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Medford News: 1891

No Medford newspapers from 1891 survive. Below are Medford-related news items from 1891, gleaned from other towns' papers Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


Medford 1891
From The Rogue River Valley, "The Italy of Oregon," Glass & Prudhomme, Portland, Oregon, 1891.


O. F. DEMOREST,
R E S I D E N T   D E N T I S T,
Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


R. PRYCE, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office in Williams' Brick Building, upstairs.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


J. B. WAIT, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office on Main Street, in Childers' building.
Calls promptly attended to, day and night.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


DR. S. DANIELSON,
Physio-Medical
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Special attention given to Chronic Diseases.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


E. P. GEARY, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Office in Hamlin's Block. Residence on C Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


E. B. PICKEL, M.D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
Medford, Oregon.
Calls Promptly Attended to Day or Night. Office on B Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


W. S. JONES, M.D.
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON
Medford, Oregon.
Office--Hamlin's Block.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1

FRANK GALLOWAY,
Medford,     -      Oregon,
MANUFACTURER OF
CELEBRATED UNIVERSAL COMBINATION FENCE!

View of Fence in Position.
It's Especially Adapted for Farms, Ranches, Orchards, Gardens and Lawns,
NEAT, DURABLE, STRONG AND CHEAP.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


ESTABLISHED SEPTEMBER 1, 1888.
Jackson County Bank,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Does a General Banking Business, and Buys and Sells
Eastern, Domestic and Foreign Exchange.
COLLECTIONS A SPECIALTY.
M O N E Y   L O A N E D   O N   F A V O R A B L E   T E R M S
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


Exchange!! Exchange!!
THE MEDFORD ROLLER MILLS will give in exchange for sixty pounds of clean milling wheat as follows: Thirty-eight pounds straight flour in [the] farmer's sacks, or thirty-four pounds of sacked flour. Exchange will apply at the Phoenix mill by adding two pounds. I am now ready to buy or store, or take in store on exchange, any amount offered.
A. A. DAVIS,       
Successor to Davis & France.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


A. GARRICK,
Merchant Tailor
And Importer of
Foreign and Domestic Woolens, Etc.,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
A FULL LINE of the best and most fashionable cloths, finishings, etc., constantly kept on hand, and nothing but first-class work turned out.
    All orders filled promptly at reasonable rates and satisfaction guaranteed.
A. GARRICK.   
Medford, May 13, 1889
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 1


WHY PAY $50 AND MORE FOR A CHEAP LOT
    When you can get an ENTIRE ACRE of the best fruit land in Nickell's Addition to Medford for the SAME price?
    Nickell's Addition joins Medford's western corporation line, is situated in a beautiful and healthful location, and is within a stone's throw of the Medford schoolhouse. The land is particularly adapted to horticulture, and great returns would be realized there from a few acres planted in prunes, peaches, grapes, etc.
    Two of its best features are that it is free from city taxes, although not lying a great distance from the business portion of Medford, while the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will run through the land near the northern boundary.
    It has been laid out in tracts of five acres and less, and will be sold at very reasonable rates on the most favorable terms, viz: one-third in cash, one-third in one year, and balance in two years.
    For further particulars apply to any reputable real estate dealer, who will take pleasure in showing you the addition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 2


    The recent announcement of the marriage of Miss Hattie Webb to W. F. Williamson, of California, took Medford society by surprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891, page 3


Fruit! HOMES IN ORCHARDS. Fruit!
    We challenge the reader to successfully controvert the assertion that an acre of thrifty, well-cultivated, producing orchard trees in the valley of Rogue River will yield a net yearly income of $100. It will average 100 trees to the acre, and the estimate is based upon the demonstrated fact that each fruit tree will produce $1 in value, net, of marketable fruit each year.
That is Legal Interest at 10 Per Cent. on $1000.
    In other words an acre of producing fruit trees has a valuation of $1000. It is better than any bank--for the bank is sometimes carried into Canada by the cashier. Dame nature--a trustworthy guardian--takes care of the principle, and the dividends never fail. Of course if you plow your orchard once in twenty years, and rob the trees of their nourishment by making a cornfield of the orchard ground, and invite the birds and orchard pests to make a restaurant of your orchard, you must not complain that your horticultural methods have precipitated a foreclosure of the mortgage on your orchard.
CULTIVATE YOUR ORCHARD
With half the care you give wheat fields, and it will yield an income on a valuation of $1000 an acre. There is not a wheat field in this county which yields such an income, and EVERY orchard does.
    We propose to sell you an acre of fine alluvial soil, within cannon shot of five growing towns, close to the steel rails of a transcontinental railroad, in the most beautiful valley on the slope of the Pacific, with one hundred growing, thrifty producing fruit trees, to be selected by you. Buy it for a home to shelter you if adversity or the winters of old age overtake you and find you penniless.
IT IS WORTH $1,000.
    We give away the land. Pay us $10 a month, 10 cents a tree, for two years, and we will present you a warranty deed of the acre, and GUARANTEE it to have a thrifty, growing, producing orchard.
    Despite these facts the farmers of the country continue to value their land high, and rob its soil by sowing it with wheat and competing in the markets of the world with the serfs of Russia and the slaves of India. "Export the wheat of a country and you ship away the vitality of its soil," says a great economic writer. The people of Jackson County should learn this as an axiom.
    Every breadwinner at the forge or near the cutting saws, or in sound of the hum of the shuttles, or the thunder of the factories, or toiling late over desk and counter, should study our plan well. It means a home for a lifetime out of the meager savings of 2 years' work. A more beautiful and a larger home than ninety percent of the population of the civilized earth can claim to own.
    Write to us, and we will send you our illustrated book of this great valley and our Orchard Home.
The Orchard Home Association.
Medford.      -      -      -      Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 2


$500,000, to loan, $500,000,
    By J. H. Whitman of Medford, on improved farm security in Jackson County, at the best rates of any loan agency in the county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 3


Trees! Trees!
HAMMON BROS.
NURSERIES!
    We have removed our Nurseries to Medford, where we have secured New Ground, the soil of which is a sandy loam, enabling us without irrigation to grow healthy, thrifty trees with an abundance of fibrous lateral roots without heavy tap roots, to be cut away in digging. We offer
                                     1000 Prune,
                                         10000 Apples,
                                             5000 Peach,
                                                 5000 Pears,
                                                     10000 Grapes,
And a good assortment of all the leading varieties of fruits.
Trees as Low as any First-Class Nursery.
GIVE US A CALL.
Nurseries at East End of Bridge.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 4


Jacksonville to Medford.
    Patronize the only wagon that connects with every train, rain or shine, and carries the U.S. mail and Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express. Satisfaction guaranteed.
JOHN DYAR, Driver.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 2, 1891 et seq., page 4


    Extensive preparations are being made for celebrating the completion of the Jacksonville-Medford railroad on New Year's Day. Buildings are being decorated, and the town will be illuminated and lighted with bonfires in the evening. There will be public speaking and a grand ball at the U.S. Hotel. The train that runs through on that day will be gaily decorated with evergreens and flags, and everywhere the important event will be heralded with unbounded enthusiasm and rejoicing. Anvils will be fired and bells rung, and flags flying from every staff and steeple in the town.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1891, page 2


    An engine from the "Oregonian" road arrived at Medford the first of the week, to be used on the Jacksonville branch, having been leased for that purpose. It is too heavy for the road, and a lighter one from the U.P.R.R. was sent out from Portland yesterday.
    The people who are building the Jacksonville branch railroad have been experiencing some of the troubles and annoyances that go to offset the advantages and pleasures of the managers of the big railroads of the country. In the hurry necessary to get the road put through and ready for operation by the first day of January of this our new year, the engine was started over the track toward Jacksonville Tuesday on a roadbed which has not yet been made solid by the required ballasting. The engine in use is a heavier one than should be used, and the first trouble of the management was the ditching of the engine. Of course there was nothing serious about the accident except the delay it occasioned, but that was a serious matter for the builders of the road. After much trouble, the engine was placed on the rails all right again by Wednesday morning.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 2, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Halley are in St. Louis on business.
    A. R. Childers and family have left this section for the state of Washington.
    Hammon Bros. have shipped about 25 carloads of apples from this point thus far during the season.
    A pleasant meeting of the literary society was held at the residence of D. J. Lumsden last Tuesday evening.
    The switch to the site of the proposed distillery is about finished. The building will be located north of town.
    J. O. Johnson, formerly of Medford, is now a resident of Whatcom, Wash. He is a live business man and is doing well.
    The carpenter shop of H. F. Wood is now conveniently located near the Clarendon Hotel. He is doing much work in his line of business.
    Knights of Pythias are justly proud of the beautiful satin banner presented them by the ladies of Medford on Christmas Eve. It is one of the prettiest ever seen in this section.
    John Edwards was delirious most of the week, on account of the terrible injuries he sustained at the Griffin Creek sawmill some time since, and can hardly be called convalescent yet.
    The city election takes place next Tuesday, and considerable interest is taken therein, especially in the contest for marshal, for which there are several candidates.
    Messrs. Medynski and Theiss, who intend to put up a large distillery and pork-packing plant at this place, are busily at work making the necessary arrangements for the inauguration of their enterprise.
    D. T. Pritchard and wife left Medford for southern California last week, whither they remove in the hope of benefiting Mrs. Pritchard's health, which has been very poor for some time past. Our town regrets greatly the loss of such estimable citizens.
    A convention was held at the opera house last Tuesday evening and the following nominations for town officers made: Mayor, G. W. Howard; councilmen, F. M. Plymale, A. A. Davis, F. Galloway and J. W. Short; recorder, J. H. Faris; treasurer, G. H. Haskins; marshal, Horace Nicholson.
    Much disappointment was felt by our people generally at the failure to enjoy their first ride on the new railroad on New Year's Day. When the engine was derailed on the short curve from the main track a general wail went up, and our local surveyor, J. S. Howard, raised himself several notches in the scale of public opinion by demonstrating his ability to lay out a curve that the engine could stick to under any circumstances.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 2


Welcome Fowler et al. to George Goeppert, lot 10, blk 71, Medford; $150.
Mrs. Sophenia Baker to G. H. Baker, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 8, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 6, Beatty's add. to Medford; $1, etc.
G. W. Connell to Delphine Goldsmith, quitclaim and release to lots 1 & 2, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford; $200.
Francis Fitch to D. H. Miller, lots 1 & 2, blk 54, Medford; and 1.62 acres in twp 37S, R2W; $175.
Wm. Clarke to Lou Della Jones, lot 16, blk 46, Medford; $525.
Mary A. Davison to H. F. Wood, lots 3 & 4, blk 40, Medford; $75.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 2


WHY PAY $50 AND MORE FOR A CHEAP LOT
    When you can get an ENTIRE ACRE of the best fruit land in Nickell's Addition to Medford for the SAME price?
    Nickell's Addition joins Medford's western corporation line, is situated in a beautiful and healthful location, and is within a stone's throw of the Medford schoolhouse. The land is particularly adapted to horticulture, and great returns would be realized there from a few acres planted in prunes, peaches, grapes, etc.
    Two of its best features are that it is free from city taxes, although not lying a great distance from the business portion of Medford, while the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will run through the land near the northern boundary.
    It has been laid out in tracts of five acres and less, and will be sold at very reasonable rates on the most favorable terms, viz: one-third in cash, one-third in one year, and balance in two years.
    For further particulars apply to any reputable real estate dealer, who will take pleasure in showing you the addition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 2


Lend a Hand.
    Now that the distillery enterprise at Medford is an accomplished fact, it behooves our farmers and foothill ranchers to ensure its success by making preparations in advance to raise all the grain necessary for its continuous operation. It should be the intention of our farmers to raise the utmost possible amount of corn and rye, especially during the coming season, while the enterprise is still in its infancy. The proprietors assure us that they will be able to afford a good market for all that is raised, and can at any time double their consuming capacity by working a night shift in case of emergency. Let the farmers but do their part in developing the industry, and the distillery and packing house enterprise will indeed prove a boon to our valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 3


    The railroad company is filling their ice houses at Ashland with a fine quality of congealed water imported from a land that is colder than this.
    Medford's Knights of Pythias are well satisfied with the social success they achieved at their Christmas ball, although financially the balance was on the wrong side of the ledger. The preparations had been very elaborate and the expenses correspondingly heavy. The boys are content in the knowledge that it will rank among the most enjoyable parties ever held in the valley.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 3


    The Jacksonville-Pacific--our railroad--did not get here on the first of January, and public enthusiasm has fallen several degrees. However the new contractors have taken hold of the enterprise with a view that warrants the belief that the road will soon be completed.
    Miss Laura Harrison, our obliging telegraphic manager, is studying stenography under the direction of Miss Kate Lemburger and is making good progress.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 2


Medford Items
    G. L. Davis and M. H. Huff have formed a co-partnership and will put in a fine line of groceries. They have rented the building formerly occupied by D. T. Pritchard.
    C. C. Ragsdale has leased the Clarendon Hotel and has already taken charge of it. C. C. Is a businessman and a good rustler and will no doubt make a success as landlord of this popular house.
    Several new crossings have been built across the street--an improvement very badly needed.
    The following ticket was nominated at a convention held in the opera house Tuesday evening: Mayor, G. W. Howard; councilmen, A. A. Davis, J. W. Short, F. M. Plymale, Frank Galloway; recorder, J. H. Faris; Treas., G. H. Haskins; marshal, H. G. Nicholson. The election takes place next Tuesday.
    The side track from the main track to the distillery is now completed and work has already begun on the buildings. They will be pushed as fast as lumber can be had.
    John Edwards, who was so badly injured in a sawmill near here some time ago, is improving rapidly and it is hoped that he will fully recover.
    The Medford Roller Mills, which have been closed for a week past for repairs, started again Monday morning. They are now running on full time.
    Born--In Medford, Jan. 5th, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. D. T. Sears, a daughter.
Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 2


    The railroad company is putting in a spur track for the new distillery company at a point about half a mile north of the Medford depot.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 3


    Mayor G. W. Howard, of Medford, has been in town a day or two this week on insurance business.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 3


Installation of Officers.
    The following reports of installation of officers in the several societies and lodges have reached the Tidings this week:
    Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., at Medford, officers installed Jan. 5th, by C. W. Wolters, D.G.C.:--Peter Henderson, C.C.; H. U. Lumsden, V.G.; M. A. Skeel, Prelate; Newell Harlan, M. of E.; J. W. Curry, K. of R. and S.; F. C. Hutchinson, M. at A.; Geo. Merriman, I.G.; D. S. Youngs, O.G.  E. P. Gregory, P.C.
    The following officers of Medford lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F. were installed by Robt. Morris, D.D., last Saturday evening: B. S. Webb, N.G.; T. W. Johnson, V.G.; C. Strang, R.S.; I. A. Webb, P.S.; D. S. Youngs, Treas.; B. Hobson, Con.; W. I. Vawter, War.; I. Woolf, R.S.N.G.; S. B. McGee, L.S.N.G.; A. M. Woodford, R.S.V.G.; W. L. Wallace, L.S.V.G.; I. A. Merriman, L.G.; R. T. Young, O.G.
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 3



    The Medford Mail says Central Point wants a newspaper, and the Times says Medford is to have a Democratic sheet in the near future.
    Peter Henderson, of Medford, has been experimenting recently with a 4-candle miniature incandescent electric light, which proved so satisfactory that he will equip his shop with a number of them.--[Times.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 3


Medford Property.
    Town lots for sale on the installment plan. Weekly or monthly payments to suit purchaser. For further information apply to
C. W. PALM
Medford, Or.
Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891 et seq., page 3


Installation of Officers.
    The following reports of installation of officers in the several societies and lodges have reached the Tidings this week:
    Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., at Medford, officers installed Jan. 5th, by C. W. Wolters, D.G.C.:--Peter Henderson, C.C.; H. U. Lumsden, V.G.; M. A. Skeel, Prelate; Newell Harlan, M. of E.; J. W. Curry, K. of R. and S.; F. C. Hutchinson, M. at A.; Geo. Merriman, I.G.; D. S. Youngs, O.G.; E. P. Gregory, P.C.
    The following officers of Medford lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F. were installed by Robt. Morris, D.D., last Saturday evening: B. S. Webb, N.G.; T. W. Johnson, V.G.; C. Strang, R.S.; I. A. Webb, P.S.; D. S. Youngs, Treas.; B. Hobson, Con.; W. I. Vawter, War.; I. Woolf, R.S.N.G.; S. B. McGee, L.S.N.G.; A. M. Woodford, R.S.V.G.; W. L. Wallace, L.S.V.G.; I. A. Merriman, I.G.; R. T. Young, O.G.
Excerpt,
Ashland Tidings, January 9, 1891, page 3


Jacksonville to Medford.
    This road is now an accomplished fact, and will be in running order by the middle of the week. Another engine for temporary use, in place of one already there, and which was found too heavy for the rails, will go down from Portland this morning, and the rolling stock. It has proved a great thing for that country that Honeyman, DeHart & Co. concluded to take the road off the hands of contractors Crawford & Howell, in order to save the money they already had invested in the rails furnished. Arrangements have been made to complete the road into its Jacksonville terminus in a few days, work being in progress as fast as men and money can do it. Plans are already prepared under which stations and warehouses will be erected at both ends. It goes without saying that the road will be of incalculable benefit to the towns. The Rogue is a beautiful little valley and has great possibilities in store for it, but of course needs some capital and enterprise to develop it. The people of the Applegate district, who have hitherto been obliged to make long hauls to get their produce to market, will be greatly benefited.
    No doubt exists that the road will eventually [be] extended on to the coast.
Oregonian, Portland, January 11, 1891, page 2



Jan 12th 1891 Monday
    A Frosty Morn. Uncle Wash and [I] started for a trip across Rouge River to Sam’s Vally,we went by Fred Barneberg’s and took a look at His beef Cattle, they are fine We drove in to Medford put the Horses in livery stable and went to Farris Hotel for dinner came out and went to livery stable, and found that the stable keeper in turning the wagon around the wheel had fallen off, and broke the axle on the front this time. We were in luck that we had not been [in] it. The spindles are very poor, so Ive took it to Legget & Merrimans shop and had a new front axle put in But did not get it done in time to leave so are going to stay all night in Medford. The ground has been frozen, a little, and Roads were Rough
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon


Jan. 13, 1891, Tuesday.
    Uncle Wash found an old Comrade by name of Mattox and went with hi to stay all night
    I staid with Will Legget had a good visit. This Morning we hitched up have the front axle fixed in good shape. We drove down to the old Widow Butler place where Maria Merriman Bennett lives and I saw Lauria Merriman Bradley, they have Just returned from Wyoming and have bought Half of Bennetts Places, and have located at last in their native place
Diary of Welborn Beeson, Talent, Oregon


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Howard spent several days in Ashland last week on insurance business.
    Mrs. O. H. Johnson of Garfield, Wash., visited friends in Medford during the week.
    J. H. Whitman of Medford has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    We regret to learn that the enterprising firm of C. H. Wallace & Son will soon leave Medford.
    Francis Fitch has returned from Salem, where he successfully argued several cases before the supreme court.
    Newell Harlan of the Mail last week heard the unwelcome news that his brother is ill at La Grande, Oregon.
    Davis' roller mills are once more running on full time, after closing a week for repairs. They are doing a big business.
    John Edwards is again on the road to health after his recent sawmill accident, much to the gratification of many friends.
    Walks across Seventh Street, from the Grand Central to Brous' saloon, and from Goldsmith's store to the bank, were built last week.
    The supreme court rendered a decision in favor of the town in the Hubbard case. Fire limits can be established ad libitum by the city council, it has been decided.
    T. E. Nichols and wife of Butte Creek last week accompanied their daughter, Miss Laura, to Medford, whither she returns to school after spending the holidays at home.
    C. C. Ragsdale and wife, who now have charge of the Clarendon Hotel, are deserving of a liberal share of patronage. It goes without saying that they will keep an excellent house.
    Davis & Huff, the new grocery firm, is composed of reliable, energetic men, and their place of business, at Pritchard's old stand, will prove to be a trade center before many days.
    F. Galloway's combination fence works needed more room to accommodate increased business, and he last week removed to the lower corner of the same block, where he will be found hereafter.
    S. S. Pentz and Wm. Slinger of this place accompanied Commander T. G. Reames to Ashland last week, to assist in instituting Malta Commandery No. 4, K.T. Both are officers of the commandery.
    Mart. Purdin had one of his fingers ripped open by an unclinched horseshoe nail one day last week, the restive horse catching the flesh with the nail point when in the act of jerking his foot loose while being shod.
    The switch to transport the machinery for the distillery to the building site has been engaging the attention of the proprietors during the week, and assurance is
given that the works will be in running condition in a very short time, thus affording a market for all surplus grain in the valley.
    "Duffy" Farrier was quite badly bruised by being thrown from his seat on the delivery wagon one day last week. An accident to the running gear, resulting in a torn-out wagon tongue, caused the team to run away, and the young man was thrown fully twenty feet, spraining his right arm and bruising his leg considerably. He is once more ready for business, however, and the team sustained but little damage.
    The city election last Tuesday called out a full vote, there being a spirited contest for a majority of the offices. The ticket nominated by the convention held on the 6th was successful in the main. G. W. Howard was elected mayor; F. Galloway, F. M. Plymale, W. B. Roberts and J. W. Short councilmen, J. H. Faris recorder, G. H. Haskins treasurer, John S. Miller marshal. The contest for the last-named office was especially close, Nicholson being defeated by four votes. All the other candidates had withdrawn, leaving the battle between the two.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 2


Our Fruits.
    Fruit shipments from Rogue River Valley towns prior to the holidays, in carload lots, amounted in round numbers to: Ashland, 246,700 pounds; Medford, 340,670 pounds; Talent, 172,400 pounds; Grants Pass, 798,140 pounds. Shipments in small lots and by express doubtless amounted to half as much more, or a total of about 2,400,000 pounds of green fruit, or over 120 carloads. When it is considered that our orchards are just coming fairly into bearing, and that the business of shipping is yet in its infancy, this is a most favorable showing. Hon. J. D. Whitman, in presenting these facts before the late meeting of the State Board of Horticulture, and commenting on the fact that the board forbade the shipment of fruit infested with the San Jose scale, stated that they conveyed but a faint idea of the fruits already grown in this section.
    "The fruit interest of southern Oregon," said he, "is undeveloped and in its infancy. Of our choicest fruit lands not 5 percent are yet occupied with fruit trees. The supply of choice fruit land is almost inexhaustible, and we will cordially welcome all who desire to engage in horticulture to our valley."
    "He who kills a bird, in my judgment," Mr. Whitman added, "kills a friend--a fact that ought to be recognized by every farmer and fruit-grower."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 3


    Articles of incorporation have been filed in the offices of the county clerk and secretary of state by the Central Point Sugar Pine Flume Company of Central Point, Jackson County; H. Amy, E. Pleasant, J.
Hinkle, incorporators; capital stock, $200,000.
    We are informed that the chief output of the Medford distillery will be the better grades of brandies and high wines suitable for medicinal purposes. The grape crop of the Jacksonville foothill region will find as ready a market there as the barley, rye and corn of the lower valley farmers.
    A correspondent advocates the building of a large brewery here, to cooperate with the distillery at Medford in furnishing palatable drinks to the thirsty Oregonians. A good idea, for every requisite of success exists from barley to pure water and superior building stone for vaults and cellars.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 3


Mary A. Davison to H. F. Wood, lots 3 and 4, blk 40, Medford; $75.
L. Etta Skeel to Bertha S. Barnum, lots 1, 2 and 3 in blk 43, Medford; $800.
B. F. Adkins to same, lots 12, blk 22, Medford; $200.
Jesse Richardson to Wm. S. Barnum, lots 11 and 12, blk 66, Medford; $1200.
G. M. Pierce to W. S. Barnum, lots 9 and 10, blk 22, Medford; $500.
Angle, Plymale & Short to N. B. Bradbury, lot 12, blk 1, Cottage add. to Medford; $100.
E. P. Geary to Edith J. Bradbury, west half of lots 1 and 2, blk 18, Beatty's add. to Medford; $35.
O.&T. Co. to L. Etta Skeel, lots 1, 2 and 3, blk 43, Medford; $100.
Same to J. H. Barnum, blk 29, Medford; $260.
James H. Barnum to Bertha H. Barnum, same as last above; $500.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1891, page 3


    The Jacksonville-Medford railroad builders have had good weather for their work since New Year's Day.
    An engine from the U.P. road arrived for the Jacksonville branch road this week. It is a little lighter than the one that has been on the road for several weeks, but it, too, is heavier than it should be for the track. McCarthy in passing Medford noticed a familiar look about the machine, and found it to be an engine he had run on the O.R.&N. road eight or nine years ago.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1891, page 3


Medford Items.
    The lumber is coming in fast for the distillery, and the work is already progressing rapidly.
    J. A. Whiteside is making some neat improvements on his property on 6th Street. He has one of the finest locations in town.
    Wm. Ulrich has gone to northern Oregon in the interests of the Farmers and Merchants Insurance Co. He will be gone over a month.
    Davis & Huff have put on a delivery wagon and now do their own delivering. The rest of the business houses still patronize the general delivery.
    The small engine rented from the O.R.&N. Co. for the Medford & Jacksonville R.R. arrived Tuesday evening and has been placed on the track. It is expected they will reach Jacksonville today (Thursday).
    Francis Fitch has moved into his new office in the Cooper building, which he has fitted up in elegant style. He occupies the entire second floor, which is divided into different rooms. They are the finest offices in Southern Oregon.
    The city election Tuesday resulted in the election of the following officers for the coming year: Mayor, G. W. Howard; Trustees, J. W. Short, F. M. Plymale, Frank Galloway, W. B. Roberts; Recorder, J. H. Faris; Treasurer, G. H. Haskins; Marshal J. S. Miller. Two hundred and twenty-nine votes were cast. Considerable interest was taken in the election, the principal fight being on Recorder and Marshal. J. H. Faris won the recordership easily by a majority of 45 over his opponent, D. T. Sears. J. S. Miller, for Marshal, had a hard fight, beating Nicholson [by] only 4 votes.
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1891, page 3



    Now that the distillery project is assured the farmers should not let the enterprise fall through for lack of their support. Corn is in demand and will continually be in demand and farmers should plant large fields of it. The market will be strictly a cash one and cannot be flooded.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1891, page 3


LODGE INSTALLATIONS.
    Olive Rebecca Degree Lodge No. 28, I.O.O.F., of Medford:--Mrs. E. B. Pickel, N.G.; Mrs. A. M. Woodford, V.G.; Z. M. Lyon, Per. S.; Mrs. Helen Strang, R.S.; Mrs. I. A. Merriman, T.
    Medford Lodge, I.O.O.F.--B. S. Webb, N.G.; T. W. Johnson, V.G.; C. Strang, Secretary; D. S. Youngs, Treasurer; I. A. Webb, P.S.: Isaac Woolf, R.S. of N.G.; Art Nicholson, L.S. of N.G.; A. M. Woodford, R.S. of V.G.; W. L. Wallace, L.S. of V.G.; B. Hobson, W.; R. T. Young, O.G.; I. A. Merriman, I.G.; G. L. Webb, R.S.S.; S. B. McGee, L.S.S.; W. I. Vawter, Conductor.
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1891, page 3


BORN
MERRIMAN--In Medford, Jan. 12th, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. George Merriman, a son.
MARRIED
HALL-OWEN--At Medford, Oregon, Jan. 8th, 1891, Mr. J. C. Hall and Miss Mabel C. Owen, Rev. M. A. Williams officiating.
Ashland Tidings, January 16, 1891, page 3


Demonstrations at Jacksonville.
    JACKSONVILLE, OR., Jan. 10.--The first train over the Jacksonville & Medford reached Jacksonville today amid the greatest demonstrations of joy. J. D. Howell, one of the contractors, and all the prominent business men of Medford were on board. Deafened by booming anvils, screeching whistles, ringing bells and shouting multitudes, the Jacksonville & Medford incorporators witnessed the first trip over the new road. The train returned to Medford this evening. The greatest enthusiasm still prevails in Jacksonville. Honeyman & DeHart, half owners of the road, have let the contract for the immediate construction of the Jacksonville depot.
Oregonian, Portland, January 17, 1891, page 6



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    All hail the coming of the regular train to the county seat.
    The latest advices from Milton Harlan at La Grande report him much better.
    George Barden last week went to Salem, probably for permanent residence.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. K. Fronk are rejoicing over the convalescence of their little son.
    Hon. Willard Crawford intends to open an assay office at Medford in a short time, we learn.
    L. Shideler is improving his property in this place, and will build a neat residence during 1891.
    John Roberts continued very ill all week, but is slowly recuperating, we are glad to learn.
    Much of the material for the new distillery is already on the ground, and work will proceed rapidly on the building.
    The second quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church was held here last Sunday, Rev. C. A. Lewis of Ashland preaching both morning and afternoon.
    A. Schilling & Co. of San Francisco have contributed a stand of handsomely arranged goods to Chas. W. Wolters' already fine stock of groceries.
    The Monarch Saloon at Medford, under the management of H. H. Wolters, is proving a popular resort. The best of everything in that line is kept there.
    The hearty manner in which the people of Medford endorsed John S. Miller's administration of the marshal's office is particularly gratifying to him and his friends.
    R. R. Dunn had a runaway experience in Siskiyou County, Cal., while on a business trip. He escaped without injury, but the team, harness and vehicle were considerably demoralized.
    Mr. Darneille of Rogue River was in Medford last week under the charge of our oculist Dr. E. P. Geary, who successfully removed a cataract which had long blinded the patient.
    Attorney Fitch now has luxurious quarters in the upper story of the Cooper building, and his friends assert that he has the most completely equipped suite of offices south of Portland.
    E. W. Hammon had the misfortune to have his buggy wrecked by his fractious horse one day last week, the animal running away with the vehicle just as Mr. H. was preparing to step into his buggy.
    Wm. Ulrich, special agent for the Farmers' and Merchants' Insurance Co., of Albany, is in northern Oregon and Washington, looking after the interests of the company and establishing agencies, and will be gone some time.
    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.
    The many improvements now under way here, not to speak of those in contemplation for the future, have put our people in good heart once more, and it is apparent to all that Medford is on the highway to greatness in the municipal line. Many are looking for chances to invest capital here, and much property will change hands before spring.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 2


Plant Corn.
    Our farmers are already making preparations to put a large area in corn next spring, particularly on adobe soil where it always does well. This is as it should be, for the Medford distillery will afford a market for every bushel that is raised, while the cultivation of corn is in the interest of the best agriculture, being superior to summer fallowing as a preparation for wheat the following season. Besides, even at existing prices, the crop is a remunerative one, and, with the advance that may be looked for soon, it will be one of the most profitable that can be raised. The proprietors of the distillery inform us that they wish the yellow corn for their use, which fact the farmers should take notice of.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3


Here at Last.
    Last Thursday the trial trip over the new railroad to Jacksonville was made and participated in by nearly 100 of Medford's citizens. Our people were taken somewhat by surprise, but managed to get the whistles and dynamite of welcome in operation shortly after the arrival of the engine, and everybody jubilated. To say that the day marked an epoch in the history of the county seat would be but the truth. The time is soon coming when the cars will be running regularly, and then goodbye to the stagecoach for all time to come.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3


    The country is full of drummers.
    Jacksonville was full of Medford people last Friday.
    Grading for the railroad track on C Street is now progressing.
    Three Concord coaches and fifteen stages will be sold at auction at Yreka, Cal., on the 31st inst.
    After the Wagner Creek trestle is completed it is likely that one near the '49 diggings will next be filled in.
    Bad colds are popular. The unnatural winter weather now prevailing is the cause of so much hawking and sneezing.
    The Jacksonville-Medford railroad is being strengthened and put in fine shape. It will be a first-class road when completed.
    If judiciously managed, the J.&M.R.R. will prove remunerative from the start, especially if extended to the lime and stone quarries of Jackson Creek.
    A deposit in the nature of quicksand has been encountered in Thomas' field below town, which the railroad company have been busy ballasting during the week.
    The locomotive doing service on the Jacksonville-Medford railroad can be heard every day. The sound is sweet music to the ears of the average citizen of Jacksonville.
    The Jacksonville & Medford R.R. on Wednesday evening brought over a load of Masons, who attended the regular meeting of Warren lodge, to which many of them belong.
    Our railroad continues to be quite a novelty, and many are availing themselves of the opportunity to take a ride between Jacksonville and Medford. The road runs through a most beautiful stretch of country.
    The locomotive made the run between Jacksonville and Medford in 20 minutes one day this week, shows that the track is rapidly assuming a first-class condition. Mr. Ridenour is acting as engineer for the present.
    Honeyman, DeHart & Co. will replace the U.P. locomotive doing service on the J.&M.R.R. with one which they are having built to order, in a few weeks. That now in use weighs about 25 tons, and the new one will be nearly as large.
    Now is the time to work for Jacksonville. With united effort among our citizens the old shire town will this season recover much of its old-time prestige. It is one of the most desirable towns, and too much cannot be said of the capacity of the adjacent foothills for fruit raising.
    Mr. Erickson of Minnesota, who has the contract for the big fill at Wagner Creek, is the right kind of a man for the place and well liked by his men, all white laborers. The old gentleman, his son and son-in-law oversee the workmen, the business agent being W. H. Seaman. They are employing a number of men with good teams at $3 per day, the contractor furnishing board, feed and tools. The company expects to be employed several months between Wagner Creek and Ashland, and are hiring all the teams possible. A good market for hay, grain and other farm produce is thus opened.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3


    H. F. Wood of Medford came to Jacksonville Wednesday to assist Chris Ulrich in the construction of the railroad depot.
    R. R. Dunn, who was manager of Staver & Walker's business at Medford and in southern Oregon, has finished his mission here and will leave for Portland in a few days.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3

   
BORN.
MERRIMAN--In Medford, Jan. 12, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. George Merriman, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 23, 1891, page 3


   Mr. Frank Conley, who brought the large C.P. engine to Medford to make the trial trip over the new railroad, returned with it to Portland last week.
    The contract for the immediate construction of a neat, substantial depot building and warehouse at this place, for the Jacksonville & Medford railroad, has been let to Chris. Ulrich by Honeyman and DeHart, half owners in the road.
    The first train over the Medford & Jacksonville railroad reached Jacksonville last Friday evening, January 16, 1891, and marks one of the most important events in the history of the place. The citizens were not aware that Friday had been set as the day for the trial trip, and when the engine's whistle awoke the echoes of the evergreen hills that surround Jacksonville and the train rushed into town, people ran from their houses, the school was dismissed, everyone hurried to the train and a scene of the most joyous excitement prevailed. Anvils were fired, bells were rung, mill whistles were opened, and the enthusiastic crowd sent forth cheer after cheer. On board the train was J. D. Howell, one of the contractors, Hon. J. D. Whitman, W. I. Vawter, G. W. Howard, C. K. Fronk, P. B. O'Neil, Dave Miller, Newell Harlan, editor of the Mail, and many other prominent citizens of Medford. About 2 o'clock the train started back to Medford loaded with Jacksonville people. It was a gala day for Jacksonville and one which will be long remembered as the inauguration of renewed life and prosperity into the grand old pioneer town.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, January 23, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
   John Ocander's new house is about ready for occupancy.
    D. T. Pritchard writes from Merced, Cal. that Mrs. Pritchard's health is improving.
    Rev. R. C. Oglesby preached at the M.E. Church in Medford last Sunday morning and evening.
    Halley, the tinner, this week displays an immense coffee-pot sign to attract custom to his emporium.
    Section boss Kelley has been engaged at Cow Creek during the week, in getting the new track there ready for the running of the trains.
    John Edwards is improving rapidly under the careful nursing of his sister, Mrs. Austin, who arrived last week from eastern Oregon to look after his welfare.
    The improved appearance of several of Medford's saloons, stores and residences during the past two weeks is owing to the skill of a traveling paperhanger in town.
    The two new hot-air furnaces donated by Isaac Garringer to the M.E. Church at this place were put in position during the week, and the comfort of the congregation is assured in the future.
    D. S. Youngs and Arthur Nicholson put in the week on a duck hunt down about Cottage Grove, with fair success. The boys made partial arrangements to procure several pairs of Chinese pheasants to be liberated in this valley in the spring.
    An alarm of fire was raised yesterday afternoon, caused by the roof of Doyle Alberry's house burning off. Prompt action by the citizens saved the lower portion of the building, although the contents were woefully damaged. The fire arose from a defective flue.
    The distillery building now being erected will be 40x160 feet, and about 60 feet high--to the peak of the roof. This will accommodate the machinery now on hand, but a similar building will be erected in the spring before active operations are begun. The institution bids fair to make an industrial center of lower C Street.
    Messrs. Medynski & Theiss advise farmers to pay attention to planting yellow corn, rye and barley in large acreage the coming spring, as the distillery intends paying higher than Chicago prices for all these cereals. Yellow corn is preferable to white for distilling purposes, and a ready market will be provided for all that can be raised.
    The Masonic delegation, which accepted the courtesy of Messrs. Howell, Ridenhour and "Duffy," rode up to Jacksonville through the June-like moonlight on Wednesday of last week to attend Warren Lodge No. 10, consisted of Messrs. J. S. Howard, J. Goldsmith, Peter Henderson, M. H. Huff, Dr. E. P. Geary, H. U. Lumsden, J. P. True, E. P. Hammond and Newell Harlan. A number of others from the valley city were in attendance.
    The party of local nimrods, who chose sides and went out to slay what was left of the rabbit crop in Barneburg's pasture last week, had rare sport and some luck. When all reports were in it was found that each side had bagged 34 rabbits and one steer. As neither side was willing to claim the steer, by mutual agreement all parties went in on a pony purse to get someone to look after the meat. D. S. Youngs led in the rabbit score, having killed 8, with Ben Webb a close second with 7 to his credit. Some of the rabbits were very large, and the mistake in regard to the steer was quite natural under the circumstances.
    There bids fair to be quite lively competition for the federal positions of gauger and storekeeper, which will materialize when the new distillery is in operation at this place. Several petitions are circulating already, to say nothing of a good deal of fine sub rosa work. Both positions will be in the nature of "good billets" for a four years' term each. In consideration of the fact that the Republican Party has thus far recognized only the old stagers in the dispensation of patronage, we trust that these two positions will be accorded by common consent to deserving applicants from among the younger generation of voters. The young men have been patiently waiting for a long while for some such recognition of their services at the polls.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1891, page 2


    Choice home-grown fruit trees for sale by E. R. Russ, Medford.
    The man Parr, who stole Merritt Bellinger's overcoat at Medford on Christmas Eve and was given 30 days in jail, was released from durance on Tuesday last.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1891, page 3


    Numerous flocks of ducks along Bear Creek attract the cupidity of the hunters nowadays.
    A carload of apples, consigned to Colorado Springs, Col., was shipped from Medford by Hammon Bros. a few days since.
    John Edwards is rapidly recuperating from his sawmill accident, and it is thought he will recover the use of his injured limb.
    Articles of incorporation of the Baptist Academy Association of Medford were filed during the week with W. J. Crawford, E. B. Pickel and G. W. Howard as incorporators.
    A. H. Carson of Redlands has been in the valley this week delivering fruit trees and superintending the planting of 15 acres of prunes and apples for Dr. DeBar at his ranch near Medford.
    Johnny Angle and Frank Fryer had a serious runaway a few days since when driving up from Medford. The animal they were driving kicked himself loose from the buggy, breaking the shafts and the harness, and when Tryer undertook to hold him by the bits he seized the young man's arm in his mouth, causing a severe wound.
    A careless hunter about Medford shot one of the imported Chinese pheasants during the week. The only way to get this bird successfully introduced into the valley will be to liberate a few pairs in the spring about some of the higher foothill ranches, where they will be looked after, and where the boys haven't gotten down to the habits of the bird hunter who shoots everything that comes before his gun.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1891, page 3


    A number of children in Medford seem to be afflicted with a general epidemic which is going the rounds in shape of a bad cold and a high fever.
    The Baptist Academy Association, of Medford, filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state last Monday, W. J. Crawford, E. P. Pickel and G. W. Howard, incorporators.
    Work on the distillery at Medford is still going on. The large building now in course of construction will be completed, and the machinery in place, in about four months. It is 40 feet wide by 160 feet deep, and will be about 60 feet high at the highest point. Another building, the same size, will be erected this year, nearby.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 30, 1891, page 3


    The young people of Jacksonville have taken advantage of the downgrade of the new M.&J. railway, and of an evening enjoy themselves by riding on the push cars which go toward Medford at a rapid rate of speed.
    The track of the Medford & Jacksonville railroad is all laid and a large force of men are at work leveling, ballasting and putting the road in good condition. Chris. Ulrich is finishing up the depot buildings, which will be completed and put in order by Saturday of this week. Construction trains have been hauling heavy loads of ties and rails safely over the road for the past week, and there is no doubt now but that the road, as far as completed, is a good one. Regular trains will run from Jacksonville and connect with all trains at Medford after the first of February.

