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Medford News: 1887

No Medford newspapers from 1887 survive. Below are Medford-related news items from 1887, gleaned from other towns' papers Also see descriptions of Medford and Jackson County for this year.


W. F. WILLIAMSON
ATTORNEY & COUNSELOR-AT-LAW
MEDFORD, OREGON.
All business in my line will receive prompt attention.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887 et seq., page 1


R. PRYCE, M.D.                                             E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Williams' Building.                                   Residence on C St.
PRYCE & GEARY.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
Medford, Oregon.
Offices in Williams' Brick Building, Upstairs.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887 et seq., page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS
    R. S. Cummons is now a resident of Prineville.
    Rev. M. A. Williams will hold services at this place on Sunday.
    The Central Hotel is being conducted after the restaurant style.
    The town is in a flourishing condition, having a debt of only $131.85.
    The firm of Kenney & Worman has been dissolved, W. G. Kenney retiring.
    Frank Lynch is assisting A. H. Carlson in the management of the Brewery Saloon.
    Dr. Will. Jackson, the scientific dentist, will visit Medford on Jan. 17th and remain a week.
    Wm. Trimble sold his blacksmith shop to M. Purdin recently and will soon pay his old home in Josephine County a visit.
    The reported failure of A. L. Johnson of this place is pronounced false by that gentleman. He has made no assignment.
    A social party took place at McGee & Zimmerman's hall on New Year's evening, which was well attended and passed off pleasantly.
    The mercantile establishments of Henry Smith and S. Rosenthal are kept stocked with a fine assortment of goods and enjoy a good trade.
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling house, not far from the center of the town of Medford. For particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton, real estate agent.
    E. G. Hurt, our official street commissioner, did as good work during the past year as the amount of road tax would admit. He is the right man in the right place.
    The Christmas tree festivities took place in the large warehouse instead of Walton's hall, as announced last week. An excellent programme was offered and all were well pleased.
    Prof. Jay Niles of Henley, Cal., who has been teaching our cornet band, has finished his course of instruction. He is an excellent musician and has given the fullest satisfaction, his pupils making rapid progress.
    M. Purdin, an excellent mechanic, is now in charge of the blacksmith and wheelwright establishment next door to the Brewery Saloon, and is assisted by Geo. F. Merriman, another good workman. We wish him success.
    Revs. T. L. Sails and T. L. Jones, Methodist evangelists, began a series of meetings in Zimmerman & McGee's hall, Medford, Tuesday evening. Services are held each day at 2 and 7 o'clock P.M. An invitation is extended to all to attend.
    Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., recently elected the following officers: N. G. [Noble Grand], I. A. Webb; V.G. [Vice Grand], J. F. Kelly; Sec., C. K. Fronk; Treas., G. H. Haskins; Warden, B. S. Webb; I.G. [Inside Guardian], B. W. Powell; Conductor, S. Rosenthal.
    The Presbyterian Church building at this place is well along, and will be completed as soon as the right kind of lumber can be procured. It will be small but handsome, being fashioned somewhat after the Presbyterian Church building at Jacksonville.
    R. M. Shely, a first-class marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford, where he is prepared to fill orders in his line in the best style and at the lowest living rates. He can furnish monuments, tombstones, etc., of every description and at any price. Copings, bases, and all kinds of stonework well done. Satisfaction guaranteed. Give him a trial.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 2


The Reported Medford Failure Untrue.
    The statement that A. L. Johnson, publisher of the Medford Monitor, had failed has been pretty thoroughly circulated and also telegraphed to the Portland papers. Mr. Johnson, however, denounces it as a canard and says that it has no foundation in truth. He reports that he has amply secured all preferred creditors, and that he will be able, in the near future, to pay all his obligations at 100 cents on the dollar. We trust that he may be able to stem the tide and triumph over whatever financial misfortune may threaten him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3


Medford Election.
    The town election held here last Monday was a spirited one and called out a good vote. We learn that John S. Miller was elected marshal, 'Squire Walton recorder, and Chas. Strang treasurer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3


    Jacksonville will have a branch railroad this year. Enough has been subscribed to guarantee its building.
    W. G. Kenney has retired from business in Medford and probably will locate in Jacksonville with his family.
    Ed. Helms safely pilots the stage through the muddy road between here and Medford, vice I. L. Hamilton, who is still ill with typhoid fever at the latter place.
    Jacksonville needs a railroad badly and must have one. The few old fogies who are opposing such a scheme ought to see by this time what we lost in letting the     O.&C.R.R. leave us out in the cold, and subscribe liberally.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
SHAW-BEVER--At the residence of the bride's parents in Medford, Jan. 4th, by Rev. W. P. Williams, Miss Sarah M. Bever and W. F. Shaw of Whitman County, W.T.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3


RAILROAD MEETING.
    A meeting of citizens of Jacksonville was held at the town hall on the evening of Jan. 3, 1887, to take steps regarding the building of a railroad from Jacksonville to connect the town with the main line of the O.&C.R.R. running through the valley.
    On motion Judge Day was elected chairman and J. Nunan secretary.
    H. K. Hanna gave his views regarding the amending of the charter so that the town could become directly interested in that enterprise, and thought such amendment would not be of any avail.
    Mr. Klippel thought by taxation we could build our railroad to the main line.
    Mr. Dunlap gave his views regarding the receipts of 600 tons at $2 per ton, or $1200, for freights between Jacksonville and Medford. He said the total length of the road would be almost four miles and a half.
    On motion of Mr. Klippel a committee of five was appointed to solicit subscriptions to a capital stock of $25,000.
    The chair appointed as such committee A. L. Reuter, N. Langell, Dr. Jackson, H. Klippel and K. Kubli.
    On motion of Mr. Langell, the chair appointed Messrs. Hanna and Kahler to look into the law and see if the corporation has the authority to construct a railroad and depot buildings within the corporation [city limits].
    On motion the meeting adjourned until next Monday evening.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3


Bright Railroad Prospects.
    Our citizens held a large and enthusiastic meeting at the town hall last Monday evening, at which the proposition to connect Jacksonville with the O.&C.R.R. by rail was thoroughly discussed. After considerable desultory talk it was agreed that a company with a capital stock of $25,000 be organized, to inaugurate this enterprise, shares to be $1 each, and a committee was appointed to solicit subscriptions to the same. A portion of this committee has been actively engaged in the work for the past few days and are succeeding admirably. When we went to press over $15,000 had been subscribed, and the prospects were favorable that our hopes would be realized. The town government cannot legally become interested in this project, but will no doubt render valuable assistance in its consummation. The people of Jacksonville are to be congratulated upon their enterprise and staying qualities. In less than a year they will probably have a railroad of their own, when a new era of prosperity and improvement will dawn. There is no computing the benefit a branch railroad will be, and without we would ultimately lose our importance as a business center.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887, page 3

THE RIDDLE HOUSE!
Medford, Oregon,
J. B. RIDDLE, Prop'r.
----
THIS HOUSE HAS BEEN THOROUGHLY fitted up with new and elegant furniture and is second to none south of Portland.
    Special pains taken in making commercial travelers feel at home.
    The tables are supplied with the best of everything the market affords.
----
FAMOUS GEM SALOON!
J. B. RIDDLE PROPRIETOR.

----
ONLY THE FINEST WINES, LIQUORS and Cigars are kept on hand and a first-class billiard table is connected with the saloon. The leading papers of the day can also be found on the reading tables.
    The proprietor is also sole agent of Medford for the Celebrated Rogue River Whiskeys.
    The saloon will always be found open at the arrival of all trains.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 7, 1887 et seq., page 3


MEDFORD'S IMPROVEMENTS.
MEDFORD, Or., Jan. 3. 1887.      
    EDITOR TIDINGS.--I send you herewith a partial list of the improvements made in Medford during the past year. It is as nearly accurate as I could make it, but is, of course, subject to correction. After footing the column and examining the total, you will have to admit that you were in error in stating last week that Central Point, next to Ashland, has expended more in improvements during the year than any other town in the valley.
A. L. Johnson, brick office and dwelling . . . . . . . . . . $2,000
Williams' block, two-story brick building . . . . . . . . . . 6,000
J. S. Howard, 2-story brick store  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3,000
Angle & Plymale, fireproof brick store . . . . . . . . . . . . 4,000
G. S. Walton, brick building . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,500
Byers & Jacobs, brick hotel improvement  . . . . . . . . . . 2,000
Mrs. L. Foster, millinery and dwelling (combined) . . . 1,000
H. F. Baker, Farmers Warehouse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200
S. H. Lyon, store  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    800
O. Holtan, tailor shop and dwelling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000
Thos. Harris, improvement on dwelling . . . . . . . . . . . . .    300
McGee & Zimmerman, public hall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,200
J. B. Riddle, poultry yards  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    800
A. L. Johnson, barn . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    500
____ Clark, dwelling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,800
C. K. Fronk, dwelling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    900
A. P. Talent, dwelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000
J. W. Short, dwelling  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,500
N. H. West, dwelling repair . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    200
W. G. Zimmerman, ditto  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .      50
R. T. Young, dwelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2,000
Wm. Edwards, dwelling . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1,000
E. J. Pool, blacksmith shop . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .    150
        Total  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . $34,900
Ashland Tidings, January 7, 1887, page 3

MARRIED
WILLIAMS-SWENSEN--In Medford precinct, Dec. 23d, by Elder H. C. Fleming, J. A. Williams and Miss Gertrude Swensen.
Ashland Tidings, January 7, 1887


    A citizens' meeting was held Monday, January 4, 1887, in the town hall of Jacksonville, to devise a way or means of connecting the town with the main line of the O.&C.R.R. Judge Day was elected chairman and J. Nunan secretary. On motion a committee of five persons was appointed to open stock books and solicit subscriptions to the capital stock of the Jacksonville Branch O.&C.R.R., said stock being  25,000 shares of the value of $1 per share. The committee have already secured over $15,000, with a good number of people yet to hear from.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, January 13, 1887, page 6


    Look out for the Jacksonville railroad's engine. Its whistle will be blowing before the end of the year.
    It is said that Geo. Brown, formerly stage driver between here and Medford, left for parts unknown a few days since, leaving several creditors behind.
    Better times in Jacksonville will certainly be the result of the completion of the proposed railroad. Everybody interested should subscribe as liberally as possible.
    In the next issue of the Times will be published a list of those who subscribed to the stock of the Jacksonville branch railroad, with the sum pledged by each subscriber. We may also publish a list of the very few who have refused to aid this enterprise, as it will not take much space to do so.
    It is reported that a prominent citizen of Medford, while in a fit of aberration and despondency, made an attempt to commit suicide by jumping off the Rogue River bridge, but was prevented from doing so by his traveling companion. He has since been suffering from a severe attack of nervous prostration.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The new town officials have qualified.
    A first-class cook is wanted at the Central Hotel.
    Dr. Will Jackson, Jacksonville's dentist, will be here on the 17th and remain a week.
    The Medford Aid Society held its last meeting at the residence of Mrs. G. H. Haskins on the 12th inst.
    This place hopes to become connected with Jacksonville by a branch railroad and will assist as much as possible toward it.
    A protracted meeting is being held at Zimmerman & McGee's hall in this place by Revs. Jones and Sails, and attracting considerable attention.
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling-house not far from the center of the town of Medford. For particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton, real estate agent.
    Lew Johnson's colored minstrels performed at this place, in Howard's hall, last Monday night, to a fair-sized audience. They gave general satisfaction.
    The firms of Kenney & Worman and Riddle & Wolters having been dissolved, each publish dissolution notices in another column of the Times. Read them.
    Medford has no newspaper now, the Monitor having suspended from lack of patronage. It is an undeniable fact that Rogue River Valley can support only two or three good newspapers, and we expect to hear of another of those now in existence "passing in its checks" before 1888.
    An interesting meeting was held by the citizens of Medford last Saturday evening to take steps toward securing railroad connection with Jacksonville through the proposed branch line. Hon. J. D. Whitman, J. B. Riddle and J. S. Howard were appointed as a committee to look after this matter and also solicit subscriptions.
    R. M. Shely, a first-class marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford, where he is prepared to fill orders in this line in the best style and at the lowest living rates. He can furnish monuments, tombstones, etc., of every description and at any price. Copings, bases, and all kinds of stonework well done. Satisfaction guaranteed. Give him a trial.
    There were some errors in our list of the newly elected officials of this place. The following persons were chosen to fill the respective offices for the coming year on the first Monday in January. Trustees, J. B. Riddle, T. A. Harris, G. H. Haskins, A. Childers and J. S. Howard; recorder, G. W. Walton; treasurer, Chas. Wolters; street commissioner, J. A. Whiteside; marshal, John S. Miller.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1887, page 3


RAILROAD MEETING.
    The following are proceedings which took place at the railroad meeting held at the town hall in this place on last Monday night which was well attended and enthusiastic as furnished us by J. Nunan, secretary of said meeting.
    The finance committee reported already subscribed $15,400 and asked for further time to make a more thorough canvass.
    Messrs. Whitman and Howard, Medford representatives, presented the minutes of a meeting which was held by the citizens of that place; said minutes were read proving very encouraging, the people consenting to do all in their power financially towards the enterprise provided the railroad connected at that place.
    Mr. Whitman, of Medford, was then called upon and made a few neat and conciliatory remarks.
    On motion the finance committee was empowered to employ a competent surveyor to make a preliminary examination of the proposed route to some point on the O.&C.R.R. so as to make a partial estimate of the cost of the construction of said railroad.
    On motion a committee of three was appointed by the chair to ascertain in what manner the right of way for said railroad from Jacksonville to Medford on the O.&C.R.R. could be procured. The following gentlemen were appointed: J. W. Merritt and A. H. Maegly, of Jacksonville, and J. D. Whitman, of Medford.
    Motion to adjourn being in order, the same was carried and meeting adjourned to be called by the chairman.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1887, page 3


Medford's Improvements.
    A correspondent says: I send you herewith a partial list of the improvements made in Medford during the past year. It is as nearly accurate as I could make it, but is, of course, subject to correction. After footing the column and examining the total, you will have to admit that you were in error in stating last week that Central Point, next to Ashland, has expended more in improvements during the year than any other town in the valley: A. L. Johnson's brick office and dwelling, $2,000; Williams' block, two-story brick building, $6,000; J. S. Howard, 2-story brick store, $3,000; Angle & Plymale, fireproof brick store, $4,000; G. S. Walton, brick building, $2,500; Byers & Jacobs, brick hotel imp't., $2,000; Mrs. L. Foster, millinery and dwelling, $1,000; H. E. Baker, farmers warehouse, $1,200; S. H. Lyon, store, $800; O. Holtan, tailor shop and dwelling, $1,000; Thos. Harris, imp't. on dwelling, $300; McGee & Zimmerman, public hall, $1,200; J. B. Riddle, poultry yards, $800; A. L. Johnson, barn, $500; ------ Clark, dwelling, $1,800; C. K. Fronk, dwelling, $900; A. P. Talent, $1,000; John W. Short, $1,800; N. H. West, dwelling repair; $200; W. G. Zimmerman, ditto, $50; R. T. Young, dwelling [omission]; Wm. Edwards, dwelling, $1,000; E. J. Pool, blacksmith shop, $150. Total $34,800.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 14, 1887, page 3


Suspended Publication.
    In the Medford Monitor of last Saturday, the publisher, A. L. Johnson, announced that the publication of the paper would be suspended after that issue, as it had not support enough to sustain it. Mr. Johnson was then already in the midst of pecuniary difficulties which have since culminated.
Ashland Tidings, January 14, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Medford is now out of debt and has money in the treasury.
    H. Kinney, the painter, was at the county seat a few days since.
    Elder M. Peterson will hold services at this place on Sunday next.
    J. W. Cunnyngham is still at Portland and his health is not the best.
    Our newly elected town officials are now in charge of municipal affairs.
    Prof. Scott Morris has resigned his position as principal of the district school here.
    Geo. Stockton, formerly foreman of the Monitor, has gone to the Willamette Valley.
    A. L. Johnson, the real estate agent, who has been very sick, is somewhat improved at this writing.
    M. E. Beatty is assisting Botts and Dave to attend to the wants of the numerous patrons of the Riddle House.
    G. W. Williams, the well-known builder, has gone to Siskiyou County, Cal., to follow his trade. He is a first-class mechanic.
    G. W. Howard and B. F. Adkins, who have been paying their old homes in Iowa and Indiana a visit, returned home this week. Welcome!
    Our people desire railroad connection with Jacksonville and will do their utmost to secure it. No doubt it will prove of much benefit to both places.
    The new Presbyterian Church in this place will be plastered as soon as the weather will permit, being already enclosed. It will be a very neat edifice.
    The Union livery stable, under the new management, continues to furnish the best of turnouts. Shorty Hamilton and Billy Beek are assisting Ed. to accommodate the public.
    The religious meeting which have been held at McGee & Zimmerman's hall for the past few weeks will soon come to an end. Much interest was manifested and several converts are reported.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 21, 1887, page 2


    Hurrah for Jacksonville's branch railroad!
    Jacksonville's future depends entirely on the branch railroad, and it must and will be built. There is no time for hesitation.
    There are still a few residents of this place and vicinity who should subscribe liberally to our railroad enterprise. In some cases they will be benefited more by rail connection than most of those who have already subscribed in a commendable manner.
    Notwithstanding the fact that there is still quite a gap between the Oregon and California railroads, overland travel is increasing steadily, many preferring a day's staging to the horrors of a sea voyage. When the two roads are connected, its passenger traffic will be immense.
    The subscription to the stock of the Jacksonville branch railroad is increasing steadily. We are sorry to say that a few refuse to contribute their share toward the enterprise, though we believe they will not refuse to accept the benefit that it will be to them. It is to be hoped that they will yet show the liberality that is reasonably expected of them.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 21, 1887, page 3


Railroad Ball.
    As will be seen by advertisement elsewhere, the Jacksonville Silver Cornet Band proposes giving a grand ball for the benefit of the branch railroad fund. No pains nor expense will be spared to make it a first-class and enjoyable event, and, as it is in a commendable cause, we hope to see it very well patronized. Don't fail to attend.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 21, 1887, page 3


    Scott Morris, of the Meadows, who has been principal of the Medford school, has resigned that position.
    A railroad from Jacksonville to Medford would be a great accommodation to the people of this part of the valley who have business at the county seat.
    Engineer D. McCarthy, who has been in charge of the railroad shops at Grants Pass during the absence of Supt. Kinser in the East, is again at his place on the passenger train, and is considerably improved in health by the change and rest.
    The people of Medford held a meeting to consider the project of raising funds to assist in the building of the proposed railroad between that place and Jacksonville, and a committee consisting of J. D. Whitman, J. B. Riddle and J. S. Howard was appointed to solicit subscriptions.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 21, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD MUTTERINGS.
    Mrs. I. J. Phipps is quite unwell at present.
    A. L. Johnson has been dangerously ill during the past week, but is now convalescent.
    Revs. Jones and Sails are holding a successful series of revival meetings here at present.
    Geo. Stockton, chief typo of the late Monitor, is now visiting relatives in the Willamette Valley.
    The Presbyterian church here in progress of construction is almost completed, and presents a very handsome appearance.
    Prof. Scott Morris has resigned his position. Hereafter the school will be conducted by Miss Molly Merriman, assisted by Miss Sophia Wilson.
    The select school in charge of Prof. H. G. Fairclo is proving a grand success, there being about seventy-five pupils now in attendance. Mr. F. is ably assisted by Miss Mary Loretz.
    The Jacksonville R.R. boom is subsiding. No doubt that a branch road from Medford to the county seat would be a great accommodation for the traveling public, but we fear that it would also be a "big elephant" on the hands of its stockholders.
    Miss Melle Wrisley went north on last night's train to visit her sister Laura, of Salem, Or., where the latter has been for several months undergoing medical treatment. Her condition at present is such that but little hope for her recovery is entertained.
Ashland Tidings, January 21, 1887, page 3


W. G. Zimmerman and S. B. McGee to Etta Zimmerman, lot in Medford; consideration, $125.
Spencer Childers to David Payne, lot in Medford; $150.
I. J. Phipps to M. Purdin, lot in Medford; $150.
J. A. Whiteside to Max Muller and B. W. Powell, lots in Medford; $250.
O.T. Co. to Wilson Maule, lots in Medford; $200.
M. E. Dougherty to T. A. Harris, lot in Medford; $500.
I. J. Phipps to J. H. Brantner, lot of Medford; $150.
C. W. Skeel to Geo. Dietrich, lot in Medford; $62.50.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 2


    Don't forget the railroad ball on Feb. 18th. It will be a grand affair.
    If you have not subscribed to the stock of the Jacksonville branch railroad, don't fail to do so at once.
    The whistle of the Jacksonville branch railroad will be waking the echoes before the end of the year.
    Always keep Jacksonville's branch railroad prominently in view. Upon it depends the future prosperity of the town.
    The Medford correspondent of the Ashland Tidings says the Jacksonville railroad boom is subsiding. This is far from the truth. No doubt his wish is father to the thought.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Prof. Williams intends giving an invitation party on St. Valentine's Day.
    T. A. Harris keeps his market well supplied with choice meats of all kinds.
    E. B. Sears, formerly of this place, now resides at Wilderville, Josephine County.
    G. W. Hoover, formerly of this place, is now employed in a leading tinshop in Portland.
    Dr. Jackson, the Jacksonville dentist, has been spending several days here, and has been kept busy.
    H. Kinney talks of going to southern California to follow his chosen profession. He is an excellent painter.
    Doctors Pryce and Geary have handsome offices in Hamlin's block and are kept busy responding to calls.
    Nothing has been seen or heard of O. H. Burton for some time, but it is believed that he is still at the county seat.
    The Monitor office is in the hands of the sheriff, who levied an attachment on it at the instance of Mrs. Stanley.
    Revs. Jones and Sails baptized a number of persons on Bear Creek last Monday. A large crowd witnessed the ceremonies.
    H. G. Fairclo's select school is very well attended. The Prof. is an excellent teacher and his pupils are steadily advancing.
    Seventh Street is in fine condition, notwithstanding the late storms, and is an illustration of what plenty of gravel will do.
    S. P. Williams has sold his interested in the barbershop adjoining the Gem Saloon to a tonsorial artist whose name we have not learned.
    Charley Wolters of the City Bakery finds his business increasing so much that he will soon enlarge his premises and also put in a stock of groceries.
    F. Hubbard keeps a full supply of plows, agricultural implements and machinery of standard brands, which he is disposing of at reasonable rates.
    Misses Merriman and Wilson continue to teach their respective departments in the district school, although the principal resigned some weeks since.
    R. T. Lawton, notary public, real estate agent and money lender, may be found at his office at any time, ready to attend to business in his line. He is accurate and prompt and may be relied on.
    Some excellent lumber is being received at Henry Smith's lumber yard here. F. L. Cranfill, manager of Mr. Smith's business, never fails in giving satisfaction, and is ably assisted in the store by Mrs. C.
    The Brewery Saloon, under the management of Gus. Carlson, is a popular resort, where the best of wines, liquors and cigars are dispensed. A fine billiard table may also be found there. Read his advertisement elsewhere.
    The religious meeting which have been held at McGee & Zimmerman's hall for the past few weeks came to an end last Sunday evening when there was a large attendance, and quite a number occupied the mourner's bench.
    Messrs. Adkins and Howard, who returned from east of the Rocky Mountains recently, were glad to get home. They have enjoyed our mild climate too long to ever be satisfied with that they encountered in Indiana and Iowa.
    Dr. Geary, who excels as an oculist, removed a cataract from the eye of the mother of S. C. Taylor of Eden precinct, a lady over eighty years of age, lately; the operation was entirely successful, and the lady can see quite well again.
    R. M. Shely, a first-class marble cutter, has resumed business at Medford, where he is prepared to fill orders in his line in the best style and at the lowest living rates. He can furnish monuments, tombstones, etc. of every description and at any price. Copings, bases and all kinds of stonework well done. Satisfaction guaranteed. Give him a trial.
    The installation of officers of
Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., took place not long since, when A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M., installed the following: I. A. Webb, N.G.; J. F. Kelley, V.G.; C. K. Fronk, R.S.; Isaac Woolf, P.S.; G. H. Haskins, Treas.; A. Childers, W.; S. Rosenthal, Cond.; H. Kinney, I.G.; B. S. Webb, R.S.N.G.; B. S. Powell, L.S.N.G.; Geo. F. Webb, R.S.V.G.; A. M. Woodford, L.S.V.G.; H. G. Fairclo, L.S.S.; G. W. Howard, R.S.S.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


BORN.
JONES--In Medford, Jan. 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. Geo. E. Jones, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


BREWERY SALOON
AUGUST CARLSON, Prop.
COR. A & 7th STREETS, MEDFORD, OR
----
THIS MOST FAVORITE RESORT has been thoroughly refitted and furnished in the most modern style, including a fine billiard table. The bar is always supplied with the choicest brands of
        WINES, LIQUORS,
BEER AND CIGARS,          
and the leading papers can always be found on the tables.
    Special pains taken to accommodate patrons and visitors. Call and see me.
                                                                                           A. H. CARLSON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887 et seq., page 3


Preliminary Line Finished.
    Frank Huffer and party, who have been running a preliminary line between Jacksonville and Medford, finished their labors a few days since. They found a favorable route--one that can be constructed at no very great expense. The distance between the two places is five miles, less 800 feet, and the grade is not heavy, after the first mile, while there will be no cut or fill of over three feet on the whole line, and but few culverts. We think that there will be little difficulty in obtaining the right-of-way at a small cost, as the survey runs along the south side of the county road, and in most places it will only be necessary to set the fences back in order to make a good and sufficient roadbed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887, page 3


Trespass Notice.
    All persons are notified not to enter my land, situated between Jacksonville and Medford, adjoining the old Tice place, on any pretense whatever. Considerable damage has already been done by trespassers, and I have been compelled to resort to the law in such cases provided.
CHAS. NICKELL
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887, page 3


A Liberal Proposal.
    The citizens of Central Point promise to donate the right-of-way and subscribe a liberal sum besides to the proposed Jacksonville branch railroad if their town is made one of the termini. This is a very fair proposition and will probably be reduced to writing soon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887, page 3


    While making the preliminary survey for the branch railroad Frank Huffer ascertained that Medford was about 120 feet lower than Jacksonville.
    The people of Jacksonville are more determined than ever to build the branch road, because it is a feasible project and will be of great benefit to the town.
    There seems to be no obstacle in the way at present to prevent the building of the Jacksonville branch railroad. Everything is favorable for the consummation of the enterprise.
    The preliminary survey of the Jacksonville branch railroad shows that it is considerably downhill from here to Medford, there being a grade of 93 feet in the first mile. In the remaining four miles there is comparatively little grade.
    The Postal Telegraph Co. will put in a line between Jacksonville and the main line before long, when we will have the best of telegraph service from two companies, as well as a branch railroad. Verily prosperous times are in store for our town.
    A preliminary line having been run to Medford to ascertain the distance from this place to that and what obstacles are to be encountered in the construction of a railroad, it is now proposed to do likewise in another direction--to Central Point--we learn.
    The Ashland Tidings says: "A railroad from Jacksonville to Medford would be a great accommodation to the people of this part of the valley who have business at the county seat." Such would generally be the case, and the enterprise would be well patronized by parties outside of our town.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Chas. W. Broback is now a resident of Hopland, Mendocino County, Cal.
    S. W. Swafford has returned from California and relocated in this precinct.
    Dr. J. O. Allen of this place will probably open a school in phonography at Ashland soon.
    Rev. T. L. Sails, the evangelist who made such an impression here, is engaged in similar work at East Portland, his home.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Remember the band ball.
    A number of improvements are in contemplation.
    Wm. Edwards is having a neat residence built, which is nearly completed.
    Amusements are numerous, notwithstanding the disagreeable weather.
    A. L. Johnson is able to attend to business again, after a severe spell of sickness.
    Oscar Burton and Dave Crosby, two of our leading dudes, have been at your place rather often of late.
    Mrs. J. M. Ogan of this place has been canvassing in different portions of the county for an interesting paper.
    Celebrate the birthday of the "Father of His Country" by attending the band ball. All who attend will have a grand time.
    E. J. Pool has ceased blacksmithing in this place and recently removed to E. F. Walker's farm in Manzanita precinct.
    The Baptists have secured McGee & Zimmerman's hall for a few weeks and are holding a protracted meeting there. Revs. Black, Stearns and others will officiate.
    The Medford select school continues to flourish and has so large an attendance that Prof. Fairclo has been compelled to employ two assistants--Misses Soliss and Loretz.
    Prof. Williams announces an invitation party at Howard's hall on the evening of St. Valentine's Day--next Monday. It will no doubt be well attended, as it will be a fine affair.
    A prominent young man of this place this week took out a license to wed a young lady living a few miles from town, and they are probably one by this time. Congratulations are in order at least.
    C. W. Stanfield, an expert hand at the business, is in charge of the Central House and is building up a good patronage. The best of meals and lodgings furnished at 25 cents each. Satisfaction guaranteed.
    Bear Creek has been too high for fording, and those living on the east side who wished to reach this place were compelled to leave their horses on the other side and cross the footbridge. Could there be no argument for a county bridge here?
    The Medford concert band, as will be seen by advertisement elsewhere, will give a grand ball at Howard's hall on Tuesday evening, Feb. 22d--Washington's birthday. The best of supper and music will be furnished and no pains spared for the success of the event. Give the band a first-class benefit, as they deserve it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 11, 1887, page 2

    Don't forget to subscribe to the stock of the branch railroad ere it is too late, as it may be at a premium before very long, and there will be none for sale then.
    When spring comes active operations will be commenced on the Jacksonville branch railroad. There is no reason why it should not be built and every reason why it should be completed at once.
    The stage running between this place and Medford broke down under its load one evening last week, shortly after leaving town. The snow was over a foot deep and the road quite rough at the time.
    No pains are being spared to make the railroad ball, which will take place in Jacksonville on the evening of the 18th, a grand success. The best of music and supper will be provided and everything possible done for the convenience and pleasure of the guests.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 11, 1887, page 3


Medford Mutterings.
    The snowstorm caught some of our stockmen napping. Some stock is already dead, and should the snow remain a few days longer, the loss for some will be severe.
    The latest railroad rumor here is a scheme to construct a narrow-gauge road from Central Point to Eagle Point. Probably this is as good a line as any upon which to speculate, so long as nothing more than the "wind work" is undertaken.
    The protracted meeting is still in progress here. Dr. Baker of Salem and other ministers of northern Oregon are expected soon to aid in the work.
    Miss Carrie Baker of this place has been employed to fill the vacancy in the Medford public schools caused by the resignation of Prof. Scott Morris.
STYLUS.       
    Medford, Or., Feb. 9, 1887.
Ashland Tidings, February 11, 1887, page 3


    At the residence of the bride's mother, Mrs. Vrooman, in Medford, on Wednesday afternoon last, at two o'clock, Mr. N. A. Jacobs and Miss Emma Strang were married by Rev. M. A. Williams.
    "Bud" Hamlin, of Medford precinct, was arrested Monday upon the charge of rape preferred by a Mr. Wood; and after a hearing before the justice at Medford was held in $400 bonds to appear before the next grand jury. The bonds were furnished. The alleged victim is a girl about fifteen years of age, daughter of Mr. Wood.
    Wm. Angle and wife are entertaining a new guest. It is a boy. He arrived on the 13th inst.--[Medford Mutterings]
Ashland Tidings, February 18, 1887


