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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1909-

News from Eagle Point, Oregon, from the pen of A. C. Howlett. Transcribed by Janet Monti. Thanks!


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. B. Zimmerman of Derby was a pleasant caller last Monday for dinner. He is recently from the old states and has taken a contract to haul saw logs for the Derby sawmill this spring and summer.
    Dr. Wamsley started last Monday for his home in Nebraska. He has been here for several weeks visiting his brother and helping to care for his sister-in-law, Mrs. Wamsley, who is lying low with a complication of diseases.
    Clarence Pierce was out last Monday doing some surveying on the tract of land he bought of J. W. Grover. Also a young man by the name of H. D. Nihart. The latter is in the employ of Baker & Hutchason of Medford, advertising their business, also speaking a good word for the Mail, and the dry cause in Medford. They both called at the Sunnyside for dinner.
    Mr. Hessler of Brownsboro was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside last Thursday night. He had been to the county seat to make his report and settle up with the county board as road supervisor, and was on his way home. Mr. Fry and son of Lake Creek were also pleasant callers Friday night. They also had been to the county seat on legal business and were on their way home.
    Last week I made mention of the Farris-Spencer wedding. Well, on their arrival at her parents, William Spencer's, they gave them an old-fashioned "infare dinner." There were 26 all told that took part in the festivities of the occasion, and after the dinner the company spent a few hours in a social dance, and my reporter informs me that they just covered them with congratulations.
    We are having trouble with our mail routes out here. For two or three days there was no mail from Trail and Prospect on account of the high water in Rogue River, and the P.&E. car is running late on account of the snow and ice along the track, although the snow has not been over three inches thick, but the ice on the track makes it hard for the car to stick and it sometimes won't stop at the word "Whoa!"
    Mr. Hawk, the man who bought the R. G. Brown place, returned last week from a business trip to the state of Washington, where he has extensive interests in coal mines and timber. He is making extensive improvements on his place, having put a good wire fence along the lane on the west side, improved his residence and fixed things up generally. I understand that he intends to build a new barn as soon as the lumber can be procured and put on the ground.
    During the last rains the water in Butte Creek rose considerable and there was quite an amount of driftwood lodged against the P.&E. bridge, and Joe Riley was employed to clear it away. He hitched to the top of a tree that was lodged against the bridge and when the team started it, that loosened the root that was hanging to one of the piers and when the full force of the water caught it it came very near carrying the team down the stream, and it was by the utmost exertion that he saved the horses from a watery grave.
    There has been quite a number of schoolteachers stopping with us during the past week, and one of them, a young lady, reared and educated in one of our mountain districts, who has just closed a term of school in one of the rural districts in an adjoining county, gave her experience in said school during the first few days' sessions. She was apprised of the fact that she had a hard school to manage, so was prepared to a certain extent for any emergency. It appears that the school had never been under strict discipline. The children had been in the habit of coming into the schoolhouse on a run and going out in the same way, and she undertook to turn over a new leaf by having them march in in regular order and retire the same way. So the first thing was to train them to march into the schoolhouse in regular order, take their places at their desks and be seated at the tap of the bell. The first effort they broke the line. She rearranged them again; again they broke, and again they were placed in line, and in the third effort was successful in getting them seated, but they were unruly and very much inclined to beat back into the old way, but things went fairly well until it came time for dismissal, when she gave them instructions how to proceed, having them put away their books first tap, rise second tap, march third tap. I will here remark that there were six boys in their 'teens who were very unruly and had been in the habit of running the school, and that it was warm weather and the windows of the school house were open. Well at the third tap when the order was given to march, one of these boys jumped out of the window, and no quicker done than the teacher jumped out of the door and after him, he running for dear life and she after him. The race lasted for about 100 yards, when the teacher grabbed him by the back of his shirt collar and the jig was up. She marched him back. She said that she choked him half to death by the time they reached the schoolhouse, and then she put him down in his seat and renewed the exercise of marching. That afternoon she supplied herself with a good supply of switches and gave each one of the half dozen leaders a good thrashing, with the result that she had good order from that time on. She said she didn't call in the directors or suspend or expel from school, but simply let them know that she was mistress of the situation. When asked how the parents of the children took such a course she said they patted her on the back and said "good!" The result is they propose to raise her wages $10 on a month and have her teach their spring school.
    Frank Neil and Mr. Humphrey of Derby were pleasant callers Wednesday night. They had been to Jacksonville, having business with the county court.
Medford Mail, January 15, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Watkins made a business trip to Medford the first of the week.
    A Miss Wassen, from Portland, is here visiting the George Brown family.
    John Warner of Trail was a pleasant caller one night last week. He was down for supplies.
    Mr. Baker of Butte Falls was here on his way to Medford on a business trip, returning Friday.
    Mr. Gilbert came out from the tall timber Tuesday morning and took the handcar for Medford.
    Mr. Wolverton came out from his homestead in the Big Butte country on his way to Medford Monday evening.
    S. H. Snider of Medford was out last Saturday canvassing the town in the interest of the H.F.R. Mutual of Salem.
    Revs. M. C. Davis and Edward F. Green will commence a protracted meeting in Eagle Point on Saturday evening, January 30, at 7:30. Meeting Sunday morning and evening on Sunday, January 31.
    Ed Hoyt and wife, nee Millie Howlett, came in from Fort Klamath Sunday evening. Mrs. Hoyt stopped off at Medford and Tuesday evening came out to her parents' and Ed went on to Portland and thought that he might peep in at our legislators while in the Willamette country.
    Mr. Hughes, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, had the misfortune to get shot in the leg, the ball ranging upward. A pistol dropped from the holster and striking on the hammer, caused it to go off, with the above result. Dr. Holt was summoned and removed the ball and at last accounts he was doing well.
    Monday evening B. H. Harris, Mrs. Miller and Mrs. Harris' baby stopped at the Sunnyside on their way from Butte Falls to Medford, remaining overnight. Mr. Harris reports the road in a bad condition between here and Butte Falls and business at this time rather dull, but lives in hopes of a revival of business in the spring.
    On Tuesday morning of last week Messrs. Stepp, Iseli and Hamlin of Round Top came out, took the P.&E. train and proceeded on their way to Medford, where they met representatives of a Michigan firm and closed a deal, selling their timber land on Round Top, but the consideration is placed at $10, but I understand that it sold at a good figure.
    One day last week Jack Florey, Ray Harnish, Henry Daley and Frank Abbott, four of our town boys, started out on a hunt. They only had one dog and he is one of the very small-sized ones, but gritty enough for a large dog. Going down the creek a short distance they came across three coons and the little dog soon put them up a tree and the result was that in a very short time the boys had them all captured, the little dog fighting like a wildcat.
    I understand that Oliver Adams is also taking options on considerable timber land in the Big Butte country and there seems to be more excitement on that subject than there has been for some time, as every time we hear of a sale of timber land we think that perhaps that will bring the day nearer for us to have better railroad facilities. Speaking of our railroad facilities brings forcibly to our mind the fact that we are just at this writing getting our mail the best way we can, sometimes on the autocar, sometimes on the handcar, sometimes on a wagon and sometimes not at all, but as a rule Messrs. Reed and Gardiner get it here all O.K.
    On Tuesday evening of last week Scott Bruce, one of the carpenters working on the Cooley house, slipped on the scaffolding and fell 16 feet. He was picked up and brought to the Sunnyside Hotel, where he is boarding. Dr. Holt was called and when he had examined him found that there were no serious hurts, but his face, arm and wrist were cut and his hip badly bruised. I did not report this sooner, as he did not want his wife to know it until it would be known definitely how bad he was hurt, and she would see it in the Mail. Last Friday he started to his home in Dudley, the unsurveyed, and I understand that he stood the trip all right.
    Charley and Albert Morine came out from the Elk Creek country last week, remained overnight and Wednesday morning left their team and went to Medford on the P.&E. railroad to attend a land case before United States Commissioner Canon, returning on Sunday. Albert said that they came out on a handcar, worked their passage and paid 25 cents for the privilege of riding, but it seemed that was a kind of private arrangement, as neither of the railroad men came out with it, but they got here all the same, and Sunday afternoon started for their home on Elk Creek, via the Rogue River bridge, as Rogue River was so high that the ferry could not run.
    The first term of our school closed last Friday. One of the fads of our old board of directors is to employ teachers for only a short time and then renew the contract, and the result was that at the end of the line specified in the contract Professor Henry decided not to teach any longer, so that left us with no principal in our school. On last Saturday the board employed Professor Narregan as principal and Miss Bertha Peachey, our old primary teacher, to continue teaching in her department, so school was resumed last Monday morning. I am requested to say in this connection that C. Thomas has been appointed as truant officer and that the law will be rigidly enforced.
    Last week it seemed as though Roy Ashpole was doomed to have something serious happen to him. The first accident was in Indian Creek. He was out with Gus Nichols and Grant Findley and in crossing the creek, when the water was very swift and deep, he attempted to cross, and the water washed his horse's feet from under him, with the result that he got thoroughly soaked. Then shortly afterward he was riding in the Rancheria country (he is a stockman) after his cattle, through the snow and slush, when his horse fell on him and he has been confined to the house ever since, and his father says he complains of a soreness across his stomach, but it is to be hoped that nothing serious will result from the fall and exposure.
Medford Mail, January 22, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. E. Hoyt, of Fort Klamath, came out from Medford last Saturday evening, returning on Sunday.
    Mr. Dunlap, of Big Butte, was a pleasant caller last week. He had been out to act as one of the arbitrators in settling up the Edsall estate.
    Robert Wiley, of Medford, was a pleasant caller last Sunday. He states that his father has sold his property in Medford and is moving out to the ranch on the desert.
    Mr. Steward and Mr. Heath, who have been living in the Daley house, have moved to Medford, where they secured a job with their teams on the big reservoir for the Medford water works.
    M. C. Mahoney, of Butte Falls, came out the first of last week after supplies for the Butte Falls restaurants and Mr. Briggs' drug store. He reports the roads in a bad condition on account of the continuous rains.
    John Edsall, who has been stopping on his ranch near Phoenix, started for his mountain ranch one day last week and when he reached here he found that his wagon was so dilapidated that he had to leave his load and wait until his son could get out for the supplies.
    Mr. Baker, of Butte Falls, called here last Monday. He was in Medford and as the telephone line is out of commission so that he could not phone he had to hire a rig in Medford and drive out twelve miles and back to attend to business that could have been attended to in five minutes over the phone.
    E. A. Hildreth, wife and son, and his wife, of Butte Falls, drove in last Sunday on their way home. They had been to the coast to visit Mr. Hildreth's son living about thirty miles above Crescent City. They had a hard trip as they were on the road for about two weeks and it rained and snowed on them almost all the time.
    Elmer and Harvey Spencer, of Dudley (the unsurveyed), came out last week and stayed overnight, and the next day Elmer Spencer went to Medford and his brother remained. The next morning they both started for their homes. They are planning on taking a contract for a part of the work on the Fish Lake and Medford water line.
    Mr. Moor, of Ashland, and a young friend of his started from home for Mr. Moor's place on Elk Creek, arriving at the Sunnyside at night. While here Mr. Moor had the misfortune to step on a nail, puncturing his foot about the center between the instep and the toes. The next morning he was so lame that he decided to return to Ashland.
    Benjamin Fredenburg came out one day last week and left his horse here and went to Medford and Jacksonville to straighten out some of the mistakes made in the assessment of lands as he had sold the timber from one hundred and sixty acres. When he came to examine he found that there had been several mistakes made in the assessment, but he got it all satisfactorily settled. The timber was sold to Edward Woodbury, of Michigan, through B. H. Harris. The consideration was twenty-five hundred dollars.
    DIED--January 25, at 12:20 a.m., Mrs. Clarinda G. Wamsley, aged 58 years, 2 months and 8 days. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on the 26th.
Medford Mail, January 29, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The people in this part of the country are beginning to plant trees again as the ground is getting dried out sufficient to dig holes and work the ground in some places.
    Mr. Miller, of Butte Falls, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside last Monday evening, remaining overnight. He had been to Medford on business and was on his way home.
    Mr. Zimmerman and Mr. Biggins came out from their homes near Derby last week and they report that that section is filling up as there has been a number of homesteads taken the past fall and winter.
    Mr. Claspill, of Butte Falls, called in for a few minutes Sunday evening and reports that heavy winds have blown down a large quantity of the timber in the timber belt on Big Butte Creek and in that vicinity.
    From present indications there will be quite a lot of building done in this neighborhood during the spring and summer. Our local carpenters seem to have their engagements ahead already to keep them busy until about June or July.
    Last Sunday as one of Robert Winter's little girls was playing she by some means fell and broke one of the bones in her right forearm. Dr. Holt, our M.D., was summoned and reduced the fracture, and at last account the child was doing well.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the S.S. missionary for the Congregational Church in this section, commenced a protracted meeting here last Sunday and on Monday was joined by Rev. Edward F. Green, of Ashland. They expect to continue the meetings all the week over next Sunday.
    Our strawberry man, E. S. Wolfer, expects to give a class of students in the agricultural college at Corvallis, a lecture on the culture of strawberries, next Friday, February 5. He is a great student of the subject of berry plants and no doubt his lecture will prove to be quite interesting and instructive.
    Messrs. Hamlin, Iseli and his son Rudolf, came out from their homes on Round Top last Monday on business. They are settling up their business affairs and getting ready to divide up their interests. Mr. Hamlin expects to move to Portland in a short time and the other members of the old firm are undecided where they will locate.
    J. C. Moor, formerly of Ashland, but now of Elk Creek, and Roy Drake, of Ashland, have been on the road between here and Elk Creek considerable of the time for the last week. They report the roads in a very poor condition, as the heavy rains during the past month have kept the ground so full of water that it is with difficulty that anyone could travel with a team, and the Rogue River has been so high that for several days the Trail mail could not cross the river.
    I have been greatly pleased to see the progress made in our Sunday school here, under the management of our new superintendent, Mr. Cooley. The school is increasing in interest and the singing is equal to any in the country, outside of, perhaps, some of the city churches. Monday night there was eight of our boys, all in their teens, that volunteered to assist in the singing at church, forming a choir with Miss Mamie Wright as organist, and they rendered several pieces greatly to the satisfaction and edification of the audience. Some of the girls, also in their teens, are practicing and we expect soon to have a church choir that will reflect credit on themselves and on the community in which they live.
    Charles and Albert Morine, of Elk Creek, were here last week twice. They were on their way to and from Medford where they were presenting evidence to establish Albert's claim to his homestead. The homesteaders seem to have considerable trouble in making their final proof on account of the many fraudulent claims that have been made, and now the honest homesteader has to suffer the consequence of the rascality of those who have taken up homesteads simply for speculative purposes.
    Mr. Ditsworth, of Peyton, was out last week circulating a petition to have a new road, or rather an old road, surveyed and declared a county road. It begins at a point near the Neil place on the Eagle Point and Derby road and running in a northerly direction down Crowfoot Creek crossing Big Butte Creek near the old Justus place and intersecting the old Crater Lake road near the Ed Higinbotham place; shortening the road from Eagle Point to Peyton by about four miles and cutting out about two miles of the worst road between here and Prospect, making a route that the mails can be carried over at all times of the year, and, so far as can be seen, discommoding no one, for the old road down McNeil Creek will still remain so that anyone can travel that way that wishes to. Mr. Ditsworth secured about forty signatures on his petition.
Medford Mail, February 12, 1909, page 7


C. C. KELSOE EXCEPTS.
Derby, Ore., Feb. 15, 1909.
Editor Medford Mail:
    In a recent issue of your paper I noticed a piece in the Eagle Point items concerning a petition for locating a county road in Road District No. 7, starting at a  point near Frank Neil's place on the Eagle Point and Derby road and running thence in a northerly direction down Crowfoot Creek, crossing Big Butte Creek near the old Justus place and intersecting the old Crater Lake road near the Ed. Higinbotham place; and also stating that there was about 40 signers on the petition. Now in regard to that petition I would like to call the attention of the Honorable County Court to the fact that only 2 of the signers are closer than 8 or 9 miles of the proposed road and nearly all at or near Eagle Point, 14 miles away. Your correspondent goes on to say so far as can be seen it would discommode no one. I would like to say here that your correspondent at Eagle Point surely is not well posted in regard to our neighborhood. He goes on and states that the mail could be carried at all times of the year over the new road. Now I can say in the interest of no less than 20 or 25 families, who it would greatly discommode to have their mail go on the proposed road. There is in the neighborhood of 30 persons whose mail comes to my place for distribution, where, if it went by the proposed new road, it would miss entirely. Therefore, I would like to call the attention of the Honorable County Court to the facts in the case; and furthermore, there would be about 5 or 6 miles of new road to make and a bridge to put across Big Butte Creek that would not cost the county less than $2000 or $2500, when, if one-half the amount is expended on the present road in a few minor changes, we would have a road that could be traveled at all times of the year and I can't see where it would be a great disadvantage to anyone. I can't see why in circulating their petition they did not give the interested ones of the Big Butte country a chance to sign their petition unless it was for the fact that they could not get a dozen signers in this neighborhood.
    Yours with respect,
Derby, Ore.                C. C. KELSOE.
Medford Mail, February 26, 1909, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. Bledsoe is a fine speaker and a forceful preacher.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Knighton, who have been up to Washington to visit his sister, returned last week.
    A. C. Howlett will preach next Sunday, February 28, at Trail, at 11 o'clock a.m., and Central S.H. at 3 p.m.
    Lin Clemens, of Central Point, came out to visit old-time friends in these parts last Saturday and is stopping at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. Austin, of Dudley, was a pleasant caller Friday night. He went on up to his home with the Peyton mail carrier, Joe Moomaw, on Saturday.
    The change in the mail carrying necessitates my writing Tuesday morning and this cuts off any very late news of the week. The P.&E.R.R. is now a thing of the past and Charles Thomas is carrying the mail on his stage to Medford.
    J. H. Miller and a part of his family, namely, Miss Francis and her brother, stopped with us one night last week on their way to Michigan, to be gone probably two months. Mr. Boughten and his son accompanied them as far as Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed Walker, the genial hustler for the Iowa Lumber Company in the Big Butte country, came out last Sunday to look after some of the company's horses that Mr. Daniels had been feeding. He procured feed from Walter Woods for them.
    The revival meetings are still in progress here. They are conducted by Rev. Bledsoe accompanied by Mr. Hazel, of Ashland, as singer. They are having considerable interest manifested and up to the present writing there has been four conversions and a deep feeling on the subject of religion aroused.
    Mr. Daniels of Flounce Rock came out last Sunday with a band of twenty-five horses that he has been feeding for parties in the valley. His hay was beginning to run short. He reports considerable snow up there and that it was snowing like mad when he came out. He was accompanied by one of the Kincaid boys.
    Miss March Kincaid came out from Medford Monday. She had been attending the teachers' examinations and was on her way home, near the Rogue River bridge in Flounce Rock precinct. She expects to open school in that neighborhood next Monday.
Medford Mail, February 26, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I understand that Irvin Pool starts for Washington Tuesday.
    Lee Edmondson and Mr. Netherland of Derby stayed in Eagle Point last Sunday night.
    W. W. Parker stopped here one night last week on his way to the Falls with a load of goods for one of the merchants.
    I understand that Frank Brown, one of our leading merchants, is going to put up a wire fence around the old Robinett property.
    I am glad to be able to report that Willis Kirkpatrick, who has been sick for some time with typhoid pneumonia, is improving rapidly.
    Rev. A. C. Howlett expects to preach at Derby on Sunday, March 14, at 11 o'clock a.m., and at Reese Creek the same day at 3:30 p.m.
    George Phillips has moved from here to Mr. Hammel's place, on Reese Creek. Mrs. Phillips is to keep house for him, as he has no cook.
    Mr. Patton of Eagle Point is putting out about 50 fruit trees to orchard on his home place for family use and expects to put out more after he moves his dwelling onto another lot.
    Andrew Coffman of Big Butte stopped at the Sunnyside last Sunday night on his way to Medford. He joins the rest of the travelers in saying that the roads are almost impassable all through the hills.
    Mr. Hamlin and family stopped here last week on their way to Portland. He has sold out his interest on Round Top and has gone to Portland to seek a location. He is undecided as yet where he will settle. William Perry and J. Edsall moved him out from his old home.
    In spite of the mud, rain and snow, the people will travel, and for the past week or two Eagle Point has been one of the business centers of Rogue River Valley. Last week there seemed to be considerable stir, but this week starts off as though the fine weather had come and the roads had dried up, judging the amount of people and teams that stop here.
    Roy Drake and Lin Foain came in from Elk Creek about the middle of last week on their way to Ashland, where the latter expects to enter school. He has been taking advantage of a good school on Elk Creek. They are both promising young men and expect to make their mark in the world. The former, Roy Drake, returned from Ashland last Sunday. He was accompanied by his mother, sister and J. C. Moor. They were on their way to Mr. Moor's farm, on Elk Creek.
    M. C. Mahoney of Butte Falls came out the latter part of the week for a load of goods for one of the local merchants of Butte Falls. I understand that they have now four stores in Butte Falls, Mr. Hughes, Mr. Marcy, Mr. Briggs and Mr. Claspill, and one would think from the number of stores in the place that it was a thriving town, but I can't say, for I have not been there for several months. L. V. Marcy, one of the merchants, says that trade is fairly good.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent went to Trail and Central last Friday and preached at the two places on Sunday, found everything encouraging and most of the people speaking a good word for the Mail, but complaining that it sometimes strays off and they don't get the paper. I found the roads bad enough on this side of the river, but when I began to go down the river from the ferry found them almost impassable, and the people kicking because they don't have more of the road tax money applied on the mountain roads; but such is life in the mountains.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, our Congregational Sunday school missionary, came on last Sunday. He had an appointment to preach Sunday night, but as the Baptists were carrying on a protracted meeting he gave way and had Rev. Bledsoe, the state evangelist, go on with the services, as it was to be the last night of the meeting. The meeting had been in progress since Tuesday, February 16. Rev. Bledsoe surely woke the people of Eagle Point up, for the church house was well filled every night and the 3 o'clock meetings were well attended. The result of the meeting is, so far, 18 conversions, 15 additions to the church and eight baptized. There was one conversion about 10 o'clock Sunday night, after the services were closed and most of the people had gone home, and the young man joined the church and was baptized that night at 11:50 o'clock. There was quite a crowd collected to witness the novel procedure. Some got up out of bed and the preacher sent a mile or more to get one man, a brother-in-law of the candidate, to witness the act. There was the most intense excitement that has been in Eagle Point for a great many years.
Medford Mail, March 5, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Frideger came out last Monday and is pruning his young orchard.
    A. J. Daley, one of our merchants, went to Medford last Monday on business.
    J. E. Stepp moved his family from Round Top last week and went to Portland.
    Claud Wamsley went to Medford Tuesday for a load of lumber for William Taylor.
    Grandma Heckathorn, who has been visiting her daughters near Woodville, returned home last Sunday.
    Wamsley & Smith have finished the house they were building for Mr. Cooley, and a family by the name of Painter has moved into it.
    George West, who is working in the forest reserve office in Medford, came out to the Sunnyside last Saturday evening to see his wife, who is boarding here, returning Sunday evening.
    Business is beginning to liven up--some of the farmers and orchardists are beginning to plow and we will soon forget that we have had an unusual wet winter and everything will soon look lovely.
    W. R. Cottle of Medford is a guest at the Sunnyside at this writing. He is engaged in laying off a tract of land, joining Eagle Point, to plant trees. He claims to be an expert at that business.
    William von der Hellen sold his farm, just north of Eagle Point; consideration, $13,250. Mr. von der Hellen has rented the George W. Daley, Jr., house and expects to move into it in the near future.
    I understand that Mr. Steward has rented the old Robinett property and expects to move into the house very soon, and that Mr. Wolverton has rented the Farlow house, and that leaves our town again without an unrented house.
    Nimrod Charley and wife came in from their home last Monday morning to go before our notary public, A. J. Florey, when they signed two deeds to Medford property. I did not learn the consideration, but Mr. Charley said he was satisfied with the sale.
    Mr. Cooley delivered a lecture last Sunday evening on the subject, "A History of the Early Church," tracing it from the beginning of history to the birth of Christ. He had a good audience and the lecture seemed to be highly appreciated by the most of those in attendance, judging by the attention they seemed to pay.
    Mrs. Lon Moomaw, who was called to Portland on account of the sickness of her sister, returned last Friday. She says that I can tell the people that she thinks that there is no place like Jackson County; that she don't want any Portland weather in hers; that it rains and then rains again, and then comes the fog and then rain.
    Last Sunday Messrs. Tuttle & Smith of Medford came out and organized a young people's society here. Carl Ringer was chosen as president, Miss Mamie Wright as vice-president, Miss Jennie Lewis secretary, Miss Ganell Jackson treasurer, and they are to meet next Sunday night to take steps to adopt a constitution and by-laws and open the books for the enrollment of members.
    Bulah Hildreth came out last week for some things he had stored at the Sunnyside warehouse. Messrs. H. H. Lorimer, Ed Bond, Sr., Ed Bond, Jr., and W. A. Miller, all of Medford, came out last Monday, took dinner and left their team at the Sunnyside stable and went up the hill to look at a tract of land that one of them had bought of Mr. Stoddard. He is contemplating putting out a lot of trees yet this spring and some onions.
    While I was away from home last week I took a trip to Gold Hill, and while there called on some of our old friends, and among them was Grandma Emery, formerly of this place, and her old friends here and in Ashland, one of her former homes, will be glad to learn that the old lady is in good health and able to do her own housework, although she will be 89 years old on the 15th of this month. When I called she was out in her yard trimming up her berry vines, and she appears to be about as vigorous mentally as she was 35 years ago. I also met old Dr. Stanley, well and favorably known in these parts. He is somewhat afflicted with rheumatism, but otherwise looks hearty. The town of Gold Hill is not growing as much as I had thought it would, but it is a pretty little place.
    William Taylor is getting the material together to move back farther up the hill so as to have the well handy. It is the old J. J. Fryer house and a part of it has been standing for the last 40 or 50 years, but he don't like the idea of having to carry water a hundred yards to the house when he can carry the house to the water.
    On Tuesday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent, in company with Rev. M. C. Davis, went to Table Rock and commenced a religious meeting, having meeting every night and Sunday at 11 o'clock. At that hour I preached and Rev. Davis preached at Moonville. The meetings were well attended and considerable interest was manifested. A. C. Howlett expects to preach at Moonville on Sunday, March 21, at 11 o'clock a.m. and at Table Rock the Saturday night before and Sun-
day night.
Medford Mail, March 12, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The farmers in this section are beginning to plow, and garden making is the order of the day.
    Fred Frideger of Medford was out a few days last week, pruning his young orchard in the upper end of town.
    W. W. Parker of Butte Falls came out last Sunday after a load of goods for one of the merchants of that place.
    A. C. Howlett expects to preach in Table Rock Saturday night and Sunday night at 7:30, and in Moonville on Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m.
    J. F. Summerville, one of the hustling insurance agents of Medford, dropped in on us for dinner last Monday. He is looking for business.
    Road Supervisor William von der Hellen has begun to work the road in these parts, and before long we will have our roads in the valley in first-class style.
    Died--In Lakeview, March 10, Mr. John W. Smith, formerly of Big Sticky. The remains were brought in and interred in the Central Point cemetery on Tuesday. A more extended notice next week.
    W. R. Cottle of Medford was out a few days last week staking off a tract of land lying east of south of Eagle Point, to be put out to orchard, and Messrs. Jones and Hedges are here this week digging the holes and putting out fruit trees.
    George West, one of the forest rangers who has been stopping in the Medford office, came out Friday evening, spending the night with his family at the Sunnyside, and on Saturday started for the head of Trail Creek to look over some timber there.
     Rev. G. L. Hall of Medford came out last Sunday evening and preached for the people of Eagle Point, and on Tuesday night he gave a reading of Riley's poems for the benefit. of the church. As I understand the proposition, one-half of the receipts are to be applied toward purchasing a bell for the church building.
    Mr. Humphrey of Derby called for dinner Monday. He came out for a lot of wire fencing, but failed to get, as the kind he wanted was all sold. So he took back a load of hay to feed the Derby sawmill team. They are getting in a fine lot of logs at the Castor mill, near Derby, and expect to be able to start to sawing by the first of April.
    Gustavus Peck, one of our thriving and enterprising farmers living on Little Butte Creek, a few miles above Brownsboro, stopped with us on Friday night of last week on his way home from Medford with a load of seed oats to sow. He, like all the rest of the farmers, complain that the ground is too wet to work to advantage.
    John Iseli, one of the three men who owned the Round Top sawmill, and was burned out last summer, moved his family to Portland last week, he being the last one to leave. The loss of the mill works a serious hardship on this community, as that mill was the main dependence for lumber here, and the families will be greatly missed in that section.
    Mr. and Mrs. Buel Hildreth came out from Butte Falls last week and stopped together for a few days, when he went back to the tall timber to look after the interest of Uncle Sam in the timber line, leaving his wife as a guest at the Sunnyside. She seems to be well pleased with her surroundings and thinks of remaining for several weeks.
    Monday noon Messrs. T. G. Cooper, J. L. Greenwood, J. N. Wood and S. A. Parker of Ashland called for dinner. They had been up Little Butte Creek to look at some land on Salt Creek. They don't speak favorably of the road up there, but like the country. While here they all weighed themselves, and Mr. Greenwood says that he has gained about 40 since he came here, going from 140 to 182. He thinks that the climate has something to do with his health.
    I found the roads between here and Derby drying up, but still very rough. The people up there are looking for the time to come when they will have the new road up Reese Creek opened up so that they will not have to go over high hills to have the pleasure of going down again. The people up there feel, and perhaps justly, too, that they are greatly imposed upon by the county court in having their roads so neglected and so much of the road fund applied where it appears to them the work is not needed.
    Last Saturday your Eagle Point correspondent started for Derby, got as far as T. G. Ayres, where he spent the night, found Mr. Ayres clearing land to put out more orchard. He tells me that he has discovered a fine prospect for coal on his place, and has developed the vein to a certain extent and from present indications there will be something doing in that line in these parts before long. A party from Medford has taken an option on one of the places near Eagle Point for the purpose of prospecting for coal, and according to the contract, they expect to go to work and drill for coal, gas, oil, etc., in the course of a few weeks.
Medford Mail, March 19, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Ditsworth of Peyton came out one day last week and brought several blackberry cuttings for E. S. Wolfer.
    Mr. Haak, Sr., and one of his sons were here last week on a visit to their son and brother, the Haak who bought the R. G. Brown place.
    Messrs. Jones and Hedges, who have been putting out an orchard near Eagle Point, got through last Thursday and returned to Medford Friday.
    When I left home, for I am now writing from Table Rock, there was a deal on foot to have our drug and hardware store change hands, but at last accounts the deal was not perfected.
    G. H. and C. O. Wamsley and J. W. Smith commenced work on a garage for Tronson & Guthrie last week, and they talk as though they would have all the work they can do this summer.
    John Unbury, who came out last fall from Illinois, returned to his old home last week. He is an old bachelor and got homesick, so had to return to his old friends in that blizzard-ridden country.
    The petition to the county court to appropriate $50,000 for the benefit of the Crater Lake auto road has been circulated in our town and I understand that there were about 50 names. The blank did not reach here until Friday night, so that the friends to the movement did not have time to circulate it but a few hours.
    W. C. Earl of Medford and J. C. Brown, the real estate hustler of Medford, were at the Sunnyside last week. They were accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. F. D. Cline and Mrs. Arnold, a sister of Mrs. Cline's. They were out to look at a tract belonging to Mr. Stoddard. The ladies expressed themselves as highly pleased with this part of the country.
    Last week I mentioned the death of Mr. John W. Smith, Sr., and promised to give a more extended notice this week. He was born May 10, 1835, and died in Lakeview, March 10, 1909, at his son's, Frank. The remains were brought in by his son Frank and were interred in the Central Point cemetery on March 16. The funeral services were conducted at the grave by Rev. A. C. Howlett. Five of his sons were in attendance at the funeral, two of them, Alfred and Rollin, remaining at their homes at Lakeview, while one of them is in Alaska. Mr. Smith is one of the old pioneers, having come to Oregon in 1868 with his wife and older children, and settled in Jackson County. He settled as a homestead the farm where now stands the 401 orchard, living there for several years. After selling that place he bought another tract of land, known in the early days as the old Hull place, just east of the H. C. Turpin ranch, where he lived until after the death of his wife, which occurred about 16 months ago, and shortly after he went to Lakeview with three of his sons, where he began to give way to that dangerous disease known as Bright's disease.
    As your readers will see, I am writing from Table Rock. Last Sunday I preached at Moonville and was to preach at this place at night. But while on my way to this place I was informed of the sudden death of our Sunday school superintendent, Frank A. Green, and am determined to officiate at the funeral Tuesday. The deceased was born in Macomb County, Michigan, January 18, 1850, and died March 21, 1909, being 58 years, 5 months and 3 days old. He leaves a wife and five children, two by his first wife, Floyd and May, the former being in business in Portland and May is teaching school in Michigan, and three children, aged 4, 2½ and 1¼ years of age, and an invalid wife to suffer the bereavement. On Sunday morning about 10 o'clock, as he was about ready to start to the schoolhouse for Sunday school he remarked to his wife that he felt faint and laid down on the bed, and never spoke again. Mrs. Green called a neighbor that was nearby, and when he reached the house he was still in death, caused by heart failure. Brother Green was the superintendent of the Table Rock Sunday school and showed by the efficiency of his work that he was especially called to that work. When I asked his son at what age his father was converted he replied, "I don't know, for as early as I can remember he was superintendent of a Sunday school and was a Christian ever since have known him, and I am 31 years old. He was a man that was universally beloved, a devoted Christian and always ready to give a reason for the hope that was within him." It is an object of remark by all of his neighbors what a devoted man he was, a loving husband, and devoted father, kind and accommodating neighbor, and the whole neighborhood turned out to do him honor. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on the 23rd. Funeral services conducted at the family residence by your Eagle Point correspondent.
Medford Mail, March 26, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Will Brown has put down a neat cement walk from the front gate to the porch.
    C. O. Wamsley has painted and put on the top of the hotel a new sign, the Sunnyside.
    Mr. McLinn of Flounce Rock came in last Friday night on his way to Medford for supplies.
    David Cingcade in getting ready to put up some more wire fence and take in more of the desert land.
    James Ringer has been painting the fences of some of the Eagle Pointers during the past week.
        W. W. Parker of the big timber country stayed with us last Friday night on his way to Medford for supplies.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis preached here last Sunday evening and expects to preach tomorrow (Tuesday) evening at Butte Falls, and at Peyton Thursday morning.
    J. R. Hazelwood, who has been spending the winter with John McKee, called in for the night Friday. He has been trapping in the Big Butte country the past winter.
    Mrs. Phillips and her three children stayed here last Saturday night and on Sunday morning secured a rig and driver and was taken to her father's, John Fry, on Trail Creek.
    Mr. McFarlin, who has a claim in the neighborhood of Butte Falls, stopped over Friday night on his way to Medford, where he was to take the train for Los Angeles, his old home. He came here for his health and got it. He had gained ten pounds while here.
    There are some changes taking place in and around Eagle Point. The change in the hardware and drug store that I spoke of last week has taken place, and J. H. Carlton has retired from the business and William von der Hellen is now the recognized proprietor of the store.
    J. Frank Brown, S. B. Holmes and William von der Hellen have bought what is known as the old Matney place of Mr. Bieberstedt, but the amount of the purchase and the price paid I did not learn. I understand that Mr. von der Hellen intends to put hands at work soon to clear the brush off the land, and when he does that he will have as good a farm as any on that creek--Dry Creek.
    Last Sunday evening, as I was conning from the Trail settlement, in company with Hamilton Watkins, in driving along the lane between Wallace Woods' and the place of William von der Hellen recently sold, we found one of Mr. Narregan's horses standing beside the fence, and on close inspection found that he had one of his forelegs fast between the barbed wire on the fence. Mr. W. climbed over the fence and raised the foot so as to push it back, and so succeeded in getting it out without serious damage. His leg was not seriously cut, as near as we could tell, for it was after dark.
    On Tuesday of last week when I came home from Table Rock I found Mrs. A. E. Riggs and her son and a daughter, Mrs. H. F. Bruce, from Nevada. Mr. Bruce and his son-in-law, H. F. Bruce, had arrived from Nevada. They had been into Idaho, Washington, Montana, etc., looking for a place that suited them; had written to Washington, D.C. for information with regard to the country, had received circulars from Jackson County, Oregon, and concluded to come here, and now the ladies think that they have found the "Lost Paradise." They bought the old Newman place near the mouth of the creek, and expect to take their homes among us. They brought a carload of horses with them, and at this writing the men are away looking after them.
Medford Mail, April 2, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Wm. Knighton went to Medford on business Tuesday.
    Mrs. G. W. Daley, Sr., started for Ashland on a visit to spend a few days.
    W. T. Sike of Medford was also here one day last week, inquiring the best way to go to the Iowa sawmills.
    W. W. Parker of the Big Butte country came out last Monday on his way to Medford as a witness in the Morley land case.
    Rev. A. C. Howlett expects to preach at Derby next Sunday, April 11, at 11 o'clock, and at Reese Creek at 3:30 p.m. the same day.
    M. C. Mahoney and L. B. Marcy of Butte Falls were here one night last week with loads of goods for Butte Falls. Mr. Marcy is laying in quite a stock of goods for the summer trade.
    The road workers have been working for the last three days leveling down the streets and filling up a slough just front of the Sunnyside Hotel, which greatly improves the looks of things around there.
    Mr. Tucker, wife and little girl, living on Rogue River about four miles above Trail, stayed here one night last week. They had been to Medford on a trading expedition and came this way on account of the shortness in distance and the smoothness of the roads.
    A man by the name of W. C. Mason, of Modoc County, California, a brother-in-law to a Mr. Chastine, lately deceased, who had a homestead in the Reese Creek country, stopped here last Saturday night on his way to the homestead to look after his brother-in-law's interests.
    H. B. Cady of Minnesota, F. D. Cline and wife, and her sister, Mrs. Arnold, accompanied by W. C. Earl, came out the first of last week to look at a tract of land adjoining Eagle Point, and Messrs. Earl and Cady came out again the last of the week. Mr. Cady is so favorably impressed with our surroundings that he says that he wants to locate among us.
    Rev. E. B. Jones, P.E. of the Jacksonville district of the M.E. Church South, and J. M. Wells of Medford were out the first of last week in company of Mr. Wines of Medford. They went on farther north to look at a piece of land, and there may be something in the land they are after, for almost everything that looks black is suspicioned of being connected with coal one way or the other.
    George West and Buel Hildreth came on to the Sunnyside, where their wives have been boarding for the last few weeks, and on Monday Mr. West went to Moonville to meet John Holtz, and they two are going into the neighborhood of Prospect to work for Uncle Sam in the tall timber, and Mr. Hildreth took his wife and went to Medford, where they expect to remain a few days and then go to their homestead.
    On Thursday of last week Mr. Willits of Elk Creek and his daughter came out and engaged a rig and driver to take the daughter to Butte Falls on Sunday, and then they both went to Medford, Miss Willitss returning on Saturday, and on Sunday went to Butte Falls, where she was to be met by Jack Tungate to take her to what is known as the Beale district, to teach a six months' school. When asked by the inquisitive driver what she was going to do with her money, she replied that she was going to save it and go to the Agricultural College at Corvallis--a wise decision.
    A gentleman from Medford came out last week by the name of Smidt, and had in tow B. H. Harris, Levi Wade and Fred Reinecke, on their way to Butte Falls. Mr. Wade went up with the expectation of running the Butte Falls sawmill this summer, but found the altitude so great that he could not live there on account of his weak heart, so Mr. Harris had to bring him out Tuesday night. At the same time he brought out Rev. Mark C. Davis, who had gone up with M. C. Mahoney on Monday and preached there Monday night. Mr. Davis intended to have preached at Peyton on Thursday night of last week, but could not get there on account of the horrible condition of the roads. They reached here at 11 o'clock p.m.
    On Wednesday of last week we had a quiet little wedding in our town. E. S. Wolfer was married to Mrs. Myrtle J. Walker at the residence of the bride's parents by Rev. Reuter of Medford. Messrs. Fred Frideger and Clarence Meeker, Mr. Cooley, our Sunday school superintenden, and your Eagle Point correspondent and wife were the only ones invited, Rev. Reuter using the marriage ceremony prescribed by the M.E. church. After the congratulations were offered and the gifts were presented, dinner was announced and we all sat at the table together, as a family, and partook of a sumptuous feast, and in the course of a few hours we all repaired to our respective homes, wishing the bride and groom a long and prosperous life.
    Last week I received a letter from A. E. Deam of Petoskey, Mich., in which he says that he has been reading the Eaglets in the Medford Mail for some time, and wants me, the author of the Eaglets, to look at some tracts of land he will designate in a future letter and let him know the particulars with regard to them, that he and his two sons expect to come here this coming fall to live. So you see the Mail is doing the work to bring men and capital to this county. I am in receipt of letters from all over the country asking all kinds of questions with regard to Jackson County, as I am pretty well known all over the country, having written every week for the Mail for 14½ years, amounting to 754 letters, without missing a week. Where is the local correspondent that can beat the record?
    On Thursday of last week J. C. Brown, accompanied by J. M. Morris, the business manager of the company that is drilling for oil on the prairie between here and Medford, stopped for dinner and in the afternoon took a trip up Rogue River and around the country, returning at night, and the next morning started again and was gone all day, coming in at supper time, took supper and started for the oil camp. Mr. Morris reported that they had drilled at that time about 700 feet, had encountered some very hard rock that it took 12 hours to drill three feet. He seems to be very much encouraged at the prospect and contemplates drilling several more wells in these parts. I visited the camp Monday morning, but learned nothing new, as the men employed have their orders to answer no questions, and Mr. Morris or the senior Mundy were not there.
Medford Mail, April 9, 1909, page 8


BROWNSBORO ITEMS.
    Charles Terrill was a visitor to Medford last week.
    Mr. Peachey is to be the new school teacher in District 35.
    An epidemic of la grippe has visited this vicinity, but without serious results.
    Miss Ina Cochran of Medford was a visitor for a few days at the home of Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Young.
    A dance was given last week at the home of Mr. Myers, the forest ranger. A large crowd and a general good time was had.
    A dance and basket supper will be held at the residence of C. D. Colby on the night of Friday, April 16. A large crowd and a good time is anticipated.
    Menter Parker, who took up a homestead in this vicinity about a year ago, contemplates returning to his home in the East. He will drive a team the entire distance.
    The roads leading to Medford and Eagle Point are gradually getting into good condition, and by the number of automobiles and vehicles encountered Brownsboro is getting to be a bustling town.
    A meeting was called for the signers to the petition circulated for a telephone system, but owing to a slight misunderstanding as to the place of meeting, the attendance was not as large as desired. Another call will be made in a few days, and it is urgently requested that everyone interested in this most necessary adjunct to the farm home be present and boost for the proposition.
    Lee Bradshaw and wife were recent visitors to Brownsboro. He reports that his large orchard is showing indications for a bumper crop of apples this year. He has had a large force of men cultivating the ground. This orchard land is a black sticky and is not irrigated. He has just received a picture postal card from England showing an exhibit of apples from the Spokane apple show, the fruit having been shipped from his orchards to the exhibit at Spokane.
Medford Mail, April 16, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Dexter is building a slaughterhouse on the old C. Griffith place, and expects to reopen the meat market in the near future.
    Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls stopped on his way from Medford, where he had been as a witness in the Murley land contest case.
    Mr. Hildreth, Sr., who has been living in Butte Falls for some time, has moved to Ashland with his wife--all the family he has left.
    James Ringer, our paper hanger and painter, is kept busy now all the time. He sent east for his paper and is doing a rushing business.
    Mrs. Howlett is having a top ground cellar and wash house combined built in the corner of the yard, with cement floor and foundation.
    Sam and Scott Bruce came out from their homes on the unsurveyed last Monday. Scott remained to work at his trade, carpentering, and Sam went on to Medford the same eventing.
    Thomas S. Zimmerman, a brother of B. A. Zimmerman of Derby, arrived last week with his family from Michigan, and at present are stopping at the Derby sawmill with his brother.
    A. J. Daley has had three teams and five men at work picking and hauling stones off his farm, just south of and adjoining Eagle Point, and now has several teams plowing the land, and intends to put in corn.
    Messrs. Netherland and Edmondson are fixing up the Derby sawmill and getting it ready for the summer's run. They have quite a number of logs on the yard and a large lot of them banked ready to haul as soon as the ground dries enough so itwlll brace up a wagon load.
    Mr. Wines, our coal man, was out one night last week and was very reticent with regard to his business. He went on farther north, where, I am told, they are finding some fine prospects for coal, and from the present indications it will not be long before coal will be used as fuel instead of wood.
    F. H. Stecker of Wisconsin stopped here one day last week on his way to the Butte Falls country. On his way back he stopped and visited the family of Mr. Humphrey, living near Derby, returning via the Sunnyside for the night. The next morning he went to Medford. He is looking for a location.
    On account of the vast increase in business in Eagle Point, C. J. Florey, our postmaster, has had to put in 33 new lock boxes in the post office, making 149 lock boxes, besides a large number of open boxes. I tell you, Eagle Point is coming to the front fast, and when the P.&E. gets atarted again we will have a regular rush of business.
    Charles Edmondson, who came out the first of last week from Butte Falls with a load of household goods for Mr. Hildreth, stopped here overnight and reports the roads to be very rough, but drying up very fast. He went on to Medford with the household goods, and Mr. Hildreth went in a rig with Eugene Stoul.
    The representatives of an oil company that are now boring for oil on the desert south of Eagle Point have been looking over our country with the object of leasing land on which to bore for oil. Mr. Morris, the manager of the company, seems to be greatly encouraged with the prospect they have where they are at work now, and if they succeed in finding oil in sufficient quantities that will give Jackson County a boost that will beat all the boosters put together.
    B. H. Harris and a Mr. Wells, with Mr. Harris' typewriter and his children, came out in an auto last week. They were working up a project to put up a telephone line from here to Butte Falls. Mr. Harris while here made arrangements with George Daley, Sr., to handle lumber here; also rented a house for an office and telephone office; also rented the hay scales so that the teamsters can weigh their loads and have them hauled by the ton instead of the old way, by the thousand feet.
    Frank Manning came out from his home, on Upper Rogue River, last Friday, and went to Medford Saturday to hunt up a box of goods that was shipped last November, charges paid to Derby, via the P.&E., returning Sunday, and on Monday morning he started for his home. They all---that is, all that have to travel over the mountain roads--complain of the horrible condition of the roads, and if the county court don't do something to help the citizens in the mountain districts there will be another great secession in the United States, for they say they will not stand it to have all the tax money that comes from those districts applied to the valley roads and leave them to wallow through the mud over rocks and stumps, they will just secede from Jackson County, and then--.
Medford Mail, April 16, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. L. Childreth has employed a man to help him in the blacksmith shop, as he has more work than he can do.
    Mr. Austin of the unsurveyed and Mr. Adams of Butte Falls stopped with us one night last week on their way to the city.
    Last week David Ball of Humboldt County, California, arrived here on a visit to his relatives. He is a brother-in-law to Mrs. Frank Lewis of this place.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Trail next Sunday, April 25, at 11 a.m., and at Central schoolhouse at 3 the same day, and the following Sunday, May 2, M. C. Davis and A. C. Howlett will hold a meeting at Trail, have basket dinner, two sermons and the ordinance of baptism will be administered by immersion. Let everybody come, bring their dinner and have a good time together.
    Frank Netherland and Lee Edmondson are having their logging wagon fixed up at the blacksmith and wagon shop of W. L. Childreth so they can do business at their sawmill near Derby. They have the mill fixed up in good shape and are cutting a fine grade of lumber.
    Mr. Hawk came out last Monday with a load of lumber for the Sunnyside Hotel.
    On Wednesday of last week a young man by the name of Miller came out from Elk Creek for a casket for J. A. Abbott, who had died that morning. Mr. Abbott was one of the old pioneers, having settled in this country in an early day. He lived to be 83 years, and leaves a wife and three children. I am not aware whether he ever was married in his younger days. He was a man who was highly respected by those who knew him. He was an old veteran, having done service for his country in the Civil War.
    T. M. Peelor and wife, of Upper Rogue River, he having bought the old Charley Knighton place, came out last Monday for supplies. They came from Missouri last fall and are well pleased with their purchase and especially with our country and climate. Among other good things he has done is to subscribe for the Medford Mail, as he wants the general and special news.
    Mr. Swihart, Sr., arrived from Wisconsin at the Sunnyside last Monday night on his way to Derby, where he has three daughters and a son living. Mr. Swihart, Jr., has a store at Derby and Mrs. Hume, one of his daughters, has been engaged teaching school there during the early spring, but now is teaching in the Higinbotham district.
    M. C. Mahoney and L. A. Wright came out from Butte Falls last Friday on their way to Medford. Mr. Wright is engaged teaching school in that city. They report that Mr. Reinecke is fixing up the sawmill in good shape and will soon be sawing lumber for this market. The company which owns the mill are preparing to deliver lumber at the lumber yard at this place, and have three men at work now fixing up a house that Arthur Pool started to build before he died, for an office, as well as for a telephone office, and they are going right ahead to put up a telephone line between here and Butte Falls, and then extend it on to Medford, as the line we have between here and Central Point is out of commission a good part of the time. Today, Monday, as I was riding along from the Bybee bridge I noticed several of the telephone poles lying on the ground and one I noticed was lying on top of the wire, and people are so disgusted with such service that they intend to put in a line to Medford where they can talk with the outside world whenever they want to.

Medford Mail, April 23, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The rain is making the people happy.
    Claud Wamsley started on a business trip for Portland last Monday morning.
    Ray Harnish took a load of people to Medford last Saturday to see the big show.
    Mrs. J. A. Abbott moved out from Elk Creek last Monday and will live in this place for the present.
    The Reese Creek and Eagle Point ball teams played a game here Sunday, resulting in favor of Eagle Point.
    Mr. Swenning, one of the leading forest rangers, stopped with us last Friday night on his way to Butte Falls.
    Mr. Hawk, our sawmill man of Clark's Creek, brought out two loads of lumber for parties i
n Eagle Point last week.
    L. Bassett of Trail was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside the early part of last week. He was on his way to Eastern Oregon.
    George West, one of the forest rangers, came out from the hills last Saturday for further instructions, returning Monday morning.
    Jud Edsall brought out the first load of lumber from the Butte Falls mills Monday, this season, for the Eagle Point lumber yard.
    Messrs. B. H. Harris, Norris and Wines came out last Monday and started with their auto for the prospective coal fields northeast of Eagle Point.
    Arthur Brown and a friend of his by the name of Robinson were out last week soliciting for the Medford Magazine. They seemed to be meeting with very good success.
    David Mayham, one of the old pioneers of the valley, came near breaking his leg the other day. He was springtoothing a piece of rough ground and fell on the harrow.
    George Richardson and family stopped at the Sunnyside last Monday night on their way to Butte Falls, where Mr. Richardson expects to work in the Butte Falls Sugar Pine Lumber Company's mill.
    Ed Walker and wife, accompanied by two timbermen by the name of Coy and Tinter, were on their way to look over some of the big timber belt in the Big Butte country. They expected to be gone about two weeks.
    H. S. Bramble and wife of Medford came out one day last week. Mr. Bramble moved the household goods of Mr. Truax out. Mr. Truax has settled on a tract of land he bought of the old John Williscroft place near Eagle Point.
    Ed Briscoe, who was recently burned out on Trail Creek and had quite a lot of things given to him by the citizens of Eagle Point, requests the Mail to extend their sincere thanks for the contribution that was sent them by the people here.
    Claud Wamsley has been engaged painting a sign on the front of the building occupied by the Butte Falls Sugar Pine Lumber Company, and B. H. Harris, the agent for the company, has promised to have all sorts of lumber on hand all the time, which will be a great convenience to this community.
    J. D. Olwell and wife, Mr. Morris and a gentleman by the name of Sherman came out for dinner last Sunday. It is getting to be quite fashionable for the good people of Medford and Central Point to ride out in their autos, take dinner and fish awhile, then return in the cool of the evening.
    Frank Lewis, our billiard saloon and confectionery man, has installed a new patented refrigerator constructed so that he can keep ice cream solid for 24 hours. It is a nice contrivance and will prove quite a blessing to those who wish that luxury, especially when there is a crowd as there often is, and the ice cream gives out about 3 o'clock in the afternoon.
    There is some real estate changing hands in Eagle Point. J. B. Jackson sold the lot on which stood the Jackson confectionery shop that was burned down some time ago, to Wm. von der Hellen, consideration $180, and S. B. Holmes sold to the same party a tract adjoining it on the north, so as to have the lots along that street correspond; consideration $150. Mr. von der Hellen expects to build on the lots in the near future.
    Little Jack Florey had quite an experience one day last week. He was engaged to work on the road hauling gravel, and when he started from home his dinner pail fell off the dump boards. That started the horses to running. and they ran about four miles, but fortunately did no damage, as the bolster jumped off, thus uncoupling the wagon, so that the horses had nothing but the front wheels to haul. They kept the road all the time and were headed for Prospect, but were overtaken by Walter Woods on horseback and stopped.
    Messrs. E. Bond, F. J. Newman and Alder Akin of Medford, accompanied by F. H. Welch of San Francisco, Cal., stopped here for dinner one day last week, and after dinner went off to look at some land. They did not let their business be known, but whenever strangers come out and go into the hills a suspicion arises in the minds of the curiously inclined that they are looking for coal, oil or gas, for since that article came out in the Friday's Morning Mail telling about so many people applying to the land office at Roseburg to purchase our hill land for the purpose of prospecting for coal there has been some excitement in that line.

Medford Mail, April 30, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Johnson, the popular teacher of the Reese Creek school, closed his school last Friday.
    Mr. Massey of Butte Falls stopped here last Friday night with another load of goods for his store in that town.
    W. C. Daley and one of the Stanley boys brought out a bunch of steers for parties in Klamath County last Friday.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Holmes of Derby has an ad in this week's issue of the Medford Mail for a black horse she has lost.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Derby next Sunday, May 9, at 11 o'clock, and at Reese Creek at 3:00 p.m. the same day.
    Sheriff Jones came out in his auto to serve some papers on parties in this neighborhood, taking dinner here, one day last week.
    John Pack of Boise, Idaho, and J. T. Young of Medford were out last week as guests at the Sunnyside and to look at our surroundings.
    Mr. Hawk and wife, of the Clark's Creek sawmill, called for the night one night last week on their way to Medford with a load of pine lumber.
    Mrs. Charles Pruitt and daughter were pleasant callers last Friday. Mr. Pruitt is building a large barn on his place, a short distance below our town.
    Our meat market men, Messrs. Deater and Daley, are having the market house remodeled so as to be able to handle their goods satisfactory to all their customers.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peyton of Peyton came out last Sunday, stayed at the Sunnyside overnight, went to Medford to close up a land deal with George Kincaid, they having sold 11 acres of their place for $50 an acre.
    There was quite a crowd of strangers out at the Sunnyside last Sunday, but as I was away from home, was unable to learn their names, although I found that one of them was Editor Putnam of the Tribune.
    James Ringer, our paper hanger and painter, has been busy this past week buying paper for different ones in this town, and has now gone to Butte Falls to do about three weeks' work there. He also has several jobs here to finish.
    Mrs. George Morine of Bonanza came out with Mrs. Howlett last Monday from Medford to visit awhile with some of her old-time friends in our town. She was formerly a resident here and has many friends that give her a cordial welcome.
    A man by the name of Johnson came out the first of last week to look at the country, going from here to Butte Falls, but remained but one night, on account of being troubled with the asthma. He seemed to be well pleased with our country and may decide to buy property here.
    Mrs. R. G. Brown of Portland, formerly of this place, came down last week and spent a day or two with her daughter, Mrs. William Brown, and then went on to Nevada to visit her aged father. She went that far in company of S. B. Holmes and wife, who were on their way to Illinois to visit his sister.
    Claud Wamsley has just closed contracts to build a large shed, 28x60 feet, for the Butte Falls Sugar Pine Lumber Company at this place, where they expect to keep all kinds of lumber. Also to build a warehouse back of the hardware store for the proprietor, William von der Hellen. Also a large $4000 dwelling on the farm recently purchased of S. B. Holmes, by Dr. Coughlin. So your readers will see that Eagle Point is coming to the front very fast.
    Last Saturday night Rev. M. C. Davis and your correspondent commenced a meeting at Trail, and on Sunday had a basket dinner, two sermons and a baptizing by immersion. The meeting had been announced in the Medford Mail and consequently it was generally known and there was a very large crowd assembled. The people came from different parts of the country, some from Table Rock, Elk Creek, Big Butte, Upper Trail, Central, etc., and Brother Davis preached one of his best sermons. At 11 o'clock in the afternoon your correspondent preached and then Brother Davis immersed two young ladies and one young man. I must not pass over mentioning something about the dinner, but what is the use, for we all know that the people out in the country know how to prepare a royal feast, and we had it there, for each seemed to vie with the other to see which could have the best.
    Judge J. R. Neil of Jacksonville and Mrs. Schneider, also of Jacksonville, were guests at the Sunnyside last Monday. The judge came out on legal business and from what I can learn he has a rather complicated case on his hands. It appears that Mr. A. had an old mare last fall that his son wanted to kill, as she was considered of no value, but the father said no, so he (the father) took her to Central Point and gave her to Mr. B., with the understanding that he was to care for her. Later, Mr. C., acting as agent for Mr. B., traded her off to Mr. D. for another horse. By this time, Mr. A. learned that the old mare was being traded, so he goes to Mr. B. and demands the mare, and Mr. B. claimed that he gave him the mare and that he had a right to trade her off, so Mr. A. then goes to Mr. D. and demands the animal, but had traded it off to Mr. E., and consequently she was out of his hands. Mr. A. then goes to Mr. E. and tells his story and threatens criminal action, and Mr. E. gives up the mare to Mr. A. and then Mr. E. commences suit against Mr. D. for the animal he traded off, and $20 damages, and now the case is to be fought out before Professor Narregan, our justice of the peace, and Judge Neil is to attend to the defendant's side of the case. How it will terminate, no one can tell. It may be like the Arrant calf case in Klamath County, where the parties have spent hundreds of dollars over a charge of stealing a calf.

Medford Mail, May 7, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    William von der Hellen has had a cellar dug as a special depositary for powder, dynamite, etc.
    Mr. Tungate and wife, of Jacksonville, came out last week to visit Mrs. Tungate's brother, John Watkins.
    Mrs. George Morine, who has been visiting Mrs. Howlett for several days, returned to Medford Saturday.
    William Brown, a brother of Hon. George Brown of this place, who has been visiting relatives in Portland, returned last week.
    Thomas Rolfe, a retired railroad man, stopped with us one night last week. He seemed to be trying to boost the Alaska-Yukon fair.
    Quite a number of our young men went to Medford last Saturday to attend the funeral of Bert Castor, who died in Vancouver, Wash.
    I learned last Friday that one of our old neighbors, Joseph Riley, had sold 40 acres of his home place, the part on the county road, to one of the Lofland boys; consideration $4000.
    J. P. Moomaw and wife went to Medford on Wednesday of last week to make a deed to a part of their place, 40 acres, that they had sold to a party, but I have not been able to learn the name; consideration, $3000.
    For the next few weeks the Eaglets will not, possibly, appear in the usual place, as your Eagle Point correspondent expects to start north today (Monday) to be gone for a few weeks, but the readers of the Mail will likely hear from him along the road.
    Frank Brown, one of our leading merchants, and his wife started, in company with his brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. S. B. Holmes, and his sister-in-law, Mrs. R. G. Brown, last week for Nevada and Illinois, where they expect to spend some time visiting friends and relatives.
    J. D. Olwell and wife and Mr. Morris, the manager of the oil well company, came out to the Sunnyside for dinner last Friday. They are still very reticent with regard to what they are doing at the oil well, but are at work putting down the casing to shut off the water, but time will tell what the result will be of their prospecting.
    Claud Wamsley, our expert sign painter, has changed the sign he painted over the office of the Butte Falls lumber storehouse as it appears that that part of it, "Sugar Pine Lumber Co., etc.," was an improvement on some other company, so Mr. Harris had it changed to Butte Falls Lumber, Shingle & Box Company.
    Mrs. Hollenbeak of Prospect came out Thursday of last week with Mr. Daniels. She was on her way to Medford to buy furniture to furnish her hotel at Prospect and get it arranged before the rush in the summer. She also intended to lay in a stock of groceries and take them home with her. She is expecting a big run on that road to Crater Lake this season.
    A. J. Daley recently purchased the building now occupied as a meat market, and the one adjoining his house; consideration $300. He is having the meat market building remodeled, repainted, a new awning put up and the old, dilapidated porch torn away and intends to have the other building repaired, repainted and things fixed up all O.K.
    I recently sent a copy of the Medford Magazine, the April number, to my brother, who lives in San Francisco, Cal, and in a letter received Tuesday of last week he said: "The Mail and magazine sent me came all right and I enjoyed reading them. The magazine is really classical. I did not suppose that Medford could get out such a magazine as that." He, like a great many more that are not posted, have but a faint idea of what Medford and Rogue River Valley can do.
    C. C. Humphrey and two children, formerly of Siskiyou County, California, stopped at the Sunnyside Tuesday night of last week on their way to what proved to be the funeral of his mother. They received a message over the phone that his mother was lying at the point of death at her home in Scotts Valley, California, and they were hastening to her bedside, but Wednesday morning the word came over the wire that she had died on Tuesday night. Mr. Humphrey and his partner are running a tunnel under a spur of Round Top, prospecting for coal, and from what I can learn the prospect is very good.

Medford Mail, May 14, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Dear Medford Mail: As business called me away from home so that the Eaglets could appear in the usual form I thought that I would give a few jottings along the way.
    I did not get off on Tuesday as was stated in the Morning Mail on account of the train being behind time thirteen hours but I left Medford on Wednesday morning on No. 16 and had a good opportunity to see the country as I passed along. There was nothing of note to attract my attention until we reached Glendale; there we found that it was raining and we could begin to see a slight change in the appearance of the crops, although they were not as good as they usually are.
    All along the line I could see a decided improvement but not so marked in the Willamette Valley proper as it might be.
    I could see that in Douglas County the farmers had been taking pattern from the farmers in Jackson County and pruning up their orchards and cultivating the soil and putting the fruit trees and berry vines in proper shape. On making inquiry upon the prospect for fruit this year I learned that the frost had done no especial damage, but that there would be a plenty as usual.
    On arriving at Cottage Grove I met one of Jackson County's old and respected citizens, Mr. Alfred Corden, formerly of upper Rogue River. The few minutes I had to talk with him I learned that he had bought a farm about two miles from Cottage Grove and was well pleased with the surroundings. Cottage Grove has improved in appearance considerable since I was over the road last and the surroundings led me to think that a new class of people has come in and settled there.
    Eugene presented, as usual, a neat appearance and showed that the citizens thought of their reputation abroad and consequently had things fixed up in shape. From Eugene on down the river the valley, or rather the farms, show a lack of taste or pride in fixing up, in fact the most of the land seems to be owned by the large landholders and they don't seem to care how their places look, although some of the farms show a degree of neatness that will compare favorably with the farms in Jackson County.
    Passing by Albany and several small towns we arrived in Salem at 6:15 p.m., where I was met by that indefatigable worker, Rev. Mark C. Davis, and taken to the home of Mr. and Mrs. Joseph Schindler, the place assigned to us by the committee on arrangements, during our stay, we having gone to Salem to attend a meeting of the Congregational Association of ministers and delegates.
    On Tuesday, we as a body took carriages and went out to the Willard church about twelve miles, where the ladies had prepared a basket dinner. Say, Mr. Editor, if you never attended a basket meeting dinner out in the country you can form no idea of what it means--the long table was spread under the trees adjoining the church and was about forty feet long and simply loaded with the good things that the Willamette Valley produces. In the afternoon we went about five miles to Howell church and there we had another royal greeting. The services consisted of singing, prayer and five and ten minute talks on the subject of Christian fellowship. Returning to Salem by 5:30 p.m., where we finished up the business of the association meetings.
    We found the roads fine except in the city of Salem where they were very rough. The next morning Rev. Davis, Smith, Oakley and myself took the car for Oregon City where we arrived about 10 o'clock a.m.
    I have written enough for this time but in my next will tell something about Oregon City, Clackamas, Damascus etc.

Medford Mail, May 21, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote to you I had just arrived at Oregon City, arriving at 10 a.m., and that afternoon I took in the lower part of the town, that part under the bluff, next to the river, and at night delivered a lecture in the First Congregational church on the Sunday school work in the eastern part of Jackson County.
    The next morning by 5:15 was out walking up the long sloping hill so that I could see what improvements had been made in the last four years. Well, there has not been the marked improvements made here that is noticeable in other places, although Oregon City is a pretty place, and that portion on the bluff, the resident portion, shows considerable taste in its arrangement. The streets are kept in good condition. Although there is a certain lack of neatness about them, there seems to be considerable business being done and the most of the people seem to be busily employed.
    Leaving Oregon City on Friday afternoon by private conveyance, I went to my brother-in-law's at Damascus, where is situated one of the finest farming sections of the Willamette Valley; land that with proper care and cultivation produces immense crops, but it requires care, cultivation and fertilizers to make it produce the best results. In order to show the difference that care and fertilizers make I will mention one instance. There are two places where I was, separated by the county road, that seem to be the same kind of land. One place had nine acres planted to oats and the other eight acres to oats. The nine acres produced 225 bushels of oats and the eight acres, 728 bushels. On the first place the farmer had the manure from his barn lay in a heap and rot, while the other hauled the manure from the barn cleaning it up every morning and scattering on the land as soon as a load could be procured.
    On Sunday I preached morning and evening in the Free Methodist church. Monday I looked over the country around Damascus and saw some fine farms and some old-time friends. Tuesday I went by private conveyance to where my daughter lives, Fairview, and in going passed through the city of Gresham, in the lower end of Powell Valley, where I used to preach 47 years ago in the old Powell Valley school house. But things have changed since then. Then the whole surrounding country was a vast forest where one could travel for miles together and the only way one could go out was straight up; but now what a change. The timber is about all gone. The country is covered with fine farms with neat, and in many instances, elegant houses. The land is considered the best in the whole Willamette Valley. We, that is my brother-in-law, wife and myself, arrived at Fairview about 11 a.m. and found my daughter and family looking for me. The town of Fairview has not grown much since my last visit four years ago. The appearance of the place shows lack of enterprise and push; the houses even having the appearance of the lack of taste to say the least of them--a good coat of paint would help the appearance of them very much.
    On Saturday morning I took the electric car for Portland, arriving there at 1 p.m., and found my wife's two brothers and family all well. I went to the Sunnyside Congregational church Sunday morning and in the afternoon called on one of our old townsmen, J. D. McGee (Donnie) a boy who was raised and educated in Eagle Point, son of O. P. McGee. "Donnie" is married and in the lumber business in Portland and reports business good, but I must close for this time but not until I tell the readers of the Mail how glad I was last Saturday to get a copy of the Medford Mail; but I find that newsy paper everywhere I go.
    In my next I will tell something more about Portland, my trip up the Columbia River, Cascade Locks, etc., where I expect to be the next time I write for the Mail.
    Please say to the readers of the Mail that I will not be able to fill my appointment at Table Rock and Moonville on Sunday, June 6th, as I can't pull loose from friends and relatives here by that time.