"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, January 30, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The bill making some changes in the Medford charter has passed the legislature and now awaits the signature of the governor.
    "Stormy" Jordan was arrested this week, charged with assaulting Wm. Clarke. The trial will be held in Justice Plymale's court in Jacksonville on next Wednesday.
    The bodies buried in the Odd Fellows' cemetery west of town are being exhumed and reinterred in the cemetery across Bear Creek. The new burying grounds are much more beautiful and appropriate than the one now being vacated.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 2


    Angle, Plymale & Short to Lewis H. Wasserman, lot 2, blk 1, Cottage addition to Medford; $100.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 2


    Tree planting is going on everywhere in southern Oregon. Many thousand choice fruit trees are being set out in different localities.
    Towns along the line of the Southern Pacific railroad are overrun with tramps, who are an everlasting nuisance with their petty pilferings.
    No ice for use in the summertime has been put up this season, owing to the mildness of the winter. We will have to rely on other sections for our supply.
    About a dozen families from the East have recently located on preemption claims in the big timber at the head of the river, and as many more are expected to join them in the immediate future.
    Fruit cars are attached to almost every northbound passenger train nowadays, showing the immense growth of the country about the Sound and the almost unlimited market it affords for the surplus fruit products of this section. There are more families than fruit trees in the Northwest today, and yet some people talk as though there was already an overproduction of fruit in this state.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 3


    J. H. Huffer, who is about patenting a neat and handy pencil sharpener, was in Grants Pass a few days since for the purpose of making a model.
    G. E. Payne, the architect of the courthouse building at Jacksonville and the Ashland bank building, is about to remove his family from their present home in Modoc County, Cal. to Grants Pass to reside.
    P. B. O'Neil of Medford was summoned to Oakland, Cal. one day last week by the sad intelligence of the death of his aged mother at that place. She was a pioneer of the coast, having come to San Francisco in 1848, and died at the age of 77 years, beloved by all who knew her.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 3


    We are informed that John Justus, who was sent to the penitentiary for life for killing his father, has been pardoned and is now in Medford.
    The Medford overcoat thief, who stole Merritt Bellinger's coat from this buggy on Christmas Eve and did thirty days' time in the county jail for the offense, went back to his old tricks again as soon as liberated. Wednesday night he purloined several articles of clothing from J. D. Hobson's residence, and was apprehended at Central Point yesterday morning. He evidently wants to board the county's expense until blackberries get ripe.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1891, page 3


    A Good Templars lodge will soon be organized in Medford.
    The Orchard Home Association are planting out 3,000 fruit trees on their tract near Medford.
    Doil Albury's house in Medford caught fire from the front room stove pipe last week, and the entire roof was burned from off the dwelling.
    Ashland is not the only town in the valley that is to have the benefit of a change in the insurance rates. Medford is also on the anxious seat, and as Mr. Lloyd, the surveyor, went to that place in the interest of the Insurance Union, when he had completed his labors in Ashland, last Sunday, the inference may be had that the Medfordians are to have whatever advantage may accrue from their water works.
    On Wednesday of last week a lad known as "Monkey" Robinson fell from a train on which he was stealing a ride at Medford, and had both feet run over diagonally by the wheels. While they were badly crushed, amputation will not be necessary. It is a very singular wound, and it is supposed he slipped and fell while attempting to get off the train at the crossing, and his feet were caught by the edge of the wheel while they were on the plank, which is put in at every crossing and which is a trifle lower than the rails.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 6, 1891, page 3


    Miss Emma Tolman has a class of twelve pupils at Medford, to whom she gives instructions in drawing and painting one day in each week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, February 6, 1891, page 3


ON TO CRESCENT CITY
    The people of Crescent City, California, are very anxious that the Medford & Jacksonville railroad be extended to the coast and there is a movement on foot among capitalists and those interested to bring about this desired result. The extending of this branch line would open up a wonderfully favored country. The Siskiyou Mountains, through which this road must pass, are latent [laden?] with nearly all the valuable metals and ores known to commerce. Among these are gold, silver, platinum, copper, iron, lime, coal, marble and associate metals and minerals. The timber adjacent to this road would be almost inexhaustible, besides the numerous rich and fertile valleys thus thrown open to profitable cultivation. Such a consummation as the building of this road would bring southern Oregon rapidly to the front.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, February 6, 1891, page 3


    Times continue dull in southern Oregon, but will probably brighten up very much, should we be favored with good crops of all kinds.
    The first well authenticated case of hydrophobia on this coast has been exercising the medical fraternity during the past week. The victim was Chris. Buckley, a farm hand living near Redding, Cal., who was bitten by a dog some three years ago, and who was taken suddenly and violently sick one day last week at the Yank ranch near there and lived but two days, suffering the most excruciating agony until his death gave him relief. All the symptoms of the disease were present, and the coroner who held the inquest over the remains pronounced it a clear case of hydrophobia. The climate of the coast was formerly supposed to be unfavorable to the development of the malady.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD'S CORPORATE LIMITS
    The following bill, introduced by Mr. Cameron, has passed the legislature:
    WHEREAS, by an Act of the legislative assembly of the state of Oregon mentioned in the title of this Act, and approved February 21, 1889, it will extend the boundaries, corporate limits and jurisdiction of the town of Medford, in the county of Jackson and state of Oregon, as to include and to embrace within the limits of said town of Medford all of the territory included within the limits of said town as in this Act provided; and whereas, by mistake and oversight, an error occurred in the description of the boundaries of said town in said Act, approved February 21, 1889, by omitting one line of said boundaries therefrom, whereby the boundaries of said town are rendered indefinite and uncertain; and whereas the said town of Medford and the board of trustees thereof have exercised jurisdiction over all of the territory embraced in the limits of the boundaries of said town, as described and amended in and by this Act, and has, among other things, attempted to vacate Johnson's addition to the town of Medford and the plat thereof, which said addition is situated within the limits of said town, as in this Act described and amended, and has exercised various other acts of jurisdiction within said limits; and whereas the validity of said acts of said town and of the board of trustees thereof are rendered doubtful and uncertain by reason of said error and omission in said description in said Act of February 21, 1889; therefore be it enacted by the legislative assembly of the state of Oregon:
    SECTION 1. That section 2 of article 1 of an Act entitled "an Act to incorporate the town of Medford, in Jackson County, Oregon, and limiting its powers and defining the duties of its officers, and to repeal an Act entitled an Act to incorporate the town of Medford, in Jackson County, Oregon, approved February 24, 1885," approved February 21, 1889, and section 2 of an Act entitled "an Act entitled an Act to amend an Act to incorporate the town of Medford, in Jackson County, Oregon, and limits its powers and defining the duties of its officers, and to repeal an Act entitled an Act to incorporate the town of Medford, in Jackson County, Oregon, approved February 24, 1885, and also an Act entitled an Act to incorporate the town of Medford, approved February 24, 1885," approved February 21, 1889, be and the same are hereby amended so as to read as follows:
    SECTION 2. That the boundary of said town shall be as follows: Beginning at the southeast corner of section 25, in township 37 south, of range 2 west, in Jackson County, Oregon, and running thence west 60 chains; thence north 80 chains to the north line of section 25 in said township and range; thence west on said north line 646 feet, more or less, to the center of the county road, running northeasterly along the northwest side of what was formerly Johnson's addition to the town of Medford, hereinbefore mentioned; thence northeastwardly along the center of said county road to the southwest corner of the John S. Miller donation land claim; thence east along the county road to and one chain east of the east bank of Bear Creek; thence southward parallel with and one chain east of the east bank of Bear Creek; thence southward parallel with and one chain distant east from said creek to a point due east from the intersection of the south line of East Twelfth Street, of the town of Medford, with the center line of the stage road running along the east side of the original town of Medford; thence west to said intersection; thence south 26....25 degrees east along said road 13.60 chains to the northeast corner of a piece of land belonging to J. D. Whitman, and described in a deed recorded in book 12 of deed records of said Jackson County, Oregon, at page 532 thereof; thence south 72½ degrees west 36.30 chains, more or less to the west line of donation land claim number forty-four, in township 37 south, of range 1 west of the Willamette meridian in Oregon; thence south along the said west line of said last-mentioned donation land claim to the south line of section thirty in said last-mentioned township and range; and thence west to the place of beginning.
    SECTION 3. That the said act of the said town of Medford and of the board of trustees thereof in so vacating Johnson's addition to the town of Medford aforesaid, and all other ordinances, resolutions, by-laws and acts of said town of Medford which were otherwise authorized by the charter of said town of Medford and of the board of trustees and officers thereof, passed, adopted or done within and in any manner affecting or relating to the premises properly within the corporate limits of said town of Medford as herein before described, since the 21st day of --------, A.D. 1889, be and the same are hereby legalized and made valid and binding upon all persons whomsoever to the same extent and in like manner as if the said section 2 of said Act approved February 21, 1889, had originally been made to read as by this Act amended.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 2


THE HORTICULTURAL COMMISSION.
    Senator Veatch, Oregon's great objector, made a speech against the continuance of the State Horticultural Commission, which was not only unkind, but unjust at the same time. Here is an excerpt therefrom:
    I think this commission the most innocent and unobjectionable of all, as it costs the least, but my objections extend just as far as the amount which it costs. I cannot see what the commission has done. There are just as many wormy apples, scale bugs, codling moths, woolly aphis and cherry slugs in Oregon as there ever were. They said, "spray your trees." I have heard that ever since I was a boy, and there is not a single thing which they recommend which was not well known to orchardists long before we had such a commission. I beg pardon for saying that the commission has not done anything. I do remember that, when they made a trip down in southern Oregon, I read about their spraying two young orchards, and the orchards died; also that a man, who was using a spraying machine, was too near when it burst, and had both eyes put out. Now, to sum up, we have to show for our horticultural commission two dead orchards, a blind man and taxes.
    Mr. Veatch is not posted, or he would not talk in such a cruel manner. The commission did much good during the past two years, and it would have done much more had it been invested with the proper authority. The legislature should give the commission further powers to proceed against refractory horticulturists, and then its benefits will be apparent.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. J. W. Barkdull returned home to Medford during the week.
    Lewis Shideler has enclosed his lots adjoining Dr. Geary's premises with a neat fence.
    School Clerk Hamilton announces that school taxes will be delinquent after the 15th instant.
    Haller, the new jeweler from San Francisco, is deserving of a good share of public patronage.
    This place will soon number among its societies a Good Templars' lodge, now being organized here.
    The railroad to the county seat adds much to the importance of Medford as a distributing point.
    Mr. Creed and his wife (nee Miss Maggie Louden) have gone to Mr. C.'s former home east of the Rockies.
    The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. E. Wilkinson, which was dangerously ill for a while, is now convalescent.
    J. W. Short, W. G. Cooper and Frank Tryer attended to mining interests on Sardine Creek during the week.
    Medford is going to make a big jump forward during 1891. Many improvements will be made during that time.
    If you want anything in the grocery, fruit or confectionery line, call at the bakery. The best is always kept there.
    Dr. Pickel's neat cottage in south Medford comes from the hands of the painters this week and is about ready for occupancy.
    Among the Eagle Point ladies attending school at Medford are Misses Laura Nichols, Anna Carney and Millie Howlett.
    Miss Emma Tolman of Ashland has organized an art class at Medford, which she instructs during several evenings each week.
    Mrs. Brown last week returned to her home in San Francisco, after spending several months with her daughter, Mrs. I. J. Phipps.
    The Rogue River Valley R.R. will build a neat and cozy depot at this place immediately, and have invited bids for the construction of the same.
    C. H. Wallace and family will soon leave this place. They have made many friends during their residence among us, who will regret to learn of their departure.
    Treasurer Haskins advertises that town taxes of Medford for 1890 are due and will be delinquent after March 1st next. All should pay up and avoid costs.
    J. O. Johnson and Spencer Childers, Sr., are contemplating an early return to Medford from Whatcom, Wash., where they have spent the winter with their families.
    Mr. and Mrs. Alberry desire to cordially thank their neighbors for the prompt assistance rendered during and after the fire which almost destroyed their home.
    West's addition to Medford will soon be thrown on the market, J. S. Howard being now engaged in completing the plat of same from notes taken in his survey last week.
    Work on the distillery buildings goes on steadily but quietly forward, and it is hoped that everything will be in readiness for handling the next crops of rye, corn and barley.
    P. B. O'Neil returned from his trip to California last week and reports the country living in anticipation of a drought and correspondingly light crops the coming season.
    The completion of the R.V.R.R. is a matter of much importance to us, as it centers a large amount of business, which has heretofore been done at other points, at Medford.
    Mrs. J. B. McGee arrived from San Francisco last week to rejoin her husband, who is engaged in developing the Cinnabar mines. They will probably make Medford their future home.
    Dr. Demorest, the popular dentist, is always kept busy. He does first-class work and his charges are reasonable. Mr. Wilkinson, who is assisting him, proves an apt scholar and is learning rapidly.
    A number of our citizens went to Jacksonville on Monday, to attend the trial of G. M. Jordan, who was charged with assaulting Wm. Clark. They were disappointed, however, as the prosecuting witness had left for other scenes, and the case was dismissed at his cost.
    Hon. Willard Crawford was sent to Salem last week by our board of trade to secure, if possible, the defeat of the special legislation contemplated by Mr. Merritt's bill granting the exclusive lumbering franchise of the south tributaries of Rogue River to the Central Point Sugar Pine Flume Company.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 2


BAKERY AND CONFECTIONERY,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
C. W. Wolters, Proprietor.
A Full Line of Choicest Groceries Kept and
Sold at Reasonable Rates.
Fresh Fruits in Season, Candies, Nuts, Etc.    Also
Stationery of All Kinds.
FRESH BREAD EVERY DAY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891 et seq., page 2


Proposals Wanted.
    Proposals for the delivery of 100 cords of wood will be received at the company's station at Jacksonville until Thursday, February 19, 1891. Wood to be of sound fir, delivered and stacked alongside of track, not less than 4x4, 2 feet long, 128 cubic feet to the cord. Cash will be paid on acceptance.
W. HONEYMAN,       
President, Rogue River Valley Railway Company.       
Portland, Feb. 13, 1891.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891 et seq., page 3


Rogue River Valley Railway Co.
    Passenger trains will commence running on Thursday, Feb. 12, 1891. The following is the time schedule until further notice: Leave Jacksonville at 8:30 A.M., at 11:30 A.M., and at 5:30 P.M. Leave Medford at 10 A.M., at 1 P.M., and at 7:30 P.M. Trains will stop at Harbaugh's on being signaled.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


    Hurrah for the railroad!
    The days are growing longer, and soon supper will be eaten before dark.
    The Medford Roller Mills have raised the price of flour to $20 per thousand pounds.
    Some snow still lingers on the foothills, and the weather is colder than it has been.
    The railroad made its first trip yesterday, carrying several passengers and the mail and express.
    It is probable that the W.U. telegraph office will be removed to the railroad depot in a few days.
    The depot and warehouse of the R.R.V.R.R. Co. at this place are nearly completed and are neat buildings.
    Snow fell to the depth of two inches in southern Oregon Monday night, but most of it soon melted away.
    W. E. Buchanan of Portland, assisted by M. Purdin, paid off the employees of the R.R.V.R.R. Co. last Tuesday.
    Don't fail to read C. W. Wolters' advertisement elsewhere. He keeps only choice goods and sells at very reasonable rates.
    A roundhouse and blacksmith shop will be built here by the railroad company at once. Chris. Ulrich will have charge of the work.
    Quite a number of our Medford friends visited us during the week, taking advantage of the completion of the railroad to make us a friendly visit.
    The sickness that has been epidemic in southern Oregon for the past month (a sort of influenza), is abating. Fortunately few deaths have occurred.
    The railroad bridge carpenters have been busily engaged in overhauling the trestles and bridges in the northern portion of the county for several weeks past.
    Hammon Bros. still ship occasionally carloads of apples to San Francisco and other points, although the traffic has about ceased for this season. They shipped two carloads last week.
    Dwellers in the foothills who have been getting out wood for the railroad this winter have not lost many days, and will realize on their contracts much earlier than usual in consequence.
    The roads are in a bad condition in many portions of southern Oregon, but may be considered good for this season of the year, as we have very few thoroughfares that are worth mentioning.
    The railroad company will carry mail and express matter between Jacksonville and Medford hereafter. Ed. Worman has taken his stage off the route, after an efficient service of several years.
    The frosts of the past week are doubly welcome to our fruit raisers, as they retarded the growth of the fruit buds as well as aided the cultivator in preparing the soil for planting, an important item in setting an orchard.
    W. E. Buchanan of Portland, representing the Rogue River Valley R.R., has been here during the week, on business connected with that enterprise. He is a courteous, energetic gentleman, and has already made many friends.
    D. W. Alberry, who has charge of the construction of the R.R.V.R.R., is rustling operations as fast as possible and doing the best of work. This promises to be a first-class line of road, as the company owning it now are sparing no expense to make it such.
    It is reported that both Medford and Ashland will get the benefit of reduced rates on insurance, on account of having water works in condition to successfully fight fire. It is no more than right that they should derive some benefit from their enterprise in establishing the systems.
    Rogue River apples are retailing for $3.00 per box in San Francisco, and even better rates are obtained for them in the Montana country. The fear of overproducing of such fruit as we raise need not deter anyone from planting an orchard. A good quality always commands a fancy price, and the quality of our fruit is of the best.
    The mildness of the present winter has furnished an exhaustless subject for comment, old settlers and newcomers vying with each other in paying homage to Oregon's matchless climate. Though the weather of the winter season of 1890-91 has been unusual in its uniform mildness, it cannot be regarded as phenomenal, since it is but the duplicate of several winters to which the memory of the pioneer runneth back with pride.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


    John Miller left for Iowa last week to pay his old home, which he has not seen for many years, a visit.
    Chas. W. Wolters, Medford's clever baker and grocer, made the Times a friendly call Tuesday. He is doing a good business.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


    We are glad to announce that the bill to abolish the state board of horticulture was killed in the senate.
    A heavy windstorm prevailed throughout the valley yesterday, which did some damage. It is reported that the roof of the Medford Roller Mill was blown off.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


Again in the Toils.
    Jas. Parr, a tramp who stole an overcoat from M. Bellinger's wagon at Medford while the owner was attending a Christmas entertainment with his family, is again in the meshes of the law for a similar offense. He was so well pleased with his 30 days' sojourn in the county jail that he resolved to get back into the institution. So he stole an overcoat, a pair of pantaloons, etc., from the room of J. D. Hobson, who is employed on S. L. Bennett's farm near Medford. Parr was arrested at Talent and brought before Justice Walton, who bound him over to appear before the grand jury, and in default of bail he was brought to Jacksonville by A. Z. Sears and turned over to the sheriff for safekeeping. Besides a two months' stay in jail, he stands a good chance of serving the state at Salem for awhile.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


R.R.V.R.R.
    The parties now owning the railway between Jacksonville and Medford have formed a corporation, known as the Rogue River Valley Railroad Company. They are putting everything in first-class order and will soon have a good road in every respect. Their new rolling stock will be put on the road as soon as completed. The first regular trips were made yesterday and proved quite successful. The following crew is in charge of the train: Mr. Ridenhour, engineer; Will Farrier, fireman; and John Dyar, conductor. The fare is only 20 cents each way, but what the freight charges will be we have not learned as yet. It is to be hoped that the enterprise will prove a remunerative one.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


G. H. Baker to Miss Helene Buhlmeyer, lot 1, blk 2, Medford; $560.85.
O.&T. Co. to S. Rosenthal, lot 19, blk 21, Medford; $200.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 13, 1891, page 3


    The Medford-Jacksonville railroad began running regular trains yesterday meeting each train on the S.P. line--fare 20c.
    Rev. E. Russ, of Medford, offers for sale a lot of about 7000 choice home-grown apple trees of twelve standard varieties--a chance for some people who are planting apple orchards to get the best stock to be had.
    On Saturday last the Rogue River Valley Railroad Company filed articles of incorporation with the Secretary of State. Its principal office is stated to be in Portland; its capital stock is $100,000 divided into 1000 shares. The object is to construct and equip a railroad from Medford, in Jackson County, to Jacksonville, and two miles beyond. Wm. Honeyman, E. J. DeHart, W. C. Crawford, J. D. Howell, are the incorporators.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 13, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    B. W. Isaacs and Sam. Murray have started a butcher shop here.
    The arrival of the trains from Jacksonville liven up our town considerably.
    Our merchants are greatly encouraged over the outlook for spring trade.
    S. Rosenthal made his numerous friends in Jacksonville a visit last Monday.
    George Merriman has so far recovered as to be able to resume work in his shop.
    Wm. Clarke is at Yreka, where he is charge of the saloon in the Clarendon Hotel.
    Mrs. Noland is now a resident of California, having removed thither some time since.
    Work proceeds on the distillery plant, and ere long the proprietors will be ready for business.
    D. J. Lumsden has sold his handsome dwelling on the corner of 8th and C streets to J. B. McGee.
    Hon. Willard Crawford will soon have his mining and assay office open for business at Medford.
    Farmers are preparing to plant an unusually large acreage in corn in the vicinity of Medford this year.
    Parties wishing to visit Jacksonville on Sundays will find the change in the railroad timetable quite convenient.
    D. T. Lawton, formerly of this place, is now a resident of Salem, where he is agent for Kellogg & Co., a steamboating firm.
    A neat depot will be built here for the R.R.V.R.R. at once. A contract to build it was last week let to E. W. Starr.
    John Edwards has so far improved as to be able to sit up a portion of every day now, and hopes are entertained of his entire recovery.
    Wm. Robinson, having taken a wood contract for the railroad company near Grants Pass, has removed his family thither.
    Our town was full of Jacksonville people last Sunday. The railroad will do much to cement the bond of friendship existing between the two places.
    A. Goldsmith and Chas. Goldsmith of Eugene, father and brother of Jules, the grocer, spent the week visiting the latter and his family at Medford.
    The Medford public schools now have an enrollment of 263 pupils, with an average daily attendance of 212. Good work is being done by the different teachers.
    The wind played sad havoc with the roof of Davis' roller mills, and the rain that followed also did some damage. Everything has been righted since, however.
    P. Henderson, the tonsorial artist, and Dr. Demorest were among the many who visited the county seat during the week.
    W. H. Barr was temporarily snowed in at his Briggs Valley mine while visiting there last week, the beautiful having fallen to the depth of several feet down there.
    A. Garrick is now carrying a fine line of ready-made clothing and neckwear for the accommodation of Medford's dressy young men. He has acquired much better quarters than he had.
    The assertion in last week's Mail, to the effect that "real estate is beginning to move quite rapidly," had nothing to do with the Cow Creek slide. It referred to the movement that is apparent to everyone now. Sales of real property have been frequent during the past few weeks.
    W. F. Shawver last week purchased of Roberts & O'Neil a five-acre tract of land near the bridge for $800, and regards it as a bargain. It is confidently expected that real estate will be in great demand here during the coming season. The branch railroad has had much to do with attracting attention to our advantages.
    The Oregon delegation have received a petition in which Frank Galloway, of Medford, has been strongly endorsed for United States storekeeper for the distillery now being erected at Medford, and the delegation has transmitted the endorsement, with their own recommendation, to the United States commissioner of internal revenue. The many friends of Mr. G. hope to see him occupy the position, as he is well qualified for it and deserving besides.
    The presentation of "Honor Bound" by the Hollis-Lent company at the opera house last week, although to a very small audience, was good. The residents of Medford should be stirred up to a sense of duty in the matter of patronizing the performances at the opera house, and reward the enterprise of Messrs. Angle & Plymale in giving us such a temple of the muses. Good troupes will not patronize the opera house unless the populace patronize the troupes.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 2


    Wm. Slinger to Medynski & Theiss, lots 1 and 2, blk 2, Cottage add. to Medford; $1.
    Honeyman, DeHart & Co. et al., to Rogue River Valley Railway Co., franchise, etc.; $1.
    E. W. Dusenberry to Wm. Slinger, lots 1 and 2, blk 2, Cottage add. to Medford; $1000.
    Welcome Fowler et al., to H. F. Whetstone, lot 8, blk 48, Medford; $150.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 2


BORN.
PENTZ--In Medford, Feb. 10, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. S. S. Pentz, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 2


Our Railroad.
    Trains are running regularly between Jacksonville and Medford, the service giving the best of satisfaction. The patronage has been good so far, and will doubtless increase, as many will come to the county seat, on business and pleasure, who never would have thought of coming before the building of the road. Last Sunday nearly 100 people made the round trip over the line, while there were many others who rode one way only. In a short time the company will handle freight, charging five cents per hundred pounds for distances less than three miles and nine cents a hundredweight for distances less than six miles. The minimum rate will be 25 cents. It is expected that the new rolling stock which the company is having built in the East will arrive in a short time, when the trip between Medford and this place will be made in less than 15 minutes. When everything is gotten in shipshape, this will be a first-class line in every particular.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 3


    The roads are worse now than they have been at any time this winter.
    Prof. Narregan has sold his interests at Tolo and moved to Medford.
    Thousands of fruit trees are being set out in different portions of southern Oregon. This will certainly be a great fruit country in the course of time.
    The town is full of canvassers for different kinds of articles. The "hard times" don't seem to discourage them, as their seductive talk makes more or less victims.
    The railroad engineers are now preparing to straighten the course of the main line at Mineral Point, in Eden precinct, and will see that all trestles are filled on the route.
    Travel on the R.R.V. railroad is fully equal to expectations so far, and there is every reason to believe that the road will at least pay operating expenses from the beginning.
    A petition is said to have been circulated in Crescent City, Cal., during the past week, requesting the R.R.V. railway company to extend their line westward to the coast at once. It is understood a liberal bonus will be granted by the town and settlements along the route.
    It is said that every building and loan association in Oregon is in a flourishing condition. The stock of the Roseburg association now commands a premium of $30 per share. There is talk of forming associations at Medford and Grants Pass in the immediate future.
    The Rogue River Valley Railroad Company has filed articles of incorporation with the secretary of state. Its principal office is stated to be in Portland; capital stock $100,000, divided into 1000 shares. The object is to construct and equip a railroad from Medford, in Jackson County, to Jacksonville, and two miles beyond. Wm. Honeyman, E. J. DeHart, W. C. Crawford and J. D. Howell are the incorporators.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 3


    Chas. Carney and wife made their Saturday visit to Jacksonville. They went to Medford from here, to visit their daughter, who is attending school there.
    W. A. Buchanan has gone to Portland, but will return in a short time. He is managing the affairs of the R.R.V.R.R. quite efficiently and acceptably.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 3


    Twenty-three passengers came in on the train from Medford last night.
    As will be seen by the timetable of the R.R.V.R.R., published elsewhere, trains will leave Jacksonville at one o'clock P.M. after tomorrow. This change will be duly appreciated by everybody, as it gives more time for the transaction of business at the county seat.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 20, 1891, page 3


    Judge Willard Crawford will open a mining assay office in Medford.
    Roberts & O'Neil have sold five acres of their land near the bridge at Medford to Mr. Shawver for $800.
    A. Darnell of Applegate, who has been nearly blind from some eye disease, was at Medford recently under Dr. Geary's treatment, and went home able to read.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1891, page 2

The Rogue River Valley Railroad's first timetable, Ashland Tidings February 20, 1891.
Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1891, page 2

    The time schedule of the Medford & Jacksonville railroad--the "Rogue River Valley Railroad," appears in the ad in this issue of the Tidings.
    Frank Galloway, of Medford, is an applicant for the position of storekeeper of the distillery to be established there, and has sent to the Oregon congressional delegation a petition for the appointment containing the names of many of the leading Republicans of the county. As there is no opposition to Mr. Galloway's petition in this part of the state, so far as [is] known here, it is likely he will be given the appointment. The Oregonian of Monday stated that the Oregon delegation had endorsed the petition with their own recommendation and submitted it to the U.S. commissioner of internal revenue.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Awbrey, the section boss of the R.V.R.R., and family are occupying the Turner residence on Fifth Street, and think of locating here.
    The depot buildings with their new coats of paint and neat fixtures look quite "stylish," and when the people turn out en masse to see the train, Jacksonville presents a lively appearance.
    On last Thursday the regular trains of the Rogue River Valley Railroad Company began running between Jacksonville and Medford. Many prominent citizens of Medford availed themselves of the opportunity and paid Jacksonville a pleasant visit. On board the train also was Superintendent Buckman and Howell Bros., part owners in the road. The passenger train makes three trips over the road daily. The schedule time is as following: Leave Jacksonville at 8:30 a.m., 11:30 a.m. and 5:30 p.m. Leave Medford at 10 a.m., 1 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. Trains will also stop at Harbaugh's on being signaled. The new owners will extend the road to the lime quarries on Jackson Creek almost a mile above town, as soon as the road is put in order between here and Medford. This will be of much benefit to Jacksonville, as a large number of men will necessarily be employed in the quarries getting the stone ready for shipment. The hills west of town are bountifully stored with the finest of lime rock, which, when a commodity of commerce, will be of great value. What a grand opening for someone with capital!
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Prof. Narregan of Tolo has purchased a desirable building tract of C. W. Palm.
    Francis Fitch is in Portland again, in the interest of the Orchard Home Association.
    Those who were so fortunate as to secure invitations to the calico hop this week are happy.
    A. Z. Sears has sold his drayage business to A. W. Bish, who will operate it hereafter.
    E. S. Carder intends returning from Tulare, Cal. in a short time, to make Medford his permanent home.
    W. P. H.. Legate was called to the bedside of his mother, who was quite ill at Talent, one day last week.
    J. R. West, who is spending the winter in California, has improved his health considerably since he left Medford.
    A. Nicholson was engaged for several days this week in clearing the brush from his orchard land near Jacksonville.
    George Parkhill returned to the East last week after his family, with whom he will come to this place to reside in a short time.
    Mingus' subdivision is the latest addition to the town of Medford; Charlie Howard completed the platting of the tract this week.
    Shorty Hamilton reports that school taxes are coming in very slowly. As they will soon be delinquent, it behooves our citizens to bestir themselves, before it is too late.
    Mr. Theiss, of the distillery force, expects to welcome his father and mother to Medford in a short time, their household goods having already been shipped from the East.
    The shipment of apples still continues at Medford, Hammon Bros. having shipped a carload of choice fruit to Denver, Col. last week, making the second to that place within a few days.
    J. E. Enyart, N. A. Jacobs, Peter Henderson and others have organized a class in stenography at this place and are rapidly mastering its mysteries. Edward Russ is instructor for the class.
    R. H. Halley and wife returned from their visit to the eastern states last week, well pleased to get back to Oregon again, after a pleasant visit with old-time friends, some of whom will be apt to follow them to this coast in the future.
    With inimitable effrontery the Klamath Star suggests that as Medford is now assured of a Good Templars lodge and a distillery, that it would be a good time to subsidize a spoon factory and a sugar refinery here and to encourage the culture of mint.
    A couple eloped from Medford Tuesday morning, but did not go further than Roseburg. A warrant was placed in the hands of Marshal Miller, charging the female with lewd cohabitation, and he put it in the hands of Sheriff Birdseye for service. Jim telegraphed the facts to Sheriff Miller of Douglas County, who arrested the woman and turned her over to Birdseye, and the latter brought her back Wednesday morning, where the Medford authorities took her in charge.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1891, page 2


Alex Mackintosh to J. A. Mabee, lot 7, blk 58, Medford; $300.
John A. Mabee to J. F. Simpson, same as above; $300.
J. F. Simpson to A. J. and Rhoda A. Davis, same; $300.
Rhoda A. Park to A. J. Davis, undivided half interest in same, $50.
A. J. Davis to James G. Birdseye, same lot, $75.25.
W. I. Vawter to C. W. Palm, quitclaim to lots 8 and 9, blk 45, Medford; $230.
Plat of West's addition to Medford.
Plat of Mingus' subdivision near Medford.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1891, page 2


    Thirty-one passengers rode on the railroad from Medford Wednesday morning.
    The railroad brings many people into Jacksonville who would rarely, if ever, come here otherwise.
    Mrs. L. Justus visited relatives at Medford last week, while en route to Ager, Cal., where one of her daughters resides.
    The R.R.V.R.R. will commence carrying freight next Monday, connection with the S.P. Co.'s track having been made.
    Under the new Australian ballot law passed by the legislature, voting precincts must not contain to exceed 250 voters. This will make it necessary to reduce the size of several precincts in this county.
    There are now known to be seven Chinese pheasants in the valley, and it is sincerely hoped that they will not be molested this season, after which it is predicted they will be so numerous that it will not be necessary to look out for them very closely.
    A daughter was born to Mr. and Mrs. J. O. Johnson, formerly of this county, now residing at New Whatcom, Wash. Their eldest daughter was born in California, the second in Oregon, and the third and last in Washington, thus bounding the states comprising the west slope of the Union.
    Barneburg & Sons of Eden precinct, the successful stock raisers, stall-fed several hundred head of cattle during the past winter and are shipping them to northern markets. Three of the steers they shipped recently weighed 5000 pounds. No wonder there is a good demand for this fine beef.
    Every inducement will be offered the farmers by the proprietors of the Medford distillery, Medynski & Theiss, to induce them to raise corn to a much greater extent than has heretofore been the case in this valley. The very highest market price will always be paid for all that can be produced, and cash in hand will be the rule.
    The mother of Joe Goodwin, on trial for murder down at Fall River, Cal., is a Mrs. Heald, living on one of Major Barron's places in Ashland precinct. Judge Parker of Linkville will defend the young man, after he is through with assisting in the prosecution of Dixon and Sylvester in Lassen County and Josh Buckmaster at Redding, Cal.
    Fred. T. Merrill is having a carload of bicycles put together at San Francisco, especially with reference to the demands of the trade in southern Oregon, and will ship a consignment of them to Ashland in a short time. With the R.R.V. railroad and a full equipment of bicycles, this valley will be well fitted out for means of local transportation.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1891, page 3


    J. N. Fanning, who owns the Clarendon Hotel property, has returned to Fresno, Cal., accompanied by his family.
    J. O. Johnson and family will return from the Sound country to this county for permanent residence in a short time, we learn.
    G. W. Edwards contemplates removing from Talent to San Francisco, and is at the Bay City now looking out a residence location for his family, who will follow him thither in a short time.
    The venerable Jesse Wilson, one of the most highly respected pioneers in the valley, has been lying very ill at the home of his son, near Medford, for a few weeks past, and his life was several times despaired of. At his advanced age, 94 years, it is not likely that he will recover.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1891, page 3


    One of Mrs. S. E. Ish's teams ran away a few days since and did more or less damage. Their driver, Jas. Cook, narrowly escaped serious injury.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 27, 1891, page 3


    Conrad Mingus is having his land near Medford divided into five and ten acre tracts for sale.
    Mr. P. W. Croake, formally [formerly?] of the Pacific Publishing Co., is in town this week gathering data for a handsome, illustrated pamphlet description of the Rogue River Valley, which is to be published soon. His prospectus is an attractive one, and he has met with satisfactory encouragement at Grants Pass, Medford and Ashland. He will also visit other towns of the valley.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 27, 1891, page 3


    G. W. Isaacs and Saml. Murray have opened a butcher shop at Medford.
    A steer belonging to Fred Barneburg was accidentally shot by one of a party of Medford rabbit hunters not long ago and the hunters went down into the pockets and made up the price of the animal to its owner.
    The Mail reports that a number of persons who have left Medford for other places within a year or two will return--J. O. Johnson, who has been at Fairhaven, and A. Childers, who also has been up in Washington, are among them.
    Said the Medford Mail of last Thursday: A. M. Wilson informs us that his father, Jesse Wilson, is quite ill at his house and will probably not recover. The elder Mr. Wilson is 94 years of age and is well known by all, having come to the valley in an early day.

"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 27, 1891, page 3


    The train running on the RR.V.RR. is conveying a goodly number of passengers between the terminus towns. Three new stations have been created on the road, the first from Jacksonville to Whetrock, next Harbaugh's, then Davisville and last of all is Medford. The road has been extended up Jackson Creek and the construction train conveys gravel to the place where the road is being ballasted.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, February 27, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Beek has returned from his northern tour, glad to get back out of the fog.
    Miss Mollie Merriman is holding a responsible position as teacher in one of the leading Portland public schools.
    The road from town to the Odd Fellows' cemetery has been placed in good repair by the lodge and interested citizens.
    The tract of land last week purchased by W. F. Shawver from Mrs. Roberts gives him an excellent piece of property on Bear Creek.
    Miller & Strang last week completed the work of putting on the new tin roof on Davis' flouring mill, and made an excellent job of it.
    I. A. Webb was elected school director and G. L. Davis school clerk of this district at the annual school election held last Monday.
    H. F. Wood last week took the contract to build the new R.R.V.R.R. depot, his bid being $687. It will soon be ready for occupancy.
    It is rumored that Chas. F. Wall will erect a fine brick block on his lots adjoining the Noland saloon property at this place, during the coming season.
    Charles Howard has removed his family to Medford from Grants Pass and has gone in to the civil engineering business in connection with his father, J. S. Howard.
    The Chinese have had to "go" from the culinary department of the Grand Central, the cuisine of which is now under the supervision of W. T. Prim, a caterer of rare ability.
    Rev. C. H. Wallace of Cottage Grove has been in town during the week, straightening up his affairs here, preparatory to taking his final departure for the Willamette section.
    W. W. Scott and family, wife and six children arrived at Medford from Iowa last week with the intention of making their home in this valley. They have relatives at Grants Pass.
    A. A. Davis, the Medford miller, was at the county seat on Tuesday. He has an abundance of grain, enough to last until new wheat comes in, and is able to take a cheerful view of prospects for spring trade.
    The calico party given at Howard's hall last week was a most enjoyable affair, and was well attended by the leading society people of Medford and vicinity. Hamilton's orchestra furnished the music, which was of the best quality.
    Medford is rapidly filling up with a desirable class of citizens, and while there is nothing like a boom on foot, it is evident that newcomers all realize that no place in the valley has brighter chances for the future than have we.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 2


MARRIED.
GROVER-GROVER--At Medford, February 20, 1891, by Rev. L. D. Goodwin, Martin E. Grover and Nettie F. Grover.
BORN.
ANDERSON--At Medford, Feb. 22, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. George Anderson, a daughter.
DIED.
WILSON--Near Medford, Sunday, March 1, 1891, of general debility, Jesse Wilson; aged 94 years, 2 months and 1 day.
    [We are accustomed to view with a certain degree of respect akin to veneration the life of one who has seen the birth and who has figured in the earlier development of a single one of our great western states. With what feelings then must we regard the existence of one whose lifespan covers almost the history of the nation; who has figured as a pioneer in a dozen states as he led the course of empire westward; of one whose birth antedated the century and who has lived under every administration since the inception of our government. His age exceeding by well-nigh a quarter of a century the allotted span, what a striking example he affords of the sturdy vigor and lusty hardihood of the founders of our government. Deceased was born in the state of Kentucky in the beginning of the year 1797, removing to this coast after a long life in the Mississippi Valley in the year 1870 to join his sons Arthur and Jesse Wilson, Jr., in the Rogue River Valley. At the time of his death he represented the first of five living generations in direct succession. He belonged to a family noted for longevity, and a sister, older than he by almost three years, survives him in her native state of Kentucky. The declining years of the subject of this sketch alone were familiar to the residents of the home of his adoption, but there was abundant evidence in them of the sterling worth of the man, as neighbor, friend and citizen, and he took with him to the grave the lasting esteem and regard of all who knew him. The remains were followed to their last resting place on Tuesday morning last, in the peaceful cemetery at Jacksonville, by a large number of mourning friends and relatives, and were laid to their long rest after a few appropriate remarks at the grave by Hon. G. S. Walton of Medford.]
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 2


    The railroad continues to be well patronized.
    Rogue River raised over 5 feet at the bridge during the heavy rains of last week.
    Mumps are holding sway in several sections in the valley, notably at Ashland.
    There has been no use so far for the Cyclone snowplow in the Siskiyous this winter.
    The railroad company is hauling freight, as well as passengers, mails and express, since last Monday.
    Thos. J. Kenney received the first full carload consigned over the R.R.V.R.R. last week, consisting of a carload of feed from the Medford roller mill.
    The fact that law regulates the fare on railroads in this state is responsible for the fact of such low rates being charged for passenger transportation on the branch road.
    The railroad fill at Wagner Creek is completed, and the contractors will now go to work at the other trestles between Ashland and Talent. It has not yet been decided what will be done at Mineral Point.
    The school census shows quite an increase in the school children population of the county seat as compared with last year. The old shire town seems to have "touched bottom" and to be on the upgrade once more.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 3


    Uncle John Wolters of Medford visited his old home in Jacksonville one day last week.
    J. C. Coker has returned from Florida and will engage in the livery business at Medford. He informs us that his father, C. W. Coker, has married since he left here and is engaged in raising oranges in Florida.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 3


    The Postal Tel. Co. has established an office in this place.
    J. Nunan last week sold 1600 bushels of wheat he had stored in the Medford warehouse to F. M. Mingus for 65 cents a bushel.
    The railroad depot in this place having been finished, the W.U. Tel. Co.'s office, of which Miss Laura Harrison is manager, has been removed thither.
    Sheriff Birdsey made a trip to Roseburg to bring back a woman against whom charges were pending in the justice's court of Medford precinct. On her return she was remarried to her divorced husband and the charges dismissed. [These are presumably the Grovers, above.]
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Thos. Harlan to Newell Harlan; N½ of lot 6, blk 3, Cottage add. to Medford; $200.
    C. C. Ragsdale to W. A. Forbes;lots 15 and 16, blk 20, Medford; $100.
    Conrad Mingus to C. W. Palm; lot 1, blk 1, Mingus subdivision; $250.
    J. C. Cowles to W. G. McCubbin, lots and blks in Park add. to Medford; $10.
    Wm. Slinger et al., to F. E. Zoellner; lots 1, 11 and 12 in blk 33 and lot 6, blk 49, Medford; $370.
    C. W. Palm et al., to Ferdinand Million, lots 9 and 10, blk 33, Medford; $160.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 6, 1891, page 3

Timetable, March 6, 1891, page 2.
Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1891, page 2

    J. S. Howard, Medford's popular postmaster, was in Jacksonville during the past week; he regards the new railroad as [a] great convenience as he will be enabled thereby to visit his many Jacksonville friends more frequently.
    The Western Union Telegraph Office has removed to the depot building, where the efficient operator, Miss Laura Harrison, will also act as ticket seller for the Rogue River Valley Railroad.
    Traveling is increasing daily on the R.R.V. railroad, and the business interests of the town of Jacksonville are looking up accordingly.
    Misses Alice and Ella Hanley visited Jacksonville Saturday and availed themselves of our new railroad facilities to spend part of the day with Medford friends, preferring "rapid transit" to the old-time style of buggy riding.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1891, page 2


    The connection of the track of the Medford & Jacksonville branch railroad with the S.P. main line at Medford was made last week, and the business of carrying freight was begun by the branch road the first of this week.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1891, page 3


    Engineer D. McCarthy has turned his engine over to Jim Porter for a week or two, having been employed for some days past in getting the better of a threatened attack of fever. He is able to be out this week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1891, page 3


    Charley Howard has moved from Grants Pass to Medford. Mr. Howard understands civil engineering in all of its branches, and J. S. Howard & Son will indeed make a strong team.--[Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, March 6, 1891, page 3


