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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Medford News: 1892

The first three years of the Medford Mail are lost; 1892 was the newspaper's fourth year and the oldest to survive. Below are Medford-related news items from 1892. Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Take a look at Nickell's addition.
    D. T. Pritchard, watchmaker and jeweler, Medford.
    Candies and nuts at the 5 and 10 store, Medford.
    A. A. Davis has returned from his trip to Olympia.
    Get prices on goods at the 5 and 10 cent store before purchasing elsewhere.
    Henry Smith is agent for Butterick's patterns in Medford.
    A nice line of ladies' and children's hosiery at the 5 and 10 store, Medford.
    Hon. Willard Crawford has been under the weather from an attack of neuralgia, but is better now.
    The distillery is running on full time, having established connection with the city waterworks.
    The Singer sewing machine business at this place is now in the hands of L. E. Hoover, lately of Grants Pass.
    Don't fail to buy a lot in Nickell's addition to Medford. The tract adjoins the west boundary of town.
    Town Recorder Faris will receive proposals for cleaning out the ditch above town up to next Monday evening.
    Pritchard, the jeweler, last week received direct from the factory a fine new safe for the better protection of his large stock.
    The new circulating library, to be placed in Strang's drug store, arrived last week, and proves to be a very good selection of books.
    Hamilton & Palm have inaugurated the idea of selling acres and town lots on the installment plan and are doing a good business.
    G. W. Kimball of Roseburg was a visitor in Medford last week on business connected with the abstracting profession, in which he is still engaged.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman is adding a dryer to his cannery near town, in order to handle the yearly increasing output of his orchard to better advantage.
    Some doubt is now expressed among the parties interested as to whether or not the Medford election should be held under the new Australian ballot law.
    L. C. Rodenberger and D. S. Youngs are the first to announce themselves as candidates for the office of city marshal at the coming municipal election.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    The Democratic mass meeting to nominate a city ticket for the approaching election met at the opera house one evening last week, but adjourned over until last Tuesday evening.
    Dr. Geary has been treating the cancer on G. W. Praytor's lip, which still proves annoying, with the electric treatment to which it very nearly succumbed while the patient was in California.
    A runaway team, near the school house one day last week, was the cause of Mr. See of Ashland getting his arm broken, he being thrown from the wagon. He is doing nicely now, under Dr. Wait's treatment.
    M. H. Huff, who has been a resident of this place for some time, has traded his stable property to a gentleman from Nebraska for a farm in that state, and left this week for that section to take possession.
    The canard about Dr. Pryce having had several ribs broken was circulated over the county before he became well enough to deny it. He was much amused when he first heard of it. He is rapidly improving in health.
    Bert. Newton of Central Point is among the list of students at the business college at present. Miss A. Cooper of the county seat is also enrolled with those who are rapidly acquiring proficiency in business forms and customs.
    A. A. Davis, with commendable Christian remembrance, delivered a sack of his best flour to each and every needy family in town he could hear of on Christmas Eve. The Ladies' Union Relief Corps found him a valuable assistant in their commendable work.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    The K. of P. party on Christmas night was the event of the season and a success in every particular. The attendance was very large, and as the managers left nothing undone, the greatest of satisfaction resulted. Excellent music was furnished by the Grants Pass string band, and the supper at the Grand Central pleased all.
    J. M. Weaver of Eugene is among our latest acquisitions, having purchased the old I.O.O.F. cemetery for a residence location, paying $65 per acre for the land. He owns a large tract of land in the upper Rogue River country, and intends to carry on the ranching business while residing in the lower valley.
    L. G. Porter has about completed setting out five acres in choice fruit trees at his place near town, and will build him a nice residence in the spring.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 2


    Did you see those fine two-year-old apple trees at Medford Nursery?
    Albert Soliss is reported ill at Stockton, Cal., we are sorry to learn.
    Medford Nursery is the place to get fruit trees. I got my trees at Medford Nursery.
    Watch cleaning $1 and warranted by D. T. Pritchard, watchmaker and jeweler, Medford.
    Daniel Greninger, late of the Meadows, now of Medford, is teaching a singing class at Antioch school house at present.
    Forty-four ladies and gentlemen from Jacksonville attended the K. of P. ball at Medford on Christmas night and were well pleased with their experience.
    R. J. Cameron of Uniontown precinct lately delivered four hogs to the packing house at Medford which weighed, when dressed, over eleven hundred pounds.
    W. H. Hosler, who has purchased some land in Medford of Mrs. Davison and others, was in Jacksonville Wednesday, accompanied by a friend from the East.
    Jackson Creek almost filled up the railroad company's gravel pit a few nights since, covering up some of the track and endangering the safety of the flatcar.
    The streams have carried more water during the past week than at any time since the flood in February 1890. They have been running bank full, but did no damage.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 3



    Adam Schmidt and son, who are now employed at the Medford distillery, spent Christmas in Jacksonville.
    C. H. Pierce, the well-known timber expert, has gone east on business, and will no doubt cause a revelation in his line when he returns.
    E. Calhoun, who arrived from Texas not long since, now resides at Phoenix, but will soon locate in the Butte Creek section. He expects to be followed by others from the same section.
Rowena Nichols, October 1903 Wilhelm's Magazine The Coast
Rowena Nichols, October 1903 Wilhelm's Magazine, The Coast
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols (nee Bunyard), a former resident of Jacksonville, returned one day last week, and will spend several months here. She has gained considerable reputation as an artist.
    Mrs. F. W. Clayton, formerly of Ashland and Medford, is in luck, her mother, Mrs. M. A. Gaffney of Seattle, having divided $300,000 among her five children, while keeping about a million dollars to keep the wolf from her own door while she lives.
    Geo. W. Dewey, who has been a resident of Talent for some time past, leaves for his old home in California soon. He will not go alone, as he has just taken unto himself a wife in the person of Miss Robinson, a daughter of S. M. Robinson of Wagner Creek, and an amiable, popular young lady. They have the best wishes of a host of friends, in which the Times heartily joins.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 3



    The R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s cars have been furnished with a stove, which proves quite comfortable during the cold weather.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 3



    James Slover, a former resident of this place and son-in-law of Hon. W. H. Parker, will shortly embark in a business enterprise in Medford. Mr. Slover is one of the most worthy young men who ever went out of this community, and he and his excellent wife will be a valuable acquisition to Medford business and social circles.

"Jacksonville Items," Medford Mail, January 7, 1892, page 2


A Hot Fire.
    This morning, Thursday, at about 2 o'clock, the citizens of Medford were aroused by the terrible cry of "Fire! Fire!" and as the cry was taken up and passed along, people tumbled out of warm beds and into cold clothing and rushing upon the street saw the town and sky brilliantly illuminated and beheld the upshooting flames which caused the light.
    Closing in upon the circle, it was soon too apparent to the ever-increasing throng that one of Medford's industries was fast being licked to ashes by the demon.
    The combined planing mill and sash and door factory of C. W. Skeel & Son is leveled to the ground this morning. Cause of the fire unknown. Loss, $4,000; insurance $2,000. Between 4,000 and 5,000 feet of lumber was consumed together with a lot of sash, doors, blinds, etc. The paint shop, containing about $1500 worth of paints and oils, standing close to the mill, escaped as also did the lumber sheds.
    In conversation Mr. C. W. Skeel gave the hose company great credit for their efficient work, claiming that their efforts had saved him, in the paint shop and lumber sheds, between $2000 and $3000.
    The mill was built four years ago, being owned by the present firm some two years.
    In reply to the question the elder Mr. Skeel was not prepared to say when or whether they would rebuild.
    How the mill caught fire, though, is a mystery. The mill was in operation yesterday, and at the close of the day all fires in the engine and about the mill were extinguished, as was the usual custom.
    This is one of the most costly fires Medford has known for some time.
Medford Mail, January 7, 1892, page 3


    The business college is in a flourishing condition, and the prospects for its increasing prosperity were never better.
    E. Bethel, brother-in-law of R. H. Halley, departed Wednesday for his Missouri home after an extended visit with relatives here.
    The Medford Roller Mills started up again Monday after being shut down for about ten days for the holidays and to repair the mill generally. Only day runs are being made at present.
    C. Wolters, our staff of life manipulator, has ceased to knead the sponge for the winter, but will do the act again with the opening up of spring.
    There are over twenty students in attendance at the Medford Business College, leaving room for but four or five more. Isn't this a good showing in less than three months?
    City election next Tuesday, Jan. 12, 1892. The Australian ballot law will be in vogue, and as the niceties of its working are somewhat complicated to the uninitiated, we may expect a gist of mistakes, more or less serious, and some of a ludicrous nature. Although on the whole a careful attention to the directions given will simplify matters to the satisfaction of all.
    J. Goldsmith is no longer a citizen of Medford, having closed out his business here to take charge of his father's large interests at Eugene. Mr. Goldsmith has been in business in Medford three years and commanded a good share of the trade of this section. Many friends, while loath to say farewell, wish Mr. Goldsmith and his estimable wife a pleasant home and much success in their new abode.
"Local News," Medford Mail, January 7, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. L. Kline and family have become permanent residents of Medford.
    Mr. Cooper resumed control of the Clarendon Hotel yesterday, Mr. Hurst retiring to his ranch.
    The roller mills at this place were closed down for repairs for several days during the last week.
    Chas. Strang is handling the Parmelee library at this place in a satisfactory manner.
    Bert Whitman has been seeking a market for several carloads of apples in San Francisco during the last week.
    The town election takes place next Tuesday. We hope that the Democrats will do their duty and elect none but Democrats.
    The town election promises to be an interesting one. No doubt the majority of the officers that will be elected will be Democrats.
    J. R. Erford having declined the Democratic nomination for Recorder, N. A. Jacobs has been selected to fill the vacancy on the ticket.
    The Indians which were advertised for by Mr. Mathews of the Klamath agency are in town. The agent has been advised of their whereabouts.
    The Monarch saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    Miss Sally Griffin was badly hurt but not seriously injured by being thrown from her cart near the Grand Central Hotel one day last week. Dr. Geary is in attendance.
    Many who have given the matter only passing attention are able to realize the growth of Medford during the last year. A large number of fine buildings have gone up, adding much to its appearance.
    Goldsmith has completed selling out and intends removing to Eugene in a short time, his father's business at that place being the prime reason for him closing his prosperous trade here. Jule is certain to do well wherever he goes.
    A son of Dr. Minnis, formerly of Medford, Laurence, was committed to the insane asylum. He is aged 21 years and is suffering a nervous attack. He is the young man who a few months ago at Roseburg acted so strangely at the marriage of a young lady whom he said he wanted to marry.
    The offer of W. H. Hosler to donate a lot of ground 100x200 feet in an eligible location to serve as a site for the proposed Medford Business College was most generous, and we trust that our citizens can see their way clear to build and equip such an institution here before spring opens.
    The straight Democratic nominees for the various municipal officers are for mayor, Geo. S. Walton; trustees, Wm. Slinger, E. J. Montague, W. B. Roberts and W. P. H. Legate; treasurer, G. H. Haskins; marshal, A. Z. Sears. The opposition ticket is headed [by] J. A. Whiteside for mayor; J. W. Short, W. P. Wood, W. B. Roberts and Dr. E. B. Pickel, for trustees; J. H. Faris for recorder; G. H. Haskins for treasurer, and L. C. Rodenberger for marshal. Whichever ticket wins, most of the successful candidates will be good Democrats. Medford citizens can trust good Democrats on general principles.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 2



    Jerome B. Walden, Jr., to James B. Chase; lots 17 and 18, block 78, Medford. $300.
    G. W. Howard to Geo. B. Anderson; lot 13, block 18, Medford. $75.
    Same to same; lot 14, same block. $60.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 2


    J. M. McGrew and family have left Sams Valley with the intention of making their future home in California.
    O. Harbaugh has sold 35 acres off the Tice place, which is located near Medford, to a newcomer for $75 an acre.
    The Ashland roller flouring mills, having been thoroughly overhauled, are once more in operation under the management of Jacobs & Virgin, who are newcomers.
    All of the section hands employed by the R.R.V.R.R. Co., excepting Mr. Alberry, the foreman, and J. Morris, have been discharged. A portion of the road is still in need of repair.
    Fruit growers find their business less profitable already, owing to the introduction of fruit pests among us, but there is yet hope of stamping them out, and all should bend their energies to the work.
    The work of bucking snow in the Siskiyous has resulted in a large number of engines having been stalled at the Ashland roundhouse lately, from five to fifteen engines being in the yard at one time.
    A. J. Stewart is this season preparing for the work of setting out an 80-acre orchard of prunes, apples and almonds on his fine place south of Medford. He is a brother of Hon. J. H. Stewart, and like the latter is thoroughly familiar with the fruit industry and has only been waiting to familiarize himself with the capacity of the valley in that line before embarking therein.
    Among the residents of the Siskiyou section who have awakened to the fact that prune culture may prove profitable, even in sections remote from the railroads, may be mentioned Maj. H. F. Barron and B. R. Kingsbury, who have each obtained about five hundred prune trees for experimental planting the coming season in addition to their already large orchards. There can be no question that the industry of raising prunes for shipment abroad by our foothill ranchers will attain to mammoth proportions in a few years more.
    Ashland's fruit business has grown to almost mammoth proportions within the past few years, and its shipments during the last season approximated three million pounds of green fruit alone. An area of orchard is tributary to the town of at least a thousand acres, and what the yield will amount to in a very few years more can only be conjectured. Other sections in the county bid fair to prove close rivals of Ashland in the matter of fruit shipments in a few years, and it requires no prophetic eye to discern the fact that it is to be our leading industry.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 3


    S. L. Jessup, agent for H. Parmelee & Co., is in town. He has met with considerable success in establishing libraries in the different towns of Oregon.
    Conrad Mingus of Ashland, one of Jackson County's most respected and prominent citizens, made us a pleasant call on Wednesday. He has been a subscriber to the Times for the past twenty-one years.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 3


    Miss Hattie Sisemore of Sams Valley and Miss Lippincott of Medford commenced their studies at St. Mary's Academy this week.

    Mrs. D. B. Soliss went to Stockton, Cal., last week, to attend her son Albert, who has been quite ill with pneumonia. He is convalescing.
    Geo. McMurray [McDonald?], the scientific veterinary surgeon and dentist, was at the county seat one day this week. He has done considerable expert work and never fails to give satisfaction.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 3


Planing Mill Burned.
    C. W. Skeel's planing mill at Medford was burned to the ground yesterday morning at about 2 o'clock. Night watch Rodenberger first discovered the fire and gave the alarm. The hose company responded with alacrity and did good work saving everything except the building and its contents. The loss is estimated at $4,000, upon which there is insurance amounting to $2,000. How the fire originated is a mystery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 8, 1892, page 3


THE ELECTION
    "Tel est notre plaisir," so spake the people, and their voice was heard and heeded, and now ye who have been in the fray, vanquished and victors, lay down your arms and throw open wide the portals of citizenship and bid "white-robed Peace" enter and reign supreme. We are pleased to say the municipal election of last Tuesday was peaceful in every respect. In fact, it was so smooth that strangers within our gates surely gave Medford the credit of having set a precedent in city elections. The Australian ballot system was in vogue, and as far as we have heard, it gave universal satisfaction to all, unless it was perhaps a few of the natural-born wire pullers, who were out of a "job" on that day. The Mail accepts the ticket as it was elected, and while extending congratulations, we might add if the city officers for the coming year, newly elected and re-elected, fill their respective positions on a whole as well as the outdoing roll, we doubt not but that the majority will be pleased and the best interest of the city looked to.
Medford Mail, January 14, 1892, page 2


    Little May Phipps is still suffering quite severely from an acute attack of rheumatism.
    Emil Barbé, one of Jacksonville's most extensive vineyardists, smiled in on us Monday. Mr. Barbé informed us he is contemplating making Medford his home in the near future.
    Bright moonlight nights are the order now, but what will the harvest be when the moon is on the wane and the inky blackness of the night is intensified by the sickly glare of our street lamps. Give us light.
    J. E. Shearer, one of the accommodating tonsorial artists at the Palace barber shop, will leave for Portland the latter part of this week, where he intends to make his future residence. Mr. Shearer has many friends here who wish him success in his new field.
    A young son of G. W. Crystal sustained severe injuries about the arm last week by falling off the porch at his home in this city. A joint was dislocated which proved very painful, but under the care of Dr. Geary the little fellow will soon be ready for another fall.
    J. A. Slover, who is to open up the drug store in Goldsmith's old stand, is busy receiving his stock and will be ready for business as soon as his fixtures arrive, which will be a week or ten days. The fixtures and arrangements of this store, we understand, will be the finest in Southern Oregon, barring none.
    Owing to wheat shortage the Medford flour mills run on half time at present. Too much wheat was shipped out of the valley this year. This should never be; at least enough should stay with us to keep local industries busy the year round, as by this means employment can be given to a greater number of men.
    The Clarenden Hotel has opened up for business this week. A wonderful improvement has been made in all its features, and as W. G. Cooper, its present host, seems to be determined to bring its standard to the top round, the house will without a doubt be a desirable place for guests. Note his advertisement in another column.
    The distillery is idle. The imported yeast maker has been shipped back to Chicago. He could make yeast for a brewery or bakery, but distillery was too high for his caliber. As soon as another one is secured in his place operations will begin in earnest.
    In order to give more extensive notice the meeting that was to be held last Saturday for the purpose of providing for the building of a business college in this city was postponed until Saturday, January 16 at 2 p.m. A large number of citizens should be present, as this is a project that is of material interest to everybody. The meeting will be held in the business college room.
"Local News," Medford Mail, January 14, 1892, page 3


Benevolent Union.
    The ladies of the different denominations met at the Baptist Church on Thursday afternoon for the purpose of organizing a relief society. Mrs. Van Dyke was called to the chair, and Miss Carrie Van Dyke acted as secretary. It was moved and carried that a society be formed for the purpose of receiving and distributing any articles or funds donated to the needy of our town. The name of said society to be the Union Benevolent Association of Medford. The following officers were elected and duly installed: Mrs. Kellogg, president; Mrs. Van Dyke vice president; Mrs. West, secretary; Mrs. Lawton, treasurer.
    Moved and carried that the society meet the first Thursday in each month at one of the churches. Committees to be formed at each meeting for the ensuing month to discover any case of destitution or want that may exist in this vicinity. The committee for this month being Mrs. Whitman, Mrs. Gilmer and Miss Callie Stuart. A separate committee appointed for the purpose of securing a room in which to leave contributions of food or clothing is composed of the following ladies: Mrs. Webb, Mrs. Hammond and Mrs. Redden. Moved and carried that each and all joining this society pay an admission fee of 10 cts.
    Society adjourned to meet at the Presbyterian Church Thursday, Feb. 4 and 8 o'clock.
    Public in general invited to assist in this work, and all ladies interested will be welcomed as members.
SUSIE M. WEST, Sec'y.           
Medford Mail, January 14, 1892, page 3


    Henry Smith, who settled in Josephine County in 1854, died at Grants Pass recently, aged 70. He has been engaged in the mercantile business on Wolf Creek and on Galice Creek, and at the time of his death had a store also at Medford. He leaves a widow and two grown sons, one of whom is a sheriff in the Sandwich Islands and the other a resident of Harney Valley. He leaves property valued at $60,000.
"General News Notes,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, January 14, 1892, page 1


    A. Garrick, the Ashland tailor, has closed out his business at the granite city to J. L. Terry, just from Spokane, and will try life in California in the future.
    McMurray [McDonald?], the veterinary surgeon, pronounces the disease of which several young cattle died in the vicinity of Medford recently to have been genuine blackleg, a disease from which calves have not heretofore been known to die with in the winter time in this section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Mail entered upon its fourth year of existence last week.
    Miss May Crain was last week enrolled among the members of the business college.
    Chas. Wolters has temporarily suspended bread making at the bakery, until spring enlivens the market.
    B. W. Powell, who is now located at Castle Rock, Wash., arrived at Medford this week and will send some time here.
    M. W. Skeel will occupy the residence vacated by W. G. Cooper when he took charge of the Clarendon Hotel.
    W. G. Cooper is now in charge of the Clarendon Hotel and is preparing to entertain the public in the best of style.
    Pritchard, the jeweler, last week received direct from the factory a fine new safe for the better protection of his large stock.
    The Medford roller mills are now running on half time, the night shift having been discontinued after the holiday rest of ten days.
    The roads are everywhere in a very bad condition, and our citizens are anxiously awaiting the arrival of the "February good spell."
    E. Bethel, who has been visiting relatives here for some time past, last week returned home to Missouri, but may return later to locate here.
    Over twenty students are now enrolled at the Medford Business College, and that institution bids fair to prove a permanent one in this section.
    Miss Jessie Worman was tendered a pleasant surprise social prior to her departure for Eugene to attend school during the coming term, one day last week.
    The burning of Skeel & Son's planing mill at this place last week is generally deplored, as no inconsiderable part of the city's building interests centered there.
    A large number of the Medford Odd Fellows attended the installation of officers at Jacksonville last week, coming up on a special train and returning after the ceremony.
    The members of the silver cornet band were the recipients of numerous courtesies at the hands of our citizens during the holiday season, having had an informal reception at the residence of G. W. Galloway on the 28th ult., and watched out the old year at the home of E. Langley on the evening of the 31st.
    The five Fort Klamath Indians who were caught in the snow while attempting to return to the reservation by the Mt. Pitt route, and who narrowly escaped perishing in the drifts, have been at Medford during the week in comfortable quarters, and by the orders of Agent Matthews will be furnished the means of subsistence while they are compelled to remain in this section.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


    J. B. Walden Jr., to James B. Chase; lots 17 and 18, block 78, Medford. $300.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


Medford's Election.
    Quite an exciting time was held at the city election held at Medford last Tuesday. When the ballots were counted it was found that the successful candidates were the following: Mayor, J. A. Whiteside; Trustees, W. B. Roberts, E. B. Pickel, Wm. P. Wood and E. J. Montague; Recorder, J. H. Faris; Treasurer, G. H. Haskins; Marshal, L. C. Rodenberger.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


    Jacksonville precinct has been subdivided into north and south Jacksonville precincts under the new law; Medford into north and south Medford and Ashland into north and south and west Ashland precincts by the county commissioners' court. We will publish full boundaries in our next issue.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 15, 1892, page 3


    Ed. Phipps goes with his sister May to California for the benefit of her health. We miss them from our pleasant school and hope they may be quickly restored to us.

N. L. Narregan,
"Educational," Medford Mail, January 21, 1892, page 2


    N. L. Narregan has purchased the old school house, paying therefor $250.
    S. Childers, according to announcement in another column, is now prepared to furnish the Universal Combination Fence. Parties contemplating fence building should call on him.
    Mr. and Mrs. I. J. Phipps and daughter left on Tuesday's train for Los Angeles. The daughter is an invalid, and the parents are taking her to Southern California in the hope to benefit her health.
    Twins were born to Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Gage in this city Monday. All are reported doing well. This pair of newcomers have the honor of being the first twins ever born in Medford. [Raymond] Crystal, now eight years old, was the first child ever born in this city.
    Some gravel has been distributed along Main Street, thus covering up a good deal of mud and improving the appearance of the street wonderfully. This is done by business men and shows a good deal of enterprise. The new council might take the initiative and set the ball rolling in their favor by carrying on this good work on the principal streets of the town.
"Local News,"
Medford Mail, January 21, 1892, page 2

Medford Business College ad, January 22, 1892 Democratic Times
January 22, 1892 Democratic Times

MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The old school building has been sold to Prof. Narregan.
    Work has been resumed in earnest at the Medford fence works.
    Miss Emma Cooper has gone to Ashland to take a position in the Ashland House.
    A. Smith, formerly of Gold Hill, has returned from Coos County to make Medford his home.
    W. G. Cooper has everything in good order to entertain the traveling public at the Clarendon Hotel.
    Tom Harris was receiving the congratulations of his numerous friends all week over the arrival of that fine girl at his home.
    At the special school meeting held last Saturday it was decided to bond the debt of the district, which amounts to about $9000.
    We learn that some of the gentlemen who were elected to office at the late city election will refuse to qualify. We hope that such is not the case.
    Skeel & Son are making preparations to rebuild their planing mill, and will in time be better prepared than ever to fill all orders in their line.
    Candidates on both tickets were elected, and considerable interest was taken in the working of the new election law. Still, only 225 votes were cast.
    Jas. A. Slover & Co. have opened business in the building formerly occupied by J. Goldsmith. They will keep a complete and first-class stock of drugs, medicines, etc.
    J. R. Wilson, who blacksmith shop is located at the corner of C and 6th Streets, is doing a good business, being an excellent mechanic and turning out the best of work.
    Geo. E. Anderson has purchased the plant and good will of the Webster soda water works at Medford. Mr. W. has removed to New Mexico for his health and will soon be followed by his family.
    I. J. Phipps and wife left for southern California this week, taking their daughter with them. It is thought that the climate will benefit the health of the young lady, which has been precarious of late.
    A meeting towards providing ways and means to establish a business college in a home of its own in this place was attended by a number of our citizens last Saturday. The enterprise should succeed.
    Wm. Ulrich was at Portland during the week and was interviewed by the irrepressible Oregonian reporter, who announced that the pork packing company had killed twice as many hogs as is really the case.
    G. W. Crystal's little son met with quite an accident by falling from the porch at his father's residence one day last week, dislocating his elbow, which Dr. Geary has about made as good as new, however.
    Dr. S. Danielson publishes a card to the citizens of Medford, announcing the fact that he is a regular graduate of a physiomedical college and also holds a certificate from the state board of medical examiners.
    John Weeks last week turned out a fine set of napkin rings at his furniture factory for shipment to eastern friends. They were made from the highly colored manzanita wood and were handsomely polished.
    The distillery people last week made the unwelcome discovery that their imported yeast-maker couldn't give the necessary raise to his yeast, and they shipped him back to grow up with the east [sic]. The plant is idle until the right man can be obtained.
    Julius Goldsmith has quit business here and gone to Eugene with his family. He proved an enterprising, straightforward merchant and a good citizen, and his departure is regretted by many. We wish Julius unbounded prosperity in his new home.
    The pork-packing company killed 60 head of fine hogs this week, which will complete the season's work in this line. Nearly 1500 porkers have been taken care of here since last fall, and this number would have been still larger had more of the farmers been alive to their best interests. There is already a fair demand for the bacon manufactured, which is of a good quality.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 2


    Jas. G. Birdseye to John W. Short; sheriff's deed to lot 2, blk 2, Short's add. to Medford. $87.
    J. W. Mattox to Jennie McFaris; lot 9, blk 9, Park add. to Medford. $600.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 2


    The Orchard Home Association, which has the largest and one of the very best orchards in southern Oregon, is making preparations to greatly enlarge its acreage. It has the south half of the Nickell place, situated southwest of Medford, bonded, and has sold a considerable quantity of it already.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 3


    Supt. Graham of the R.R.V.R.R. Co. is visiting his home in Clackamas County. His office at Medford is in charge of Mrs. W. V. Lippincott during his absence.
    Marshal Grimes, accompanied by S. A. D. Higgins, the Duke of Sleepy Hollow, left for Grants Pass on Tuesday. It is thought that the latter went to work a fissure that he discovered on a former occasion.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 3


     Jackson County Bank, filed January 20th. Capital stock $50,000, in 500 shares of $100 each; incorporators, W. I. Vawter, G. W. Howard, J. E. Enyart, Wm. Slinger, Charles H. [Pierce].
"Articles Filed," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 3


    Francis Fitch and wife have gone to Portland to reside permanently.
    The Australian system was used at the late Medford election and gave satisfaction.
    The law firm of Hammond & Briggs of Ashland has been dissolved. The senior member of the firm will open an office at either Medford or Jacksonville, while Mr. Briggs will remain at Ashland.
    Phil D. Yeiser, who formerly resided at Medford, was recently arrested in southern California for forgery committed in Arizona. He is an intelligent but dissipated individual, and this action of his is not entirely unexpected.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols opened an art studio in the Ryan building on California Street. She will spend a good deal of time in the next few months in collecting a series of historical sketches, etc., for the world's fair next year at Chicago.
    Spencer Childers, the new proprietor of the Medford fence works, has commenced business and will make a superior article of fencing. Those needing anything in this line should not fail to give him a call, as his work is first class and rates reasonable.
    Frank Cardwell, who was for several years a resident of Jacksonville and Medford, died at his home in Chicago recently of typhoid malarial fever, aged about 28 years. He was sick only a few days.
    Hon. W. S. Crowell of this precinct last Monday evening delivered an able lecture at the Presbyterian Church at Ashland, on the topic "A Yankee in the Flowery Kingdom." Having been American consul at Amoy, China, for over four years, he is thoroughly familiar with all phases of the subject and was enabled to make his remarks of much interest to the large audience who heard them. We hope that he will repeat this lecture in Jacksonville at an early day.
    The tariff reform club, which perfected an organization at Medford last week by the election of Hon. J. D. Whitman, president; G. S. Walton and F. M. Plymale, vice presidents; S. S. Pentz, secretary, and D. T. Sears, treasurer, will hold another meeting at the opera house next Tuesday evening, at which time the committee appointed to provide a permanent place of meeting will make their report. The executive committee consists of J. H. Whitman, E. B. Pickel, D. T. Sears and G. S. Walton. It will no doubt do good work in the campaign.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 22, 1892, page 3


Distilleries
    There are in this district distilleries as follows: Medford Distilling and Refining Company, Medford, Or.; Portland Distilling and Cattle Feeding Company, of Troutdale, Or.; and the Uniontown Distilling Company, Uniontown Wash., having an aggregate mashing capacity daily of about 650 bushels, and turning out about 2000 gallons per day. These distilleries have all been started within the last year and have a capital of over $150,000 invested in their plants.
    There are nine rectifiers and 3249 retail liquor dealers in the district. It is composed of the states of Washington, Oregon and the territory of Alaska, and is divided into seven divisions; Medford being in the third division, of which Nathaniel Langell, of Jacksonville, is divisional deputy.--[Mail.
Ashland Tidings,
January 22, 1892, page 3


    The Mail says that the Medford mill is running on half time on account of scarcity of wheat, and complains that too much was shipped out of the valley this year. Local millers will have to tone up their nerve and "get a move on them" early in the season when the wheat market is on the boom, as it was in 1891, or the outside buyers will trespass on their needs every time.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, January 22, 1892, page 3


    Medford is the hub around which the revolutions of the county's fortune wheels buzz.

Medford Mail, January 28, 1892, page 2


    The new sidewalk between the depot and the school house is nearing completion. This piece of work will be an accommodation to our citizens and a credit to Medford.
    S. Childers having purchased a Universal Combination Fence business from Frank Galloway, is prepared to fill all orders in this line. Note his "ad" in another column.
    C. W. Skeel & Son will begin immediately the erection of a new planing mill on the old site and expect to have it finished within sixty days. The mill will cover a much larger ground floor space and all the latest improvements in machinery, etc., will be used.
    We would suggest that the city council establish some measure to prevent cattle from running at large in the city, as it is now impossible to protect ornamental shrubbery which adds so much to the appearance of the streets and yards.
    G. W. Priddy has leased the brick yard, of which L. L. Angle had charge. Mr. Priddy intends to put a force of men to work turning out brick preparatory to the prospective extensive spring building boom.
    S. Rosenthal has moved his stock of goods from Gold Hill to this place, and will again handle dry goods in connection with his extensive line of furnishing goods. Mr. J. L. Hammersley, who conducted the store at Gold Hill, will assist Mr. Rosenthal in the business here.
    At a special meeting of the old city council held last Thursday night the newly elected officers were all sworn in, and Friday evening the new board organized and appointed their committees. J. Brandenburg was appointed street commissioner. The first regular meeting of the new board occurs next Monday night.
    The Jackson County Bank was incorporated on the 21st inst. with a capital stock of $50,000 by W. I. Vawter, G. W. Howard, J. E. Enyart, Wm. Slinger and Chas. H. Pierce. The officers are: W. I. Vawter, Pres.; Wm. Slinger, Vice-Pres.; G. W. Howard, Cashier; J. E. Enyart, Asst. Cashier. The bank takes up business February 1st under the new reign.
    F. L. Cranfill, manager of the late Henry Smith's extensive business in this city, returned Saturday from Wolf Creek where he had been invoicing the Smith business. Sylvester Smith, the youngest son of Henry Smith, accompanied Mr. Cranfill on his return here in the interests of his father's business. He is one of Eastern Oregon's prominent stockmen.
    We are informed of parties in the East looking this way with the idea of organizing a development company in our midst for the purpose of advertising and settling up this part of Oregon. There is plenty of money back of the project and the prospects are that in the near future something definite will come to light. One or two of our responsible citizens are in communication with the projectors and a number of very interesting epistles have been exchanged.
"Local News," Medford Mail, January 28, 1892, page 3


    Joe Theiss, one of the attaches of the distillery, has left for the East to be gone for some time.
    Bert Redden and Hiram West took their girls out riding Sunday. They were Jacksonville girls, and of course all had a jolly time. The boys took the lassies home and started to drive back here after dark. They didn't get here, however, in as good shape as they started, for they had a breakdown and were obliged to get out in the mud knee deep and patch up affairs and then walk in the rest of the way.
    We are informed of parties in the East looking this way with the idea of organizing a development company in our midst for the purpose of advertising and settling up this part of Oregon. There is plenty of money back of the project and the prospects are that in the near future something definite will come to light. One or two of our responsible citizens are in communication with the projectors, and a number of very interesting epistles have been exchanged.
"Additional Local News," Medford Mail, January 28, 1892, page 3


    Mr. M. E. Bain, partner of F. G. Kertson in the publication of the Medford Mail, has arranged to sell his interest in the Mail to Kertson, and will probably take the plant of the late Central Point Enterprise and start a new paper somewhere farther north in Oregon. Mr. Bain is a bright and enterprising young man, and the Tidings hopes to see him strike a good opening in the business.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, January 29, 1892, page 3


     W. R. Callahan to George Hall, lots 14, 15 and 16, block 6, Park add. to Medford. $500.
    E. F. Walker to J. H. Faris, lots 3 and 4, block 54, Medford. $110.
    Volna Webster to Thomas J. O'Harra, 162 feet off south end of lots 9 and 10, block 8, Park add. to Medford. $100.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 2



    Crawford & Co. of Medford have their five-stamp mill at work at the Willow Springs mine, and will make a long run during the next few months.
"Mining News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 2



    Roads have improved considerably during the past week.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols, the artist, is receiving considerable encouragement here and has organized a large class in painting.
    The wind did some damage on the east side of Bear Creek a few nights ago, blowing off the roof of the barn on the old Hockenjos place, and upsetting a number of other things.
    W. P. Dodge of Medford, the well borer, sent a day in Jacksonville this week, and will do more or less work here during the summer months. He bored quite a number of wells last year, and gave the fullest satisfaction. This season he is better prepared than ever for work in his line, having added new machinery to his outfit.
    Robert Crockett, one of the railroad bridge gang, who were engaged several days in relaying the Medford depot platform, had the misfortune to cut his foot severely with a broadaxe one day lately. The blade penetrated dangerously close to an artery, but luckily missed it, and the wounded man was able to go to his home near tunnel nine, after Drs. Geary and Wait had taken some stitches in the cut.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Griner and wife arrived in Jacksonville from Tennessee this week.

    Orson Gilbert of Crescent City, Cal. made his many friends in this section a visit during the week. He came by way of the Gasquet road and says that he met with very little snow anywhere on his route.
    Hammersley & Rosenthal have closed business at Gold Hill, and the goods have been removed to Medford.
    C. F. Lewis, the railroad man, who spent a few years at one of the big mining camps in Mexico, has returned to southern Oregon and is located at Medford.
    Sylvester Smith, son of Henry Smith, deceased, recently arrived from eastern Oregon, where he is engaged in the stock business. He comes on business connected with his father's estate.
    On Saturday, February 20th, the sheriff advertises to sell some valuable Medford real estate under execution issued out of the circuit court in the case of Main & Winchester vs. W. G. Cooper et al.
    Geo. Hall of Medford precinct, who purchased a portion of O. Harbaugh's farm, made us a pleasant call last Monday, accompanied by a friend who was a neighbor of his in Washington. Both are well pleased with southern Oregon.
    M. E. Bain, formerly of the Central Point Enterprise, and more recently connected with the Medford Mail, has departed for other scenes, carrying with him the best wishes of many friends. He is a good printer as well as a pleasing writer.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    There are no empty houses in Medford.
    The little Gage children are the first pair of twins ever born in Medford.
    Mrs. L. C. Gruby has returned from a visit to her sister in Yamhill County.
    Dr. Pryce, the well-known physician, has been to Portland on a tour of recreation.
    Skeel & Son will soon build a larger and better planing mill on the site of the old one.
    The pork packing establishment will kill no more hogs this season. They slaughtered about 1400 head.
    Dealers are paying $1 per box for choice packed apples at this time in Medford, for shipment below.
    J. W. Graham, resident manager of the R.R.V.R.R., returned from his visit to the Willamette Valley last week.
    Mrs. F. G. Kertson went to Monmouth, Polk County, this week to attend the funeral of her father, C. B. Graves.
    F. L. Cranfill has been at Wolf Creek for the purpose of invoicing the property belonging to the estate of Henry Smith.
    J. E. Shearer, the popular barber, has gone to Portland to accept a position offered him by one of the fraternity at the metropolis.
    Medford will have an electric light system sooner or later. Parties from abroad are already considering the feasibility of the undertaking.
    Our new city officers have assumed the duties of their respective positions. The council has appointed J. Brandenburg as street commissioner.
    It is expected that more buildings will be put up in Medford this year than in any other town in southern Oregon. Quite a number are in contemplation.
    The Union Benevolent Association of Medford lately installed Mrs. Kellogg as president; Mrs. Van Dyke, vice-president; Mrs. West, secretary, and Mrs. Lawton, treasurer.
    "It never rains but what it pours." Last week we chronicled the advent of the Gage twins in Medford, and a pair of fine girls have since made their appearance at the residence of D. P. Greninger.
    A number of the business men of Medford have put a quantity of gravel upon the mud on our streets, much to the improvement of the same. The council should lose no time in putting a layer of gravel over the entire surface of those streets from end to end.
    At a special school meeting held in this district last week, to devise means of lifting the school indebtedness, it was decided to bond the district for $9,000, the bonds to be issued in three installments payable in three, six and nine years respectively, the selling to be to the party who will bid to take them at the lowest rate of interest.
    The county commissioners' court did not decrease the boundaries of Medford precinct, as some parties have stated. Several of the newspapers made a number of mistakes in giving the changes made in some of the precincts, and the impression got abroad that our precinct had been mutilated. At the next term of court this precinct will be shaped so that a number of voters whose interests are entirely with us will be included.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 29, 1892, page 3



    The Medford distillery is idle, awaiting the arrival of a man from the East who knows how to make yeast.

"General News Notes,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, January 30, 1892, page 1


    In last week's Mail we had occasion to mention, partly by request and partly by observation, the fact that stray animals, such as cows, sheep, etc. were doing a good deal of damage to ornamental and fruit trees in and about the city by being allowed to run at will by day and by night; and at the same time we asked the city council to take the matter in hand and rectify the evil. Immediately after the issue of our paper, and as the result of our remarks, a petition was started out by interested ones praying the council to take immediate action in the matter. This petition was doomed to rivalry, for hardly had it become cold in the hand of its framer when a remonstrance hobbled up in a determined and aggressive manner, and went the rounds at a lively rate and was handed in at Monday's council meeting to offset the first petition. But the first petition didn't put in an appearance, as it was thought best by those who wished to see loose animals corralled to hold back until the whole matter had been thoroughly discussed and every possible name secured. Thus the matter stands. On the one hand, part of our citizens are determined to protect their property by excluding stray animals from within the city limits, while on the other the owners of these cattle, sheep, hogs, etc. are just as set against being obliged to confine their quadrupeds and bipeds, but as we believe that right is might, it must surely follow that the first petition will be answered satisfactorily.

Medford Mail, February 4, 1892, page 2


    The bridge gang are busy about the depot grounds putting down sidewalks and fixing up crossings, etc.
    The Portland machine firms of Mitchell, Lewis & Co. and Staver & Walker have consolidated under the name of Mitchell, Lewis & Staver Co.
    Walter Anderson, from Crescent City, brother of George Anderson, our soda manufacturer, has been in the city this week, looking over the field, intending to establish an ice factory in Medford.
    Austin S. Hammond, late of the firm of Hammond & Briggs, lawyers of Ashland, has hung out his shingle in this city where he can be found by his old friends and also by those who wish to make his acquaintance as a counselor or otherwise.
    Chas. DeLashmutt, telegraph operator at Central Point, after visiting his sister, Mrs. Dr. E. B. Pickel for a few days in this city, will leave for East Portland to take charge of a station there.
    Let us do everything we can to push Medford forward this year, and give her that business success and strength which her importance demands. We have the healthiest and prettiest town in Southern Oregon, and by a strong and united effort we can make her the most prosperous.
    With the opening of spring, building operations will start up with a rush in Medford, as many new and elegant dwellings and business houses are in contemplation.
    I. J. Phipps, wife and daughter are on their way back from Southern California, where they went a week or so ago for the daughter's health. The child's health has improved, but the parents are reported ill with la grippe. Nothing like Oregon climate after all.
    Sig Erni, the one-legged gymnast and all-around athlete, gave two performances in town last week at the opera house. They were pronounced good. This fellow is a veritable modern Hercules, being developed muscularly to a wonderful perfection. His roller-skating act was especially worth seeing, while his feat of making the round of the opera house--250 feet--on a single crutch, without other support whatever, brought down the house.
"Local News," Medford Mail, February 4, 1892, page 3


    In the matter of a place to hold meetings of the town board, the following action was taken: proposition from Adkins & Webb offering room in their brick building for one year for $42, payable quarterly in town warrants. On motion the proposition was accepted, it being the cheapest and best offer, and the recorder was ordered to remove the town property to said room.
    A proposition was read from B. F. Webb, offering to rent one-half of old store room, on C Street, for use of hose cart, hose, etc. for $48, payable quarterly in town warrants. On motion the proposition was accepted, it being the best and cheapest place offered.
"City Fathers," Medford Mail, February 4, 1892, page 3


    The firms of Staver & Walker and Mitchell, Lewis Co., doing an extensive business in Oregon and Washington, have been consolidated, under the name of Mitchell, Lewis, Staver & Co. Consolidation seems to be the word with the majority of great manufacturing enterprises. It generally means higher prices to the people.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 2



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Angle, after an absence of several months, is with us again.
    E. S. Johnson has gone to Portland to accept a position in the plumbing line.
    Joe Theiss is absent in the East on business connected with the Medford distillery.
    W. L. Webster, who went south for the benefit of his health, has located at Eddy, N.M.
    W. C. Engledow of Jacksonville is engaged in painting the inside of Slover & Co.'s drug store in fine style.
    The county commissioners' court established our boundaries in a manner satisfactory to all this week.
    Walter Anderson of Crescent City, Cal. has been in Medford this week, and talks of starting an ice factory.
    J. R. Wilson of this place is handling the Lowden perfection fence machine, an excellent one, by the way.
    Geo. E. Anderson, who now owns the Medford soda manufactory, is making a number of excellent drinks.
    Austin S. Hammond, lately of Ashland, has located at Medford for the practice of the law. He has met with considerable success in our courts.
    G. W. Priddy is making preparations for a building boom in the springtime, gentle Annie, having leased the Angle brickyard, and will soon have a force of men at work in that line.
    It is well nigh impossible to rent a room or a residence here at this time, so full of life and people is Medford. The town is enjoying a healthy growth that bids fair to make it one of the leading cities in the state.
    George Hall of Dayton, Wash. is one among the most desirable of our newer acquisitions. He has purchased residence property in Medford and has also bought thirty-five acres of the choicest land on the Harbaugh ranch, between this place and the county seat. He will reside for the present at this place.
    Since January 31st the Jackson County Bank has been an incorporated body, the incorporators being W. I. Vawter, G. W. Howard, J. E. Enyart, Wm. Slinger and Chas. H. Pierce. The officers in charge since the new regime came in are W. I. Vawter, president; Wm. Slinger, vice-president; G. W. Howard, cashier; J. E. Enyart, assistant cashier. The bank is in excellent hands, and a fine business is assured from the very start. The capital stock is placed at $50,000.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 2


House Burned.
    From Recorder Faris of Medford we learn that the residence of Mr. Kellogg, who resides a few miles northeast of Medford, was destroyed by fire last night. It was a handsome building, completed not long since, and the loss must have been considerable. We have learned no further particulars.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



Want a Railroad.
    Eagle Point is very desirous of getting that extension of the Medford end of the R.R.V.R.R. to Butte Creek next summer, and even thus early the citizens of that section are beginning to agitate the matter lest there should be a road built up the river, via Grants Pass and Gold Hill, and leave one of the best water powers and manufacturing sites in southern Oregon sidetracked. It seems to be on the cards that a road will perforce be built from some quarter to the big timber before the lapse of very much more time, and the Butte Creek section has entirely too many advantages to recommend it to allow its people to take a back seat. That section produced the best wheat last season, and with a railroad to admit of it being profitably shipped, as also flour, the mills of that vicinity would soon have an enviable reputation all over the coast.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



    The new silver half dollar has been introduced here by Beekman & Reames and seems to be popular.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



WHY PAY $70 AND MORE FOR A CHEAP LOT
    When you can get an ENTIRE ACRE of the best fruit land in Nickell's Addition to Medford for the SAME price?
    Nickell's Addition joins Medford's western corporation line, is situated in a beautiful and healthful location, and is within a stone's throw of the Medford schoolhouse. The land is particularly adapted to horticulture, and great returns would be realized there from a few acres planted in prunes, peaches, grapes, etc.
    Two of its best features are that it is free from city taxes, although not lying a great distance from the business portion of Medford, while the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will run through the land near the northern boundary.
    It has been laid out in tracts of five acres and less, and will be sold at very reasonable rates on the most favorable terms, viz: one-third in cash, one-third in one year, and balance in two years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



    We are pleased to announce that the condition of Mrs. W. M. Colvig, which was critical for a time, is much improved at this writing. Dr. DeBar, assisted by Drs. Pickel and Geary of Medford, found it necessary to perform some operations, which have proved successful.
    Mrs. Thos. H. B. Taylor met with a very painful accident a few days since, being caught by a falling bank while she and her sister Miss Booker were running the giant in her husband's mines. T. H. B. and his son were both sick with the grippe at the time and the two hired men had quit work. Mrs. T. is all right again, able to attend to her household duties or run the giant, as the occasion may demand.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



    C. Mingus to Austin S. Hammond, 220 acres in Medford. $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 5, 1892, page 3



    A. Jakes has sold out his butcher shop to Ed Wilkinson.
    Dr. R. Pryce is back from the Willamette much improved in health.
    D. T. Sears has had the front of his millinery store painted and fixed up in good style.
    Ed Wilkinson, our popular butcher, has just purchased 50 head of the finest beef cattle in Jackson County from Fred Barneburg.
    L. C. Rodenberger has resigned as marshal and night watch. D. S. Youngs has been appointed marshal and Thomas Morine night watch.
    H. McCarthy of the Portland artificial ice firm of Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson has been in the city several days, and we learn his mission is to look over the field with the idea of establishing an ice factory in Medford. He thinks about a 6-ton plant could be made to pay, which would cost $10,000. It is to be hoped he will see his way clear in getting down to business.
"Local News," Medford Mail, February 11, 1892, page 3


    Dr. G. H. Aiken is pleasantly located at Fresno, Cal., where he is doing well.
    We are pleased to announce that the condition of the wife of District Attorney Colvig is much improved and that the prospects for her ultimate recovery are favorable.
    Dr. Edward Day leaves his week for his home at Vacaville, Cal., after a very pleasant visit with the family of his brother, Hon. Silas J. Day of this place. Edward Day, Jr. will accompany him to the Sacramento Valley.