Medford Mail, May 28, 1909, page 5


VISIT EAGLE POINT
Large Crowd From Medford Attends Entertainment

    A special train from Medford last night took over 60 old soldiers and their ladies to Eagle Point. The occasion was a public entertainment given for the purpose of raising money to procure a bell for the church there. It had been planned to hold the exercises under a large pine tree, but on account of the rain they had to be held in the church.
    The meeting was called to order by J. W. Grover and after a song by the choir the invocation was given by Rev. Lamar of California.
    A splendid luncheon of coffee, cakes, etc., were served by the ladies to the Medford visitors. The ladies who waited upon and were active in carrying on the entertainment were Mrs. Grover, Mrs. Flora, Mrs. Brown, Mrs. Jackson, Mrs. Smith, Mrs. Ringer and several others whose names your correspondent did not know.
    Miss Elsie Nye of Flounce Rock sang a solo, accompanying her voice on the guitar, which was greatly appreciated. A poem written by an old soldier at Tolo was read by Carl Ringer and was applauded.
    Miss Mamie Wright presided at the organ and altogether a very jolly time was had. The Medford crowd returned home well pleased with the manner in which they had been entertained.

Medford Mail, June 4, 1909, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
Medford Mail:
    This morning I was greatly disappointed on the arrival of the messenger from the Cascade Locks post office when he announced that the Medford Mail did not come, for I was eagerly looking for it so that I could get the news from home. But I was not the only one disappointed, for O. P. McGee and family look for the Mail as eagerly as they would a letter from home.
    Well, the last time I wrote was from Portland, where I remained until Friday, the 28th inst. While I was in Portland I traveled around considerable, saw many of the sights of the big city and noted to some extent some of the improvements, etc., but one thing I noticed was that there was quite a number of houses and some prominent business houses with the sign out "For Sale" or "For Rent," but nevertheless there seemed to be a vast throng moving in every direction and all kinds of business being carried on. In many places the streets were torn up where they were putting the fire [sic] for the streetcars underground, making improvements in the streets, etc. Truly Portland is a busy place, but still there are scores of people there of all ages, sex and color looking in vain for employment.
    While in Portland I found J. E. Stepp and John Iseli and families, formerly owners of the Round Top mill of the Big Butte country. After they were burned out on Round Top they sold their timber land to the Dewing Company of Michigan and have bought property in Southeast Portland and gone into business there. But the women folks say they would like to be back on their old homes on Round Top, where they could enjoy the salubrious climate of Jackson County. I also called on Mrs. Rippy, nee Lottie Taylor, formerly one of Eagle Point's most promising and lovable--pardon the expression--young ladies; also Miss Ollie Nichols, daughter of Hon. T. E. Nichols of Eagle Point. They seemed to be the very picture of health and happiness.
    Leaving Portland Friday morning on the steamer Bailey Gatzert, I took a trip up the Columbia River. It proved to be a very disagreeable day, for the wind blew very hard and a cold rain accompanied it, making it difficult for me to stay on the deck to see some of the grandeur and beauty of the scene along the banks of the river. There was nothing of especial interest to see after leaving the Alder Street dock until we reached the Columbia River proper, although the sight of three large ocean steamers was something to an old Southern Oregon hayseed; but they were a grand sight to me; but when we reached the great railroad bridge across the Columbia River at Vancouver the sights began to loom up. That bridge truly is a wonderful work of art, with its piers of solid masonry at equal distances across the river, on which the massive steel bridge is built, stretching out for a mile or more and bearing up its burdens of living freight. It is indeed a sight worth seeing.
    Passing from there on a clear day one has a fine view of Mount Hood as it lifts its snow-capped head into the clouds and looks down on the rugged and abrupt hills, or rather mountains, along the banks of the river. After we had reached Cape Horn, where the mountains are almost perpendicular and raise their heads from 2000 to 3000 feet and send forth from their snow-capped summits beautiful streams coursing down the mountainsides, in some instances falling 800 or 900 feet perpendicular. It affords a sight of beauty and sublimity that is seldom found.
    On the boat were about 200 passengers and among them one could hear a variety of singular remarks and questions. One lady from Boston, Mass., when she saw a large tract of land covered with standing dead trees on the top of one of the high, steep hills, asked what all of those poles were standing there for, and when told that they were stumps of trees that had been killed by fire, she inquired how in the world anyone could get up there and build a fire in such a place; that surely no one would camp on such a place as that, and when it was suggested that the fire could be built at the foot of the hill and run up the side of the mountain she looked amazed at such a bright idea. And she appeared to be a woman of culture and intelligence--but it was all new to her.
    We arrived at Cascade Locks about noon, where I was met by one of Jackson County's old and honored citizens, O. P. McGee, and after getting my mail jumped into his rig and started for his ranch, two and a half miles up the river. On the way we picked up Mrs. McGee, who had been staying with her daughter, Mabel, Mrs. Bert Wilder, and while I am on the subject, will tell her many friends in Jackson County that there was born at their home on May 22 an 11-pound boy, and Grandpa
McGee feels quite aged.
    The town of Cascade Locks is a small village situated on the Oregon side of the Columbia River about 20 miles below Hood River. There is but very little farming country surrounding it, as the high and almost inaccessible mountains raise their lofty peaks from near the banks of the river. There is some stock raised here and Mr. McGee says that it is like climbing a ladder to get them onto the hills.
    The town of Stevenson, the county seat of Skamania County, Washington, lays on the opposite side of the river. It appears to be but a small place, but I understand that it is the largest town in the county. About all there is in these parts is the timber and fishing industries. There is a sawmill here in Cascade Locks that employs about 140 men. They have a fine plant and turn out about 100,000 feet of lumber per day, and the most of it is shipped east. I expect to leave here Monday morning for Wilbur, Wash., via Spokane, where you will probably hear from me again.

Medford Mail, June 11, 1909, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    That John Ashpole and wife had gone to the Willamette Valley to visit friends.
    That the new railroad company had a force of men and teams extending the road toward the big timber.
    That Mrs. Howlett had been making several changes around the Sunnyside and everything was going with a rush.
    That C. O. Wamsley had bought the lumber in Medford to build the house for Dr. Coughlin on the S. B. Holmes place.
    George West, one of the lumber cruisers, came out last Sunday to see his wife, who is boarding at the Sunnyside. and on Monday went to Medford on business.
    When I reached Seattle I was met by one of our old Eagle Point ladies, Mrs. Charles Jones, nee Lelah Fryer. I was taken by her and her husband, who joined us later, around the city, out on Lake Washington, through the fair grounds, and my stay there was made as pleasant as one could wish.
    There will be a picnic dinner and Sunday school meeting on Rogue River next Sunday below the Bybee bridge. There will be Sunday school exercises commencing at 10 o'clock a.m. preaching at 11 o'clock and an interesting program in the afternoon. Everybody is invited to come and have a good time.
    Professor Miller, one of the pioneer instructors of Rogue River Valley, and Mrs. Benjamin Fredenburg called for dinner last Monday. Mrs. F. was on her way to Medford to try to straighten out the tangle with regard to her homestead. She had lived on it for nine years and made her final proof and our particular officials want to know where she was the extra two years.
    Our annual school meeting passed off very pleasantly. Had a great attendance. J. B. Jackson was elected director and Mrs. Cora Officer was elected clerk. E. S. Wolfer was nominated for re-election, but he positively refused to serve any longer. There was no tax voted, as it was thought best to wait until after the assessor made his report and then call a special meeting for that purpose.
    Leaving Seattle on the 1:15 p.m. train, I started for Portland, where I witnessed the final of the great rose carnival. That was truly grand. Leaving Portland the next morning for Fairview by electric car, I wended my way via Oregon City, Eugene City, Coburg, etc., arriving in Medford at 11 a.m., taking the P.&E. train for Eagle Point at 2:30 p.m., and I found that during my absence from home that I. B. Williams' son had bought the Farlow property, paying $500 for the same and had the carpenters working on the old building, reroofing and changing it around considerably.
    The last time I wrote for the Mail I was in Wilbur, in the state of Washington, and the article was missent, lost on the way, or found its way into the "wastebasket." Well, after leaving Wilbur, Wash., I camped Thursday night until after midnight in a little dark hovel, with ten men and one woman. The hovel was called the Adrian depot. It was lit by a small coal oil lamp, and the chimney was so black that it was
hard to tell the color of the blaze, but at 12:38 a.m. the train arrived and we took passage for Seattle, where we arrived at 10:30 a.m. There was nothing of note transpired except the passing over and through the Cascade Mountains, where we passed through one tunnel three miles long and another about one-quarter of a mile long, and that one was called the Horseshoe tunnel, where the cars entered and came out about 200 yards away from the entrance, but the most beautiful sight was the tall peaks on the summit, sending their black cragged peaks through the snow, and the morning sun glistening on them produced a scene that was truly beautiful.

Medford Mail, June 25, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Nathan Smith and Ham Watkins started for Fort Klamath last Monday with a small load of cherries for that market.
    George Beale of Mt. Pitt district came out last week, bringing Miss Willitss of Persist. She has been teaching school in that district.
    S. H. Harnish has been making quite a change in his barn, having raised the roof, enlarged the building, added a large shed and fixed things up in good style.
    Ellis E. Powell of San Francisco, Cal., a piano tuner and cleaner, stopped at the Sunnyside last Monday and called for a room. He will possibly remain several days.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Trail next Sunday, July 4, at 11 o'clock a.m. and Central at 3:30 p.m. Also he will preach at Derby July 11 at 11 o'clock a.m. and at Reese Creek at 3:30 p.m.
    The railroad men are rushing things about here, and it looks good to see a lot of box cars standing on the side track and flatcars out on the new part of the road. It looks as though somebody meant business, the way they are pushing the work.
    I. B. Williams has had the carpenters finish their job on the property he purchased from Mr. Farlow and now has Mr. Ringer repapering the inside and as soon as that is completed will have the entire house, roof and all, painted white. He believes in having things fixed up all O.K.
    There was an unusually large crowd at Sunnyside last Sunday, there being in addition to the regular boarders quite a number from Medford and Central Point to witness the ball game between the Big Sticky team and the Eagle Point team, and the Eagle Point team came out second best.
    James Kirkpatrick of Fort Klamath came in a few days ago to see his father and brother, the latter, Willie Kirkpatrick, having been sick for the past three months, he having decided to go to Portland to one of the hospitals there for treatment, and James returned to Fort Klamath Tuesday.
    Mr. Duncan of Medford and David Smith came in last Monday with two horses that had got away from Mr. Reinecke at the Castor place on the Butte Falls road. It appears that Mr. R. was unhitching the horses from the hack, and not being familiar with the teaming business, he unhitched the wrong end of the horses first, with the result that they became frightened and started to run, knocking him down and badly hurting him, breaking the tongue of the hack, and when the horses were found several days later the harness was in a sad plight.
    We have had a some little excitement in our little village during the past week. There were two boys, John Mayham and Harvey Smith, rode their horses through our street one day last week faster than was prudent. Whereupon Constable Thomas went before N. L. Narregan and filed a complaint, took out a warrant, arrested them, brought them before his honor, Squire Narregan, whereupon one of the boys, John Mayham, pleaded guilty to the charge of fast riding, and the justice of the peace imposed a fine of $20 and costs amounting in all to the neat little sum of $25. Pretty heavy penalty for riding fast along the county road. The other boy, for they are both boys, says he will stand a trial and the time is set for the 7th of July, and if the justice imposes a fine in proportion to their ages and the difference in pleading guilty and not guilty, the school fund will be increased considerably.
    Last Sunday the Table Rock Sunday school had a picnic and religious services on the bank of Rogue River. They were assisted by the Agate Sunday school and representatives from Eagle Point, Moonville and Antioch Sunday schools were present. After an interesting program by the members of the different Sunday schools, Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church, read a poem entitled "The Hell Bound Train," giving an account of the origin of the poem, as it was founded on the conversion of a saloon keeper who lost his wife while he was on a spree in Medford some 18 years ago, and she was buried while he was so drunk that he knew nothing of it until it was all over. The reading was followed by a lecture by Rev. A. C. Howlett on "The Fast Young Man," after which dinner was announced and we all partook of refreshments, and one of the prominent articles served was ice cream, homemade, real cream. There was enough for all and then the freezers were still going when I left for home. At night children's day was observed at Eagle Point. The young people had a fine program which they rendered, after which Rev. Davis delivered a short address on "How to Be Happy." Taking it all together, the day was profitably spent and Rev. Davis can report that the Congregational Sunday schools he has organized at Eagle Point, Table Rock, Agate, Moonville, Reese Creek, Derby, Trail, Peyton, Butte Falls and Central are doing fine.

Medford Mail, July 2, 1909, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Jordan is getting the material on the ground to build a new house, and I understand Mr. Bruce has the contract to build it.
    During the past week there has been an unusual amount of travel on the road and a part of the time the Sunnyside has been full to overflowing.
    Mr. Reed, who is living on what has been known as the unsurveyed country, came out last Monday, stopping at Eagle Point for dinner on his way to Medford.
    Mrs. Delaney, wife of the timekeeper on the railroad that is being extended beyond here, came out one day last week, remaining with her husband until the next day.
    Scott Bruce has just finished building a house for Ed S. Wolfer on his strawberry patch, where he is pleasantly located with his amiable wife, the happiest man in all these parts.
    Mr. and Mrs. W. S. DePuy, of Kenmare, N.D., called here for dinner last Friday. They were out looking at the country. He says he wants to buy about 30 or 40 acres of good land but intends to see the country first.
    W. W. Parker of Butte Falls came over one day last week bringing with him his daughter, Miss Ella, and his sister-in-law of Pasadena, Cal., Mrs. Catching. She was on her way to Forest Grove to visit relatives.
    On Tuesday of last week Rev. H. T. Golder and Mrs. J. A. McGlosman stopped on their way from Butte Falls where they had been, Rev. Golder on business, and Mrs. McGlosman to accompany her husband, who was there on business and who remained while she returned to Medford.
    In spite of the fact that we have been having a little warm weather and the mercury has been climbing up to the one hundred mark, still everyone seems to be enjoying themselves and working along as though there was nothing unusual happening, while we are reading of deaths by the score in our eastern cities we suffer no inconvenience on account of the heat. What a delightful climate we have in our beautiful Rogue River Valley.
    On Wednesday last Bud Hildreth and M. C. Mahoney came out with loads of posts and shakes for our market, went on to Medford after their loads, stopping at the Sunnyside, both going and coming; also Messrs. Baker, DePuy, Claspill, Jack Tungate, Young, Jud Edsall and Massey, all of Butte Falls or vicinity, called for dinner or for a night's lodging, while many strangers are going and coming and everybody seems to be busy.
    George Porter of Fort Klamath came in last Saturday bringing two lady tourists, who with their husbands had been seeing the wonders of Southern Oregon. Their husbands left them at Fort Klamath to go to San Francisco, while they took a trip over the Rogue River road via Crater Lake, the Mill Creek Falls and Rogue River Falls. Mr. Porter reports that they were determined to see everything of interest along the route and told how they enjoyed the trip up the mountain on the snow to the rim of the lake; but there was so much snow they did not venture down the crater, but they thought that Crater Lake was the most wonderful sight they had ever witnessed and one of the ladies had traveled around the world, seen the Yellowstone Park, been in Alaska for 18 months and still Crater Lake outdoes them all.
    Last Saturday I went up Trail Creek, where I had an appointment to preach on Sunday, and while on my way up the creek I could not help noticing how fine the crops looked in that section. Nick Vaughn had a piece of corn and a patch of potatoes that looked as fine as any I have seen this season, while most of the gardens looked fine. The most remarkable place was at Mr. Fry's. He has a small tract of a few acres that has been set in alfalfa and last spring he plowed it up and sowed wheat and oats mixed and now he has a crop that will yield from three and one-half tons of hay to the acre, and it is not great coarse straw but it has grown thick and consequently a fine straw but heavily loaded with grain and blades. All the crops up in that region look fine.
    Please say to the people in the vicinity of Reese Creek and Derby that I will preach at Derby at 11 a.m. and at Reese Creek at 3:30 p.m. next Sunday.

Medford Mail, July 9, 1909, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Attorney O. C. Boggs and wife of Medford drove out from Medford last Sunday eve.
    S. S. Akin of Prospect was over last week for a load of provisions, etc., for Prospect.
    A. B. Hamlinton, now living on Yankee Creek, was in Eagle Point last Sunday and Monday. He and Chauncey Florey started for Crater Lake last Tuesday.
    Miss Bertha Peachey, who is teaching school on Yankee Creek, arrived last Sunday, stopping overnight, and on Monday went to Grants Pass to have her eyes treated by a specialist.
    Mr. Harvey, one of the enterprising citizens, has been covering his house with rustic and giving it a coat of white paint, which has greatly improved the appearance of the house. He is a hustler.
    Mr. Hamlinton, the man who bought the William Ulrich place, was a guest at the Sunnyside several days lately. He is highly pleased with our country and especially with our climate. It is so temperate--neither too cold nor too hot.
    George W. Owings and family drove here last Sunday evening from Nevada, where they have been spending some time. Mr. Owings says that he has traveled over a big lot of country since he left here and has found no place that suits him so well as Eagle Point, and he thinks now that he has come to stay.
    Mr. Rodgers, the general manager of the business of the Pacific & Eastern Railroad, came over last Monday to pay up the hotel bill for the board of the men working on the railroad and to pay up the men for the month of June. The company seems to be in dead earnest about building the road this time.
    Monday afternoon Mrs. Charles Buett and her daughter, Miss Mabel, accompanied by one of the Misses Fielder of Medford and Mrs. Dora Caldwell of Lakeview [sic]. Mrs. Caldwell and Dora Fleming is a daughter of H. C. Fleming, formerly superintendent of common schools in Lake County, and at one time county superintendent of Jackson County.
    Benj. Edmondson, Sr., arrived last Sunday from his home at Butte Falls, returning on Monday. His daughter-in-law, Mrs. Charles Edmondson, is having a very serious time with her hand. She had a felon on one of her fingers and came down from her mountain home to have it lanced, but complications set in and it is feared that she will lose her hand.

Medford Mail, July 23, 1909, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Born--July 8, 1909, to Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Peyton, a son.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, a daughter of Hon. George Brown, started for the Seattle fair the first of last week. She will be gone some six weeks or longer.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman of Derby, Or., July 22, a 10½-pound daughter. At last accounts the parents were both doing well.
    Frank Lewis has built a neat summer kitchen for his wife. The lower part of the walls are built of rustic and the rest is covered with screen wire.
    During the past week there has been quite a large number of persons passing through here for the mountains and a number of them have gone to Crater Lake.
    Monday morning, George Brown and his brother, William, his daughter, Mrs. Cora Officer, and a distant relative of the Browns, Mrs. Clark, started for Crater Lake.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. S. Miller and son, Ralph, of Illinois, brother-in-law and sister of A. B. Zimmerman of Derby, arrived on the P.&E. train on Tuesday afternoon and were met by young Master Zimmerman, their nephew, and went on to Derby the same day.
    B. H. Harris and Mr. Norris called one day about the middle of the week. Mr. Norris had just returned from a trip to the old states, where he spent his childhood days. He reports everything in the eatable line very high back there, and wages are very low.
    Claud O. Wamsley and his niece, Miss Clara Tickle, went to the Big Butte country last Sunday to take an outing, catch some fish, take a hunt, etc. Claud reports that he had a good time, but had the fisherman's luck--came home hungry, but then they wanted to go out and see the country, anyhow.
    A gentleman and wife by the name of Abernathy, from Texas, called at the Sunnyside Monday afternoon inquiring for a man by the name of Harrald, and while I was directing the man where he lived, Mr. H. sent for him to come to Brown's store to meet him, so they went up in the Trail settlement the same day.
    The men who are delivering the pipe line along the route from Medford to the source of supply of water are making headquarters here now and boarding at the Sunnyside. The railroad men who have been boarding at the Sunnyside have moved and established a camp about four miles north of Eagle Point, as it was too far to walk to and from work.
    There has been another change in business in our thriving little village, A. B. having purchased the stock of goods belonging to A. J. Daley, has opened up and ordered a new stock of goods, changed the name of the store to the Eagle Point cash
store, where he proposes to sell strictly for cash and cut off the extra percent for credit. We wish him abundant success in his undertaking.
    Last Sunday we--that is, Rev. M. C. Davis and myself--held a meeting at Table Rock. Rev. Davis preached in the forenoon and I preached in the afternoon, and following the services, E. L. Cooley, the Sunday school superintendent of the Eagle Point Sunday school, was baptized by immersion in Rogue River by Rev. Davis. There was a large crowd attending the services, and there were nine wagonloads of people went to the river to witness the rite.
    Last Sunday morning a deputy sheriff of Siskiyou County, California, came to the Sunnyside about 4 o'clock in the morning in an auto. They had started out of Medford about midnight to come to Eagle Point to try to catch a forger that is wanted in California, and his driver got lost on the desert, and he said he had traveled about 50 miles in coming to this place, and then found out that he should have gone to Central Point instead of Eagle Point.
    Last Sunday, Mr. Haney of Jacksonville drove up to the Sunnyside with Mr. and Mrs. U. G. Smith, superintendent of the Medford schools; Mrs. Nye and daughter, Miss Ruth, Mrs. Charles King, all of Medford, and Mrs. Williams of Utah, and called for rooms for the company. They were on their way to Crater Lake, and some of the company called for an early breakfast, and by 5 o'clock Monday morning Mrs. Howlett has them at the table ready to start on their journey. They are a very jolly crowd and anticipate having a good time. They expect to be back to Medford by Saturday.
    J. Ward Starr, a son of John Starr of Anderson, Ind., stopped here on Wednesday night of last week on his way to visit Mr. Purdin of Mill Creek (Prospect), and was followed by his father on Friday, where they will meet and after visiting with their old-time friends they will proceed on their way to the Willamette Valley, thence to Seattle. From there they intend to visit Vancouver, B.C. They are traveling for pleasure, and the young man is so well posted in the history of the country that he can really enjoy the trip. Mr. Starr is a farmer and dealer in cattle, hogs, etc., and takes a great pleasure in looking at the stock along the route.

Medford Mail, July 30, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    While at Derby last Sunday I learned that Mr. Swihart was building a new store on the road near the Derby post office.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bonner, who have a homestead in the Big Butte country, were pleasant callers the first of last week on their way to their homestead.
    Benj. Edmondson, Sr. came out on Thursday of last week with a load for our merchants, and then went to Medford after a load of goods for one of the Butte Falls merchants.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. C. Moore, and her little daughter, of Elk Creek, formerly of Ashland, who were recently married, passed through Eagle Point a few days ago on their way to their Elk Creek home.
    Willis Kirkpatrick, who was reported on the sick list this spring and later taken to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, returned last week but little improved, if any at all. He is now stopping at the Sunnyside.
    The teamsters hauling the pipe for the Medford pipe line, who are boarding at the Sunnyside, complain most bitterly of the parties flooding the road between here and Brownsboro so as to make the road almost impassable.
    Dr. H. D. Dudley, recently of Mexico, who is here on a visit to his brother in Medford, and has been up to the Iowa mills, the guest of Ed. Walker and wife, for the past week, came out last Monday with Ed. and remained until an auto was sent out from Medford for him.
    Frank Miller, son of Dr. Miller, for years a resident of the Butte Creek country on Salt Creek, and his wife stopped here for noon on their way to Medford to visit Mrs. Miller's parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Nichols. They were accompanied by Mr. Leslie Holliday.
    Mr. A. B. Hamlinton is engaged building a neat wood house on the property recently purchased by Isaac B. Williamson and is also finishing up the job of painting commenced by James Ringer who had to quit on account of having run a large splinter in the palm of his hand.
    Rev. John Fletcher came out from Dudley last Monday to meet his brother-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. J. F. Favell of Ragalcon [sic], Wisconsin, who arrived on the P.&E. car on the same evening and remained overnight at the Sunnyside and the next morning took the stage for her sister's on the unsurveyed (Dudley).
    Last Sunday evening Misses Gladys Kindle, Georgie Cline and Margarette Holmes and Messrs. Kenneth Beels, Harry Hull and Seth Devine, of Central Point drove out to Eagle Point and stopped at the Sunnyside for supper. They took a stroll about town and were so well pleased that they planned to come again next Sunday.
    While I was in Derby last Sunday attending meeting I had the pleasure of meeting Mrs. Elizabeth Holmes, the lady who had an ad inserted in the Medford Mail advertising a lost horse. Her friends advised her that the horse was dead etc., and that there was no use to waste money advertising, but she being a sensible lady put in the ad, and the result was in a few days the horse was found about ten miles from home and returned to the owner.
    Mr. J. W. Meyers, a deputy fruit i
nspector, called last Monday for dinner and spent the afternoon examining the orchards in this section.
    Last Saturday Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayers gave a birthday dinner, it being the anniversary of the birth of their daughter, Mrs. William Perry and their son-in-law Mr. Newport, of San Francisco, Cal., who is now with his wife visiting her parents. Those present were Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayers, Mr. and Mrs. William Perry. Mr. and Mrs. Hildreth, Mr. and Mrs. Newport, Miss Rose Ayers, Master Amos Ayers, Mr. C. Nihart, Mr. Hammel, Prof. C. E. Johnson, Miss Stella Betz and Miss Fay Perry.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. L. Derrick of Nebraska, friends of Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Stevens, arrived on the P.&E. train Monday afternoon, procured a rig and driver and went on their way the same day to meet their friends, but on their arrival there found that Mr. Stevens was off with a thresher and that Mrs. Stevens had just gone to Ashland to be at the bedside of her mother, Mrs. Bradshaw, who is there under medical treatment, Mr. and Mrs. Derrick have undertaken a tour of the country. They visited the fair at Seattle and after visiting with Mr. Stevens a short time expect to stop off at Ashland and visit Mrs. Stevens and her mother, then visit
relatives in California.

Medford Mail, August 13, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Died--The infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Harvey, August 16, 1909.
    A. C. Howlett expects to preach at Trail next Sunday, August 22, at 11 o'clock a.m., and at Central at 3:30 p.m. the same day.
    The Brownsboro ball team came down last Sunday and played the Eagle Point team. The score stood 7 to 9 in favor of Eagle Point.
    A. E. J. Percival and the two Messrs. Sawyers came out last Friday and went on out to the railroad camp, about three miles north of Eagle Point, the two Messrs. Sawyers to go to surveying for the railroad company and Mr. Percival as general manager of the road.
    H. H. Hoxey of Medford, while assisting in unloading a car of pipe for the Medford water works, at the depot of the P.&E. at Eagle Point, had the misfortune to get caught by one of the pipes as it swung around and bruised him up considerable about the face and upper part of the body.
    Misses Frances Aiken and March Kincaid of Prospect, who had been out to Jacksonville to take the teachers' examination, came out last Friday on the P.&E. railroad, intending to take the Peyton stage on Saturday morning, but Mr. Moomaw had such a load that he could not take them, so they had to wait until Sunday, and went up with William von der Hellen as he was going up to the old Nye place after his family, who were there taking their summer outing. They spent the time very pleasantly, however, at the Sunnyside.
    The young folks had a dance here last Friday night. There were 48 numbers sold. Mesdames Carlton and Jackson served the supper. Those who were in attendance report having had one of the quietest dances they have had for a long time. At the same time the ladies of the Baptist church gave an ice cream social and invited a great many of the young people, and they report having had a very pleasant time, so the readers of the Mail can see that there is an element in our town that is willing to try something besides the dance for pleasure.
    Coroner Kellogg of Gold Hill came out last Monday eve on the Carlton auto on his way to the Trail Creek country to hold an inquest, if it is necessary, over the remains of a corpse that was discovered in the hills. The remains were found by Green Mathews and he reported to the coroner that there was a bullet hole in the skull. Mr. King of Medford came out Tuesday morning about 4 o'clock to accompany Mr. Kellogg to the place, thinking perhaps that the remains may be those of his brother, who disappeared some two years ago.
    Rev. W. B. Pinkerton of Eugene will preach at Moonville, Sams Valley, on Sunday, August 29, in the Gardener hall at 11 a.m.; also at Table Rock at 3 p.m., and at Eagle Point at 8 p.m. the same day. He expects to be accompanied by Rev. M. C. Davis and A. C. Howlett. Rev. Pinkerton is pastor of the First Congregational church of Eugene, also a member of the H.M.S. board of Oregon, and will take a tour of the work in Southern Oregon. He will also preach at Peyton schoolhouse on Monday, August 30, at 8 p.m.

Medford Mail, August 20, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    L. U. Sheldon, who sold his farm near the mouth of Little Butte Creek, started for Omaha last week.
    Benj. Edmondson drove into the Sunnyside feed yard last Monday night with a load of shakes for the Medford market.
    Mrs. W. M. Potter of Ashland came up last week to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. A. J. Daley. She was accompanied by her daughter, Miss Cecil.
    By looking in another column of this issue of the Medford Mail, those interested in contract work will find an ad for bids to build a schoolhouse in Reese Creek, District No. 47.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our new merchant, has moved his family out from Derby and at present they are living in a part of the store. He starts off as though he meant business.
    W. W. Parker came out from his mountain home last week, bringing his wife and mother with him. Grandma Parker's many friends gave her a cordial welcome.
    Mr. Sandoz, the man who bought the A. J. Daley place on Elk Creek, stopped with us Wednesday night on his way home. He was loaded with screen doors, windows, furniture, etc., for his new mountain home.
    Rev. W. B. Pinkeman will preach at Moonville next Sunday, August 29, at 11 o'clock p.m.; at Table Rock, 3 p.m.; Eagle Point, 8 p.m. He expects to preach also in the Peyton schoolhouse on Monday night at 8 o'clock.
    A. H. Titus of Lambertville, New Jersey, came out one day last week to spend a few days fishing, but owing to the low stage of the water, the fish did not bite as he had expected, so he returned to Medford to take the car for Portland.
    Miss Bertha Ditsworth and one of Mr. Ditsworth's neighbors, young Sherman Hawk, of the Hawk sawmill, came out last week on business. She is one of the successful teachers of the Peyton neighborhood and a promising young lady.
    There is at this time, and has been for the past few weeks, a great deal of travel on the road. The ferryman at the free ferry told me Saturday as I crossed the river about 4 o'clock that he had already crossed 25 wagons that day, beside the horsemen and footmen.
    George Daniels, who is living at the Gray's sawmill, near Prospect, came out last week after a load of goods for S. S. Akins' store at Prospect. He was accompanied by S. A. Greaser and George East, on his way out, and on his return Mr. Akins' son was with him. They report business very lively at Prospect.
    Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Webster of Peyton were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside one day last week. They came down with Tracey Boothby and one of the Manning boys, and while here Mr. Webster gave me $1.50 to pay for the Mail for a year, as he says he wants the news and that the Mail is the right place to get ft.
    The first of last week, just after I had sent my Eaglets off, Mr. Lumsden, wife, son and mother, accompanied by Herbert Kentner, well known and highly respected citizens of Medford, came riding up to the Sunnyside in their auto for dinner. They were just returning from Crater Lake and reported having had a very pleasant time.
    Monday, a little after noon, B. H. Harris and wife, Mr. Dudley, a brother of the Dudley who owns some considerable timber near Butte Falls; Mr. Goodfellow, who owns a large tract of timber near Prospect, and Miss Pierce of Medford and Miss Gardiner of Michigan called at the Sunnyside for dinner, and after dinner went on to Medford.
    C. D. Pardue of Mill Creek came out last week to consult Dr. Holt with regard to a very badly cut thumb. He had cut it on a mowing machine and it had healed over and then broke again, and he has been here now for about a week and the end is not yet. The M.D. had to lance it in four places, but he thinks that he will be able to go home by the last of the week. He is a guest at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Last week Rev. W. S. Holt, wife and daughter, Miss Margaret Holt, were visiting their son, Dr. W. P. Holt, of this place. Rev. Dr. Holt and family are from Portland and the reverend gentleman is the secretary of the missionary board of the Presbyterian Church on this coast and his field embraces Oregon, Washington, Idaho and Alaska, so he has to travel a great part of his time.
    About the middle of last week four young men dropped into the Sunnyside and called for dinner. They were Carl Murphy, his brothers, Ray and Muncy, also Linn Housley. The three Murphys were from Ashland and Mr. Housley was from Eastern Oregon. They had been to see the sights and beauties of Southern Oregon, such as the Rogue River rapids, Mill Creek Falls, Natural Bridge, Rogue River Gorge, the cascades of Castle Creek, Crater Lake, etc. They saw it all and had the time of their lives.

Medford Mail, August 27, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. William Spencer and her son came out from Dudley and met her husband at the Sunnyside last Saturday.
    Mr. Pardue of the Mill Creek ranch, who has been here having his hand treated by Dr. Holt, returned home last Saturday.
    J. C. Brown, the man who sells dirt, called last week. He was accompanied by Mrs. Green and daughter, from Gardiner, Ill.
    Last Saturday M. C. Mahoney, wife and little daughter came into the Sunnyside on their way to their home in Butte Falls, from Washington.
    Last Friday night Mrs. Porter Robinett and her son, Clarence, of Nevada, came out from Medford to visit her sister, Mrs. George Daley.
    Our school will commence on September 13, P. H. Daily and wife as teachers. Mr. Daily has already moved into our town and is getting ready for business.
    There were quite a number of the railroad men came from the camp last Saturday morning to the Sunnyside for breakfast on their way to Medford to see the show.
    Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Saturday night on their way from the show to their home in Butte Falls.
    There were a number of our citizens who went to Medford last Saturday to see the circus who "got left" by the train on the P.&E. starting on time, but the most of them came out on the 11 p.m. train.
    Died--Sunday afternoon, Willis Kirkpatrick, after a lingering illness. Last spring he was taken down with typhoid fever and at the time was taken to the residence of John Ashpole, where he lingered along for several weeks. He was finally taken to the Good Samaritan Hospital in Portland, where he remained for quite a while. He was then brought back here and after suffering for about four weeks he passed away at 5:45 p.m. Sunday, August 29, aged about 30 years. The funeral services were conducted at the church by Elder Moomaw and interment was made on Monday, August 31, in the Central Point cemetery.
    Last Saturday evening as James Ringer was coming in with the Peyton-Derby mail, just as he started down the Vestal hill he found Mrs. Vestal lying beside the road in a helpless condition, where she had been for hours. It appears that she had driven to one of her neighbors, Mr. Castor's, and was returning, when the neck yoke broke, and she was thrown out of the rig, bruising her hip very badly. Mr. Ringer had three passengers with him, but she was so badly hurt that she could not ride on the stage, so they left her, after having taken the cushion off the seat to make a bed, with an old quilt she had on the hack, and one of the passengers, Bert Nason, remained with her while Mr. Ringer went to the Vestal home and reported and had them bring a mattress to take her in on, and then Mr. Ringer went on to Eagle Point and sent Dr. Holt out. I understand that he reports that her hip is badly bruised, but thinks that there are no bones broken.

Medford Mail, September 3, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Myrtle Magerle of Woodville was here last week visiting her aunt and uncle, Mr. and Mrs. Frank Lewis.
    Mr. Halley, the agent for the McMinnville Mutual Insurance Company, was out last week on business for the company.
    It is expected that our school will commence next Monday, and we anticipate having a good school this coming winter.
    Mr. Nason of Prospect came in on the P.&E. last Monday eve on his way home. He went up on the Eagle Point and Peyton stage.
    Mr. Lang of Medford is engaged painting the new home being built for Dr. Coughlin. He is a guest at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    P. H. Daily has moved into his winter quarters, and J. B. Williams has moved to the Sunnyside for the winter at least.
    A. B. Hamlinton is doing some carpenter work for Mr. Moomaw, getting in some new windows and making other changes in the house.
    A Miss Carpenter of Des Moines, Ia., is the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Castor. They are here to visit friends and see some of the world-famed Rogue River Valley.
    Our little town presents quite a lively appearance as the railroad and pipeline men are stirring around quite lively. The surveying party is pushing the work along as fast as they can and everything is going with a rush.
    Some of the railroad officials were out last Saturday and arranged for the right of way through some of the farms, and I understand that they are to be here today (Tuesday) to arrange for a settlement for the few that are left.
    S. H. Harnish has bought out the contract for carrying the mail from Eagle Point to Medford and back, and has equipped himself with a good covered hack and good teams. He is the man for the place and will serve the public well.
    Last week I sent an ad for a lost horse for Mrs. E. Holmes of Derby. She lost the same horse last spring and put an ad in the Medford Mail and in a few days the horse was found and returned to the owner, and now she is advertising for him again. And this week I send another advertisement for our new merchant, A. B. Zimmerman. He seems to be a wide-awake kind of a man and believes in advertising.
    I am in receipt of a letter today from a man by the name of H. M. Parker of Garfield, Washington, making inquiries about this valley. He says his health is not good in Washington and he wants to know about this country. I also received a letter from J. E. Stepp of Arleta, Or., in which he says to tell Mrs. Howlett that he expects to have his feet under her table again before long, as he thinks of coming back to Jackson County again.
    C. W. Potter of Medford came out one day last week, bringing his cousin, S. F. Potter, of New York, with him. The latter was looking over this part of the country with a view of buying a tract of land in this section. They came in their own conveyance, took their time and looked at the different parts of this Little Butte Creek Valley. They seemed to be well pleased with this section and think that Eagle Point will eventually be a thriving manufacturing town, as we have a fine water power here and a large, fine farming and fruit country to rely on.
    Rev. W. B. Pinkerton of Eugene came down week before last, preached at several places in the valley, went to Crater Lake on Tuesday of last week, and on his return preached at Peyton last Sunday at 11 o'clock and at Derby at night, and Monday morning came to this place just in time to catch the P.&E. car for Medford, so I did not have the privilege of talking with him, although he told me he had a fine trip.
    "Shorty" (I don't mean this as a slur, but I don't know his Christian name) Garnett and wife and J. W. Lawton and a lady by the name of Smith stopped Sunday eve for supper on their way from Crater Lake, where they had been for an outing, and then proceeded on their way home in Medford. I was not at home, so did not have the pleasure of meeting them, and Mrs. Howlett was so busy she did not have time to entertain them.
    Rev. A. J. Folsom also came out from his home in Forest Grove last week, preached here last Tuesday night to a good audience, also at Table Rock Wednesday evening, and on Thursday received a telegram that his wife was very sick and was called home, so he did not go to Trail and Central as was announced, but your Eagle Point correspondent went and preached in his place to two good congregations. The people of Trail brought their dinners with them, and we all had a fine time under the branches of a great oak.
    The past week there has been a great amount of travel over the road in every direction, and among the travelers were a great many strangers from all parts of the country. Sometimes I learn the names, destination and former residence, but it is often the case that they are very reticent, and they come and go, but among the recent arrivals was Mrs. Ragstal, a sister of Mrs. Castor of Derby, of Des Moines, Ia. She is visiting her sister at the Castor place, near Derby.

Medford Mail, September 10, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. S. Wolfer received an order from Chicago for a carload or part of a car of tomatoes, last week.
    Thomas Coy, our road supervisor, has put in a metallic culvert at the crossing opposite the post office.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Table Rock next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m, and at Unionville at 7:30 p.m.
    Mrs. Scott Bruce is now at E. S. Wolfer's putting up berries, fruit and vegetables for winter use. She is from the Dudley settlement.
    Last week James Ringer repainted the store building now occupied by A. B. Zimmerman and he (the new storekeeper) is having things fixed up all O.K.
    Prof. P. H. Daily and wife opened our school last Monday morning, and it seemed good to hear the school bell ring once more and see the children going to school with their books as though they meant business.
    John A. Bryan of Cass County, Mo., came out on the Pacific & Eastern last Sunday afternoon and is the guest of L. B Williams at the Sunnyside. They were old-time acquaintances in Missouri, and have not met before for thirty-five years. Their joy was mutual on meeting. They were fast friends and near neighbors in Missouri.
    Last week I sent an ad to the Medford Mail for A. B. Zimmerman and it had hardly got dry before the evening paper [the Medford Daily Tribune] wrote him a letter asking for his advertising, offering all kinds of inducements, but Mr. Zimmerman says that the Mail is good enough for him and that he is well pleased with the makeup. He is surely starting off on the right foot.
    Last Sunday at the close of service at the Reese Creek school house the matter was brought up with regard to raising money to purchase an organ for the school, Sunday school and church services, and after talking the matter over it was decided to have a box social in the school house on Saturday evening, October 2. There will be an interesting program and the boxes will be sold to the highest bidder. The funds will be applied toward paying for the organ. Prof. P. H. Daily and wife have agreed to take part in the services and no doubt an interesting time will be had.
    Last Thursday Arthur Moore and his mother, Mrs. A. O. Ellison, of Wisconsin, arrived on the Pacific & Eastern, stopping overnight at the Sunnyside and the next morning we (that is, your Eagle Point correspondent and they two) started for her son's place on the headwaters of Elk Creek, arriving at the homestead at 6 o'clock p.m.
    We had quite an experience in going up, although the road was pretty good as far as it went, on the route to the Elk Creek mines, but after that it was, the most of the way, simply a cow trail, with most of the logs cut out, and up and down across canyons and up high mountains through the heavy forests; in fact the trail was so bad that Mrs. Ellison became so nervous that she had to be helped out of the hack and walk over some of the most dangerous places.
    But we got there all right and found everything very nice. We had a neat little cabin, good barn, an outhouse for tools, granary, woodshed, etc., and we spent the night very pleasantly. Among other things the boys told me was that they had just cut out the road and that led to the question how they got their cook stove in there.
    In response to my inquiry how they got it in there, they said that they made a strong wheelbarrow attached a horse with a long rope and one of the men led the horse and the other held the wheelbarrow and came up the trail. I said, "Surely necessity is the mother of invention."
    On the way home I met a man going up the mountain with a loaded hack and as he stopped for me to pass I asked him how far he was going up and he said to Medford, whereupon I inquired where he was from, and he said the mines. It appears that as he came out from the mine he took the wrong end of the road and if he had gone about a mile farther he would have run the road out into a cow trail. Fortunately I turned him back, but I think that he must have taken the wrong road again and started up Rogue River at the Elk Creek bridge for I saw nothing more of him after we got down the creek about ten miles.
    The people along Elk Creek are doing considerable work improving their places and I can see quite a change for the better since I was up there last, several years ago.

Medford Mail, September 17, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Bryant has moved from the Ed Griffith place to the old Robinett house.
    J. W. Grover and George Lewis went out hunting last week and had good success.
    I see that our neighbor, J. A. Harvey, has built a new wood shed on his place.
    Mrs. A. M. Thomas, who has been out in Klamath County for a few weeks, returned last week.
    A. C. Howlett will preach in Trail next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. and at 3 p.m. in the Central school house.
    Mrs. Lozier and Mrs. Lockwood, of Medford, came out one day last week and reorganized the W.C.T.U. at this place.
    A family by the name of Launtz has moved onto the Dr. Page place and are sending their children to school at Eagle Point.
    The contract for building the new schoolhouse in Reese Creek was let to Mr. Hawk of Clark's Creek, but I did not learn the price.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, who has been spending some time at Seattle attending the fair, returned last week to her father's home in our town.
    Mrs. Charles Jones, nee Lelah Fryer, of Seattle, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, returned home last week.
    The work on the P.&E. railroad is causing a great stir in these parts and the Sunnyside is crowded every night with guests from all parts of the country.
    Mr. Alright and Guss Rosentall have finished the school house well and put a house over it and now it is ready for the painters. The house is rather modern in style.
    Mr. Myers, the fruit tree inspector, stayed with us again one night last week. He finds plenty to do in his line, as there are fruit trees in every nook and corner in these hills.
    John Childreth, a brother to our blacksmiths, W. L. and George Childreth, of Pendleton, came down on a visit and on his return his brother Wes went as far as Salem with him, returning last Friday.
    Prof. J. C. Johnson, the old and tried teacher of Reese Creek, is now in his third week in that district. He has proved to be the right man in the right place, and the people in the district know how to appreciate his services.
    Mrs. Adams, sister of Dr. Bonner, came out to Eagle Point with her brother one day last week on her way to her home in Nebraska. She expects to return to this country and take up a homestead and go into the turkey business.
    A short time ago I sent an ad to the Mail for a lost horse, ordered by Mrs. E. Holmes of Derby, and as soon as the Mail got circulated in that region the horse was found and returned to the owner. It pays to advertise in the Mail.
    Last week our school opened with an enrollment of 49 names, and last Monday it was increased to 57, and Professor Daily thinks the prospect good for a full school this winter, as the children seem to be taking great interest in their studies.
    J. H. Carlton sold his house and household furniture in Eagle Point to Gus Nichols, a short time ago, consideration, $2800. He also sold the undivided half of 60 acres of the old J. J. Tryer place to his partner in the land, T. E. Nichols; consideration $4500.
    Thomas Coy, our road supervisor, has put in a new culvert in the slough near the post office, but it looks as if it was cut off at both ends and leaves an ugly-looking hole between the fence and the culvert that is liable to to be run into in the dark, and quite a number of the taxpayers in our town think that they are entitled to better service in that line.
    On last Friday your correspondent took a trip to Butte Falls, taking with him in two rigs Mr. and Mrs. M. C. Mahoney and their daughter, Mrs. Albert, and little son, Mr. Moor, Mr. Clevenger and Mr. Erickson, one of the forest rangers. We found Butte Falls about the same as it had been on former visits, although there are some improvements in the way of building and the schoolhouse is nearer completion. They have a school of 26 pupils, but the kindergarten department was not in evidence. I learned that the mill was undergoing some changes and that they anticipate doing a good work this summer.
    While there, Mr. Miller asked me if I was still writing for the Mail, and when I answered in the affirmative he said he wanted the Mail sent to him so that he could get all the news from the outside world, so he paid me for a year's subscription for the Medford Mail and now will get the news fresh.
    Last week your Eagle Point correspondent took a trip to Flounce Rock, taking with him Mr. Ellingsworth, of Medford, who was on his way to Klamath County. We found the roads in a horrible condition and the grades in many places so narrow that teams could not pass. The crops looked good all along the road and especially the alfalfa and the stock men seemed to be in good spirits and their stock was looking well. The country is being settled up all along the route and the large barns and neat dwellings show that that part of the country is in a prosperous condition.
    L. E. Lake, wife and son, from Arkansas, arrived at the Sunnyside last Monday and while  looking around at the town before coming to the hotel Dan remarked to his parents that they had not met Mr. Howlett yet, and asked where he was. His parents are constant readers of the Mail and have been greatly interested in the Eaglets for some years, and little Dan was interested to see the author of the Eaglets. They are here to look at our country and seem to be favorably impressed, especially with our climate, but think that our land is unreasonably high. Mr. L. says that his correspondence with the publisher of the Mail has been very satisfactory and has promised to call on him before leaving these parts.
    Last Sunday I preached at Table Rock and at night at Moonville, and Monday morning took a trip to the Miller orchard on Sams Creek, in quest of peaches, where I met Mr. and Mrs. Miller, and was shown through their extensive orchard. They have already sold tons of peaches and have tons more to sell, and i
n addition to that they have as fine an apple orchard as there is in Sams Valley, and at the time I was there they were about through with drying prunes. They also have a very extensive almond orchard, where they have six different varieties of almonds; in fact, they have an ideal home and almost everything around them that heart can wish.
Medford Mail, September 24, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. R. Minter, of Eagle Point, an old advertiser in the Mail, has an ad in this week's issue for sheep.
    A. C. Howlett expects to preach at Derby next Sunday, October 10, at 11 a.m. and at Reese Creek at 3 p.m.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harvey Spencer, Mrs. Jess Spencer, Mrs. William Spencer and Mrs. B. W. Reed, all of Dudley, came out last week and took the Pacific and Eastern car for Table Rock to help in the Washburn orchard.
    Mrs. William Dennis of Butte City, Mont. is here visiting her mother, Mrs. A. M. Thomas. She has been visiting relatives for the past six weeks, spending a few days at the Seattle fair. She was raised and educated here in Jackson County and has many old friends here.
    Arthur Brown and wife were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Sunday. Mr. Brown is the publisher of the Rogue Magazine at Medford and anyone who is interested in the productiveness and resources of the Rogue River Valley will do well to read its pages.
    The contractors are getting their forces and material together as fast as they can to push the work on the Pacific & Eastern railroad extension. They have now, Monday, about forty men at work and are fixing for a bigger camp, but the rain has hindered considerable and it has been difficult to get teams to get out the necessary equipage for the camp.
    J. C. Brown, the man that sells dirt, accompanied by Mr. and Mrs. J. H. Smith, came out one day last week to look over a tract of land that Mr. Brown recently bought of J. P. Moomaw, and while here made a deal whereby Mr. Smith became owner of the property, although they did not give out the purchase price. After taking dinner at the Sunnyside they proceeded on their way to Medford.
    During that storm the auto broke down and Harry started on foot to find a team to haul them in to civilization. He found an Indian that agreed to come the next morning to take them to the Woodruff camp on Union Creek, but he was slow coming the next morning, so Harry started again and found him in the barber's chair having his hair cut to present a favorable appearance hauling an auto. But he came.
    A gentleman by the name of Gray with his family arrived here last Saturday from Klamath County with a sick child. Mrs. Grey and two children stopped at the Sunnyside and consulted Dr. Holt and by Monday morning the little fellow was so much improved that his parents expect to return and settle in this of our excellent school facilities. Mr. Gray was formerly a resident of Medford, having kept the Phipps stable for about a year.
    W. C. Estes, of Sioux City, Iowa, and Prof. Miller of this county, two old school teachers, stopped at the Sunnyside one night last week and Mr. Estes went on to Butte Falls, returning the next day. He is traveling over the country, on foot to a large extent, looking at the timber, orchards and things in general. He says that he wants to locate near a good school and seems to be favorably impressed with our surroundings. He thinks that the Rogue River Valley is an ideal place to live, as we have as fine a climate as can be found anywhere on tho coast.
    J. H. Carlton, accompanied by his wife and father, S. A. Carlton, returned from a trip to Pendleton and other Eastern Oregon points last Friday. They went and came in Harry's auto and everything went all O.K. until they got within about 50 miles of home, when their troubles began. They encountered a mountain rain and snow storm and those of us who have had experience with a few of them know what that means.
    In the meanwhile the party had scraped away the snow and slush and stretched a wagon sheet for a tent and spent the night quite pleasantly. When the Indian arrived he hauled the auto to the above-mentioned camp, and then Harry started again in search of a team and soon found George Morine, one of his old neighbors, and secured his team to haul the auto to Prospect. There they procured another team, but it was not up to date and they were compelled to go at the old ox team rate of two and a half miles an hour. They finally reached Tucker's. There they met the Trail-Prospect mail carrier, on horseback, and engaged seats for five for the next day on the stage; but the team was so slow that when they reached Trail they found that the stage had been gone thirty minutes, so they were left again, and the result was they had to get another rig to bring them home. But Bessie, that is Mrs. Carlton, says that if it had not been for the breakdown they would not have had any experience of interest on the trip. While in Wood River Valley Mr. Carlton bought a part of the McCoy place of 170 acres, consideration $6,000. Mr. Carlton does not expect to move out until spring. Mr. and Mrs. Carlton will be greatly missed by a long list of friends to [cut off]

Medford Mail, October 8, 1909, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. B. Hamlinton is engaged at carpentering for Mr. Hawk.
    John Watkins is building a storehouse on his lot and getting ready for winter.
    J. C. Moore, wife and little daughter, from Elk Creek, were guests at the Sunnyside last Monday.
    Augustus Edmondson came out last Monday with a load of lumber for William von der Hellen from the Castor mill.
    Jack Austin brought two loads of lumber from the Marks sawmill, situated on Long Branch, for Peter Young last Thursday.
    A. C. Howlett expects to preach in Table Rock next Sunday, October 17, at 11 o'clock, and in the Pankey schoolhouse, Sams Valley, at 7:30 p.m. the same day.
    Mr. Ditsworth and his stepdaughter, Miss Ida Lee Lytle, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside one night last week on their way from Medford to their home near Peyton.
    John Ashpole and wife arrived at their home in Eagle Point last week after an extended visit with their relatives in the Willamette Valley, and also visiting the Seattle fair.
    I understand that we are to have another meat market opened up here by Artie Nichols and Carl Jackson in the house formerly used as an office for the Butte Falls Lumber Company.
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our enterprising merchants, sends an order to the Mail print shop this week for account tablets. He is one of our progressive business men who believes in advertising.
    Last week Mr. and Mrs. Michael (nee Gertrude Mahoney) of Portland arrived at the Sunnyside on the Pacific & Eastern railroad and after dinner took the Eagle Point and Butte Falls stage for Butte Falls to visit Mrs. Michael's parents.
    Mrs. Adele Jordan, a daughter-in-law of our townsman by that name, arrived here last week from Montana. She expects her husband to be here in the course of about two months, and he may buy property here and permanently locate among us.
    Mrs. Ella Harrison, a niece of J. J. Fryer, whom he has not seen for over 50 years, arrived at his home in Eagle Point last week from Illinois. She is the first of his blood relatives that he has seen since he came to this coast, over 50 years ago. I understand that she is a prominent worker in religious matters.
    Arthur Brown, he who sends forth the Rogue Magazine and prints the nice engravings of our beautiful orchards, homes and farms, in company with T. O. Erickson, one of Uncle Sam's industrious servants, who is looking after the timber interests in Jackson County. were guests at the Sunnyside last Monday night.
    It is a conceded fact that we are having the best school here that we have had for years. Mr. and Mrs. Daily are both old experienced teachers and know how to work together to make a success of the school, and it keeps on increasing in size and interest. I called in for a few minutes one day last week and found the children in the principal's room working like beavers. I hope to be able to visit the school again when I have more time and give a more extended notice.
    Last week H. D. Blanchard and wife came out from their home near Prospect. They were accompanied by Mrs. Blanchard's uncle, aunt and and three cousins, Mr. and Mrs. C. H. Peelor and Misses Lita, Enid and Cecil Peelor, from Henry County, Missouri. On Saturday your correspondent took them to Butte Falls, where they expect to remain for a while, while they look around. They have sold their farm in Missouri and came here to stay. They expect to buy a home and want a farm where they can raise fruit and alfalfa.
    Engineer R. P. Cowgill, assisted by C. W. Rumpoor, is making a survey of Little Butte Creek for the state engineer's office. He is taking an account of all the water in the creek, the water in the irrigating ditches, mill race, etc. He also is taking account of the amount of land under irrigation in this section. He has already surveyed the creek from the mouth up as far as Eagle Point. They have been guests at the Sunnyside while doing the work, but expect to have to move their quarters by the last of the week.
    The box social given at the Reese Creek schoolhouse on the eve of the 2nd proved to be a grand success, While the people, both young and old, had a cracking good time, they realized the neat little sum of $55.40 to buy an organ for the use of the district school, Sunday school and church. The people in that neighborhood don't do things by halves, but when they want anything they simply dig up the funds and get st. They have let the contract for building the new schoolhouse to Mr. Hawk, of Clark's Creek, for $850, to be finished the 1st of January next.
    While I was in Butte Falls last Saturday I noticed that every house was filled and a call for more. Mr. Mathews has just finished a beautiful residence there. Mr. Dufray, the restaurant man, is building a large hotel; William Chambers has opened a restaurant and they have four stores; B. H. Harris is putting in a lifting engine to draw the lumber from the mill up to the top of the hill The railroad surveyors are running a line on the side of the hill, trying to get through the Ginger Creek gap, and things are going with a rush. While I was there I preached Saturday night to about 50 or 60 people, and Sunday went to Derby and Reese Creek to my regular appointments.

Medford Mail, October 15, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Biggins of Derby is in our town giving lessons in oil painting. She has quite a number of pupils.
    Henry F. Daley, our meat market man, has this week sent in an order for counter tablets for his meat market.
    Revs. Bledsoe, McKee, La Mar and Hall have been conducting a series of meetings the past week in this place and are meeting with some success.
    There is a constant demand for horses and teams to carry men among the route of the Pacific & Eastern and haul supplies and tools for the men.
    J. L.. Banta of Prospect, who has rented the Red Blanket ranch, passed through here with a load of supplies for that section last Wednesday morning.
    Tuesday of this week your Eagle Point correspondent started to Eugene to attend the annual conference of the Congregational Church of Oregon and expects to visit Portland while gone.
    [omission] Oregon, came in on the Pacific & Eastern railroad Saturday morning. She is a niece of the principal of our school, P. H. Daily, and came to make him a visit.
    Our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Noye of Fort Klamath, came out on the Pacific & Eastern last Thursday. She came by the way of Klamath Falls and Weed on the Southern Pacific to Medford.
    Mr. Meyer, the fruit tree inspector of these parts, and wife, were guests at the Sunnyside Hotel last Thursday. Mr. Meyer says that he is about through with this section of the county.
    I understand that Mr. Pelouze and wife, who bought the Eli Dahack place, have come and gone on to the place. Mr. Pelouze brought a carload from Los Angeles of household goods and stock and has plans to build this fall and winter.
    Claud Wamsley, a young mechanic who has been a regular boarder at the Sunnyside for nearly two years, started last Monday for St. Louis, Missouri, to take a course in architecture, expecting to be gone about six months.
    H. C. Clark of Nebraska came in on the Pacific & Eastern last Thursday, stopping overnight at the Sunnyside. He procured a horse and saddle and went on his way to Mr. Ditsworth's, near Peyton. He is an old acquaintance of Mrs. Ditsworth.
    Last Thursday auto No. 1777, containing three ladies and one gentleman, stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner. They came from Portland and were bound for Eastern Oregon via Crater Lake, intending to go by Beau [sic] to their homes in Portland.
    Dave Dunlap and Miss Margaret Mendith of Medford came out in a rig last Thursday and took dinner and supper at the Sunnyside. They were the guests of Mr. Root, the riding boss for the railroad contractors. After spending the afternoon and evening here they returned to Medford.
    W. R. Davey of Portland, who is in the service of the United States, came out last Thursday and after spending the night at the Sunnyside took the Butte Falls stage for that place. He is employed to look after the land and timber interests of the government.
    I see in an article in the Morning Mail that one day last week a representative of the Mail visited Eagle Point and reported that twenty people took dinner at one of the hotels in our town. That is no uncommon thing, as we often have more than that at the Sunnyside and for awhile Mrs. Howlett had to put up nineteen lunches every morning for the regular boarders--and still they come.
    Last Friday, just as the family were finishing eating their dinner at our house, Mr. and Mrs. Pelouze, Mrs. Lucinda Wilson and her granddaughter, Miss Eva Paine, came in for their dinner. They spent a short time after dinner looking over the Sunnyside Hotel and getting better acquainted with our family and guests. Mrs. Wilson was in 1867 a pupil of mine in the Little Butte, now Eagle Point school district.
    Mr. Biggins has a force of men at work setting the poles along the route to Butte Falls for a telephone line to connect that place with the outside world. The company has not decided yet whether it will con- [omission] meet here with the old Central Point line or run direct to Medford.
    I understand that William von der Hellen and Frank Brown have purchased the old line from here to Central Point and intend to put in new poles and have this line in a good condition which will be a great boon to this part of the country because the service heretofore has been very unsatisfactory.
    The railroad supplies are constantly arriving and I understand that the contractors contemplate putting up a commissary department along the railroad about four miles from here to store their supplies. That will probably be as far as they can lay the track for some time, as from there on the right-of-way is through the hills and very sticky for quite a distance.
    The subcontractors are establishing camps all along the route for about twelve miles from here, but from what I can learn the most of the work done this fall and winter will be opening cuts and making fills, but we can't tell, as the railroad men seldom give anything out with regard to their plans.
    Last Saturday Captain Joe Cassidy, the boss blacksmith of Medford, and his company consisting of A. E. McBride, his horseshoer, and A. R. Harmon of Trail, and George Young, called for dinner and reported that they had had a terrible conflict with a bear on the headwaters of Trail Creek, but after a prolonged battle with the monster they finally succeeded in bringing him to the ground and brought the hide to present as evidence of the truth of their statement, in case anyone should question the correctness thereof, and called Messrs. Jason, W. M. Hartman, S. E. Oliver, Mr. Tarbell and your correspondent to witness the hide.
    While we were examining the trophy, claws, etc., J. Hartman purchased the skin for his brother to take back to Ohio with him to establish the fact that we have bears in Oregon.

Medford Mail, October 22, 1909, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When last I wrote I was in Oregon City on my way north. I had seen some of the sights of Eugene and among some of the most interesting things was to witness the 1800 children, young and old, going to school, attending the various departments from the kindergarten to the state university. I could see that Eugene has grown and improved since my last visit in June. White in Albany I noticed that that place had improved in the way of improvements and the streets presented the appearance of life and energy, but Salem showed a lack of taste or neatness and one would hardly expect to find the capital of our great commonwealth with its streets uncared for and the borders along the rickety sidewalks covered with weeds, especially such ones as the dagger, cocklebur and Canada thistle and the mud so deep that a pedestrian could hardly get across one of them; but there are better days coming. On down the railroad the small towns along the route show that the people have been taking lessons from our Jackson County people and are turning their attention to taking care of their places, which are being cut up into small farms and many of them put out to orchards. On arriving at Oregon City I could discover no great change for the better, although there seems to be considerable business done there. From there by private conveyance to Clackamas station.
    Here the military department has established its target practice grounds, having purchased a large tract and established headquarters, and one can see some fine marksmanship, as some of the boys in blue are expert marksmen. Here is the shipping point for the country back and while I was there the potato raisers were hauling and carting their potatoes for shipment, realizing 70 cents a hundred pounds for them f.o.b. From there to Damascus, my old stamping ground. I found everything about as usual except that some of the farms were changing hands and being put out to fruit. The land in this section is not so high as it is in Jackson County, nor so good, although some of the land owners are holding land pretty high. Here is one of the best places in the Willamette Valley for apples, equal to Hood River and almost as good as Rogue River Valley. Crossing the country in a rig through the country to Sycamore, I took the electric car for Fairview and found the place but little changed from what it was last June, although there have been some changes for the better.
    There is one very serious drawback to that section of the country, and that is the cold bleak east wind that comes down the Columbia River, and some of the citizens tell me that the mercury drops to and below zero and remains so for days, and in some instances weeks together, and the ordinary weather is so cold that I wanted a heavy overcoat on the most of the time when I was out of doors; but the people as a rule are healthy and seem to live well and consequently happy.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 3, 1909, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The last time I wrote for publication it was for the Mail, but as that is a thing of the past, I now commence to give what items I can recollect to the general reader of Southern Oregon and the adjoining country through the medium of the Mail Tribune, and I do not feel that I have to be introduced to the general newspaper reader, as I have been prominently before the public in that line of business for the last 25 years, and I trust that my many friends scattered over the country will accept my thanks for the many favors shown me in the way of gathering items for publication and patronage in the line of subscriptions and job work, and I also ask a continuance of those favors, and I promise to try to be as faithful in the future as I have tried to be in the past in giving the general news of our neighborhood.
    I. B. Williams and Mrs. A. M. Thomas went to Central Point on business last Wednesday.
    The railroad men are pushing their work on as fast as they can and the hotels at this place are crowded every night by railroad men and transient roomers. A force of men commenced to lay steel a day or two ago and they are rushing the work along as fast as they can. They have the roadbed graded ready for the ties and steel for about four miles from the Eagle Point depot, and the graders are going right along with the work.
    Mr. and Mrs. Barron, who are living in the Dr. Coughlin place, were Medford visitors last Tuesday. He reports a fine variety of fruit on the place he has charge of; also that he has the house and barn near completion that he has had erected on the place.
    Professor P. H. Daily, the principal of our school, reports that the school is progressing finely, growing in interest, as well as in numbers. There are now 68 names enrolled and more to come.
    Since the board of control of the state of Oregon have been sending out their notices to the water users of Little Butte Creek, well digging has become the order of the day, and G. W. Daley, S. H. Harnish [and] A. C. Howlett are preparing for the emergency that is likely to arise over the water problem, and are preparing to pump water from the wells and be independent of the board altogether.
    Mr. Deter, he who originally opened the meat market here and sold out to Henry Daley Simon, has bought back into the institution and now they will do a good business in their line.
    The farmers in this section are improving the time during the pleasant weather to put in their fall grain.
    Lee Bradshaw is hauling and storing his apples in the Holmes warehouse, and as soon as he has enough hauled to fill a car will ship them east. He reports a fine lot of apples this fall; in tact, this Butte Creek country is coming to the front as an apple and pear-producing country. Speaking of apples, I could not help but notice the difference in the apples here and in the Willamette Valley when I was there last week. The apples in this country are so much better colored and have a much richer flavor.
    Mr. Robertson, who bought the Sheldon place, near the mouth of Little Butte Creek, came in with a load of wood for one of our citizens. He called at the Sunnyside for dinner and reports everything lively in his section.
    Charley Conrad of Medford, who is in the employ of the Union Meat Company, stopped at the Sunnyside last Wednesday night on his way up the country looking for turkeys for shipment. He went on up toward Trail.
    The many friends of Miss Donna Rader are pleased to see her back again in William von der Hellen's hardware and drug store. Owing to the sickness of Miss Allison Officer, her mother, Mrs. Cora Officer, had to temporarily withdraw from the store.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our new merchant, bought a load of hogs of John Higinbotham last Wednesday, or, rather, a load that he brought out of the foothills for another man. He paid 6 cents a pound live weight.
    Speaking of our merchants, they are simply doing a big business and are kept busy most of the time, and our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, and his brother, George, are kept a-going all the time.
    Miss Love Jennings of Iowa, a granddaughter of our townsman, John Jordan, was the guest of Miss Gernell Jackson Wednesday night.
    We have a new barber shop in our town and we predict for him a good business.
    A. C. Ackerman, our state superintendent of instruction, will deliver a lecture on educational lines on Thursday evening, November 11, at 7:30. Let everybody turn out and fill the church building of Eagle Point to its utmost.
    Mr. Whitley of Prospect returned from California last Wednesday, stopped at the Sunnyside overnight and Thursday went on up to his home.
    Jake Jonas, who has spent the summer in the neighborhood of
Talent, returned to Eagle Point last Wednesday and is now awaiting the arrival of his mother from Wallowa. They expect to live on the Jonas farm this season.
    D. F. Craddock has a want ad in this issue--read it.
    Three men were arrested here on the railroad Wednesday morning. They are accused of stealing clothes from the boss bridge builder. He took a handcar and started for Eagle Point depot, where he found them waiting for the car to go to other parts of the country. The men tried to take the handcar, but were overpowered, badly beaten and put in a box car and locked in. The sheriff called and they were taken to jail. The same night there was two suits of clothes, a hat and pair of shoes taken out of a room in the Sunnyside Hotel by railroad hoboes. They made good their escape before the theft was discovered. There are some hard lookers coming out here now.

