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The Infamous Black Bird Southern Oregon History, Revised


Eagle Point Eaglets 1907


A. C. Howlett Visits California.
    As I passed through Medford on Christmas, on my way to the city of San Francisco, I looked over the vast crowd that thronged the depot grounds and wondered how it happened that there were so very few in that company that I could recognize. I think that there were only about a half dozen that I knew, and still I am supposed to know a large portion of the citizens of Medford, but the reader must have in mind that Medford is one of the most thriving business places on the Pacific Coast, and that there are hundreds of strangers coming all the time to see the wonderful resources of our lovely valley. But when I started to write I didn't intend to write an eulogy on Medford and its surroundings, but give an account of my experience, on the road and in the cities of California--for at this writing I am in Napa City. Well, after leaving Medford we reached Ashland, just in time to partake of a fine Christmas dinner, and after dinner took a spin around Ashland. Ashland is growing some, but I noticed several notices "To Let'' and "For Sale." The streets were in a fairly good condition and there seemed to be considerable business going on. They have several fine churches and the schools are already of general reputation, and may I justly say that Ashland is a very nice place in which to live, but from what I could learn of the prices of the necessities of life they are considerable higher than they are in either Medford or Eagle Point. On Wednesday at 12:35 p.m. we boarded the train for San Francisco. There were also a number of Jackson County folks on the train, so I had the company of some of our old neighbors. There was nothing of especial note happened on the route. I saw but very little of California on the route, for it was dark the most of the way. We arrived in San Francisco at 9:30. I at once took a car and went to my brother's shop and found him at his bench. That afternoon I hunted up some of my old neighbors, among whom was Miss Hattie Cingcade, who is working in an office in a large department store as stenographer and typewriter, and Miss Laura Ayers, who is working in another store as saleswoman, and Fred Green, one of Eagle Point's most promising young men, who has an important position in the Credit Bureau Emporium, and Carl Ringer, who is one of the motormen on a streetcar line. They are all the product of Eagle Point and we may justly feel proud of them, as they are all on the high road to prosperity and honorable positions. This closes the first day's experience in the Bay City.
A. C. Howlett.
Medford Mail, January 18, 1907, page 1


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. Greenwall, a brother-in-law of Mrs. J. B. Jackson, arrived here during my absence.
    Mrs. May Stickle and her two children have gone to Eastern Oregon, where she has a position near Prineville.
    The orchardists have been and are now busy spraying their trees, and getting ready for another large crop of fruit.
    I am glad to be able to announce that J. W. Wright, our harness maker, has greatly improved in health and is able to go out again.
    The masquerade ball given on the first of January was a grand success. There were over 100 tickets sold and Mrs. Howlett had a crowd to feed, but she had enough and to spare.
    Since I last wrote the Eaglets for the Mail I have had and seen many changes, and now I am once more seated at my home and will try to report at least some of the incidents that have occurred during the past three weeks, in these parts.
    Shortly after my departure for San Francisco an Indian woman by the name of Summers died of consumption. Dr. Holt conducted the funeral services in the Eagle Point church and the remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery.
    The two dances, November 29th and January 1st, gave such general satisfaction that the Eagle Point band boys have decided to give another one on February 14th in Daley's new hall and have engaged Mrs. Howlett to give the supper at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Sam Jackson, a brother of J. B. Jackson, started from here about two weeks ago to go to the Joe Bar mines and has not been heard from since, although he promised to write as soon as he reached the mines, and his brother is quite uneasy on account of his strange silence.
    A man by the name of Moore and two by the name of Jones stayed here a few nights ago on their way to the unsurveyed section. They report that there is but little snow up there and that everything is lovely. They have a number of varieties of berries and fruit trees planted and expect fine results.
    There has been a number of strangers here, some looking for homes, some looking for land for speculation and two coal experts looking over our hills for coal. These last two claim that they have found evidence sufficient to justify the conclusion that there in an abundance of coal in these parts, and one of them advised me to hold on to that tract of land I have on the hill above town.
    James Ringer, who has the contract for carrying the mail from here to Peyton, has been laid up with la grippe since Christmas and his son-in-law, Joe Moomaw, has been carrying the mail. On one of his trips he was weatherbound and was compelled to stay all night on the road. If some of the road fund that is expended where it is not needed was applied toward bridging McNeil Creek, there would be no trouble carrying the mail from here to Peyton or Prospect.
    The sad intelligence reached me on my arrival home that Mr. A. J. Childreth, father of our blacksmith, passed over the divide to the great unknown at the residence of his son, J. R. Childreth of Pendleton, December 20th, aged 65 years, 7 months and 17 days. He leaves a grown-up family and several grandchildren to mourn the loss. The deceased was a member of the Baptist Church and a consistent Christian and lived in such a manner that he could say, "Follow me as
I have followed Christ."
Medford Mail, January 18, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. G. W. Daley, who went to Klondike last summer, returned a short time ago.
    Our sick folks are all convalescing I am glad to state. Thanks to our healthful climate.
    J. W. Grover is driving posts, so as to fence his land between the creek and the county road.
    S. B. Holmes gave a card party last Friday evening, and those present enjoyed themselves so much that they did not disperse until after midnight.
    Mr. Mahoney and his daughter, Mrs. Alberts, with her two children stopped here overnight last Sunday on their way to their home in the unsurveyed region.
    That little item I put in the Mail in regard to the disappearance of Sam Jackson soon brought a letter from him announcing his safe arrival at the Blue Ledge mine.
    The Ladies Aid have ordered and received a galvanized iron fender and new heater for the church at this place, and it will probably be in place in time for services next Sunday when Mark C. Davis, our Sunday school evangelist, will hold services at 7:30 p.m.
    If reports are true, and I think they are, there was a wedding took place last Tuesday, the groom being one of our enterprising young farmers, and the bride is a charming young lady reared in our foothills. If our conjectures are true and correct we as a community tender congratulations.
    John Kirkpatrick, an aged pioneer, having been a resident of this coast for the last sixty years, returned from a trip to Crescent City a short time ago and has taken up winter quarters at the Sunnyside Hotel. He is thinking of taking a trip to his old home in Illinois. He is now in his eighty-third year and still quite active and healthy.
    During the past week there have been several persons passed through here on their way to the unsurveyed region, among whom were a brother of J. E. Spencer and a traveling companion, both from Pennsylvania, A. B. Soling, a coal expert from Iowa, and a young man by the name of Jack Illig, of Portland. They are having a rough time getting their baggage on account of the horrible condition of our mountain roads.
    George Daley gave a dance in his new hall last Saturday night and reports that it was very well attended, and that they had an enjoyable time; but the dance guests are getting ready for the big time on the 14th of February when the Eagle Point band gives their big dance with supper at the Sunnyside Hotel. Several numbers have already been sold. They, that is the dancers, say that they can have a better time here than anywhere else they go.
    I had an occasion the first of the week to go up to W. C. Daley's. I moved his daughter, Mrs. Ora Jones, from here up there, and talk about roads, the county road, the one that has been traveled for the last thirty years, has had no work done on it for the last three years, and it is in such a condition that it is almost impossible to go over it with a wagon; in fact the road is so bad that the most of the travel leaves the road and wanders around in hopes of missing some of the mud holes by a circuitous route, but strangers don't understand how to go to miss these bad places. I noticed that the water is undermining the ends of the bridge across Connution Creek so that it is dangerous to cross with a team, and if it is not fixed before another rain storm the bridge will likely go out, and then the taxpayers can build another, but a little work in time will save it. There is a move on foot, so Mr. Daley told me, to get a good road from Eagle Point to Brownsboro. The plan is for a mass meeting to be held at Brownsboro, composed of the citizens of Lake Creek precinct, and they are to select a committee to view out a good roadway and set stakes so as to have the road on an even grade and then petition the county court to lay out the road and have it worked so that people can travel at all times of the year without risking their lives or taking chances on breaking their rig. The people living in the district above Brownsboro have done a great deal of grading on their roads, and in the course of a short time, if they can have their own way, will have a road that will reflect credit on them as a community. I noticed all along the route that the stock, mostly cattle, looked fine and there seemed to be plenty of feed for them. I also noticed that some of the farmers are keeping goats to clear their land; they slash the timber and the goats do the rest.
Medford Mail, January 25, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Dr. Page has been clearing the brush away from the county road along his place and driving new posts preparatory to putting up a new wire fence.
    Mrs. Cora Officer and her daughter, Miss Allison, returned from a trip east last week, where they have been visiting relatives.
    John Hart, one of our prosperous farmers, has just returned from California where he has been by the bedside of his sick daughter. He reports that her case seems to be almost hopeless.
    Arthur Pool has been cutting some of the trees along the bank of Little Butte Creek, which greatly improves the appearance of his lot and affords a much better view of that part of the town.
    On Friday evening of last week Miss Flora Daley gave a party to a number of her schoolmates. There was quite a number present and the evening was very pleasantly spent with dancing, games and music, after which light refreshments were served.
    The report has been going the round that Miss Mann, the principal of our school, was going to resign as teacher and accept a position in one of the Medford schools; but I am authorized by a member of the school board to say that she will teach the whole term of eight months.
    Rev. C. M. Davis preached for us last Sunday evening to a good-sized audience, and he preached a fine sermon that seemed to take with the people. Someone, by mistake, took his umbrella, a self-opener, and he wishes the party to leave it with me, as he needs it in his business.
    I omitted to state in my items last week that another of Elder J. P. Moomaw's son-in-laws, a Mr. Willison from Dakota, has come out to look at our country and is thinking of returning to Dakota and disposing of his business there and returning to our section to make his home. He reports that in that country the ground freezes to the depth of six feet while here it never freezes six inches in depth--who wonders that he wants to make the change.
    Thomas Fredenburg came down last week from the unsurveyed region. He reports the snow about three feet deep in that section of the country--the unsurveyed section is on top of our high mountains--and that one can hear the sound of the ax all over the woods. The settlers are very busy clearing their claims, building houses for newcomers, and getting ready to live there. He also reports that there are only five more claims in that part of the country to be taken.
    There is getting to be considerable interest taken in the possibilities of this immediate section of the country. The indications are that there is coal in abundance here, and the fact that we have one of the best sulfur springs here, and indications are such that lead us to think that there is also oil here, for in two different places springs have been struck that send forth an oily substance that floats on the water, and I think that steps will be taken to test it and see what it is and if it can be procured in any quantity.
Medford Mail, February 1, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Last week John Kirkpatrick made a business trip to the county seat.
    Bert Peachey was visiting friends in Eagle Point last Monday and Tuesday.
    Elmer Spencer came out from the new surveyed wagon [road] last Thursday and had to remain until Monday on account of the high water.
    Miss Bertha Peachey stopped in our town last Saturday night and Sunday went to Mr. Lee Black's when she opened school last Monday morning.
    Mr. Echek, the man who has charge of the John Daley orchard, is preparing to bring his family from Eastern Oregon and move on the place and Mr. Daley will move to Medford.
    Bandmaster Foley is drilling the E.P. Orchestra and getting everything ready for the dance on the 14th inst. Those who have heard them play say they are improving very rapidly and they are looking for a very pleasant time on that occasion; the tickets are being sold quite fast.
    A petition was circulated here to have Wm. Perry appointed as road supervisor for this district. A very large majority of the taxpayers would like to see him or someone else appointed that would take an interest in the roads, and try to make them so that they are passable.
    Last Saturday Jud Edsall started from home in Big Butte with ten yew fence posts and on account of the horrid condition of the road between here and Brownsboro had to unload, pull his empty wagon out by hitching to the end of the tongue--as the horses could not get a foot in the proper place--reload, and finally had to leave his wagon and take another day for it.
    C. E. Parker and Nick Young started last Friday for Burns, Oregon, to look after their interests there. The latter has been here visiting his brothers, Thomas and Peter, and sisters, Miss Clara and Mrs. James Owens, and the former has been here looking over our country, and he, like most of the rest that come for that purpose, is well pleased with what we have here to see.
    Last Sunday John Daley and family by appointment took dinner with Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Jackson and while they were having a very pleasant visit, and they can always have that with Mr. Jackson's family. The water in Butte Creek was steadily rising and when they got ready to go home found that the water from Butte Creek had backed the water in the Nichols branch so that they could not get off of the footbridge so had to retreat, but they had a very enjoyable time that night and the next day managed to get home.
    Speaking of high water Mr. Peyton and a part of his family came out from their home on Rogue River, near the middle or Flounce Rock bridge, last week and when they reached McNeil Creek there they had to stop on account of that ugly stream being past fording, and the mail carrier got as far as the crossing of McNeil Creek on Saturday last and could go no further on account of the high water. It is estimated that a bridge can be built across that stream for about one hundred and fifty dollars, and still the people in that section are bottled up for want of a bridge, while a large amount of money is expended on our roads where there seemed to be no necessity of them being repaired. Let us have a fair deal and give the people living in the hills a show to get their mail and the mail contractor a chance to fill his contract without risking his life or the life of his horses in trying to cross those ugly streams.
Medford Mail, February 8, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. Stone and her sister, Miss Jones of Medford, were pleasant callers last Monday.
    A man by the name of Stone has opened up a barber shop in the old Jerry Heckathorn building.
    The Jacksonville and Medford motorcar made a trip to our section of the country last Tuesday. They did not reach the town on account of a washout on the railroad track.
    Mrs. Amy Brown gave a birthday party for her husband one night last week and the guests spent the time playing cards, and with music and song passed the time off very pleasantly, the Eagle Point Orchestra rendering some fine music.
    There was trouble in our school last week between the teachers, and a meeting of the board was called. The two teachers, Miss Lulu Mann and Mrs. J. R. Cook, stated their grievances and some of the pupils were examined and they were both dismissed by the board. The directors will secure new teachers and school will probably commence again next Monday.
    The eighth grade examination took place last week, there being twelve pupils took the examination, and seven of them passed as following: Lily Ulrich, Anna Ulrich, John Crump, Carl Jackson, Herbert Carlton, Opal Daley and Thomas Vestal. The other five as following: Jennie Lewis, Mamie Wright, Carl Taylor, Roy Ashpole, and Frank Abbott, and they only failed in arithmetic, running as high as ninety-eight percent in several of the branches.
