the Green ledge.
    J. T. Flynn brings good news to the miners of this section, as he has obtained assurances from J. B. Hagin, the millionaire, that due attention will be given by him to any legitimate mining enterprise of promise in southern Oregon.
    Wm. Bybee has leased his mine on Canyon Creek, Josephine County, to O. F. Russell, while S. L. Fielder is in charge of his claim some distance from Grants Pass. Both are experienced miners and will no doubt make a good showing.
    Dr. Flanagan and Z. Moody, who own the Messenger mine on Applegate and other promising ledges in that vicinity, will soon resume operations on a larger scale than ever. They have shipped all their concentrates to the Linnton smelter.
    Jewett & Co., who own the Blanket and old Jewett ledges, which are situated not far from Grants Pass, are shipping their concentrates to the Linnton smelter. They are greatly encouraged by the way their mines are turning out.
    Messrs. Patterson, Graham and Payne of Ashland are this year prosecuting work at their placer claim on Beaver Creek more systematically than ever before, and will doubtless do well with the property when they hoist out the big boulders which have heretofore interrupted work so seriously.
    At the mines of Wimer Bros. and Simmons & Cameron near Waldo, Josephine County, work has been prosecuted with a full head of water for several months past. A break in the ditch interrupted work at the latter's claims for a short time, however. The prospects are good for a big cleanup at both places.
    Among the discoveries in the mining line reported lately are those of a fine ledge by Hardin & Co. on the hill facing the old Centennial diggings, from which a considerable amount of gold has already been taken, the first pocket tapped yielding rich ore. Enoch Rhoten has also made another of his pocket finds, from which he took about $250 in one day, and two other prospectors in the same neighborhood, whose names we failed to learn, also struck a pocket from which about several hundred dollars were extracted before it was milked out.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    Many new claims have been located within the last two weeks in the vicinity of the Ashland Mining Company's ledge, and indications point to active mining operations on a large scale in the near future.
    The sale is reported of the Riddle nickel mines of Douglas County to an eastern syndicate for the sum of $450,000.
    Lucky Bart, who is now in a distance of about 80 feet on his ledge on the Sardine Creek divide, last week shipped a carload of ore to Tacoma for a working test of the mine, before prosecuting work further.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3


    A MILL.--Ashland Tidings, March 23: Archie Taylor is putting up a mill at the Griffin mine in Slate Creek precinct, Josephine County. Charles and L. C. Bayse have struck a rich and most promising quartz ledge, averaging over two feet in width and assaying $72 per ton. An extension of Lucky Bart's mine on the Sardine Creek divide was last week struck by Munden & Eaton, who think they have as rich a ledge as the original strike. William Bybee has leased his mines on Canyon Creek, Josephine County, to O. F. Bussell, while S. F. Fielder is in charge of his claim some distance from Grants Pass. Among the discoveries in the mining line reported lately are those of a fine ledge by Hardin & Co. on the hill facing the old Centennial diggings, from which a considerable amount of gold has already been taken, the first pocket tapped yielding rich ore. Enoch Rhoten has also made another of his pocket finds, from which he took about $250 in one day. Flanagan & Moody of the Messenger mine on Applegate, Jewett & Co., who own the Blanket and old Jewett ledges near Grants Pass, and other Josephine County miners are shipping their concentrates to the Linnton smelter near Portland.
    THE PATTON.--Jacksonville Times, March 25: The extensive operations of the Ashland Mining Co. at the Patton ledge in Talent precinct have been so important of late that a writeup in the Ashland papers has been considered proper. It appears as if the company have discovered a mine of equal importance to some of the famous Nevada ledges. The body of ore is so extensive, and the assays have been so favorable as the work progressed, that the company is now satisfied that it will pay them to put up a mill and employ a large force in developing the mine to the utmost during the next year,
    ASHLAND.--Tidings, April 1: Superintendent Wilson, of the Ashland Mining Company, is preparing to build a wagon road from the end of the road near B. F. Wagner's place up to the mine. At present, everything hauled to the mine has to be taken around by way of Talent and up Wagner Creek, about 12 miles, while a road from the Wagner Creek canyon road to the mine makes the distance only about 3 miles from Ashland.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 9, 1892, page 268


    AN ASHLAND COAL MINE.--Ashland Tidings, April 15: Nothing is too high for Ashland's prospects now. Besides having the most promising gold mine in Southern Oregon, she has just uncovered some of the finest coal ever taken from the ground on the Pacific Coast. The find is on the slope just across Bear Creek from the town--less than a mile from the city limits. The croppings were discovered by Nobby Martin and Frank Robinson in a gulch where the coal measure had been cut by erosion. The coal was tested and found to burn well. An expert miner examined the find last week and pronounced the prospects very flattering. The land on which it is found belongs to O. Coolidge and R. K. Sutton. It was bought in a school section by them several years ago as pasture land. E. K. Brightman, Nobby Martin and Frank Hansen have bonded the land for a year, putting up a $100 bonus last Tuesday, and have begun surface prospect work. They find a layer of about 18 inches of coal and slaty matter, but have not yet opened it sufficiently to know much about the extent or situation of the vein below the surface. Beyond question the quality of the coal is first-class. Coal croppings have been found along the Emigrant Creek cut in the hills southeast of Ashland, and if one mine is opened, others will no doubt follow.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 23, 1892, page 299


MINING NEWS.
    The placer miners will have a better run than they anticipated, the late rains having furnished considerable water.
    We are informed that Dr. Braden has sold his mines, mill, farm, etc., near Gold Hill to parties from Detroit, Mich., for $24,000. Geo. Hayes of Baker City negotiated the sale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1892, page 2


    Your correspondent has just returned from Hungry Creek. We left Phoenix one week ago last Tuesday and the first place struck on Hungry Creek was Jim Briner's. We found Jim down in the mine hard at it with pick and shovel. He didn't look very hungry, though he said he got terrible hungry last winter when he had to pack in meat on his back from Shattuck's, a distance of eight miles, in five feet of snow. He went on snow shoes, that is, part of the time, and part of the time the snow shoes were on top--once they bucked him off and he went head foremost into a prospect hole, but he got out all right. Two Chinamen, who went out about the same time, failed to make the riffle and one has not been heard of since. Jim says there was eight feet of snow there at one time, but he stayed with it and thereby got to work early and has now finished ground sluicing and will commence to clean up this week. It will take about three or four months and he expects to take out quite a stake. One mile below Jim's is the Giddings claim. Ab. is about ready to begin operations with a hydraulic pipe. Owen Dunlap, of Phoenix, and Nick Brophy, of Talent, are working for him. Both are good hands to work, but Ab says he will have to start a pack train to keep them in grub.
    Jim Sterling has struck a rich quartz lead near the head of Hungry Creek which is considered a good one. It is 8 feet wide and he has sunk down 100 feet and it assays from $8 to $12 all the way down and across.
    A company from Salem have struck a good lead on Beaver Creek. They are here more particularly to look for one of those rich strikes we read about but never find. One of the party claims to have seen a quartz lead on Hungry Creek 30 or 40 years ago that was almost 3 feet wide and nearly half gold. He did not know then that the gold could be got out and now he can't find it, but he seems to have faith.
    We went from Briner's over to Grouse Creek where we found Bill Patterson, Cliff Payne and Ad Graham (three as good fellows as anyone could wish to meet in the mountains), all busy at work. They have their ditch all cleaned out, the hydraulic is in running order, and as soon as they get their derrick up the dirt will have to fly. Ad does the cooking and is hard to beat, but he will have to concede that Griffin can beat him making bread (the boys can explain the reason why when they come over). Cliff and Ad caught 39 trout while we were there and we had them for breakfast. There is plenty of snow in some places but not enough to hinder work. There is room for a good many men on Beaver, that is, men who are "on the work." Several places will pay from $1.50 to $2.50 a day to the man.
"A Lively Letter from Phoenix,"
Ashland Tidings, May 6, 1892, page 3


    THE MINES.--Ashland Tidings, April 23: Wallace Rodgers and John Loftus are sinking a shaft on the ledge recently uncovered on the hill back of the flouring mill lot in the Roper and Carter summit addition. The ledge was two feet wide at the surface. The shaft is now down about 25 feet, and the ledge has widened to three feet. The vein has every appearance of being a true fissure, and the boys are taking out some very fine-looking rock. Prospect still improves in the Ashland mine on Patton ledge--drifts now about 100 feet from shaft--three feet of rock assaying from $15 to $48 to the ton. The wagon road will be ready for use next week. J. H. McBride is interested with E. K. Brightman in the bonding of the Coolidge and Sutton land, on which coal has been found, east of Ashland, and on Tuesday he began work with a force of several men, running a prospecting drift. The discovery of the coal croppings there was first made some years ago, it is now learned, but no prospect work has ever been done. The coal taken out burns well and does good forge work.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 7, 1892, page 335


MINING NEWS.
    J. Wells, who discovered such a rich ledge on Bishop Creek, is prospecting it thoroughly, with good results.
    A carload of ore from the Patton ledge, in the upper valley, was last week shipped to Portland for a working test.
    E. Sanderson Smith, the mining expert, has bonded John Miller's mining property on Farmer's Flat in the interest of parties from abroad.
    Water has not been abundant at A. W. Sturgis' diggings in Forest Creek district during the past season, but the output promises to be first-class.
    There is still a large supply of water at the mines of J. T. Layton and the Sterling Mining Co., where piping is yet prosecuted on full time. Good cleanups are expected at both places.
    Two carloads of quartz from the Ashland mining company's ledge were last week sent to the smelter at Linnton, near Portland, in order to have a practical working test made of the ore, which requires to be roasted in order to be worked.
    Geo. Senn will arrive at Cinnabar about the 1st of June, accompanied by a representative of the company which has bonded the Siskiyou Q.M. Co.'s property. Prospects never were better, and there is every probability that a sale will be effected, when operations will be conducted on a large scale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3


    JACKSON CO.--Jacksonville Democrat, May 13: Scott & Short are working a very promising ledge in Sterlingville precinct. The quartz is not abundant so far, but very rich. Houck & Co.'s new quartz mill last week arrived at Gold Hill and will soon be ready for crushing ore. It is a valuable addition to the mining interests of this section. DeBar & Co. are making excellent progress in developing their mine in Willow Springs precinct. They are down quite a distance, and the ledge is improving both in size and richness. J. W. Sherer & Co. of Galice Creek are taking out $100 per day with two men and a giant. Their mining property on Grave Creek, covered by a five-mile ditch, is said to be even better than their Yank ledge diggings. E. Lister of Grants Pass has bought the interest of Edward Keislin in the Anderson mine in the Applegate district for the sum of $800. Work of development will be continued as fast as possible. Quartz from this ledge has been crushed in an arrastra for some time past with good results.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 21, 1892, page 371


MINING NEWS.
    Geo. Hines and Ben Thurston of Applegate have discovered a fine ledge near the divide between Galls and Foots creeks, which promises very well.
    G. D. Owings has bonded his placer claim near the head of Jackson Creek to H. M. Chapin and D. G. Smith who are prospecting it with considerable success.
    Work has been suspended for the present at Cinnabar by the Q.M. Co., and their property will be left in competent hands until such time as operations will be resumed.
    Hull, Beck & Co. have made a valuable quartz discovery in their Louse Creek mines in Josephine County. The recent cleanup in their placer claims resulted quite favorably.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 2


    GALICE.--Jacksonville Times, June 19: Cleaning up for the season has commenced at Ennis & Cameron's mines in Galice Creek, Josephine County. A favorable result is expected. Prospectors are investigating into the grand possibilities of the ledges of Southern Oregon at present, and there can be no longer any doubt that there is a great future ahead in the line of quartz mining in Southern Oregon. H. K. Schultz of Roseburg arrived from Myrtle Creek Monday, well loaded with gold dust from a partial cleanup of the "Blue Rock" mine of Fawcett, Schulz & Co., in Bear Gulch. He exhibited a nugget weighing $40, which is the largest ever found in that section. Operations at Cinnabar will probably be suspended in a short time, only a small force being employed there now. The mines have been bonded for a round figure, and representatives of both the Siskiyou Q. M. Co. and the syndicate who intend to purchase them are expected on the ground at any time.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 25, 1892, page 459


MINING NEWS.
    Blanks for the location of placer and quartz mines, printed after the latest forms, for sale at the Times office in quantities to suit.
    The American Mining Code, standard authority on all subjects pertaining to all mining, water rights, etc., is kept for sale at the Times office.
    Josephine County is full of prospectors, and a mining boom is on in that section. A number of enterprises are being inaugurated, some of which will doubtless prove valuable.
    Geo. Lewis and Yancy Allen came up to Willow Springs precinct with their teams during the week for the purpose of hauling the Baker quartz mill to Josephine County. It will be set up at the Little Anaconda mine, of which Archie Taylor is superintendent.
    A Grants Pass paper says: Wm. Bybee showed some regular '49 nuggets in town last week. They had been taken off the bedrock in the Josephine mine near Rogue River, twelve miles from this city, preparatory to a cleanup. He had a two-ounce vial full of coarse gold and a nice little breastpin nugget weighing $9. He is also busy fixing up the old ditch of the Waldo mine and predicts a big pay from old tailings this winter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    Elliott Creek miners are busy and seem to be doing well.
    Dr. Powers of Sacramento, Cal. and Mrs. Sunderhaas, the discoverer of the Young America mine in California, have been at Gold Hill, thoroughly prospecting recent discoveries in that section, and from the favorable showing thus far made, it is highly probable they will make extensive investments in Rogue River Valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    Considerable prospecting is still going on in the vicinity of Gold Hill, and several good properties are being developed.
    We learn that the "Lucky Bart" mine in Sardine Creek district has been sold to Portland parties for $20,000. It is considered first-class property.
    Scott & Short, who are developing a ledge in Sterling district, are doing nicely with an arrastra. The quartz pays well and promises to be abundant.
    Geo. Hines and Ben Thurston are developing a ledge in Galls Creek district, which promises nicely. The ore is full of free gold, and what has been crushed has paid very well.
    Mrs. Irwin, the present owner of the Braden mine near Gold Hill, has let contracts for getting out a large amount of ore from her ledge. The mill has been compelled to shut down, owing to the scarcity of water.
    Judge Crawford of Medford was at Elk Creek lately to examine a large deposit of ore, claimed to be nickel. He reports large croppings of that ore. Samples have been sent away for assay. If the percentage of nickel in the ore is sufficiently large, the mine may prove very valuable.
    The company which purchased the Anderson gold quartz mine in Wagner Creek seems greatly encouraged by the outlook. The superintendent, Mr. Wilson, reports that the developments down to two hundred and fifty feet show a continuous body of sulphuret ore of almost regular width. The company received its machinery for the new mill at Ashland last week. It is proposed to erect the machinery at the old planing mill site in Ashland and to utilize that power. The mill and concentrator are erected under a special contract with the inventor, who guarantees a success. The mill crushes the ore, not with stamps, but with rolls, and the crushed ore does not pass over plates, but into the concentrator. The concentration of the copper and iron pyrites in the ore will be accomplished by fans and air currents, blowing the "gangue" away like chaff. The concentrates will be shipped to smelters. A capacity of seventy tons a day is claimed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 3


    NICKEL.--Jacksonville Times, Aug. 11: Judge Crawford of Medford was at Elk Creek lately to examine a large deposit of ore, claimed to be nickel. He reports large croppings of that ore. Samples have been sent away for assay. If the percentage of nickel in the ore is sufficiently large, the mine may prove very valuable.
    NEW MILL.--The company which purchased the Anderson gold quartz mine in Wagner Creek seems greatly encouraged by the outlook. The superintendent, Mr. Wilson, reports that the developments down to 250 feet show a continuous body of sulphuret ore of almost regular width. The company received its machinery from the new mill at Ashland last week. It is proposed to erect the machinery at the old planing mill site in Ashland, and to utilize that power. The mill and concentrator are erected under a special contract with the inventor, who guarantees a success. The mill crushes the ore, not with stamps, but with rolls, and the crushed ore does not pass over plates, but into the concentrator. The concentration of the copper and iron pyrites in the ore will be accomplished by fans and air currents, blowing the"gangue" away like chaff. The concentrates will be shipped to smelters. A capacity of 70 tons a day is claimed.
    THE ORME MINE.--Rogue River Courier, Aug. 13: The ledge being developed by the company composed of Messrs. Boynton, McFerson and Orme promises to make its owners rich in the near future. This ledge adjoins the famous Jewett mine about four miles from town on Old Baldy. It was a blind ledge and was discovered with a pick and pan. The lowest assay figures $61.15 to the ton, and the highest reaches $400. The spur of the ledge is 20 inches wide between well-defined walls, but the main ledge is much wider. A shaft is being sunk and the men are down 20 feet. The ledge is widening and the rook getting richer as the sinking proceeds.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 20, 1892, page 134


    NEW MILL.--Ashland Tidings, Aug. 19: The latest news from the Caven quartz mine in Siskiyou County, in which Messrs. Mullen, Kingsbury and Walters of Ashland, and Spencer of Portland, are interested, is that the mine is one of the richest now opening in this part of the country. The 10-stamp mill which was ready for business last week made a trial run of 12 hours last Saturday, and the result was a cleanup of more than $100. The mill was to be started for regular work last Wednesday, and good returns are looked for. A permanent ledge five feet wide has been tapped at a depth of 60 feet in the shaft, and it improves with depth.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 27, 1892, page 150


    The Medford Mining Co. have sold their placer mine on Klamath River, opposite Ash Creek, [to] J. C. Bayer, W. R. Price and another Portland man for a nice consideration. W. P. Legate will remain and conduct the mine for the new purchasers.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 3


    Lucky Bart [Signorritti], who recently sold his famous Buckskin mine to Lindley, of Sacramento, has returned to Gold Hill, and will put in the fall and winter prospecting for another bonanza.
"Gold Hill Items," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    J. H. Sowell and son are still engaged in prospecting their quartz ledge in Althouse precinct, and think that they have a bonanza.
    Rummel Bros. will be working off bedrock in less than a week in their Klamath River mines. So J. W. Courtney reported last week.
    Houck & Schaefer have removed their quartz mill to Woodville, to work up the ore on the dump of the mine they recently purchased from W. J. Stanley, in connection with Robt. Taylor and R. Beswick of Ashland.
    The Judson quartz mill, which has been doing service in Slate Creek precinct for some time past, was last week removed to Wolf Creek, where it will be operated on some promising ledges under the management of Mr. Boyd, a first-class mining expert.
    C. W. Ayers was out from Portland lately, looking up a mineral exhibit for the exposition, having been given charge of this matter by the managers thereof. Southern Oregon could make a showing second to none in this line, if the necessary attention would be given the matter of securing specimens for a few months in advance of the date set for the exposition. However, we hope no pains will be spared to make a first-class exhibit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


    PAY DIRT EVERYWHERE.--Grants Pass Courier, Sept. 15: J. S. Plaster had his prospecting pan at work down on Rogue River, near its junction with the Applegate, last week, and found dirt which pays 25 cents to the pan. A five-mile ditch had been surveyed from the Applegate 16 years ago to work these placers, but was not completed.
    ANOTHER PLACER.--H. C. Smith last week struck a placer mine on the bank of Rogue River about two miles above town. An ordinary man can clean up $2.50 in a day of ten hours, and Mr. Smith thinks there is no need of a healthy man going hungry or getting broke in this country.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 24, 1892, page 214


    MILL MOVED.--Jacksonville Times, Sept. 23: Houck & Shaefer have removed their quartz mill to Woodville, to work up the ore on the dump of the mine they recently purchased from W. J. Stanley, in connection with Robt. Taylor and R. Beswick of Ashland. The Judson quartz mill, which has been doing service in Slate Creek precinct for some time past, was last week removed to Wolf Creek, where it will be operated on some promising ledges under the management of Mr. Boyd, a first-class mining expert.
    LUCKY BAR MINE.--Grants Pass Courier: This valuable placer is situated on Sucker Creek, ten miles from Althouse post office, and is giving evidence of the foresight and perseverance of its owners, Messrs. Devore, Razee and Weidman. For the past five years this mine has been worked at a continual expense, but recently rich pay dirt has been found in blue gravel which lies seven feet thick down near the bedrock, which has not yet been reached except through prospecting shafts. Coarse gold is known to exist in paying quantities on the bedrock, and drifting will proceed when that point is reached. Water power is used to hoist the water and pay dirt to the boxes on the upper end of a 24-foot incline, and the same water which does the hoisting washes the debris from the gold. The famous Josephine County caves supply the stream which is being utilized by the owners of the mine. Wm. M. Richards, a mining man of experience and good judgment, has charge of the works, and the owners cannot help feeling gratified at the "sand" they have exhibited in bringing the investment to a paying basis. Other bars on Sucker Creek will be worked by parties encouraged by the result of development at Lucky Bar.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 1, 1892, page 230


MINING NEWS.
    The Hope No. 2 mine in the upper part of the valley has now out over 200 tons of richer ore than any discovered in the mine prior to the recent rich strike. A day-and-night force has been at work during the last two weeks.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1892, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    The Boulder Creek mining company was incorporated last week by prominent citizens of Grants Pass, capitalized at $200,000, with works located at Grave Creek.
    G. W. Anderson & Co. will commence crushing ore at their mine on Williams Creek in a short time. The ledge is over several feet in width and assays very well throughout.
    The Taylor Placer Mining and Milling Company has been capitalized at $2,000,000, and most of the stock was taken in the East. Developments on a large scale may be looked for there in a very short time.
    The Sacramento capitalist Morton Lindley, who recently purchased Lucky Bart's mine on the Sardine Creek divide, is working a large force on the tunnels and is putting up buildings for his men.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 3


    QUARTZ CRUSHER.--Grants Pass Courier, Oct. 20: Messrs. Taylor and Ezell are making arrangements to erect a Thorn quartz crusher at a point on Williams Creek convenient to Black Oak, Trio, Terminus and Ezell quartz claims. Doc Taylor went to Portland last week for the plant, which will cost in the neighborhood of $6000. The crusher will be operated by water power and will run day and night. The Thorn crusher is capable of crushing ore as low grade as $2 to the ton at a profit, and there are thousands of tons of rock in sight which assays from $15 to $20. Some 25 men will be employed on the works when the plant is in position and it will be a big thing for the mining interests in that part of Josephine. The location of the works is about 17 miles from this city, on Farris Gulch. A chlorination works will be erected in connection to dispose of the concentrates.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 29, 1892, page 294


    THE ASHLAND MILL.--Ashland Tidings, Oct. 31: The stamp mill for the Ashland Mining Co. is being set up in the most solid, substantial manner at the Gilroy mill building, some of the heaviest timbers ever worked in Ashland being used in the framework. Four big wagonloads of ore reach the big ore bins in the mill every day now from the mine. Quartz prospectors are still scouring the hills near Ashland.
    A CRUSHER.--Grants Pass Courier, Oct. 29: Messrs. Taylor and Ezell are making arrangements to erect a Thorn quartz crusher at a point on Williams Creek convenient to Black Oak, Trio, Terminus and Ezell quartz claims. Doc. Taylor went to Portland last week for the plant, which will cost in the neighborhood of $6000. The crusher will be operated by water power and will run day and night. The Thorn crusher is capable of crushing ore as low-grade as $2 to the ton at a profit, and there are thousands of tons of rock in sight which assay from $15 to $20. Some 25 men will be employed on the works when the plant is in position, and it will be a big thing for the mining interests in that part of Josephine. The location of the works is about 17 miles from this city, on Farris Gulch. A chlorination works will be erected in connection to dispose of the concentrates.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 5, 1892, page 310


    THE QUARTZ MILL RUNNING.--Ashland Tidings, Nov. 18: The new quartz mill of the Ashland Mining Co., at the old planing mill on Mechanic Street, was started Tuesday and everything found to work to a nicety. Wednesday the mill commenced running regularly, crushing quartz, and its busy hum is pleasant music to the people of Ashland now.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 26, 1892, page 358


MINING NEWS.
    Judson & Gordon have purchased the old Lucky Queen mill for use at their Coyote Creek mine.
    J. C. Lewis has put in a Tremaine mill at his Reuben Creek mine, and will soon get after that $100,000 said to be in sight.
    Kearns & Gleim now own, and will work to its fullest capacity, the Ramsey placer claim on Jordan Flat, Josephine County.
    The late rains have furnished enough water to start some of the placer mines. A. W. Sturgis of Forest Creek is cleaning up the bedrock left over last season.
    Holyoke & Anderson are crushing 12 tons daily with their five-stamp mill on Horsehead Gulch, in Williamsburg precinct, Josephine County, and doing well.
    The five-stamp mill of the Ashland mining company now being operated at the old planing mill site in Ashland is a complete success and is reducing much low-grade ore at present.
    The value of ore in sight at the mine of John C. Lewis of Portland, in Wolf Creek district, is stated to be in the neighborhood of $100,000. The property has sold at various times for from $50 to $3,600, but now is not for sale at any figure.
    The pipe and pumps are on the ground at the Taylor Milling and Mining Company's claims, near Leland, Josephine County, to be used in hoisting water to a ridge which will be piped through giants to the diggings below, among the richest in the country.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1892, page 3


    A FIRST-CLASS QUARTZ MILL.--Ashland Tidings, Dec. 5: Probably the snuggest, tightest, best-equipped and smoothest-running quartz mill of its size in practical operation on the Pacific Coast at this time is that of the Ashland Mining Company at the Helman Street crossing of the S.P. railroad in this place. The machinery was purchased of the Joshua Hendy Machine Works, San Francisco, and was put up by M. J. Sweeny, who was sent by the company for that purpose and who is now running the mill, in connection with Chas. J. Allmen, the assayer of the Ashland Mining Co. The mill comprises at present one battery of five stamps, a Challenge ore feeder, a Hercules rock crusher and a Triumph concentrator. The power is furnished by water from Ashland creek applied upon the turbine wheel formerly used by the planing mill. The capacity of the mill is from 10 to 15 tons of rock in 24 hours, and this may be doubled, of course, by the addition of another five-stamp battery, which may be put in at any time at very slight additional expense besides cost of battery alone. The mill has been put up in the most solid and substantial manner, under the direction of supt. J. A. Wilson of the mining company. Hauling ore from the mine to the mill, four teams are steadily employed, carrying about 15 tons a day. About 100 tons are on hand under cover in the mill as a reserve run when hauling shall be interrupted by bad roads. Work at the mine continues upon the line of development mapped out by supt. Wilson.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 17, 1892, page 406


    COPPER.--Rogue River Courier, Dec. 16: Capt. L. Burbridge returned from the Waldo copper fields last week after investigating the probable extent of ore out there. He thinks well of that country and will so report to the capitalists who sent him. He will take steps to have extensive prospecting done, and if the result is satisfactory, smelting works will be set up out there. He is in the employ of the Pyritic Smelting Co. The Captain went to San Francisco Monday.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 24, 1892, page 422


MINING NEWS.
    Dan Griffiths has struck ore in his shaft at his Hungry Creek mine which assays $25 to the ton.
    The frosty weather has had a depressing effect on placer miners, whose work has been seriously interfered with.
    Gin Lin is at work at present piping off the land between Cameron's store at Uniontown and the residence of R. J. Cameron.
    After a week's run with their two-stamp mill in the Siskiyous recently, the Spencer mining company cleaned up 205 ounces of gold.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1893, page 3


    PROSPECTING.--Ashland Tidings, Jan 27: From the amount of prospecting already under way in the mountains about Ashland it looks as if a custom quartz mill will be so imperative a necessity here soon that one must be put up. C. H. Veghte has made a proposition which is talked some on the street. Mr. Veghte already has a 40-horsepower engine, and agrees to set up and run a first-class five-stamp mill provided he is guaranteed the work of crushing 500 tons of rock at $5 a ton. Somewhat of a sensation was made last Tuesday by the exhibition of the richest piece of quartz yet shown here--a little piece about half gold, which is said to have been found by the wife of Dr. H. T. Inlow in their dooryard on their little farm east of Bear Creek. It may have come from a ledge there, or from the blue gravel deposit known to exist under the hills on the east side of Bear Creek. John H. Real, C. H. Hosley and others went over with pick and pan to do some prospecting there yesterday. Keno, Klamath County, is the latest seat of gold excitement. A settler named Took, on the south side of Klamath River, about 1½ miles from Keno, was digging a well, and at a depth of 60 feet he struck a formation from which he panned out $1.50 in gold with an ordinary skillet. The gold was probably from the stratum of blue gravel which underlies a large portion of the lake and Klamath River country, and it may lead to the development of some good drift mines there. C. H. Hosley, M. L. McCall, Destin High and George Engle have located a claim angling from the west side line of the Ashland Mining Company's 4500-foot claim, and they believe they are on the main lode of the Ashland mine, the A. N. King lode, better known as the Patton lode, from the Patton extension of the King claim. Surveyor McCall ran the lines of the new claim Tuesday, and it is christened the Nancy Hanks. Wallace Rodgers and J. M. Hocker are at work running prospect cuts upon the claim. One day last week Messrs. Logg & McDonald, of Foots Creek, tired of working over ground which had for a long time failed to produce anything of consequence, went farther up the stream, taking out a few wheelbarrow loads to test the diggings. The very first washout produced a nugget of "old channel" gold weighing $170. In addition to this the wheelbarrow experiment panned out about $6 in legitimate washing. The placers themselves are by no means completely washed out in Southern Oregon. One of the largest straight string of mining claims yet located near Ashland is upon what is called the Blue Lead. It is a continuation of the ledge upon which Roper, Carter & Mills have sunk a prospect shaft on the hill in town. It is traced by a cap ledge on the surface for several miles in a direction nearly due south, and 13 claims have been located on it already. George Fendall is one of the locators, as are also railway mail clerks Knowles and Bangasser, of the Portland run. Mr. Knowles got a fine prospect one day this week from a piece of surface float from the ledge. Will Q. Brown, of Riddle, now employed by the large company to whom he sold his nickel mines near Riddle, was on Wednesday's south train, going to San Francisco. Mr. Brown says the machinery for the reduction works is at the Riddle railroad station, but cannot be hauled to the mines until the roads improve. It will be summer before smelting operations are begun, but when the mining is started once it will be upon a large scale. There is abundance of the nickel ore in that region, and the demand for the metal is good, since the approval of the nickel steel armor plate for naval use.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 4, 1893, page 78


MINING NEWS.
    Placer miners will do well this season, having a good supply of water.
    T. H. B. Taylor and sons of Pleasant Creek are having a big run, with lots of water, and will doubtless make a nice cleanup in the spring.
    S. C. Lawrence has located an extension to the ledge discovered by D. Horn in Galls Creek district, which promises fully as well as the original discovery.
    John J. Neathammer is utilizing the fine head of water he has at his mine on Saxe's Creek, in the vicinity of Woodville, and expects to make a good showing when he cleans up.
    D. Horn, who found so rich a ledge in Galls Creek district recently, has sold it to a company composed of O. Ganiard, H. L. White and others. Four thousand dollars was the price paid, Horn retaining a number of sacks of rich ore he had already taken out. The new proprietors doubtless have a bonanza, and will work it to the fullest extent.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1893, page 3


    The mining fever has broken out in Medford, Or., and professional business and laboring men are looking toward the hills and anxiously awaiting a settlement of the weather with a view of taking a prospecting tour. New impetus is given to the excitement each day by the return of prospectors with specimens of rich gold-gearing quartz and glowing accounts of the possibilities of the mineral belt of Southern Oregon. But all previous returns were totally eclipsed when D. H. Horn came to town with a pocketful of quartz. Many of the specimens contained almost an equal amount of gold and quartz, some of the particles of gold being as large as a pea. Five pounds of this rock, when pounded out by a hand mortar, produced over $100, which would run the percentage up to the modest sum of $40,000 to the ton.
"Occidental Melange," Pend d'Oreille News, Sandpoint, Idaho, March 4, 1893, page 1



A SOUTHERN OREGON MINE
Review of Operations in a Famous Channel Near Jacksonville.
    JACKSONVILLE, March 8.--(To the Editor.)--One who has lived in Southern Oregon since 1852, who has carefully noted the discoveries and developments in the various mining localities, and "written up" the mines at different times for eastern papers, visited the famous A. W. Sturgis placer mine on Jackson Creek recently, with a view to gaining some information in regard to the old channel from which Mr. Sturgis has been realizing such handsome returns for the past two years. Those mines were discovered in the spring of 1852 during the mining excitement of that year. They are situated just across the hill, from four to five miles southwest of Jacksonville. The creek has been mined up and down for a distance of about 12 miles. For six miles it has been completely worked out, and the bedrock gone over and over again to a width of 100 yards. The coarser tailings have been thrown up in great cone-shaped piles for miles up and down the flat, presenting a scene of utter desolation, without a vestige of earth to relieve the monotony of the bleaching waste of heaps of stone and gravel--the result of the miners' toil for gold. The whites mined this camp for many years with rockers and toms, and later with sluices, and finally, concluding that what remained would not further justify them to work, they sold out their claims to Chinamen, or abandoned them, and the Chinese got practical possession of the whole creek for a distance of four or five miles. They at once set long lines of sluices and worked the whole creek over again, running through all the old tailings, and very materially widening and increasing the area worked over by the whites. There are no means of determining, even approximately, the amount of gold taken out by the Chinese in this third or fourth working, but the fact that they continued to mine this stream with a large force of men, and with great energy and industry, for 10 or 12 years, would justify the presumption that they at least made good wages.
    The writer is informed that one company of Chinese took out $42,000 in a very short time, from the junction of a small gulch, that puts down from the mountain, with the main channel. It is believed that this rich find was deposited there by the cutting of the gulch through the old channel, afterward discovered by Mr. Sturgis. The money was hauled to town by the late John Cantrall and shipped to China. The next year the same company took out $17,000. The last Chinese company that worked these mines took out but little, and got into debt to Mr. Sturgis, who at that time was running a store on Applegate, and as they were not able to pay him when they left, he bought their claim, which covered a distance of 900 yards. He has since bought a number of claims, and now owns 3600 yards of the creek, and thinks, with the plentiful supply of water afforded by the present favorable winter, he may be able to make a fair face on the mine in the remainder of the years allotted to him, but says this is the utmost he can hope to do. Mr. Sturgis, who discovered the back channel, is a broad-minded, philosophical sort of man, a reader and analytical thinker, and withal somewhat of a geologist, who has closely studied geological formations. Many years ago he conceived the idea that there was a much older channel than the one being worked, believing that, from the indications, some time in the past an upheaval or slide had occurred creating the present channel, which appeared in some respects to be modern, and that the original channel had been covered up, and was not far distant from the present one. This conviction was so strong as to induce him to buy out the Chinamen, as stated above, and a footing once secured on the creek, he at once began to run a cut into the bank in search of the lost channel, which he felt certain existed somewhere in the direction he was running. In his efforts to reach this channel, Mr. Sturgis met with many obstacles and disappointments, chiefly of a financial nature, but by courage and determination, driven forward by his convictions, he surmounted all difficulties and drove the cut from year to year further into the bank, and was finally rewarded by the discovery of the proof of his convictions--a back channel, rich in the precious metal, well earned by dint of much labor, personal sacrifice and perseverance.
    Geographically, these mines are near the center of the mineral deposits of Jackson County, and Mr. Sturgis is of the opinion that more gold has been taken out of this one camp than from all the other mining camps in the county, but in this he is probably very much mistaken. The mines immediately surrounding Jacksonville have probably produced more gold than any other mining center in Southern Oregon, but even these have fallen far short of having produced as much as all the balance of the camps put together. The output of gold from all the mines in Southern Oregon since their discovery in the fall of 1851 will probably reach $25,000,000, possibly more. Mr. Sturgis has always been very reticent as to the output of his mine, but that it is large and the claim a very valuable one is an open secret. The mine is now fitted up with the most modern hydraulic machinery, and the only drawback is an insufficient supply of water during the summer months. The history of the noted Sterling mine, made famous by the construction of the great ditch from Applegate and the putting in of an immense hydraulic plant by Hon. D. P. Thompson and the late Captain Ankeny, will form the subject of the next article on the Southern Oregon mines. This mine is now yielding handsomely under the management of Mr. Henry Ankeny, and it is rumored that the output of the present year will be much in excess of the past.
Oregonian, Portland, March 11, 1893, page 3


    PLACERS.--Jacksonville Times, March 3: Placer miners will do well this season, having a good supply of water. T. H. B. Taylor and sons of Pleasant Creek are having a big run, with lots of water, and will doubtless make a nice cleanup in the spring. 8. C. Lawrence has located an extension to the ledge discovered by D. Horn in Galls Creek district, which promises fully as well as the original discovery. John J. Neathammer is utilizing the fine head of water he has at his mine on Saxe's Creek, in the vicinity of Woodville, and expects to make a good showing when he cleans up. D. Horn, who found so rich a ledge in Galls Creek district recently, has sold it to a company composed of O. Ganiard, H. L. White and others. Four thousand dollars was the price paid, Horn retaining a number of sacks of rich ore he had already taken out. The new proprietors doubtless have a bonanza, and will work it to the fullest extent.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 11, 1893, page 158


    PIPING TIMES OF PROFIT.--Rogue River Courier, March 16: H. M. Chapin came in from the Poorman place, on Grave Creek, Monday. He has been piping constantly of late and has good prospects of a profitable cleanup. He says there are no less than nine sets of pipes and monitors on lower Grave Creek (below the railroad) all singing merrily as they wash Josephine hillsides into the ravine and start the "slickens" on its way to the mouth of Rogue River.
    WILLIAMS CREEK.--The neighborhood of Williams Creek is becoming famous for the frequency and value of its quartz ledges. Several mills have been erected recently, and these will start grinding ore when the roads dry off sufficiently to allow hauling from the tunnels to the mills.
    SILVER DISCOVERY.--H. B. Sluter, one of our pioneer mining men, informs us that a 12-foot vein of native silver has been found in tunnel eight. The find is the property of Sol Abraham, who will visit the point shortly with engineers to determine the course of the vein with a view to tapping the ore at the surface of the hill. Mr. Abraham owns three 40-acre tracts adjacent and the lode has been traced through each tract, but it goes no farther. Piles of silver ore can be found along the railroad, where it had been dumped by the tunnel diggers, who had no idea what valuable stuff they were handling. It is considered lucky that Sol Abraham has become possessed of the ledge, as it will take considerable wealth to develop it.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 18, 1893, page 174


MINING NEWS.
    The Hayes-Swinden claim has yielded an unprecedentedly large number of nuggets during the last few months, and they have ranged all the way from $55 in weight to one monster of $375. None prettier have ever been found in this county. It was even reported that a nine-hundred-dollar nugget had been picked up there one day last week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 7, 1893, page 3


    MORE NUGGETS.--Rogue River Courier, March 30: Jeff Hayes and Chas. Swinden brought in two nuggets of gold from their placer on Oscar Creek last week, one of which weighed 13½ ounces and was valued at $220. The other was somewhat smaller. The large nugget was shaped and sized like an Eastern oyster and contained some quartz which was embedded in the yellow metal. The placer is in the same vicinity as that in which the $365 nugget was found a few days previously by Broder Custar. The streams emptying into the Applegate and Williams creeks are simply full of gold. On Monday a 4½-ounce nugget was brought in from the same place.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 8, 1893, page 222


MINING NEWS.
    An old prospector struck an enormously rich pocket in Willow Springs precinct, near where N. Cooke's store formerly stood. It is said that he has already taken out $1500, and there is plenty of the same ore in sight.
    W. E. Jacobs has gone to San Francisco to have the rich ore which he and E. K. Anderson brought from D. Horn, at the time he sold the Last Chance mine, reduced or sold for specimens. It is so rich that the jewelers offer to take the whole lot for specimens, at almost the valuation of its weight in gold. When the jeweler's saw shaves off the specimens the flakes of gold shine like stars in the rock, making the richest ornaments conceivable. The ore now being taken from the mine is also very rich, and a carload of it will also be taken to the smelters below.
    Few people in this section realize the interest taken in southern Oregon mines abroad, and the great wave of mining immigration and excitement about to sweep over this valley. In Idaho miners report little else is talked about except the mineral resources and prospects of Jackson and Josephine counties, and ever since the recent shooting scrape in the latter, over the right to work a mine which has hundreds of equals in our section, the interest is growing rapidly. Even in Colorado the miners are contemplating a rush to this section. There will be many rich quartz pockets struck during the next six months, and quite a number [of] fine ledges uncovered. Southern Oregon has waited long, but her day has come.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 21, 1893, page 3


Southern Oregon Mines.
    C. A. Taylor, who has been securing ore in Josephine County to ship with Oregon's minerals in the world's fair, succeeded in gathering about 3000 pounds of average mineral ore which will run from $20 to $480 per ton. About 30 mines and prospects are represented, with from 50 to 300 pounds of ore from each.
    J. B. Magee, of the Annie mine in Bohemia district, Lane County, reviewed the Jackson and Josephine County mining prospects in a talk with the Cottage Grove Echo-Leader reporter on returning to that place last week. "It is impossible to approximate the extent of the Bohemia mines," said Mr. Magee, "as the Annie mine is the only property that has been developed to any considerable depth. And as regards surface prospects, I have never seen anything to equal the Bohemia district in richness. But I have great confidence in the future of Southern Oregon as a mining country. Bohemia is no doubt a part of the great gold belt running north from Yreka through the Siskiyous, the Cow Creek Mountains, the South Umpqua, the Calapooia Mountains, then skirting the head of the Willamette, thence on to the Santiam."
Oregonian, Portland, April 22, 1893, page 8


The Latest Discovery.
    Central Point, Or., April 25.--The richest gold strikes in southern Oregon since the days of '52 have been unearthed within two miles of this place in the last two days, and the entire country around here is wild with excitement. If the present exodus from this point to the hills continues, the town will be almost depopulated before the end of the week. The scene of the Hershberger strike, mentioned in the Oregonian a few days ago, was visited today. The rich pay streak continues to grow richer, and they are taking out gold in large quantities. Within two hours this morning more than $500 in coarse gold was taken from the ledge. This mine is in the famous Willow Springs district, which has a gold-producing history dating back to 1852. Within a radius of one mile from the Hershberger claim there are no less than six rich pockets being worked, and from $50 to $100 are being taken out each day by a single miner. Fred. Downing has unearthed about 100 feet on one ledge, which contains a number of pay streaks that show pieces of gold as large as a pea. The main body of the lode is free-milling rock that will run $300 to the ton, and several thousand dollars will be taken from each pocket. The soil from the surface of all the ledges is filled with coarse gold, and is being sacked and stored. The excitement has reached neighboring towns, and prospectors are coming in on every train.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 28, 1893, page 3


MINING STORIES
Told by a Southern Oregon Man--Latest News from the Gold Districts.
    A mining man from Southern Oregon was at the St. Charles yesterday, and related to an interested group the latest news from the gold districts. "I've come straight in from the head of Jumpoff Joe Creek," he said, "where Hammersley made his big find. The snow up there is about four feet deep. The trail into town is very narrow and treacherous, running in some places along the trunks of fallen trees. Snow is continually falling, making the rough bark very slippery. Many times this morning in coming over such places I tumbled off into snow up to my neck, and had to flounder around and tramp it down before I could climb back onto the tree again. In spite of the snow we have managed to build a cabin on Mr. Hammersley's claim and dig a shaft 30 feet in depth. At the bottom of the shaft there is a vein from eight to sixteen inches in width. An assay of ore taken from the full width of the lode shows a value of $1335 per ton. The assay was made in Ashland, and some smart fellow heard that the ore was very rich, and immediately telegraphed to the papers that it was worth $500,000 per ton. The mine is situated up on the side of the mountain, and the vein dips at an angle of 45 degrees. Mr. Hammersley knew that there was some fine placer mines in the valley, and came to the conclusion that there must be a rich vein on the mountain. He commenced tracing it up last fall, and finally struck it about four feet below the surface on the spot where the mine has been opened.
    "One of the most phenomenal finds has been made very recently by old man Hershberger, about three miles from Central Point. He and his sons were out prospecting and found indications right in the center of the old Jacksonville stage road, near Willow Springs. After uncovering a few inches of earth they found a vein from six to eight inches in width from which, in two hours' time, they took $500 worth of almost solid gold. Anyone but a miner would think a chunk of the vein matter was solid gold. As far as can be seen all of the vein matter is just as rich as that taken out. It is the richest vein I have ever heard of, and yet thousands of people have driven and walked over that very spot without ever thinking of gold. On the other side of the range, at Galls Creek, about seven miles from Gold Hill, a man by the name of D. Horn took out half a dozen sacks of pay dirt which he sold for $3500. He has just sold his claim for $4000 cash.
    "Good finds are of daily occurrence, and seem to cause no unusual excitement. People about that part of the country are too lazy to dig gold, and the influx of prospectors is not very great. Gold Hill, you know, was named from the fact that years ago $250,000 worth of gold was dug from its top. An enterprising prospector has hunted up the old vein, and is now preparing to take out a little more of the yellow metal."
Oregonian, Portland, April 29, 1893, page 8


    RICH GOLD STRIKE.--An Associated Press dispatch of April 20th says: The tension of quartz mining excitement in these parts, already pretty high, was increased a little today by reliable news telling of a remarkable strike in the Willow Springs precinct near the old post office. The lucky prospector's name is Jacob Hershberger, and so rich is the vein that yesterday morning he took out rock enough streaked with gold to easily bring a thousand dollars, and it is estimated that he has taken out no less than $2500 since finding the vein a day or two ago. One remarkable thing about the find is that the vein was discovered right on the old overland stage road and only 200 yards from the Willows Springs stage station, where, before the railroad's advent in this valley, all overland passengers on the old Oregon & California stage line waited while a change of horses was made. Several other strikes in the same vicinity have been made lately, and the hills are filled with industrious prospectors. The excitement has not been so intense in mining matters since the palmy days of old, when there was scarcely any other industry than mining in this section. At the Hammersley ledge near Jumpoff Joe, men are reported as hammering out $20 to $40 per day per man with an old historic hand mortar. Mining strikes in this country lately have brought many mining men and capitalists from the outside to look over the country, and much outside capital will be at work developing the promising properties soon. A special dispatch to the San Francisco Examiner dated Central Point, April 25th, gives the following additional information: The richest gold strike in Southern Oregon since the days of 1852 has been made within two miles of this place in the last week. The entire country is wild with excitement, and, if the present exodus to the hills continues, the town will be depopulated before the end of the week. Your correspondent today visited the scene of the Hershberger strike. The rich pay streak continues to grow richer, and they are taking out gold in fabulous quantities. Within two hours this morning, more than $500 in coarse gold was taken from the ledge. This mine is in the famous Willow Springs district, which has a gold-producing history dating back to 1852. Within a radius of one mile from the Hershberger claim no less than six rich pockets are being worked, from $50 to $200 being taken out each day by a single miner. One ledge contains pay streaks showing pieces of gold as large as a pea. The main body of the lode is free-milling rock that will run $300 to the ton. Several thousand dollars will be taken from each pocket. The soil from the surface of all the ledges is filled with coarse gold, and is being sacked and stored. The excitement has reached neighboring towns, and prospectors are coming in on each train. It is estimated a million dollars' worth of gold is in sight in the Willow Springs district today.
    THE GOOD PROSPECTS.--Jacksonville Times, April 22nd: Few people in this section realize the interest taken in Southern Oregon mines abroad, and the great wave of mining immigration and excitement about to sweep over this valley. In Idaho miners report little else is talked about except the mineral resources and prospects of Jackson and Josephine counties, and ever since the recent shooting scrape in the latter, over the right to work a mine which has hundreds of equals in one section, the interest is growing rapidly. Even in Colorado the miners are contemplating a rush to this section. There will be many rich quartz pockets struck during the next six months, and quite a number of fine ledges uncovered. Southern Oregon has waited long, but her day has come. W. E. Jacobs has gone to San Francisco to have the rich ore which he and E. K. Anderson brought from D. Horn, at the time he sold the Last Chance mine, reduced or sold for specimens. It is so rich that the jewelers offer to take the whole lot for specimens, at almost the valuation of its weight in gold. When the jeweler's saw shaves off the specimen the flakes of gold shine like stars in the rock, making the richest ornaments conceivable. The ore now being taken from the mine is also very rich, and a carload of it will be taken to the smelters below.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 29, 1893, page 270


MINING NEWS.
    Ed. Smith, owner of the Star mine in Wolf Creek district, is running a two-stamp mill and concentrator and is meeting with fair returns.
    The late rains will prolong the present mining season beyond any for many years in southern Oregon, and the old placer mines will be the largest for the past decade.
    The Little Anaconda Co.'s mine in the Wolf Creek district has been pretty thoroughly developed, and the two-stamp Tremain mill will be in operation there under the supervision of W. P. Ely during the coming summer.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 5, 1893, page 3


MINING NEWS.
    A. S. Sturgis, who owns one of the best and most extensive mines in the state, has moved a vast area of dirt this season and is still busy. The last cleanup he made was several weeks ago which realized $1249.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1893, page 2


The Mines of Southern Oregon.
(From Our Special Correspondent.)