MARRIED.
JACOBS-STRANG--In Medford, Feb. 16th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, N. A. Jacobs and Miss Emma Strang.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Marriages are becoming numerous in this place and vicinity.
    Everybody is going to the band ball next Tuesday evening.
    H. Kinney, one of our knights of the brush, will soon leave for southern California.
    H. F. Wood, the scientific carpenter, has just finished a neat residence for Wm. Edwards of this place.
    Rev. Dr. Baker of Salem, a prominent divine, is assisting in the protracted meeting now progressing here.
    The Baptist meeting being held at Zimmerman & McGee's hall is still going on and attracting considerable attention.
    We are sorry to learn that the invitation party announced to take place Monday night was not a success, as it deserved be well patronized.
    Geo. W. Williams, the builder and architect, is in San Bernardino, Cal., and reports a boom in that section, with plenty of work for mechanics.
    Miss Carrie Baker, an excellent teacher, has succeeded Scott Morris as principal of the district school. The attendance is increasing and a good school is promised.
    Prof. Fairclo, principal of our select school, and Miss Annie Murray of Manzanita precinct, were united in matrimony one night last week. We wish them much joy and prosperity.
    No pains are being spared to make the ball, to be held here next Tuesday evening (Washington's birthday), a grand success, which it will no doubt prove. The best of music and supper will be provided.
    The charter of this place has been amended by the legislature, through the efforts of Senator Stanley and Representative Bowditch. We are not aware what changes have been made, but will doubtless know in due course of time.
    A runaway took place here last Sunday, but no serious injury resulted therefrom, though it was a narrow escape. Wm. Beek, who was driving one of E. Worman's teams on Seventh Street, hit one of the horses with the whip, which started up and turned the corner suddenly, throwing the driver to the ground. The wheels ran over Beek's head, but, singularly enough, did not hurt him much, while the team ran to the end of the street and collided with a tree, demoralizing the vehicle, but doing no other damage.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


Big Sticky Items.
    One of our belles was married to Prof. Fairclo last week.
    Marriage has become a popular thing in Rogue River Valley. We hear of several weddings being on the tapis, but must not say further.
    There is plenty of snow in this region as yet and prospects of spring farming are gloomy. Fall-sown grain is looking well--at least when we saw it last.
    Letters received from California lately state that everything is dried up and blowing away there. Oregonians ought to be happy, even if they are wallowing in the snow and mud.
VALENTINE.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


New Road Wanted.
    Quite a number of citizens of Manzanita and Medford precincts desire that the county commissioners should order a road opened between Jas. Bigham's place and the town of Medford, and have presented a long petition to that effect. It is claimed that there is no public thoroughfare in that vicinity and that much difficulty is experienced in traveling through the neighborhood on that account. The commissioners should see that every necessary and practical public improvement is made, and as this seems to be one of them, we hope that they will consider this matter favorably.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


Line to Central Point.
    Frank Huffer and surveying party, who are doing the preliminary work for the Jacksonville branch railroad, last week ran a line to Central Point, and to the astonishment of all found that it was 1200 feet shorter than the line run to Medford recently. It runs through the lands of Col. Miller, Armstrong estate, M. Hanley, Chambers estate, Capt. Barnes and Beall estate, but does not seriously injure any of them.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


    The Jacksonville branch railroad is an enterprise that must and will be built this year.
    Medford celebrates Washington's birthday with a grand ball in the evening, under the auspices of the cornet band.
    Everybody should attend the railroad ball tonight and show their appreciation of the grand enterprise in prospect.
    The railroad ball will bring out a number of handsome toilettes, the ladies taking much interest in the affair themselves.
    The roads between the two ends of the railroad are so rough that a great portion of the mail from California is sent by Portland steamers.
    Keep the Jacksonville branch railroad prominently in view. Those who have not subscribed should not fail to do so at once. It should be remembered that in securing the road they not only have an interested in it, but at the same time enhance the price of their real estate and establish a permanent prosperity in our town.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 18, 1887, page 3


Correspondence.
Medford, Or., Feb. 11, '87.
    Ed. Courier:--We have been so busy for the past few weeks that we have not been able to comply with our promise to give you a weekly letter. Will you forgive us for dereliction of duty?
    Snow, mud and water reign almost supreme in Medford. Stock men are anxious about their stock this stormy weather. It is feared that the loss in cattle and sheep will be large.
    Protracted meeting is going on in McGee and Zimmerman's hall at this place, and much interest is manifested in them by the people. Rev. J. C. Baker of Salem is now aiding in them. Quite a number have professed conversion, and many more are enquiring the way of life.
    The solons of the Oregon Legislature seem to be in quite a muddle on the act to incorporate Grants Pass. It occurs to us that any who are interested in the future growth and development of Grants Pass would favor the act. Grants Pass ought to be an incorporated town.
    Elder M. Peterson was in town last Wednesday.
    Wonder why the editor of the defunct Monitor remains so closely housed up?
    Miss Carrie Baker has recently taken a position in the Medford High School.
    Rev. A. Brown of Williams Creek, who has been visiting friends in Medford, returned home last Monday. While here he gave us a good, sound, logical sermon on the text "Come and See."
    Rumor has it that a certain professor in Medford will wed one of his pupils on Sunday next.
    Beautiful overhead today.
PLOW PLOW.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, February 18, 1887, page 3


Correspondence.
Medford, Or., Feb. 21, '87.
    Snowed again last night.
    Baptizing today at Medford.
    There has been some little talk of reviving the Medford Monitor.
    Rev. J. C. Baker, who has been aiding in the meetings, returned to his home in Salem.
    Married in Medford on the 17th inst., by Rev. Father Williams, N. A. Jacobs and Miss Emma Strang.
    Rev. Dr. Baker's sermons will be remembered long by the people of Medford. They were sound to the core.
    Prof. Horace Fairclo and Miss Anna Murray were united in marriage at the residence of the bride's mother, by Rev. C. Hoxie, on the 13th inst.
    The meetings conducted by the Baptists in McGee & Zimmerman's hall still continues with increasing interest. Twenty-one have united with the Baptist Church.
    Those who love to trip to the sound of music essayed to get up a dance on the night of the 14th, but so deeply interested were the people in the meetings that it was a complete failure. For tomorrow night the "gay" and "giddy" have their card out for another, but--.
PLOW PLOW.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, February 25, 1887, page 3

    The survey of the Jacksonville branch railroad has been completed to Medford. Another survey will be made from Jacksonville to Central Point to ascertain which is the more practical a route for the proposed road. The estimated cost, including necessary engines, cars, etc., is $21,650. Of this amount $17,000 has already been guaranteed.
"Railroad Notes," Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 24, 1887, page 3


THE BRANCH RAILROAD A NECESSITY.
    There are people who cannot or will not see the necessity of connecting Jacksonville with the main line of the O.&C.R.R. by rail. Happily they are VERY few in numbers. They advance reasons for their theory, but none can deny that Jacksonville has lost at least some of its prestige as a trade center, and that the present state of affairs may gradually get worse unless something is done to regain the business which has slipped away. Outside parties--those who can and do look at our dilemma from a disinterested standpoint--all agree that a branch railroad will do much to maintain the importance of our town, if it does not place it on the road to prosperity, and several newspapers have discussed the matter and view it in the same light. Among the latter is the Portland Mercury, which in its last issue truthfully says:
    Jacksonville is another of those beautiful little towns that finds itself avoided by the crow-flight of the overland railroad route to our sister State, and has already begun to feel the rivalry of such small towns as Medford and Central Point, which are the principal shipping points in that portion of the Rogue River Valley, the most picturesque section in western Oregon. Jacksonville is nearly five miles off the road, and yet she is the center of a great deal of slowly accumulated wealth. You can go to San Francisco and pick out scores of capitalists there who got their first start in Jacksonville. Many of those are still special partners in enterprises carried on there, spending their share of the profits abroad and contributing nothing to the progress or development of the country. If a branch railroad were built from Jacksonville to some of the younger towns on the main line, the old town would continue to "hold the top hand" and still be a place of importance. It lies in the center of the only vine-producing part of Oregon and will have many sources of great wealth, long after placer mining is discontinued altogether. Her business men must have a railroad to tap the main line, if they have to build it themselves. We have a belief that they will do it, and that before long, for they are not the kind of men to get left.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 2


Railroad Meeting.
    Notice is hereby given that the committee heretofore appointed to have the ground surveyed for a railroad from Jacksonville to connect with the O.&C.R.R., and to estimate the cost of constructing said railroad, will report their proceedings at a special meeting to convene at the town hall in Jacksonville on Monday evening next, February 28, 1887, at ? o'clock [sic], at which time it is contemplated to organize a joint stock company, and to open books for the purpose of receiving subscriptions to the capital stock of the Jacksonville branch of the O.&C.R.R. Let everybody attend that can and let us have a rousing, good meeting, and demonstrate that the people of Jacksonville are alive to their interests.
SILAS J. DAY, Chairman.
J. NUNAN, Secretary.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 3


    Railroad meeting next Monday.
    Frank Huffer is engaged in estimating the cost of constructing the proposed branch railroad from this place and will have the estimates ready for consideration at the meeting next Monday evening.
    Harry McClallen had one of his fingers severely injured while the northbound train was stopping at Medford on the night of the 16th. He was in the act of jumping from the baggage car, when the ring on his fourth finger became fastened on an iron hook, and his entire weight falling on it, he received painful though fortunately not serious injuries.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 3


    D. Loring, who is in the employ of the O.&C.R.R. Co. at Portland, paid our town a visit during the forepart of the week.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Some prospective changes in real estate in this place are rumored.
    R. T. Lawton, our real estate and loan agent, is doing considerable business in his line.
    A number of horses were sold here to Mr. Allen, representing the S.P.R.R. Co. last week.
    E. Worman of the Union Livery Stable is kept busy attending to the wants of his numerous customers.
   D. W. Crosby and the Misses Riddle were in Jacksonville last Friday night and attended the railroad ball.
    John Wolters, lately of Ashland, is a resident of this place at present, being a member of his son Charles' household.
    Mr. Dougherty, a brother of Mrs. W. H. Barr of this precinct, who has been paying her a visit, returned to Eldorado, Mo., his home, recently.
    The roads leading into Medford are almost impassable, which makes business unusually dull here. Our road supervisor should remedy this as soon as possible, as it is a crying shame.
    W. H. Barr recently sent a waterfowl, resembling a seagull, which was killed near this place, to Dr. DeBar of Jacksonville, who will probably have it stuffed. It is quite a curiosity in this section.
    We inadvertently neglected to mention in our last that a bouncing boy had put in an appearance at the residence of Wm. Angle, one of our merchants, on the 14th inst. William is correspondingly elated.
    There are some cases of sickness in this vicinity, but none of a serious nature. Mrs. Dr. Adkins, Mrs. I. J. Phipps and a few other residents of this place, who have been considerably indisposed, are convalescent.
    The Riddle House is acknowledged by all to be one of the leading hotels in the State. Its rooms are neat and clean, excellent meals are served there, and no pains spared to make guests comfortable and entirely at home.
    W. K. Price was in Jacksonville last Saturday, looking for horses to replace the ones he had sold to A. J. Allen. He is still in charge of the old Broback place, not long since sold to Roberts & O'Neil by J. H. Barnum.
    The ball given by the Medford Cornet Band was a pleasant affair, but not as well attended as it should have been. The best of music had been provided, while the supper set at the Riddle House could not have been excelled.
    The protracted meeting which has been going on at McGee & Zimmerman's hall during the past few weeks, under the auspices of the Baptists, came to an end last Tuesday evening. It was well attended throughout and fifteen converts are reported.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 3
    The Jacksonville people are determined to have a branch railroad to Medford, on the O.&C.R.R. This is only one of the indications which go to show that in due time Oregon will be gridironed with railroads. Speed the day.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 25, 1887, page 4


    A large and enthusiastic meeting was held last night for the purpose of discussing the question of building a branch railroad to connect with the O.&C. Considerable time was taken up in the discussion of the matter, when it was voted to incorporate under the name of the Jacksonville Branch of the O.&C. Railroad. The incorporators are: Max Muller, Will Jackson, A. L. Reuter, Henry Klippel and M. J. Nunan [sic]. Capital stock, $300,000. It was not decided which place, Medford or Central Point, to build to, but is to be agreed upon by the stockholders.
"J
acksonville Items," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 2, 1887, page 1


    Another meeting to discuss the proposed Jacksonville branch railroad and to hear the report of Frank Huffer, who had finished the preliminary survey of the routes to both Central Point and Medford, was held Monday evening. The town hall was filled to overflowing and the greatest interest was manifested. Nearly everybody is interested in the enterprise.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 2


    This place has all the facilities necessary to make a first-class terminus for the Jacksonville branch railroad, and we hope your citizens will not overlook the advantages the route between the two places presents.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 2


RAILROAD MEETING.
    Pursuant to call of the chairman, a meeting of the citizens of Jacksonville was held in the town hall Monday evening , February 28th.
    Frank Huffer, civil engineer, to whom the contract for a preliminary survey was given, made his report of the two routes surveyed, viz: From Jacksonville to Medford and from Jacksonville to Central Point; also estimated cost of construction, including rolling stock, etc.
    On motion of Mr. Klippel, Mr. Huffer's report was accepted and ordered placed on file.
    Messrs. Hanna, Klippel, Maegly and Merritt addressed the meeting.
    On motion, it was decided that articles of incorporation be entered into and filed with the Secretary of State, to build the Jacksonville branch of the O.&C.R.R., with the following persons as incorporators: A. L. Reuter, Will Jackson, Max Muller, Henry Klippel and J. Nunan.
    A vote of thanks was extended Mr. Huffer and his corps of assistants for the able and satisfactory manner in which they discharged their duty.
    A motion to adjourn, subject to a call of the chairman, was carried.
S. J. DAY, Chairman.
J. NUNAN, Secretary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Janie McClendon, who has been a resident of this place for several months past, has returned home.
    A majority of our citizens are now of a religious turn of mind, and amusements will be below par until a change occurs.
    The roads between this place and the county seat never were in a worse condition than at present. It is a shame that such should be the case.
    Chas. W. Wolters, the enterprising proprietor of the bakery in this place, was in Jacksonville last Tuesday on business. He established a depot for his bread at the S.F. Variety Store in that place.
    Our citizens should not fail to secure connection with the proposed Jacksonville branch railroad, as it will prove quite beneficial. It will be a sad mistake to allow any other point to be one of the termini of that road.
    Under the revised Medford charter all business houses, etc., will be licensed in order to raise the required revenue for maintaining our town government. The street commissioner will be chosen by the trustees, instead of being elected by the people, which will be found a very tame proceeding.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of Chas. W. Wolters, who not only furnishes this market with the best of bread and pastry, but keeps a first-class stock of fancy groceries, provisions, tobaccos, cigars, candies, nuts, etc., besides. If you want anything in his line don't fail to give him a call, for he will please you.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 2


RAILROAD RECKONINGS.
    According to the report of Frank Huffer, engineer in charge of the preliminary work on the proposed Jacksonville branch railroad, it will cost the sum of $29,103.04 to build said road to Medford and $27.973.55 to build it to Central Point. These figures do not include freight charged on the O.&C.R.R. on rails, fastenings, motor and flatcar, neither the cost of the right-of-way, which will be inconsiderable, owing to expected concessions. Manager Koehler of the O.&C.R.R. estimated that the cost of building and equipping this line would be between $35,000 and $38,000, which is generally considered much too high. In our next issue we hope to be able to give a detailed statement of the estimates of both Messrs. Koehler and Huffer.
    At the meeting held last Monday evening Mr. Huffer's report was accepted, and a resolution passed to enter into articles of incorporation. Messrs. Nunan, Reuter, Klippel, Jackson and Muller have been designated as incorporators and the capital stock has been placed at $30,000. Two different sets of incorporation papers have been signed--one designating Medford as the terminus, the other naming Central Point. The route and town which offers the greatest inducements will be selected, and soon, too. The incorporators met Wednesday afternoon, and it was decided that two of them should interview the citizens of Medford, two the people of Central Point, while the fifth (Mr. Nunan) will endeavor to interest the wholesale merchants of Portland and San Francisco in our enterprise. Correspondence has also been opened with the S.P.R.R. Co., which will probably soon have control of the O.&C.R.R.
    Thus have the first steps toward the consummation of Jacksonville's most important enterprise been taken. It is sincerely to be hoped that such harmony and good judgment will prevail as to ensure success. There should be an entire absence of opposition that is not well founded, for a house divided against itself must certainly fall.
    About $18,000 has been subscribed to the capital stock of the railroad, and enough more has already been promised to make the sum $20,000. No doubt several thousand dollars will be subscribed by wholesale merchants in Portland and San Francisco, while other pecuniary assistance will be received from different sources.
    We consider that success is certain, if those most deeply interested are true to themselves, the welfare of our town and that of the people in general. That the branch railroad will be of great benefit to us all none can successfully dispute, and that our prosperity and importance as a trade center depends on rail connection with the O.&C.R.R. is equally as incontrovertible.   
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 3


    Hurrah for the branch railroad!
    Jacksonville must and will have the branch railroad. It is necessary to its prosperous existence.
    The municipal charters of Ashland, Jacksonville and Medford have each been amended during the session of the present legislature.
    There being no bakery at this place, a depot for bread manufactured by Charles Wolters of Medford has been established at the S.F. Variety Store.
    The land sold at sheriff's sale last Saturday was bid in by A. W. Presley at $300. The sale of the property in Medford was postponed until tomorrow for lack of bidders.
    Mr. Whitman, son of Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, made us a call last Monday. He has been sick for some time with typhoid fever, but has recovered sufficiently to resume his position with Battin & Co., commission merchants at Portland, for which place he starts this week.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 3


Medford Public School.
    The following are the names and average standing of the pupils of the Medford Public School, averaging 90 and above in examination for the month of February: Joe Thomas, 90; Lillie Grusch, 90; Mary Baker, 90; Hattie Galloway, 96; Homer Harvey, 94; Cecil Young, 94; Mamie Wilson, 93; Ora Adkins, 93; Milla Riddle, 93; Bert. Brandenburg, 90; Bert. Redden, 95; Minnie Cooper, 95; Clara Mingus; 90; Jessie Worman, 97; Mary Wilson, 90; Ray Young, 90; Mary Isaacs, 94; Meryl Colleen, 96; Helen Holton, 91; Julia Finnerty, 91; Virgie Woodford, 91; May Earhart, 93; Grace Amann, 94; Hattie Landis, 91; Sarah Colleen, 90.
CARRIE BAKER, Principal.
MOLLIE MERRIMAN, }
SOPHIE WILSON,         }    Assistants.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 3


N E W    B A K E R Y ! !
IN MEDFORD.
CHARLES WOLTERS, PROPRIETOR.

FRESH WHEAT
AND
GRAHAM BREAD
Always kept on hand.

Also a Complete Line of
                                COOKED CORN BEEF.
                                        BONELESS HERRING.
                                              CANNED CHICKEN.
                                                        BAKING POWDER.
                                                                LUNCH TONGUE.
                                                                        CHIPPED BEEF.
                                                                                  PEPPER SAUCE.
                                                                                          PIGS FEET.
CIGARS, CIGARETTES & TOBACCOS.
            CANDIES.
                    OYSTERS.
                           SARDINES.
                                   CRACKERS.
                                            CURRANTS.
                                                    BREAKFAST
                                                            CHOCOLATE.
                                                                    G R A H A M
                                                                            CRACKERS.
                                                                                    RAISINS.
                                                                                            CACHOUS.
                                                                                                    APPLES.
                                                                                                            CHEESE.
                                                                                                                    FLOUR.
                                                                                                                              ETC.
LEMONS, ORANGES AND FIGS.
MEDFORD, OR.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887 et seq., page 3


    It was decided at a mass meeting at Jacksonville, Or., to incorporate a company with a capital of $300,000 to build a railroad to connect with the Oregon and California Railroad at Medford or Central Point.
"Miscellaneous," Salt Lake Daily Tribune, March 6, 1887, page 3


JACKSONVILLE'S RAILROAD.
Bright Prospects for a Branch Line to Connect with the O.&C.
Jacksonville Times.
    According to the report of Frank Huffer, engineer in charge of the preliminary work on the proposed Jacksonville branch railroad, it will cost the sum of $29,103.04 to build said road to Medford and $27,973.55 to build it to Central Point. These figures do not include freight charged on the O.&C. railroad on rails, fastenings, motor and flatcar, neither the cost of the right-of-way, which will be inconsiderable, owing to expected concessions. Manager Koehler of the O.&C. railroad estimated the cost of building and equipping this line would be between $35,000 and $38,000, which is generally considered much too high. In our next issue we hope to be able to give a detailed statement of the estimates of both Messrs. Koehler and Huffer.
    At the meeting held last Monday evening Mr. Huffer's report was accepted, and a resolution passed to enter into articles of incorporation. Messrs. Nunan, Reuter, Klippel, Jackson and Muller have been designated as incorporators, and the capital stock has been placed at $30,000. Two different sets of incorporation papers have been signed--one designating Medford as the terminus, the other naming Central Point. The route and town which offers the greatest inducements will be selected, and soon, too. The incorporators met Wednesday afternoon, and it was decided that two of them should interview the citizens of Medford, two to the people of Central Point, while the fifth (Mr. Nunan) will endeavor to interest the wholesale merchants of Portland and San Francisco in our enterprise. Correspondence has also been opened with the S.P.R.R. Co., which will probably soon have control of the O.&C.R.R.
    Thus have the first steps toward the consummation of Jacksonville's most important enterprise been taken. It is sincerely to be hoped that such harmony and good judgment will prevail as to ensure success. There should be an entire absence of opposition that is not well founded, for a house divided against itself must certainly fall.
    About $18,000 has been subscribed to the capital stock of the railroad, and enough more has already been promised to make the sum of $20,000. No doubt several thousand dollars will be subscribed by wholesale merchants in Portland and San Francisco, while other pecuniary assistance will be received from different sources.
    We consider that success is certain if those most deeply interested are true to themselves, the welfare of our town, and that of the people in general. That the branch railroad will be of great benefit to us all none can successfully dispute, and that our prosperity and importance as a trade center depends on rail connection with the O.&C.R.R. is equally as incontrovertible.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 7, 1887, page 8


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. W. Short and S. Childers are improving their residence property.
    Miss Stannus' entertainment here last week was not well patronized.
    Mrs. J. W. Cowles is now in San Francisco and expected home before long.
    We regret to learn that Mrs. E. Worman is quite ill and that the worst is feared.
    A number of our young men have gone to the C.&O.R.R. front in quest of work.
    Miss Annie Walker of Ashland precinct has been paying Mrs. Wm. Angle, her aunt, a visit.
    The aged father of E. J. Pool of this precinct, who has been quite ill, is much improved in health.
    R. M. Shely, our marble worker, last week set up a beautiful monument in the Jacksonville Cemetery.
    There has been a great demand for hay and grain here, as well as elsewhere, which commanded prehistoric prices.
    Considerable sickness is reported in this vicinity by Doctors Geary and Pryce, who are kept busy attending to calls.
    M. Armstrong's family have removed to Grants Pass, and Marc. will soon follow. They will permanently locate in that lively town.
    Geo. W. Isaacs was at the county seat last Tuesday. He reports a considerable loss of stock among cattle in Chimney Rock precinct, where his stock range is.
    More marriages are said to be on the tapis in this vicinity. A prominent young man who handles more or less grain is included in the list, Dame Rumor says.
    Messrs. Klippel and Muller were in Medford a few days since to see what encouragement our citizens will give to bring the Jacksonville branch railroad to town.
    A. J. Torrey, who had his leg broken some time since by a bank caving upon him while engaged in mining on Coleman Creek, is improving as fast as could be expected.
    H. Kinney and H. F. Wood, two excellent mechanics, have gone to southern California to temporarily follow the painting and carpentering business there. Success to them.
    There is a rumor that the Monitor will be resuscitated. Anybody who would attempt such a thing certainly must have more money and time at their disposal than ordinary mortals have.
    It is to be hoped that our citizens will not allow some other point to become the terminus of the Jacksonville branch railroad. It will certainly be quite beneficial in more ways than one to have railroad connection with Jacksonville.
    The road between this place and Jacksonville should be macadamized, so that it will be as good in one season as in another. Such an improvement would prove beneficial to both towns and should not be neglected any longer. Let the proper steps be taken soon.
    A blind man, playing an organ, gave two entertainments--consisting of singing, etc., at Howard's hall last week, which were well attended. At the last he gave two prizes--an album to the most popular lady in town and a pair of baby stockings to the laziest man. After an interesting contest, Miss Wyland was awarded the first prize, while B. W. Powell took the stockings. Much sport was afforded.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 2


    Messrs. Reuter and Jackson, representing the people of Jacksonville, paid Central Point a visit last Monday to ascertain what inducements will be given by our citizens to make this place one of the termini of the branch railroad. It is quite probable that it will soon be known what we will do. It will be of great advantage to us if we are connected with the county seat by rail, and we should strain every nerve to accomplish this union. Let this great opportunity to materially benefit ourselves not be lost.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 2

Our Branch Railroad.
    The incorporators of the Jacksonville branch railroad have interviewed the citizens of Central Point and Medford and have been assured that everything possible will be done to ensure the consummation of that enterprise. As to what inducement will be given to make either one of those places the eastern terminus of the road nothing definite has been ascertained, though we will doubtless soon know. There is no doubt that the road will benefit them greatly, and whichever fails to secure the prize will have occasion to regret it in the early future. Mr. Nunan will soon visit Portland, where a goodly sum will be subscribed. The building of this road is already assured beyond all reasonable doubt.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 3


    He who opposes the Jacksonville branch railroad is an enemy to the best interests of our town.
    The county commissioners' court ordered a view of the proposed road running between Jas. Bigham's place and Medford, and appointed Wm. Compton, W. W. Erb and Jesse Dodge as viewers.
    The branch railroad will not only assist Jacksonville in retaining the county seat perpetually and its present importance as a trade center, but will make it more prosperous, substantial and lively. Keep these facts prominently in view.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 3


Medford Select School.
    This school closed on the 4th with real interest. Prizes were awarded in the primary department for the best scholar to Arval Perdue, and for the best recitations to May Phipps. In the advanced department the following awards were made: Perfect deportment, Ella Fredenburg; best mathematician, Ella Bursell; best penmanship, Frank Shideler; most improvement, Rosa Wilson; at closing exercises, Josie Merriman, Bertha Stewart and others. The most real merit is due my assistants, who have won for themselves excellent reputations and are very promising teachers.
H. G. FAIRCLO.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 3


    The wife of E. Worman of this place died at her home last Saturday, after a prolonged illness.--[Medford Mutterings]
Ashland Tidings, March 18, 1887


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A number of improvements are contemplated here this season.
    The case of J. Retty vs. W. G. Kenney, for damages, has been compromised [settled].
    O. Gilbert and family, who are now at Crescent City, Cal., will return during the summer.
    Several parties from east of the Rocky Mountains are arriving, some of whom will locate in the valley.
    Milton Maule, our popular painter, is improving his town property, which presents a handsome appearance.
    A. L. Johnson is able to be about again, after a protracted and severe illness. He was in Jacksonville last Tuesday.
    Prof. Fairclo of this place will teach the Mound district school during the ensuing term. He is an excellent teacher and will no doubt give satisfaction.
    The interest of John Byers in the fine two-story brick building known as the Riddle House will be sold by Sheriff Dean in Jacksonville on April 10th.
    Two families arrived here Wednesday from Montana. They were unfortunate during the winter, having lost a snug fortune by their stock perishing in the snow.
    Steps have been taken to secure a favorable place for a cemetery in this vicinity, but as yet they have been unsuccessful. Our town should certainly have a suitable burying-ground close by.
    Our citizens are taking much interest in the Jacksonville branch railroad, and will do their utmost to bring it here. This is a step in the right direction, as that enterprise will benefit us a good deal.
    H. E. Baker was at the county seat this week. He reports the price of grain firm and wheat worth 60 cents a bushel net. At one time he would have paid 65 cents a bushel for a round lot of wheat.
    The organization of a Rebekah degree lodge of the I.O.O.F. at this place last Monday evening proved an interesting event. A number of ladies and gentlemen from Jacksonville and elsewhere were present.
    Geo. Stephenson of Ashland, the energetic liveryman, proposes engaging in business here soon. Thos. McAndrew will build a commodious stable on his lot adjoining J. C. Elder's store, which Mr. S. will lease for a number of years.
    Oscar Lewis, the scientific painter, has contracted to do considerable work to different portions of the county, and has commenced operations at the place of Frank Galloway, near here. His rates are reasonable and he guarantees satisfaction.
    The wife of Edwin Worman died in this place last Friday evening, after a long and painful illness, having been an invalid for several years. Her remains were buried in the Jacksonville Cemetery on Sunday, Rev. M. A. Williams conducting the funeral services. Mrs. W. was a lady of many excellent traits of character and was highly esteemed by all who knew her. The grief-stricken family have our heartfelt sympathy.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887, page 2



                Fence Your Farms,
                                       Fence Your Orchards,
                                                                Fence Your Lawns,
FENCE AND CROSS-FENCE FARMS AND RANCHES
With a Lawn Fence!
                   Stronger than a Barb Fence,
                                    Neater than a Board Fence.
                                                     Cheaper than a Rail Fence,
                                                                      And more Durable than Any.

