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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Notes on Dr. E. P. Geary
Dr. Edward Payson Geary

Dr. Edward Payson Geary

    The Rev. Mr. Geary, of the Old School Presbyterian Church, arrived here a few days since direct from New York. Mr. Geary comes among us a laborer in the cause of education and a promoter of religion. The board of the General Assembly have commanded him to attend to these great interests in our yet infant country. We hope his usefulness as a teacher and expounder of the gospel may become widespread. It will be a source of gratification to his distant friends to learn of him and that of his family's safe arrival in the Territory.
Oregon Spectator, Oregon City, April 24, 1851, page 2


    Rev. E. Geary, O.S. Presbn., has arrived and settled in Yamhill Co. near Lafayette. He has a large school and has been preaching at several points.
George H. Atkinson to the American Home Missionary Society, letter of July 22, 1851. Congregational Home Missionary Society, Letters from Missionaries in Oregon, 1849-1893.


    DR. E. P. GEARY: lives in Medford; is a physician and surgeon; was born in Brownsville, Oregon, April, 1859; came to Jackson County in 1882.

A. G. Walling, History of Southern Oregon, 1884, page 503



    Dr. Geary has bought a lot at Medford and will move down there in a short time. We are sorry to see him leave Ashland, but wish him success in his new location.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 8, 1884, page 3


    The Tidings says that Dr. Geary has bought a lot at Medford and will move down there in a short time. We are sorry to see him leave Ashland, but wish him success in his new location.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 9, 1884, page 3


    Attention is called to the card of Dr. E. P. Geary, who has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. The doctor is a first-class physician and surgeon and will no doubt soon build up a good practice in his new location.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884, page 3


E. P. GEARY, M. D.,
P H Y S I C I A N   A N D   S U R G E O N,
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office in A. L. Johnson's building.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 22, 1884 et seq., page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary has located at Medford for the practice of his profession. The Dr. is a graduate of one of the leading medical colleges of the Eastern States, has been in active practice several years and we hope to see him command a large share of the public patronage.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, February 23, 1884, page 3


E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Physician And Surgeon.
MEDFORD, OREGON.
Office in A. L. Johnson's building.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 1, 1884 et seq., page 2


    Dr. Geary has a large practice already at Medford.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, March 21, 1884, page 3


    ACCIDENTALLY SHOT.--While fooling with a pistol at Medford last Thursday a fifteen year old son of C. W. Broback shot himself in the arm, accidentally inflicting a painful but not dangerous wound. He will recover to try it over again if he wants to.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 22, 1884, page 3


    ACCIDENT.--A son of C. W. Broback of Medford, aged about 15 years, accidentally shot himself in the arm with a pistol last week. Dr. Geary dressed the wound, which is not considered dangerous, though painful.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1884, page 3


    SERIOUS ACCIDENT.--Railroad agent Cunningham at Medford sends us the following item from that place: While the gravel train was passing through Medford last Thursday Mr. Westrop's horse, which was hitched to a buggy, took fright and started to run away. Messrs. Egan and Westrop each caught hold of the horse and tried to stop him but failed. Mr. Egan then jumped in the buggy and Westrop still held to the horse until he reached the railroad track near the depot where Mr. Westrop fell and Mr. Egan started to jump out and at the same time the horse starting down the middle of the track throwing Mr. Egan on his side against a bank. The horse kept on and completely demolished the buggy. Mr. Westrop was cut around the head and face, Mr. Egan getting some of his ribs broken in the fall. Dr. Geary was immediately called and thinks Egan is not fatally hurt but cannot tell just at present. Later reports say that he is getting along all right.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, April 12, 1884, page 3


    Dr. Geary and Wm. Ulrich are building neat dwelling houses at Medford, all of which looks rather auspicious.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 16, 1884, page 3


    Dr. Geary is building a dwelling house at Medford. Hum--kind o' thought so all the time.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 23, 1884, page 3


    The dwelling houses of Dr. Geary and Wm. Ulrich, in the southern part of town, are nearing completion, and will both be neat and pretty in appearance. D. H. Miller, of Miller & Vrooman, will build a new dwelling house, also.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1884, page 3
 

    Dr. Kremer and family now occupy Dr. Geary's handsome cottage.
"Medford Notes," Ashland Tidings, September 5, 1884, page 3
 

    A.O.U.W.--Arrangements have been perfected for the organization of a lodge A.O.U.W. at Medford. Dr. E. P. Geary, a physician of excellent reputation, has been selected to make the examinations and when preliminaries are completed W. J. Plymale, under authority of the G.M.W. together with a large delegation of [Jacksonville's] Banner Lodge will visit Medford and start the lodge in first-class order. A pressing invitation will be extended to the Brothers of Ashland Lodge to be present and assist in the ceremonies, which will be instructive and highly interesting to those who are fortunate enough to be present on that occasion. All will be fully advised as to the time.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, September 6, 1884, page 3


    A lodge of the A.O.U.W. will be organized at Medford before long. Dr. E. P. Geary has been selected as medical examiner and the preliminaries are well under way. W. J. Plymale will officiate as organizing officer, and will be assisted by members of Banner Lodge of this place.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1884, page 3
 

    The new lodge of A.O.U.W. at Medford will soon be put in working order. The medical examinations have been made by Dr. Geary.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, October 4, 1884, page 3

 Agnes Margaret McCornack Geary
Agnes Margaret McCornack Geary

    MARRIED.--At the residence of the bride's mother in this city, Wednesday, October 22nd, Dr. Edward Geary and Miss Agnes McCornack, Rev. E. R. Geary performing the marriage ceremony. The happy couple took the afternoon train for their new home at Medford, where the Dr. has been practicing medicine for some time past. The best wishes of the Guard go with them.
Eugene City Guard, October 25, 1884, page 5


    A Eugene city correspondent of the Oregonian says: "Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford and Miss Agnes McCornack were married at the bride's home in this city on the 22d and immediately took their departure for their new home in Medford. They both hold honored places among the alumni of the State University, as well as in the hearts of the people of this vicinity, and carry with them our most sincere wishes that their wedded life may be prolonged and happy." The Doctor's many friends in southern Oregon also offer their congratulations and best wishes.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1884, page 3
 

    Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford visited his old home at Eugene City this week but has since returned accompanied by his bride. We congratulate and wish them all the happiness and prosperity possible.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 1, 1884, page 3
 

    A.O.U.W. LODGE.--Medford Lodge No.---, Ancient Order of United Workmen was established last Saturday evening by Deputy Grand Master Workman, W. J. Plymale. Nineteen members were initiated, and six others will come in hereafter, as charter members, not being able to attend upon that evening. Following is a list of the officers installed for the ensuing term: G. W. Williams, P.M.W.; A. L. Johnson, M.W.; W. H. Barr, Gen. Foreman; M. Rodgers, Overseer; Isaac Woolf, Recorder; D. H. Miller, Receiver; C. Strang, Financier; F. B. Voorhies, Guide; A. S. Johnson, I.W.; P. O. Wilson, O.W. There were present six members of Ashland Lodge and five from Banner Lodge, at Jacksonville, and after the business of the occasion had been disposed of the visitors were invited to join the members of the new lodge in the discussion of an elegant supper at the Central Hotel. Being one of the fortunate guests, the writer can testify that the generous hospitality of the new lodge was well matched by the efforts of the proprietor of the hotel, and the result was as fine a supper as anybody in Oregon could have desired. The new lodge starts out with good, reliable men as its members, and will ably assist in furthering the beneficent work of the charitable order of which it is the latest offspring.
Ashland Tidings, November 14, 1884, page 3
 


    Rev. E. R. Geary of Eugene City paid his son, Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, a brief visit last week. He is a brother of ex-Governor Geary of Pennsylvania and one of the ablest and most cultured divines in the state.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, December 12, 1884, page 3



No Shooting Done.
    Last Friday night there was a free fight at Medford, which resulted in several of the combatants being knocked out. A carpenter named Walker was the victor, until he undertook to demolish one of the proprietors of the Gem Saloon, who was acting in the role of peacemaker. He received an ugly wound in the head at the hands of W. G. K. [Kenney], who struck him with a self-cocking pistol that went off at the same time. Wm. Heffron of Roseburg, one of the combatants, had the index finger of his right hand so badly bitten by Walker that Dr. Geary was compelled to amputate it, and his cheek also suffered the loss of a piece of flesh. At last accounts Walker was at work at his trade, but little the worse for his exploits.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 16, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Geary of Medford, who is also a skillful oculist, performed a successful operation on the eyes of Jas. Porter, a fireman for the railroad, at Ashland lately.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 6, 1885, page 3


Medford Election.
    The citizens of Medford held an election for town officers last Wednesday, under the provisions of their new charter. Considerable interest was taken, there being a number of candidates for some of the offices. The following officers were chosen: Trustees, Dr. Geary, J. S. Howard, I. J. Phipps, W. H. Barr, A. R. Childers; marshal, J. H. Redfield; treasurer, Chas. Strang; recorder, R. T. Lawton; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
Democratic Times,
Jacksonville, March 27, 1885, page 3


    MEDFORD ELECTION.--At the election for town officers for Medford the following proved the successful candidates: For Trustees, J. S. Howard, I. J. Phipps, Dr. E. P. Geary, Wm. Barr and A. Childers. Marshal, J. H. Redfield. Recorder, R. T. Lawton. Treasurer, Chas. Strang. Street Commissioner, E. G. Hurt. 98 votes were cast at the election.
Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, March 28, 1885, page 3