    E. W. Hammon, who was formerly engaged in the nursery business in this county, is now superintendent of the Western Cooperative Colonization and Improvement Co. of Alameda County, Cal., and which does an extensive business.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Pryce has returned from Portland improved in health.
    J. S. Howard was commissioned as postmaster of Medford on the 5th.
    Ed. Wilkinson has the only butcher shop in town, having bought A. Jakes' business. He will always keep the best.
    G. W. Howard of the bank is at Olympia, Wash. He is interested in the milling business with A. A. Davis, and may locate there permanently at an early day.
    The junior member of the firm of Demorest Bros., the expert dentists, attended the party given by the young lady members of the Jacksonville Star Lodge. So did Geo. Thomas.
    Jas. Surran, who late arrived from Puget Sound, has bargained for a five-acre tract in in the northern portion of town, belonging to Messrs. Isaacs and Day, and will commence at once improving it.
    I. J. Phipps and wife were afflicted with la grippe while absent in California, and hastened home sooner on that account. Their little daughter, in whose behalf the trip was undertaken was improved by it, however.
    Your correspondent hears the name of M. Purdin mentioned in connection with the office of sheriff of Jackson County. He is one of our best and most prominent citizens, and would make a first-class officer.
    L. C. Rodenberger, who was elected marshal of Medford, has resigned his office, and D. S. Youngs was appointed to succeed him. Lee thought that the council did not offer to pay him enough for his services. Thos. Morine has been elected as night watchman.
    The city council will hereafter meet in Adkins & Webb's building, where quarters have been secured for the coming year. The hose cart and fixtures are quartered in their old store room on C Street, which has been rented by the town board for that purpose.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 2


    Sarah A. Bateman to J. W. Short, lots 1 and 2, blk 31, Medford. $100.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 2


    The provident horticulturist is busy with his spraying apparatus.
    A newcomer, Mr. Childers, now resides on the Cummings ranch in Meadows precinct.
    The ticket fixer will be conveniently absent at future elections, which will not be appreciated by some.
    Single fares on the Rogue River Valley R.R. have been placed at 24 cents, and round-trip tickets at 40 cents. We are unable to perceive why tickets were not put at 25 cents each way at the beginning. That is certainly a very low rate.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, horticultural commissioner for the third district, met the citizens of Jacksonville last Friday evening to discuss matters of importance to our fruit interests. We are sorry to state that the attendance was not as large as it should have been. Mr. W. is a practical horticulturist, and never fails to give information of much benefit.
    The fight for the nomination for prosecuting attorney of this judicial district on the Republican side of the house seems to be between J. W. Hamaker of Linkville and A. S. Hammond of Medford. Mr. Hamaker will come with a united delegation from the eastern counties, it is said. Robt. G. Smith of Josephine County may also be "in it" when the time comes.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3



    Dehorning of cattle will soon in vogue in southern Oregon; that is, if it proves as popular here as it has elsewhere.
    M. Purdin, assignee of the estate of Kincaid Bros., insolvent debtors, has been discharged from his trust. He did his work well.
    Jacob Klippel, who was a resident of Jacksonville precinct for many years, is paying his old home a short visit. He is now engaged in the real estate business at Portland.
    A child belonging to Mrs. Brown of Medford precinct was severely burned a few days since. Her dress became ignited from the fireplace, and before the flame could be extinguished the little one was badly burned.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3



Valuable Patent Sold.
    Redfield Bros. of Glendale, Douglas County, who invented a mowing machine a few years ago, have brought it up to such a state of perfection that it attracted the attention of such moneyed men as Alex. Martin, Sr., of Oakland, Cal., E. R. Reames of San Jose, Cal., and G. W. Stephenson of Ashland. Three of the Redfields met Messrs. Martin and Stephenson at Jacksonville on Tuesday and disposed of their patent to them under favorable arrangements. The purchasers will immediately take steps to manufacture a number of these machines and place them on the market. They have a number of advantages over all other brands, and we expect to see a good demand spring up for them at once.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3



Fruit Evaporation.
    Hon. A. H. Carson of Redlands lately read a very interesting paper before the Ashland fruit-grower's association on the subject of evaporating fruit, which the author as well as most of those in attendance believed to be the surest way of settling the local market problem in this valley. Mr. H. [sic] sensibly says that many evaporators and but few canneries are wanted. The best prepared and best packed fruit in the evaporated line always commands good prices, while the prices for cannery products are often depressed, and the plant may yield no profit during an entire season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1892, page 3



    It is reported that a business college building will within a couple of weeks rear its material proportions towards the sky from somewhere near the public school.
    Angle & Plymale are taking out partitions in their store, which will make it one of the largest in this section.
    The Goldstone Bros., a firm lately from Eugene, are putting in a large stock of merchandise in the Cooper Building [for the New York Cheap Cash Store].
    The Y.M.C.A. will meet at 3 p.m. Sunday, Feb. 21st, to which the ladies are invited. An invitation will be given to the ladies to organize an auxiliary to the Y.M.C.A. We hope to see a goodly number present, and that some movement will be made in this direction.                                     M. E. RIGBY, Sec.
    A. Jakes, who lately sold out his butcher shop at this place to E. Wilkinson, is at Grants Pass assisting Butcher Williams with his business. Although Mr. Jakes was established but a few months among us, his methods and his meats were first-class, and many regrets are expressed at his departure.
"Local News," Medford Mail, February 18, 1892, page 3


    C. W. Skeel and Son are rebuilding their planing mill at Medford which was recently destroyed by fire.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The sheriff will sell the fine Cooper brick building and residence at Jacksonville tomorrow.
    Goldstone Bros., lately of Eugene, have opened a stock of merchandise in the Cooper building.
    J. H. Faris, our genial recorder, is building a neat residence in the southwestern portion of town.
    Fred. Barneburg last week sold Ed. Wilkinson his spring beef, in the shape of fifty head of fine stall-fed steers.
    Hamilton & Palm have just received an invoice of the best spring wagons, carts, etc., which they will sell at the lowest rates.
    Considerable building has already been commenced, and the prospects for much improvement during 1892 is good.
    G. F. Newton last week returned from the Willamette section, whither he was summoned to attend the funeral of his sister.
    Judge Crawford's name is being used in connection with the office of district attorney. He filled that position in Idaho for a number of years.
    Mrs. Huff and her children have departed for Central City, Nebraska, to rejoin Mr. H., who went east to prepare their future home for them some time ago.
    A chocolate sociable was given at Cooper's hall by the ladies of the M.E. congregation, for the benefit of Rev. Mr. Thompson, which was a very pleasant affair.
    T. M. Howard and wife have been the recipients of many congratulations. They have gone to housekeeping already in the southwest portion of town.
    A number of enterprises are in prospective. Nearly all the new ventures of importance that are being established in the valley find inducements in Medford that bring them thither.
    Among the later acquisitions to Medford may be mentioned L. H. Fawcett and family, just from Central City, Neb., who have decided to make this section their future home, Mr. F. having exchanged his Nebraska property for that of M. H. Huff.
    H. McCarthy, G. and W. Johnson of Portland intend starting a brewery and ice factory in Medford at an early day, having already been donated the land on which to build the same. There is no doubt but what these enterprises will prove remunerative.
    Hamilton & Palm, the real estate agents, report the following sales: O. Harbaugh's property in western portion of town to T. M. Howard; N. H. Spencer's property on Front Street to S. A. D. Higgins; two and one-half acres in the Mingus addition to Medford to S. Penwell.
    J. M. Weaver and family left on last night's overland for their future home at Medford. They came here from Pennsylvania about two years ago, and the many friends they have made during their stay here wish them success and happiness in their new home.--[Eugene Guard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 2



    Our citizens are quite indignant over the uncalled-for attack which the Medford Mail made on our respected fellow citizen, Hon. J. W. Merritt. If its editor has a personal grievance, his columns are not the place to air them. The course he has adopted will not injure Mr. M. in the least.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 2



    Lester High of Ashland has purchased the barber shop of R. F. High, the latter having sold out with the intention of removing to Sacramento, Cal.
    S. A. D. Higgins is making preparations to open business in Medford, having purchased the building now occupied by Weeks Bros. He will keep a first-class stock of goods in his line.
    Mrs. R. Nichols has removed her studio to Orth's brick building on Oregon Street. She has formed a good-sized class in different branches of painting, and her pupils are making excellent advancement.
    The old Medford band will be rehabilitated in a short time in order to be in readiness for the approaching campaign. The boys have all the ability necessary to organize themselves into a first-class band.
    The area in wheat this year will be larger than ever, most of the farmers in the lower valley having come to the conclusion that it is about the most profitable of the cereal crops and next to fruit, in this section.
    Numerous residents of Ashland, as will be seen by our official reports of real estate transactions, have recently sold their timber claims in the Jenny Creek section to Pierce Bros. for the eastern syndicate for whom they are operating, as well as other timber land investors. Extensive operations may be looked for in this timber belt before many months go by.
    Fruit-growers of this county have inaugurated a campaign of extermination against fruit pests, and the orchardists are everywhere busy pruning and spraying their trees. The San Jose scale seems to be the most formidable, as it is found in almost every locality and even on the rose bushes. The action of the Oregon state board of agriculture in ruling out pest-infected fruit has stimulated orchardists to united effort.
    A Salem exchange says: "The Rogue River Valley Railway Co. has applied to the board of railroad commissioners for an advance of freight rates, and they have filed a new tariff sheet for approval. This road runs between Jacksonville and Medford and is four and three-quarter miles in length, standard gauge. The president's letter, claiming that the company is not making expenses, has been filed and will be acted upon at the regular meeting of the board."
    Those who thought that the idea of extending the railroad now in existence between this place and Medford, both east and westward from its present termini, would die out in time, have been mistaken in their surmises. There is much talk in the premises already, and it seems evident that the eastern company who are now contemplating the extension are in earnest in the matter. It will be a great benefit to this valley when we can not only have the coast connections, but a railroad to the head of the river as well.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3



    Henry Griner and wife left for Evans Creek on Wednesday, where they will probably locate.
    J. O. Johnson, who is now in California, will return to Jackson County in a short time, to permanently remain.
    W. R. Andrews of Seattle, Wash., who formerly practiced law at Jacksonville and Medford, is with us again, and may conclude to locate.
    Mrs. J. T. Guerin and children of East Portland arrived at Eagle Point last week for an extended visit with relatives at that place and at the county seat.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3



    Francis Fitch and wife arrived from Portland a few days since. Mr. F. is on professional business.
    A brother of W. C. Engledow arrived from Nebraska, accompanied by his family, last week. He is also a painter by occupation.
    A. J. Stewart of Eden precinct called on us a few days ago. He will soon leave on a trip for his health, accompanied by his wife.
    H. D. Kubli last Tuesday evening departed for the metropolis, to be absent about ten days, to get medical advice relative to some troubles he has been having with his right arm.
    J. F. Ritter, who purchased 20 acres of land in Medford precinct of Chas. Nickell last spring, is planting a large number of choice fruit trees there.
    A. S. Hammond of Medford denies that he is a candidate for district attorney or any other office. Judge Webster says that he is not seeking any position.
    Rev. Robert McLean delivered an address to a fair audience at Ashland opera house one evening recently on "Chile and Her People." He was for a number of years a resident of that country.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3



A New Deal.
    The Medford Roller Mills, from this date, will exchange as follows: For one bushel of good, clean wheat or pounds enough of dirty wheat to make sixty pounds of clean wheat, will give thirty pounds of best flour, twenty pounds of mill feed--bran and shorts mixed--which would be fifty pounds for sixty pounds of clean wheat. When flour is wanted in my sacks two pounds of flour less to the bushel will be given. This change is made to stop the talk of taking one-half, as some customers cannot see that thirty-eight pounds of flour, the exchange heretofore, was more than one-half. Hoping this will be more satisfactory, I am
                        Yours respectfully,
                            A. A. DAVIS, Owner.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 19, 1892, page 3



    Time was when Medford, with a unity gratifying in the extreme, responded to the call for a "bonus" to be raised for any industry seeking a location, but that time has passed, there is no use denying it. As a general thing, our citizens think they have "bonused" beyond all reason, and a majority of the most substantial have put "their foot down" in a way that settles the bonus business as far as they are concerned. There is truth and some reason in this, we acknowledge; but it seems hard to let the chance slip of getting a good industry established in our midst for the want of a few hundred dollars. Other towns will give the bonuses asked, so in order to keep abreast we must do likewise until such time when industries will seek us, not we them.

Medford Mail, February 25, 1892, page 2



    About fifteen buildings are under construction and in contemplation in Barr's Addition.
    One of the girl twins lately born to D. P. Greninger, of this city, died last week, and the other is very low.
    J. H. Faris expects to have his new residence in Barr's Addition ready for occupancy about the middle of April.
    In less than two years there will be 3,000 people living in Medford--the metropolis of Southern Oregon, it is bound to be.
    Miss Hoyt, of Grants Pass, was registered at the Business College this week. Miss Hoyt is an old teacher, having taught for nine years.
    A bowling alley is the latest acquisition to Medford's recreative pastimes. A. M. Gregg is the "boss" of the alley, and it is located in the fire engine house.
    The families of J. and M. Goldstone, of the New York Cash Store, arrived from Eugene Tuesday morning. They will set up housekeeping as soon as possible.
    In the Cooper Block the Goldstone Bros., well known and reliable business men from Eugene, have this week opened up a large stock of dry goods and general merchandise. They make a fine display in every respect.
    The planing mill of C. W. Skeel & Son is being hurried to completion with a wonderful rapidity; the frame work is all up and the roof on and some of the machinery in place. The capacity is about double the old mill and the arrangements are modern and much more complete. The shafting is underneath the floor instead of overhead as in the old, thus giving more space overhead. It is expected the mill will be in full operation in thirty or forty days.

"Local News," Medford Mail, February 25, 1892, page 3


Ice Factory.
   The Portland ice firm of Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson seem desirous of establishing a plant in this section of the country and one of the firm has been here several times of late. They required a bonus of several hundred dollars with the understanding that immediate work would begin upon a several thousand dollar factory. A committee of our prominent citizens have worked zealously for the last few days, and part of the bonus has been raised. This will be tendered the company, and it is expected they will accept it and begin operations at once. Grants Pass offered this same company $1000 in cash and grounds upon which to build, but the offer was refused, we understand, with the idea of giving Medford the first chance, as this place was preferable.
Medford Mail, February 25, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Skeel's new planing mill will be in operation about the 1st of April.
    The local lodge of the K. of P. are preparing to give entertainments to last through the season.
    Miss Nettie Graves of Monmouth has been the guest of her sister, Mrs. F. G. Kertson, during the last ten days.
    Medford is the home of another pair of twins. This makes three couplets which have arrived inside of six weeks.
    The business college intends building neat and commodious quarters near the public school building in the near future.
    Rev. L. D. Goodwin has not yet located, but will send for his family as soon as he is permanently settled in his northern home.
    Goldstone Brothers of Eugene have been engaged during the last week in opening an extensive stock of merchandise in the Cooper building.
    Quite a number of new residences are in contemplation by residents of Medford during the coming season. Who says our town is not growing rapidly?
    We understand that our citizens succeeded in raising the bonus required by McCarthy & Johnson, and they will in all probability start the erection of their brewery and ice plant soon.
    The railroad premises about Medford have been thoroughly overhauled by the bridge gang during the last few weeks. The improvement in crossings and sidewalks is quite noticeable.
    The sheriff sold Cooper's brick building and residence at the courthouse door in Jacksonville last Saturday, which were bid in by Main & Winchester of San Francisco. The property sold for something over $4000.
    A. Bird of Nebraska writes to citizens of Medford relative to the matter of establishing a cannery at this place during the coming summer, and proposes visiting the valley during March to interview our people as to the prospect of united support in the matter.
    San Francisco people have discovered that the quality of our bacon is unexcelled, and G. C. Clark of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s force at that place has telegraphed to the packing house to send him a sample of fifteen or twenty pounds for testing the quality, prior to ordering the entire supply.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 2


    Jennie E. Griffis to A. W. Clemens, lots 8 and 9, blk 49, Medford. $350.
    A. L. Kotze to G. A. Hover, lots 1 and 2, blk 6, Park add. to Medford. $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 2



    Old settlers in southern Oregon claim that the Indians kept the country looking neater than the whites do. There was no underbrush forty years ago in Josephine County, as the aborigines kept it burned off. Grass grew luxuriantly everywhere, but now much vegetation has been largely killed off by a layer of resinous pine pins and the deep shade. Deer could be seen for miles in those days of open country and big grass.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 3


Leap Year Party.
    A number of ladies of Medford gave a leap year party at Angle & Plymale's opera house on Monday night, which was the most successful affair of the kind ever held there. The spacious hall was taxed to its utmost capacity by the merry dancers, among whom were sixteen couples from Jacksonville. W. H. P. Legate and Harry Angle furnished excellent music, the supper provided by the ladies being also duly appreciated. The fair managers of the ball (Mesdames Hutchinson [sic], Davis and Skeel) are deserving of much credit, for their efforts were certainly quite successful.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 3



    The estate of the late Henry Smith of Wolf Creek appraises nearly $70,000.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 26, 1892, page 3



    The New York Cheap Cash Store is offering lots of good bargains.
    Dr. R. Pryce will leave the valley soon in search of health and rest.
    It is rumored that a temperance billiard hall will soon be established in Medford by a party from Jacksonville.
    The Weeks Bros. are shipping three carloads of dried fruit to parties in Portland from their ranch south of town.
    Miss May Sackett has again taken up her studies at the business college.
    C. A. Peninger is among the late additions to the Medford Business College roll.
    A new barber shop is about to set up here, by a party from the Sound country.
    Harry Angle, Geo. B. Addington and Chas. Angel have of late been amusing themselves hunting the jackrabbits in his native lair in the hills to the east of town. The rabbits are as thick as fleas on a dog's back in haying time. The hunters secured twenty-two of the long-eared quadrupeds last Monday.
    The planing mill whistle is heard again. About all the machinery is in place, and the mill in shape to turn out work. The new mill is an ornament to Medford and a credit to its proprietors' progressiveness.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 3, 1892, page 3


Firemen Entertained.
    Monday evening the residence of G. W. Galloway was brilliantly illuminated without and within, the occasion being a reception in honor of Protection Hose No. 1. At half-past eight o'clock, supper was spread, and the bounteous repast was keenly enjoyed by all the guests. Flowers tastefully decorated the table and filled the room with a delicious odor.
    After the spread, numerous games were indulged in by a portion of the company, while others congregated about the spacious and beautiful rooms and enlivened the evening by witty tales and hearty laughter.
    The silver cornet band was in attendance, and at intervals furnished excellent music.
    The genial host and hostess seemed to be at their best, and all expressed themselves as never before being entertained so royally.
    The guests of the evening were as follows:
PROTECTION HOSE NO. 1
    G. L. Davis, H. G. Nicholson, A. C. Nicholson, U. S. Damon, Bert Brandenburg, Eugene Amann, Gabe Plymale, Wm. Robison and Chas. Perdue.
    The members of the cornet band were:
    Isaac Woolf, D. S. Youngs, Jno. Montague, Geo. Montague, David Montague, Arthur Fitzgerald, Robt. Galloway, E. Bashford and A. E. Danielson.
    The other guests were: Mr. J. M. Foster, Miss Mary Theiss, Miss Lizzie Theiss and Mrs. Gilmore.

Medford Mail, March 3, 1892, page 3


Notice.
    Dr. R. Pryce will leave Medford for a time because of ill health, and all those knowing themselves to be indebted to him are requested to call and settle with him within a short time or pay the amount to the Jackson County Bank.
Medford, March 3, 1892.           
Medford Mail, March 3, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. M. Gregg last week opened a bowling alley in this place.
    The latest in millinery can always be found at Mrs. Palm's.
    J. H. Faris will occupy his new residence in Barr's addition after the 15th of April.
    Miss Lizzie Hillis, who has been at Medford for some time past, last week visited home folks on Evans Creek.
    M. E. Bain, the printer, has returned from the north and has some intentions of starting a newspaper somewhere in the valley.
    Medford Nursery, one-half mile east of Medford, is the place to get your trees. Trees delivered in town, at the depot or express office free.
    The planing mill of Skeel & Son is rapidly approaching completion, and will be in operation again in a short time and in better shape than ever.
    L. G. Porter has about completed setting out five acres in choice fruit trees at his place near town, and will build him a nice residence in the spring.
    An elegant and fashionable line of millinery goods has just been received by Mrs. Palm. The fair sex should call and see them, as they are the latest.
    G. W. Howard returned one day last week, but left soon afterward with his family for Olympia, Wash., where he is engaged in the milling business with A. A. Davis.
    Dr. R. Pryce will leave Medford for a short time in the hope of benefiting his health. We hope that he will return soon, as he is a first-class surgeon and physician.
    Our community was greatly shocked by the sudden death of Samuel Earhart, who died of heart disease last Monday. He leaves a family and a large circle of friends.
    The prospect of having the railroad extended soon is putting new life and ambition into Medford's citizens, and we look for one of the best seasons ever known here during the coming summer. It is probable that the eastern gentlemen who have made the proposition to take hold of the R.R.V.R.R. and advance the necessary money to extend it over the Cascade Range will be here in a few weeks.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 2


    Ernest Langley is filling Geo. Coulter's place as fireman of the R.R.V.R.R. while the latter is polishing up the inside of the Banquet.
    The success of Mrs. Rowena Nichols as a teacher of art is best illustrated by the results achieved, and from the talk of the art critics of this section many of the pictures painted have been genuine gems of art, indicating careful training as well as native talent.
    Redfield Brothers have won the regards of the ladies of America by the invention of an automatic music-turner that will to a great extent enable them to dispense with awkward young men. It's a daisy and does its work faithfully and well.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. W. L. Webster of Medford will join her husband in New Mexico soon.
    A singing school under the tutelage of Professor Merrill tends to enliven matters at Medford.
    We are glad to learn that the wife of District Attorney Colvig is much improved in health and is steadily convalescing.
    Weeks Bros. of Medford precinct have lately disposed of three carloads of their fine dried fruit to Portland parties.
    D. McCarthy's engine ran into a small band of deer on the grade on the river not long since. Two of them had a narrow escape from coming to grief.
    S. A. D. Higgins is making preparations to leave for Medford, where he will open a billiard hall and confectionery store next week. He has ordered a magnificent soda fountain from the East, which will arrive in the course of a few weeks.
    Many of the old orchards have been stripped of diseased trees, in order to get rid of the insect pests which threaten southern Oregon's chief industry, and we hope that nothing will be left undone to further the good work inaugurated by the state board of horticulture.
    The travel over the R.R.V.R.R. has exceeded all expectations, more than 20,000 fares having been collected during the first year of the service. This is certainly a very good showing, as it represents an income of $4000 from this source alone. We predict that even a better report than this will be made during the coming year.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 3


A Handsome Place.
    The Orchard Home Association have planted another large tract in fine fruit trees on the Nickell farm near Medford. They have the largest and best orchard in southern Oregon, if not in the state. An experienced and first-class orchardist is in charge, and it is a pleasure to anyone to look at the tract he has planted, which is about 100 acres in extent, and being extended every year. Only the choicest trees are used. The greatest of care is bestowed, and those who purchase of this land can rest assured that they are getting value received. About 50 acres have already been sold to parties living in different parts of the Northwest. In all probability the whole tract of 220 acres will be sold during the next year or two, which will bring a desirable population in our midst, as the purchasers are people of good standing.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 3


A Needed Improvement.
    A prominent citizen of the country north of the river, writing to one of our county exchanges a short time since, called attention to the crying demand for the expenditure of some county funds in getting a passably good road around the upper grade of the Table Rocks. Ever since the first settlement of the county, owing to a failure of the viewers of the Bybee's ferry and Fort Klamath wagon road to locate the route clear of adobe or "sticky" soil, the road has been well nigh impassable in the winter season to even the lightest kind of vehicles. For the short stretch of two miles hundreds of travelers have been compelled to spend the better part of a day in urging their weary horses through by short pulls and constant cleaning of the wheels. As the soil is full of wash boulders, making an insecure foundation for any sort of a road, it has been impossible heretofore to make a passable winter road with the available labor which could be applied upon it. As the Times believes in the intelligent expenditure of county funds in the bettering of our road system, and knowing that the work can only be done at certain seasons of the year, and believing that the many residents of the country north of the river have endured the petty tyranny of this short stretch of road long enough, we would venture to suggest to our honorable county court the propriety of engaging some experienced road builder to at once construct, at as little expense as may be consistent with doing thorough work, on a good gravel road along that stretch of mountainside. It is much too important a highway to be longer neglected by the county court, and the only wonder is that the residents of that section have not made this matter an issue in local politics long ago. Let the work be executed while it can be done the best and the most economically, and the whole north side of the county will be vastly benefited by it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 3


A Difficult Operation.
    Drs. J. R. Rickenbach and J. W. Robinson of Jacksonville and Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford one day this week performed an operation on Theo. Schultz, who has been suffering with epileptic fits ever since he fell from a tree and injured his head several years ago. A piece of his skull was removed, which it is hoped will offer the relief expected. At last accounts the patient was doing well, and the operation promises to be as successful as it was skillful and difficult.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1892, page 3


    The new planing mill at Medford has commenced operations. Most of the machinery is now in place, and the proprietors expect to have the mill running at its full capacity in a few days.

"General News Notes,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, March 9, 1892, page 1


    An ice plant of vast proportions is an assured fact in the immediate future for Medford. Let the good work go on.
Editorial, Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 2


    The hum of the planing mill is sweet music.
    J. J. and G. W. Priddy were over from Central Point Saturday in the interests of the new brick yard they are about to establish here.
    Miss Verna Weaver, who recently came from Eugene, is prepared to do dressmaking in the latest style; will be found in room No. 5 over Angle & Plymale's store.
    Carl J. Johnson and family arrived Sunday from Wisconsin.
    There is some talk of organizing a tennis club in Medford.
    J. A. Whitman this week shipped a carload of apples consigned to Tacoma parties.
    T. Morine resigned as night watch this week and purchased part of the Roxy Ann Saloon.
    Angle & Plymale are having shelving and fixtures put in placed in the extension to their store.
    A normal school will be opened May 1st in connection with the Medford Business College.
    The Weeks' furniture is being moved from its present quarters to a building on the south end of Front Street.
    Why not call a meeting, ye baseball lovers, and organize a club that will be a pride to Medford and a source of terror to every club in the valley.
    J. E. Shearer has purchased Palm's barber shop and is having it cleaned and renovated throughout. Mr. Shearer intends to secure his share of the trade. Note his adv. in another column.
    County Treasurer Geo. E. Bloomer was among Medford's Sunday visitors from the county seat. Geo. must have run up against the razor edge of a cyclone, judging from the barrenness of his "fiz."
    Wm. Olwell, late bookkeeper at the Medford Roller Mills, is back at his father's ranch near Central Point, where he will remain several weeks and lend a hand at pruning their 160-acre orchard.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 3


AN ICE PLANT.
The Plans and Specifications Being Drawn Up in Portland.

    Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson, of Portland, are at the present writing having plans and specifications drawn up for an ice plant to be established in Medford as soon as practicable.
    The required bonus has been raised and the grounds secured, and nothing now remains but the commencement of building operations to assure to Medford another feather in the cap of her advancement.
    The parties will be on the grounds in a few days when active work will begin.
Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 3


    Contractor Lyon, of Medford, spent Monday in Grants Pass, securing material for the erection of buildings in that city.

"Grants Pass Items," Medford Mail, March 10, 1892, page 3


    Weeks Bros., who have the large peach orchards south of Medford, have three carloads of dried fruit to ship to Portland.

    At the annual school meeting in Medford last week J. D. Whitman was elected director and J. H. Faris clerk. A four-mill tax was voted to form a sinking fund and pay interest on the indebtedness incurred in building a new school house; also, a six-mill tax to pay teachers' salaries. The last assessment values the property in the district at $303,500.
    An old and respected resident of this valley, Samuel Earhart, died at his residence, about a mile south of Medford, Monday morning, February 29th. Heart disease was the fatal cause. He was born March 24, 1831, in Indiana County, Pa. He was buried Tuesday in the Medford cemetery; one of the largest funerals seen in Medford for some time followed the remains to the grave. A widow and several children are left behind, but well provided for. The local G.A.R. took a prominent part in the last sad services, he being a member of the organization.--[Mail.

"Here and There,"
Ashland Tidings, March 11, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. A. Peninger is now enrolled as a regular student at the business college.
    Weeks Bros. last week shipped three carloads of dried fruit to Portland consignees.
    Miss Lulu Gibson, the clever operator at the telegraph office at this place, last week spent a day or two at Ashland.
    Dr. Pryce went to Halsey, Linn County, to hold a consultation in a critical case. His services are in demand everywhere.
    The reception last week at the residence of G. W. Galloway in honor of Protection Fire Company No. 1 was in all respects highly enjoyable.
    Mrs. Ensley, a sister of Mrs. Cranfill of this place, had the misfortune to lose about $180 by the robbery of the safe at Drain one day last week.
    Mrs. W. L. Webster and the children last Wednesday departed for New Mexico, where they will join Mr. W., who has been there for some time past.
    Miss Mamie Isaacs was last week presented by her father, G. W. Isaacs, with one of the finest pianos anywhere in southern Oregon. It was brought direct from the eastern manufacturer's.
    Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson of Portland have succeeded in getting subscriptions aggregating $300 to a bonus fund to induce them to locate an ice and brewery plant at Medford.
    S. A. D. Higgins has purchased the building on Front Street lately occupied by Weeks Bros., and will conduct a billiard hall, soda fountain and confectionery store there. He will keep a first-class place.
    Building operations are rapidly beginning to liven up as summer approaches. There will be a large number of nice residences erected at Medford and in the suburbs of town during the coming season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 2


    Ed. Falconer and wife of Gold Hill are contemplating a removal to Medford in the near future, having paid several visits to the latter place with that end in view.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols of this place has been engaged in the work of organizing an art class at Ashland during the week, meeting with much encouragement in the granite city.
    The usual spring scramble (which we are getting to anticipate as a regular thing in the future) is setting in for the Rogue River apples sent below as the last consignments of the season, and San Franciscans want it understood that they want the rest of them at any fair price. Some fine returns have been received for a late lot recently shipped from this valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 3


    S. A. D. Higgins, who has been a resident of Jacksonville for the past two years, removed to Medford this week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 3


    At his feeding yards in Medford precinct Fred. Barneburg has the finest lot of fat cattle west of the Rocky Mountains today. He has four steers that will weigh over a ton each, and all his cattle show the effects of excellent care and feed. He believes in a straight rotation of pure grain hay as the best fattening ration for cattle, and his success as a feeder is conclusive proof of the soundness of his views.
    Yellow Newtown pippins, which require but eighty to fill a bushel box, have been shipped out of the valley for the regaling of San Francisco palates in quantities during the past few weeks, one carload having been consigned by B. Eggleston of Ashland. The fact that late keepers in the apple line are the most profitable in the long run was never better illustrated before than it has been this season. Everything sells when there is no fruit elsewhere.
    A worthy citizen of one of the out precincts was run down by the tax gatherer this week, and found himself 10 cents short of the required amount, went to the village store to raise the wind, taking a dozen fresh eggs with him. Finding no market for his eggs he was about to return disconsolate when a bystander offered him ten cents if he would suck all the eggs on the spot. Just to prove they were fresh the worthy citizen performed the feat and obtained his tax receipt. Times are not so hard as they once were in the rural districts.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 3


    S. J. Day and G. W. Isaacs to A. J. Stewart, 1.98 acres in Galloway's add. to Medford. $800.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1892, page 3


    Can we say more to prove Medford's advancement than that her school census this year gives 501 children of school age in this district against 383 last year?

Medford Mail, March 17, 1892, page 2



    The distillery began operations this week.
    The S.P.D.&L. Co., of Grants Pass, have put in a branch lumber yard here, of which Merriman & Johnson are agents.
    The city council has decided that the "cow ordinance" shall be enforced. All cattle, except milch cows, must not run at large within the city limits.
    There are some very handsome apples now for sale in Portland. They retail at $1.75 per box. We are told they are from the orchard of Mr. J. H. Stewart, of Medford, Or., whose article on "Over Production of Fruit" appeared in the last issue of this paper.--Rural Northwest
    S. A. D. Higgins, of Jacksonville, has purchased the building lately occupied by Weeks'
 furniture store, situated [at 20 North] Front Street, and has fitted the place up for a billiard hall, and moved his stock and furniture over here from Jacksonville. Nothing but temperance drinks are sold, and the place is quite attractive.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 17, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford barber shops will be closed on Sunday after April first next.
    Martin Hart now officiates as night watch and is giving good satisfaction.
    A carload of choice apples for Tacoma parties was last week shipped from this place by J. A. Whitman.
    Dr. W. S. Jones is a temporary widower, his better half being absent on a visit to her old home in Iowa.
    A normal department will be added to the Medford business college on May 1st. It will no doubt be a success.
    The distillery has resumed operations and will manufacture a large quantity of superior goods in its line before quitting.
    Weeks' furniture store is now in new quarters at the south end of Front Street. They keep nice goods and sell at very reasonable rates.
    An agency of the S.P.D.&L. Co. of Grants Pass has been established at Medford. Merriman & Johnson are in charge of the lumber yard.
    Rev. L. D. Goodwin during the past week joined his congregation at Puyallup, Wash. The best wishes of many friends here follow him to his new field of labor.
    Skeel & Son, who recently bought the Talent planing mill machinery, have removed the same to their new mill at this place and will keep it busy from this time forward.
    Tom Morine last week resigned his position as night watch, and has bought an interest in the Roxy Ann Saloon. The best of wines, liquors and cigars are always kept there.
    Much building of residences and business houses is contemplated at the metropolis of the lower valley during the next few months, and already noise of preparation are hard on every side.
    A sociable was given at the opera house last Friday evening for the benefit of the brass band, which was well patronized and passed off nicely. Some members of the Gold Hill band were also in attendance.
    Hamilton & Palm report the following sales of real estate: A house and 12 lots to A. J. Stewart; three lots to S. Childers; two lots to J. R. Wilson; 2¾ acres of the West addition to C. W. Haines; a lot to Frank Green.
    Arrangements have been perfected to have an ice plant established in Medford during the next few months. The required bonus has been raised for Messrs. Johnson & McCarthy, and plans and specifications for the building have been adopted.
    J. E. Shearer, the popular barber, who recently returned from Portland, has assumed charge of the shop formerly conducted by C. W. Palm on Front Street and thoroughly renovated it. He is a first-class workman and deserves a liberal patronage.
    S. A. D. Higgins has fitted up the big building on Front Street, until lately occupied by Weeks Bros., for a billiard hall and temperance saloon, and will keep a first-class place. He has ordered a fine soda fountain, which will arrive in a short time. Give him a call.
    At the school election held at this place last week. Hon. J. D. Whitman was elected director and J. H. Faris clerk. A six-mill tax was levied to pay expense of conducting the schools of this place during the ensuing year and a four-mill tax to provide a sinking fund.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 2


Patent Fence.
    E. A. Welds, of Roanoke, Va., who is making headquarters at Medford, has a late improved patent fence which is meeting with general approval of the farmers. That this fence can be built with one-half of the rails on one-half of the amount of land over the old way can on investigation be proven beyond all doubt. Its strength and durability is unquestionable. It's worthy of the consideration of all farmers. A few among the many who have purchased farm rights and who would gladly recommend it to their fellow farmers are: B. & R. V. Beall, E. F. Walker, O. Harbaugh, J. Bradley, S. L. Bennett, A. Fordyce, C. T. Payne, J. W. Casebeer, Jas. F. Wells, E. B. Myer, E. W. Carver, Jas. Hamlin, A. Gorden, I. N. Shook, J. Wagner, P. Powell, W. H. Shepard, H. F. Barron & Sons, Jacob S. Walz, D. N. & W. H. Peninger, R. F. Dean, J. B. Wrisley, F. M. & H. Amy, Whetstone & Son, J. M. Lofland, J. S. Lacey, M. Bellinger. Anybody wishing particulars, address E. A. Welds, Grand Central Hotel, Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 2



    A. Garrick, the merchant tailor, sold his stock of goods and removed to California some time since.
    The baseball fever has begun to take effect, and we may expect it to become epidemic during the season.
    Apple trees at Medford, to close out present stock, 5 to 7 feet branched, $7.50 per 100, $65 per thousand.
    S. A. D. Higgins, the duke of Sleepy Hollow, has left the place that knew him once and will be found at Medford hereafter; hence these steers [a pun on "hence these tears"].
    Prof. J. B. Farley, the pioneer school teacher, who has been spending the past two years in Josephine County, intends removing to Jackson County in a short time.
    John B. Griffin is now interested with Riley Hammersley of Phoenix in a patent, self-acting farm gate, that bids fair to be a little ahead of anything in that line heretofore seen.
    Dr. J. M. Taylor, formerly of this valley, now a resident of Lane County, is reported to have struck it rich in the mines down there, having been offered $50,000 for his interest in a ledge he has been prospecting for some time past.
    Capt. Crowell and son of this precinct have this year set out 900 more trees at their fine ranch near town. They contemplate building a residence soon in the clearing they have made on the hillside above the road, opposite their present dwelling-house.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3


    W. L. Webster, formerly of this place, was last week joined by his family at Eddy, New Mexico. We hope that they will prosper in their new home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3



    The Rogue River Valley Railway Company was allowed to increase its tariff rates on merchandise between Medford and Jacksonville.
"The Railroad Commissioners," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3



Important Notice.
    Dr. R. Pryce will leave Medford for a time, owing to ill health, and all those knowing themselves to be indebted to him are requested to call and settle with him within a short time or pay the amount to the Jackson County Bank.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3


    Geo. Wealthy of Portland, representative of the Orchard Home Association, was in the valley this week for the purpose of gathering data for a handsome and readable pamphlet that organization will issue at an early day.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1892, page 3



    Under the auspices of the Medford fire company the Fisk Jubilee Singers will give a concert in the Medford opera house on Wednesday, March 30. Tickets for sale at G. L. Davis'.
    Hen fruit seems to be rather plentiful just now. We quote the local price at 10 cents per dozen.
    Mrs. Agnes Hall, sister of Mrs. S. Childers, returned to Medford Sunday from Woodland, Cal., after an absence of several months.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 24, 1892, page 3


Notice!
    After April 1st, 1892, the barber shops in Medford will close on Sundays.
        Signed,                                           W. L. TOWNSEND,
                                                                J. E. SHEARER.

Medford Mail, March 24, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The distillery started up again last week, and is manufacturing a full line of fine goods.
    A. A. Davis has shipped a great many apples to the Sound cities during the last fortnight.
    John F. Johnson, formerly of Grants Pass, is now officiating as chief mixologist at Hanley's.
    We are sorry to learn that Judge Crawford and wife intend leaving for Portland in a short time.
    The infant daughter of Burrell Miller and wife was buried in the Jacksonville cemetery one day this week.
    There are 501 children of school age in Medford at this time, which is a considerable gain over last year.
    August Schmidtlin and family of Jacksonville attended the funeral of Mrs. G. W. Doney last Monday. The deceased and Mrs. S. were half sisters.
    This evening the Phoenix amateurs will present "Ten Nights in a Bar Room" to a Medford audience. We hope to see a large audience, as the play will be well presented.
    Mr. Theiss, the elder, will soon leave for his home in Illinois, after a stay of several months in Medford. He made many friends while here, all of whom regret his departure.
    The city fathers have decided that none but strictly milch kine shall hereafter be allowed the freedom of the city. The main cow ordinance is to be strictly enforced hereafter.
    Postmaster Howard carried the Republican primaries here last Saturday for Hermann in hollow style. Those members of the G.O.P. who were not promptly on hand were spared the trouble of participating, as Bre'r H. had the delegates elected before they had time to even get around to see how it was done. "For ways that are dark," etc., John Chinaman not alone is peculiar.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 2


    Day Parker, a son of W. H. Parker, is employed at his father's law office.
    S. C. Sherill, formerly of this county, is teaching a spring term of school in Paisley, Lake County.
    Mrs. R. Nichols, the artist, is meeting with much success, having several classes in painting in different portions of the county.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 3


    Thos. E. Stanley and his newly wedded wife, from Bogus, Cal., are visiting relatives and friends in southern Oregon.
    Some of the Jacksonville and Medford boys played an impromptu game of baseball at Medford last Saturday, which was won by the latter.
    John H. Huffer, Jr. has been awarded the contract for building the stone foundation of the fine residence that J. Nunan will build this season. The price was $485.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 3


    D. J. Lumsden et al. to Lizzie H. Johnson, lot 4, blk 2, Lumsden's add. to Medford. $112.50.
    Gage M. Pierce to John Hockenjos, lots 6 and 7 in block 32, Medford. $250.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1892, page 3


    Warren Dodge is drilling a well for Mr. Hammond.
    The bowling alley is attracting a good deal of attention, both ladies and gentlemen indulging in the sport.
    Ed Pottenger is visiting in the city from Olympia, where he is in the employ of A. A. Davis in the milling business.
"Local News," Medford Mail, March 31, 1892, page 3


    Wm. Angle et al. to John Ocander, lot 8, block 3, Cottage add. to Medford. $165.
    O.&T. Co. to Southern Oregon Pork Pkg. Co., lots 1, 2, 11 and 12, block 35, Medford. $220

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 2


    Some handsome apples from the orchard of Hon. J. H. Stewart of this county have been retailing in the Portland markets lately for $1.75 per box.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3


    Miss Susie Turner is again in charge of the Jacksonville railroad depot, while Miss Jennie Jackson is holding a case in the Times office.

    Hon. W. S. Crowell was in Jacksonville on Wednesday. He is still further improving his farm near town, which will soon be one of the finest in southern Oregon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3


    D. P. Greninger has removed his family from Medford to the Meadows for the summer.

    E. A. Hoag, who has been in Missouri and California for the past two years, returned to Medford a few days since. His good opinion of Rogue River Valley continues to increase.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. S. Youngs is around again after a wrestle with his old enemy, the rheumatism.
    A handsome daughter made her appearance at Geo. Merriman's residence last Saturday.
    Mrs. Agnes Hall is again a resident of Medford, after an absence of several months in California.
    W. H. P. Legate of this place was over at his Klamath River mines for several days during the past week.
    A number of young folks tendered a surprise party to Carl Narregan on Friday evening of last week at the residence of his father, Prof. Narregan.
    The annual election of officers of Protection Hose Company No. 1 will be held at the city council rooms next Wednesday evening, and it is hoped all members will be present.
    Much interest is taken in the approaching entertainment to be given at the opera house on the evening of the 11th inst. by the members of the Medford silver cornet band.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1892, page 3

Knights of Pythias ad, April 7, 1892 Medford Mail
April 7, 1892 Medford Mail

    W. J. Fredenburg's two-story brick residence is going ahead slowly on account of wet weather.
    Dr. R. Pryce will depart for Klamath land, Friday, in search of much-needed rest and recreation.
    W. P. Dodge, the veteran well-driver of the valley, starts out this spring with a new team, and informs us his apparatus is in good shape now to drive wells, having just purchased new drills and wire ropes, etc., and he is prepared to fill all orders promptly. As orders are coming in every day, those wishing work done would do well to consult him immediately. His foreman, F. A. Bliss, is an old and experienced well borer.
    E. P. Walker has purchased the livery stable lately purchased by Mr. Fawcett from Mr. H. Huff. Mr. Walker will keep a first-class stable at this stand which will be known by the name of "Alliance Livery Stable."

"Local News," Medford Mail, April 7, 1892, page 3   "Alliance" was a Populist buzzword--as in the Farmer's Alliance and People's Party or the National Farmers Alliance. An ad run in the April 22, 1892 Mail lists the partners running the enterprise as "Murray & Walker."


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Knights of Pythias will give a unique performance at the opera house on the 20th inst.
    The band boys should have everybody at their entertainment at the opera house on the 13th inst.
    Mrs. A. Woodford entertained her brother, Wm. Dyer of Roseburg, for several days during the last week.
    The boys have been enjoying trout and sucker fishing in the ditch and creek during the last few days.
    J. A. Stewart, formerly of this precinct, was married to Miss Alice Copeland in Klamath County last week.
    Mrs. N. Hosmer of Foots Creek precinct was in Medford this week, consulting Dr. Geary, the scientific oculist.
    I. L. Hamilton and W. H. P. Legate were in Siskiyou County, Cal. lately, looking after a mine which is said to be very rich.
    A periodical devoted to the interests of the Medford business college is the latest new venture here. It is spicy and neat.
    Prof. N. A. Jacobs is interested in the firm of Reames, White & Co., doing business at Jacksonville, but will continue teaching school.
    Mrs. Graves and family of Monmouth are among the latest acquisitions to Medford society. They will make their future home in this place.
    The Silver Cornet Band's concert has been postponed until April 13th. No doubt it will be a well-attended and meritorious affair.
     A pleasant time was enjoyed by the ladies and gentlemen who tendered Miss May Theiss a surprise party at the home of her parents in this place one evening last week.
    Frank Clayton, formerly in the jewelry business at this place, last week passed through the valley on his way south, accompanied by his wife, to attend the sickbed of his father.
    The recent "split in the Republican Party" at this place was productive of much amusement. The local representative of valor without discretion is able to be about again. He will hereafter know that it is as dangerous to monkey with a "cullud gem'en" as with a buzz-saw.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 2


    J. D. Whitman to Jas. K. Darnell, lots 3 and 4, blk 48, Medford. $80.
    S. S. Cooper to Enoch F. Walker, lots 5 and 6, blk 40, Medford. $75.
    O&T Co. to J. A. Webb, lot 16, blk 14, Medford. $50.
    O&T Co. to P. H. Oviatt, lot 4, blk 80, Medford. $50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 2


    Miss Bertha Stewart of Medford is teaching the spring term of school at the district on Rogue River opposite Woodville.
    W. S. Fitzgerald and family have departed for their old home in Kansas, the change being rendered necessary by the state of Mr. F.'s health.
    The annual meeting of the stockholders of Southern Oregon Pork Packing Co. will be held at Medford on Saturday, May 7th, at 10 o'clock a.m. to elect officers, etc.
    It is reported that the People's Party will soon establish a newspaper at Medford, which will represent the interests of that organization in an unmistakable manner.
    Willis Townsend and family are the latest accessions to the population of upper Sams Valley, having taken possession of their recent purchase, the Turnham ranch. They hail from the state of Washington.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce has gone to Linkville to spend a few months in that high altitude for the benefit of his health. He is one of the best physicians in the state, and we hope that he will return to our midst in the near future, fully restored.