    The vast area of orchards in southern Oregon that will bear their first crops this season will make our surplus something huge in 1891, if no untoward circumstance arises. From indications at present the season will be most propitious.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. A. Davis shipped a carload of mill-feed to Grants Pass last week.
    J. O. Johnson and family returned to Medford this morning.
    One of Mr. LaFollett's children died in this city a few days since.
    E. Langley acted as fireman on the R.R.V.R.R. during the sickness of W. Farrier.
    Spring fights have commenced already in Medford, but no one has been seriously hurt so far.
    Hon. Robt. Clow, one of the railroad commissioners, visited relatives here one day last week.
    Frank Cardwell, who was appointed deputy assessor, has resigned and will leave this section soon.
    Hanley & Wilkinson, the butchers, are offering the choicest of cuts to the residents of Medford.
    Rev. C. H. Wallace and sons took their departure for permanent residence at Cottage Grove last week.
    A daughter of Warren Dodge has returned home from Ashland, where he has been attending school.
    D. S. Youngs purchased a large amount of goods for his second-hand store at Jacksonville during the week.
    D. T. Sears went to Grants Pass with the railroad commissioners last Saturday, returning home next day.
    Sneak thieves entered the store-room of John A. Hanley one night last week and stole several small articles.
    Judge Walton last week entertained his old-time friend, Frank Witte of Iowa, during the latter's stay in this place.
    Merriman & Legate, the live blacksmiths, received a carload of stone-coal from the north one day last week.
    H. F. Wood, the popular contractor, will push the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s depot at Medford to completion with all speed.
    Dr. Demorest now occupies fine quarters in the front of the opera block building, where he has fitted up his new office.
    Francis Fitch returned from Portland last week, here he has been looking after the interests of the Orchard Home Association.
    S. G. Wortman returned to Medford last week from his trip through Mexico, and will probably remain here for the future.
    District Attorney Colvig was here Tuesday, conducting the prosecution of the tramps who burglarized a car on Sunday night.
    The city council made a mistake when they abolished the night watch. It is at night when nearly all the burglaries and fires occur.
    Dr. Jones was at Jacksonville Wednesday, having been called to treat some members of the family of Mr. Alberry, the section foreman.
    Fred Barneburg shipped two carloads of fat cattle north last week from this station. His stall-fed stock have already earned a good reputation.
    C. C. Ragsdale, having disposed of his hotel interests to Forbes & Coker, will probably spend a portion of his time the next few months in California.
    The rapidly increasing business of Medford establishes the fact beyond a doubt that this is destined to be the leading town in the valley in a very short time.
    Since the switch connection with the S.P. line was established on the R.R.V. railroad last week, the handling of freight for Jacksonville has been greatly facilitated.
    The recent bad weather has delayed building operations at the distillery site somewhat, but the work will be pushed  as rapidly as possible from this time forward.
    W. A. Forbes, one of the new proprietors of the Clarendon Hotel, last week traded Los Angeles property for S. H. Hull's residence on the corner of Front and Eighth streets.
    Prof. N. A. Jacobs will teach the intermediate department of our public schools for the remainder of the term, Miss Coleman's health not admitting of her resuming her duties there.
    Medynski & Theiss announce that they will be ready for business by the time that harvest is over, and expect to have their buildings completed and machinery in place by the first of June.
    Much complaint has been heard of muddy streets in Medford during the past few weeks. One or two of our merchants have found it necessary to have the mud cleared away at their own expense. Shame!
    The Postal telegraph system between here and the county seat is deserving of a share of the public patronage. Will Miller has control of the Jacksonville end of the line at his office in Dr. Jackson's old business place.
    D. G. Coy of Roseburg opens a full line of clothing, boots and shoes, etc., this week in the store-room adjoining Hanley & Wilkinson's butcher shop in Medford. The car thieves last Sunday night gave him an excellent advertisement.
    An inspection of the real estate transfers the past few weeks will satisfy anyone that a healthy immigration is now pouring into the county, and most of these desirable newcomers inquire into the advantages offered by Medford before investing elsewhere.
    The section crew had the misfortune to have their handcar wrecked by the freight train coming up unexpectedly in the fog one day recently and striking the car before they could remove it from the track. It was taken to the car shops at Grants Pass for repairs.
    Uncle John B. Wrisley has received an appointment in the U.S. land office, we learn, and will probably be called to Washington city. We shall regret to see Uncle John depart from among us, but it gives us pleasure to know that B. F. Dowell will have so able a voucher at his elbow, as it were, to substantiate his statements about the privations and hardships of early days among the pioneers [i.e., testifying in favor of Indian war claims]. What a team Uncle John and the immortal B. F. would make, should they be able to join forces in the third house at Washington.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    C. Mingus to N. L. Narregan; 7 acres in Mingus subdivision. $500.
    Leonard & Skeeters to Vawter & Howard; lot 15, block 13, Medford. $1000.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 2


CAR THIEVES CAUGHT.
    Last Sunday evening, at Medford, S.P. car No. 4800, containing a consignment of goods for the new Medford clothing merchant D. G. Coy, was broken into by tramps at about 9:30 o'clock, and 21 pairs of double blankets, several hats, a number of pairs of shoes, some razors, etc., were found to be missing next morning. In the car was found a No. 10 badly worn tramp's shoe and a No. 7 of the same species, the mates to the odd shoes being found at the end of the switch, denoting at least two thieves to have been present at the robbery. A lot of "dope waste" had been piled on a dry goods box and lighted to serve as a candle for the rascals, and had burned a hole through the box, showing them to have been engaged a considerable time at the job. On Monday the sheriff was given a minute description of the stolen property, and ran the thieves down at Ashland, with the assistance of Marshal Mayfield and Deputy Marshal Smith, who obligingly ran one of them into the cooler, while the sheriff was given a fair swing at questioning the younger of the fellows, who had obtained a night's lodging with a woman living near the depot at that place. After making several contradictory statements the man at last confessed to the details of the crime, and put the officers on the track of the missing property that they admit having stolen, even to the two pairs of blankets they had used for bedding and left under a laurel tree near Phoenix. The other fellow virtually admitted his complicity in the crime after learning of his partner's confession, but both denied breaking the seal of the car, or taking the missing 19 blankets. As their story hung together so well the officers are inclined to think that other thieves raided the car after they left it. The young fellow who confessed gave his name as Wm. Johnson, the other calling himself Jim McCarthy. Both had a preliminary hearing before Justice G. S. Walton at Medford on Tuesday last, and were able to await the action of the grand jury. In default of $500 bail bonds both languish in the county jail. They were photographed by P. Britt yesterday, in response to a telegram from the railway authorities, L. R. Fields, the general traffic superintendent, thinking they are responsible for other crimes in which the railroad is interested. They are unquestionably elected for long terms in the penitentiary. Francis Fitch, Esq., assisted District Attorney Colvig in the preliminary examination before Judge Walton, appearing as the representative of the S.P. company. The cases of goods were badly torn up in the car, the fellows being unable to find the clothing they were in search of. No clue has yet been found to the nineteen pairs of missing blankets, nor to several missing hats and five pairs of shoes.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


Spray Your Trees.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman, horticultural commissioner for this district, is now in Jacksonville with a complete spraying apparatus, and is fully prepared to operate against the San Jose scale and other fruit pests. We hope that our citizens will lend him their assistance in getting rid of what promises to be southern Oregon's greatest enemy. Mr. W. is doing this work at the lowest possible figure. The people of Jacksonville should waken to the importance of this matter before it is too late, as much of our future prosperity depends on it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


A Sad Accident.
    One of the children of J. N. Walters, of Medford, aged about two years, came to its death by drowning last Saturday. A washtub containing water was sitting on the back porch of the residence, into which the little child fell unnoticed. The lifeless body was discovered by the mother about fifteen minutes afterwards.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


    Business is looking up, and money will no doubt be more plentiful soon.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co. finished their switch in Jacksonville this week.
    The lumber output of Jackson County was over 25,000,000 feet last year.
    The roads were never before in such a sorry plight at this season of the year.
    Our railroad continues to be well patronized, both as regards the passenger and freight traffic.
    Miss Rose Luy of this place is now learning the "art preservative" [i.e., printing] in the Mail office at Medford.
    The ballasting of the railroad track progresses steadily. The rails in some of the fields on the line have sunk to the level of the ground.
    Assessor Hamilton has appointed A. S. Johnson of Medford as his deputy. We are informed that he is well qualified for the position.
    Every day the great convenience of the R.R.V. railroad is demonstrated anew, and we are glad to see that it is being liberally patronized.
    The weather is considerably warmer than it was at the beginning of the month, and the snow that fell on the mountains during the past few weeks is disappearing.
    Miss Laura Harrison is ensconced in cozy quarters at the depot, where she officiates in the dual capacity of W.U. telegraph operator and ticket agent for the R.R.V.R.R.
    A small consignment of choice apples was shipped by Benj. Eggleston to Page & Son of Portland during the week; but the apple season is about over for this year.
    The Orchard Home tract, near Medford, is now under the superintendency of Henry Pohlman, a fruit tree expert lately from Los Angeles, who has himself bought five acres of the land.
    The official figures show that the fares on the R.R.V.R.R. average about 50 per day, a pretty good showing for hard times. There is no longer any doubt as to the road paying expenses.
    By the provisions of the new Australian ballot law it will be necessary to subdivide Ashland, Medford, Jacksonville and Central Point precincts, each of these having more than the stipulated number of 250 voters allowed.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Hutchison, freight and passenger agent of the R.R.V.R.R., is in Jacksonville frequently  since assuming that position.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


    H. F. Wood is pushing the railroad company's depot at Medford to completion, and is doing a good job.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


Notice.
    Those wishing to sell goods of any kind will do well to consult D. S. Youngs, Second-Hand Dealer, Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 13, 1891, page 3


    At the school meeting for Medford district, on Monday of last week, I. A. Webb was elected as a trustee to serve for three years, in place of W. H. Barr whose term of office had expired. G. L. Davis was elected to fill the vacancy made by I. L. Hamilton.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1891, page 3


    W. I. Vawter and wife and Mr. [and] Mrs. J. Goldsmith, of Medford, spent Saturday in Jacksonville. Mr. and Mrs. Vawter came over to avail themselves of our superior photograph talent to have their dainty little darling, that has lately blessed their home, photographed.
    This morning the working crew on the R.R.V.R.R. boarded the gravel car to run down on the road as usual, trusting the brakes to hold it. The brake beam broke on the heavy down grade, and all the hands jumped off but four, who probably took the fastest trip of their lifetime; down below Harbaugh the car stopped on an up grade and the engine ran down and brought it back; the regular morning train was a little late in consequence of the accident. Nobody was hurt, and the gravel train will probably have an engine in future.
    One of the delightful events of the past few weeks was a trip over the R.R.V.R.R., in company with the pioneer poet, historian and philosopher, Gen. E. L. Applegate. He is equally as familiar with the people and events of pioneer history as he is with the history of ancient Greece and Rome, and it is one of the privileges of a lifetime to listen to his thrilling anecdotes of pioneer days or to hear him tell, in classic story, the history of buried ages, while he stands with his majestic intellect, a grand connecting link between the present and the past.
    James McCarthy and William Johnson, who burglarized a freight car in Medford Saturday, were arrested by Sheriff Birdsey near Ashland Monday and a part of the stolen goods found in their possession; they were brought before Justice Walton of Medford and pled guilty to the charge of burglary, and placed under $500 bonds to appear before the grand jury. They could not furnish bonds and were brought to Jacksonville and lodged in jail. The goods stolen were household and mercantile, belonging to D. G. Coy. Among them were 22 pair of blankets; the prisoners pointed out a woodpile in Medford where they told the sheriff he would find two pairs of blankets, and he found them as they had stated. They deny all knowledge of the other articles and District Attorney Colvig will investigate the case.
    The R.R.V.R.R. is increasing in passenger traffic daily, and freight trains are running regularly. The outlook for the new enterprise is extremely favorable notwithstanding the low rates of 4 cts. per mile. It is said to be paying running expenses and will soon pay dividends on the original investment. Business is looking up in Jacksonville, and the coming year will see the town improve in every way.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1891, page 3


The Gay and Festive "Hobos."
    A span of tie-polishers last Sunday night burglarized a freight car on the Medford sidetrack, treating themselves to new hats, shoes and a pair of blankets apiece. Sheriff Birdsey, assisted by Detective Smith and Enoch Hamilton, arrested them at a late hour the following night, at Ashland near the R.R. trestle. The Sheriff, accompanied by Marshal Mayfield, kindly took them in out of the wet and lodged them in jail at Jacksonville. Part of the stolen property was found in their possession, and the officers found where the thieves had sold the rest of the articles taken.
Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1891, page 3


Rogue River Valley Water Co.
    Articles of Incorporation of the Rogue River Valley Water Company were filed with the county clerk this week; Incorporators, Henry Klippel, Jonas A. Lee and Francis Fitch. Capital stock $250,000, divided into 25,000 shares of $10 each. Principal place of business, Medford. The objects as set forth are to appropriate water from the lakes and mining streams of Jackson County, Oregon, and particularly from those streams known as Big Butte and Little Butte and from that lake known as Fish Lake, all in Jackson County, to construct and maintain reservoirs for the storage of water in said county and state; to build and construct ditches, canals, flumes, dams, distributing ditches and feeders in said county; to utilize for public use and public sale the said water so to be appropriated for purposes of irrigation and supplying water for household and domestic use and for watering livestock, etc.
Ashland Tidings, March 13, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Kate Van Dyke has accepted a lucrative position as a type-writer at Visalia, Cal.
    Miss Ada Barr will graduate soon in stenography and type-writing om San Francisco.
    W. L. Townsend, lately of Ashland, has purchased P. Henderson's tonsorial parlor.
    Artie Robinson, who had his feet so badly crushed by the cars some weeks ago, is able to be about again.
    B. J. Carder and wife last week returned to Medford, after spending the winter in southern California.
    Mr. Wheeler, representative of Mitchell & Lewis, is among us again. There seems to be some attraction here.
    The Oregon Land and Trust Co. has opened an office in Medford, one door south of the Grand Central.
    Jacob F. Ritter of Fresno, Cal. has become a resident of this precinct, having purchased 20 acres of the Lacy tract.
    Bert. Whitman is back from the Heald business college at San Francisco, where he has been for the past several months.
    H. B. Theiss welcomed his family from the East last week, and they are now comfortably established at their new home in this place.
    The firm of Leonard & Skeeters has ceased doing business at this place, and D. G. Coy, lately of Roseburg, has taken possession of their old stand.
    Business is looming up and we expect a prosperous year. The real estate market is improving nicely and several sales have been made, while a number are on the tapis.
    M. Purdin has purchased I. L. Hamilton's interest in the Grand Central Hotel, and took possession a few days since. The new firm of Harris & Purdin will no doubt prove a popular one in every sense.
    J. Goldsmith and family were summoned to Eugene last week by the intelligence that the elder Mr. Goldsmith was very ill. Fortunately the illness was only temporary and Jules returned home a few days afterward.
    As the third story goes up on the distillery building our citizens begin to fully appreciate the magnitude of the concern. It will doubtless prove all it promised to be in the commercial line and be of vast benefit to the community.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    O.&T. Co. to E. A. Langley; lot 12, blk 43, Medford. $50.
    Wm. Slinger et al., to Harry Perrin; lots 1, 2 &3, blk 46, Medford. $192.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 2


Prospects Lively.
    The fact that the S.P. railroad company has ordered 1000 carloads of ballasting gravel from the rich beds at Jacksonville assures a lively traffic over the R.R.V.R.R. for the next two months. If Jacksonville can be rightly accused of giving a stone where bread was asked for, it cannot be denied that the stone is of a superior marketable quality--from our splendid sandstone and lime-rock to our superb gravel beds, not to speak of our quartz veins. What's the matter with Jacksonville, anyhow? She's all right.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


Safe for Sale.
    A first-class Hall's patent fireproof safe, weight 2700 lbs., first cost $250, cheap for cash. Address
M. PURDIN, Medford, Or.           
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


    Roadmaster Alberry has received a fine new handcar for use on the R.R.V.R.R.
    The railroad is being put in excellent shape by roadmaster Alberry and his force.
    The flatcar being used for hauling gravel on the R.R.V.R.R. ran off at a lively rate one day this week, the brake giving way. Several of the employees were aboard, but the most of them jumped off. The car ran down the incline at the rate of a mile a minute, but finally stopped when upgrade was encountered at Harbaugh's. Fortunately, nobody was hurt.
    The proposition to extend the R.R.V.R.R. to Eagle Point is still earnestly discussed by our citizens. It would result in most of the rich trade of that section being diverted to Jacksonville and Medford, and the scheme would receive the hearty endorsement of the citizens of all that section, as it would place them in direct communication with the world, besides making their superior water power available for manufacturing purposes. Eagle Point might prove a big town if it had a railroad.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


    Prof. Narregan called last Saturday. He is now stationed at Medford.
    C. C. Ragsdale called yesterday. He will soon leave Medford for California.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


    Jas. Herely and family have removed from Tacoma to Kent, Wash.
    The train ran into the depot being built for the R.R.V.R.R. at Medford, and damaged one end of the passenger car considerably.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
TAYLOR-WOODY--At the residence of J. N. Woody, near Medford, March 5, 1891, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, Willis A. Taylor and Miss Annie E. Woody.
BORN.
PHIPPS--At Medford, March 7, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. M. P. Phipps, a son.
JACOBS--In Medford, March 17, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Jacobs, a son.
DIED.
LAFOLLET--At Medford, March 8, 1891, of typhoid fever, Elmer Lafollet; aged five years and 1 month.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 20, 1891, page 3


Sad Drowning Accident at Medford
[Medford Mail.]
    One of the most distressing accidents which ever occurred in this city was the death of the little two-year-old child of Mr. and Mrs. J. N. Walters of this place Saturday. The little one had been given a piece of bread and butter to keep her quiet while the mother was washing the front windows and had at once started out of the kitchen door to play in the yard. Shortly after the mother went to look for her child, imagine her anguish and terror when she beheld the little one head downward in a tub of water which was standing on the back porch. The child was immediately taken into the house and a doctor summoned but nothing could be done. The little one had strangled before she was taken from her position. The mother was driven nearly frantic with grief but was finally reconciled to the loss of her child. The funeral took place on Sunday from the house, quite a number of friends of the family being present.
Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1891, page 2


    County Assessor I. L. Hamilton this week sold out his interest in the Grand Central Hotel at Medford to M. Purdin.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1891, page 3


    This morning the working crew on the R.R.V.R.R. boarded the gravel car to run down on the road as usual, trusting the brakes to hold it. The brake beam broke on the heavy down grade, and all the hands jumped off but four who probably took the fastest ride of their lifetime; down below Harbaugh the car stopped on an up grade and the engine ran down and brought it back; the regular morning train was a little late in consequence of the accident. Nobody was hurt, and the gravel train will probably have an engine in future.
    One of the delightful events of the past few weeks was a trip over the R.R.V.R.R., in company with the pioneer poet, historian and philosopher, Gen. E. L. Applegate. He is equally as familiar with the people and events of pioneer history as he is with the history of ancient Greece and Rome, and it is one of the privileges of a lifetime to listen to his thrilling anecdotes of pioneer days or to hear him tell, in classic story, the history of buried ages, while he stands with his majestic intellect, a grand connecting link between the present and the past.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1891, page 3


BORN.
JACOBS--In Medford, Oregon, March 18, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. N. A. Jacobs, a son.
Ashland Tidings, March 20, 1891, page 3


WHY PAY $70 AND MORE FOR A CHEAP LOT
    When you can get an ENTIRE ACRE of the best fruit land in Nickell's Addition to Medford for the SAME price?
    Nickell's Addition joins Medford's western corporation line, is situated in a beautiful and healthful location, and is within a stone's throw of the Medford schoolhouse. The land is particularly adapted to horticulture, and great returns would be realized there from a few acres planted in prunes, peaches, grapes, etc.
    Two of its best features are that it is free from city taxes, although not lying a great distance from the business portion of Medford, while the Jacksonville-Medford railroad will run through the land near the northern boundary.
    It has been laid out in tracts of five acres and less, and will be sold at very reasonable rates on the most favorable terms, viz: one-third in cash, one-third in one year, and balance in two years.
    For further particulars apply to any reputable real estate dealer, who will take pleasure in showing you the addition.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891 et seq., page 2     The price in the headline increased from $50 to $70 with this issue.


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Isaacs & Murray have closed their butcher shop for the present.
    Ed. Tryer is assisting F. Galloway at the combination fence works.
    M. Purdin has been admitted to practice at the bar, and is well received.
    Geo. Justus has been visiting his sister at Ager, Cal., during the week.
    Fred Faris now dispenses sweets to the sweet at Goldsmith's headquarters.
    The elder Mr. Galloway has returned to Medford for permanent residence.
    Peter Henderson and family last week visited at Woodville, prior to their departure for the north.
    H. U. Lumsden and family are spending a month in the Sound country, in quest of health and pleasure.
    The Mitchell & Lewis Co. have reestablished headquarters here with a big stock of goods in their line.
    The W.C.T.U. now meets regularly every Thursday afternoon, at 3 o'clock, at the Presbyterian Church.
    Rev. F. Watry will hold services at the Catholic Church next Sunday, which is Easter, at 11 o'clock A.M.
    Mrs. Bell returned to Ashland last week after a very pleasant visit with her daughter, Mrs. E. W. Hammon of this place.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s depot at this place is finished and is a handsome one, reflecting much credit on the contractors.
    Mrs. M. A. Davison has sold four acres near town to Mrs. F. L. Cranfill for $70 an acre. C. W. Palm negotiated the sale.
    On Thursday evening of last week the sons of veterans residing in Medford met and perfected an organization of the order here.
    George Merriman recently bought Dr. Pickel's house and lot in the southern part of town and will occupy the same as a residence.
    Mr. Crouch contemplates building at once on the handsome lot he last week purchased from C. W. Palm, in the Mingus subdivision.
    Considerable building is already going on at Medford, although the season is yet early. We expect to see a great deal of improvement here during 1891.
    J. O. Johnson and family have returned to Medford for permanent residence, and are glad to get back again after their sojourn in Washington.
    A. M. Gibson of Missouri spent the week investigating the resources of Medford and vicinity, with a view of locating here. He is a cousin of O. P. McGee.
    Davis' park in the southern part of town is now a very handsome enclosure, and many hope that he will carry out his threat of donating it to the city for the use of the public.
    Much complaint of tramps is heard on every side, and it is highly probable that a tramp ordinance, to enable our marshal to put these worthies to work, will be passed at an early day.
    It was reported on our streets during the week that parties abroad would meet our citizens more than halfway on a cannery proposition for Medford, provided sufficient interest is taken here to insure the success of the undertaking.
    A. Childers, the pioneer brickmason, who went to Whatcom, Wash., on a visit some time since, was taken sick. He will return as soon as he recovers. His son Arnold is also there, and his family have been sick more or less of the time.
    The huge proportions of the distillery buildings attract many visitors every Sunday to inspect them, and the fact is becoming more evident every day that the representations of the gentlemen who have the concern under way will be fulfilled to the letter.
    Much interest is taken in Medford in the proposed road to be opened to the Cinnabar Springs and health resort the coming summer. Citizens here will petition the county court to lend a helping hand in the work. The road will prove of vast benefit to all sections of the country if it is built, affording easy means of access to the most important health resort on the coast, and one that will pay all parties interested to keep tributary to this county.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Volna Webster to Belinda Webster; north part of lots 7 and 8, blk 8, Park add. to Medford. $100.
    Peter Fitch to Vawter & Howard; lot on East 9th Street, Medford. $400.
    C. W. Palm et al. to John Cox and George Finley; lot 13 blk 47, Medford. $200.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 2


    Miss Mamie McMahon, who has been critically ill at S. Earhart's residence in Medford precinct for some time past, is recovering slowly.
    The Orchard Home Association is planting 20 acres more in choice trees. It has upwards of 60 acres planted, which is evidence that their scheme is proving popular, as it rightfully should.
    The new locomotive for the R.R.V.R.R. arrived this week and is ensconced in the roundhouse. It is small, but handsome and powerful. The passenger car is expected soon, conductor Dyar informs us.
    The real estate market in Jackson County is in a better condition than it has been for nearly two years past, and many transactions are looked for during 1891. Considerable land has changed hands during the past few weeks.
    Some hoodlum placed a cartridge on the railroad track near the Times office, which exploded with a loud report as the train passed over it. Such conduct is criminal, to say the least, and should be severely punished. It might have resulted in someone getting hurt.
    Mitchell & Lewis Co. have opened their branch house at Medford, and will carry a very complete stock of farm wagons, springwork implements, corn and hay tools, etc., adapted to this section of country. They manufacture and handle a strictly first-class line of goods and sell direct to the consumer. Farmers will consult their own interests by examining their stock before purchasing elsewhere. See their advertisement in another column.
    The manner in which our citizens are beautifying and renovating their premises, not to speak of their hearty support of the efforts of the state board of horticulture to eradicate the fruit pests that at one time bade fair to eradicate the fruit, cannot be too highly recommended. We have here one of the prettiest little towns on the coast; and since our citizens have taken renewed courage from the advent of our railroad [it] bids fair to again be one of the most prosperous.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 3


    W. Honeyman and W. A. Buchanan, members of the firm of Honeyman, DeHart & Co., Portland, proprietors of the R.R.V.R.R., made this section a visit last Sunday. They returned home well satisfied with the manner in which their railroad is being conducted and patronized.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 3


    Since the advent of the railroad the genus tramp is becoming more abundant.
    Since the railroad was built we see five strangers on the streets of Jacksonville now where we saw one before.
    Next Monday M. Purdin, the assignee of the estates of Magruder Bros. and Kincaid Bros., will auction off the goods remaining. The unsold goods were brought to Medford last week.
    A postal inspector was in Jacksonville this week for the purpose of making arrangements to transfer the mail contract to the R.R.V.R.R. Co.
    The hoodlums who are playing all kinds of pranks on the railroad track will come to grief sooner or later. Efforts are being made to locate them, and when they are discovered the severe punishment they deserve will be meted out to them.
    Rev. Mr. Aleridge of Medford preached at M.E. church in Jacksonville last Sunday. His remarks concerning our town were not complimentary, principally because he was not favored with the audience he expected. But, then, he did not know that the people here had never gained a reputation as church-goers.
    Some very small individuals smeared the railroad track in Cardwell's field with rancid lard or soft soap last night, so that the train could make no progress and caused a delay of nearly half an hour. There is a law against such proceedings, and the perpetrators of this outrage will not think it so funny when they find quarters in the county jail.
    It transpires that the correct name of young McCarthy, who is confined in the county jail for stealing from a freight car at Medford, is Demar. He is an old offender, having given bonds to appear in one of the San Francisco courts, with his father as bondsman. His identity was fortunately discovered by a checkbook in his possession, and the elder Demar, who is a poor man, will be spared the loss of his money.
    W. P. Dodge of Medford is now sole proprietor of Dodge Bros.' well-drilling business, and is prepared to fill contracts in that line, as well as prospecting mining claims. He has drilled a number of wells in different portions of the county and never failed to give satisfaction. His machine can drill to the depth of 400 feet, if necessary. We take pleasure in recommending Mr. D.'s work. His advertisement will appear next week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 27, 1891, page 3


Democratic Times, March 27, 1891 et seq., page 3

   Post office inspector and road agent Samuel Flint, of San Francisco, was in Jacksonville Monday, looking after postal matters and arranging for the transferring of the mail contract between this place and Medford to the R.R.V.R.R.
    Rev. M. C. Aleridge of Medford occupied the pulpit of the M. E. Church in this place last Sunday morning and evening. Although his audience was small on both occasions his sermons are pronounced of more than ordinary excellence. Our people should not miss an opportunity to hear him.
    M. Purdin, the Medford lawyer, has purchased the Grand Central Hotel at that place. He can now be "admitted to the bar" without any special examination. He is a capable man of business, courteous and obliging and the Grand Central will continue to be the leading hotel under his management.
    W. L. Miller has purchased the telegraph line between this place and Medford and has an independent connection with the Mackey-Bennett line, for which he is now operator. He has also accepted the position of Associated Press correspondent and telegraphic and general correspondent of the Portland Telegram. He will attend to all the business promptly and acceptably.
    The home of Prof. N. A. Jacobs, of Medford, was made happy on March 18th by the advent of a bouncing baby boy. Brother Jacobs is Grand Treasurer of the R.D.C. and members of the Degree will join us in the wish that little one may inherit all the good qualities of both father and mother and become in time a shining link in the order.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, March 27, 1891, page 3


ARBOR DAY.
    The Arbor Day programme of the Medford public schools was carried out in a manner befitting the occasion. Notwithstanding it rained almost incessantly during the night before, Friday proved to be a bright and pleasant day.
    At 1:30 o'clock p.m., the pupils formed ranks at the school grounds under the supervision of the teachers, and, after marching through the principal streets of the city, repaired to the Presbyterian Church, where the exercises took place.
    Rev. F. J. Edmunds made a few very appropriate remarks pertaining to Arbor Day, which were well received. After which the programme was taken up and disposed of. The pupils all acquitted themselves admirably. The dialogue "Visiting a Dentist," by pupils from Miss Strang's room, brought forth a storm of applause from the audience, especially from the little folks, who seemed to enjoy it very much.
    The exercises were concluded by planting a chestnut tree in the city park.
The Young Idea, Washington School publication, April 1891, page 2


NEW SCHOOL HOUSE.
    On the 9th of May the legal voters of this district meet and decide whether or not a new school house will be erected. If the question carries, and we have no doubt but that it will, the kind of structure, plans, cost, etc. will have to be determined upon, and later on the tax can be levied, but not until all the preliminaries as stated above have been settled. Voters, give us a school house that we can all feel proud of.
The Young Idea, Washington School publication, April 1891, page 2


LOCAL ITEMS.
    One month of school yet.
    Vote for a brand-new school house.
    Miss Laura Nichols is with us again.
    The "one-horse circus" has come and gone.
    Johnny Plymale is the proud possessor of a bicycle.
    There were thirty-five scholars enrolled in our room this month.
    President Harrison and party are expected to pass through our city on the 4th of May.
    We are expecting a visit from our good-looking and popular school superintendent at any time now.
    Every man that is interested in the progress and welfare of Medford should vote to build a school house.
    School closes on the 22nd of May, and a public entertainment will be given by the pupils in the evening of that day.
    Miss Iva Purdin lost three days this month on account of sickness, the only time lost during the entire eight months.
    Every parent who cares for the health and comfort of his children should vote for the erection of a new school house.
    Messrs. M. Purdin and I. A. Webb, directors of No. 49, paid the different departments an official visit during the month. Call again, gentlemen.
    Miss Grace Davis was absent several days this month on account of sickness. Gracie is one of our brightest scholars and we are pleased to see her back again.
    Medford cannot afford to be behind her rivals in school matters, so it behooves her citizens to see to it that a large and commodious school building of some kind is erected this year.
    Miss Mary Wait, sister of Miss Jessie Wait of our department, who is attending school in East Portland, took part in the contest between the pupils of the schools of that city and Vancouver, Wash. recently.
    On the different pages of the Idea will be found samples of the work we are doing in composition, letter-writing, etc. Be lenient with your criticisms, please, and remember these productions are of pupils in the 4th reader grade.
"Local Items," The Young Idea, Washington School publication, April 1891, page 3


    CASH VS. CREDIT.--The credit system, as at present carried on in Oregon, is the whole cause of what is now termed "hard times." The farmer, the merchant, the stock raiser and grain dealer all do an immense credit business. We say it is the cause of hard times and expect, by points which have come under our observation, to prove our assertion. We ask, can any farmer or business man pay from twenty to thirty percent interest and then make a success of such business? You say no, as all business men say. But does a farmer pay such interest as above stated, you ask. Take the following for an example: A farmer in this section a short time ago wished to purchase a wagon. Upon inquiring the price he was informed that it was $104 on one year's time, at ten percent interest, $97 on thirty days or $88 cash. At that rate the purchaser pays about twenty-six percent on his investment. If he borrows money on his farm to pay the debts he has contracted he pays eight percent on his mortgage, four percent to insure the property against fire if there be buildings on the land, and from three to five percent to the loan agent. Is there any wonder that he cries "hard times." The reason that corporations are on the increase is that they do a strictly cash business. You would not ask the railroad company to trust you until your wheat is threshed for a passage from here to Chicago or Portland. Then why ask your neighbor or merchant to wait on you. Pay as you go, and if you cannot pay don't go, and in a short time you will find that cash is king and that credit is the slave that has bound you, not with a golden link, but with an iron band for lo these many years. We say break the iron band and deliver yourselves from the bonds of slavery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. G. Coy, the new clothier, auctioned off a lot of goods last week.
    Peter Henderson intends to look up a location in the Coos Bay section.
    J. A. Brown has purchased the Robinson delivery business and took charge last Monday.
    W. P. Dodge now has sole control of the well-boring machine and is taking many contracts.
    D. H. Miller will welcome a brother from the East to this valley for his future home in a short time.
    Pension examinations continue frequently, as many as six being made at Medford in one day recently.
    Chas. Skeeters and J. Leonard left for Crescent City one day recently, after quite a lengthy sojourn here.
    P. J. McGee, who left Oregon last fall for Kansas, will return to Medford in a short time to reside permanently.
    G. H. Haskins has an assistant in his drugstore in the person of Ed. Phipps, who is studying pharmacy there.
    Miss Ada Barr returned from San Francisco last week, after graduating in a school of stenography in that city.
    The M.E. Church presents a greatly improved appearance since being treated to a coat of paint on the interior.
    Miss Elma Young has been in town from San Jose during the week, visiting her parents and friends at this place.
    The contract for laying the water pipe for the city was let last week, and the system will be complete in a very short time.
    S. D. Biden, a newcomer of the most desirable class, last week purchased 10 acres of W. H. Shores, through S. H. Hull's agency.
    Shipment of forty boxes of apples was made to San Francisco by Davis & Huff one day not long since. Good fruit commands high prices at this season.
    Dr. Pickel entertained his mother and sister, Miss Della, of Talent, during the week. Miss Della began a term of school at the Bell school house last Monday.
    Rev. Lund of Roseburg recently presented Dr. Jones of this place with a pair of fine homing pigeons, which are beauties and very valuable, as they are of a choice strain.
    The matter of building that new schoolhouse is once more being agitated. It will be an absolute necessity before long, which is a high compliment to the growth of our town.
    Mart Hurst of Antelope will take charge of the Clarendon Hotel in a few days. With the efficiency of Mrs. Hurst as a cook they cannot fail to make a success of the venture.
    J. C. Elder entertained his sister and her son from Iowa during the week. Mrs. Brooks, the sister, is very much pleased with Oregon, as no one could avoid being at this season.
    Mrs. Belinda Masterson of Gold Hill recently purchased two desirable building lots in Medford through the agency of Faris & Erford, and announces her intention of building soon.
    A. A. Davis completed arrangements for giving the railroad company 51 carloads of patronage, grain, flour and mill seed, during his recent trip over the road between here and Eugene.
    Miss Ora Adkins was brought home from the state university by her father last week, the young lady having just passed through a severe attack of pneumonia. She is convalescing now.
    G. Theiss and daughters, Misses Mary and Lizzie, arrived from their former home in Illinois, to make their residence here, during the last week. Mr. T. is the father of our estimable townsman, B. P. Theiss.
    Trade has improved wonderfully in Medford since the building of the R.R.V.R.R., and our merchants now have little to complain of in the way of patronage. The town is steadily growing, and many strangers have come amongst us recently.
    M. Purdin, having purchased a half interest in the Grand Central Hotel, is now devoting his energies to the effort to make that the leading hostelry of southern Oregon, in which effort he has the hearty support of his partner, the genial Tom Harris.
    The chief of all worn-out plays, "Uncle Tom's Cabin," will be presented by a company of barnstormers in a tent in Medford. It is about time that this very ancient chestnut were retired for awhile, at least, if for nothing more than rejuvenation.
    As we predicted some time since would be the case this spring, many immigrants are making it a point to stop over at Medford to investigate the climate and resources of this section, and numbers of them are finding desirable homes in our midst. Medford is bound in the very nature of things to be the center of a most prosperous community for many years.
    The camp of Sons of Veterans was organized at Medford last week as announced, with fifteen charter members. Officers were elected
after organization as follows: Captain, C. O. Damon; first lieutenant, E. S. Johnson; second lieutenant, L. H. Mattox; camp council, Newell Harlan, E. L. Bashford, L. D. Goodwin; first sergeant, U. S. Damon; sergeant guard, Fred Faris; corporal guard, E. L. Bashford; camp guard, J. S. Bunch; picket guard, W. S. Johnson.
    The letters written the president as a part of the literary and rhetorical training of the pupils of the Medford public schools have been heard from. A number of the missives were enclosed and sent by Principal Crawford to President Harrison, who had his private secretary sit down and acknowledge their receipt in very courteous terms. Unless the copy of the private secretary's letter published in the Mail is a base slander upon a worthy man, Mr. Halford's own early training in the literary line was grossly neglected.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 2


BORN.
FRAZIER--At Medford, March 24, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. John Frazier, a daughter.
WEBB--In Medford, March 31, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. Geo. L. Webb, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 2


    Operations have been under way during the past two weeks at the Orchard Home Association tract looking to the transformation of that beautiful location into an entire orchard in the immediate future. A large number of trees have already been set out.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 3


    John Posey, formerly of Medford, now a resident of California, is visiting James Bigham's family of Lake Creek.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 3

 
    H. H. Wolters and Miss Mamie McMahon of Medford were joined in matrimony one day this week. They have the congratulations and best wishes of many friends and acquaintances.
    A majority of the hands employed on the R.R.V.R.R. struck for higher wages yesterday. Their demand not being acceded to, they quit work. They have been getting $1.50 a day, but wanted $1.75.
    As the new engine becomes "limbered up" it does satisfactory work, and the railroad boys are much better pleased with it than at first. It hauled the passenger coach several times within the week, and bids fair to fulfill the guarantee of 80 tons up a 3 percent grade as it settles to its work.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    H. E. Baker to Vawter & Howard; quitclaim to lot 4, blk 6, and all of blks 7 and 8, Beatty's add. to Medford. $1.
    George H. Baker to same; same property. $1700.
    L. M. Lyon to Mrs. M. J. Tipton; lot in Medford, $1800. (Subject to lien.)
    A. S. Jacobs to Elizabeth C. Wait; lots 4 and 5, blk 52, Medford. $425.
    Eunice M. Lumsden to Oliver McGee; lot in Medford. $2600.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891, page 3


Well Drilling and Prospecting,
THE UNDERSIGNED, having become sole proprietor of Dodge Bros.' well-drilling business, respectfully announces that he is now prepared to do all work in his line in a first-class manner and at a reasonable rate. I will also take contracts for prospecting placer mines. The capacity of my machine is 400 feet. I refer to the work I have previously done in different portions of the valley.
    Satisfaction guaranteed.
    For further particulars call on or address
W. P. DODGE, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1891 et seq., page 3


    Mrs. Barrett, the evangelist, finished her work in Ashland and went down to Medford last Saturday to hold a series of meetings. It is announced that she will return to Ashland after the completion of her Medford engagement and deliver a course of temperance lectures here.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1891, page 3


    Says a Washington dispatch to the Oregonian: The postmaster general has informed Representative Hermann, in reply to previous application made to him, that the Rogue River Valley Railroad Company declines to transport the mails on its line between Medford and Jacksonville for the compensation provided by law for ordinary railway service. The postmaster general decides that it is not discretionary with the department to allow a greater compensation than is provided by law.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1891, page 3


    The little 12-ton engine which was ordered especially for the R.R.V.R.R. has not yet been [made] to work satisfactorily, and it is feared that it will not do the work on the road, as the grade is heavy all the way from Medford.
    William Ulrich, the irrepressible insurance agent of Medford, was in town during the week. When he concludes to insure anybody's property they had better capitulate at once, as he don't know any such word as fail, and everybody feels better and happier when their property is insured in a reliable company, especially if there is a fire soon after.
    Wednesday night of last week a .44-caliber pistol cartridge was placed on the R.R. track near the Times office, and was exploded as the train came in, the shell passing very near Mr. Nickell, who was going to the depot. The next night the  track was greased on the heavy grade near the Cardwell farm residence and the train was delayed nearly an hour. There is no clue as yet to the perpetrators of the dastardly outrages, but they indicate clearly the presence of a lawless, reckless hoodlum element that will sooner or later fall in the hands of the law, and be justly punished for their misdeeds.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, April 3, 1891, page 3


    It gives us pleasure to note that our cotemporaries throughout this judicial district are commenting most favorably on the fact that Jacksonville has at last thrown off her lethargy and is in the van of progress once more since the building of our railroad, with many improvements in contemplation and some already under way.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 2


MARRIED.
WOLTERS-McMAHON--At the residence of S. Earhart, near Medford, April 2, 1891, H. H. Wolters and Miss Mamie McMahon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 2


A Correct Report.
    The rumor which we republished a few weeks since, to the effect that the female evangelist, Mrs. Barrett, who has been holding a series of revival meetings at Medford and Ashland, was none other than the noted Mrs. Emma Malloy, of Springfield, Mo., of criminal calendar fame, turns out to be correct; and while the lady makes no definite denial of the charge, she rightfully claims that anyone has the option of reforming and leading a new life at any time he or she may see fit to do so. If the evangelist is content to pursue her calling with such a handicap upon her as so unsavory a record, it is probably nobody's business; and if she can succeed in distracting attention from herself to the extent of planting the seeds of faith and trust in her hearers, it perforce indicates a high degree of mental power in herself, or a limited degree of intelligence and common sense in her hearers. Let the work go on without let or hindrance, and time will determine which horn of the dilemma the public will roost on.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


The Coming Circus.
    The new united monster shows will be at Medford on Friday, April 17th. From all accounts this mammoth combination, with its wonderful galaxy of arenic talent and wonders from wonderland, will with its advent here mark an epoch in the history of this section. It is by far the greatest circus in the universe, and our citizens, both far and near, should feel specially favored by its coming. One feature alone of its many attractions, Queen Jumbo, is enough to arouse the curiosity and attention of everybody within fifty miles. The presence of the largest animal in the history of the world, and that a living, breathing, moving mountain of flesh, is sufficient to startle the sluggish blood of the most inert among us. See advertisement elsewhere in our columns. An excursion train will run between Jacksonville and Medford on that occasion.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


    The railroad company will run an excursion train to Medford on the day McMahon's circus exhibits in Medford. The fare will be only 20 cents for the round trip.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman is doing good work in introducing spraying machines in large numbers into the valley. He orders from headquarters and gets the lowest prices for the people.
    Mrs. Barrett, the evangelist, came to Jacksonville last week to have the editor of the Ashland Record, who has been publishing a number of severe criticisms concerning her career in the East, indicted for criminal libel. The grand jury failed to take any notice of the matter, however.
    Messrs. Whitman and Narregan of Medford have made a proposition to the commissioners' court to abstract all the lands in the county, to ascertain description, ownership, etc., for a certain percentage of the tax that will be levied upon the land that the assessor fails to find and assess.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Col. Jacob Johnson inspected his ranch on Rogue River one day during the week.
    Johnny Bellinger last week sold his fine span of horses to Mrs. Cardwell of Jacksonville for $200.
    Hon. Willard Crawford is about recovered from his recent indisposition and attack of the grippe.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s depot is one of the handsomest on the coast; C. I. Hutchison is in charge.
    Our people are being overwhelmed by traveling shows, not less than four being billed for Medford inside of eight days.
    S. Rosenthal is showing a splendid line of new goods, which all in need of such will find it to their advantage to inspect.
    M. Lafollet and family last week went to California to reside in the future on a fine farm they recently acquired near Oakland.
    The new house in the Mingus subdivision is being built by B. F. Crouch of Linkville, who recently bought a desirable lot there.
    There is a fine opening at Medford for a good, responsible jeweler to ply his calling. The town has been without a jeweler for some time.
    Four of our sportively inclined residents have been indicted for gambling. Only two were arrested, the balance being conveniently absent from the valley at present.
    J. W. Miller, the advance agent of 100 Nebraska families who would like to better their condition by removing to this section, was in Medford last week, looking over the situation.
    A pile of straw set on fire by one of John Perdue's children last week almost resulted in the destruction of his barn and outbuildings, the fire being beyond control when discovered.
    The parlor meeting of the W.C.T.U. at the residence of Henry Baker last week was a pleasant event, there being no less than 65 in attendance, all enjoying themselves. Several new members were received.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


More Hoodlumism.
    Jacksonville has a crop of the meanest hoodlums in existence, some of whom are trying hard to develop into thieves and train wreckers. Members of this gang stole some of the cakes which had been baked for the sociable of the O.E.S. from the Masonic club room last night. Somebody--no doubt a hoodlum--placed a rail across the railroad track in Cardwell's field one night recently, and an accident would probably have happened had not the engine crushed it in running over the stick of wood, as it fortunately was an old one. If these criminal freaks are persisted in somebody will find himself in the county jail or penitentiary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


Special Railroad Excursions.
    The Rogue River Valley R.R. Co. will run excursion trains to Medford on Friday, April 17th, on the occasion of the exhibitions of McMahon's United Shows, both afternoon and evening, to accommodate the citizens of Jacksonville and vicinity, at half rates, or one fare for the round trip. Make up your parties, and for time of trains consult the conductor. By order of
C. I. HUTCHISON, Agent.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


    The new cars for the R.R.V.R.R. Co. are expected to arrive any day and will make a handsome appearance.
    Two carloads of lumber from T. H. Gilson's sawmill was shipped to Medford recently, to be used in making a sidewalk to the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s depot.
    F. Hubbard, who was here yesterday, informs us that a high wind has been prevailing at intervals at Medford for the past day or two--the strongest he has ever seen here.
    A movement is on foot to organize a pork-packing company, with a capital of $20,000, for the purpose of buying the hog crop of southern Oregon and converting it into hams, bacon and lard. The scheme is a feasible one and cannot but prove highly remunerative. A number of prominent business men of Medford, Ashland and other portions of the county intend taking stock. The packing house will be located in Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1891, page 3


    Medford is again without a jeweler.
    J. W. Miller of Central City, Neb., has been in Medford representing a colony of 100 families who desire to obtain cheap land in Oregon.
    The cars, three in number, consisting of a mixed baggage and express, a flat and a box car, for the R.R.V.R.R., are expected this week. The new engine will not be put on the road for regular trips until they arrive.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 10, 1891, page 3


    The "Uncle Tom's Cabin" company that showed in Medford Tuesday evening paraded our streets in the afternoon of the same day and afforded some amusement for the boys.
    Quite a number of Jacksonville people went to Medford last Wednesday evening to hear the much talked-of evangelist, Mrs. Malloy-Barrett; and found her to be a most entertaining talker.
    Several hands on the ballasting force of the new railroad struck for higher wages last week, which not being granted they promptly quit work. It appears that their expenses were in some way advanced and they in turn asked for additional wages from $1.50 to $1.75 per day.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, April 10, 1891, page 3


Democratic Times, April 10, 1891, page 3

At Medford.
    MEDFORD, Or., April 10.--Arbor Day was appropriately observed in our city today. At 1 o'clock the pupils of the public schools formed ranks at the school houses, marched down Main Street and thence to the Presbyterian Church, where the exercises took place. Although it rained last night it proved to be a pleasant day, and a large number of visitors were present. On account of our school grounds not being suitably improved, the trees were planted in the city park.
"Observances Elsewhere," Oregonian, Portland, April 11, 1891, page 12

Warning to Fruit Growers.