A Case of Tracheotomy.
    Mrs. L. A. Rose of Phoenix has been quite ill with diphtheria, but we are glad to learn that there are favorable symptoms for her ultimate recovery. Dr. Geary of Medford, a skillful physician, found it necessary to practice tracheotomy in her case, a new medical process which consists in inserting a tube in the windpipe, through which the patients breathe, when otherwise it would be impossible to do so at all and death would necessarily ensue. Through the unremitting care of Dr. Geary Mrs. Rose will owe her life, if she recovers.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 10, 1885, page 3


    We are pleased to state that Dr. Geary of Medford, who has been suffering from an attack of diphtheria, has so far recovered as to be able to be about again.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 17, 1885, page 3


    The medical fraternity from other portions of the county was well represented in Jacksonville last Thursday, with the following list: Dr. Parsons of Ashland, Dr. Stanley of Sams Valley, Dr. Kremer of Sams Valley, Dr. DeVis of Phoenix, and Dr. Geary of Medford. One of them informed us that they had come here to hold an inquest on the town, but after an examination they concluded that it was the liveliest corpse they had seen for some time. The inquest was in consequence indefinitely postponed.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 9, 1885, page 3


    C. C. Beekman of this place, a short time since, presented A. L. Johnson, Dr. Geary and J. S. Howard, as trustees of the Presbyterian Church, at Medford, with two choice lots, upon which it is proposed to build a church building in the future. A liberal act.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 22, 1885, page 3


    Mr. C. C. Beekman recently presented two lots to the trustees of the Presbyterian Church at Medford. J. S. Howard, A. L. Johnson and Dr. E. P. Geary are the trustees.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 23, 1885, page 3


    The Trustees of the town of Medford presented the following proposition, which was accepted:
To the Honorable Board of Immigration for Jackson County, Oregon,
J. B. Wrisley, Chairman:
    We, the Trustees of Medford, Jackson County, Oregon, hereby make you the following proposition, if you will locate your headquarters at Medford. We will furnish you with suitable rooms, stationery and lights free of charge during your stay in Medford while carrying on the business of the Board.
                                                                                    J. S. HOWARD, President
                                                                                    W. H. BARR,
                                                                                    E. P. GEARY,
                                                                                    I. J. PHIPPS,
                                                                                    A. CHILDERS
Excerpt, "Board of Immigration," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 29, 1885, page 2


    Miss Geary of Eugene City, sister of Dr. Geary of Medford, has been paying southern Oregon a visit.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1885, page 3


BORN
GEARY--At Medford, Aug. 16th, to Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Geary, a son.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 21, 1885, page 3


    Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford, two of southern Oregon's best and most prominent physicians, have formed a co-partnership for the practice of medicine and surgery. Attention is called to their notice published in another column.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885, page 3


Notice of Co-Partnership.
WE THE UNDERSIGNED, DEEMING IT for our own convenience and for the best interests of the community, have decided to form a co-partnership in the practice of Medicine and Surgery in Medford and, in order to make the proper arrangements for such co-partnership, those indebted to either of us will confer a favor by settling their accounts at their earliest convenience.
    Our offices will be as heretofore until the rooms which we have engaged in Williams' brick building are completed.
                                                                        R. PRYCE, M.D.
                                                                        E. P. GEARY, M.D.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 13, 1885 et seq., page 3


    Drs. R. Pryce and E. P. Geary of Medford have formed a partnership for the practice of medicine. They will make a strong team, as both are acknowledged as fine physicians and surgeons.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, November 14, 1885, page 3


    Dr. Geary, who was rather severely hurt recently by being thrown from a horse, has recovered.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 11, 1885, page 3


    At the Medford town election held on Monday last 125 votes were cast and the following candidates elect: Trustees, Dr. Geary, G. W. Howard, F. Galloway, A. Childers, J. S. Howard; recorder, G. S. Walton; marshal, I. Woolf; treasurer, Chas. Strang; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, January 9, 1886, page 3


    At the Medford election 125 votes were cast and the following candidates elected: Trustees, Dr. Geary, G. W. Howard, F. Galloway, A. Childers, J. S. Howard; Recorder, G. S. Walton; marshal, I. Woolf; treasurer, Chas. Strang; street commissioner, E. G. Hurt.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, January 15, 1886, page 3


    Miss Elizabeth Geary, daughter of Rev. E. R. Geary, of Eugene City, and a sister of Dr. Geary, of Medford, died at her home in Eugene last Saturday, after a protracted illness, from cerebrospinal meningitis.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Miss Lizzie Geary of Eugene City, sister of Dr. Geary of Medford, died a few days since after a brief illness. The deceased was an estimable young lady, and her loss is regretted by a large circle of relatives and friends.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Dr. Geary has been at Eugene City, whither he was called by the serious illness of his sister. We regret to learn of her death.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 12, 1886, page 3


    Dr. Geary and family returned from Eugene Tuesday, where they were called by the illness of his sister.
"Medford Brevities," Ashland Tidings, February 19, 1886, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, has been nominated for State Senator in this county, and it would certainly be to the credit of our county to elect him. He is a young man of unexceptional  [sic] character and recognized ability, is a son of one of the pioneers and most respected citizens of Oregon, and is earnestly interested in the development of the Rogue River Valley.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, May 21, 1886, page 2


    Pryce & Geary is the well-known name of a medical firm at Medford. Both are candidates for office this time, but their names appear on tickets of different complexion.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 22, 1886, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, nominee for State Senator, is a gentleman exceptionally well qualified for the position. He is a young man of vigor and energy and there is no one of either party in the county who would not believe, upon a comparison of the two candidates, that he would be able to do much more for the interests of Jackson County than would his opponent, Dr. Stanley.
"Editorial Notes and News," Ashland Tidings, May 28, 1886, page 2


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, has been nominated by the Republicans of Jackson County for State Senator. The citizens of that county would do themselves a credit by electing him.--Eugene Register.
"Local Items," Oregon Sentinel, Jacksonville, May 29, 1886, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, who was at Soda Springs with his family the first of the week, was hastily summoned to Eugene by a telegram Tuesday announcing the critical illness of his father, the Rev. E. R. Geary, of that city. The venerable Dr. E. R. Geary is a brother of ex-Governor Geary, of Pennsylvania, and has been prominent in church work in Oregon for many years. He has reached the advanced age of four score and more, and cannot long sustain the double weight of years and disease.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, August 27, 1886, page 3


Dr. Geary Dead.
    Edward R. Geary, D.D., one of the most prominent citizens of this city and state, died at his residence in Eugene last Wednesday evening, of derangement of the digestive organs.
    A brief epitome of his well-rounded life is as follows: He was born in Boonsboro, Maryland, April 30, 1811, and graduated from Jefferson College, Pennsylvania, in 1834; after studying theology in 1840 he entered the ministry of the Presbyterian Church, and served as pastor of a church in Lansinburgh, Ohio, until 1851, when he came to Oregon and located in Yamhill County, and was appointed clerk of the United States circuit court for that county. Afterwards he was elected county clerk and then superintendent of schools for Yamhill County, and was appointed clerk to Gen. Palmer, superintendent of Indian affairs. In 1857 he succeeded J. W. Nesmith as superintendent of Indian affairs for Oregon, by appointment of President Buchanan. In 1876 he moved from Linn County to Eugene, where he resided until the time of his death, admired, respected and beloved by all our citizens and pursuing his duties as pastor of the Presbyterian Church, preaching his last sermon only three weeks ago Sunday. He was twice married, first to Miss Harriett Reed, and after her decease to Miss N. M. Woodridge. He leaves three sons and three daughters to mourn his loss. Dr. Geary was a very prominent Mason, having taken the thirty-second degree.
    Dr. Geary possessed the highest intellectual and moral qualities that made him an ornament to the community. In all good causes to benefits and improve the people he was a leader, and in all cases where he antagonized other men's opinions, he did it so conscientiously, with so much courtesy and toleration, as to win their sincere friendship, and leave a pleasant memory of himself in their minds. In short, he was a grand, good, Christian gentleman.
    His work on behalf of the state university, of which he was regent, was effective and untiring, and a great part of the success of that institution is due to his effort.
    The funeral services were held Thursday afternoon in the Presbyterian Church in the presence of a large audience. Fitting and touching addresses were made by Rev. S. G. Irvine of Albany, Prof. Thos. Condon, Rev. C. M. Hill, Rev. A. C. Fairchild, [and] Elder G. M. Whitney. The remains were then conveyed to the Masonic cemetery, where they were interred after further funeral ceremony.
Eugene City Guard, September 4, 1886, page 5


DIED.
GEARY--At his home in Eugene City, Sept. 1, 1886, Rev. Edward R. Geary, D.D., aged 75 years and 5 months.
Ashland Tidings, September 10, 1886, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, who is administrator of the estate of his father, the late E. R. Geary, was in Eugene last week on business connected with the settlement of the estate.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, October 1, 1886, page 3


    Dr. Geary has returned from his trip to Eugene City.
"Medford Squibs,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 8, 1886, page 2


BORN
GEARY--In Medford, Dec. 8th, to Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Geary, a daughter.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 10, 1886, page 3


    Mrs. A. H. Wyland of Antelope Creek, who has been quite sick for some time past, is recovering under the efficient treatment of Drs. Pryce and Geary.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 24, 1886, page 3


    Doctors Pryce and Geary have handsome offices in Hamlin's block and are kept busy responding to calls.
    Dr. Geary, who excels as an oculist, removed a cataract from the eye of the mother of S. C. Taylor of Eden precinct, a lady over eighty years of age, lately; the operation was entirely successful, and the lady can see quite well again.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 28, 1887, page 3