"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 3


    E. W. Hammond, southern Oregon's leading botanist, called during the week. He will continue his researches as soon as the weather will permit. Much attention has been attracted to this section by his excellent articles.
    Sylvester Smith, who is engaged in the stock business east of the mountains, and his brother Ed., who recently arrived from the Sandwich Islands, were in Jacksonville one day this week. They are sons of the late Henry Smith.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1892, page 3


    The people's party managers of Jackson County will hereafter have a newspaper organ of their own. They have chartered the Medford Mail for a year at $90 a month, and the publisher of the Mail, Mr. Kertson, will continue to print the paper under their editorial management. The Mail will unfurl its new flag this week, and will give us another "people's paper." Under existing conditions it is getting to be a difficult thing for a man up a tree or down a well to find out just who "the people" are.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, April 15, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mort Foster has gone to Coeur d'Alene to remain for the summer months.
    The question of bonding the debt of Medford is one of the absorbing topics of the hour.
    Dr. Cole will soon return to Medford to resume the practice of his profession, we learn.
    The normal department of the business college will open the first of May next with a large membership.
    E. P. Walker has rechristened his livery stable the "Alliance" stable, since his purchase from Mr. Faucett.
    The Silver Cornet Band entertainment last Wednesday evening was thoroughly appreciated by all in attendance.
    S. Childers is finding a ready sale for a large amount of his combination fence, about the best on the market.
    The Mail has been subsidized for a year by the People's Party and will hereafter be devoted to the cause of the third organization.
    The Pythian Knights are preparing for a grand entertainment on the 20th inst., when the "Ancient Order of Hercules" will be put on the boards.
    J. H. Faris has been appointed by the local benevolent society as a committee of one to receive donations of clothing for the needy, and other necessaries.
    A ball will be given at the opera house this evening, and it will no doubt prove a well attended and pleasant event. Everybody is invited to attend and have a good time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1892, page 2


    Thos. E. Stanley, lately of Siskiyou County, Cal., is assisting in the management of Fradenburgh's stables, and may become interested in them.
    The wife of Jas. Priddy died suddenly last Sunday morning. She had arisen in her usual good health and was stricken with apoplexy a few hours afterward, from which she soon died. Mrs. Priddy had been a resident of Jackson County for many years and was highly esteemed by all who knew her.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1892, page 2


    If you want prune trees from the Medford Nursery, you had better get them soon.
    Geo. Priddy, the expert brickmason, is doing some fancy work at Dr. Robinson's new residence.
    Taylor Payne is in Benton County, in the interest of the Medford Wire Brace Co., and doing good work.
    The People's Party now have a full-fledged organ, having subsidized the Medford Mail. We learn that they have guaranteed the proprietor 600 subscribers.
    We learn that the Prohibitionists will nominate a full county ticket, in which event there will be four separate tickets in the field. "The more the merrier."
    The physicians of southern Oregon will meet at Medford May 16th and 17th, in order to perfect a local organization, to act in connection with the state medical society.
    Drs. Pickel and Geary of Medford lately performed the somewhat delicate operation of removing a tumor from the face of L. A. Drake, of Talent, in an entirely successful manner.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1892, page 3


    H. L. Wright has opened a tailoring establishment in this city and is prepared to do all kinds of custom and repairing work on short notice.
    Mrs. D. G. Ross has opened a first-class restaurant in this city in the building lately occupied by the cigar factory. Meals at all hours and at all prices can be had at this house, and the table is always spread with the best the markets afford.
    The New York circus showed here Tuesday, day and evening, and everything passed off quietly and pleasantly. A large number of the rural population were in to see the fun. The show is a good one. Among the features worth mentioning was a little farce of a local nature and was worked to a charm here as follows: One of the circus performers entered the ring during the performance, dressed in rags and yelling and hooting at the top of his voice in drunken hilarity. Ed. Robinson, special policeman for the city, at this stage of the game saw a chance to distinguish himself, so rushing upon the supposed drunk he nabbed and started to drag him out of the tent. All at once the supposed drunk jerked away from Robinson, tore his rags off and stood erect dressed in full circus tights, and before the other could think, mister circus man had mounted a horse and was gone. The laugh that followed was thunderous as the officer disappeared. This trick is played in every town.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, April 22, 1892, page 3


Card of Thanks.
    I desire hereby to express my thanks for and entire satisfaction with the work done by Mr. L. M. Lyon in the building of my house. All the work done, by all who have aided in the erection and completion of the building, evidences both taste and skill. I have closely watched the progress and process of the work, and know whereof I affirm.
F. J. EDMUNDS.           
Southern Oregon Mail, April 22, 1892, page 3


Ancient Order of Hercules.
    The above much talked-of and inimitable burlesque on secret orders was richly rendered in the opera house Wednesday evening by the members of Talisman Lodge No. 31 K. of P. The play throughout spoke of the study and attention given it by the actors, and the conglomeration of laughable situations were duly appreciated by the packed house. Banker Vawter in an appropriate little speech opened the ceremonies, after which the orchestra played, the curtain rolled up and the fun began--for the audience--but the candidate had a tussle to keep himself gathered together. The High, Low, Jack and Game, and P.P.C., P.D.Q., Rats and Guards of Honor, all were there and there on time at every point. Manager Narregan is to be congratulated on the training he instilled into the actors, and it is safe to say this farce is the richest thing ever put on the stage in this particular line.
Southern Oregon Mail,
April 22, 1892, page 3

    The Normal Department of the Medford Business College will open May 1st. All who wish to take the normal course should be on hand at the opening. Pay in advance is not required; attend a month and become acquainted with our methods.
    Many rise in the morning with a headache and no inclination for breakfast. This is due to torpidity of the liver and a deranged condition of the stomach. To restore healthy action to these organs, nothing is so efficacious as an occasional dose of Ayer's Pills.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


    John Henry Morris, the printer, well known in this valley, is the candidate this year of the People's Party for circuit clerk of Multnomah County.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Will Olwell is once more at his post of duty in the Medford roller process flouring mill.
    Miss Della Pickel's pupils tendered her a most pleasant surprise party at her home in this place one evening last week.
    The "Ancient Order of Hercules" as presented by the local K.P. order at the opera house last Wednesday evening was a grand success in every particular, the parts being well sustained by everyone engaged, the music excellent, and the hop after the play enjoyed by all. The matter of goat-riding is thoroughly understood by all our citizens now. George Schmidt, Adam Schmidt, Miss Birdie Schmidt of this place and Mr. Rankin, the Medford photographer, composed the orchestra.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


    John Clark has had a bowling alley in full blast at this place and also one at Medford during the last few weeks.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


    The circus was pronounced very good by those in attendance, but the crowd was not very large.
    Willis Townsend and wife of Table Rock precinct have the sympathy of all who have formed their acquaintance since their recent removal to this valley, because of the loss of their little son, aged 2 years and 6 months, his death resulting from an attack of scarlet fever last week. Another son is ill with the same disease.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


    Zelpha E. McCubbin to William S. Conkling, lots 11, 12 and 13, blk 6, Park add. to Medford. $120.
    Wm. S. Conkling to George Hall, lot 13, blk 6, Park add. to Medford. $40.
    C. C. Beekman to J. S. Howard, lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11 and 12, blk 79, Medford. $360.
    Gage M. Pierce to John Arnold, lots 7 and 8, blk 6, Medford. $135.
    Mrs. E. M. Dennison to Helen F. Haskins, lots 7 and 8, blk 6, Medford. $1.
    Mrs. E. M. Dennison to Thos. F. West, lot 2, blk 14, Medford. $50.
    D. J. Lumsden et al. to Mary E. Merriman, lot 12, blk 2, Lumsden's add. to Medford. $50.
    Hamilton & Palm to Minnie Morine, e ½ of lots 1 and 2, blk 18, Beatty's add. to Medford. $175.
    Nannie Barr to Minnie Morine, lots 5 and 6, blk 58, Medford. $250.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1892, page 3


    Grading is being done and rock hauled for the laying of the foundation for the ice factory and brewery, and they tell us we will have ice plenty and to spare inside of five weeks. Medford truly moves.

Southern Oregon Mail,
April 22, 1892, page 2


    SAMUEL EARHART, formerly a prominent citizen of Blacklick Township, died
recently at his home in Medford, Jackson County, Ore. He had resided
there about six years. He was about 55 years of age and leaves a widow
and six children.
"Recent Deaths," The Gazette, Indiana, Pennsylvania, April 27, 1892, page 4



    Mrs. S. E. Penwell has opened a bakery in the Faris hotel, where fresh bread can be procured daily.
    The foundation for the brewery and ice plant is being hurried forward and before long the factory will be well under way.
    I. W. Thomas, one of the valley's substantial ranchers on the road between this town and Jacksonville, was among our callers a few days ago.
    Judge Tressler and family arrived Sunday from Central City, Neb., to take charge of their property here, having exchanged property in Nebraska with W. P. Wood for a house and lot near the school house.
    Mrs. D. G. Ross has opened a first-class restaurant in this city in the building lately occupied by the cigar factory. Meals at all hours and at all prices can be had at this house, and the table is always spread with the best the markets afford.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, April 29, 1892, page 3


Notice.
    All those knowing themselves to be indebted to G. L. Davis will please call and settle before May 1, 1892, as after that date the firm will be known as Davis & Pottenger, and the old books must be closed.
Southern Oregon Mail,
April 29, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Work is progressing rapidly on the brewery and ice plant.
    Mrs. W. I. Vawter has gone to the Willamette Valley on a visit, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Hill.
    Postmaster Howard, who is now in the East, will attend the Minneapolis convention before returning home.
    W. H. P. Legate, who has become interested in the mines near Hornbrook, Cal., has removed thither. We wish him success.
    During the temporary absence of Miss Lulu Gibson from the Postal Telegraph office, Miss Rose Buckley has had charge of the instruments.
    The charity entertainment at the opera house last Monday evening was a most commendable undertaking, and quite a nice sum was realized by the ladies having it in charge.
    The manner in which our city marshal was fooled by the fraudulent drunk at the circus meets with the approval of Young America, regardless of piety, party or previous condition.
    The performance of the "Ancient Order of Hercules" at the opera house is still the topic of conversation, and it is conceded to have been the richest piece of acting in the burlesque line that has ever been attempted by local talent.
    The anniversary of the organization of Odd Fellowship was appropriately celebrated by the local lodge, assisted by members of Jacksonville and other lodges. There was a good attendance of brethren, as also daughters of Rebekah, and everything passed off nicely. There was a parade in the afternoon, in which quite a number participated. Literary and musical exercises of an excellent character followed. Chief among these was the oration by Hon. Gen. H. Burnett of Salem, which was voted able and interesting. An oyster supper at the opera house concluded the festivities.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1892, page 2


    Jim Linn is acting as fireman on the R.R.V.R.R., vice Ernest Langley resigned.
    The house-cleaning season has opened in earnest, and the tidy housewife is fairly "in it."
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Wilcox of Talent is paying his old home at Ottumwa, Iowa a visit, and may be gone some time.
    Mrs. R. Nichols, the artist, has gone to Tolo to commence the preliminaries for her proposed picture of Table Rock.
    Charles H. Pierce, who sprained his ankle not long since while in the Jenny Creek section, was compelled to return home for medical treatment. He is able to be about again, however, and left for Sacramento yesterday morning.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1892, page 3


    John H. Huffer, Jr., who has the contract for building the stone foundation to J. Nunan's new residence, commenced work a few days since.
    Doctors Demorest, the Medford dentists, were in Jacksonville last night. They do the best work, and their business is constantly increasing.
    Messrs. Day, Wood, Kubli, Band, Arnold, Luy and Popovich went to Medford Wednesday evening to organize an encampment of the I.O.O.F.
    Considerable rock was shipped from this place to Medford during the week, to be used in building the foundation of the brewery and ice plant.
    A. J. Weeks passed last week at Oakland, Cal., and thinks of opening an architect's office in that place and resuming his old-time profession.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1892, page 3


    Watch cleaning $1, and warranted by D. T. Pritchard, watchmaker and jeweler, Medford.
    Money to loan on long or short time. For further particulars go to Hamilton & Palm of Medford.
    C. O. Damon of Medford [and] L. N. Browning of Josephine County have been drawn as members of the grand jury which meets at Portland on May 17th.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1892, page 3



    Bicycling is all the rage in town at present and a club is talked of.
    Mrs. W. V. Lippincott is in the R.R.V.R.R. office during the absence of Mr. Graham.
    J. H. Faris has gone out of the hotel business and is now living in his elegant residence in the western part of the city.
    We understand the [Jacksonville] Silver Cornet Band is no more. The old Medford band is booming and will be heard no doubt a number of times during the campaign.
    George Anderson has had his soda wagon painted up and a new sign put on.
    G. L. Davis has moved into his residence lately purchased from Judge Crawford.
    Miss Carrie Lumsden arrived from San Jose Friday of last week, and after visiting friends here a few days will continue on to Portland.
    Dr. Pryce, of Medford, has gone to Bly to obtain a "higher altitude," as he expresses it. When he reaches that elevated region he will be a high Pryce, though he will not, we hope, be unpopular on that account. High prices are in order to the north and east of Klamath Falls, anyhow.--Klamath Star.
    W. P. Dodge had the misfortune to break the main arm of his drill on Thursday of last week, but by sending off immediately for repairs he is in shape to go ahead with drilling again. Mr. Dodge has an excellent apparatus, and as he is a good rustler and a good workman, those wishing wells bored will do well to call on him. He spares no pains or expense to keep his machine in first-rate order and meet his contracts.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 6, 1892, page 3


Wanted.
    Ladies and gentlemen to inspect shoes in the window of the New York Cheap Cash store and see prices.
Southern Oregon Mail,
May 6, 1892, page 3



Precinct Officers.
    J. W. Miller has been nominated on the People's Party ticket for Justice of the Peace of Medford precinct, and Samuel Murray for precinct constable. They are both good and solid men and should receive a large number of votes.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 6, 1892, page 3



Runaway.
    A lively runaway occurred in the streets of Medford Tuesday. One of Worman's delivery teams, starting from the depot, tore down Main Street and across the bridge and out on the road leading by McAndrews' ranch, making a circle by the road leading back to town. When about half way around, S. McGee, who met the running team, grabbed the hind end of the hack and managed to climb in. The lines were dragging between the horses, but Mr. McGee managed to crawl out on the tongue, secured the reins, crawled back into the wagon and brought the animals to a standstill. This was a brave piece of work. Nothing was injured.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 6, 1892, page 3


Golden Wedding.
    A few days since Mrs. I. A. Webb, of this city, received a beautiful wedding card announcing the celebration, on the 5th inst., of the 50th anniversary of the marriage of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Burton, of Mitchell, Indiana. They were joined in wedlock in 1842, and the father is seventy-four years of age, while the mother was born sixty-six years ago, and both are hale and hearty to a wonderful degree. This golden wedding, we understand, is the first occurrence of the kind in the Burton family and was the occasion of a grand reunion of the family. May this aged couple enjoy the fruits of life for long years to come is the wish of the Mail.
Southern Oregon Mail,
May 6, 1892, page 3

    Conrad Mingus to Annie E. Davis, lot 4, blk 75, Medford. $125.
    Annie E. Davis to William Ulrich, lot 4, blk 75, Medford. $175.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1892, page 3


    Hon. W. S. Crowell has been at his homestead location in the Jenny Creek section during the week.
    Mrs. John Weeks of Phoenix has lately been entertaining her sister, Mrs. J. McKay of Woodstock, Canada.
    Frank Mingus has been at various points in Douglas County in the interests of the Weld patent wire brace fence.
    J. W. Graham, manager of the R.R.V.R.R., has returned from the Willamette Valley. Mrs. Lippincott has been filling his place at Medford quite acceptably.
    Misses Emma and Lottie Stephenson, accompanied by their father, G. W. Stephenson, and R. K. Sutton, were at Roseburg last week on timberland business.
    Chas. H. Pierce has returned from his trip to California and will soon leave for Jenny Creek, to resume the work of estimating the timber on the land he is interested in.
    We were pleased to meet our old friend, Dr. A. C. Stanley of Sams Valley, yesterday. This was his first visit to Jacksonville in over two years. He has fully recovered his health, but will always be crippled, we are sorry to say.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Hamilton & Palm have farms, acreage and town lots to sell at reasonable rates on the installment plan.
    Hamilton & Palm have just received an invoice of the best spring wagons, carts, etc., which they sell at the lowest rates.
    Judge Tressler, of Central City, Neb., has arrived to take possession of the property recently bought by him from W. P. Wood.
    The brewery and ice plant will soon be on the ground and in position, and another important industry will be inaugurated here.
    Miss Hallie L. Hoyt deserve the credit for the fine numbers of the Business College Journal which have received so much praise.
    Medford Nursery, one-half mile east of Medford, is the place to get your trees. Trees delivered in town, at the depot or express office free.
    An elegant and fashionable line of millinery goods has just been received by Mrs. Palm. The fair sex should call and see them, as they are the latest.
Weld Wire Fence patent
    C. I. Hutchison has resigned his position with H. Smith & Co. and has taken the road in the interest of the Welds Wire-Brace Fence patent, going north on Tuesday evening.
    Rogue River Encampment No. 30, I.O.O.F., was instituted at Medford last week by A. D. Helman, G.P. of the grand encampment of Oregon. It has 29 charter members and elected the following officers: W. I. Vawter, C.P.; I. A. Webb, H.P.; M. Purdin, S.W.; B. S. Webb, Scribe; G. F. Merriman, P.S.; D. S. Youngs, Treas.; G. B. Addington, J.W.
    The Medford Wire-Brace Fence Company was organized at this place a short time since and articles of incorporation filed with the secretary of state and county clerk. The object of the organization is to dispose of rights to the Welds fence patent, conceded to be one of the most valuable inventions of modern times, and which is highly recommended by farmers and ranchers who have investigated its merits. The incorporators are E. A. Welds, president; C. I. Hutchison, vice-president and manager, and J. E. Enyart, secretary and treasurer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1892, page 2


    Jesse Enyart, who left Logansport about three years ago and located in
Medford, Oregon, writes to his old friend, J. D. Ferguson, that he likes
the country and is doing remarkably well. He is now assistant cashier of
the Jackson County Bank and secretary and treasurer of the Medford Wire
Brace Fence Co. He will pay Logansport a visit during the World's Fair.
"Locals," Logansport (Indiana) Reporter, May 9, 1892, page 4


    The distillery is in full blast and is turning out quantities of superior good, we understand.
    Mr. Ely is having a one-story 25x26 brick built just off 7th Street on C, which will be occupied by a butcher shop we understand as soon as completed.
    The work of improving C Street has begun.
    Several new students have been added to the roll of the business college, and still they come. The college is fast forging to the front as an institution of learning under the able management of Prof. Rigby.

    The combination ice house and brewery will soon be in operation. We will have ice about June 1. The building is enclosed and the machinery will soon be in place. A force of men are pushing matters as fast as the weather permits.
    We are pleased to note the arrival in our midst of Dr. Ketcham, a young dentist of considerable renown and a graduate of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery. He is at present located in the Clarenden Hotel, and we recommend that he be given a call.
    D. S. Young's cactus is in bloom. The plant is on exhibition in the windows of the second hand store, and all who are lovers of the beautiful in nature should not fail to gaze on this rare specimen of flowering shrub. The plant stands about three and one-half feet in height, and the blossom is about six inches in diameter, deep red in color with a long silken tassel hanging from the center.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 13, 1892, page 3


Steam Carpet Cleaner.
    An innovation in carpet cleaning is the latest thing we are called upon to notice, and as spring is here and the carpet cleaning episode is at hand we advise everybody to grasp this opportunity to have their carpets, matting, mattresses, etc., etc. cleaned as they have never been before, and at a price within the reach of all--5 cents per yard for carpets, and other things in proportion. The carpet cleaner, which has just been put in operation, is located on the premises of Sam Murray, on North C Street, and is worthy of inspection. The affair is an immense hollow roller, 37 feet in circumference, and 12 feet in length. The inside is provided with half a dozen baskets, into one of which the carpet is thrown and the wheel set in motion. The carpet is carried half way around and of course, of its own accord, falls to the bottom again into another basket, thus of its own weight shaking out every particle of dust and dirt. The wheel makes 25 revolutions per minute and the carpet falls 50 times, which proves that it gets a good shaking up. Everything cleaned by this process is made as good as new in every respect. The machine will be in operation here two weeks only, after which it will go north, therefore all wishing work done must apply immediately to Sam Murray, Medford, Ore. The machine is patented.
Southern Oregon Mail,
May 13, 1892, page 3


Fourth of July Celebration.
    A grand joint celebration will be given by the citizens of Medford and Jacksonville on the booming Fourth, which promises to be the grandest celebration ever held in Southern Oregon. The citizens are hereby requested to meet at the opera house, Medford, next Wednesday evening, May 18th, at 8 o'clock, to appoint committees on the same. Let everyone attend. By order of citizens.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 13, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The number of bicycles is getting to be so large in town that a club is talked of.
    J. H. Faris has retired from the hotel business, and is now at home in his fine residence in the western suburbs.
    Preparations are being made by the citizens of Medford to celebrate the coming Fourth of July in grand style. A great programme will be presented, and all who attend will not regret it.
    The silver cornet band is reported to have disbanded, leaving the metropolis of the lower valley with but one band of music. It is a source of consolation and pride that the old Medford band is still an excellent one.
    S. McGee last week prevented serious consequences ensuing from a runaway of one of Ed. Worman's teams, by climbing into the back from the rear of the flying rig and gathering up the reins by walking out on the buggy tongue to get them, thus bringing the team to a standstill, a very hazardous piece of work.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1892, page 2


Steam Carpet Beater.
    H. L. Wright of Medford has his steam carpet beater in operation and is ready to beat and renovate carpets at the low price of five cents a yard. This process thoroughly cleanses carpet and is highly spoken of by all who have tried it. Mr. Wright will send a team to Jacksonville if a reasonable number of orders can be secured.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1892, page 3


    The main arm of W. P. Dodge's well drill was broken not long since, but the damage was soon repaired. Mr. D. is doing good work and is kept busy.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1892, page 3


    Dr. E. T. Ketcham, a dentist recently from Baltimore, has located in Medford. He spent several days in Ashland this week.
    Mrs. Williams, wife of Rev. M. A. Williams, of Medford, is seriously ill from a neuralgic attack, and Mrs. H. Ralph of this place has been nursing her.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 13, 1892, page 3



    The bakery has moved to the old photograph gallery building.
    Mrs. S. E. Penwell has removed her bakery from the Medford House to the old photograph gallery, on B St.
    The fire lads are having elegant suits made and will soon be on parade.
    Judge Willard Crawford is a fisherman of no mean qualities. He informs us he has hooked about twenty-five hundred of the sparkling trout from Bear Creek this season.
    L. G. Porter and Harry Angle returned this week from a trip to the Rogue River timber and report the woods in a pretty rough condition, the heavy fall of snow, about 12 feet, having felled innumerable trees across the path. Game has been plenty the past winter, especially deer. Angle says that Porter ate six deer in as many days while on the trip.
    Geo. W. Priddy has moved his family to Medford from Central Point. He started up his brick yard this week and will soon have a kiln under way.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


A Narrow Escape.
    Dr. E. P. Geary's residence had a narrow escape from fire Wednesday night at about 11 o'clock. The ash barrel, which stood near the woodshed and next to the fence, took fire, and when discovered the fire had spread to the woodpile and also the fence, which were all burning with increasing fierceness and would have soon reached the woodshed and the house, but for the timely arrive of Marshal Youngs, who happened to be in the vicinity looking for stray cows to impound. The marshal, calling upon Chas. Perdue and Gabe Plymale, rushed to the scene of the fire, and with the aid of the garden hose soon extinguished the flames, thus preventing a serious conflagration.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


Dr. E. T. Ketcham.
DENTIST.
    All work relating to dentistry, especially crown and bridgework. Gas given for painless extraction of teeth. Temporary office: Clarenden Hotel.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


Hose Co. Officers.
    The following officers have been elected to serve for the ensuing year in Protection Hose, No. 1:
    D. T. Lawton, president; A. C. Nicholson, vice-president; Jno. W. Curry, secretary; F. G. Plymale, assistant secretary; G. L. Davis, foreman; H. G. Nicholson, 1st assistant foreman; Jno. W. Curry, 2d assistant foreman; G. L. Davis, treasurer; Wm. Robinson, sergeant-at-arms; D. T. Lawton, A. C. Nicholson, H. G. Nicholson, trustees; E. A. Langley and E. Amann, hydrantmen; Jno. W. Curry and H. G. Nicholson, pipemen; carriage directors, F. G. Plymale, Robt. Galloway.

Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


Thank You.
    The editor of the Medford Mail, a paper which has recently been hired to preach "reform" to the unsophisticated of Jackson County, acknowledged the weakness of the People's Party here by the candid confession that the Mail had only one subscriber in Josephine County. The calamity howlers must do better than that else they will soon be without an organ.--Grants Pass Observer.
    Since the above was published in the Observer, our subscription list in Josephine County has climbed close on to fifty names, therefore we say thank you, Mr. Observer, for this puff.
    However, can it be possible that the laborers and farmers of Josephine County will support a paper of the Observer's ilk, which mentions them only as "calamity howlers." "Give the devil his due," and quash the viper.

Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3   With its April 22, 1892 issue, editor Felix Kertson renamed the Medford Mail the Southern Oregon Mail, and the paper was largely given over to Populist political news.


    William Angle et al. to Annie N. Lewis, lot 5, blk 2, Cottage add. to Medford. $125.
    Sallie E. Ish to Mrs. Jennie Hardy, 2 acres in Ish add. to Medford. $100.
    Sarah Jane Justus to A. E. Woods, lot 15, blk 46, Medford. $100.
    A. E. Woods to Sarah Jane Justus, lot 4, blk 53, Medford. $100.
    G. W. Howard et al. to Sarah Jane Justus, lot 15, blk 46, Medford.
    John Van Sickle to Sarah
C. Woody, lots 5 and 6, blk 12, Medford. $750.
    P. H. Oviatt to John H. Thorndike, quitclaim to lot 4, blk 80, Medford. $150.
    O&T Co. to A. E. Woods, lot 4, blk 53, Medford. $75.
    O&T Co. to Vawter & Howard, lot 3, blk 70, Medford. $50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Ketcham, the new dentist, is located at the Clarenden Hotel.
    W. I. Vawter is at Astoria this week, attending the grand lodge of the I.O.O.F. and Rebekah degree.
    Mr. Ely is engaged in erecting a brick building, 25x26 feet in size, near the corner of C and 7th street.
    Thos. Morine has reopened the Roxy Ann Saloon with a fine stock of wines, liquors and cigars.
    A. A. Davis recently returned from Olympia, Wash., where he is engaged in milling business with G. W. Howard.
    Geo. W. Howard, who now resides at Olympia, Wash., is paying this section a visit. He is well pleased with his new location.
    Profs. Rigby and Hart are succeeding finely with their business college enterprise, which bids fair to prove an important factor in the city's growth.
    Geo. E. Anderson of the Medford soda works now delivers the numerous articles he manufactures in a new wagon neatly lettered. He is building up a good business, as his wares of an excellent quality.
    Chas. Brous, who has been suffering with dropsy and heart disease for some time past, left for Cinnabar on Tuesday, for the benefit of his health. John S. Miller went with him. We hope to chronicle Mr. Brous' recovery.
    Hon. J. B. Eddy of Pendleton addressed a meeting at the opera house one evening this week. This was the first Republican speech that has been made here this season. The attendance was fair, a number from Jacksonville being in attendance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 2


A Surprise.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford has filed his nomination for county judge with the clerk and is now an independent candidate for that office. This much of a surprise to Mr. W.'s many friends, as they did not expect him to adopt such a course. Of course, there is not any prospect of his election. His candidacy may help J. M. McCall, the Republican candidate, however. The Times hopes that Mr. W. will retrace the steps he has taken.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3



     Mrs. W. F. Towne of Phoenix has lately been entertaining her father, J. W. Stockbarger of Williams Creek.

    Henry Klippel, who has the contract for furnishing the lumber for J. Nunan's new residence, delivered 3000 feet of some of the finest building material we ever saw.
    The number of bicycles and tricycles in Jacksonville and other towns of Rogue River Valley is increasing steadily. Anyone wishing the best of everything in this line should address Fred T. Merrill, Portland.
    Miss Bliss last week returned home to Medford, after conducting a successful school in Phoenix district. An entertainment will be given this evening by the pupils of the various departments of that school.
    Everett Mingus of Ashland was a member of the class of medical students who graduated from the University of Pennsylvania on the 6th instant, and will soon be home to engage in the practice of his profession. Everett is a bright and promising young man, and we predict he has a fine career before him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3


Political Pointers from Medford.
    That Prof. C. S. Price will get the largest majority of any candidate on the Democratic ticket . . . That Billy Holmes will be re-elected with plenty of votes to spare if the people are alive to their own interests; that, having filled the office of county recorder for two years in a commendable and satisfactory manner, it is meet to reward him with a re-election for two years more . . . That James R. Neil has made the best county judge the county ever had; that no man can say aught against his official career; that Medford failed to get a bridge until he became county judge; that Judge Neil's legal ability and experience make him eminently qualified to administer the probate matters of the county according to law, and thereby save much trouble and expense that might result from the act of an incompetent or an illiterate county judge . . . That the People's Party candidate for sheriff is not consistent with that party's ideas of reform: Scene in Medford--saloon, boys, silver, bar, whisky, drink, shake, etc. . . . That banker, W. I. Vawter, was talking through his hat when he made the declaration published in Sunday's Oregonian that the Republicans would capture half of the offices in Jackson County at the coming election . . . That the Democratic ticket will be elected if the Democrats will see their best interests and vote their ticket . . . That the Republicans down the way are doing all they can to create discord and dissensions among the Democrats, etc. . . . That Capt. G. W. Bell, the great tariff reformer, made a good impression on the good people of this city and set many to thinking irrespective of party on the live issues of the day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3


    H. L. Wright and Sam Murray of Medford were in Jacksonville during the week taking orders for the steam carpet-beater.
    We are pained to announce that S. B. Galey's mind is giving away. Religious science seems to be the hobby on which he is going daft.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3


    D. Loring to George H. Andrews, lands and lots in Jackson and Josephine counties. $1.00 etc.
    O.&T. Co. to same: lots and blocks in Grants Pass, Gold Hill, Medford, Phoenix, and R.R. add. to Ashland, etc. $1.00.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. C. Park, the expert mechanic, may hereafter be found at Merriman's blacksmith shop.
    Miss Anna Wilkinson, a sister of our popular butcher, arrived from England a few days ago and will remain some time.
    G. W. Priddy has removed here from Central Point and is engaged in manufacturing brick. He is a first-class mechanic and knows how to make an article that will give the best of satisfaction.
    The following are the officers for the ensuing year of Protection Hose No. 1: D. T. Lawton, president; A. C. Nicholson, vice-president; Jno. W. Curry, secretary; F. G. Plymale, assistant secretary; G. L. Davis, foreman; H. G. Nicholson, 1st assistant foreman; Jno. W. Curry, 2nd assistant foreman; G. L. Davis, treasurer; Wm. Robinson, sergeant-at-arms; D. T. Lawton, A. C. Nicholson, H. G. Nicholson, trustees; E. A. Langley and E. Amann, hydrantmen; Jno. W. Curry and H. G. Nicholson, pipemen; carriage directors F. G. Plymale and Robt Galloway.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 2


    An art circle was recently formed at Ashland, in the parlors of the Oregon, composed of members of Mrs. Rowena Nichols' classes at the county seat and at Ashland. The ladies of this valley are now taking a very lively interest in art matters.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 3


    Taylor Payne and E. A. Welds, the clever representatives of the Medford Wire-brace Fence Co., have returned from a successful trip to the Willamette Valley.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 3


    W. H. Bradshaw, the candidate of the People's Party for sheriff, seems to be laboring under the delusion that he will be elected. He will be fooled even worse than he was when he ran for the same office on the Republican ticket in Kansas some years ago. His party had a big majority in the county, but Mr. B. was badly beaten nevertheless. Save your money and time, Brad.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 3


Located.
    E. T. Ketcham, D.D.S., graduate of the Baltimore College of Dental Surgery, has located an office in the Clarendon Hotel, Medford, Oregon, and those wishing work in the dental line will do well to give him a call.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1892, page 3


    The Medford Mail, which charges other journals with slinging mud, has indulged in this delectable pastime more than any of its cotemporaries. It is the old story of the pot calling the kettle black. A fair sample of the kind of stuff it has dished out to its readers during the campaign is its wanton and slanderous attack on Dr. Porter, the Democratic candidate for coroner. That gentleman has diplomas from two of the best medical colleges in the United States, and is a skilled and successful practitioner as well as a good citizen and honest man. More than once he has been called in consultation with the physicians of southern Oregon, all of whom speak of him in the highest terms. Such scurrilous attacks as the Mail makes only assist those against whom they are directed. The people of Jackson County will answer them by electing Dr. Porter coroner by a large majority.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    B. F. Crouch is at Jacksonville, employed on J. Nunan's fine edifice.
    C. W. Palm, the real estate agent, recently sold G. W. Howard's farm in Eden precinct to a Mr. Mitchell for $8000.
    Grand Democratic rally at the grove tomorrow afternoon. The Medford band will be in attendance, and the meeting will be addressed by Col. J. T. Bowditch, W. H. Parker, Esq., Judge Crawford, Col. R. A. Miller, Hon. S. U. Mitchell and others. Everybody should turn out.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 2


    Those new crossings are quite an improvement.
    A sister of Ed Wilkinson lately arrived in this city from England.
    Protection House Co. No. 1 of Medford will give their annual grand ball on July 4th.
    R. H. Whitehead has commenced the erection of an elegant residence on South C Street.
    Several of our business men have had new signs painted, which improves the appearance of the places of business.
    J. A. Goff has purchased the Medford photograph gallery from McBride & Case. We wish Mr. Goff success in his new venture.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. U. Lumsden, of San Jose, Calif., are expected here the latter part of this week and after a short visit will continue on to Portland, their future home.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 3, 1892, page 3


    H. Klippel's sawmill on Galls Creek is engaged in sawing 6000 ties for the S.P.R.R. Co.
    Wm. Chastain and Fred Miles of Galls Creek are hauling lumber for J. Nunan's new residence from Klippel's mill. It is of fine quality.
    Sam Phillips' brick house in the southern portion of town is nearing completion. It will be one of the most substantial dwellings in this section.
    A large number of sample ballots have been printed by order of the Democracy, so that the people can become thoroughly acquainted with the Australian voting system before the day of election. Anybody can obtain them, free of charge, by addressing the Times office.
    H. F. Wood, the well-known contractor, is busily engaged in building operations in Jacksonville. He will soon have J. Nunan's residence (which will be the handsomest in southern Oregon) well under way. J. H. Huffer, Jr. has finished the stone foundation thereof, which is a fine, substantial one.
    Pierce Bros., who are now in the Jenny Creek section, estimating the amount of timber on the large body of land they have purchased, assisted by an eastern expert, are gratified to find that the average is even larger than they expected. That region contains one of the most extensive and best tracts of timber land on the coast and will soon be the scene of extensive lumbering operations.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. Nichols will leave for Tolo and Grants Pass in a few days to finish the sketches of Table Rock and the Josephine County caves she is making.
    Democratic rally at Medford tomorrow afternoon. A special train will be run from Jacksonville, and everybody who wishes to ride can do so free of charge.
    Read the advertisement of Hubbard Bros., of Medford, who carry a full line of standard farming machinery. Their goods are first-class and their prices reasonable. Don't fail to give them a call if you need anything in their line.
    Scott Morris, the Republican candidate for school superintendent, is burdening the mails with circulars laudatory of himself. Some testimonials from his former home are included, from which we judge that an ordinary standard of education must prevail there. Mr. Morris holds only a second-grade certificate in this county and has not proved a success in any of the schools which he has taught here. No one for a moment supposes that he would make nearly so good a superintendent as the present incumbent.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 3


Grand Rally.
    The campaign will close at Medford tomorrow (Saturday) afternoon, when the Democratic canvassers will speak in the grove near that place, and will be joined in the discussion of the public issues of the day by representatives of the People's Party. The Medford silver cornet band will be in attendance and discourse its best music. Nothing will be left undone for a glorious time. Everybody, irrespective of party, is invited to be present.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1892, page 3


NOTICE
To Persons Using Water from the Medford Water Works.
    You, and each of you, are hereby notified that unless the water rent for the first half year of 1892 (from January 1 to July 1, 1892) is paid on or before Monday, June 6, the water will be turned off by the marshal and kept turned off until said water rent is paid.
J. H. FARIS, Recorder.           
    Medford, Ore., June 1, 1892.
Southern Oregon Mail, June 3, 1892, page 3


    Several young lynx, which had been caught near Roxy Ann, were exhibited in town last Saturday.
    C. W. Wolters has just received a half carload of the Mason fruit jars, the best in the market.
    The Medford Gun Club have imported several pair of the Mongolian pheasant and will turn them loose for breeding purposes. Anyone killing these birds will suffer the penalty of the law, which is [a] $50 fine, we believe.
    W. H. Hosler returned from Eugene yesterday and conversation with Julius Goldsmith, who lately sold out his large grocery store in Medford and went into business in Eugene. Mr. Goldsmith said he was sick of the Willamette Valley as a business point and was coming back to Medford in the near future to make his living. Score another for Medford.
    The prospects are good that a cannery will be one of the next enterprises for Medford in the near future. The Salem Canning Co. have been making inquiries through Mr. J. Hockersmith, and have proposed that a stock company be formed and the farmers in this valley take $2,000 in stock. We understand that a number of our best orchardists have signified their willingness to take hold of the enterprise and no doubt the matter will soon be pushed to a success. It is certainly to be hoped this grand industry will be secured for Medford.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 10, 1892, page 3


    As we predicted, the People's Party did not elect a single candidate on its county ticket at the late election.
    Quite a number of votes were lost through the complication of the new voting system, though it is a surprise that more did not go uncounted. These intricacies having now to a great measure been overcome, the Australian ballot law, with a few amendments that will doubtless be made by the next legislature, will certainly prove a great success in the future.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1892, page 3


    The force engaged on the roadbed of the R.R.V.R.R. has been increased lately. The track has been moved in places and is straighter and more substantial than ever.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1892, page 3


    John Olwell, who has been attending a commercial college in California, has returned to Central Point.
    Mrs. John Weeks of Phoenix has been entertaining her niece, Miss Lena McKay of Canada, during the past few weeks.
    Joe Pierce, who has been in the Jenny Creek country for some time past, returned to Jacksonville the forepart of the week and will stay awhile.
    Thos. A. Harris of Medford left for Cinnabar on Wednesday to recuperate during the next few weeks at the springs in that vicinity. Mr. Brown of Medford accompanied him.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    R. H. Whitehead is erecting a fine residence on C Street.
    Mesdames Goldstone this week paid a visit to their old home at Eugene.
    Mrs. Fairclo of Klamath County is visiting her old home in this vicinity.
    The wire-brace fence is proving very popular with the farmers of the Willamette section.
    Charles Harvey of this place has been entertaining his cousin, attorney Earle of Colorado.
    D. J. Lumsden and family arrived from California a short time since and will spend a short time here.
    H. U. Lumsden and wife, who will make their future residence at Portland, are visiting their old home here.
    Protection Hose Company will give a ball on the glorious Fourth of July next. It will undoubtedly be a grand affair.
    McBride & Case last week sold their photographic establishment at this place to J. A. Goff, who will continue the business at the old stand.
    The social party in the McAndrew building last Saturday evening passed off pleasantly. A number of couples from Jacksonville were in attendance.
    D. T. Pritchard is doing a fine business in the jewelry line, and is deserving of extended patronage. Take your watches to him for cleaning, for his charges are moderate and his work first-class.
    The ice factory will soon be ready for business, and Johnson & McCarthy will then supply the towns of southern Oregon with the finest ice ever handled here, and at a low figure. The output will be several tons per day, the process being very simple, merely the submersion of cans of pure water in brine vats, cooled down by means of ammonia coils. No storage room is needed, as the cost of manufacture is light after the plant is established.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1892, page 3


    E. S. Eddy to R. F. Ragsdale, lot 4, blk 49, Medford. $125.
    Milton Maule to Ida K. Crane, lot 5, blk 24, Medford. $650.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1892, page 3


The City Park.
Editor, Southern Oregon Mail:
    Now that the election is over and the defeated candidates have gone on their pilgrimage to the regions of "Salt River," and the elected ones have begun to realize the fact that they are "in it," let us quit the discussion of the vexed questions composing the science of politics and say something about the affairs of our city.
    The city park is the subject that seems to be needing more attention than any other at this time. When this plot of land was obtained by the city, steps were taken to plant trees and shrubbery and beautify the same, but the trees that were planted were not of a kind that will give much shade, and a good many of them have since died, so that we are not much nearer the end in view than when we first began. Either the city council or the citizens should take the matter in hand and see that at once a sufficient number of maple trees are planted to thoroughly shade this piece of ground, so that for school picnics and 4th of July celebrations we will not have to go away from home to find shade. Trees for this purpose can be had cheaply and should be of a uniform size as near as possible, of from two to three inches in diameter, sawed off about eight feet from the ground. There should be good preparations before planting, by digging holes deep and large, and using plenty of sediment from the creek and plenty of rotten manure. Having the water at all times ready there will be no trouble in making them grow. Let this matter be looked after at once.
TAXPAYER.           
Southern Oregon Mail, June 10, 1892, page 4


PRIZE ESSAY.
Our Grade.
J. C. FIELDER.
    At the beginning of the school year our class consisted of thirteen pupils and kept increasing until the class numbered twenty-four, averaging from fourteen to twenty years of age.
    As we will give a short sketch of each pupil, I will begin with Arthur Faris. Arthur is about the youngest in the class, yet he is one of the best in mathematics.
    Grace Elder is the smallest in the class. She is very quiet and has a gentle disposition.
    May Earhart has gotten along quite nicely in her studies, considering she was promoted during the first term of school and had to catch up with the class. On the death of her father she left school and did not return.
    Ira Purdin is getting along quite well with his studies. He was also promoted from a lower grade level.
    Carl Narregan is the son of our professor and consequently stands [as] well with the teacher as he does in his studies.
    John Harvey, one of the Central Point boys, is a young man who thoroughly enjoys school. He walked eight miles every day. "Pursuit of knowledge under difficulties." John has plenty of ability if he will only persevere.
    Besides John there were two other boys who walked from Central Point: Amos Fries and Percy Newton. Amos is a smart young man. He has taught some, passing both examinations with an average high enough for a first grade certificate. He was never so very quick, but when he demonstrated a fact it showed some depth of mind and quite a good deal of thought.
    Percy Newton is one of the boys whose delight is in playing some joke on somebody. He is a fair scholar. He left school soon after the teachers' examination.
    Julia  Rodschaw is one of the girls who joined the class in the winter. She is very quiet and modest appearing. She is now teaching near her home.
    Zora Bliss was one of the oldest girls in the class and stood high in her studies. She is teaching near Eagle Point.
    Zada Owens was in the school such a short time that we did not have an opportunity of becoming acquainted with her. While in school she very seldom had anything to say. She left the school early in the winter, only coming back to take the examination.
    Mamie Isaacs was our organist all winter, but about one month before school closed she stopped. She got along in some of her studies very well. Her best was history.
    Addie White is a Montana girl. Her parents moved to Medford last summer. She commenced school soon after it began and has not missed more than one or two days during the term.
    Grace Foster was one of the youngest and best in the class. She was quite proficient in algebra, but in March she left school as she had an opportunity to learn telegraphy.
    Bessie Brous is one of the most regular girls in attendance and has always passed with a high average.
    M. D. Nicholson is a merry, laughing girl with the M.D. on the wrong side of her name. She has been one of the class leaders a number of times.
    Bertha Stewart is one of the girls who studied quite hard during the winter and passed the teachers' examination. She has taught several terms of school. She is now teaching at Woodville.
    Myrtle Woodford is a good-natured girl. She passed the examination to the delight of her friends.
    Emma Smith is a California girl. She is visiting at her uncle's this winter and is attending school. She is soon to leave for California.
    Bessie Wait is a very good scholar, having been class leader a number of times. She is also a very good elocutionist.
    Dora Buchanan did not join our class until late in the fall, then left when she got her certificate for her school in the mountains.
    Junie Stewart is attending school, coming from home which is nearly three miles from town. She is quite a favorite on account of her pleasant disposition.
    Fannie Haskins is quite a good scholar. She made good progress in penmanship. She is studious and anxious for the time to enter college.
    Julia Fielder, a Michigander, aged sixteen, is a girl of small stature, but gigantic intellect. She is one of the most mischievous girls in school and gives the teacher trouble by persistent gum chewing.
    In November we moved into the new school house, and the building was dedicated December 4, 1891.
    We have observed with appropriate exercises some of the principal days this year, beginning with Thanksgiving and followed by Whittier's birthday, Washington's birthday, Christmas, New Year's and Arbor Day. We also observed Decoration Day by going to Jacksonville and helping decorate the soldiers' graves.
    On February 10, 1892, the high school took the teacher's examination, all passing well, Amos Fries, Bertha Stewart, Zora Bliss and Dora Buchanan getting second grade certificates. All of the others received, or could have received, third grade certificates if they had desired. There are eight of the class teaching at present. They all have pleasant schools. Our class passed as high on an average as any of the old teachers.
    In March the class finished Reading, History and Physiology, passing good examinations.
    On May 6, 1892, our school gave an entertainment, the high school taking an active part. One of the most enjoyable features of the evening was the fan drill, while the trained chorus of sixty voices was welcomed twice on the stage. A very amusing feature of the evening was the farce entitled "A Double Cure," in which Fannie and Bob distinguished themselves.
    The school has made good progress this year owing to the kind efforts of Prof. N. L. Narregan.
    Many who at the first of the school year could hardly read their own writing are now proud of having their work exhibited, showing there has been some hard work before the muscular movement could be conquered, but by the kind yet firm direction of our professor most of the class have mastered it.
    Success to the high school of Medford.

