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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford Pioneers: The Stewarts and Their Orchards
I'm not positive all these guys were related.

J. H. Stewart April 12, 1856 Quincy Whig
April 12, 1856 Quincy Whig

J. H. Stewart April 26, 1858 Quincy Daily Herald
April 26, 1858 Quincy Daily Herald

J. H. Stewart December 1, 1860 Quincy Whig
December 1, 1860 Quincy Whig-Republican

Vote Early and Straight!
DEMOCRATS, BRING OUT YOUR NEIGHBORS.
    Maurice Kelly, A. H. Trimble, Geo. J. Richardson and Joseph Stewart are all unexceptionable [sic] gentlemen who will legislate for the best interests of Quincy and Adams County. They are entitled to the support of every citizen who has the interests of Quincy and Adams County at heart. They should have the vote of every Democrat in the county.
The Quincy Daily Herald, Quincy, Illinois, November 8, 1870, page 2


    We are under obligations to Joseph Stewart, representative from this county in the legislature, for a number of state documents.
The Quincy Daily Herald,
Quincy, Illinois, February 10, 1871, page 2

J. H. Stewart home 1872 Atlas of Adams County
J. H. Stewart home 1872, Atlas of Adams County


    Hon. J. H. Stewart.--"Elmwood," the country seat of Mr. Stewart, is as the reader can easily perceive from an inspection of the view, one of the finest places in the suburbs of Quincy. The house occupies a commanding position, which allows a fine view of the city. The grounds are ornamented with varieties of evergreens, forest trees and shrubbery. The house is a two-story structure, ornamented with piazzas &c, which give to it a tasty appearance. The place is in cultivation principally for fruit, and there is an abundance of this at Elmwood. Mr. Stewart has taken a deep interest in horticultural matters, and the result of his investigations in the fruit line are indicated in his success as a fruit grower.
Atlas of Adams County, 1872, page 86

J. H. Stewart 1879 History of Adams County p.434
1879 The History of Adams County. Thanks to Jeannette Mullane for this and other images.


    STEWART HON. JOSEPH HOWARD, farmer and fruit grower; Sec. 25; P.O. Quincy; was born in Washington County, Me., Nov. 22, 1833; came to this county in 1836; was married in Payson to Miss Elizabeth Hyman, Nov. 29, 1854. She was born in crossing the Atlantic, as her parents were emigrating from Germany to this country. Mr. Stewart is one of a family of ten sons and four daughters, all of whom are now living, with the exception of one daughter, who, at her decease, left a family of five children. Hers has been the only death, with the exception of Mr. Stewart's father, that has occurred in the family. On Thanksgiving day of 1877 the family had a reunion, at which five generations of the family were represented. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have five children: Anna B., born Sept. 23, 1856; Clara M., May 17, 1860; Cora E., Nov. 24, 1867; William H., Dec. 13, 1869; Junie C., June 17, 1876. Mr. Stewart has about 700 acres of land, all of which is very valuable. He has been a member of the Legislature of this State.
The History of Adams County, Illinois, 1879, page 732


    Joseph Stewart, one of the commissioners of the Indian Grave District Levee, reports that the levee is safe. It is believed that no break will occur.
"Items in Brief," The Quincy Daily Herald, Quincy, Illinois, April 30, 1881, page 3


LAWN PARTY AND SOCIABLE.
    A lawn party and sociable will be given at the residence of Mr. Joseph Stewart, on North Twelfth Street, next Tuesday, by the Ladies' Aid Society of the Vermont Street Baptist Church. It will be an excellent opportunity for all citizens to go out to the suburban residence, obtain an elegant supper for 25 cents, and spend a pleasant evening. Conveyances will leave the church at 4 and 6 o'clock P.M. Those who cannot go in time for the supper can take the trip in the cool of the evening and be provided with ice cream and other refreshments. The arrangements are such that all who go will have a jolly time.
The Quincy Daily Herald, Quincy, Illinois, July 10, 1881, page 4


    Enjoy a pleasant ride tomorrow evening by driving out to the residence of Mr. Joseph Stewart, on North Twelfth Street, and take supper with the ladies of the Vermont Street Baptist Church..
"Brevities," The Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, July 11, 1881, page 2


    Owing to the storm yesterday afternoon the lawn party at Mr. Joseph Stewart's was abandoned.

"Items," The Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, July 13, 1881, page 2


THE HOTTEST DAY.
    Yesterday was the hottest day known in this city for many years. At the residence of Hon. Joseph Stewart in Ellington, the mercury went up to 108. Mr. Stewart states that he has kept a record of his thermometer, which has never been changed for fourteen years, and that yesterday was the first time it went to 108. The day in the city was undoubtedly the hottest for many years.
The Quincy Daily Herald, Quincy, Illinois, August 12, 1881, page 4


    Mr. Joseph Stewart reports that frost entered the ground to the depth of sixteen inches.
"Brevities," The Quincy Whig, Quincy, Illinois, February 7, 1884, page 8


    Transfers of real estate in Adams County for the week ending July 8:
Joseph H. Stewart to Ben Heckle, part northwest section 15, Ursa township . . . 2000
"Real Estate Transfers," The Quincy Whig, Quincy, Illinois, July 10, 1884, page 8



    Hon. J. H. Stewart, a prominent fruit grower of Adams County, Illinois, has been in the valley for several days, and may locate, as the country seems to suit him. He is a nephew of Alex Stewart of Medford precinct.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    Mr. Joseph Stewart, of this city, and Mr. H. Tandy, of Newtown, expect to leave for the Rogue River Valley, Oregon, in a few days. They will probably be absent over a month.
"City News," The Quincy Daily Journal, Quincy, Illinois, February 7, 1885, page 4


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Adams County, Ills., who paid this valley a visit last summer, has returned with the intention of remaining. He was one of the prominent nurserymen of that portion of the Sucker State. He will probably engage in the same business here.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1885, page 3


    J. H. Stewart said that while he was a stranger to our soil and climate, he was not a stranger to a horticultural society, for he had belonged to one for years and knew they were of great benefit to the fruit interest. He desired to impress upon the minds of the gentlemen present that too much care could not be taken in selecting varieties of fruit before planting orchards. While there were many varieties of fruit that possessed merit, there were but few kinds that would prove profitable to ship for the general market.
Minutes, February 28, 1885, Fruit Growers Association of Southern Oregon Record Book, 1885-1889, page 20


 
    Hon. J. H. Stewart will start for his home near Quincy, Ill., next Sunday, for the purpose of closing his business there and removing to this country. His family will accompany him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 3


    Henry C. Howard of Eden precinct has sold his fine farm to Hon. J. H. Stewart, now of Adams County, Ill., for the sum of $5,400. Mr. S. is a fruitgrower of much experience and a gentleman of enterprise and intelligence, and we welcome him in our midst.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Stewart, recently from Illinois, has bought the Ball place of about 200 acres near Phoenix, and intends to put nearly the whole of it out in pears. He is an experienced fruit grower, and after looking over the Pacific coast has come to this valley as the best place for his business. In a few years he will be able to ship pears by the carload from his own orchards to the East.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1885, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who purchased H. C. Howard's place in Eden precinct, started for his home in Illinois Sunday evening. He will return with his family as soon as he disposes of his large interests there. Mr. S. will plant several thousand apple and pear trees and several acres of strawberries as soon as he takes possession of his new farm.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


    Mr. J. H. Stewart, whom we mentioned last week as intending to set out an extensive pear orchard on the farm recently purchased by him between Phoenix and Medford, has discovered a large deposit of chalk or gypsum on the farm which he thinks will be a profitable item of export. He has gone back to his old home in Illinois to sell out his property and settle up his business there preparatory to coming out there to live, and expects to return here in time to set out a large number of fruit trees next fall.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 27, 1885, page 3


We got a package of Strawberry roots from Hon Joseph Stewart from Muncie, Illinois they have come in good order. Emmett is going to set them out.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, April 10, 1885


Emmett has set out the Strawberry plants, recd from Mr J Stewart

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, April 13, 1885


    Strawberries, the finest ever grown in this locality, were sold at the groceries yesterday at 10 cents per quart. Mr. Joseph Stewart will have a very large crop of berries this season, and they will compare favorably with the best raised in the South or West. The Stewart berries are in demand in all of the western and northwestern cities.

The Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, June 6, 1885, page 3


Mr. Solomon Stahl has purchased the elegant home of Mr. Joseph Stewart, on North Twelfth Street. This is one of the finest country seats in the entire West and Mr. Stahl is certainly fortunate in securing so magnificent a home. It comprises a large, commodious residence, a magnificent lawn of four acres, with an abundance of the finest shade trees and shrubbery and many acres of strawberries, raspberries and other fruit.
The Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, August 9, 1885, page 10


    Mr. Joseph Stewart, who recently sold his home in Ellington to Mr. S. Stahl, left with his family last evening for his future home in Oregon.

The Quincy Daily Journal,
Quincy, Illinois, September 9, 1885, page 4


    Among the arrivals on Monday was J. H. Stewart and family, of Illinois. Mr. Stewart, who has been for many years a well-known horticulturist and fruit dealer in the Chicago markets, came out here last spring, made a trip to Medford and bought a large fruit farm. Today he is here with his family, a carload of implements, etc., and has en route 8000 peach trees of a choice variety which he will set out this fall. Mr. Stewart and family went south yesterday.
"Immigration Board Items," Oregonian, Portland, September 16, 1885, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart and family arrived from Quincy, Illinois, this week. As will be remembered, Mr. S. purchased the farm of Henry C. Howard, near Phoenix, a few months ago.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1885, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, of Illinois, who was in this valley last year and bought a farm at the west side of the valley, north of Phoenix, arrived this week with his family from Illinois, and is preparing to go into fruit culture on a large scale. He brought with him a carload of implements, etc., and has en route 8000 peach trees of choice varieties, which he will set out this fall. Mr. Stewart has been a prominent fruit dealer in the Chicago markets, and his judgment as to the outlook for the fruit industry in this valley is worth something.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1885, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart and family have taken possession of the farm purchased of H. C. Howard prior to his [Stewart's] return to Quincy, Illinois.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1885, page 3


    Mr. Stewart is selling a large number of fruit trees on his place west of the old stage road north of Phoenix.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 12, 1886, page 3


    From invitations received by Mr. W. S. Flack it is learned that Miss Annie B. Stewart, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Stewart, is to be married on Easter Sunday to Mr. Arthur J. Weeks, one of the leading architects of Portland, Oregon, and the owner of [a] large fruit farm. Miss Stewart has a large circle of friends and acquaintances in Quincy who will extend to her their heartiest congratulations. A lady of the highest attainments, she will grace any home and will doubtless receive a cordial welcome in Portland.
"Brevities," The Quincy Whig, Quincy, Illinois, April 8, 1886, page 8


MARRIED
WEEKS-STEWART.--At the residence of the bride's father in Medford precinct, Apr. 25, 1886, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Mr. Arthur J. Weeks and Miss Annie Belle Stewart.
Ashland Tidings, April 30, 1886, page 3


MARRIED.
WEEKS-STEWART--At the residence of the bride's father, April 25th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Arthur J. Weeks and Miss Annie Belle Stewart.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 1, 1886, page 3



Kate & I rode down the valley to visit at Mr Joseph H Stewarts Had a good visit he has over a hundred acres set out to fruit trees all growing fine. They are nice people from Quincy, Illinois.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, July 28, 1886


I went to Jacksonville Wm Beeson, Joseph Stewart, and Arthur Weeks went with me I negotiated a loan from Mr Stewart for two years, for a 1000.00 in a Mortgage on the home farm.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, July 29, 1886


Mr Stewart and His son in law Mr Weeks called to day I rode to Saw Mill with them. I sold them 16000 feet of lumber for a check on Beekman at Jacksonville for $144.00. They stopped for dinner.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, August 11, 1886


Emmett & I went to Saw Mill got a load of Lumber and Emmett took it to Ashland planing Mill to have it dressed. Mr Stewart Came to Mill and I sold him several thousand feet more lumber. Been pleasant day. Kate & Winnie Canning blackberrys Grand Pa went back to Ranch this Morning.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, August 12, 1886


A Fine Fruit Farm.
    People who want to know what can be done in the way of making a fruit farm in this valley should visit the place of Mr. J. H. Stewart, about two miles north of Phoenix. Mr. Stewart is an experienced fruit grower, having spent some thirty years in the business in its various branches in Illinois. He came out with his family to this valley last October to take possession of this farm of 180 acres, which he had bought the year before. He knew just what he wanted to do, and just how to do it. Messrs. S. B. Galey and F. H. Carter, of this place, paid Mr. Stewart a visit one day this week, and report that he now has growing on his place a young orchard composed of 4000 pear trees, mostly Bartletts, 3000 peach and 3500 apple trees, and has raised from the seed and budded several thousand more young peach trees. Besides this he has what he calls his "home" orchard, in which are some 300 young trees of 30 or 40 different varieties. Mr. Stewart has entirely transformed the appearance of the place, and is now building a fine new farmhouse on it.
Ashland Tidings, August 13, 1886, page 3


    Some of the largest and finest watermelons brought to Ashland this season were from the farm of J. H. Stewart (the old Ball place), between Medford and Phoenix. It was thought before Mr. Stewart bought this place that vegetables couldn't be grown there to advantage, but Mr. S. tried his system of farming on it and has thoroughly surprised some of his neighbors. The Tidings can testify to the quality of the melons, having been favored with a thirty-pound sample by Clayton & Gore, who are handling them here.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 17, 1886, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, one of the most progressive farmers in the State, has lately completed a handsome and well-arranged residence on his place in Eden precinct. It is second to no farmhouse in the county. A. J. Weeks was the architect.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1886, page 3


    A gentleman of large ideas removed to this vicinity (Medford) two years ago and bought a farm which was supposed by many to be exhausted. He dropped his plow down a few inches below the customary level (about 3 inches), then followed with a subsoil plow. He then pulverized thoroughly this bed of loose earth, and the results have been astonishing. The former owner bought his garden produce, melon and vegetables. The new man raised $1,000 worth of melons and all kinds of garden and field crops in great profusion and of the best quality. His corn is not behind that of the best Illinois product in quality, nor far behind it in yield. He has demonstrated that we can produce any kind of crops raised in the Ohio Valley and many others in addition. He advocates drainage rather than irrigation. He planted pear seeds last spring, budded them in June and now has budded trees large enough to transplant to the orchard. All this in less than eight months! This is, except France, the only spot on earth where such a thing can be done, and American pear stocks are a thing of history. Our nurserymen are no longer compelled to import pear stocks from sunny France, but can have them produced in the "Italy of America.'' Brains and energy are the two great needs of Southern Oregon. All else Nature provides.
Scott Morris, "Our Oregon Letter,"
The Plain Dealer, North Vernon, Indiana, December 8, 1886, page 2


    FRUIT CULTURE "OUT SOUTH."--Southern Oregon is bound to become the great fruit-producing section of the state. Within the past two years over a million peach trees have been set out in Jackson County alone. Many of them will produce some fruit this year. Mr. Stewart, one of the members of the Iowa press excursion, which visited this state two years ago, purchased a place out there and has set out 3500 peach trees, and Mr. Whitman, another of the same party, has set out an extensive orchard of Bartlett pears. The prospect of the near completion of the connection by rail with California has made the people of the southern portion of the state jubilant and infused new life into that section.
"Local and General," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 22, 1887, page 5


I went to Mr Joseph Stewarts to get a bus of seed corn & some beans. Jessie & Fannie went with me. We had a pleasant visit, but got home in evening. Mr Stewart is busy planting nursery and grafting trees. He is going to have about 20 acres of Mellons.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, March 26, 1887


I rode down to Stewarts had a visit all day. His garden and Orchard look fine fruit trees are growing nice He has 18 acres of Mellons and 5 acres of Sweet potatoes.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, July 3, 1887


I went up to Saw Mill and around to Stewarts paid him $100.00 interest on the note we owe him

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, July 6, 1887


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct anticipates a large crop of fine sweet potatoes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 3


Kate & Mrs Jacques and I went to Jacksonville we Called at Mr Stewart and he went with us We mortgaged our place to Mrs Jaques for $1500.00 due in five years, and we paid Mr Stewart His $1000.00. We took dinner at the Union Hotel and got home at dark, left Mrs Jaques at Talent.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, July 30, 1887


    Hons. J. D. Whitman, J. H. Stewart and other enterprising citizens of this valley propose underdraining their land and have already made a contract with Messrs. Close, experienced tile makers who recently arrived from Canada, for a large amount of their ware.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


One of Our Promising Farms.
    One of the very best cultivated and most productive farms in southern Oregon is that of Hon. J. H. Stewart, in Eden precinct. Watermelons, berries, fruit and vegetables of all kinds grow in reckless profusion there evincing the skill and industry of the proprietor. Mr. S., having had charge of the place less than two years, has not yet had an opportunity to fully demonstrate the productiveness of his farm nor his ability as a farmer. It will take a few years yet to put his place at its best. Then can be seen if the soil of this section cannot compare favorably with that of any other.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has raised watermelons this season weighing 50 lbs.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who owns part of the Justus tract of land in this precinct, sold at administrator's sale, is having several buildings put up on it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 2


    A Mr. Stewart, who came from Indiana, has located some distance south of Medford, which is the railway station for Jacksonville, about five miles distant. He is planting a large pear orchard in the rolling land or foothills, because that valley is so sure in producing good crops of very excellent pears. He is well up in pear culture and considers that region the best he ever knew for that purpose. Apples and cherries do well there, and the good people thereabouts have a faith in themselves and their country that is pleasant to behold, but they probably err in supposing that no other part of Oregon can hold a candle to them or compete with them in these products.
"Southern Oregon,"
Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1887, page 1


    Rev. Wm. Stewart of Quincy, Ills., an able preacher, will occupy the pulpit of the Baptist Church in Medford next Sunday; and on the third Sunday in January.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 3


    The farmers of Jackson County can grow garden stuffs and melons in the greatest excellence and profusion. Their melons have been literally corded up in our grocery stores all the summer and fall, and they can meet any demand. Mr. Stewart, who was mentioned the other day as planting out many pears, has already 150 acres of orchard, and will this season plant out seventy acres more, intends next spring to plant about a quarter section of land in tomatoes, melons, sweet potatoes, etc., having made a success of such crops the past season. The soil is quick, the summers warm, and the valley possesses every facility for producing early fruits and vegetables in the greatest excellence as well as profusion.
"Agriculture," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 5, 1888, page 2



    Rev. Wm. Stewart will preach in the Baptist Church next Sunday morning and evening.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 2


MARRIED.
HILL-STEWART--AT the residence of the bride's parents in Eden precinct, Jan. 17th, by Rev. Wm. Stewart, D. R. Hill and Miss Cora E. Stewart.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1888, page 3


    Rev. Wm. Stewart of Quincy, Ills., brother of Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has been paying this valley quite a visit, started on his return home a few days since. We hope he has become sufficiently attached to this valley to permanently locate here in the near future.
    Mr. and Mrs. Dillon Hill, who were united in matrimony on the 17th inst., have already commenced housekeeping at the new residence recently built on Hon. J. H. Stewart's farm near this place. They begin married life under auspicious circumstances, and they have the congratulations and best wishes of a host of friends.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    Hon J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct made us a call last Tuesday. He is now engaged in planting 6000 choice fruit trees. Mr. S. is one of the most enterprising and intelligent of our citizens. We are always glad to see him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 10, 1888, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct, who also owns a piece of land near Medford, has just finished planting 65 acres of it in choice fruit trees. He leads all other horticulturists in southern Oregon, having nearly 200 acres in trees, all of which will be bearing by 1892. It can truly be said that Mr. Stewart is an energetic and progressive farmer and fruit raiser.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 24, 1888, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, of Medford, shipped 1300 lbs. of sweet potatoes recently from his farm between Medford and Phoenix. Mr. Stewart raised tons of sweet potatoes last season, and has demonstrated since coming to this valley that vegetables of all kinds, melons, corn, etc. will grow well on the land in this valley without irrigation, if only thorough cultivation be employed.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 9, 1888, page 3


    If we have the straight of it, Robert A. Miller of Jacksonville has been made president of the fruit growers association of Southern Oregon. This no doubt means that the organization will take on new life and vigor and become something more than a sort of haphazard advertising medium for tree peddlers. With such actual and practical, and experienced, growers of fruit and grapes as Stewart, Whitman, Miller, Galey and others, this association should be made one of the recognized interests of the state. It ought to be able to make rules and regulations for all growers in Southern Oregon, and so hedge this great interest, that dishonest men in the business or deal with it cannot get it at a disadvantage.
Southern Oregon Transcript, Medford, March 13, 1888, page 3



    Rev. Wm. Stewart, who spent last winter here, is now preaching in the First Baptist Church of Quincy, Ill.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


    W. S. Gore brought up from J. H. Stewart's place last Saturday a pie plant stem and leaf which is the largest displayed here up to date, measuring 30x31 inches across when spread out flat. Mr. Stewart is preparing to raise a large amount of truck this year, as usual. He has in ten acres of sweet potatoes and a large area of corn, tomatoes, watermelons, etc.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 11, 1888, page 3



    Messrs. Stewart and Hon. J. D. Whitman have the finest fruit ranches in the county. Frequent visits by strangers are made to these beautiful places. The crops upon both are simply immense and are convincing evidence of what brains and energy will do in this glorious climate.
"Medford Notes," Oregonian, Portland, July 24, 1888, page 6


    Capt. A. J. Stewart, a brother of Hon. J. H. and F. M. Stewart, arrived from the East a short time since and will locate. He has purchased some land of S. B. Edsall and J. A. Anderson.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 29, 1888, page 3


Progressive Agriculture.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart will, we learn, soon begin work underdraining the lower portion of his fine young orchard near Phoenix, having already placed his order for ten thousand feet of tiling with Henry Close & Son of Ashland. There can be no question but what judicious underdrainage would benefit large areas of land in this county, enabling farmers to start the plow much earlier in the spring, and reclaiming much land that is ruined for orchard purposes by standing water. But for his inability to obtain tiling at reasonable figures Mr. Stewart would have underdrained his orchard last fall, and would doubtless have saved many fine trees which were ruined by the standing water during the long continued wet weather of last season. He will lay six-inch tiling, principally, although much of a smaller size will be used. It is thought by those who have had experience with tiling that thorough underdrainage would enhance the value of adobe soil fully one hundred percent, as it then could be worked at will instead of at the caprices of the weather, as is now the case, besides being revivified and enlivened by being relieved of its surplus moisture in time to be heated into growing condition by the earlier spring sunshine.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 27, 1888, page 3


I went down to Stewarts to view a new County Road with Mr Olwell of Pheonix and Mr Whitman of Medford as viewers, and J S Howard Surveyor the road runs from the Hamlin road to the Mountain road near Colmans, we pronounced favorable.

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, October 15, 1888


Drain Tiling.
    Close & Sons have shipped a carload of drain tiling to H. B. Miller of Grants Pass this week from their yard near town, and J. H. Stewart and others of this county have been using a considerable quantity this winter in draining fruit lands. Close & Sons will manufacture a large amount during the coming season, and will find a heavy demand, both in this neighborhood and other parts of the valley.
Ashland Tidings, January 11, 1889, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has sold 22 acres of his farm in Eden precinct to S. H. Sykes, lately from the East, for $3000. It is planted in fruit trees.
    We learn that Hon. J. H. Stewart successfully experimented in the line of producing sun-dried raisins last season from Muscat of Alexandria grapes, grown on his place near Phoenix. The raisins were of good quality and well cured.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, of Eden precinct, succeeded in producing excellent sun-dried raisins last season, it is said, from Muscat grapes grown on his place. If it be possible to produce good raisins in this valley, another great field in the horticultural line will open for our home industry.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 29, 1889, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has been appointed a member of the southern district agricultural society, established by the last legislature. A better appointment could not have been made.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 4, 1889, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has 15,500 choice fruit trees growing nicely on his farm, and his son-in-law, A. J. Weeks, also has a young orchard containing about the same number of trees.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 3


Besieged with Credentials.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, the county agricultural association's representative on the district agricultural board, is having honors thrust upon him. Before the organization of a local society the county court appointed him to represent this county on the board. At the primary organization of the Jackson County Agricultural Society Mr. Stewart was appointed as its representative on the district board, and, upon its incorporation under the name of the Jackson County Agricultural Association, Mr. Stewart was declared to be its accredited representative on the board; and now we learn that he will carry credentials from still a third local agricultural society organized at Medford a few days since. In common with the rest of us, who have the good of the county at heart, Mr. Stewart deplores the differences, but will do all in his power to secure the location of the district fair in the county, if possible to do so. It is to be hoped that he and Mr. McDonough will be successful in securing the fair; but they would have had a much easier task if there had been anything like cooperation among the residents of our enterprising railroad towns in this matter. The county at large will not endorse any effort on the part of anyone to play the marplot, when it comes to depriving this valley of so desirable a boon as the district fair.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has resigned his position as a member of the state agricultural board for southern Oregon, and Gov. Pennoyer will be called upon to fill the vacancy.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1889, page 3


    J. H. Stewart has had 4000 feet more of tiling hauled to his fruit farm from Close Bros.' brick yard near Ashland.
    J. H. Stewart, of Eden precinct, will tile drain a portion of his orchard this fall having had very satisfactory results from his first venture in that line.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1889, page 3


I hauled two loads 64 boxes, and then I picked apples and so forth Mr Shade, picking Apples Emmett took load potatoes and onions to Mr Stewarts 20.00

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, October 1, 1889


Saturday I hauled two loads of wood to Henry Low, and then John hauled two loads wood to wood House J H Stewart came up to get 1000 scions of the Red Pryor Apple to send to His brother in law at Albany Nursery ---- [illegible] He thinks Pryors Red a good Shipping apple. He seems to think this snow storm is a good thing for Rouge Pair so do I. it will make the water Supply and no danger of a drowth next Summer but still a great deal of stock will die but it may learn people not to have more stock than they have feed. The sun has shone bright all day but not melted the snow on top but thawing from the ground. It is freezing to night and stars shining bright

Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon, January 18, 1890


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, the orchardist, has completed the laying of two miles of tiling, and is now free from the annoying excess of moisture which prevented early plowing in his fields in former years.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1890, page 2



   
Of J. H. Stewart it may be truly said that he has devoted his life and his intellect to furthering the interests of horticulture in this section of the Northwest. We very much doubt if there is another man north of the Santa Clara Valley who has done more than he to show the almost illimitable capacity of our soil and climate for the production of the fruits of the temperate and semitropical regions--those magnificent productions which bid fair to bring a stream of dollars into the pockets of our orchardists for all time to come. Before coming to the coast Mr. Stewart served several terms in the Illinois legislature at a time when most exciting events were transpiring, and the knowledge of the fact that he is skilled in debate and parliamentary tactics doubtless governed by the convention in fixing upon him by an almost unanimous vote as one of our candidates, for he was not seeking the nomination at their hands. His attention has been engrossed so closely in developing one of the model orchards and farms of the valley that he has heretofore found no time to take any active part in politics. Like his colleagues, he has been a lifelong Democrat and has a clean record as a business man and gentleman.