Medford Mail, November 8, 1909, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    R. P. Cowgill, a civil engineer, and his assistant, Charles D. Ramyon, who have been taking the measurements of the water in Little Butte Creek and its tributaries, as well as the capacity of the ditches taken therefrom, have finished their job and returned to make their report to the state office. They were pleasant guests at the Sunnyside for several days while working in this section.
    Mr. Riggings of Derby was here late last week disposing of stock of the Butte Falls Telephone Company. They are extending the line from here to Butte Falls and if satisfactory arrangements are not made to connect here with the Central Point line and from there to Medford, the line will be extended direct to Medford, our natural business center.
    George West, one of our forest rangers, who has been stationed at Mill Creek station for the past few months, came out last week, took his wife, who is boarding at the Sunnyside, and went to Butte Falls for a few days, returning the last of the week to this place.
    Monroe Baldwin. who has a homestead near Round Top, was a guest at the Sunnyside Thursday night of last week on his way to Medford to act as a witness for Mr. Wolverton in making proof on his homestead.
    E. F. Graham and wife of Prospect were sojourners here last Saturday night. They have a farm about two miles above Prospect, where they are engaged in the cultivation of ginseng. Mr. G. reports that he has now 30,000 plants, from one to seven years of age, that it costs about $600 for seed for an acre, or 80,000 plants, and that an acre of good ginseng will yield at 5 years of age about $35.000 of roots; that the average price last year was $8 per pound after it was dried and that
three pounds of green roots will make one pound of dry or marketable product. But he says that there is a great deal of work in preparing the ground for the seed and that there is no profit until about the fifth year.
    Dr. S. F. Grover, formerly of Dudley, but now of Los Angeles, and a friend of his by the name of William Riesland, also of Los Angeles, came out in this place. procured a team and Sunday morning started for Butte Falls. Mr. Riesland is looking for a location to settle, as his wife does not have good health in that dry. hot climate, and he seems to think that Rogue River Valley is the place he is looking for.
    A. H. Weber, a traveling salesman of Ashland, called last Saturday for dinner. He said that if Eagle Point is a dry town he had sold some Peruna here.
    Fred Barney of Talent called the latter part of the week and had his son. a lad of about 13 years, with him. He was taking him to Medford to attend school while Mr. B. is canvassing for the nursery business.
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our enterprising merchants, took a trip to Talent last week and while there bought four carloads of baled hay for this market. Speaking about our merchants, they are simply run off their feet with business constantly receiving goods, and there is scarcely any time in the day but you can see wagons in front of the stores loading for different parts of the country or else unloading goods from the depot or produce from the country.
    Our new barber is having a room put up on one of A. G. Daley's lots, between the Zimmerman store and the John Ashpole property.
    The contractor, Mr. Hawk, who is building the new schoolhouse in the Reese Creek district, is pushing the work right along. They have the roof about all on at this writing, Monday night, and expect to have it completed in a short time, as they have five or six men working on it.
    James Ringer is engaged in painting Peter Young's new home, and the carpenters are pushing the work right along.
    One of our prominent and highly respected citizens, J. H. Carlton, moved from our town to Medford, as he had sold his residence here to Gus Nichols and had to give possession, and Mr. N. moved into the house formerly occupied by Mr. Carlton. While we extend a cordial greeting to Mr. and Mrs. Nichols, we regret to lose the company of Mr. and Mrs. Carlton, for they have been a part of our town for several years and Mrs. C. is one of the George Brown girls, who has been raised here among us.
    Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls brought out a load of yew posts last Sunday and Monday took them to Medford.
    C. B. Zeek of Bandon and August D. Singler, a Medford constable, came out last Monday and took charge of two horses that Israel Patton had in his possession that he bought of a man who lived in this neighborhood by the name of Gillespie, that had been stolen from Bandon some time ago, and it appears that the team had been hired out to some parties and were taken some time before the owner missed them. I understand that the man who sold them to Mr. Patton has moved to California.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peelor, who bought the Charley Knighton place on Rogue River, near Flounce Rock, drove into the Sunnyside stable last Monday night. Talking about stables, the two feed stables in Eagle Point are full almost every night and still they come.
    Professor Narregan has moved to Medford and Carl Narregan has moved into the house formerly occupied by his father. Charley Thomas has moved into the Narregan ranch, formerly occupied by Carl Narregan, so they change all around.
    Fred Findley, one of our prominent stock men, was in town Monday after a load of wire fencing he bought of our hardware merchant, William von der Hellen.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 10, 1909, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Tuesday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent was called on to take Mr. Haberling, who has been working on one of the orchards south of Medford, to his homestead on the headwaters of McNeil Creek, and while on the road I was watching for items of interest for the readers of the Mail Tribune, and among the things I noticed was that E. S. Wolfer, our strawberry and tomato man, was preparing to go into the poultry business and has fenced off a tract of land expressly for the chicks, built a neat and commodious henhouse; also has planted the posts for a new wire fence around his place taking in a two-acre tract that he bought some time ago off the R. G. Brown place, and is weaving a fence, thus fixing things up generally. Also that Fred Pelouze is having his home, on the place he bought of Eli Dahack, remodeled and fixed up generally, and getting his ground plowed and preparing to plant it to trees. That the farmers along the route were generally busy putting in their crops, fencing or hauling their produce to Eagle Point market or for shipment. I also found the roads in a horrible condition, and when I enter my protest against the manner in which the people in the outlying districts are treated with regard to the roads by the county court, I feel that I am expressing the views of a majority of the taxpayers of the county. If our county court (now, I hope that this is not treason or contempt of court) would open up their official souls and spend say $100,000 in improving our county roads and let the other fellow that comes later and has the benefit of the improvements help pay for the work, it would be a benefit to those who are now wallowing through the mud and jolting over the rocks, in more ways than one, and would make the country so attractive that the prospective purchaser would fall in love with our country instead of being disgusted, as was a man I was taking up Little Butte Creek not long ago, when he remarked that he would never live in such a country as this when he could find a penitentiary to live in--he was so disgusted with the roads.
    But I did not intend to write an article on political economy; but the people in the country back from the cities have a right to better treatment thin they receive from the hands of the county court.
    William Murry and Claude Miles of Medford were guests at the Sunnyside two or three days the past week.
    Tuesday, Wednesday and Thursday of last week were busy days at the Sunnyside, as that was headquarters for E. M. Helms & Co. of Portland, where they were delivering groceries they had contracted to the farmers in the surrounding country, and many of our townspeople, some of them coming as far as 22 miles through the mud and rain.
    Roy Richardson, son of one of the lending citizens of Peyton, a brick contractor of San Francisco, was here last Wednesday morning and procured a saddle horse at the Sunnyside stables to go to visit his father near Peyton.
    Elmer Spencer and a friend of his recently from the East spent the night here last Wednesday on their way to Mr. Spencer's home near Dudley, and he reports everything in a flourishing condition up there, and that the Dudley post office is a place of general importance and is bound to be a business center.
    Lem Charley and wife of Brownsboro were the guests of Mrs. Howlett last Wednesday.
    Mrs. J. A. Jonas arrived at her home in this place from Wallowa last Thursday and joined her son, Jake, who had prepared to meet her here.
    Mr. Marcy, Mr. Rowden and son were pleasant callers last Thursday. After dinner they went on their way to Medford for goods for Butte Falls stores.
    G. G. Smith, a traveling salesman of Omaha, Neb., representing a drug firm of that city, called for dinner last Thursday; also George T. English and wife of Chelsea, Mich., were here the same day to look over the country. Mr. English is proprietor of the Fairview farm of that place. He is a dealer in thoroughbred sheep, swine and poultry. They are here on business in his line.
    A. B. Hamlinton, a young man who has been boarding at the Sunnyside most of the time for the past two years, has gone to Fort Smith, Ark., to visit his sister. He did not state when he would return, but his friends predict that his stay will not be long.

Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1909, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    B. T. Harvey of Flounce Rock, who has been visiting friends and relatives in that section, returned to Eagle Point the latter part of last week and proceeded on his way to his home in the Willamette Valley.
    Frank E. Smith and wife of southeastern Alaska came out on the P.&E. railroad and engaged your correspondent to take them to Derby, where they spent a few days visiting Mrs. Smith's sister, Mrs. Frank Netherland, returning on Monday, and after spending a few days visiting relatives in Talent, expect to start for their home in the north. They speak in high terms of that section and claim that the cold is not so severe as it is in some of our northern states.
    H. A. McLellan, a representative of the Mail Tribune, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside, and after spending the night engaged Jake Jones to go and drive for him over the country in the Butte Creek and Rogue River sections. He is hustling the old delinquents up pretty lively.
    Frank Netherland of Derby, one of the proprietors of the Derby sawmill, came out last Monday on business and to bring his brother-in-law, Mr. Smith, to the valley.
    Mr. Marcy, one of the Butte Falls merchants, stopped at the Sunnyside last Sunday night on his way home with a load of goods.
    F. D. Clark and R. G. Andrews of Seattle were pleasant callers last Monday. They were looking for a place where they could invest their money in good garden land and were very favorably impressed with our surroundings.
    Last Sunday night there was three men came to the Sunnyside Hotel about 11 o'clock at night and called for beds. They were from the railroad camp wear Derby. One of them, Mat Olsen, had been blown up to a limited extent while he was fixing to put in a big blast. Having put in a small one to swell the hole, he was putting in some black powder preparatory to putting in a quantity of dynamite. The powder in the hole ignited, supposed to have been caused by a spark of fire from the small blast hanging to the roots of a tree, and the result was that his face was badly powder burned and several stones struck him in the face, but fortunately the black powder in the can or the 20 pounds of dynamite did not explode. Dr. Holt, our M.D., was called and dressed the wounds and Tuesday morning he was resting easily. Speaking of the P.&E. railroad, the track layers say that they are getting along fine with their work and will soon have the steel laid as far as they have the right of way graded. The different gangs are at work on the cuts and fills and the big steam shovel is doing good work supplying the road with gravel for ballast.
    Scott Claspill, a Butte Falls merchant, stopped Monday night at the Sunnyside on his way home with a load of goods.
    M. Conley, one of the Butte Falls carpenters, stopped with us last Monday night. He reports that the mill men are getting out timbers for a 75,000-capacity mill in that enterprising town and that business is looming up.
    A gentleman by the name of Wright of Salem, who is in the nursery business, called last Monday, looking for a location. He seemed to think that Eagle Point was about the right place.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent was unexpectedly called to Portland last Tuesday on account of his son-in-law, G. H. Shaw, having been accidentally shot in the face by a gun going off in the hands of one of his neighbors, the charge of shot striking him on the side of the face, breaking the jawbone on both sides. He is at the Good Samaritan Hospital, and I am going to bring the children home to Eagle Point so as to relieve his wife of the responsibility of caring for them. At last accounts he was resting easily. On account of my being called away I will not be able to fill my appointments at Table Rock and Sams Valley next Sunday.

Medford Mail Tribune,
November 17, 1909, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote my last article for the Mail Tribune I was on my way to Portland, and while I was gone I jotted down a few items that I thought might be of interest to the readers of Rogue River Valley.
    The first item of interest for at least some of the readers of the Mail Tribune was the meeting of Bob Anderson and family on the car on their way to Tacoma to visit his father in his declining years. Mr. Anderson was well and favorably known in Medford and Eagle Point in the construction days of the Pacific & Eastern railroad. Since he was here he has been situated at Goldfield, Nev., but he now thinks that he will remain in a more northern country and expresses a preference for this valley.
    The next one of whom I shall write is J. E. Stepp and John Iseli, the two men who owned the Round Top mill that was burned the summer of 1908. They are both living in Firland, Portland. Mr. Stepp is in the real estate business and Mr. Iseli is working at his trade as cabinetmaker. They are both doing well, but are dissatisfied with the long, wet, cold winters up around Portland. Speaking about cold weather, Mr. Iseli told me that at the time we had a little cold snap here go as to freeze ice as thick as a pane of glass, that it was so cold in East Portland that the water pipes bursted and that the ground was frozen so hard that it would bear up a wagon and team, and in a card from a niece I have in Washington she says her son, a boy of 10 summers, is out on the ice skating while she is writing. How is that for the middle of November, while here in Southern Oregon we have hardly had frost enough to kill the tomato vines? Mr. Iseli says that just as soon as he can sell out there he is coming back to this country to live, and Mr. Stepp says to tell "Ma Howlett" that she may look for me to have my feet under her table at most any time. Once home in Jackson County they most always come back again. I also saw O. P. McGee and family. They also want to sell out and come back to their old staging ground. Another, item of more than ordinary interest is the fact an Eagle Point orchard took the first prize for the best carload of Spitzenberg apples at the Spokane apple show, and after it was known on the car and in Portland, Fairview and Oregon City that I was from Eagle Point the people were asking me all kinds of questions about Rogue River Valley and Eagle Point in particular, for while Eagle Point is acknowledged to be the banner place for onions and small fruits, it is now conceded to be the banner place for Spitzenberg apples--but I must stop on this line or I may be classed among the "railroad boosters."
    Since my arrival I have gleaned the following items:
    Miss Elsie Nye and her mother are caring for William von der Hellen's children while they are away to Portland, Mrs. von der Hellen having gone there for the purpose of having an operation performed for appendicitis. The operation was performed in the Good Samaritan Hospital last Saturday and Sunday morning I saw her and she was feeling tine.
    The Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company have a gang of men at the railroad bridge watching to keep the driftwood from banking against it, as Butte Creek has been quite high, although not near so high as it was seven years ago. They have quite a force of men stationed there and are doing good work and lots of it, considering that it has rained so much the past two weeks. Along the different camps the men report that they are getting their camps arranged so as to have things convenient and make the men comfortable.
    Charley Thomas had a runaway with his team last Sunday and came near being killed, with the result that he got off with one horse having his leg broken so as to have to be killed, and had his buggy broken all to pieces. Fortunately he had refused to take his children with him at all, though his wife had asked him to, and as a general thing he took them with him, and his wife had been in the habit of taking the children with her
and driving the team, although one of the horses was known to be a runaway horse.
    The friends of George Wicks are rejoicing with him over the advent of a nine-pound boy at his home on the 9th instant.
    R. L. Finlayson. a traveling salesman of San Francisco, was here last Monday interviewing our merchants on the subject of J. A. Folger & Co.'s goods.
    Mr. Bassett has opened up a cobbler shop in our town.
    I learned today (Tuesday) that Mrs. Lee Watkins, living near Agate, while attempting to cross a slough near the north end of the Bybee bridge, had her horse drowned, and came near being drowned herself, and had it not been that there were two men nearby to help her she would have drowned.
    Miss Myrtle Howell of Oakland, Cal., was the guest of Mrs. Cora Officer last week, and is now visiting friends in Ashland.
    Last Monday night Brisenos' show was here and gave an entertainment, and the next morning there was scarcely anyone would admit that they were there. Finally it leaked out that they had been sold, and now the people say they are sorry that they did not egg the whole outfit, for they say that it is the biggest fake, humbug or anything else you may name, except a respectable show, and still the people will patronize these one-horse, catchpenny traveling shows. Experience is the best teacher and fools, etc.

Medford Mail Tribune,
November 26, 1909, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Wednesday of last week I was called on to take Mrs. J. D. Tuder, child and her brother, Mr. J. Thomason, up near Craig and Fuller's camp on the P.&E. railroad and while en route saw Mr. Craig, one of the contractors, who informed me that they were getting along full as well with their work on the railroad as could be expected and he seemed to be in fine spirits over their prospect. They have quite a force of men at work and still more are coming.
    While in conversation with Mr. Thomason I naturally turned the conversation to the subject of newspapers and the Mail Tribune in particular and so he has ordered the weekly to be sent to him.
    Mr. Bagdon and his son, Charles, in company with W. W. Parker, all of the Butte Falls country, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Wednesday night. Mr. B. was moving out to his farm near Medford, while Mr. Barker returned to his home Thursday morning.
    Ed Higinbotham came out last Wednesday, bringing out a load of thirteen telephone poles for the Butte Falls-Eagle Point line, and he remarked that he had all that he wanted to haul with four horses, for the road is a fright. When it comes to paying fifty-eight cents apiece for hauling telephone poles it makes it quite expensive to get a line up.
    On Friday I was called on to take Mr. Wm. Runnel of Grants Pass up to Wm. Perry's, where he, his brother George and Mr. John Wharton have established a camp and are clearing the right-of-way along the railroad survey. The contractors are establishing camps all along the route and men are in demand to do all kinds of work.
    Mr. Riggins, the man who has the contract to put up the telephone line from here to Butte Falls, came in to the Sunnyside Sunday with four men and Monday morning they started to finish putting up the poles and stretch the wire along the route to Butte Falls and then if satisfactory arrangements cannot be made with the owners of the Eagle Point-Central Point line the company will proceed to extend the line on to Medford.
    Our school is progressing finely under the management of Prof. P. H. Daily and wife and the last report is that the enrollment has reached over eighty and still they come, and if houses could be obtained for families to live in there would be so many come that it would be necessary to fix up the upper part of the school house and employ one or two more teachers, which will likely be done next season and then those old croakers who have been fighting good schools in Eagle Point for the last four or five years will have to take a back seat. At a special meeting the school district voted a four-mill tax for school purposes and the majority of the patrons are determined to have a first-class school and no other kind will do them.
    Last Thursday the school boys and the young men of our town who do not attend school met and had an interesting game of football. There was only two or three persons hurt. The game was decided as a tie as neither team could claim the victory.
    I see by looking over our town that there are now two families living in tents so as to take advantage of our good school and other surroundings.
    Thanksgiving Day was observed here by having as usual good dinners and at night the ladies gave a sandwich supper to raise funds to buy a bell for the church, and succeeded quite well in the undertaking and the same night Geo. Daley gave a dance which was well attended.
    One of the young men boarding here at the Sunnyside by the name of Egger had his foot badly hurt while working on the extension of the P.&E. railroad, but D. Holt was called and dressed the wound and he thinks that he will be able to go to work again soon.
    Burt Peachey, formerly of Ashland, but now a forest ranger, came out last week to spend Thanksgiving with Mr. and Mrs. Geo. W. Daley and family.
    This Monday afternoon J. W. Grover called on your correspondent to go and take a lot of articles of wearing apparel that had been found laid away under George Daley's dance hall. Someone had broken out the iron rods that had been put in the openings in the foundation wall of the hall and had put quite a bundle of clothing. Among the articles was a slicker and a pair of shoes and several other things. They are now in the hands of Mr. Daley.
    Owing to the crowd that is coming to the Sunnyside, Mrs. Howlett in order to make room for them to sleep has had a temporary floor put in the attic of the hotel and now has seven beds there and they are all full every night.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 1, 1909, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John Higinbotham and his father-in-law, John McKee of Big Butte, were pleasant callers last week. Mr. McKee is quite aged and the continuous rain and snow works quite a hardship on him.
    There has been so much rain during the past week that there has been quite a number of the men that have had to quit work on the P.&E. railroad but in spite of the rain and snow there is enough to keep the work moving right along and if nothing more happens to deter them from work the people of Butte Falls will soon hear the sound of the whistle in that section.
    Mrs. Brainard and her two children from Washington arrived and Benj. Edmondson of Butte Falls met her here and took her to that place where her husband is engaged in remodeling the mill and getting it ready for business.
    On Wednesday of last week there was to have been a meeting of the water users of the Butte Creek section to take steps toward testing the constitutionality of the new law governing the water in the streams in Oregon, but for some reason their attorney, A. E. Reames, could not come out and the result was that they were compelled to come back again on Friday and then the state officers were to be here on Saturday and the result was that quite a number of them remained from Wednesday until Sunday. There was quite a number who filed claims for water and some were in favor of letting the law take its course and others said no, but fight it out, so there was no definite understanding. They are to meet here again on the 18th inst. and see what can be done. There seemed to be an idea that there was a trick in the law to take the water from the small holder and give it to the corporations, but we will see later on. From present appearances the case will be taken to the highest courts.
    Last week there was for a short time a break in the P.&E. railroad that caused some annoyance to the passengers. The company found it necessary to lower the track on the north end of the desert and for a short time it was necessary to have the passengers walk for a short distance and the baggage could not he delivered on time, so as to cause some delay with parties who were going on further than Eagle Point. But the trouble is all over now and the train is making its regular trips.
    Mr. Riggins and his men have been putting up the wire for the telephone between here and Butte Falls, and the people in that city will soon be in communication with the rest of the world.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Charles Thomas, December 1st, an eight-pound boy.
    J. C. Brown, land agent, came out last week and brought with him Mr. E. W. Bromley of Chicago who was here last August and bought a tract of land off the Stoddard tract and he is now here to put it out to fruit. He also has charge of the tracts of land that were bought some time ago by Mr. J. C. Smith, Mr. Earl and Mr. Roberts, all of Chicago. They all together embrace a tract of land of one hundred acres that they expect to put out to fruit this winter.
    This neighborhood is regretting that they are to lose ex-sheriff Rader from this community, as he is one of our best citizens, having lived among us for the most of his life. Such is life in the Far West. Men will sell and move and new ones take their places.
    S. B. Holmes and J. Frank Brown have had the surveyors out to run the lines around the land they have recently purchased and are getting ready for the rush that is coming in the spring.
    Mrs. Steve Meskimen and D. N. McCurry of Ashland were here last week looking over the situation, looking for homes.
    Fred Bellows of Ashland moved his family to our town last Tuesday.
    Mrs. Wilson of Dudley was a pleasant caller one night last week. She reports everything in that section flourishing.
    Mr. Qualley of Ashland sojourned here for a short time. He also is looking for a home among us.
    Mrs. Adams and her daughter, Miss Nellie. arrived here last Monday from Denver, Colo., and was met by her brother, Dr. Bonner of Derby, he having secured a rig at the Sunnyside stable. They left for his home in the Big Butte country.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis. the Sunday school missionary, preached for us twice last Sunday at this place.
    Dr. Conroy of Medford came out last Tuesday and procured a saddle horse at the Sunnyside stable, took a trip over the right of way of the P.&E. railroad, returning at night, stopping overnight with us. He was making arrangements to care for the sick and wounded in the employ of the P.&E. railroad company.
    Last Wednesday morning your correspondent was called on to take three passengers to Trail and he found that the high waters of the Rogue had done considerable damage along the road, in one place completely blocking the way so I had to hunt a new crossing of a prominent slough just above the John Black place, now owned by Grant Mathews. The road is in a frightful condition in many places. The horses would sink to their bellies in the mud. I learned while at Trail that the snow was unusually deep in the high hills and at Briscoe's sawmill on Trail Creek the snow was three feet deep and a short distance above it four feet and up. The new county road above Trail was badly washed by the last freshet, and fears were entertained that this snow will go off with a warm rain and the results will be another flood.
    Dr. Jordan of St. Paul, Minn., arrived at his father's last Tuesday night, his family having preceded him several weeks and his arrival has been looked for by the friends of the family for some time.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 10, 1909, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Dollie Parker of Butte Falls, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. W. W. Parker, who has been attending school oat Forest Grove, Ore., for the past two years, returned home last week via the P.&E.
    T. M. Peelor of the Flounce Rock settlement was a pleasant caller two nights last week. In the meantime he visited Medford and Jacksonville on matters pertaining to the title to his land that he bought about a year ago of Mrs. Charles Knighton. When the abstract was called for it was found that there was a flaw in the title on account of someone not being careful about making out a deed, that has caused a delay and considerable expense as the matter had to go through the circuit court for settlement.
    Alfred Gordon, who owned a fine farm on Rogue River and sold about two years ago, went to Lane County and bought a small farm near Cottage Grove, was a pleasant caller Thursday night. He informs me that he has sold his farm near Cottage Grove and came back to Rogue River Valley to live; that up there in Lane County the winds are too cold and swift and that the general outlook does not suit him as this favored spot does; that in his estimation there is no place like his old home and he thinks that he will purchase land in these parts and settle down and be satisfied.
    Last week just as I was starting for Trail with three passengers there was a railroad team driven up to the Eagle Point Hotel with a man lying in the wagon and on inquiry found that the man had been found lying in a pond of water, snow and ice where he had been all night. It is supposed that he was on his way to one of the railroad camps and had been drinking and in the dark fell in the mud hole, where he lay all night. It was thought that he would lose his legs but at last accounts he was able to walk.
    Fred Bellows, who came from Ashland last week, has engaged to work for Mr. E. W. Bromley and has moved into the old J. P. Moomaw house on the hill above Eagle Point.
    Fritz Fry of Little Butte Creek, while out hunting near Fish Lake one day last week, while standing on a log slipped off, his gun going off at the same time, the charge taking effect in his elbow. Dr. Holt was summoned and reduced the  fracture but entertains fear that he will lose his arm. He went up to the McAlister Spring last Friday to bring him down to his father's.
    O. R. Chaffee, of Grand Rapids, Mich,, a traveling salesman for the firm of Young & Chaffee, furniture manufacturers, and T. S. Hutchings of Hilt, California, were guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday night. Procuring saddle horses they proceeded on their way up the Rogue River to Elk Creek where they are interested in timber lands.
    Rev. H. N. Smith, state missionary of the Oregon conference of the Congregational Church for the Sunday school interests, dropped in on us Saturday afternoon unannounced and went to Reese Creek with your Eagle Point correspondent to attend a meeting of the Sunday school at that place and to assist in the preaching services.
    Last Thursday Mr. Henry Pennington, who has a homestead near the road to the Obenchain ranch, called on your correspondent for a team to go to his home and bring out his wife and her sister but owing to a press of business I was unable to go until Friday when I went and found the reads about as bad as they ever get. On arriving at his home I found that the ladies had decided to remain so he came out and took the afternoon train for Medford the same day.
    The railroad company is pushing the work along as fast as they can under the conditions. The roadbed is so soft that the weight of the locomotive and cars presses the ties and rails almost out of sight in many places and it will be some time before they will be able to get it solid enough to run over with loads. The men are sticking to their job and will eventually have a fine road from Eagle Point to the Deschutes. Now, kind reader, don't get excited.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 13, 1909, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Renyen, our boss painter and paper hanger, has just finished a job of paperhanging for R. R. Minter.
    On the 11th of this month surveyor R. P. Cowgill passed through our town on his way up Little Butte Creek to do some work in his line, namely, measuring the water in the ditches, etc.
    On the same date Mrs. Graham of Prospect came out on horseback, stopping for dinner, and then proceeded on her way to Medford on business. Her husband is engaged in the cultivation of ginseng near Prospect and seems to be making quite a success of it.
    Rev. Howard N. Smith, state superintendent of the Sunday school interests of the Congregational Church of Oregon, came out on Saturday of last week and on Monday was joined by Rev. Mark C. Davis, assistant superintendent of the Sunday school interests, and they attended to some business connected with their office, leaving on Tuesday morning. Whatever their business was it was not given out.
    Gus Burns of Grants Pass, a friend of Rev. Mark C. Davis, came in on Tuesday morning from the Butte Falls country and they met at the depot and took the morning car for Medford together. Mr. Burns had been looking over some of the timber in that section and thinks that it is grand indeed.
    The railroad company is experiencing considerable trouble in their work on account of the continued rains. I heard one of the railroad men say that it had rained in whole or in part twenty-eight days in the month of November. It had made the ground so soft that it is very hard to get a solid foundation for the roadbed, but they are pushing the work right along where they can. When they cannot use a heavy locomotive they run the motor car to haul lighter loads and take supplies to the commissary store.
    They are making a decided improvement on the road between here and Medford. Dr. Holt, the assistant physician for the railroad employees, reports that they are accomplishing wonders along the right of way. Muddy roads that are almost impassable and in some of the camps they have to contend with sticky mud that beggars description.
    J. Frank Brown, one of [our] live real estate agents, reports that there are several deals on hand whereby changes will take place in the real estate as there are now four or five places that the parties are simply waiting to get an abstract of title and then the changes will be made.
    The surveyors have been engaged for several days in trying to locate the boundary lines of some of the places north of our town, and now I understand that they have to start anew at the township line and run the work all over in order to get the right starting point as the witness trees have been destroyed and the whole work must be done again.
    There have been several small bands of cattle driven out from this country lately.
    Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls stopped with us last Tuesday night, loaded with household goods he had had shipped from Chicago. He claims that he can save considerable by sending back east for them. There is an object lesson to our merchants. He will tell his prices and that will cause others to send and thus take the trade from our home merchants.
    Mrs. Thomas Fredenburg of Butte Falls came in on her way from Klamath Falls last Wednesday night where she was met by her son and they two went on up to her home ranch Thursday morning.
    Mrs. McDaniel of Brownsboro came in to the Sunnyside Thursday for dinner on her way from the county seat, where she had been to see about her husband's estate.
    Another pioneer has gone to rest. Died, December 13th, 1909, Mrs. Susannah W. Weeks, at the residence of her son Frank Johnson, aged 86 years, 9 months and 11 days. The subject of this notice was born in Montgomery County, North Carolina, April 2, 1823, and came to Jackson County, Oregon in October, 1853, settling on Little Butte Creek with her brother, the late John Mathews, and sister, the late Mrs. Charles Griffith, and a number of others who came across the plains together among whom were Mrs. and Mrs. Wooley, now dead, and now the entire number of the old members of the company have passed away except Christopher Wooley. She leaves five sons and three daughters and a large number of relatives to cherish her memory, and has three children who have passed on to the beyond before her. She was a woman of remarkable vitality, being able to do the housework for her boys, who are unmarried, up to last August. She had a large circle of friends as was evidenced by the large crowd that attended the funeral, there being about eighty persons there. The remains were interred in the family burying grounds on her son's place at the mouth of Indian Creek on the 10th instant. Funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett, assisted by Rev. Rowley.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 20, 1909, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. White of Illinois, son-in-law and daughter of H. M. McIntyre of Derby, arrived on the Pacific & Eastern a few days ago and went on up to the home of her father.
    Quite a number of the water users of Little Butte Creek were here Saturday of this week to perfect plans so as to secure water for irrigating purposes on their farms, and a company was incorporated to handle the water in this neighborhood.
    W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, went to Medford last Monday on business connected with some of the water rights in this section.
    Land is changing hands in this section very fast just now. J. F. Brown as agent sold the old Captain West place last Monday, 280 acres, consideration $4000, to Dr. Nording of Ohio. William von der Hellen has been selling a part of his land on Dry Creek, but I have not learned the particulars, but understand that he has sold for a good price.
    G. W. Daley, Jr., is reported to have sold his town property in Eagle Point to John Nichols, consideration $3000.
    Mrs. Mary Beale has sold her property just north of town to J. F. Brown and S. B. Holmes; consideration $3000. James Ringer sold his land on Big Butte Creek; consideration $2000, and there are several more deals on hand that I expect to be able to report soon.
    The big steam shovel that has been lying at the Eagle Point depot for some time started last Monday for Fuller & Gray's camp on Reese Creek to be used in making a big cut on the Pacific & Eastern right of way. That the managers of the move will meet with considerable trouble in moving the great machine over the soft ground is already anticipated, but they were provided with short rails and timbers and will move them on to the front as they will be needed. The condition of the road is such that it will take some time, as they have to cross a big sticky flat that is now almost impassable to teams, but they, the railroad men, seem to laugh at impossibilities and simply go ahead and do it.
    E. W. Bromley, who is preparing to put out about 100 acres in fruit trees this winter, reports that he is getting along nicely with his work, clearing away the grubs, rocks etc., and expects to go to hole digging in the course of a few days. As he is one of our progressive men and intends to keep up with the times, he has sent through your correspondent for the Daily Mail Tribune, so as to keep posted on what is doing in the world.
    Mrs. William von der Hellen, who has been in the Good Samaritan Hospital undergoing treatment for appendicitis, returned to her home last Tuesday greatly improved in health.
    Elmer S. Spencer of Dudley has also been in the hospital for the past month taking treatment from Dr. Conroy for appendicitis and gallstone. He came out to the Sunnyside last Tuesday on his way home greatly improved in health. He also has given your Eagle Point correspondent his subscription for the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    John Kirkpatrick, who has been living on a farm near Merlin, sold it a few days ago for just double what he gave for it about a year ago and now has come to Eagle Point to buy property, as he thinks that this is the best place he knows of in the county.
    Dr. Jordan of Montana--in a former letter I stated that he was from St. Paul, Minn.--in an interview last Monday said that he was delighted with this climate, that while he was receiving letters from his old home telling of the thermometer registering from 8 to 18 below, people were here going around in their shirtsleeves. And his niece, Miss Lovie Jennings, says that this is the most delightful climate she ever saw. But why talk of the climate more than anything else? Everything in Southern Oregon speaks for itself as very good.
    George West, one of the forest rangers, and his wife, who has been a boarder at the Sunnyside the most of the time for the past year, started Wednesday afternoon on the Pacific & Eastern for Seattle, where Mr. West will attend the forest rangers school for the winter. Mrs. West will be greatly missed, as she has made a great number of friends during her stay here.
    Mrs. Porter Robins, who has been assisting at the bedside of her mother-in-law, Mrs. S. F. Robins of Central Point, returned to the home of her sister, Mrs. George W. Daley, Sr., last Tuesday, She reports that Mrs. R. is greatly improved in health.
    Some of the men who have been engaged in putting up the wire for the phone between here and Butte Falls came into the Sunnyside Wednesday and report that they have completed the work of putting up the wire for the main line and expect soon to put in the phones along the route and as soon as we can get connection with Medford we can do business to much better advantage.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 24, 1909, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On the 23rd and 24th inst. there was quite a number of the railroad men called for their time and went to Medford to spend Christmas and the result was a temporary slack in business at the hotels [in] our town, and when they came back on Monday they were informed that they could not have their names re-enrolled on the books until after the old year had expired. The cause of such a move is unexplained, but I suppose those at the head of affairs know what is best for the company. After January 1, 1910, they will put on as full a force as possible and rush the work right along. The steam shovel that was started from here on the 20th was on the morning of the 27th about a quarter of a mile from the end of the track. Those who have charge of moving the machine seem to be having considerable trouble on account of the ground being so soft.
    Ed Walker and family, who have charge of the Iowa Lumber Company's mills, etc., on Big Butte, came out on the 23rd inst., leaving the team at the Sunnyside stable and went to Medford to spend the Christmas holidays with Mrs. Walker's mother, Mrs. Loar.
    I. B. Williams, one of our retired capitalists, who is rooming at the Sunnyside Hotel, went to Medford on Saturday and Monday last on business connected with a big land deal.
    On Friday eve., being the regular time for Santa Claus to put in his appearance here, the people assembled at the church and had an elaborate Christmas tree prepared and after an interesting program by the school children and some excellent vocal music by Mr. White and Miss Jenkins, Santa put in an appearance, through a window, to the consternation of some of the little folk, and joy of others, and distributed quite a number of presents and all went home feeling that they had been amply repaid for their trouble.
    Christmas was duly celebrated here, although this being a dry town, there was no drunkenness, but the citizens generally had a good square meal and in some instances there was an extra gathering among them, being one at J. W. Grover's, who had invited Prof. P. H. Daily and family to spend the day with them, also Mr. Jordan had a family reunion of at least a part of his family, there being his son, Dr. Jordan and family of Montana; Miss Lovey Jenkins, a granddaughter, E. S. Wolfer, a son-in-law, wife and daughter, besides a few invited guests, and they spent they day very pleasantly together.
    The people of Reese Creek opened their new school house last Christmas Eve by having a good old-fashioned basket supper and dance. A few of our young people attended and report having had a very pleasant time. The proceeds, amounting to about $35, after expenses were paid, is to be applied toward purchasing a bell, flag, etc. for the school house.
    Last Sunday Dr. Nuding and wife procured a rig at the Sunnyside stable and went to the farm he recently purchased of Mr. Henderson, the old West place. He is more than pleased with his purchase.
    G. W. Owings, proprietor of the Eagle Point Hotel, has erected a store room alongside the old building.
    W. T. Beveridge, one of the civil engineers on the P.&E. right-of-way, S. Glasgow and E. E. Edsall were brought out last week by Yud Edsall to spend the holidays in Medford.
    J. W. Innes and Dr. J. H. Eayers [sic] of north Chicago were out last Friday. Mr. Saeyrs [sic] remained over until Sunday evening. They were looking for places to purchase so as to locate in this delightful climate. They were guests at the Sunnyside.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. Thomason who have a camp on the Vestal place and have a contract on the right-of-way for the P.&E. railroad, stopped with us on Sunday night on their way to California to be gone a few days.
    On Christmas Day when P. H. Daily and wife, principal and primary teachers in our school, returned from visiting J. W. Grover, they found that they had company of their own, his brother, T. W. Daily and wife, Bertha Daily, Mr. and Mrs. Ed Stinson and son Willie, had taken possession and were awaiting the arrival of the host and hostess, but after the surprise was over and Mrs. Daily had got things straightened out a little they all settled down to business and had one of the pleasant times of their lives.
    Tuesday morning about 3:30 o'clock Frank Ditsworth came into the Sunnyside for a bed having rode all night from Peyton, for a doctor to go to the family of Mr. Stadler [sic] , as Mrs. Standler [sic] is reported to be quite low with typhoid fever. Dr. Holt, our doctor, being away on a visit to his parents in Portland, Mr. D. tried to get Medford over the phone but could not get Central Point as the wire is out of order so had to go to Brownsboro to phone to Medford for a doctor.
    Speaking of a telephone: The present owners of the line are taking steps to have the line between here and Central Point put in good shape so that we will not have the trouble that we have been having during the past.
    S. J. Jones of Roseburg, a capitalist who boarded with us four years ago, came in on the P.&E. Tuesday morning. He had been in Ashland on land business and came over to see old-time friends and prospect for business. He is planning to spend the summer here next year.

Medford Mail Tribune,
December 30, 1909, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Died--December 19, 1909, at the residence of his father in Salena [sic] County, California, Amos Hoyt, aged 66 years, 2 months and 24 days. The deceased was a resident of Jackson County, Oregon, for quite a number of years. He is survived by his two sons and their mother, who was divorced and afterwards married Mr. Gardner, of Klamath County. His two sons are doing business in Fort Klamath. He was well and favorably known, not only in this county but also in Klamath County and Canada where he spent a few years prior to his death.
    On Wednesday of last week George F. King and his brother came out to Eagle Point on the Pacific & Eastern, and Thursday morning Roy Smith took them up to the lower bridge on Big Butte Creek, where they camped for the purpose of cruising a lot of their timber in that section. They have ordered a team to come for them on the 10th inst.
    The masquerade dance given by George Daley on the night of the 31st ult. was well attended and the supper was reported to be quite good. A sandwich supper, but the dancers complained of the dust on the floor being almost suffocating; also the crowded condition of the hall, as quite a number came out of curiosity and took up the room that belonged to those who bought tickets.
    Thomas Rolfe, of Medford, came out last Saturday and remained over Sunday. He was here looking for a location as he wants to bring his family who are now in San Francisco, to this favored spot, and spend the rest of his days in our salubrious climate.
    Miss Partha Smith, of Talent, came over and procured a rig last Sunday to take her to Lake Creek, where she is engaged teaching school.
    There was another man blown up on the right of way of the Pacific & Eastern last Sunday, but I could not learn his name or the particulars of the accident, but learned from Dr. Holt, who attended him just after the accident, that his face was badly scratched, an ugly scalp wound and his hip badly bruised. The report came to town that he was blown about 20 feet in the air when he lit on a stump and this is the cause of the severe bruises.
    Mrs. Scudder and family, of this place, but now a resident of Medford, came out last Sunday to visit Mrs. Howlett and the girls. I was away from home; also Prof. P. H. Daily and family; he and Mrs. Daley have charge of our school, and spent a part of the day Sunday visiting Mrs. Howlett and our girls. They all are reported having had a very pleasant time.
    Last Saturday, January 1st, 1910, Mrs. A. N. Thomas gave a rag tacking party to a few of her old-time friends, and your Eagle Point correspondent was among those invited. There was just 17 altogether, not including Mine Hostess, Mrs. Thomas. After we had sewed rags for a carpet for awhile, you see, I bossed the job, dinner was announced and we all sat down to an old-fashioned dinner, one that makes a dyspeptic groan to contemplate eating, and spent a good long time at the table, and such a feast of good things; well after dinner we spent a few hours more in visiting and having a good time and then went to our homes wishing that we may all be permitted to eat dinner together again on January 1, 1911.
    Frank Manning came out from his home on Rogue River, near Peyton, last Sunday to sign some papers before our notary public, A. J. Hogg. He reports the roads just as bad as they can be between here and his place.
    A woman by the name of Robinson of San Francisco, Cal., the mother of the late Mrs. Studler, came out on the Pacific & Eastern last Monday. She was on her way up Rogue River to visit her son-in-law, but on her arrival here she met Frank Manning, of Peyton, and arranged to have Mr. Studler bring the children out as soon as the roads were so he could and have them taken to California to be cared for by his relatives.
    At last accounts the steam shovel that is on the way to Fuller & Craig's camp had got to the Cromer Flat and were having trouble getting hands to work at that business as it was so disagreeable working in the frozen mud.
    It was announced last Sunday that Rev. James R. Knodell, the president of Anti-Saloon League of Oregon, will lecture at the Eagle Point church on Thursday, January 13th inst., and will discuss the issues involved in the anti-saloon subject.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 6, 1910, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    At the citizens meeting which was held here on the 4th inst. there was quite a number of those who took stock in the telephone company that had been organized at Butte Falls and an agreement was reached by which quite a number of our citizens are to have phones put in their homes, and the old telephone line from here to Central Point was turned into Butte Falls company and all who took stock became shareholders. Brown & von der Hellen turned over the old line and one hundred phones, poles and all things belonging thereto in consideration of the company allowing them two hundred and fifty dollars and they, Brown & von der Hellen, took the most of that amount in shares at $10 each. After the deal was made Wm. von der Hellen was elected one of the directors and Frank Brown was elected treasurer for the company. There was some talk of changing the name of the company to the Butte Falls, Eagle Point & Medford Telephone Company, but that was left to be decided at a future meeting. It was also understood that the Pacific Telephone Company was to put in operation an extra wire from Medford to Central [omission] Eagle Point wire so that we of Eagle Point can get Medford direct without calling up Central Point, as there has been so much trouble to get the connection with Medford there. The meeting also instructed the director, Mr. von der Hellen, to put on a force of men and put the line between here and Central Point in a good condition. Attorney John Carkin and B. H. Harris were here to represent the interest of the Butte Falls people and the different motions were passed over the line to and from Butte Falls by phone.
    Wm. Muller and W. C. Murphy of Medford were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday night.
    Died, January 3, at his home on Little Butte Creek, August Myers, aged about 84 years. I have not been able to learn the particulars of the death or his family, but know that he leaves two sons, Henry and Husmen, and that he has been sick for some time.
    A. B. Zimmerman has been appointed a freight agent in place of George Owings, who resigned at the Pacific & Eastern depot.
    The tracklayers are now laying more steel and soon the inhabitants of Vestalville will be having railway communication with the outside world.
    The steam shovel that has had such a time getting to Craig & Fuller's camp by the time this is in print will have reached its destination and the work on the "Big Cut" will be pushed right along.
    On Wednesday the 5th, your Eagle Point correspondent took O. Adams, B. H. Harris' foreman at Butte Falls, up to his place of business, where he is superintendent of the work of putting an addition to the saw mill at that place. Messrs. Wm. Chambers and Charley Edmondson took up the same day two large sheaves, each weighing about sixteen hundred pounds, to be put in the addition to the mill. He tells me that they are making arrangements to open a bank in Butte Falls. Then they will have twenty-four families, eight bachelors' establishments and only think of it, there are seventeen young ladies of marriageable age and still eight keeping bach, four stores, one school, two teachers, eighteen pupils, a meat market, one hotel, two restaurants, one lodging house and one saw mill, two feed stables, and one law office. And since they have telephone communication with the outside world they expect to do business in earnest. They also have a project on foot to open up a country road to Prospect and thereby bring all travel to Crater Lake, etc., through that city. Speaking of country roads, through the energy and determination of some of the business men of Butte Falls they have secured a route from Eagle Point to that place by which we can travel, especially in the dry season, from here with a good load as by means of the new road. The two bad hills on the old route were cut out and now we have an easy grade around the Vestal Hill and the Rocky Hill; the grade on the new road is just fine and after the ground becomes packed we will have a fine road all the way to the Falls. The grade around Rocky Hill should be widened some and more turnouts made. Stopping at Derby on my way home I met Mr. Swihart, the Derby merchant, and he informs me that business is becoming better all the time and the principal trouble with him is to get in goods enough to supply the demand. He also tells me that a strong move is on foot to have a daily mail instead of a tri-weekly, as the subscribers to the daily Mail Tribune, as it is, can't get the news until they are old
Medford Mail Tribune, January 10, 1910, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Austin of Dudley, who had been in Medford looking after his interests there, came out last Sunday on the P.&E. train, stopped at the Sunnyside overnight and left there on Monday. He was talking of looking at some land above here on the creek, and one would infer that he would like to purchase a tract of good orchard land. He has a place near Dudley on what was formerly called the unsurveyed, and has quite a nice orchard planted there. He is one of our progressive men and is firm in the opinion that Southern Oregon is the proper place to live.
    One of the Whitley boys, who has been in California for some time, running a donkey engine, dropped in on us Sunday evening, remaining overnight. He was on his way to their ranch near Prospect.
    The many friends of John Ashpole are glad to see him on our streets again. He has been confined to his room for some time with a kidney trouble.
    During the recent storm Little Butte Creek got rampant and tore about 20 feet of the dam that turns the water into the Snowy Butte millrace and S. B. Holmes has had the breach repaired. The Smith boys did the work.
    Edwin C. Dohl of Minnesota, formerly an assistant in one of the banks, whose health has failed, has come to the Sunnyside to remain during the winter to try to recuperate. He thinks that this is a grand country.
    J. Hartman, the bridge contractor, stopped for dinner last Monday.
    Jud Edsall, the general hustler between the railroad camps near Butte Falls and Eagle Point, Medford, etc., came out Monday, and leaving his team here, went on to Medford the same day, returning Tuesday and went on up home the same night. While Mr. Hartman was here he was looking after some of the bridge work on the right of way on the P.&E. route.
    Jerry Bishop and another gentleman came out from Medford last Monday, procured horses here and went on up into the tall timber.
    About two weeks ago Ed Walker, who has charge of the Iowa Lumber Company's interest on Big Butte, and his family came out to spend the holidays with Mr. Walker's mother, Mrs. Loar, of Medford, last Monday and returned to their home on Tuesday.
    The King Brothers, George and Charles, came out from the Big Butte country last Monday [and] took dinner at the Sunnyside, taking the train for Medford the same evening.
    Deputy Sheriff William Ulrich went to Big Butte Creek last Saturday and arrested a man by the name of Wilks and brought him through town Sunday morning on their way to Jacksonville, charged with threatening the life of Z. Meeker, and Sunday night Z. Meeker, the prosecuting witness, and two of the Colby boys, John and Ray, stayed here on their way to Jacksonville to appear as witnesses in the case, returning Monday night on their way home, as there was a flaw in the indictment and the man was turned loose.
    The last time I wrote I expressed the opinion that the steam shovel that parties have been trying to move to the right of way on the P.&E. would be at its destination by the time that letter was in print, but in that I was mistaken, as they have had an amount of trouble since and have progressed slowly. They only had eight steel rails when they got started, and about the time they got opposite F. J. Ayres' residence, where they had to climb a steep hill, they broke two of the rails, that leaving them only six, and as they have to have two of them under the machine all the time, leaving only four to use, it necessitates going very slowly, and having a very steep hill to climb it takes longer than I expected.
    Last Tuesday I had the pleasure of visiting our school, in the principal's room, at least. Professor Daily has proved to be the right man in the right place. He had at the time I visited the school 43 children in his room and 34 in his wife's room, for Mrs. Daley is our primary teacher and Mr. Daley informed me that if he had room to take them in there would be six more come from outside of the district. But the school--well, you have seen ants or bees at work; well, the children all seemed to vie with each other to see who could do the best, and the recitations were fully up to the standard. I promised Mrs. Daley that I would visit her department next time, and I anticipate a good time there. We are planning to add another teacher next year, if not two of them.
    A company of surveyors are here at this time surveying off the land bought of William Hart Hamilton of William Ulrich, and cutting it up into small tracts. Mr. Hamilton is also having a large number of fruit trees planted this winter.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 13, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Messrs. J. W. Wakefield of the real estate firm of Brown & Wakefield of Medford, and A. C. Stock, another homeseeker, came out the first of the week looking over our country in search of orchard land.
    Mr. and Mrs. John O'Connor, who were married in Jacksonville by Judge Neil on the 11th inst., came out on the P.&E. on the 12th and spent the night at the Sunnyside and about 10 o'clock p.m. there was a company of youngsters--I suppose boys--congregated under the window of their bedroom and gave a genuine old-fashioned charivari. The groom got up, dressed himself, went out and gave the boys some money and started them off. The next morning they started for the railroad camp, where Mr. O'Connor is at work putting in culverts.
    B. H. Harris, general manager of the Butte Falls Lumber Co., and Phil Flood of Portland came out last Thursday evening on their way to Butte Falls. Mr. Flood is a member of the hardware company where the Butte Falls company gets the most of its machinery for the mills. Mr. Harris brought out with him six phones to be put up on the Butte Falls, Eagle Point and Medford Telephone Company's line, putting one in the Sunnyside Hotel--something that we have very much needed for a long time.
    Earl E. Reisland and Dr. S. F. Grover of Los Angeles came into town last Friday morning, remaining overnight, and on Saturday morning started on foot for the tall timber to visit friends near Dudley and to look over some country near there for ore, copper and quicksilver. It is claimed that both abound on the headwaters of the Umpqua and the Rogue rivers.
    Last Thursday Rev. J. R. Knodell, president of the Anti-Saloon League of Oregon, delivered a lecture in Eagle Point on the subject of the liquor traffic, and notwithstanding the fact that the night was very dark and stormy and mud under foot, he had a very good-sized audience.
    Our meat market has closed its doors again for a short time, the management say to make some changes in the interior of the building, but they expect to open again in a few days.
    Some of the citizens of Eagle Point were greatly excited when it was learned that a lot of lumber and shingles had been unloaded on the desert about a mile from the station, and the report gained considerable momentum that the depot was to be moved at once and a town built up on the desert and leave Eagle Point out in the cold. But when it was learned that the lumber and shingles were for Mr. Hoover to build bunk houses, etc., for his men who will be engaged in planting trees on his farm, some of the citizens began to breathe more easily, although there is a probability that a station will be established on the desert near the Mintor place, about four miles from here.
    Mrs. Bellows arrived last Friday from Eugene and went directly up the hill to her son's residence, the Moomaw place.
    Mr. Pelouze received a lot of fruit trees on the P.&E. last Friday and took them to his ranch on Little Butte Creek, above town.
    Mr. Harberling, who has a homestead in the tall timber, came out last Saturday on his way to Grants Pass.
    Mr. Ditsworth came out from Peyton last Friday, remaining overnight with us, and Saturday morning went to Medford. He expected to go home through Sams Valley, as he has business there. He reports some sickness in his neighborhood, although those who have been afflicted are on the way to recovery.
    J. W. Richardson of Peyton came out Friday and went on through to Medford the same day, returning to the Sunnyside Saturday eve.
    Mr. Rolfe, of whom I made mention a short time ago, has been to Medford, procured the necessary lumber and is now building for himself a house on a tract of land he has filed on west of north of Eagle Point about one mile. He is assisted by Mr. Shadle.
    I am glad to see that you, Mr. Editor, are coming out in favor of bonding the county to make good roads. The condition in which the people from the East and Middle States find our roads, especially in the winter where it takes ten to twelve hours to go a distance we should go in two or three hours, and if they should happen to want to walk up a hill to lighten the load or for exercise, and find the mud from four inches to a foot deep, and the stones and roots, and many instances stumps, in the county roads that are constantly traveled, they become disgusted with the country and come to the conclusion, and justly, too, that there is not much push about Oregonians anyhow and decide to go where the people have more pride, to say the least of it. If we can't bond the county, on account of the old obsolete constitution, then let the county court issue warrants and run the county in debt, say $150,000 or $200,000, and have the money applied toward making good roads, especially on the thoroughfares that are constantly traveled by a majority of the traveling public, and the country will soon fill up with class of people that will gladly pay their proportion of the expense.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 18, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    It becomes my painful duty to chronicle the death of Miss Gale Draper, aged 15 years and 11 days, who died at the residence of her grandfather, Mr. Castor, near Derby. Miss Draper was a promising young girl, just blooming into womanhood, and was stopping with her grandparents attending the Derby school, and was one of the bright and promising pupils of that school, and one who will be greatly missed by her teacher and schoolmates, as well as by the whole community. She leaves a mother and brother as well as many other relatives to feel their loss. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on Monday.
    Born--On the 17th instant, to Mr. and Mrs. David Swihart, near Derby, a 12½-pound boy. The parents think that Southern Oregon is a good place for babies.
    There is a man by the name of C. O. Ward in our town who has opened a watch repairing shop, first in the same room where a man has opened [omission] pairing shop, but he has lately moved into the office of the Butte Falls Lumber Company, so the readers of the Mail Tribune will see our town is coming to the front, and we expect to see several buildings go up in the spring and summer, so that there will be houses to rent for the use of people who want to take advantage of our excellent school facilities. Speaking of our school, Professor Daily reports that he has now over 80 names enrolled in his school.
    Our meat market closed its doors one day last week, but promised to reopen again in a few days, but as yet there has been nothing done in that line.
    I am glad to be able to say that the management of the phone company has a team at work hauling poles along the old Eagle Point-Central Point line, to repair it so that we will not have so much trouble in getting communication with Medford as what we have had.
    Messrs. A. L. Cusick, Emil Carder, C. Walker and C. W. Mooney called Tuesday. Mr. Carder and Glen Fabrick, both of Medford, had purchased a tract of land lying west of Eagle Point about two miles of Luke Ryan of Jacksonville, and the three gentlemen had accompanied Mr. Carder to look at the purchase. Mr. Walker is recently from Texas and Mr. Mooney is recently from North Carolina, and they are so well pleased with the country, especially the climate, that they say that they cannot find words to express their admiration of the country. They agree with me in saying that if we will tell the plain, unvarnished truth about Southern Oregon that that is good enough.
    The Butte Falls basketball team, which had been to Jacksonville to play, called at the Sunnyside on their way home last Tuesday, and although they came out second best, they feel that they are entitled to a high degree of honor for playing as well as they did. They are a fine-looking set of young men.
    John Warner of Trail was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside last Tuesday night.
    Our phone line is being extended in different directions and soon we will have communication with the entire settlement.
    The railroad company had a big gang of men at work for the last few days fixing the track where it was laid on the soft ground and the carpenters are putting in a long bridge at the end of the track and pushing the work on ahead as fast as they can.
    The steam shovel that is destined for Craig & Fuller's camp is this morning about a quarter of a mile from its destination, so Mr. Vestal phones me. It had gotten off of the track last Sunday, and they have just got it on again, but from what I can gather along the line, they are pushing the work right along.
    John Allen of Derby came out to attend the funeral of Miss Gale Draper and stopped overnight in Eagle Point. He says that hay is very scarce in that section, but he thinks there will be enough to take the stock through the winter.
    Mrs. E. Holmes, who is teaching at Derby, also came out to attend the funeral of Miss Draper; in fact, there was quite a large number of people of Derby who came out on that occasion.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Clarno, January 11, a son.
    Mrs William Abbott and her daughter, Mrs. Mae Fox, were the guests of Mrs. Howlett Wednesday evening.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 21, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Killiam Biller and W. H. Wall, one of the new arrivals from the East, called at the Sunnyside for dinner last Thursday. They came out on the P.&E., stopped off at the Butte Creek bridge, went down the creek to look at a tract of land Mr. Miller had bought of Lonnie Duggan, and after tramping through sticky for a half a dozen miles tried to do justice to dinner, after which they took a tramp up the hill to Eagle Heights to look at what is known as the Stoddard tract. Mr. Wall seemed to be very favorably impressed with this part of the country and talked as though he would buy property here.
    Mr. McCray, chief engineer of the Fish Lake Ditch Company, and Mr. J. L. Shaska called here for dinner last Thursday on their way up to the Fish Lake ditch. Mr. Shaska said that he was to have a gang of men go to work and clean out and enlarge the ditch so as to carry water enough to supply the demand. Mr. McCray tells me that he has the reservoir at Fish Lake arranged so as to hold a vast amount of water as a reserve and yet the dam is perfectly safe.
    Rev. Stayton, the Sunday school missionary for the Baptist church, Rev. McKee, the Bible colporter for the Baptist Bible society, and Rev. La Mar, the pastor of the Baptist church at Eagle Point and Talent, were here last Thursday and Rev. Stayton gave a very interesting talk to the school children in the afternoon after school and at night gave a talk to the adults on the subject of Sunday schools.
    Mrs. Martha Brown and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. George B. Brown, were pleasant guests at the Sunnyside last Thursday night. Mrs. Brown and Mrs. Howlett have been old-time friends for over 40 years, and it seemed like old times again to have them together talking over the changes that have taken place since they first became acquainted in 1864 when we were all young. They have been to Medford to have some dental work done and returned as far as Eagle Point on the P.&E.
    Ira Tungate, formerly one of the forest rangers, but now a plain citizen of Medford, stayed with us last Thursday night. His health, though not good, is improving, and he thought best on account of the exposure to which the rangers are subjected that he had better resign his position.
    S. H. Harnish had the misfortune to have one of his horses run a 20-penny spike nail into his foot about an inch and a half that is causing the animal a great deal of pain, and fears are entertained that he may have an attack of tetanus. He is one of his driving horses, and the loss of such an animal would be quite severe on Mr. Harnish.
    Last Thursday the two Misses Ewen went to Jacksonville to take the necessary steps to try to get possession of their part of the farm that belonged to their father, who died several years ago without a moment's warning, and it is claimed that there was some irregularity in the settlement of the estate.
    Mrs. S. B. Holmes went to Medford last Thursday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 24, 1910, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. P. Watt of Jerome, Idaho, was among the callers at the Sunnyside since I last wrote for the Mail Tribune. He was looking over our country with a view of locating among us. He, like all the rest of the people who come from the East and Middle West, fell in love with our climate.
    Born--To Benjamin Brophy, January 23, 1910, a nine and one-half pound boy.
    T. M. Broker of Medford was in Eagle Point overnight last Monday working in the interest of the Mutual Life Insurance Company of New York. Although he did not meet with the success he desired, he thought he would come back and try again.
    Mr. Peyton, of Peyton post office, came out last Monday after provisions. He reports the road in a very bad condition and thinks that there ought to be some plan devised by which the people living in the mountain districts could be helped in that line.
    Mr. Bowden of Butte Falls came in on the P.&E. Tuesday eve and stayed overnight. He expects to move his family to Texas this spring, as he has bought a farm there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Webster, living near Peyton, came out last Sunday and the same afternoon went on to Medford, returning Monday afternoon, and on Tuesday morning started early for their home.
    The road between the depot and the business part of town got so bad, and especially right at the depot, that it became necessary to do something to help it, so some of the enterprising citizens put teams and men at work hauling gravel, and by that means has helped the matter some, but the outlet from the depot is still very bad. There is some talk of putting down a plank walk so that pedestrians can get out without wading. But before that can be done we ought to procure a right of way from Mr. Hamilton, the owner of the land. There is some little talk about incorporating our village so as to make the owners of hogs in the neighborhood keep them [penned] up, but the move does not seem to take very well, as some think that if they have the power to force the hogs in the pen the next move would be to shut the cows up and then--.
    James Ringer went to Jacksonville last Tuesday to attend to some business at the courthouse.
    Mr. Bassett, our cobbler, went to Medford, as also did Mr. Jones our barber.
    In my last I state that the Butte Falls basketball team came out second best in their game with the Jacksonville team. In that I was misinformed, as it appears that the Butte Falls team won the game with high honors.
    P. W. McCuiston of Sacramento, Cal., came out on the P.&E. road Wednesday morning and your correspondent took him up to the Maney & Murphy camp at the commissary store. He is in the employment agency business and is furnishing hands for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad. Mr. Maney is one of the subcontractors and reports that they have now about 500 men employed on the work and expect, as soon as the weather settles, to put on a much larger force.
    William Stalder of Peyton came out last Wednesday on his way to Jacksonville to make out a deed to the place that he has sold to Mr. Bradshaw, who is living on the Stewart place on Rogue River. He expects as soon as he can get his business settled up to take his children back to Nebraska to his mother, as he lost his wife a short time ago.
    Ed Conden of Butte Falls was a guest at the Sunnyside last Wednesday night.
    N. J. Wiley, a contractor and builder of Medford, and Mr. D[illegible], a livery stable man, called for supper Monday night, had their horses fed and then went on their way to Medford. Mr. Wiley was looking over the field to see the prospect for work.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 28, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Austin Green, grandson of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, celebrated his 21st birthday on the 3rd inst., and his grandparents made him a present of two valuable lots in Fryer's addition to the town of Eagle Point on that occasion.
    J. C. Brown, the dirt seller, and M. B. Glover, both of Medford, were out to our town looking over the land adjoining. Mr. Glover was looking for orchard land.
    Miss Mabel Prewell and Miss Sarah Singleton were in our town last Saturday on business and calling on some of their many friends.
    George Yere, who has been engaged with a party of civil engineers on the right of way of the P.&E. near Butte Falls, and John Edsall came out last Saturday, took dinner at the Sunnyside, and Mr. Yere went on to Medford the same afternoon, and Mr. Edsall took a load of supplies up to feed railroad men on. They report that those who have charge of the clearing of the right of way are getting along well with their work and by the 20th inst. they will have the whole of the right of way cleared to Butte Falls.
    Mr. Fry of Little Butte Creek, Lake Creek P.O. and two of his sons called for dinner the last of the past week. One of the boys was the one who accidentally shot himself in the arm some time ago. He says that he has but little use of his arm yet, but thinks that he will eventually have the use of it to a great extent.
    A lady by the name of Noland and her little boy came to Eagle Point to board last Monday. Her husband is a bridge carpenter on the P.&E. railway.
    Mr. Peyton and his daughter Miss Mary, came out last Tuesday, [and] took the car for Medford the next morning. He made the round trip, Miss Peyton remaining in Medford.
    Mr. Miles of Medford came out Tuesday evening, spent the night in Eagle Point and returned to Medford Wednesday eve.
    Alex. Vestal was a pleasant caller in Eagle Point and reports that the steam shovel has finally got to work on the big cut near Vestal's. They have had a long and hard time moving it to its destination, but have finally succeeded.
    Last Wednesday morning the railroad men who have been boarding at Eagle Point took their lunch [omission] railroad track, but they were met by the section boss, who informed them that the orders from headquarters was to suspend operations for a while on that part of the railroad where they had been working, and the result was quite a number of them started this (Thursday) morning for Medford.There were about 100 Hindus quit work Tuesday. Speaking of Hindus, there were about 12 of them came to the Sunnyside last Wednesday about noon and called for dinner. They gave orders for fried pork, no beef. Mrs. Howlett fixed a table for them in the laundry room and served them with dinner, and it might be of interest to the reader to know some of the peculiarities of these people. They all sat down and then the first thing they ate was the pork. They would each reach to the dish and take a piece of pork and eat that first, then the tomato preserves, then bread, and last potatoes, eating everything with their fingers, not using their knives at all. None of them washed their hands except the boss before eating, and after they got through they all washed clean with soap.
    Fred Dunlap of Talent and two teamsters, who were hauling his household goods, stopped here last Wednesday night on their way to Mr. Dunlap's homestead on Indian Creek, near Derby.
    There were three men came in Wednesday night from Pankey's logging camp, cold, hungry and tired, and called for supper, etc., and they ate as though they enjoyed it.
    Your correspondent went to Sams Valley last Saturday and did not get home until Tuesday night, so am [a] little slow in getting in the news.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 4, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    As an evidence of the progressiveness of our neighborhood and the interest taken in educational matters I will state that now, notwithstanding the fact that heretofore we have had, for some time at least, what might be called poor schools, we have one of the best schools in the valley, and as an evidence of that fact, we have now enrolled 90 names, and another evidence is that there is not a single kicker in the neighborhood, and it does one good to visit the school and see how the children vie with each other in trying to excel and trying to be good, and I am informed by the teacher that he has had several applications from young teachers for admission to our school, but have had to refuse them on the ground that there was no room, and that all of the time was taken up with those who were attending; but we expect to arrange so that the next year we will have three, if not four, teachers, and teach as high as the tenth grade, anyhow, and in the course of a short time will have a high school in Eagle Point.
    Mrs. Barney Hinds, whose husband is one of the superintendents of construction work on the P.&E. Railroad, has moved her quarters to the Sunnyside Hotel.
Mr. and Mrs. J. R. Noland, who have been guests at the Sunnyside Hotel, moved their quarters to the Iowa lumber mills on Big Butte last Sunday. Mr. Noland is going to take charge of one of the donkey engines to clear off a tract of land for the purpose of putting out an orchard, as there are about 20 or 30 acres near the Sills Spring that has but little timber on it and ought to produce fine fruit.
    We have had another deal in real estate here. Mrs. Anna Tyrrel, formerly Anna Heckathorn, [sold] to G. W. Owings what is known as the old pool hall, now occupied by Frank Lewis as a pool and billiard room; consideration $600. Mr. Owings, who is now keeping the Eagle Point Hotel, says that he intends to cut it up into small rooms for a lodging house.
    Miss Danna Rader, formerly saleslady in William von der Hellen's hardware and drug store, has returned to her old stand, as Mrs. Cora Officer, who has occupied the position for some time, contemplates taking a trip to Portland in the near future.
    Mesdames Lottie Van Scoy and S. B. Holmes went to Medford last Saturday on the P.&E., returning the same day.
    Mr. Pelouze, the man who bought the Eli Dahack place, took from the P.&E. depot last Saturday a large box of fruit trees to be planted on his farm.
    Mr. Paris, one of the subcontractors from Maney brothers, went to Medford on the P.&E. last Friday, returning on Saturday, stopping overnight here, and on Sunday tried to get a team to haul his supplies up to his camp, but failed, as every available horse was in use or engaged, so he had to carry what he could to the commissary store and take the chances of getting them hauled from there.
    Rev. J. R. N. Bell, pastor of the Presbyterian church at Corvallis, Or., on his return trip from Los Angeles and Mexico stopped off at Medford and took the P.&E. train for Eagle Point to visit your correspondent, the first time we have met for 20 years. We have been mutual friends for the last 35 years, and though the meeting was, on my part, at least, entirely unexpected, I assure your readers it was a very agreeable surprise. We first met in Ashland where he was a southern Methodist preacher, afterward were interested in the sheep business, as well as traveled and preached together and became warm personal friends. Since then he has gone to the Presbyterians and I to the Congregationalists. For five years Mr. Bell published and edited the Roseburg Review and I was his correspondent from this place, writing over the nom de plume Uno. But it is not necessary for me to write an eulogy on such a man as Dr. J. R. N. Bell.
    Last Saturday night some of our local talent gave an entertainment in Holmes' warehouse to raise funds to buy ball suits. The entertainment was well attended and gave general satisfaction. One man who was there remarked that that tall man was a professional, and a lady remarked that it, the show, was better than one we had here a short time ago, when they were all professionals; but we have sometimes those Cheap John shows that are a disgrace to the name. But they say that the people love to be bilked.
    I understand that through the management of H. A. McLellan, the traveling agent for the Mail Tribune, that arrangements have been perfected to have the Mail Tribune delivered to the subscribers at Eagle Point on the same day that it is published instead of having to wait until the next night, as we have been doing. And by that arrangement the subscribers at Brownsboro and Butte Falls will get it on the next day and Lake Creek the day following, whereas the way the delivery has been made, we at Eagle Point would get it the next night after publication, Brownsboro and Butte Falls the next night after we get ours, the Lake Creek one day later still. So you see that that arrangement accommodates quite a long list of subscribers.
    John Pankey and three of his men, who are working in his logging camp near Peyton, came out on the P.&E. last Saturday night, stopped at the Sunnyside overnight and Sunday went on up to camp. Mr. Pankey says that provisions cost him much, and especially hay and grain for his teams, as hay is very scarce. The roads are so bad that the expense is so great that he will not do so well as he anticipated on the contract.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 7, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Emma Hewes of Yakima, Wa., called here last Sunday for a team to take her to her brother's, Mr. Kashan, on Antelope Creek, where she expected to spend a few days and then proceed on her way to California to visit her father.
    Sunday, George Coran, one of the business men of Medford, called here for dinner on his return trip from the Iowa camp. He reported that everything was stirring in the hills and that people were getting ready for a vast amount of business this spring.
    Mrs. W. H. Rush, wife of the superintendent of Camps Nos. 1 and 2 on the right of way of the P.&E. railroad, has changed her boarding place and taken rooms with her mother, Mrs. Hinds. Also Mr. Murphy, the section boss on the construction work of the P.&E. near the depot.
    I reported in my last letter that the men had been laid off on the construction near the depot, but that was only a temporary move on account of having run out of wood for the steam shovel and could get no gravel for ballast on the road. But now they are at it again in full force.
    Mrs. P. H. Daily, our primary teacher, was called to Jacksonville last Tuesday to assist in examination of the applicants for certificates to teach school, and Miss Mae Bigham is filling her place during absence.
    Prof. Edgar E. Smith and wife passed through town last Monday, stopping overnight with some of their old-time friends, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Daley, and Tuesday were on to Jacksonville to attend the teachers' examination; also Miss Jennie Mahoney and Miss Leta Peelor of Butte Falls spent the night in Eagle Point on their way to try for certificates to teach.
        Ira Tungate, one of Butte Falls enterprising young men, spent Monday night with his uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. John Watkins, on his way to Jacksonville on business. He has a billiard room in Butte Falls and has ordered two pool tables to use in his business as soon as he can build a room sufficiently large for that purpose.
    The many friends of Miss Lovey Jennims, who have enjoyed her company since her arrival here last fall, regret that the time has come for her departure for her old home in Iowa. She is the granddaughter of our townsman, Mr. Jordan, and since her stay among us has made many warm friends that predict she will return to our favored land soon.
    Verne T. Canon, son of Mayor Canon of Medford, was a pleasant caller at Eagle Point Wednesday. He was posting bills for some of the business men of Medford.
    Mr. Ditsworth of Peyton came out from Medford Tuesday night as far as Eagle Point and spent the night. Wednesday morning he went on his way home via the Reese Creek route. He brought out his stepdaughter, [omission] position in Deuel & Kentner's store as saleslady. On his way home he secured a small quantity of coal from one of the coal mines on Roxy Ann to try when he got home.
    Mr. Mathews, one of Butte Falls' capitalists, came out Sunday and went to Medford after a load of goods for his brother-in-law, Mr. Massey at the Falls, remaining overnight in Eagle Point. Scott Claspill, another Butte Falls merchant, stopped here Tuesday night with your Eagle Point correspondent, having a load of goods for his store. Mr. Grigsby, another business man of Butte Falls, stopped with us on Monday Night. He was loaded with machinery for the Butte Falls mill.
    There were several of the railroad men quit their jobs and went up to the Iowa mills to work but they had hardly begun work before orders came to suspend operations. There was no reason assigned so the most of the people--one a woman--came back to Eagle Point on Tuesday and some of them went to work again on the P.&E.
    Fred Dunlap, formerly of Talent, who had his household goods hauled up to his homestead on Indian Creek near Derby last week, brought his family out on the P.&E. car Wednesday and spent the night in Eagle Point.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 11, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among the many callers at Eagle Point since I wrote last I will note L. McLellan of Medford, County Assessor Wm. Grieve and Charles Kinsey of Wampa, Idaho. The latter two were out to look at a tract of land above here on Little Butte Creek, and Mr. Grieve was also simply smiling on his many friends out here.
    The many friends of the Ewen sisters, Misses Clare and Ethel, are glad to learn of their good fortune in securing their part of the old home place that was taken on a mortgage while they were but small children, and now they have deeded the land to N. L. Narregan, the man who made the last purchase, the consideration being $11,000.
    G. H. Wamsley and daughter, Miss Mabel, returned from an extended visit to Los Angeles and vicinity to visit his sister and other relatives. While on their trip they took a sea voyage from Los Angeles, or rather a shipping point eighteen miles from the city, to San Francisco. Miss Mabel says that she rather enjoyed the voyage but her father was rather "squeamish."
    Mrs. Floyd Pearce of Forest Creek came over to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Frazer, last Saturday.
    Porter Robinet arrived last week from San Francisco, his family having preceded him several months.
    Mrs. Caroline Pool of Butte Falls, who has been spending the winter with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Tungate of Jacksonville, came out last Saturday and went to her home at Butte Falls on Monday.
    In my last I spoke of Mr. Owings having bought the old pool hall and now J. W. Smith is putting in partitions and cutting it up into bedrooms, something greatly needed in these parts.
    Some of our citizens are about ready to go up in smoke or some other way, for the railroad company have actually put a switch out on the desert and are going to pull the town up there in spite of the fact that there is neither road, water nor grass or anything to raise; but if it does go we can raise vegetables to supply the new city.
    Grant Harvey while running a horse with another young man last Saturday night had his horse fall, and when young Harvey struck the ground he found that his collar bone was broken and that he was pretty badly bruised up.
    There has been quite a number of the employees on the railroad and the right of way for the railroad come out the past week but the most of them only temporary.
    John Edsall came out last Saturday after a load of supplies for his railroad camp, the men who are getting out the timbers and building short bridges and culverts up in the timber. He reports that the contractors have the right of way cleared almost to Butte Falls.
    Died--February 9, 1910, at the family residence on Reese Creek, Mrs. Jennie L. Johnson, aged 46 years, 3 months and 25 days. She was born in Monroe County, Ohio, of Quaker parents and adhered to many of the peculiar tenets of that church, although in after life she united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and lived in accordance with the teachings of that denomination. I had the pleasure of visiting her a few times during her sickness and she was always ready to give a reason for the hope that was in her. She died a peaceful death and has gone to her reward. Her husband, Prof. J. C. Johnson, is now teaching second term of school in the Reese Creek district, and is universally liked by all the patrons of the school. In addition to her leaving her husband, she also leaves a young man whom they have raised, by the name of Penn. They leave no children of their own. The lady came here for her health and being sick all the time formed but few acquaintances. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery and religious services were conducted in the Eagle Point church by Elder J. P. Moorman, assisted by A. C. Howlett.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent has been and still is on the sick list and has not been able to gather many items of news and in this connection will say to the readers of the Mail Tribune that I will not be able to go to Table Rock and Sams Valley next Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 15, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. W. Delin of Medford, formerly foreman of a gang of men in the construction work of the P.&E.R.R., but now having charge of another gang constructing a large building in Medford, and Mr. T. C. Fair of Kansas City, Missouri, were pleasant callers the first of the week on their way up the line. They were looking for something in the orchard line, and on their return the next day Mr. Fair expressed himself as highly pleased with our country out here and especially our climate.
    There was another accident reported in one of our railroad camps the first of the week. In blasting on the right of way, a large stone lit on one of the tents in which were some or at least one Hindu, and he was so unfortunate as to have an arm and a collarbone broken and otherwise was badly bruised up. He was taken to the Medford hospital for treatment.
    Mr. C. B. Webster of Peyton came out a few days ago and went to Medford to consult with D. Conroy with regard to his wife's health, as she has been under his treatment for some time.
    Mrs. N. S. Thomason and her daughter, Mrs. Rosa Tudor came out from their camp near Vestal's last Monday and stayed overnight with us and Tuesday went to Medford, and that night Mrs. Tudor went to Portland, Mrs. Thomason returning Wednesday morning, and proceeded on her way home. Mrs. Thomason reports that the roads this side of Vestal's are absolutely impassable and that in coming out they had to travel in the bed of Rice [sic--Reese?] Creek most of the way down.
    George Daley gave another dance on the 14th of this month. There was not the attendance that there used to be, but enough to have a good time.
    S. B. Holmes is having the tail race of the mill cleaned out and is getting ready to grind again.
    Mr. A. J. Braash of Santa Mater [sic], Col., stopped for dinner last Monday. He said that he was up here last fall to see the country and now he has come to buy land. He says that our land may appear high to us, but there is not, in his opinion, an acre of land in the vicinity of Eagle Point an acre that is not worth now $100 an acre and that it will in crease in value for some time to come.
    Mrs. Ada Wallace Unruh, the president of the W.C.T.U., also chairman of the united committee to try to secure the adoption of the constitutional amendment making Oregon a dry state, spoke here last Tuesday evening to a large and enthusiastic audience on the work of the W.C.T.U. in the United States during the past thirty-five years. She also gave an address in the afternoon to the ladies and especially to the girls that are just coming to womanhood. She is a very forceful and interesting speaker and gave general satisfaction.
    Our school board met last Tuesday afternoon and made the necessary arrangements to secure the same teachers that we have now, Prof. P. H. Daily and wife, for another school year at a slight advance in salary. And now the talk is that we will have to finish one or perhaps both rooms upstairs and employ another and perhaps two teachers, thus the world doth move and Eagle Point is jogging right along with the rest. We are gradually shaking off the old mossbacks and are taking our stand where we belong, in the front ranks. An amusing incident occurred in the primary department of our school last Tuesday, when Mrs. Daley, our primary teacher, returned from Jacksonville, where she had been assisting in the teacher's examination. As she passed by the school house on her way home, some of the children [saw] her through the window and they were so pleased that one had to tell the other until there was a regular demonstration. The little fellows craned their necks, clapped their hands and showed all kinds of joy over her return. No wonder the directors engaged her for another term.
    Mr. Broughton, son and daughter came out last Tuesday and took the train for Texas. Mrs. Broughton will remain until the close of the school at Butte Falls, when she will join her husband in their new home.
    I. B. Williams, who has been to see the country in Josephine County, especially the Illinois Valley, returned to his room at the Sunnyside last Tuesday. While gone he bought property in Grants Pass and expects to go there to live in the near future.
    We have had another change in real estate here, A. B. Zimmerman, one of our merchants, having purchased the store building and land adjoining on the west and north, from A. J. Daley. The price is not given out.
    Bert Higinbotham came out and spent the night with us last Tuesday. He was after provisions, for up in that healthy country, people patronize the grocer, miller and meat market in preference to doctor and drug store.
    During the past few days, two or three families passed through here on their way to the hills, but I was unable to get the particulars.
    S. H. Parker of Grants Pass called for dinner last Wednesday on his way to the Tronson and Guthrie orchard. He is canvassing for an orchard heat--used for keeping keeping off the frost.
    Last Monday night while the dancing company were enjoying themselves dancing in the hall, some of the Christian people had a little social of their own at the residence of Mrs. Mary Ringer. The party was given by our church organist, Mrs. Ringer's daughter, Miss Mamie Wright, and there was quite a number of young folks as well as older ones invited and a general good time was had. The evening was spent until a late hour playing games, interspersed with much vocal and instrumental music and during the evening a light lunch served, when all departed for the homes wishing Miss Mamie many happy returns of St. Valentines Day.
    Two of our promising young people, Mr. Austin Green and Miss Belle Maultby, had quite an experience a few days ago. Mr. Green had business up in the neighborhood of where Miss Belle lives so he very naturally called to see her and while there the arrangement was made if not before for Miss Maultby to come out to the valley with him so he arranged with the stage driver to meet him at old John Black's place on the county road from Eagle Point to the ferry and he and Mr. Green would take a cutoff and save some six or seven miles travel. So all was arranged and on the morning of the 15th they started from the home of the young lady in plenty of time to meet the stage. They crossed the river in a skiff and went on to the Black place, but that morning Mr. Watkins, the stage driver, had hired another man to drive the stage and forgot to tell him about meeting the young couple so he got in a hurry and drove faster than was usual and when the young couple arrived they found that the stage had already passed forty-five minutes before, and there they were, eight or nine miles from home and no way of communicating to their friends, but Mr. Green looked around and found a lady that would let him have a team provided he could find, catch and harness it, so he started out and found and procured the team and at night arrived safely at his grandparents, so Miss Maultby is resting a while with friends here and expects to extend her visit to Medford and visit more friends there.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 18, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    F. M. Compton of Medford came out last Thursday and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and Friday morning took a rig and started for the foothills to look at a tract of land of about 9000 acres, to be bought if suitable for orchards.
    Dr. Cyover called on his way from a visit and business trip to the neighborhood of Dudley's, where he has been spending several weeks. He is now on his way to his home near Los Angeles. He reports a grand trip in that section.
    Buel Hildreth and wife also came out from their mountain home last Thursday and were the guests of Mrs. Howlett. Mr. Hildreth reports that hay is getting very scarce about Butte Falls, and that many of them that have teams in that section are bringing them out to the valley to feed. Mr. Hildreth and wife went out to the old Maule place where Mr. Shaffer is now living, as he has a job of work there.
    That little ad that I sent to the Mail Tribune the first of the week has already brought results, as Mrs. "N" has already received an offer on Friday evening.
    Miss Grace Polk came out on the P.&E. last Friday, went to the Sunnyside for the night and on Friday evening Jack Florey took her as far as Butte Falls with the understanding that if she could not get someone there who is familiar with the country to take her to Dudley where she is engaged to teach school he would procure a couple of saddles and go the rest of the way on horseback, as the roads are so very bad up there that it is not considered advisable for a stranger to try to go with a rig.
    George Warner also came out from Medford on the P.&E., went to the Sunnyside Hotel with the calculation that he would get a team at the Sunnyside stable to go on up to his home in the Grand Cove, but the downpour was a little too much, so he concluded to stay over another day, expecting to have better weather, but we wait to see, as I am writing now Friday evening.
    Mrs. Cora Officer started last Thursday for Portland to be gone for some time.
    Mr. and Mrs. von der Hellen, Mr. and Mrs. Chris Wooley, Mr. and Mrs. Porter Robinett, John Watkins, Miss Bell Maultby and your E.P. correspondent went to Medford Thursday on the P.&E., besides a large number that I did not know. There was about 20 or 25 persons in the car going both ways, and the prospect is that there will be a big run here this summer.
    I. B. Williams, who has been stopping with us this winter, and has bought property in Grants Pass [and] moved his things from here Friday morning for his new home.
    Mr. Dohl, who has been staying at this hostelry for several months, started Friday morning for Ashland for medical treatment. He came here for his health from South Dakota and for some time stayed on Antelope Creek. He has relatives in a bank in South Dakota, where he has worked for eight years before he came here, but failing health caused him to seek our climate, but to little benefit. James Ringer accompanied him as far as Medford, where he met with an acquaintance that went with him on to Ashland and will look after him until he is properly cared for.
    Mr. Kershaw, who lives on Antelope Creek, came out to our place last Friday and brought his sister, Mrs. Emma Hayes, and her little daughter. They are now on their way to her home in San Bernardino County, California.
    Ed Walker was a pleasant caller last Wednesday. He was out trying to secure hands to work at the Iowa mills, clearing land and getting it ready to put to orchard.
Mr. Rush, the superintendent of camps Nos. 1 and 2, came in Friday to visit his wife and mother-in-law and reports that the steam shovel is doing fine work, but that the constant rain keeps the ground in such condition that they can accomplish but little.
    Mr. Murphy, the boss of the track gang, makes the same complaint. He says in one place on the desert where they had ballasted the track that the first time the dirt train ran over it it simply mashed it all out of shape again, but we are expecting better weather now that we have had our heavy February rains to settle the ground.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 21, 1910, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Carrie Millspaugh, district secretary for the Women's American Baptist Home Missionary Society, came out on the P.&E. last Sunday and spoke three times in the church at this place. In the afternoon she organized a women's missionary circle at this place. There was not the hearty response that ought to have been expected, as there was only $2 and a few cents raised at the missionary collection, and but few seemed to take hold of the proposition to form a circle. She is a woman of considerable ability and received a cordial greeting from the members of the church here.
    Mr. Hammon of Trail called Sunday night on his way from Medford to his home. He has been in the goat business on Trail for some time, but has sold his band and is turning his attention to some other branch of business.
    John McKee of Big Butte was a pleasant caller Monday morning. He was on his way from Medford, where he had been staying for some time, to his home.
    G. H. Wamsley and daughter, Miss Mabel, were visiting at the Sunnyside last Sunday.
    Thomas Grigsby came out for a load of goods the first of the week for the Butte Falls merchants.
    W. Gerig, general superintendent of construction, came out last Monday, procured a horse and saddle at the Sunnyside stable and went as far as they have the right of way cleared, that is, almost to Butte Falls. He says that they are getting along nicely, clearing the right of way and with usual success they will have the right of way cleared by the first of March and that the men are doing fairly well at work, considering the drawbacks. The constant rain and of necessity mud makes it very disagreeable for the men, as they have no conveniences for drying their clothes and even in the camps they have mud all of the time, but he thinks that as soon as we have a little dry spell so as to settle the ground that the men will become better satisfied and work will progress more rapidly. There was a carload of steel rails went on to the front Monday and there is now a large force of men ballasting the track, making the switch on the desert and the bridge crew is busy putting in culverts and in fact things begin to look lively around.
    A drummer was here last Monday all day and all night with a whole wagonload of drummer's trunks interviewing Brown & Sons, and the probabilities are that they have laid in another large stock of goods. In fact, there is scarcely a day but one of the two general merchandise stores receive new goods, and it is often the case that the customers have to wait till their team comes to trade.
    Ernest Cole, now one of the railroad postal clerks on the Southern Pacific railroad, came over last Monday to gather up some of his belongings, as he has sold his land in this neighborhood. He bought 15 acres of land of Pierce & Son for $22.50 an acre and sold it with no improvements except a small house and hen house for $50 an acre. Not a bad investment for him.
    Mr. Peyton came out last Monday with a team and Tuesday morning left the team at the Sunnyside stable [and] went to Medford to meet his daughter, who he expected to go home with him.
    Our daughter Hattie started last Monday for Portland with our three little grandchildren that I brought down last November, as their father has improved so that they thought best to have their children come home. L. E. Smith, one of the young men who has been living with us for several years, also went at the same time to visit the McGees, Stepps, Iselis [and] Obenchains, who live in Portland.
    Died--February 18, 1910, at the family residence in Butte Falls, Howard Briggs, who was born in the state of New York August 22, 1831, aged 78 years, 5 months and 20 days. At the commencement of the Civil War he joined Company G, 46th regiment, Pennsylvania volunteer infantry, and served with that company until wounded. He received an honorable discharge from said company, but as soon as he had sufficiently recovered from his wounds he helped to raise Company I, 189th New York volunteer infantry, and served as lieutenant of that company until the close of the war. He has served his country and state in several official positions. He has lived a long and upright life and has always been honored and respected wherever he has lived. He is survived by his wife, two sons and a daughter. He passed away contented and peacefully, saying that he was ready to meet his God. His son phoned for me to come and attend the funeral, but I was not physically able to go, so Rev. C. Davis went and officiated at the grave. The remains were interred in the Butte Falls cemetery on the 21st and Mr. Davis reports that there was a very large attendance at the grave. Mr. Davis also preached in the Butte schoolhouse on the same night to a large audience.
Medford Mail Tribune, February 24, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Thursday I took a trip to Ashland and did not return until Monday and per necessity the Eaglets did not appear in their usual place. While in Ashland I met with quite a number of my old-time friends and had the pleasure of hearing Bro. Dr. Farris deliver his famous lecture on “The Fact of Jesus,” in the Congregational Church of that place; also some fine preaching by the same man.
    I can see that Ashland is growing considerable and the city presents a clean and healthful appearance and that the city is extending out on the Boulevard, but there is not the stir nor the business done that there seems to be done in Medford.
    Last week after I wrote I learned that Ernest Culbertson, son of Jas. Culbertson of Lake Creek, had the misfortune to have one of his eyes hurt by a piece of a knot flying as he was splitting a stick of wood and that he went to Portland to an eye specialist, and later I learned that the doctor had to remove the eye entirely and fears are entertained that he will lose the other eye. He is a young man about twenty years of age and he and the family have the sympathy of their many friends in these parts.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. H. Green of Medford came out on Wednesday of last week, procured a rig at the Sunnyside feed stable and went up to Mr. Geppert's, remaining until Friday on account of the heavy rain on Thursday.
    There was another man crippled on the right-of-way on the P.&E. Railroad last Sunday, he having his leg broken and his back badly hurt. He was brought out on one of the railroad wagons, put on a car and taken to the hospital in Medford Sunday night.
    Since my return from Ashland we have had quite a number of strangers call, among whom were W. T. Vincent, C. A. Harne, both of Medford; W. W. Wolf of Spokane, Wa.; O. Adams of Butte Falls, C. A. Russell and A. D. Warner of Medford, the last two named men out here to put in a new switchboard for our telephone system, and while they were here they put in an electric bell in the kitchen of the Sunnyside Hotel which is connected with the telephone in the main hall of the hostelry so that if anyone calls the women in the kitchen will hear and go to the phone, a great convenience.
    Since I last wrote John Noland and family have quit these parts and gone to Gold Hill to work.
    Mrs. B. Hindes and her daughter, Mrs. Rush, who have been boarding at the Sunnyside for several weeks, moved to Maine's camp, No. 2, where their husbands are superintending the railroad work.
    When R. E. Peyton was here he reported that they had had a box social at the school house in his district for the purpose of raising money to buy more books for their school library and that they raised over $20. They don't do things by halves in that district when it comes to matters of education. That little mountain district has already turned out eight or nine teachers.
    Miss Lottie Peters of Butte Falls came out last week to be treated by Dr.Holt, as she is in poor health. She is a guest of the Sunnyside and can go see the doctor every day.
    Deter & Daley have opened their meat shop again, so now the citizens of Eagle Point can get fresh meat again.
    There was quite a crowd of our people went to Medford Tuesday evening to attend the theater and enjoy the fun of hearing a good thing from home talent.
    W. B. Anspach of Iowa came out on the P.&E. Tuesday evening and spent the night with us and is here to look for a business location.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 3, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote, William von der Hellen has started the carpenters to work to build him a dwelling house.
    E. S. Wolfer has filled an order for 16,000 strawberry plants to be planted in the Willamette Valley.
    As there are a number of inquiries as to how my son-in-law, G. H. Shaw, who was accidentally shot last November, [is doing,] I will say that my daughter reports that he is getting along nicely and has passed the dangerous point, so as to be able to be around and wait on himself.
    Last Wednesday Mr. and Mrs. Fred Conklin arrived from Vallejo, Cal., to go onto the Studler ranch near Peyton. Mr. Conklin is a brother of the late Mrs. Studler, and as Mr. Studler did not sell his place as he anticipated he has made the arrangement with Mr. Conklin to live with him and have Mrs. Conklin take care of the children. R. E. Peyton came out the same day and Thursday morning left the Sunnyside with them for their mountain home.
    Harry Bryant, son of our townsman, while playing ball at school, had the misfortune to be struck on the nose with the ball and so Dr. Holt had the job of reducing a fractured nose to its proper position. But the nose is getting along all O.K.
    Wednesday being Miss Dottie Harnish's 15th birthday, about 30 of her young friends and some of her old friends gave her a surprise party and had one of those good, old-fashioned times such as we used to enjoy when we were young. There were a number of presents presented to the young miss, and her many friends wish her many returns of like occurrences. A little incident occurred to a part of the company while on the route to the party that was not altogether pleasant. While they, four or five girls and Mrs. J. P. Moomaw, Jr., were crossing the wire suspension footbridge one strand of the cable gave way, lowering one side of the bridge, and came near frightening some of the party out of their wits. But on examination it was found to be safe, but not so convenient as it had been, but men were put to work and the break was mended, new posts planted and everything is all O.K. again.
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our progressive merchants, who bought the Daley store and lots adjoining, is fencing the lots off and putting in his early garden. He intends to put out about 60 square rods of strawberries and make a nice home for his family. He is one of the hustlers of our town, and if we can get a few such families to settle among us we will soon have a community that anyone can feel proud of.
    Dave Rummel and one of his partners, John Wharton, came in from their camp, where they have had a contract to clear the right of way for the P.&E. Railway, last Thursday night, to settle up with Maney Bros. They had taken a contract to clear a strip three miles long in the right of way just this side of Butte Falls, and now they think of taking another contract to cut the wood up into two-foot lengths for the railroad company.
    George Stevens and his son were up from his ranch Friday morning to see Dr. Holt. His son had bruised his hand and blood poison had set in, so the doctor had to cut it open, but now his father thinks that he will get along all right.
    This (Friday) morning, as I was on my rounds to gather items of news for the Mail Tribune, I called on J. B. Montgomery, and he gave me the item that he is now the oldest stage driver in the world, being almost 80 years old; that he commenced driving stage out from Marysville, Cal., in 1850, drove two years there and then came to Jacksonville and drove out from there for 27 years. There was one driver who drove on the same route with him that was a little older, but that he died a few months ago, leaving him the oldest driver in the world, according to statistics.
    William Knighton and wife, who have been spending several weeks in the Willamette Valley visiting his sister, who was sick and eventually died. They then remained until after the distribution of the property was announced and I understand that by her will he inherited a handsome fortune.
    Ed Walker, business manager for the Iowa Lumber Company on Big Butte, came out last Wednesday and reports that they had started the mill to running and Mr. Baldwin of the same place came out the same day and reported that they had about twenty-five men at work and Mr. Geppert, Jr., came out Friday and said he wanted to make arrangements to stop regularly at the Sunnyside, as he was engaged to haul provisions for the Iowa Lumber Camp, so it begins to look as though they were going to do something this time.
    Scott Claspill came in to the Sunnyside Friday evening and reports business lively at Butte Falls.
    Rev. G. William Giboney of Medford, a Presbyterian minister, came out on the P.&E. last Thursday and procured a saddle horse at the Sunnyside and went to Butte Falls to look over the ground with an eye to organizing a church in the place, returning to the Sunnyside Friday night. He thinks the prospects rather favorable, as the people up there seem to want preaching.
    J. C. Richardson of Peyton drove in last Friday night with a load of household goods. He was on his way moving to Medford, as he has rented his farm to Mr. Kinkaid for a year.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 7, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Friday, as the people of Eagle Point and vicinity were preparing for dinner there came a terrible stench of a combination of sulphur and other chemicals, and we began to look around to see from whence it came and found that Little Butte Creek had turned as white as though the water was half milk, and then the good ones began to look around for the cause. Some thought that a powerful sulphur spring has bursted into the creek, while others thought that Mount Pitt had opened up and we were having a veritable volcano, and some said that the Fish Lake Ditch Company had turned the water in from the reservoir at Fish Lake and some thought that a sulphur mine had exploded, etc., but the real cause was discovered it was found that Cephas Moomaw had started for the Bradshaw orchard with four barrels of spray dope and in crossing the creek about three or four miles above here three of the barrels had rolled out and in the smashup had bursted and the contents had so impregnated the water and air as to produce the above result. There was a young man standing in the back end of the wagon and when the barrels rolled out pushed him out and one of them struck him but owing to the depth of the water he was not hurt, but if the water had been shallow it would probably have killed him.
    The same day and not but a few minutes before the tainted water came down, Roy Smith was riding his horse into the creek to wash him off and the horse became unmanageable and threw him off into the water, and he had not reached the house before the spray dope came. Some of our fishermen are fearful that the dope will have killed all the fish and thus put a stop to that line of sport we have on the creek.
    J. C. Hood and family arrived on the P.&E. last Monday from Racine, Wis., to settle permanently among us. Mr. Hood's father-in-law, Henry James, had preceded him a short time. Mr. Hood had previously bought what is known as the Jacks place, about a mile above town.
    Mrs. Colby, living above Brownsboro, came down to our town to trade last Monday, and among other articles she purchased was a bale of barbed wire, and in driving over the cobblestones in our road a short distance from the store the noise from the jolting of the wire frightened the horse and they began to run. She managed to stop them in a short distance and then one of the tugs came unhitched and that started the horses again, and in a short time the neck yoke gave way, causing the tongue to strike the ground. Then the team came loose from the hack and pulled her over the dashboard about 20 feet, and just then one of the Lewis boys came along and helped her up, but she said that she was not hurt, but the supposition is that by the next morning she would feel the effects of the fall, but it is thought that no serious damage was done.
    William Perry and wife of Butte Falls came out last Sunday and were the guests of Mrs. Howlett Monday night. He reports everything in a flourishing condition in his neighborhood. He lives about three miles southwest of Butte Falls. He says that they have a fine school in their new schoolhouse. J. C. Johnson is teaching, and they expect as soon as the Iowa Lumber Company gets their large mill erected in that immediate neighborhood to have a full school, as they expect to have a full crew of men, and several of them will have families with children to go to school.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, our Sunday school missionary, met me at Table Rock station last Sunday and accompanied me to Table Rock, and after I had preached gave us a good talk, and Sunday night we went to Moonville and he preached to another large congregation. We have a fine Sunday school at both of these points.
    At Table Rock they are planning to build a new schoolhouse, something that is greatly needed. While at Moonville we came near having a fire. Mr. Gardner, who owns the hall and kindly threw it open for preaching and Sunday school, built a fire in the stove to warm the hall Sunday night, and shortly after he heard an unusual noise, went upstairs and found that the blaze was running out of the stovepipe and that the fire was raising the lid off the little airtight heater, but fortunately there was no damage done.
    The Rogue River Orchard Land Company, who have purchased the Hamilton tract in Eagle Point, have kindly donated a strip of land 60 feet wide, beginning at the county road near the bridge and running out to the depot, and from there around to intersect the road just below the Catholic church, and the citizens turned out last Monday and moved the fence out of the middle of the strip to the outside, so now we can go directly to the depot without going through gates.
    Died—On Saturday night, March 5, 1910, at Derby, the infant son of D. H. Swihart. The remains were interred in the Butte Falls Cemetery last Monday.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 9, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A few days ago Ray Harnish went up to the high hills to help Roy Ashpole with his cattle and returned very unexpectedly, and when asked why he returned so soon, replied that five feet of snow was a little too much for him, so he came home. The deep snow in the hills this spring will ensure us a plenty of water and is a good indication of a healthy season as well as a good crop season.
    I had the pleasure of meeting A. H. Kolset of White Rock, S.D., last Tuesday, who is here to look after his brother-in-law, J. C. Dahl, who was an invalid at the Sunnyside for some months. Mr. Kolset is cashier of the Citizens' State Bank of White Rock, S.D., and, like all the rest of the people who come from the states and territories north of us, think that we have an ideal climate here. Also J. C. Hood, the man I spoke of in my last, was instituting a comparison between our climate and that of Chicago. He said that when he left there was snow there three feet deep on a level. Who would live in such a country, when they can come to Southern Oregon and find such a climate as we have here?
    The men who have been clearing the right of way for the P.&E. Railroad have been coming out for the past few days with their checks to be cashed, buying up supplies for the spring work. They all say that the work is progressing finely, considering the amount of rain we have had, but now that the winter seems to be broke, the company is pushing more men to the front. There is one thing noticeable, and that is that the Hindus are leaving and the Greeks seem to be taking their places.
    Harvey Spencer of Dudley came out from Medford last Tuesday, and Wednesday morning went on up home. Scott Bruce, also of Dudley, was here a few days ago from Portland, where he had been to have his hand treated for blood poison. He cut it some months ago and blood poison set in, so that he had to go to Portland for treatment. Also Elmer Spencer of Dudley, who was operated on in Medford for appendicitis, went back to the hospital to have the wounds dressed the first of the week.
    A man by the name of J. M. Morrow came in looking for relatives in a destitute condition last Tuesday. He has what a health officer of Eugene calls cancer of the jaw, and is in a terrible condition, and the next morning your correspondent started with a subscription paper and raised him $15.25 and he took the train for Portland Wednesday. He used to work for John Nichols and seemed to be highly respected.
    I learn on what I think is good authority that Harry Carlton has sold 120 acres of his ranch for $16,000, and that Jo Rader has resold his farm for $42,000 and that there are several other deals on hand.
    The surveyors have been busy this week laying off what is known as the Hamilton (Ulrich) tract of land in small lots, and that they will be placed on the market soon.
    The carpenters are being engaged in advance here to build and the indications are that there will be quite a rush here this summer, and us old mossbacks are hoping that we will have to employ two more teachers in our school.
    S. B. Holmes and the Browns are putting in a sewer system on their places and are building a septic tank, taking time by the forelock to prevent disease when the town gets full of people.
    I understand that George Childreth, who has been working in the blacksmith shop with his brother Wesley, is going to Medford to live and work at brick making.
    Mesdames Riddle and Maney, wives of the contractors on the P.&E. Railroad by that name, came out last Thursday and called on Mrs. Howlett. They are camped at the commissary store on the P.&E. about three miles from our depot.
    E. W. Phillips, who has been spending some months trapping in the grand cave, near John Obenchain's, came out Thursday a fine lot of furs. He expects to ship them to the eastern states direct, as he says that he can realize more for them than he can here.
    Mr. Deter, of the firm Deter & Daley, informs me that he has just bought 19 head of fine fatted beef cattle for the Eagle Point meat market, and that that concern is a permanent fixture.
    Mrs. Maltby of Long Branch at this writing is visiting the of J. J. Tryer and her daughter, Miss Bell, who has also been visiting the same family, went up to her home last Wednesday.
    Hay hauling seems to be the order of the day now, as one can see loads of hay driven onto the scales every day.
    Paints, wall paper, glass. Metcalf's, 318 E. Main Street.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 13, 1910, page 11