    TO THE EDITOR:--The mines of Southern Oregon, which in the past have been but little known and talked of outside of their own locality, are now attracting considerable attention among prospectors and capitalists all over the Pacific Coast. This is all owing to a few energetic men, both capitalists and prospectors, who were not afraid to back their judgment with unremitting labor and capital. It has been the popular belief among mining men for years that Southern Oregon contained no standard mines of any importance, but the development of the Ashland mine and others proves the incorrectness of this belief. Although they have some good mines in Southern Oregon and more are being developed, still it does not compare favorably with the quartz mining districts of California, in regards to richness and extent of ledges.
    The geological formation of the mineral belt in Josephine and Jackson counties, taken as a whole, is of a pockety nature and the mineral bearing ledges small and irregular in width, as a general rule. Porphyry, strongly impregnated with iron and lime, is predominant throughout the formation of the mineral belt, although in some localities every class of formation existing in the mineral belts of the coast may be found all mixed up together, showing evidence of simultaneous upheavals of the earth's crust at some remote period in those localities. Those spots, so to speak, occur principally in the northern portion of Jackson County and the southwestern part of Josephine, and are productive in small pockets which seldom exceed a few hundred dollars, with the exception of some late discoveries. There have only been two large pockets discovered so far in Southern Oregon, viz: Gold Hill and Steamboat, and it is the current belief among prospectors and miners that where there are one or two large pockets such as there were found, there must certainly be more, yet undiscovered.
    Gold Hill produced over $129,000 while Steamboat yielded in the neighborhood of $246,000, as near as can be learned from the most reliable authority, and although some 20 miles apart, yet they were both discovered in this mixed formation. Within the last few months several good pockets have been discovered in Jackson County in what is known as the Blackwell Hills between Gold Hill and Jacksonville, but the largest, amounting to something over $4000, was discovered by Mr. D. Horn, on Galls Creek, about four miles from Rock Point.
    Among the energetic capitalists who are expending money to prove whether the ledges go down to any great depth or not and still carry gold in paying quantities are the Schieffelin Bros., well known in mining circles in connection with the Tombstone mines of Arizona. They are operating on Foots Creek some ten miles from Gold Hill.
    Ashland is at present the center of attraction for mining men and prospectors. Some very good prospects are being developed at present in that vicinity which promise to become good-paying properties, and quite an active boom in mining is the result. The formation in this district is favorable for permanent gold-bearing ledges, and no doubt this district will attract considerable attention from capitalists in the future. The placer mines of Southern Oregon were rich when worked in the early days, and wherever rich placer mines existed over a large scope of territory, good quartz mines have been developed afterward, as a general rule. The prospector who is unacquainted with this country will find a difficulty in prospecting here that he does not meet with further south.
    On the north side of the Siskiyou Range the country seems older and more broken and the formation covered with a greater depth of soil than it it is on the south side of the mountains, which makes it difficult to prospect in, but the greatest obstacle that the prospector will find in his way is slides. In this broken up formation innumerable slides have occurred at some remote period and moved parts of the formation and ledges with them intact, covering the formation underneath sometimes to the depth of 50 feet or more which makes prospecting in such localities slow and expensive. But in the course of a few years capital combined with improved methods will overcome this difficulty and uncover the blind ledges and make to them yield up their store of mineral treasure.
ALEX. QUARTZ.
Ashland, O., May 27, 1893.
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 3, 1893, page 340


    The Golden Reward Mining Company of the Black Hills, Dakota, shipped a lot of ore for experimental treatment to the Chick quick process plant at Pittsburg, Kan., but the process people refused permission to the mining company's president to come and see the process operated, and that ended the business, as it should have done. A "process man" who has a metallurgical secret should be allowed to keep it and the miner should put no faith in him whatever. The patent laws of this country are good enough to protect an inventor, and if he really has anything of value he can afford to patent it, let the people know what he has and charge them for using it. No man can tell what tricks are being played upon him if a process is only worked in secret by the inventor himself. It may be that the Chick people have a valuable method of treating ores, but confidence is not inspired in it by a refusal to let people interested see the operation. This is the same Chick process which was tried in Shasta County, in this state, but it is not being worked there at present, as far as we know.
"Comment,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 10, 1893, page 35


    PROSPECTORS.--Jacksonville Times, June 16: Jackson and Josephine counties are still full of prospectors. Geo. Jenson, who is running a tunnel for the Jacksonville Milling and Mining Co., thinks that the main ledge will soon be struck. A. W. Sturgis has 12 men employed at his extensive mines in Forest Creek, and will make a cleanup by the 1st prox. which will astonish the natives. The Ashland Mining Co. has procured a Burleigh diamond drill to hasten operations in the hard rock in which they are now working, and will be in use after the first of July. Geo. Schumpf's ledge in Willow Springs precinct has been put in good shape and looks better than ever. Many of the placer miners have finished for the season, but the majority are engaged in cleaning up or preparing to. The output of gold dust will be larger this season than it has been for many years past. Thos. Hammersley, of Gold Hill, who made an important discovery in Jumpoff Joe district, has sold half his ledge to Messrs. Lewis & Kinney, of Portland, for $1000. They will develop it immediately. A very promising ledge has been discovered in Humbug district by Henry D. Kubli and Ben. Thurston, and it promises to be a permanent vein. Some of the ore was sent to K. Kubli, and it certainly is among the richest we ever saw. Ore crushing will begin at the Fitch & Davis mine, called the Comstock of Oregon, before another month goes by, the machinery being already at the ground. The work of getting the mill up the mountain was immense, and several men were injured in the undertaking.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 24, 1893, page 398


MINING NEWS.
    Dr. Hinkle of Central Point is the owner of a promising quartz ledge in Sardine Creek district, near Murphy Gulch. It is well defined and carries considerable free gold.
    The cleanup now being made at A. W. Sturgis' diggings in Forest Creek district is proving a big one. Al. will be several thousand dollars richer than he was in a short time, and nobody envies him his good fortune, for he richly deserves it.
    The new pay chute of the Ashland mine recently opened on the surface of the lode at a distance of about nine hundred feet from the working tunnel of the mine, is showing some wonderful prospects at several places. Some of the rock mortared last Friday showed the richest prospect in free gold ever panned out in Ashland. With the development already done and the prospects already opened--the vein explored to a depth of nearly 400 feet and a pay chute or chutes already opened for a thousand feet along the lode--the Ashland, in the opinion of experienced mining men who know what they are talking about, is the best free-milling gold mining property, bearing high grade ore, in the country.---Tidings, June 20.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1893, page 3


RICH GOLD FIELDS.
    Among the guests at the Perkins Hotel in Portland is J. M. Hagerty, a mining man who has just returned from a two-months' sojourn in the southern Oregon gold fields, says the Oregonian. Mr. Hagerty is interested in the Okanogan country, where he has spent several years in opening and developing mines, and, although still a young man, is considered an authority on mines. In answer to a query as to the prospects of southern Oregon as a mining section he said:
    "After carefully examining the various mining properties there, I have come to the conclusion that mining is only in its infancy in that section of the state. In formation and climate it is an ideal mining country, and the cheapness of labor and provisions and the railroad facilities make it possible to operate mines with a comparatively small outlay of capital. But it has been held back, and still is to a great extent, by reason of a hostile feeling on the part of the oldtimers--properly called 'mossbacks'--against quartz mining. There was no quartz mining carried on in early days, and they do not believe in it. Then, too, there has been a great deal of mineral land fraudulently taken up under the timber and stone act, and they do not want it exposed. The country from Roseburg to Ashland was not originally settled by mining men but by 'camp followers,' who, delighted with the climate, soil and the possibility of making a good living with little labor, squatted in the valleys and raised cattle and fruit sufficient for their own use, and were satisfied. Then the Oregon and California Railroad was built, bringing in new blood and new conditions, but the country was still agricultural. Since 1850 mining has been carried on on a small scale, except in one or two instances, until about three years ago, when a few prospectors from California aroused some interest in quartz mining. But it has not been until within the past year that this new movement has received any real encouragement. The development of the Ashland mine proved the fact that there were good paying ledges in that section, and gave encouragement to a large number of prospectors. The majority of the ledges found, however, and especially the larger ones, are either barren on top or so low grade as to be unprofitable to work.
THE ASHLAND MINE.
    "The owners of the Ashland mine are entitled to a great deal of credit, as well as the profit they are making, for the determined manner in which they continued the development of their property under what seemed the most discouraging outlook. The country between Jacksonville and Gold Hill is very rich in pockets. It is from that section that so many reports of rich strikes originate. There is no doubt that many miners have found pockets from which they have taken out from $500 to $5000 in a single day; but that does not mean that they have discovered a mine, for that single day's work, in all probability, has sufficed to entirely clean out the pocket. These pockets are curious formations, and are caused by slides of decomposed quartz, in stringers, coming from no one knows where. A few months ago an old prospector discovered nearly $5000 in the old stage road near Central Point. The excitement was intense in that section for a while, but perhaps the most excited individual was Postmaster Howard, of Medford. He thought, from the description of the place, that it was on some property he owned. So he engaged the services of a surveyor and hustled out there with blood in his eye, intending to prosecute the lucky prospector and take the gold away from him. But poor Howard was laughed at for his trouble, for when the survey was completed he found that his line came within 10 feet of the coveted spot.
TITLE TO MINING LANDS.
    "Another thing that has placed a limit on prospecting, but should not, is the general belief that the grant of lands to the Oregon & California Railroad Company carries with it the right to all minerals not discovered at the time of the grant. This not the case, however, and I can quote to you the clause in the patents the corporation received from the United States government which makes the necessary provision. It reads: 'Excluding and excepting from the transfer by these presents all mineral lands, should any such be found to exist in the tracts described in the foregoing; but this exclusion and exception, according to the terms of the statute, shall not be construed to include coal and iron lands.'
    "So, you see, the patents do not pass title to mineral lands other than coal or iron, so that these lands can be prospected in the same manner as government lands and title acquired in like manner. I believe it is to the interest of the railroad company as well as the country at large that this fact should be generally known, as it will give the prospector more courage to know that after he has made a strike he need not be afraid of losing it because it is on railroad land. The railroad company, on the other hand, is fully awake to the value of the mining interests in southern Oregon, and is quietly influencing immigration and capital in that direction. There is more legitimate prospecting and mining being done at the present time in the Wolf Creek district, between Riddle and Gold Hill, than in any other section I visited. They have already located some good properties there, and I expect to see some good mines as a result of the work being done. The public would have heard of some big transfers in mining property had it not been for the panic which struck the country about two months ago. I know of several bona fide deals which could not be closed on account of the stringency of money. The same reason can be assigned for the cessation of development work in many instances, for it takes lots of money to develop a gold mine and put it on a paying basis."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 14, 1893, page 3


    GOLD FIELDS.--J. M. Hagerty in Oregonian, July 15: "After carefully examining the various mining properties in Southern Oregon, I have come to the conclusion that mining is only in its infancy in that section of the state. In formation and climate it is an ideal mining country, and the cheapness of labor and provisions and the railroad facilities make it possible to operate mines with a comparatively small outlay of capital. But it has been held back, and still is, to a great extent, by reason of a hostile feeling on the part of the oldtimers, properly called 'mossbacks,' against quartz mining. There was no quartz mining carried on in early days, and they do not believe in it. Then, too, there has been a great deal of mineral land fraudulently taken up under the timber and stone act, and they do not want it exposed. The country from Roseburg to Ashland was not originally settled by mining men, but by 'camp followers,' who, delighted with the climate, soil and the possibility of making a good living with little labor, squatted in the valleys and raised cattle and fruit sufficient for their own use, and were satisfied. Then the Oregon & California Railroad was built, bringing in new blood and new conditions; but the country was still agricultural. Since 1850, mining has been carried on on a small scale, except in one or two instances, until about three years ago, when a few prospectors from California aroused some interest in quartz mining. But it has not been until within the past year that this new movement has received any real encouragement. The development of the Ashland mine proved the fact that there were good-paying ledges in that section, and gave encouragement to a large number of prospectors. The majority of the ledges found, however, and especially the larger ones, are either barren on top or so low grade as to be unprofitable to work. The owners of the Ashland mine are entitled to a great deal of credit, as well as the profit they are making, for the determined manner in which they continued the development of their property under what seemed the most discouraging outlook. The country between Jacksonville and Gold Hill is very rich in pockets. It is from that section that so many reports of rich strikes originate. There is no doubt that many miners have found pockets from which they have taken out from $500 to $5000 in a single day; but that does not mean that they have discovered a mine, for that single day's work, in all probability, has sufficed to entirely clean out the pocket."
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 22, 1893, page 62


    BROWNTOWN NOTES.--Grants Pass Courier, July 20: Our miners are plodding along in the old groove. July will see the most of our placer men cleaning up and then they, too, will in all probability take to the hills prospecting for quartz and placers also, for there are doubtless many places where parts of the old and higher chambers are still covered deep by the wearing away and slides of the mountains. Krouse and Baldwin have commenced opening on their quartz claim, north extension of the Griffin ledge, and have found some pretty rock. Griffin has bonded his claim to a San Francisco company. This company represents some millions, and it will soon have a crew of men at work developing the lode and putting up a boarding house. Beig is hard at work slashing the brush over his hydraulic claim. His water is done for this season. Ehman will soon be closing up, as the water will commence to slacken with this warm weather. The Doney family are getting themselves comfortably fixed and are opening their claim for extension work. There are a number of prospectors in the south about the O. and C. line. As there is a quantity of quartz there, good news may come any day. The Sucker Creek miners are hard at work opening new claims and prospecting for new deposits.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 29, 1893, page 78


Southern Oregon Mines.
Jacksonville Times.
    The capitalists of South Bend, Wash., who are represented by Judge Holcomb and Colonel Etner, are enlarging their operations in Southern Oregon and inducing other men of wealth to invest in our mines.
    The machinery which propels the Burleigh drill at the Ashland Mining Company's mine is in operation. It will take some time to bore the tunnel with which it is intended to tap the ledge at a lower level, as it will be 600 feet long.
    The report that Colonel Ewing has bonded the Mountain Lion mine in Missouri Flat district is erroneous. The original proprietors are still working it and have struck free-milling ore that will assay $300 to the ton. This is one of the best mines in Southern Oregon.
    The Tidings says that F. W. Hogg, who had a bond on the Buckeye mine of Fred Grob, near Jacksonville, has bonded the property to Holcomb & Etner, who will put men at work to prospect it within 20 days. The mine is on Jackson Creek, about four miles north of Jacksonville. It was first prospected about 20 years ago and has a 30-foot shaft and a 50-foot tunnel in it. The ledge is about three feet wide, and samples of rock from the old dump are rich in free gold.
Oregonian, Portland, July 31, 1893, page 4


MINING NEWS.
    Beekman & Reames' bank has been buying more gold dust this year than any during a long time.
    The Hope mine in Talent precinct, which belongs to G. S. Butler, L. W. Burriss, S. D. Taylor and others, as also two locations on extensions of the same, have been bonded to Gund & Edwards of Seattle, Wash., for $12,000.
    Work is steadily progressing on the new tunnel of the Ashland mine, which will be 600 feet long when completed. Although the hardest rock is encountered, the Burleigh drill is moving ahead at the rate of five feet a day.
    Wimer Bros., who own extensive placer mines in Waldo district, have made a partial cleanup. A representative of the Times while at Grants Pass last week, saw two bags of gold, weighing nearly 40 pounds, which had been taken out so far. It was something handsome to look at. As this represents nearly $10,000, it will readily be seen that Messrs. Wimer will have a profitable season.
    John C. Lewis, who is operating extensively in Wolf Creek mining district, has just received a concentrator weighing 2200 pounds. He is operating one of the richest quartz ledges in southern Oregon on a small scale.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 11, 1893, page 3


    PROGRESS AT ASHLAND.--Tidings, Aug. 4: The new 600-foot tunnel at the Ashland mine is still going through the toughest kind of rock, but it moves ahead at the rate of five feet a day with the aid of the Burleigh drill.… Work at the Stonewall mine is progressing well. A tunnel is being driven in along the ledge to strike the deep prospect shaft at a 160-foot level. It will be 360 feet long and is 170 now. A railway was laid this week in the tunnel to facilitate the work. Some fine pay ore has been taken out during the past week.… Jas. E. Smith, who was in town this week from the Pierson mine on the Klamath River, says they expect to have their quartz mill running within 30 days. It is the Jacobs mill of five stamps, which had been run as a custom mill near Henley. It has been moved and is being put up at its new site, where power to run it will be furnished by a current wheel in the Klamath River.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 12, 1893, page 110


MINING NEWS.
    The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up and the prospects for a good yield are excellent.
    A. W. Sturgis of Jackass district has finished this season's work and made a big cleanup, running well up into the thousands.
    It is said that a genuine fissure vein has been struck at Dr. Hinkle's mines in Sardine Creek district. The ore prospects very well.
    Simmons, Cameron & Co., who are operating an extensive mining claim in Waldo district, Josephine County, have finished cleaning up and realized handsomely from the past season's work.
    The placer mines of Jackson and Josephine counties yielded better during the past season than any for years past. Many thousands of dollars of gold have been put into circulation during the past few months.
    W. H. Hampton, the well-known mineralogist, negotiated the sale of the Dysert mining property in Grave Creek district to Portland capitalists, and is taking steps to acquire adjoining placer mines. It is the intention to incorporate a stock company and inaugurated a big mining enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 18, 1893, page 3


    BUYING GOLD DUST.--Jacksonville Times, Aug. 11: Beekman & Reames' bank has been buying more gold dust this year than any during a long time.… The Hope mine in Talent precinct, which belongs to G. S. Butler, I. W. Burriss, S. D. Taylor and others, as also two locations on extensions of the same, have been bonded to Gund & Edwards of Seattle, Wash., for $12,000.… Work is steadily progressing on the new tunnel of the Ashland mine, which will be 600 feet long when completed. Although the hardest rock is encountered, the Burleigh drill is moving ahead at the rate of five feet a day.… Wimer Bros., who own extensive placer mines in Waldo district, have made a partial cleanup. Our representative, while at Grants Pass last week, saw two bags of gold, weighing nearly 40 pounds, which had been taken out so far. It was something handsome to look at. As this represents nearly $10,000, it will readily be seen that Messrs. Wimer will have a profitable season.
    THE GLOBE LEDGE.--Rogue River Courier: Razee and Boynton are driving a 250-foot tunnel at the base of an old shaft on Thompson Creek, a tributary of the Applegate. Some $30,000 had formerly been taken out of the mine, but the property fell into litigation and so Razee and Boynton have purchased the claim and gone to work. Pay ore is being followed along the line of the new tunnel.
    SALE OF THE LITTLE DAISY.--Ashland Tidings, Aug. 11: The sale of the Little Daisy mine, of Hammersley and sons, at the head of Jumpoff Joe Creek, to a company of Colorado and Idaho capitalists, was reported last Friday. The purchasers are J. M. Burke and T. D. Drew, and the price is said to be $40,000. The mine is upon a lead of soft or decomposed quartz which varies in thickness from a few inches to 14 inches, and yields from $50 to $1000 to the ton. It was located last fall, and the development consists of a 70-foot shaft, from which drifts have been run a total length of not over 60 feet. The new purchasers intend to put up a 10-stamp mill. Mr. Burke is a prominent Idaho miner, and ran for Governor of that Territory last year.… A large number of men are at work in the Bohemia mining district near Cottage Grove.… The new 5-stamp mill of the Lucky Bart mine on Sardine Creek is expected to be started the last of this week.… W. H. Hampton, the Portland assayer, was in Ashland last Saturday, and it was learned that he has bought the Dysert property of 514 acres, on Grave Creek, 10 miles east of the railroad. The price was $8000. The property consists of rich placer ground and also isolated quartz ledges that prospect well. Mr. Hampton and those who will be interested with him, purpose the opening of a 10-mile ditch to work the placers, taking the water from Grave Creek within the Jackson County boundary lines.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 19, 1893, pages 126-127


MINING NEWS.
    The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up, and the prospects for a good yield are excellent.
    The Mountain Lion mine in Missouri flat district has been bonded to John H. Simons for $12,000.
    Work on the Clark mine in Williams Creek district will soon be resumed, Portland parties having purchased it.
    Prospectors still continue to be numerous, and a great deal of prospecting is being done in Jackson and Josephine counties.
    Work at most of the mines in Williams Creek district has been temporarily suspended. Some good prospects have been found.
    Messrs. Burke and Drew, who purchased a mine in Jumpoff Joe district, are expected to return in a few days with machinery to work the mine.
    F. Grob and J. Nunan, representing Joe Braendle, this week bonded their quartz mine in Jackson Creek district to Fred. Hogg, Judge Holcomb and others.
    The placer mines on Wolf and Grave creeks have paid better this season than for a long time past. It is said that at least $10,000 will be cleaned up at the Ruble mine.
    Simmons, Cameron & Co. of Waldo district will operate on a larger scale than ever next season, and have invested in 2,500 feet of hydraulic pipe, which J. L. Wildren will put together at the mine.
    Interest in the nickel mine affairs was much awakened by the arrival of Col. W. H. Taylor of Chicago at Riddle Friday morning. Col. Taylor, who is one of the principal owners of the property, comes direct from London, England, where he has been negotiating the sale of the mines to an English syndicate. He was accompanied here by his associate, Mr. J. H. Brand, and with supt. S. B. Cobb and C. W. Quackenbush proceeded directly to the mines. Just what will be the result of his visit here is unknown, but it is thought the work will be resumed at an early day, as we are informed that plenty of capital is available as soon as some difficulty among the stockholders is settled.--[Roseburg Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 25, 1893, page 3


    MUCH PROSPECTING.--Browntown Cor., Josephine Courier: Most of the miners are about through cleaning up for the season, and although they do not laugh over the outcome or report any big thing, they try to be satisfied and hopeful for the coming winter. Crosby & Hopkins have struck what they think is the old Cowen lode. The rock prospects fairly. Although the vein matter is but small, it may open up better as they go down. W. A. Johnson has commenced sinking on his location. The ledge is quite large and looks very favorable. Dicky is now working with the Briggs & Doney Company on McDonald Gulch. The company are getting their ditches in shape for a long season's run. I have not heard from Sucker Creek basin, except that the men are all at work and quite sanguine of making a big run and cleanup.
    CLEANING UP.--Jacksonville Times, Aug. 18: The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up, and the prospects for a good yield are excellent. A. W. Sturgis, of Jackass district, has finished this season's work and made a big cleanup, running well up into the thousands. It is said that a genuine fissure vein has been struck at Dr. Hinkle's mines in Sardine Creek district. The ore prospects very well. Simmons, Cameron & Co., who are operating an extensive mining claim in Waldo district, Josephine County, have finished cleaning up and realized handsomely from the past season's work. The placer mines of Jackson and Josephine counties yielded better during the past season than for years past. Many thousands of dollars of gold have been put into circulation during the past few months. W. H. Hampton, the well-known mineralogist, negotiated the sale of the Dysert mining property in Grave Creek district to Portland capitalists, and is taking steps to acquire adjoining placer mines. It is the intention to incorporate a stock company and inaugurate a big mining enterprise.
    CROWDING WORK.--Ashland Tidings, Aug. 18: Col. Thos. Ewing returned Tuesday morning from Seattle, to look after his mining operations, and is crowding work upon the prospect tunnel at the Mountain Lion mine.… Geo. P. Gund, of Seattle, with whom Lon Edwards is interested in mining investments, arrived last Saturday and spent several days visiting, with Mr. Edwards, the several mines where they have prospect work in operation. Mr. Gund is well satisfied with the prospects, and expects to spend more time here during the fall. The Anderson land at Wagner Creek Gap, the St. Patrick claim owned by Jos. A. Wilson, the Park ledge owned by Vannatta and others, and the Hope mine, are some of the properties bonded by Gund & Edwards.… Beagle & Brunk have bought a placer claim of a Chinaman on Grouse Creek, just above the Patterson mine. They already had the Beagle claim on Beaver, just below the Patterson mine. Charles Cowles and a partner have located a placer claim on Mt. Sterling, below Flett's mine, and will prospect it this fall.… Tom Hurd reports that Jack Morris has just worked up a $700 pocket of gold quartz in the Blackwell district. Morris has made a scientific study of this sort of mining, and has found and worked 13 pockets in that region within the last six years, from which he is several thousand dollars ahead.
    CLEANING UP.--Jacksonville Times, Aug. 25: The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up, and the prospects for a good yield are excellent. The Mountain Lion mine in Missouri Flat district has been bonded to John H. Simons for $12,000. Work on the Clark mine in Williams Creek district will soon be resumed, Portland parties having purchased it. Prospectors still continue to be numerous and a great deal of prospecting is being done in Jackson and Josephine counties. Messrs. Burke & Drew, who purchased a mine in Jumpoff Joe district, are expected to return in a few days with machinery to work the mine. F. Grob and J. Nunan, representing Joe Braendel, this week bonded their quartz mine in Jackson Creek district to Fred Hogg, Judge Holcomb and others. The placer mines on Wolf and Grave creeks have paid better this season than for a long time past. It is said that at least $10,000 will be cleaned up at the Ruble mine.
    THE SIMMONS & CAMERON.--Rogue River Courier, Aug. 24: J. L. Wilder went down to Galice Creek Thursday, where he has a contract to put up 2500 feet of hydraulic pipe in the Simmons & Cameron mines. He intends manufacturing the pipe at the mines, and it will probably take three mouths to complete the job. This property is one of the "permanent" ledges of the county, and the owners hope, with the additional pipe, to be able to make a better showing than ever at the end of the coming winter's run.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 2, 1893, page 158


    CLEANING UP.--Jacksonville Times, Sept. 1: The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up, and the prospects for a good yield are excellent. Ennis & Cameron of Galice Creek have finished their season's work and made a satisfactory cleanup. Messrs. Noah & McCracken of Sams Valley are engaged in prospecting a quartz ledge, which promises well. A very rich discovery is reported from Sucker Creek, Josephine County, near the big cave. The quartz is said to be very rich in free gold. The Burleigh drill employed at the Ashland mine is doing good work and has progressed over 200 feet. The rock is becoming softer and more headway is being made. Hosmer, Anderson & Co. of Foots Creek district, who have finished cleaning up, were in Jacksonville one day last week. They realized several thousand dollars from their season's work. The Times was in error last week in stating that J. L. Wilder was putting together 2500 feet of hydraulic pipe for Simmons, Cameron & Co. in Waldo district. It is at Ennis & Cameron's mines in Galice Creek district that he is doing the work.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 9, 1893, page 174


MINING NEWS.
    The Columbia Mining Co. of Grants Pass has filed articles for the purpose of working the Anaconda mine, situated in Applegate district in Josephine County. The amount of the capital stock is $100,000. Allen Nevin, A. C. Tayler and Robert Smith are the incorporators.
    A quartz ledge has been discovered on one of E. E. Miner's farms in Gold Hill precinct, which promises very well. It is six feet wide and grows richer and is better defined as development progresses. Some of the ore taken from the ledge at a depth of thirty feet was sent to the celebrated Selby smelting works of San Francisco and assayed at the rate of $14.50 per ton. As this mine is located in one of the richest mining districts of southern Oregon, Mr. Miner naturally feels highly elated.
    The Grants Pass Observer says that rich placers are being worked on Powell's Creek, a tributary of Williams Creek, in Josephine County. There are already eighteen claims located on the creek, which cover a distance of about five miles, and leave about three and one-half miles further up the stream yet vacant. There seems to be a rich bar at the bottom, which is from 16 to 35 feet wide and very rich. This pay chute does not seem to have any direct course, but runs in all directions along the creek bed. From $4 to $8 per day for each man with pick and shovel has been realized this summer from some of the mines. Powell's Creek furnishes water the year round. Bedrock is reached at a depth of from two to eight feet, and the ground is easily worked. The gold found is coarse.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 15, 1893, page 3


    CLEANING UP.--Jacksonville Times, Sept. 9: The Sterling Mining Co. is engaged in cleaning up, and the prospects for a good yield are excellent. The Ashland Mining Co. has suspended operations with his Burleigh drill until water becomes more plentiful, after having progressed 250 feet. The Jacksonville Mining and Milling Co. will hold a meeting on the 15th inst., to decide what they will do in the future. A ledge has been struck, but of what value and extent its future developments must decide. A. W. Sturgis, of Jackass district, who owns one of the best placer mines in the state, has done well during the past season. The gold cleaned up was sold at Beekman & Reames' bank and amounted to about $17,000. Mr. Sturgis is still engaged in cleaning up the work done with the hydraulic last winter and spring.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 16, 1893, page 191


    HYDRAULIC MINE.--Browntown Cor., Rogue River Courier, Sept. 14: The Illinois Hydraulic Mining Co. is the first incorporated hydraulic company in this section of Josephine County. It is a Portland company with Capt. Geo. A. Pease, president; E. E. Lawrence, secretary; and H. L. Doney, superintendent of works. Their property consists of some hundred and sixty acres of gravel deposit on Bollen Creek and McDonald Gulch, to which they have brought water in ditches, and from the known richness of this section in the past there is a bright outlook for the future. They are now working some six men and will soon commence opening a new trail to connect with the Browntown trail and post office.
    TO WORK A MINE.--The Columbia Mining Co. of Grants Pass have filed articles for the purpose of working the Anaconda mine, situated in Applegate district, in Josephine County. The amount of the capital stock is $100,000. Allen Nevin, A. C. Taylor and Robert Smith are the incorporators.
    PROMISES WELL.--Jacksonville Times: A quartz ledge has been discovered on one of E. E. Miner's farms in Gold Hill precinct, which promises very well. It is six feet wide and grows richer and is better defined as development progresses. Some of the ore taken from the ledge at a depth of 30 feet was sent to the celebrated Selby Smelting Works of San Francisco, and assayed at the rate of $14.50 per ton. As this mine is located in one of the richest mining districts of Southern Oregon, Mr. Miner naturally feels highly elated.
    PLACERS ON POWELL CREEK.--The Grants Pass Observer says that rich placers are being worked on Powell Creek, a tributary of Williams Creek, in Josephine County. There are already 18 claims located on the creek, which cover a distance of about five miles and leave about three and one-half miles farther up the stream yet vacant. There seems to be a rich bar at the bottom, which is from 16 to 35 feet wide and very rich. This pay chute does not seem to have any direct course, but runs in all directions along the creek bed. From $4 to $8 per day for each man with pick and shovel has been realized this summer from some of the mines. Powell Creek furnishes water the year round. Bedrock is reached at a depth of from two to eight feet, and the ground is easily worked. The gold found is coarse.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 23, 1893, page 206


    TO WORK CINNABAR MINES.--Ashland Tidings, Sept. 23: The company which owns the cinnabar property at Cinnabar Springs, 40 miles from Jacksonville by road and trail, is preparing to do this fall and winter the $1300 worth of assessment work required upon the 13 claims. B. M. Newcomb, superintendent of the Napa Consolidated Quicksilver Mining Co., owns a controlling interest in these cinnabar mines. Mr. Newcomb visited the property last week, spent two days looking it over, and was much pleased with the prospect in sight. He ordered contracts let for two tunnels--one of 200 and one of 300 feet in length. Wm. Patterson and J. W. Briner were on the ground with Mr. Newcomb and submitted a bid for the tunnel work. They have not yet been awarded the contract, but it will probably be given to them. J. C. McCully, who has been in charge of the mines for the past year or two, will superintend the work. Mr. Newcomb believes the mines will pay well. The mines which he is superintending near Napa, Cal., are now turning out about 800 flasks of quicksilver per month.
    Hill & Stevens, who have an extension of the Homestake mine claim near Woodville, struck the ledge with their prospect tunnel last Saturday, and found it more than 20 feet wide.
    Supt. Drew, of the Hammersley mine on Jumpoff Joe, is greatly elated by the prospects since the mill started, and reports that he has the purchase price of the mine ($40,000) in sight. Over $2600 was put on the dump in one day of last week from the prospect shaft.
    NICKEL MINE.--Riddle Enterprise: Dr. B. Mohr, the expert sent to make a report of the nickel mines by the English syndicate, arrived at this place direct from London on Wednesday, and, in company with Will Q. Brown, proceeded at once to the nickel mines to make an analysis of the ore. But little time was occupied by the expert in the analysis, and his report will no doubt consummate the sale.
    NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Sept. 22: Ed Schieffelin, the well-known discoverer, is taking out some fine ore from the Little Bunkum ledge in Foots Creek district.
    Lindley & Co., proprietors of the Lucky Bart ledge in Sardine Creek district, have put in a mill and are crushing ore. A good report may be expected from that mine in the near future.
    Drew & Co., who purchased the Hammersley ledge in Jumpoff Joe district, have their mill in operation and are crushing first-class ore. The mine is getting better as development progresses.
    Prof. Moury informs us that he is arranging a big scheme in Elliott Creek district which promises good results. In company with C. A. Fuher and J. Weill of Portland, he has located several placer claims.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 30, 1893, pages 222-223


    MAKING WAGES.--Rogue River Courier: Two men are drifting on a bar just below the mouth of Galice Creek on Rogue River and cleaning up from $6 to $10 per day. They have struck a pay channel and are digging a tunnel four feet high and 12 wide, working on their knees with pick and shovel and wheeling the dirt to sluice boxes placed some distance below.
    PLACER MINE.--Rogue River Courier: The Illinois Hydraulic Mining Co.'s placer on Bollen Creek, near the California line, bids fair to rival the famous Wimer and Simmons placers in richness and extent. The company has 160 acres of very rich dirt, which they have been prospecting for several months with a "self-shooter" and as a result, six ounces of gold was picked up off a strip of bedrock 36 feet long and six feet wide last week. The bank, which is composed of porphyry and serpentine, averages 50 feet in depth, and the bedrock is a light-colored scaly granite. A magnificent fall of water has been obtained by digging a ditch three miles long, and a natural lake at the summit of the mountain nearby will act as a reservoir from which water can be obtained all summer. A string of pipe and a monitor are now being placed in position and as these fields furnished many big nuggets in early days, we expect to hear of big cleanups on this new property. Supt. Doney says there is plenty of good mining ground near Browntown awaiting energy to develop, and he is willing to guide the stranger to rich fields still undeveloped. The elevation of this placer is 3500 feet, so there will be no trouble about dumping the debris. Six men are now employed at the mine, but the force will have to be increased as developments proceed. Supplies for the mine are obtained from Browntown, distant six miles.
    JACKSON COUNTY NOTES.--Times, Sept. 30: Messrs. Hill and Stevens, who have been prospecting an extension of the Homestake mine is Evans Creek precinct, have struck a ledge over two feet wide, which prospects well.
    The Jacksonville Milling and Mining Co. met a few days since and ordered the stock upon which assessment had not been paid sold. Prospecting will be resumed at an early day. A well-defined ledge is in sight, but whether it is rich remains to be seen.
    E. Sanderson Smith, the well-known mining expert, who has done so much to attract the attentions of capitalists toward Southern Oregon, will resume operations at the Gold Hill mine in a short time. He is hopeful of striking a rich seam of ore which will startle the oldest inhabitant.
    The Mountain Lion mine, in Missouri Flat district, has not been bonded to anyone. Bailey & Co. are working it and taking out free-milling ore to be crushed on their two-stamp arrastras. As they have already considerable high-grade ore on the various dumps, and tons more in sight, an extensive and successful run will be made. Mining men who are looking for first-class gold mines should not fail to visit the Mountain Lion and convince themselves that it is one of the best-paying quartz properties in the state.
    "The Annie mine was never in better condition than it is today," said J. B. McGee, president of the Annie Mining Company, to a reporter one day this week. "By sending our concentrates to Tacoma for reduction," he continued, "we have just doubled our product in pure gold, and the total monthly average output at the present time is about $6000. We have recently put in two small concentrators, capable of turning out a ton of concentrates per day. The first ton of this material was shipped to Tacoma on July 15th and netted us about $100. Since that time we have been shipping regularly, and now the average return is about $100 per ton. This, taken together with another $100 worth of metal crushed out by a five-stamp mill, makes up the neat little sum I have spoken of."
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 7, 1893, page 238


    NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Oct. 6: John Bailey and Ed Layton have pounded out $950 worth of gold from rock taken from a claim they have located in Williams Creek district. The claim is on an extension of the Bone of Contention ledge, upon which they have sunk a 12-foot shaft. The ledge is from 12 to 18 inches in width and can be traced several hundred feet.
    W. H. Hampton of Portland, the mineralogist, who has secured the Dysert and other properties in Grave Creek district, Josephine County, is making preparations to commence the construction of a ditch 15 miles long. This will famish an ample supply of water, all that is needed to develop one of the richest placer mining districts in the Northwest.
    The Siskiyou Quicksilver Mining Co. is making arrangements to run 500 feet of tunnel, and has levied another assessment of one cent a share to raise funds with which to prosecute the work. Mr. Newcomb, who owns a controlling interest, seems to be of the opinion that cinnabar exists in paying quantities, and that the projected work will establish the fact.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 14, 1893, page 255


MINING NEWS.
    A. W. Shearer picked up an 8-ounce nugget in his claim on Steamboat last week, while cleaning up.
    Dr. W. H. Flanagan of Grants Pass, having bought an interest in the Golden Fleece mine near Ashland, will move his quartz mill, which has been working on Williams Creek, thither.
    The Siskiyou Q.M. Co. has let the contract for running two tunnels at Cinnabar. Drake & Co. have one and Haskins Bros. the other. Work will be commenced at once, and will be pushed as rapidly as possible.
    H. C. Dollarhide and Harvey Roach, who are working at their coal mine in the Siskiyous, have found a good lignite coal and believe the tunnel they are now running will strike a vein of sufficient thickness to pay for working.
    J. C. Antonelle, who is engaged in constructing a canal to be used for mining purposes for A. L. Lewis in Wolf Creek district, has fifty men at work now and will soon increase the price [sic] to 250. The canal will be 16½ miles long and will be used for hydraulic mining purposes.
    The Staples & VanVactor mine at the Sterling ledge on head of Hungry Creek in California is now running its new ten-stamp mill. Wm. Patterson runs the engine on one shift, and Owen Dunlap of Phoenix is also employed at the mine. Altogether, about twenty men are at work there now, and probably ten will be retained all winter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 20, 1893, page 3


    STRIKE ON MONGER CREEK.--Rogue River Courier, Oct. 12: Minus Caldwell and Sam Ryan have "struck it rich" on Monger Creek, a tributary of Williams Creek, about 26 miles from Grants Pass. They are getting out good gold with pick and pan, and indications are that there is plenty of it ahead of them. This region lies along the boundary of Josephine and Jackson counties and was overlooked in the mad rush for rich placers 35 years ago. The canyons over there are full of hopeful prospectors, and old settlers predict flush times there this winter. Water is plenty and the bedrock is found from four to ten feet.
    J. C. Taylor, who has been busy at Galice Creek all fall, reports things progressing in that part of Josephine and predicts a bright future for the mines there. He has recently set up 1048 feet of giant pipe, which tapers from 23 inches in diameter down to the monitor with a splendid fall of 335 feet.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 21, 1893, page 270


Hydraulic Fields of Southern Oregon.
    Prof. Leigh Harnett, a mining man well known in Oregon, is of opinion that the hydraulic territory in Southern Oregon, from Canyonville to Ashland, is the richest and most continuous on the coast. Says Mr. Harnett:
    "From the earliest days it is a matter of history that out of the placer mines of Southern Oregon fully $40,000,000 have been taken up to the present time. This large sum was taken from such small portions of the low-lying ground that could be reached by water and worked by sluices. Today, in Oregon, as once in California, a sufficiency of water is the great consideration; that is, to put under systematic operation the whole range of the rich placer fields of our state, especially the portions suitable to the great hydraulic system. When that day comes Oregon will be the banner gold-producing state of the Union."
    The gold flow Mr. Harnett refers to he says is fully 200 miles long without sensible break or intermission. This, he contends, is proved by two facts--the similarity of the gravel formation and the result of the hydraulic pipe wherever water, in even limited quantity, could be obtained at any point of the 200 miles. During the present season there has been an unusual supply of water, and the cleanups, the best of all evidences, have been proportionately good, while all were in advance of past years. Messrs. Sturgis and Hall and Beck, near Grants Pass, respectively, cleaned up $20,000 and $10,000 clear profit. Below them, the Humphrey and Sterling mines, with the best hydraulic plants, perhaps, in the state, are still to be heard from. The claims on the whole line, at from 10 to 20 miles apart, are under pipe, and therefore the whole length Is now really developed beyond mistake--a most important point.
    This question of sufficiency of water for thorough work Mr. Harnett hopes soon to prove. Last summer he formed a company in Portland, called the South Umpqua Hydraulic Mining Company, and they have since done good work. The ditch, ten miles long, with a carrying capacity of 5000 inches of water, is surveyed, the whole territory carefully prospected, and a sawmill put up at the head of the mines is now cutting lumber for their dam across the Umpqua and such portions of the ditch as will have to be flumed. Mr. Harnett thinks that the whole of his company's ground is good for five cents a cubic yard. There are two other ditches being surveyed, one 35 miles long and 400 feet higher than the one first mentioned. This ditch belongs to San Francisco men and is intended for lumber as well as mining. Farther south, at Grave Creek, John Lewis, of Portland, has commenced an extension for a better supply of water next season.
    It is fortunate for Southern Oregon, Mr. Harnett thinks, that California has resumed the hydraulic system on a large scale, for when these three ditches are turned over the placer ground and show its real value, large sums will come from California to Oregon. The people of that state, says the Professor, will never lose their love for hydraulic mining, more particularly where the debris question, as in Oregon, can never exist to any extent.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 28, 1893, page 277


    MINE SOLD.--Ashland Tidings, Oct. 20: The Ophir mine near Ashland, owned by McCarthy, Beswick, Martin, Roper and others, has been sold to a Mr. Lawrence, cousin of the mayor of Brooklyn, N.Y., for $1500, cash sale, money to be paid in 30 days. The Ophir has two prospect tunnels in it, and some fine prospects have been struck. It is near the Golden Fleece, upon which the Huntington mill is to be put up immediately, and is supposed to be a similar formation. Mr. Lawrence started for New York last week, and is expected back soon.
    Another quartz mill will begin its musical hum in this neighborhood soon. Dr. W. H. Flanagan of Grants Pass has taken an interest with Hill & Shannon in the Golden Fleece mine, north of town, and is moving his Huntington mill to the mine, which has been operated on Williams Creek, in Josephine County. The Golden Fleece is a claim on E. K. Anderson's land, crossing the upper end of the old McCall & Anderson gravel mines, which have been worked by hydraulic pressure for many years. Mr. Hill, who is an experienced miner, became convinced that this placer mine was fed by a mineralized dike or ledge near at hand, and in his prospecting found the source of the gold to be an extensive body of ore which had been cut into at the upper end of the gravel mine. He and R. T. Shannon secured a bond or long-time lease of the ground from E. K. Anderson, and have been actively at work prospecting it during the past few months. Different parties have examined the property with a view to putting a mill upon it; but, as the formation is peculiar and unlike what most of them have been familiar with, they hesitated until Hill & Shannon grew tired of waiting and began negotiations with Dr. Flanagan. Some 30 sacks of the ore were carted over to Williams Creek and tested in the Flanagan mill, and the result was so satisfactory that it was determined to move the mill to the mine at once. It is being transported now by wagons, and will be put at work just as soon as the necessary buildings and accessories can be constructed. Mr. Hill put half a dozen men at work last Monday, fixing the wagon roads and bridges across the gulches. The power is to be supplied by a 20-foot overshot wheel (20 horsepower) which I. O. Miller is now making. The mill--a Huntington rotary--works up about 1½ tons of the ore per hour, and scours the gold so that much of it which would be lost in the hydraulic operations by failure to amalgamate will be saved on the plates. The battery is also supplemented with a first-class concentrator, and very little gold will get through to the tailings. Mr. Hill calls the ore deposit a boil between walls. The walls are a long distance apart, but he believes it is a genuine fissure and that the mine will be a deep one. However that may be, there is a vast body of ore on the surface. It can be worked for about $1 a ton, and, if it yields as the prospects indicate, the miners will have a bonanza.
    W. L. McClure and W. T. Shaffer were in town last Monday from Gold Hill, and a few mining items of interest were obtained from them. Joe Cox, who was with Lucky Bart in the discovery of the mine sold to Lindley, has made another rich discovery on Sardine or Murphy Creek which he thinks will be a good thing. Lindley's mill is running steadily at the Lucky Bart mine, and everything is reported favorable there. At the Hammersley mine, at the head of Jumpoff Joe, the mill is disabled, but the mine is opening out handsomely--ledge getting bigger as they go down, and as rich as ever.
    S. D. Taylor came over a few days ago from his mine at the head of Hungry Creek, and reports everything looking bright at the mine. Staples & Van Vactor's new five-stamp mill, not far from his mine, runs like clockwork and gives encouragement to prospecting in that region.
    H. C. Dollarhide and Harvey Roach continue work at their coal mine in the Siskiyous, and with constant encouragement at the improvement of the prospect as their work progresses. They have found a good lignite coal, and believe that a tunnel which they are now running will strike a vein of sufficient thickness to pay well for working. Their mine is within three miles of the railroad and within 300 yards of a wagon road.
    COW CREEK MINES.--Jacksonville Times: C. S. Goodnow, of Cow Creek, an old miner, started up his hydraulic works on the 20th of September. He thinks that he will clean up $5 worth of gold per hour when his works are in full operation. He has a blue gravel lead such as is peculiar to California, and such leads are considered by old miners to give the best results from work performed.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 28, 1893, page 286


MINING NEWS.
    Since the arrival of the Huntington mill at the Golden Fleece mine near Ashland, attention has been attracted to that locality, and several pieces of land near have been bonded.
    Lon. Edwards has his men at work at the Hope mine, which was bonded a short time ago by Gund & Edwards. They are cleaning out the old prospect shaft at a point near the dividing line of the "Hope" and "Shorty" claims. The shaft was filled up with waste by the men who worked the mine last. After it is cleaned out and retimbered it will be sunk deeper upon the ledge in prospect work.
    Phil. Miller, who is superintending operations at the Miller mines on Farmers Flat, is making preparations for the next season's run.
    John Simons left Tuesday morning to commence operations on the Bailey mine on Missouri Flat, which has been bought by a Portland syndicate.
    Drew & Co. are about to put up a five-stamp mill on the quartz ledge which they recently purchased from G. R. Hammersley in Jumpoff Joe district.
    Jos. Wolfstein and J. Weill have located 40 acres of mining ground near the Oregon line and have acquired water rights on Dutch Creek, a tributary of Elliott Creek.
    Messrs. Poppleton & Bishop, the gentlemen owning the dry-wash machine, which was given a successful trial at Al. Sturgis' claim this week, have bonded the Owens claim in Jackson Creek district and will put a force of men to work on the mine as soon as possible. The machine is evidently a success and will make it possible to work many claims in this section which have not paid before on account of lack of water.
    Messrs. Poppleton & Bishop, who have invented a machine for dry-process washing, have been experimenting with it [on] Al. Sturgis' placer claim. They passed six buckets of tailings from the Sturgis mine through the machine and got about 15 cents in gold from it. The dirt was afterward panned out without raising a color. The owners of the machine will work the tailings of the Sturgis mine and expect to make it pay.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1893, page 3


    THE GOLDEN FLEECE.--Ashland Tidings, Oct. 27: The Huntington mill for the Golden Fleece mine arrived last week, the building for its occupancy is constructed, and the water wheel which is to furnish power to run it is being set in place. Dr. Flanagan and Messrs. Shannon and Hill, who were at the mine Wednesday, report that they hope to see the mill running in two weeks.
    The prospect of a successful issue of this new enterprise has turned attention of mining men to that locality, and the lands adjacent to the claims of Shannon & Hill are looked upon with covetous eyes. Mrs. Kilgore, who owns the 22-acre tract including the buildings and orchard of the old Hammond or Rockfellow place, has given a bond upon it to Mr. Hough for 30 days, the price being $4500, $100 being paid down to secure the bond. Postmaster Hammond, who owns 80 acres higher on the hill, has also given a short bond on it to other parties.
    Lon. Edwards has his men at work at the Hope mine, which was bonded a short time ago by Gund & Edwards. They are cleaning out the old prospect shaft at a point near the dividing line of the "Hope" and "Shorty" claims. The shaft was filled up with waste by the men who worked the mine last. After it is cleaned out and remembered it will be sunk deeper upon the ledge, in prospect work.
    W. W. Walters went over to Sawyers Bar the first of the week, to put J. M. Harney and another man at work upon a mining claim in which he is interested with a San Francisco party.
    Mr. Dunn, a geologist employed by the California State Mining Bureau, has been tracing the famous "blue lead" up through California from the mining counties in the central part of the state through the northern counties to the Siskiyou mountains. At Klamath River he fell in with C. B. Jilson, the original blue lead discoverer and proprietor of the Siskiyou region, and in company with Mr. Jilson came over to Ashland Tuesday evening. Theory and surface indications trace the blue lead under the Siskiyou Mountains into this valley, but as this is outside of Mr. Dunn's territory he did not put in any time at explorations here.
    TO CRUSH ORE.--Jacksonville Times, Oct. 27: Ezra Poppleton and H. T. Bishop, of Tacoma, are making preparations to crush the ore from the Owens mine in Jackson Creek district and have already shipped machinery from Tacoma, which is expected here soon.
    Wallace Rogers and A. J. Jackson have unearthed a three-foot ledge near the Shannon & Hill mine, which promises to be very rich. The first assay on the surface went $17.50 to the ton. A force of men are at work and if the ore is as rich at a depth of 25 feet a mill will be put in.
    A hydraulic giant will soon be put in at the Illinois Mining Co.'s claim in Althouse district, Josephine County. They have some rich ground there and intend to work on a large scale. The claim was worked in early days by a couple of Germans, who took out several thousand dollars, and, being satisfied with their haul, left the country. H. L. Doney and Dr. J. M. Taylor found the old workings, while on a prospecting tour in July last, and washed out some rich dirt and found some good-sized nuggets.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 4, 1893, page 306


MINING NEWS.
    Wimer Bros. have commenced piping at their claim in Waldo district.
    Siskiyou County produced over $900,000 worth of gold last year, and this year it will exceed around $1,000,000.
    Work is being pushed rapidly on claims in the Applegate section, and prospects are very favorable for a good season.
    About 200 men are at work on the 15-mile ditch being constructed in Wolf Creek district to work the placer claims located by W. H. Hampton and J. C. Lewis.
    The monthly cleanup of the Ashland mine resulted in a brick weighing over $5,000. This is one of the best-paying and [most] reliable pieces of mining property in the district.
    Z. F. Moody of Salem, son of ex-Governor Moody, is interested with Dr. Flanagan and Messrs. Shannon and Hill in the Golden Fleece mine near Ashland, and came to see how the work of putting up the mill progresses. It is expected the mill will be started by the middle or last of this week.
    Geo. F. Gund, the Seattle member of the firm of Gund & Edwards, arrived in Ashland last week, accompanied by Geo. T. Miliken, the expert who was here last summer. In company with Mr. Edwards they have put in the present week examining the Hope mine and other properties in which Gund & Edwards are interested.
    All the miners on the Klamath River are now doing good work with excellent success in taking out gold dust at their several claims, the weather being fine for carrying on mining operations in that stream. The same may be said of the miners along Humbug Creek, and other tributaries of the Klamath throughout the entire county and in Trinity County adjoining.
    A rich strike has been made at the Golden Eagle mine on Williams Creek. R. M. Garrett and Jack Garvin of Ashland, part owners in the mine, brought a sack of ore to Ashland last week weighing nineteen pounds, out of which they got over $250 in gold. By washing and panning the ore went from $25,000 to $30,000 to the ton, and one lump they had assayed went over $100,000 to the ton. The ore was taken from a 30-foot prospect shaft on a ledge three feet wide, and is located within a half-mile of the Bone of Contention ledge. Arrangements will soon be made to work the mines through the winter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 10, 1893, page 3


    AT THE GOLDEN EAGLE.--Ashland Tidings, Nov. 3: The latest mining sensation in local circles is the rich strike made in the Golden Eagle mine on Williams Creek, owned principally by Ashland people. R. M. Garrett and Jack Garvin, part owners of the mine, who had been there for a week or two, returned last Saturday with some ore that lifted the eyes out of the sockets of the beholders. They had a sack of ore weighing about nineteen pounds. They had already washed out of it without crushing a bunch of nuggets worth about $150. The rock was mortared in Ashland and yielded another hundred dollars. The tailings also carried plenty of fine gold which they had to catch by amalgamation. The ore was taken from a 30-foot prospect shaft in a ledge about three feet wide. It was located last spring by Robert Neal of Wagner Creek and Fred Mallen, and has been sold by them to a company composed of Jack Garvin, R. M. Garrett, Judge Tolman, Crit Tolman, R. Beswick, J. H. Martin, Capt. Ingalls of Portland, and Dr. Van Hasslocher of Paris. It is located on Williams Creek, within half a mile of the "Bone of Contention" mine owned by Smith & Booth of Grants Pass, upon which there is a stamp mill. The company have three ledges, one larger and another smaller than the Golden Eagle, and all lying parallel. The claims are on a ridge cut by the gulches from which hundreds of thousands of dollars were taken years ago in the rich Williamsburg diggings, and the men who have made this strike of rich ore think they have lots of it within their claims. They will make arrangements soon to work the mine through the winter.
    The Ashland mine, the foundation of all the mining activity about Ashland, continues to turn out its regular monthly dividends.
    Geo. F. Gund, the Seattle member of the firm of Gund & Edwards, arrived in Ashland last Friday, accompanied by Geo. T. Milliken, the expert who was here last summer. In company with Mr. Edwards they have put in the present week examining the Hope mine and other properties in which Gund and Edwards are interested.
    Snowgoose Brothers, who came in from Klamath County late in the summer, and one of the Wertz boys, have several quartz claims in the Siskiyous, near the railroad, which show good prospects. They are fixed with buildings, etc., for winter weather, and intend to keep right at work, regardless of wind, rain or snow.
    J. W. Briner is still at work prospecting his cinnabar claims up near the head of Applegate, and from samples of ore which he took over to Philip Mullen last week to test he is satisfied that he has one of the best cinnabar prospects unearthed in this region.
    J. F. Duffy has struck a very promising lead of cinnabar in the prospect tunnel which he is running on the claims near the McCall & Anderson mine, and is now drifting along the vein and taking out some ten percent cinnabar ore.
    THE ILLINOIS PLACER COMPANY.--Oregonian: Among the recent arrivals is Captain George A. Pease, who has just been looking after his interests in the Althouse district. He reports that the most promising placer prospect there is owned by the Illinois Hydraulic Mining Company. It is situated about 60 miles southwest of Grants Pass, in Josephine County, and is in the heart of the Siskiyou Mountains. About 30 years ago it was worked by a couple of Germans. After several good finds they came upon a piece of quartz which netted them about $1200, and satisfied with their haul they left the country. The big hole which they dug in the mountainside was partly filled by a mountain slide, and it was in that condition when H. L. Doney and Dr. J. M. Taylor, while on a prospecting tour, found the claim about July 1 last. They washed out some rich dirt, and picked up several good-sized nuggets before leaving the place. Eight claims, covering about 160 acres, were staked out on the property, and a company formed to work it. An abundance of water can be obtained from Boulder and McDonald creeks through pipe lines about 600 feet in length, but reservoirs must be built to keep up the supply all the year round. While digging a ditch the workmen picked up $600 worth of small nuggets, and again, while sluicing out a portion of the old tunnel, 20 feet in length and 4 in width, 20 ounces of small nuggets and coarse dust were picked up. There are now en route for the mine a hydraulic "giant," some smaller machines and a large amount of piping, all of which, it is expected, will be in place before the snow falls. No attempt has yet been made to estimate the value of the dirt, for the owners of the mine believe they have something better on hand than the placer mine. About 350 feet up the mountainside they have discovered a
well-defined ledge from which, they believe, the gold in the placer below has been washed. It is the intention to sluice out all the debris below this ledge, laying the rock bare, before working on the ledge itself.
    MINING NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Nov. 3: Since the arrival of the Huntington mill at the Golden Fleece mine near Ashland, attention has been attracted to that locality and several pieces of land near have been bonded.
    Lon. Edwards has his men at work at the Hope mine, which was bonded a short time ago by Gund & Edwards. They are cleaning out the old prospect shaft at a point near the dividing line of the "Hope" and "Shorty" claims. The shaft was filled up with waste by the men who worked the mine last. After it is cleaned out and retimbered it will be sunk deeper upon the ledge, in prospect work.
    Phil. Miller, who is superintending operations at the Miller mines on Farmers Flat, is making preparations for the next season's run.
    John Simons left Tuesday morning to commence operations on the Bailey mine on Missouri Flat, which has been bought by a Portland syndicate.
    Drew & Co. are about to put up a five-stamp mill on the quartz ledge which they recently purchased from G. R. Hammersley in Jumpoff Joe district.
    Jos. Wolfstein and J. Weill have located 40 acres of mining ground near the Oregon line and have acquired water rights on Dutch Creek, a tributary of Elliott Creek.
    Messrs. Poppleton & Bishop, the gentlemen owning the dry wash machine which was given a successful trial at Al. Sturgis' claim this week, have bonded the Owens claim in Jackson Creek district and will put a force of men to work on the mine as soon as possible. The machine is evidently a success and will make it possible to work many claims in this section, which have not paid before on account of lack of water.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 11, 1893, page 318


MINING NEWS.
    The placer miners are ready for the winter's run.
    A great deal of prospecting is still going on in southern Oregon, and some discoveries which promise well are being made.
    The Sterling Mining Co. still has a good supply of water and has been engaged in piping for several months past, something never known before in the history of the mines.
    Lindley & Co. of California, who purchased the Lucky Bart mine on Sardine Creek some time since, have put up a first-class mill, which is running steadily on good ore. This promises to be one of the best pieces of mining property in southern Oregon.
    Prospectors when out of reach of assayers to test their ore can by the following method determine whether the rock to be tested carries mineral or not: When you desire to make the test pulverize the rock very fine; then take one part of the pulp and two parts of common gunpowder; mix them together with enough water to make a stiff dough; work it up and mix thoroughly together in your hands; then form into a cone or pyramid and let it dry in the sun or near a fire. When dry, set the cone on a flat stone and put a live coal on top of the cone. When it has sizzled and sputtered itself out the mineral, if there was any in the rock, will be found in the shape of a button on the stone.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1893, page 2


    MINING NEWS.--Jacksonville Times, Nov. 17: The placer miners are ready for the winter's run.
    A great deal of prospecting is still going on in Southern Oregon, and some discoveries which promise well are being made.
    The Sterling Mining Co. still has a good supply of water, and has been engaged in piping for several months past, something never known before in the history of the mines.
    Lindley & Co., of California, who purchased the Lucky Bart mine on Sardine Creek some time since, have put up a first-class mill, which is running steadily on good ore. This promises to be one of the best pieces of mining property in Southern Oregon.
    UPPER GRAVE CREEK MINES.--Rogue River Courier: Geo. Cronk reports good prospects among the placers on Upper Grave Creek. Blalock & Son, he says, have struck a splendid ledge of copper, gold and silver on Onion Creek. About 200 men are employed on the big ditch up there. The laborers get $1.75 a day and board themselves. The promoters of the project have established a commissary and sell groceries, etc., to the men. The ditch is to be 15 miles long, and, when complete, will have fully half a mile of perpendicular pressure. This is liable to tear things on Grave Creek this winter.
    Surveyor G. I. Brown spent a few days last week surveying mining claims down Rogue River. He reports the Bybee placer almost ready for work with two monitors in position. Big apples 16 inches in circumference ornamented the lunch baskets on the expedition, and Mr. Brown thinks that country is good for other purposes besides gold mining.
    Green Bartlett was in from Deer Creek Monday. He talks of erecting smelting works on his Preston Peak ledge, as that is the only way the ore can be handled. The vein is 30 feet wide and the ore assays 80 percent of copper and $15 per ton of gold. Work has been suspended out there this year on account of the snow.
    SALE OF THE HAMMOND TRACT.--Ashland Tidings, Nov. 17: The sale of A. P. Hammond's tract of 82 acres, adjacent to the claims of the Golden Fleece Company north of town, where the Huntington mill is being set up, was consummated this week. The purchase was made by Geo. S. Sanford, who is here, and he buys for himself and three capitalists of Long Island City, N.Y. His associates are Matthew J. Goldner, president of the Jackson & Vernon Ave. Improvement Co., M. F. Claven and Horatio S. Sanford, the latter of whom is mayor of Long Island City and one of the proprietors of Sanford's patent medicines. The price paid for the 82 acres was $2500. The same gold-bearing vein or dike which the Golden Fleece Company is preparing to work is located across this property, and it is the intention of the purchasers to put up either a Huntington mill or a stamp mill at once. The plan is to put their mill below the Golden Fleece mill and use for power the same water from the Anderson mining ditch.
    The Golden Fleece mill will soon be running, and a test made which will either encourage or depress the high hopes entertained of an extensive mining industry from the beginning in this new direction started by Hill & Shannon.
    It is reported from Gold Hill that Morton Lindley has struck a rich pay chute in a new place on the Lucky Bart claim, on Sardine Creek, and that the property is showing up well.
    Fitch, Davis & Cardwell, who put up a Huntington mill on their mine near Willow Springs, will add a concentrator to the machinery and start it in operation again this winter.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 2, 1893, pages 366-367


    NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Dec. 8: Messrs. Beck & Black have leased the Sherer & Windom claim in Josephine County and will commence active operations at once.
    Wickstrom Bros. & Corliss have purchased the placer mines of Loomis & Hay on Jones Creek for $650, and will work the claims to their full capacity this season.
    The mill owned by Dr. Flanagan and Z. Moody, and which has been operated in Williams Creek district for some time past, has been removed to Ashland precinct, where it will crush quartz from the Sherman ledge.
    T. J. Chapman, the newly appointed receiver, will soon take charge of the Hammersley mine, in Jumpoff Joe precinct. The property is considered to be quite valuable, and a mill has been operated there with considerable success for several months past. 
    Mining Commissioner C. W. Ayers returned last week from Chicago with three blue ribbons which he carried off for mining exhibits from this state. One is for a placer mine in operation, awarded to Mr. Ayers. The others are one for collective exhibit of gold ores and one for collective exhibit of gold, silver, copper and lead ores, by state of Oregon.
    NEW MILLS.--Four new quartz mills are expected to be set up in the vicinity of Ashland this winter.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 16, 1893, page 399


MINING NEWS.
    The placer miners are busy.
    Alex. Orme, the well-known miner of Foots Creek, was in our midst last week.
    Francis Fitch has been confined to his room for several days with a severe attack of grippe.
    The Lucky Bart mining company have shut down their mill for the present, owing to the bad roads.
    Ennis & Cameron are running on full time at their placer mines in Galice Creek district, having an abundant supply of water.
    Messrs. Hall & Sleezer, who found a promising quartz ledge in Tallowbox district, are making preparations to develop it.
    Considerable rain fell during the week and water is running freely again, much to the joy of the miners, who have been frost-bound for awhile.
    Operations have been resumed at A. W. Sturgis' placer mines in Jackass district, and a big run will doubtless be made there during the next few months.
    Four prospectors from Tacoma and Mr. Culp have discovered good placer diggings in Steamboat precinct, near T. B. Houston's residence, and are engaged in working them.
    Knott, Swinden and Donson of the Marland mine, in  district, have commenced a 500-foot tunnel on their property and expect to do a great deal of work this season.
    G. W. Rowland and A. J. Daley, who are operating a Chile mill and arrastra at their quartz mine near Gold Hill, are pleased with the prospects. The ore looks well, and they expect to make a respectable cleanup.
    It is said that a ten-stamp mill will soon be put up by J. C. Lewis, the Portland mining man, on the Green quartz mine on Galice Creek. This mine has been worked occasionally for the past eighteen years and has proved to be a paying property.
    A number of discoveries of rich quartz in different portions of southern Oregon are being reported regularly. Some first-class mines are certain to be developed in the near future. This is the richest mineral region in the whole state.
    Fred. Miller of Missouri Flat was in Grants Pass lately, and reports that work on the Mountain Lion mine is being pushed vigorously. A new quartz mill will soon be placed in position, to take the place of the arrastra now in use. First-class ore is being taken out.
    Messrs. Boynton, Razee and Tobler of Grants Pass, who have been prospecting the old Thompson Creek ledge, have received sufficient encouragement to put up a five-stamp mill, which is expected to arrive before long. They have struck a well-defined and rich vein of quartz.
    The Taylor Mining Co. of Chicago has recently paid off a large part of its debts, and will resume work soon in the Wolf Creek district. A large amount of machinery has been standing on the cars there for months, owing to the inability of the company to pay the freight.--[Roseburg Review.
   