    In spite of the rain and mud the travel still continues to increase and our thriving little town is being visited by a great many strangers, some on their way to the mountains to try to secure homes on government land, others taking in supplies to their homesteads, and quite a number looking for homes among us. Among those who have been visiting our town are Mr. Raymond, of Griffin Creek, with five men and a young lady, driving a four-horse team loaded for the unsurveyed land. Mr. Mahoney, the two Jones cousins, Geo. Beale, Jack Tungate, S. E. Bruce, M. S. McMasters, Thomas Fredenburg, son and daughter, besides a number who passed through here between meal times and did not stop. Messrs. Thomas Hall of Seattle, Wash., and James Hancom of Medford, were here last Monday looking for locations, inquiring about our school facilities and church advantages.
Medford Mail, February 15, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Our school reopened last Monday with Prof. A. S. Haselton as principal and Miss Ella Parks as primary teacher.
    Howard Fox, who has been working on Wagner Creek this winter, returned for a short stay with his family last week.
    The Medford and Jacksonville motor car came over the track from Medford to Eagle Point last Sunday. There were about eight or nine passengers aboard.
    Jason Hartman, our bridge builder, and Mr. Jones, living about three miles east of Medford, called last Sunday. Mr. H. seems to think that the railroad is a sure go.
    Married.--In Lakeview, January 31, 1907, E. E. Bunch and Mrs. Mae Sickle, daughter of Mrs. Art Thomas of this place. Her many friends here join in congratulations.
    The dance given by the Eagle Point band the night of February 12th was a very pleasant affair. There were about fifty numbers sold. H. Wendt, a photographer from Central Point, came over and took a flashlight photo of the company in the hall, and several copies have been sold.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school evangelist, came among us last Saturday and announced and commenced a protracted meeting on Sunday night. He was joined by Rev. Edward F. Green, pastor of the Congregational church of Ashland on Monday. They expect to continue the meeting over next Sunday.
    John Shure, recently from Minnesota, and Miss Jones of Medford were pleasant callers last Sunday. While speaking of the contrast between this place and his old home he said that the Friday before he
left, February 8th, the mercury dropped to sixty below zero, while here we are around in our shirtsleeves.
    Dr. Page is just finishing putting out a large tract of land to orchard, apples and pears. He is having his place fenced with Page fence this week.
    The many friends of Miss Lottie Taylor were pleased to see her return to our midst last week and resume her old place in J. H. Carlton's store.
    Mrs. Echek, wife of the foreman on the John Daley place, arrived last Sunday and is now on the place with her husband, Mr. Daley having sold out some time ago and moved his family to Medford. They will be greatly missed, for Mr. D. has been one of our leading citizens, and his wife and daughters have been prominent in society.
    There was quite a number of the citizens of this vicinity met at a point on the desert north of here to try and discover the origin of the apparent foundation of what once might have been a large house. The stones are six sided, about eighteen inches long and convexed on one end and concaved on the other so as to fit exactly and appear to be set in mortar, and one remarkable peculiarity is there is no stone to be found in the neighborhood of the same kind. There will be further research made in the near future, and if anything is discovered of interest it will be duly reported.
Medford Mail, February 22, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    James Ringer made a business trip to Prospect last Saturday,  returning Sunday.
    E. S. Wolfer came over from his Rogue River ranch and brought 12000 strawberry plants to set out on his farm in this neighborhood. He seems to be confident that he will have a fine lot of berries this season.
    Mr. Skeen, wife and daughter of California have been visiting their son-in-law, Isaac Smith and family. Mr. S. and wife returned last week, but the daughter remained and is having her eyes treated by Dr. Pickel of Medford.
    S. H. Harnish, who has been living in the Griffith house, has moved into the home formerly occupied by James Ringer, and Mr. Ringer has moved into the Peachey home and Mr. Stone expects to move into the Griffith home the last of this week.
    Wilbur Ashpole and Wm. von der Hellen have bought a large tract of land on the desert north of here and have been fencing. Gradually the range is being fenced up, and in a short time about all the outside range will be gone and stockmen will have to provide feed for their stock or drive them back to the high hills.
    Charles Turrel of Brownsboro and a friend of his, John M. Hickman of Michigan, were pleasant callers the first of last week. The latter was here looking after the timber interests of parties in Michigan, but gave out nothing more. He is on his way home but expects to return to our valley in the near future, being so well pleased with our surroundings and especially the healthfulness of our country.
    P. H. Daily, county superintendent of schools, visited our school last Monday. He also met with the directors of this school district to talk over the trouble with our former teachers, Miss Mann and Mrs. Cook. What the outcome will be remains to be seen, and will be looked for in this district with considerable interest, as it is claimed by those who ought to know that the proceedings of the board in dismissing them was not exactly according to law.
    Died.--At the family residence on Rogue River, February 19, 1907, John Maupin Black, aged 76 years, 2 months and 14 days. Mr. Black was born December 5, 1830, in Callaway County, Missouri. He professed religion at the age of 18 years and joined the regular Baptist Church and lived a consistent Christian life to the day of his death. He leaves a wife and three grown children, two girls and a boy. In an early day he came to this county and has lived on the same place for over forty years. At one time he was the Democratic candidate for county judge. He was a man that was highly respected by all who knew him. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery, funeral services being conducted by Rev. M. C. Davis.
Medford Mail, March 1, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    There are a few cattle buyers in our section, but they are very quiet about their business.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent has leased the Daley farm joining Eagle Point, so to raise more feed and have more barn room.
    Mr. Stone, our barber, has gone to Medford at this writing, Monday, to move his family out. They will occupy the Griffith place.
    Wm. Ulrich is building another house on his place. I suppose from the appearance it is designed for a poultry house.
    J. W. Grover, one of our enterprising farmers, is clearing off the willows along the bank of Butte Creek so as to cultivate the land; will probably sow it in alfalfa.
    Mr. Tratt of San Francisco, Calif., who has been visiting his mother-in-law, Mrs. Y. A. Abbott of this place, returned to his home last week.
    S. C. Bruce, one of the enterprising citizens of the unsurveyed region, is making trips pretty regular just now considering the bad condition of the roads.
    Howard Fox, who is working on Wagner Creek, returned home last Saturday, on account of the death of his wife's grandmother, Mrs. Abbott, near Phoenix.
    Mr. Parker, who has been working during the winter on the Dr. Page place, is moving to Central Point and expects to work in the Hopkins orchard.
    S. H. Harnish, who has moved on the place formerly occupied by James Ringer, is making considerable improvements in building more shed and stable room, a hen house and fixing things up generally.
    H. B. Spencer, one of the Spencer brothers, who has settled on the unsurveyed land in the Big Butte country, met his wife at Central Point last week and they proceeded on their way to their new home.
    John Higinbotham, John McKee and one of the Cobleigh boys stopped here overnight last Sunday and proceeded on their way to the "Hub." Mr. Cobleigh however proceeded out to Phoenix, where he is making his home for the present time.
    The dance given by George W. Daley, Sr., last Saturday was a very pleasant affair. There were about fifty persons present and they had nineteen couples on the floor at one time. Mr. D. and his large phonograph entertained the people while they were resting from dancing.
    B. F. Harris and two gentlemen from Michigan were pleasant callers last Sunday. They were on their way to Butte Falls. They are delighted with our climate. They had their fur overcoats along but found that all they needed in that line was a light dress coat.
    Revs. Davis and Green closed their meeting on Wednesday evening of last week. There was considerable interest manifest and toward the last the congregations were quite good. They are both gentlemen of culture and refinement and made a good impression on the people here. They expect to commence another series of meetings here on the fourth Sunday in April.
    George W. Daley Jr., had an eleven-hundred-gallon water tank brought out from Medford last Saturday, and when he gets it in place, with his centrifugal pump and gasoline engine he will be prepared to irrigate his garden, and have protection against fire. He expects to put water into every room in the house. There are others who propose to follow his example in that line.
Medford Mail, March 8, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Arthur Pool recently sold his farm, situated on the edge of the desert, of two hundred and forty acres, for $3,000.
    Last Sunday Wm. Perry and his bride took dinner with us, and their man friends here are covering them with congratulations.
    Since writing the foregoing in regard to Mr. Wright, I have just learned of his death this Tuesday morning, March 12. Further particulars next week.
    J. W. Grover is clearing a large patch of willows off along the bank of Butte Creek, near the county road, and is going to put in alfalfa--a good move.
    John W. Wright, who is very low with something like a cancerous growth in the throat, had the satisfaction of having a visit from his mother, Mrs. Pettigrew, last week.
    Last week I stated that Wm. Ulrich had put up a new house and it looked as though he was going into the poultry business, but the new house proved to be a scale house. He has put in a scale to weigh cattle, hogs and other stock. Mr. Wamsley, the mechanic who built it, says that it is so strong that you might drive a hundred head of wild buffalo in and not break it.
    Messrs. Iseli and Thurtle of Round Top, Austin of the unsurveyed country, Ira Tungate of Jacksonville, Thomas Fredenburg of Big Butte and Mrs. Coffman of Jacksonville were sojourning at the Sunnyside on Wednesday night of last week.
    Mr. Tronson, one of the men who bought the John Daley place above our town, has moved his family to the place. They are putting out a large number of trees on the land that has been in grain, and they will soon have an orchard that will compare favorably with the famous Olwell orchard.
    The first of last week your correspondent made a trip to Round Top sawmill. The owners are getting ready for a big run, as orders are constantly coming in for lumber. They are making some changes in the road, greatly improving it, and by the time the mud dries up enough to commence teaming they will be better than they have ever been.
    Our Butte Falls merchant, G. T. Richards, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside on Thursday and on Friday he proceeded on his way home, accompanied by your correspondent. Mrs. Edith Coffman accompanied us as far as John Edsall's. I took up a load of groceries for Mr. Richards. I was sorry that I did not have time to stop to visit friends there, but on account of the bad roads I had no time to spare. Those who are living there seem confident of a big business in the near future, and Wm. Chambers has built a neat hotel for the accommodation of the travel. Mr. Richards has a fine stock of goods--much better than we should expect to find in a place so far back from the railroad--but nevertheless he has a large variety and a good stock on hand. They have also a good school taught by Miss Cadell, also a thriving Sunday school, sawmill, etc. The city park is laid off, the business lots are arranged so as to face the park, and they have a fine water power, the waters of Big Butte Creek falling over a precipice nineteen feet high, giving all the power they will need for the big sawmill they anticipate putting in as soon as the railroad is completed to that place. There is a number of families living there now to take advantage of the school, and everything looks encouraging.
Medford Mail, March 15, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Our mail carrier from Central Point failed to reach here last Monday on account of the break in the Bear Creek bridge at Central Point.
    Ex-sheriff Rader was over a day or two ago trying to buy some cedar fence posts. He finally succeeded in getting a few from a gentleman in Central Point, who had bought up all there was here.
    Arthur Pool has had a man at work tearing down the old Pool hall, stable and blacksmith shop, and he had torn the roof off, leaving the long rafters without any stays, when the wind Sunday afternoon started them and down they came with a crash. No damage was done except to some of the lumber.
    In my last I announced the death of John W. Wright and promised the readers of the Mail to give a more extended notice later. The deceased, John Wesley Wright, was born June 16, 1868, and died March 12, 1907, aged 38 years, 8 months and 13 days. He was a man of strong religious convictions, having professed religion in 1902, and lived an exemplary Christian life until the Master called him home. He leaves a mother, half brother, wife and three children, two sons and a daughter. He was a member of the A.O.U.W. He came and settled among us about a year ago and during this time had made many warm friends.
    Last Sunday Mrs. Howlett gave a birthday dinner in commemoration of my seventy-fifth birthday. A few of our old-time friends were invited, among whom were J. J. Fryer and wife and grandson, Austin Green, Mrs. A. M. Thomas, Grandma Heckathorn, Miss Parks (our primary teacher), David Cingcade and wife, besides a number of friends who came to extend congratulations and get a good dinner. When leavetaking began they expressed the desire that I might live to see many more anniversaries of my birth. I tell you, Mr. Editor, it makes one feel young in their advanced years to have such a gathering of old-time friends. And while I am on the subject of the passing years, I may add that I am now well along in my fifty-first year as a newspaper correspondent, and am still working and writing for the
Medford Mail.
    Last Sunday afternoon Frank Ditsworth and three of his sisters of Peyton stopped in with us and were kept busy all day and until Tuesday morning on account of the rain and high water in McNeil Creek, the stream that is such a bother to the mail carrier from here to Peyton. In speaking of their neighborhood with regard to schools, they report that they have about twenty children in the district that draw school funds, and in that district they levy a special school tax sufficient to raise $800 a year, besides their per capita tax and $50 that each school district draws, and the result is they have eight teachers who have been reared and educated in that district. The three sisters, Misses Ida, Ada and Mae, are all there teaching now or will commence to teach in a short time, as they all three have contracts to teach in the three districts near them. The citizens there are talking of taking steps toward establishing a high school, as the people are of an intelligent class and are not too stingy to pay a tax for school purposes.
Medford Mail, March 22, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born.--March 22, to Mr. and Mrs. Orla Hayes, a daughter.
    I understand that at Butte Falls they are hewing out the long timbers for the big mill and sawing the short ones.
    Messrs. Stone and Hartman were in this section last Sunday. Mr. Stone was looking for horses, while Mr. Hartman came to see about building a bridge across Butte Creek at the John Daley place.
    I understand that three gentlemen were in this section last week from the east during the heavy storm and there was so much water on the ground that they went away with a very poor opinion of the places they came to see. If they would come when they could see the land instead of a sheet of water they would probably change their opinion of our country.
    Mr. Baldwin of Round Top called here last Monday. He reports that times are beginning to liven up and that the two mills in that section are getting ready for operation, and intend to do a large business during the coming summer.
    Jess Fredenburg of Butte Falls came out last Monday on his way to Willow Springs after his mother. He reports there is a number of cattle dying in his section on account of the heavy storms of the past two weeks.
    W. H. Bowen and Mr. Wamsley made a business trip to Ashland last week. Mr. Bowen reports the opinion prevails in Ashland that the apricot, almond and early peach crop have been injured by the cold snap we have had, although in this section there has been no damage thus far.
    Mr. Lewis, the Central Point beef man, called Tuesday morning and reports that the high water of Bear Creek, near Central Point, did hundreds of dollars worth of damage, washing away acres of the best bottom land. Mr. L. had his slaughter house, tools, corral, etc., swept away, and came near losing forty head of hogs he had in the pens. He estimates his loss at $250.
    Mr. Austin, who is living on unsurveyed land north of Big Butte Creek, came out last Monday on his way to Medford. He says that the settlers in that section are all making arrangements to make that place their permanent home and are clearing the land and putting in orchards and berries. That is going to be one of the best fruit sections in the county, as the soil is very productive and particularly adapted to horticulture.