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since I last wrote R. C. Lawton came out, hunted up his tract of land he had purchased off the Stoddard tract, got the material on the ground to fix his camp and by Saturday left his room at the Sunnyside Hotel for Medford to get his wife, returning on Sunday and Monday morning moved his effects onto his farm, pitched his tent and went to housekeeping. He plans to grub the land and prepare it this summer for planting and put it to orchard this coming fall. The happy young couple anticipate spending a pleasant time, camping there this summer.
    The Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company have had their surveyors out surveying out a new line for their railroad, leaving the old track on the desert on the south side of Little Butte Creek and running up the edge of the desert, crossing Antelope Creek about one-fourth of a mile above the junction of that stream and Little Butte, running thence a northeasterly course and crossing Little Butte somewhere near, if not in, the town of Eagle Point, thus cutting out several bad curves and avoiding some very soft ground through which the present road travels. I understand that they have crossed Butte Creek in two different places. I was away from home when the surveyors got through and left the Sunnyside so did not learn where they went. I understand that there is one man through whose place the new survey runs that walked along behind the surveyors and pulled up the stakes and threw them into the creek, but we might as well buck against fate as to buck against a railroad company.
    Scott Claspill and wife of Butte Falls came out on Friday of last week and bought a part, at least, of their load of goods for their store at our local stores, returning on Saturday, and Miss Lottie Peters, an invalid who has been stopping at the Sunnyside, who has lived with them for a great many years, returned to Butte Falls with them. She has greatly improved in health since her arrival here.
    Mr. Marssy, another of our Butte Falls merchants, was down the last of the week and stopped on the way to Medford, returning Saturday with a part of a load of merchandise for his store, [and] proceeded on his way Saturday evening toward home.
    George Childreth moved his family to Medford last week and on Monday Wm. von der Hellen moved from the house recently purchased of George Daley, Jr., by John Nichols into the home just vacated by Mr. Childreth, and thus it goes--as soon as a home is vacated by one it is filled by another, and still they come.
    There never was such a demand for teams since the town of Eagle Point was started as there is now, and it seems that the demand is increasing every day.
    Last Sunday there was quite a crowd came out from Medford but as I was away from home I am unable to give a list, and now as the woods in the valley are drying up the good people of the city will continue to come and enjoy the fine ride, and a large number who cannot procure rigs come up on the trains.
    Tull & Schermerhorn started one of their trusted men last Saturday with a team to take a family to the Iowa camp from Medford and he got as far as John Allen's by night and Mr. Martin, the driver, was taken sick, so had to phone to Medford for help. The result was that Charley Tull went and they arrived at the Sunnyside Hotel Sunday night about 8 o'clock, but I am glad to say that Mr. Martin was feeling much better and after supper they went on to Medford. Charley says that the roads are all gone clear out of sight. Mr. Tull hired Thomas Abbott to go with him up to Allen's and take the load from there on to the Iowa camp, he returning to Sunnyside Monday afternoon about 3 o'clock.
    Mr. Craig of the firm of Craig & Fuller, one of the railroad contractors, was here Monday afternoon looking for a conveyance to take his wife up to his camp.
    Last Saturday afternoon, although I was hardly able to ride, I saddled my horse and started for Trail when there were two young folks anxiously looking for me, stopping over night with mine hostess, Mrs. Middlebusher. The next day about noon I started again and wended my way to John T. Zimmerlee's and after a few minutes time for preparation on the part of the young couple I was prepared to sent the following notice to the Mail Tribune: Married, by Rev. A. C. Howlett at the residence of the bride's parents Mr. Charles Blaess and Miss Minnie Zimmerlee, March 13, 1910. After the ceremony was over we all sat down to a bountiful repast. There were no invitations given out, but about all of the two families were present. I learned while in the neighborhood that their friends, and there is a lot of them, intend to give the young couple a good old charivari Sunday night.
    Mr. Dupray of Butte Falls came in last Monday night from Medford on his way home and stopped with us. He informs me that he expects to close his hotel the first of April and from that time keep simply a rooming house and billiard room; that W. W. Parker and wife will open up a hotel, etc.; that business is beginning to liven up in the Falls and they are looking for lively times there in summer.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 16, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. McFarlin of Everett, Wash., in company of E. C. Aylor of Medford, were out about the middle of the week looking at some of our orchard land.
    A. Gridley, merchant of Edgewood, Cal., called Wednesday in company of his cousins, Jud and Thomas Edsall, the former on his way home. He had been visiting his uncle, John Edsall, of Butte Falls.
    S. S. Akins also called on his way out to Medford. He is platting a part of his place at Prospect into lots and will place them on the market this spring. He seems to think that the road from Butte Falls to Prospect will prove a success and that quite a number of people will settle in the place.
    Elder J. P. Moomaw met with quite a severe accident a few days ago. He was standing on a chair tacking up some screen wire around his porch and, making a misstep, he fell and hurt his back and hip quite badly.
    A young man representing the Singer Sewing Machine Company stopped here last Thursday for dinner, and while hitching up his horse to the rig he became frightened and started to run, with only one of the breeching straps fastened, and the result was that after pulling the agent around the yard for quite a while, caught one of the buggy wheels on a post and pulled loose from the shaft, doing no damage except to tear off one of the straps of the shaft. Had he not been a strong man the horse would have gotten away and probably done considerable damage.
    J. W. Richardson, formerly of Peyton, but now of Medford, came out this week to make a concrete wall for Mr. von der Hellen's cellar and lay a concrete wall for his new house. The wall will be of cobblestones laid in cement, and the stones projecting out making a good and ornamental foundation.
    Mr. Mathew of Butte Falls came out Wednesday for his son-in-law Mr. Winningham, who has sold his place on Elk Creek and now has moved to the Falls.
    Mr. Grigsby of Butte Falls was also out after a load of goods for Mr. Hughes of that place.
    Mr. Reynolds of Lake Creek was a pleasant caller recently.
    Mr. Netherland and Benj. Edmondson of Butte Falls were here last Thursday after machinery for the mill. Mr. Netherland, who is in charge of the mill, says that he is getting it fixed up in shape and as soon as he can get some new machinery up to replace the broken parts that they intend to go to cutting lumber, but first they have to cut some to repair the old mill to get it in shape. They anticipate doing good work this summer.
    There is more land being sold in this neighborhood. Frank Nichols sold his place, consideration $4000, and his cousin Gus Nichols has sold his for $40,000. There has been quite an amount of money paid on the two places--enough to ensure a genuine sale.
    Israel Patton has also sold his place in Eagle Point to Professor P. H. Daily, the principal of our school. The price is not given out.
    James Ringer, our paperhanger and painter, went to Butte Falls, returning Friday. He says that he has engaged quite considerable work there in his line. He reports that the ball game between the surveyors' team, composed largely of Eagle Point and Brownsboro boys, and the Butte Falls team was an interesting game, with the result of 5 to 7 in favor of the surveyors' team.
    Tree planting is being rushed in this section now, and there is more demand for teams than ever.
    John Nichols has moved into his new quarters within the last few days.
Mr. D. Linn of Medford, formerly one of our boarders, was a pleasant guest Friday night.
    There was a social party at A. L. Haselton's last Thursday night, given by his daughter, Miss Bessie, and because she invited some and did not invite some others, some of those who felt slighted got up an opposition party in the lower end of town, but I have not been able to learn the particulars of the one in the lower end of town, but the one given by Miss Bessie Haselton was a grand success. There were about 25 present, and those who were present report that they had a fine time, and I suppose that the other party also had a good time, as our Eagle Point young folks always do when they get together.
    Porter Robinett started for San Francisco a few days ago, leaving his family here with Mrs. Robinett's brother-in-law, George W. Daley, Sr.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 21, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Elmer Spencer of Dudley, who has been in the hospital in Medford the second time this winter to be treated for appendicitis and gallstones, came out last Saturday and Sunday morning. Lon Smith took him in a buggy as far as Butte Falls, where he was to stop for the night on account of his weak condition, and Monday night a message came over the phone to the Sunnyside to try to get Dr. Conroy on the phone and have him come with all speed to his relief, as he was in a critical condition, and his many friends here are anxiously waiting for word from there.
    Thomas Riley, one of the old pioneers of this county, and at one time one of the county commissioners, was smiling on his many friends here last Monday.
    John Edsall of Butte Falls was a pleasant caller last Monday on his way to the valley.
    Sunday evening A. E. McBride, Miss Constance McKilligan, Warner Castor and Miss C. G. McKilligan, all of Medford, called for supper and spent a while resting and enjoying good music, after which they started, but they--some of them, at least--expressed fears that they would get lost on the desert, although the road is plain and the moon was shining bright.
    Last Saturday Misses May Howe, Grace Smith and Mable Webb were in Eagle Point on their way to Trail. They are all school teachers and have schools engaged in that region, although Miss March is teaching at Trail, but there are several schools in that section and they will find plenty to do in their line, and fine communities in which to teach.
    Miss Mable Webb is recently from the state of Kentucky, and like all the rest who come from the old blizzard-ridden countries, is delighted with our delightful climate.
    Our stage driver from Eagle Point to Trail had a little more than he bargained for in the way of passengers last Saturday, as he had to leave quite a number on account of room and bad roads.
    Charles Burgess, who has been to Los Angeles to have cancers removed, returned the last of the week after having the operation performed, and his many friends here are rejoicing with him over his success.
    I understand that Mr. Harvey and wife arrived a few days ago from Vermont and will take charge of the Dr. Page orchard in the near future; also that they are well pleased with our climate, and why shouldn't they. When they left home everything was frozen up as tight as a jug and on reaching here in a few days found the wildflowers blooming on all the hills around.
    Rev. Delam, the Baptist Sunday school missionary, preached for us last Sunday night. He had preached and organized a Sunday school in Brownsboro the same day in the forenoon. I understand that he contemplates conducting a series of meetings in that place soon.
    I wish here to express my thanks to Mrs. G. W. Owings, hostess of the Eagle Point Hotel, of this place, for several items of interest in this article.
    Evert Culbertson of Lake Creek, who had his eye put out some time ago by a chip of wood striking his eye, and went to Portland for treatment, returned last Saturday. His sister, Miss Hazel, accompanied him from Medford and they were met here by their father, James C., and all went up home Saturday evening.
    James Ringer, our expert painter, commenced to paint the house erected last fall for a cellar and laundry room for the Sunnyside last Monday, but the rain Monday night has put a stop to that kind of work.
    J. O. Grey and wife and four boys, direct from Chicago, Ill., came into the Sunnyside last Monday evening via the P.&E. train. He has come to take charge of and superintend the planting and cultivating of the tracts of land recently purchased by J. H. Smith, Mr. Earl and Mr. Roberts, all of Chicago, off of a tract lying close to the town of Eagle Point and about a mile from the Tronson & Guthrie orchard. They have been having the three tracts of land planted to fruit trees this past winter, under the supervision of Mr. Bromley. Mr. Grey's advent among us with his four children will add to our school, and Mrs. Grey will be quite an addition to the female part of our society, while we are always glad to extend the hand of fellowship to such men as Mr. Grey.
    Archie Thomason, his brother James, and Oscar Smith called Tuesday for dinner on their way to California. They did not say where they were going, but said that they had left railroading and were going to California. They have been cutting wood on the right of way of the P.&E. Railroad for the company, or rather the contractors, all winter, and are through with their job.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 24, 1910, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Paul I. Vanorder, a member of the C.L.L. Company of Medford, and Ed Walker came out on Thursday of last week and Mr. V. procured a horse here, and they two went to the C.L.L. Company's mills near Butte Falls. Mr. Vanorder returned on Saturday. He reports that they have the most of the logs sawed up that they had cut when they shut down some months ago and have commenced to cut fresh ties; that they have a fine lot of lumber on hand now and will continue to cut right along.
    Mrs. John Edsall and son-in-law and wife, Mr. and Mrs. John Conner, were pleasant callers Thursday on their way to Jacksonville.
    Mrs. L. J. Greenwalt of North Yakima, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. J. R. Jackson, returned home last week.
    F. R. Bollecher, deputy U.S. Marshal, came out one day last week to serve notices on the witnesses along Little Butte Creek of a contest suit testing their right to use the water of said creek for irrigating purposes.
    P. H. Daily is having one of the lots he purchased of Israel Patton plowed and scraped so as to level it down, getting it ready for irrigating. He expects to build on the lot this summer and fix the place up all O.K.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company has put on a new passenger car and now they are running two cars, using the old one to haul the work hands out to the grading camps.
    Dr. Holt informs me that the subcontractors are getting along nicely with their work on the P.&E. right-of-way, and they think that they will have their jobs completed by the first of May.
    Maney Bros. have just established another railroad camp near the school house on the Edsall flat about three miles from Butte Falls.
    Craig & Fuller, subcontractors under Porter Bros., think they will have finished their contract by the first of May, so you see that the railroad work is going with a rush all along the line.
    Roy Ashpole informs me that he has brought all of his cattle out from the feed yards on the headwaters of Big Butte to the low hills. That he has found one of his horses with the brand smooched so as to disfigure it and that he knows the guilty party.
    Charley Sherman had his mare taken out of his pasture on the night of the 18th and he is satisfied that she was stolen. These are the first instances we have known of where horses have been stolen for a long time, but with the advent of railroads or any other enterprise that calls for many men there is always a class of fellows who exist for the purpose of living off the hard earnings of others.
    George H. Stowel informs me that he has bought 120 acres of land in the old Fryer pasture of Peter Young at a consideration of $3000 and is going to move onto it [and] put it in cultivation. He has [as] fine sticky land on the tract as anyone need want. He surely got a bargain in the deal.
    L. A. Murphy of Ashland was a pleasant caller last Friday afternoon. He had been to Butte Falls to see about a witnesses in a suit pending in which his wife is defendant to set aside title to a certain tract of land.
    Buell Hildreth and wife stopped here on their way to Butte Falls last Friday night.
    Fred Bellows, who has been living in what is known as the old Moomaw home on a farm now owned by J. H. Smith of Chicago, moved out last Friday and Mr. J. O. Grey, a new arrival from Chicago with his family, moved in on Saturday. Mr. Grey has come to take the place of Mr. Bromley who came out from Chicago last fall and has planted about forty-five acres to fruit trees this winter on the four tracts belonging to himself, Messrs. Roberts, Earl and Smith, and now he goes back and Mr. Grey takes charge of the entire tract of 80 acres.
    Will Chromnel, the man who has been the bookkeeper at the Pankey logging camp on Rogue River near Peyton and had the misfortune to be caught by a falling tree and have his back badly hurt. He has returned from Medford and gone back to his former place of business.
    Miss Viola Pheister of Medford, who is teaching school at Asbestos, came out on the Trail-Eagle Point stage last Thursday on her way to Medford. Sherman Oliver of Trail also came out Saturday on his way to Jacksonville to serve as a juror in the circuit court, going to Medford on the P.&E. the same afternoon.
    Mrs. Klingle and her daughter, Mrs. Henry Meyer, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Saturday afternoon on their way to Medford to attend church on Easter Sunday.
    R. A. Vestal and Amos Ayres went to Medford Saturday afternoon to spend Sunday.
    Lemon Charley and his brother Clay were smiling on their friends in Eagle Point Saturday afternoon.
    Deter & Daley have put a phone in their meat market so now people who have phones can order meat, etc. without going to the shop.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our accommodating freight agent of the P.&E., as well as merchant and general roustabout, reports business lively and Bison & Sons are generally busy as bees, and our blacksmith W. L. Childreth is so busy since his brother left for a job in Medford that he complains of too much work. He will have to have more help. Both hotels are kept busy and our accommodating postmaster, A. J. Florey, is kept busy most of the time, as this is the distributing post office for ten offices, not counting Medford. Frank Lewis is kept busy with his billiard [room.]
    The many friends of Miss Bessie Haselton, one of our most popular teachers, are please to have her back among us again.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 28, 1910, page 8



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Friday night, April 1, there will be a box social given in the Baptist Church of Eagle Point, and instead of selling the boxes to the highest bidder the old maids of the town are advertised for sale at public action. How many will be sold your correspondent is not informed, but if he is correctly informed, there will be but very few as he don't know of but one who claims to be on the lady bachelor list, and she declares that she is not on the market. Nevertheless, you better come who want to invest in the line of goods, for there may be a few that under the strain of the excitement may consent to being on the list. The old maids will be sold by weight and I hear some of the interested gentlemen talk about bidding as high as ten or fifteen cents a pound. The proceeds are to be applied to the B.Y.P.U. fund, which I suppose means bright youths popular union. But everybody come and have a good time and help the girls along in their commendable undertaking.
    Misses Grace and Lucile Henry were callers at Eagle Point Hotel last Saturday on their way to their homestead near Brownsboro.
    A man by the name of Williams, who has been around our town for some time, made a trip to Butte Falls the first of the week. He is looking over the country with a view to locating among us.
    Miss Caroline Dexter, who has been visiting friends in Eagle Point for some time, returned to her home in Medford Sunday.
    Carl Stout, one of the bridge carpenters of the P.&E. Railroad, who has been away for some time on account of the serious illness of his wife, returned to Eagle Point Monday and was shaking hands with his many friends in these parts. He expects to be at work soon framing the new bridge across Butte Creek on the new survey.
    Mrs. Colonel Pool was the guest of her uncle, John Watkins, last Sunday night and on Monday went to Jacksonville to be appointed as guardian for her two children. Her father, Frank Tungate, was also with her at Mr. Watkins'. James Bryer also went to Medford the same day and to Jacksonville on land business.
    Mr. Zemy, who has a homestead in the forks of the Rogue River, and his partner, who have been trapping during the last winter, came out on Sunday and report that they have done fairly well in their line, as they had quite a bunch of furs. They were on their way to Medford.
    I. H. Cooley, one of the Medford capitalists, and owner of a young orchard about a mile above our town, was out Monday morning trying to get hands to work on his farm.
    E. S. Wolfer has been engaged this week doing the plumbing work for S. B. Holmes.
    The sad news came to us Sunday night that one of Mr. and Mrs. George Weeks' little children, about 2 years old, was burned to death last week, dying Sunday night [Pericilla Ellen Weeks, 3/9/1908-3/27/1910]. The report came to me that while Mr. and Mrs. Weeks were both out of the house, leaving four little children in the house, that one of the children took a grease lamp that was used as a substitute for a coal oil lamp, while they were out of the latter, and lit it, and it appears that they had set it on the floor, and the little child's clothes took fire from it. The other children gave the alarm, but before the mother could get to the child it was so badly burned that death followed Sunday night. The remains were interred in the Trail Cemetery on Monday. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Rowley. There were about 50 attended the funeral.
    William Brown, Sr., a brother of our townsman, George Brown, started for his home in British Columbia last Sunday.
    Last Sunday night the younger portion of our community gave an Easter entertainment in the church and for once the house was full. The evening exercises during the evening were highly spoken of. The house was beautifully decorated with flowers and I am sorry to say that many of them were blossoms off of our neighbors' pear trees.
    Mr. Harvey, of whom I made mention in a former letter as taking charge of the Dr. Page orchard in this section, was placed on another orchard near Medford, and the same man still has charge of this orchard that has been here all winter.
    William Gipson came our last Monday evening to call up Mr. Gerig for more men to go to Thompson's Creek camp No. 2. He says that they are rushing the work through as fast as they can and are getting along finely. He reports that Mr. Thomson, who went to Idaho for his uncles, disposed of them there and has gone to Klamath County to buy a new supply.
    Jud Edsall of Butte Falls came out Monday after hay to take up home. He says that is is almost impossible to get hay up there and that some of the railroad teams had to do without hay for a whole week and that when he drove in sight with a load of hay on his wagon that every mule in the camp commenced to bray.
    Young Geppert, who is hauling provisions for the Iowa camp, says that it keeps him busy hauling grub for the men.
    George Stowell (Pete), who has has charge of the Hamilton place, now owned by the Oregon Orchard & Land Company, has moved onto his land that he bought of Peter Zemy, and Mr. Allen has moved from the old Ashpole place into the house formerly occupied by Mr. Stowell. Thus the people change around.
    Jessie Cole, Jr., of Nevada County, California, and Mr. C. Burgess of Reese Creek called Tuesday for dinner. Mr. Burgess is the man of whom I spoke some time ago, who went to Los Angeles to have two cancers removed and one off of his lip and the other off of his throat, and he reports that the trouble is entirely over and that he is well of the cancers. His many friends congratulate him on his success.
    I wish to extend my thanks to Charley Rice, a young man working at the Eagle Point Hotel, for several items in this letter, and kindly ask a continuation of these favors.
    Last Tuesday Deputy Sheriff Ulrich came out and arrested Mr. Deter and Henry Daley on the charge of keeping an unclean slaughterhouse, and if you could have heard the howl of indignation that went up from the people of our quiet little village you would have though that something very serious had happened.
Medford Mail Tribune, March 31, 1910, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There has been another change in real estate in this section, A. H. Kirkland having sold his 100-acre tract of land, lying west of our town, to Charles Feltz, consideration $6500.
    G. H. Wamsley has put in a new flume connected with the Snowy Butte Mill to take water to the old J. J. Fryer ditch.
    W. W. Parker, the new hotel keeper of Butte Falls, was a pleasant caller Wednesday night. He reports business good in his line, that the new management is getting the mill at that place fixed up in shape and that soon they will be sawing lumber to put on the market.
    Mr. Pelouze, the man who bought the Eli Dahack place, was a pleasant caller Thursday. He is putting out a large orchard and seems to be the right man in the right place.
    W. C. Batterson of LaMoure, N.D., came out from Central Point with Mrs. Wilkinson and children to visit her father, J. P. Moomaw. They are old-time acquaintances in the old states. Mr. Batterson is a capitalist and is looking for profitable investments.
    Since I last wrote, P. H. Daily and your correspondent have put up a new line fence between their lots and Mr. Daley; also put up a new fence between his lots and I. B. Williams. Mr. Daley went to Medford on Saturday to let the contract to build his house on the lots he has been grading.
    Mr. Massey, one of the Butte Falls merchants, was here since I last wrote. He was after goods for his store. He was accompanied by B. F. Morris of Butte Falls. They seem to think that their town will be a lively place this summer.
    Bert Nason of Prospect arrived from a protracted visit back to his hold home in Pennsylvania last Wednesday and Thursday took the Trail stage to go to his home near Prospect.
    George West and wife returned to their home in the Sunnyside Hotel last Thursday from their trip to Washington, where he has been attending the foresters' school. They say that they are glad to get back to their old home country again. Mr. West started to Butte Falls in company of Ira Tungate, who also was a pleasant guest at the Sunnyside Hotel Thursday night and Friday morning.
    T. E. Pottenger, Shorty Miles and Mr. Biddle came out from Medford last Thursday in their auto to take a look at our surroundings and see old-time friends.
    Died--At the home of her brother, March 31, Miss Jemima Hannah, aged 68 years, 11 months and 17 days. Miss Jemima Hanna, or “Aunt Mima,” as she was generally called, was one of the early settlers of Jackson County, having settled here in 1863, coming from her native state, Missouri, with her father, Hon. Josiah Hannah. When they first settled in the valley it was on Bear Creek, not far from where the city of Medford now stands. Later they moved and located on a farm on Rogue River about five miles below Trail, where she has lived until the day of her death. She professed the Christian religion when she was about 16 years of age, and joined the M.E. Church South and lived a devoted Christian life from then to the time God took her. During her long protracted illness, which lasted for years, she was never known to murmur or complain, but always seemed to be resigned to the will of God. She leaves her only brother. There never were but the two children, and they have always lived together, and his descendants and a large circle of friends to await the reunion in the beyond. The interment was made in the Antioch Cemetery, and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett on April 1, 1910.
    Saturday morning a company of surveyors started from here to the hills, but they did not give out their destination, but it was learned that they were headed for the south side of Mount Pitt, and the general impression among the knowing ones was that they had been sent out by the P.&E. Railroad Company, but we will see. Speaking about the railroad company, there has been a petition circulated around town asking John H. Allen to favor the people of this town with a depot, etc., and not try to build a town upon the desert as some claim that they intend to do, but we will see. Generally the railroad companies and all other big corporations do as suits themselves best, and let the other fellow do as he can.
    Our daughter, Hattie, returned from Portland last Thursday after an absence of five weeks.
    There was a meeting called for the stockholders of the Butte Falls and Eagle Point Telephone Company to be held at Derby on the afternoon of the 2nd day of April at 2 o'clock, with the understanding that the secretary of the company, John Carkin, attorney-at-law, etc., was to be present with the books and try to straighten out the tangle that the company is into, but the secretary and D. H. Downey, of the Pacific Telephone and Telegraph Company, were here for dinner at about 1 o'clock the same day, and when told that they had to ride 12 miles over one of the worst roads in the state, they drew a long breath, but while they were drawing a long breath those who had gone from here and those who had come from Butte Falls were using their breath in a different manner. But I will have to give your readers the result of the meeting in my next.
    Mr. Deter and Henry Daley, who were arrested for keeping an alleged unclean slaughter house, have returned to our town. They seem to think that the case will be thrown out of court, and then, they say, will be their time. What the outcome will be seems hard to foretell.
    The party given in the church last Friday night proved to be a grand success. On account of the scarcity of old maids, some of the younger ones were sold, and those who were present report having had lots of fun. And to help the matter along, some of the old ladies were sold, and in some instances sold twice. The plan was to wrap the ladies in a sheet, put them on the scales and then sell them to the highest bidder. A. B. Zimmerman, one of our merchants, acted as auctioneer, and he proved to be a success. The highest price anyone brought was $4.50. In some instances, the young men were mistaken and bid on the wrong girl, and one young man told me that he had to buy two girls before he got the right one, and the other boys would run the price up. The receipts of the evening were $32.30, and this money is to be applied toward procuring better lights for the church, fixing it up generally, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 4, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    The latter part of last week Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Peyton came out from their home and stopped with us, leaving their team, went to Medford and on Saturday were met there by his cousins, A. M. and Miss Bertha Peyton. A. M. Peyton brought his wife and three children with him from Chappell, Neb. They have sold out their belongings there and have come here to look for a home. Mr. Peyton says that this is the first one of his blood relations, outside of his own father's family, that he ever saw, and he is a man of a large family. A. M. Payton says that he is going to look around and see how he likes this country before he settles.
    A. H. Kirkland, the man whom I reported as having bought the Feltz place, about two or three miles west of our town, brought his family to the Sunnyside Hotel last Sunday, where they had taken rooms. He is accompanied by L. Langvoid. In conversation with Mr. Kirkland about the purchase of the tract, he said that he thought that he would take it, but on a more thorough examination that he concluded not to take it, and now he is looking at another tract of land on Antelope Creek.
    Frank Manning came out last Sunday and brought his two youngest daughters. They were the guests of Miss Marguerite Florey Sunday night, and Monday morning they all started for their mountain home near Peyton.
    Last Sunday I went to Table Rock and while there learned that the sensible people of that school district had voted to build a new school house to cost $3000, issue warrants to pay for the same and then vote a tax to pay it off with the interest gradually. They have needed a new schoolhouse there for some time and would have had one, but a few opposed it, and to try to keep peace they gave way, but now a good majority say build, and they will build. I saw as I rode along the road that a large tract of land in that belt is being put out to fruit trees.
    Perry Foster came out Monday morning and took the train for Medford to close a deal with a syndicate for his place on Rogue River. The price paid was $80 an acre. I understand that there are several others of his neighbors who sold at the same time. He was accompanied as far as Eagle Point by his son Edward, and son-in-law, Henry French.
    Our road supervisor, Thomas Cay, tells me that he has been scraping the roads where the mud was sufficiently dried up, but that he has hard work getting teams to work on the road, especially at the price the court authorizes him to pay.
    John Ritter of Medford and his bride came out last Sunday to visit his sister, Mrs. G. W. Owings, hostess of the Eagle Point Hotel.
    William Findley and Willard Owings started yesterday (Monday) with a load of supplies for Maney Bros.' new camp on the P.&E. Railway route.
    Mr. Swartz and bride arrived the last of last week from Tacoma, Wash. Mr. Swartz is the general superintendent of the work of Porter Bros., on the construction work of the P.&E. Railway.
    Miss Mollie Webb, the young lady school teacher of whom I made mention once before as having to go to Medford for treatment for poison oak, has recovered and has returned to take charge of her school again at Trail.
    A. L. Taylor of Southern California, a representative of the Crown Medical Co. of, Ashland, O., was doing business with our druggist a few days ago.
    I understand that a gentleman by the name of Nason, who has been in the employ of the P.&E. Railway Company, has been engaged to lay off the tract of land lying south of the P.&E. depot into lots and that the lots will be put on the market here soon and that there will be quite a demand for building sites in our town soon.
    Benj. Edmondson, Sr., of Butte Falls, came out last Monday for a load of powder, etc., for the Butte Falls people.
    Mr. Baldwin came out Monday for a load of pipe for the Crater Lake Lumber Co. (Iowa mills), as they contemplate putting in a hydraulic ram to bring water from Big Butte Creek to furnish water for their mills.
    At the meeting of the stockholders of the Butte Falls & Eagle Point Telephone Co. last Saturday they elected Mr. Wilcox president, and Mr. Briggs of Butte Falls secretary, and put two men at work on the line to repair it, and now (Tuesday morning) we can talk with our neighbors at Butte Falls, and they propose to put the line in a good condition all the way from Butte Falls to Central Point.
    Frank Neil, wife and little daughter were pleasant callers last Monday on their way to their home near Derby. They have been living in the county seat for some time.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 6, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    B. A. Murdock and E. J. Phillips stopped a few nights ago and report things lively up at the Pankey logging camp. Mr. Murdock has just finished building a schoolhouse in the neighborhood of the old Chauncey Nye place, near Prospect. Speaking about schoolhouses and schools, I may remark that that section of the country is the banner section for schools and school teachers. Some time ago I remarked in one of my letters that in the Peyton district they had at that time eight school teachers that in the Peyton district they raised and educated there, and they have in Prospect a high school that continues for nine months in the year and always employs A1 teachers; and let me tell you that we of Eagle Point are catching the disease, for I heard one of our business men--a married man, but no children-- say that we would soon have to enlarge out school house and employ more teachers.
    Percy Boothby came out the first of the week and went to Medford for seed oats to sow. He speaks encouragingly of the prospects in his section and expects soon to hear the shrill whistle of the electric car in his section, as that part of the country, upper Rogue River, is becoming noted for the fine fruit they raise.
    J. F. Young, a Medford contractor, was out to our town last Wednesday looking for a contract to build somebody a house.
    The contractors who have agreed to build the house for William von der Hellen commenced work on the same last Wednesday. They were detained some on account of the lumber not arriving on time.
    Norman Smith of Portland was a pleasant caller on his way to visit his old-time friends Messrs. Peelor and Blanchard, who bought the Charley Knighton place near Flounce Rock. He procured a saddle horse here and went up last Thursday.
    Benj. W. Harnish, an old citizen, now 80 years old, who lives on the old Joe Willson place and raises garden truck, ordered the Mail Tribune the other day. He said that he was taking the Oregonian, but that he wanted the home news; that while there was a great deal in the Oregonian, that there was but little that was of interest to the general reader.
    There have been two companies of surveyors pass through our town lately. The last company, mentioned last week, stopped at Musketer Swanoff's, on Willow Creek, and the last one started Thursday morning, and they talked as though they were going to Fish Lake, but what their business was they left untold; but so many people coming and going makes business in our lively little town.
    The households goods of J. O. Gray, who moved onto the old Moomaw place, arrived all O.K. on the 6th inst.
    H. D. Foster, a member of the office force of the Foresters, was a pleasant caller Wednesday night on his way to the big burn on Cat Hill, near Mt. Pitt. He and John Holts, another of the United States rangers, are going to plant seed in the burn to try to reforest the land. They are going to plant a few acres this spring and then this fall plant some more to see which will be the best time to plant the seed.
    A. B. Zimmerman, our local railroad agent, and one of our live merchants, has just received a new supply of necessities for the store.
    Last Thursday morning as the locomotive of the P.&E. was backing in on the switch it came with such force against the ends of some lumber that was on a car that it burst out the end of the car, and that frightened Gus Rosenstat's team, that had a part of a load of lumber on, and they started to run. Gus caught the horses by the bits, but they soon got away from him. The wagon came uncoupled and off the horses went pell-mell up through town, where they were stopped by Charley Sherman. There was no damage and no one hurt.
    The report that reached me this (Thursday) morning that William F. Smith had sold his tract of three acres to Ed Foster, consideration $3000. There had been no money paid, but my informants, William Knighton and G. H. Wamsley, said that they thought it a bona fide sale. Mr. Foster is a young man with a wife and two children, and they are the kind of people we like to have come among us and help along with our schools.
    W. A. Robbins, traveling salesman for Ireland & Antle of Medford, and A. H. Weber, salesman for Woodard, Clark & Co., of Portland, were pleasant callers last Thursday. They were doing business with our merchants.
    C. C. Kester of Bloomsburg, Pa.; J. M. McPhee, formerly of Portland, but now of Medford, and H. M. Coss of Medford were here Thursday for dinner. The two first named were looking for land and the latter was trying to find it for them.
    Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard of Flounce Rock came out last Thursday after a load of supplies. Mr. Blanchard says that times have been lively all winter; that they could sell everything that they could spare right at the house and then not supply the demand. They are more than pleased with the country and with the people as well.
    Charley Morine of Elk Creek dropped in Thursday night on his way home from Ashland, where he has been attending to business.
    Our people are beginning to think about who they will put in for our school director next June. We want someone who will take an interest in building up the school and keep it growing.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 10, 1910, page 15