THE BEST OF ALL FENCES ! !
    Five double strands of No. 12 Galvanized Bessemer Steel Wire, with forty four-foot pickets to the rod, and every picket reaching across all five of the double strands of wire, and so tightly that it would take a yoke of oxen to pull a picket out. Each wire has the support of the other nine and each picket is supported by all the wires.
    Barbed Wire is barbarous. Board Fences need constant attention. After having been up but a short time, the boards warp, split and shrink, water gets in between the boards, and soon destroys the fence. Rails are getting expensive and scarce, and the ground they take up is becoming of more value than to raise weeds to seed the farm.
$1.00 A ROD, OR $300.00 A MILE,
For a Fence that will turn a Bull or Pig!
    Sixty to eighty rods can be hauled at a load and two men can put up 600 rods a day after the posts are set. To move the fence pull out the staples and roll up the fence like a bolt of carpet in a store.
H. B. REED,
the agent for the machines for manufacturing this fence, is here and has a machine at the depot at Medford and will set it up at some point in Jackson County yet to be determined upon, and thus add another industry to Rogue River Valley.
    Wire is now on the road here and pickets contracted for. Set your posts firmly in the ground at, say, a rod apart, and be ready for a fence.
    The fence will be delivered in rolls of about five rods at the above prices at Jacksonville, or any railroad station in Jackson County, on all orders received by the 7th of April. All orders filled as per date of receipt.
    THOROUGH SATISFACTION GUARANTEED or no sale. If you don't like the fence when you see it your order will be canceled.
    Rabbit-tight or chicken fences made to order at a slight advance of the above prices. A rabbit-tight fence is also boy-tight. Yard fences of dressed pickets--painted if desired--for town and country lawns. Machines also for sale for other district.     Address
H. B. REED, Jacksonville, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887 et seq., page 2


    Don't forget the branch railroad.
    As will be seen by notice elsewhere, Sheriff Dean will sell two parcels of real estate in Medford precinct on April 16th.
    Jackson Creek has been making inroads on the road between this place and Medford, but the damage was repaired during the past week by Street Commissioner Eaton.
    The wagon conveying the party who went to Medford Monday evening, to assist in the institution of a Rebekah lodge, stuck fast in the mud while returning, causing considerable of a commotion among the ladies, one of whom lost her purse. All arrived home safe, in due course of time, however.
    The bright prospects of the Jacksonville branch railroad have already started a number of improvements here. Wintjen & Helms have enclosed the large lot where the Arkansas Stable formerly stood and will start a garden and orchard there, besides having erected a commodious barn. Sheriff Dean is beautifying his premises, a neat new fence being among the improvements.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887, page 3


Lodge Organized at Medford.
    A lodge of the Rebekah degree of the I.O.O.F. was instituted at Medford last Monday evening, by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M., with twenty-one charter members. The following ladies and gentlemen were chosen and installed as officers of the lodge: Mrs. G. H. Haskins, N.G.; Mrs. Isaac Woolf, V.G.; Mrs. B. S. Webb, Sec.; Mrs. C. K. Fronk, Treas.; Mrs. G. W. Howard, Warden; Mrs. A. Childers, Conductor; G. W. Howard, Chaplain; G. H. Haskins, R.S.N.G.; B. S. Webb, L.S.N.G.; I. Woolf, R.S.V.G.; J. F. Kelly, L.S.V.G. After the organization there were three initiations. The closing exercises consisted of a fine collation prepared by the ladies of the order.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 18, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD MUTTERINGS.
    The fine weather of the last two weeks has been well improved by the people of our town and vicinity. The farmers are working at high pressure, while in town the sound of saw and hammer tell us that our mechanics also are not idle.
    A trip to our rival town, Central Point, a few days since convinced us that she, too, is breathing the spirit of thrift, as is evidenced by her improvements on every hand. Already she contemplates the erection of fifteen new buildings during the coming summer.
    One of Medford's projected enterprises for this summer is the building of a warehouse by the farmers of this vicinity.
    H. G. Fairclo has closed his select school here and is now teaching the Mound district school.
    Will Phipps begins wielding the birch next Monday at Lone Oak.
    Will Gore has been employed as teacher of the advanced department of the Medford public school during the last term of the present year beginning April 4th.
    Dr. Stanfield, of Eagle Point, has removed to this place. His family, which has been in the Willamette Valley during the past winter, arrived a short time since.
    The wife of E. Worman of this place died at her home last Saturday, after a prolonged illness.
    Medford, March 16.
Ashland Tidings, March 18, 1887, page 3


    MEDFORD FOR THE RAILROAD.--The Medford R.R. committee have notified the committee at this place that they have raised $1,600 and agree to raise it to $3,000. The proposition will be accepted by the committee here, provided the citizens of this place will support them. The work of the committee will still continue to increase the amount. The time for definite action on the part of our citizens has arrived, and the question must be settled in a very short time, whether the people want a railroad or not.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


    Stephenson & Thompson of Ashland will, in about ten days, open a livery stable with a complete outfit in Medford.
    The libel suit brought by G. H. Chick against J. F. Ragsdale for $20,000 was dismissed on Wednesday last, with costs on plaintiff.
    George Crystal of Medford was in town this week selling pruning shears, the best in our judgment ever presented in this market.
    The suit of Chick vs. Ragsdale, instituted for damages done by the latter to the reputation of the former, has been dismissed at the plaintiff's cost. That Mr. Chick had a reputation here no one will for a moment deny, but just how that reputation could be injured by Mr. Ragsdale or anyone else we cannot conceive. Perhaps Mr. Chick desired money with which to gain a new and better one. We hope so at least.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
    Ike Webb is building an addition to his dwelling house.
    J. D. Whitman is very busy pruning his young orchard.
    Work upon the foundation of the Baptist Church has commenced.
    Mrs. Crow of Oakland, Oregon is visiting her daughter, Mrs. F. M. Cranfill.
    Our Railroad Committee has raised $1600, and feel confident they will swell the amount to $3000.
    Whitman and Adkins received by last freight their improved drill for testing the coal fields east of town.
    Mr. Baker, Dr. Pryce, J. C. Cowles and others are busy setting out shade trees in front of their property on C Street.
    We have the promise of a good fruit crop. Mr. Bodine thinks he will have a heavy crop of peaches in his new orchard.
    A large number of ladies from Jacksonville were here last week, and organized a Rebekah lodge in this place. It was a happy gathering, and all appeared to enjoy themselves.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


DIED.
WORMAN--At Medford March 12th, Mrs. Susan Worman.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 19, 1887, page 3


    At Medford a number of improvements are contemplated the present season.
    Twenty thousand dollars have been subscribed to the Jacksonville branch railroad stock fund.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 21, 1887, page 4


    FRUIT CULTURE "OUT SOUTH."--Southern Oregon is bound to become the great fruit-producing section of the state. Within the past two years over a million peach trees have been set out in Jackson County alone. Many of them will produce some fruit this year. Mr. Stewart, one of the members of the Iowa press excursion, which visited this state two years ago, purchased a place out there and has set out 3500 peach trees, and Mr. Whitman, another of the same party, has set out an extensive orchard of Bartlett pears. The prospect of the near completion of the connection by rail with California has made the people of the southern portion of the state jubilant and infused new life into that section.
"Local and General," Morning Oregonian, Portland, March 22, 1887, page 5


    Medford is taking much interest in the Jacksonville branch railroad. Will our citizens allow it to capture the valuable prize without so much as an effort? We think not.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Stanfield and family of Eagle Point have become residents of this place.
    The farmers in this vicinity talk of building a warehouse in Medford this season.
    Times are improving and we expect considerable improvement here during the year.
    Elder M. Peterson will hold service in this place on Sunday, both morning and evening.
    Rev. S. P. Wilson held services here last Wednesday evening and had a good congregation.
    Jos. Bever accompanied Rev. S. P. Wilson, presiding elder of this district, to Jacksonville last Thursday evening.
    Hon J. D. Whitman and wife paid their son, J. H. Whitman, deputy county clerk, a visit last Sunday. It was Mrs. W.'s 64th birthday.
    The Presbyterian Church building will soon be completed, when services will be held regularly by Rev. M. A. Williams, the veteran preacher.
    Will Phipps was at the county seat last Saturday and obtained a first-grade certificate. He will teach the school in Lone Oak district--no doubt with success.
    Wm. H. Gore, who has been in Washington Territory for some time, returned a short time since and will teach the advanced department of the public school in this place, commencing the first Monday in next month.
    The proposed change in the running time of the railroad will make Medford an eating station, the northbound train stopping for supper and the southbound train for breakfast. This will be a decided advantage to our town.
    Much interest is being taken in securing connection with the county seat by rail at this place, and it seems quite likely that our citizens will be successful in their laudable endeavors. Nearly $2,000 has already been subscribed and more will no doubt be secured. There is no disputing the fact that the building of this railroad will be of great benefit to both Jacksonville and Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 2


Jacksonville Branch R.R.
    Public sentiment is nearly solidly in favor of the branch railroad, only a very few opposing it, and their objection being purely a selfish one in nearly every instance. These obstructionists are generally men who have profited much by the traffic which has been bestowed upon Jacksonville in former days, when money was plentiful and the town in a flourishing condition. They never have reciprocated the kind treatment bestowed upon them; and now that it is necessary to inaugurate some enterprise like the branch railroad to enable Jacksonville to maintain its importance as a trade center and county seat, they not only refuse to subscribe anything, but at the same time attempt to throw cold water on the scheme. They cannot prove by facts and figures why this railroad will not be a benefit to our town, but, in order to excuse their want of enterprise and liberality, advance theories untenable and imaginary in a high degree.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 3


Fruit Culture "Out South."
    Southern Oregon is bound to become the great producing section of the State. Within the past two years over a million fruit trees have been set out in Jackson County alone. Many of them will produce some fruit this year. Hon. J. D. Whitman, one of the members of the Iowa press excursion which visited this State two years ago, purchased a place there and set out 2500 peach trees, and Hon. J. H. Stewart, lately of Illinois, has set out an extensive orchard of Bartlett pear and other choice trees. The prospect of the near completion of the connection by rail with California has made the people of the southern portion of the State jubilant and infused new life into that section.--[Oregonian.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 3


Hurrah for Jacksonville.
    The success of the branch railroad connecting Jacksonville with the main O.&C. line, at or near Medford, seems assured. The estimated cost is $30,000, of which $20,000 has already been subscribed. The promptness with which the people have responded to secure so important an enterprise is characteristic of the people most interested. When their line is completed the pioneer town of Jacksonville will be itself again. Nestled as it is in a delightful cove in the foothills, the home of the most hospitable people on earth, it will always remain a place of attraction to all who visit it. Jacksonville is the locale of events which, when recorded to the future, will add a tinge of romance to the history of the Sunset State.--[Portland Mercury.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 3


    A number of strangers have been in town during the past week, some of whom will locate here. The assurance of the constructing of the branch railroad is already bearing fruit.
    The branch railroad project is not dead nor even slumbering. The incorporators are proceeding as rapidly as possible, and as soon as we hear from the wholesale merchants of San Francisco and Portland, and also from the citizens of Central Point and Medford, work will be commenced in earnest. Everything is being done cautiously, in order to avert mistakes and ensure success.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 3


JANUARY.
W. G. Kenney to Edwin Worman, property in Medford; consideration; $2250.
Max Muller and B. W. Powell to O. T. Hoft, property in Medford; $
225.
Transcontinental Co. to B. W. Powell and S. Rosenthal, property in Medford; $
90.
O. H. Johnson to Chas. Nickell, property in Medford precinct; $
150.
FEBRUARY.
Frederick Barneburg to I. J. Phipps, property in Medford; $150.
The Oregon & Transcontinental Co. to Mary E. Gore, property in Medford; $125.
Walter S. Gore to Mary E. Gore, property in Medford; $50.
I. J. Phipps to George S. Walton, property in Medford; $
376.15.
Oregon & Transcontinental Co. to Harriet B. Stanley, property in Medford; $
200.
E. P. Geary to H. F. Wood, property in Medford; $75.
I. J. Phipps to Catherine
Soren, property in Medford; $20.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 1


MEDFORD PUBLIC SCHOOL.
    The following is the standing of all pupils averaging 80 and above in examination for the month of March:
UPPER DEPARTMENT.
    First Grade--Joe Thomas, 96; Mary Baker, 99.
    Second Grade--Cora Redden, 92; Clara Mingus, 89; Bert Redden, 87; Ora Adkins, 91; Minerva Bever, 95; Hattie Galloway, 95; Ira Riddle, 92.
    Third grade--Eddie Riddle, 85; Beryl Colleen, 90; Asahel Hubbard, 86; Grace Foster, 96; Milla Riddle, 92; Mamie Wilson, 96; Hiram West, 85; Jessie Worman, 90; Sadie Amann, 85; Ray Young, 87; William Elder, 85; Minnie Cooper, 90; Gus Cunnyngham, 85.
INTERMEDIATE DEPARTMENT.
    Fourth Grade--Edward Redden, 86; Mary Isaacs, 93; Mary Wilson, 93; John Landis, 86; Martin Holtan, 86.
    Fifth Grade--Virgie Woodford, 88; Minnie Riddle, 87; Chas. Cranfill, 90; May Earhart, 91; Mollie Landis, 88; Harmon Fredenburg, 85; Fannie Haskins, 91; Guy Childers, 86; Sadie Noland, 88; Egbert Childers, 85; Vina Whetstone, 86; Chas. Finnerty, 88; Hella Holtan, 92; Julia Finnerty, 90; Daisy Mingus, 87; Grace Amann, 95; Myrtle Woodford, 87.
    Sixth Grade: Maud Johnson, 94; Abba Cantrell, 89; Lillie Jones, 90; Hattie Landis, 92; Alfred Walters, 89; Ernest Walters, 87; Chas. Higinbotham, 93; May Phipps, 90; Willie Grush, 85; Ira Purdin, 92; Carl Crystal, 91; Chas. Noland, 90; Clarence Black, 91.
PRIMARY DEPARTMENT.
    Seventh Grade--Matilda Edwards, 89.
    Eighth Grade--Ollie Holtan, 93; Sarah Whetstone, 85; Willie Shoemaker, 86; Annie Wilson, 89; John Johnson, 85; Etta Earhart, 89; Ivy Purdin, 89; Willie Isaacs, 90.
    Ninth Grade--Johnnie Swafford, 95; Kate McIntosh, 90; Emmett Barkdull, 89; Lindsay Purdin, 94; May Bailey, 96; Willie Crenshaw, 95; Wayland Edwards, 85; Geo. Crenshaw, 98; Alice Grush, 96; Lee Cantrell, 92; Bess Whetstone, 93; Stella Redden, 90; Charley Isaacs, 90.
                                            CARRIE BAKER, Principal.
MOLLIE MERRIMAN, }
SOPHIE WILSON,         }    Assistants.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 2


    Central Point will make a grand struggle to be the eastern terminus of the Jacksonville branch road. We hope that it will succeed.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A chattel mortgage sale of horses, vehicles, etc., will take place here this week.
    Several strangers have been on our streets lately. Some will no doubt locate in the valley.
    Dave Crosby spent a few days in Portland last week, visiting his mother and sister.
    Manager Koehler has furnished Messrs. Whitman and Adkins a drill with which to test their coal mines east of this place.
    The Stuttz troupe will appear at Howard's hall tomorrow evening. They should be greeted by a full house, for they deserve it.
    G. W. Howard and M. E. Beatty, the well-known insurance and real estate agents, were in Jacksonville during the week.
    Recorder Walton and Street Commissioner Whiteside were in Jacksonville not long since getting a list of taxpayers in Medford road district.
    Dr. W. Stanfield has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. He comes well recommended, and will make chronic diseases a specialty.
    A grand May Day party will be given at Howard's hall under the auspices of Misses Genevieve Riddle and Elma Young. No doubt it will be a first-class affair.
    John Wolters and his son H. H. were in Jacksonville Monday. The former is a Mexican veteran and went to the county seat for the purpose of perfecting his pension papers.
    J. B. Riddle has been at the railroad front and will reopen his saloon on the Siskiyou Mountains before long. He is of the opinion that work will be resumed in that vicinity soon.
    The Medford public school will commence a new term next Monday, Wm. H. Gore succeeding Miss Carrie Baker as principal. The school has done well under the present management.
    M. E. Beatty, one of the most popular and energetic young men, has opened a real estate office in this place. He already has a number of pieces of property for sale and will no doubt build up a good business.
    A foreign mission society was organized in this place one evening last week, after Mrs. Martha Wilson of Eugene city, secretary of the chief society, had delivered a lecture in Walton's hall. It will meet the first Friday afternoon in each month. The following are the officers: Mrs. F. Hubbard, Pres.; Mrs. J. M. Ogan, Vice Pres.; Mrs. J. M. Walters, Rec. Sec.; Miss Vina Bever Cor. Sec.; Miss Ida Redding, Treas.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 2


    The bicycle has arrived in Jacksonville, and several parties are wasting their energies upon it.
    Rev. A. H. Sunderman has been engaged to teach the Brownsboro school and Miss Helen Strang of Medford will teach the Chimney Rock district school.
    Times have been very hard in southern Oregon, but we think the worst is over now, and a rapid improvement may be looked for after work is resumed on the extension of the O.&C.R.R. This country will begin to boom again inside of a year.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 3


    Representatives of the Postal Telegraph Company were here yesterday making arrangements for building a line from Medford to this place. They expect to open for business in about ten days.
"Notes from Jacksonville," Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 4, 1887, page 4


Correspondence.
Medford, Or., Mar. 21, '87.
    Ed. Courier:--I desire to make a statement through your worthy paper for the benefit of the public in regard to a mistake made in the minutes of the Rogue River Baptist Association in 1886. Said mistake was made in regard to the name of Rev. James Hummer, whose name was used in the minutes as only a lycentiate, when he is a regular ordained Baptist minister, also that his name should not have been used at all, as he is not a member of the association above named and never was. Being the clerk of said association, I desire to set the matter right before the public.
Geo. E. Jones.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, April 4, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Business is improving here.
    Miss Carrie Baker is teaching the Antioch school.
    A large amount of grain was shipped from this place during the week from Baker's warehouse.
    The horse buyers for the railroad company were here last Tuesday and bought several head of horses.
    The Stuttz dramatic company performed in Medford last Saturday evening and were greeted by a fair audience.
    Messrs. Byers and Guerin, the well-known brick masons, intend going to eastern Oregon to follow their business.
    Tice Bros. have purchased J. C. Cowles' neat residence in this place, paying $800 for it. They secured a bargain.
    Geo. E. Anderson has returned from Josephine County, where he has been engaged in trapping and prospecting for some time.
    C. W. Stanfield, who has been in charge of the Central House for some time past, has suspended business and is now in Ashland.
    Postmaster Miller has been spending several days at the residence of G. Naylor, in Jacksonville precinct, and also paid the county seat a visit Wednesday.
    A number of Gold Hill bloods made this place a visit last Saturday evening, making the journey on a handcar. They met with quite an adventure on the road.
    Mr. Jenkins has returned from California and will probably take charge of the Postal Telegraph Company's office, which will be opened here at once.
    The Medford district school commenced another term last Monday, with Prof. W. H. Gore as principal and Misses M. Merriman and Sophia Wilson as assistants.
    The residents of Medford and vicinity are incensed at the discontinuance of Smith's post office on Sticky, and severely criticize the mail contractor who has so persistently failed to supply that section with the required mail service. That office would have been a great convenience to a large number of families, and should be reestablished at once.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1887, page 2


    The Postal Telegraph Co. will not build a branch line to this place at present, and the Western Union Co.'s monopoly of our business will continue.
    Through the efforts of our enterprising citizen, J. Nunan, the wholesale merchants of San Francisco subscribed the sum of $2100 to the Jacksonville branch road, which will prove quite a help.
    Between ten and fifteen thousand bushels of grain--mostly wheat--was shipped from the warehouses at Central Point, Medford and Gold Hill to Portland during the week. This is the last shipment which will be made this season.
    Claims for damages amounting to about $1800 have been asked by parties owning land on the line of the proposed road between Medford and Jas. Bigham's place, and the county commissioners' court has appointed Thos. Cameron, H. J. Terrill and John Devlin to assess the same.
    H. B. Reed has received a machine for the manufacture of the Universal combination fence and set it up at Medford. He has received a number of orders for this first-class fencing, which has given satisfaction where tried. It would be a paying investment for someone to buy this machine.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 8, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD MUTTERINGS.
    Business is improving.
    S. Rosenthal, our popular merchant, intends leaving for the Coeur d'Alene mines shortly to open a store. Success to him.
    The Postal Telegraph Co. have established an office here in the Riddle House, with C. S. Jenkins as agent.
    Angle & Plymale sent a load of produce to the railroad front this week.
    Mr. Stanfield has opened a restaurant in the rooms formerly occupied by O. Gilbert, on Main Street.
    The spring term of school began last Monday with Prof. W. H. Gore as principal and Misses Mollie Merriman and Sophie Wilson as assistant teachers. Under the present corps of teachers we cannot fail to have one of the best schools in the county.
    Miss Carrie Baker, who had charge of the school in this place during the winter, is now engaged in teaching at Antioch. She is an excellent teacher and never fails to give perfect satisfaction.
    J. N. Wolters, who has the contract for graveling B Street, is doing good work, and it is already much improved.
    Work has begun on the Baptist church at this place and will be pushed with rapidity. It is to be brick and will be one of the finest churches south of Portland.
SCRATCH ALL.       
    April 5th, 1887.
Ashland Tidings, April 8, 1887, page 3


    On account of being unable to get poles, the Postal Telegraph Co. have decided not to connect this place with their main line.
    With the completion of the branch railroad, which we hope will be soon, Jacksonville will soon regain what it lost by the O.&C. railroad leaving it to one side. It is a beautiful town, has nice surroundings and is full of hospitable people, and all will be glad to hear of its prosperity once more.
"Notes from Jacksonville," Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 9, 1887, page 2


    The growth of Central Point is increasing rapidly. Twenty-two buildings are to be erected this summer, of which seven are being built at the present time. The prospects for a depot are certain, and we would very much like to have the Jacksonville branch railroad, and think it would be of great benefit to Jacksonville also. Central Point is the grain center of the valley, all of its grain going to the mills at Phoenix or Ashland. The branch railroad to this place would put Jacksonville the leading shipping town of Southern Oregon. Central Point is beautifully situated and surrounded by the finest farms in the valley, but her citizens seem to care little or nothing for a branch railroad and have not even made a struggle for it, for they think to have a depot anyway.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1887, page 2


    Wm. Angle of Medford has been at the railroad front with a load of produce.
    J. N. Vannoy and family, lately of Josephine County, have become residents of Medford.
    The foundation of the new Baptist Church at Medford is being laid. It will be a neat structure.
    A restaurant has been opened in one of I. J. Phipps' buildings in Medford by C. W. Stanfield.
    The Postal Telegraph Co. has an office in the Riddle House at Medford, with C. S. Jenkins as operator.
    S. Rosenthal, Medford's pioneer merchant, is selling out at cost and talks of going to the Coeur d'Alene mines.
    There is some talk of building a telephone line between Jacksonville and Medford. It would prove a paying investment.
    H. B. Reed has put up a machine at Medford and is manufacturing a large amount of Universal combination fence, for which a great demand is growing.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 15, 1887, page 3
    There is some talk of building a telephone line between Jacksonville and Medford.
    The foundation of the new Baptist church at Medford is being laid. It will be a neat structure.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 18, 1887, page 5


    Yesterday the Oregon & California Railroad brought down from Medford two carloads of hogs and one of sheep belonging to Mr. Jackson. The freight of the O.&C. came in with eleven carloads of stock from Albany. There were over 300 head of cattle, a large part of which were yearlings. There was one carload of sheep and one of horses. This market will have plenty of good veal for a while.
"The East Side," Oregonian, Portland, April 21, 1887, page 2


Conrad Mingus to Rebecca A. Finney, property in Medford; consideration, $210.
I. J. Phipps to R. Pryce, quitclaim deed to property in Medford; $1.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1887 page 1


TO SAN FRANCISCO IN 42 HOURS.
THE OREGON & CALIFORNIA TO PUT ON DAILY TRAINS,
LEAVING HERE AT 4 P.M.

    By May 1 the California & Oregon road will be opened for traffic to Arteena, a point two miles this side of the Klamath River. On that day the time between this city and San Francisco will be reduced to 42 hours. Trains making through connection will leave Portland at 4 P.M. every day, including Sunday, and will arrive here at 10 A.M. Superintendent Brandt has not yet completed his time card, but approximately trains will run as follows: The southbound  train will arrive at Ashland at 9 A.M., passengers taking breakfast at Medford. Six hours and a half is allotted to the stage ride of thirty miles, including time for dinner; and the train for San Francisco will leave Arteena at 3:30 P.M., arriving in San Francisco at 10 A.M. Trains will leave San Francisco at 1 P.M., arriving at Arteena at 9:30 A.M. The northbound train will leave Ashland at 5 P.M. Passengers will take supper at Medford and breakfast at Albany. The southbound through train will also stop for supper at Albany; Aurora being sidetracked on the question of meals.
    Trains will leave as usual at 8 A.M. and arrive at 3:30 P.M., but will run only as far as Eugene, the local passenger travel south of that point being taken care of by the California express, which will also take the place of the Albany express as far as Albany. Pullman sleepers will be attached to the through trains. The above arrangement will probably be in effect until the two lines are connected. It will give passengers a daylight ride through the Rogue River Valley and over the Siskiyous.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 22, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD MELANGE.
    News is scarce.
    Farmers are jubilant over the recent rains, which are a great benefit to the late-sown grain.
    J. B. Riddle is constructing a sewer from the Riddle House to Bear Creek.
    Messrs. Webb & Zimmerman have started a lumber yard on C Street, where they will keep all kinds of lumber constantly on hand.
    Chas. Wolters is improving his lot, and will erect a fine dwelling the coming summer.
    J. S. Howard, who has been out on a surveying expedition for several days past, returned last Tuesday.
    Angle & Plymale run a wagon to the R.R. front every week, and are better prepared than ever to purchase all country produce.
    Dr. Ballard, of Iowa, who has been visiting Mr. G. H. Haskins of this place for some time, returned home this week, much pleased with our town and surroundings.
    A Mr. Brown of Montana will drive several thousand head of sheep from this valley to that range this spring. He has already bought a large number.
    Miss Amanda Goodyear, of Ashland, is teaching at the Walker school house in Manzanita precinct.
SCRATCH ALL.       
    Medford, Or., April 20, 1887.
Ashland Tidings, April 22, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. B. Riddle will soon open a store and saloon on the Siskiyou mountain.
    The construction of the Baptist Church at this place is rapidly progressing.
    A telephone line between Jacksonville and Medford would no doubt prove a paying enterprise.
    Geo. E. Anderson of this place is now employed at one of the sawmills at Crescent City, Cal., and doing well.
    Ed. Simon of Eagle Point is building a dwelling house, and rumor says that Medford will soon lose one of its fair residents.
    We are sorry to hear of the death of Mrs. J. N. Banks, formerly of this place. She was an amiable lady and well respected by all who knew her here.
    Chas. W. Wolters has had a lot fenced with the Universal combination fence, which is durable, neat and cheap. It will no doubt be the popular fence in Jackson County at no distant day.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1887, page 2


The Branch Railroad.
    Word has been received here from Wm. Reid, the Portland capitalist, that the rails of the Willamette Valley Railroad, in which he is interested, will soon be taken up and offered for sale. As they have been worn but little and will answer the purposes of our branch railroad very well, the incorporators will probably purchase some of them, as several thousand dollars can be saved in doing so. Henry Klippel will go to Portland soon in the interests of the road.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1887, page 3


For Sale.
    The Excelsior Livery Stable at Medford is offered for sale. It has stall-room for twenty horses, holds twenty tons of hay, and has a large carriage room, office, etc. It rents for $30 per month now. Hack horses, carriages and buggies sold with the stable, if desired. Best bargain in the country. Will take good horses in part payment. Apply at Johnson's land office, Medford, Oregon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1887, page 3


    Spikenard has a new postmaster, Elias C. Benham having been appointed to succeed Scott Morris.
    Geo. Freeman has sold his fine team to the railroad company and ceased the freighting business.
    The Jacksonville branch railroad is not dead, nor even sleeping. It is necessary to our town's future prosperity.
    The property belonging to P. C. and Mary E. Witison, situated near Medford, and sold at sheriff's sale last Saturday, was bid in by Joseph Gaines, for $829.
    Notwithstanding that two or three of our citizens are throwing cold water upon the branch railroad scheme it is still prominent in the minds of the balance of the people. Nearly everybody considers that Jacksonville will be greatly benefited by it.
    D. Loring's red Irish setter, which jumped from the top of Labbe's four-story block at Portland a few days since, is recovering from his injuries and will be all ready for business when the grouse crop is ripe. The fact of the animal falling on the old, mossy, springy roof of a shed probably saved his life.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1887, page 3


Pope Leo's Poems.
    Squire Barkdull of Medford is now engaged in canvassing for the poems of Pope Leo XIII, a handsome and valuable work, and which is proving quite popular everywhere. Don't fail to give him your order, as you will never regret it.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1887 et seq., page 3


    The Jacksonville branch railroad is still the talk of the town, though a few are getting very impatient, but it will be at least three weeks before the committee will be able to make a definitive report, says an exchange of that town. Everything is being done that the committee can do in the way of soliciting aid from a distance, and correspondence is going on constantly with the parties who furnish railroad material. The prospect at present looks very bright, and the committee say they are satisfied they will make it go.
"Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, April 27, 1887, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Zimmerman & Webb have established an extensive lumber yard here.
    Our town continues to improve and receive additions to its population.
    Isaac Woolf is hauling large numbers of eggs and poultry to the railroad front.
    I. L. Hamilton, the popular driver, makes frequent trips to the county seat of late.
    S. A. Redden intends leaving for Nebraska in the near future, but may return before long.
    Look out for the advertisement of F. Hubbard, the leading dealer in agricultural implements.
    Medford has been greatly encouraged of late and has high hopes of future prosperity and importance.
    J. B. Riddle came down from the Siskiyous last week, where he is engaged in business, but did not stay long.
    Childers & Son are finishing the brick foundation for the Baptist Church. The contract for doing the carpenter work will soon be let.
    Mrs. J. S. Howard and daughter were in Jacksonville last week, and were accompanied home by Mrs. Geo. S. Howard, who made them a short visit.
    The Postal Telegraph Co.'s office in this place is doing a good business. It is located in the Riddle House and is in charge of C. S. Jenkins, an excellent operator.
    The report that C. L. Adams would resuscitate the Monitor was premature. He left for California a few days since without making any arrangements whatever.
    Don't forget the May Day party which will be given at Howard's hall in this place under the auspices of Misses Genevieve Riddle and Elma Young. It will no doubt be a fine affair.
    The Medford district school is in a flourishing condition, the attendance being as good as at any time during the scholastic year. Prof. Gore is giving entire satisfaction, and is ably assisted by Misses Merriman and Wilson.
    J. G. Crossman, formerly of Eagle Point, has located in this place and is already building up a good business. He is one of the best wheelwrights in southern Oregon, prompt and reasonable in his charges, and deserving of patronage.
    The Odd Fellows of this place have purchased a piece of land of J. W. Short, about a mile west of town, which they are putting in shape for a cemetery. It will be made a neat spot in due course of time.
    It has been decided to make Medford an eating station at once, and, commencing with Sunday, trains from the north will stop here for breakfast and those from the south for supper. The platform in front of the station will also be made several hundred feet longer, a survey of the ground having already been made. It is also supposed that the new management will build a large and handsome hotel there in the near future. This new departure will prove important to our town.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1887, page 2


New Enterprise.
    A. L. Reuter, Dr. Jackson and other residents of Jacksonville will soon organize a joint stock company for operating a telephone between this place and Medford. The poles have already been purchased and the batteries, etc., ordered from Portland, so that it will not be long before the line is in operation. It will be a great convenience to the public and will no doubt prove a paying investment. If it can be demonstrated that its extension to Ashland will prove profitable, no doubt the incorporators will extend the line to that place. We hope that they will.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1887, page 3


    The viewers in the matter of the proposed road between Medford and Jas. Bigham's place have cut down the damages asked from $1800 to $200.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 29, 1887, page 3

    A. L. Reuter, Dr. Jackson and other residents of Jacksonville will soon organize a joint stock company for operating a telephone between Jacksonville and Medford. The poles have already been purchased and the batteries, etc., ordered from Portland, so that it will not be long before the line is in operation.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 3, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    H. B. Reed, the live fence man, has gone to Klamath County on business.
    M. E. Beatty is proving a live real estate agent and is building up a good business.
    W. J. Zimmerman and Geo. Webb were in Jacksonville last week looking after a contract.
    Dr. W. Stanfield, eclectic physician, has removed to Talent for the practice of his profession.
    Times are looking up somewhat, and new life seems to have been imparted into our town of late.
    Read the new advertisement of R. T. Lawton, the well-known insurance, real estate and loan agent.
    W. R. Andrews, the attorney, has purchased property in Medford, and may remove his family hither before long.
    Frank Kasshafer of Jacksonville, who has been assisting J. B. Riddle to meet the wants of his numerous customers, returned home this week.
    John Byers has gone to Portland and will soon be joined by his partner, Jas. T. Guerin. Both are first-class workmen and will do well wherever they go.
    S. L. Bennett is circulating a subscription paper for the benefit of the proposed Baptist Church at this place and is succeeding fairly. The building, when completed, will be open to all denominations.
    Albin Taksa raffled off one of his ingeniously constructed and handsome clocks and also some beautiful picture frames at the Gem Saloon last week. Thos. Wilson won the former and John Bellinger the latter.
    We learn that a gentleman has been in Medford for the purpose of ascertaining whether it would be a paying investment to resurrect the Monitor. Anybody will not be long finding out that there is already a surplus of newspapers in the valley.
    Medford is now one of the principal eating stations of the O.&C.R.R., and trains stop at the Riddle House for breakfast and supper. The new arrangements make quite a difference to our growing little city and will no doubt assist us in many ways. The passengers all speak in the highest terms of the fare they receive.
    The May Day party given at Howard's hall last Monday evening, under the auspices of Misses Genevieve Riddle and Emma Young, was one of the pleasantest and best-managed affairs which has ever taken place here. Nothing had been left undone and everybody enjoyed themselves. The music furnished by Wilson's string band was excellent, while the supper served at the Riddle House could not be surpassed. During the evening Miss Effie Merriman was crowned Queen of May.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887, page 2


F. HUBBARD,
DEALER IN AGRICULTURAL IMPLEMENTS
And Manufacturer's Agent for the

Celebrated Newton Wagon,
which has a reputation second to none.  Also, agent for the
KNOWLTON MF'G. CO.
of Rockford, Ill., manufacturers of Reapers, Hay Rakes and Mowers with spring attachments by which it carries the weight of the bar on the drive wheels, giving a cutting power greater than any other Mower, with less draft, and the only machine with Sickle Edge Guard Plates, which prevents the grass from slipping forward when the section strikes it, besides having the only guard that sharpens itself by use.
    Also manufacturer's agent for
EMERSON, TALCOTT & CO.'s
celebrated standard Reapers, Mowers and Steel Wheel Hay Rakes of different lengths.
    Also manufacturer's agent for the
NORWEGIAN PLOW CO.'s
goods of Dubuque, Iowa, known the world over as the best ever made.
    All these goods are manufactured expressly for the Coast trade and shipped through by the low freights, enabling me to sell at very low prices. Call and see me before purchasing.
F. HUBBARD, Medford, Jackson County, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887 et seq., page 3