    Considerable sickness is reported in this vicinity by Doctors Geary and Pryce, who are kept busy attending to calls.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 11, 1887, page 2


    Doctors Pryce and Geary have lately invested in a handsome new buggy, and now drive as fine a turnout as there is in the county.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 13, 1887, page 3


    Dr. Geary of Medford, who is a skillful oculist as well as a good physician, successfully performed a delicate operation on the eyes of the eldest daughter of V. A. Dunlap of Linkville, removing one which had been so badly punctured a few years ago by a pair of scissors as to be sightless.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 20, 1887, page 3


Accidents.
    A son of Squire Barkdull of Medford had one of his legs broken in two places on Wednesday evening, by falling from a pile of lumber on which he was playing. He is doing well under the treatment of Doctors Pryce & Geary.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 3, 1887, page 2


    Doctors Pryce & Geary, our progressive physicians, have introduced the new treatment for consumption, and is it working wonders in some instances. They are always up to the times and are constantly adding to the enviable reputation they already enjoy.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 24, 1887, page 2


    'Squire Barkdull of Medford made us a call last Monday. He informs us that his son, who had his leg broken recently, is improving fast under the treatment of Doctors Pryce & Geary.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 1, 1887, page 3


    Dr. Geary is at Eugene City, paying relatives and friends a visit. He will return soon, accompanied by his family.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 8, 1887, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary was in Portland this week. He will probably return home in a few days, accompanied by his family.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 15, 1887, page 2


    Dr. Geary has returned home, but his family is still in Eugene City.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 22, 1887, page 2


    A SUCCESSFUL OPERATION.--An incident of a day or two ago reminds us of what, when fully realized and actualized by explanation, with the aid of a model, was really a wonderful piece of surgical skill. We refer to the operation performed by Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, January 7th, for the removal of a cataract from the eye of Mrs. Taylor, mother of Clark Taylor of this neighborhood, a lady now 87 years of age. The common but mistaken impression is that this cataract is a disorder of the outer surface of the eye. The lens removed from the eye of Mrs. Taylor is about the size of half a pea, brown in color, and in its hardened and opaque condition, wholly destroyed the sense of sight. In plain terms it was necessary to make an incision and such a disposition of the parts as to allow the entrance of an instrument back of the lens, and an extraction of it. It was skillfully and rapidly done in this case. When we remember the delicate character and structure of the organ, and its extreme sensitiveness to the touch, we can have only the highest admiration and regard for the mental and manual training that attains success in these difficult cases. Mrs. Taylor greatly rejoices in the restoration of the sense of sight in the eye operated upon. By the aid of glasses expressly ground for the case, under the supervision of Dr. Geary, the lady can enjoy the pleasure of reading. When the fact is known that this lady had been blind for years, and that she heard the voice of grandchildren whose dear faces she had never seen, we have some conception of what restoration of sight means to her.--Transcript.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 12, 1887, page 1


    A. Cole, whose eyes were seriously injured by a premature explosion in the Siskiyou tunnel, is being treated by Dr. Geary of Medford, a scientific oculist, with the best of results.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 26, 1887, page 3


    A. Cole, whose eyes were seriously injured by a premature blast in the Siskiyou tunnel, is recovering under the skillful treatment of Dr. Geary.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 16, 1887, page 2


    Dr. E. P. Geary has purchased J. D. Maxon's farm on Griffin Creek, paying $1,500 for it. Fruit can be grown to perfection there.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 23, 1887, page 3


    Mr. Jas. Howard of this precinct has been dangerously ill, but is improving under the treatment of Doctors Geary and Gill.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 2


    Doctors Pryce and Geary of Medford have purchased L. A. Murphy's farm in Little Butte precinct, paying $1275 for the same.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 7, 1887, page 3


    The second son of M. P. Phipps had one of his legs broken a few days since by a kick from a vicious mule. Doctors Pryce and Geary are in attendance.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 21, 1887, page 2


    Doctors Pryce & Geary and Dr. Parsons of Ashland one day last week amputated one of the legs of the second son of Pres. Phipps, which had been broken just above the knee by a kick from a mule and commenced to mortify. The operation proved entirely successful and the boy is recovering.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 4, 1887, page 3


    The citizens of Medford met last Tuesday evening and nominated a full set of candidates for municipal officers, to be voted for at the town election next month. The following are the nominees, as nearly as we learned: Marshal, John S. Miller; recorder, C. H. Barkdull; treasurer, Chas. Strang; trustees, Dr. Geary; C. W. Skeel, D. H. Miller, A. Childers, M. Purdin.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 23, 1887, page 2


    The following is a list of newly elected town officers; Mayor, Dr. Geary; councilmen, D. H. Miller, A. Childers, E. G. Hurt and C. W. Skeel; recorder, C. H. Barkdull; treasurer, Chas. Strang; marshal, John S. Miller. A better set of officials could not have been elected, as they are all good and progressive citizens.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 13, 1888, page 2


    We are glad to announce that our citizens appreciate the value of vaccination, and Doctors Pryce and Geary have been kept busy distributing bovine virus.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 27, 1888, page 3


    Mayor Geary has appointed the following committees, to serve during the existence of the present board of trustees: Streets, Miller and Childers; finance and ways and means, Hurt and Miller; fire and water, Skeel and Hurt; sanitary, Childers and Skeel.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 3, 1888, page 2


    The climate here is very even, and general health prevails, thus making it rather dull for a physician, so that the one we have [E. P. Geary] recently bought a ranch, and is growing rich raisin grapes.
"A Sunny Land," Waukesha (Wisconsin) Freeman, March 1, 1888, page 6


    Dr. Geary and family have been visited lately by Mrs. Worth of Eugene City, a sister of the Doctor.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 20, 1888, page 3


    Mrs. Dr. Geary of Medford spent a few days in Jacksonville during the week, being the guest of Mrs. Dr. Robinson.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 11, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Geary of Medford, one of the Republican nominees for representative, has declined, and the vacancy on the ticket will be filled at once.
    The firm of Pryce & Geary of Medford, the well-known physicians and surgeons, will soon be dissolved. Elsewhere will be found their notice calling upon those indebted to call and settle at once.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


SETTLE-UP NOTICE.
ALL THOSE KNOWING THEMSELVES indebted to the undersigned, either by note or book account, are hereby earnestly requested to call and settle at their earliest convenience. Our business must be closed.
PRYCE & GEARY.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 18, 1888, page 3


    Drs. Pryce & Geary, of Medford, call upon all who are indebted to them to make settlement, either by cash or note, as soon as possible. Dr. Geary has sold out in Medford, and is preparing to move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs.
    Dr. E. P. Geary has sold his house and lots in Medford to his partner, Dr. R. Pryce, and will move to Seattle as soon as he can settle his business affairs in this county. Dr. Geary has gained a high reputation and a large practice in this valley, and many people will regret to see him leave.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, May 18, 1888, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary will leave for the Sound in a short time, where he will make his future home.
"Medford Notes," Oregonian, Portland, May 22, 1888, page 7


    The Republicans have nominated R. T. Lawton, one of Medford's real estate agents, as a candidate for the legislature to fill the vacancy caused by the withdrawal of Dr. Geary.
"Here and There,"
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 25, 1888, page 3


G R A N D
4th of JULY CELEBRATION
AND BARBECUE
At Medford, Or.
----
THERE WILL BE A GRAND celebration, barbecue and free dinner at Medford on Independence Day, and a cordial invitation is extended to the citizens of Jackson and surrounding counties to participate.
OFFICERS OF THE DAY:
    President of the day, J. S. Howard; chaplain, Rev. M. A. Williams; reader, Dr. E. P. Geary; orator, Hon. Willard Crawford; marshal, D. W. Crosby.
PROGRAMME:
    Hoisting of flag and firing national salute at sunrise. The procession will form at the depot grounds at 9:30 o'clock A.M., and, after marching through the principal streets of Medford, will proceed to the grove, where the following exercises will be observed: Salute of thirteen guns; music by choir; music by band; music by choir; reading Declaration of Independence; music by band; oration; music by choir; dinner; including roasted ox and mutton.
AFTERNOON AMUSEMENTS.
    In the afternoon there will be a baby show, racing of all kinds, climbing the greased pole and catching the greased pig, etc., for prizes. A match game of baseball will also be played. In the evening there will be a magnificent display of
FIREWORKS!
    The celebration will close with a
GRAND BALL
in the evening.
    The Henley (Cal.) brass and string band will furnish music for the occasion.
    Half-fare rates on the railroad have been secured. Come, everybody, and enjoy yourselves.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 15, 1888 et seq., page 3


    On Wednesday of last week Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, was called to this place to perform an operation on the eye of Mr. Wright, who is in his 79th year and has been totally blind for the past two years, not being able to distinguish daylight from darkness. The doctor found it necessary to remove the lens from the eye, which he did successfully. The patient is getting along splendidly and can distinguish objects about the room. As soon as the eye gains strength enough, a glass will be furnished, to suit the case, when it is thought Mr. Wright can read ordinary print. This is the third case of this kind in this valley the doctor has treated, and all with the best results. Dr. Pryce assisted in the operation.
"Phoenix Items," Ashland Tidings, June 29, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Geary and Miss Ella Gore witnessed commencement exercises at the State University in Eugene City last week.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 6, 1888, page 3


    Dr. Geary has returned from his trip to Seattle, W.T., which will soon be his future home.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 19, 1888, page 3


    Mrs. McClain, mother of Mrs. E. G. Hurt of this place, who fell downstairs last week and broke her hip, is somewhat better, though her health, which is usually feeble, makes it against her. Doctors Geary and Pryce are in attendance.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 26, 1888, page 3


