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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Walling's History of Southern Oregon
All indications are that it was written by Herbert O. Lang. Read it here.


    ALBERT G. WALLING.--We see by advertisements in some of the Northern papers that this gentleman is an independent candidate for State Printer. He says he is a Union man. If this be true, we are a little astonished that he did not submit his claims to the convention at Eugene. Union men were pretty well represented there, and Mr. Walling has no excuse for not presenting his claims. That farmers are entitled to a voice in the government they build up, in connection with others, is to us a self-evident proposition. But why a printer, who works upon [line of type obscured by a fold] any more entitled to the office than any other printer, we can't see.
    That there is a great deal of intriguing and wireworking among politicians we are free to confess. But why should Mr. Walling complain of this when he never submitted his claims to the action of this eliminating process? As for ourself, we do not support the Union ticket, nor have we ever supported any ticket, out of any personal considerations, but for the sake of the principles embodied in the platform upon which the nominees stand, and because we considered the most effectual mode of securing the triumph of said principles. But it is useless to reason. We can tell you in short, Mr. Walling, that you won't get fifty votes south of the Calapooia Mountains.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 3, 1862, page 2


A. G. Walling.
    The only complete job printing, bookbinding and lithographing establishment in this city is that of A. G. Walling, corner of First and Ash streets. He is one of the oldest job printers in Oregon, and has always enjoyed the reputation of doing first-class work in all branches of the business. Since adding lithographing to his business he has done a large business in that line, and has a force of artists which cannot be excelled. As to bookbinding, everybody knows that he does most excellent work. His prices have always been very low, and during the past year he has done a very much larger business than ever before. When you want good, artistic work done, A. G. Walling is the man to do it for you.
Oregonian, Portland, January 1, 1883, page 7


    HISTORICAL MATERIALS.--It is very desirable that the compilers of Walling's history of Southern Oregon shall have access to all available resources of information respecting this part of the state. Early records of pioneer life, accounts of Indian wars, sketches of noted events, biographers of eminent individuals, important statistics, etc., are especially valuable. Persons who possess written or printed matter of this sort are earnestly requested by the publishers to place the same at the disposal of Mr. H. O. Lang, now at Roseburg, in order that such material may be utilized in preparing the history. Favors thus shown will be deeply appreciated and acknowledged; while documents loaned will be preserved and duly returned.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 22, 1883, page 3


    MATERIAL FOR HISTORY .--It is very desirable that the compilers of "Walling's History of Southern Oregon" shall have access to all available resources of information respecting this part of the state. Early records of pioneer life, accounts of Indian wars, sketches of noted events, biographies of celebrated individuals, important statistics, etc., are especially valuable. Persons who possess written or printed matter of this description are earnestly requested to place the same at the disposal of Mr. H. O. Lang, at the Cosmopolitan Hotel, Roseburg, in order that such materials may be utilized in preparing the history. Favors thus shown will be appreciated and acknowledged; while documents loaned will be carefully preserved and returned uninjured.
Douglas Independent, RoseburgSeptember 22, 1883, page 3


    H. O. Lang, who is in our city collecting and preparing material for "Walling's History of Southern Oregon," is at present suffering from a severe attack of rheumatic fever.
"Local Items,"
Douglas Independent, RoseburgSeptember 22, 1883, page 3


    MATERIALS FOR HISTORY.--It is highly desirable that the compilers of Walling's History of Southern Oregon shall have access to all available sources of information relating to this part of the state. Early records of pioneer life, accounts of Indian wars, sketches of noted events, biographies of celebrated men, important statistics, etc., are especially valuable. The publishers earnestly request persons possessing written or printed matter of the sort to place the same at the disposal of H. O. Lang, now at Roseburg, in order that such materials may be utilized in preparing the history. Favors thus shown will be gratefully appreciated and suitably acknowledged, while the documents loaned will be preserved and promptly returned.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 28, 1883, page 3


