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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised



Grace's Visit
The story behind "Grace's Visit to the Rogue Valley," and a transcript of the silent film's 1965 narration.


ALLEN TO TAKE MOVIES OF FAMILIAR SCENES
    A. C. Allen of Hollywood Orchard has secured a moving picture machine and will take local views of familiar scenes and faces. As soon as a few pictures are taken they will be developed and shown at the Isis. Pictures showing orchard work, movies of Crater Lake and fishing scenes will be specialized.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 11, 1914, page 1


    The meeting of the Oregon State Bankers' Association at Medford Monday and Tuesday was one of the biggest ever held in the state. . . . A. C. Allen, a valley orchardist, took film views of the crowd, which will probably be seen later at our moving picture theaters.
"Ashland Ladies Banquet Bankers," Ashland Tidings, June 18, 1914, page 4


    The directors of the Medford Commercial Club met Wednesday afternoon to consider advertising the Rogue River Valley. . . . It was decided to assist A. C. Allen in making 6,000 feet of films of the Rogue River Valley, Medford, Crater Lake and other attractions to be shown free in a building arranged for moving pictures at the Panama-Pacific Exposition.
"Medford Boosts Crater Lake," Ashland Tidings, February 1, 1915, page 1


    A. C. Allen has returned from San Francisco, where his eight-year-old son was successfully operated upon for hernia. He reports the exposition as far from complete. Much interest was shown in the proposed moving picture story panorama of the Rogue River Valley, and exposition authorities asserted that this class of entertainment far excelled the exhibits for advertising purposes.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1915, page 2


    "Birth of a Nation" opens in San Francisco March 1, 1915.  A. C. Allen has no opportunity to see it. It opened in Portland on August 29, after completion of "Grace's Visit." Holbrook Withington and Lewis Bundy are not known to have left the valley before its completion.


    Game Warden  Finley has arranged to supply 600 feet of Rogue River fishing films for the moving picture panorama. A. C. Allen is preparing for the Rogue River Valley movies at the Oregon building at the fair.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 11, 1915, page 5


    Messrs. Allen, [Lewis] Bundy and Withington of Medford were in the city Monday evening conferring with the Commercial Club trustees in regard to an advertising project along moving picture lines. The Commercial Club men have taken the matter under consideration.

Ashland Tidings, March 11, 1915, page 8



    "We have arranged with A. C. Allen to get up a moving picture reel, telling the story of the Rogue River Valley and Crater Lake. The county court appropriated $600 to cover the expenses of the same, and he is donating his services and machinery free of charge. In these movies all phases of our domestic life will be featured, as well as the history of the valley and moving panoramas of our beautiful scenery, as well as the legend of Crater Lake.
    "We have arranged with State Game Warden Finley to secure duplicates of his reels, showing steelhead fishing in the Rogue by local anglers."
County Commissioner Frank H. Madden, "County Court to Improve Exhibit," Ashland Tidings, March 29, 1915, page 1


    A. C. Allen, the local moving picture man, took several hundred feet of C. E. Gates, F. W. Streets and the city council yesterday after[noon] in film. This was part of the film that will be sent to the San Francisco fair for exhibition in the Oregon Building. The city council of this city has appropriated $100, the Commercial Club $100, the Ashland business men $100 and the county court $600 for the making of the film of the valley.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 2, 1915, page 6



    Moving pictures of the fire department making a run are being taken by A. C. Allen this afternoon, the entire department being out, with all hands at their posts.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, April 3, 1915, page 2


    A moving picture of the Medford fire department in action was taken yesterday afternoon, and if it is as good as the original it will be quite an addition to the series of pictures now being taken of the Rogue River Valley. The department was first taken leaving the fire hall for a fire and was then taken in action unslinging the hose and using the nozzles. The pressure was good, and the picture will be a good display of our water system.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 4, 1915, page 6



    A. C. Allen has been busy in Medford during the past week securing moving pictures for the Jackson [County] exhibit at the fair.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, April 5, 1915, page 8


    The sixth grade of the Roosevelt School will give Shakespeare's "Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Page May 7. The purpose of this is to raise money to pay for a piano recently purchased for the school. The youngsters have been studying this play in connection with their reading work, and it is really remarkable how well they handle this difficult selection.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 10, 1915, page 6


    A. C. Allen and Judge Withington of the local moving picture corporation, owned and operated by the city and county court for the taking of local advertising pictures of the valley to display in the Oregon Building at the fair, were on the streets yesterday afternoon taking pictures of the crowds and other features. Among the other features was our police department taken in action, arresting the double of Charlie Chaplin now in our city advertising the famous comedian by [that] name. This stunt was very cleverly pulled off.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 11, 1915, page 8


    The engagement of Miss Josephine Root, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John M. Root, to  S. M. Bullis, son of S. S. Bullis, was announced Wednesday evening. Miss Root is well known in the valley and is one of the most popular young ladies of the younger set. Mr. Bullis has only resided in the valley for about a year, having come here from Chicago to manage his father's mine at Sterling. S. S. Bullis, the father of S. M. Bullis, is the owner of the street railway in this city and owns extensive property holdings throughout Jackson County.
    The engagement comes as a complete surprise to the many friends of the two young people.

"Society," Medford Sun, April 15, 1915, page 6



A. C. Allen, cash advanced for taking movies for Panama exposition . . . . $600.00

"County Court Proceedings," Medford Mail Tribune, April 16, 1915, page 7


    Mrs. Alan Brackinreed and Mrs. George B. Carpenter, president and second vice-president of the [Medford Drama] League, visited Miss Gallagher, principal of the Roosevelt School, during the week and witnessed a rehearsal of "Midsummer Night's Dream," which will be given by the students of the school. They reported the performance most creditable, and an effort will be made to secure a moving picture film of the principal dances and tableaux by A. C. Allen, to be included in the exhibition of the valley at the Panama exhibition. The league will endorse and support both the Roosevelt School performance and the film.
"New Officials for Drama League," Medford Mail Tribune, April 17, 1915, page 6


    Mrs. Alan Brackinreed and Mrs. George B. Carpenter, president and second vice-president of the league, visited Miss Gallagher, principal of the Roosevelt School, during the week and witnessed a rehearsal of "Midsummer Night's Dream," which will be given by the students of the school. They reported the performance most creditable, and an effort will be made to secure a moving picture film of the principal dances and tableaux by A. C. Allen, to be included in the exhibition of the valley at the Panama exposition. The league will endorse and support both the Roosevelt School performance and the film.

"News of Medford Drama League," Medford Sun, April 18, 1915, page 2



    Among the many spectators who witnessed the taking of the motion pictures in Payne's Gulch Sunday were Mr. and Mrs. Lee Root, Miss Mayme Deuel, Mr. and Mrs. Conro Fiero, Mr. and Mrs. B. B. Brown and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. U. Lumsden, Mr. and Mrs. Hutchison and daughter Fern, Ralph McCurdy, Mr. and Mrs. Childers, Mr. Westerlund, C. Y. Tengwald and W. Harrington.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 20, 1915, page 6


INDIAN MASSACRE AT TABLE ROCK ALARMS TRAVELERS,
FILM TO BE SHOWN LATER

    It was a peaceful Sunday afternoon, and we were driving along a rough country hill road about eighteen or twenty miles above Medford in the north end of Sams Valley, enjoying the quiet and beauty of the little meadow- and pine-covered hills, when a shriek rose from a little valley screened from our view by the heavy timber growth. For about ten seconds following this agonized cry of terror all was quiet, then, as suddenly as an April thundershower, the most terrible Indian war whoops and firing of guns burst on our astonished ears. We were startled, we were shocked, we couldn't believe our ears; we didn't think there were any Indians within a hundred miles of us, and yet right below us someone was in distress and was without doubt being bombarded by several hundred redskins.
    We didn't know what to do, having no weapons, but we had to do something, so we each grabbed up a monkey wrench and tore down the hillside toward the bedlam of yelling demons. The trail was rough and winding, but in a minute we were climbing the last little hill that separated us from the terrible slaughter. We topped the last hill, and there below us lay a little cabin, hewn of rustic logs, with a mammoth old fireplace of rough stones, in a little clearing. It was surrounded by a ferocious band of about thirty Indians, who were pumping shells at it as fast as they could load and fire.
    As we watched, too dumbfounded to move, a small band of mountaineers came rushing up the slope from a low-lying valley. They began firing as soon as they got within range, and the Indians began to drop on all sides. Ye gods, we were actually seeing a real Indian battle in the Rogue River Valley in the year 1915. The settlers were outnumbered by about five to one, though, and they were having a hard time advancing, and then several of them dropped. About that time we had recovered our nerve and let a yell out, "We're coming!" when a man stepped out from behind a small clump of trees and shouted, "For heaven's sake, Riegel, kill that Indian chief, we've only got forty more feet of film." It was director Judge Withington of the Rogue River Valley Moving Picture Company.
    By the time we came to it was all over, and another scene for the big advertising film that A. C. Allen of Medford is taking for the citizens of the valley for exhibition in the Oregon Building at the fair was completed.
    This film was taken Sunday in Payne's Gulch above Gold Hill, and is one of the best that they have taken. The Indians who acted in the picture are members of the local Redmen's lodge, and they certainly did their part well.
    The picture concerns the rescue of a miner's wife and is supposed to be an actual happening in this valley in the early days. Miss Josephine Root played the part of the miner's wife and Mr. Sprague Riegel of Gold Hill played the miner's part. Various other local men acted in the picture as mountaineers. Walter Kennedy was the Indian chief.
    A large crowd witnessed the taking of the picture, and the entire day was spent in rehearsing and photographing it.
    The county court and Medford Commercial Club and city council and Ashland business men are backers of this enterprise, and it is without a doubt the best advertising scheme the valley has ever had.
    A. C. Allen is donating his machine and entire time free, also Mr. Withington, the director, is donating his time. Mr. Bundy, the author of the various scenarios and the father of the scheme, is working absolutely free, and all the participants donate their time.
    The entire film will be completed soon and will be shown for several days in the valley before sending to the fair.
Medford Sun, April 20, 1915, page 6


    The local moving picture company, who are taking the advertising pictures of the valley, journeyed to Jacksonville Tuesday afternoon and took several films full of pictures. The main picture taken was in a reproduction of a train holdup in the early days of this country. The Barnum engine and two cars were used, as the held-up train, and various prominent citizens of this city acted as bandits. The light was very good, and Mr. Allen, the camera man, thinks that the films will be very good.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 21, 1915, page 6


    A trial run of the moving pictures of the Rogue River Valley taken by A. C. Allen was given at the Page Theater Thursday afternoon, and proved mechanically perfect. All the scenes were without a flaw, and the next step will be to connect them on the film so as to form a connected narrative. The dramatic elements in the pictures are the work of Judge Withington. An early public presentation of the pictures will be made, after which they will be shown at the fair.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, April 23, 1915, page 2


    Holbrook Withington of Medford was with the motion picture company Tuesday afternoon.
    A. C. Allen and his moving picture company of Medford were in town Tuesday staging a holdup on the Barnum railroad in the western end of the city. A number of citizens of Jacksonville were present at the scene, which was very realistic. When completed the film with others showing scenes in this valley will be sent to [the] Panama exposition at San Francisco and used in advertising Jackson County.