Medford Mail, March 29, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--March 31, 1907 to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Smith, a daughter [see correction below].
    Mr. Houghdon and wife stopped here last Sunday night on their way to Butte Falls.
    There will be a grand dance in Daley's hall on May Day. Mrs. Howlett has been engaged to give the supper.
    I unintentionally omitted to report in my last week's letter the arrival of a new baby boy, on the 21st of March, at the home of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen--Grandpa Florey begins to look quite venerable.
    Mrs. Ida Grimes, daughter of Baxter Grigsby, of Klamath County, a prominent stockman of that section, is in our valley visiting relatives and friends. She is at present the guest of her grandmother, Mrs. A. M. Thomas.
    D. J. S. Pierce of Forest Creek came over last Sunday and called on his sister, Mrs. A. M. Thomas. He was on his way to Elk Creek and was accompanied by his daughter, Miss Grace, who is engaged in teaching school in that district.
    Last Sunday night the Eagle Point Sunday school favored us with a very interesting entertainment, which consisted of vocal and instrumental music and recitations by the children and a very interesting dialogue. It was voted that the entertainment was a grand success.
    W. H. Canon of Wisconsin and his son, F. J. Canon, of Montana, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Hotel last Monday night. They were on their way to the Trail Creek country to look at the timber and find out what they could about the timber and lumber interests, making inquiries about the output of the mills in this section, price of lumber, etc.
Medford Mail, April 5, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Chris Beale of Butte Falls also sojourned at the Sunnyside Monday night.
    Jesse Ferrin and wife of Ashland came down last week to visit his mother, Mrs. Wm. F. Smith.
    Henry Daley, a promising young man of our town, is preparing to go into the bee business. He received a supply of lumber preparatory for the business last Monday.
    Miss Bessie Bell of Brownsboro, who has been in Medford visiting her sister, Miss Donna Bell, who is teaching in one of the public schools in that city, returned last Thursday and was a pleasant sojourner with us Thursday night and returned home on Friday morning.
    Dick Stepp, who has been in Portland for the past few weeks, returned to his home at Round Top sawmill. He has been working in the round houses for the O.R.&N. Co. in the daytime and studying telegraphy at night. He is a promising boy and will make his mark in the world some day.
    Sometimes the printers make mistakes, but last week your Eagle Point correspondent made a big mistake in announcing the birth of Isaac Smith's daughter. I had it written Aaron instead of Isaac; they are brothers, but I have it all O.K. this time. It should have been: Born to Mr. and Mrs. Isaac Smith, March 31, a baby girl.
    Messrs. Moir and Farres of Big Butte country, Henry Gordon and Tom McAndrew and A. Y. Young and family dropped in on us last Monday night. The first two mentioned proceeded on their way Tuesday morning to Medford; the next two were taking a band of cattle to the range on the north side of Big Butte, and Mr. Young and family were on their way to their homestead near the south [sic] of Rogue River.
    Mr. Wendt, the Central Point photographer, came out and pitched his tent for business last week, but the constant downpour of rain was such that he decided to store his things and spend a few days with his family at his wife's parents on Little Butte Creek. He expects to return as soon as the weather settles when he will be ready for business--See his ad to this issue of the Mail.
    Last Sunday Mrs. George Daley Sr., received a telegram from Sterling City that her mother, Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, was lying very low at the home of her son-in-law, Porter Robinett, with pneumonia. She started immediately, taking the midnight train. Mrs. Simon is one of the old pioneers left in this section, and her many friends are anxiously waiting to hear from her again.
    There was considerable disappointment here among those who enjoy a good entertainment, on account of the rain last Friday night, as they had planned to go to the school entertainment at the school house three miles above Brownsboro, but while they were disappointed, there was about eighty persons attended and the four young men who took dinner here Saturday report that the exercises were very good and that they had a fine lunch and danced all night.
    B. F. Harris, the railroad promoter, accompanied by C. E. Wolverton of Sunnyvale, Calif, who is representing the San Jose Basket & Box Factory, was here interviewing our strawberry men on the subject of strawberry crates and on his way to the big timber to examine the outlook. Mr. Harris was also accompanied by J. A. Sullivan of Des Moines, Iowa, and B. W. Heberling of Sunnyvale, Calif. The last two gentlemen are looking for homes, and the way they expressed themselves this section of the universe seems to be the place they have been looking for. They were much pleased with the prospect here.
Medford Mail, April 12, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Miss Parks, our primary teacher, went to visit her parents, near Sterling, last Friday, returning on Sunday.
    Wm. Perry and family went to his homestead last week. They have been stopping with his brother-in-law, J. W. Grover.
    The ball-goers are already engaging stable room for the dance here, May first, and Mr. Daley is expecting to have a large crowd that night, and Mrs. Howlett is fitting the Sunnyside up so as to accommodate all that come.
    Chas. Hayes, who has been living here this winter to take advantage of our school, moved to Medford last Monday to engage in hauling lumber from the sawmill southeast of Medford.
    Gilbert E. Tooth, a son-in-law of Mrs. J. A. Abbott, arrived recently from Massachusetts, where he had been to visit his old home and be treated for injuries he received during the earthquake of April 18, 1906. He was one of the heavy losers on that occasion in San Francisco.
    Last Friday our teachers, Prof. A. S. Haselton and Miss Ella Parks, had Arbor Day exercises at the school house. There was a nice program and the children did themselves credit for carrying it out. They planted several trees on the school grounds, thus taking the initiatory steps to have a beautiful playground around the school building.
    Ed Higinbotham and wife were pleasant callers on their way to Medford, last week, and also on their return. Ed has taken the contract to cut and deliver the logs for the Round Top Mill Company this summer, so we feel assured that the mill will have something to do. In fact the orders are coming in for lumber already and the company assures us that they are going to put the road in good condition this spring so that lumber can be hauled without risking one's neck and team.
    The many friends of Mrs. Chas. Carney were shocked and grieved to learn of her death, last Friday. A few of her old neighbors attended the funeral last Saturday and many more would have attended had they known of the death, but it was not generally known until after her burial. She lived for several years in this neighborhood, took an active part in social and religious exercises and was a prominent worker in the W.C.T.U. Mr. Carney's friends deeply sympathize with him and his family in their bereavement.
    Last week I spoke of Mr. Wolverton of Sunnydale, Calif., being here, and since then he has visited Butte Falls and took a look at the timber in that part of the county, and language failed him in speaking of the wonderful resources of our valley; not only the timber but our agricultural and horticultural resources, and also our wonderful water power in Big and Little Butte creeks. He claims that the outlook for the country in the region of the two creeks, above mentioned, is as good as the outlook of any other part of the valley of Rogue River and that all that is lacking is a little energy and capital to develop the country, for he is of the opinion that the soil of the Big Butte country, after the timber is taken off, is equal to any of the soil in the surrounding foothills that is noted for its productiveness.
    Died--April 15, 1907, at the home of her son-in-law, Porter Roberts, in Sterling City, Calif., Mrs. Elizabeth Simon, aged about 76 years. Mrs. Simon was one of the early pioneers of Jackson County, having come here within the early '50s settling in Sterling, this county, and in a short time she and her husband, Peter Simon, settled on a farm, now forming part of Eagle Point, where they raised a family of children, remaining there until after the death of Mr. Simon. The place was then sold to Wm. Ulrich. Mrs. Simon and her husband unite with the Presbyterian Church and was one of the organizers of the Eagle Point church under the ministry of the late Rev. M. A. Williams. She was a consistent Christian woman and leaves a family of four boys and two girls and a large circle of friends and relatives to mourn her loss.
Medford Mail, April 19, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Ben. Fredenburg, of Butte Falls, spent Monday night here.
    Mrs. Gilmore, of Nevada, is the guest of Mrs. A. M. Thomas.
    Mrs. Thomas Fredenburg has been stopping here for the past few days.
    Haying is under way; the crop is not up to the average, but there will be quite a plenty.
    Last week Austin Green had the misfortune to lose a large silk muffler that he prized very highly.
    Two men by the names of Apple and Lewis came out from the coast to visit the family of A. Mayfield last week.
    Walter Wood is now the proud father of baby number two, which was born on the 13th of May--an eleven-pound boy.
    Holmes Bros. are getting the material together to put up a large water tank near their mill as a protection against fire and for irrigating purposes.
    Last Sunday Baxter Grigsby, Chas. Thomas and Mrs. Conn arrived at the home of their mother, Mrs. A. M. Thomas. She is looking for more of her children in a few days.
    Married--In Jacksonville June 1, 1907, Mr. F. A. Bellows and Miss Clara Winkle, and the same evening the happy couple returned to his mother's farm on Rogue River.
    Word came last Sunday that the little child of Aaron Beck, of Butte Falls, that has been sick for several days, had died and was buried on Sunday. I have not learned the particulars.
    Jake Wetzell came out last week to see about opening a meat market here, but he met with but little encouragement as we now have a meat wagon four times a week from Central Point.
    Mr. Hendricks of the unsurveyed region was a pleasant caller last week, also Mr. Reed and Mr. Austin; they are all in high glee over their prospects of getting a home in that favored part of the country.
    Mrs. Leona Abbott and family went to Phoenix on Decoration Day, where they witnessed the unveiling of the monument over her late husband's grave, which was erected by the members of the W.O.W. lodge.
    Last Sunday our daughter, Mrs. Millie Hoyt, of Ft. Klamath, arrived at our home in Eagle Point, but before this is in print she will be home again. She came on a flying business trip connected with their big hotel in Ft. Klamath. She went to Medford on Monday to buy some of the fixtures for their new house.
    George Roberts, Mrs. O. B. Walker and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Ed Walker, stopped at the Sunnyside last Monday for dinner; they were on their way from the Butte country, where the two ladies had been visiting Mrs. O. B. Walker's son, who is engaged in timber cruising for the Iowa Lumber & Box Company.
    I see by some of the papers that there is a movement on foot to have the government bring water into our valley for irrigation purposes and we believe that that would be a move in the right direction and if our local papers will take the subject up something might be done in that way that would increase the productiveness of our land and thereby create business and thus make Jackson one of the leading counties in the state.
    Last Friday Rev. Edward Green, of Ashland, by special invitation, went to the home of Hugo von der Hellen where all arrangements had been made to have the ordinance of baptism administered to the two children of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen. He reports having had a very pleasant time and that the ceremony was very impressive. The same day Rev. Mark C. Davis baptized Misses Mamie Wright and Jennie Lewis in Butte Creek by immersion. There was quite a crowd gathered to witness the administration of the ordinance.
    Last Saturday night the citizens in the neighborhood of Boswell school house gave a box social; there was quite a number of our people attended. The boxes brought generally a good price and the receipts of the evening was thirty-three dollars and seventy cents. The exercises were remarkably good and the evening was spent pleasantly and profitably, for the proceeds are to be applied toward paying the expense of the first three months school. The teacher, Miss Ruby Russell, deserves great credit for the successful manner in which she managed the affair.
Medford Mail, June 7, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. and Mrs. Cary, of Phoenix, were here last week, they were the guests of Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Knighton.
    Our blacksmith, W. L. Childreth, has employed [a] man by the name of Carno, of Humboldt County, California, to help him in his shop, and they both seem to have all the work they can do. Mr. Carno has moved his family into the Riddle house.
    N. V. Redifer, of Myrtle Creek, who has stock in Klamath County, returned from a trip to that country a few days since. He stopped here overnight on his way home; he crossed over the Trail Creek route and stopped to visit an old friend, John Williscroft, of Trail.
    Mr. Conner, superintendent of the bridge construction for the P.&E.R.R. Co., is now repairing the railroad bridge across Little Butte Creek. The R.R. Co. has a force of men repairing the track and expect to have a construction car running over it in a short time, Section Boss Charles Wolgamott reports.
    The dance last Friday night was quite a success. There were forty-one numbers sold for supper, besides a number of half tickets. Eagle Point seems to be quite a favorite resort for the dancing part of the community. They seem to have a pleasant time whenever they come.
    Frank Neil of Derby and his two daughters, Miss Nydah and Mildred, and his mother-in-law, Mrs. Jones, stopped here for dinner Friday. The Misses Neil and their grandmother were on their way to Portland. The two young ladies are going to visit friends and relatives in that city for a time.
    Last week Mr. Swenge, of Grand Forks, N.D., traveling in the interest of the Vermont Loan and Trust Company, was here looking for a location for a bank. He was so favorably impressed with our surroundings that he promised to return in the near future, and thinks seriously of opening up businesss here.
    J. W. Bailey and J. A. McLeod, of Iowa, were here last week on their return trip from Butte Falls. They have been looking over the situation here and have decided to open up business between here and Butte Falls, but did not give out the kind of business they contemplated going into, but one of them remarked that they expected to be in our town considerable of the time this summer.
    Last Friday Mrs. A. N. Thomas gave a birthday dinner and your Eagle Point correspondent had a special invitation, but on Thursday night was taken sick and consequently was unable to attend, so you see I missed [a] good thing for once in my life, on account of being sick. But those who attended report having had a royal good time and such a dinner, well Grandma Thomas knows just how to get up a good dinner and entertain company. Those present were: mostly her children, B. S. Grigsby, wife and daughter, Charles Thomas and family, Mrs. Henry Conn and daughter, Mrs. L. P. Maury and two daughters of Coquille, D. J. S. Pierce, of Forest Creek, Mrs. Cillian, of Nevada, Wm. Knighton and wife, J. W. Grover and family and Grandma Heckathorn. There were several besides myself and wife who were invited, but were unable to attend, but enough were there to have a good time and we all hope she may live to celebrate many more birthdays.
    I unintentionally omitted to state last week that Harry Guerin, of Portland, was here visiting his grandparents, Mr. and Mrs. George Brown.
    Ben. Edmondson, formerly of Derby, but now living at the Bybee Springs on Evans Creek, called last Monday for dinner. He reports that he has everything fixed up for the summer's run at that celebrated health resort.
    Last Monday as Ed and Charley Cingcade were driving onto the scales in Eagle Point with a load of hay their team became unmanageable and turned the load of hay over in the street; thus freeing themselves of the hay and hay rack they started to run; they crossed the bridge and passed two teams and were headed for home when they were caught. The wagon was somewhat damaged, but not much harm was done.
    Next Monday is school election day and a vote will be taken on levying a tax. Let everybody who is interested in having a good school turn out and try to put in a good director.