"Our County Ticket," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 9, 1890, page 2



    J. H. Stewart is our leading orchardist, and a thoroughly qualified man for the office of legislator. Vote for him next Monday.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1890, page 3


    Much interest was taken in the speeches at the opera house hall by Messrs. [J. H.] Stewart and [Francis] Fitch. Both are cogent reasoners and forcible talkers and held the attention of their hearers throughout.
    Hon J. H. Stewart and Francis Fitch, Esq., delivered telling speeches to a good audience, at the Medford opera house, in the interest of Democracy and reform, on Wednesday evening last. Both were listened to with profound attention and their remarks went right home to their hearers.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1890, page 3


    A rhubarb leaf from the farm of Hon. J. H. Stewart exhibited in Medford last week measured three feet, one inch wide by three feet, ten inches long.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Medford Mail: Thos. Shattuck, the watermelon king of Josephine County, was in the valley during the week and while here made arrangements to handle Hon. J. H. Stewart's melons grown on his fine farm near Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 25, 1890, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart last week disposed of his watermelon crop in the field to Thos. Shattuck, the melon king of Josephine County.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1890, page 3


    F. H. Page, of the firm of Page & Sons, Portland, was a visitor in Medford yesterday, after having spent several weeks' vacation on the fishing grounds of the Klamath country. Mr. Page has the distinction of being the first [fruit] shipper from the Rogue River Valley [H. E. Battin & Co. preceded Page & Sons.], and his reminiscences of old times are replete with interest. The first car of pears came from the old Stewart orchard, now the famous Burrell property. This was in 1889 or 1890, Mr. Page is not certain which. [Fruit was shipped by the carload from the Rogue Valley in 1884, the year the railroad--and J. H. Stewart--arrived here. Bartlett pears were shipped by the carload from the Rogue Valley as early as 1888--before Stewart's orchard came into bearing. Contemporary news accounts (see above) suggest Page is remembering the shipments of 1891.] In order to make the pack worthy of the quality of the fruit, which was destined to astonish the New York and other markets and create a standard which has never been equaled by any other fruit section, Mr. Page brought a force of ten or twelve people from Portland to sort and pack the pears, wrap and box them in fancy style, and personally supervised the work. The result was so satisfactory that the banner price of 80 cents per box gross was paid to the grower.

"Early Days of Fruit Shipping," Medford Mail Tribune, July 27, 1910, page 4    The remainder of the article is transcribed here.


    Dillon Hill and family accompanied Hon. Jos. Stewart and wife to the coast, near Crescent City, and will remain there until late September.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1890, page 3


Fruit Items.
    J. H. Stewart will not have pears enough on his young orchard between Medford and Phoenix to make carload shipments to the East this year, but will have about 400 or 500 boxes to sell. Next year he will no doubt be making carload shipments to Chicago, and when his 160-acre orchard comes into bearing he will send to Illinois some of the finest Bartletts the people there have ever seen.
Ashland Tidings, August 15, 1890, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart this week ships a carload of mixed fruit to Portland.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart expects to ship an enormous quantity of Bartlett pears from his large orchard next season. The  young trees are just coming into bearing and will yield something over 500 boxes of luscious fruit this season.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1890, page 3


    Mrs. A. J. Stewart departed one day last week for a visit with friends in Chillicothe, Missouri, and will be absent several weeks.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 26, 1890, page 3


    Our market is being furnished with first-class sweet potatoes from Hon. J. H. Stewart's fine farm near Phoenix.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    J. H. Stewart and D. R. Hill shipped a carload of melons to Portland last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1890, page 3


    Messrs. Stewart and Hill last week shipped two carloads of fine watermelons from this section to a Montana consignee, this being their last shipment. They average 20 pounds apiece.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1890, page 3


    A. Stewart of Klamath County visited Medford lately, coming after supplies, and returned home a few days since.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1890, page 2


    The county clerk issued a license on the 24th to Wm. H. Stewart and Miss Ida Jane Barneburg. . . .

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 26, 1890, page 3


    [In 1891] I went home to Medford and got a job working for a man by the name of [A. J.] Stewart, who was improving quite a large tract of land preparatory to setting out an orchard on it. He had built a good residence, barns, and other outbuildings. My principal job with him was to make the kitchen fire in the morning, then take care of two teams of horses and after breakfast go out and help clear off the land. There were oak trees and quite a large number of manzanita scattered over the tract. The manzanita could be pulled out by a team. We used a log chain, which was wrapped around the base of the shrub and the team could pull it out. The brush was then piled and burned. The oak trees, most of which were small, had to be grubbed out. That was hard work. The weather in Rogue River Valley is damp and cold in the winter, but seldom gets really very cold. There is generally a lot of rain and sometimes wet snow. The work and the cold weather gave me a tremendous appetite, such as I never had before. Stewart was a man in his sixties and had lived in Texas, I believe, on the Mexican border. He was used to working Mexicans. I was to get up at five o'clock in the morning and work as long as there was daylight in the evening. I became very tired of his mean, arbitrary ways, and when at last he found fault with me about not getting the horses cared for in the morning as promptly as he thought ought to be done I left. He tried to coax me to stay but I had taken all I cared to from him.
Levi Harper Mattox, memoirs, typescript filed at the Southern Oregon Historical Society, page 115


    A wonderful growth of rhubarb has been produced at Hon. J. H. Stewart's place during the present season, the direct cause being tile drainage and liberal manuring of the soil.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 2


    Hon. J. H. Stewart and Weeks Bros. have contracted their peach crop, we learn, to the amount of 30,000 boxes or more, to the Salem Canning Company, the agreed price being reported to be 1½c per pound.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart responded to the call for summer cabbages last week with the first of the season, raised on his tile-drained garden land above Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


    At Medford last Tuesday, J. H. Stewart was thrown from a horse he was riding and had his collar bone broken. He was also badly bruised about the hip and altogether suffered painful injuries. Drs. Geary, Pryce and Wait attended him, and after being put in as comfortable condition as possible, he was taken home.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1891, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, who was thrown from his horse at Medford last week, sustaining a fracture of the collarbone, is getting along as well as could be expected this hot weather.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


Rogue River Melons Coming.
    Messrs. Shattuck and Lee, the great melon growers of Grants Pass, arrived here yesterday for the purpose of seeing what arrangements they can make for marketing their crop here. They say there is from 150 to 175 acres in melons in that section this season, including Mr. Jackson's fifty acres, which lie up the river about fifteen miles from Grants Pass. The prospects are good for a fine crop of watermelons, cantaloupes and casabas. The melons are all fine, and there is plenty of them. The output will be fifty carloads or more, and shipping will be begun next week. The watermelons grown on Rogue River are principally of a hybridized variety originated by J. H. Stewart, of Medford, who began his experiments in this line over twenty years ago, which have resulted in the evolution of the best melon yet found. The area suitable for growing melons is very limited. The melons will range from fifteen to twenty pounds in weight, which is much more profitable than larger ones, of which a much less number can be put in a car, making the freight very expensive. The hauling of the melon crop to the railroad furnishes employment for all the teams in the vicinity while it is going on.--[Oregonian.
Ashland Tidings, August 7, 1891, page 2



    Page & Son have bought the peaches and tomatoes of J. H. Stewart, between Phoenix and Medford, and are shipping from his place this week.
"Fruit Items," Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1891, page 3


    A. J. Stewart, Jr., who has been visiting at the residence of his parents near Phoenix for some time, last week departed for his home in New Mexico, where he is engaged with a large mining company.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 3


    A. J. Stewart of Eden precinct has been shipping a large amount of tomatoes north by express.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 3


    F. H. Page, Jr., is preparing a fine exhibit of apples from the J. H. Stewart farm for the Portland Industrial Exposition. There should by all means be an exhibit of Ashland peaches at the fair. Won't somebody take the trouble to make a collection and send the fruit down?
"Fruit Items," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1891, page 2


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, one of the best horticulturists in the state, has already sold and shipped a large quantity of dried fruit, for which he received a good figure. He has also sold most of his winter fruit at a nice price, receiving $1 a box for 1200 boxes of apples, to be delivered next month. Mr. Stewart's example is one that can be emulated with advantage.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1891, page 3


    A. J. Stewart will set out an 80-acre orchard this season on his place between Phoenix and Medford. He will plant prunes principally, and a goodly number of almonds. Mr. Stewart is a brother of J. H. and F. M. Stewart, the large orchard men in the same neighborhood.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 18, 1891, page 3


    One of the largest and best appointed plants [i.e., orchards] is that of J. H. Stewart, Esq., consisting of 240 acres of from one to five years' setting, cultivated and pruned in a workmanlike manner, and the trees are showing a good and healthy growth. Mr. Stewart has exercised great care in his treatment of this promising orchard, having underdrained it with tile in those places where it was most needed, and from the large amount of tile lying upon the grounds I judge that this portion of the work is not yet completed. This gentleman is sanguine of success in fruit raising, for we found him preparing another plat of forty acres, which he proposes to put into apples another year.

James A. Varney, "Report of the Inspector of Fruit Pests,"
First Biennial Report of the Oregon State Board of Horticulture, 1891, page 31


FRUIT CULTURE.
BY J. D. WHITMAN, OF MEDFORD.
    Mr. President: In view of the fact that the culture of fruit has been discussed for years from every conceivable standpoint, and by much more able men than myself, I can scarcely hope to present a single original thought. You will, therefore, pardon me if in the presentation of this paper I shall take a somewhat wide range, even to the discussion of not only fruit but the fruit grower and the general farmer and their relations to their homes and families. The first from a Southern Oregon standpoint; the second, in a more general sense.
    Prior to the advent of railroads into Southern Oregon but little attention was given to the growing of fruit beyond supplying the local demand. With no fruit pests to defeat their efforts, the growing of the choicest of fruits was a most easy task for all. But with railroad development, affording facilities for reaching the outside markets, came also the fruitgrower seeking a soil favorable to the production of the choicest fruits, ranging all the way from the semi tropical to the hardiest varieties, and over which the conditions of climate were so adjusted to the nature of the soil as to warrant their extensive production. In this Southern Oregon excels, and but few who have fairly investigated her claims have found it desirable to look further. But when the men of faith commenced planting large orchards, the Rip Van Winkle element of our valley commenced croaking, "No markets," and seemingly very candidly advised us that we would soon be digging up our orchards to grow wheat in place of fruit.
    But, fortunately, among the fruit-growers was one man of vast experience in fruit culture and of indomitable courage, whom neither Rip Van Winkle nor fruit pest could prevent pushing ahead with all possible industry, intelligence and energy; a man whose name is worthy to be mentioned in every fruit growers association in Oregon, Joseph H. Stewart. He presents today the model fruit farm of our State, consisting of two hundred acres, largely the work of his own hand within the last five years. Southern Oregon challenges the State to show its equal within her borders. With such a leader, the courage of the less experienced fruit-grower has never wavered. And it is due to some of the croakers, even, to say that they also have fallen into line and are planting trees somewhat extensively, so much so that some portions of the valley are fast becoming continuous orchards. Prior to the advent of our leader in fruit-growing, it was thought that melons could be produced only in certain favored localities, but when this man of iron will plunged his subsoiler far beneath the shallow plowing of previous years, he soon taught us that melons could be grown in all parts of our valley, and not only of superior quality but in such abundance as to supply the Willamette Valley with but little apparent diminution in quantity.
Excerpt, First Biennial Report of the Oregon State Board of Horticulture, 1891, page 106


    A. J. Stewart is this season preparing for the work of setting out an 80-acre orchard of prunes, apples and almonds on his fine place south of Medford. He is a brother of Hon. J. H. Stewart, and like the latter is thoroughly familiar with the fruit industry and has only been waiting to familiarize himself with the capacity of the valley in that line before embarking therein.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 3


    The records tell us that A. J. Stewart has disposed of his ranch to his son Clinton J. for the consideration of $10,000. The land is situated about four miles south of town, and there are over 200 acres in the tract. This one of the finest ranches and orchards in the country, and the buildings upon it, barn, dwelling house, etc. are things of beauty indeed, and will no doubt prove a joy forever to the new and lucky owner.

"Local News," Medford Mail, January 14, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Stewart of Eden precinct called on us a few days ago. He will soon leave on a trip for his health, accompanied by his wife.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3



    There are some very handsome apples now for sale in Portland. They retail at $1.75 per box. We are told they are from the orchard of Mr. J. H. Stewart, of Medford, Or., whose article on "Over Production of Fruit" appeared in the last issue of this paper.--Rural Northwest
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 17, 1892, page 3


    Some handsome apples from the orchard of Hon. J. H. Stewart of this county have been retailing in the Portland markets lately for $1.75 per box.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3


    Bertha Stewart is one of the girls who studied quite hard during the winter and passed the teachers' examination. She has taught several terms of school. She is now teaching at Woodville.
    Junie Stewart is attending school, coming from home which is nearly three miles from town. She is quite a favorite on account of her pleasant disposition.

J. C. Fielder, "Our Grade," Southern Oregon Mail, June 10, 1892, page 4


    A. J. Stewart and wife of Eden precinct, who have been spending the past two months in Mexico and east of the Rocky Mountains, have returned home, considerably improved in health.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3


    Miss H. A. Harris, who has been visiting the family of Hon. J. H. Stewart for the past two months, left on Wednesday evening's train for her home in Denver, Col., where she has a position in the public schools of that city.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 5, 1892, page 3


    Ira Drake has entered the employ of Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. A. J. Stewart has been in California during the past week, and Mr. S. has been a guest of the Clarendon Hotel.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 2

Joseph H. Stewart 1893
Joseph H. Stewart, 1893

Stewart's Gopher Trap.
    At the Newberg institute Prof. Washburn described a gopher trap which he saw in use at the orchard of J. H. Stewart, the well-known fruit-grower of Southern Oregon. The trap consisted of a small box left open at each end and with a lid on top which can be readily fastened. In this box Mr. Stewart fastens pieces of pork rind which have been thoroughly steeped in a solution of strychnine. Gophers have a fondness for running through such openings as the box discloses to them, and in passing through they are attracted by the pork rind and proceed to feast upon it, with fatal results. The rind being fastened in the box prevents danger to dogs, poultry, etc. Mr. Stewart uses a large number of these traps about the corners of his large orchard, and as a result suffers very little from gophers.--[Rural Northwest.
Ashland Tidings, January 6, 1893, page 1


Fine Trees.
    C. E. Stewart of Eden precinct is planting 2500 trees which he bought of the Central Point nursery. He says they are growing the finest trees there he ever saw. If you are in need of any go and do likewise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 20, 1893, page 3


    One of the most effective means for [ground squirrels'] destruction seems to be a trap in successful use in the large orchard belonging to J. H. Stewart at Medford, Or. He places, in fence corners about his orchard, boxes about one and one-half feet square at the ends and about four feet long. The top and two ends are united and can be lifted off the box. The ends do not reach quite to the bottom board, an open space of about four inches intervening [see Fig. 13], and enabling the animal to run through the box and out at the other end. On the bottom, midway between the two ends, pieces of pork rind are securely nailed. These pieces have been first soaked in a solution of strychnine, made by boiling strychnine in water. Kernels of corn may be steeped in the same solution and placed with the pork as an additional bait, but is more easily displaced and hence more likely to be eaten by some animal for which it is not intended. But the pork rind cannot be removed. The top is fastened onto the box by means of a couple of nails, which can be easily pulled out when putting in new bait.
    Mr. Stewart asserts that his trees are free from all attacks of this pest through using this very simple device.

"The California Ground Squirrel," Oregon Agricultural Experiment Station Bulletin No. 24, March 1893, page 21


    Report has it that Jas. Stewart, who owns a fine peach orchard just south of Medford, has decided to graft the entire orchard to prunes.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, May 5, 1893, page 3


    Jos. Stewart is said to be talking of grafting his entire peach orchard near town to prunes in the immediate future, and prune raising is demonstrated to be such a success that many new orchards will be set out next year. The fruit is less liable to be killed by frosts than peaches.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1893, page 3


    Jos. Stewart, the big fruit man just south of Medford, has 4000 pear trees set out, 3000 of which are bearing this year. He expects to ship nine carloads of Bartlett pears direct to Chicago this summer. Talk about fruit--well yes, we have a few. The man that builds a cannery in this valley has laid the foundation to an income worth reaching for.

"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, June 2, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart is preparing to ship no less than nine carloads of Bartlett pears to Chicago during the coming summer, and will have oceans of fruit of all kinds. We trust he will receive ample reward for his nerve in giving orcharding a fair test on a scale in this valley, as he has expended a big fortune already on his splendid orchard.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1893, page 2


    A. J. Stewart and wife last week returned from their sojourn in Mexico and New Mexico, and will remain in the valley during the summer season.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 16, 1893, page 3


    The first shipment of peaches this season was made last Monday by J. H. Stewart & Son and J. A. Whitman.

"All the Local News," Medford Mail, July 28, 1893, page 3


    A. J. Stewart is figuring on erecting a fine residence in the south and west part of town, near Prof. Narregan's place.
Medford Mail, August 11, 1893, page 3


TWENTY CARLOADS OF PEARS
Visit to a Sample Fruit Farm in Southern Oregon.
    The Medford Mail thus describes a visit to a typical fruit farm in Southern Oregon, owned by Joseph Stewart:
    "The farm is located 3¼ miles south from Medford. The land is very fertile and seems particularly adapted to the culture of fruit. There are 160 acres of land--not a large farm would it be for growing wheat, but an immense affair when planted entirely to fruit trees. Of this 160 acres Mr. Stewart has 60 acres planted to pears, Bartlett variety, and from which they are expected to gather this year from 8000 to 9000 boxes of fruit, each box weighing 40 pounds, or, in other words, nearly 20 carloads. Just think of it! More than an entire trainload of Bartlett pears, all from one farm. We made a drive through the orchard, and remarkable as it may seem, there is not a weed in the whole orchard. The trees are loaded to the utmost capacity, many of the branches reaching to the ground, yet bearing their immense burden without breaking. The sight which presents itself is one for which descriptive adjectives have not as yet been coined equal to do the occasion justice. As far as the eye can reach, down long rows of uniform trees, nothing but large, healthy Bartlett pears are seen growing. It is a sight worth going miles to see. Aside from this pear orchard are 50 acres of late winter apples which are bearing well and in a very healthy condition. The farm has quite an orchard of peach trees, but with these Mr. Stewart is making no special effort. Last spring he grafted prunes onto 1200 of his peach trees, and the result bade fair to be an exceptionally flattering one, as nearly all the grafts are growing well and seem even more thrifty than do the natural branches. The reason given for this grafting operation is simply that prunes are more profitable than peaches and do not crowd so closely onto his pear harvest, and are much easier to handle. During the fruit picking and packing time 75 or 80 hands are employed in caring for the fruit, and seven or eight during the other months. Mr. Stewart also supplies the Portland market with about 10 tons of rhubarb each ear. Aside from this large home orchard Mr. Stewart has 78 acres planted principally to apples, joining Mr. Whitman's orchard, near Medford.
    "The 20 carloads of pears, spoken of above, will be shipped to Chicago and New York markets, the refrigerator cars to be used in their transmission. The orchard of which we have above written is only about 7 or 8 years old, which fact proves conclusively the great results that can be accomplished in fruit-raising where careful attention is given and knowledge of fruit culture is possessed, as is the case with Mr. Stewart."
Morning Oregonian, August 12, 1893, page 6


    H. F. Wood has the contract for building Mr. Stewart's residence. The building they tell us is to be a beauty.
    On Monday, August 28th, J. H. Stewart, the big fruit grower, will commence his work of packing Bartlett pears. He expects that ten carloads will be required to complete the pack. He will ship from Medford over the Southern Pacific to Portland and to the east over the Union Pacific--the eastern destination has not as yet been decided upon. The car will be iced here and will require about a ton of ice to the car.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, August 18, 1893, page 3


A Big Shipment.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct, the well-known horticulturist, who has one of the largest and best orchards in the state, is getting ready to ship a trainload of his unsurpassed pears to the market of the northwestern and eastern states. It will be the most extensive shipment of fruit ever made from southern Oregon, and shows what may be expected in the future of this fruit-growing section. Besides this vast amount of pears, Mr. Stewart will have a large quantity of apples, to say nothing of melons, vegetables, etc., for sale. His example is worthy of emulation.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, August 25, 1893, page 3



    Jas. Stewart began the shipment of his crop of Bartlett pears last Tuesday. He will load and ship one car a day for at least fifteen days. The first shipments are being made to Chicago.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 1, 1893, page 3


A Fruit Farm that Pays.
    The fruit farm of J. H. Stewart, situated halfway between Phoenix and Medford, about ten miles north of Ashland, presents an attractive scene of busy industry this week. The great Bartlett pear orchard of 60 acres planted by Mr. Stewart six or eight years ago is beginning to yield its generous returns for the intelligent and vigilant labor and care expended upon it, and the first crop of consequence is now being picked and shipped.
    Page & Son, of Portland, have bought the entire crop at 1½ per pound. Mr. Stewart picks the pears and delivers them in boxes to Page & Son at the packing house on the farm. Here they are wrapped and boxed by Page's people, after which Mr. Stewart delivers them to the cars. Twenty-seven women and girls are employed packing the fruit, and about as many men are at work picking, boxing and hauling; so the farm, as remarked at first, is a busy camp at present. The crop is picked and shipped at the rate of a carload a day, and will make from twelve to fifteen carloads bringing Mr. Stewart about $4,000. The girls are paid by Page & Son 4 cents per box for wrapping and packing the pears. They are camped in tents on the farm.
    The orchard is an object lesson to people interested in fruit growing in Southern Oregon. The trees are free from the scale, and the fruit is free from the grub of the codling moth.
    Capt. Teel and R. S. Barclay, of Ashland, visited the orchard last Monday, and George W. Crowson, of this place, and Mr. Sheffield of Portland were there Tuesday. They advise everyone who may be inclined to grow discouraged over the fruit business, on account of the orchard pests that have appeared within the past few years, to go and see the clean trees and fruit of Stewart's orchard. It shows that an orchard may be kept free of the San Jose scale, and that apples and pears may be saved from damage of the codling moth.
    The Tidings will have more information in a future issue concerning Mr. Stewart's successful orchard management.
Ashland Tidings, September 1, 1893, page 3


    Nearly thirty females have been employed at Hon. J. H. Stewart's farm near Phoenix the past few weeks, in wrapping and packing Bartlett pears for the eastern and northwestern markets. The product of the entire orchard of sixty acres has been purchased by F. H. Page & Son at 1½ cents per pound and is of the finest quality. As about fifteen carloads will be shipped, Mr. Stewart will receive about $4000 gross for his pears. He is one of the most prominent, painstaking and intelligent horticulturists on the coast, and well merits his success.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3


    H. F. Wood, the popular contractor, is engaged in building a nice residence for A. J. Stewart and wife of Medford.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 8, 1893, page 3



    Contractor Wood is pushing the construction of the Stewart residence in west Medford and the same will soon be ready for occupancy.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 8, 1893, page 3


    Nearly thirty females have been employed at Hon. J. H. Stewart's farm near Phoenix the past few weeks, in wrapping and packing Bartlett pears for the eastern and northwestern markets. The product of the entire orchard of sixty acres has been purchased by F. H. Page & Son at 1½ cents per pound and is of the finest quality. As about fifteen carloads will be shipped, Mr. Stewart will receive about $4000 gross for his pears. He is one of the most prominent, painstaking and intelligent horticulturists on the coast, and well merits his success

"Here and There," Democratic Times, September 8, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart will realize $4000 from 60 acres of Bartlett pears. The crop made about 15 carloads and was gathered, packed and shipped without expense to the grower.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 29, 1893, page 3


     J. H. Stewart:--"Our pears are giving better satisfaction in the East than those of California. I received a letter from Tennessee saying they had received some of them and in the same letter was an order for more."
"Echoes from the Street," Medford Mail, September 29, 1893, page 2


    Mr. Stewart, of Medford, will realize $4000 from 60 acres of Bartlett pears. The crop made about 15 carloads and was gathered, packed and shipped without expense to the grocer.--Oregonian.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, September 29, 1893, page 3


    Will Reap, he who has been engaged upon the J. H. Stewart fruit farm for the past six years, took Tuesday evening's train for Chicago, to be absent six weeks.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 29, 1893, page 3


    A. J. Stewart's new residence, corner of Tenth and F streets, is nearly completed. It is an eight-room residence, very nicely situated, is very conveniently arranged and tastily finished in the interior while the outside is so arranged as to present an imposing and pleasant appearance. H. F. Wood did the woodwork and our good friend, F. M. Poe, is doing the plastering.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, October 6, 1893, page 3


    Jay Guy Lewis, superintendent of horticulture at the World's Fair, says that the Oregon apples are far ahead of any others exhibited there. In speaking of a shipment from J. H. Stewart of Medford precinct, he says that for size, quality and color they cannot be beaten.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 27, 1893, page 3


Southern Oregon Pears Are All Right
From the Rural Northwest.
   
The statement recently appeared in one of the leading newspapers of this state that Oregon-grown Bartlett pears do not stand shipment well unless packed before they are fully grown. Although this statement was made by a gentleman who ought to know what he is talking about, the Rural Northwest is not inclined to accept it as a fact. A great many of the pears which were grown in Oregon this year would not stand shipment well for the simple reason that the trees had not been properly sprayed with the Bordeaux mixture and in consequence the fruit was attacked by fungus and made ready to rot on the slightest provocation. No such fruit should ever be shipped out of the state. On the other hand, the Medford Mail reports that returns have been received from the several carloads of pears shipped from that place and that in every instance they were reported to have reached their destination in splendid shape. Messrs. Stewart and Weeks & Orr, the orchardists who raised these pears, have the reputation of caring for their trees in the most thorough manner, and they did not have to pick their pears before they were grown to make them keep, even when they were shipped to New York.

