The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Raphael Morat
Pioneer vintner and owner of the Rogue Valley's first tasting room.


    FROM ELLIOTT CREEK.--James Lawrence was in town this week, after an absence of several weeks at Elliott Creek, where he is engaged in mining operations. Here, in company with Fred. Grob, Chris. Wintjen and Raphael Morat, he is interested in a gravel bed, supposed to be rich in the precious metal. The company has been busy for several weeks past, digging a ditch about a mile long to bring water on this bed from a stream known as Cougar Creek. The ditch will carry five hundred inches of water, and it is expected to have it completed in five or six weeks. If the prospects prove favorable, a hydraulic will immediately be brought into service. Too much credit cannot be given them for the enterprise they have manifested, and we trust they will be amply repaid.
"Mining Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 17, 1877, page 3


    On Tuesday last Mr. Jas. Lawrence returned from a visit to his diggings on Applegate. The two Wintjens--John and Chris.--accompanied him. They report work progressing finely and prospects flattering. These claims consist of 80 acres of a gravel bar and "back channel" at the intersection of Carberry fork and the main Applegate, about thirty miles west of here. The owners are Chris. Wintjen, Jas. Lawrence, Fred. Grob and Rafael Morat, who discovered and located the ground last summer, since which time they have been steadily employed in building a ditch and prospecting. They have a ditch of near two miles' length and carrying several hundred inches of water. With this they have begun an open cut, intending to extend it across the entire width of the claim. They have ran it far enough already to show a body of pay gravel thirty feet deep, with the bedrock pitching into the hill at an increasing incline. Pursuing the same grade to the foot of the hill will show a face of 100 feet or more of pay gravel, and will require a 50- or 60-foot cut through the rimrock to secure a drain and dump into Applegate. It is their intention to lengthen and otherwise enlarge their ditch, and to put on a giant hydraulic, as soon as they can determine the width of the channel with the cuts and tunnels.
"Mining Items," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1877, page 2


Sheriff's Sale.
BY VIRTUE of an execution duly issued by the Circuit Court of the State of Oregon, for the County of Jackson, and to me directed and delivered, in favor of L. J. C. Duncan, Peter Britt and Joseph Wetterer, and against John Cimborsky and Rafael Morat, for the recovery of the sum of two hundred and eleven and twenty-sixth hundredths dollars ($211.26) costs and disbursements, and also the costs of and upon this writ, I have levied upon and will offer for sale for cash, at public auction, to the highest bidder, at the Court House door in Jacksonville, in said county, on
Monday, June 11, 1877,
at one o'clock P.M. of said day, the following described real property, to wit:
    The undivided one-fourth interest in a mining claim commencing at a black oak tree about two rods northwesterly from the junction of the main Applegate and Carberry fork of said stream and running southeasterly 80 rods to a notice posted on a pine tree; thence 160 rods southwesterly to a stake; thence northeasterly 80 rods to a notice posted on a pine tree about two feet in diameter; thence southwesterly 160 rods to the place of beginning. Said claim being on unsurveyed land and comprising 80 acres in Township 40, south of range 3 west, in Jackson County, Oregon. The notice of said above described mining claim was filed and recorded in the Clerk's office of Jackson County, Oregon, on the 22nd day of September, A.D. 1876, by James Lawrence, Chris. Wintjen, Fred. Grobe and Rafael Morat.
    Also the undivided one-fourth interest in a water ditch taken out of Cougar fork of said Carberry fork and leading on said mining claim.
    Also all the right, title and interest and improvements in the following described real property, to wit: The northwest ¼ of the northwest ¼ of section 31, and the southwest ¼ of the southwest ¼ of section 30, in Township 37, south of range 2 west.
    Levied upon as the real property of Rafael Morat, one of the above-named defendants, to satisfy the demands of the above-named execution.
J. W. MANNING,
    Sheriff of Jackson County, Oregon.
Jacksonville, May 10, 1877
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 2, 1877, page 4


    In the matter of the estate of Chas. Brunet, deceased. Raphael Morat was appointed administrator of said estate, with R. S. Dunlap, T. B. Kent and J. R. Neil as appraisers.
"Probate Court,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 2, 1878, page 3


    Raphael Morat left for California on Wednesday last taking a load of grapes for the Siskiyou County market.
"Brief Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 30, 1878, page 3


    NEW DISTILLERY.--Raphael Morat arrived from Reading yesterday with the fixtures of a distillery he will soon establish at his vineyard near this place. It is of the most improved pattern and of considerable capacity.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 4, 1878, page 3


    Raphael Morat is now manufacturing a large quantity of wine at his vineyard north of town.
"Brief Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 25, 1878, page 3


    Raphael Morat has his distillery in operation and is now manufacturing a fine article of brandy.
"Brief Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 29, 1878, page 3


    Jos. Wetterer and Raphael Morat are manufacturing an excellent article of brandy. The former will distill five hundred gallons and the latter not quite as much. The U.S.  Gauger is expected here this month to measure the liquor.
"Brief Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 3, 1879, page 3