    Last Monday John Higinbotham and wife, Mr. and Mrs. Humphrey, Emery Spencer and a man by the name of Mackey stopped here for supper and hurried on to Medford the same night. The men above mentioned with the exception of Mr. Higinbotham have been engaged in estimating the timber on the Iowa Lumber & Box Co. land in the Big Butte country.
    I am in receipt of a letter from H. T. Hull, 1711 South 9th Street, Newark, N.J., asking a number of questions about this country, and says he is reading my Eaglets in the Mail. What do you think of that? He says he has read so much in the Eaglets about this part of the country that he wants me to particularize. He asks eight questions namely, alfalfa, wheat, corn, stock, horses, hunting, fishing and the population of Eagle Point, and wants to know about the railroad to Eagle Point. If some of you readers will take the trouble to answer some of his questions they may confer a favor on him and be instrumental in bringing a good business man among us.
Medford Mail, June 14, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Last Sunday Miss Maggie Daley went to visit with Misses Bertha and Maud Peachey on Yankee Creek.
    Mrs. Mary Wright, accompanied by her daughter, Miss Minnie, and Miss Blanch Cox, went to Medford last Saturday. The two girls went on to Ashland to attend the Children's Day exercises at the Congregational church.
    Arthur Morrison had the misfortune to lose a valuable mare last week, thus breaking up his team. She lay down and in rolling ran a sharp stick into her body, penetrating the intestines, causing death in a short time.
    L. M. Sammons, who has been working at the Blue Ledge mine for some time, came out and joined his half-brother and family, Mr. and Mrs. A. H. Turbiville, stopping with us Thursday and Friday nights on their way to Ft. Klamath. They intended to go the Rogue River route, but when they reached here learned that the snow was too soft to bear them up on the high hills, so they went by Ashland and Klamath Falls.
    Hugo von der Hellen and Thomas Riley were pleasant callers last Sunday. Mr. von der Hellen informed us that his wife had gone to Corvallis to be present at the marriage of their son George to one of the Corvallis young ladies. Rev. Edward F. Green, of Ashland, went down on Tuesday to perform the marriage ceremony for the young couple. Mr. and Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen will take up their abode at the Blue Ledge mine, where Mr. von der Hellen has the position of assayer for the company.
    There was an auto came out last Sunday morning containing three men and one lady. They started as though they were going up the hill on the road to Yankee Creek, but left the machine at the foot of the hill and proceeded on their way on foot. I learned later that they were Mr. Lawton, of the firm of Page & Lawton, and a land buyer and his wife looking for land. They bought the Geo. Brown tract of land, paying $25 per acre. Eagle Point is gradually coming to the front and people are learning that we have some choice farms in these parts.
    Our school meeting was well attended, in fact the best attended of any school election we have had for several years. The people are beginning to see the necessity of putting in persons for directors that take an interest in our schools and are in favor of being the best teachers and good schools. W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, was elected director and Mrs. Alice V. Cook was elected clerk with no opposition. Mrs. Cook was one of the teachers who was discharged by the board last winter and by her being elected as clerk without opposition is considered as an endorsement of her course. It is expected that this little affair will be carried to the courts, as Mrs. Cook held the register and made her report just the same as though she had taught the entire term out and now claims her pay for the five months that she was to teach.
Medford Mail, June 21, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Alex Betz, Peter and Purl Stowell started the first of the week for Fort Klamath to engage in haying.
    Mrs. Jack Howell of La Grande has been here visiting Mrs. Wm. H. Brown and her sister, Miss Lottie Taylor.
    Mrs. Purdy and her daughter Miss G. Purdy, mother and sister of Mrs. Holt, who have been here visiting for some time, returned to their home in Oakland, Calif., a few days ago.
    Arthur Pool is having a building erected on the upper end of the lot formerly occupied by the Pool hall and stable. I understand that it is designed for a confectionery store to be in charge of his son Irvin.
    Jason Hartman has erected a tower thirty feet high back of J. H. Carlton's hardware store and put a 4000-gallon tank on it. The pipes are not placed in position, but will be in a few days. The pump is attached to the wheel in the grist mill.
    Elmer Boardman came out last Monday with a load of shakes for your Eagle Point correspondent. He reports business brisk in the neighborhood of Butte Falls. Everything in the timber line is in demand, from shingles to fence posts. Everybody busy and consequently prosperous.
    There are quite a number of our citizens who expect to go to Jacksonville on the Fourth of July and take in the sights there and return to Eagle Point to attend the dance given by George Daley in his new hall. As usual supper will be served at the Sunnyside Hotel by Mrs. A. C. Howlett.
    Our P.&E.R.R. begins to look as though the new management meant business, as they are putting on more men, have their timetable published and by the time this is in print expect to have a train running from here to Medford, making two round trips each day.
    Walter Foster, a nephew of Mrs. Howlett, arrived here last Sunday from Clackamas. He proceeded on his way to the hatchery on Rogue River, near the mouth of Elk Creek, last Tuesday in company with Mr. Kelly, the superintendent of the hatchery. He is employed by Uncle Sam in the fish department.
    Mr. and Mrs. Harrigan, of Michigan, were here last Sunday on their way from Butte Falls to Medford. They are looking for a home, and seem to be more than pleased with our country. They speak in the highest terms of our climate, water, water power and especially of our fruit and berries.
    Arrangements are being made to have a grand time in Eagle Point at the time of the erection of A. J. Florey's flag pole and the spreading to the breeze the flag on July 3rd at 2 o'clock over the new post office building. It is on the program to have some speeches made and appropriate exercises by some of the children.
    A man by the name of Sanders stopped here last Monday night. He had been on Rogue River to look at the Bybee tract of land and then came up here to look at some of the places here. He is well pleased with the prospects here, but wants to look around some more before he decides where to purchase. He is not only looking for himself but for others. He has been looking over some of the places Page & Lawton have listed in this section.
    Mr. Mahoney and his daughter, Mrs. Albert, who are living on the unsurveyed land north of Big Butte, were here on their way to Medford. Mr. Mahoney went for a load of [omission] for the big sawmill at Butte Falls, and his daughter went to Medford to buy supplies. Mr. Austin and Mrs. Wilson were also here last Saturday night on their way to their home on the unsurveyed land. Mrs. Wilson thinks that this country has the most delightful climate and is the proper place for one who is in search of health.
Medford Mail, June 28, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    S. C. Bruce, who has a home in the unsurveyed section, started last week for Spokane, Washington.
    Rev. Wherry, a Baptist minister, held services here and also at Brownsboro during the past week. He had very good congregations at all of these meetings.
    The ladies of Eagle Point had an ice cream social on Tuesday night of last week. It was a kind of a basket social, each lady bringing in something to make the heart glad. Those who were in attendance pronounced it a grand success, but whenever the ladies of Eagle Point undertake to do anything they always succeed.
    Rev. John Lawrence, of the unsurveyed section, will preach in the Eagle Point church next Sunday at 11 a.m. and 8 p.m. Mr. Lawrence is an old evangelist, having been in the work in different states for several years, and from the way he carries on a conversation he is likely to interest an audience. There is a minister from Central Point who has sent word to friends that he will be here the same Sunday night. So while we have had almost a famine in that line, we will have a literary and perhaps a spiritual feast.
    The Butte Falls stage, that has been running from Medford to Butte Falls, has changed its route and now starts from the Sunnyside Hotel every morning and meets the train at 8:45 a.m., and one starts from Butte Falls the same time and connects with the train at 4:45 p.m. This is a great convenience to the traveling public. The railroad company is making preparations to extend the road. They are having ties hauled out, there being several teams engaged hauling from Caster's, where the Harris company is putting up a sawmill to cut ties for the railroad.
    On Wednesday of last week the first car of the P.&E.R.R. came out and brought quite a number of Medford folks and on Thursday entered formally on the work on the new railroad, and a large delegation of our citizens turned out to meet the train and many of them brought the products of our soil, and had a long table, decorated with a grand display of flowers, fruits, vegetables, grasses, etc. John Cook made a few remarks on the arrival of the train after which Mr. Estes responded in a short talk, setting forth some of the things that we may expect from the company. The train is now coming and going regularly and I understand that the company is doing very well considering the fact that Eagle Point is but a small village, but during the past week business has been remarkably brisk.
    Robbie Jonas and wife surprised his parents one day last week by presenting themselves at the family home. Mr. and Mrs. Jonas knew nothing of their son's marriage until he introduced his wife, and to say that they were surprised hardly expresses the thought. Mr. Jonas says that he hardly knows how to treat a daughter, for he never had one before, but expressed the wish that they would remain until he becomes acquainted with his daughter. Mr. Jonas has been principal of a school in Walla Walla, Wash., with about two hundred pupils and four teachers under him, and also publisher and editor of a newspaper in that city. We of Eagle Point naturally feel proud of such young men coming from among us, and his many friends here are wishing him and his estimable wife a long and prosperous journey through life.
Medford Mail, July 5, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Rev. Davis went to Derby last Wednesday and to the unsurveyed region to organize Sunday schools.
    Section Boss Anderson has rented the Peachey home and expects his family to arrive by the time this is in type.
    Dr. Holt is building a barn on a lot he purchased from J. H. Carlton and getting the material all out of an old residence.
    The P.&E. Railroad has erected a small house for a store room to answer until they can get the lumber out to build a depot.
    Mrs. Sarah Guerin, of Portland, has been here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. George Brown.
    Mr. and Mrs. Benj. Edmondson, Jr., came to the Sunnyside last week with a sick child and Dr. Holt was called. At this writing she is thought to be some better.
    The Butte Falls stage that starts from the Sunnyside Hotel every morning at 8:45 a.m. is always loaded, and sometimes they are not able to take all the passengers.
    Our town is getting to be one of the liveliest little towns in Southern Oregon, and the present prospect is that we will have a big run all fall. The Sunnyside Hotel has already had to erect two large tents for lodging rooms and needs still more.
    Rev. A. J. Folsom, of Portland, missionary of Congregational Church and Rev. M. C. Davis and Edward Green will commence a series of meetings in Eagle Point next Monday, July 2, 1907. Rev. Folsom is said to be an energetic and live preacher and it will pay to go out and hear him.
    The small mill that was erected at Butte Falls has been moved to the Caster place about twelve miles from here, and will be used to cut ties for the P.&E. Railroad, and as soon as that is completed and teams can be secured work on the railroad will be pushed right along until it reaches the big timber.
    John D. Holst and wife had a little celebration of their own on the Fourth of July, '07, when there came into the family a twelve-pound daughter. To say that they had a joyful time does not overstate the facts in the case, for John thought it was one of the happiest Fourths he ever spent.
    While at Round Top I had the pleasure of meeting Vern Baldwin, son of Monroe Baldwin, who started back to Redwood Falls, Minnesota, a short time ago, with an invalid son, who died on the way. Mr. Baldwin has so fallen in love with this country that he has decided to remain here and has taken up a timber claim near Grand Cove, this county.
    John Kirkpatrick, who has been making his home with us for several months, started for Fort Klamath Tuesday morning with his son, Jeff, and Mr. Booth, who came in last week. They went to Medford and procured their loads, returning to Eagle Point Monday. They report that the haying business in the Fort Klamath country will not be as extensive this summer as usual, that the stockmen out there are pasturing their lands more than usual and intend to turn off the cattle this fall, as a large percent of them are steers and will be made into beef.
    Mrs. O. Gilbert and her friend Mrs. E. Woolsoncroft, of Ashland, came out last Sunday on the P.&E. train and spent the day visiting old-time friends in Eagle Point, among whom were Mrs. Geo. Brown and her family of daughters. They took dinner at the Sunnyside and in the afternoon A. C. Howlett took them out for a drive and to see the town and surrounding country. They seemed to greatly enjoy the ride and the fine scenery, they drove by some of the famous onion and strawberry patches, and took in the most of the town.
    On Tuesday of last week I took a trip to the Round Top mill after a load of lumber, and upon arriving there found that they had broken a cogwheel and that Mr. Stepp, one of the proprietors of the mill, had gone to Medford to get another one made at the Medford Iron Works. While there I learned that they had about three hundred thousand feet of lumber on hand and were sending it out as fast or faster than they could make it. They had just received an order for 30,000 feet of lumber for the Butte Falls bank building and another large order for the depot building at Eagle Point, besides smaller orders were constantly coming in. From what I can learn all the mills in that section of the country are kept busy all the time. The road to the Round Top mill is in the best condition I ever saw it in and with very little work it can be made good [illegible] for anyone to haul over.
Medford Mail, July 19, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Miss Jennie Lewis was visiting friends in Medford last week.
    J. H. Carlton has had new screen doors put in his store.
    Miss Gernell Jackson has been visiting the family of Arthur Nichols.
    Mr. and Mrs. Russell, of Medford, came out last Sunday evening on the train.
    Autos are getting to be quite a common sight on our streets nowadays.
    Prof. Abe Bish and family came on the P.&E. Monday morning on their way to visit Mrs. Bish's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Peachey.
    Revs. Folsom, Green, Davis and Fletcher commenced a protracted meeting here last Monday, to continue all week.
    The new railroad management are having considerable surveying done, but the people are wondering where it will locate the road and where they will establish the depot.
    Miss Jones, of Roxy Ann, was visiting her sister, Mrs. Stone, last Sunday. She was accompanied by Miss Cassie Plymire, Miss Maud Peachey and Miss Hannah Wenn, of Yankee Creek.
    We have had another change in the time for the arrival of the stage from Central Point; it now arrives about ten o'clock a.m. and with the irregularity of the Southern Pacific trains we get our mail whenever we can. Our Portland papers lay over in Central Point until through grace [we] are allowed to have them. We are living in hopes that a new mail route will be established from Medford to this place, and then we will get our mail more regularly.
    Rev. M. C. Davis passed through here one day last week on his way to the unsurveyed region, returning via Peyton. He reports the Sunday school at that place is in a flourishing condition. He preached there twice last Sunday. While on the unsurveyed tract he made partial arrangements with Rev. John Fletcher to take charge of the work here and at Table Rock. Rev. Fletcher is an able and interesting speaker, and the people of this community will give him a cordial welcome.
    Rev. W. S. Smith, traveling Sunday school missionary for the Presbyterian Church, preached for us Saturday evening, and Sunday morning and evening. He is quite a forcible speaker and made a favorable impression on the audience. Elder Moomaw had an appointment to preach at eleven o'clock, but kindly gave way for Mr. Smith. F. A. Myer and his mother, of Talent, were out to hear Mr. Moomaw, but were not much disappointed as Mr. Smith gave us a fine sermon.