Medford Mail, October 27, 1893, page 1


Medford Apples at Chicago.
    Below is a letter received by Mr. J. H. Stewart from the World's Fair superintendent of horticulture for Oregon:
    J. H. Stewart,
            Medford, Oregon.
    Dear Sir:--We received the shipment of fruit from you on the 10th inst. and found it in prime condition--in fact it was packed perfectly and could come in none other than good shape. Your variety was very good, and size, quality and color cannot be equaled anywhere. The judges of the department say, and do not hesitate to say, your Jonathan, Hoover, Baldwin, Monmouth and others were the finest they have ever seen. In this instance it is a matter of sixty or seventy years experience in fruit, and it is a feather in the cap of apple culture in Oregon to be the subject of such favorable comment. We are far in advance of all competitors in all fruits, and it is through the efforts and enterprise of our growers that enables me to make this statement. I wish to thank you and the people of Oregon for their kind endeavors to assist me here. With great consideration, I am yours truly,
JAY GUY LEWIS.           
Medford Mail, October 27, 1893, page 2


    We would be just one item short each week if we were not called upon to make a correction of the previous week. Last week we had Bert Whitman buying 2000 boxes of apples from his brother, J. H. Whitman. The latter Mr. Whitman isn't growing fruit but is instead attending strictly to a good abstract and law business. It was J. H. Stewart who grew those apples.

"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 3, 1893, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, the large orchardist, last Tuesday shipped a carload of winter pears to St. Louis. The gentleman, aside from having harvested and shipped something like fifteen carloads of pears, has grown this year about fourteen carloads of winter apples. He has already shipped two carloads, one to Seattle and one to Arizona. He has also sold 2000 boxes to J. A. Whitman, and the remainder will be kept for a future market.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 17, 1893, page 3


    Miss Mina and Jessie Stoups, of this place, have earned a good many dollars this summer picking and packing fruit for J. H. Stewart. They walk down and back every day, a distance of two miles, which shows the energy and pluck the Phoenix girls have, and also explains the reason why they are sought from far and near by farmers, doctors and even professors, and if not by preachers, then preachers' sons, who know that these are the kind that make good wives.

"Phoenix Flashes," Medford Mail, November 24, 1893, page 2


    Four carloads of apples are being shipped from Medford this week. Two of them were loaded at Jacksonville by Mr. Moore, and billed to Butte City, Montana, one from J. A. Whitman, billed to Dillon, Mont., and one from J. H. Stewart for Seattle.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, November 24, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct shipped a carload of fine winter pears to St. Louis, Mo. last week. He is one of our most successful fruit-growers, and has over a hundred acres in orchard. This year he will receive in the neighborhood of $20,000 for his apples, prunes and pears. The example he has set is certainly worthy of emulation.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 1, 1893, page 3


    Herman Crowell of this precinct and the second daughter of Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct were united in matrimony on Nov. 29th. Their many friends tender congratulations and best wishes, in which the Times heartily joins.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 1, 1893, page 3


He Has Probably Changed His Mind.
From the Rural Northwest.
   
"The Medford Mail reports that Mr. J. H. Stewart, the well-known 'overproduction' orchardist of that place, has this year harvested and shipped about 15 carloads of pears and has also grown 14 carloads of apples. There hasn't been any appreciable lack of demand for the kind of fruit which Mr. Stewart places upon the market."
    No person ought to object to a good-natured poke at his tender spot when it is rounded off so cleverly as is the above. We will venture the assertion that by this time even Mr. Stewart has his doubts as to the possibility of an overproduction of fruit. So long as our fruit is kept at the standard it has already attained, every acre of ground in the Rogue River Valley may be planted and yet there will be no overproduction. Our orchardists need have little fear of a decline in demand so long as their already established good reputation is maintained.

Medford Mail,
December 8, 1893, page 3


Married--Crowell-Stewart.
    On November 30, 1893, at the residence of the bride's parents, at Eden Valley Orchards, near Medford, Oregon, Miss Clara, daughter of Hon. J. H. Stewart, to H. M. Crowell, son of Hon. Wm. S. Crowell, of Klamath County, Rev. M. A. Williams officiating.
Medford Mail,
December 8, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct will ship a carload of fine winter pears to New York in a few days. He has a large quantity of superior apples, for which he is getting $1.10 per box laid down in Medford. It is evident that horticulture in southern Oregon, when followed intelligently and skillfully, pays well.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 15, 1893, page 3


    J. H. Stewart shipped a car of his choicest apples to New Orleans Wednesday.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, of Eden precinct, Jackson County, shipped a carload of fine winter pears to St. Louis, Mo., last week. He is a successful fruitgrower, and has over 100 acres in orchard. This year he will receive in the neighborhood of $20,000 for his apples, prunes and pears.--Oregonian.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, December 15, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct made the Times a pleasant call the forepart of the week. He is just recovering from an attack of the prevailing complaint, la grippe. Mr. Stewart is one of the foremost fruit-growers of the Pacific coast, and has given the horticulturists of Jackson County some valuable points on the proper culture of fruit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 22, 1893, page 2


    In making mention of the products of our fruit farms hereabouts we must not lose sight of the fact that F. M. Stewart, while not as extensive a grower as some, is a long ways from being a producer of inferior qualities. Last Saturday he brought to Medford a few sample boxes of his dried fruit which for excellency of quality and neatness in packing cannot be excelled, and we question if equaled by more than a very few of our most thoroughly schooled fruit men. The varieties shown were the Petite and silver prunes, pitted plums and peeled peaches. These were evaporated in a machine of Mr. Stewart's own manufacture and are packed in ten-, twenty- and forty-pound boxes.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, December 22, 1893, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Stewart left Sunday morning for Victoria, New Mexico. Mr. S. owns property in that country and will undoubtedly remain there for a considerable time--perhaps return to Medford and perhaps not. Their return will be gladly chronicled by this paper. They are the kind of people that help good, thrifty towns.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 22, 1893, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has been appointed administrator of the estate of Wm. Renken, deceased, elsewhere publishes his first notice to creditors.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 29, 1893, page 3

Joseph Howard Stewart and wife Elizabeth Hyman--back row June, Calie, Cora, William and Anna Stewart
Joseph Howard Stewart and wife Elizabeth Hyman Stewart.
Back row June, Calie, Cora, William and Anna Stewart

    A. J. Stewart and wife, who left Medford for Victoria, New Mexico, a short time ago, have arrived at their destination, and will probably remain there.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 11, 1894, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct called this week. He is shipping two carloads of apples to Denver, Colorado.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 18, 1894, page 3


    J. H. Stewart, the big orchardist, is shipping two carloads of apples from Phoenix to Denver, Colorado this week. The bad roads between Mr. Stewart's place and Medford is wholly responsible for his shipping from Phoenix.
"All the Local News,"
Medford Mail, January 19, 1894, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Strayer arrived in Medford Friday night from Dallas Center, Iowa. These people are old acquaintances of J. D. Whitman and are the foster parents of Will Reap, he who is stopping at J. H. Stewart's Eden Valley fruit farm. Mr. and Mrs. Strayer will undoubtedly remain here during the coming spring and summer.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, January 26, 1894, page 3


    John Stubblefield, who lived at the farm of Hon. J. H. Stewart in Eden precinct and returned to Whitehall, Illinois, was married in that town some time since.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 1, 1894, page 3


    J. H. Stewart loaded a car of apples at Medford last week to be shipped to some eastern points.

"All the Local News,"
Medford Mail, February 9, 1894, page 3


    F. M. Stewart put up about 6,000 pounds of prunes at his farm northwest of Phoenix last season. He packs them in neat ten-pound boxes and gets the top price for the product.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 8, 1894, page 3


    The wonderful growth trees attain in the Rogue River Valley in a single season is indeed marvelous. I. L. Hamilton left at this office Saturday two cuttings, one from a Winter Nelis pear tree and one from a Petite prune tree, that measured each nine feet, and all this length was the result of one year's growth. The cuttings were from the orchard of J. H. Stewart.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, March 16, 1894, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart returned Sunday from their winter's stay in New Mexico. A host of friends there are here who are pleased to welcome them back to our city.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, May 11, 1894, page 2


    Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart, and daughter Julia, returned from San Francisco Saturday last. Mr. and Mrs. Stewart have been attending the fair, and Miss Julia has just completed a musical course of study at Oakland. They were accompanied by Mrs. O. Ferguson, of Sacramento, who was a schoolmate of both Mr. and Mrs. Stewart. The lady will visit in the valley for some time.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, June 22, 1894, page 3


    F. M. Stewart, the orchardist, proves that while prune trees attain a wonderful and rapid growth in the Rogue River Valley they at the same time do a whole heap of producing. He brought to this office last week a branch from one of his trees that had grown ten and a half feet this season, and from the same tree, only four years old, he has just gathered fifty pounds of fruit.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, October 19, 1894, page 3

Eden Valley Packing House, 1895, J. H. Stewart left of center, facing right
Eden Valley Packing House, 1895. J. H. Stewart left of center, facing right

Fruit for Mexico.
    J. H. Stewart, of Medford, Rogue River Valley, writes Page & Son: "I shipped lately 23 boxes of strictly fancy, four-tier Red Canada apples to the City of Mexico, per express. They were ordered by Mr. Valentine, of San Francisco. I shipped him three boxes for his own use to San Francisco. and he ordered 23 of the same to the superintendent of Wells-Fargo Company at the City of Mexico, a seven days' trip." This is a new apple that has not been grown here hitherto, and is very choice. It looks as though Mexico might find a market for much of our choice fruit in the not-distant future.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 16, 1895, page 6


SUCCESSFUL FRUIT GROWER.
High Prices Paid in New York for Fruit Shipped by J. H. Stewart.

    The Fruit Trade Journal, published in New York, has the following to say of fruit shipped from Medford, Oregon, by Mr. J. H. Stewart, the former well-known fruit grower of Quincy:
    Mr. J. H. Stewart, of Rogue River, furnished a car of Beurre Clairgeau pears and astonished New Yorkers when sold. Lately he furnished Page & Son a car of Winter Nelis pears that were sold in New York for fabulous prices, because they were large and very fine. He had cultivated and packed them so that they reached New York in the best shape; discarded all small or inferior fruit, and sent only the best. The result was that they sold for double the price a car brought that were average pears, and not packed well. That car was very heavy, much heavier loaded than the average, selling for over $2,000. They paid for size, cleanliness and excellence. J. H. Stewart sprays his trees, and his pears and apples have no insects, no fungus, no blight; are extra large and extra fine. Such fruit goes on the tables of the "nobs," and they pay extra to have the best. The man who can command that trade will make money where merely ordinary fruit will hardly pay at all. Excellence will always pay in fruit growing.
The Quincy Morning Whig, Illinois, February 5, 1896, page 3



    D. R. Hill shipped a carload of very fine apples to Butte, Montana last week. J. H. Stewart also shipped a carload last week--to Portland. Mr. Hill is this week wrapping and packing twenty boxes of choice Red Cheeked Pippins to be shipped to Mr. Valentine, of the Wells Fargo Express Company, at San Francisco.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, February 14, 1896, page 5


    Next we cross the street, and come to D. R. Hill's home. Mr. Hill is an extensive fruit grower and while his house is not so large as some, it is a very neat and substantial one and in every way adequate to the needs of himself and happy family. J. H. Stewart is also preparing to erect a fine home on the same tract of land, which will be another notable improvement of Medford, and of which we will speak later.
"Oakland [sic]--A Medford Suburb," Medford Mail, June 19, 1896, page 8


    The rock for the foundation of A. J. Stewart's fine new residence, to be built in Oakdale addition to Medford, is on the ground, and work will soon begin in the erection thereof.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, June 26, 1896, page 5



    Orchardist J. H. Stewart will ship about 1000 boxes of very fine pears this week and next. This is his entire crop. Quite a drop from twenty carloads last year--but you keep your eye on this, and all other orchards in the valley, next year.

"News of the City," Medford Mail, September 18, 1896, page 7


    In our write-up of Oakdale addition to Medford last spring we stated that when J. H. Stewart's new residence was completed we would give it a more extensive notice. The house is completed, and when shown through it a reporter found it to be one of the best-appointed residences in the city. It is a large, ten-room, two-story house, replete with all the latest approved heating and ventilating appliances. These rooms are all very commodious, with hot and cold water in each of them. At the rear end of the house he has a good-sized room with cement floor and a perfect drainage system in which is sunk a large cistern, from which water can be used for drinking and cooking purposes. From the large windmill which he has has erected are pipes running to every room in the house with sufficient pressure to throw water, should it be needed, to extinguish conflagration, should any occur. In all of these rooms are hose and hose attachments ready for use. The whole house is a model of neatness, and the workmanship shows unmistakable evidence of a master mechanic hand. The cost of the residence is about three thousand dollars.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, November 6, 1896, page 7


    Weeks & Orr and F. M. Stewart are loading a car with evaporated prunes this week. The former will load 16,000 pounds and the latter 8,000 pounds, which will be shipped to Chicago, where a fair price is being paid. That the fruit will bring the top notch in price no person doubts who knows of the excellent manner in which these gentlemen put up their fruit.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, November 13, 1896, page 7


    J. H. Stewart, Jr. met with quite a misfortune last week. He was employed in laying shakes on the roof of the horse stables at the fair grounds and when carrying a bundle of shakes across the roof he stepped on a weak board which broke, letting him through the roof. His chin and cheekbone struck the roof board, severing the skin quite badly--so bad that the wound required stitching.

"A Grist of Local Haps and Mishaps," Medford Mail, April 23, 1897, page 7



    C. E. Stewart reports his almond orchard well filled with fruit this season. He has two thousand trees in bearing, and the promise for a big crop is very flattering. His other fruit trees are equally as well filled. Ben Davis apple trees, he states, have fully three crops on them, two-thirds of which will have to be taken off. All apple, peach and pear trees will need thinning to considerable extent. His prune trees will need no thinning because of being young and very vigorous.
    Two years ago The Mail made several mentions of the immense Bartlett pear crop of Hon. J. H. Stewart. That season he picked and shipped to eastern points eighteen carloads of pears. This year he estimates he will ship not less than twenty-five carloads. His trees are larger now and are capable of carrying considerable more fruit than they did two years ago.
"A Grist of Local Haps and Mishaps," Medford Mail, May 7, 1897, page 2


    C. E. Stewart, of Medford, says his almond orchard is well filled with fruit this season. He has 200 trees in bearing, and the promise for a big crop is very flattering.

"State News," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, May 11, 1897, page 2


    Alexander Stewart died at the home of his daughter-in-law, about three miles east of Medford, Wednesday, May 12, aged 88 years and 10 months.

"State News," Daily Capital Journal, Salem, May 18, 1897, page 2


    The almond orchard of C. E. Stewart of Eden precinct, which comprises about 2000 five-year-old trees, is reported to present one of the prettiest orchard scenes in the valley with its well-loaded and well-cared-for trees, and from present prospects ought to yield the owner a fair return for his industry.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 7, 1897, page 3


    J. H. Stewart is making ready to ship apples next week. He estimates he will have twenty-five carloads of this kind of fruit. Weeks & Orr are figuring on their crop for about twelve carloads and will commence shipping next week.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, October 28, 1897, page 7


    W. Stewart has sued the Southern Oregon Packing Co. before Justice Jones' court, in Medford, for $230.35, alleged to be due for 30 head of hogs, and obtained judgment for the amount with costs.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1897, page 3



    Miss Junie Stewart, youngest daughter of Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has been sick for several weeks with typhoid-pneumonia, died on Friday. She possessed many estimable qualities, and her death is generally regretted.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1898, page 3


    Jas. Stewart has been making a tour of the valley lately, collecting for the Collier Book Co. He is succeeding nicely.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 24, 1898, page 3


    J. H. and C. E. Stewart each shipped a carload of dried fruit to New York from Eden precinct last week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of The Times:
J. H. Stewart to A. J. Weeks, 54.04 acres in twp 38 s, r1w . . . 2161.60
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 3, 1898, page 2


    Jas. Stewart, a rising young barrister, has been nominated for justice of the peace by the reform forces. 

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 12, 1898, page 3


    Jas. Stewart is our new justice of the peace. He is the youngest man ever elected to fill a public office in Jackson County, being a few months over 21 years of age.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 9, 1898, page 2


   
Mrs. E. Stewart has gone to Klamath County to spend the summer with her sons.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 23, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. Arthur Weeks of Oakland, Calif. is paying a visit to her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1898, page 3


Fires at Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., Sept. 12.--The fire of Sunday was followed by the burning of two barns about midnight last night in another part of the city. The barns were the property of Arthur Wilson and A. J. Stewart, standing on opposite sides of an alley. The fire was undoubtedly the work of incendiaries. There was no insurance on either. An extra force of night watchmen will be put on at once.
Daily Capital Journal, Salem, September 12, 1898, page 1



    W. N. Welch, of Talent, was in the city Monday. The gentleman has been living on the J. H. Stewart place, but next week himself and family will leave for Wasco County, this state, where they will reside.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 6


    Johnny Stewart has quit the brewery and has taken a position with Boyden & Nicholson.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 30, 1898, page 7



    J. H. Stewart, of this city, Fred Page, of Portland, and Senator Stratton, of Oakland, Calif., are up on Rogue River this week deer hunting. Upon their return they will hunt quail in the valley for a few days. Mr. Stewart has recently acquired a quarter section of land on Rogue River, and it is there he is camping [with] his party.

Medford Mail, October 7, 1898, page 6  Stewart's property straddled the Rogue River within the current boundaries of Shady Cove.



    F. S. Stratton, a prominent attorney of San Francisco, and F. H. Page, of the firm of Page & Son, of Portland, were guests of Hon. J. H. Stewart a few days the past week, and, accompanied by Mr. Stewart and his son, W. H. Stewart, went into the Big Butte country for a day or two of hunting and fishing.
"Personal,"
Medford Monitor-Miner, October 13, 1898, page 3


    Hon J. H. Stewart will gather enough apples from his extensive orchards in Eden precinct to make 25 carloads; and Weeks & Orr will have about 12 carloads for shipment. They represent a considerable sum of money.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 3, 1898, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
Andrew Griffin to J. H. Stewart; lots 17 and 18, blk 13, Medford . . . 2200.00
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 7, 1898, page 3


    Choice apples are selling for fancy figures, there being a big shortage throughout the country. J. H. Stewart, Weeks & Orr and others are getting $1.25 a box for Newtown pippins and other favorite varieties f.o.b. the railroad.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1898, page 3


    The material for the new bank building is being put on the ground. Hon. J. H. Stewart is superintending operations.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1898, page 2


    Arthur Weeks of Oakland, Calif., an excellent architect, is in Medford, crafting plans for the fine brick building Hon. J. H. Stewart, his father-in-law, proposes erecting soon.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1898, page 3



    J. Hugger was in Jacksonville one day last week. He informs us that Hon. J. H. Stewart, who raises large quantities of very fine apples, has shipped a number of carloads this season, several of which went to England. They commanded $1.25 a box.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 19, 1898, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has sold his fine fruit orchard in Eden precinct to Gordon Voorhies of Portland for a consideration of $20,000.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1899, page 3



    The work on the Stewart block is progressing rapidly. The tower is being erected and the building is nearing enclosure. That it is a great addition to Medford as a beautiful piece of architecture is putting it very mildly.
    G. Voorhies, of Portland, who has purchased the Stewart fruit farm, is in Medford this week. Mr. Voorhies is highly pleased with our valley and with his new investment. He will remain here for an indefinite time attending to business, after which he will return to Portland for his family, who will reside at their new home in Southern Oregon.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 21, 1899, page 7


    Capt. G. Voorhies, the gentleman who recently purchased the J. H. Stewart orchard ranch, has already commenced making improvements about the residence and grounds surrounding. He has purchased from C. H. Elmore a new Star windmill, and the same will be put in position at once. A large tower for the mill will be built, and in this will be two water tanks; one of these will be of 2000 gallons capacity and the other 3000. The cost of the mill, tanks and tower will be $500. Pipes will be run from the tanks to all parts of the house and grounds. Aside from these improvements several changes are being made in the arrangement of rooms in the house. Perry Stewart is doing the carpenter work.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 28, 1899, page 7


    Gordon Voorhies, who purchased J. H. Stewart's fine, large orchard in Eden precinct, has been spending a few days in Jacksonville. The Times is pleased to learn that he will become a resident of our valley.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1899, page 3


    Herman J. Burrell of Portland, a brother of Mrs. G. Voorhies of Eden precinct, whose husband purchased the Stewart farm not long ago, died last Monday, aged 30 years. He had been in poor health for some time.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 8, 1899, page 3


    Medford's new bank was organized last Saturday, with a capital of $50,000. The officers are: President, J. H. Stewart of Medford; vice-president H. E. Ankeny of Sterlingville; cashier, J. E. Enyart of Medford; directors, W. B. Roberts, R. H. Whitehead, J. H. Stewart, H. E. Ankeny, J. E. Enyart. A number of the prominent citizens of the county have taken stock.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1899, page 2


    Our new banking institution opened for business on the morning of the 20th. It is called the Bank of Medford, and occupies handsome quarters on the corner of Seventh and B streets. The officers are: President, J. H. Stewart; vice president, H. E. Ankeny; cashier, J. E. Enyart; directors, H. E. Ankeny, J. H. Stewart, W. B. Roberts, W. F. Towne, R. H. Whitehead, Horace Pelton and W. S. Crowell.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 22, 1899, page 2



A NEW BANKING HOUSE.
Medford Bank Opened its Doors for Business Tuesday Morning--
A Mention of the Building--Bank Officers Elected.
    On Tuesday morning of this week, June 20th, the Medford Bank opened its doors for business.
    For months past there has been under course of construction one of the best, if not the best brick structure in our blooming little city--in this is situated the Medford Bank--for this purpose the building was constructed. Its first floor was arranged in every detail in such manner as best suited to banking business. The interior of this structure is a model of neatness and grandeur throughout, while the exterior is as well lacking in none of these. It is a structure the city has every reason to be proud of from the foundation to the uppermost point. It is a structure so solidly built that centuries of time and use cannot wear away. The building is 25x86 feet in size and two stories high. It is built of brick with sand rock at both top and bottom of each of the several pillars and at door and window sides and corners. The two large front windows are of the best French plate glass. Its every bearing is as solid as rock, lime, cement and the best of wood can make. This building is located at the corner of Seventh and B streets. The entrance to the banking room is from Seventh Street through a massive door of the best sugar pine with plate glass panels. Once inside this lobby or waiting room the eye is at once riveted to the counters and office fittings. One glance at these and the master hand of Weeks Bros. and their corps of able wood workers is plainly in evidence. The Mail will venture the assertion that there is not a better piece of work of its kind in any city on the coast. The counters are of solid oak with curly ash for trimmings and panels. This is surmounted with a solid oak railing set with frosted and beveled French plate glass. At the back end of the counter is a good-sized room set apart from the banking room proper and will be for use by bank officials. This is divided from the other room with oak and glass partitions. Still beyond this is a directors' room, 16x24 feet in size, and beyond this is a 20x24-foot room which will be used undoubtedly for store purposes. A large safety vault has been provided for the bank's treasure and valuable papers. This has cold air ventilation and is positively fireproof. Inside this is a Diebold safe--a double timer, of the best of steel, and burglar proof.
    The upstairs, or second story, is divided into suites of rooms--six in number. A hallway extends the entire length of the building on the second story and each of these rooms opens into it. These rooms face on B Street, and from each of them there projects a large bay window. They are finished in sugar pine, and in each of them are marble wash basins and city water attachments. The first suite of rooms--fronting on Seventh and B streets--has been rented by Drs. Keene and Burnett, for dental parlors. The next ones by County Judge W. S. Crowell; the next will be a physician's office, and the last, or rear ones, D. T. Sears has secured for sleeping apartments. The building throughout is provided with electric lights. The ceilings of the first story are fourteen feet high and those of the second story ten feet high.
    This beautiful, massive and very conveniently arranged structure is owned by Hon. J. H. Stewart, the well-known orchardist, and who, parenthetically let us state, has made a fortune by growing fruit in Southern Oregon. The building, which cost upwards of $8000, was put up purposely for the Medford Bank's use, and every detail of its construction was superintended by Mr. Stewart. The architect who designed the building was Arthur Weeks, of San Francisco. G. W. Priddy did the brick work, G. Diel and F. M. Stewart the carpenter work, J. W. Richardson the plastering, J. E. Toft the painting and oil finish, and J. H. Butler the wainscot papering.
ORGANIZATION OF MEDFORD BANK.
    As per previous arrangement those gentlemen who are now stockholders in the Medford Bank met in the new bank building last Saturday and perfected the organization of the bank association.
    The officers elected were J. H. Stewart, president; H. E. Ankeny, vice president; J. E. Enyart, cashier; directors, J. H. Stewart, H. E. Ankeny, R. H. Whitehead, W. S. Crowell, W. B. Roberts, Horace Pelton, W. F. Towne. The stockholders, other than those whose names appear above, are P. B. O'Neil, G. W. Isaacs, Ben Haymond, W. H. Bradshaw and C. C. Beekman. Capital stock of the bank, $50,000. These are all representative business and moneyed men of Jackson County, and this fact places the new institution on a solid financial footing.
Medford Mail, June 23, 1899, page 6


    The Medford Book Store, which is conducted by Jas. A. Stewart, our popular justice of the peace, has been stocked with the latest and best in stationery of all kinds, stylish papeteries, writing materials, etc., in addition to the usual standard supplies. Mr. S. spares no pains to please, and succeeds admirably.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1899, page 1


    W. H. Stewart of the Earl Fruit Co. last week finished shipping 15 carloads of Bartlett pears from the orchards where they [were] purchased, near Medford and Phoenix. The fruit netted the growers $1 per box.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1899, page 3


    F. M. Stewart is again local reporter for the Mail, vice Earl Van Antwerp. He is the right man in the right place.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1899, page 2



    The larger orchardists are so encouraged by the prices received for their products that the acreage has been materially increased during the past year. A hasty glance at a few of the large orchards will give some idea of the extent of the fruit industry in the valley. The crop of Weeks & Orr yielded 550 boxes of apples, 2000 boxes of pears, 2000 boxes of peaches, 40,000 pounds of prunes, and 10,000 pounds of dried apples. Captain G. Voorhies will dispose of 6000 boxes of apples, 9500 boxes of pears, and 65,000 pounds of prunes.
G. A. Gregory, "Jackson County," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 1, 1900, page 3


Died at Los Angeles.
    MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 16.--Mrs. A. J. Stewart, mother of Mrs. W. B. Stevens, of Albany, and merchant F. K. Deuel, of Medford, died after a short illness, this morning, at Los Angeles. She had been with her husband in New Mexico for some time previous, and had just gone to Los Angeles for treatment.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 17, 1900, page 6



    The will of Mrs. Mary A. Stewart of Jackson County, who died at Los Angeles, Calif., recently, has been admitted to probate. The estate is valued at $21,000, and the cash is willed to the children of the deceased--F. K. Deuel of Medford and Mrs. W. B. Stevens of Albany--and Fred. D. McCulloch, her grandson. The two first-named get $6000 each and the third $5000. The real property, etc., is bequeathed to Capt. A. J. Stewart, husband of the deceased.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1900, page 3  This item is lifted verbatim from the Morning Oregonian, February 5, 1900, page 3.