"Local News,"
Jacksonville Post, April 24, 1915, page 3


    The moving pictures that A. C. Allen has been taking of the valley for advertising purposes at the fair were given a trial run at the Page the middle of the week. They proved very good. All the scenes are perfect. About three thousand feet have been taken already, and about that many more will be taken. The pictures will be shown in this city soon.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, April 24, 1915, page 6


    Probably one of the most deserving performances from an amateur standpoint ever to be given in Medford is the "Mid-Summer Night's Dream," which will be presented by the children of the Roosevelt School under the direction of the principal, Mrs. Gallagher. According to those who have seen the rehearsals the progress made by these young scholars is simply amazing, while the educational value in awakening a deep and lasting sense of the vitality and worth of Shakespeare can scarcely be overestimated. The performance will be given at the Page, May 7, and the Drama League will do everything in its power to see that there is a capacity house. So favorably impressed was A. C. Allen after seeing some of the dances in the play that he has decided to take a moving film of several of them to be shown in the Rogue River movie at the Panama exposition.

"Appreciation of Andrews Family by Medford Drama League," Medford Sun, April 25, 1915, page 4



    Medford Sun: A. C. Allen and Judge Withington of the local moving picture corporation, owned and operated by the city and county court for taking of local advertising pictures of the valley to display in the Oregon building at the fair, were on the streets yesterday afternoon taking pictures of the crowds and other features. Among the other features was our police department taken in action.
"State News," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, April 29, 1915, page 4


    The wedding of Miss Josephine Root and Mr.  Bullis will take place at high noon today at the Root residence on West Main in the presence of only the immediate family. The wedding was set for a later date, but owing to the fact that Mr. Bullis was called to Sterling to take charge of the mines there it was decided that the ceremony be performed at once in order that his bride could accompany him. Both young people are very popular members of Medford's younger social set. Miss Root is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Root, pioneer residents and property owners in the Rogue River Valley. Mr. Bullis is the son of S. S. Bullis, a large property holder, the owner and manager of the Southern Oregon Traction Company. After the wedding the young couple will leave for Sterling, where they will reside until the close of the mining season, when they will take an extensive wedding trip in the East, including New York and other points.

"Society News," Medford Sun, May 1, 1915, page 2


    The wedding of Miss Josephine Root and Mr. Seth Bullis took place at high noon Saturday afternoon at the Root residence on West Main in the presence of only the immediate family, the marriage ceremony being performed by Rev. William Hamilton of the Episcopal Church. After the ceremony a ten-course dinner was served at the Medford Hotel, covers being laid for eight. Mr. Mohr of the Medford Hotel honored the bridal couple by having the table set with the gold service, which is only used on very rare occasions. The dinner was served in the private dining room, on the mezzanine floor, which was beautifully decorated with garlands of roses, with a massive centerpiece of roses. The bridal party consisted of Mr. and Mrs. Seth Bullis, Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Root, parents of the bride, Mr. and Mrs. L. F. Root, Helen Bullis and Raymond Bullis. The young couple left by automobile for the Sterling mine, where Mr. Bullis intends to take charge until the mining season closes, when they will leave for an extended honeymoon, including the exposition, en route to New York. Mr. Bullis is one of Medford's most popular young ladies, and is the only daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. M. Root, residents and property owners of Medford and the Rogue River Valley. Mr. Bullis is the son of S. S. Bullis, a large property holder, being owner and manager of the Southern Oregon Traction Company, and recently came west to look after his father's mining interests.

"Society," Medford Sun, May 2, 1915, page 5  They divorced in the 19


    The children of the sixth grade of the Roosevelt School, under the able direction of Mrs. Gallagher, will present "A Midsummer Night's Dream" at the Page Theater next Friday afternoon. At the beginning of the school year Mrs. Gallagher found this grade very deficient in reading, and it was with some misgiving that the study of this, the lightest of Shakespeare's comedies, was begun in February. The improvement is amazing. The parents, who were at first skeptical, have become enthusiasts. Every member of the class has a speaking part. So pleased was A. C. Allen with the rehearsal that he has decided to use some of the scenes in the movie films for the Panama exposition. The third and fourth grades contribute the fairies and brownies to the "dream" play.
    A Maypole dance by the first grade will precede the play. It is hoped the proceeds from this entertainment will be sufficient to make the final payment on the piano. Attend this performance and see for yourself what children can do. The following program will be given:
    Songs by Roosevelt School, "No Land Like Oregon," "Song of May," "Now Is the Month of Maying"; Maypole dance, girls of second grade; "Tinker's Song," first and second grades and fourth and fifth boys; folk game, "Captain Jinks," second grade; folk game, "To Banbury Cross," fourth and fifth grade girls; folk game, "Hot Cross Buns," first grade; "A Midsummer Night's Dream," pupils of sixth grade, cast: Theseus, Perry Gregg; Egens, Yolane Rummel; Lysander, Wilbur Phelan; Demetrius, Charles Jackson; Philostrate, Velma Hull; Quince, John Bateman; Bottom, Lethew Meadows; Flute, Edward Kelly; Snout, Rupert Maddox; Snug, Marnie Olson; Starveling, Clarence Steward; Oberon, Clare Pickel; Titania, Pauline Johnson; Puck, Bertha Harting; Hippolyta, Bruce Putnam; Hernia, Irmia Dyer; Helena, Josephine Lindley; Pear Blossom, George Cherry; Cobweb, James Henson; Moth, Kenneth Cole; Mustard Seed, Ralph Lunt; attendants on Theseus and Hippolyta, Lois Maxwell, Velma Hull, Sterling Bullock.
"Society," Medford Sun, May 2, 1915, page 5


SCHOOL PLAY IN VALLEY MOVIES
    Recognizing the educational value of the Midsummer Night's Dream, which is to be given Friday afternoon at the Page, the Drama League has persuaded Mr. Allen to include it in the series of moving pictures that are to be shown at the fair in San Francisco.
    The Roosevelt School entertainment is introduced by English folk games and followed by the sixth grade play "A Midsummer Night's Dream." The English May Day idea has been carried throughout the entire program that is to be given Friday afternoon at 2:30 at the Page Theater.
    Only when it is remembered that there are but 122 pupils enrolled in this school and that every pupil is taking an active part can the efficient work of each teacher be fully appreciated.
    Public entertainments are generally given by the talented few, chosen and drilled for the occasion. Regardless of talent this program represents the everyday classroom work of each child.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 5, 1915, page 4


    G. Sooysmith drifts into the city from the country every now and then rigged out like a farmer who has lived on Butte Creek since 1848.
"Smudge Smoke," Medford Sun, May 13, 1915, page 4


    A. C. Allen plans to leave the first of the week for Crater Lake with his moving picture outfit to take final pictures for his Jackson County movies for the exposition.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, May 14, 1915, page 2


    "We are all looking forward to the moving pictures which Mr. Allen is taking, for we hear that they are exceedingly good. They will be a great attraction, and I am fully persuaded that a good many thousand people will see them and be interested in them before the season is over."
Frank TouVelle, "Jackson Exhibit Greatly Improved," Ashland Tidings, May 20, 1915, page 8


Put Valley in Moving Pictures
    Mr. Allen, leader of the movement to advertise Jackson County at the exposition with characteristic historical and local moving pictures, was in Ashland Tuesday in conference with Mayor Johnson in regard to the pictures for Ashland. It is proposed to put in Ashland lithia spring, a view of the start of the new scenic drive and any other unusual pictures that may be suggested. The pith of a moving picture is action, and big preparation will be made for the event, which will occur in about a week or ten days. There will be over three miles of film in the piece, starting with a pear tree in full bloom gradually fading away and presenting a beautiful woman, arms full of flowers, and named Miss Rogue River Valley. This maiden is wooed and wed by a Jackson County boy, and they start out to see the valley both in its historical and present aspect. The pictures will show what they witness on their trip. A very nice and interesting plan and one that will be of inestimable value in advertising this county and its resources. Much of it will find its way into the Pathé Weekly. The new development at Ashland is a fine subject for the weekly films if properly grouped and given attractive action. The project is a good one and is meeting with hearty support from valley communities. It is not a money-making enterprise, but is gotten up with a view of presenting the resources of this county in an interesting and attractive manner.
Ashland Tidings,
May 20, 1915, page 8


    In response to many inquiries as to the date of the production of the "movies" which A. C. Allen and Holbrook Withington are taking for the Jackson County exhibit at the Panama Pacific fair, the producers announce that if they have favorable weather they will be through taking pictures in about a week, as they already have about four reels. They cannot fix the date when the film will be shown here, as they are at the mercy of weather conditions, but the date will be announced as soon as possible in these columns.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, May 21, 1915, page 2


    According to information given out by A. C. Allen and Judge Withington, in charge of the taking of motion pictures with Rogue River Valley as the setting place, the task will be completed in about a week, providing weather conditions permit. The pictures will be shown at the Jackson County exhibit at the Panama-Pacific Exposition.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, May 22, 1915, page 4



Take Movies of Park Scenes
    A. C. Allen was up from Medford Friday accompanied by a party of Medford people who are taking the motion pictures which are to be shown in the Oregon building at the exposition. Several scenes were taken in the park, but owing to the cloudy day a second trip will be made to Ashland and other scenes taken. A story is being interwoven with the pictures, and hundreds of scenes from throughout the valley will be shown. It is hoped to have the pictures shown at a local theater before they are sent to the exposition. About 4,000 feet of film have been taken. When completed there will be 7,000 feet. Judge Withington of Medford is directing the production and directed the action of the Medford actors and the crowd of Ashland supes [supernumeraries--"extras"] in Friday's pictures. About a hundred of Ashland's most handsome men and beautiful young ladies were used Friday. Doc Freeburg took an important part in the production.
Ashland Tidings,
May 24, 1915, page 1


Wanted Some Free Advertising
    The value of advertising is certainly appreciated by a certain tobacco salesman who was in Ashland Friday. This quick-witted gentleman grasped an opportunity for some free advertising while the moving picture men from Medford were taking pictures at the entrance to the park and drove his car, which has a big tobacco sign emblazoned on the side, in front of the picture machine. He then simulated an amateur driver having trouble and managed to jerk around in front of the machine for several seconds, keeping his sign in a prominent place. It was a little overdone, however, and this part of the film is to be cut out.
Ashland Tidings,
May 24, 1915, page 1


    The movies which are being taken through the valley by A. C. Allen and Holbrook Withington for the Jackson exhibit at the exposition will be completed within the next week, provided a couple of clear days allow of the finishing up in this district. The pictures will be shown in Medford and probably in Ashland before being taken to the exposition.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 24, 1915, page 5


    When the moving picture people were up from Medford Friday afternoon and snapping pictures in the park, all of the available young people around town were herded up into the park, among them Misses Riegel and Beede from the recorder's office. Upon leaving the office the young ladies locked the door and unknowingly locked Councilmen Cunningham and Riegel in the recorder's private office. The imprisoned men finally made Fire Chief Robison aware of their predicament by pounding on the wall and were released.

"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 24, 1915, page 8


    Judge Withington, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Fiero and A. C. Allen were among the party of Medfordites who engaged in taking moving pictures in the city Friday.

