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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


The Great State of Siskiyou
Before there wasn't a State of Jefferson, there was a State of Siskiyou. Or Shasta.



    A writer in the Mountain Herald contends that the interests of the people of Northern California and Southern Oregon demand that those sections of country should be united, and a separate state organization formed.
Placer Times and Transcript, San Francisco, October 7, 1853, page 2



    Gen. Lane, we understand, is pledged to a division of Oregon Territory. A new Territory, South, will be asked from the general government, through him, at the coming session of Congress. Our informant states that he committed himself during the last canvass to that effect. He has many promises to redeem, and the one mentioned above has remained in darkness here up to this time.
Oregon Spectator, Oregon City, November 5, 1853, page 2


    By the news from Oregon, published yesterday, we hear that Gen. Lane is pledged to advocate a division of Oregon Territory in Congress. The news is entirely unexpected. At the last session of Congress, Washington Territory was constituted, cutting off about two-thirds of the former contents of Oregon. The southern line of Washington Territory is the middle of the Columbia River from its mouth to the point where it strikes the 46th degree of north latitude, which it thence follows to the Rocky Mountains. Oregon is now 4 degrees (280 miles) broad, and 12 degrees (420 miles) long. Of this, the only settled portion is west of the Cascade Mountains and about 100 miles wide. The population is about 45,000, and is confined principally to the valleys of the Columbia, Willamette, Umpqua, Coquille, and Rogue River. We presume that three-fourths of this population is in the Willamette Valley. The Oregon papers do not say how it is proposed to divide the territory, but the project is probably to make the line near the 44th degree of N. latitude, so that the new territories may have an equal amount of seacoast. By placing the line a little further south the whole of the Willamette Valley might be given to Oregon, while the southern territory might obtain the Umpqua, Coquille, and Rogue River.
    The project appears premature. There are as yet no  evils experienced by the great size of the territory. The. population of the whole is too small to authorize a claim for admission as a state, and by dividing the territory the time of the admission may be postponed until a comparatively remote day. It is not to be denied that, in time, policy will demand a division. The interest of the states on the Pacific will demand a representation of more than six Senators; but before the increase of Senators may be obtained it can be of but little benefit to cry for division.
    The motives of the present movement are not given, and we can only conjecture whether it is a pecuniary speculation of persons who wish to have the capital on their lands, or a political speculation of politicians anxious for office not to be had in Oregon, or a sincere belief that division is politic, and can be best secured at the present time.
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, November 8, 1853, page 2


    A NEW STATE.--A writer, in the Mountain Herald, a California paper, contends that the interests of the people of Northern California and Southern Oregon demand that these sections of the country should be united, and a separate state organization formed.
Detroit Free Press, November 20, 1853, page 2


    STATE OF KLAMATH.--The Yreka Herald contains the following communication:
    The time cannot be far distant when our Pacific Coast, extending from 32 to 49 deg. north latitude, will have to be subdivided into several states. This coast embraces about 17 degrees, over one thousand miles in a straight line, or, following the meanderings of the ocean, a shore of several thousand miles in extent. The interior is fast filling up, and the necessity for facilities of communication from different points on the coast becomes every day more apparent.
    Between San Francisco Bay and the Columbia River, a distance of some six or seven hundred miles, there are places like Humboldt Bay, Trinidad, Crescent City, Port Orford, Coos Bay and Umpqua River, which, as points of communication with the interior, are in a greater or less degree susceptible of improvement. But for the state of California or the Territory of Oregon they are of too secondary a nature to receive any effective support either from the people of Oregon and California, or from their delegations in Congress.
    Southern Oregon and Northern California, embracing the range of country east of the coast that stretches from Cape Mendocino [to] the Umpqua heads, presents a country of a uniform character, and distinct from the rest of either California or Oregon. The beds and banks of its streams and its mountains are auriferous, and therein it differs from the remainder of Oregon, which is an agricultural, grain and cattle-growing country. Its intercourse with the Sacramento Valley is barred, or at least greatly impeded, by high mountains, which part of the year are impassable. It presents a system of watercourses and mountain ranges entirely its own, and whereof the Yreka plain is about the center. Though its valleys afford pasture and farming lands, yet its most interesting feature is the gold scattered over its plains, riverbeds and mountains. This it is which ensures a speedily growing population, to whom already the Indians, formerly so formidable in this region, have been forced to submit.
    Only lately, Washington Territory has been formed out of the most northern portion of Oregon, with a seacoast of some three degrees, from 49 deg. north altitude to the mouth of the Columbia River. If there is left to Oregon a smaller extent of coast, say from the mouth of the Columbia River to the Umpqua heads, we have from the latter to Cape Mendocino, also three degrees of seacoast, which would be allotted to the new Territory.
    To develop properly the resources of the country between Cape Mendocino and the Umpqua heads, and east of them, it is necessary to form it into a Territory by itself and have its interests fairly represented in the U.S. Congress. Its interests are separate and distinct from those of either California or Oregon, and it clogs the administration of both. The little mail communication it now enjoys is very imperfect, and the greater portion of it has none at all. Appropriations by Congress for California or Oregon are of course mainly applied to San Francisco and the Columbia River. We need and are entitled to come help where we are; our bays and rivers are susceptible of improvement; our Coast Range is not impassable for wagon roads. Therefore let the people speak out and unite upon some plan of action for the purpose of forming a new Territory out of Northern California and Southern Oregon. Let our local resources be developed by a government identified with our locality; let us have a voice in the national councils, where we can urge upon Congress our wants. Let us have a new Territory!
S.H.G.
Crescent City, Nov. 23, 1853.
Alta California, San Francisco, December 19, 1853, page 2