Locators of quartz claims should keep in mind the following provisions of the law in regard to assessment work on claims for 1893: "The claimant or claimants of any mining locations, in order to secure the benefits of this act, shall cause to be recorded in the office where the location notices or certificate is filed, on or before December 31st, 1893, a notice that he or they in good faith intend to work said claim."
    F. V. Skiff, chief of the department of mines and mining at the World's Fair, compliments Oregon highly on the showing made in the department. The miniature placer mine is especially praised. The exhibit is characterized as being a full and complete display of the resources of the state in that direction, and much credit is due C. W. Ayer, the mining commissioner, for his success despite the adverse circumstances he labored under.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1893, page 2


    TO TRY AGAIN.--Ashland Tidings, Dec. 15: Jas. E. Smith & Co. have concluded to build another wheel to run their mill by the current in the Klamath River. The unexpected rise in the river last month took out their wheel and they thought of putting in an engine, but finally decided to risk another wheel, which they will build so that it may be lifted higher than the one that was lost. L. E. Payne went over to Anderson's Ferry from Ashland on Wednesday to construct the wheel for them.
    The Shorty, a short extension of the Hope mining claim, is now owned by Messrs. Alonzo Edwards, E. K. Anderson and Geo. C. Sanford. They are preparing to work the mine, and have men at work clearing out the old shafts and putting them in safe working condition.
    RECEIVER FOR A MINE.--Jacksonville Times: T. J. Chapman of Gold Hill has taken charge of the Hammersley mine, having been appointed receiver by the circuit court. A large quantity of quartz has been crushed by the small mill on the ground, and it is supposed that it paid well. It is likely that operations will be continued.
    The T.P.M.&M. Co. of Leland have five men at work on their property laying pipe, digging ditches and getting ready to commence active operations at an early day. The water used to operate this mine will be forced by pump pressure to an elevation of 400 feet. Dan Greer, an experienced California miner, is superintendent.
    RESUMED OPERATIONS.--The Taylor Placer Mining and Milling Company of Chicago, says the Grants Pass Observer, has again resumed operations. Representatives of the company from Chicago have been in the county for a few weeks fixing up its business, which had got into bad shape owing to bad management. They have paid off several thousand dollars of its obligations, and now, with a clear record to commence anew with, the work will be pushed to completion. Undoubtedly this company owns some of the richest placers found in Southern Oregon. Much of the ground shows very rich, as high as 80 cents to the pan having been washed out by prospectors, while it is said to be impossible to wash a pan without getting several particles of gold. The company have on the ground a complete set of powerful pumps, shipped from the East for the purpose of raising water onto their claim. The pumps will be run by steam power and are being placed in position now.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 23, 1893, page 414


MINING NEWS.
    The cold weather is interfering with the miners.
    A new million-dollar smelting plant for San Francisco Bay is projected by a syndicate of Omaha capitalists, headed by Wm. Selover. The company is to be known as the Occidental Smelting and Refining Company, and it will handle all kinds of ores. It is said the Great Falls, Montana plant will be duplicated.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 29, 1893, page 3


    Since Rogue River, in Oregon, has regained its normal stage of water, a deep channel is being cut straight out to sea, while the north spit has moved out to sea fully half a mile. At low tide a low spit can be seen reaching out from the McCormack rock in a semicircle to the mouth of the river, half a mile farther out than the former spit, and where the mouth of the river formerly was is now dead water.
"Coast Industrial Notes," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 30, 1893, page 429


    THE SIMMONS DAM.--Rogue River Courier: The carrying away of the Simmons' dam is bad for the Waldo country, as it throws a number of men out of employment and forces the owners to discontinue piping for the season. This rich placer annually distributes thousands of dollars in the southern end of this county, besides netting a handsome cleanup for its owners. The value of the dam was probably about $500, but its loss is small compared to loss of the season's run.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 30, 1893, page 430


    NEW CONCENTRATOR.--Ashland Tidings, Dec. 30: Mr. Staples, who is now in San Francisco, is expected to bring up with him on his return a concentrator for the mill on the Sterling ledge.
    R. M. Garrett, Jack Garvin, Dr. Hirchslager and Crit Tolman came up from their mine on Williams Creek last week, and report prospect work in progress with good results. Captain Ingalls, of Portland, another of the owners, visited the mine last week.
    W. D. Anderson, a well-known miner and prospector, is in town this week from Sardine Creek, and reports a good strike in one of his locations, about a mile from the Lindley quartz mill. The rock from a three-foot ledge assays $17 in gold and $6 in silver.
    It is rumored that an attempt is being made to compromise or settle the dispute for possession of the Hammersley mine at the head of Jumpoff Joe. Morton Lindley, of the Lucky Bart mine, and another man are said to be making the effort to bring Hammersley and Drew to an amicable agreement.
    Will Q. Brown, of Riddle, reports that there is no prospect of anything being done at the nickel mines until spring, in any event. If the Chicago company is not prepared to commence active operations then, Mr. Brown believes another company will take hold of the business. There is a large quantity of nickel ore in that region not owned or controlled by the Chicago company, and the field will be open for a new enterprise if the old company doesn't begin to produce the metal.
    MINING NOTES.--Jacksonville Times, Dec. 22: The Lucky Bart Mining Company have shut down their mill for the present, owing to the bad roads.
    Ennis & Cameron are running on full time at their placer mines in Galice Creek district, having an abundant supply of water.
    Operations have been resumed at A. W. Sturgis' placer mines in Jackass district, and a big run will doubtless be made there during the next few months.
    Knott, Swinden and Donson of the Marland mine, in  district, have commenced a 600-foot tunnel on their property, and expect to do a great deal of work this season.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 6, 1894, page 13


    THE MOUNTAIN LION.--Jacksonville Times, Jan. 4: The company now in charge of the Mountain Lion mine, in Josephine County, has run a 120-foot tunnel since Dec. 1st. They are running day and night and taking out considerable ore of a good quality.
    The Ashland Mining Co. has resumed operations on their 600-foot tunnel, upon which work was stopped last August on account of scarcity of water. They are running the Burleigh drill steadily and expect to reach the ledge in February.
    The mine in Josephine County, of which a three-fourths interest is owned by Devoe, Brown and Hand, is to be developed. Those gentlemen have bonded their interest to a Mr. Murray for $30,000. J. W. Brown and son and Louis Dyer will go out from Albany to commence operations for Murray at once.
    It is said that a ten-stamp mill will soon be put up by J. C. Lewis, the Portland mining man, on the Green Quartz mine on Galice Creek. This mine has been worked occasionally for the past 18 years, and has proved to be a paying property.
    Work on the Mountain Lion mine is being pushed vigorously. A new quartz mill will soon be placed in position, to take the place of the arrastra now in use. First-class ore is being taken out.
    Messrs. Boynton, Razee and Tobler of Grants Pass, who have been prospecting the old Thompson Creek ledge, have received sufficient encouragement to put up a five-stamp mill, which is expected to arrive before long. They have struck a well-defined and rich vein of quartz.
    WORKING THE TAILINGS.--Rogue River Courier: Cheney, Spencer & Hayes own a paying placer mine about a mile from Waldo. They are working 50 acres of tailings which are estimated to be worth $100,000, as the early-day miners were not very careful about picking up the fine gold, and even let a good many good-sized chunks of amalgam run over their riffles.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 13, 1894, page 29


MINING NEWS.
    Brown & Lawrence recently made a mill test of the ore from their mine in Gold Hill district, at the Braden mill, with good results.
    T. F. Dugan and Bernard Loran, who are mining on Rich Gulch, think that they have struck the old back channel and expect to be well rewarded for their work.
    The Times was incorrectly informed in stating that a large force of men is employed at the Lucky Bart mine. Mr. Lindley, the principal owner, informs us that not much work is being done there on account of the bad roads in that section.
    W. B. Flamm, who found the rich pocket near Bald Mountain in Jackson Creek district a short time since, has received returns from the ore he sent below for reduction through Beekman & Reames' bank. There was between $300 and $400 in gold and a small percentage of silver, which, while not as much as was reported, is a nice cleanup for a few hours' work.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1894, page 3


The Southern Oregon Mines.
    G. W. Davis, a California mining man, who has been quietly inspecting the Southern Oregon gold district, with a view to investment, has been in Portland, where he was interviewed by an Oregonian reporter. He believes that if capital were invested in building roads over the mountains and improving the transportation facilities Southern Oregon might soon lead the world in gold production. He is of the opinion that many fine prospects, which are really worthless to their present owners, might be developed into paying properties if placed in proper hands and backed by sufficient capital. Many of these prospects, Mr. Davis states, are in such out-of-the-way places that thousands of dollars must be expended on roads before the proper sort of developing machinery can be hauled in. Then another outlay of capital must be made before the investor can get any returns.
    "But in my judgment," he continued, "there is sufficient evidence of the presence of gold to justify the expenditure of capital. The surface croppings in a number of prospects I examined are the finest I have ever seen in any part of the country. The success of the Ashland mine indicates what perseverance in developing will do. There are other properties which I think will soon be on an equal footing with the Ashland. The Contention mine, situated on Williams Creek, about 18 miles southwest of Grants Pass, was discovered about 18 months ago by a man named Bailey, and now produces a free-milling ore which runs about $15 per ton. The owners are doing a great deal of development work. They have reached a depth of nearly 150 feet, and have done over 600 feet of tunneling. The mine has been prospected for 800 or 900 feet on the surface, and 400 feet of tunneling shows a continuous vein, the average depth of which is about four feet, and the paying streak shows a tendency to widen. There is an eight-stamp mill on the property.
    "I heard a great deal of the Hammersley mine, on Jumpoff Joe Creek, about 16 miles northeast of Grants Pass, but did not have time to personally investigate it. I understand Messrs. Goodsel & Drew are the owners of this property, and that they have made a rich strike. They have reached a good depth, and drifting has shown that the ledge is increasing in size. There is a small mill on the property.
    "Investors, as a rule, do not take much stock in placer mining, but Southern Oregon offers some great opportunities in that direction. Nearly all of the best placer claims have been taken up. There are consolidated claims covering hundreds of acres, but they are owned by bankrupt companies, who will not sell out except at a fancy figure. There is a big claim on Grave Creek which covers about 700 acres and is owned by Portland parties, I believe. A 15-mile ditch is under construction which will furnish a good supply of water during eight months of the year. It is seven feet in width at the top, three feet deep and gives a supply of 3000 miner's inches. It is expected that the ditch will be finished by February 1st. Most of the placer claims can only be worked a few weeks in the year, owing to the scarcity of water in their vicinity.
    "Taking into consideration all of the difficulties in the way, I consider the mines of Southern Oregon equal to any on the coast."

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 20, 1894, page 40


    NEW MILL.--Jacksonville Times, Jan. 11: A new five-stamp mill is expected soon for the Shorty mining claim in Ashland district. The mill site is on Bear Gulch, within 200 feet of the present dump. The mine has been paying under rather adverse circumstances, as the ore has been hauled several miles by wagon to be milled.
    BIG MINING DEAL.--Jacksonville Times: J. M. Sparham & Co., mining brokers of Seattle, Wash., have purchased 600 acres of mining ground in Foots Creek district. This includes all of what is known as the "Old Cement Channel," and is supposed to be very rich. The land was owned by Messrs. Bailey, McKnight, Goldsworthy, Swacker and Brooks. The parties have executed a deed in trust to the company, conditioned that if the purchase price is not paid on or before June 28th the land reverts to the original owners. Sparham & Co., who have plenty of means, intend to thoroughly prospect the ground.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 20, 1894, page 46


MINING NEWS.
    The Golden Eagle Mining Co. have a force of men at work building a road to their mines in Williams Creek district, in order to haul the ore to the mill, which is two miles distant. There are 75 tons of quartz on the dump, to be milled when the weather settles, and they have a prospect shaft down 80 feet.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1894, page 3


    RICH POCKET.--Jacksonville Times: W. B. Flamm, who found the rich pocket near Bald Mountain, in Jackson Creek district, a short time since, has received returns from the ore he sent below for reduction through Beekman & Reames' bank. There was between $300 and $400 in gold, and a small percentage of silver, which, while not as much as was reported, is a nice cleanup for a few hours' work.
    WORKING A DRIFT MINE.--Ashland Tidings: Swinden Bros. are working a drift placer mine near Redland, Josephine County, this winter.
    Adam Clark has a new two-stamp Elsmere mill on his claim on Sams Creek, and expects to have it running within a few days.
    Jack Garvin, who sold his one-sixth interest in the Golden Eagle quartz mine on Williams Creek to Pelton & Neil a short time ago, is preparing to resume work on one of his quartz locations on Wagner Creek.
    T. A. Hill, the miner who first prospected the claim known as the Golden Fleece, on which the Moody and Flanagan mill has been erected, has sold his one-fourth interest in the mine to R. P. Neil; consideration, $1000.
    Owing to the had roads the Ashland Mining Company only got ore enough down from the mine to run the mill 12 days last month, but with that cleaned up bullion enough to pay all expenses of the mine and mill and the work on the new 600-foot tunnel. The new tunnel ought to be completed now in less than two months.
    J. E. Smith & Co. are having bad luck at their quartz mill on Klamath River. The new wheel in the river which they had all ready to start the mill with this week was taken out by the freshet of Monday. There was a 12-foot rise of the river, and the wheel had to go. They mean business, however, and will proceed to put up another wheel at once.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 27, 1894, page 62


MINING NEWS.
    The company interested in the Mountain Lion group of mines in the Missouri Flat district have purchased a 5-stamp mill with concentrator, which will be shipped in a few days. The prospects for a paying property are very encouraging.
    John Fullerton and John Rast have sold the Steam Beer placer mines, located in Grave Creek district, to Elvin Nicodemus of Chicago, and the consideration was $6000. These mines have been worked for several years past, under the management of Frank Oggier, and have yielded a good income, says the Roseburg Review. The property comprises about 160 acres of placer ground, adjoining the mines owned by the Taylor company. The new owner has taken possession, and will work the mines on a much larger scale than heretofore.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1894, page 3


    BUILDING A ROAD.--Jacksonville Times: The Golden Eagle Mining Co. have a force of men at work building a road to their mines in Williams Creek district, in order to haul the ore to the mill, which is two miles distant. There are 75 tons of quartz on the dump, to be milled when the weather settles, and they have a prospect shaft down 80 feet.
    G. W. Tremain, of Wolf Creek, has sold two stamps of the Star mill to M. E. Clark & Son of Leland, who shipped them to Gold Hill, where they will be placed in operation.
    J. Garvin has commenced work on one of his quartz locations on Wagner Creek, having disposed of his sixth interest in the Golden Eagle mine, on Williams Creek, to Pelton & Neil.
    Owing to the bad roads, the Ashland Mining Co. only made a 12-day run last month. The new tunnel will be completed in about two months, as the Burleigh drill is doing good work.
    Hull & Beck, who have rich placer diggings on Louse Creek, a few miles from Grants Pass, have found one of the ledges which feed their mine. They sacked eight sacks of ore for shipment the other day, which are valued at several hundred dollars per sack.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 3, 1894, page 77


Mining Statistics.
    A section in which mining has moved rapidly forward this year is southern and southwestern Oregon. Last year the production of the territory within the boundaries of Coos, Curry, Douglas, Jackson and Josephine counties was $149,194.17 in gold and $246.17 in silver. This year promises to exceed those figures by many thousands. Although the state of Oregon has not made much noise about its mineral wealth, the report of the director of the mint shows its rank as a gold producer to be seventh, having an accredited production of $20,000,000 since the organization of the government mints and assay offices. Oregon today unquestionably offers one of the best fields on the North American continent for the gold miner, and many have been extremely fortunate within the past year.--Northwest Mining Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1894, page 3


    BOUGHT A MILL.--Jacksonville Times: The company interested in the Mountain Lion group of mines in the Missouri Flat district have purchased a five-stamp mill with concentrator, which will be shipped in a few days. The prospects for a paying property are very encouraging.
    SOLD PLACER MINE.--Judge Fullerton and John Rast have sold the Steam Beer placer mines, located in Grave Creek district, to Elvin Nicodemus of Chicago, and the consideration was $6000. These mines have been worked for several years past, under the management of Frank Oggier, and have yielded a good income, says the Roseburg Review. The property comprises about 160 acres of placer ground, adjoining the mines owned by the Taylor Company. The new owner has taken possession, and will work the mines on a much larger scale than heretofore.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 10, 1894, page 93


MINING NEWS.
    Messenger Bros., who are engaged in placer mining in Williamsburg precinct, recently cleaned up nearly $200 in nuggets.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 15, 1894, page 3


    GOOD FOR PLACERS.--Jacksonville Times, Feb. 11: The weather is propitious for the placer miners and they are in a happy frame of mind. The prospects for an extended run are good.
    Lewis & Hampton, who own the Dysert placer mine in Grave Creek district, have a sawmill of their own in operation, getting out timber to flume a 15-mile ditch. This will prove to be valuable property.
    Jas. McDonough of Tolo, while in Jacksonville a few days since, exhibited some rich specimens of quartz which he had picked up at his placers near Fort Lane. These mines are just below the McDonough ledge, from which considerable gold has been taken in days gone by.
    T. J. Chapman, receiver of the Hammersley mine, is in town today and brought with him between $1100 and $1200 worth of amalgam, the product of the mine from a run of a few days. Mr. C. is now engaged in fixing up the mill for another run, and has nine men employed at the mine.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 17, 1894, page 109


    FOR HYDRAULIC MINING.--Roseburg Review: C. O. White of Tacoma has shipped his extensive plant of mining machinery to Myrtle Creek. It is proposed to use it in working the great beds of gravel along the Umpqua River, on the Hadley place, about a mile from town. Mr. White claims to have a process by which he can separate the fine gold from the gravel, and he will put a force of about 60 men at work as soon as his machinery is in place.
    GOOD NUGGETS.--Rogue River Courier: The Messenger boys have been washing a dry gulch high above the waters of Williams Creek during the recent freshets and have 10 nice little nuggets, of an aggregate value of $150, to show for their work of about 10 days' duration. If water could be gotten up there, the boys would soon grow rich, as there is an abundance of just such dirt as they washed during the 10 days' wetness.
    STRUCK A BONANZA.--Rogue River Courier: Enos Mallory has struck a six-foot fissure of gold-bearing quartz in his mine at the top of Old Baldy, six miles southeast of town. The ore assays $250 to the ton and there is every indication that the ledge is permanent, as it has been tapped by tunnels nearly half a mile apart.
    CLEANUP.--Jacksonville Times: A partial cleanup at the Golden Fleece mine produced a 16-pound piece of amalgam. Operations on the mine are being conducted day and night. Two promising ledges of cinnabar have been unearthed there lately.
    Two carloads of machinery, consisting of a quartz mill, concentrator and equipments, have been ordered from the Fulton Iron Works of San Francisco for the Mountain Lion mine, and are expected to arrive in a few days.
    The S.P. Co. has made a reduction on the freight rate of ore shipped from Ashland to San Francisco. Ore worth under $50 per ton pays $5 per ton; under $100, $6.60; over $100 and not exceeding $300, $8.60. The ore must be shipped to the Selby smelting works, of which Chas. S. Allmen, assayer for the Ashland Mining Co., through whose efforts the reduction was made, is the agent.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 24, 1894, page 126


    TOO MUCH SNOW.--Jacksonville Times, Feb. 22: The miners of Elliott Creek have departed for the season on account of the snow, which is four feet deep.
    A great deal of snow lies on the higher hills, which ensures a protracted run to those placer miners whose ditches head there.
    It is reported that Alex Orme, the well-known prospector, has made another big strike in quartz in Foots Creek district, and has already taken out several thousand dollars.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 3, 1894, page 141


MINING NEWS.
    The Siskiyou Quicksilver Mining Company have levied an assessment of 7 cents per share on the capital stock of the company, to carry on the development work now in progress.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 15, 1894, page 3


    STARTED UP A MILL.--Jacksonville Times, March 12: The Lucky Bart Mining Company have started up their mill, which has been idle for some time owing to the unfavorable weather.
    Dr. J. Hinkle of Central Point is developing a quartz mine in Sardine Creek district, which promises well. He thinks that he has a genuine fissure ledge.
    The placer mines in Foots Creek district are running on full time and the miners are much elated over the prospect of a good cleanup. The season's output for this district is expected to reach up well toward the $600,000 mark.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 17, 1894, page 174


    GOOD NUGGET.--Rogue River Courier: Holcombe & Robinson are running a paying placer on upper Jumpoff Joe. Last week a nugget was picked up which weighed $62. The week previous one was uncovered valued at $74.
    Lister, Calvert & Holyoke are developing a promising claim nearby. They are preparing to ditch and pipe in time for next season's water.
    Bailey & Farquhar have their new mill almost ready for crushing at the Mountain Lion on Missouri Flat. The roads between the Rogue River bridge at the foot of Sixth street have been badly cut up by hauling the heavy plant over them. The teamsters Had a tough time miring down and digging out, the sawdust which was peppered over the highway last fall having done nothing further than to make freighters swear.
    Hull & Beck are working seven men on their placer and quartz mines on Louse Creek, eight miles from this city. M. F. Hull was in town Tuesday and exhibited a $54 nugget, which was washed in sight by one of his two giants. Several smaller nuggets were uncovered previously, but no note is taken of small things at the Hull & Beck mine. They are also driving a tunnel on their quartz ledge which proves to be the source of big nuggets for the placer below.
    Messrs. Smith & Pierce have a bonanza within two miles of Gold Hill. They are going down on a ten-foot ledge of rich rock and have a splendid stamp mill proposition.
    Clark & Son of Leland are cleaning $1 an hour off their two-stamp Tremaine mill within four miles of Gold Hill. This is pretty good wages for three men.
    The Hammersley suit has been settled, and the original locator will take possession of the valuable property on the 22nd inst. Digging and crushing will proceed without stoppage.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 24, 1894, page 190


    The Hammersley mine contest has been settled and the receiver discharged. Hammersley pays Drew & Co. $2,500 for their interest, and takes possession of the mine. Kingley & Bull, who claimed an interest in the mine, are left in the cold, and George R. and Riley Hammersley get full possession of one of the best mines in Southern Oregon. This property was bonded by Hammersley Bros. to Eastern parties, and a failure to meet the payments caused the suit, the outcome of which has been watched by mining men all over the state. The mine will be running to the full capacity of the mills within a week. This ends one of the worst muddles in the annals of Southern Oregon mines.
"Northwest News: Oregon," Hood River Glacier, March 31, 1894, page 1


    RICH PLACER.--Rogue River Courier: Sam Axtell was up from Galice Creek this week. He and Gene Merrill bought a half interest in 40 acres of good mining ground for $500 and are busy ground sluicing with rich results. The bedrock has not yet been reached, but a vial filled with coarse gold shows that the bank carries colors clear down.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 31, 1894, page 206


    RICH POCKET.--Jacksonville Times: Messrs. Knott, Swinden and Birdsey have struck a rich pocket in their mine in  district.
    E. K. Anderson and Crit Tolman are pushing work on their quartz mill in Wagner Creek district, and are nearly ready to commence crushing ore.
    B. F. Durphy of Portland is prospecting the Miller hydraulic mine on Farmers Flat, with a view to purchasing the same. A price has been agreed on for the property under certain conditions; but no sale has been consummated or bond given as yet. This is one of the best placer mines in Southern Oregon, and should bring a good price.
    Carter Bros. are extensively engaged in mining on the old Kilgore place in Ashland precinct, with good prospects of a big cleanup. They have 1300 feet of hydraulic pipe, and having the use of several miles of new ditch from Wagner Creek, will wash a good deal of ground during the season. Messrs. Carter are full of energy and have been interested in a number of mining enterprises.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 7, 1894, page 222


The Ashland Strike.
    The strike in the Ashland mine, in Jackson County, marks an epoch in the mining development of Southern Oregon. At a depth from the surface of 575 feet, a 600-foot tunnel has struck the ledge, thirty feet across the walls and carrying a good body of quartz. It is well known that vein mining in Oregon has always been confined to bodies of ore near the surface, depth never being attained. It was the opinion of many, and the practice of all, that the veins were not permanent, and would pinch out at a depth of a few hundred feet. Spotted ledges, pockety quartz and unreliable stringers were generally believed to be the characteristic features of the mines, and systematic deep mining was unheard and unthought of. It remained for the Ashland mine to make the first practical test of the character of the veins and to dispel prevalent theories about their superficiality. The mine was being worked by shaft, but the water so increased that it could not be handled. A drain tunnel was necessary. The experience and judgment of the operators convinced them that the ledge was permanent, and they decided to seek the ledge by a drain tunnel 400 feet below the 200 level. This course was unusual in Southern Oregon, but the sound judgment of its projectors is amply justified by results. After 600 feet of dead work the ledge was struck in place. The future of the mine is absolutely assured. It cannot be doubted that the success of this enterprise will be a great incentive to more general and systematic development of other Southern Oregon mines.
    It should be added to the above that there is one other mine in Southern Oregon which has attained a depth of 600 feet--that of Kubli & Bolt, in the Galice Creek district. The circumstances, however, were different. The vein, a narrow one, was followed in development. The mine is still being worked, the quartz being crushed in an old-fashioned arrastra.

Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 14, 1894, page 227


Gold Mines of Southern Oregon.
Written for the Mining and Scientific Press by Alex. Quartz.

    Now that some of the Southern Oregon mines are attracting considerable public attention in the East as well as on this coast, the following facts regarding the quartz mining industry and its outlook may be of interest and value to those who are in quest of information relating to that section.
    Ashland and vicinity--now the most prominent district in Jackson County--promise to become a prosperous and booming camp in the near future. The Ashland mine, which has paid good dividends continuously for the past year or more, has proven to the most skeptical that there is at least one permanent paying mine in that district. For years past, when speaking with mining men of the mines of Southern Oregon and Northern California, the majority of them said: "Yes, they all prospect well enough on the surface, but the mines don't go down in that section like they do in other places." To one and all I made the same answer. "The mines do go down, but it is the miners that don't go down." My opinion was based upon the knowledge I have of how most of the quartz mining and prospecting work in that section has been conducted until recently. A crosscut tunnel was run to cut the ledge in the Ashland mine at a depth of 600 feet, and various opinions were expressed by "the knowing ones" as to what would be found when they reached the ledge--if the ledge reached that depth at all. The ledge, which was cut a short time ago, proved to be 30 feet between walls, with eight feet of better ore than has been heretofore found in the mine, and confirms the theory that the ledges do go down in that section and carry the pay like they do in other places.
    The development of a great ore body at a depth of 600 feet in a measure decides the future of the district. It will tend to give prospectors and capitalists more confidence in developing ledges which they were doubtful of before. There is one serious drawback to any district that this strike in the Ashland mine may cause, and that is a raise in the price by those who have claims to sell, which will only serve to scare away capital and retard development work. The geological formation in the vicinity of Ashland is favorable for the existence of deep and permanent fissures and ledges--granite, slate and porphyry in well-defined belts being the principal country rock.
    The Golden Fleece mine, situated three miles north of Ashland on the line of the Oregon and California railroad, is another property that is attracting considerable attention at present. This mine promises to become one of the largest low-grade gold mines in America, and, while in proportions it is like unto the great Treadwell mine of Alaska and the Homestake of Dakota, yet it is of a very different class, being similar to the Mercur mine of Utah. The reef or deposit is undoubtedly a portion of the prehistoric river channel that at one period drained the Western Slope, running parallel with the coast line, and is plainly traceable from the Umpqua River in Oregon to Trinity County, Cal., and on which there are several mines located and worked. The deposit, which is vast in extent, contains a curious combination of minerals, gold, cinnabar, native quicksilver and native amalgam all existing together in the same conglomerate mass. The deposit, or reef, which runs in an almost easterly and westerly direction, dips into the mountainside at an angle of fifteen degrees. The footwall, or bedrock underlying the deposit, is a porphyritic slate, cut in many places by seams of feldspar, carrying a large percent of cinnabar, while the capping, which could be called the hanging wall, is a metamorphic sandstone. This metamorphic sandstone capping, in most places where it is opened in the mine, does not terminate abruptly where it joins the ore, but amalgamates with it where they join, so that it is in places difficult to determine where the sandstone cap ends and the ore begins. The ore underneath the capping appears to be a washed gravel cement, which gradually changes into an oxidized conglomerate mass of ore with little or no traces of wash gravel at the bottom. The present method of working is by an open cut into the deposit, and the ore, which is strongly oxidized by the presence of a large percentage of iron, pulverizes very easily, as high as one ton per hour being worked with a 3½-foot Huntington mill, using No. 40 slot screens. The gold, most of which is on the coarse order, is free in the ore or conglomerate, and all shows evidence of being wash gold at one time, though in its present condition it is heavily coated with iron and other minerals.
    The general average of the assays and tests of the ore give a result ol $4 per ton. This mine can be worked, owing to its many natural advantages, cheaper than any mine on the coast. The present cost of mining and milling the ore on a small scale is about 65 cents per ton, ample water power for a large plant being available. The development of the mine on an extensive scale will be an important factor in bringing the mineral resources of Southern Oregon into prominence.
    A new ten-stamp mill is being erected on the "Shorty" mine on Wagner Creek only a few miles from Ashland. As far as developed, this mine makes an exceptionally good showing, and will prove a good paying property beyond a doubt.
    The placer mines of Jackson County have continuously produced gold in paying quantities since early in the "fifties," and if the generally accepted theory be true that where there is a large number of good paying placer mines there must also be good quartz mines, there is certainly a good field for the prospector and capitalist in Jackson County, and especially on the slope of the Siskiyou Range from Ashland to Jacksonville.
    Although Southern Oregon, and Jackson County in particular, which I visited recently, have been "black-eyed" and "cursed" by "natural gas" (?) capitalists and miners for years past, I firmly believe that in another year it will become prominent as one of the leading gold-producing sections of the Pacific Slope.
ALEX. QUARTZ.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 14, 1894, page 228


    SETTLED ITS DEBTS.--Jacksonville Times: The Myrtle Creek Mining Co. has settled its debts by paying about 85 cents on the dollar and all costs, and will continue operations on a large scale.
    J. A. Martin, of Foots Creek, called on us Friday, from whom we learned that Messrs. Goldsworthy, Bailey and other miners in that district have again bonded their placer mines.
    The dam at the Simmons-Cameron mine, near Waldo, which went out in January, was soon afterward replaced, and operations are progressing there with a full head of water and good prospects. A late season is expected, on account of the deep snow in the mountains.
    Swinden & Hayes, who are mining in Josephine County, near the Redlands nursery, feel greatly encouraged, as they have picked up several nice nuggets lately, one of which weighed $136 and another $85.
    J. Smith and John Miller, who have been prospecting in Gold Hill district, have struck a rich pocket of quartz, from which they have abstracted considerable gold.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 14, 1894, page 238


    IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY.--Grants Pass Courier: Fred Maher has struck a bonanza between Thompson Creek and Williams Creek. He has found a two-foot vein of gold-bearing quartz which mortars from $2 to $20 to the pan. This is no pocket, but a true fissure vein, and bears every evidence of being a permanent thing. A strike of this kind would be heralded in some countries with a column article and four scarehead double-pica capital lines [i.e., large newspaper headlines], but they have become too common in Josephine County to get excited over.
        The success of the tunneling in the Ashland mine settles the question as to permanency of mines in Southern Oregon. Heretofore the cry has been that our veins of gold "peter out" or become base at the depth of a few hundred feet, but this tunnel at Ashland is 600 feet long, and has found a richer and wider vein of quartz than that upon which the mill had been crushing for nearly a year with much good results.
    Josephine County's gold dust has helped tide over the hard times. During the past two years an immense amount of prospecting has been done, and a silent stream of yellow dust has been flowing out in consequence. Nobody, unless directly interested, ever sees this product going on its way to market, but the coin derived therefrom is all spent here, and thus Grants Pass business men have had fewer sight drafts to pay than those of any town in Southern Oregon.
    JACKSON COUNTY.--Times: Conger & Arnold have two Tremain quartz mills on the Governor Chadwick mine on Rogue River, opposite Fort Lane, and will commence crushing ore this week. They have bonded a large area of land. It is rumored that Mangam & Stewart of Tacoma, who purchased the Graupner place, have bonded the Sterling Mining Co.'s property at a high figure. Capt. C. H. Thompson, of Detroit, Mich., who has been in the valley for a few weeks looking at various mining properties, has arranged to bond the Braden ledge in Gold Hill district. He has been interested in Colorado mining property with Gen. Russell A. Alger, and it is supposed that the latter gentleman is also in the present deal.
    Medford Mail: W. H. Rhoten and A. W. Sturgis are placer mining up on Jackass Creek, and are meeting with success in big chunks. Last week they took out 68 ounces of clear gold from their flume, as the result of a two months' run. They have not made their cleanup yet, nor will they do so as long as the water supply holds out, but when they do rich returns are expected.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 28, 1894, page 270


    JOSEPHINE COUNTY.--Courier: Woolfolk & Son are running an arrastra by horse power on their ledge in Dry Diggings, and the ore is fairly yellow with gold. The formation is a mixture of decomposed quartz and granite and there is big pay in the crushings. The owners are preparing to run their arrastras with water power.
    J. C. and A. E. Root are developing the Black Bess ledge on Coyote Creek in company with L. G. Geary. The vein of gold-bearing quartz has been traced under the mountain, and it is found cropping out unmistakably on the Wolf Creek side.
    The Ennis-Cameron placers on Galice Creek are being operated night and day and there is an abundance of water for four months yet. The wages paid miners on this property range from $2.50 to $3.50 per day.
    The Garrett ledge on Bamboo Gulch near Williams Creek is paying wonderfully, $20 to the pan being taken out by a crude mortar process. This is not a pocket, but a very rich ledge which bears every indication of permanency.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 5, 1894, page 286


   GRANTS PASS Courier: R. M. Kelly and W. J. Strong are doing development work on their copper ledge near the state line, six miles south of Waldo. The ore, of which there is an immense body, assays $24 in gold, 17 percent copper and $12 in silver to the ton.
    At both entrances to Tunnel Nine a huge vein of black quartz, resembling coal, crops out all the way along the tunnel, and there are large dumps of the ore at both ends. An expert, employed by J. C. Lewis, puts its average value at $80 per ton. His is not the ordinary method of ore extraction, but a combination of chemical and liquefying processes. Fifteen claims have been staked out in the immediate neighborhood, and the black vein has been traced over a wide area.
    Three giants are running continuously on the Hampton-Lewis placer on Grave Creek. The large force of men needed on the ditch construction has been paid off and the crew consists of ten hands. The ditch, which is 16 miles long, leaks more or less its entire length, as the blasting loosened the embankment dirt, so water will not be very abundant this season.
    JACKSONVILLE Times: E. E. Miner & Co. are down 120 feet with their shaft in the Dardanelles mine and have run a drift in ten feet, where they have struck a ledge four feet wide, of decomposed rock. There are 150 tons of ore on the dump which assays from $8 to $50 per ton.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 19, 1894, page 317


SOUTHERN OREGON MINES.
Preparations Are Being Made for Successful Prospecting.
    A Portland prospector, who has spent several seasons in Southern Oregon, says that there is a perfect dearth of mining news in the big camps of that section. Most of the well-established placers and ledges are being worked steadily, but not on the extensive scale that would prevail if the investment of capital could be secured. Prospectors are not nearly so numerous as in former years, not because there is any abatement of the gold fever, or that the best part of the country has been worked over, but simply because it is now difficult even to secure a grubstake, and a prospector without his grubstake is like an artisan without his tools. The gold-bearing districts have never been thoroughly prospected by practical miners. The hordes that have poured over them in former years were on the lookout for rich pockets, where they might pick up a small fortune in a single season, and they had neither the cunning nor patience to locate and develop quartz ledges. Just now, although interest is apparently flagging, such is not really the case. Parties are forming almost every week, and the most careful preparations being made for successful prospecting. Most of these parties are headed by men who have spent years in the business, and who are competent to judge from surface croppings what the lower levels may be expected to bring forth. It is predicted that before the summer is over the Southern Oregon gold belt will offer exceptional opportunities to investors.
Oregonian, Portland, May 20, 1894, page 12


    To us who have just been out skirmishing throughout the county, especially the mineral belt, we are somewhat surprised at the vastness of your gold mines. Our first introduction after leaving Medford, on the 8th inst., was the celebrated placer mine, owned and operated by Mr. Sturgis, who has had forty-five years experience in mining. This gentleman informed your humble servant that he refused seventy-five thousand dollars for his mining property this spring. After leaving Mr. Sturgis' mine, we were next ushered to the home of Mr. Dunlap. Here we enjoyed a pleasant afternoon--Mrs. D. guessed our capacity for delicious edibles and prepared dinner accordingly. Long after our appetites were appeased, our eyes still gloated after the refreshments that were left. Mrs. D. understands how to prepare a meal for a lot of hungry miners. After dinner we took in the mines owned by Mr. D. This mine is not worked successfully on account of scarcity of water. One of our number asked Mr. D. what he would take for his mine. His reply was, "This mine is not for sale, for this is what gives us our bread and butter." The mine is situated on Poor Man's Creek about eight miles south of Jacksonville, one and a half miles south of east, and in sight of the famous Sturgis mine.
J. R. Hardin, "From Medford to Applegate," Medford Mail, April 20, 1894, page 4


    Courier: J. C. Lewis is now running three tunnels night and day on Mt. Reuben. One of these bores is over 400 feet in the mountain, and the owners think 200 feet more will strike the ledge 1000 feet below the surface. The ledge has been followed on its highest level by a 600-foot tunnel, and the lode proves from 12 to 30 feet in width. This will be the deepest mine in Oregon when finished.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 26, 1894, page 334


    JACKSONVILLE Times: Phil Miller brought in 120 ounces of gold dust from the Miller placer mine in Farmers Flat on Wednesday. They have only just begun to clean up, and this gold was taken from a few boxes, leaving the greater number and all the bedrock to be cleaned yet. The output for the season will run close to $10,000. Swinden & Hayes cleaned up $1200 from an eight days' run lately on their Oscar Creek placer mine in Josephine County. The Homestake mine near Woodville is developing in a promising manner. A tunnel has been run to a depth of 270 feet, tapping the ledge about 200 feet from the surface. The lode is two feet wide in the face of the tunnel and shows high-grade ore. Fred Maher has struck what looks like a bonanza between Thompson and Williams creeks, in the shape of a two-foot ledge of gold-bearing quartz, from which he has pounded out with a hand mortar from $2 to $20 to the pan. It is said to be no pocket, but a trace fissure vein. Operations will be resumed on the old Hope ledge in the Wagner Creek district, now known as the Shorty, in a few days. An excellent mill has been put up there. The mill at the Mountain Lion mine on Missouri Flat has been shut down for reasons unknown. The tunnel is now in 300 feet, and an inexhaustible supply of rich ore is said to be in sight.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 2, 1894, page 350


    THE JACKSONVILLE, OR., Times says Dr. Friedline and Mr. Kelly of Moscow, Idaho, are there with a patent sluice for saving flour gold. The machine consists of a double sluice box in the form of an open-ended square, which is placed at the end of the sluices usually used. The water is divided and runs through a box on each side in which are placed screens loaded with mercury which catch what gold has escaped above. The machine has been used in Snake and Salmon rivers for the past few months and is pronounced to be a success.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 23, 1894, page 387


    WILLIAMS CREEK MINES.--Courier: There is considerable stir in the Williams Creek ledges. The Bone of Contention has 20 men at work, some running a 1300-foot tunnel, some stoping, and others sinking an air shaft on top of the hill. They have struck five feet of good ore in this shaft, which is now down 50 feet.
    The Ezell mill started up Tuesday, running eight stamps. A large overshot wheel has just been put in position, and it furnishes four or five horsepower night and day.
    Anderson & Holyoke will start their mill this week. They got their power from the Gotcher ditch and will run night and day.
    There will be about 100 men employed at the mines and mills on the Williams Creek hill this summer.
    IN SOUTHERN OREGON.--E. P. Thompson of Grants Pass, in speaking of Southern Oregon mines, says: "There is a great deal of activity in mining circles just now, and many properties that have been inaccessible during the winter, because of the depth of the snow, are being cleaned up for the summer run. Prospectors are just as numerous as in former years, and no complaints are heard of the country being prospected out. A large amount of development work is being done, and with very satisfactory results. The Bone of Contention, a splendid prospect located 18 miles southeast of Grants Pass, has been sold by Messrs. Booth, Smith and others to H. E. Huntington. A force of men are at work developing the property. The Golden Eagle, in the Williams Creek district, recently had a cleanup. Some 80 tons of ore were run through, and averaged $20 per ton. The famous Hammersley mine, at Jumpoff Joe, is being operated by the man who discovered it, and the Lucky Bart and Ashland properties are all right. Placer claims everywhere are being worked with good results. The Wimer, Waldo, Simmons and Cameron & Ennis claims, on Galice Creek, are proving good producers, the outputs thus far being fully up to the expectations of their several owners. There are many men scattered up and down the various creeks who are devoting all their time to washing out bars."

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 14, 1894, page 27


The Story of a Pocket.
    The finding of a rich pocket near Gold Hill about the middle of June by Geo. Lyman and J. W. Cox created quite a little excitement in that locality, but not so much as did the promise of a lawsuit to settle the right to the claim upon which the pocket was found.
    The story of the pocket is told thus-wise: Three years ago J. W. Cox, who was then a prospector in that locality, discovered a trace of gold on the mountainside, not a great distance from the Louden residence, but at that time there were claims staked out quite promiscuously thereabouts, and he deemed it not expedient to do any great amount of prospecting until such time as the right to the ledge to which the tracing undoubtedly led should have been settled or lines definitely located. He said nothing of his find, but made a tour of prospecting in California, and last month, three years later, he returned in company with Lyman and upon arriving at the identical spot where he had previously made the discovery, they began investigations and soon found the same trace, and from this the pocket was located. Very close to where the pocket was uncovered is a claim owned by C. C. McClendon. Upon this gentleman hearing of the discovery of the pocket he at once instituted suit to recover ore already taken out and enjoining Lyman and Cox from further work, believing the pocket to be on his claim. Subsequent developments have shown that the pocket was about twenty feet from the line of McClendon's claim, and last Saturday the case was withdrawn and costs assumed by plaintiff. There also would have arisen a question as to McClendon's right to the claim which he holds belongs to him, had the case come to trial.
    The value of the ore taken out of the pocket is estimated at from $2,000 to $3,000. Some very fine specimens were taken out, among them being chunks of quartz weighing from fifteen to twenty-five pounds, which were beautifully and thickly specked with pieces of gold as large as pinheads, and one of these chunks would easily assay from $60 to $100. Messrs. Lyman and Cox have located a claim right at this point, which covers all the leads in that immediate locality, and they are now at work drilling down on the ledge in quest of other pockets.
Medford Mail, July 27, 1894, page 2


    The quartz mine belonging to Birdsey, Knott & Swinden, Blackwell district, near Gold Hill, Jackson County, Or. , was sold to Chapman Bros. of California, for $20,000. The ledge is 3½ feet wide, and shows much free gold. There are 40 tons of picked ore on the dump, which, it is claimed, will assay $50 to the ton. The original company has a lot of rich ore not included in the sale, expected to reach into the thousands when crushed. The purchasers intend to sink 100 feet, and if it preserves its width and richness at that depth they will put up a 10-stamp mill.
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 4, 1894, page 71


    ROGUE RIVER NAVIGATED.--Grants Pass Courier: H. B. Moore of Curry County came up Rogue River in a boat for supplies for their ranch, a distance of eighty miles, consuming forty hours on the trip. Their boat was twenty-four feet long and they were obliged to "line up" over rapids and falls for a distance of ten miles.
    They prospected along the banks with pick and pan, and anybody can find diggings where fifty cents to a dollar a day can be made with a rocker. The best prospects they struck were down the stream about sixty miles.
    They took about 700 pounds of provisions on their down trip and claim that the stream could be made navigable for small boats at very small expense, and that the government could by blasting and locks make Grants Pass accessible for steamers of good size, even when the water is low.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 4, 1894, page 74


    C. W. Miller, P. Patterson and J. D. Cook of Portland, Or., have incorporated the Farmers Flat Mining Company with a capital stock of $40,000. The company will do general mining business, principally near Jacksonville, having purchased the Miller mine for $12,000.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 11, 1894, page 83


    JOSEPHINE COUNTY.--Roseburg Review: K. B. Ireland has returned from his trip to Josephine County. He located some sixteen mining claims for two companies while there, and will soon return to begin operations. These claims are situated on Althouse Creek about forty miles from Grants Pass, the ground along that stream having been the richest in Oregon forty years ago when Mr. Ireland first mined there. The bars have already been worked over as many as five times, and Chinamen are still washing away there. What he and his associates now propose to do is to work the benches and higher ground bordering the creek. They will first have to construct a three-mile ditch, which will give them an abundance of water the year round.
    JACKSON COUNTY.--J. L. Coyle of Henley, says the Ashland Tidings, reports that Wm. Rummel and George Parsley found a rich pocket of gold quartz recently on Ash Creek, a tributary of Klamath River, about eight miles below Hornbrook, from which they cleaned up $1500 with a hand mortar in one week. They are on the hunt for another pocket and have good prospects of finding it. A miner named Reader has mortared out nearly $10,000 during the past eighteen months from a small quartz ledge which he has located just across the river from Ash Creek. He calls his claim "Fool's Paradise." About a year and a half ago he struck the first pocket and took out $4000. Since then he has found bunches which yielded as follows: One each of $150, $300, $3200, $1790, the last amount being cleaned up by himself and another man in eight days in August. The gold is found in kidneys or pockets lying between the quartz and the porphyry.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 1, 1894, page 138


Tolo Mining Company.
    The Tolo Mining Company had a meeting of trustees last evening and elected the following officers: President, Judge William H. Reid; vice president, Judge J. L. McMurray; secretary, J. B. Cromwell; treasurer, J. C. Fairchild; metallurgist, Peter Daly.
    The property of the company is situated in Jackson County, Oregon, near Tolo, and is said to be a very valuable piece of property. The company has contracted for a mill, and the development of the mine will proceed at once.
Tacoma Daily News, September 8, 1894, page 1


    Adams, Frakes & Mann have put in a large hydraulic plant at the junction of Silver and Wards forks in Elliott Creek district, Jackson County, Or. The ground is rich in coarse gold, pieces ranging from $5 to $15 being frequently picked up. Work has begun on the ditch to be built by Boggs & Haney on Elliott Creek. It will have a capacity of 2000 inches, and will afford water for four six-inch giants for six months in the year. The claim consists of eighty acres of rich ground.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 15, 1894, page 163


    PROGRESS OF DEVELOPMENTS.--The Anaconda mine on Williams Creek, at the depth of 100 feet, is showing a fine body of ore for a distance of seventy feet in the new drift. This proves the chute to be 200 feet in length and the vein from one to four feet wide, which will mill $15 a ton in free gold. A large Huntington mill will soon take the place of the arrastra now in use.
    The Bone of Contention has been sold to F. A. Huntington et al. of San Francisco, who will start to work at once fitting up the eight-stamp mill with new mortars, enlarging the apron service and making such other changes and improvements as the increase of force on the mine will demand.
    The Mountain Lion Co. are building a road to their new claim--the Mountain--which has encouraged its owners by showing, at the depth of fifty feet, four feet of free-milling ore that will mill $50 to the ton. This, worked in connection with the Mountain Lion, which discloses in its lower levels two feet of even a higher grade concentrating ore, will tax the capacity of the large five-stamp plant to its utmost, though run continuously.
    Rich rock has been found on the hillside below the once famous Jewett mine, which seems to be a feeder that will lead to another rich chamber of ore, like the one that was worked out in early days. The chambers have been known to occur at frequent intervals in other mines of this peculiar character, and there is no reason why this will not prove the case in the Jewett, as the development work is paying a handsome profit.
    The Hammersley mine continues to contribute its usual amount to the only circulating medium. The tunnel is in a distance of 400 feet, which crosscuts three other veins besides the Little Daisy, which startled oldtimers with its richness from top to bottom of the sixty-foot shaft, which is tapped by a thirty-foot upraise from the tunnel. With the exception of some ore stoped from a level with the bottom of the sixty-foot shaft on the one vein, it is still in the mine, which leaves ninety feet of ore above them.

"Josephine County," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 22, 1894, page 186


    GOLD SPECIMENS.--Tidings: Hon. Theo. Cameron went north last evening with the mineral exhibit to the state fair. He had with him a hundred ounces of choice specimens from Beekman & Reames' bank and fifty ounces of nuggets from the Sterling mine. Had he known it in time, he could have procured a lot of nice specimens from the Sturgis mine and from his Galice Creek mine and from many other large claims in the district. The gold which is taken out of the mines is generally shipped directly to the Mint, and unless a specimen is a curiosity in some way it is not presented. He had but a small quartz exhibit on account of the fact that the large number of specimens saved from the rich finds for keepsakes were crushed under the pinch of the money stringency and converted into cash to meet current demands. The notice was too short to prepare such an exhibit as our mineral resources would warrant, but Mr. Cameron carries with him what will be likely to prove the drawing card of the pavilion.
"Jackson County," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 22, 1894, page 186


    BROWNTOWN NOTES.--Rogue River Courier: Baldwin and the Skeeter Bros. are pushing down their incline, with the ledge in full view, showing a compact body of good ore.
    Robt. Dicky and others are fixing to open up a placer mine on Johnson's Gulch.
    Krouse and Frank Floyd have found some good quartz on the Main Divide, which they hope to develop next spring.
    The Riese Bros. have found some good placer ground on one of the tributaries of the Rim Gulch, and are working hard.
    Hopkins, Crosby and Bridges have been doing some development work on the Sunny Side lode, a ledge at the head of Malvania Gulch, which, although small on the surface, seems to increase in breadth as it goes down, and which prospects well in free gold.
    Clemn is opening a new tunnel on the old Enterprise lode, which will tap the pay chute at a depth of seventy-five feet; here there is a large body of ore, all of which prospects in free gold to the pan.
    Gardner is fixing up to work his placer claim on the left-hand fork during the winter. In the spring he proposes to sink deep on a quartz ledge which he opened this summer.
    Mr. Ireland with his crew of seven are hard at work on their new ditch and dam. This is a Roseburg company with sixteen members and 320 acres of mining ground.
    ANOTHER STAMP MILL.--Rogue River Courier: The Bone of Contention owners are busy setting up an eight-stamp mill at the works. A. Sparlin and son Ira have been hauling the plant, which arrived from San Francisco last week. L. J. Kendrick, the superintendent, reports a tunnel 500 feet into the mountain and a well-defined streak of pay ore four feet wide between walls. The pay streak sometimes narrows to two inches, out the distance between walls averages four feet. Some big developments are expected from this mine.
    THE WIMER PLACERS.--The owners of the Wimer placer mines near Waldo have spent several years constructing a free outlet for their tailings and are now on the eve of attacking some of their richest banks and making big money. Peseverance and push have accomplished much in bringing these golden buttes under the monitor's influence, and the reward is nigh.
    DOC IRELAND BAR.--T. J. Clark and P. H. Riggs have a paying placer on Doc Ireland Bar near Grave Creek, ten miles below Leland. They have eighty acres of pay dirt and water for six months in the year, with eighty-foot pressure. A ditch and flume bring the water from Rock Creek, three and a half miles away.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 13, 1894, page 234


Grants Pass Gold.
    A Grants Pass man well versed in our resources estimates our annual output of gold at $500,000. As most of our mines are owned here this money stays amongst us and helps everybody in the community. It is lucky in these times of depression to be able to export something which does not depreciate and which adds to the world's wealth without making any individual in it poorer. This half a million of dollars is a conservative estimate. Our gold, unlike other products, goes out silently and secretly. No string of freight cars is necessary to haul it away; no great hurrah is ever made by the miner as he brings in his dust to sell in the city or express direct to the mint. For obvious reasons those interested in gold dust withhold information as to the amount of exportation or means of sending it away, but the many channels of outgo have been carefully figured and the result is at least a cold half million a year.--Rogue River Courier.
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 20, 1894, page 244


    NEW CLAIMS.--Jacksonville Times: Quite a number of mining claims have recently been located at the head of the Chetco, in Curry County, by a company of Kerbyville miners, who are supposed to represent San Francisco parties.
    A twenty-stamp Tremaine mill has been erected at the Copper Stein mine, in Mount Reuben district, and will soon be grinding. A tunnel taps the vein at a depth of fifty feet and the rock is thought to be rich.
    The Ashland Company, for whom R. M. Garrett has been prospecting on Williams Creek, has suspended operations, some of the members having failed to produce the sinews of war necessary to carry on the work.
    Work on the Clay Dollarhide coal mine, near Pilot Rock, is being prosecuted by parties who are interested with Mr. D. in the claims. These deposits and the Tolman discovery, northeast of Medford, if they prove what is expected of them, will open a new industry in this section.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 27, 1894, page 267


    AROUND JACKSONVILLE.--Times: W. L. Weatherred of Portland, a stockholder in the Annie Mining Co., has received notification of the sale of the mine to San Francisco capitalists, the consideration being $61,800.
    The Sterling Mining Co. has finished cleaning up last season's work and will resume piping at an early day. It is stated that they have done exceedingly well during the past year, gold dust to the amount of nearly $100,000 being the result. It is probably the best placer mine in Oregon.
    The coming year promises to be the best in the last quarter of a century for the mining interests of Southern Oregon. Capitalists are becoming interested in our mines, and the more they investigate the better they like the prospects. The developments in quartz mining for the past few months have demonstrated the fact that the mineral deposits of this section are in ledges and not mere pockets.
    Two practical miners--Mattern and Sackett--have been at work in a prospect tunnel, on land belonging to G. F. Billings, about a mile north of Ashland, in a place which was abandoned by an Ashland company last winter, after it had been driven more than 100 feet. The old company ran by the ledge they were looking for without knowing it. Mattern and Sackett found a five-foot fissure, and in their prospect drift upon it have taken out considerable pay rock. Last week they sent four and one-half tons of the ore to the Selby smelter, at San Francisco, and their returns showed that it yielded, gross, about $1500, and netted them here, above all charges, $1290.98: They are believed to have a true fissure vein and a valuable property.
    BROWNTOWN NOTES.--Rogue River Courier: Griffin struck some of the richest rock in his new tunnel the other day that has ever been seen in this section. Some of it will go from $3 to $4 to the pound weight, or from $6000 to $8000 to the ton, and you can scarcely look at a piece of it without seeing free gold.
    Three men--newcomers from Washington--have been prospecting in the same range south to the California line and have found the southern extension of the same ledge covered with shale and cased in hard slate. The ledge, where opened, is from two to three feet in width and prospects well in free gold. The season is now too far advanced for them to do much more than prepare for an early spring work.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 3, 1894, page 283


Mineral Lands and Railroads.
    The following paragraph from the Democratic Times, Jacksonville, Oregon, emphasizes our remarks of last week on the subject of railroad selections of mineral lands:
    "The list of lands advertised by the Roseburg Land Office and claimed by the O.&C.R.R. Co. embraces a large mineral area in Josephine as well as in Jackson County. A large portion of the mining ground along Coyote, Grave and Louse creeks, and Jumpoff Joe is included in the list; also the Dry Diggings section, east of Grants Pass. Parties having unpatented mining claims should look the matter up."
    It will be seen from this that the warning given in the Press of last week came none too soon and that miners in all sections should at once begin to look up the exact geographical location of their properties, so as to be posted as to their position in township and section.
    It will not do to be careless or neglect this matter or the mine owner will find his claim covered by agricultural patent to the railroad company. It will be necessary to look out that the lists of lands advertised do not cover mining ground. The difficulty is that these legal advertisements, giving township, range and section, are full of a lot of confusing figures, and not very interesting reading. But if the miners in the different sections do not read them, to see if their particular sections are named, they will be apt to lose their claims unless they file the required protests at once.
    The railroads can, by the means adopted, get hold of this mining ground by a perfectly legal process, and after their patents are obtained there is no redress. The fact that a man has properly located his claim and had a possessory title for years makes no difference, unless he has a patent. It is his duty to file a protest in the proper land office when the ground in question is advertised. The newspapers in the various mining sections should all note this fact and warn the miners of the danger there is of claims being lost unless the necessary precautions are taken.

Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 3, 1894, page 274


    HYDRAULIC MINES.--Rogue River Courier: Collis & Wickstrom started their hydraulic works in operation at the Dry Diggings Saturday.
    Bailey and Miller have just finished setting up 1000 feet of hydraulic pipe on their placer on Missouri Flat, not far from the Mountain Lion mine.
    Messrs. Spencer & Gunning have put about 2000 feet of hydraulic pipe in position to play on their placers at Bloody Run this winter. The diggings are just back of Ole Severson's place and are known to be rich.
    F. P. Johnson, formerly landlord of the Palace Hotel, came in from Oak Flat this week and reports the work of building a three-mile ditch progressing favorably. He and two other miners are interested in the project and have a good placer mine awaiting the water which comes from Soldier Creek with a fall of 200 feet. The bank averages fifteen feet to the bedrock and prospects well from the grass roots down. The scene of operation is down the Illnois River twenty-five miles from Kerby and fifty from Grants Pass the road you have to travel.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 10, 1894, page 299


Manafraidofabear Is Held Up.
    Jno. B. Griffin, formerly of Phoenix, but now of Grants Pass, has given battle to many a drove of bears and has always come out victorious, but when he is tackled by three highwaymen his knees knock together and he makes a very graceful surrender, as is proven by his own narrative which is given below:
    GRANTS PASS, Nov. 11.--Editor, the Mail: You will, perhaps before this reaches you, have heard of an attempted holdup of myself while coming from the Hammersley mine on November 10th, and by request of Riley Hammersley I will give you the straight story so there will be no misunderstanding of the matter.
    I went up to the mine on Friday, the 9th, in company with Mr. Calhorn, of Phoenix. We met Hammersley at the foot of the Burkhart hill on his way out. He had "cleaned up" that day and was on his way out with the bullion, some $1400. We talked awhile and went on, Riley telling me he would be back in a day or so. I remained overnight at the time and until afternoon the next day, when I started back, in company with Hawley Bull, one of the hands. We had probably gone two or three miles when Mr. Bull stopped to fix his saddle, which was bothering him. My horse being impatient, I rode on slowly over a little rise in the trail and near where the wagon road intersects, and suddenly I saw three men walking slowly in front of me. I thought nothing of it and rode up and the two that were behind stepped out, one on each side, as if to let me pass; the other stuck to the trail as I passed between the two. The one in front suddenly turned and asked: "Is your name Hammersley?" I said no, sir, my name is Griffin, when the one on the left spoke up and said, "Don't give us no lies," at the same time throwing his gun, which was a double-barrel shotgun, around in a handy position. I caught on then and, glancing hastily around, saw that the other fellow had his gun also in position, although not pointing directly at me. I was a little shaken but hastened to explain that Hammersley had gone out the evening before and was in Medford. Just about this time Mr. Bull came in sight when one of them saw him and said, "Hello, here comes some more," and they stepped past me and started on down the trail, at the same time I made the remark, "Yes, there are more coming." They made no demand on me for money, but it is a plain fact that their intention was to hold Hammersley up and would have undertaken it if it had been him. They must have thought that this was his day, as he has been in the habit of coming out on the 10th, but this time came out on the evening before, but if they had tackled Riley I will promise them they would have met with a warm reception, as he was well armed. I told Mr. Bull how near I came to getting plugged full of lead, and that we would take the left-hand trail to avoid any further conflict, which we did and hurried along right lively. We came to Woodville that night and next morning waited until Riley came down from Gold Hill and told him of what he had missed and put him on his guard. Now, what they intended to do is more than I can tell. Everyone can form their own guess. Riley had several men with him when going out with the bullion, and now he will be better prepared than ever, and if these would-be highwaymen ever try a holdup, I pledge my word they will have an interesting time of it.
JOHN B. GRIFFIN.
Medford Mail, November 23, 1894, page 4


    The Tolo placer and quartz mining property, near Fort Lane, Oregon, has been sold to Tacoma men for $6000. The mine embraces 160 acres and has been profitably worked by crude methods for the past twenty years. The new company have bought a 150-horsepower engine and the other necessary machinery. The water will be pumped from Rogue River and the pressure will be through the force of the engine. They claim that they can force through the pipe 2000 gallons per minute. The cost of the machinery is $7500. It will be placed and ready for operation by January 1.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 8, 1894, page 355


    The Marotte mines, in Jackson Co., Or., owned by the Detroit Mining Company, of Detroit, Mich., have a ten-stamp mill upon the ground.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 29, 1894, page 404


    Major Newell, who is the inventor of a scheme to raise gold-bearing gravel from the bed of a stream by means of a strong suction pipe and extract the precious metal therefrom, has launched his craft on Rogue River, near Grants Pass, Or. The boat is thirty feet long by twelve wide, and is fitted with an engine and boiler to run the pump and a set of sluice boxes to wash the sand and gravel after it has been raised to the surface.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 5, 1895, page 3


    JOSEPHINE CO.--Major Newell has hung up his gold-pumping boat for awhile and gone to Portland where he will negotiate for a larger boiler und move powerful pumping apparatus.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 19, 1895, page 42


    There are three giants running night and day within three miles of Grants Pass, Or. Two of them belong to Wickstrom & Corliss in the Dry Diggings and the other to Spencer & Gunning on Bloody Run. Several acres will be torn up and sent into Rogue River before the water gives out, and the indications point to a profitable cleanup.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 2, 1895, page 67


    A new concentrator, with a capacity of eight tons per day, has been put in at Z. A. Moody's quartz mill near Ashland, Or. The ore from the Mattern mine will be run through it when it is ready for business.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 9, 1895, page 83


    Ashland Tidings: The miners were all down from the Ashland mine Saturday, and $1500 which had just been cleaned up from the plates at the mill in town was divided among them, giving them about $40 each, and putting them in considerably better humor. This cleanup was the result of only a short run. Some splendid rock has been sent down from the mine lately, and the men say there is plenty of it in sight to bring the owners of the mine out all right.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 9, 1895, page 91


    A REPORTED STRIKE.--A strike in the old Dry Diggings mine, three miles east of Grants Pass, is reported. This is one of the oldest mines in Southern Oregon, large amounts of gold having been taken out of it in early days, and it is still being mined every winter with good results. The main ledge has never been found, though it has been hunted for for many years. Two giants have been at work this winter on the property. Two years ago two young men found a pocket far up the hill, above any work which had ever been done on the property before, and took out sixteen ounces of gold from it. Taking up that clue, three miners begun looking for the source of the lead this winter, with the result of finding a leader to what is supposed to be the main lead to the Dry Diggings mine. Some very rich quartz and dirt has been taken out, as high as $7 per pan being realized.
"Oregon: Josephine County," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 16, 1895, page 106


    In Southern Oregon, where most of the mines of the state are located, the bill introduced by Representative Smith of Josephine, to change the mining laws of the state, is unpopular. It is claimed it would unnecessarily place many impediments in the way of the development of Oregon's placer mines and seriously injure that important industry. The impounding of tailings, which is required by the measure, is one of its specially obnoxious features. The miners say Representative Smith's bill will probably suit R. D. Hume and some farmers living along the streams in which the farmers run their tailings. Hume threatened to shut down mining in Southern Oregon because the people objected to him capturing all the fish that wanted to go up the river. He said the miners were shoaling the mouth of Rogue River. The miners do not want any such bill, and it will be the beginning of endless litigation and the shutting down of gravel mines in Jackson and Josephine counties.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 23, 1895, page 115


    THE ASHLAND MINE.--Tidings: The miners and other creditors of the Ashland mine, which has not been managed to suit many of them for some time past, have been in Ashland consulting, and it is understood that a number of additional liens against the property will be filed at once and Judge Hanna petitioned to appoint a receiver for the property. The mine is advertised to be sold upon execution on the 23rd, but it is not likely that the sale will take place. The mine was never in a more promising condition, it is said, as far as showing up good paying rock is concerned.
Jackson Co.
    The San Francisco parties who had the Mountain Lion mine, on Missouri Flat, bonded, have given it up and Bailey Bros. are again in possession.
    The Hammersley mine is gradually bringing its owners out of deep water. The mine has already cleared off some $13,000 indebtedness, and is only partly opened as yet.
    Jennie Bros., who have purchased the placer claims of Kenney, Benson and Anderson, on Sardine Creek, have put in two giants with eleven-inch pipe, and expect to make a good showing during the season.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 23, 1895, page 123


    THE ASHLAND MINE.--Tidings: Upon application of the creditors, Judge Hanna at Jacksonville this afternoon appointed Jos. Dame receiver of the Ashland mine, with bonds placed at $20,000. It is expected that work will go right ahead at the mine as soon as the papers are completed. The total claims represented in liens filed upon the property amount to nearly $9000, $4800 of which are wages due the miners and the remainder material claims held in Ashland.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 2, 1895, page 139


    WILL PUMP DIRECT.--The Tolo Mining Co. have switched on their idea of getting water on their placer mines with a flume, after spending considerable time and money in the endeavor, and will pump with steam from Rogue River direct. The flume built will be used for running tailings into the stream.
Josephine Co.
    BOUGHT A MINE.--Ex-Collector of Customs Quinn, of this city, has bought the Hammersley mine in Jumpoff Joe precinct for $25,000.
Jackson Co.
    THE ASHLAND MINE.--Capt. Jas. Carroll is having the Ashland mine experted. His option on the property expires next week.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 23, 1895, page 187


    K. Quine, of Riddle, Douglas Co., Or., has sold his placer miue to H. Ball of Tacoma. The property consists of a gravel bar on Cow Creek, where considerable gold has been washed out with rockers. Mr. Ball will put in a pumping plant to cost $3,500. Panners are said to have made $1 to $2 a day on the ground.

"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 30, 1895, page 195


AT THE TOLO MINE.
An Economical Method of Mining Now Employed.

    JACKSONVILLE, Or., April 1.--The pumping plant at the Tolo mine was started up Saturday. The method of operating differs radically from that generally employed. A marine boiler, of 200 horsepower, and a duplex Gardiner pump are used. The boiler is placed at the lower end of the claim, and the pump on the bank of Rogue River, 742 feet from the boiler. The power is transmitted from the boiler to the pump through a 2½-inch pipe. To avoid condensation as far as possible, the pipe is boxed and covered with dry sand. The distance from the pump to the end of the water pipe, to which the giant is attached, is 1500 feet and the elevation 55 feet. The plant worked as well as any hydraulic plant could. The steam gauge at the boiler indicated a pressure of 80 pounds and that of the pumps 60 pounds. With 43 pounds as the natural gravity, or pressure, at 100 feet, it was found that 40 pounds of pressure at the pump was equal to 100 feet of gravity pressure, so a pressure equal to 150 feet was being used. It will be understood, of course, that this is only a small part of the power of which the boiler is capable.
    The success of this plant and its cheapness, as compared with the construction of long and expensive ditches, will commend it to public favor, and the result may be to revolutionize mining all over the coast. If, for instance, it was desired to mine any of the numerous bars on Rogue River or Applegate, many of which are known to be fine-paying propositions, with water to handle them, instead of being required to dig a ditch at a cost of $7500 to $100,000, which would be practically prohibitive, a plant of this character might be put in and these bars successfully worked at a cost not greater than $1500, all ready for operation.
Oregonian, Portland, April 2, 1895, page 3


    NEW IN OREGON.--Times: The company in which Judge Reid, W. W. Milner and C. O. White of Tacoma are interested started operations at their mines near Tolo this week. The steam pumping apparatus, which furnishes a fine supply of water from Rogue River, works to perfection and inaugurates a new system of mining.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 6, 1895, page 219


    RICH LEDGE.--Lawrence & Cameron of Galls Creek have a rich ledge, and recently had eleven tons of the ore crushed at the Lindley mill on Sardine Creek, from which was obtained $4,800 in gold or nearly $440 a ton. Galls Creek is one of the richest districts in Oregon, but very few well-defined ledges have as yet been found, pockets predominating.
    GENERAL SOUTHERN OREGON NOTES.--Birdsey & Co., of  district, have resumed piping, the late rains having brought sufficient water.
    Frank Knight has traded his interest in Kubli & Co.'s mine in Galls Creek district for another promising ledge on Galice Creek.
    J. B. Dyer has bonded the Shepherd quartz ledge on Emigrant Creek, and is engaged in making preparations to develop the mine.
    The Homestake mine, in Woodville district, is prospecting well and work is being pushed on it.
    Schrimpf Bros., of Williams Creek district, are working in ore which produces an average of $20 a ton.
    Bailey & Co., owners of the Mountain Lion mine in Missouri Flat district, will soon resume work.
    The boiler and engine of the Hosley mill, on the Siskiyous, were shipped by John R. Stearns last week to the Songer & Dame mine on Klamath River, which will be operated on a large scale.
    James Wyatt and Scott Gall, of Sams Valley, have struck a quartz ledge on Fitzgerald Mountain, which promises to be rich. Samples of the ore have been estimated by experts to assay $80 per ton.
    Work has been resumed in the Anaconda mine, in Josephine County, by Mr. King and Arch Taylor, of Grants Pass. Prospects are good. The Bone of Contention still lies idle, awaiting the return of J. C. Ezell.
    The stockholders of the Hammersley mine, in Jumpoff Joe precinct, held their annual meeting at Medford last week. Officers were elected as follows: President, G. R. Hammersley; vice president, A. S. Hammond; secretary and treasurer, J. L. Hammersley; general manager, Riley Hammersley. Although the mine is bonded the company will work portions of it until final payment is made.
"Galls Creek District," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 6, 1895, page 219


    JACKSON AND JOSEPHINE COUNTIES.--Dysert & Miller are opening some promising placer mines on Jack's Creek in Josephine County, which they expect to work on an extensive scale next season. They are building a ditch to carry water from Jumpoff Joe Creek.
    Dugan & Colvig have a small force at work developing their quartz ledge west of Jacksonville, which is getting richer and better defined. They are exhibiting some fine ore.
    Capt. Nash was at Althouse, Josephine County, last week, where he put a hydraulic plant into shape for the Roseburg company which is operating in that section. They have a supply of water and plenty of ground.
    The old channel in Humbug district, Applegate precinct, which was so rich in early days, has again been discovered by a miner named Poole, who has been drifting there for some tune past. He has taken out about $1500 since he struck it.
    CINNABAR MINE.--Ashland Tidings: The Minneapolis people, who had Hill's cinnabar mine on upper Wagner Creek bonded, allowed the bond to lapse last month. Hill has since been running a new tunnel in on the ledge. The ore carries gold as well as quicksilver.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 27, 1895, page 267


    Considerable placer mining will be done in Southern Oregon this season. There is some stir in the vicinity of Gold Hill, about fifteen miles from Jacksonville, Jackson Co. The Gold Hill Channel Mining Co. has several claims on Foots Creek, two miles from Rogue River, along an ancient river channel which they have tunneled 1500 feet and which turns out "black gold" bringing $18 an ounce at the mint in this city. Ed. Schieffelin, the discoverer of the Tombstone, Arizona, mines, is running a tunnel near Woodville, the ore from which is rich in free gold. He has another claim on California Creek, and a five-stamp mill which turns out good returns. F. Laurence, from another adjacent quartz claim, recently sent 11 tons of ore to this city, which brought him $4800, at an alleged expense of $500. It's a good country to mine in, and is attracting the renewed attention of the prospector and the capitalist.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 4, 1895, page 275


    The Oregon & California Railroad Company has applied for patent to another lot of land in Southern Oregon, aggregating about 12,000 acres. Some of these lands are situated in Douglas County, more in the extreme western part of Jackson County. Mineral land is included and those interested in that section should investigate the descriptions carefully. The lists were filed with the officers of the Roseburg land office April 23rd, and sixty days from that date are allowed for the filing of protests or contests against the claim of the railroad company on the grounds that the land is more valuable for mineral than for agricultural purposes. These protests should be filed with the Roseburg land office officials.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 11, 1895, page 291


    THE QUINE MINE.--The placer mining and milling plant which will work the Quine mine at Riddle consists of two boilers of 35 horsepower and a pump with a 12-inch suction and a 10-inch discharge, with a capacity of 2000 gallons per minute.
    GOLDEN STANDARD.--H. D. Kubli writes from Galls Creek district that a richer body of ore than ever has been struck in the Golden Standard mine. He says that as high as $2 has been obtained from a handful of it, and enthusiastically adds that he is now asking $60,000 for the mine.
"Jackson County," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 11, 1895, page 299


    PLACER MINE SOLO.--Jacksonville Times: The sale of Ennis & Cameron's placer mines in Galice Creek district to Messrs. Bent and Alexander, formerly of Colorado, has been confirmed. The new firm will take possession as soon as their predecessors finish cleaning up this season's work, which will be the latter part of July. In the neighborhood of $20,000 was paid for the property.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 1, 1895, page 351


HYDRAULIC MINING.
A Tacoma Company Operating in Southern Oregon.

    Some months ago we chronicled the incorporation of the Tolo Mining Company with headquarters at Tacoma in this state.
    The company secured a tract of placer ground and some gold quartz property in southern Oregon, devoting their early attention to the development of the quartz mines from which they took more than $10,000 besides putting several tons of ore, valued at $10 or $15 per ton, on the dump.
    It is now reported that they have equipped their placer mine with a steam hydraulic plant which is described by the Ledger as follows:
    The method adopted by the Northern Pacific in washing down the bluff on Pacific Avenue gave the present owners of the mine an idea as to the manner of working it. They determined as an experiment to put in a steam hydraulic plant. The experiment has proven entirely successful.
    A few months ago the company purchased the tract and invested about $25,000 in the new scheme. The ground being now worked is 1,500 feet from the river and the elevation sixty-five feet. A 150-horsepower engine is located along the line of the pipe 760 feet from the river and steam is conveyed to a large Gardner pump located on the river bank. With this arrangement about 2,000 gallons of water a minute is forced through a heavy pipe to a giant located at the mine, and similar to the one now at work on the bluff north of the Ocean warehouse on Tacoma's harbor.
    As a rule the company uses a pressure of about 130 pounds through the giant, or equal to nearly a 300-foot head of water. Commencing at the lower portion of the mine is a large sluicebox with a number of feeders above.
    The mine employs eight men. About five weeks ago they began to sluice down the earth. As yet there has been no cleanup. The fifty-six ounces secured in the first twenty days' work came off the bedrock. It will be some time before a cleanup is made, but there is every indication that when it is, many thousands of dollars will be realized.
    Last Tuesday, in working farther up the hill, an old channel of cement and gravel was struck, which promises to be quite extensive. It is from two and a half to three and a half feet thick, probably extending several hundred feet around the hill. The Tolo company's miners had worked on the channel but a short time, when after washing down the bedrock that day several nuggets of gold were picked up, the largest weighing over $100. The bedrock, which is a decomposed granite, when left exposed slacks in the weather, and as it too is known to be gold bearing, the giant can be profitably run over the same ground again in a few months.
Northwest Mining Review, Spokane, Washington, June 3, 1895, page 281


JACKSON COUNTY.
(Medford Mail.)
    Moses Lee claims to have found a rich quartz lead on Jumpoff Joe. He shows some rich specimens.
    Mark Whipple, the tall sycamore of Woodville precinct, who has a valuable placer mine on Jumpoff Joe, was down last week to pay his friends a visit.
    We learn the hoisting works at the Hammersley are in position and are working finely. The mill is running steadily, and some big cleanups will be made soon, as the ore is very rich, and it will be pushed for all there is in it.
    John Robinson, the popular merchant of Wilmer, went to Grants Pass Saturday evening, returning Sunday morning. He also has a rich placer and is making a big cleanup, having already picked up several hundred dollars in nuggets.
(Jacksonville Times.)
    The Mountain Lion mine in Missouri Flat district, which is again being operated by Bailey, Davidson & Co., shows a good quality of ore and plenty of it. It will be heard from in the near future.
    The hoisting works at the Hammersley ledge in Jumpoff Joe district have been placed in position and work well. The mill is running steadily, and a big cleanup is expected by Quinn & Lindley, who have the mine bonded.
    Kinney, Shearer & Co., who now have their placer mines in Steamboat district well rigged up, expect to make a good report in due time. They have a sawmill in operation to furnish them with the necessary lumber.
    Birdsey, Knotts & Swinden of the "Roaring Gimlet" mine in Kane district have a lot of good ore at the Braden mill and expect good results. They recently struck a pocket from which they extracted over a thousand dollars.
    Applegate Bros., who struck a rich pocket on Lane's Creek a short time since, and whose shaft caved in when 20 feet deep, when the ore body was getting richer, are running a 100-foot tunnel to strike the ledge at a depth of fifty feet. The mine gives every evidence of permanence and richness.
    G. W. Boggs arrived from Tacoma, Wash.. a few days since, and will look after his extensive mining interests on Elliott Creek. The sawmill he ordered will soon arrive, and will be in operation as soon as possible. Southern Oregon needs just such men as Mr. Boggs to develop her industries.
    The sale of Ennis & Cameron's placer mines in Galice Creek district to Messrs. Bent and Alexander, formerly of Colorado, has been confirmed. The new firm will take possession as soon as their predecessors finish cleaning up their season's work, which will be the latter part of July. In the neighborhood of $20,000 was paid for the property, which is among the best in Oregon.
Northwest Mining Review, Spokane, Washington, June 3, 1895, page 282


    C. O. White, superintendent of the Tolo Mining Company, reports a strike in the McDonough ledge, which is included in the Tolo placer purchase.
    Another pocket of gold and silver ore was taken from the Beekman & Huffer ledge on Jackson Creek lately, which is much richer in gold than anything yet discovered in this ledge. No estimate of the value of these finds can be made on account of the rock being rich in both silver and gold.
    Emil Holden, a scientific German, has discovered a silver and gold-bearing ledge on the divide between Jackson and Galls creeks, about four miles from Jacksonville, which is said to be the largest and most valuable discovery ever made in Southern Oregon. The ledge is 30 feet wide and has been traced a distance of 6,000 feet. A large number of assays give the average value of the silver per ton at 50 ounces and $8 of gold. More prospecting is being done in Southern Oregon at the present time than ever before.
    About 60 miners are at work in Steamboat district, opening up placer mines, and the prospect is good for turning out considerable gold.
    J. T. Layton's Farris Gulch and Williamsburg hydraulic mines are being operated with old-time vigor.
"Jackson County," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 8, 1895, page 366


JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
     COPPER DEPOSITS.--Large copper deposits are said to exist in Josephine County, thirty miles south of Grants Pass, at the mouth of Falls Creek on the west bank of the Illinois River.
    A. M. Brown has bonded eighteen claims on the creek and brought Geo. F. Wheeler from Baltimore, who bought an interest in the claims, and on returning to Baltimore organized the Siskiyou Mining Co. and sent out the necessary capital for Mr. Brown to commence development work with and to put in the necessary machinery for a test.
    They are now opening the mine in two places, by tunneling, and getting out ore which is said to run from twenty-two to forty-five percent pure copper.
    At present twenty-two men are at work.
JACKSON COUNTY.
    TO BE SOLD.--Sheriff Patterson will sell the Ashland mine July 6th to satisfy judgments against the property by Kinney & Provost, $9988.60, with $1200 costs; T. K. Bolton, $2305.30 and $5500, with $570 costs and attorney fees; a total of approximately $20,000 judgments. Four claims are embraced--the Nutshell mining claim, the A. N. King mining claim, the Patton extension of the A. N. King and the Rogers & Roach claim.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 15, 1895, page 382


    THE BEEKMAN AND HUFFER MINE.--Tidings: J. H. Huffer went to San Francisco on Tuesday to make arrangements for securing a stamp mill to set up at the Beekman & Huffer bonanza on Jackson Creek, near Jacksonville. This claim continues to yield handsomely with a hand mortar, a $600 slug being realized last week, and the owners think that, with a three or five-stamp mill, they can work some of the less rich ore with profit. The ledge is a wide one of some fourteen feet, with rich pockets.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 29, 1895, page 415


    IN SOUTHERN OREGON.--Tidings: A run of three cars of ore from the Homestake mine, near Woodville, yielded $350, about the same as from that previously milled.
    W. L. Chapman & Co., of Portland have men building a wing dam in Rogue River, one-half mile above Gold Hill.
    Campbell & Co., of Portland, have bought the Hamelin claim on Rogue River, fifteen miles below Gold Hill, and have men building a reservoir for hydraulic purposes.
    THE TOLO MINING CO.--The carload of ore shipped by the Tolo Mining Co. to the Ashland Mining Co.'s mill resulted favorably, averaging $35 to the ton. There is considerable more of the same kind in sight.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 13, 1895, page 30


    SALE OF THE ASHLAND MINE.--The sale of the Ashland mine under the judgments of A. E. Kinney et al, aggregating $21,523.43, was made at Jacksonville last Saturday. The creditors, represented, made the purchase. It is understood that work will be resumed on the mine.
    THE HAMMERSLEY PROPERTY SOLD.--Gold Hill Miner: Three months ago Morton Lindley bargained for the Hammersley Mining Co.'s property, situated on Jumpoff Joe, and located about twenty-five miles north of Gold Hill. The group of mines comprises Daisy, Little Dorrit, Lady Oregon, Coxey and Hopkins' Choice, and the property has been worked with successful results ever since the discovery of the property, some two years since. Mr. Lindley bargained for the property with the condition of placing on the property hoisting works and necessary machinery for working the mine for six months in order to test its merit. After a two months' run Mr. Lindley became satisfied that the property was all right, and, as a result, he and his associates have purchased the property outright.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 20, 1895, page 46


    AT THE ASHLAND MINE.--Eight men, under Thos. James as superintendent, have begun work at the Ashland mine. The work will be prosecuted on the west side, where some of the richest rock yet milled from the mine has been opened up. The development there has ftilled with water since work stopped, and the first thing to do will be pumping out. Only a day force will be employed at present and a week or two will be required before a steady output of ore can be expected.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 27, 1895, page 63


JACKSON COUNTY.
(Jacksonville Times.)
    Albert Ziniker came out from the Bohemia mines Thursday, bringing with him 15 pounds of gold bullion from the Musick mine.
    R. Anderson has leased the Red Oak mine on Galls Creek and will put a force at work at once. Joe Phillips is to be foreman.
    A nugget weighing $165 was unearthed last week in the placer claim of Hager & Jenks on Canyon Creek, 10 miles from Kerbyville.
    C. L. Morton has two shifts of men working on his Galls Creek placer proposition. He will not stop until he reaches the true channel.
    Dr. Willis Everett, at one time employed at the Hope mine in Talent district, but now of Tacoma, Wash., is looking at some of our mining properties.
Northwest Mining Review, Spokane, Washington, August 12, 1895, page 362


    GENERAL NOTES.--A carload of quartz shipped from the Tolo Mining Co.'s ledge to Ashland produced $30 to the ton.
    Capt. Brown has several samples of ore from the copper mines on Illinois River at his office in Grants Pass, which assays 27 percent pure copper and carries several dollars in gold. He is looking for smelting machinery.
    Reports of rich gold finds come from the Siletz, and gold-bearing sand is reported found on the beaches near Tillamook. Sluices are being worked and good results reported.
    Thirty men are at work on the Josephine County copper mine, some on the tunnel and some on the trail being built from Mudd ranch to Wheeler City. About 350 tons of ore are on the dump waiting the arrival of the machinery, which will be taken in as soon as the trail is completed.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 17, 1895, pages 106-107


    Supt. James has a small force of men at work at the Ashland mine.
    The Tolo Mining Co.'s effects are being sold for debt. The wood, hydraulic pipe, etc., were sold a few days since to satisfy the claim of Mr. Potter of Rock Point precinct. Reid, Milner & Co. have telegraphed from Tacoma that they will settle everything.
    Ladd & Williams of Gold Hill district cleaned up $1700, the season's run, at their placer mine.
    Beekman & Huffer's quartz mill will be in operation next month.
    Hull, Beck & Pelton of Louse Creek have struck a rich body of ore in their quartz mine and have taken out several hundred dollars.
    The Lucky Bart and Rita mines in Sardine Creek district are being operated with a small force, and the ore is being crushed by J. H. Breeman at the Lindley mill.
    The Sterling Mining Co. have commenced cleaning bedrock and will be so employed for the next six weeks. The prospects are good for a favorable result.
    N. H. Spencer of Griffin Creek, who has been prospecting a graphite proposition, has run a cut of about forty feet and struck a five-foot ledge, which has the appearance of being permanent and shows a good quality of ore.
    R. F. Yocum and Dr. Pearce of Poormans Creek will cut a four-mile ditch from Griffin Creek this fall. It will raise the supply to enough for six months' work.
    W. H. Reid of Tacoma, Wash., is straightening out the business of the Tolo Mining Co.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 24, 1895, page 122


    The Rogue River Mining Company has incorporated at Portland, Or.; capital stock, $100,000; incorporators, C. B. Spencer, A. F. Groves and Isaac Meyer.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 31, 1895, page 135


    Writing of Jackson County placer mines, Leigh Harnett says at the Beekman & Huffer quartz mine, on a high hill three miles west of Jacksonville, Mr. Beekman is said to own 100 acres and he was told that within a radius of half a mile from the mine in question there are seven ledges. For so short a space that is something new in geology. More than likely, when development work brings more correct ideas, it will be found the lower deposits of ore, now thought to be ledges, are nothing but fractures from the intact ledges above. It is scarcely possible in creation for seven intact ledges to exist at depth in the narrow space of half a mile. Nevertheless, it is true the location now spoken of embraces three ledges, and that the company are opening the second and third. "In the upper tunnel on the second ledge, 105 feet long when I saw it," says Mr. Harnett, "the vein was two feet wide all the way, with both walls showing out in excellent form. The ore all along the tunnel and on the dump is really rich. Midway in the tunnel a hole some ten feet deep has been sunk to test the ore, and in this it is found still richer. In the lower tunnel the vein spreads out to cover ten feet and in streaks is very rich. From appearances it is not likely the vein will continue its present width, and for permanency at depth it is to be hoped it will not. As a proof of the richness of the ore, I may state 100 pounds were sent to the Selby smelter at San Francisco, which on reduction paid $800. This is enormous, but Selby can always be relied upon. There are also some remarkably rich streaks of silver in the ore, a thing I was not expecting in Southern Oregon until Mr. Huffer called my attention to it. Were I an owner in the mine, however, I should regret this duplex ore, as the silver, apart from its depreciation in value, will give much trouble in the final reduction. A good mill is in course of erection, and when completed will run total expenses up to $6000."
    WILL PUMP WATER.--Major Newell, who has been experimenting with a boat intended to pump auriferous gravel from the bottom of Rogue River for the past several months, has leased a placer claim from Wm. Hamlin, two miles from Grants Pass, and will use the engine from his boat to pump water for the use of the mine.
    Jas. H. Kincaid has sold his interest in placer mines in Willow Springs district to B. W. Huston, who with J. W. Ingram will put in a hydraulic to operate them.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 31, 1895, page 138


Jackson County.
    Last month 46,624 pounds of ore were shipped from the Ashland mine to the Selby Smelting & Lead Co. at San Francisco. The value was $132.75 per ton, or $3000 for the whole. The shipment was the product of the work of four men for 32 days.
    Work is being pushed on the Waldo and Siskiyou copper mines with a full force of men.

Josephine County.
    About one hundred men are at work on the Hampton ditch on upper Grave Creek.
    The tunnel on the Fidelity mine is driven into the hill 260 feet, and the ore taken out is to be milled at the Anderson & Holyoke mill.
    A five-stamp mill will soon be added to the two-stamp mill now in operation on the Mt. Reuben property of J. C. Lewis. The ore runs $14 per ton, and there is a 12-foot vein.
    It is reported that a three-foot vein of rich ore has been encountered at the 115-foot level of the Hammersley mine.
Northwest Mining Review, Spokane, Washington, September 15, 1895, page 396


Jackson County.
    The Golden Standard mine on Galls Creek is producing some very rich ore.
    A contract has been let on Louse Creek for a ditch 260 rods long, to be three feet wide at the bottom. The parties letting the contract are Messrs. Hull, Beck and Pelton.
    The Hammond mill will soon be in operation on the Steamboat ledge.
    Another giant and other machinery is to be purchased to equip the mine of Williams and Ladd with.
    Two hundred acres of land have been located within the past few weeks, which runs well in copper. Samples show from 14 to 18 percent.
Northwest Mining Review, Spokane, Washington, October 15, 1895, page 403


    KERBYVILLE.--Jacksonville Times: The business men of Kerby are now experiencing an old-time mining boom, and the little burg presents about the same life it did in the '50s. Hotels are crowded, pack trains are loading, and the stores are crowded with men going to the mines in the vicinity. A person cannot go toward any point of the compass and miss a mining camp. On Althouse, up the Illinois River, down that stream, west of Kerby on Josephine or Soldier Creek, any direction one strikes mines and mines. It is thought that fully 1000 men are now in the vicinity, all actively engaged in mining or prospecting. Kerby is the distributing point for the whole region and is centrally located.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 2, 1895, page 286


    In Southern Oregon 25 men are employed at the Illinois River copper mines at present. The smelting plant has been hauled in over the four-foot grade built from Deer Creek, and preparations are being made for roasting ore, about 500 tons of which lie on the dump. The company will put a wire suspension bridge across the Illinois River.
    A Chinese storekeeper of Honolulu, Siskiyou Co., is the principal owner of the Benz Bar claim at Klamath River, employing forty-four men, some of whom are Caucasians. He says his countrymen don't want any more mining claims, as no young Chinese can come to this country, and those now here are too old to open any new claims.

"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 16, 1895, page 319


    The case of Simpkins vs. Savage, lately decided by the circuit court for Josephine County, Or., determines an important local question, viz., rights to mine the beds and bars of Rogue River and its tributaries, the Applegate and Illinois. It is well known that these streams are rich in gold, and when the sandbars therein are exposed by low water it becomes very profitable to work them. The decision of the circuit court determines the title to these sandbars. The court held that in such streams as Rogue River the riparian owner takes to the thread of the river, subject to an easement in the public to use the stream for navigation. Meander lines described in the surveyor's notes or in the patent do not necessarily determine the boundary of the tract. They are run for the purpose of defining the sinuosities of the banks of the stream. The water is the real boundary. A grant from the government,
without reservation, of lands on the banks of a navigable stream passes title to the unsurveyed islands lying between the mainland and the center of the stream.

"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 23, 1895, page 338


    THE HAMMERSLEY MINE.--There are three engines now in operation at the Hammersley mine at the head of Jumpoff Joe. One is used for a sawmill; one for the hoisting apparatus. A three-foot vein of rich ore is now being followed at a depth of 240 feet. Five more stamps were hauled in last week, making ten in operation.
    Z. A. Moody is driving a tunnel at the Edna mine, in the Ashland district, and is in 60 feet.
    Swinden & Hayes have completed a ditch at their mines on Oscar Creek, Josephine County, and are ready for wet weather.
    The new mills at the Steamboat and Beekman & Huffer mines will soon be crushing ore.
    The Jacksonville Times says: " All that is needed to make Southern Oregon forge to the front as a gold-producing section is a wet winter. More mining will be done than ever before in that event."
    The Hicks Milling Co. at Ashland will commence crushing ore from the Tolo mine as soon as a boiler for heating purposes is put in. They will also work a large amount of second-grade ore from the Ashland mine.
    F. Stith, at the Free and Easy mine in Kerbyville district, will put in 1200 feet of flume to run the quartz down the mountain to the arrastra.
    Grayson & McCumber are developing the Anderson-Holyoke mine in Williams Creek district.
    At the Black Gold Channel Tunnel Co., Foots Creek, the tunnel is in 1000 feet, with a number of crosscuts. There are 80 men employed, and the force will be increased to 50. Hoisting works, an electric light plant and 3000 feet of rails for the new incline will be ordered.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 23, 1895, pages 342-343


HISTORY OF THE FIRST QUARTZ MILL IN OREGON.
    The mining industries in Southern Oregon have taken on new life lately. Yesterday's Oregon Mining Journal, from Grants Pass, is full of news of that section as well as of the mining history of the country. It says:
    "Jackson County had the honor of receiving the first quartz mill introduced into Oregon. The Gold Hill mine had just been discovered, and the owners were working in an arrastra quartz worth a dollar a pound. The old machine, with its cumbersome drags, lazy mules, etc., became repulsive to its owners, although they were dividing 1000 ounces of gold a week. So, in 1860, they let a milling contract to Henry Klippel, one of the firm, who went to San Francisco and purchased a 12-stamp mill, of the style then used. It had low, iron mortars, with wooden housings and six stamps working in each mortar. It was shipped by sea to Scottsburg, on the Umpqua, and hauled thence by team to Jacksonville, the steam engine and boiler accompanying. The freight bill alone was $2500, and the total cost of the mill when erected was $12,000. Its first performance was the reduction of 100 tons of refuse quartz from the vein, which had been thrown aside as too poor for the arrastra process. It yielded $100 per ton. The next run was on ordinary quartz from the mine, and much to the surprise of all it yielded only $3 a ton, owing, as was supposed, to defective amalgamation. Another run yielded only $2.40 per ton, and operations ceased. Later, the mill and engine passed into the hands of Jewett Brothers, who placed them on their mine, near Grants Pass, where they did good service for quite a while. Later still, they were converted into a sawmill. When last heard from the engine was in use at Parker's sawmill, on Big Butte Creek, in Jackson County. It should be preserved as a relic."
Oregonian, Portland, November 24, 1895, page 9


Southern Oregon Pocket Mines.
    The pocket mines of Southern Oregon have yielded over $1,000,000 during the past 30 years. The following is a record of the production of each of the more noted and best-attested mines:
Steamboat . . . . . $315,000
Gold Hill . . . . . . . 150,000
Jewett . . . . . . . . . .   40,000
Blackwell . . . . . . .   10,000
Holman  . . . . . . . .   10,000
Davenport  . . . . . .     8,000
Hicks  . . . . . . . . . .     2,000
    He would be a rash man who would say that no more pockets as rich as these lie within Southern Oregon.
Oregonian, Portland, November 24, 1895, page 9


ON THE ILLINOIS.
Two Well-Defined Ledges of Copper Discovered.
    E. M. Albright, C. D. Reaser and J. D. F. Stevenson last week discovered two ledges of copper on Rancherie Creek, in the same district as the mines of the Siskiyou Copper Company, on the lower Illinois, and about 2½ miles south of the company's mines. These gentlemen have been prospecting in that neighborhood all summer. Two of them, Albright and Reaser, were the locators of the Siskiyou mines, and sold them through Captain A. M. Brown to that company. At their present location, they have exposed two large, well-defined ledges of copper, which apparently is of the same grade as that of the Siskiyou mines. They have five claims in that neighborhood, from one of which they have taken out about 10 tons of ore.
    William Stock, D. W. Jones, and E. E. Johnson this week sold their Oak Flat placer mines, on Illinois River, to C. L. Mangum, of Grants Pass, who, on the same afternoon, conveyed them to Michael McDermott, of Portland, This property is considered very valuable. Last winter it was mined by ground sluicing and yielded 40 cents per cubic yard. Mr. McDermott will improve the property this winter, and next season he will equip it with a large hydraulic plant.
OTHER SOUTHERN OREGON MINES.
On Applegate River.
    B. B. Haney and John Hustle, of Tacoma, have bought from Messrs. Cameron & Boaz a large tract of placer ground on the Applegate River, near Uniontown, and will proceed at once to equip the same with a good hydraulic plant. A part of this gravel has been worked for 40 years, by ground sluicing, and has always yielded large returns. It is thought that when it is brought under the pipe it will prove a great property.
Louse Creek.
    J. A. Peterson, of the Young-Love and Peterson mine, on Louse Creek, has for the past six weeks kept eight men constantly employed. Mr. Peterson expects to get opened up about February 1 and commence to pipe.
    Joseph Pollock brought into Grants Pass the other day a fair-sized pile of gold, cleaned up in his arrastra on Louse Creek. Out of three tons of ore he obtained $165.
Big Picket Creek.
    Frank J. Owens, who purchased the Old Sturgeon mine, on Big Pickett Creek, for a California company, has landed in Grants Pass for the mine a carload of pipe, giants, and a full equipment of hydraulic machinery. All of these have been sent in [to] the mine.
Josephine Mine Leased.
    William Bybee has leased the Josephine mine, on Rogue River, to J. M. Underwood, of Indianapolis, under a contract of sale.
Oregonian, Portland, November 24, 1895, page 9


SOUTHERN OREGON MINES.
The Mill at the Steamboat Mine Ready to Start.
    The news of Southern Oregon's mines printed below is taken from yesterday's Oregon Mining Journal, of Grants Pass:
    The King-Smith Mining Company owns the celebrated Steamboat mine. The company lately struck the main ledge, which has been sought for ever since 1865. Fowler, Glenn & Co., who worked the mine at that period, took out nearly $400,000, and then lost the ledge. G. S. Smith has been prospecting for the lost ledge for the past five years, and at last his efforts have been crowned with success. The ledge runs in a northerly direction, dipping to the east. The company has 250 tons of ore ready to mill, averaging $25 in free gold, and the sulphurets running as high as $3000 per ton. The mill is now ready to start, and will be under the supervision of G. W. Smith, assayer, of Ashland. King Bros., of Portland, part owners of the mine, arrived lately and proceeded to Steamboat Creek.
    J. Bous, of the Black Gold Channel mine, on Foots Creek, is in San Francisco completing arrangements for equipping and working the mine. The California mining exchange is now in full ownership of the property. It is said that two hoisting shafts run by water will be put in for the underground work, and new buildings and conveniences generally will be put in. If the plans mature, about 100 men will be employed.
    The Macomber-Grayson Company has secured possession of the Richmond mine. This is a promising prospect on the Applegate. The company proposes to do considerable development work, and, if this work should confirm present indications, a mill will be put in.
    Call Bros., on Upper Pleasant Creek, will put pipe and giant on their placer claim this fall.
Oregonian, Portland, December 1, 1895, page 6


    In the southwestern part of Oregon, at Grants Pass and Medford, the placer mines are being worked with much success.
    The Illinois River copper mines, Oregon, are giving employment to twenty-five men. The smelting plant has all been hauled in ready to be set up.
    Portland and San Francisco men have purchased the McCarthy & Durphy gravel claim of 400 acres in Jackson County, Oregon, and it will be worked systematically next season.
    The placer fields on the Olalla section, Douglas County, Oregon, have been worked on a small scale for about forty years, but none of the channels have ever been piped by the hydraulic process.
"Mines & Gossip," The Mining Industry and Review, December 5, 1895, page 243



    Five stamps have been added to the mill and thirty-five men are at work at the Hammersley mine, Jumpoff Joe district, Oregon.
    Foots Creek, which is twelve miles up Rogue River from Grants Pass, Oregon, is attracting considerable attention on account of the richness of its mines.
    The Oregon Mining Journal
is authority for the statement that the pocket mines of Oregon have yielded over $1,000,000 during the past thirty years.
    N. A. Stevens, of the Illinois Valley country, Oregon, has eighteen miles of mining ditch now finished, and expects that mining operations there will be very active this winter.
    Cameron & Boaz have sold a large tract of their mining ground near Uniontown, Oregon, to B. E. Taney and John Hastie, of Tacoma, who will equip it with a first-class hydraulic plant.
    W. H. Miller has a rich ledge on Soldier Creek, Oregon, not far from the Illinois River, and twenty miles west of Kerby, from which he pounds out in a hand mortar from $10 to $12 per day. He lives alone, works the mine himself and is not bothered with a mill or a stock company or anything else.
"Mines & Gossip," The Mining Industry and Review, December 19, 1895, page 269


     SISKIYOU MINING CO.--From Capt. Geo. F. Wheeler, of the Siskiyou Mining Company, the Mining Journal learns that nothing will be done this winter in the matter of constructing a road to the coast from the copper mines, but the energies of the company will be bent towards getting out, reducing its copper ores and shipping its copper. A temporary arrangement has been made with the S.P.R.R. Co. whereby the copper will be shipped by rail to Galveston, and thence by water to New York, whence it will be transported to Baltimore, where the Baltimore Copper Co. will handle it.
    MINE BONDED.--G. F. Wheeler, A. M. Brown and J. H. Simon have a bond on the Mountain Pride mining claim, located on the Yank ledge on Rogue River, near the mouth of Galice Creek, for $30,000.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 21, 1895, page 410


    SOUTHERN OREGON.--Gold Hill Miner: The Daisy mine is again in a fair way to pay a good dividend.
    There are now dozens of men with pick, shovel and rocker working along Rogue River. Many of those men have tents stretched, and one can see their camp fires burning while they are engaged in their work along the water's edge. There is no limit to the amount of paying ground up and down the river, and the day is not far distant when the ground will be worked on a larger scale. Some parties have already been experimenting with water wheels for throwing water in quantities sufficient for placer work. What is needed is a great canal, furnishing water sufficient for all.
    The Lance Mining Company, which has purchased 700 acres of George W. Lance, at the outlet of Foots Creek, is rushing work in putting the mine in working order. They are cutting a raceway 2000 feet long and twelve feet wide, to reach Rogue River with the tailing. They have let the contract for 600 block and 30,000 feet of lumber for flume. They have also let the contract to build a reservoir covering six acres, and for ditches about six miles for sluicing and piping purposes. They have placed an order for 2000 feet of fifteen-inch pipe, expecting to be piping in February.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 28, 1895, page 430


    OPERATIONS RETARDED.---Oregon Mining Journal: The work of destruction commenced a week ago by a dynamite fiend on the bridge of the Siskiyou Mining Co., over the Illinois, was this week completed by the elements. The snows and rains of the past week sent an immense body of water down the river, with the result that the bridge was lifted from its supports and carried down the stream. This loss is most embarrassing to the company at this time, and will retard operations for several months. Supplies will be taken across the river on a wire rope, and in the meantime the 1000 tons of copper ore on the dump will be at once smelted.
    A PROMISING PROPOSITION.--Mail: There is probably not another mining proposition in Southern Oregon, practically undeveloped, that is promising a brighter future than the one now being opened at Bolt by the Lance Mining Co. The property which this company owns comprises 700 acres and is located almost squarely at the door of the Bolt post office. Work is now being pushed for early and earnest working of the mine. There are now eight or ten men at work. One hundred and fifty sluice boxes, twelve feet long, are being built, 5000 blocks are being sawed, a sluice way 2300 feet in length is being made, and a tunnel from Foots Creek to the Rogue River is being put through, this latter for dump grounds. The company will put in 2000 feet of pipe and will have plenty of water, during an average wet season, to run eight months in the year. A reservoir, with a capacity of from two to three million gallons, is also being made. From this the company expects to be able to run eight hours. The ground is very rich--in no pan which has been tested has there been found less than five cents in gold. The average of a yard of dirt where work is to commence is seventy-five cents. Three miles of water ditch is also to [be] built; this work is to be done by contract. Work is expected to commence with pipe and giants about February 1st.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 4, 1896, page 10


    The following is given as Oregon's gold yield by counties for 1894: Baker, $447,995.72; Benton, $2,042; Coos, $106,353.77; Crook, $1,050; Curry, $8,800; Douglas, $70,879.38; Grant, $128,583.09; Harney, $1,500; Jackson, $167,646; Josephine, $143,676.61; Lane, $32,500; Linn, $2,000; Malheur, $13,500; Marion, $982.88; Union, $1,059.070; total, $5213,356.42.
"Mines & Gossip," The Mining Industry and Review, January 9, 1896, page 312


    Forty representatives of the leading mining companies of Jackson, Josephine and other counties of Oregon met at Grants Pass, Or., last Monday, and effected a permanent organization of the Southern Oregon Miners' Association. Officers were elected and future meetings arranged for. The object is to secure better legislation for the protection of mutual interests, and a diffusion of knowledge of interest to miners generally.

"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 11, 1896, page 23


JACKSON COUNTY.
    M. A. Graham of San Francisco has bonded the entire Golden Fleece mining property, with the exception of the Edna quartz mine, which Messrs. Moody, Saltmarsh and Boland will continue to work. The property bonded by Mr. Graham comprises 269 acres. He will begin extensive operations at once and intends to erect thereon a milling plant which will work from 100 to 300 tons of rock every twenty-four hours.
    At the Ruble placer mines, on Coyote Creek, three giants are at work. Some sliding has interfered with the working of the ditch.
    Chas. Hocom reports having struck a nineteen-inch vein of good-paying quartz, carrying free gold, on Neil Creek, about two miles south of the railroad.
JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    The Gold Basin project will employ some 200 men next season. A ditch twenty miles long is projected, tapping the headwaters of Chetco. The present ditch, three miles in length, will bring a good deal or rich dirt under the monitors without the aid of pumping works.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 11, 1896, page 31


MINING NOTES AND NEWS
    Ft. Jones Reporter: The nice sum of $12.50 was netted from ten pounds of ore taken from the Herr & VanNaber mines, Humbug Gulch. This is equal to about $2500 per ton, and although we would like to see it hold out, still such good luck seldom comes to a working man.
    There promises to be considerable activity in the development of quartz properties in the Wagner Creek section the current year. The well-known "Hope" mine is likely to be developed, and sufficient capital is said to have been enlisted to develop several other most promising properties in that section.
    Word has reached Eugene from a private source, says the Register, that Sampson McConnell, of Eugene, who has been prospecting in the Jackson County district for the past 18 months, has struck a pocket from which he has taken $10,000. On making the find he said nothing to anyone and kept quietly at work until he had cleared the pocket and had banked the metal.
    It is reported that Mr. M. A. Graham, the San Francisco capitalist who recently bonded the Golden Fleece property near the old '49 Diggings just a short distance west of Ashland, has made the first payment on the bond and also has sent up word which indicates that the machinery will be shipped very shortly for an extensive and complete plant for working the immense body of ore peculiar to the Golden Fleece. The development of this property is a matter of much interest to our local mining interests.
    Another rich pocket has been struck in the Last Chance on Galls Creek. This mine was originally owned by Dillard Horn and was sold by him to Jacobs, White, Tiffany and Ganiard. These parties have been in litigation a good part of the time since the sale, and their difficulties are still unsettled. Two pockets of rich ore yielding four and five thousand dollars each were opened up on this mine since work was begun on it, and it is expected the pocket of ore just discovered by White will produce quite as much as the former.
    The Grants Pass Observer very truthfully says: A more outrageous and unjust rule could not be devised to ascertain the mineral or non-mineral character of these lands than that now in force in the Land Department. The department treats them all as non-mineral so far as the railroad company is concerned and requires no proof from the company that they are not mineral in character, while with homesteads and preemptions it has always required that the applicant shall establish by evidence at the time of final proof that the land is more valuable for agriculture than for mineral purposes. The people of Josephine County should not cease to struggle against the injustice of such a rule which gives preference to a great corporation over the common people. The rule ought to be the same with a railroad company that it is with a citizen. It should be made to furnish proof that the land applied for was not mineral land.
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1896, page 3


    Southern Oregon miners would do well to note the publication notices issued from the Roseburg Land Office of lands for which patents are asked by the Oregon and California Railway Company, comprising the east part of the south half of section 23, township 30 south, range 1 east, which is in the neighborhood of Neil Creek; also part of the west half of section 7, in township 37 south, range 2 west, near Jacksonville; also parts of a large number of sections in township 35 south, range 4 west, in the Evans Creek district. In another notice of the same date there is listed part of the east half of section 10, township 38 south, range 1 east, north of Ashland, in Antelope district; also part of section 31, township 38 south, range 1 east. This is near the Golden Fleece mine, now known as the Edna; also a part of the east half of section 35, township 30, range 1 east, this within the Ashland Butte reserve. On the Siskiyou it comprises nearly all the odd sections in township 40 south, range 2 east, and in the same township south, range 3 east, and the odd sections in a large tract of land in the Dead Indian country. Those interested have only another month in which to make special and detailed protest.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 18, 1896, page 43


    GENERAL SOUTHERN OREGON NOTES.--The Ashland mine is preparing to ship a car of ore to the Selby smelter.
    H. M. Hicks, in Cottonwood mining district, on south side of Siskiyous, has a force of men in placer operations at the Hicks & May claim there. Placer miners along the smaller watercourses are "making hay" now while the water lasts.
    A working test of ten tons of ore from a ledge which B. F. Wagner uncovered west of Ashland, near the Ashland mine, was made at the Hicks quartz mill last week, yielding $16.50 per ton.
    The sheriff has attached the Hammersley mine for Jones & Otten of Gold Hill.
    Over in the Applegate country there is activity in placer mining. The Sterling mine people are confident of cleaning up over $100,000 this winter.
    G. Bartlett, McMullan Creek, Deer Creek district, is locally reported to have received $75,000 for his prospect near Preston Peak, about thirty-two miles west of Kerby. This is supposed to be a great strike and Mr. Bartlett demands $100,000 for it. The lowest assay is as follows: Gold, $40; silver, two ounces; copper, 40 percent, or 800 pounds to the ton. The ledge is twenty-seven feet wide.
    THE VICTOR.--W. W. Taylor, of the Victor, has returned from this city where he recently contracted for $150,000 worth of additional pumping machinery. Within the last ten months he has expended nearly $65,000 on the Victor, principally on the present pumping plant which has yielded 52.8 ounces of gold on a ten days' run. When the new pumps are added, the whole plant will run ten 4-inch nozzles the year around--the first instance of hydraulic mining on such a large scale in that section. The water has a 300-foot head and ten 4-inch nozzles under such a pressure will do considerable amount of work. Col. Taylor last week showed the Ashland Tidings a letter which he had received from his friend, Lord Stanley, of England, only the previous day stating that he had £50.000 ($250,000) which he desired to invest in gold mines out here, and asking his interest and advice in the matter.
    WALDO COPPER MINES.--In the copper mines near Waldo the vein has widened out into a good-sized ledge of carbonate of copper and black oxide of copper ore, the former carrying 36 percent and the latter 54 percent in copper. The company will at once erect its smelter; within six weeks two smelters will be running in Josephine County. The Elmer Brown Copper Company has had the machinery--save the blower--for this smelter on the ground for several months, partly in place and housed. The mines are about five miles southwest of Waldo, in Page Gulch. The main ledge is about 4½ feet wide and pitches from west to east. The development work consists of a tunnel on the south side of the creek 130 feet in length, a shaft on the north side of the creek 85 feet in depth, and two tunnels and a shaft a short distance to the southwest and about 900 feet above the creek. The force at the mines will be increased.
    Journal: Two giants are running night and day at the Hampton & Lewis mine on Grave Creek. This is one of the largest placer mines in Southern Oregon. It now has a water supply of more than 4500 miner's inches and will next season have 1000 inches additional.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 25, 1896, page 71


    Capt. Thomas Mein, one of the California miners under arrest in the Transvaal, South Africa, was once a miner in Southern Oregon, and was superintendent of the Ennis & Cameron mine on Galice Creek. From California he went to Venezuela and then to Alaska, where he was foreman of the Treadwell mine.
"Personal,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 25, 1896, page 74


    Without organizing any million-dollar companies with $25 paid-up capital, our sister state to the north is turning out considerable gold in a quiet way. In Southern Oregon, over one hundred hydraulic giants are reported in operation in the vicinity of Grants Pass, and the quartz properties of that region are receiving considerable attention. In Baker Co., in the northeastern part, are some rich gold properties --steady producers that will aid in sending Oregon's gold yield over the $3,000,000 mark in '96.
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 15, 1896, page 121


    Rogue River Water and Mining Company; directors, J. W. Northrup, W. F. Hyde, D. Suter, C. T. Dennis, A. N. Hungerford; capital stock, $5,000,000, all subscribed; San Francisco.
"Recent Mining Incorporations,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 22, 1896, page 152


    The O.&C.R.R. Co. has made application at the Roseburg, Or., land office for patents to another long list of lands in the Southern Oregon mineral belt. Some of these lands are in the best mining regions in Jackson County, and those interested there should send direct to the register of the land office at Roseburg for a copy of the list and instructions as to the proper action to take in entering a protest against the patenting of any parcel of this land to the railroad company. Any action in the matter must be before April 4th, '96.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 29, 1896, page 163


OREGON.
    Capt. K. Boze, of Applegate, recently disposed of the result of a cleanup from his placer mine, which netted him several hundred dollars.
    The smelter at the Waldo copper mines will resume work in a few days.
    Forty tons of ore are now on the dump at the Steamboat mine. Four men are employed at the mine.
    Piping will soon begin on the property of the Elliott Creek Mining Company.
    The Sturgeon mine on Picket Creek in Josephine County is being worked with a monitor.
    A giant is being worked in Panther Gulch in the same vicinity, and the Picket Creek Mining Company are nearly ready to pipe.
Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, March 1896, page 165


OREGON.
From the Oregon Mining Journal.
    VICTORY.--A trip to the south end of Douglas County shows considerable activity in the mines. The Victory is working about twenty men, and receiving very satisfactory returns. One pan of selected gravel, taken from the bedrock, washed out nearly $23.
    BRADEN.--The old Braden mine on , near Gold Hill, is again producing some very rich ore. This mine was a few years ago a steady producer, and supplied a 10-stamp mill, which is still on the property and will soon be again utilized by the parties now working the mine.
    OREGON BONANZA.--The Oregon Bonanza mine, on Williams Creek, is now down 120 feet and shows a vein about 2 feet in width of very rich ore. The manager of the company, Geo. W. Greyson, who has just returned from California, informs us that his company will sink about 200 feet further. As it is, this is the most promising mine--so far as development goes--in Southern Oregon.
"Mining News," The Mining Industry and Review, March 5, 1896, page 412


    The Rogue River Mining and Water Co., composed of residents of this city, has located as a water right one hundred thousand inches, to be taken out of Rogue River, conducted through flumes to Galice Creek, Josephine County. J. W. Northrup is president of the company, W. F. Hyde secretary and American Banking Co. treasurer, all of San Francisco. It is thought they will build the ditch which Jas. Braden has been securing the right of way for in Gold Hill and Willow Springs precinct, for which a preliminary survey has already been run.