Ashland Tidings,
May 24, 1915, page 8


    While on the way to the summit and along the Dead Indian Road, the party by appointment met the genial A. C. Allen with his moving picture camera, who, after staging the scene, proceeded to run off many feet of film, showing the Grizzlies in action. The club feels highly honored in being asked to act for the movie man and to be the first organization in southern Oregon to be solicited for the purpose of obtaining moving pictures of its organization at work.
"46 Grizzlies Hike to Summit of Grizzly Peak," Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1915, page 3


GRIZZLIES ARE SNAPPED BY MOVIE MAN
    Forty-six members of the Grizzly club with several visitors left Medford Hotel Sunday morning at 5 o'clock for the summit of Grizzly Peak, east of Ashland. The party was conveyed by automobiles to the railroad crossing three miles south of Ashland, where the machines were abandoned and the most strenuous hiking trip in the history of the club was commenced.
    The trip was designed as a test trip for membership in the club. One of the requirements for membership in the organization is to walk from the Southern Pacific tracks to the summit of Grizzly Peak and back. Although the trip was a long and difficult one, with no water except what little could be carried along, every member of the party succeeded in making the complete ascent.
    While on the way to the summit and along the Dead Indian Road, the party by appointment met the genial A. C. Allen with his moving picture camera, who, after staging the scene, proceeded to run off many feet of film showing the Grizzlies in action. The club feels highly honored in being asked to act for the movie man and to be the first organization for the purpose of obtaining moving pictures of its organization at work.
    After the last member of the party arrived at the summit, an old-time picnic dinner was served. The committee discovered that the supply of water was exhausted and that consequently the much-needed coffee could not be made, and that to make the return trip without water or anything to drink would be almost an impossibility for many of the members. But, thanks to Mrs. Bunce, who discovered a bountiful supply of snow, which was soon melted, drinking water and coffee made, and a dinner served that will never be forgotten by any member of the party, for this was at least one time in the lives of all that refreshments were actually necessary.
    At 6 o'clock, and after the party had somewhat recuperated and refreshed and witnessed a real snowball fight and toboggan slide on the snow on the 30th of May, and had the pleasure of viewing one of the most wonderful and beautiful pictures that nature has ever painted or of which man has ever dreamed, the return trip was commenced and made over a different route, which brought the party out at the old mill on the Pacific Highway, north of Ashland, at 11 p.m., where the autos were waiting to convey the party back to Medford.
    No one who has ever had the pleasure of viewing the Rogue River Valley from this peak, with the great systems of mountain ranges on every side and the snow-capped peaks of Mount Shasta, Mount McLoughlin and Mount Ashland in the distance, will ever regret making the trip to the summit of Grizzly Peak.
Medford Sun, June 2, 1915, page 3


Medford Grizzlies Scale Grizzly.
    Forty-six members of the Medford Grizzly hiking club climbed Grizzly Peak last Sunday and enjoyed a very pleasant day of real mountaineering. Moving pictures of the crowd were taken by A. C. Allen. The Medford Tribune concludes an interesting article on the trip with the following:
    "No one who has ever had the pleasure of viewing the Rogue River Valley from this peak, with the great systems of mountain ranges on every side and the snow-capped peaks of Mount Shasta, Mount McLoughlin and Mount Ashland in the distance, will ever regret making the trip to the summit of Grizzly Peak."
"In the Social Realm," Ashland Tidings, June 3, 1915, page 4


    A. C. Allen is taking moving pictures of Crater Lake for the Jackson County display at the fair.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1915, page 5


    A. C. Allen, who is taking the southern Oregon moving pictures for the Oregon exhibit at the exposition, is at Crater Lake getting several hundred feet of film.

"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 7, 1915, page 5


COMPLETE FILM OF ASHLAND VIEWS
    Messrs. Allen and Withington, who are taking the "movies" of the valley for the Jackson County exhibit at the San Francisco fair, have just finished their scenic views of Ashland, and Mr. Withington states that Mr. Allen has secured scenics which equal the best of the professionals. Glimpses of Ashland Creek, up the canyon, above the reservoir, panoramas of the boulevards and the Pacific Highway which cannot be excelled have been taken. The scenic attractions around Ashland are such that in this respect, Ashland will outshine Medford. But in these scenes, credit will be given where credit is due. E. V. Carter has, by allowing them the use of his car, enabled them to get the most attractive scenes in that end of the valley, which for natural beauty far exceed anything else except the views along Rogue River.
    They will probably have the complete film ready for local exhibition sometime next week.
Medford Sun,
June 8, 1915, page 6



    A thousand men volunteered Wednesday morning of this week to work on the scenic drives elevated above the Plaza, a spontaneous movement which will be duly featured in picture films being prepared by A. C. Allen. Perhaps the number was not 1000, but it was formidable.
"Ashland and Vicinity," Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1915, page 5


Movies of Ashland Are Completed
    Messrs. Allen and Withington, who are taking the "movies" of the valley for the Jackson County exhibit at the San Francisco fair, have just finished their scenic views of Ashland, and Mr. Withington states that Mr. Allen has secured scenics which equal the best of the professionals. Glimpses of Ashland Creek, up the canyon, above the reservoir, panoramas of the boulevards and the Pacific Highway which cannot be excelled have been taken. The scenic attractions around Ashland are such that in this respect Ashland will outshine Medford. But in these scenes credit will be given where credit is due. E. V. Carter has, by allowing them the use of his car, enabled them to get the most attractive scenes in that end of the valley, which for natural beauty far exceed anything else except the views along Rogue River.
    They will probably have the complete film ready for local exhibition sometime next week.--Medford Sun.
Ashland Tidings, June 10, 1915, page 6


    A. C. Allen, who is taking the moving pictures of valley scenes, will return to Ashland sometime this week to take pictures of the new auto camp grounds.

Ashland Tidings, June 14, 1915, page 1


    A. C. Allen, who has charge of the moving pictures of the Rogue River to be shown at the 1915 fair, reports that all the scenes will be completed in a week or ten days, except the Crater Lake film, and that the pictures will be shown at the Page Monday and Tuesday, July 5-6. The films will be ready for exhibition at the exposition by the middle of July, when the heaviest travel is expected to begin from the East.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, June 22, 1915, page 2


    The "movies" taken in the Rogue River Valley to be exhibited at the fair will be shown at the Page Theater, Monday and Tuesday, July 5 and 6, according to A. C. Allen, who is in charge of the taking of the pictures.

"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, June 23, 1915, page 2


    The movies of valley scenes taken for exhibition in the Oregon building at the Panama exposition will be shown at the Page Theater in Medford July 5 and 6, according to A. C. Allen, who took the pictures. It is hoped that it may be possible to have them shown at a local theater before they are shipped south.
Ashland Tidings, June 24, 1915, page 1


    The A. C. Allen moving pictures of the Rogue River Valley will be shown at the Page Theater next Monday and Tuesday, July 5 and 6.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, June 28, 1915, page 2


Valley Movies Shown Here First
    The moving pictures taken by A. C. Allen of Ashland and the Rogue River Valley will be shown for the first time in Ashland at the Vining Theater on Wednesday and Thursday, June 30 and July 1.
    There are between 5,000 and 6,000 feet of film in the pictures, which include many views of the valley's beauty spots artistically woven into an interesting story. A prominent Medford lady starred in the story. Pictures were taken here in the park, at the springs, on the streets, on the scenic drive and in other parts of the city.

Ashland Tidings,
June 28, 1915, page 1


MEDFORD FILMS TO BE SHOWN MONDAY
    Those who go to see the Rogue River Valley moving pictures at the Page July 5-6 (and from all indications, that includes everybody) need not go prepared to make allowances for amateur work, for the photography is up to the best professional standards.
    The producers have tried to avoid the mistake made by other counties of showing commonplace scenes which can be duplicated anywhere, and have adopted the plan of showing the attractive and distinctive features of the valley as they appear to a young lady who comes to visit friends and is so charmed by the attractions of the valley that she remains here. The present stage of development is contrasted with the old times by illustrating the stories told the fair visitor by some of the well-known old pioneers. All of the valley's attractions, including the magnificent scenery, are shown, with occasional bits of romance and comedy, and suggestions of the pleasures and luxury which are available, the whole being woven together with sufficient thread of a plot to hold the observer's interest.
    The most up-to-date dissolving views, novel introductions and tableaus are shown, the whole comprising 6 full reels, including over 250 scenes. The pictures of the Sterling mine excel any hydraulic mine pictures ever taken; one view, for which the producers waited nearly two hours, showing a peak of gravel weighing over 50 tons cave in in one big smash.
    The holdup of Barnum's train, the Indian fight in Payne's Gulch, "Lord Algy's" hunting trip and the butterfly dances by Miss Swem and four other pretty young girls at George B. Carpenter's country home being particularly effective, and the closing tableau is novel and charming.
    The pictures will be shown continuously from 2 p.m. until 11 p.m. each day and everyone should go the first day, as the pictures well merit a second visit.
Medford Sun, July 4, 1915, page 6


MOVIES REMARKABLE SCENIC PRODUCTION
OF LIFE IN VALLEY
    Great credit is due A. C. Allen, Holbrook Withington and their many assistants in preparing the moving picture scenario of the Rogue River Valley for exhibition at the San Francisco exposition. With one or two exceptions, due to cloudy weather at the time the pictures were taken, the pictures are clear and distinct. They comprise not only a panorama of the valley's beautiful scenery, but faithfully portray scenes from its early history as related by pioneers, contrasted with the development of today.
    The scenery shown depicts the orchards in bloom, the verdure-clad and snow-capped mountains, the newly completed Siskiyou grade, the paved Pacific Highway, the cities of Ashland and Medford, the Rogue River, its cascades and gorges, Mill Creek and Barr Creek falls, and the countless vistas that open on every side in the Rogue River Valley.
    The placer mining scenes at the Sterling Mine are probably the finest pictures of placer mining ever shown. They are contrasted with the primitive methods of the days of '49. Camping and hunting scenes are shown, while the fishing scenes on the Rogue give a good idea of the sport of fly fishing. Orchard scenes are numerous, while details of social life in the valley are well patronized.
    The Medford Community Day parade is shown, and the Ashland community labor on [the] scenic boulevard is also portrayed. Sports and exercises by school children are depicted, including the open-air production of "Midsummer Night's Dream" by the pupils of Roosevelt School. Glimpses of busy days on Ashland and Medford streets are also set forth.
    Glimpses of social life show a swimming party at a private swimming tank at a Gold Hill orchard, tennis and golf matches at the Medford Country Club, automobile drives and a fairy dance at a Medford country home. The scenario ends with the chief dancer fading into silhouette as the words "Come to Jackson County" gradually emerge in the background.
    Throughout the scenario runs a pleasing thread of comedy and romance that adds greatly to the attractiveness of the pictures, which are most artistically arranged. When it is considered that this is the first attempt, both of the photographers and actors, the result is remarkable and shows that Medford possesses genius for movie productions as well as in many other lines.
    The pictures will be shown again this afternoon and evening at the Page, and no one should miss seeing them. They are well worth while.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 6, 1915, page 3