    W. H. Stewart had a very successful operation of skin grafting performed on his right arm on Tuesday of last week, by Drs. Jones & Shearer. When he was but three years old his hands and arms were badly scalded, since which time no natural skin has grown on them. Twenty-seven pieces of skin were taken from his shoulder for this recent operation, and these were grafted to his right forearm. The operation was very successful, each of the grafts having united with the flesh and after only a little more than a week's time is nearly healed over--both where grafted and where the grafts were taken away.

"City Happenings
," Medford Mail, March 9, 1900, page 7


    A successful operation was performed last week on W. H. Stewart by Dr. Jones & Shearer, consisting of removing twenty-seven pieces of skin from his shoulder and grafting them on his forearm. Mr. Stewart was badly scalded when but three years of age, and no natural skin had ever grown on the arm.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 12, 1900, page 3


    Mrs. E. Stewart, mother of Judge Jas. Stewart, was injured quite seriously on Wednesday of last week from a fall, and is still unable to move about much.
    Dillon Hill shipped another carload of Southern Oregon red apples to Portland this week. This is the last shipment of his '99 crop.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, March 16, 1900, page 2


    F. M. Stewart and A. H. Chessmore have joined issues and are now doing business as the Southern Oregon Real Estate and Employment Agency. They have rented office rooms near F. M. Wilson's bakery, and Mr. Stewart is there installed as manager of the agency. Both these gentlemen are honorable citizens of our town and will undoubtedly get a share of the business. They propose getting out a descriptive pamphlet of the Rogue River Valley for use in supplying information to prospective locators. In another column of this paper they have taken space in which they invite patronage.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 23, 1900, page 7



    A. H. Chessmore and F. M. Stewart have opened a real estate office and employment agency in Medford.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 26, 1900, page 3


    We unintentionally omitted to mention last week the arrival of a girl baby at the home of Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Stewart. The date of the arrival of this young lady was March 17th--St. Patrick's Day.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, March 30, 1900, page 6


    There is a possibility of a mixup in voting for Justice of the Peace in Medford precinct. The Republican nominee is Mr. F. M. Stewart, who until the last three years was a farmer and orchardist in Eden precinct, since which time he has been a resident of Medford engaged most of the time as bookkeeper in the Mail office--now of the real estate and employment agency of Stewart & Chessmore. He is an old soldier and a member of Chester A. Arthur G.A.R. post of Medford. He is an honest gentleman, a respected citizen and is well qualified to fill the office. His opponent is Mr. James Stewart, a young man. Don't get the names mixed. Make no mistake--vote for F. M. Stewart, the Republican nominee.
Medford Mail, May 25, 1900, page 2


    A. J. Stewart returned to Medford last week from his winter's stay in California and New Mexico. The gentleman was quite ill during the winter but has now entirely recovered his usual good health. He will probably remain hereabouts during the coming summer, looking after his interests.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 20, 1900, page 6


Gold Bricks.
    President Stewart, of the Medford Bank, called us in Saturday to look at their display of gold bricks from the Sterling mine. On a table in the center of the office was piled up seven large gold bricks, representing a cash value of $17,000. On the same table was a pile of twenties to the value of some $13,000, making a total valuation of a little over $30,000. The gold from the Sterling mine was only that which had accumulated in the sluice boxes and which are cleaned up about once each month, the general cleanup taking place later on when the season's run is over. As this has been a good year for placer mining, it is expected the Sterling's "cleanup" will amount to some $150,000, while the other placer mines will show a large increase here this year.
Medford Enquirer, April 27, 1900, page 5


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Medford, who owns a body of land on upper Rogue River, has started a big orchard there, and will soon have 80 acres planted in pear trees.
    Dillon Hill, a prominent fruit grower of Pooh Bah precinct, was in Jacksonville yesterday, contracting for the delivery of pears for domestic use at two cents a pound.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 16, 1900, page 3


    Hon. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart, Judge Crowell and Mr. and Mrs. H. M. Crowell were up at the Stewart summer retreat on Rogue River last week having a delightful time in that especially favored and most beautiful spot in Southern Oregon's grand panorama of exquisite scenery--where wild deer plead with the gunman for execution and mountain trout make a practice of flirting with the fish line flies--and all this from choice.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, September 7, 1900, page 6


    A Bryan club with a large membership was organized in Medford Sept. 1st. The following officers were elected: President, J. R. Wilson; vice-president, E. P. Hammond; secretary, Jas. Stewart; executive committee, J. A. Whitman, R. P. Little, J. G. Hodges. The club meets the second and third Fridays in each month.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 10, 1900, page 2


Oregon Red Apples Go Everywhere.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart has done much to establish a reputation for Oregon fruit in almost all countries of the known world. His fruit has in years agone been eaten in London, Liverpool, Calcutta, Hong Kong, Glasgow, Paris, and we truthfully say, we think, in every important city in the United States and Canada. He has established this reputation by growing only the very choicest fruits and in packing them in the most careful and painstaking manner. For years Mr. Stewart has packed and shipped, each season, several hundred boxes of both pears and apples for J. J. Valentine, president of the Wells, Fargo Express Company, these addressed to officials of the company and to his friends in all parts of the United States and Canada. This year Mr. Valentine's order is for 170 boxes of Winter Nelis pears and over a thousand boxes of apples. An order is now here for the pear and part of the apple shipments. These boxes will all be labeled and shipped, with few exceptions, one box to an individual and go to nearly as many different cities as there are boxes sent. An idea of the range of shipments can be gotten when we give a list of a few of the cities to which they go, namely: Chicago; Portland, Oregon; Portland, Me.; New York City; Galveston, Texas; St. Paul, Minn.; New Haven, Conn.; Montreal, Canada; Englewood, N.J.; Boston, Mass.; Washington, D.C., and hundreds of other eastern cities. Several years ago Mr. Valentine sent to his eastern friends boxes of California nuts, but the growers, after a time, began gouging him on prices and flim-flamming in quality, and he switched to Oregon fruits and for a number of years has paid his compliments in Southern Oregon products. Mr. Stewart charges Mr. Valentine no more than the fruit will bring elsewhere in the market, and in all his shipments no inferior or disease-infected fruit has been packed. Nothing could more substantially advertise Oregon than the sending of this fruit broadcast throughout the East, and to Mr. Stewart belongs the credit for having made it possible for us to so advertise.
Medford Mail, October 19, 1900, page 3


    A. J. Stewart left Monday morning for El Paso, Texas, where he has large interests and where he will spend the winter, returning to Medford next spring, as has been his wont to do for several years. He is a splendid gentleman, and his comings are always welcomed by our townspeople.

Medford Mail, October 19, 1900, page 6


    C. E. Stewart, the orchardist, is one of the most fortunate men in this whole land, and if there is cold turkey to be had it is almost always shied his way. The prune crop of Southern Oregon has pretty nearly all been sold at prices on a basis of from four and a half to five cents, but it remained for Mr. Stewart to put the finishing touches on and "bull" the market, as it were, until it suited his fancy--and his fancy was suited last week when he sold his prunes for six and one-half cents per pound f.o.b. Medford. This price was on a basis of 40s to 50s--of which Mr. Stewart has a considerable amount, but one condition was that they all be petite. The purchase was made by New York parties, and the fruit is now being packed for shipment. He has already shipped one carload to eastern parties, for which he received six cents. He has remaining one full carload. The price received by other growers was so much in advance of what they had been getting previous years that they were well satisfied--and willing to let the local buyers make a little margin.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 30, 1900, page 7


    Hon. J. H. Stewart returned Tuesday from another trip to Salem, where he has been making a red-hot fight against some of the provisions of the proposed new charter. Mayor Crowell and attorney Vawter have been camping on the scene of action. The sympathy of the community is with Mr. Stewart.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1901, page 5


    There is considerable of a rumpus over the adoption of the proposed charter of Medford, now before the legislature, principally because it intends to enlarge the boundaries of our town and make citizens of some who do not wish it. Mayor Crowell and W. I. Vawter have been at Salem, advocating the passage of the new incorporation act, and were met by a foeman worthy of their steel in Hon. J. H. Stewart, who objects to being arbitrarily made one of Medford's citizens.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 31, 1901, page 7


    A warmly contested fight over the proposed Medford charter was one of the events of the week. J. H. Stewart in opposition, and attorney W. I. Vawter and mayor W. S. Crowell in favor of the charter, indulged in an interesting discussion of its provisions, particularly that section extending to the boundary line so as to include Mr. Stewart's residence in South Medford, in the corporation limits of the city. The bill, with the exception of section 96, relating to county roads and bridges inside the corporate limits of the town, was endorsed by the Jackson County delegation, and will come up for final consideration sometime this week.

"Legislative News,"
Medford Mail, February 1, 1901, page 2


    The first hot fight of the session in the House took place Thursday night over the Medford charter. Hedges of Clackamas led the opposition prompted by attorney A. N. Soliss of Jacksonville, and tried to have the charter, which came up for final consideration at this time, referred to the committee on corporations, which was defeated. Representative Stewart led the fight for the charter, and able speeches were made by the other members of the Jackson County delegation, Messrs. Briggs and Carter, in its support. The bill went to a vote, and a call of the House was demanded by the opposition, with the result that it was passed by a vote of 39 to 16. A copy of the same charter was introduced in the upper house by Senator Cameron Thursday afternoon and passed under a suspension of the rules, and in 15 minutes' time. It was a splendid victory for the Jackson County delegation. It was a tropical fight over the passage of this Medford charter. When, after an hour and a half's weary routine in passing a number of charter bills that had no opposition, the clerk called up Representative Briggs' House Bill No. 30, the expectant ones who had come to see the fight aroused to attention and were not disappointed. W. I. Vawter, Judge Crowell and other Jackson County people were on the Jackson County delegation side of the house, while A. N. Soliss was entrenched opposite, behind and prompting Representative Hedges of Clackamas. On the call of the bill Representative Hedges gained the floor, moved that the bill be referred to the Committee on Cities and Towns, and proceeded to make a speech against the passage of the bill. This brought Representative Matthew Stewart to his feet, who made one of his forcible speeches and was followed by Representative Carter. During the latter's speech the Speaker decided remarks out of order and called for a vote on the motion to refer, which resulted in a tie. The speaker voting against re-referment, the bill was put on its final passage and Hedges again took the floor and with maps in hand proceeded to tell the representatives of the outrage of taking in a strip of land within the corporate limits of Medford by the proposed charter, claiming that the thing was done in the dark and made an eloquent plea against the bill. Hon. Matthew Stewart again got the floor, and in an impassioned speech pled for the passage of the bill and claimed that the real antagonism to the charter was J. H. Stewart, who sought to evade paying taxes on property which would have all the benefits granted by the city government in the way of sidewalk, lights, etc. He read affidavits from reputable citizens of Medford showing that a meeting called to protest against the charter held in Medford was not attended by any number of representative citizens. At the end of Mr. Stewart's speech it was plain to see that he had captured the House and the bill would pass. Hon. E. D. Briggs followed and talked for the passage of the bill. A call of the House was demanded, after which the question was called, and the bill carried by a vote of 38 to 16, on the announcement of which much applause was heard. J. H. Stewart made a hard fight against this charter bill and enlisted considerable talent in opposition to it.

"Senator Makers Take Time," Ashland Tidings, February 4, 1901, page 2



    Quite a number of the orchardists hereabouts have purchased gasoline engines with which to furnish power to operate their spraying pumps. The Olwell boys experimented with one last year and found it to be a great saving in labor and added proficiency to the service. The gentlemen who have made recent purchases are Messrs. Weeks & Orr., C. E. Stewart, Capt. G. Voorhies, J. A. Whitman, John Gore and Olwell Bros. The Mail has also purchased one, of the greater horsepower than the spray engines, for use in operating its presses.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 15, 1901, page 7


    A real estate deal of magnitudinal proportions was made on Tuesday of this week, wherein Hon. J. H. Stewart, president of the Bank of Medford, acquires the Fordyce farm of 160 acres, located just southwest of Medford. The consideration was $10,000, for which amount Mr. Stewart presented his check upon the signing of the transfer papers. The property is well adapted to fruit raising, for which purpose the purchase was made. Seventy acres of the land will be planted to Bartlett pears, and during the next two years thirty acres of the celebrated Newtown pippin apples will be set out. His son-in-law, Dillon Hill, will have charge of the property, and will move his family thereto as soon as convenient. Mr. Stewart has made a flattering success in fruit raising since he has resided in this county, and it is largely due to his efforts and encouragement that the fruit industry in the Rogue River Valley has gained the enviable position it has. That he will repeat the success he attained in that business in former years can scarcely be doubted, and since each success achieved in this, one of our greatest industries, attracts favorable attention to our fertile little valley it is of more than passing interest to know that a gentleman of such keen business attainments has decided to again interest himself in this line of husbandry.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 22, 1901, page 7


    F. M. Stewart, the real estate man of Medford, and another gentleman were out the first of the week looking at some of the fine farms in this section.
"Eagle Point Eaglets,"
Medford Mail, March 1, 1901, page 5


    Captain, Judge or Mayor Crowell--whichever you please--who was instrumental in having Hon. J. H. Stewart's property placed within the corporate limits of Medford, has been circumvented after all. Mr. Stewart, having purchased the Fordyce farm, across the road from the premises annexed, will make that his headquarters in the future and move the buildings on the Hill place thither. Old Windy has a decided weakness for throwing down those whom he should serve most.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1901, page 4


    Hon. J. H. Stewart will this season plant 60 acres of the Fordyce place, situated near Medford, in Bartlett pears. He will next put 40 acres in Newtown pippins.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1901, page 5


    J. H. Stewart today purchased the fruit orchard of A. C. Fordyce, located just south of Medford. Consideration, $10,000.
"Medford Brevities," Morning Oregonian, March 30, 1901, page 4


    C. E. Stewart, the orchardist, reports that his almond crop has not been injured materially by the recent frosts. There still remains at least two-thirds of a crop--possibly more. Part of his orchard is by far too heavily loaded with bloom, while in other parts there is a good half a crop. His peaches have enough bloom remaining to make an average crop. These same conditions prevail over the most part of the valley as regards the earlier blooming fruit. The apple and pear blooms were not advanced enough to be damaged at all.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 12, 1901, page 7


    Contrary to expectations, the valley has been visited by heavy frosts during the past few days which have materially damaged the fruit crop in some sections of the surrounding country. The pear crop has suffered the greatest damage. The orchards of Weeks & Orr, Clint Stewart and G. Voorhies were affected to a greater extent than the orchards nearer Medford. This is due to the fact that a heavy fog settled around Medford Saturday and Sunday mornings, which protected the orchards within the limits of its visitations. It is to be hoped that future developments will demonstrate that the injury done is not so extensive as at present appears. In view of the events derogatory to the fruit interest during the past week it is extremely fortunate that we have had a late, backward spring which precluded the too-early awakening of the fruit buds, in which case the fruit crop of the whole county would have been jeopardized.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 26, 1901, page 7


    J. H. Stewart and Dillon Hill have just completed the work of planting to pears fifty acres of the Fordyce farm, which they purchased last spring. Next winter they will plant several acres more of this land to apples.
    J. H. Stewart has been spending a week at his upper Rogue river summer resort, where he has been making a number of improvements.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 24, 1901, page 7


    The annual meeting of the board of directors of the Medford bank was held in Medford on Monday of this week. The books of the bank, and all the institution's transactions during the year were carefully looked into, and everything was declared to be in a very satisfactory condition. The officers elected were H. E. Ankeny, president; J. H. Stewart, vice president; J. E. Enyart, cashier; M. L. Alford, assistant cashier. Mr. Stewart, who has been the bank's president since its organization, two years ago, declined a reelection, owing to other business which requires his personal attention. The stockholders of the bank are H. E. Ankeny, J. H. Stewart, C. C. Beekman, R. H. Whitehead, Horace Pelton, Ben Haymond, James Pelton, W. H. Bradshaw and J. E. Enyart.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 14, 1901, page 7


    Twenty-five hives of bees for sale cheap. Jas. Stewart, Medford.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, June 21, 1901, page 7


    G. W. Kincaid, of Peyton, this county, was in our Hub City the first of the week. The gentleman is farming the J. H. Stewart ranch up on Rogue River.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, July 19, 1901, page 6


    F. E. Payne:--"Nothing new; nothing doing out my way. As a matter [of fact] I don't expect much doing for a few years yet. I'm just waiting for my forty-acre apple orchard to get to doing business. The trees are doing well, and in a very short time I'll have an orchard to be proud of. Oh, that land was built especially for growing trees. J. H. Stewart has put out fifty acres of pears on the Fordyce place, which joins my land, and next winter he expects to plant another forty-acre tract to yellow Newtown apples."
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, July 19, 1901, page 7


    Geo. Kincaid, who has charge of J. H. Stewart's Ranch on upper Rogue River, was in Medford last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1901, page 4


    Dr. and Mrs. Louis Bundy, H. G. Nicholson, H. G. Howland and F. M. Stewart paid a visit to the oil well, near Ashland, last Sunday. Messrs. Stewart and Howland are officers in the Rogue River Valley Oil Company, and Dr. Bundy is the company's chemist and expert.

"Purely Personal,"
Medford Mail, July 26, 1901, page 6


    A. J. (Bud) Hamlin has sold his land, situated a few miles this side of Phoenix and containing about 260 acres, to Capt. A. A. Voorhies of Portland, who is the present owner of the Stewart orchards adjoining. The price paid was $9000.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1901, page 5


    Bud Hamlin has sold his farm of 269 acres, in Eden precinct, to Captain Voorhies for $9400. The property joins Mr. Voorhies' land on the west and will undoubtedly be set to orchard by that gentleman. It is good orchard land, better if anything than the 10 acres of orchard which Mr. Voorhies is now cultivating--and harvesting a big crop of fruit from each year. Mr. Hamlin expects to leave Medford within the next few weeks, but just where he will go to is unsettled.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 2, 1901, page 7


    Fred Barneburg and Will Stewart were down on Rogue River this week with a line out for fish--many of which they gathered in. Mr. Barneburg leads the van of fishermen in this neck of the tall sugar pines--with D.H. Miller, Prof. Narregan and Billie Isaacs very closely following.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, August 16, 1901, page 6


    A. J. Stewart has purchased 200 acres of the Mingus land from S. M. Eby, paying a little over $11,000 therefor. The property is one and a half miles west of Medford and is some of the best land in the Rogue River Valley. Mr. Stewart, we understand, will plant the same to fruit within a couple or three years. The deal was made through the F. M. Stewart real estate agency.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, August 16, 1901, page 6


    There are many good arguments which can be put up in support of the growing of fruit as against that of wheat. These arguments are nearly all known to the people of the Rogue River Valley, and it would be useless to reiterate them here, but a comparison favorable to fruit is here found, and as it is founded upon facts and logical figuring there are no premises left for dispute: Forty acres of wheat on the Asa Fordyce place, which was purchased a few months since by Hon. J. H. Stewart, thrashed out this year forty-three bushels per acre, the wheat being raised by Mr. Fordyce. This forty acres will be planted to Yellow Newtown apples next spring by Mr. Stewart, and thereby hangs a tale, or rather a reflection. This forty-three bushels is worth about $20 and is a good yield for an acre of ground, but it took two years to get it, as it was a summer fallow crop and a heavy drain was made on the soil. When the Yellow Newtowns begin to bear a full crop the number of bushels per acre will in a single year equal ten such crops of wheat, or the yield for twenty years, and in dollars, twenty such yields or the gross returns for forty years. The loss of income while the orchard is maturing, measured by the wheat standard, will be covered twice over by a single good crop. To care for and harvest one good crop of fruit will for a single year necessitate the expenditure of $150 an acre or $6,000 for the forty acres. Factory and mill will take part of this, but much the larger portion will go directly to labor here, and the community will derive as great incidental benefit from this forty acres of orchard as from a thousand acres of wheat. Soil must be carefully selected, and brain as well as brawn given to attain success in such a highly specialized industry as successful growing of fruit. Failure is certain if slovenly or careless methods are followed. Assuming thirty years as the life of an orchard on such land and in the hands of such workmen as Mr. Stewart and his son-in-law, Mr. D. R. Hill, then for thirty years labor will be largely employed, the community sustained and the owners will have something to show for a life of labor other than a very sluggish soil and a dynamic mortgage.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 16, 1901, page 7


    Miss Mollie Barneburg and Mrs. Wm. Stewart have been visiting in Ashland, guests of their sister, Mrs. High.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1901, page 2


    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. C. E. Stewart, Saturday, August 24, 1901, a boy baby.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, August 23, 1901, page 6


    A. J. Stewart will plant part of his recently acquired land to fruit this fall, he having already purchased 1000 Comice pear trees from L. E. Hoover. The land is part of the old Mingus tract and was purchased last week from S. M. Eby.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 23, 1901, page 7


    Thos. Honeyman, of the firm of Honeyman, DeHart & Co., has purchased Hon. J. H. Stewart's orchard, which adjoins Medford on the north. The sale includes about 80 acres of land and the fine residence built a few years ago, as also that occupied by Dillon Hill. The price paid was $15,000.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1901, page 3


Portland Man Invests in Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., Aug. 29.--Thomas Honeyman, Sr., of Portland, today purchased the J. H. Stewart residence and orchard property here. The purchase includes 65 acres of bearing apples and a pear orchard, the residence and a grove of 12 acres surrounding it. It is said Mr. Honeyman will make his future home at Medford. The price was $15,000.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 30, 1901, page 5


    Jake Huger, superintendent at the Voorhies fruit orchard, reports that he is packing Bartlett pears at the rate of a carload a day and would be packing more if more pickers could be had. He expects at least twenty carloads of pears will be gathered from the orchard, and there may be thirty.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 6


    J. H. Stewart, the orchardist, has sold his fruit orchard and residence to Thos. Honeyman, senior member of the Honeyman Hardware Co. of Portland. [It was actually E. J. DeHart.] The purchase comprises seventy-seven and one-half acres of land and includes, aside from sixty-five acres of bearing orchard, the fine residence recently built by Mr. Stewart and the residence of his son-in-law, Dillon Hill, together with the twelve acres of grove that surrounds these buildings. Mr. Stewart reserves the crop of fruit now being harvested. The price paid was $15,000, and possession is to be given Oct. 1st. Mr. Stewart and Mr. Hill will move to the Fordyce place, which Mr. Stewart purchased a short time since and which is situated just south of the above-mentioned property. Mr. Honeyman, it is reported, will move to his recent purchase and will make Medford his future home. The land in question, or a part of it at least, is inside the incorporate limits of our city. It is an ideal home, and had Honeyman hunted for years for a more suitable suburban place of abode he could not have found it.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 30, 1901, page 7


    Clinton E. Stewart, who owns one of the largest and best orchards in southern Oregon, has bargained it to O. S. Clay of Snohomish, Wash. It contains about 300 acres of land, half of which is set with a superior quality of fruit and nut trees. The Times learns that the price agreed on is $14,000. The sale was made through the real estate agency of York & Wortman of Medford.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1901, page 7


    W. S. Clay, of Snohomish, Wash., who had been in Medford a couple of weeks, on Saturday of last week closed a deal whereby he became the possessor of C. E. Stewart's fine orchard, located south of Medford. The purchase comprises all of Mr. Stewart's land, over 200 acres, the most of which is now a bearing orchard, together with all horses, wagons and farm implements, save one or two horses and a few minor articles which are reserved. The price paid was a good, snug sum--the exact amount not being given out by parties interested. Mr. Clay left Monday morning for his home where his family resides. Possession is to be given on or before January 1, 1902, but Mr. Clay will lose no time in moving here and be in readiness to take possession at any time. The purchase was a good one, and Mr. Clay will never have occasion to regret having become the possessor of this fine farm. The sale was made through the W. T. York real estate agency and was one of the largest deals ever made in Southern Oregon orchard property. Mr. Stewart will probably plant another orchard at some other place in the valley.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, September 13, 1901, page 6


Wanted.
    Twenty wood choppers wanted. Good winter's job. Apply to F. M. Stewart, Medford.
Medford Mail,
September 13, 1901, page 6


    A few weeks ago these columns told of the sale of the J. H. Stewart fruit farm, near Medford, to Mr. Honeyman. It was Mr. DeHart, another member of the Honeyman Hardware Company, of Portland, to whom the sale was made.

    Perry Stewart and family have moved from Sebastopol, Calif. to Redding, Calif. Drifting Medford way, seemingly. They'll be back here again one of these days--and their many Medford friends will be pleased thereat.