    S. C. Bruce and wife, of the unsurveyed country, stopped here one night last week, and his brother came out and stayed one day and that evening, Friday, was met by Mr. Austin and two young men. Mr. Bruce and one of the young men went on their way to Medford that night and the next morning Mr. Austin and the other young [man] started on toward Medford on foot. Everybody nowadays seems to want to see Bliton.
Medford Mail, July 26, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    George and John Daley took a trip to the high hills some weeks ago and have not returned yet.
    Cephas Moomaw started last Monday for Lemoine, Calif., to work with his brother, Ben, in a lumber camp.
    Mr. and Mrs. Holden, of Elk Creek, stopped here last Sunday night on their way to Medford on a business trip.
    John Higinbotham and his wife were pleasant callers one day last week. They report business lively in their section.
    Rev. John Fletcher of the unsurveyed section will preach here the second Sunday in August both morning and evening.
    Miss Maggie Daley returned from Ashland last Monday, where she had been for a few days' visit with Miss Bertha Peachey.
    Dr. Pickel, of Medford, has been called out to see Arthur Pool, who is lying very low with heart trouble, also to see Wm. Ulrich, who is troubled with an abscess.
    People are coming here every few days looking for houses to rent. If someone who has the capital to build with would invest some of it in that way it would be a good investment.
    Jason Hartman has just completed a bridge across Butte Creek on the old John Daley place for Messrs. Tronson and Guthrie. They are also building a new house on the place.
    The P.&E. railroad company seems to be doing considerable business carrying passengers and freight.
    There were two loads of telegraph poles loaded at the depot a few days ago for the company.
    John Ashpole came near being badly hurt a short time ago. He was hauling a load of manure and in crossing a small ditch he was thrown out of the wagon on his head and was unconscious for some time.
    Mrs. Saltmarsh came up from the Willamette Valley one day last week to see her father, A. Pool, and left her purse containing about fifty dollars lying on the seat in the car of the P.&E. It was found by the conductor and returned to the owner the next morning.
    J. E. Stepp, of the Round Top Lumber Co., and his son, Mat, came out last Sunday and took the morning train for Medford, returning in the afternoon accompanied by his two daughters, Misses Maggie and Hattie, who have been visiting in Medford.
    Last week as Ed Cingcade and his father were hauling a load of hay a clip came off one of the singletrees, the tongue dropped down and the wagon turned over--Mr. Cingcade jumped off and Ed was pulled off by the lines and quite badly hurt on the knee, wrist and head, but he is getting on all right.
    Last Sunday there was quite a number of the citizens of Jacksonville came out on the train. Some brought their lunch with them and others took dinner at the Sunnyside. Among the picnickers who came several stopped off at the R.R. bridge on Butte Creek and spent the time fishing and hunting berries. Among those who came on to town were O. Harbaugh and family, Chris. Ulrich and family and a gentleman who attends to the wants of the people of Jacksonville with his dray, and his family, Miss Mollie Britt and Mrs. Smith and her daughter.
    Our U.S. mail arrives here sometimes at one time and sometimes at another, and the contractor so manages his drives [that] the mail sometimes gets here in the morning and sometimes in the afternoon, and the result is our Portland daily paper has to lay over in Central Point overnight and the news gets quite stale by the time it reaches here. We were in hopes that arrangements could be made to have the P.&E. train carry the mail from Medford and then we would get our mail a day sooner. If the Agate post office could be revived and established at the Gregory place, on the P.&E. road, and have the mail brought out on the P.&E. it would accommodate a large number of people.
    W. F. Arant, superintendent of the Crater Lake Park, and his brother from the Willamette Valley were pleasant callers Monday last week on their way to the home of the former. They had been to Medford for supplies. Mr. Arant reports the road between here and Crater Lake in a fair condition, but needing some work done on it. He thinks that with the expenditure of about seven hundred dollars that the road could be placed in a first-class condition and suggests that if Medford is awake that it will look after the matter, as Ashland and Klamath Falls are doing all they can to draw the travel on that route. He says that he has a force of ten men at work on the new route from White Horse--that is one of the camping places on the route between here and Crater Lake--to the Crater Lake road from Fort Klamath. On the new route that he has surveyed out and is working he will cut off some of the distance and cut out the hill going to the summit on the old road, having a grade of not more than twelve inches to the rod anywhere, whereas on the route we now travel we have to ascend a hill that in one place the grade is forty-six and a half inches to the rod. He thinks that he will be able to have the road finished in time for the fall travel, and if the people of Medford will wake up, have the road repaired between this valley and White Horse, we can safely count on having about all the tourists go by this route.
Medford Mail, August 2, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Charles Cingcade started last week for Walla Walla, Washington.
    Born--July 20, 1907, to Mr. and Mrs. Tracy Boothby, a son.
    Mrs. Newport and her sister, Julia Ayers, of San Francisco, came up last week to visit their parents, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayers. Miss Julia went to Mt. Pitt to visit her sister, Mrs. Wm. Perry
    Mr. and Mrs. Harry Cingcade came in from Klamath Falls last Saturday. Mr. Cingcade remained in Central Point and his wife went on to Big Butte to visit her parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Obenchain.
    Mr. and Mrs. Charley Edmondson and their daughter, Miss Bernice, came out last Monday night to assist in the care of Benj, Edmondson's child, who is laying very low at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Misses Emma and Bessie Maury, of Coquille, have been here visiting their grandmother, Mrs. A. M. Thomas. They started on their return trip last Monday, but expect to visit friends on their way home.
    In my items last week I announced that Rev. John Fletcher would preach at Eagle Point on the second Sunday--next Sunday--at eleven o'clock and at night, but was misinformed. He will preach at Table Rock at eleven o'clock and in Eagle Point in the evening.
    D. L. Clouse, president of the Fidelity Mutual Aid Association of Portland, came out last Saturday evening on the P.&E. train to adjust the claim of John A. Ashpole for injuries sustained by his fall, reported a few weeks ago. The claim was accepted and the amount paid. Mr. Clouse returned to Medford Sunday morning.
    Last Thursday I was called to take a man by the name of Geo. C. Smith and family, consisting of wife and son, to Peyton. He bought a tract of land in that neighborhood eight years ago from a widow lady in Portland and had never seen it, so concluded to go up and find it. His home is in San Antonio, Texas, but he is so favorably impressed with this country that he talks of moving onto his property next summer. We found the road to Peyton in a fine condition, with the exception of a short distance just beyond Clark's Creek, where it is so rocky that the road is bound to be rough until it is covered with crushed rock or gravel. While at Peyton I learned that they have a new hall where they hold Sunday school and preaching. Mrs. Peyton reports that they have a fine Sunday school and a good attendance at preaching services.
    The Eagle Point Ladies Aid Society had an apron sale last Thursday. It was gotten up on short notice. Mesdames Buck and Smith of Medford sent word that they would be out on Thursday to reorganize the W.C.T.U., and a few of our Eagle Point ladies, among whom were Mesdames J. W. Grover, A. J. Florey, W. A. Smith and Alice Cook, took a notion that they would have an apron sale at that time, and so they commenced to advertise it. The word was passed around and the result was that the society took in from the sale of ice cream and cake the sum of $33.60 and I was authorized to say that that money is to be applied, first to pay for the insurance on the church building, second to purchase a new lock for the church door and the rest to be applied, with the fund on hand, to purchase seats for the church. The two ladies above referred to, Mesdames Buck and Smith, came out as announced and reorganized the W.C.T.U. with ten adult members: Mrs. J. W. Grover, president; Mrs. A. J. Florey, vice president; Mrs. Alice Cook, secretary; Mrs. J. A. Jones, treasurer.
Medford Mail, August 9, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. Ella Taylor, of Ashland, is visiting her cousin, Mrs. A. J. Florey.
    There was quite a number of our young folks went to Medford last Saturday, returning Sunday.
    S. H. Harnish and family started Saturday for the Blue Canyon. They were accompanied by W. H. Bowen.
    Rev. A. L. D. Minear, of Jacksonville, a Dunkard minister, will preach here next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m.
    Last Monday E. S. Wolfer and Clarence Meeker passed through here on their way to their homesteads on Elk Creek.
    Elder J. P. Moomaw had the misfortune to be kicked by a colt last Monday, but fortunately was not seriously hurt.
    The heavy rain last week did considerable damage to the stacked grain and hay, although it helped the fruit and vegetables.
    Chris Beale and Mr. Hendrith stopped here on their way to Ashland last week and Chris brought back a load of furniture for Butte Falls.
    H. J. Langdon, for the present stopping at Trail with his family, came down Sunday afternoon to meet two of his friends, who came out on the P.&E. train.
    The Butte Falls stage that leaves here every morning except Sunday seems to have about all that they can do in the way of carrying passengers and often have to hire extra teams to carry them.
    Mrs. Mary Albert, of the unsurveyed [region,] has been visiting in Ashland and Medford and for the past several days has been a guest at the Sunnyside Hotel at Eagle Point. Her father, Mr. Mahoney, came down last Monday with a load of yew posts for parties in Medford.
    Messrs. Norris and Henderson started last Monday morning for the Caster sawmill for loads of ties, but could not get their loads and Mr. Norris came back and loaded up with machinery for Butte Falls. Mr. H. remained to have a load sawed for him.
    Frank Manning of Leeds spent several days in Medford and at the Sunnyside the last of last week. John X. Miller, of Trail, was also a guest at the same hostelry the last of the week. There has been quite a run of business here for the past two or three weeks, and if the amount  of people and teams that stop with us is any indication Eagle Point is getting to be quite a lively town.
    Rev. John Fletcher, of the unsurveyed region, preached for us last Sunday, both morning and evening. At night he had a full house and the best of behavior. He is one of the old-fashioned preachers that preach straight from the shoulder. He is very popular and has consented to preach here again on the first Sunday in next month, Sept. 1st.
    A man by the name of Warner, from Iowa, stopped off here last Sunday and I took him to Trail where he met his son, whom he had not seen for some fifteen years. I brought back with me Mrs. Hammond, of Trail, who wanted to go to Medford on business, but when she reached here she met her husband and learned that she would not have to go any farther so they returned to Trail Monday morning.
    The railroad force is, at this writing, putting in a stub on the desert near where the old telephone road crosses the railroad track, and they are preparing to put in a "Y" at this place. The sawmill at Caster's has been troubled on account of the lack of water, and the teamsters  engaged to haul ties for the railroad have had to lay off for several days, but they started up again last Monday and expect to do business right along.
    On Tuesday of last week, August 6th, Sylvia Edmondson, the little girl that was sick for several weeks at our home, passed away; aged 2 years and 9 months. The parents, Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Edmondson, desire the Mail to extend their thanks to the kind friends who rendered them so much assistance during the sickness and at the time of the death of their child. Your Eagle Point correspondent took the remains to the Butte Falls cemetery on the 7th and the funeral services were conducted by Rev. Owens, of Butte Falls. There was quite a number of people from the Falls and surrounding country at the funeral.
Medford Mail, August 16, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    I am glad to be able to announce that Arthur Pool, who has been very ill, has so far recovered as to be able to ride up to town.
    Nimrod Charley brought out two loads of lumber to the railroad here for shipment last Monday. He expects to bring out about 40,000 feet and ship it to Medford this summer.
    Attorney Mattingly, of Medford, and Mr. Sayling were pleasant callers last week; the former named gentleman was out to look at our wonderful country and to get acquainted with the people in these parts.
    Jesse Applegate, of Ashland, was a pleasant caller the first of last week. He was on his way from the Elk Creek mines, where he has been in the interest of a mining syndicate of New York. He seems to think that there will be something doing up there in the mining business before long.
    Married.--At the court house in Jacksonville, Oregon, August 17, 1907, by Judge Dunn Aaron Smith and Miss Elizabeth Stowell. That Saturday night Mrs. Gus Nichols gave them a wedding supper and they also had a social dance, at which quite a number of their friends were present.
    Mr. Wamsley took the contract for painting the inside of the annex to the school house and laying the floor in the upper story. He has finished the painting and is getting the lumber on the ground for the floor. Thus by degrees we are getting our school house finished, but we live in hopes of having another room for school purposes here before long, and if the people will turn out at our school meetings, as they did the last school meeting, we will soon have a board of directors in that will try to build up our schools and have the best of teachers.
    We are having another feast in the line of religious services. Last Sunday Rev. Minear, of Jacksonville, preached in the forenoon and Rev. Archer, a Baptist minister, preached at night. There were also present Elder J. P. Moomaw and Rev. Ethel, a Methodist minister, from Iowa, a nephew of M. A. Pool. Rev. Archer announced that he would continue the meetings all this week. Rev. John Fletcher, our popular missionary preacher from the unsurveyed region, will preach here the first Sunday in next month, September 1st.
    Ernest Cole, recently from the southern part of Missouri, purchased fifteen acres of land of C. H. Pierce & Son of Medford, joining the Moomaw place, it being a part of the old Wm. Daley place, consideration twenty-two dollars per acre. Mr. Cole moved onto the place and pitched his tent and has gone to work. He intends to put out an orchard and go into the poultry business. The only fault we have to find with him is that he has no wife and children to help our school along.
    Last Sunday the Central Point stage drove up to our door and who should get out but our daughter Tavia (Mrs. G. A. Shaw) and her three children. She took us by complete surprise, as we had no notice of her coming. That afternoon our house was filled with her old schoolmates and friends. Her husband and a friend of his are on the way with a rig. They expect to visit Eastern Oregon while here and see Crater Lake and some of the surrounding scenery.
    The railroad is proving quite an item in business circles, as our producers are shipping hay, grain, fruit, lumber etc., to different parts of the world, besides our business men are having their goods brought in on the cars. Some of our people are getting anxious because the new railroad company don't go to grading and extending their track, but they are running a new survey trying to find a route they can run without so many steep grades. They are talking of changing the road where it is already laid, raising the bridge across Butte Creek at least three feet and changing the entire route from the present terminus and running farther east, striking the foothills near Frank Nichols'. This leaves the Derby route altogether.
Medford Mail, August 29, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--September 1st, to Mr. and Mrs. Wilbur Jack, a daughter.
    John Higinbotham drove in last Tuesday night with Jesse Spencer and wife, Mrs. Albert and her two sisters, the Misses Mahoney, on their way to Medford.
    Mr. Lindley and son and two young men came out last Tuesday and stopped overnight on their way to Prospect. They met Mr. Porter and his friends at the Eagle Point depot and took them to Prospect.