VALLEY MOVIES PROVE GREAT FEATURE
    Great credit is due A. C. Allen, Holbrook Withington and their many assistants in preparing the moving picture scenario of the Rogue River Valley for exhibition at the San Francisco exposition. With one or two exceptions, due to cloudy weather at the time the pictures were taken, the pictures are clear and distinct. They comprise not only a panorama of the valley's beautiful scenery, but faithfully portray scenes from its early history as related by pioneers, contrasted with the development of today.
    The scenery shown depicts the orchards in bloom, the verdure-clad and snow-capped mountains, the newly completed Siskiyou grade, the paved Pacific Highway, the cities of Ashland and Medford, the Rogue River, its cascades and gorges, Mill Creek and Barr Creek falls, and the countless vistas that open on every side in the Rogue River Valley.
    The placer mining scenes at the Sterling mine are probably the finest pictures of placer mining ever shown. They are contrasted with the primitive methods of the days of '49. Camping and hunting scenes are shown, while the fishing scenes on the Rogue give a good idea of the sport of fly fishing. Orchard scenes are numerous, while details of social life in the valley are well patronized [sic--"portrayed"?].
    The Medford Community Day parade is shown, and the Ashland community labor on [the] scenic boulevard is also portrayed. Sports and exercises by school children are depicted, including the open-air production of "Midsummer Night's Dream" by the pupils of Roosevelt School. Glimpses of busy days on Ashland and Medford streets are also set forth.
    Glimpses of social life show a swimming party at a private swimming tank at a Gold Hill orchard, tennis and golf matches at the Medford Country Club, automobile drives and a fairy dance at a Medford country home. The scenario ends with the chief dancer fading into silhouette as the words "Come to Jackson County" gradually emerge in the background.
    Throughout the scenario runs a pleasing thread of comedy and romance that adds greatly to the attractiveness of the pictures, which are most artistically arranged. When it is considered that this is the first attempt, both of the photographers and actors, the result is remarkable and shows that Medford possesses genius for movie productions as well as in many other lines.
Medford Sun, July 7, 1915, page 6


LAST CHANCE TO SEE VALLEY MOVIES
    On account of the increasing demand for a repetition of the Jackson County moving pictures, Messrs. Allen and Withington have leased the Star Theater for Friday, July 9, and the entire six reels will be shown, afternoon and evening, for positively the last time, as the pictures must be in San Francisco by the first of next week.
    Time and prices will be so arranged as to give everyone a last chance to see these wonderful pictures.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 8, 1915, page 3


VALLEY MOVIES AGAIN TONIGHT
    For the benefit of those who were unable to see the Jackson County motion pictures at the Page, as well as those who desire to see them again, Messrs. Allen and Withington have secured the Star Theater for Friday afternoon and evening, July 9, and the full six reels will be displayed again, in first-class manner, with good lighting.
    This will be positively the last chance to see these pictures before they are shown at the exposition, and in order that everyone may have an opportunity to see them, they will be shown at popular prices to any part of the house. Admission, adults 15 cents, children 10¢.
Medford Sun, July 9, 1915, page 6


GRACE'S VISIT TO VALLEY MAKES HIT AT EXPOSITION
    OREGON BUILDING, PANAMA-PACIFIC EXPOSITION, July 20.--Those who have seen the new film, "Grace's Visit to the Rogue River Valley," are unanimous in the conclusion that Grace certainly did not go home after her stay in that region of wondrous beauty and very evident prosperity. They find it easy to continue the film a reel or two and picture the dear girl as having found her prince in this fairyland, where she lived happy ever afterward, surrounded by peace, prosperity and plenty of little Graces and princes. If any fail to stay through the entire six reels it is only because they fear the spell may cause them to forget their happy homes elsewhere and hie themselves away to this flower land, this bower land, where everything delights the eye, dollars grow on trees, and monster trout seem to grab the hook almost without an invitation.
Distinguished Rotundities
    From the minute the distinguished Jacksonville rotundities doff their tiles and break forth in smiles in front of the Jackson County court house until that silhouetted form of the charming fairy brings the ending, there is not a dull moment, and through the hour and a half visitors follow Grace with pleasure as evident as that of the small boy in the wake of a brass band.
    The story of quaint Mrs. Merriman, telling of the times when "salt was worth its weight in gold," and the vivid portrayal of the attack of Black Bart upon that old wood-burner train, offer splendid contrast to the Rogue River progress of today as typified by the arrival of the Shasta deluxe train at the busy station in Medford and further exemplified by scenes of Medford's violent business activity on busy days. And how the visitors do enjoy watching the autos speeding over that stretch of Pacific Highway through the Siskiyous; this sight alone will bring hundreds through the Rogue River Valley.
Westerlund Makes Hit
    The grade crossings, the Grizzly Hiking Club, the beautiful Medford homes, new Elks club, and tiny John Westerlund (382 pounds in his stocking feet) leading that big parade give glimpses that make the crowd want to see more, and it is forthcoming in the golf pictures, placer mining, Grace and other nymphs in that inviting pool, the cattle and hay making scenes, and whoever saw a more thrilling picture than that splendorous litter of moneymakers?
    Those heavy-laden cherry trees make the mouth water, the mountain scenes bring a longing, the Rogue River fishing brings yells of delight and the waterfalls and Rogue River Gorge proclaim this a region unsurpassed for scenery. And then comes Ashland, beautiful Ashland, and her wonderful scenic driveway, that lovely park almost in the heart of the business district, those $175,000 lithia springs, the paved and parked boulevard, the panoramic views of the city and valley, and finally come Grace and her camping party, showing all the delights of game hunting in the Rogue River Valley, the tenderfoot adds comedy, the dancers and the many social affairs add grace and charm, proclaim a delightful culture there, and the country club, the fine homes and the vast stretches of incomparable orchards tell of prosperity. And the fairies give the one last added touch that leaves nothing to be desired.
    The film is a hit, a real hit.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 20, 1915, page 6


CRATER LAKE PICTURES AT STAR THEATER
    The pictures of Crater Lake taken by A. C. Allen that are to be sent to the San Francisco exposition will be shown at the Star Theater tonight and Sunday and Monday matinees and nights. These are the first moving pictures ever taken of the lake, are said to be fine, and this will be the only time they will be shown in Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 31, 1915, page 4


    Moving pictures of Crater Lake, taken by A. C. Allen of Medford, have been sent to the Oregon building at the exposition, where they will be shown in conjunction with the valley film which is making such a hit.
"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 5, 1915, page 5


JACKSON COUNTY MOVIES SHOWN AT EXPOSITION DAILY
    A. C. Allen has returned from San Francisco, where he inserted the Crater Lake movies in the Jackson County scenario and arranged to have the pictures shown every afternoon at 3:30 o'clock at the Oregon building, instead of every other day as heretofore. While there he lectured upon the pictures as shown and found no trouble in holding the audience, which had been leaving because the operator took three minutes to change films. Ben Sheldon and others will lecture hereafter.
    "I found that the Oregon and Canadian buildings had the largest crowds," said Mr. Allen, "but the movies were neglected. California has an operator busy from 10:30 a.m. until evening, while Oregon employs an operator only two hours a day.
    "There were no signs at the Jackson County exhibits in other buildings calling attention to the movies, and this should be remedied. Considerable jealousy exists among other Oregon counties against the Jackson County movies, because they are so much more complete than any other. The reel has been shortened some, but there is no reason why there should not be a daily exhibit of all the films.
    "Of course all the audience does not stay throughout the show, but all who are in any way interested do. It is the same with all the exhibits--those interested examine closely, those not, come and go.
    "Jackson County is certainly getting its share of publicity. Fresh fruit is needed to keep the display up to date."
Medford Mail Tribune, August 9, 1915, page 6


    On Tuesday Ben Sheldon of Medford and Judge William Colvig talked Rogue River Valley and Oregon to a theater full and throughout the day the Rogue River Valley pictures were viewed by many thousands.
"Free Things Draw Biggest at Fair," Albany Daily Democrat, August 18, 1915, page 1


World's Fair Advertising.
A. C. Allen, Crater movies for the world's fair [sic], $80; F. W. Bartlett, salary, looking after sporting exhibits, $65; H. O. Frohbach, salary taking care of exhibits, $125; Carl Purdy, supplies for exhibit, $39; Medford Printing Co., titles for moving pictures for exhibit, $17.25; Ben Sheldon, salary and expense to San Francisco, in interest of Jackson County exhibit, $149. Total . . . . . $475.25
"County Court Proceedings," Ashland Tidings, August 30, 1915, page 7


    A. C. Allen has returned from a trip to Crater Lake, where he took a new series of moving pictures of the scenic wonder.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, September 23, 1915, page 2


12,000 VISIT BUILDING DAILY
    Oregon Building, P.P.I.E., Oct. 15.--From computations just completed the numbers now passing through the Oregon Building daily average about 12,000. Sometimes the number falls to 6,000 or 8,000 because of weather conditions, but on occasions extraordinary they rise to 25,000 and 30,000, and it is believed that on Labor Day the Oregon Building crowd probably reached 40,000 during the nine hours the building is ever kept open. From 1,200 to 3,000 of the Oregon Almanac, [a] large and heavy booklet without pictures, are taken daily together with thousands of other pieces of literature about the different counties or sections of the state. About sixty-five different pieces of literature are available at a central booth in the building, and there are takers for all of it. Even with this list, there are some requests that cannot be filled. One man wants a booklet on walnut growing alone; another thinks we ought to have a booklet on forestry. Often there are requests for literature about some particular county that has no literature here, and many think there should be one booklet setting out exactly where homestead land can be found, together with all the information that will make it easy for them to go into Oregon and pick up a quarter section worth several thousands of dollars. However, there are not many questions that cannot be answered satisfactorily and followed up with some literature calculated to be helpful.
    The other form of publicity comes in the moving picture theater. This seats 200; pictures are shown from 1:30 to 5:30 each day, including Sunday, and during the afternoon Ralph J. Staehli, of Portland, moving picture expert, gives interesting explanation of the pictures and dwells upon the possibilities in Oregon. Very often standing room in the theater is at a premium. The crowds change about every two reels, and twelve are offered, so the number seeing Oregon through the movies averages from 1,000 to 1,200 daily. This is considered remarkable, for the people who pay their good money to get to the Exposition are not inclined to "waste" their good time in moving picture theaters. However, the one at the Oregon building is especially fine and catches the people for a time at least. On the outside of the building is a large stand [with] the names of the films shown and the hour at which they are presented. This brings many into the building, and brings many back to see the particular thing in which they are interested.
    Of the films, the Pendleton Round-Up is probably the most popular. As every Oregonian knows, this is full of thrills from start to finish, and the fame of the roundup has spread to the uttermost corners of the earth. The crowds laugh and cheer this film, just as they would the big show, and there is no doubt but that this film has brought and will continue to bring many people into and through Oregon at Round-Up time. And the Portland Rose Festival convinces them that Oregon must be, indeed, a most lovely spot in which to live. The picture of the "Logging Industry" shows one of Oregon's greatest industries and holds the audience spellbound. Most of the lookers have never seen really great forests and have never seen how trees and logs are handled. This picture shows the erection of the Oregon Building, and this arouses their enthusiasm. The Columbia River Highway pictures, with the wonderful scenes along that driveway, come in for enthusiastic praises, and the Oregon Fish and Game reel makes every sportsman in the audience long to land in dear old Oregon. The farming lands and diversified methods are shown in the pictures devoted to the "Apple and Hop Industry." There are some very beautiful pastoral scenes in this. The Rogue River Valley comes in for good advertising in the film "Grace's Visit to the Rogue River Valley," and Ben Sheldon, of Medford, gives explanation of the scenes as often as time available makes possible. The Klamath Falls film, the last one to be added to the theater equipment, is a beauty and is enlarged upon by Phil Sinnott, Klamath's representative. It is believed by the Oregon Commission and all the people about the building that the moving picture theater with its excellent films is one of the most effective means of advertising at the fair.
La Grande Observer, October 20, 1915, page 3