    One of the many resources of wealth to the people of southern Oregon is in her fruit crop. Neglect last year caused a severe loss on account of the apple worm (codling moth). I have examined several apple orchards in the past three days and have found the codling moth worm in great numbers. As soon as the season advances the worm will undergo its natural change and become a moth, and at the proper stage the moth deposits its egg on the apple. It is nocturnal in its habits, doing its work at night, and the thoughtless apple grower if he neglects to spray is not aware of the damage done until along in the summer he finds his choice red apples ripening prematurely and falling to the ground. Now, through your paper, permit me to urge our apple men not to neglect spraying this season. The thing needed is a good spray pump; then Bulletin No. 4 contains the remedies, which can be had by addressing Hon. J. D. Whitman, Medford, Or., member of the state Board of Horticulture for the 3d district of Oregon.
A. H. CARSON.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 1


    It is now an admitted fact on all sides that the coming season is certain to be the most fruitful in the history of this valley, and the question is already confronting many as to what will be done in the line of establishing canneries and providing for a local market for our fruit surplus. The great number of young orchards that will this year bear their first full crop will make a temporary tightness in the labor market that has not been felt here for a number of years; and if to this drawback is added the usual difficulty experienced in finding a local market for the more perishable fruits in their season, many will be discouraged after years of waiting for the trees to mature. Now is the time to take this matter in hand and to provide a market for all this surplus at home, whenever the condition of the fruit or of the markets abroad will not warrant its shipment. In its preserved or dried state it will never be much trouble to find buyers for all we have to spare, but with our limited facilities for handling it in its fresh condition our fruit may prove a burden on our hands, superior as it is to the eastern article as well as to the most of what is produced in California. At least three fully equipped canneries are needed in this valley this season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A large $20,000 brick hotel will be erected here this summer, it is said.
    This is circus day, and our town will doubtless be full of people.
    Skeel & Son last week shipped 25 finely finished sash doors to J. W. Howard of Grants Pass.
    Davis & Huff shipped a small consignment of apples to San Francisco last week, positively the last.
    Six thousand feet of new pipe will be used in the extension of the Medford waterworks system.
    The W.C.T.U. announce a pink tea social at the opera house on the evening of May 1st next.
    Considerable building is going on, with the prospects of many improvements being made this summer.
    Prof. Crawford of the Medford schools has been granted a life diploma by the State Board of Education.
    Mumps have been holding sway in Medford for the past week. There were all quite high at latest accounts.
    There is a good opening here for a fruit-canning establishment, and the man who takes hold of it will no doubt do well.
    E. Davis and family have returned from Missouri for the second time to Medford, and say they will stay for keeps this time.
    Rosenthal, the genial merchant, visited Grants Pass not long since, and has since shipped down a lot of bacon to pay his expenses.
    A. A. Davis has returned from a successful soliciting trip to the Sacramento country, where his flour will compete with the best.
    Rev. C. M. Hill was sick at this place and unable to fill his engagement at Grants Pass last week. He is a brother of Mrs. W. I. Vawter.
    A large pork-packing establishment will be started here soon with a capital of $25,000. Parties from different portions of the country will take stock.
    Milton Maule's property was last week purchased by a Mr. Galloway, just out with his wife from Pennsylvania, for the purpose of making his home among us.
    The town council has been considering an ordinance during the week to compel citizens to keep their premises and contiguous streets in good sanitary condition. A sensible one.
    Our fellow townsman, D. H. Miller, last week received the sad news of the death of his brother, whom he was expecting to arrive here before long. We tender our condolence.
    E. J. Montague and family entertained Mr. and Mrs. Long from Eugene during the week, the latter having come to this valley to try the effect of a change of climate on her health.
    Coker & Forbes have been succeeded in the management of the Clarendon Hotel by Mart. Hurst and wife of Butte Creek, but are still in charge of the stables conducted in connection therewith.
    Marshal Miller was a sufferer from the prevailing ailment during the week. Abstracter Whitman has also been confined to his room with a severe attack of the grippe for more than a week past.
    Protection hose company has already secured the opera house for the second annual ball on the 4th of July. The boys are too wide-awake to ever get left on any of their calculations in the entertainment line.
    A neat, solid sidewalk now joins the platforms of the S.P. and R.R.V.R.R. companies at this place. The depot of the branch road is one of the neatest on the coast and is ably presided over by C. I. Hutchison.
    Georgia Reed's Comedians are playing to large audiences and giving entire satisfaction. The performers are hard to beat. They will be here during the balance of the week, and everybody should make it a point to see them.
    Medford's big distillery will start up in about three months, and with the fine crop already assured there can be little doubt that it will find all the grain needed for its successful operation right from the inception of the business, a fact upon which the owners as well as the people of the valley generally should congratulate themselves, for it will enable a most important enterprise to get fairly established upon a safe basis the first year of its existence.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 2


A Card.
MEDFORD, Or., April 10, 1891.        
To MITCHELL, LEWIS & CO.
    Gentlemen:--The Canton clipper sidehill plow, bought of you last month, works to perfection, either on sidehill or level ground. It is light draft and easy to handle and all that could be desired in a sidehill plow. I would not take one hundred dollars for my plow if I could not get another one like it. I consider that I am more than three hundred dollars out in loss of time, plowing one way and use of land, by not getting one of these plows two years ago. I can cheerfully recommend these plows to farmers having use for a sidehill plow.
FRED LARSEN.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 3


    Snow has disappeared from the hills.
    Wm. Coker has removed to Montague, Cal., where he is engaged in carpentering.
    R. S. Coker was the last to leave for the Sacramento car shops, where many of our boys are now employed.
    Frank Shideler of Medford last week opened school for the spring term in the Soda Springs district above Ashland.
    Growing grain never looked better. The fruit is all right yet, and nothing but a killing frost will blast the certainty of a big crop.
    Still the farmers are engaged in planting alfalfa, and large areas of the older plantings are approaching maturity for the first cutting.
    Mart. Hurst and wife of Antelope are conducting the Clarendon Hotel at Medford and give general satisfaction. They are being liberally patronized.
    Johnson and McCarthy, who broke into a railroad car at Medford, were taken to Salem yesterday by Sheriff Birdsey and Geo. F. Merriman of Medford.
    The prospects of a good crop is what is making the drummers swarm through the valley, and we have had more than our share of them for the past two weeks.
    The large locomotive which has been doing service on the R.R.V.R.R. will be returned to Portland this week. The company's new rolling stock will be employed hereafter.
    Tickets are being sold at both stations of the R.R.V.R.R. The route is now being operated on first-class principles.
    The county commissioners, at their special meeting on Wednesday, did not accept Whitman & Narregan's offer to furnish an abstract of the lands in Jackson County, as it was considered too high. The work will be done by someone, however.
    Quite a number of residents of Medford, both male and female, attended the last performance given by the Gage-Keene company, when the powerful drama "Mr. Barnes of New York" was admirably presented. Our citizens should return the compliment next Tuesday evening, when the Alba Heywood company will give one of its inimitable entertainments there.
    The orchardists are taking vigorous measures looking to the eradication of the fruit pests that have secured a lodgment in this section. All the trees that had become infested with the San Jose scale have either been cut down or cut back closely and sprayed, and it is hoped the treatment will prove efficacious.
    G. A. Eckerly of Seattle writes to friends in this valley that he will visit this section soon with the intention of looking out a desirable location for establishing a fruit cannery. It is high time for the various towns of the valley to begin to take action relative to offering inducements to these gentlemen from a distance who are desirous of inaugurating this business, which cannot fail of being profitable, in our midst. A few canneries judiciously operated would not only greatly improve the local market, but would afford employment for numbers who are now idle during at least a portion of the year.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 3


    Mrs. R. T. Young of Medford visited Jacksonville on Saturday, accompanied by her daughters. Miss Elma returned to her cage in the Times office at San Jose, Cal. this week.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Milton Maule to Hester A. Galloway; lots 1, 2, 3 and 4, blk 12, Medford. $2800.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1891, page 3


    Dr. Clark, representing the Paradox Medical Co. of Portland, who has been giving entertainments at Ganiard's Opera House for a fortnight past ["with performing dogs and other attractions"], moved on to Medford for a week's stay last Sunday. From there he goes to Grants Pass, to favor them with a two weeks' visit.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 17, 1891, page 3


    When the president and party arrive in Oregon they will be received at Ashland, and the Oregon committee will take charge of the "remains" and conduct them to Portland, where the grand blowout will take place. We rather fancy that the party will not be in exactly a receptive frame of mind after the treat that nature will furnish them in coming down the Siskiyous, and perhaps it would be as well if our local Boanerges would refrain from spouting until their minds get back to the purely earthly again. At this season of the year we haven't really much to offer the distinguished gentlemen except fine scenery and a glance at our good-looking girls. There isn't even a pumpkin or a beet to rhapsodize over.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Henry Griffin is putting in a fine field of corn on the True place near the old stage road.
    Wm. Ulrich now has an office fitted up in the rear of the bank, in Mrs. Stanley's building.
    B. F. Crouch has gone to Linkville, but will soon return with his family, to permanently locate here.
    A branch of the Epworth League was organized at this place last Wednesday evening at the M.E. Church.
    O. P. McGee and family have removed to the Williams Creek section, where they will make their future home.
    J. H. Faris was recently appointed pension agent by the department at Washington. An excellent appointment.
    Messrs. Leonard & Skeeters, who were in business here some time ago, are now at Crescent City, Cal. Good luck to you, boys.
    A. Childers and family arrived at Medford last week from the Sound country, and will be content to remain here for the future.
    Wilkinson & Hanley have dissolved partnership in the butchering business, and Ed. will continue the business alone in the future.
    D. S. Youngs, the expert tree trimmer, has been engaged at the Walz ranch during the week, preparing the fruit trees there to bear up under their burden of apples and peaches.
    The programme carried out by all connected with our public schools on Arbor Day reflected credit upon pupils and teachers alike, and gave the public an idea of the civilizing influences around us.
    P. B. O'Neil was in Napa, Cal. during the week, arranging for the erection of a monument above the remains of his recently deceased mother, who sleeps in the quiet burying ground at that place.
    A member of the Oregon Iron and Steel Company of Portland, Mr. G. S. Miller, has been in this place during the week, looking for an eligible site for a blast furnace near some one of the large iron deposits of southern Oregon.
    The school meeting in District No. 49, Medford, will be held tomorrow to vote upon the proposition to levy a three-mill school tax, for the purpose of paying one-third of the cost of building a new schoolhouse for the district. Much interest will be taken at the election.
    The plat of the town of Medford, recently completed by Mr. Narregan from official plats among records of the county, is something long needed by the school clerk and assessor, and should be paid for at liberal rates by the town council. Owing to the numerous additions to the town, the map of the city complete resembles a gerrymandered congressional district more than anything else.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 2


That Butte Creek Extension.
    Messrs. Honeyman & Buchanan, of the R.R.V.R.R. management, have been in the valley for several days, investigating the feasibility of at once extending the Rogue River Valley Railroad to the splendid water power on Butte Creek at Eagle Point. The most casual inspection is enough to satisfy a thinking mind that such an extension as that proposed would almost work a revolution in the business interests of this valley. There is no better nor more easily available water power in the valley than at and above Eagle Point, while the large and rapidly extending area of grain and fruit land in that section warrants the prediction that it would soon expand into one of the leading agricultural sections if easy means of transportation can be obtained to the main line of the overland road. There is perhaps as large an area of frost-proof foothill fruit land in this section as in any other part of the valley, and if the same facilities are afforded for getting to the market, it will most of it be in cultivation within the next decade. It gives us pleasure to state that the visiting gentlemen received assurance from the citizens of Butte Creek section as well as from residents of Medford and the lower valley, that when the time for action arrives, substantial assistance will be rendered in carrying the project into execution. It is a matter that concerns the whole valley, and would do more than any other conceivable thing within our reach to develop the country, and make it an inducement for some one of the great transcontinental lines to eventually throw a branch road through this valley. Twenty miles of completed roadbed are not to be sneezed at when even the greater companies are making their computations, and this line would unquestionably at no distant day become part of an overland system. We trust that success will crown the efforts of Messrs. Honeyman & Co.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


A Thieving Gang on the Rampage.
    McMahon's Circus performed at different points in the valley last week to fair-sized audiences. During its stay the hangers-on robbed all they could by gambling devices and then finished their stay by stealing everything in sight. Several parties had to go to the cars of the company to recover their effects, which were reluctantly given up even then, the proprietors of the circus acting as if they had an understanding with the thieves. Whisky and cigars were also sold without license and other lawlessness indulged in. Should this gang visit southern Oregon again, it will meet a warm reception. The majority of them should be serving the state in the penitentiary even now.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


    One of the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s flatcars is on the Siskiyou mountain in a disabled condition, and those in authority refuse to receive it.
    The roads are improving fast since the pleasant weather began, and they are in a comparatively good condition, excepting that they are somewhat rough.
    I. E. Deboy, the Gold Hill jeweler, now makes regular trips to Central Point and Medford on Thursdays and Fridays of each week, which is quite a convenience to residents of those places.
    There is a great deal of travel on the overland passenger trains, and standing room is all there is left quite often. It is not an unusual sight to see upwards of three Pullman sleeping cars attached.
    Tracheotomy was successfully performed by Drs. Pryce, Geary and Pickel of Medford last week upon the person of the little adopted child of Mrs. Baker near Central Point, the babe being afflicted with membranous croup.
    The fact has become already noticeable this spring that all the trains going north are heavily loaded, while those going south are "flying light" and carrying few passengers. This is at least significant of the fact that a heavy tide of immigration is setting our way from the southern country, while from all accounts there is an equally heavy influx of population over the northern routes. Oregon's day has come at last, it would seem, to get her share of the mass of emigrants that annually pours over the Rockies from the eastward.
    The rented engine which was in use on the R.R.V.R.R. was sent home to its owners, the U.P. Company, last Friday, and now the "pony" has the whole responsibility of local travel and traffic resting on its shoulders, so to speak.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    B. S. Webb to Arthur C. Nicholson, 2 acres of Barr's add. to Medford. $200.
    Wm. Angle et al. to H. Hollingsworth, lot 7, blk 3, Cottage Grove add. to Medford. $160.
    John H. Brantner to Milton Maule, lot 5, blk 24, Medford. $300.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Beek, the genial assistant of C. K. Fronk at the Medford depot, was among those who visited Jacksonville on Sunday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


    The residence on the Cardwell farm, which has been doing service for so long a time, is being superseded by a neat, new one.
    A. Garrick, the Medford tailor, has leased the shop lately occupied by Mr. Zoellner at Ashland and will remove his stock of goods to the latter city.
    The new rolling stock of the R.R.V.R.R. arrived today, much to the relief of the railroad boys who were heartily tired of hauling the heavy passenger coach which has been in use heretofore.
    An excursion train was run between Jacksonville and Medford last Tuesday evening, on the occasion of the Alba Heywood Company. A goodly number participated in the diversion, the train being loaded to its utmost capacity.
    Heavy fast freight business on the S.P. line has made it necessary to run the passenger [train] over the Siskiyous in two sections on several occasions recently. The shipments from the citrus fruit belt are assuming huge proportions this spring.
    Dr. A. C. Caldwell returned to Ashland last week from Marion County, where he was summoned to attend at the bedside of his brother, who was stricken with la grippe, but arrived there too late to be of any assistance to him, the young man having breathed his last before the doctor's coming.
    Our old friend H. B. Reed has changed his calling since our last issue, and now instead of being the "combination fence man" of southern Oregon, is entitled to the sobriquet of the "combination hash man," having succeeded to the control of the well-known Oregon Hotel at Ashland. He is well acquainted throughout the southern part of the state, has a host of friends, is an excellent business man, and we predict a large measure of success for him in his new calling. To say nothing of the fact that he has the best hotel building in which to operate that can be found in the state outside of Portland, he begins business at a time when the outlook is extremely favorable for a good season in every line.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
HOUSTON-MERRIMAN--At East Portland, April 5, 1891, G. A. Houston of Portland and Miss Mollie Merriman, late of Medford.
MATHES-MILLS--At the residence of the officiating minister, April 16, 1891, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Geo. Mathes and Miss Jennie Mills.
BORN.
GARRICK--At Medford, April 10, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. A. Garrick, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 24, 1891, page 3


    Messrs. Honeyman and Buchanan, of Portland, managers of the R.R.V.R.R., were in Jacksonville Wednesday.
    About 50 persons from Jacksonville attended the Alba Heywood concert in Medford last Tuesday evening, the R.R. running a special train for their accommodation.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, April 24, 1891, page 2


    Garrick, the tailor, has moved his establishment from Medford to Ashland, and has moved into Zoellner's old stand.
    Miss Mollie Merriman, formerly of Medford, was married in Portland April 6th, to G. A. Houston, a civil engineer of that city.
    J. W. Hockersmith says that arrangements are pretty well perfected for the organization of the Southern Oregon [Pork] Packing Co., which expects to start up the pork packing business at Medford this fall. Mr. Hockersmith as instigator of the scheme has canvassed among some of the solid farmers and hog raisers of the valley and secured subscriptions to the capital stock of the company which is placed at $25,000. Mr. Hockersmith thinks that the company will be able to secure 2000 hogs for butchering next fall.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, April 24, 1891, page 3


    N. L. Narregan has just finished the work of making a plat of Medford, which, considering the many additions, was quite an extensive job.
    Jacksonville and Medford are exchanging courtesies lately by means of the new connecting railroad. Medford people patronize Jacksonville entertainments in a body and Jacksonville people will no doubt reciprocate.
    Medford has called for a meeting of the legal voters in the school district tomorrow (Saturday) to vote on the proposition to levy a 20-mill tax to raise one-third of the money necessary to build a commodious school house for the district.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, April 24, 1891, page 3


Railroad Extension.
    A large number of citizens of Eagle Point were at the railroad meeting at Central Point last Monday evening. The residents of that section want a railroad and want it badly, but are not very particular what town they connect with on the railroad through the valley. It would be of immense benefit to the whole country to have a railroad in operation to the Butte Creek region, and if Central Point secures the plum it will not be impossible for the R.R.V.R.R. Company to lease the S.P. roadbed between Medford and that place and run through trains from the county seat to the water power on Butte Creek. One crew could operate the whole plant, via any route, and all the towns of the central valley would thus be connected with bands of steel and within a few hours' communication at any time. The connection of Butte Creek with Jacksonville is a consummation devoutly to be wished. By many it is thought it would be preferable to extend the present road from Medford to Eagle Point by another route. Which one will be taken is, of course, in doubt.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


Dunn-Pape.
    R. R. Dunn, manager of Staver & Walker's extensive branch house at Walla Walla, Wash., and Miss Emma Pape, a young lady who grew to womanhood in Jacksonville, were joined in matrimony at the residence of the bride's parents (Postmaster Pape and wife) on Wednesday afternoon, Rev. Robt. Ennis officiating in his usual impressive manner. The affair was a very quiet one, only the relatives and immediate friends of the bride being in attendance. An elegant wedding dinner was served after the ceremony. The couple soon afterward took the train for their future home, being accompanied to Medford by several of their friends. The contracting parties are well and favorably known in southern Oregon and carry the best wishes of all with them to their new home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


A New Incorporation.
    Articles of incorporation have been filed in the county clerk's office by the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Co., which is composed of Wm. Slinger, Wm. Ulrich, W. I. Vawter, J. W. Hockersmith and E. Worman. The principal place of business is Medford, and the capital stock is placed at $25,000, divided into shares of $100 each. This enterprise will prove of great benefit to the whole of southern Oregon, as it will furnish a ready cash market for a great portion of the hogs which may be raised here in the future. It is the intention of the company to commence operations soon and have everything in readiness when the packing season commences.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


    Southern Oregon orchardists are paying far more attention to their holdings than ever before, and will get their orchards into prime condition before long.
    Wheat is scarce in the valley, and a good article commands 65c and upwards a bushel. Flour has also advanced, being quoted at $22.50 at the Medford mills at present.
    A. Garrick, one of the best tailors who ever did business in southern Oregon, has moved his stock of ready-made clothing to Ashland, where he will also engage in the tailoring business.
    There is still more or less sickness in southern Oregon, but health is improving since the backbone of la grippe was broken. It is astonishing how many people were affected by the epidemic.
    B. F. Stephenson of Medford has established his reputation as a "rustler," having taken a large number of subscriptions to Talmage's book "From Manger to Throne," notwithstanding the hard times in southern Oregon.
    We are in receipt of a neat and interesting little publication called "The Young Idea." It is as, its name indicates, devoted to educational matters, and is edited by Prof. N. A. Jacobs, teacher of the second department of the Medford school.
    Mrs. E. B. Myer presides over the Oregon Hotel at Ashland under the new management, and cannot fail to give satisfaction, as she is one of the best housekeepers in the upper valley. The proprietor, H. B. Reed, was called to Indiana last Monday by a dispatch announcing the death of his father at that place, and he will probably not return short of three weeks.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


    Early garden stuff, such as radishes, lettuce, onions and asparagus, is in the market.
    It seems highly probable that the R.R.V.R.R. will be extended to Butte Creek, and maybe to Josephine County, at no distant day.
    Peter Applegate has a party in the field looking for the most feasible railroad route between Central Point and the Butte Creek section.
    The marshal shot at a hoodlum who broke away from him as he was about to arrest him for violating the curfew ordinance. Next time he may shoot to hit, so those interested will "look a leedle out."
    The railroad work in the Cow Creek Canyon, which was commenced a year ago, is finished and Bays & Jeffrey, the contractors, have removed their plant to other scenes. It cost the S.P. several hundred thousand dollars to repair the ravages of the winter of 1890.
    Phil. Wadsworth of Portland, vice-president of the Oregon Trust Co., has been in this section again. His firm are locating a number of immigrants, direct from the East, in southern Oregon, and are receiving much assistance from their local agent, J. Harryman of Medford, who is full of energy.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co. is now using its own rolling stock, a handsome passenger and baggage car in one, as also a flatcar, having been received from the Stockton car works during the week. The locomotive experiences no trouble in hauling the heaviest loads over the road now, the new cars fitting its capacity exactly. We feel proud of our railroad, and it will soon prove a first-class one in every respect. Ballast is all it needs now.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Welcome Fowler et al., to Catherine E. Crystal; lot 5, blk 71, Medford. $90.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


The Presidential Party.
    It is thought that President Harrison and his party will pass through the valley next Tuesday forenoon. Judging from the following correspondence, sent us from Medford, he may make a short stop there:
MEDFORD, Or., April 27, 1891.       
To Benjamin Harrison, President U.S.A., San Francisco, Calif.
    Can you stop at Medford, if only for five minutes? Comrades want to see you once more.
J. R. ERFORD,       
Commander Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R.       
THE REPLY.
SAN FRANCISCO, April 28, 1891.       
To J. R. Erford, Medford:
    The President directs me to say that he will be glad to accept your kind invitation of the 27th inst., and will arrange to stop at Medford for a few minutes if our schedule will permit.
GEO. W. BOYD, In Charge.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 1, 1891, page 3


    A neat little school paper called the "Young Idea" devoted to the interest of the second department of the Medford public schools, N. A. Jacobs, teacher, has been received at the Tidings office.
    Articles of incorporation of the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company were filed with the county clerk Wednesday. The objects of the company as set forth in the articles are the purchasing and slaughtering of hogs, manufacturing bacon and lard and packing and curing meats and selling and disposing of the same for profit. The principal place of business is at Medford, capital stock $25,000 divided into shares of $100 each. Incorporators, Wm. Ulrich, Edwin Worman, J. W. Hockersmith, Wm. Slinger, W. I .Vawter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 1, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Hutchison, depot agent of the R.R.V.R.R. of Medford, spent Sunday in Jacksonville accompanied by his wife.
    Mrs. S. R. Taylor went to Medford this week to buy furniture and carpets, wallpaper, etc., to be used in refurnishing her boarding house. Mrs. Taylor, by her industry and good taste, is making her place of business so attractive and comfortable that patronage don't have to be solicited, it comes for its own pleasure.
    Why is it that there is not a full line of house furnishing goods, wallpaper, etc., carried in Jacksonville as there used to be? There is certainly sufficient demand in this line to justify the establishment of the trade. Now that there is through railway transportation, our people ought to be able to buy these goods as cheaply at home as in their neighboring towns.
    Messrs. Honeyman & Buchanan, managers of the R.R.V.R.R., have been in Jacksonville during the past week superintending the completion of the road. They have everything completed and in fine order about the depot grounds. The $12,000 bonus was all paid over to them this week excepting $500 which they refused to take until some minor details of the contract are concluded. The gentlemen became partners in the enterprise through force of circumstances, but the outlook is so favorable they are now looking to the further extension of the road as profitable investment. A large and enthusiastic meeting was held at Central Point Monday, for the purpose of trying to extend the line to Eagle Point. They contemplate going on the S.P. Co.'s line from Medford to Central Point, and on to the fine timber belt on Rogue River.
    A large delegation of Eagle Point citizens was present, and submitted an offer to secure a free right-of-way and do the grading for the whole distance of fourteen miles between Central Point and Eagle Point.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, May 1, 1891, page 3


    I. A. Merriman is the agent of the great Standard Oil Co. for Medford.
    Neil West and Bert Redden of Medford started last week with forty head of horses to Sierra County, Cal. They will take charge of a large band of horses at that place, which they will pasture on the large free range of that county. They form a partnership for the purpose of breeding and raising fine horses.
    The following is the Medford Mail's account of the big distillery being built at that place, and work on which is progressing: The lower part of the building which is 170 feet long by forty feet wide, is being subdivided into three apartments as follows; the store room which cuts off thirty feet from the east end of the building, the wine room which joins with it, the dimensions of which are about twelve by twenty feet, while the balance of the lower floor is devoted to the machinery. The partition between the different apartments are to be tightly sealed on both sides, the only means of entrance being from the outside. Uncle Sam carries the keys to the wine and store room which he only unlocks twice a day, in the morning and in the evening, when he draws off and stores the spirits. The east end of the building from the second floor up is to be partitioned off with four grain bins. The grain elevators will also be in this end of the building. The rest of the building will be used for the still, the pipes etc. which is necessary. The spirits which are to be made by this plant will mostly all find a market in the patent medicine and perfume plants on this coast. The utmost capacity of the mill will be 12000 bushels per day. The latest improved machinery will be used and the spirits will be entirely pure.
"Southern Oregon Items," Ashland Tidings, May 1, 1891, page 4


    MEDFORD FLOUR.--A. Goldsmith has received another carload of the celebrated Medford flour. He will keep this excellent brand of flour in stock at all times hereafter.
Eugene City Guard, May 2, 1891, page 1


    Grants Pass, Ore., May 5.--Oregon's distinguished guests arrived at Grants Pass at 10 o'clock last night and received a cordial welcome. The visit to Medford was acknowledged by a general illumination of the town, bonfires being particularly numerous. The local Grand Army [of the Republic] men were drawn up in line at the station and greeted their old comrade with cheers. The President [Benjamin Harrison] was introduced to the throng by the Mayor of Medford [G. W. Howard], and made the following speech:
    Comrades and fellow citizens: It gives me great pleasure to see you tonight, especially to have these old comrades' greeting. I would have you think of me as a comrade. I recall those army scenes which are fresh in your minds as well, the scenes of privation, suffering and battle; and I am glad to see that the old flag you took to the field and brought home in honor is still held in honor among you. It is a beautiful emblem of a great government. We ought to teach our children to love it and to regard it as a sacred thing, a thing for which men have died and for which men will die. It symbolizes the government of the states under one constitution, for while you are all Oregonians as I am an Indianian and each has his pride in state institutions and all that properly pertains to our state government, we have a larger and greater pride in the fact that we are citizens of a nation of a union of states, having a common constitution. It is this flag that represents us on the sea and in foreign countries; it is under this flag that our navies sail and our armies march. I thank you for this cordial greeting. I hope you have found in this state comfortable homes and that in the years that remain to you God will follow you with those blessings which your courage and patriotism and sacrifices have so well merited. (Cheers.)
"A Welcome in the Rain," New York Tribune, May 6, 1891, page 7


The President at Grants Pass.
    GRANTS PASS, Ogn., May 5.--Oregon's distinguished guests arrived here last evening at 10 o'clock and received a cordial welcome. The visit to Medford was acknowledged by a general illumination. Local Grand Army men greeted their old comrade at the station, and after being introduced the President made a short speech to them.
The Salt Lake Herald, Salt Lake City, Utah, May 6, 1891, page 1


    The towns in the heart of the valley are still taking much interest in the project of building a railroad from the Butte Creek section to connect with the S.P. All begin to realize that it will be impossible to construct a road that will not be mutually beneficial to every one of those towns.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


    True to its time-honored custom, our glorious climate went back on itself when it was called on to do its best in an emergency, and the presidential party will always believe that the lie about its raining in Oregon thirteen months in the year is gospel truth. No sooner was the state line crossed by the special train than Jupiter Pluvius let go all holds on his nozzle and a downpour began which has had no equal at this season since time began, if local annals are trustworthy. Certain it is that scenery was at a discount in the course of the run down the mountain, and the patient citizens aboard the train had to endure the usual stock of visiting pleasantries about webfeet and the like. It is really too bad that Jupiter P. should behave so when so much depends on his behavior, especially after all that we have done for him in the way of apologizing for his misdoings and lying about his shortcomings. It was small wonder that his veil of clouds and dampness cast a gloom over the reception committee at Medford and rendered it hard work to get their enthusiasm up to the cheering point. It seems hard when we had so little to offer in the way of entertainment to our guests [that] that little should have been ruthlessly taken from our grasp, as it were. We trust that the rain god will not be so inopportune in bestowing the blessings again, though it cannot be denied that the purely agricultural verdict will be that he did just right in assuring the biggest crop of the decade, president or no president.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


RAILWAY TO EAGLE POINT AND SUGAR PINE BELT.
    It is announced this morning that the parties who built the Medford and Jacksonville railroad yesterday organized in Portland a corporation called the Rogue River Valley Railway and Improvement Company. Its announced object is to build a railroad from the Southern Pacific track to Eagle Point and from thence into the sugar pine belt. The new road will traverse the line between the Southern Pacific track and Eagle Point, along which the land owners will make a reasonable land grant by way of subsidy. Engineer Howard, with a force of men, starts this morning from Medford to run a preliminary survey from Medford to Eagle Point. The articles of incorporation provide for land and townsite investments and the building and running of mills for the manufacture of all kinds of products. It is promised that this valley will be largely advertised and a good class of settlers persuaded to come here, new industries created and capital brought in.
    If a reasonable land and money subsidy is offered by the land owners at Medford, Central Point and Eagle Point and the country between, it is promised that this road will be in working operation by harvest time. It is suggested that money subscriptions will be taken, in installments, as every two or more miles of the road is completed. This will make it easy to everyone. Francis Fitch of Medford is the attorney for the new corporation, and communications can be sent to him or to Honeyman, DeHart & Company, Portland.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


    The railroad company has a force engaged in building a new platform at the Jacksonville depot, which will be much wider and more convenient than the old one. This improvement will prove quite popular with the public.
    On the receipt of telegraphic information that the funeral of his father in faraway Indiana would be over before he could arrive there, H. B. Reed of the Oregon [Hotel] at Ashland abandoned his original intention of proceeding at once to the home of his late father.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of the Rogue River Lumber Co., which not only keeps 250,000 feet of the best lumber of every description at its yards in Medford, but will manufacture to order any bills that may be desired. Prices are reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    F. Hubbard's sons have rented Cooper's brick building on 7th Street and will stock it with agricultural implements and machinery of all kinds.
    D. J. Lumsden and family left for their new home at San Jose, Cal., last week, and many are sorry to see them take their departure, for they are valuable citizens in any community.
    While extinguishing his store lamp one day last week, G. H. Haskins had the misfortune to knock the chimney from the lamp, and in its fall it struck his hand, making an ugly cut, from which he suffered much inconvenience for several days.
    Miss Mary Wait was successful in gaining the second prize in the recent elocutionary contest between pupils of the Portland school which she is attending and those of the Vancouver schools. Miss W. is quite gifted in that line, besides having had careful training.
    School district No. 49 will hold a meeting for the purpose of devising ways and means for building a new schoolhouse on the 9th instant. Medford is sadly in need of better schoolhouse facilities, and yet there are many who feel disposed to put off the building of a new house until the stress of hard times is past.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


BORN.
ISAACS--At Medford, April 26, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Isaacs, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 2


Democratic Times, May 8, 1891, page 2


The President at Medford.
    A large number of people from different portions of the county assembled at the depot at Medford last Monday evening to greet President Harrison and his party, who are on a visit to the Pacific coast. Bonfires and Chinese lanterns were burning brightly and anvils booming as the special trains ran into town, the one containing the committee appointed by the legislature to meet the president, and a number of other prominent citizens of the state, preceding that carrying Mr. Harrison and his party about five minutes. The first train did not tarry, but the other stopped for a few minutes. The president appeared on the rear car of his train and was introduced by Mayor Howard of Medford. A number of members of the G.A.R. were drawn up in line and Mr. Harrison addressed them as follows:
    "It gives me great pleasure to see you tonight. Especially these old comrades, to whom I am glad to give a comrade's greeting. I would have you to think of me as a comrade. I recall those army scenes, which are fresh in your minds as well--scenes of privation, suffering and battle--and I am glad to see that the old flag you took to the field and brought home in honor is still held in honor among you. It is a beautiful emblem of a great government. We ought to teach our children to love it and regard it as a sacred thing, a thing for which men have died, and for which men will die. It symbolizes the government of all the states under one constitution, for while you are all Oregonians, as I am an Indianian, and each has a pride in his state institutions and all that properly pertains to our state governments, we have a larger and greater pride in the fact that we are citizens of a nation of a union of states, having a common constitution. This flag represents us on the sea and in foreign countries. It is under this flag that our navies sail and our armies march. I thank you for this cordial greeting. I hope you have found in this state comfortable homes, and that in the years that remain to you God will follow you with those blessings which your courage and patriotism and sacrifices have so well merited."
    The train pulled out immediately afterward, without a word being said to the general public. Nothing was seen or heard of the other prominent members of the party, excepting Postmaster General Wanamaker, who appeared in response to a call after the cars were in motion. There was little cheering and a lack of the enthusiasm which was expected, but the rain which was falling heavily at the time perhaps was responsible for that.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 3


Let the Good Work Proceed.
    Commissioner Whitman reports that there has been rather a general compliance with the law looking to the eradication of the fruit pests now ravaging the orchards of the valley, and while some few persist in neglecting the precautions recommended by the board, by far the larger number of our orchardists are going to give preventative measures a fair trial before abandoning the field to the insect pests. This is as it should be, and we trust those who have not done so will at once proceed to disinfect their trees. The present season is a critical period in the history of fruit growing in this valley, for it will be demonstrated whether or not we can free our orchards of the presence of these little hindrances to the success that is otherwise assured. A long pull and a strong pull altogether will accomplish the work, in the opinion of the horticultural commission.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 3


Democratic Times, May 8, 1891 et seq., page 3

    Measles and mumps are holding sway in southern Oregon at present.
    A larger acreage than ever will be planted in melons in southern Oregon this season.
    An immense area is being planted in corn and potatoes this season--more than ever known before.
    Surveyor Howard has a party in the field surveying a railroad route from Medford to Butte Creek.
    Will. Farrier, fireman for the R.R.V.R.R., is confined to his home at Medford with an attack of the mumps.
    The balance of the railroad fills between Ashland and Talent will not be made until next fall, it is semi-officially announced.
    May Day was a most beautiful occasion, and it was generally observed. Picnics, excursions, balls, etc., were the order of the day.
    There promises to be quite a scramble for timber land in the upper Butte Creek and Rogue River sections when Applegate's survey is completed.
    Peter Applegate is expected to commence surveying a large quantity of government land in the upper Rogue River and Butte Creek sections soon.
    W. G. Bishop is keeping his cattle during the summer on the Jump-Off Joe range, having driven them down from his ranch near Medford last week.
    A full carload of people from Jacksonville went to Medford on Monday to see the president and his party. A special train was run for their benefit.
    Clarence, son of Frank Kasshafer, fell a few days since and fractured his collarbone. Dr. DeBar was called, and the little sufferer is improving rapidly.
    Peter Applegate's party surveyed a feasible railroad route between Central Point and Eagle Point. It remains to be seen when work will commence on it.
    Garrick, the Ashland tailor, is making a reputation as the clothier for the man of moderate means and is rapidly building up a fine business at the granite city.
    Sam Hadley, a well-known pioneer of southern Oregon, and at one time a large stock owner, was recently stricken with paralysis at Paisley, and has since died.
    Rev. M. A. Williams filled the pulpit of the Presbyterian Church at Ashland last Sunday, and Prof. Crawford of Medford expects to be able to conduct services there next Sunday.
    J. W. Wimer, formerly of Josephine County, D. A. Huling, lately of Medford, and R. W. Lundy form a firm who are engaged in handling hardware, stoves, agricultural implements, etc., at Myrtle Point, Coos County.
    Medford also has several specimens of the hoodlum in his toughest stage, it seems, and they have been detected stealing from store buildings on more than one occasion. The last place they broke into was Goldsmith's, from which they stole several cans of sardines and some cookies. It has not been decided what to do with these petty thieves.
    The Grants Pass baseball boys hope for the formation of a league of the southern Oregon clubs before the summer is over. If not, why not? There never was a half dozen towns more favorably situated for that kind of sport than the towns south of Roseburg. Who will take the initiative? Jacksonville has some of the best ball players in southern Oregon, and would certainly be "in it."
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Mary H. Hanley to Edward Wilkinson; undivided half of lot 14 block 13, Medford.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 8, 1891, page 3


Democratic Times, May 8, 1891, page 4

    John Hanley, of Medford, has been in town during this week. He has withdrawn from the butchering business in which he was engaged with Mr. Wilkinson, at that place.
    The engine of the R.R.V.R.R. was derailed as it was running down the switch preparatory to starting to Medford on the 1 o'clock run Tuesday afternoon. The train was delayed some time in consequence.
    Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Kubli came to Jacksonville Tuesday intending to go to Medford to see the presidential party pass that place, but they found on arriving here that they were a day too late, as it had passed the evening before.
    Prof. N. A. Jacobs, of the Medford public schools, was in Jacksonville Saturday and handed us a copy of The Young Idea, a neat little paper edited and published by his department of the school. Some of the articles would be creditable to any pen, and all of them are complimentary to their authors. The paper was the inspiration of the Prof's literary ability, and it will no doubt mark the beginning of literary taste in all who contribute to its columns.
    A large number of Jacksonville people went to Medford Monday evening to see the presidential party. Extensive preparations had been made by the Medford Post, G.A.R. and the citizens of that place to give the President expression of their good will. The streets in front of the R.R. track were brilliantly lighted with bonfires, and the adjacent buildings were illuminated with Chinese lanterns and decorated with flags and bunting. When the train arrived the President appeared on the rear platform, where he was cordially welcomed by the Post, on behalf of themselves and the citizens, to which he made an earnest and happy reply. At the conclusion of his remarks some Pennoyer Democrat in the crowd hurrahed for Cleveland, and although Wanamaker was loudly called for, the gentleman simply bowed his acknowledgment and the train pulled out. Medford made a very complimentary effort to properly honor the distinguished visitors to our state, and it is to be regretted that the ubiquitous hoodlum was there to mar the good feeling of the occasion. Medford can take comfort in the fact that its good people are no more responsible for such an act than the people of the state are for the peculiar views of our erratic Governor.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, May 8, 1891, page 2


AT MEDFORD.
    At Medford the people had brightly illuminated the town about the depot and Chinese lanterns adorned the fronts of many of the buildings.. The Grand Army [of the Republic] men were drawn up in line to welcome the president and greeted their old comrade with cheers. President Harrison addressed them as follows:
    It gives me great pleasure to see you tonight. Especially these old comrades, to whom I am glad to give a comrade's greeting. I would have you to think of me as a comrade. I recall those army scenes, which are fresh in your minds as well--scenes of privation, suffering and battle--and I am glad to see that the old flag you took to the field and brought home in honor is still held in honor among you. It is a beautiful emblem of a great government. We ought to teach our children to love it and regard it as a sacred thing, a thing for which men have died, and for which men will die. It symbolizes the government of the states under one constitution, for while you are all Oregonians, as I am an Indianian, and each has a pride in his state institutions and all that properly pertains to our state governments, we have a larger and greater pride in the fact that we are citizens of a nation of a union of states, having a common constitution. This flag represents us on the sea and in foreign countries. It is under this flag that our navies sail and our armies march. I thank you for this cordial greeting. I hope you have found in this state comfortable homes and that in the years that remain to you God will follow you with those blessings which your courage and patriotism and sacrifices have so well merited.
Excerpt, "The President in Oregon," Ashland Tidings, May 8, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD, OREGON, MAY 4.
    The President's visit to Medford at 10 P.M. was acknowledged by a general illumination. The veterans of Chester A. Arthur Post, G.A.R., J. R. Erford, Commander, and J. H. Faris, Adjutant, were out en masse. Mayor G. W. Howard made a brief address and introduced the President, who said:
    Comrades and Fellow-citizens-- It gives me great pleasure to see you tonight, and especially these old comrades, to whom I am glad to give a comrade's greeting. I would have you think of me as a comrade. I recall those army scenes which are fresh in your minds as well as mine, the scenes of privation, suffering and battle, and I am glad to see that the old flag you took to the field and brought home in honor is still held in honor among you. It is a beautiful emblem of a great Government. We ought to teach our children to love it and regard it as a sacred thing, a thing for which men have died and for which men will die. It symbolizes the government of the States under one Constitution, for while you are all Oregonians as I am an Indianian, and each has a pride in his State institutions and all that properly pertains to our State Government, we have a larger and greater pride in the fact that we are citizens of a Nation, of a Union of States, having a common Constitution.  [Cheers.]
    It is this flag that represents us on the sea and in foreign countries. It is under this flag that our navies sail and our armies march. I thank you for this cordial greeting. I hope you have found in this State comfortable homes and that in the years that remain to you God will follow you with those blessings which your courage and patriotism and sacrifices have so well merited. [Cheers.]
From Speeches of Benjamin Harrison, Twenty-Third President of the United States,
by Benjamin Harrison, Charles Hedges, United States Book Company 1892, page 401


    Organizer S. Holt started another society of the Farmers' Alliance going at E. F. Walker's in Medford precinct April 25th, with the following officers: President, F. Downing; vice-president, F. M. Amy; secretary, Mr. Briggs; treasurer, Mrs. A. B. Hammond; chaplain, I. B. Williams; lecturer, A. B. Hammond; steward, T. J. Armstrong.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 8, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Mary Davison of this place is teaching the Flounce Rock school.
    J. C. Tipton has opened a butcher shop in the building east of the Railroad Saloon.
    A. Garrick, wife and child last week removed from Medford to their future home in Ashland.
    Riley Strait, the gunsmith, has gone to California. It is said that he will not return alone.
    Forbes & Coker have dissolved partnership and J. C. Coker will continue the business of the stable in the rear of the Clarendon Hotel.
    Mr. Mathei, an experienced brewer, arrived from the north this week and intends putting up a brewery in some portion of southern Oregon.
    Deboy & Stuart this week removed their jewelry establishment from Gold Hill to Medford, where they will make their headquarters in the future. Success to them in their new location.
    Charley Brous is now the sole proprietor of the Railroad Saloon, having purchased the interest of Mr. O'Donnell. He keeps a full stock of the best wines, liquors and cigars. Give him a call when you are in Medford.
    The commencement programme arranged by the public schools for the 22d instant bids fair to excel anything of the kind ever before attempted in Medford. Pupils and teachers are working hard to that end, and their efforts will certainly be crowned with success.
    S. L. Bennett, of Jackson County, Oregon, is in town, having been summoned to the bedside of his sister, Mrs. Lizzie Jackson, who has been dangerously ill. Mr. Bennett is a pioneer resident of the West Side, but moved to Oregon 7 years ago.--[Stanislaus (Cal.) News.
   