    W. J. Plymale has fitted up a first-class turnout and is making regular trips to Medford, meeting the trains from both ways and making close connection. He is well patronized.
    The novelty of running the railroad through the valley in daylight seven times a week has not worn off as yet, and every train continues to attract considerable attention. The new arrangements suit our people exactly.
    Two stages are now running between Jacksonville and Medford, each making two trips daily, and Thompson & Stephenson's hack also makes daily trips between this place and Ashland, as that there is considerable bustle here in consequence of the daylight trains.
    R. T. Lawton of Medford has made more favorable arrangements at Portland and is now prepared to loan money on reasonable terms. He also makes a specialty of the insurance and real estate business, and may be relied upon to deal squarely and promptly with all.
    A telephone line between Jacksonville and Medford is being built and will soon be in operation. A point of the company, with a capital of $1000, and composed of: J. Nunan, A. L. Reuter, Will. Jackson, J. B. Riddle, has been incorporated. Their enterprise will no doubt provide a good convenience, and a paying one besides.
    Travel through the valley is perceptibly increasing since the staging was shortened. It is estimated that the trains daily carry about twenty passengers each way when they arrive at Medford for meals. The number will be still larger when the railroad system is completed, but people will prefer the overland trip to a sea voyage, especially when it will take no longer to reach San Francisco.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887, page 3


    Henry Klippel goes to Portland this week to look after the interests of the Jacksonville branch railroad, and will be gone several days.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887, page 3


BORN.
PRUETT--Near Medford, April 11th, to Mr. and Mrs. Irwin Pruett, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887, page 3


R. T. LAWTON,
Loan and Real Estate Agent,
MEDFORD, OR.
----
Will furnish LOANS in amounts as low as $300, and as high as securities will be furnished.
    Time, from two to five years, with interest at 8 percent, secured by unencumbered real estate.
Medford, April 28, 1887                                                              R. T. LAWTON.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 6, 1887 et seq., page 3


  Medford has a Presbyterian church completed and workmen are engaged in laying the foundation for a Baptist one.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 9, 1887, page 4


    Democratic Times: Travel through the valley is perceptibly increasing since the staging was shortened. It is estimated that the trains daily carry about twenty passengers each way when they arrive at Medford for meals.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 10, 1887, page 3


    There is now a gap of twenty-nine miles between the California terminus and the Oregon end, which will be covered within a year and possibly this year. San Francisco and Portland will then be within thirty-six hours of each other. From a business point of view this proximity is encouraging. A large field is open to such California products as Oregon does not supply herself with.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 2


More Service Needed.
    Jacksonville needs and is entitled to mail service twice a day from the railroad station, and it should be established at once. The mail from California now lies at Medford sixteen hours, to the inconvenience and injury of a large number of people. It will not cost the government $100 a year to give us this extra service, and that is too insignificant a sum to quibble about when the importance of a bi-daily mail is considered.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


Card of Thanks.
    A public acknowledgment of thanks is due all those who kindly assisted in the Presbyterian Church benefit, given at Medford on last Friday evening, particularly to Mr. Howard, for free use of his hall and also to the Medford Brass Band for the compliments they bestowed so generously in music; all of which is duly appreciated. By order of the committee.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


    While in Jacksonville last week, Receiver Koehler informed the incorporators of the Jacksonville branch railroad that he would do all in his power to encourage our enterprise if retained in a position to assist us.
    The telephone line between this place and Medford will soon be completed., when it will cost only 25 cents to talk a reasonable length of time over it. It will be a great convenience and will no doubt prove remunerative.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


County Commissioners' Court.
    In the matter of the establishment of a county road between Medford and James Bigham's place in Manzanita precinct, it was ordered that reports of surveyor, viewers and appraisers be and are hereby approved, and that said road be opened for public travel. It was also ordered that Sallie E. Ish and Sophie J. Ish be allowed $200 damages, awarded by said appraisers on account of said road.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John Robinson has gone to Crescent City.
    It is quite noticeable here that travel is beginning to increase.
    Jas. T. Guerin has gone to Portland and will be gone some time.
    Mrs. Knight has returned to Minnesota, accompanied by her daughter.
    The O.&C.R.R. Co.'s new platform near the depot is about completed.
    Miss Helen Strang is teaching the Chimney Rock school and pleasing her patrons.
    Squire Walton has been spending several days with relatives in Jacksonville during the past week.
    A. H. Carlson, the clever proprietor of the Brewery Saloon, paid the county seat a visit this week.
    A. E. Woods, an excellent mechanic, is now in the employ of D. Wilson, dealer in saddles, harness, etc.
    J. N. Walters is hauling a large amount of lumber to this place from Muller & Cook's mill on Forest Creek.
    Business is improving here and good times are expected inside of a year. We hope that our fondest hopes may be realized.
    Doctors Pryce and Geary have lately invested in a handsome new buggy, and now drive as fine a turnout as there is in the county.
    H. B. Reed, the fence man, did not go east of the mountains, as expected, and may be found at his stand in this place, as of yore.
    S. Rosenthal has concluded to stay with Medford, since its prospects are so flattering, and has consequently abandoned his trip to the Coeur d'Alene mine.
    Jasper Crenshaw has been building first-class platform scales of large proportions for I. J. Phipps, and did a good job. They are located just west of the Union Livery Stables.
    The entertainment given by the Ladies' Aid Society of this place was a success in every particular, there being a full house. Everything passed off nicely and something over $28 was netted.
    There seems to be every indication that the railroad company will build a large eating station at this place, having reserved some land for that purpose. This will prove quite an addition to Medford and will help to increase the importance of our town.
    Attention is called to the advertisement of F. Hubbard, the well-known dealer for agricultural implements. He has added a number of popular machines to his already large and superior stock, and by selling at such low rates that none who wish anything in his line go away without investing. Give him a call and judge for yourself.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3
 

    S. P. Wilson, a Portland preacher, advertises for a man of "grace, grit and growth" to go preaching in southern Oregon, which leads the Portland Telegram to appropriately remark that ministers as well as others must step to the music of progress these times. Growth was formerly a forbidden quality in a pastor, and the road to it has been paved with contests bitter and many.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 4


    The second trial of young Hamlin, on charge of rape, has occupied the circuit court most of the week. It was not concluded at last report.
Ashland Tidings, May 13, 1887


    The telephone line between Jacksonville and Medford will soon be completed.
    Two stages are now running between Jacksonville and Medford, each making two trips daily.
"Notes of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 17, 1887, page 2


Mary A. Davison to Herbert E. Law, property near Medford; consideration, $1.
W. B. Roberts to Samuel Earheart, 152 acres in T37S, R1W; $6,500.
I. J. Phipps to Eunice Ogan, property near Medford; $50.

J. C. Cowles to Chas. Tice, property in Medford; $1000.
John Byers to Jas. Gaines, property in Medford; $2,100.
I. J. Phipps to Julia A. Edwards, property in Medford; $175.
A. R. Phipps to Julia A. Edwards, property near Medford; $52.
H. B. Miller to C. W. Skeel, property in Medford, $210.
Benj. Hardman to Mrs. S. Whitney, 2.12 acres near Medford, $270.
F. Galloway to Hattie F. Andrews, property in Medford, $300.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 1



    What Jacksonville needs, and must have, is mail service twice a day from the railroad station, and steps are being taken to secure it. It is an outrage to give such important places like Jacksonville and Yreka only one mail a day, in order to save the government a few dollars of expense. Our representatives in congress should exert themselves in this matter and see that justice is done.
    Quite a number of residents of southern Oregon have gone east of the mountains this season, and more will follow. Eastern and southeastern Oregon are lands of much promise and great futures, which will account for the attention they are receiving everywhere. There is also more unoccupied land that is of good quality there than anywhere else in Oregon. Especially is this the case in Klamath and Lake counties, which are filling up fast with a desirable population.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 2


    The Oregonian on different occasions has sounded the praise of H. E. Battin of Portland, but if that individual is a fair sample of the commission merchants of Portland, the good Lord deliver those who have occasion to deal with them. The people of this county are already well acquainted with the manner in which he treated a well-known melon raiser of Rogue River, who, having shipped Battin almost all of his fine melons last season, found the proceeds nearly covered by freight and excessive commission charges. And now comes a merchant of Grants Pass, who shipped him 1500 lbs. of the best onions, and received a check for the magnificent sum of $1.79 in return, although they could readily have been sold for $25 at home. It is just such proceedings which make people chary of many of the business people of the metropolis, and it is not to be wondered at.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 2


    Dr. Geary of Medford, who is a skillful oculist as well as a good physician, successfully performed a delicate operation on the eyes of the eldest daughter of V. A. Dunlap of Linkville, removing one which had been so badly punctured a few years ago by a pair of scissors as to be sightless.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 3


    Henry Klippel left for Portland last Sunday evening, where he goes in the interest of the Jacksonville branch railroad. We expect to see the wholesale merchants contribute liberally to our favorite enterprise.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. B. F. Adkins is at Portland.
    Geo. E. Neuber is now a resident of this place.
    Considerable improvement is going on in this place at present and more is contemplated.
    J. W. Short has purchased D. Payne's dwelling house in Medford, securing a bargain. He is buying considerable property in this town.
    Archbishop Gross delivered one of his able and interesting lectures at this place last night. He was greeted by a large audience.
    Jas. Gaines has taken possession of the farm he bought, near this place, and will improve it at once. There is a lurking suspicion that he will not occupy it alone.
    It is reported that Otto Lind, who made great pretensions toward being a mining expert, to the sorrow of a number of our citizens, died in Shasta County, Cal., some time ago. The story goes that he found a rich mine, which so unbalanced him that he became insane and died soon [afterwards].
    The following ladies and gentlemen, members of the Rebekah degree lodge at this place, made Hope lodge a fraternal visit at the same time that Jacksonville lodge did: Mr. and Mrs. G. W. Howard, Mr. and Mrs. G. H. Haskins, Mr. and Mrs. I. A. Webb, M. and Mrs. I. Woolf, Mr. and Mrs. D. Wilson, Mrs. C. K. Fronk, Lou Kelley, H. P. Adkins, S. Rosenthal, A. S. Childers and others. All speak in the highest terms of their treatment while there.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 3


Runaway.
    As D. W. Crosby, O. Burton and A. Brentano were returning from Jacksonville last Tuesday night, their team became frightened as the wheels of the buggy struck the railroad track near Medford, and made a sudden plunge. The lurch threw Crosby, who was driving, over the dashboard and he struck on his head, receiving an ugly gash, and also being stunned for awhile by the blow. Burton and Brentano jumped from the buggy, but both were injured, the latter's leg being considerably hurt by striking on a wheel. The team collided with a stump some distance further on and were stopped without doing any damage to the vehicle. The wounded are recovering rapidly and will soon be about again.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887, page 3


Important Meeting.
    A meeting of the subscribers to the capital stock of the Jacksonville branch railroad has been called for next Monday evening, at 8 o'clock. It will be held at the town hall and a full attendance is requested, as business of importance will be transacted.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887, page 3


    The Jacksonville branch railroad must be a success.
    We learn that Jas. Priddy has sold his farm near Medford to a gentleman from the eastern states.
    The stages continue to make two trips daily between this place and Medford, and are hauling quite a number of passengers.
    A proposition has been made that Jacksonville and Medford celebrate the Fourth of July jointly at Heber's grove. Not a bad idea.
    There is every probability that the Jacksonville branch railroad will be built. A few croakers are throwing cold water on the scheme, but they cannot defeat it.
    Prof. Armstrong of the Portland Business College subscribed for $250 of stock of the Jacksonville branch railroad, showing that he has not forgotten his native town. "Long may he wave."
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887, page 3


    Frank Huffer, an excellent engineer, has reported at the headquarters of Chief Engineer Eckelson of the O.P.R.R., and entered the employ of that company. His brother John accompanied him and is also a member of Frank's surveying party.
    Henry Klippel, who has been at Portland in the interests of the Jacksonville branch railroad, returned home this week. He found many of the wholesale merchants as penurious and non-enterprising as the Oregonian pictures them, but nevertheless succeeded in obtaining subscriptions to the amount of nearly $1,500. The metropolis probably does not care whether San Francisco absorbs the large trade of Jacksonville or not.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Dr. Adkins has returned from Portland.
    John Wolters, Sr., has returned to Medford.
    R. T. Lawton loans money in any quantity on good terms.
    Runaway accidents seem to be numerous in this vicinity of late. What is the matter with the young bloods?
    Some of the grain sown for hay near here is heading out short and will not make the crop expected. Such is not generally the case, however.
    Rev. M. A. Williams, after next month, will hold services at the new Presbyterian Church in this place on every first, second and fifth Sabbaths in each month.
    A meeting was held a few evenings since to take steps toward celebrating Independence Day here in an appropriate manner. Further particulars will be given hereafter.
    The Presbyterian Church is completed, excepting that seats are not yet in position. Rev. M. A. Williams, while in Grants Pass recently, gave an order for them, and they will soon be completed.
    C. W. Wolters, our wide-awake baker, is in the field with a new stock of all kinds of goods in his line and more popular prices than ever. Read his advertisement elsewhere and find out what he keeps.
    Messrs. Whitman, Bell and Adkins are continuing to prospect their coal mine a short distance from here, and the outlook is flattering. We hope to see the energy and enterprise of these gentlemen amply rewarded.
    Prof. Morris will give a free illustrated lecture at Stanley Hall, Medford, Friday evening June 3d. Free public examination at close of lecture. Front seats reserved for ladies. Lecture to commence at 8 o'clock P.M.
    While out in a cart last week, a few miles from here, Geo. Neuber and O. H. Burton experienced a runaway. The bridle slipped over the head of the pony which they were driving and he became unmanageable, colliding with a telegraph pole and demoralizing the vehicle to w
hich he was attached. The boys escaped comparatively unhurt, leaving the cart without ceremony or any order as to their method of going.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887, page 3


NEW BAKERY!
CHAS. WOLTERS, Proprietor.
   ----
FRESH
Wheat and Graham Bread
Always kept on hand.
ALSO A COMPLETE LINE OF
COOKED CORNED BEEF, BONELESS HER-
RING, CANNED CHICKEN, BAKING
POWDER, LUNCH TONGUE,
CHIPPED BEEF, PEP-
PER SAUCE AND
PIGS' FEET.
CIGARS, CIGARETTES AND TOBACCO,
CANDIES, NUTS, OYSTERS, SARDINES,
SODA and GRAHAM CRACKERS, CUR-
RANTS, BREAKFAST CHOCO-
LATE, RAISINS, CACHOUS,
APPLES, CHEESE,
FLOUR, ETC.
LEMONS, ORANGES and FIGS.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 27, 1887 et seq., page 3

JACKSONVILLE, May 25.
    A serious runaway happened at Medford last evening while a party consisting of Dave Crosby, O. Burton and August Brentano of New York, were returning from here. When passing the railroad crossing at Medford the team became frightened at a boxcar standing near the crossing and ran, throwing the occupants near the car. Crosby was seriously injured, while Burton and Brentano were both badly bruised.
"Jacksonville Notes," Morning Oregonian, Portland, May 28, 1887, page 6


Accidents.
    A son of Squire Barkdull of Medford had one of his legs broken in two places on Wednesday evening, by falling from a pile of lumber on which he was playing. He is doing well under the treatment of Doctors Pryce & Geary.
    A son of Adam Berg of Medford, aged about fourteen years, met with an accident one day last week, which resulted fatally. He was in the act of leading a colt near I. J. Phipps' barn, when it suddenly took fright and started to run. Young Berg unfortunately held tightly to the rope, and in the race he fell and was dragged a short distance. He picked himself up, and to all appearances was uninjured. Not long afterward he laid down on a lounge and never arose again. The horse had either kicked him in the abdomen or he had been hurt internally in being dragged. Young Berg was a boy of much promise, possessed of industry and good habits, and his untimely death casts a gloom over those who knew him. He leaves an aged father and also other relatives to mourn his loss. The remains were buried in the Jacksonville cemetery next day, Rev. W. P. Williams officiating.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Adam Berg intends leaving this place soon, we are sorry to learn.
    Jasper Crenshaw has gone to the railroad front in search of employment.
    J. S. Howard has gone to Big Applegate to survey Wm. Dorn's mining claim.
    Rev. Mr. Engle preached and lectured here during the past week and was well received.
    A. L. Johnson intends leaving for San Francisco soon, to go into the insurance business.
    Frank Kasshafer of Jacksonville is assisting in "doing the honors" at the Riddle House.
    Geo. Rieve, Jacksonville's expert wheelwright, made our town a visit last Monday evening.
    H. E. Baker and G. W. Merrill, the well-known grain and wool buyers, were in Jacksonville Wednesday.
    Prof. Morris, the phrenologist, will give free lectures here on the 3d, 4th and 6th of June. Everybody should turn out and hear him.
    Webb & Zimmerman have received the contract for building the Baptist Church at this place. The lumber is already on the ground.
    W. H. Barr of this precinct has assumed control of the Justus farm near here. He was in Ashland precinct lately; also at the county seat.
    Geo. Berg, son of our fellow townsman, Adam Berg, returned from Siskiyou County, Cal., last week, but went back there a few days afterward.
    A. Brentano and D. W. Crosby are recovering from the effects of their recent accident and are able to be about again. Dave is fortunate enough to be reinforced by an accident insurance policy which nets him $10 a week.
    All those who stop at the Riddle House agree that they never received better treatment, more toothsome victuals or more comfortable lodgings anywhere. Bous. never leaves anything undone to please his numerous guests.
    W. R. Andrews, Esq., the well-known attorney, will return to Medford next week, to practice his profession. He has rented one of the front rooms in Johnson's bank building. Mr. and Mrs. A. will be warmly welcomed back by their many friends.
    A commission was appointed at a meeting held here recently for the purpose of ascertaining the sentiment of the people of Medford on the proposition to celebrate the coming Fourth of July. The town has been canvassed and a large majority are in favor of joining in a celebration at Heber's Grove with Jacksonville.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 2


Sociable at Medford.
    The ladies of the Medford Aid Society will give a mush and milk festival on Monday evening, June 6th, at Stanley's Hall. Admission 10 cents, including supper. All are invited. Come eat, drink and be merry. By order of committee.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 3


    W. R. Andrews is the only bicyclist Jacksonville can boast of, and he rides his untamed steed well.
    The stage running between this place and Medford has been renovated and is more comfortable than ever.
    D. W. Crosby has resigned his position at the Riddle House at Medford and has been appointed a deputy by Sheriff Dean, at the instance of the S.P.R.R. Co., with headquarters on the Siskiyou Mountains.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 3


    Prof. Morris, after delivering a successful series of phrenological lectures here, left for Medford this week. His last lecture took place Wednesday evening and was well attended, interesting and quite instructive.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 3


Southern Oregon Coal Find.
    Gen. Tolman visited his coal claim northeast of Medford last Tuesday, says the Ashland Tidings, and brought to town some specimens of the coal obtained from the croppings. It is especially rich in bitumen, and tests made many years ago determined that for gas-making it is equal to the best coal found on the coast. It would be considered first-class for use as steam-making fuel, also, and if a sufficient quantity of coal of this quality be found it will be a fortune for the owner, as it is within two miles of the O.&C. railroad. The land was located by Gen. Tolman in 1862, he having bought the right of a prospector, who discovered the coal. Prospecting to ascertain the character and extent of the coal bed will probably be commenced this season.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 3


Jacksonville Branch Railroad.
    Articles incorporating the Jacksonville branch railroad company were filed in the county clerk's office last Tuesday, and in the evening a meeting was held at the town hall for the purpose of receiving subscriptions to the capital stock, which has been placed at $30,000. There was a generous response from all present, especially from those not blessed with a large amount of worldly goods. Next day a committee waited on many who had previously agreed to take certain amounts of stock, and in some cases were surprised to find that men whose word was supposed to be as good as their bond, upon one curious pretext or another, refused to make good what they had on a former occasion expressed in "black and white." By dint of much perseverance and work the gentlemen to whom had been entrusted the labor of soliciting subscriptions had presumably secured almost a sufficient amount to build the proposed branch road; but now that so many of those who had placed large sums opposite their names have to all appearances crawfished, the fate of this noble scheme is uncertain; in fact, the chances are against its consummation. It is humiliating to acknowledge that a community so wealthy as ours, and whose prosperity in a great measure depends upon something like the branch railroad, should dissipate its golden opportunity, simply through penuriousness and lack of enterprise. Is it possible that the mossbacks are in the ascendancy and Jacksonville is doomed to decadence? Probably those most responsible for any failure to secure railroad connection with the outside world will have occasion to regret their unseemly action more than anybody else.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 3

JACKSONVILLE, June 3.
    A. L. Johnson, the Medford banker, has left for parts unknown.
"News Items from Jacksonville," Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 4, 1887, page 2


    A son of Squire Barkdull of Medford had one of his legs broken in two places Wednesday evening, by falling from a pile of lumber on which he was playing.
"News of the Northwest," Morning Oregonian, Portland, June 7, 1887, page 6


    Down in Medford last week it was so hot that wax candles melted on grocers' shelves and honeycombs melted into beeswax.

Daily Morning Astorian,
June 7, 1887, page 3



    W. J. Plymale's stage has come to stay. He makes regular trips twice a day to connect with the morning and evening trains, and he asks a liberal share of public patronage.
    W. J. Plymale is having a first-class wagon built for the passenger traffic between Jacksonville and Medford, and it will be completed in a few days. He is leaving nothing undone to secure a liberal share of public patronage.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    A number of improvements are being made here.
    Much fencing is being done along the new road between this place and Jas. Bigham's farm.
    J. W. Simpson has become a resident of this place, having removed from Ashland precinct.
    A. L. Johnson and wife have gone to San Francisco, where Mr. J. will engage in the insurance business.
    Fresh tropical fruits can always be obtained at the bakery, also the finest candies and the best nuts.
    F. Hubbard is selling heaps of agricultural implements and machinery. He keeps a good assortment.
    The phrenological lectures delivered here by Prof. Morris were well attended and gave general satisfaction.
    A large audience greeted S. P. Putnam, the well-known liberal lecturer who appeared in Medford last night.
    A. N. Poston and wife have been disposing of a considerable amount of excellent vegetables here and in Jacksonville.
    Our citizens are decidedly in favor of a macadamized road between here and the county seat, and will lend a helping hand.
    A great many teams have lately been unloading wool at the depot, a large quantity of which has been shipped from the valley.
    The case of Miller vs. Ragsdale, tried in Justice Barkdull's court last week, resulted in a verdict for the plaintiff in the sum asked for.
    You can always get a nice, clean shave and shampoo and have your hair neatly trimmed by calling on B. W. Powell, our tonsorial artist.
    M. E. Beatty, the real estate agent, has a large number of farms, as also other property, for sale, and intending purchasers should give him a call.
    O. Gilbert and family will return from Crescent City, Cal., about Sept. 1st. They report the lumber trade of Del Norte County extensive and times lively.
    After this month Rev. M. A. Williams will hold services regularly at the new Presbyterian Church in this place, which will soon be furnished with neat and comfortable seats.
    W. R. Andrews has returned to Medford with his family and resumed the practice of law. His office is one door east of the post office, where he formerly held forth. He will act as city attorney.
    Dame Rumor speaks of a wedding, in which a prominent business man of our town and a young lady residing not many miles distant will be the contracting parties. We congratulate in the advance.
    The mush and milk sociable announced to take place at Stanley's Hall last Monday was postponed until next Monday evening, on account of Prof. Morris' lectures. A good time is promised all who attend.
    Walter Anderson and Miss Hattie Gilbert, formerly of this place, were married at Crescent City on the 1st inst. The young people have many friends in southern Oregon, all of whom join in congratulating them and extending wishes for a prosperous and happy future.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 10, 1887, page 3


A. S. Johnston to Martha J. Rowland, property in Medford; consideration, $800.
Martha J. Rowland to Anna Barr, property in Medford; $400.
O.&C. Transcontinental Co. to B. J. Adams and S. L. Bennett, trustees of Medford Baptist Church, property in Medford, $125.
John W. Short to trustees of Medford Lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., property in Medford; $325.
Nettie L. Howard to Martha C. Howard, property in Medford; $200.
I. J. Phipps to Martha B. Howard, property in Medford; $25.
G. Naylor to David H. Miller, property in Medford; $50.
O.&C. Transcontinental Co. to E. L .Elder, property in Medford; $200.
Frank Galloway to J. C. Cowles, property in Medford; $400.
Frank Galloway to J. C. Cowles, property in Medford; $1.
C. W. Broback to D. H .Miller, property in Medford; $50.
Chas. Nickell to John W. Short, property in Medford; $250.
Emma Justus to B. W. Powell, land near Medford; $375.
A. L. Johnson to Joseph Dray, property in Medford; $1000.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1887, page 2


    W. J. Plymale is painting his new bus, which will be put on the line between here and Medford in a short time.
    The mush and milk sociable given last Monday evening in Stanley's hall by the Medford Aid Society passed off pleasantly and was much of a success in every respect.
    Some of the people of Manzanita precinct, who attended the lecture on phrenology at Medford on the night of the 6th, found their horses untied and gone and they had to go home on Foot & Walker's line. It was quite late when they got there and their thoughts over the affair were more vivid than elegant.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1887, page 3


    Mrs. C. W. Vrooman of Medford is visiting her daughter in Walla Walla, W.T.
    J. S. Howard of Medford was in town yesterday engaged in surveying about the Rogue River Distillery.
    Mrs. J. C. Cowles of Medford, who has been in California for several months past, will return ere long, we learn.
    W. R. Andrews, formerly of this place but now of Medford, will deliver the oration at Gold Hill on July 4th. Mr. A. is a splendid speaker and will no doubt do justice to the occasion.
    J. T. Roloson of this place intends starting for New York State the forepart of next week, to pay his old folks at home a visit. He will take his son with him and expects to be gone about two months.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 17, 1887, page 3


    The telephone line between this place and Medford is not complete yet, owing to the trouble of getting instruments.
"Jacksonville Notes," Oregonian, Portland, June 18, 1887, page 6


    John Miller offers his entire stock of hardware, the whole or in part, at cost. It is his intention to retire from business. Call on him and price his hardware and you will find it to your advantage to purchase from him.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 23, 1887, page 3



MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our band is practicing regularly and will no doubt make a good showing at Grants Pass on the 4th of July.
    Trains still stop at this place for breakfast and supper, notwithstanding the change in time. Medford is considerably benefited by this arrangement.
    Revs. S. P. Wilson and W. P. Williams will hold services in this place Saturday afternoon and evening. It will be the occasion of the 4th-quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church for this circuit.
    Doctors Pryce & Geary, our progressive physicians, have introduced the new treatment for consumption, and is it working wonders in some instances. They are always up to the times and are constantly adding to the enviable reputation they already enjoy.
    A number of the members of the Rebekah degree lodge at this place paid Ruth Rebekahs of Jacksonville a fraternal visit last Monday evening. Among those present were G. H. Haskins, J. F. Kelley, D. Wilson, I. A. Webb, Isaac Woolf, R. S. Webb and their wives, C. K. Fronk and S. Rosenthal. All express themselves well pleased with their visit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 2


Jacksonville Will Always Be a Trade Center.
    A number of real estate transactions are taking place in Jacksonville at fair figures, and there are very few empty buildings here, which is a sign of increasing prosperity. The county seat is at present enjoying a large trade, the most extensive it has had since the railroad reached Ashland, and there is no town in southern Oregon whose volume of business is greater than its. Our citizens generally feel encouraged and on every hand may be seen improvements. Had the branch railroad materialized, a bright future for our town would have been assured. We must now attempt to secure the next best thing in order to establish the permanency of Jacksonville beyond cavil. A horse railroad is now being discussed and should be built by all means. It has been demonstrated that such an enterprise would pay neat dividends on the money invested, to say nothing of benefit it would be to the town. The roads leading to this place should also be put in first-class condition, so that they can be traveled conveniently in the winter season. The county authorities, with their usual generosity, will appropriate as much for this purpose as the citizens will subscribe, hence it is our fault if the contiguous thoroughfares are neglected. There is no reason why Jacksonville should lose any of the trade and importance it now possesses. Future immigration will not only maintain them, but, on the contrary, materially increase them, if we have enough enterprise to be equal to the opportunity. We must be more harmonious in matters of a public nature, however, and leave nothing undone which will conduce to the general welfare of our community.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


    Plymale is engaged in painting his new stage, which will soon be placed on the road between this place and Medford. He will then be prepared to carry passengers to and from the railroad depot with dispatch and in the best style.
    Arthur Wilson, road supervisor for the district adjoining Jacksonville, is doing much excellent work toward improving the highways under his control. He has lately graveled a portion of the Ish lane, a very bad piece of road during the winter, and would continue the good work if he had means at his disposal. The citizens of Jacksonville, aided by the county authorities, will no doubt appropriate a neat sum to assist him in his efforts to give the public passable roads during the wet season.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


    Mrs. E. Wilkinson, nee Miss Flora Orth, arrived from California yesterday, to pay her old home a visit.
    Several of the members of Medford Rebekah lodge, I.O.O.F., paid Ruth Rebekah lodge a fraternal visit last Monday evening.
    Stages leave for Medford at half-past six o'clock in the morning and at five o'clock P.M., connecting with trains from both ways.
    H. B. Reed, the live fence man, informs us that he is taking a large number of orders for the Universal fence. It is neat, cheap and durable, consequently the best which could be used by everybody.
    J. T. Rolison, one of our most prominent contractors and builders, left for his old home in Mecklinburg, N.Y., where he will probably spend several months. He was accompanied as far as Washington Territory by Robt. Knowles, who intends locating in that section. Success to them.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


Railroad Time Changed.
    Another change in the railroad schedule has been made. For the present trains leave Oakland, Cal., at 6:30 P.M., a local train from Sacramento connecting at Davisville, arriving at Sisson next morning for breakfast, at Montague about 8:15 as usual, and reaching Cole's at 11 A.M. for dinner. Stages for Ashland are then taken, which point is reached at 5 P.M., passengers taking supper at Medford about an hour later than usual. Coming south, trains leave Portland at 4 P.M., reaching Medford for breakfast, Cole's for dinner, and Montague about an hour earlier than heretofore, or 4:45 P.M.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 3


    W. J. Plymale will run a daily stage line from Jacksonville to Medford to connect with the trains north and south. Will leave Jacksonville promptly at 7 A.M. and 4 P.M. A liberal share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 30, 1887, page 3


    S. B. Hadley and Ed. Dunnavin of Myrtle Creek have gone to eastern Oregon. Sam goes to his old home at Paisley and Ed. in search of his fortune.
"Random Jottings," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 1


    A strong effort is being made to have the mail service increased on the route between this place and Medford, so that our mails from the south will not lie at the latter town for about fifteen hours after their arrival. Senator Mitchell and Representative Hermann have both assured us that they will do their utmost in the matter. It is a shame that so important a town as Jacksonville should be treated in this manner, when it will cost the government so little to accede to the wishes of our citizens.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Bruce Allen will be foreman in our newspaper.
    O. Holtan, our tailor, has removed to a rancho on Rogue River.
    Mrs. C. W. Wolters has returned from her trip to Shovel Creek Springs.
    Warren Howard and family have removed from Phoenix to this place.
    Billy Zimmerman feels bigger than ever since the arrival of a bouncing boy baby at his house.
    Our band goes to Grants Pass on the 4th and will furnish excellent music for the occasion.
    Milton Maule, the expert painter, is painting several vehicles for E. Worman, and is doing first-class work.
    The telephone line between this place and Jacksonville is in working order and will prove quite a convenience.
    Advices have been received here to the effect that A. L. Johnson and wife are comfortably located in Sacramento, Cal.
    Prof. H. G. Fairclo is teaching the Fort Klamath district school with success. He will return about the middle of September.
    The brick foundation of the Baptist Church at this place is about completed and Webb & Zimmerman, who have the contract for doing the carpenter work, will soon commence operations.
    A lawsuit occupied the attention of Justice Barkdull and a jury last week, W. R. Andrews and Judge DePeatt being the contending counsel. The controversy was over the hire of a team and wagon, Mr. R. Whitsett being the plaintiff and Hammon Bros. defendants, of Phoenix. A verdict of fifteen cents was given plaintiff, but the costs amount to over $80, which were taxed against the defendants.
    The plant of the Medford Monitor has been purchased by C. B. Carlisle of Portland, who will soon commence the publication of a newspaper at this place. We learn that it will be neutral in politics, with Democratic leanings, whatever that may mean. Mr. Carlisle is a good writer, but your correspondent is reliably informed by leading Portland Democrats that his Democracy is of a very gauzy nature.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 2


    H. B. Reed is receiving many orders for the Universal combination fence. E. F. Walker, Thos. Chavner and Gen. Ross have each had a long string of it put up on their farms, and Chas. Nickell has contracted for half a mile of it.
    The grasshoppers have invaded the corn patches of M. Maule and a few others, who have farms along Bear Creek, doing considerable damage. They were troublesome in the same district last year, but their ravages were confined to only a few places.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 3


    C. K. Baumle and John Matzen, formerly of this place, are engaged in conducting a bakery at Spokane Falls, W.T.
    J. H. Griffis, who has the contract for building the Kane Creek schoolhouse, is making excellent progress and doing good work.
    Since the Times went to press we learn that an order has been received giving Jacksonville mail service twice a day. This is as it should be.
"Local Brevities," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 3


    C. B. Carlisle of Portland, secretary of the State Board of Immigration, made our town a visit last Friday, accompanied by W. R. Andrews. He will locate at Medford soon.
    'Squire Barkdull of Medford made us a call last Monday. He informs us that his son, who had his leg broken recently, is improving fast under the treatment of Doctors Pryce & Geary.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 3


BORN.
ZIMMERMAN--In Medford, June 24th, to Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Zimmerman, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 3


    C. B. Carlisle, secretary of the State Board of Immigration, has tendered his resignation and the same has been duly accepted. Mr. Carlisle recently purchased the plant of the Medford Monitor, and will shortly begin the publication, in that city, of the Southern Oregon Transcript. He left for his new field of enterprise the first of this week .Wallace R. Struble of Portland succeeds to the position of secretary of the immigration board, and has already entered upon his duties.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 1


Mail Service Increased.
    The U.S. government has readily seen the justice of giving Jacksonville mail service twice a day, and after tomorrow our mails will be brought from Medford after the arrival of each train. Had the attention of the P.O. Department been called to this matter before, the change would have been made long ago.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


A Worthy Enterprise.
    The telephone line between this place and Medford is now in first-class running order. The lowest possible rates are charged, they being only 15 cents for the first ten words and one cent for each additional word. We hope that this enterprise will prove successful.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


    Passenger travel between this place and Medford has been heavy for some time past. Both stages are doing a good business.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Frank Kasshafer has ceased his connection with the Riddle House and returned to Jacksonville.
    Miss E. Galloway, who has been attending the State University, returned home a short time since.
    Dr. Geary is at Eugene City, paying relatives and friends a visit. He will return soon, accompanied by his family.
    Miss Carrie Baker, who has been teaching school in Antioch district, has returned home. She gave general satisfaction.
    C. W. Wolters has been appointed agent for the S.F. Chronicle at this place. He will no doubt fill the position acceptably.
    Medford did not celebrate this year, but most of her residents went to Ashland and Grants Pass to be patriotic. A few went to Jacksonville.
    H. E. Battin, the well-known commission merchant of Portland, accompanied by his wife, were guests of Mr. and Mrs. J. D. Whitman this week.
    Bruce Allen, who will be foreman of our newspaper, is engaged in putting the material in shape for its early publication. Mr. Carlisle has resigned his position in Portland and will be a resident of our town. He will name his journal the Southern Oregon Transcript, we learn.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
DORA-CHANDLER--In Medford, July 3d, by Geo. S. Walton, recorder, Chas. Dora and Rhoda Chandler.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


    SAN FRANCISCO, July 8.--H. E. Baker, of Medford, Or., is in town. He came down overland, and states that he is surprised at the activity shown in the various towns on the road. Grading on this side of the Siskiyous, he says, is about completed, and almost the entire force of graders, numbering 6000 or 7000 men, has been transferred to the other side. The track will be laid up to the Siskiyou tunnel by next week. Then staging will be reduced to twelve miles.