World's Fair Advertising
A. C. Allen, expense of trip to San Francisco and work on movies . . . . . . $25.00
"Court House News," Medford Mail Tribune, November 29, 1915, page 5


    The educational motion picture was for the first time given a real test at the Panama-Pacific Exposition, and to the credit of the Oregon commission can it be said that in spite of active competition of 87 other theaters on the grounds, pictures of Oregon's scenic assets, specializing on the Columbia River Highway, Crater Lake and the Rogue River country, were shown to an average of about 1200 people each day.
"'Oregon First' Is a Slogan Recognized in San Francisco," Oregon Daily Journal, Portland, December 5, 1915, page 7



    Mr. A. C. Allen and Judge Holbrook Withington, who are at the head of the movement to organize a motion picture film company for Rogue River Valley, report excellent progress in the matter. They have already a large part of the equipment and have reached a point in the initial work that practically assures success.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, December 7, 1915, page 2


    A. C. Allen and Holbrook Withington of Medford, who directed and photographed the Rogue River Valley moving pictures which were shown at the exposition, are organizing a motion picture company to produce in this valley. The accessibility of varied locations and the weather conditions here would seem to be almost ideal for such a venture.
Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1915, page 1

Ad for Albert C. Allen film, February 16, 1916 Medford Mail Tribune
February 16, 1916 Medford Mail Tribune

LOCAL MOVIES AT PAGE THEATER GOOD
    "In Southern Oregon," the moving pictures taken by Judge Withington and A. C. Allen, were given at the Page Theater last night to a large crowd, and the pictures pronounced better than the first. Another large crowd will see the films today and tonight. They are worthwhile.
Medford Mail Tribune,
February 17, 1916, page 3



PHOTOPLAY IS ACTED NEAR MEDFORD
IN SISKIYOU MOUNTAINS
Photographers Prepare to Establish Permanent Commercial Studio in Rogue River Valley, Asserting Pacific Highway Has Opened Up Wealth of Material in Way of Natural Stage Settings.
    MEDFORD, Or., March 4.--(Special.)--That the Pacific Highway over the Siskiyous has opened up a wealth of moving picture material is the belief of Holbrook Withington and A. C. Allen, who took the Medford movies for the Panama Exposition, and are now preparing to establish a permanent commercial moving picture studio in the Rogue River Valley.
Movie Moonshiners, March 5, 1916 Oregonian
    A few of the natural stage settings are shown in some of their photographs, and a scenario is being prepared, based upon a raid on Siskiyou "moonshiners," with a liberal romantic theme worked in.
    The plot has not been completed, but it probably will include the hero's escape from the moonshiners by jumping from a concrete bridge to the top of a passing Southern Pacific train, the heroine threatened with death in the boiling springs near Ashland, an attack upon the moonshiners' camp, and a pursuit through the Ashland "glaciers."
    Messrs. Allen and Withington maintain that there is every type of natural scene in and near Medford with the exception of "marines," but as the ocean is only 100 miles away this difficulty can be readily overcome.
Oregonian, Portland, March 5, 1916, page E9


Will Stage Movie Thriller Near Here
    Messrs. Allen and Withington, the Medford photographers who took the motion pictures of the Rogue River Valley woven together with a thread of drama, which made such a hit at the Oregon building at San Francisco throughout the fair, proclaim that the Pacific Highway has opened up a wonderful assortment of scenic settings which they will use in several picture dramas which they contemplate staging. A motion picture producing company has been organized for the valley, with these gentlemen as the prime movers.
    A picture is now being prepared for production and will be staged in the Siskiyou Mountains. The plot of the scenario revolves around a raid upon a "moonshiners'" camp in the Siskiyous, with a romantic theme woven in with sensational features.
    Among other settings in the vicinity of Ashland it is planned to have the Jackson Hot Spring, scenes on the Siskiyou grade and on Mount Ashland used. The heroine will be threatened with death in the hot spring, the hero will jump from one of the concrete bridges near Steinman to a moving picture train on the railroad below, and other "thrillers" making use of the thousands of "different" settings near this city used.
    A commercial motion picture studio will be established near Medford, in all probability. The weather and atmospheric conditions of the valley are said to be ideal for motion photography, and the valley affords an unlimited variety of settings.
Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1916, page 1



    A. C. Allen of Medford was in Ashland Friday. Mr. Allen is enthusiastic over the possibilities of producing motion pictures in the valley, and with other Medford men has formed a company for commercial production of "movies."

"Local and Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1916, page 5



Movies to Impress Fish Screen Need
    A. C. Allen, who took the Rogue Valley motion pictures which were shown at the San Francisco exposition, has secured some fine pictures of the Aitken fish screen and has taken them to Salem, where he will show them before the legislature in an endeavor to convince them of the need for adequate screen legislation.
Ashland Tidings, January 25, 1917, page 1


Rare Old Film Is Reprocessed for Showing March 5
    A realistic glimpse of the Rogue River Valley as it was in the pre-World War I years, and of the people as they were when "atoms and space travel weren't even in the funny papers" will be offered the public March 5 with the showing of "Grace's Visit to the Rogue Valley" (Oregon).
    It's the family made by A. C. Allen Sr., and Holbrook Withington, starring Grace Andrews, now known as Mrs. Conro Fiero. It was made to be shown at the Panama exposition in San Francisco in 1915.
    The rare old film was obtained by valley friends of Allen and Mrs. Fiero and has been reprocessed to be preserved in the Jacksonville Museum. Before it is placed in the museum the premiere showing of the reprocessed film has been arranged to help defray the costs of reprocessing it.
    The party will start at 8 p.m., and a limited number of tickets will be available. They are to be sold at Anders Photo Shop in the Medford Shopping Center, Barker's and Swem's in downtown Medford and at the Rogue Valley Country Club.
    The film is approximately one hour long, and there will be two showings in the one evening. The second showing will follow a social intermission and discussion of the film with Mrs. Fiero and Allen, who are to be special guests.
    It will probably take two showings to enable people to recognize many valley citizens who appear in the film. The years have made changes in the people as well as in the towns, resorts, farm and homes that were photographed by Allen and his associate, Withington, then a Medford attorney.
    The film opens with Grace Andrews, recently on Broadway in David Belasco productions, arriving on the train (there were really passenger trains in Medford then). The railroad station scene shows the actress being met by Susan Deuel, now Mrs. Gain Robinson.
    The two young ladies dressed in the high fashions of the day tour the valley with the movie camera focused on them. During the tour they are entertained with reenactments of early history as they travel from one community to another. The list of events includes a train robbery and an Indian raid.
    Views of the then "progressive Medford" will be a laughing matter to the younger generation, but there are many scenes to evoke nostalgia for others, who recall the romantic days of the "fruit boom in the Rogue River Valley."
    A souvenir will be given at the door will show a copy of the film title and a picture of Grace Andrews, taken from the film.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 21, 1965, page 7


Pictures Depict Life in Valley in [1915]
    Friday night's the night at the Rogue Valley Country Club when the pages of Southern Oregon history will be turned back to the year [1915] with the showing of the re-released film "Grace's Visit to Rogue Valley, Oregon."
    The fun evening has been planned to give valley residents an opportunity to help sponsor the gift of this historic film to the Jacksonville Museum.
    The show starts at 8 p.m. There will be two showings of the film, sparked with nostalgic quips from spectators and emcees.
    During the social intermission the star of the show, Grace Andrews Fiero, and A. C. Allen, who did the filming, will respond to interviews and questions from the audience with the guidance of Russ Jamison, broadcaster, and Robertson Collins, who will give the history of the film's restoration. They will assist in the positive identification of the many valley people in the script.
    The film was made to tell the Jackson County story to the world at the Pan American Exposition in San Francisco in 1915. I"t has been re-processed to preserve the story for generations of Jackson County people.
    Through the six-reel film Grace and her companion on tour, Susan Deuel, now Mrs. Gain Robinson of Medford, visit the region--its recreational areas, its mines, its farms, its cities and its orchards. They listen to the stories of its history, which are reenacted in the manner of the old silent film. They participate in the social life of the period--a period in which ambition blended with gaiety and even splendor to create a society that was individual.
    The pictures on this page are not from the film, but from scrapbooks depicting the same period. They show some of the same places, some of the same people--women with a Parisian tilt in their hats, men with a continental look about the clothes they wore, all the women beautiful and all the men with money, at least for that fleeting moment in history they later labeled "The Boom."
Medford Mail Tribune, February 28, 1965, page B1

Albert C. Allen, November 30, 1972 Medford Mail Tribune
Private Services Held for Author Albert C. Allen
    Private services for Albert C. Allen, 97, who died in a Medford nursing home Tuesday, were held today at the Perl Funeral Home followed by entombment in the IOOF Eastwood Mausoleum.
    Mr. Allen came to the Rogue River Valley in 1904 and recorded much of the area's history 10 years later when he filmed the motion picture "Grace's Visit to the Rogue River Valley," now preserved in the Jacksonville Museum.
    The film was re-shown just before Thanksgiving at an event arranged by Mrs. Conro Fiero, the former Grace Andrews, featured in the scenario.
    As author, horticulturist and wildlife photographer, Mr. Allen was best known during his more active years. He, however, sold a number of films, including a Pathé scenic of "Pear Growing in Oregon" and others on fishing and hunting in Oregon and Idaho, taken while he was newsman for Pathé.
    He was first to film Crater Lake, and his auto was the first to make the trip into Crater Lake National Park.
    Material for his book, "Crater Lake and its Legend," includes much information he obtained from Will Steel, known as father of Crater Lake National Park. One of the illustrations shows Judge Steel's party leaving Medford for Crater Lake in 1903.
    A veteran of the Spanish-American War, some of his technical writing, published after he resigned his commission and was honorably discharged, compared the merits of the Krag-Jorgensen and Mauser rifles.
    His versatility was further evidenced in such books as "King of the Wilderness," "The Little Shepherd of Lava Lake," "Meeko" and "Rabbit Trails."
    Born in Nashville, Tenn., June 18, 1875, Mr. Allen was the son of Leven C. Allen and Kate McKee Allen. He was married in Salt Lake City, Utah, in 1899 to Lillian Keith. Following her death he was married in Eugene, Ore. in 1926 to Bessie Courtney, who also preceded him in death.
    He is survived by a son, Albert C. Allen Jr., a grandson and two great-grandchildren, all residing in the Modoc Road area of the Table Rock district, where Mr. Allen had his own print shop in his home on the Rogue River.
    He started writing as a child. He wrote for school publications, newspapers and magazines before he went into authorship of books.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1972, page 15