SOUTHERN OREGON HISTORY.
    The prospectus of A. G. Walling's proposed history of Southern Oregon has been handed us. From the details laid down in the prospectus, we conclude that the book is to be handsome, durable, well written, spacious and altogether well worthy [of] the subject upon which it treats. The Plaindealer says it will contain in the neighborhood of 500 large pages, printed on the finest paper and most durably bound. Its pages are to be replete with information invaluable to old settlers and new ones, and it will contain bits of history and reminiscences of early pioneer life and interesting details that cannot be arrived at from any other source. Mr. Walling's excellence as a printer and lithographer is too well known to need comment. The illustrations will be numerous and complete, and of the highest quality attainable. The literary work, in the hands of Mr. H. O. Lang, a writer of ability and experience and a gentleman who is acquainted with the work of such an enterprise, having been identified with many similar undertakings, will be a model. In the whole compilation of the work thoroughness, correctness and excellence will be the paramount objects, without regard to expense. The territory will soon be canvassed for minor details and subscriptions for the work, and no one is too poor to subscribe for a work which treats of his own country and himself or pioneer parents. We expect the work will receive the encouragement of all our people, and we heartily commend the gentlemen interested in its completion to everyone in this section, whose support in this enterprise they merit.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 29, 1883, page 2


The New History.
    The importance of this work, now in progress, cannot be overestimated, and the time in which to develop such an enterprise could never be more favorable than the present. Southern Oregon has heretofore, and even yet, to a large degree been undeveloped and unknown, though its resources are abundant, its climate fine, and its location, geographically speaking, unexcelled. The experience of our farmer, our stock-grower, our nursery man, and in short, every producer, has universally gone to prove the superior merit of the country. Yet in the face of such experience people are not generally informed as to the natural advantages we possess. The time is just coming when the veil of obscurity is to be removed and when Southern Oregon will, for the first time in her existence, be thoroughly represented beyond the limits of her own dominion. The illustrated history of Southern Oregon, compiled and collated by H. O. Lang, with a corps of assistants, is the medium through which this knowledge is to be diffused.
    One immediate necessity for collecting the data for and compiling this work now is because the sources of information are purer and more available than will ever be in the future. The ranks of the pioneers is diminishing yearly. Thus every year lessens the testimony as to the early history of this country; and every year dims the memory of those who preserve the unwritten detail concerning it. There still remains, however, enough living witnesses to give such testimony as is necessary to be preserved in the country's record.
    The object of the history is a sufficient voucher for its success. The conditions are ripe and the people are glad to hail its advent. Every family needs a record of its own country. No library will be complete without it.
Douglas Independent,
Roseburg
September 29, 1883, page 2


    H. O. Lang, who is engaged by A. G. Walling in collecting information for his illustrated history of Southern Oregon, has left his headquarters in Roseburg and gone into Coos and Curry, to make a personal inspection of these counties and gather information from the early settlers of the notable events of their pioneer days. We hope he may find his trip both profitable and pleasant.
"Local Items,"
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, October 6, 1883, page 3


THE HISTORY.
    Mr. James E. Eastham arrived from Roseburg last Tuesday. Mr. E. belongs to the corps of writers for Walling's history of Southern Oregon. Mr. Walling will soon be in Jacksonville, accompanied by Mr. Lang, chief writer for the book. The gathering of historical data is being carried on and will continue until this region is thoroughly written up, all topics of interest and importance receiving careful attention. The publishers employ a very large force of compilers, who work with the exactest method, visiting absolutely every accessible place and conversing with every intelligent person regarding the history and resources of the country, personal reminiscences, agricultural topics, pioneers' stories, Indian battles, statistics of productions (grain, lumber, gold, manufactured goods, etc.). A complete resume of the mining operations of past years will be given, with a full history of those remarkable incidents which have made this region so famous. The wars with the Rogue River Indians will be exhaustively treated, and if possible the name of every white man who took part therein will be given, the military organizations being carefully written up. The chief writer has already received a very large number of contributions from private sources relating to this subject in the shape of written or printed matter, showing the interest that people take in the subject. By the aid of personal interviewing this bulk of manuscripts and print is being verified and wrought into history.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 10, 1883, page 2


    PERSONAL.--Mr. Lang, who is engaged in writing and compiling Walling's History of Southern Oregon, has engaged rooms in Mrs. McCully's building, where he has a neat and commodious office. Persons possessing information relating to the early settlement and development of the country will confer a favor by calling upon Mr. L., who would be glad to utilize such knowledge.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 16, 1883, page 3