    Ashland Tidings: F. O. Cherum of Tacoma has purchased the Boggs mining property.
    Yesterday morning one of the men working at the Tolo mine cleaned up the snug sum of $310 from five pans of dirt.
    The continued dry weather is disappointing to the placer miners, but they are living in hopes that March will bring a better water supply.
    Another run of sixteen tons of ore from B. F. Wagner's mine, just west of Ashland, has been completed at the Hicks & Co.'s quartz mill this week, yielding $10 per ton.
    The Hayes placer mine in Gold Hill district, now owned by J. H. Beeman, is being operated this season. The bank averages sixteen feet in height and pays well. A three-foot flume of good grade carries the tailings to the river, and a tramway with a dump car is used to remove the large boulders. On the hill 200 feet above is an ingeniously arranged reservoir, in which at regular intervals the water rises high enough to overflow into a small tank, the weight of which lifts the gate and allows the whole body of water to rush down the gulch, thus washing the ground in its path.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 7, 1896, pages 190-191


    Jas. Porter of Grants Pass has a four-foot ledge of asbestos in Jackson Co., about forty miles from Ashland, which he is about to develop.
    If all that our Southern Oregon subscribers write us is borne out by developed facts, that region is unusually rich in a variety of mineral resources. A Grants Pass man now writes that he has a deposit of bismuth. This brittle metal is of considerable commercial value, and at present is worth about $2 per pound. Bismuth has been found at various places in this state, Utah, Colorado and Arizona. The most important deposit, so far as the writer knows, is at the Bismuth Queen, near Golden, Colorado. The principal reducers of the ore are in Saxony and London, the ore mostly coming from Australia, though Schneeburg, Saxony, yields some native bismuth in its cobalt mines. The process of reducing bismuth ore is roasting, smelting and subsequent cupellation. Where designed for medicinal purposes, the metal must pass through a special process of purification.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 14, 1896, page 203


    The difficulties that have embarrassed the management of the Black Channel Company to develop in the placer mines on Foots Creek, near Gold Hill, have been settled as far as manager Bouse and the miners are concerned, by the former turning over to the latter who are represented by Hammersley, Neff and Walroth the lease of the property. By the terms of the agreement the miners are to continue work on the property until they shall have paid off, in addition to the current working expenses, the back amounts due which aggregate about $35,000. Nearly $10,000 has been spent in developing the property by the Bouse company, and the claim is said to be rich and in such a condition that it can be quickly realized from.
    THE WALDO SMELTER.--Mining Journal: Capt. Geo. F. Wheeler has returned from the Waldo copper mines and the blowing-in of the smelter. The results of the preliminary run were satisfactory. About 300 pounds of copper, 96 percent fine, were run through, and he brought back with him and now has in the office of the Elmer-Brown Company, in this city, 150 pounds of the product as a testimonial to the value of the ore and the success of the smelter. He regards all uncertain factors in the problem, if there ever were any, as eliminated, and within a week the copper bars will be coming into Grants Pass in a steady stream for shipment east. The only obstacle met in this preliminary run was the lack of iron for fluxing. Near to the chief copper ledge lies an immense deposit of what has heretofore been considered iron, and it was from this deposit that the company expected to get its iron for fluxing; but, on trial in the smelter, it was found that the deposit contained, in fact, more copper than iron and was unfit for flux. Of course, the company does not regret this discovery, as the deposit thus becomes very valuable, but iron for fluxing will have to be obtained elsewhere.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 14, 1896, page 210


OREGON.
    The Johnson Creek mines in Southern Oregon are the scene of active work with good results. A 200-foot tunnel is being driven on the Big Joe mine to tap the vein. The ore of this property is said to run nearly $50 per ton in gold.
    The Applegate Water Company has been incorporated by the following named gentlemen to operate some placers near Applegate: F. R. Neil, M. M. Gault, F. M. Wade. Principal place of business, Jacksonville.
Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, April 1896, page 208



    The Hammond Manufacturing Company . . . prefer to furnish a plant complete in running order, and are now erecting the most complete twenty-stamp mill on the coast for the Noonday Mining Company in southern Oregon, using both steam and electricity developed by a water wheel four miles from the mill.

"Progressive Manufacturers," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, April 1896, page 214


OREGON.
From the Oregon Mining Journal.
    COPPER MINES.--From Captain Brown, manager of the Elmer-Brown copper mines near Waldo, we learn that a full force of men has again been put to work on the mines, developing and taking out ore. A large proportion of these ores--the oxides, black and red--are rich enough to bear shipment so that pending the erection of the new smelting works these ores will be hauled into Grants Pass and shipped thence to Galveston by rail and thence by water to New York, where they will be treated by the Orford Reduction Works. Captain Brown further informs us that by the 10th of May he expects to have the new plants proposed to be erected at both the Waldo and Siskiyou mines in process of construction, but the Waldo plant will be first put in operation. The additions to the present machinery at both places will consist of reverberatory and fusing furnaces. The first shipments of ore will be made during the coming week.
"Mining News," The Mining Industry and Review, April 23, 1896, page 501


JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    Blalock Bros. are piping with a good head of water at the head of Grave Creek.
    Twenty men are at work on the Hampton-Lewis placer. Three giants are at work.
JACKSON COUNTY.
    Wells and Taylor have leased the Lucky Bart mine on Sardine Creek, and have five men at work.
    The Grants Pass Courier says: The Gold Basin Company expects to send a party of prospectors out to the works in May to determine whether the ground justifies any more expense. The work done out there last summer was mostly thrown away, as no proper survey has been made. Some $500 was expended in setting up a sawmill alone and at this writing the water for hydraulicking will have to be raised the enormous height of 2500 feet, which according to the last expert's report, needs ground that will prospect $1 to the cubic foot. No greater than 10 cents to the foot has thus far been discovered. The company is an honest one; has paid all bills and spent its money in good faith and it is to be hoped the ground will justify going ahead.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 25, 1896, page 343


    W. H. Taylor, of the Victory placer mines near Glendale, reports work progressing satisfactorily at the Victory with three nozzles.
    The Observer says an $85 nugget was picked up recently at the old Baltimore mine on Williams Creek. On Coyote Creek the Ruble mine has produced about $12,000 during the past winter. They are still piping, using two giants.
    J. S. Howard is locating the new ditch enterprise, which is to take water out of Rogue River, above Gold Hill. As laid out, it will be about 25 feet across the bottom, 29 feet across the top and 6 feet in depth. The first objective point of the ditch is said to be Galls Creek, a distance of five miles from where the water is taken out of Rogue River, three miles above Gold Hill. It is estimated that the first mile of the ditch, which will include a large amount of fluming as well as rock excavation, will cost $10,000, and the rest of it will cost several thousand dollars per mile. J. W. Northrup, president of the company, says that the breaking of ground on the ditch will be celebrated on May 11th at the head of the canal, three miles south of Gold Hill.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 9, 1896, page 382


    H. Mattern is developing a quartz ledge near Ashland and getting out some ore which is shipped to the Selby Co. The second-grade ore is crushed at the Hicks mill. 
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 16, 1896, page 402


    It is announced in Southern Oregon that John Bouse, whose connection with the Black Channel Co.'s mines has elicited so much comment, has left that section "for good."
    Sheriff Hiatt of Josephine County will sell the property belonging to the Hammersley Mining Co., in Jumpoff Joe precinct, Josephine Co., on June 15th, under an execution issued in favor of Jones & Otten.
    W. H. Miller, owner of the Denver City mine on Soldier Creek, Josephine County, has entered into a contract with San Francisco parties whereby, in consideration of 610,000 in cash, they are to be allowed to prospect the ledge for a period of sixty days, the amount to be credited on the purchase price of $75,000 if the property is taken. The deed has been placed in escrow with the Grants Pass bank.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 23, 1896, page 423


SOUTHWESTERN CAMPS.
    William Bybee has made a nice cleanup from his placers on Canyon Creek in Josephine County.
    A mill test of twenty tons of ore from the Clint & Jones mine in Mt. Reuben district yielded an average of $48 to the ton.
    Schieffelin & Co.'s mill at Buncom, in Foots Creek district, is doing some custom work. Some good ore is being crushed.
    J. L. Dewey, the well-known merchant of Glendale, shipped a lot of gold dust to Grants Pass last week, aggregating several hundred dollars.
    Miller & Davidson of Missouri Flat have been doing well at their placer mines. They brought over $800 worth of dust to Grants Pass one day last week.
    A. Throckmorton is engaged in hauling ore from the Coffman ledge to Kennedy & Co.'s four-stamp mill on Applegate, which is doing good work. The quartz prospects well.
    Several teams are engaged in hauling the boiler and engine for Roberts & West's quartz mill to Applegate. They are large in dimensions and will furnish much power.
    George B. Dornin, who is operating the Jewett mill and mine, located near Grants Pass, informs The Times that they are working day and night and milling ore which goes $13 to $14 per ton.
    Simmons & Cameron, as also Winter Bros., who own extensive mines in Waldo district, Josephine County, are now driving down, preparatory to cleaning up. They will doubtless take out many thousand dollars.
    The Panther Creek Mining Company, operating on Oak Flat, in Lower Illinois River district, last week placed an additional giant in position. The mine has lately come into possession of George B. Ward and others of Oregon City.
    A correspondent writes from the Bohemia mines: "There are about 115 men on the pay rolls of this district at present. Although this is a greater number of men than has ever before been employed in the camp so early in the season, there have been two or three men on hand for every job."

"District News, Oregon," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, June 1896, page 324


JACKSON COUNTY.
    Thomas & Daw, who sent fifty pounds of ore from their ledge in Uniontown precinct to the Selby Smelting Works in San Francisco, last week received a check for $146.50, the net result of the reduction. They had previously taken $650 from the same place.
JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    The Grants Pass Courier says the copper mines will employ some 200 men this season. A new smelter is to be erected at Waldo, and one at the Illinois River works.
    Wm. Bybee has bonded his mining property in Josephine County, consisting of several hundred acres, to A. J. Paul and others for $30,000.
    A new camp is reported at the mouth of Biggs Creek, where the mining industry is assuming greater proportions than ever.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 13, 1896, page 488


    E. J. Norcutt, of Lewiston, Idaho, in a communication to the Oregon Pioneer Association says that the first mining code in the state of Oregon was enacted on Canyon Creek, Josephine County, in April, 1852. The principal provisions were those fixing the limit of channel claims at 50 yards and bank claims at 40 feet, and that all the claims not worked when workable were jumpable after five days.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 20, 1896, page 503


    Mining Journal: The Griffin ledge is near the south side of Rogue River. On February last ten tons of the ore from this ledge, treated at the Schieffelin mill on Foots Creek, yielded the owners over $100 a ton. The ore travels somewhat in kidneys and varies in quality. It is so far all free milling.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 20, 1896, page 511


JACKSON COUNTY.
    Henderson & Kalfus, lessees of the plant and placer mines of the Siskiyou Gold Mining Co., on Elliott Creek, the "Joe Bar diggings," have completed the opening and equipment and are piping day and night.
JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    Journal: The Hammersley mine is again in operation under the management of the new owners, Jones & Otten. R. Rogers is acting superintendent. It is claimed that the stopes of this mine contain $20,000 of ore. The property was sold last week at the courthouse on an execution sued out by Jones & Otten. Two thousand dollars was offered for the mines and $800 for the mill and machinery. The question of the priority of liens as between them and the laborers on the mine was argued before the Judge, who held that the miners' liens took effect from the date of the beginning of work. Consequently the claims of Jones & Otten become subordinate to the other claims, and the effect of the sale must be to compel the purchasers to satisfy the liens of the men.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 27, 1896, page 527


MINING NEWS.
    J. W. Virtue is in the Applegate section looking after his mining interests.
    J. R. Van Winkle of Falls Creek found a $94 nugget in his placer claim one day last week.
    J. J. Houck has started his quartz mill at Gold Hill and will be prepared hereafter to do custom work.
    Miller & Brady are developing a promising quartz proposition near the Big Mountain mine in Josephine County.
    Mangum & Stock of Grants Pass have sold an interest in the Waxahachie gravel bar on Illinois River to F. R. Doerfus, J. A. Rehkopf and Joseph Rauch of Grants Pass, who will equip the property with a modern hydraulic plant.
    There are a number of capitalists in southern Oregon looking for investments. The reputation of southern Oregon as a mining country is getting better all the time, and it is only a matter of a few years when our mineral resources will receive the attention they deserve.
    The Hammersley mine bids fair to be tied up again through litigation. It is reported that Jones & Otten, who purchased the mine at sheriff's sale, subject to the laborer's liens thereon, are merely taking out the ore in sight without doing any development work, which is sure to leave the mine in a bad shape. The lien claimants have applied to Judge Hanna for the appointment of a receiver and for an injunction to restrain Jones & Otten from working the property until after the claims of the lien holders have been adjudicated.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1896, page 3


    Democratic Times: Work on the Snowgoose ledge, near Steinman, is progressing favorably. A tunnel 140 feet in length to tap the ledge is nearly completed.
    The Monmouth Mining Co. of Beaver Creek district has started a new tunnel to tap their ledge at a considerable depth. The tunnel will be over 400 feet in length.
    Tidings: J. Briner, from the Beaver Creek section, reports that the Monmouth Co., which is developing a big ledge in that section, between Bumble Bee and Hungry Creek, is starting in on a new tunnel which will tap the ledge at a considerable depth and will be some 400 feet in length. This ledge is one that has been traced a long distance on that side of the Siskiyous, and has also been traced on the north side of these mountains, in Oregon.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 11, 1896, page 34


MINING NEWS.
    Hull & Beck of Louse Creek cleaned up for the season last week. The yield last year was $5000 and is understood to be much greater this year.
    Duffield & Burns have made a good cleanup at their mines in Galls Creek district. It is reported that they have realized over $3000 from the season's run.
    N. C. Boynton has purchased an engine and boiler, which he will use to run an arrastra on his quartz property on Jumpoff Joe. A stamp mill will be erected there soon.
    J. E. Verdin and R. R. Weathered have a promising copper ledge on Limpy Creek, about twelve miles down the river from Grants Pass. The ledge is twelve feet wide and shows considerable native copper.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 13, 1896, page 3


JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    G. F. Wheeler wires from New York that he goes to Grants Pass. Money has been raised to equip and develop the mines at Waldo and on the Illinois, and this week supt. Brown expects to have men at work at both places.
JACKSON COUNTY.
    The suits involving the Golden Fleece mine near Ashland have been transferred to the U. S. District Court at Portland, on the petition of E. M. Corliss, who claims to own the mine by assignment from M. A. Graham.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 1, 1896, page 94


    M. Schieffelin, one of the first discoverers of Tombstone, Arizona, district, is prospecting in Inyo Co., Cal. Ed Schieffelin is prospering in Southern Oregon mining operations.
"Personal,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 15, 1896, page 140


    Jacksonville Times: Palmer & Co. have resumed work on their ledge in Farmers Flat district.
    W. W. Mason, the mining expert, who has been examining the Miller ledge on Soldier Creek, Josephine County, is building an arrastra, and a crosscut at 30 feet deep shows a body of good ore.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 22, 1896, page 159


    Jacksonville Times: The Applegate Mining and Milling Co. are pushing development work on their group of quartz mines with good prospects.
    It is reported that $600 worth of gold was taken out of the Bonanza mine, in Williams Creek district, one day last week.
    John and George Anderson have struck a rich ledge on Horsehead Creek, Josephine County, from which they are taking considerable gold.
    From the preparations going on in Galice Creek district, there will be more hydraulic mining there during the coming season than at any time in the history of that section. A number of new plants will be put in and some of the old ones enlarged.
    Simkins & Fowler have completed their wing dam in Rogue River, near Crow's ranch, and are ready for mining operations.
    Active operations have been resumed at the Shorty mine in Ashland district.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 29, 1896, page 178


SOUTHEASTERN [sic] CAMPS.
(Jacksonville Times)
    The Lance Mining Company has eight men employed in building a large reservoir.
    A seventeen-mile ditch is being constructed by Hale Bros. & Co. of Leland.
    Alex Watts is building a five-mile ditch in the Williams Creek district.
    It is reported that several hundred dollars' worth of ore was taken from the Oregon Bonanza mine in one day recently.
    Several free-milling quartz locations have been made on Soldier Creek in the vicinity of the Denver mine.
"District News, Oregon," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, September 1896, page 88


    Mining Journal: W. A. Clark, the millionaire copper magnate of Butte, Montana, came in from the north and went out with Captain Brown to the copper ledges on the Illinois last week.
    G. R. Hammersley & Co. of Gold Hill are wing damming the Rogue River at that place.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 5, 1896, page 198


    The following advertisement appeared lately in a Southern Oregon paper: "One-fourth interest in a mining claim in the Applegate district, that assays gold, silver, lead and copper, for a No. 1 team, wagon and harness; team to weigh not less than 2400; mares preferred. It will pay someone who has horses to sell to investigate this proposition."
    The Democratic Times of Jacksonville, Oregon, says: "Among the lands included in the patents to the railroad company, recently filed, are several tracts which have been claimed as mineral for several years, and against the patenting of which the owners filed protests. They are quite anxious to know why their contests were ignored."
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 12, 1896, page 215


    Major Newell is about to put a 120-H.P. engine in his mine in Rogue River near Grants Pass, Oregon.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 19, 1896, page 235


    Democratic Times: In the lower tunnel of Dr. Hinkle's quartz ledge on Sardine Creek a vein has been struck showing a width of 2 feet of good ore.
    A. W. Sturgis of Forest Creek has sold his property to Portland parties. The price paid is $40,000.
    Major Newell is preparing to put a 120-H.P. engine at his mine on Rogue River, near Grants Pass.
    The Steamboat mine has been bonded by Captain Nash and W. I. Vawter of Medford, Charles W. Knowles of Portland and A. M. Crawford of Roseburg, who will endeavor to discover the lost quartz ledge and also the placer channels, which were rich in early days.
    Grants Pass Observer: The Gold Basin Company has given up the idea of getting water on their property and are packing the machinery back to Kerby. A large amount of capital was sunk in the venture.
    The merchants of Grants Pass buy from $500 to $800 worth of gold dust per day. The large cleanups are shipped direct to the Mint, and no record is kept of them.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 19, 1896, page 242


JACKSON COUNTY.
    The placer mining interests are particularly bright as the precipitation has been heavy and there is promise of extensive operations in the placers of this county this winter.
    Williams and Whalen have completed a ditch from Evans Creek and E. C. Brooks has finished his Saxe Creek ditch, which will supply water for the giants.
    The Consolidated Saxe Creek Mining Co. have begun operations with a large force of men.
    Saxe Creek is credited with producing $300,000 in gold dust since 1857.
    Work is being pushed in the Ruby mine, and ore will be shipped to the Selby smelter.
"District News, Oregon," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, October 1896, page 113


    The Hammond Manufacturing Co. of Portland, Oregon, have recently completed the installment of a mill and tramway on the Noonday mine in Southern Oregon. The trial run was perfectly satisfactory, and the mill is now running steadily. Besides the tramway there is a rock crusher, twenty stamps, automatic feeders and eight vanners.
    Wolf and Zwicker of Portland have recently sold a large assignment of hydraulic pipe and other material to the Panther Creek Mining Co. of Josephine County, Oregon.
"News Nuggets," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, October 1896, page 115


    Quartz mining is coming rapidly to the front in Southern Oregon, and the number of ledges which are being successfully worked refutes the theory that this country contains only surface or pocket ledges, says the Democratic Times. Deep mining is the salvation of any mineral country, and the time will ultimately come when Southern Oregon will be the scene of some of the largest mining operations in the country.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 10, 1896, page 295


    Democratic Times: Crow & Co. of Lost Flat, Josephine County, are taking out considerable rich ore, which it is estimated will yield $100 to the ton.
    Twenty-seven tons of ore from the Oregon Bonanza mine, in Williams Creek district, crushed last week, yielded 215 ounces of gold, valued at $3000.
    Capitalists and miners have been quite numerous in Grants Pass lately, and the outlook is good for a season of exceptional activity in mining circles.
    The Eccentric Mining Company, of Williams Creek district, last week had fifteen tons of ore milled, which yielded 39.36 ounces of gold, valued. at $13.50 per ounce.
    Several men are steadily employed at Beekman & Huffer's mine, near Jacksonville, and considerable good ore is being taken out.
    Democratic News: The Mattern mine, in Ashland district, is being steadily developed, with flattering prospects.
    A contract has been let for sinking a shaft on the west side of the Ashland mine.
    The owners of the Black Republican mice, near Dodson Butte, Douglas County, have struck a large vein of ore, which is said to assay well in copper and gold.
    F. Mattison and W. T. Nelson of Idaho have purchased a group of placer mines containing 100 acres in Kerbyville district.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 24, 1896, page 343


    Grants Pass Observer: Taylor & Crow, who have a quartz mine on Lost Flat, near Galice Creek, have received returns from 12 tons of ore which averaged $125 per ton, and the ledge is 36 inches wide and getting richer as depth is reached.
    George B. Ward, who is interested in mining property on the Illinois, has shipped a large lot of supplies of pipe, giants and general implements for mining. They expect to be ready for work as soon as water comes.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 7, 1896, page 382


    The miners who have been operating in Rogue River by means of wing dams have done well this season.
    Operations have been resumed at the Jewett mine, near Grants Pass.
    The Consolidated Saxe Creek Mining Co. will resume work on their properties in a short time.
    The date for the holding of the annual meeting of the Southern Oregon Miners' Association has been postponed to Nov. 16 at Grants Pass.
    Monitor Miner: E. O. Lampher and Chas. H. Lawrence, mining experts from Chicago, representing capital, have been in the country for the past ten days examining into mining resources.
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: A run of ten tons of ore from the Goldbug mine, owned by Farnham, Billings & Lucas of Ashland, last week yielded $19 per ton in free gold, besides the concentrates,
    C. L. Mangum has sold the Cameron ditches and water rights on Star Gulch, in Applegate mining district, to O. G. Shurtliff, E. Sikes and others of Portland.
    Grants Pass will soon have a custom quartz mill and cyanide plant, to be erected by Dr. W. H. Flanagan.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 14, 1896, page 406


    On Rogue River, in Southern Oregon, Newell and Iliff have purchased heavy pumps to force water from the river direct against their gravel banks for washing. Two such plants were in successful operation last winter.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 21, 1896, page 419


    In Southern Oregon the miners are much encouraged with the prospect of a favorable season. Some of them have water sufficient to commence work.
    A. Lewis has a large force of men at work on the old Taylor Placer Mining and Milling Company property, extending the ditch to supply the mine with water for this season's run.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 21, 1896, page 426


JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    J. W. Robinson of Wimer has commenced work on his placer mines in Brass Nail Gulch with a large force of men.
    The lost channel of Humbug Creek was struck in John Bolt's placer mine last week and $13.11 was washed out of the two wheelbarrow loads of dirt from the drift.
    Allen Lewis has a large force of men engaged at the mines on Grave Creek, formerly owned by the Taylor Mining and Milling Company, extending the ditch and putting in new pipe.
JOSEPHINE COUNTY.
    A rich strike is reported to have been made in the Renshaw Consolidated mine. An assay is said to have been made which shows $83 per ton in gold.
    George Dornin has five men at work on the Jewett mine. Some large bodies of ore have been exposed.
    The Griffin Mining Company of Sardine Creek is having milled some ore which nets about $40 per ton. The ledge is about 3 feet wide.
    William Edwards, a mining expert from London, England, and Benjamin Bullard, formerly superintendent of the Squaw Lake Mining Company, have been inspecting the Denver City ledge.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 28, 1896, page 447


SOUTHWESTERN DISTRICTS.
    General R. G. O'Brien, of Olympia, Washington, has bonded the Louse Creek placers from Ad Helms and others of Jacksonville.
    Work has been suspended at the Hammersley mine, and the pumps drawn.
    The Golden Standard Mining Company met in Jacksonville on the 3rd instant and elected a full set of officials and directors.
"District News, Oregon," Mining: Journal of the Northwest Mining Association, December 1896, page 158

    Jacksonville Democratic Times: Work has been suspended at the Ashland mine owing to too much water. A pumping plant will be put in soon.
    The Hope mine in Ashland district has been bonded to Thos. James, acting for Eastern capitalists.
    Work has been commenced at the Hampton-Lewis mines on Galice Creek with one giant. Two more will be put in operation as soon as there is sufficient water.
    Grants Pass Observer: Charles Stratton has commenced operating his hydraulic mine on Williams Creek.
    M. W. Bates, of Duluth, Minn., is investigating the nickel mines near Riddle. He represents a company that desires to buy the property.
    T. James has bonded the Hope and Shorty mines and has made a first payment of $2,000.
    Jacksonville Times: The smelter is running at the Illinois copper mines and some good matte is being turned out.
    Four monitors and a force of thirty-five men are employed at the Hampton-Lewis mine on Grave Creek. Work has been going on day and night, but cold weather is now interfering.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 5, 1896, page 466


    Jacksonville Democratic Times: George B. Dornin will soon put in an improved 5-stamp mill at the Jewett mine, near Grants Pass.
    The Louse Creek mines, owned by A. Helms and others, have been bonded to R. G. O'Brien of Olympia, Wash.
    Pfeil Bros.' mines, on Galls Creek, are being fitted up with a hydraulic plant and will be operated this season more extensively than ever.
    The gold output of Galice Creek district will be larger than ever this season, owing to the fact that mining operations are more extensive there than ever.
    Placer mines will probably make a good showing this year, as the wet season seems to have set in earlier than usual.
    The pumps have been taken out and work suspended at the Hammersley mine.
    J. H. Beeman of Gold Hill, who has bonded the Rhoten ledge in  district for California parties, is engaged in developing the proposition.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 12, 1896, page 487


    Taylor & Crow brought up another carload of 13¼ tons of ore from their mine, near Merlin, which netted $2,866.77.
    Supt. James has begun work at the Shorty mine.
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: The Blalock mine, on upper Grave Creek, is being operated with two giants in a red gravel formation, with good prospects.
    Operations have been resumed at the Black Channel Company's mines in Foots Creek district. About thirty men are employed. Some extensive improvements have been projected and a ditch will be dug and reservoirs built.
    The Oregon Siskiyous Mining Company has been incorporated to develop mining property in Jackson County. The capital stock is placed at $50,000. I. G. Rowley, G. H. Himes and A. Rowley are the incorporators.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 19, 1896, pages 506-507


    At Taylor & Crow's mine, in Galice Creek, Southern Oregon, four men can mortar out from the richer rock $500 to $600 a day, according to a local paper.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 26, 1896, page 519


    Grants Pass Observer: About 19,000 pounds of machinery for black sand mining arrived at Coquille City lately. It is owned by foreign capital, who have had representatives there for some time past.
    Jacksonville Times: Several giants are being operated at the Alexander & Bent mine on Galice Creek, formerly owned by Ennis & Cameron.
    S. Mulveyhill and Chas. Anderson of Gold Hill district recently found a valuable deposit of mineral on Water Gulch. The formation is a stratum of porphyry and iron.
    Southern Oregon's gold output this year promises to exceed that of any previous one for a long time, judging from the preparations for the opening of new mining propositions and the increased activity at mines which have been operated before.
    Medford Miner: The Black Gold Channel mine has started up again with a force of thirty men, under the management of Mr. Pierce of Oakland.
    Rogue River Courier: Baylor & Iliff have been delayed in getting their 5-foot pump from the East. They have put in a 30-inch flume to carry off the debris into Rogue River, and when the pump is at its highest capacity it will turn 1500 inches of water against the gold-bearing banks at what will equal a 250-foot pressure.
    Younglove and Green have begun piping on Louse Creek. They have a 900-foot tunnel flumed and will pipe night and day.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 26, 1896, page 527


    There is a novel hydraulic mining plant on the Rogue River near Grants Pass, Oregon. Two large pumps have been put in--one a centrifugal and the other a duplex Gardner. The latter provides water from the river for sluicing and the former for piping--forcing the water through a nozzle against the bank.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 9, 1897, page 27


    Grants Pass Mining Journal: Van Dorn brothers have a giant and 600 feet of pipe for their ground on Pickett Creek. Mr. Woodcock of Kerby has purchased a giant for a placer mine on the Illinois. Campbell & Gould, on Greens Creek, are running their pipe and giant. Belding & Dowell are working their ledge on Greens Creek. They have a 12-inch vein of $25 ore which has been traced on the surface for 500 feet.
    Medford Mail: The mining interests of Southern Oregon continue to attract a great deal of attention. People are constantly coming to examine the placer and quartz properties.
    B. P. Dunphy has in hand 800 acres of placer mines on Galls Creek. They have been worked by two men for more than thirty years. The ditches to supply the water are complete, and two houses for workmen and a boarding house have been built.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 9, 1897, page 34


    Grants Pass Mining Journal: A short bond has been given to Tacoma parties on the Big Mountain mine in Missouri Flat.
    About forty men are employed on the Black Gold Channel mines building a reservoir and ditches.
    The purchasers of the Olalla placer ground have organized as the Paradise Alley Mining Co. and are now pushing work rapidly. Over fifty men are employed.
    Rogue River Courier: The Black Channel mine is being run by the old Shotwell Company of Seattle and forty-five men are employed.
    Baylor & Iliff's pumping plant is in operation on the banks of Rogue River. Six men are employed at the plant and fifteen in the timber cutting wood for it. Eight cords are burned up in twenty-four hours. Already a big hole has been piped in the bank.
    The nickel mine at Riddle will, it is said, start up in the spring.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 16, 1897, page 50


    Grants Pass Observer: J. E. Brown has a 30-foot tunnel on Mt. Reuben, adjoining the Ajax, which shows a ledge of 7 to 8 feet of solid ore.
    C. A. Wilcox of Wimer, on Evans Creek, will put a pipe and giant on his placer this season.
    George Darwin, superintendent of the Jewett mine, has put a force of men at work driving a lower crosscut tunnel to cut the lead at a depth of 100 feet below the present workings.
    Nearly all the bars along Rogue River between Woodville and the mouth of Galice Creek have been located and many pumping plants will be worked next season.
    Medford Monitor-Miner: The Bonanza mine recently turned out in twenty-six days' run $20,000 in gold.
    The Black Channel gold mine, on Foots Creek, is being worked by about sixty men, under the management of superintendent Shotwell.
    A deal has been closed by some Eastern parties for the ranches belonging to McDougal, Mardon, Hall and Mrs. Birdsey, on , near Gold Hill. The purpose is to use the land for gravel mining. The consideration is about $30,000. It is the intention to run a large ditch from upper Bear Creek.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 23, 1897, page 77


    Medford Mail: All the placer mines along Evans and Saxe creeks are in full operation with plenty of water.
    The Brooks placer mine is running in full blast with good supply of water.
    F. McComb and H. Oden are mining a placer mine, below the mouth of Saxe Creek, with a big head of water.
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: The Linchpin mine in Wagner Creek district has developed a body of good sulphuret ore, 7 feet wide, at a depth of 114 feet.
    Phillips & Strong of Waldo district are building a long line of 3-foot flume for an outlet.
    Morris & Smith, who bought the Polk Dews mine on the Palmer Creek some time since, one day last week picked up a $27 nugget.
    Gold Hill News: , near Gold Hill, is under bond to Boston men. They will take water (5000 inches) from Bear Creek. This will require a ditch thirty miles in length, which will give them 400 feet fall al the head of .
    The old Gold Hill mine, said to have produced a large sum from a pocket in early days, is being developed by a crosscut tunnel, cutting the ledge at a depth of about 250 feet.
    Dr. Braden will start his quartz mines and mill next week.
    J. Beaman is taking considerable ore out of the Ritter and will start his mill shortly.
    Parties are negotiating for the Sardine Creek placer fields. This is a very extensive gravel deposit,
    A number of small placer mines are operated around Gold Hill. With a high line ditch Southern Oregon would produce several millions in gold every year.
    The Black Channel, on Foots Creek, is being put in working order. Large reservoirs, flumes, etc., are being built.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 6, 1897, page 115


MINING IN OREGON.
Many Rich Properties to Be Developed in the Spring.
    The spring will, according to well-informed mining men, see quite a boom in Southern Oregon mines, and a great deal of development work will probably be done there this year. The boom in the Kootenai has in a great measure turned everyone's attention to British Columbia, but too many rich mines exist in Southern Oregon to allow of that region being entirely overlooked.
    The Applegate Gold Mining & Milling Company, which has a group of claims on the Applegate River now in course of development, promises to become a valuable property. The owners, who are Portland business men, have been pushing work on the claims during the winter, and the results have been so gratifying that they are now contemplating the erection of a mill.
    The president of the company, who returned recently from a visit to the mines, reported that considerable work had been done on the Rising Sun mine during the winter, and that the lode has been struck through a tunnel of 100 feet, at a depth of 125 feet. The character of the rock was found to be about the same as that discovered at the shaft, which runs from $12 to $14 a ton. Work has also been pushed on the tunnel of the Mountain Queen, and it is expected that it will soon strike the vein. If the rock should prove to be as good as that which shows on top, and runs from $25 to $30 a ton, the owners will be well satisfied.
    Considerable development work has also been done on the Lucky Boy, and the prospects are very encouraging. The shaft on the Rainbow has been sunk 40 feet, and a tunnel is being run in on the Red Bird, but as yet the lode has not been discovered.
    A letter received yesterday from George S. Horner, superintendent of the mines, says that he expects to strike a rich chute in the Rising Sun inside of a week, the indications being very favorable for a rich strike. For the present, work is being concentrated on the Rising Sun, with the expectancy of unearthing the chute.
    F. Sanderson, of Riddle, Or., is desirous of finding a body of gypsum and of sulphate of soda, in Oregon, which he can draw upon in smelting nickel ore near Riddle. J. H. Fisk, the assayer, when asked for his opinion, said yesterday that the best body of gypsum he knew of was located about four miles from Huntington. Fine samples have been exhibited from this body, which Mr. Fisk considers the finest gypsum in the state. There is no sulphate of soda to be found in Oregon, as far as Mr. Fisk's knowledge goes, but there is plenty of soda in Harney County which can easily be made into sulphate of soda, by the ordinary process.
Oregonian, Portland, February 7, 1897, page 20


    Gold Hill News: Wm. Arthurs has purchased the W. A. Jones property on Little Applegate, and will put a hydraulic plant on it,
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: Water is more plentiful than it has been, and the miners feel encouraged.
    The Black Channel Company of Foots Creek district is building a number of ditches, flumes and reservoirs and will operate on a large scale.
    The old Gold Hill mine, which produced a large quantity of gold in early days, is being developed by a crosscut aimed to strike the ledge at a depth of 250 feet.
    It is reported that Ed Canfield of Galice Creek district has found the ledge for which he has been looking for a number of years.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 13, 1897, page 134


    At Waldo, in Southern Oregon, a large vein of copper has been uncovered by hydraulic mining.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 20, 1897, page 151


    Grants Pass Observer: About $300 in coarse gold was brought in from the Hayes & Jewell mine on Oscar Creek this week. The largest chunk weighed $180.
    F. H. Mason & Co. of Spokane, Wash., have bonded the Boynton quartz mine on Jumpoff Joe for a short time in which to make a thorough examination.
    Rogue River Courier: The Horn-Silsby-Tucker mine is piping night and day on the lower Illinois, and the first cleanup has proven it to be one of the richest placer mines in Southern Oregon. Some thirty men are at work, and a ditch 3½ miles, just completed, will furnish water the year round.
    The Bolt quartz mine, on Galice Creek, has been sold to a company of Bavarian capitalists, who will erect a large mill to crush their own and their neighbors' ore.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 20, 1897, page 154


    Rogue River Courier: E. C. E. Smith, a mining expert recently from John Day district, has bonded the placer mining grounds on Sardine Creek, from Messner's to E. N. Williams', a distance of six miles. It comprises 1100 acres of mining ground and the consideration is $35,000. Mr. Smith expects to sell the property to an English syndicate.
    The Baylor-Iliff pump placer mine above town shut down after the cleanup last week and discharged the men. It is said operation will begin again in a couple of weeks. Quien sabe!

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, February 27, 1897, page 174


    Six new quartz mills will be erected near Grants Pass, in Southern Oregon, as soon as the rainy season is over.
    It is announced by the Jacksonville, Oregon, Times that a syndicate formed by Eastern capitalists has been making arrangements to build a large irrigating and mining ditch to take water from the Rogue River near the forks and carry it along the foothills to Gold Hill and the  country. The proposed capacity is 10,000 inches.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 6, 1897, page 191


    Medford Monitor-Miner: The Gray Eagle mine on Sardine Creek is showing up well, having a large ledge that will mill over $20 per ton in free gold.
    The Jewett mine near Grants Pass is turning out much fine ore and the ledge is growing wider and richer as the depth increases.
    Rogue River Courier: The quartz mine known as the S.S. on Jumpoff Joe has been bonded for sixty days to Portland parties.
    At the Jewett mine the ore body is now from 7 to 8 feet in width and getting richer all the time.
    Blalock Bros. have been piping night and day on their Grave Creek placers running two giants.
    Muir & Green, of the Junction mine on Louse Creek, are figuring on a big ditch to take water out of Evans Creek and carry it to the mine. They have filed a water right below the forks of the creek some seventeen miles from where it empties into Rogue River and contracted for preliminary survey.
    Another carload of ore is being loaded at Merlin by Taylor & Crow. The rock has to be packed on horses fourteen miles, but the net proceeds at Ashland always repay the owners well for the trouble.
    E. N. Williams of Gold Hill sold his placer ground on Sardine Creek to some Colorado parties, who talk of putting in a ditch from Rogue River to increase the water supply.
    A large custom mill, one able to handle the ores of this section, would do much to advance the interest of this camp. There are large amounts of ore on the dumps that would pay handsome returns. 

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 6, 1897, page 194


    The Victory Placer Mining Company of Oregon has incorporated at Roseburg; capital stock, $5,000,000; W. H. Taylor, J. M. Stevenson, C. A. Sehlbrede. The property they propose working adjoins the Nash, or Victory mine, near Glendale, Or.
    Jacksonville Times: More than a dozen giants are now playing in Canyon Creek district, not far from Kerbyville, within a radius of six miles.
    Beekman & Huffer have several men at work at their quartz mine near Jacksonville, who are engaged in stoping. They will immediately commence the construction of a 180-foot tunnel to tap the ledge.
    Applegate Bros. are doing considerable development work on the La Rose ledge in  district. They have opened the mine at different points for a distance of 400 feet, and everywhere find it showing good ore.
    Medford Monitor-Miner: The Cameron placer mine on Applegate comprising a large amount of ground has been sold to San Francisco parties for about $50,000. A $25,000 hydraulic plant will be put in and the property will be operated on a large plan.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 13, 1897, page 214


    The construction of another large ditch in Southern Oregon is proposed, tapping Rogue River on the north side, the capacity of the ditch to be 10,000 inches and the course about 70 miles. It is claimed that 15,000 acres of farming land and 3500 acres of mineral land will be subject to the proposed ditch. The cost is estimated at $400,000.
"Coast Industrial Notes," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, March 13, 1897, page 219


OUR OREGON LETTER.
EUGENE, OREGON, Mar. 2, 1897.
Editor Republican:
    I have just returned from a two weeks' stay in Grants Pass, in Southern Oregon, where I was assisting Bro. Jenkins, our pastor there, in revival meetings.
    Grants Pass is a beautiful city of 2,500 inhabitants, in the Rogue River Valley, surrounded by lofty mountains upon the summit of which I stood one day and beheld a panoramic scene of surpassing loveliness. We had a bird's eye view of the city and the entire stretch of the valley surrounding it. The city bears its name in honor of America's greatest soldier, Gen. Grant. The valley was named in honor (?) of the Rogue River Indians, who were such thieves as to be justly entitled to the name they bore. Grants Pass is on the main line of the Southern Pacific railroad, some 300 miles south of Portland. Mining, lumbering and fruit raising are the chief industries of the place. The town is supplied with electric lights, water works for fire protection and domestic use, and is well equipped with public schools. We have a beautiful church edifice with a strong and loyal membership.
    The mountains round about seem to be full of gold. Both placer and quartz mining are carried on very extensively all through that country. It is estimated that $250,000 are annually shipped from Josephine County in gold dust. Some of the most extensive mines yield from $20,000 to $30,000 per year. The mining section of Southern Oregon is divided up into districts, each appropriately named. Claims are taken by individual prospectors, limited in size to 600 feet by 1500 feet. When a prospector finds a "lead" he at once files a notice with the county clerk of his intention to take the claim, then after doing $100 work on it for five years he is granted a patent by the government. Each claim is named, some with very queer names, such as "Jumpoff Joe," "Whiskey Creek," "Kerby," "Scott's Gulch," "Old Yank," "Old Tennessee," "Sucker Creek," "Gold Basin Placer," "Steam Beer Mine," "Jack and Horse Creek," "Dry Diggins," "Dutch Johnny." I had the privilege of visiting four mines during my stay in Southern Oregon.
    One morning we walked out about three miles to the Iliff & Baylor mine on the south bank of the Rogue River. This is a placer mine of 20 acres of gravel land which is "piped" by steam power. What is meant by "piping" is this: The engine to furnish the pressure stands on the bank of the river and forces the water through a large iron pipe with a 3-inch nozzle at the end. This mighty stream is directed against the gravel bank, which is washed down and out through the sluice flumes into the river, the gold remaining in the flume. The flume is filled up with square blocks of timber about six inches thick, so as the water and mud go rushing through, the gold drops down between the blocks and is saved from washing out into the river, where the debris is all dumped. Quicksilver is also put into the flumes to attract and hold the gold. The owners of this mine were very kind and courteous to us, setting us across the river in a boat and taking pains to show us all through the mine. We visited the Corliss mines, of "Dry Diggins," about two miles north of the Iliff & Baylor mine, the same day. This is a very rich placer mine operated by a hydraulic giant. The water is conveyed around the mountain spurs in a ditch six miles long, to a mountainside 300 feet above the gulch where the piping is done. The water from the ditch empties into a reservoir and is conveyed down a 15-inch pipe. It makes a pressure of 250 pounds to the square inch, which will throw a stream from the 3-inch nozzle over a pine tree 500 feet away and 200 feet high. The mighty stream will roll and tumble the great rocks about with perfect ease, hurling boulders as large as your head 30 feet into the air. The "Dry Diggins" have been operated for the last 30 years, and a million dollars of the shining metal has been taken out. It was operated until 4 years ago when Mr. Corliss got possession of it in the primitive way by "panning," "sluice boxes," and "rockers." Mr. Corliss has put in a $2,500 hydraulic plant and now the mine is yielding up its treasures much more rapidly. He told me that 60 days piping last winter cleaned up $4,000. Three men are all that are required to operate it. This mine is called the "Dry Diggins" because they can operate it only in the winter while they have a flow of water. There is a movement on foot now to tap the Rogue River many miles above Grants Pass and convey the water by means of ditch and flumes, so that such mines can run the year round. This would cost some money, but surely would yield great returns to the miners. The old part of the Corliss mines that have been worked over years ago are now being gone over again with pan and rockers. Men go out from Grants Pass with their pans, picks, and shovels and make from 50 cents to $2 a day. Mr. Corliss permits them to work and make what they can. The quartz mines we visited will be described in another letter.
    Kind regards to the friends of Williamsport and vicinity, and to the editor and his family.
Very truly,
    J. T. ABBETT.
Warren Republican, Williamsport, Indiana, March 18, 1897, page 4


    In Southern Oregon fifteen years ago it cost more to pay the freight charges on goods into the mines than the supplies now cost at the mines.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 3, 1897, page 279


    Times: Carson & Son are running a drift in their placer mine on Oscar Creek, Josephine County, and have reached a depth of 300 feet. They have struck an old channel and are taking out good pay.
    A deal has been closed by the Olalla Mining Company for the purchase of a large area of ground on the Olalla River, Douglas County, and work will be pushed. Portland parties are interested.
    The mines in Evans Creek district are being run on full time with a good supply of water; also those on Pleasant Creek.
    The recent strike at the head of Pleasant Creek is attracting considerable attention. Fourteen claims have already been located on the lode.
    A. W. Sturgis of Forest Creek made a partial cleanup a few days since, after a five weeks' run. Nearly $2100 worth of gold dust was taken out.
    The carload of quartz from the Taylor & Crow mine on Lost Flat, Josephine County, which was crushed at the Hicks mill at Ashland last week, yielded $2,500. There were thirteen tons of the ore. The carload crushed before produced nearly $3,000.
    Courier: There are twelve men employed on the Horn-Silsby-Tucker placers on the Illinois River. Considerable work has been done on the new ditch, strengthening it against the snowfall in the mountains, but they will have water for working the year around.
    The Hampton-Lewis placers on Upper Grave Creek keep sixteen men busy. Extensive preparations have been going on at these mines for two years and now they are about ready to run six monitors steady. A race 1200 feet long has just been completed. It is paved with railroad iron to resist the cutting process of boulders.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 3, 1897, page 287


OUR OREGON LETTER.
EUGENE, OR., March 29, 1897.
Dear Republican:
    According to promise in my last, I will now give your readers some  account of quartz mining as I saw it in Southern Oregon. This kind of mining has been engaged in to some extent for a long time, but owing to the great expense of developing a plant of this kind it has not been nearly so extensive as the placer mining. A stamp mill in close proximity to the mine, so as to make the expense of getting the quartz from the mine to the mill as light as possible, and a stream of water for use in crushing the quartz are a necessity to the largest success. Where the quartz must be hauled from ten to twenty miles to a custom mill it cuts off very much of the profit. The quartz mining until recent years was done in a primitive way, the arrastra being used. This machine for pulverizing quartz is a curiosity to him who never saw one. Boulders are dressed off on one side and laid to make a smooth floor, upon which the quartz is to be crushed. Large stones with one side dressed smooth and with holes drilled in the sides in which to fasten an iron clamp or hook are drawn round and round on the stone floor either by mule or water power. There are four arrastras at work on different veins on the "Jumpoff Joe" crushing quartz at a great rate. I was privileged to visit a 5-stamp mill in Ashland while in Southern Oregon. All one can do while visiting such a place is to look and listen. Such a clatter it keeps up! The five great rods with steel hammers on the ends are lifted by steam power and dropped one at a time on a steel plate, keeping up such a din that there is a sense of great relief when one's visit is over and he steps outside.
    Through the kindness of Mr. Mead & Sons, we were driven out one day to their "Sun Beam" mine. It is located on a mountainside about four miles northeast of Grants Pass, on the north side of Rogue River. They have sunk a shaft 80 feet deep and are now taking out gold-bearing ore from what seems to be an exhaustless vein. What ore they have had milled they have taken to the stamp mill on Williams Creek, a distance of about twenty miles. But they are putting up a mill near their mine and when that is completed they estimate that the yield of the Sun Beam will be $500 per month, with five men to operate it. While not as rich ore as some mines yield, the quartz is soft and therefore easily taken out and crushed.
    We also visited the Jewett mine, which is owned by Mr. Darwin, of Grants Pass. This mine is located on the south  side of a great mountain known as "Old Baldy." Mr. Mangum, a mining expert, gave us a rare treat by driving us out to this mine one morning. We drove to within about three-fourths of a mile of the mine, when, owing to the precipitous condition of the trail, we deemed it expedient to leave our team and go the rest of the way on foot. After a little climbing we found ourselves at the mouth of a tunnel into which we could walk perfectly erect. Lighting candles, with which we were provided, we made our way into this tunnel a distance of about 300 feet, when we came to the end. Here a shaft was sunk to a depth of 90 feet. Down this we climbed, clinging to a pine pole ladder with one hand and holding a tallow candle with the other. When within 15 or 20 feet of the bottom the ladder ran out and we had to swing ourselves down on a rope. The first inquiry we made of the lone miner down there was if he had any dynamite? Being assured that we were perfectly safe we rested easy--that is to say, as easy as it is possible for two preachers to rest 190 feet below the surface of the mountainside directly over our heads. After obtaining some specimens of the rich quartz from the bottom of this shaft we climbed out. This is a mine upon which much money has been expended, but when Mr. Darwin's plan for its complete development is carried out it will be sure to make its owner a Croesus. It is very expensive to drill into the solid rock, blast it out, lift it 90 feet with buckets, wheel it out 300 feet on cars, then haul it a mile or more with wagons. It costs at least 75 cents a ton to get the quarts to the mill. The plan is to continue down with the shaft some 60 feet further, tunnel in from another side of the mountain, then the quartz can be carried out to a point just above the mill. By putting in a cable tramway the ore can be let down to the mill in buckets at a very nominal cost. The vein they are working gives every evidence of containing plenty of wealth, for there is no indication of the ledge "pinching out."
    The gold-bearing quartz of Southern Oregon varies greatly as to richness. Some of it assaying as low as $3 per ton, which will hardly pay for working unless the conditions are most favorable. Difficult ledges assay different amounts--$10, $20, $40, $75, $100--and I heard of one four-foot vein of ore which assays as high as the fabulous sum of $415 per ton. This is the Queen Ann ledge on Coyote Creek, in the Mount Reuben district. But I must stop writing about these mines, for I want to tell you of the wonderful sight we had from the top of Old Baldy, to which we climbed, a distance of about a half a mile above the Jewett mine. The beautiful valley spread gracefully out before us, bordered on either side by the rugged mountain spurs and ridges, while through the center, in graceful curves, ran Rogue River, on the north bank of which, five miles away, is the city of Grants Pass. This natural picture, brought near to us by Mr. Mangum's powerful glass, was one of surpassing grandeur and loveliness. After feasting our eyes upon this scene of beauty we turn our faces to the east, where looms up high above the rough and jagged peaks of the Cascades, the grand, symmetrical, snow-capped old mountain, Mt. Pitt, some sixty miles away, but which appeared to be but a stone's throw as we looked at it through the glass. How wild and rugged is that gorge out of which twists and wriggles in serpentine beauty Rogue River! How grand and shaggy the appearance of the sixty miles between where we stood and Mt. Pitt! The summits of the mountain spurs covered with snow and gleaming in the sunlight are beautiful in the extreme. The awful solitude of the deep, dark canyons is broken only by the dashing mountain streams, as they come dancing and leaping in cascades from among the lofty crags and cliffs. But we are reminded by the stiff, chilly breeze from the snowy summits that we must make the descent, so after a fast walk down the steep side of the old mountain, we were ready for our drive back to town. I saw one nugget of gold of $180 value, and a brick of gold worth $1,400. Last year a nugget of $440 was picked up within a few miles of Grants Pass. Bro. Jenkins and I expect to visit two of the wonders of America in July--Crater Lake and the Josephine Cave. I will be pleased to give your readers a description of them. 

J. T. ABBETT.
Warren Republican, Williamsport, Indiana, April 8, 1897, page 4


    Jacksonville Democratic Times: Belding & Dowell of Greens Creek will soon erect a stamp mill. They have several hundred tons of good ore on the dump.
    G. W. Bailey has opened the old Mountain Lion mine on Missouri Flat in a new place, and discovered a vein 18 inches wide which prospects well.
    Six monitors are running at the Hampton-Lewis mines on Grave Creek. A race 1200 feet long has just been completed, which is paved with railroad iron.
    The Spokane parties who bonded the Boynton ledge on Jumpoff Joe for $3000 have found that the pay seam widens from its original 18 inches to 4 feet, and some of the rock assays high.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 10, 1897, page 306


The Oregon Mineral Land Bill.
    In Southern Oregon the miners are beginning to feel the need for the passage of the mineral lands bill, presented in the United States Senate by Senator McBride, providing for the segregation of agricultural and mineral lands under the railroad grants--similar to the mineral land bill proposed for California. The newspapers of Southern Oregon are exposing the methods of the railroad, whose representative says that there is a mistaken idea among the people to the effect that the railroad company wants to gobble up the mineral lauds. On this subject the Rogue River Courier says:
    "The people residing in the mineral belt of Southern Oregon have had these same sentiments preached to them for several years, notwithstanding mineral claimants find they must go to much trouble and expense to defend their claims from the railroad land grant patents. Possibly the fault is with the General Land Office, which by its ruling throws the burden of proof upon the mineral claimant. It is hoped that through the new Commissioner, Mr. Hermann, who should be familiar with the situation, the ruling may be modified to throw the burden of proof upon the company, or otherwise simplify the miner's procedure. There is good ground for maintaining the position that the bulk of the railroad lands claimed in Southern Oregon are mineral, and would be found to be so upon examination. But patents have issued for a vast amount of these lands to the railroad already."

Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 17, 1897, page 322


    Rogue River Courier: A 5-stamp mill is being set up on the Belding-Dowell ledge, on Greens Creek, about five miles from town.
    Cramer & Wheeler of Myrtle Creek have purchased a quartz ledge on Galice Creek from Henry Hutchins for $3000.
    Placer men have about quit in the Dry Diggings country, as the water has given out. Some prospecting is being done for ledges.
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: The Lance Mining Company of Foots Creek will enlarge their plant next season. One giant has been in operation and more will be added. The flume being constructed from Rogue River, to secure a dump, has been run into bedrock about 2000 feet from the river.
    A. A. Davis of Medford will soon erect a mill at the ledge to Lane Creek district, formerly owned by Scott & Lee.
    Hull & Beck of Louse Creek are running their placer mines on full time, with plenty of water and good prospects.
    If this weather continues many placer miners will commence cleaning up. The water supply is diminishing in different localities.
    A 200-foot working tunnel is to be run at the Barth-Signoretti mine, on Murphy Gulch, to tap the ledge at a depth of 150 feet below the old shaft.
    Dr. Hinkle's North Star mine, on the Sardine Creek divide, is being developed, and is showing up well.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, April 24, 1897, pages 346-347


    Rogue River Courier: Thirty men are at work on the Pickett Creek Mining Company's placers. Most of them are engaged in digging the new five-mile ditch. Piping has been suspended for the season.
    A prospector picked up a $140 nugget at the head of Jumpoff Joe last week. It was shaped like a piece of strap 4 inches long and rather thin.
    The Alexander-Bent placers are running on full time on Galice Creek. Two monitors are busy tearing down banks from 30 to 90 feet high.
    The contract for running the 500-foot tunnel on the new Lewis aqueduct has been let to J. W. Ray for $2.25 a foot. A twelve-mile ditch will be dug this fall, after the cleanup. This ditch will connect the upper Grave Creek placers with the Lewis diggings near Leland.
    An old channel, rich in gold, crosses the Siskiyous at the head of the Althouse, near the California line, and has been traced across the Illinois Valley in a northwest course, thence across Rogue River below the Sherer placers and thence into Douglas County, striking the rich diggings of Cow Creek. In early days to strike this channel meant pounds, not ounces, of nuggets, but it takes digging and piping to uncover them now, although the old channel is exceedingly rich wherever dug into. Modern methods will make it yield more gold than ever in the near future.
    Grants Pass Observer: At the Lewis placer mine on Grave Creek two 5-inch giants are in place, working alternately. Sixteen men are employed in and about the mine.
    A large vein of ore has been cut through in the Free and Easy mine at Kerby at a 150-foot depth.
    The old Hole-in-the-Ground property is being opened up by the A. J. Richison Mining Company, which has purchased the Hold Out claim and is getting the mine in shape for work.
    Medford Mail: Work will soon be commenced on the mining ditch from the Saxe Creek falls to N. D. Young's placer mine, where a hydraulic plant is to be put in.
    Work will soon begin on the Bart-Signoretti mine, owned by Purder & Stanfield, near Murphy Gulch. A 200-foot working tunnel is to be run to tap the vein at a depth of 150 feet below the old shaft.
    It is reported that the parties interested in the proposed big mining ditch from Evans Creek to Louse Creek are soon to let out the contracts for the building of it. The length of the ditch will be about forty-five miles and will have a capacity of 1500 inches of water.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 1, 1897, page 370


    E. B. Jennings of Table Rock, Jackson Co., Oregon, upon whose farm coal has been found, has bonded his property to capitalists who have paid $1000 down and agree to pay $50,000 if, upon sinking, developments are satisfactory. Preparations are being made to sink 800 feet.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 15, 1897, page 407


    Rogue River Courier: Marteen Brothers cleaned up last week on the Althouse and got $3000 from the sluices.
    Crow & Taylor will ship another carload of ore from Merlin to Ashland on the 10th.
    Horner and Savage of the Seattle Dredger Co. are out on Silver Creek looking up placer interests. A survey will be made and ditches dug this season.
    River bar mining will soon be in operation if the dry weather keeps up, though there is more snow in the Siskiyous than usual at this time of year.
    The Coast Range Mining Co. is putting in a pumping plant near Woodville.
    The Hampton-Lewis placers are operating two giants night and day with sixteen men.
    Grants Pass Observer: Fox & Co. are working on a copper deposit near Waldo that promises well.
    Belding & Dowell's 5-stamp mill is running on good ore from their Greens Creek mine.
    Copper ore that carries from $3 to $8 in gold is reported found near Browntown by Smith & Thurshburger [Hershberger?].
    The Rocky Gulch Co. made a partial cleanup last week which was very satisfactory. They will have plenty of water to run nearly all summer.
    The new 5-stamp mill at the Jewett mine will be ready to start up in about ten days. They have about 200 tons of ore on the dump ready to haul to the mill.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 15, 1897, pages 414-415


    The Grants Pass Observer says that it would be difficult to prescribe the limits of the copper belt of Southern Oregon and Northern California, the center of which is at or near Grants Pass, though the belt has a width of about sixty-five miles northeast and southwest, and a length of not less than 300 miles, in the limits of which are many outcroppings of copper. At present there are but two properties being worked in this district, and these on small scales.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 22, 1897, page 431


    Grants Pass Observer: In the Waldo district Weimer Brothers have 2,100 inches of water with about 175 feet pressure. Four giants were operated last winter. Twelve men is the usual force employed during the season at the mine. They are now completing the new flumes on the old Darkas ditch, which nearly doubles the quantity of water for the time.
    In the George Simmons mine a large cut for an outlet for debris had to be run to the Illinois River nearly two miles distant. This mine is operated nine to ten months every year, and employment is given to from eight to twelve men.
    On Galice Creek tho Alexander-Bent placer mine is the largest hydraulic mine in this district. It comprises 510 acres of patented land and extends along an ancient river channel over three and one half miles in length, far above the present bed of Galice Creek.. The water supply is taken out of the west fork of Galice Creek, and is conveyed seven miles to the mine, giving a pressure of from 335 to 500 feet.
    Rogue River Courier: Supt. Weston has struck what he has been tunneling after for the last two years on the Summit gold mine ledge, at the head of Althouse. At a depth of 435 feet he opened a rich ledge of quartz on the 23rd of last month and the miners are into it now 8 feet but there is no sign of getting through. This means a chlorination plant in the Althouse country.
    The new 2-stamp mill for the Ajax mine at Mt. Reuben is on the ground and will be crushing ore at that point soon.
    Dowell & Belding's 5-stamp mill started up last week on Greens Creek.
    Jacksonville Democratic Times: A new 5-stamp mill will soon be in operation at the Jewett mine near Grants Pass.
    Swinden, Still & Co., on Oscar Creek, cleaned up their season's work last week, with satisfactory results.
    Belding & Dowell, on Greens Creek, have a new 4-stamp mill in operation.
    The cleanup of the Rocky Gulch Mining Company in Galice Creek district was a satisfactory one. The company has plenty of water yet.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 22, 1897, page 435


    Medford Mail: The old Bybee quartz mine on Rogue River, below Galice Creek, is now the property of Turner & Sanders, who will resume work this summer.
    Work still continues at Baylor & Iliff's pumping plant on Rogue River. This plant has been working now for some five months and it has been demonstrated that it is a paying enterprise.
    Dowell & Belding's 5-stamp mill started up last week on Greens Creek.
    A. W. Fox and others have taken charge of the Strong & Phillips copper ledge in Waldo district, and will sink a shaft 100 feet and then run a drift of the same length.
    Rogue River Courier: The 5-stamp mill at the Jewett mine will be in operation in a few days. Some 100 tons of ore are ready for grinding.
    Layton is running two placer mines with abundant water, one on Williams Creek and the other on Ferris Gulch.
    Pollock & Co. are in over 100 feet on a ledge at the head of Jumpoff Joe which widens as they advance. Hitherto an arrastra has done the crushing but sulphurets lately appear and so a stamp mill with concentrator are being considered.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 29, 1897, page 454


    The Miners' Association of Southern Oregon has enlarged its executive committee from eight to fifteen. The members now are William H. Hampton, H. A. Shorey, L. L. Jewell, Frank M. South, J. W. Robinson, George Lyman, J. D. Cook, George W. Lance Jr., H. A. Corliss, L. Savage, W. F. Hull, A. M. Brown, F. Niday, John Bolt, P. H. Harth, N. P. Dodge, J. L. Calvert.
"Personal," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, May 29, 1897, page 459


    Monitor-Miner: The Coast Range Mining Company is preparing for extensive placer mining operations on the Stidham Bar on Rogue River.
    Observer: The new 5-stamp mill at the old Jewett mine near Grants Pass is completed and will start up soon.
    The copper deposits of Southern Oregon are attracting quite considerable attention this spring, and some good companies are looking this way for investment.
    Rich diggings have been reported as being struck on Silver Creek that pay $15 per man. This creek was famous in the early days and at one time furnished employment to several hundred men.
    G. W. Trefren of Ashland and D. V. Snowgoose propose to put in a pumping and elevating plant to work a gravel deposit below Grants Pass.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 5, 1897, page 474


    Rogue River Courier: Slate Creek and Deer Creek are the only streams in Josephine County where no mining is done.
    Crow & Taylor are packing some 1500 pounds of ore daily out from their Galice Creek mine and caching it at Mr. Crow's place preparatory to hauling it by wagon to Merlin.
    Medford Mail: Rich diggings have been reported on Silver Creek that pay $15 per man. This creek was famous in the early days and at one time furnished employment to several hundred men.
    Utilizing the water of Rogue River for mining is becoming more general. Trefren & Snowgoose are now putting in a pumping plant near Grants Pass. There are many acres of placer ground along the banks of the Rogue which can in no other way be worked than by means of pumping plants, but these plants to be made profitable must be constructed with the object of cheapness in operating. Several plants of this nature already put in are too costly in operating. A floating water wheel for this purpose has been suggested as possible and economical.
    Jacksonville Times: The Shorty-Hope Mining Company of Ashland district are advertising for bids for the construction of 375 rods of ditch at their mine.
    The Portland parties who have leased the Braden mine, in Gold Hill district, have a force of men at work getting out ore, and will start the mill in a few days.
    J. Chapman has sold his mining claim on Applegate to S. Cole of Medford.
    S. T. Call, of Calvert & Call, has sold his interest in their hydraulic mine in Pleasant Creek district to J. D. Stevens of Jacksonville.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 12, 1897, pages 498-499


    There is some stir in Southern Oregon over discoveries of quartz on the headwaters of Elk Creek, about forty miles north of Medford, and many people from that and other towns have gone to the scene. The mines are reported to cover a territory five miles by ten. The formation is said to be a blanket under a covering of lava.
"Concentrates," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 19, 1897, page 515


    Rogue River Courier: Harmon & Green are tapping Galice Creek with a l½-mile ditch. A giant and pipe will be in position this fall ready for the run.
    Harrington Bros. have been getting out some rich rock from the Exchequer mine on Williams Creek.
    Medford Mail: F. V. Medynski on his Forest Creek quartz claim has an 18-foot ledge, which he is working on. The quartz is not especially rich, but the vast amount of it makes the proposition a valuable one.
    The development work at the Shorty-Hope, near Ashland, has been showing up better rock lately than ever.
    A 5-foot ledge has been struck in the Braden mine, Jackson County, in the 50-foot tunnel recently run. The 5-stamp mill connected with the mine has started up.
    R. T. Shannon of Ashland and G. Bowers of San Francisco have leased, with an option of purchasing, the Oregon quartz mine on Little Applegate.
    The Prescott Placer Dredging Company, capital $250,000, will send the dredger Anaconda, now working on the Seattle tide flats, about July 1 to Rogue River to take out gold-bearing sand from the banks and bottom of the river at the rate of 4000 cubic yards per day. This sand is said to run from 15 cents to $1 in gold per cubic yard. Sand yielding 15 cents per yard can be worked at a profit.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 19, 1897, page 518


    Rogue River Courier: The Blue Bucket ledge, like that of the Lost Cabin, seems to be turning up in all portions of the coast. A party is now out in Grant County expecting to find gold by the bucketful, according to the legend. The Lost Cabin mine has not been found now for several months. Any person who knows of its whereabouts can get up a party of prospectors in Grants Pass.
    A San Francisco company is about to work the Phillips-Strong copper ledge, a mile and a half from Waldo. The ore is situated in a creek bed, where a pumping plant will be put in to keep the shaft clear. The rock assays 20 percent copper and $10 a ton gold.
    The Lewis mine cleaned up last week and the result was highly satisfactory. A great deal of money has been expended in putting these diggings in shape.
    The Baylor-Iliff pump works are running in daylight hours with seven men.
    The Coast Range Mining Co. are running their pump works ten hours each day, just below Woodville.
    Medford Mail: C. E. Smith on Little Applegate has a ledge 50 feet in width which, while the ore is not high grade, will be a good working proposition.
    Articles of incorporation have been filed in the Secretary of State's office incorporating the Pearl Mining Company, with a capital of $110,000.
    The Elk Creek mining excitement has gone a-glimmering, in the minds of most people. One party reports an abundance of ore there, but it is so low grade it will not pay for milling. While it is true that the majority of reports are derogatory, it is, as well, true that some are favorable. It is reported that there are between 600 and 700 people at the mines, and that the district is fifteen miles in length and five miles in width.
    On the Great Applegate Mining Company's ditch there are from fifteen to twenty men at work.

"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, June 26, 1897, page 548


    Monitor-Miner: Kennedy & Co. are operating the Oregon Belle mine on Forest Creek. It is a free-milling ore, running from 6 inches to 5 feet in width, and a tunnel has been run 60 feet on the ledge.
    Rogue River Courier: John Bolt of Applegate has leased his Galice Creek mine to Santa Cruz (Cal.) parties.
    Browning & Hannum have made a rich strike of decomposed quartz on Grave Creek. They are putting up an arrastra.
    The Oregon Bonanza mine is in good ore and the vein has widened out to 30 inches and is filled with pay.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 10, 1897, page 30


MINES AND MINING.
    Several boys up around Phoenix are making from seventy-five cents to a dollar a day each with a rocker in washing gold from the loose gravel in Bear Creek.
    The Mail has printed much regarding the Morine mining find, located on Elk Creek, twelve miles below the Merritt mine, that was very flattering, and we printed it just as 'twas given us--and honestly given we have every reason to believe, but there have been assays received this week which are not so flattering. A. A. Davis, of this city, sent samples of the ore to the Selby smelter, San Francisco, and the returns showed but $1.80 to the ton in gold. It is not improbable that the gentlemen will find better rock further in on the ledge, but this last assay is not a very encouraging one.
    Messrs. J. L. and C. J. Brobst, of Cripple Creek, Colorado, and M. C. Wright, of Portland, were in Medford Monday purchasing supplies for their mining camps on Elk Creek. These gentlemen, together with A. A. Dekum, R. C. Wright and R. J. Hendria, of Portland, have organized the Sunset Mining Company and propose operating several mines on Elk Creek. They have located four claims, eighty acres of land, or rather eighty acres of quartz. Mr. J. L. Brobst, in reply to a Mail reporter's inquiries as to the extent of the company's ledge, said: "It is all ledge--eighty acres of solid quartz--and our average assay is $16 to the ton." The property is known as the Buzzard group and is adjoining the J. W. Merritt mine. Twelve men will be put to work on the mine at once, and a mill with a capacity of thirty tons of ore per day will be placed in position for work just as soon as it can be gotten there. Mr. Brobst remarked that he and his co-laborers in this new proposition were not in any way akin to the swine family--they don't want the earth, but are satisfied with just that eighty acres of it. "We are mining men and feel quite positive that we know a good thing when we see it--and there is a cold million of gold--which, by the way, is not in its crude state, but minted and in our possession, which is backing this proposition," said Mr. Brobst.
From the Grants Pass Mining Journal.
    Hale Bros. last week sold their interest in the hydraulic mine at Leland to their partner, J. U. Willeke. The mine is now owned by Willeke & Porter. Messrs. Hale Bros. will open up a good piece of ground on McNair Flat, below on Grave Creek.
    We learn that Reuben Jones has bonded the Albany group of mines to his cousin, Senator Jones, of Nevada, for the reported sum of $50,000. We are pleased to see such men as Senator Jones become interested in Southern Oregon mines.
Medford Mail, July 16, 1897, page 6


    It is reported that the Albany group of mines in Wolf Creek district, Southern Oregon, have been bonded to Senator Jones of Nevada.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 17, 1897, page 47


    Capt. Nash has bonded the Golden Standard mine in Galls Creek district, owned by H. D. Kubli and Hon. E. B. Watson, for $125,000. John Daggett of San Francisco and other California capitalists are interested in the bond.
    The Times says there is renewed activity in mining in Southern Oregon, due perhaps to the abundant water supply of the past season. The annual cleanup season holds surprises for the most sanguine owners, and all who own mining property in Southern Oregon look upon it as decidedly more valuable than it was considered in past seasons. The result is a boom in mining locations, and numerous prospective sales of valuable properties.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, July 31, 1897, page 103


MINING IN SOUTHERN OREGON
The Discovery of Quartz and Placer in Earlier Days
A History of Wonderful Gold Production

    The colonization of the "Oregon Country" is one of the marvels of the age. A little over a half century ago this great Western empire, with its peerless climate, and with its varied and inexhaustible resources, was a veritable "no man's land," untrod by the foot of white men, save a few trappers in the employ of a trading company. Yet it is today the seat of a high civilization and the abode of 400,000 people possessing colleges, schools, railroads, telegraphs and all the institutions of the oldest states. No reading is more fascinating to the student of human affairs than the story that recounts the details of this modern miracle. It is to depict the part played by the pioneer miners in the development of a portion--Southern Oregon--of this great empire that this article is written.
    The discovery of gold in Southern Oregon, and the resulting settlement of the section, was one of the many aftereffects of the mad rush of the Argonauts to California. To understand the cause and force of that movement, it must be borne in mind that the world's production of gold had fallen so low that the old ratio of production had changed, during the previous half century, from 16-to-1 to nearly three of silver to one of gold. The panic of 1837 was yet oppressive in its effects on commerce, and many hundreds of thousands of young men were, everywhere, in Europe and America, ripe for any adventure.
    It was under such circumstances that the discovery of gold in California was, in 1848, flashed around the world by one of those subtle currents of intelligence as marvelous as the submarine cable. The rush to California from all quarters of the globe began, and every river, stream and gulch in that state were, in a few months, the abode of thousands of young men in search of the yellow metal. It is not our purpose to dilate on the wonderful riches unearthed by them, nor on the stimulating effects upon commerce of the millions of new money poured through every mint into the channels of trade. It is, rather, to trace the influence of those pioneer gold-hunters upon the development of the mining industry of Southern Oregon that this article is written.
    Had, in 1849, an eagle in the midst of his lofty soaring among the clouds cast a glance over the territory lying between the Calapooia Hills and the California line, he would have beheld not as yet a single human habitation. Passing along the trail running into California he would, perhaps, have beheld an occasional traveler, a seeker after furs--going from, or returning to, the fort at Vancouver. Along the banks of Rogue River, the Illinois, the Applegate, the Umpqua, and their tributaries, there would be seen scattered bands of short, copper-colored Indians, nude as when born, fishing for salmon, or, perhaps, pursuing some animal along the foothills. He would have seen great herds of deer and elk, numberless coyotes and many gray wolves, prowling among the mountains.
    This was the panorama exhibited just 48 years ago. But a year and a half later a magic change had taken place. One day in April, 1851, among the many hundred miners scattered along the streams of Northern California it became noised about that "rich diggings" had been discovered in Oregon, and the next day, with that restless energy characteristic of the period, several hundred men were on their way to Jackson County, which then extended from the California line to the southern border of Douglas County. These men crossed the Siskiyous near Ashland and scattered in a few months into every part of the new gold fields. At the same time rumors of the new discoveries penetrated the Willamette Valley, and like reports met the trains of immigrants on their way from the East by way of old Fort Klamath to the "Oregon country." So that, in 1851-2, these converging streams of gold-seekers met in the Rogue River Valley and intermingled. Scottsburg, at the head of navigation on the Umpqua, became an entrepot of importance, and long trains of mules laden with goods for the new mining camps filed daily along the precipitous path which was dignified by the name of road, their tinkling bells sounding musically to the many travelers in search of the new diggings.
    The first discovery of gold in Jackson, then including Josephine County, was in the south end of what is now Josephine County. In May, 1851, four miners, Dusenberry, Collins, Lawrence and Rodam, known as Dusenberry & Co., discovered gold on the creek now called Josephine Creek, and a month later the metal was discovered on Canyon Creek, a tributary. The first rush of miners was to those creeks. Among those who came from the south at that time was James P. Tuffs, who is still living at Grants Pass, enjoying a ripe old age. Mr. Tuffs came with a party of several hundred from Yreka in April, 1851. The course of travel was over the Siskiyous, down Rogue River, which was crossed at the Perkins ferry, located on the place of Col. G. B. Currie, just above Grants Pass, thence up Slate Creek in the bed of the stream, and over to the Illinois. On a knoll situated about two miles south of Kerby, this party on their arrival found several hundred men encamped, with numerous pack animals. The gold-seekers quickly scattered along the Illinois and its numerous tributaries, but, as little was found, many of them disposed of their provisions and returned to their old claims in California.
    In a few weeks gold was discovered in Scotts and Allen gulches at what is now known as Waldo. This discovery was made by some sailors, who, putting into Crescent City, became infected with the prevailing craze for gold, deserted their ship and passed over the mountains into the interior. The place was long known as Sailor Diggings. These discoveries did not attract very much attention, however, at the time, as they were eclipsed by richer strikes made almost simultaneously on Jackson Creek, about one mile west of the present town of Jacksonville, on the Althouse and on Galice Creek.
JACKSON CREEK.
    The discoveries on Jackson Creek were made by a man named Sykes in December, 1851, and a little later Skinner and Pool, two packers, made like discoveries in Rich Gulch, one half mile north of Sykes' claim. These streams were found to be marvelously rich, and for many years they produced an immense amount of gold. Within a few weeks there were over 300 men working on these creeks, and the present town of Jacksonville sprung into existence.
    Among those who came to Jacksonville in 1853 was "Uncle Billy" Saunders, the surveyor, who has been ever since a resident of Josephine County, and who is still living in Grants Pass. "Uncle Billy's" account of the conditions prevailing on Jackson Creek in the winter of 1853-4 is an interesting story and illustrates the vicissitudes to which the pioneer miners were subject. In the winter of 1853 a continuous fall of snow occurred all over Southern Oregon for a period of six weeks, and far to the north the ground lay covered with two feet of snow. In consequence, all travel was impeded, packers from Scottsburg, the Willamette Valley and Yreka were everywhere snowbound, and for several months not a pound of flour or potatoes, or a grain of salt found its way into camp. In a few weeks everyone was on half rations, and many were on the verge of starvation. There was plenty of money, or, rather gold dust and nuggets, but neither flour nor salt could be had for any amount of gold. The last sack of flour sold for $75.00. The want of salt was, above all, most keenly felt. Men became salt-famished, and many were the expedients adopted to secure a substitute. The two feet of snow deprived both cattle and horses of their usual pasture, and many hundred cattle died in the Rogue River Valley. Meat was sold by the butchers at 35 cents per pound. But such meat! Only a little sinew and gristle hanging to the bones, and this was suspected to have been cut from the dead animals out on the snow. Still, it was thankfully received, and when boiled with mackerel, of which there happened to be a small quantity in the town, it was highly relished. Salt became as valuable as gold, and was exchanged at the stores for an equal weight of gold as long as it lasted.
ALTHOUSE.
    The Althouse placers were discovered by Phil. Althouse. They proved marvelously rich. In them were found many large nuggets. "Uncle Billy" Saunders, before mentioned, picked up one in June, 1856, on his claim that "weighed" $1,080. But in the following year an even larger one was discovered by Matthew Collins and James Casey, two young Irishmen. It "weighed" $3,100. In the winter of 1852-3 there were at least 1,500 miners on the Althouse and its tributaries. There were also many miners on Sucker Creek. Browntown was laid out in 1852 and at once became a lively, typical mining town. It was named after "Webfoot" Brown, who was the butcher of the camp. As early as March, 1853, there were ten or twelve stores, several saloons, and a good hotel in the town. This old town was located just below Walker Gulch. It has long since disappeared, though New Browntown, just above, perpetuates the name. Among those prominent in the camp at that time was Jack McDougal, who is still living in the south end of the county. John Elder, who is now ranching on Elder Creek, packed into the new camp from Crescent City. Judge P. P. Prim, of Jacksonville, kept a store there in 1852. James Little, who is now ranching near Waldo, was also there at that time. Dr. D. S. Holton was the physician of the camp and a few years later became a prominent politician, being several times a member of the legislature. J. B. Hickox, or "Hicks," as he is called, was also there. Judge Walker, who died about a year ago in Grants Pass, was the justice of the peace in 1853.
SAILOR DIGGINGS OR WALDO
did not attract much attention until about 1855, though between 1851 and that date there was considerable mining going on there. In the year 1855 the camp experienced a veritable "boom" and attracted many miners from Althouse. In the first two years of the camp's existence no quicksilver was used in mining operation, but it was introduced in 1853 and did much to stimulate mining enterprises. In the year first named there were 500 miners in the district, and the town contained four general merchandise stores, several saloons, a brass band, and many gamblers, fast women and dance houses.
    The surface of the Waldo claims consisted of loose gravel, and it yielded readily to the pick and shovel. This was the ground worked by the early miners there and elsewhere. The under strata contained considerable clay and were, in consequence, so sticky that they could not be worked by the simple methods then in vogue. It yields, however, readily to the giant.
    The first piping was done about 1854 in Scotts Gulch, by Col. Stevens' company. An inch-and-a-half nozzle was used under 300 feet of pressure. The same giant is still in use in Scotts Gulch. The first attempt to open an outlet race to the deep ground at Waldo was made by George Temple and others in Butcher Gulch, now Wimer outlet. This was in the latter '50s. Rim rock was struck by them twenty feet from the surface at the river. A mile-and-a-quarter flume was constructed, which came to the surface almost where the Wimer giants are now set. This company paid $80.00 per day for 500 inches of water and $4.00 per day for men mining with sluiceboxes, picks and shovels. Waldo has, also, the distinction of having possessed the first church constructed in the county. It was built by the Catholics and fell down in 1889. The early merchants of the town were Logan & Thompson, Work & Crandall, A. B. McIlwaine, John Bolt and Mr. Coyle. These, like other pioneer merchants, made their "pile" in a few years and departed, with the exception of Mr. Bolt, with their money to spend it elsewhere. It was in the spring of 1853 that the trail between Waldo and Crescent City was first constructed. This trail was built by "Bullhead" Smith, long afterwards a resident of Smith River Corners, in Del Norte County. From this date nearly all supplies for Southern Oregon came in by way of Crescent City, which, in consequence, soon became a place of considerable commercial activity. The extent of the traffic may be estimated from the fact that within a year there were 3,000 mules on the trail carrying supplies. A short time afterwards John Mann began a pony express to and from Crescent City to connect with the steamers, and large shipments of gold to San Francisco were made by that means. A few years later came the daily six-horse Concord coach. This did not last long, however. The post office department reduced the service to twice a week, then raised it to thrice a week, and it did not again become a daily until 1883, when J. Wimer & Sons built a new road over the mountains to connect with that built by Horace Gasquet, deceased.
    Waldo has another distinction. In 1856 the territorial legislature created the county of Josephine, and Waldo became the first county seat. In the fall of that year the first court held in the county was held at Waldo, with Matthew P. Deady, afterwards United States district judge, as the presiding magistrate. The first sheriff of the new county was James Hendershott, and Dr. D. S. Holton was his deputy. At this time Judge H. K. Hanna was a common miner at Waldo. Other familiar figures were W. R. Willis, now of Roseburg, Judge Williams, of Portland, afterwards United States attorney general, and J. D. Fay, Sr.
KERBY.
    The act creating the county of Josephine provided for an election to determine the permanent seat of the county government. The county took its name from Josephine Creek, which in turn was named in honor of Josephine Rollins, who, then a girl of 16, came from California in 1853 with her father. The election occurred in June, 1856, and Kerby was chosen. At this time there was scarcely a house in the place, but a large amount of open ground, the proximity of the Illinois River, and its central location with reference to the new camps were conclusive arguments with the electorate. It was soon a lively town and for 28 years continued to be the county seat. Among the first merchants was Sam Sawyer who also built and kept a hotel there. Mr. Sawyer died six years ago, after he had made a fortune at Kerby and had lived for many years a retired life at Oakland, Cal. The hotel now kept by N. Delamater, who is also a pioneer miner, was built and kept by S. Vining, who also kept a store at the place.
    Up to the removal of the county seat to Grants Pass, in 1884, Kerby participated in the ups and downs of the mining industry of the county. It is still a growing town and ships large quantities of goods over to Happy Camp, down the Illinois and in other directions. For several years John Howard, the pioneer merchant of Grants Pass, has kept a store there which has enjoyed a large trade.
GALICE CREEK.
    The Galice Creek placers were discovered in 1851 by Louis Galice, a Frenchman, who was in the following year murdered, with six others, by the Indians. This district proved quite rich, and during the 40-odd years it has been mined it has produced an immense amount of gold.
OTHER DIGGINGS.
    Big Bar, on Rogue River, in Jackson County, was also much mined in early days. Sterlingville became a lively camp in 1854. Much mining was also done on Evans Creek and its tributaries, on Foots Creek, Galls Creek, Humbug, Steamboat, Grave Creek and Wolf Creek. Williamsburg, in Williams Valley, was another lively camp. It took its name from Col. Bob Williams, an old miner and noted Indian fighter, who in the wars of 1853 and 1855-6 achieved considerable distinction as the colonel of the Southern Battalion of volunteers. At this camp there were, in 1855-6, 500 men mining. The town at the present time has, however, but little to show of its former activity.
    Strange as it may appear, all of these streams are still being extensively worked, save Big Bar, and are producing large amounts of gold every year.
INDIAN WARS AND OTHER EMBARRASSMENTS.
    It must not be assumed that the pioneers met with no embarrassments. The Indian outbreaks of 1853 and 1855-6 were a source of great annoyance and much anxiety. The murder by the Indians of Louis Galice and his companions was the ultimate cause of the first outbreak, though for two years preceding the natives had shown an increasing hostility. The aggressions were not all on one side, however. The native women were often the victims of the incontinence of irresponsible parties, and occasionally an Indian was wantonly killed by some white man. On the other hand, the Indian quickly acquired the love of gold, which he could exchange for guns, pistols and ammunition, and the "piles" of gold often recklessly exhibited by the miners excited his cupidity and led to treacherous assault. For the Galice murders Chief Taylor, the head of a piratical band of Indians from the mouth of Rogue River, was apprehended and hung, in [1853], with three others by a self-constituted jury, at Vannoy's Ferry, which was located six miles below Grants Pass. [The writer is confabulating Galice's murder with those attributed to Old Taylor. Galice was killed months after Taylor's hanging.] This act precipitated the outbreak of 1853. During this and subsequent outbreaks, "forts" were erected by the miners, and into which they would at times crowd for protection. These "forts" consisted of log buildings surrounded by a stockade. Such "forts" were erected near the mouth of Deer Creek, on the Anderson ranch, opposite Kerby, and at other places.
    The mining seasons of 1853-4 and 1854-5 proved unprofitable; the rainfall was unusually light and, together with the Indian wars, tended to keep many men out of the mines.
THE EXODUS OF 1858 AND 1861.
    These embarrassments and the reports of rich diggings on Fraser River, in British Columbia, seriously impeded the growth of the country. In the year first named a stampede to the new diggings occurred. Several thousand miners abandoned their claims in all the different camps and took the road for the north. So precipitous was this stampede that for several years thereafter almost any article of household furniture could be picked up around the several mining camps, and even band instruments and clocks. This excitement was followed in 1862 by an almost as great a rush to the Salmon River diggings in Idaho. These two excitements almost depleted Southern Oregon of miners and for ten or more years the industry languished. However, many of these old Fraser and Salmon River pioneers came back in subsequent years, and even at this late date one occasionally returns, astonished at the changes that have taken place in his absence.
THE CHINAMAN.
    With the departure of the white miner came the Chinaman, who took the place vacated by the former, and during the next few years took out from the various districts many tons of gold. With the exception of Gin Lin, who still operates a hydraulic on the Little Applegate, these Orientals never made a permanent improvement in the country, and it is now difficult to find a vestige of the thousands who once occupied the streams.
    It may be surmised that the advent of these leeches was not beheld with complacency by the remaining white miners. Numerous protests were made and after a somewhat heated controversy, they were finally forced out of the country. They were aliens, who had no legal right whatever to mine on the public domain, and history now approves as wise the course then taken by the miners.
EARLY MINING METHODS.
    With the departure of the Chinamen came a new era. The miners of the early period confined their labors to the creek beds and low bars. The high bars and channels, which are now being extensively worked, did not escape their attention, but the amount of labor and capital required in the construction of the necessary ditches precluded their working; these were left for a later day. The long tom, Hungarian sluice and rocker were the exclusive mining devices. The first-named consisted of a piece of "tom" iron extended from the lower and narrower end of a sluicebox, so perforated as to permit the gold, when the gravel was stirred with a shovel, to drop through the interstices below. The Hungarian sluice differed from the sluices of the present day in this, that the riffles ran parallel with the course of the water and were not made, as now, with blocks. Quicksilver was not used at all at first, but it came in vogue in 1853, and greatly facilitated the extraction of gold.
    Claims in the bed of the creeks were generally limited to 50 yards, extending on each side to [the] high water mark, and banks or bar claims to 40 feet on the creek, running back to the hill or mountain. All claims became generally "jumpable" at the end of five days from cessation of work, and in disputes touching these matters were submitted to arbitration. It is an interesting fact that the first "code" embracing these provisions was adopted in April, 1852, under a large oak tree on Canyon Creek, at a meeting of some 40 miners gathered for the purpose.
A NEW ERA.
    But, as before stated, with the departure of the Chinamen came a new era. A large hydraulic mine was opened up and equipped on the high channels of Galice Creek by Bowen and others. This led to the construction of the Sterling ditch by Captain Ankeny and D. P. Thompson, of the Squaw Lake ditch by Judge H. K. Hanna, C. B. Bellinger, J. K. Kelly, J. C. Hawthorne, ex-Governor Thayer and Henry Klippel, of the Grand Applegate ditch by W. R. Willis and Sol Abraham, and of other large ditches. The successful operation of these plants provoked a revolution in the methods of mining, and, while ground sluicing is still quite common, the hydraulic giant has been ever since the great agent for moving the gravel banks.
QUARTZ MINING.
    The original source of the large quantities of gold found in all the streams of Southern Oregon has always been a matter of interesting speculation. Much of this gold is coarse, and it is frequently found adhering to or commingling with quartz. This fact has led to the general adoption of the theory that the gold deposits are due to the disintegration of ledges in the surrounding mountains, exposed by the eroding forces of nature. The great number of rich ledges of varying width found in all the mountains confirms this theory. Quartz mining had its beginning in the discovery of the Hicks ledge on Jackson Creek, in 1859. It proved to be a pocket, but quite a snug little sum was taken out of it by Secora Hicks and S. R. Taylor. Gold Hill was the next noted find in the way of quartz. It was discovered in January, 1860, by J. Hays and a Mr. Graham, who took T. Chavner, George Ish and A. J. Long and John C. Miller in with them. Within a week the mine passed into the hands of Henry Klippel and two others, who erected an arrastra to treat the ores. The dividends of the company averaged for a while 1,000 ounces of gold per week, and before it was abandoned it yielded its owners $150,000 in gold. In April, 1860, a 12-stamp mill was, at great expense and labor, erected to take the place of the arrastra, and the arrastra tailings yielded in this mill the first week $10,366. This was the first stamp mill erected in Oregon. It was afterwards sold to the owners of the Jewett mine, three miles from Grants Pass, where it did good work for several years.
    The discovery of the Gold Hill ledge quickly led to other quartz discoveries and, among others, the Fowler, which yielded $315,000; the Jewett, $40,000; Blackwell, $10,000; Holman, $10,000, and Davenport, $8,000. Some of these mines are still being worked at this time, notably the Jewett.
    The Southern Oregon prospectors have heretofore, as a rule, sought only free-milling ledges, and if the gold was not plainly visible to the eye the find was considered of no value. The section still presents, in this respect, a practically unexplored field and offers tempting opportunities to experienced prospectors.
    The copper ledges in the south end of Josephine County, which are numerous and extensive, at an early date attracted attention, but they have never as yet been profitably worked. The first of these enterprises was that of the Queen of Bronze, near Waldo, on which a French doctor and his associates spent $30,000. It subsequently became the property of Henry Villard, who purchased it of John C. Elder and James Lyttle for $10,000. Another enterprise was that made in 1862 by a number of San Francisco men to work the copper ledges at the junction of Falls Creek and the Illinois. They erected an old-fashioned mill on the ledge but, after spending $20,000 upon the property, abandoned it. Both of these properties are still considered valuable, but as they and others worked in early days are still "going" mines and are elsewhere described, further mention in this article is not deemed necessary.
THE PIONEER HIMSELF.
    The men who, in early days, flocked to Southern Oregon in such numbers and laid so well and deep the foundations of the present social, political and industrial fabric, were no common men. They were, with hardly an exception, men under 25, well grounded in republican institutions, many of them college graduates, some of them lawyers and doctors who abandoned a lucrative practice in the East and South--and all of them courageous, resourceful, hardy and strong. They were, above all, law-abiding and lovers of justice. Without constitutional courts, they administered punishment to those who broke the divine ordinances summarily, but yet with all the forms and deliberations characteristic of courts of law, and so well was their work done that homicides were rare and but few assaults on the integrity of property were ever reported. All hail! to the Southern Oregon pioneer.
   

THE PRESENT CONDITION OF MINING IN SOUTHERN OREGON
    Southern Oregon produces gold, silver, copper, iron, coal, asbestos and many other valuable minerals. The section is, however, essentially a placer or hydraulic gold-mining country and is, in this respect, second on the Pacific Coast to California only, to which, in its physical features, it bears a striking resemblance. But it is a placer or hydraulic country for the reason that more attention has been paid to that class of mining than to any other. The reasons for this are patent. The miners, of both the early and late period, have been men whose necessities forced them to seek mineral wealth by that channel which assured the quickest returns with the least expenditure of money. Prospecting for quartz ledges is a pursuit full of embarrassments, and the prospector necessarily has a precarious mode of existence. In Southern Oregon, in early days, the mountainsides were kept comparatively clear of undergrowth by the fires set out by the Indians, but such fires are now forbidden by law, so that the country has become covered with an undergrowth of bushes and trees, which interferes with travel and conceals the surface from view. The landscape is much broken, and in many places there are rugged and steep mountains. When a ledge has been discovered, its value must be determined by exploration, and after this value has been ascertained a road has to be constructed, a cabin built and a mill erected--or, else, there must be a patient and uncertain waiting for the arrival of a purchaser. In the meantime the question of "grub" and other supplies is an ever-present one, and both money and credit are likely to become exhausted. On the other hand, the nearest gulch invites the gold-seeker to enter, with no capital save pick and shovel and sluicebox, and assures him of at least moderate remuneration for his toil. Ultimately his labors may well disclose a rich bank of gravel--a high bar or an old channel. A longer and larger ditch is constructed, the water supply is increased, and thenceforth and for many years the hydraulic giant affords him an income of several, perhaps many, thousands a year. In other words, the miner, as others, moves along the line of least resistance, and that line has directed his footsteps into placer and hydraulic mining rather than into the more uncertain field of quartz mining.
    But, off and on, for the past thirty years, the desire to discover the source of the immense quantities of gold found in the creek beds and bars of Southern Oregon has proven a strong temptation to the prospector, and as a result of his labors many large bodies of ore have been uncovered, as well as unnumbered ledges of varying width, a considerable number of which are yearly adding their quota to the world's production of gold.
    The source of the gold supply of Southern Oregon has always been, and still is, an interesting subject of speculation. As to the source of a part of this gold supply a theory has been propounded which appears at least to be plausible. Geologists concur in the statement that far back in mesozoic time all Southern Oregon and the Pacific Slope, as far east as the Rocky Mountains, were parts of the ocean depths, save a mountainous island, whose eastern shoreline, crossing the Siskiyous near Ashland, extended northwesterly to Coos Bay and southwesterly to the mouth of the Klamath River. Upon the beaches of this island, out of the mountains above, the eroding elements, through countless ages, washed and deposited with the sand and gravel immense quantities of gold. They further tell us that during this period not less than 3,000 feet of sediment were deposited, covering the territory tributary to the Rogue, Umpqua and Coquille rivers. Later the Cascade Mountains emerged, and still later the mountain chains with which we are now familiar. This last emergence drained off the water and in places left the ancient shoreline high on the tops of mountains and in other places buried deep beneath mountain slides. The newly formed rivers and creeks then began to cut their channels to the sea, and wherever one of these streams struck this shoreline it scattered the gold contents all along its course. This theory accounts for much in Southern Oregon which would otherwise be inexplicable. It accounts for the numerous "ancient channels," with their marine shells, washed gravel and huge boulders, found in numerous places high up on many mountaintops, notably on Briggs Creek and at the Gold Basin. It also accounts for the many tons of gold taken out of such streams as the Althouse, Sucker Creek, Galice Creek and others. It should be remembered, too, that in the beginning the streams did not occupy their present beds, nor were there deep canyons in existence. But there were numerous lakes and ponds, and into these the currents bore their burden and deposited immense beds of auriferous gravel.
    This theory does not explain, however, the fact of the existence of the large nuggets, found almost daily, attached to or commingled with quartz, little worn and broken off at a comparatively recent date. That these nuggets came from ledges in the surrounding mountains was, and is, a conclusion which would be irresistible even were it not supported by the discovery, as before stated, of so many well-defined gold-bearing ledges in all directions.
    The attempt, however, to work these ledges has not always proven satisfactory or profitable. Failures have occurred, but it is patent to the most casual observer that many of them have been due to inexperience, and some to wasteful and extravagant management; the expense of procuring machinery has been great, and the capital has often been small. But after making all allowance for these failures, the showing made for Southern Oregon quartz mining is well worthy of consideration, and as experience enlarges from year to year, better results are being obtained. It should be remembered, too, that the process of extracting gold from quartz is a discovery of very recent years and that the problem has not yet been solved with entirely satisfactory results.
    The vein matter of Southern Oregon ledges varies but little throughout a wide extent of territory, and, with some exceptions, may be described as a hard, white and compact quartz carrying metallic sulphides and gold (with some silver) in varying degrees. This quartz, where within reach of the action of air and water and thus oxidized, was alone worked by the early miners and is still all that is sought to be utilized by many persons. This class of ore yields its gold contents readily in the arrastra and in the stamp mill and battery, and these simple devices may be found all throughout the section in operation, generally with water power. From the practice of working only the oxidized, free-milling ores it has resulted that many gold mines may be found with all the surface ore extracted and with rich ledges of sulphides exposed in the tunnels and shafts. Knowledge is, however, ever increasing, and the art of concentration or "ore dressing" is being learned. The mills are being equipped with Frue vanners and other concentrating machinery, and within a short period a much larger yield from the quartz mines may be anticipated.
    But it is not enough to concentrate the ore and ship the sulphurets; the expense of shipment of the concentrates to San Francisco, which is the most available point for treatment, and the charges for such treatment are so great that when added to the cost of mining and milling, much of the profit to the mine owner is sacrificed, and in many cases the mine is closed altogether. A chlorination plant, or some other suitable form of reduction works, is greatly needed and if erected at a convenient point would greatly stimulate the development of the industry.
    Much has been said about the "pockety" nature of the quartz mines of Southern Oregon. This characterization is, however, in the estimation of many competent men, largely undeserved. In the first place, it should be remembered that gold ledges everywhere are never of uniform width but contract and expand and are often broken. In the next place, the gold is never uniformly disseminated throughout the ledge matter, but occurs in chutes of varying lengths. This is true of Southern Oregon quartz mines, and to it is due, in a large measure, the exaggerated impression existing on this subject. This impression is particularly unfortunate, as it has deterred many persons from investing in promising quartz mines and others from exploring the lower strata. It should be borne in mind that there has as yet been but little deep mining in Southern Oregon. There are numerous mines containing hundreds of feet of tunneling close to the surface, undertaken to secure the free-milling ore, but only in one or two instances have perpendicular shafts been sunk to a depth of even two hundred feet, and in those instances good, substantial ledges have been disclosed. Many well-informed men are confident that when the temptation to mine only the free-gold ores shall be overcome and shafts shall be sunk to a depth of 500 or 600 feet, as is done with little ado in other sections, large, well-defined paying ledges will be disclosed, and such will probably be the case.
    Mining in Southern Oregon at the present time takes many forms. The hydraulic mine is most in evidence and produces the greatest amount of gold. However, much ground sluicing may be found, and the gold extracted by this means gives a support to many men. This elementary form of mining is not, however, one of choice; it requires but little capital, and insufficient means precludes the use of the hydraulic giant. Much ground is thus profitably mined which would, under pipe and giant, yield a fortune. This ground can be had at reasonable prices, and as it is physically possible, in most cases, by the construction of ditches from three to twenty miles in length to get sufficient water upon it for hydraulicking, the field for investment on the part of men with moderate capital is an inviting one. A still larger field is the consolidation of various small properties on the several creeks and the working of the same under one management with larger water facilities. Several such consolidations are now under consideration.
    It should be borne in mind that hydraulic mining is far less hazardous than any other form of mining, as all the factors entering into the problem can be accurately estimated in advance, while, when once equipped, no great amount of skill or expense is required, comparatively, to obtain successful results.
    Another form of mining is by wing-damming the rivers. This method of mining has been in vogue along Rogue River for the past two years and has proven profitable. Of course, it is only applicable in the summer season, when the water is low. The question, too, of placing dredges on Rogue River is receiving considerable attention.
    A new method by pumping water directly against the adjacent bank by means of a steam pumping plant has lately been inaugurated by Messrs. Baylor & Iliff, on Rogue River, just above Grants Pass. This enterprise has now been long enough in existence to demonstrate its practicability, and its promoters pronounce it a decided success. A description of this plant will be found elsewhere. A like plant is now being erected on the same river opposite Woodville, and other parties have the establishment of similar enterprises in view. Should the assurance of success now being given as to these enterprises be verified by further experience, the problem of extracting the gold from the auriferous banks of Rogue River and other streams, will, in the judgment of mining men generally, have been permanently solved, and it will result in the establishment of many such enterprises.
    The gold output of Oregon last year amounted to $1,950,204, the largest for twenty years. Of this sum nearly one-half came from Southern Oregon. It is a noteworthy fact that this output of the state was nearly six times that of the state of Washington, and that it was, besides, in excess of that of British Columbia, and nearly one-half as much as that of Montana. Previous to 1896 the greatest annual output of Oregon's gold mines was in 1877, when the value of the yield approximated $1,192,000. From 1877 to 1883 there was noted a steady decrease in figures representing the yearly output of gold till 1884, when Oregon produced but $552,472 in gold. Each successive year since 1888 has shown a steady increase in the output. In 1891 it reached the million mark, and in the five years since that time it has practically doubled in volume. The greatest increase has been made since 1893, when depression in other lines forced the people's attention to the business they practically ignored during the period of greatest advancement in the Pacific Northwest.
    These figures bear testimony to the increasing activity of the chief industry of Southern Oregon. This activity, begun so auspiciously some three years ago, may be counted upon to continue and to increase in force in proportion as the mineral wealth of the section becomes known.
   

THE MINES OF SOUTHERN OREGON
DOUGLAS COUNTY
    There has been, and still is, less mining in Douglas County than in either Josephine or Jackson counties. The county is, however, within the Southern Oregon mineral belt, and the formations are similar to those existing in the other counties named. In early days considerable gold was obtained on the South Umpqua and Cow Creek, and their tributaries, and both of those streams are still the seat of considerable mining.
On Steamboat Creek
    In the northwestern part of the county is the farthest point north where gravel has been worked for gold. This creek is an affluent of the North Umpqua. On all the other tributaries of the North Umpqua gold can be found. However, but little mining has ever been done in that section. Some prospecting has been done there, and some good quartz has been found. The district also contains some copper, found in serpentine.
South Umpqua District
    The South Umpqua, with its tributary creeks, Coffee, Elk, Bear, Cougar, Deadman's, Myrtle and Day's, was in early days a region of considerable note. On all these streams washed gold was, and still is, found. The most of the shallow deposits were, however, washed out long ago, but some deep gravels suitable for hydraulic mining still remain. At the present time, the greatest amount of activity exists on Coffee Creek, at a point about 22 miles east of Canyonville. One Alex. Dumore has the distinction of first discovering gold on this creek, in 1857. The gold was coarse, many nuggets of the value of $20 having been found. Various attempts have been made to discover the source of this gold, but so far without success. On Granite Creek, a tributary of Coffee Creek, is the only hydraulic in operation in the district. This is the property of the Granite Creek Placer Mining Company, of which Captain J. P. Shaw, of Portland, is president. It has been in operation only a short time. The company has excellent water facilities and a good dump. The gravel yields from 15 to 50 cents per cubic yard in gold. There are also, some ten other locations in the district, which are worked by ground sluicing.
Cow Creek District
    A still more noted tributary of the Umpqua is Cow Creek. The gravel of this creek has been worked for over 30 years. The placers are still extensive, and some noted bodies of deep gravel are found. On Tennessee Gulch, some 20 miles up the creek, some good mining ground is also found. Another affluent of Cow Creek is Quines Creek. On this creek there is said to be a­ silver-bearing quartz ledge, three or four feet in width. Considering that silver ledges are rare in Southern Oregon, this discovery is noteworthy. Just above the mouth of Tennessee Gulch is the Union quartz mine, which has been extensively worked, producing some very rich ore, treated in an arrastra. The vein is small, however. It was in this vicinity that the "Starveout strike," otherwise called the "Green Mountain Mine," was discovered some years ago. It is a well-defined ledge some six feet in width. Another discovery on this creek is an iron mine. There is also found considerable copper, in ore or native.
    But the principal enterprise on Cow Creek is the Victory mine, near Glendale, the property of the A.B.C. Co., a corporation whose chief stockholders are residents of Chicago. The president of the company is John Addison. This property, until lately, was operated by the Victory Placer Mining Company, of which Col. Taylor was manager and promoter. There are several hundred acres of rich gravel, but the difficulty has heretofore been insufficiency of water. To supply this, Col. Taylor undertook to erect large pumps, but before he could demonstrate his ability to mine profitably by this means, the company became involved
in financial difficulties, with the result that the property was sold under a judicial decree and purchased by Mr. Addison and his associates. To increase the water supply, the new company is now constructing a system of ditches, 25 miles in extent, which will tap several creeks putting into Cow Creek, and which, it is claimed, will furnish ample water for the greater part of the year.
Olalla District
    Another noteworthy enterprise is that of the Paradise Mining Company, a Portland concern, which owns 700 acres of rich gravel near Olalla. This is a new enterprise. It will be equipped with pipe and giant during the coming summer.
Hogum Gulch
was first discovered in 1859, when it paid $50 a day to the man. The creek channel has been partially worked out, but the creek bars and high rims furnish good ground for piping. The principal claims on the gulch are those of Hobert & Grimes and Eliff & Booth, both of which are composed of blue gravel and are equipped with pipe and giant. The former has a mile-and-a-half ditch completed and other ditches under construction. It has, also, 900 feet of 18-inch flume.
Dodson Butte District
    About nine miles east of the railroad is the Dodson Butte district, in which are found several very promising ledges. Of these most development work has been done on the Black Republican mine, owned by S. C. Flint and others, of Roseburg. A 250-foot tunnel has been run and an 8-foot ledge cross-cut. This ledge carries gold and copper and assays from $40 to $400 per ton.
    The Yankee Boy and the Lucky Boy, owned by H. M. Oatman, adjoin the Black Republican. Several cross-cuts have been made on the ledges in these mines, showing an 8-foot vein of "peacock" copper and some gold, which assay about $45.00 a ton.
Brushy Butte District
    In this district, also, there are several good quartz mines. The 16-to-1 mine, owned by Smith Baily and others, contains a 150-foot tunnel and several cross-cuts. It shows a 12-foot ledge carrying gold and copper, assaying about $60 per ton. The Eagle mine and the Eagle Extension are the most developed mines in the district. They are the property of William Lough and others. A 16-foot ledge has been exposed, carrying gold and copper of an assay value of' $40.00. The Brushy Butte copper and gold mine has had considerable development. It is the property of S. A. Clarke, H. W. Miller and others. A ledge, varying from six to fifteen feet in width, carrying gold and copper of an assay value of from $10 to $40 per ton, has been exposed. This ledge can be traced on the surface fully 7,500 feet. All these mines are about ten miles from the railroad.
    The brevity of this article might lead one to the conclusion that the mining industry of Douglas County is insignificant. This would be a false impression, however. In all the districts mentioned, and in others not mentioned, will be found many small mines in operation, and, also, many promising quartz ledges. Inasmuch, however, as the latter are as yet little developed, and the space allotted to cover a large territory is limited, a further notice is not permissible. Douglas County, like other parts of Southern Oregon, feels the need capital for the development of her mineral resources and offers a profitable field for such investments.
   

MINES IN JOSEPHINE COUNTY
    Rugged mountains, alternating with steep canyons and narrow valleys, make up the northern portion of Josephine County, a region that is good for little else than mining. The rocks contain many auriferous quartz veins, and placer mining is carried on, on nearly all the streams. The watercourses connect with Rogue River, the streams having a westerly course.
Mt. Reuben District
    The Mt. Reuben district is situated in the northwest corner of Josephine County, about sixteen miles northwest of Leland station. This district appears to be a continuation of the Galice Creek district, and commences on the north side of Rogue River. It lies north of Rogue River. Mt. Reuben is a high ridge running almost due north from Rogue River. It expands from Reuben Creek, on the east, to Whiskey Creek, on the west, there being about five miles between the mouths of the creeks. The ridge extends back north from Rogue River, about eight miles. The whole mountain seems to be highly mineralized, and it is a continuous network of ledges and small veins. The general course of the veins seems to be northeast and southwest. The formation is porphyry and the ledges are a mica schist.
    After crossing Reuben Creek, going west, the first mine encountered is the Ajax, owned by Clark & Williams. This mine is opened by a tunnel, tapping a strong, gold-bearing ledge, four feet wide at a depth of about 100 feet perpendicular measurement. The main chute is exposed and is continuous for 200 feet. This mine shows some ore milling into the thousands of dollars. The mine is equipped with one of I. B. Hammond's improved triple discharge mills, which is giving very satisfactory results.
    The next mine west is the Copper Stain, owned by J. B. Wetherell & Co. It is equipped with a Tremain mill, and is operated by tunnel and shaft. The ore is high grade. The company owns four full claims. About one-fourth mile south is the Sandoz mine, owned by Louis Sandoz. It is also equipped with a Tremain mill. The mine is operated by tunnel and shaft. The vein is about four feet wide, at a depth of 100 feet. The ore has an assay value of $20 per ton, with $5 free on the plates. Further north on the west side is the Ramsey group, owned by Stroud, Ramsey and Decker. It consists of six claims. This property is opened by several tunnels, one of which is 350 feet long, tapping the ore at a depth of 150 feet. The ore is continuous, showing an average width of 12 inches, with an average assay value of $13 per ton. This is a milling and concentrating proposition. Further north and east are a number of fine, strong ledges, showing low-grade milling values, with little or no development work. Still further east is a group of claims owned by Geo. Berglund & Co. It shows some high-grade ore.
    About two miles south, on the summit, is located the Albany group, consisting of eight claims. This property is prospected entirely by shafts, the greatest depth being 110 feet, perpendicular measurement. It shows a strong 4-foot vein of $20.00, free-milling ore. Some milling tests of 20-ton lots show a milling value of $48.20 per ton. One mile west of the Albany group is located the Gold Bug, owned by R. A. Jones. It is being developed by a tunnel. This vein shows it to be the richest continuous pay chute yet found in the district. One and one-half miles further south and east are several locations recently made, showing milling values on the surface.
    The district has an abundance of wood and water. More men are mining on Whiskey and Reuben creeks now than at any time for many years. A company has leased Briggs & Clark's mine, below the mouth of Whiskey Creek. The veteran miner, Charley Bear, is still taking out nuggets from his mine at the mouth of the creek. The Root Brothers are working different mines with success. In fact, every claim is being worked from the mouth of the creek as far up as there is sufficient water.
Grave Creek District
    This is another historic district, having been in early days the seat of great mining activity, and it has never ceased to furnish its quota of gold. It was about three years ago that it experienced renewed activity. This was due to the establishment of several large hydraulic enterprises on the creek. At the present time it is, from one end to the other, the seat of much mining activity, and a large scheme is on foot to consolidate several of the large properties and greatly increase the water supply.
    At the head of the creek Mose Hopwood & Co., and Watts & Keating are ground sluicing. Just below [Mr.] Smoker is working a creek bar with one giant, with a pressure of 80 feet. He gets his water from Boulder Creek. Other ground sluicers are Keeney & Co., and David Johnson & Co.

THE COLUMBIA MINE.
    This is, par excellence, the hydraulic mine of the district. It lies about eight miles from Leland, the nearest point on the railroad. The owners are L. A. Lewis, of Portland, and William Huntley Hampton, the eminent engineer. This property is worthy of more than a casual notice. It has been only operated during the past two seasons, but the returns the very first season were so satisfactory that the owners felt justified in expending many thousands of dollars in getting the ground in proper shape for working. Fifteen miles of ditch furnishes a pressure of 350 feet and affords water enough to operate two giants the greater part of the year. There are two distinguishing features of the Columbia mine: the first is the thoroughness with which everything has been done--the quarters built for the owners and workmen--the commissary and dining apartments, and the engineering skill displayed in the construction of the ditches, dams, sluiceways and flumes. All this has been done under the supervision of Professor Hampton, who has worked out every detail and superintended the work from the beginning. The chief distinguishing feature of the mine is, however, the hydraulic elevator.
    This was constructed to overcome the embarrassment of a deficient dump. It lies about 1,200 feet below the ground now being worked, with which it is connected by a 1,200-foot cut, in which are placed the sluiceboxes. The elevator consists of a 40-foot pipe, 2½ feet in diameter, supported at an angle of about 45 degrees. At the base of this pipe a giant implanted in the ground forces the gravel as it comes through the flume up through the pipe, where it passes in an elevated flume to a point several hundred feet below. Another elevated flume furnishes by-water. This elevator was worked during the past season and with entirely satisfactory results. It has the distinction of being one of the largest of the kind ever constructed. The force of the giant operating this elevator can hardly be appreciated by one who has not seen the giant in operation. Some idea of this force may be gathered from the fact that it will toss an 800-pound boulder up the pipe like a marble. All this force is not due to one giant, however, for penetrating the pipe about midway is another giant, which adds its strength to the one below. This structure has, of course, been an expensive one, and only a large property would justify its construction. However, Messrs. Lewis & Hampton have built not for one year, but for many years, and from near the junction of Tom East Creek and Grave Creek, where they are now mining, two miles or more of ground lie above them on the first-named stream, which will keep them busy mining for several decades.
BLALOCK BROS.
    This mine has been in operation for the past three seasons only, and it is operated with a four-mile ditch, 2,250 feet of pipe and two giants. It has a good water pressure for seven months in the year. These improvements have been made with an expenditure of about $5,000. The bank consists of a heavy marine wash, 25 feet in depth, with about five feet of red loam on top. The owners were the original locators of a part of the ground, but large additions were made by purchase. Starting the work of equipment with little capital other than muscle and courage, Messrs. Blalock Bros. persevered in their design, and although the mine is not fairly developed as yet, it has yielded them not less than $3,000 a year during the time it has been in operation. When fully opened up a much larger revenue may be anticipated, and the last of the ground will not be reached in the lifetime of any of the owners.
    Below Blalock Bros. is the claim of George Pease, operated for the past two seasons by ground sluicing. This ground will be equipped with pipe and giant in the coming fall. Other ground sluicing claims in the neighborhood are those of Rose & Johnson, Joe Strollburg, Dan Wilson, William Thomson, Ed. Richards, and Ernest Briggs & Co.
    Browning & Sons have also a profitable mine located on Jordan Gulch. They have 80 acres, and operate one giant with a pressure of 80 feet. This ground has produced some unusually large nuggets.
    On Slate Creek, a tributary, Cross & Keen have a ground-sluicing claim which they will equip with a giant during the coming season.
At Leland
between the Columbia mine and the railroad station at Leland no hydraulic mines exist, although the ground is all known to be rich in gold. At Leland are two noted hydraulic mines, those of John C. Lewis, of Portland, and the Steam Beer, owned by E. Nicodemus. The Lewis mine was only equipped during the past season. The Steam Beer has been in operation for several years. Both mines have the reputation of being excellent producers.
WILLEKE & PORTER,
FORMERLY HALE BROS. & CO.