Southern Oregon Mail, June 10, 1892, page 4


Dissolution Notice.
MEDFORD, Ore., June 11, 1892.
    To whom it may concern: This is to certify that we, M. R. Hart and M. E. Rigby, have dissolved partnership in the Medford Business School.
M. R. HART.           
M. E. RIGBY.           
Southern Oregon Mail, June 17, 1892, page 2


    J. A. Goff's photograph gallery sports a new sign.
    John Olwell has returned from Oakland, where he has been attending college.
    Miss Zorah Bliss closed a very successful term of school in Antelope district last Friday.
    The estimable wife of Rev. M. A. Williams is seriously ill with inflammatory rheumatism.
    R. H. Whitehead's new dwelling on C Street is in the hands of the painters.
    The wife and family of Mr. Johnson, of the brewery and ice works, arrived from Portland Sunday to make Medford their future home.
    W. F. Griffis is having erected for himself a neat residence in the western part of the city. W. K. Davis and S. B. McGee are the contractors.
    The Medford Distilling Company have opened a warehouse in town on Front Street, where they have an excellent display of goods. See their advertisement in another column.
    The business college firm of Rigby & Hart has dissolved. The school will continue as usual under the immediate supervision of Prof. Rigby.
    Mr. Ross has disposed of the city restaurant business to a Mr. Eddy, of Ashland, and left for Roseburg Tuesday evening. The new proprietor will continue the business at the old stand.
    The Italian with his cage of parrots has shaken the dust of Medford from his feet in search of pastures new. The people of Medford have no money to give to a macaroni, garlic-scented individual, who seems too healthy to earn a living by honest toil.
    Davis & Pottenger's new advertisement in another part of this paper offers some very choice bargains. Get a chance at the tea set.
    Several of our citizens showed signs of having had a tussle with the intricacies of the Australian ballot system on election day by being marked about the mouth with the indelible pencil.
    The R.R.V.R.R. bed is being leveled and the track straightened, which are much-needed improvements.
    Dr. Ketcham still has a good supply of gas on hand for the painless extraction of teeth.
    Judge Crawford is having rooms fixed up in the Hamlin brick and will move into them as soon as they are ready for occupancy.
    Macy Pickering, late of Clay County, Iowa, and an old friend of F. A. Bliss and Warren Dodge, is holding down a good job at George F. Merriman's blacksmith shop.
    Will Halley has been quite sick at his father's place near Medford for several days. His sickness is the result of injuries received at the Lake Labish wreck some time since.
    Last week we were pleased to mention that C. W. Wolters disposed of something over 100 boxes of strawberries in one day, but last Saturday the record was broken by Charley selling 370 boxes during the day.
    M. Goldstone has made several improvements about his large establishment, among which we noticed a neat sign and a portable awning.
    The members of Protection Hose No. 1 of Medford will give a grand ball and supper on the evening of July 4th. As the boys are sparing no effort for the occasion, this will certainly be the event of the season. See their adv. and bills.
    Maurice E. Bain, our late associate, has again embarked in the newspaper business. His paper is published in the interests of Barlow, Aurora and Canby, Ore., and is called The Three Sisters. As Mr. Bain is a notorious woman-hater, we wonder what influence was brought to bear upon him that he would consent to title his paper The Three Sisters. However his paper shows up quite well, and we wish him success.
    In consequence of the engine of the R.R.V.R.R. getting out of repair the train was stopped for a couple of days this week. Ralph Ridenhour, engineer, assisted by Horace Nicholson, of Adkins & Webb's, fixed it up as good as new and Thursday morning it came down on time. During the layoff Geo. Coulter treated the car and engine to a new coat of varnish, which makes them shine like a new silver dollar.
    That Medford enjoys the distinction of numbering among its citizens several connoisseurs of rare flowers is undeniable, as anyone knows who has strolled about the city and gazed upon the numerous yards of beautiful blooming flowers. Among the rest we may mention the yard of Mrs. J. A. Edwards in the north part of town. The innumerable rare flowers and shrubs in this yard are indeed a source of pleasure and joy forever to the owner. Last Saturday Mrs. Edwards kindly gathered for us 60 varieties of roses and other flowers and arranged them into a magnificent bouquet, for which we return thanks.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 17, 1892, page 3


    Why have a plate with a few teeth on it covering the roof of the mouth when there is no need of it? Answer: Ask Dr. Ketcham, Medford.
    The rolling stock of the R.R.V.R. Co. was thoroughly renovated during the week and presents a much improved appearance. No trains were run on Tuesday and Wednesday.
    John Barneburg and Miss N. Kellogg of Medford precinct treated their friends to a genuine surprise on the 4th inst., when they suddenly went to Jacksonville and got married, and left for Portland the same evening. They have our heartiest congratulations and best wishes, in which we are joined by a host of their friends.
    The State Teachers' Association will hold its next regular session at Portland, commencing on June 28th, and continuing four days. An interesting programme is in course of preparation. G. G. I. Newbury of Jacksonville will read a paper on "The Relative Importance of Parent and Teacher to the Child's Character."
    The Memorial Day address delivered by Hon. W. S. Crowell at Ashland was a gem of its kind, and was pronounced the finest effort in that line which it had ever been the good fortune of the listeners to hear. Its literary excellence was in keeping with the delivery of the orator, and stamped him as one of the most effective public speakers of this section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. John Bellinger last week returned home from a visit to her sister, Mrs. C. K. Fronk of Albany.
    John F. White, one of our prominent merchants, expects to leave for his old home in Kentucky in a few days.
    Clarence Kellogg of Medford made Jacksonville a call on Wednesday evening. His visits promise to be more frequent in the future.
    Mrs. Kate S. Slocum of Portland will spend the summer months in this locality visiting her sister, Mrs. W. J. Plymale, and other relatives.
    John W. Aid, the Ashland photographer, was in town this week delivering views he took here on Decoration Day. His firm does excellent work.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Horace  Nicholson has been at Jacksonville making repairs on the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s rolling stock.
    His many friends will be glad to learn that Jules Goldsmith contemplates returning to Medford, to reopen business here at an early day.
    Mrs. E. A. Johnson have the sympathy of their many friends over the loss of their baby girl, who died of scarlet fever not long since.
    Crop prospects were never better in this section, and Medford has reason to congratulate herself over the bright outlook. Trade is picking up already, and a prosperous season is looked for.
    Misses M. A. Theiss and Della J. Pickel last week departed for a few weeks' vacation, taking the train for Portland, going thence by steamer to the bay city, and home again after a trip through California.
    The Salem Canning Co. have made a proposition to the orchardmen of this valley to establish a cannery at Medford during the next few months, and only ask the farmers to take $2,000 in stock in the cannery to ensure its being consummated. Parties interested in fruit farming should lose no time in getting the proposition accepted.
    The Medford Gun Club has just imported a dozen Mongolian pheasants to be turned loose for breeding purposes, and it is hoped they will not be molested until they have an opportunity of raising a few broods to stock the valley with this desirable game bird. The hue and cry about them being enemies of the farmer has completely died out, even in the Willamette section, and they are there esteemed as a very desirable acquisition to Oregon's game birds.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Stewart and wife of Eden precinct, who have been spending the past two months in Mexico and east of the Rocky Mountains, have returned home, considerably improved in health.
    M. E. Bain, formerly of the Central Point Enterprise, is engaged in the publication of a weekly newspaper at Barlow, Clackamas County, which he calls The Three Sisters. It is a neat and newsy publication.
    Pierce Bros. have suspended cruising operations in the Jenny Creek and Klamath River sections for the present. Mr. Leonard, an expert who came from Pennsylvania to assist them, started on his return home during the week.
    The Medford Distilling and Refining Co., which lately finished the manufacture of a large quantity of superior liquors, cologne, spirits, etc., has opened a wholesale house at Medford, and is now prepared to furnish the same in quantities to suit. The gentlemen composing this company have had much experience in this line and gained an enviable reputation while in Illinois. That their goods are pure and first-class in every respect may be relied upon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1892, page 3


    I. A. Webb received a brand-new "New Mail" bicycle direct from the factory this week. Ike thinks he can get the beast tamed down in a short time.
"Additional Local," Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 2

Fourth of July ad, June 24, 1892 Southern Oregon Mail
Fourth of July ad, June 24, 1892 Southern Oregon Mail

    W. L. Townsend now occupies the H. U. Lumsden property on C Street.
    C. I. Hutchison is back from his northern trip.
    G. W. Priddy & Co. have just finished burning a kiln of 140,000 brick at their brick yard near this city.
    Geo. Anderson is having his soda factory lined and filled with sawdust, to keep things cool, no doubt.
    L. G. Porter and fiery steed will loom up on the 4th. He has been selected as marshal of the day.
    Dr. Ketcham, at the Clarenden Hotel, says the elevator is out of repair, but his office can be reached by the stairway, just the same.
    Mrs. S. E. Penwell has removed her bakery from the Medford House to the old photograph gallery, on B St.
    E. W. Starr is back from Roseburg, where he went to put in bids for the erection of buildings on the district fair grounds.
    The gun club of Medford having turned loose about a dozen China pheasants, they expect lots of sport in the years to come.
    E. B. Hunsaker, formerly a merchant, but now a horny-fisted son of toil, was over from his farm in Sams Valley Saturday doing some trading with our merchants.
    W. S. Barnum is having an elegant residence built on C Street. W. K. Davis and S. McGee are the contractors. Clyde Davis is learning the carpenter trade with his father.
    The J. H. Faris residence, in the western part of the city, is receiving the finishing touches from the hands of Walter Scott, who is an expert painter as well as a skillful carpenter.

    J. T. Miller, one of the best nurserymen in the valley, was doing business in Medford Saturday. Mr. Miller's nursery is situated on the Leever Ranch near the fairgrounds and we learn that this nursery is being stocked with the best varieties of fruit trees obtainable.
    On two roads between here and the river, C. W. Wolters has placed on trees and fences about two dozen large signs reminding people of the fact that Medford is the place to buy groceries. Charley understands advertising and knows that it pays.
    Sam Murray and Milton Maule are down in the Willamette country working up a boom on the carpet sweeping business. They are also prepared to talk wire brace fences, take a job of painting, or open up a butcher shop.
    Boots and shoes anatomically built by A. C. Tayler. Repairing promptly attended to. Carries in stock ladies', men's and infants' correct shape shoes. Personal attention given to fitting the foot. Opposite post office.
    The machinery for the brewery and ice factory have arrived and are being placed. The machinery is immense and elegant and from the way things look at the factory it is safe to say this industry will rank second to none in this section.
    J. A. Whitman has returned from his trip to Portland and the Sound country. He says there is more building going on in Medford than in any place he visited while gone.
    Talk about painting things red on the 4th, Medford will do this up brown by painting Roxy Ann of a vermilion hue with several hundred pounds of blood-colored fire and any quantity of fireworks. The reflection will light the sky up for miles around. Watch for it. Come and see it.
    Last Monday the consummation of a dicker took place in Medford between two of our good citizens, by which Charles Wolters disposed of his elegant baby buggy to J. L. Napier for much less than cost. We conclude by this that Charley has gone out of the business for a time at least.
    Isaac Woolf was out driving Sunday behind one of his fine teams, when one of the horses became frightened at an approaching train, and rearing and plunging, sat down on the tongue, completely demolishing it. No further damage was done, and Mr. Woolf congratulates himself that it was no worse.
    J. A. Whitman has returned from his trip to Portland and the Sound country. He says there is more building going on in Medford than in any place he visited while gone. He reports fruit dealers of Portland very cautious this season about making contracts, owing to the crop and prices being uncertain.
    W. E. Newton, of Portland, was here this week to place an agency for the Imperial bicycle, of which he is coast agent. Adkins & Webb took the agency. This machine is rather high priced, but it is well worth the money. Mr. Newton and a friend rode from Portland to Roseburg, a distance of 218 miles, in 28½ hours.
    The frogs, as it were, seem to be masters of the situation, and we confidently expect the council will be called upon to raise up in all its might, or words to that effect, and put a quietus on their hilarious and discordant strains. Let the good work of extermination be carried to a successful termination even if the troughs must be abated as a nuisance.
    A serious conflagration was averted at the John Perdue residence yesterday, by the timely action of Mr. Perdue, who had his hands burned in putting out the fire. Very little damage was done, however, but a badly frightened family, the loss of some window curtains and the walls being somewhat blackened with the smoke are the particulars in a nutshell.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


A New Soda Fountain.
    J. A. Slover & Co. were the recipients this week of a fine large soda fountain which will ornament one of the counters in their neat and tasty drug store. Jim expects to have it in good working order in a few days, and as it is the only one in town they will be kept busy during the Fourth and have a good trade all summer.
Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


New Night Watch.
    At a special meeting of the city council held at the council rooms Saturday evening, T. W. Johnson was elected night watch to serve during the pleasure of the board. They also appropriated the sum of $25.00 toward his monthly pay, the business men of the town raising the balance, making his salary $50 per month. Councilmen E. J. Montague and W. B. Roberts were granted a leave of absence.
Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


A $2,000 Damage Suit.
    S. Childers, through his attorney, S. S. Pentz, has filed a complaint in the circuit court against M. P. Phipps for $2,000 damages. Mr. Childers claims that in an altercation in which Mr. Phipps was the aggressor, he was so roughly handled by the defendant as to cause him great bodily pain, and the injury may result in a permanent sickness, thereby unfitting him for manual labor of any kind. Mr. Childers was a very sick man at the time and refused to put up his "props," but Mr. Phipps, who is a large and powerful man, with muscles like Peter Jackson and who strikes like a mule kicking, advanced on his man and pummeled him severely until stopped by a looker-on. The case will be tried at the September term and will, no doubt, be a racy and interesting proceeding.
Southern Oregon Mail, June 24, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. P. H. Legate is at Hornbrook, Cal. in the interest of the mines in which he is interested.
    Our citizens are leaving nothing undone to make the coming celebration a howling success.
    Mrs. D. Chapman of Ashland last week visited her daughter, Mrs. W. L. Townsend, at Medford.
    Horace Nicholson has been at Jacksonville making repairs on the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s rolling stock.
    Jesse Walker has removed from Klamath County to this section, where he will make his future home.
    Messrs. Davis and McGee are erecting a neat residence for W. S. Griffis, in the western part of town.
    The family of Mr. Johnson of the ice works arrived from the state metropolis at Medford for permanent residence last week.
    Henry Holst entertained as his guests for several days last week Rev. H. Tiss of the Lutheran Church at Oakland, Cal.
    Bring "Mollie and the babies" and let them have a roaring time. The grand old Fourth rolls around but once in a year.
    Fred. Barneburg and wife of this precinct last week entertained their daughter, Mrs. D. High of Ashland, for several days.
    Mrs. Eddy, late of Ashland, is now in charge of the Ross restaurant, Mrs. Ross having departed for Roseburg last week.
    The Medford Distilling Co. now have a fine line of goods displayed at their downtown warehouse, which they opened recently.
    Medford will be "in it" this year with one of the grandest celebrations ever held in southern Oregon. People are coming from far and near.
    W. H. Bradshaw's team ran away here this week and raised considerable excitement. Fortunately they were stopped without doing much damage.
    The beautiful collections of house plants displayed by some of the ladies of Medford are a veritable source of wonder to the newcomers of this section.
    Will Halley has been quite ill at his father's place near town during the past two weeks with disorders following the injuries received at the Lake Labish accident.
    Dr. Geary was last week called upon to treat the eyes of Miss Dotia Willits of Ashland, who was brought down by her mother, Mrs. D. B. Willits, for that purpose.
    Dr. W. S. Jones made one of the quickest trips to Cinnabar on record, having been called to pay Chas. Brous a visit. He was accompanied by Mrs. Brous, who remained with her husband.
    W. B. Roberts and wife will spend the next few months at Bartlett Springs and other resorts in the golden state, in the hope of benefiting Mrs. B.'s health, which has been in a precarious state for some time past.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 2


    J. H. Barnum to Kittie L. Webb, a parcel of land, Phipps' reserve to Medford. $250.
    W. E. S. Eddy to Wm. Myer and G. F. Billings, lots 1 and 2, blk 36, Medford. $200.
    Edw. A. Johnson to Wm. Ulrich, lot 6, blk 15, Medford. $250.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 2


    Dr. Ketcham does gold crown and bridge work, Medford.
    Farmers are busy haying, and the towns are dull as a consequence.
    Dr. Ketcham, dentist, is to be found in his office at Medford, night and day.
    One of the main features of the Fourth of July celebration at Medford will be the illumination of Roxy Ann with red light in the evening.
    Everybody seems to be going to Medford on the Fourth. By a glance at the large posters it will be seen that an excellent programme has been arranged, and a good time is in store for all who may attend.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


Roxy Ann to Be Illuminated.
    In addition to the numberless attractions offered for the amusement and entertainment of her thousands of visitors on Independence Day, Medford proposes a matchless and genuine treat for all who may throng there. At 10 o'clock p.m. 200 pounds of red light will be ignited on the very top of Roxy Ann, the lofty peak of the sturdy old mountains east of that thriving city. The sight will be grand, magnificent, appalling. The like has never been attempted or thought of before, and it will be the event of one's lifetime to gaze upon this immense display of man's great inventive genius. Don't neglect this opportunity of seeing the very heavens ablaze with resplendent glory and brilliancy.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


    Hon. W. S. Crowell has gone to his Jenny Creek ranch for the summer.
    Miss Hattie Newbury is visiting her brother Abe at Ilwaco, and will be gone several weeks.
    John Dyar, conductor on the R.R.V.R.R., was in Roseburg and Portland last week, attending a meeting of the conductors' association. S. W. Kindle filled his place during the interim.
    Geo. R. Neil and Will L. Miller, who have been attending the Ann Arbor law school, returned home on Wednesday to spend the summer vacation. They have made excellent progress with their studies.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


    J. A. Whiteside of Medford is assisting H. F. Wood on J. Nunan's new residence.
    Guy Weidler, who is connected with the internal revenue department, was in Jacksonville a few days since, accompanied by Frank Galloway, storekeeper at the Medford distillery.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1892, page 3


    The Medford gun club has just imported a dozen Mongolian pheasants to be turned loose for breeding purposes, and it is hoped that they will not be molested until they have an opportunity of raising a few broods to stock the valley with this desirable game bird. The hue and cry about them being enemies of the farmers has completely died out, even in the Willamette section, and they are there esteemed as a very desirable acquisition to Oregon's game birds.--[Times.

"Here and There,"
Ashland Tidings, June 24, 1892, page 3


The Klamath Lake Plateau.
    Charles H. and Joseph G. Pierce, of Medford, Or., yesterday purchased 5000 acres of fine timber land on the Klamath Lake plateau. This purchase was the second made by the Pierce Bros., they having purchased 10,000 acres of land in the same locality only a few months ago. In the same locality Pardee, Cook & Co. of Chicago have purchased 14,000 and own besides 50,000 acres of government land adjoining. Together with the Pierce Bros., the latter firm propose to at once begin the working of the timber on their lands, and it is supposed that a large number of men will be shortly employed.
The Morning Call, San Francisco, June 25, 1892, page 3


    INCORPORATION.--Articles of incorporation of the Medford Mining Co. were filed with the secretary of state Saturday by Fred Barneburg, Pete Barneburg, G. B. Addington, George Merriman and I. L. Hamilton. The amount of the capital stock has been fixed at $1600. The principal place of business will be at Medford, Jackson County.
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, June 27, 1892, page 3


    NOTARIES.--The following were the notarial appointments at the state capitol yesterday: D. C. Sherman, Salem; R. T. Lawton, Medford; D. R. Murphy, Portland.

Evening Capital Journal, Salem, June 29, 1892, page 3


OREGON.
    Medford.--The building for the ice factory and brewery was ready for the machinery June 1, but it was delayed by high water in the East.
Ice and Refrigeration, July 1892, page 41


    Slover has the only fountain in town and gives a large, foaming glass of soda for 5¢.
    Mrs. S. M. West and son Hiram left Tuesday morning for Loyalton, Calif., to spend the summer.
    I. A. Webb has purchased the lot and house next to his residence from Mrs. Barnum, of Ashland. He is remodeling the house into a fine barn.
    Work was commenced on the M. C. Phipps brick on C Street this week. A. Childers & Son are doing the work.
    One of Rufus Cox's hay wagons took a tumble to itself and dumped its contents into the street last Friday in front of the Grand Central.
    P. W. Olwell, the king orchardist near Central Point, has been making several improvements about his premises, noticeable among which are the gable windows in the residence.
    Something got the matter with the R.R.V.R.R. engine on Monday, and it came very near not getting in before the northbound passenger had left this place.
    D. T. Sears is assisting Mrs. Miller in D. H. Miller's hardware store during the latter's absence at Cinnabar, where he is assisting Mrs. Brous to take care of Charles, who is in a critical condition.
    Al Morris' spirited buggy team took a lively spin last Friday, starting from the Grand Central and dropping the buggy in the alley between A. C. Tayler's boot and shoe store and D. T. Sears' store. A few dollars will repair the damages.
    A gentleman from the East, who is looking up a suitable place to locate, was asked by an old friend here if he was tired of the cyclones, etc. of his old home, remarked: "If I wasn't I wouldn't be in Rogue River Valley."
    B. F. Yount left Sunday evening for Davenport, Wash., where he goes to enter the employ of the A. A. Davis Milling Co., who are putting in a flourishing mill in that place. His family will remain here for a couple of months at least.
    Our Southern Pacific depot is sporting the latest thing in train order signals. The signal is at the top of a long pole placed near the depot. Our readers can investigate for themselves better than we can describe it. All telegraph stations on the system are provided with the like apparatus.
    Hubbard Bros. are gathering in their farm machinery from their different branch houses. The machinery from Central Point was moved here this week, and a carload from Grants Pass will soon be here. Their stock will then be about complete. They are agents for the Northwest Implement Company.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 1, 1892, page 3


The Combination Industry.
    Rumors were rife on our streets this week relative to the completion of the ice factory and brewery, and several had it that artificial ice would be plenty about Saturday. This was getting interesting, and a Mail reporter hied himself to the base of operations to get at the bottom of the business.
    The reporter found all hands busy as bees setting up machinery and putting the finishing touches to the woodwork, etc.
    We had pleasant conversations with two of the firm, Messrs. McCarty and Johnson, who kindly showed us around the entire factory, and explained the differed different details and workings of how to make ice and beer.
A Johnson Compressor Patent.
    The factory will not be complete for some weeks, but it is expected that ice will be ready for sale in about two weeks, not before. This plant in every respect is first class, in fact the machinery and building are not duplicated anywhere in this part of the country. The combination compressor and engine is from the Johnson patent, and is of fifty horsepower. The capacity of the factory is about five tons of ice per day and twelve barrels of beer. The walls of the building and the different rooms, such as the storing, cooling, etc., are twelve inches in thickness, with two air chambers, giving a perfect circulation throughout. When everything is completed we will give a detailed account of all that goes to make up this great industry. Suffice it to say now that the importance of this plant in our midst is not half appreciated by our citizens, but we hope it will be when the output begins.
Southern Oregon Mail, July 1, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Harris & Purdin received a carload of ice during the week.
    A. A. Davis is in Olympia again and Will. Olwell is managing the Medford mills.
    Mrs. Eaton of Jacksonville has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. Geo. S. Howard.
    Prof. Hart departed for Redding, Cal. after selling out at this place last week.
    Prof. Rigby is now assisted by Frank Wait in the training department of the business college.
    Clarence Kellogg, who has been acting as engineer at the Medford Mills, has gone to Portland.
    J. A. Goff, who is now proprietor of the Medford photograph gallery, is doing first-class work.
    Hon. H. K. Hanna will officiate as president of the day at the approaching celebration in this place.
    Priddy & Son have just completed the burning of 140,000 superior brick at their kiln at this place.
    Miss Bertha Stewart last week returned home after finishing a successful term of school in Schieffelin district.
    Medford's new factory will be supplying the citizens of this valley with an abundance of ice in a short time and at a low figure.
    E. J. and George Montague have been at Roseburg for some time past, being employed at the county fair grounds at that place.
    Medford is preparing for a grand time, and no mistake, next Monday. The picnic grounds are on C. C. Beekman's vacant lots in town.
    The many friends of Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Fronk will regret to learn of the death of their infant girl at their home in Albany on the 22nd.
    Geo. E. Anderson has had his soda factory lined with sawdust against the evil days when the sun climbed clear over the thermometer.
    J. A. Whitman, on his return from Portland, reports there is more substantial improvement visible in Medford than in any town he visited.
    Prof. Narregan has been retained as principal of the Medford schools, which is a deserved compliment to an efficient and popular teacher.
    Much better work is being done at the Medford photograph gallery since J. A. Goff became proprietor. His prices are also more reasonable.
    Our celebration promises to be a magnificent success. No doubt the biggest crowd in the valley on that day will assemble here on the glorious Fourth.
    C. I. Hutchison last week returned from his trip to the northward in the interest of the wire-brace fence works, and may be found at Henry Smith's.
    The new residence of W. S. Barnum on C Street is assuming proportions. W. K. Davis and S. B. McGee are the architects and builders, and doing first-class work.
    Chas. Wolters has recently had a number of board signs erected, calling the attention of his friends to the fact that he still does business at the old stand on a larger scale than ever.
    Miss Rosa McAndrew received the congratulations of numerous friends upon her success in securing the handsome gold medal at the St. Mary's Academy at Jacksonville.
    Our popular jeweler, D. T. Pritchard, held ticket No. 86,348, which drew the $10,000 prize in the last drawing of the Louisiana lottery. We congratulate him upon his good fortune.
    Thos. A. Harris, who has been spending several weeks at Cinnabar, returned home on Saturday. He has hardly assumed the proportions of George Merriman, but is nevertheless improved in health.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson will officiate as chaplain in his usual impressive manner at the coming celebration. Robt. Galloway will read the Declaration of Independence, while L. G. Porter will make an excellent marshal.
    Dr. W. S. Jones was summoned to Cinnabar last week, to attend to Chas. Brous, who was suddenly taken worse. He was much better when the doctor returned home, Mrs. Brous having gone over to nurse the patient. Dave Miller was also with the sick man.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 2


    J. W. Short to Edw. A. Johnson, one-half lot 6, blk 15, Medford. $250.
    O. Harbaugh to M. J. Crewe, lots 3 & 4, blk 15, Medford. $335.
    L. L. Angle to Ella Pottenger, lot in Medford. $75.
    J. G. Birdseye, sheriff, to Main & Winchester, sheriff's deed to lot 1, blk 14 and lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 10, Medford. $4,154.61.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 2


    In a circular issued by the Babcock Printing Press Co. is an advertisement announcing that the Medford Mail is for sale.
    Mrs. E. Turner has sold 22 acres of land in Central Point precinct, adjoining the farm of Granville Sears, to a gentleman named Childers, who recently arrived from the state of Washington. The purchaser intends to make his future home there.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3


    John Dyar, who has acted as conductor for the R.R.V.R.R. Co. since it commenced business, will soon enter the employ of the S.P. He will be succeeded on the local road by Supt. Graham.
    J. W. Hockersmith returned from a trip to Portland in the interest of the Medford packing house a few days ago. The only danger apprehended about the business is that the supply of bacon may give out before the season closes, as it finds a ready market wherever offered.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3


    Lou Bender, while riding a fractious horse at Medford one day last week, was seriously injured by the animal falling with him. One of his legs was broken in two places. Dr. Jones was summoned, and the patient is doing nicely and getting along as well as could be expected.
"Accidents," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1892, page 3


    A Woman's Relief Corps auxiliary of the G.A.R. was organized at Medford yesterday, Mrs. J. M. McCall, of this place, being the instituting officer. Mesdames Crocker, Casey, LaValley, Tolman, McClunie, Beach, Veghte, Corbett, Sayles, O. Ganiard, J. Ganiard, A. P. Hammond also went down from Ashland to assist in the organization.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, July 1, 1892, page 3


    Soda water 5 cents a glass at C. W. Wolters'.
    The flour mill has closed until the fall trade.
    Maxcy handles all kinds of soda water at 5 cents a glass.
    Ladies call at New York Cheap Cash Store on the 4th of July and get a fan free of charge. Note the address, Cooper brick.
    The R.R.V.R.R. engine jumped the track one day last week by running into an open switch, but the train was delayed but a short time.
    A. A. Davis, who is building up an extensive milling business in the state of Washington, came home Saturday to remain for a while.
    The Weeks Bros. are putting in new furniture throughout the business college. The fall term of this school begins September 1. Special teachers for each department will be provided.
    Medford boasts of a lawn tennis club and croquet club, and the members thereof can of evenings be seen at the ground on the Adkins premises swinging the racquet and handling the mallet.
    We have the material here for a first-class band, as was demonstrated on the 4th. It would please a great many citizens if the boys were encouraged to give open-air concerts during the summer. If this should be done, in a short while Medford could boast of the best band in the valley.

    Gooseberries seem to thrive in this section far beyond the average. From the Weeks Bros.' ranch and from E. Russ' nursery samples of this fruit were sent us last week which averaged about three inches in circumference. They were of the Berkeley variety and were of delicious flavor.

    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company received a carload of pork and lard direct from Denver, Col., last week. It was sent in a refrigerator car, and arrived in excellent shape. The pork will be cured and smoked at the company's establishment.
    Each day, just as the sinking sun is kissing the hilltops far around, may be seen much of Medford's youth and beauty quietly and sweetly strolling among the friendly trees that shade the roadway leading from town toward Roxy Ann. There the young man and maiden fair, free from all earth's intrusion, can safely warble their tales of love until the shadows of night, sternly closing down, admonish them that it is high time to return to "home and mother." Who knows but that ere summer is gone the little sprigs of affection now budding there will grow into great trees of love, the existence of which will create a demand for marriage licenses and the minister.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 8, 1892, page 3


THE GLORIOUS FOURTH.
A Great Gathering and a Good Time in Medford.
    Bang! Bang!! Bang!! Boom! Pop!
    It was the nation's birthday and everything went.
    The Fourth of July in Medford was celebrated befittingly, and everybody seems happy over the result.
    The first thing on the program was salute firing, and that was done with credit as our numerous citizens will testify who were awakened in the early morning.
    The procession was made up in the early forenoon and made quite a showing. The Liberty car was a pretty sight as it wheeled along its bevy of winsome lasses. Miss Etta Medynski represented the Goddess of Liberty and Miss Fannie Haskins the Angel of Peace. The public school drum corps added to the pretty sight.
    After the procession the crowd retired to the grounds, and after listening to the band and the Glee Club, Prof. Jas. G. Clark rendered the beautiful "Sword of Bunker Hill." The reading of the Declaration of Independence followed by Robt. W. Galloway, and after more music W. W. Cardwell, Esq. rose to deliver the oration of the day. He did himself proud, and the congratulatory remarks on every hand proved that the oration was very much enjoyed.
    After dinner the meeting was again called to order by Judge Willard Crawford, who had been chosen president of the day in place of Judge Hanna.
    After listening to the band the president announced that the baby contest was in order. A silver cup was to be presented to the prettiest baby. Col. R. A. Miller, W. W. Cardwell and T. A. Harris were selected as judges, and the result of the contest was the presentation of the cup to the baby girl of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schmidtling, of Jacksonville.
    Next on the program were the races, and the gathering adjourned to the main street of the town.
    The hose race against time by Protection Hose No. 1 came off first, and the result was 150 yards in 55 seconds--15 seconds ahead of time. J. J. Watts, of Prospect, was the judge.
    Race No. 2 was the potato race and was won by Press Phipps; prize $1.
    The second hose race was a run of 100 yards in 14 seconds.
    The fat man's race was won by D. S. Youngs without effort.
    The egg and spoon race was awarded to Gilbert Anderson; prize $1.
    John Johnson scooped in the boys' race under 14 years of age.
    The bicycle race was a good exhibition and was won by Elmer Fawcett.
    At this juncture Mayor Whiteside announced that as the crowds were getting too numerous the balance of the races would be dispensed with.
    Several balloons were started off, and fireworks filled up the rest of the program until the illumination of Roxy Ann, which took place at 10 o'clock. The illumination was a good one, considering that a bright moon dispelled the darkness. Clarence Kellogg and Arthur Nicholson were the two selected to go to the top of Roxy Ann.
    The fireman's ball was well attended, and we learn that all enjoyed themselves.
    It was estimated that something over 3,000 people were in attendance at the celebration.
    The lady equestrians in the procession was a novel and pleasing feature.
    The band deserves credit for the good music and the numerous pieces rendered.
    The Glee Club also covered themselves with glory.

Southern Oregon Mail,
July 8, 1892, page 4



A Voice.
Editor Southern Oregon Mail:
    I wish to say a few things about the Fourth.
    I was especially pleased to hear a young man read the Declaration of Independence. He did it with credit to himself and the satisfaction of his hearers. The oration was excellent and ought to go into the papers.
    The music, a good selection, was well rendered by the band and glee club. Of course all were delighted who heard Prof. Clark sing.
    The fireworks as seen from Nob Hill were very fine.
    The fire on Mt. Roxy cast its light far and wide. Taking it all in all, I think the verdict is that the Fourth of July, 1892, in Medford was a pleasant day.
    I wish to make a suggestion to the committee on next year's program. Let there be six or more young ladies and gentlemen to read parts of the Declaration and a prize be given to the best reader. This plan will greatly increase the interest in this part of the exercises and also help to fix in many minds these immortal words.
    REV. E. RUSS.           
    Medford, Ore.
Southern Oregon Mail,
July 8, 1892, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Jacksonville was very well represented at the celebration here.
    J. A. Slover's soda fountain is well patronized this warm weather.
    Mrs. S. M. West and son Hiram are spending the summer months at Loyalton, Cal.
    Childers & Son last week began work on the new brick building of M. P. Phipps on C Street.
    Lyda D. Sackett and A. F. Davis last week each located homestead claims in the upper Meadows section.
    W. K. Davis has been overhauling the machinery in the Eagle Mills at Ashland during the last week.
    Miss Mary Wait, who was reported very ill at the residence of her father, Dr. J. B. Wait, last week, is improving.
    Davis & Pottenger have been doing a heavy poultry business lately, having shipped over 400 chickens in one day.
    The ice factory will be ready for business in a short time now, and our citizens will then have the opportunity of buying cheap ice.
    C. W. Skeel, the well-known architect and builder, and Wm. Ulrich, the insurance agent, were at the county seat during the week.
    B. F. Yount of Medford last week preceded his family to Davenport, Wash., to enter the employ of the A. A. Davis Milling Co. at that place.
    Rev. P. R. Burnett last week went to Turner, Or., to attend the Christian missionary convention. His term of pastorate at this place has expired.
    Geo. Coulter, the well-known knight of the brush, who has no superior as a carriage painter, is kept busy at his shop in the eastern portion of town.
    J. A. Faris's handsome residence in the western portion of the city is completed. Walter Scott, the clever painter, gave the building the finishing touches.
    Dr. Geary of this place was doing some professional work for Squire Parker of Klamath County during the week, the latter's eyes having given him considerable trouble of late.
    Hubbard Bros. have now concentrated their agricultural machinery at this place, and have a full stock on hand of all the lines handled by the Northwest Implement Co., of which they are the authorized agents.
    Those who are qualified to judge say that by far the largest crowd that assembled in southern Oregon to celebrate the national holiday was in Medford on the 4th. A most excellent programme of literary exercises was observed, and the participants are highly complimented. The parade was a handsome one, attracting much attention. The sports were numerous and afforded much amusement. Last, but not least, was the party given by Protection Hose Co. No. 1 at the opera house, which was well attended and proved a very pleasant affair. Our citizens left nothing undone to please all who came to Medford, and that they succeeded admirably, everybody must admit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1892, page 2


    M. Purdin to Lizzie Purdin, lt 12, blk 15, Medford. $1.
    M. J. Crewe to Joel Ward, lts 3 & 4, blk 15, Medford. $400.
    A. G. Johnston to Joel Ward, lt 4, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford. $1500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1892, page 2



    The R.R.V.R.R. was kept busy carrying passengers on the 4th, making a number of extra trips during the day.
    Hugh Taylor last week returned to Philadelphia after a brief visit with his sister, Mrs. John Taylor of the upper valley, and her family, his son remaining for a several months' visit in southern Oregon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1892, page 3


    Miss Ida Naylor is paying friends in Jacksonville a visit. She is becoming proficient in typography.
    Dr. James Braden of Gold Hill last week went east, to attend to business interests at his old home in Indianapolis.
    Gus. Newbury returned from Portland last week. He delivered the oration at Eagle Point on the 4th, which is highly spoken of by those who listened to it.
    J. W. Graham, superintendent of the R.R.V.R.R., is also acting as conductor, John Dyar having resigned that position in order to accept another on the S.P.
    Dr. Everett Mingus has located in Portland for the practice of his profession and has rooms in the Marquam edifice. He has excellent prospects for building up a lucrative practice.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1892, page 3


    Demorest Bros., dentists. Nitrous oxide gas administered for painless extraction of teeth.
    There is probably more building going on in Medford than in any other town in Southern Oregon.
    We have been informed that Bert Whitman is a good fisherman, so long as the ladies keep their distance. Ask Bert about the rest.
    Sam Murray is at Salem and may go into the butchering business at that place.
    The penalty for shooting the Chinese pheasants will be enforced to the fullest extent by the Medford Gun Club. As the law soon expires in the Willamette Valley, an extension will be secured for this part of Oregon.
    Note G. W. Priddy's brickyard adv. on the first page, and give him a call when you want brick.
    J. W. Marksbury returned from Omaha Wednesday. We caught a glimpse of him going by on the train.
    Dr. E. T. Ketcham, the dentist lately located at this place, left for his home in California Thursday on an extended visit.
    While the flour mill is closed it is being completely rehauled and cleaned. A wagon scales is being put in, and everything will be in shipshape order about the 1st of August, when it is expected the fall run will begin.
    Postmaster Howard returned this week from his extended trip in the East. He was accompanied by a regulation grandpa hat and seems wonderfully proud of it. He visited the principal places in the East and reports an interesting and pleasant trip.
    Quite an exciting and disastrous runaway occurred in the streets of town Wednesday. The team of Wm. Garrett took a notion to skip, and they made for the bridge over Bear Creek, but instead of going over the bridge they switched off and went through the creek, leaving the wagon upturned against a stump in the middle of the stream. The horses were caught a short distance out. The harness was somewhat damaged and the wagon a little the worse for the accident.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 15, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Ora Adkins is at home again, after her visit at Olympia, Wash.
    Dr. Geary was at Grants Pass last week installing the officers of the lodge of K. of P. at that place.
    The Misses Theiss and Della Pickel last week returned from their tour to Portland and San Francisco.
    Medford now has thoroughly organized lawn tennis and croquet clubs, ready for the summer campaign.
    Mrs. M. Purdin entertained her mother, Mrs. J. L. Worlow of the Antelope section, for several days recently.
    F. M. Mingus came up from the seat of the wire-fence war in the Willamette to spend a few days at home.
    G. W. Priddy and wife have the sympathy of their many friends in the sad loss they sustained by the death of their infant daughter one day recently.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel had the pleasure of meeting an old-time friend on the overland train one day recently, in the person of J. C. Barnard of Rockwood, Tenn.
    Mesdames Hutchinson [sic], Enyart and Skeel made a trip last week to Rogue River, in the vicinity of Leeds post office, where the daughter of the last-named lady is teaching school.
    The new business college furniture is being supplied by Weeks Bros.' factory, and the school will be in readiness for the next term, which commences at the beginning of September.
    Miss Jessie Worman last week returned from Eugene for her summer vacation, and was warmly welcomed by her many friends. She has been a student at the University of Oregon for some time past.
    The following officers were elected for the ensuing year by the Woman's Relief Corps, organized by Mrs. J. M. McCall and other Ashland ladies last week at this place: Mrs. Isaac Woolf, President; Mrs. M. S. Damon, S.V.; Mrs. J. H. Whitman, J.V.; Miss Minnie Weaver, Sec.; Mrs. W. K. Davis, Treas.; Mrs. E. [illegible--Sproul?], Chap.; Miss Ida Redden, Con.; Miss Sarah Amann, Asst. Con.; Mrs. Etta Earhart, Guard; Mrs. Minnie Phipps, Asst. Guard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 2


    E. T. Bartlett, formerly of this county, has located a promising quartz ledge in Cottonwood district, Cal.
    The Medford Mail says S. Childers has begun suit against M. P. Phipps for $2000 damages, the case to come off at the September term of the circuit court. The complaint is that while Childers was in bad health and not able to defend himself he was pounced upon and beaten by Phipps, who is a large and powerful man.
    We neglected to mention in the last issue of the Times that Roxy Ann, the hill situated east of Medford, was illuminated on the evening of the 4th of July by a committee appointed by those having in charge the celebration at the town above mentioned. A large amount of red fire was used, and the effect was pleasing to the large number of people whose eyes were turned Roxy Ann-ward.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 3


    We are glad to notice that J. H. Whitman of Medford, the well-known abstracter, is able to resume his duties again.
    Mrs. T. G. Reames left for Yaquina Bay on Tuesday evening, accompanied by her son Evan. They will be gone a few weeks.
    Mr. Rogers and wife of Quincy, Ill. are paying Dr. DeBar and family a visit. They leave for Alaska in a few days, and will be accompanied by Misses Lizzie Graves and Carrie Beekman. We wish them a pleasant trip and safe return.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 3


    Peaches from Whitman's orchard near Medford were sold in Jacksonville during the week.
    W. I. Vawter of Medford, D.D.G.M., will install the officers of Jacksonville Lodge No. 10, I.O.O.F., tomorrow (Saturday) evening.
    Mrs. M. A. Williams of Medford precinct has been confined to her bed by inflammatory rheumatism for some time past, and is still in a helpless condition.
    Will. Merriman, who is now employed at the railroad office at Albany, has been making his relatives and Jacksonville friends a visit, returning home last week.
    A painful accident last week befell Gus. Woody, living east of Medford, a fractious horse striking him in the face and smashing his cheekbones quite seriously. Dr. Jones will save him from being disfigured.
    S. Smith of eastern Oregon, son of the late Henry Smith, returned home last week. He was in this section on business connected with the settlement of his father's estate, and will come back to southern Oregon for the purpose of residing.
    Mrs. Minnie Phipps has commenced a suit against I. J. Phipps and wife of Medford for alienating the affections of her husband and for slandering her character, asking for damages in a sum exceeding $20,000. Judge Webster and Francis Fitch are her attorneys, while Hon. W. M. Colvig has been retained by the defense.
    "The Little World" was exhibited at Medford last week and received considerable patronage. It is quite clever.
    Your correspondent neglected to state in his last issue that Miss Ettie Medynski and Fannie Haskins admiringly represented the goddess of liberty and angel of peace at the Medford celebration. Judge Crawford acted as president of the day, Robt. Galloway as reader, Rev. Thompson as chaplain, W. W. Cardwell as orator, D. T. Lawton as grand marshal, and L. G. Porter as standard-bearer. All acquitted themselves creditably.
    The Medford Mining Company, capitalized at $1,600 [sic], has been incorporated by Fred and Peter Barneburg, G. B. Addington, Geo. Merriman and I. L. Hamilton, with its principal office at Medford. Geo. Merriman is president, I. L. Hamilton secretary, P. Barneburg treasurer, W. H. Legate manager. John Barneburg and C. W. Palm are also interested. Their mining property is over the line in Siskiyou County, Cal. and prospects very well. We saw some of the gold taken out recently, which was coarse and of excellent quality.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1892, page 3


    This week has seen considerable of Max Muller lumber being hauled through town to Jacksonville from his mill southeast of town.
    J. R. Hardin is running the Palace barber shop during the absence of W. L. Townsend, who has gone to the mountains with his family.
    W. Green has established a tailor shop in Medford in the old Faris Hotel. [His ad on page 2 locates the hotel at "7th and C streets."] He has a good display of goods and no doubt will receive his share of patronage.
    The exodus of Medford citizens to the coast and the mountains these days is especially noticeable among the business houses. Business is at a standstill.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins and family, Dr. E. B. Pickel and wife, Mrs. J. E. Enyart and Mrs. George Davis left for Dead Indian Springs Tuesday to be gone several weeks.
    Grandpa's hat is a common sight about the streets of Medford these days. Postmaster Howard seems to have set the fashion, and it is taking like wildfire.
    The O.K. Barber Shop, of which J. E. Shearer is chief tonsorial artist, is furnished with elegant and easy chairs, and the razors are always in good order. Go thou there and have thy face shorn of its prickly points. Next to Grand Central Hotel, Front St.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson is becoming a very expert bicyclist.
    Two new tailor shops established in Medford this week. Pretty good record, this.
    Bishop Morris and Charles Strang were down to Rogue River Monday on a fishing jaunt, but as the finny tribe are not biting much nowadays they were not successful in landing but a very few. The bishop has the reputation of being an expert angler, while Charley is considered the biggest crank on fishing in town.
    A big damage suit has been instituted against I. J. Phipps, a wealthy citizen of this city, by Mrs. Minnie Phipps for alienating the affections of her husband, etc. Francis Fitch and L. R. Webster brought the suit for Mrs. Phipps, while W. M. Colvig will contest the case for the defendant.

    Several hundred feet of sidewalk will be put in at the school house grounds, which will add much to the comfort and convenience of the pupils and the people living in the western part of the city. Now if the grounds were only enclosed with a suitable fence they could be improved and beautified by planting flowers, trees. etc.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 22, 1892, page 3


A Slim Robbery.
    The R.R.V.R.R. depot at this place was entered and robbed of a number of fare tickets last Tuesday night. It is evident that the burglar or burglars expected to secure some cash from the till, but in this they were disappointed and no doubt took the tickets just to take something, as they are of no possible value. Marshal Youngs says it is evident the entrance was affected through the door by a key that fit the lock, although the intention was without a doubt to make it appear for some reason the back window was used. After getting inside and finding nothing the back window was raised, the hose put in and the water turned on and left running over the desk and floor. No clue to the prowlers.
Southern Oregon Mail, July 22, 1892, page 3


A Sad Case.
    Charles Brous is lying at his residence suffering terribly but patiently with that dread disease, dropsy. All that medical skill can do is being done for him, but tender care and watchful nursing is ever present, but withal his chances for long life are not of the best. He has been at the Cinnabar Springs for some time, but lately it was thought best to have him here under the immediate care of the doctors, so some time since four of our citizens, D. H. Miller, J. S. Miller, John Redfield and George Boyd took it upon themselves to escort him safely home. Their terrible experience none but themselves will ever know. They were four days going forty-five miles, and time and again the suffering patient begged of them to leave him by the wayside to die. A hack was used as a conveyance, and as the trail most of the way led over boulderous mountains steep and treacherous, where a horse could hardly pick his way, some of the hardships can be imagined. The route taken led to the railroad at Yreka, Cal., which was finally reached, all more dead than alive. Great endurance indeed was shown by the patient and those who had him in charge.
Southern Oregon Mail, July 22, 1892, page 3


    M. Purdin to Lizzie Purdin, lt 12, blk 15, Medford. $1.
    A. Alford to T. F. West, lts 1 and 2, blk 6, Medford. $150.
    A. D. Helms to J. D. Colleen, lt 10, blk 73, Medford. $25.
    J. D. Colleen to C. W. Skeel, same property. $50.
    A. Alford to T. F. West, lts 1 and 2, blk 6, Medford. $150.
    C. W. Skeel to Anna L. Smith, lt 10, blk 73, Medford. $165.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 2


    D. W. Alberry has resigned his position as section boss of the R.R.V.R.R. and went north this week. His family will follow soon.
    The Medford office of the R.R.V.R. Co. was burglarized last Tuesday night, but nothing of value has been missed. The miscreant turned on the water before leaving, but no damage was done.
    The World's Fair Club of Jacksonville, which is composed solely of ladies, have perfected arrangements with Mrs. R. Nichols to paint the much-talked-of picture of Table Rock. It will be a handsome one and will no doubt attract much attention at Chicago.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Ralph Ridenour, who has been acting as engineer for the R.R.V.R. Co., will resign on the first of the month and go north.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols last week returned to Jacksonville from Grants Pass, where she has been engaged in sketching, but did not remain here long. Yesterday she left for San Francisco, where she will finish her paintings of Table Rock and the Josephine County caves.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. Eaton has returned from Medford, where she has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. G. S. Howard.
    A new house and barn at the Chavner place is under process of construction by E. W. Starr of Medford.
    D. P. Barnes of Sams Valley, who has been in bad health for some time past, has been at Medford under treatment for the past week.
    A. D. Naylor, who is in charge of Max Muller's sawmill a few miles east of Medford, had his thumb taken off by the machinery a few days ago.
    Geo. W. Priddy of the Medford brickyards has a large quantity of fine brick on hand, which he is selling at the most reasonable figures. Anybody needing any of this building material should give him a call.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce, while on his way to Cinnabar last Wednesday morning, fell to the ground from the wagon on which he was riding with such force as to break an arm. Dr. DeBar was summoned and set the broken limb, bringing his patient back with him.
"Accidents," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Minnie Dennis is at present sojourning at the Ashland House.
    Clarence Kellogg has gone to San Francisco, to the regret of his many friends here and at Jacksonville.
    The grandmother of S. L. Bennett of this precinct died in Iowa not long since. She is said to have been 110 years old.
    Frank Davis and family have returned from Meadows precinct, where some of them have located on government land.
    J. A. Whitman has shipped quite a quantity of early peaches already, and will handle his share of the fruit of the valley this year.
    Dr. Pryce, who has been in Klamath County for some time, returned last week. His health was not improved much while there, as the weather was cold most of the time.
    We are sorry to learn that the health of the daughter of W. V. Lippincott is so poorly that her mother has decided to take her to the vicinity of Dunsmuir to spend the summer.
    Those needing brick should not fail to call on G. W. Priddy, who recently finished burning a fine, large kiln of them. George is also a first-class mason and never fails to give satisfaction.
    W. I. Vawter of the Jackson County Bank, who is the new D.D.G.M., has been installing the newly elected officers of the different Odd Fellows' lodges in Jackson and Josephine counties.
    B. P. Theiss of the distillery is home again, after an extended trip north and south in the interest of his firm, who are rapidly securing a goodly share of the trade of the coast in their line.
    Medford does not claim to have anything like a building boom on hand, but still the fact remains that there is more substantial improvements going on here than at any other point in southern Oregon.
    Chas. Brous, who has been at Cinnabar for the benefit of his health, was brought to town one day this week. It took several days to make the trip, owing to the roughness of the roads and Mr. B.'s critical condition. He has been suffering for nearly two years with heart trouble and dropsy.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1892, page 3


    Articles of incorporation were filed as follows yesterday in the office of the secretary of state: The Great Oregon Gold Mining Co., of Medford, incorporated with a capital stock of $250,000 by S. P. Conger, Lee W. Smith and D. M. Conger. . . .