New States upon the Pacific.
    The New York Herald has a leader upon the probabilities of the formation, at no very distant period, of a new territory out of a portion of territory from Southern Oregon and Northern California. It says that many of the ports between San Francisco and the mouth of the Columbia River, a distance of seven hundred miles, are susceptible of improvement, and are necessary as points of communication with the interior country, but while they remain attached to either California or Oregon they will not command that attention they would if they were [the] only outlets of a state or territory. The Herald says that the country contemplated for this new territory differs from the remainder of Oregon and California--that it is mostly a mountainous, auriferous soil, and is rapidly filling up. It is certainly, in our opinion, for the interest of the inhabitants of the Pacific Coast to carve Oregon and California into new states, as fast as the increase of population will permit, that our political influence may be felt in Congress, which, with only two members in each House, is next to nothing. For every new state formed, two additional members will be added to the Senate. At present, Congress doles out everything to California grudgingly. For more than three years California has been a member of the federal union, with a commerce inferior to but two cities of the Union, and yet no lighthouses are upon our coast, no fortifications for the defense of San Francisco. Every dollar appropriated for a custom house, hospital or navy yard comes forth as grudgingly as though it were a donation to California, when in fact it is but a necessary expenditure on the part of the general government to build up her empire on the Pacific Ocean--an empire that commenced with the possession of Oregon, and these improvements are national, and the appropriations should come forth freely and liberally. But such will not be the case while the Pacific Coast has so small a political influence in Congress.
Sacramento Daily Union, December 21, 1853, page 2


    STATE OF KLAMATH.--Yreka Herald contains the following communication:
    The time cannot be far distant when our Pacific Coast, extending from 32 to 49 deg. north latitude, will have to be subdivided into several states. This coast embraces about 17 degrees, over one thousand miles in a straight line, or, following the meanderings of the ocean, a shore of several thousand miles in extent. The interior is fast filling up, and the necessity for facilities of communication from different points on the coast becomes every day more apparent.
    Between San Francisco Bay and the Columbia River, a distance of some six or seven hundred miles, there are places like Humboldt Bay, Trinidad, Crescent City, Port Orford, Coos Bay, and Umpqua River, which, as points of communication with the interior, are in a greater or less degree susceptible of improvement. But for the state of California or the territory of Oregon, they are of too secondary a nature to receive any effective support either from the people of Oregon and California, or from their delegations in Congress.
    Southern Oregon and Northern California, embracing the range of country east of the coast that stretches from Cape Mendocino the Umpqua heads, presents a country of a uniform character, and distinct from the rest of either California or Oregon. The beds and banks of its streams and its mountains are auriferous, and therein it differs from the remainder of Oregon, which is an agricultural, grain and cattle-growing country. Its intercourse with the Sacramento Valley is barred, or at least greatly impeded, by high mountains, which part of the year are impassable. It presents a system of watercourses and mountain ranges entirely its own, and whereof the Yreka plain is about the center. Though its valleys afford pasture and farming lands, yet its most interesting feature is the gold scattered over its plains, riverbeds and mountains. This it is which ensures it a speedily growing population, to whom already the Indians, formerly so formidable in this region, have been forced to submit.
    Only lately, Washington Territory has been formed out of the most northern portion of Oregon, with a seacoast of some three degrees, from 49 deg., north latitude to the mouth of the Columbia River. If there is left to Oregon a smaller extent of coast, say from the mouth of the Columbia River to the Umpqua heads, we have from the latter to Cape Mendocino, also three degrees of seacoast, which would be allotted to the new territory.
    To develop properly the resources of the country between Cape Mendocino and the Umpqua heads, and east of them, it is necessary to form it into a territory, by itself, and have its interests fairly represented in the U.S. Congress. Its interests are separate and distinct from those, of either California or Oregon, and it clogs the administration of both. The little mail communication it now enjoys is very imperfect, and the greater portion of it has none at all. Appropriations by Congress for California or Oregon are of course mainly applied to San Francisco and the Columbia River. We need and are entitled to some help where we are; our bays and rivers are susceptible of improvement; our Coast Range is not impassable for wagon roads. Therefore let the people speak out and unite upon some plan of action for the purpose of forming a new Territory out of Northern California and Southern Oregon. Let our local resources be developed by a government identified with our locality; let us have a voice in the national councils, where we can urge upon Congress our wants. Let us have a New Territory!
S.H.G.
Crescent City, Nov. 23, 1853
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, December 19, 1853, page 2