The following citizens of Medford made final proof on timberland entries in the Lakeview land district last week: Anna E. Davis, Myra Wrisley, Geo. W. Coulter, Frances J. Johnson, Silas H. Hull, Edgar T. Pottenger, John Wrisley, Geo. L. Davis, E. A. Johnson and Theron Smith.
    At the meeting held by the voters of Medford district last Saturday it was decided to build a neat and commodious schoolhouse. J. D. Whitman, H. F. Wood and J. A. Whiteside were appointed as a committee to confer with the directors in the matter of devising ways and means, make plans, etc.
    Some youthful pilferers last week went through Goldsmith's store and purloined a lot of cigarettes, candies, etc., obtaining entrance through a rear door by removing the glass. The boys were apprehended without trouble, but out of consideration for their parents no prosecution will be had. It is high time that young America was checked in his reckless career, when he can descend to the low level of the midnight burglar in order to gratify his love for forbidden sweets.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Marion Tryer to J. F. Tryer; lot 12, blk 40, Medford. $40.
    Thos. McAndrews to D. H. Miller; lot 7, blk 24, Medford. $400.
    O.&T. Co. to W. J. Ward; lots 10, 11, and 12, blk 49, Medford. $120.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 2


Wood Wanted.
    Proposals will be received at the office of the Rogue River Valley Railway Co. in Portland, until the 25th inst., for the delivery of 300 cords (128 cubic feet) of merchantable fir wood in quantities of 50 cords or more along the line of said Railway. Wood to be of the following dimensions: 4x4 and 20 inches long; and to be stacked securely. Payment will be made on acceptance of not less than 25 cords.
W. A. BUCHANAN, Secretary.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891 et seq., page 2


Democratic Times, May 15, 1891 et seq., page 2


    Sam Hadley, a pioneer of southern Oregon, died in Lake County recently. He was his own worst enemy.
    Chris. Ulrich and H. F. Wood, the contractors, are doing considerable work in Jacksonville and Medford, being first-class mechanics.
    Thos. McAndrews is now the owner of the well-known shorthorn bull "Sam," imported to this valley by Hon. Robt. Clow, railroad commissioner. He is one of the best-bred animals in Oregon and took a number of premiums at the state fair at different times.
    The Rogue River Lumber Co. have established a lumberyard at Medford, where they have 250,000 feet of all kinds of rough and seasoned lumber on hand, and which they will keep constantly supplied with the best in this line. They sell at the most reasonable rates.
    Many immigrants are arriving in the state over the S.P. lines, but the tide is headed toward Portland, and only few of the intending settlers are coming this way. The crop of the present year should call their attention to the merits of southern Oregon as a place to locate.
    Francis Fitch has been circulating a subscription paper in the interest of the proposed railroad to Butte Creek, and is meeting with gratifying success. It is to be hoped that everybody in the central portion of the valley and along the proposed route will lend a helping hand, as the enterprise will be one of immense benefit to the entire section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1891, page 3


Where Shall It Be?
    Neither the Ashland nor the Medford people seem willing to start the ball rolling for a Fourth of July celebration. Medford people say they will not celebrate this year if Ashland wants to, while Ashland celebrated last year and don't appear anxious to jubilate very much the coming 4th. There should be one big rousing celebration somewhere in the valley. Shall it be at Ashland or elsewhere?
Ashland Tidings, May 15, 1891, page 3


The Medford Distillery.
    In a talk with a Tidings representative this week, Mr. Medynski, of the Medford distillery, gave information of some interest, as follows: "Our distillery will be ready for operation by the time the crop is harvested. Our capacity will be 500 bushels daily although but half of that amount will be worked up at first. The product will be altogether cologne spirits, such as is used for perfumery, chemical and medicinal purposes, and will all be shipped to Portland and San Francisco. The jewelers of the United States use 64000 gallons of spirits monthly for manufacturing purposes. The people will learn to take advantage of the market we will offer them and they will be greatly benefited by it. The offal from a distillery is just as fattening for stock as the grain itself, and with about 8 lbs. of hay daily cattle fatten quicker on this feed than on any other. In order to collect the revenue--90 cents per gallon--two government officers will be stationed at the distillery continually, and it will not be allowed to operate unless the property is unencumbered by mortgages. Our building is 40x160 feet and 60 feet high. We have an 80-horsepower engine. One of the main objects of our locating here was to get out from the control of the whisky trusts, so powerful in the East."
Ashland Tidings, May 15, 1891, page 3


The Railroad Extension to Eagle Point.
    J. S. Howard, of Medford, with a force of men is engaged in making a survey of the route for the extension of the R.R.V.R.R. to Eagle Point.
    Among the incorporations that filed articles with the secretary of state this week is the following:
    The Rogue River Valley Railway & Improvement Company. The general purpose of this incorporation is to build and conduct railway and telegraph lines between Medford, Central Point and Eagle Point and termini distant from Eagle Point not more than 100 miles, in Jackson County, Or. The capital stock is $500,000. The incorporators are Wm. Honeyman, E. J. DeHart, Wm. A. Buchanan, Thomas D. Honeyman and Francis Fitch. The articles of incorporation are very elaborate and provide for the transaction, building and carrying on of many operations looking to the development of the farming, horticultural and timber resources of the Rogue River Valley, and also comprehend possibilities of manufacturing establishments.
Ashland Tidings, May 15, 1891, page 3


    A neat little school paper called the Young Idea, devoted to the interest of the second department of the Medford public schools, N. A. Jacobs, teacher, has been received at the Tidings office.
    At a school meeting held at Medford last Saturday, it was decided to build a new school house, and a committee, consisting of H. F. Wood, J. A. Whiteside and J. D. Whitman, was appointed to confer with the directors to formulate plans, consider ways and means, etc., and to meet again in two weeks.
    Mr. McCarthy, of the Portland firm of Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson, manufacturers of the Johnson Compound Ammonia Compressor and ice and refrigerating machines, was in Ashland Wednesday. His company are thinking of putting up one of their ice plants somewhere in this valley, and came to Ashland first to look over the prospects here. Mr. McCarthy was very much pleased with the splendid location that could be obtained for such works along Ashland Creek, but will look at several other towns in the valley before he makes any definite arrangements. His company is putting in a plant in Eugene, with a daily capacity of 5 tons of ice, which is the same as they would put up here.
    Articles of incorporation of the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company were filed with the county clerk Wednesday. The objects of the company as set forth in the articles are the purchasing and slaughtering of hogs, manufacturing bacon and lard and packing and curing meats and selling and disposing of the same for profit. The principal place of business is at Medford, capital stock $25,000 divided into shares of $100 each. Incorporators, Wm. Ulrich, Edwin Worman, J. W. Hockersmith, Wm. Slinger, W. I. Vawter.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 15, 1891, page 3


    A peculiar kind of woolly worm, something like a caterpillar, is reported as doing considerable damage to the corn and other crops, as well as the young vineyards, in the foothills east and northeast of Medford.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 15, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. D. Whitman will begin the erection of a storage house for fruit in a short time.
    Miss Bertha Stewart of this precinct is teaching a successful term of school in Lake Creek district.
    Hon. Willard Crawford intends to erect a fine residence on his west-side lot during the next few months.
    Messrs. Narregan and Palm have been engaged in subdividing 15 acres of the Mingus tract into town lots.
    A. A. Davis has been shipping the product of his roller mills away up into Washington recently. It can't be beaten.
    A. J. Fredenburg will beautify his property on the west side with a nice brick residence during the next few months.
    B. F. Crouch has about completed his dwelling on the lots he recently purchased and will soon occupy the premises.
    Forbes & Coker have dissolved partnership in the livery line at Medford, J. C. Coker continuing the business at the old stand.
    The Portland firm of Johnson, McCarthy & Johnson intend to equip and establish an ice factory at Medford or Ashland during the summer.
    The first strawberry and ice cream festival of the season at the opera house last Friday evening was a pronounced success in every way.
    A pleasant social party assembled at the residence of R. T. Young one evening last week, the occasion being the 16th birthday of Miss Ray Young.
    J. O. Johnson will engage in the real estate business here again. He is a genuine rustler and will no doubt infuse new life into the market.
    James A. Johnson is in Council Grove, Kansas, where he has property interests, of which he will make final disposition before returning to this valley.
    Frank Mingus will next winter supply our citizens with wood from his yard, just established. He has let contracts aggregating over 1000 cords already.
    Although Mr. Goldsmith refuses to prosecute the little rascals who burglarized his store last week, the boys understand perfectly that it must not occur again.
    A dastardly attempt was made a few nights ago to burn the Grand Central Hotel. Fortunately, the scoundrel's plot was discovered before he had time to execute it.
    Rev. Wm. Lund last week preached his farewell sermon in this section at the Episcopal Church in Medford, having been transferred from the pastorate of the Roseburg district.
    Klippel & Lee received four carloads of lumber for their Medford yards last week--the first installment of 100,000 feet to come soon. They handle a superior article and sell at the lowest rates.
    E. J. Montague with four assistants, Messrs. Ocander, Morgan, Hansen and Hobson, left last week to fulfill a contract for delivering over 5,000 cords of wood to the railroad company.
    The many Medford friends of Mr. and Mrs. L. C. Gruby (nee Miss Maggie Tice) extended their warmest congratulations to them last week after their marriage at Ashland. They both stand high in this community.
    The commencement exercises of the Medford public school will take place at the opera house today, and will no doubt be of a high order. Miss Jessie Worman, Ida Redden and Grace Foster, and Edward Phipps and Fred Faris will form the graduating class.
    Weeks & Co. of Phoenix were engaged during the week in putting in place the furniture manufactured at Phoenix, with which they propose to stock their business house in this place. The finishing touches will be put on by experienced workmen here.
    Several of our Masonic citizens attended the meeting of Warren Lodge No. 10, A.F.&A.M., at Jacksonville last Wednesday night, when the question to allow Medford Masons to organize a lodge of their own was discussed. No doubt the desired privilege will soon be granted.
    Business houses on Seventh Street have been ordered by the city council to place a V gutter in in front of their premises, to afford better drainage, and, in the event of their refusal or neglect to do so, the marshal was instructed to have the necessary drain constructed at their expense.
    Next Saturday, at the called school meeting of the voters of this district, the committee appointed to draft plans, etc., at the meeting held last week will make their report, and it is confidently expected that the growing interest in school matters will assure us a new edifice during the coming year.
    Over $15,000 of the capital stock of $25,000 of the Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company has already been subscribed, and the remainder will be soon taken, we are informed. It will be a great institution for this vicinity, and will furnish a ready market for all the hogs raised in the valley. Breeders should now see to improving their stock, as packers invariably discriminate in favor of well-bred hogs, which are much the more profitable to handle.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 2


Look After Your Trees.
    With all the magnificent setting of fruit this season much will be given over to the worms and grubs, simply because so many of our orchardists have not yet learned to combat these insect pests with the sprayer and the poisons which have been proved a specific for the evil. A few of our best fruit men are keeping the sprayers going every day, drenching the newly set fruit with the solutions that will prevent the hatching of the eggs of the pestiferous moths, and such will reap their reward in a crop that can but prove to be of greatly enhanced value, simply  from the fact that the other orchardists are neglecting this now-necessary precaution. When two men and a team can successfully and thoroughly spray 500 trees in a day, as is being exemplified every day by one of our leading orchardists, it is the sheerest folly to surrender to the codling moth, no matter how numerous or how strongly entrenched he may be. Fortunately all our fruit men have their eyes open, and are themselves open to conviction when any great lesson in horticulture is impressed upon them, and we are confident that before another season rolls 'round all will be prepared to intelligently combat this common foe to what bids fair to prove our greatest industry. The profits attending fruit culture are now too well understood by all for anyone to argue that it will not pay to take these precautions to insure a full crop of the very best quality. The country is to be congratulated upon the fact that the curculio has not yet effected a lodgment here, and that the peach-tree pests are as yet comparatively absent. Of course, they will all come in time; but as our citizens become better versed in the art of fighting them they will lose their terrors. The scale has been almost eradicated down in California by the introduction of the Australian ladybug, and a like result is anticipated here when it is employed to assist in the work of destruction. The sprayer intelligently handled must be largely relied upon to do the balance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 3


A Big Enterprise.
    The Medford distillery bids fair to prove the most important enterprise in its line yet inaugurated in this valley, as it will require about 500 bushels of grain per day, and will give employment to several men and teams, besides contributing largely to the success of the proposed feeding yards and packing house of Medford. Medynski & Theiss have their 40x160-foot building almost ready for occupancy, and will start up on half time immediately after harvest. The building stands 60 feet high and is an imposing structure. The output will be the foundation for fine liquors, wines and cologne spirits used largely for medicinal and manufacturing purposes, and will find a market almost entirely without this valley. Among other encouraging features of the enterprise will be the fact that two government gaugers will be on constant duty at the distillery after it starts up, and a good deal of quiet emulation is already prevailing in this vicinity as to who will get the plums.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 3


    The streets and roads are quite dusty, and a good shower of rain would not be out of place.
    Flowers are in bloom everywhere, and southern Oregon presents a handsome appearance.
    The pupils of Pleasant View school, near Medford, under the careful tutelage of Miss Della Pickel, are preparing to give an entertainment on the 29th inst.
    It is likely that an excursion train will be run from Portland to the Orchard Home Association's lands in due course of time, when intending purchasers can easily see that they are getting their money's worth. "Seeing is believing."
    Mayor Howard of Medford is grieving over the ruin of his promising orchard on Evans Creek, the trees all having been girdled with a saw by some devilish wretch just at the crown of the roots. They hang such miscreants in some sections of the country.
    The orchardists in southern Oregon will find themselves under the necessity of generally thinning out, even to the sacrificing of half the young fruit, so heavily loaded are the trees. The sooner the work is done the better, or small fruit must be the rule the coming season.
    Chas. Howard left Medford last week on his customary summer jaunt through the mountains, appraising lands for the C.&O. railroad company. He took out a surveying party of seven, with Geo. Webb as foreman, and will be gone until fall, working through to the state line. After the land is viewed and appraised the company will offer it for sale.
    Workmen have been busy protecting the newly set fruit trees on the Orchard Home tract from the rays of the midday sun, by wrapping the trunks of the trees. With the thoroughly cultivated ground and the uniformly straight rows, the tract of 70 acres presents a most enticing appearance, and gives assurance of material results in a few years' time. The trees are of the choicest varieties.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 3


    Butte Creek and Medford flour is selling at $1.25 a sack, while no other brand is selling for less than $1.10 a sack, cash. This commodity has not been so high for a long time past. Wheat is also commanding a good figure.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
PEYTON-HERRON--In Medford, May 16, 1891, by Elder G. S. Walton, Reuben E. Peyton and Miss Ora F. Herron.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1891, page 3


    Jacksonville is going to celebrate the 4th in glorious style this year.
    Willie Farrier has sufficiently recovered from his recent illness to be able to resume his position as fireman for the R.R.V.R.R.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, May 22, 1891, page 2


    The Medford Mail has christened J. W. Hockersmith the "Jackson County pork king."
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 22, 1891, page 3


    J. D. Whitman will build a fruit warehouse at Medford.
    J. C. Tipton has opened a new butcher shop in Medford.
    Judge Willard Crawford will build a new dwelling house for himself at Medford.
    The Medford roller mills are shipping forty carloads of wood from the north for their engine.
    Frank Mingus is going into the wood business at Medford, and will pile up a thousand cords of firewood for next winter's sales.
    The fine orchard on the farm of G. W. Howard on Evans Creek has been ruined by some miscreant, who probably imagined he had a grievance against Mr. Howard. All of the best trees in the orchard have been girdled by a saw just at the top of the ground. The orchard was ten years old, thrifty and bearing well. Suspicion points strongly toward a certain party, who could indeed be made to suffer if Mr. Howard chose to prosecute them.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 22, 1891, page 3


    Representative Hermann has been interesting himself before the department as to increase the classification of the Medford post office, in Jackson County, and is now informed that an order has been issued making it a presidential office.
"For a Second Term," Oregonian, Portland, May 23, 1891, page 10


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford has been made a presidential post office.
    There are a few cases of whooping cough in this place.
    The business of the Medford post office has increased so much that the department at Washington has made a presidential office of it.
    D. T. Pritchard recently purchased the building occupied by M. S. Damon as a shoe store on 7th Street, and will soon open a jewelry store there.
    W. W. Wheeler last week returned from the Klamath Lake country, in which locality he established a branch of the Mitchell & Lewis machinery company.
    The Southern Oregon Packing Company will have suitable buildings erected at some eligible site near the railroad track before fall, for the carrying on of their business.
    The Medford band boys have received an invitation from Roseburg to participate in a band contest to be held at that place on the coming Fourth of July.
    Mrs. Dr. Geary enjoyed a visit during the week from her brother, Dr. McCornack, late of Eugene, who has recently established himself in the practice of his profession at Mendocino, Cal.
    The Knights of Pythias will join with the G.A.R. this year in the observation of Memorial Day at this place. There will be far more than the usual amount of interest taken in the occasion both here and at Jacksonville.
    There was a buoyancy of exultation about the news columns of the Mail last week that is satisfactorily accounted for by the repentant father, on the grounds of that big baby girl that came to his home early in the week. All are doing well.
    D. H. Miller and Chas. Strang have dissolved the partnership heretofore existing between them, and Mr. Miller will hereafter conduct the hardware branch of the business, while Mr. Strang will have exclusive control of the drug department.
    The most complete and one of the very best stock of goods in southern Oregon may be found at the store of Henry Smith. This establishment is under the efficient management of Mr. and Mrs. F. L. Cranfill, who never fail to please their numerous customers.
    Our new schoolhouse will be one of the handsomest and best in the whole of southern Oregon. A. J. Weeks, an excellent architect, drew the plans that were accepted at the meeting held last Saturday. An eight-mill tax has been levied, which will raise enough funds to run the schools during the coming year and pay for about one-third of the cost of the new building, which is estimated at $7000.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 2


MARRIED.
FITCH-CARDWELL--In Medford precinct, at the residence of the officiating minister, by Rev. M. A. Williams, May 25, 1891, Francis Fitch and Miss Laura B. Cardwell.
BORN.
HARLAN--In Medford, May 17, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. Newell Harlan, a daughter.
DIED.
WHITMAN--In Medford, May 26, 1891, of whooping cough, Herman Larue, infant son of J. H. and S. M. Whitman; aged 10 months and 11 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 2


Farmers, Attention!
    Do not be in a hurry to contract your wheat crop, as prospects are good for good prices, and remember that I paid from five to seven cents per bushel more than a shipping price last fall. I can and always will be able to pay the highest shipping price for all and any amount of wheat you offer, and many times more than a shipping price. So do not be in a hurry to tie yourselves up to some outside parties in a contract that will perhaps lose and make you no money, as they will not make a contract to pay more than the market price will be, and I can and always will pay you that, and you thus have the chances on your side to get more. Bring in what wheat you now have to the mill, as I am paying 80 cents for good wheat. Thanking you for past favors, I am
                              Yours respectfully,
A. A. DAVIS.       
Medford, May 27th.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891 et seq., page 3


    Thin out your fruit trees.
    Thin out your trees and have fine, large fruit.
    Crop prospects are better than ever, and farmers are jubilant.
    E. G. Hurt has been appointed engineer of the Medford city water works. A good appointment.
    Immigration is commencing to flow into southern Oregon again, and real estate is beginning to move somewhat.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of the directors of Medford district, who invite sealed proposals to build the new schoolhouse at that place. Bids will be opened on June 27, 1891, and plans and specifications can be seen at the store of I. A. Webb after June 1st.
    S. B. Galey of Ashland expects to market at least 10,000 boxes of fine peaches this season from his various orchards about that place, and has contracted his entire crop to the fruit firm of Page & Son of Portland. By strict attention to business and making a specialty of something that everyone cannot raise to perfection, Mr. G. is making the profession of horticulture extremely profitable.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 3


    Health is good, and doctors are idle.
    The force at work on the roadbed of our railroad had been cut down to five men. The track will be put in first-class shape during the season.
    Numerous strangers in this section are awaiting the decision of the managers of the R.R.V.R.R. with reference to the proposed extension of their railroad, before investing in real estate in this valley.
    Wm. S. Guerin, son of school superintendent Guerin of Curry County, was drowned at the mouth of Klamath River not long since, the boat in which he was riding with four other persons upsetting. His companions escaped. Will. was a nephew of Jas. T. Guerin and an intelligent, popular young man.
    A colony arrived in Medford one day recently and intend locating in this valley. The colony idea is growing in strength in all parts of California, and it has been found to work well, inasmuch as newcomers by this means are enabled to some extent to select their own neighbors. There is no reason why it should not be extended to this fruitful section.
    Francis Fitch of Medford, a prominent member of the Jackson County bar, and Miss Laura B. Cardwell, a young lady well known here, were quietly married at the residence of the officiating minister, Rev. M. A. Williams, last Monday. The couple left for Portland on the evening's train to spend their honeymoon. We tender our congratulations and best wishes.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Sallie E. Ish to Medynski & Theiss; lots 1, 2 and 3 in blk 1 of Ish add. to Medford. $300.
    T. F. West to Medynski & Theiss; lot 2 in blk 1, lot 5 in blk 2, lot 4 in blk 3 in West's add. to Medford. $300.
    David J. Lumsden to R. H. Whitehead; lots 1, 2, 3, 14, 15 and 16 in blk 1 in Lumsden add. to Medford. $555.
    Volna Webster to W. P. R. Wood; 194 feet off end of lots 5 and 6 in blk 8 in Park add. to Medford. $100.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1891, page 3


    Hon. Francis Fitch, of Medford, and Miss Laura Cardwell, of Jacksonville, were married on Monday by Rev. M. A. Williams, and departed the same evening for Portland and the Sound cities. The happy couple are favorably known in Jacksonville, and a host of friends join us in congratulating.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, May 29, 1891, page 2


    The Medford brass band has been invited to go to Roseburg on the 4th of July.
    The public schools of Grants Pass and Medford both closed with interesting exercises last week.
    Miller & Strang, of Medford, have dissolved partnership. Mr. Miller will continue in the hardware business, and Mr. Strang takes the drug store.
    A fire was discovered last Sunday in the building near the Grand Central Hotel. It was thought at first that the fire had originated accidentally but an examination led to the impression that the fire was placed there by someone. What the object could have been seems a mystery, and it was indeed fortunate that the fire was discovered in time to prevent a general conflagration.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, May 29, 1891, page 2


    The report comes from Medford that several of the leading orchardists near the place have contracted to sell their whole peach crop to the Salem cannery this season, the price not yet made public.
"Preparing for Fruit Shipments," Ashland Tidings, May 29, 1891, page 3


    Dave Payne is up in the Siskiyous, hauling wood for Geo. Engle.
    George Merriman of Medford was in town the first of the week, pushing the introduction of the "Plano" mower and binder, which he considers the finest machine ever placed on the market.
    A. H. Maegly, who came out from Portland to look after business interests at Jacksonville recently, was called to Los Angeles this week by the death of his father, who resided there.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, May 29, 1891, page 3


    Prof. W. J. Crawford and family, of Medford, are here to spend the summer. They will move into Mrs. Jones' house, which the professor has purchased.

"Zena Items," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, June 3, 1891, page 1



    A band of gypsies is infesting this place at present.
    New potatoes are fast superseding the old stock and are of excellent quality.
    Some gypsies, also two manipulators of bagpipes, were in town during the week.
    Klippel & Lee of Medford have the largest and best stock of lumber in the county, and their prices are quite low.
    Delegates from the farmers' alliances will meet at Medford today for the purpose of forming a county alliance.
    A wonderful growth of rhubarb has been produced at Hon. J. H. Stewart's place during the present season, the direct cause being tile drainage and liberal manuring of the soil.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co. received a handsome boxcar, which will carry 20 tons, last week, and is now fully supplied with rolling stock.
    The Jacksonville baseball club, better known as the Bean-Eaters, went to Medford last Saturday and defeated the home club after a close contest. A good game was played by both sides.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 2


Row at Ashland.
    A misunderstanding concerning the possession of the Oregon Hotel at Ashland took place last Tuesday. H. B. Reed, who had rented the house of Dr. Helm, got into a row with the former lessee and the company owning the building, and the latter undertook to eject Reed, which treatment he did not like and he drew his pistol. A warrant was sworn out and Reed was arrested. Justice Berry held him to answer before the grand jury, on a charge of an assault with a dangerous weapon, placing his bonds at $300, which he furnished. It is not likely that an indictment will be found against him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


    Beautiful weather.
    A bountiful harvest is assured.
    A couple of chimney sweeps visited our town last week.
    There is a healthier tone in the real estate market than for some time past. Considerable land is changing hands.
    Quite a number of strangers may be seen in Jacksonville nowadays. The pioneer town is attracting much more attention than it has for years. Its advantages will become more manifest each succeeding year.
    Southern Oregon will gain considerably in population this year and much more during 1892. We have passed through our most trying ordeal, and a good-sized boom is now in order.
    According to telegraphic dispatches the Rogue River Valley R.R. Co. will soon carry the U.S. mails between Jacksonville and Medford, the post office department having entered into a contract to that effect with the said corporation. This will be a great relief to some people we know of.
    Wheat is now ranging from 75 to 80 cents per bushel in this valley, the highest price attained in recent years, and it is confidently predicted that the new crop will come on at equally remunerative figures, which fact is greatly encouraging to farmers. Since the improvement to the quality of the wool clip of this section the sheepmen are realizing better prices also, and the outlook is quite favorable all round.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. H. Hull is in Chicago, working up an immigration boom for this section.
    Frank Stephenson last week contributed a tapeworm 22 feet long to Dr. Jones' collection of medical curios.
    Davis, the miller, last week shipped 1,000 sacks of his superior flour to Portland, where it is as thoroughly appreciated as it is here.
    John A. Miller, recently of Klamath County, has gone into the livery business at this place since selling his horses on the Klamath ranges.
    The map-drawing and letter-writing exercises of the little pupils in Miss Hay's department of our schools was one of the leading matters of interest to parents at the final examinations last week
    Tipton denies the report that he is in the undertaking business in Medford, but wants it understood that he is in the meat business. He is not running a hearse in connection with his butcher shop.
    Nearly all of our fraternal societies participated in Decoration Day ceremonies at Medford last week. It is doubtful whether the event was ever more impressively observed in southern Oregon than it was here.
    Medford citizens are proud of the showing made by the pupils of our public schools at the commencement exercises held at this place last week, and accord credit where credit is due, to the able corps of teachers who have guided the footsteps of the young people during the last year.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Ella L. Short to D. L. Guthrie; lot 2 Short's add. to Medford. $115.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


    Phil Yeiser of Medford was at the county seat Wednesday. He is employed in the office of Francis Fitch.
    Jas. Slover tarried here a day last week, while on his return from San Francisco, where he has been laying in a fine, large stock of goods for the new drug store of Slover & Miller at Crescent City, Cal. The many friends of the young men wish them the fullest measure of success.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


BORN.
ROBINSON--In Medford, May 24, 1891, to Mr and Mrs. Will. Robinson, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 5, 1891, page 3


    There is still some hitch in the mail contract between this place and Medford, and the original contractor, W. G. Kenney, is again carrying the mail by the old-time wagon method.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1891, page 2


Medford Notes.
    Medford will not celebrate the Fourth of July this year, but expects to come to the front with a big celebration next year.
    Wm. Angle has been at the Shovel Creek Springs on the Klamath, or somewhere in that part of the state, during the past two weeks, recruiting his health.
    Medford merchants generally report business improving and money getting a little easier in the channels of trade.
    The contract for the two buildings for the pork packing company to be erected south of the depot will be let soon.
    The local medical examining board of the pension department, consisting of Doctors Pryce, Geary and Wait, has examined a large number of applicants during the past two weeks--some fifteen or twenty in all.
    Surveyor J. S. Howard finished his survey of the projected extension of the R.R.V. eastward to Eagle Point, and sent his report down to the company last Friday. He makes the distance a little over 11½ miles. It is reported that the company has asked of Medford a free right of way through the town, ample grounds for terminal facilities and a cash bonus of $12,000.
    Medford is to have a schoolhouse that will be a credit to the city. The district trustees will have the work begun soon, at least the building is to be completed ready for occupancy by the first of October. Two teachers have been elected for the next school year--Prof. N. L. Narregan, as principal, at a salary of $100 per month, and Miss Carrie Sackett, for the kindergarten work of the primary grade.
Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1891, page 2


    Geo. L. Webb, of Medford, was in town the first of the week, to have some dental work done by Dr. Caldwell.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1891, page 3


    Since the passenger coach has been attached to the through freight train on the overland road, it is announced that the local passenger service will hereafter be diverted to this train, which will be changed to a fast freight for the transportation of passengers, fruit, etc., and the mail train will then be a regular cannonball flyer, stopping only at the principal stations and carrying no second-class passengers or emigrants.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    If you want anything in the line of farming machinery or implements, call at Merriman & Legate's.
    John Redfield last week returned to Medford from the Sound country, and will reside here in the future.
    Miss Alpha McDowell is teaching her second term of school in the Allen district, near the mouth of Big Butte Creek.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Pierson had the misfortune to lose an infant child [to] that scourge of childhood, the whooping cough, last week.
    Prof. Crawford last week removed his family to Roseburg, after concluding a most successful term of school here, and will make Douglas County's capital his future abiding place.
    F. Hubbard of Medford has been canvassing Klamath County in the interest of the Northwestern Agricultural Implement Company during the past week, meeting with considerable success.
    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Co. has purchased property in the northern portion of town, near W. S. Barnum's new residence, for their buildings, and will commence operations during the month.
    Harris & Purdin, the genial landlords of the Grand Central Hotel, have been making a number of improvements to their caravansary which cannot but prove popular. They keep a first-class house and always give satisfaction.
    John Montague recently purchased at his own expense six fine instruments for the use of the new band which he has been engaged in organizing for some time past, and announces that he and his boys will have a first-class band ready for next season, in spite of all opposition.
    Medford real estate men think there is room in this valley for a population five times as great as that now living here, and will take steps to secure a part of the of the wished-for increase during the coming season. There can be no question but what our foothill and orchard lands will support a large and prosperous community.
    Hon. Willard Crawford and others recently discovered a vein of coal in the foothills east of Medford, which bids fair to prove the richest find of this character that has thus far been made in the valley. While at the surface the vein is not to exceed two inches in thickness, yet in the prospecting of the ledge it was found to widen out so rapidly that at the depth of three feet it was at least five inches in width and promises to open into a broad seam. The quality has proven excellent.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 2


Railroad Extension.
    E. J. DeHart and W. A. Buchanan, of the R.R.V.R.R. Co., were in the valley this week on business connected with the proposed extension of their road, and were accompanied by Mr. Graham. They visited the Butte Creek and Applegate sections and seem to be of the opinion that it is a feasible project to extend the line. We are informed that they will make such extension to Eagle Point if a sufficient inducement is made them by the citizens interested. We are of the opinion that connection with the Butte Creek section will be quite beneficial to Jacksonville and its vicinity, and that everybody should lend a helping hand to the enterprise. Our line is too short to help us a great deal; but if we are connected with Eagle Point and the upper Rogue River country in the near future, much benefit will accrue.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 3


    Geo. Bush has recovered from his illness and is spending his time between Medford and Jacksonville.
    Thin out the fruit which hangs so thickly on your trees. Fully one-half should be plucked, and right now.
    The contract for carrying the mail between Medford and Jacksonville has been turned over to the R.R.V.R.R. Co., which commenced the service as an original contractor last Monday.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart and Weeks Bros. have contracted their peach crop, we learn, to the amount of 30,000 boxes or more, to the Salem Canning Company, the agreed price being reported to be 1½c per pound.
    J. W. Hockersmith has been in the Willamette Valley during the week, looking after his prospects in the fruit line below. He expresses the opinion that no less than 150,000 boxes of peaches alone will be shipped from Ashland, Phoenix and Talent stations this season, and as he will handle no inconsiderable portion of the crop of both berries and peaches, he finds it to his interest to make arrangements with the cannery men and commission merchants to take the surplus off his hands.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 3


    E. D. Rose and L. G. Porter of Prospect were in Jacksonville on Saturday.
    Ike Muller, who is now located at Crescent City, Cal., arrived this week to move his household effects to his new home. He will return with his family in a short time.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 3


    The R.R.V.R. Co. will run trains every hour between Jacksonville and Medford on the 4th of July, which will be quite a convenience.
    H. B. Reed of Ashland called one day last week. He has commenced suit for $10,000 damages against Dr. Helm. Francis Fitch is his attorney.
    Don't take our word for it, but go to Merriman & Legate at Medford and see the Plano machines for yourself. They lead everywhere.
    We are sorry to learn that Francis Fitch, Esq., who has been suffering with a severe attack of la grippe for the past few weeks, is still considerably indisposed.
    The return game of baseball between the Medford and Jacksonville second nines has been arranged for tomorrow, and a good deal of interest will be taken in the result locally.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1891, page 3


    Prof. Narregan and Misses Lucy Hay and Cora Sackett, of Medford, attended the entertainment given by our public school last Friday.
    A number of the members of Banner Lodge No. 23, A.O.U.W., went to Medford Wednesday night to meet G. M. W. Daley of that order. They were elegantly entertained by the Medford lodge at a banquet prepared and served by wives of the members, whose charming presence rendered the occasion one of pleasant reminiscence.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 12, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Ira Purdin now has a position in S. Rosenthal's mammoth store.
    The Medford band will furnish the music for the 4th of July celebration at Jacksonville.
    D. T. Lawton is now employed in the Mitchell & Lewis Co.'s implement warehouse at this place.
    Dick Cranfield has established a chicken ranch west of town, to facilitate the handling of fine fowls.
    Shawver & Youngs are engaged in putting up a neat dwelling house for W. P. Wood, in the Park addition.
    The Medford Distilling and Refining Co. is making preparations to commence business in a short time.
    A cigar factory will be started here at once by newcomers. They will occupy Powell's building, on 7th Street.
    Oliver Sargent was the only patriot who enlisted at his country's call when the enlisting officer was in Medford.
    T. C. Nicholson, father of Horace Nicholson of this place, recently arrived from his home in Oak Grove, Iowa.
    Mrs. D. T. Pritchard is regaining her health since removing to Medford, much to the gratification of her many friends.
    Maude Harris returned to her home at Portland after a visit with her father, T. A. Harris, one evening last week.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has been engaged for some days on his fruit-packing house, and will be ready for his crop when it matures.
    Peter Henderson, well known in this place, is now a resident of Salem, where he is successfully plying his trade in the tonsorial line.
    The Plano mowing machine, binder and rake can be seen at Merriman & Legate's. They are the best and cheapest in the market.
    D. J. Lumsden & Son are engaged in the wood, hay and produce line at San Jose, Cal., and are reported to be building up a paying business.
    The V troughs on either side of the street now accommodate a flow of pure water that is quite an improvement on the old order of things.
    Chas. J. Howard, the railroad land viewer, was in town a few hours one day last week, having left the rest of the company out in the Dead Indian section.
    Prof. Narregan last week returned home from his trip to Portland in the interests of the local members of the Masonic order. He was successful in his mission.
    Prof. N. L. Narregan, a first-class teacher, will guide the destinies of the Medford public schools during the next scholastic year, having been engaged as principal at a liberal salary.
    Miss Sackett has been engaged to teach the next term of kindergarten school in Medford, having proven her qualifications in that line to everyone's satisfaction during the past year.
    Bert. Whitman is engaged in soliciting fruit for fall delivery from the foothill farmers, and intends to handle double the amount that he shipped last year during the coming season.
    James Hansen returned home last week, having left his daughter in the hospital at San Francisco in the hope of effecting a perfect cure for her trouble, which is pronounced to be hip disease.
    Mrs. J. H. Behrens of San Francisco has been the guest of her uncle, Thos. Morine, during the past week, having accompanied her husband thus far on his course to Germany, where he goes for a two-months' visit.
    The Masonic grand lodge has granted a dispensation to organize a subordinate lodge at Medford, and steps looking toward that end are in progress. It is estimated that the new lodge will have at least 25 charter members.
    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company have advertised for bids for the erection of their packing house on the property recently purchased by them, bids to be opened at the office of the secretary on the 20th instant.
    Medford's citizens have shown their customary liberality in subscribing to the new railroad extension bonus, and as the amount asked for is almost raised, there can be little doubt but that the road will be constructed in the near future.
    Our citizens cannot afford to let the opportunity for connection with Butte Creek by rail pass. It means increased business and importance for our town. The bonus asked by the railroad company is a mere bagatelle compared with the benefit that will accrue from the extension.
    The newly organized cornet band are improving rapidly in their execution, and will soon become expert musicians. They participated in a picnic at Eagle Point last week, which was a very enjoyable affair. The boys should be encouraged in their laudable ambition to have the best band in the state in Medford.
    Medford has magnanimously concluded to join with her sister towns in celebrating the glorious Fourth of July this year, but gives notice in advance that she will expect her neighbors to be equally magnanimous next year, when she will undertake a celebration that will be remembered in the history of the valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 2