Oregonian,
Portland, July 9, 1887, page 2



    OREGON PEACHES IN MARKET.--A lot of fine peaches was received here yesterday from Wasco County and some from Medford. The steamers have been bringing up a great many California peaches of late, and some of them have arrived in poor condition. After the O.&C. is completed we shall probably get our early peaches from Sacramento and the region round about. But plenty of good peaches can be raised in Oregon, and our orchardists must see to it that they are raised. Of course we will always import a few from California early in the season, but there is no need of any more. Wasco County and many other parts of eastern Oregon and portions of southern Oregon raise the best kind of peaches, and near Vancouver they raise peaches which cannot be beaten anywhere. As for grapes, they can be raised in the vicinity of this city in any quantity, as is proven by Mr. Simon's vineyard, which has produced abundantly for several years, and is literally loaded with fruit again this year.
"Local and General," Oregonian, Portland, July 9, 1887, page 7


    Jacksonville Times: Harvest is approaching, and heading will soon be under way. The warm weather is causing the grain to ripen fast.
    Jacksonville paper: The railroad surveyors have finished their work in the Siskiyous and started for lower California this week. The beginning of the end is near.
    Eugene Ricksecker's party of U.S. topographical surveyors came in from Klamath this week, but will start out again soon, says an Ashland paper. The other party which started out from Ashland this summer is still in the mountains of Josephine County.
    Oregon Sentinel: Several parties were in this vicinity during the week looking for fruit land. It is just a question of time when the hills around Jacksonville will be covered with vineyards and orchards, this district being especially free from frost.
    The Ashland Tidings has the following crop notes: Report from most parts of the county is that the grain has filled well, and the crop will be large and of good quality. Grasshoppers are doing some damage to gardens and corn patches along the east side of Bear Creek in some places. Grain harvest will soon begin in earnest. Some fields are already ready for the sickle.
    William Egan, of this valley, has discovered an extensive salt marsh, about eight feet across, says the Lakeview Examiner. Around the edges the ground is covered with a three-inch layer of good salt; all through the center the water bubbles up like water boiling. All the water is thick with salt. It is considered a valuable find for the community, as well as for Mr. Egan. It is located ten miles east of north of Silver Lake. Mr. Egan is now busy building vats to evaporate the water into salt.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, July 12, 1887, page 6


ABOUT FOREST FIRES.
Jacksonville Sentinel.

    Now that tourists are beginning to pour into Southern Oregon, it would be well for all good citizens, especially those who compose mountain parties, to guard against the spread of mountain fires. Aside from the wanton destruction of valuable timber and the drying up of water sources, it is specially desirable that our grand scenery and majestic forests should not be obscured by smoke during the summer season. To the overland traveler from the dusty and withered plains of California, the sight of the green fields of Rogue River Valley is a standing plea in our favor.
    Already the contrast is beginning to produce marked commercial changes. And it will be hard for the immigrant to see why land in California should range from $50 to $1000 an acre, when the same land in Oregon is only worth from $10 to $15 per acre. Again, the revenue from tourists is destined to be of some importance; it is safe to predict that several thousand dollars will be distributed by those visiting Crater Lake, the Josephine County caves, the Siskiyous and other of our justly famous mountain resorts. It is plain, then, that all are interested in seeing that the country is not enveloped in smoke.
Oregonian, Portland, July 12, 1887, page 6


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    L. J. Crenshaw and family have gone to northern California.
    There will be preaching by Revs. Brownson and Williams on Monday.
    T. A. Harris keeps the market well supplied with the choicest of meats.
    S. Rosenthal is as jolly as ever and sells the best of goods at the lowest prices. He is always glad to see you.
    Dr. E. P. Geary was in Portland this week. He will probably return home in a few days, accompanied by his family.
    Ed. Worman keeps a large number of first-class turnouts of every description and never fails to please his numerous customers.
    M. Purdin and Geo. F. Merriman, the popular blacksmiths, assisted by J. G. Grossman, a first-class wheelwright, are kept busily at work.
    Henry Smith's store, under the efficient management of Mr. and Mrs. Cranfill, continues to do a good business. They are both clever and obliging.
    Prof. W. H. Gore, the efficient principal of our public school, has returned from Salem, and is now at Grants Pass taking part in the teachers' institute.
    The I.O.O.F. graveyard, which has been located half a mile west of this place, is being put in shape. It is proposed to make it a handsome burying ground.
    Our new paper will be called the Southern Oregon Transcript, and will be issued about the 20th inst. Mr. Carlisle, the publisher, has already become a resident of this place, having arranged his affairs in Portland.
    The Times was in error last week in stating that Rev. M. A. Williams would hold services at the Presbyterian Church at Jacksonville. Instead, he held the first services in the new church at this place, which has lately been finished in fine style. A large congregation was present.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 2


    H. B. Reed is putting up a string of the celebrated Universal combination fence for John G. Van Dyke of Eden precinct.
    D. Loring, connected with the O.&C.R.R. Co., and well known here, has blossomed out as an oarsman. At the celebration in Portland he contested for the gold badge offered single scullers, but was defeated by L. Quackenbush.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 3


    Geo. Rieve, our popular wheelwright, and Mrs. M. E. Sturgis of Uniontown precinct were quietly married in Jacksonville last Sunday, only a few intimate friends being present. The contracting parties both have many friends, who tender their congratulations and wishes for a long life of prosperity and bliss.
    H. E. Battin, a well-known commission merchant of Portland, accompanied by Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, made us a call last Friday. The former has been making his annual tour through southern Oregon, and while here made arrangements to dispose of much of our fruit, onions, etc., at the metropolis.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 3


    Don't set the woods and mountains on fire.
    Bum Neuber now officiates at the Gem Saloon in Medford.
    The train leaves Ashland twenty minutes sooner than usual and consequently arrives that much earlier at Medford.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD ITEMS.
Medford, July 13.       
    An unavoidable circumstance has delayed, for a week or two, the issuance of the Southern Oregon Transcript.
    The weather is just as near perfect for the season as possible. Today, the 13th, we notice some haze in the hills, indications, perhaps, of a smoky season.
    The new Presbyterian Church, situated on the west side of town, was occupied for the first time by a congregation last Sunday, Father Williams preaching the sermon. The time for dedication has not been announced.
    The carpenters are placing the rafters on the handsome brick church erected by the Baptist people of this little city. The church will be ready for occupancy sometime in September, and it will be an ornament to the place.
    A ride through the country immediately tributary to Medford is in the midst of fields magnificent in their beauty and plenteousness of crop. It reminds one of the favored spots in the famous Miami Valley in Ohio, the country about Binghamton, New York, or the region between Louisville and Frankfort, Kentucky. It is rich in its promise to the farmer.
    H. E. Battin, Portland, well-known fruit dealer, has been here for a week making an examination of the orchards in this valley. He informs me that he finds a fine crop of peaches, plums, apples and grapes. He has purchased the product of a number of orchards, and not a few watermelon crops. He has already started a heavy shipment of peaches to your city. After all the talk about the failure of the fruit crop in Southern Oregon, these shipments will satisfy everybody, even the croakers. This portion of the state is, no doubt, especially well adapted to the culture of fruits.
    Two gentlemen in the employ of the Southern Pacific spent a day here last week, after having made an examination of the coal field on Evans Creek, some thirty miles from Medford. Mr. Youle, of Ashland, has an interest in this coal prospect, and accompanied the Californians in the field. The fact that Mr. Youle is to go ahead and make a beginning in the way of development is evidence that the Southern Pacific people are satisfied with the present outlook. There are one or two other coal interests nearer town (less than six miles) that are being developed by private parties.
    Medford people, alive to the importance of the matter, are making due preparations to properly meet and care for the large immigration that is certain to come into this valley once the short gap in the railway below here is closed. They realize that there must be the utmost harmony and helpfulness among citizens, that men who are coming to this valley who have business in their eyes, money in their pocket, or its equivalent in ambition or labor in their bodies, shall be greeted with a hearty welcome and all the encouragement that a warmhearted, thrifty, generous people know how to bestow. Recently a number of wealthy Californians--farmers--have made purchases in this vicinity. Californians like this climate. Why not, pray?
SEE.       
Oregonian, Portland, July 16, 1887, page 6


    WM. EGAN, of this valley, has discovered an extensive salt marsh, about eighty feet across, says the Lakeview Examiner.  Around the edges the ground is covered with a three-inch layer of good salt; all through the center the water bubbles up like water boiling. All the water is thick with salt. It is located ten miles east of north of Salt Lake [sic]. Mr. Egan is now busy building vats to evaporate the water into salt.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Miss Nettie Tice is now a resident of Grants Pass.
    Dr. Geary has returned home, but his family is still in Eugene City.
    Our population continues to increase and the town is generally improving.
    W. S. Barnum, proprietor of the planing mill, paid Jacksonville a visit Saturday.
    F. Hubbard and "Shorty" Hamilton were at the county seat during the week.
    Much hay is now being shipped from this station by Merrill, Baker and others.
    Several of our citizens are "rusticating" in the mountains, and others will soon follow.
    Our town council has reduced the license for retailing spiritous liquors here to $200 a year.
    H. B. Reed, the fence man, has a number of unfinished contracts and expects several more.
    Snooks wants to know why "Shorty" has so much important business at Jacksonville of late.
    Prof. Hutchins of San Francisco has been visiting I. J. Phipps and family, who are relatives of his.
    There is a change in operators of the Postal Telegraph Co. in Medford, Bobby Riddle succeeding C. S. Jenkins.
    N. A. Jacobs has sold his residence property in this place to W. H. Beauchamp, lately from Table Rock precinct.
    Bruce Allen has returned to Ashland and is succeeded by a young man--a stranger--as foreman of the Transcript.
    It is said that W. H. Barr and W. K. Price of this precinct are further along with their farming operations than anyone else.
    M. E. Beatty, the live real estate man, has a large number of farms, etc., for sale and is getting ready to do a large business.
    D. Wilson, the clever harness maker and saddler, accompanied by his family and J. H. Gordon and family, spent Sunday on Applegate.
    Judge Hanna of Jacksonville and J. H. Huffer, referee in the Bailey divorce suit, have been here on different occasions lately, for the purpose of taking testimony.
    W. G. Kenney has become interested with E. Worman in the Jacksonville-Medford stage line, and it is rumored that he is also one of the owners of the livery stables here.
    Webb & Zimmerman are making excellent progress with their contract of building the new Baptist Church. They are excellent mechanics and will no doubt construct a handsome edifice.
    It is announced that the first issue of the Southern Oregon Transcript will be issued one week from today. Mr. Carlisle has been suffering with a carbuncle, which will account for the delay.
    J. A. Whiteside, our efficient street commissioner, has been putting our streets and roads in the best of repair, considering the limited amount of funds at his disposal. He is proving a first-class officer.
    Mrs. A. Pollard of Rock Island, Ills., wife of one of the officials of the C.B.&Q.R.R. Co., and Mrs. H. Johnson of Portland, whose husband is in the employ of the N.P.R.R. Co., made this place a short visit last week. Both are daughters of F. Hubbard, dealer in agricultural implements.
    The following is a list of the officers of Medford lodge No. 83, I.O.O.F., installed on July 9th by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M., J. F. Kelley, N.G.; C. K. Fronk, V.G.; G. H. Haskins, R.S.; Geo. Webb, Treas.; I. Woolf., P.S.; S. Rosenthal, Con.; B. S. Webb, R.S.N.G.; G. W. Howard, L.S.N.G.; B. W. Powell, R.S.V.G.; L. Woodford, R.S.S.; I. Williams, L.S.S.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 2


    W. G. Kenney has become interested in the stage and mail line between this place and Medford, and the team now engaged [in] the service stops at the Union livery stable.
    Plymale has put on a new and first-class stage between Jacksonville and Medford, and makes close connection with all trains. He spares no pains to please his customers and gives the fullest satisfaction.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
HALL-McSWEENY--At the residence of S. Earhart near Medford, Sunday, July 17th, by Rev. W. P. Williams, P. C. Hall of Mendocino County, Cal., and Miss Ida B. McSweeny.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 3


    The new paper at Medford will make its appearance on the 25th.

"Jacksonville Items," Oregonian, Portland, July 23, 1887, page 3


    Volume 1, No. 1, of the Southern Oregon Transcript, published at Medford, has been received. Mr. C. B. Carlisle, formerly secretary of the Oregon state board of immigration, is the editor and publisher of the new paper. The Transcript is a twenty-eight-column paper, presents a neat typographical appearance, and is both sprightly and newsy.
"Brief Mention," Oregonian, Portland, July 28, 1887, page 8


David H. Miller to Caroline E. Damon, property in Medford; consideration, $700.
Nannie Barr to J. C. Cowles, property in Medford; $200.
Sarah J. Pool to Philip Haught, property in Medford; $350.
Solomon Abraham to Henry E. Baker, property in Medford; $
400.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    W. R. Andrews, Esq., expects to leave for Washington Territory soon again, on legal business.
    G. W. Merrill and H. E. Baker have purchased quite a lot of hay and shipped it to Portland.
    The Union Sunday school now meets regularly in the new Presbyterian Church and is in a flourishing condition.
    W. S. Barnum, proprietor of our sash and door factory, has been in the mountains on a recuperating expedition.
    Quite a number of strangers have arrived at this station lately, many of whom will locate somewhere in the valley.
    R. T. Young and J. K. Darnell are engaged in plastering Dr. Walters' fine residence at Ashland. Oscar Lewis is engaged in painting it.
    Misses Carrie and Mary Baker of this place, accompanied by Miss Lawrence, a lady friend from the East, have been sojourning at the Soda Springs.
    Your correspondent is informed that there is no foundation for the rumor that W. G. Kenney has again become interested in the livery stable at this place.
    C. H. Gordon, who has been at work in Josephine County, has joined his father and they are conducting a blacksmith shop here, assisted by J. S. Higinbotham as wheelwright.
    Thomas Glendenning, who is interested in one of the largest dairy ranches in Scott Valley, was in the city Tuesday on his way to Medford. He will return a married man.--Yreka Union.
    Street Commissioner Whiteside is building a number of crosswalks on 7th Street, something that will prove quite convenient. Some of the other streets should be graveled and treated likewise.
    Mrs. J. C. Cowles, the artist, is still at Yreka, Cal., giving lessons in all branches of painting, drawing, etc., with much success. She also enlarges photographs and paints portraits from life.
    The Southern Oregon Transcript, edited and owned by C. B. Carlisle, late secretary of the State Board of Immigration, made its appearance last Tuesday. It is well filled with local news and will no doubt supply the demand for a newspaper in this place.
    The lecture entitled "American Education," delivered at this place one evening recently by Prof. D. T. Stanley of Monmouth, is highly spoken of by all who were fortunate enough to hear it. It was highly entertaining and instructive, and reflects much credit on the genial Professor.
    D. Wilson, the enterprising and clever manufacturer of and dealer in saddles, harness, etc., keeps one of the neatest and best stocks in southern Oregon and sells quite reasonably. He is also thoroughly reliable and prompt and spares no pains to please. Give him a call if you need anything in his line.
    The Ashland Tidings article on the quality and size of the peaches being shipped from Medford station to Portland is as malicious as it was unwarranted. If the fruit to which so much objection is being taken by Mr. Leeds was as ornery as represented, why is there so much of a demand for it? Either the people of Portland have a perverted taste or he has simply falsified the facts and slandered the shippers. Your correspondent can plainly discover the green-eyed monster dallying with the "nigger in the woodpile." The Tidings seems to think that no section but Ashland precinct can and ought to produce fine peaches, and it does not want any other to export them and gain the distinction accorded.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 2


Southern Oregon Ahead.
    Quite a number of crates of peaches have been shipped to Portland and the Willamette Valley from Ashland, Medford, Gold Hill and other points in Jackson and Josephine counties, and sold readily for $1.50 a crate. They reached there in splendid shape. Some were from the orchard of L. Martin of Ashland. The fact that the Albany Herald and other Oregon newspapers reported that nearly all the fruit in this valley had been killed by frost prevaricated seriously is more apparent than ever at this time, now that large quantities of fine peaches are being shipped northward from nearly every station. Prunes, pears, plums and apples, as also melons, tomatoes and other choice vegetables, will follow in course of time. The day is approaching when Oregon can furnish her own fruits without the assistance of California, and have plenty left for export. We have much faith in the fruit industry.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 3


    The Southern Oregon Transcript has made its appearance and Jackson County again has four newspapers.
    R. M. Shely of Medford will soon develop a quarry on Applegate, marble from which he has already tested to his satisfaction.
    Plymale's stage line to Medford is well patronized, as also is his livery stable, where excellent teams and vehicles may be obtained for all occasions.
    Some miscreant attacked the apiary of Thos. McAndrew of Medford precinct and robbed some of his hives, besides killing quite a number of bees. This is the second time such vandalism has been perpetrated, and severe punishment should be meted out to the guilty party.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 3


    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct anticipates a large crop of fine sweet potatoes.
    Frank Kime, while at work with Wm. Edwards' threshing crew at Dr. DeBar's farm in Medford precinct, was kicked in the chest by a horse and received painful injuries.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 29, 1887, page 3


    Number 1, Vol. 1, of the Southern Oregon Transcript is received. It is published at Medford by C. B. Carlisle, an experienced newspaper man, is Democratic in politics and jumps in with considerable vim.

Daily Morning Astorian, July 29, 1887, page 3


STOLE A HIVE OF BEES.
    It is a disputed question as to which is the bravest man, he who steals a hot stove or he who steals a hive of bees. Sometime since a man in eastern Oregon distinguished himself by carrying off a hot stove, and now a man in southern Oregon comes to the front with the other fellow. The Medford Transcript says: "A few days ago, and for the second time this season, parties with a sweet tooth, but lacking conscience, made a raid on Thos. McAndrew's bee stands, destroying one altogether, carrying off the honey and killing the bees. Another stand was partly broken up." It is hard to say which one would rather attempt to get away with--a bee hive or a hot stove. If a fellow waited long enough the stove would cool, but nothing except death can cool the business end of a beer.
Oregonian, Portland, July 31, 1887, page 5


A. L. Johnson to Henrietta B. Stanley, property in Medford, consideration; $650.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 2


At the Front Again.
    H. E. Baker is again in charge of the Medford and Gold Hill warehouses and offers excellent inducement to those wishing to store grain with him or receive advances on the same. He is courteous, prompt and thoroughly reliable, and all those wishing to transact business in his line should give him a call. See his advertisement in another column.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 3


Notice to Farmers.
ALL FARMERS STORING WHEAT, BARLEY
or oats in the Medford or Gold Hill warehouses
can obtain a
Cash Advance
on application to me as soon as the grain is received.
Applications for Loans and Storage Room are now solicited.
Sacks Loaned to Farmers Without Charge.
----
H. E. BAKER, Medford, Or.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887 et seq., page 3


    Mr. Carlisle has ceased to be secretary of the immigration board, and Mr. Wallace R. Struble takes his place. Mr. Carlisle will publish the Southern Oregon Transcript, says the Benton Leader. We trust that Mr. Carlisle will succeed better as an editor than he did as secretary and that Mr. Struble will succeed better as a secretary than he did as an editor.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    G. W. Merrill, the well-known buyer of hay, grain, etc., is at this place.
    Only one arrest has been made in Medford since January. A good record.
    Dr. R. Pryce of Medford has gone to Yaquina Bay for a few days' recreation.
    Rev. A. M. Johnson, a Baptist minister, preaches at Walton's hall on Sunday.
    Geo. Stockton, formerly foreman of the Monitor, is now in San Francisco.
    The Ladies' Aid Society held a pleasant sociable at the residence of Mrs. G. H. Haskins recently.
    A lightning and painless tooth extractor has been doing a rushing business in Medford this week.
    F. L. Cranfill of Medford has been paying Henry Smith of Wolf Creek, who has been quite sick, a visit.
    N. H. Spencer of lower California, who purchased Jos. Bever's property in town, has arrived with his family.
    A. J. Weeks of this precinct, the skillful architect, has been quite sick, but is now convalescing, we are glad to learn.
    Chas. P. Buck, son of Dr. Buck, of this county, arrived here a few days since, accompanied by his family, from Illinois.
    M. E. Beatty elsewhere gives notice to the farmers that he has leased the Central Point warehouse and is prepared to store grain in any quantity at reasonable rates.
    We regret to learn that W. R. Andrews, our attorney-at-law, intends leaving this place, to practice his profession elsewhere. We wish him success wherever he may go.
    H. E. Baker, the energetic and clever proprietor of the warehouse at this place, has returned from his trip to San Francisco, where he studied the wheat market and its fictitious quotations.
    H. F. Wood was in Jacksonville one day this week and called at the Times office. He has lately returned from Sisson's, Siskiyou County, Cal., where he is employed by the S.P.R.R. Co. as a bridge carpenter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 5, 1887, page 3


Medford, Aug. 4, 1887.
    Crops have turned out fine this year.
    We hear the threshing machines busy at work.
    Medford is doing good business, everything lively.
    All the young folks are going to Crater Lake for a pleasure trip.
    The market is overrun with apples, peaches and watermelons.
    Miss Allie Matthews, from Rock Point, is here visiting; is the guest of Miss Elva Galloway.
    Misses Jennie and Addie Colvig from Rock Point are visiting their cousin here, Miss Virgie Woodford.
    The Ladies' Aid Society will give a free entertainment at Howard's Hall on the 17th of August. Everyone invited.
    Work has commenced on the school house, enlarging the rooms. School will commence the first of September. Four teachers will be employed.
    There was a grand ball here last night. Two prizes were offered--one for the ladies and one for the gentlemen. The lady should be the best dressed, best looking, and the best dancer, for which Miss Alice Matthews was chosen. The winner of the gentleman's prize was a young man from Portland; we did not learn his name. The prizes awarded to the young couple were elegant. Medford deserves praise.
MARS.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, August 5, 1887, page 3


    A SUCCESSFUL OPERATION.--An incident of a day or two ago reminds us of what, when fully realized and actualized by explanation, with the aid of a model, was really a wonderful piece of surgical skill. We refer to the operation performed by Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, January 7th, for the removal of a cataract from the eye of Mrs. Taylor, mother of Clark Taylor of this neighborhood, a lady now 87 years of age. The common but mistaken impression is that this cataract is a disorder of the outer surface of the eye. The lens removed from the eye of Mrs. Taylor is about the size of half a pea, brown in color, and in its hardened and opaque condition, wholly destroyed the sense of sight. In plain terms it was necessary to make an incision and such a disposition of the parts as to allow the entrance of an instrument back of the lens, and an extraction of it. It was skillfully and rapidly done in this case. When we remember the delicate character and structure of the organ, and its extreme sensitiveness to the touch, we can have only the highest admiration and regard for the mental and manual training that attains success in these difficult cases. Mrs. Taylor greatly rejoices in the restoration of the sense of sight in the eye operated upon. By the aid of glasses expressly ground for the case, under the supervision of Dr. Geary, the lady can enjoy the pleasure of reading. When the fact is known that this lady had been blind for years, and that she heard the voice of grandchildren whose dear faces she had never seen, we have some conception of what restoration of sight means to her.--Transcript.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1887, page 1


    We are informed that J. T. Rolison, who is now in New York, does not intend returning to Jacksonville.
    A telephone line is to be established between Yreka and Montague. That between this place and Medford works satisfactorily.
    Roberts & O'Neil's field of grain in Eden precinct was set afire by a spark from a passing locomotive a few days ago, Doug. Strong informs us. Fortunately the fire was immediately seen by several persons, who extinguished it before any serious damage resulted.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Joe Scott, lately of Grants Pass, is at the Riddle house.
    Considerable wheat is being stored in Baker's warehouse.
    Miss Helen Strang is visiting her sister, Mrs. N. A. Jacobs of Jacksonville.
    The population of this place is steadily increasing and a number of improvements are under way.
    C. W. Skeel, the well-known carpenter, is employed on Dr. Walters' fine residence at Ashland.
    R. T. Lawton, the pioneer real estate agent, has embellished his premises with a first-class windmill.
    H. B. Reed was at the county seat Tuesday. He is promised numerous orders for his unequaled combination fence.
    A. J. Fredenburg of this place is hauling a considerable amount of lime to Ashland from the quarry near Jacksonville.
    More testimony in the Bailey divorce case was taken before J. H. Huffer, the referee, at Jacksonville on Tuesday.
    The schoolhouse is being enlarged and renovated. Four teachers will be employed, with Prof. W. H. Gore as principal, and the school will reopen about Sept. 5th.
    The citizens of this place one night last week held a meeting and formulated a letter to the officers of the S.P.R.R., calling their attention to the advantages our town presents as a site for a roundhouse.
    A grand entertainment will be given at Howard's hall on Friday evening, August 12th, under the auspices of the Ladies' Aid Society. A first-class musical and literary programme is being arranged, and a nice time is in store for all who attend.
    W. R. Andrews, who has been practicing law in our midst with success for some time past, left for Seattle, W.T., this week, where he will permanently engage in the practice of his profession. The best wishes of his many friends go with him.
    The following are Rev. M. A. Williams' appointments: Every first, second and fifth Sunday in each month at Medford; third Sunday at Eagle Point; fourth Sunday at Grants Pass. Services at each of the above places will be held at 11 o'clock A.M.
    Your correspondent notices that the editor of the Ashland Tidings and the Medford Transcript have locked horns already, and as usual the former indulges in a fusillade of abuse when "he gets the worst of it," using such pet names as liar, etc. Mr. Carlisle has decidedly the best of the controversy, for his opponent's criticism of the fruit shipped from Medford was not prompted by the best of motives.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
CASEBEER-DAHACK--At the residence of Geo. W. Isaacs, in Medford, Aug. 9th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, J. M. Casebeer and Miss Minnie Dahack.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
HALL-McSWEENY--At the residence of Mr. Samuel Earhart, Medford, Oregon
on July 17th, 1887, by Rev. W. P. Williams, Mr. Perry C. Hall, of Mendocino County, California, and Miss Ida B. McSweeny, of Indiana County, Pa.
Indiana (Pennsylvania) Weekly Messenger, August 17, 1887, page 2


Festival at Medford.
    The ladies of the Baptist Church at Medford will give a festival at Zimmerman & McGee's hall on the evening of the 24th. An admission of 25 cents will be charged, which will entitle those who attend to a dish of peaches and cream. Ice cream will also be served at 15 cents a plate. All are invited, and a most enjoyable time is promised.The proceeds of the festival will go towards purchasing an organ for the new church.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1887, page 3


    R. M. Shely, who has been in the marble business at Medford for some time past, has removed to Williams, Josephine County.
    The entertainment given by the Medford Ladies' Aid Society at Howard's Hall in Medford last Friday night was much of a success.
    There is a culvert on the county road between this place and Medford which is in a dangerous condition for wagons to pass over, and should be repaired before any accident occurs.
    L. Shideler was in town this week, showing samples of prunes which were grown on his place about four miles east of town [Jacksonville]. They were the finest fruit of the kind we have yet seen.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1887, page 3


    Dr. R. Pryce of Medford has returned from his trip to Yaquina Bay.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1887, page 3


    According to the Medford (Or.) Transcript, C. C. Ragsdale, a farmer residing near that town, has cut this season sixty-three tons of alfalfa from sixteen acres of ground; then turned seventy-five head of horses and cattle and 150 hogs to pasture it, and expects to get another three-ton-to-the-acre crop before the snow flies. The statement is vouched for.
"Ranch and Range," Reno Evening Gazette, August 23, 1887, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    John F. Kelley of Grants Pass was in town on Monday.
    C. W. Coker of this precinct has struck a vein of fine coal, which promises well.
    E. G. Hurt and family of this place have been visiting Klamath County, with a view of locating.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman left for Iowa a few days since, having been called there by important business.
    Messrs. Baker and Merrill are still buying a large quantity of hay and shipping it to the Portland market.
    Ed. C. Phelps of the Yaquina Mail thinks of locating here and establishing a job printing office. He was here last week.
    J. W. Cunnyngham of this place, who has been in the Willamette Valley for some time past, will return home in a few days.
    Messrs. Baker and Merrill have had a platform built adjoining the railroad depot, also a string of Reed's combination fence.
    Thos. McAndrew, one of the most prominent farmers of this precinct, is having a neat residence built by Webb & Zimmerman, the well-known contractors.
    J. C. Cowles, who has been paying his wife, who is still in Yreka, Cal., a visit, returned home a few days since. Mrs. C. will follow in a short time.
    The Baptist Church will be completed next month. It will be a neat and commodious structure, having a steeple which will be about 70 feet higher than the building.
    At the Riddle House may be seen some very fine specimens of peaches raised by C. Mingus of Jacksonville precinct and S. L. Bennett of this precinct. For size and quantity they cannot be surpassed.
    The warehouses of H. E. Baker, at this place, are full of wheat, and their utmost capacity will soon be taxed, unless shipments are made. These facts speak loudly in favor of Mr. B.'s business qualifications and integrity.
    The ladies of the Baptist Church held a pleasant sociable last Wednesday evening, which was well attended. Peaches and cream and ice cream were served in liberal quantities. The proceeds will be used in purchasing an organ for the new church.
    The voters of this district, at the meeting held for that purpose last Saturday, decided that a tax of 10 mills on the dollar should be levied, to repair the school building and maintain a school during the greater portion of the year. This tax will raise about nine hundred dollars. Forty-four voters were present, seventeen of whom voted against the tax because they opposed the management of the school, it is said.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 2


A Chick Again on the Wing.
    Geo. H. Chick, who has bilked nearly everybody having anything to do with him, is making himself quite scarce around Redding, the scene of his last magnificent (?) mining scheme. He left this county mourned by many confiding creditors, which seemed to be the case everywhere. Chick knows nothing about mining and is a fraud of the first water. We warn the public against him.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


    Jonas Justus had his thigh bone fractured a few days ago in being thrown from a horse. Dr. Pryce of Medford is attending him.
    A. Cole, whose eyes were seriously injured by a premature explosion in the Siskiyou tunnel, is being treated by Dr. Geary of Medford, a scientific oculist, with the best of results.
    Mrs. S. E. Ish and daughter of this precinct probably have the largest body of good farming land in southern Oregon, and have it well cultivated too. The yield of grain this season was 12,000 bushels.
    The expert whom Gen. Tolman employed to prospect his coal land not far from Medford pronounces it excellent. Blacksmiths who have tried some of the coal are also well pleased with it. A prospect hole is now being sunk.
    The Transcript announces that one of the most extensive livery and sale stables in this place will soon be removed to Medford. There is not a grain of truth in the statement, and we are surprised that Bro. Carlisle should give space to it.
    Hons. J. D. Whitman, J. H. Stewart and other enterprising citizens of this valley propose underdraining their land and have already made a contract with Messrs. Close, experienced tile makers who recently arrived from Canada, for a large amount of their ware.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


BORN.
McGEE--In Medford precinct, August 8th, to Mr. and Mrs. S. McGee, a daughter.
POOL--In Medford precinct, August 23d, to Mr. and Mrs. E. J. Pool, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


One of Our Promising Farms.
    One of the very best cultivated and most productive farms in southern Oregon is that of Hon. J. H. Stewart, in Eden precinct. Watermelons, berries, fruit and vegetables of all kinds grow in reckless profusion there evincing the skill and industry of the proprietor. Mr. S., having had charge of the place less than two years, has not yet had an opportunity to fully demonstrate the productiveness of his farm nor his ability as a farmer. It will take a few years yet to put his place at its best. Then can be seen if the soil of this section cannot compare favorably with that of any other.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


    The Medford Transcript says:
    "The Grants Pass Courier man gives the personified inertia of that town a regular shaking up nowadays. He takes the fossils by the bootstraps and just lifts them where they can see a little of the enterprise of the outside world."
    If the will was equivalent to the deed, our esteemed cotemporary would be nearly right, but unfortunately our mossbacks are so completely fossilized that it requires more than newspaper articles to stir them up. A few hundred pounds of dynamite might give them the necessary elevation, but even then they would require new eyes to see beyond their own noses. Our hope is in the enterprising men of the town. They may, by their example and precept, do what the newspaper aims at. If we can unite progressive men and keep them awake, all will be well in time.
Rogue River Courier, Grants Pass, August 26, 1887, page 2


    Says the Medford Transcript: In speaking of the coal vein in the hills adjacent to Medford, the owner of the land says, "It is my opinion that once we get at this vein, the real one, we shall strike it rich." All the experts who have examined the coal so far taken out are in accord as to its being a No. 1 for quite all purposes.

"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, August 27, 1887, page 6


    When you broach the subject of old men, Southern Oregon can jump up more that are "full of years" than any other section of the State; and they are sprightly, wide-awake, lively men, too. There is Jesse Wilson, for instance, who lives just below town, and who not only goes about doing chores at home, but walks to town, at a pace equal to many of our younger men. For a week or two he has been suffering with a crippled foot, and when we met him a day or two ago he remarked that "if it wasn't for that lameness," he would be a "pretty good boy yet." Mr. Wilson was born in 1796, and being a good Democrat, has voted for every president of that political persuasion since 1817, except Franklin Pierce. He knew personally several of the Democratic presidents, having lived near the Capital, in Virginia, in which State he was born. Mr. Wilson has several sons in this valley.--Transcript.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The circus will not be at Medford this year. Lucky Medford!
    R. T. Lawton, real estate dealer, is agent for the celebrated Perkins windmill.
    Stacks of hay are piled at the Medford warehouse and will soon be shipped to Portland.
    S. Rosenthal is displaying a fine, large stock of clothing. He keeps a nice stock of goods.
    Dr. Buck and son were in Jacksonville a few days ago. The latter will soon go to Big Butte precinct to make his future home.
    Dr. Pryce has returned from his trip to Strawberry Valley, Cal. The demand for his services made his stay necessarily very short.
    Prof. Rork of Michigan spoke on the prohibition question at Walton's hall last Wednesday evening. He had a large audience and left a favorable impression.
    The case of the State vs. Ed. Saltmarsh, arrested on a charge of an assault and battery committed on Mrs. Kelly Fields of Sterlingville, was tried in Justice Barkdull's court yesterday.
    Mrs. L. J. Foster and Mrs. G. H. Haskins were in Jacksonville Monday. They are circulating a subscription list for the purpose of purchasing a fine organ for the Presbyterian Church and are succeeding admirably.
    The Presbyterian Church at Medford will be formally dedicated next Sunday, Sept. 4th. Rev. J. V. Milligan of Ashland will preach the sermon. This is one of the neatest church buildings in southern Oregon and a credit to this place.
    The sociable given a few evenings since at Howard's hall for the benefit of the Baptist Church fund was a decided success. The receipts were $81.25 and the expenditures $15.75, leaving a balance of $65.50, a snug sum, by the way.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 2


    The real estate boom continues in California and is gradually moving northward. Part of it may reach southern Oregon after a while.
    The State Board of Immigration suspended on the 30th ult., for lack of funds. The last legislature failed to provide funds for its continuance and it consequently died.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 2


Southern Oregon Moving Ahead.
    Many improvements are being made in every portion of the county. Quite a number of new dwelling houses and other buildings are being erected--more than ever before during this season of the year--while a vast number of minor improvements are taking place. That southern Oregon is steadily moving forward none can deny, and its progress will no doubt be much more rapid hereafter. Unless we are badly mistaken, Jackson County will move ahead of several of those who have preceded it in wealth and population when the next census is taken--in 1890. Her resources are numerous and varied and they have only lacked capital and opportunity to prove how great they are.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


Skating Rink.
    J. A. D. Dubell opened a roller skating ring at Stanley's Hall on Wednesday evening, at Medford, which continues indefinitely. Everybody is invited to come and participate in the sport. Skates supplied at the hall.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


    Kress & Fisher have gone to Medford precinct to paint Thos. McAndrew's new residence.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


    The time is at hand when the wagon roads to Medford and Central Point should be graveled for winter use. It should not be neglected any longer.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


BORN.
ROYSE--In Medford, August 25th, to Mr. and Mrs. David Royse, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


    At the recent meeting of the Northwestern Fruit Growers' Association, a paper on "orcharding" was read by F. L. Whitman, a son of J. D. Whitman, of Medford, says the Transcript. The article was so thoroughly practical and apposite that its publication in the Oregonian was requested by the society. It appears in that paper of the 14th of July.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 4


    Another week will finish up the harvesting in this valley, says a Medford paper.
    Medford exchange: Apparently the whole hill region east of this city, and within a few miles, is a vast coal bed. Croppings are found almost every day, and the specimens are A No. 1.
    Medford Transcript: A walk about Medford and some inquiry shows that there is a steady growth, some considerable investment of money, and quite a number of newcomers looking for locations. It is a steady, wholesome growth, and on this account of great good to the city. We can much better afford to grow in this way than under the spasmodic pressure of a boom.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, September 8, 1887, page 6


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Attend the skating rink.
    The prohibition lecturers are invading this place.
    John Byers and J. T. Guerin are in Walla Walla working at their trade.
    H. Landis, lately of this precinct, is now a resident of Sisson, Siskiyou County, Cal.
    O. H. Johnson of Linkville is in the valley on a visit and may conclude to locate here again.
    We learn that E. C. Phelps, with his job office, will arrive here from Newport during the month.
    S. Rosenthal has no room for trash. He keeps the best goods and sells them cheaper than the cheapest.
    Coal of an excellent quality exists in large quantities in the hills east of town, which will sooner or later be developed.
    Stilly Riddle and his trainer will soon return to this place from Douglas County, bringing the fast mare "Nelly Gray" with them.
    The Presbyterian Church was filled to overflowing last Sunday, which was the occasion of its dedication. Rev. J. V. Milligan preached an able sermon.
    Medford has another boot and shoe shop, D. Wilson having secured the services of a good mechanic, who will promptly fill all orders for footwear and repairing.
    E. B. Hunsaker of Ashland has sold the ladies of the Baptist Church in this place a fine chapel organ. It will soon ornament the audience room of that edifice.
    Eugene Ricksecker and his party of surveyors, who are operating in the interests of the United States, making scientific researches, were camped here this week.
    Prof. H. G. Fairclo, who has been teaching a successful term of school at Fort Klamath, has returned to the valley and will probably teach the Wagner Creek school.
    The district school house has been repaired and improved in appearance. Studies commenced last Monday and Prof. Gore and his assistants will no doubt teach a successful term.
    A jury was empaneled in Justice Barkdull's court last week to try the case of Edward Saltmarsh, charged with assault and battery on Mrs. Fields of Sterlingville. He was found guilty and sentenced to pay a fine of $10 and costs, which he liquidated.
    Our citizens should awaken to the necessity of improving the road between this place and Jacksonville. It would be of great benefit to us in more ways than one. Besides, other points will move in this direction soon and divert the travel which would otherwise come this way.
    The great match race between Stilly Riddle's "Nellie Gray" and Tolman & Co.'s "Ten Cents" will be run at this place on the 9th day of October. A good track will be prepared for the event, which will no doubt prove an exciting one. The race is for $1,000 a side, and will be witnessed by a large crowd.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1887, page 2


Good Roads Wanted.
    It is high time that steps were taken to improve the roads between Jacksonville, Medford and Central Point. In the winter season it is often almost impossible to reach the county seat, on account of the mud, which militates against public and private interests as well. Those are the main thoroughfares of the county, and the commissioners' court should spare no reasonable expense in placing them in the best possible condition. No doubt the citizens of the towns interested will assist materially, but the court above mentioned should appropriate a liberal sum toward the work, for it will be money well expended and which the people will not begrudge. Let this matter be attended to at once.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1887, page 3


    The match race between "Ten Cents" and "Nellie Gray" will be run at Medford, instead of at Yreka, Cal., on October 9th.
    If it is intended to gravel the roads between this place and other points in the valley, it is high time that work be commenced.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1887, page 3


    We learn that a match race has been made between R. B. Hayes' horse, "Bingo," and Stilly Riddle's "Nelly Gray." The race will be run at Medford soon.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1887, page 3


    W. J. Plymale will run a daily stage line from Jacksonville to Medford to connect with the trains north and south. Will leave Jacksonville promptly at 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. A liberal share of patronage is respectfully solicited.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 15, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    There will be no religious services here next Sunday.
    H. E. Baker, of the Farmers' Warehouse, was in Jacksonville Saturday.
    There have been several transfers of real estate in this place during the past fortnight.
    The Ladies' Aid Society held an interesting meeting last Wednesday afternoon.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman, who went to Iowa a few weeks since on business, has returned home.
    J. B. Riddle, who has been attending the Douglas County Fair, returned home Sunday.
    G. H. Baker and wife, who have been spending some time in California, are expected home soon.
    Frank Galloway has sold S. E. Redden two acres near town for $300. The land has a small building on it.
    It is reported that a bank will soon be opened in the brick building formerly occupied by A. L. Johnson.
    The public school is again in session, having a large attendance and being in charge of an efficient corps of teachers.
    Mr. Chartrand, lately of Michigan, has bought W. F. Williamson's property in this place. He secured a bargain, as the price paid was quite low.
    A. Cole, whose eyes were seriously injured by a premature blast in the Siskiyou tunnel, is recovering under the skillful treatment of Dr. Geary.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman has placed some very fine Bartlett pears on exhibition at the Riddle House. W. A. Bodine has added a few monster peaches to his exhibit at the same place.
    M. E. Beatty, the real estate agent, has been spending several days at Central Point, looking after his interests there. He now has a gentleman from California assisting him in looking after his land business.
    Geo. E. Anderson, who has been at Crescent City, Cal., for some time past, will return in a short time. So will other residents of southern Oregon who have been employed at the sawmills in that section during the summer.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 2


    According to the S.F. Examiner, A. L. Johnson, erstwhile a real estate agent at Medford, and one of the most colossal frauds on the continent, is again in his old business of humbugging the unwary and swindling all who put any confidence in him. The people everywhere should give this fellow a wide berth, for he is not to be trusted under any circumstances.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 3


    J. G. Van Dyke has purchased the Worley tract of land, lying south of Medford, for $1000. It contains 12 acres and is well improved.
    Now is the time to improve the roads and get them in good repair for the winter season.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart of Eden precinct has raised watermelons this season weighing 50 lbs.
    A great many people are making arrangements to plant fruit trees, and it is safe to say that hundreds of thousands of choice varieties will be set out this fall and next spring. The raising of fruit promises to be the leading and most profitable industry of southern Oregon in the near future.
    A large amount of fruit is still being shipped to Portland from this valley, principally from Ashland. The express car is filled with peaches, etc., nearly every day, and the daily exports will probably average $75.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 3


    Your correspondent and the public generally are of the opinion that the vulgar and exceedingly flat joke that the editor of the Medford Transcript attempted to perpetrate at the expense of the proprietors of our fine, large hotel, was quite successfully turned at the expense of that individual by the Central Point correspondent of the Tidings. The Medford man was treated well while here, and his insults are as uncalled-for as they are ungentlemanly.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 3


    The Board of Immigration has ceased to exist. It curled up its [omission] and has gone to join the hotel scheme. The necessity of giving a Board of Immigration a support has always been found expedient in the new and growing cities, both in the East and on this coast. It is apparent, however, that Portland does not need or want any of these newfangled notions, nor a modern hotel. The old mossback style is good enough for a time longer.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Remember the great match race here on October 8th.
    We regret to learn that Miss Genevieve Riddle is quite ill.
    Real estate is looking up somewhat and some sales are taking place.
    C. H. Gordon has sold out his blacksmith business to M. Purdin and will remove to Seattle, W.T.
    The Ladies' Aid Society will give a sack sociable on the evening of Oct. 11th. A pleasant time is assured.
    J. C. Corum of Chimney Rock precinct will soon bring his family here, to take advantage of our school facilities.
    H. E. Baker, the clever warehouseman, is now the owner of the fine team formerly driven by J. C. Whipp of Jacksonville.
    The family of Henry Smith of Wolf Creek has located here for the present, to allow the children to attend our school.
    Dr. E. P. Geary has purchased J. D. Maxon's farm on Griffin Creek, paying $1,500 for it. Fruit can be grown to perfection there.
    Adkins & Webb have let the contract for erecting a two-story brick building to S. Childers on the site of their present business place.
    The Medford Sunday school elected Mrs. G. H. Haskins, Mrs. Finney and G. W. Webb as delegates to the convention to be held at Grants Pass in October.
    M. P. Phipps of this precinct offers for sale a few head of choice, young Merino rams. They are well-bred animals and will be sold at a reasonable figure.
    H. B. Reed and R. C. Miller have started for Klamath County, where they will manufacture the celebrated Universal combination fence in large quantities.
    Over 25,000 bushels of wheat and barley are already stored in the warehouse at this place, and more is arriving. The proprietors also have a large amount of baled hay on hand.
    Oscar Burton, who has been paying relatives here a visit during the past year, started on his return to Indiana last Wednesday. He will not be away from here very long.
    M. E. Beatty and R. T. Lawton, the real estate agents, have been at the county seat several times lately. They both expect to sell a large amount of real estate during the next year.
    A. S. Johnson of this precinct has become possessed of the Losey place on Griffin's Creek, having traded Mrs. Dray some property in this place as a portion of the consideration. It is a good fruit farm.
    A great crowd will no doubt be present to witness the great match race between Tolman's "Ten Cents" and Riddle's "Nelly Bly," which will take place at Medford on Saturday, October 8th. It will be a match for $1000 a side, and as both animals are known to be fast, much interest is being taken in it.
    The citizens of this place are awakening from their lethargy and on Wednesday evening organized a board of trade, which will no doubt do much in attracting attention toward our town. The following are the officers: J. D. Whitman, president; Dr. B. F. Adkins, vice president; M. E. Beatty, secretary and treasurer; D. H. Miller, J. S. Howard and C. B. Carlisle, committee on membership.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1887, page 3


    Over 25,000 bushels of wheat and barley are already stored in the warehouse at Medford, and more is arriving, says an exchange.
    A little daughter of James Bell, of Medford precinct, while riding with her father on a farm wagon Sunday, was thrown off, and one of the hind wheels passed over her body above the hips. At last report her recovery was considered probable.
    Jacksonville Sentinel: Rev. J. W. Miller, resident minister of the M.E. church at this place, returns to the Jacksonville charge after an absence of twenty-three years. He is remembered as having administered to the spiritual wants of our people nearly a generation ago and to a generation that is now nearly all gone.
"News of the Northwest," Oregonian, Portland, September 26, 1887, page 4


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Rev. W. B. Smith will preach in Medford Sunday evening at 7:30 p.m.
    J. B. Riddle, the popular proprietor of our leading hotel, was at the county seat Saturday.
    Several residents of this place attended the funeral of Frank Presley at Jacksonville yesterday.
    H. B. Reed and R. C. Miller, the fence men, have not gone to Klamath County as yet, but will go soon.
    Rev. M. A. Williams will hold services at the Presbyterian Church next Sunday morning at the usual hour.
    All the businessmen of Medford have joined the board of trade, which promises to do much good for our town.
    J. France's family of Table Rock precinct are temporarily residents of this place. Miss F. comes for medical treatment.
    B. W. Powell has purchased several acres of land near the schoolhouse of F. Galloway, which he will sell in quantities to suit purchasers.
    It is reported that a lady resident of this place has twice attempted suicide lately. Domestic trouble and ill health are the alleged causes.
    Street Commissioner Whiteside has just completed a substantial sidewalk between the Riddle House and the depot. He makes a first-class official.
    For sale at a bargain--a cozy dwelling house not far from the center of the town of Medford. For particulars enquire of R. T. Lawton, real estate agent.
    M. P. Phipps of this precinct offers for sale a few head of choice, young Merino rams. They are well-bred animals and will be sold at a reasonable figure.
    Our real estate agents are exhibiting handsome specimens of the products of the soil and are prepared to make a lively campaign when the boom reaches here.
    Prof. T. F. Campbell, the noted lecturer, addressed the people of this place on the prohibition question one evening last week. He is a good speaker, but did not make any votes for his cause.
    Your correspondent erred last week in stating that Oscar Burton had gone East, as he is still here. It was his intention to start last week, but he has changed his mind for the present.
    The great match race between "Nelly Gray" and "Ten Cents" is the absorbing topic of the day. No doubt it will be an exciting and well-contested race, as it will be on the square and the best horse will win.
    In a very short time the Baptist Church of this place will be finished and ready for occupancy. It is a handsome edifice and would do credit to a much larger town than Medford. The dedication services will take place in a short time.
    Miss Martha Howard, daughter of J. S. Howard of Medford, and Mr. Roberts, eldest son of W. B. Roberts, the well-known farmer, were married at the residence of the officiating minister Sunday. Your correspondent tenders his congratulations and wishes them much joy and prosperity.
    J. D. Whitman is building a fruit house on his farm, below town. He will make it double in the sides, with a filling-in of sawdust, and a place overhead for about five feet thickness of hay. It will be kept closed in the daytime, and opened at night, after the fruit has been put in for the winter, says the Transcript.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1887, page 2


Departed This Life.
    Frank Presley, a native of Southern Oregon, died at Medford last Wednesday. He was taken seriously ill several weeks ago with typhoid fever at Clear Lake, Modoc County, Cal., near the state line, where he was engaged in improving some land he had taken up. His parents thought it best to remove him to this valley; but the fell destroyer, Death, had already claimed him for his own, and he died soon after his arrival at Medford. Frank Presley was an industrious, intelligent and upright young man, of much promise, and one who had many friends. His untimely death is mourned by all who knew him. We sympathize with the grief-stricken parents, who have indeed lost a noble son. His funeral took place from the Presbyterian Church in this place, Rev. Robt. Ennis preaching an impressive sermon.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1887, page 3


    Mrs. J. T. Rolison left for Mecklenburg, New York, to join her husband. They will permanently locate there.
    John Bellinger and Miss Effie Merriman were married at the residence of the bride's parents in Medford Wednesday, in presence of relatives and a few friends of the contracting parties. They commence life with excellent prospects, and have the best wishes of all. We tender our congratulations.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
ROBERTS-HOWARD--At the residence of the officiating minister, near Medford, Sept. 25th, by Rev. C. H. Hoxie, J. C. Roberts and Miss Martha Howard.
BELLINGER-MERRIMAN--At the residence of the bride's mother, in Medford, Sept. 28th, by the Rev. Geo. W. Black, John H. Bellinger and Miss Effie Merriman.
DIED.
PRESLEY--At Medford, Sept. 28th, Frank, eldest son of A. W. and R. M. Presley (formerly of Jacksonville); aged 21 years, 11 months and 8 days.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1887, page 3


A CORRECTION.
    Messrs. J. S. Howard, J. D. Whitman, C. B. Carlisle, M. E. Beatty, B. W. Powell, Vrooman, Miller & Co., Adkins & Webb and Angle & Plymale of Medford, Jackson County, make the following statement under date of September 30:
    Whether or not intended, the dispatch from Jacksonville to your paper of the 29th regarding the death at this place of young Presley is calculated to do an injury to Medford. Presley lived in Modoc County, California, was taken sick there with the typhoid fever six weeks ago and as a last hope brought here that he might have the care of Drs. Pryce and Geary. The journey over the mountains proved too much for him in his weakened condition, and he died soon after getting here. He was buried in Jacksonville. The health of Medford is very good. Please give this space in the Oregonian.
Oregonian,
Portland, October 3, 1887, page 2



GROWTH OF FRUIT PRODUCTION.
    Nobody who has not recently visited Southern Oregon can have an adequate notion of the development of fruit production in the Umpqua and Rogue River valleys during the past two years. It is coming to be the chief interest of these districts, and is destined to exceed all other productive industries combined. Instances are very common this year where fruit farmers have received from one to five hundred dollars per acre for the produce of their orchards. The figures seem large, but they are vouched for and are correct unquestionably. As a natural consequence, the whole country is turning its attention to fruit, and hundreds of acres heretofore uncultivated or devoted to grain are being planted with fruit trees. There is no danger of overproduction, since the demand is greater than any possible supply. The extension of orchards means not competition but cooperation. As the fruit supply increases, the facilities for shipping and marketing it improve.
    The railroad company is dealing liberally with this expanding interest. For example, watermelons are brought from Rogue River to Portland in carload lots at a rate which averages only a trifle above 1 cent for each melon, and the rates for other kinds of fruit are proportionately cheap. Under this policy, which we trust will be continued by the management soon to come in, the railroad is helping the country and making for itself a great future business.
    The development of the fruit and other productive industries in Oregon is very fortunate at this time, when wheat, our great staple, is year by year becoming a less profitable crop. It would be a very bad situation indeed if the country had no other resource besides an industry rapidly declining, and in danger of absolute failure. Wheat is now selling in the European markets for a less price than ever before, and it is predicted by economists that it will go still lower. If their judgment is true, it must soon be impossible to produce wheat in Oregon for export except at a loss. The worst feature of the wheat situation is that it is likely to be permanent. Cheap land, cheap labor and improved methods of transportation are increasing greatly the wheat production of the world. We are now in competition in the wheat markets with the European countries, India and Russia and may soon be with Africa. There is practically no limit to the extension of wheat production since it may be carried on anywhere.
    Fruit, on the other hand, requires particular and rare conditions of soil and climate which are found in perfection on the Pacific coast. In them we have a resource of the highest value practically free from competition.--Oregonian.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Remember the match race tomorrow.
    H. E. Battin was in the valley again this week, looking after the apples he purchased recently.
    Jas. Gaines has returned from his trip to Washington Territory, after an absence of over two weeks.
    J. H. Berry is in charge of Herely's Butte Creek express while the proprietor is on the railroad front.
    McCallister & Co. have removed to Medford and will commence the manufacture of brooms at once.
    M. S. Damon, a carpenter, has purchased D. H. Miller's residence and is permanently located here.
    Mr. Chartrand, who purchased the Williamson property in Medford, has arrived and taken possession thereof.
    School tax in this district will be delinquent on Nov. 24th. Geo. L. Webb, school clerk, is ready to receive it now.
    E. C. Phelps, lately of Newport, Benton County, has removed his job office to this place and is ready for business.
    Mr. Jas. Howard of this precinct has been dangerously ill, but is improving under the treatment of Doctors Geary and Gill.
    S. L. Bennett of this precinct again comes to the front with some fine, large apples, some of which weigh nearly 1½ pounds each.
    A large crowd may be expected here tomorrow, as much interest is being taken in the match race between "Nelly Gray" and "Ten Cents."
    Our town is filling up since school commenced, several parties from outside precincts coming here to avail themselves of our school facilities during the winter season.
    The Rogue River Baptist Association was in session for several days in this place since your correspondent's last report. There was a good attendance of members of that church.
    Ed. Worman, of the Union livery stable, keeps quite a number of first-class teams and turnouts and is kept busy attending to his customers. He is ably assisted by "Shorty" Hamilton.
    Gen. E. L. Applegate delivered a lecture on the prohibition question at Howard's hall on Monday evening. There was a good-sized audience and the speaker acquitted himself creditably.
    Prof. La France organized a large dancing class here one evening last week. The opening social was a well-attended and enjoyable affair. Regular sessions will be held every Tuesday evening hereafter.
    W. B. Roberts and family will soon remove to the old Broback place near town, which had been rented by W. K. Price during the past few years. The latter will remain in the valley, we are glad to learn.
    The board of trade has asked the O.&C.R.R. Co. to present our town with block 55, to be converted into a park. Nothing would add more to the looks of Medford than a handsome public square in its precincts.
    Mrs. J. C. Cowles, who excels as instructress of decorative and landscape painting, has returned to her home in this place, after an extended absence. We are glad to learn that she will again give instruction, as there are many ladies who will be glad to take lessons from her.
    M. E. Beatty, the live real estate agent, is selling a large amount of land. He reports the sale of the Callaghan property and one of E. H. Brown's farms on Butte Creek to Thos. F. Fisch, a California capitalist; also some fruit land belonging to O. Bursell of Manzanita precinct to different parties.
    The new Baptist Church in Medford was dedicated last Monday, under the most auspicious circumstances. It was filled to overflowing on that occasion, and the services were of a very interesting character. Rev. G. J. Burchett of McMinnville preached the sermon, which was an eloquent one. The cost of the building is over $2500, outside of seats, etc.
    The Medford Aid Society will give a sociable at Howard's hall next Tuesday, Oct. 11th. Tickets for gentlemen will be only 25 cents; boys under 15 years, 10 cents. Each ticket draws a nice lunch in a paper sack and also the name of a lady partner to assist in eating the same. An excellent programme will be prepared and a good time is assured all who attend. All are invited.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 2


    Match race at Medford tomorrow.
    The sale of the Stephenson farm near this place to W. K. Price of Medford precinct was not consummated.
    W. J. Plymale will run an extra stage between Jacksonville and Medford tomorrow, when the great match race takes place.
    Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford have purchased L. A. Murphy's farm in Little Butte precinct, paying $1275 for the same.
    The price of wheat has stiffened a little and 50 cents a bushel is being paid at the Medford warehouse. It will probably be much better before spring.
    The match race for $1000 a side, which will take place at Medford tomorrow between "Nelly Gray" and "Ten Cents," is the absorbing topic of the day. Both horses are known to be fast and an exciting contest is expected.
    If there is any intention to put the wagon road between Jacksonville and other points in the valley in good repair, it ought to be done at once. The winter season will soon be here, when it will be too late to do anything.
    The California boom is a fair sample of stock speculations there since the earliest days. It lacks bottom. The balloon so high there is liable to collapse before it gets here. Oregon, if it gets a boom, wants a reliable one, not an inflated one.
    Two hundred and twenty tons of fruit have been shipped to Portland from Medford railroad station this season. When the whole season's shipment from Rogue River Valley comes to be figured up it will be seen that the fruit exporting business is already of consequence to the railroad, as well as to the exporters.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 3


    C. Mingus and family have removed to Ashland, where they have invested in some town property. F. M. Mingus, their eldest son, will manage their home farm.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 3


BORN.
HOWARD--In Medford precinct, Sept. 29th, to Mr. and Mrs. Jas. Howard, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    One of the largest crowds ever seen here attended the races last Saturday.
    Childers & Son are now engaged in manufacturing a large kiln of superior brick.
    H. H. Wolters has closed his saloon on the Siskiyou and returned to this place.
    J. S. Hagey and family, lately from South Bend, Indiana, have located here.
    The Aid Society meets at the residence of Mrs. J. H. Barnum on Saturday evening.
    Dr. Will. Jackson of Jacksonville will pay Medford a professional visit next week.
    Fall fights opened out in good style here last Saturday, when several knockdowns occurred.
    S. Rosenthal is displaying a fine, large assortment of ladies' cloaks and wraps of all kinds.
    Regular services will be held in the Baptist Church as soon as the seats are put in position.
    The Riddle House was filled to overflowing last Friday and Saturday and did an immense business.
    Prof. La France has organized a dancing class at this place, which meets regularly every Tuesday evening.
    Our town was full of people on several days during the past week, the races attracting considerable attention.
    If you want your property sold quickly at the best figures, call on M. E. Beatty at his real estate office in Medford.
    McCallister & Co. have removed to this place, where they are now engaged in the manufacture of superior brooms.
    Supt. Jacobs paid our school a visit last week and expressed himself pleased with the manner in which it is conducted.
    C. W. Skeel, the popular mechanic, is kept busy and is now engaged in building an addition to S. E. Redden's residence.
    A. Childers having resigned as a member of the town council, Postmaster Miller has been appointed to fill the position, which he will do creditably.
    Isaac Woolf is still engaged in hauling fruit, vegetables and farm produce to the railroad front, where he is paid good prices for the same.
    A number of real estate transactions have taken place in Medford and vicinity during the past fortnight. Property is looking up again.
    The sack sociable given by the Ladies' Aid Society last Tuesday evening proved an enjoyable affair. There was a large attendance and a neat sum was realized.
    A little son of James Howard met with a severe accident a few days ago, near Medford. He was riding a horse, which threw him off, breaking one of the bones of the right arm besides dislocating his shoulder blade.
    Willard Crawford, formerly prosecuting attorney of the third district of Idaho Territory, and who has held other positions of public trust, has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. He is [a] lawyer of ability and experience.
    We learn that Johnny Curry has purchased a half interest in the right to manufacture and sell the Universal combination fence in this county of H. B. Reed. The new firm will no doubt do a good business, as they have a first-class article.
    Quite a number witnessed the races at the track near this place on Monday, when several contests of speed took place. The principal race was for a purse of $50, hung up by the enterprising proprietor of the Riddle House, with entrance added. Three horses were entered, but it proved a poor race, as two of the riders did not know that a start had been made. Tolman's buckskin horse won, distancing the others.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 2