    FROM YREKA.--The Mountain Herald comes to us with its leading article devoted to the subject of the proposed new Territory, from which we make the following extracts:
    "The interests of Northern California and Southern Oregon are identical--while those of Northern Oregon and Southern California, with which we are now connected by State and Territorial bands, differ from us widely in interest.
    "We want a new Territory. The people of Umpqua say so! Humboldt, Klamath and Siskiyou are unanimous in favor of it. The Rogue River country join with one unanimous consent. A voice from Mendocino to the Umpqua cries let us have a new Territory. It is caught up in the mountains, and is resounded from the Trinity to the Calapooya. The people are unanimous."
"News from the Interior," Democratic State Journal, Sacramento, December 26, 1853, page 2


    A NEW TERRITORY.--The following extract is from a lengthy leader in the Yreka Herald:
    "We want but to be properly represented in the general government to secure to us the aid to which we are entitled, and which is so necessary to the growth and development of this part of the country.
    "We want a new territory. The people of the Umpqua say so! Humboldt, Klamath and Siskiyou are unanimous in favor of it. The Rogue River country join with one unanimous consent. A voice from Mendocino to the Umpqua cries let us have a new territory. It is caught up in the mountains and is resounded from the Trinity to the Calapooia. The people are unanimous."
Sacramento Daily Union, December 28, 1853, page 2


    NEW TERRITORY.--The people in the southern counties of Oregon, and northern counties of California, are out in favor of a new territory, in which they propose to include Shasta, Trinity, Humboldt, Siskiyou and Klamath counties. The Yreka Herald says:
    Northern California and Southern Oregon--A New Territory.--The increase
of population, the permanent growth, the steady progress of improvement, and the almost daily development of new resources of wealth in Northern California and Southern Oregon, have rendered this section not only the most wealthy, but given it advantages over any other portion of the Pacific Coast.
    Here we have a climate which for health is not surpassed by any in the known world. We are free from all fevers, floods, and pestilences of the Sacramento Valley. The farmer has a market at home for all his produce, with natural barriers against all competition from abroad forever. Our valleys are fast settling up, and the voice of the plowman may be heard, as he turns the virgin soil, mingling with the echo of the woodman's ax. The hardy sons of the farmer pioneers of the Western States are progressing with their improvements. They bring with them their families, and are making for themselves a home in this delightful country, where the monster poverty is easily conquered, and where fortune smiles upon all who persevere in industry and sobriety. The auriferous deposits are as rich and extensive as any in California, affording profitable employment to thousands of miners. In short, our population will in one year from the present time be immense.
    As yet we have received little of the benefits from the general government to which our comparative importance entitles us.
    The interests of Northern California and Southern Oregon are identical--while those of Northern Oregon and Southern California, with which we are now connected by state and territorial bands, differ from us widely in interest.
    For the better development of our numerous and extensive resources of wealth, it is necessary that this portion of the country should be formed into a new Territory. We want a voice in our national assembly, to urge upon Congress our immediate wants. We have never had any of the benefits of the appropriations either to California or Oregon. They are of course swallowed up, either by the dull
monster of the north or the grasp of the south. Connected as we are with California
and Oregon, although we pay our full proportion of tax, yet owing to our great distance from, and the difficulty of access to the capitols, we are a drag upon both
state and territory. Our representatives both from Oregon and California, in the general government, have been so wrapped up in the mighty affairs of the older settled portions of the State and Territory, that they have neglected to secure for us even the benefit of a postal arrangement of any kind, with the exception of a one-horse mail from Oregon semi-occasionally.
    Our Indian affairs have either been grossly neglected or attended to in a halfway kind of style, which is far worse than entire neglect--leaving the hardy pioneer to defend himself and his family from the murderous hand of the savage as best he could, or be murdered like dogs--our cattle driven off and our property destroyed
with impunity.
    Our bays and rivers are susceptible of great improvement.
    We want but to be properly represented in the general government to secure to us the aid to which we are entitled, and which is so necessary to the growth and development of this part of the country.
    We want a new Territory. The people of the Umpqua say so. Humboldt, Klamath, and Siskiyou are unanimous in favor of it. The Rogue River country join with one unanimous consent. A voice from Mendocino to the Umpqua cries, let us have a new Territory. It is caught up in the mountains and is resounded from the Trinity to the Calapooya. The people are unanimous.
Nevada Journal,
Nevada City, California, January 6, 1854, page 1