    We are pleased to hear that the history of Southern Oregon now being prepared by Mr. H. O. Lang, to be published by A. G. Walling, is being pushed forward to completion very rapidly. Very flattering reports are being received from the agents in the field every day. Mr. H. S. Strange will go north Monday and gather all information he can relating to that part of the county, while other representatives will start for Gardiner.
    A. G. Walling of Portland, who is getting up the history of Southern Oregon, was in Roseburg this week. He stopped on his return from Jackson County, where he has been arranging for the collection of information for his book. His enterprise is a laudable one and will preserve many ancient landmarks of the early settlement which would otherwise be lost.
"Local Items,"
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, November 17, 1883, page 3


    WALLING'S HISTORY is progressing rapidly. Many documents and files of papers containing valuable historical matter have been found to assist in the work, and many interesting personal accounts have been recorded. A copy of the Spectator, published at Oregon City by W. G. T'Vault, dated Feb. 5, 1846, has been received from William Hoffman, Esq., and may be seen at Mr. Lang's office. W. M. Turner will write up the history of Jacksonville, and A. G. Rockfellow's services have also been engaged, and several interviewers will shortly enter upon work in this county and Josephine.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 23, 1883, page 2


History Notes.
    Mr. William M. Turner, long and favorably known throughout Oregon as an accomplished writer, has undertaken the work of writing the history of Jacksonville for Mr. Walling's big book. By such hands the account is sure to be pleasingly and accurately written, and to possess those graces of composition for which the gentleman is noted. No better selection could have been made, and Mr. Walling and the public are to be congratulated on such an acquisition. Mr. Turner has already entered upon his literary labors and is interviewing a number of the oldest residents concerning the early records of the town.
    Mr. Albert G. Rockfellow has become a member of the publisher's staff, and is busily collecting data. His work will refer more particularly to Ashland and vicinity.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1883, page 2


    H. O. Lang, who is engaged in collecting information for Walling's History of Southern Oregon, has returned to Roseburg and will be found at his rooms on Jackson Street by all persons who have any information to communicate concerning the early settlement of this section.

"Local Items,"
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, December 8, 1883, page 3


    H. S. Strange started for the Calapooia on Wednesday in the interest of the Oregon History.

"From Wilbur,"
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, December 8, 1883, page 3


    Anyone having facts connected with the early history of Southern Oregon will confer a favor by communicating the same to H. O. Lang, the editor of the new history of Southern Oregon.
    Mr. H. O. Lang, chief editor of Walling's history of Southern Oregon, returned from Portland this week and will continue his labors on the work. His trip below [i.e., to Northern Oregon] was mainly to gather data for the work from records on file in the State Department at Salem.
"Local Items,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1883, page 3


    Dr. J. W. White of Oregon City is now in Portland, to attend the funeral of Mrs. A. G. Walling, who was his aunt.
    The funeral of Mrs. A. G. Walling will take place this forenoon at ten o'clock from the family residence. Friends of the family are invited.
"Brief Mention," Oregonian, Portland, December 26, 1883, page 3


A. G. WALLING.
Lithographer, Publisher and Bookbinder.
    Mr. A. G. Walling, located at the corner of First and Ash streets, is the leading job printer, lithographer and bookbinder of Portland. In fact he is the only one in this line of business who conducts all branches of it, and the only one prepared to properly do such work as it should be done. He is one of the pioneers in the business and does by far the largest part of the work in Portland. He has the best corps of artists in his lithographing department that can be procured, many of whom have obtained wide renown as skillful workmen in the East and in Europe. The artistic printing which is turned out from his establishment cannot be excelled in any similar institution in Oregon, and his bookbinding is known to be the best on the coast. Just now he is engaged in the publication of the History of Southern Oregon, a quarto of 600 pages, finely illustrated, neatly printed and elegantly bound. This will be an addition to Oregon literature of which we may well be proud.
    Mr. Walling is the first man in Oregon who commenced the work of lithographing, and to him is due the impetus given to that branch of the business now so largely carried on by him. His facilities for this work are superior to any possessed by any other firm on the North Pacific Coast, and his prices are much lower than even San Francisco rates for the same class of work. As a man of business integrity Mr. Walling stands high and is esteemed among his many acquaintances for his excellent social qualities as well as for his straightforward manner of doing business. We are only glad to see such men prosper. The next time the reader has any printing to be done, go and see Mr. Walling about it.
Oregonian, Portland, January 1, 1884, page 9