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    One of the autos that came rushing through our quiet little village came near being wrecked last Friday evening when it came in contact with Mr. Zimmerman's dog, but the dog came out second best. He won't run ahead of another auto--that's all.
    Mrs. Dr. Bonner of Derby and her sister-in-law, Mrs. H. L. Adams, came out from their mountain home last Saturday on horseback after a few supplies and for powder, etc., to blast out a well. They seem to be delighted with their new home in the hills.
    Last Saturday Mr. and Mrs. O'Brien, formerly Mrs. Cora Officer, came out from Medford to visit her father, brothers and sisters. They were recently married in Portland, and I could not get the particulars, so did not mention the matter in the Eaglets, but will here say that her many friends here are wishing her and her husband a large share of the pleasures of life in their new relations. Well, the young folks had a dance Saturday night and kept it going until about 1 a.m Sunday, and then a company of her friends, and some who went through curiosity, collected at her brother-in-law's, H. B. Holmes, to give them an old-fashioned charivari--whooping, yelling and making all the hideous noises they could, and finally Mr. Holmes came out and ordered them away, greatly to the disappointment of the crowd.
    The carpenters have the frame of William von der Hellen's house up and soon will have it closed in.
    There is a report here that there has been another land sale made in these parts, or rather on Yankee Creek, but I have not the particulars this morning.
    A gentleman here recently from the north brings the word that the Hill railroad that is to connect with the P.&E. will be built from Crescent City and that the Hill company will bring the material there by water and be sent on across from there, on account of the high price they have to pay for transportation over the Southern Pacific Co.'s lines, and with Hill working from Crescent City one way and the Deschutes the other we will soon have a good through road from coast to the east, independent of the Southern Pacific, and then perhaps will have better facilities for carrying on business.
    Rev. Delano, a Baptist preacher, came in last Sunday and preached for Rev. Lamar Sunday night. He had a good-sized audience.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary, came in on us last Sunday evening on the P.&E. and Monday went to Butte Falls.
    Jesse Spencer of Dudley came in Sunday eve and Monday morning he started on back home. He reports that a government inspector is up in that region and is taking pictures of all the places and of the inhabitants, scrutinizing everything he sees.
    E. S. Wolfer has just finished the plumbing work on the house Gus Nichols bought of Harry Carlton.
    Joseph Rader, who has recently sold his farm on Antelope Creek, commenced to move to Medford last Monday morning.
    We have three weeks of school yet in this term, and Professor Daily says that the school is keeping up fine; that there will be an average of over 60 during the entire term.
    In going to the Reese Creek school house last Sunday I noticed that the P.&E. Railroad Company had a vast amount of timber, such as tie, bridge timbers, lumber for cattle guards, etc., on the desert north of here, and everything looks as though the work was being pushed right along, and the report from all along the line shows that we have the right man at the head offices now.
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our leading merchants, believes in the use of printer's ink, one would think if they will look at his new ad in the Weekly Mail Tribune.
    Today, April 11, 1910, is a noted day in the family of one of our townsmen as well as one of our leading carpenters, as 62 years ago he was born into the world, 46 years ago today he enlisted in the Army during the Civil War and 40 years ago today he was married, and today he is learning something of the plumbing business, as he is helping E. S. Wolfer in that line.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 13, 1910, page
2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Monday, the 11th inst., after writing for the Mail Tribune, I took the stage for Butte Falls, arriving there at 6:15, where I was met by Rev. M. C. Davis and one of the Butte Falls hustlers, M. C. Mahoney. Rev. Davis had already had the announcement made that there would be preaching that night and by 7:45 the schoolroom occupied by the primary department was well filled and Mr. Davis preached and explained the cause of our visit to Butte Falls, i.e., to organize a Congregational Church, and announced preaching for the next evening, when he would read from the Congregational Church manual something of the rules and doctrine of the church. After the reading your correspondent preached and on Thursday evening we organized a church of ten members, six of whom were present, but the others were hindered from coming, but will be formally received when Mr. D. will be up there again. While we were there Rev. Delano, a Baptist minister, came up and announced that he would preach on Thursday eve, and on Thursday night Rev. Giboney stayed with us and went to Butte Falls on Friday to remain over Sunday, so while those people have been almost wholly without preaching the past winter, they have one now.
    The Dewing company have men at work remodeling the mill and getting everything ready for business. They have a fine school, with Mr. Wright as principal, and Mrs. Barrett in charge of the primary department. While there Dad Mahoney took me all through the schoolhouse, and I tell you, it is a schoolhouse. They may well feel proud of it. The three rooms designed for the classes are all large and the auditorium or assembly room is large enough to hold almost any audience that will assemble there, while in addition they have cloak rooms, halls and closets for the use of the janitor to keep his brooms, water pot, etc., in, and the whole house is finished off in the most approved style. They have five stores (two in one building), one grocery store and a dry goods store, including the drug store, a barber shop, billiard room, soft-drink establishment and a good hotel, the View Hotel, kept by Mrs. W. W. Parker.
    The sale to which I referred in my last was made, it being the J. A. Smith place on Yankee Creek, consideration $25,000. The place was bonded to William von der Hellen, and he sold it to a New York company.
    The citizens of Eagle Point were greatly surprised to learn that the mail had been take from S. H. Harnish and given to the railroad company, but such is life in the Far West.
    Mr. Miller, the agent for the Butte Falls Lumber Company, passed through here last Thursday on his way to Butte Falls.
    Mrs. Frank Tungate of Jacksonville and her daughter, Mrs. Emma Ellison, and three of her children, came out on the P.&E. last Thursday to visit Mrs. Tungate's son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. J. Watkins.
    A. H. Kirkland and family, of Ohio, who have been stopping at the Sunnyside for some time, started for Gold Beach, Cal., last Thursday.
    I see that there are four carloads of wood pipe that have been unloaded lying along the track near our depot, for the Medford water works.
    Since Sam Harnish has been deprived of carrying the mail he has come to the conclusion to subscribe for the Mail Tribune.
    Mr. Moore of Elk Creek was a pleasant caller last Thursday night on his way to his home of Elk Creek. He was returning from Ashland and reports that the frost has injured the apple crop considerably.
    Frank Ward, representing the Bruce Shoe Company of Portland, and Guy G. Smith, representing M. E. Smith & Co. of Omaha, Neb., were selling A. B. Zimmerman a stock of new goods last Friday.
    A company of railroad surveyors came to the Sunnyside Hotel Friday night. They are going over the old track to straighten out some of the curves, etc.
    Mr. and Mrs. L. J. Simpson, who have been visiting friends in San Francisco, are on their way home in Coos Bay, stopped off at Medford to visit Dr. R. C. Gale, special agent of the Department of Commerce andLabor, and family, came out to Eagle Point in an auto [and] stopped for dinner at the Sunnyside Hotel. Mr. Simpson is general manager of the Coos Bay Lumber Company, also mayor of the place. He said that wherever he goes he can hear nothing but about Medford and Rogue River Valley and the wonderful fruit we raise here. So he stopped off to see for himself, and he says that we have indeed a fine country here, and especially around Eagle Point.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent would suggest that some of our merchants fix up their porches and tidy things up so that their surroundings will be more attractive.
    P. H. Daily expects to have the carpenters at work on his new house next week.
    There was a school entertainment at Brownsboro last Friday night, and a dance at Colby's followed. There were 12 or 15 of our young folks went from here and of course they had a good time.
    Mr. Bradshaw of Peyton, who has been pruning the J. A. Smith orchard on Yankee Creek, finished his job last Friday and Saturday morning started for his home.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 18, 1910, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Just after I was returning from the post office after mailing my last letter to the Mail Tribune, in which I made mention of the condition of some of the porches of some of the stores, I came across John Smith preparing to recover Mr. von der Hellen's porch and I could not suppress a smile, as I thought of what I had written about porches, but that illustrates the fact that great minds will run in the same channel, but there are other porches that could be improved by covering.
    Mr. Deter and Charlie Rice started out Saturday morning to begin to repair our telephone lines between here and Central Point, and now Monday night they have the line so that we can talk again to the outside world.
    Mr. Claspill of Butte Falls was here a few days ago and said that they would start two men from there to fix the line between here and that place in a short time so that we will likely have a good line of communication from Butte Falls to Medford ere long.
    T. J. Parton, the gentleman who bought the Joe Rader place, was in our town last Saturday attending to business and getting acquainted with the people.
    J. N. Nuller of Gold Hill was here on business last Saturday.
    George Fisher, who has a farm on Indian Creek, has secured a position in Mr. Childreth's blacksmith shop as a horseshoer and general helper.
    Prof. A. L. Haselton came home from his school at Dardanelles last Friday. He says that he has one more week to teach in that district and then he will go to Antioch and with the close of that term return to Dardanelles and commence another ten months' school.
    R. L. Higgins (Tex) brought out a horse to the Dr. Page ranch that was bought in Medford and came over to his old boarding house for dinner.
    James Runon, our boss paper hanger and painter, is finishing his work on the Jordan house and getting ready to commence on another job.
    Clifford Lake, recently from Hastings, but now in the employ of Maney Bros. on the construction work of the P.&E. Railroad, was a pleasant caller last Saturday and reports that Fuller and Cray are about and will soon be leading down the right of way, that it is the intention of the company to get the ground prepared and then such work of track laying as fast as they can.
    H. M. Coss came out Saturday and brought Mr. and Mrs. G. E. Busch recently of Colchester, England, to see the country and especially to see the world-renowned Tronson & Guthrie orchard. Mrs. Busch seemed to be greatly pleased with our part of the valley and especially with Butte Creek.
    Born--Near Derby, to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Higinbotham, April 8, a daughter.
    Bert Higinbotham, who has been engaged on the Flounce Rock ranch for some time, stopped with us Sunday night on his way to Medford. He reports everything up in that region lovely.
    P. H. Daily commenced to get the material on the ground to build his new house and Messrs. Mason and Hess came over Monday and commenced to work on it.
    Thomas Abbott and his mother started for Ashland Monday morning in answer to a call announcing the serious illness of his aunt, his father's youngest sister.
    Our postmaster commences this Monday morning to weigh the mail matter that leaves his office on the P.&E., as that company have taken the contract to deliver the mail twice a day except on Sunday and then only once.
    D. Crockett, one of the contractors on the P.&E., stopped for dinner last Monday on his way out to Medford to procure more hands to work on the P.&E. Railroad. He reports that on last Friday the cook in his camp (Thompson Bros.) went away and left fire in the camp and when he returned found everything burned up including about three hundred dollars worth of provisions and quite a number of other things, including two large tents.
    Two companies of surveyors left here Monday for the hills. One company went to Butte Falls to survey the proposed new road from there to Prospect and the other to Prospect to commence to survey the proposed Crater Lake auto road. Times are getting lively here at Eagle Point.
    W. P. Whitman, formerly of Portland, passed through here for Prospect a few days ago.
    Jesse Enyart of the Medford National Bank and five others came out Sunday morning for breakfast at the Eagle Hotel on a fishing trip.
    Miss Louise Blass and her mother are off on a trip to Woodville to visit her sister and Mrs. Blass' daughter this week.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Knighton are visiting her brother-in-law and sister, Mr. and Mrs. Mayfield of Phoenix.
    Mrs. G. K. Owings was visiting the family of Wm. Taylor Sunday. Mr. Taylor and Mr. Owings were schoolmates when children. Mrs. Woody of Phoenix was also visiting Mr. Taylor at the same time. They were all schoolmates.
    Mrs. Frank Brown has just returned from a visit to her sister in Jacksonville, Mrs. J. Hartman.
    Robert Grey of Medford, who was in the employ of the Ray syndicate, passed the night with us last Monday on his way to the Pankey logging camp near Peyton to look after the interest of the company in that line of business. He went on the Moomaw stage.
    Quite a number of our young folks went to the top of Table Rock last Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 20, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Jo Miller, a brother of John X. Miller of Trail, stopped here last Tuesday night on his way to Trail.
    W. M. Nellis, the man who bought the Flounce Rock ranch, and Brent Higinbotham stopped here for dinner Tuesday on their way home. They report everything is lively up there.
    Mr. Bradshaw, who has been living near Peyton, moved out last week and went to the George N. Smith place, on Yankee Creek, that was recently sold to a New York party.
    Mrs. Jack Steward of Medford came out last Wednesday to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Harvey, of this place.
    Mrs. Rice of Guthrie, Okla., mother of Mrs. Lawton, who has a tract of land near here, on the Stoddard place, came in on the P.&E. last Wednesday. Mr. and Mrs. Lawton are living in a tent on their place and profess to be as happy as a king and queen on an English throne. Mrs. Roe is delighted with our country and especially our climate.
    The same car brought Frank Morris, Jr., of San Jose, Cal. He came to visit Messrs. Fischer and Dodge on the old George Jackson place, on Rogue River.
    Land buyers are coming, and land is being sold at good prices. W. F. Smith, who owned a place on the north side of Butte Creek, in the lower end of town, sold it to Frank Nichols, consideration $2700. There are four acres, more or less, and the line runs to the center of the creek, so that the actual land in the tract is about two and three-quarters or three acres, so that land in Eagle Point, you see, is bringing about $900 an acre, and still the land buyers come and keep looking for land.
    William von der Hellen, one of our leading merchants and real estate dealers, has bought him an auto and been taking lessons in the art of running the machine. He spent a few days receiving instructions from a competent instructor in Medford and now is having the time of his life. He started to go to the depot of the P.&E. Railroad in the auto and in trying to dodge an elder snag he collided with a wire fence, broke one part off at the ground, pulled the fence loose for quite a distance and the next time he went to the depot he ran the auto on the other side of the elder snag. But Will is learning fast and will make a success of his undertaking.
    J. W. Richardson is now at work putting up a chimney for Mr. von der Hellen in his new house. The carpenters are rushing the work along and soon he will be able to move into it.
    Messrs. Nelson and Hess are getting along nicely with P. H. Daily's new house, and others are planning to build here this summer. If I am not mistaken, there will be several new houses go up here this summer. I learned today that one of our merchants was planning to build a large brick.
    Last Thursday I took two men up to Fuller & Craig's camp. They are getting along fine with their work and expect to have it done according to contract. The general complaint is that they cannot get and keep hands all along the route. They come and go all the time. There were two of Murphy's gang quit work Friday because they could get better wages elsewhere. The railroad company is getting a large amount of timbers on the desert ready for use as soon as the ground is ready for the track.
    Messrs. Bailey and Baker of Butte Falls are here now. Saturday morning they came over the line from Butte Falls and mended the wire where it was broken, cleared the limbs off the wire, and are now going back to place it in a good condition, and the line has been patched up between here and Central Point, so that we can kind of halfway do, but the company intends putting it in a good condition and keeping it so, as there is so much business done here we can't get along without a phone.
    Next Friday will be the last day of the school, and Professor and Mrs. Daily are planning to have a good time next Friday evening. There will be a basket supper served in his yard about 6 o'clock and they will have some exercises by the children and a good time generally. Come, everybody, and bring your baskets and have a good time.
    Messrs. Zimmerman and Ashpole have just received a gasoline engine and centrifugal pump and are getting ready to irrigate their gardens.
    F. J. Ayres came out last Friday morning and took the train for Medford. He reports everything flourishing in his section and that they are pushing the railroad work along as fas as they can.
    The report came Friday morning that there was another man blown up on the railroad and seriously hurt.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 26, 1910, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    After writing for the Mail Tribune last Friday night and mailing the letter on the 23rd inst., I started on horseback for the country on upper Trail Creek, noting the changes that have been made along the route. The first thing that attracted my attention was the great improvements in our road. They have been scraped and some of the worst mud holes filled up and fixed so that they presented a good appearance, and in one place the lane between Mr. Bergman's and the Ole Johnson place had been widened so that they could get along and miss the worst mud holes. Mr. Johnson has put in a neat wire fence and left the lane about sixty feet wide. Just beyond Grant Matthews has made a slight change in the road by fencing in another field, thus turning the road up a sharp steep little hill that was avoided the way the old road run, but he has fenced in a nice tract of land that will someday be put into fruit. I noticed that a family had moved onto a tract of land formerly occupied by Benjamin F. Baker and that that part of the country is looking up and the people living along the line are getting ready for the Crater Lake road. Crossing Rogue River on the free ferry and stopping at the Trail Hotel for dinner, I wended my way up the creek, noting quite an improvement in the appearance of the place formerly occupied Mr. Inlow, by now owned by a young man by the name of Lawrence. The people in the section are looking anxiously for the Crater Lake road. I remained overnight with a friend, Mr. T. C. Gaines. The next morning I wended my way up to the Trail school house, where I preached to a good-sized audience and after partaking of a lunch that had been prepared by kind friends, went to the Central school house, where I found another congregation waiting for me. After speaking I organized a Sunday school of 20 members. In my rounds I met with three of our young lady teachers; first, Miss March Kincaid who is teaching at Trail, Miss May Ditsworth who is teaching in the Gale district and Miss Rose Newland in the Central school house. There have been several additions to that neighborhood, and I am glad to note that they appear to be people of the right sort. I could note a decided improvement all along the road that I traveled and the most of them seemed to be for the best and the people all seemed happy and contented.
    Mrs. George West went to Butte Falls last Saturday to meet her husband who is one of the forest rangers, returning on Monday.
    Dr. McKnight and family, recently from Virginia, came out last Monday on the Pacific and Eastern and Tuesday took the stage for Trail where they think they may perhaps camp for awhile, but they intend to spend the summer camping near the old Tucker place. They are recent arrivals and he is like the rest of the newcomers and tells us that we don't know the value of our land or how to appreciate our climate and that all that keeps the throng of people east is that they don't know what we have here.
    Charley Wilkinson and wife, who own a farm east of Medford near Roxy Ann, were pleasant callers last Monday on their way to Butte Falls. They have been spending the winter in Los Angeles, California, and recently returned.
    Messrs. Zimmerman and Ashpole gasoline engine and pump in oper- [line missing] ditch that supplies the S. B. mills with water power. it seems to prove a success.
    The railroad company have changed the time of arriving and leaving Eagle Point now. They arrive about the same time in the forenoon, but in the evening they arrive about 5:45 and leave at 6 p.m.
    Frank Nichols and wife moved their effects from their fathers' into the place he bought of W. F. Smith last Tuesday.
    Mrs. William Abbot moved her family into their mountain home last Tuesday to spend the summer.
    Mr. T. H. Phillips and wife of Medford came out on the Pacific & Eastern and in the afternoon were met here by Mr. Hoefft of Lake Creek, where they have gone to spend a while visiting.
    Ortin Nichols, Carl Jackson & Co. have bought out the Deter & Daley meat market and opened up business Tuesday morning. Carl wears the white apron and smiles on the customers while Artie rustles the stock for the market.
    Miss Lord, a sister-in-law of Cap Miller, arrived from South Dakota, Monday, and is now visiting her sister on the old J. Carlton place.
    E. D. Spina, recently of Illinois, was here Tuesday looking for a location.
    Mr. Dupray of Butte Falls had three barrels of bottled beer shipped out and hauled to Butte Falls by some of their local teamsters, and the agent, Mr. A. B. Zimmerman, received a letter from him stating that when the barrels arrived there was one barrel that had been opened and twenty-five bottles were missing. But he says he has a receipt for the goods in good order.
    E. J. Kiser, editor of the Valley Record of Ashland and Miss Jessie Anderson and Miss Alice Nile, all of Ashland, were pleasant callers on Mrs. Howlett last Sunday, and I regret that I was away, as I was local correspondent for eight years for the Valley Record and I should have been pleased to have met my old friend Kiser at my home.
    Mr. Trowbridge of the firm of White & Trowbridge, real estate agents of Medford, came out in their auto bringing Mr. Maine and Mr. Bowman of Medford and Mr. Bonneli of Wisconsin. They had been up in the neighborhood of Brownsboro and called for dinner. Of course they were looking for land for orchards and came to the right place to find it.
    Mr. Baldwin of Crater Lake Mills came out Tuesday and called at the Sunnyside for dinner and reports that the mill is doing good work, cutting down about 30,000 feet a day when they run regular.
    Arthur Brown of the Rogue River magazine and Mr. T. O. Erickson of Medford called for dinner Tuesday. Mr. Brown was hustling for his magazine and met with good success.
Medford Mail Tribune, April 28, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Foster, one of the office force of the forest rangers of Medford, called on his return from a trip to the Cat Hill country a few days ago and among the incidents of interests he related was one concerning one of his brother rangers, George H. West. It appears that the said Foster has a horse that does not always do as he is told and upon the occasion referred to Mr. West and John Holtz started to take a ride in a rig with the aforesaid horse and one of Johnnie's. Everything went along smoothly until they came to one of those pole bridges that are quite common in the hills, and there the horse decided that the bridge was not safe and so refused to go and on account of the urging on the part of Johnnie the horse began to rear and plunge and kick, whereupon Johnnie aimed to get behind the seat to get farther from the horses heels and George seeing him making that move aimed to jump clear from the wagon and just as he jumped the horse gave a sudden plunge throwing West out on his side and just then the wheel struck his leg and at almost the same time tore the skin off his forehead. He was not seriously hurt but had a very close call.
    Since Nichols, Jackson & Co. have bought out the meat market, they have been making some changes in their cold storage room. Mr. John W. Smith has been doing the carpenter work.
    Since Deter and Dulcey have sold out the meat market business here, Mr. Deter has bought the lot formerly occupied by A. J. Florey, where now stands the lumber shed and yard. I understand that Mr. Florey sold the lot for $250 and that Mr. Deter is contemplating purchasing the shed and lumber that is within the yard.
    Mrs. Higgins of Jacksonville was out visiting her mother Mrs. F. W. Smith the middle part of the week.
    Jo Moomaw has just put his stage on the road between Eagle Point and Peyton again for the summer and fall or as long as he carries the mail.
    Ham Watkins, who is carrying the mail from here to Trail, was taken sick last Tuesday on the way between Trail and Eagle Point and had to stop and get someone else to take it on in his place and Judge John Watkins took it from here to Trail where he had to lay over on Wednesday while the mail was taken to Prospect by another carrier. John says he got so tired living in the country (Trail) that he cannot stand it. Nothing but city life will do for him, so he will stay in Eagle Point.
    S. A. Carlton was smiling on his many friends here last Thursday and his son J. H. was gazing around among the people to find how much they were worth and another son was gazing around to try to find out all that he could about how many there were in each family and how old they were--and it ain't fair to make the girls tell a boy like Herbert how old they are and all the particulars, but such is life when the census enumerator comes around.
    R. R. Minter, our boss sheep man in these parts, was in town Thursday and reports that his sheep are doing fine and that he now has on hand about 800 lambs and anticipates having a crop of wool.
    E. W. Carlton of New Jersey came out on the Pacific & Eastern last Thursday and spent the night with us and the next day went to visit an old acquaintance on the old J. H. Carlton farm, returning on Friday morning to Medford.
    Mr. Mayfield and family and son John and family moved into the house recently vacated by Mrs. William Abbott Wednesday.
    Dale Hazle is engaged in lathing Mr. von der Hellen's new house and Wolfer and Wamsley are doing the plumbing work.
    Charley Lear, who has been working in the mines in Siskiyou County, California, called Thursday on his way to the Elk Creek mines.
    Ed Welch and T. J. Yocum of Central Point were pleasant callers [in] Butte Falls country. Mr. Welch is interested in the sawmill business and was up in that country to look at the timber. He speaks in high terms of the timber and says that the Crater Lake mill is doing fine work.
    The Sunnyside has just hauled out from Medford 8000 feet of lumber with which to put in four dormer windows and partition off four more bedrooms. John W. Smith, Mr. Bryant and Mr. Wamsley are doing the work.
    Lee Edmondson of Derby was here last Thursday and says that he expects to move his mill from Derby up near the source of Big Butte this summer.
    Artie Nichols, our meat market man, called for dinner last Thursday.
    J. E. Green, T. W. Osgood and I. F. Dodge drove up Thursday in an auto for dinner about two p.m. They were a little late but got dinner all the same and after dinner went to see the world-famed Tronson & Guthrie orchard near Eagle Point, then went up the railroad to the commissary and were talking of going up to Craig & Fuller's company.
    Mr. Morris, the oil well and coal man who superintended the boring of the oil well in the desert south of here about a year ago, was a pleasant caller Thursday afternoon but went on to Medford.
    Thomas Abbott and Fred Bellos had quite an experience Thursday afternoon. They were plowing on the old Moomaw place and one of them laid the lines down to get a drink and about [then] the horse took a notion to go off and they went with the plow attached and when they stopped the plow was in a thicket of young oaks minus one handle and the beam bent but nobody hurt.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 3, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Saturday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent went to Butte Falls. While there he preached on Saturday night and on Sunday both morning and evening. Sunday was quite a noted day, being the first of May. The boys, or rather the people of the town, had a dance on Saturday night before, and on Sunday there were two games of ball, one in the forenoon and one in the afternoon, Sunday school in the morning and preaching and the Endeavor Society and preaching in the evening, and notwithstanding the ball games and other amusements going on at the same time, [there] was a very good congregation, both Saturday night and both times on Sunday. The people of that place seem to appreciate religious services and take an interest in trying to keep them up. I can see that the town has improved since I was there last. Ira Tungate and another man have bought a frame of a building that was put up some time ago and left without being finished owing to the shutting down of the mill and general suspension of business, and now the people of the place have to go to the Iowa mill for their lumber, as the Butte Falls mill is being remodeled, but they expect to start up again very soon. The business men say that business is becoming more lively, and they are looking for a good time this summer.
    On my way home (for I went on horseback so that I could go where [I] pleased), I spent a while at the Iowa mill and the accommodating manager of the mill--I have forgotten his name--took pains to show me all that he could around the mill. They are doing some fine work and turning out a fine lot of lumber. He informed me that they had on hand about 600,000 feet of lumber and were cutting right along, but are handicapped on account of scarcity of help. The best run was last Saturday. They cut 20,000 feet in a half a day. They are about through sawing the old logs that were cut two years ago and will soon begin on the standing timber.
    On Friday last our school closed and the closing exercises was held in the upper story of the school house on account of the rain on Friday night. The Eagle Point band turned out and took part in the exercises by rendering some fine music. The children did themselves credit and showed clearly that their teachers had not neglected to do their part. After the exercises were over supper was served in one of the lower rooms that had been provided by the good ladies of the town, and about 10 o'clock the crowd, for it was a crowd, began to disperse. Some went to their homes and some went to a dance that was in progress. The school has been one of the best, if not the best, that we have had here for several years, and I am glad to be able to say that the school board have acted wisely and secured the services of Mr. and Mrs. P. H. Daily for our next fall and winter school. Who they will employ for the third teacher is not yet decided, but it is generally conceded that we will have to have three teachers from now on, as our school is increasing in size and there is so many of them that will go into the higher grades.
    Mrs. Howlett reports that there was quite a number of the citizens of Medford came out in their autos for dinner last Sunday and among them was the editor of the Mail Tribune, but she was too busy to take their names, so that I am not able to make mention of them in particular. I am sorry that I was away from home, but trust that the next time I will be more fortunate and have the pleasure of meeting them at my home.
    It is hardly necessary for me to mention that Dr. Reddy [and] John R. Allen were here, for that has already gone to the world; also that Dr. Keene, William and Mike Hanley passed through here the last of last week on their way to the Hanley ranch on Little Butte; in fact, there are so many people visiting our thriving little town that it keeps me guessing to keep track and decide what to write for the Mail Tribune.
    Charles Bacon, our new depot agent for the P.&E. Railroad, has taken a room at the Sunnyside and gone to work in earnest, and the people, not only of this town but of the surrounding neighborhood, are glad to have an agent who can devote all his time to that branch of the business. While Mr. Zimmerman, the former agent, was well liked and gave general satisfaction, he could not devote all of his time to that work, and often parties who had to go a long distance had to wait until a late hour or else go and get him to go expressly to wait on them at the depot.
    The mail route agent, he who looks over the different routes the mail carriers travel, was here a day or two ago trying to get someone to put in bids for carrying the mail over the different routes, as the bids that have been put in have been turned down on account of them being so much higher than they have been heretofore; but the authorities at headquarters don't take into account that hay and grain have raised in price from 100 to 200 percent in the last few years.
    As soon as it was announced in the Mail Tribune that the town of Eagle Point was to be moved there was a party rushed into our quiet little village and wanted to engage to move houses to the new townsite, but could not get one job, as there is but one man that wants to move, and he has a stone house and can't move it.
    Mr. and Mrs. R. E. Peyton passed through our town last Tuesday on their way to Medford, while his cousin, Alvin Peyton, and family, spent the night at the Sunnyside.
    Elmer Spencer, who has been in Medford under the care of a doctor, came out to the Sunnyside last Monday to board, as he says that he can get board enough cheaper to justify his going to Medford twice a week to see the doctor and then save money. His brother, Jesse Spencer, came out from Dudley last Tuesday and spent the night with Elmer.
    I. J. Purkeypile and Pat Stidham of Central Point are here at this writing, Wednesday forenoon, wiring the new houses, getting them ready so as to have electric lights as soon as the electricity can be obtained. They have just finished wiring William von der Hellen's new house and are working on P. H. Daily's today.
    James McClanahan and James Miller of Elk Creek were sojourners here Tuesday night. Mr. McC. has a sawmill on Elk Creek and says that he has now about 200,000 feet of lumber on hand, but that there is a big demand for lumber and that the people come to the mill and haul it away right along.
    Dr. Holt had a man with his vacuum house cleaner out a day or two ago cleaning his house.
    Deter & Daley are planning to make some substantial improvements on the lots they bought of A. J. Florey.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 6, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    On Wednesday, May 4, Mr. Whetsel, of Whetsel Music Co. of Medford, came out, and during the afternoon went around town and invited quite a number to come to the Sunnyside Hotel to hear him give a musical entertainment on his phonograph, as he had a few with him, as well as a number of records. The result was that before we got supper over the neighbors began to come in, and with that addition to the 37 we had to supper and breakfast, we had the house well filled and the visitors remained until 11 o'clock, and then reluctantly started for home. The next day he started for Lake Creek, and when he returned Friday afternoon he had no machines in sight. The citizens of the Butte Creek seem to know when they have a good thing.
    E. B. McGill, John F. Reardon and Hunt Hollister, all of Seattle, were among the guests Wednesday night. They did not give out their business, but were particular to inquire about the character of the soil, the timber, climate, water supply, etc., and I judged that they were thinking about investing some money in these parts, as they assured us that they would be back in a short time to enjoy the delightful climate (for it is not so warm here as it is in Medford by several degrees), pure water and fine scenery.
    R. U. McClanahan called Thursday for dinner and to get acquainted with your Eagle Point correspondent. He was soliciting for the Mail Tribune and meeting with some success.
    Thursday night R. E. Peyton and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Alvin Peyton, Carl Richardson, Mr. and Mrs. Kincaid and son were among the pleasant callers at the Sunnyside, besides quite a number of strangers whom I did not know.
    Mrs. Dr. Holt, wife of our M.D., has returned from a protracted visit with her mother in Berkeley, Cal., last Thursday. Her many friends were pleased to see her among them again.
    R. H. Whitehead and Volney Webster of Medford passed through Eagle Point Friday morning on their way to Big Butte to take their annual outing and have the sport of catching and the pleasure of eating some of the fine mountain trout that live in that stream.
    Jackson, Nichols & Co. have moved the slaughterhouse from the old Griffith place onto Mr. Jackson's place, above town.
    Last Saturday Messrs. Harry Starr, Frank Woodard and Ed Blanchard, three traveling salesmen of Portland, representing some of the business houses of Portland, and are here in the interest of our merchants, that is, trying to get them interested in their line of business, called for dinner and when they left promised to come again when they make their return trip to this place.
    Shortly after they arrived, Dr. Reddy, E. B. Randall, Mrs. Evans, H. S. Dudley and F. V. White arrived and called for dinner. While in conversation with one of them, I think that it was Mr. White, with regard to the merits and demerits of the Mail Tribune, he made the statement that there was not one city in ten of 10,000 inhabitants that could boast of so good a general newspaper and one that could exert such an influence as the Mail Tribune, and I said "Ya." There is one thing certain, the Mail Tribune gets the news. I take the Oregon Journal, but I get all the telegraphic news in the Mail Tribune the evening before I get it in the Journal. But this is a digression. Just after Dr. Reddy and his company had eaten their dinner and gone, H. M. Coss, one of Medford's live real estate men, Judge Crews and wife and Mrs. Wheeler, all of Medford, called for dinner. After dinner they took a trip to Sams Valley via Bybee's bridge, and intended to go from there via Gold Ray, Tolo, Central Point, back to Medford. For me to say that the dozens of strangers that call on us, they are all delighted with our climate and surroundings, does not exaggerate the case.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 10, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday was quite a busy day day at Eagle Point. One of the attractions was Sunday school and preaching in the forenoon. In the afternoon the Eagle Point ball team played ball against the Hillcrest team, with the game resulting 10 in favor of Eagle Point and 4 for the Hillcrest team. For the benefit of those who are curious to know where the Hillcrest team originated and who they are, etc., I will say they are mainly what we used to call the Big Sticky boys. There was a large crowd assembled to witness the game from different parts of the valley, and while some came merely for the sake of coming, some came to attend church, and Mr. Lamar, our Baptist minister, preached as good a sermon as I have ever had the pleasure of hearing from him. There was also another class that came to spend the day along the banks of our beautiful Little Butte Creek fishing. Some came to visit friends, etc., but the most of them came to witness the ball game. There was quite a number who brought their lunches with them, and one company of about 25 ate their lunch under the lumber shed. They had brought their freezer, cream, etc., so as to have ice cream as well as other delicacies, and notwithstanding the crowd that brought their lunch with them, both hotels were full--at least, I judge that they were both full from the fact that there were 38 took dinner at the Sunnyside, and the Sunnyside stable was filled with teams.
    Among those I can mention as visiting the Sunnyside hostelry are H. B. Cady, Mrs. G. K. Arnold, Mrs. F. D. Cline, Mrs. H. B. Cady, Miss Hettie Cady, Miss Encie Stewart and Leonard Robinson, all of Medford. Quite a number of the foregoing attended services at the Baptist church.
    E. M. Olmstead of Ashland, deputy head consul of the Modern Woodmen of America, called last Sunday and engaged a room and stated that his business was to try to effect an organization of a lodge here. He had planned that they might organize, and then the I.O.O.F. and they would go in together and build a hall to be used for a lodge room. He remained until Tuesday morning and left before I had asked him the result of the effort.
    Civil engineer Osgood and Omer Murphy came out Sunday afternoon in an auto and called for a moment. They were looking for a party, unknown to your correspondent, to go to Trail.
    Dr. Gale and family, John Boiner, Miss Alice Hanley and her niece, Miss Mary Hanley, were also among the guests at the Sunnyside last Sunday, and the Castor brothers of Phoenix, besides a number of whose names I did not know. Eagle Point is getting to be quite a resort for pleasure-seekers that are fond of fine scenery and good fishing.
    W. L. Small of Medford came out last Sunday morning on the P.&E. to go to work with Mr. Richardson plastering William von der Hellen's new house. They will probably finish the job by the middle of this week.
    Mr. Small is planning to put up a fireplace and chimney for P. H. Daily in his new house.
    The carpenters are pushing the work right along on the addition to the Sunnyside.
    Benj. Edmondson of Butte Falls came out last Monday after a load of goods for one of the merchants of that place.
    Mr. Dupray of Butte Falls and Stanley Spencer of Dudley came out last Tuesday and went on to Medford the same afternoon on the P.&E.
    Alfred Gordon came out last Tuesday and brought out a man [Mr. Freiburg] who has been cooking for the Pankey logging camp, who had been bitten by some kind of a poisonous reptile on the foot and left him at the Sunnyside for medical treatment. Dr. Holt was called and treated the foot, and this (Wednesday) morning he is resting easily.
    Burt Peachey came around to visit his old-time friends last Monday.
    A. H. Peachey made a business call in Eagle Point Tuesday.
    Walter Wood is building a new house on his place, which will greatly improve its appearance.
    C. W. Austin of Dudley came in on us Sunday evening and the next morning took the car for Medford.
    Dell Hazle has just finished up a job lathing P. H. Daily's new house, and returned to Medford Tuesday evening.
    Jud Edsall came out for a load of supplies for a camp of surveyors who are camped on the proposed railroad route east of Butte Falls, and to take up another crew of surveyors to be located at Fish Lake.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 13, 1910, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    E. S. Wolfer has been doing the plumbing work on P. H. Daily's new house since I wrote last and Webb & Brown, Joe Williams and Webb, Sr., are at this time (Saturday morning) plastering the house.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ditsworth of Peyton called for dinner Wednesday on their way home from Medford, where they had been for some of their supplies and to visit her daughter, who is a saleslady in one of the dry goods stores of Medford.
    Last Wednesday Fred Bellam's team, which was working for Mr. Grey on the old Moomaw place, took a notion to take a spin around our town, while Lester Abbott was arranging a bale of hay in the wagon, but just after they started Lester caught the lines, but they had got such a start that they ran a short distance and collided with an oak tree, with the result that Lester was thrown out of the wagon and his head cut slightly and his knee quite badly hurt, so that he had to lay off and go to his home near Clark's Creek.
    Last Thursday Rev. M. C. Davis rode in on his bike and spent the night with us, and Friday morning started for Ashland to meet Rev. William Ewing of Boston, missionary secretary of the Congregational Church of the United States, and Howard N. Smith, state missionary for the Congregational Sunday School interests of Oregon. Rev. Davis expects to go to Butte Falls and preach on the night of the 20th of May and go from there to Central, near Trail, to assist in a basket making on the 22nd inst.
    E. L. Cooley has been conducting the examination of the applicants for eighth grade certificates during the last few days, he having been appointed by the board to perform that important duty. There were seven applicants, viz.: Clara Zimmerman, Fern Daley, Grace Brown, Harry Bryant, Charles Patten, Frank Haselton and Robert Pelouse. Mr. Daily, the teacher, expressed the opinion that they should all pass, and Mr. Cooley remarked that they are a class of bright children. Such children as these will make their mark in the world.
    Born--May 11, to Mr. and Mrs. Linning Dugan, a 9½-pound boy.
    Elmer Spencer, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside for some time and receiving treatment from Dr. Conroy of Medford, has so far recovered as to be able to return to his home near Dudley. He was taken up in one of the Sunnyside rigs last Friday.
    Len E. Smith went last Thursday to Fish Lake to take Thomas Stearson and Charley Wilkinson to that region for the summer.
    Mrs. R. C. Lawton reports that they have their bungalow well along and will soon have the roof on. They are planning to have their ten-acre tract well improved and have everything handy.
    There has been a big rush in our town for several days and the crowd seems to increase in size and interest. There are people here every day looking for homes, and one of the mechanics who has been working on the new houses that are going up tried to buy a lot Friday on which to build, but at last accounts had not succeeded.
    Last Thursday evening our daughter Tavia and four children, Mrs. G. H. Shaw of Fairview, Or., came in on us announced [sic]. She reports that her husband, who was accidentally shot last November, is getting along nicely. He has opened a grocery store and is doing well.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 17, 1910, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Bertha Ditsworth and her sister, Jane, were pleasant callers the last of the past week on their way to Medford.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church, requests the Mail Tribune to announce that there will be a general Sunday school picnic on Children's Day, June 12 on the banks of the Rogue River, about a mile below the Bybee Bridge, entrance to the house [sic]. All the Sunday schools are invited to come and take part in the exercises.
    Rev. Leadford commenced a protracted meeting here last Friday night, May 13, and expects to continue all this week.
Ball Game.
    Last Sunday the Medford baseball team came out and played against the Eagle Point team, with the result that Medford came out second best. There was not much interest manifested, as the crowd in town was not near as large as it was the Sunday before.
    Emil Peil, Miss Nino Emery, Miss Lina Casey and Miss Ada Erb, all of Ashland, are reported to have been among the guests present at the Sunnyside last Sunday. Mr. Peil is one of the leading business men of Ashland, and the three young ladies are descendants of the old pioneer stock of Jackson County, Oregon.
    Bert Higinbotham and his brother John were pleasant callers Monday. Bert went on to Medford for some household goods and John returned to his home in the Big Butte country.
    Mr. Colby and two of his sons, as well as one of the Meeker boys, all of Big Butte, were pleasant callers Monday. Mr. Colby's son came out to settle up with the county court for work done on the county roads, he being one of the deputy supervisors.
Cuts Much Wood.
    W. E. Hammel, who owns a large tract of land on Reese Creek and had a lot of wood cut last winter, is now delivering the same to the citizens of Eagle Point.
    Mr. Bailey of Butte Falls, our telephone man, has been stopping at the Sunnyside the past two days, installing our new switchboard and removing the old one out of Brown & Son's and intends to put the old one in Butte Falls. The new one is put in A. B. Zimmerman's store.
    B. W. Harnish is having a water wheel put into the creek on his place to raise water for irrigating purposes. Mr. Deter is doing the work.
    W. L. Childreth has taken his wife and small children up on Elk Creek to stay with his brother Henry for a while.
Serious Accident.
    Clasper Nelliss, son of the man who bought the Flounce Rock Ranch, had a serious accident happen to him a few days ago; in driving one of the tugs came unhooked and the horses started to run, throwing him off of his balance and after running about a hundred yards, ran into a tree and almost demolished the wagon, throwing him out and bruising him up quite badly. Just as it happened Elmer Demson of Trail happened along and stopped the team and helped him get the wagon together so that he could take it to the shop.
    Elmer Demson, Miss Myrtle Peyton and Key Kincaid came out early Tuesday from Medford in an auto to try to catch the 6 o'clock stage, but reached here a little too late. They took breakfast at the S.S. ["Sunnyside"] and after breakfast started on for their home, Peyton, a distance of 26 miles. There are the kind that don't stop for trifles.
    Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Wilson, recently from Eugene, have moved onto the tract of land they bought of the Stoddard tract, known as Eagle Heights, and are preparing to build this summer.
    Austin Green started for Los Angeles last Monday to join his mother and take the Christian Science treatment for his complaint.
    Clyde Plymire and wife were pleasant callers Tuesday afternoon. They were on their return trip from Butte Falls, where they had been on a prospecting tour for a business location.
The Hogs Got Away.
    Artie Nichols, one of the firm of Nichols, Jackson & Co., while running a hog the other day fell and struck his breast against the end of a scantling, breaking one of his ribs and otherwise bruising him up.
    James W. Berry, wife and daughter, Miss Ruth, and Mr. and Mrs. O. Chaffee and twins stopped at the Sunnyside Tuesday for dinner on their return trip from Butte Falls, where they had been spending a few days. Mr. Berry is now located in Medford, although they have been from Ohio but a short time, and Mr. Chaffee is engaged in business in Medford.
    There was a party of men stayed at the S.S. Tuesday night, who were on their way up the country to join the railroad surveying party. They were with Jud Edsall, who is hauling provisions for the party.
    C. J. Ford of Falls City, Wash., was here Tuesday night looking for a situation.
    Professor P. H. Daily informed me that all of the seven applicants who applied for the eighth grade certificates passed except one, and he passed in everything except in spelling, and that he will take that in June. He was so anxious to hear that he called Superintendent Mills up on the phone and asked him. He admits himself that he was surprised at the results.
    Scott Bruce, who has been spending the spring and summer on his homestead near Dudley, came out a few days ago and is engaged at his trade for Mr. Haak, and next week will go to work finishing up Mr. Jordan's house. He is engaged to build a large barn for Mr. Haak this summer.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 19, 1910, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Rosella Beneke of Butte Falls came out on the stage last Tuesday and is engaged to work for Mrs. A. J. Daley.
    Miss Lorena Riggins of Derby returned from a visit to Ashland last Tuesday. She is now a guest of her uncle, A. B. Zimmerman.
    Mr. Swihart of Derby and wife, who have been visiting relatives in Ashland, have returned to Eagle Point to spend a few days visiting before going to their home.
    Israel Patton, who has been a resident of Eagle Point for the last two years, has sold his home place and last Wednesday moved his family to Butte Falls.
    Mr. Bryant has been engaged the past week building and arranging a bathroom in the residence of A. J. Daley.
    Bert Peachey, one of the forest rangers, who is stationed in the Dead Indian country, was here visiting his friends the past week. There seems to be something attractive to Bert around here, for he don't visit very many of his old friends when he comes around.
    I had a short interview the other day with Mr. Craig, of the firm of Craig & Fuller, contractors on the Pacific & Eastern. He tells me that he has about all of the first part of his contract nearly finished and will be ready for the steel by the middle of June, but that they have sublet the contract to make the big cut, 600 feet long and 40 feet deep. He thinks that it will take quite a while to make that cut, as it is so deep that it will be hard to get the steam shovel up to it to work, but he speaks encouragingly of the prospect.
    Messrs. Hitchcock and Clark recently bought the J. H. Carlton place. Mr. Hitchcock also bought the 70-acre tract from Thomas Riley, and Mr. Clark also bought a place on Big Sticky, joining the Vilas Ranch. These gentlemen are just starting in to "batch," as their cook, Mrs. Capt. Miller, and her husband have moved away.
    Charley Thomas, one of our old-time friends, had quite an experience last Monday coming out from the show. He got on the P.&E. car with his family, wife and two children, and he thought he would have time to get off and get the children some ice cream, so started, and a moment later the train started and left him. So he hired an automobile to take him out, as as the auto reached here quite a while before the train did, he got out and waited for his family and the auto turned for home. After the car started and got as far as the junction, Mrs. Thomas discovered that her husband was not on the car, so got off with her two children and walked back to Medford--she in Medford and Charley in Eagle Point. When the car arrived Charley looked for his family and was informed by the conductor that they had got off at the junction and gone back. So Charley boarded the train for Medford, where he found his family waiting for him. Then they took the car again for Eagle Point at 11 o'clock p.m., reaching here about midnight, but their troubles were not ended yet. As they were walking from the station to where his team was, for they live about three or four miles from town, they had to cross a little stream of water, and Mrs. Thomas had her baby, and her foot slipped and she fell into the water, and in trying to save her baby from getting wet, she got wet herself all over. Charley, seeing the predicament his wife and baby were in, rushed into the water to help them, and so he got wet also.
    Mrs. Cal Pool and her two children of Butte Falls came out last week on a business trip and to visit her uncle, John Watkins. Her brother, Ira Tungate, was also out at the same time, looking after supplies for his billiard room.
    Mr. Freiburg, the man of whom I made mention in my last as being at the Sunnyside on account of a bad foot, has so far recovered as to be able to walk around again.
    John Watkins has been engaged the past week ceiling a part of his house that had not been finished.
    The carpenters have got through putting in the dormer windows and partitioning the upper story of the Sunnyside Hotel, and at this writing James Ringer is engaged in papering the rooms. The addition will open up three more large bedrooms that are light and airy.
    John R. Allen, our railroad king, and Mr. Gerig, vice president of the company, were out Thursday looking over the road and some of the surrounding country.
    Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard of Flounce Rock were guests at the Sunnyside Thursday night. He came out to buy a mower and rake and reports everything lovely up his way and that the prospects for a good crop were never better.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 22, 1910, page 15


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Rigdon, from near Brownsboro, went to Medford Saturday to meet his wife, who has been teaching school in the Willamette Valley the past eight months.
    Mrs. George Morse of Medford and her sister, Miss Grace Stevens, of Woodville, visited G. W. Owings and family and Mrs. Findley at the Eagle Point Hotel Sunday, being old-time friends.
    L. B. Ring, a retired editor from Neillsville, Wis., spent last week in Eagle Point and has now gone to spend the summer with the railroad surveyors, to decide how he likes our climate.
    Miss Myra Brown of Roseburg is visiting her cousin, Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    William Ulrich and wife spent Sunday with Gus Nichols and family.
    Jack Florey came down from Butte Falls Friday for supplies for the surveyors.
    Mrs. Chauncey Nye and daughter, Miss Elsie, mother and sister of Mrs. A. J. Florey, will return Tuesday to their old home near Prospect, after several months, visiting at Roseburg and Eagle Point.
    The Baptist people gave a big baked dinner near the church Sunday and had three sermons by Rev. Tedford.
    Our usually quiet town got busy last week when George Ulrich platted the Ulrich addition to Eagle Point, a prize piece of ground. Leo was seen from 5 o'clock in the morning until 10 at night with his plat under his arm and business in his eye, and within a week over $1000 worth of lots were sold.
    Not long ago it was announced that Eagle Point was to be moved up on the desert. Only a few have any idea of moving.
    Eagle Point has the honor of the prize onions, the prize apples and the finest water power in the county; fine soil, lovely gardens, berries, all kinds of fruits and some of the prettiest lawns anyone would wish to look at.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 25, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Earl Reisland and R. P. Bailey are at work repairing the telephone line between Butte Falls and Central Point via Eagle Point.
    Miss Maggie Daley has been installed as hello girl at this point.
    Since my last, which was sent by Friday's mail, I have spent a few days in the vicinity of Trail. As was announced in the Mail Tribune, Rev. M. C. Davis and myself held an all-day meeting at the Central schoolhouse and had services on Saturday night. The congregation was good and the people seemed to appreciate the preaching and Sunday school exercises.
    I noticed a decided improvement in the county roads along the route. The crops are looking fine. While I was up in that region I had the pleasure of meeting some of my old-time friends. Among them was Joseph Hannah, an oldtimer, Jack Huston and family and his father and Mrs. Huston's father, E. Hammond. When we compared ages we found out that the sum of them was 246 years, or an average of 82 years. I also met W. P. Morgan and wife, old pioneers of Central Point, and they are near the octogenarian line. Jackson County must be a good place to find old people.
    James Ringer is engaged in painting P. H. Daily's house.
    M. M. Hamlin, recently from Washington, came in and engaged a room at the Sunnyside Monday, waiting for Jud Edsall to come out from the surveyors' camp at Fish Lake to take him out to the camp. He is a civil engineer and is going to work on the survey for the P.&E. Railroad.
    Mrs. F. M. Thompson sends with this issue a card of thanks to her friends and neighbors for their kindness during her affliction in the loss of her husband recently.
    A. B. Zimmerman comes out with another advertisement calling attention to a number of tracts of land he has for sale, in and outside of the town of Eagle Point.
    Jesse Fredenburg of Butte Falls has been hauling out a lot of shakes for the Sunnyside Hotel to cover a new barn.
    Scott Claspill and wife and Miss Lottie Peters were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday and Monday nights. They came out from their homes in Butte Falls to replenish their stock of goods.
    B. F. C. Edmondson came out Sunday for two spools of wire rope for the Butte Falls mill.
    George H. West, one of the forest rangers, came out Saturday to visit his family, returning on Sunday to his camp near the headwaters of Big Butte.
    Gus Rosenstahl is engaged digging a well for Professor P. H. Daily. Thomas Abbott is helping him.
    John McIntyre brought out a load of lumber from Hawk's mill last Monday for Mr. Wilson.
    W. B. Chance, deputy commissioner and factory inspector, called on us Tuesday while on his way to Butte Falls to inspect lumber mills.
    Edward Welch and Sam Rollens called for early dinner Tuesday while on their way to the Big Butte country to select a location for a sawmill. Mr. Welch informs me that they, his father, J. B. Welch, and his brother, intend to move at least one of their mills up onto the railroad right of way near Butte Falls.
    George Garret, wife and family and attorney Phipps and wife came out last Sunday to visit Mrs. Howlett and the ladies. Mesdames Garrett and Phipps are two of our old neighbor girls (nee Frances and Clara Rader), having been raised near his place.
    Israel Patton, who recently moved to Butte Falls, came out Tuesday night and stopped with us overnight.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 26, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. L. Simpson of Coos called last Wednesday night. He has been looking over the country around Peyton and Butte Falls with an eye to investing. He has great faith in the future of Rogue River Valley.
    William Perry of Edsall's Station came over Tuesday after a load of supplies and a blacksmithing outfit.
    E. S. Wolfer is putting a force of pickers in his berry patches and shipping the fruit to outside towns.
    Among the many pleasant callers since I last wrote were R. B. Beeson of Medford, C. L. Dixer of Seattle, in company of H. H. Lorimer, of the Valley Land Company of Medford.
    Mesdames Wm. Knighton and J. G. Briscoe of Trail were visiting friends in Eagle Point last Wednesday.
    John Obenchain and William Chambers of Butte Falls came out Wednesday after a planer, edger, etc., with a two-horse wagon each, but when they came to look at the machine they found that it was altogether too large, weighing 7000 pounds so they had to call for help on the job.
    Wednesday afternoon there were two men brought in from Fuller & Cray's camp who had been blown up on the works. They were badly torn up, according to foreman Murphy. Another of his gang came near being killed on the track. A few men on a handcar were going out to work and this man (he is a foreigner and we could not make out his name), let go of the handle of the car propeller to change hands, and just then Mr. Murphy put on the brake to let the men get water, and when the car slackened the man fell off in front of the car, it doubling him completely up and came very near breaking his neck, but as it happened he was not seriously hurt.
    Mrs. J. W. Richardson, formerly of Peyton, but now of Medford, came out Wednesday evening on the P.&E. car and Thursday took the morning stage for her old home to put up berries for winter use.
    B. W. Harnish is having a water wheel and flume put in the creek so as to irrigate his truck patch. D. W. Deter is doing the work and will use the water to irrigate his land.
    A. B. Zimmerman has cut off a neat little room in the back part of his store for a telephone room and put in a window for light and [is] fixing things up in good shape.
    H. M. Coss, real estate man of Medford, brought out two men, Messrs. Shook and W. A. McNair of Ashland. Mr. McNair is a druggist of Ashland and is here looking over our country to try to see our possibilities.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company is pushing their work along as fast as possible, with the available force. They are sending out timber almost every day, depositing it on the desert north of our town and at the end of the track about three miles from our town. It is estimated that they have now at the switch on the desert about a half million feet of bridge timbers all ready to be framed and carried forward for construction work.
    Frank A. Crisey, our county surveyor, called out last Thursday to survey two tracts of land that have recently been purchased by Deter & Daley, known as the Pool and Florey tracts. After running the lines out and establishing the corners they had the land laid off into lots 25x198 feet for business lots.
    The carpenters are through with their work on the von der Hellen house and the painters are ready to go to work.
    J. J. Fryer had a business call by phone to Medford Thursday afternoon.
    Mrs. G. H. Shaw expects to start for her home in Fairview next Sunday.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent expects to start for Wolf Creek this (Friday) morning to spend a few days and attend a wedding, and will probably find something of interest to write for the Mail Tribune.
    Scott Bruce has been engaged for the last few days putting on the finishing touches on Mr. Gordon's new house.
    Dalton Brophy of Central Point came out Thursday evening to look over the situation with a view to establishing a jewelry and repair shop in our town.
Medford Mail Tribune, May 29, 1910, page 15


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Friday last I visited Wolf Creek with the family of a friend and ministerial brother, Rev. Mark C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary for the Congregational Church in Southern Oregon. In passing along over the route I noticed several changes that had taken place since last fall and especially with regard to the fruit culture, for I could notice that a number of tracts of land had been recently put to fruit and that the families along the route were turning their attention to the culture of berries, and the general appearance of things led me to the conclusion that the farmers of Rogue Valley were up to date. I also noticed that the towns presented a much neater appearance than what they did a year ago. At Grants Pass we were led to think that we had arrived at a city of some importance, as our ears were greeted with the crying of the vendors of popcorn, ice cream, Oregon apples, peanuts, etc., as well as the names and prices of fare at the different hotels. I could see that there was considerable improvements going on in the streets, but the main part of the town is so far from the railroad that I could not see much of it. At that place the sheriff of Josephine County and one of his deputies, H. N. Parker, boarded the car with Mr. McGuire, on his way to the penitentiary. Mr. Parker had his family on board, and after leaving the prisoner they intended to go on to Washington to visit friends there. By 8:30 p.m. I arrived at Wolf Creek, where I was met by Mr. Davis, and after a horseback ride of four miles reached his home, where I found preparations being made for a wedding the following Sunday.
    Sunday morning by 9 o'clock some of the invited guests began to arrive and by 11 there were 21 of us there to enjoy the marriage festivities, and at 11:10 George L. Howard and Miss Maude Ellen Davis were joined in matrimony by her father, Rev. Mark C. Davis, under a beautiful arbor that had been arranged of evergreens and roses. After congratulations were over and the presents were presented, photos of the bride and bridegroom standing under the arbor were taken, and later a photo was taken of the entire group and then dinner was announced, and the dinner corresponded with the other arrangements. In the afternoon the young couple moved to their home that Mr. Howard had arranged in advance. Mr. Howard has a store and post office in Placer and is a young man of promise, while Mrs. Howard is a lady of fine accomplishments.
    While I was away from home Geo. West, who has been in the Big Butte country, came out to visit his family and friends and started this (Tuesday) morning for his new station, Silver Camp.
    There was a large crowd of Eagle Pointers went to Medford and Central Point on Decoration Day.
    When I arrived at Eagle Point I found Charley and Al Morine on their way to their home on Elk Creek.
    John R. Allen, of railroad fame, was the guest of Fred Pelouze last Sunday.
    The Phoenix ball team met the Eagle Point ball team here last Sunday and the game stood 12 to 11 in favor of Eagle Point.
    There was a large crowd in town that day and there were between 50 and 60 persons took dinner at the Sunnyside, and during the day there were 118 meals eaten at the hostelry. That gives some idea of the amount of business there is done in Eagle Point sometimes. Mrs. Howlett is having a tent put up to make more bedrooms.
    P. McHugh, one of the railroad contractors, stopped here Monday night and Tuesday morning procured a horse and went up on the line to look over some of the work that is to be constructed east of Butte Falls.
    Miss Bertha Peachey came out on the P.&E. Monday evening and was met by her brother and went to Yankee Creek.
    There is considerable complaint being made about the condition of the road between here and Brownsboro and I am requested to call attention to that part of the road through the Mail Tribune.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 1, 1910, page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I wrote last I had just reached home the night before and did not have time to gather all the news of interest in our section, and among the items I had omitted to mention was that by special arrangement Rev. Le Mar, our Baptist minister, held memorial services on Sunday, May 29, and preached especially to the old soldiers, and on Sunday night the exercises at the young people's meeting were conducted with special reference to Memorial Day. Those who were in attendance report that the sermon was very appropriate to the occasion and that the young people's meeting was truly commendable.
    Another item was that L. W. Whiting did some surveying on the north side of the creek for S. B. Holmes or William von der Hellen, surveying off some old lots and that in running the line between William Brown's lot and the one William von der Hellen bought of S. B. Holmes that he cut Mrs. Brown's flower bed off and put it on the von der Hellen lot. It is strange that after the lots have been surveyed and staked off by such renowned surveyors as J. S. Howard or his son Charles that the stakes have to be moved by every new surveyor that comes along, for no two of them run on the same lines or same angles.
    While I am on the subject of Sunday work and Sunday doings I will remind the reader that on Children's Day, June 12, there will be a Sunday school picnic on Rogue River below the Bybee Bridge. The entrance to the ground will be near the Table Rock schoolhouse. Rev. Mark C. Davis will have charge of the meeting, and it is expected that there will be a number of Sunday schools represented. Mr. Davis will also preach at Central Point on Monday, the 13th, at 7:45 p.m.; Trail on the 14th, Elk Creek on the 15th, Reese Creek on the 16th, Dudley the 21st and Peyton the 22nd. Parties interested will please remember the dates.
    J. F. Eaton of Medford has about finished painting Mr. von der Hellen's house.
    Eugene Childers and wife (nee Miss Williams of Central Point) are visiting Benjamin Brophy and family.
    J. Frank Brown, one of our leading real estate men, as well as merchant, and Mr. Miles of Medford were showing Mr. O'Neal and Mr. James around the country and called for dinner on Tuesday. Mr. Brown reports that he has recently sold what is known as the Gilchrist place, recently purchased by Mr. Bishop, to a man by the name of Knight; consideration $1. Frank said the he sold it so cheap that he was ashamed to tell.
    The people of Eagle Point are going to have a bridge built across that mud hole near the station, as the money has been subscribed and as soon as the material can be put on the ground it will be built.
    W. P. Wood, formerly a harness maker of Medford, has bought the squatter right to Mr. Stowell's place on the hill west of our town and moved his family onto it.
    Mr. Netherland, who has charge of the Butte Falls mill, and Mr. Israel Patton came out last Wednesday after a load of supplies for the mill and horse feed.
    B. G. Phares and wife came out last Thursday and took the train for Medford. Mrs. Phares will remain in Medford for a short time and her husband will start for Roseburg this (Friday) afternoon to file on his homestead on what is known as the unsurveyed.
    There has been notice sent to Mrs. Howlett that there will be about 20 from that section here for dinner Friday on their way to Roseburg to make their filings tomorrow, June 4. Hiram G. Thomson and his son Fred called for dinner Thursday on their way to Lake Creek. They were taken up by S. H. Harnish.
    Henry Childreth moved his family out from Elk Creek last Thursday and remained here overnight and Friday moved into what is known as the Pelling house just vacated by George Phillips, who has moved into the house just vacated by Mr. Patton.
    Mr. Ling and son of Medford came out Thursday evening in a rig to do some painting for Mr. Tronson, the apple king.
    Henry Hillier passed through here Thursday on his way to the Butte Falls country to look for a place to locate a sawmill.
    Mr. Ash of Elk Creek came out Wednesday, left his team here and went to Medford and on Thursday evening came out and went as far as Trail that night.
    Martin Spencer was among the guests at the Sunnyside last Thursday night on his way from Dudley, the unsurveyed, to Roseburg.
    Mr. Austin and Mrs. Wilson of Dudley came out Thursday evening on the Eagle Point and Peyton stage, took the train for Medford and will go to Roseburg to file on their homesteads June 4.
    Haying is in full blast and everybody is so busy that items are scarce.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 5, 1910, page 11