WILLARD CRAWFORD,
ATTORNEY AND COUNSELOR AT LAW,
Medford, Oregon.
Will practice in all the courts of the State.
Office in Hamlin's brick building, upstairs.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887 et seq., page 3


    Trains are running through the Siskiyou tunnel and a change has been made in the timetable, which brings the southbound train to Medford at 8:10 A.M., instead of 7:45, and the northbound at 5:25 P.M., instead of 6:05.
    Tom McKay, a swarthy individual of large proportions, was arrested last Saturday at Medford, charged with committing an assault on James Stewart with a club. He pleaded guilty and was fined $10 and costs by Justice Barkdull, which he paid.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 3


    Willard Crawford, Medford's new lawyer, called on us last Monday.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 3


    This place was well represented at the Medford races.
    Our favorite nag was defeated at Medford last Monday; not because she was too slow, but because the rider did not get the word to go in time. We still think the gray can defeat the buckskin easily.
"Central Point Pointers," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 3


BORN.
PURDIN--In Medford, Oct. 10th, to Mr. and Mrs. M. Purdin, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 3


The Match Race.
    A very large crowd assembled at the race track near Medford last Saturday to witness the match race that had been arranged between Stilly Riddle's gray mare "Nelly Gray" and Luther's roan horse "Ten Cents," backed by Crit Tolman and others. The stakes were $600 a side and the distance run was 500 yards. L. S. Smith of Grants Pass rode the former and Thos. Miles the latter. Notwithstanding the mare had never been beaten, and she was known to be fast, the horse was decidedly a favorite in the pools and betting. It was 4 o'clock when the riders mounted for the contest. Not much trouble was experienced in starting, the horses getting off on the third attempt, "Nelly Gray" having about two feet the start. This advantage she increased considerably, and at the 300-yard post she was over a length ahead. The rider of "Ten Cents" tried hard to catch his competitor, but to no purpose, the mare losing little ground until she stepped into a gopher hole. Smith here showed his skill again and did not allow this accident to interfere much with "Nelly Gray's" stride, landing her winner of the race and money quite handily. No time was taken, but it was fast. There was an attempt to create a squabble, a few interested parties claiming that the horse was not beaten; but the fact that "Nelly Gray" had fairly won was so patent that the claim was treated with derision. The money has since been handed over to the mare's backers, who gave bonds ensuring the stakeholders against any responsibility. A considerable sum of money changed hands on the result.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 14, 1887, page 3


    George Priddy has his new brick house well under way. He expects to have it enclosed before next winter.
    C. B. Carlisle, of the Southern Oregon Transcript, made our office a short but very pleasant call this week.
    Medford people gave the Raymond excursion party a reception on their arrival in that city last Friday morning.
    W. S. Barnum, of Medford, has bought the boiler lately used in Klippel and Baumle's quartz mill and will move it to that town for use in his planing mill.
    The Raymond excursion party from Boston passed through the valley last Friday morning, overland to San Francisco. There were 103 people in the party.
    We acknowledge an exceedingly pleasant call on Tuesday from Mrs. J. C. Cowles, of Medford. We regret to learn that this accomplished lady will leave Southern Oregon for Red Bluff, Cal., soon. The lady and her work are both appreciated here.
"Local News,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 20, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our population continues to increase.
    A number of town lots have recently been sold here.
    Our citizens are moving for better protection from fire.
    A. G. Owen has removed to Crescent City, Cal. with his family.
    Warren Howard and family have removed to Ashland.
    A bank and circulating library are promised our progressive town.
    Work has been commenced on Adkins & Webb's new brick building.
    Mrs. Jas. Howard of this precinct, who has been very sick, is recovering.
    Mrs. Westcott of Edgerton, Wis., is visiting her brother, Geo. H. Haskins.
    'Squire Barkdull is looking after some promising mines he is interested in.
    J. C. Cowles and wife will leave for Red Bluff, Cal., this week for a short visit.
    It seems probable that the railroad company will donate block 55 to the town for park purposes.
    Rev. M. A. Williams, who has been attending the Presbytery at Tacoma, returned home last week.
    J. H. Caruthers, lately of Texas, has purchased several acres of land near here and located with his large family.
    W. S. Barnum, not having enough power in his planing mill, has secured a larger engine of H. Klippel, Jacksonville.
    H. H. Wolters, who has been engaged in business on Siskiyou Mountain for several months past, has returned to Medford.
    T. A. Harris, our clever butcher, has been quite ill with typhoid fever. We are glad to learn that he is rapidly convalescing.
    Rev. G. W. Black and wife were presented with a handsome tea set by friends in Josephine County, for which they return their sincere thanks.
    Your correspondent erred in saying that Johnny Curry had become interested with H. B. Reed in the sale of the Universal combination fence.
    The second son of M. P. Phipps had one of his legs broken a few days since by a kick from a vicious mule. Doctors Pryce and Geary are in attendance.
    A new sidewalk has been built in front of Phipps' building, west of Purdin's blacksmith shop, which is occupied by McCallister & Williams, broom makers.
    M. P. Phipps of this precinct offers for sale a few head of choice, young Merino rams. They are well-bred animals and will be sold at a reasonable figure.
    Your correspondent agrees with the general opinion that I. L. Hamilton is Medford's chief lady's man. "Shorty" is as liberal as he is popular and never fails in "doing the grand."
    John Noland, on behalf of the citizens, presented Cardinal Gibbons with a basket of choice fruits and also several floral tributes upon his recent visit here, which were duly appreciated.
    Cardinal Gibbons and the Raymond & Whitcomb excursion party were aboard the train which passed through the valley last Friday. The citizens of this place took advantage of the occasion to exhibit the agricultural and horticultural products of the valley, and when the visitors arrived a handsome display of peaches, grapes, apples, prunes and pears, vegetables, corn and grain of many different kinds, greeted their gaze as they stepped off the platform, and which was subsequently presented to them. The party was met at Grants Pass by a reception committee appointed the evening before, consisting of Hon. J. D. Whitman and C. B. Carlisle, and the greater portion of the town, headed by the cornet band, were at the depot when the train arrived. The allotted half hour was very pleasantly spent, and the cardinal and excursionists departed with the highest opinion of the valley and our people. No doubt this affair will prove beneficial to southern Oregon in more ways than one. Those managing it are deserving of much credit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1887, page 2


    Tramps are numerous in southern Oregon.
    Cress & Fischer are now engaged in painting Thos. McAndrew's new dwelling house in Medford precinct.
    W. K. Price of Medford precinct has purchased the Deskins farm, in Willow Springs precinct, of Geo. W. Cooksey. The price paid was $4,5000, and Mr. P. secured a bargain.
    For the best turnouts for all occasions call at the Excelsior livery stable in Jacksonville. Plymale's prices are quite reasonable and he never fails in giving satisfaction. You will also do well to patronize his stage line running between this place and Medford.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1887, page 3


    Pressley & Co.'s fine steam sawmill near Medford, Oregon, burned on the 23rd, loss $10,000; no insurance.
"Miscellaneous Mites," Salt Lake Tribune, October 25, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    The dancing school flourishes.
    Childers' big brick kiln will soon be ready to burn.
    The project of a public library is becoming more popular every day.
    Frank Galloway has sold fifteen acres near this place to J. H. Caruthers, lately of Texas.
    Bobby Riddle of the Postal Tel. Co. has improved the looks of his office in the Riddle House.
    E. J. Pool has rented some land from M. P. Phipps and is building a dwelling house in this vicinity.
    John W. Short of this place has raised some peanuts which compare favorably with the imported ones.
    Roberts & O'Neil have raised four good crops of alfalfa during the past season on their farm near this place.
    Chas. H. Duncan, an experienced tinsmith, has arrived here with the intention of locating. He is a son-in-law of E. C. Phelps.
    Bous. Riddle is suffering with a sprained back, but he was strong enough to haul down the stakes put up on the match race on the 8th.
    The credit of raising the largest squash your correspondent has seen this season belongs to C. W. Coker, who lives not far from here.
    C. S. Jenkins now manipulates the yardstick at Henry Smith's mercantile establishment, which is under the efficient management of F. L. Cranfill.
    Hon. J. H. Stewart, who owns part of the Justus tract of land in this precinct, sold at administrator's sale, is having several buildings put up on it.
    Our friend Charley Strang is the happy father of a fine boy, and Grandpa Vinc. is even friskier than he over the event, if such a thing were possible. We congratulate.
    Luther Kennedy, who has been stopping here for several months past, was taken to Jacksonville one day this week to be examined for insanity. He labors under the hallucination that he owns the earth.
    The Medford Sunday school has decided to raise its portion of the fund needed to place an active traveling agent in the field, pursuant to a resolution to that effect adopted at the late convention at Grants Pass.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 2


    R. M. Shely and family of Williams Creek made our town a visit a few days since.
    Preparations are being made for the planting of an immense number of fruit trees.
    No grain is being sold, as the market is quite dull and a very low price is paid everywhere.
    Brush land near Ashland is selling as high as $100 per acre. Rather high prices for unimproved land.
    The different warehouses in the county are full of wheat, and nearly everybody is holding for a raise in the price.
    Cress & Fischer have finished painting Thos. McAndrew's residence in Medford precinct. They did good work and Mr. M. speaks highly of their skill as painters.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 3


    E. C. Phelps, the Medford job printer, made the Times office a brief call last Saturday.
    J. M. Cummons has sold his farm, not far from Medford, to a gentleman from California. M. E. Beatty negotiated the sale, which involved the sum of $2500.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 3


Fruit Trees at Wholesale.
    Orders taken for choice fruit trees of every description, in any quantity, at the lowest wholesale rates at M. E. Beatty's real estate office in Medford. Satisfaction guaranteed.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
BEATTY-BELL--At the residence of John Short, Oct. 23d, by Elder M. Peterson, J. W. Beatty and Miss Hulda Bell.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 28, 1887, page 3

J. S. HOWARD
Medford, Ogn.,
WHOLESALE AND RETAIL DEALER
IN
General Merchandise.
---------
HONEST GOODS
AT
LIVING PRICES.
                                                    GROCERIES,
                                                            FLOUR,
                                                                    DRY GOODS,
                                                                            BOOTS AND SHOES,
                                                                                    OIL CLOTH,
                                                                                               HATS,
                                                                                                    CAPS,
                                                                                                            STRAW GOODS.
And everything kept in a General Merchandise Store. It will be to the interest of those wishing anything in my line to call and examine my GOODS and PRICES before purchasing elsewhere.
PRODUCE
TAKEN AT FULL MARKET PRICE.
J. S. Howard,
Medford,   -   -   -   -   -   -   Oregon.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 29, 1887, page 3


    A board of trade has been organized at Medford.
    Medford is making efforts to get a bank started at that place.
    M. E. Beatty, real estate agent of Medford, has been in town during the week.
    Jas. Roberts and Miss Martha Howard of Medford were married last Sunday. We extend congratulations, and may their life be long, happy and prosperous.
    Frank Presley, who was reported sick at Clear Lake, Modoc County, Cal., died on the morning of the 28th, at Medford, where he had been brought for treatment. Frank was a good boy, and his parents have our sympathy. Funeral services will be held at the Presbyterian church, in this place at 10 a.m. today. The public school will march in procession from the church to the cemetery.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 29, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
ROBERTS-HOWARD--In Medford, Sep. 25, by Rev. J. Hoxie, Jas. Roberts and Miss Martha Howard.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 29, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD'S PROSPERITY
Large Shipments of Fruit to Portland--The Real Estate Movement..
    MEDFORD, Oct. 28.--To her other large shipments for the season, aggregating about 350 tons of fruit, Medford forwards today ten fully loaded cars of fall and winter apples. These cars are placarded "Southern Oregon fruit for H. E. Battin & Co., Portland, Oregon; from Medford." These cars carry about 110 tons of fruit. Another train, equally as large, will leave here the coming week. The broken freight shipments of fruit for the past week have footed up a couple of tons. The aggregate of fruit shipments from Medford so far this season, by Battin & Co., has been about 570 tons. Since August 25 Wells, Fargo & Co. have forwarded from Medford forty tons of grapes, peaches and mixed fruit.
    During the last twenty days forty-three city lots in Medford have been sold. During the past ten days a dozen farms in the near vicinity of Medford have been bought by locators from other states. Ten families have been added to Medford's population during the last two weeks.
Oregonian, Portland, October 29, 1887, page 1


GOOD FOR MEDFORD.
A Southern Oregon Locality That Is Just Waking Up.
[Copyright 1887 by the California Associated Press.]
    MEDFORD (Or.), October 28th. To her other large shipments for this season, aggregating about 350 tons of fruit, Medford forwards today ten fully loaded cars of fall and winter apples. The cars are placarded "Southern Oregon fruit, for H. E. Battin & Co., Portland, Or., from Medford." These cars carry about 110 tons of fruit. Another train equally as large will leave here the coming week. The broken freight shipments of fruit for the past week have footed up a couple of tons. The aggregate of freight shipments of fruit from Medford so far this season by Battin & Co. has been 570 tons. Since August 25th, Wells, Fargo & Co. have forwarded from Medford forty tons of grapes, peaches and mixed fruit.
    During the last twenty days forty-three city lots in Medford have been sold, and during the past ten days a dozen farms in the near vicinity of Medford has been bought by locators from  other states. Ten families have been added to Medford's population during the last week.
Sacramento Daily Record-Union, October 29, 1887, page 1


    Mr. D. T. Lawton and family yesterday took their departure for Medford, Southern Oregon, where they will make their future home. Mr. Lawton's friends are in hopes his health will be restored by the change.

"The East Side," Oregonian, Portland, November 2, 1887, page 2


B. W. Powell to Nannie Barr, Q.C.D. to 198.04 acres of land near Medford; consideration, $375.
Joseph Bever to W. H. Spencer, property in Medford; $800.
B. W. Dean, sheriff, to Angle & Plymale, 2.35 acres near Medford; $87.64.
B. W. Dean, sheriff, to G. H. Baker, property in Medford; $574.
A. M. Wilson to Mary Davison, Q.C.D. to 9.83 acres in Medford precinct; $1.
O.&T. Co. to E. Miranda Dennison, property in Medford; $175.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 1


    There is a great demand for fruit trees this fall. One order, received by a nurseryman of Portland a few days since from southern Oregon, called for 5000 prunes, 1000 each of 5 varieties, and 1000 Bartlett pear trees. There is an immense number of trees being planted in southern Oregon this year, and in most cases the number of varieties in an orchard is small. The majority of fruit-growers have become aware of the advantage of being able to furnish carload lots of the same kind of fruit.
"Editorial Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 2


Insane.
    Luther Kennedy, a curious old man, who has been in southern Oregon a long time, was brought from Medford one day last week, charged with insanity. He labors under the delusion that he owns the Riddle House and other property. An examination was held before Judge DePeatt on Friday and Kennedy was pronounced insane by Dr. Sommers. Sheriff Dean and Owen Keegan took him to Salem the following day and delivered him to the authorities of the asylum.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 3


    Southern Oregon is full of strangers in quest of homes. As a consequence, real estate transactions are numerous, and will soon be more so.
    Jackson County, judging from the number of marriages announced every week in the Times, is enjoying a matrimonial as well as a real estate boom.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Frank Galloway has sold his farm and other real estate and will engage in business in Walton's brick. He is a reliable and worthy gentleman, and we wish him success.
    H. B. Reed has sold his machine and the right to manufacture Universal combination fence in Jackson County, outside of Ashland, to E. G. Hurt, an excellent mechanic, who will continue to furnish the public with a first-class article of fence at very low rates.
    The wagon which is standing in the road between this place and Jacksonville should be removed, as it has already caused more than one accident. As Silas Hawk was going to the county seat last Tuesday, his horse became frightened at it and ran away, throwing Mr. H. out and bruising him considerably.
    Doctors Pryce & Geary and Dr. Parsons of Ashland one day last week amputated one of the legs of the second son of Pres. Phipps, which had been broken just above the knee by a kick from a mule and commenced to mortify. The operation proved entirely successful and the boy is recovering.
    Judge Willard Crawford, lately prosecuting attorney for Bingham County, Idaho, was admitted to the supreme court of this state and has taken up his residence in Medford, southern Oregon, where he will engage in the practice of the law, in which he has been very successful. He has purchased 320 acres of land near Medford and will improve it. He formerly served in the Wisconsin legislature, from the Boscobel district. He will be a valuable accession to southern Oregon.--[Portland World.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 3


    There is some talk of the Methodist people getting ready to commence the erection of a church in the spring, says the Medford Transcript. The society is quite a strong one now, several accessions having been made during the last three months.

"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 10, 1887, page 63


A. S. Johnson to Margaret E. Higinbotham, property in Medford; consideration, $100.
A. M. Russell, trustee, to G. W. Howard, Q.C.D. to property in Medford; $50.
G. W. Howard to Margaret E. Higinbotham, property in Medford; $50.
B. S. Webb to G. L. Webb, property in Medford; $700.
C. C. Beekman to Medford School District No. 9, Q.C.D. to property in Medford; $1.
W. R. Andrews to Frank Galloway, property in Medford; $280.
O.&T. Co. to B. S. Webb, property in Medford; $50.
David Payne to O. Harbaugh, property in Medford; $150.
John Frazer to John C. Slagle, property in Medford; $300.
H. C. Mulvany to John Slagle and J. W. Fraser, property in Medford; $320.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 1


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    M. E. Beatty and Willard Crawford of this place have been appointed notaries public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Quite a number of lots in town have lately been sold by the railroad company per J. S. Howard, their agent.
    Carter Bros. of Ashland, two excellent painters, are now engaged in painting Mrs. G. W. Fordyce's fine new house in this precinct.
    Call on E. G. Hurt if you need any first-class fencing. He owns the business formerly conducted by H. B. Reed and guarantees satisfaction.
    The recent Sunday school concert at the Presbyterian Church was much of a success. The attendance was good and everybody acquitted themselves creditably.
    D. T. Lawton and family have taken their departure for Medford, Southern Oregon, where they will make their future home. Mr. Lawton's friends are in hopes his health will be restored by the change.--[Oregonian.
    The publisher of the Transcript, in his last issue, announced that he would be compelled to reduce the size of the paper for the present. As your correspondent observed at the outset, Jackson County has as many newspapers as it can support.
    G. W. Howard, who has been in Klamath and Lake counties for the past several weeks, has returned home. He did a large business and wrote up many insurance policies while gone. Mr. Howard is one of the most reliable and efficient agents in the state.
    To her other large shipments for the season aggregating about 350 tons of fruit, there was forwarded last week from Medford ten fully loaded cars of fall and winter apples. These cars were placarded "Southern Oregon Fruit for H. E. Battin & Co., Portland, Oregon, from Medford." These cars carry about 130 tons of fruit. Another train, equally as large, will leave here this week. The broken freight shipments of fruit for the past week have footed up a couple of tons. The aggregate of freight shipments of fruit from Medford so far this season , by Battin & Co., has been about 570 tons. Since Since August 25th Wells, Fargo & Co. have forwarded from Medford forty tons of grapes, peaches and mixed fruit.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 2


    Henry Klippel, the real estate agent, has established a branch office at Medford, with D. W. Crosby as manager. Read his advertisement for bargain [sic].
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 3


    I. L. Hamilton and Miss Enola Gibson, both of Medford, who have many friends throughout this section, were married on Sunday last. We wish them a long and prosperous journey through life.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 3


    G. W. Edward, agent for McDonough & Johnson, paid our town a visit this week. He has purchased 25 carloads of fruit in Rogue River Valley this season.
    Central Point can now boast of 116 inhabitants. Your correspondent will endeavor next week to give the value and number of buildings that have been constructed in the past year.
    Central Point, with its future prospects, bids fair to become one of the leading cities of Southern Oregon. Four years ago now Central Point was a blank in Jackson County. After our opponent town had started at the present place called Medford, people ridiculed the idea of Central Point ever amounting to anything. But look upon our thriving village today! After all opposition and prejudice she is growing right along; she is ranked with the other leading towns; she will soon score the last point, which will ever bring prosperity, yet it is our indefatigable citizens that have accomplished this result. What town ever struggled under any more disadvantages for its freedom than Central Point? It is true we have a larger scope of country surrounding us than our contemporaries' towns, of which we feel proud, but again we have less facilities with the railroad. All that is needed to complete our prosperity is a depot; with, it, our town would spring forward as the leading manufacturing town of Southern Oregon; without it, in a few years we will come to a standstill. Our citizens should never rest till this one great design is accomplished. Our warehouses are full of grain, ready for shipment. Our merchants are continually receiving large stocks of goods. The passenger train arrives here at 6:30 p.m., going north, and Central Point furnishes her amount of passengers, and in consequence of rain and no depot people are left shivering on a miserable platform to await the coming of the thundering locomotive. They pay just as much for their fare as those who have a cozy depot to comfort their wants, while reading the news in the Democratic Times. A depot would be beneficial to the railroad company as well as to Central Point.
"Central Point Items,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 3


    The boom in California is collapsing. A reaction is liable to follow. It was mere speculation, another wheat gamble, a summer's breeze. Overdone. It is to be hoped no such boom will strike Oregon. All we want is a steady reliable growth, at a good rate of speed; but no $1000 an acre for farming land.
"All Sorts," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 11, 1887, page 4


Big Demand for Fruit Raised in Southern Oregon.
    General T. G. Reames, formerly a postal inspector, but now in the banking and mercantile business in Jacksonville, was at the St. Charles Hotel Tuesday. Mr. Reames reports that business is looking up in his section and real estate has increased in value fully 40 percent in the last year. This rise in values is due principally to the fact that merchants from both San Francisco and Portland have come in and bought all the fruit raised there. The fruit purchased consists principally of prunes, grapes and apples. The farmers, having a good market on both sides of them, naturally value their lands higher than they used to. Mr. Reames told of one farmer who cleared $175 per acre on several acres of apples. The fruit dealers promise to take all the apples, grapes and prunes the farmers can raise, and the outlook is therefore very bright.--[Portland News.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    S. S. Cooper has purchased 20 acres of land near this place of I. J. Phipps, paying $50 an acre for the same.
    We are glad to notice that E. C. Phelps, the job printer, who has been quite sick with fever, is able to be on our streets again.
    H. B. Reed and R. C. Miller left for Klamath County last week, where they will engage in the manufacture of the Universal combination fence, the best made.
    D. W. Crosby & Co., real estate agents, have established comfortable quarters in the building formerly occupied by A. L. Johnson, and are doing a lively business.
    Mr. Lumsden of San Jose, Cal., a few days since purchased 10 acres of first-class land of J. H. Barnum, adjoining this place, for which he paid a round hundred dollars per acre.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1887, page 3


Notice.
    The public is hereby notified that I am not connected with the Medford livery stable in any respect whatever. Public please take notice.
W. G. KENNEY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1887, page 3


    We are sorry to learn that Mrs. C. W. Wolters of Medford, who has been seriously ill, has suffered a relapse and is again in a critical condition.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 18, 1887, page 3


    The railroad depot platform at Medford has been lowered to accommodate the Southern Pacific cars.
    The Medford Transcript says the Riddle House register shows the names of seventy-two arrivals for one week. During the same time the names on the U.S. Hotel register in this city numbered eighty-seven.
"Local News," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1887, page 3


    According to the Transcript, Medford has the following under way. A grist mill, water works, county fair grounds, tile making, dry earth and box system, public library, public square, all of which we shall have in due time.
    The Medford Transcript jokingly says: Some of the wild geese that have been winging their way southward appear to have become confused by the delightful climate of this valley, for they have turned north again. A climate that can tickle a wild goose is all right.

"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 24, 1887, page 6


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Mrs. E. M. Ogan has gone to Soledad, Cal., where she will spend some time.
    Mrs. C. W. Wolters, who has been quite sick for some time past, is convalescing.
    Geo. E. Neuber has left the Riddle House and is now engaged in the stock business.
    Mr. Backus, the efficient night watch of this place, made the county seat a visit last Tuesday.
    Merrill & Baker have been shipping several carloads of wool, wheat, etc., during the past fortnight.
    The Presbyterian Church has been furnished with a new organ, which is a fine, large instrument.
    The platform of the depot has lately been enlarged and remodeled to accommodate the increased business.
    A number of town lots have been sold lately and buildings are being put up on some of them. There is considerable stir about our town.
    J. A. Stewart and Mr. Stimson of this precinct have returned from Klamath County, where they each took up some government land.
    The Medford Aid Society will meet semi-monthly hereafter, on every other Tuesday evening. The first meeting was held at the residence of Mrs. West on the 22d.
    Mr. Fowler, who is located at this place, has been at the county seat several times during the week, accompanied by his family. He will locate somewhere in the valley.
    The Medford public school, under the efficient management of Prof. Gore and his able corps of assistants, is in a flourishing condition. The number of pupils enrolled is 154.
    Miss Carrie Baker has returned from a visit to California and resumed her position as teacher in our school. Her sister, Miss Mary, has been filling her place during her absence.
    Judge Crawford, our attorney-at-law, M. E. Beatty, real estate agent, S. Rosenthal, merchant, and Mr. Watterman, lately from Colorado, made Jacksonville a call during the week.
    A teachers' institute for Jackson County will be held at this place next Saturday, which will no doubt be an interesting one, as an excellent programme has been arranged for the occasion.
    Our citizens will make a fine exhibition of the products of the valley at the time the excursion between San Francisco and Portland takes place. The driving of the last spike will thus be appropriately celebrated.
    A musical society has been organized at this place with nearly 40 members. The following is a list of the officers: President Geo. L. Webb; vice president, Miss Ella Gore; secretary, Miss Elma Young; treasurer, Miss Mollie Merriman; leader, Geo. L. Webb; organist, Miss Mary Baker.
    An attempt will be made to induce someone to establish a flouring mill at this place. Dr. Adkins, D. H. Miller and B. W. Powell have been appointed as a committee by the board of trade to solicit contributions toward a fund which will be offered as a bonus to someone who will establish that enterprise.
    Childers & Son have fired their large kiln of brick. They have also been awarded the contract for building the foundation of D. T. Lawton's residence and lately completed that of Geo. L. Webb's dwelling house.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1887, page 3


BORN.
PHELPS--At Medford, Nov. 17th, to Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Phelps, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 25, 1887, page 3


    The railroad depot platform at Medford has been lowered to accommodate the Southern Pacific cars.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 26, 1887, page 6


    Miss Carrie Baker of Medford, Oregon, has offered herself as missionary candidate, through the Minneapolis branch. As she has sent no testimonials and expects to spend some time in the study of medicine, we recommend that her case be referred to the Reference Committee.

The Heathen's Woman Friend, December 1887, page 157


N. A. Jacobs to Louisa E. Beauchamp, property in Medford; consideration, $400.
B. W. Dean, sheriff, to James Gaines, 55.85 acres of land near Medford; $828.35.
A. L. Johnston to G. H. Baker, property in Medford; $974.07.

G. S. Walton to Paul and Praxella Chartrand, property in Medford; $525.
John P. Wooley to Sarah L. Van Dyke, 12.44 acres of land in Medford precinct; $1000.
G. E. Jones to H. E. Baker, property in Medford; $100.
B. W. Dean, sheriff, to Nannie Barr, property in Medford precinct; $115.
A. Childers to A. V. Owen, property in Medford; $400.

B. W. Dean, sheriff, to Nannie Barr, property in Medford precinct; $115.

"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 1


O.&T. Co. to Mrs. Sarah C. Van Horn, property in Medford; consideration, $275.

B. W. Dean, sheriff, to Chas. Nickell, property in Medford precinct; $355.

B. W. Dean, sheriff, to Chas. Nickell, property in Medford precinct; $230.
I. J. Phipps to P. Chartrand, property in Medford; $200.
I. J. Phipps to M. E. Beatty and H. E. Baker, 22.50 acres near Medford; $502.50.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 2


Another Railroad Proposition.
    W. A. Bantz, formerly a railway clerk, but now a real estate agent at Portland, was in Jacksonville this week and made a proposition to build and operate a motor road between this place and Medford, provided the people will agree to deed him 200 feet of land on each side of the road upon the completion of the same one year hence. It is proposed to cut up the land thus donated into very small tracts and require all purchasers to build a house and improve the property. In this manner a continuous settlement could be built between the two towns, which would greatly enhance the property in the vicinity and guarantee the prosperity of both Jacksonville and Medford. We have not had the opportunity to debate the feasibility of this project in our own mind, nor have we heard any general expression on the subject. We are decidedly in favor of connecting our town with the main line of road by rail at some point. Should Mr. Bantz' proposition be the best that could be suggested, we sincerely hope that it will be accepted and acted upon at once. Then let our citizens take the matter seriously under advisement without further delay and act as their best interests dictate.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 3


    Jas. T. Guerin, the scientific brickmason, who has been in Washington Territory for several months past, has returned. He will remove to California in the near future with his family and probably locate.
"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    J. W. Briner of Talent, the prohibitionist, made our town a visit last Friday.
    D. W. Crosby and Genevieve Riddle paid friends in Jacksonville a visit last Sunday.
    Geo. E. Anderson has returned from Crescent City, Cal., where he has been for several months past.
    W. G. Cooper has purchased D. Wilson's stock of saddles, harness, etc., as also his town property, paying $2200 for the same. Mr. Wilson will probably buy a farm somewhere in Jackson County.
    T. A. Harris, the well-known butcher, has sold his business to John A. Hanley, who will furnish the public with the choicest meats of all kinds. Mr. Harris will remain a resident of this place.
    Webb & Zimmerman, the expert contractors, have a number of dwelling houses for different parties under way. They are constructing a commodious residence for T. A. Harris, which will probably be the finest one in Medford.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 2, 1887, page 3


    The Medford Transcript editor is still troubled over the possibility of State Senator H. B. Miller being a candidate for Congressional honors, and boasts how he can write Mr. Miller's political doom with two penfuls of the mighty ink he uses on his quill. If the Transcript man continues to be so prodigal in the use of gall he will not have any left to take the flatness out of his ink when Miller is nominated, if that should occur. Let's see--Miller was one of the members of the State Board of Immigration when the Transcript editor was hired as secretary of the board. Is it possible that Mr. Miller had the assurance to criticize the clerk of the board, or to notice some of the many of his reported shortcomings in the management of the immigration rooms? To imagine that such presumption on the part of Mr. Miller may have lodged the little seed of bitterness in the fertile soil of the editorial brain which is now sprouting these ante-campaign menaces, is not inconsistent with the character of the editor in question, as revealed in his newspaper career.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, December 2, 1887, page 2


    Medford is to have a "spellin skule" tonight.
    Dr. S. Danielson, late of Missouri, has located at Medford.
    Adkins & Webb, of Medford, shipped a carload of hogs to Portland last week.
    A Portland real estate agent says he will have a railroad built and in running order between Jacksonville and Medford within a few months if the people will give him a land grant three hundred feet each side of the road along its whole length.
    Col. Ross and J. B. Wrisley, two of the prominent pioneer residents and farmers of Rogue River Valley, announce in our advertising columns that they are prepared to attend to the real estate business at their office in Medford, and are also agents for the Woodburn Nursery.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 2, 1887, page 3


    Farmers in all parts of Rogue River Valley are bestirring themselves in the orchard planting business, and within a few years the fruit exportation from Southern Oregon will be immense.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, December 2, 1887, page 3


Real Estate Sales.
    The Medford Transcript reports the following transactions in that place:
    Judge Walton, City Recorder, has sold his brick block to Mr. A. Giffen of Canada, consideration $1850. Mr. Giffen will use it as a store. F. Galloway has bought the residence property of S. Childers. It embraces nearly 2 acres of ground; consideration, $800. T. A. Harris has sold his butcher and meat market business to Mr. John Hanley. Mr. Hanley will take possession on the 10th. Mr. Harris will remain in Medford. M. E. Beatty, real estate dealer, reports the sale of four city lots in the southern portion to F. M. Plymale, consideration $400. Mr. Plymale will have his town residence on this ground.
Excerpt,
Ashland Tidings, December 2, 1887, page 3


    In the Medford (Oregon) paper appears some familiar names to the old residents of Emmet County, among which are Haskins and Lawton, druggists, comprising G. H. Haskins, our old-time druggist, and D. T. Lawton who has lately removed to Medford from Portland. R. T. Lawton and son advertise as dealers in real estate. Good land is higher in price in southern Oregon than in Iowa we judge, doubtless owing to the scarcity in the former locality.
"Local News," Northern Vindicator, Estherville, Iowa, December 2, 1887, page 5


HO FOR OREGON
A Grand Excursion to Celebrate the Last-Spike Driving.
    At the rooms of the State Board of Trade, last evening, W. L. Merry of the Chamber of Commerce, A. T. Hatch President of the State Board of Trade, Frank Dalton of the Produce Exchange, W. T. Garrett of the Manufacturers' Association, Geo. W. Saunderson of the Merchants' Exchange, Mayor Pond representing the city, J. A. Fillmore and W. H. Mills, representing the Southern Pacific Railroad Company, met to consider the programme for celebrating the opening of the California-Oregon railroad. It was explained by Mr. Fillmore that for the state representatives the company had provided four cars. They will leave San Francisco Friday afternoon at four o'clock, and arrive in time for the driving of the last spike at Ashland on Saturday at 2:30 P.M. The excursionists will remain there over night and resume their journey on Sunday at 7 A.M., making stop at Medford's [sic], Grants Pass, Roseburg, Eugene City, Albany, stopping over night at Salem, proceeding next morning to Portland, where they will arrive on Monday at 12 M. Here the Governor of Oregon, the Mayor of Salem (the state capital) and a delegation of citizens will meet the party and conduct them to the city hall, where a grand reception will be held in the evening. During the stay, excursions have been arranged to The Dalles, the upper and lower Cascades, and other places of interest on the Columbia River.
    Returning from Portland, the excursionists will leave at 11 A.M. Thursday, arriving in Ashland at 6:30 next morning, passing over the Siskiyou Mountains by daylight, arriving in Sissons station, at the foot of Mount Shasta, at 1 P.M. Friday. Proceeding thence, they will pass through the Sacramento Valley the same day and arrive in San Francisco Saturday morning at 6:30.