    Judge James Stewart has taken a position as night clerk at Hotel Nash. Legal and office business requiring his attention will be looked after during the afternoon of each day.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 27, 1901, page 7


WILL TAKE UP FRUIT FARMING
Prominent Business Man, E. J. DeHart, Will Go to Medford.
    E. J. DeHart, who recently purchased the fruit farm of Hon. J. H. Stewart, one mile from the town of Medford, Jackson County, will remove there with his family on October 10. The place contains 80 acres, 65 of which are in fruit trees. There are 2000 apple trees, 800 pear trees and 200 prune trees. The trees are all bearing and in the best of condition, and the land is in the highest state of cultivation.
    In making his home on this place Mr. DeHart can hardly be said to be going into farming to grow up with the country, for all the hard work and waiting has been done. The place is in one of the most beautiful sections of the state, with a most delightful climate, where every prospect pleases, and if rural felicity is to be found in Oregon it is there.
    Mr. DeHart has long been a prominent factor in business circles in Portland. He went into business here in partnership with John R. Foster. In 1862 he bought out Mr. Foster's interest and conducted the business under the firm name of Jacob Underhill & Co. until 1868. He then went to San Francisco, where he was in business for five years. He then went to New York, where he stayed till 1875. In 1876 he returned here and took charge of the business of E. J. Northrop & Co. In 1878 he bought out Mr. Northrop and organized the firm of Thompson & DeHart. Later William Honeyman became his partner, and the firm of Honeyman & DeHart continued the business until Mr. DeHart sold his interest to the sons of Mr. Honeyman some 18 months ago. Mr. DeHart has always borne a first-class reputation as a business man and has hosts of warm friends who will wish him every success in his new departure.
    Mr. Stewart has bought 160 acres of land just across the road from Mr. DeHart's place, where he proposes to make another fruit farm.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 2, 1901, page 8


    Clinton E. Stewart, who purchased part of the Mingus place, situated in Heber Grove, of his father, Capt. A. J. Stewart, will set it in orchard. The latter will do likewise with the balance. The tract amounts to over 200 acres.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 10, 1901, page 7


Notice to Directors.
    The directors of the Rogue River Valley Oil Company are hereby requested to meet at the company's office in this city on Friday, Oct. 18th, at 7:30 p.m. Matters of importance to consider.
F. M. Stewart, Secretary,           
Medford Mail, October 11, 1901, page 2


    Ordered by the court that C. E. Stewart be allowed $8 rebate on his road tax for use of wide tire wagons.

"County Commissioners' Court," Medford Mail, October 11, 1901, page 2


Fruit Pickers Wanted.
    Five or six fruit pickers wanted at Voorhies' Eden Valley orchards.
Medford Mail, October 11, 1901, page 2


    Perry Stewart and family returned to Medford Tuesday evening from California, where they have been sojourning for the past six months. They are not enthusiastic in their praise of those parts of the state where they stopped--Sebastopol and Redding. There are features of the country that are not so bad, but on a general roundup of all matters Mr. Stewart has come to the conclusion that the Rogue River Valley is a long ways ahead of 'em all. Mrs. Stewart's health has improved somewhat but she has not entirely recovered. They have concluded to make Medford their home for a time without date--and their many friends will rejoice because of their conclusion.

    Mr. and Mrs. E. J. DeHart and daughter, Miss Ella, arrived in Medford last week from Portland and are now preparing for a permanent residence in our city. It was Mr. DeHart who purchased the J. H. Stewart fruit orchard in southwest Medford, paying $15,000 therefor. Mr. DeHart is of the hardware firm of Honeyman, DeHart & Co., Portland. He has decided to try rural life in the suburbs of Medford and is seeking a rest from business turmoils and perplexities and an enjoyment of the quiet and independence of a Southern Oregon orchard home. He has moved his household effects and is now in full possession of his property. These are fine people, and the coming of more like them to our locality will be of profit to the valley and pleasure to our people. Mr. DeHart has one of the finest home places in all Southern Oregon, and his orchard is ranked among the first in its production of Oregon red and yellow apples.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 6


    Clint Stewart has purchased from his father the 200-acre tract of land, west of Medford, which the latter gentleman purchased a few months ago from Mr. Eby. The land will all be set to apple and pear trees this winter.
    A. J. Stewart is having a dwelling house erected on his recently acquired land west of Medford. The building is 26x28 feet in size and one story high. Contractor A. C. Nicholson is doing the carpenter work.

    Jake Huger, superintendent of the Capt. Voorhies orchards, packed and shipped last week four carloads of Winter Nelis pears, and has this week commenced gathering and packing apples. The pears were shipped to eastern markets.

"Additional Local," Medford Mail, October 18, 1901, page 6


    E. J. DeHart, who purchased the Hon. J. H. Stewart fruit orchard, near Medford, has given an order to L. E. Hoover for thirty Royal Ann cherry trees, the same to be planted this winter. Mr. DeHart has noted the growing demand for this variety of fruit and proposes to be in a position to supply some of it. Among the recent innovations in bar drinks is the cherry cocktail, in the preparation of which the Royal Ann almost always figures, and the demand for this variety of fruit is growing to wonderful proportions because of this cocktail notion, or fad.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 1, 1901, page 7


    Capt. Gordon Voorhies is preparing to plant to trees the 240 acres of land which he recently purchased from Bud Hamlin. This land adjoins Mr. Voorhies' old orchard, and when all is planted he will have 380 acres in trees--the largest orchard tract in Southern Oregon.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, November 8, 1901, page 6


    Perry Stewart and O. S. Snyder have invented a device for holding a screen door closed and also preventing it from slamming. It is a queer sort of a contrivance with springs and grooves here and there and needs to be seen to be understood and doubtlessly used to be appreciated. The gentlemen have the article patented--and if they don't make a cold million out of it they ought to.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 8, 1901, page 7


    MR. DeHART'S FINE PLACE..--While in Medford a few days ago, Adam Klippel called on his former neighbor here, E. J. DeHart, who recently purchased some 87 acres of the celebrated Stewart fruit ranch, adjoining Medford. He says Mr. DeHart is delighted with his place and his new home, and showed him all over it. Mr. DeHart had just completed picking 1000 boxes of apples of one variety, and was getting them ready to ship. Not only has he secured a lovely home and surroundings in one of the most delightful sections of Oregon, but he looks forward to making a financial success of fruit growing, and thinks it will not take him many years to clear the $15,000 he paid for the place. One thing which will be of interest to prune growers and handlers is that Mr. DeHart has decided to cut down all his prune trees and plant more apple trees. Prunes are "mighty onsartln," anyhow, and it is only once in three or four years that there is much profit in them.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, November 9, 1901, page 7


    A. Stewart of Klamath County is paying relatives living in Medford a visit. He is a brother of Justice Stewart.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 14, 1901, page 4


    Hon. J. H. Stewart returned this week from a several weeks' stay at his mountain ranch, on Rogue River.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, November 22, 1901, page 6


    A. J. Stewart left Wednesday for El Paso, Texas, where he will spend the winter.

    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stewart left Wednesday for a few weeks' visit to San Francisco.

    W. S. Clay and family arrived in Medford Wednesday evening from Snohomish, Wash. Mr. Clay is the gentleman who purchased the C. E. Stewart fruit ranch a couple of months ago.

    Mrs. D. M. Knisely, of Edgerton, Ohio, arrived in Medford Wednesday evening and will remain during the winter with her uncle and aunt, Mr.and Mrs. F. M. Stewart. The lady is the wife of Dr. Knisely, a prominent dentist of Edgerton, and is here for the benefit of her health. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. E. B. Farley, wife of a big wholesale furniture dealer in Colorado Springs, Colo., and is here upon a visit.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 6, 1901, page 6


    Capt. Gordon Voorhies has ordered enough Yellow Newtown and Spitzenburg apple trees and Bartlett and Howard pear trees to plant the Bud Hamlin place, which he purchased a few months ago. There are about two hundred and sixty acres in the place, and it will all be planted.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, December 6, 1901, page 6


    J. A. Stewart left Wednesday for El Paso, Texas, where he will spend the winter.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. H. Stewart left Wednesday for several weeks' visit in San Francisco.
    Mrs. D. M. Knisley, of Edgerton, O., arrived Wednesday and will remain during the winter with her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart. She was accompanied by her sister, Mrs. E. B. Farley, of Colorado Springs, Col.
"Medford," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, December 8, 1901, page 21


    Engineer Vic McCray came in from the Fish Lake Ditch this week for a few days' business stay in the city. He returned Wednesday, accompanied by F. M. Stewart, a notary public. They will visit several farmers along the line of the ditch and secure their acknowledgments to a number of ditch contracts and rights-of-way.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 13, 1901, page 6


    John Barneburg:--"We had a letter from Mollie this week. She is at Dr. Burke's hospital in San Francisco, and is very much improved in health. We also heard from Will Stewart. He has been at another hospital in that city having skin grafted onto his arms and hands. The operation proved a complete success, and he has now left the hospital. His arms and hands were badly burned several years go, and they have been very troublesome to him since because of the fact that the skin would not cover the burned places. How large were the strips of skin that were grafted on? I don't remember, but they were inches wide and several inches long. They were taken from his hip. He's all right now and will probably be home soon."
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 20, 1901, page 7


    Mrs. D. B. Fairley, who has been here upon a visit to her sister, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, left Tuesday for Southern California, where she will visit a few weeks before returning to her home at Colorado Springs, Colorado. Her husband is quite a wealthy and prominent mining man and is at present president of the Chamber of Commerce of Colorado Springs.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, December 27, 1901, page 4


    Mrs. F. M. Stewart, who has been quite ill for several months past, is reported to be somewhat improved.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, December 27, 1901, page 7


    E. J. DeHart is making many substantial improvements about his suburban orchard home. He has carpenters at work putting up a 30x50-foot carriage and implement house, the same being finished in good style and in keeping with his elegant residence and other surroundings. He has grubbed out all his prune trees and has set the ground to Bartlett pears and has also set out sixty fruit trees of various kinds for a family orchard. These include cherry, fig, peach, apricot, almond and plum trees. He proposes making other improvements about the place, and when all are completed he will have a model home.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, January 2, 1902, page 7


    The Bartlett pear has not been neglected, and some striking successes have been scored in its culture at the old Stewart (now Voorhies) orchard, notably, which almost repaid the purchase price of the orchard in two crops to the present owner, largely through Bartletts. While superior to the California product, our Bartlett pears come on the market while yet glutted with California's surplus each season, and the variety is so perishable that it will not stand cold storage after transportation east, thus frequently "netting a loss" to the shipper. The present season our local growers, who sold early or on contract, made a handsome thing out of Bartletts, but the dealers are said to have come to grief. As a solution of the difficulty, dealers and growers are talking up the proposition of local cold-storage plants, to lengthen the season. A better plan would appear to be that of Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has discovered a nook in the higher mountains, up Rogue River, remote from railroads at present, where the fruit matures some two weeks later than in the valley, where he is preparing the ground for setting sixty acres in pears next year, realizing that in the present state of development of this section transportation will not be lacking when the trees get into bearing. Mr. Stewart is deserving of the title of Father of the Fruit Raising Industry here, and his present enterprise at the age of 72 years should put to the blush those who state that life is too short for the man of average age to plant an orchard.
"More Good Fruit Stories," Medford Mail, January 31, 1902, page 1



    J. H. Stewart:--"I want some trespass notices. I am compelled to put them up to protect myself, though I never did put up such a notice before. The young men and boys around town have had the run of the old fairgrounds so long that they think they own them, and go out there to shoot birds, etc. Now, I have some very fine colts being fed in that grove, and there has been too much promiscuous shooting going on there of late. None of the animals have been injured so far, but I don't care to take any chances. Hence, these notices."

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 7, 1902, page 7


    J. H. Stewart has but recently finished planting fifty acres of land, on the Fordyce place, to apples--2100 trees thirty-one feet apart. He is now preparing to plant thirty acres of his Rogue River ranch to pears. This last-named place is pretty well up in the mountains, being only a short distance from Fall Creek.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 14, 1902, page 7

LEADER OF INDUSTRY
What J. H. Stewart Has Done at Medford.
A DISTRICT REVOLUTIONIZED
The Development of the Fruit Industry in the Rogue River Valley
Portland Capital Taking Hold of It.

    MEDFORD, Or., Feb. 20.--(Staff correspondence.)--The most interesting man in Southern Oregon is Hon. J. H. Stewart, the Medford apple-grower. He is essentially a man who does things, and he is, furthermore, a man who has reasons for things. I venture to say that Mr. Stewart never did anything in his life without knowing why. It was no accident that he came to Southern Oregon 15 years ago; it was no accident that he established himself just where he did; it was no accident that he prospered, and that in prospering he has revolutionized the industry and the fortunes of the country around about Medford. These were my conclusions as the result of a three hours' interview with Mr. Stewart yesterday, and they will, I think, be borne out by anybody who will read even so much of the story of his experiences and achievements as I may be able to reflect in what is to follow.
    Mr. Stewart comes of the race of true-bred Americans, born in the early years of the last century, with enough of Yankee in his blood to give mental energy and fixedness of purpose, and enough of the Scotch-Irish strain to yield imagination, fluency in expression, and the taste for public affairs. Mr. Stewart is at once a man of action and a man of talk; and he both acts and talks to some purpose. He has no affectation of reserve, no habit of hiding his light under a bushel. He is willing that his neighbors and all the world shall have any advantage which may come through his experiments and achievements. And now that he is past the age when it is reasonable to hope for any personal profit from new ventures, he is as busily employed in useful labors as if his daily bread depended upon his daily effort.
----
    Mr. Stewart was past 50 years of age, and had done about one man's share of work, before coming to Oregon. He began business life in Illinois and Missouri, 'way back in the '40s, grew millions upon millions of orchard trees as a professional nurseryman, planted many orchards, and incidentally served several terms in the Illinois Legislature, before the time came when he could cut loose and satisfy a lifetime's wish to visit the Coast. "I had seen enough," he said, in the course of talk, "to make it clear to me that the fruit business in the Mississippi Valley was about played out, for the development of the Coast was rapidly making, as it has since made, it impossible for the interior states to compete in the general markets." Mr. Stewart's idea upon leaving home was to settle somewhere in the Puget Sound country, and it was to that part of the Coast that he first turned. But the conditions for horticulture, and especially for apple-growing, did not wholly suit him, and he came on south, carefully taking in every section of the country from the Columbia River down to Southern California. Several months were spent in visitation and investigation. No section was slighted, even the remote country of Lake and Klamath counties being visited. His final determination was that the Rogue River Valley, above every other section of the Coast, was adapted to the growing of apples on a large scale. And, being thoroughly convinced, he bought the land where afterwards his first orchard was planted--now the Voorhies place--and returned to his home in Quincy, Ill., for the winter and to close out his affairs. The winter was by no means an idle one, for, in addition to other labors, he grafted with his own hand the several varieties of nursery stock which he thought suited to his new situation; and, in large part, the Voorhies orchard today is the outcome of that winter's work at Quincy, Ill.
----
    Mr. Stewart found, as he expected to find, that horticultural experience in one country is no infallible guide to successful practice in another country where the conditions of soil and climate are different. And thus it was that, after his first planting was three years old, he set about reforming it. It takes nerve to cut to the trunk and "work over" thrifty and promising trees, but this Mr. Stewart did with a good portion of his orchard. "There are some things," he says truly, "which have got to be learned by actual experience on the ground. I watched the old orchards about me, I watched my own trees, and I became convinced that I had made some mistakes, and I rectified them so far as it was possible, though it cost me a painful effort to do it."
----
    It is not necessary to follow in detail the first years of Mr. Stewart's career in this state. By 1890 it was demonstrated that a new spirit had entered into the Rogue River Valley. A country which had formerly been thought fit only for the rougher sorts of production--for pasture and for grain--suddenly came into prominence as the producer of apples and pears the like of which had not often been seen even in those parts of Oregon famous for their fruit products. It was soon found that the skill and energy of one man had given to the Rogue River Valley a new character and a new impetus: that the special adaptations of the country had been found. But this did not wholly satisfy the people; who had long been used to isolation, and who had not learned the significance of transportation. "We may," declared the doubting Thomases, "be able to grow apples by the ton, but what good will it do us? Who is there after the limited Portland demand shall be supplied to buy our product?" Mr. Stewart had not overlooked this point, and his answer came in the form of a season's crop shipped and sold at a great profit in the markets of the Eastern States and Europe. He knew what no other man in the country suspected, namely, that such a product as that of the Medford district had the world for its market. It was upon the basis of his knowledge of the demand which waited upon a strictly first-class apple, in connection with his faith in the soil and climate of the Rogue River Valley, that his first orchard was planted. It was a case where the outcome entirely justified the hope and fully rewarded the effort. But years intervened between the plan and the demonstration, and they were years which to a man less confident in his own judgments, less resolute in his purposes, less willing to work for the future and to wait upon the future, would have been tedious and anxious to the last degree. In a sense, as he now frankly admits, they were so to Mr. Stewart, but he worked and waited through them hopefully and cheerfully. "I never much minded the croaking," he says, "for I never doubted what the end would be."
----
    It was in 1885 that Mr. Stewart set about the work of making his first orchard. It was eight or 10 years before the vision which inspired his efforts and buoyed him through the years of waiting stood plain in the view of everybody. Since that day of demonstration it is now less than 10 years. These periods are short when considered in connection with the industrial revolution of a country. But they have been momentous in the highest degree for the Rogue River Valley. They have established her name in the commercial world; they have witnessed the progress of tree planting until all around Medford the country is coming to be one vast orchard; they have given the valley an industrial specialty which means so much for any country; they have brought new people and new capital into the valley, and have given it purpose, hopefulness and general impetus. And for all this the Rogue River Valley is indebted to J. H. Stewart.
----
    Mr. Stewart is naturally best known as an apple-grower, but he has by no means confined his energies to one variety of fruit. His experiments in pear growing are, in his own view, as important as in apple-growing. The pear is destined to be as great a commercial  success, he thinks, in the Rogue River Valley as the apple. "We can compete with the world in pears," he says. "Our best varieties are large in size, fine in color and flavor, and will keep better in transportation than the product of any other country." In his first orchard there was a large planting of pear trees, and they have been profitable from the beginning. In one or two seasons when, from frost or some other cause, the apple crop has been disappointing, the pear crop has remained to make the season one of profit. Last year in many orchards the pear crop was the more profitable end of the business, and it is for this reason that every orchard now set out in Rogue River Valley is made up in large part of pears. The grape, too, has come in for a share of Mr. Stewart's attention, and. while neither himself nor his neighbors has done anything with it in a commercial way, Mr. Stewart is convinced that there is in the Rogue River Valley a great future for the table grape. Of the 50 or more varieties which he has fruited during the past 15 years, there are two--the Catawba and the Delaware--which, in his judgment, can be produced in the very highest perfection in the Rogue River Valley. Whoever will take up the production of these varieties on commercial lines, Mr. Stewart thinks, will duplicate the success which has been made in connection with the apple and pear business and give to the valley a new and large source of income. In no other country that he knows of can these favorite varieties be grown without a blemish--and this is the record of experiments extending over a period of something more than 15 years.
----
    My interview with Mr. Stewart yesterday was, of course, largely a "fruit talk." He spoke from the standpoint of an established authority and with the caution of a man anxious to avoid misleading statements. "I make it a rule," he said, "not to advise the fruitgrowers of Oregon upon points of practice, because my experience in this state has been limited to this valley, and I know that what is truth and wisdom here may be the very reverse as related to other districts. For example, there can be no question that with us the Newtown Pippin is the best apple--best because it is less liable to blight from frost than other varieties, because it is relatively free from pests, because it is a fine keeper, and, last but not least, because its market is the world. In my judgment--and I have observed widely for a period of 60 years--the Rogue River Valley can produce a better Newtown Pippin than any other spot in the world. I have tested the matter here, and I know of what I speak. But this may not apply to other parts of Oregon. Each district has its own characteristics of climate and soil, and each must find out by experience what its best adaptations are." Proceeding, Mr. Stewart said that there were reasons why the Spitzenburg, which does so well at Hood River and elsewhere. is relatively less successful in the Rogue River Valley. Color, he declared, which is so large an element in the commercial value of the Spitzenburg, is a product more of moisture than of warmth; and not in all seasons do the ruddy apples get moisture enough to develop them in perfection. The red varieties--very notably the Jonathan--do better in the high ground far above the floor of the valley than in the valley itself; and Mr. Stewart is now planting these varieties on a mountain tract 30 miles from the railroad, hoping to gain, through the excellence of the mountain fruit, a price that will make it profitable to bring it to the railroad by wagon.
----
    On every hand, as one drives about Medford, there is manifest the influence of horticulture upon the welfare of the country. The various orchards now in bearing aggregate no less than 1000 acres, and the annual shipment runs up to about 200 carloads. In addition to this, there are large orchards at other points in the county and in the adjoining county of Josephine. Indeed, the largest single apple orchard in the country is at Central Point. There are, too, indications that the business is but just begun. Within the year upwards of 1000 acres have been set out in apple and pear trees, and this planting, added to what has been set out during the past two seasons, makes some 2000 or more acres, which will in time be added to the productive area.
----
    The part taken by Portland men and Portland capital in these enterprises is interesting and significant. Some three years ago Mr. Gordon Voorhies, of Portland, connected with the Burrell family, bought from Mr. Stewart his original place three miles south from Medford, and since that time has added greatly to it. His planting the present season will aggregate something like 225 acres. It is understood that Mr. Voorhies' venture has proved highly successful, so much so that in the brief period of his ownership his original investment has been fully regained. Another Portland investor in the Medford orchard district is E. J. DeHart, the well-known hardware merchant, who has recently become the owner of a fine place of 75 acres immediately north of town. Mr. DeHart has come with his family to the new purchase, and proposes to make his permanent home here. Another and very recent venturer in orchard property in the Medford district is Mr. Hunt Lewis, of the well-known Portland family. His fine place of 160 acres joins Mr. Voorhies" place on the south. It is sometimes asserted that Portland is slow to take hold of the productive interests of the country, and in instances this may be true; but in the case of the apple industry the charge certainly will not be. Indeed, if the movement shall keep up we may soon expect to hear that the capitalists of Portland are crowding the owners of the soil from out their own territory.                               A. H.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 22, 1902, page 1