    About 1½ miles below Leland is the hydraulic mine of Hale Bros. & Co., which has been profitably mined for several seasons. The gravel is red and like all similar ground on Grave Creek, is rich in gold. The mine has good dumping facilities; however, the water facilities at present are not adequate to produce the best results. A new ditch will have to be constructed for this purpose, and this will be done shortly. One giant is operated at present and about an acre of ground has been piped off. This mine lies close to the railroad track, and is a constant source of interest to travelers, as its operations can be plainly seen from the passing trains.
    Passing on down Grave Creek seven or eight good-paying hydraulic mines are seen. On the right-hand side of the creek is that of G. Karg, which has been extensively operated for years with one giant. A mile or so below, on the opposite side of the creek lies the hydraulic mine of
GEO. B. ARCHER,
which has been in operation for several seasons. The gravel is blue, and the banks stand up 80 feet in height. The dump facilities cannot be surpassed anywhere, and the water facilities are better than are generally found elsewhere. This ground has been mined for years, but it is only within the last few years that it has fallen into the hands of the present owner. Mr. Archer is an old California hydraulic miner, and everything about the mine testifies to his skill and thoroughness. He has two or three hundred acres of ground, 3¾ miles of ditch, three reservoirs, and a 4-foot flume, through which the tailings are dumped into Grave Creek. Two giants are used.
    The other prominent mines below are those of Klum & Goss, J. B. Lawler, Halsey & Co., and the Harris Flat Mining Company, with J. W. Virtue, the former owner of the Virtue mine, near Baker City, as part owner and general manager. So far, little effort has been made to pipe this ground; the effort has rather been by the sinking of shafts and running drifts, to determine the extent and richness of the ground before expending any considerable sum in the construction of ditches.
    We come now to the
HARTH & SMITH MINE,
owned by P. H. Harth & Son, the Grants Pass clothing merchants, and L. S. Smith. This property was worked during the past season by lessees. The water supply is sufficient to operate two giants during the mining season, and the pressure is good. The mine produces much coarse gold and is considered a valuable property.
Wolf Creek District
    The northernmost district is that of Wolf Creek, which is a tributary of Grave Creek, and which is from 15 to 20 miles in length. On Sailor Creek, near the upper waters of this creek, is the hydraulic mine of H. D. Sluter, which was equipped with pipe and giant about two years ago. Mr. S. has 80 acres of red gravel, and a 3-mile ditch gives him an ample pressure for five or six months. This mine has also three small reservoirs and good facilities for dumping. Mr. Sluter has also a quartz claim in the neighborhood.
    Below on the creek is the placer mine of J. B. Hannum. Mr. Hannum is a pioneer miner of the year 1852 and has lived 15 years on this creek. He is, besides, a horticulturist of no average success, for around his cabin grow the finest apples, peaches and plums. He has 40 acres of ground, red and blue gravel, located on a basin with an altitude several hundred feet above the railroad station at Wolf Creek. This ground has been considerably mined and is undoubtedly a good piece of property. The water facilities are limited, but could, with a small expenditure, be greatly increased.
    Next below is the hydraulic claim of J. E. Farmer, the local railroad agent. This claim is equipped with pipe and giant and is, in its general nature, very similar to that of J. B. Hannum.
    On Manhattan Gulch, which there puts into Wolf Creek, are the claims of John Saunders and Herbert Burleigh & Co. Neither is as yet equipped with pipe and giant.
    Passing on down the creek, the mine of Lehman Bros. is reached. This has the general characteristics of the other mines on Wolf Creek. The present owners have worked the ground for many years, with satisfactory results.
    Between Lehman Bros. and the mine of Jack Layton, below, Messrs. Booth & Tuffs have considerable ground not now being mined, but which is known to be rich. The Layton mine is equipped with pipe and giant and has the general features of the hydraulic mines on Wolf Creek. The pressure is fairly good, and sufficient water is obtained in an ordinary season to afford six months of mining.
    Other mines on the creek below are those of T. E. Wallace, Daniel Matthews and J. McGuire. Richardson & Son, of Stayton, Oregon, are the latest arrivals on the creek. They have only within the last few months put in a pipe and giant. Among the quartz ledges on the creek is one owned by Flynn & Son. Considerable development work has been done on the ledge, and the amount of ore exposed has been so great that the owners feel justified in erecting a 5-stamp mill for its reduction.
Coyote Creek District
    Coyote Creek is the most important tributary of Wolf Creek, and it has been the seat of considerable mining for the past 40 years. At present there are two hydraulic mines on the creek. The uppermost is that of Ruble Bros.--William N. and S. C. Ruble--whose ground covers a couple of miles of the creek and back channels. The gravel is similar to that on Wolf Creek and has a depth of about twenty feet. Much coarse gold is found. The water rights appurtenant to the mine are very valuable and afford a pressure of about 300 feet for two giants. The drawback to this mine was formerly lack of dump facilities. The owners have, however, obviated this difficulty by an ingenious contrivance which is
RUBLE BROS.' ELEVATOR.
    This is a structure which is both an elevator and separator combined, and consists of a plank floor 10 feet wide and 26 to 40 feet long, with side boards 6 to 8 feet high to prevent gravel and gold from splashing over the sides. This structure is set at right angles to the flume, with the lower end resting on the flume at a rising angle of 15 to 20 degrees. Over this floor about one foot are placed cross rails of wood, supported underneath and faced on top with steel straps projecting a little over the wood on each side. These are placed so as to leave 2-inch openings between the strips, through which the gold, sand and fine gravel drop through onto the floor beneath and are washed into the flume. One giant, placed in front, plays on the elevator at a distance of 60 to 100 feet from the lower end. Another giant is set so as to drive the gravel near enough for the first giant to drive it over the screen. These giants can both be operated at once, or if there is not sufficient water for both giants, they can be used separately, say, 12 hours each at a time. It will be seen that this grizzly is designed for working flat, gravelly ground, when the larger rock has to be handled. Messrs. Ruble Bros., the inventors, claim for it that with it twice as much gravel and rock can be moved in a given space of time and with a given amount of water, as can be moved by running the gravel and rock through a flume, in the same period of time and with the same water. As to water, at least 100 feet of pressure is needed to do good work. Boulders weighing from 100 to 500 pounds, owing to pressure and water, and stumps, logs and roots, all pass over the grizzly, so that only the very large rocks have to be handled. It is also claimed that not so much sluice water is needed as where all the rock and gravel are passed through the flume. It saves the gold better, as the flume seldom clogs and no rock reaches the flume to cause the sand and gold to boil out of the riffles, and it can be operated on any ground, if a drain can be opened to carry away the muddy water. All the debris can be placed on the ground that has been worked. In proof of the utility of this invention, the owners point to their four years' use of it, and they stand ready to place a like contrivance for operation on any mine of good reputation, to be paid for in installments, or they will sell mine rights on reasonable terms. Writing of this invention in a recent communication, the owners say: "We think so much of it that we would not part with the use of it for half the value of the mine."
BENNETT & McINTOSH.
    Below, about one mile and a half above the junction of Coyote and Wolf creeks, are the hydraulic mines of Bennett & McIntosh, where two giants are operated. This ground is very similar to that of the Ruble Bros., save that the natural dumping facilities are good. The difficulty heretofore has been, however, lack of water. But this difficulty is being gradually overcome by the extension of ditches into the near gulches and draws.
    Besides these two larger hydraulic plants, there are a number of other claims on the creek, which are ground-sluiced during the winter.
COYOTE CREEK QUARTZ MINES.
    On this creek there are also several good quartz mines, notably the Marshall, the Sarah Bell, the Queen Ann, Little Anaconda, and the St. Lawrence--all having good strong veins. On these ledges considerable work has been done in the past, but as they are now not being operated, save the Sarah Bell, they will not be described at length. It is sufficient to say that the owners still regard them as very valuable and are careful to preserve their rights.
Galice Creek District
    This district--one of the oldest in the country--lies about 25 miles west of Grants Pass, which is the source of supplies for the district. Merlin is the nearest point on the railroad. From there a wagon road runs for six miles to Crow's ranch, where a trail covers the residue of the distance. The miners of this district have long felt the need of a wagon road in lieu of this trail, but it is only lately that any steps have been taken to have it constructed. Within a year, however, it is anticipated that this road will be built, and the importance of the mining interests of the district certainly justify the labor and expense. In this district are several good quartz, as well as hydraulic mines. We can enumerate only the most important.
ALEXANDER & BENT MINES.
    The largest, most prominent and best-equipped hydraulic mines in this district are those of Judson Bent and Adin Alexander, both of whom reside in Southern California. They are commonly called the Alexander & Bent mines. These mines are located near the junction of Galice Creek and Rogue River. They consist of 757.89 acres of gold-bearing gravel covered by United States patent. The ground covers a channel four miles in length, and is divided by the right-hand fork of Galice Creek into two separate mines, each having an independent water supply. The upper property, which is at the head of the channel, is supplied with water by a ditch, seven miles in length, from the left fork of Galice Creek. The lower property is supplied by an 8-mile ditch from the right fork of the creek and by a ¾-mile ditch from Rock Creek. The lower property is fitted up with all necessary buildings for mining. There is also a fine orchard on the property, and enough hay is raised to keep two horses and a cow. Two giants are run day and night throughout the mining season, that is, from seven to nine months in the year.
    These mines have been worked continuously for over 15 years., and there is no danger of their being "worked out" for 50 years to come. About two years ago they first came into the possession of the present owners. Before that time they were owned and operated by Frank Ennis and Tod Cameron, of Jackson County, who are popularly credited with receiving from them an annual revenue of $20,000. All things considered, it is doubtful if there are any better hydraulic mines anywhere than these. Besides the advantages already enumerated, there is a water pressure of from 335 to 500 feet and a dump which cannot be excelled. The mine is also equipped with a sawmill, which furnishes all necessary lumber. During the absence of the owners their interests are entrusted entirely to Benjamin E. Stahl, who is an old and experienced California miner. Many improvements have been made on the mine under the present owners, and the success which has so far been had is largely to be attributed to Mr. Stahl's experience and good judgment.
THE ROCKY GULCH MINE.
    It is owned and operated by an incorporated company, the chief stockholders of which are L. L. Jewell, J. W. Sherer and S. S. Prentiss, all residents of Grants Pass. The property lies just north of that of Alexander and Bent's, and is on the same old channel, high up above Rogue River, which cuts through it. The ground covers 140 acres and includes five distinct channels lying along the mountainside, one above another. This ground has been worked off and on for the past 20 years, with varying success. The present owners have done much to equip the property; a ditch several miles in extent has been built and a large reservoir constructed. With these facilities one giant can be operated for the whole year, and two giants for a part of the time. The gravel banks are not as deep as those of the Alexander & Bent mines, but it is stated that the gold is more evenly distributed.
    The other hydraulic mines in the district are Elwell & Gass, who have only recently partially equipped their property on Stratton Creek; J. Bartley, E. E. Merrill and Harmon & Green. The first named have excellent water rights, and all of them possess good dump facilities.
THE SUGAR PINE QUARTZ MINE.
    In this district are several producing quartz mines, the oldest of which is the Sugar Pine, Green or Bolt mine, and which is the property of John Bolt, of Jackson County. This is one of the oldest quartz mines in Southern Oregon, and has been worked, perhaps, more extensively than any other quartz mine in the section. There are 1,800 feet of tunnels, the longest of which is 700 feet. It lies close to the right-hand fork of Galice Creek and not far from the hydraulic mines of Alexander & Bent. The vein is in slate, stands nearly vertical, with a strike nearly north and south, and it averages in width one foot. The vein matter is white, splintery quartz, accompanied by much talc, with occasional deposits of calcspar. The metallic constituents are chiefly iron pyrites, copper pyrites and a very little galena. The sulphurets of copper and iron occasionally occur in large masses, forming [a] considerable part of the vein at the point, and these massive pyrites carry a very high percentage of gold. This property has been worked off and on for the past 30 years. The ore is treated in an arrastra and until lately no effort has been made to save the sulphurets. The ore averages probably $30 a ton.
THE LOST FLAT MINE.
    This mine is at the present time the greatest quartz producer in the district. Every few weeks a carload of ore is taken out, shipped on muleback to Crow's, thence by wagon to Merlin, and thence by rail to Ashland for treatment. During the past few months it has netted its owners, J. C. Taylor and William Crow, some $9,000 or $10,000. It takes its name from the fact that for many years the ledge could not be found, although many shafts were sunk and tunnels run to find it. These explorations were due to the fact that the surface was well covered with quartz boulders lying in red dirt. Many of these boulders and the surface quartz were treated in an arrastra built for the purpose, and the yield was good. The discovery of the ledge was mainly due to J. C. Taylor. After making numerous cuts and shafts, a small quartz seam was discovered, and this led to the discovery of three distinct parallel veins, about 150 feet apart, each about four feet in width, all three of which carry gold in paying quantities. There is much soft, oxidized ore which yields not less than $125 to the ton. In fact, much of this ore has been so rich and so easily worked that the gold has been mortared out by hand, yielding over $100 a ton by this method. It is probable that a mill for the treatment of the ores will be erected during the coming fall, at the mine.
THE GOLDEN WEDGE MINE.
    On Rogue River, about four miles below the mouth of Galice Creek, lies another group of quartz mines, the most interesting of which is the Golden Wedge mine. This mine exhibits a deposit of 700 feet of ore lying on the side of a hill to a depth of 30 inches. It is as if a ledge had stood up several hundred feet above the surface and had ultimately fallen, scattering its fragments over the ground. The owner of this interesting deposit is Henry Hutchins, an old and experienced miner. Mr. Hutchins spent much time in searching for this ledge, and it was only a few months ago that he located it. In the meantime, an arrastra has been at work on the hill deposit, and the ore has paid well. There are many thousand dollars in this deposit, and Mr. Hutchins has an assurance of many years' work before him, without counting on the lately discovered ledge.
    The other mines in the neighborhood are those of F. Duff, on Rocky Gulch, a promising ledge, not much as yet developed, and the Bybee mine, now the property of Turner & Sanders, the Galice Creek merchants. This mine has been worked off and on for 30 years and has had many vicissitudes. The present owners still regard it as valuable, and are willing to spend some money on it to determine its true worth.
THE BIG YANK.
    A striking feature of the Galice district is the Big Yank ledge, which is 250 feet wide and is to be traced for 40 miles over the country. It crosses Rogue River three miles below Galice Creek. It is a contact vein, with a slate hanging wall and hyposyenite on the footwall. The vein matter is mainly a bluish quartz colored by copper, which is plentiful, existing as copper pyrites. Assays of the quartz show from $2.00 to $36.00 per ton in gold and silver, with a small percentage of copper. This is an inviting proposition to large capitalists. For over 30 years it has attracted attention, but, as it will require considerable money to erect the necessary works, no one has as yet made any serious effort to turn this immense ledge to account.
Jumpoff Joe District
    On the upper part of this creek is the Lucky Queen mine, which was extensively worked several years ago. It has over a thousand feet of shafts and tunnels. It belonged originally to an incorporated company, which erected a 10-stamp mill, with pans, etc., and for several years endeavored to make the property pay. After spending $25,000, or more, their patience gave out in 1879, and the mine was abandoned. Afterwards it was jumped, but the new locators have never attempted to do anything with the property. The ore is base, containing a large percentage of metallic sulphides. This failure may be attributed to a selection of the wrong process for reducing the ore.
THE ESTHER.
    Another quartz mine that ran onto breakers several years ago was the Esther. This mine produced over $25,000, though the expenses were fully as much. It had a 5-stamp mill, three amalgamating pans, boiler, etc., all of which cost nearly $7,000. It is not now worked.
THE HAMMERSLEY.
    At the head of Jumpoff Joe lies a group of mines, the most prominent of which is the Hammersley. This is another wreck, though it is conceded on all sides that the fault does not lie with the mine. It has always exhibited, and still exhibits, a strong vein of high-grade ore, the values increasing with depth. But this showing has been the means of dazzling the eyes and benumbing the conscience of nearly everyone ever connected with it, with the consequence that it has been constantly in litigation and is not yet out of the hands of the courts. It was originally the property of Hammersley and others, who sold to David Goodsell, T. D. Drew and others. These put on a steam stamp mill which was afterwards changed for a 5-stamp mill of another pattern. But shortly afterwards the company became involved in litigation with the Hammersleys, who had not received all of the original purchase price, and a receiver was appointed. The property fell back into the hands of the Hammersleys, who later sold to the Hammersley Mining Company, incorporated, the principal stockholder of which was Morton Lindley. John C. Quinn was the manager. In a short time these, too, were at loggerheads; liens for labor were filed by the workmen. Jones & Otten, the Woodville merchants, attached, sold and bought it in--undertook to work it, failed and quit. This is a brief history of the mine. The underground workings consist of an inclined shaft and about 1,000 feet of drifts and tunnels. This is one of the few mines worked to a depth of 200 feet, and it refutes the statement that the ledges of Southern Oregon do not hold out with depth. The mine can now be bought for a small sum compared to its worth, and it offers a bonanza to some experienced man with a small amount of capital.
J. W. AND M. A. ROBINSON.
    On Brass Nail Gulch, a tributary of Jumpoff Joe, and about 500 yards below the Hammersley, lies the hydraulic mine of J. W. and M. A. Robinson. This is a mountain gravel deposit, covered over with a heavy flow of surface rock. The bedrock is of slate and porphyry. The mine is fitted up with one giant, a good derrick and a car for handling the rock. The ground is very rocky, and as it lies close up to the source of the creek, the piping is done almost entirely with reservoir heads. This mine was originally discovered by J. J. Holcomb, in 1891, who worked it by ground-sluicing for two years, taking out about $4,000. In 1893 J. W. Robinson, the Wimer merchant, bought a half interest and took out about $2,000. Afterwards M. A. Robinson bought out Holcomb, and a giant was put on. The sum of $1,300 was the net profit that season. The season of 1896-7 proved very unfavorable on account of the limited rainfall, yet a profit of from $600 to $800 was secured, and the cleaning up is not yet finished. The distinguishing feature of this mine is its coarse gold. Nuggets of large size have been found; one picked up weighed 13 ounces and another 9 ounces. Many have been found worth $100. With proper allowance for the shortness of the mining season, this is one of the richest mines in Southern Oregon.
SEXTON AND NIDAY.
    Just below is the placer claim of C. D. Sexton and Frank Niday, a claim which is also noted for its large nuggets and which, in other respects, is very similar to the Robinson claim. This property is better known as the "Old Wines' place." It formerly belonged to Henry Wines, an eccentric German who met a tragic death, and while in his custody yielded many a nugget which was the wonder of the country. Messrs. Sexton and Niday operate one giant under a pressure of 125 feet. They have about two miles of ditch.
BEN. TABOR & CO.
    Further down the creek are two promising quartz ledges, only one of which is now, however, being operated. The first is owned by Ben Taber & Co., and consists of a 2-foot vein of high grade, free-milling ore. The development work consists of an 85-foot shaft and a 60-foot tunnel. The ore is worked in an arrastra. The other ledge is known as the "Old Tex ledge" and is the property of Jones & Otten, the Woodville merchants.
DYCERT & MILLER.
    On Jack's Creek, a tributary of Jumpoff Joe, is the noted hydraulic mine of Jos. C. Dycert and R. F. Miller, embracing 415 acres of ground. The claim lies about one mile above the junction of the two creeks. The ground consists of black gravel and rotten wash, with red soil above. The claim is equipped with pipe and giant, has one ditch completed and another 4-mile ditch nearly so, good buildings and good flumes. This gravel is very rich and in spite of the deficiency of water has been a good producer. When the ditch now under construction shall be finished, the income derived from the mine will run up into many thousands.
PHILLIPS & CONNOLLY.
    There is another noted hydraulic mine on Jack's Creek, that of Phillips and Connolly. This claim is very similar to that of Dycert and Miller and is equipped with pipe and giant.
THE ORO FINO QUARTZ MINE.
    On the divide between Jumpoff Joe and Louse Creek are two "going" quartz mines. The first, the Oro Fino, is the property of H. C. Boynton, Fred Turner and L. L. Jewell. It exhibits a 2-foot ledge of high-grade, free-milling ore, which is treated in an arrastra and a 2-stamp mill on the ground. Considerable development work has been done, and the work is still being vigorously pushed.
REESER, TURNHAM & LYMAN.
    On the same vein is another mine, the property of C. D. Reeser, William Turnham and George Lyman. The ore is the same as that of the Oro Fino mine and is also treated in an arrastra. The development work consists of a tunnel 250 feet in length.
    The proximity of these two mines and the facilities for working them together has suggested the idea of consolidating them, and this will probably be done at no distant day.
THE BABY QUARTZ MINE.
    Another good mine on this creek is the Baby mine owned by Joseph Pollock and L. L. Jewell. The ore is high-grade and free-milling, and is operated in an arrastra. The development work consists of two tunnels--one 80 feet in length and another 100 feet in length, also a winze. The vein in the upper tunnel is about two feet in width, but in the lower tunnel it shows a width of not less than four feet. The size of these ore bodies makes the mine unusually valuable.
Louse Creek District
    At the head of this creek Hull & Beck operate a placer mine, which is equipped with one giant. The gravel is red and well filled with rocks. The banks are about 30 feet high, and the water facilities fairly good. Messrs. Hull & Beck have been operating this property for several years, and their income has been popularly estimated to be from $10,000 to $15,000.
THE JUNCTION MINE.
    Just below is the Junction mine, the property of Messrs. Younglove and Green, of Santa Cruz, Cal. This property embraces 100 acres of ground. It takes its name from the fact that it lies at the junction of the three forks of the creek, which furnish the very best water facilities. The equipment consists of pipe and giant, ditches and a large reservoir, besides quarters for the men. It was only last season that any effort was made to operate the giant. So far the energies of the company have been mainly directed towards overcoming the difficulties arising from the lack of adequate dump facilities. To overcome these difficulties a 1,200-foot flume was constructed, 900 feet of which lie underground. This engineering feat was accomplished under the direction of Captain Thos. R. Muir, who has had wide experience as a miner in the mines of California. It may be said that no mine now has better dump facilities, and it may be anticipated that Messrs. Younglove and Green will, during the next season, begin to receive handsome returns on their investment.
SEXAUER BROS.' QUARTZ MINE.
    About one mile from the Junction mine Sexauer Bros. have for several years successfully operated a quartz mine. The vein is small, but exceedingly rich. The ore is treated in an arrastra.
THE FOREST QUEEN PLACER MINE.
    On the lower part of Louse Creek is a well-equipped hydraulic mine now operated by Gen. R. G. O'Brien, of Olympia, Wash. It was formerly known as the "Lance Property," and has always been conceded to be rich. Since Gen. O'Brien secured possession of the property he has made many improvements. There are four ditches, with a capacity of 4,000 inches of water, 1,500 feet of hydraulic pipe, two giants, 1,400 feet of 4-foot flume, six houses, one barn, 100 full-bearing trees of choice fruit, a garden patch of four acres and a 10-acre pasture.
    The bank presents on top a layer of red clay; then follows a stratum of red and gray gravel, and lastly a deposit of blue and gray gravel, lying on the bedrock.
Dry Diggings District
    Opposite and on the east side of Rogue River and extending back into the hills are the noted Dry Diggings, covering 1,000 or more acres, and which have been the seat of mining operations for more than 30 years. This ground has paid from 25¢ to 30¢ per cubic yard. It is apparently a granite slide from the overhanging mountains and is fed by numerous ledges, of varying width, lying in the hills above.
    The name might imply that there is a total absence of water, but this would be erroneous. Jones Creek flows through it and furnishes in the winter considerable water, which is partly utilized.
    The most valuable part of this ground is owned by the Dry Diggings Mining Company, a close corporation, of which H. A. Corliss is manager. This company owns 400 acres of ground and also possesses the most valuable water rights. The water is, of course, taken from Jones Creek. There are three or four miles of ditch and two small reservoirs. These furnish water, under 330 feet of pressure, for about three months in the year for one giant, but an extension of the ditch for about 3½ miles--which is partly completed--will provide a sufficiency of water for about five months in the year.
    The marvel of this claim has been the number and size of the nuggets found. One of these nuggets "weighed" $308, and a number have been found approximating in value $100. Even with such a short run, the income of the company has heretofore been about $3,000. The extent and richness of this ground has stimulated inquiry as to the possibility of increasing the water supply. At the foot of it is that magnificent stream, Rogue River, with its perennial flow of water, and the suggestion has been made to secure water from it by a series of force pumps. This will require some capital, however. But it is under consideration by the Dry Diggings Company.
    About one mile above the ground of the Dry Diggings Company and on Bloody Run, Gunning & Spencer operate one giant.
    Back on Jones Creek are several promising ledges--the most important of which is that of Meade & Smith. This ledge is six feet in width and will yield $10 per ton in gold, besides the sulphurets. It has an 80-foot shaft and some drifts. The ores are treated in a Tremain mill, located on the ground, the sulphurets being shipped.
Grants Pass District
    Below Grants Pass, and on the opposite side of Rogue River from Merlin, lies a group of hydraulic mines which are just coming into active operation. These mines lie on Big Pickett and Little Pickett creeks, from which streams and their affluents the necessary water is obtained for mining. The ground subject to these streams is quite extensive and has been mined in a desultory way for 30 or more years in a primitive fashion. The two creeks obtain their name from Captain Pickett, an old pioneer, who once kept a ferry close by on the river.
    The most important of the enterprises in this neighborhood is that of the
PICKETT CREEK MINING CO.
    This is an incorporated company, and the capital invested is in part local and in part from California. This company began its work of equipment a little over a year ago, and this work is being rapidly advanced. Several miles of ditch have already been constructed, and other ditches are now being excavated. When completed the company will possess some of the richest ground in Southern Oregon, with ample pressure and water for the greater part of the year. John Alton and Geo. I. Brown are the local representatives of the company. The first named is the general manager, while Mr. Brown has solved the engineering problems. One giant only is now operated.
THE BIG FOUR MINE.
    Another important hydraulic enterprise in the same neighborhood is that of the Big Four Mining Co., also incorporated; the principal stockholders of which are T. P. Judson, Jeff Ownbey, and Morford John. One giant is operated. This ground is very similar to that of the Pickett Creek Company. The water supply is not so abundant, but is capable of further development.
OTHER MINES
in this neighborhood are those of Alfred & Delavan, and J. B. Oviatt, both partially equipped. In this region, too, are several fine copper ledges, none of which are, as yet, developed.
THE JOSEPHINE MINE.
    On the same side of the river and nearly opposite Merlin is the Josephine mine. It is the property of William Bybee, of Jacksonville, but is operated by the Josephine Mining Company, Oregon City capitalists, who have this and other mines of Mr. Bybee under a contract of purchase. One giant is used. The ground lies right on the bank of Rogue River and the dump is into that stream. This is an old mine and has always paid well. The present lessees express themselves well satisfied with the returns of last season's operations, although the run was a short one.
SNOWGOOSE BROS. & TREFREN.
    This is a new enterprise, and the description of it is taken from the Oregon Mining Journal of June 19th:
    Messrs. Snowgoose Bros. and Trefren, of Ashland, have just started an enterprise on a low river bar, about 14 miles below Grants Plass, which is deserving of some consideration. This bar is about nine feet below the present river bed. The ground will run from 75 cents to $3 a cubic yard. However, the gold is very fine, and the difficulty heretofore met with has been the inability of saving this gold and at the same time handling enough dirt to make the enterprise profitable. Besides, there is about 20 feet of sand on the top of this pay gravel. Another obstacle has been the lack of dump and also the lack of water. To obviate these difficulties it is proposed to put in an engine, boiler and pump, which will be used in pumping water from the river into the sluiceboxes. A hoist consisting of a cable attached to a large scoop and running around a reel attached to the engine is operated by the engine, one man being required to handle the scoop. It is proposed to move the surface sand with a hose attached to the pump. The gravel will then be scooped into the sluiceboxes. It is claimed that by this apparatus from 600 to 700 cubic yards of gravel can be handled every 24 hours. Grizzlies will be put into the sluiceboxes. These grizzlies will be about 18 inches in width and eight feet long. With these the sand will be separated from the gravel, the former passing into one sluicebox and the gravel into another. This sand, it should be remembered, is the black magnetic iron so common along the river. It is, as a rule, heavier than the gold, and unless some process be devised for separating the gold from it, the sand will pack so hard that the gold will run over it and be lost. To obviate this difficulty, a device consisting of a series of perforated silver plates, placed at different angles in the boxes, has been made use of. It is claimed that no gold can pass over or through these plates without coming in contact with the quicksilver. This device is an invention of Snowgoose Bros. and is protected by patent. It has been experimented with sufficiently to demonstrate its practicability. Considering that there are billions of tons of this gold-bearing black sand on Rogue and other rivers, the enterprise just inaugurated will be watched with great interest, as it offers a method of not only saving the fine gold, but of handling and disposing of the gravel on a large scale. The machinery for this plant has been brought from the Risdon Iron Works, of San Francisco, and will be erected under the supervision of J. O. Rusby, of that company.
THE JEWETT QUARTZ MINE.
    This is one of the earliest discovered quartz mines in Southern Oregon. It was first located in 1861, and it has been worked off and on ever since. It has produced a large amount of ore, which has generally been found in kidneys. This fact accounts for the spasmodic manner in which the mine has been worked. After a kidney was worked out the owners would conclude that the ore was exhausted and would abandon the mine, when someone with new hopes and more energy would assume control and discover another kidney. The first owners, the Jewett Bros., who were among the first Rogue River ferrymen, made several thousand dollars out of the surface workings. Afterwards, they ran a tunnel and struck what has been termed the "big chamber." This was a large kidney of ore, which is popularly estimated to have yielded not less than $50,000. The property now belongs to Geo. W. Dornin. Mr. Dornin is an old Nevada and California assayer and smelterer. He brought to the mine a practical knowledge of mining and ore treatment which it never before possessed. Considerable exploration has been done by him. The ground under the "big chamber" has been opened, exhibiting a large body of ore worth about $15 a ton, besides running high in gold-bearing sulphurets. These developments justified the discarding [of] the old Huntington mill long in use at the mine and the purchase of a new 5-stamp mill, with concentrator attachments, and this mill is now in successful operation, with ore enough in sight to keep the mill occupied for many months. This mine lies about four miles south of Grants Pass and on the west side of Old Baldy, at an altitude of about 2,000 feet.
THE MOUNTAIN EAGLE QUARTZ MINE.
    On the north side of Old Baldy, on a gulch running into Green's Creek, lies the Mountain Eagle mine, which is very similar in many respects to the Jewett mine. It, too, is a very old mine. Since its first location in 1860 it has passed through many hands and at times was entirely abandoned. Like the Jewett mine, the ore has been found mainly in kidneys, and the mine has at various times yielded a large amount of gold. The present owners are W. I. Dowell and W. P. Belding. The latter, like Mr. Dornin, is an old and experienced mill man and miner. The new development work has been systematically pursued. A tunnel has been run into the mountain some distance below the old workings, and considerable ore of a good quality has been exposed. As a result of this development, the owners have only lately placed a mill on the property. This is now running, and there is enough ore in sight to warrant the statement that the owners will find the venture profitable.
CAMERON AND PAIRAN.
    Another quartz mine on Green's Creek is that of Cameron and Pairan, which joins the Mountain Eagle. This is a new discovery, comparatively, but the development work has disclosed a good-sized vein of high-grade ore. This ore is being shipped for treatment.
THE CAMPBELL & GOULD HYDRAULIC.
    In the same neighborhood, on Green's Creek, is situated the hydraulic plant of Campbell & Gould, who are residents of Portland and men of some means. Under their management, a reservoir with a capacity of several million gallons of water has been constructed at a point about a mile above the workings. This gives a pressure of about 200 feet for several months in the year. An old channel is being worked, and as the work has been done in a very cautious and miner-like manner, the enterprise will doubtless meet with success.
THE BAYLOR & ILIFF PUMPING PLANT.
    On Rogue River, nearly opposite, is the hydraulic pumping plant of Baylor & Iliff, known as the Gold Bug mine. This enterprise was inaugurated in its present form some six months ago. It was preceded by a smaller plant operated by Mr. Iliff and Major C. Newell, of Portland. This proved such a success that the present large plant was established. Both enterprises were suggested by the auriferous nature of the lands lying on both sides of the river. The plant consists of two pumps-a No. 12 centrifugal pump, and a Gardner force pump, with an 18-inch steam cylinder, 12-inch stroke, 14-inch water cylinder, 12-inch stroke, 12-inch suction pipe and a 10-inch discharge. It is operated by a direct application of the steam from the boiler. It throws 200 inches of water under a pressure of 150 feet. The centrifugal pump with the application of 35 horsepower raises 500 inches of water to an elevation of 30 feet, which is used for a sluice-head. This pump has two 10-inch suction pipes and one 15-inch discharge pipe. The pumps are operated by two 80-horse power boilers. The Gardner pump has a capacity of 65 horsepower. The centrifugal pump has a capacity, with its engine, of 110 horsepower. So far, only 45 horsepower has been used on the centrifugal pump and 35 horsepower on the Gardner pump.
    Messrs. Baylor & Iliff are pioneers in this class of mining in this section, and the success they have had has already stimulated the placing of a similar plant higher up on the river.
    No enterprise established in Southern Oregon promises more for the development of the country than this. Its significance lies in the fact that it has been demonstrated that the banks along Rogue River can be thus profitably worked. With continued success many similar plants will unquestionably be established on the banks of the river and its tributaries.
Williams District
    This district lies about 20 miles south of Grants Pass. Williams Valley is a broad and beautiful valley, interspersed with beautiful farms. Numerous quartz mines are found in the hills on each side and there are several good hydraulic mines.
JACK LAYTON'S MINES.
    Jack Layton, one of the oldest and most successful of Southern Oregon miners, has two mines in this section, out of which he gets an income estimated at from $15,000 to $30,000. The first lies on Bamboo Gulch, a tributary of Williams Creek. At this point he possesses 80 acres of rich, red gravel and operates one giant for ten months in the year. Across the ridge, about two miles distant, lies the other mine. It is on Farris Gulch, which puts in to the Applegate. In this gulch Mr. Layton possesses 400 acres of red gravel, running up the creek, and which is from ten to thirty feet deep. Both of these mines are operated with water from Williams Creek, by means of two ditches, 13 and 22 miles, respectively, in length. The Farris Gulch mine is also equipped with a large reservoir, and two giants are operated. This reservoir covers three acres and is enclosed by walls 50 feet high. This mine has been operated for the past 25 years, and it is not likely to be worked out in half a century.
C. H. STRATTON.
    On Munger Gulch, which puts into Williams Creek, C. H. Stratton is operating one giant on a high bar. Water is obtained from the ditches of Jack Layton. Mr. Stratton is a Portland man and the season just closed was his second in operating the mine.
ALEX. WATTS.
    On Horsehead Creek, which also puts into Williams Creek, Alex. Watts, another pioneer miner, operates one giant. He has 160 acres of ground and two ditches, six miles and two miles, respectively, in length, which afford a pressure of about 100 feet for the usual mining season. This ground has been mined for over 30 years.
MORRIS, SHARP BROS. & HOSLER
    On Powell Creek, another tributary, is the hydraulic mine of I. S. Morris, L. L. Sharp, J. E. Sharp and M. A. Hosler. Powell Creek is a stream six miles in length. It was worked many years ago near the mouth, but the bars being wide and deep it was not extensively worked. About six years ago I. S. Morris began to work the ground at a point about three miles above the mouth. He found it rich, with only from two to five feet of gravel. From that time there were many men working on the creek, each owning a small piece of ground. But this fact operated against an advantageous use of the water and the ground, and it led to the purchase of nearly all these small claims by the present company. This company now own over 200 acres of ground in one body, and the bulk of the water. They have equipped it with pipe and giant and a derrick for moving the boulders. With this equipment, large returns may be expected for many years to come, for the ground is so rich that it paid $5.00 a day to the man, on an average, during the mining season, with pick and shovel. The gold is coarse. Nuggets "weighing" from $2 to $15 are frequently found, and some have been picked up worth from $20 to $85.
KIESSLING AND KREMER.
    On Horsehead Creek, above the claims of Alex Watts, is the mine of E. H. Kiessling and Dr. W. J. Kremer. One giant is operated from a short ditch, with a 50-foot pressure. The need of this mine has been a more abundant water supply, and the owners are now preparing to secure this by means of a new ditch from Powell Creek.
THE RISING STAR.
    On the right-hand side of Horsehead is the Rising Star quartz mine, the property of S. Messinger & Sons. The vein is from 12 to 15 feet in width. All the upper surface for a distance of 700 feet and to a depth of 60 feet has been worked out. This space enclosed all the free-milling ore, and the vein now contains only sulphurets, which average $15 to $20 per ton. The free-milling ore yielded from $10 to $20 per ton.
THE ECCENTRIC.
    One half mile above, on the left-hand side of the gulch, is the Eccentric mine, owned by William Fitzpatrick and J. P. Anderson. This mine has been in operation for the past two years. It shows a fair-sized vein carrying free-milling ore worth about $35.00 a ton. The development work consists of a tunnel 255 feet in length, running along the ledge. About one mile below is the Anderson mill--a 5-stamp mill operated by water power--where the ores are treated.
THE TIPTOP.
    On the divide between Powell and Horsehead creeks lies the Tiptop mine, also owned by S. Messenger & Sons. This shows a 13-foot ledge of free-milling ore, running from $5 to $7 per ton. The development consists of a tunnel 150 feet in length, running along the ledge. This mine lies on the top of the mountain, and its development is retarded by the lack of a road to reach it.
THE IONE.
    On the same mountain, but considerably lower, is the Ione mine, the property of E. N. Provolt. The ledge varies from 18 inches to four feet, and the ore, which is free-milling, runs from $10 to $25 per ton. The development consists of a tunnel 150 feet in length and a shaft 75 feet in depth.
THE MOUNTAIN KING MINE.
    On the north side of Powell Creek is the Mountain King mine owned by a company from Eugene, Or. The ledge varies from 18 inches to 36 inches in width, and the ore runs from $50 to $80 per ton. At the present time the ore is being milled at the Mountain Lion mill, four miles distant, but the company expects to erect their own mill shortly.
THE BONE OF CONTENTION AND LITTLE FRITZ.
    These mines are located on the same ledge on the east side of Williams Valley. So also are the Rosebud and Gold Bug claims. Considerable development work has been done on all these mines. The Bone of Contention has a 400-foot tunnel. The ledge is from 24 inches to 48 inches in width, and the ore runs from $5 to $15 per ton. Close at hand is the Bone of Contention mill, an 8-stamp mill operated by water power. Neither the mill nor any of these mines are now in operation.
THE OREGON BONANZA CO.
    This company is incorporated under the laws of Oregon. C. A. Macomber, of San Francisco, is the president and general manager. The company has three mines located on the mountain between Powell and Horsehead creeks--one of which, the Oregon Bonanza, has produced a large amount of gold. The milling has been done in part at the Bone of Contention mill, and in part at the Anderson mill. The vein has been of varying width--at times as narrow as six inches and again as wide as three feet. All the ore in the upper levels was free-milling and in places enormously rich. In the lower levels sulphurets were struck. This property has been well equipped with shaft houses, ore bins, blacksmith shop and houses for the men, and the work of development under the direction of John King, who is also a stockholder in the company, has been done in a systematic manner.
THE HIDDEN TREASURE.
    Close to the Oregon Bonanza is the Hidden Treasure, the property of the same company. This is a wide ledge of low-grade ore and it cuts the vein in the Oregon Bonanza diagonally. This ledge has not been as yet much developed, but from its size and strength much is expected of it.
THE ECLIPSE.
    The last of the properties of this company is the Eclipse, which lies on the Powell Creek side of the mountain. This is considered the most valuable of the possessions of the company. The vein has been wider and stronger than that of the Oregon Bonanza and, if anything, richer. These three claims are undoubtedly among the best in the Williams district, and they will undoubtedly do much to enhance the reputation of the mines in that section. It is the intention of Mr. Macomber to erect a mill at an early date.
THE EXCHEQUER QUARTZ MINE.
    In the Williams district and about 12 miles south of Grants Pass is a group of mines which deserves particular mention. Of these perhaps the most important is the Exchequer, which is the property of Dr. W. H. Flanagan, of Grants Pass. This is a well-defined ledge showing at the present time from two to five feet of ore in the bottom of the shafts. The ledge will average two feet of solid ore. The development consists of several shafts--the largest being 160 feet in length. There is also 700 feet of tunneling. This mine presents the usual characteristics of the mines in the district, that is to say, the ore in the upper levels is free-milling while in the lower levels the gold values are contained in the sulphurets. These sulphurets will average $200 a ton. On the Exchequer ground is another good, strong vein running parallel with the main ledge and lying about 50 feet north. This has been opened up for a distance of 100 feet and runs about $5.50 in free gold.
THE ANACONDA.
    Close to the Exchequer is the Anaconda, another strong ledge. It is the property of A. C. Tayler, of Grants Pass. This ledge has had considerable development work done upon it. The ore in the upper levels was free-milling, but the values now lie in the sulphurets. The ledge varies from 12 inches to 36 inches in width. The development consists of one 80-foot shaft and several hundred feet of drifts.
THE FIDELITY.
    Another partially developed mine in the same group is the Fidelity, the property of Sharp Bros., of Powell Creek. The ledge is very similar to those of the Exchequer and Anaconda, and the ore hardly differs in any respect.
    This group of quartz mines presents an inviting proposition to any experienced mining man with some capital. If consolidated and worked under one plan, they would furnish an unlimited amount of ore. This ore can be handled at a very small cost, and the proximity to the Applegate will permit of excellent water power. However, the sulphurets are hardly rich enough to ship, and before the ore can be profitably mined there must be a reduction in the existing transportation and smelter charges, or else the erection of a plant for treatment on the ground.
Missouri Flat District
    West of the Applegate is found a group of mines, some quartz and others placer, which have yielded considerable gold.
THE MOUNTAIN LION.
    The most prominent of these mines is the Mountain Lion--a quartz ledge, on which considerable work has been done. It is the property of Bailey & Co. It was first discovered in 1887, after which it was worked for several years, yielding in an arrastra some $12,000. It has several shafts and many hundred feet of drifts. The owners are also possessed of a 5-stamp mill, with a Woodbury concentrator, run by steam power, with which they treat their ores.
    Bailey & Co. are also possessed of other mines in the same neighborhood--the Big Mountain mine and the Homestake--neither of which has so far been extensively developed. Of these two the last named is as yet a mere prospect, though a most promising one. It has a 70-foot tunnel, which shows a ledge varying in width from three feet to seven feet. The ore runs about $15 in free gold and sulphurets.
THE BLACK POCKET MINE.
    Another quartz mine on Missouri Flat is the Black Pocket mine, the property of L. L. Jewell, Carty Davidson and Jay Davidson. The pay streak is quite small. The gold occurs in scales and flakes and occasionally in sheets. At one time $2,700 was taken out of a small place, and this was done with a pan only.
MILLER AND SAVAGE.
    On Miller Creek, which flows into the Applegate, is the hydraulic mine of Fred Miller and Lincoln Savage. This property was equipped with a giant about two years ago, and it has paid its owners fairly well. They have 60 acres of ground.
DAVIDSON BROS.
    Another placer on Missouri Flat equipped with pipe and giant is that of Davidson Bros. This property is also on Miller Creek.
LEW HANSON.
    On the same creek Lew Hanson also has a hydraulic plant, but no giant. All this ground was mined for years by ground-sluicing, and it paid so well that the owners felt encouraged to put in larger plants.
On Oscar Creek
    This creek is also a tributary of the Applegate. It lies just ten miles south of Grants Pass. The creek is only a short one, but it is remarkable for its large nuggets. The great drawback is lack of water, and unfortunately it is so situated that a sufficiency cannot be had without a large expenditure of money. The important mine on this creek is the Treasure Trove, the property of Frank Hayes, L. L. Jewell and Dr. J. S. Moore. It is situated close to the source of the creek. Out of this ground some noteworthy nuggets have been taken within the last few months. These nuggets run from two to twenty ounces, and the gravel will yield about 30 cents per cubic yard. In the short time the mine has been operated by the present owners it has yielded from $5,000 to $10,000. In view of the fact that the run is limited to a few months in the year, this is an excellent showing. The equipment consists of a reservoir, constructed last year, 250 feet of pipe, and one giant. Frank Hayes is the manager. Mr. Hayes is an excellent miner, and all the work done testifies to his skill.
The Kerby District
    This district contains a good number of hydraulic mines and several quartz ledges, now being developed.
    On the north fork of
Canyon Creek
is a hydraulic mine owned by J. F. Stith, of Kerby, and lately operated under lease. It is equipped with a No. 2 giant and has a mile-and-a-half ditch. The gravel is red and from 4 to 12 feet deep. The water facilities are good for six months.
THE BYBEE MINE.
    About three miles below is the Bybee mine, another of the mines under contract of sale to the Josephine Mining Co., which operated it during the last season with satisfactory results, under the management of A. N. Ashley. This claim was formerly owned by H. Wittrock, who secured from it, as claimed, $10,000 before he sold it. It has been worked off and on for many years. The present company has made great improvements upon it, rebuilt the old ditch and put in 1,000 feet of 6-foot flume. It now controls nearly all the water of the creek. It is said that the company last year took out with pick and shovel enough gold to cover the cost of erecting this flume. The claim has, also, 2½ miles of ditch, with a pressure of 375 feet, two giants, and a hand derrick, with a 60-foot boom.
THE HAVILAND CLAIM.
    At the junction of Canyon and Josephine creeks is the Haviland claim, owned by Nauke & Stith. This claim is equipped with one No. 3 giant and has a pressure of 280 feet. It was operated last season under lease by Jack Fox.
On Josephine Creek
    About one mile below, on Josephine Creek, is a ground-sluicing claim owned by Kerby parties. This claim embraces a high channel and is noted for its coarse gold, many ounce-nuggets having been found. Plenty of water can be had at a comparatively small expense for operating a giant.
YOKUM BAR.
    On the right-hand side, a short distance below, is a claim lately equipped by J. F. Stith. It has a 2½-mile ditch and one giant. However, with the present facilities the water is scarce.
THE CHINESE GULCH.
    A mile and a quarter below is the Chinese Gulch claim, the property of Frank Dessenger, but operated last season by C. E. Tebbs & Co., of San Francisco, under a bond for purchase. This claim was only equipped last fall. It has two miles of new ditch, 2,000 feet of pipe, two No. 3 giants and bunk houses. This claim shows coarse gold on bedrock.
ALEX. WATTS.
    On a high channel just below Alex. Watts has a claim also equipped with pipe and giant. This claim was operated during the last season by W. Raimy.
THE MUD FLAT CLAIM.
    One mile below is the Mud Flat claim owned and operated by William Lyttle and William Ghores. It is equipped with pipe and giant, and has two miles of ditch, with a pressure of 180 feet. It has been worked for two seasons.
MORRISON & SONS.
    Just opposite is another claim only opened last season. It is the property of Morrison & Sons and is equipped with pipe and giant. The water is scarce, but the owners are reported to have made last season more money than any other person or company on the creek. It is noteworthy that this claim lies just below the Free and Easy quartz mine, described below.
PORTER AND HUNT.
    Another claim only equipped last season is that of Porter & Hunt, lying 1¼ miles below. The gold is coarse.
GASTON & CLARK.
    Opposite is the ground-sluicing claim of Gaston & Clark, two old and experienced miners. They operate by ground-sluicing.
Illinois District
    At the mouth of Josephine Creek is the claim of Ray & Dalton, also equipped with pipe and giant. Both the owners are Californians. At the present time the water facilities are very limited; however, a ditch has been lately surveyed to bring in water from Sucker Creek, 18 miles, which, when completed, will give an ample supply. An application has also been made for patents to the ground.
COW FLAT MINE.
    One mile below is the Cow Flat mine, owned by Mr. Hopkins and operated during the last season by Geo. Bour and others. It consists of a low bar of gray gravel, which yields handsomely of fine gold. It is equipped with one giant. The water facilities are good, but the dump is deficient. This it is proposed to obviate with an elevator next season.
H. S. WOODCOCK & SON.
    Opposite is the mine of H. S. Woodcock & Son. It also consists of a low bar of gray gravel. This mine was first operated last season, and it is reported that the owners took out $850 in less than four months' run with one giant. Here also the dump is defective.
On Tennessee Gulch
is a quartz mine owned by Samuel White, Sr., and James Davison. This consists of a large porphyry dyke carrying free gold in the upper workings and sulphurets in the lower levels. The ore is treated in an arrastra, and it is believed that the owners are doing quite well.
THE FREE AND EASY.
    About two miles west of Kerby lies the Free and Easy, another quartz mine, owned by J. F. Stith and others, but for some time operated by A. W. Fox and others under a bond for purchase. This is a wide ledge, having many of the characteristics of the ledge on Tennessee Gulch. It is believed that the ore will run about $5 in free gold, besides the sulphurets. Considerable development work has been done upon the mine, and the indications are that it will prove a permanent, paying investment.
Lower Illinois District
    This district is a comparatively new one and it shows great activity. It covers the Illinois and its tributaries from the mouth of Deer Creek to the junction of the river with Rogue River.
Below Deer Creek
one finds several low bars being worked by ground sluicing. There are still a few undeveloped bars in that section which would pay under the giant.
FRANK BURNS & SONS.
    At the mouth of Six-Mile Creek is a hydraulic mine opened up last fall by Burns & Sons. The ground lies about 300 feet above the Illinois and has a splendid dump. It is equipped with pipe and one giant.
AT DORRS' RANCH
James McGuire has for several seasons mined on a low bar with very inadequate facilities--a small pipe and hose--yet the returns have been very satisfactory.
THE SPRING BAR CO.
operates a mine below on a high bar of the river. It has three claims, which are equipped with pipe and giant.
THE HORN-SILSBY MINE.
    On a high bar of the Illinois, just above Briggs Creek, is the hydraulic mine of W. F. Horn, A. W. Silsby and others. This mine was only equipped last season and is still in active operation. Sufficient work has not yet been done to determine by pipe tests the full value of the ground, but such tests have been made by panning and the sinking of shafts to satisfy everyone that the owners have a remarkably rich piece of ground. The mine has, also, great advantages in an all-the-year-round supply of water and the best of dumping facilities. One giant is at present operated.
PANTHER GULCH CO.
    Another mine just being opened up is that of the Panther Gulch Mining Co., owned and operated by George B. Ward and Oregon City parties. It is equipped with pipe and giant.
NELSON & RILEY.
    On the left bank of the Illinois, Nelson & Riley have been mining for some time. They are now preparing to put in a large flume, by which they will divert the waters of the river and secure an ample water supply.
THE WAXAHATCHIE MINE.
    This is a hydraulic property owned by C. L. Mangum, William Stock, Joseph Wolke and other residents of Grants Pass. It was only equipped with pipe and giant last season. The water facilities are excellent and the ground very rich.
Upper Briggs Creek
    On the upper part of this creek there are a large number of men ground sluicing, but who contemplate putting in hydraulic plants in a short time. Among them are Nassett & Son, M. Davis, Clum Bros., Charles Swartum, Bennett & Wilson, Block & Casmy, A. L. Henson, and Louark & Co.
BRIGGS VALLEY MINING CO.
    On this creek the Briggs Valley Mining Co. operates one giant. The company has about 200 acres of a high channel, and a 2½-mile ditch gives 170 feet of pressure for one giant during the mining season. The gravel is red and blue and contains some cement.
THE WOODCOCK MINE.
    At the mouth of Red Dog Creek is another hydraulic mine operated by Mr. Woodcock with one giant. All the facilities for mining are good.
THE COPPER MINES.
    The conspicuous feature of this district are the copper mines owned and operated by the Siskiyou Mining Co., a Maryland corporation. This company obtained control of these mines some two years ago, through Captain A. M. Brown. A smelter was erected and considerable development work done. The company met, however, considerable bad luck; the first season the expensive bridge built across the Illinois was taken out by the high water--just at the beginning of winter--and for many months the mine was shut down on account of the inability to get supplies in. Next year the early advent of the rainy season stopped operations, and finally after some $15,000 worth of ore had been extracted a receiver was appointed by the circuit court. At this writing, however, arrangements have been made for a resumption of work under a guarantee of ample capital advanced by Pittsburgh capitalists, and it is confidently anticipated that in a short time the receiver will be discharged and the work on the mine prosecuted with intelligent vigor. The mines are located on Falls Creek, just above its entrance into the Illinois, and all the facilities for mining exist in abundance, wood, water and mill site. It is generally conceded that there is a great deal of high-grade ore in these mines. The ore is found, however, in serpentine and has been found so far quite bunchy. Under the new management it is anticipated that the extent and character of the ore bodies will be promptly ascertained by intelligent explorations, and if these anticipations should be verified a large reduction plant will be constructed, a road--perhaps a railroad--built to Chetco Bay, on the coast, whence all shipments in and out will be made by sea. The mines are 37 miles from Grants Pass and about an equal distance from the sea.
THE DENVER CITY LEDGE.
    On Soldier Creek is a ledge which has attracted a great deal of attention on account of its width and the richness of the ore. It is the property of W. H. Miller. This ledge shows a face about 30 feet wide, with a rich pay streak about two feet in width abutting against one of the walls. So far very little work has been done upon it, but it has been traced for several hundred feet up the mountainside. The owner is an eccentric character, who has a very high idea of the value of his discovery, and although its apparent great value has attracted many mining men from all quarters, no one has as yet been able to make satisfactory terms with him. Meantime he sits with a mortar and pestle, and secures all the gold necessary for his maintenance, seemingly determined to wait until someone comes who will be willing to take the mine on his terms.
Sucker Creek District
    Sucker Creek is another tributary of the Illinois River. Like the Althouse it has its source in the Siskiyou Mountains. Between California Bar, which stands at the mouth of Sucker Creek Canyon and nine miles above the mouth of the creek, and the Illinois is a valley from two to four miles wide, studded with beautiful farms. This is an ideal farming country, but the whole valley is also good for mining. This fact is so well recognized that it is reported that some Oakland capitalists have been for the past year endeavoring to get control of the farms, with a view of subjecting them to the pipe and giant.
KEATON AND DEAN BROS.
    Above California Bar Keaton & Dean Bros. have the lowest mining claim of importance. This ground has been mined for the past six years. It embraces about 60 acres, including an upper channel. A No. 1 giant is used. The ground has a good dump, but its water facilities are limited. It produces coarse as well as fine gold.
J. B. CARR.
    Above and partly running into Anderson Gulch is the 120-acre claim of J. B. Carr, which is also equipped with a hydraulic plant. This claim produces much coarse gold, and at one time a nugget weighing $365 was picked up on the ground. This gold is supposed to have come from Anderson Gulch. The mine has a splendid dump, but the water facilities are at present limited.
HENRY BENCKE.
    The next claim is that of Henry Bencke. This embraces 40 acres and lies one and a half miles above. It also includes an old upper channel. This ground has proven itself to be quite rich. The mining at present is carried on with a pipe and hose.
R. C. TURNER.
    At the mouth of Boland Creek, another noted stream, is the claim of R. C. Turner. This claim has a good dump, but it is only ground-sluiced at present.
A. J. SMITH & CO.
    This claim embraces 100 acres of ground. Mining is carried on at present only by ground-sluicing, but the ground can be easily made subject to pipe and giant. There are good water rights appurtenant, and a 3-mile ditch will furnish water all the year round at a pressure of 200 feet for a No. 4 giant. This claim embraces also an old upper channel and it is considered quite rich.
CAMERON & GUILD.
    J. C. Cameron and George Guild have 80 acres on the same upper channel. The ground is equipped with pipe and a No. 2 giant. There is a 30-foot dump. The water facilities are good. They include two ditches--one out of Grizzly Gulch and another ont of Spring Gulch--which furnish water for four or five months in the year.
GEORGE BENSON.
    On Tennant Gulch, George Benson has 40 acres of good ground. He has a good dump and water for about six months in the year. This ground will be equipped with pipe and giant during the coming season.
TOM FENTON,
on Boland Creek, a tributary of Sucker Creek, has some rich ground, which has heretofore been worked by drifting. It is generally understood that even by this primitive method of mining the claim has paid from $2.50 to $3 a day per man.
ULM AND REESE BROS.
    Another piece of rich ground on Boland Creek is that of Ulm and Reese Bros. This is also an old upper channel. It has been so far mined only by ground-sluicing.
CHARLIE YEAGER.
    On a back channel of Boland Creek, Charlie Yeager is mining by ground-sluicing. This ground is deemed to be very rich. In early mining times a $900 nugget was picked up on the claim.
JAKE KLIPPEL.
    On McDonald Gulch is a piece of ground, the property of Jake Klippel, which is notoriously rich. Within its confines, in early times, a $1,600 nugget was picked up, and on another occasion a boulder was unearthed which yielded $1,100. It was only last summer that Mr. Klippel himself picked up a nugget valued at $157. The claim is equipped with pipe and giant. McDonald Gulch is a very small affair in itself--just large enough to embrace three 20-acre claims--but it is a matter of current knowledge that in early times it increased the gold output to the extent of $3,000,000.
FITZSIMMONS & CO.
    On Democrat Gulch, another tributary, Fitzsimmons & Co., representing San Francisco capital, have 40 acres of ground. This claim was equipped with pipe and giant for the first time last season. The claim has a good dump and good water facilities for about six months in the year.
ALLEN HIGH.
    There are two quartz ledges in this district that are well worthy of attention. The first is the property of Allen High and lies on the ridge between Deadhorse and Silver gulches. This is an 8-foot ledge, carrying copper and silver. It is as yet but little developed.
A. J. SMITH & CO.
    On McDonald Gulch, just above the claim of Jake Klippel, is the quartz claim of A. J. Smith & Co. This is a ledge of large dimensions, carrying gold, silver and copper in large quantities. The formation is porphyry and syenite. The development consists of a shaft 25 feet in depth and a tunnel 35 feet in length, run from a point 140 feet above the creek. There are many reasons to think that this ledge has been the feeder of the rich claims below on the creek and the source of the large nuggets found, as before noted, on the Klippel claims.
Althouse District
    The Althouse is a tributary of the Illinois and has its source high up in the Siskiyou Mountains. A stranger going into this old camp today and seeing the miles of rock piles and boulders might conclude, if he knew nothing about mining, that the creek had been struck by a cyclone. If a mining man, he might conclude that the country was worked out. But this would be an erroneous impression. Many of the old pioneers themselves are "worked out" or have passed away, but the fountainhead and feeders of all this vast district, from the summit of the Siskiyous to the Illinois River, a distance of over 20 miles, are still hidden in the mountains and hills.
THE HANSEN CLAIM.
    The lowest worked claim on the creek is the Hansen hydraulic claim. This consists of 320 acres of ground, which is good for either mining or farming. As far back as 1862 the owners of this ground attempted to open it up for mining by constructing a tunnel from Democratic Gulch through the dividing ridge. They found good pay, but the works caved in upon their flume, which so discouraged them that they have never resumed work upon it. However, the richness of the ground and the facilities for mining have lately attracted the attention of outside capitalists, and the chances are good for a resumption of work upon the claim.
L. LEONARD.
    Adjoining the Hansen claim is that of L. Leonard, embracing some 60 acres. This ground was also worked for a while through a tunnel made on the Hansen claim. But the owners made the mistake of running it too high and it was not a success, although there is some good pay in the creek bed.
THE FORBES GROUND.
    Continuing up the creek, one finds the major part of the foothills worked until is reached the Forbes ditch and flume, which crosses the creek from east to west.
THE ALTHOUSE MINING CO.
    This company owns claims both above and below the Forbes ground. The latter is the property of Clem & Co. These two companies have lately consolidated their claims, so that they now possess 380 acres of ground, extending up the creek and on the hillsides. An abundance of water for nearly all of the year is obtained by means of a ditch and flume from the main creek. These claims have long been known as the Gold Lead and Slug Bar.
THE ENTERPRISE COMPANY.
    Up Walker Gulch, on the east, just below where the town of Browntown once stood, is the property of the Enterprise Company. This consists of a quartz claim and a mill site. The claim embraces two veins. The larger of these veins contains an 180-foot tunnel and one or more shafts. There is also an 80-foot cross tunnel. Only one wall has been found of' this ledge. Further south is another tunnel 160 feet in length. This tunnel exposes quartz the entire distance. The ore thus exposed is not high grade, but it is free-milling. At the present time a new tunnel is being opened, which is already in over 100 feet. This is designed to intersect the ledge. This, when completed, will afford from 250 to 300 feet of "backs" with a large vein to stope on.
DONEY BROS.
    Continuing up the creek one passes much ground which has never yet been prospected. At Grass Flat, some time ago, Doney Bros. put in a 400-foot bedrock flume, but they failed to find the pay channel they were seeking.
OTHER CLAIMS BEING WORKED.
    Next above Grass Flat is the ground of the Morie Co. This property is just being opened up. Still farther above is the ground of Riggs & Russ, where an attempt is being made to work the cement on the old Hansen hydraulic claim.
CHARLIE DECKER.
    Above the forks of the creek is the Charlie Decker mine, which is being worked with pipe and giant, water being secured from the Trimby ditch, on the south side of the East Fork.
THE TACOMA OR SISKIYOU CO.
    Passing by the claims of Roderigo Marteen, Asterman and Schofield, on the right-hand fork of the creek, where some good piping ground is seen, one reaches the claim of Frank Housted, on Iron Gulch, which puts into the East Fork. Several men are employed at this mine. The next claim is that of the Tacoma or Siskiyou Mining Company. This claim is equipped with pipe and giant. However, the claim is located so high up the creek that the water supply is very limited. Some five men have been given employment.
THE SUMMIT MINE.
    On the mountain ridge dividing Oregon from California is the Summit quartz mine, the property of J. H. Weston. This is a tunnel location. On the apex of this mountain is the Griffin ledge, a small but very rich vein which has been worked, when the snow would permit, for years, the ore being treated in an arrastra. The existence of this vein suggested to Mr. Weston the idea of his tunnel location. This was made somewhat over a year ago. A tunnel, well down towards the base of the mountain, was run in to a distance of about 450 feet, when a 10-foot ledge of sulphurets was struck. How high these sulphurets run is as yet only a matter of conjecture. Mr. Weston, is, however, confident that he has a bonanza. The formation and other conditions are very similar to those surrounding the mother lode of California, and this fact gives an appearance of permanency to the discovery. Another significant feature of this discovery is that it discloses that large, well-defined gold-bearing ledges are to be found by sinking to greater depths than is customary in Southern Oregon.
Waldo District
    In the south end of the county also is the Waldo district, which has not many, but several, very noted and highly productive hydraulic mines. These mines are all on the upper Illinois or its tributaries.
WIMER BROS. & CO.'S MINE.
    Twenty years ago ground was first broken on the outlet race to the Wimer mine. This year it has been completed. This race is 1⅓ miles long and 60 feet deep. It runs through low hills and heavy timber and has a 268-foot tunnel through bedrock. The work has cost over $100,000. This opening is the natural outlet to all the famous deep and rich gravel deposits in the Waldo district.
    The company owns 400 acres of mining ground, which, it may be truthfully said, "prospects" from the grass roots to the bedrock, and this being the lowest place in the camp contains probably 2,000 acres more of mineral land. The water supply consists of two ditches, each having head boxes 4x6 feet, one being two miles long, the other, when completed, to be about 3¾ miles long, and affording an abundance of water for mining purpose for at least nine months in each year. This mine is equipped with four giants, three locomotive headlights, 8,000 feet of pipe, ranging in size from 11 to 60 inches in diameter, the major part of which is from 17 to 22 inches. There are also over 3,000 feet of 4x5 outlet flume. This mine is worked at least 11 months in each year, employing about a dozen men and using from two to four giants. From this time on the number of men and giants can be doubled.
    Up to this year it was generally supposed that this basin carried but little heavy gold, it being classed as a fine gold-bearing mine. The last run, however, yielded handsomely in nuggets picked up around the giants outside of the main race and flumes. At this writing the regular annual cleanup has not been made. Some of the nuggets picked up have "weighed" $6, $8 and $44. The gold from this mine assays as high as $19.10 and is always worth, over and above transfer expenses and mint charges, $18.50 per ounce, there being but little silver in it. One remarkable feature of this property is that the outlet race, over a mile long, and necessary to reach and work the main deposit, has "paid" all along its entire length and more than double all expenses of construction.
    Besides these extensive deposits that lie high enough for the pipe, there is also connected with this property one of the richest drifting propositions ever discovered on this coast. This is a dry channel 90 feet from the surface, lying on rotten, purple boulder formation bedrock and about six feet thick, which prospects from 25¢ to 95¢ to the pan in heavy scale gold. There are but few rocks and they are not large, the formation being brownish, yellow clay, with porphyry streaks of black, and is so tight that water does not penetrate it. This channel is unlike any formation ever seen in this country and at first was not taken for "pay dirt" by the most experienced miners. Development work will begin on this deep ground as soon as it can be reached by its owners.
SIMMONS AND CAMERON.
    Just over the ridge from the road leading from Grants Pass into Waldo is the hydraulic mine of George Simmons and Tod Cameron. It consists of 740 acres of ground. The water facilities are good and have been provided at great expense. Like the mine of Wimer Bros. & Co., a long and expensive cut had to be made as an outlet for the tailings. The mine is operated nine or ten months in the year, and from eight to ten men are employed. The gold is generally fine. Mr. Cameron lives in Jacksonville, but Mr. Simmons has erected for himself a handsome residence close to the mine.
THE BYBEE MINE.
    There is another hydraulic mine, the property of William Bybee, but now under contract of purchase by the Josephine Mining Co. All the equipments on this mine are about to be renewed and added to by the latter company, and it will be in operation during the coming season.
WONG BACK FAWN & CO.
    At the mouth of Sailor Creek a number of Chinese have operated with pipe and giant on a good piece of ground for the past ten years. The leading member of the company, Wong Back Fawn, has a Chinese wife, married with all approved formalities, and is a fixture in the country. The gravel is red and quite deep. The owners say that the ground pays well and will average 25 cents per pan on bedrock. A feature of the mine is a derrick, with iron ropes and heavy tackle, used in removing the boulders.
THE COPPER LEDGE.
    Extending from Indian River, in California, through to Curry County, is an extensive copper belt, and a number of wide ledges of high-grade ore have been exposed in this district.
THE QUEEN OF BRONZE.
    The oldest of these ledges on which any work has been done is the Queen of Bronze. This mine was worked some twenty or thirty years ago, but the attempt to make it pay proved disastrous. Later it passed into the hands of Henry Villard, of railroad fame, but he concluded that at the prices then prevailing for copper, together with the expense of getting in machinery and supplies, it could not be profitably worked. It is now the property, it is believed, of the estates of Hughes, Brandt and Chadwick. The ground is all patented.
KELLY AND STRONG CLAIMS.
    Next come the claims of Kelly and Strong, commonly known as the Waldo copper mines, and located about 5 miles from that place. These claims were bonded last year by the Elmer-Brown Copper Co., Maryland capitalists, who did considerable development work and erected a smelter. The company was unfortunate, however, in its choice of a man to manage the smelting department, and closed down--it is claimed for a while only. At the present time a question as to the right to the possession of the mines has arisen between the company and Strong and Kelly, and the dispute has been carried into the courts. Considerable work has been done on these ledges, but not in such a way as to disclose beyond a peradventure the extent of the ore bodies. However, all competent men declare the claims to be a magnificent surface prospect, and with the high price now prevailing for copper as an inducement, it may well be anticipated that the work of development will be resumed at no distant day.
PHILLIPS & STRONG.
    The latest copper discovery is that of Phillips & Strong, only a mile or two from Waldo. This ledge was discovered only a few months ago, while the owners were making a cut for a hydraulic mine. The ledge is about six feet wide and is said to contain much high-grade ore. At present a contract has been entered into to do considerable development work upon it.
   