Excerpt, Daily Alta California, December 4, 1887, page 8


G. L. Webb to Mary R. Phelps, lots 1 and 2 in block 3, in Medford, Oregon; consideration, $650.
C. W. Broback to J. M. Williamson, lots 5 and 11 in block 15, Medford; $300.
I. J. Phipps to Mary F. Williams, lot 2 in block 60, in Medford; $30.
Wilhelm Wansher to Nellie P. Kercheval, 2½ acres in Medford; $250.
I. J. Phipps to S. W. Speas, 20 acres in Medford; $1000.
O.&T. Co. to D. T. Lawton, lots 11 and 12 in block 12 in Medford; $225.
J. West Lawton to Amelia R. Lawton, 1½ acres in Medford; $150.
H. T. Smith to Eliza Bell, lot 16 in block 23 in Medford; $225.
I. J. Phipps to Sarah E. Perdue, 2 acres beginning at the west boundary of Packard donation claim No. 89, township 37, south of range, 2 west; $50.
O.&T. Co. to Willard Crawford, lot 12 in block 68 in Medford; $50.
O.&T. Co. to G. L. Webb, lots 1, 2, 3, 4 and E ½ of lot 5 in block 55 in Medford; $187.
O.&T. Co. to Willard Crawford, lots 7, 8, 9 and 10 in block 66 in Medford; $115.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 1


B. W. Powell and S. Rosenthal to Philip Haught, lots 14 and 15 in block 14 in Medford; consideration; $200.
I. J. Phipps to Stephen S. Cooper, lots 5 and 6, block 40 in Medford; $50.
Louisa E. Beauchamp to E. P. Geary, lot 8 in block 15 in Medford; $200.
G. H. Baker to Geo. Anderson, lot 5 and 6 in block 18 in Medford; $250.
"Real Estate Transactions," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


    According to the Medford Transcript Gov. Pennoyer is the worst specimen of a crank, Register Johnston of the Roseburg land office is an impertinent and ignorant fellow, Jackson County's officers are boodlers and so on. Poor Democratic officials! They ought to hand in their resignations at once, for they don't suit Bro. Carlisle, and he is so competent to judge, and is such a good Democrat, you know. It is really a deep mystery how the affairs of Jackson County and Oregon could have been administered before the advent of this illustrious individual.
    The grand jury made a mistake in not subpoenaing C. B. Carlisle of Medford (who has been so quick in applying such pet names as "boodlers," "robbers," etc. to county officials and vilifying some of our best citizens), and requiring him to substantiate the charges he recklessly makes in his paper. There is no doubt but what that individual would have entirely backed down from his position, acknowledged that he was guilty of prevarication or shifted the responsibility upon someone else. He never could have proved his assertions, and none know it better than he. Now that a committee has been appointed to investigate the books and an opportunity presented to [do] so, let Carlisle prove what he harps about so persistently or go up on the record as a slanderer. The next grand jury may still have need for him, however.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


    Bro. Carlisle of the Medford Transcript claims to conduct a Democratic paper, and yet there is not a Republican journal in the State which abuses Democratic officials in so mean and unjust a manner as his does. Next year we expect to see him supporting the opponents of the Democracy, and at the same time insisting that he is a consistent Democrat. Of course, he is not hurting or deceiving anybody, only posing as [a] political monstrosity.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


A VERY FRESH INDIVIDUAL.
    The editor of the Medford Transcript, who is trying very hard to write himself into notoriety, seems to have a penchant for abusing and misrepresenting everybody whom he thinks is not doing him enough homage. When he arrived in southern Oregon he evidently imagined that his advent as a journalist would be the cause of a great commotion, judging from the tack he took; but the serenity of the "Italy of Oregon" was not at all convulsed, and everything is progressing as nicely as ever, just as if Bro. Carlisle was still secretary of the State Immigration Board and receiving the blessings (?) of the greater portion of the people of the State, which awfully friendly (?) feeling was the principal cause for the summary abolition of said board. Probably this noticeable indifference for him is the reason for his journalistic recklessness and his apparent determination to be heard anyhow.
    If he thinks that his recent ebullitions on the county debt question will gain him the notoriety he so busily seeks or have any effect on the general public, he again shows how poorly he calculates. This subject has been thoroughly discussed during every political campaign for the last ten years, and the people, by their ballots, have, at every election, shown that they were satisfied that the county debt was honestly and necessarily incurred; that the great amount of crime which has been punished was the principal cause of this accumulation of indebtedness, and it could not be averted without resorting to the dishonest method, so strongly advocated by the editor of the Transcript--repudiation.
    It illy befits a newcomer, who has hardly become acclimated and knows but very little of our county affairs, to talk of repudiation; and his talk of "the people being robbed by a set of boodlers," is as impudent and silly as it is slanderous and unjust. This repudiation of honest debts and libeling of honorable, prominent citizens may be "after his own heart" and customary where he hails from; but, if we are to judge from the expressions of those who have read his vaporings, [it is] decidedly out of place in Jackson County. This is a very unhealthy country for repudiators and slanderers anyway, which may account for the contempt efforts like that referred to are treated with.
    The editor of the Transcript again succeeds in writing himself down as a very impudent and unfair individual in his comments on the Hamlin case, in which he proceeds to dictate to District Attorney Colvig what his course therein shall be. He not only puts words in that official's mouth that he never uttered, but unjustly endeavors to create a prejudice against Mr. C. Prevarication and abuse have had their day in Jackson County long ago, Bro. Carlisle will find out sooner or later. District Attorney Colvig has the confidence of the people, who know that he will do his whole duty, without fear or favor.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. T. Lawton has been appointed a notary public by Gov. Pennoyer.
    Considerable property is still changing hands and improvements continue on every hand.
    Rev. C. H. Hoxie of this precinct has sold 80 acres to Mr. Hansen of California for $3000.
    Jas. Herely, the Butte Creek mail contractor, is now in the employ of the O.P.R.R. Co.
    Mrs. Charles Wolters, who has been very sick for some time past, is convalescing, we are glad to learn.
    Mr. Meeker of Portland, an insurance agent, is making several investments in this place and vicinity.
    'Squire Walton has sold his brick store building to Mr. Griffin, a newcomer, who will go into business here in the near future.
    The railroad company has advanced the price on its lots in this place, and quite a number have been sold at the advanced price.
    D. T. Lawton, who moved to Medford some time since, was in the city on a business trip. He reports favorably on the change of place and climate.--[East Portland correspondence.
    Our energetic citizen John W. Short has sold several acres of land in this vicinity to Mr. Meeker of Portland, receiving $65 per acre for the same. Not so very long ago he paid $25 per acre for the property.
    B. W. Powell, one of our most energetic business men, is being visited by his daughter, whom he had not seen for many years. She arrived from the eastern states a short time since and may remain here permanently.
    Our prospects for a flouring mill seem to be good. A gentleman from Portland is in town and agrees to put up a large mill at this place if a certain subsidy will be raised, and it is likely that his terms will be acceded to.
    The regular quarterly meeting of the M.E. Church South for this circuit was held here last Saturday and Sunday. Rev. J. W. Craig, presiding elder, Rev. W. B. Smith and several other members of the church were in attendance.
    W. G. Cooper, who has purchased D. Wilson's harness and shoe shop at this place, will have a full and first-class stock of all kinds of goods in his line, selling at reasonable rates and guaranteeing satisfaction. He will no doubt do a good business.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 2


    Crit. Tolman has commenced suit against Riddle Bros. for the recovery of the $600 which the latter won of him in the match race between "Nelly Gray" and "Ten Cents."  It was a square deal and the Riddles are entitled to the money.
    There is no town in the valley, Medford excepted, which has not been slurred in the most contemptible manner by Mr. Carlisle of the Transcript. We are reliably informed that very few people of our neighboring town approve of such uncalled-for conduct on the part of their paper.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 3


    D. Wilson, lately of Medford, has purchased A. W. Presley's property near Brownsboro, paying $1200 therefor.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 9, 1887, page 3


    Mr. Ward Douglas, of Portland, special agent of the New York Life Insurance Co., arrived in town the forepart of the week, and will spend some time in business here.
    H. B. Reed, the fence manufacturer, returned from Linkville last Wednesday. He sold his interest in the business for that country to C. H. Mapes, and the firm is now Miller & Mapes.
    Rev. R. M. McLean and family were in Ashland last Saturday, on their way from Klamath County to Grants Pass--their new home. Mr. McLean was not so badly hurt by the kick from his horse as was supposed from the report last week.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1887, page 3


    The fruit grower's association of Southern Oregon will meet at Medford tomorrow afternoon at one o'clock. The fruit industry of our valley should be well represented there.
    G. W. Edwards shipped two carloads of apples from Talent this week, consigned to McDonough & Johnson, of San Francisco, and will ship eighteen more carloads from the same place soon.
    W. G. Cooper has purchased D. Wilson's stock of saddles, harness, etc., as also his town property in Medford, paying $2200 for the same. Mr. Wilson will probably buy a farm somewhere in Jackson County.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 9, 1887, page 3


    Southern Oregon is receiving much attention from immigrants. According to the report of the Secretary of the State Board of Immigration, the 71 reduced tickets which were recently issued are divided, according to counties, as follows; Jackson, 21; Josephine, 12; Douglas, 2; Lane, 6; Marion, 15; Linn, 1; Benton, 7; Polk, 5; Yamhill, 2.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    D. W. Crosby & Co. have retired from the real estate business.
    J. M. Ogan has gone to California, where he will remain for some time.
    We learn that the real estate firm of Ross & Wrisley has been dissolved, Gen. Ross retiring.
    W. G. Cooper keeps a first-class line of saddles, harness, etc., and sells cheaper than the cheapest.
    Jas. Bell, formerly of this precinct, has taken charge of Thos. Culbertson's farm in Little Butte precinct.
    Sheriff Dean was at this place on Tuesday on a tax-collecting trip, and receipted for $550, which may be considered a good day's work these hard times.
    Wm. Ulrich has been appointed agent of the Farmer's Insurance Co., of Albany, a new but first-class organization. He is a "rustler" and will no doubt do a good business.
    W. M. Turner, the well-known architect, was in Jacksonville Wednesday, accompanied by Mr. Carter, his son-in-law. The latter is a resident of Chadbourne, Neb., and is on his way to California with his family.
    Thos. McAndrew of this precinct, who has some of the best bottom land in the valley, raised over 750 bushels of potatoes on two acres last season. A few of those tubers weighed five pounds each and many of them nearly three pounds each.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 2


W. G. COOPER,
Cor, 7th and B Streets,
MEDFORD, OR.,
Manufacturer of and Dealer in
BUGGY, CARRIAGE and TEAM
HARNESS.
S A D D L E S   A N D   R O B E S
A Specialty.
All Kinds of Repairing Done.
----
A BOOT AND SHOE SHOP
is connected with my harness shop. Having engaged the services of a first-class shoemaker, I am prepared to manufacture boots and shoes of the latest styles promptly.
    My prices in both departments will be quite reasonable and satisfaction guaranteed.                                                                              W. G. COOPER
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887 et seq., page 2


    Al. Eaton is driving Plymale's express wagon to Medford and return.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 3


    John T. Rolison and family returned to Jacksonville last Sunday. We regret to learn that Mr. R. is suffering with a severe attack of inflammatory rheumatism.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 3


    Roads are muddy.
    Thousands of fruit trees will be planted this and next seasons.
    Jas. T. Guerin and family have gone to California, where they will probably locate.
    Medford is making extensive arrangements to receive the excursionists next Tuesday.
    A greater number of deeds are now being recorded than ever known before in the history of Jackson County.
    Jacksonville still flourishes and will be represented on the occasion of the great railroad excursion next Tuesday.
    Read the advertisement of W. G. Cooper, of the Medford saddle and harness shop. He has an excellent stock of goods and sells cheap.
    F. L. Whitman, son of Hon. J. D. Whitman of Medford, who is in the employ of H. E. Battin & Co. of Portland, is in the valley looking after the December shipment of apples.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 16, 1887, page 3


Recognized at San Francisco.
    The San Francisco Daily Report of Dec. 2d has the following in its real estate review:
    The famous Rogue River Valley, in Southern Oregon, which has for many years enjoyed the distinction of being the garden spot of our sister state, is enjoying a lively land boom. The valley lands are phenomenally fertile, the climate is salubrious, and, now that the California & Oregon Railroad has achieved a close connection, the products of the valley can be easily marketed. The red apples of Rogue River are not only choice eating, but form a very pretty feature in table decorations. Through the extension of the railroad the Rogue River region has become tributary to the city [i.e., to San Francisco].

Ashland Tidings,
December 16, 1887, page 3



    J. M. McCoy, who has been at Medford for some time, arrived here this week with a large stock of books for sale, and intends to open a circulating library in town. Announcement in next issue of the Tidings.
    G. W. Edwards shipped yesterday from E. K. Anderson's orchard near Talent two carloads of winter apples, consigned to McDonough & Johnson, San Francisco. Mr. Edwards pronounces them the finest two carloads of winter apples that ever left this valley.
    The fruit growers of Jackson County should organize a regular war upon the codling moth, which has undoubtedly made its appearance in Rogue River Valley, though its effects are not yet appreciable upon the apple crop. Keep the pest down as much as possible.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 16, 1887, page 3


    Mr. J. G. Van Dyke has moved with most of his family into his new house in Medford, leaving his oldest son to manage the farm in Eden precinct.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 16, 1887, page 3


    The first stop was made at Medford, a bright, wide-awake little city of a thousand inhabitants, in the heart of Bear Creek Valley, in the midst of the fruit belt of Southern Oregon. This place was reached at 7:30, but a very little after daylight. In view of the fact that it was Sunday, the citizens had dispensed with that part of the programme which was to be made hilarious by use of cannon and much cheering, but they had placed tables nearly the whole length of the platform, and on these heaped up a liberal exhibition of fruit, grain, corn, vegetables and the like, grown in the immediate vicinity. Surmounting a lot of packed fruit ready for shipment was a banner, on which was inscribed "Medford gives you greeting. Help yourself"--an invitation the excursionists accepted. The fruit was excellent, in size, color and flavor. The apples were especially fine. Although the hour was early, there was quite a crowd at the depot, and during the short stay of fifteen minutes the visitors were most cordially entertained.
    An amusing incident occurred just as the train started. E. S. Washburn, a well-known San Francisco contractor, who was asleep in his berth, was awakened by the conductor shouting "All aboard!" Glancing out of the window, he saw the tables of fruit and the invitation "Help yourself." Hastily slipping on his trousers, he rushed out en deshabille, seized a huge squash weighing 155 pounds, shouldered it and carried it into the car, triumphantly exclaiming "I couldn't steal the city hall, but I can get away with anything in Oregon."

"The Last Spike Party," Oregonian, Portland, December 19, 1887, page 1


    Several cases of measles are reported at Medford.
    Medford town election will take place on Jan. 3rd.
    Roads are becoming pretty muddy in all parts now.
    The days of staging are numbered with the past.
    Farmers are beginning to order fruit trees by the thousand.
    Medford has raised the $2000 bonus and will have a flouring mill.
    D. W. Crosby & Co. have retired from real estate business in Medford.
    C. K. Fronk, railroad agent at Medford, left last evening for a short visit to his parents at Goshen.
    The California excursionists are expected back from their northern trip some time during the week.
    Fred Luy, Jr., has concluded to learn the barber's trade under George Schumpf and commenced work last Monday.
    Al Eaton drives Plymale's coach to Medford now. Dave Thompson is driving the stage to Butte Creek for James Herley.
    W. J. Plymale is running a daily stage from Jacksonville to Medford to connect with the trains both north and south. His stage leaves Jacksonville promptly at 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. A liberal share of the patronage is solicited.
    We clip the following from the Indiana Commercial, published in Mitchell, Laurence County: J. Oscar Burton, son of Hon. Alfred R. Burton, after a delightful visit of three weeks with his parents and relatives, took his departure for Washington city, where he will begin a course of study in a medical college. May success await him, for he well deserves fortune's fairest favors.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 22, 1887, page 3


CALIFORNIA AND OREGON CONNECTED.
    The train from Portland arrived at Ashland, Saturday, Dec. 17th, at 10:30. It consisted of the Pullman cars Roseburg and Triumph, Henry Villard's private O.R.&N. car, which has been four years in building, and attached car. Supt. Brandt, of the O.&C., assisted by Mr. Fields, train dispatcher, had charge of the excursion, with Shan Conser as conductor, says the Oregonian.
   
The train came through without accident or incident, and its arrival was greeted by music from the Ashland cornet band under the leadership of B. R. Willits. The weather through Rogue River Valley is foggy and the air reasonably cool and bracing.
    The last spike connecting the Oregon & California with the California & Oregon railroad was driven at fifty-one minutes past 4 by Chas. Crocker, one of the original organizers of the Central and Southern Pacific railroad companies. Connection with the W.U. telegraph system had been made, and every stroke that Mr. C. made upon the golden spike was heard in nearly every town and city on the coast. The ceremony was delayed until dark by derailment of a construction train on the south slope of the Siskiyous. A crowd of 2000 or more gathered at the scene of junction and waited patiently from 2 o'clock until 4. There is no telegraph station between Siskiyou and Ashland, and the exact running time could not be learned. The crowd became uneasy, and tired women who sat in vehicles at the side of the track shivered under the influence of a north wind. Men moved about to keep warm, and horses stamped to keep off the chill. Darkness was coming on and still no train, and it was suggested that the programme be changed to so as to drive the spike when the train arrived, and then have the speeches in the Knights of Pythias hall. However, stuff was secured for bonfires in case the ceremonies would have to be gone through after dark. Finally at 4:25 the headlight of a pilot engine could be seen occasionally as it came down the canyon; then everybody cheered. A hundred yards behind came the first section of the excursionists' train and it stopped just north of the point of the junction amid great cheering and music by the Ashland band. It was then 4:35 and the sky having clouded, it was impossible to read without artificial light. There was a hasty consultation between the Portland committee and the San Francisco executive committee, and all agreed, "We'll go ahead and do the best we can." Five minutes later the second section came up and the crowd gathered around a small stand erected at the side of the track. It accommodated only the speakers and reporters.
    Hon. Horace Davis of San Francisco presided. Speeches were made by Gov. Pennoyer, Hon. M. C. George and Donald Macleay, upon the part of Oregon, while Frank M. Pixley, J. P. Irish, J. I. Steffens, Chas. Crocker and others represented California. The benediction was pronounced by Rev. Mr. Satchwell of Sacramento, while Rev. Mr. Strong of Ashland also invoked a prayer. Following Gov. Pennoyer's speech, a poem was read by Mr. Phelps. The band then played "America," the whole crowd joining in singing three verses, just like a camp meeting, which ended the exercises. The scene during the speaking was most unusual for a public gathering. The crowd formed a packed circle around the platform. The speakers standing on the table were twenty feet above the heads of most of the audience. It was pitch dark. A bonfire to the west of the crowd was the only light. A dim lantern served the reporters, and another was brought into play for the orators, who delivered their speeches from manuscript. Besides the speakers not a face on the platform could be seen in the crowd, and the speaker could see only a few who held the table to keep it from falling with them; but everybody was in the best humor, and had the speeches lasted an hour longer, probably few would have left.
    There were 225 people on the California train, of whom eighty were guests and the remainder volunteer excursionists.
    The people of Ashland made a fine display of fruit and vegetables in the depot, and gave many baskets of fruit to the visitors. Ashland was brilliantly illuminated.
    The Oregon delegation was served that night with a splendid dinner aboard their own train. The menu card, handsomely printed, is a souvenir of the occasion. They spent the evening in calling upon the California delegation at their cars and cultivating friendly feeling, and the Californians returned the compliment.
Excerpt, Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 2


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    There are several cases of measles in town, but none of a serious nature.
    Hon. J. D. Whitman represented Medford at the spike-driving last Saturday.
    J. P. Welch, M.D., formerly of this place, is now located in Colusa County, Cal.
    J. L. Woolridge of Applegate was at Medford this week with a load of fine vegetables.
    Prof. Ganiard is giving our band boys instructions, and they are making commendable progress.
    Phil. Butcher is in charge of Hanley's butcher shop in this place and succeeds in giving satisfaction.
    The Cornet Band will give a grand ball on the evening of the 26th, which no doubt will be a pleasant one.
    S. B. Hadley, one of the earliest settlers of this place, has removed to Paisley, Lake County, from Myrtle Creek.
    Henry Smith and S. Rosenthal have a fine line of goods, especially adapted for nice, substantial holiday presents. Give them a call.
    A prominent business man of this place and an amiable young lady residing not far from here will be united in matrimony in the near future.
    A good-sized audience was present at the performance given by the "Uncle Tom's Cabin Company" one evening last week, which gave satisfaction.
    DeLane's "Uncle Tom's Cabin Company" became financially stranded when they reached here, and stayed a few days awaiting assistance. They have since proceeded northward.
    J. W. Burson of California and Miss Martha Fowler of this place were married at Jacksonville one day this week. They have since returned to the Golden State, which will be their future home.
    E. C. Phelps, the expert job printer, has purchased the job material formerly used in the Transcript office. He will also print the inside of our town paper, the other part being patent and printed in Portland.
    The bonus asked by Gove & Co., a Portland firm, to put up a flouring mill at this place, being about subscribed, we expect to see this enterprise established here in time for next season's crop. The liberality of our people is to be commended.
    The citizens of Medford met last Tuesday evening and nominated a full set of candidates for municipal officers, to be voted for at the town election next month. The following are the nominees, as nearly as we learned: Marshal, John S. Miller; recorder, C. H. Barkdull; treasurer, Chas. Strang; trustees, Dr. Geary; C. W. Skeel, D. H. Miller, A. Childers, M. Purdin.
    No clue as yet has been found to the fellow who recently broke into A. H. Carlson's saloon in Medford and stole $50. Gus had the money hidden in an obscure place, but the thief was probably looking into the window at the time he was counting it, and saw where he hid it. Entrance as effected through a small window in the side of the building.
    The excursion trains stopped fifteen minutes at this place last Sunday while en route to Portland from Ashland, and were greeted by quite a number of people from different portions of the valley. A fine display of fruits and vegetables had been put on the railroad platform for exhibition, which attracted much attention. The visitors, being invited to help themselves, generally accepted the invitation.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 2


    As the road on the Siskiyou Mountains is soft and in poor condition, the railroad company will keep four stages there, in case of accident. A slide of earth may cover the track at any time, so that it may not be possible to move it inside of several days. It is then that the stages will prove quite handy.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 3


Religious News.
    Rev. G. E. Jones, formerly of Medford, now resides in Table Rock precinct. His appointments at Antelope and Antioch are the same as usual, on the first and third Sundays of the month.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 3


MARRIED.
PLYMALE-LUY--At the residence of M. A. Williams, near Medford, Dec. 18th, by Rev. M. A. Williams, William L. Plymale and Miss Nellie Luy.
    [We acknowledge the receipt of compliments. The young couple are well and favorably known and have the wishes of their many friends for a happy and prosperous journey through life, in which the Times heartily joins.]
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 3


    The Southern Oregon Fruit Growers' Association held a meeting at Medford on the 10th, which was well attended and proved quite interesting. Several new members were admitted.
    The entertainment given at Medford last week by the amateurs of that place was a highly successful and interesting event. A large number were in attendance. The performers all acquitted themselves creditably, and some of them especially so.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 3


    Medford has raised [a] $2000 bonus and will have a flouring mill.
    Medford Transcript: The Episcopal Church people have secured a handsome building site on Seventh Street, opposite the Presbyterian Church, and expect to erect a church thereon ere many months.
"News of the Northwest: Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, December 24, 1887, page 6


UNFAIR AND UNTRUE.
    The Medford Transcript of November 8th came to our notice this week and contains an article reflecting upon C. W. Johnston, Register of the Land Office at this place. We know Mr. Johnston to be a gentleman of undisputed integrity, positively upright in his business relations, and as an efficient and correct officer he has no superior, save possibly one in California. C. B. Carlisle, in our opinion, has gone very far out of his way to speak falsely of this man, and prompted, no doubt, by a motive so sinister and mercenary as to be almost unworthy of notice. The whole offense committed by Mr. Johnston was that he did not give the Transcript land notices, when that paper did not or could not comply with the law respecting its circulation. Carlisle refused to make affidavit to the land office as required by law on all papers of doubtful circulation, when Mr. Johnston requested him to do so. Yet this man stated and wrote a letter in which he says (August 4, 1887) that he has "upward of three hundred subscribers assured, which is more than any paper in the county has," meaning Jackson County. Now, a more consummate falsehood could not be uttered by an intelligent man, while at that moment the Times had over 2,000 subscribers, and the Sentinel and Tidings something less, and Carlisle could not help but know it. Carlisle's questionable conduct in the State Board of Immigration is reappearing in his newspaper business, and he might as well get ready and "move on." This much has been said by us for the benefit of those who do not know Mr. Johnston, for where he is known he needs no such defense at our hands, especially from the attacks of such a man as C. B. Carlisle.--Roseburg Review.
    In connection with the above we might add that this man Carlisle wrote to the Interior Department at Washington that Register Johnston, than whom there is no more honest and efficient official in the State, that the reason he was sending land notices to the Times office was because Mr. Johnston and the editor of this paper were dividing the proceeds. A baser and more ridiculous lie never was concocted, and none know it better than this same Carlisle. He very conveniently forgot to write that the reason no land notices are sent to his paper is because it does not come up to the standard of general circulation, having about 250 subscribers, nearly every one of whom lives in Medford and its immediate vicinity. And the assertion that Mr. Johnston would prostitute his honor, disobey the law, and do the public an injustice besides, for the pitiful amount that Carlisle says he is receiving for sending the Times the few land notices that appear in its columns, only shows the calibre of this slander and is on a par with the claim that his sheet has as much or more circulation than any of the other papers published in Jackson County. Anyone who would seek to have an official removed by such means is very small indeed.
    Carlisle knows no good of anybody or any town besides his own, and uses his paper to beslime everybody who does not pay tribute to him, measuring them in his own small half-bushel. It is he who calls our county officials "boodlers" and showers his filth so promiscuously and with more gusto than any writer for the police papers ever did. We have it from the best authority that he will have ample opportunity to prove the charges he has so recklessly made in the courts of justice.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 2


    W. J. Plymale has put a four-horse team on the road between this place and Medford, and is better prepared than ever to carry passengers.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 3


    Thos. T. Turner, who has been in charge of the Medford railroad depot in the absence of C. K. Fronk, has returned.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 3


MEDFORD SQUIBS.
    Our school is enjoying a holiday vacation, but will resume studies next Monday.
    J. W. Short and E. F. Walker have purchased of C. Mingus 60 acres of land adjoining this place.
    The Baptist Sunday school, recently organized, is in a flourishing condition and promises well.
    A lot for an Episcopal Church has been secured, and a building will be put up in the near future.
    The party announced for the 26th inst. was postponed on account of the sickness prevailing in town.
    G. E. Anderson has invested in a dray and is engaged in hauling all kinds of freight at reasonable rates.
    Street Commissioner Whiteside is proving an efficient official and leaves nothing undone for the public good.
    W. A. Bodine, who recently sold his farm near this place, has removed to Washington Territory with his family.
    Our town election takes place next Tuesday. It seems as if the citizens' ticket will be elected without much opposition.
    Henry Richardson is now at Placerville, Cal., where he holds a responsible position on the construction force of the S.P.R.R. Co.
    It is now proposed to build a large brick schoolhouse in this place, which would be a great benefit to this place in more ways than one.
    C. W. Skeel, one of our best mechanics, was recently joined by his son and daughter, from the eastern states, who will probably locate here.
    In our last issue we neglected to mention the death of the only son of Mrs. Gilmer, a bright little boy, who died of scarlet fever on the 17th inst.
    Mrs. J. R. West, one of our most accomplished and amiable ladies, has gone to Lincoln, Neb., to spend the winter. Her absence will be generally regretted.
    Rev. Wm. Stewart of Quincy, Ills., an able preacher, will occupy the pulpit of the Baptist Church in Medford next Sunday; and on the third Sunday in January.
    C. K. Fronk, who has been visiting relatives and friends in Lane County, has returned home. His place was acceptably filled by Thos. T. Turner of Jacksonville.
    In the last issue of the Times we erred in stating that M. Purdin had been nominated for councilman. E. G. Hurt was nominated instead, and will no doubt make a good official.
    Angus Carlson of the Brewery Saloon inaugurated a turkey shooting match near his place of business, which proved quite interesting. A large number of fat turkeys were slaughtered and some good marksmanship was shown on Christmas.
    Gen. Ross has sold out his interest in the real estate firm of Ross & Wrisley to John S. Miller, another old pioneer, and who is also well acquainted with nearly every foot of soil in southern Oregon. We take pleasure in recommending Messrs. Wrisley and Miller, as they are thoroughly reliable and good business men.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 30, 1887, page 3


Last revised August 21, 2017
For more complete names of persons identified by initials, see the Index.