From Yreka.
    We are indebted to C. C. Beekman, of Cram, Rogers & Co.'s Express, for the Mountain Herald of Dec. 31st.
    We perceive that a call has been made, by prominent gentlemen, upon citizens of Jackson County, O.T., to assemble in general mass meeting at the Robinson House, Jacksonville, on Saturday the 7th day of January, 1854, at 4 o'clock p.m., for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of taking measures to effect the formation of a new Territory out of that portion of Southern Oregon and Northern California lying between the Calapooya Mountains on the north and the Trinity Mountains on the south; and also to appoint delegates to a general convention to be held at Jacksonville, on the 23th day of January next. A similar call has been made upon the citizens of Siskiyou, to meet in Yreka on the 14th inst., for the same purpose. Indeed, leading citizens of Jackson, Douglas and Umpqua counties, Oregon, and of Siskiyou and Klamath counties, California, have taken all the necessary steps to secure a full representation in the proposed general convention, to be held at Jacksonville on the 2th inst. The Herald advocates the movement.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, January 7, 1854, page 2


    NEW TERRITORY.--The citizens of Klamath and Siskiyou counties, in this state, and Douglas and Umpqua counties, in Oregon Territory, are to hold meetings in their several counties, and appoint delegates to a general convention to be held at Jacksonville on the 25th inst. The convention has for its object the formation of a new territory out of that portion of Oregon lying south of the Calapooya Mountains, and that portion of California lying north of the Trinity Mountains.
Sacramento Daily Union, January 9, 1854, page 2


    THE NEW TERRITORY.--Mass meetings were to be held in this connection at Jacksonville, O.T., on the 7th, and at Yreka on the 14th inst. The convention will be held at Jacksonville on the 25th inst.
Sacramento Daily Union, January 16, 1854, page 2


    DIVISION OF THE TERRITORY.--We have been shown letters received by the southern members, urging upon them the necessity and expedience of making a move for the division of the Territory. A convention is to be held on the 25th of this month in Jacksonville, for the furtherance of this object. It is contemplated to make a new Territory out of that portion of California north of the Trinity Mountains and of that portion of Oregon south of the Calapooias. This question and the one in regard to the relocation of the public buildings have been prolific of considerable outdoor discussion. A majority of the members are opposed to a division of the Territory at the present time, but are willing to give the south the university if the southern members can agree on the location, but there seems to be but little probability of this, as the members of Umpqua and Douglas desire its location at Winchester, and the members of Jackson County at Jacksonville.
"Legislative Summary," Oregon Statesman, Oregon City, January 24, 1854, page 2


    A NEW TERRITORY.--It seems the people in the northern portion of this state and the southern portion of Oregon are moving in earnest in favor of the creation of a new territory. They were electing delegates to attend a convention which was to have been held at Jacksonville, on the 25th instant.
    In referring to one of these meetings the Mountain Herald says:
    "On our first page will be found the proceedings of the mass meetings of the citizens of Siskiyou County. Able and enthusiastic remarks were made by Judge Robertson, John Cosby, Esq., H. G. Ferris, Esq. and others. The list of delegates from this county to the general convention at Jacksonville, on the 25th, may be found in the proceedings. Siskiyou will have a full delegation there. Never were the people more unanimous on any subject than are the people of the proposed new Territory on this. Let the sentiments of the people be heard at their general convention, so that our national, state and territorial representatives, in their respective legislative bodies, may fully represent our wishes in this important matter."
Sacramento Daily Union, January 31, 1854, page 2


    TERRITORIAL CONVENTION.--In pursuance to a call heretofore noticed, delegates from Siskiyou County, Cal., and Umpqua, Jackson and Coos counties, Oregon Territory, met in convention in Jacksonville, on the 28th January, and organized by the election of H. G. Ferris of Siskiyou, as president; E. Steele, of Yreka, and Samuel Colver of Jacksonville, vice presidents; and T. McF. Patton and C. S. Drew, secretaries. There were 21 delegates present, several counties not being represented at all. 
    The convention resolved to use "every exertion to prevent the formation of a state government in Oregon with its present boundaries." Three committees were appointed to draft memorials--1st, to Congress; 2nd, to the California Legislature; 3rd, to the Oregon Legislature. A committee was also appointed "to draft a petition to circulate among the citizens of the proposed new Territory--said committee to consist of the sheriffs of the said counties."
    The convention then adjourned to meet at Jacksonville on the third Monday of April (the 17th). We are of the opinion that this movement is premature. However, the people of the counties directly interested ought to be the best judges of their wants.
Shasta Courier, Shasta, California, February 11, 1854, page 3


For the Oregonian.
New Territory!--Mass Meeting.
    In pursuance of a call, made and published in the Mountain Herald of the 30th December, the citizens of Jackson County convened at the Robinson House on Saturday, Jan. 7, for the purpose of taking into consideration the propriety of organizing a new territory, and to devise means to effect the same.
    On motion, Samuel Culver, Esq., was elected President, and T. McF. Patton chosen Secretary.
    L. F. Mosher, Esq., was called upon to state the object of the meeting.
    On motion of Dr. Robinson, a committee of five were appointed by the president to draft a memorial to the legislative assembly, and also to nominate ten delegates to represent Jackson County in the general convention, to be held at this place on the 25th inst.
    The committee consisted of--Dr. Jesse Robinson, chairman, L. F. Mosher, W. W. Fowler, T. McF. Patton, S. C. Graves.
    The committee reported a memorial, which was unanimously adopted. It reported, also, the following names as delegates: W. W. Fowler, Wm. Burke, T. McF. Patton, Geo. Dart, A. McIntire, L. F. Mosher, C. S. Drew, Samuel Culver, John E. Ross, R. Dugan.
    On motion of J. A. Lupton, the secretary was requested to correspond with the different counties, and solicit a full delegation from each.
    On motion, the proceedings of this meeting were ordered to be published in all the Oregon papers--also the Mountain Herald.
    On motion, adjourned.
SAMUEL CULVER, Pres't.
T. McF. PATTON, Sec'y.
Oregonian, Portland, February 11, 1854, page 2


New Territorial Convention.
    In pursuance of a call made for a general convention, to discuss the propriety of a division of the Territory of Oregon, and to devise means to consummate the same, the delegates convened at the Robinson House, in Jacksonville, on the 25th of January.
    On motion of L. F. Mosher, the convention was organized by the election of H. G. Ferris, of Siskiyou Co., California, as president pro tem., and T. McF. Patton, of Jackson Co., Oregon Territory, as secretary.
    On motion of E. J. Curtis, a committee of three was appointed to examine credentials of delegates and report to convention. Committee consisted of Messrs. L. F. Mosher, Samuel Colver and C. N. Thornbury.
    On motion of L. F. Mosher, a committee of three was appointed to report permanent officers for the convention. Committee consisted of Geo. D. Snelling, S. Ettlinger and E. J. Curtis.
    On motion, convention adjourned until tomorrow, at 10 o'clock a.m.
----
THURSDAY, Jan. 26, 1854.
    Convention met pursuant to adjournment and was called to order by the president.
    Mr. Mosher, from the committee on credentials, reported the following delegates:
    From Siskiyou Co., Cal.--Messrs. E. Steele, C. N. Thornbury, E. J. Curtis, H. G. Ferris, E. Moore, C. Wheelock and J. Darrah.
    From Jackson Co., Oregon--L. F. Mosher, R. Dugan, J. E. Ross, C. Sims, T. McF. Patton, S. Colver, D. M. Kenney, C. S. Drew, M. Angel and J. Robinson.
    From Coos Co., Oregon--S. Ettlinger and A. Little.
    From Umpqua Co., Oregon--G. L. Snelling.
    On motion, this report was received, and committee discharged.
    Mr. Snelling, from the committee on permanent officers, reported--for president, H. G. Ferris; vice presidents, E. Steele and S. Colver; secretaries, T. McF. Patton and C. S. Drew. The report was received and committee discharged.
    On motion of E. J. Curtis, a central committee was appointed for the purpose of corresponding with the various counties &c. Committee consisted of C. S. Drew, C. Sims, G. L. Snelling, C. N. Thornbury and L. F. Mosher.
    Mr. Mosher offered the following preamble and resolution, which was unanimously adopted:
    Whereas, The Legislative Assembly of the Territory of Oregon have introduced and passed an act providing for the sense of the people of said Territory to be taken in reference to the formation of a state government,
    Therefore Resolved, That we will use every exertion to prevent the formation of a state government in Oregon with its present boundaries.
    On motion, three committees were appointed, consisting of three each, for the purpose of drafting memorials: 1st to Congress, 2nd to the Oregon Legislature, and 3rd to the California Legislature.
    Committee to memorialize Congress--E. Steele, L. F. Mosher and E. J. Curtis. Committee to memorialize Oregon Legislature--G. L. Snelling, T. McF. Patton and D. M. Kenney. Committee to memorialize California Legislature--C. N. Thornbury, E. Moore and W. A. Robertson.
    On motion of E. Steele, a committee of six was appointed, consisting of the sheriffs of the several counties, for the purpose of circulating a petition for a division of this Territory.
    On motion, Samuel Colver was chosen chairman of said committee and vested with instructions to prepare the petition and forward the same to each of the sheriffs, as aforesaid, for circulation.
    The following resolution was introduced and adopted:
    Resolved, That this convention adjourn to meet at Jacksonville on the third Monday in April next (17th), A.D. 1854.
    On motion, the proceedings of this convention, signed by the officers, were ordered to be forwarded to the editors of the Mountain Herald, Oregonian, Oregon Statesman, Oregon Weekly Times and Spectator, with a request that they be published.
    On motion, convention adjourned.
H. G. FERRIS, Pres't.
E. STEELE, SAMUEL COLVER, Vice Presidents.
T. McF. PATTON, C. S. DREW, Secretaries.
Oregonian, Portland, February 25, 1854, page 2


    NEW TERRITORY.--A resolution was introduced today in the House of the Legislative Assembly, requesting our Delegate in Congress to use his influence to form a new Territory out of Southern Oregon and Northern California. Every member south of the Calapooya Mountain voted for the resolution, and every one north of this mountain against it. So the resolution was lost, there being only five members south of the proposed northern boundary line of our new Territory. The northern portion of Oregon seems determined to hold on to the south, and compel her to pay taxes without an equal representation.
    Mr. Jackson, from Clackamas County, then introduced a resolution requesting our Delegate to use his influence to prevent the formation of a itory, which passed by a large majority; however, every member south of the Calapooya Mountain voted against it. This vote will be an advantage to the friends of the itory, as it shows that the whole southern delegation are united, and determined to have a itory. The votes of the members north of the Calapooya Mountain, during the whole session, have been oppressive to the south, and well calculated to compel the people to form a itory, and set up for themselves.
    Mr. Martin from Douglas County introduced a bill sometime last week, locating the University of Oregon at Winchester. This bill was summarily laid on the table. Soon afterwards, a bill was introduced in the Council, moving the whole of the public buildings farther south, locating the Penitentiary at Oregon City, the Capitol at Corvallis, late Marysville, and the University at Winchester, for the purpose of doing the southern part of Oregon ample justice in the distribution of the public buildings. But this bill was too just and equitable to pass this august and selfish body. So it was indefinitely postponed yesterday, which gives it a quietus this session.
    Southern Oregon has now nothing to expect from the Legislative Assembly of Oregon, and a division is inevitable. Southern Oregon has more than one-third of the population of the Territory, yet she has only five members in the House out of twenty-six, and only one member in the Council out of nine. As five is to twenty-six, or one to nine, so are the rights, privileges and interests of Southern Oregon respected in this Legislative Assembly. She will pay one-third of the taxes of the Territory, yet she is denied the location of the University, notwithstanding not a dollar has yet been expended at Corvallis. What then has she to expect from the Territorial Legislature? Nothing. But we have one consolation left. We can and will have a itory, without their assistance. Northern California and Southern Oregon have the resources within themselves to make a large, respectable and wealthy state. The proposed itory has fertile valleys, rich mines and good harbors that is equal to any on the Pacific Coast, and she has at this time population enough to support a respectable state government. The sooner a itory is formed, the sooner Northern California and Southern Oregon will become a prosperous, wealthy and happy state of the American Union. I have the honor to remain, yours respectfully,
B.F.D. [B. F. Dowell?]
--[Cor. Yreka Her.
"Late and Interesting from Oregon," San Francisco Evening Journal, February 21, 1854, page 2


    There has been a movement in Southern Oregon of some significance, working to the erection of a new state in that quarter. Meetings and conventions have been held, and memorials will go forward to Washington urging the proposition.
"Oregon Territory," New York Daily Herald, March 26, 1854, page 2



    The agitation in the north for the formation of a territory out of the Klamath country still continues. Another convention had been called for, to meet at Jacksonville, O.T., on the 7th of April.
"Two Weeks Later from California," Putnam County Courier, Carmel, New York, April 1, 1854, page 2


    PROPOSED FORMATION OF A NEW TERRITORY OUT OF SOUTHERN OREGON AND NORTHERN CALIFORNIA.--On the night of August 17th, a large gathering of the citizens of Crescent City and vicinity took place, to hear the addresses of the various candidates for office. During the evening, says the Herald, the organization of a new Territory, to be formed out of the northern part of this state and Southern Oregon, was incidentally touched upon. The manner in which the sentiments of the speakers were received by the large assemblage present is but a slight indication of the deep enthusiastic feeling pervading our entire community in favor of the measure. At a proper time, the voice of the people in this region upon that question of vital importance to us will be heard, and that, too, with a unanimity astonishing to its few opponents.
Empire County Argus, Coloma, California, September 16, 1854, page 1


    Lately the Yreka Union
has ably urged the subject of a division, and the Jacksonville Sentinel (O.T.), under date of the 19th ult., says:
    "The new State of Shasta will be formed. It will not be long before the question will be put whether the country between the Siskiyous and Calapooyas will remain attached to Oregon, or connect itself with Shasta. That question is already virtually before the people. The action of the California Legislature precipitates upon the country the whole subject in such a form that it must be disposed of. The discussion that has commenced will be continued until the question is fully settled. New boundaries are to be formed, and of this region every locality must have the opportunity to decide for itself and choose its relation on its own view of interest."
Crescent City Herald, February 6, 1856, page 2


    JOSEPHINE COUNTY, O.T.--Mr. J. R. Hale introduced a bill into the Legislative Assembly of Oregon to divide Jackson County and form of the southern [sic] part of it Josephine County.

Crescent City Herald, February 6, 1856, page 2


    Mr. Watkins moved a substitute [amendment] to the effect that if at any time the majority of the voters of Southern Oregon should desire it, that they might have the privilege of forming a new state in conjunction with a portion of the state of California.
    The chairman decided the amendment out of order.
"Proceedings of the Constitutional Convention,"
Oregon Argus, Oregon City, August 29, 1857, page 2


Division of the State.
    In the year of eighteen hundred and fifty-two, the question was first agitated in Northern California and Southern Oregon relative to the formation of an independent state comprised of the territory therein included. In 1853, a convention was called in the Rogue River Valley to take into consideration the practicability and propriety of these measures, when it was unanimously declared to be the correct policy. An effort was accordingly made in the California Legislature, resulting in the engrossment of a considerable time, and in the proposition of various plans of division, none of which proved satisfactory. Some advocated the propriety of separating the agricultural from the mineral land, urging that their interests were incompatible with the equal laws of a common government, and therefore proposed that the state should be divided into three parts, setting aside the northern counties, which with a liberal slice of Southern Oregon should form the Northern District, and retaining Shasta, the central and a portion of the southern mines for the Southern District, leaving the cow counties, as they are called, for the southern state. After the expenditure of a great deal of gas in the Legislature, by the press and the people, the subject finally settled down into a comparative repose, with the exception of citizens in Siskiyou, the northern counties, and in the Umpqua and Rogue River valleys of Southern Oregon--this portion of the coast not being so easily satisfied with the difficulties with which they were obliged to contend in traveling several hundred miles to and from their respective capital. A temporary quietus was, however, soon placed upon the Umpqua citizens, in the establishment of a Port of Entry at a town founded on the coast by the name of Roseburg [sic]. Here the postal department made it obligatory for the mail steamer to land regularly and exchange its mails, which fact has imparted a sort of independence to that portion of Southern Oregon. But it seems that notwithstanding the necessity of the landing of the mail steamer, there are, owing to fearful shipwrecks, but few vessels whose masters have the hardihood to enter its port; and owing to the expected revision of the general government in the proposed economy of its postal arrangements, even the mail steamer will probably be withdrawn, when they will again be reduced to entire dependence on Crescent City and the overland roads.
    Citizens of the Rogue River Valley are alive, we are informed, to the local advantages of a central government, and in the northern counties of our own state, the question of "division" is again becoming a topic of conversation, and a question of serious consideration.
    The apparent apathy of Central and Southern California in the interests of the North, and their seeming want of confidence in our local importance and worth, is arousing a sense of self-dependence whose natural tendencies are favorable to an independent government. It is true that a railroad, such as we have advocated, would greatly tend to remove the barriers against reciprocity which exist between us, but it also seems true that lower capitalists do not appreciate the common benefits that would result from it; while with us at the North, a railroad or division! is becoming the watchword.
    There are advantages that would accrue to the formation of more states on the Pacific Coast, among the most important of which is the additional influence which we would command in Congress And it is but fair to concede that the increased and increasing importance of the Pacific demands additional votes in our National Legislature. One thing is quite certain--something must be done for the North, or otherwise she will be forced into retrenchment, and to the necessity of acting for herself.--Siskiyou Chronicle.
Daily National Democrat, Marysville, California, January 20, 1859, page 3


    The Siskiyou Chronicle has an article urging the formation of a State out of Northern California and Southern Oregon.
"Further from California," Baltimore Sun, Baltimore, Maryland, February 17, 1859, page 1


    Several bills were introduced, among them a bill to allow the creation of a new government out of the northern counties and of Southern Oregon. . . .
"Legislative," Sacramento Daily Union, February 18, 1859, page 2


    THE 
NORTH DEMANDING A SEPARATION.--The Yreka Union demands that the northern part of the state shall be cut off from California and united with Southern Oregon to make a new state, which is to include all the territory west of the Sierra Nevada and Cascade Mountains, between parallels 40 and 44 of north latitude.
Daily Alta California, San Francisco, February 18, 1859, page 1


     GREAT 
NORTH.--The Yreka Union demands that the northern part of the state shall be cut off from California and united with Southern Oregon, to make a new state, which is to include all the territory west of the Sierra Nevada and the Cascade Mountains, between parallels 40 and 44 of north latitude.
San Joaquin Republican, February 26, 1859, page 1


    The people of Southern Oregon are agitating for a new state, to extend
from the Calapooia to the Scott Mountains, to include the Umpqua, Rogue and Klamath Valleys. The region is larger than most of the Atlantic States, and distinct in its industries and interests from either the Willamette or Sacramento valleys.
"Editorial Notes," Washington Gazette, Washington, Indiana, October 13, 1877, page 1


    Daniel Moe Kenney was active in the effort to create a new state out of Southern Oregon, in 1854. The movement originated at Yreka, Cal., and was strongly championed by the editor of the Yreka Herald. At a meeting at Jacksonville on January 7, 1854, it was decided to hold a convention on January 25 for further discussion. Those who met drafted a memorial to Congress and to the Oregon and California legislatures. The new state was to include Northern California and Southern Oregon. United States Senator Joseph Lane wrote to friends in Southern Oregon that such a move would delay the admission of Oregon as a state, so the movement was dropped. Among those prominent in this agitation were T. McF. Patton, later ambassador to Japan and for many years a prominent book dealer at Salem; D. M. Kenney, L. F. Moser, George Dart, C. S. Drew, John E. Ross, J. A. Lupton, Martin Angel, Richard Dugan, G. L. Snelling, A. McIntyre, William Burt, S. C. Graves, Anthony Little, C. Simms, S. Etlinger, Jesse Richardson and W. W. Fowler. There was also a very active group at Yreka, who hoped that Yreka should be the capital of the proposed new state.
Fred Lockley, "Impressions and Observations of the Journal Man," Oregon Journal, Portland, July 9, 1936, page 10


   

Last revised July 21, 2022