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. T. Young, one of the Medford carpenters, came out to the Sunnyside to spend the night last Friday, and then went to Mr. Paine's ranch on Rogue River, the Alfalfa Garden patch, to put a track in his barn and to have an outing and catch some fish.
    Wm. McClanahan of California, father of the sawmill man by that name on Elk Creek, called on his return trip from Elk Creek to his home in Siskiyou County.
    Henry Meyers of Lake Creek reports having sold 17 head of hogs, off the range, for $329, an average of $19.95 a head, and they had cost him scarcely nothing.
    Our neighbor who bought the Eli Dahack place, Mr. Pelouze, lost a fine horse last week.
    Mr. Huddle, one of the rangers, came out last Saturday evening, took supper and then applied for a rig to come out and get him to go to Medford, leaving his horse here, returning Tuesday morning, and then went back to Prospect the same day.
    Last Saturday evening Mike Hanley applied to Mrs. Howlett to know if three or four could get breakfast by six o'clock the next morning, and she answered yes. The next morning Mr. Hanley and Wm. Whistler, with a chauffeur, came out at 6:15 a.m. and found there had already [been] nineteen eaten breakfast, but they were satisfied with what they had and went on their way rejoicing up to the Hanley ranch on Little Butte.
    Sunday evening there was a crowd of the citizens of Dudley come out and stopped at the Sunnyside overnight and the next day. S. H. Harnish took a load up and your correspondent took two to Butte Falls. Among the callers were Messrs. G. W. Albert, E. Spencer, M. Spencer, B. Phares, A. J. Smoot, Wm. Spencer, H. B. Reed, John Moore, M. C. Mahoney and Mrs. Mary Albert, and later Harry and Jess Spencer. All are from the neighborhood of Dudley, and they had been to Roseburg to make filings on claims.
    Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Clark, who arrived from California Saturday evening on the train, got a rig at the S.S. Stable and went to Butte Falls to visit their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. Morris, and on Monday your correspondent took their baggage and M. C. Mahoney and Ira Tungate up to Butte Falls. Speaking of my trip to Butte Falls, I wish to speak a word of praise for those who have had charge of the road work on that route, and especially the last three miles of the road that has been under the supervision of W. W. Parker, for where the road was made over a tract of land covered with large boulders he has removed them and made a fine, smooth road, so that anyone can ride over it with some pleasure. He seems to be the right man for the place.
    I. B. Williams came up from Grants Pass the last of the week to look after his property here.
    Prof. P. H. Daily went to Elk Creek to spend the summer. He will teach a small school up there. His family will follow in a few days.
    S. B. Holmes and wife have gone back to Illinois to visit his relatives, and Wm. Brown and wife have gone to Portland to visit Mrs. Brown's mother and sister and brother.
    Wm. Ulrich and wife were out the last of the week to make bonds and deeds to the lots he has sold in our town.
    The Eagle Point ball team went over to Sticky (Hillcrest) and met the Hillcrest team, and the result was 12 to 16 in favor of the Hillcrest team.
    Mr. Ruylin, one of the Medford architects, was out viewing Mr. von der Hellen's and P. H. Daily's new houses the first of the week.
    Cline and Marguerita Holmes of Central Point came into the S.S. for supper Sunday night.
    Mrs. Jeff Matney and son of Shale, Cal., called here for dinner Tuesday, and your correspondent took them up to her sister's, Mrs. Finley, that afternoon.
    Mr. C. W. Rollins of Paso Robles, Cal., traveling salesman for Boogher, Force & Goodbar Hat Co., spent the night here Monday. He remarked that he had been in the habit of going through this valley twice a year for several years but that it was the first time he had ever been over here, and that he thought that we were in the mouth of a canyon, and was surprised to find such a large country, and when I told him that there were four school districts above here he was more surprised than ever.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 9, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Sheriff Jones and wife passed through here on Tuesday of last week on their way to Butte Falls.
    Messrs. Bryant and Smith have commenced to put up a neat picket fence in front of the new P. H. Daily house.
    Mason and Hess, the carpenters, who have been engaged on the P. H. Daily house for some weeks past, have finished their job, and James Ringer is putting on the finishing touches with the paint brush and they are today (Saturday) moving their household goods into their new and beautiful home, although they do not expect to live in it until fall, as they expect to spend the summer on Elk Creek, where Mr. D. has already gone.
    I see that J. W. Grover has put up a very neat wire fence in front of his residence.
    Mrs. E. L. Norwood of Los Angeles passed through here a few days ago on her way to visit her sister, Mrs. Cobley, of Butte Falls.
    Mrs. John Wharton, wife of the night watchman of the Butte Falls Mill Company, spent a night and part of two days with us Thursday and Friday, on her way home. She had been to Medford to visit relatives.
    Mr. Martin and John Goodwin came out with two teams and four wagons last Thursday to commence to haul the remainder of the pipe for the Medford water works. They have their headquarters at the Sunnyside.
    J. C. Moore and an old-time friend of his, W. M. Lindsay, recently from Washington, and a young man by the name of H. A. Eslick of Ashland, stopped here Thursday night.
    Last Friday afternoon we had an unusually hard windstorm. It blew down some of the telephone poles between here and Central Point and put the line out of commission, but A. B. Zimmerman, one of our merchants, who has the switchboard in his store, started out early Saturday morning and soon had the line in running order again.
    On Thursday there was an auto came rushing up to the Sunnyside Hotel containing five persons, to wit: R. L. Wilson of Chicago; Dr. and Mrs. W. G. Goffe and their daughter, Miss Cordelia Goffe, of Medford, and J. W. Dressler, one of the men of Medford that takes a pride in showing strangers the beauty and loveliness of our country. After dinner they took a spin up on the desert north of our town. They seemed to be very much pleased with our country out here, but more especially the rich bottom land of Little Butte Creek, and asked all kinds of questions about the land, soil conditions, climate, water supply, health and almost everything they could think of.
    Mrs. Seward, recently from St. Louis, Mo., and her daughter, Mrs. Loomiller of Spokane, Wash., mother and sister of Mrs. Scott Bruce of Dudley, came to the Sunnyside last Friday and in the evening they were met by S. Bruce, and the arrangement was made to take them up to his home Sunday (tomorrow).
    Messrs. Martin and Goodwin came in today (Saturday) with a very sick horse and called for a veterinary over the phone, but he has not arrived at this writing.
    Saturday morning Mrs. Howlett and Mrs. A. N. Thomas started for Central Point to visit Mr. and Mrs. William Chambers, and also to visit Mrs. Thomas Cousen, Mrs. Mary Winegar, a sister of two of the pioneers of Jackson County, Aaron and William Chambers; also the Maury family near Jacksonville. They are old-time friends and relatives by marriage.
    A company of surveyors are surveying off a tract of land on the desert north of our town and staking it off into small tracts.
    G. W. Owings informed me Thursday night that he was going to build two large houses on the lots he recently purchased of William Ulrich, and that there was going to be a great deal of building going on this summer, but if there is, the readers of the Mail Tribune will be likely to know it through the Eaglets.
    In my last I stated that S. B. Holmes and family had gone to Illinois to visit his relatives, etc. In the matter of place, I was misinformed, as I have learned later that they have gone to British Columbia.
    John Smith and G. W. Wamsley have taken the contract to raise the Baptist church up out of the ground and put a rock foundation under it. They are quarrying out the rock and getting the material ready now.
    W. L. Childreth has his brother, Henry, employed now to help him in his blacksmith shop. He now has two helpers and says that he can't keep up with the work.
    Our neighbor, S. H. Harnish, I understand, has the contract for carrying the mail from here to Butte Falls, commencing July 1.
    Miss Ila Lytle of Medford, who has been visiting her mother and stepfather, Mr. and Mrs. Ditsworth, came into the Sunnyside Saturday evening on the Eagle Point and Peyton stage on her way to Medford.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 13, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Just as I mailed my letter to the Mail Tribune, who should stop out of the post office but Chauncey Florey, office deputy in the assessor's office at Jacksonville. He and his wife had come out to visit his father and mother and her parents and other children. Their many friends gave them a cordial greeting, and hearty congratulations were extended to them with many well wishes.
    Last Sunday morning your Eagle Point correspondent took a trip to Table Rock to attend the Sunday school picnic that had already been announced in the Eaglets. When I arrived on the ground, on the banks of the Rogue River, I found that Rev. Mark C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary, had already been there, and he, with the assistance of some of the neighbors, had erected a tent large enough to comfortably seat a little over a hundred persons, had the seats already arranged, a long table erected and an organ on the ground and everything ready for the entertainment. At a little past 11 a.m. services were commenced and Mr. Davis preached to a large and appreciative audience--not like they have in the cities, but about two hundred people. Before preaching he had small envelopes distributed and later they were gathered up and the result was a contribution of $11.62 toward the Sunday school cause in Oregon.
    After preaching dinner was served, after which the program of the Sunday schools. The following Sunday schools were represented: Agate, Chaparral, Sams Valley and Table Rock, besides a few scattering ones from other schools. The program was simply fine; the children had been well trained and each one seemed to know just what to do and how to do it, and at the close Mr. and Mrs. Odell, Mrs. Beebe, and one other whose name I have forgotten, sang an appropriate song and when they were through the audience encored them and they sang "Jesus, Lover of My Soul," as but few can sing it, then the benediction was pronounced by Rev. Davis. After dismissal someone who had strong lungs cried out "We will have enough ice cream for everybody and everybody is invited to remain." Then the real social part of the program commenced, and the first call was for able-bodied men to man the freezers, and in a very short time Miss Mae Nealand presented your correspondent with a dish of ice cream. None of your town blue John froze but the genuine article, and thus began that part of the program and that was kept up for about an hour. We all began to scatter for our homes, but many of us will remember the Sunday school picnic of June 12, 1910, and look forward to the children's day for June 11, 1911.
    Speaking about Sunday schools brings to my mind that next Monday, June 20, is school election day and it stands us in hand to see to getting a good man in for director and try to keep the old mossback set out, so that we can keep up a good school. Let everybody turn out.
    Last Sunday the Table Rock ball team came over and met the Eagle Point team. They had an exciting game and did some good batting on both sides. The game stood at the close 18 to 26 in favor of the Eagle Point team.
    Last Sunday night I was requested to go to Brownsboro to attend the funeral of John Hart, whose remains were found in the north fork of Little Butte Creek on Saturday, June 11. The county coroner was called and the decision rendered was that his death was accidental. It appears from what I could gather from Mr. Bradshaw, his son-in-law and others were out riding and had an attack of heart failure, as he was subject to that trouble, and fell off of his mule into the creek, as his body was found partly in the water, although his head and shoulders were out of the water. His head was badly mashed where he had struck a rock in the fall. He had been missing for some time and search was instituted. The mule was found about a half a mile from where the body was found. The interment took place on the 13th inst. in the Brownsboro Cemetery.
    Mr. Hart was a native of Scotland and was born Jan. 17, 1843, aged 67 years 5 months and 24 days. He came to the United States in the same year that he was married, 1869, and settled in Waltham, Ill. Later he came to Nebraska, where he lived for ten years, finally coming to Oregon in 1895, where he has resided up to the day of his death. He has four sons and three daughters, four of whom are still living, to wit: Mrs. E. H. Tucker, Mrs. R. H. Bradshaw, William and Thomas. All except Thomas are living near Brownsboro, and he is in California. He united with the Presbyterian Church in Waltham, Ill., where he still held his membership, and also was a member of the A.O.U.W. lodge in good standing. His funeral was attended by a large number of his old neighbors and floral offering showed the high appreciation to which he was held by his neighbors. Eagle Point and Table Rock lodges of the A.O.U.W. were represented at the funeral. The family desires to extend their thanks for favors and kindness shown during their affliction.
    Mr. B. Tuttle and Mr. H. Atter, two old prospectors, have been stopping with us for a short time on their way to the head of Cow Creek.
    We had a little excitement in our village last Tuesday. In making some changes on the railroad the cattle guards had to be filled up and the gap was left open so that some of the town cows got into the orchard of young trees, so the foreman on the old [blank] place that now belongs to the Oregon Orchard and Land Company put a strong fence across the track, but when the train came out it was removed, but I didn't learn the particulars, but the P.&E. cars will continue to run and the town of Eagle Point will continue to grow.
    C. A. Walruff of Phoenix called last Wednesday. He is in the employ of Silverton Pub. Co. of Chicago, and is soliciting for subscribers for Roosevelt's new book, his travels in Africa, and is meeting with good success.
    Charley Morine came out from Medford Wednesday on his way to Elk Creek.
    S. H. Harnish went Wednesday to Butte Falls to take a family that came out on the train Wednesday.
    Everybody is busy, and hay hauling seems to be the order of the day.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 15, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    James Ringer, the boss painter and paper hanger, is repainting the Sunnyside Hotel.
    J. P. Morrow, Sr., has sold his property here and bought the old McGee place on Williams Creek, and his son, Cepheus, has already gone there to cut the hay and get ready to move.
    Wm. Knighton and wife expect to go to Carson, Wash., in a few days.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy was a pleasant caller Thursday evening, as was also Mrs. Frank Brown and Mrs. Murphy. Their visits are always appreciated at the Sunnyside.
    R. U. McClanahan, formerly in the employ of the Mail Tribune office, was a pleasant caller on his way to Thompson's railroad camp Thursday.
    Wm. Holmes of Medford was out last Thursday looking up some of the old water rights and giving and taking affidavits regarding water rights in these parts. Some of the wise ones in our town predict that the Holmes Bros. are on a deal to dispose of their water right here to the Fish Lake Ditch Company, but that is all conjecture.
    Misses Ada and Ora Ditsworth came out from Medford Wednesday afternoon with Mr. Alvin Peyton, one of their neighbors, and took the stage Thursday afternoon at 5:45 for their home near Peyton.
    G. W. Wamsley and John W. Smith have been putting in a septic tank for Wm. von der Hellen and A. J. Daley. Mr. Deter placed in position last Friday a large reservoir to be used jointly by Messrs. von der Hellen and Daley.
    A. J. Daley is having the dirt removed from under the meat market and is putting in a nice cement cellar to be used by Nicholas Jackson & Co. in connection with their meat business.
    I see in one of our local papers that Hood River is boasting of her many autos and instituting a comparison between that town and Medford, and while you are talking about autos, Eagle Point is coming to the front in that line, as they are getting so common that our horses do not mind them, and since our retired merchant and capitalist, A. J. Daley, has bought one, our town is considerably enlivened by them, for his grandson, Henry, just makes the thing pop.
    Mrs. P. H. Daily, our primary teacher, started Friday to Elk Creek to join her husband, who preceded her a few days, she remaining a few days to receive their new house from contractors and move her household goods into it.
    Messrs. Hess & Bruce have just commenced to put up a large barn for Mr. Hank on the old R. G. Brown place.
    Messrs. J. F. Elliott and D. W. Sage of Central Point, who have been on Big Butte on a pleasure trip and to catch some mountain trout from that stream, called for breakfast on their way up and stopped again on their return trip. They encountered some mud on their return trip, as they were riding their bikes, but got through in time for dinner. They caught several nice fish to bring home with them.
    Several of W. E. Hammel's relatives came out on the P.&E. car Thursday and Friday and went direct to his ranch on Reese Creek. As I did not see them I am unable to give their names, but learned that his father was among the company.
    Rev. M. C. Davis preached at the Reese Creek school house Thursday night to a congregation of seventy, but while he was preaching someone mischievously inclined, or else of a devilish disposition, put a knife into one of his bike wheels, and as he had promised to come to our house that night had to walk and run his bike, but he arrived by 10:20 all O.K.
    Rev. Gibbons went up to Butte Falls on Friday and on Saturday Rev. Shields was to have gone to be with him to spend the Sabbath at that place. Rev. J. F. Abbott, Sunday school missionary for the M.E. Church, came out the same day (Friday) intending to have gone up to Butte Falls, but learning that Revs. Gibbons and Shields were to be there remained here and preached for us Sunday.
    John W. Smith and Mr. Wamsley have raised the church building about a foot higher and put pillars under it, and the talk is that the old Ulrich property has changed hands again and that the new owner has promised to give the lot that one-half the house stands on, as when it was built the prime movers were so elated or excited that they put the building on the center of two lots, although they discovered the mistake before they had all the sills laid, and when they procure a deed to that the committee intends to have a good foundation put under the house. They also intend to have an entrance and a belfry put on and a new coat of paint, so that it will not look so much like an old deserted building.
    Ed Kincaid came here today for dinner and reports that he had his horse very badly hurt a day or two ago. In jumping a log the horse jumped against the sharp end of a snag and ran it into the inside of his hind leg some eight inches, so as to render him unable to work, and Ed thinks that it is very doubtful if he recovers. He is a good horse and will be quite a loss to him.
    Naylor Williams of San Jose, Ca., a nursery man, called Saturday for dinner. He came up from his home to look at some mining property at Gold Ray belonging to Dr. C. R. Ray.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 20, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Freeman of Peyton met at the Sunnyside last Saturday evening rather unexpectedly, Mrs. F. having come out on the Eagle Point and Peyton stage for the purpose of going to Medford to meet her husband, and he came out on the train on his way to go up to Peyton that night to see her, as he had heard that she was indisposed, and just as he was preparing to start for Peyton he learned that she was at the Sunnyside, so came over, and they remained until Tuesday and took the stage for home, she feeling much better in health.
    J. T. Haley, who bought a part of the old Lafflin place, called Monday morning and reports that his children have scarlet fever and that his house is quarantined, and that he and a hired man are keeping batch in a tent, and that he has no way of getting word to or from his family, as the mail carrier refuses to handle the mail from the house.
    Rev. Abbott, Sunday school missionary for the M.E. Church, preached Sunday night to a large audience. In the morning he lectured to the Sunday school and a few who had heard that he was to be there. His lecture in the morning was exceptionally fine and interesting to the children, as well as to the adults, and if he should happen to return to this place he would receive a cordial greeting.
    T. H. Williams has taken charge of the barber shop while the proprietor, Mr. McDaniel, has gone to California on a business trip.
    Our annual school meeting was held Monday. There was a good attendance, and A. B. Zimmerman was elected in the place of W. L. Childreth, whose term of office expired as director, and A. J. Florey, our accommodating postmaster, was elected clerk.
    Dr. Bonner and wife and one of Fort Hubbard's boys called for dinner Monday on their way to the Big Butte country.
    Mr. Rosebaugh, business manager of the firm of Hutchison & Lumsden, and young Mr. Lumsden, came out Monday in their auto, called for dinner and went on their way, but I was so busy that I only had time to say "Howdy" and they were gone.
    Mrs. Levi Murphy of Ashland came out Sunday evening with her son, Orin, in his auto to pay Mrs. Howlett a visit. They are old-time friends of long ago. Mrs. A. N. Thomas, another old-time friend to the two, by special invitation called and spent the day Monday with Mrs. Howlett and Mrs. Murphy. We have all been acquainted for the last 40 years.
    Jimmie Duggan, one of our prosperous farmers, is hauling lumber to build a new house.
    The railroad company has moved the steam shovel onto the north side of Butte Creek, and it is working on the hill just north of the depot. The company are rushing the work along as fast as they can. Mr. Callahan was down Monday and reports that he has his part of the contract completed near the north side of Round Top. John Murphy, the foreman of the gang that is boarding at the Sunnyside, spoke for board for ten more men, making a gang of 24. There were 43 stayed here Monday night, and we had 33 horses in and around the barn to feed. So the readers of the Mail Tribune will see that there is something doing at Eagle Point.
    Speaking of Eagle Point brings to my mind that the Hillcrest ball team came over last Sunday and played against the Eagle Point boys and got licked, but not quite skunked. The game stood 2 to 19 in favor of Eagle Point.
    John W. Smith and G. H. Wamsley are at work raising the Sunnyside barn and putting on a new roof, increasing the storage capacity and making more stable room.
    There were two men came in Monday evening with teams and engaged board and stable room at the Sunnyside. They were here to haul pipe for the Medford pipe line from Eagle Point to Wasson Canyon.
    John McKee, son and daughter, Mrs. John Higinbotham, came out Tuesday, called for dinner and went on to Medford the same day.
    J. C. Moore of Elk Creek and two other men came out Monday, stopped overnight with us and went on to Ashland Tuesday.
    Messrs. Dodge and Layton are engaged boring a well for E. S. Wolfer. They are having some trouble on account of the gravelly formation they have to go through.
    The rain and cloudy weather the past week has been worth pennies to the corn, late grain and gardens and has not hurt the hay.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 26, 1910, page 10



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    S. A. Morse of Roseburg was a pleasant caller Wednesday. He was on his way to Brownsboro on a business venture.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Brown of this place, who have been visiting relatives and friends in Portland, returned last Tuesday night on the P.&E., but your Eagle Point correspondent did not learn of it until after he had written and posted his last letter. Their uncle, William Brown, came home with them. Mr. Brown has spent several months here the past year. He is a brother of our townsman, George Brown.
    S. B. Holmes and wife have returned from an extended visit to friends and relatives in British Columbia.
    Dr. Bonner and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Fred Bonner, and her son, Al, called for dinner Thursday on their way to Medford. Mrs. Bonner was on her way to her home in Nevada. She had been visiting her brother-in-law and family and his sister, Mrs. Adams, near Derby.
    Al Cox of Ashland, a representative of a tea and coffee house of that place, called here Thursday on his way to the neighborhood of Derby to look at a tract of land in that section, but when he reached here decided that he would not have time to make the trip and get back to Ashland in time to meet his engagement there.
    Mr. Thomson, formerly of Yankee Creek, but now of Lake Creek; James Culbertson and son of Lake Creek, were all here Thursday. They report everything in their section in a prosperous condition.
    The two men, Messrs. Martin and Goodwin, are rushing the pipe to the front as fast as they can, and the pipe layers are putting it in place as fast as they can. There were two men came with teams, started to haul pipe for them, but only made one trip. They found that there was some work connected with hauling pipe, especially over some of the roads.
    J. W. Grover and family have been attending the Baptist convention in Medford for the last few days. They expect to return today (Saturday).
    F. L. Findley of Medford, representing the Hale Piano House of that city, was a pleasant caller Thursday. He had been up in the neighborhood of Trail and was just returning home.
    The Shepard Bros. of Ashland were with us the last of last week and up to about the middle of this canvassing for the Shepard Piano House of Ashland, so you see that Eagle Point is attracting the attention of the musical element of business men.
    Mrs. R. L. Sandy, a traveling woman, was here trying to arrange to secure a house to exhibit her moving picture show, but did not succeed, as Mr. Daley, who owns the dance hall, was away from home, and she failed in securing the church building for that purpose.
    The report was going the rounds the other day that Mrs. T. E. Nichols had lost a handbag containing $85 in money and a $10,000 in notes and securities, but when she returned home she found the bag hanging in its place and that she had made a mistake and taken the wrong bag, one that did not have the cash and notes in it.
    Mr. Vaughn of Peyton was with us last Friday night and reported that Mr. Paine, who bought the Alfred Gordon place on Rogue River, came near getting killed the other day. He was riding a wild horse and he reared up so straight that he thought that he would fall over, so leaned forward and the belt of his chaps caught on the horn of the saddle, and as the horse came down he commenced to buck, and he fastened to the horn of the saddle, and, being a heavy man, his weight hanging there caused the saddle to turn and he fast to it so that he could not clear himself from the horse, and he kicking and bucking all the time. There was a crowd of men there, but the animal was so scared that he could see nothing, but finally his belt broke and he came loose and the horse dashed through the crowd and ran about a mile before he was caught. Fortunately for Mr. Paine, he got off unhurt, but he said that he could see the horse's shoes as he would kick and strike at his head. He has come to the conclusion that he does not have riding enough to justify his riding such a horse.
    Mr. Ditsworth was among the callers last Friday night, over after a load of box material to pack his berries and fruit in, and some cherries to take to Fort Klamath. He will finish out his load at home.
    Jess Fredenburg came out from Butte Falls last Friday after a load of machinery for the Butte Falls saw mill. He says that this load will finish up hauling the machinery for that mill, except a new water wheel that will be put in later.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent was in Medford Friday, consequently cannot give all the news this (Saturday) morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 27, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday, Messrs. Winn and Jewel of Trail, who have been living at the United States hatchery, called for dinner, and on Monday Mr. Jewel and wife called again for dinner. Mr. Jewel has charge of the United States works at the mouth of Elk Creek. He reports that they have been putting in the racks in Rogue River and are getting ready for the fall work.
    W. W. Parker of Butte Falls and his daughter, Miss Dollie, called for dinner last Monday. Miss Dollie was just returning from a visit to Forest Grove, where she had been to visit a sick uncle, who is now convalescing. Her sister, Miss Ella Parker, started to go to Forest Grove the same day to visit relatives in that section.
    Miss Laura Smith, recently from Alaska, came out from Medford on the P.&E. Railroad Saturday evening, and Sunday morning went with your Eagle Point correspondent as far as Trail, and there I had to stop to preach, and she procured a rig and went on up to her sister's, Grace, who is teaching school on Elk Creek. On Tuesday she returned to the Sunnyside on the Eagle Point and Trail stage. She says that she thinks that her sister will accompany her on her return to Alaska.
    Mr. Russell of Medford and Mr. Ling, also of Medford, came out Saturday eve to take a spin in their auto, take supper, fish a little and talk to the Eagle Pointers about his candies, etc.
    John Wiley and Mike Baumeister, two carpenters who came out from Medford to go to work on the new house that Mr. Brower of Ashland is building a short distance above here, spent Sunday night with us, and the next morning went on up to work on the new building. He has quite a number of carpenters at work, among whom is one of our boarders from Dudley, Harvey Spencer.
    Last Sunday evening Mr. Bacon, the freight agent on the P.&E., brought his family from Grants Pass. They at present are stopping at the Sunnyside, but expect in a short time to move into the I. B. Williams home.
    On my trip to Trail last Sunday we had quite an experience on the grade between the free ferry and Trail. There is a strip of road--if it is entitled to be called a road--that is so rough that it is dangerous to drive fast over, and so narrow that it is almost impossible for two teams to pass, and on that aforesaid piece of road I met an auto. Well, the question came up about backing out, for it was impossible to pass there, and upon examination found that it would be easier for me to back with my hack that to have them back over the rocks and narrow grade, so I started to back, and after backing for something like a hundred feet, came to a place where I could pull out on the side of the trail by having Miss Smith get out and have two men hold the hack to keep it from turning over, and then while I was sitting in the hack the two men stood at the horses' heads while the chauffeur guided the auto by, and then the ladies in it got out for fear of being dumped into the river, but we all got through safe without any mishaps. And that is the kind of roads that we invite strangers who come to visit our country to ride over to see our beautiful country. I think that we better do away with that old fossil of a section in our state constitution limiting the counties going in debt to $50,000 and bond the county for $100,000 or $200,00 for road purposes. But I did not intend to write an article on political economy, but simply call attention to that horrible piece of road.
    J. M. Dodge, who has been engaged boring a well for E. S. Wolfer, has moved his well-boring machine to Mr. Henry's, above Brownsboro, where he is going to bore a well. The well he bored for Mr. Wolfer was a grand success. He went to a depth of 51 feet and struck a vein of water so strong that it raised to within a few feet of the surface, and came with such force that it washed the walls of the well so that the water was clear, and Mr. Wolfer and family, Mr. Dodge and helper all drank of it, and it was fine.
    Mr. Dodge says that it is very seldom that they find such a vein as that, but often they have to draw the water out with a bucket to get it clear. Mr. and Mrs. Wolfer are delighted over their success in that line.
    Jack Glennon of Los Angeles, a brother-in-law of G. H. Wamsley, one of our carpenters, came in on the P.&E. last Monday to pay them a visit. Miss Mabel Wamsley and her uncle paid us a visit on Monday.
    Mr. Wheeler, one of the Butte Falls merchants, came out to the Sunnyside Monday night after a load of goods. Jess Fredenburg accompanied with his team. He will also take a part of his load for Mr. Briggs of Butte Falls. They are making big preparations for a high time the Fourth.
    Mrs. Wright and her stepson spent the night with us Monday, and Tuesday morning took the Peyton stage for her father's, Mr. Hawk of Dudley.
    One of our old-time friends, J. S. Howard, his grandson Master Robert and Mr. McGowan, all of Medford, came out Tuesday in Mr. Howard's new auto, for dinner and to try the machine. He says that it is all O.K. and that he is going to bring Mrs. Howard out to see us.
    Mrs. A. H. Thomson of Lake Creek, formerly of Yankee Creek (Wellen), came out Tuesday morning just too late for the train, so spent the rest of the day with Mrs. Howlett, taking the train at 6 p.m.
Medford Mail Tribune, June 29, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    W. O. Welch, formerly of Waterloo, Ia., but now a citizen of Medford, tarried with us the night of the 28th. He was out in this part of the country looking for a farm. He said that he had tramped over two places of 160 acres each that day and felt somewhat fatigued. He is another of the citizens from Iowa that is ready to proclaim the praises of the Rogue River Valley.
    O. D. Fees, superintendent for Baker & Vincent, came out Wednesday and called for dinner for himself and six more, the men who were unloading the pipe for the Medford waterworks, from the cars. They remained overnight and at noon announced that they were done unloading, having unloaded three cars in about one day. Mr. Roberts, the subcontractor, also accompanied him. Mr. Fees reports that all of the pipe has been unloaded except a part of a car that ought to be here tonight, Thursday, and that the teamsters, Messrs. Martin and Goodwin, will unload and place on their wagons. Mr. Fees' team came out today and brought seven men and after dinner they all--13 altogether--went up to the end of the pipe to work on the line.
    George West, one of Uncle Sam's boys, who has his family boarding at the Sunnyside, came in a few days ago. He expects to start for the neighborhood of Prospect soon after the Fourth of July and take his family with him for the summer.
    Dr. Bonner of Derby and his sister, Mrs. Adams, her daughter, and nephew, Al Bonner, were here Wednesday for dinner on their way to Medford, and the ladies were on their way back to their old home in Nevada, and the doctor and Al left one span of their horses here, and on their return Thursday took a four-horse load of their belongings up to their ranch. The doctor has high hopes of that country where he has settled.
    William von der Hellen, our hardware and drugstore man, has taken a partner into his business, his brother George, so I suppose the name will be changed to von der Hellen Bros. William von der Hellen has moved his family into their new house and Henry Childreth has moved his family into the house formerly occupied by Mr. von der Hellen, and he is busy helping his brother, Wess, in the blacksmith house.
    There was a company of surveyors, Stuart McKissick and helpers, who are engaged laying off lots on the desert north of here, came in last Wednesday and engaged board and lodging at the Sunnyside.
    Sam Harnish, the new mail contractor, went to Butte Falls this morning, Thursday, to be ready to commence to carry the mail over the route from that place via Brownsboro to Eagle Point. He has effected a change in the schedule and now he will have one team leave Butte Falls at 10 a.m. and another Eagle Point at the same time, using two teams, and having each start at 10 a.m. so as to accommodate the traveling public, leaving here after the cars arrive and arriving in the afternoon in time to catch the car for Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bishop, who are living on the old Nunan place, were doing business in Eagle Point Wednesday.
    Sid Nichols and family arrived from Hood River on the car Wednesday eve and stopped overnight at the Sunnyside and the next morning took the Peyton and Eagle Point stage at 5:30 a.m. Mr. Nichols has been engaged in the mercantile business in Hood River and is thinking of opening up business here, as he predicts that Eagle Point has a bright future. Mrs. Nichols is a daughter of Mr. Vaughn of Peyton, one of the prosperous farmers of that section of the country. Mr. Nichols made especial inquiry with regard to securing a lot for a store building and a house in which to live. They seem like the right kind of people and we would be glad to have them locate among us.
    Mrs. Eliza Albert, mother of George Albert of Butte Falls, also arrived on the same car and stopped with us overnight and took the Butte Falls stage Thursday. She is from Payette, Idaho.
    William Hughes of Butte Falls and Ira Tungate arrived at 9 p.m. last night and got supper. They made the 54th one to have supper and lodging that night, and Mrs. Howlett had to turn away three besides for want of room, and they still come. Among those who came too late for beds--there is always something to eat--was Mr. and Mrs. Lee Edmondson of Derby, who had just been married and wanted a room, but they were all filled, so they went to her brother-in-law's, A. B. Zimmerman, for the night. The bride was formerly Mrs. E. Holmes, nee Miss E. Swihart.
    Thursday afternoon just as I was well under way writing this article for the Mail Tribune, who should drop in on us but Nick Young, one of the prosperous farmers of Burns, who was raised here, and is a brother to Peter and Clara Young, Mrs. George Givan and Mrs. James Owens, wife of one of our commissioners.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 1, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A gentleman from Portland by the name of M. West came out from Medford Tuesday night and the next morning took the Eagle Point-Trail-Prospect stage for Trail.
    George White and wife came out Tuesday evening on the Eagle Point-Peyton stage and stopped for a day or two to have an operation performed on his tonsils, but our doctor was called away to Talent, so they had to go to Medford to have the work done.
    Since I last wrote we have had our share of auto riders, and they generally come about dinner time, Thursday, T. K. Bolton, C. M. Staples and R. L. Burdic of Ashland, accompanied by H. M. Coss. They were simply riding around to see the country and try to find something to eat that was good.
    F. Huff of Dunsmuir, Cal., was among the callers Thursday night. He came out to try to buy out our blacksmith business of W. L. Childreth, but Wess thinks that he has so good a thing here, for he has all the work that he, his brother Henry and his other helper, the shoer, Geo. Fisher, can do.
    C. B. Webster, wife and little boy came out from near Peyton on the stage Tuesday night, went to Medford the next morning on business, returned on Friday and Saturday took the stage for their home.
    Mr. Powers, deputy sheriff of Butte Falls, stopped with us Wednesday night on his way home. He had been out to Medford and stayed there to catch the Eagle Point and Butte Falls stage.
    G. H. Johnson of Dunsmuir, Cal., stopped Thursday night on his way to Butte Falls, Crater Lake, etc. He was also looking around to view out the prospect for an electric plant here. He is interested in an electric plant in Dunsmuir, Cal., and would like to establish one here and thus utilize the water power that is going to waste.
    Mrs. W. G. Wright, a daughter of Mr. Hawk of Clark's Creek, recently from Los Angeles, stopped here on Thursday night on her way to Grants Pass for medical treatment. She is accompanied by her stepson and [illegible].
    John P. Clum, one of the post office inspectors, stayed with us Friday night on his tour of inspection.
    I understand that Mr. Parden, the gentleman who bought the Joseph Rader place, has had his leg so badly injured that his physician forbids his using it, but I did not learn the cause of the trouble.
    A. H. Boothby and wife and son Percy and wife called Friday evening on their way to Medford. A. H. Boothby and wife are on their way to San Joaquin Valley, California, where he has resided for the last year or more. Mr. Boothby was for a number of years a resident of this valley and for a number of years resided in Klamath County, Oregon.
    Rev. Reuter, formerly of Medford, having acted as pastor of the First Methodist Church in that city for some years, but now he has charge of church at Newport, Or., came out Friday to look after a young orchard he had planted near here.
    Our railroad agent at the Pacific & Eastern Depot of this place has moved from the Sunnyside Hotel into the house recently bought by I. B. Williams, and vacated by Professor P. H. Daily.
    Quite a number of the railroad men quit work on the road Friday here, but said that they were going to another camp. The P.&E.R.R. Co. has begun to lay steel again.
    Benj. Howe of Talent came Saturday afternoon on his bike on his way to Elk Creek to visit his sister, who is engaged teaching a school about five miles above the mouth of the creek.
    Mr. Wheeler, of the firm of Claspill & Wheeler of Butte Falls, stopped here Friday night, as did also Ed Walker of the Iowa mills, near Butte Falls. Ed got to the depot just in time to see the train move off for Medford.
    W. A. Gellatly, sheriff of Benton County, Oregon, his two brothers, R. G. Gellatly, of Cheomoth, J. A. Gellatly of Wenatchee, Wash., mayor of the town of Wenatchee, with son and daughter and Miss Farris. J. A. Gellatly and family came all the way from Wenatchee, Wash., in his auto. They are going to Crater Lake and will then proceed on north through Eastern Oregon to Pendleton in their auto, and thence on to their home in Wenatchee, Wash. They are a jolly crowd and are going to see what is to be seen on the route.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 12, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    By special request I take pleasure in announcing the marriage of Cephas Moomaw and Miss Nellie Dutton by Rev. Johnson in Jacksonville July 9, at the residence of Jason Hartman. After the words were said that joined the happy couple for life Mrs. Hartman served supper. Lon Smith, who acted as best man, says that this was the first couple he ever saw married, and that he thinks it was fine. He don't know but he will try to experience the sensation himself before long.
    Last Saturday Mrs. Starkey and her sister-in-law, Mrs. P. G. Goodwin, came out from Medford to see John Goodwin, and after supper John went to Medford with them. John is engaged hauling the pipe for the Medford waterworks. He and Mr. Martin have been engaged at that work for some time, and last Monday Dolph Kent joined them with another four-horse team and two wagons and they are now rushing the work.
    Ed Walker and two of his friends, Messrs. G. W. Collens and Perry Emigh, timber men, called for dinner here Sunday on their way to the Iowa camp.
    Ora Deeter, a son of our townsman, the transfer man, arrived for a visit with his father Sunday evening.
    I understand that David Cingcade, one of our substantial farmers, had his horse fall with him a day or two ago and hurt him quite badly. He was riding after cattle near the Soda Springs, on Little Butte, when the accident occurred.
    J. G. Mudley, deputy fruit inspector, stayed here last Monday night. He is examining the fruit trees in this section.
    There was a young man by the name of William Lebb hired a horse to go into the hills above Derby a few days ago, and when he returned Monday he had a rattler's rattle about two inches long to show what he had been doing in the way of killing snakes.
    A short time ago I had occasion to mention something about there being so many autos around here, and some of the owners or their friends are having the time of their lives with them. A. J. Daley bought one a short time ago and his grandson took charge of it as chauffeur, and soon got so that he thought that he had a monopoly on all the knowledge in that line. He started for Butte Falls and went all right, but on his return he ran so fast that he lost one of his wheels, and there he was out near Derby, ten or twelve miles from home and thirty miles from his base of supplies, but he left his machine and started for Eagle Point, hired William von der Hellen's machine, went to Ashland, procured a new wheel and in the course of time brought this machine in all O.K. But you know that troubles never come single, and but a short time after he started for a ride with some of his friends to go to Butte Falls and back, and something went wrong and he did not reach Butte Falls until night, and he had no light, so had to stay overnight, greatly to the annoyance of some of his friends, but he came the next morning all O.K. The next unpleasant occurrence was when he took some of his friends out for a ride, and when he was about four miles from home and supplies discovered that he was out of gasoline and the auto refused to budge, and what was poor Henry to do, four miles from home and a company of friends on his hands? But it is an ill wind that brings no good. He chanced to meet a man with a rig that was lost, and so Henry secured his services, and by that means procured a supply of gasoline, and they all reached their homes sometime that night. But Henry is not the only one who has trouble with the "pesky things." William von der Hellen started last Saturday for Crater Lake with a company of friends and made the trip all O.K. until he got part way down the Pumice Grade. Then when he was about a quarter a mile from the river, way up on the side of the grade, his auto took fire and he and his friends had to wear out their coats whipping the fire out. I did not learn the extent of the damage done to the machine, but it shows the effect of the fire.
    I would mention that that company who took dinner here from Wenatchee, Wash., Corvallis, etc., had a little breakdown about a mile this side of the free ferry and did not get to Crater Lake until some time the next week, but don't like to speak discouragingly of such things for fear some people may think that I am an old hayseed.
    George Clark, E. A. Ashman and J. G. Tracy, all of the engineering corps, or one of them, of the P.&E., called for dinner Monday, and Mr. Tracey procured a horse and left immediately. The other two remained until the evening train arrived.
    Benton Bowers, C. H. Gurrin, C. H. Parvin and W. S. Chatlin came out from Ashland Tuesday and stopped for dinner, then went to view the Tronson & Guthrie orchard and look over some of the land that Mr. Bowers bought from C. C. Beekman.
    The word has just reached here that the infant child of Mr. and Mrs. Nogood, who came from Los Angeles recently, died Tuesday morning. It was about 20 months old and had never had good health.
    Mrs. Howlett has the carpenters at work enlarging her kitchen, as she finds it too small for her business.
    One of our neighbors, Timmie Duggan, while pulling on the brake on a load of hay had the misfortune to have the pulley give way and he fell off the hay, dislocated one wrist and cracking a bone in his arm. Dr. Holt was called and reduced the fracture.
    Mrs. Hildreth came in on the Butte Falls and Eagle Point stage Tuesday evening on her way to Ashland.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 14, 1910, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Nichols, recently from Nevada, but now temporarily stopping at Peyton, was here the last of last week looking around for a situation to go into business in our town.
    Miss Bertha Ditsworth of Peyton called last Friday on her way to Ashland to attend the Chautauqua, returning on Sunday afternoon. She reports that there was a large attendance at the Chautauqua and that she had quite an experience coming from Ashland to Medford. She started out from Ashland in an auto on Saturday night and had gone but a short distance when their lights went out. Returning to Ashland, they had the lights properly arranged and started again, but had gone but a short distance before they punctured a tire. Returning again, they stopped for the night, and the next morning started again, and in a short time punctured another tire, fixed that and went on slowly and after proceeding on their way about half way to Medford, punctured another tire, and this time they had to run on in to Medford on a flat wheel, reaching Medford late in the afternoon. O, the joy of riding in an auto! Miss Bertha took the stage Monday morning for Prospect and will reach home Tuesday.
    Mrs. Edward Watson of Butte Falls called on her way to Medford. She came out on the Eagle Point and Butte Falls stage, taking the Pacific & Eastern train in the afternoon.
    Mr. Sandoz, the man who bought the A. J. Daley place on Elk Creek, stopped with us Friday night.
    W. P. Hughes and wife, who have been with the Tracey surveying party, came out Wednesday afternoon on the E.P.&B.F. stage, remaining overnight, and later in the evening the whole party came out and called for supper after supper time, but they all got it.
    A. H. Weber, of Portland, representing the Woodard Clark Drug Co., M. A. Robbins, representing the Inland Cigar Co., of Medford, and W. E. Young, representing the Oregon Wood Distilling Co., of Portland, were all here for dinner Friday, while soliciting business among our merchants.
    Carl Ringer, who has charge of the Joseph Rollins mountain ranch, between Butte Falls and Antelope Creek, came out last Friday and spent the night with us. M. Rader met him here and transacted some business with him.
    Mr. Jewel, who has charge of the Elk Creek hatchery, was a pleasant caller here Friday.
    A gentleman by the name of Stewart and his son from Chicago, who bought a large tract of land on Little Butte Creek, above Hanley's ranch, arrived here Friday and on Saturday hired a rig to take them on to their property. He bought the land without seeing it. He thinks that sometime there may be an electric car line running up there and then he may realize something out of it.
    A party of young people engaged Henry Daley to take them up to Trail last Saturday night to a dance. After he reached there he concluded that he would go up a little farther, and--well he had to have Mr. Middlebusher to bring the party home Sunday morning, as his auto was shy a wheel.
    A family by the name of Howe have moved into the house recently vacated by J. P. Moomaw Sr.
    P. H. Daily, who is spending the summer on Elk Creek, passed through here on his way to Medford Friday evening and returned Sunday night.
    Scott Bruce drove up to his home on Clark Creek Sunday evening.
    The following items were sent me for the Mail Tribune by a friend in the hills:
    A Sunday school has been organized at Peyton under the auspices of Mrs. Alvin Peyton.
    Mr. Pine, who has had such an experience with a wild horse recently, lost a very valuable horse last week. It slipped from a rock in an irrigation ditch and was drowned before anyone could help it.
    Prof. George Henry and his brother Will are out from Jacksonville on a fishing trip, and have spent several days at Dr. Erskins', near Peyton, the past week.
    I understand that the Whilleys at Persist will open their new home soon with an old-fashioned house warming.
    The lady who was so kind to send the above items says that she is in the habit of reading the Eaglets and if we wish she will send us items now and then.--Thanks for the items you have already sent and ask for a continuation of such favors.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 19, 1910, page 4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    William von der Hellen made a business trip to Portland last Saturday.
    Frank Brown and Gus Nichols have returned from their trip to Reno, where they saw the sights of their lives.
    Mr. Lammie has moved his photo tent from near the blacksmith shop onto one of the business lots recently sold by William Ulrich.
    Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bruce, her mother, Mrs. Martha Stewart, and Mrs. B's sister, Mrs. C. H. Lonmiller of Spokane, Wash., came out from Dudley Monday and took the train for Medford.
    Mr. Murphy, a son of J. C. Murphy, our old railroad section boss, came out recently on a business trip.
    John Allen, one of our hustling farmers and stock raisers of Derby, spent the night here last Tuesday.
    Messrs. Wamsley and J. W. Smith are at work now putting an entrance to the church building and putting up a belfry, as the ladies are determined to have a bell on the building.
    Last Monday evening, as Dr. Holt was driving to Butte Falls to see a sick child, his horse ran away with him, throwing him out of the buggy and bruising him up considerably about the face and shoulder. The horses broke the tongue out of the buggy. He had his little girl with him, but she got off with some slight bruises.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edmondson and their daughter, Miss Bernice, of Butte Falls, were here Monday on their way up to Medford. Mr. R. K. Rigdon accompanied them. They report that the Butte Falls sawmill is running now and cutting about 40,000 feet of lumber a day. They are putting out ties for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad.
    Mrs. George Richardson and child also came out from Butte Falls on Monday.
    Tuesday afternoon as Mr. Delinn was driving in his buggy across a little hill in the lower end of town his horse became unmanageable, breaking one of the lines, ran around and broke the shafts from the buggy and ran up through town, crossing the creek at the dam, ran on up to Tronson's orchard and I have learned that the horse was badly hurt in the runaway. Mr. Delinn suffered a very badly bruised knee and will rest for a few days.
    Tuesday evening Ira J. Dodge of Medford came out in an auto bringing with him Mrs. Folger and her two daughters, Misses Elizabeth and Joy. They stopped at the Sunnyside for supper and then went on up the creek on business, returning to Medford the same night.
    Mrs. Markle of Medford came in on the Pacific & Eastern Tuesday evening and is stopping at the Sunnyside at present. Her husband is one of the brakemen on the P.&E. and as soon as his household goods arrive expects to go to housekeeping.
    Robert Lewis and Mr. Ash of Persist called at the Sunnyside Tuesday, but Mr. Ash went on to Medford, while Mr. Lewis remained.
    Gus Rosenthal has been building a house on the A. J. Daley tract of land, as he has it leased for four years.
    Howard Fox came out from his mountain home north of Big Butte and reports everything lovely up there.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 21, 1910, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Messrs. Spencer and Baker, two young men who are connected with one of the P.&E. Railroad Company surveying gangs, came out from Medford Thursday morning without breakfast and called at the Sunnyside for bread and milk and after satisfying their appetites took the Butte Falls and Eagle Point stage for Butte Falls.
    Mrs. Netherland and her two children came out from Butte Falls on the stage Wednesday and the same day took the car for Talent to visit her mother. She reports that Mr. Netherland has sold his farm near Derby to a man by the name of Hall of Klamath Falls; consideration, $3000.
    Wednesday afternoon J. L. Demmer, one of the city dads of Medford, and George C. Walter and his brother, Earnest E. Walter, Messrs. H. A. Voyce, A. P. Whitney and W. Whiteside, all of Medford, met at the Sunnyside to wait for the 6 o'clock train to Medford. They had been up the country looking for an opening. Some of them had been to Butte Falls, while others had been up the Rogue River; some had been out here before and those who had not seen our town before were well pleased with the outlook, and those who had been here in times past expressed their surprise at the growth and development of our valley.
    George Wilson and family, formerly from Chicago, came in Wednesday night and are sojourning at the Sunnyside until they can get moved onto their homestead near Derby. Mr. and Mrs. Wilson, I understand, have been engaged in teaching in some of the colleges in Kentucky and Illinois for several years, and now desire to retire to a more private life, where they can raise apples, poultry, etc.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charles Edmondson and their daughter Miss Bertha, after having Bertha's throat operated on by Drs. Seeley and Holt, returned to here Wednesday evening, remaining until Friday morning, when they took the stage for Butte Falls.
    Speaking of the Butte Falls and Eagle Point stage, the drivers have about all they can do in hauling passengers. This morning (Friday), there were two ladies from Talent and two men who could not go on the stage, so had to hire rigs here to take them.
    W. R. Hall, recently from Bakersfield, Cal., stopped here for dinner Thursday on his way from Butte Falls. He is looking over the country to see the prospect for securing a good-sized tract of land for fruit and to find a model climate, and he thinks that he has found the latter, at least.
    I understand that a brother of G. W. Owings, the landlord of the Eagle Point Hotel, has come to town and may remain here.
    I learned that there is to be a cobbler shop opened up here in the near future, but have not learned who the person is who will open it.
    Lee Edmondson and wife, with Mrs. A. B. Zimmerman, called Thursday, and Mr. Edmondson reports that last Saturday morning when he went to start up his sawmill near Derby that he found that during the night someone had stolen the big driving belt from the mill. It is made of heavy leather and the supposition is that someone who wanted it for shoe soles had taken it.
    A short time ago A. B. Zimmerman put an ad in the Daily Mail Tribune, advertising a lot of land he has for sale, and a few days ago he received a letter of inquiry from a party in Illinois, asking about the land, so the reader can see the advantage of letting people know where you are and what you have.
    Miss Sarah Tinker, a sister of the late Mrs. George Brown, arrived Thursday from Iowa. She is visiting her brother-in-law, George Brown, and family. I am sorry to say that Mr. Brown is in poor health.
    Mrs. Harriet Davis and Mrs. J. H. Clark of Milwaukee, Wis., arrived in our town Thursday. They came out with Mr. O'Brien of Medford in an auto and are guests at the Sunnyside. Mrs. Davis has a tract of timber land on Round Top and is here to look after her interests in that line and to see the country generally, and Mrs. Clark owns the Jack place, adjoining the Tronson orchard, and a farm on the beaver dams, about 16 miles northeast of Butte Falls, and is here looking after her interests in that line. She is also interested in the cause of education, she being one of the superintendents of the schools in her town, Milwaukee. How long they will remain they have not given out as yet.
    Our barber, Mr. McDonnell, has been installing an "electric fan" without electricity. He has invented, or rather installed, a water wheel in the irrigating ditch, and by the use of belts and pulleys arranged a fan so as to keep up a breeze in the shop.
    Scott Claspill, who has been back to visit his mother in Illinois, returned Friday morning and took the stage for his home in Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 24, 1910, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. K. Hayden of St. Paul, Minn., stopped at the Sunnyside a few days while he was looking around at the country. He is here after a good location for dairy farmers, as he and some of his neighbors who have had experience in that line of business wish to take advantage of our delightful climate.
    Mr. and Mrs. Toft, a daughter of Mrs. Abbott of this place, is here visiting her mother. They came from California.
    P. Nelson, the machinist, who is superintending the construction of the Butte Falls mill, called for dinner last Monday on his way to Medford. He complains of being handicapped in his work on account of not being able to get the kind of machinery he wants, but says that he has the mill running now and is cutting about 25,000 or 30,000 feet per day. They are sawing ties for the railway company.
    Mr. and Mrs. Carpenter of Ashland are stopping at the Sunnyside for a few days. They started to go to Butte Falls, but were disappointed in getting a seat on the stage, so decided to remain here for a few days.
    Professor J. C. Johnson, who has been teaching school this summer in the Perry district, about three miles west of Butte Falls, is here on his way from Ashland, where he attended the Chautauqua.
    Since my last, Mesdames Davis and Clark have gone to Portland. I understand that Mrs. Clark sold her place on Connution Gulch that she bought from George Brown before she left.
    Tuesday noon Mesdames May Telfer and L. Enyart, both of Medford, came in on the Butte Falls stage from an outing they had been taking. They went up to the old Geppert place with Mr. Miles in his auto; that was the end of the road for an outing, and Mrs. Enyart is so enthusiastic over the beauties and grandeur of that country that she cannot say enough in its praise. The timber, the fine large swamps where the cattlemen cut the hay for their cattle, the soil, everything combined, she thinks, makes a perfect paradise. They took the car Tuesday night for Medford.
    Last Friday morning I received a letter from R. E. Peyton requesting me to come up on Saturday to solemnize the marriage of his daughter on Sunday morning. So Saturday morning I took a rig and started, and while on the way noted that our road supervisor had been doing some fine work on the road between here and Vestal's, putting it in good shape; also that he had a gang of men at work opening up the survey for the country road from Conover camp to Castor's, work that has been needed for a long time. I also noted that there were several new buildings going up along the route, and some of the old buildings were being improved. But this was not what I started to tell, but wanted to tell about the wedding.
    Just as the clock was striking 12 noon, Elmer Dawson and Myrtle E. Peyton were united in marriage on Sunday, July 24, by Rev. A. C. Howlett. The groom was accompanied by Edwin S. Kerby as best man and the bride by Miss Anna Kincaid as lady of honor. The groom and best man were dressed in the conventional black, while the bride and lady of honor were dressed in white. The wedding was intended as a private affair, as there were no invitations given out except to Misses Anna and Kay Kincaid. All the rest were relatives of the bride, Mr. Kerby being an adopted brother of R. E. Peyton. There were 22 altogether and the tables were spread so that all could be seated at the same time for dinner. It is not necessary for me to even make mention of the dinner. The only trouble was there was too much and too great a variety for the average stomach.
    After dinner we all went to the hall, where they have Sunday school every Sunday afternoon. There were about 40 present for the occasion, and as the arrangement had been made, I preached for them after Sunday school and at 4 p.m. started for home, and was accompanied by Miss March Kincaid, who came to Eagle Point to consult with Dr. Holt with regard to her trouble, arriving at 9:30 p.m.
    I might remark that the wedding occurred on Mrs. Peyton's 40th birthday, so she had a double celebration that day.
Medford Mail Tribune, July 27, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    I. Whitley, who has been engaged running a donkey engine at Butte Falls, was doing business in Eagle Point recently.
    Ira J. Dodge, George Trace and F. Morais were here last Thursday looking for hogs and chickens.
    Frank E. Carpenter, a concrete contractor of Ashland, who has been stopping at the Sunnyside for several days, with his wife, started for home Thursday morning. He is so favorably impressed with Eagle Point that he says he is coming back.
    Benton Bowers and two brothers by the name of Farmer, one from Iowa and the other from Oklahoma, with the wife and little son of one, called Thursday for dinner and returned for supper. Mr. Bowers was taking them over a tract of land he bought recently of C. C. Beekman, also showing them some of the attractive features of the Butte Creek country. They seemed to be very much pleased with our little valley along the banks of Little Butte Creek.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company are putting a force of men on now and have commenced to lay the track. They also have a gang of bridge carpenters at work on the desert north of Eagle Point, where they have unloaded the timbers to be framed ready to be put together as they are needed for bridges. They are also establishing two camps along the route, and from all appearances are going to have the cars running into the big timber this fall.
    Elder J. P. Moomaw, who moved to Josephine County a short time ago, was smiling on his friends here again the past week. He came after a load of household goods.
    George W. Daley, Sr., is taking his annual outing and hunt in the Umpqua hills.
    Messrs. Wamsley and Smith have about completed the annex and steeple in the church, and as soon as the bell arrives and is put in position then the good people of Eagle Point will not have to guess at the time to go to church or Sunday school.
    Mesdames J. J. Tryer and A. N. Thomas have been spending a few days visiting friends and relatives in Central Point and Medford.
    E. Turner, one of Medford's carpenters, stopped here Thursday night on his way from Butte Falls. He had been up to that place to look for a location to open a restaurant, but did not succeed, as he could not secure a suitable house.
    Messrs. Powers and Wheeler and Mrs. Baker and Mrs. Claspill, all of Butte Falls, stayed here Thursday night and the next morning S. H. Harnish, the mail contractor, took them up in an extra rig, as the regular stage coach was full--in fact, the stages are all well patronized from here to the different points in the country.
    Mr. Long of Peyton called for dinner Friday and reports that he had just sold a tract of land on the northwest side of Rogue River to a Portland syndicate, and that they are going to take water out of the Rogue River at that place for a large irrigating ditch so that they can irrigate a large tract of land on that side of the river.
    Von der Hellen Bros. are putting an addition to their hardware and drug store two stories high. The upper story will be used for the furniture department, as they expect to carry a line of furniture in connection with their other business.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 1, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Sadie Van Dyke of Medford, who has been taking an outing in the Big Butte country, stopping with the King brothers' families, came in on the Peyton stage last Saturday evening, stopped at the Sunnyside overnight and Sunday morning took the P.&E. for home. She reports having had a lovely time and regretted having to return so soon.
    Sunday morning M. D. Price and W. M. Dunlap of Medford came out on their way to Blue Canyon, and when they arrived and learned that their traveling companions had gone on with a team they were in a desperate hurry to get on, so they chartered a rig, and your correspondent to engineer it, to take them to Butte Falls. So, starting at 10 o'clock a.m. we went on, and by 2:30 reached and there found that their company were camped near by on the banks of Big Butte Creek; so, bidding them a joyful time, they pushed on to their camp, while your correspondent looked around a little while his team rested and ate, to try to gather some items for the readers of the Mail Tribune. In the town of Butte Falls there were not many people stirring, as many of them had gone to the nearby timber to try to stop the ravages of the fire that bid fair to destroy a vast amount of timber, but I could see that the town had improved some considerable since I was there last. Those whom I saw were quite enthusiastic over the prospect of a railroad in the near future. I also noticed that the contractors are rushing the work along, grading, making cuts and fills, scattering ties along the route and getting ready for the steel.
    That Sunday night they had the track laid across the Vestal place, making about three miles of track they had laid during the past week, and that they were about two miles from the first bridge there is to build, and that they are rushing everything on to completion.
    Joseph Moomaw, our Peyton and Eagle Point mail contractor, is getting material on the ground to build for himself a new house.
    Mr. Haak, the man who bought the R. G. Brown place, has about completed a large barn, torn down the old one and put the new one back of the house and otherwise greatly improved the appearance of his place.
    Benton Bowers has his new house about completed, and the family has moved into a part of it.
    C. A. Orr of Central Point, who is engaged in the dairy business, was over in the interest of the life insurance company. He remained overnight and said that he expected to return in a short time.
    We had a little excitement in our quiet little village last Monday afternoon. Mr. Nygren, who lives on the old Guano place, came out in the morning to meet two lady friends--a Mrs. Jones of Woodville and her two children, and a cousin from Grants Pass, who were going up on Little Butte for an outing, and just as they started one of the horses became frightened, broke a breast strap, and that let the tongue down, then the horses began to kick, breaking the crossbar and bending one of the rounds of the hack, and the ladies jumped out and the one from Grants Pass hurt her hand and one knee quite badly, and as they were afraid to ride behind that team, they procured a rig at the Sunnyside stable and went on to their destination.
    Thomas Christie came out Tuesday morning to take charge of the freight business at the P.&E. depot, and Mr. Bacon, the old agent, will take charge of a train of cars on the construction work.
    W. C. Daley, one of our leading stockmen, was a pleasant caller Tuesday. He says that the pipe leading to Medford is leaking quite badly, but a gang of men are working on it now.
    Mr. Jewel and wife of the Elk Creek hatchery were callers Tuesday noon.
    Mrs. A. C. Howlett has gone to the mountains to take an outing for a week or two and to visit friends in Butte Falls and in and around Dudley.
    Tuesday afternoon Revs. Giboney and Shields and Mr. Potter called for a short time. They, in company with Rev. McLain of Grants Pass, had been to Butte Falls and report having organized a Presbyterian church with ten members and twelve adherents. These are those who do not belong to the church, but will throw their influence to help the cause along. They did intend to try to build a church, but the people did not give them the encouragement they wanted, so they have abandoned the idea for the present.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 3, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Professor A. L. Haselton, who has been teaching at Antioch, is taking a layoff and is at home with his family.
    J. F. Young was out Wednesday talking to the people about brushes.
    J. K. Neal of Buena Vista, Cal., stopped with us Tuesday night and Wednesday morning took the Prospect stage for Elk Creek to visit his son, who is one of the forest rangers.
    E. G. Riggs of McCormick, Wash., also tarried with us Tuesday night and took the same stage for Prospect; he was going up there to look over some of the prospects there with a view of going into some kind of business.
    George F. King of Medford, who has been outing out in the mountains, also was here Tuesday night, as also was C. W. Austin of Dudley. They both took the P.&E. and went to Medford Wednesday morning.
    Mrs. J. F. King of Corvallis, Or., a sister of the Spencer Bros. of Dudley, also stopped with us Tuesday night and the next morning took the Butte Falls stage for that place, where she was met by one of her brothers. She is recently from the state of Pennsylvania, and regrets that she did not come out to this favored land with her brothers, who have all secured good claims on what has been known as "the unsurveyed" country.
    O. E. Stinson of Medford drove in Wednesday morning with a load of household goods belonging to his brother-in-law, Professor P. H. Daily. Mrs. Daley and the children accompanied him, also his wife, but Mr. Daley remained on Elk Creek a little longer to arrange business and bring in the rest of the things in his buggy. Mrs. Daley reports that they had a very pleasant time while camped there, that there was a spring of nice, cold water right by the camp and that they all had good health.
    Mrs. Elizabeth Albert of Payette, Idaho, who has been visiting her son, George, in Butte Falls, came out on the Wednesday's stage, rested at the Sunnyside until train time and started via Medford for her home in Idaho. She is perfectly delighted with our climate and our country in general, and especially with the big timber around Butte Falls.
    W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, took his family and started Tuesday for Crater Lake and the Fort Klamath country, to be gone a week or more. He has had so much work to do this summer that he has had to have two journeymen to help him and became so run down that he was compelled to take a rest. He has left his brother Henry and George Fisher to run the shop, and they seem to be able to fill the bill.
    The Misses Anna and Loraine Ulrich have been visiting some of their old schoolmates during the past few days. They were principally the guests of Miss Gernell Jackson while where.
    Miss Donnie Rader, the accomplished and accommodating saleslady in von der Hellen's hardware and drug store, has been absent from her post for a few days, while she helped her mother in the house during the threshing season on the farm.
    A. J. Daley, his grandson, Henry, and Mr. Deter, our transfer man, took a trip to Crater Lake and Pelican Bay Monday and Wednesday returned. Mr. Daley has been living here for over 30 years and this is the first time that he has ever been out in that country. They took in all the places of interest, including the gorge, natural bridge, Anna Creek Canyon, etc., and feel well paid for the trouble of going. Mr. Daley fell in love with the Klamath country, thinks it is a grand place to live in the summer, but thinks that there is too much snow in the winter, as he says that Mr. Arant told him that the snow falls 25 feet deep at his headquarters on Anna Creek.
    There was a man here Thursday morning by the name of Boomer--I did not meet him myself--that was talking with some of the business men as to the advisability of opening a bank here, and I am sorry to say that some of our business men gave him but little encouragement, but many think that a bank would be a good thing here and would soon build up a good business.
    Another gentleman, S. S. Stites, was here interviewing our orchardists with regard to the shipment of fruit and noting the amount and kind of fruit to be shipped. He is working in the interest of the Southern Pacific.
    W. H. Saden of Guthrie, Okla., was here Thursday looking for land. He procured a rig and driver at the Sunnyside stable and went up on Reese Creek to look at a place, but the man was not at home, but he thinks that he will return, bring his wife with him and look the situation over.
    John. A. Moore, Joseph Hendrix and S. G. Thomson, the first two are from Dudley, and Mr. Thomson is from Lake Creek, they all came in on the Butte Falls stage, took dinner at the Sunnyside and went on to Medford on the train Thursday eve.
    Hon. E. E. Kelly, attorney of Medford, was out Thursday on business and took dinner at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 7, 1910, page 10


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A petition is being circulated in our town to have a special tax to secure a high school in our town, and is being signed by the most of the citizens of the place.
    The last of the past week your correspondent was called on to take Miss Rose Messal, formerly of Lake Creek, but more recently of Sacramento, Cal., up to her brother-in-law's, Neil Walch's, and while on the route I discovered quite a marked improvement all along the way. The first noticeable improvement was in the ditch of the old Fish Lake Ditch Company; instead of having the water running to waste over the desert they have made a fine canal, and put bridges over it where the roads cross and got it up in fine shape. Another improvement was in the appearance of the orchards along the route; also a few new houses have been built and everything presents a thrifty appearance in that line, but the bridges along the county road leading up Yankee Creek, some of them at least, are in a bad condition, and the county is liable to have to pay for someone being hurt or having a horse crippled.
    Mrs. Geppert and Miss Nellie Coran came out from Butte Falls last Saturday, took dinner here and then took the cars for Medford, where Mrs. Geppert procured a quantity of supplies, shipped them to Eagle Point, and her son took them from here to her home near Butte Falls.
    Professor J. C. Johnson, who is engaged in teaching school in the Perry district, came out from his homestead on Reese Creek Monday, went to Jacksonville from here to take the teacher's examination.
    While engaged in moving the old Joseph Moomaw house, preparatory to building a new one, James Ringer, his father-in-law, got seriously hurt. Just as they were about through with the job and were giving it the finishing touches, a porch that was attached to the front of the old house gave way, catching Mr. Ringer, throwing him onto a pile of wood, hurting him quite seriously, having broken two of his ribs and hurt his back quite badly, so that he will not be able to work for some time.
    Professor A. L. Haselton is having a new roof put on his dwelling house.
    Mrs. Sophia Robinett has accepted a position in the View Hotel at Butte Falls with Mrs. Charles Edmondson.
    Miss Violet Vaughn and Miss Bertha Ditsworth were pleasant callers last Monday on their way to Medford.
    Deputy Assessor Habiling of Butte Falls came out last Saturday on his way to Medford and Jacksonville. He reports that he has finished assessing in his district. He had to go on foot to do his work, on account of the scarcity of horse feed in that mountain district.
    Last Saturday I took Herbert Allen, Guy Thornburg and Mark Leonard, all of Medford, to Butte Falls, with their camping outfit. They intended when I left them to go on to Blue Canyon and take a hunt. Two of them were never out in the hills before. They are all boys, and they imagine that they will kill all sorts of game. They want to kill a bear at any rate, and they promised me that when they returned they would report to me the result of their hunt, so that I could give it to the readers of the Mail Tribune.
    Mr. Owen of Dudley was a pleasant caller Sunday night on his way home.
    L. Longvand, a graduate of a Norway university, stayed here Sunday night. He is here in the interest of capitalists, examining the nature of the soil, as to its adaptability to the different kinds of fruit. He has been spending some time in the Sams Valley and Rogue River country.
    There was a collision on the P.&E. Railroad last Monday as the regular passenger train was going out from here to Medford and the No. 4 was coming in with a box car loaded with wood. They met on a curve about half a mile from the depot, with the result that the boxcar was jammed some, the door thrown off, the cow-catchers of both locomotives broken off and things shaken up generally. Fortunately no one was seriously hurt, although the fireman of No. 4 was bruised up considerably.
    Mrs. Horton of Butte Falls and baby came out on the stage Monday, took dinner here and then took the car for Medford.
    John E. Nice of Thurston, Or., who has the right to this and Josephine County to sell Watkins' stuff, and his uncle, J. H. Moore of Springfield, Or., called for the night Monday. He takes the place of Mr. Marksbury, who has been traveling this beat for several years.
    A traveling salesman by the name of Hart was a guest at the Sunnyside Monday night, as also was Mr. Boughden, Jr., formerly of Butte Falls, but who now is a citizen of the state of Texas. He just arrived from that state and expects to return this fall with his mother and the small children. Mr. Boughden, Sr., lived for several years in Butte Falls, but his interest called him to Texas, where he expects to reside for a while at least. Mr. Boughden reports that they are having a high old time with the negroes there.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 10, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George von der Hellen is getting the material on the tract of land he bought of J. B. Jackson to build a residence.
    Miss Cavara Pool took the stage Tuesday for the upper country. She seemed to think when she left that she would go to the Soda Springs, on the south fork of Little Butte Creek.
    Mr. Pelouze, one of our enterprising farmers and fruit raisers, was down on Tuesday after shingles to roof an addition to his barn, to be used as a wagon and tool house. He says that he has completed his water system and now can irrigate the most of his place. He seemed to be considerably disappointed over the discouragement that was given the gentleman who was trying to work up an interest in the establishment of a bank here. He happened to meet with the wrong man. It is not always that the business men of a town will work for the best interest of the town in which they live.
    Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls and his stepdaughter stopped here for dinner Tuesday, while they were on their way to Jacksonville, where Miss Ada Greyham will take the examination for a teacher's certificate. Mr. Fredenburg returned and spent Wednesday night with us. He is hauling in his supplies for winter.
    Mr. Wolverton of Butte Falls, who has considerable holdings in the timber belt, was a pleasant caller Tuesday. He reports that the work is progressing finely along the railway. The right of way runs across a part of his land and he thinks that that part of the country will become a great fruit center when the timber has been cut off.
    H. W. Combs of Medford was a pleasant caller Tuesday night. He was out here in the interest of a sewing machine company.
    Misses Blossom Morris and Leta Peelor of Butte Falls stopped here their way from Butte Falls to Jacksonville to take the teachers' examination.
    Ed Walker and Mr. Johnson came out from Medford Tuesday night on the P.&E., ate supper and then Ed took his team and started for home. He has charge of the Hafer company sawmill. He authorized me to say that the fire in that section was under control; that it had done practically no damage.
    Mrs. T. J. Holt of Portland was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside Tuesday night. She came out on the Eagle Point-Peyton stage. She is a niece of Frank Manning of Peyton, one of our hustling farmers, and had been visiting her uncle and family for a few days.
    E. P. Power of Medford also came in on the same stage and spent the night with us. He had been up to the Hill orchard, on Rogue River, the old Stewart place, to make some wagon crates to haul fruit in. He reports that Mr. Hill has a heavy crop of pears and that they will compare favorably with any pears in the market. He says that the fruit crop up there is extra fine and that the berry crop cannot be beaten.
    Vincent Zelondek of Chicago also spent the night. Mr. Zelondek is an artist, but his health has failed him and he is now looking for a place where he can raise fruit and have good health, and that is no "booster's" yarn, either.
    Miss Lilian Lunden of Mt. Jewett, Pa., came out on the P.&E. Wednesday night and expects to have an old-time friend, Mr. Martin Spencer, meet her tonight, Thursday. Mr. Spencer is one of the enterprising citizens of Dudley, and Miss Lunden has come out to make them a visit. She has fallen in love with the Sunnyside and our delightful climate and thinks that our little Butte Creek is one of the most lovely streams she has seen yet. She may remain here a few days before she goes to the timber belt.
    Mr. Paine, who bought the Alfred Gordon ranch, on Rogue River, spent the night with us Tuesday. He is quite enthusiastic over the Crater Lake road and proposes to give $200 toward the completion of it. Although he is a newcomer here, he knows a good thing when he sees it.
    There have been several strangers here today, but I did not learn their names. Three of them were traveling salesmen, but I only saw them a minute at dinner time and was so busy that I had no time to talk with them.
    Mr. Thompson, the Lake Creek postmaster and expert painter and paperhanger of the Lake Creek country, came in from Medford Thursday, took dinner and transacted some business and went home.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 14, 1910, page 11