    Mr. and Mrs. E. G. Scammon of Minneapolis, Minn., arrived last Sunday evening and went direct to Mrs. Scammon's brother-in-law's, R. R. Minter. They took them completely by surprise. They had a joyful meeting.
    Jesse Applegate had a load of supplies taken from here to the Elk Creek mines last Monday. Mr. Mahoney did the hauling for him. They brought out a heavy casting for repairs that was broken in the quartz mill.
    Grant Shaw and his friend, Ed. Wheeler, of Fairview, Oregon, arrived last week. They are looking over the country with a view for settling in Southern Oregon. They expect to go to Klamath County and visit Crater Lake before they return.
    Prof. W. L. Arant, of Eastern Oregon, and his cousin E. L. Arant, of Klamath Falls, were pleasant callers last Sunday. The Professor had been out to Klamath County to visit his uncle, Supt. Arant, of the Crater Lake Park, and was on his way home to take charge of his school, and the other on his way to Medford for a load of pipe to be used to bring water from Anna Creek to the buildings in the Crater Lake Park.
    Last Tuesday there were four capitalists from different parts of the country met here for dinner, looking for land and homes. They were M. L. Shover, of Troy, Ohio, C. W. Gibbs and Adam Emig, of Leavenworth, Washington, and Jesse Cook of Burbank, S.D. The latter named gentleman has bought property in East Medford, but still wants more. They all seemed to think that our Eagle Point country was the proper place. They visited Wolfer's strawberry garden and were surprised to find great luscious strawberries this time of the year. They were also surprised to see such onions as they found in A. L. Haselton's garden; in fact they think that this is a wonderful country.
Medford Mail, September 6, 1907, page 6


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Rev. Decker of Ashland, a Dunkard preacher, is here this week holding a series of meetings.
    Rev. John Fletcher, of the unsurveyed section, will preach here next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. and Rev. M. C. Davis will preach at night.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jones, son-in-law and daughter of Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, arrived last week from Seattle, Washington, where he is engaged to contracting and building work.
    John Shaller and wife (nee Josie Pool), of Yamhill County, are here at the bedside of her father, Arthur Pool. Benton Pool also arrived last week. Mr. Pool is quite ill and but little hope for his recovery.
    Mr. and Mrs. James H. Wamsley, and niece, Miss I. W. Young, of Los Angeles, California, arrived at the residence of his brother last week and returned to their home last Tuesday. They are traveling for their health.
    Last Thursday night Jesse Applegate came in from the Buzzard mine on Elk Creek about ten o'clock, ate his supper and had me take him to Central Point in time to catch the midnight train, as he wanted to reach Ashland that night, but the wreck on the S.P. track detained the train so that he had to hire another rig to take him to Ashland. He appears to be in fine spirits over the prospect of the mine.
    James Jordan and J. E. Vaughn, both of Iowa, stopped here last Tuesday night and while here Mr. Jordan bought the Cook property of Mrs. Alice Cook, consideration $1200. He says that he has been a constant reader of the Mail, and the Eaglets was the cause of his coming here to look for a home. He says that he wants to find a place where he can live and enjoy life in a good climate and healthful location, and thinks that he has found it here.
    Last Sunday night while Elder J. P. Moomaw was attending church his horse broke loose from the hitching post and started for home. They first tried to go the trail but finding that rather difficult they turned their course and took the road for about half a mile then left the road and took for the woods and finally hung up against a tree, and strange as it may seem they broke nothing except a stay chain and pole strap; even the cover of the rig was not hurt although there were trees all along the route.
    A gentleman by the name of Price, of Colorado, stopped with us one night last week. He was looking over our country with the object of locating here. He has been carefully examining our land with reference to gardening and small fruit raising and expressed himself as highly pleased with our section for he had seen our onions and berries, especially Wolfer's strawberries that are now bearing the second crop. He said that he wanted to visit some other sections of the country, but thought that around Eagle Point was good enough for him.
    On Wednesday of last week Mrs. Rachel Allen, of Oregon City and her daughter, Mrs. Mary Hull, of Portland, arrived at the Sunnyside Hotel and on Thursday your correspondent took them up to Derby to the former's son, John Allen. Mrs. Allen is 87 years of age and is quite spry, has never had to wear glasses and can get around quite well for a lady of her age. While up in that section Mr. Allen took me out to see some of the changes that had taken place since I lived in that section and among other things he showed me a tract of land that was then covered with vine maple, balm trees and ash trees, but now is one of the finest timothy meadows in the country. The clearing of the land cost him about three hundred dollars and he cut hay enough from it the first two years to pay all the expenses of clearing and had some left. He is now utilizing the ground by pasturing his best cattle on it. There is no telling what the outcome of our hill ranches will be until men get hold of them that have the nerve and energy to clear the land and bring it into use.
Medford Mail, September 20, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Al and Charley Morine came out from their Elk Creek home last Sunday on their way to [illegible].
    Last week W. H. Bowen and Ernest Cole went to the natural bridge on Rogue River to take a hunt.
    J. F. Ditsworth left here last Sunday for Klamath County with a load of fruit and vegetables.
    A. S. Combs of Siskiyou County, Calif., has secured a position as foreman on the Guthrie and Tronson place.
    S. H. Harnish and Irvin Pool started for Fort Klamath with two loads of vegetables for W. F. Smith last week.
    S. H. Harnish has the carpenters, Wamsley and son, putting rustic on his house and Elder J. P. Moomaw is fixing up his home, the old Coy home, ready to move into.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jesse Spencer, of the unsurveyed section, came up from the hop yard near Woodville Monday morning and proceeded on their way to their home in the hills.
    Everybody is busy now and times are good. Lumber hauling is all the go. The farmers are very busy cutting the third crop of alfalfa and hands are scarce.
    Mrs. George Morine of Bonanza, Oregon, and her daughter, Mrs. Chas. Conrad, came out last Friday to visit old-time friends in Eagle Point, spending the night and attending the dance.
    Mr. Ling and his son accompanied by another young man called for dinner Sunday. They were on their way to Guthrie's and Tronson's to paint the new houses they have just erected.
    Just as I was finishing this epistle Misses Jennie and Gertrude Mahoney, of the unsurveyed country, came in from the hop fields on their way home. They report having had a very pleasant time while in the hop yard.
    Last Sunday we had two congregations disappointed here, as Rev. Fletcher didn't put in an appearance in the forenoon and Rev. Davis failed to come in the evening. The young folks met in Sunday school in the morning and in the evening we had some fine singing. Mrs. Cora Officer acted as organist.
    Grant Shaw and family, accompanied by Ed. Wheeler, all of Multnomah County, Oregon, returned from their trip to Fort Klamath and Crater Lake last Friday. They seem to think that that lake and its surroundings [is] one of the greatest natural beauties of nature on the coast. They report that there was plenty of snow there on Thursday of last week, and very cool in the bargain. Monday morning Mr. Wheeler took the train for Portland.
    The dance last Friday night was a very pleasant affair. There were just enough present to make everything pleasant. There was but very little drinking. A few of the young men who think they have to have a little booze to keep their spirits up brought some along, but the better class disapprove of the use of intoxicants in the company of ladies, so abstained from the use of it altogether.
    County Surveyor Perkins and Mr. Pierce, Jr., came out last Friday to survey the tract of land Ernest Cole bought of Pierce and Son some time ago. They were accompanied by N. C. Sorenson, of Blackford, Idaho, and J. W. Akers, of Nebraska. The latter two were out here to look at the country. They both seemed to be favorably impressed with the appearance of the country around Eagle Point.
    There was a man by the name of Brooks, from Silverton, California, came in from Fort Klamath with him and while here visited Mr. Wolfer's strawberry garden, and to say that he was surprised to find him selling strawberries as large an English walnuts and larger here on the 20th day of September, but nothing surprises us in that line except that everybody who has water to irrigate does not have them, for the Butte Creek soil is all right for almost everything that we want to raise.
    Last Friday W. B. Chance, of Albany, Oregon, Deputy Labor Commissioner, came out on the P.&E. and had me take him up to Round Top mill to examine the machinery and etc. He found the mill in good running order and made some good suggestions as to improvements etc. On the way home we came by Brownsboro so that he could see the country. He was highly pleased with our timber, and promised to return in the near future and go further back into the timber belt. That night he met Nimrod Charley at our hotel and had a long talk with him in regard to his mill and gave him some fine points on protecting the laborers in the mill. The mill men seemed to appreciate his visit. He made a good impression on their minds.
Medford Mail, September 27, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    J. A. Jonas has been putting some substantial improvements on his house the last week.
    More land buyers were out here the first of the week looking for homes, but I didn't learn their names.
    Floyd Pierce and family were over from Forest Creek last week to visit Mrs. Pierce's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    Messrs. Lawton and Stoddard were out last Sunday morning with a land buyer looking at some of the places northeast of Eagle Point.
    S. H. Harnish and Irvin Pool returned from Ft. Klamath last Saturday; they came by the way of Klamath Falls, and found bad roads and high-priced horse feed. Mr. Harnish says he don't want any more of that road in his travels.
    Mrs. L. B. Sorrels, of Grants Pass, Oregon, Deputy Organizer of Knights and Ladies of Security, assisted by Rev. Gillette, of Central Point, are guests at the Sunnyside Hotel at Eagle Point, organizing a society here. They seem to be meeting with good success.
    Our son-in-law, Grant Shaw, and family started last Tuesday for their home in Multnomah County. They went by team. Mrs. Shaw came out several weeks ago by train and wanted to go through the country in a rig so she could get a better view of the country.
    Our school opened last Monday morning with Prof. Jesse G. Walker, of Ashland, as principal. The board has not secured the services of a primary teacher as yet, but there are several of the pupils who have passed the eighth grade, and one of them has charge of that department until the board can secure a regular teacher.
    There was a box social last Saturday night given in Lewis' hall in the interest of the lodge of Knights and Ladies of Security. There was not a very large attendance as it was not generally known that there was to be one, but those who attended seemed to have had a good time.
    Walter Foster, formerly of Clackamas, but now working for U.S. and a friend of his, both from the Elk Creek hatchery, dropped in Sunday afternoon. Mr. Bolle was on his way to Grants Pass to work in the hatchery. There they report but little doing at the Elk Creek hatchery except catching some trout, as the salmon catching season is over.
    Mrs. Onnia Thomas, a sister of our postmaster, A. J. Florey, from Santa Clara, Calif., and her daughter-in-law, Mrs. Jessie Thomas, of San Francisco, arrived at the residence of Mr. Florey last Saturday. The brother and sister have not met before for forty years. Mrs. Ella Taylor, a cousin of Mr. Florey, is also visiting the Florey family.
    Last week the remains of the late Martin F. Hurst, who died in Ashland, was buried in the old family cemetery on the old home place, now owned by his son-in-law, Thos. Riley. About all of the old citizens attended the funeral. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Hoxie. A more extended mention of his death was made in the last issue of the Mail. He as a man was highly esteemed in this section where he raised his family, and his wife and children, who survive him, have the sympathy of the host of friends they have in these parts.
    On Thursday of last week, Mrs. Howlett gave a quilting and rag tacking party to a few of her friends, partly to enable the Perry girls and their mother and partly to enable our daughter, Mrs. Tavie Shaw, and her husband to meet with a number of their old friends and schoolmates, and partly because she, Mrs. Howlett, dearly loves to have a good social time. Well, she gave the party and from all accounts had a royal good time--I was not at home that day, but my reporter says there were just forty-seven grown persons and twenty children, not counting our own home folks and regular boarders. It is not necessary for me to say a word about the dinner, but there was enough left when we arrived home that night for us--the two Smith boys and myself, who had been to Round Top mill for lumber; well the result was the ladies quilted out six and three-fourths quilts and sewed all the carpet rags Mrs. Howlett had on hand, and among other things had one of the most enjoyable times of their lives. Mrs. Perry and her daughters were all here except Hattie (Mrs. Allen). She was visiting her mother-in-law and brother-in-law, John Allen, and sister-in-law, Mrs. Mary Hull, at the residence of John Allen near Derby, and Lottie (Mrs. McGuid). They were unavoidably absent, sending their regrets. It is useless for me to give the names of all of those who were present but will say that almost everyone among the ladies in the neighborhood near here that love a good time.
Medford Mail, October 4, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Nimrod Charley is hauling out a fine lot of lumber and putting it at the P.&E.R.R.
    Ed Warner and wife, of Medford, came on the car last Tuesday and went with George West to Butte Falls.
    D. F. Karnes and family, of Medford, were out last week visiting Mrs. Karnes' mother, Mrs. Heckathorn, and her brother, Frank Lewis.
    During the past week there has been at least a dozen men here looking for land, and I suppose there is as many more that don't come to the Sunnyside.
    When Miss Maggie Stepp was going home from Eagle Point last Sunday she lost a jacket, and the finder will please leave it at Mr. Daley's store or at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Mr. Allen, a bartender in the Moore Hotel of Medford, is at present a guest at the Sunnyside, trying to recuperate his health. He is using the water from the Eagle Point Sulfur Spring.
    Miss Maggie Stepp, of Round Top, came out last week with your Eagle Point correspondent, returning last Sunday with John Iseli and wife who came out last Saturday and went to Medford on the P.&E. car.
    Speaking about the P.&E. railroad they, the P.&E. people, are making the regular trip twice a day. They have put in a spur also that they can take the passenger train back to Medford behind the locomotive instead of pushing it as they did at first. They have also built a chute to load stock and seem to be doing considerable business.
    A. C. Howlett has gone to hauling lumber from Round Top mill in his old age to enlarge and remodel the Sunnyside Hotel and consequently news items are rather scarce this week. The road on the north side of Round Top is simply awful, mud, rocks, roots and ruts, but we get there all the same and get a fine quality of lumber.
    There is a deal on foot where land that was bought last spring for eight and ten dollars an acre is now being sold for forty and fifty dollars per acre, simply because people are beginning to learn that about the best fruit land in Southern Oregon is in the Butte Creek country, and now there is an effort made by people who desire to go into fruit culture to procure a tract of our land.
    There was a wool-picking party given by Mrs. J. H. Carter last Tuesday night and as usual Mrs. Howlett went, and when she got out her wool cards one of our boarders said that he had never heard before of carding wool, and there were several present who never had seen a wool card before, so Mrs. Howlett had to get some wool and show them how they worked. They had lots of fun over their ignorance of the things that were common in our boyhood days.