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Sound track to KMED's 1965 Edition of "Grace's Visit to the Rogue Valley"
Including Interviews with Grace Fiero and A. C. Allen
    Voiceover: The story we present now was recorded on film over fifty years ago. It was part of a film story called "Grace Visits the Rogue River Valley" [sic], commissioned by Jackson County to depict life at that time in the Rogue River Valley for promotional showings at the Pan-Pacific Exposition [sic] in San Francisco in 1914 and 1915 [sic]. We choose to call it the golden era. It depicts a golden era in the fascinating social and historical development of the Rogue River Valley in Southern Oregon, the bustle and boom in the orchard business in Southern Oregon, and the glamor and excitement of the social life of that time.
    On the program you will meet Mr. A. C. Allen, who though he lacked photographic experience, managed to record the story on a hand-cranked thirty-five-millimeter motion picture camera, developed the negative by handmade primitive methods, then frame by frame printed the finished product for showing in San Francisco. You will also meet Grace Fiero, who as a former [unintelligible] was the only professional to appear in the story used as the basis for the film. This then is the golden era, recollections on film, which following the original presentation on KMED-TV will be placed in the custody of the Southern Oregon historical museum.
    Russ Jamison: I'm Russ Jamison of KMED, and our guest is Mrs. Grace Fiero, the only professional actress to appear in this fifty-year-old film that you're about to see. Mrs. Fiero--Grace--how did you happen to become a part of this film?
    Grace Fiero: Well, my family, the Andrews Opera Company, had settled here in the valley, and Holbrook Withington, who directed this film, was very much interested in the theater, and was backstage there a lot, and through that I met Holbrook Withington, and he asked me to be in this film.
    Jamison: Well, those were somewhat the boom days of the Rogue Valley, weren't they, 1914-15? [The Orchard Boom ended in 1912.]
    Fiero: Well, the boom was still on, but it had really started in 1909 and 1910.
    Jamison: That was about the time Conro Fiero came--
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Your husband to be.
    Fiero: Yes, he came out here through Honoré Palmer [Potter Palmer, married to Bertha Honoré]; you know the Modoc Orchards? Well, he had known him in Chicago, and Honoré came back and told Conro how marvelous this place was, and he came out and bought the orchard which is now Mon Desir. We built that house while we were engaged.
    Jamison: How did you meet Conro, and where?
    Fiero: Oh, Holbrook Withington told me that Conro wanted to meet the girl with the red hat with the cherries on it.
    Jamison: Now, that's great.
    Fiero: Now that was great. So I went to the Wigwam [at Main and Oakdale] for a dance. Every Thursday night they had a dance at the Wigwam tent, which was across from the park--the present park, where the library is--and when I arrived there, with another gay blade from the Rogue Valley, I forgot all about him when I met Conro through Holbrook Withington. We danced all evening, and [I] saw him every day afterwards, and soon we were engaged.
    Jamison: Does this film that we're about to see pretty carefully reflect the social life of the day?
    Fiero: Ah, yes, those were gay, happy days. We were just dancing and swimming and picnicking all the time.
    Jamison: Well, it sounds very interesting and exciting, and I hope you are as excited as I am to see again these scenes from [1915] in the Rogue Valley. [The film was shot in 1915.] But our thanks to you, Grace Fiero, for this personal sidelight on the real Grace, and now the fanciful Grace as she visits the Rogue River Valley.
[film begins]
    Jamison: Grace's Visit to the Rogue River Valley, scenario by A. C. Allen and Holbrook Withington. And there she is, Grace Andrews as she visits the Rogue Valley. Where is this, Grace?
    Fiero: This is the railroad station when I just arrived visiting Susan Deuel, who's now Mrs. Gain Robinson--and that's Conro Fiero, and I have a romance with him all through this picture. We were married at that time.
    Jamison: Whose car, A.C.?
    A. C. Allen: The car [a Peugeot] belonged to Mr. George Carpenter, who was an orchardist down near Phoenix.
    Jamison: You're arriving where, Grace"
    Fiero: Woodlawn Orchards, which is now Mon Desir [Restaurant]. This is my old home, and that's my sister-in-law, Emily Fiero, greeting me, and there's Susan Deuel again, who I'm supposed to visiting.
    Jamison: Presently Mrs. Robinson.
    Fiero: Oh, yes, [Mrs.] Gain Robinson.
    Jamison: And there's Mrs. [Artenicia Riddle Chapman] Merriman.
    Fiero: Mrs. Merriman tells me stories of the olden days, which are enacted in just a few minutes as the film unfolds
    Jamison: The scenario for acting this out: "At Gold Hill, salt was then worth its weight in gold," according to Mrs. Merriman. Where was this taken, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: This was a stage station on the Rogue River, just above Gold Hill, and remember, this is over fifty years ago!
    Jamison: Did you have any trouble recruiting actors and actresses?
    Allen: At first, they didn't believe it was movies. Now, after later on, when they really found out, it was hard to keep them out of the picture. They all volunteered.
    Jamison: There's a scene of weighing salt worth its weight in gold, and here comes the buggy up to the old stage stop. Any identification on any of these people, A.C., or has it been too long?
    Allen: I don't know any of them. I did know them, but I've forgotten their names.
    Jamison: Again, this was fifty-year-old film, filmed originally by A. C. Allen, on [a] thirty-five-millimeter hand-cranked camera. There's the sign.
    Fiero: Where was this taken?
    Allen: Up near Foots Creek, at that old stage station there.
    Jamison: [Reading sign] "Beware, don't carry treasure on the stage; Black Bart is loose again." What about this?
    Allen: [Referring to exposure of a feminine ankle.] This is a daring scene.
    Jamison: Now Mrs. Merriman, what she--
    Fiero: continues her story--what happened in the olden days.
    Allen: This was taken on the Jacksonville-Medford high--er, railway [on April 20, 1915], owned by Mr. Barnum and family and run by him. You'll see his train come along.
    Jamison: The actors were very authentic; they put railroad ties on the track.
    Allen: And Barnum was running the railway, and notice the speed at which he approaches that tie.
    Jamison: He was being especially careful. They're hiding in those bushes. Some of this film was damaged in the flood, wasn't it, A.C.?
    Allen: No, this is mostly age.
    Jamison: Just age.
    Allen: Fifty years.
    Jamison: Even by those standards in those days that was an old train, wasn't it?
    Allen: It was.
    Fiero: He was a funny-looking old man.
    Jamison: Was the line currently in operation at that time?
    Allen: Yes, he was running trains between Medford and Jacksonville and carrying passengers.
    Jamison: Here come the passengers. We'll have some closeups now; see how many you can identify, Grace and A.C., over fifty years ago, recalling in 1965.
    Allen: That is Mr. [William] Barnum, the owner of the railroad, being held up.
    Jamison: Now the conductor being robbed. All volunteer actors--
    Allen: Every one, without rehearsal.
    Fiero: There's Uncle Ed, Ed Andrews, that's being held up. There he is.
    Jamison: Quite reluctant.
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Reluctant participant.
    Fiero: There's Josephine Root, the tough girl in the play, and Gerald Sooysmith, with his hands up. With the top hat on. [Root was Grace's cousin. Josephine's mother's sister was married to Ed Andrews.]
    Jamison: Geraldine [sic] playing the very tough lady, right?
    Fiero: Yes. Don't recognize any others.
    Jamison: He got his tie clip on that one.
    Allen: This fella in the middle with a shovel was a stranger, a prospector, who had strolled down the track and was jammed by the actors, who pulled him and made [him] stay, and he thinks it's real.
    Jamison: They finally had to pull him away. Now he [unintelligible] that his money was safe; it was hid under his foot.
    Fiero: Now it's back at Woodlawn Orchard; Mrs. Merriman continuing the story of the old days.
    Jamison: Now see the difference now, she's saying, look how modern it is in [1915]. Where's this, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: This is the premium railway station in Medford. We were very proud of that in those days.
    Jamison: Even had train service. [Passenger service had ceased in 1955.]
    Allen: Even train service, and I'd like to travel on one now.
    Fiero: There's the French car again, the chauffeur. Now I'm being taken all over the valley and shown the places of interest.
    Allen: This is Mr. [Frank H.] Madden's residence, an orchardist in the valley.
    Fiero: That's on Old Stage Road isn't it?
    Allen: On the old stage road between Jacksonville and Gold Hill.
    Jamison: Now over the Siskiyous, the old, what--the old Pacific Highway?
    Allen: This is the old Pacific Highway, and [it] replaced the toll gate that used to be on part of the road and cut down lots of the grade, a modern new highway at that time.
    Jamison: Had some rather severe grades even for that day, didn't it?
    Allen: Yeah, much more than they have now.
    Jamison: An old touring car with the entourage going over the Siskiyous. Do you remember the day that that picture was filmed in [1915], Grace?
    Fiero: Yes, we had many wonderful trips over that Siskiyou. That was one of our trips that we took very often. It was a beautiful drive. We'd go over to Hornbrook.
    Jamison: Parts of that road are still passable today, aren't they?
    Allen: Part of them are still passable and they're being used!
    Jamison: I understand in this film you had a rather primitive method for developing the film, too, A.C.
    Allen: Yeah, I had no machinery whatever; I had to make racks and develop by hand in trays that I had to make myself.
    Jamison: The printing was done within the camera, wasn't it?
    Allen: It was done through the camera, and done at the rate of taking one picture at one turn of the crank. So you can figure out how many turns it had to make; they say sixteen turns to the foot, and six thousand feet.
    Jamison: A most interesting project in [1915], on a rather limited budget too. Now this is where, A.C.?
    Allen: This is climbing Grizzly Peak, opposite Phoenix, and the Grizzly mountain climbing team [on May 30, 1915].
    Jamison: Now, Grace Fiero, you're downtown as Grace Andrews, rather, visiting the valley.
    Fiero: Yes, this is East Main [in Medford]. That was the Andersons' old home. And there here we are at the Elks Lodge.
    Jamison: Present Elks club, currently standing today, rather new at that time, wasn't it?
    Fiero: Yes. [It was completed in the spring of 1915, when filming began.]
    Jamison: Everyone was proud of it. Remember, these pictures were taken for showing at the exposition in San Francisco, right?
    Allen: Yes, and they run every so often during the whole fair.
    Jamison: 1914 and '15. Roosevelt School at the time. What about the day that you took these pictures, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: This lives in my memory very distinctly, because at this time, for some reason or other, I had a very bad case of hay fever, could hardly see what I was taping. I'll remember it.
    Jamison: We will too, because you recorded on film the old Roosevelt School, and compared to today, no vegetation growing around. And now, Grace--
    Fiero: All right, this is [unintelligible] attacking, that we're about to see now
    Jamison: Mr. Payne was a rather elderly man at that time, wasn't he?
    Allen: Yes, he was an old man, and well known in this country, he and his family, an old prospector.
    Jamison: [Reading] "Sixty years ago" reenacting now. Who's this?
    Fiero: That's Josephine Root with Sprague Riegel.
    Jamison: Reenacting a scene of sixty years ago fifty years ago [on April 18, 1915].
    Fiero: [Laughing] Yes, a hundred and ten, isn't it?
    Jamison: That's what I make it. Now, there she comes.
    Fiero: On her way to get--a bucket of--oh!
    Allen: She discovers the Indians.
    Jamison: Uh-oh. Panic. What to do? Mr. Payne continues the story. Who are the actors acting as Indians?
    Allen: This is the Redmen Lodge of Medford, and they did a pretty good job of it. One member especially was very proud of his fall, which you will see presently near the cabin.
    Jamison: Payne's Gulch out in Sams Valley near Mr. Payne's cabin. And there comes the rescuers. And the man falls, and the heroine comes out. And again the heroine is--
    Fiero: Josephine Root, and Sprague Riegel.
    Jamison: And a very colorful gentleman there, Mr. Payne.
    Fiero: Wasn't he, though?
    Jamison: The old Rogue River Valley Country Club, built on property that belonged to Conro Fiero.
    Fiero: Yes, he had eighty acres out there which he gave to the country club at that time.
    Jamison: Predecessor to the present Rogue Valley Country Club.
    Fiero: Yes. And Chandler Egan laid out the golf course at this country club, as well as the new one.
    Jamison: [Reading} "Former national amateur golf champion, H. Chandler Egan." Demonstrating his drive, and there's another character in this. Who is that?
    Allen: Lord Algy [E. W. Carlton]. He was a sort of contender for Conro's girl's hand. But he had no chance.
    Jamison: You were actually married to Conro at the time.
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Fanciful story between you and Conro and Lord Algy.
    Allen: Vint Beall was one of the old-time ranchers, near Central Point, and he tells of the old times.
    Jamison: Methods were crude in the mining days. It's interesting to note that the Beall Lane was named for the Beall family, wasn't it? Commonly referred to as "Beel" Lane, I think, sometimes.
    Allen: But Old Man Beall said, "My name is 'Bell,' B-E-double-L. Bell!" [Apparently Allen meant to say "B-E-A-double-L."] But this was a scene in Payne's Gulch, with volunteer miners, who'd never used a shovel before or since on such things. And the foreman is one of the big ranchers, Mr. Pelton, who didn't like the work that was being done.
    Jamison: Now Mr. Beall continues in telling his story. This is very reminiscent, it looks authentic today, and probably looked crude in those days, didn't it?
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Those were the early days of mining. Now Mr. Beall continues with his story. Are those gold?
    Allen: Those are real gold nuggets, taken from the museum of Jacksonville at that time, the bank of Jacksonville. And the mine was run by the Bullis giant washing down the gravel with the gold in it. And you'll soon see quite a big wash come down from the bank.
    Jamison: This is the old Sterling Mine, and remnants of that mine, of course, are still in evidence, and it was one of the largest mines in this area, owned by the Bullis family. The flume contains the riffles which gather between the riffles and there's the gold. Sounds simple, doesn't it?
    Fiero: You know we all had such a lark taking these pictures that I don't think we really realized that it was to be shown at the Panama exposition. And afterward I was in San Francisco and went in to see the Oregon Building down there, and this film was running. And I was so surprised, and of course very thrilled to see the film of "Grace's Visit to the Rogue Valley."
    Jamison: There's a big hydraulic jet getting ready to wipe out a cameraman.
    Allen: Yeah, the cameraman is put off; they just figured to give him a little kick. Watch him.
    Jamison: Uh-oh. He gives up. As the hydraulic jet comes closer he leaves. Now this is the huge undercut that you're talking about, isn't it.
    Allen: This is the one. This is one of the largest they've ever made.
    Jamison: How many feet of film in an old thirty-five-millimeter hand-cranked camera.
    Allen: The most the magazine would hold would be two hundred feet.
    Jamison: I'll bet you were a little fretful lest you not get the rest of this scene, then.
    Allen: We were afraid that they wouldn't get through before the film ran out.
    Jamison: The old Sterling Mine, hydraulic mining in [1915]. Very soon, the ledge above, at the top of the picture, will come tumbling down. The mine was actually in operation at the time, wasn't it.
    Allen: At that time it was in active operation. In fact, my son, who was always with me on these pictures, picked up a gold nugget that he found on the ground. They took it away from him.
    Jamison: Now, Grace?
    Fiero: This is at Jack Morrill's ranch near Gold Hill. He and Sprague Riegel were running this ranch together. We had many marvelous parties there. They were two bachelors, of course.
    Jamison: Any of the individuals identifiable in the picture now, fifty years later, Grace?
    Fiero: Fern Hutchison was there, a minute ago. They're going too fast to identify.
    Jamison: You might just note that the film in those days was at sixteen frames a second and present equipment at twenty-four frames per second. It gives the effect of a rather rapid movement, doesn't it. The old residence--the remnants are standing today, of the place, I understand.
    Fiero: Yes, the house burned down, but the remnants of the place are still there.
    Jamison: Now, who is this?
    Fiero: Why, that is Lord Algy.
    Jamison: Making a play for Grace's hand.
    Fiero: Grace'll have none of it.
    Jamison: Has eyes for--
    Fiero: Conro only.
    Jamison: Now at the Rogue River ranch.
    Allen: This is the old Horace Pelton.
    Jamison: I think Mrs. Pelton is on the--
    Allen: Mrs. Pelton was one of the riders.
    Jamison: Some of the actors and actresses don't look too secure behind that horse. How about the cameraman?
    Allen: He wasn't happy either; those horns didn't look good.
    Jamison: This is a fanciful trip of Grace Andrews in a trip around the Rogue Valley, and now a haying scene.
    Allen: This is on the old Ish property, or Gore property, near Medford. And [William] Lewis, he was--the only sheep on the desert out here, near the Agate, in that country.
    Jamison: Quite a herd of sheep. You don't see very many sheep out in that district, at least anymore.
    Fiero: And Lord Algy being very brave.
    Jamison: In amongst the sheep, and young Jim Allen, isn't it?
    Allen: Yes, that's young Jim Allen, my son. This is a prize pig that was on the orchard owned by Potter Palmer of Chicago at the time, and very high-bred pigs; we had to sterilize our shoes before we were allowed to go near 'em.
    Jamison: And we conclude Act One of "Grace's Visit to the Rogue Valley" as everyone is enjoying dinner.
   