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When I last wrote, Thursday, I spoke of Miss Lillian Lunden arriving from Mt. Jewett, Pennsylvania, and expecting to meet Mr. Martin Spencer of Dudley. Well he came that evening on the stage, and although they had not seen each other for over four years, the recognition was mutual, and the next day they went to Jacksonville together and Judge Neil said the word that joined them together for life. The next day, Saturday, I took them to their home amid the majestic forests near the Dudley post office, where he has already prepared a beautiful home for his bride. I discovered quite a number of changes for the better in the neighborhood. Elmer Spencer has built a new home in a different place from where he formerly lived. Mr. Smith has been making several improvements and important changes; Jess Spencer has built a new house and I learned that all the rest of the set there in the community were making many improvements. They have also built a new school house in that neighborhood, and are clearing the land for orchards and fixing themselves with fine homes.
    Tuesday night we had an unusual amount of lady guests. In addition to the bride just mentioned, we had five young lady school teachers, viz: Misses Florence and Bertha Ditsworth, Miss Vaughn of Peyton and Miss Leta Peelor and Miss Blossom Morris of Butte Falls, Mesdames F. R. and J. C. Phares and B. T. Phares, Mrs. J. C. Phares also had her little son with her, and Mrs. Wilson of Dudley. In addition to those, we had R. B. Thomas, one of the railroad contractors, who graded four miles of right of way for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad this side of the Edsall Flat, and Mr. Price of Elk Creek, besides several whose names I didn't learn.
    Miss Josie Riley, daughter of Hon. Thomas Riley, was a pleasant caller on our daughters, Hattie and Agnes, last Friday.
    A. B. Cornell of Grants Pass and C. B. Orr were pleasant callers Friday of last week.
    Messrs. Price and Dunlap, two men whom I took up to Butte Falls to go on a hunt up to Blue Canyon, returned Friday and report that they had a fine time and good luck hunting, and felt greatly improved in the line of health.
    Hon. E. V. Carter and C. L. Hatfield of Ashland phoned to the Sunnyside for dinner for two of the hungriest men in Oregon last Friday and when they came they reported that they had started for Crater Lake and just this side of Prospect one of their autos gave out with them and they came back to Trail to phone for a machinist to come and do the repair job, and that the line was out of commission, so they had to come to Eagle Point, where they phoned for help. They have left the company expecting to get communication at the Enyart place and return at once, but instead they had to come here, about 25 miles, and they said that they did not know what their companions would think of their absence.
    Hon. Judge J. R. Neil came out last Sunday and spent the day at the Sunnyside.
    I am not able to report much that transpired here since Saturday morning, as I was away from home until Sunday afternoon, when I returned from my trip to Dudley. I brought with me Mesdames Jesse Spencer and Elmer Spencer, who both went to Medford Monday morning. When I reached home I found that my wife had returned home on the day before and reports that she had one of the most enjoyable visits of her life. While she was gone she visited all of the Spencers, five families, Mrs. Reed, Mrs. Owens, Mrs. Bruce, etc., besides several families in Butte Falls and this side of there. When I reached home I found two autos and a number of rigs there, and it looked like the house was full, but I did not get their names as they started before I got my team put away, but later another auto came and a hack load consisting of Joseph Wolke and wife Misses Alma Wolke, Clara Wolke, Sydney Wolke, Harry Starr, Mrs. Starr, Otto Starr, Lumple Starr, Florence Plumley and Mrs. Will Reed, all of Grants Pass. They had started for the Butte Creek country beyond Butte Falls for an outing and Mr. Wolke, who is a hardware merchant of Grants Pass, while on his way, near Gold Hill collided with a telegraph pole and broke his auto considerably, and getting another machine, in making the turn around the corner near the old Erwin Pruett place on the Eagle Point and Medford road he broke one wheel and an axle and threw the whole family out, but fortunately no one was hurt, except Mrs. Wolke, who had her elbow skinned a little. After the last breakdown he hired a team to bring them to the Sunnyside, where they found dinner already prepared for them, as they had phoned ahead. Here he hired Henry Daley to take them on to Butte Falls in his auto and I have not heard the result, but Mr. Wolke said that he had started out wrong from home.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 16, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    P. W. Haley, who bought a part of the old Stow farm of the Lofland brothers and has spent some time this summer in the neighborhood of Gresham, Multnomah County, returned the first of the week to look after his interests here. He expects to bring his family here this fall and make this neighborhood his permanent home.
    Tuesday noon there was a company of five, viz: Charles Magley, G. W. Priddy, O. D. Magley, E. Worman and J. B. Smith, drove up in a rig for dinner on their way to Crater Lake. They were aiming to go as far as the Big Butte bridge that afternoon and have a good time fishing in that beautiful stream. They had started with the calculation of seeing and enjoying the route. They obtained special directions from me how to go so as to see all the wonders along the route, and said that they were in no hurry.
    D. W. Day of Butte Falls was a pleasant caller Tuesday on his way to Medford. He reports everything quiet in his town.
    Professor P. H. Daily since his return from Elk Creek has been finishing up his well, building a woodshed and having things fixed up generally and gotten ready to commence school again in September. We are making calculations to have three teachers this fall and winter and will soon have a school that will compare favorably with any school in the county outside of the cities, and they will have to get a move on to keep out of the way, for we are getting some of the progressive element among us.
    Miss Rose Ayres, who has been assisting Mrs. Howlett and daughters in the Sunnyside, went home Tuesday to take a vacation for a couple of weeks.
    I noticed as I came out from Dudley the first of the week that John Allen was making some improvements in the way of building, and that Mr. Swihart, both of Derby, was building a new barn; that Lee Edmondson was making some improvements; that Mr. Castor was putting up a neat wire fence in the place of his old one; that Mr. Baker was clearing off his homestead and all together they along the road are having a general improving spell.
    Rev. Fredenburg of Sams Valley held preaching services here the latter part of last week and on Sunday. He had the honor of holding the first services after the bell was hung in the church belfry.
    Mr. Howe moved his family to Medford last Monday, vacating the Moomaw home, and on Thursday Henry Childreth moved into it.
    Elmer Spencer came out from his home on Wednesday, met his wife at the Sunnyside and Thursday morning then went to Medford. Mrs. Jesse Spencer, who came out from Dudley last Sunday with me, started home today, Thursday, with John Higinbotham, who came out to take up a load of fruit, etc., for the two above named Spencer families.
    C. V. Cooper, a civil engineer in the employ of the Rogue River Electric Company, and Mr. Willis stopped here Tuesday night and took the Prospect stage for that section of the country.
    F. W. McKnight and Boyd Tucker were pleasant callers last Wednesday. Dr. McKnight has his family camped on Rogue River near Trail and reports having a fine time fishing, hunting, etc., and Mr. Tucker is keeping the Allen Hotel at Trail and reports that he is doing a good business.
    There were five railroad men came in Wednesday and reported that they have all the grading done this side of Butte Falls and that further work was suspended in that line on the laying of ties and steel was concerned.
    Mr. Killinghart, a traveling salesman for Lang & Co. of Portland, and another gentleman of Medford whose name I have forgotten, came out in an auto Wednesday and sampled the dinner at the Sunnyside.
    K. R. Glenn, wife and little daughter of North Yakima, Wash., who have been visiting her mother, Mrs. Barnes of Butte Falls, and had the misfortune to lose their baby while there, came out Wednesday on the stage, took dinner and supper with us and took the train for home. Mr. Glenn is delighted with our country and especially with our climate.
    M. C. Briggs of Butte Falls came out Wednesday on the stage and left our house in the afternoon for Medford.
    Mr. Cowden of Butte Falls came out Wednesday for a load of goods for Mr. Hughes.
    Dr. W. B. Power of Redlands, Cal., and Samuel C. Hall of Los Angeles were here Wednesday and took the train for Gold Ray, where they went to spend a while fishing. They are out to look at the country, see the sights, etc. They had been to Crater Lake and pronounce that one of the grandest sights on the continent.
    Mrs. Henderson, who lives on a homestead on the north fork of Reese Creek, spent the night here Wednesday and Thursday morning went up home with one of our teams.
    Mr. Wheeler of the firm of Wheeler & Claspill of Butte Falls came out from Medford last Monday night and took the stage for home Thursday evening.
    Lew and Roy Smith, who live near here, went up Little Butte Creek about seven miles to put a roof on a barn for Marshall Garrell and while [there,] they had quite an experience with rattlesnakes, as they report that the snakes are exceedingly vicious.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 19, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Just after I had written for the Mail Tribune last Thursday, H. D. Edmeades, son and father, drove up to our place and gave me one of their cards, representing themselves as Edmeades Bros., shoe dealers, of Medford. They were out here looking for a situation for business.
    H. L. Gilbert, a civil engineer, who has charge of a company of 25 men on their way to Crater Lake to work for Uncle Sam in the national reserve, called for dinner Thursday. They were very reticent with regard to what they were going to do, but as they wanted to hire another team they had to let it be known as to their destination.
    Our community has been considerably excited here for the last two days on account of the fires raging in the tall timber. Friday morning a train of three passengers, a baggage and flat car passed through here with a company of 110 soldiers on their way to the fire belt, the cars running out to the station near Derby, about eight or nine miles from here. They unloaded the troops, wagons, mules, horses and baggage on the side of the mountain where it was so steep that they had to let the wagons down with ropes, and the poor mules had had no water for about 24 hours, and there was none for them, so they had to travel almost to the falls before they found any water. Instead of going off the right of way a short distance, they tried to follow the right of way and came in contact with some deep gorges and had lots of trouble getting through. When they reached Butte Falls teams were procured to take them to the different places where they could work to the best advantage in putting out the fire.
    Word reached us over the phone last night (Friday) that the fire was raging in the country known as the unsurveyed country, and that there had been three houses burned and that all of the women and children had gone out to John Higinbotham's and Hawk's sawmill, and this (Saturday) morning we started teams to help them out.
    Mr. Pratt of Medford came in today at noon and reports that the fire was general all over the country in the neighborhood of Cat Hill and Four Bit Creek, and later advices state that there is a big fire on the north side of Rogue River, in the Prospect timber. Ray Harnish, the Butte Falls stage driver, came in today noon and said that he took out a load of the troops last night to fight the fire in the unsurveyed country, and that about all that he could see was a wall of fire one and a half or two miles long in the big timber.
    Thursday night Messrs. Edgar Hafer, TouVelle, Walter Dudley of Illinois and the news editor of the Mail Tribune, Harry H. Hicks, came out from Medford and called for a late supper. They were on the way to the Iowa mills and the next morning went to Four Bit Creek to look after the Crater Lake Company's interest in that section.
    L. E. Smith has just phoned from Castor's that he had been as far as Hawk's mill and learned that the fire had not reached so far as the Spencer's, and that there had been but little damage done and that they had the fire under control.
    George Wilson, who has taken up a homestead along the railroad near Derby, and Mr. Cameron, another gentleman from that section, were here Friday for dinner, and report that the work is progressing finely on the railroad and that the people are elated over the prospect of having a railroad station there and a good road out from the station to intersect the present county road from here to Butte Falls.
    Robert Prescott of Eugene was another one of the many callers who are here to look at our country and looking for fruit land.
    Mrs. Scott Claspill of Butte Falls was here Friday night interviewing our merchants and laying in a stock of dry goods for their store. She has great hopes for the future of that section.
    Professor J. N. Miller and Mr. Lorrey of Josephine County came last night and called for a late supper. Mr. Lorrey had been out all day with a team and did not reach his destination until late in the evening.
    Mr. Ditsworth came in from Fort Klamath Friday afternoon on his way to the valley after a load of fruit, etc., to take out to Fort Klamath, and later in the day his daughter, Miss Ada, came in on her way up home. She has been engaged teaching school in Josephine County. There are five sisters in the family that are all teachers, and a remarkable circumstance is that there is but one of the five has ever failed in their examinations, and that was when she took it the first time, and the most of them are experienced teachers, something that they and their father may well feel proud of.
    Messrs. C. R. Neiheit and Bud Willits came in today from the Rowley copper mine and the headwaters of the Umpqua and report that they have a very valuable mine there.
    Mr. and Mrs. Blanchard, who are living on the old Charley Knighton place, came in Friday, bought their load, stayed at the Sunnyside all night and Saturday morning started for home. Miss Ada Ditsworth accompanied them.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 22, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Lewis Drake a mining man from Redding, Cal., stopped here last Sunday night on his way to Portland. He had been out to the Rowley mine on a tributary of the South Umpqua River, and reports that they have a fine vein of copper.
    At the same time Theodore Legree of Chehalis, Wash., was here; he was looking over our country for a home where he could raise apples and have the benefit of a fine climate.
    Sunday evening after we had had supper Mr. and Mrs. W. L. Rau, proprietor of the Moore Hotel, Medford, with their two boys, and Mrs. Sid Hanley, her two boys and little daughter, came up with their auto and called for supper, and after supper spent a short time visiting, as the Hanleys and myself and wife are old-time acquaintances. They all promised to come back and try to be here at meal time.
    Mike Hanley was also a pleasant caller on Monday, but your correspondent and wife were in Medford and failed to see him, but in speaking of the fire raging in the timber he spoke to our daughters as though the fire would not kill many of the cattle on the range, although it will destroy a large area of the pasture for the season at least, and some of the stockmen seem to think that where the ground has been so heated that there will be no grass for several years, which will work for a great hardship on them.
    There was a young lady came out from Butte Falls Monday and spent the day with us whose name I did not learn as I was away from home, but the girls say that she reports that the fire in the neighborhood of Butte Falls is terrible.
    Mrs. Nelson, whose husband is the master mechanic at the Butte Falls sawmill, came out Monday night on the way to meet her husband. She came from Portland.
    Mrs. Hawk, whose husband owns and operates the Hawk sawmill on Clark's Creek, came out on the P.&E. Monday night. The train was belated on account of having to bring a train of 15 cars as far as Table Rock station, so that the passengers did not reach here until 9 o'clock, but the Sunnyside rig was there to meet them and brought them safely to headquarters. Among the other passengers who came to the Sunnyside that night was V. E. Johnston, one of the crew of the pile drivers for the P.&E. Railroad. He expects to go to the front in a few days, as they are building a pile driver now on the railroad. There were some more men came, but as they came late and left early, I did not learn their names, but one of them was a carpenter going to work on the P.&E. bridges.
    One would think that we were getting to be quite a residence center by the looks of things around the railroad depot Monday night. There was a large number of citizens collected at the depot and two trains on the track at the same time, Pullman cars, box cars, passenger cars, flat cars and everybody busy. The cause of the excitement was the arrival of Major Martin with his troops and their outfit on their way to the timber belt to try and save it from destruction. They arrived here a little before dark, unloaded their stock and remained until 5 o'clock the next morning, when they started with two engines to haul them up the grade to where the first bridge is put in. They reloaded the stock.
    Among the passengers from Butte Falls was Judge Pentz, the chief justice of that city. He gave us a glowing account of how the fire fighters are battling with the flames and some account of the approximate damage done by the fire, and he stated that Round Top was all aflame when he came out, but we cannot see it from here on account of the smoke.
    Professor P. H. Daily has completed his woodshed and now is preparing to put in a pumping plant in his new well with a tower and reservoir. He authorized me to say that school will commence on the 11th of September; that the board are going to have the upper rooms finished so that we can employ three or four teachers if we need them, but the main trouble with us here is that we cannot get lumber or at least the kind that we want.
    There is quite a number of contemplated buildings this fall if they can get the material.
    Mrs. Samuel Klingle and her daughter, Mrs. Henry Meyer of Lake Creek, were guests at the Sunnyside Tuesday, also Artie Nichols and Henry Daley.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 25, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Beatrice Spencer came in from the neighborhood of Dudley Thursday on her way to Jacksonville to take the examination for a license to teach school. She reports that the fire in that neighborhood was doing a great deal of damage and this (Friday) morning we received a message over the phone from Martin Spencer, the mail carrier from Dudley to Butte Falls, in which he said that the fire was past control and that all that they were trying to do was to save the homes; that there were 50 troops at the Dudley post office trying to save the buildings. This is at Jess Spencer's. That the fire was in many places leaving nothing but the charred stumps of the great forest; that there had been up to date no homes burned in that section, although I learned through another source that Benjamin Fredenburg had lost one of his large barns and hay; that is near Butte Falls and not on the unsurveyed.
    Miss Clara Zimmerman has a new typewriter and is learning to use it.
    Orland Bell of Brownsboro is putting up the poles for a telephone line between here and that place. He says that he has taken the contract to put the line up for the Multnomah Telephone Company of Portland; that they intend to run the line through here direct to Medford; that the company intends to put up heavy poles from Eagle Point to Medford, but the business men of our town seem to know but little about the move; that so far as the Butte Falls and Eagle Point line is concerned, they have made no arrangements to connect with the line here, but perhaps that will be done later.
    A gentleman by the name of Hicks and five others came through here Wednesday on their way from Crater Lake. They had been out by the Pelican Bay route via Fort Klamath and came in by the crater. From their looks they had their share of the dust on the road.
    Mr. Northrup and mother, who live on his farm about two and a half miles from Medford, came out last Wednesday and engaged rooms at the Sunnyside and the next day went to visit some of their old-time friends Mr. Pelouze and family, spending the night with them, and Friday morning secured a rig and went to Happy Camp on Rogue River to spend the day fishing.
    Thursday morning Messrs. Wamsley and Smith commenced to repair the interior of our school house and get it fixed up for our winter school. They will also put a rock foundation under the annex instead of the pillars that they have now. The school board also met and ordered a special meeting to be called to authorize the board to contract for the finishing of upper rooms and furnish them for use. I tell you the people of Eagle Point are waking up and the old mossbacks are relegated to the background.
    Thursday C. E. Carpenter and his sister, Miss Anna Carpenter, W. H. Crandell and sister, Mrs. Harris of Iowa, called for dinner. Mr. Carpenter is out from his home in Wyoming to look after his interests here which he bought about a year ago, an 80-acre tract off of the west side of the Green Mathews place, and had 40 acres set to trees. Mr. Crandell expects to come out and take charge of the place in the near future.
    John Higinbotham and Lee Sutton of the Big Butte country were here Thursday and reported that in their neighborhood they have the fire under control.
    Frank F. Anderson of St. Paul, Minn., passed through here the other day. He is taking in the country as he goes on Walker's line. He said that he had walked over a great portion of Montana and the country between there and here, and was going to Crater Lake, Fort Klamath, Pelican Bay, etc. He appears to be an intelligent young man and is simply enjoying his life in that way.
    R. Happock, one of the civil engineers on the P.&E. Railway, took supper here Wednesday night and went on up to F. J. Ayres'.
    There have been quite a number of strangers come in, eaten a meal or stayed all night, and pass on whose names I did not learn, and among them was two gangs of bridge carpenters on their way to the front, where they are putting in bridges along the railroad.
    Von der Hellen Brothers have added to their stock of goods a line of furniture.
    Arthur M. Geary was a pleasant caller Wednesday on his way from the fire belt, where he has been taking photos of the fire and the means [they put out] the fire for the Oregonian. While here he met Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy (nee Lottie Brown), one of his old schoolmates of former days.
    Ed Weston of Medford came out last Thursday evening on the P.&E., spent the night here and this (Friday) morning started on horseback to the fire belt to take photos of the different scenes for the general government. He expects to be gone for several days.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank Robertson and Mr. and Mrs. Ray Ulrich of Jacksonville drove in last night on their way from Crater Lake. They went out by the Lake of the Woods, Pelican Bay, etc., and came in the Rogue River route. They report that the roads are rough on account of the ground being rutted out in holes.
    Arthur Anderson and family also came in last night over the same route traveled by Ulrich and Robertson, and while they think that the road is rough, they all say that the trip is worth taking and that Crater Lake is among the wonders of the world.
    B. L. Jewell and Henry O'Malley of Grants Pass called this (Friday) morning and while here Mr. Jewell gave me an ad for the Mail Tribune to let the people know that he had some fine pups for sale.
    Mr. Sharp, one of the Medford real estate men, came out with his father and Mr. Reed in an auto. They were going to the Bradshaw drop and took the wrong road on the desert in the smoke, but were started right after they got here.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 28, 1910, page 10



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Misses Mildred and Nydah, daughters of Hon. Frank Neil, and granddaughters of Hon. Judge J. K. Neil, came out last Saturday morning, and were met by their father and went on to their home near Derby.
    S. A. Carlton and son Lyle of Ashland came over Saturday to look after his interests in these parts.
    Carl Ringer, who has had charge of Joseph Rader's ranch on the divide between Antelope and Butte Creek, was smiling on his friends here Saturday. He had Carl Newbury, cousin of ex-County School Superintendent Gus Newbury, with him. Carl Ringer gave an account of how William Cottrell's horse broke his nose by running into a wire fence.
    Carl also told of a spring on Joe Rader's place that has not been dry for years going dry this summer, but after the cool weather commenced the water raised, showing that this has been the driest summer we have had for years.
    J. E. Michelson and O. S. Ayers of Seattle were among the guests Saturday. They were here looking over the country on business.
    Harry Starr and wife and two daughters, Misses Dorothy and Twinkle, Mrs. Will Reed, Miss Florence Plumley, Mr. and Mrs. James Wolke and three daughters, came in from where they had been camped on Big Butte Creek at Camp Nick Saturday. Mr. Starr and his crowd came in time for dinner, but the remainder did not arrive until 7:30 p.m. They phoned from Derby to Mrs. Howlett to have supper ready by the time they came in on the Daly auto, and after supper went on to Medford. They all are citizens of Grants Pass. Mr. Wolke is the gentleman who had so much trouble with his auto some two weeks before on the road from Medford to this place.
    Miss Ina Willitsts, her brother and his wife, spent the night here Saturday and Sunday morning Miss Ina went up to Climax, where she was to commence teaching school this Monday morning. Mrs. Willitsts went on to Medford and Jacksonville Monday morning and her husband, Arthur Willitsts, took the mail to Prospect for his brother, Lewis, who is the contractor.
    Mrs. Thomason, whose husband has had a contract on the railroad right of way for cutting wood, came out Saturday on the stage and went to Medford on business Sunday evening.
    There was a pack train came in Saturday of government mules of 23 animals and camped near the depot. They are here after supplies for the troops and fire fighters. Assistant Quartermaster Halgan has charge of them. The officers have decided to make this place the base of supplies and have the provisions sent from here to wherever they are needed. Lieutenant A. D. Budd was a guest at the Sunnyside Sunday night. He was here looking after the interest of the troops.
    Mr. Burch, a brother of Mrs. P. H. Daily, came out the last of the week to visit his sister and family. Professor Daley has gone to the hills on a hunt with William Knighton and J. W. Grover.
    Last Sunday your correspondent was called on to take Lewis Smith of Portland to Butte Falls. Mr. Smith is a brother of Professor E. E. Smith of Butte Falls and a traveling salesman for the Portland Horticultural Association, and while here took time to visit his brother and family.
    E. W. Carlton, who bought the McDonough place, the old Pickens ranch, in Table Rock was here Monday afternoon and bought a fine team from a man that is a stranger to me, whose name I did not learn.
    Dr. Bonar, wife, brother and nephew came out from the doctor's homestead near Derby Monday, took dinner here and went on to Medford.
    Mr. Jewell and Henry O'Malley came out from the Elk Creek fish hatchery Sunday forenoon, left their team at the Sunnyside stable and went to Medford the same morning.
    William Perry and F. J. Ayres came out with their families Monday, left their teams at the Sunnyside stables and took the car for Medford to see the show.
Medford Mail Tribune, August 31, 1910, page 3





EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    B. W. Holeman of Puyallup, Wash., was here the middle of the week looking for a place to invest money to advantage. He went from here to Butte Falls, returning Wednesday. He has been in the Hood River, Palouse, Wenatchee, etc., counties and thinks in some respects that this is ahead of them all.
    We are having our regular quota of traveling salesmen and solicitors here--F. W. Crane, who was soliciting for a typewriting company, and I. L. Krauss of Medford, representing the Pease Manufacturing Company of Cincinnati, O., who was canvassing for a patent sad iron.
    Mr. Ditsworth and his three youngest children, a daughter and two boys, came in Sunday evening and started early Monday morning for Medford to see the show, returning Monday. The three children were delighted with what they saw. Speaking of the show, there was quite a delegation [who] went from Eagle Point that day and quite a large number passed through here in wagons, buggies, etc., to see the show.
    Mr. Long and Mr. Cassidy of Medford were both out here for a night Tuesday. Mr. Cassidy represents a grocery firm in Portland.
    A. J. Daley has had Stevens' hay balers baling his hay, finishing up Thursday noon.
    Henry D. Simon, George Lewis and Henry Childreth started on a hunt Wednesday in an auto, to be gone several days. We are waiting for some venison.
    P. H. Daily had his water tower and tank put up Wednesday and Thursday and will soon have water in his residence. Speaking of Professor Daily, he expects to commence our school one week from next Monday, September 12.
    Mr. Halley, the representative of the McMinnville Insurance Company, was out last Tuesday looking after the business of the company.
    Mr. Clark of Medford was out with his auto Tuesday evening with a lady and gentleman. I understand that he had come out to help a brother autoist out of trouble.
    Last Monday evening about 8 o'clock there were three men [who] drove up in a buggy and one of them jumped out in the dark and skipped around the woodshed and the other two sat there thinking that he would return and pay his bill. After waiting for a while it occurred to them that he had said on the way out that he was going to Mayfield's, so they drove down there, and as soon as they were gone he tried to enter the woodshed, but finding that way blocked he opened a door and went into the grain house and covered up with some sacks. In the meantime there were some young men who board here were watching, and as soon as he entered the grain house two of them started for the men in the buggy and soon brought them back. They procured a lantern, went in and in a few minutes located him and demanded four dollars for bringing him out from Medford, but as he did not produce the coin they took him out, made him get into the buggy again and started with him for Medford, a badly scared man, for they promised him all sorts of punishment, such as working on the streets, going to the pen, etc.
    Mr. O'Brien of Butte Falls, a subcontractor on the culvert work on the P.&E., was here Tuesday night and reports that he has about finished his contract.
    The steam shovel has had to suspend operations for a while, as the railroad company have the road ballasted up to the bridge they are now building. The engineer, Mr. Fraser, thinks it will be a week or more before they will commence again. The company have employed Mr. Vinson, the sewing machine-ice cream man of Medford, as night watchman, to fill the place made vacant by C. Plymire, who is installed as fireman.
    Charles Brophy, who has been visiting his brother, Benjamin, went to Medford Wednesday.
    John Nichols has erected a new woodshed and A. B. Zimmerman is getting the material on the ground to build one for himself.
    Messrs. Hughes and Cowden of Butte Falls came out Wednesday after a load of goods for the former, and Mr. Hughes went on to Medford the same day.
    O. R. Brown commenced to put up the wire, two strands, for the telephone between here and Lake Creek Wednesday.
    Wednesday night the timekeeper for the bridge gang came in about 10:30 with three men and called for beds for the three men, said that all [sic] of them, while working on the bridge in the course of construction of the P.&E., fell about seven feet and bruised him quite badly about the body and one arm. They took him on to Medford Thursday morning. I did not learn their names.
    Mrs. Ringer, who has a place in the lower end of town, raised some peaches this year, and a 3-year-old tree that measured 11 inches in circumference. They were the Early Alexanders.
    Mr. and Mrs. Clancy [Chauncey?] Florey were out the first of the week visiting their parents.
    James Watkins, his son-in-law and wife and baby, and Mr. Hutchason, all living on the Trail route, called for dinner Thursday: also Misses Ada, Florence and Bertha Ditsworth, three sisters, called on their way to the valley, where they have each a school engaged for the fall and winter. Another one of the sisters went out to teach last Saturday and there is one now engaged teaching.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 4, 1910, page 12
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    G. W. Tehber, a traveling salesman for a harness firm of Portland, stopped here Monday night.
    Mr. Massey, one of the Butte Falls merchants, came out Monday after a load of goods.
    Boyd Tucker and family came out from Trail Tuesday. The family were the guests of George Daley.
    Mr. Vaughn of Peyton was a pleasant caller for the night the latter part of last week. He was here in the interest of our blacksmith.
    Mrs. Amos Willits, who has been visiting her parents in Ashland, returned to the Sunnyside Sunday night and took the stage for her home near Persist Monday.
    One of the Stanley brothers stopped here Monday night. He says that they are gathering their cattle and taking them to Klamath County, as the fire has destroyed their range for this fall.
    A. L. Cross and wife were here Sunday for dinner. Mr. Cross recently bought the Clopton place, near Brownsboro, and like most of the others who have come here to Jackson County from the east, thinks that this country is all O.K.
    Two traveling salesmen stopped here Friday night and Saturday morning procured a rig at the Sunnyside stable, went to Butte Falls and back and took the P.&E. car for Medford. They were traveling in the interest of the Augdill Scale Co.
    Henry McClure O'Bleness and Arthur Tipton Bagley, two gentlemen, stopped here Saturday night on their way to Butte Falls and the fire belt. They are traveling newspaper writers for the different Sunday papers and an occasional magazine. They anticipated getting some fine subjects in the fire belt.
    Professor Wright, the principal of the Butte Falls school, returned from a trip to Pennsylvania, where he has been to visit his parents, spent the night here, took the stage Monday morning for his home in Butte Falls. C. P. Briggs and N. D. Stoddard of Butte Falls came out on the stage Tuesday and went to Medford the same afternoon.
    J. C. Phares, wife and mother, of Tacoma, Wash., who have been visiting relatives near Dudley, came out last Saturday on their way home. Mr. Phares reports that the most of the settlers in the vicinity of Dudley have not suffered much on account of the fire, although some of them have had considerable of their timber destroyed by the fire, but that none of the houses were burned.
    Died--September 1, John B. Montgomery, at the family residence, in the old Catholic church in Eagle Point. The burial services were conducted in the Catholic church by Rev. A. C. Howlett and interment in the Griffin Creek family burying ground on the 2nd inst. The deceased was born in West Virginia February 10, 1831. He was a man who was generally known to all of the old settlers, as he came to Oregon in the early '50s, and was strictly a man of the world. For years he drove stage on the line from Roseburg to Yreka, and for several years kept a stand at Agate, but the last years of his life he spent in Eagle Point. There a number of his neighbors attended the funeral services at Eagle Point, although but few followed the remains to the grave. He leaves a wife, one daughter and one grandchild to feel his loss.
    Died--At the residence of his son, on Lake Creek, September 3, 1910, Herman G. Thomson, aged 89 years and 8 months. The deceased was born January 1821, in the state of New York, and came to Oregon last summer with one of his sons, and has lived with the two sons on Lake Creek to the day of his death. He was one of 14 children and leaves two sons and the daughter, the latter residing in New York state, and one sister to feel his absence. The remains were interred in the Brownsboro Cemetery on Sunday afternoon. The religious services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett.
    A. L. Cross of Ashland was here Saturday night and while here told me how a newcomer bought ten acres of hill brush land near Ashland. He said that he bought the tract, as it joined his place, so that he would have something to do and help in his woodpile, and paid $90 an acre. Well, this man came along and entered into conversation with him, and among other questions asked him if the land belonged to him. Being answered in the affirmative, the next question was, "Do you want to sell it?" The answer no was given. "Well, if you did want to sell it, about what would you take?" was the next question. The answer was, "Well, I don't know; about $150 an acre." "Very well," said the stranger, "make me out an abstract and your money is ready." So they met at Myers' office the next morning, the deed was given and the money paid. That is the way they do business in Ashland.
    Last Sunday afternoon Mr. Morritz, the timekeeper of the bridge crew on the P.&E., engaged a rig at the Sunnyside stable to meet three ladies at the train the next day to take them up to where Mr. McDonald is putting in the big bridge on the P.&E. So the next morning your correspondent took a team and covered carriage, went to the depot and there found Misses Lena MacDonald, Hazel Dean, E. C. McLean and Mr. Morritz was also on hand, and [after] a little preparation at the Sunnyside we all started. Nothing of special note occurred for a short time until we began to go over some of the cobblestones that are put on our county roads, and then the girls, for they were all young and full of life, began to occasionally utter a little scream, but when we had to leave the county road on Reese Creek and start up the mountain; then the screaming began in earnest, and finally one of the the girls got on the front seat with me and Mr. MacDonald undertook to hold the other two in the rig, and I simply watched the one on the seat with me, but we went on up until we struck the railroad and then we had to leave the rig and I took the horses on to the feed yard. We found Mr. MacDonald there with a crew of about 35 or 40 men putting a bridge across Bull Run. The bridge is 90 feet high and 800 feet long, and the way they were putting it up was a sight. Everything worked like clockwork. Mr. MacDonald thinks that he will have the steel on the bridge by Friday or Saturday and through to Butte Falls by November 15. After we had partaken of a good dinner the ladies, Mr. Morritz, Mr. MacDonald and another man crossed the canyon and went about half a mile to where they were driving piling for another bridge. By 3 o'clock we were on our return trip, and coming down the mountain over the rocks and sidling places the girls couldn't keep from screaming, so we let them scream. But we got through all O.K. and they voted that your correspondent was a good driver. Taking supper at the Sunnyside, Mr. MacDonald and Mr. Frasier--he is the engineer who runs the steam shovel--arranged to have one of the Murphys come out with an auto to take them to town, and after spending the evening until about 9 o'clock, they started for Medford, voting that they had had one of the most enjoyable trips of their lives.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 8, 1910, page 2
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Nichols is starting to build a new house on the place he bought of William F. Smith.
    C. A. Francois and F. H. Clark were out looking over our country for an investment in apple land.
    Messrs. John W. Smith and G. W. Wamsley are building a barn on the old J. J. Fryer place for F. E. Nichols.
    Speaking of living in tents, there are several tents being put up around town to be used here this winter in the absence of something better.
    Mrs. Geppert and her son spent the night here Thursday on their way home from Medford, where they had been for some of the necessaries of life.
    George von der Hellen is pushing his new house along as fast as possible. He has moved his family on the ground and is camping in a tent, thus enjoying life.
    Mr. Eadler was with us Thursday night and reports that there has been a number of cattle burned in the fire on Little Butte near Soda Springs. The cattle were in a canyon and the fire surrounded them before they could be driven out.
    Mrs. Wharton of Butte Falls came out Thursday, spent the night with us and Friday morning took the stage for Trail, where she is engaged to teach school this fall.
    When Professor P. H. Daily returned from his hunt he reported having killed some deer and one bear, and he had the skin and meat as evidence.
    Miss Donna Rader, the popular saleslady in von der Hellen's hardware, drug and furniture store, has been visiting the family of Artie Nichols on Salt Creek.
    Alfred Smith and wife of Bandon came in on us for the night Thursday. They were met by their cousins, Aaron and Isaac Smith, the next morning and went to the country with them for a few days.
    The soldiers who have been engaged on the fire line have been coming in the last few days and this, Saturday, afternoon the last of them arrived. They are a fine-looking set of men and are well behaved. The people who came in from the fire belt report that they did good work while there, and the people can't speak in high enough terms of them.
    Mrs. King, a sister of the Spencers of the Dudley settlement, who has been visiting her brothers there, came in Friday and took the train for Medford on her way to her home in Corvallis.
    The three carpenters, Messrs. Bradbury, Wolgamott and Atwell, who are building Mr. Stewart's house, are guests at the Sunnyside, and another crew of carpenters who are now at work on the Benton Bowers new house have engaged board and room at the S.S., also a number of families who are working on the P.&E. have spoken for rooms, and it begins to look as though Eagle Point was fast coming into notice.
    Messrs. Bert Henderson and H. C. West, insurance adjusters, were guests at the Sunnyside the middle of the week. They spent a good part of the day fishing in Little Butte Creek.
    Last Thursday as the railroad train was coming in from the Butte Creek bridge some horses that were being pastured in Mr. Young's field took fright and started to run in the same direction the train was going and they soon became tangled up in wire fences and broke through, three of them tearing some of the fences down for several rods and cutting one of them, a fine young mare of Peter Young's, very badly, and at last accounts it was feared that she was ruined for life.
    Mr. Reed of Dudley came out on Thursday, spent two nights and Saturday morning loaded John Higinbotham with his winter supplies. He had quite an experience with the fire, as he was in the midst of it for several days. He seems to think that the timber is not damaged so much as has been reported, although in some places where the timber was extra thick and the debris had collected the most of the timber is ruined.
    Our freight agent, Thomas Christy, at the P.&E. depot has been succeeded by F. M. Stewart, and Thomas Christie has assumed the position of braking on the passenger train between here and Medford. Mr. Stewart has bought a five-acre tract of land near the depot and Messrs. Bradbury, Charles Wolgamott and Atwell are engaged in building a house for him on the land.
    Mr. Beeson of Talent started from here Saturday morning for the McAndrews place on Rogue River to build a house for Mr. Brophy.
    During the past few days there have been a constant run of strangers. One day this week we had 18 strangers for dinner, not counting our regular patrons.
    Nelson Nye, a brother-in-law of our postmaster, A. J. Florey, came in from Alaska Friday night on his way to his old home near Prospect. His wife is still with her mother in Washington. I did not have any talk with him, as he started early this, Saturday, morning for his home.
    Mrs. George West, wife of Forest Ranger George West, came in on the Prospect stage Saturday evening to the S.S. Just as I am writing she says that George is the busiest man in the United States.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 12, 1910, page 2
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our school commenced Monday morning, but I have not been able to learn the number enrolled.
    Charley Wolgamott, who has been working on Mr. Stewart's house, quit Monday evening on account of not feeling well.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company started the steam shovel again this morning and the crew are ballasting the track, getting ready for business.
    Mrs. Scott Bruce of Dudley came out on the Eagle Point and Peyton stage Tuesday eve to remain a few days. She and her husband are guests at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Mrs. Harry Spencer came out Saturday on the stage from Dudley and expects to return tomorrow, Wednesday. Mr. Kelso will take up the winter supplies for the family.
    Saturday evening Messrs. Biggs and Baker of Butte Falls came out from Medford and spent the night at the Sunnyside, and Sunday morning your correspondent took them home.
    Edward M. Babcock and his brother Clyde, of Cottage Grove, Or., near Eugene, were guests at the Sunnyside Sunday night. They were distributing books that they had received subscriptions for.
    The people coming in from the mountains, where the fire and soldiers were, speak in the highest terms of their work and gentlemanly deportment, and the people of Eagle Point were more than pleased with their company while here.
    Mrs. George West came out Saturday and her and Mrs. Spencer have been the guests of Mrs. Howlett. Mrs. West leaves Wednesday on the Eagle Point-Prospect stage for Prospect to join her husband, who is stationed in that neighborhood as one of the forest rangers.
    Mrs. A. Dregt of Portland and F. J. Pflyer, also of Portland, arrived Sunday by private conveyance from Medford to take charge of a tract of land that Mr. Wilson sold to Mr. Dregt on Eagle Heights. They have gone onto the place and are planning to fence it, dig a well and make it their home. Mr. Pflyer has come to do the manual labor act.
    Last Sunday morning our depot looked all same Chicago. The main line was full of cars for quite a distance and the side track seemed to be full of cars. Thirteen passenger coaches, baggage cars, express cars and locomotives whistling, the bells ringing, men running to and fro, made us think that Eagle Point was indeed something more than a little village way back in the hills. The cause of all this stir was the departure of the soldiers from among us. They had been back in the forests fighting fire and, having got through with the work assigned them, were on the eve of their departure, but before they left the young people of Eagle Point gave them a dance in the Daley hall. I understand that there were about 40 ladies present and they report having had a fine time.
    Monday morning I took a lady by the name of Stanley up to Maney's camp on Reese Creek, and on my return found Mr. and Mrs. Thomason, Mrs. Beck and a young man all anxious to go to Medford before the train time, so I took another team and went to Medford that evening. Tuesday morning had to go to the train for a load of supplies to go to Wolfer's tomato garden for tomatoes. On my return I found Mr. Macdonald, his sister, Miss Lena and Miss E. M. Coggins of Medford waiting for me to take them up to the long bridge on the P.&E.; got a fresh team and went up there, and while there took a stroll across the bridge to where they are putting another bridge, and they have the pile driver working on another about half a mile farther on; found the men busy at work and doing good work. The bridge looks like a good structure and strong enough to bear up to all the weight they can put on it.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 15, 1910, page 2
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    When our school opened last Monday the enrollment was 72, 50 percent above the enrollment last year. That speaks volumes either for our teachers or for the increase of children in our district, and perhaps for both, but most likely for our teachers, for we had an enrollment of 95 last year with the same teachers.
    Mrs. Brighton of Butte Falls stopped here Thursday on her way to her new home in Texas. Mr. Brighton went to that state about a year ago and bought land, came back and later returned to Texas, but left his wife and small children to take advantage of the fine school in Butte Falls.
    Hon. William M. Colvig came out on Wednesday and Wednesday night delivered his campaign speech. I did not have the satisfaction of hearing him, but the next morning I inquired of three prominent men about the speech and crowd. The first one said that he had a small gathering--the speech was made on the street in front of Brown & Son's store. The next one was one of the old line politicians and he said that when he commenced he had a half dozen hearers but by the time he got through he had 18 or 20; that the most of his time was taken up in explaining the whys he had flopped from the Republican Party to the Democrat and from the Democrats to the Republicans, by the Populist and Free Silver Democrat, etc., and summed up by saying that he did not think that the generality of the voters knew enough to select their candidates for Senator and consequently he was opposed to the primary election law and especially Statement No. 1, and as a bait advanced the idea that he, if elected to the Senate, would get a big howl for the proposed Catholic hospital in Medford. The speech in the main was the same one he delivered here when he was candidate for district attorney on the Democratic ticket a few years ago, only changing the political names.
    Wamsley and Smith had a big barn raising here Friday, raising the Nichols barn on the old J. J. Fryer place.
    Miss Varien Stickle of Burns, Or., came in a few days ago to spend a while with her grandmother, Mrs. Thomas.
    Mr. Vincent has moved his family into a part of the old William Ulrich house. He is night watchman for the steam shovel on the P.&E. Railroad.
    Speaking of the P.&E. Railroad, for the benefit of those who are anxious to know what is doing in that line, they are rushing the work right along and expect to be to Butte Falls by the 15th of November. They are at present putting down only half of the ties just so that they can run over the road with the construction cars until they get to Butte Falls, where they can get the ties much cheaper and then they will run over the road again and finish it up. They are doing good, substantial work along the line and putting down heavy rails, and by Christmas we will all be able to ride on the cars to Butte Falls.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 18, 1910, page 12
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Lewis Jones and Mr. Reed came in from Dudley for a load of supplies, spent the night here and returned home Thursday morning.
    Miss Francis Akin of Prospect came out Thursday and spent the night and Friday spent the day visiting our school. She is one of Professor Daily's old pupils.
    I am glad to be able to announce that James Ringer is so that he is able to be among us again, although he has not got entirely over his hurt.
    Thursday I took the household goods and family of Fred Bellows to Central Point, where they took the S.P. train for Coburg, Or., where he expects to work in the Booth & Kelly sawmill.
    [omission] She is on her way to Agate, where she is to be the principal of that school. Her assistant, or primary teacher, is Miss Mae Nealand of Table Rock, and we may congratulate the people of Agate on securing two such competent teachers.
    Messrs. Tokly of Hood River, Barbour, Fred Dutton and Kent came in late for dinner Thursday. They were bringing in a carload of Jonathan apples for shipment to New York City from the old Smith orchard on Yankee Creek, now owned by Messrs. Barbour and Burgess. This is just the beginning of the apple shipments from this neighborhood.
    Last Thursday Mr. Cowden, Chas. Edmondson and John Obenchain called for dinner and took the 6 o'clock train for Medford, where Mr. Cowden was to make his final proof on his homestead, and they were to be his witnesses. An old gentleman by the name of Rudolf Trockson of Butte Falls also came out with them, but remained at the Sunnyside until their return.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 19, 1910, page 7
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. S. Carlton has been smiling on his many friends here.
    Alfred Gordon passed through here Monday on his way to Medford.
    Mrs. McNeil and Mrs. Reynolds were the guests of Mrs. John Hart last week.
    Mr. Stewart has resigned his position as freight agent here and Oscar Wright has taken his place.
    Mr. Brannan is engaged putting in a septic tank for Professor P. H. Daily.
    William von der Hellen took a business trip Wednesday to John Rader's and Thomas Riley's.
    Captain Miller, who has been living near Brownsboro for some time, started for the coast a few days ago to remain for a while.
    Lon Smith, one of the young men who has been making his home with us for the last five years, is engaged driving the stage from here to Butte Falls for Mr. Harnish.
    Dell Hazel and Mr. MacAdams and another gentleman whose name I did not learn and three ladies came out from Medford Sunday for dinner in an auto, and after dinner took a trip up the country north of here along the railroad track.
    William Spencer of Dudley came out last week, when to Medford and bought his supplies for winter, and Sunday John Higinbotham came out and took them to his home. Messrs. Lewis Jones and Mr. Owens also were here taking supplies for their families for the winter. They are all looking forward to the time when they can ship their supplies up on the cars.
    The same day F. A. Peil of Medford drove up on the way from Crater Lake with Emil Corker and wife and Wilson Corker of Medford, and J. W. Little, Mirian Little and Corinne Little. The last three named are from Cincinnati, O., out on a visit to Mrs. Hittle's brother Mr. Corker. They have been visiting relatives in Seattle, Portland, Eugene and will round up their visit by seeing the ninth wonder of the world, Crater Lake. They are highly pleased with our delightful climate and the productiveness of the soil.
    Frank Neil was here Monday circulating a petition for a county road from the station, Derby, near the present site of the Derby post office on the P.&E. Railroad, on what is known as the Wrisley Flat and running by the old Hi Wilkinson place down Crow Fork. He says that the railroad company have made a survey over the proposed route--the same route that was traveled 25 years ago. He was meeting with good success.
    Last Thursday, September 15, being William Knighton's 77th birthday, and September 20 Mrs. Nellie Grover's birthday, the same date the 20th being the 50th anniversary of the marriage of Mr. Knighton and Miss Dawson, the arrangement was made to have a union celebration of the events. So invitations were given out to about all of the old acquaintances of both families to meet at the residence of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover on that day to take part in the exercises of the golden wedding, and by 10 o'clock a.m. the company began to arrive and about noon dinner was announced. Mrs. Grover acted as mistress of the ceremonies and after she had arranged 23 to the tables--all standing--Rev. Lamar commanded William Knighton and his wife to join their right hands and then proceeded to pronounce the words that would join them together for the rest of their lives, making him promise to take her, keep her and provide for her, and bring in the wood and water, do the other chores, etc., which he cheerfully agreed to do, and then, turning to the lady, asked her if she would take him, wash his clothes, mend his socks, make his bed, cook his food, wash his feet and comb his hair (he is bald headed), but when it came to washing his feet, right there she protested and said no; no washing feet in hers. But the matter was amicably arranged, and we were all seated and your correspondent was called on to ask the divine blessing on the food, etc., after which all hands began to eat as though we had had nothing to eat since breakfast. And, oh, such a dinner! Mr. K. had been to Medford and procured all the delicacies he could find, and then in addition to that Mrs. Grover is recognized as being a perfect mistress of the culinary department of housekeeping and the result was the natural question the next morning: "How do you feel after dinner"? Those present were: Mr. and Mrs. William Knighton, Mrs. Mayfield, Mrs. A. J. Goode, Mr. and Mrs. Painter, Mr. and Mrs. Stewart, Mr. G. H. Wamsley, Mr. J. J. Fryer, Rev. and Mrs. Lamar, Mrs. G. W. Owings, Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson, Mrs. Riddle, Mr. Whetsel of the Whetsel Music Company of Medford, Mrs. James Ringer, Mrs. Ed Egrass, Mrs. Jonas, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, Mrs. A. J. Florey, Mrs. W. L. Childreth, Mrs. Frank Nichols, Mr. and Mrs. Charley Thomas, Mr. and Mrs. A. C. Howlett, Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover, Miss Mabel Wamsley, Miss Mamie Wright, Misses Hattie and Agnes Howlett, Mr. William Wright and Oscar Wright. As the reader will see, there was a good many widows and girls of marriageable age, and the idea of a golden wedding made some of the old widowers and boys of marriageable age feel young again, and we began to think that we might have to send a runner to Jacksonville before the festivities would be over. I tell you, Mr. Wamsley is a boss hand at waiting on the table, and he just tried himself on that occasion.
    There has been another change in real estate here. Wednesday morning Leo Ulrich reports having sold lot No. 2 in Ulrich addition to Eagle Point to a gentleman from near Peyton by the name of Sid Nichols, and reports that he expects to build this fall and go into business.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 23, 1910, page 2
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    U. G. Hurley, a photographer from Fruitvale, Cal., has been to Butte Falls and came out Wednesday, where he had been taking views of the scenery in that section. He has been stopping at the Sunnyside for a couple of days taking photographs of some of the buildings, orchards, our school, etc. He produces some fine pictures.
    J. Moomaw has about completed his new house, E. S. Wolfer has just finished plumbing it, and James Ringer, who has been laid up with broken ribs, said today (Friday) that he thought that he would be able to go to work and finish up the painting next week.
    I understand that J. W. Grover has sold that part of his place lying south of the county road, including his house, barn and orchard. I did not learn the price paid or the name of the man to whom he sold, but heard that he was a man from Seattle, Wash.
    We have just stopped working on a new well we have been digging at the Sunnyside. We went down 37 feet and struck a kind of slate formation that experts say is a sure indication of coal, and it is the opinion of a number with whom I have talked that this entire Butte Creek Valley is underlaid with a bed of coal.
    Judging by the amount of building material on the different lots in Eagle Point, there will be something doing in the building line this fall, although it is very hard to get lumber either here, at the mills or at Medford. Wamsley and Smith are building a barn for T. E. Nichols and they complain that they can't get lumber enough to keep them busy much over half the time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peyton of Peyton were here Friday trading with our merchants, and on their way to Medford to see the show Saturday.
    Miss Donna Rader, who was called home on account of her mother going to Klamath County to visit her sister and stepmother, Mrs. Severance, was behind the counter again Thursday morning in von der Hellen's store.
    Henry French and Alex Foster were doing business in Eagle Point Thursday.
    Mr. and Mrs. A. Clarno were smiling on their friends Thursday.
    Old Grandfather Clarno, now 84 years of age, was down from his home near Reese Creek, and while here called on your correspondent to talk over church matters.
    Mrs. Dartz, who is on the Wilson place in Eagle Heights, had a lot of wire fencing arrive Friday and was taken to her place by Deeter and Daley the same day.
    A gentleman by the name of Hutchison, who has a homestead on Reese Creek, came out Thursday night on the P.&E. car and spent the night here, the next morning taking the Eagle Point and Prospect stage for home.
    Miss Ina Willits of Persist, who has been engaged teaching school near Climax, came out Thursday evening, spent the night here and Friday morning went up home with her brother, who has the contract for carrying the mail from here to Prospect, via Trail and Persist.
    Sheriff Jones came out Thursday morning and left the ballot boxes for Eagle Point, Trail, Flounce Rock, Lake Creek and Climax and Butte Falls at the Sunnyside, in care of his deputy, John W. Smith, and he started the same afternoon and went to Climax and Lake Creek Friday morning started for Trail and the other precincts with them.
    E. S. Wolfer is working on P. H. Daily's house today, doing the plumbing work.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 25, 1910, page 12
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Scott Nichol, who bought a business lot here a few days ago and in preparing to build this fall, spent the nights of Friday and Saturday here, and on Monday morning he took the stage for his home near Peyton, where his family is staying.
    J. C. Moore and family and J. D. Pearce of Elk Creek passed through here Saturday on their way to Oakland and on Sunday evening they returned with the exception of Mrs. Moore and her little daughter, and in addition to the party there was Lawrence Moore and his family on their way to Elk Creek, where they expect to remain for a few days.
    Miss Ida Ditsworth, of Peyton, who for some time has been at Grants Pass having her eyes treated, passed through here Saturday, returning to her home. She was met here by her parents who returned to their home with her.
    The primary election here was rather a tame affair as there was very little interest taken, and but very few votes polled, totaling only 43 Republicans and 11 Democrats, and quite a number who had registered did not take interest enough in the matter to go to the voting place and vote, and then there was quite a number who registered as independent, socialists, etc., who could not vote.
    Mr. Harmon, one of the civil engineers of the P.&E., and the one who ran the survey over the proposed route for the wagon road down Crowfoot, spent the night here Sunday night and in conversation with him with regard to the route for the proposed road says that he found a fine grade and a very practicable route for a wagon road. The new route follows the same course that was used years ago as the only wagon road to Peyton and the country adjoining.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 28, 1910, page 2
 


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. F. Fredenburg stayed here Sunday night and took the Butte Falls stage for her home. She has been in Ashland for medical treatment for the past three months.
    There has been an unusual number of strangers stop here during the last few days and many of them are very reticent as to their plans or aims, but most of them are persons, some are women, who look like business men and women. Monday morning Mrs. H. gave five of them an early breakfast--5:30 a.m.--so that they could catch the 6 o'clock stage.
    Monday night Rev. Ward W. MacHenry of Ashland and Rev. A. A. Holmes of Medford gave a lecture each on the subject of the anti-saloon movement in this state. There was a good-sized audience met them at the church. We also had another lecture in the church Sunday morning by a stranger, who came from Medford, but I did not meet him, as I was away from home. We also had what they called a harvest sermon Sunday night, when the farmers and gardeners brought in the products of the soil, and Rev. Lamar preached a sermon suited to the occasion.
    Mr. Austin of Dudley came out Monday morning on the P.&E. train and left some of his things here. He took the stage for Butte Falls.
    Mrs. Stone of Medford came up Monday and spent the day at the Sunnyside with her sister, Mrs. Clyde Plymire, returning the same day.
    Mrs. Plymire went to Medford Tuesday.
    During the past few days the old lumber shed that has been standing on the south side of the county road that runs through the town for the past two years was torn down and moved away, and it is understood that there is to be a building put up on the ground that was previously occupied by it in the near future.
    Henry French of Peyton came Monday and reports that a bear has been troubling him for some time and that he had eaten about a hundred pounds of peaches.
Medford Mail Tribune, September 30, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George F. Jones and family of Dudley, who have been stopping for some time in Medford, came out Tuesday night on the cars, stopped at the Sunnyside until the next afternoon and were met by his brother Linas and they all started for his home about five miles above Hawk's mill.
    W. C. Thurlow, a traveling salesman for a glove house of Seattle, spent the day here and at Brownsboro Wednesday.
    J. H. Colter of Medford is stopping here, putting up a stone wall for A. G. Daley and William von der Hellen in front of their dwellings.
    Miss Jennie McKiblen of Beaumont, Tex., whose father has purchased a farm near Ashland on which the family is living while he is in Texas settling up his business, came up Wednesday with Mrs. I. C. Moore and her two daughters, Anna and Myrtle Drake, from Ashland on a business trip north of our town, returning the same day.
    John Barneburg, Shorty Miles, Mr. and Mrs. Welfloy of Salt Lake were guests at the Sunnyside for dinner Wednesday. Mr. Welfloy and wife were looking over our part of the country and seemed to be well pleased with our surroundings.
    William P. Tharker of Medford has engaged a room at the Sunnyside and is engaged lathing George von der Hellen's new house.
    Thursday Mr. Thompson and wife came down from their place to replenish their stock of goods at Lake Creek, and while down called for dinner at the S.S.; also Mr. Wortman of Medford was here looking over the beef market; also Mr. Allen of Trail and Mr. Stowell of Butte Falls were here. Allen and Stowell had a bunch of beef cattle and ate their breakfast by 4:30 a.m. Friday morning. There were also six others who wanted and procured an extra early breakfast so that they could get an early start. I tell you things are buzzing around here now.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 4, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our leading merchants, is preparing to build a home near his store for a family residence, as he needs the rooms occupied by the family in his mercantile business.
    Jud Edsall, John Foster, Harry Penn and Mr. Farlow, who have been in the surveying crew working on the railroad right of way between Butte Falls and Pelican Bay, came in Wednesday night and spent the night here, and Thursday morning Mr. Farlow went to his home. Jud Edsall went to his father's near Butte Falls, but returned the next day and John Foster went to work for us on a sewer pipe we are putting down. The surveying party has been disbanded for the winter.
    County School Superintendent Percy Wills was out Wednesday and visited our school for a short time. Our school is growing in interest and numbers and we have a good prospect for a No. 1 school here again this winter.
    The railroad company is making some changes in the work in this section. I understand that they are going to dispose of the steam shovel they have been using and put in another and are adding to their facilities for handling gravel.
    Your correspondent took a spin over to Sams Valley Friday after a load of peaches, but found that the crop had been gathered and sold with the exception of a few, but I had been there before, and so we are not out of that luxury.
    Friday while Mr. Woodburn was working loading ties for the P.&E. railroad he accidentally fell off the pile of ties and broke one of his legs. He was taken to the hospital at Medford for treatment.
    The same day as Harry Smith was holding a heavy sledge against a large bolt in the steam shovel that they were taking to pieces to ship to The Dalles, and another man was striking the bolt, a piece of steel from the face of the hammer broke off and punctured Harry Smith's leg just below the knee, entering an artery. He was immediately placed on a handcar and brought to town and Dr. Holt removed the piece of steel and now Harry is looking for a soft job while he is unable to do heavy work.
    The men having charge of the steam shovel here have taken it to pieces and it is now on a flatcar at the depot ready to be shipped to The Dalles.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 5, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. T. D. Singleton, on their place near Eagle Point, September 28, 1910, a daughter.
    Wamsley & Smith have taken the contract to finish the upper story of the school house and get it ready for another teacher as our school is assuming such proportions that we will require of, if not two or more teachers this winter.
    Wamsley & Smith are also building a grocery for S. H. Harnish on his home place. They are about through with their job on the T. E. Nichols barn, but have their work planned ahead for this fall.
    Mr. Spilte has put up a neat little house on the lot he purchased of W. Ulrich, and as soon as the material can be procured Charley Cingcade and Roy Ashpole are going to put up a confectionery store on a lot on the Ulrich addition and there is now quite a number of tents already on the ground and families living in them. The railroad company has men digging a well at the depot, or rather where the depot will be built, as the place now is but a little house erected in a hurry and has been used thus far as a depot building, but I am told the company expects to put up a nice comfortable building at the present site. The company has taken the steam shovel to pieces and shipped it to the Deschutes country and is fitting up a smaller one that Craig & Fuller used last winter on the big cut. They are opening up a new gravel pit near Derby station and if the gravel proves to be good they will establish a camp there. Mr. MacDonald, the boss bridge builder, was here Sunday night and reports that they are getting along very fine with the bridge work and everything is going with such a rush that it makes us old hayseeds stand and take notice.
    Sunday night in addition to having Mr. MacDonald here we also had Mr. Beveredge and Mr. Hammer of the civil engineer railroad corps and Mr. Fraser, engineer of the steam shovel; also we had Mr. Paine of Rogue River and Mr. Willits of Elk Creek and Mr. Young of Medford; the latter three brought over a bunch of beef cattle for Wortman & Son. Mr. Paine is the man who bought the Alfred Gordon place on Rogue River and in conversation with him I happened to mention about the petition being circulated for a road from Derby station to Rogue River via the Crowfoot route, and Mr. Paine seemed to be greatly interested in the move and said that he would like to meet the civil engineer who [had] done the platting of the proposed road, and just as it happened Mr. Hammon, the civil engineer referred to, was in the adjoining room, so they met and had quite a talk over the matter. Mr. Hammon said that it was about seven miles from the Derby station to Rogue River by that route, and that he had found a good easy grade for the road and in his opinion that was the most feasible route for a wagon road that he knew of and he had been over a large part of that country for the P.&E. Railroad. Mr. Paine is firmly of the opinion that there will be an electric railroad up Rogue River along the north bank in the course of a short time.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 6, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Among other improvements in our neighborhood I omitted to mention that J. B. Jackson has been making some substantial improvement on his house by adding another bedroom, screening in their porch and fixing things up generally. Mrs. Jackson, her daughter, Miss Gernell, and Miss Donnie Rader were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Sunday evening.
    Last Saturday night Mr. Mathews of Butte Falls spent the night here and Sunday morning a message came over the phone that his wife was found that morning dead in her bed. She had been suffering for some time with dropsy and the folks thought that she was getting along all right, but when her daughter went to the bed to call her to breakfast she found her cold in death. He was notified by phone about 10 o'clock while on the road home with a load of goods for one of the stores. I have not the particulars of her life or the data from which to write an obituary, but suppose that will be done by your Butte Falls correspondent.
    M. O. Laney, Vernon Brophy and Miss Georgie Cline and Miss Marguerite Holmes of Central Point came in Sunday evening, called for supper, spent a while visiting in the family and returned home the same night. Miss Holmes has charge of the intermediate department of the school at Woodville and says that they have a fine school of about one hundred pupils.
    George W. Daley had his tract of land surveyed last Sunday.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 9, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    John McKee came out the first of the week with a band of beef cattle for the Medford market.
    James Owens, our county commissioner, and his wife, were over Wednesday looking at some of the Eagle Point property with the view of purchasing a home among us and sending their children to our school.
    Mr. and Mrs. Nelson of Portland were pleasant callers Wednesday. Mr. Nelson has been putting the machinery in the Butte Falls mill during the past summer.
    E. G. Ferrin of Seattle spent the night with us Wednesday. He has been in business in Tacoma and is now located in Seattle, but may settle here in Southern Oregon, as he is highly pleased with our country and especially with our climate.
    Miss Grace Polk, who has been teaching school at Dudley came out Saturday to attend the teachers' institute.
    On Wednesday last S. H. Morse, one of the post office inspectors, came out, and after inspecting our post office engaged your correspondent to take him to the post office he wished to visit and that afternoon we went to Wellen. That was the first time I had been there for several years and was generally surprised to see such a marked change in the place. Everything as neat as wax, and Mrs. von der Hellen seemed to take pleasure in showing us how roses and especially one that has grown in two years so as to cover the entire end of the house. We did not find Mr. von der Hellen at home, but Mrs. von der Hellen and her son Carl rendered Mr. Morse all the assistance they could. The next day we started for Prospect via Derby. Here he found that the postmaster, Mrs. Chartraw, was also away from the home, but her daughter, Miss Myrtle, her assistant, was there and had the books up in fine shape. I notice also that they had been making some substantial improvements on their place; also that Lee Edmondson has put an addition to his house. Passing on we stopped at Kelso's and had dinner. There we met George West, one of the forest rangers, on his way out to procure tools to work on the Medford-Crater Lake Road. In passing along I noticed all along the route decided improvements on the farms. After crossing Rogue River and going up the Flounce Rock grade we found that Hon. John Grieve, the supervisor of that district, had opened up a new road along the bluff overhanging Rogue River, leading to Prospect, and cutting out the sticky hills and rocky part of the road, as it is on pumice soil all the way. Now, arriving at Prospect at 5:45 p.m., we found that there was quite a number of tents there and a number of men employed on the road. Among them was Mr. Heidel, the chief engineer, who was just getting a gang of men at work on the new Flounce Rock grade, and after that is finished it will be a pleasure to go from here to Crater Lake. Spending the night at the Prospect Hotel, where Mrs. Hollenbeak presides, and uses every means to make the place homelike. The next morning we started at 7 o'clock for Trail, only stopping long enough to say hello to our friends Mr. and Mrs. Blanchet, who brought the Charley Knighton place, we drove along by several fine farms, reaching Trail at 11:55 a.m. Here we found that Mrs. Middlebusher was doing a thriving business and has enlarged her house. She reports that she is doing a good business in her hotel and store. After Mr. Morse had passed on the post office we proceeded on our way and found that Mr. Stacy, the road supervisor, had a gang of men working on the road between Trail and the ferry. He surely deserves credit for the work he has done on that piece of road, for it was one of the worst places on the route from here to Crater Lake. There was nothing of note until we arrived at the Sunnyside Friday evening at 5 o'clock and Mr. Morse took the P.&E. for his home in Roseburg.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 11, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday the railroad camp, that has been located on Butte Creek at the railroad bridge, broke up and Mr. Cole and Jim Ely took a room at the Sunnyside. Mr. Cole is one of the engineers who is running a dirt train. In addition to Mr. Cole we have twenty-two of the regular workmen added to our list of boarders, making now thirty-two railroad working men. Last week, after the railroad company had sent the steam shovel to the Deschutes, they established a camp near the Derby station on what is known as the Wrisley plat and are using the same steam shovel that Craig and Fuller used on the big cut near Vestal's, but the engineer, Mr. Fraser, says that he does not think that it will take long to dig the pit out and then they will probably bring the shovel down to where the old shovel was at work digging.
    Mr. MacDonald was here Monday night and reports that they are getting along fine with the bridge work, although the rain today, Tuesday, will retard the work considerable.
    There is a force of men at work digging a well at the depot for the railroad company. They are not getting along very fast as the rock through which they are digging is hard to work to advantage without blasting and is of such a formation that the powder only blows out a small hole at a time.
    Word has gone out that the railroad company is to build a depot here at once.
    Charley Cingcade and Roy Ashpole have the lumber on the ground to build a house for a confectionery store.
    Wamsley and Smith have the lumber and are now working on the upper rooms of our school house, getting it ready for our third teacher.
    Frank Nichols has his new home well under way.
    Joe Moomaw has about completed his home.
    In the absence of lumber to build with there is quite a number of tents scattered around the town. Mrs. Howlett has three large tents in the yard to accommodate her guests.
    A. S. Bennett and family and a young man whose name I did not learn came out from Medford Sunday for dinner at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 12, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. W. Grover and family, Mr. Wm. Knighton and wife and Mr. and Mrs. Holbert of New York state were enjoying the benefit of our sulfur spring, just above the Sunnyside, last Sunday. Mr. and Mrs. Holbert are old-time friends of Mr. J. W. Grover and came out to visit him, and now they are so well pleased with the country that they are thinking of buying property here and establishing a home.
    Last Sunday, Mrs. Edwards, wife of one of the engineers on the P.&E. railroad, and his sister, Miss Edwards, came over to see our town and have a good time. They spent a part of the time visiting Mrs. Cole at the Sunnyside.
    Benjamin Fredenburg brought out 34 head of beef cattle Monday for Warner, Wortman and Gore of Medford.
    Owing to the sickness of the mail contractor and stage driver on the Eagle Point-Prospect route, Ray Willits and Mr. Ormel is driving the stage team at present.
    Fred Pedezrne while working with dynamite, used in blasting post holes, a blast went off prematurely and blew a lot of dirt and gravel into his face, badly injuring one of his eyes, but Dr. Holt thinks it will not be serious.
    I omitted to state in my last that R. G. Brown, formerly of this place, but now of Portland, was here visiting his father, George Brown, who is in very poor health.
    Mr. Hutchison, who lives on a farm near the old John Black place, came in Monday night and stayed over Tuesday.
    I. C. Moon of Elk Creek and his son drove in out of the rain Tuesday and spent the remainder of the day on account of the rain.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 13, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Professor L. A. Wright, principal of the Butte Falls school, and the primary teacher, Mr. A. M. Marrett, and Miss Edith Graham, all of Butte Falls, were here for dinner Tuesday on their way to Grants Pass to attend the teachers' institute.
    George W. Reynolds, a traveling salesman for the Hand Made Shoe Company, spent the night here Tuesday. He was interviewing our merchants on the subject of footwear.
    Born, to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Smith, October 10, a son, so reports Dr. Holt.
    Last Sunday as Roy Cobleigh was playing with a pistol it was discharged accidentally, the ball entering the left leg just above the knee, ranging downward, and lodging distressingly near the knee joint. He was treated by Dr. Holt and afterward brought to the Sunnyside where he is likely to remain for some time. While the wound is not considered dangerous, still it is very painful, as it was necessary to open up a hole through his left leg in order to remove the bullet.
    Word came over the wire Thursday evening from Butte Falls that Buel Hildreth of that place, while working with the logs got caught between two of them and the flesh badly torn from his legs. Although there were no bones broken still he was badly hurt and it will require a long time before he will be able to work again.
    Some of the bridge men of the P.&E. Railroad Company were here Thursday night and report that they were driving the piling for the last bridge between here and Butte Falls, although they have two large bridges to build yet.
    The railroad company have staked off the ground for the depot at this place and work will commence on the building next week. It is to be 30x90 feet with porches, etc., to extend to cover an area of 60x120 feet and have it arranged so that teams coming in to load or unload can have a shed to work under during rainy weather. They have moved the building site a short distance north of the old station so as to have the depot on better ground and a better way to get to it.
    Charley Cingcade and Roy Ashpole are rushing their building right along and by the time that this goes to press will have the roof all on.
    Hon. James Owens, our county commissioner, came over the other day and bought the old Farlow property that was bought about a year ago by I. B. Williams. It is understood that the price paid was $1,000. There is not a day but someone is here trying to buy or rent a home, and business is getting better every day.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 17, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    K. Thomson, one of the civil engineers on the P.&E. Railway, spent the night with us last Friday and the next morning procured a rig at the Sunnyside stable, went to Butte Falls and returned as far as Derby, where he was met by Roy Smith, who brought the team home.
    The same night Messrs. J. C. Johnson, who is teaching in the Big Butte district; Professor Wright and Mrs. Barrett, Butte Falls teachers; Miss Edith Graham of Higinbotham district, and Mrs. Foster, who is teaching on Trail Creek, all spent the night here and the next morning all except Professor Wright took the different stages for their respective homes, Mr. Wright going up on horseback, as there was not room in the stage. They all had been to Grants Pass to attend the teachers' institute. They reported having had a royal good time.
    Elmer Spencer and Mrs. Smoot of Dudley came out on Friday and Saturday [and] took a team from the Sunnyside stable, went to Medford and back on Saturday, and Sunday morning took passage on the work train for Derby.
    Walter Wood came in last Friday with a huge bear that he had killed on the north side of Round Top. It was so large that it took five men to put it on the horse to bring it in and the poor horse almost gave out under the immense weight.
    Scott Claspill, one of the business men of Butte Falls, was a pleasant caller this week; also Mr. Marcy, another one of the Butte Falls merchants, called on his way to Medford to buy goods.
    There seems to be some stir in the land circles around Eagle Point, Mr. W. M. Woodward being here, representing Mr. Hamilton, who bought the William Ulrich place, and is getting some interest manifested in the subject, and knowing ones are of the opinion that there will be some changes here in that line in the near future.
    There was a deal in real estate in this neighborhood a few days ago. James H. Smith of Chicago, who bought a 20-acre tract of land off the old Moomaw place, has bought what is known as the Wilson place, lying east of and joining the old Dr. Page place, containing 20 acres and one-half is planted to Newtown and Spitzenberg apples; consideration, $2500.
    G. H. Eads and N. A. Clark came out Sunday and took in a load of the things belonging to Mr. Guthrie, formerly of the firm of Tronson & Guthrie.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Henry Childreth, October 16, 1910, a young blacksmith.
    Rev. W. H. Jones, a Presbyterian minister, recently from Bellingham, Wash., came out on the Butte Falls stage last Monday after his family. He is in charge of the church at Butte Falls, where he expects to reside.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 23, 1910, page 11