MORE FRUIT TALK
How the Newtown Pippin Gained Its Fame.
ELIMINATION OF THE UNFIT
An Interesting Story Relative to the Origin of the Oregon Pioneer
Fruit Varieties--The Ashland Fruit District.
    MEDFORD, Or., Feb. 22.--(Staff Correspondence.)--"I think I may fairly boast," remarked Mr. DeHart to me this morning, as he piled another log on the blazing hearth, "of the most expensively stocked woodshed in the State of Oregon." Proceeding, he explained that the basis of his fuel pile was a prune orchard planted some eight or 10 years ago and recently dug up, just as it was coming into maturity, because it has been found that the prune is not a profit-winner in the Rogue River Valley, or at least not in the district of which Medford's the center. It seems that those who ventured early in the orchard business here, including Mr. J. H. Stewart, were to some extent infected with the prune craze which swept the country a few years back, and without carefully estimating all of the facts related to the production and marketing of prunes, made a very considerable planting of prune trees. This explains the presence about Medford of some small prune orchards which are not profitable but which there is some natural reluctance to destroy. The situation of the orchardist in possession of a thriving plantation of prune trees is precisely that of one having on his hands a half-worn suit of clothes which he is unwilling again to wear, but, nevertheless, lacks the moral courage to give to the poor. Mr. DeHart solved the dilemma by having his prune trees dug up and converted into firewood and by planting apples and pears in their place. Some others have followed the same course, but others still hold on to their prune trees, hoping against hope and waiting for the season of old-time prices, which will never come again.
    The variety planted here is the Petite, or French prune, which comes into direct competition with the California prune crop, to which it is inferior in the all-important point of size and with which, under the local conditions of climate, it is unable to compete as to price. Mr. Voorhies, who, as the owner of the old Stewart place, has a beautiful prune orchard, still holds fast to his trees and last season turned out a product of several carloads, but the sizes were small and the price, which has been  reserved, must have been very little if anything above the cost of production. There can, I think, be no mistake in the calculation which adjudges the prune tree commercially worthless in the Rogue River Valley, and which has sentenced it to the axe and to the fuel heap.
----
    I was especially interested in this because in times past I have witnessed the very same evolutionary process in various parts of California. Some 15 or 20 years ago, when California went prune mad on the basis of the early and great success of the prune business in the Santa Clara Valley, prune orchards were set out with small regard for local conditions, and, among other places, in the region fronting the Coast south and west of the Santa Cruz Mountains. In time there grew up a great orchard area along the Coast. The trees were vigorous and healthy, as they are now in the Rogue River Valley. Their product of fruit was immense, exceeding, in many localities, the product of Santa Clara orchards. But, in spite of all, the Coast prune could never be made to yield a profit. At first the blame was laid upon the fogs which prevented the fruit from drying by the cheap and handy process of exposure to the sun; and to get over this difficulty a great drying plant was created by the Coast growers on the inland side of the Santa Cruz Mountains, the fruit being hauled over to the drying grounds by an easy arrangement with the railroads.
    But this plan did not work in practice, and the Coast growers fell back upon artificial drying, which consumed all the margin of the business and put them at a disadvantage as compared with the growers in the valley districts. At last the wiser among the Coast growers abandoned the prune business altogether and directed their attention toward other forms of production. Whole orchards of fine prune trees were cut down and burned, and the soil which they cumbered was given over to other and more profitable crops. I myself witnessed the destruction of one of the largest prune orchards in the Pajaro Valley (Watsonville), and am able to bear personal testimony to the disappointment and loss suffered in the effort to do in that locality what was being done and which continues to be done easily just across the range less than 20 miles away. The abandonment of prune growing, if not the beginning of the apple industry in the Watsonville district, was at least the beginning of its larger development. Apple trees were, to a very great extent, planted in the room vacated through elimination of prune orchards, and today they contribute in large measure to the welfare of one of the most prosperous sections of California.
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    In horticulture, as in other things, each country has to find out its best adaptations. There is but one guide to this end, and that is experience, and experience usually comes high. Too often those who venture first are heavy losers, and too often they are looked upon as cranks even by those who gain most through the demonstrations into which they have cast their energies and their fortunes. Happily, this has not been the experience in the Rogue River Valley. The industrial Moses of that district, Mr. Stewart, made some mistakes, as he frankly confesses, but his early ventures, as well as his more recent ones, have been on the whole successful and profitable. He had what many a man lacks at the critical time--namely, the nerve to look his failures in the face and to discount their effect before they could impoverish him or seriously impair his fortunes.
----
    In the course of my long talk with Mr. Stewart, reported at length in my letter of yesterday, many interesting facts in connection with apple production were developed, but nothing that interested me more than the story of how the Newtown Pippin, which is so general a favorite on the other side of the Atlantic Ocean, came into its very great reputation. There are, as the apple world knows, few places where the Newtown can be grown to perfection. Everywhere in the Mississippi Valley it is a failure, and it is only here and there in small spots an the Atlantic Coast that it is a pronounced success. One of these favored spots is in Albemarle County, Virginia, which has long enjoyed a specially favorable reputation in the Eastern apple markets. Some 30 or more years ago an Englishman of rank found his way into Albemarle County, and being greatly pleased with the quality of the apples which he found there, sent several barrels as gifts to friends and distinguished persons in England, among others to Queen Victoria. The Queen acknowledged the gift in a personal letter, which found its way to the Albemarle apple growers, who made it a point each year thereafter to send her a large consignment of their choicest production, specially polished and wrapped and packed in varnished barrels. Whoever came into hospitable contact with Queen Victoria for a long series of years was more than likely to be given opportunity to sample her American apples, and thus it came about that the Newtown Pippin--or the Albemarle Pippin, as it is commonly called in England--grew into a great and special fame, which lasts to this day and helps to make the fortune of the apple grower of Medford and other apple districts of Oregon. And this fame is not likely to suffer in the hands of our people. The Newtown Pippin of Albemarle County, fine fruit as it is, is no match for the Newtown Pippin grown at Medford or Hood River and at some other places in this state, and already, when compared with the Oregon product, it ranks as second class in the markets of the East and of Europe.
----
    Mr. Stewart believes that he has a very curious historical connection with the horticulture of pioneer Oregon, though he was wholly unconscious of it until after his first visit to the state in 1884. In the course of his examination of the early orchards in the Willamette Valley and of Southern Oregon in that year, he was surprised to find a range of varieties familiar to his youth, and which, so far as his knowledge goes, were never propagated excepting in his father's nursery at Quincy, Ill., in the early '40s. The history of these varieties is a peculiar one. The elder Stewart was a pioneer in the nursery business in Illinois, and found it difficult to keep up his stock in a country so far from the sources of supply. On one occasion he commissioned a neighbor who was going to Ohio, then a relatively new country, to bring him a new stock of scions, and as a result got a quantity of seedlings which had been developed in Ohio by settlers from New England. From this invoice he produced a stock of trees of a kind never, to his knowledge, propagated by any other nursery; and it was these varieties which Mr. Stewart encountered here in 1884, so greatly to his surprise.
    Upon his return to Illinois he spoke of the matter to an old man who as a youth had been in his father's service, and got what may be an interesting historical fact. It appears that some time in the '40s a man from Missouri, whose name was long ago forgotten, came to the elder Stewart's nursery at Quincy and bought a general assortment of fruit trees, which he intended to take across the plains to Oregon. They were packed with great care for the journey in a wagon bed. Mr. Stewart has neither names nor dates in connection with this incident, but he is convinced that this wagonload of trees was none other than that which Seth Lewelling brought across the plains at a very early date, and which became the parent stock of most of the early orchards of Oregon. In no other way can Mr. Stewart account for the presence in all our old orchards of the varieties which were familiar to his boyhood, and which, as above stated, were the special product of his father's nursery.
    The facts are certainly interesting and suggestive, and it would be worth the while of some enthusiastic historical student to run them down. No other incident in connection with the pioneer industry of the country is more interesting than the Lewelling enterprise, and any new fact in relation to it is worthy of record. I suggest that the point be taken up by the State Horticultural Association and fully investigated.
----
    Of course, all the horticultural energy of Southern Oregon is not centered in the Medford district, nor is it limited to the apple and the pear. The country about Ashland has long been famous for its peaches. Peach orchards, both old and new, abound in that region, and I know of nothing prettier than the many plantations which checker the mountainsides to the south and west of the city. Already the supply far exceeds the domestic demand; and from orchards already planted there is destined to come a product great enough to make a place for itself in such markets as it may be able to reach. There is, however, this serious fact in connection with peach growing in Southern Oregon, namely, that for all its excellence--on account, indeed, of its peculiar excellence--the Oregon peach is not a good shipping fruit. If it had the tough skin and the fibrous pulp of the Sacramento peach it would not be so luscious, so good to eat from the hand, but it would have better carrying quality, and therefore have higher commercial value than it is. There is probably a commercial future for the Southern Oregon peach, but it is one limited to such markets as may be reached by a brief carriage. In the cities of the Pacific Coast the Ashland product is not likely to find a serious rival, but its field is in these relatively local markets. The Southern Oregon small fruits are, like the peach, of unique quality. They grow with surprising vigor and in surprising quantity. Their flavor is unsurpassed. Comparison of the Ashland strawberry with the California strawberry, for example, puts the latter wholly in the shade; but the condition which establishes the quality of the Ashland fruit is as well the condition which limits its commercial value. It is too juicy, too rich, too intrinsically good to stand up under stress of time and change of temperature; therefore it will not bear long-distance transportation. Its market must be found near at hand--in San Francisco, Portland, Seattle and elsewhere near home.
    A. H.

Sunday Oregonian, Portland, February 23, 1902, page 9



    Jas. Stewart, our efficient justice of the peace, had business at Jacksonville the other day.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1902, page 4


ALL HONOR DULY GIVEN.
The Oregonian of February 22d Printed a Three-Column Article
Telling of Hon. J. H. Stewart's Successful Introduction of Horticulture
in the Rogue River Valley.
    In the Portland Oregonian of date February 22d, there appeared a three-column article, written by a special correspondent, bearing in a general way upon the horticulture interests of Jackson County, but more particularly upon the success which Hon. J. H. Stewart, the parent to this industry, has made from a commercial point of view. We publish below excerpts from the article:
    The most interesting man in Southern Oregon is Hon. J. H. Stewart, the Medford apple grower. He is essentially a man who does things, and he is furthermore a man who has reasons for things. I venture to say that Mr. Stewart never did anything in this life without knowing why. It was no accident that he came to Southern Oregon fifteen years ago; it was no accident that he established himself just where he did; it was no accident that he prospered, and that in prospering he revolutionized the industry and the fortunes of the country around about Medford.
    Mr. Stewart comes of the race of true-bred Americans, born in the early years of the last century, with enough Yankee in his blood to give mental energy and fixedness of purpose, and enough of the Scotch-Irish strain to yield imagination, fluency in expression, and the taste for public affairs. Mr. Stewart is at once a man of action and a man of talk; and he both acts and talks to some purpose. He has no affectation of reserve, no habit of hiding his light under a bushel. He is willing that his neighbors and all the world shall have any advantage which may come through his experiments and achievements. And now that he is past the age when it is reasonable to hope for any personal profit from new ventures, he is as busily employed in useful labors as if his daily bread depended upon his daily effort.
    Mr. Stewart is past 50 years of age, and had done about one man's share of work before coming to Oregon. He began business life in Illinois and Missouri 'way back in the '40s, grew millions upon millions of orchard trees as a professional nurseryman, planted many orchards, and incidentally served several terms in the Illinois Legislature, before the time came when he could cut loose and satisfy a lifetime's wish to visit the Coast. "I had seen enough," he said, in the course of talk, "to make it clear to me that the fruit business in the Mississippi Valley was about played out, for the development of the Coast was rapidly making, as it has since made, it impossible for the interior states to compete in the general markets." Mr. Stewart's idea upon leaving home was to settle somewhere in the Puget Sound country, and it was to that part of the coast that he first turned. But the conditions for horticulture, and especially apple growing, did not wholly suit him, and he came south, carefully taking in every section of the country from the Columbia River down to Southern California. Several months were spent in visitation and investigation. No section was slighted, even the remote country of Klamath and Lake counties being visited. His final determination was that the Rogue River Valley, above every other section on the Coast, was adapted to the growing of apples on a large scale. And being thoroughly convinced, he bought the land where afterwards his first orchard was planted--now the Voorhies place--and returned to his home in Quincy, Ill., for the winter and to close out his affairs. The winter was by no means an idle one, for in addition to other labors, he grafted with his own hand the several varieties of nursery stock which he thought suited to his new situation, and in large part the Voorhies orchard today is the outcome of that winter's work at Quincy, Ill.
    By 1890 it was demonstrated that a new spirit had entered into the Rogue River Valley. A country which had formerly been thought fit only for the rougher sorts of production--for pasture and for grain--suddenly came into prominence as the producer of apples and the like of which had not often been seen even in those parts of Oregon famous for their fruit products. [Local newspapers had encouraged fruit production for years before Stewart's arrival; this became an insistent drumbeat as the prospect of rail connection to the outside world became more likely.] It was soon found that the skill and energy of one man had given to Rogue River Valley a new character and a new impetus; that the special adaptation of the country had been found. But this did not wholly satisfy the people who had long been used to isolation, and who had not learned the significance of transportation. "We may," declared the doubting Thomases, "be able to grow apples by the ton, but what good will it do us? Who is there after the limited Portland demand shall be supplied to buy our product?" Mr. Stewart had not overlooked this point, and his answer came in the form of a season's crop shipped and sold at a great profit in the market of the eastern states and Europe. He knew what no other man in the country suspected, namely that such a product as that of the Medford district had the world for its market. It was upon the basis of knowledge of the demand which waited upon a strictly first-class apple, in connection with his faith in the soil and climate of the Rogue River Valley, that his first orchard was planted.
    It was in 1885 that Mr. Stewart set about the work of making his first orchard. It was eight or ten years before the vision which inspired his efforts and buoyed him through the years of waiting stood plain in the view of everybody. Since that day of demonstration it is now less than ten years. These periods are short when considered in connection with the industrial revolution of the country. But they have been momentous in the highest degree for the Rogue River Valley. They have established her name in the commercial world; they have witnessed the progress of tree-planting until all around Medford the country is coming to be one vast orchard; they have given the valley an industrial specialty which means so much for any country; they have brought new people and new capital into the valley, and have given it purpose. And for all this the Rogue River Valley is indebted to J. H. Stewart.
    On every hand, as one drives about Medford, there is manifest the influence of horticulture upon the welfare of the country. The various orchards now in bearing aggregate no less than 1000 acres, and the annual shipment runs up to about 200 carloads. In addition to this, there are large orchards at other points in the county and in the adjoining county of Josephine. Indeed, the largest single apple orchard in the country is at Central Point. There are, too, indications that the business is just begun. Within the year upwards of 1000 acres have been set out in apple and pear trees, and this planting, added to what has been set out during the past two seasons, makes some 2000 or more acres, which will in time be added to the productive area.
    The part taken by Portland men and Portland capital in these enterprises is interesting and significant. Some three years ago Mr. Gordon Voorhies, of Portland, connected with the Burrell family, bought from Mr. Stewart his original place, three miles south of Medford, and since that time has added greatly to it. His planting the present season will aggregate something like 225 acres. It is understood that Mr. Voorhies' venture has proven highly successful, so much so that in the brief period of his ownership his original investment had been fully regained. Another Portland investor in the Medford orchard district is E. J. DeHart, the well-known hardware merchant, who has recently become the owner of a fine place of seventy-five acres, immediately south of town. Mr. DeHart has come with his family to the new purchase, and proposes to make his permanent home here. Another and very recent venturer in orchard property is Mr. Hunt Lewis, of the well-known Portland family. His fine place of 160 acres joins Mr. Voorhies' place on the south. It is sometimes asserted that Portland is slow to take hold of the productive interests of the country, and in instances this may be true; but in the case of the apple industry the charge certainly will not be. Indeed, if the movement shall keep up we may soon expect to hear that the capitalists of Portland are crowding the owners of the soil from out [of] their own territory.
Medford Mail, February 28, 1902, page 1


    C. W. Hughes, who has charge of the old Mingus place, located in Heber Grove, now owned by Capt. Stewart, was to town the forepart of the week. Great progress has been made in denuding the timbered land, which will be transformed into an orchard.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1902, page 5


    Mrs. D. M. Knisely, who has been visiting her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, for the past three months, left last week for her home in Edgerton, Ohio.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 7, 1902, page 6


    Jake Hugger reports unusual activity out at the Voorhies fruit ranch. Aside from the regular work of caring for the trees there is a large force of men at work setting out 170 acres of land to trees, and another gang has been grafting. Mr. Hugger is putting in 25,000 pear grafts and 30,000 apple grafts. It can be truthfully said that Jake is a "grafter" of no mean pretensions.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 7, 1902, page 7


    Mrs. D. M. Kniseley, who has been visiting her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Stewart, for several months, left this week for her home in Edgerton, Ohio.

"Medford," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, March 9, 1902, page 20



    Will H. Stewart returned Sunday evening from San Francisco, where he had been for two weeks undergoing treatment at the Lane Hospital. The operation was that of skin grafting. This is the second operation which Mr. Stewart has had performed, and he feels confident that it is the last one which will be necessary. In this last operation pieces of skin nearly the size of one's hand was removed from one part of his body and grafted onto other parts.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 28, 1902, page 6


    W. H. Stewart, the energetic horticulturist, has returned from San Francisco, where he spent some time in the Lane Hospital. He underwent a second operation for skin-grafting, which seems to be entirely successful.

"Southern Oregon News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1902, page 2


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has returned from a trip to his farm on Rogue River. That section is well adapted to the fruit industry, and he has planted a considerable area in apples and pears, particularly the latter.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1902, page 5


    Captain Gordon Voorhies was down from Portland this week looking over his large orchard tract, which is being so ably managed by Jake Huger.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 11, 1902, page 6


    Hon. J. H. Stewart has commenced preliminary arrangements for the erection of a magnificent residence on his place southwest of Medford. He has selected a very beautiful spot, in a grove facing the west, and is now trimming the trees and shaping matters generally for the finest semi-city and country home in all Southern Oregon.
"Additional Local," Medford Mail, April 18, 1902, page 6


    Capt. A. J. Stewart, who has been spending the winter in New Mexico and Arizona, returned on yesterday evening's train.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1902, page 5


    A. J. Stewart returned Tuesday evening from his winter's stay in Mexico and California. He will remain during the summer, and a glad hand is given him by his many Medford friends.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, April 25, 1902, page 6


    C. E. Stewart is doing a lot of improving on the farm he recently purchased adjoining the Ish place, west of Medford. He has had grubbed several acres of brush land and is having timbers hewed with which to build a big barn. Besides this he has put in tiling in a marshy place to the north end of his fields and has water running therefrom which he is figuring on making valuable use of. This marsh is different from most of them. Instead of being low ground, it is a kind of mound, in which the water rises and flows off. By piercing this mound through and through with tiling Mr. Stewart has collected the water in one body and now estimates that there are seventy-two inches of water flowing from the marsh. He is now figuring on putting in a hydraulic ram and forcing the water to the farmhouse, to be used for domestic purposes.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, April 25, 1902, page 7



    A. J. Stewart returned Tuesday from a winter's stay in Mexico and California.

"Society: Medford," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, April 27, 1902, page 22


    George Porter is now temporary night clerk at Hotel Nash--doing service while the regular clerk--Judge James Stewart--is out doing some campaign work.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 9, 1902, page 7


    Jas. Stewart has returned from his trip in the northwestern part of the county. His place as night clerk at Hotel Nash has been acceptably filled by Geo. Porter.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1902, page 7


    Clint Stewart, the veteran fruit man, has received a silver medal for the best almond exhibit at the Charleston fair. He holds the record in this respect, for he captured silver medals at the Portland exposition and also at the Buffalo Pan-American Exposition. Col. Dosch, who is in charge of the Oregon exhibits at the Charleston fair, states in a letter that the exhibit from Clint attracted widespread attention. He states further that the Oregon department is constantly crowded with people anxious to learn things about Oregon. Many people scarcely believe that such fine products can be grown here. Others ask the Colonel if the Indians are still very dangerous in Oregon.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart will soon begin the construction of a handsome residence on his farm near Medford. W. W. Woods has furnished a carload of lumber already. Shingles will be used instead of rustic.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1902, page 5


    It is an agreeable task to advocate the election of a man like C. E. Stewart as a member of the legislature, and the Mail takes great pleasure in doing everything in this power to further his successful candidacy. The voters of Jackson County cannot possibly make a mistake in choosing Mr. Stewart to represent them in the lower house of the legislature. A long and successful business career, in which he has had to deal with large interests, fits him fully to cope with the questions affecting his constituency which may come before the legislative assembly at its next session, and his known honesty of purpose and integrity ensure that he will be nowhere but on the right side of those questions. Amply qualified, strictly honest, clear-headed and able as Clint Stewart is, can the voters of this county do better than to send him to the legislature to look after their interests? We don't think so, and have sufficient confidence in the people of Jackson County to believe that they will look to their own interests in the matter and record their votes accordingly--for C. E. Stewart.
"A Word About Republican Candidates," Medford Mail, May 30, 1902, page 6


    Bert Miller has taken a position as night clerk at Hotel Nash. Judge Jas. Stewart has been switched from night to day clerk at this popular hostelry.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, May 30, 1902, page 7


    The Medford Bachelor Club went into mourning this week. One of its members so far forgot himself as to get married last Sunday. Miss Sophia I. Ratrie, of Lake Creek, is the young woman who is responsible for the gloom that surrounds bachelor hall and causes the flag to fly at half mast. It was for her sake that Jim Stewart, the popular justice of the peace, and a member of the club in good standing, forsook the ranks. The couple were married by Rev. F. L. Crandall and are at home to their many friends in the West cottage on A Street. They have our congratulations and best wishes.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1902, page 4


Married--Stewart-Ratrie.
    Judge James Stewart, of this city, and Miss Sophia I. Ratrie, of Lake Creek, were married by Rev. T. L. Crandall at the Baptist parsonage in this city, on Sunday, June 1, 1902.
    The groom has been a resident of Medford for many years and has a host of warm friends who are now extending congratulations.
    The bride, until last fall, was a resident of Lake Creek, where a brother and sister reside and where she is well and most favorably known. She is an orphan girl, her parents having both died some years ago. Frank and Chas. Swingle, of Langell Valley, Klamath County, are her uncles. She was a student in the Medford Academy during its last term.
    The happy couple have commenced housekeeping in a residence on North A Street, which the groom had previously made ready.
Medford Mail, June 6, 1902, page 2


    J. H. Stewart has the foundation completed for a fine residence in a grove at the old fair grounds. Owing to his inability to secure lumber, the carpenter work cannot be commenced until sometime in July.
    Captain Gordon Voorhies, who purchased the J. H. Stewart Eden Valley Orchard, has let the contract to G. L. Schermerhorn to remodel the old house and to build an addition to it 23x33 feet, two stories high with a wide porch extending around it. Work will be commenced in a few days, provided the lumber can be had.
    The brick block that A. J. Stewart is having erected on Eighth Street is rapidly nearing completion, and if no delays are encountered the building will be ready for occupancy about the first of July. S. Childers has the walls up and E. W. Starr is pushing the carpenter work with all possible haste and will have the roof ready in three or four days so that the bricklayers can put up the fire walls, after which the tinners will put on the tin roof. The building, which is 50x55 feet, is to have a cement floor, and it will be an ideal workroom for the cigar factory. Messrs. Palm and Whitman have leased the building, and they will move their factory as soon as it is ready for them.
Medford Mail, June 13, 1902, page 3


A Fine Farm Home.
    J. Hugger, foreman of Capt. Voorhies' Eden Valley Orchard, was busy Monday with his teams, transferring a carload of household goods and farm supplies that had been sent from Portland by Capt. Voorhies for the new residence on his farm. A gasoline engine and 1100 feet of 2-inch pipe were in the shipment, and will be used in the installation of a water system for the house and outbuildings, the water coming from a big well dam in the orchard. A Shetland pony and a diminutive cart, for the amusement of Capt. Voorhies' children, were also a part of the shipment. Another carload of household goods will be put up as soon as the house is completed. It will be the largest and one of the finest farm residences in Jackson County. Capt. Voorhies arrived from Portland Sunday to supervise the finishing touches to his house, to have it in readiness for his family, who will arrive in about three weeks.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1902, page 4


    Capt. Gordon Voorhies' addition to his farm residence is rapidly nearing completion and will be ready for occupancy by the middle of August. The additions and improvements made about this very pleasant place are colossal in extent, and by them the place is made one of the largest and grandest farm homes in Southern Oregon. Contractor G. L. Schermerhorn has the contract for all the work of the structure. He is nearly through with the woodwork, and Ling & Boardman are now applying the paint while the Childers boys are doing the mason work. E. S. Wolfer has the plumbing contract and is also putting in an acetylene gas plant which is of size sufficient to supply twenty-five large gas jets. Mr. Voorhies has had his household effects shipped here from Portland, and his family will arrive just as soon as the new residence is ready for them. Mr. Voorhies expects to make Southern Oregon his permanent home hereafter and is laying out plans that both himself and family may have all the comforts and conveniences of city life. Mr. Voorhies shipped a carload of household goods from Portland about the first of June, but at Oregon City the car caught fire and the goods were badly damaged. His fast driving horse was also in the car and it, too was quite badly burned, from the effects of which it has not yet fully recovered.

    C. E. Stewart has let the contract to the Medford Planing Mill Company for the erection of a fine dwelling on his farm on the Medford-Jacksonville boulevard. The residence is to be 32x48, one and a half stories, and will have every convenience that goes to make a modern dwelling. The plans were prepared by architect I. A. Palmer, and they show the house to be one of the handsomest farm residences in Jackson County. The full cost will be about $2000. Work upon the foundation was commenced last week by G. W. Priddy, and so soon as the lumber can be had, which will be in about three weeks, manager Bradbury of the planing mill will have the carpenter work started.
    Jake Huger, superintendent at the famous Voorhies orchards, reports that Bartlett pear picking will commence about the 10th of August. This is about ten days earlier than usual. The crop of pears from this orchard will amount to fully twenty carloads.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 1, 1902, page 7


Distinguished Crater Lake Party.
    The Portland and Salem party bound for the Crater Lake National Park arrived in the city Thursday morning and after lunch at Hotel Nash they started upon their journey by the Rogue River route, expecting to camp at Eagle Point last night. Friday noon they will lunch with Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart at their mountain home. The program beyond that is not known except that they will return to the railroad by the Dead Indian road, and will reach that point on August 20th.
    The party consists of Governor and Mrs. T. T. Geer; Congressman T. H. Tongue; Miss Bessie G. Merriam, of Brooklyn; Miss Louie Church and Miss Margaret J. Cooper, of Salem; Mrs. Lee Hoffman; Miss Hoffman, James Steel, F. H. Fleming, Benj. Lombard and Will G. Steel, of Portland.
Medford Mail, August 8, 1902, page 6


    Mrs. Ragsdale, of western Wash., arrived in Medford Tuesday and will hereafter reside in Jackson County. The lady is a sister of Mrs. James Stewart. Her husband will arrive later. Both formerly resided in the Butte Creek country.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, August 8, 1902, page 6


    In the Popular Mechanics, published at Chicago, there appeared on July 12th a fine write-up of Oregon, which together with the fine halftone illustrations occupies over six pages. One of the pictures is that of a pear packing scene in the Capt. Voorhies orchard, two miles south of here, taken when the place was owned by Mr. Stewart.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 8, 1902, page 7


    At Eagle Point we met a hearty reception and were supplied with cream, fruit and other things to make camp life more pleasant. Citizens of this town gathered around our campfire and were addressed by Governor Geer and [Congressman] Tongue. When the latter concluded the exercises closed with music. Today we move on to J. H. Stewart's summer home, where he is starting his new fruit farm. We will be entertained by him for lunch, and hope to prevail on him to accompany us to Crater Lake.
Will G. Steel, "Pleasant Time for Tourists," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, August 10, 1902, page 6


    Col. C. E. S. Wood of Portland, the well-known lawyer and public speaker, was in Medford and its vicinity Tuesday, the guest of Hon. J. H. Stewart..
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1902, page 5


A MODEL ORCHARD HOME.
What Mr. De Hart Has Been Doing in Jackson County.
Medford Mall.
    Some few weeks since a representative of the Mail had the pleasure of a drive through the orchard owned by Mr. E. J. De Hart, south and east and adjoining the city of Medford.
    There are 65 acres in the tract, and nearly all of it is in bearing orchard. The apple varieties are Newtown Pippins, Ben Davis, Red Cheeked Pippins, Canada Reds and a few Willow Twigs and Lady apples. His pear varieties are Bartletts, Winter Nelis and De Anjou. Besides these, he has a family orchard, in which he has growing nearly all the varieties of fruit used on the table. There was a prune orchard on the place when he bought it, a couple of years ago, but this he grubbed out and planted the ground to Bartlett pears.
    Mr. De Hart's orchard is a model of neatness--not a weed in sight anyplace; the ground has been worked over until it is as smooth as a house floor. Truly, orchardists can give their orchards no better care than Mr. De Hart has given this one, and he is being rewarded. The trees are heavily loaded with the very best fruit it is possible for trees to produce. The orchard is under the superintendency of Mr. William McCredie, an experienced orchardist, who takes great pride in the thoroughness of the work as insisted upon by Mr. De Hart.
    Mr. De Hart's residence, which joins the orchard, is a most beautiful spot, and its owner is almost continually adding new beauty and convenience to it. He has but recently put up several new buildings for various uses about the place, one of which is a peculiarly constructed milk house and cellar. These are made with double air spaces on all sides, and the fresh air is taken in several rods away from the building and is carried through terra cotta pipes underneath the ground to the floors of the milk house and cellar. Mr. De Hart has also put in a gasoline engine, with which water is pumped for irrigating his lawn and vegetable and flower garden.
    Anyone visiting this fine suburban home cannot but admire the place, its location beneath those grand old oaks, its neat appearance and the general spirit of thrift which prevails everywhere.

Morning Oregonian, Portland, August 28, 1902, page 4


    Mr. Stewart, the orchardist, has greatly improved his [upper Rogue] place by clearing away a large amount of timber and brush and putting out about thirty acres of pear trees. . . .