    Jamison: Our guest now is Mr. A. C. Allen, the man who made the film you have seen, and there's more to come. Mr. Allen, did you have any previous film-making experience?
    Allen: None whatever.
    Jamison: All you had was the camera. What kind?
    Allen: I had a German make, wooden, Ernemann motion picture camera.
    Jamison: Hand-crank variety.
    Allen: Hand-crank variety.
    Jamison: Mr. Allen, how did you get into the project of making a film about the Rogue Valley?
    Allen: Well, I had a friend by the name of Dr. Lewis Bundy, a dentist, and he was very anxious to get pictures of the Rogue River Valley sent to the Panama-Pacific Exposition at San Francisco. And he in turn asked me if I'd be interested in taking the pictures.
    Jamison: I understand you had a little trouble even after you were commissioned to do this with the county warrants that were paid to you.
    Allen: They finally--somebody finally got the check from the county and handed it to me. I don't know how I got it, but I had a $600 warrant. I took it to the bank, and they refused to cash it. They didn't cash the county warrants at that time, but they recommended me to another citizen, who discounted it ten percent, and I got $560 [sic] out of it.
    Jamison: And you were off and running in making a film about the Rogue River Valley.
    Allen: And I was off to making the film.
    Jamison: Well, we know that this was made originally in [1915], filmed on a nitrate-based thirty-five-millimeter film, over the years deteriorated rather badly, didn't it?
    Allen: It did that, but I was really surprised after all it had gone through that its condition was really as good as it was.
    Jamison: And now it's finally transferred to modern sound-on-film sixteen-millimeter, and our thanks to you, Mr. Allen, for letting us know you, and also for future generations that might be able to enjoy this picture of the Rogue River Valley.
[film resumes]
    Where was this, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: This is the [James and Horace] Pelton ranch, and there was one of the largest cherry trees I ever saw. Good cherries, and that's Pelton's daughter.
    Jamison: Now you meet some successful women orchardists.
    Fiero: That's Mrs. Holloway, who had the orchard. She's the mother of Ruth Edgell, who's living here now.
    Jamison: Rather primitive spray equipment in those--
    Allen: At the back you see Holbrook Withington. She turns the spray on him. That was the director.
    Jamison: Somebody got tumbled. [Reading] "A trip on the Pacific & Eastern Railway." To where, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: From Medford to Butte Falls. This picture was taken with me riding on the cowcatcher of the engine, and it wasn't very pleasant.
    Jamison: We remind everyone that this film was shot in [1915] with an old hand-cranked thirty-five-millimeter camera by A. C. Allen, and developed by hand and printed by hand. Remarkable photography. How many feet of film total in the film, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: There was five thousand feet of negative and five thousand feet of positive.
    Jamison: This is Mount Pitt. . . . This is Mr. Howard.
    Fiero: Yes, he is at our old house there again.
    Allen: He was one of the old surveyors, one of the first surveyors in Southern Oregon.
    Jamison: Called the "Father of Medford," and this is the first store [in Medford]. It's located down at the present Sims Cycle across from the Jackson County Federal parking lot, isn't it? [J. S. Howard's store, 21-23 South Front, burned in 1894. The store used as a stand-in is unidentified. In 1965 Sims Cycle was at 41 South Front, on the corner of Eighth.]
    Allen: I don't know.
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Now the fire engine, and for those days it were very speedy. And horse-drawn ones, too.
    Allen: He was late getting aboard.
    Jamison: Did they stage this especially for you?
    Allen:
Yes, this was staged especially [on April 3, 1915].
    Jamison: Out on East Main. Somebody got their lawn watered that day free. ["East Main" refers to the scene of the fire engines speeding down the hill. The "lawn-watering" scene was filmed elsewhere.]
    Allen: This was--they were very proud of this new pump. It hadn't been in Medford very long.
    Jamison: What location for downtown Medford?
    Allen: This is on the Front Street and Main [on April 10, 1915], with the Nash Hotel on the right. Charlie Chaplin happened to be an advertising stunt put on by the Page Theater. [The Chaplin short subject "A Jitney Elopement" was playing at the Page.]
    Jamison: The Jackson County Federal building [at 2 East Main, Medford] would be on the right of this picture presently, and the bank on the left; this is looking down Main Street east. Looking east, now; of course Main Street is presently a one-way going west.
    Allen: Yeah.
    Jamison: And there's the train depot. [It isn't the train depot; he's looking at the exhibit building.] How about the cars? This is normal traffic?
    Allen: Well, it may have been raised a little. [Chuckles.]
    Jamison: Now where is this trip?
    Allen: This is the Gold Ray Dam, near Gold Hill.
    Jamison: And Table Rock in the background, and rather a substantial amount of photography along the Rogue River. It wasn't too well known in those days, was it?
    Allen: No, it wasn't. It was nice, clear water, and lots of it.
    Jamison: And this picture, shown in San Francisco, probably enticed many a person to come to the bountiful Rogue River Valley, perhaps even to meet the Grace Andrews of the picture.
    Fiero: Yes, there were a number of people that moved up here from San Francisco and had summer homes after seeing this, I believe.
    Jamison: This is the falls--
    Allen: That was Mill Creek Falls, on the road to Crater Lake, and Barr Creek Falls coming just into the picture now. They're both close together, emptying into Rogue River.
    Fiero: That's a beautiful picture, isn't it.
    Jamison: Remarkable for fifty-year-old film. This has been reconstructed on sixteen-millimeter silent film; the coordinator of that project was Robertson Collins, at his insistence, and many Rogue Valley residents made this film possible for presentation to the Southern Oregon museum. How long did it take you to go to Crater Lake on that trip, Mr. Allen?
    Allen: The first trip by automobile took two long days. Then later we could make it in one day.
    Jamison: Making a speed run to Crater Lake, taking all of one day.
    Allen: That was with a car. Three days with a team.
    Jamison: Along the Gorge, isn't it?
    Allen: That's the Rogue River Gorge.
    Fiero: One of the hills we had to go over going to Crater Lake then was called Pumice Hill, or Pumee Hill, and it was just thick pumice powder; it was just terrible going through that.
    Allen: And a twenty-four percent grade.
    Jamison: So people didn't make too many fast trips to the Crater Lake, did they, in those days. Again I would comment on the clarity of some of the pictures, and some of it has deteriorated. Is it just age, or heat?
    Allen: It's hard treatment by different operators and--the old age.
    Jamison: This is the very same print, the original of this, was the one that was shown in San Francisco, wasn't it.
    Allen: The same one, yes. I never had money enough to get over one print.
    Jamison: These scenes taken on the road to Crater Lake, right?
    Allen: Yes, near Prospect.
    Jamison: A wide thoroughfare up there now.
    Allen: In fact, that piece of road is almost the same, only it has been straightened and rebuilt.
    Jamison: Are the people there identifiable?
    Allen: That is Jim with a gun.
    Jamison: [Reading] "Some sugar pine! This tree 28 feet in circumference 5 feet from the base, 230 feet high, contains sufficient lumber to completely build and furnish a nine-room house." And that old sugar pine is still there, isn't it, A.C.?
    Allen: It's still there, and seems to be doing fine. [The pine was dead by 1965; it was cut down in July 1966.]
    Jamison: It hasn't grown much, though, I know. It took quite awhile, even at sixteen frames a second, to go to the top of that tree. Do you recall any unusual experiences in the filming or the processing of this film, A.C., that might be humorous? I understand you had to build most of your equipment, didn't you?
    Allen: Oh, yes, I had to build it; in fact, after I got the film and started taking the pictures, it was a puzzle to know how to develop them. I had to build my own racks they had to be developed on and to be dried on and so forth. This is the Crater Lake from the top of the rim, and that is Mr. Ben Sheldon that is on there. Now from here this is the Phantom Ship, and just to the left of that in the cliff is a cavern, in which we rowed--you could row a rowboat, and one day while I was taking other pictures of the lake one of the so-called "eruptions" occurred, an enormous one; it put a cloud up into the sky like an atomic bomb, and I think it was the same kind of eruption they've had ever since. It was nothing but a big landslide. The dust looked like smoke, and the rocks churning into the water like boiling water, but it was only a landslide.
    Jamison: The man on that peak up there, was that the ranger?
    Allen: No, that was Ben Sheldon, and he came--he made a cut across instead of following the path, and he was--he nearly fell over the cliff. This is The Pinnacles, on Sand Creek.
    Jamison: Again we comment on the clarity of the film after fifty years of being tucked away and used, and I think we're very fortunate to be able to have these recorded on film, some of the earliest motion picture film ever taken of the Crater Lake, and The Pinnacles, wouldn't you say?
    Allen: Yes, they were the most--they were the first successful motion pictures taken of the park. Of course the cameramen didn't understand the lighting changing at that altitude, and most of them were spoiled in exposure. This is the first real successful pictures taken.