    The Linkville Star says that J. P. Roberts and wife of that place have gone to Medford, taking their youngest daughter, Mary, intending to place her under the treatment of Dr. Geary, an oculist. Miss Mary is aged nine years and has been troubled all her life with crossed eyes.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 23, 1888, page 3


    The infant son of Mr. and Mrs. E. P. Geary died at Medford yesterday.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 1, 1888, page 3


    Alice E. Geary, youngest child of Dr. E. P. and Mrs. Geary, died at the family residence Thursday night of typho-malarial fever, aged one year 11 months. The remains were taken to Eugene City on Wednesday night's train by the sorrowing parents.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, November 2, 1888, page 3


    DIED.--A daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dr. Geary, aged about two years, died at Medford and was brought to Eugene Thursday, when the interment took place in the Masonic cemetery.
Eugene City Guard, November 3, 1888, page 5


    The death of little Alice Geary cast a gloom over the whole community. Her remains were taken to Eugene City for interment. We sincerely sympathize with the grief-stricken parents.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


DIED.
GEARY--In Medford, October 30th, Alice C., infant daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Dr. E. P. Geary, aged 1 year and 11 months.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 8, 1888, page 3


CUT HIS THROAT.
The Desperate Act of a Bridge Carpenter at Medford.
    MEDFORD, Ore., Dec. 8.--John J. Dowes, a bridge carpenter at this place, attempted suicide at 4 o'clock this morning by cutting his throat with a pocketknife. He had been arrested in a drunken condition and placed in the town jail, where he was found two hours later on the floor of the jail with three ugly wounds in his throat, one of them penetrating into the upper cavity of the windpipe. He had lost a great deal of blood when found. Dr. Geary was immediately summoned and dressed the wounds. The man is now lying in a critical condition.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, December 9, 1888, page 2



    Frank Galloway's little son is suffering with diphtheria, and has been in a critical condition. Doctors Pryce and Geary were obliged to practice tracheotomy upon him, and this very difficult operation so far gives evidence of success.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, December 20, 1888, page 2


    Dr. Geary, assisted by several of our physicians, performed an operation upon the six-year-old son of Frank Galloway, who has been suffering with membranous croup. It is not often that tracheotomy is performed so successfully.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 10, 1889, page 3


    Mrs. Dr. Geary has recovered from her recent illness.
    The following are the new officers of Medford's lodge of the A.O.U.W.: Dr. E. P. Geary, M.W.; Charles Strang, foreman; W. H. Barr, recorder; J. N. Walter, overseer; J. N. Hockersmith, guide; John Morton, I.W.; J. C. Corum, O.W.; J. W. Plymire, receiver.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 17, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Geary was called to Eugene City last week by the serious illness of his aged mother.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Geary has returned from Eugene City, whither he was called by the serious illness of his mother. We are glad to learn that she is now convalescent.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 14, 1889, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, as will be seen under the head of "new this week," has opened up an office in Hamlin's Block and will be prepared to answer all calls for professional services. He recently performed a very successful operation in removing a cataract from the eye of Mrs. Rummell of Antelope. The doctor has a coast reputation as an oculist while he is unexcelled in general practice.

"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Geary, the successful and skillful physician, surgeon and oculist, will remain in Medford a while longer. Everybody is glad to learn that.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889, page 3


E. P. GEARY, M. D.,
PHYSICIAN AND SURGEON,
Medford, Oregon.
----
Office in Hamlin's block. Residence on C Street.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 7, 1889 et seq., page 3


    Dr. Geary of Medford was here Tuesday, to hold a consultation over the case of Col. Ross with Dr. Sommers.
"Personal Mention," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1889, page 3


    In view of the leading position taken by Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford as an oculist, the residents of the valley are to be congratulated on the fact that he has finally abandoned his purpose of removing to Seattle, and will remain permanently in Jackson County. He has won the confidence of all by his skill in his specialty and his uniform success in the general practice of medicine.
"Here and There," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 30, 1889, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary left for the Willamette Valley on Sunday evening to attend the funeral of his aged mother, who died that day. He has the sympathy of all in his bereavement.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 20, 1889, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, of Medford, was called to Eugene recently by the fatal illness of his mother, whose death occurred on the 16th inst. Mrs. Geary and her husband, Rev. Dr. Geary, who passed away some two years ago, were among the most honored of the older citizens of the Willamette Valley.

"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, June 28, 1889, page 3



    Dr. Geary of Halsey on last Thursday removed the remains of his sister from the graveyard near Brownsville to Eugene, where he reinterred them by the side of other relatives buried there, says the Albany Herald
of June 26th. On digging into the grave the corpse, which had been buried over twenty-four years, was found to still retain some features by which it could be recognized.
"General Notes and News," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 11, 1889, page 4


    The following is a list of the officers of Medford lodge No. 83 [I.O.O.F.], which were recently installed by A. D. Helman, D.D.G.M.: M. Purdin, N.G.; W. H. Gore, V.G.; E. B. Pickel, R.S.; B. S. Webb, P.S.: L. L. Angle, Treas.; F. Amann, Warden; S. Rosenthal, Cond.; H. G. Kinney, I.G.; I. A. Webb, R.S.N.G.; L. W. Johnson, L.S.N.G.; E. P. Geary, R.S.V.G.; W. I. Vawter, L.S.V.G.; S. B. McGee, O.S.; A. C. Nicholson, R.S.S.; L. M. Lyman, L.S.S.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, July 25, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Geary has fitted up a new office in Mrs. Stanley's building, where he will henceforth make his headquarters.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 22, 1889, page 3


    Dr. Geary's fine ranch on Griffin Creek is this year yielding some exceedingly fine fruit.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 29, 1889, page 3


    B. F. Stephenson, who is in charge of Dr. Geary's farm on Griffin Creek, is doing good work. He has obtained a large supply of water from the side hills and is still looking for more.
"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 12, 1889, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary ships a large quantity of grapes, grown on his Griffin Creek farm, every day.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, September 19, 1889, page 3


    Wrisley & Co. report the following sales: Eighteen acres off Judge Walker's place to Dr. Geary; five acres by A. McKechnie to D. H. Miller; eighteen acres by A. McKechnie to Wm. Huff.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 24, 1889, page 2


    Dr. Geary and W. I. Vawter last week purchased from Judge Walker a forty-acre tract of land lying on the Jacksonville and Medford road.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 31, 1889, page 2


    Dr. Geary on Tuesday of last week preformed a successful operation for cataract on the eyes of Isaac Simpkins of Woodville. Two years he operated on one eye, enabling him to see, and how he has the use of the other one. This is the fifth case of cataract the doctor has had in this valley, says the News.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, November 21, 1889, page 3


Almost a Serious Accident.
    One night last week Dr. E. P. Geary of Medford was summoned to the bedside of Commodore Taylor at Eagle Point, and while on his way thither, accompanied by a driver, came near losing his life in one of the swales between Central Point and the desert. The melting snow was flooding the country and had gorged the channel in the swale just below the road, causing the water to back up in the road to the depth of several feet, and in the darkness the team became unmanageable and one of the horses was drowned, although the occupants of the buggy cut the animals loose in the endeavor to save them. It has been remarkable that more accidents of this kind have not occurred during the floods of the past week.
Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 30, 1890, page 3



    When I returned to Medford [in 1890] I went to see Dr. Geary, who had been one of my physicians during my siege of pneumonia. I talked to him about studying medicine, and it ended up in his saying that he would be glad to have me come into his office and stay through the winter and that he would do all he could to get me started in the study of medicine. In those days it was customary for a young man who was going to study medicine to go into a doctor's office and stay for a considerable time. Of course, it was necessary to attend a medical college and get a medical degree, but it was not nearly so difficult as it is as the present time.
    I went into the office and got a bag of human bones, which I believe contained the whole skeleton, and took it home so that I could study it at night. It was not a very pleasant thing for Mother and the girls. Dr. Geary had specialized in eye, nose and throat, but was engaged also in general practice. He hoped to confine himself to his specialty and later went to Portland, Oregon and made quite a name for himself. He was a splendid surgeon. I saw him operate on a man for cataract which was a successful operation. He had a fine general education and was a graduate of Jefferson Medical College in Philadelphia. His uncle had been Governor of Pennsylvania. Dr. Geary fitted glasses and taught me how it was done. I soon got so I could handle the preliminary part of fitting glasses, and finally I could do it fairly well. I became acquainted with many people in Medford that I had never before had an opportunity to meet. The town was quite wide open at that time. There were several saloons, all of which were gambling houses. There were many farmers in the vicinity of Medford who rode into town every day except Sunday, unless they were sick, and went direct to one of the saloons and stayed there until toward evening. Before the Civil War when there was a conflict between England and the United States as to who owned Oregon and Washington, a federal law was passed giving anybody a section of land who would go to Oregon or Washington and settle. Some of the farmers in the Rogue River Valley were the beneficiaries of that law and were quite wealthy. Some of them had gotten into trouble in the eastern states and had escaped the authorities and gone to Oregon, Washington and California. There were several men in the valley whose histories, as far as the general public knew, started with their arrival in Oregon.
Levi Harper Mattox, memoirs, typescript filed at the Southern Oregon Historical Society, page 116


Hand Blown Off by Giant Powder.
    JACKSONVILLE, Feb. 22.--Ex-County Commissioner S. A. Carleton, of Little Butte Creek, had his right hand blown to fragments last Saturday by the premature explosion of giant powder. The mutilated member was amputated by Dr. Geary of Medford, and the gentleman was resting easy at last accounts.
Morning Oregonian, Portland, February 23, 1890, page 10