"Incorporations,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, July 27, 1892, page 3


    A. J. Fredenburg's fine brick residence is nearing completion.
    Hurrah for straw hats. All sizes and styles below cost at Angle & Plymale's.
    The Ashland tailor who recently put in a shop here has pulled in his horns and departed hence.
    The A. A. Davis mill property has been improved largely inside and outside.
    W. P. Dodge has received his new tools and is boring wells again in full blast. He lost considerable time, but will make up for it.
    G. W. Mathes and Jeff Brophy will soon open up a butcher shop in Medford. Mr. Mathes has moved his family here from near Phoenix.
    W. Green, the new merchant tailor of Medford, has just received the largest stock of goods ever brought to the Rogue River Valley, and as he is here to stay and build up a trade, he will make suits to order for $24 and up, and pants for six dollars and up. Step in and see his display. Fit guaranteed. All kinds of cleaning and repairing done. Old Faris Hotel building.
    L. G. Porter is building a residence for himself on his 5-acre lot.   
    The city council has under advisement a proposition from Willamette capitalists to light Medford with electricity. The parties were here this week looking over the ground, and left their proposition.
    Was it a dream or did it really come to pass that one of the most estimable young ladies of Medford had a narrow escape from drowning not more than a hundred years ago or more than a million miles from here while bathing in a babbling brooklet?
    Brophy & Mathes, the new butcher firm of Medford, expect to be ready for business about the first of next week. The shop will be temporarily located in the building where the city meat market used to be, but will be moved to the brick on C Street back of Slover's Drug Store as soon as it is ready for occupancy. Watch for their adv. next week.
    Dr. and Mrs. Pickel returned from the mountains Tuesday, leaving the rest of the campers still enjoying life in the woods. The doctor is the proud possessor of a wildcat skin, the result of his unerring aim with the rifle. He shot the animal just before starting home.
    Miss Elva Galloway has resigned her position in the Medford public schools and accepted one in the Ashland schools at a much larger salary. It is a notable fact that the teachers of this city are paid less wages than any town in Southern Oregon. If the district expects to keep up a good school it will have to pay better wages.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, July 29, 1892, page 3


To Be or Not To Be.
    Is it for the best? That is the question which the city council has wrestled with for the last few days and which will be settled definitely at the regular meeting next Monday evening. Shall the city be lighted with electricity? Parties have been here this week and proposed to the city council to put in a $12,000 electric plant and furnish the city ten arc lights for $1,200 per year for so many years. The council are muchly tempted to accept the offer, the particulars of which of course we have not extended into. The property owners and taxpayers are of course to be consulted, they having the more interest at stake. But as the charter limit for city taxes--10 mills--has been reached, this added expense will not raise taxes and therefore will not be noticed, the only difference is this added expense will delay the payment of the city's indebtedness just so much longer and of course taxes will remain as they are at present until the town is out of debt.
    However, as Medford claims to be the hub of the valley is it not time she was taking on somewhat more of a metropolitan air? There is no denying that improvements are at all times beneficial, and especially at this dull season of the year. It would without a doubt be a great feather in the city's cap if she could out inform the world that improvements within her limits are the order of the day even in the dullest season. Streets well lighted take on an attractive air and while serving as a good drawing card for capital, they enhance the value of property. Is it for the best?
Southern Oregon Mail, July 29, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. F. Johnson last week departed for a new location in Montana.
    Fred Faris is holding down a nice mercantile position at Fresno.
    Rev. Eneas McLean of Coos County visited friends at this place during the past week.
    Robert Burnett left last week for Portland, for a permanent location at the metropolis.
    Wm. F. Crain is assisting Ed. Worman in the livery business, and gives general satisfaction.
    Medford has had two new tailor shops added to our list of business houses since the last issue.
    Joe Hockersmith will open in the pork packing business on his own account during the coming fall.
    Jesse Walker has purchased the livery stable of his father, E. F. Walker, and will conduct the business hereafter.
    During the absence of W. L. Townsend, who is out in the mountains with his family, J. R. Hardin is running his barber shop.
    Lou Bender will soon be able to be about on crutches. He had a spell of pleurisy last week, which complicated the case somewhat.
    Miss Jennie Jackson, the clever agent for the R.R.V.R. at Jacksonville, has made our town several short visits during the week.
    Some of the enterprising citizens of this place are talking of enclosing a parcel of land for baseball grounds, which would be a good idea.
    Chas. Brous is lying very low with dropsy at his residence in this place. The fact that he survived the hardships of the trip from the Cinnabar Springs is marvelous.
    Miss Eva Galloway, one of the most popular and efficient teachers in southern Oregon, has accepted a position in the Ashland public schools, which she will no doubt fill creditably.
    The Medford gun club would respectfully respect sportsmen to abstain from shooting the young Chinese pheasants which were recently imported into the valley until the birds get fairly established and begin to multiply.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins and family, Dr. E. B. Pickel and wife, accompanied by Mrs. J. E. Enyart and Mrs. George Davis, constitute one of the numerous parties who are taking their summer vacation at Dead Indian Springs.
    The fall term of the Medford Business College will open on Monday, Sept. 5th. Although it has done a good business in the past it will doubtless do better in the future. Prof. Rigby is leaving nothing undone to give satisfaction in every way.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 2


    Volna Webster to Maggie F. Noble, part of lots 9 & 10, in blk 8, Park addition to Medford. $200.
    D. J. Lumsden et al. to Mrs. D. G. Ross, lot 7, blk 3, Lumsden's add. to Medford. $20.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 2


    The hegira to the mountains continues.
    W. G. Kenney is engaged in hauling a great quantity of lumber to this place for Max Muller, from the latter's sawmill on Jos. Crain's place east of Medford.
    A large amount of early Alexander peaches have been shipped during the month from Ashland and other points in the valley. While not a strictly first-class peach, the early Alexander is one of the varieties that usually prove very profitable.
    An item is going the rounds of the southern Oregon press, announcing that Judge Webster and Francis Fitch have formed a partnership for the practice of the law. This is an error. The first-named gentleman has opened an office in Jacksonville; but Mr. Fitch has not fully decided to relocate in this section, we are informed.
    A baseball tournament is talked of at Roseburg, open to the clubs of all the counties of southern Oregon, but as the boys are posted as to the two new players who have signed with Roseburg "for the season," two professionals from the metropolis, it is hardly likely that the boys of the headquarters of statecraft, Jacksonville, will bite at the tempting bait. The boys here may be somewhat fishy, but they're not "suckers."
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


    Miss Rose Buckley of Uniontown precinct has been acting as operator for the Postal Telegraph Company at Medford, during the temporary absence of Miss Gibson.
    Mrs. W. H. Parker of this precinct is being visited by two of her sisters, Mrs. McCord and Mrs. McKinley, who reside at Colfax, Wash., and whom she has not seen for many years. Mrs. McCord is accompanied by her daughters.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


    G. W. Crystal of Medford is furnishing the market with excellent vegetables.
    About 60 people are now camping in the vicinity of Dead Indian Springs.
    Election hats--both Cleveland and Harrison chapeaus--for sale at the S.F. Variety Store.
    Senator Cameron has sold 125 acres of land in Uniontown precinct to his brother, Zach Cameron, who was in town last week.
    Wm. Puhl has charge of the barber shop formerly conducted by C. B. Rostel, who will probably locate at Yreka, Cal., where he is at present.
    The towns of the valley are almost deserted, the springs in every part of the foothills being thronged with those who desire to escape the heated term in the lower regions.
    O. T. Brown and family of Klamath County will soon remove to this valley, to take possession of the fine farm they last week purchased of Charles Kingsbury in the upper valley.
    W. H. Parker, Esq., who is a farmer as well as an attorney, has had his threshing done already. The yield is an exceptionally good one for this year, some of his land turning off 40 bushels of wheat to the acre.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


Accident.
    R. L. Dusenberry, who acts as head sawyer at Klippel's mill on Galls Creek, had a leg broken a few days since. He was riding on the running gears of a wagon, and ran against a stump with such force as to break the limb. Dr. Geary of Medford was summoned and reduced the fracture.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


Base Ball Game at Grants Pass.
    The match game of baseball played last Friday at Grants Pass between the club of that place and nine Jacksonville and Medford players proved as bitter [as] it was unsatisfactory. Both sides claim the victory, although the umpire decided in favor of the players from abroad, because the home club refused to go to bat after the 8th inning. For the biggest part of the game the Grants Pass boys had a comfortable lead and all went well, but when their opponents tied the score--17 to 17--on the 8th inning, the umpire and everything else was all wrong. From an unprejudiced standpoint, it seems as if the Grants Pass players did wrong in not finishing the game, for they had accepted the decisions of the umpire too long to admit of a protest at the 11th hour. It is conceded by many that the Jacksonville-Medford club would have no trouble in defeating the representatives of Josephine County with practice, for the most of them are more than average players. The Times hopes that those clubs will meet soon again and decide who are the champions of southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1892, page 3


Medford Business College.
    The fall term of the Medford Business College will open Monday, September 5. All who anticipate attending the fall term are urged to be present at the opening. We are expecting a large number of students at that time, and if those who attend will write two or three weeks previous to coming, it will give us time to make preparations for them.
    Our college rooms are being newly and neatly furnished. The instructions are thorough, and every effort is being made to bring our home school to the highest standard and make it second to none as an educational resort.
    The departments now in operation are: Commercial or business department, Telegraphy, Shorthand, Typewriting, Penmanship, English and Normal departments. Any subject not named in the above with which the student wishes to become familiar will be taken up and thoroughly discussed.
    And we will say to all who are planning to attend this winter, do not leave the state, but visit your home school, talk with its former students and patrons, and then spend this winter where you are satisfied you can get the most for your time and money.
    Write to MEDFORD BUSINESS COLLEGE for further information, Medford, Or.
Ashland Tidings, July 29, 1892, page 3


    L. G. Porter is building a residence on his 5-acre lot in Medford.

    The fine brick residence of A. J. Fredenburg, at Medford, is almost completed.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, August 4, 1892, page 1


    J. F. Johnson, formerly a bartender at Medford, was married in Douglas County July 22nd at the residence of Ben Wiseman to Mrs. Mary C. Kennedy.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, August 4, 1892, page 3


The Editor Has Skipped.
    Mr. and Mrs. F. G. Kertson left Tuesday evening for Portland. Mr. Kertson goes as a delegate to a meeting of the central committee of the People's Party of the state of Oregon, and will be absent a couple of weeks. Mrs. Kertson will visit relatives and friends in Salem and Portland, and spend a month or so in Polk County, her old home. So, gentle reader, if this great family newspaper is not up to its usual standard in local news, as well as heavy and convincing editorials, and you are satisfied beyond a doubt that the editor pro tem. is the biggest chump that ever lived, you will please go to the devil.
Southern Oregon Mail, August 5, 1892, page 2


    We give a cash discount of 5 percent on all purchases, Angle & Plymale.
    Call and see the new 5 and 10 cent counters at the Racket.
    Mrs. M. R. Hart and Mrs. M. E. Rigby now occupy the M. S. Damon dwelling on C Street.
    A. J. Meeker, one of the best shingle makers in the world, brought down a big load of his goods this week.
    A. H. Hooker and family arrived from Heppner, Morrow County, last week, and expect to make this valley their home. They are old friends of the Halleys.
    The ice factory expects to put out its first lot of frozen water this week.
    W. E. S. Eddy has corked up the city restaurant and will go back to Ashland.
    J. W. Short was appointed councilman at the last meeting of the board, vice E. J. Montague resigned.
    Tom Morine is out of the saloon business, having disposed of the same to T. M. Howard and W. H. Hosler, who will continue the business at the old stand on Front Street.
    Bishop Morris was on Wednesday evening's train for Portland from his trip to Klamath County. He reports having had a most enjoyable time and the fishing exceedingly good.
    Brophy & Mathes opened up their new meat market yesterday morning! Mr. Brophy is an expert man at the block, having had several years experience. See their new ad elsewhere in this paper.
    It is reported that giant powder is being used to kill fish in Rogue River. This is in violation of the law, and parties practicing it should desist at once, or they may find themselves in the clutches of an officer.
    Miss H. A. Harris, who has been visiting the family of Hon. J. H. Stewart for the past two months, left on Wednesday evening's train for her home in Denver, Col., where she has a position in the public schools of that city.
    G. W. Bashford returned from Portland Wednesday morning, where he went to buy a thresher for himself, James Wilson, J. P. True and Asa Fordyce. The machine arrived on the freight on the same day and will soon be at work.
    The business college of Medford closed last Wednesday for one month's vacation, and will open again September 4, 1892, with flattering prospects. About sixty students will attend the coming term, and as a corps of competent teachers have been engaged, there is nothing to hinder this institution becoming first class in every respect.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 5, 1892, page 3


    Fred Luy, Jr., who is now proprietor of a barber shop in Tacoma, Wash., paid his former home in Jacksonville a visit. We are pleased to learn that he is doing well.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 2


    Wm. Edwards et al. to I. J. Phipps, quitclaim to tract near Medford. $1.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 2


    E. Sanderson Smith of this place last Monday departed for his Steamboat mines, to be absent some time.
    Dr. J. M. Taylor last week returned from the San Francisco trip which he took for the express purpose of buying machinery for his Grave Creek placer mines.
    Miss Frankie Barnes returned from her temporary home at Idaho to attend upon her father, D. P. Barnes of Sams Valley, who has been very ill at Medford during the last two weeks.
    Misses Elva Galloway of Medford and Bertha Colton of the granite city have been chosen to fill the vacancies in the different departments of the Ashland schools, caused by the failure of two of the eastern teachers who received appointments early in the season to accept.
    Prof. M. E. Rigby was in Jacksonville Thursday in the interest of his college at Medford. He is making all preparations for the coming term, which opens Monday, Sept. 5th. Teachers have been engaged for every department, and every effort is being made to make the school second to none on the coast.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 3


A Bigamist Levants.
    Medford, Or., July 31.--Henry Robinson, who recently arrived here from Iowa with a woman he represented to be his wife, was arrested near here Saturday on a warrant charging him with polygamy. The warrant was issued out of Justice Walton's court, and the prisoner is held to answer before the next grand jury, with bail fixed at $300. Robinson's first wife resides here. District Attorney H. L. Benson represented the state while S. S. Pentz appeared for the prisoner. He has since made his escape from the town jail.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1892, page 3


    Medford, Oregon, July 31.--Henry Robinson, who recently arrived here from Iowa with a woman whom he represents to be his wife, was arrested near here Saturday on a warrant charging him with polygamy. The warrant was issued out of Justice Walton's court, and the prisoner is held to answer before the next grand jury, with bail fixed at $300. Robinson's first wife resides here. District Attorney H. L. Benson represented the state, while S. S. Pentz appeared for the prisoner.

Ashland Tidings, August 5, 1892, page 3


Laconic Wiring.
Grants Pass Courier.]
    Dist. Attorney Benson was summoned to Medford Friday to represent the state in a case against one Henry Robinson for polygamy or bigamy. The evidence was considered sufficient to bind the defendant over to the grand jury, but he kicked a hole through the jail that night and escaped. The constable up there telegraphed Mr. Benson, "Prisoner escaped; what shall I do?" The answer was sent back, "Catch him."
Valley Record, Ashland, August 11, 1892, page 1


    Medford Lodge 103, A.F.&A.M., was instituted at Medford Friday evening by Gen. T. G. Reames. A banquet was given by Cooper of the Clarendon Hotel, at which 80 Masons from neighboring towns sat down to [sic].
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, August 11, 1892, page 3


    The Willamette capitalists have withdrawn the proposition to light Medford with electricity for $1200 per annum.
    Medford is very modestly forging to the front as the principal town of our famous Rogue River Valley. More building is going on here than in any other town in Southern Oregon. Our businessmen enjoy the best trade. Better bargains can be had here with our merchants than can be secured elsewhere. If you are skeptical come to town and investigate for yourself.
    It would not be very surprising if the town would be without water for irrigating and fire purposes in a month or so more. Bear Creek is drying up fast. Had the town spent the money in digging wells at the water tank that it paid out for having the ditch dug, we no doubt would now have a good supply of water for all purposes.
Editorials, Southern Oregon Mail, August 12, 1892, page 2


Business Change.
    The old and reliable firm of Adkins & Webb, who started into the hardware business about the time Medford was founded, sold out their big stock of goods to W. H. Simmons and F. B. Cathcart, of Sacramento. The new firm expect to take charge about the first of next month, and are bound to do well as the house enjoys a big trade.
Southern Oregon Mail, August 12, 1892, page 2


    Sam Murray has returned home from his northern trip.
    Francis Fitch is having a room fitted up in Hamlin's brick for an office.
    The new sidewalks are being put down at the school house grounds by A. M. Woodford.
    Welborn Beeson is supplying C. W. Wolters, the popular grocer, with fine apples of the Red June and Astrakhan varieties.
    F. B. Cathcart took Monday morning's train for Sacramento. He will return in a few days bringing with him his family and household effects. W. H. Simmons' family will come along with them.
    The flouring mill was shut down this week on account of the crank pin of the engine getting out of repair, which necessitated it being sent to Portland.
    Wm. C. Boutelle, a United States postal inspector, paid Postmaster Howard an official visit Saturday. Of course he found everything in apple pie order. It was also found on investigation that J.S.'s Harrison plug was the only genuine bell-shaped grandpa hat in town.
    Tom Morine happened to look under the sidewalk near the R.R.V.R.R. depot one day this week, and found the tickets stolen from the little depot some time ago. It is very likely that it was getting pretty hot for the guilty party, and he thought it best to return the property.
    The saloon men and business houses were notified last Saturday by a committee to keep their places of business closed on Sunday or the Sunday law would be enforced. No attention was paid to the threat. District Attorney Benson has been notified but hasn't showed up yet, so nothing has been done. But evidently there will be music in the air.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 12, 1892, page 3


    Madison Rodgers to C. W. Skeel, quitclaim to lot 10, blk 24, Medford. $1.
    Frank Green to Geo. H. Haskins, lot 2, blk 5, Beatty's add. to Medford. $75.
    G. H. Baker et al. to Frank Green, same as last above. $125.
    Bertha S. Barnum to C. W. Skeel, lot in Medford, etc. $4000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The ice factory is in running order and ready to fill orders.
    Miss Dora Buchanan has closed her school in Meadows district.
    The family of Wm. Ulrich are paying relatives on Williams Creek their annual visit.
    Francis Fitch has again become a resident of Medford and will practice his profession.
    Mrs. O. F. Demorest of this place has been visiting her parents at Dallas, in Polk County.
    Geo. Sly and family last week returned from the north, to make Medford their future home.
    Geo. Anderson has been supplying the Medford market with fine salmon from Rogue River.
    Little Jimmy Howard, while exercising on a trapeze a few days since, fell and broke an arm near the elbow.
    T. M. Howard and W. H. Hosler have bought Tom Morine's saloon business and will conduct a first-class place.
    Davis' mill has everything in readiness for the coming season, and will start up on new wheat in a very few days.
    M. L. Alford of Ashland is looking after Charley Wolters' interests during the latter's chase after health and pleasure.
    A. A. Davis is engaged in building a new addition to his residence. B. F. Crouch is doing the work, which is first-class.
    Miss Edith Crouch recently closed a successful term of school in Klamath County and is visiting her relatives at Medford.
    B. P. Theiss has returned from his trip to California in the interest of the distillery and reports success in working up the trade.
    Among improvements in the western part of town may be mentioned the neat residence of J. R. Wilson, near Prof. Narregan's place.
    G. W. Mathes has removed his family from near Phoenix, in order to embark in the butchering business at this place with Jeff. Brophy.
    We are informed that Adkins & Webb have sold their hardware business to two gentlemen from Sacramento, Cal., who will take possession on Sept. 1st.
    Little Edna Hanley is somewhat better than last week. Dr. Parson of Ashland was last week called to consult with Dr. E. P. Geary in relation to the case.
    C. W. Skeel was in Jacksonville on Tuesday. The planing mill and factory he is conducting here with his son is doing a lively business and turning out good work.
    Misses Lou Gibson and Hallie Hoyt of this place are away on a visit. Miss Buckley of Uniontown is supplying Miss Gibson's place in the telegraph office during her temporary absence.
    The business college will reopen for the next term on the 5th of September, with an assured attendance of about 60. The institution is now on a firm basis, and will reflect great credit on our town.
    Wm. L. Halley of this place will soon begin a suit against the S.P. Company for damages resulting from injuries sustained at the time of the Lake Labish disaster, from which he has never fully recovered. The company offered him $100 in settlement at the time, but it was respectfully declined. E. J. Emmons of Sisson, Cal. will conduct his side of the case.
    The proposition of the Willamette company to light the city with electric lights has lately been extensively discussed by our people. It cannot be many years until the waters of Butte Creek will be utilized for lighting the towns of the lower valley in one general circuit, since the recent important discoveries in the matter of the transmission of electrical power.
    A prouder man we never saw than Judge Crawford, whom we met one day last week with a large, magnificently framed oil painting, which he was carrying with the utmost care. Upon inspection we found it to be a representation of "The Three Teton Mountains," which are situated near the eastern line of Idaho and south of the Yellowstone Park. When interrogated, the Judge informed us that the artist was his niece, Miss Blanche Crawford, of Soda Springs, Idaho, now in her 15th year. For one so young the painting is simply wonderful. The Judge has it finely mounted and hung at his home. We hope the young artist will reach the top round of the ladder of artistic skill, and congratulate the Judge on having so skillful a niece.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2


    Ralph Ridenour still officiates as engineer of the R.R.V.R.R., having been induced to remain.
    Jas. D. Fay and family have become permanent residents of Jacksonville and are occupying H. J. Booker's dwelling-house on Oregon Street.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson last Sunday preached his farewell sermon to his congregation at this place, and will probably be assigned to the evangelical field for the future, his efforts in that line having been crowned with much success in the past. He and his brother have made many warm friends while in this valley, who all wish them a full measure of success wherever they may be called hereafter.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 2


    Fires are burning in many sections of southern Oregon, and the atmosphere is full of smoke.
    The Medford mill has reduced the price of flour to $20 a thousand, but the Eagle mill is selling for $17.50 a thousand. The rates may be still lower later on.
    J. R. Cameron, wheat shipper, who has for some time been the sole partner in the firm of C. Caesar & Co., has lately returned from a four-month visit to Great Britain, and announces that hereafter he will conduct his business under the name of J. R. Cameron & Co. He formerly resided in Jacksonville.
    W. H. Parker, Esq., and wife celebrated their silver wedding in a quiet manner at their home in this precinct yesterday. A number of relatives from Washington were in attendance, and the event proved a very pleasant one. The Times trusts that Mr. and Mrs. Parker may celebrate their golden wedding.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 3


    Many of the patrons of the Medford schools express regret that Elva Galloway's salary as a teacher was not made high enough to retain her services. She will be employed at Ashland during the coming year.
    The board of school directors for Jacksonville district met not long since and selected this excellent corps of teachers for [the] ensuing year: Prof. Price, principal; Gus. Newbury, assistant principal; Miss Agnes Devlin, intermediate department, and Miss Dee Ankeny, primary grade. They will no doubt give satisfaction.
    At the People's Party meeting held in Medford on the 30th ult., the following were appointed to act as the executive committee of the county central committee for the next year: Dr. S. Danielson, J. W. Abbott, S. M. Nealon, I. W. Thomas and F. G. Kertson. The next meeting of the central committee has been called for September 17th, at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 3


Hay Baling.
    The undersigned has provided himself with a first-class hay baler and is prepared to execute all contracts expeditiously and well at the most reasonable rates. For further particulars address or call on
W. RENKEN, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1892, page 3


    Medford Lodge No. 103 A.F.&A.M., which had been in existence under a special dispensation during the past year, was regularly instituted under a charter from the Grand Lodge of Oregon last Friday evening. The ceremony was enacted with the following representatives of the Grand Lodge present: T. G. Reames, Grand Master; C. C. Beekman, Grand Senior Warden; C. H. Vaupel, Gr. Junior Warden; Max Muller, Gr. Sec'y; W. M. Holmes, Gr. Marshal; S. S. Pentz, Gr. Chaplain; Wm. Nelson, Gr. J.D.  The officers of the new lodge, elected and installed, were N. L. Narregan, W.M.; E. P. Geary, S.W.; W. I .Vawter, J.W.: J. P. True, Treas.; W. V. Lippincott, Secy'; Dr. Pickel, S.D.; J. F. Kelley, J.D.: A. H. Huston, Tyler. The lodge starts with some thirty members. At the conclusion of the lodge work an elegant banquet was served at the Clarenden Hotel. ?There were present fifteen Masons from Jacksonville and fifteen from Ashland Lodge, including C. H. Vaupel, Geo. Vaupel, A. P. Hammond, F. H. Carter, S. F. Morine, P. B. Fitzpatrick, W. H. Leeds, Wm. Nelson, G. W. Matthews, T. K. Bolton, J. P. Gilmore, A. C. Caldwell, Geo. Crowson, B. F. Wagner and L. F. Willits.

"Here and There,"
Ashland Tidings, August 12, 1892, page 3


    Capt. Edward Kellogg, who has been running on the Upper Cowlitz, has gone to Medford to visit his family, whom he has not seen for a year.
"Society: Miscellaneous Notes," Oregonian, Portland, August 14, 1892, page 9


    Many people of this county remember Geo. H. Chick, who put up an ore reduction plant at Medford of his own invention and which proved a failure. He went from here to Redding, and thence to Los Angeles, making a failure in each instance. From there he went to Pittsburg, Kansas, where he erected another plant. In this venture his method of treating rebellious and refractory ores has proved a great success, as we see in a copy of the Pittsburg Headlight. This plant reduces twenty-five tons every twenty-four hours, and pays a dividend of 5 percent each month on the capital stock of the corporation. A company of Chicago capitalists has paid him $75,000 cash for the right to use his process and erect a large plant in the Black Hills in Dakota. The Headlight says the Pittsburg plant is the only one of the kind in existence in the world, has been running for six months and has proved a grand success. It is called the Chick Short Method Smelting Process.

Valley Record,
Ashland, August 18, 1892, page 3


The "State" Pays Promptly.
Medford, Oregon, Aug. 8, 1892.
    Received of the State Insurance Company, of Salem, Oregon, the sum of $617.40 in full settlement of my dwelling which burned recently, and I fully recommend this company to my neighbors and friends who need insurance.
(Signed) W. P. Farlow.
Valley Record, Ashland, August 18, 1892, page 3


    Miss Mollie Barneburg, of Medford, is visiting Ashland friends, the guest of her sister, Mrs. D. High.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, August 18, 1892, page 3


    Jno. Hardin is back from Medford, where he has been in the butcher business--scraping the faces of the male population.

"Willow Springs Whittlings," Southern Oregon Mail, August 19, 1892, page 2


    The A. A. Davis roller mill is running again.
    Maxcy has moved his [soda fountain] into the Powell Building, just vacated by the City Restaurant.
    Mrs. B. F. Yount left last Friday evening for Davenport, Wash., where she goes to join Mr. Yount, who is in the employ of the A. A. Davis milling company at that place.
    The Jacksonville marble man, J. C. Whipp, put up a neat tombstone Saturday in the I.O.O.F. cemetery over the grave of the departed wife of J. H. Brantner.
    Miss Lila Sackett has been selected as teacher in the Medford public schools, vice Miss Elva Galloway resigned.
    F. B. Cathcart, wife and family and Mrs. W. H. Simmons, arrived Wednesday evening from Sacramento to make this city their future home. Messrs. Simmons and Cathcart are the gentlemen that bought out Adkins & Webb.
    The fire company was called out Saturday, and the boys had a lively run. The Messrs. Goldstone's womenfolks were burning up some trash at their residence near the school house, when the dry grass in the yard somehow got fired, and it was thought the house would be set on fire, so rapidly did it spread. The fire was put out, however, before the boys reached the scene.
    The ladies of the Episcopal Guild will give a bazaar and ice cream social on Thursday, August 25 at the opera house, the proceeds to be used in finishing the interior of their church. The patronage of the public solicited. Refreshments, 15 cents; children 10 cents. The bazaar will be open in the afternoon from 2 o'clock, and ice cream will be served, commencing at 6 o'clock.
    The Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson ice plant turned out its first ice Tuesday, it being four inches thick. The output will be immense as soon as everything gets in good working order. The proprietors have had much bad luck to contend with but they think all difficulties are now surmounted, as the machinery is working nicely. Large cakes of ice weighing 240 pounds were taken out Wednesday.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 19, 1892, page 3


    N. Ahlstrom reports that the circus that exhibited back of the new depot in Ashland three years ago introduced the Canada thistle into that neighborhood, and notwithstanding that he has cut it down several times it keeps on increasing every year and will soon threaten to overrun the whole country if some effort is not made to wipe it out. The authorities should see that this dangerous pest is nipped in its incipiency.--Ashland Record.
"All Sorts," Southern Oregon Mail, August 19, 1892, page 3


    Chas. Main et al. to Chas. F. Nicholson, lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 10, Medford. $925.61.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Mathes and Jeff Brophy are now conducting a butcher shop in Medford.
    Davis & Pottenger are selling their fine stock of glassware and crockery at cost.
    The ice plant is in running order and is manufacturing a first-class article of ice.
    Mrs. A. E. Kellogg last week entertained her uncle, George Linville of Portland, for a few days.
    L. M. Lyon has been near Jacksonville during the week, at work on F. W. Knowles' new house.
    The tickets lately stolen from the R.R.V.R.R. were found under the sidewalk last week by Tom Morine.
    Attorney Fitch will have one of the neatest offices in town in the Hamlin block as soon as he gets it fitted up.
    A. M. Woodford has been busy during the week in placing the new sidewalks about the schoolhouse grounds.
    Bert. Whitman, our enterprising fruit dealer, has lately contracted for a considerable quantity of apples.
    Thos. McAndrew of this place has been taking a course of treatment at Tolman's vapor baths and springs above Ashland.
    E. J. Montague was joined at Roseburg last week by his family from this place. We are sorry to lose such estimable people.
    Misses Ada Parker and Nellie Vroman of Gold Hill will attend the commercial school at Medford during the coming fall and winter months.
    David Reid and family have removed here from Butte Creek, so that Mrs. R.'s eyes can be treated. Dr. Geary has already afforded great relief.
    Dr. Geary last week went to Colestin for the purpose of bringing home his wife and little folks, who have been sojourning there during the heated term.
    W. H. P. Legate of this place has removed his family to the Klamath River section, where he is in charge of the mines of the Medford Placer Mining Co.
    W. H. Simmons and F. B. Cathcart of Sacramento will succeed to the hardware business of Adkins & Webb, one of the old and reliable firms of this place, who will retire on the 1st.
    Considerable uneasiness is felt at this place over the fact that the water in Bear Creek and the ditch is falling so rapidly. It would be awkward to fight a fire if the supply runs out.
    Dee Roberts accompanied P. B. O'Neil to Red Bluff one day last week, to see his parents, before the party take their trip through Lake and Klamath County region in search of health and recreation. Dee has since returned home.
    Miss Rose Buckley, who has been in charge of the Postal Telegraph office during the absence of Miss Gibson, returned to her home in Uniontown precinct last Saturday. The many patrons of the office were pleased with the manner in which she conducted the business thereof.
    The enterprising yet conservative course pursued by our people has resulted in concentrating much of the trade of the valley at this point, and our town is rapidly getting the name of being the best in southern Oregon. More building is certainly being done here this season than at any other point, and all our people appear to be happy.
    S. Rosenthal last week successfully pursued the pleasures of the chase, the game being an absconding debtor, who thought he would need all his available cash in his prospective new location, and who had neglected to straighten up matters here before leaving. Rosy overhauled him at Ashland and forced him to disgorge at the point of being dragged back to Medford in handcuffs.
    The prosecution of parties for alleged violation of the Sunday law has not resulted very successfully, and we think that it is about time that this persecution of our business men, especially at public expense, should cease. Our city certainly loses nothing in any particular by the transaction of business on Sunday in a quiet, orderly manner. It is much of a convenience to a number of people living at a distance from town to be able to make their purchases on any day in the week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 2


    Kellogg has been purchasing a good many apples and pears in the valley for his Portland firm, and will ship out considerable fruit. He is offering 65 cents a bushel for good apples delivered at Medford.
    Parties from California are now in the valley buying winter apples. The crop is not as large as usual, but is of a good quality. Better prices than those which have obtained during the past few years are being paid. One firm is offering 65 cents a bushel, which may yet be improved upon, owing to the scarcity of the fruit. Southern Oregon apples have an extensive reputation, which is growing steadily.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 3


    Dave Crosby and wife, lately of Walla Walla, Wash., will soon take charge of the Riddle House at Riddle, Douglas County.
    L. L. Merrick last week returned to Ashland from California, where he has been representing a house handling cash registers, etc.
    Capt. Crowell is at Jenny Creek, looking after his homestead property. He is a live man and abreast of the times in all improvements.
    Joe Pierce, who has been a resident of Jacksonville and Medford for the past few years, will leave for his old home in the East soon, to permanently remain. He has made many friends during his stay here.
    Mrs. Hugh Elliott last week bade farewell to her mother, Mrs. Hayes, of Grand Rapids, Mich., who returns to her home after several months spent in Jacksonville. She will visit her son George in Montana, while on her way east.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. Cardwell has leased her farm to John Bellinger and will move to Medford at once.
    D. W. Alberry is now a resident of Grants Pass, having obtained employment on the steam shovel.
    Mrs. A. H. Maegly and children arrived from Portland on Wednesday, and will pay their old home a visit.
    Henry Mensor of Washington passed through the valley one day this week, en route to San Francisco.
    Henry Robinson, lately of Medford, the man of many wives, is said to be stopping with a brother in the vicinity of Pendleton.
    Capt. W. S. Crowell has had a well, 40 feet deep, drilled below his dwelling, in which there is 20 feet of water, and has commenced boring another on the point above the house. He is building another large shed on his premises, and will soon have one of the finest farms in the county.
    Nearly the whole week has been consumed at Medford in attempting to convict the saloon keepers of violating the Sunday law, but so far without success. The prosecution has been balked every time by legal impediments, and no case had gone to the jury up to the time the Times went to press.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. B. F. Yount of Medford has joined her husband at Davenport, Wash.

    F. G. Stimpson, one of the progressive farmers east of Medford, is erecting a new residence for himself.
    Mrs. Leslie of Gilliam County, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Fredenburg of Medford, has returned home.
    C. W. Wolters and family, of Medford, Or., have been spending several weeks along our sea shore. Mr. Wolters is a native of this city and left here when an infant, this being his first visit since. He is proud of his birthplace and met many friends of his father, and himself and family have made many more during their stay. His father is now a resident of Jacksonville, Or., and is remembered by all the oldtimers of this place, being in business here 32 years ago. Mr. Wolters is one of the prominent merchants of Medford.--Crescent City Record.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, August 25, 1892, page 1


    Thos. McAndrew, of Medford, returned yesterday much improved in health and spirits by his sojourn at Smith's springs.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, August 25, 1892, page 3


Fire at Medford.
    Monday night about 1:30 a.m. the wood pile of A. A. Davis, lying between his flouring mill and the railroad track at Medford, was discovered ablaze. The alarm soon brought Medford's entire population to the scene as well as the hose company. The water supply was so weak that it was of no service, and the only water to be had was that pumped from wells, and wet blankets used. The wood, some 220 cords, was consumed by the flames, and herculean efforts finally stanched the fire there after the flames had severely scorched and blistered the flour mill building. It was a miraculous escape, and had the mill once caught fire all the powers of heaven and earth would not have saved the town from complete destruction.
    Mr. Davis thinks the fire was started from a spark from the engine of the northbound freight train which passed just before.
Valley Record, Ashland, August 25, 1892, page 3


    John Hanley and J. C. Hall were granted the right to sell liquors on the fair ground near Central Point by the secretary, Mrs. W. J. Plymale. The bid was $215.75, the highest ever paid for the privilege.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, August 25, 1892, page 3


    L. G. Porter expects to move into his new residence east of the creek in about two weeks.
    The new hardware firm of Simmons & Cathcart have been awarded the contract by the city to lay water pipes, etc., as advertised.
    Even the ladies pitched in and worked and carried water at the late fire. That was a wonderful bucket brigade.
    The hot coffee distributed among the workers at the fire last Tuesday morning by Mrs. I. A. Webb was a very thoughtful and kindly act and fully appreciated by all.
    Widow Kime's barn on the old Shideler place, near Bashford's, southwest of town, burned to the ground Monday of this week. Considerable hay was lost. Cause unknown.
    Our people here feel under lasting obligations to Jacksonville for the loan of its hand engine in the time of need, and to its citizens also, who turned out so generously, a debt of gratitude is owing.

    Geo. Priddy has been repairing Angle & Plymale's brick sidewalk.
    W. W. Cardwell and wife have returned to Medford from Portland to live here in the future.
    Charley Howard, of Medford, struck in on Spencer Creek Friday with a crew of surveyors of railroad land. They are working up toward Pelican Bay.--Klamath Star.
    Adkins & Webb have stepped down and out of business, and the new firm of Simmons & Cathcart is in full possession. See their adv.
   
The Alford steam thresher crew will arrive tomorrow from Jackson County without any of the bother of last year, their traction engine and thresher having remained here since last fall.--Klamath Star.
    The Creed Bros. have been boring wells for W. S. Crowell, and last week in five and one-half hours thirty-five feet was sunk. Pretty good record this, and proves that the Creed Bros. have an excellent apparatus.
    Wilson & Dowell have moved their wagon shop out of the Damon Building which stood on the Amann property on C Street. Mr. Damon has taken the building down, and the wagon shop is now located back of the blacksmith shop.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson and wife left Monday evening for Portland. Mr. Thompson goes to attend the conference at the metropolis. He expects to be returned here for the coming year to resume his duties at the Methodist Church.
    The Medford Distilling and Refining Co. challenges the world for purity of goods. Their goods are made from the best of corn and rye and are ABSOLUTELY PURE. Wholesale house at Medford, Ore. Your valued orders solicited.
    J. A. Martin drove in from Bolt Monday to get flour, claiming that in his vicinity it was selling at about $25 per thousand pounds, while here he paid $17.50. Quite a difference. He was accompanied by Mr. King, brother of W. S. King of Bolt.
    W. Green, the new merchant tailor of Medford, has just received the largest stock of goods ever brought to the Rogue River Valley, and as he is here to stay and build up a trade, he will make suits to order for $24 and up, and pants for six dollars and up. Step in and see his display. Fit guaranteed. All kinds of cleaning and repairing done. Old Faris Hotel building.
    Mr. C. W. Wolters and family, of Medford, Ore., have been spending several weeks along our sea shore. Mr. Wolters is a native of this city and left here when an infant, this being his first visit since. He is proud of his birthplace, and met many friends of his father, and himself and his family have made many more during their stay. His father is now a resident of Jacksonville, Ore., and is remembered by all the oldtimers, being in business here thirty-two years ago. Mr. Wolters is one of the prominent merchants of Medford.--Crescent City Record.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, August 26, 1892, page 3


Fire! Fire!
    Our city was saved, and that by a miracle and hours of hard and hot work, but A. A. Davis, of the flour mills, is the loser by about 200 cords of cord and slab fir wood. The fire occurred last Tuesday morning at about 1 o'clock, the origin of which is unknown, but as usual there are no end of theories advanced.
    This immense pile of wood stood about 50 feet west of the flour mill, and only because the wind was favorable can it be said that all that portion of the city in the vicinity of the fire escaped devastation by the terrible flames. Of course we do not forget that even though the elements were kind, the mill and all property adjacent would have burned ten times over had it not been that our citizens turned out by the score with buckets and drained every well in the neighborhood. How they did work with buckets and carpets and small hose until broad daylight! A harvest of blistered hands and faces and stiff joints tell the tale. Finally the Jacksonville suction well fire apparatus was sent for and speedily subdued what was left of the terrible fire fiend's handiwork.
    What of Medford's water supply? There was none! No water in the ditch for two days previous, and what little there was in the tank the fire boys made good use of. The lesson was a costly one to Davis, the sufferer, but perhaps cheaper in the end.
    Phoenix citizens had been given permission to use for irrigating what little water there was in the ditch at this season of the year, providing they would clean out the ditch, and thus Medford found itself almost in the "soup," as the saying is. But there let us be thankful all is as well as it is. We will only add that there is a certain clique who on these occasions always hold aloof from any good work that might be rendered. They sit or lounge around, making side remarks, and even hindering the public-spirited workers who know no fatigue.