BORN.
HAMILTON--In Medford, June 14, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Hamilton, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 2


A Cannery.
    The Times is pleased to announce that there is a probability that a cannery will be located in southern Oregon in the near future. A. Bird of the Salem cannery has made a proposition to establish such an enterprise if the people will guarantee him a bonus of $2000 and the land necessary therefor. The citizens of Medford, with their usual enterprise, are making an effort to secure the prize. This section needs a cannery more than anything else, next to a railroad to the coast, and we hope that nothing will be left undone to take advantage of Mr. Bird's offer. The probability is that much fruit will go to waste because there are no means of putting it up for market in some shape. A cannery will not only provide a market for all our surplus fruit at good figures, but will give employment to many men, women and children at the same time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


ROGUE RIVER VALLEY RAILWAY CO.
NOTICE TO SHIPPERS.
    Special CARLOAD rates between the terminal points can be obtained by applying to the agent at Medford at any time.
W. HONEYMAN, President.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891 et seq., page 3


    A. C. Tayler and wife last week returned from Chicago, and will reside permanently at Medford in the future.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart responded to the call for summer cabbages last week with the first of the season, raised on his tile-drained garden land above Medford.
    The R.R.V.R.R. Co. donated the sum of $20 to assist in defraying the expenses of the 4th of July celebration in Jacksonville. It was a liberal donation.
    Fruit men report very little trouble from the codling moth this season, and ascribe his absence to the spraying done and the cool weather we have been having.
    The Mitchell & Lewis Co. last week received a carload of fine buggies and phaetons from their headquarters at Portland, to supply the demand for that line of vehicles here.
    J. W. Cunnyngham last week tested one of the new mowers [Patent No. 395,349] in which he is interested with Redfield Bros., and found the implement to do all that was hoped for it. The inventors confidently believe that their discovery will work a revolution in the mowing machine line.
    Commissioner Whitman of the horticultural commission is looking after the fruit imported from California to this section and putting our fruit men on their guard against the danger of allowing any more pests from the golden state to be imported to rob our orchard men of their already hard-earned profits.
    Engineer McCarthy last week chose a new engine to take the place of No. 22, which is becoming too small for the heavy work demanded of it in handling the passenger trains. The new engine was just from the repair shops, and while it has been in service for some time, it is thought it will be what is needed. Two engines are sometimes required to haul the passenger [train] up from Grants Pass, so heavy is the tide of summer travel.
    Surveyor Howard, who completed the survey for the extension of the R.R.V.R.R. to Eagle Point a short time ago, made the distance over the proposed route from Medford a trifle over 11½ miles. All the railroad company will ask the people of Medford for is a bonus of $12,000, payable in installments of $4,000 each year for three successive years after the completion of the road, and for right-of-way through the town, as well as for terminal facilities.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


    Gus Newbury will soon take the road in the interest of the Jacksonville Marble Works.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


    Are we going to have any summer?
    Haying is greatly retarded by the stormy weather.
    The R.R.V.R. Co. wants 250 cords of good fir wood.
    John F. Howard and wife of Medford precinct have gone to Yreka, Cal.
    Ike Muller and family have gone to Crescent City, Cal. to permanently locate.
    D. R. Hill of Medford precinct, the successful horticulturist and melon raiser, made us a pleasant call yesterday.
    A crippled fakir, who moves about on his knees with alacrity, sold more or less stationery in Jacksonville yesterday.
    The Medford band of fifteen pieces has been secured for the 4th of July celebration here. It will discourse sweet music during the entire day.
    The return game of baseball between the Jacksonville and Medford second nines resulted in a victory for the former, who have now won two games in succession and hold the championship for the present. 'Rah!
    The S.P. company has decided to have the entire roadbed between the '49 diggings and Ashland overhauled and the route established about 50 feet farther west than at present located, in order to have the several dangerous trestles along the line replaced by fills. The general public will rejoice to hear this, as the present trestles are anything but safe, and it will be but a matter of months until some of them would have given way under a heavy train had the company not decided to replace them.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


Professional.
    We publish elsewhere the law card of W. H. Parker, attorney at law. He is a good lawyer and a successful practitioner. Though he had studied for the profession for many years he did not apply for admission to the bar until the expiration of his second term as county clerk. He surprised his friends with the skill displayed in the management of his first cases, and it was the opinion of the court and bar that he has more than ordinary legal acumen, and is gifted with the best qualities of a criminal lawyer. Mr. P. came to this county in 1854, when a mere boy, and spent his early life on the farm and driving ox teams. Later, though given the privilege of attending school but a few months, he succeeded in acquiring a liberal education, and raised to front rank among schoolteachers. Afterward he was a lumberman and stock raiser, then county clerk for two terms.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 19, 1891, page 3


The Eagle Point R.R.
    W. A. Buchanan, E. J. DeHart and a Mr. Graham, all representing the R.R.V.R.R., are in the city on railroad business. They looked over the proposed route on Wednesday, in company with civil engineer J. S. Howard, and are quite well pleased with the lay of the land in particular and the country in general. They are willing to build the road, but they must receive substantial encouragement in order to do so.
    The subscription papers have been in circulation and it behooves everyone to give as much as they justly can and consider the money well invested. The road is within our grasp. Shall we take it?--[Medford Mail.
Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 1


    Bert Whitman is actively engaged in the valley in contracting for a good share of the fruit crop. He sent a number of cars out of here last fall and will more than double the shipment this year.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 1


    Hon. Francis Fitch of Medford is very sick at the home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Cardwell, of this place. Drs. Geary and Robinson are in attendance.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 2


    A cigar manufactory is to be established at Medford, under the management of a Pennsylvania cigar maker who was recently located at Empire City.
    A masonic lodge is to be instituted at Medford shortly, an informal meeting looking to that end having been held Monday night. The last Grand Lodge granted the long-sought dispensation at its recent session, as a result of the "fine work" of Prof. N. L. Narregan, who had the matter in charge.
    Goldsmith, the Medford merchant, was in Ashland the fore part of the week, having bought the clip of the Van Dyke band. He is our authority for the statement that two-thirds of the required bonus for the construction of the Eagle Point railroad line has been raised, and the remainder will be guaranteed before the week is out.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 3


    The R.R.V.R.R. will run trains every hour between Jacksonville and Medford on the 4th of July.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. N. Brantner's premises are being renovated in a handsome manner.
    Miss Irene Wiley intends studying telegraphy here during the next few months.
    Miss Montague has been entertaining as her guest Miss Irene Wiley, lately from Nevada.
    W. G. Cooper last week returned home from his trip to eastern Oregon in the fence line of business.
    J. Bradley will soon erect a fine dwelling on his farm near here, having let the contract for the same.
    C. Mingus retailed fine cherries in Medford from his Ashland trees last week, for the low price of 20 cents per gallon.
    Crewe & Pavitt are now running their cigar factory on full time, and will doubtless build up a fine business in a short period.
    G. H. Haskins' dwelling is now much improved in appearance since his addition was completed and a new coat of paint applied.
    Bert. Whitman has been in the northern and eastern part of the state looking up a market for our fruit surplus during the past week.
    E. J. Montague does not expect to be able to complete his wood contract for the railroad company, near Sisson, before the first of September next.
    Medford will be a presidential office after July 1st, and the salary of the postmaster will be $1000 a year. This shows that our town is growing steadily.
    Division superintendent Alberry has been engaged during the past week in putting in a switch for the R.R.V.R., which will prove a great convenience in making up trains.
    The contract for building the southern Oregon Pork Packing Co.'s buildings in this place has been let to G. W. Bashford. There were several bids, which ranged between $1300 and $2500.
    G. H. Haskins has recently enlarged his drugstore capacity by extending the shelving to the rear of the building, after removing the partitions, much to the looks and convenience of the same.
    Little Jay Bradley last week was obliged to submit to a delicate surgical operation performed by Doctors Geary and Wait, for the removal of a tumor from the child's neck. It was entirely successful.
    Medford mechanics recently completed a fine double-seated wagon for Ulrich's insurance agency. Merriman & Legate did the ironwork, J. W. Miller the woodwork, and the painting was done by C. O. Damon.
    It is to be hoped that our citizens will not fail to make up the subsidy asked to ensure the extension of our railroad to Eagle Point. Nothing will help Medford as much as the building of this road to Butte Creek, and the great enhancement of the value of property will be one of the benefits that will accrue. We hope that this golden opportunity will not be lost.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1891, page 2


G. W. Howard to J. W. Frazier, lots 3 and 4 in block 78, Medford; $100.
W. I. Vawter to G. W. Howard, lot in block 14, Medford; $1.
G. W. Howard to W. I. Vawter, lot on E. 9th Street, Medford; $1.
Emma E. Barker to W. I. Vawter and G. W. Howard, lots 3 and 4, N ½ of lot 2, block 9, Medford; $400.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1891, page 2


    We are sorry to learn that Hon. J. D. Whitman has resigned his position as commissioner of the third horticultural district, his resignation having been forwarded to Gov. Pennoyer about three weeks since. He has made an energetic, painstaking official, and has already done the fruit interests of this section much good.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1891, page 3


    H. Wendt's field in the northeastern portion of town has been transformed into an excellent baseball ground. The match game on the 4th of July will be played there.
    The wife of Eneas McLean, who formerly resided at Medford, died at Roseburg last Friday, while en route to Grants Pass from Coos Bay, and was buried in the cemetery near the county seat of Josephine. She had suffered long with consumption.
    Mr. Theiss of Medford was in Jacksonville one day last week, accompanied by Dr. G. B. Cole, lately of La Salle, Ills., who came to southern Oregon for the benefit of his health and also to seek a location. He has already formed a partnership with Dr. W. S. Jones of Medford, who enjoys a large and growing practice.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1891, page 3


    The Medford post office will be a presidential office after July 1st.
    Mrs. McLean, wife of Rev. Eneas McLean, formerly of Medford, died at Roseburg last Friday, while the family was en route from Coos Bay to Grants Pass. She had been ill for a long time with consumption. The burial was at Grants Pass on Saturday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 26, 1891, page 3


    W. N. Hamilton, of Medford, a brother of County Assessor Hamilton, started Tuesday morning for Truckee, Ca.., where he expects to locate.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, June 26, 1891, page 3


BORN.
HAMILTON--In Medford, June 14, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. I. L. Hamilton, a daughter.
Ashland Tidings, June 26, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Robert Galloway is the new dispensing clerk at Haskins' drug store.
    Assessor Hamilton's brother, W. N., has gone to Truckee, Cal. to locate.
    George Coulter is now regularly employed in D. H. Miller's hardware store.
    T. F. Gooch, lately of eastern Oregon, has become a resident of this place. He is welcome.
    Harris & Purdin are furnishing ice to a large number of parties throughout southern Oregon.
    Our post office is now a presidential office, and a new commission has been issued to the present incumbent.
    H. E. Baker returned to Medford from his trip down to Barr's mines in Josephine County one day recently.
    Rev. J. P. Coleman, late of Grants Pass, has been appointed to fill the pulpit of the M.E. Church in Medford.
    Miss Mary Wait last week returned home from Portland after ten months of close and successful application to study.
    A platform truck has been delivered to the agency of Wells, Fargo & Co. of Medford to accommodate their rapidly growing business here.
    F. Mitchell, of the firm of Mitchell, Lewis & Co., was in Medford last week on business connected with the agricultural machinery line of trade.
    Roberts & O'Neil last week exhibited samples of oats from their fields near Medford which were no less than six feet, eleven inches in height.
    J. F. Theiss has about recovered from the injuries he sustained by an accident at the distillery a few weeks ago, and is able to be about once more.
    Among those who have recently located in and about Medford may be mentioned G. E. Allen, Chas. Grey and T. F. Gooch, all from North Powder, Oregon.
    The new lodge of Masons in this place has received their charter and will be prepared for transacting the usual business of the fraternity in a short time now.
    John Harryman, the live real estate agent, last week went to Portland after doing a rustling business in this valley for some time past. Medford will miss him most.
    The new Medford school building will be ready for occupancy by the first of the coming October, we learn, and will be an ornament to the town. It was badly needed.
    Staver & Walker's former machine hall has been elegantly fitted up for Charley Strang's drug store business, and he will this week take possession of his commodious quarters there.
    Dr. Pickel last week purchased the fine lots fronting on 7th bought not long since by L. Shideler, and the lots fronting on 6th Street found a purchaser in the person of G. H. Haskins.
    Bert. Whitman last week returned from a successful tour through the northern and eastern counties soliciting orders for the fruit surplus of this valley, a large portion of which he purposes handling.
    W. I. Vawter and family have been touring through the state of Washington during the past week. Mr. V. will attend the session of the grand lodge of the A.O.U.W. at Victoria, B.C., to which he is a delegate, before his return home.
    Medford's lawn tennis club reorganized for the season at the residence of I. A. Webb last week and ordered a set of archery implements, with the intention of adding that exercise to the already extensive list of amusements afforded by the club.
    A number of the citizens of Medford are in favor of fixing upon a desirable location in the grove midway between this place and the county seat, whereat to hold future Fourth of July celebrations. There can be no doubt that a most desirable location for the purpose can be secured there.
    The ladies of Medford last Tuesday evening presided over a social entertainment at the opera house for the benefit of the new cornet band, and the interest taken in the affair is indicative of the degree of interest felt in the effort of the boys to upbuild a good junior band in our midst.
    One of the pleasantest social affairs that it has been the privilege of Medford's citizens to enjoy for many a day was the lawn social at the residence of Mrs. L. L. Angle last week, given by the Y.W.C.T.U. of this place. The silver cornet band dispensed some of the finest selections on the occasion, and all participated in the games upon the lawn and delicious repast that followed.
    Your correspondent was very much impressed a few days since by the arrival on the train from Jacksonville of a fashionably attired person. Upon inquiry we learned that he was none other than the widely known S.A.D. Higgins, who has lately been christened the Duke of Sleepy Hollow and who is meeting quite a sensation among the ladies. There is a suspicious rumor afloat concerning his visits to this place, and as they are becoming more frequent and regular we are constrained to think there is "something in it."
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 2


    Rev. J. A. Slover and family of Grants Pass attended the wedding of their eldest son and Miss Ivy Parker on Wednesday.
    E. Sanderson Smith, the mining expert, has gone north to interest more capital in the mines of southern Oregon. He has done much for this section.
    Alf. W. Salmon, wife and child, from Victoria, B.C., were in Jacksonville on Wednesday. Mr. S., until recently, was a coffee planter in India, and purposes making his home in this valley and becoming an American citizen. Welcome!
    Hon. H. C. Hansbrough, the new senator from South Dakota, formerly a resident of this section, is now visiting his old home in Douglas County. His brother is still among the S.P. railroad forces, being the popular trainman, James Hansbrough.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 2


James G. Birdseye, sheriff's deed to Norwegian Plow Company, lot 5, in blk 1, in Medford; $184.
D. J. Lumsden et al. to E. B. Pickel, lots 5, 6, 7, blk 2 in Lumsden add. to Medford; $300.
Henry Richards to E. B. Pickel, N ½ of lot 11, 12, 13, in Medford; $200.
G. W. Black to same, lots 9, 8, 10, [omission], town of Medford; $700.
C. W. Broback to Wm. Lynch, N ½ of lots 8, 9, 10, 11, blk 2, town of Medford; $75.
"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 2


    Geo. T. Catching of Grants Pass received the contract for building the new Medford school house. His bid was a little over $7,000.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 3


    Shortly after Wm. L. Miller, special correspondent of the Medford Mail, started from the woodpile to deliver his budget of items last Wednesday, the wind blew through his whiskers with such force as to knock off his hat. As the train was in full motion he was unable to recover his chapeau, and it was soon afterward appropriated by a tourist on his way to the soldiers' encampment at Eugene.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 3


    I. E. DeBoy has established his headquarters in Medford, but will pay regular visits to Central Point every Thursday.

"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
SLOVER-PARKER--At the residence of the officiating minister in Medford precinct, June 30, 1891, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Jas. A. Slover, Jr., and Miss Iva Parker.
    (The Times tenders its heartfelt congratulations, and trusts that this worthy young couple's voyage through life may be peaceful, prosperous and happy. There are few among the rising generation in Jackson County who possess in a greater degree the confidence and esteem of those intimately acquainted with them, and we commend them to the good graces of the citizens of Crescent city, where they will make their future home. Only near relatives of the contracting parties witnessed the ceremony, and bride and groom departed on the evening train for Grants Pass, from which place they took the stage for Crescent City.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 3, 1891, page 3


    Medford has organized a baseball nine to play at Jacksonville tomorrow.
    Sawmill slabs are used for fuel for the Medford city waterworks engine, eight carloads being received from Merlin last week.
    G. W. Bashford took the contract to build the smokehouse and other buildings for the Medford pork packing company at $1300, and began work last week.
    The Medford gun club are again in active practice. They practice every Thursday evening and have sent off for a gold medal to be awarded to the one making the best score. The medal is to be retained by the winner until he is beaten out of it by some member of the club. A leather model is to be awarded to the poorest marksman and he is compelled to wear it at the tournaments until he can do better.--[Mail.
    Mr. Tyron, who has a large tannery at Crescent City, was in the city the past week trying to get the citizens interested toward organizing a stock company, with a capital stock of $30,000, for a boot and shoe factory. Owing to the temporary stringency of the money market, he did not succeed as well as he wished and left on Tuesday, after having announced his intention of calling again later in the season.--[Medford Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 3, 1891, page 2


    Frank Galloway, the Medford fence man, was in town Tuesday on a business visit.
    The Medford-Jacksonville railroad will be kept warm tomorrow, running extra trains.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has resigned as commissioner of the state board of horticulture for the southern district.
    The contract for the building of a new schoolhouse at Medford has been awarded to Katchling, of Grants Pass, for $7,208.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 3, 1891, page 3


    Dr. G. B. Cole, recently from La Salle, Ill., has gone into partnership with Dr. W. S. Jones at Medford.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 3, 1891, page 3


    WASHINGTON, July 2.--The President today made the following appointments:
    Postmasters--James S. Howard, Medford, Ogn.
Excerpt, "Presidential Appointments,"
The Salt Lake Herald, Salt Lake City, Utah, July 3, 1891, page 1


    It is estimated that the railroad company carried over 1000 people between Jacksonville and Medford on the 4th of July. John Dyar has not had much experience as a conductor, but he handled this multitude like a veteran and gave general satisfaction. This method of locomotion no doubt added much to the success of the celebration.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Eva Galloway is home from her California trip.
    Dr. Danielson now has his office over Goldsmith's store.
    Frank Stevenson is now employed at the Grand Central Hotel.
    L. C. Rodenberger has removed his family to Medford to reside.
    A. A. Davis has been in the Sound country drumming up business for the "Medford Straight" flour during the past week.
    Judge Crawford's new dwelling house is rapidly assuming proportions and will be ready for occupancy in a short time.
    N. A. Jacobs will serve Medford's school patrons in the capacity of first assistant to Prof. Narregan during the coming term.
    W. P. Wood this week takes possession of the Jackson & Damon building as headquarters for his saddlery and harness business.
    Mrs. Chas. Howard and her children last week went to Josephine County to spend the heated term with Mrs. H.'s relatives in that section.
    J. H. Faris last week returned from his tour through the Mississippi Valley states, and was well pleased to get back to Medford once more.
    Drs. Cole & Jones have had their office rooms elegantly fitted up during the past week, and now have most comfortable apartments.
    Banker Vawter last week had the building formerly owned by Leonard A. Skeeters renovated and repainted and fitted up for new tenants.
    Work has been pushed rapidly on the packing house buildings during the past week, and it will be completed within the specified time.
    On Friday evening July 3d, a most pleasant party was given at the opera house, which was attended by most of the lovers of dancing here.
    The ladies of Medford at the benefit tendered the junior silver cornet band last week cleared about $20. An enjoyable time was had by all present.
    Harris & Purdin now fatten their own fowls for the table at the Grand Central, having last week erected a neat house in the rear of the hotel for that purpose.
    The friends of Alex Galloway one evening last week tendered him a soap-bubble surprise party, which was a success in every way and much enjoyed by the young folks present.
    C. J. Pavitt has been on the road a good deal of the time the past fortnight in the interest of our cigar factory, which is turning out a good class of goods at very reasonable prices.
    Medford musical artists supplied inspiration for both the Jacksonville and Sams Valley celebrations, the junior band going to the latter place, where their playing was duly appreciated.
    Miss Harrington of Portland last week delivered a very interesting lecture to the members of the Ladies' Foreign Mission Society, after the dime social at the residence of Mrs. D. T. Lawton.
    Mrs. Weeks one day last week severely injured her wrist by a window sash having fallen upon it, the heavy frame causing the bursting of an artery, which resulted in profuse bleeding. She is now convalescent, however.

    H. H. Wolters, the mixologist, has removed his saloon to the building next door to C. W. Palm's barber shop, on Front Street. He has supplied the bar with the finest wines, liquors and cigars, and a fine billiard table can also be found there. Give him a call, for he will treat you well.

    The contract for building Medford's new school house was last week let to George Catching of Grants Pass, whose bid was over seven hundred dollars lower than that of his lowest competitor. The plans were drawn by Mr. Weeks, the local architect, and call for a two-story building fronting to the north, with four classrooms below, each 25x30 feet, two of the same size above stairs and one of double the size. In addition, there will be a recitation room adjoining the large school room and several cloak rooms in various parts of the house. It is to be completed by October 1st next, and the low cost $7,208, taken in connection with the fact that it will provide accommodations for years to come for the rising generation of Medford, is the reason why the taxpayers of our district rejoice.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1891, page 2


BORN.
DAMON--At Medford, June 30, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. C. O. Damon, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1891, page 2


Trustees Medford Lodge No. 23, I.O.O.F., to town of Medford, 2 acres in Twp 37S, R1W, for cemetery.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 10, 1891, page 3


    Willie Farrier has given up his position as fireman on the Rogue River Valley Railroad and left for Harrisburg Tuesday. Lon Woodford, of Medford, now holds the position.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1891, page 2


    The Medford-Jacksonville railroad took in nearly $400.00 for passenger fares on the 4th.
    It is understood that the bonus required to secure the extension of the Medford-Jacksonville railroad to Eagle Point has been all made up, or so nearly made up that the amount is certain to be raised.
    At Medford last Tuesday, J. H. Stewart was thrown from a horse he was riding and had his collar bone broken. He was also badly bruised about the hip and altogether suffered painful injuries. Drs. Geary, Pryce and Wait attended him, and after being put in as comfortable condition as possible, he was taken home.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1891, page 3


    Bert Whitman shipped a number of boxes of peaches from Medford this week. They were from the orchard on the Bodine place, four miles east of town. Tennessee Smith expected to ship a few boxes from his place near Phoenix, also. The first picking in Ashland for shipment will begin tomorrow.
"Fruit Items," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1891, page 3


G. ELKSNAT,
CIVIL ENGINEER,
Medford, Oregon.
Surveying of all kinds done in a first-class manner and at reasonable rates.
Special attention paid to running ditches, flumes, canals, etc.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891 et seq., page 1


Baseball.
    A good deal of interest is taken locally in the game of baseball to be played at Medford tomorrow afternoon. The Medford nine accepted a challenge from the Grants Pass boys to play a match game at Medford, and while the boys from down the alley have an almost unbroken list of victories to their credit, among others having taken a game from the Williams Creek nine by the paralyzing score of 47 to 3, it is thought that the Medford boys have a living show to win, as they have been doing some judicious practicing lately, besides strengthening their nine at several weak points. At all events they will let their opponents know there has been a game, before the last inning is played. There is a possibility that the Grants Pass club will play in this place within the next two weeks. We trust the plan will be carried into execution, as a little healthy rivalry in athletic sports will enliven an otherwise dull season in this section. The number of persons who take a lively interest in the national game is increasing yearly, and Jacksonville has the material to form a club that will be the peer of any in Oregon, if the boys will only go about organizing in the right way and be willing to submit to the practice and training without which no great degree of perfection can be attained. Many from here will attend the game at Medford tomorrow, and local pride will induce some of those in attendance to put up their money on the local club.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    Chas. W. Coker, who formerly resided in this valley, is now in Florida, where he owns an orange grove.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    Clarence Kellogg is the new fireman on the R.R.V.R.R., since last week.
    L. G. Porter and family of Prospect were at the county seat several days this week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    The work of graveling the roadbed of the R.R.V.R.R. was begun this week.
    The railroad extension from Medford to Eagle Point is as good as assured already, and we hope to see the dirt fly before another month rolls around.
    J. H. Stewart, who was thrown from his horse at Medford last week, sustaining a fracture of the collarbone, is getting along as well as could be expected this hot weather.
    The young folks of this place have made arrangements for an excursion to the Colestin soda springs on Sunday the 26th instant, and have obtained a rate of $1.75 for the round trip from Medford, which will induce a large crowd to take advantage of the opportunity for a pleasant outing.
    The sweet music discoursed by the serenaders these moonlight nights is one of the pleasantest features of life in Jacksonville. Almost every evening during the past week their fresh young voices have been blending with the voices of the midnight wind and wakening the echoes of the surrounding hills.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dave Miller's new hardware sign attracts much attention.
    Willie Narregan is now chief assistant to Wolters, at the bakery.
    Charles Strang moved his stock into the opera house building last week.
    G. L. Davis remodeled the interior of his storeroom during the past week.
    A number of shipments of peaches were made from Medford station this week.
    J. E. Shearer manipulates the razors over the new chair in Townsend's barber shop.
    The distillery will be ready to buy and contract for grain after this week we learn.
    The railroad windmill, having had its day, was recently taken to pieces and shipped to Portland.
    Among recent timber locators in the Jenny Creek section we note the name of Hon. M. Purdin of this place.
    Liquor license for the next six months was last week granted to Harris & Purdin, H. H. Wolters and Charles Brous.
    "Buck" Hobson was down from the Siskiyou wood camp last week, receiving congratulations over his recent marriage.
    Prof. N. A. Jacobs now holds a state teacher's certificate of which he is certainly deserving, ranking among our best teachers.
    W. S. Barnum is now employed in the railroad machine shops at Grants Pass, and is at home with his family only on Sundays.
    A Railroad Extension Ball at the opera house is announced for August 14th next. All should attend and encourage the enterprise.
    John A. Ramsdell of Ashland has the contract for moving the old schoolhouse from the site to be occupied by the new structure in this city.
    Miss Rebecca Shideler of Medford spent a few days at Wagner's soda springs recently as the guest of her brother, who is teaching the school near there.
    Spencer Childers has the contract for doing the brick work and plastering about the new schoolhouse building at Medford, and it will be well done.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


The Railroad Extension.
    A large and enthusiastic railroad meeting was held at Eagle Point on Thursday of last week to get the sentiment of the people there concerning the proposed extension of the R.R.V. railroad from Medford to that place, with the assurance of a still further extension to the Klamath country, if suitable inducements are offered for the proposed present section, which it is the intention to build this fall. The meeting was addressed by Messrs. Graham and Fitch on behalf of the railroad company, and by several citizens interested. Before its close subscription papers were opened, and we learn that already the sum of about $1300, besides terminal facilities in the shape of ten acres for a depot site, have been subscribed by the citizens of Butte Creek, in addition to which a number have signified their willingness to donate ties and material. This is certainly a good beginning a commendable work, and we trust it will not be allowed to lag for lack of interest on the part of those who will be most benefited. Private instructions have been received at Medford, ordering a preliminary route survey of the summit of [the] Cascades, and everything points towards the early building of not only the Eagle Point extension, but the Klamath County extension as well.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 17, 1891, page 3


    Clarence Kellogg, of Medford, is now fireman on the R.R.V.R.R.
    Another use for asbestos which is the happy suggestion of the wonderful brain of a prominent Medford gentleman is for pater familias to provide himself a suit, and when the domestic horizon is overcast with threatening clouds, indicating the ceaseless downpour of feminine wrath, the happy possessor can don his asbestos suit and sit in cool content until the heat of the storm rolls by, and the temperature lowers sufficiently to allow him to resume the peaceful garb of domestic citizenship. Verily would Xanthippe have been undone had this happy thought been the blessed boon of buried ages.
RAILROAD MEETING AT EAGLE POINT
    An enthusiastic mass meeting was held at Eagle Point last Thursday, for the purpose of raising a $12,000 cash bonus to extend the R.R.V.R.R. to Eagle Point. Messrs. Honeyman, Buchanan and Graham of the R.R.V.R.R. were present, and Messrs. Geary, Pickel, Howard and Webb, of Medford, represented that place. Enthusiastic speeches were made by Messrs. Fitch, Graham, Brown and Howard, and at the close of the meeting $1000 was subscribed in the room. The company will send out a party headed by surveyor Howard to locate the most practicable pass across the Cascade Mountains, looking to an eastern extension. The proposed extension will soon materialize, as "the people have a mind to work" in the matter.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 17, 1891, page 2


    Perhaps I had better correct the statement of my last week's letter and, instead of two carloads, amend by saying 200 carloads as the probable surplus of apples from this locality, and we might add to this statement the prospect of 20 carloads each of hay and grain, also 100 carloads locomotive wood and 20 to 30 carloads of fruit boxes this season. When all this is summed up, without a depot or shipping facilities, what might not be expected of this place if the railroad company did its part and provided these accommodations.

"Talent Items," Ashland Tidings, July 17, 1891, page 2



Officers Installed, I.O.O.F.
    The following officers of Medford lodge I.O.O.F. were installed last week by D.D.G.M. Morris: T. W. Johnson, N.G.; Chas. Strang, V.G.; D. S. Youngs, Sec.; I. A. Webb, P.S.; H. G. Nicholson, Treas.; A. C. Nicholson, W.; E. B. Pickel, C.; B. F. Adkins, R.S. to N.G.; S. B. McGee, L.S. to N.G.; R. T. Young, R.S.S.; I. A. Merriman, L.S.S.; S. Rosenthal, R.S. to V.G.; W. P. H. Legate, L.S. to V.G.; I. Woolf, I.G.: L. M. Lyon, O.G.
Ashland Tidings, July 17, 1891, page 2


Exchange! Exchange!
    With farmers and merchants in any amount from one bushel to one thousand bushels at the Medford Roller Mills.
A. A. DAVIS.       
Medford, July 18, 1891.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Since being newly painted, the distillery building looms up larger than ever.
    Charles Delashmutt has accepted a position in the machine shops at East Portland.
    Case, the eastern Oregon photographer, will open a gallery in Medford in a short time.
    The Medford flouring mills had a granary addition, 24x60 feet, two stories in height, erected last week.
    Surveyor J. S. Howard was engaged in doing some surveying at the Gold Hill mines of Dr. Braden last week.
    Fishing parties from this place to the river and the numerous trout streams in the foothills are of frequent occurrence.
    Mrs. A. A. Davis and son were last week summoned to Albert Lea, Minn., to the bedside of Mrs. D.'s mother, who was very ill at that place.
    Work on the new packing house has been progressing rapidly during the last week, and it will not be long until it will be ready for business.
    Dr. Geary last week performed the extremely delicate operation of taking several stitches in the corner of the eye of a little child, five years old, of Mr. Red of Grants Pass.
    Hon. Willard Crawford last week presented the R.R.V.R.R. company with a half ton of coal from his mine near here, to be tested [in] the company's engine. The coal is of excellent quality.
    The citizens of Medford were much gratified at the victory of the local club in the baseball game played last Saturday, but duly appreciated the gentlemanly behavior and fair play of the Grants Pass boys.
    Should operations be begun at an early date on the Eagle Point extension of the R.R.V.R.R. it will be necessary for the construction boss, Mr. Albury, to remove to Medford as his headquarters, and he has secured property here with that object in view.
    It is thought that when another season rolls round, there will be no lack of a market for the surplus of small peaches in the valley, as the distillery will be able to use them all in the manufacture of preach brandy, for which there is a lively demand in the East. The present season, the break in the market so far as early fruit is concerned, has been rather discouraging to our growers, but many will obviate the trouble another season by grafting to late varieties, as so many have already done at Ashland and vicinity.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3


Baseball.
    The game of baseball at Medford last Saturday was too one-sided to be called interesting from a sporting point of view, and yet there was such good nature displayed on all sides, and the visiting club from Grants Pass took their defeat with such equanimity, that those who witnessed the game was not sorry they attended. A return game is not improbable, as the boys from down the road were fully aware that practice is all they need to make them the equals of any club in the western part of the state. The Medford nine was assisted by Wm. Miller, K. Kubli, Jr., and Geo. Neil of Jacksonville, and the combination made a very strong nine. ______________ of Grants Pass umpired the game. The following is the score by innings:
Innings            1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9
Medford         2    1    6    4    0    0  13    2    *    --28
Grants Pass    1    0    2    0    2    0    2    1    0    --  8
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3


    The festive watermelon will soon be in our midst; we yearn to receive it here.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3


To Be Surveyed at Once.
    General superintendent Graham of the R.R.V.R.R. has been in the valley for several days past for the purpose of getting the prospective survey of the extension for the road from the terminus of the present survey at Eagle Point to the Klamath country under way. J. S. Howard of Medford will have charge of the party in the field and it is the present intention, if a suitable route can be found, to follow up Butte Creek from Eagle Point to a location above Brownsboro, where it will be necessary to make the bench land elevation or plateau which extends to the north of Mount Pitt, and thence to the lower divide which crosses the Cascades between the Dead Indian and Rogue River wagon roads. Once the elevation of the foothill plateau is attained, there will be no trouble whatever about crossing the Cascades, as there is quite a uniform grade around and over the divides. The through route will also be carefully looked out from Medford direct to Brownsboro, and the company will carefully estimate the cost of construction before determining definitely which route to follow. Either will open up a vast body of fruit land and foothill country that has heretofore been unavailable, on account of the lack of transportation facilities. It is thought the Eagle Point route will be selected eventually, although it will depend somewhat on the comparative ease of securing right of way and the asked-for bonus. We trust that our neighbors over in that section will take warning from the example of the county seat in being too dilatory once upon a time and thereby avoid sacrificing their chances for eventually becoming one of the manufacturing centers of Oregon, which we verily believe will be the result of making the place the railroad terminus of the first proposed extension. Right now is the time to act, and clinch a contract with the railroad company. The immediate enhancement of values will be tenfold the amount of the bonus asked for by the projectors of the enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 24, 1891, page 3


    The following teachers have been chosen for the Medford public school for the coming year: Prof. N. L. Narregan, principal; Prof. N. A. Jacobs, first assistant; Miss Mary Theiss, intermediate department; Miss Della Pickel, preparatory department; Miss Carrie Sackett, primary department. One is yet to be elected.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 1


    The R.R.V.R.R. ran an excursion train to Medford last Saturday afternoon, to accommodate those who desired to see the baseball game between Grants Pass and Medford at that place. A large number availed themselves of the opportunity and, aside from the interest of the national game, all had a pleasant time.
    W. L. Miller, of the Medford Mail, flitted southward last Sunday morning, leaving his friends in blissful uncertainty as to his final destination, presumably San Jose, Cal. He will enjoy a two weeks' vacation and return brim full of newsy items for the Mail, and fully caparisoned to lead the winning game in the baseball contest between Grants Pass and Jacksonville, which is the next on the list.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 2


Baseball Game.
    Jackson and Josephine counties met in the baseball field at Medford last Saturday afternoon--a picked nine of Jacksonville and Medford boys being pitted against the Grants Pass club. Will Miller was pitcher and Kap Kubli catcher of the Jackson nine. The score stood 28 to 8 in favor of Jackson. Mr. E. A. Boalich, of Grants Pass, was the umpire. A return game will be played in Jacksonville soon.
Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 3


    The Medford Mail has a new dress of brevier type, and shows other evidences of prosperity and improvement under its present management.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 3


    Mrs. C. K. Fronk, of Medford, known to many friends in Ashland as Miss Mollie Merriman during her school days here, was in Ashland last Monday with her little daughter.
    Judge Chas. Walker, formerly of Medford, is now in the real estate business at Cottage Grove, Lane County, with W. P. Lockwood, the firm name being Lockwood & Walker.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 24, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Sells Bros.' show is due at Medford on the 24th prox.
    The thermometer registered 108 degrees in the shade one day last week.
    A number of fields of barley have turned off 50 bushels and upward to the acre in this vicinity.
    R. T. Young and family last week left for San Jose, Cal., their future home. Success to them.
    The Durand Organ and Piano Company of Portland talks of establishing a branch house at Medford.
    The foundation of the new schoolhouse is completed and the superstructure will soon assume proportions.
    Rev. M. C. Aleridge and family last week removed to Brownsville, Linn County, for permanent residence.
    The M.E. Church boasts of one of the sweetest-toned bells in the county, received last week from Portland.
    Coker & Miller's threshing machine has begun the season with a fine run at Arthur Wilson's place near Medford.
    Work is rapidly progressing on the S.O. Pork Packing Co.'s buildings. The main one is looming up and already presents an imposing appearance.
    Judge Chas. Walker, erstwhile of this precinct, is now associated in real estate business with W. P. Lockwood at Cottage Grove, Lane County.
    Messrs. G. W. Howard, Adkins, Pickel, Hutchison and Enyart, accompanied by their families and Mrs. Jesse Enyart, have been camping at McAllister's Soda Springs on Butte Creek during the past week.
    H. C. Lewis, who is engaged in the manufacture of lumber near Drain, Douglas County, is paying this place his first visit in six months. He may return to this valley, to permanently engage in business, in a short time.
    J. E. Enyart had a narrow escape from a serious accident one day this week. He was driving his spirited horse, when the single tree broke and the animal commenced kicking and running at the same time. In jumping from the buggy Mr. Enyart wrenched one of his ankles, but fortunately escaped serious injury. The harness and vehicle were more or less damaged.
    Medynski & Theiss, the distillery men, have been very busy during the week with their elevator building, that is now about ready for the reception of grain, and which will enable them to begin operating the plant about the 15th of September next. This business venture will prove of vast benefit to the valley in many respects, and not the least will be the fact that it will be the means of giving employment to many men who would otherwise be idle. Work for the laboring man is what brings true prosperity in the long run.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    S. G. Wortman to Elizabeth Wortman; lots 14, 15 and 16, block 78, Medford; $1.
Excerpt, 
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891, page 2


DIED.
WHITMAN--In Medford precinct, July 28, 1891, Mary A., wife of Hon. J. D. Whitman; aged 68 years, 4 months and 8 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891, page 2


G. B. Cole, M.D.                           W. S. Jones, M.D.
COLE & JONES,
P H Y S I C I A N S   A N D   S U R G E O N S,
Medford, Oregon.
Special attention paid to chronic diseases and diseases of women.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891 et seq., page 2


    The roads were never so dusty before.
    Fires are burning in the hills northwest of town.
    The atmosphere is becoming smoky at a rapid rate, and it seems as if mountain fires will be as numerous as ever this summer.
    Slides still obstruct the railroad through the Cow Creek canyon. Huge heaps of dirt and rock have occasionally fallen on the track during the past few weeks and delay trains more or less.
    Cox's steam thresher has been busy in this precinct during the past week, and the grain will soon be rolling into market, the yield being fully up to expectations in most sections.
    Southern Oregon will have a surfeit in the circus line, as both Forepaugh and Sells Bros. intend visiting us this season. The latter will be here in August and the other about a month later.
    The railroad company now attaches fruit cars to the passenger trains as they pass through the valley, thus giving the benefit of fast freight transportation to the dwellers in Oregon as well as to those of California.
    The carload rate on fruit by the fast freight from this valley to Portland is 45c per hundred, as against $1 per hundred by express in small lots. The large shipper thus has every material advantage over his smaller cotemporary.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891, page 3


    Hammond & Briggs intend opening a law office at Medford soon, we learn. The first-named will be in charge of the branch, Col. Briggs looking after the Ashland business.
    Attention is called to the professional card of Doctors Cole & Jones, who have formed a partnership at Medford for the practice of their profession. Both are first-class physicians and will no doubt build up an extensive practice.
    We very much regret to announce the death of the estimable wife of Hon. J. D. Whitman. The services took place in the Episcopal Church at Medford yesterday, after which the remains were taken to the Jacksonville Cemetery for interment. Mrs. W. was a lady of many virtues and rare attainments, greatly esteemed by all who knew her. We hope to give an extended obituary notice in the next issue of the Times.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 31, 1891, page 3


ANNUAL JURY LIST
    The following is the jury list selected from the assessment roll of Jackson County, by the County Court [of Commissioners], on the 8th day of July, 1891. Said list contains the names of 200 persons who shall serve as grand and trial jurors for the term of one year.
NAME, RESIDENCE, OCCUPATION
Chas. Arnold, Medford, Farmer
Wm. Angle, Medford, Merchant
J. Brandenburg, Medford, Carpenter
W. G. Cooper, Medford, Farmer
James Carr, Medford, Farmer
W. G. Cooper, Medford, Saddler
John W. Curry, Medford, Clerk
C. A. Damon, Medford, Painter
Samuel Earhart, Medford, Farmer
J. H. Faris, Medford, Hotel Keeper
J. W. Harvey, Medford, Farmer
R. H. Halley, Medford, Turner
W. R. Jones, Medford, Farmer
A. G. Johnson, Medford, Farmer
E. G. Montague, Medford, Laborer
D. H. Miller, Medford, Laborer
Milton Maule, Medford, Painter
George F. Merriman, Medford, Blacksmith
Excerpt, Ashland Tidings, July 31, 1891, page 2


    M. H. Huff has bought the Coker livery stable in Medford.
    The Coker and Miller threshing machine began work Monday at Arthur Wilson's place near Medford.
    The foundation of the new school house at Medford is completed, and the wood work was begun this week.
    Hammond & Briggs will open a law office in Medford, Mr. Hammond to be at that place and Mr. Briggs to remain in Ashland.
    The Medford distillery people talk of working up the small peaches of next year's crop into peach brandy. This will make a market for culls which are usually a dead loss.
    About sixty people from Jacksonville and Medford made an excursion to Colestin last Sunday, among them being many of the prominent citizens, old and young, of the two towns.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 31, 1891, page 3


    The Medford Mail reports the heat 108 in the shade at that place on Wednesday of last week.
    The new distillery at Medford is expected to begin business about Sept. 1st by using 500 bushels of grain a day.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, July 31, 1891, page 3


    R. T. Young and family, of Medford, have moved to San Jose, Cal.
    Will Q. Brown, of Riddle, was in the valley again last Friday and Saturday, making geological observations for the government [U.S. Geological Survey] in the region east of Bear Creek between Ashland and Medford.
    A number of Medford people are camped at the McAllister Soda Springs on Butte Creek, among them being Messrs. G. W. Howard, B. F. Adkins, C. I. Hutchison, Dr. Pickel, Mr. Enyart and families, Roberts & O'Neil, Ed. Phipps, Bert Brandenburg, U. S. Damon, Frank McBride.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, July 31, 1891, page 3


    Attention is once more called to the fact that Grants Pass, Medford and Ashland last year shipped more fruit than all the Willamette Valley combined. Three hundred thousand pounds went from the Pass alone, this station standing next to Salem on the list of fruit shipping stations in the state. The present year it is thought the shipments will be almost doubled from all stations in southern Oregon.