THE MANUFACTURE OF LIQUOR IN SOUTHERN OREGON.
    Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. Gauger, who recently made this county an official visit, writes us as follows under a late date:
    My visit to your section was to ascertain the quantity and proof of the brandy made by the various distilleries. J. W. Smith, at Phoenix, has manufactured between one and two hundred gallons of brandy from apples, but had not finished at the time I was there. Jos. Wetterer, in Jacksonville, has about the same quantity, also made from apples, but had not completed his run. Raphael Morat, on the outskirts of town, is through for this season and has between three and four hundred gallons on hand, manufactured from grapes. This is the first year that any of them have had stills in operation, though some liquor was made at Phoenix last season. One still at the latter place did not run.
    The brandy is from proof to fifteen and twenty percent above proof. It is considered a good article and, if properly rectified, would be as desirable as the brandies from California. As the expense of rectification is considerable, the distillers dispose of the brandy without subjecting it to this process, and it finds a ready sale. They pay a tax of 90 cents per proof gallon and are allowed to sell at the distillery in stamped packages without license. After I have ascertained the quantity and proof and put on each package the required marks and brands, to sell less than a stamped package they are required to pay a retail dealer's license.
    There is no reason why the surplus grapes, apples, pears, peaches, etc. grown in your vicinity should not be manufactured into brandy. The liquor is well liked by many, it being often preferred to others on account of being the pure article, but for general use it requires rectification or old age. When manufacturers reduce the brandy they distill and the excellence of the article is generally known, it will supersede several other liquors, and the money that usually goes out from this section for this purpose will be retained at home and another source of revenue established.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1879, page 1


    Raphael Morat is erecting a new residence at his vineyard north of town.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 20, 1879, page 3



    Raphael Morat proposes improving his premises with a neat, new residence, now in course of construction.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1879, page 3


    A neat saloon and residence has just been completed by Rafael Morat.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 1, 1879, page 3


    Raphael Morat has recently built a neat residence with a saloon attached, near town, where the best wines and brandies can be obtained.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1879, page 3


    Raphael Morat, the boss grape-grower of Jacksonville, is now busily engaged with his hired help gathering grapes. He expects to make upward of 3,000 gallons of wine off of his ten-acre patch.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1879, page 3


    Raphael Morat, grape grower of Jacksonville, is now engaged with his hired help gathering grapes. He expects to make upward of 3000 gallons of wine off of his ten-acre vineyard.
"Southern Oregon," Oregonian, Portland, November 7, 1879, page 1


    In the County Court last Monday, Raphael Morat, a native of France, was admitted to citizenship by Judge Day.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 5, 1879, page 3


    LIQUOR GAUGED.--Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. Gauger, has been in Jackson County during the past week on official business, and while here gauged over 1,500 gallons of liquor manufactured since his visit last February. Mr. Kilbourn says the product is of an excellent quality, and made principally from apples. The inclement weather of the past few months has interfered with its manufacture and sale. Of the amount gauged 500 gallons were stilled by Raphael Morat, of Jacksonville, 200 gallons by J. L. Hockett, of Phoenix, 200 gallons at the Eagle Brewery in this place, and over 500 gallons by Jesse & Neff of Wagner Creek.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 23, 1880, page 3


    SHOOTING AFFRAY.--On Sunday afternoon an altercation took place between Jack Montgomery and John F. Earl, in which the former was dangerously, if not fatally, shot. It seems that an electioneering party went out to Rafael's wine cellar about half a mile north of town, and while there a political discussion arose between Earl and Montgomery, both having drunk considerable wine. Montgomery was angry and quite aggressive, wanting to pit a young man named Stevens from Josephine County against Earl in a fight. Earl, who is quite peaceable, begged off, saying that he was a stranger and desired no trouble with men whose names he did not even know. Decker and Lorraine, two bystanders, held Montgomery and advised Earl to leave, which he did immediately, but Stevens and Montgomery following closely. When about one hundred yards from the house and approaching him rapidly, Earl twice warned his pursuers to stop. Still advancing on him, Stevens drawing his coat, Earl fired without effect; but immediately firing again, Montgomery was struck a little to the left of the pit of the stomach and in the region of the lower lobe of the left lung. Stevens then retreated and Earl immediately came to town and gave himself up to Deputy Sheriff Caton, who committed him to jail. The wounded man was examined by Dr. Callendar, who pronounced his wound a mortal one. For several hours he spit up large quantities of blood and suffered much, but on Monday he was able to be removed to the county hospital. Earl was examined on Monday before Justice Huffer, and all the testimony being in his favor and showing that he acted purely in self-defense, he was discharged. It is almost needless to moralize on this affair but one thing is certain, had there been no drinking, there would have been no bloodshed, and it is another argument against the bad practice of corrupting voters by the use of liquor, reprehensible in any party and a proper thing to stop.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, June 2, 1880, page 3


Jacksonville Precinct, Oregon:
Rafiel Morat, 44, born in France, grape culture
Julien Raspono, 49, born in France, hired hand, works in vineyard
U.S. Census, enumerated June 7, 1880


    The vineyards of Col. J. N. T. Miller and Raphael Morat are supplying the market with a superior quality of early grapes of the Sweetwater variety.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 3, 1880, page 3


    Raphael Morat left for Yreka the other day with a large load of grapes, wine and brandy.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 15, 1880, page 3


    Raphael Morat returned from Yreka this week, where he disposed of a wagonload of grapes, brandy, etc.