K. of P. Lodge at Medford.
    Talisman Lodge No. 31, K. of P., was instituted at Medford Wednesday evening with -- charter members. Following is a list of the officers: Francis Fitch, P.C.: Chas. W. Wolters, C.C.; Dr. E. P. Geary, V.C.; C. Hutchinson, Prelate: M. Purdin, M. of E.; H. Lumsden, M. of F.; J. E. Enyart, K. of R. and S.; Lake France, M. at A.; J. Carry, I.G.; C. O. Damon, O.G..
    H. T. Chitwood, Grand Chancellor of Granite Lodge, the installing officer, and --- members of Granite Lodge, went down from Ashland to take part in the ceremonies. They come home full of the hospitable entertainment of the Medford people, and tell of the spread at the midnight supper. After supper speeches by Messrs. Bowditch, Fitch, Chitwood, Logan, [illegible] enlivened the occasion. A good time, with no rebate, was enjoyed.
Ashland Tidings, April 4, 1890, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary, whose skill and success as an oculist are so well known throughout Southern Oregon, is frequently called upon to perform surgical operations for the relief of defective vision, and has a high record of success in many difficult cases. The operation for strabismus to straighten "cross eyes" is one of the simplest to perform, and almost invariably successful. His latest case was that of Chris. Buhlmeyer, whose eyes were straightened out by the doctor one day recently.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, June 13, 1890, page 2


    Mrs. Dr. Geary and children, of Medford, are visiting the lady's mother, Mrs. McCornack, at Eugene.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, August 29, 1890, page 3


    Dr. Geary's fine new residence is nearly completed, and will soon be ready for occupancy.
"Medford Items," Ashland Tidings, November 28, 1890, page 3


    A. Darnell of Applegate, who has been nearly blind from some eye disease, was at Medford recently under Dr. Geary's treatment, and went home able to read.
"Here and There," Ashland Tidings, February 20, 1891, page 2


    The local medical examining board of the pension department, consisting of Doctors Pryce, Geary and Wait, has examined a large number of applicants during the past two weeks--some fifteen or twenty in all.
"Medford Notes," Ashland Tidings, June 5, 1891, page 2


    Hon. Francis Fitch of Medford is very sick at the home of his mother-in-law, Mrs. Cardwell, of this place. Drs. Geary and Robinson are in attendance.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, June 19, 1891, page 2


    At Medford last Tuesday, J. H. Stewart was thrown from a horse he was riding and had his collar bone broken. He was also badly bruised about the hip and altogether suffered painful injuries. Drs. Geary, Pryce and Wait attended him, and after being put in as comfortable condition as possible, he was taken home.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, July 10, 1891, page 3


RAILROAD MEETING AT EAGLE POINT
    An enthusiastic mass meeting was held at Eagle Point last Thursday, for the purpose of raising a $12,000 cash bonus to extend the R.R.V.R.R. to Eagle Point. Messrs. Honeyman, Buchanan and Graham of the R.R.V.R.R. were present, and Messrs. Geary, Pickel, Howard and Webb, of Medford, represented that place. Enthusiastic speeches were made by Messrs. Fitch, Graham, Brown and Howard, and at the close of the meeting $1000 was subscribed in the room. The company will send out a party headed by surveyor Howard to locate the most practicable pass across the Cascade Mountains, looking to an eastern extension. The proposed extension will soon materialize, as "the people have a mind to work" in the matter.
"Jacksonville Items," Ashland Tidings, July 17, 1891, page 2


    Dr. A. C. Caldwell, the dentist, was at Medford Monday consulting Dr. Geary concerning his eyes which have been troubling him lately. The doctor has not been able to attend to his dental patients this week in consequence of treatment, but expects his eyes to be all O.K. again in a few days.
"Personal," Ashland Tidings, September 18, 1891, page 3


    Dr. Geary has been treating the cancer on G. W. Praytor's lip, which still proves annoying, with the electric treatment to which it very nearly succumbed while the patient was in California.

"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, January 1, 1892, page 2



A Narrow Escape.
    Dr. E. P. Geary's residence had a narrow escape from fire Wednesday night at about 11 o'clock. The ash barrel, which stood near the woodshed and next to the fence, took fire, and when discovered the fire had spread to the woodpile and also the fence, which were all burning with increasing fierceness and would have soon reached the woodshed and the house, but for the timely arrive of Marshal Youngs, who happened to be in the vicinity looking for stray cows to impound. The marshal, calling upon Chas. Perdue and Gabe Plymale, rushed to the scene of the fire, and with the aid of the garden hose soon extinguished the flames, thus preventing a serious conflagration.
Southern Oregon Mail, May 20, 1892, page 3


    David Reid and family have removed here from Butte Creek, so that Mrs. R.'s eyes can be treated. Dr. Geary has already afforded great relief.
    Dr. Geary last week went to Colestin for the purpose of bringing home his wife and little folks, who have been sojourning there during the heated term.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, August 19, 1892, page 2


    A new sidewalk is being built from Dr. Geary's place to the corner of G and Seventh streets. An extension of this walk along Ninth Street to Mr. Geo. Webb's place is contemplated.

"Weekly Round-Up," Southern Oregon Mail, February 3, 1893, page 3


    Even the most adept professional men, whom the majority of the world's people believe equal to all occasions, are novices in many lines outside their professions, and none the least of them is Dr. Geary. In surgery and materia medica the doctor is quite at home, but when it comes to riding a bicycle successfully he is several leagues outside the front yard fence which surrounds his fine residence on Seventh Street. Alex. Galloway assured the gentleman of medicine that he could mount and ride a wheel as easily as he could convert an artificial eye into one of life, and upon this guarantee he made a purchase of a Falcon No. 1. The doctor and Alex. retired to a supposed secluded part of the city and there a circus was gone through with, which is alone peculiar to acrobats. Finally the wheel was led up alongside of a fence and the doctor gallantly mounted and after a little wibble-wabble byplay he rounded the corner in a truly dignified style. If the doctor wants to know how this escapade came to be printed he can call at D. H. Miller's hardware store and get--satisfaction.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, May 19, 1893, page 3



    Dr. E. P. Geary is improving the convenience of his residence, on Seventh Street, by adding a second story to his kitchen addition.
"City Local Whirl," Medford Mail, April 21, 1893, page 3


It Is Whispered Around
    That Dr. Geary has been "joshed" to his heart's content on that bicycle deal, and now to get square with the small bits of humor which have been flashed upon him at home, he proposes to get one for Mrs. Geary--and have a little fun all to himself.
Medford Mail, May 26, 1893, page 2


    Traveling Passenger Agent Jones, of the Southern Pacific, was in Medford Sunday and Monday on business. When here he made it a special mission to renew acquaintance with Dr. Geary and talk over old-time days when the S.P. was being constructed and the doctor was the company's surgeon.

"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, August 18, 1893, page 3



    Mrs. Stout, of Klamath Falls, came to Medford this week with her granddaughter, for operation upon the latter's eyes. She was cross-eyed but Dr. Geary performed an operation upon them and the little lady returned to her home with a pair of eyes as straight as anyone has.
"Purely Personal," Medford Mail, October 27, 1893, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary is division surgeon for the Southern Pacific Railroad and about this time every year he receives an annual pass over the line, between Portland and Ashland--he is already fixed with this convenient piece of cardboard for the year '94. In early construction days the doctor was the company's regular employed physician and surgeon, and there was no little work to attend to in his line at that time. So efficient were the services rendered at that time as to warrant the company in continuing him in their employ, and the pass spoken of is one of the courtesies extended by the company.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, January 5, 1894, page 3


    A very successful surgical operation was performed in Medford last Monday, it being that of the removal of an ovarian tumor from Mrs. Wm. Turner. The operating surgeon being Dr. E. P. Geary of this city, assisted by Drs. J. B. Wait and J. S. Parsons, of Medford and Ashland. The tumor weighed forty-two pounds and had been two years in attaining this growth. This is the first operation of the kind which has ever been performed in Southern Oregon, and because that it is proving to be so successful an one is a matter in which much credit is due the operators. The age of the patient--sixty years--made it a more dangerous operation than it would have been had she been younger. The lady is at present resting very nicely and has almost reached a point at which she may be considered out of danger. A remarkable feature of the operation is that not a particle of fever has existed since the tumor was removed. This may be accounted for by the great precaution used by the operators in not permitting a particle of disease germ to enter the incision--this being accomplished by boiling all instruments used, and taking all other precautions which modern surgery provides in such cases.
"All the Local News," Medford Mail, February 2, 1894, page 3


    Dr. E. P. Geary has moved his office, temporarily, to a rear room in the Phipps block. He will have offices fitted especially for his use in the new Haskins block.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, March 16, 1894, page 3


    J. R. Erford:--"When Dr. Geary used to drive a team in making his professional visits about the city and country he used to stop when near an approaching train of cars, get out of his buggy and hold the team by the head. I noticed him doing the same thing with his bicycle a couple of days ago--force of habit undoubtedly."

"Echoes from the Street,"
Medford Mail, April 13, 1894, page 2


    Dr. E. P. Geary went north one evening this week, accompanied by his sister, who has been paying him a visit and lives at Astoria, as far as Astoria.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, May 24, 1894, page 2


    Miss Ella Geary returned to her home at Astoria Wednesday. The lady has been visiting her brother, Dr. E. P. Geary, and family for a few weeks.