MINES IN JACKSON COUNTY.
    Jackson County has a large area, a greater population and more varied resources than the adjoining county of Josephine. While mining is an important industry within its confines, yet it is not the chief industry. This county has much more arable land than Josephine County, and it is, in consequence, much more of an agricultural and horticultural community. The major part of the flour and of much else consumed by the miners of Josephine County comes from Jackson County. Stock-raising is also a profitable industry in that county, and the fruit-growing industry is a very extensive one. Still the county has many mines, some of them among the most productive anywhere, and much mining ground and many claims as yet untouched.
Gold Hill District
    In the western part of the county lies the Gold Hill district, which embraces the mines along a number of creeks flowing into Rogue River, not far from the town of Gold Hill. On all of these creeks mining has been carried on for the past forty years, and yet the industry there may be said to be in its infancy. Over $50,000 was produced in this district last season.
Foots Creek
    Among the most important of these creeks is Foots Creek, which is about six miles in length and flows into Rogue River from the south, close to Woodville. The Foots Creek Valley is about two miles in width. It has a slate bedrock and gray gravel. This gravel will yield 50 cents to the cubic yard. The gold is coarse and dark.
COOK & SONS.
    At the head of the valley is the hydraulic mine of Cook & Sons--ground that has been mined for more than 30 years. The firm operates three giants and has water for six months in the year, with a pressure of 200 feet.
BLACK GOLD CHANNEL CO.
    Next below is the property of the Black Gold Channel Co.--Seattle capital. This company owns 900 acres of ground on the creek and the connecting gulches. It has water for about six months in the year. For the first two seasons after this property fell into the hands of the present company, the mining was carried on by running tunnels and by drifting and sluicing. But last winter a giant was put on. The company takes its name from the color of the gold found on the creek.
GEO. W. LANCE & SONS.
    On the right-hand fork of the creek is the property of Geo. W. Lance & Sons. This is another old mine. Two giants are operated under good pressure. The gravel is heavy.
OSMER & ROBINSON.
    On the same fork, below, is the property of Osmer & Robinson, which has been in operation for several years. One giant is operated under good pressure.
    On the left fork there is another claim where one giant is operated. It belongs to a Frenchman.
LANCE GOLD MINING CO.
    One of the largest enterprises on Foots Creek is that of the Lance Gold Mining Co., a Portland concern, of which Professor H. A. Shorey is president and manager. This company has 700 acres of ground, running for about two miles along the creek. It has spent considerable money in equipping the property. There are 10 miles of ditch, 2,000 feet of sluiceway and a large reservoir, The dump is directly into Rogue River. A giant was operated by the company for the first time last winter. Next season will witness three giants in operation, however.
On Evans Creek
    This creek enters Rogue River from the north, close to Woodville. On the upper waters of the creek and on its feeders there is considerable mining. The auriferous nature of the creek was discovered in 1856, and from that time on it has been continuously mined. It has been estimated that Evans Creek yielded altogether over $500,000 in early days. The gold was nearly all quartz gold, but although there were known to be numerous quartz ledges on the creek, no attempt was made to work them until 1892.
THE CON. SAXE CREEK CO.
    On Saxe Creek, a tributary, is a group of quartz mines owned by the Consolidated Saxe Creek Mining Co., of which G. D. Young is secretary. There are five claims in this group, and the development consists of 600 feet of tunnels and 150 feet of shafts, besides numerous surface openings. The veins average from 3 to 5 feet in width, and it is said that mill tests have shown the ore to be quite rich in gold, besides silver. The company contemplates erecting a stamp mill shortly.
    This company also has 110 acres of placer ground on the creek now under ditch, and which it is proceeding to equip with pipe and giant.
THE BROOKS CLAIM.
    To the north of this ground lies the Brooks placer claim. This ground is equipped with pipe and giant and elevator, and is said to be a paying property.
THE HILLIS PROPERTY.
    On the south side is the Hillis claim, also said to be a paying property.
    On Pleasant Creek and Murphy Gulch are several other large properties, including those of Calvert & Stephens and the Bart-Signoretti quartz claim.
THE HOMESTAKE.
    One mile west of Woodville is the Homestake. This is a quartz mine and the property of W. J. Stanley, of Ashland. It has considerable development. The ore runs from $7 to $11 in free gold and $200 in sulphurets. These are working tests. The vein is from 8 inches to 30 inches in width and is said to be a true fissure.
On Rogue River
is the plant of the Coast Range Mining Co. This is a pumping plant, similar in its general features to that of the Baylor & Iliff pumping plant, near Grants Pass. It has only been in operation during the past few weeks, but there is no reason why it should not prove a success. The owners are Portlanders.
On Sardine Creek
    The Sardine Creek Mining Co. operates one giant and took out about $6,000 last season. Other hydraulic mines on this creek are those of C. Jenne, C. Vroman and R. L. Dusenbury, which produced last season, with one giant each, $1,500, $1,800 and $2,000, respectively. On this creek there were, also, last season some 25 different ground-sluicing enterprises.
THE NORTH STAR MINE.
    On this creek are also several quartz mines, among them the North Star. This mine is the property of Dr. Jesse Hinkle, of Central Point. The formation is slate; the vein is about 3¼ feet in width, and the ore is free milling. The development consists of two tunnels--each about 90 feet in length and located about 200 feet below the summit of the mountain. There is plenty of wood and water, and it is a mine that can be worked very cheap.
OTHER QUARTZ MINES
are the Gray Eagle group, owned by H. A. Mears; the Shoestring group, owned by Hoffman & Allen, and the Rita and Lucky Bart, owned by J. Beeman and others. Of these, the first named is now in about 150 feet, showing a well-defined ore chute for a length of 75 feet--2 to 4 feet In thickness--of base ore averaging $18 per ton in gold. The Shoestring group is now under bond to Messrs. Sears, White & Brown, of Portland, who have a force of eight men opening up the property, the ore being treated at the Lucky Bart mill. This mill is kept in operation on ore from the Rita and Lucky Bart ledges.
On Water Gulch
is another hydraulic mine equipped with pipe and giant. It is the property of Mr. Hays and produced about $2,000 last season, besides $600 taken out by ground-sluicing.
THE STRUCK AT LAST
is a quartz mine owned by E. Ray and has exhibited some rich ore in chutes. It is now being actively developed.
THE OLD GOLD HILL MINE,
which in early days produced such an immense amount of gold, is being opened up by a cross-cut tunnel which will tap the ledge at a depth of 260 feet. Mr. Rhinehart, who is in charge of the work, as superintendent, is daily expecting to cut the ledge and strike the ore chute which produced the big mass of gold.
THE BRADEN MINE
is being worked under lease with ten men employed. The ore from this mine keeps a 5-stamp mill steadily running.
On 
C. S. McDougal is operating one giant with good results. There are also several ground-sluicing enterprises on this creek.
    On this creek and in the Blackwell Hills there are also several good quartz mines. Among these is the Dardanelles mine, owned by E. E. Miner. It is opened by a shaft 110 feet in depth and several drifts, showing three feet of ore that will average $16.00 per ton.
On Galls Creek
two giants are in operation and a number of men are kept busy ground-sluicing during the rainy season.
THE ROGUE RIVER WATER & MINING CO.
    This is an ambitious enterprise undertaken by San Francisco capitalists. Its purpose is to divert the waters of Rogue River at a point about three miles above Gold Hill into a large canal and carry the same to the mining lands below, for mining purposes. This enterprise was inaugurated last year under the management of J. W. Northup, of San Francisco. So far, about one mile of the canal has been excavated. It is 24 feet wide at bottom and 30 feet wide at top, and 7 feet deep--the largest mining canal in the world. The same company has in contemplation the construction of other large canals which will be subject to pipe and giant and the irrigation ditch will water all the lands along Rogue River from Gold Hill to far below Grants Pass. Should this plan be carried out it will revolutionize all industry in Southern Oregon, and bring big returns to the company for capital invested, as the bars on both sides of the river contain gold-bearing gravel in paying quantities.
THE STERLING MINE.
    On Sterling Creek, eight miles south of Jacksonville, is the Sterling mine. This is the most productive hydraulic mine in Southern Oregon--not that the ground is any richer than other mines in the section, but it has been provided with greater water and other facilities for extracting the gold and in this way makes a better showing. It is the property of the Sterling Mining Company, of which the chief stockholders are Henry Ankeny, of Jacksonville, and Vincent Cook, of Portland. The amount of gold produced by the Sterling mine can only be estimated, but it is safe to say that its annual yield is from $125,000 to $150,000.
    The history of this property is interesting. In 1870 a part of the ground, 2½ miles on Sterling Creek, was secured by location or purchase by Tod Cameron and W. S. Hayden, and they worked it until 1877, with water from Sterling Creek, when it was conveyed to the Sterling Mining Company, then composed of David P. Thompson, of Portland, Levi Ankeny and W. S. Burrell, for $25,000. The new company thereupon paid out some $70,000 for ditch and water from the Little Applegate, and some $15,000 for contiguous ground. In making these improvements, J. S. Howard, the Medford surveyor, acted as engineer. In 1878 Thompson seems to have lost faith in the enterprise, for in that year he "swapped" his interest in the company to Captain Ankeny for what was known as the "New Market block" on First Street, in Portland. Captain Ankeny died about four years ago and his interest fell to Henry Ankeny, who still owns it.
    The feature of the Sterling mine is its 25-mile ditch, taken from the Little Applegate, and carrying 2,500 inches of water. This ditch gives water enough for two giants, nine months in the year, with a pressure of 250 feet. The gold is found in a red clay gravel deposit, about 80 feet in height. The mine is also equipped with three miles of flume, 4 feet wide and 2½ feet deep, blocked the entire distance, and with a water-power derrick with a 60-foot boom, operated by a Pelton wheel.
FARMERS FLAT MINE.
    This is another hydraulic mine, lying on the left-hand fork of Jackson Creek and close to the Pierce & Sturgis, and the Owings & Blatt placer mines, on Forest Creek, and to the Beekman & Huffer quartz mines, on Jackson Creek. It is the property of Mrs. Mary Miller, of Jacksonville, and has been in operation for the past 16 years. It is a rich gravel wash. The ground is fully equipped. It has eight miles of ditches, three reservoirs and 2,000 feet of pipe, which operates one No. 2 giant. This is a very desirable property. Besides the above improvements, there are a residence, barns, large orchard and 40 acres of good farming land.
THE STURGIS.
    Six miles southwest of Jacksonville, on Forest Creek, is another large hydraulic mine owned [by] A. W. Sturgis. The property embraces 400 or 500 acres of ground--an old high channel running parallel with the creek. The gravel is red and the banks are about 40 feet high. This property has been in operation about eight years. It has water for about seven months in the year and produces about $35,000 a year.
THE SQUAW CREEK CO.
    This company has 160 acres of ground on the Applegate and 30 acres on what is known as Dividend Bar, on Squaw Creek. The gravel is red. The feature of this property is its water facilities. Squaw Lake, which covers about 125 acres of ground, is used as a reservoir and furnishes an abundance of water for piping. This water is conveyed to the ground through an 11-mile ditch. The mine is also equipped with an electric light plant.
GRAND APPLEGATE CO.
    The property of this company lies on the south side of the Applegate and is just being equipped. It has a 6-mile ditch, carrying 7,000 inches of water. This water is taken from the main Applegate, just below Elliott Creek. This is an old enterprise which has taken on new life. Three miles of the Grand Applegate ditch was built years ago, but the early promoters gave up the enterprise and it lay dormant until resurrected by Messrs. Cool and Wade, of Portland, who are, respectively, the president and secretary of the new company. This project is an ambitious one; it is nothing less than to furnish an abundance of water with which to mine between 3,000 and 4,000 acres of ground on the Applegate.
ON STAR GULCH,
a tributary of the Applegate, are three hydraulic claims equipped with pipe and giant. Of these the most important, perhaps, is that of the Star Gulch Mining Co., of which B. E. Haney is manager and part owner. It is located at the head of the creek.
THE STEAMBOAT.
    On the main Applegate is the Steamboat hydraulic claim owned by Jacob Shearer & Sons, which should not be confounded with the great quartz mine of the same name and in the same section. It comprises 160 acres of ground and has been worked for many years. The equipment consists of an 8-mile ditch, 1,500 to 2,000 feet of pipe, with which one giant is operated under a pressure of 300 feet.
On Humburg Gulch
is an extensive auriferous gravel deposit, the property of John Bolt. It is not yet equipped with pipe and giant, but has attracted the attention of many persons, and will one day add materially to the gold output of Jackson County. Mrs. Hines also owns some rich ground on this gulch.
Wagner Creek and Ashland District
    This is a quartz rather than a hydraulic mining district. The general character of the ores is base, carrying auriferous and argentiferous galena, tellurides and heavy iron pyrites. There are exceptions to this characterization, but rarely so when depth is attained. The trend of the veins is generally from the northwest to the southeast. The district possesses good roads and an abundance of timber and water.
IN EARLY DAYS,
placer mining was carried on in several localities around Ashland, gold being found in greater or less quantities on Emigrant, Bear and Wagner creeks and their tributaries. Probably the most extensive placer in this section was what was known as the French Diggings, two miles below Ashland, on Bear Creek, where many thousands of dollars were taken out in the early '50s.
    Later discoveries in quartz allow why this large deposit of gold was found there, for to the southwest of this point and on practically the same lode is found the Mattern, Gold Bug, Ashland and Shorty-Hope mines, besides several quite well prospected claims that have no particular name.
THE MATTERN MINE
is 1½ miles north of Ashland, and the tunnel starts into the hill from the railroad tract, the mine proper being on land owned by G. F. Billings.
    This mine is managed by H. Mattern, a miner of experience. The workings consist of over five hundred feet of tunneling and drifting, and since Mr. Mattern took hold of it the mine has paid its own development work and put some money into the pockets of the owners. Quite an amount of new improvements have gone into this mine lately and a larger output is expected.
THE GOLD BUG
is also on land of G. F. Billings, the workings consisting of a tunnel and drifts from which good ore has been taken, and had it not been for transportation expenses the mine would have paid its way from the start. D. R. Billings and R. Lucas are the lessees of this mine and are pushing the work.
THE ASHLAND,
two miles west of the city of the same name, has had the most work done on it of any mine in this locality and has yielded the largest output of gold, there having been cleaned up from this mine over $100,000, and doubtless there are other thousands to be taken out. But at the present time only development work is being carried on by the owners. Several hundred feet of tunnels and drifts, as well as a fine working shaft with hoisting and pumping machinery, constitute the workings of the Ashland.
THE SHORTY-HOPE
is located on the east side of Wagner Creek, about four miles from Ashland, the hyphenated name arising from the fact that the two mines, "Hope" and "Shorty," have been purchased and consolidated by a party of capitalists consisting of the Sanfords of New York, and Thomas James, of Ashland. D. S. Sanford is the active promoter of this enterprise and passes much of his time at Ashland, while Mr. James is the efficient manager. A detailed description of the work done on this property would be tedious, but the amount is large and the prospects of a heavy output are excellent.
    The present five-stamp mill is about to be replaced by a twenty-stamp plant, and a force of men are now constructing a ditch from Wagner Creek to furnish power for this mill.
    A vein of ore of extraordinary richness has just been struck in the Shorty-Hope, and it is hoped that shortly the circulating medium of the country will be largely augmented by the yellow boys from this mine.
    On the same lode as the Ashland is a mine opened by B. Wagner, from which considerable pay ore has been taken, and as the work is pushed and new developments made, the indications are more than good.
    In the Siskiyou Range, and running in nearly an east and west direction, occurs a series of veins or lodes of low grade, base ores, and considerable prospecting has been done in this section.
THE SUNSET,
owned by the Snowgoose Brothers, is in this section, about eight miles southeast of Ashland. On this property two tunnels have been run, aggregating 250 feet, much of it through very hard rock, and a working shaft of large size has been sunk 60 feet. The ore is too low-grade to pay for shipping to the smelter, but grows better with depth, and the owners confidently expect that in time they will reap reward for their labor.
THE GOLDEN FLEECE.
    North of Ashland about two miles is located what is known as the Golden Fleece mine, consisting of a blanket deposit of mineral-bearing ore which has been worked by different processes. But from the peculiar character of the material and its low grade, it has not been found to pay sufficiently to make working profitable. This property is owned by E. K. Anderson and has been operated by Z. Moody, a son of ex-Gov. Moody.
THE OREGON.
    On the Little Applegate is the Oregon, owned by Carter and Garvin, now under bond to San Francisco parties. The vein is wide and mills between $4 and $5 per ton in free gold. A 160-foot tunnel has been run along the vein, showing in places bunches of high-grade sulphurets, besides the free gold.
THE LINCHPIN
has a shaft 117 feet in depth and shows a large body of ore, which has heretofore been milled in an arrastra, averaging $22.50 per ton. It is the property of Gendar, Russell & West.
THE MIZPAH
is the property of Gendar & Hatch. It is an extension of the Shorty-Hope mine. A shaft is being put down which shows a 4-foot ledge. The ore prospects well and if it continues to do so with depth the owners contemplate putting a mill on the property.
OTHER QUARTZ MINES
in this district, all of which have been more or less developed, are: The Morning Star, owned by J. Adams; the Lucky Queen, owned by B. Dyer; the Humbug, owned by Couch & Holderman; the Cleveland ledge, owned by Virgin & Stevenson; the Mary Jane, on Panther Butte, owned by H. L. & J. H. Hatch; the Growler, owned by Corbett, Shoup & Parker; the Little Pittsburgh, owned by J. Garvin and W. Illingsworth; the Pilgrim, owned by E. K. Anderson, and the Galena ledge, owned by Garvin & Brown.
CINNABAR.
    On Arrastra Creek cinnabar has been found in the mine of T. W. Hills, and its croppings can be traced, it is said, for several miles. The extent or width of the vein in the mine have not as yet, however, been determined. The ore assays from 1 to 7 percent cinnabar and about $1.50 per ton in gold.
    The development of the mines of this district is much retarded by the lack of proper reduction works, as the ore will not, in general, stand transportation charges. It is the opinion of competent authorities that were a smelter erected close at hand its capacity would be taxed. New ledges are being continually discovered and there are many tons of ore now in sight which would pay a local smelter to treat.
----
IN CONCLUSION.
    In concluding this cursory description, or rather, enumeration of the mines of Jackson County, it is felt that justice has not been done to the subject. Many of the properties mentioned have merited a lengthy notice, and many deserving others are not even mentioned. The task undertaken has proven impossible within the limits of this work, and we have been compelled to be content with the foregoing brief review.
Oregon Mining Journal, Grants Pass, Midsummer Edition 1897, pages 30-61


SOUTHERN OREGON MINES.
Results of Work Done in Jackson and Josephine Counties.
    The Grants Pass Observer, in its last issue, says:
    The last carload of ore shipped from the Taylor & Crow mine, at Lost Flat, and milled at Ashland, returned $1387.28, or a fraction over $108 per ton. The returns show this gold to be $34 fine, which is $19.31 per ounce.
    Browning Bros., of Graves Creek, have their arrastra completed and running on ore that is worth $500 per ton. They have run a tunnel on the ledge about 40 feet, and the vein is 10 inches wide at present. No stoping has been done as yet. They have treated about 10 tons of rock, and expect to clean up $5000 in a few days.
    The Horn-Silsby-Tucker hydraulic mine, on the lower Illinois and Briggs Creek, has practically been sold to Sterling F. Haywood, of New York, for $20,000. The papers have all been signed and deeds put in escrow, and the property turned over and work commenced to put the property in shape for the next season's run. The ditch will be enlarged to carry 3000 inches of water the year around. A sawmill will be built and some large pipe laid. A No. 4 giant will be added and the mine put in first-class shape for future working. The property consists of 12 claims (240 acres), of which about three-fifths is good mining ground.
    Henry Fetterly and R. C. Turner have taken a contract from Rube Jones, who represents Senator Jones, of Nevada, to run a crosscut tunnel 100 feet, with the privilege of continuing it 450 feet. Work is to commence immediately, or by August 1. They will put four men at work. The contract price is less than $10 per foot. This property is situated on Mount Reuben, 35 miles northwest of Grants Pass, and will be known as the California and Virginia mines, formerly known as the Albany group of eight claims.
    C. A. Macomber came in from the Oregon Bonanza last week, bringing with him about $700, which was a partial cleanup from the mill after running about 73 tons of ore. The mine for the next 30 days will be run by some lessees. Messrs. Macomber and King will make a trip through Lower California, in Mexican territory, to look at a new gold discovery in quartz, which is reported as very rich. If they find everything as represented, they will commence operations on a large scale at once. Mr. Macomber has a large commission from the Mexican government, and has formed a company of San Francisco capitalists, and will remain in that country indefinitely, providing everything is favorable for rich mines down there.
Oregonian, Portland, August 1, 1897, page 5


    Hale Bros., says the Jacksonville Times, are making arrangements to equip their mine on Harris Flat, Josephine County, with pipe and giant. A new ditch, which is expected to furnish them with water for eight months in the year, is being built.
    The Alexander & Bent mine (formerly known as the Ennis & Cameron) in Galice Creek district, has, it is reported, again changed hands. The price was $75,000, $5,000 down and the balance in payments ranging from two months to one year.
    F. A. Baker, E. S. Reed, R. B. Miller, J. F. McCartney and W. H. Hearn have organized at Portland the Galls Creek Mining Co., with a capital of $60,000, to work the old placer claim of the Pfell Bros., on Galls Creek, near Gold Hill, which they lately purchased for, it is said, $8000.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 7, 1897, page 126


    The Miller ledge and adjoining claims on Soldier Creek, Southern Oregon, have been sold to Simpson & Co. of Eureka. Cal., for $28,000.
    The copper mines in Josephine County are started again. Mr. Keller is superintendent and A. W. McKeen foreman. Twelve men are employed.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 14, 1897, page 147


Southern Oregon Mines.
    In April, 1851, California gold miners along the streams of Siskiyou and Shasta counties heard of newly discovered diggings farther north, and heading for Rogue River in Southern Oregon found hydraulic mining ground that through the years has furnished considerable gold. The fluctuating nature of the industry in Oregon is illustrated by the fact that while in 1884 that state produced $552,472 in gold, the output for '96 is estimated at $1,950,000, showing that there as elsewhere the depression in other lines of industry caused renewed attention to be given to mining--the original source of all human wealth. Of the amount stated Southern Oregon produced about 40%; of this percentage by far the largest part was from the hydraulic mines. There is a little surface quartz mining going on in that section of the state, but no depth has in any instance been attained.
    The conditions and climatic surroundings make hydraulic mining in Southern Oregon a most congenial employment. The gold is fairly plenty; transportation is easy; no legal restrictions exist; wood and water abound; the climate is fine, and labor is easily procured. There are several operated mines that return good dividends, and a large number of paying claims. The pipe and giant so far constitute the main form of hydraulic mining, though wing damming and dredging are receiving some recent attention.
    On this page and on page 192 are given some typical views of mines in Josephine Co. The Josephine mine on Rogue River, Grants Pass district, has long been worked and has always paid well; the Merrill mine, Galice Creek district, shows, incidentally, a device for removing stumps, etc.; the Junction mine, close to the Merrill, and where the three forks of the creek unite, is particularly well supplied with water, the lack of dumping facilities being partly compensated for by the recent construction of 1200 feet of flume. At the adjacent Forest Queen mine, on Louse Creek, are four ditches, 1500 ft. hydraulic pipe, 1400 ft. flume and two giants.
    Since the first piping at Scott's Gulch, near Waldo, in 1854, the harnessed streams of Southern Oregon have washed out many millions in gold, and, as in other sections of the coast, the amount mined is but a fractional index of the golden store still to be produced. Of late years mining has become "fashionable" again in Oregon, the hard times causing many to take up the more profitable industry. One of Oregon's most urgent needs is some mining legislation. At present it is considerably behind its sister states in this regard.
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 28, 1897, page 189


    Borden & Howell of Evans Creek, Josephine Co., are building a twelve-mile ditch to cover their placer mines and expect to employ a large force of men shortly.
    The 64⅔ ounces of bullion from the Oregon Bonanza mine in Williams district, which was shipped to the Selby smelting works at San Francisco, yielded $1008, or a little over $100 to the ton of ore crushed.
    The Eureka Mining Co., the new owners of the Denver City ledge, on Soldier Creek, Josephine County, will employ thirty men soon.
    The Jackson Mountain Mining Co. has incorporated to mine gold, silver and copper in Jackson County; capital, $750,000; office, Portland; D. M. Watson, C. L. Carr and A. J. Farmer. The company is developing a quartz mine near Jacksonville.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, August 28, 1897, page 199


    The men who bought the Horn Silsby-Tucker mine, Jackson County, have organized a joint stock company with Capt. A. M. Brown as superintendent. The mine hereafter will be known as the Oak Flat mine.
    G. W. Trefren, superintendent Rogue River mine, on Rogue River, reports running fifteen men and cleaning up from $5 to $12 per day per man.
    Sharp, Morrison and Hosley made a cleanup at their Powell Creek, Josephine Co., mine after a run of fifty-four days, giving $2000.
    There are several wing dams in Rogue River between Tolo and Grants Pass, and many of them are worked to good advantage.
    P. H. Oviatt of the Evans Creek Mining Company has a load of coal in Grants Pass from their mine, tested by the water works engine with satisfactory results.
    The Jackson Mountain Mining Company has incorporated in Jackson County; capital, $750,000; office, Portland: D. M. Watson, C. L. Carr, A. J. Farmer. The company is developing a quartz mine a few miles west of Jacksonville.
    Brobst Bros. of Denver and Dekum Bros. of Portland have a group of claims on Elk Creek under the title of the Apollo Mining & Milling Company, and are working a night and day shift of fourteen men running two tunnels on their property. James L. Brobst is superintendent.
    The Ox Heart and the K.S., adjoining the Oro Fino mine, Josephine Co., have been sold to Spokane parties.
    The first money on the Horn, Silsby-Tucker placer mine is paid. Baltimore men take the property; price, $20,000.
    J. H. Weston of the Summit mine, on the Oregon and California line, reports the crosscut tunnel progressing. He has cut a 30-foot vein of low-grade sulphuret ore.
    J. W. and M. A. Robinson of Wimer have a placer mine, Josephine County, on Brass Nail Gulch, a tributary of Jumpoff Joe Creek, a few hundred feet below the Hammersley quartz mine: $1892.26 was the cleanup for ninety days' run with two men.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 4, 1897, page 219


    Jacksonville Times: A. B. Hopkins has sold the DeLamater mine in Kerbyville district to Portland parties for $4000.
    The Oak Flat Placer Mining Co. of Josephine County is constructing a ditch three miles long from Soldier Creek to their mines, which will carry 4000 miners' inches of water. They sent to the Willamette Valley for laborers last week, as they could not be obtained here for the wages offered, $1 a day and board.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 11, 1897, page 247


    Trefren & Snowgoose Bros.' mine near Merlin is a bar claim in Rogue River and is mined by the wing dam method. They have been on the pay streak channel for three weeks, taking out $40 per day, with an expense of $15 per day.
    Judge W. H. Reid of Tacoma has bought the Hammersley mine on Jumpoff Joe.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 18, 1897, page 271


Southern Oregon Mines.
Grants Pass Journal
.
    Frank Houston a few days ago discovered a rich free-milling, gold-bearing ledge near his famous placer mine at the head of Althouse Creek. The ledge is 14 inches wide, and the rock is fairly alive with free gold all through it.
    The new machinery for the mill to be used on the Miller ledge by the Humboldt Mining Company was this week successfully hauled out to the head of the copper company's trail.
    Mr. Franks, of San Francisco, has this week closed a deal for the Woodcock claim, on Red Dog, and the John Taylor and Dudley Depuy placer claims, on upper Biggs Creek, the Woodcock claim being desirable on account of its water right. Mr. Franks will start in at once to equip the claims with a good ditch.
    At the Olalla mines the company is building seven miles of ditch, upon which 40 men are at work, receiving from $1.75 to $2.50 per day. The main ditch is 8 feet 10 inches wide at the top, 4 feet at the bottom, and about 3½ feet deep, with a carrying capacity of 4000 inches of water. Two No. 7 and two No. 4 giants will be put to work when the rainy season sets in, and they are now putting in a 50-arc electric light plant, which will enable them to work day and night. They also have a two-stamp quartz mill at the mine, which will be used in thoroughly prospecting a large deposit of conglomerate rock which is on their property, and which assays between $7 and $8 per ton.
Ashland Valley Record
    On Upper Applegate, McMurkey is doing a good custom crushing business with his new process roller quartz mill.
    Ex-United States Marshal J. C. Franks, of California, and A. W. Silsby have bargained for John Taylor's placer mine, on Briggs Creek, Josephine County.
    Calvert & Stevens have added to their water power and pressure by the building of a new ditch on their placer mine on Pleasant Creek, and are preparing to take out lots of gold this winter.
    A San Francisco syndicate represented by W. H. Smith and J. D. McGill has purchased the placer mining grounds known as the Joe Bar group, in the Big Applegate country, and located on Elliott Creek. The consideration was $20,000. The new owners have already ordered extensive machinery and a modern plant, which will equip the property so that it will be ready to use up all their water privileges.
    The Distlehorst-Barton dredger has resumed work mining the bottom of Klamath River near Oak Bar.
    Hannum & Browning secured at $920 gold brick from 12 tons of second-grade ore from their Greenback quartz mine, on Grave Creek.
    A Portland company, with E. J. Borden in charge, is building an extensive ditch to lead the water of Evans Creek into Pleasant Creek for mining purposes, principally. The proposition opens up a great placer mining field.
    The Apollo Mining & Milling Co., of Elk Creek, Jackson County, is doing much to develop that section. It has a good trail to its mines, and a wagon road is nearly completed. Three large log cabins have been built, and several more are in course of construction. A mill site is being cleared, and the company expects to have its mill running by December 1. Three tunnels are now being worked, all in ore--15, 33 and 20 feet. Assays run from $4.50 to $50; average value, $16.50, which is a good showing, as the ore bodies are large. The excitement has all died out, and things have got down to actual business, and the camp is bound to be a good one.
Ashland Tidings
    E. K. Anderson has leased his Bear Creek mining property to a San Francisco capitalist, and operations will commence this fall. Charles Bronson, a San Francisco mining expert, was up here about two months ago, and made an examination of this creek claim, and on his judgment and report the trade was consummated. Mr. Bronson visited quite a number of fair quartz prospects in the vicinity of Ashland, and seems very favorably impressed with what he saw.
    About 60 men are at work building a ditch from Wolf Creek to the mine of Porter & Willeke on Grave Creek.
    J. W. Bevan and A. H. Bannister, of San Francisco, have purchased seven placer claims on Star Gulch, at a good round price, from B. E. Haney.
    A joint stock company consisting of W. H. Beldier, A. J. Hicks, C. F. Young, E. N. Williams, W. H. Cane, E. J. Lampson, C. P. Parker, F. L. Heft and C. Vroman, of Gold Hill, and M. L. Burns, E. Burns, C. Burns, R. Burns, F. Strong and S. Woody, of Josephine County, have located 320 acres of high canal gravel on the banks of the Illinois River. The dirt runs 50 cents per yard in gold. Thirteen thousand inches of water have been located, and the ground has 500 feet of dump.
Jacksonville Times
    Seven tons of ore from John Abbott's mine, in the Mount Reuben district, crushed at Hicks' mill at Ashland last week, yielded over $20 to the ton.
    The boiler and engine, ore cars, rails, etc. for the Eureka Mining Company's property, on Soldier Creek, have arrived at Grants Pass, and will shortly be in position at the mine.
    William Alfred, W. R. Walker and Thomas Perry have completed a wing dam in Rogue River, about six miles above Grants Pass, and have commenced work, with good results.
    Experts have been examining the Golden Standard mine, in Galls Creek district, and the sale to San Francisco parties, which has been pending some time, is expected to take place soon.
    Nineteen and one-half tons of ore from Dr. DeBar's mine, in Jackson Creek district, was crushed in Beekman & Huffer's mill last week, and yielded well.
    A. Lempke, J. W. Howard, W. T. Coburn and other business men of Grants Pass have leased John Bolt's mine on Galice Creek, known as the Sugar Pine, for a year. J. Swearingen will be in charge of the work, which will be pushed forward as rapidly as possible.
Roseburg Review
    The tunnel of the Roseburg Mining Company, on Brushy Butte, is now into the mountain some 112 feet, and is progressing slowly. All indications are promising as the work goes on.
    Messrs. Rice, Flint and Kimball visited the Black Republican and Yankee Boy mines this week, and are satisfied with the progress of the development work going on. They brought back some fine samples of copper ore from the Yankee Boy.
    The owners of the Black Republican mine are still pushing development work, and they will soon be in 200 feet.
    The contractor who is running a tunnel for the Roseburg Mining Company expects to complete it inside of 30 days. The prospects are good. Already a small vein shows by assay $15 in gold and 10 percent copper, and the same character of rock as in the true vein.
Grants Pass Observer
    L. T. Green has a new location on a promising quartz ledge on Mount Reuben.
    The owners of the Baby mine are contemplating shipping a car of ore to the Tacoma smelter for treatment.
    C. D. Crane this week shipped to the Tacoma smelter 2100 pounds of very rich ore from the Oro Fino mine, which is expected to run away up in the thousands.
    John C. Lewis has 20 men working on his ditch, from Wolf Creek. The old ditch is being widened and the mine put in shape for a big run this winter. This property is near Leland.
    C. L. Morton, who has been mining and prospecting on Upper Althouse, came down this week, and reports mining and prospecting very active in that section, with some good finds being made.
    A. W. McKeen, foreman at the Siskiyou copper mines, on lower Illinois River, reports work progressing nicely, with eight men at work.
    George B. Archer, who owns a very extensive hydraulic mine on lower Grave Creek, has his mine all ready for the next season's work, and is patiently awaiting the arrival of water. The gravel contained in his property is glacial or ancient wash, and unlike most of the other gravel deposits of Grave Creek.
    Willeke & Porter, who own the Hale Bros. hydraulic mine, at Leland, are constructing a new ditch from Wolf Creek, which, when completed, will give them plenty of water for eight months. The ditch is four feet on the bottom, and five miles long. The water will be carried across Grave Creek in a 30-inch iron pipe. Fifteen men are employed on the work.
    Charley Taylor spent several days at his quartz mine on Galice Creek this week, and says the property is looking better than ever and some very rich ore is being taken out. This property has made a good record for itself and promises to continue to do so in the future. The ore has been shipped to the Ashland mill for treatment, and runs from $90 to $200 per ton.
    The old Braden mine, near Gold Hill, has been opened up by Colorado parties, and a large body of good free-milling ore has been encountered, of sufficient extent to justify them in moving the 10-stamp mill nearer the mine, and it is kept busy on high-grade ore.
    I. G. Moon and T. H. Turner have been doing some work on the old Bybee mine, 35 miles down Rogue River. They have encountered some very rich ore. The vein is 18 inches wide, and between well-defined walls. Rogue River cuts this vein at nearly right angles, and exposed the ore in the bed of the river for over 300 feet. This property was worked in an early day with an arrastra, and some money taken out, but has lain idle for many years.
    The outlook for a very active season in mining, both quartz and placer, for Josephine County, was never better. Many new hydraulic plants are going in, and quartz prospects are being developed, with some very rich discoveries being made. We don't want a boom, but we do want capital to come and look over our mines. We have poor men enough among us. We can use some good prospectors who have money enough to keep themselves in grub for one year, and if they will go into the mountains of Southern Oregon and prospect diligently, they will find something--it may not be a Klondike--but they will have something that will sell, or pay them to work.

Oregonian, Portland, September 22, 1897, page 8


    At Galice Creek the Sugar Pine quartz mine, known as the Bolt or Green ledge, is to be worked after a long suspension. This mine has produced nearly $70,000.
    Bronson and Loomis have bonded a tract of placer ground along Bear Creek, below the Golden Fleece mine, near Ashland.
    Caldwell and Ingalls have bonded the dump of the old Ashland mine and say they will put in a cyanide plant.
    Ruble Bros. are working the old Anaconda quartz mine on Coyote Creek. They have shipped 2500 pounds of ore to San Francisco for treatment.
    The Baisley-Elkhorn mine, fifteen miles northwest of Baker City, will pass into the hands of a New York syndicate, with a prospect of being better developed with ample capital. It is stated that the purchase price is $30,000.
    J. C. Franks of Alameda has bought of Woodcock & Taylor their mining ground on Briggs Creek for $3000.
    The Yank ledge, 250 feet wide and one of the largest in Southern Oregon, is being sampled with a view of putting in a cyanide plant.
"Oregon," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 25, 1897, page 295


    H. A. Keller is now manager of the Siskiyou copper mines, Illinois River, Southern Oregon.
"Personal," Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, September 25, 1897, page 296


    The property of the Apollo Mining and Milling Co. is in Pearl mining district. Elk Creek, Jackson County, forty-five miles northeast from Central Point. The company intended putting in their mill this fall, but has postponed that till spring. They will keep men at work all winter, building roads, bridges, tramways, store house, assay office, etc.
    Woodcock & Taylor have sold their placer ground on Briggs Creek, Josephine County, to J. C. Franks of Alameda. The property will be equipped with hydraulic appliances. A new ditch one and one-half miles long will be built.
    Conde & Locke have bonded the Magnolia mine, Granite district, for $40,000.
    In Jackson County Whipple & Holcomb are fitting up a hydraulic plant at their mines on Jumpoff Joe. The Black Gold Channel Mine Co. will put in 2000 feet of hydraulic pipe on their property on Foots Creek. The Eureka Mining Company have received their forty-ton mill at Grants Pass. Smith & Beer are equipping a large hydraulic plant on the East Fork of the Illinois River, Josephine County, to cover six miles of ground on the river. Three giants will be operated on this property. The ore from the Oro Fino on Jumpoff Joe is now going to the Ashland stamp mill. The old combination mill and arrastra used for so long at this mine went to pieces recently. The owners propose putting in a 10-stamp mill.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 2, 1897, page 319


    In the suit of Simpkins, who claimed riparian rights on Rogue River, Oregon, against James Savage, a miner, who was working a mine in the bed of the river by a wing dam, in the Josephine County Court, Judge Hanna decided last week: That the riparian proprietor owns the ground as far as the center of the stream and is to be protected by the court. The effect of this decision is locally interpreted to be that along the banks of a stream that have passed out of the hands of the federal government and become private property, the miner who proposes to mine the banks or bars of that stream must first secure a permit from the contiguous proprietor. If there is no such proprietor, then the bars and banks of the stream are open to location as any other mineral ground.
"Concentrates,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 9, 1897, page 335


    H. A. Keller, who recently completed the Yerington, Nevada smelter, is examining copper properties on the Illinois River, Southern Oregon.
"Personal,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 9, 1897, page 341


    C. L. Manning and Wm. Steck of Grants Pass have sold their interest in the California and Gold Bar placer claims on Silver Creek, a tributary of the Illinois River, to Geo. Phillips of San Francisco, for $11,250. Recent reports show the gravel on this claim to be from 25 to 35 feet deep and rich in coarse gold. Mr. Phillips has brought from California a complete hydraulic plant to work this new claim.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 9, 1897, page 343


    Campbell Bros. of Port Blakeley, Chilcott of Seattle and Behrman of Port Townsend, Wash., have bought the entire Black Butte bunch of quicksilver claims in Southern Oregon--320 acres--and completed arrangements to begin operations.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 16, 1897, page 367


    A strike is reported made in the Elk Creek country of a large body of low grade ore. The ledge is 400 feet wide and is a contact vein between granite and porphyry walls. The ore assays on surface from $2.65 to $6.80 per ton.
    Fitzgerald & Frakes on Elliott Creek, at the mouth of Silver Fork, have opened up a bed of talc, lime and quartz near the head of Dunamoor Creek, from which they claim they have been able to get seventy-five cents to the pan by pulverizing the stuff, which is soft and largely decomposed, by hand. There appears to be a wall of porphyry, but the formation is peculiar and a remarkable one in which to find gold in quantity, if at all. Other parties who have examined the ore found colors but nothing rich. These men exhibit some fine specimens of dust which they claim to have panned from their mine.
    In Josephine County, Southern Oregon, M. Keller, manager and consulting engineer, has fifteen men employed, principally on the main tunnel which is 480 feet long and within 30 feet of the main ledge.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 23, 1897, page 391


    The bonding of 3000 tons of tailings owned by Hicks & Co. of the Ashland quartz mill to Caldwell & Ingalls entails the erection of a cyanide plant to work the tailings.

"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, October 30, 1897, page 414


    At Beekman & Huffer's ledge in Shively Gulch, west of Jacksonville, recently 2½ tons of ore were crushed in their mill, and a $1200 brick was the result. Fifty sacks second-grade quartz, milled some time before, yielded $550; 2600 pounds of concentrates smelted in San Francisco produced at the rate of $180 to the ton.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 6, 1897, page 435


    A large ditch is being constructed to take water from Elliott Creek, in Siskiyou County, to claims on the headwaters of Applegate, in Jackson County, Oregon.
"Siskiyou,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 13, 1897, page 463


    It is reported that negotiations are pending with New York capitalists for the sale of Wimer Bros.' hydraulic mines in Waldo district, Josephine Co.
    The annual meeting of the Southern Oregon Mining Association is called for Nov. 17th, at 7:30 p.m., at Grants Pass, at the office of the secretary.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, November 13, 1897, page 463


    Ashland Record: Parham & Van Nane shut down their mill at the Braden mine last week to clean up and put in a new pump.
    Oliver Jillson is erecting a 5-stamp mill on his mine near Henley.
    J. C. Petters, of San Francisco, is developing the Old Coil mine.
    C. D. Crane shipped ten tons of rock from the Oro Fino mine in Southern Oregon to the Ashland smelter, and received a gold brick worth $515.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 4, 1897, page 527


    A. H. Carson of Grants Pass says that at the present time there is not a placer mine in Southern Oregon that has water that is not paying.
    At the Jewett mine, Grants Pass, the 5-stamp mill is running steadily on $20 ore.
    The Southern Oregon Miners' Association elected W. H. Hampton Pres., L. L. Jewell Treas. and E. C. Wade Secy.
    In the spring of 1896 there were few giants operated in Josephine County, and at the present time there are twelve in readiness for the coming season. Quartz mines are also being developed.
    Miner: J. Burkhardt of Pleasant Creek has been prospecting for coal in Jackson County. He has specimens of bituminous coal, the ledge of which he says is three feet wide and as good coal as is produced in the Eastern States, and that it bears every indication that it will prove to be a regular blanket ledge of enormous extent.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 11, 1897, page 555


Southern Oregon.
    That Southern Oregon, particularly Josephine County, is rapidly coming to the front in the mining line is evidenced by the rapid strides made around even Galice. In the spring of 1896 there were but few giants operated in this disrict, and at the present time there are at least 12 in readiness for the coming season. The various quartz mines are also being developed which in time, from indications, will be good producers.
Grand Forks Miner, Grand Forks, B.C., December 11, 1897, page


    The Observer says the shaft on the Black Pocket near Grants Pass is 30 feet deep and has paid $100 per foot.
    The Champion near Ashland has been sold to J. Woodruff of Chicago, for $10,000.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 18, 1897, page 574


    The Ashland mine was sold last week to Bennett & Reynolds of Minneapolis. The consideration was $20,000. A tramway will be constructed from the Ashland mine to the mill.
    Wimer Bros. & Co. are running three monitors at Ashland.
    The Victory, at Glendale, is running four giants night and day.
    Stein & Bowers are putting in mills with a capacity of thirty tons per day on their Woodville purchase, and driving a tunnel.
    C. E. Brown bonded three quartz properties on Williams Creek for $10,000.
    Ingalls & Friday's last cleanup, six miles below Merlin, averaged $8 per ton. The dike of porphyry is 60 feet wide.
    J. C Taylor of the Lost Flat mine, near Jacksonville, has a 70-foot tunnel in good ore.
    Rowley & Co. have their quartz mill in Uniontown in operation.
    Brown Bros. have made a strike in the Canfield property near Jacksonville.
    Ten tons of rock from the Free Silver mine, ten miles southeast of Ashland, yielded $45 per ton. The concentrates show $150 gold and 966 ounces silver to the ton.
    The Neil Bros. have bonded three claims near Ashland for $10,000 to C. E. Brown.
    The Lawrence M. Co. is doing development work on the Matt Johnson property, on Reuben Creek, near Ashland.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 25, 1897, page 599


    B. E. Stahl is supt. of the Bent & Alexander mine, Ashland, Oregon.
    A. T. Caldwell of Portland is superintending the construction of a cyanide plant at Ashland, Oregon.
"Personal,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, December 25, 1897, page 603



Last revised November 12, 2019