    B. F. Alley, lately of California, arrived this week and will assist Mr. Lang in the compilation of Walling's history of Southern Oregon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 4, 1884, page 3


    A. G. Walling arrived from Portland yesterday and is directing the work on his new book. His wife died at her home Dec. 24th.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 12, 1884, page 3


   
WALLING'S HISTORY.--Mr. A. G. Walling, who is engaged in preparing a history of Southern Oregon, made us a pleasant call this week and left with us a steel engraving of Gen. Lane, which is to grace the pages of the work, with a biography of the General, showing the relation he sustained to the early settlement and development of Oregon. The engraving is taken from a portrait at the time the General was a candidate for Vice President of the United States, and will be familiar to the old pioneers who knew him in the days of his greatest manhood, when the laurels of victory, won on the plains of Mexico, were fresh on his brow. Mr. Walling proceeded south into Jackson County, to look after the progress of his work.
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, January 12, 1884, page 3


    Fred. Walpole of the Meadows has been engaged by A. G. Walling to make sketches for his history.
    J. E. Eastham is now in Josephine County canvassing for Walling's history. The work is being well received, a large number of persons subscribing for it.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1884, page 3


    A. G. Walling, the historian, has returned from his trip into Southern Oregon. He stopped over in Roseburg on his return, to look after the progress of the work in this part of the state.
"Local Items," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, January 19, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Fagan, one of the gentlemen employed in collecting information for Walling's biographical history of Southern Oregon, when crossing the south Umpqua River, at what is known as Conn's ford, came near receiving an immersion. He got too far downstream for the ford and his horse got into swimming water, and it was only by good management and in following the directions of Harry Jones, who happened on the scene at the critical moment, that he was enabled to reach the shore.
"Local Items," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, January 26, 1884, page 3



    Mr. Walling, who is preparing the illustrated history of Southern Oregon, was in Roseburg this week and made us a pleasant call. On Wednesday Messrs. Fagan and Pickett left Roseburg for Coos and Curry counties, to collect information and illustrations for their special department of the history.
"Local Items," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, February 23, 1884, page 3


    D. D. Fagan and J. T. Pickett, in the interest of A. G. Walling's history of Southern Oregon, left Roseburg last week, en route for Coos and Curry counties, via Drain's Scottsburg and Gardiner, for the purpose of collecting view and other desirable materials for the aforesaid work. More than half the history has been completed and the printing has been commenced. About 1200 copies have been subscribed for, and the publisher expects to raise the number to 2000.
Coast Mail, Coos Bay, February 28, 1884, page 3


    B. F. Alley is now in this section assisting in sketching and writing up our valley for Walling's new history of Southern Oregon.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884, page 3



    H. O. Lang, chief editor of Walling's History of Southern Oregon, has gone to Portland to finish up the work there.
    Work on the History of Southern Oregon progresses finely, with Messrs. Lang, Alley, Eastham and Walpole in charge in this county. A. G. Walling, the publisher, also paid us a visit this week.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 8, 1884, page 3


    A. G. Walling, of Portland, who is compiling the history of Southern Oregon, was in town this week and informed us that the work is now ready for the press and will be ready for delivery in a short time.
"Local Items," Douglas Independent, Roseburg, March 8, 1884, page 3


    We were shown the advance sheets of some sketching being done for Walling's history by Fred Walpole, which were quite handsome.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 14, 1884, page 3


        SOUTHERN OREGON HISTORY.--In all the articles which have appeared in this paper relative to the forthcoming History of Southern Oregon, but very little has been said about the illustrations, and to this part of the work we now direct the attention of our readers. Col. B. F. Alley has this matter in charge in Jackson County, and Fred. Walpole is the artist. The last-named gentleman has already sketched the residence and surrounding scenery of our old pioneer, Maj. Barron. It is a full-page view, and the entire head of the valley is drawn so as to include Pilot Rock, that well-known landmark which guided the early pioneers into the valley of Rogue River. What can be more pleasing than the views, sketched here and there of residences in the valley, interspersed with drawings of the mountains that hem them in on either side. Jackson County can boast of as good homes and fine scenery as can be found in Southern Oregon; and by all means these homes and our scenery should be represented in the history, so that the outside world may know the beauties and comforts of this, the Italy of Oregon.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 15, 1884, page 3