Medford Mail,
May 25, 1894, page 3



   Dr. [E. P.] Geary as a bicycle hostler cannot be put down as a crowning success. As a matter of fact, the grooming of his wheel has been sadly neglected of late. It has neither been sponged, curried or rubbed down for several moons, and its neglect was becoming noticeable, but a few of the doctor's good friends gave him a benefit one day last week. He had left his wheel standing on the sidewalk while he did a little office work. In the interval his friends "swiped" the wheel and in the rear of one of their places of business they applied cleansing and burnishing lotions, and a short time thereafter the wheel was in its place again, but it had been transmogrified into a thing of beauty. The doctor came on the scene a little later, but the wheel he knew not--and for the next several hours he rode a borrowed wheel, believing someone had appropriated his.
Medford Mail, July 20, 1894, page 3


    --Last Monday Drs. Geary and Pickel, assisted by Dr. Wait, performed a very delicate operation upon the person of Mrs. John Atterberry, of Applegate, and was that of removing a large cancer from her right breast. The cancer was an unusually large one and had been growing rapidly for about two years, and during the last three months it had doubled in size. Some of the cancer glands extended to the armpit and under the shoulder blade and involved both the superficial and deep axillary glands, which had to be removed. The incision made was about fourteen inches in length and owing to the close connection of the diseased glands to the large blood vessels and nerves under the arm, it was a most formidable operation. It required the greatest of skill to perform the operation and a goodly sprinkling of nerve to tackle it, but it was a case which would have been beyond the reach of even the skilled hands of these eminent and well-schooled physicians and surgeons in a short time. The patient is doing very nicely at present and will undoubtedly entirely recover. The operation was performed at the residence of W. J. Fredenburg, at whose place the lady is stopping.
"News of the City," Medford Mail, August 17, 1894, page 3


Difficult Surgical Operation.
    A very delicate operation was performed on Dr. E. P. Geary's little 2½-year-old son, Edward, last Friday evening for the relief of strangulated hernia. The operation is known to the medical profession as Bassinni's operation in herniotomy. It was performed by Dr. E. B. Pickel assisted by Drs. Wait of this city and J. W. Geary of Central Point.
    The patient being so young, the case presented special difficulties which were successfully overcome, and the child is on the road to complete recovery, as the operation when successful is a radical cure.
    The operation was done under aseptic precautions, and as a consequence no fever has followed. Dr. Geary, realizing the danger of delay in such cases, lost no time in summoning his medical colleagues, and the result has justified his faith in surgery and reflects credit on our local profession. The many friends of the family will be pleased with the news that there need be no anxiety as to the result of the operation.
South Oregon Monitor, Medford, February 12, 1895, page 3


    GEARY, DR. E. P., of Medford, was born in Brownsville, Oregon, April 21, 1859, and except two years spent at medical college in the East, has been a continuous resident of the state. He graduated at the University of Oregon in the class of 1880. He is president of the Republican Club, and was a delegate to the county conventions of 1890 and 1892 and the state convention of 1892. In 1888 he was elected the second Mayor of Medford, and in 1890 was the Republican nominee for the State Senate. He is Grand Chancellor of the K. of P., president of the United States Board of Medical Examiners, and a member of the Town Board.

Republican League Register, Reporter Publishing Co., Portland, 1896, page
212


    GEARY, DR. E. P., of Medford, was born at Brownsville, Oregon, April 24, 1859, and except two years spent at medical college in the East, has been a continuous resident of the state. He graduated at the University of Oregon in the class of 1880. He is president of the Republican Club, and was a delegate to the county conventions of 1890 and 1892 and the state convention of 1892. In 1888 he was elected the second mayor of Medford, and in 1890 was the Republican nominee for the State Senate. He is Grand Chancellor of the K. of P., president of the United States Board of Medical Examiners, and a member of the Town Board.

Republican League Register, Portland, 1896, page 212


DRS. GEARY & PICKEL.
PHYSICIANS AND SURGEONS.
    That "nothing succeeds like success" is a trite aphorism which seems to have received recognition even as far back as the Dark Ages. Drs. Geary & Pickel, the subject of this sketch, have, by their industry and by virtue of their ability, placed themselves in the highest rank of the medical profession. These eminent gentlemen are both graduates from our best medical colleges and since coming to Medford have gained a very large and lucrative practice. They have successfully performed several surgical operations which were apparently impossible. Drs. Geary & Pickel are progressive men and aid all enterprises that advance the city. They are located in the Haskins building, where they have in their spacious reception rooms one of the largest and most complete libraries in the state. We commend them to the favorable notice of all readers as men of broad and liberal views and, as physicians and surgeons, there are none more worthy of note in the state of Oregon.
"Our Business and Professional People Briefly Mentioned," Medford Mail, May 28, 1897, page 3


    Dr. E. B. Pickel of Medford has purchased the interest of his partner, Dr. E. P. Geary, and also the elegant home of the latter. It is said that Dr. Geary will go to California and locate in one of the large cities and devote his attention to the special line of the eye.
"Brevities," Ashland Tidings, December 20, 1897, page 3



    Dr. E. P. Geary returned a few days since from a trip to California in search of a location. He found nothing to suit him, and will locate at Portland.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, February 7, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. E. P. Geary and children left last week for Eugene, where they will be joined by the doctor shortly and proceed to Portland to locate. The many friends of the family in this place regret to see them leave and wish them the best of fortune in their new location.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, March 28, 1898, page 3


    Drs. Geary, Wait and Pickel last week performed an operation for appendicitis on Henry Helms of Talent. This is the sixth successful operation for that disease which has been performed by Dr. Geary, and speaks very nobly of his ability as a physician.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 11, 1898, page 3


    Mrs. E. P. Geary and children, who have been visiting relatives in Eugene, went to Portland last week, where they will reside in the future.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, April 14, 1898, page 3


    Capt. Woodbride Geary, Thirteenth Infantry, who was shot October 10th while on a reconnaissance near San Francisco de Malabon, Philippine Islands, and died from the effects of the wound, was a native of Oregon. He was born in 1857, was graduated from the West Point military academy and appointed second lieutenant in 1882, and was promoted to first lieutenant in 1891. He received his commission as captain in the Thirteenth Infantry June 30, 1898. Two brothers, Dr. E. P. Geary of Portland and formerly of Medford, and John Geary, a farmer of Halsey, survive him. The father, Dr. Geary, died at Eugene in 1886.

"Local Notes," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, October 16, 1899, page 3


    James Lewis Geary, son of Sam'l. Geary, died suddenly at the family home on Elk Creek, on Christmas Day, aged fifteen years, ten months and sixteen days. Deceased was the idol of the household, a very bright, industrious young fellow, and his sudden demise has caused a great grief in that before-happy family. Heartfelt sympathy is earnestly expressed by neighbors and friends of the family.
    Mrs. Geary, wife of Captain Geary, who was killed in the Philippines, has accepted $3000 in payment in full from a life insurance company in which the captain held a $5000 policy. The company refused payment on the grounds that the policy holder invalidated his policy when he joined the army. Capt. Geary was a brother of Dr. E. P. Geary, formerly of Medford.

"City Happenings," Medford Mail, January 4, 1901, page 7


    Miss Della Pickel, who has been attending the Bryn Mawr college, located near Philadelphia, is in Portland, visiting Mrs. Dr. Geary. She will soon return to Medford.
"Medford Squibs," Democratic Times, Jacksonville, June 26, 1902, page 2


Estrayed--
    From the Geary ranch on Griffin Creek, large, black sow, with split and underbit in right ear. Information leading to her recovery will be thankfully received by J. W. Bonar, Medford.
Medford Mail, September 19, 1902, page 6