"Personal Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 22, 1880, page 3


    Raphael Morat made over 500 gallons of grape brandy at his distillery last year and will make about the same quantity this season. The other distilleries in the county will make about as much more.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 29, 1881, page 3


    Up to date, the only wine made in our state has been produced in Jackson County by Raphael Morat, J. N. T. Miller, Peter Britt and others, to an aggregate of about four thousand gallons per year. The distillation of brandy from peaches and plums has proven more profitable in that section and wine-making will yet have to give way to it, at least in that locality.
"Grape Culture in Oregon," The West Shore, Portland, February 1881, page 56


    Morat & Co., near town, manufactured several hundred gallons of excellent grape brandy last year and will make more during 1881.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 4, 1881, page 3


    Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. Gauger, of Portland, is among us on his annual visit to the distilleries. He gauged 600 gallons of fine grape brandy for Raphael Morat yesterday and 200 gallons apple brandy for Mrs. Wetterer and will proceed to Phoenix today. Oscar is always in a pleasant humor and puts on no style if he is a brother of the celebrated Hallett Kilbourn and a U.S. official.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 16, 1881, page 3


    WORK OF THE GAUGER.--Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. Gauger, during his stay in Jackson County, gauged 600 gallons of brandy for Raphael Morat, 200 for Mrs. Wetterer of Jacksonville, 200 for J. L. Hockett of Phoenix and 200 for T. J. Neff of Wagner Creek. This liquor is all of an excellent quality and commands a ready sale. Mr. Kilbourn left for Grants Pass Tuesday, where he expected to gauge a considerable quantity for Wm. Triplett of Rogue River. Jackson County produces more homemade liquor than any other in the state and an increase is being constantly reported.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 22, 1881, page 3  The article was copied by the Eugene City Guard of May 21, 1881, page 1


    Mrs. Sarah McKnight, Mrs. Boshey, daughter and granddaughter left here on Tuesday morning for the Soda Springs. Mr. Rafael Morat accompanied them.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 23, 1881, page 3


    Raphael Morat will soon take another load of grapes, brandy, etc., to Roseburg, where his wares command a ready market.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 30, 1881, page 3


    J. N. T. Miller and Raphael Morat are now engaged in picking the grapes in their large vineyards. As the grape crop is much larger this season than usual, a vast amount of wine and brandy will be manufactured.
"Brief Reference,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1881, page 3


    J. N. T. Miller and Raphael Morat have made near 10,000 gallons of wine from their vineyards this season. A good portion of this will be distilled into brandy.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 5, 1881, page 3



    For native wine and brandy of a superior quality, call at Raphael & Julien's, just north of town. They manufacture more each year.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 19, 1882, page 3


    THE GAUGER'S WORK.--Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. gauger, has been paying the valley an official visit during the week and returned home to Portland yesterday. He gauged and stamped about one thousand gallons of spirits, most of which was grape brandy distilled by Raphael Morat. The rest was apple brandy manufactured by Mrs. Wetterer and by the Phoenix distillery. Mr. Kilbourn expresses the opinion that this valley will soon produce large quantities of wine and spirits of the best quality.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 20, 1882, page 3


    Oscar Kilbourn, U.S. Gauger, last week inspected 800 gallons of grape brandy for Raphael Morat; also some apple brandy for Mrs. Wetterer of this place and Thos. Pankey of Phoenix. He pronounced all of it of excellent quality.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 26, 1882, page 3


    Raphael Morat of this place has opened a saloon at Cow Creek.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, July 1, 1882, page 3


    Raphael Morat of this place has gone to Grave Creek and opened a saloon.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 7, 1882, page 3


    Raphael Morat of Jacksonville was in town this week with a load of wine and brandy, of his own manufacture. He had no difficulty in disposing of his cargo at remunerative prices.--Roseburg Independent, Sept. 30.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 6, 1882, page 3


    Comstock's mill at Grave Creek is doing good work. There is a store there and two saloons in the vicinity--one kept by Raphael Morat and the other by Geo. Roberts.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 13, 1882, page 3


    Col. J. N. T. Miller and R. Morat & Co. finished picking their grapes this week. They gathered enough to manufacture forty barrels of wine apiece. The grapes are of a superior quality, but hardly as abundant as usual.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 27, 1882, page 3


    The deputy internal revenue collector found the various breweries and distilleries in good condition. He informs us that more liquor is manufactured at Raphael Morat's place near town than anywhere else in Oregon.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 19, 1883, page 3


    State vs. Geo. Roberts, R. Morat, B. A. Williams, J. Smith; selling liquor without license. Defendants each fined $50 and costs.

"Circuit Court Proceedings,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 13, 1883, page 2


    Raphael Morat continues to supply the [railroad construction] front with grape brandy of a good quality.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 20, 1883, page 3


    Raphael Morat intends opening a wholesale liquor store in the place on California Street formerly occupied as a butcher shop.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 7, 1883, page 3


    The building formerly occupied by Nick Ficke as a butcher shop is being fitted up in fine style for Raphael Morat, who will open a saloon in it next week. H. Weydeman is doing the work.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 14, 1883, page 3


    Morat & Chale will have their saloon in running order in a few days.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 15, 1883, page 3


    Morat & Chale's new saloon is about ready for occupancy, J. T. Roloson and Adam Schmidt having fitted it up in fine style.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 21, 1883, page 3


    John Carter is doing the painting in Morat & Chale's saloon and is showing some good work.
    Morat & Chale expect to open their saloon today. Jack Marshall will also be ready for business in a few days.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 22, 1883, page 3


    Oscar Kilbourn recently received a box of grapes from Raphael Morat of Jacksonville, which excel in flavor any California grapes brought to the market. Mr. Morat controls some forty acres of vineyard, and manufactures large quantities of wine and brandy. When the railroad is completed to Jacksonville, Portland will be well supplied with grapes, peaches, etc., from that locality.--Oregonian.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 28, 1883, page 3


    Morat & Chale's saloon opened out last Sunday and is ready for business. They also propose keeping an oyster saloon in connection with their business.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 29, 1883, page 3


    Raphael Morat vs. W. Prefontaine; to foreclose mortgage.
"Circuit Court Docket,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 2, 1883, page 2


    The vineyards of Col. J. N. T. Miller, R. Morat and M. Laist are furnishing a fine article of grapes at the low price of 5 cents a pound.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 5, 1883, page 3


    Tom Brown officiates at Morat & Chale's as first assistant.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 12, 1883, page 3


    ARRESTED.--Fred Haim, a stranger, claiming to be a cooper, was arrested last week on complaint of Raphael Morat, who charges him with absconding with $20 he had given him for the purchase of barrel staves from Veit Schutz. Although Haim had several days' start he was overhauled by Sheriff Jacobs and brought back. Justice Huffer held him to answer, fixing his bonds at $100, which he furnished by giving a gun and two colts as security to his bondsman.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 19, 1883, page 3


    SETTLED AND DISCHARGED.--Fred Hines, an employee of Raphael Morat, was arrested and bound over this week by Justice Huffer on a charge of having stolen $20 from his employer. The case was finally compromised by paying all costs and damages in the case, when he was discharged from custody.

Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 20, 1883, page 3



Wine and Brandy!
THE UNDERSIGNED takes pleasure in informing the public that he now has on hand a large stock of superior Wine and Brandy, which he will sell in quantities to suit purchasers, at the following rates per gallon: Claret Wine, 50 cents; Angelica, $1; Brandy, $3.
    Give me a call at my place of business on the Oregon stage road, just north of Jacksonville, and judge for yourself.
RAPHAEL MORAT.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1883, page 2


    THE VINTAGE.--Grapes have been picked, and a great deal of wine is being manufactured in this county. J. N. T. Miller, Raphael Morat and P. Britt are the principal producers, though there are quite a number who make wine on a small scale. The grape crop has proved an abundant and superior one, and, perforce, the wine is also better than usual.

Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1883, page 3


    Raphael Morat's team ran into a crowd of young bloods standing on the sidewalk last Sunday evening and threw him out of the wagon. No damage was done, and the case against Raphael was dismissed by Recorder Webster.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1883, page 3


    Raphael Morat has a large stock of wine and brandy, of good quality, which he is selling cheap. For further particulars see his advertisement.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 9, 1883, page 3


MORAT & CHALE'S
SALOON,

JACKSONVILLE, OREGON.
HAVING OPENED a saloon on California Street, we ask for a share of the public patronage and promise good treatment in every case. We keep none but the best of liquors, wines and cigars, and satisfaction is guaranteed. Try us and be convinced.
MORAT & CHALE.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 24, 1883, page 1


    Gus Delpey is now in charge of Morat & Chale's saloon after night and whenever wanting a good lunch or drink give him a call when satisfaction will be guaranteed.
"Local Items,"
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 15, 1883, page 3


    At Morat & Chale's saloon the finest lunch can always be obtained.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 28, 1883, page 3


    RAPHAEL MORAT: lives near Jacksonville; is a grape and wine grower and distiller; was born near Pyrenees Mountains, France; came to California in 1859 and to state and county in 1870.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 505



Morat, Raphael, manufacturer native wines
Morat & Chale (Raphael Morat, Alfonzo Chale), saloon
Oregon, Washington and Idaho Gazetteer and Business Directory 1884-5, R. L. Polk & Co., page 181


    Mr. Faber has completed a match-box, made of stone, for Chale & Morat, which is a beauty.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 25, 1884, page 3


    A. Chale of this place last week received tidings from his brothers, whose whereabouts were unknown to him for many years past. They are located at St. Andrews, Dakota, a long distance from here; still the information that they were yet in the land of the living was quite welcome.

"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 21, 1884, page 3


    Pryor Eaton is officiating behind the bar at Morat & Chale's.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 27, 1884, page 3


    Geo. W. Holt has just completed a fireproof cellar for Rafael Morat with a capacity of holding 1,000 gallons of wine.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 2, 1884, page 3



Wine and Brandy!
THE UNDERSIGNED takes pleasure in informing the public that he now has on hand a large stock of superior Wine and Brandy, which he will sell in quantities to suit purchasers, at the following rates per gallon: Claret Wine, 50 cents; Angelica, $1; Brandy, $3.
    Give me a call at my place of business on the Oregon stage road, just north of Jacksonville, and judge for yourself.
RAPHAEL MORAT.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 8, 1884, page 4


    Morat & Chale have been granted a six-months' liquor license by the trustees.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1884, page 3


    As will be seen by his notice elsewhere, Raphael Morat has been appointed executor of the estate of Julien Raspot, deceased.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1884, page 3


Dissolution Notice.
THE FIRM of Morat & Chale, engaged in the saloon business in Jacksonville, is hereby dissolved by general consent, Raphael Morat retiring. A. Chale will continue the business at the old stand and asks for a continuance of patronage.
RAPHAEL MORAT,
A. CHALE.
Jacksonville, Sept. 11, 1884.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 5, 1884, page 3


    Raphael Morat, the well-known manufacturer of wine and brandy, is building a fine stone cellar in which to store his products. Geo. Holt is doing the work.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 1, 1884, page 3


    Geo W. Holt has just completed a fireproof cellar for Rafael Morat with a capacity of holding 1,000 gallons of wine.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 2, 1884, page 3


    Raphael Morat of this precinct will be at the State Fair at Salem with a large quantity of his superior grapes.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3


    A large quantity of superior grapes has been shipped to the Willamette Valley from the vineyards of Col. Miller and R. Morat.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1884, page 3


    Rafael Morat made over 8,000 gallons of wine this year, and several other vineyards in Jacksonville did nearly as well.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, December 27, 1884, page 3


    Oscar Kilbourn of Portland returned home this week after having gauged a large quantity of liquor for Lytle & Co. and Raphael Morat. He also spent a few days at the Soda Springs.

"Personal Mention,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 15, 1885, page 3


    Raphael Morat came back from San Francisco this week but did not bring that promised bride.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, August 15, 1885, page 3


    State vs. Raphael Morat; indictment for selling liquors to miners. Dismissed on motion of District Attorney.

"Circuit Court Proceedings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 30, 1886, page 3


    Raphael Morat has just received a diploma from the Commissioners of the World's Fair held at New Orleans last year for the fine display of wines and brandy made here.

"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 10, 1886, page 3



    Robt. A. Miller and Raphael Morat are making large shipments of grapes to the Portland market, where they find a ready sale.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 18, 1886, page 3


    State vs. Raphael Morat, for selling liquor to minors, jury disagreed and were discharged.
"Circuit Court Proceedings," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 16, 1886, page 3


    R. Morat's claim on Foots Creek has been put in excellent condition, and much work is now being done there.
"Oregon,"
Mining and Scientific Press, San Francisco, January 29, 1887, page 69


    Raphael Morat is operating the Prefontaine diggings in Foots Creek district with promising results.

"Mining News,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 4, 1887, page 2


    Raphael Morat vs. W. Prefontaine; confirmation. Sheriff's sale confirmed.

"Circuit Court Proceedings,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 25, 1887, page 2


    The case of the State vs. Raphael Morat, convicted of selling liquor to minors, has been appealed to the supreme court.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 1, 1887, page 3


    State vs. Raphael Morat, mandate of the Supreme Court received and judgment of court below reversed.

"Circuit Court Proceedings,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 3


    Raphael Morat is shipping a large quantity of grapes to the Willamette Valley markets.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 2, 1887, page 3


Grapes and Wine.
    A large quantity of grapes are being shipped to Portland from this place by Mrs. J. N. T. Miller, Raphael Morat, Emil Berbe, Martin Laist and others. They sell at good prices, and being tender and of good flavor, are preferred to California grapes by most people. In the future, when raising grapes of different qualities will have attained a high standard of development in Southern Oregon, we may expect our grapes to be sold almost exclusively in Oregon markets. In the vicinity of Jacksonville may be found thousands of acres of land especially adapted to the culture of the grape, and this will all, sooner or later, be utilized for that purpose by people who understand the business. We confidently expect that this section will before many years command much attention from those handling grapes and wine.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 9, 1887, page 3


    R. Morat of Jacksonville has moved to the creek and put his claim in running order. He also intends putting out a large orchard during the coming season.

"Foots Creek Fritters,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 2


    R. Morat is improving his place by planting several acres in fruit trees, and he also intends to add a large vineyard the coming season.

"Foots Creek Fritters,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 16, 1888, page 2


    Raphael Morat returned from his Foots Creek claim during the week.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    In the matter of the estate of Julien Raspot, deceased. Ordered that warrant [be] made for arrest of Raphael Morat, administrator of said estate, for contempt of court in refusing to pay off judgment of C. B. Rostel against said estate.
"Probate Court Proceedings: June Term,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 1


    Raphael Morat, who was ordered to be imprisoned for contempt of court in refusing to obey an order of Judge DePeatt in the Raspot-Rostel case, was released upon a writ of habeas corpus issued out of Judge Webster's court.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


GRAPE CULTURE.
    Jackson County is specially adapted to the raising of grapes. Near Jacksonville is the vineyard of Col. J. N. T. Miller, containing about twenty acres, which is the largest in the state, and yielding from two to five tons to the acre. About half the crop is shipped to Portland and other points. The remaining portion is made into wine. The principal variety is the Miller Mission, a hybrid doubtless from the California Mission, but superior in many respects. It is an excellent table and wine grape. The grapes are superior as to flavor over many California varieties, and the wine is lighter, and preferable, in consequence, as a table wine. The Sweetwater is another grape much grown, and is also used for the table and wine making. In this vineyard are about twenty varieties of grapes, most of them recently planted, and their adaptability to the soil and climate not known, though other vineyardists have had good success with most of the kinds planted. Adjoining Col. Miller’s vineyard is that of Raphael Morat, containing ten acres, with the same varieties above mentioned. The yield is about the same. A portion of the crop is made into brandy of excellent quality, selling at $2 to $5 per gallon, according to age. Adjoining these two vineyards is that of Emil Barbe, containing six acres of the same varieties. About half the crop sold and the rest made into wine. Thus we have about thirty-six acres in one body and all in vines, situated on the southeast slope of a hill having red clay soil, and sheltered from strong winds. The wine is sold at from 30 cents to $1 per gallon. The grapes vary from ½ to 5 cents per pound. Peter Britt has five acres in vineyard one mile and a half north of Jacksonville. Nearly the entire crop is made into wine. Mr. Britt has experimented with nearly all kinds of grapes, and has many choice varieties in cultivation. The Black Hamburg does well on his place. Granville Sears, living three miles from Jacksonville, has four acres of vineyard. The crop is sold to the local trade. Conrad Leever, one mile further north, has four acres, the product of which he sells to the local trade. Dr. George DeBar, near Central Point, has eight acres of young vines. Dr. Geary, of Medford, has eight acres on Griffin Creek which yield a large crop annually, and is sold to the Portland trade. Martin Last has a vineyard. one and one-half miles west of Jacksonville, at quite an elevation above the valley and on the mountainside, which produces large and desirable grapes. C. D. Reed, one-half mile west of Jacksonville, has about eight acres in young vines, while to the south of the town are the vineyards of Frank Lorraine and one belonging to his brother. Mr. Herberger has several acres nearby, while several new vineyards have been planted on adjoining ground, belonging respectively to Mr. 
Christian, Mr. Emil Barbe, Mr. Beavenue, Mr. Lampert and others. Hon. J. H. Stewart has some choice varieties on his fruit farm near Phoenix; also his son-in-law, Mr. Arthur Weeks, is interested in grape culture. These gentlemen have had good success in the culture of the Concord, Isabella, Muscat, Rosa, Peru, Tokay and kindred varieties. In fact it is no longer a question that all the choice grapes of California can be produced in Jackson County, the flavor in many instances being greatly improved. In the neighborhood of Ashland are a number of vineyards which do well except on north hillsides and when irrigated. The same is true of all the localities.
    Besides the vineyards mentioned are to be found a great number of small holders enjoying the luxury of their own "vine and fig tree." It is hard to estimate the acreage in vines, though new vineyards are being planted every year. It is destined to be the most profitable industry in Jackson County. The varieties of raisin grapes all do well, and some seasons without doubt raisins could be cured by the sun in the vineyard, but the experiment has not been tried. As yet the only disease of the vines is mildew, occurring but rarely. A frost, appearing about the second week in May and recurring two years out of five, decreases the annual yield nearly, if not quite, one-half in such years. Vines have been injured by winter, freezing once in twenty-five years. The French method of pruning is the one in vogue; the vines are trimmed from the first of February to the last of April. No fertilizers are needed, and the best vineyards are not irrigated. The Indian summer with its warm hazy atmosphere lasting from thirty to forty days, with possibly one shower of rain, makes a season for ripening of fruit equaled, perhaps, by no place on earth. Grapes are picked and shipped from the vines as late as the 27th of November. The last week in October is usually devoted to wine~making. Twenty-pound boxes of grapes sell at the vineyard for from 50 to 90 cents per box.
    What is said of Jackson County in respect to grape culture applies with almost if not equal force to Josephine County, where there are many young vineyards being grown. Any hill land with east, south or west facing, out of the severe frost limits and strong wind currents, ought to and will produce excellent grapes. Some parts of Douglas County will doubtless grow profitable vineyards, but the increased precipitation will militate against wine-making, without which extensive viticulture is attended with danger of overproduction, though choice table grapes are grown in the Willamette Valley under far less favorable conditions. The dry sheltered valleys of Douglas, removed from the streams and having southeast hillsides, ought to produce grapes equal to Josephine and Jackson counties. Lake and Klamath are not grape-producing counties. Coos and Curry will doubtless never interfere with the larger vineyard growers of Jackson, Josephine and Douglas. These three counties, excepting a part of Douglas, lie between the Cascade and Coast range mountains, and are therefore sheltered from disastrous storms and winds. Jackson County, or the Rogue River Valley more particularly, is further protected from the coast moisture by a lofty spur of the Siskiyous on the west. It is a prevailing opinion among those best informed that champagne can be manufactured out of the wines produced in the Rogue River Valley. If this be true, and the light sparkling wines indicate it, a new source of revenue will be acquired by this favored locality. The conditions are analogous to the celebrated champagne districts of France, with better climatic conditions, being about the same annual temperature, the same rainfall, nearly a like distance from the ocean. The soil is different in that chalk beds are absent from the vineyards of Rogue River Valley, yet chalk is found in several places, while lime is found in close proximity to some of the best vineyards. Although the elevation of the vineyards of Southern Oregon exceeds by nearly twice the elevation of those in France, yet the difference is equalized by their being several hundred miles nearer the equator. More than that, and the chief advantage, is in the longer season for ripening. The wine-making season for champagne in and about Rheims is the last of September or the first of October, while the wine-making season in the Rogue River Valley is just one month later, an advantage apparent to wine producers, Indian summer in Southern Oregon being the most perfect imaginable. However this question may be settled by subsequent experiments, it remains a fact that the wines of Southern Oregon are gaining an enviable reputation in the markets, the yearly vintage being usually consumed before the close of the next season. If in the crude processes of manufacture and the cruder handling of the Southern Oregon wines this much can be said of them, what must the future bring forth?
    It is argued by some that the native wild grapes are the true indicators of propitious climatic conditions. The berberis aquifolium, Oregon grape, and the berberis nervosa, the low Oregon grape, are both indigenous, and were eagerly sought for before the imported varieties supplanted them.
    With the hills of Jackson, Josephine and Douglas dotted with vineyards and beautiful villas, and the valleys rich in harvests of wondrous fruitage, the castled Rhine will need to look to her laurels in the realm of song, while the classical vales of Italy and the sunny slopes of France will find a rival in the land of the fabled West.
"Grape Culture," The Resources of Southern Oregon, Southern Oregon State Board of Agriculture, Salem 1889, pages 51-53.  The Grape Culture section of the 1890 edition is identical.



    Raphael Morat of Foots Creek was in town over Sunday celebrating the centennial of the fall of the Bastille. He received the congratulations of his friends on the fact that it was the 54th anniversary of his birthday.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1889, page 3


    Raphael Morat has returned from Foots Creek, where he has been for some time past.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 27, 1889, page 3


CLASS III--GRAPES.
    Best exhibit of wine grapes, R. A. Miller, 1st, $5. Best exhibit of grapes, J. H. Stewart, 1st, $1. Best exhibit Mission grapes, R. Morat, 1st, $1. Muscat grapes, Dr. E. P. Geary, 1st, $1. Improved Mission and White Sweetwater, John Miller, 1st on each, $1. Flame Tokay and Black Hamburg, W. C. Winston, Douglas County, 1st on each, $1.
"Premiums Awarded [at the District Fair]," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 3, 1889, page 3


GRAPE GROWING IN JACKSON COUNTY.
Yields of the Vineyards at Jacksonville.

    Four of the leading grape growers in the vicinity of Jacksonville have furnished us with a report of this year's yield which, while it is less than half of the yield of the same acreage in 1887, is still sufficiently encouraging to be of interest to those who are or possibly will engage in grape culture.
    Peter Britt's vineyard has six acres in vines, three acres of which are bearing. This year there have been made 1000 gallons of wine from this vineyard; in 1887 the same acreage produced over 2000 gallons. Over 40 varieties of grapes are growing, but not all bearing, including many of the finest varieties grown in California, France and Germany.
    Raphael Morat has ten acres in vines; yield this year about 43,800 lbs., from which was made 1700 gallons of wine, and 200 gallons of brandy; balance sold in northern markets. Value of yield $1295; one-half of yield of 1887.
    Emil Barbe has six acres in vines, made 1200 gallons wine this year, has two varieties--"the Miller Mission" and "White Sweetwater"--considered one-half of crop of favorable seasons.
    Col. R. A. Miller, who has charge of J. N. T. Miller's vineyard, reports sixteen acres in vines; yield this year 22 tons, from which were made 800 gallons wine, the balance shipped to Portland market; there are twenty-five varieties of grapes growing in this vineyard, the most being the "Miller Mission" and "White Sweetwater," estimated at less than one-half the yield of 1887.
    In 1888 the late frost damaged the entire grape crop of the valley; in addition the acreage reported in vines [omission] there are many small vineyards in the vicinity of Jacksonville, and the acreage is constantly increasing.
    In the valley W. T. Leever, vineyard south of Willow Springs, and Mrs. Straub, north of that place, Dr. E. P. Geary, on Griffin Creek, and J. H. Stewart, of Phoenix, are successful vineyardists. The exhibit from the vineyard last mentioned took premiums at the District Fair. This shows conclusively that grapes can be grown anywhere in Jackson County, returning a profit for their culture in this year (which is conceded to have been less than half the usual yield) of $100 per acre; deduct from that 25 percent for cultivation, and we have a net profit of $75 an acre. This should certainly be sufficient inducement to quadruple the acreage in grapes the coming season. Raisin grapes are among the varieties already growing, and no doubt we could engage as successfully in making raisins as wine. Los Angeles last year shipped raisins through this valley east, over the Northern Pacific. It would be an easy matter for Jackson County to stop the wheels of this traffic, with a good article nearer the market.
Ashland Tidings, December 20, 1889, page 1


    Jas. Gaines of Medford and Raphael Morat of Foots Creek were here during the week.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 3, 1890, page 3


    The surprise of the week in Jacksonville was the marriage, last Saturday evening, at the bride's residence in this place, of Raphael Morat and Mrs. Anna F. Williams, both well known throughout the county. Justice Plymale performed the ceremony which made the happy couple one, and numerous friends tendered congratulations. The Times joins in wishing them long life and happiness.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 3

MARRIED.
MORAT-WILLIAMS--At Jacksonville, May 10, 1890, by W. J. Plymale, J.P., Raphael Morat and Mrs. Anna F. Williams.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, May 16, 1890, page 3


    The residence property of Raphael Morat and wife is being greatly improved.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 13, 1890, page 3


    R. Morat is improving his premises in Jacksonville to a substantial manner.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1890, page 3


    Stephen Swacker, who was employed at Raphael Morat's mining claim for so long a time, resides near Fort Bidwell, where he is employed on a stock ranch.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 18, 1890, page 3


    Raphael Morat has gone to Foots Creek to look after his mining interests.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 9, 1891, page 3


    Raphael Morat has gone to Northern California to sell his mules, if possible.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 14, 1891, page 3


    A considerable quantity of grapes is being shipped from the vineyards of Col. J.  N. T. Miller and Raphael Morat. They are of excellent quality.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 4, 1891, page 3


    A considerable quantity of choice grapes is being shipped from the vineyards of Col. Miller, Raphael Morat and E. Barbe.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 18, 1891, page 2


    Raphael Morat, who went to California some time since with several head of mules, has returned home.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1891, page 3


    Raphael Morat left for Northern California yesterday morning, where he is employed in one of the lumber camps.

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 27, 1891, page 3


    Mrs. Annie F. Morat sustained a broken rib and other injuries while engaged in domestic pursuits a few days ago.

"Local Notes,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1892, page 3


    Raphael Morat has returned from Foots Creek

"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 17, 1893, page 3


    The Foots Creek placer fields, the largest placers in Southern Oregon, are in full blast, with the advantage of an unprecedented water supply. The mines of Lance & Son, R. A. Cook & Sons, Goldsworthy & McKnight, Carr Bros., Hosmer, Anderson & Sanders, Raphael Morat, Bailey & Son and Swacker & Son are running day and night, and will have a season from six to seven months. Besides these mines quite a number of gulches heretofore not having much water are being ground-sluiced by ranchers. The season's gold output on Foots Creek this year will probably be doubled and reach even $100,000.
"Oregon," Hood River Glacier, Hood River, Oregon, March 31, 1894, page 1  This article was part of a "patent outside" of identical front pages of the Glacier, the Newberg Graphic, and the Oregon Mist.


    The dwelling house of M. Morat was burned to the ground Thursday evening with all its contents. The fire started while the family were at supper and had made considerable headway before it was discovered. The fire company could render but little assistance in saving the building but kept the fire from spreading to other property. Mrs. Morat was quite badly burned while trying to save some valuable papers. There was no insurance on the property and the loss will amount of $1000.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, November 30, 1894, page 5


    Mrs. R. Morat has received news of the death of her grandchild, Hazel Hoeber, of San Francisco. Diphtheria was the immediate cause of death.

"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, February 12, 1897, page 3


    Raphael Morat lost the dwelling house which stood in his vineyard, just north of Jacksonville, together with its contents and the outbuildings nearby, through fire early last Saturday evening. No one was near at hand, and nothing was saved. It is unknown whether it was an accident or whether an incendiary did the work. The loss is estimated at $700, and unfortunately there was no insurance.
"Two Residences Destroyed," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1898, page 3


Fire at Morat Vineyard.
    Last night about 6 o'clock the residence at the Morat vineyard, north of town, burned to the ground, together with the winery vats, etc. The building was unoccupied, and the fire is supposed to have been the result of an accident. The building was owned by Mrs. Raphael Morat, and was not insured.
Oregonian, Portland, April 12, 1898, page 3


    The fire which destroyed the dwelling house belonging to R. Morat last week seems to have been of incendiary origin, as it has since transpired that Thos. L. Reynolds, while passing the building a few nights previously, discovered and extinguished a fire on the floor thereof.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1898, page 3



    R. Morat, who has been a resident of Jacksonville for many years, died Monday night, after a lingering illness. For a long time he operated a vineyard near town, but in late years he was engaged in mining near Foots Creek. A widow survives him.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 30, 1898, page 3


    Raphael Morat, a native of France, 64 years of age, died at his home in Jacksonville at 11 o'clock a.m. on the 28th, of Bright's disease. Mr. Morat came to Jacksonville about 35 years ago and has been mostly engaged in mining. He was one among the first successful vineyardists of the county, and at the time of his death owned the large vineyard adjoining J. N. T. Miller's. He had valuable mining interests on Foots Creek, where he lived most of the time, and worked and superintended the mine himself. He was a very industrious and energetic man and well respected. He married Mrs. Williams, the mother of Andrew and Walter Hubble, several years ago, who, with two other grown stepchildren survive him. He leaves considerable property. The remains were interred in Jacksonville Cemetery on the 29th, Rev. Robert Ennis officiating.
Ashland Tidings, June 30, 1898


Raphael Morat
1835-June 28, 1898
Jacksonville Cemetery Sexton's Records. Grave unmarked.


For Sale.
    A dwelling house with five rooms, two fireplaces and other conveniences, a well of good water close to kitchen door. Price $220. For particulars inquire of
MRS. A. MORAT,
    Jacksonville, Ore.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 12, 1902, page 4


    The many friends of Mrs. Anna Morat, who went to San Francisco a few weeks ago for medical treatment, will be pained to hear of her death, which occurred at the German hospital in that city on November 17th, from the effects of an operation performed for the removal of a cancer. Mrs. Morat was a resident of Jacksonville for many years and was sixty-three years old at the time of her death. Four grown children, all residents of California, survive her. Her remains were cremated.
"Jacksonville News," Medford Mail, November 28, 1902, page 3


                              
                                                                                    
Last revised July 12, 2019