Southern Oregon Mail, August 26, 1892, page 3


Fire Bugs.
    "Gentlemen, evidently there are fire bugs among us." The above remark, and there surely is reason for it, can be heard on all sides in Medford these days. The burning of Davis' wood, which came so near proving fatal to our beautiful little city, aroused well-grounded suspicion that it was the work of malicious hands, but the straw which broke the camel's back was laid on about midnight on Wednesday, when flames were discovered on the corner of the warehouse belonging to the R.R.V.R.. and standing close to their depot. The fire was almost immediately extinguished, consequently no damage resulted. That oil was used this time there is ample proof. An old can partly filled with white lead was also found on the spot, and this led to a suggestion that perhaps spontaneous combustion might explain away the mystery, but this is hardly satisfactory. If human hands are doing this devilish work, and should the perpetrators be apprehended, woe betide their fate. Hanging is too good for such as they.
Southern Oregon Mail, August 26, 1892, page 3


Special Meeting.
    A special meeting of the town board was called Tuesday afternoon to consider the water question. All citizens were invited to attend the meeting with the board. Provision was made for the immediate construction of two large headgates to store water for emergencies such as arose Monday night. Also the water committee was authorized to appoint a night engineer forthwith for the time of one month, pending the settlement of the well question. A mass meeting was called for this (Friday) evening at 8 p.m., in the opera house, to which all citizens interested are urgently requested to attend. At this meeting steps will be taken to procure the sinking of an artesian well without further delay. It was certainly almost the unanimous sense of the meeting that a deep well, artesian or otherwise, was indispensable, and the sooner dug the better.
Southern Oregon Mail, August 26, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Medford schools will reopen on the 5th proximo.
    Mrs. E. Williams, lately of Gold Hill, has become a resident of Medford.
    Dr. Buck accompanied C. P. Buck and family on their pilgrimage to Illinois last week.
    Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson's first round drove out all competition, and they now have the ice field to themselves.
    Bids for placing the new hydrant and laying 351 feet of new pipe were opened at the office of town recorder on the 20th instant.
    A neat monument was last week placed over the grave of Mrs. J. H. Brantner, in the I.O.O.F. cemetery. J. C. Whipp did the work.
    Maxcy now occupies better quarters than formerly, in the room recently vacated by the city restaurant. He manufactures a fine article of candy and is well patronized.
    Miss Lila Sackett will teach the department of the Medford public school rendered vacant by the resignation of Miss Elva Galloway, to accept a better position in the granite city schools.
    Medford, having had a very narrow escape from a destructive conflagration, should now take immediate steps toward protection from a similar occurrence. We may not be so lucky next time.
    The ladies of the Episcopal Guild held a bazaar and ice cream festival at the opera house last evening, in which many ladies and gentlemen of Medford took a lively interest. It was a handsome affair and netted a neat sum.
    The two fire alarms occurring during the past week have served as a warning to our citizens to be on the lookout for fires during the dry season. The project to have a big cistern provided for the future meets with the approval of the greater portion of our people.
    Your correspondent last week omitted to state that a female minstrel troupe performed at the opera house not long since. The audience was not as large as the quality of the show deserved. There was not a woman in the house, which would ordinarily seem surprising, as the performance was such as would not offend the most fastidious. Those evil-minded individuals who attended to witness something naughty were considerably disappointed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 2


    Our citizens are being furnished with a good quality of ice by the company which lately put up a plant at Medford.
    Willits & Weeks have been engaged during the last few days in remodeling and improving R. P. Neil's neat residence at Ashland.
    J. N. Phillips is said to be making an active political canvass of Coos County. His promises to pay his obligations are n.g., and his pretensions are still worse.
    Prof. Rigby has been engaged in canvassing the country in the interest of the Medford Business College during the last two or three weeks, and will have quite a number of intelligent young gentlemen and ladies present at the opening of school at the opera house in Medford on the fifth proximo.
    Prof. Francis Guenette, who has just finished the instruction of one of the best music and voice culture classes ever conducted in Yreka, has been in Ashland during the past week for the purpose of organizing classes at that place, and will be at Medford and the county seat. There is plenty of musical talent in southern Oregon. All it wants is development and training, and we trust that our citizens will assist the professor in organizing a good class to attend the "singin' skule" here.
    An attempt was made to fire the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s depot at Medford on Wednesday night, but fortunately it was frustrated by the arrival of the night watchman, T. W. Johnson. It seems as if the incendiary is abroad in the land. Hemp would be too good for him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


    Henry Mensor, formerly of this place, has removed from Centralia, Wash., to Placer County, Cal.
    Chas. H. Pierce, who has been looking after his interests on Puget Sound, returned home during the week.
    Miss Susie Turner is temporarily in charge of the W.U. Tel. Co.'s office and railroad station at this place.
    J. M. Childers and his son George, Jas. A. and Louis C. Pankey of Sams Valley were in town the forepart of the week.
    Isaac and Wm. Mensor were aboard one of the southbound trains, en route from Port Townsend, Wash., to San Francisco, this week.
    Chas. Wall and wife of Flounce Rock precinct will leave for their old home in the Sandwich Islands next week, and will take the remains of their son with them for burial there.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


    Fred Stimson has about completed a nice new barn on his farm east of Medford.
    The south approach to the railroad bridge at Gold Hill has been nicely filled in by the railroad folks with earth taken from Bloody Run.
    We are sorry to learn that John Wolters, the baker, will leave for Medford this week, to conduct the mechanical department of his son's bakery.
    The fire at Medford last Tuesday morning lit up the country for many miles around. Many were of the opinion that the town was being consumed by a conflagration.
    There was spirited bidding for the privilege of selling liquor on the grounds near Central Point during the coming fair. J. C. Hall and J. A. Hanley were the successful bidders at $215.75.
    Messrs. Hardin and Brown have made a rich strike on the face of Paddy Hill, near Gold Hill, exposing a rich pocket of quartz. John R. Hardin went out from Medford to look after its development.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


In Status Quo.
    There has been a cessation of hostilities between the saloon-keepers of Medford and those who inaugurated the Sunday-closing crusade. Owing to the faulty condition of the complaints gotten up by the prosecution not a single case ever reached a jury, although several attempts were made to do so. The defendants sued out a writ of prohibition last Friday, to prevent the complainants from molesting them further, which will come up before Judge Hanna at the regular September term of court. Prosecuting Attorney Benson appears for the state, while the defense is represented by Wm. M. Colvig, Willard Crawford and Francis Fitch.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


Resolution of Thanks.
    Resolved, that we, the board of trustees of the town of Medford, for and in the name of the people of Medford, extend to the town board and citizens of Jacksonville our thanks for their help and for the use of their fire engine during the fire in our town on the morning of August 23rd; also to Supt. Graham of the R.R.V.R. Co. for his promptness in sending said fire engine to us by special train.
    Done by order of the town board of Medford this 23rd day of August, 1892.
J. A. WHITESIDE, Mayor.       
    J. H. FARIS, Recorder.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


Fire at Medford.
    Some miscreant set the large woodpile in front of the Medford Roller Mills afire on Tuesday night, and that town was in danger for awhile. It was with the utmost difficulty that the mills were saved. The fire engine from Jacksonville was sent for and brought down by a special train, and did good service. About 150 cords of wood were burned. There seems to be no doubt that this was the work of an incendiary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


Medford Business College.
    The opening exercises of the Medford Business College will take place at the First Baptist Church at Medford. The following programme has been carefully arranged for the occasion. Music will be furnished by a drilled choir of thirty voices with orchestral accompaniment conducted by Prof. John Weeks of Phoenix, an old-time conductor of music.
    1. Opening hymn, "All Hail the Power."
    2. Prayer, Rev. J. F. Edmunds.
    3. Anthem, "I'll Wash my Hands."
    4. Address by Prof. C. S. Price, county superintendent.
    5. Address by Rev. Stephens, Medford.
    6. Anthem, "See, See they Come."
    7. Address, W. I. Vawter, Pres., Jackson County Bank.
    8. Address, Hon. W. H. Parker of Jacksonville.
    9. Address, Prof. Gus. Newbury of Jacksonville.
    10. Address, Rev. G. W. Black of Ashland.
    11. Anthem.
    12. Address, Hon. J. A. Whiteside, city mayor of Medford.
    13. Address, J. D. Whitman of Medford.
    14. Address, Rev. Ira Wakefield, Phoenix.
    15. Closing hymn, "Old Hundred," by congregation.
    16. Benediction by Rev. E. Russ, Medford.
    The entertainment is free to all and we take this method of inviting the public to attend.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


The Orchard Home in Canada.
    William Hall, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, was at Medford Sunday, accompanied by his wife. Mr. H. has charge of the business of the Northern Pacific Express Co. at Winnipeg, and has been taking a 30-day vacation, most of which was spent in attending the Knights Templar conclave at Denver, Colorado. He came around this way for the purpose of inspecting the splendid orchard of the Orchard Home Association, near Medford, in which he invested last winter. Mr. Hall was highly pleased with the orchard, promises to buy more, and will make a favorable report upon it to his friends in Manitoba, where Oregon fruit is quite well known.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


    Grace J. Skeeters to W. E. S. Eddy, lots 1 and 2, blk 36, Medford. $225.
    O.&T. Co. to Harry G. Wortman, lot 12, blk 78, Medford. $45.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1892, page 3


Fires at Medford.
    A pile of wood, about 275 cords, in front of the Medford flour mill burned last Tuesday morning about 1 o'clock, and it took hard work to save the mill, as there was no water in the ditch at the time. The loss of the wood was $800; no insurance. The fire was seen at Jacksonville, and the fire engine was taken down from that place by the cars.
    Wednesday night about midnight a fire was discovered in the platform between the freight depot and passenger depot of the Jacksonville railroad, and was promptly put out, water being on hand that time. Some people think the fires were of incendiary origin.

Ashland Tidings, August 26, 1892, page 3


    The Medford people's party club has a membership of about fifty.

    S. H. Holt will live near Medford this winter to allow his children to attend the school there.
    The recent close call Medford had by fire has stirred up the water supply question in that town.  A meeting of citizens was held last week to boom up the artesian well question.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, September 1, 1892, page 1


    Miss Lulu Gibson, of Medford, is telegraph operator at Tolman's Springs.
    Miss Ida Barr and Mrs. H. E. Baker and infant of Medford went to Colestin Saturday.
    Miss Mamie Isaacs accompanied a party of Medford people to the seaside at Crescent City last week.
    T. A. Harris, the Medford hotel man, was up Saturday and returned with Mrs. Harris and their Democratic kid.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, September 1, 1892, page 3


    Medford is paralyzed over indications that there are firebugs in the community. Besides the impression that Davis' woodpile fire was the work of a fiend, an attempt was made to fire the branch railroad depot, and on Saturday night just before 12 o'clock parties returning home from a social hop discovered that the outhouse of the new school house had been fired, undoubtedly with a fixed intention of destroying the whole building. On Sunday night the big barn and its contents, situated opposite the packing house, was burned to the ground. All these fires have left the evidences of incendiary origin, and if the parties are ever caught their necks will be utilized.

"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, September 1, 1892, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce is back and his arm is doing well.
    J. R. Wilson's new house is being rushed along nicely.
    The monkey and the bagpipes made the rounds of town this week.
    Slover has the only fountain in town and gives a large, foaming glass of soda for 5c.
    The business college is now furnished throughout with new furniture and presents a homelike and business appearance.
    Mrs. Dyer and son, mother and brother of Mrs. A. M. Woodford, are up from Grants Pass visiting in this city.
    Demorest Bros., dentists. Nitrous oxide gas administered for painless extraction of teeth.
    Mrs. M. H. Graves, mother of Mrs. F. G. Kertson, after several months' residence in this city returned to Polk County Monday.
    Brophy & Mathes are now quartered in their new butcher shop on C Street just off 7th, where they are prepared to serve the best of meats.
    Died in this city Sunday night, the four-year-old daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Perdue. The child was only sick four days.
    Mason fruit jars at C. W. Wolters; largest stock and variety.
    John Wolters, the late Jacksonville baker, has moved to Medford and will run the bakery of C. W. Wolters. As Mr. Wolters is a master at the business his wares are sure to be in demand.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson, late pastor of the Methodist Church of this city, has been appointed to fill the pulpit for the coming year at Grants Pass. Rev. E. E. Phipps will succeed Mr. Thompson. Rev. E. S. Thompson has been transferred from Central Point to Roseburg.
    The barn of John Ocander burned to the ground Sunday night. The origin of this fire is only one among several mysterious blazes which have occurred in town with[in] the week. One of the outbuildings of the school house was also scorched the other night, but prompt action prevented much damage. The mysterious purpose of this hellish work is only equalled by the invisibleness of the culprits.
    The ice factory is running at night at present and lying idle during the day. This is a precaution taken to ward off any attempt to set fire to the plant by firebugs.
    The boys of Medford are tolled off the streets these nights at nine o'clock by the Grand Central Hotel bell. This is a good law and should always be enforced.
    John Wolters, the late Jacksonville baker, has moved to Medford and will run the bakery of C. W. Wolters. As Mr. Wolters is a master at the business, his wares are sure to be in demand..
    Rev. E. E. Thompson, late pastor of the Methodist Church of this city, has been appointed to fill the pulpit for the coming year at Grants Pass. Rev. E. E. Phipps will succeed Mr. Thompson. Rev. E. S. Thompson has been transferred from Central Point to Roseburg.
    Miss Della J. Pickel and Miss Mary Theiss left for Salem Tuesday, where they have accepted positions to teach in the public schools at that place.
    A. A. Davis went north Saturday to look after his milling interests on the Sound. The mill at this place is being repainted to obliterate the marks left by the late fire. The mill is running night and day at present. C. N. Hastings of Sprague, Washington, is night miller and W. Halley, night engineer. Wm. Olwell is still general superintendent.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 2, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. G. Porter's handsome residence east of Bear Creek will be ready for occupancy next week.
    Mrs. M. H. Russell and family last week departed for Nebraska, their old home, to remain.
    George Hamlin recently purchased fifty acres of the J. S. Herrin ranch, near Medford. It is fine land.
    Simmons & Cathcart were awarded the contract to lay the water pipe for which proposals were advertised recently.
    Mrs. T. A. Harris of Medford and her little daughter have been at Ashland, visiting the lady's sister, Mrs. B. R. Willits.
    Miss Gibson is again indisposed, and the Postal Telegraph office is in charge of Miss Rose Buckley, who never fails to please.
    W. Green, the new Medford tailor, is here to stay, and will guarantee satisfaction at the lowest rates ever given for good-fitting clothing in this valley.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson and wife left last week for Portland, where the reverend gentleman goes to attend conference. He expects to be relocated here.
    S. H. Holt has leased a ranch near Medford, in order to give his children the benefit of the superior schools of the valley metropolis the coming winter.
    Misses Theiss and Pickel have accepted situations in the Salem public schools. Medford thus loses two excellent school teachers whose services will be missed.
    The People's Party Club of Medford precinct has reorganized with J. W. Miller as chairman, G. S. Briggs secretary, E. P. Hammond treasurer. The Halley hall south of the Clarendon Hotel was decided on as a permanent meeting place and a committee appointed to secure it, etc.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1892, page 2


    Wm. L. Plymale has gone to Medford to take a position in the Mail office.
    John Wolters has removed to Medford, and Jacksonville is without a baker.
    I. W. Thomas last week returned from his trip to the mines on Williams Creek, well satisfied with the outlook.
    Dense smoke obscures the surroundings these days, and it will probably not be dissipated until the rainy season sets in.
    The placing of ice on sale in the various towns of the valley by the Medford factory at the low rate of one cent per pound will enable all to enjoy this essential luxury.
    Two pictures painted by Mrs. A. Ingalls of Portland were raffled off at Medford and Jacksonville during the past week. Both were won by Chinese, although they were the only ones of that nationality on the lists.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1892, page 3


    Joe Pierce on Monday left Jacksonville for New York state, where he expects to remain permanently.
    Dan Chapman of Ashland visited us a few days ago. He informs us that his daughter, Mrs. Townsend of Medford, is quite sick.
    Mrs. A. Ingalls of Portland, who has achieved considerable reputation as an artist, was in the valley the forepart of the week and disposed of a number of her pictures during her stay.
    Mrs. McKinley and Mrs. McCord of Colfax, Wash., who have been the guests of W. H. Parker and family for some months this summer, have taken up their permanent residence at Medford, being unable to procure suitable accommodations at the county seat.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1892, page 3


    W. Green, the Medford tailor, was in Jacksonville one day last week and took several orders for clothing. He is a first-class tailor and guarantees satisfaction.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1892, page 3


    Medford people are still uneasy about fire and are exceedingly anxious for a good rain, to soak up the dry wood and grass. A barn near the distillery was burned last Sunday night, and the town was in a tumult of excitement over the conviction that some scoundrel or scoundrels seem to be making a determined effort to seriously damage the town by arson. A dozen extra night watchmen have since been employed.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 2, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD BUSINESS COLLEGE OPENING.
    Following is the program of opening exercises of the Medford Business College, to be held in the First Baptist Church, Medford, Monday evening, Sept. 5th, beginning at 7:30. Everybody cordially invited:
    1. Opening chorus--All Hail the Power.
    2. Prayer, Rev. F. J. Edmunds, of Medford.
    3. Anthem--I'll Wash My Hands.
    4. Opening address by Prof. C. S. Price, county superintendent.
    5. Address, Rev. Stevens, of Medford.
    6. Anthem--See! See! They Come.
    7. Address, W. I. Vawter, president of Jackson Co. Bank.
    8. Address, W. H. Parker, of Jacksonville.
    9. Address, Gus Newbury, of Jacksonville.
    10. Address, Rev. G. W. Black, of Ashland.
    11. Anthem.
    12. Address by Hon. J. A. Whiteside, city mayor of Medford.
    13. Address by Hon. J. D. Whitman, of Medford.
    14. Closing address by Rev. Ira Wakefield, of Phoenix.
    15. Closing hymn--Old Hundred by congregation.
    16. Benediction, Rev. E. Russ, of Medford.
Ashland Tidings, September 2, 1892, page 3


    A new residence is being built at Medford for J. R. Wilson.

    The daughter of Mr. Perdue died at Medford on August 27th, aged 4 years.
    W. G. Cooper was up from Medford after his lost mare. John B. Griffin found the animal on Dead Indian.
    Misses Della Pickel and Mary Theiss have gone to Salem to teach in the public schools. This makes seven Jackson County teachers employed in the public schools of the state capital.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 1


    Cecil Young is at Medford, visiting from San Jose, where he has been a conductor on an electric road.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


    Geo. Parker and Frank Bellinger are enrolled at the Medford Business College.
"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


    From 90 to 100 carloads of wheat have been shipped south from Gold Hill station so far this year.

"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


Medford Items.
    Jesse Simpson is now a resident of Albany.
    Bert Whitman shipped a carload of fruit north Monday.
    J. C. Cook, of Big Butte, is assisting in the busy season at the Ish farm.
    Dr. R. Pryce, our skilled physician, has returned and is wearing his arm in a sling.
    The grand jury indicted H. H. Robinson for polygamy. His whereabouts is unknown.
    J. H. Williams is in Eureka, Cal. Mrs. Williams and the children have moved to Medford from Gold Hill.
    Mrs. Lee Jacobs, the Record's entertaining Jacksonville correspondent, as visiting Medford friends Monday.
    Mrs. Maggie Gruby and Miss Hurst were among Medford's charming ladies who were visiting at Tolman's springs recently.
    A. Z. Sears and wife and Miss Mamie Isaacs returned Saturday from a toss in the billowy waves of the bounding ocean at Crescent City.
    Miss Lulu Gibson is still operator at Tolman's and will remain until her health improves. Miss Rose Buckley's benign smile greets the patrons at the Postal Telegraph Office in the interim.
    Mrs. M. Ragsdale, whose husband was taken to the asylum about a month ago, has moved to Medford from Big Butte and is building a residence on the property purchased from Geo. W. Isaacs.
    J. S. Howard, the surveyor, is off on a two weeks' trip to Klamath County. Manager Koehler while here in a private car Friday gave him a special mission there in regard to some of the company's land matters.
    The public school opened Monday in the $15,000 school house with Prof. Narregan principal, N. A. Jacobs vice principal, the two Misses Griffiths [and] the two Misses Sackett as teachers. Prof. Rigby's business college opened with about 30 pupils.
    The Baptist pulpit here is now ably filled. Rev. T. H. Stephens, recently of Sacramento, is our new pastor and with his interesting wife have already endeared themselves with the congregation, which is the largest in membership and influence of the denominations in Medford.
    G. W. Galloway and family have been entertaining their son Alexander, who occupies a responsible position in a leading Portland firm. In company with his friend, Mr. Browne, they rode from Portland to Medford on bicycles, making the trip in four days. They start home the last of this week.
    The city water tank pump is kept running day and night now by engineers E. G. Hurt and H. E. Baker. A dam has been placed in Bear Creek, making a headworks to keep a good flow of water in the city ditch supplying the water tank and thus ensuring a fair pressure in the water works in case of a fire these dry times.
    The Jacksonville branch railroad had an accident. While coming into the yard here in full speed with a heavy S.P. freight car between the engine and regular coach, the air brakes refused to work. The little engine was unequal to the occasion, and the momentum of the freight car pushed the engine clear through the yard and headlong off the end of the track into the real estate. It required four hours to get things fixed. The report that the little engine went clear through into Eagle Point country was a false alarm.
Valley Record, Ashland, September 8, 1892, page 3


    County Treasurer Bloomer waddled into town Sunday on his bicycle.
    The distillery will start up about the first of October.
    The wood and brickwork of the bank has been repainted in bright colors and looks nobby.
    Mr. E. Allen is building himself a neat residence on his property in the new part of town near the Faris place.
    A. J. Daley of Butte Creek has had the building formerly occupied by John Watkins moved to the old post office and fitted up as an office for Dr. Stanfield.
    The placing of ice on sale in the various towns of this valley by the Medford factory at the low rate of one cent per pound will enable all to enjoy this essential luxury.
    The town board of Medford has notices out offering a reward of $450 for the arrest and conviction of the guilty parties causing the late fires in this city. It is a good move.
    J. W. Smith is busy making improvements in the way of fences, etc., on his lately purchased ranch east of town. Mr. Smith is a progressive citizen and understands the business of ranching.
    Several loads of venison have been sold on our streets the past two weeks.
    The new water main near the school house fills a long-felt want, and those new sidewalks are substantial improvements. Now for a fence.
    Mrs. Minnie Phipps, daughter of W. G. Cooper of the Clarenden Hotel, returned Monday from a few weeks' visit to San Francisco.
    Geo. A. Jackson, the melon king, visited Medford Saturday. He will ship a dozen or fifteen carloads of melons this season and reports the market as being better than last year.
    The street commissioner has put down a new crossing at the alley between the post office and G. L. Davis' grocery. There are no end of improvements going on in this burg, which is all that is needed to prove that our city is progressing rapidly and substantially.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel has been making some substantial improvements about his residence and property where he resides. The house has been moved back from the street and the foundation raised, while the lot has been filled in and leveled.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 9, 1892, page 3


Notice.
    We have moved into our new shop on C Street, and are now prepared to serve the public with everything in our line. Thanking you for your past patronage, we hope, by fair dealing, to merit a continuance of the same.
    We are yours anxious to please,
BROPHY & MATHES.
Southern Oregon Mail, September 9, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Brophy & Mathes' butcher shop has changed locations.
    A newcomer by the name of Sayre died here one day during the week. He leaves a family.
    Dr. R. Pryce is gradually recovering the use of his broken arm. He has returned to Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Perdue have the sympathy of the community in the loss by death of their little child last week.
    The business college starts out with brand-new furniture this season, and everything presages a prosperous year.
    Mrs. M. H. Graves last week returned to her home in Polk County, after a long visit with her son-in-law, Editor Kertson.
    J. O. Johnson, the well-known operator in real estate, is visiting his old home. He is now a resident of Pacific Grove, Cal.
    Alex. Galloway and a young friend last week finished a trip by bicycle from Portland to this place and spent some days, the guest of the former's father.
    The firebugs have given us a rest for over a week and everything has resumed its normal condition. A number of night watchmen are still on duty however.
    Dr. Pryce was called to Ashland during the week, to attend the wife of W. L. Townsend of this place, who is quite sick at the residence of her father, Dan Chapman.
    C. W. Wolters is now the agent for Wadham's sugar depot in this place, and will hereafter supply the retail dealers. He this week received a carload of the saccharine matter.
    The roller mills are running night and day. During the absence of A. A. Davis on the Sound C. N. Hastings, Mr. Johnston and Wm. Olwell have entire charge, the latter being manager.
    The Medford public schools reopened last Monday with an attendance larger than ever before known on opening day. Under the efficient management of Prof. Narregan, assisted by an able corps of teachers, we predict a successful term.
    The opening of the Medford Business College was the event of the season. The exercises were of an interesting character and well received. A large crowd was in attendance. A full account will appear in the next issue of the Times.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 2


    S. S. Martin to F. T. and M. J. Crewe, lots 1 and 2, blk 15, in Medford. $1500.
    F. T. Crewe to Albert A. Hall, lots 1 and 2, blk 15, Medford. $1500.
    Mary Agnes Anderson to Geo. H. Haskins, lot 1, blk 5 in Beatty's add. to Medford. $75.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 2


    John Byers, the contractor and builder, who now resides in eastern Washington, last week passed through the valley for California.
    Grain everywhere is turning out better than anticipated early in the season, and if the farmers could get a decent price for the results of their labor times would not by any means be as close as they are at present.
    The total wool clip of this county exceeded 100,000 pounds the present year, and the price realized will be a little in excess of 16 cents per pound. Considerable wool was this year shipped by the farmers and sheep-raisers, and they report that it paid well enough to induce them to continue the practice.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 3


    C. C. Ragsdale of Colusa County, Cal. has been in the valley recently, accompanied by his brother-in-law, W. T. Brown, who came up for a hunt in the mountains.
    L. L. Merrick, with his wife and daughter, last week left Ashland for Portland to reside, Mr. M. having assumed control of the Portland branch of Reynolds' typewriter and bicycle headquarters.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Ragsdale of Umatilla County is paying this section a visit. He is a brother of C. C. Ragsdale.
    Evan Reames has gone to Lexington, Virginia, to attend the law school there, which has a high reputation.
    Dr. Pickel of Medford made us a call one day during the week. He has been appointed to succeed Dr. Porter as coroner. This is an excellent appointment, as the doctor ranks high in his profession.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1892, page 3


A HUNTING ACCIDENT.
A Medford Man Receives a Charge of Duckshot.
    JACKSONVILLE, Or., Sept. 12.--A party composed of Charles Pierce and George E. Neuber, of Jacksonville, and Thomas A. Harris and George Addington, of Medford, left Medford at 1 o'clock this morning for a week's hunting and shooting in the Huckleberry Mountains above Rancheria Prairie. About 7 o'clock, when they were a few miles above Brownsboro, Neuber and Addington got out of the wagon to shoot at some rabbits. In climbing in the wagon Neuber's gun, which was loaded with duckshot, was discharged, the load taking effect in Harris' hips, inflicting a dangerous wound. A messenger was dispatched for Dr. DeBar, of Jacksonville, but it is feared that Mr. Harris would bleed to death before the doctor reached him. Mr. Harris is one of the proprietors of the Grand Central Hotel and saloon at Medford, and Mr. Neuber is proprietor of the Banquet saloon at Jacksonville.
Oregonian, Portland, September 13, 1892, page 4



THE USUAL RESULT.
Fatal Result of Carelessly Handling a Loaded Gun.

    ASHLAND, Sept. 13.--T. A. Harris, proprietor of the Grand Central Hotel at Medford, was accidentally shot and probably fatally wounded yesterday forenoon near Big Butte post office, in this county. He was on a hunting trip with three other men, one of whom, George Neuber of Jacksonville, was riding in a buggy with Harris. Neuber was climbing into the buggy hurriedly with a shotgun loaded with buckshot in his hand when the hammer struck on something and one barrel was discharged, the charge entering Harris' body at the hip and penetrating portions of the abdomen. Medical aid was immediately summoned, but it is thought that the unfortunate man can live but a short time.
The Morning Call, San Francisco, September 14, 1892, page 2


    The Jacksonville, Oregon Courier says: "William Hall, of Winnipeg, Manitoba, was at Medford Sunday, accompanied by his wife. Mr. H. has charge of the business of the Northern Pacific Express Co. at Winnipeg, and has been taking a 30-day vacation, most of which was spent in attending the Knights Templar conclave at Denver, Colorado. He came around this way for the purpose of inspecting the splendid orchard of the Orchard Home Association, near Medford, in which he invested last winter. Mr. Hall was highly pleased with the orchard, promises to buy more and will make a favorable report upon it to his friends in Manitoba, where Oregon fruit is quite well known."
Winnipeg Free Press, Manitoba, September 14, 1892, page 6


    In this grand and favored land one person out of every twenty is a pauper, two millions of men are out of work, nearly two millions of children under 15 years of age are earning their own living, 150,000 women in New York City are earning less than 60 cents a day, the working girls of the country average less than $3 a week, and the working men who are able to find work do not average more than $300 a year.
Valley Record, Ashland, September 15, 1892, page 2


    Geo. Van Tine and family of Tenino, Wash. and P. L. Fountain and family of Dairy, Klamath County, arrived Tuesday.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, September 15, 1892, page 3


    Contractor Lyons has just finished a large and elegant greenhouse for S. A. Sutter of this place. This winter flower house is the finest in its line in this section.
    D. S. Youngs has resigned the marshalship and Tom Morine has been appointed in his stead. Mr. Youngs will put in a new and large stock in his store and will devote his whole time to the business.
    The streets were filled with people last Saturday, and [a] large number of farmers' teams were hitched about town. Trade will liven up again now, since the crops are harvested.
    W. H. Parker, of Jacksonville, has rented the G. W. Howard property in this city and will move his family here.
    Theo. Cooper, son of W. G. Cooper, of the Clarenden, arrived from Baker County Saturday on a visit.
    A new 100-foot sidewalk is being put down on C Street alongside of Simmons & Cathcart's hardware store.
    The circuit court has decided that Judge Walton has no jurisdiction in the Sunday closing case, lately on trial in this city. This winds up the matter.
    W. H. Barr, of Quincy, Ill., is visiting his brothers and other relatives in this vicinity.
    Banker G. W. Howard has arrived from the Sound, where he is interested in the milling business. He will remain here until he has disposed of his horses and cattle.
    Mrs. M. Ragsdale, whose husband was taken to the insane asylum about a month ago, has moved to Medford from Big Butte and is building a residence on the property purchased from Geo. W. Wallace.
    Lake of the Woods seems the favorite rendezvous of Southern Oregon pleasure seekers just now. Ashland, Medford, Grants Pass, Keno and Linkville all had delegates there last week, while Buck Lake was represented by the famous bear slayer, John Griffin, who enlivened the evening hours of the night.
    The city water tank is kept running day and night now by engineers E. G. Hurt and H. E. Baker. A dam has been placed in Bear Creek making a headworks to keep a good flow of water in the ditch supplying the water tank and thus insuring a fair pressure in the waterworks in case of a fire these dry times.
    The concert at the opera house last Friday, given by the ladies of the Benevolent Society for the benefit of the hose company, was amusing and entertaining. A packed house was present. The entertainment netted about $57, including the donation of $5 each by Judge Crawford and Mrs. Dennison.
    The forest fire is crawling northward toward the headwaters of Anderson Creek and if not checked by rain may reach Jacksonville by Christmas. It is likely to make a large and better grazing ground for deer and other stock. So there is not so much loss as gain anyhow.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 16, 1892, page 3


TO THE PUBLIC.
    On account of the possible contagion of the dread disease, Cholera, you are requested to use extra care in all matters of a sanitary nature: see that all garbage in back yards or vacant buildings or lots is gathered and burned; that all water closets or cesspools of any kind are properly and speedily cleaned and disinfected; that wells or cisterns are kept clean and wholesome; in short that all disease germs caused by waste may so far as possible be destroyed. The town authorities will use all efforts to put the town in a good sanitary condition and ask all citizens to consider themselves a sanitary committee to assist in this matter.
J. A. WHITESIDE, Mayor.
    MEDFORD, ORE., Sept. 12, 1892.
Southern Oregon Mail, September 16, 1892, page 3


Notice
    To the Committee on Health, the Town Marshal, the Street Commissioner and the Special Police:
    GENTLEMEN: You are hereby instructed to THOROUGHLY inspect all water closets, barns, barn lots, and in the rear of all premises, and see that the same are put in a cleanly condition; that proper disinfectants are used when in your opinion they should be; and if all places so inspected shall not be put in cleanly and proper condition by the owners, the same shall be declared a nuisance and it shall become the duty of the MARSHAL to abate the same at the expense of the property owner..
J. A. WHITESIDE, Mayor.
    MEDFORD, ORE., Sept. 12, 1892.
Southern Oregon Mail, September 16, 1892, page 3


Terrible Accident.
    T. A. Harris, of the Grand Central Hotel of Medford, was shot and horribly wounded by the accidental discharge of a gun early Monday morning while he and three friends were on a fishing and hunting trip.
    The party consisted of Tom Harris, Geo. Addington, Chas. Pierce and G. E. Neuber. They were headed for Four Bit Lake and expected to put in several days in the mountains.
    The accident occurred near the ranch of J. O. Obenchain on Big Butte. Mr. Neuber, who had been out of the wagon looking for rabbits, decided to ride awhile and in climbing in the vehicle his gun was discharged, the entire charge of birdshot with the wadding and pieces of clothing and blankets being driven into the body of Mr. Harris, who was on the front seat driving. The load struck just left of the lower part of the backbone, ranging slightly upward and to the right, lodging just inside of the right hip bone.
    As soon as possible the wounded man was carried to the house of J. O. Obenchain, where he is still. Medical assistance was procured from this city and Jacksonville, and everything is being done to ease the sufferings of the patient. Mrs. Harris is at her husband's bedside. At last reports he was resting easy. We only voice the sentiment of the entire community when we express heartfelt sympathy for the unlucky man and those near and dear to him, and every hope is held forth that he will speedily recover.

Southern Oregon Mail, September 16, 1892, page 3


    Almost the entire divide between the Wagner Creek and the Ashland Creek valleys has been burned over by the forest fires prevailing during the past few weeks.
    George Parker and Frank Bellinger of this precinct are enrolled for the coming term at the Medford Business College, which institution is rapidly acquiring a most enviable reputation for the completeness and thoroughness of its course.
    Californians at the coming election will vote their sentiments on a ticket 16x32 inches. When one reflects that the tickets used at our late June election were only about 8x19 inches in dimensions, an idea of the responsibility devolving upon the citizens of the Golden State can be formed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1892, page 3


The Picture Completed.
    The ladies who so patriotically encouraged the idea of having the oil painting of the Table Rock mountains executed by Mrs. Rowena Nichols, and who have been uneasy lest the work should not be ready for exhibition at the Portland [sic] exhibition, have had their fears for naught, for the work is already done, and the picture has received many encomiums from artists of note in the bay city and others. The news was received here several days ago, and it is also learned that the best possible position has been secured for the work at the exposition where it is sure to attract much attention by reason of its individual merit and because of its historic interest. The ladies' club and Mrs. Nichols are alike to be congratulated over the happy outcome of their efforts.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1892, page 3


    Mr. Burnett, who formerly taught school in this county, is now attending the state normal school at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A first-class quality of soda water is dispensed at Maxcy's.
    The bank building presents a greatly improved appearance since it was treated to a new coat of paint.
    Mrs. P. R. Burnett and family this week follow the husband and father to their future home in Eugene.
    John Bigham is once more at home in this section after his trip through California, in search of a better location.
    The distillery will again be in running condition after the first day of October, and will probably be kept constantly in operation after that time.
    J. W. Hockersmith has contracted for a large portion of the hog product of the valley during the coming few years, and is very stipulating that farmers must improve their stock if they want to get the highest market price. He recommends the use of thoroughbred Poland China sires and Berkshire or grade brood stock. Raising hogs is already one of the most important branches of farming in southern Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1892, page 3


    Thomas Morine has been appointed marshal of Medford.
    Thos. Cooper, of Baker City, is visiting his folks at the Clarendon Hotel, Medford.
    W. H. Parker, Esq., the Jacksonville lawyer, has moved his family to Medford.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 1


    Miss Etta Skeel, of Medford, and Wilbur Hagan, of Woodville, are attending the state blind school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Van Tine of Tenino, Wash., who have been visiting the latter's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Jackson Hockersmith, returned home Tuesday. It was a family reunion, P. L. Fountain and family of Dairy, J. N. Hockersmith and family of Medford, Jos. W. Hockersmith and family and Mrs. A. P. Weiss and children being present.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 3


    The Medford Mining Co. have sold their placer mine on Klamath River, opposite Ash Creek, [to] J. C. Bayer, W. R. Price and another Portland man for a nice consideration. W. P. Legate will remain and conduct the mine for the new purchasers.
    Dr. Pickel is coroner of Jackson County at last, having been appointed by the county commissioners to succeed the late Dr. Porter. Dr. Pickel ran against Dr. Parson for that position two years ago, when the two factions of the county physicians' ring made the campaign for that office so lively that it produced a tie, when Parson drew the straw that made him coroner. At that time Pickel was a sort of non-union physician, but now the fraternity have sort of taken him in and turned their batteries of slander, billingsgate and general stinkingness on some other head. Physicians rank with piano tuners and fishwomen in their display of professional jealousy.
    Mr. L. L. Angle desires to call the attention of the public to the advertisement to be found in another column of this paper, under the caption "We Loan Money." We claim to represent the most complete and most thoroughly adapted building and loan methods in the United States. Loans are granted for any period of time, from one to twelve years, requiring the return of such a sum, in principal account, as will, at the same rate of interest, amount to the principal of the loan at the expired time, thus canceling the mortgage by easy monthly installments, and in addition thereto the borrower receives, on his stock, a sum equal to the amount loaned; making the average interest rate, on the twelve years' loan, only 1⅜ percent. The annual report shows assets of over one hundred thousand ($100,000) dollars. Those desiring to borrow or invest on the B.L. plan will find it to their interest to write Mr. Angle for full particulars of the organization he represents.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, September 22, 1892, page 3


    Those who are interested will be sorry to learn that the railroad company are not making any contracts for wood.
    Nannie Barr has transferred to Ella Woodford lots 13, 14, 15, and 16 of block 44 in Medford, for $374.
    L. G. Porter has moved to his property east of Bear Creek.
    Horace Nicholson has charge of D. H. Miller's hardware store during the latter's absence in Portland. Horace informs us he will embark in business for himself in a few weeks.

    H. O. Chute and Chas. Campbell, of Dalles, are about to open a jewelry store in this city. The gentlemen come highly recommended and will no doubt meet with the success they deserve.

    Medford will ship about 50,000 bushels of apples this season. This is more than any other point by a good deal. The same can be said of peaches, prunes, etc.
    In the Sunday closing case from this city we stated last week that the circuit court had decided that Judge Walton had no jurisdiction in the premises. This is erroneous, and we wish to set the matter right. The circuit court dismissed the case on motion of the counsel for the saloon men, so that puts the parties back to where they were in the beginning.
    Cobble gutters will replace the present wooden ones in our streets. Stone is being hauled for the purpose. Our streets are also to be graded with sand.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 23, 1892, page 3


Wholesale House Established.
    We challenge the world for purity of goods. The Medford Distilling and Refining Company has established a wholesale house at Medford. Our goods are made from the best of corn and rye and are absolutely pure. We solicit your valued orders. Address
Medford Distilling and Refining Co.,       
Medford, Oregon.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 1


    L. C. Montague to J. A. Brown, lots 5 and 6, blk 59, Medford. $150.
    J. A. Brown to G. W. Howard, lots 5 and 6, blk 59, Medford. $100.
    Zelpha E. McCubbin to Wm. S. Conkling, lots 5 and 6, blk 6, Park add. to Medford. $80.
    Paul Chartrand to Wm. Ulrich, lots 8, 9 and 10, blk 11, Medford. $675.
    O.&T. Co. to D. H. Miller and Chas. Strang, lots 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18, blk 55, Medford. $390.
    Geo. H. Andrews to Wm. Ulrich, lots 11 and 12, blk 53, Medford. $160.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 2


    Ira Drake has entered the employ of Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct.
    Mrs. Mark Armstrong of Medford, who has been quite ill for several weeks past, is improving, though very slowly.
    The longest dry spell which southern Oregon has ever known ended last Sunday, since which time considerable rain has fallen.
    W. H. Parker of this precinct has rented the G. W. Howard property at Medford, with the intention of making his home for the winter in that place.
    A large quantity of apples is being hauled through town from the Applegate section, for shipment to California. The fruit is of fine quality and commands 65 cents a box delivered at Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


    Geo. B. Addington has removed from Medford and will be a resident of Jacksonville for awhile.
    L. C. Coleman, having finished his annual visit to Jackson County, will leave for his home in San Francisco soon.
    D. Loring, who is connected with the S.P.R.R. Co.'s land department, has been east of the mountains with J. S. Howard of Medford.
    Misses Hattie Newbury and Lottie Reed, two of our best teachers, left for Portland during the week to assume positions in the schools of the metropolis.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


A Great Offer.
     I will give for the next 30 days one enlarged 11x14 picture, in India ink, with every dozen cabinets.
    J. A. Goff, Photographer, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


    H. B. Reed will establish works at Grants Pass at once and manufacture a superior article of fence.
    Mrs. J. W. Wiley of Eden precinct was in Jacksonville one day last week, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. Walters of California.
    Dr. Pryce, the well-known physician, has gone to Forest Grove to receive treatment at the Keeley Institute at that place. We hope that he will return completely cured.
    The wife of W. L. Townsend of Medford and daughter of D. Chapman of Ashland died at the residence of her parents one day this week. She had been ill for some time past.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. A. F. Ragsdale, lately of upper Butte Creek, has removed to Medford.
    The entertainment given for the benefit of the hose company netted the neat sum of $57.
    Theo. Cooper of Baker City has been visiting his relatives. He has been gone some time.
    O. Holtan's daughters arrived lately from Long Branch, and are attending school in Medford.
    W. H. Barr last week entertained his brother, who lives at Quincy, Ill. He spent several days in the valley.
    Tom Morine, who is now marshal of Medford, vice D. S. Youngs, resigned, makes an excellent official.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson and wife last week left for Grants Pass to reside, Mr. T. having been assigned to that field.
    Miss Etta Skeel will attend school at Salem during the coming winter, having departed for the capital city last week.
    Miss Emma Smith last week returned to her home at Modesto, Cal., after a pleasant visit with the family of her uncle, S. L. Bennett.
    A. W.C.T.U. lecture was delivered at the M.E. Church in this place last Monday evening by Mrs. Della C. H. Cox, a national organizer of the organization.
    Engineers Hurt and Baker were kept busy during the last few weeks in keeping the city water tank full. There will be no trouble on this score hereafter.
    A change in the management of the Grand Central Hotel is expected to take place soon. It is rumored that Geo. E. Neuber of Jacksonville will be the new landlord.
    Chas. J. Howard was in the city last week, having finished his first job of viewing for the railroad company, but immediately left for further operations along the state line, west of Keno.
    The proclamation of Mayor Whiteside, calling upon our citizens to clean up, preparatory to a possible visitation of that dread scourge, the cholera, should be heeded by every citizen of Medford.
    The death of T. A. Harris has left a void in this community that can probably never be filled. He was genial, courteous and unselfish, and everybody misses him. His bereft family have the sincerest sympathy of all.
    B. P. Theiss of the Medford distillery returned from a trip to the state of Washington, which proved quite satisfactory. The goods manufactured by this establishment are first-class and will soon become popular.
    The Yreka Journal speaks slightingly of the Medford Mining Company, which last week sold out its holdings on the Klamath River, as being composed of a "number of Oregon ranchers with no experience in mining." Unfortunately Brother Nixon is non-come-at-able.
"Medford Squibs" Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1892, page 3


Resulted Fatally.
    T. A. Harris, of Medford, whose accidental shooting while on a hunting expedition up Butte Creek was reported last week, died Thursday evening, September 15th, about 6 o'clock, after having endured great suffering. The wound was a terrible one, and the fact that the No. 6 shot with which the gun was loaded, had scattered and penetrated the bowels, which the main wound had not injured, made impossible the recovery which was for a time hoped for. The funeral occurred on Saturday at Medford. Mr. Harris was at one time in the butchering business at Astoria, and later at Ashland. For some time past he had been in the hotel business at Medford. He leaves a wife and infant daughter and a young daughter by a former marriage, to mourn his loss.
Ashland Tidings, September 23, 1892, page 3


    Z. E. McCubbin has sold lots 5 and 6 in block 6 of Park Addition to W. S. Conkling for $80.
    Wm. Ulrich has purchased of Paul Chartrand lots 8, 9 and 10 in block 11 in this city for $675.
    Geo. H. Andrews last week sold lots 11 and 12 in block 53 in this city to Wm. Ulrich. Consideration $160.
    Jas. G. Clark, the poet and singer, will hold a concert in the Methodist Church at Phoenix this Saturday evening.
    Mr. McKay and family, of Modoc County, Cal., arrived in town this week and moved into the Chas. Damon residence.
    The record tells us that the O.&T. Co. has transferred to D. H. Miller and Chas. Strang lots 14, 15, 16, 17 and 18 block 55 in Medford, for $390.
    J. A. Brown last week purchased lots 5 and 6 in block 89 in this city of L. C. Montague for $150 and immediately transferred them to G. W. Howard for $100.
    A large quantity of apples is being hauled from the Applegate section, for shipment to California. The fruit is of fine quality and commands 65 cents a box delivered at Medford.
    J. O'Hara has purchased the residence occupied by Dr. S. Danielson.
    Fred. Barneburg, while at Portland at the convention, blew out the gas in a hotel and went to bed. I. A. Webb happened to enter the room in time to save Mr. Barneburg's life, but it was a close call.
    The reported sale of the Grand Central Hotel has not been consummated as yet. Messrs. Neuber and Armstrong are figuring on purchasing the business but have not taken charge.
    Reasonable people are finding little fault with the advances Medford is making. People visiting other sections for awhile and then returning here are astonished at the growth of our town. We are in it.
    A sleight of hand manipulator with ventriloquistic proclivities performed payingly on the depot square a couple of evenings this week. People always seem to have money to spend on these occasions and great crowds elbowed their way to the front.
    Mr. Woody, who some time since purchased the Van Sickle property back of the Baptist Church, moved his family in on Wednesday of this week.
    Clarence Kellogg, day engineer in Davis' flour mills, expects to soon leave for Portland, to take a position as engineer on one of the riverboats.
    John W. Curry, so long connected with the establishment of Angle & Plymale of this city, will leave for Albion, Calif., on the first of next week, to take charge of the books in a large establishment there.
    Mrs. Ida Kahler, of this city, daughter of Judge Walton, left for Coeur d'Alene, Idaho, Monday evening, accompanied by her youngest child. She will be absent for several months. As an artist, a musician and songstress, Mrs. Kahler ranks with the first in this community.
    Hallowe'en is the evening preceding Hallow Day, or All Saints' Day, which is celebrated November 1st, in honor of the conversion, in the seventh century, of the Pantheon at Rome into a Christian place of worship. Pope Boniface II dedicated this way to the Virgin and all the martyrs.
    A gentleman interested in boring wells has visited Medford and other places hereabouts lately. His home is in Portland, but he is so favorably impressed with our salubrious climate and prospects that he speaks of returning to locate among us. He made a proposition to our town board to sink a well.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, September 30, 1892, page 3


An Apology.
    Ira Wakefield, of Phoenix, called on us this week and told a good story on himself. He was billed to speak at the People's Party meeting at Central Point Saturday night, but through the week he lost a day and arose Sunday morning early, thinking it was Saturday and, repairing to his potato field, he pitched in with the idea of gathering his crop before starting to Central Point. His delusion was short lived, however, as his wife soon convinced him that he was breaking the Sabbath. Thus it was that the Central Pointers waited in vain for the good speech prepared for them.
Southern Oregon Mail, September 30, 1892, page 3



Literary Society Organized.
    The students of the Medford Business College organized a literary society in the college rooms Friday evening, Sept. 23d. The following officers were elected for the term: President, Geo S. Parker; vice-president, Miss Ethel Holder; secretary, Frank Wait; treasurer, Miss Kate McCord. The society will meet in the college rooms every Tuesday evening at 7:30 o'clock p.m. The questions that tend to elevate and educate will be discussed by students. Question to be discussed on Tuesday evening, Sept. 27th: Resolved, That there is more pleasure in pursuit than in possession.
Southern Oregon Mail, September 30, 1892, page 3


    Jason Kellogg to C. D. Kellogg, lot 11, blk 13, Medford. $1.
    R. H. Whitehead to T. J. O'Harra, lots 4 and 13, blk 1, Lumsden's add. to Medford. $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Messrs. Chute & Campbell have opened a store at this place.
    Go to Chute & Campbell for your watch and clock work, satisfaction guaranteed.
    A. Langell of Klamath County has been in this section during the past week, visiting his son.
    The next soldiers' and sailors' reunion will be held at this place during the summer of 1893.
    L. G. Porter now occupies his property east of the creek, which has been handsomely improved.
    Apples of the crop of 1891, still in good condition, were exhibited on our streets by M. S. Emon lately.
    The evening course at the business college begins next Monday, and will continue through the winter.
    Mrs. A. J. Stewart has been in California during the past week, and Mr. S. has been a guest of the Clarendon Hotel.
    Horace Nicholson was in charge of D. H. Miller's hardware store during the latter's absence at Portland on the I.O.O.F. excursion.
    The M.E. Church South hold their regular quarterly meeting at the camp ground near Central Point on Friday and Saturday, the 23rd and 24th inst.
    The business college is being well patronized, as it deserves to be. Prof. Rigby is sparing no pains to give satisfaction, and is succeeding admirably.
    W. P. H. Legate will shortly remove his family back to Medford from Siskiyou County, and will occupy the residence lately vacated by Rev. Burnett.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel has been making some nice improvements about his residence property, and will soon have one of the most attractive places here.
    Everyone will regret to hear of the death of Charley Brous, which took place last Sunday after a protracted illness. He was a whole-souled honorable man and well thought of by all who knew him.
    The proposed new cobblestone gutters will make a vast improvement in the condition of our streets, to say nothing of the addition of a coat of sand and gravel as contemplated by our city fathers.
    Among those who participated in the I.O.O.F. excursion to Portland from this place last week were the following: I. A. Webb and wife, D. H. Miller and wife, Dr. Pickel and wife, L. M. Lyon and wife, Mrs. W. I. Vawter, A. C. Nicholson, G. F. Merriman, D. S. Youngs, Mrs. R. T. Lawton, C. C. Taylor and Barneburg and daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 2


    Dave Payne has been on Klamath River for some time past, running a 100-foot tunnel in the Payne-Fox mine in that section.
    A force of men, under the superintendence of J. Morris, are putting the roadbed of the R.R.V.R.R. in good condition for winter.
    Chairman Whiteside of Medford called a meeting of the Republican county committee at the town hall in Medford last Monday to devise ways and means to stop the Cleveland boom in this county.
    The matter of the dismissal of the writ of prohibition sued out of the circuit court in order to enable the district attorney to let go of the Medford prosecutions in the Sunday closing cases led the papers to state that the justice court had no jurisdiction in the matter, which was erroneous and properly accounted for by the Mail last week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 3


    John Shideler has returned from the Willamette Valley and will become a permanent resident of southern Oregon.
    Messrs. Chute and Campbell, who recently arrived from Polk County to locate at Medford, called one day this week. We hope that they will become permanent residents of the valley.
    Mrs. Max Muller, wife of our county clerk, and her daughter Bettie, who have been in San Francisco for some time past, returned home one evening this week. Miss Amelia and Willie remain in the bay city, the former to learn telegraphy and the latter the druggist's profession.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 3


    J. W. Hockersmith and family last week removed back to Medford from Ashland.
    D. D. Hill of Medford precinct was in town Tuesday with a load of fine vegetables and melons.
    Robt. T. Armstrong has returned from California, and rumor says that he will engage in business at Medford.
    D. W. Crosby of Riddle is paying his old home in Jackson County a visit. Dave has developed into a 200-pounder.
    One of the latest acquisitions of the People's Party following is Prof. N. A. Jacobs, who presided at the party rally at Medford on the evening of the 17th instant. We trust that the People's Party will show due gratitude to new recruits at their next biennial county convention.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1892, page 3


OREGON.
    Medford.--The new ice factory of Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson was put into operation August 23, and is supplying Ashland, Jacksonville and other towns with ice at one cent per pound..
Ice and Refrigeration, October 1892, page 288


    The Mail says Medford, in Southern Oregon, will ship 30,000 bushels of apples this year. Many of them will come from Applegate.