    Jamison: Now a trip to Ashland, and Ashland park, Grace. Did you enjoy this--reminiscent?
    Fiero: This is the only one I really remember. I'd never tasted the sulfur water; you see me being presented with a drink very shortly.
    Jamison: A drink of lithia water?
    Fiero: Lithia water. And it was quite a surprise.
    Jamison: Do you recall the social life of the day--was it much as depicted in this film?
    Fiero: Yes, very much.
    Jamison: There was much time for picnicking and parties?
    Fiero: Yes, parties at the country club all the time, and at the different homes. And we thought nothing of motoring twenty, thirty miles from one house to another for a dinner party, and--
    Jamison: Life at a much leisurely, more leisurely pace than today.
    Fiero: Oh, much more.
    Jamison: Any identifiable people there, Grace?
    Fiero: Well, that's my sister-in-law, Emily Fiero, and my husband--my suitor [in the film] at the moment, Conro Fiero.
    Jamison: Pictures of where Ashland gets its water. The residents around Ashland will be interested in seeing these pictures, also downtown.
    Allen: This is the square in Ashland, and for this picture they were to have a sort of an Ashland Day, with a lot of cars out, and the busy scenes and so forth, but you can see what came out. Watch these cars.
    Jamison: Looks like you had a few cars that they just kept going around.
    Allen: We did.
    Jamison: I thought that was Lord Algy going across.
    Fiero: There's Conro.
    Jamison: And this is the Ashland School, still presently standing today.
    Allen: This is the busy street we got.
    Jamison: The old Vining Theater on the left, the Lyric Theater, going east toward the college. The college would be on the--further out this boulevard, Siskiyou Boulevard. Not too much traffic to hinder your photographic efforts.
    Allen: Not much to bother us in those days. This is the--one time where the citizens all turned out [on June 2, 1915] to celebrate the completion, or near completion of a new Ashland highway [Glenview Drive] around, above Ashland.
    Jamison: Now I think we'll very soon see Grace Andrews, Grace Fiero, taking her taste of lithia water. Did you enjoy it?
    Fiero: Should I be truthful? [Laughs.] I'll not be popular in Ashland.
    Jamison: I noticed you smiled on camera.
    Allen: I'm sorry I didn't get the rest of the shot of her after I had turned the camera [off], but it was worth taking.
    Jamison: Those are scenes now high above Ashland. About what point?
    Allen: I don't know Ashland well enough to know the names of points, but this is at the--around the mouth of the Ashland Canyon, I think they call it.
    Jamison: From the far side.
    Allen: From the far side.
    Jamison: At the top of the picture at the right is the picture of the cut of the old road, or the new road that was being constructed earlier in the picture. Again, another remarkable photography for those days. [Reading] "Grace goes camping with her friends." Where was this?
    Allen: That was taken on Little Butte Creek.
    Fiero: Austin Corbin's ranch.
    Allen: Just above Eagle Point.
    Jamison: Who is that?
    Fiero: I think that was Chandler Egan. That's Marilyn Hayden.
    Allen: That is my son Jim.
    Jamison: Looks like he caught something.
    Allen: Yes, he's showing the decoys that he was going to use for his hunting. And here is Algy.
    Jamison: Lord Algy. Not your pick, right?
    Fiero: Right.
    Jamison: We have to continue to identify these people by their names in the film and their real names. Now what's going on here, Grace? I think I can--
    Fiero: [Laughs.]
    Jamison: Woodland tryst between Grace and Conro.
    Fiero: Right.
    Jamison: Now you're back at camp.
    Fiero: And it was always fun.
    Jamison: Rather--love to rough it.
    Allen: Jim was--
    Fiero: We did love to rough it, too, in those days.
    Jamison: And everybody says, "Where's Algy?" He's missing. Now they're signaling, right?
    Allen: That's the signal to see where he is.
    Jamison: Rather remarkable actors for their day.
    Allen: This is the way Lord Algy told it after he got back to camp.
    Fiero: I didn't believe him.
    Jamison: This is his story of what happened, right?
    Allen: That is right.
    Jamison: You must understand there were some unexpected actors, right?
    Allen: Yeah, unexpected to all of us.
    Jamison: [Reading] He says, "It was a deuced long tramp." He's hunting, obviously. He continues his story to Grace Andrews. He sees something, and he fires.
    Allen: He's lost his ammunition.
    Jamison: He continues his story to Grace and the rest of them, who were doubting a little bit, I think.
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Now what happened?
    Allen: A very brave hunter, as he told it, but watch what he saw.
    Jamison: He's lost. And apparently a little frightened.
    Allen: That dog was but one of the volunteers.
    Jamison: And approaching now--
    Allen: This is the big bear.
    Jamison: He's tired, and he's weary, and he's frightened, and there comes the bear out of the brush--and the "bear" turns out to be--a friendly old cow, an unexpected actor. You didn't expect to see that one in the picture, did you, A.C.? Now he stalks the camp; he sees it through binoculars. How did you achieve that effect, just as they do today, A.C.?
    Allen: Hmm?
    Jamison: The effect of the binoculars, how did you achieve that?
    Allen: Through masks, on the lens.
    Jamison: Now Lord Algy is contriving his story to tell them back in camp, is that right?
    Allen: That's right.
    Jamison: I see. And now, Grace, you're being entertained at a reception, the caption said.
    Fiero: This is at the--George Carpenter's place, which is a beautiful house, and a swimming pool.
    Jamison: Where is that located?
    Fiero: Oh.
    Jamison: Out on the--
    Fiero: The south--above the Voorhies orchards.
    Jamison: And who is dancing?
    Allen: This is the--name is Swem, Katherine Swem. She was a very fine little dancer, and she had some help with some of her schoolmates; they were all schoolgirls.
    Jamison: Now did they have music, and was this staged and rehearsed?
    Allen: No, no rehearsal, no music. She just had to do it by counting. [The dancers were castmates from the Roosevelt School production of "A Midsummer Night's Dream." See above.]
    Jamison: So all of her friends at the reception just grouped together on the lawn and [unintelligible] did the entertaining; is that right, Grace?
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: Do you identify any others in the picture there, just offhand? Well, she received a nice hand from the crowd. I think we're extremely fortunate to, as we mentioned, to have this film after all these years, and to keep the film for posterity. Any other recollections that you might have of highlights of taking this film, Grace?
    Fiero: I remember this beautiful scene.
    Allen: Another volunteer, on the--in the water.
    Fiero: That was the Carpenters' little scotty dog; I remember that dog.
    Jamison: Now you're looking out over the valley, and the little butterfly girls are helping to set the scene. This venture to publicize the Rogue River Valley at the exposition in San Francisco in  1914 and '15. These scenes, taken from high above the valley, give a very glamorous picture of the orchards down on the floor of the valley, and now the entertainers again, the butterflies again, the dancers are--.
    Allen: The idea was that the dancers would gradually fade out, and then their--Katherine would make the final scene, and the slogan, "Come to Rogue River Valley" would appear in the sky. But in the long years of usage it's been cut off, that is, the sign has been--
    Jamison: Come to the Rogue River Valley, but apparently in 1914 and '15 a good many people got the message to come to the Rogue Valley, as Grace Fiero has indicated in the picture. Other recollections of the print? We're approaching the end of the scene now. In retrospect, do you have any nostalgic moments as you've watched the film, A. C. Allen?
    Allen: Well, only that I don't see how it was done. If I had to do it again, I wouldn't dare do it, don't you see. I didn't know anything about it; I'd never seen a motion picture taken. I'd seen plays in the theater, and it was really a staggering thing that I don't even realize yet.
    Jamison: How about you, Grace?
    Fiero: Beautiful view of the valley.
    Jamison: And it still is.
    Fiero: Yes.
    Jamison: In those days, in [1915] and even yet today. And we draw to a close as we reminisce with A. C. Allen and Grace Fiero [unintelligible] in 1914 [sic].
    Voiceover: Now this postscript to our story. The original negative, produced by A. C. Allen, was printed on thirty-five-millimeter silent film in [1915]. Over the years it had deteriorated rather badly. A project to restore the film and to preserve it for its historical significance was undertaken in 1965 by Robertson Collins, of Jacksonville. Funds raised at a private showing in that year helped offset the cost. The monumental task incurred by the laboratory can be realized when you consider that the original film had deteriorated to the point that each frame was transferred individually in the process. A television showing, at which time narration was added, converted this sixteen-millimeter silent film to a videotape recording. Television station KMED-TV underwrote the cost of making the final sixteen-millimeter sound film for eventual presentation to posterity through the Southern Oregon historical museum. Your gracious commentators, though fourscore in years, added to the historical value with their recollections of those earlier days, nearly hidden in the mists of fifty years. To Mrs. Grace Fiero, and Mr. A. C. Allen, Senior, goes our deepest appreciation. They have added immeasurably to our store of historical film data from the golden era in the Rogue River Valley. This showing by permission of the Southern Oregon historical museum, Jacksonville, Oregon, Miss Mary Hanley, curator.



Last revised September 19, 2017