"Josephine County Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3



Democratic Times, August 7, 1891, page 2

An Avalanche of Wonder and Fun.
    Sells' great show is blocked for Medford on Monday, August 24, and, regarded as a whole, it is doubtless without parallel. Wherein it differs from others is this: In its rare variety, its endless interest, its boundless capacity to please every taste. Good things with it are not doled out with a grudging hand; they are poured forth in a Niagara-like profusion, typical of the great country of greatest enterprises. Here we have a regal Roman hippodrome, a five-continent menagerie, three big circuses, a wild Moorish caravan, performing droves of wild and domestic beasts, a huge tropical aquarium, aviary, royal Japanese troupe, Arabian Nights entertainment, spectacular pilgrimage to Mecca, and splendid free street parade, rolled into one tremendous alliance, for but one price of admission; or more properly speaking, roaring, rushing, racing, marching, dancing, gliding, tumbling, soaring, diving and disporting under some ten acres of tents. Whew! The very thought of it fairly makes one catch his breath, and not only is it all a very great, but it is a very good, clean, admirably managed show, under the immediate eye of its proprietors, and free from any and every annoyance or objectionable association.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


Wending Its Way.
    The codling moth has at last made its appearance in the Applegate section, and the orchardmen there will have to begin spraying another year to combat the foe. There are as yet but few indications of its presence, but enough to show that it has effected a lodgment, much to the disgust of those who hoped it would not for years pass over the high divides. In the Illinois Valley the pest has heretofore been entirely unknown, and it is thought it will be some time before it reaches there; but eternal vigilance will have to be practiced everywhere before many years roll by, else we will have wormy apples like the eastern states.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


    A few melons have made their appearance, but the crop will not commence to move in earnest for a fortnight.
    For a few days this season the bathing has been fine in Rogue River; but with the return of cool nights the water has again become so cold as to keep even the small boy out of the swim.
    A horse was struck by the cowcatcher on McCarthy's engine in a field near Phoenix one day last week and knocked end over appetite, but jumped up and ran off as if nothing was the matter with him.
    Sells Bros.' show is said to have headed off Forepaugh in his contemplated raid through this section and northern California, and the latter will only exhibit at Portland in Oregon, after going to the Sound cities.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


    A. S. Jacobs and his son Newt were in Jacksonville on Saturday.
    D. W. Albury, foreman of the R.R.V.R.R. Co.'s force, has removed to Medford, as also have the men under them.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


    Rev. Father Noel of Roseburg visited several of his former charges in this section during the week, in company with Father Watry of this place.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The packing house is about ready for business.
    Roseburg wants a game of baseball with the Jackson County team, and should by all means be accommodated.
    A fair yield is reported by the threshers everywhere, and it is evident we are to have one of the best grain crops for years.
    Dr. Pickel is doing as well as could be expected since killing his first deer at McAllister's Springs one day last week. It was a fine one.
    Geo. R. Young, who recently bought the Montague property in this place, will remove his family thither from Oakland, Cal. about the first of October next.
    Thos. Curry of Table Rock precinct has put in a fish trap for the purpose of supplying the citizens of Medford with fish during the remainder of the summer.
    Davis & Huff have dissolved partnership, Mr. Davis continuing the business at the old stand. Mr. Huff will hereafter devote his attention to the livery business exclusively.
    C. A. Dickison and family have returned to Medford after an absence of several months down in California, where Mr. D. was employed in the W. P. Hammond nursery.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


IN MEMORIAM.
MARY A. WHITMAN.
    Mary A. Whitman, who died at her residence near Medford, July 28, 1891, was born at Leek, Berkshire County, Mass., March 20, 1823, and was married at Winsted, Conn., November 25, 1851, to Hon. John D. Whitman of Medford, who survives her. She resided at the town of her birth until 1858, when she removed with the family to Dallas County, Iowa, settling about twenty miles northwest of Des Moines, on the then-wild and almost unbroken prairie, with no neighbors nearer than one mile distant from her home and few human habitations in sight, though the eye could survey the country for many miles in all directions. With the exception of about eighteen months' residence in the city of Des Moines during the years 1863 and 1864 Mrs. W. continuously resided in Dallas County until she removed to this county in September, 1885, a period of more than 27 years. She was the mother of six children, three sons and three daughters, all of whom, excepting two sons, have preceded her to that bourne from whence none return. In early childhood she united with the M.E. church, and until her death remained a faithful and consistent member of that denomination. Her parents were also most exemplary members of that church, and the Christian spirit taught her in youth seemed to govern every act of her life. Always a true and affectionate wife and mother, ever and always kind and considerate of the feelings of others, never harshly condemning, and never at all until every palliating circumstance was carefully and thoughtfully considered. In all her relations of life she fairly represented the true Christian graces, faith, hope and charity. Never could it be more truly said that she died beloved by all who knew her.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
TOEPPER-COUNTS--In Medford, August 1, 1891, by Geo. S. Walton, J.P., John Toepper of Jacksonville and Mrs. Anna Counts, late of Drain, Douglas County.
    [We extend heartiest congratulations to our worthy townsman and bride, and trust that their voyage down life's stream may continue in peace and prosperity. It is not good for man to live alone, and it is another evidence of friend Toepper's good sense that he has secured a helpmate to share his pleasant home.]
BORN.
GAINES--At Medford, July 26, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Gaines, a daughter.
LEWELLYN--At Medford, July 26, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. Charles Lewellyn, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 7, 1891, page 3


SHOT HIMSELF.
A Rejected Lover Blows the Top of His Head Off.
    ASHLAND (Oregon), Aug. 10.--W. T. Pine, who has been running the American Restaurant near the Ashland depot for a short time, committed suicide at Medford this morning by shooting himself in the head with a pistol. Coroner Parson went to Medford on receipt of the news this morning. Pine has worked at different hotels along the line of the railroad as a cook, and he became infatuated with a waiter-girl, who did not seem to reciprocate his love. He left Ashland on the train last evening for Medford, where the girl's parents reside and where she has been lately. The girl still refused to accept his proposal, and Pine placed the muzzle of a pistol in his mouth and blew the top of his head off. Pine was about 30 years of age, and has been drinking heavily for several months past to drown his troubles, as he said.
San Francisco Call, August 11, 1891, page 8


    William Pine, an Ashland, Or. restaurant keeper, shot and killed himself Monday at Medford. He was in love with Miss Armstrong, of that place, and called on her and threatened if she would not marry him to kill her and himself. The girl's mother got her out of the house, and Pine then sat on a bed and blew the top of his head off.

"General News Notes," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, August 12, 1891, page 4



Suicide.
    W. T. Pine, who has been engaged in the restaurant business at Ashland for some time past, committed suicide at the residence of Marcus Armstrong in Medford last Monday morning. It seems that the deceased had become infatuated with Mr. A.'s eldest daughter, who was in his employ, but who did not reciprocate his love. He was in a state of intoxication the day before and brooding over his troubles. When he went to the residence of the girls' parents, and found that she did not wish to have anything to do with him, he placed a pistol in his mouth, pulled the trigger and was soon in that bourne from whence no traveler returns. Dr. Parson, county coroner, was summoned and held an inquest, and a verdict of suicide was returned. Pine was a newcomer and comparatively little is known of his antecedents. He was about 30 years of age.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


Medford Distillery.
    The Medford Distillery and Refining Company, F. V. Medynski and B. P. Theiss, who have lately completed a distillery at Medford, Jackson County, have filed the necessary papers with Col. Weidler, collector of internal revenue, and will be ready to begin business about September 1. They have one still of a capacity of 2000 gallons and another of a capacity of 8000 gallons. They will start up by using 250 bushels of grain per day, which will make about 1000 gallons of spirits. They will make high wines, cologne spirits, alcohol and whisky. They will add to the capacity of the plant next year, but will go slow this season on account of scarcity of corn in that section, as they intend to use considerable corn.--[Oregonian.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Wheeler, manager of Mitchell & Lewis Co.'s business at Medford, made us a pleasant visit yesterday.
    Several of the parties interested in the R.R.V.R.R. arrived from Portland a few days ago, and it seems probable that the road will be extended to Eagle Point in the near future. It would be a great benefit to the section that the road would touch.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


    T. S. Porter, agent for McBride & Case, the Medford photographers, spent a day in Jacksonville this week. The firm is doing first-class work.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


The Greatest of All
    Of Sells Brothers' enormous united shows which are to exhibit at Medford on Monday, Aug. 24th, it may be truly said that "age cannot wither nor custom pall their infinite variety." Thus, the twentieth year of their vastly progressive existence, they come to us with an array of sensations, spectacles, performances and living wonders from every clime, simply bewildering. In fact there is scarcely room to mention separate departments, let alone the hundreds of features that go to make of each a great and amazing show. Besides every notable variety of rare wild beasts, including the tremendous pair of living hippopotami, every act possible to human nerve, agility, and ingenuity and brute sagacity, the excitement of the thrilling hippodrome races, the rare, specially exhibited features, and the ravishing dancing of the great Spanish artiste, Cyrene, there is to be considered the wild Moorish Caravan, introducing the most wondrous feats of barbaric agility and superbly armed and equipped in [a] grand, novel and romantic spectacular pilgrimage to Mecca. From performing mammoth or huge disporting amphibia to [the] daintiest detail there is nothing inferior or commonplace about this extraordinarily rich and attractive alliance. It possesses every feature, feat and display, of both home and foreign origin, in keeping with such an entertainment that can be produced, and many nowhere else to be seen. Its morning glorious street parade is a free introduction to a holiday none should miss.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Pritchard, watchmaker and jeweler, Medford.
    J. H. Whitman and family have removed to the residence of Hon. J. D. Whitman.
    Wm. Ulrich, the live insurance agent, has gone to Lakeview in the interests of the Farmers and Merchants Ins. Co. He was accompanied by Mr. Theiss.
    A moonlight sociable will be given near the city water tank tomorrow (Saturday) evening by the Y.W.C.T.U. and E.L. All are respectfully invited to attend.
    Mitchell & Lewis Co. are receiving new goods continually and will soon be in receipt of a carload of fine wagons and buggies, etc. They keep only the best and sell at reasonable rates.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


    The Tidings reporter who last week spoke of the engine on which Rochford was killed as 237 should have said No. 240. "237" is Barnum's engine.
    Elsewhere in this issue will be found an advertisement calling for tenders for the building of a residence for A. W. Salmon, Esq., of Victoria, B.C.. Mr. Salmon was visiting the Rogue River Valley a short time ago and was so well pleased with the country that it is understood he has purchased the Coker place east of Medford 3 or 4 miles and will build a nice residence upon it. The place is situated on what is called the Coker Butte, has a nice orchard, and is credited with being one of the sightliest places in the country.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1891, page 3


    The Medford distillery and refining company, Messrs. F. V. Medynski and B. P. Theiss, who have lately completed a distillery at Medford, Jackson county, have filed the necessary papers with Col. Wiedler collector of internal revenue, and will be ready to begin business about September 1. They have one still of a capacity of 2000 gallons and another of a capacity of 8000 gallons. They will start up by using 250 bushels of grain per day, which will make about 1000 gallons of spirits.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1891, page 3


LOVE AND WHISKEY
    Monday morning about 6:30 o'clock W. T. Pine, who has been running the American Restaurant near the Ashland depot for a few weeks, committed suicide by shooting himself in the mouth while at the house of Mark Armstrong in Medford, Pine having gone down there from here on Sunday evening's train. Coroner Parsons was notified and at once started for Medford to hold an inquest. A jury was soon empaneled, several witnesses examined, and after due deliberation the coroner's jury rendered the following verdict.
    We do find that the deceased was named W. T. Pine, was a native of New York state, aged 27 years, and that he came to his death voluntarily and with his own hand from a gunshot wound in the mouth and that he died instantly.
            C. M. HARVEY,
            J. F. FRYER,
            GEO. W. COULTER,
            JAS. R. HOWARD,
            I. A. MERRIMAN,
            E. WORMAN.
    From the evidence brought out at the coroner's inquest, and from other circumstances known to different people on the outside, it is plainly shown that love and whiskey were the causes that led Pine to take his own life, and it is generally believed that if he had carried out his intentions as he had planned, he would also have ended the life of the unfortunate object of his misplaced affections, Miss Josey Armstrong, whom Pine has been desperately infatuated with for several months, but who has steadily refused to marry him as he desired.
    Pine left Ashland for Medford on Sunday evening's train. He went up to the Armstrong home there and wanted Josey to go to Ashland that evening with him in a buggy, it having been agreed between the parties that she should go to Ashland to work for Pine at his restaurant. Pine was so drunk though that he could scarcely stand and Mrs. Armstrong refused to allow her daughter to go on the morning train. He left the house and did not return until 5 o'clock next morning, when he came and knocked at the door and asked to be admitted. Mrs. Armstrong let him into the house and in spite of her remonstrance he went straight to the room where the girls, Josey and her sister, were asleep, and sat down in a chair by the side of the bed. He wakened the girls, who asked him to get out of the room so they could get up, as they were afraid of him. By this time it was only a few minutes until 6:30 o'clock. He refused to go out, telling the girls they could lie in bed "until half past six." They ran out of the room, leaving him there. Shortly a shot was heard. Pine had placed the muzzle of a pistol in his mouth, and killed himself instantly. Coroner Parsons was notified at once and held an inquest, Dr. R.
Pryce being the examining physician. Pine's body was buried with little ceremony at Medford.
    Pine came to Ashland about a month ago and started up at the American Restaurant near the depot, renting the building from R. T. Mellus, and the furniture, etc., from Leabo & Smith. He received considerable patronage, but drank heavily, and was owing several grocery bills in town at the time of his death. Previous to coming to Ashland Pine worked in the Grand Central and Clarendon hotels at Medford, and it was at the latter place he became acquainted with the Armstrong girl, who was working as a waiter girl there at the same time. From that time he was "crazy" after her and seemingly did not get over his craziness until he cured it with the pistol shot last Monday morning. He has a brother in San Francisco and several relatives in different places, it is said.
Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1891, page 3


MARRIED.
TOEPPER-COUNTS.--In Medford, Aug. 1, 1891, by Geo. S. Walton, J.P., John Toepper to Mrs. Anna Counts, late of Drain, Douglas County.
Ashland Tidings, August 14, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    If you want pure, fresh candy, call on Maxcy.
    E. Hammond is visiting in Yolo County, Cal., and will locate there soon.
    A. C. Tayler has opened a shoe shop in Medford, opposite the post office.
    Mrs. O. H. Slocum has returned home to Iowa after a pleasant visit with her father, F. Hubbard of Medford.
    C. O. Damon accompanied his family to Drain station one day last week, where his better half will visit her parents during the next few weeks.
    Maxcy is manufacturing a superior article of candy, which has become deservedly popular. He also keeps ice cream, soda water, etc., and is building up a nice business.
    One of the most complete grocery and provision stores in southern Oregon is kept by Geo. L. Davis. He has a large stock of the best goods and never fails to please, for his prices are most reasonable.
    A social party took place at the opera house last Saturday evening, which was well attended. Excellent music was furnished by Prof. Walker and a gentleman who handled the guitar deftly. Several couples from Jacksonville also participated.
    Medynski & Theiss expect before another season to be able to work up the surplus crop of small peaches in this valley into peach brandy at the distillery, thus affording a market at home for what would otherwise prove worse than a total loss, by begetting a tendency to glut the foreign market with small fruit.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 2


Sells Bros.' 20th Annual Tour.
    Other shows may come and go, but Sells Brothers' Enormous United Exhibitions, like Tennyson's brook, seem destined to "go on forever." They have already been under one and the same ownership and management longer than any other similar enterprise now in existence, and their continual increase in size, attractiveness and popularity is a fair sign of health and longevity. Messrs. Sells are legitimate, enterprising showmen and honorable men, with whom it is both pleasurable and profitable to do business. As such, both they and their stupendous and elegant entertainment will be again and most heartily welcome at Medford on Monday next. For their present tour there are wild beasts, hippodromatic circus spectacular, and other resources of instruction and amusement have been largely increased, and they undoubtedly present altogether the biggest and best show of its kind in the world. They manage it in person, and it is so conducted as to deserve and obtain universal popularity and patronage.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Iradell J. Phipps to Maggie Caldwell; lot 6, block 24, Medford; $175.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 2


Rogue River Valley Apples.
    The Earl Fruit Company of California has already contracted to have over 6,000 boxes of Rogue River winter apples labeled with their brand next fall, having so far bought only in the northern and southern portions. Getty, their agent and solicitor, announces it to be the intention to buy at least 10,000 boxes of the choicest fruit that this section produces during the season. At the solicitation of our fruit growers and because of the reputation which our apples have made in the markets of the world, they have concluded to brand their shipments this season "Oregon Apples," in place of "Mountain Apples," as heretofore.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


    Sells Bros.' second advertising car was here during the week renewing posters, etc.
    Look out for the sure-thing gamblers, thieves, etc., which always follow in the wake of a circus.
    The usual number of fools will be in Medford Monday who think they can beat the circus men at their own games. Some men will not even learn by experience.
    E. K. Anderson expects his peach crop to bring him not less than $4,000 in hard cash this season and will besides ship about five carloads of prunes and pears and at least twenty carloads of apples before the season closes. Who says that fruit raising does not pay?
    All of the exchanges along the line of march of the circus have been systematically warning the public to beware of the brace games and sure snaps of the fakirs who accompany such aggregations of wonders, and our own citizens would do well to heed the warning. There is not one among the fakirs but understands how to gull the average citizen, and if the a.c. could only be made to see this fact with the appalling distinctness that the fakir sees it, the occupation of the latter would be gone.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


    Sixty-five cents a bushel has been paid for wheat during the past week, but much more has been sold at 60 cents.
    J. R. Hardin, late of Umatilla County, a nephew of C. C. Gall of Sams Valley, has removed to Medford to make his future home.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


    H. B. Reed has again become a resident of Portland.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


Trains on Circus Day.
    The R.R.V.R. Co. will run trains to Medford next Monday, the 24th, as often as necessary for the accommodation of the people, and a special train will be run after night for the convenience of those who may desire to remain for the evening performance.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


BORN.
JONES--At Medford, Aug. 9, 1891, to Dr. and Mrs. W. S. Jones, a daughter.
MARRIED.
SIMPKINS-WRISLEY--At the residence of the officiating minister, Aug. 12, 1891, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Philip L. Simpkins and Miss Myra E. Wrisley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1891, page 3


    Messrs. Buchanan & Graham, of the R.R.V.R.R., came up on a special train from Medford Tuesday. They have just returned from a trip east of the mountains, where they have been looking for a practical railroad route over the Cascade Mountains. They will leave Jacksonville today for Cinnabar, where they will also canvass railroad possibilities in the future.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 21, 1891, page 2


Pine Had Left a Wife and Children.
    Postmaster Hammond received a letter last Tuesday morning from Mrs. Conville Pine, of Houlton, Columbia County, Ore., who says that her husband, Chas. Pine, had left her and their two little children at that place about two years ago, and had gone to Napa City, Cal., and thence to Dunsmuir, after which she had been unable to hear from him. Seeing an account of the suicide of W. T. Pine at Medford, she thought it likely that he was her husband. Accordingly, she wrote to ascertain, and gave a full description of her husband, the description corresponding exactly with the appearance of W. T. Pine, and leaving no doubt that he was the man. The lady writes a very straightforward, clear and sensitive letter, and tells a story which does not reflect much credit upon the recreant husband. He left her and the children in a destitute condition, and never afterward contributed a cent to their support, and then made a maudlin effort to induce a young lady at Medford to marry him. No wonder he was tired of himself and sought refuge in suicide.
Ashland Tidings, August 21, 1891, page 3


    A. C. Tayler has opened a shoe shop in Medford.
    C. H. Dunham is buying wheat for Angle & Plymale, of Medford, who are shipping to the San Francisco market. He has bought several carloads in the Talent neighborhood for 60 cents per bushel.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, August 21, 1891, page 3


    Asa Fordyce, of Medford, was in town last Saturday, bringing a load of bacon and lard, for which he reported a very dull market.
    John B. Wrisley, of Medford, came up last Monday, and intends to come up again soon, to try the benefits of the Tolman Springs for rheumatism.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 21, 1891, page 3


    The Coker & Miller thresher recently made three settings and turned out 1,180 bushels of grain in half a day at the Roberts & O'Neil ranch.
    J. E. Tipton, Jr., of Medford, went to Portland to ship as cabin boy on the U.S. vessel Charleston before the departure of that ship for Chinese waters.
    Mrs. H. B. Stanley of Medford has been at San Francisco in the hope of effecting a cure for the lameness from which she has been suffering for two years past.
    By shrewd manipulation of the special-rate problem in the railroad line, Sells Brothers outwitted Forepaugh's combination in the far West, resulting in the former circus getting exclusive privileges over the S.P. lines.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 1


    Viewed in the light of scenic display the mountain fires in the rear of Jacksonville during the past week have been a huge success, awe-inspiring and grand in the extreme, but somewhat saddening to anyone who delights in the beauty of nature clad in living green. Aside from any mere pecuniary consideration, there is something very depressing in the blackness and desolation that must result for years from the devastating flames. To those who take an interest in forestry and who have learned what importance attaches to the protection of the hillside covering, from climate consideration, it seems like a wanton waste of one of nature's best gifts to thus denude the everlasting hills of their robes of green. Carelessness in the handling of fire in the hills in the dry season is alone responsible for the destruction, and the disastrous results of the burning out of an old reservoir on the creek above town in the present instance should admonish all to greater care in the future.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 2


The Circus.
    Sells Bros.' circus exhibited at Medford on August 24th. Several thousand people attended the day performance, but the attendance at night was light. A number of new features were introduced, but it was "the same old thing" for the most part. Still, better satisfaction was given than is usually the case. Those in charge of the affair are courteous and honorable, which is too frequently the exception to the rule. Another noticeable feature was the absence of the sure-thing gamblers and sneak thieves, who have often been the adjunct of the modern circus. The only serious complaint we hear since Sells Bros. left is that they took away a few thousand dollars of the cash so badly needed in the valley.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. P. Greninger and family, lately of Central Point, are now residents of Medford.
    B. F. Crouch and family, late of Klamath County, have become residents of Medford.
    Mrs. E. J. Montague has been visiting relatives at Sisson, Cal., during the past week.
    A. E. Kellogg has erected a fruit drier at his ranch near town, with a capacity of 140 crates per day.
    The Medford roller mill is running day and night on new wheat and manufacturing superior flour.
    Angle & Plymale of Medford have shipped several carloads of wheat to the California market.
    Mrs. J. S. Munday of Fairhaven, Wash., has been visiting her sister, Mrs. L. L. Angle at Medford.
    Geo. Coulter, the painter, is at the county seat assisting W. C. Engledow in painting the courthouse.
    A carload of wheeled vehicles arrived last week for Mitchell & Lewis from their headquarters at Portland.
    Mrs. A. Z. Sears, accompanied by her mother, Mrs. E. W. Starr, left for Salem for a few days' visit one day recently.
    Mrs. Thompson of Eugene has been visiting her daughter, Mrs. Pritchard of this place, during the past week.
    Mrs. I. M. Harvey has been at Sacramento during the week, in attendance upon a family reunion at her old home.
    A. Conklin of Grants Pass last week had a model of his patent fruit drier made at [Miller's] hardware store in this place.
    M. Demmer, who purchased a portion of the Mingus addition to this place, is making a number of improvements thereon.
    A pleasant lawn social was held at the residence of Mrs. H. E. Baker on Wednesday evening last under the auspices of the W.C.T.U.
    Mrs. Dr. Demorest has been entertaining during the past week her sisters, Miss Nellie Haggard of Portland, and Mrs. Muir of Dallas, Or.
    Chas. Strang recently caught a fish over two feet long in Rogue River with a trolling spoon, and it wasn't an overly good day for fishing either.
    Mr. Lamb and family from Walla Walla, Wash., have been visiting the former's sister, Mrs. G. W. Howard, at this place during the past ten days.
    Clarence Kellogg has promoted himself from the position of fireman for the railroad company to that of engineer at the roller flouring mill on the night shift.
    Mrs. H. B. Monteith of Ashland has organized a music class at Medford, for the purpose of giving lessons and instructions on all the modern musical instruments.
    A large amount of freight for Medford and Jacksonville merchants has been received at this place during the past few weeks, sometimes as many as two or three carloads per day.
    H. B. Monteith is this week displaying at Miller's hardware emporium a model of his patented fruit drier, which is one of the most complete steam driers we have yet seen.
    Dr. Cole last week welcomed his son from LaSalle, Ill., who came out to herald the advent of the other members of the doctor's family, who have been detained at their former home through the illness of Mrs. Cole's mother.
    Geo. L. Davis, the popular groceryman, who had a narrow escape from serious injury to his hand in manipulating a beef-chipping machine, is almost well. One of his fingers was almost severed from his hand by slipping under the knife.
    A immense amount of wheat has been received at and shipped from Medford during the past two weeks. The price has been good as compared with recent years, and as the farmers appreciate the value of a home cash market, everybody is more than satisfied with the situation.
    G. W. Catching will this week complete the outside work on the new schoolhouse and will have it ready for occupancy in time for the fall term of school. The building is of a most substantial character, and will prove a great advertisement for the town for many years to come, as well as to the builder.
    Miss Eva Galloway, who passed an exceptionally good examination at the recent teachers' examination at the county seat, has been employed to teach the department in the Medford schools for which no teacher had heretofore been engaged. She will doubtless prove satisfactory in the highest degree to the patrons of the school.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 2


Worthy of Patronage.
    The photograph gallery of McBride & Case, which has recently been opened in Medford, is indeed worthy of patronage. The work done by these gentlemen is of the very best quality, as many specimens in the gallery will attest. They make a specialty of enlarging pictures, and citizens should not patronize any transient rustler for work of this kind. Theirs is equal to any done in large cities and far superior to much which is turned out. Photographs are at present being made at reduced rates, and parties should take advantage of them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891 et seq., page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    George W. Isaacs to Silas J. Day; undivided ½ of lot in lock 6, Galloway addition to Medford; $325.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 2


DIED.
MONTAGUE--Near Arlington, Or., July 26, 1891, Olive May, daughter of G. W. Montague and wife of Medford; aged 4 years, 5 months and 2 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 2


    The fellow Pine, who committed suicide at Medford one day recently, turns out to have been a married man from Columbia Co., who deserted a wife and two children some time ago. His wife writes to this section anything but a flattering account of the shortcomings of the man who thought he was killing himself all for love.
    Mrs. Peter Simon has promised to donate five acres of ground for terminal facilities to the extension of the R.R.V.R.R., whenever the road is completed to Butte Creek. Matthews Bros. will contribute an equal amount adjoining the Simon tract, and each will probably lay out a town plat in the vicinity of the proposed depot at Eagle Point.
    The English gentleman, A. W. Salmon, Esq., of Victoria, B.C., was last week called home by business requiring his immediate attention, and he will not know for some time to come whether or not he will be able to carry out his plans for establishing a home in this valley, although he holds options on a number of choice locations for palatial homes in the heart of the valley. He has not let the contract for a house to be built on the Coker premises east of Medford, that deal being as yet held in suspension.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 3


    The veteran J. B. Wrisley celebrated his 72d birthday one day last week. May he see many happy returns of the day.
    Geo. H. Andrews and wife of Portland were in Jacksonville on Wednesday. Mr. A. is land agent for the S.P. Co., and fills the position quite acceptably.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 3


    E. W. Hammond, the well-known botanist, has gone to Mount Shasta in the interests of science. His services are in demand by several scientific institutions at the East.
    Mr. Kellogg, who has been acting as fireman for the R.R.V.R.R., had one of his feet hurt last week by a forward wheel of the locomotive running over it. He has since resigned his position and is succeeded by a young man named Cole.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 28, 1891, page 3


    A. H. Maegly came up from Portland to visit his family, who are spending the summer here, and to look after his business interests in this part of the state.
    Clarence Kellogg, the foreman on the R.R.V.R.R., met with a painful accident last Friday afternoon. As the engine started to run down to the switch, in attempting to jump on he slipped and fell, the wheel passing over his right foot. He was taken to his parents' home at Medford that evening, and as some of the bones are broken and his foot badly crushed it will be some time before he is around again.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1891, page 2


Base Ball
    The Medford junior base ball nine having challenged the Ashland lads for a match game, they will cross bats on next Saturday afternoon at the depot grounds. The Ashland club is made up as follows: O. O. Helman c., Fred Houck p., Hum Pracht ss., Walter Frulan 1b., Oley Thornton 2b., Charley Loomis 3b., Gordie Frizelie lf., Otto Miller cf., Jack Sells rf., Praytor extra. The players composing the Medford club are as yet unknown to the Ashland boys, but they think they can "do 'em up," whoever they are.
Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1891, page 3


    D. L. Rice and Harry Casey rode down to Medford last Monday evening after supper to take in the circus, and Casey broke a wheel, and had to submit to a ride home on the cars.
    The circus had a big crowd at Medford last Monday, and the people were roasted, boiled or broiled, according to their position in the big tent. The lemonade boys became millionaires, and the vendors of palm-leaf fans did a business that made them as autocratic as an unrivaled railroad corporation. The train went over the Siskiyous in three sections, and there were fourteen engines in the Ashland yard Monday evening, including those waiting for the circus. The show was at Yreka Tuesday.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1891, page 3


    Page & Son have bought the peaches and tomatoes of J. H. Stewart, between Phoenix and Medford, and are shipping from his place this week.
"Fruit Items," Ashland Tidings, August 28, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Bob Faris spent a day at home with his parents recently.
    J. A. Whitman is still expressing a great deal of fruit from this depot.
    The Mail has changed its publication day to Saturday, instead of Thursday.
    Frank Tryer, who has been managing the Pendleton fence works, has returned home.
    H. F. Wood of Jacksonville has done excellent work at the photograph gallery during the week.
    The packing house building has been accepted by the company and will soon be ready for business.
    C. H. Pickens has removed his family to Medford to avail themselves of superior school facilities.
    Mrs. Frank Fehely of Crescent City, Cal. has been visiting her old home in this place during the past few weeks.
    J. S. Howard has turned over the W.,F.&Co.'s agency at this place to his son Charley, who is at home in this city.
    Ed. Worman, the popular proprietor of the Union livery stables, was at the county seat Wednesday on legal business.
    Mrs. W. I. Grinnel has returned to Portland after a pleasant visit with her parents, G. W. Galloway and wife of this city.
    Mrs. A. Merriman of this place has been entertaining her daughter, Mrs. J. C. Clark, and her children, of Washington, during [the] week.
    Miss Lou Gibson, the Postal telegraph operator, was taken sick last week, and her place in the office was temporarily filled by Chas. Delashmutt.
    A young man hired a team of Ed Worman a few days since and drove the horses so hard that they were almost ruined by the bad treatment. There is some talk of a prosecution.
    The distillery will commence business as soon as the bonds of Frank Galloway and J. A. Whiteside, the storekeeper and gauger, are approved at Washington and their commissions received here.
    Mrs. J. O. Johnson this week received the sad news that her father had been thrown from his buggy at Pacific Grove, Cal., and received fatal injuries. She left Medford for the scene of the accident Wednesday morning, accompanied by Mrs. Chas. Hall.
    The Medford public schools, which open next Monday, bid fair to prove among the best in southern Oregon, under the efficient tutelage of the teachers who will be in charge. Especially attention will be given to music, penmanship and drawing, in addition to the prescribed course of studies.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1891, page 2


Lacking in Judgment.
    Ed. Worman, the liveryman of Medford, came near saying goodbye to a team and vehicle in an unexpected manner last Tuesday evening, having hired it to a man giving his name as J. S. Gordon, who was a prominent sheepman (in his mind) having a large band of sheep awaiting shearing at the head of the river, and who (also in his mind) wanted to use the rig to haul a load of supplies to his camp from a Jacksonville store. He obtained the outfit, but foolishly confided his intention of getting away with it to an acquaintance at Medford, who informed Worman that he was about to be swindled out of his property. Worman used the wires and a messenger to such good effect that the sheriff and his deputy headed off the man at Wagner Creek as he was making for the California line. Gordon was given a preliminary hearing before Justice Plymale at this place on Wednesday afternoon and bound over in the sum of $500, to await the action of the grand jury on a charge of horse stealing. Barry, the witness, was also held to appear at the same time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1891, page 3


    George Coulter is acting as fireman for the R.R.V.R.R.
    I. E. Deboy has returned to Gold Hill, where he will follow his occupation of jeweler.
    Misses Chavner of Gold Hill recently bought a handsome phaeton of Mitchell & Lewis of Medford.
    Carloads of southern Oregon fruit, watermelons, etc., are finding their way into the northern markets, and are readily disposed of.
    George Engle of Ashland last week finished his first 2,000-cord contract for furnishing engine wood to the S.P. company, and is now engaged on his contract south of the summit, which calls for the same amount.
    Frank Galloway and J. A Whiteside have been appointed to take charge of the government interests in the Medford distillery. The former will act as storekeeper and the latter as gauger. Both are good appointments.
    Sells' circus train was a couple of hours late at Redding, Cal. The elephant, Jumbo, Jr., reached from his car above Delta and pulled out the coupling pin with his trunk, cutting the train in two, and the engine and part of the train ran twenty miles before anything was found to be wrong and had to go back, thus causing the delay.--[Shasta Courier.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1891, page 3


    Miss Rose Cardwell has removed to Medford, to take a position in the law office of Francis Fitch, Esq.
    The fires in the hills west of town have subsided to a great extent, but those a few miles further north are still burning fiercely.
    David Loring and family of Portland arrived in Jacksonville yesterday. Mr. L. has since returned home, but his wife will remain a while.
    Julius Goldsmith of Medford is paying the highest cash price for good pears, peaches and prunes. If you have any to sell don't fail to call on him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1891, page 3


Fun for the Boys
    While the large tank which held the big pair of hippopotami for the Sells Bros.' circus was being taken to the show grounds last Sunday, it mired down in front of Dr. Jones' place and the animals had to be liberated before the vehicle could be extricated from the mire. They sported in the water ditch for several moments and showed themselves off to an excellent advantage. With this and a ten-horse runaway, besides seeing a pair of elephants lift the tank from the mire, we can truly say the boys enjoyed it.--[Medford Mail.
Ashland Tidings, September 4, 1891, page 2


    Mrs. Peter Simon has promised to donate five acres of ground for terminal facilities to the extension of the R.R.V.R.R., whenever the road is completed to Butte Creek. Matthews Bros. will contribute an equal amount adjoining the Simon tract, and each will probably lay out a town plat in the vicinity of the proposed depot at Eagle Point.--[Times.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 4, 1891, page 3


    Mrs. J. C. Clark, a daughter of Mrs. A. Merriman of Medford, accompanied by her three children, arrived Wednesday morning on a visit. Mr. Clark has recently sold out his interest in Washington and is now looking up a location. He may conclude to locate in Jackson County, although at present he is looking at Douglas County.--[Mail.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 4, 1891, page 3


    The distillery at Medford will commence business as soon as the bonds of Frank Galloway and J. A. Whiteside, the storekeeper and gauger, are approved at Washington and their commissions received here.

"General News Notes," Evening Capital Journal, Salem, September 8, 1891, page 4



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    E. G. Salstrom and family of Prospect will remove to Medford soon.
    C. I. Hutchison has been succeeded by Supt. Graham as agent of the R.R.V.R. Co. at this place.
    Dr. Pryce has returned from his trip to Cinnabar, much improved in health. He was gone several weeks.
    Miss Ella Drake has been manipulating the lightning for the Postal Telegraph Company during the illness of Miss Gibson.
    The school directors of this district have invested in a large quantity of furniture, etc., which will arrive by the time the new schoolhouse is ready for occupancy.
    Miss Ida Redden left here last week to accept a position in the school of which her brother is in charge in California. She was tendered a surprise party before leaving.
    J. R. Evans has sold his interests in Medford and removed to Morrow County. He is a good, enterprising citizen, and we are sorry to lose him. However, we wish him unbounded prosperity in his new home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Edward Brace to Medford and Jacksonville R.R. Co.; right of way through block 1, Galloway addition to town of Medford; $25.
    Mary A. Davison to Medford and Jacksonville R.R. Co.; right of way; $1.
    Medford Lodge, I.O.O.F., to same; same; $1.
    Charles Nickell to same; same; $1.
    I. C. N. Tinkler
to same; same; $1.
    C. W. Skeel
to same; same; $1.
    Oliver Harbaugh
to same; same; $1.
    Lucia B. Gere
to same; same; $1.
    I. W. Thomas
to same; same; $1.
    David Whetstone
to same; same; $1.
    A. H. Maegly
to same; same; $1.
    Merritt Bellinger
to same; same; $1.
    Caroline Cardwell
to same; same; $1.
    Henry Wend
t to same; same; $1.
   