Medford Mail, October 11, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Hon. H. von der Hellen was a pleasant caller Sunday for dinner.
    Miss Gernell Jackson was the guest of Miss Agnes Howlett Sunday p.m.
    A. J. Daley has had a new roof put on his barn. Wamsley and son did the work.
    Dr. Page has had a new roof put on his barn, and had a large tract of land cleared.
    Thomas Coy has re-roofed his residence and added several conveniences to the house.
    N. L. Narregan was out last week looking over the tract of land he bought of Grant Mathews.
    Bert Harris and George Daley, Sr., were on the Round Top range looking for something in the timber line.
    Frank Lewis has been hauling out lumber from the Round Top mill to build a confectionery establishment.
    Surveying parties have been out in these parts subdividing some of the tracts of land that have been recently purchased.
    People are taking advantage of the fine spell of weather and doing up their fall work and getting ready to put in their fall grain.
    Ed Higinbotham has been hauling lumber to be used in extending the Antelope bridge, as it is likely to go out unless it is fixed soon.
    S. S. Aiken and Mrs. Hollenbeak were guests here last Saturday night. Mrs. Hollenbeak was en route to Prospect to take charge of a hotel there.
    Mrs. Alyce Green, of San Francisco, arrived at the home of her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, last week and started on her return trip Tuesday.
    J. H. Ditsworth was here last Saturday night and took out some of the Eagle Point onions for the Klamath County folks. He also took a quantity of strawberries, put up fresh in sugar in jars for the market.
    Mrs. Wm. Spencer and her daughter, Miss Beatrice, came out from the unsurveyed region last Saturday and are at present guests at the Sunnyside Hotel. Miss Beatrice expects to go to Lebanon to take a commercial course in the school at that place. Mrs. Jessie Spencer is also with them, and the three will remain in this section for a short time, making Eagle Point their headquarters.
    While Medford and Central Point can boast, and justly too, of their fine apples, we on Butte Creek can have something to say on that line, for Guthrie & Tronson sold thirty boxes of choice apples to E. H. Harriman, the railroad king, at seven dollars a box on the cars at Eagle Point. That shows what the Butte Creek Valley will do in the line of apples, and we have a few peaches, seedlings, that will compare favorably with anything in that line--none for sale.
Medford Mail, October 18, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Born--October 6, 1907, to Mr. and Mrs. Green Mathews, a son.
    S. H. Harnish has had a new porch put on the front of his residence.
    Wm. Beall and family have returned from Klamath County.
    Mr. Wamsley and son will commence work on the new free ferry next week.
    Mr. Carns has moved from the Caster sawmill into the Brown house again to spend the winter.
    Mrs. A. V. Cook and her adopted son started last week for their new home in Kansas.
    Rev. Minear, of Medford, preached for us last Sunday and next Sunday evening Rev. M. C. Davis will preach for us.
    Mr. Guches has moved into the Daley house until he can build on the tract of land he recently purchased.
    Prof. Narregan has commenced to move his household goods out and is getting ready to live in this favored neighborhood.
    The house that Mr. Pool had erected last summer has just had the roof put on, but work has again stopped on it.
    Wm. Ulrich has sold his place--reserving four or five acres--about 900 acres in all--to Mr. Palmer, of Chicago, consideration $25,000.
    Mr. Guches, son-in-law of John Watkins, has purchased another tract adjoining his consisting of 25 acres, consideration $35 per acre.
    The new mail service by rail commenced last Monday so now we have the mail three times a day from the Southern Pacific railroad. Isn't Eagle Point coming to the front?
    John R. Smith has bought 20 acres of land off the old John Williscroft place including the house and orchard, and barn, consideration $1200.
    Mr. Stone, the barber, and family have moved temporarily to his father-in-law's, Mr. Jones, east of Medford, and has secured J. W. Smith, Jr., to take charge of his shop during his absence.
    J. E. Warren, of Medford, has joined the number of land buyers in this section, as he has purchased of Pierce & Son of Medford a tract of land adjoining Eagle Point consisting of 25 acres, consideration $500.
    Hugo Daley, son of G. W. Daley Jr., the miller in Davis' mill at Medford, came near being drowned one day last week. He was with some other little boys playing along the bank of the creek, and in attempting to cross the log rolled and threw him off on the upper side of the log. He washed under the log down the stream, the other children screamed, and Mr. Childreth ran to the rescue just in time to save him.
    I understand that Pierce & Son, of Medford, have sold another forty-acre tract, but have not been able to learn the facts. Prof. Narregan has bought 96 acres of Grant Mathews, consideration $5000. So the reader of the Mail will see that there is something doing around Eagle Point, and I wish to call the attention of the assessor to the fact that there is more than forty-four thousand dollars worth of property in this school district. Under the old system of assessing the county clerk reported that there was forty thousand and four dollars taxable property in Eagle Point district, and then a change comes and the property was to be assessed at its real value and the property of the "small fry" was raised to three times the former assessment and still our moneyed men didn't have as much property to pay taxes on as they did before, and the clerk reported a raise of about four thousand dollars in the district. Can someone explain how that happened? Speaking of our school district brings to mind the fact that at last accounts we have no primary teacher in our school and no school clerk as the law provides. Why?
Medford Mail, October 25, 1907, page 8


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. Wm. Holmes is here visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Geo. Brown.
    Thos. Coy, the road supervisor, has been putting gravel on the road and in some places greatly improved it.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. Boyd Tucker, October 29, 1907, near the Rogue River fish hatchery, an eleven-pound boy.
    B. W. Heberling, who has a homestead north of Butte Falls, came out last Monday for supplies, returning Wednesday.
    Mr. Kincaid and his son came out from Butte Falls. The former went on to Medford, but the son stopped at the Sunnyside.
    Chris Beale and Ben Fredenburg have been to Josephine County buying up young cattle. They met with fairly good success.
    George West stopped Monday night at the Sunnyside. He was on his way to Ashland to see his wife, who is there under medical treatment.
    The P.&E. railroad company cut the wages of their hands working on the road from $2 to $1.50 per day, and the result is, those in the Eagle Point gang quit, so there is nothing doing in that line.
    Prof. N. L. Narregan and his son were pleasant callers Monday and Tuesday. Prof. Narregan is moving his household goods onto the Mathews place which he bought of Grant Mathews.
    B. H. Harris, L. B. Brown and three other men passed through here Tuesday morning on their way to Butte Falls via Caster's mill, to look over the property of the B.F.S.P.L. Co.
    Messrs. Stepp, Iseli and Hamlin, the proprietors of the Round Top mill, have been hauling out lumber and taking back hay and mill stuff. They are getting their mill yard pretty well cleared up.
    Rev. McKee, colporter traveling in the interest of the Baptist Bible Society, preached for us last Sunday, Monday and Wednesday nights. He preached in Brownsboro Tuesday night. He is a very earnest and pleasant speaker and made a good impression here. Elder Minear, our Dunkard preacher, will preach here next Sunday, both morning and evening.
    Our school meeting passed off very quietly as the neighborhood is beginning to wake up to the necessity of doing something to put down czar rule in the district. There was a plan to try to keep in the old ring but the people said no, and when they speak something is likely to be done. At the last annual school meeting there was a motion carried to levy a school tax and the year before a similar motion was carried, and strange to relate it has been reported by the chairman that neither of the motions have been reported to the county clerk, but now we think that the business will be properly attended to, as we have elected J. A. Jones as clerk and he has already proved himself perfectly competent to fill the office.
    Died--At the family residence November 5th Mrs. Melissa A. Smith, wife of John W. Smith, aged seventy years, 2 months and two days. The subject of this sketch was born in the state of Ohio, Sept. 1, 1837, and was married to John W. Smith, December 22, 1855, in the state of Illinois. In the spring of 1860 they moved to Colorado where they remained for eight years, going from there to California in 1868. From there they moved to Jackson County, Oregon, settling on a farm now owned by Dr. Pickel. Having sold the place to a good advantage they bought a part of the old Hull place on the edge of the desert, where they have lived together until she was suddenly called to her reward. During her life she has given birth to nine boys, all of whom are living, except one who died at the age of eighteen. Four of the sons have lived in this county all their lives and but one of the four is married, Rolin. Arthur arrived after the death of his mother, George is in Northwest Canada, Frank is in Lakeview and Alfred in Nebraska. Mrs. Smith was a woman who was highly respected by all who knew her, and the couple have raised a family of eight boys that any parent may well feel proud of. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery November 8th, where a large concourse of old neighbors and friends witnessed the last sad rites. The funeral services were conducted by A. C. Howlett. The pall bearers were James Owens, Charles and Irvin Pruett, Scott Pool, John Bighorn and Mr. Gall.
    J. W. Smith and his sons desire to express their gratitude to their friends and neighbors for their kindness and assistance in their hour of bereavement.
Medford Mail, November 15, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. C. E. Hoyt made a business trip to Medford last Tuesday.
    Mrs. Wm. Holmes, who has been visiting here, returned home last Friday.
    Leo Ulrich, who has been working in Portland for some time, returned home last week.
    Mrs. Wm. Brown and her sister, Miss Lottie Taylor, were pleasant callers one evening last week.
    Dick Stepp, of Round Top, who has been in Portland for the last two months, returned last Sunday.
    Our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, made a trip to Talent to visit her old friend, Mrs. Gardener, nee Clara Richardson.
    A young lady by the name of Miller, from Bybee Springs, stopped here last Friday night on her way to Leeds to take charge of the school in that district.
    Land buyers are continually coming in to look over our part of the country, but there are not many changes taking place, perhaps owing to the flurry in the money market.
    Mesdames Bessie Carlton and Lottie Van Scoy were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Sunday evening. They were the guests of our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt.
    Mr. and Mrs. Bond and children, of Plush, Eastern Oregon, arrived here last Friday on a visit to Mrs. Bond's mother. Mrs. Bond was formerly Mae Stickle.
    Mr. Moore, of Ashland, having bought a place on Elk Creek, passed through here on his way to Elk Creek last Monday night, stopped at the Sunnyside, and Tuesday went on his way.
    Miss Anna Ulrich, who taught for several weeks without a certificate, secured a permit to teach and has been employed to teach in the Eagle Point school until February, when she will have to take the examination.
    Last week I took a man by the name of Heberling to his homestead on Cattail, hauling provisions for him and his neighbor, Mr. Wolverton. The last named came out last Monday night and stopped at the Sunnyside and Tuesday morning went to Medford.
    Miss Bessie Haselton, one of the graduates of our school and one of the most promising young ladies of our neighborhood, is teaching school in the Foots Creek district and from all accounts is proving herself an acceptable and efficient teacher.
    One day last week as James Ringer, our mail contractor between here and Peyton, was riding along on horseback and the horse stumbled and fell, throwing Mr. Ringer in such a way as to break one of the bones in his left arm and dislocate his wrist. Dr. Holt reduced the fracture and the arm is doing as well as could be expected. Joe Moomaw is carrying the mail for him during his layup.
    I received a letter the other day from our daughter, Mrs. James M. Lewis, of Wilbur, Washington, in which she says: "Papa sends me the Medford Mail so that I can get the news of Jackson County, and hear from home every week.'' If people leaving here for other places would have the Mail follow them they would get not only the news from home but from the entire country.
    One night last week Dr. Holt came near being burned out. He and his family occupy rooms in the Carlton residence, and they use an oil stove. On the occasion referred to he lit the fire in the stove and went into another room, neglecting to regulate the blaze, and it so happened that Geo. Brown was going home from his daughter's, Mrs. Holmes, when he discovered the blaze and gave the alarm and the doctor, hearing the cry of fire, ran to the kitchen just in time to save the house. The walls were badly scorched, but no serious damage done.
    Last Sunday we had whole lot of "meetin'." Elder Minear had an appointment to preach and he brought out with him John A. Myers, Charles Nininger and M. M. Carl, of Sams Valley, and they all took a hand; some read, some prayed, Mr. Minear preached in the forenoon and Mr. Nininger followed with a half-hour exhortation, and at night Mr. Nininger preached for a little over an hour. The house was so cold that some of the congregation went home and others flocked around the stove, and shortly after the last move he stopped and called on Mr. Minear to close and said he thought that we had had as much as we could digest and so let us go home at 9:15.
    Last Saturday your Eagle Point correspondent took Mr. and Mrs. Scott Bruce as far as Kelsoe's, near the Big Butte bridge on the Ft. Klamath road, and while on the road came near having a serious accident. As I was driving along, just after crossing the bridge I lost my balance and fell off of the wagon, but fortunately I lit on the soft sticky and about all the damage done was a little mud on my clothes and a badly scared old man, for when I left the seat I, of course, took the lines with me and left the lady on the seat alone and four horses walking as fast as they could with no driver, but fortunately I had enough breath and wits left in me to take in the situation and started on the run and hallowed, whoa! The horses stopped and I climbed on the wagon again, and Mrs. Bruce was as white as this sheet of paper, although she did not fully realize the danger she was in, for if the horses had realized that they were loose they might have taken a notion into their heads to take a spin.
Medford Mail, November 22, 1907, page 4


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. R. L. Parker, of Butte Falls, was the guest of J. J. Fryer and family one night last week.
    Benj. Fredenburg and Chas. Beale were pleasant callers last week. They have been buying up calves and taking them onto the range on Big Butte.
    D. J. S. Pearce was over last week to visit his sisters, Mesdames Thomas and Saint Clair [Esther Pearce Sinclair], and his niece and nephew, Mr. and Mrs. Bout [sic--Bond? Ball?] and her children.
    Dick Stepp, of Round Top, was a pleasant caller Tuesday night. He reports that the most of the lumber has been sold from the mill yard.
    Bert Higinbotham and John Allen stopped overnight here Friday. They had been to Medford with two loads of hogs, that they sold to George Nichols.
    The two Mrs. Magerle, sisters of Jerry Heckathorn, came down from Woodville and went up to Butte Falls to see their brother who is very sick; at last accounts there was but little change. Drs. Seely and Holt are in attendance.
    John Campbell is here visiting his brother Harry, and Mrs. Scudder.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey and her daughter, Mrs. Wm. von der Hellen, returned from Ashland last week where they had been visiting Mrs. Florey's cousin, Mrs. Ella Brown.
    C. S. Bartlett and his son, E. C. Bartlett, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Tuesday night. They procured a rig Wednesday morning and proceeded on their way to Trail. They are from the state of Michigan and are looking for timber land.