OUR HISTORY.
    The illustrated History of Southern Oregon, whose merits we have been pleased to frequently mention, has still another phase not thoroughly presented to the public. This is the art department of the work. The waning intelligence of early events, the unearthed history of an early date, and the innumerable personal gleanings of reminiscences, biographies and personal experiences, all perform very essential factors in the record of one's country, but all of these, when spread before us, like a branch shorn of its blossoms, lose their vigor and beauty without a glimpse of the scenes wherein such events transpired. These mountains, rivers, valleys and landscapes, which almost rival the Alps themselves, are fit subjects to embellish the forthcoming volume, or even the artist's studio. Our valleys, thickly studded with dwellings and farms and their many checkered thoroughfares, our budding commerce, manufactures, institutions of learning and halls of justice, and all other signs of civilization that portend future prosperity, present indeed a pleasing aspect and furnish a handsome view for the artist's pencil. In the midst of the natural and artificial scenery the artist is now at work sketching for Mr. Walling's new book, which is to be profusely illustrated with them. Such embellishments will not only reflect credit upon the country, but largely enhance the appearance of the volume. Col. B. F. Alley has charge of the art department of this work, while Fred. A. Walpole, a talented young genius, does the sketching.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, March 21, 1884, page 2



    A. G. Walling, the printer, who is putting out a history of Southern Oregon, will use for the frontispiece of the work a steel engraving of General Joseph Lane from a photograph taken about the year 1860. The picture shows up a very good-looking middle-aged man, and it will be a most fitting acquisition to the work for which it is intended.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 22, 1884, page 3


    The
Times building will form one of the illustrations that will appear in Walling's history of Southern Oregon. A sketch of the structure was made by Fred. A. Walpole, the popular artist, which has been lithographed at Mr. Walling's establishment in Portland. Col. B. F. Alley has our thanks for advance copies of the picture, which is as natural as life and superior in every aspect.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1884, page 2


    A. G. Walling, the printer, who is getting out a history of Southern Oregon, will use for a frontispiece of the work a steel engraving of General Joseph Lane from a photograph taken about the year 1860.
"Local Notes," Corvallis Gazette, March 28, 1884, page 5



    The History of Southern Oregon published by A. G. Walling of Portland, will be ready for delivery to subscribers next week. It is a fine work and should be in every household in this section.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 7, 1884, page 3


    The history of Southern Oregon, published by A. G. Walling, is now coming out of the hands of the binder, and the work of delivering it will soon be commenced.
"Local Notes," Corvallis Gazette, June 13, 1884, page 3



    The Southern Oregon history was delivered Thursday and prominent citizens might have been seen collected together in excited mobs discussing their portraits. Of course they expected to see fine-looking handsome young gentlemen, but the truthful hand of the photographer presented a rather meager-looking lot of middle-aged men, and the ambitious pioneers turned sorrowfully and regretfully to chronological events of their life which consisted mainly in the names of their numerous progeny. The views of these same disappointed aspirants for historical honors that were "taxed without representation" are enjoying the joke immensely.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 21, 1884, page 3



    The pictures of some of our pioneers appear in Walling's history. The intimate friends of those gentlemen seem to doubt the fact, however.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3



    While H. O. Lang was editor in chief of the History of Southern Oregon, and wrote up all the historical matter it contains, his name fails to appear as such on the title page of the work, although the gentleman said it was part of his agreement with the publisher that it should so appear. As that is about the only creditable part of the work, we suppose the publisher thought he would assume it.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 26, 1884, page 3


    H. O. Lang, who acted as historian for A. G. Walling, now holds a similar position on Himes' history of the Willamette Valley. His name was to appear on the fly sheet of the Southern Oregon history as editor of the work, but the publisher conveniently neglected to put it there.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1884, page 3