EDWARD RACHFORD GEARY. A brave, patient and richly endowed nature was called from various fields of activity through the death of Edward Rachford Geary, September 3, 1886, but though so long a time has elapsed, months, years nor great changes will place a limit on the extent and usefulness of his ministerial, educational and general accomplishments. While giving all praise to this pioneer of 1851 for his successful manipulation of resources, it is but fair to say that certain advantages aided in his rise to prominence, not the least being a more than ordinarily strong constitution, a stature developed to six feet, and inherited traits which have always been associated with the best and most virile blood of England. These same ancestors were peculiar in one particular, in that all were devoted to a seafaring life, only one son being left to perpetuate the Geary name of nine generations; the others were killed in the British navy.
    Born in Hagerstown, Washington County, Md., April 30, 1811, Mr. Geary was one of four sons (two reaching maturity) born to his parents, Richard and Margaret (White) Geary, the former of whom was an educator, and removed with his family to Pennsylvania in 1823. Edward was six years older than his brother, John, the latter of whom was equally impressed with the importance of life, and molded his tendencies into broad and liberal channels. John Geary won the rank of captain in the Mexican War, and that of general in the Civil War, and he became the first mayor of San Francisco, having removed to California at an early day. He carried scars from wounds in both wars, and aside from this distinction, won more than local prominence as a politician. At the time of his death in Harrisburg, Pa., at the age of sixty, he had just completed his second term as governor of Pennsylvania. Edward Geary early turned his thoughts to the ministry, and after graduating from the Jefferson College, Pa., entered the Allegheny Theological Seminary. Afterward he went to Alabama, organized and conducted an academy for three years, and soon after his return to Pennsylvania, in 1838, married Harriet Rebecca Reed, whom he had known as a child. Miss Reed was born in New Berlin, Pa., May 24, 1814, and received an excellent education in her native state. Soon after the marriage the young people removed to Wayne County, Ohio, where Mr. Geary had charge of a Presbyterian church at Fredericksburg for twelve years, during this time having other church responsibilities in the state. His first wife died February 17, 1844, leaving two children, Mrs. Martha L. Perham, of Butte, Mont., and Mrs. Worth. For a second wife Mr. Geary married Nancy Merrick Woodbridge, a native of New York, who was born near Owego, Tioga County, January 17, 1818. Mrs. Geary died in Oregon in 1889, having borne eight children, two of whom died in infancy. Of the other children, John White Geary is a physician of Burns, Ore.; Elizabeth W. died in Eugene in 1885; Ellen E. lives in Astoria; Woodbridge, a graduate of West Point, was stationed first in Texas, and then at Fort Parker, N.Y., later at Mackinac, Mich., and Sault Ste. Marie, becoming an instructor in tactics in the Agricultural College in Corvallis, Ore., and from there enlisting in the Spanish-American War, his death occurring as major and acting captain at the battle of Mallabon, Philippine Islands; Dr. Edward P. Geary, of Portland, Ore.; and May L., who died in early childhood.
    Mr. Geary came to Oregon in the year 1851 as representative of the Board of Foreign Missions, to look after the church and school work. By way of the Isthmus of Panama he reached San Francisco, and from there embarked on a sailing vessel for Astoria, coming from there up the river to Oregon City, and thence on the upper river aboard the first boat to make the trip, known as the Little Hoosier. Upon arriving in Oregon he found work much less advanced than he anticipated, and instead of a ready means of livelihood in his chosen occupation he was obliged to turn his attention to secular work. He organized a school and in connection preached as opportunity offered, and about this time was appointed secretary to General Palmer, Superintendent of Indian Affairs. Later he succeeded General Palmer in this important responsibility, in April 1859. In 1856 he had removed to Linn County from his former home near Lafayette, settling upon a claim which continued to be his home for some years. For a time he was interested m a general merchandise business, and on one occasion was sent east to purchase machinery for the woolen mills at Brownsville, the second enterprise of the kind in the state of Oregon. The burning of this mill entailed great loss to its promoters, Mr. Geary sustaining a portion of it himself. He afterward became interested in another general store, but sold out the same upon becoming one of the organizers of the Albany college, of which he served as president. For some time he served as county judge, although he never aspired to political recognition; in the meantime he had purchased a farm near Albany, making this his headquarters while associated with the college and judiciary. In 1873 he removed to Eugene, where he built a home and was instrumental in locating the university at that place. This college enlisted his sympathy and co-operation, and up to the time of his death he was a member of the board of regents, and a substantial contributor to its financial welfare.
    In the meantime Mr. Geary had preached in many churches, most of which he himself organized and started upon their self-supporting careers. The gospel was to him a living force in the everyday affairs of men, and after its application came all else that made living desirable. No call was too remote, or entailed too arduous toil for his ready response, and at one time he rode one hundred and thirty miles on horseback to Portland to converse with a member of the board of missions for a couple of hours. He possessed a magnetic and forceful personality, impressing all with his sincerity and truth, facts observable especially in his intercourse with the Indians in the very early times, when he used to secure treaties, thus averting disaster on many occasions. Many experiences of a startling nature came his way while intent upon his errands of mercy, and on one occasion while going through the almost impenetrable woods he was attacked by bears and succeeded in killing one with the butt of his gun. He had the faculty of adapting himself to all conditions and circumstances, and was equally at home in the tents and huts of the early settlers, as in the ministerial halls of the assembly. He was a member of the general assembly in 1884, having served in a similar capacity on a prior occasion. Thus was the life of Mr. Geary cast in useful and distinguished mold, and whether as a preacher, merchant, educator or agriculturist, he maintained a settled faith in goodness and success, as understood by the larger minds of the world, never losing track of the gospel of humanity, which smoothed his way in times of distress and seeming failure, and encouraged his progress in the way to which nature and inclination had called him.

Portrait and Biographical Record of Western Oregon, Chapman Publishing Co. 1904, page 128


    Dr. E. P. Geary:--"You people who have lived in the Rogue River Valley for many years and--you might say--grown up with the country, don't have any idea of the changes which have come about during the past eight or ten years. During my residence in the Rogue River Valley I got hold of a tract of land in the Griffin Creek country, and when I removed to Portland I was willing to take most any price in order to get rid of it. I am glad now that I didn't find a buyer. I didn't realize what I had, though, until I came back here last week and took a look over the valley. Many a place where I traveled through muddy fields and thickets of chaparral answering professional calls in those days are now covered with thrifty orchards. The country doesn't look as it used to, and I am almost inclined to question the wisdom of my moving away. But I have that Griffin Creek ranch yet, and I'm going to plant fifty acres of it in pears this fall and winter. Some of these days I may take my ease under mine own pear tree."
"Echoes from the Street," Medford Mail, June 29, 1906, page 1
Geary Orchard, September 11, 1910 Oregonian
September 11, 1910 Oregonian

    A mile and a half above the Bruce Wilson orchard is the farm of 360 acres belonging to Dr. E. P. Geary. This ranch has been owned by Dr. Geary for 20 years, and consists of parts of three donation land claims. Besides the 60 acres in fruit, there is a considerable acreage of alfalfa. There is a vineyard covering ten acres, containing mainly Tokay and Blue Mission varieties, although one small strip contains 14 different kinds of grapes. Besides the commercial orchard of four-year-old apple and pear trees, there are several acres of peaches and apricots and two acres of walnuts and about a quarter of an acre of Sperma figs. The English walnut trees bear heavily every year, producing a fine grade of nut. It is not generally known that walnuts thrive in Southern Oregon--these being the only group of grown trees in the valley. The Sperma fig trees bear heavily also, producing three crops of fruit a year.
"East Sends Many Fruitgrowers," Sunday Oregonian, Portland, September 11, 1910, page 60


MEDFORD'S FIRST MAYOR VISITOR
Dr. E. P. Geary of Portland Is Pleased with Progress Made by City--
Signed Application for First Water Supply for This City.
    Dr. E. P. Geary, now a well-known physician and surgeon of Portland, but formerly mayor of Medford, visited his old home for a few hours last week. Called to the bedside of his old friend, Dr. Van Dyke of Grants Pass, who has been very sick with pneumonia, he took the opportunity of coming to Medford and driving out to the farm on Griffin Creek which he has owned for over 20 years.
    Dr. Geary, who is one of the Rogue River Valley's most enthusiastic boosters among the business and professional men of Portland, was very much pleased with the improvements which were taking place in Medford and the surrounding country. He said that one had to go to Portland to fully appreciate the Rogue River Valley, as there it was the most praised and talked-of fruit district in the Northwest.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 19, 1911, page 1


ONE TREE DOES WORK OF MANY
Forty Trees Are Pollenized by Buds on One and Splendid Crop Will Be Harvested--
Frost Hit the Others in Griffin Creek Orchard.
    Because the pollen-bearing tassels of one tree in Dr. Geary's small English walnut grove on Griffin Creek was protected from the heavy freeze this spring by smudge fires, a heavy crop of nuts has set on all the trees. Although the frost did not bother the fruit blossoms in the Griffin Creek locality on account of its high elevation and excellent air drainage, the walnut tassels with the exception of the one tree which happened to be just below a row of pear trees, which were smudged, were all frozen black. But the pollen from the tassels on the one tree fertilized the female buds on the other 40 walnut trees in the grove. The crop will probably average a bushel to a tree.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1911, page 6
Arthur Geary 1911-6-14p9Oregonian
June 14, 1911 Oregonian

FIRST MAYOR VISITS CITY
Dr. E. P. Geary, Who Was the First Executive of Medford City Government,
Tells of Early Days--Many Changes Made.
    "Medford has certainly grown since the time when I had the honor of directing her endeavors as mayor," stated Dr. E. P. Geary of Portland, who spent Monday in this city. Dr. Geary was mayor of the city in 1885 when the town was first incorporated.
    "In those days where now large modern business blocks stand we had nothing but brush to levy taxes on. It was a crying need in those days to secure money enough to cut the brush back along the street now known as Main. We had little money for improvements, and I remember well agitation even at that early date to bond the little town in order that it might grow. The seed of progressiveness which was sown at that time has since produced wonderful results.
    "Being mayor in 1885 was not much of a job. I imagine it would cut heavily into a physician's time should he tackle the job now."
Medford Mail Tribune, February 27, 1912, page 2


    Arthur Geary has arrived to look after his ranch in the Griffin Creek district. He has just completed a year as the graduate manager of athletics at the University of Oregon.
"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, June 6, 1912, page 2


GEARY TO TALK ON AUCTIONS
Oregon Man to Lecture in this City
GROWERS' GOOD IS AIM

    Arthur M. Geary, formerly a fruit grower near Medford, will soon give a lecture upon fruit marketing here.
    Mr. Geary has just returned from a two years' stay in New York, where he was graduated this May from the Columbia Law School.
    While in New York, Mr. Geary wrote market reports for western papers and kept in close touch with the fruit district along Greenwich and Washington streets. He gave a series of illustrated lectures concerning the Pacific and Columbia River highways. His lectures, coupled with his interest in the markets, attracted the attention of the fruit auctioneers of New York.
August 7, 1915 Jacksonville Post    In March, the first convention of auction companies of the United States was called for the purpose of raising funds and carrying out a campaign of education among the apple growers of the Pacific Coast, which are the only fruit raisers on the Pacific seaboard who do not sell all of their fruit which is marketed in the sixteen or seventeen largest cities of the country through the medium of auction sales.
Mr. Geary Makes Campaign.
    The American Fruit and Production Auction Association, which was formed at this meeting, asked Mr. Geary to visit the other principal cities of the United States where auctions are found and prepare himself thoroughly concerning the auction system as it is now operating in this country and later to come to the coast with lantern slides to give illustrated lectures.
    Mr. Geary is an Oregonian of the second generation, both his father and mother having been born in the Willamette Valley.
    He was graduated from the University of Oregon in 1910. At the commencement exercises he won the Beekman prize of one hundred dollars for oratory.
Twice Manager Orchard.
    After his graduation, Mr. Geary managed his father's orchard near Medford for a couple of years. Later, he became graduate manager of student activities at the University of Oregon. While employed at the university, he began the study of law. Attendance at a summer session of the University of California and two winter terms and a summer session at Columbia University completed his course in law.
    Next fall Mr. Geary plans to begin the practice of law either in Portland or New York.