    Nelson Nye and his sister, Miss Elsie, came out from their home near Prospect to see their brother-in-law, A. J. Florey, our postmaster, who is confined to his bed with pneumonia. Drs. Seely and Holt are in attendance. Wednesday morning he was considerable better.
    Alfred Smith and family from Lincoln, Nebraska, arrived at the home of his father, John W. Smith, last week. He had not heard of the death of his mother until he arrived in Medford. He and his brother Arthur are keeping house for his father.
    Last Sunday Thomas Carney, Richard Calder, J. D. Findley, J. D. Eaton and Ernest Richardson called at the Sunnyside for dinner. They had left Medford Sunday morning about two o'clock, came out to the old Riley home now owned by Thomas Riley and camped until daylight and then went quail hunting. They report having fired one hundred shots and killing eighteen birds. They had the famous dog, Dewey, along and he did most of the hunting.
    Last Sunday night Rev. M. C. Davis, traveling missionary in the interest of the Congregational Sunday school, preached here to a good-sized and attentive congregation, and Monday night preached at the Reese Creek school house and organized a Congregational Sunday school. There were fifty-eight took part in the organization of the school and the following officers were elected for one year: Miss Rose Ayers, supt.; Thomas Vestal, secretary; Miss S. Minter, treasurer, and Miss Clara Ewen, librarian. Notwithstanding it was a pitch-dark night and the sticky mud was at its best to stick, there was a good congregation; in fact wherever Mr. Davis preaches he has a full house. He reports that the prospect is very bright at Peyton--the Ditsworth school house, and at Trail. That he organized a church at that place and started a subscription for a church building, with good prospects for success.
    When Rev. Davis preached here last our organist was absent, and he called for someone to volunteer to play and Miss Blanche Cox went forward and filled the position with credit and to the satisfaction of the audience. She is but a child [she was 14], but she shows the right spirit for volunteering and doing the best she could, and her services were highly appreciated.
    Last Sunday the remains of Arthur B. Pool, one of the old residents of this section, was laid to rest in the Brownsboro cemetery. The funeral services were conducted by Elder J. P. Moomaw at the family residence and Dr. Holt at the grave. The deceased was born in Ohio in January 1835 and died November 22, 1907, making him 72 years and about 10 months old at the time of his death. The deceased leaves a wife and a number of children by his first wife and a son by his widow. He has been somewhat prominent in business circles in this section as he kept a hotel here and conducted a blacksmith shop for a number of years. The Mail is requested to extend the thanks of the bereaved to the neighbors for their kindness during his long illness.
    On Wednesday of last week I took a trip to Prospect, taking our daughter, Mrs. C. E. Hoyt, that far, where her husband met her and Thursday morning they started for their home in Fort Klamath. When we reached Prospect we found about four inches of snow on the ground and the roads as bad as they well could be. There was about sixteen inches of snow at Silver Camp and it was snowing when they, Ed Hoyt and Mr. Parker, for Mr. Parker came over with him as far as Prospect and then came on the rest of the way with me, but the storm ceased Wednesday night and they went on through encountering only about two feet of snow on the summit. On our way back we stopped at L. B. Caster's for dinner and there among other good things they had was a radish that weighed ten pounds and measured twenty-four inches in circumference and eighteen inches in length. So I suggested to Mrs. Caster to let me bring it out and place it in the exhibit building, and I placed it there to show people what can be raised in our foothills, as anything can be raised there that we want for food from peanuts to potatoes, as Mr. Stepp has potatoes that weigh three pounds, and a fine lot of them at that, and anyone can see by calling at the Round Top mill and inquiring for them; they are not for sale.
Medford Mail, November 29, 1907, page 4


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    E. S. Wolfer passed through here last week on his way to visit Mr. Wolfer on Cattail.
    Mrs. Cora Officer and Miss Lottie Taylor went to Jacksonville on Thursday of last week.
    Our postmaster, A. J. Florey, who has been quite ill, is on the road to recovery, I am glad to state.
    Al Boardman, of Butte Falls, was a pleasant caller last Saturday night. He left Sunday for a visit with his son, Charles. [See correction below.]
    Miss Maggie Daley came out Thanksgiving to attend the dance, and to visit her parents. She is attending the business school in Medford.
    Fred Good, of Medford, is stopping at the Sunnyside and is putting out trees on the Frideger place that Mr. Frideger brought from the Charley Taylor place.
    Rev. Robert Fletcher and Dr. S. F. Graves came in from the unsurveyed region last Monday night. They went to Medford Tuesday, returning the came day to the Sunnyside.
    A young man by the name of Fry, son of one of the old Jacksonville pioneers, now living on Little Butte Creek, brought out a load of hogs last Monday which he sold to J. H. Carlton.
    George West, who has been in Ashland for a little over a week with his wife, who is there undergoing medical treatment, returned last Monday and on Tuesday went to his homestead in the neighborhood of Willow Creek.
    George W. Daley Sr. has his bills out for a masquerade ball on the eve of January 1st, 1908, and has engaged Mrs. Howlett to get the supper. He gave a midnight dance on Thanksgiving eve and reports it as being well attended.
    Mr. Meeker, a son of the old gentleman by that name, living on Big Butte, who has been visiting his father, returned to his home in Stockton, California last Sunday. He was accompanied by a half brother on his return.
    Prof. Narregan has moved his family from Medford to our town and occupies the house he bought from Grant Mathews. We are always glad to have such men as the Professor among us and think he will be a great help to our school.
    Miss Bessie Haselton, who is teaching in the Foots Creek district, came home to spend Thanksgiving with her parents. She says she is getting along well with her school and her many friends here are rejoicing with her in her success as a teacher.
    Last Saturday Joe Pool procured a shotgun and while fooling with it, the gun in some way went off, the charge passing between Ray Harnish and Robbie Pool, who were with him. The contents struck the ground, glanced, scattering shot all around Grandpa Harnish, who was standing on the porch.
    Wm. Spencer, who has been working at his trade as a carpenter, in Medford, returned home last Saturday. He stopped here for dinner and started for his home in the unsurveyed country, but got bewildered and stayed alone in a sheep herder's cabin on Reese Creek, and continued his journey next day.
    Mr. and Mrs. Peyton and two children, and cousin Mrs. N. E. Phillips and son, J. F. Phillips of Oklahoma, came in from the former's home at Peyton recently. Mrs. Phillips and her son expect to remain in Medford for a while--perhaps a year, as they have come to see the country and intend to see it all before they return home. If they are favorably impressed with it they expect to buy property here and remain permanently.
Medford Mail, December 6, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mrs. David Cingcade started last Saturday to visit her daughter, Miss Hattie, who is in San Francisco.
    John Hall, an uncle of our townsman, George Phillips, and L. Bassett, a cousin of his, arrived here last week on a visit to their relative.
    Rev. Minear will preach here next Sunday at eleven o'clock a.m. and Rev. Haskell will preach at night.
    Mr. Bond has been building a barn for his mother-in-law, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, on the tract of land she purchased from J. J. Fryer.
    J. A. Kelts, recently from Wisconsin, but now temporarily settled in Medford, was out here looking for a suitable location for a confectionery and bakery.
    Mr. Bailey, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, was a sojourner with us last Sunday night and on Monday morning procured a horse and proceeded on his way home.
    George C. Howard, of South Dakota, was with us last week; he has his family located in Ashland at present. He has traveled extensively in Eastern Oregon and is now looking over this county. He expects to locate somewhere in Southern Oregon, as he has fallen in love with our climate as well as many other things in connection therewith.
    J. D. Wigle, of Coburg, Oregon, a timber locator, and C. H. Hanson, of Harrisburg, Oregon, stayed with us one night last week. They were on their way to the tall timber. They procured horses here and Mr. Wigle located his man on a timber claim and returned the same day and took the P.&E. train for Medford.
    We have a new enterprise underway in our town. Claud Wamsley has bought and has in operation a wood sawing machine that does fine work and makes the small boy grin to think that the days of the old buck saw are drawing to a close.
    Last week the type made me say in the Eaglets that Al. Boardman left here to visit his son Charles, when it should have been his brother Charles, and as Al is not a married man he would like to have the mistake corrected.
    George West had a business call from his mountain home last Sunday. He came out Sunday night and went to Medford and back here the next day, and on Tuesday returned home accompanied by one of the leading business men of Medford, and by the time this is in print will have located him on a fine timber claim.
    Last Monday, December 9th, James Ringer, our mail contractor for the Peyton mail route, was exhibiting some fine, large, ripe strawberries as anyone could wish for that he picked that day--in dead of winter--off the vines in his son-in-law's berry patch, and reports that there are plenty of them there yet. How is that for climate?
    Rev. McKee, the Bible colporter for the American Baptist Bible Society, preached for us last Sunday morning. Although he had not been announced until late Saturday afternoon, still he had a good audience and preached a fine old-fashioned gospel sermon. He announced that there would be a meeting of those interested in the church affairs next Saturday afternoon at 1:30 p.m., for the purpose of electing a board of trustees for the Eagle Point church, and a full attendance is requested.
    E. L. Lyle, of St. Louis, Mo., was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside last week. He is traveling in the interest of a nursery company in Chicago, and a school book publishing company of St. Louis. In conversation with him in regard to this country he remarked that had he not taken a ride out of Medford with a friend and seen the country from some other standpoint than a car window, that he would have been ready to board the car for home with the impression that Jackson County was a very small affair as far as the fruit industry was concerned, but when he took a trip around Medford and saw the hundreds of acres set to orchard in bearing and hundreds more set to young trees, and when he saw the fruit that these trees produced, and the excellent soil we have, he changed his mind and came out on the P.&E. to look at our country. On arriving here he took a rig and drove out to see a few of our fine orchards and some of the land that will in a short time be in orchards. He came to the conclusion that Jackson County will become one of the fruit countries of the Pacific Coast.
Medford Mail, December 13, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Mr. Banden, a cousin of our postmaster A. J. Florey, and his wife came out on the P.&E. one day last week and spent the day, returning in the evening. They are from Detroit, Michigan, and are here looking at the country.
    Just after I had mailed my Eaglets last week I received the sad intelligence that one of our old neighbors, Nick Young, had had the misfortune to have both of his legs broken between the knee and ankle. He was plowing on his ranch near Burns with a young team and they became unmanageable, throwing him off the disc plow and just as he fell the plow swerved just enough to cause the hind wheel to strike his legs, breaking both of them. His many friends here deeply sympathize with him in his misfortune.
    Just as I was writing this Tuesday morning Elder J. P. Moomaw came in and read a circular letter from a committee of church workers of his, the Dunkard church, soliciting funds to help the poor of their city, Saint Joseph, Missouri, and I thought that perhaps an extract from it might lead someone of our heaven-favored people to more highly prize the great blessings of our land. It commences by saying "Do you realize that Christmas, the day of greatest cheer and rejoicing throughout the Christian world, will soon be here * * * on account of the panic there are thousands of men in the city of St. Joseph, who have lost their positions and are without means to buy food, clothing or fuel, and that there will be hundreds of men, women and half-clothed, hungry, homeless little children to whom Christmas only means added suffering from want and hunger * * * we expect to gather up at least one thousand children from the old tents and houses without floors, where they never know what a table means, * * * where they never sleep in a bed, but simply pile around the floor, like little pigs * * *." But I must not trespass too much on your space, but while hundreds and thousands all over our Eastern cities are suffering from the want of the necessities of life and dying in that cold and crowded country while we in this favored land can't realize what that all means. No longer ago than last Monday I heard two young men discussing the labor problem and one remarked to the other that he would not work for one dollar and a half a day and board himself, while back in our old homes of years ago hundreds and thousands would be glad to work for their board, and still we often hear people complain of hard times here where we enjoy all the blessings of our favored land.
    Rev. Haskell preached for us last Sunday both morning and afternoon as Rev. Minear is reported to be very low with cancer of the stomach. He left an appointment to preach again next Sunday at 2 o'clock p.m. and Rev. M. C. Davis will preach at night the same day, next Sunday.
    The church meeting held here last Saturday was well attended; Rev. McKee presided. All the members of the Baptist Church were in attendance except one and he was unavoidably detained in his shop. Everything passed off beautifully; after the reading of the scripture and prayer the meeting was called to order and Mrs. W. L. Childreth, acting as secretary. A motion to ask those present who were not members of the Baptist Church to take part in the discussion of the subject of selecting trustees prevailed, and then a general discussion was had and it was decided without any opposition that they would select two trustees from the membership of the Baptist Church and three from those of different faiths. J. P. Moomaw, a Dunkard, J. A. Jonas, a Methodist and J. W. Grover, an outsider, were elected from the latter classes and W. L. Childreth and Wm. Knighton were selected by the church. An effort was made to reorganize the Sunday school and J. A. Jonas was named as superintendent, A. C. Howlett as assistant superintendent. The Sunday school is to commence on the first Sunday in January 1908 at 2 o'clock p.m.
    Mrs. Geo. von der Hellen, who will soon accompany her husband, Lieut. von der Hellen, to Manila, was the guest of Mrs. Wamsley of this place.
    Born--December 10, 1907, in Butte Falls to Mr. and Mrs. Frank Netherland, a son.
    Messrs. Hall and Wynnes, of Medford, were out here last week looking over the land and one of them was trying to bond some places, but how he succeeded I do not know.
    Miss Kate Faith, of Alaska, was here last Saturday visiting her aunt, Mrs. A. N. Thomas; on Saturday afternoon she went to visit her niece near Brownsboro. She had been to Eastern Oregon visiting her brother-in-law and sister before coming here.
    Thomas McAndrew came out last Saturday after mill stuff, returning Sunday. He reports everything lovely up at his place near Peyton.
    M. C. Mahoney came out last Monday from Butte Falls. He was accompanied by merchant Hughes and George Albert; the last two named went to Medford by rail and Mr. Mahoney went Tuesday morning with his team.
    We are going to have lots of dancing here, a dance Christmas night and a masque ball New Year's night, January 1, 1908.
Medford Mail, December 20, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    Ben Brophy and wife came in from Klamath Falls last week to visit Mrs. Brophy's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Nichols.
    L. A. Whitley, who has been working in a sawmill at Santa Cruz, California, for the past season, returned home last week.
    R. E. Peyton came out last Friday to meet his adopted brother, who has been teaching school near Jacksonville. [They] returned Saturday to their mountain home.
    Miss Mamie Wright, formerly of this place, but now of Central Point, is visiting friends here.
    I am sorry to have to write that Mrs. Geo. Brown is quite ill and Dr. