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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Correspondence of the Oregon Superintendency
1877
Southern Oregon-related correspondence with the Oregon Superintendency for Indian Affairs.



War Department
Washington City
January 5th 1877
Sir:
    Referring to the telegram from General Howard to the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, dated the 30th ultimo, in regard to an issue of blankets from Camp Harney, Oregon, for the use of Indians, which the Commissioner handed to the Quartermaster General on the 3rd instant, I have the honor to inform you that if the Indian Department can replace in kind any blankets which the troops at Camp Harney can spare for the Indians, General Howard will be authorized to make the transfer suggested, but such transfer can only be authorized on the express condition that the Indian Department shall replace them at Camp Harney by an equal number of army standard blankets, to be purchased either from the present contractors--Messrs. Wilson & Bradbury of Philadelphia, or from the Mission and Pacific Woolen Mills of San Francisco, which was the last contractor, and which probably has a surplus of standard blankets not delivered under the contract of last fall.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. D. Cameron
            Secretary of War
The Honorable
    The Secretary of the Interior
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Grand Ronde Indian Agency
    Oregon Jan. 8th 1877
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit herewith "Estimate of Funds" for the 1st and 2nd quarters 1877.
    The total amount asked for is on $7,000.00/100 including pay of agent and fulfillment of treaty with Molel Indians.
    I have asked for the very smallest amount with which this agency can be managed in any way satisfactorily, knowing the smallness of appropriations and the economical tendency of the present Congress.
    But I feel it my duty to urge upon the Department the filling of this requisition.
    The progress made by the Indians at this agency has, I believe, been in no way inferior to that of any other. At present, the Indians are fairly advanced. But this end has only been attained by years of patient and persistent labor. This good work, so well commenced, should certainly be continued. And it seems both the reverse of economy and wisdom to jeopardize a retrogression into the old state of affairs for the want of the small expenditure that would enable the agent to go on with the work of instructing these tribes in the arts of civilization and industry.
    Not only is a miller and sawyer, farmer, blacksmith and carpenter needed here, to teach their trades to the young Indian boys and men; but they are actually needed for the preservation of the government property at this place. For it will be readily understood that since the removal of all employees at this agency, it is utterly beyond the power of the agent, unassisted, to overlook the Indians; make out his own papers; take charge of the government stock and cattle; repair buildings & fences; cut hay necessary for winter; and perform the numerous other offices needed for the maintenance in good order of the property of the United States on an Indian reservation.
    I have asked for $1,000.00/100 for the aid of the old and infirm, many of whom are suffering from want of sufficient food and clothing; while the houses in which several of them are living are badly in need of repair.
    I ask also for $1,000.00/100 for the purchase of seed. This would enable me to induce the Indians to cultivate more than twice the land that will otherwise be cultivated this year.
    I have asked, too, for $500.00/100, more than the "treaty" allowance, for the support of the school. This is not as much as is really needed. Many more pupils could be obtained if there was a sufficiency of funds to clothe and feed them. For many of the Indians will not send their children to school at all unless they are lodged, boarded and clothed. The teachers are unremitting and unbounded in their devotion to their work, and have effected wonders, but find themselves fearfully hampered for want of the funds necessary to carry it on successfully.
    I do hope that the Department will be pleased to give this statement of facts its serious consideration and that it will see the necessity of and find the means to fill the enclosed estimate.
    There is yet one other matter in this connection to which I am desirous of calling the attention of the Department. The Indians are beginning to ask what advantage it is to them to remain under the control of the agent; and why it would not be better to entirely ignore his authority. They say that they are receiving nothing from the government; that they are locked up, as it were, on the reserve, with a very small allowance of land, away from mills, shops and market; that in consequence of this, they are in a worse condition than they would be if they were to leave the reservation and refuse to acknowledge the agent's authority. And while I have, thus far, been able to maintain this authority, it is impossible to say how long this can be done, unless I am possessed with the means of reopening the "shops & mill" and of thus making the advantage of obedience and submission more evident.
Very respectfully, your obedient servant,
    P. B. Sinnott
        U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Grand Ronde Agency
   Oregon Jan. 8th 1877
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to transmit herewith "Estimate of Funds" for the 1st and 2nd quarters 1877.
    The total amount asked for is only $7,000.00 including pay of agent and fulfillment of treaty with Molel Indians.
    I have asked for the very smallest amount with which this agency can be managed in any way satisfactorily, knowing the smallness of appropriations and the economical tendency of the present Congress.
    But I feel it my duty to urge upon the Department the filling of this requisition.
    The progress made by the Indians at this agency has, I believe, been in no way inferior to that of any other. At present the Indians are fairly advanced. But this end has only been attained by years of patient and persistent labor. This good work, so well commenced, should certainly be continued. And it seems both the reverse of economy and wisdom to jeopardize a retrogression into the old state of affairs for the want of the small expenditures that would enable the agent to go on with the work of instructing these tribes in the arts of civilization and industry.
    Not only is a miller and sawyer, farmer, blacksmith and carpenter needed here, to teach their trades to the young Indian boys and men, but they are actually needed for the preservation of the government property at this place. For it will be readily
understood that since the removal of all employees at this agency it is utterly beyond the power of the agent, unassisted, to overlook the Indians, make out his own papers, take charge of the government stock and cattle, repair buildings & fences, cut hay necessary for winter, and perform the numerous other offices needed for the maintenance in good order of the property of the United States on an Indian reservation.
    I have asked for $1,000.00 for the aid of the old and infirm, many of whom are suffering from want of sufficient food and clothing, while the houses in which several of them are living are badly in need of repair.
    I ask also for $1,000.00 for the purchase of seed. This would enable me to induce the Indians to cultivate more than twice the land that will otherwise be cultivated this year.
    I have asked, too, for $500.00 more than the "treaty" allowance, for the support of the school. This is not as much as is really needed. Many more pupils could be obtained if there was a sufficiency of funds to clothe and feed them. For many of the Indians will not send their children to school at all unless they are lodged, boarded and clothed. The teachers are unremitting and unbounded in their devotion to their work, and have effected wonders, but find themselves fearfully hampered for want of the funds necessary to carry it on successfully.
    I do hope that the Department will be pleased to give this statement of facts its serious consideration, and that it will see the necessity of, and find the means to, fill the endorsed "Estimate."
    There is yet one other matter in this connection to which I am desirous of calling the attention of the Department. The Indians are beginning to ask what advantage it is to them to remain under the control of the agent, and why it would not be better to entirely ignore his authority. They say that they are receiving nothing from the government, that they are locked up, as it were, on the reserve, with a very small allowance of land, away from mills, shops and market; that in consequence of this they are in a worse condition than they would be if they were to leave the reservation and refuse to acknowledge the agent's authority. And while I have, thus far, been able to maintain this authority, it is impossible to say how long this can be done, unless I am possessed with the means of reopening the "shops & mill," and of thus making the advantage of obedience and submission more evident.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     P. B. Sinnott
       U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.


Bureau of Catholic Indian Missions
    Washington, D.C., Jan. 12, 1877
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affairs
        Sir:
            In your communication of July 12th 1876, in answer to my letter of March 24th 1876, in which I ask that the Nestucca Indians be placed under the jurisdiction of the U.S. agent at Grand Ronde, you say that you had referred the matter to the agent at the Siletz Agency and to Special Commissioner Simpson, and that from their reports and from all you can learn in regard to the matter, you are unable to find--
    1st. Evidence that these Indians were promised that they should be under the Grand Ronde agent's jurisdiction, or
    2nd. That said Indians desire the fulfillment of said promise, if made,
    3rd. That it is less difficult for the Nestucca Indians to reach the Grand Ronde Agency than it is to reach their present agency--i.e., the Siletz, and therefore you say, "As present[ly] advised I see no reason for attaching the Nestucca Indians to the Grand Ronde Agency."
    It is certainly true that, if you are properly advised, your reasons are sufficient for not making the change I have asked, and it is equally true that, if you are not properly advised in the premises, and if the facts are in truth the exact reverse of what you are led to believe, they are sufficient to make it your duty to make the change I have requested. That you have not been properly advised, and that the facts are with perfect exactness just the reverse of what you have been led to believe, I am abundantly able to prove.
    As to the first point, Were the Nestuccas promised that they would be placed under the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde agent? Agent Bagley and Special Commissioner Simpson advise you that they were not. As against this evidence I submit the following:
    1st. A petition of the nine leading men among these Indians, signed on the 11th Aug. 1876, certified to by the U.S. interpreter and U.S. Agent Sinnott, and verified before a justice of the peace. In this petition these head men, in substance, say that when they agreed to settle on Salmon River, the U.S. promised that as money had been appropriated, and placed in the hands of the Siletz agent to be expended for them, he would have jurisdiction of them until the following summer, when the Grand Ronde jurisdiction should be extended over them. (See Ex. "A")
    2nd. A certificate, signed by U.S. Indian Agent Sinnott, C. D. Folger and Alex. Day, in which they state that the first condition agreed to by Special Commissioner Simpson was that the Nestuccas should be under the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde agent. And to this the interpreter, Loui Lipisink, certifies that this was the first condition demanded by the Nestuccas. (See Ex. "B")
    3rd. Letter of Special Comr. Simpson to Bishop Blanchet, in which he does not deny that these Indians were promised the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde agent, but says that there was "no definite understanding in the treaty." "I also promised them to use my influence to have them allowed the privilege of settling their difficulties at the Grand Ronde Agency &c." (See Ex. "C")
    4th. Report of Agent Sinnott (Rpt. Ind. Affrs. for 1875, p. 346). He says that he was present at the treaty, and that "the Indians first desired to come here (Grand Ronde Agency); if not, and they located at Salmon River, they wanted the jurisdiction of this agency extended over them. Before their consent was obtained, they were promised that they could have the benefit of the schools of this agency; have the same privileges of the saw and grist mill as the Indians living here; have their troubles settled here by the same laws that govern the Indians here; and that efforts would be made to have that portion of the country to be occupied by them attached to this agency."
    5th. In his Report for 1875 the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, on page 58, says: "The opening of this portion of Oregon to settlement has made their (the Nestuccas') removal necessary, and through the efforts of Special Comr. Simpson they have reluctantly consented to remove to the mouth of Salmon River, on the Siletz Reserve, on the condition that they shall be included under the Grand Ronde Agency, from which they are only eight hours distant by a good road."
    I have here submitted sufficient evidence to prove that you were misled in your first conclusion, and that in truth these Indians were promised that they should be under the Grand Ronde agent's jurisdiction. It is true that Comr. Simpson says that it was not definitely named in the treaty, but no one has asserted that it was; it is only claimed that the promise was made by the U.S. Commissioner. He says that he only promised that he would use his influence to have this done--but he must be mistaken in this, for the Indians, the interpreter, the whites present and U.S. Agent Sinnott testify that he promised that it should be done after the Siletz agent had expended for them the money he had received. But granting that all these men are mistaken in this, and that Simpson really did only promise to use his influence to have this thing done, one thing is perfectly certain, and that is that the Indians and all present understood him to promise the jurisdiction absolutely, and further that the Indians would not have made the change otherwise. If then it is necessary on any score to keep good faith with so insignificant a lot of human beings, the U.S. must return them to their old haunts, or place them under the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde agent.
    The second question is, Do these Indians still desire the fulfillment of this promise? You have been advised that they do not; but as a conclusive answer to the question, I refer to the petition of the Nestuccas herewith, made in August last, in which they pray and insist that the promise on which they consented to remove to Salmon River to fulfill, by placing them under the jurisdiction of the Grand Ronde agent. I therefore give you the fact itself, and it certainly proves that you were misinformed when you were led to believe that it did not exist.
    The third and last question is, Whether the Siletz Agency is more accessible from Salmon River than the Grand Ronde. You have been led to believe that the Siletz is much more accessible, and that in point of fact, so the agent at Siletz says, that it would require a greater outlay to make the road to Grand Ronde passable the greater part of the year, and then, too, they would have to cross the Coast Range of mountains.
    The fact is that in order to reach the Siletz Agency, the Nestuccas are forced to make a journey of ten miles to the Siletz River, and thence by canoe a further journey of forty miles, occupying two days; whereas the Grand Ronde Agency is reached by a journey of eight hours over a good road..
    As to this point, Special Comr. Simpson says (Ex. "C") he promised the Nestuccas to use his influence to have them allowed the privilege of settling their difficulties at Grand Ronde Agency, as it is much easier of access than Siletz.
    The Nestuccas, in their petition (Ex. "A") say, "The mouth of Salmon River is but six or eight hours' drive from Grand Ronde at all seasons of the year over a good wagon road, when to reach the Siletz Agency they have ten miles to go to the Siletz River, thence by canoe forty miles to the agency, a journey  of two days and during the winter months very dangerous."
    In view of the evidence herein cited, I respectfully submit that I have proved--
    1st. That the U.S., by its duly authorized representative, did promise the Nestucca Indians that they should be placed under the jurisdiction of the agent at Grand Ronde.
    2nd. That the Nestucca Indians have ever since, and do now, insist that they should be placed under their jurisdiction--and,
    3rd. That the Grand Ronde Agency can be reached in one sixth of the time, and with less danger, from Salmon River than can the Siletz Agency, and I am therefore, in all fairness, entitled to the order I have asked.
    This little handful of ignorant, helpless men believe that you are doing them an injustice in this matter; the order they ask is of no earthly consequence to you--it can't possibly work the least possible injury or loss to the service or the U.S., but it will be of much value to the poor people who ask it.
    You want to make them contented by all legitimate and proper means, and I therefore hope that you will grant the prayer the Nestuccas make in the petition herewith filed.
I am, very respectfully,
    Your obedient servant
        Charles Ewing
            Comr.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Klamath Agency Or.
    Feb. 3rd 1877
Sir
    In reply to inquiries made in your letter of 15th ultimo I have to say that the no. of scholars given in my monthly school reports as "Day Scholars" are, as you infer, identical with the "Boarding Scholars," and not in addition thereto.
    In my annual report I gave 27 as the average attendance for the year closing with the date of my report, which is correct. The reason for a reduction in numbers has been fully explained to you in my monthly reports for August and September, and my letter dated Oct. 7th 1876. The no. will be increased to about 20 in a few days.
    Hereafter the school reports will be made out as you require.
Very respectfully
    L. S. Dyar
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Agency Or.
    Feb. 12th 1877
Sir:
    I have the honor to report that H. W. Shipley has returned to this agency to complete his contract, the erection of a grist mill for the use of this agency. He does not consent to the proposition contained in your letter of Oct. 1876, but says he has a proposition from your office, which being satisfactory will now complete the mill.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
         Washington
             D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Agency Or.
    Feb. 12th 1877
Sir:
    I am credibly informed that many of the Alsea Indians have expressed a desire to locate at the mouth of Siletz and Salmon rivers, and at other points on the reservation, and are only awaiting transportation. Could it be possible to comply with their wishes now, it would be a great saving to the Department, as they (the Indians) could plant gardens &c., which would provide food for another year.
    If this matter is delayed until after seeding time this opportunity to retrench will have passed.
    John, Chief of Salmon River Indians, has just visited this agency, and says his people are very anxious to know where they belong and are awaiting the action of the Great Father at Washington to determine.
    Says they prefer this agency but the agent at Grand Ronde desires them to choose him as their agent, also says they are willing to do what the Great Father requires of them.
    He was accompanied by his two boys, of the ages of 9 & 11 yrs. respectively. They are very bright boys, and he very much desires them to be in school here. But on account of lack of funds and my inability to provide for them they were compelled to return with sad hearts.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
         Washington D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.


Klamath Agency Or.
    Feb. 17, 1877
Sir
    Under date of Nov. 29, 1876 I forwarded to your office certain papers relating to the appointing of Indian traders for the Inds. of this reservation, but have received no reply. If they were not sufficient please instruct me further as to my duty in the premises.
    There is no trading post within the limits of the reservation, and the amount of business will not warrant the establishing of one. What will be required in this case?
Very respectfully
    L. S. Dyar
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affrs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        Mch. 7th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to inform you that the grist mill being built for use of this agency is drawing near to completion, and circumstances exist which seem to require a special report in relation to its construction &c.
    On the 14th day of September 1875 my predecessor, J. H. Fairchild, entered into a contract with H. W. Shipley for the construction of a grist mill at this agency and a bridge across Siletz River on the road leading to Yaquina Bay. Under the provision of this contract the Department were required to furnish all timber, lumber &c. for the construction of both mill and bridge, also to furnish transportation for all machinery, nails, windows, doors, bolts, spikes &c. necessary for its construction and also to furnish all the labor necessary for the excavations and for raising the bridge. The contractor was to furnish all the machinery, nails, doors, windows &c. for the mill and the bolts, spikes &c. for the bridge, the latter to be substantially built, capable of resisting the high water, and all to be completed by the 14th day of Sep. 1876.
    The resignation of Mr. Fairchild took effect on the 29th day of February 1876, and on the following day I assumed charge under my commission. The funds allotted this agency for that fiscal year being at that time nearly all expended, it was not possible for me to fully comply with the requirements of the contract without violating instructions contained in your office letters of March 15th, Apr. 27, Apr. 28, August 21st and telegrams of April 18th and August 21st 1876.
    The bridge was completed about the last of October, and after doing service about two weeks, during a rise in the river on the night of Nov. 14th was carried away and went to sea. Before this occurrence, however, I received your office letter of Oct. 23rd instructing me on condition of Mr. Shipley's acceptance of the proposition contained therein to issue to him certified vouchers for the amount due on his contract when the work shall have been completed. Although I have repeatedly asked Mr. Shipley to accept your proposition, he has not yet signified his intention to do so but on the contrary has said he is completing the contract on a proposition received by him direct from you. During the past week, however, he has presented a bill for labor performed and material furnished amounting in the aggregate to over two hundred dollars, for which he demands certified vouchers. A portion of this work has been done by Indians who claim they have not received pay for the same from Mr. S. He also demands certified vouchers for the amount he claims to be due on his contract and which I am unable to do without violating your instructions as above stated. I am desirous that Mr. S. shall receive every dollar justly due him and just as desirous that every Indian who has labored for him shall receive his pay. Now in view of the fact that the bridge is not here, and that Mr. Shipley has shown himself unfriendly to me, and desiring that strict justice may be done him I would respectfully ask that you authorize General O. O. Howard, commanding Military Department of Columbia, to select two or three competent persons to inspect the work done by Mr. Shipley, and if they under oath shall find the same to comply with the requirements of the contract, upon such statement being made by them to me I be authorized to issue certified vouchers for the same. I would further ask that if this request be granted by you in view of the importance of an early adjustment of the matter Gen. Howard be requested by telegraph to select the inspectors at once, and that he notify Mr. Shipley at what time the inspection will be made so that he may be present to explain &c.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
         Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Or., March 28th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 9th inst. marked F in answer to mine of 17th ult., asking to be permitted to pay out of money allotted this agency for present fiscal year certain indebtedness contracted during third & fourth quarters 1876, in which you say you are surprised, in view of instructions contained in your letter of Aug. 21st, to learn of this indebtedness. If I have at any time failed to keep your office informed of the financial condition of this agency, it must be because you have failed to receive communications which have been sent you from this office. I respectfully call your attention to my telegram of August 28th in answer to yours of Aug. 21st. Also to my letter of August 28th more fully explaining the nature of this indebtedness, a portion of which at that time was estimated for the reason that the weights of grist mill machinery were not yet here and some of the bills for supplies furnished had not yet been rendered. My quarterly returns for third and fourth quarter 1876 contained statements of the indebtedness in question and in my monthly report for November, forwarded Dec. 6th on pages 5 & 6, you will see what were my intentions at that time in relation to the matter of carrying indebtedness beyond the close of fiscal year. I have seen no reason to change my intentions in relation to this, but on receiving the circular of instructions from the 2nd Comptroller, extracts from which were sent you in my letter of the 17th February, I feared I might not be allowed to do so and hence wrote you for permission to pay the same or, if such permission could not be granted, permission to issue certified vouchers so that the amounts might be paid at once. Most of this indebtedness was contracted before I received your letter or telegram of Aug. 21st. In your office letter of May 12th 1876, I was directed if possible to stop all work on improvements contracts until after the first of July, from which I inferred that after that time I would be expected to continue the work and so far as it was possible comply with the requirements of the contract with Mr. H. W. Shipley for the construction of grist mill & bridge. Nearly all this indebtedness was incurred on this account. On receipt of your letter of 9th inst., yesterday I immediately informed all regular employees that for want of funds they would be discharged on the 31st day of March, at which time I will revise my list of employees, returning only a teacher and perhaps temporarily a carpenter. At all events, I am determined to report no deficiencies for this agency at the close of the present fiscal year excepting the amount due H. W. Shipley on his contract, which I find you have already reported and embraced in your requisitions for next year. I regret having incurred your displeasure and would respectfully ask that funds allotted this agency for 2nd quarter be placed to its credit as early as practicable so that I may be allowed to close up this year clear of debt.
Very respectfully, your obdt. servt.
    William Bagley, U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Prescott Arizona
    March 31st 1877
Sir
    I am in receipt of a letter from Mr. William Chambers, enclosing one from Wm. Bagley, Esq., U.S. Indian Agent at Siletz, Oregon, making some inquiries relative to the license formerly given Mr. Chambers as sutler at Siletz Reservation, and requesting me to furnish the Department all the facts in my knowledge on the subject.
    At this late date I am unable to say more than [that] when I assumed charge of the Siletz Reservation Apr. 1st 1873, the Indians generally requested the appointment of Mr. Chambers as sutler--no objection was made by any--accordingly he was appointed and my recollection is that the license was renewed as often as required by law.
    With reference to the payrolls for Indian labor paid by Mr. Chambers, I have to say--that it had been customary, when funds for the agency were not at hand, to permit those Indians who were employed about the agency and who needed the amount due them to purchase provisions for their families, to draw from the sutler such amounts, and when funds arrived payment was made to the sutler with the consent of the Indians.
    When the impaired state of my health made it evident that a much longer residence at Siletz would be probably fatal, I sent the Hon. Commissioner my resignation, with the request that if deemed disadvantageous to the service to make a change at that time, leave of absence be granted me for two months--subsequently I forwarded a request to be relieved on account of the state of my health and recommended Mr. Bagley as my successor. To this I received official notification that my resignation was accepted, to take effect Nov. 1st 1875. I had previously received notice that leave of absence would be granted, with authority to place Mr. Bagley in charge of the reservation. I accordingly placed Mr. B. in charge Nov. 1st, turning over to him what funds were on hand, and fully informing him of my plans for the future. The amount allotted Siletz for the 2 first qrs. of 1876 I felt confident would be sufficient, with economy, to meet all expenses. As my resignation had been accepted to take effect from that date, I did not feel justified in dictating the line of policy proper for him to pursue but suggested the necessity of reducing the number of Indian laborers, unless further appropriations could be procured.
    The point I wish to make is--that my resignation having been accepted to take effect Nov. 1st 1875, I considered myself relieved from responsibility as to the management of the agency, and clothed my successor, Mr. Bagley, with full power to contract or increase the expenditures as his judgment should dictate, he having been nominated my successor.
    All expenditures after Nov. 1st should certainly be charged to his administration.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        J. H. Fairchild
            Late U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



U.S. Senate Chamber
   Washington, April 9, 1877
 Hon. John Q. Smith
   Comr. Indian Affairs
     Sir:
       I desire to be a
dvised as to what is being done if anything at this time, or what has been done heretofore in regard to the allotment of lands in severalty to the Indians in the Siletz Agency, Oregon. I earnestly hope and recommend that this may be done as rapidly as possible. Please advise me in reference to the matter.
Very respectfully
   John H. Mitchell
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Oswego Oregon
    April 12th 1877
Sir
    When authorized to do so by the Commissioner of Indian Affairs, please issue a certified voucher for one half the amount due me from the United States on contract for building grist mill and bridge on Siletz Indian Reservation and deliver the same to the order of L. S. Shipley. You will also please deliver to his order a voucher for one half the balance claimed by me as expense incurred in building bridge when the same shall have been allowed by the Commissioner of Ind. Affairs.
To William Bagley, Ind. Agent
    Siletz Indian Agency
(Signed) H. W. Shipley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Exchange & Banking House of John Conner
Albany, Oregon May 12th 1877
Commissioner of Indian Department
    Washington D.C.
        Dr. Sir
            Permit me to call your attention to this fact: That the agents of Siletz and Grand Ronde in this state have for years, and are now, giving permits to their Indians to leave their reservations and camp around this and other places in Oregon. It is a nuisance that ought to be abated. They steal, more or less, will get whiskey and have fights, and one murder here in this co. a few years ago & cost this co. quite an amt. It serves for licentious purpose, enticing our young men & even married men. Their dances & pow wows at night are disturbances, and in behalf of all our best citizens we ask, as a favor and a right, that you demand of your agents to keep their Indians on their reservations. One ignorant German just arrived happened to give an Indian a drink of whiskey, and at once has to pay the penalty.
Respectfully yours
    Jno. Conner
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



THE DEATH OF A NOTED INDIAN CHIEF.
    Died at Siletz Indian Agency, May 5, 1887, old man Joshua, head chief of the Joshua tribe of Indians, age about 90 years.
    Tyee Joshua was one of the noted chiefs that took an active part in the Rogue River war of 1855-6. He and his warriors fought long and terribly for their homes and country, but were finally overpowered and conquered by the white man, and compelled to surrender and submit to his control. Joshua, with his people, were present at a great council, held in a beautiful valley of the Rogue River, which lasted ten days. At this council Joshua advised his people to surrender and go upon the reservation. For two years they had fought with all the power of their wild and savage nature, their signal fires of war had blazed upon almost every mountaintop in all that country; the war whoop and war dance were heard to resound through the valleys and around the grand old mountains of Rogue River, making the scene grand and imposing, and never to be forgotten by those who took part in that memorable war. The Indians knew that when they gave up the struggle they would lose their nationality and everything they held sacred. This seemed to crush their proud spirits, and they have been a sad and despondent race ever since. The few old Indians that still remain on the reservation complain and brood over the wrongs done them by the whites in taking their country from them and compelling them to go on reservations, where the process of civilization has well nigh exterminated the race.
    In his younger days, Chief Joshua was a fine specimen of his race; a fine form, sturdy, supple and strong in war, and the proud possessor of ten wives, all of whom have long since passed to the "happy hunting grounds," and in his old age he was blessed with a young wife, whom he had bought while on the reservation. Old Joshua was quiet, peaceable, industrious, and gave the authorities no trouble during his long stay upon the reservation.
    This makes three noted Indians that have died during the winter, viz: Tyee Joe, old man Shellhead, and Joshua. They have gone to take up their positions as tyees in the happy hunting grounds, where they will not be troubled with the white man and his reservations.--Yaquina Post.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1877, page 1



Office Siletz Indian Agency
   Toledo Benton Co. Or.
 
   June 4th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your letter of 15th ult., marked F, and enclosing copy of a letter to you from Lin Starr in which he alleges that he has been in the employ of the Indian Dept. under an agreement made with me in September 1876, since that time, and asking how he should receive pay for his services &c. In reply I have to say that I know of no such man as Lin Starr, though a man by the name of Linton Starr, who resides at the mouth of the Alsea River, who had in charge the govt. scow when I received the govt. property from Agent Geo. P. Litchfield in Sep. 1876, who has been engaged in his own private business, though I have at different times asked him to notice the govt. stock as he was passing among them and informed me by letter if anything was wrong with them. On one occasion I got him to drive a team up the back and at another time to castrate some bulls, and for all he has done I have repeatedly asked him to present his bill for payment which he has failed to do, and when offered money has refused to receive it, saying that when I got ready to move the stock if I could employ him to help me, that was all he wanted. Immediately on the receipt of your letter as above I went to Alsea to see him concerning the matter and found him not, as he had gone down the coast with a pack train, engaged as he has been all the time in his own business excepting a few instances where I have requested him to do a few hours or [a] few days labor. I left at the former agency a note again requesting him to send in his bill for adjustment and payment. I will pay him as Lin Starr alleges all that is right. When I hear from him again I will confer with you further in this matter.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Indian Agent
 NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Newport, June the 9th 1877
Mr. Wm. Bagley
    Sir
        I have saw and made the proper arrangements with Bensil and in case the proposition you make is easy and clear it will be arranged satisfactory. I send this by one of your Indians. Please make the arrangement against next Wednesday, the 13. I will go down to the Alsea agency and turn all of the Indian Department cows out to grass and be in readiness to turn over to you at any time all the property belonging to your agency.
Yours respectfully
    Linton Starr
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Siletz Agency, June 11, 1877
R. A. Bensil, Esq.
    Dear Sir
        After a careful examination of the account of Linton Starr as rendered and from what I know of the amount of labor performed by him for this agency from time to time since the receipt by me of the Alsea property, I cannot see where his bill should amount to more than one hundred dollars, and I am confident there are plenty of men in the Alsea who would have done all he has done for that amount. If, however, he will give me an itemized bill of labor performed & it amounts to more than that, I am perfectly willing to pay him for all he has done. He was not employed as a regular employee and has been attending to his own business all the time as everybody knows.
    I would like to have him send me an account of the number of days he has been employed in the service of the govt. Even regular employees now have that to do and it would not be a hard task for him. If he will do this so that I can make out his voucher, I will pay him as I agreed to what is right. If he is willing thus to settle the matter and he is careful of his habits, I will be glad to have his assistance in the removal of the Alseas & their settlement here.
Very truly
    Yours &c.
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Newport, Oregon
    June the 15th 1877
Agent Bagley, Siletz Agency, Oregon
    Sir
The proposition you proposed to make to me through Royal Bensil amounts to this. If I will make out an itemized account. Now I will tell you facts I don't want to do you any injury. Consequently, I sent to Jno. P. Dead--one of the finest of men--as you told me one of your friends and an old acquaintance of mine--a full or partial account of our [illegible] work. It [is] as follows:
    Time commencing September the 13th, 1876 to July 1877. You know this to be the fact from the fact I asked to be 
[illegible] in May, about the 1st, 1877, which you refused to do.
    Well, I claim $50.00 per month from the 13th of September (1876) to July the 1st 1877--and one bull killed by the Flathead Alsea Indians worth $40.00,
    And two ropes furnished for the safekeeping of the I.D. scow placed in my charge by you $2.00 each. $4.00
    And an item I forgot when I was called to appear at your house [at] the Siletz agency, forage for the Indian delegates sent to make arrangements with you for their removal from my place to your agency
Three Indians forage 75 cents each $2.25
My own expenses $4.25
Total $6.50
Linton Starr
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        June 19th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to herewith enclose two original copies of letters received from Linton Starr and one copy of a letter written by me to Hon. R. A. Bensil of Newport, Or., all in relation to his claim against this agency. I respectfully desire to inform you that this [is] unjust and incorrect, and though I would rather have paid him one hundred dollars on my own account than to have brought in this claim at this time, I will state that there are plenty of men well qualified to do all the work he has done and who would be glad to do the same for less than that amount. I am confident that this is an arrangement of others and that the idea of a heavy claim against this agency at this time did not originate with Linton Starr.
    I am ready and respectfully ask permission to personally assume the payment of any amount that might be allowed him by any court of justice or legal arbitrament for services rendered by him.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        June 26 1877
Sir
    I am in receipt of your telegram of 23rd inst. to which I have briefly replied by telegraph today and now respectfully desire to report more fully than could be sent by such mode of transmission without incurring too much expense. In relation to Grist Mill built by H. W. Shipley under contract of September 14th 1875 with J. W. Fairchild, U.S. Indian Agent, I have to say that I have no hesitation in certifying as it its being in accordance with the requirements of said contract and would be willing to issue a certified voucher for $1684 5/100 for same. In relation to Bridge built under same contract, I have to say that the 4th article of said contract requires the said bridge to be a good strong structure capable of resisting the winter freshets, and at the time of its completion I believe it to be capable of such resistance, but after doing service a very short time a very sudden rise in the river bringing a great amount of driftwood swept it away and thus failed to be built in strict accordance with the requirement of the contract. As proof of the strength of the structure I will say that from Indians living at the mouth of the river a distance of fifty or sixty miles from where it started, I learned that the main span reached that point unbroken. From all who saw the structure while standing I hear not an expression of doubt as to its capability of resisting high water but on the contrary heard from bridge builders who saw it expressions of doubt as to the necessity of so heavy and thus expensive a bridge at this point. I will further state that during a residence of nearly four years at this Agency I had never known so sudden a rise or such a run of driftwood as at the time the bridge was carried away. Owing to all these facts in connection with the fact that the work was done by Mr. Shipley in good faith I would recommend that if it is possible to do so without conflicting with law, his claim be allowed and paid.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Office Siletz Indian Agency
   Toledo Benton Co. Or.
 
   June 28th 1877
Sir
    Permit me to respectfully present for your consideration a brief statement of the general condition of this agency (financially and otherwise) since October 1875 when my predecessor J. H. Fairchild left the agency in my charge as Farmer.
    The steam sawmill being erected was in position in the open air ready to saw lumber for a house to cover it, but the dam erected to furnish the means of transportation of logs to the mill was gone and the only means of supplying the necessary logs was by hauling them over very rough roads to the side [sic] of the mill and rolling them in on skids, which was very expensive. The rainy season was upon us, the machinery exposed to the storm and must be covered to protect it from damage.
    H. W. Shipley, contractor with Agent Fairchild for the construction of a grist mill and bridge for the agency, was here ready to commence work, and in order to comply with the requirements of the contract the agent must furnish the lumber, timber &c. The grist mill machinery, ironwork for the bridge &c. was in Corvallis, sixty miles from the agency. A stipulation in the contract required the agent to transport the same at govt. expense to the agency, but the roads had become impassable for loaded wagons. There were an unusual number of destitute Indians on the reserve (including the Tillamooks & Nestuccas, who had been induced to come here by the efforts of the Hon. Benj. Simpson, acting under instructions from your office) to be provided for. All this was in addition to the usual expenses of the service here, and to meet it there was not a dollar of govt. funds and but very little subsistence or supplies of any kind. During the winter through rain, snow and sleet the work was prosecuted, employees & Indians vying with each other to secure the protection of machinery and completion of the work. Dams were constructed, logs cut and delivered, lumber manufactured for both sawmill and grist mill structures, and in February we were able to report the sawmill completed and the contractor at work on the grist mill structure. During this month also by your order I received from Agent Litchfield of Alsea Agency one thousand dollars, and now our attention was turned to the farms. Preparations were made to plant good crops, and if possible bring the Indians into a condition of self-support. We had been compelled to issue to destitute Indians much of our seed grain, which we hoped to replace by purchase, verbally entering into arrangements with parties to furnish all that was necessary. Fences were repaired and rebuilt, ground prepared and some grain sown, when on the 8th day April 1876 I was instructed by you to stop all work, discharge all employees and incur no expense. The funds received for balance of fiscal year being barely sufficient to pay employees and for supplies that had been purchased, nothing more could be done before July 1st, at which time work was resumed in the way of repairing roads, transporting machinery &c., furnishing material for bridge, excavating &c. as required by the above contract with H. W. Shipley, harvesting hay for the Dept. and assisting Indians in their harvest. During the entire present fiscal [year] we have been compelled to practice the closest economy in order to report the agency clear of debt on the 30th inst. Though your allotment for this agency for the time has been very liberal when compared with the small appropriations made by Congress, it has nevertheless been inadequate to the actual wants of the agency, and hence I have thought proper to offer a few suggestions relative to the continuance or discontinuance of the agency which are herewith enclosed for your consideration.
    In relation to the claim of Linton Starr, of which mention is made in your letter of 15th ultimo, I have to say that this claim being neither correct nor just, and having reported the facts to you in my letters of 4th and 19th inst., I have not considered the claim as indebtedness of this agency.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Indian Agent
 Hon. J. Q. Smith
   Comr. Indian Affs.
      Washington
         D.C.
 
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Office Siletz Agency Oregon,
    June 30, 1877.
Hon. J, Q. Smith
    Commr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I desire to respectfully offer a few suggestions relative to the continuance or discontinuance of this Agency.
    By the general review of the financial condition of this Agency from the time (Oct. 1875) Agent J. H. Fairchild left the Agency in my charge as Farmer to the close of the present year you will see that I have at all times been short of funds to conduct its affairs as they should be conducted, for the good of the Department and Indians.
    While I fully believe that there is not a place to be found west of the Cascade range of mountains so well calculated for a permanent home for all the Indians formerly occupying the coast country of California, Oregon and Washington Ter. as is the Siletz River under its present boundaries.
    I am compelled to admit that if the appropriations for incidental expenses cannot be so increased, that there can be a good corps of employees engaged at all times, and the Indians who are able and willing to work, given employment by which they might obtain subsistence and necessary clothing, or furnished with teams, agricultural implements, building material, seed &c. that they might cultivate the lands that rightfully belong to them, it would be better to abolish the Agency, giving to such as are willing to become citizens one hundred sixty acres each, and remove the helpless or those dependent to some locality where they could be provided for at government expense, concentrating all such at one point and let all the money appropriated for this portion of country be used for the benefit of all the Indians at one point. In other words I believe it would be better to have one reservation with one agent and fourteen employees than fifteen reservations with fifteen agents and few or no employees and no funds for support of Indians.
    I am aware that this partially agrees with your recommendations as given in your report for 1876, differing only in one particular. I would suggest the propriety of keeping the Indians who are accustomed to obtain their food in part from the ocean and bays on or near the coast, while those who have formerly occupied the interior should be taken to the east of the Cascade Range where they could keep as many horses as they choose.
    This Reservation contains sufficient good agricultural land to supply all the coast Indians with as much as they could or would cultivate. It is bounded on the N.E. & S. by mountains, on the W. by the ocean. It is isolated from the White settlements and always will be so until the Agency is abolished and the country opened to settlement.
    Could there be found another place on the coast better suited to the wants of the Indians than this I would favor their concentration there, but in any event there should be a sufficient sum of money appropriated to keep them on the Reservation.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U. S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Grand Ronde Agency
    Oregon July 9, 1877
Sir
    In reply to your favor of the 28th May 1877, marked "C," enclosing a copy of letter from Jno. Conner of Albany, Oregon, asking for the removal of Indians from Albany and elsewhere in this state to their respective agencies and that they be compelled to remain on the agencies, I will say:
    At my request the Indian sheriff of this agency went to Albany and could find no Indians belonging to the Grand Ronde Agency, nor could he hear of any who had been there.
    I have never made a practice of giving passes to go to the towns and remain, yet some may at times do so without my knowledge or consent.
    It would, if practicable, certainly be a great injustice to the Indians who are industrious, and have worked faithfully in putting in their crops, and now at the written request of farmers who desire them to come, are anxious to go outside the agency limits and work for means to purchase food & clothing, and after we have been for years bringing every influence to bear upon them to induce them to become industrious, honest and self-supporting and when we have no funds to employ them nor to purchase supplies for them, to insist upon their remaining at home in idleness when good opportunities are offered them to work. I am this day in receipt of a note asking me to send Indians off the agency to cut two hundred cords of wood, and in fact I am almost daily in receipt of requests for passes to allow Indians to go off the agency to work.
    The Indians are a harmless people among the whites and of great benefit to perform very hard and laborious contracts, such as grubbing and making rails, and I am prone to think if greater efforts were put forth by white citizens in assisting to capture and prosecute these worthless whites who are continually violating the "Indian liquor law" there would be less necessity for asking the favor of having all the Indians kept upon the agencies & allowed to suffer for want of food and clothing because a few whites are prejudiced against them, while many of the best farmers of the land are asking that they be allowed to come among them and work.
    As to the crimes the Indians are accused of committing, since my assuming charge of this agency some five years ago, there has been no case reported to me of any Indian of this agency committing any crime against a white man.
    At this time and under the existing circumstances, I am of the opinion that to attempt to compel the Indians to all remain upon the agency would soon create discord and insubordination while at the present time there is good feeling among them towards the whites.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.




Office Grand Ronde Agency
    Oregon July 10, 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to inform you of the building at this agency by the Catholic Mission of a fine large school building for a boarding, lodging and industrial school for the Indians, the construction of which was referred to in my last annual report. This building is large enough to accommodate all the Indian children now on the agency, or who may be brought here with the necessary board, lodging and school room. The main building is in size thirty by seventy-five feet, two full stories high, with thirteen feet ceilings, with two wings, each thirty by forty-six feet in size, each one story and a half high with the necessary attachments of wood, vegetable & other houses.
    The building is a good, solid frame structure, weatherboarded on the outside and painted, is covered, & when finished will be ceiled with dressed lumber and painted on the inside.
    At the present time the building is up, weatherboarded and painted, with the windows and doors in, the cover on, and a portion of the floors laid, but unfortunately for the agency the mission have exhausted their funds, while at least one thousand dollars is yet required in putting up partitions, doors &c., ceiling and painting and furnishing some necessary school furniture &c. to complete the building.
    I would respectfully ask that the Department allot to this agency the sum of one thousand dollars out of the fund "For the support of schools, not otherwise provided for, for the support of industrial schools and for other educational purposes for the Indian tribes" to enable me to employ mechanical labor and to purchase the necessary material for the furnishing of the building, which will, when so completed, furnish the necessary room for all school purposes at this agency for many years to come.
    The actual value of the building, when completed, will be about four thousand dollars and is one of the most important improvements to the agency and Indians that has yet been accomplished upon the agency and can now be completed at a cost to the Department of only one fourth its value.
    I would respectfully ask the early and favorable consideration by the Department of this matter, that we may complete the building, ready for occupancy, before the rainy season.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servt.
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



North Yamhill
    July 14th 1877
To Com. of
    Indian Affairs
        Washington D.C.
            Dear Sir
                I write to you upon this occasion for the purpose of informing you that I was associated with Father in his contract to build a grist mill & bridge in the Siletz Reservation, and for the services rendered by me in fulfilling that contract Father gave me an order on the agent, William Bagley, for one half the amt. yet due on contract. And the order directs that whenever the agent shall be directed by you to issue vouchers for any sum whatever that he shall divide the amt., giving vouchers for one half the amt. to me. Mr. Bagley accepted the order in this way. He said he was willing to divide the vouchers and fully comply with the orders unless your Department interposed objections or gave instructions that would prevent his doing so. I will send you a copy asking that whenever you shall instruct Mr. Bagley to issue vouchers that he may issue them, as that order may directs. And that if your Dept. should see fit to settle the matter without Mr. Bagley's assistance that you will recognize the order and that it may have the same effect with you that it has had with Mr. Bagley. I wish also to state that I spent over sixteen hundred on the reservation in order to complete the contract, and as yet have not received a single dollar as compensation for it. And the only way I have to get any pay for my labor is to get it out of what is yet to be paid. There seems to be a question with your Dept. as to whether the government ought to pay for the bridge, it having been washed away soon after it was completed. And the question hinges upon the stipulation in the contract that the bridge was to be secure against winter freshets. We spent one winter on the Reserve before we built the bridge and watched the river constantly during any storms and wet weather we had, for the purpose of being better able to select a good location for the bridge and to be able to design a structure that would be serviceable and lasting. And from all we saw and from all we could learn from the agent and others, with the Indian testimony concerning the character of the stream, we believed the bridge we built ample for any service that might be required of us. We used all the information obtainable and after we made our plan, located the bridge and had commenced work upon it. Mr. Bagley and others who were far better able to tell what the stream required than us expressed themselves satisfied that the bridge would be a good and serviceable one. I do not believe that there is an engineer in the service of the government that could have done better, as he would have been compelled to have been governed by the character of the country through which the stream runs and by the best obtainable information as to how the stream acted and was affected by winter freshets. In making plan we were governed to a great extent in building the bridge by what the agent said and by his suggestions. And I know that he was satisfied from the time the bridge was begun until it was swept away and in fact expressed himself proud of having as fine a structure on the reserve. And it seems to me as Mr. Bagley as agent was the only person authorized to act in conjunction with us in building the bridge, and he being pleased with it, he being willing to accept the work and being willing to use it in government service, that we were relieved of any responsibility in the matter. It seems to me that the bridge was washed away as government property and not as property of H. W. Shipley. And if your Dept. is not willing to pay for it it seems to me that Mr. Bagley is responsible to us for it, as his acceptance of it and use of it prevented our taking any precautions or using any means for protecting the bridge against driftwood. I spent more hard work more time and more means to complete the contract than anyone connected with it, and as yet have had nothing in return for it. And I earnestly hope that some of the statements I have made you will have consideration enough for to give a decision at an early day as to what the government will do. As I am anxious to get my money from some source as quickly as I can, you will confer a great favor by giving this com. your earnest and early consideration. And in conclusion permit me to be
Your most respectfully [sic]
    And obedient servant
        L. S. Shipley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Grand Ronde Agency
    Oregon July 20, 1877
Sir.
    I have to report the burning at the agency on the 15th inst. of the agent's residence.
    The house took fire in the kitchen, between the ceiling and roof, and in spite of the efforts of myself and several white men who were present & some Indians, the fire increased steadily from the beginning, and in a half hour from the first alarm the building began falling in. We however saved the school building, which stood nearby, and the greater portion of the government property which happened to be in the house at the time. There was one cooking stove and some smaller articles destroyed.
    There is no other building on the agency belonging to the Department suitable for a residence at the present time, they having been turned over to the Indians at the time the employee force was reduced. There is one building here that can be made comfortable and safe, by recovering it and putting in new sills, and putting up some partitions &c. I would respectfully ask the Department to allot to this agency at least a sufficient sum to enable me to repair this building out of the fund for "Buildings at agencies & repairs of the same" which can be done with five or six hundred dollars.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.

NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81,
Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.




Bureau of
Catholic Indian Missions
Washington, D.C. July 30, 1877
Sir:
    I have the honor, herewith, to submit for your consideration the following proposition with reference to conducting and carrying on the Industrial Boarding School at the Grand Ronde Agency, Oregon, for the scholastic year ending June 30, 1878, to wit:
    For the sum of $1000 in addition to the $3000 now allowed under treaty stipulations, I will contract to conduct and carry on the said Industrial Boarding School, with an average attendance of not less than thirty (30) boarders as pupils, and as many day scholars as can be induced to attend, during the fiscal year ending June 20, 1878, and will furnish the necessary and suitable teachers, clothing, school appliances and fuel for the boarders, and will contract to complete the school building, now erected, but incomplete.
I am, sir, very respectfully
    J. B. A. Brouillet
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Siletz Ind. Agency Oregon
   Aug. 1st 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to report that on the 28th ult. the sawmill, after a few days repairing, was ready for use.
    During the the month of July I secured the services of A. F. Peterson to assist the carpenter on the repairs of the sawmill.
    The structure has been thoroughly braced and stayed with strong timbers, and everything is in fine working order.
    Being entirely without lumber in the shop, not having even enough to make coffins for the deceased, I found it necessary to start the sawmill on the 30 ult., as the exigencies of the services absolutely required it.
    I called into this service all employees that could be spared.
    The Carpenter acted as sawyer, the Physician as screen tender, and the Clerk as engineer. They cheerfully "took hold," and with the assistance of three Indians succeeded in sawing out 4,000 ft. of beautiful fir lumber, which will last but a short time, there being so great a demand, both by Department and Indians, and I hope that before long I may be able to start the sawmill again to saw two weeks in succession and obtain lumber for the many Indians waiting to build houses and barns upon their places.
Very respectfully
   Your obt. servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
   Commr. Indian Affs.
      Washington
         D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Siletz Ind. Agency Or.
     August 4, 1877
Sir:
    I have the honor to report for your consideration my action in relation to the removal of the Alsea Indians.
    Believing it to be to the interest of the Department and Indians as well as of the settlers on the Alsea country, I have endeavored whenever an opportunity has been presented to persuade them to come here, but until the 7th of July 1877 have never been able to obtain from a majority of them an expression of willingness to come upon any terms whatever.
    In a visit to their former country (Alsea) in June 1877 I persuaded them to visit this agency on the 4th of July to unite with the Indians on the agency in the celebration of the day. While here they formed more favorable opinions of this country than ever before, and on the 7th of July they desired to talk with me about making this a permanent home, their only objection to coming being their want of teams, seed, farming implements &c. Add to this the fact that in leaving their former homes they leave their comfortable houses, and in some instances gardens, which had been cleared of timber by their own labor.
    Were their parents either white or black, it would almost be robbery to take this property from them without remuneration, but being Indians who have never taken up arms against the whites, and who have ever occupied this country as fishing and hunting ground, until taught by the whites to till a small portion in order to obtain subsistence.
    The natural hatred of our superior race for the Indian prevents the possibility of remunerating them for the sacrifice they have made.
    However, relying on the humanity of our government and acting on suggestions contained in your letter of Apr. 28, 1876, I promised to give them the property formerly belonging to the Alsea Agency, including the stock, and also promised to furnish transportation for their goods and effects, from Alsea River to Yaquina Bay and also from Depot Slough to this agency.
    On their return home from this agency after consulting with all the members of their tribe who were not present in council when the above promises were made, they sent a messenger for me, requesting me to meet them at Alsea for another and final talk.
    Accordingly, on the 24th ultimo I proceeded to Alsea and there in council all agreed to remove at once, giving up all claim to their former land. ("Land of Their Forefathers") on the following condition, viz: That all property including the stock formerly belonging to the Alsea Agency should be given to them in severalty, that the expenses of removal of their goods and effects from Alsea to Yaquina Bay 15 miles should be paid by me, also the expense of transportation across the portage from Depot Slough to this agency, a distance of six miles, that their ferriage across Yaquina Bay also be paid by the Department, and subsistence furnished them while en route.
    They are to come to Siletz Agency and be on the same footing in relation to supplies as other Siletz Indians, also to be permitted to select homes for themselves, the land to be allotted them in severalty at the pleasure of the government, or, in case of the abolition of the agency, they desired to be shown how to secure their lands as citizens of the United States and state of Oregon.
    They have selected that part of the reserve lying between the mouth of Siletz and Salmon rivers as their future home, and beg me to furnish them with a farmer and school teacher, which promise I could not make, unless funds for their payment could be secured from the Indian Department.
    As they were desirous of immediate removal and owing to the excited state of feeling among white settlers on account of the alleged understanding among all the tribes of the West, concerning a general uprising against the whites, and fearing that by some overt act on the part of lawless whites who would be glad to see an Indian war, which might result in the extermination of all the male Indians. I deemed it both prudence & economy to comply with their wishes at once and, making arrangements for transportation of their goods &c., took the government stock, with the assistance of the Indians, and drove them to this reservation. I am aware of the fact that in ordinary circumstances I should have received more direct authority from you in the matter, but am satisfied that by this prompt action on my part I have saved much expense to the Department, and I hope to receive your approval of my action in the matter.
    I will say, however, that had there been a prospect of an early visit from Inspector Watkins, I should have waited to consult him before acting.
    Knowing through the newspaper telegraphic reports of his whereabouts and how occupied, I could not hope for an early visit from him.
    As soon as the work of removal is accomplished, I will forward to you a full statement of the expenses incurred, and would respectfully ask that you will if possible furnish me with funds and supplies necessary for the payment of these expenses, necessarily incurred, and for the settlement and subsistence of these Indians on this reserve. It will require the utmost energy on my part to keep and provide for them with the amount asked for in the accompanying estimate.
Very respectfully
   Your obt. servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
   Commissioner Indian Affs.
      Washington
         D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Klamath Agency
    Linkville Oregon
        August 11th 1877
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir,
            I have the honor to herewith transmit my estimate for supplies for Klamath Agency for the fiscal year ending June 30, 1878. Their estimate has been made under difficulties, and while I cannot hope that it is perfect, yet I feel conscious that I have done the best I could under the circumstances. I have asked permission and authority to purchase in open market such articles as are needed for immediate use, and which can be bought to advantage in Rogue River Valley, thus saving the expense of transportation for 300 miles.
    The price of wheat in that valley is so steady and uniform that nothing is gained in regard to price by advertising, while much is lost in regard to time. Considerable delay would render it difficult and expensive to get the wheat over the mountains this season.
    The blankets can be bought at Ashland Mills, Oregon (about 100 miles distant) at from 1½ to 2 dollars less than these recently bought at Portland, besides being superior in quality and quantity. I refer to the blankets purchased under contract made by Lieut. Boyle.
    The reasons for purchasing beef in open market are equally good. There are but few cattle dealers in this section, thus enabling them to combine and bid above a fair purchase price. Besides, we are in pressing want of beef at the present time.
    With regard to the purchase of annuity supplies I will now frankly state that the Klamath and Modocs desire me to represent to you that they wish that the annuity fund due them, amounting to $3000, be spent equally in the purchase of wheat and oxen. They suppose that it would buy over 2000 bush. of wheat and not less than 12 yoke of good work oxen. You will observe that my estimate does not entirely correspond with their desire. I am not sure but that there ought to be less spent in the articles they name and more in a general way. The school fund is inadequate to support a school of the number of pupils that can be obtained. The 500 dollars allowed for that purpose will not with the most rigid economy clothe, feed and care for over 15 regular attendants. The expense per week for all such purposes would even then be less than 70 cts. per pupil. With 25 pupils, which is only a reasonable number, the weekly average would be only 50 cts. for each pupil.
    I am in doubt whether I have the right to use the annuity or other funds for school purposes. Please inform me if so and what amount.
    We have also a building suitable for hospital purposes. There are several infirm and sick persons who need to be there to be cared for, but we have no fund for that purpose.
    Is there not a remedy for this difficulty? Please give me the needed information. In conclusion I desire to call your attention to the fact that there are about 1000 Indians on this reservation, many of whom are destitute, and some of whom are invalids. The agency is remote from settlements of enterprising citizens, so that there is very little opportunity for the Indians to secure employment except for a short time during the furnishing of wood and hay at Fort Klamath. To their credit I will say that they are very anxious to work and thus earn their own living.
    These disadvantages make it more difficult to manage the service and call for large supplies and constant labor and care on the part of the agent and employees.
    I have made these statements for the purpose of paving the way to say most emphatically that we need all the supplies which the most liberal appropriations and allowances will procure.
Yours very truly
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agt.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Bureau of
Catholic Indian Missions
Washington, D.C. August 20th 1877
Sir:
    I have the honor to submit for your consideration the following proposition in reference to the Industrial Boarding School at the Grand Ronde Indian Agency, Oregon, to wit:
    I will contract to conduct and carry on the Industrial Boarding School at said agency during the scholastic year ending June, 1878, for a compensation of $100 for each boarder, the average number of such boarders not to be in excess of forty, and I will agree to furnish sufficient and suitable teachers, books, board, lodging and clothing for said boarders, and in addition to take as day scholars such pupils as are offered by the agent or as may be induced to attend such day school.
I am, sir, very respectfully
    J. B. A. Brouillet
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Office, Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        August 20th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to herewith transmit estimates of expense of fitting up a boarding house for a boarding school for this agency and for conducting such a school for six months.
    These estimates should have been sent with my monthly report for July, but owing to press of business were not enclosed therewith. I respectfully ask your indulgence. I further respectfully ask your careful consideration of the herewith enclosed special report of our teacher, Rev. T. F. Royal, in relating to the conduct of a school for this agency and, if possible, assist us in the way of an allotment of funds for this purpose.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.


Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Oregon
        August 20th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to herewith transmit estimates of expense of fitting up a boarding house for a boarding school for this agency and for conducting such a school for six months.
    These estimates should have been sent with my monthly report for July, but owing to press of business were not enclosed therewith. I respectfully ask your indulgence. I further respectfully ask your careful consideration of the herewith enclosed special report of our teacher, Rev. T. F. Royal, in relating to the conduct of a school for this agency and, if possible, assist us in the way of an allotment of funds for this purpose.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.

Estimate of expenses for building
and fitting up a boarding house
for the school on the Siletz Ind. Reservation
& for support of same for six mos.
   
House 45 ft. x 25 ft.. 2 Stories.
         15 M. ft. Lumber @ $2 $180.00
15 M. Shingles @ $3 45.00
12 Doors @ $2.50 30.00
17 Windows, Sash $ $1.50 25.50
6 boxes Glass @ $4.00 24.00
4 kegs Nails @ $4.50 18.00
Locks, Butts @ Screws for 12 Doors 10.50
20 lbs. Putty @ .80 1.60
Lime for Whitewashing 5.00
Lining and Paper for Five Rooms 70.00
3 Stoves (1 Cook, 2 Box) 75.00
1 Clock 7.50
6 sets Common Chairs 30.00
6 sets Common Breakfast Plates @ 1.25 7.50
2 Large Platters 2.00
2 sets Cups and Saucers 3.00
2 sets Teaspoons 1.00
5 Sets Tablespoons 5.00
30 Tin Cups or their equivalent @ 1.00 3.00
12 Milk Pans @ .50 6.00
1 Churn 5.00
2 Sugar Bowls 1.00
2 Cream Pitchers .50
2 Water Pitchers 1.50
4 Water Buckets 2.00
½ doz. Brooms 3.00
50 yds. Toweling 10.00
360 yds. Brown Muslin for Sheets, Pillow Cases &c., 15¢ 54.00
120 yds. Bed Ticking @ 15¢ 18.00
30 pr. Blankets @ $5 150.00
Making Bed Clothes 14.25
Carpenter Work on Building 225.00
Supplies for Subsisting 30 Pupils for Six Months @ $1 per Week 780.00
Cook and Laundress @ $30 per mo. 180.00
Matron @ $600 per an. 300.00
Clothing for 30 Pupils
200 Prints @ 8¢ 16.00
160 Jeans @ 30¢ 48.00
100 Flannel @ 37½¢ 37.50
50 Linsey @ 20¢ 10.00
100 Muslin @ 12½¢ 12.50
1 M. Needles 1.50
2 lbs. Linen Thread @ $1 2.00
3 doz. Spools @ $1 3.00
3 doz. Wool Hose @ $1.75          5.25
3 doz. Socks @ $1.50 4.50
2 doz. Wool Hats @ $6 12.00
5 doz. Handkerchiefs @ $1 5.00
3 doz. Fine Combs @ $1 3.00
¼ gr. Zinc Mirrors @ $10.50 2.62 ½
20 pr. Boys' Kip Shoes @ $1.35 27.00
20 pr. Misses' Kip Shoes @ $1.25 25.00
10 lbs. Knitting Yarn @ $1       10.00
$2518.23
    After an experience of one year's teaching here and careful observation for another year, I am constrained to call attention to the following facts.
    Such a boarding house is an absolute necessity to complete success in our educational work on this reservation.
    For want of it, but few of the children, except those immediately about the agency, have been able to attend the school. There are over a thousand Indians belonging to this reservation and scattered abroad over a large territory. We are repeatedly urged to take children from abroad and educate them, but we have been under the painful necessity of denying such privilege. Hence, the Alseas, Nestuccas and others at the mouth of Salmon River; those at the lower and upper and Klamath farms, are all deprived [of] the opportunity of educating their children, being from four to forty-five miles distant. There are also many parents who spend much of their time out of the reservation, working for a subsistence, who would leave their children here in school if we could keep them. Besides these, there are many orphans and other indigent children who are suffering for want of such provisions.
    We hope to obtain from the churches and from private donations something for the relief of those last mentioned, but not enough to support them in school.
    Hoping that you may be able to make appropriations for the above object, I hereby submit all of the above.
Respectfully yours
    T. F. Royal
        Teacher, Siletz Ind. Agency
To the Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Com. Ind. Affairs
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



    Respectfully referred to Mr. Indian Agent Bagley. I have written to Judge Mosher saying I would call your attention to this matter.
Respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
Roseburg, Augt. 21, '77
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    U.S.S.
        Dear Sir
            In behalf of one of your constituents, I address you upon a matter which is not only important to him, but to the whole Umpqua Valley.
    William Rose is engaged in fishing at the forks of the Umpqua about 7 miles west of here, and furnishes this market with fish, and a little later in the season furnishes the most of the trout for the Portland market. There are other fisheries, but this example will do for all.
    For two or three years past, an Indian called Joe, who belongs, as I am informed, to the Siletz Reservations, has been permitted by the agent to come to the Umpqua to fish. He does this by erecting a dam at a narrow place on the rapids a few miles above Scottsburg, thereby preventing the run of salmon almost entirely. 
    Two years ago, I issued a warrant under the state law. The Indians to the the brush and the Sheriff could not arrest them. He tore down the dam, but it was built again in a day. The nuisance has become unbearable for the reason that it is not only the loss of our run, but if the fish cannot go up the river to spawn, there will be no return. The cannery recently started at Gardner had no fish for this reason. You will see the necessity of removing the obstruction at once, and I think you will agree with me in thinking that it can be more easily done through the Indian agent than by making "good Indians" of them, which will be done if this goes on much longer.
    While it costs large amounts on the Columbia and other streams to establish fish breeding places, we cannot afford to have ours destroyed by a band of diggers already fed at the expense of the government.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obt. servt.
            L. F. Mosher
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Oregon
        Aug. 27th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to herewith transmit a letter from Hon. L. F. Mosher of Roseburg Or. which has been kindly sent me by Hon. John H. Mitchell U.S.S. [letter of August 21, above].
    I think the Indian complained of is one of those formerly belonging to the Alsea Agency who have not yet signified their willingness to remove to the agency. These Indians should by all means be brought on the reserve and provided with work by which to earn their subsistence.
    I am powerless to do anything in the matter unless provided with funds with which to pay expenses. It is very important that I soon go to the Umpqua and to Coos Bay to see and if possible persuade these Indians to come on the reserve. Such as belong here and are without leave of absence should be compelled to return and provided with employment by which to earn their subsistence. Should have their land allotted to them in severalty and be required to remain here. I respectfully ask that you will fully consider the importance of this matter, and if it be possible to do so, send us all the funds we have asked for in our estimate.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. J. Q. Smith
   Comr. Indian Affs.
      Washington
         D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.


North Yamhill
    August 28th 1877
Commissioner of I.D. Affairs
    Washington, D.C.
        Dear Sir
            I was notified a few days ago by Agent Bagley that he had been instructed by your department to issue certified vouchers for the amt. still due him, H. W. Shipley, on contract. Mr. Bagley stated that he had issued two sets of vouchers. One set for $1,520 and the other for the same amt. I will state to you that I was associated with Father in the contract all the way through. And when we completed our job, there being no money to pay us with, he gave me an order on the agent at Siletz for one half of all moneys due and to be paid. As compensation for my services, Mr. Bagley accepted the order and issued the vouchers as the order directed, in halves. And since he is relieved of any further action or responsibility in the matter, I will enclose the order, asking that when you issue a warrant for the money, that you issue two, each for $1,520. And if you cannot, send one to me. I would like you to send one in the care of the First National Bank, Portland, with a request that they notify me, as it would then only be necessary for me to get Father's endorsement of the warrant to get the money. I also ask that when you forward the warrant, that you notify me, as it will give me an opportunity to be in Portland when the warrants get there. These are important reasons to me why I should be permitted to draw my own money.
    I saw Senator Mitchell in relation to the matter, and he recommended me to write you enclosing the order, expressing a wish that you do all you can under your dept. regulations for me.
    If you cannot do anything for me, please return the order to me as quickly as possible.
Yours respectfully
    L. S. Shipley
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



STARVING INDIANS.
    EDITOR GAZETTE: I wish to make a few statements, through your paper, relative to the situation of the Indians on the Siletz Reservation. The Alsea and Nestucca Indians were removed about one year ago from their reserve on the Lower Alsea to the Siletz, and no extra provision made for their maintenance, as was promised by Mr. Ben. Simpson. These Indians are now actually dying off, fast, from starvation. Their sole living is gained from what little fishing they can do. For some time past a majority of them have been living on mussels and the remains of the whale that was washed ashore on North Beach a few weeks since.
    Mr. Bagley has had no funds with which to provide for them, or he would cheerfully do so.
    I sincerely wish someone would interest himself in procuring means to save these tribes from starvation. I do not think the government would knowingly go back on the promises made by Simpson at the time of the removal of these Indians to our reservation, if Mr. Simpson was authorized to make them.
    I hope you will be kind enough to publish this communication, as it is a matter of life and death with these Indians.
Yours truly,
    GEORGE HARNEY.
Siletz, Aug. 29, 1877.
Corvallis Gazette, September 7, 1877, page 2



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Sep. 6th 1877
Sir
    I respectfully ask if, during this and the next month, I may be allowed to employ a miller to run the mill, grinding the wheat for the Indians. Further, will I be permitted to take customary toll and grind the same for issue to the sick, &c., for Indian laborers, for school lunch, &c. and further, will I be allowed to grind for whites off the reserve who may desire it, taking and using the toll as above.
    The usual wages of millers are four dollars per day when temporarily employed.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agent
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Portland, Oregon
    Sept. 8th 1877
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    My Dear Sir
        I desire to call your attention and through you the attention of the Indian Department at Washington to some matters relative to the Indian service in our state. I noticed yesterday in the Corvallis Gazette a letter written over the signature of George Harney--an Indian chief at Siletz Agency. The letter states that those Indians, namely the Alsea and Nestucca Indians, that were brought on to the Siletz Reservation two years ago are many of them dying with starvation--and bitterly complaining that promises made to them had not been complied with on the part of the government. I am satisfied that to some extent this is true. I did, under the direction of the Department--treat with, remove and locate at the mouth of Salmon River some sixty-five Indians of the Nestucca tribe. I promised them assistance in farming, &c. and that they would be furnished seed for the first crop. This I am told was not done. The letter I referred to, I presume, had more reference to those Indians that were from the Alsea Agency than those from the Nestucca. I am satisfied that the whole affair is in bad condition--and something should be done immediately to relieve them. My proposition is to get them together as quick as possible at the mouth of Salmon River--such of them as are not capable of taking care of themselves--and put some person in charge of them there to act as a sub-agent--and let the government assist them in preparing houses, &c. for their accommodation. I am fully satisfied from what I hear since you left here that if something is not done soon that there will be trouble that may cost the government millions--besides the loss of many lives. I do know that when an Indian feels that he is outraged, that he will become desperate in the extreme. I believe they should have fair dealing and then compel them to perform their part. I assure you they are the last people in the world that it will do to tamper with--and it does seem to me that our great nation can afford to be just if not generous.
    I send you by this mail a map or diagram of the proposed reservation at the mouth of Salmon River where the Nestucca Indians and a part of the Alseas are now located. You will see that it contains 110,080.00 acres--which is ample for all the Indians that are now on the Siletz and Alsea reservations that are not capable of taking homestead and becoming citizens. The inspector Col. Watkins is not here or I should present this subject to him at once. I am satisfied that if all those Indians were consolidated as before mentioned--and some suitable person placed there in charge of them, that it would not be long until they could be self-sustaining. They should have a well-organized manual labor school established at that point, where the boys, young men and girls could be taught to work as well as read. No other kind of a school is worth anything among Indians. While I fully believe that the Indians should be taught the Bible and Christianity, I believe they should be taught to obey one of the first injunctions of the Bible, and that is that they should get their living by the sweat of their own brows.
    I wish before closing this letter to call your attention to another forcible argument in favor of consolidation. That is that we have too many Indian reservations and those we have are too large. Our Indians are really like some of Oregonians--they are land poor. They depend upon their large acres for a support without cultivating the soil. 
    You will please pardon me for the intrusion and believe me,
As ever yours
    Ben Simpson
Hon. J. H. Mitchell
    U.S. Senator
        Washington City
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office, Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Sept. 10th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge the receipt of your circular letter of 21st ultimo, marked C, giving instructions to use the utmost diligence in gaining all the information possible in regard to the conduct and intentions of the Indians, &c., and further instructing me to report illicit traffic of arms, ammunition or other contraband articles among them. I respectfully ask if, when the Indians of this agency are peaceable and quiet, I am required to endeavor to prevent their obtaining such articles from persons off the reserve with whom they traffic. When unable to employ them on the reserve or to furnish them with subsistence, it would seem cruel to deprive them of the privilege of hunting.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Comr. of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



"STARVING INDIANS."
    We published a communication from Geo. Harney, in the Gazette of the 7th inst., which Agent Bagley denominates "that absurd letter," and which not only contains untruthful assertions, but unjustly reflects upon Hon. Ben. Simpson, who was appointed special Indian Agent for removal of the Alsea Indians, but who was prevented from completing his work by a serious accident which befell him while in its performance. We exceedingly regret that anything should appear in the Gazette which would either directly or indirectly cast unjust reflections upon any public officer, or in any manner prejudice the Indians upon our border, or retard a peaceful and speedy solution of questions connected with the Indians upon our reservations. In order to correct any wrong impressions that may have been created, we take pleasure in publishing the following note from Mr. Bagley:
    "EDITOR CORVALLIS GAZETTE--Dear Sir: Lest some stranger might be deceived by that absurd letter of George Harney, in your issue of the 7th inst., permit me to say, though your columns, that though our allotments of government funds have been very small no Indians belonging to this Agency have died from starvation. The Nestuccas came on the Reserve nearly two years ago. Four deaths have occurred from them, all from disease. The Alseas commenced their removal here about six weeks ago. No deaths have occurred among them. In addition to a considerable quantity of provision furnished them by me, they have the source of supplies as they have ever had, viz: the ocean. Could they be given all the food in Oregon, they would eat whale blubber as a luxury.
"Yours, respectfully,
    "WILLIAM BAGLEY, Agent."
Corvallis Gazette, September 21, 1877, page 2


The Grand Ronde Indians.
    Grand Ronde, Oregon, is a large and beautiful valley, settled by severall Indian tribes, each family living on a portion of land allotted to them according to the stipulations of the treaty made with them by the government. The roads in the reservation are in good order. On our way to the agency I was surprised to see so many well-built farm houses. Each contains several rooms, comfortably furnished, in which neatness and order reign. These houses have been built by the Indians, as there are no white mechanics employed on this reservation. About several of the houses may be seen small gardens and orchards which I should judge would yield enough vegetables and fruit for each owner. All the land is well fenced. The Indians, with regard to their manner of dress or living, try to acquire the habits of the whites. They generally earn their living by farming, raising stock, and other pursuits of civilized nations. They carry their products for sale to the neighboring markets. Some of them raise between one and two thousand bushels of grain on their land. Besides the reaper and threshing machine furnished by the Indian Department for the use of the Indians, they have themselves purchased four other reapers and mowers. When they are not busy at home they take their machines outside to help the white people during harvest.
    The Indians have nearly all abandoned the old customs. The solemnization of marriage according to the rites of the Catholic Church, to which nearly all belong, is in common use on this reservation. Any violation of the marriage law, or of good morals in general, is punished more or less severely, according to the grievousness of the fault. With regard to their funeral ceremonies and the way of keeping their graveyards, with few exceptions, they follow the example of their white neighbors. Instead of being governed by chiefs, as formerly, they have their legislature to make laws and officials to execute them.
    What particularly attracts the attention of a visitor, on entering the agency, is the large, fine building which is to be the boarding school for the education of the Indian children. The expenses of this building have been willingly remitted by donations and subscriptions received from Belgium by the Rev. Father Croquet. This reverend gentleman has indefatigably toiled for seventeen years among the different tribes of this reservation.--Portland Oregonian.
Chautauqua Journal,
Sedan, Kansas, September 21, 1877, page 1




Los Angeles California
    September 22nd 1877
Sir
    Enclosed I have the honor to transmit the explanations to exceptions taken to my accounts from Siletz Agency for the 3rd and 4th qrs. 1875.
    In making these explanations I have been somewhat embarrassed through the absence of many documents to which I should like to refer. As stated in the explanations, ill health has rendered a residence in Oregon inexpedient, and I have been compelled to make these explanations assisted only by copies of the vouchers to which exceptions have been taken, and have not had the letters, instructions, telegrams &c. sent me by the Hon. Commissioner for my guidance, as also the contracts, schedule of prices &c. under which many of the expenditures were incurred to refresh my memory. Consequently these explanations are somewhat more imperfect than would be the case had I the necessary data to refer to.
    I trust these circumstances may be taken into consideration in adjusting my accounts. Not an expenditure has been made that was not necessary for the interest of the Department and the welfare of the service, and in those cases where departure has been made from the ordinary methods, such departure has been rendered necessary by unavoidable circumstances. I venture to hope that my accounts may meet with speedy and favorable consideration.
I have the honor to be
    Very respectfully
        Your obedient servant
            J. H. Fairchild
                Late U.S. Indian Agent
                    Siletz Agency Oregon
The Hon. Commissioner [of] Indian Affairs
    Washington
        D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



INDIAN HOMESTEADS.
    There is a disposition on the part of all the more civilized Indians upon the Siletz Reservation to avail themselves of the rights and privileges accorded them by the government under the act of 1875, securing homesteads to settlers on public lands. We think the law, if fully understood by the Indians, would be much more satisfactory to them and far preferable to the present arrangement, and would immediately throw open for settlement a large portion of the public domain in the western portion of our country, now comparatively valueless. There is no good reason, in our judgment, why the few Indian heads of families, now on the Siletz Reservation, should have from five hundred to one thousand acres each of the best agricultural land of our county, without cultivation or improvement, while the head of a white family is only allowed one hundred and sixty acres, under compulsion to reside upon and cultivate the same.
    We are not of those who think the "Indian better than a white man," nor do we think an "Indian has no rights which a white man is bound to respect." The law should protect each in the enjoyment of his rights. As will be seen by the copy of the U.S. laws which we append below, these Indian homesteads shall not be subject to alienation or encumbrance for the space of five years. This is a wise provision, as during that time the Indians will learn the value of their homes and hold them as tenaciously as the average white man. We are indebted to Hon. Ben. Simpson for [the] copy of laws subjoined:
    "Section 15.--That every Indian born in the United States, who is the head of a family, or who has arrived at the age of twenty-one years, and who has abandoned or may hereafter abandon his tribal relation, shall, on making satisfactory proof of such abandonment, under rules to be prescribed by the Secretary of the Interior, be entitled to the benefits of the act entitled 'An Act to secure homesteads to actual settlers on the public domain,' approved May twentieth, eighteen hundred and sixty-two, and the Acts amendatory thereof, except that the provisions of the eighth section of said Act shall not be held to apply to entries made under this Act; provided, however, that the title to lands acquired by any Indian by virtue thereof, shall not be subject to alienation or encumbrance, either by voluntary conveyance, or the judgment, decree, or order of any court, and shall be and remain inalienable for a period of five years from the date of the patent issued thereof; provided, That any such Indian shall be entitled to his distributive share of annuities, tribal funds, lands, and other property, the same as though he had maintained his tribal relations; and any transfer, alienation, or encumbrance of any interest he may hold or claim by reason of his former tribal relations, shall be void.
    "Section 16.--That in all cases in which Indians have heretofore entered public lands under the Homestead Law, and have proceeded in accordance with the regulations prescribed by the Commissioner of the General land Office, or in which they may hereafter be allowed to so enter under said regulations prior to the promulgation of regulations to be established by the Secretary of the Interior under the fifteenth section of this Act, and in which the conditions prescribed by law have been or may be complied with, the entries so allowed are hereby confirmed, and patents shall be issued thereon; subject, however, to the restriction and limitation contained in the fifteenth section of this Act, in regard to alienation and encumbrance.
    "Approved March 3, 1875."
Corvallis Gazette, September 28, 1877, page 2



Sulphate Cinchonidia
    It is very difficult to get the specific effect of a remedy in the treatment of disease among the Indians especially when left to their own direction whether to take it or not. They frequently lay the medicine aside and do not take it at all. But so far as I have been able to ascertain the difference in the effect of the two remedies (sulphate quine [sic] and cinchonidia) is not generally of a marked character. Cinchonidia in its action upon the nervous system is less marked than those resulting from the use of quine when there is brain trouble, ringing in the ears, deafness, disturbance of vision and vertigo. In some persons quine produces muscular prostration, coldness of the surface and in very large doses mental derangement and collapse. Cinchonidia is more mild and does not produce such results.
    In the treatment of malarial fever, we found that when the disease was disposed to run into the chronic form, cinchonidia was a more effective remedy to check it than quine.
    In the treatment of delicate individuals whose systems were full of malarial poison, their vital forces depressed, their secretions deranged, their powers of assimilation and disintegration below par, their nervous systems depressed, and their livers engorged, in such cases cinchonidia is a much better remedy than quine and certainly so to the patients from its affecting less the nerves of special senses as referred to above.
    In cases where intermittents are disposed to assume a masked form, cropping out under the guise of neuralgia, rheumatism &c., cinchonidia has some advantages over quine.
    I have learned by experience that all alkaloids act more rapidly than the agents from which they are taken.
Respectfully submitted
    F. M. Carter, Physician
Siletz Agency
    Sept. 29, 1877
   

    The hygienic condition of the Indians is improving, and they are gaining confidence in the agency physician. They always call upon him instead of relying on their native medicine men in case of sickness or accident.
    The Indians have almost entirely abandoned their ancient mode of curing the sick by singing, dancing and various peculiar contortions and incantations in which they call upon their "medicine gods" to help them, and are adopting the white man's medicine and the palefaced doctor to cure them when sick.
    The most intelligent of them see that all die who are treated by their doctors, consequently they lose faith in them. Extermination or civilization are the only alternatives left for the Indian, and they are compelled to choose the latter. In the race of life they cannot compete with the white man while their ignorance superstition and old ways clings to them, so they are forced by circumstances over which they have no control to leave them off.
    Their people are rapidly passing away, and something must be done or a few more years will find them beneath the clods of the valley.
    The white man is increasing, advancing and populating the country, and if they expect to cope with him they must adopt his way of doing business and seek a higher state of civilization. Therefore they are building houses, cultivating the soil, raising stock and in every way trying to improve themselves and elevate their race. The result is they are more healthful, intelligent and neat in their houses, persons &c. than ever before. The Indians on this reservation are slowly but certainly advancing in the arts of civilized life.
    Some disease among them is absolutely incurable, especially tertiary syphilis, and the most that can be done for that class is to properly take care of them as long as they live.
Respectfully submitted
    F. M. Carter
        Resident physician
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Siletz Indian Agency, Oct. 1, 1877
Hon. J. Q. Smith
    Commissioner Ind. Affairs
        Dear Sir
            I have the honor to transmit herewith according to your instructions per telegram Sept. 14, an estimate of supplies for the three remaining quarters of this year. Also a special estimate for the Alseas at the mouth of the Siletz & Salmon rivers. These estimates set forth what is absolutely necessary to set us on our feet for the present year. With such assistance now, we hope soon to approximate a condition of self-support.
    The fences about all the farms, the barns, houses, commissary buildings, &c. are nearly all rotten and falling down; and our farming implements are all about worn out and worthless. The Alseas are just setting up in a new home, having all their houses yet to build, their teams, wagons, farming implements, &c. yet to purchase and their farms to improve.
     I would respectfully suggest that the above supplies should be purchased in San Francisco for the following reasons:
    Viz: They would cost less.
    The transportation* would be more certain and far less expensive.
    But the main reason is that transportation from Portland here at this season of the year is almost impossible, the rainy season having already commenced.
    I would therefore recommend advertising in the San Francisco Daily Chronicle. If you decide to purchase in Portland, I would recommend advertising in the Daily Oregonian.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Ind. Agt.
*Transportation by schooner to Newport within fifteen miles of this agency.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



United States Senate Chamber
    Washington,
        Oct. 3rd 1877

Dear Sir,
    The "Siletz River," which is included in the "Siletz Indian Reservation" in Oregon, contains an abundance of excellent salmon, millions more than the Indians require. 
    A difference of opinion exists as to whether these fisheries are free to all--or if not free to all, has the agent in charge of the Department here--power to give a license exclusive or otherwise to fish in this river.
    Some years ago, the Superintendent of Indian Affairs for Oregon--Mr. Huntington--leased the right to certain parties to take oysters from a bay within this same reservation. The matter got into the courts and the courts sustained the lease. If these fisheries are not free to all, then I am advised certain persons are desirous of obtaining the exclusive right to establish a cannery on this river within the reservation and for which privilege quite a revenue could be derived for the benefit of the Indians and all could be done with the consent of the Indians, I have no doubt, and the agent.
    Please advise me on these several points.
Respectfully
    John H. Mitchell
Hon. Comr. of Indian Affairs
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



October 7th 1877
To the Hon. Indian Comr.
    Washington D.C.
Sir, what I wish to know is whether there is any law prohibiting Indians of the Klamath Indian Reservation running at large or not, as the Indians says that all of Sprague River belongs to them, and have told the settlers on Sprague River to leave there or they would fight, but still we do not care for that, but then they are running among our stock and hunting all over our hunting grounds. Also, we cannot leave anything out of doors with safety, and they come to the houses when the menfolks is away from home and frighten the women, and if I understand rightly, the reservation is 46 miles square, and a space of 30 miles north of the reservation that there is no settlers and there is just as much game there as here and what I have said I can prove by the settlers.
    Wishing to hear from you soon I remain your most humble and obedient servant
Jacob Buckmaster
    Bonanza
        Lake Co.
            Ogn.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Department of the Interior,
U.S. Geographical and Geological Survey of the Rocky Mountain Region,
J. W. Powell, Geologist in Charge.
Klamath Agency, Oregon
    October 13, 1877.
To the Hon. the Commissioner of Indian Affairs
    Washington, D.C.
        Sir,
            In conformity with the instructions received there since my last, [I] continued to investigate the Klamath tribe of Indians, including Modocs, with respect to their ethnology, language and present social status, endeavoring also to get glimpses at their mythology, migrations and history. As language is now my principal object of research, I have been at great pains to collect from every reliable source texts, songs, sentences and vocables, and of the latter I have now secured nearly five thousand. The language has kept itself pretty free from foreign influence, and comparatively only few English terms or terms from other Indian tongues have found their way into that interesting idiom. I have already collected many of the most necessary elements to compose a grammar of the language, and when I had opportunity to do so, I also took note of words from the neighboring idioms of the Shastas, Wascoes and especially of the Pit Rivers.
    After the first of November, please direct any of your favors to my address; Post Office, Sacramento, Cal., whence my mail will reach me though I may have gone to other places in Oregon state. The appropriation of $525 for the 4th quarter of 1877 hasn't reached me yet through Major J. W. Powell, but I recd. with thanks your circular letter to the Ind. agents.
I remain, sir, most respectfully yours
    Albert S. Gatschet
        Special Agt. for Ethology & Linguistics
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 623 Oregon Superintendency, 1876.



Ill-Treating Indians.
An Instance of the Inefficacy of Prayer.
What Comes of Christianizing the Reds--
the Impositions Practiced--the Cause of Indian Wars--Etc.

Correspondence to the S.F. Chronicle
    EDITOR CHRONICLE--Sir: I desire through your columns to call public attention to the pitiable and deplorable condition of certain Indians on the coast of Oregon. I have just returned from Yaquina Bay, and I have seen from seventy to eighty poor Indians in a starving condition. The manner in which this state of affairs has been brought about is something that ought to be well ventilated, and then, if allowed to continue, should bring the blush of shame whenever we lay claim to being civilized, let alone a Christian people. These Indians are principally from what has been known as the Alsea sub-agency, situated about twenty-five miles south of Yaquina, and a little glance at these coast agencies is necessary to place the case in a clear light. About fifteen years ago, when I first visited this portion of Oregon, there were gathered on the Siletz Agency, twenty miles north of Yaquina, about 1500 or 2000 Indians of the various coast tribes. They were then under the management of Benj. Simpson, who was certainly a very efficient agent. They had fine farms, well fenced, and good, comfortable houses. The appropriations from government were quite small, but the agent kept the Indians at work and they produced more potatoes, oats, etc., than they required and had quite a surplus for sale. I have purchased whole cargoes and loaded vessels with their produce. They were as
COMFORTABLE AND CONTENTED
probably as it was possible to make them. At the same time the sub-agency at the Alsea contained about six hundred, who were also well situated with good farms and good homes, and under the management of George Collins, and subsequently Samuel Case and Geo. Litchfield, were kept employed and contented. But after the close of the war the brilliant idea was conceived of placing the whole management of Indian affairs into the hands of the Christian Church. And we certainly have paid and are still paying dearly for the experiment. We have had the Modoc War; we have had to fight Sitting Bull, and then Joseph, and there is no telling who it may be next. It seems as though the government considered that as soon as the church took matters in hand and the spiritual welfare of the Indians was likely to be well attended to, nothing more was necessary to be done. And it would appear as though the church people took this same view to a great extent, for when a committee was examining into the condition of the Indians in Oregon some years since the editor of a leading religious paper remarked that "if the spiritual condition of the Indians was good it was the chief object to be attained." And so they taught them to pray. They would not see, or at least would not concede, that it was bread the Indians wanted instead of prayers. Their stomachs required food instead of their souls. And it would really be amusing, if it were not so serious a case, to notice to what extent this foolish policy was carried. After Agent Simpson came Gen. Palmer, who was also a good farmer, and who started in with a determination to
MAKE THE AGENCY SELF-SUPPORTING.
or as nearly so as possible. He bought farming utensils, horses, wagons, a threshing machine, etc., and had he been left alone to carry out his ideas and reasonably supported by the government, he would have made a great success. But the appropriations, small and inadequate as they had been before, were cut down still lower or withheld altogether, and it was thought that Palmer was looking too much at the physical and not attending sufficiently to the spiritual wants of the Indians, so he was removed and Mr. Fairchild appointed. He filled the bill in the great essential point. He had prayers early and late. He prayed long and often, but hunger and poverty were preying too, and the Indians continued to grow thinner and weaker, and newmade graves became plentiful. The houses have been permitted to decay and fall to pieces, the fences have disappeared, and, on the whole, to look at the agency now and think what it was fifteen years ago brings up a very sad comparison. So much for the Siletz. Let us turn now to the Alsea and see how even worse the matter stands. A pressure was brought within the last year to induce the Alseas to vacate their homes and remove to the Siletz. Force was not to be employed, but they were to be persuaded and induced by large promises. They were told that they would be well provided for at the Siletz; that homes would be prepared for them; that they should have farming implements and friends to instruct and assist them; and at last, reluctantly and with many doubts and misgivings, they abandoned their old homes and took up their line of march for the Siletz. It is almost needless to state, as it will be doubtless be anticipated, that
NONE OF THE PROMISES MADE THEM
have been kept. No preparation of any kind has been made to provide for them. White men have quietly moved in and occupy their abandoned homes; they cannot return to them, and so they stray off and hunt a living as best they may. And so here at Yaquina, as I stated in the commencement of this article, I find seventy or eighty of them in a starving condition. They have nothing to eat except what little they get out of the water, and even this they are sometimes deprived of. A short time since a dead whale came drifting in near the mouth of the bay. It was not only dead, but very dead, judging from the smell of it, and it would naturally be supposed that the Indians would be welcome to this contribution of Providence, but such was not the case, for although they had been watching it anxiously for two days, just as it came rolling into the surf a white man rushed in and laid claim to it, and they were not permitted to enjoy a mouthful of this delectable food until they paid the enterprising white man for it. North of Yaquina is a small river called the Nestucca. Here, too, from time immemorial, has lived a small tribe of Indians in a perfectly independent state, so far as living was concerned, for their land was rich, and fish abounded on all sides of them, but the white man looked upon their land and saw that it was good, and forthwith
CLAMORED FOR THEIR REMOVAL.
    The government again resorted to the policy of great inducements. They were promised farming implements and a farmer to teach them if they would remove to another stream. They did so, and all the farming implements that were ever sent them consisted of one old wagon that broke down before it reached them, and now their condition is about the same as the Alsea.
    Now, these are facts that cannot be gainsaid, and is there not an injustice here that calls loudly for a remedy! When will the government see the importance of taking this matter out of the hands of those who have shown such an entire lack of ability to manage it and place it under the care of them who have common business ideas--men who will make it a specialty to look after the natural wants of the Indians and are willing to trust to a merciful God the salvation of their souls! As a simple business proposition, it will cost less to provide for them than it will to fight them. But this is not the reason why it should be done. It should be done because it is right and but simple justice. We take them from their hands and we make no provision for them, and when at last they are driven to desperation and do what almost any other people under heaven would do under much less provocation, we kill them. What is strange about these Oregon Coast Indians is that under all these trying circumstances
THEY REMAIN HONEST.
    The people in this vicinity seldom charge them with theft. They often leave their houses unlocked in their absence, and seldom if ever find anything disturbed by the Indians. This I consider wonderful, for if ever a people would be justified in stealing it would be these. But why test this quality beyond all reasonable limits! Why wait until at last they, driven frantic by hunger, commit some act for which it will be necessary to kill them! Something should be done and at once. Winter is coming, and they should be fed. Prayers will not suffice them any longer. Their case is one in which it may be truly said: "We have asked for bread and ye have given us a stone." In conclusion, I would say to the charitable people of San Francisco that I shall return to these people in a few days with a vessel, and if anyone should feel disposed to contribute a trifle toward their relief I will agree to convey and deliver it to them free of charge. Any article of food, however small, and any old worn-out clothing that can be of no use to you will be acceptable to them. Few people could see them as I have just done without a feeling of pity. The government may finally attend to them, but it moves slowly and their wants are pressing. A very little trifle from each will be a great help to them.
J. J. WINANT,
    No. 107 California Market.
Morning Astorian, October 19, 1877, page 1



SILETZ INDIAN AGENCY.
    ED. GAZETTE: Inspections of agencies usually mean a hasty glance at the country; a little talk with the several employees, and a grand powwow with the Indians, in which promises are a conspicuous part of the proceedings. Out of four inspections witnessed by me, one of which was made by U.S. Senators, this one, just made by Col. E. C. Watkins, Inspector, was the most thorough and complete, though the Col.'s time was short, having been delayed in Nez Perce country. Col. Watkins issued his orders with military exactness, and Agent Bagley was kept busy getting things in shape. As the people are mostly interested in the "vacation" question, I will say the Indians, contrary to the old and usual style of speechmaking, expressed a desire for farming tools, teams, and above all the speedy allotment of lands, so that they could feel certain and secure in their possessions. They also wanted schools, in order that, as they were left to do for themselves, they could understand the English language and learn our laws and obey them. The Inspector briefly told them how for 20-odd years the government had fed and instructed them; taught them how to cultivate land--and become independent citizens; the time had now arrived when they must select land--improve it, accept the situation and become citizens, pay taxes, and bear their part of the people's burden. By so doing, white men would not seek to drive them back, but assist them in maintaining their independence. This kind of talk seemed to suit the Indians very well--so far as I was able to judge. Agent Bagley was credited with having done well with the means at his disposal. An allotment, such as Col. Watkins will recommend, will locate, permanently, a good many deserving Indians, and in time will vacate quite a large tract of excellent farming country, in which many enterprising people will find comfortable homes. The Caroline Medau will sail for this port Oct. 23rd, and be here about the 1st of November.
RIALTO.
Newport, Oct. 20, 1877.
Corvallis Gazette, October 26, 1877, page 2



Office Siletz Agency Or.
     Oct. 27, 1877
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
Sir:
    I have the honor to report that during the present week the Siletz Grist and Saw Mill have been running and are doing good work.
    On the 22nd instant I purchased 28 bushels of wheat and had it floured for Department use, and 30 bushels belonging to the Indians of the reservation was also ground.
    The flour manufactured on Department account is now used for subsistence of Indian laborers working in the saw mill.
    I have also purchased supplies from the sutler which are absolutely required for subsistence of Ind. laborers, and must be paid (if approved by you) from funds allotted this agency for the 4th quarter.
    As yet I have been unable to procure any beef or pork for the Ind. laborers, but must soon, as there is much more work to be done in the mill, perhaps 10 or 12 days more.
    The average amount sawed per day is 8000 ft. The Indians are becoming accustomed to mill work and will soon be able to do as much work as so many white men.
    The services of two whites only are engaged at present in the mill, viz., sawyer and engineer.
    The carpenter is an experienced sawyer, and is doing better work and more of it than any sawyer ever employed.
    The lumber is of the best quality, and the mill is capable of turning out as good a variety as any mill in this country.
    The small cutoff saw has been erected, and thus the wood required for agency use can be secured with but a trifling expense to the Department, as all the slabs from the logs can be utilized and sawed in proper lengths.   
Very respectfully
   Your obt. servant
     Wm. Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
By
    W.E.R.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




U.S. Senate Chamber
   Washington, Oct. 30, 1877
The Hon'ble.
    Commissioner of
        Indian Affairs
Sir:
    Some three weeks ago I addressed you a letter requesting the opinion of your Bureau in regard to the salmon fisheries on the Siletz Indian Reservation, Oregon, as to the rights of parties connected therewith. Please see my communication. I have had no reply, and would be pleased to get one at your earliest convenience.
Very respectfully
   John H. Mitchell 
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Office Siletz Indian Agency
     Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        Oct. 30, 1877
Sir
    Referring to my "Monthly Report" for Sept. in relation to the subject of Indians obtaining whiskey, I desire to further report that at a preliminary examination before a justice of the peace. I was required to sign a "recognizance" to appear before the grand jury for the county in which the crime was committed to testify against the person accused of furnishing whiskey to Indians belonging to this reservation.
    Accordingly on the 22nd inst. I left the agency for Albany, and while there had the satisfaction of seeing the guilty party convicted.
    This matter of Indians being furnished with intoxicating liquors by these low, unprincipled persons, who infest the camps of Indians engaged in working for whites, is a growing evil and for which I know of but one remedy, "viz" Keep the Indians on the reserve where they belong. Here they cannot get whiskey and there are no disturbances. Should one of these unprincipled "villains" show his presence here bringing the vile stuff with him he would be summarily dealt with, but off the reserve it is a very difficult matter to detect or convict them.
    Unless the Indians can be furnished with labor by which they may earn their subsistence and clothing, be furnished with teams, seed, farming implements and a part of their subsistence for a year it is not just to require them to remain on the reserve.
    I respectfully ask that the "Estimates for Supplies" sent to your office on the 29th "ult." be complied with if possible, thus enabling the Indians to be profitably employed at home, thus saving trouble and dissatisfaction with the whites and expense to government. Another important help to this result would be the allotment of land in severalty to the Indians, securing them in their titles to the same, thereby showing the Indians that our government has at last concluded to fulfill the promise made them by her agents more than twenty years ago. It is to be hoped the next Congress may conclude it is economy to keep the Indians on their respective reservations and appropriate the necessary funds for that purpose.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



THOSE "STARVING INDIANS."
    Some time since we published a communication from George Harney, stating, in substance, that some of the Alsea Indians, en route to the Siletz Reservation, were in a suffering and starving condition. In reply to that communication we published a letter from Indian Agent Bagley, denying Harney's allegations. About that time Capt. Winant published letters in some of the San Francisco papers, stating that those Indians were in a destitute and starving condition, which appealed to the charity of the citizens of that city. Dispatches from Portland contradicted the "starving" reports, and yet the Captain maintains that he spoke from actual observation, and gives the names of prominent citizens on the Bay to corroborate his statements.
    While it may be true that some few of the Indians referred to are in the condition Captain W. represents them, or was, when he was at the Bay, we cannot think that many could "starve and die" without the knowledge of Mr. Bagley, the humane and Christian gentleman who has charge of the Siletz agency. That extreme cases of poverty and destitution occur among the whites, occasionally, we all know--but these are exceptional cases, and it may be so with those Indians.
    We saw Mr. Bagley, last week, and he said nothing about the "starving Indians." Col. E. C. Watkins, Inspector of Indians on this coast, recently made an official visit to the Siletz, and it was his business to find out the exact condition of these wards of government. If they had been dying from starvation, at that time, he ought to have found it out. For the good of the Indians, and for the sake of all interested, we hope a thorough investigation of the whole affair will be made, at an early day.
Corvallis Gazette, November 2, 1877, page 2



"Census Roll"
of
Indians belonging to the
Siletz Agency,
1877. 
Tututni Males Females Total
     
Heads of Families
or Lodges
No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole No. Ea.
Lodge
William Strong 1 1 1 1 4
John Woodman 1 1 1 1 1 5
Wm. Hensey 1 2 1 4
James Hensey 1 1 1 3
Old Shellhead 1 1 1 2 2 7
Charles Shellhead 1 1 2
Old McKay 1 1 2
Jeff McKay 1 1
John McKay 1 1 1 2 5
James Blair 1 1 2
Simpson Blair 1 1
Mr. Simpson 1 1 1 2 5
Mr. Barney 1 1 2
George Barney 1
1 2
Jake Cook 1
1 2
Joseph Cook 1 1 1 1 4
Enoch Arden 1 1 2
John Johnson 1 1 1 1 4
Oscar Cook 1 1
2
Jonas 1 1 1 3
Old Weigen 1 1
Old Leggens 1 1 2
John Logan 1 1 2
Old Bob Metcalf 1 1 2
Jerry Lang 1 1 1 3
Wm. Jordan 1 1
Dan Jordan 1 2 1 1 5
Joseph Gay 1 1 1 1 4
Ben Hardin 1 1 1 1 4
Abraham Lincoln 1 1 2
L. Sam Long 1 1 2
Jim Scott 1 1
Frank Wilbur 1 1
Mr. Shem 1 1 1 3
Old Charley Yama 1 1 1 3
Frank Selzie 1 2 1 4
Antone Selzie 1 1 1 3
Old Mc. Jack 1 3 2 6
Eddie Bensil 1 2 1 4
George Collins 1 1 2 4
Pete Collins 1 1 1 3
Old Wallace 1 1 1 1   4
Simpson Billy 1 1 1 1 4
Old Sanchy 1 1 1 3
Charley Pony 1 1 1 3
Old Megison 1 1
Total  13   35   6 14   14   35   7   13   137    
Alseas No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Watson 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 2 10  
Spencer 1 1 1 1 4
Cal Jim 1 1 2
Bill 1 1 1 1 4
Louis 1 1 2
William 1 1 1 3
Martin 1 1 1 3
Jim Cook 1 1 1 1 4
Jesse 1 1 2 1 1 6
Jackson 1 1 3 1 2 1 2 11  
Louis Long 1 1 1 3
Nate 1 1 1 3
Plate 1 1 2
Lutson 1 1 1 1 1 5
Sam 1 1 2
Dr. John 1 1 1 3
Ben 1 1 1 3
Albert Chief 2 1 2 1 1 7
Mack 1 1 2
Scott 1 1 1 1 1 5
Cultus George 1 4 1 2 8
Big George 1 1 1 1 4
Old Dick Litchfield 1 1 2
Yaquina John 2 1 1 1 5
Cultus Jim 1 1 2
David 1 1 1 3
Total  11   20   13   9 12   24   5 14   108    
Joshua No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Depot Charley 1 1 1 1 2 1 1 8
Charley Ling 1 2 1 1 1 6
Bob Metcalf 1 1 1 1 4
Jim Watts 1 1
Old Catfish 1 1 1 3
Old Big Tom 1 1 1 1 1 5
Chilla Martin 1 1 1 1 1 5
Dutch man 1 1 1 1 4
Joshua George 1 1 2
Abey Davenport 1 1 2
Louis Shortfellow 1 1 1 1 1 1 6
Jim Meacham 1 1 2 4
Sandy Grant 1 1 2
Henry Clay 1 1
Charley Penn 1 1 1 3
George Oregon 1 1 2 1 5
To-mots-an-na 1 1 1 3
Ben 1 2 1 1 5
Bill Cook 1 1 1 3
Old Bill 1 1
Jo 1 1 2
Jack 1 1
Telamchu 1 1 2 1 1 6
Tuta Oosha 1 1 2
Total  8 19   6 10   7 18   6 10   84  
Coquell No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Charley 1 2 1 1 1 6
Tecumseh 1 2 1 4
Jim 1 1 3 5
Thompson 1 1 1 1 4
Solomon 1 2 1 4
Hunter 1 1 2
George 1 1 1 3
Dick 1 1 2 4
Sheridan 1 1 2
Jack 1 1 2
Billy   1 1 1 3
Old Sylvester 1 1 1 3
Old Bill 1 2 2 1 1 7
Johnson 1 1 1 1 1 5
Lane 1 2 1 1 5
Ule-tal-te-la 1 2 3
Whiskers 1 1 1 1 4
Molthouse 1 1
Saxit 1 1
Mustah 1 1 1 3
Nect 1 2 2 5
Mike 1 1 2
Johncy Jale 1 1 3 5
Olney 1 1
Total  8 19   6 5 12   24   2 8 84  
Sixes No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
George 1 1 1 1 1 1 6
Wislow 1 1 1 2 5
Lazy Jim 1 1
Jackey 1 1 2
Jim Sixes 1 1 2
Billy 1 1 1 1 4
Stuart 1 1 1 1 2 6
Jake Stuart 1 1
Tah-chal-na 1 2 1 2 2 1 9
Old Jake 1 1 1 2 1 2 8
Old Que-que 1 1 2
Old Kohua 1 1
Old Me-to-tu 1 2 3
Willie 1 1
Cultus Charley 1 1
Charley Long 1 1 2 4
Cutlip 2 2 4
Tyee Simmons 1 3 4
Eddy 1 2 2 1 2 8
Total  10   16   4 6 8 17   3 8 72  
Chetco No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Jerry Cap 1 1 1 1 4
Old Fairchild 1 1 2
Wm. Fairchild 1 1 1 3
Baldwin 1 1 2
Charles Chetco 1 1 1 3
Tenas Charley 1 1 1 1 1 5
Ben 2 2 1 1 6
Harry 1 1 2
Alac 1 1 1 3
Old Dick 1 1 1 1 4
Fred Peterson 1 1 1 3
Dick Peterson 1 1 1 3
John 1 1 2
Joshua 1 1 1 3
Duke 1 1 1 1 4
Louis Spencer 1 1 1 3
Cal. Jack 1 2 1 4
Old Ed. 1 1 2
John Fiddle 1 1 2
Ben Sanderson 1 1 1 3
Total  5 18   3 8 7 18   1 3 63  
Euchres No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Old Aryessie 1 2 3
Joseph Auld 1 1 1 1 2 6
J. Q. Smith 1 1 1 3
Jim Wallace 1 1 1 1 4
Andrew Jackson 1 1
Halo Glease 1 1 1 2 2 1 8
Old Jack 1 1 1 3
Old Soc-et-na 1 1 1 3
E. Bill 1 1 1 3
Scalley 1 1 2
Morris 1 1 1 3
Warner 1 2 1 2 6
Old Castinea 1 1 1 3
Lawson Santa 1 1 1 1 2 6
Brown 1 1
Euchre Jim 1 1 1 1 4
Total  8 13   2 4 9 16   3 4 59  
Naltunnetunne No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Alac Ross 1 1 1 1 4
Jim Ross 1 1 2
Captain 1 1 1 1 4
John Chapman 1 1 1 3
Harry Chapman 1 2 1 4
Simpson Chapman 1 1 2
Club Foot Jack 1 1
Louis 1 1 1 1 4
Charley 1 2 1 4
Ben Tyee 1 1 1 3
Clo-chaä-pa 1 1 2
Lo-qui-cha-ha 1 2 1 4
Wi-an-to 1 1 1 3
Ches-le-shu-ha-to-quith 2 1 3
Ike 1 1 2
John 1 2 1 1 5
Loui Nolt 1 1 2
Jo Matches 1 1 2
Willie Ross 1 1 1 3
Total  2 18   6 3 6 15   3 4 57  
Rogue River No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
George Harney 2 1 1 1 1 6
Bill Evans 1 1 1 3
James Buchanan 1 1 2
Nat Buchanan 1 1
Old Bill Harney 1 1 2
Hugh Whiskers 1 1 2
Jim Cayota 1 2 2 1 6
Johney Evans 1 1 1 3
Jack Babtiste 1 1 1 3
R. Simmons 1 2 1 4
John Waters 1 2 1 2 6
David 1 1 2
Moses Munday 1 2 3
Little One 1 1 1 3
John Adams 1 1 1 1 4
Nat Chieftain 1 1
Fred Toby 1 1
Total  1 17   3 7 6 14   2 2 52  
Shasta Costa No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
John 1 1 2
Jack Ortan 1 2 1 4
Sam Mann 1 1 1 3
Captain 1 1 1 2 5
Jim Galletson 1 1 1 3
Old Jim 1 2 3
Jackey 1 1 1 3
Frank 1 1 2
George Mann 1 1 2
Brown Ortan 1 1 2
Jake Ortan 1 1 2
Charley Ortan 1 2 1 4
King 1 1
Abraham Bell 1 2 1 4
Henry Bell 1 1
David 1 1
Nat Brown 1 1
Christina Brown 1 1
Louis 1 1
Old Harvey 1 1 2
Total  4 15   4 7 4 12   1 47  
Klamaths No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Old Jo. 1 2 1 1 1 6
Henry Chapman 1 1 1 3
Charlie 1 1 2
Old Jack 1 1 1 3
Smith 1 1 2 2 6
Leo John 1 1 1 2 1 6
Billy 1 1 1 2 1 2 8
Old John 1 2 1 1 5
Bob 1 1 2
Tom 1 1 1 3
Mike Williams 1 1
Total  3 8 3 3 10   11   6 1 45  
Nestucca No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Bill 1 1 1 1 1 5
Dick 2 1 1 2 1 7
Old Peter 1 1 2   4
Old John 1 2 1 1 5
Old Dick 1 1 1 1 1 1 6
Old Bob 1 1 1 1 4
Sam 1 1
Collier 1 1 2
Levi 1 1 2
Peter 1 1 2
George 2 1 1 1 2 7
Total  4 13   4 3 5 10   3 3 45  
Galice Creek No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Jim 1 1 1 1 4
Bill 1 1 1 1 1 1 6
Cap. 1 1 2
Baptiste 1 2 3
John 1 1
Jimmy 1 1
Billy 1 1
Total  2 3 3 2 4 1 1 2 18  
Salmon River No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No. over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Lodge
Chief John 1 1 1 3
Short John 1 1 1 1 1 5
Charley 1 1 2
Jack 1 1 2
Johnson 1 1
Jim 1 1
Total  2 4 1 2 2 2 1 14  
Siuslaws, Coos and Umpquas
Estimated  200    
    The census of these last three tribes of Indians belonging to this reservation has not been taken as the Indians are not here and could not have been taken without great expense to the Department.
   
Recapitulation
Tribe Males Females Total
   
No.
over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 No.
over
50
No. over
20
No. over
10
No. under 10 Whole
No. Ea.
Tribe
Tututnis 13 35 6 14 14 35 7 13 137
Alseas 11 20 13     9 12 24 5 14 108
Joshuas   8 19 6 10   7 18 6 10   84
Coquells   8 19 6   5 12 24 2   8   84
Sixes 10 16 4   6   8 17 3   8   72
Chetcos   5 18 3   8   7 18 1   3   63
Euchres   8 13 2   4   9 16 3   4   59
Naltunnetunnes   2 18 6   3   6 15 3   4   57
Rogue Rivers   1 17 3   7   6 14 2   2   52
Shasta Costas   4 15 4   7   4 12   1   47
Nestuccas   4 13 4   3   5 10 3   3   45
Klamaths   3   8 3   3 10 11 6   1   45
Galice Creeks   2   3 3   2   4   1 1   2   18
Salmon Rivers   2   4 1   2   2   2   1   14
Siuslaws, Cooses and Umpquas--estimated 200
Grand Total  81 218   64   83 106   217   42   74 1085  
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Siletz Indian Agency
     Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        Nov. 2nd 1877
Sir
    I desire to respectfully call your attention "first" to the Census Roll of Indians belonging to this agency from which you will see the number formerly belonging to the Alsea Agency. "Second" to Tabular Statement of funds sent me for Third Qr. 1877, during which these were induced to come to this agency. "Third" to Indian Department office letter of date Sept. 17th 1877 marked "F," in which I am informed that this ($750) is all that can be spared for their removal. From the Tabular Statement as above it would seem that this amount was intended to cover the expenses of their settlement upon the reserve.
    I respectfully ask if this means that I am expected with seven hundred and fifty dollars to remove the number of Indians indicated distances varying from forty to eighty miles, transporting their goods and effects across two bays and over heavy mountain roads, subsisting them while en route, and then out of the same funds pay for food, clothing, blankets, and provide houses for their shelter during the coming winter! If so I will say that it will be impossible to do all this with the amount thus allowed for the purpose, and the only alternative will be to let them return to their former homes to hunt and fish for their subsistence. In many instances these Indians have left comfortable houses constructed by themselves from lumber picked up along the beach and gardens cleared of brush and brought under cultivation by their own labor, and it is but reasonable that they should expect our government to at least make them as comfortable as they have been in their own country. "Estimates for Supplies" sent to your office Sept. 29th last were made up with the full knowledge that the appropriations for Indian Dept. made by last Congress were limited and such "Estimates" were reduced to the minimum for the purpose indicated, and I respectfully ask that if possible you will grant all therein called for. Without these supplies, these Indians must suffer with hunger and cold. In years past they have been promised many things which they have not received, and though they are friendly now, if not provided for this winter they might commit acts which would tend to hostilities with whites who now occupy their former homes. It is a fact well proven by experience that Indians when friendly are not as expensive to government as when hostile, and hence as a matter of economy I respectfully urge your early compliance with these "Requisitions for Supplies." Their desire for the allotment of lands in severalty as for seeds, teams, farming implements &c. and their willingness to work are evidences of their desire for improvement in civilized life. The fact that several of them who but a few weeks ago first heard the gospel are now earnest Christians, and that though they are destitute of houses. Those who are within convenient distance of the school house eagerly grasp the opportunity to send their children to school, are further evidences of their capacity for civilization and true Christianity. Is it not plainly the duty of our government to encourage and assist them.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



LETTER FROM CAPT. WINANT.
    EDITOR GAZETTE: I arrived on the 2nd inst., from San Francisco, with a general cargo of merchandise for Messrs. Hammond, Williams, Hulse and others. I shall load oysters in a few days, if weather permits, and return.
    I notice some criticisms, both in your paper and the Statesman, in regard to an article published by me recently in the San Francisco Chronicle, in relation to the Indians. So far as your remarks go, I have no fault to find, but would merely suggest that you have the opportunity of finding out the truth of what I wrote by corresponding with almost any of the residents of this place, most of them, of course, being personally known to you. The Statesman, however, besides indulging in a little fling at me, by intimating that I was "putting up a job" to fleece the charitable people of San Francisco, goes further, and publishes an absolute falsehood in conveying to its readers the idea that Col. Watkins has just visited the Indians spoken of in my article as being destitute. The fact is, Col. Watkins did not see those Indians at all; he only got as far as the Siletz Agency, and remained there only one day. When Mr. Bensell, who met him there, asked him if he would not visit the Alseas, he regretted his inability to do so, for the want of time. So the news gatherers who have made it appear that Col. Watkins visited the Alseas must use his name without authority, as the Col. certainly did not reach Yaquina Bay, and he is not the man to make a misstatement. In this connection I will also state that I see an item telegraphed from Portland to San Francisco, conveying the same idea, "that Col. Watkins had visited the Indians reported by me as being destitute, and found the whole story false." Somehow it seems that the people who are so anxious to contradict my story, without investigating the facts, get the Siletz mixed up with the Alsea Indians. My article stated distinctly that the suffering Indians were from the Alsea Agency. And I want to make this plain, in justice to Mr. Bagley, the agent at Siletz, as it might otherwise be understood that I was reflecting on his management. This I certainly have no desire to do, as, from the best information I can get, Mr. Bagley has had more difficulties to contend with than any agent on the Siletz. He has been denied the means heretofore accorded to the agents, and he has done all that it was in his power to do with the means afforded him. He has been active and diligent in attending to the wants of his people, and has, doubtless, often regretted his inability to do more. This much I think due to Mr. Bagley, and I hope that those who may yet try to disprove the facts stated by me will not make it appear that I have charged him with mismanagement or neglect of duty, as I have not, or could not, do. And yet, I say, in conclusion, that the condition of the Indians along this part of the coast is even worse than I have made it out, and instead of foolish and groundless denials, calls for honest investigation.
Yours, respectfully,
    J. J. WINANT.
Newport, Nov. 4, 1877.
Corvallis Gazette, November 9, 1877, page 2



THE ALSEA INDIANS.
The Report of their Starving Condition Confirmed.

    To the Editor of the Chronicle--SIR: The following dispatch to the Call from Portland, in answer to Captain J. J. Winant's article in your issue of the 12th, is evidently intended for a crushing contradiction of the same:
    "The reported starving condition of the Indians over at Yaquina Reservation turns out to be without the slightest foundation in fact. There is certainly not the least truth in the report. To suppose that Indians anywhere along the coast, and especially at Yaquina Bay, could starve to death at this season of the year is simply absurd. The streams abound with salmon, trout and other kinds of fish. Along the beach great quantities of shellfish can easily be obtained, while the mountains and forests teem with game. At Yaquina the sod is very fertile, and all kinds of vegetables can be raised almost without cultivation. Wheat can easily be procured of the farmers in the vicinity by the Indians in exchange for labor if they are only willing to work."
    It so happens that this case is altered by peculiar circumstances. The person who wrote that article was geographically and otherwise in error. There is no such place as "Yaquina Reservation." If Siletz was intended, that is in Benton, not Polk County. The land is fertile and all occupied by white men, who regard Yaquina Bay as the certain terminus of the Willamette Valley and Coast Railroad, now in course of construction. If land could have been obtained, August is rather late to plant early vegetables. We ship most of our flour from San Francisco, so the chance for exchanging labor for wheat is not apparent. The facts are, the Alsea Indians (part of them) left their old home early in July of this year, and disposed of their boats, fish traps, houses and gardens on the Alsea River. While en route for Siletz Agency, and at Yaquina, they learned the agent at Siletz was, owing to lack of funds, unable to assist his own indigent Indians, much less others. So they halted, waiting for the coming of Inspector Watkins, without money, for if they had any when they arrived here, in the language of one of the chiefs, it "lasted quick." Without boats to fish with, they done what any other people would have done under similar circumstances--tried to get work, and succeeded in finding a day's work now and then. Agent Bagley done all he could to help them--gave them a little flour for a week or so. This soon ceased, and when Captain Winant was here these Indians were destitute and in actual want. It is not necessary for this community to see a man dead and have a coroner's verdict to establish the fact that he starved to death: They consider themselves thoroughly competent to judge the condition of these Indians. Inspector Watkins came to Siletz and was pushed for time. The writer talked with Colonel Watkins in regard to these and other Indians--the Cooses, Umpquas and Siuslaws, on the Siuslaw River, now unprotected and being crowded off the lands they have held for generations. Colonel W. could make no promises; in fact he did not believe in promising unless there was an appropriation to meet it. So the Alseas have scattered--homeless, winter almost here. If hungry and desperate, some innocent one of that race, who, by promises, has made them wanderers, should suffer, who shall we blame? Certainly the best plan is to urge the proper authorities to protect these Indians, and for that purpose language cannot be too strong.
R. A. BENSAL.
    We, the undersigned, having read Captain J. J. Winant's article in your paper of October 12, 1877, in reference to the destitute condition of the Alsea Indians, desire to corroborate that statement. [Winant's article was reprinted in the Astorian on October 19, transcribed above.]
E. M. ABBEY,
WM. HAMMOND,
G. R. MEGGINSON.
NEWPORT, Yaquina Bay (Or.), Oct. 27th.
San Francisco Chronicle, November 7, 1877, page 4



DEPARTMENTAL TELEGRAPH LINES,
EXCLUSIVELY FOR GOVERNMENT BUSINESS.
Department of the Interior,
    Washington, D.C., Nov. 12, 1877.
From U.S. Senate
To Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Has the contract with H. W. Shipley for construction of mill at Siletz Agency Oregon been approved.
    This mill has been completed a year; the money to pay Shipley was appropriated last Congress. I am unable to understand why it is he is kept out of his money.
John H. Mitchell
    Please answer.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



THOSE "STARVING INDIANS."
    The various dispatches, letters, newspaper articles, and unkind innuendos that have been indulged in, recently, both in this state and California, has been the result, in our opinion, more of "misunderstanding" than of any intentional wrong, either on the part of letter writers of newspaper men. Last week we published an article from Capt. Winant, on this subject, and for corroboration of the same, if it needs any, we publish the following letter from Hon. R. A. Bensell, from the Salem Statesman, November 8th:
    "EDITOR STATESMAN:--In your issue of Oct. 26th reference is made by the publication of a part of an interesting letter from J. J. Winant, of S.F., on the 'destitute condition of the Alsea Indians.' And you also state that you referred the matter to Col. E. C. Watkins and P. B. Sinnott, Esq., 'who unhesitatingly pronounced the statements made by Capt. Winant as untrue,' and that 'Col. Watkins and P. B. Sinnott had visited these Indians.' I was at Siletz Agency during Col. Watkins' stay there, and witnessed the inspection made by him, and was well pleased with the candor and honesty of purpose in dealing with the Indian question; to my certain knowledge, however, neither Col. Watkins, Capt. Wilkinson or P. B. Sinnott ever visited the Alsea Indians at Yaquina Bay, and from the favorable opinion of the gentleman named, I concluded your reporter did not state the case clearly, and located the Indians, referred to by Capt. Winant, at Siletz, instead of Yaquina Bay. Col. Watkins informed me that owing to his prolonged service in the Nez Perce country, his time was limited, and he regretted his inability to visit the Alsea, Coos, Umpqua and Siuslaw Indians, which several tribes once constituted the Alsea Agency. The condition of the Indians mentioned by Winant has been fully corroborated by citizens of this place, and I am at a loss to understand why such hasty and uncalled-for remarks should be made by newspapers concerning a matter in which every good citizen must feel an interest. Capt. Winant is a resident of S.F., where twenty years of honest dealing and gentlemanly deportment, characterized by many acts of generosity, will be all the answer necessary to the criticism of 'grievances, jobs,' etc. Capt. W. received from the charitable people of S.F. several packages of old clothes, which he is distributing among the needy and destitute Indians.
    "You will do a simple act of justice to all parties interested by publishing this brief article.
"R. A. BENSELL."
Newport, Or., Nov. 5th, 1877.
Corvallis Gazette, November 16, 1877, page 2




Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Nov. 22, 1877
Sir
    During the month of October and a part of this the saw mill has been kept in motion, and today the last logs were sawed from the pond at the mill.
    This supply of lumber is fast decreasing, and as the demand from both Department and Indians is increasing, it will soon be gone.
    There are more Indians on the reservation at present than have been for many months.
    A good talk by Inspector Watkins to them has given new impetus to the affairs of the Indians, and now they are trying to secure their land by making improvements, building houses, barns & fences on their homes, & there you see the necessity of immediately complying with their urgent demands from the Indians in furnishing lumber.
    By furnishing the Indians with lumber they are not only kept from going to the outside world to work, but are kept here to work for themselves, and improve their own homes.
    Several thousand feet of saw logs have been carried on my Property Return for two years, but I have been unable to convert them into lumber as there was no way to get them to the mill.
    Should these logs not be delivered immediately and sawed?
    There should be a contract let immediately by all means, for the delivery of the few logs remaining on hand, and 100,000 ft. more to be cut during this & next month.
    Those Indians who are trying to help themselves should receive some aid from government, and thus encourage them in the work they have begun.
    If this can not be done immediately, some branch of the service will be affected and surely suffer, resulting I fear to the detriment of the affairs of this agency, as well a great drawback to its prosperity.
    And now in conclusion I do respectfully ask permission to go on with this department of the work, and be allowed to let a contract for the delivery of 200,000 ft. of saw logs to the site of the Siletz saw mill.
    Hoping to hear from you as soon as practicable, I remain
Very respectfully
   Your obt. servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
To the Hon. Commr. Ind. Affs.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



SILETZ INDIAN RESERVATION.
Settlement on the Lands--and Triumphs of Christian Civilization.

    The valuable lands of this reservation will be taken up rapidly now. Already, times are lively here. Teams are running in every direction, hauling out new lumber for permanent improvements. Inspector Watkins' decisions, and wise counsels, have given new impetus to enterprise at Siletz. Many of the people who had been hesitating and distrustful are now inspired with confidence, and are going to work with courage to make homes for themselves. They are encouraged also with their success in farming this year. Unfavorable as the season has been for harvesting, they have saved a large proportion of their grain by running two reapers, and stacking their grain, and stowing it away in barns, and running the threshing machine between showers. They are especially pleased because they have, without assistance from the whites, performed ALL the labor of cultivating, harvesting and threshing their grain; and that, after all their losses by rain, they are largely remunerated for their toil. About one half of those who had their threshing done by machine saved three thousand bushels, or an average of two hundred and fifty bushels apiece. They are attached to this country because, when all other means of subsistence fails them, they are surrounded by hills and forests that abound in game; and brooks, rivers and ocean tides that yield inexhaustible supplies of fishes, that are easily taken at all seasons of the year in great variety and quantity.
    Now, since the mills are finished and in operation, they are jubilant over the prospect of new houses, and plenty of bread. Of the one thousand and eighty-five Indians belonging to this reservation, there are comparatively few of those degraded ones who are often seen hanging about the towns outside. A large majority of them are pleading for permanence in their homes here, and for good titles to their lands. And many are proving themselves worthy, not only by their industry and honesty, but by their eager conformity to all the requirements of Christian civilization. Hence they are constantly becoming more and more comfortable, peaceful, contented and hopeful. There are many orphans, and helpless persons, who are constant objects of charity.
    The following circumstances will show that Christianity is triumphing among this people. This week our uniformly quiet and orderly community was thrown into a state of intense excitement by a report of hostilities between the Klamaths and Rogue Rivers. A feud betwixt them had resulted in deeds of violence and resort to arms. The agent immediately interfered, and before anyone was killed he succeeded in disarming the belligerent parties, and collecting them at the agency, where [they] were brought together in the council room. After explanations were made they were permitted to recite their grievances, in a proper spirit, and make propositions of peace. But they had not proceeded far before they began to make humble confessions, and noble concessions. Some even wept bitterly. Friendship was soon restored, and pledges of future peace was given by a hearty shaking of hands. It is due to our Christian Indians here to say that they performed a noble part as peacemakers.
T. F. ROYAL, Missionary.
Siletz Agency, Nov. 14, 1877.
Corvallis Gazette, November 23, 1877, page 2



Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Oregon
        Nov. 24th 1877
Sir
    I desire to respectfully report to you that for the first time since my connection with this agency as an employee Apr. 1873 we have had on the reserve something near a war between tribes belonging to this agency. During the past summer some Rogue River Indians working in the Willamette Valley while under the influence of whiskey beat and maltreated the chief of the Klamaths, for which they were arraigned and tried at the agency and being found guilty were required to pay damages for their misconduct last week. The parties again quarreled over it and the Klamaths overpowering the R.R.s endeavored to return to them just the same amount of blows as had been given their chief in the summer. The head chief of the reservation, being a R.R., was with them and endeavored to kill the Klamath chief with a pistol, but the weapon failing to discharge did not succeed and mounting his horse came in haste to the agency and informed me that the K.s were killing two of his people and desired me to bring them all to the agency at once. In company with my clerk I went to the Klamath village, two miles distant, and on the way met the two R.R.s reported by the head chief as being murdered and saw that though they were considerably bruised, they were not dangerously injured. At the Klamath village we found the Indians ready to either fight it out or settle the matter peaceably with the R.R.s, and after a short talk they all consented to come to the agency for a peaceable settlement of the difficulty. On nearing the agency, while passing a house, we were surprised to see the head chief and his two friends, armed with a shot gun and knives, attempt to renew the fight with the Klamaths, now unarmed, declaring they would take the life of the other Klamath chief and others named by them, which they would likely have done had it not been for the timely assistance of employees, who wrested the gun from their hands and overpowering them held them in check. The K.s fled and in a short time we were permitted to hear for the first time in many years a genuine "war whoop." Hastening to meet the Klamaths, before they reached the agency I with the assistance of friendly Christian Indians convinced them that the other party were disarmed and powerless to injure them [and] prevailed on them to return to their village and if possible settle the matter peaceably the day following. Next day they again came to the agency at my request, and notwithstanding they complained much of the treatment they had many times received from the R.R.[s], said they were now willing to bury the hatchet and henceforth live in peace with them. Owing to the treachery exhibited by the head chief, I deemed it my duty to suspend him until Jan. 1st, when as I informed him should his conduct until that time be such as shall win the respect of a majority of the Indians of the agency they might reelect him.
    A full report of the matter has been made to Gen. O. O. Howard, Com. Dept. Columbia, and should further trouble between these parties ensue it may become necessary for me to place some of them in his care. We hope, however, the matter is fully settled.
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Ind. Agt.
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



    Number of Alsea, Nestucca & Salmon River Indians now of Siletz Agency rightfully entitled to rations from the U.S. government during the rainy season of 1877 & 1878. Taken from the census roll of Indians belonging to the agency.
Heads of Families 40
Males not H. of F. 32
Females over 10 63
Children under 10   32
    Total 167
Children ½ rations deduct   16
Whole number full rations 151
Will require for six months the following subsistence, "viz"
27180 lbs. Flour probable cost 5 ¢ per lb. $1359.00
81540 lbs. Beef probable cost 5 ¢ per lb. 4077.00
1087 lbs. Coffee probable cost 25 ¢ per lb. 271.80
2174 .4 lbs. Sugar probable cost 15 ¢ per lb. 326.16
271 .8 lbs. Soap probable cost 10 ¢ per lb. 27.18
135 .9 lbs. Tobacco probable cost 1.00    per lb. 135.90
815 .4 lbs. Beans probable cost 5 ¢ per lb. 40.78
217 .8 lbs. Salt probable cost ¢ per lb.       4.08
6241.90
Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo Benton Co. Or.
        Nov. 26th 1877
Sir
    I desire to again respectfully call your attention to the condition of the Alsea Indians who are here, as well as those who are now at Alsea on leave of absence. We have found it impossible to feed any of them, except such as we can give employment or furnish with lumber for houses and were left with the only alternative of allowing them leave of absence to fish in the waters of Alsea, where they are acquainted with the fishing ground and can more easily obtain their subsistence than here, besides this many of them still own their comparatively comfortable houses at Alsea, into which they can go and find shelter from the storms which for a few weeks past have been very severe.
    While I deeply regret the necessity of this course, it could not be avoided unless by allowing them to suffer with hunger and cold. They should by all means be provided by government with houses, food and clothing this winter, and with some teams, seed and farming implements in the early spring so that they could during the coming year provide their own food for themselves. They do not give up their desire to remain here so soon as they shall be assured that govt. is acting in good faith with them in the matter of allotment of land and assistance to cultivate the same. I respectfully ask that you will at an early day make such provision as is possible for their maintenance and so forth. Unless this can be done it will not be possible to keep them on the reserve, except by force of arms. They could be overpowered and starved to death on the reserve, but such a course would not be wise. I herewith send you a statement of the number of Alseas who have voluntarily given up their claims to the Alsea country and desire to find homes on this reserve with the amount required to furnish them with rations during the winter. Could we obtain one half the amount they are justly entitled to and in the spring provide for them such teams, tools, seed &c. as would enable them to provide for themselves, they would be comfortable and contented. Or could they be returned to their former homes and secured in the possession of them they would provide for themselves. What can I do for them. Estimates have been sent to your office, from which I have received no reply. Can you do anything to help us place the Indians of this reserve in a condition to support themselves and thus soon bring them out of the slough of despond. Would that our government might deal justly with the Indians and thus save millions expended in prosecuting wars against them. As there are no treaty funds for this agency we are dependent entirely upon the general incidental fund, and hence plead earnestly to you. Hoping you will give this matter your early attention, I am
Very respectfully
   Your obedient servant
     William Bagley
       U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Office Klamath Agency
    Linkville, Oregon
        Nov. 28, 1877
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir
            A letter was received at this office from Comr. Smith dated July 30, 1876, marked A containing the substance of a decision made by the Hon. Secretary of the Interior by which David J. Ferris, sawyer (detailed as laborer & mail carrier) was dismissed [from] the service Aug. 15, 1877. I immediately wrote the Department asking whether I would be allowed to fill the vacant position by nomination. Upon receiving an affirmative answer I sent in the name of Thos. S. Mills for confirmation.
    Between the dismissal of David J. Ferris and the nomination of Thomas S. Mills, there was an interval of just one half a quarter, the pay for which at $700 per annum would amount to $87.50/100.
    I would respectfully ask that this fund be placed to my credit at San Francisco. I ask this 1st because they are treaty funds, an equivalent for which has been rendered, 2nd because they are very much needed to pay for labor in the saw mill department.
     3rd because it does not seem to me to be just that the Indian service here should suffer the loss of funds for which neither the Indians, the agent, nor the employer were to blame.
    The nomination of David J. Ferris as sawyer & his detail as laborer & mail carrier were made upon the suggestion & recommendation of the then acting comr. In proof of this, see letter sent this office dated Oct. 24, 1876, marked F. See also a letter from the Department approving his nomination and detail, dated Dec. 15, 1876, marked A & signed by the Comr.
    Now I have no fault to find with these honorable gentlemen in this matter. Their motives were evidently proper and benevolent. I simply state these facts to show that the plan adopted by which these funds were withheld [from] the service here did not originate with this office.
    I again most respectfully ask that these funds be placed to my credit accompanied by such instructions as the Department may think best to give with regard to their proper use.
Very respectfully yours
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.



Office Klamath Agency, Linkville, Oregon
    Nov. 29, 1877
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Comr. Ind. Affairs
        Sir
            Your office letter of the 16th instant, calling my attention to instructions given me by the Department, May 10th 1877, and requiring me to immediately report the date upon which I entered the service, and also asking me to explain the cause of non-compliance with directions given, &c. came to hand today.
    In reply, I have to say that in accordance with instructions, I took charge of the agency on May 12th, 1877, my time commencing with the 12th. In compliance with the instructions to explain the cause of my not complying with the direction heretofore given, I have to state that both Mr. Dyar, the retiring agent, and myself were of the opinion that the fractional quarterly papers, the receipts given by me to him & his report &c. were all that was necessary.
    By reference to my monthly report for May, 1877, you will find the following: "On the 12th day of May, L. S. Dyar, my predecessor, turned over to me all the property of the Klamath Agency, putting me in full possession of all the property carried upon his quarterly returns, I giving my receipt, &c."
    Your office letter of June 15, 1877 (R) says, "Your own pay will be sent when you shall have reported the date upon which you relieved your predecessor." On the receipt of this, I reported by letter the date upon which I entered the service, though I cannot now find the copy of that letter. L. M. Nickerson, one of my employees, assisted me in making this report & alleges that he has a distinct recollection that such a letter was written & sent by mail.
    On the 13th of Aug., 1877, your office sent $206 to pay agent's salary from May 12th 1877 to June 30th 1877. 
    I also beg to refer you to my descriptive statement of agent & employees at Klamath Agency, submitted July 23, 1877. Also that of Oct. 1st 1877, in which I give the date upon which I entered upon my duties as agent. I was under the impression that I had given the required notice. It has been & is still my desire to obey instructions promptly & strictly.
I am very respectfully yours
    J. H. Roark
        U.S. Ind. Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton Co., Oregon
        Dec. 8th 1877
Sir
    I have the honor to acknowledge by last mail the receipt of your circular to Indian agents of Nov. 19th giving instructions to me to notify traders that "in future when making purchases from or sales to Indians, money only must be used" and that "the use of tokens, tickets or store orders will not be permitted."
    Also, circular of instructions relative to purchase of beef cattle, being a "supplement to Sec. 29 Instructions to Superintendents & Agents of July 1st 1877."
    Also, instructions relative to receipts for articles delivered at an agency, being a "Supplement to Sec. 38--Instructions to Superintendents and Agents of July 1st 1877 with formulas accompanying."
    In reference to the first I respectfully ask some instructions. It has been our custom at this Agency when authorized to employ Indians to labor, and there were no funds or supplies in hand if they were in need of subsistence, clothing or other necessary supplies, to give them orders on the sutler for such amounts as they were really in need of and when funds are placed in depository to our credit for current quarter (which has generally been the last week and in some instances the last day of the qr.) we have drawn checks on bank for amount due such Indians, giving sutler the amount due him for supplies thus furnished the Indians.
    Do these instructions prohibit the giving of such orders? If so, I do not see how we are to provide subsistence for such Indian laborers. We know from experience that it is much better to have money in bank than at the Agency, and when the wind blows down our fences, or one of our old decayed department buildings needs props, it is necessary for a short time to employ some Indians to assist in repairing the one or propping [up] the other. They must have something to eat, no food on hand, or money in bank or in hands applicable to purchase of such supplies as they need. How can we do otherwise than give them an order on the sutler for such articles, with the understanding that out of the amount due these laborers, he is to receive his pay? Could money for current expenses for each qr. be placed to our credit at the beginning of each qr. instead of at the close? By bringing the necessary amount of change to the Agency, we might fully comply with what seem to be your instructions in relation to store orders without seriously retarding the necessary work, though it would be very annoying and materially increase the office work. If money cannot be so placed (at the beginning of the qr.) it will be a great hardship to the Indians to be required to do without such supplies as they actually need until the close of each quarter. I respectfully ask that if I have rightly understood your instructions, that so far as they relate to store orders, in connection with this Agency, they may be rescinded and that until such time as money for current expenses are placed to our credit in depository, we be allowed to give such orders to Indians.
    As until funds for present qr. arrive we shall be considerably embarrassed in our work here in consequence of these instructions, I further respectfully ask that on receipt and consideration of this, you will telegraph permission to give store orders as we have done before.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Honorable E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affs.
        Washington
            D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Grand Ronde Agency, Oregon
    Dec, 12, 1877
Sir,
    I am in receipt of your favor of the 13th ult. marked "R," also the accompanying statement of funds for the 3rd qr. 1877. Replying to that portion of your letter which says, "Said contract providing that payment thereunder be made here &c." I will say the Department seems to be in error as to the date of my receiving a copy of said contract. The first intimation I had of the existence of such a contract was about the 22nd of September last, when I received a copy of itm and as soon as practicable, to wit Oct. 1, 1877, I turned the school over to the "sisters" in charge and discontinued it on account of the government.
    The funds asked for in my requisition was to pay the expenses up to that date & prior to the date it was conducted under the contract. I would respectfully ask that the funds may be forwarded at an early day.
    Also, I would ask that the funds for this agency for the present quarter may be forwarded at once, as I am much in need of the funds, and especially of the amount of $500 repair fund which I was authorized by letter from the Hon. Commissioner, dated August 29, 1877, and marked "F" to expend in repairing the agent's dwelling. I have purchased material and employed mechanics and have the building referred to in said letter from the Hon. Commissioner marked F almost ready for occupancy, and I am extremely anxious to pay off the indebtedness incurred in the prosecution of this work, as I have made promises to do so, expecting to be able to meet such mitigations.
Very respectfully
    Your obt. servant
        P. B. Sinnott
            U.S. Indian Agent
Hon. E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner
        Indian Affairs
            Washington
                D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 626 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.


Office Siletz Indian Agency
    Toledo, Benton County, Oregon
        Dec. 26th 1877
Sir,
    In compliance with requirements contained in your letter of 4th instant marked A., "in answer to mine of 9th ultimo (asking an increase in the force of regular employees of the Agency, &c.), I have the honor to herewith enclose an estimate of the amount required for pay of an engineer and carpenter for balance of fiscal year ending June 30th 1878 and respectfully submit the following in relation to the necessity of this, proposed, expenditure.
    The Alsea, Nestucca & Salmon River Indians have given up their former homes to the whites and are now on this reserve, or if absent they are so by leave of their agent. Many of them before coming here had comparatively comfortable houses, some of them had cleared up land for gardens, and this after having done the work with their own hands, they have abandoned and come on this Reserve with very little expense to government, and now they ask to be provided with lumber, nails, &c. and a carpenter to assist and instruct them in building. They also ask some subsistence, clothing, &c. for the first year they are here, and should by all means be provided with ox teams, seeds, and tools and farming implements to enable them by their own labor to provide for themselves. They have voluntarily, as desired by authorized agents of government, given up all claim to several hundred thousand acres embraced in the former Alsea Reserve and that portion of this (as formerly bounded) lying north of the Salmon River, and it is not unreasonable in them to expect govt. to assist them and to complain if such assistance is not forthcoming.
    They are now in a helpless and pitiable condition and should by all means be put to work.
    Relative to the manufacture of lumber for Indians or for Department use, I have to say that the Dept. steam sawmill is in good order, ready for service. There is an abundance of choice timber within one mile of the mill. One dollar per M. will pay for cutting the logs, which can be paid for in lumber. Two dollars per M. will pay for hauling to the mill, which should be done by contract, as the Indians cannot profitably manage a heavy logging team in the woods or on mountainsides. We have no Dept. cattle suitable for working in the timber, hence could not possibly deliver the logs without purchasing teams and a logging outfit. Three dollars per M. will pay for manufacturing the lumber and delivering the same on the yard, making a total of six dollars per M. Two regular employees are required to work in the mill, viz: sawyer and engineer, one thousand dollars per annum each will secure the service of competent persons to fill these positions. Again, referring to the matter of hauling the logs, I will say that while I would be glad to be permitted to purchase a logging outfit and employ a teamster to instruct the Indians in this work, but cannot see how we can afford (with the small amount we are likely to receive) to incur this expense now. I am confident that this work can be done by contract for one half the cost it would if done by the labor of inexperienced Indians. I therefore respectfully ask that we be permitted to employ in the regular service of this agency from January 1st 1878 to June 30th 1878 inc. the following, viz:
One engineer 6 mos. @ $1,000 per annum--$500.00
One carpenter 6 mos. @ $1,000 per annum--$500.00
Total $1000.00
    And further respectfully ask that the allowance for regular employees be increased to that extent.
Very respectfully
    Your obedient servant
        William Bagley
            U.S. Indian Agent
Honorable E. A. Hayt
    Commissioner of Indian Affairs
        Washington, D.C.
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.


Siletz Agency, Oregon Dec. 28, 1877
    Today came to me three of the leading men of Nestucca Indians from Salmon River on Siletz Reservation named Sam, Jack & Baxter, and made the following statements and requests, namely
1st by Sam:
    My chief is dead. He died with a sad heart. He had not received from government such things as had been promised him. Now I have a sick heart. I want to know how much I am going to be paid for my former home, which I have given up to the whites. I do not know where my agent is now. Next summer I will try to learn where is my agent. I say this because my mind is unsettled and I am discontented. Our people are all sad because we do not know where our agency is. Next summer if the President will inform us where we are to go to see our agent, we will be glad. This is all I have to say on this subject now but will talk a little about what Ben Simpson promised us before we came to Salmon River.
    He came to our village at Nestucca and talked good to us, promising us many things if we would leave our country and go to Salmon River. We took his word and went. Have been there now a long time and do not find the things he promised.
    2nd by Jack. I fully agree in all Sam has said and have nothing further to say.
    3 by Baxter. I also have nothing to say, as Sam has said what I think.
    In reply to this, I said to them:
    You are now and have been since you came to this Reservation subject to the rules and regulations of this Agency. There was issued to your people during the first winter blankets, calico, jeans and other supplies. Also wheat, coarse flour and other articles of subsistence. Last spring a team was sent from this Agency to plow your gardens and seeds were issued to your people to plant. Now of such articles as there are here for you, you get a portion. Nothing but a law of Congress or an order from the President of the U.S. can separate you from this Agency while you remain at Salmon River. Should such a law or order be made or issued, I will be informed of the fact and will at once inform you. Government expects you to do the best you can on the land you occupy and if you want help from govt., the best way to secure it is by improving your farms.
William Bagley
    U.S. Indian Agent
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 625 Oregon Superintendency, 1878.



Employees at Klamath Agency in 4th Quarter 1877
        David Hill, Interpreter $300 per annum $  75.00
Charles Preston, Interpreter   300 per annum 75.00
Eveline H. Roark, Teacher   900 per annum 225.00
George S. Nickerson, Assistant Teacher   700 per annum 175.00
James S. Dennison, Physician 1100 per annum 275.00
James H. Clark, Blacksmith 1000 per annum 250.00
Robert M. McTeer, Miller   900 per annum 225.00
Francis M. Rice, Wagon Maker 1000 per annum 250.00
Lewis Nickerson, Superintendent Farming 1000 per annum 250.00
Hylena A. Nickerson, Matron   500 per annum 125.00
George W. Roark, Farmer   900 per annum 225.00
Ole C. Gunnison, Carpenter 1000 per annum 250.00
Thomas S. Mills, Sawyer   700 per annum     175.00
$2575.00
    150.00
2425.00
NARA Series M234 Letters Received by the Office of Indian Affairs 1824-81, Reel 624 Oregon Superintendency, 1877.




Last revised June 20, 2021