"Northwest News,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, October 3, 1892, page 1


    The best five-cent cigar in town is the Pride of Medford cigar, for sale by Davis & Pottenger.
    The records show that Jason Kellogg last week transferred lot 11 of block 13 in Medford to C. D. Kellogg.
    A farewell dance was given to Jno. Curry and wife, at the opera house Monday evening, which was attended by a large number of young ladies and gentlemen of this vicinity. Mr. Curry left for his new field Tuesday morning. The large circle of friends of the family express much regret at their departure. The Mail wishes them success in their new home.
    J. H. Shideler and family have returned from Linn County and will live at Medford. They were visiting friends at Colestin, Dollarhide's and Ashland last week.
    Surveyor Charles Howard came home and spent Sunday with his family. He returned Monday to the camp east of the mountains and will continue in the field until the snow flies.
    Miss Lou Gibson, the postal telegraph operator who has taken several months' vacation, is back at her post in the Grand Central Hotel. Miss Rose Buckley, who has attended to the keys in the absence of Miss Gibson, will accept a position to teach in the business college.
    L. M. Lyon has sold his six-acre tract east of town to Mr. Hooker, lately from Morrow County, for $600.
    C. H. Godfrey has exchanged his 80-acre tract near Coker's Hill east of town to a Mr. Phillips, for a farm near Springfield, Mo.
    Geo. Hamlin has purchased the Webster tract of 100 acres, one and one-half miles southwest of this city, for $4,000.
    At the regular meeting of the City Council last Monday, it was decided not to cobblestone the gutters at present, but the streets will be graded immediately.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 7, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John W. Curry goes to California to accept a clerical position at Albion, says the Mail.
    W. G. Cooper and Isaac Woolf last week departed for California to find a better land than this if possible.
    Albert Hall has traded his lots in this place to Jacob Johnson for the latter's fine fruit ranch up Rogue River.
    Cecil Young last week returned to his occupation in California, after a pleasant visit to his old home in this place.
    Clarence Kellogg will accept a position on one of the river boats out of Portland, after resigning his position at Davis' mill.
    Miss Ida Kahler and infant child last week departed for the Coeur d'Alene section, where they will remain during the fall months, visiting relatives and friends.
    Assessor Hamilton was over at the mine on the Klamath sold by the Medford Mining Company to Portland parties, during the week, completing the transfer of the property.
    The meeting of the Southern Oregon Stock Protective Association was held at this place last Saturday for the annual election of officers, and the transaction of other important business.
    The students of the Medford Business College have organized a literary society which will meet every Tuesday evening during the next few months at the college rooms, and debate topics of interest. Geo. S. Parker is president of the society; Miss Ethel Holder, vice-president; Frank Wait, secretary, and Miss Kate McCord, treasurer.
    The project of boring for artesian water is once more being discussed by our citizens, and a gentleman was here last week prospecting the field, and if he can induce the residents of this place to try the experiment, and it results successfully, as he thinks it will, he is prepared to conduct the experiment of getting artesian water over the big desert at his own expense, as a speculation. It would be a truly grand thing for the entire valley, could it be done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1892, page 2


    D. J. Lumsden et al. to Wm. Allison, lots 5 and 6, blk 3, Lumsden's add. to Medford. $40.
    S. Tomlinson to John H. Curry, lots 3 and 4, blk 56, Medford.
    Albert A. Hall to Jacob Johnson, lots 1 and 2, blk 15, Medford. $1500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1892, page 2


    A Harrison campaign club was organized at the opera house at Medford on Tuesday evening last.
    Miss Irene Chitwood has returned to Ashland after a pleasant visit with her sister, Mrs. Ogle, at Klamath agency.
    A. D. Dodson, a onetime newspaper man of Medford in the days of the empire, passed through the valley one day last week on his way to California, in his private conveyance.
    Chas. Pierce departed a few days ago for a brief visit to his old home in Pennsylvania. He will return to the region before Christmas.
    W. P. H. Legate still has charge of the gravel mine on Klamath until recently owned and operated by a Medford company, now under the ownership of Price, Bear & Co., of Portland.
    Mrs. Joe Frank of Alturas denies the soft impeachment to the effect that she was married to Rev. J. H. Mayfield, one time of this valley, using the press to give more publicity to the detail.
    A. L. Reuter and daughter, Miss Lena, will depart in a short time for Atlanta, Ga., in the hope of benefiting Mr. R.'s health, which has been poor for some time past. He has derived some relief from the use of a Georgia doctor's medicines, and goes to the South for the winter in order to be directly under the physician's care.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1892, page 3


    W. P. H. Legate and family are back in Medford to reside permanently.
    S. Tomlinson has transferred lots 3 and 4 of block 56, in this city, to John H. Curry.
    Albert A. Hall to Jacob Johnson, lots 1 and 2, block 15, Medford, $1500, so the records tell us.
    Mrs. Jackson has purchased W. P. Wood's interest in the property on C Street where the Mail office is.
    The fruit from the Anderson orchard has been purchased by Portland parties, who are shipping it north.
    Mrs. A. H. Maegly and children have returned to their home in Portland after a summer visit in this valley.
    The ladies of the Medford Baptist Church will give a supper on the night of election day.
    "We ARE carpenters," said "Old Nick," standing off and surveying the partially constructed engine house which is being built next to Holtan's tailor shop.
    From the records we learn that D. J. Lumsden has sold to Wm. Allison lots 5 and 6 in block 3 of Lumsden's addition to Medford, consideration $40.
    Dan'l. Walker, who has a good crop of apples on his orchard south of Ashland this year, was down at Medford Monday of last week, closing up the trade by which he sold them to Bert Whitman, of Medford, at 70 cts. per box.
    Emil Peil, the blacksmith, brother of F. A. Peil of Antelope, returned to Jackson County last week from Alaska, where he had been working at the celebrated Treadwell mine for some months. He may return to Alaska next spring.
    W. I. Vawter, president of the Jackson County Bank of this city, was admitted to practice law in all the courts of Oregon by the Supreme Court at Salem this week. Mr. Vawter has been studying in the office of S. S. Pentz for some time, and passed the examination with flying colors. We believe this is one of the few instances in the history of this county where a man has been admitted to the bar who studied only in a law office.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 14, 1892, page 3


WHERE'S SOUTHERN OREGON?
Seven of the Sixteen Counties of the First Congressional District.
    "What sections are included in the term Southern Oregon? What counties do you mean by Southern Oregon?"
    This pair of questions has bothered lots of old settlers, says the Klamath Falls Star, and has been a fruitful source of contradictions in camp and cabin, field, pasture and mine for years and years. Some have hesitated to include Lake, or even Klamath among the Southern Oregon sections, while others boldly designate the territory including Klamath, Lake, Harney and Malheur as "Southern Oregon."
    But Prof. Thomas Condon, the geologist in the State University, designates the region " as to include Lake and Klamath counties on the east, Douglas, Coos and Curry counties on the west, and Jackson and Josephine on the south." This gives to Southern Oregon seven out of the sixteen counties of the First Congressional District.

Southern Oregon Mail, October 14, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Peter Henderson, late of this place, is now located at Walla Walla, Wash.
    O. Mickelson of Keno has leased the Redden blacksmith shop at this place.
    Dr. E. B. Pickel lately enjoyed a visit from his old-time friend, J. C. Barnard of the Willamette section.
    Miss Laura Nichols of Eagle Point is one of the latest additions to the membership of the business college.
    Superintendent Theiss of the distillery last week went north on business of the firm. He is selling a great deal of liquor.
    Miss Rose Buckley has accepted a position as teacher in the Medford business college, which she will no doubt fill acceptably.
    Miss Lou Gibson last week returned to her station as Postal Telegraph operator, after several months spent in search of health.
    Assessor Hamilton was over the hill to settle up the business of the late mining company of this place on the Klamath River during the week.
    W. I. Vawter of the Jackson County Bank has been admitted to the practice of law by the supreme court. He passed a very creditable examination.
    The Grand Central Hotel is still under the management of the firm of Harris & Purdin. Steps are being taken to settle up the business of the firm, owing to the death of Mr. Harris.
    The farewell dance given at the opera house last week in honor of Mr. and Mrs. Johnny Curry was among the pleasantest social events of the season. They have since gone to California to reside.
    The stock of jewelry now exposed for sale by Pritchard, the jeweler of Medford, has never been surpassed in the history of the town, and the low prices at which he sells first-class articles in his line are a source of surprise to the uninitiated.
    Besides the elected delegates, Messrs. Enyart and Hutchison, Talisman Lodge No. 31 was represented at the K. of P. lodge, which met this week at Eugene, by Dr. E. P. Geary as grand inner guard and Francis Fitch, Esq., as grand orator.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 2


    Dr. Minnis, formerly of Medford, is a resident of Portland, and doing well with a surgical invention of his own.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols, the artist, has been quite sick at Portland. Her picture of Table Rocks is on exhibition at the exposition.
    Chas. H. Pierce left for the eastern states a short time ago, to be gone some time. He will be absent several weeks on timber land business.
    Miss Jennie Jackson, who has so efficiently and acceptably filled the position of agent for the R.R.V.R.R. and W.U. Tel. Co. at Jacksonville, resigned her position a few days since and has been succeeded by Miss Susie Turner, a competent young lady, who will doubtless also succeed in giving the fullest satisfaction.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 2


    E. F. Walker to Josephine Poe, lots 5 and 6, blk 40, Medford. $200.
    W. H. Hosler to Martha Hosler, lost 7 to 15 inclusive, blk 4, Park add. to Medford. $100.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 2



    J. A. Whitman last week closed a deal for the entire apple crop of the Daniel Walker orchard, south of Ashland, for the handsome price of 70 cents per bushel box.
    F. A. Peil of Antelope last week welcomed his brother Emil back from his long sojourn at the Treadwell mines in Alaska. Emil will probably return to Douglas Island in the spring, when daylight comes again in that far northern clime, and resume his forge.
    F. G. Lenz, the transcontinental bicyclist, passed through the valley on Sunday last, stopping over on Saturday night at Gold Hill, to which point he was accompanied from Grants Pass by F. W. Chausse of the Observer at that place, a wheelman of local repute.
    The formation of a Harrison club at Medford last week and the fact that Binger Hermann is billed to speak there tomorrow evening has aroused a little enthusiasm among the Republicans of the county, but even the closing days of the campaign bid fair to be very tame.
    Several boxes of fine grapes were this week shipped from Col. J. N. T. Miller's vineyard to Shorey & Hall, commission merchants at Albina. Were it not for the extortionate rates of transportation charged by the S.P.R.R. Co., much more of our unsurpassed fruit would find its way into the markets of the world.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 3


Photography.
    Cloudy days preferred for taking photographs by our instantaneous process.
J. A. Goff, Medford, Or.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 3


    Rev. M. C. Aleridge, lately of this valley, is now stationed at Coeur d'Alene city, Idaho.
    J. H. Huffer, Jr. has finished a stone walk leading from the courthouse steps to the gate, which is a substantial and handsome piece of work.
    Chas. H. Pierce took east with him the photograph of a sugar pine tree in the Jenny Creek section that contains 39,000 feet of fine lumber, a whole lumber yard in one tree, according to eastern ideas.
    Hons. J. D. Whitman of this county and A. H. Carson of Josephine County attended the quarterly meeting of the State Horticultural Society at Newberg, Yamhill County. They are among the most prominent members of the society, and their views are always received well.
    Miss Jennie Jackson left for Grants Pass on Wednesday evening, to make her future home there. She made many friends in Jacksonville during her long residence here, whose best wishes follow her.
    A. L. Reuter, one of our prominent capitalists, left for Georgia on last night's train, to be treated for dropsy by one of the most eminent specialists in the United States, and will be accompanied by his daughter, Miss Lena. We hope that he will return fully restored to health.
    Hon. W. M. Colvig is making a very favorable impression in the Willamette Valley by his masterly speeches in behalf of the national Democratic candidate. He has already gained the reputation of being one of the ablest and most logical speakers who have ever spoken in the state.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1892, page 3


A Morning Fire at Medford.
    Medford's people were awakened and stirred up from center to circumference at an early hour this morning by the thrilling alarm of fire and the sight of a seething cauldron of flames that threatened the utter annihilation of their property and the ruthless and merciless destruction of their fair homes. At 4:30 a.m. a lamp exploded in the two-story frame building at the east corner of 7th and C streets, and once used as the Medford Hotel. The building was occupied by Geo. Webb's Racket Store and W. Green's tailoring establishment. The flames soon caught on to the next two frame buildings adjoining it on the east and occupied by D. T. Pritchard's jewelry store and a small notion store and residence occupied by Mr. Wilson and family. Here the intrepid fire protection boys stanched the fiery elements and soon put them out entirely.
    Webb's goods went up in the flames, as did Green's. The latter's loss is $1600, insurance $600. Pritchard saved his jewelry stock almost entirely.
    The total loss is about $8000, well covered by insurance, the recent suspicions of there being a firebug in the town causing citizens to insure heavily.
    All the goods in the burning block were hurriedly moved, and much damage done in that way. Damon's boot and shoe stock was partially ruined in that way, and Ed. Wilkinson was up early in his nightshirt and threw meat and tools into the street.
    The brick building on the corner to the west occupied by J. A. Slover & Co.'s drug store and above in offices suffered slightly. The heat broke the windows in the bank at the south corner, and slightly scorched the big Angle & Plymale and Adkins & Webb block at [the] opposite corner. The wind was north; the fire went fast and threw out coals all over town. A good supply of water in this part of town saved the day.
Valley Record, Ashland, October 20, 1892, page 3


    Alford's threshing machine has given good satisfaction this season.
    Joe Hockersmith, of the Medford pork packing house, came over yesterday evening to get a band of our Klamath porkers. He starts home with the drove today.
    Bob Anderson, of Tule Lake, came over from Jackson County Wednesday with a couple of his fine racehorses, which he had entrusted to a man named McDonald, of Yreka, who called himself a horse trainer. McDonald's treatment to the fine animals showed how much disappointment a would-be trainer can contribute to the heart of a man who takes him for a could-be, but finds him a man who needs lots of training himself.
"Klamath News from the Star," Southern Oregon Mail, October 21, 1892, page 2


FURIOUS FLAMES.
Medford Is Again Visited by the Fire Fiend.

    Shortly after four o'clock a.m. yesterday (Thursday) the cry of fire rang out clear and startling and almost in a less space of time than it takes to tell it, our slumbering city was rudely awakened, and our citizens on rushing forth witnessed one of the principal corners in Medford in a mass of flames, which lighted up the city for blocks in every direction
    It is supposed the fire started in Green's tailor shop on C Street just off of Main, by the explosion of a lamp, which was kept burning nightly in the shop. A. J. Brophy, brother of Jeff Brophy, our butcher, who rooms over Slover's drug store, claims to have witnessed the explosion from his window and of course he immediately gave the alarm which was responded to nobly by the fire company and citizens.
    In round numbers the loss by fire, water and damage in removing will approximately $6,000.
    Below we give the losses, insurance, &c., as near as possible at this time:
    W. Green, merchant tailor, loss, $1,700; insurance, $1,250.
    G. L. Webb, Racket Store, loss unknown; insurance $1000.
    D. T. Pritchard, jeweler, loss $1000; fully insured.
    M. S. Damon, shoe store, loss by removing, etc., about $200; insured against fire.
    Vawter & Howard, building and barn, loss $1,400; insurance, $800.
    Clarence Kellogg, building, loss $200; fully insured.
    San Francisco drummer, building, partly lost, insured.
    J. H. Thorndike, feed store, loss by removing; insured.
    J. R. Wilson, household goods and variety store, slight loss by removing; no insurance.
    Ed. Wilkinson, butcher, slight loss by removing; insured.
    Jas. A. Slover & Co., druggists, slight loss by water; insured.
    S. Rosenthal, clothier, slight loss by water; insured.
    The doctors' instruments and books, over Slover's drug store, were also damaged considerably.
    Hutchison & Enyart, hay, $25,00; no insurance.
    Numerous other small losses are sustained by citizens of which we have no data.
NOTES OF THE FIRE.
    Several cans of coal oil, which stood in one corner of G. L. Webb's store, came out whole--that is the oil came out of the hot flames whole, but the cans were melted and scorched. A queer incident.
    D. T. Pritchard, the jeweler, lost no time in hanging out his sign, even while the flames were still unsubdued. He can be found on Front Street in Palm's old stand.
    The fire boys did excellent work and deserve credit.
    Postmaster Howard did some good work in the business college, by dragging out the benches and firing them off the veranda into the street.
    Mr. Scott reports that in the absence of himself and family at the fire, burglars ransacked his residence, helping themselves to eatables, etc.
Southern Oregon Mail, October 21, 1892, page 3


    Josephine Poe has purchased lots 5 and 6 of block 40 in Medford of E. F. Walker for $200.
    I. M. Harvey of Medford sold to J. L. Wigle, lately from Halsey, 36 acres west of Medford for $2160.
    The boundaries of the school district [sic] of Jackson County were established at the last term of Commissioners' Court.
    We learn from the records that W. H. Hosler has transferred to Martha Hosler lots 7 to 15 of block 4, Park Addition to Medford, for $100.
    Dr. S. Danielson is moving in his new residence on the Mingus tract. Mr. O'Hara will occupy the house vacated by the doctor on C Street.
    C. W. Wolters has taken out the partition in his grocery store, which enlarges the place to almost double the size heretofore, making it one of the largest groceries in Medford. We are pleased to note the prosperity of this popular grocery.

    Died, near Althouse, Or., on Oct. 4th, 1892, Prof. J. B. Farley, a native of Ireland, aged about 70 years, says the Grants Pass Courier. Prof. Farley was the first teacher to take charge of a school in Jackson County, and was remarkably proficient in mathematics. His death occurred at the residence of K. S. Keffer.

    A Spiritualist held forth for two nights in this city this week. Medford boasts of a large number of followers of Spiritualism.
    Several new sidewalks are being put down in this city, which are good improvements. The grading of the streets is a good thing at the right time.

"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 21, 1892, page 3


Where's Southern Oregon?
    "What sections are included in the term Southern Oregon? What counties do you mean by Southern Oregon?"
    This pair of questions has bothered lots of old settlers, and has been a fruitful source of contradictions in camp and cabin, field, pasture and mine for years and years. Some have hesitated to include Lake or even Klamath among the Southern Oregon sections, while others boldly designate the territory including Klamath, Lake, Harney and Malheur as "Southern Oregon."
    But Prof. Thomas Condon, the geologist in the state university, designates the region known as Southern Oregon "so as to include Lake and Klamath counties on the east, Douglas, Coos and Curry counties on the west, and Jackson and Josephine on the south." This gives to Southern Oregon seven out of the sixteen counties of the first congressional district.--[Klamath Star.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 1



    Sallie E. Ish to George B. Johnston and Thos. J. Spangler, blk 5, Ish add. to Medford. $63.
    Welcome Fowler to Bessie Thompson, lot 10, blk 52, Medford. $70.
    P. B. O'Neil et al. to W. F. Shawver, lot 5, blk 15, Medford. $500.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. Burch and E. Woods have removed from this vicinity to Table Rock precinct.
    W. H. P. Legate and family have taken up their abode in Medford, we are glad to announce.
    A. A. Davis last week returned from looking after his milling interests in Washington.
    Henry Richardson, formerly of this precinct, has removed from Woodland, Cal. to Sacramento.
    Jas. Bigham and family have removed from their Butte Creek ranch to their farm in this vicinity.
    Miss Mary Theiss last week departed for the East, to remain some time in Chicago and other cities
    Horace Nicholson displays a nice line of agricultural machinery at his wareroom in this place.
    C. H. Barkdull is again a resident of Medford, having abandoned mining on Evans Creek for the present.
    Seventh Street became quite muddy since the rains began, but the gravel which has been dumped upon it has placed it in good condition again.
    The ladies of the Medford Baptist Church will render the waiting on the evening of election day more endurable than it usually is by a nice supper.
    Mr. Halley has succeeded Clarence Kellogg as engineer at the Davis flouring mills, the latter having gone north to accept a position on a Columbia river boat.
    E. L. Brown, the expert watchmaker and jeweler, may be found at his shop on C Street, ready to execute all orders in first-class style and at reasonable rates. Give him a call.
    Fresh oysters in any style, as nice and palatable as they can be obtained in Portland, are served at Maxcy's. A. H. Walker is in charge of the kitchen, and evidently understands his business.
    The Medford literary society last week received as accessions to its membership Miss B. Buckley of Uniontown and Miss Laura Nichols of Eagle Point, both connected with the business college.
    Hon W. F. Butcher addressed a large audience at the opera house on Saturday evening, in answer to Congressman Hermann's speech, and created a favorable impression. He successfully showed the fallacy of Binger's position on the main questions at issue and illustrated how the people have been deluded by the garbled reports and misleading figures made use of by Republican orators.
    Congressman Hermann addressed a good-sized audience at the opera house, on the political issues of the day, last Saturday afternoon. It was plainly evident that Binger's forte is handshaking and working the departments, for certainly his speech was not such as to install either enthusiasm or admiration in the average constituent. His remarks were exactly in the same line as those by Senator Dolph and other campaign orators, using the same claptrap and distorted figures for bamboozling the dear people. It is doubtful whether the G.O.P. derived any benefit from his effort.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 2


    D. C. Herrin, late of Ashland, is doing well at The Dalles in the photographic line.
    Mrs. Mark Armstrong of Medford, who has been quite ill for a long time past, is recovering, though slowly.
    Milton Harlan, at one time a publisher of the Medford Mail, is now employed on The Dalles Chronicle. He has a homestead claim in Wasco County.
    Demorest Bros. of Medford administer the nitrous oxide gas for the painless extraction of teeth, and use all the latest appurtenances in dentistry.
    Mrs. Rowena Nichols, the well-known artist, is receiving the congratulations of her many friends upon her marriage to Mr. Davys, a prominent citizen of Seattle, Wash., where she formerly resided.
    Mrs. J. S. Lacy of this precinct, one of the pioneers of southern Oregon, is dangerously ill with heart trouble, we are sorry to learn. Her life is despaired of, and a number of her relatives have been summoned to her bedside.
    Mensor Bros., who got their start in Jacksonville, have two stores in Spokane, and seem to be doing a good business. One of their establishments, which is known as "The Lace House," is quite handsomely fitted up, being filled with elegant goods and giving employment to a number of clerks.
    The people of southern Oregon, and especially the pioneers, will regret to learn of the death of Prof. J. B. Farley, which occurred in Althouse precinct, Josephine County, on the 4th inst. He was a gentleman of learning, with ability to impart his knowledge, and was probably the oldest schoolteacher in this section. Of most generous impulses, his death will be regretted by all who knew him.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 3


    Leslie Merrick, formerly of Ashland, is clerking in one of Portland's clothing stores on First Street.
    Chas. Gray, who is in charge of C. F. Wall's business in Flounce Rock precinct, made us a call on Wednesday.
    Will Merriman, the popular telegrapher, has been spending several days in the valley on important business. He is still located at Albany.
    Miss Rose Luy, who has been a member of the typographical corps of the Times office for the past 17 months, left for Salem on Wednesday. We join her many friends in wishing her an enjoyable visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 3


    G. H. Ellis, who is now located at Medford, made us a call a few days since.
    C. H. Walworth and family have removed from Yankee Creek to Medford and opened a restaurant.
    M. Dammer of Medford was in Jacksonville last week. He was accompanied by some relatives and friends who had lately arrived from Kansas.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 3


Fire at Medford.
    Early yesterday morning the building formerly occupied as a hotel by J. H. Faris, but at the time by Geo. A. Webb as a dry goods store and Wm. Green as a tailor shop, was discovered to be on fire and an alarm immediately sounded. The hose company was soon on the scene, and with the aid of the city water works succeeded in controlling the conflagration before it had proceeded very far. The building in which the fire started was totally consumed, as also was the one adjoining, occupied as a jewelry store by D. T. Pritchard. Two small houses next on the row were damaged more or less, but the occupants saved most of their effects. Messrs. Webb and Pritchard also saved the greater portion of their goods. The fire was started in Green's tailor shop by the explosion of a lamp left burning by the proprietor, who lost all his tools and goods. The loss will reach a few thousand dollars, upon which there was some insurance. Mr. McCarthy of the ice works, who is a practical fireman, rendered valuable assistance in directing the battle with the flames. The hose company is also entitled to great credit for its services, and too much cannot be said of the efficiency of the water works. All the circumstances were favorable, or much more destruction would have occurred, as the whole block is composed of wooden buildings, with one exception.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1892, page 3


Where's Southern Oregon.
    "What sections are included in the term southern Oregon? What counties do you mean by southern Oregon?"
    This pair of questions has bothered lots of old settlers, and has been a fruitful source of contradictions in camp and cabin, field, pasture and mine for years and years. Some have hesitated to include Lake, or even Klamath among the southern Oregon sections, while others boldly designate the territory including Klamath, Lake, Harney and Malheur as "southern Oregon."
    But Prof. Thomas Condon, the geologist in the state university, designates the region known as southern Oregon "so as to include Lake and Klamath counties on the east, Douglas, Coos and Curry counties on the west, and Jackson and Josephine on the south." This gives to southern Oregon seven out of the sixteen counties of the First Congressional District. (But what authority have you for mixing up geology and politics at this stage of the campaign, Peter?)
Ashland Tidings, October 21, 1892, page 2

Daggett Patent
    Mrs. M. J. Carr, of Medford, is agent for the Daggett patent Russia iron self-basting roaster and baker and is now canvassing Ashland for orders. This is the champion roaster and baker, and no housewife who has ever been lucky enough to try one will ever believe she can properly cook for a family without it. There are numerous sizes and different prices, all warranted first-class. Mrs. Carr also sells an oil pump for large cans and a patent lamp burner.
"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, October 21, 1892, page 3


Fire at Medford.
    Medford has at last had a fire which amounts to something. About 4:40 yesterday morning the tailor shop (Green's) in the Medford House block on [the] north side of Main Street was discovered to be on fire, and the alarm brought out the fire department in short order. The hotel (belonging to J. H. Faris), Pritchard's jewelry store and Geo. Webb's Racket Store were burned. Most of the contents of the buildings were removed to the street, but were badly damaged. The buildings were said to have been well insured.
    The origin of the fire is believed to have been the explosion of a kerosene oil lamp.
    The fire department did good work, and the waterworks enabled them to prevent the spread of the flames and save much property.
Ashland Tidings, October 21, 1892, page 3


    The city council has condemned one of the partly burned buildings of the last week's fire.
    G. W. Priddy and S. H. Lyon are doing the work of preparing a place for the Racket Store.
    W. Fowler has sold lot 10 in block 52 in Medford to Bessie Thompson for $70.
    Lot 5 in block 15 of Medford has been purchased by W. F. Shawver of P. B. O'Neil for $500.
    G. L. Webb has temporarily located the Racket Store in H. G. Nicholson's implement house, two doors from [the] Mail office. Soon as the place is ready the Racket Store will be moved into the back of the building occupied by Slover's drug store.
    The youngest child of Chas. Strang is very ill.
    The oyster house of Maxcy's is becoming quite popular.
    Some new floors have been put down this week in the Grand Central. S. W. Speas has been doing the work.
    The Wolters grocery has been enlarged, repainted and the ceilings kalsomined, which gives this establishment quite a metropolitan appearance.
    The Racket [Store] badly singed but still in the ring. Will soon have a new stock
    Thanksgiving Day (the last Thursday in November) will soon be with us.
    Hallowe'en (the evening preceding All Saints Day) occurs next Monday evening.
    The Racket will occupy its new quarters next week, back of Slover's drug store. In the meantime you can buy goods just as cheap in the temporary quarters with H. Nicholson, the implement man..
    H. Nicholson's implement house has just opened to the public. Call and inspect his plows, wagons, etc. Two doors from Mail office, Medford, Ore.
    Rev. E. Russ will depart for Amity, Ore., to take charge of the Baptist Church at that place. He was at one time pastor of that same church for fifteen years. Evidently he gave satisfaction.
    The ladies of the Benevolent Society will give an old-fashioned supper tonight (Friday) Oct. 28th in the opera house. This supper was to be given this coming Monday (Hallowe'en), but as the concert occurs on that night this Friday was decided on. Admission 25 cts.
    Doctor George [McDonald], the veterinary surgeon, has returned to Medford again after an absence of several weeks. He is now treating Mr. Harbaugh's Philogene, one of the finest animals in this section, and will in a week or so have the noble horse as good as of old. The doctor has several other complicated cases in hand and reports all progressing nicely.
    In last week's Mail there appeared an article clipped from the Klamath Star and credited to that paper. This article dealt very plainly, but not very complimentarily, of a horseman named McDonald. We know nothing of the truth of the article, but in justice to Mr. McDonald, who it seems has since locate din Medford as a horseman and veterinary surgeon, we will state that the Mail does not wish to convey the impression that it sanctions what the Star said. No doubt Mr. McDonald can explain the matter satisfactorily to all.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, October 28, 1892, page 3


Card of Thanks.
    It is with pleasure I am permitted to express my thanks to the friends who so bravely and faithfully assisted in securing my goods from the flames, and I only hope that I may never be called upon to return the compliment.
    I also thank my many customers for their valued patronage during the past year and will gladly welcome you back to the new Racket, in rear of Slover's drug store, on C St., where you will find equally as good values as in the old.
                Yours,   G. L. WEBB.
Southern Oregon Mail, October 28, 1892, page 3


Protection Hose Co. No. 1.
    The following members of Protection Hose Company No. 1, were only duty at the fire of Thursday, Nov. 20, in Medford.
    G. L. Davis, foreman; H. G. Nicholson, first asst.; Robt. Galloway, second asst.; Gabe Plymale, treas.; U. M. Damon, Sec'y.; A. C. Nicholson, Eugene Amann, B. Brandenburg, W. R. Fredenburg, J. J. Brophy, John Angle, E. A. Langley, D. T. Lawton and W. T. Johnson. Fourteen in all.

Southern Oregon Mail, October 28, 1892, page 3
    Wm. Ulrich to W. F. Shawver, half of lot 6, blk 15, Medford. $200.
    J. R. Standley to W. S. Jones, lot 3, blk 28, Medford. $40.
    Wm. Slinger to Lou Della Jones, lots 17 and 18, blk 46, Medford. $190.
    L. L. Angle to Conrad Mingus, quitclaim to tracts near Medford, formerly in bond.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1892, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Josie Merriman is at home again, after a long absence.
    Mrs. Pickel, mother of Dr. Pickel, has been visiting her daughter, at Talent.
    The new sidewalks put down for the city last week were a much-needed improvement.
    A medium audience greeted the spiritualist who held forth at the opera house one evening last week.
    Jas. Bigham has removed his family to town, so that the children can avail themselves of our superior school facilities.
    John L. Wigle, lately of Halsey, Linn County, has recently invested in a fine tract of land near town, and will make his future home here.
    Dr. S. Danielson has taken possession of his new residence in the Mingus tract, his old home being occupied by the family of Mr. O'Hara.
    Mrs. B. P. Theiss and her little daughter, Geraldine, last week departed for San Diego, Cal., to try the effect of a change of climate on the little girl's health.
    C. W. Wolters last week enlarged the capacity of his grocery store by tearing out the partition in the building, which greatly improves the appearance and increases its size considerably.
    Mrs. S. S. Smith of Cincinnati, who has been visiting her cousin, Mrs. D. T. Sears of this place, departed with her husband for California last week, with the intention of remaining there some time before going east.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1892, page 2


    Henry Mensor, formerly of this place, is now located at Woodland, Cal.
    John Bigham of Medford precinct made us a call during the week. He recently returned from California to remain.
    L. C. Kellogg and his packing crew went to Josephine County last week from Talent to pack a lot of apples for shipment from that section.
    Henry Klippel is furnishing a considerable amount of building material, which is evidence of the fact that much improvement is going on in this section.
    Ladru Royal, A. H. Maegly, Adam Klippel and J. H. Oatman & Bro., all former residents of this county, are now real estate dealers at the metropolis.
    S. A. D. Higgins, the last of the dukes of Sleepy Hollow, was with us Wednesday night. His many lady friends were pleased to note his improved appearance.
    S. P. Cummons, wife and child of Humboldt County, Cal., after an absence of nine years, are at their old home in Ashland, and will probably remain for the winter.
    W. G. Tanner and E. L. Hollenbeak, formerly of this section, are now manipulating politics in the state of Washington, their headquarters being at Lowell, near Everett, Wash. The latter is now making the race for county commissioner.
    At the recent meeting of the state board of horticulture, which was attended by Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, the practice of importing fruit trees from abroad, with all the numerous pests with which they are usually infested, was condemned in unmeasured terms.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1892, page 3


    Albert N. Soliss of Griffin Creek, a first-class penman, will next week take a position in the office of the county recorder.
    Prof. J. T. Hover, one of the pedagogues who have wielded the birch in this county, is now a resident of Snohomish, Wash.
    William Bybee, Sr., has returned from Josephine County, where he spends much of his time looking after his mining interests.
    R. V. Beall of Central Point visited our town on Wednesday. He informs us that his son will go to Berkeley, Cal. to attend school next week.
    J. W. Graham, superintendent of the R.R.V.R.R., left for Portland Wednesday evening, to be gone a few days. His son is acting as conductor in the meantime.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1892, page 3


    Henry Mensor has removed from Washington to California, and is now stationed at Woodland.
    Volna Webster, after a stay of several years, has sold his real estate and will leave Medford soon.
    R. L. Cummons and family, lately of Grants Pass, have become residents of Eagle Point precinct.
    Rev. F. Watry has opened a German school in town, which should be well patronized. He is an excellent teacher.
    Sheriff Pelton started for Salem yesterday, having in charge Arthur Robinson of Medford, an incorrigible young fellow, who will be placed in the reform school.
    Mrs. Brown, who lately purchased the Anderson tract in Eden precinct of G. W. Howard, was in Jacksonville yesterday, accompanied by her brother, D. Mitchell.
    Thos. McAndrew and R. S. Dunlap went to Josephine County a few days ago, to exhume the remains of the late Prof. J. B. Farley for reinterment in the Jacksonville cemetery.
    Will Olwell has gone to Davenport, Wash. to take charge of the mill of Davis & Co. at that place, now ready for operation. He is a straightforward business man, and his many friends wish him success in his new home.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1892, page 3


    Charles Robinson, of Medford, a 16-year-old boy, was brought before Judge Neil this morning and pronounced a fit subject for the reform school. His father is dead. Sheriff Pelton started with him for Salem tonight.
"Jacksonville Notes," Oregonian, Portland, October 28, 1892, page 3


    John R. Stearns is at Medford assisting the packing company put up hogs. They commenced last week by killing 40 head.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, November 3, 1892, page 3


    L. L. Angle, the Medford broker, was in the city Saturday. He is the agent of an eastern syndicate and can secure loans of money at a liberal rate of interest on good security. See his advertisement.
    Thos. McAndrew of Medford has had the remains of the late Prof. J. B. Farley exhumed from the burying ground in Josephine County and buried in the Jacksonville cemetery.
    Joe Hockersmith and C. K. Klum have joined forces this year in the pork packing business and will kill from 1000 to 1500 hogs this winter. They commenced killing this week at Medford.
    The Oakland Times in a recent campaign issue contained the pictures and biographical sketches of a number of the Democratic leaders of that section. In the number the physiognomy of Chas. W. Logan, formerly of Ashland, looms up as president of the Young Men's Democratic Clubs of Alameda County.
"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, November 3, 1892, page 3


    Isaac Woolf has returned from California.
    C. B. Crisler, of Ashland, has moved to Medford and will work in the pork packing house.
    Simmons & Cathcart are having the front of their hardware store repainted by Milton Maule.
    W. S. Jones has purchased of J. R. Standley lots [sic] 3 block 38 in Medford for $40.
    Real estate transfer: Wm. Slinger to Lou Della Jones, lots 17 and 18, block 46 in Medford for $190.
    The Medford Business College is steadily growing in favor and attendance. Several new students this week.
    Dr. R. Pryce is back from the Willamette.
    Jeweler E. L. Brown has vacated the Standly [sic] brick on C Street and is now occupying the Wood harness shop building.
    The jewelry firm of Chute & Campbell, lately established in this city, has broken up, Mr. Campbell having gone to California and Mr. Chute taking charge of the business and moving everything to Klamath Falls.
    H. Nicholson's implement house has just been opened to the public. Call and inspect his plows, wagons, etc. Two doors from Mail office, Medford, Ore.
    Night miller Hastings, of the A. A. Davis flour mill of this city, departed for Walla Walla, Wash. last Sunday, where he will take a position in a flour mill. The Davis mill will not run of nights hereafter.
    Although Rev. E. Russ has been called to occupy a Willamette pulpit, we have been requested to state that the Russ Nursery will continue business as usual and will be in charge of the son, Edwin Russ. Mrs. Russ will also remain here.
    Numerous important changes will shortly be made in the management and appointments of the Grand Central Hotel. The family of mine host Purdin are moving into the hotel. Mrs. Harris is now living with her mother, Mrs. Tice.
    The ladies' benevolent society of Medford has at last disposed of Arthur Robison, better known as "Monk." He has been placed in the reform school at Salem. This is only one of the many laudable acts performed by the society.
    The dinner to be given on election day in Medford promises to be well worth partaking of. The repast will be served in the buildings damaged by the late fire.
    H. McCarthy, of the ice house, last Sunday shipped a fine lot of venison to a fish house in Portland. The venison had been in cold storage in the ice house for a few days and was in fine condition. The ice house will prove quite an accommodation to hunters who wish to store game while making arrangements to ship.
"Local and General," Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


Pork Packing.
    Joe Hockersmith will go into the pork packing business on an extensive scale in this city this winter and having purchased a five-acre tract just north of the distillery, commodious buildings are being erected, and he expects to begin killing in a few days. A large band of fat hogs have just been driven in from Klamath County, and these will be slaughtered immediately. Farmers having porkers to dispose of will do well to consult Mr. Hockersmith. It is with pleasure that we recommend his product.
Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


The Entertainment.
    The hose co. entertainment, under the auspices of the Medford Benevolent Society, which was given in the opera house last Friday evening, was so well patronized that the hall's capacity was tested to its fullest extent. Three long tables ranged side by side, with a seating capacity of over a hundred people at one time, groaned under a weight of an endless variety of dishes, cooked and arranged principally in the good old-fashioned way, but dainty and delicious in every respect. Those ladies who hovered about the tables anticipating the wants of the hungry guests were arrayed mostly as our great-grandmothers were--in flowing robes of grotesque make and color, presenting an appearance at once unique, interesting and in keeping with the occasion. The proceeds netted something over $50.
Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOLS.
N. L. NARREGAN, PRINCIPAL.
    Report for month ending Oct. 28, 1892:
    First grade--Miss E. J. McGuire, teacher; number enrolled 46, daily attendance 3d [sic--36?], tardiness 3.
    Second grade--Miss Lila Sackett, teacher; number enrolled 46, daily attendance 3g [sic--38?], no tardiness.
    Third grade--Myrtle Nicholson, teacher; number enrolled 37, daily attendance 31, tardiness 2.
    Fourth grade--M. E. Griffiths, teacher; number enrolled 46, daily attendance 38, tardy 1.
    Fifth and sixth grades--Carrie Sackett, teacher; number enrolled 60, daily attendance 54, no tardiness.
    Seventh and eighth grades and high school--number enrolled 88, daily attendance 77, tardiness 3.
    Total enrollment 323, daily attendance 275, days taught 19, cases of corporal punishment one.
    The monthly examinations closed Friday night. More hard work was done and a greater interest manifested in results than any previous examination in the history of the school.
    The Holt sisters are quite ill.
    Miss Cordelia Keizur is a member of the high school and preparing for the teachers' work.
    The boys of the school have organized an athletic club with boxing gloves, sandbags, etc. They are soliciting funds to build a school gymnasium.

Southern Oregon Mail, November 4, 1892, page 3


    Hallowe'en was duly celebrated, especially in Jacksonville. Some hoodlums resolved fun into malicious injury when they filled H. J. Booker's well, which has attained a depth of about 80 feet, with articles it is impossible to extract. The perpetrators of this outrage should be severely punished therefor, as well as for other pranks equally as reprehensible.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1892, page 3


A Huge Tomato.
    The biggest tomato on record was raised this season in Mrs. G. W. Crystal's garden near Medford. It was a monster, weighing over four pounds. The largest tomato we had heard of before was the one which took the $500 premium in the last national competition, and it weighed a pound less than Mrs. Crystal's. The latter has been saved for its seed and will doubtless net the owner a handsome sum.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1892, page 3


Wholesale House Established.
    We challenge the world for purity of goods. The Medford Distilling and Refining Company has established a wholesale house at Medford. Our goods are made from the best of Corn and Rye and are absolutely pure. We solicit your valued orders. Address
MEDFORD DISTILLING AND REFINING CO.,               
Medford, Oregon.               
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1892, page 3


    Everybody should hear the speeches, which will be delivered by Francis Fitch, Esq., at Medford and Grants Pass tomorrow and at Ashland Monday evening. He is one of the ablest and most interesting speakers on the northwest coast.
    The Mail estimates the loss by the late fire at Medford, including damage by water and removals, at about $6,000. The principal losers are: W. Green, merchant tailor, loss $1,700, insurance $1,250; G. L. Webb, racket store, loss unknown, insurance $1,000; D. T. Pritchard, jeweler, loss $1,000, fully insured; Vawter & Howard, building and barn, loss $1,400, insurance $800; Clarence Kellogg, building, loss $200, fully insured; San Francisco drummer, building, partly lost, insured; J. H. Thorndike, feed store; J. E. Wilson, variety store; Ed. Wilkinson, butcher; S. Rosenthal, clothier; J. A. Slover & Co., druggists, sustained slight losses by removing or by water.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Francis Fitch at the opera house Saturday afternoon.
    Rev. E. Russ goes to Amity to take charge of the church at that place, much to the regret of his friends in this section.
    M. Purdin has purchased the interest of the late Thos. A. Harris in the Grand Central Hotel, and will conduct it in the best style.
    Once more the prospect of boring for artesian water is being seriously discussed by our citizens, and it is probable that the experiment will soon be made.
    G. L. Webb's racket store is temporarily in Nicholson's implement house, but will be permanently located back of Slover's drugstore as soon as the place is made ready for the stock.
    Dr. Pryce, who has been undergoing the Keeley cure at Forest Grove, has been pronounced cured, much to the delight of his many friends. He was still at Portland at last account.
    The ladies of the Benevolent Society gave an enjoyable entertainment in Medford last Friday evening, which included a fine supper. The proceeds will be applied to charitable purposes.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
November 4, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    Wm. Slinger to Lou Della Jones; lts 17 and 18; blk 46; Medford $190.
    Charles Nickell to Sarah F. Van Riper; property in Medford $900.
    J. R. Stanley to W. S. Jones; lt 3; blk 28; Medford $40.
    Sallie E. Ish to George B. Johnston and Thos. G. R. Spangler; 1.26 acres, Ish add. to Medford $63.
    D. J. Lumsden and wife et al. to Wm. Ellison, all of lts 5, 6, blk 3, Medford, $40.
    Wm. Ulrich to W. F. Shouver, ½ of lt 6, blk 15, Medford $400.
Ashland Tidings, November 4, 1892, page 2


Pork Packing Business.
    J. W. Hockersmith and C. K. Klum have gone into partnership in the pork packing business, under the firm name of Hockersmith & Klum, and will immediately commence butchering hogs at Medford, where they will carry on the business through the winter. They have already bought a large number of fine hogs. Hockersmith has shipped about a thousand head of hogs this season already, to Portland, Tacoma and Seattle. The Medford Pork Packing Co. will also butcher a large number of hogs--probably the two firms will pack 2500 head during the winter.
    The hog raising business is steadily increasing in this valley, and should become an extensive industry.

Ashland Tidings, November 4, 1892, page 3


    N. M. Caster died at Medford, Oct. 20th. He was 41 years old and a native of Van Buren County, Iowa.
    The Davis flour mill at Medford has ceased running its night shift, and Mr. Hastings has gone to Walla Walla.
    The entertainment given recently by the Medford Benevolent Society in honor of their hose company was a successful affair and netted $50.
    G. W. Cooper, the Medford hotel man, is engaged in seeding a farm he has rented near San Jose, Cal., and will soon move his family there.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, November 10, 1892, page 1


    Mrs. Martha Armstrong, wife of Marcus Armstrong of Medford, died at the family residence Sunday afternoon after a three months' illness. The burial was in the Jacksonville cemetery. The deceased was 41 years old, and leaves a husband and four daughters.