A. Learned to same; same; $1.
    Town of Jacksonville to same; land for railroad track, terminal grounds, etc.; $1.
    Medford and Jacksonville R.R. Co. to W. C. Crawford et al.; all corporate rights  existing under the laws of this state, its franchises, rights of way, terminal rights, etc.; $1.
    W. C. Crawford et al. to R.R.V.R.R. Co.; all rights, titles and interests and corporate rights existing under the laws of the state, franchises, rights of way, terminal rights, etc.; $1.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 2


BORN.
THUMBURG--At Medford, September 1, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. Chas. Thumburg, a daughter.
DIED.
CRABTREE--At the Harbaugh farm near Medford, September 4, 1891, of typhoid fever, James R. Crabtree, aged about 28 years.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 2


    The R.R.V.R.R. track is being ballasted and put in good condition for winter.
    We must have one or more canneries at once. Our extensive fruit interests demand that.
    Tramps are even more numerous than usual this year, and there seems to be no way of abating the nuisance.
    The atmosphere does not seem so full of smoke as formerly, denoting that some rain must have fallen in the mountains.
    D. W. Alberry and his force of section hands are making arrangements to return to Jacksonville, this being the most convenient place to begin their work in the morning.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 3


    Ira Phelps, formerly of Medford, is publishing a newspaper at North Yamhill.
    W. Wheeler, the gentlemanly agent for Mitchell & Lewis at Medford, has returned to Portland to remain.
    James Galloway, who has been visiting his son, Frank Galloway, in Medford, for some time past, has departed for his home in Kansas.
    A. J. Stewart, Jr., who has been visiting at the residence of his parents near Phoenix for some time, last week departed for his home in New Mexico, where he is engaged with a large mining company.
    A neat schoolhouse is being erected in Grove district, the one recently formed out of portions of Medford and Jacksonville territory. The building is being erected on a site provided by Mr. Mingus.
    J. R. Crabtree died at the farm of O. Harbaugh in Medford precinct, where he has been employed for some time past. He was an industrious, honorable young man, whose untimely demise will be regretted by many.
    A. Alford, one of the best threshing machine men in Rogue River Valley, has purchased the fine steam outfit of Edwards Bros. and started for Klamath County last Monday. He will surely do well, as that section's grain yield is very large.
    M. Purdin, who took charge of the insolvent estate of the Magruder Bros., settled the affairs thereof in a manner satisfactory to everybody concerned, and was granted his discharge by the circuit court last week. We know of no person who could have made a settlement better and more promptly than he did. Mr. Purdin is a first-class business man, and one who all have confidence in.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 3


New Works.
    B. F. Stephenson of Medford, the live book agent, was on our streets yesterday. He is canvassing for some of the best works published, by such authors as Buell, Redpath, Johnston, Talmage and others whose books are of the highest order of merit. Mr. S. never fails to give satisfaction and is meeting with success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 11, 1891, page 3


    Clarence Kellogg, the fireman on the R.R.V.R.R., had a narrow escape from losing a limb last Friday evening, in Jacksonville. His foot slipped and the hind trucks of the engine passed over the side of his right foot, crushing it severely. He will not lose his foot.--[Mail.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 11, 1891, page 3


BETTER MANAGEMENT MUST PREVAIL SOON.
    There is nothing in the fruit situation at present to discourage any sensible man. It is quite true that much fruit will be wasted in the valley this season, owing solely to the fact that our horticulturists neglected to take time by the forelock, as we persistently advised them to do last spring, by building canneries and dry houses, to utilize the enormous surplus that we all realized would be inevitable if only the fresh fruit market was to be available. When one considers for a moment how vast the world is and how limited is the area which produces the choicest fruits, the conclusion is forced that if such fruits as we produce here can be preserved in such shape as to be capable of transportation to the world's consumers--not our limited local consumers of fruits in their season, but the great army of consumers who are compelled to content themselves with the same fruit in its dried or canned condition, there can be no doubt but its production will always be profitable in the extreme, regardless of the yield here or elsewhere. The dried prune, which will bear transportation to the utmost confines of Asia and Europe if necessary to find a market, or the incomparable canned peaches and Bartlett pears that are sought after in every land under the sun where Pacific coast fruits have been introduced, these are certainly not subject to the whim of the local markets or the control of the local dealers. While it is to be regretted that so much fruit will go to waste in our favored valley this year, yet we are confident that the evil will suggest its own remedy for the future, and that ere another season rolls 'round we will be largely equipped with means for its preservation that will take away the element of uncertainty attending the finding of a market for the surplus and render the occupation the most certain of any in the state. There will unquestionably be a temporary advance in the prices of grain lands in the valley this year, owing to the success of the grain raisers in supplementing a heavy crop with good prices, but our fruit-raising friends should not abandon the work which they have so well begun, merely because a single season has proven inauspicious for them, when the trouble arises largely from their own neglect in taking precautions to make themselves independent of such a situation as prevails in the fruit markets east and west the present year.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The city water works are now said to be self-supporting.
    Hon. Willard Crawford now occupies his neat, new residence.
    Thos. Morine has disposed of his dray business to I. A. Merriman.
    Frank Shideler will attend the state university at Eugene the coming winter.
    We are sorry to learn that Thos. A. Harris is considerably indisposed again.
    Dr. Danielson's office is now over J. Goldsmith's store. He is practicing with success.
    B. F. Yount of Ellensburg, Wash., is now on the night shift as miller at the Medford Roller Mills.
    O. Holtan has removed his tailoring business to the front room of the Wood & Jackson building.
    Rev. Mr. Burnett, the Christian minister, has established himself permanently in the Russ residence.
    Mrs. J. Higinbotham has returned from California with her family, to reside permanently in Medford.
    The excellent plate work done by our local dentist, Dr. O. F. Demorest, is filling his office with patients.
    J. H. Whitman's residence property has recently been let to L. Shideler and family, who are now in possession.
    Mrs. Phil Haught and daughter yesterday left for Alaska, to join Mr. Haught, who has been there for some time past.
    Henry Smith's new store room is as neat as a pin since coming from the hands of H. F. Wood and Babcock, the painter.
    A. A. Davis has recently put in a barley crusher at the roller mill in this place, with a capacity of 500 bushels per day.
    The action of the city council in ordering hitching racks erected at suitable localities in town is a move in the right direction.
    Charles Weeks of Spokane, Wash., returned home last week, after a pleasant visit with his brother, A. J. Weeks of this place.
    Rev. C. M. Hill, of Portland, the well-known Baptist preacher, is the guest of his sister and brother-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. W. I. Vawter.
    C. W. Palm has rented the store room opposite Webb's furniture store for millinery purposes, and will stock it up in a short time.
    Miss Jennie Graham was temporarily in charge of the Postal telegraph office during the week, owing to the indisposition of Miss Gibson. Miss Ella Drake again officiates.
    The fine map of Medford and additions, prepared by Mr. Narregan some time ago, was accepted by the council at $100, which is cheap.
    Prof. Jacobs, who has been in charge of the Mail during the editor's illness, has descended the tripod, Mr. Harlan being able to resume his duties.
    The town board last week issued license to T. M. Howard to retail liquors in Medford, his petition containing more names than the remonstrance to the same.
    Harris & Purdin have been catering to the wants of the public in the ice line so successfully this summer that an ice plant at this place is seriously talked of.
    The council last week ordered the fire committee to procure the required number of ladders for the successful fighting of fire within the city limits. A sensible idea.
    J. F. Ritter, who purchased a portion of the Lacy tract in this precinct last spring, has returned from California and will commence improving his land at once. He will plant it in fruit.
    C. H. Pickens was at Jacksonville Wednesday for the purpose of making arrangements to place two of his daughters in St. Mary's Academy, a most excellent institution for females.
    The suit of H. F. Wood vs. the R.R.V.R.R. Co. has been compromised, the company paying Mr. W. $150 for damages to his premises caused by the track running in front of his doorway.
    I. Woolf and I. A. Webb returned from their trip to Crescent City during the week, where the former marketed a load of watermelons and peaches from this valley at anything but remunerative figures, times being dull there.
    A petition was presented to the city council last week praying for the enforcement of the regulation with reference to Sunday closing. Some of the leading citizens appeared before the board and discussed the matter.
    A. A. Davis has been at Olympia, Wash. during the week looking after his interests in the milling line at that place. He has shipped a large amount of wheat there from this valley for grinding, and will keep up the shipments all season.
    Owing to the fact that so many of the pupils of the Medford public school were engaged in the fruit orchards about town and to the approaching district fair, the board of directors wisely determined to postpone the beginning of school for the fall term until the 28th inst.
    A large audience listened to an instructive discourse from Prof. M. V. Rork at the opera house one evening last week, setting forth the objects of the organization which has become so well known as the farmers' alliance. A local alliance will probably be organized within a short time.
    The schoolhouse building is rapidly approaching completion, and will be ready for occupancy in a short time now. The board of directors closed a contract with a school furniture company of Portland for the best style of desks and seats throughout the building, at a most advantageous figure, School Superintendent Price having enabled them to procure the furniture at wholesale prices, with all discounts off.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 2


    And still it rains.
    Harvesting is almost ended.
    A little snow has fallen on the highest peaks.
    The firm of Klippel & Lee, engaged in the lumber business, has been dissolved. See notice in another column.
    Grain is duller than it has been, and buyers are paying only 80 cents a hundred for barley and a cent a pound for oats. Wheat is still quoted at 65 cents a bushel.
"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 2


    Indian summer prevails.
    Dave Crosby is at Walla Walla, Wash., officiating as barkeeper in the Stine House.
    A. J. Stewart of Eden precinct has been shipping a large amount of tomatoes north by express.
    The rush of wheat to the mills and warehouses still continues. Most of the millers have secured enough for the entire season.
    A. J. Weeks of Medford precinct has had many young folks engaged in picking fruit and pitting it for drying for some time past.
    Prof. L. A. Simons has purchased 15 acres of fine land off the Walker tract near Medford, with the intention of setting out a fine orchard there.
    Rev. Robt. Ennis last week occupied the pulpit of Rev. J. F. Edmunds of Medford, the latter gentleman preaching at Jacksonville the same evening.
    The Eagle Point extension of the R.R.V.R.R. is once more being seriously discussed, and we may look to see important movements in the line of construction within a very short time.
    Mrs. Jas. R. Crabtree has been very low with fever at Medford ever since the death of her husband, and the birth and subsequent death of a child during her illness renders her recovery doubtful.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 3


    Wm. Stewart, one of the industrious and gentlemanly young men of Medford precinct, made the Times a pleasant call last Monday.
    W. W. Stitt and mother, from the trans-Rocky northwest, have lately been visiting the families of J. H. and Arthur Wilson of Medford precinct. Mr. Stitt is a cousin of these gentlemen.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 3


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    Martha A. Chappel to Ben Haymond; lot 11, block 36, town of Medford; $50.
    James G. Birdseye to Henry A. Frenna; lot 7, block 58, Medford; $91.55.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 3


Bring in Your Corn.
    We will buy all the corn in this valley at 50 cents per bushel on ear. We shell it ourselves.
MEDFORD DIS'G. AND REF'G. CO.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891 et seq., page 3


Corn Wanted.
    The Medford Distilling and Refining Co. are ready to buy corn, and will pay 50 cents per bushel for all the corn in this valley.
MEDYNSKI & THEISS, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891 et seq., page 3


   Culled from Medford Mail: Mrs. Jas. Crabtree, whose husband died of typhoid fever at the Harbaugh farm, has been moved to town. She has also [been] taken down with the fever and yesterday gave birth to a little son which complicates her case very much, and doubts are entertained as to her recovery. . . . . Our board of directors has made a contract with C. F. Weber & Co., of Portland, through their agent, G. W. Frasier, for desks, etc., for the new school building, to cost $1036. They are double desks with seats arranged so that a pupil may stand or leave his seat without disturbing his seatmate. . . . . Opening of Medford schools has been postponed until Sept. 28, to give the children a chance to finish the fruit picking and attend the district fair.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1891, page 1


    Medford is having a little temperance agitation evidently. A petition for a saloon license was remonstrated against before the city trustees there last week, but the petitioners outnumbered the remonstrators. A petition was also presented to the trustees asking for the closing of the saloons and other places of business on Sunday, and it was referred to a committee to make a report on it.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1891, page 3


    P. B. O'Neil and Will Roberts, the successful farmers of Eden precinct, are exhibiting some fine specimens of fruit grown on their farm to the San Francisco people. They went down there last week on a business and pleasure trip of several weeks.
    Dr. A. C. Caldwell, the dentist, was at Medford Monday consulting Dr. Geary concerning his eyes which have been troubling him lately. The doctor has not been able to attend to his dental patients this week in consequence of treatment, but expects his eyes to be all O.K. again in a few days.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. B. McGee is engaged in erecting a neat residence on C Street.
    The son of Thos. McAndrews has returned home after a prolonged absence.
    M. P. Phipps last week departed for Fort Klamath with a band of horses and mules.
    A. J. Fredenburg will soon begin the erection of a fine two-story residence at this place.
    D. T. Sears, wife and baby spent the week with friends and relatives at Salem and in Polk County.
    Dr. A. C. Caldwell of Ashland is undergoing treatment for eye troubles at the hands of our skilled oculist, Dr. Geary.
    Dr. Demorest is the happiest man in these parts just now--all because a bouncing boy baby has taken up headquarters at his home.
    A. R. McPherson and A. N. Soliss last week departed for Stockton, Cal. to take the regular course at the business college at that town.
    Miss Lulu Gibson found it impossible to resume her duties, and Miss Ella Drake is filling her place in the Postal telegraph office at this place.
    Will. J. Phipps and mother returned from their California trip last week. Will. has been canvassing for a school supply house during the past year.
    S. S. Catching of Douglas County, a first-class mechanic, is assisting his brother in the construction of our schoolhouse. George is adding much to his reputation by the fine work he is doing.
    Rev. E. E. Thompson, lately assigned to the M.E. pastorate, has arrived at Medford, where he will make his headquarters. He causes a most favorable impression upon his hearers and the general public.
    Mrs. J. R. Crabtree, who has been so near death's door, is now pronounced out of danger by the attending physicians, Drs. Jones and Cole. This has proved one of the most difficult cases to treat, as there were so many complications.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    J. B. Wait to Austin S. Hammond; lot 3, block 2, Cottage addition to Medford; $80.
    I. J. Phipps to W. S. Barnum; 4 acres in corporate limits of Medford; $500.
Excerpt, 
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 2


BORN.
DEMOREST--In Medford, Sept. 16, 1891, to Dr. and Mrs. O. F. Demorest, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 2


    A great deal of wheat is still being shipped from the valley.
    The Earl Fruit Company is preparing to make a shipment of five carloads of fruit about the 5th prox. They have already shipped considerable.
    Look at the fruit exhibit at the fairgrounds and see if the Times exaggerated the possibilities of southern Oregon as a fruit-growing section.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 3


    Miss Cora Brown, who has been visiting at this place during the week, will go to Portland next Saturday to visit her sister, Mrs. J. T. Guerin, at East Portland for some weeks before returning home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 3


    Mr. Hembree, who has been acting as engineer on the night shift at the Medford mills, called at the Times office lately.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 25, 1891, page 3


    F. H. Page, Jr., is preparing a fine exhibit of apples from the J. H. Stewart farm for the Portland Industrial Exposition. There should by all means be an exhibit of Ashland peaches at the fair. Won't somebody take the trouble to make a collection and send the fruit down?
"Fruit Items," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1891, page 2



    The Medford public school will open next Monday, Sept. 28th. The new school house being yet unfurnished school will begin in the old building.
"Some of the Schools," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1891, page 2


    S. Rosenthal, of Medford, and J. S. Hammersly, formerly with Reames & White of Jacksonville, will open a store at Gold Hill.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1891, page 2


    Milton Harlan has sold the Medford Mail to Kertson and Bain, the publishers of the Central Point Enterprise, who intend to publish both papers, Mr. Kertson taking charge of the Mail, Oct. 1st. Mr. Harlan has been in very poor health for some time, and is said to be suffering from nervous prostration. He intended to start for La Grande this week to try a change of climate, if able to undergo the trip.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, September 25, 1891, page 3


    A NEW AGENT.--W. L. Jester, for about five years the competent and popular agent of the S.P. at this city, has retired from the position, and is succeeded by Charles Fronk, recently of the Medford office. . . .--Albany Democrat.

Evening Capital Journal, Salem, September 26, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A. A. Davis started for Olympia, Wash. on business, but will not be gone long.
    D. W. Hazel has gone to Olympia, Wash. to look after A. A. Davis' milling interests there. His family will probably follow soon.
    J. Thorndike, late of Galice Creek, has opened a feed store at the old stand of Geo. Davis, and will deliver goods in his line to any part of the city.
    Newell Harlan is visiting with his family in La Grande at present, and after recuperating his health will return to this place and open a job printing office.
    Arthur Boussum has been promoted from the Medford office to a position in [the] W., F. & Co. office at Portland, and left for the scene of his future duties last week.
    J. E. Shearer, the expert barber, was at Jacksonville on Tuesday, accompanying some relatives, who had been visiting him, that far on their way home to Steamboat.
    A load of Klamath County rye was delivered at the distillery last week by Mr. Walker of Bly, the first of the kind that has thus far been received at the Medford emporium.
    Dr. O. F. Demorest of this place now makes the Chase combination dental plates with gold or aluminum roofs, and has lately introduced several new features in dentistry. For good work give him a call.
    The breaking of a scaffold at the new schoolhouse one day last week precipitated three painters and the contents of the paint pots to the ground, a distance of more than twenty feet, but fortunately without injuring anyone seriously.
    The Y.W.C.T.U. announce a picnic at the old campground on Rogue River tomorrow, provided the day is suitable for that sort of entertainment. The Medford Silver Cornet Band is expected to be in attendance, and good speaking is assured.
    It is proposed to publish a school paper by the pupils of the public schools during the coming scholastic year, and as there is much talent in that line displayed among the growing generation here and it is a useful branch of training, the scheme is highly commendable.
    C. K. Fronk, who has so efficiently managed the railroad office at Medford almost since it was opened, was transferred to Albany last week, succeeding W. L. Jester. He made many friends while here, and all regret to see him and his estimable family leave our midst. W. V. Lippincott, late of Myrtle Creek, will have charge of this office and will no doubt give satisfaction.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 2


    A large amount of sorghum is now being manufactured in southern Oregon.
    Much wheat is still being hauled to market, most of which is shipped out of the state.
    I. J. Carson is confined to his bed with typhoid fever at the residence of W. B. A. Temple at Medford.
    Kertson & Bain of the Central Point Enterprise have purchased the Medford Mail and took possession yesterday. W. F. Kertson will be in charge of the latter.
    Jack and Will Houston of Table Rock precinct have been very busy manufacturing sorghum lately, the past season having been unusually favorable for the growth of the plant.
    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company will begin to slaughter hogs at their yard in Medford in a short time and will make a big run during the balance of the season. It will prove of immense benefit to the valley to have a local market of this character, and the venture can but prove profitable if rightly managed, as it will doubtless be by the gentlemen who have the matter in charge.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 3


    Miss Cora Brown last week departed for a ten days' visit with her sister, Mrs. J. T. Guerin, at East Portland.
    David Loring and wife, accompanied by their little nephew, returned home to Portland after a pleasant visit at Jacksonville last week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 3


    W. V. Lippincott, who has taken charge of the Medford railroad station, vice C. K. Fronk, made us a pleasant call one day recently. He has been in the railroad company's employ a long time and understands his business thoroughly.
    The large barn of W. H. Barr, situated near Medford, was last Friday night burned to the ground, together with a large quantity of hay stored in it. Together with its contents it was fully insured in the Farmers and Merchants Insurance Company of Albany, and Wm. Ulrich, the agent, has already adjusted the loss. Mr. Barr, who was in the mountains at the time, says the fire was no doubt of incendiary origin.
    Silas H. Hull, formerly a real estate dealer of Medford, who left that place some time since, was arrested in Salem week before last, upon complaint of his wife, who charges him with committing bigamy. The co-respondent is a woman who also resided in Jackson County until lately. Hull's bonds were fixed at $400, which were given. His wife had previously instituted a suit for divorce against him, but it has not been finally acted upon as yet.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 2, 1891, page 3


    J. W. Hockersmith moved his family down to Medford last Friday, to remain during the winter, while he is employed with the pork packing company.
    The two brothers who are M.E. ministers, one at Medford and the other at Central Point, Revs. Thompson, were both in Ashland last Monday, visiting Rev. C. A. Lewis.
    Rev. Father Watry, the Catholic priest who has been in charge of the churches at Ashland, Jacksonville and Medford, left last Tuesday for his old home in Milwaukee, Wis., and is succeeded by Rev. J. R. Boever, recently arrived at Jacksonville from Minnesota. By his geniality and unvarying courtesy, Father Watry made many friends in this county outside the pale of his church, and his departure is generally regretted.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 2, 1891, page 3

    It is now stated that Shannon Conser has received the appointment of train dispatcher of the S.P.R.R.
    Dr. Demorest of Medford excels as a dentist and never fails to give satisfaction. His work is first-class and his charges reasonable.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The Mail, under the management of F. G. Kertson, made its appearance last week and promises well.
    The first day's attendance at the public school was 220 pupils, an excellent showing so early in the season.
    Surveyor Howard has been at Palmer Creek surveying mining ground belonging to C. W. Kahler and Gin Lin.
    The work on the new schoolhouse will be completed and the building ready for occupancy in about two weeks.
    Mrs. Dr. Demorest is being visited by her sister, who lately arrived from Polk County and may conclude to locate.
    Mrs. R. C. Fielder has taken up her abode in Medford, to obtain the advantages offered her children by our schools.
    Judge Chas. Walker, now a resident of Lane County, visited his old home at this place during the past fortnight.
    A newcomer last week purchased 20 acres of the Roberts & O'Neil land on Bear Creek, paying $115 per acre for the same.
    Miss Ella Drake returned to Ashland last week, after officiating as telegraphist for the Postal at this place for a few months.
    Miss Lou Gibson, the accomplished manager of the Postal Telegraph office at Medford, is again at her post, after an illness of several months.
    Pigeon shooting has been the prevailing sport in the valley during the past two weeks, some of our nimrods having brought in nice bags.
    G. W. Catching is making a complete job of the new schoolhouse building, and it will be a model of convenience, beauty and comfort when completed.
    Frank Galloway, who has been appointed storekeeper at the Medford distillery, will close his fence business at once, in order to assume the duties of his office.
    J. W. Hockersmith has removed his family to this place from Ashland, to reside during the winter, in order to give the necessary attention to the business of the packing house.
    Work will begin in the manufacturing line at the new distillery in a short time now, as everything is almost ready, and the proprietors desire to lose no more time than is absolutely unavoidable, as they are under heavy expense at all times.
    The effort being made by the Baptist denomination to establish an academy at Medford, the State Educational Society having guaranteed $10,000 if the local interests would raise a like sum, is worthy of the highest commendation, and we trust that it will succeed. Medford is particularly well situated with reference to offering a site for such an institution, and our citizens take the liveliest interest in all educational matters which go toward assuring the subscription of the necessary amount.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 2


    The S.O. Pork Packing Co. of Medford is getting ready to commence business and will soon purchase a large number of hogs.

    Weeks Bros. have been very busy during the past few weeks drying the immense amount of superior fruit from their 15,000 trees near Medford.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 3


    J. O. Johnson of Table Rock precinct has removed to California for the winter.
    Mr. Olwell of Wisconsin, brother of our esteemed fellow citizen, P. W. Olwell of Central Point, is paying this section a visit.
    Prof. J. B. Farley, the pioneer teacher, who is now located in Josephine County, paid friends near Gold Hill a visit recently.
    H. W. Shipley, a prominent citizen of Sams Valley, called at the Times office Wednesday. He has had much experience as a fruit grower, and is favorably mentioned as a successor to Hon. J. D. Whitman, who so efficiently officiated as member of the state board of horticulture from this district.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 3


O. N. Fowler to N. H. Spencer, lot 12, blk 21, Medford; $800.
James Helms to T. W. Johnson, lots 9 and 10, blk 26, Medford; $250.
Lewis Shideler to George H. Haskins, lots 1, 2, 3 and 4 and strip adjoining in block 67, Medford; $600.

"Real Estate Transfers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 9, 1891, page 3


    Roberts & O'Neil sold 20 acres of their land near the Bear Creek bridge at Medford last week at $415 per acre.
    Johnny Ross caught a coyote the other night and killed it with a jackknife, but received an ugly wound in the hand during the scuffle. How is that for nerve?--[Mail.
    The Jackson County Teachers' Association which was to convene on the 10th inst. has been postponed until Saturday, October 24th. The meeting will be held in Medford.
    Pigeon shooting seems to be the order of the day at the present writing. Every day our sporting-inclined citizens take advantage of the good sport offered, and parties can be seen going out in all directions.--[Medford Mail.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 9, 1891, page 3


    Mr. D. T. Lawton, manager of the business of Mitchell & Lewis for Southern Oregon, was in town from Medford Wednesday.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 9, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. H. Barkdull, lately of this place, is now a resident of Oregon City.
    Mrs. Ed. Wilkinson has been visiting relatives and friends at Roseburg.
    The city dads have provided a pound for stray cattle illegally marauding the town.
    Medford demands and must have electric lights, even if the plant to operate them has to be located on Butte Creek.
    Mrs. A. A. Davis and son returned from a visit, extending over the last three months, with Minnesota relatives, last week
    The project of sinking a large well near the tank to provide drinking water for the city should by all means be pushed through.
    The attendance at the Medford schools is increasing daily, and all the room in the new building will be needed before the season closes.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has sent some huge specimens of choice pears to the Portland exposition, which are attracting much attention.
    Quite a number of prospective locators from abroad, including several from California, were in the city examining into our resources during the last two weeks.
    It is reported that Geo. Addington, since his return to Puget Sound, has joined the majority. We congratulate, although we cannot but feel sorry for some of our young ladies.
    Rigby & Hart, who have gained an excellent reputation in California, have opened a business college in Medford. They should receive a liberal patronage, as they are worthy of it.
    Johnson brothers of Medford were rejoiced to meet their mother and a sister, just from the old homestead in Iowa, one day last week. The elder lady has attained the age of 85 years, but stood the long journey splendidly.
    At the election of officers of the Y.M.C.A., at this place last week, William Halley was chosen president; Homer Harvey vice-president; P. S. Porter secretary, and A. W. McPherson treasurer, to serve during the ensuing year.
    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company will begin the season's work next week, and expect to slaughter at least 2,000 head of hogs this year, and probably double that number in the future. It will prove one of the most important of the city's institutions.
    Earl Fronk fell from a porch at his parents' residence a few days since and sustained severe injuries, a piece of wood entering his abdomen and inflicting a painful though not a dangerous wound. His father was summoned from Albany and was glad to find the little sufferer improving.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 2


    L. G. Porter, the timber expert, called one day recently.
    Geo. Holecamp is now a resident of Medford, where he will engage in the business of manufacturing sausage of a superior quality.
    Now that the Medford distillery has created a market for rye, it would be a good idea for some of our farmers to plant more or less of their poorest land in that cereal, as good crops can be raised regularly where other kinds would not do nearly so well.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 2


BORN.
FOSTER--At Medford, Oct. 7, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Foster, a daughter.
KELLOGG--At Medford, Oct. 6, 1891, to Mr. and Mrs. E. A. Kellogg, a son.
DIED.
JOHNSON--In Medford, Oct. 13, 1891, Norah Johnson, wife of E. S. Johnson and daughter of F. M. and Jane Plymale; aged 23 years, 6 months and 13 [days].
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 2


Horses and Wagons for Sale.
    The undersigned has for sale a span of horses, also two wagons and two sets of harness, in good order, which he offers for sale at a reasonable figure. For further particulars enquire of
W. L. WEBSTER, Medford.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891 et seq., page 3


    Go to the Medford Nursery for apple trees.
    Did you see those fruit trees at the Medford Nursery?
    Adam Schmitt and son are at Medford, in the employ of the Medford Distilling Co., making barrels.
    A McMinnville correspondent has this to say of a young man who recently lived on Lake Creek and at Medford: H. J. Little, while out riding Sunday with the Misses Shurtleff, had quite a lively runaway. The buggy was upset and the occupants thrown out, but fortunately they were not seriously injured.
    The estimable wife of H. T. Severance of Little Butte precinct died at the family residence a few days since, at a ripe old age. She was the mother of the Nichols brothers of Butte Creek and Mrs. F. M. Plymale of Medford. One of the worthy pioneer women of southern Oregon, she leaves a large relationship as well as many friends to mourn her loss.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 3


    Hon. E. DePeatt of Umatilla County, formerly a prominent citizen of this section, paid Jacksonville a short visit the forepart of the week, returning home with his wife and daughter soon afterwards. We are glad to learn that the Judge is building up an extensive legal practice in his new home.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 3


Commercial School.
    Everybody who starts out in life should have at least a first-class business education. This is what Rigby & Hart, late of Santa Rosa, Cal., will give all who attend the commercial school which they will open at Medford on November 2d. The school will be in session both day and evening, and the following branches will be thoroughly taught: Bookkeeping in all of its departments, banking, mathematics, commercial law, commercial grammar, political economy, civil engineering, plain and ornamental penmanship, card writing, blackboard writing, pen engrossing, painting in oil and water colors, crayon, pencil and ink, painting and drawing in every department. Architecture, planning, designing, letter writing, and every branch generally taught in a first-class business college. They will make this a first-class school for both gentlemen and ladies. As they come well recommended from their former home in California, the public may rest assured that they will do as they agree to.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891 et seq., page 3


    The route of the Southern Pacific railroad through southern Oregon and northern California is a poor one for winter operation and for freight carriage at all times. Eventually a road will branch off at the head of the Sacramento Valley and across the mountains to the east, then build north and enter the Willamette Valley through the middle fork pass. The grades would be easy and an immense saving in operating expenses would be realized.--Eugene Guard.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1891, page 4
  

    The first accident to stock on the Rogue River Railroad happened last night. Several horses pasturing near town got on the track and the engineer blew the whistle, which frightened them still more. Some of them jumped through a barbed wire fence, and one belonging to Gen. T. G. Reames, a family buggy horse, ran into the stock guard and was instantly killed.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, October 16, 1891, page 2


Pork Packing.
[Medford Mail.]
    The Southern Oregon Pork Packing Company expect to begin operations about the 20th inst.
    The building where the salting, smoking, curing, packing, etc., will be done is 60x58 with 10-inch walls packed with sawdust and rendered impenetrable to flies and is as cool as an ice house.
    The capacity of the building where the hogs are hung is for 2500 quarters. 2000 hogs it is expected will be slaughtered this year.
    The hogs are bought already fattened, as this method pays better for the buyer and seller.
    The lard house, which stands within an hundred yards of the packing house, is 20x30 feet, and will contain two large furnaces with three 20- and 30-gallon kettles each. The lard cooling and packing department is in the same building.
    The sugar curing process has been adopted entirely and the pork, bacon and lard turned out will certainly find a ready market.
Ashland Tidings, October 16, 1891, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. K. Fronk's family go to Albany this week to reside there permanently.
    J. H. Faris, our efficient recorder, has succeeded Geo. L. Davis as school clerk.
    C. H. Barkdull, for a long time a resident of Medford, has removed to Oregon City.
    Wes. Johnson is now associated with I. A. Merriman in the dray business in this place.
    Miss Edith Crouch, formerly of Linkville, is attending the higher department of our public school..
    Mrs. M. Purdin has been entertaining her sister, Mrs. Jas. Bunyard of Harney Valley, during the past few days.
    E. G. Salstrom and wife, late of Prospect, now occupy the Holst residence in this city, where they will remain until spring.
    Miss Haggard, a sister of Mrs. Dr. Demorest of Medford, accepted a situation in the Times office at Jacksonville this week.
    Charles J. Howard is engaged in building himself a new house in Barr's addition. He is in charge of Wells, Fargo & Co.'s express office here.
    Hiram West has returned to Medford from the Sierra Valley, Cal., where he has been residing for some time past. Mrs. West will also return soon.
    N. A. Jacobs has let the contract for a neat residence on C Street to Skeel & Son. This firm also has the contract to erect a residence for Spencer Childers in a short time.
    Phil. Yeiser, who was a resident of this place for several months, has, like the Arab, "folded his tent and quietly stolen away." A number of too confiding persons mourn his departure.
    The death of Mrs. Nora Johnson, daughter of F. M. Plymale, last week cast a gloom over the whole community, for the lady was a general favorite and the light of the home circle. Her death was in a measure unexpected, although she had been in poor health for some time.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 2


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    C. W. Palm et al. to R. Behrendt; lots 1 and 2, block 47, Medford. $180.
Excerpt,
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 2


At Work Again.
    Hon. John D. Whitman, State Horticultural Commissioner, made the Review a pleasant call. He has just commenced his official work again, which was interrupted by the fatal illness of his wife, who died last summer. He then tendered his resignation as a member of the board and devoted his time to caring for his large fruit crop until a short time since. His resignation not being accepted, he has consented to begin once more his crusade against the fruit pests of the state. Mr. Whitman finds that some very effective spraying has been done in this vicinity, the summer wash appearing to have been a success. There is little doubt that the scale and bark louse may be easily exterminated. The commissioner advises now a wash composed of one pound of lye to two and a half gallons of water. He thinks there is no doubt that fruit growers will secure a good price for their product if they do not sell too quickly.--[Roseburg Review.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 3


Fires.
    Two alarms of fires were sounded in Medford during the week, and the buildings found to be in flames were both totally destroyed. A dwelling house in the southern portion of town, belonging to Mr. Gore and occupied by Mr. Tipton, was discovered to be afire early last Sunday morning. Its contents also proved a total loss, although they were insured. Tuesday evening the barn on the premises occupied by E. W. Hammon, located in the same neighborhood, was razed to the ground by the fiery element. There was no insurance on this property. The origin of the fire in either instance is unknown.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 3


    Jas. Herely has removed from Kent, Wash. to Tacoma, where he is permanently located.
    Frank Mingus now resides on his father's tract near Medford, which he will manage this season.
    M. E. Beatty is once more in the real estate business at Portland, after a temporary absence in Idaho and Montana.
    P. H. Oviatt of Medford was here a short time ago. He is interested in a yellow ochre mine in Sardine Creek district which promises very well.
    A number of Gypsy families have been wandering through the valley for the past few weeks, wending their way to the warm climes of California.
    Prof. Narregan of Medford made out the assessment roll for the assessor this season, which kept him very busy during his leisure moments for some time past.
    Several loads of rye have been hauled for the Medford distillery from Klamath County by persons who have gone there with a load of produce, who thus kill two birds with one stone.
    The man with a practical fruit dryer, especially adapted for small orchard use, will find a bonanza awaiting him in this valley another season, for many farmers lost the price of half a dozen such in wasted fruit this year. All wish to see a different condition of affairs existing in the fruit line here next year.
    The resignation of Hon. J. D. Whitman as a member of the State Horticultural Commission was not accepted, and he will serve out the term for which he was appointed, much against his will, as the duties of the office interfere with his private business. He is one of the most efficient members of the commission.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 3


    Jeff. Hamlin of Medford precinct called last Saturday.
    Plowing and seeding have been commenced in some localities.
    The slaughter of hogs has been commenced at the Medford pork-packing house.
    Geo. Holecamp of Medford is furnishing this market with a fine quality of sausage.
    Miss Cora Brown, who recently returned from Portland, was accompanied home by a nephew, the eldest son of Jas. T. Guerin.
    Rigby & Hart's college opens at Medford in a few days. They are receiving much encouragement from the people of the whole county and will no doubt be well patronized. They deserve encouragement, as they are first-class instructors and will give the fullest satisfaction.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 23, 1891, page 3


    J. W. Hockersmith, who was in town last Monday, said he expected to begin killing hogs at the Medford packing house next week, and that the calculation is to kill two thousand head this season.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, October 23, 1891, page 3


Democratic Times, October 23, 1891 et seq., page 3

    H. B. REED IN COURT.--A most sensational incident occurred in Judge Hebbard's court yesterday during the trial of the divorce suit of Georgia B. Reed against Horace B. Reed, the fence man well-known in Jackson County. The husband was on the stand, and it was desired to prove that he was a man of violent temper. He had been worked into one or two passions by the cross-examination of attorney Shurtleff, who represented Mrs. Reed. Finally Shurtleff asked:
    "When your youngest child died, did you accuse your wife of killing it?"
    Reed gave a howl, jumped out of the witness stand, and, with a livid face and eyes starting from their sockets, rushed toward the attorney as if bent on wringing his neck. Before he got near enough to touch Shurtleff, however, Reed stopped and hissed between his teeth, "Scoundrel!"
    The courtroom was all excitement for the time. Judge Hebbard said something about ordering Reed to jail; the clerk got up and stood between the two men, and Mrs. Reed started as if the scene reminded her of some of her domestic difficulties.
    "I don't believe we need any more evidence on the point of temper," remarked the judge, when Reed finally took his seat. "I will stop the examination now and hear arguments next Saturday." Mrs. Reed has since been granted a divorce on the grounds of desertion. The two married in Sacramento in 1879, and have three children, the youngest of which is three years old. The present suit for divorce was the second one brought by Mrs. Reed. The first one was compromised. The mother was given the custody of the children.
    Mrs. Reed is the daughter of E. H. Briggs, a well-known fruit grower in the Sacramento Valley, who died leaving an estate worth $500,000. Reed now lives in Portland, and it is alleged that he deserted his wife.--S.F. Chronicle, Oct. 11.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 1


REAL ESTATE TRANSFERS.
    The following deeds have been recorded in the office of the county recorder since the last report of the Times:
    A. E. Woods to R.R.V.R'y. Co., quitclaim to use of West 8th Street in front of lot 13, block 39 Medford. $150.
Excerpt, 
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    C. K. Fronk was joined last week at Albany by his family.
    Merriman & Legate have now three forges in their shop, and are still rushed with business.
    The new Medford business college is displaying 75 designs in art penmanship at the Baptist Church.
    W. S. Barnum last week built an addition to his repair shops at this place, where he is doing a good business.
    D. W. Hazel has been joined at Olympia, Wash., by his family from this place, who will make their future home there.
    The S.O.P.P. Co. is now engaged in manufacturing bacon and lard, having already killed several hundred head of fat hogs.
    A Masonic lodge will be organized here forthwith, with Prof. Narregan as W.M., Wm. Slinger S.W. and Julius Goldsmith J.W.
    Landlord Faris will hereafter conduct the Medford House on the plan of a private boarding house, and it goes without saying that it will be a good one.
    J. F. Theiss of the distillery has purchased the residence property lately occupied by H. E. Baker, the latter having removed to the corner of Fifth and D streets.
    Geo. Addington returned from Seattle several days ago, and alone, too. The report that he had "doubled up" while absent turns out to be a canard.
    Francis Fitch, Esq., was last week elected grand orator for the ensuing year by the grand lodge of Knights of Pythias, and Dr. Geary was elected grand inner guard of the same lodge, two highly important positions.
    The teachers of Jackson County were well represented at the meeting of their association, held in Medford last Saturday. It was the most successful session of the association ever held, nearly 50 pedagogues being in attendance.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ogan, who have been residents of this section for several years past, not long since left for California to make that state their future home. Mrs. O. disposed of her property to her son, I. L. Hamilton, before leaving.
    John A. Hanley has purchased the saloon fixtures and stock of goods belonging to Chas. Brous, and will thoroughly renovate the Railroad Saloon. When it is reopened it will be one of the handsomest public resorts in southern Oregon.
    The Medford Business College opened last Monday under favorable auspices. The attendance, which is already good, continues to increase. Messrs. Rigby and Hart will no doubt give the fullest satisfaction and should be liberally patronized.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 2


    The R.R.V.R.R. track is being well ballasted and will be in first-class condition for the winter's business.
    S. Rosenthal reports the branch store he is interested in with Joe Hammersly at Gold Hill as doing a fine business.
    T. J. Kenney has been supplying this market during the week with fine spareribs and backbones from the pork packing house at Medford.
    The R.R.V.R. Co. will change the price of fare each way between Jacksonville and Medford to 25 cents. They were entitled to take this compensation from the beginning, and certainly nobody will object to them getting their dues now.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3


    Dr. Porter has returned to Gold Hill from Portland, bringing back a better half with him, much to the surprise of his friends. We extend congratulations.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3


    O. P. McGee has again become a resident of Medford precinct, having returned from Williams Creek lately.
    Considerable rye is being hauled for the Medford distillery from Klamath County, where much of it is raised. It brings 1½ cents a pound.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 30, 1891, page 3


    Two alarms of fire were sounded in Medford last week, and the buildings found to be in flames were both totally destroyed. A dwelling house in the southern portion of town, belonging to Mr. Gore and occupied by Mr. Tipton, was discovered to be afire early last Sunday morning. Its contents also proved a total loss, although they were insured. Tuesday evening the barn on the premises occupied by E. W. Hammond, located in the same neighborhood, was razed to the ground by the fiery element. There was no insurance on this property. The origin of the fire in either instance is unknown.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, October 30, 1891, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    E. J. Montague has recently added a number of improvements to his town property.
    The firemen have been indulging in regular drills lately, greatly to their advantage.
    Ed. Temple was quite ill again with fever at his home in this place during the past week.
    Mr. Cranfill, manager of Henry Smith's store in this place, has invested in a fine delivery wagon.
    Weeks Bros. have dried over twenty tons of peaches and prunes at their place near town this year.
    C. W. Skeel and William Ulrich both contemplate building neat residences in Medford in a short time.
    Only high wines, alcohol and a high grade of spirits will be manufactured at the distillery from the start.
    Dr. R. Pryce is called upon to exercise his skill from Yreka to Grants Pass, and is steadily extending his practice.
    Tom Harris has recovered from a sever spell of fever. His many friends hope that his health will improve rapidly.
    Our merchant, J. Goldsmith, has been entertaining his sister, Miss Celia Goldsmith, from Eugene during the past week.
    G. L. Webb's store in the Medford House bids fair to be one of Medford's important mercantile establishments in the future.
    Albert Rau, an expert yeast maker from the city by the lakes, has been installed as chief of that department at the distillery.
    The distillery already has in its storehouse and granaries at least 6,000 bushels of grain of fine quality, and will take all it can get hereafter.
    Many await with interest the oyster supper of Protection Hose Company at the opera house this evening, the management insuring a fine entertainment.
    J. A. Whitman is handling E. K. Anderson's fruit crop of 6,000 boxes of apples, besides a quantity of pears. He is shipping at the rate of two carloads a week.
    Frank Galloway and J. H. Whiteside are now fulfilling the duties of their positions, those of storekeeper and gauger. They will no doubt give satisfaction.
    Dr. Geary will this year market no less than ten tons of grapes from his six-acre vineyard on Griffin Creek. A large quantity have been brought to Medford during the past week.
    The finishing touches are being applied to the new schoolhouse, and when ready for occupancy we can boast of one of the most commodious and best arranged school edifices in the state.
    The Grand Central, under the popular management of Harris & Purdin, continues to be the leading hotel in southern Oregon. Nothing is left undone for the comfort and pleasure of the guests.
    The local branches of the Epworth League of Central Point, Medford, Grants Pass and Ashland will hold a convention at this place, beginning on the 21st inst. Much interest is taken locally in the welfare of the League.
    John A. Hanley has thoroughly renovated the Railroad Saloon, and it was opened this week under the new management. The place has been stocked with the finest wines and liquors and presents a handsome appearance.
    Medford can justly claim to have the best furnished schoolhouse in the southern part of the state, owing to the public spirit of School Superintendent Price in bringing the attention of the board to the Frasier furniture at agent's prices.
    The Y.M.C.A. should be encouraged to the utmost in its attempt to establish a free reading room in this place, in which it already has taken the initial steps. Contributions of books and periodicals should be sent to the secretary, F. S. Porter.
    Faris & Erford solicit fine samples of fruit and vegetables to display in their windows and to use in alluring the wary immigrant to invest here. There are few who come into the valley who get any clearly defined idea of our resources without these displays.
    The Portland men who were down in the interest of the proposed brewery and ice factory here have the matter under advisement, and it is within the range of probable events that we will have another important industry established here in a short time.
    It is certainly just that the city streets should be well lighted during the winter season, especially, and nothing gives a stranger a more unfavorable impression of a town at any time than to view it brooding in gloom and darkness, while other places in the vicinity are ablaze with light. Let there be light!
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 2


Farms for Rent.
    The undersigned has two farms, one containing 160 acres and the other 320 acres, for rent. For further particulars call on or address.
MRS. S. E. ISH,       
Jacksonville Precinct.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 2


MARRIED.
WILCOX-SIMPKINS--Near Medford, Oct. 28, 1891, by Rev. M. A. Williams, Gideon W. Wilcox and Miss Angie E. Simpkins.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 2


Wheat Wanted.
    Wheat seventy cents per bushel at the Medford Roller Mills.
A. A. DAVIS.       
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891 et seq., page 3


    Thos. E. Stanley now resides at Bogus, Cal., where it is said that he has captured the heart of a young lady. Shake, Tom.
    Single fares over the R.R.V.R.R. have been raised to 25 cents, round-trip tickets still remaining at 40 cents. This is quite proper.
    The S.O. Pork Packing Co. of Medford is furnishing our merchants with lard of an excellent quality, in five and ten pound buckets. They have already slaughtered several hundred head of fat hogs.
    The railroad company has ordered the wood contractors in the Siskiyous to cease work until further orders. There is said to be at least 10,000 cords of wood in the mountains between Ashland and Hornbrook.
    Fred Barneburg is now feeding the best bunch of steers he has ever handled since he has been in the business, having brought in 125 head of his own raising from the Dead Indian range last week, which were in fine condition to start with.
    The prevaricators who declare there are less wormy apples this year than last are willfully misrepresenting the facts, as any intelligent man can tell at a glance. The pests are rapidly propagating all over the valley, notwithstanding which there are many fine apples this year everywhere which would do to set before a king.
    The shipments of fruit from this valley to the Eugene cannery from the stations of Medford and Ashland alone aggregated 231,040 pounds, or more than 115 tons, every pound of which, along with ten times as much more which went to waste in this section, should have been made use of in local canneries. The fruit interest here is assuming mammoth proportions faster than anyone realizes, and it is the sheerest folly to have to look for a market for our best canning fruit to a cannery hundreds of miles away. We should have at least three canneries in full blast here before another year rolls 'round.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 3


    G. A. Hover, a brother of the versatile J. T., arrived in this valley from Nebraska last week, with the intention of making this section his place of abode in the future.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 6, 1891, page 3


Hallowe'en.