A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail, August 29, 1902, page 5


    Wm. Stewart has 120 acres of apples and pears. Jos. H. Stewart has 120 acres of new orchard. Mr. DeHart has seventy acres, mostly apples. This was formerly owned by J. H. Stewart.
"In Eden Valley," Pacific Homestead, Salem, September 4, 1902, page 1


    At the Capt. Voorhies fruit farm, harvesting of the Bartlett pear crop was finished on Tuesday. The crop is reported to have yielded, equally as well, if not some better than the yield of last year, which was about twenty carloads. The harvesting of the later varieties of pears on this farm will begin next Monday.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, September 19, 1902, page 7


    Hon. J. H. Stewart's residence, located on the Fordyce place, not far from Medford, is nearing completion. It will be one of the handsomest and most convenient in Southern Oregon.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 19, 1902, page 1


    Dillon Hill on Thursday shipped a carload of superior corn to the Gold Hill mills, where it will be converted into meal.
    About four miles south of Medford is the almond orchard belonging to W. S. Clay and Mr. Mead. The farm consists of 232 acres. There are 35 acres in almonds 10 years old and have been bearing for five years. The crop this year was extra good. Mr. Clay bought the place of C. E. Stewart. Last year it produced about 140 sacks of 60 pounds each, which sold for 12½ cents per pound. This year's crop will be double. The almonds from this orchard won the gold medal at the Pan-American. Messrs. Clay and Mead have 40 acres set to Petite prunes and 65 to apples and pears.
"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 26, 1902, page 2


    Capt. Gordon Voorhies and family left Wednesday evening for Portland. They will remain in that city a couple of weeks, after which they will go to Kentucky to spend the winter.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, November 28, 1902, page 6


    Judge and Mrs. Jas. Stewart are the happy parents of a lively girl baby, which arrived at their home on Saturday morning, November 22, 1902.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, November 28, 1902, page 7


    W. H. Stewart of Roxy has gone to Portland, for treatment.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1902, page 2


    Jas. Stewart, who is in Salem, was the Democratic candidate for reading clerk of the lower house of the legislature.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1903, page 3


    S. G. Earl, a prominent citizen of Adams County, Ill., and his wife are visiting Hon. J. H. Stewart, the pioneer horticulturist, who is an old friend of theirs.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1903, page 4


    Hon. and Mrs. J. H. Stewart, who have been making San Francisco and Oakland a short visit, returned the forepart of the week.
    Thos. Beavers of Peyton was in Medford the forepart of the week. He is in charge of J. H. Stewart's property, located in that section.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1903, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart during the past week received a fine automobile, and with E. D. Elwood enjoys the honor of being the Southern Oregon pioneer in that line.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1903, page 2


    A member of the Portland Crater Lake party has given the Portland Oregonian the following account of their trip. . . .

    A lively scramble down the mossy steeps of the picturesque little waterfall on the country place of J. H. Stewart, of Medford, was a feature of the next camp. This situation is the heart of the forest, the charming vistas and wildwood glens causing Joaquin Miller to exclaim that he could not wish heaven itself to be more delightful and entrancing in its beauty. The rustic cottage with its wide verandas was filled with trophies of chase and pinewood curios. The campfire talks inspired by the rare hospitality of the owners were quite as notable as at Eagle Point.

"Return from Crater," Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, August 27, 1903, page 1



JOSEPH HOWARD STEWART. As a pioneer fruit-grower of Jackson County Joseph H. Stewart takes first rank, and his products are shipped to all parts of the United States and Europe. He is a profound student of everything pertaining to horticulture, and is one of the best posted men in his line between the Atlantic and Pacific oceans. When he first came to Oregon, people generally questioned the advisability of raising fruit, but there are many today who wish they had followed his example. His father, William Stewart, was born of Scotch parents in in the north of Ireland, and upon coming to America about 1821 located on the coast of Maine, in Washington County. He had made a former visit there while sailing before the mast and studying navigation, to which he did not take kindly, having a genius for mechanical invention. In Maine he married Nancy Marston, a native daughter of the state, and who, at the time of her death m Quincy, Ill., left seventy-five descendants. Fourteen children were born to William Stewart and his wife, ten sons and four daughters, Joseph Howard, born in Washington County, Me., November 22, 1833, being the fourth son. After bringing his family to Quincy, Ill., in 1836, William Stewart inaugurated a career which did him credit from many standpoints. Settling on land in Adams County, he started a nursery and farming business, and the first fruit trees brought to Oregon in an ox-train came from this farm. He was one of the original Free Soilers, and took an active part in political matters. He was president and one of the foremost promoters of the first agricultural society in the state of Illinois, organized in 1854, supporting the same by his hearty zeal and cooperation the remainder of his life. Mr. Stewart died in 1859, at the age of fifty-six years, leaving his family and friends a legacy of an honored name and to those dependent upon him a comfortable inheritance.
    Owing to early association with his father's nursery, Joseph H. Stewart had scant opportunity for attending school, a deficiency which has since spurred him to unusual effort along educational lines. At the age of twenty-one he married, in Quincy, Ill.., Elizabeth Hyman, who was born on the Atlantic Ocean while her parents were en route to America from Germany. Her father, George Hyman, was a tailor by trade, and in 1836 located in Adams County, Ill., where he died at an advanced age. In 1853 Mr. Stewart removed to Hannibal, Mo., taking with him an already established reputation as a practical
fruit-grower, having taken many premiums at state exhibits, and served on fruit commissions. In 1860 he removed to Quincy, and there engaged in the nursery business until 1884. While residing there in 1860 he made the first large exhibit of fruit in the East, showing one hundred and twenty varieties of pears and apples at the American Pomological Society held in Philadelphia. In 1870 he was elected to the state legislature and during the session secured the passage of the drainage law. During the building of the levee at Quincy, in 1878, he superintended the work in the Indian Grave drainage district. Ambitious and resourceful, he firmly believed that Oregon held exceptional opportunities for the fruit-grower, and in the spring of 1884 he took a trip to the state, investigating the soil and general prospects. Well pleased with what he found, he returned to his family in the fall, and in February, 1885, located in the Rogue River Valley. Two months later found him in Illinois, negotiating for the sale of his property, with the proceeds of which he removed his belongings to the coast. Needless to say, fruit trees constituted a large part of the outfit. The first year in the valley he had one hundred and sixty acres under orchard, and the next year an additional one hundred acres. In 1890 he shipped the first carload of fruit out of Jackson County, and in 1896 his output consisted of ninety-five carloads of apples and pears. [That sentence is likely the genesis of the myth that no fruit was shipped from the Rogue Valley until 1890. That sentence means--and should read--"he shipped his first carload."] Mr. Stewart has sold the first two orchards which he started, and at present has about four hundred acres devoted exclusively to apples and pears.
    In 1898 Mr. Stewart built a fine residence in the Cascade Mountains, on the Upper Rogue River, surrounded by thirty acres of orchard, and fitted with every modern improvement. He has taken an active part in the business life of Medford, and in 1899 was one of the organizers of the Bank of Medford, owning the bank building and serving as the president of the concern for two years, and is now its vice-president. The bank is one of the solid financial institutions of the county and is incorporated for $50,000. Mr. Stewart is encouraging fruit-growing in his children, and his son William is one of the large fruit-ranchers of Jackson County. One child, Junie I., died at the age of twenty, and three daughters, Mrs. A. J. Weeks, of Oakland. Cal., Mrs. H. M. Crowell and Mrs. D. R. Hill are living. Mr. Stewart is a Democrat in political affiliation, and fraternally is a charter member of Blue Lodge No. 103, A. P. & A. M. of Medford.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co. 1904, page 489


    Dillon Hill:--"Not much doing right now in the orchard business--most too wet. We have nothing but young orchards to care for, but if you think they do not need looking after some you are very much mistaken. It is when trees are about two years old that they need the greatest care. This will apply now particularly to pruning. A man to prune young trees and do it properly must know his business. Almost anyone can prune old trees, but it requires an expert to prune them when young. My father-in-law, J. H. Stewart, has just finished pruning our 125-acre orchard, on the Fordyce place [at age 71]. It might seem a little egotistical in me if I was to say that Mr. Stewart knows his business when it comes to growing fruit, but I have an idea that most orchardists of the valley will bear me out in the assertion. But, say, speaking about orchards, I want to tell you that our Rogue River orchard is going to be a good one. We have thirty acres planted to Bartlett and Comice pears. The trees are now two years old. We have plans laid to put out thirty or forty acres of our land up there to apples. You see, it's like this: The altitude is very much greater there, and it stands to reason that the greater the altitude in which you can grow fruit the firmer and better flavor will be the fruit. I have eaten Jonathan apples that were grown up there in April and they were firm--almost as firm as when first picked from the tree. Yes, we are expecting our Rogue River orchard will make a splendid showing when it commences to bear fruit. In planting our Fordyce orchard we did it with a view to convenience as well as profit. For instance--we planted 900 Bartlett, 900 Beurre Bosc, 800 Housels, and 1000 Comice pears. Now this fruit will ripen in the order named, and there will be no rush necessary to take care of one variety before the other is ready to handle. After the pears are all through with, the apples will come on. We have planted 2000 Newtown trees and 3000 Jonathans. We have 300 or 400 seedling trees, which we expect to graft to Beurre d'Anjous."
"Street Echoes," Medford Mail, January 8, 1904, page 1


Fruit Farm Sold.
    It is not every 200-acre tract of land in Southern Oregon that will sell for more than $20,000, and while this is true it is also true that there are a great many tracts of this size in our valley which could be easily made of value equal to the above amount if they were properly managed and as effectually planted in fruit trees; while as they now lay they are not worth a tenth of this amount. But this is not the whyfor of this item. We started out to make mention of the fact that W. H. Stewart has sold his 200-acre fruit ranch to J. W. Perkins, of Portland, for more than $20,000--presumably about $22,000.
    The land in question is situated two and one-half miles west of Medford, and of the 200 acres there are now 100 acres planted to the very best varieties of commercial fruits, principally apples, and most of the trees are now bearing and have been for three or four years. The new owner, we understand, will put out fifty acres more of the land to fruit. It was upon this place that Mr. Stewart built a fine residence last season. Mr. Perkins is a young man who has been extensively and successfully engaged in business in Portland for a number of years, but who was compelled to retire on account of health. He and his wife and mother will move to his new possessions about the first of April. Mr. Stewart has not decided definitely as to what vocation he will pursue, but he will, in all probability, remain in the valley.

Medford Mail,
March 4, 1904, page 1


    Arthur J. Weeks of Oakland, Calif. has sold the piece of fine land he bought about two years ago, which formerly belonged to the Hanley estate and is located on the Jacksonville-Central Point road, to Wm. H. Stewart. The most of it is already planted in apple and pear trees. The new proprietor will make this an ideal orchard and one of the very best in Southern Oregon.

"Brief Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 27, 1904, page 1



    C. E. Stewart today sold his fine orchard farm, which lies two miles west of Medford, to A. C. Allen, of Salt Lake. The consideration was $30,000. This place consists of 200 acres of land with 100 acres set to choice fruit. Mr. Allen left for Portland tonight and will return soon, accompanied by his family.
    J. W. Perkins, of Portland, recently purchased of William H. Stewart 200 acres of choice fruit land, the largest part set to apples. The price was $22,500. It lies three miles east of Medford.
"Rogue River Farms Sold," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 6, 1904, page 4


    HAS TURNED FROM HARDWARE TO FRUIT.--G. J. De Hart, formerly of Honeyman & De Hart, but now a fruitgrower at Medford, is in the city with his family on a short visit, and will leave for home
tomorrow. Some three years ago Mr. De Hart disposed of his business interests here at Medford, his family desiring a change of climate. He has prospered very well in his new business and ships a dozen or more carloads of apples, etc., yearly. He is loud in his praise of the delightful climate of Medford, which has restored perfect health to his family, who, as he says, fairly live outdoors all summer. He frankly admits, however, that he occasionally pines for the company of his old business associates and friends here. The winters he spends in Southern California, and so sees nothing of the rainy season or winter of Oregon.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 13, 1904, page 9


    Will H. Stewart, an old Quincy boy, the son of J. H. Stewart, of North Twelfth Street, is in the city with his wife and son, visiting home folks. He lives at Medford, Oregon, and is in the fruit raising business there. He has been down to the world's fair.
"The News in Brief," The Quincy Daily Journal, Quincy, Illinois, October 18, 1904, page 8


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who has been ill for several days, is considerably improved at this time. Dr. Pickel is in attendance.

"City Happenings," 
Medford Mail, February 10, 1905, page 5


The New Adjutant-General.
    F. M. Stewart, the new Adjutant and Quartermaster-General for the department of Oregon, is the modest color bearer of Medford Post, but is regarded in high favor by his comrades. He had an excellent war record. He enlisted in 1862 in Company C, Fifty-fifth Illinois Regiment, and served till 1865, when he was mustered out of the service. He passed through many of the severest engagements of the war, and was in the battle of Shiloh. At Altoona--made famous in song by the heroic defense by the few when General Sherman sent word "Hold the Fort"--Mr. Stewart was one of those few who received the commendation of General Sherman. With Mr. Stewart as Adjutant-General, his comrades are sure there will be no more "courthouse reunions of veterans." He has entered upon his duties and taken charge of affairs. The office has been moved to Ashland so the department commander can keep in closer touch with the details of business. Adjutant-General Stewart will make weekly visits to Ashlared.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, October 18, 1905, page 11


    A short rural telephone line has recently been put in south and west of Medford. There are five patrons on the extension, and its length is over a mile. Regulation poles have been put in, and the wiring has been done in conformity with the prescribed rules and regulations of the Sunset Company's line, to which line a connection has been made near E. J. DeHart's suburban home. The line was put in by the patrons, but the Sunset Company will furnish the 'phones and will charge a monthly rental of $1 for each 'phone, and the patrons will then have free switching with Medford, Jacksonville and all other rural lines running out from Medford. The cost of putting in the line to the patron has been between $6 and $7 each. Those on the extension are: J. H. Stewart, D. R. Hill, J. A. Perry (farm residence), True Cox and T. E. Pottenger's stock yards.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, February 2, 1906, page 5


    Hon. J. H. Stewart, the well-known orchardman and capitalist, is lying quite ill at his residence on Oakdale Avenue. Mr. Stewart has been ailing for the past several months, but until lately has been able to be up and around. His friends are hoping to hear of the restoration of his usual good state of health.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, March 2, 1906, page 5


Death and Funeral of Hon. J. H. Stewart.
    The funeral of Hon. Joseph H. Stewart, which took place on Tuesday, July 10th, was one of the most largely attended funerals ever witnessed in Medford.
    The services at the late residence were very simple and impressive, and the esteem in which the departed one was held by his family, his friends and his neighbors could be seen in the grief-stricken faces and the welling tears of those who had assembled to pay the last tribute of respect to the dead.
    The services consisted of singing by Mrs. Vawter, Mrs. Pickel and Miss Jones--one hymn, "Beautiful Isle of Somewhere," being particularly impressive and appropriate. Then came scripture reading, prayer and the reading of the following tribute to Mr. Stewart, by Rev. F. W. Carstens:
    "Joseph H. Stewart was born in Washington County, Maine, November 22, 1833. Died at Medford, Oregon, at 9:00 p.m., Saturday, July 7, 1906; aged seventy-two years, six months and twenty-two days. When twenty-one years of age, at Quincy, Ill., he was united in marriage to Miss Elizabeth Hyman, who now, as the faithful companion of years, survives him, sorrowing.
    "After his marriage he resided for a time in Hannibal, Mo., but in 1860 removed to Quincy, Ill., where he established a nursery and engaged very successfully in fruit raising, taking many premiums at state exhibits and such-like places. In 1870 he was elected to the state legislature, serving with great acceptability. In 1884 he made a trip to Oregon, believing--from what he knew of the country--that Oregon would be an unexcelled place for growing fine fruit, berries, etc. So much pleased was he that February, 1885, found him located in Rogue River Valley. As early as 1890 he began to realize from his new orchard of the West. That year he shipped a carload of fruit--the first that was ever shipped from Jackson County. [Tons of fruit were already being shipped out of the valley in 1884--the year Stewart arrived. A carload of apples was shipped to Portland that same year. See the next obituary. ] In 1896 his output was ninety-five carloads of pears and apples. He has been called the 'father of the fruit industry in Oregon,' and, as his old friend, Dr. Geary, once said, 'Every fruit tree in Rogue River Valley will be a monument to his memory.'
    "He was a man of affairs and took a keen interest in all public enterprises, advising, directing and often aiding with his influence and money.
    "He was one of the organizers of the Medford Bank, which was organized in 1890, and served as president of it for two full years.
    "In his immediate family he leaves a companion, one son and three daughters to mourn their loss. Outside of the immediate family many near relatives and a host of friends share with the family the loss as heartfelt and personal.
    "In Mr. Stewart's life there is a tribute to the nobility of true manhood and to those qualities of sterling worth which made his life a success. He was an unusually strong, healthy man, never ill to speak of, until about two years ago; but since that time he has been a great sufferer, though he has borne the suffering and pain with the fortitude and courage so characteristic of him, often affirming that he believed he would get well and be strong again.
    "He thought deeply and for himself upon all subjects--religion included--and often during his illness he spoke of the future, saying in his characteristic way: 'I'd like to explore the future life and know what it is,' and expressing himself as entirely ready to go when his time should come.
    "The end has come. 'The Golden Bowl is broken and the Pitcher at the fountain; the Silver Cord is loosened and the Wheel broken at the Cistern.' We weep and yet we mourn not as those who have no hope."
    The funeral cortege was met at the schoolhouse by the members of Medford Lodge, A.F.&A.M., and escorted to the cemetery, where the last sad rites were performed under the rules of the Masonic order.
    At the head of the procession was the white horse and the buggy used for many years by Mr. Stewart, in which was seated the officiating minister and the grandson of the deceased, Howard Hill.
Medford Mail, July 13, 1906, page 1


    In the death of Hon. J. H. Stewart Rogue River Valley has lost one of its most progressive and enterprising citizens. A citizen who has done more than any one man in the county to bring the fruit industry to its present point of importance and prosperity. When Mr. Stewart first came to this valley in 1885, the growing of fruit other than for home use was unthought-of. [Fruit was marketed on a limited basis regionally as early as the 1860s. Some sources credit A. J. Weeks with planting the first commercial orchard in 1883.] His trained, practical mind grasped the situation and its possibilities at once. He planted the first commercial orchard in the valley [This does not mean he planted the first orchard.] and in 1890 shipped the first carload of fruit ever sent to foreign markets. Since that time the industry has grown to immense proportions, and to the initiative of Joseph H. Stewart this growth and prosperity is attributable. Mr. Stewart was the fourth in point of age of ten brothers, and was the first of the ten to pass away. The youngest brother of the ten is fifty-three years of age and the oldest about eighty.
Medford Mail, July 13, 1906, page 4


WAS MEMBER OF ASSEMBLY
ELECTED FROM QUINCY TO THE STATE LEGISLATURE.
Hon. Joseph H. Stewart, Who Died Recently in Oregon,
Was a Former Prominent Resident of This City.

    A copy of the Medford Mail of Medford, Jackson County, Oregon, under date of July 10, was received today at the Herald office, which contains a full account of the funeral of the Hon. J. H. Stewart, brother of William Stewart, of 1249 Maine Street, and whose death was noted in The Herald.
    The services, which were very simple and impressive, were held at his late residence in Medford and were largely attended by his family and many friends and neighbors who held him in the very highest esteem. Rev. F. W. Carstens conducted the services and paid a high tribute to his integrity, giving, also, a short sketch of his life. He said in substance:
    "Joseph H. Stewart was born in Washington County, Maine, November 22, 1833, and died at Medford, Oregon, July 7, 1906, aged 72 years, 6 months and 22 days. When 21 years of age, at Quincy, Ill., he married Miss Elizabeth Hyman, who survives him. After his marriage he lived for a while in Hannibal, Mo., but in 1860 moved to Quincy, where he became a most successful fruit grower. In 1870 he was elected to the state legislature and served with great acceptability. In 1884 he made a trip to Oregon, believing that climatic conditions there were suitable for fruit growing, and was not disappointed. He was so pleased with the country that he moved there the next year and as early as 1890 began to realize from his new orchards. In 1896 his output was 95 carloads of pears and apples. He had been called the 'father of the fruit industry' in Oregon.
    "Mr. Stewart was a man of affairs who took a keen interest in all public enterprises, advising, directing and often aiding with his influence and money. He had an exceedingly large circle of friends and acquaintances, all of whom feel deeply the loss they have sustained in his death."
Quincy Daily Herald, July 20, 1906, page 8


THE DEATH OF A FORMER CITIZEN
    Hon J. H. Stewart, Formerly of Quincy and Adams Co., Died in Oregon.
    HANNIBAL, Mo., July 24.--News has been received in this city of the death of the Hon. J. H. Stewart at his home in Medford, Jackson County, Ore. He was for many years prior to and during the war a resident of Hannibal and owned the Col. Hatch farm, which he sold to Col. Hatch about the year 1860. He originally resided in Payson, Ill., and afterwards moved to Quincy. He now has a brother residing in Quincy, a superannuated minister of the gospel. He was well and favorably known by all the older citizens of Hannibal.
The Quincy Daily Whig, Quincy, Illinois, July 25, 1906, page 4



    When J. H. Stewart set out his orchard in Eden precinct he gave it the name of "Eden Valley Orchards." Later, when the orchards were purchased by Capt. Voorhies, the above name was to some extent replaced by the title of "Voorhies Orchards." Since that time the Burrell Investment Company has acquired title to the orchards and now the place is spoken of only as the "Burrell Orchards," which latter is the title used in all printing matter appertaining thereto.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, August 31, 1906, page 5


    A. J. Stewart, who has been on a trip to the southern part of the Republic of Mexico, is home again. John H. Stewart, his son, did not return with him, having decided to remain in the mines of that section, where his cousin has been for several years.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, March 22, 1907, page 5


    After a year's travel abroad, Mr. and Mrs. Gordon Voorhies and four children returned home on Wednesday. As of old, they will spend their winters in Portland and the remainder of their home at their Medford ranch. While in Europe Mr. and Mrs. Voorhies were for some months in France and also made a long stay in Berlin with Mrs. Voorhies' sister, Mrs. Biddle, whose husband, Lieutenant Biddle, is stationed there as naval attache.

"Society: Medford," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, March 31, 1907, page 26


Country Estate at Hood River.
    HOOD RIVER, Or., June 16.--(Special.)--E. J. DeHart, of Portland, who recently sold his orchard property at Medford for $35,000, yesterday purchased a 30-acre place at Hood River, which he will make his home. The property is situated along the Columbia River, and it is the intention of Mr. DeHart, who has retired from business, to make it into a fine country estate.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 17, 1907, page 3


    A. J. Stewart, who has been visiting with relatives in Medford for the past two or three days, returned to his home at Cottage Grove Tuesday.
"Social and Personal," Medford Daily Tribune, November 19, 1907, page 4



    F. M. Stewart of this city is in receipt of the sad news of the death of his oldest brother, John Stewart, which occurred at Fowler, Illinois on December 21, 1907. Mr. Stewart had been a horticulturist nearly all his life and as such was a great success. He was eighty years of age.
"City Happenings," Medford Mail, January 10, 1908, page 5

Pear Tree and J. H. Stewart, June 1908 Sunset magazine
June 1908 Sunset magazine.

    Howard Hill, son of D. R. Hill of north of town, left Sunday for Berkeley, Cal., where he will take a year's special course in the agricultural department of California's famous state university. He will take up the studies of entomology, botany and chemistry. His object is to perfect himself as a thorough and up-to-date orchardist, in which vocation he is already one of the best for his age in the valley, and will be a worthy successor of his famous grandfather, the late Hon. Joseph H. Stewart, the acknowledged father of the fruit-growing industry of southern Oregon.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, August 7, 1908, page 6


    The authors of this report have the following to say about J. H. Stewart, who, with his brother, F. M. Stewart, planted the first orchard in the valley
[The first settlers planted large home orchards in the early 1850s. Some sources credit A. J. Weeks with planting the first commercial orchard in 1883, the year before J. H. Stewart arrived.], shipped the first car of fruit out of the valley [A carload of apples was shipped out of the valley in 1884, the year before Stewart planted his orchard.] and sent the first fruit to London from this valley in 1893:
    "At that time the so-called father of the fruit industry of Jackson County, Mr. J. H. Stewart, who came to Medford from an eastern fruit district, and understood the possibilities of that enterprise, foresaw a great future for the valley, and accordingly, in 1885, he planted quite a large acreage of apples and pears, the former being largely of the Ben Davis variety. He cared for the trees according to his own ideas, and that orchard stands today as an example of one having always been well cared for. His methods, especially those of pruning, were followed by all the men who set orchards during the few years immediately following, and soon extended to the various other portions of the state where commercial fruitgrowing was attracting attention, the railroad making such an advance possible. It was he who so strongly advocated the industry and who so freely explained the methods of carrying on the work. Thus it was this promoter who first gave the impetus resulting in the large planting in Jackson County."
C. I. Lewis, S. L. Bennett and C. C. Vincent, "Orchard Survey of Jackson County," Oregon Agricultural College Bulletin No. 101, October 1908, also quoted in the Medford Mail, January 29, 1909, page 1


THE UNHAPPY MOSSBACKS.
    The Oregonian prints today a pastoral epistle from Millard O. Lownsdale, Apostle to the Mossbacks, giving ghostly counsel to his woebegone flock. The counsel is excellent. It ought to stir the souls of these children of wrath into repentance for their many sins and set the ax to work in every old orchard from Roseburg to Portland. But we fear it will not. Jordan is a hard road to travel. Broad is the way that leads to codlin moths, and many there be that find it. Once a mossback, always a mossback is a maxim which experience compels one to accept, however sorrowfully. It is easier to keep ninety and nine sensible orchardists in the path of righteousness than to retrieve one case-hardened mossback from his wicked ways. As a rule argument is wasted upon him. It is not enough for him to be "hair hung and breeze shaken over hell," as good old Lorenzo Dow used to put it. He must actually be dropped down into the brimstone.
    It is remembered that when Mr. Stewart first set out his now-famous orchard near Medford he was abhorred by his neighbors as a public enemy. They had been raising apples for many years, and they knew all about it. They knew, for one thing, that no such apples could ever be raised in Southern Oregon as they used to pick in Daddy's old orchard back in Missouri. After setting their trees out these devout pioneers had, with a beautiful and childlike faith, left the Lord to take care of them. The results rather tended to show that the Lord had not made a specialty of horticulture. And now here came this self-confident and intrusive Scotchman with a lot of newfangled and foolish ideas. They could have forgiven him for being foolish. What could not be forgiven was the sad fact that his ideas would compel people to go to work. They were an impious assault upon the sacred belief that in Oregon work was a sin.
    One fancies that here, perhaps, lies the secret of the reluctance of the mossback to accept the plain truth. So long as he can shun it or argue it away he can continue in his old, shiftless, lazy courses with a good conscience. Hence he conjures up reasons to show that it is wrong to cut back the horrible old orchards. Pruning trees is a good deal like work, while to let them alone is no work at all. With these two alternatives clearly before him, which would you naturally expect a mossback to choose? He began life with the fundamental belief that work is wicked, and the government encouraged his faith by giving him for nothing more land than any man could cultivate. A premium was thus set upon thriftlessness and selfish exclusiveness, two characteristics which have persisted down to the present time and seem likely to survive for a goodly season yet to come.
    While we admire, therefore, Mr. Lownsdale's enthusiastic missionary work among the mossbacks, and laud and magnify his energetic spirit, we cannot conscientiously say that we have much hope of his success. The most effectual remedy for the mossback is time, which ultimately seizes him with a grasp he cannot shirk, and lays him away where he will cease forever to impede the progress of the world. In our candid opinion, when the mossback was shipped to this world a mistake was made by the clerk of the universe. He was created for some other sphere, where work is not necessary. Here he finds himself entirely out of place, and the striving of his neighbor is a continual grief to him. We do not, of course, recommend to the mossback that he should take it into his own hands to remedy the mistake that was made in sending him to the earth to live, but if it should be a chance occur to him to do so there are several very effectual and not unpleasant devices for the purpose which one could gladly suggest to help him avoid failure.
Sunday Oregonian, Portland, March 22, 1908, page 30



Here on a Visit.
    A. J. Stewart, formerly of Medford, now a resident of Cottage Grove, is in Medford for a couple of days' business visit, and to visit his brother, Judge F. M. Stewart, and other relatives. He likes Cottage Grove, but admits he does not have to move with as swift a pace to keep up with the booster procession as he did when living in Medford. Clint, his son, he says, is seriously considering the subject of setting out a 200-acre fruit orchard near Cottage Grove.
Medford Mail, November 13, 1908, page 2


    Mrs. J. H. Stewart, accompanied by her friend, Mrs. E. M. Sherman, of Illinois, departed yesterday for Oakland, Cal., where she will visit for several months with her daughters, Mrs. Arthur Weeks and Mrs. H. M. Crowell.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail, January 15, 1909, page 6

May 9, 1909 Oregonian
May 9, 1909 Oregonian

VETERANS REMEMBERED
Judge F. M. Stewart Gets Back Pay for War Services

    On the 14th of next July there will have elapsed just 44 years since Judge F. M. Stewart, a resident of this city and employed on the reportorial staff of The Morning Mail, was mustered out of the army service at Louisville, Kentucky.
    At the time Mr. Stewart thought he had all that was coming to him from Uncle Sam, but from recent advices from Washington it appears he did not get it all.
    The substance of the Washington communication is that $4.98 is due him from the government and will be sent him at once. The above amount is due him for services rendered from July 14 to 20, 1865, and for clothing allowance for the same period.
    Mr. Stewart's company was mustered out of service at Louisville, Kentucky, on July 14, 1865, but because of congested transportation facilities at that time he did not reach Springfield, Illinois, where he was formally discharged, until four days later, and it is for this period that the payment is made.
    Mr. Stewart says he didn't care a whoop then whether he ever drew a dollar of government money--he, like thousands of other boys, just wanted to get home. Some of the soldiers, he says, did not even wait for their formal discharge, and their name stands on the records today with the word "deserter" written after it.
    A couple of years ago Mr. Stewart received a communication from a Washington attorney asking for permission to look up his war record as to his money allowance. The permission was granted, and this $4.98 voucher is the result.
Medford Mail, May 28, 1909, page 3


Stewart Orchard Sold.
    Will Stewart's farm and orchard, two miles southwest of town, containing 160 acres, was sold Tuesday to George Daggett, a recent arrival from Indianapolis, the consideration being $85,000. John D. Olwell, of Medford, made the sale. The place is one of the most desirable in the valley and has a large acreage set [to] commercial apples and pears.
    Mr. Daggett was on a tour of the coast but had no thought of making such an investment until he arrived in the Rogue River Valley Monday morning. The attractions were too strong to resist, however, and within 48 hours he was the possessor of a beautiful home and a profitable investment.
Central Point Herald, June 24, 1909, page 1



BIG DEALS IN ORCHARD LAND
Several Tracts Have Changed Hands During the Past Few Days
    One of the largest orchard deals made in this locality for several months was closed yesterday, when C. F. Rowell, until recently a wholesale and retail upholsterer in Cedar Rapids, Ia., and E. M. Soboda, a wholesale and retail coal dealer, also of Cedar Rapids, purchased from G. A. Morse his orchard tract, about four miles south of Medford and for which $80,000 was paid.
    There are 145 acres of land in the tract, and of this fully 125 acres are set to fruit. This is in apples, pears and some prunes. Some of the trees are from 12 to 15 years old, while a few pear trees are only 4 or 5 years old. The older orchard is now in the prime of bearing fruit, and it is estimated the fruit now on the trees will produce a net income of $10,000.
Planted by C. E. Stewart.
    This is the orchard originally owned and planted by C. E. Stewart, and about seven years ago was sold to Clay & Meader and later by these gentlemen was sold to G. A. Morse. The orchard was planted about four or five years after the Hon. J. H. Stewart planted the parent orchard of the valley, which is now part of the large Burrell orchard.
    The orchard has always borne a good crop of high-grade fruit, and has always been given excellent care, and with the same kind of care it ought to continue to bear in abundance and as good a variety for 20 or 25 years longer.
    Mr. Rowell will have the care and superintendency of the orchard, and Mr. Soboda will return to Iowa and resume his business there. The sale was made through the agency of Brown & Wakefield.
More Important Deal.
    Another orchard deal of even greater proportions than the one mentioned above is the matter of exchange of orchard land for a goodly sized quantity of the coin of the realm. There are more acres in the sale we are about to give mention to, and more money is required to possess it.
    This sale is that of the Will Stewart orchard, situated about four miles out of Medford and a mile and a half north of Jacksonville.
    There are 170 acres in the tract, and the price paid was $85,000. The purchaser is E. M. Daggett, a recent arrival from Minneapolis, Minn. About 100 acres of this tract is set to apples and pears, about 50 acres of each. These trees are 5 and 6 years old and are very thrifty. The remainder of the land is to fruit culture.
    Mr. Stewart has kept this land in a high state of cultivation, and it is today one of the prettiest orchard pictures there are in the valley.
Excerpt, Medford Mail, June 25, 1909, page 1


    William Stewart sold his farm of 170 acres to George Daggett, of Minneapolis, for $85,000.

"Land Sales Heavy," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, June 27, 1909, page 6


    The Burrell Investment Company, which has 600 acres in trees and nearly 200 acres of the tract in bearing, is composed of Portland capitalists. Captain George Voorhies bought 152 acres from J. H. Stewart in 1900 for $22,000. This piece of land contained some of the oldest pear trees in the valley, which, in the banner fruit year of 1907, yielded $2000 worth of pears to the acre. After a few years Captain Voorhies turned his interests over to the Burrell Investment Company, which is now the largest single fruit grower in Southern Oregon.
Arthur M. Geary, "Enormous Wealth of Rogue River Orchards," Morning Oregonian, Portland, September 5, 1909, page F2



    Judge F. M. Stewart of this city received word last evening of the death of an elder brother, H. M. Stewart, at his home at Nixie, Missouri, at the age of 67 years. The judge had not been apprised that his brother was ill.
"Personal and Local Brevity," Medford Mail, October 22, 1909, page 2


    It is a somewhat significant fact that the Rogue River Valley in Oregon, where the writer has resided for the past twenty-six years, owes its present position in the world's fruit trade largely to the good judgment and horticultural knowledge of a veteran in horticulture from the State of Illinois. There is no better illustration than his experience furnishes that methods of culture and selection of varieties must conform to local conditions. From the day when Hon. J. H. Stewart, now deceased, first saw upon the banquet tables of the Pioneer Association, assembled in annual reunion at Jacksonville, Oregon, a finer display of prime apples than he had ever seen at a state fair in the Mississippi Valley, he became a staunch advocate of commercial fruit culture in southern Oregon. Urging upon his neighbors in the [middle] eighties, before as yet the transportation was provided, the necessity of preparing to supply the Eastern demand for such choice fruit, he himself planted more than one hundred acres of apples and pears, fortunately including a good proportion of yellow Newtown pippins and Bartlett pears.
Wm. H. Holmes, "Southern Oregon Apple Growers--'Rogues' in Name Only," Proceedings of the Thirty-Sixth Fruit-Growers' Convention of the State of California, Watsonville, December 7, 8, 9 and 10, 1909
, State Printing Office, page 21


    Clint Stewart, who came [to southern Lane County] from Medford, will plant 2800 apple trees in the spring. . . .
"South Lane Apple Mad," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 10, 1910, page 9


    C. M. Speck, acting with Neely & Young, of Spokane, and other Spokane associates, have purchased the 605-acre tract of orchard land at Medford owned by Captain Gordon Voorhies, of Portland, paying an even $500,000 for the tract. The land, known as the Burrell orchard, is one of the finest orchards in the state. It is located one mile from Medford.
"Farms Sell Well," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, February 20, 1910, page 50


Stewart-Perry.
    F. M. Stewart, the well-known G.A.R. man, and Mrs. Susan Perry were married Tuesday evening, Rev. C. H. Hoxie officiating.
    Mr. and Mrs. Perry left this morning for California, where they will visit relatives and friends. Afterward they will visit in Louisiana, Illinois and other states and expect to be absent several months.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1910, page 5



    The Chrysanthemum Circle, Women of Woodcraft, will observe Decoration Day today, when services will be held at the cemetery at 5 o'clock, and the graves of the departed members will be decorated.
    During the services a monument which has been erected in memory of Mrs. Stewart, one of the pioneers of the country and an early member of the circle, will be unveiled.
"In Medford's Social Realm," Medford Mail Tribune, June 12, 1910, page B1

Voorhies House, September 11, 1910 Oregonian
September 11, 1910 Oregonian

    Captain Gordon Voorhies has the largest producing orchard in the Rogue River Valley. He has 605 acres in orchard, most of which is in bearing. One hundred and ten acres of his trees are 18 and 20 years old. This tract Captain Voorhies bought from J. H. Stewart, known as the father of the fruit industry of Southern Oregon, for $20,000 ten years ago. This was the first large sale of fruit land in the valley and started much comment at the time.
    One of the prettiest apple orchards in the valley is the one owned by Bruce Wilson, brother of Dr. George Wilson, situated on Griffin Creek, three miles and a half from Medford. He has 80 acres of 7-year-old apple trees with their first large crop hanging from the trees. These trees are pruned according to the old Stewart system, with one main leader, from which the other limbs branch. The branches begin a few inches above the ground and alternate around the main stalk.
"Many College Men Buying Homes in Rogue River Valley," Medford Mail Tribune, September 13, 1910, page 8


MRS. STEWART TO BE BURIED HERE
Aged Resident Dies in Oakland--Has Been a Resident
of Jackson County for the Past Twenty-Seven Years.
    The body of Mrs. J. H. Stewart, who died this morning at Oakland, Cal., will arrive in this city Friday night. She will be buried at the I.O.O.F. cemetery, where the body of her husband, who died here four years ago, now lies.
    Mrs. Stewart, who was 75 years old and a resident of this city for the last 27 years, came here from Quincy, Ill. She had been in ill health for about six weeks, and the end came while she was visiting with Mrs. A. J. Weeks, her daughter, in the California city.
    Besides Mrs. Weeks, she is survived by Mrs. H. M. Crowell of San Francisco and Mrs. D. R. Teil of Medford, daughters, and W. H. Stewart of Medford, a son.
    The funeral arrangements will be in charge of Messrs. Weeks & McGowan and will be announced later.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 11, 1911, page 8


STEWART--In East Oakland, Cal., January 11, 1911, Elizabeth Hyman Stewart, widow of the late J. H. Stewart of Medford, Ore., and devoted mother of Mrs. D. R. Hill and W. H. Stewart of Medford, Ore., Mrs. H. M. Crowell of San Francisco and Mrs. Arthur J. Weeks of Oakland, Cal., a native of Germany, aged 74 years and 5 months.
"Births, Marriages and Deaths," San Francisco Call, January 12, 1911, page 10


Notice
    The funeral of Mrs. J. H. Stewart will be held Sunday at 1:30 p.m. from the late residence on South Oakdale Avenue. Interment in I.O.O.F. cemetery. Friends and acquaintances invited to attend.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1911, page 4


MRS. STEWART PASSED AWAY
    Through a relative in this city the Journal has been informed of the death of Mrs. Elizabeth Hyman Stewart, widow of the late J. H. Stewart, who at one time represented this district in the Illinois legislature. Her death, according to the notice published in the Oakland (Cal.) Enquirer, occurred in East Oakland, Cal., Jan. 11, and she is survived by three daughters and one son, as follows: Mrs. D. R. Hill of Medford, Ore.; Mrs. H. M. Crowell of San Francisco; Mrs. Arthur J. Weeks of Oakland, and W. H. Stewart of Medford, Ore. Mrs. Stewart was born in Germany, and at the time of her death was aged 74 years and five months.
    The Stewart family was well known and highly esteemed here for many years. Mr. Stewart was a prominent nurseryman and horticulturist. The family removed to the Pacific coast about twenty-five years ago.
The Quincy Daily Journal, Illinois, March 4, 1911, page 7


NEW REAL ESTATE COMPANY ORGANIZED
    A real estate partnership has been formed under the name of La Loma real estate company, by W. H. Stewart, with office in the Stewart Building, over the Nicholson Hardware Company. Mr. Stewart is one of the pioneer orchardists of the valley, a son of the first commercial orchardist, and well informed regarding the history and possibilities of this section.
    Mr. Amy is also a pioneer of the valley, moving here a year ago from Central Point where he resided for many years. Mr. Savage came here recently from Corvallis, where he is widely known and has an enviable reputation. Already money [sic--many?] properties have been listed with the new firm and a rushing business is in prospect.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1911, page 6


    . . . it may be of interest to Quincy people to know that an Adams County farmer is the founder of the immense apple industry in the Northwest. This man is J. H. Stewart, a brother of the well-known truck gardener, William Stewart, whose choice asparagus is known to every resident of Quincy. J. H. Stewart lived on the place known as "Stahl's Paradise," the property purchased several years ago by the late Dr. C. L. Koch, whose widow resided there until last fall when fire destroyed the residence. Mr. Stewart built the house which was burned in this fire and really made the place what it has been for the past quarter of a century.
    Mr. Stewart went to Oregon in the early eighties and located near Medford in the Rogue River Valley, where he surprised the natives by planting an orchard of 160 acres. This was something unheard of in that part of the country and the older settlers jeered him for attempting such a thing. Nothing daunted him, and by the time he was ready to harvest his crops, the rest had been convinced that this Adams County farmer knew all along what the fertile Oregon soil was best adapted to. Today Oregon and Washington orchard land is commanding fabulous prices and the men who own it make fortunes in a few years through the fine apples they raise in such abundance.
    In the early years of the apple industry the growers did not get the returns that are now reaped. One of the oldest, in fact the second oldest man in the apple business, the man who watched Stewart and copied him first, said recently that they sold the first apples cheap and when they finally got as high as ninety cents a box for them they thought they were doing well. One day he had an idea. He wrote to the London Times and asked for the name of a reputable English fruit concern. He offered this company two carloads of Newtown pippins at their own figure and was surprised when the company cabled back a price in pounds, shillings and pence, which when translated nearly took the wind out of him. When the draft came he was convinced, for the same apples which he had been selling at 90 cents a box were paid for at $3 a box in London. With such a market at their disposal, the commission men who had reaped a harvest in the past had to meet the prices and this brought about a revolution in the apple industry. It made possible the immense orchards of the Northwest, the almost incredible prices of the land there and also the handsome apples for which the consumer here pays all the way from 5 to 15 cents apiece.
"The Price of Apples," The Quincy Daily Herald, Illinois, March 17, 1911, page 7


    J. H. Stewart, the leader of the homeseekers and former member of the Illinois legislature, knew good fruit land [and] good fruit climate when he saw them, and along the Rogue he saw plenty of both. With his son-in-law, A. J. Weeks, with J. D. Whitman of Iowa and with P. W. Olwell he laid the foundation for the Rogue River Valley's paramount industry. Near the new little town of Medford and over toward Central Point the four bought land, bought it cheap in quarter-sections, and set out trees on these tracts. Naturally the grain[-growing] conservatives considered the fruit radicals ripe for the lunacy commission, maintaining that the newcomers would not be able to sell enough fruit to make the venture pay. But they changed their tune when the well-tilled, scientifically pruned, thoroughly sprayed orchards came into bearing six to eight years later. Where wheat had furnished a maximum revenue of thirty to forty dollars an acre, the orchards were producing from a hundred to a hundred and fifty dollars an acre. Buyers from California came, purchased the crops at 65 to 85 cents a box and shipped the fruit under California brands. The price was not high, but the trees produced regularly and heavily. Evidently the conservatives had been mistaken. After all, there was profit in fruit. Here and there all along the Rogue and its tributaries, from Grants Pass to Ashland, young orchards and vineyards quietly took the place of grain fields. . . .
    When an offer was made, [Stewart and his fellows] sold out, one after the other, assuming that their holdings would follow the example of the Middle Western orchards and soils, attain a maximum, an apex of productiveness, and go down slowly thereafter. Twenty thousand dollars, a little more than the revenue of a good year's crop, was the average price paid for a hundred and sixty acres in full bearing, and the owners were glad to take the money, certain that the buyer was walking off with a heavily gilded piece of common burnt clay. . . .
    From seventy and eighty cents a box the offers gradually rose, [and] the revenue from the orchards increased. Within a few years the buyer of the old Stewart place, having paid $22,000 for two hundred acres, smiled and smiled for three long sunny days after passing the brick on to the next man for $78,000. All the valley smiled with him at the purchaser.
Walter V. Woehlke, "Transplanting the Garden of Eden," Sunset magazine, June 1911, page 590


    With the sale of 45 acres in the Morrill orchard by Captain Gordon Voorhies, of Portland, to Mrs. A. E. Bingham, of Santa Barbara, Cal. yesterday, and the sale of 230 acres of the Potter Barneburg place to Stephen Tobin, of Casper, Wyo., the orchard sales of the last six weeks in Medford total $427,000.
"Orchard Sales $427,000," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 20, 1912, page 1



    Mrs. James Stewart, who has been visiting her cousin, F. M. Stewart, took the car for Medford Thursday afternoon.
A. C. Howlett, "Eagle Point Eaglets," Medford Mail Tribune, February 23, 1915, page 5


DIED
    William H. Stewart, one of the most prominent orchardists of the valley and widely known, died at his Medford residence January 19 of sclerosis of the liver, aged 47 years. He was born at Quincy, Ill., and came here with his parents in 1885. His father, the late Joseph H. Stewart, was the pioneer commercial orchardist of the valley, and planted the Burrell and other famous orchard tracts, and his son followed the same occupation, planting the Hillcrest Orchard and later the Stewart Orchard, west of Central Point, which he owned at his death.
    The deceased was a member of the Masonic Lodge, the Blue Lodge, the Shriners, the Knights Templar and the Elks, and a director in the Farmers' and Fruitgrowers' Bank. He leaves a wife, Mrs. Ida Stewart, and three sisters, Mrs. Dillon Hill of Medford; Mrs. A. J. Weeks of Oakland and Mrs. H. M. Crowell of Los Angeles.
    Funeral announcements will be made later.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1917, page 2


    William A. Stewart, a prominent orchardist of the valley, died at his home in Medford, Friday, Jan. 19, aged 47 years. He planted the Hillcrest Orchard, near Medford, and later the Stewart Orchard, near Central Point.
"Local News," Jacksonville Post, January 20, 1917, page 3


    C. W. Whillock, having faith in Medford and believing every man should own his own home, has purchased the beautiful residence of Mrs. Will Stewart on the corner of Mistletoe and Tenth, paying $7000 for the property and $3000 for the furnishings. They get possession October 1st.
"Local and Personal," Medford Sun, September 21, 1919, page 2


THE PEAR PIONEERS OF MEDFORD
By JEUNESSE BUTLER
    From "way down east" to "the far west" (Maine to New York, New York to Illinois, Illinois to Oregon) came the Stewarts, all nurserymen, unto the fourth generation. True pioneer souls they were, with the courage and vision, patience and persistence which characterized those whom all Oregon is remembering today during her Diamond Jubilee. The courage to leave the familiar for the unknown, the vision to sense what the future could bring, the patience and persistence to work for it.
    "The Illinois State Agricultural Society award this diploma to Wm. Stewart and Sons, Hannibal Mo. for the best 25 varieties of fruit. October 4, 1856," reads a framed announcement hanging on the dining room wall of the Dillon Hill home on Kings Highway, where lives Wm. Stewart's granddaughter, Mrs. Hill. Opposite the diploma is a beautiful picture of a Rogue River Valley orchard in bloom, taken in 1914.
    Joseph H. Stewart, son of William, planted the first commercial orchard in this valley, the Eden Valley [orchard], now known as the Voorhies orchard and owned by Col. Gordon Voorhies, experienced and prominent grower. Mr. Stewart bought the tract of 160 acres in the spring of '85 when it was known as the old Ball place, and planted 100 acres in fruit. In '87, he bought what was known as the Justus place, now the George Marshall, and two years later planted about 76 acres in apples and pears.
    Spraying did not appear as necessary in those days, more moisture made less irrigating, and smudging had perhaps not been invented. Good corn could be and was raised without a drop of water, according to those who remember, and corn and watermelons were grown between trees in the orchards while they [i.e., the orchards] were growing. Blight was something of a problem, then as now, and the soil of the Eden Valley was a mixture of the sandy and "sticky."
    Mrs. Hill likes to recall that her father sent out the first carload of Ben Davis apples that ever left the valley. Their destination was Germany, she says. Bartletts, 'Anjous and Howells were the principal varieties, with the Bartlett considered the best commercial pear.
    The Dillon Hill home is a quaint and charming place, by the way. Marble-topped tables, capacious fireplaces, old-fashioned rocking chairs and a Steinway parlor grand piano, rosewood cased, combine to give an air of old-time repose and comfort. The house was built in 1905, a year before Joseph Stewart died. The lumber was hauled from a mill near Prospect by mule team. But all this does not concern orchards, nor growers.
    It was in 1901 that 160 additional acres of fruit land were purchased from Asa Fordyce. Fred Page of Portland bought much of Mr. Stewart's fruit, states Mrs. Hill. They also shipped to Sgobel and Day of New York, Ray and Hatfield of New York and Dennis and Sons of London, England. By this time, residents of the valley and others were ready to believe Mr. Stewart's evaluation when he predicted the Rogue River country would be the "ideal pear spot of the West." Mrs. Hill also likes to dwell somewhat on the visits to her father of both Mr. Sgobel and Day, whose names are still familiar to this section. For the possible encouragement of those who today may need it, there is Mr. Stewart's advice given so many years ago, "It may be slim in spots, but just grit your teeth and hang on."
    Mr. Stewart and his family took things as they came, from the time he took a crowbar and sounded the ground to find what he wanted until actual buying and selling took place. Sacks of flour were only 75 cents in those days, and a side of bacon cost about one dollar. "Father eventually sold enough fruit to make a good living," Mrs. Hill recalls, and "he was a good financier," she adds with pardonable pride.
    A story such as this must necessarily be written somewhat sketchily, for the writer is dependent upon memories for most of the information, and the present writer believes it is much better to give the readers of the Pear-O-Scope all she has been able to gather even if not presented in ordered sequence.
    For instance: The Eden Valley orchard boasted 50 varieties of pears and apples, the elder Stewart having brought his own nursery stock from Illinois. He came before there were any railroads. [This is incorrect.] His brothers came later and also bought fruit lands. The codling moth and the blight were early arrivals. Ninety acres were planted in melons. Although having been a commercial grower in New York and later in Illinois, Joseph Stewart encountered something "new and different" when he discovered "sticky."
    That he was considered in those early days to be "crazy" doesn't seem so unusual, for he had new ideas about fruit production and marketing. "A true conception of values in properties and varieties," states his daughter. Ninety-six cars of his own fruit were shipped in 1896.
    The price range was about the same as today, and the pack practically the same. Although it was thought the Newtown apple would last, the pear was even then considered the important product of the valley. The Clairgeau was once a moneymaker. The Nelis, the Bosc and Comice were first planted about 1890 by Will Stewart, a son, at what is now known as the Hillcrest orchards. Wagner Butte was planted by his brother, A. J. Stewart.
    Sons and sons-in-law planted and owned the Marshall orchard, the Hillcrest, the Hollywood, the Burch property and the Weeks tracts on the river. Also the piece now owned by Mrs. Jessie Minear close to Jacksonville.
    The Olwells were the next to join the growers in the Rogue Valley, then W. H. Norcross of Central Point and Mr. Whitman, grandfather of Olin Whitman. The Pellett orchard near Talent was one of the early tracts, also the Helms property near Ashland and the orchards of Chris Eismann and brothers at Grants Pass.
    If the Stewarts have a coat of arms, many of their friends think, it should bear an insignia of pears, for Joseph Stewart was surely a pear pioneer. He was a member of the first horticultural society in the United States, the American Pomological Society, which originated in 1848. Howard Hill, his grandson, has a most interesting copy of the proceedings of the eighth session of the society held at Philadelphia in 1860. Interesting and informative data taken from this book and other sources will follow in additional articles which will appear in the Pear-O-Scope from time to time, at the request of our readers.
Rogue River Valley Pear-O-Scope, May 1934, page 3
 

    A [pear blossom] tour of about 30 miles starts on the Jacksonville Highway to Jacksonville, then left to the Stage Coach Orchard, and along South Stage Road and Kings Highway. Just south of the last slight jog in the road is the area's oldest pear planting, set out in 1885. The site marks the beginning of the largest solid planting in the county, about 5,000 acres.
"Connie Hanscom Named Queen of Pear Festival; Tours Suggested," Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1956, page 1



Last revised November 3, 2016