"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, November 10, 1892, page 3


    H. O. Chute of Medford has opened a jewelry store in Klamath Falls.

"Klamath County Items," Valley Record, Ashland, November 10, 1892, page 3


    A federal officeholder at Medford [postmaster J. S. Howard?], who makes some pretensions to being witty, was parading last evening with his Harrison hat draped with a copy of the Democratic Times, the portion towering above the crown being filled with hay, and bearing the legend "The Democratic Times and hayseeds have carried the country." Thanks, awfully; when we reflect that this same precious pretender was seen on the morning of election day posting a placard bearing the inscription, purporting to be an official document emanating from Chairman Harrity of the national Democratic committee, reading thus: "A vote for Cleveland is a vote for Harrison in Oregon; a vote for Weaver is a vote for Cleveland in Oregon," and having Mr. Harrity's forged signature attached, designed to fraudulently impress the Republicans in the People's Party fold with the necessity of going back to their former political affiliations. This deserves to rank with the fellow's other record as a politician.
    The Democratic vote in Jackson County is small, for the reason that several hundred Democrats, acting under the advice of the national and state committees, voted for Weaver and Field with the intention of rescuing Oregon from the Republican column. This is the reason why the People's Party carried the county. Had the Democrats voted their ticket, as they otherwise would have done, they would not only have given Cleveland and Stevenson a neat majority here, but it would also have been shown that the People's Party is not numerically so strong as it was last June, when it polled between 700 and 800 votes. The fact is, the greater portion of the Populists who came from the Republican Party were whipped back into the support of Harrison, and the vote of several precincts shows it. As the Times has often said, the Republicans cannot be depended upon to vote against their party at the critical time, although they are not slow to encourage their Democratic brethren to remain steadfast members of any political sideshow that they themselves forsake when the Republican bosses crack the partisan lash.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 2


    Rev. C. H. Hoxie is now in charge of the M.E. Church at Klamath Falls, having gone out last week to assume charge.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 3


    Miss Susie Turner, the popular agent of the R.R.V.R.R. and W.U. Tel. companies, has returned from her visit to Ashland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 3


    Don't fail to attend the grand jollification at Medford next Tuesday.
    The S.O. Pork Packing Co. is regaling our people with choice spare-ribs and backbones.
    Henry Mensor last week left Medford for Port Townsend, Wash., where he will take a position in his brother's store.
    A. S. Johnson of Medford, deputy county assessor, made us a call today. He filled his position well and gave general satisfaction.
    Joe Hockersmith of Medford was in town yesterday. He has made arrangements to buy over 1000 head of fat hogs already, and will manufacture them into bacon, lard and hams.
    It is announced that Marshal Grimes will resign his position and that the board of trustees will probably elect his successor tonight. He may remove to Medford at once and take charge of the Clarendon Hotel.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dave Cardwell of Sams Valley is attending the Medford business college.
    John R. Stearns of Ashland is now in the employ of the pork packing co.
    Ed. Wilkinson, who sprained his ankle badly at the late fire, is all right again.
    The pork-packing company are busy now and will slaughter about 2000 head of hogs.
    All are invited to join in the celebration at Medford next Tuesday. It will be a grand affair.
    L. L. Angle has gone into the money-loaning business, as the agent of an eastern syndicate.
    Bob Faris has been paying relatives and friends a visit. He is still in the employ of [the] S.P.R.R. Co.
    The merry-go-round has been infesting this place for several days, but has not been very well patronized.
    Edwin Russ is now conducting the Russ nursery at this place, since the departure of his father for the Willamette section.
    The business college is rapidly growing in importance, and our citizens are beginning to realize its value to the community.
    Mrs. Purdin is now officiating as landlady at the Grand Central, Mrs. Harris having last week removed to her mother's residence.
    The S.O. Pork Packing Co. is slaughtering a large number of hogs and will soon put a choice lot of new bacon and hams on the market.
    Jos. Hockersmith and C. K. Klum of Talent are associated together in the pork packing business at this place, and have begun business.
    There will be a grand jollification over the election of Cleveland and Stevenson at Medford next Tuesday. Everybody is invited to attend and participate.
    Recorder Faris has completed the assessment roll of Medford, and it is open to inspection until after the 10th of December, as provided for in the town ordinances.
    Francis Fitch, Esq. was greeted by a fair-sized audience at the opera house last Saturday, and delivered one of the best speeches made in the state during the past campaign.
    A prime lot of cold-storage venison was last week shipped to Portland by H. McCarthy of the ice works, and the company will afford facilities to hunters in the future to make a market for their game abroad.
    Mrs. M. A. Armstrong, wife of Mark Armstrong, died at the family residence in Medford last Saturday, of malarial fever, after an illness of several weeks. She was buried in the Jacksonville cemetery on Monday. The bereft family have the sympathy of the entire community.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 2


    The business of shipping out old junk from the larger towns of this valley was last week inaugurated by two Romanians at Ashland. It is a well-established business in the different American cities.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 3


    Joe Hockersmith of Medford was in town yesterday. He has made arrangements to buy over 1000 head of fat hogs already, and will manufacture them into bacon, lard and hams.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1892, page 3


    H. McCarthy, of the ice house, last Sunday shipped a fine lot of venison to a fish house in Portland. The venison had been in cold storage in the ice house for a few days and was in fine condition. The ice house will prove quite an accommodation to hunters who wish to store game while making arrangements to ship.--[Medford Mail.
    Sheriff Pelton lately arrested David Mitchell of Eden precinct on a charge of shooting at a man named Chapman, and brought him to town. Mitchell had a preliminary examination in Recorder Day's court and was held to answer before the grand jury in the sum of $200. He furnished the bonds at once and is now at liberty.--[Mail.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, November 11, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. John W. Curry left Medford Wednesday for Albion, Mendocino Co., Cal., where Mr. Curry is in charge of a large mercantile business.
    Isaac Woolf, of Medford, returned home last week from a trip down into California. Mr. Woolf sold the team of fine horses which he drove down, but says it was difficult to find a purchaser.
"Personal,"
Ashland Tidings, November 11, 1892, page 3


    J. H. Whitman at Medford received a circular advising all Democrats to support the Weaver electors as the surest way to elect Cleveland. Mr. Whitman at once replied as follows:
    The circular is discouraging, disorganizing and disgraceful in its every sentence to such an extent that I dislike to charge it upon any political organization; but it has an author somewhere, and whoever the perpetrators may be, I desire now to denounce them as both cowards and scoundrels, and to denounce the personal insult heaped upon me by sending the trash to me, thereby assuming that I am likewise a coward and scoundrel, capable of perpetrating such base treason to my party and its principles as to distribute the circular.

"Is It Democratic Treason?"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 11, 1892, page 1


    Dr. R. Pryce is in San Jose, Cal., to spend a portion of the winter.

"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, November 17, 1892, page 1


Medford Ratifies.
    A torchlight brigade of 280 illuminated performers marched through the streets of Medford shouting for Cleveland. A rare old time was had, everybody satisfied except a few who rather wished that it hadn't happened just that way. The Grants Pass band was present and gave them some sweet and stirring music. The number of states carried by Cleveland were represented by ladies on horseback. Postmaster Howard, Mr. Edwards and Uncle John Wrisley were in the procession looking a little worse for wear, and apparently in deep mourning. Messrs. C. S. Price, R. A. Miller, J. T. Bowditch, W. H. Parker and J. D. Whitman and others furnished the chin music for the occasion.
Valley Record, Ashland, November 17, 1892, page 3


    Fred Barneburg drove in over three hundred beef steers from the Dead Indian country last week, where he has been having them fed for the last two months.

"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, November 17, 1892, page 3


    Quite a number of our people attended the Cleveland jubilee at Medford Tuesday evening, and the majority attended the advertised "free ball." But after the crowd had formed on the floor two collectors went around and collected 50 cents from each gentleman, claiming this sum was needed to defray the expenses of the musicians and the hall rent. This caused some disaffection, not that the amount was large, but that the posters advertised a free dance. A jubilee will be held here Saturday evening, and the best band in the state will furnish music. The hall and everything will be free. Let all come and have a good time. It will not cost a cent.

"Jacksonville Jottings," Valley Record, Ashland, November 17, 1892, page 3


A Case of Kidnapping.
    A correspondent of the Times writes: The stealing of his infant son from the mother's arms by Henry Mensor, last week, is still the topic of conversation in Medford. The husband and wife had agreed to separate, the mother to retain the youngest child, a boy of less than two years, the father to have the custody of the elder son. Mrs. M. and her babe had been at the home of her married sister at that place a few days, when Henry appeared on the scene and coaxed his wife and her sister, accompanied by the little ones, to go to the photograph gallery to have their photos taken. Arriving at the place he requested the ladies to alight and assist the children from the vehicle. While the latter were yet seated in the buggy he whipped up the team and fled with them, in spite of the screams of the abandoned wife and mother, and has probably taken the children with him to Washington ere this.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


A Successful Affair.
    The Democratic jubilee at Medford was a success in every particular and will long be remembered. Hundreds of people from different portions of southern Oregon were there, and all enjoyed themselves. The affair reflects credit on those who managed it, for they did their work patriotically and well. The torchlight procession, headed by the Grants Pass band, was a large and handsome one. Short speeches were made by Judge Crawford, Hon. J. D. Whitman, W. S. Crowell, W. H. Parker and Cols. Bowditch and Miller and others, all of which were well received.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


    The R.R.V.R.R. will run a special train tomorrow, which will carry free of charge all who wish to attend the jubilee at Jacksonville.
    The parade and torchlight procession at Jacksonville tomorrow (Saturday) evening will be one of the grandest and largest ever seen in Oregon.
    The "merry-go-round" moved to Jacksonville from Medford yesterday and will be here for several days, much to the delight of the youngsters.
    Dr. Cardwell, of the state board of horticulture, is in California looking into the condition of the fruit interests there as compared with Oregon.
    C. D. Walrath of Oklahoma, formerly of Medford, is now at Dunsmuir making preparations to put up a brick building on his lots at that place. He was here not long since.
    Let us make the jubilee at Jacksonville tomorrow a nonpartisan affair. Cleveland and Stevenson will be president and vice-president of the whole people, and not of any party or sect.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


    Miss Rose Buckley, who manages the telegraphic department of the Medford Business College so cleverly, spent Sunday night in Jacksonville.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


    Mr. and Mrs. C. A. Ruggles of Klamath County have lately been in Rogue River Valley, interviewing the oculist and dentist at Medford. We acknowledge a call from Mr. R., who formerly conducted a circus.
    J. W. Hockersmith has already shipped about a thousand head of fine hogs this season, and the new firm of Hockersmith & Klum will handle considerable of the produce of the county during the next few months.
    Mrs. Hansen of Medford precinct, who has been ailing with consumption for a long time, died on the 14th inst., and was buried in the Catholic cemetery at Jacksonville yesterday. Services were held at the grave by Rev. Father Watry.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


    Emma Bloom to Alex G. Hawes, lots 4, 5 and 6, blk 46, Medford. $10.
    Charles Nickell to Orchard Home Association, lots and blks in association tract. $3213.20.
    Orchard Home Association to K. R. Philpot, lot 1, blk 3, association tract. $427.50.
    Same to Anna H. Maxwell, lot 2, blk 3. $427.50.
    Same to Thos. J. Hyman, 5 lots in blk 3. $1250.
    L. F. Follett to N. H. Spencer, lot 12, blk 21, Medford. $1000.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The local dancing club now gives bi-weekly dances at the opera house, which pass off nicely.
    Dr. J. W. Odgers of Portland is the latest dentist in the valley, having recently located at Medford.
    Medford was crowded with people, who came to participate in the Democratic jollification, on Tuesday.
    The ladies of Medford announce a thanksgiving dinner for the benefit of sweet charity on the afternoon of the 24th.
    Ed. Pottenger was last week agreeably surprised by a visit from his mother, Mrs. Alex. Pottenger, of Minneapolis, Minn.
    The dinner and supper provided by the ladies of the Baptist Church on election day was a success, having netted over $60.00.
    W. H. P. Legate, the expert mechanic, may again be found at his forge in the blacksmith shop in which he is interested with Geo. F. Merriman.
    Jacksonville was better represented than any portion of southern Oregon at the jollification last Tuesday. About 150 people from the county seat participated in one way or another.
    The ball which followed the jubilee last Tuesday evening was a fitting finale for so grand an occasion. The opera house was filled with a merry throng, which danced until the wee sma' hours of morning to excellent music furnished by Messrs. Owings and Cook.
    Tuesday was a stormy day, and the rain interfered greatly with the arrangements which had been made for the exercises during the day. The parade, in which a large number of ladies on horseback participated, was a handsome one and was highly spoken of by all who witnessed it.
    The great success of the Democratic jubilee last Tuesday, and the fact that the most cordial feeling prevailed over it--even the Republicans pronouncing it one of the best-conducted and most pleasant demonstrations ever held in the county--is a source of much congratulation to the gentlemen who had the matter in charge. There was no effort made to compel anyone to "eat crow," and it was simply the outpouring and effervescence of joy over the result of the election, which will do a world of good in reuniting and harmonizing the Democracy of the country. Let us repeat the gratifying success at Jacksonville tomorrow night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    Conrad Mingus to H. F. Wood, lot 5 blk, 44, Medford; $250.
    H. F. Wood to C. Ulrich, lot 5, blk 44, Medford; $170.
    Adoniram J. Stewart to John R. Wilson, land adjoining Medford; $265.45.
    Charles Nickell to Orchard Home Association, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, 17, 18, 19, 20, 21, 22, 23, 24, 25, 26, 27, 28, 29, 30, 31, 32, 33, 36, 37, 40, 41, blk 3, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, 16, blk 4, of Orchard Home Tract, as per plat of same filed in recorder's office; $3213.20.
    Orchard Home Association to Katharine R. Philpot, lot 1, blk 3, O.H.A. tract; $427.50.
    Orchard Home Association to Anna H. Maxwell, lot 2, blk 3, O.H.A. tract; $427.50.
    Orchard Home Association to Thomas A. Hymon, lots 24, 25, 28, 32, blk 3, O.H.A. tract; $1250.
    L. A. Follett to N. H. Spencer, lot 12, blk 21, Medford; $100.
Ashland Tidings, November 18, 1892, page 2


    Mrs. Patterson, of Eugene, Mrs. Willis and Mrs. Abrams, of Roseburg, and Mrs. Sutter, of Medford, have sent up a wonderful display of cut blooms, covering over a hundred varieties. Their combined contributions constitute the attraction of the fair, and the management feel very grateful for the exquisite addition to the show.

"The Great 'Mum Fair,"
Evening Capital Journal, Salem, November 18, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. Gruby, who has been engaged as waitress at the Central Hotel, Medford, for some time, has gone to Yreka to spend the winter.

"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, November 24, 1892, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Willy Green, the tailor, has left Medford for other parts.
    Robt. T. Lawton is preparing to open a saddler shop in his building opposite Angle & Plymale's.
    W. G. Cooper is now farming in the Santa Clara Valley, Cal., and will soon remove his family thither.
    E. L. Brown last week removed his stock of jewelry from the old stand in the Stanley building to the Wood harness shop.
    Mr. Chute, of the late firm of Chute & Campbell, jewelers, has located at Klamath Falls, while Mr. Campbell has gone to California.
    Mr. Hastings, the night miller at Davis' flouring mills, has departed for Prescott, Wash., and the mill is not at present running at night.
    Robt. Faris has been paying Jacksonville several visits lately. He may leave for Junction City to resume his position on the freight train, in a few days.
    I. L. Hamilton, having finished his duties as county assessor in a satisfactory manner, has gone south, and may go as far as Mexico. Success to him.
    Hockersmith & Klum have secured control of a five-acre pasture north of the distillery. Medford bids fair to be the Chicago of southern Oregon in the packing line.
    Dr. Demorest had the pleasure of entertaining a number of relatives from the Dakota country during the week, including a sister and brother from that bleak clime.
    A. Fetsch, lately from San Francisco, has opened a tailor shop on C Street. He has had much experience in first-class shops in different cities, and guarantees satisfaction. Give him a call.
    Cotton bolls matured thoroughly in the dooryard of Mr. Johnson of the ice works at this place this season, which is important news in view of the fact that cotton has advanced two cents in price since the recent Democratic victory.
    The supper given for the benefit of the same company by the Ladies' Benevolent Society at the opera house netted the handsome sum of $50, and was pronounced one of the most satisfactory entertainments ever given in Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
November 25, 1892, page 2


    Jacob Kohen to W. I. Vawter, lot 12, blk 13, town of Medford. $500.
    Conrad Mingus to H. F. Wood, lot 5, blk 44, town of Medford. $250.
    H. F. Wood to C. Ulrich, lot 5, blk 44, town of Medford. $175.
    A. J. Stewart to John R. Wilson, tract in Medford. $260.45.
    S. S. Pentz to Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., quitclaim to land in twp 37s, r2w. $1.51.
    W. I. Vawter to Simon Rosenthal, QC to lot 12, blk 13, Medford. $1.
    William Johnson et al. to F. W. Lutkemeier, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 41, Medford. $1.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1892, page 2


A Complimentary Notice.
    Dr. J. W. Odgers, the dentist, left this noon for Medford, where he will be located, being obliged to seek a more bracing climate on account of Mrs. Odgers' health. During the few months of residence here Dr. Odgers showed himself not only to be a good citizen, making many friends here, but as well a first-class dentist, already building up a good practice, his work speaking for his skill, backed up by long experience. Medford is fortunate in securing so competent a dentist. There is no profession in which one needs to be sure they are in good hands more than in dentistry, and this the patrons of Dr. Odgers can depend on.--[Albany Democrat, Nov. 8th.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1892, page 3


Dental Notice.
    Dr. J. W. Odgers, the dentist, has permanently located in Medford for the practice of dentistry. From a continued practice of over fourteen years, he is prepared to guarantee entire satisfaction. Give him a call. Office over Slover's drugstore, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1892, page 3

    Rev. F. J. Edmunds, lately of Medford, is now in charge of the Presbyterian pulpit at Klamath Falls.
    Fred. Barneburg of Medford precinct, the well-known stockraiser, is at present feeding 300 fine beef steers.
    A. Strobel, the proprietor of the "merry-go-round," is now in Jacksonville with his family. His machine is located on the vacant lot near the depot.

    The Rogue River Valley Railway Co., whose line extends between Jacksonville and Medford, reports a total gross earning for the year [of] $3,221. The road is 5½ miles in length. Cost of road and equipment, $41,160.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1892, page 3


    H. B. Reed, who is manufacturing fence at Grants Pass, recently returned from a trip to California.
    Dr. Odgers and A. Fetsch, Medford's new dentist and tailor, made the Times office a pleasant visit on Tuesday.
    Miss Sophie Simon of Eagle Point has been visiting at the residence of H. Klippel of this place during the week.
    Mrs. Klippel of Jacksonville, accompanied by her sister, Mrs. Allison of California, visited at Eagle Point last week, being the guests of Mrs. Simon.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    Jacob Kahn and wife to W. I. Knowles, lot 12, blk 13, Medford; con $500.
    S. S. Pentz and wife to Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., land in tp 37 s, r2w; $150.
    W. I. Vawter and wife to Simon Rosenthal, lot 12, blk 13, Medford; $1.
Ashland Tidings, November 25, 1892, page 2


    J. M. Lofland last Friday turned over the "boss" hog of the season to the Medford Packing Company. It was a two-year-old (but littered at the same date as W. H. Parker's celebrated 10-month-old porkers mentioned in the Times recently) and tipped the scales at 490 lbs., netting Mr. Lofland $22.05 at 4½ cts., the price paid.

"Brevities,"
Ashland Tidings, November 25, 1892, page 3


    A daughter was born to the wife of C. B. Cristler at Medford, Nov. 11th.

"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, December 1, 1892, page 1


    P. B. O'Neil returned to Medford Sunday from a visit with relatives at San Jose and San Francisco.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, December 1, 1892, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. A. Davis' handsome residence has been greatly improved by its new coat of paint.
    Messrs. Welds and McCloud of the wire-brace fence works were in town during the last week.
    The looks of the Grand Central Hotel bar has been greatly improved by the paperhanger and painter.
    Considerable building is going on here; also in the vicinity of town. Medford is steadily going ahead.
    John Stearns last week scalded his foot badly at the packing house, and has laid off in consequence, being at Ashland during the week.
    Fred. Barneburg brought in his fine band of beef steers from the Dead Indian section last week, and has commenced feeding them.
    L. M. Lyon has taken the contract to finish up the Episcopal Church at this place, the ladies of the Guild having raised the means.
    D. T. Pritchard has bought and will fit up the building lately belonging to Messrs. Vawter and Rosenthal, for use in his jewelry business.
    The S.O. Pork Packing Co. has a new crop of bacon, lard and hams, of fine quality, which they are disposing of in large quantities.
    Miss Mamie Day, Miss Nellie Soliss and Day Parker of Jacksonville precinct were enrolled as members of the business college during the past week.
    A. S. Hammond, the attorney, will this week remove his family from Ashland to Medford for permanent residence. He has built a neat residence here.
    The project to put up a business college building for the use of Prof. Rigby's classes seems to be on the verge of fulfillment. The project is a most worthy one, and should be carried out.
    The Medford dancing club held its regular semi-monthly party at the opera house last Saturday evening. Messrs. Owings and Cook of Jacksonville furnished the music. It was a pleasant affair.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1892, page 2


    P. H. Oviatt to Mrs. Callie Palm, lot 1, blk 60, Medford. $250.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1892, page 2


Incorporations.
    Articles of incorporation have lately been filed with the secretary of state by the following: Wm. Johnson, F. W. Lutkemeier, H. H. McCarthy and O. W. Johnson, incorporating the Southern Oregon Brewing, Ice & Cold Storage Company, with a capital stock of $25,000. Medford is the principal place of business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1892, page 3

    J. M. Lofland of this precinct last week sold a hog to the Medford packing company at Medford which weighed 400 pounds, being something over a year old. The animal was of the Poland China breed and netted the owner $22.00.
    J. Weeks & Sons of Medford and Phoenix, the well-known workers in wood and manufacturers of furniture, etc., have shown some samples of their skill in J. Nunan's elegant resident in Jacksonville. Besides doing considerable of the fancy work on the edifice, they have manufactured five mantels from oak, which are marvels of workmanship and ingenuity. Their work will compare favorably with the best seen in larger cities.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1892, page 3


    A son was born to the wife of John Robinson at Medford the 28th ult.
    A daughter arrived at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Cottrell of Medford, Nov. 23rd.
    December 26th is the day set for the 3rd annual ball of Talisman Lodge, K. of P., of Medford.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, December 8, 1892, page 1


    Fred Barneburg, the big stock-raiser, was in the city yesterday visiting his daughter, Mrs. D. High.
    Mrs. B. R. Willets went to Medford Tuesday to attend the wedding of her cousin, Miss May Crane, to Mr. Cox.
    Mr. and Mrs. M. L. Alford went to Medford Sunday, where Mose will be engaged for some time in C. W. Wolters' grocery.
    Wm. Townsend has been up from Medford for two weeks, during the dangerous illness of his mother, who is now somewhat improved.
"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, December 8, 1892, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. Maggie Gruby is now a resident of Yreka, Cal.
    I. L. Hamilton and Jeff Brophy are off on a trip to Mexico.
    Interest is already being taken in our coming town election.
    The business college has fifty-four students enrolled for the winter course.
    S. H. Holt is now on the road in the interest of the Medford business college.
    Robt. Galloway passed through the valley one day last week, en route for the north.
    A new assay office has been opened here, which will doubtless prove of considerable benefit.
    W. C. Engledow contemplates removing his family from the county seat to this place soon, it is said.
    Mr. Hastings has returned from the state of Washington and is employed at the Medford distillery.
    The distillery will soon start up for the winter's run. Its products are first-class and proving popular.
    The Medford distillery has received the required authority and will resume operations in a few days.
    Spencer Childers, Jr., has the contract to erect a handsome residence for W. B. Roberts in the southern part of Medford.
    Miss Lucy Demorest last week returned home to Dakota, after visiting her brothers, the dental surgeons, at this place.
    Prof. Rigby is displaying a fine moss-agate paperweight, presented him by friends and former students in California as a testimonial.
    Miss Lee Daniels is again employed in the dining room of the Grand Central Hotel, which is gratifying to her many friends here.
    F. S. Rankin was at one time very low, and it was thought he could not possibly recover. He is somewhat improved at present.
    Much poultry is at present being shipped out of this valley, especially from Medford, for the holiday trade. Davis & Pottenger have handled a large portion of it.
    The library connected with the Medford business college, which is one of the best in southern Oregon, has lately been enlarged by the addition of a new supply of books.
    Miss May Davidson recently closed a term of school at Soda Springs, having had an average of twenty-three pupils in attendance. She is one of our most popular teachers.
    L. B. Fisher of piano fame departed last week for Carthage, Mo., his former home, and will probably take a position in the house for which he has been working at Minneapolis, after the holidays.
    A number of subscriptions to the proposed Medford business college building have already been received, and the prospects for the success of the scheme are flattering. Prof. Rigby thinks that it will cost $4,000 to erect a structure that would answer all purposes.
    There was a hunting match one day this week, participated in by sixteen residents of Medford. M. W. Skeel and Geo. B. Addington chose sides, and the match was won by the latter's team by 60 points. About 1000 points were made by the Nimrods. An oyster supper at the expense of the defeated side was afterward indulged in.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 2


    Dr. W. M. Marsters, lately of this section, is now residing in San Joaquin County, Cal.
    A company has been organized at Medford for the establishment of a fishery on Lost River in Klamath County.
    The Lacy herd of cattle, belonging to Jas. R. Howard, were last week driven to Medford precinct for winter quarters.
    We wish to call the attention of the public to the beautiful photographs Messrs. Rifenburg & Murphy are making at their studio in Medford, at prices to suit the times. Call and see them, whether you want work or not.
    H. H. McCarthy is now offering $1.20 per dozen for rabbits delivered at the cold-storage warehouse at Medford. They will soon become a staple commodity in this valley.
    L. C. Kellogg reports having shipped about 7,000 boxes, or 20 carloads, of apples out of this valley the past season, mostly consigned to Japan, via Portland. Inferior fruit is made into cider and shipped in liquid state, a vast improvement over breaking the market for good fruit with the culls, as was formerly practiced.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 3


    A. Fetsch of Medford, who recently opened a tailor shop at Medford, was at the county seat several times during the week.
    Miss Kate Lemberger, court stenographer, during the past week returned from east of the mountains, where she has been on official business for some time past.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 3


    The R.R.V.R.R. has reestablished its wood yard on the schoolhouse flat.
    The R.R.V.R. has several men employed in ballasting and putting its road in good repair.
    M. L. Alford and wife were in Jacksonville yesterday. They will locate in Medford, we learn.
    Cabinet photographs are $3.00 per dozen at Rifenburg & Murphy's studio in Medford. Satisfaction guaranteed.
    Max Muller's sawmill, which has been in operation at J. A. Crain's place, a few miles east of Medford, cut nearly 900,000 feet of lumber during the past season.
    It is said that the Childers-Phipps damage case, which was tried this week, will be appealed, as neither party is pleased with the verdict of the jury.
    E. C. Brooks, the veteran jeweler and dealer in holiday goods, has lately received a large and first-class stock of jewelry, diamonds, watches, plush goods, standard books and everything else in the line of holiday goods. There is no place in southern Oregon where a handsome Christmas present can be obtained cheaper than at Mr. Brooks'. Don't fail to give him a call and examine his goods.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    P. H. Oviatt to Mrs. Carrie Palm, lot 1, blk 60, Medford; $250.
    W. H. Hosler to D. G. Karnes, land in tp 37 s, r2w, 5 84/100 acres, also lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14, 15, Park add. to Medford; $900.
    Charles Nickell to Orchard Home Association, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, blk 8, Orchard Home tract, Medford; $290.
Ashland Tidings,
December 9, 1892, page 2


Lost River Fishery Experiment.
    J. D. Whitman, D. H. Miller, William Slinger and J. A. Whitman, of Medford, have incorporated the Klamath Fish Company, with a capital stock of $8,000. The purpose of the company is to prepare for commerce some of the fish which annually run up Lost River in Klamath County from Tule Lake in great quantities. These fish have been called suckers and have also been classed as a variety of mullet, but the new company will call them "lake pike," as it is claimed that the fish are not a true mullet. In February and March of each year they run up Lost River in such great numbers that there is no trouble whatever in taking as many as may be desired. For years the Indians have caught and dried them in great quantities at a fall or rapid in the river known as the Lost River Fishery. The new company has bought of Andrew Soule the lands on Lost River which include this fishery, and is preparing to experiment largely in salting, drying and canning the fish during the next annual run. Hon. J. D. Whitman and his son are now out in Klamath County, putting up buildings and making other preparations for the business. Mr. Whitman considers the fish worth canning and anticipates that it will make a good and saleable article of merchandise. If the company's experiment be a success it will undoubtedly lead up to a large business, for the quantity of fish to be taken from Lost River is apparently without practical limit.
Ashland Tidings,
December 9, 1892, page 3


    J. D. Whitman, of Medford, went out to Klamath County last Friday, to supervise preparations for the Lost River fishery experiment, in which he and others are interested.
    Mrs. W. I. Vawter, of Medford, spent several days in Ashland this week with her mother, Mrs. Hill, of Portland, who is also the mother of Rev. Clay M. Hill, the Baptist home missionary and revivalist. They were guests at Mrs. P. Dunn's and Mrs. D. L. Rice's, Mr. Hill being a cousin of Mrs. Dunn.
    C. H. Veghte has been at Medford this week supervising the laying of 3800 feet of tiling for the distillery, to give it a supply of water from the ditch. The distillery will begin its winter run soon.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1892, page 3


    On December 2nd a daughter was born to the wife of N. S. Bennett of Medford.
    Miss Carrie Cooper, of Medford, has gone to Santa Clara County, Cal., to keep house for her father.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, December 15, 1892, page 1


    I. L. Hamilton and Mr. Brophy, of Medford, returned Saturday from their trip to Mexico, south of Yuma, where they may go and locate.
    D. W. O'Donnell, who went to Eureka, Cal., with Tom McAndrew, Jr., by way of Crescent City, returned yesterday. McAndrew is still there, as is H. H. Harrison.
    H. P. Wells has disposed of his band of beef cattle which he has been feeding in the Dead Indian country to Wm. Hanley of Medford, and expects to deliver them about the first of January.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, December 15, 1892, page 3


    Wm. Hanley was up to Maj. Barron's on Monday and bought some 60 head of fine beeves.

"Brevity Basket," Valley Record, Ashland, December 15, 1892, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. L. Townsend has temporarily quit the tonsorial business.
    Mrs. S. S. Pentz and her infant child are now visiting in California.
    Mrs. Fetsch arrived from Grants Pass last week to join our husband, our new tailor.
    Adam Schmidt and wife of Jacksonville have returned to Medford and will stay some time.
    Horace Nicholson's tenpin alley has been well patronized by the young men and their elders.
    Miss Carrie Cooper has rejoined her father at San Jose, Cal. The balance of the family will follow soon.
    M. L. Alford is now employed in the grocery store of C. W. Wolters. He removed with his family to Medford last week.
    O. Holtan, the merchant tailor, has recently gotten in a fine line of goods and is well prepared for the holiday trade. Give him a call.
    Miss Rose Buckley has returned home to Applegate, after teaching telegraphy in the Medford business college for some time past.
    Much interest attaches to the school matters published under the supervision of Prof. Narregan, who is making an excellent record as a teacher.
    Forty-five new residences have gone up in Medford during the last year, and the fact that there is not now a vacant house in the place speaks volumes for our prosperity.
    Mrs. W. I. Vawter last week accompanied her mother, Mrs. Hill, to Ashland for a short visit with the family of Rev. Clay M. Hill, the popular Baptist minister, who is brother and son to the ladies, respectively.
    W. P. Wood, having sold his stock of harness, saddles, etc. to D. T. Lawton, will soon remove his family to the eastern states. Mr. Lawton will carry on the business at the new shop on Main Street.
    C. H. Veghte of Ashland has been at Medford during the past week, engaged in laying about three-quarters of a mile of tiling for the distillery company, to enable them to get a better supply of water for condensing purposes.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has been in Klamath County during the week, supervising operations at the proposed fish cannery on Lost River, a company having been organized at this place to save the vast quantity of fish and their oil that have heretofore gone to waste there.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
December 16, 1892, page 2


    I. J. Phipps to J. W. Ward, w ½ lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford. $300.
    Julia E. Beekman to John A. Smith, lots 14 and 15, blk 3, Medford. $150.
    W. H. Hosler to D. G. Karnes, 5.80 acres in twp 37s, r2w, also lots 7, 8, 9, 10, 11, 12, 13, 14 and 15, blk 4, Park add. to Medford. $900.
    Chas. Nickell to Orchard Home Assoc'n., lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, blk 8, Orchard Home tract. $290.
    Orchard Home Association to Henry Pohlman, lots 10, 11, 14, 15 and 18, blk 3. $1250.
    Same to same, lots 1 and 2, blk 8. $500.
    Catherine Roberts to J. K. Reader, lot 9, blk 1, Cottage add. to Medford. $600.
    Thomas G. Spangler to Geo. B. Johnson, 1.26 acres in Ish add. to Medford. $35.
    C. W. Broback to Verlinda Miller, lot 9, blk 73, Medford. $25.
    Verlinda Miller to C. W. Skeel, lot 10, blk 73, Medford. $25.
    Geo. H. Andrews and wife to Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson, lots 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6, blk 41, Medford. $320.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1892, page 3


    John B. Cann, the big blowhard, of Siskiyou fame, is now keeping a house at Alton, Humboldt County, Cal. He figured as a witness in the Curtis murder case of San Francisco a short time since, although he probably knew nothing about it.
    N. H. Spencer of Griffin Creek recently sold to the Medford Pork Packing Co. two hogs weighing 935 pounds net, the heaviest pair yet delivered there.
    Timberland owners in the upper Rogue River country are talking of a scheme of having a railroad survey made in the spring from Aiken's mill down the north side of the river for about five miles, then crossing above Hole-in-the-Ground Canyon and coming down the south side of the stream, to some point on the S.P. line, at either Medford, Central Point or Tolo. The projectors intend making Eagle Point one of the stations on the road.
    The Cooper-Phipps damage case occupied the attention of the circuit court for several days the forepart of the week. It was stubbornly contested from beginning to end and resulted in the jury giving a verdict for the plaintiff, Miss Emma Cooper, in the sum of $5,000, after a short deliberation. The case will no doubt be appealed to the supreme court.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1892, page 3


    Geo. W. Isaacs, the Medford capitalist, was among our visitors during the week.
    J. E. Enyart of Medford visited our town during the week, on business connected with the formation of a gun club.
    Treasurer Bloomer is in the insurance line at present and will doubtless soon establish a fine business, as he is a rustler.
    Fred Luy, Jr., will arrive this week from Tacoma, Wash., where he is engaged in the barber business, but will not remain long.
    Wm. Townsend of Medford has been in attendance at the bedside of his mother at Ashland during the last week, the lady having been very ill.
    Dan Cardwell, who has been addicted to the use of opiates for a long time past, last week went to the Keeley Institute at Forest Grove for treatment.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1892, page 3


    A. Karitsch, a native of Alsace-Lorraine, died at the county hospital on the 14th, of typhoid fever. He was about 40 years of age and was formerly employed in the Medford distillery.
    Harrison Tuttle, formerly superintendent of the Siskiyou Quicksilver Mining Co.'s mines at Cinnabar, and Mrs. Nellie Plymale, lately of Jacksonville, were married at San Francisco on Dec. 8th.
    A. L. Reuter returned from his trip to Georgia, via California, one evening this week, accompanied by his daughter, Miss Lena. His condition is considerably improved, we are pleased to announce.
    A number of the residents of Jacksonville and Medford are taking steps toward the formation of a gun club, and expect to have a tournament at this place on Jan. 2d. This will furnish much amusement for "the boys," but may prove death to somebody.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    I. J. Phipps to J. W. Ward, w ½ of lot 1, blk 3, Barr's add. to Medford; $300.
    Thos. G. Spangler to Geo. B. Johnston, 1 26/100 acres in Ish add. to Medford; $35.
    Julia E. Beekman to John A. Smith, all of lots 14, 15, blk 43, Medford; $150.
Ashland Tidings,
December 16, 1892, page 2


    A number of the residents of Jacksonville and Medford are taking steps toward the formation of a gun club, and expect to have a tournament at this place on Jan. 2d.--[Times.
Ashland Tidings,
December 22, 1892



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Messrs. Brophy and Hamilton have returned from their trip to Mexico.
    Miss Minerva Armstrong is at Portland attending Prof. Armstrong's business college.
    Mr. Murphy, the photographer, made a trip to San Francisco, and has not returned as yet.
    J. H. Faris and J. S. Howard of this city have lately been appointed notaries public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Henry Smith's store has been in holiday regalia during the past week and presents a handsome appearance.
    The S.O. Packing Co. has slaughtered nearly 1500 head of fine, fat hogs and will continue in the good work.
    W. L. Townsend is back at his barber shop again, after attending at the bedside of his mother at Ashland for several days.
    Ham Wolters has been dissecting steers at the Premium Butcher Shop. He is an old hand at the business and will give satisfaction.
    Mrs. G. S. Briggs, who has been under the care of the physicians for some time past, is getting along nicely, after having had a difficult operation performed.
    J. E. Enyart accompanied A. W. Childs of the State Insurance Company on his trip through the valley last week, and will soon take rank as one of the leading solicitors of Oregon.
    Medford's city election will be held on the 10th day of January, 1893, and considerable interest in the matter of choosing the men to fill the various positions is already aroused.
    Hockersmith & Klum are still shipping large numbers of fat hogs to the northern markets, and will make the local demand for pork products that much better within a few months.
    C. W. Milton has resigned his position in J. R. Wilson' blacksmith shop for the purpose of going into business for himself at Talent, and is succeeded at his old forge by A. Nicholson.
    Mr. and Mrs. John Beek have gone to Portland on a wedding trip, and will return in a short time and make their future home in Medford. They have the congratulations and best wishes of numerous friends.
    The novelty of a Christmas pyramid will be presented at the Baptist Church tomorrow evening, in lieu of the usual Christmas tree, which will appear at all the other churches according to the time-honored custom.
    The Medford Business College has been incorporated, and it is the intention of the incorporators, W. I. Vawter, M. E. Rigby and Dr. B. F. Adkins, to construct a $5000 building in the near future. Success to the enterprise.
    Mrs. T. Chagnon and Miss Verna Weaver have opened dressmaking parlors in the Odd Fellows' building. They are experts in this line of art, employing the latest and most popular systems. As they guarantee satisfaction and are reasonable in their charges, they will no doubt do a large business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville,
December 23, 1892, page 2


    G. W. Howard to Rachel M. Johnson, lot 6, blk 48, Medford. $200.
    Wm. R. Callahan to Wm. S. Conkling, lots 9 & 10, in blk 6, Park add. to Medford. $95.
    Volna Webster to W. R. Stammers, part of lot 4, blk 8, Park add. to Medford. $50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1892, page 2


    D. W. Alberry, who filled the position of section boss for the R.R.V.R.R. Co., and afterwards went to Grants Pass, has levanted to parts unknown. He leaves a host of creditors wherever he "pitches his tent."
    J. Calvert, who looks after the business of a firm of contractors in southern Oregon, and who was recently charged with destroying a sack of mail matter, has been freed from the charge by the U.S. grand jury, now in session at Portland.
    The passenger car of the R.R.V.R.R. Co. was on dry dock for a day or two during the forepart of the week, and the passengers and mail were hauled to Medford by the detached engine or teams from the Union Livery Stable during the interim. It was an amusing sight to see several prominent citizens riding astride the cowcatcher between termini of the road.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. D. Allison last week departed for the bay city after a pleasant visit with her sister, Mrs. H. Klippel of this place.
    A. S. Hammond and family have removed to Medford from Ashland, and will reside there permanently, having built a nice home.
    Miss Rose Griffiths of Gold Hill, who has been engaged in teaching school at the Beagle schoolhouse during the past few months, was at Medford last week visiting her sister, Miss Madge.
    Will Martin is practicing dentistry at Oakland, Cal., while Geo. Martin, who is also a dentist, has gone to Berlin, Germany to accept a position. Both are sons of Alex. Martin and were born in Jacksonville.
    Chas. H. Pierce, who has been in New York and Pennsylvania for some time past, will return to Jacksonville in a short time, accompanied by a younger brother. Joe Pierce will remain at his home in New York state for awhile.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1892, page 3


    Attention is called to the advertisement of Mrs. T. Chagnon and Miss Verna Weaver, who have opened dressmaking parlors in Medford.
    It is rumored that the Medford and Jacksonville sports will indulge in a shooting tournament in this vicinity on Monday, Jan. 2, 1893. There will also be a horse race the same day.
    A boy whose name we did not learn was robbed by "hobos" at Medford yesterday. He was entrusted with some money by his father (about $12), of which fact the tramps somehow became apprised, and when the opportunity presented itself they lost no time in taking the coin from him. The criminals have as yet not been discovered, but they are supposed to be among the five hard characters which were subsequently arrested by Marshal Morine.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1892, page 3


Real Estate Transactions.
    Malenda Miller to C. W. Skeel; lt 10, blk 73, Medford, $25.
    G. W. Howard to Rachel M. Johnson; lts 5, 6, blk 4, Medford, $200.
    Wm. R. Callahan to Wm. S. Conklin; lts 9, 10, blk 6, Park addition to town of Medford, $95.
    Orchard Home Association to Henry Pohlman, lts 10, 11, 14, 15, 18, Orchard Home first adjoining Medford, $1250.
    Same to Same; lots 1, 2, blk 8, $500.
    Catherine and Charles Roberts to J. K. Reoder and wife; lt 9, blk 1, Medford $600.
    George H. Andrews to Johnson and McCarthy and Johnson; land in Medford $320.
    C. Mingus to Zera and Hattie Bliss; 2 acres in Mingus addition $175.
Ashland Tidings,
December 23, 1892, page 2


    Bert Whitman, of Medford, was in town yesterday. He shipped a carload of apples to Montana last week.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 23, 1892, page 3


    Hockersmith & Klum shipped 86 head of fat hogs to Portland last week, most of them having been bought by Joshua Patterson. Prices for fat hogs range from 3½ for the very scrubbiest to 4½, and even a little more, for the best. Patterson's band, being extra choice, was wanted by different buyers, and it is understood he finally sold at $4.60 or $4.75 per 100 lbs. Hogs and poultry make far more money for our farmers than do horned stock, in proportion to the capital invested. Southern Oregon ought to double her production of bristles and feathers.

"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 23, 1892, page 3


    Rev. A. S. Foster is to take charge of the Presbyterian Church in Medford next month.
    Henry Breese and Grant Rawlings, of Talent, are attending the Medford business college.
    D. A. Boussum, who married Miss Cottrell at Medford a year ago, died on Dec. 18th of consumption, aged 23 years.
    M. E. Rigby, W. I. Vawter and Dr. Adkins have incorporated the Medford business college. A bonus is asked for the erection of a $5000 building.
    John Beek, Western Union operator at Medford, and Miss Josie Merriman were married on the 21st ult., and are spending their honeymoon in Portland.
    L. L. Angle, of Medford, passed the 60th milepost in prime condition and was given a birthday party at his beautiful home in honor of the event.
"Pressed Bricks," Valley Record, Ashland, December 29, 1892, page 1


    Charley Laird came over Saturday from his place on Little Klamath Lake and married a nice young lady near Medford, returning home with his prize Tuesday. This is Charley's first trip this way since driving stage six years ago.

"Personal and Social," Valley Record, Ashland, December 29, 1892, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Bert Whitman last week shipped a carload of fine apples northward.
    Christmas festivities were held at the different churches in town and proved quite interesting.
    The usual ten-mill tax was levied by the city council for municipal purposes at its meeting last week.
    A. L. Eager of Oakland, Cal. has been on duty at the depot telegraph office while Mr. Beek was on his honeymoon.
    A lodge of the I.O.G.T. was organized at Medford last week with 40 charter members and an efficient corps of officers.
    A party of young people assembled at the residence of L. L. Angle one evening last week to celebrate the 60th birthday anniversary of Mr. A.
    Mrs. H. Ralph of Ashland has been at Medford during the past week engaged in nursing Mr. Rankin after his long tussle with typhoid fever.
    Oscar Stewart, formerly of this precinct, has joined the ranks of benedicts, for further particulars of which see another column. We tender congratulations and best wishes.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman, who has been looking after the affairs of the new fishing company in Klamath County, has returned home. He is well pleased with the prospects.
    Since selling his property on D Street to Tilson Smith of Rogue River, A. M. Woodford has perfected arrangements to build at once on his residence lots in the western portion of the city.
    There was some disappointment over the exhibition of the English female turners in this place on the 24th, as it was not nearly as naughty as the baldheads had hoped it would be; in short, there was nothing very much out of the way about the show.
    The tournament held here last Monday, between sportsmen of Jacksonville, Ashland and Medford, attracted a good-sized crowd. Some good shooting was done, and honors were divided between our boys and those from Ashland. The fun will be continued at Jacksonville next Monday.
    The ball given in the opera house under the auspices of the Knights of Pythias was one of the handsomest and most delightful ever held in this city. The best of music and supper had been provided, and nothing was left undone to score the success which rewarded the efforts of the managers.
    J. E. Drucks of Portland, who resided in Medford a few years since, has commenced a suit against J. Fleischner, the progress and result of which will be regarded with an extreme degree of interest by the public generally, and will determine whether the "middleman" or broker in a money-lending proposition is to be held in any way responsible. Drucks claims that he made a loan of $1500 to Johnathan Tice and F. M. Reid, through the representation of Fleischner that Tice and Reid were worth $40,000 or more, and were perfectly responsible, when such was not the case. As Drucks never got his money back from the borrowers, he wants a judgment against Fleischner, the scalper, for principal and interest.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 2


    George Stockton, formerly an Ashland printer, is now a resident of Hartford, Connecticut.
    E. Hendricks of Sonoma County, cal., who paid his brother-in-law, I. M. Harvey of Medford precinct, a visit not long since, was well pleased with southern Oregon and may return to reside in the future.
    A number of young folks from Jacksonville attended the party given by the Knights of Pythias at Medford last Monday evening and thoroughly enjoyed themselves. They report that nothing was left undone by the managers and that they succeeded admirably.
    J. A. Wilson, on the occasion of his being reelected superintendent of the Ashland Mining Co., was presented with the little gold brick designed for a pocket piece, formed from bits of gold picked up about the margins of the pile at the recent cleanup, and valued at $100. Sheriff Kelly was reelected president and J. B. Coffin secretary of the company, which is principally composed of Portland men.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


    Mrs. W. Moore, who has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. J. W. Merritt of Central Point, returned home yesterday.
    Everett Mingus, M.D., formerly of Jacksonville precinct, who graduated last June from the medical department of the University of Pennsylvania at Philadelphia, has recently accepted the chair of histology in the Willamette University of Salem.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


    In the Phipps cases, tried in the circuit court at this term, Judge Hale has denied motion for a new trial, and they will doubtless be appealed to the supreme court.
    John F. White, who is still at his old home in Kentucky, writes to the Times that he will probably return to Jacksonville in the spring. His wife is in poor health, and as soon as she is able to travel they will leave for the West.
    The People's Party have named a local committee, consisting of N. A. Jacobs, S. H. Holt, Ira Wakefield and W. H. Breese, to draft bills in more or less numbers for introduction in the legislature. We trust the brethren will act judiciously, and not from buncombe motives.
    The Times, in its last issue, inadvertently neglected to mention that the literary society of the Jacksonville public school made the literary society of the Medford business college a fraternal visit a short time since. A special train carried down about 50 young folks that evening, all of whom report having had an agreeable time, as an interesting programme, which also included refreshments, was observed. Such an exchange of ideas and fellow feeling is commendable and cannot but result in good.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


    Volna Webster to W. R. Stammers, Jr., part of lot 4, blk 8, Medford. $50.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


We Loan Money
To buy, build and improve your home at an average interest rate of only 1⅜ percent. Allow 12 years time in which to repay loans by small monthly installments. Pay investors big returns with absolute security. Assets over $100,000. For particulars apply to
                                        L. L. ANGLE, Agent,
                                            Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1892, page 3


College Incorporated
    Medford Mail: Last Saturday in this city, the Medford Business College was incorporated by the following gentlemen: Prof. M. E. Rigby, banker W. I. Vawter and Dr. B. F. Adkins. The objects of the incorporators are to erect a college building and maintain a business college in Medford. About a $5000 building will be erected in the near future. Subscription papers are in circulation asking for donations toward the enterprise. Several liberal amounts have already been subscribed.
Ashland Tidings, December 30, 1892, page 2


   


Last revised August 8, 2016
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.