Jacksonville Post, August 7, 1915, page 4


    Arthur M. Geary, formerly a resident of Medford, spent Thursday here visiting his brother and old friends. He is on his way to the Presidio, where he enters the officers training camp.

"Local and Personal," Medford Mail Tribune, August 23, 1917, page 2



COUNTY PIONEERS TO TRACE FATHER'S PATH ON ISTHMUS VOYAGE
    Dr. Edwin P. Geary, well-known Portland physician, now retired, left From San Francisco with Mrs. Geary Saturday on the Panama Pacific liner Mongolia, en route to New York by way of the Panama Canal. This is Dr. Geary's first sea voyage.
    His father, Rev. Edward R. Geary, D.D., traveled west by way of the Isthmus of Panama in 1851 and wrote a diary giving a description of his journey. The method of travel followed by Dr. Geary in making the transit of the isthmus in a luxurious liner will be in sharp contrast to the laborious journey of his father 78 years ago. It was necessary then to cross the neck of land by a jungle trail on muleback after going up the Chagres River 15 miles by boat from the Atlantic side. Ships were then boarded at Panama for the trip up the west coast, which took a month sometimes.--Oregonian.
    Dr. and Mrs. Geary are pioneer residents of this county, and for many years lived on Griffin Creek. Dr. Geary practiced in this city and Jacksonville for many years.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 3, 1929, page 5


DR. EDWARD GEARY
SECOND MAYOR OF MEDFORD PASSES
Widely Known Healer Had Been Blind and Mute
for Several Months from Recurring Paralytic Strokes.
    PORTLAND, Ore., Jan. 15.--(AP)--Dr. Edward P. Geary, 73, widely known physician and surgeon at the turn of the century and second mayor of Medford, Ore., died last night at a Portland hospital. Dr. Geary retired shortly after the World War and had been ill for the past two years.
    Dr. Geary was taken to the hospital Sunday afternoon. He had suffered four paralytic strokes in recent months and had been unable to see or talk for several weeks, the coroner learned.
Born in Brownsville
    Born at Brownsville, Ore., he received his education at Albany College, the University of Oregon and Jefferson Medical College, Philadelphia. After his graduation from the last-named school, he became assistant surgeon for the railroad, then being constructed between Oregon and California, with headquarters in Jackson County.
    Dr. Geary is credited by colleagues with having introduced aseptic surgery to southern Oregon. He came to Portland in 1898, and later was elected Multnomah County physician, a post he held for 14 years. He was active in organizing a visiting and consulting staff of surgeons and nurses for Multnomah Hospital.
Came Here in 1882
    Dr. Geary is survived by his wife, Mrs. Agnes M. Geary, and three sons, Arthur M. and Ronald W., of Portland, and Edward A. Geary of Klamath Falls, Ore.
    Dr. Geary settled in Jackson County in 1882 and joined the railroad service. He became active in public life and was elected Medford's second mayor.
----
    Dr. Geary is remembered here as one of Medford's first physicians, and as one of the persons instrumental in the organization of city government here. In 1885, when the city was organized with a board of trustees to head the municipality, he was one of the five trustees. When the mayor form of government was adopted, J. S. Howard was elected to fill that office, and was succeeded by Dr. Geary in 1888, the city's second mayor. [Howard, as president of the board of trustees, became mayor when Medford's new city charter went into effect, but Geary was the first man elected mayor of Medford.]
Was Adroit Surgeon
    When he practiced medicine here there was no hospital, but Dr. Geary was noted for his great proficiency, especially in surgical work, local druggists recalled today. He was able to operate skillfully with either hand.
    In 1888, when the late Dr. E. B. Pickel came to Medford, he became affiliated with Dr. Geary, and the two practiced as partners in medicine for a number of years. The large white house, recently razed on [326] West Main Street, known for many years as the Pickel home, and later as Fountain Lodge, was erected by Dr. Geary, and it was there his family resided until he sold the home to Dr. Pickel and moved to Portland in 1898.
Children Born Here
    He had previously lived in the Lee Jacobs house on [125] South Central. All the Geary children were born in this city, the three sons, who survive their father, and Everett Geary, who died in Klamath Falls last spring.
    The family is one known and revered by all southern Oregon pioneers, many of whom still owe their existence to the care given them by Dr. Geary during the early days.
    While other properties here were sold by Dr. Geary, a ranch on Griffin Creek is still owned by the family.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 15, 1934, page 1


ARTHUR GEARY, McNARY OPPONENT, CAMPAIGNS HERE
    Arthur M. Geary, a native son of Jackson County who has become outstanding in Oregon political and business circles, and who is a candidate for the Republican nomination for U.S. Senator in opposition to Charles L. McNary, visited briefly in Jackson County Tuesday evening and Wednesday morning. He is making a hurried trip through the state, accompanied by his cousin, Bainbridge Geary.
    "The most significant fact disclosed on this trip is the apparent unanimous opinion of weekly newspaper editors that McNary should be replaced," Geary said. "I feel that is because the weekly newspaper editors are closer to the common people, and are less influenced by political patronage."
    Geary was born near Jacksonville.
    He said he was making no promises except to do everything possible, if elected, to help win the war.
    "I have made no promises to groups or factions," Geary said. "If elected, I intend to represent all of the people of Oregon. I do not plan to go there as advocate of any special group."
Medford News, April 17, 1942, page 1

Arthur M. Geary, November 21, 1943 Oregonian
Arthur Geary, Rate Attorney, Succumbs Here
    Northwest livestock producers lost a friend and defender Saturday morning through the death of Arthur M. Geary, 54, attorney for the Northwest Traffic Shippers League and various agricultural organizations, at the Veterans Hospital following an illness of six weeks.
    Mr. Geary, an authority on livestock freight rates and ocean bills of lading, also was active in politics, having been a candidate in the 1942 Republican primary election against Senator Charles L. McNary.
    In expressing regret of Northwest livestock men over Mr. Geary's death, R. L. Clark, president of the Pacific Woolgrowers and secretary of the Portland Livestock Exchange, explained that this rate attorney devoted his entire life in maintaining that fair relationship must exist between livestock freight rates and those for dressed meats and slaughterhouse products. Mr. Geary defended this stand for the last 20 years, Clark added.
    Mr. Geary, a lieutenant colonel in World War I, was past commander of Portland chapter of the Military Order of World Wars, was a member of the American Legion, Veterans of Foreign Wars, a past governor of the bar association and a member of the University Club and First Presbyterian Church. He held a partnership with Geary Brothers seed firm, Klamath Falls.
    Born December 5, 1889 at Medford, Mr. Geary was a Portland resident for 45 years. He was University of Oregon's first graduate manager following his graduation in 1911. He held this position for two years, spent a year on the Geary fruit ranch at Medford, and then entered Columbia University law school, New York, where he graduated in 1915.
    Mr. Geary married Martha Dorman, daughter of Orris Dorman, Spokane, on May 6, 1934. Surviving besides his wife are a son, Richard; two daughters, Susan Jane and Dorothea, all at the family residence, 404 SW Warrens Way; his mother, Mrs. Agnes M. Geary, Portland; two brothers, Edward A. Geary, Klamath Falls, and Roland W. Geary, Portland.
    Finley & Son mortuary is in charge of arrangements.

Portland clipping dated November 21, 1943, Thomas scrapbook, SOHS M43B3


DEATH COMES TO ARTHUR M. GEARY
    Portland, Ore., Nov. 20.--(U.P.)--Arthur M. Geary, 53, prominent Oregon attorney, died today in the veterans' hospital after a major operation.   
    He had been legal representative of various farmer and rancher groups in the Pacific Northwest, and was an expert in the field of marketing of farm produce. He led numerous battles to obtain lower freight rates for Northwest farmers, fruit growers and livestock shippers.
-----
    Arthur M. Geary was well known in Medford, being the son of the late Dr. E. P. Geary of this city and having attended Medford High School and later the University of Oregon. He made frequent visits to Medford and in the last general election was a candidate for U.S. Senator. Among his survivors is a brother, Edward Geary, of Klamath County. His father was one of the first mayors of Medford and a well-known pioneer.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1943, page 1


Mrs. Agnes Geary, Former Resident, Dies in Portland
    Mrs. Agnes McCornack Geary, at one time a resident of Medford and widow of the late Dr. Edward P. Geary, died at her home in Portland, August 1. The Geary family lived many years ago on a ranch in the Griffin Creek district.
    Mrs. Geary was a member of the first graduating class of the University of Oregon, and had been a member of the First Presbyterian Church for 50 years.
    Survivors include two sons, Edward A. Geary of Klamath Falls, Roland W. Geary of Portland; a sister, Mrs. Aletha McCornack of Eugene, and several nephews and nieces in Klamath Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 8, 1944, page 10




Last revised March 21, 2017