The County History.
    The History of Lane County is nearly completed; it is far advanced in the press, and if we may judge from the advance sheets we have glanced over will be an excellent specimen of typographic art, embracing accurate accounts of our early and present history.
    The History of Southern Oregon, which includes Jackson, Josephine, Coos, Curry and Douglas counties, is now published, and has unsolicited brought the following complimentary epistle from Hon. Jesse Applegate, whose unimpeachable honesty stamps him as being unable to become the medium to convey praise where none is due:
A. G. WALLING, ESQ., HISTORIAN;
    DEAR SIR:--Since my return from Portland with your valuable History of Oregon I have had but little time to dip into it, but the little time I have had has raised it greatly in my esteem. The plan is comprehensive--ever exhaustive--of the events having any bearing upon the history of the country of which you write. Great pains have evidently been taken to obtain an accurate record of events, and a fair and impartial account of the controversies and divisions among the people--the motives of their leaders have been fairly treated and their acts justly judged.
    I have read the book seriatim to the account of the religious war, or "clash of creeds" resulting in the matter of Dr. Whitman and associates. I have found very few errors in the text, and they of little consequence to the parties concerned--none whatever to general history. As my leisure serves I shall continue to note inaccuracies and omissions to the end. But as I am now satisfied that you have no object in view other than to make the best history of country you can, it will be a real pleasure to me to assist you all I can in so laudable an effort.
    I herewith enclose the few notes I have thought necessary to make the one hundred and sixty pages I have found time to read. I have made them as short as possible.
Yours respectfully
    JESSE APPLEGATE.
    Such a communication as the above from so well known and respected a resident as Mr. Applegate proves conclusively that Mr. Walling's undertaking is one deserving of every support, and this should be given freely, for only the number of books subscribed for will be published and no books will remain to be sold at a reduced price.
Eugene City Guard, August 2, 1884, page 5


    Walling's History of Southern Oregon is now being delivered in this county by W. E. Newsome. Out of 1000 copies printed, 960 have been subscribed for. The history includes Jackson, Josephine, Douglas, Curry and Coos counties. It is profusely illustrated and the typographical work and the binding neatly gotten up. Its subscribers can judge of its merits, as we have had no time to examine it. From this county Mr. Newsome will go to Curry.

Coast Mail, Coos Bay, August 14, 1884, page 3


    Newell Hall has completed his contract for delivering the Southern Oregon history to subscribers in Josephine County, and it's safe to say that the famous history could be bought cheap over there. Here, however, we prize it very highly for the splendid pictures (?) of one prominent citizen it contains.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 6, 1884, page 3


    CONDEMNED.--At the annual reunion of the pioneers last Thursday a resolution was passed by nearly unanimous vote condemning Walling's History of Southern Oregon, the old settlers claiming that it is not a correct history of the early settlement of this part of the state.

Oregon Sentinel,
Jacksonville, September 13, 1884, page 3


    HISTORY DENOUNCED.--Walling's history of Southern Oregon, which has been subjected to much adverse criticism, received still further and more emphatic condemnation at the hands of the pioneers at their reunion last week. They denounced it as wholly inaccurate and not fit to be designated as a history of this part of the world.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    Lindsay Applegate, of Ashland, is writing a "History of Southern Oregon." It should possess merit.
"Brevities,"
Douglas Independent, Roseburg, September 20, 1884, page 3


    R. Pickett, the young man who was the artist for A. G. Walling's History of Southern Oregon, is attending the San Francisco School of Art [and] Design.
"Here and There," Roseburg Review, March 13, 1885, page 3


    "Walling's History" says that Waldo is in Sailor's Gulch, and three miles from the California state line, and that the altitude of the wagon road across the mountains is 4800 feet. Waldo is a mile from Sailor's Gulch, six miles from the California line, and the highest point on the wagon road is 3000 feet.
"From Waldo," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 3, 1885, page 3


A. G. Walling, Portland, 1870-1896.
    A. G. Walling is principally remembered today as a publisher of county histories. He printed the History of Southern Oregon, 1884; Illustrated History of Lane County, Oregon, 1884; History of Benton County, 1885. He also published Oregon and Its Advantages as an Agricultural and Commercial State, 1870, and Northwest Coast, Including Oregon, Washington and Idaho, 1878. He was by trade a printer. He came to Oregon in 1850, at the age of 22, and helped to plat the town of Willamette. He edited the Oregon Farmer from 1858 to 1863. He died in Portland in 1896.
Alfred Powers, History of Oregon Literature, Portland 1935, page 738



Last revised July 31, 2022