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    In the hurry and rush of business in my last I omitted to chronicle the most important event in the life of our railroad agent, Oscar Wright, and that was his marriage to Miss Eva Moore on the 17th inst. in the county seat. After their marriage they took rooms at the residence of James Jordan. The ladies of the town gave them a genuine charivari, and after wishing the young couple a long and prosperous journey through life they bade them goodnight.
    Charles Thomas, who is engaged hauling for the Crater Lake road workers, has moved his family into the house vacated by his mother.
    A. B. Zimmerman, one of our merchants, has commenced the erection of a house near his store for his family residence.
    Among the rush of business there seems to be a complete lull in the political world, and if it was not for the notices of an election that have been posted we would hardly know that there was to be an election.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company are pushing on their work now during this pleasant weather as fast as they can. Mr. McDonald, the boss bridge builder, says that they will finish the bridge across Cat Tail by the 24th inst., and they have one more large bridge to build and some small ones and the work will be done to Butte Falls.
    They have already commenced work on the depot building here and the curious ones are asking, "What has become of the new town where the wise ones were going to have the depot, etc.?"
    Amos Bellows returned from Alaska a short time ago and is visiting his relatives in these parts.
    Roy Cobleigh, the young man who accidentally shot himself while playing with a revolver, is getting along finely--can walk around without a crutch or cane.
    Ray Willits, the mail contractor, who runs between here and Prospect, has so far recovered as to be able to carry the mail again.
    There is the greatest demand for teams here that was ever known.
    John Higinbotham of Big Butte came out last week for a load of corn.
    Mr. Jewell, the fish hatchery man, came out and went to Medford last week, leaving his team here.
    John Edsall and William Perry also came out, left their team and went to Medford on the cars.
    Elvin Abbott, who is living with his mother on her farm near Hawk's sawmill, came out and spent the night here, taking back with him a part of their winter supplies.
    Mrs. Cole, mother of one of the engineers on the P.&E., came out last week with her daughter-in-law, to visit her son and family, who have a room at the Sunnyside.
    C. P. Briggs and E. Wheeler of Butte Falls came out Friday on the stage [and] went to Medford in a rig from the Sunnyside stable to attend a meeting of the stockholders of the Butte Falls-Medford Telephone company that was held Saturday.
    Carl B. Neal and F. L. Carlson also came out from Butte Falls at the same time.
    H. E. Koontz, who has charge of a crew of men on the government reserve, on the Crater Lake road, came out last Friday and went on to Medford. Mrs. George West came out with him from Prospect and took a room at the Sunnyside Hotel. Mr. Koontz reports that they are getting along fine with the work this pleasant weather.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 26, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday Mesdames Jess Spencer, Harvey Spencer, Reed and Nalley, all of Dudley, who are working in the Washburn orchard, came over on the P.&E. car to visit Mrs. Howlett and attend to a little business. They said that they expected to be through in about two weeks and that then they wanted me to meet them in a big hayrack instead of a carriage.
    Last Sunday I was called on to take Irvin Daley and wife and a young man by the name of Stewart, whose father has charge of the Natatorium, up a about a mile above Brownsboro. Mrs. Daley was going to visit her mother and Irvin and Mr. Stewart were going hunting for bear. When I reached home I found E. D. Briggs, G. S. Butler, E. Peil and A. E. Kenny, all of Ashland. They had been up to Brownsboro to see some property that belongs to Mr. Briggs and had phoned to the Sunnyside for dinner.
    The young folks in this neighborhood and quite a number from up the creek met at the dance hall last Saturday night, and judging from the crowd of young folks that greeted me Sunday morning when I came downstairs there must have been a good-sized crowd, and they expressed themselves as well pleased with the party.
    Work is progressing with the P.&E. depot here, and there is considerable inquiry for houses and lots on which to build, and from present appearances there will be much more building here next season than there has been this, although there are several buildings in the course of construction now.
    There is a force of carpenters at work on Frank Nichols' house, another on Mr. Steward's, another on Kincaid & Ashpole's, another on A. B. Zimmerman's, another on George von der Hellen's, another putting up a water tower and tank for the Sunnyside Hotel, besides several small jobs in the line of repairing, etc.
    Cottle & Daley have just finished a cement walk for Mrs. Howlett. They have also just finished a neat stone wall for William von der Hellen and one for A. J. Daley and done some cement work for Gus Nichols. In fact, everybody is busy and seem to be prospering.
    Last Tuesday A. Tackstrom of Medford came out and hired your correspondent to take him up to his ranch, the Jack Anderson place, on the head of Lake Creek, that he recently purchased. He remained with us over Wednesday, looking around with a view of locating among us, as he fell greatly in love with our town and its surroundings.
    Benj. Kenney and wife came out from Medford Tuesday eve and the next day went up to Carl von der Hellen's. They were also guests at the Sunnyside Hotel. I understand that he is going to cut a lot of wood and have it sawed up for the Medford market.
    A man by the name of Pepper came in Tuesday and is stopping here. He has a 20-acre tract of land on the Stoddard place and wants to improve it this fall.
    Miss Hazel Dean of Medford came out Wednesday to visit Mrs. Clyde Plymire, who is rooming with us.
    A. H. Thomson of Lake Creek is engaged painting George von der Hellen's new house.
    Joe Moomaw has men fixing up his old house that he formerly lived in for a woodshed and carriage house.
    James Ringer, who was hurt some time ago by having a roof of a porch fall on him, has gone to Medford to try to get medical aid, as he is still suffering from the effects of the accident.
    Mrs. Wilson of Dudley came in Wednesday eve on the P.&E. car on her way home. She has been up in Washington visiting her daughter, who lives in Spokane, and while there visiting hurt her hand in some way and blood poisoning set in and she was in a very critical condition for several weeks, but we are glad to be able to say that now she is considered out of danger.
    C. W. Austin of Dudley also came in Wednesday, also Jess Spencer and John Higinbotham, besides a large number of strangers are here looking for homes, etc.
Medford Mail Tribune, October 28, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Since my last Thomas M. Riley has sold a half interest in an 80-acre tract of land lying on Antelope Creek known as the old William Wiley place, to Frank C. Clark of Medford, and they two have purchased a 40-acre tract joining the above described tract from Thomas Riley, son and they intend to plant the most of the 120 acres to apples and pears. Mr. Clark is so well pleased with this part of the valley that he is profuse in its praises.
    Mr. Gilliam of Medford, Okla., was out last week looking over our country. He, like almost everyone else, is sounding the praises of Southern Oregon and the Butte Creek country in particular. He seems to think that Eagle Point will in the course of a few years be quite a business center.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence of Trail came out Friday and your correspondent took them on to Medford, so that they could take No. 16 at 5:24 for Portland. Mr. Lawrence has been summoned as a witness before the United States court in a case where two men of Gold Hill are charged with neglecting to put out their camp fire and causing the destruction of valuable timber.
    I have just learned that the school board have employed another teacher for our third room, but I have not learned her name but will report more of the particulars later.
    I have just learned that a lady by the name of Hite from California has commenced teaching in the Reese Creek district on the 24th inst.
    Mrs. Cole, wife of one of the engineers on the work trains, went to Medford last week to have a sore finger treated.
    [illegible] Edsall, living in near Butte Creek, had the misfortune to fall out [illegible] last Wednesday [illegible] head on a wagon wheel and up to Sunday morning had not returned to consciousness, and fears are entertained that he will not recover.
    Mr. Barton, who bought the Joe Rader place, near Eagle Point, who has been in the Medford hospital for some time having his leg treated, has returned home, but is still confined to his bed.
    Mrs. A. W. Thomas has had an addition put to her barn, a shed to supply stable room for horses.
    Wamsley and Smith have just erected a tower at the Sunnyside and E. S. Wolfer is engaged doing the plumbing act. Wamsley & Smith have just finished their job on the Baptist church. Mr. Cottrell and Henry Daley are making cement walks in Gus Nichols' yard and everybody is too busy to stop to think.
    There are about 35 railroad men stopping at the Sunnyside Hotel, and that keeps us out of mischief.
    George W. Daley, Sr., who has been drilling a three-inch hole in the bottom of the well that he dug, has gone down a depth of 70 feet and finds the same formation that was found in the bottom of the well dug at the Sunnyside Hotel, viz: a slate formation, the same that is usually found on top of a coal bed. He intends to keep going until he finds a strong vein of water or coal.
    At the meeting of the Butte Falls and Eagle Point Telephone Company held in Medford a short time ago arrangements were made so that we will have connection through to Medford on the same terms that we have with Central Point.
    John Ashpole and wife started last week for Los Angeles, Cal., to try that climate for his health, as he has an abscess formed on one of his lungs, and thinks that that warm climate may help him.
    Mr. Painter has moved from the Cooley place into the Pelling house.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 1, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Charley Cingcade and Roy Ashpole have about completed their new billiard and confectionery rooms and are ready for business.
    There have been some changes in real estate here, but the sales are not yet confirmed and consequently not ready for publication.
    Mr. Dodge is busily engaged drilling wells--one for Minter Bros., one for Eli Dahack and one for a lady on the Stoddard tract.
    Mr. Barrett has moved to Butte Falls again for the winter.
    The orchardists are bringing in a vast amount of apples for shipment, and they report that the crops are unusually fine this year.
    The apple packers on the Washburn orchard have got through and gone home. Among them were Mrs. Reed, Mrs. Owens, Mrs. William Spencer, Mrs. Harvey Spencer, Mrs. Nellie and Mrs. Jess Spencer, all of Dudley. They report that the crop was very fine both in quantity and quality.
    Mr. and Mrs. Alfred Smith have secured a position on the farm of Thomas E. Nichols, Mrs. Smith looking after the household affairs while Mrs. Nichols is in Portland with her daughter, Ollie, who is on the sick list in that city.
    George West, one of the forest rangers, who has a gang of about 20 men working on the Crater Lake road in the government reserve, came out Tuesday, but returned on Wednesday. He reports that they are getting along finely with the work during this fine weather.
    Mrs. Hollenbeak, who keeps the Prospect Hotel, came out Tuesday evening on the Eagle Point-Prospect stage to look for a house to live in this winter, as she will close the hotel when the men quit working on the road in that section.
    We have another change in one of our business firms here, Geo. Brown having sold his interest in the store to his son, R. G. Brown, of Portland. Mr. Brown's health is very poor and he is winding up his business and getting it in shape so that if the change does come, it will be so arranged that the estate can be settled up without any difficulty.
    Mr. MacDonald, the boss bridge builder for the P.&E., thinks that if this fine weather lasts another week that they will have the track laid into Butte Falls, as they are now working on the last bridge.
    The carpenters are rushing the depot building as fast as they can and business here seems to be going with a rush.
    George W. Daley, Sr., is down to a depth of 85 feet at this writing (Wednesday morning). He says that he has struck a harder kind of rock, but with that exception no material change in the last 25 feet.
    E. S. Wolfer, our strawberry man, has been experimenting with raising corn. He reports that he gathered four bushels of ear corn off of a tract of land 15x30 feet, and that the corn weighed 42 pounds to the bushel of ears; that the corn is an eastern variety and he thinks that in another year the yield will be better still.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 4, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Rev. Hicks of Ashland lectured for us last week on the subject of the liquor traffic. His audience was not so large as I have seen in Eagle Point. The next day he and Rev. Lamar took the stage for Butte Falls.
    R. P. Neil, candidate for state senator, was smiling on his friends Wednesday last, but by the time that is read by the public the case will be decided as to who will represent us in the upper house of our state assembly.
    Cingcade & Ashpole have their house opened and Mr. Williams has moved his barber shop into one of the rooms.
    There was an announcement made for a lady to lecture in the church last Wednesday night, but for some reason she did not put in her appearance.
    There were two traveling salesmen here Thursday right from Portland, but I did not learn their names.
    The last bridge between here and Butte Falls was completed Saturday and the steel will probably be laid into Butte Falls by next Sunday if the weather is not too inclement. I understand that the people of Butte Falls are preparing for a high time on the completion of the road to that place.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company is preparing to put up a large reservoir here and is planning to do the proper thing with Eagle Point. I understand that they are going to work on the new bridge across Butte Creek and make the cutoff that I spoke of some months ago.
    Jud Edsall, of Edsall Flat, who has teams on the railroad, came out Saturday and reports that his father, who fell off a haymow some days ago, is improving very slowly. He says that the company has about four miles of track to lay yet to reach the Falls.
    Hafer & Co. are having the lumber hauled from the mill out to the "Y" on the railroad, ready for shipment as soon as the track is ready for use.
    Last Thursday I took a trip up on Rogue River, about 22 miles, and was pleased to see the marked change in the line of improvements and especially on the county road from the free ferry to Trail, where it was so rough that one could hardly drive faster than a walk. Now they have the road widened and have hauled pumice dust and put on the rocks and now we can drive along on a brisk trot. But the road from there to the old Gordon place needs widening and straightening in many places. If we would bond the county for say $500,000 and put it out judiciously on the roads it would be one of the best advertisements the county could have, beside a decided benefit to those of us who have had to make the roads we now have.
    Our school is progressing finely under the management of Professor P. H. Daily, and this morning will open with an addition of another room and teacher, Miss Howe. The room was seated and all arranged last Saturday, and from present indications all three of the teachers will have all they can do.
    Mr. Bromley, of whom I made mention some months ago, arrived at the Sunnyside last Saturday from Chicago. He has sold out his business there and came here to live. He has a 20-acre tract of land on the old Moomaw place set to orchard. His family is at present in California, but will arrive as soon as he can secure a house to live in.
    J. W. Grover tells me that there is now no doubt about his having sold his place, as the party has already made the first payment--enough to ensure the sale.
    There have been several sales off of the Hamilton tract of land and money enough paid down to secure the land by the purchasers, although I am not at liberty to give names as yet.
    Mr. Adams of Dudley called Saturday on his way to Medford.
    Mrs. Fiske and her two children came out Saturday on the Butte Falls stage and at night took the car for her home in Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. Willits, Sr., of Persist, spent the night here Saturday on their way home from Medford.
    Benjamin Edmondson came out Friday, spent the night here and went to Medford and back here. He has been laying in a new supply of household furniture for his mountain home in Butte Falls.
    Dr. A. W. Deane of Medford, Mr. Rawley, Jr., and Jeff Conover came in Saturday night for supper and beds at a late hour, and at that time there were 60 men and nine women to provide with beds, but Mrs. H. said that she would do the best she could for them. The question is, where does so many people come from, for we have from 0 to 70 every night and still they come.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence of Trail, of whom I made mention last week, returned from Portland Saturday night, came out Sunday morning to the Sunnyside for breakfast and I took them up to within a mile of the free ferry, where they were met by his son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. MacDonald, and they got in my rig and Mr. L. and wife went on up to their home on Trail Creek and Mr. MacDonald and wife came out with me and went on to Medford.
    Jack Florey says that after election the post office will go broke. We have had a regular flood of political circulars.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 9, 1910, page 2



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    George Miller of Medford, Mr. Wanhope of California and Harry Richardson were pleasant callers the first of the week. The first two were seeking a way to get to Butte Falls and Mr. Richardson of Agate brought them over this far in his carriage.
    E. W. Bromley, recently from Chicago, who has been taking the Weekly Mail Tribune back there, has settled in Eagle Point for the present, rented a room from Y. M. Nichols and is taking his meals at the Sunnyside. He expects to build in the spring on his twenty-acre tract of land near here.
    Among the first things that he did after his arrival was to send in a subscription for the Daily Mail Tribune.
    Mr. Howard, recently from Texas, who has a homestead near the Eagle Point-Trail road, was a pleasant caller Thursday night. He speaks in glowing terms of this country and has come to stay.
    Our school is progressing finely with our three teachers in charge of the three rooms--P. H. Daily and wife and Miss Howe. Professor Daily reports that they are doing fine and a good prospect for a full school.
    A subscription is be circulated to raise funds for work to gravel the road from the new depot to the county road, and Friday morning there was $112.50 subscribed.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 14, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our election passed off very quietly. There was but a very small vote polled and but very little interest manifested. A few of the straitjacketed Republicans voted the ticket straight, but most of the people voted for the man, regardless of party.
    E. S. Wolfer, our plumber, is kept busy all the time. He is just finishing up a job on the Sunnyside and has the work to do for Frank Nichols' new house, von der Hellen's new home, Gus Nichols' home and, in fact, everybody is so busy that we can hardly stop to eat. I noticed when I am traveling that there are new houses going up all over the valley and old ones being repaired, and everything looks bright and prosperous.
    The P.&E. Railroad Company has a force of men building a depot; another building a large water tank; another laying pipe to pump the water from Butte Creek; another getting gravel from the creek bed to make concrete work, and thus our readers will see that Eagle Point has become quite a business center. The hotels are crowded and every day there are inquiries made for houses to rent.
    Our daughter, Millie, Mrs. E. Hoyt, came in from Fort Klamath last Thursday on a visit to the old folks at home. She reports that things are lively out in that part of the country.
    Mrs. Floyd Pearce of Forest Creek is out visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Tryer.
    John Allen of Derby came out last Friday and brought two beeves--1150 pounds--of fine beef for the Sunnyside Hotel, and that will last us about 10 days.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 15, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Walter Robinett and his cousin, Ed Sugden, arrived from Vancouver, Wash., the past week and were the guests of Mr. Robinett's sister, Mrs. Thomas Coy, of this precinct.
    Mr. and Mrs. O. Arnspiger, Fred Tice and James Stewart have been guests at the Sunnyside last week, and the three men named have been engaged surveying the old Joe Rader place for Mr. Parton. They found quite a difference in the old lines that had been marked out by guesswork and the true lines.
    During the past week Bird Rose and his mother, the former from Linn County, came out on a short visit with Mrs. A. C. Howlett and family. She is a sister of the late Mrs. Mary Ann Chambers, whose first husband was killed by the Indians in the war of '55. While here they, in company with your correspondent and wife, visited her old home town, Jacksonville, saw the house that Mrs. Chambers built in the '50s and visited the cemetery where her remains were interred, her old home on the Chambers farm, now owned by Mrs. Bursell, took a trip around through Central Point and then to Medford. Mr. Rose pronounced the section of the country through which we passed one of the finest tracts of land he had seen in Oregon, and he owns about 3000 acres of land in Linn County, besides property in Hood River, but he thinks that Hood River is equal to this valley in general.
    Died--In Portland, November 16, 1910, Cassius Clay Charley, aged 50 years, 3 months and 11 days. He leaves a wife and three children--Floyd, aged 19; Claus, aged 14, and Leland, aged 10 years; also a father, mother, three brothers and one sister, and a long list of warm friends to regret his early death. Mr. Charley had been a resident of the Butte Creek country for a number of years. He was married to Miss Emogene Brown May 1, 1887, and was recognized as one of the leading stockmen and farmers in that section. The funeral services were conducted in Medford by Rev. Hoxie on the eve of the 17th and interment was made in the Brownsboro Cemetery on the 18th, and the religious services were conducted by your Eagle Point correspondent at the grave. There was a large number of his old friends and relatives attended the funeral.
    William von der Hellen is putting up a house on the tract of land he bought of Mr. Hamlin, the old William Ulrich place, near the new depot, and I understand that it will be occupied by Mr. Bacon, of the conductors on the P.&E.
    W. W. Parker came out Friday night from Butte Falls to meet his two daughters, Misses Ella and Dolly, and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Catcher of Forest Grove. The two daughters have been spending some time in that section with relatives.
    J. J. Fryer and his grandson, Austin Green, made a special trip to Jacksonville last Friday on special business with the county clerk, but I have not learned the result--perhaps will learn more by the next time I write.
    G. E. Trott and H. S. Truax stopped for dinner and Mr. Truax went on to Medford the same afternoon Saturday. Mr. Trott has leased the old Flounce Rock ranch and is preparing to improve it.
    Dr. Nuding, who bought the old West place, near Brownsboro, was called by phone to Medford to close a deal whereby he sold the place for, I understand, a good advance on the purchase price.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 21, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mr. Lake and family arrived here the first of the week to take charge of the old William Ulrich place that he bought of Mr. Hamilton of San Jose, Cal., so I am informed by R. G. Brown. He also told me that Mr. Lake contemplates opening up a bank here, something that would be a very material help here.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. L. McIntyre, who have a homestead on McNeil Creek, came out on the P.&E. train Tuesday night and when Mrs. McIntyre reached the Sunnyside she was all muddy from wading across the street in the dark, but that difficulty will be overcome to an extent at least, as S. R. Holmes has installed a large lamp in front of his house and the Brown brothers have put one at the entrance of the footbridge and the Sunnyside will have one as soon as they can be brought from Portland. Mr. McIntyre went to his home on Wednesday, Jud Edsall taking them up in his buggy.
    Mr. Morrison of Butte Falls came out Wednesday with Israel Patton's team. Mr. Patton is building in Butte Falls and has been here the last few days getting his doors and windows ready and will take them home Thursday.
    Clyde Plymire, who has been fireman for the steam shovel, is at present night watchman of one of the engines.
    There has been a subscription paper circulated here to raise funds to gravel the road from the depot to the county road, and about $125 was subscribed at last accounts.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 25, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. C. W. Day of Pacific Grove, a niece of Mrs. Howlett's, came in on No. 16 to Medford on the evening of the 22nd and was met there by her aunt and cousin, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, and came out in a rig in spite of the rain and darkness that night. Mrs. Day is an Oregon-raised girl, but moved to Pacific Grove a few years ago and has come back to her native land to see how it appears to be on her native soil again. She seems to like Southern Oregon better than the Willamette Valley, where she was raised, although she has come in one of the unprecedented storms in this country. When was it ever known to snow, and especially four inches deep, in the Rogue River Valley as early as the 24th day of November? I have been living in this immediate neighborhood for 44 years and don't remember of ever seeing snow in the valley earlier than the 3rd of December. But this is an off year in many aspects--a long, dry summer, a late fall and snow on Thanksgiving Day. But I still say that the climate in Southern Oregon is hard to beat.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. A. Clark of Medford came out last Thursday and were met here by Thomas Riley, Jr., and taken to the hospitable residence of Thomas Riley, Sr. Mr. Clark is a partner in a tract of land that he and Thomas R. bought of Thomas R. Jr. Mr. C. is one of the real admirers of Southern Oregon. He expects to help to furnish the world with fine Rogue River fruit in the future.
    Mrs. Henry Myers of Lake Creek and a friend of hers, Miss Martha Kockerscheidt, from Nebraska, were pleasant callers last Friday. Mrs. Kockerscheidt is here combining business with pleasure, the guest of Mrs. Henry Myers.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 29, 1910, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Professor Robert Jones of Wallowa, who is publisher and editor of the paper in that town, and who at one time was on the Mail office force, is here visiting his mother and brother, Jake.
    There is a move on foot to build a sidewalk along the route from the depot out to the business part of our town, and by the time this is in print there will be a way provided so that persons who come in on the evening car will not have to walk through the mud to reach the hotel.
    The way that the railroad company have the time arranged to leave Medford now, it brings the car here after dark, and that works quite a hardship on the traveling public, but we are thankful for any favors in that line.
    Professor P. H. Daily is having his water tower sided up and the tank covered. John Foster is doing the work.
    There is a move on foot to try to incorporate our town, but there is a very strong sentiment against it, and the friends of the movement have but little hope of succeeding now.
    There was a large crowd attended the dance here Thanksgiving night, and those who attended report that it was one of the quietest dances they have ever had here, as there were no drunks and consequently no unusual noise.
    The report has been started here that our mail contractor, S. H. Harnish, was not going to carry the mail to Butte Falls anymore this fall in rigs, but on horseback, but Mr. Harnish told me this (Saturday) evening that he would run two rigs at least for a month yet, and to Brownsboro all the time.
    Mr. Cowden and young Mr. Massey came out from Butte Falls Saturday after loads of goods, and Mr. Moose came out for the Hafer mill company after a load of feed. They had depended on getting it taken as far as Cameron on the cars, but the heavy rains have made the roadbed so soft that they cannot run over it with safety.
    Mrs. Charles Wilkinson came out Saturday night to visit her son and wife, who are boarding at the Sunnyside. Her son, Clyde Plymire, is fireman for the steam shovel. They have succeeded in bringing the steam shovel out and will put it at work near Table Rock station in a few days.
Medford Mail Tribune, November 30, 1910, page 6


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Sunday night we had no train from Medford, and the result was that there were several remained here that had intended to go to Medford. Among them was Mr. Wilfley, the man who bought the John Hart place, about two and one-half miles northeast of here. He has had a family, Thomas Cingcade, move onto the farm and expects to have it brought up to the modern standard. He seems to be well pleased with his purchase, and especially with our country and climate, although he had to encounter one of the worst storms, if not the worst, in this country for the time of the year. He is fortunate in securing so good a man and family as that of Mr. Cingcade, as he can depend on him as altogether trustworthy.
    Mr. Bacon and family have moved into their new quarters, a new house built by von der Hellen Bros. Mr. Bacon is conductor on one of the work trains and was formerly agent for the Pacific & Eastern Railroad Company at this place. He has, by his courteous treatment of the people, formed the friendship of the most of those who know him, and we are all glad to see him and his family so comfortably fixed, and have reason to hope that they will remain among us for some time to come.
    Through the enterprise of a few of our enterprising citizens, we have provided a temporary plank walk from the depot--I don't mean the little shack that was put up by the railroad company some time ago for temporary use, but the depot that is now about completed, and an ornament to our town, and reflects great credit to the men who are at the head of affairs in the work of railroad building. The new depot, as it will be when completed, will be 90x120 feet all over, and the interior of the building will consist of a large freight room, large enough probably to answer the purpose for several years. They have also arranged to have two waiting rooms, one for the ladies and one for the men, so that the men who want to can smoke and talk without being embarrassed by the ladies, and the ladies will not be annoyed by the smoking, etc., of the men. In addition to these, there is also a ticket sellers' window in each room; also two rooms for the living rooms of the agent, so that he can always be at home in his office.
    They are having a large concrete flue built so as to be free from the danger of fire and I understand are planning to extend the platform on up the track to where they are putting in the water tank so that they can unload material that will not be injured by the elements on the outside.
    During the recent storm the railroad company kept a gang of men stationed at the railroad bridge across Butte Creek with an engine to draw the driftwood out from the bridge, and just after daylight Tuesday morning they hooked onto a large tree that was caught on another tree and kept pulling until the hook gave way, and then my informant, Clyde Plymire, says that he quit and came home to the Sunnyside.
    The roadbed north and northeast of here is in such a condition that they are unable to run the large engines over it, but they have the steam shovel in place again near Table Rock station and will soon be ballasting the road again but there is not much prospect of the company doing much business on it this winter.
    Last Wednesday was a busy day with the business portion of our town, as there seemed to be a large crowd of men, women and children in from various parts of the country. There was quite a crowd came to the Sunnyside for dinner, among whom were Mr. and Mrs. William Perry and their two little girls, Miss Fay Perry and Miss Stella Betz of Butte Falls, Mrs. F. J. Ayers of Reese Creek, Mr. Finley, also of Reese Creek, Mr. Saling of Medford, besides quite a number of names I did not learn, and in addition to that there was quite a number on the streets whose names I did not learn. Robert Minter, one of the successful business men of these parts, and two of his daughters were doing business in town Wednesday with our merchants.
    There was a big demand for teams here Wednesday morning after the train came in and there were several started out on foot, as there were more than the stage could take.
    Mr. Wilkinson and son of Central Point stopped at Sunnyside stable with their teams and spent the night with his brother-in-law, S. H. Harnish. He was moving the household goods of Thomas Cingcade onto Mr. Wilfley's farm.
    Mr. Stewart has five or six carpenters at work on his new bungalow and Frank Nichols is pushing his new house along as fast as possible.
    John M. Allen brought out two more beeves last Wednesday for the Sunnyside. He reports the mud very deep, but not sticky--too wet.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 4, 1910, page 18



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Our school district has had quite an addition during the past year notwithstanding that there were thirty moved out and aged out. Still the number of children runs to 122, an addition of twenty-five to the last year's list, and now a call is made for a meeting for the village to vote on levying a five-mill tax on the district property to keep up the current expenses and the remainder to be applied toward paying off the indebtedness of the district.
    Our two daughters, Hattie and Agnes, went to Grant's Pass last Wednesday to consult a specialist with regard to their eyes.
    Another daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt of Fort Klamath, who is here visiting, and her cousin, Mrs. C. W. Day, spent Wednesday in Medford shopping and seeing the city. Mrs. Day is from Pacific Grove, California, and expressed her surprise at seeing such a large and thriving city as Medford, and it is yet in its swaddling clothes as far as age is concerned. And yet Millie--that is Mrs. Hoyt--says that she thought that business was rather dull for Medford Thursday.
    W. H. Brown of Weed, California, was a pleasant caller the first of the week. He was on his way to Trail and Elk Creek to visit some of his old friends of Minnesota. He spoke as though he might spend some time here when he returned.
    The first of the week our mail carrier from here to Prospect, Mr. Ray Willits, was stopped on account of Rogue River being so high that he could not cross. Another striking instance, showing the necessity of having a bridge across the river between here and Trail.
    Mrs. George West returned Saturday from Butte Falls, where she had been visiting Mrs. Beulah Hildreth.
    A few days ago a lady friend told of another instance of a young man, Harry Ram, shooting himself through the hand with a revolver. He didn't think, and had his hand over the muzzle of the gun, pulled the trigger and then discovered that he had his hand in the wrong place. He might of shot someone else just as well. When will people learn to let such things alone? Every few days the Portland papers tell of someone shot, accidentally, with a revolver.
    James Owens, one of our county commissioners, who bought the I. B. Williams property here, has commenced to move some of his things from the farm over here so that his children can have the advantage of our excellent school, and by the time that this is in print his children will be enrolled among our pupils.
    John Edsall took a load of goods to Butte Falls Friday for Claspill & Wheeler and brought back a load of household goods for his father, who is moving into the Abbott house in Eagle Point.
    A gentleman stopping here Friday night brought the word that the gang of men working on the road near Union Creek has been called off, as the snow was one and a half feet deep at the camp.
    John Nichols has been enlarging and reroofing his wood shed and fixing things homelike.
    Mr. Matthews of Butte Falls came in from Medford Friday night with a part of his load, and was detained here Saturday by the heavy rain.
    The recent rains have been quite a drawback to the railroad work along the line, as it has washed the fills out in some places and caused the roadbed to slide in some and the ground is so soft that they cannot run the cars farther than about the old commissary building.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 5, 1910, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. W. Bates of Medford was a guest at the Sunnyside the first of the week.
    Miss Belle Finley, who has been assisting in the culinary department at the Sunnyside, was called home Tuesday last on account of her mother's sickness.
    Professor Wilson, who has a homestead near Cameron station, spent a few days here the first of the week, then went to Medford on business. He seems to be much pleased with his location and especially with this country.
    Mr. and Mrs. Frank H. McDonald of Medford came out Tuesday and procured a rig and driver Wednesday and were taken to Trail to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Lawrence, the parties who bought the property of the what was then Widow Inlow, but now is Mrs. Abbott.
    G. W. Owens, proprietor of the Eagle Hotel, started for Nevada on Tuesday, to be gone for an indefinite period.
    Alfred S. Lee and L. Upshur, two civil engineers, came out the past week and surveyed out the lines of the proposed incorporate limits of the town of Eagle Point. William von der Hellen has circulated a petition to the county court to call an election so voters in said boundaries can vote on the proposition as to whether we will be incorporated or not. Mr. von der Hellen secured the required number of names to the petition and took it before the county court, but the move will have to be advertised for three consecutive weeks before action can be taken by the court, and then comes the tug of war, although there does not seem so much opposition to the move as at first appeared on the surface.
    We have two families living in this neighborhood that boast of having four generations still living, and they are both related by marriage. There is Grandma Heckathorn, Mrs. Frank Lewis, Mrs. Chauncey Florey (nee Jennie Lewis) and Mrs. Florey's baby on the one side. Then there is Grandma Nye, Mrs. A. J. Florey (nee Miss Ettie Nye), Chauncey Florey and his baby, and they are all hale and hearty, showing what our southern climate can do to prolong life.
    Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Quackenbush and their two boys, Mr. and Mrs. M. Gorman and son, and Miss Emma Armes of Talent came in on the P.&E. train Tuesday evening, stopped at the Sunnyside--there were 84 took supper and breakfast that night and the next day--and the next morning the two men walked to the Bradshaw orchard, procured a team and proceeded on their journey to that place. The two men will have charge of the orchard this year.
    Misses Hazel and Leona Dean of Medford came out Wednesday to visit friends in our town.
    Jess Spencer of Dudley came out Tuesday, spent the night here and on Wednesday went to Medford on business, returning the same day, and the next day took the stage for Butte Falls.
    Sam Bruce, also of Dudley, who has been in the coast region cruising timber for the Southern Pacific Railway Company, came in Tuesday night and the next morning procured a rig and went home.
    T. F. Kelso and wife (they had been married on Monday) stopped here for dinner Wednesday. They were accompanied by his brother and family.
    Bert Woodruff, who lived for a number of years in the Big Butte country, but has been gone for some time, has returned and was a pleasant caller Wednesday.
    The legal voters of Eagle Point School District No. 9 met at the schoolhouse on Friday, the 9th, and voted to levy a tax of 5 mills for school purposes, and to assist in paying off the indebtedness of the district. The valuation of the district is reported by the county clerk to be $316,616, and the railroad property was not put in the report, because the clerk had not heard the valuation placed on it by the state board of equalization.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 11, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Mrs. Samuel Klingle of Lake Creek came out the last of last week, went to Medford and remained until Sunday eve.
    Rev. Jones, the Presbyterian minister of Butte Falls, came out Friday after a load of his household goods. He, with others, have depended on the railroad to get their goods up there this fall, but the early rains have rendered the ground so soft that the railroad company cannot use the track, so the good people of that town have to still use wagons and teams to get their freight up from our depot. Tonight, as I am writing, there are three teams, Mr. Matthews with two and Mr. Cowden with one four-horse team, all loaded with goods for Butte Falls, and they talk as though they would keep on hauling all winter, although the roads are in terrible condition.
    There was quite a crowd came in Sunday from Jacksonville on the way to Butte Falls, who had been before the grand jury as witnesses, etc., some to prosecute and some to try to stop prosecution, but we judge by the report of that body that there will likely be some of them go to Jacksonville as witnesses again.
    George West and Mr. Warren came out from the forester's camp last Friday. Mr. West has had charge of a gang of men working on the Crater Lake road and Mr. Warren has had charge of the culinary department.
    Professor Wilson, who has taken a homestead near Cameron station, and has been in Medford for several days, came out last Friday from Medford with a lot of supplies and a cage of thoroughbred chickens. He procured a team here and went up home Saturday.
    Among the callers Sunday were Wilbur Ashpole and Mr. Tryer of Medford, Mr. Netherland of Butte Falls; Charles Edmondson of Derby, besides a number of strangers whose names I did not learn. People are constantly coming in inquiring about the country, climate, etc., but the roads and country generally is so wet that they can do but little more than inquire, but the general impression seems to be that there will be quite a rush here in the spring.
    Ed Walker, who has charge of the Hafer interests in the Butte Falls country, came out Monday and brought out J. F. Moore and family. They took the train for Medford and Ed returned home the same afternoon.
    Mrs. Mary Albert of Butte Falls came out Monday on the stage and went on to Medford the same evening.
    Mrs. Wright and her three children came out from Butte Falls Monday with Mr. Cowden. She is going from here to Central Point, where she will spend a few days with friends and then will go to St. Louis, Mo.
    The railroad company is doing a great deal of work on and around the new depot. They are hauling gravel from off the desert and filling in on the end where the passengers will get off and on the cars; are digging a great hole to put up the water tank. They are having considerable trouble in digging for the foundation, as the first man who had charge of the work made a mistake and tried to dig down the holes without cribbing, and when the rain came the whole thing caved in, and now they have about 20 men working taking out the mud and cribbing up the walls, but they are getting there all the same, and in the course of a short time I will be able to report the work completed. They are also distributing the ties to lay another track about sixteen hundred feet long for a passing track.
    Mr. Paine, now of Medford, who bought the Alfred Gordon place, on the Rogue River, above Elk Creek, was a guest at the Sunnyside Hotel Sunday night.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 15, 1910, Page 6



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Tuesday Ed Clemens and Mr. Lewis, the man who bought the Terrell place, came out on the cars, procured a rig here and went to the farm. It is the old West place near Brownsboro. He is planning to make considerable improvements on the place this winter.
    James Ringer, who was badly hurt last fall by having a porch roof fall on him, has so far recovered as to be able to go to work again. He is papering his son-in-law's, Joseph Moomaw's, new house and occasionally doing a little painting. He had his ribs broken loose from the spine and is still quite feeble.
    Frank Manning of Peyton, wife and daughter came last Tuesday and Wednesday went to Medford, and at this writing, Friday, has not returned.
    R. E. Peyton of Peyton, and wife and two younger children, returned from a visit to relatives in Illinois last Tuesday and remained here until Thursday, when they employed Jud Edsall to take them as far as Derby, where they were met by their son to take them on up home. They expressed great delight over getting back to our lovely country climate.
    Scott Claspill and wife came out from Butte Falls Wednesday and went to Medford the next day to lay in a supply of dry goods for their store in B.F.
    M. F. Hanley and another man whose name I did not learn spent the night with us Wednesday.
    Mose Barkdull, Dell Hazel, Jack Plymale and another man whom I did not know have been here loading a car of apples Thursday and Friday.
    A. D. Wolfer, a brother of our strawberry man, and his friend, Mr. Strang of Portland, came in on E. S. Wolfer Tuesday evening unannounced. Ed said that at first he hardly knew his brother.
    Elmer Spencer and Mr. Smoot came out Tuesday, went to Medford and Wednesday made their final proof on their homesteads, and on Thursday morning took the stage for Butte Falls.
    We had quite an excitement here at the Sunnyside Wednesday night. The report was started that Mrs. Gorman and her sister, Miss Emma Ames, were lost in the fog. They had started from their home on the Lee Bradshaw place to come to Eagle Point and reached here all O.K., but when they started back about 4 p.m. the fog settled and they being unacquainted with the country, took the wrong course, but finally found the place about an hour ahead of the hunters. They ran across Mr. Grey, who lives on the old Moomaw place, and he put them on the right track, but they got bewildered in the fog and tramped for quite a while in sticky before they found the place and now they laugh at their first experience in sticky and the fog.
    Mr. and Mrs. Quackenbush, the newcomers on the Lee Bradshaw place, went to Medford Friday evening to remain until Sunday.
    Married--By John Watkins, J.P., Mr. Monday and Mrs. J. A. Bbzbot [sic], in Eagle Point, the evening of the 14th of December, 1910.
    Daniel Y. Iddings, secretary of the Rogue River Valley Orchards Company of San Francisco, Cal., spent the night with us Wednesday. He was here looking after the interests of the company. They have the Ulrich-Hamilton tract of land at their disposal and he was here also to interview other parties who own large tracts of land. He seemed to think that this section of the country will soon be quite a prominent factor in Jackson County.
    Mr. Ainsteader and two helpers came out Friday to survey off the Bradshaw place. They are stopping at the Sunnyside.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 18, 1910, page 15



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Harry Penn, a young man who has been partly raised by Professor J. C. Johnson on Reese Creek, and one who is highly respected, started for Ohio last Saturday.
    Austin Green, who was recently married to Miss Belle Maultby, and has been spending the honeymoon with her parents, has returned to his grandfather's, J. J. Fryer. They contemplate building on Mr. Green's lots in the spring.
    Frank Manning, one of the progressive farmers and stock raisers of Rogue River, near Peyton, came out with his wife and one of his daughters Saturday and Sunday and they went to Medford to have an operation performed on her nose and tonsils in the Medford hospital, he returning and started for home Monday afternoon. At last accounts the patient was getting along finely.
    Engineer Cole and family went to Medford Saturday morning, returning Sunday evening. Clyde Plymire, who has charge of his engine at night, and wife accompanied them.
    The railroad company have laid the track on the north of the depot for the passing track and getting it in fine shape. They are getting along nicely with the concrete work for the water tank and tomorrow (Wednesday) will commence to distribute the pipe to pump water from Butte Creek for the big tank. It is said to hold 50,000 gallons of water and will be filled by a 25-horsepower engine.
    It is definitely stated that the Lake Bros. intend to open up a bank here soon, but one of the brothers told me Monday that they were undecided as to whether they would open in the house in which they are living, the old Ulrich house, or wait until they could build in the spring, but we will have a bank anyhow, sooner or later.
    There is some land changing hands here. Last week A. J. Daley sold to Gus Rosenberg a part of lots 11 and 12, in block 7, Emery & Daley's addition to Eagle Point; consideration $250.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 22, 1910, page 4



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There is considerable excitement in our town over the question of incorporation. The move seems to meet with some opposition on account of the tract of land included being so small as it leaves out six families in the upper end of town and four in the lower end; but you know that they have to have something to kick about.
    Miss Belle Finley was visiting Medford the last of the past week.
    R. R. Minter, one of our prominent sheepmen, was doing business in our town Saturday.
    John Rader, another one of the leading stockmen, and his wife were here Tuesday getting ready for Xmas.
    Hauling gravel seems to be the leading business here just now.
    William von der Hellen reports having sold 200 acres of the old A. S. Carlton place to an orchardist. Consideration $26,000.
    J. S. Quackenbush and wife went to Medford Saturday to get supplies, returning Monday. Mr. Quackenbush has charge of the Lee Bradshaw orchard.
    J. M. Wilfley, who bought the John Hart place, took up a load of fruit trees Tuesday. He expects to plant about 5000 trees this winter.
    E. Walker and family and Mrs. Geppert came in from the neighborhood of Butte Falls Tuesday to be in Jacksonville on the 21st inst. as witnesses in the circuit court.
    Mr. Dufrey of Butte Falls called on his way out to the valley Monday.
    Professor Edgar E. Smith was a guest at the Sunnyside Tuesday night on his way to Jacksonville.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 26, 1910, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    There has been a considerable rush to our town during the past few days. On Wednesday night the Sunnyside was full, and there were twenty head of horses in town, most of them from Butte Falls, and again Thursday night we were full to our utmost capacity and the barn was also full, and the question arrives where do so many come from? Among the visitors were Lerone (Bud) Obenchain, from Klamath Falls, on his road to his old home to visit his father, Mr. John Obenchain, proprietor of the old and popular hostelry known as Obenchain's. Another was Charley Edmondson, a step brother-in-law, who married a stepsister by John O.'s second wife; another was Israel Patton of Butte Falls, who came out on Wednesday, went to Medford on Thursday and back to Eagle Point the same day; William Hughes, recently from Cottage Grove (he was on his way to visit his parents who are in the mercantile business in Butte Falls), Professor E. E. Smith, who has been engaged teaching in the sugar pine district for the past year or two, but is now living in Butte Falls; one of the Baker boys, who had been attending circuit court in Jacksonville; Thomas Farlow and wife, who live on the south fork of Little Butte Creek, and had been out to Medford for supplies and furniture; Mrs. Geppert and her son, Harris, who were on their way to Jacksonville to act as witnesses in the Jack O'Conner hog case; Ira Tungate, one of the business men of Butte Falls; Mr. Wheeler, of the firm of Claspill & Wheeler, also of Butte Falls; Mr. Mathews, who is interested in the Marcy & Cadzoe store of Butte Falls, was out for a load of goods with a young man by the name of Morris; Ed Watson, the justice of the peace for that city, beside three strangers whose names I did not learn.
    Thursday I took a trip to Medford on the P.&E. train, and among the passengers was Mr. and Mrs. Findley. They went in on special business, but the train was so long getting to Medford that Mrs. Findley said that she had no time to do any trading, so had to return home with[out] what she wanted. Mrs. Wright, the wife of the depot agent; Mrs. William von der Hellen, Mrs. F. M. Stewart, Mrs. Cole, wife of one of the engineers running a train on the P.&E. railroad beside quite a number of men already mentioned.
    Our school gave quite an interesting entertainment Friday afternoon, and the ladies are preparing to have a nice program for Sunday.
    Messrs. Arnspiger, Stewart & Co., the engineers who have been out surveying out the Lee Bradshaw place, got through Friday afternoon and returned to Medford.
    Gus Rosenberg, who bought a part of two lots of A. J. Daley, bargained for the other parts of lots Friday from A. C. and S. E. Howlett, and has fenced them in and expects to build on them in the spring.
    Miss Rosa Ayres, who has been assisting Mrs. Howlett in the hotel, went home Friday afternoon to spend Xmas with the old folks at home.
    F. M. Stewart was circulating a petition to have himself reappointed a notary public last Friday.
Medford Mail Tribune, December 27, 1910, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Frank Manning of Peyton came out last Friday after his wife and daughter who have been staying at Thomas McAndrew's since the operation was performed on Miss Manning's nose. They started for their home Saturday morning.
    Mrs. Painter started last Friday to visit relatives in Nebraska. She learned that her mother was sick.
    Sunday morning your correspondent took passage for Wm. Gregory's on Big Sticky. As he had received a special invitation to meet Mr. William Erastus Wilson and Miss Ina M. Goodale of Medford, who were armed with a license from the county clerk and demanded of me to join them in the bonds of matrimony, which I did in the most approved style. The groom was dressed in a neat black suit and the bride was dressed in a beautiful white silk dress trimmed with dutchess lace, and at the noon hour they, led by your correspondent, marched and took their position under a large marriage bell and in less than one and a half minutes the happy [couple] were united in marriage and were receiving congratulations from their many friends. The bride was presented by her father, Hon. H. W. Goodale of Medford.
    After the ceremony was over and the congratulations were extended, the many presents were made, and it is not necessary to try to enumerate them here, but suffice to say that they received enough to set up housekeeping except furniture and that would have been given but they expect to make their home in Oroville, Cal. Then dinner was announced and it is useless to try to tell about that dinner for they had nine different kinds of cake, two turkeys weighed 16 and 18 pounds, fried chicken, pies, preserves, tropical and domestic fruit, in fact everything that could be found that was good to eat but if any of your readers wish to know all about the affair just ask Mr. Duncan of the Union Stable, Medford. There were present on the occasion Mr. and Mrs. H. W. Goodale, Mr. Milo Goodale, Mr. Frank Goodale, Mrs. L. L. Wilson, Miss L. Jane Wilson, Mrs. Mary Paine, Mr. and Mrs. J. Cook, Mr. and Mrs. H. L. Gregory, Miss Cora Gregory, Mrs. S. Gregory, Mr. and Mrs. William Gregory of Cuchalponet, Mrs. Lizzie Owens, Mr. Ray Gaunyaw, Mr. and Mrs. Al Turpin, Master Vernon, Miss Ina Owens, Miss Virgie Owens, Miss Etha Payne, Mrs. Amile Cameron, Mr. George E. Rety, Mr. Thomas Triplet, Master Eddie and Richard Payne. After dinner was over the afternoon was spent in social converse, music, smoking, etc., and about 4 p.m. the P.&E. car came along and I had to tear myself away, but it will be many years before we all forget the Christmas day of 1910.
    The past week has been a busy week with our postmaster and he says that he is glad that Christmas is over. The mail sacks have just simply been loaded for the last three or four days before Christmas, not only coming but going from this post office, and the mail carriers had to take the loads on the hack.
    Our school is progressing finely. We have now 100 in regular attendance, in the three rooms, and have 11 pupils in the high school grade, and will have more after the holidays.
    Lemon Charley came out Monday night, spent the night here and Tuesday went to Medford.
    Ed Walker, wife and baby, came out from Medford, where they have spent the most of last week, spent the night here and Tuesday morning started for their home at the Iowa mills on Big Butte.
    There have been two men here trying to talk up a saloon interest as soon as we incorporate.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 3, 1910, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    A. J. Daley has been having the little house adjoining his old store house fixed up and expects to rent it, as there is such a demand for houses here as there is not an empty house in our town.
    Mrs. M. J. Jarnot of Kelso, Wash., came out a few days ago to see her husband who is one of the carpenters now at work putting up the water tank and power, or engine, house for the P.&E.R.R. Co. She remained but a few days as they have a son at home who is troubled with heart disease, and she does not like to leave him long at a time. But while she was here she fell in love with our climate, but objects to the mud.
    Mr. and Mrs. Durkey of Portland, who own a ten-acre tract of land near here, went to Portland Friday. Mrs. Durkey has been stopping on the place for some time and her husband came down a few weeks ago. She expects to return in the spring and make it her home and he will remain and settle up their business before he comes. They have been in the hotel business there.
    Mr. A. N. Ford, [who] for a number of years was sexton of the Central Point Cemetery, but now of Butte Falls, was called out by the death of his brother's wife the first of the week, but returned to Butte Falls Friday morning on the E.P.&B.F. stage.
    Mrs. Krumpe, formerly of Yreka, Cal., came in a few days ago to meet her husband, who has been working with the steam shovel gang.
    Speaking of the steam shovel, word came in tonight stating that the men on the work had all been laid off for an indefinite time. And that being the case but little will be done until spring. One day last week Mr. Cole, one of the engineers who runs one of the work trains, went up beyond Cameron some distance and brought out a lot of piling for the Bear Creek bridge, but he reports the road in a bad condition and from present appearances there will be but little done on the road this winter.
    Messrs. Bell and Wellman, who have charge of putting up the tank and pumping plant, are rushing the work right along. They have the concrete pillars made and are now laying the pipe to carry water from Butte Creek to the tank. They have secured the right of way to lay the pipe from the tank to the creek and have purchased a 30-foot strip between the road and the creek off the J. J. Fryer tract, and are laying a concrete foundation four feet thick for the engine house and have a 10-horse gasoline engine with which to pump and force the water into the tank. Mr. Wellman, the foreman on the construction of the work, says that it will take them several days to complete the job yet.
    Mr. and Mrs. George W. Daley gave a dance and supper Friday night and had a good attendance. Mrs. Daley gave the supper herself, and those who attended report having had a very enjoyable time and fine supper.
    Miss Bertha Peachey, formerly one of our school teachers, but of Ashland, came up to enjoy the dance and visit old-time friends.
    We have had two sets of surveyors here for the past few days; one company has been laying off the lots in the new addition to Eagle Point, between the railroad tract and the business part of town, and the other company have been surveying off the land that belongs to the Butte mill. It is understood the property has changed hands but what changes will be made is not known. The knowing ones seem to think that there will be several changes here in the spring.
    George West, one of the forest rangers, who has had his wife boarding here for the last two winters, has moved to Medford to spend the rest of the winter.
    Mr. Bromley, who had been out to Jacksonville for a few weeks, has returned to Eagle Point.
    Scott Claspill, one of the Butte Falls merchants, came out Friday night bringing out a lady by the name of Steward, who had heard over the phone that her husband was lying at the point of death in a hospital in Portland. They arrived at the Sunnyside about 10 p.m., and she was taken by one of the Sunnyside stable teams to Medford that night so she could catch the early morning train.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 5, 1911, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    J. M. Van de Maas, who lives on Rogue River, near the mouth of Big Butte, spent two nights with us and during the time between the two nights went to Medford, but he happened to go to Medford on Monday, the 2nd, and that being a legal holiday, he had a hard time finding the men he wanted to see, but he finally succeeded and reached the Sunnyside in time for supper.
    John Foster went to Trail last Monday afternoon, returning Tuesday.
    John Winningham and young Massey came out Sunday after a load of goods for Butte Falls, but when they reached here they found that the goods had been carried to Cameron when the train went up after the piling mentioned in a former article, so they had to pull halfway back to Butte Falls through the Reese Creek sticky, and the road is said to be almost impassable, and take the goods from there over a very bad road.
    John Foster has been circulating a petition to the county court to have a wagon road laid out and opened to a point on Rogue River near the Henry French farm and another petition was circulated on the Trail side of the river to have a simpler move made on that side, with a view to having a bridge built across Rogue River at that point, something that is greatly needed, for it will eliminate about two and a half miles of the worst kind of sticky and obviate the necessity of having the traveling public stop in the midst of their journey or have the mail carrier travel sixteen miles out of his way to get through with the mail, as he did during the last freshet. Besides that it will be proper place for the auto road to cross the river and be a great accommodation to this and the Sams Valley communities. The petition was only circulated for a few hours and there were 36 names secured and among them were almost every prominent business man in these parts.
    Messrs. A. Eltown of Tolo and L. E. Finch of Medford were here Tuesday for dinner and were inquiring about a piece of land and conveying their idea that they might possibly buy lots and put up buildings to rent--a good idea, for there is not a good house to be had in our town.
    Last Monday, Clyde Cole and the engineer of the P.&E. railroad went a few miles after a load of wood and on his return trip his engine got off the track and someone had to come out and order supper for the men and then go on to Medford with a handcar for the necessary appliances to put the engine back on the track, and the result was that they had to stay there all night, and they could not keep up a fire because they were scarce of water, and if they kept up the fire it would boil away all the water and then they would have to "kill" the engine. They reached the Sunnyside about 8 o'clock the next morning.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 8, 1911, page B4


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Four of Mrs. F. M. Stewart's daughters, Mrs. Nettie Grover, Mrs. Lottie CeCaid [Kincaid?], Mrs. Libbie Eikmire and Mrs. Della Nichols were together visiting their mother and some of their friends one day last week.
    Mr. and Mrs. Horton came out from Medford last week, stayed all night and the next morning took the stage for Butte Falls, their former home. Mrs. Horton has been engaged teaching school in Trail this fall, and has gone there for the winter.
    One day last week there was a gang of Greeks taken from here to Bear Creek to load some flatcars with sand and gravel, in charge of Mr. Krumpe, and by some means the conductor on the passenger train was not notified to stop and take the cars and men to Eagle Point and the result was that they all, about twenty of them, had to walk to their camp, a distance of about 11 miles.
    W. W. Parker and wife of Butte Falls were among the guests at the Sunnyside Wednesday. They had been to Medford and were on their way home. Mr. Parker says that the road that he fixed so good last fall has been cut up so between the Iowa mill and the "Y," on the railroad track, that one can hardly get along with a load.
    I received a letter last Wednesday from a Mrs. Condon of Eugene asking for information with regard to a location here and I had to write her word that there was not an empty house in our town to be had, but there were two men here last week looking for locations and they talked as though they might buy lots and build some houses to rent. I told them that it would be a good idea. They were both carpenters, and talked like business men.
    Two young men, Messrs. Pomeroy and Paine of the Meadows, came in Friday evening to stay over night and one of them, Mr. Paine, had one of his legs badly swollen and was quite lame and on inquiry I learned that the day before they had had a genuine runaway. Mr. Paine was standing holding the horses by the bits and Mr. Pomeroy was in the new hack he had just bought and the horses started, knocking Mr. Paine down and running over him, throwing Mr. Pomeroy out, smashing the hack, breaking up the harness and skinning up one of the horses quite badly. Mr. Paine says that he does not see how they got over him and pulled the hack over him without killing him.
    W. J. Moon of Portland and Sal B. Crane of New York called for dinner Friday. They said that they were looking for a good investment in land. There were also two strangers here Thursday and Friday. They were with J. W. Grover walking over a portion of the Hamilton tract of land, but who they were and their business they kept to themselves.
    Burton Bowers of Ashland was over Thursday looking after his interest in these parts.
    Clay Cole and Clyde Plymire, one of the engineers and one of the firemen on the P.&E., moved their families from the Sunnyside last week to Medford, as the work in their line had shut down for the present. Cole expects to return in about a month.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 10, 1911, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Miss Stella Betz of Butte Falls was visiting relatives here the last of the week.
    While uploading a lot of pipe off of a car one of the men working in the tank gang slipped and was hurt so that he had to lay off for a short time. Speaking of the tank that the P.&E. Railroad Company are putting up, while they have labored under many disadvantages they succeeded in getting the 12 concrete pillars in. They are built on the solid rock, 12 feet below the surface, and are four and one-half feet square at the bottom and two feet square at the top, and there is just 12 posts 12 inches square 16 feet long and braced in every way so that the structure would hold a thousand tons of weight. On this they will put a tank 16 feet high that when filled will hold 50,000 gallons of water and that estimated at eight pounds per gallon would make, without counting the weight of the tank, 400,000 pounds, and still the foundation would hold that multiplied by a thousand more. They have the pumping plant well under way, the pipe being laid to bring nectar from the creek, and the ten-horse engine will keep the tank supplied with water all the time.
    Miss Belle Finley was visiting some of her friends here a few days ago.
    Robert Minter, one of our prosperous stock men, was among us the first of the week.
    Frank Brown and William von der Hellen, two of our prosperous merchants, were in Medford Monday.
    F. M. Stewart is having the plastering done on his new house and getting things in shape.
    The railroad company has placed two large lamps on each end of the depot platform so that when the train is late the passengers can see where to go.
    Mr. Silsby, the old conductor, has gone away for a short time, and Charley Bacon is taking up the tickets now. Since the first of the year the company have been selling tickets here, so now we Eagle Pointers can put on city style and buy our tickets the same as in larger cities.
    I omitted to report that the Greeks in the railroad camp celebrated their Xmas last week.
    A Mrs. Vaughn, her daughter and son-in-law stepped off the cars just north of the Butte Creek bridge and they set their grips down on the side of the track to go to a home nearby for someone to help to carry the baggage to the home, and while gone someone came along, picked up one of the grips and a bucket of eggs that were set there, and when the parties came back for their baggage they found that they were minus one grip. Starting down the track, they soon found the grip. It had been opened. The thief found nothing but women's paraphernalia so left it.
    Mr. Cobleigh, Sr., wife and daughter, spent the night here on their way to Phoenix, where they expect to reside this winter.
    Died--On Sunday, January 8, 1911, Thomas Coy, aged 48 years, 9 months and 8 days. The funeral took place on Tuesday. Interment was in the Central Point Cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Lamar, our Baptist minister. Mr. Coy was one of our good, substantial citizens, a man of strict integrity, a kind and loving husband and father. He leaves a wife and five children, four boys and one girl. His loss will be felt in the community, for while he was unassuming, he was quite active in public affairs.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 12, 1911, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Wesley Childreth, our efficient and accommodating blacksmith, took a trip to Medford the first of the week.
    Fort Hubbard, of the firm of Hubbard Brothers of Medford, spent the night with us last Wednesday. He had been to Butte Falls to start an engine which he had sold to some parties there.
    Dr. Holt met with quite a mishap a few nights ago. He was going to see a patient at Big Butte and his horse fell, throwing the doctor, whose spurs became entangled with the saddle strings, and the animal got away, leaving the doctor afoot. He proceeded to the home of Mr. Geppert, procured another horse, and went on his way. The next morning he found the horse about a mile above Brownsboro.
    I am requested by Mrs. Coy and family to extend their thanks to the neighbors and friends who assisted them during the sickness and after the death of her husband.
    Mrs. Ed Tucker of Brownsboro and little daughter came out last Thursday morning to take the train for Davis, on her way to her son-in-law, Mr. Marsh, near Central Point, but did not reach here in time for the train, so had to go in the evening and then walk about a mile there to the place.
    Judge Pentz of Butte Falls came out from Medford Thursday, but as the stage was too crowded, he had to wait until Friday to go home.
    There was quite a number went from here to Medford Friday to attend the funeral of Mrs. J. H. Stewart.
    The work train of the P.&E. Railroad made a trip to Cameron on Thursday and another on Friday. It took quite a lot of goods for the Butte Falls merchants.
    W. R. Merrill, special agent for the Bell Telephone and Telegraph Company, of Portland, returned from Butte Falls Saturday, where he was attending to company business.
    Mrs. Frank Neil of Derby and one of her daughters came out last Wednesday, and Friday Mr. Neil and the other two daughters came out and went to Jacksonville.
    Miss Armes and her brother-in-law Mr. Quackenbush, who are living on the Lee Bradshaw place, came out Friday morning to do their trading with our merchants.
    Mrs. Norwood, who has been visiting her sister, Mrs. Carl Cobleigh, came out Friday and went to Medford on the evening train.
    The gentleman who bought the John Hart place was here Friday. He is putting out a number of trees this fall and winter. In fact, there is a very large amount of land being planted to orchard in this section, although this little spell of cold weather has put a stop to tree planting for a while.
    Colonel Roberts, formerly of Big Sticky, but now of Sams Valley, called for dinner Friday. He was here in the horse business.
    Mrs. Geppert and her son came out on Saturday on the stage. Her son, Harry, had an abscess on the underside of his knee and came out to have it treated by Dr. Holt.
    There is a big excitement here over the question of incorporation. William von der Hellen and the Brown brothers are at the head of the movement. When the people learned that if they incorporated they would have to build a new bridge across Butte Creek at this place, they started the cry of no incorporation. Yet the time for the election is January 31 and the election board as named is Wm. von der Hellen, Royal G. Brown and Dr. Holt, judges, and S. B. Hines and A. C. Howlett clerks. The fight is on and it is hard telling how it will terminate.
    George Noble, a traveling salesman for Cahn, Nickelsburg & Co. of San Francisco, was with us Thursday and sold a good bill of goods to A. B. Zimmerman, one of our general merchants.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 16, 1911, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    C. Farrar, the man who bought the Lamb place on the North Fork of Little Butte Creek, came out on the car Sunday and Monday, procured a horse here and went up and back. He is at present a resident of Seattle, Wash.
    W. J. Raymond of the Raymond Shoe Company, Stockton, Calif., spent the day with us Monday, interviewing our merchants and viewing our country. He was accompanied by W. W. Spengler of the Hardeman Hat Company of Seattle, Wash. They took the entire day looking over the land and asked a great many questions.
    Marion Adair of Trail Creek, who has been to Roseburg to prove up on his homestead, came out Monday expecting to take the stage Tuesday morning for his home, but found that the stage does not leave here only on Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays. So he stopped with us at the Sunnyside taking the stage Wednesday morning.
    Israel Patton, Frank Netherland, George Smith, Miss Beck and Mr. Mills, all of Butte Falls, came out Monday and most of them took the car for Medford the same afternoon.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, daughter of the late Hon. George Brown, was visiting Mrs. E. L. Wolfer last Monday.
    There is a great deal of travel on the road. Monday morning there were four passengers on the Trail stage and two more are booked for the same stage tomorrow, Wednesday morning, and there is a constant call for rigs to go to all parts of the country. Lud Edsall's team took two men, civil engineers, up to the Mike Hanley ranch Tuesday morning and two more hired saddle horses here the same time and parties are here now waiting for horses to go to Derby.
    The men who have been engaged planting trees have had to lay off for a few days on account of the snow, but tonight, Tuesday, it is raining and the snow will soon be gone and then work will be resumed.
    The tank gang put up the tank today and at night succeeded in putting on one hoop, but there is danger of the wind tonight blowing the whole thing down, as it is 24 feet in diameter and 16 feet high and with only one band if the wind blows as strong as it sometimes does it will likely go down.
    Charley Cingcade who, with Ray Ashpole, is running a billiard and confectionery establishment, has been in the hills near Soda Springs on Little Butte for the past few days gathering cattle.
    Mr. Deter, one of our business men, has been away for several days and when asked where he had been replied that he had been out canvassing for a patent ironing board, dehorning cattle and selling phonographs, rather a novel combination.
    Samuel Brice, who is in the employ of the S.P.R.C. Co. cruising timber, came out from his home near Dudley Monday on the Butte Falls stage, and so did Mr. Barber of Seattle come out at the same time.
    C. M. Grimes and wife, who have been visiting her relatives for the past two weeks, returned to their home Monday in Linn County.
    Louis Ault of Klamath Falls came out on the car Tuesday and tried to get conveyance to the place near Derby, but could not procure one as all of the rigs and saddle horses were in use.
    E. S. Purney, a civil engineer who has been assisting in laying off some of the lots in the new part of our town, is a guest at the Sunnyside at present.
    Benjamin Edmondson, one of our leading stockmen, came out Tuesday from his home near Butte Falls. He reports that the snow commenced to thaw Monday and Tuesday. When he left there it was about 16 inches but was going off very fast.
    George Wiley of Ashland, a man who was mostly raised in this neighborhood, came up from his home Tuesday to visit some of his old-time friends and neighbors, of whom he has a great many here.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 19, 1911, page 3



EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Last Saturday morning a number of young men--the Jacksonville basketball team--came out on the car and went to Butte Falls, where they were to play against that team.
    The excitement is increasing here continually on the subject of incorporating the town, or rather a part of it, and a number of citizens feel sore over a slur that was thrown at them by some anonymous scribbler charging them with being old mossbacks because they differ as to the expediency of incorporating so small a part of the town and at such an early date.
    There was quite a number of our citizens went to Medford last Saturday on account of the arrest of Thomas Edsall, a mere boy, charged with being implicated with John O'Connor in the pig-swiping move near Butte Falls. Among them was Mrs. Geppert and her son, Harris, and Wm. Taylor of Eagle Point.
    Mr. A. B. Zimmerman and John Nichols went to Medford the last of the week. They are two of our business men who are working against the incorporation move.
    Mr. Massey, one of the Butte Falls merchants, was here after goods for his store the last of the week. While here he hired a man and team to haul a part of his goods as far as Brownsboro, so as to shorten his drives. The roads from Brownsboro to Butte Falls are very bad.
    John Groff and wife of Newberg came in from Medford to spend a day or two last Saturday night. They were on their way from Los Angeles, where they had been spending several months. They spent the day Sunday on the desert north of here looking for agates and other curios. They found quite a number of very pretty stones. Mr. Groff is a concrete contractor and spends his time at Newberg and Los Angeles.
    Mr. A. Edler and his three daughters, Misses Hannah, Flora and Elizabeth, came out Saturday night spent the night with us and the next morning went on to Medford to see his wife, who has undergone an operation in the hospital.
    Mr. Earle S. S. Smith, wife and Mr. Lawrence Minot Pittman came over Sunday morning and engaged me to take them across the desert via Table Rock station across the lower bridge of Little Butte Creek, up Rogue River and around on the desert north of Eagle Point just to look at the country. Mr. Smith is a banker and has a project on foot to open another bank in Medford. Mr. Pittman is a mining engineer recently from Arizona. To say that they were delighted with the trip does hardly do justice to the subject, and Mrs. Smith could hardly tear herself away from the scenery. They have promised to come back when the roads get good and have me take them up to Trail via Bybee bridge and back via the Fan [free?] ferry so they can see more of the country.
    We have been having some changes in real estate here. Charley Thomas has bought two acres off of the Jonas place and R. J. McQuaid and sons, N. C. and J. F., have purchased three acres off of the same tract. The McQuaids are going to build two houses on their land right away. They expect the lumber to be on the ground and work to commence on two of the buildings Wednesday or Thursday, and Mr. Thomas will build in the spring.
    Mr. P. W. Williams of Butte Falls came in Tuesday evening and he informs me that he has started a new paper, The Progressive in that town, that he will be the publisher, proprietor and editor, that he has purchased the printing plant at Central Point and expects to put out a readable paper, and he knows that we all wish him abundant success in his undertaking.
    Glen Fabrick of Medford and his father-in-law, Mr. C. G. Roberts of Hood River, came out Monday and had me take them up to Mr. Fabrick's place on Antelope Creek.
    Mr. A. L. Massey and wife of Portland came in Tuesday night on the train on their way to Butte Falls to meet his parents and other relatives.
    John Winningham of Butte Falls came out Monday and brought Mrs. Stewart, who lost her husband a short time ago, and went with her as far as Medford where she took the Southern Pacific for California.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 27, 1911, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS
By A. C. Howlett
    Ed Walker and wife, who live at the Iowa mills, near Butte Falls, came out Thursday from Jacksonville, where he had been as a witness in the Jack O'Conner hay case, also Mrs. Geppert [and] her son Harris. O'Conner came back to Eagle Point on Saturday morning and started for Butte Falls with his wife, Mrs. Carl Cobleigh and one of the Thomasen boys.
    Prof. C. E. Johnson who has a homestead on the railroad track near Reese Creek, has been visiting Medford and Ashland, came out on the P.&E. Friday morning to his homestead and returned Saturday evening to the Sunnyside.
    A gentleman by the name of Donahue, a lumber cruiser from Portland, just returned from a trip up on Trail Creek. He reports the whole country a combination of mud, slush and snow, but it will be better soon. In a few days after the sun has shone a short time the roads will be so much better that he will hardly know they are the same roads.
    In spite of the continual showers, mud and slush people are pushing their work right along. The McQuaids are putting up their houses; they had one up and sheeting all ready for shingles Saturday evening and Frankatish [sic] also has his house so that they have moved in and have let rooms to one of the McQuaids until they can build their own house on the land they bought from Mrs. Jonas. J. W. Grover is getting the material on the ground to build two houses this spring and there seems to be a general feeling here that our little town is coming to the front.
    Miss Flora Aiken, a stepdaughter of Mr. Uouland [sic], reported Friday morning that the men working on the old Beekman tract of land, now owned by Benton Bowers, had found the bones of an arm and hand of a human being while repairing a fence, but there is no recollection among us old settlers of anyone being lost in that section.
    H. E. Whitney, one of the United States rangers, spent the night here Friday on his way to the Cat Hill and country to plant seed to reforest the burned section in that district.
    Chambers Grigsby and family, a son of Mrs. A. N. Thomas, is here visiting his mother and old-time friends. He is expecting his brother Milan and sister Henery Corrin of Douglas County to come down in a few days and after visiting them a short time, will return to his home in Nevada.
    E. H. Carder, the man who bought the Pat Ryan tract of land lying about two miles west of Eagle Point, and Mr. J. H. Holmes were pleasant callers. A few days ago Mr. Holmes was out looking for a tract of apple land or where he could raise an orchard.
    C. M. Boynton of Medford was a guest at the Sunnyside Friday night.
    George Feefus and T. J. Towreip of Portland called for dinner Saturday on their way to Derby.
    Andrew Coffman and Lee Waddell of Big Butte also called for dinner Saturday; they were on the way from Medford to their homes.
    C. C. Breeman department company, fruit inspector of Medford, came out Saturday and examined two lots of trees that had been shipped out here. He also was a guest at the Sunnyside.
    C. P. Briggs, a druggist of Butte Falls, and Mr. Cowden were pleasant guests at the Sunnyside Friday.
    E. S. Turney, a civil engineer, was also with us Saturday.
Medford Mail Tribune, January 31, 1911, page 3


 

Last revised July 31, 2020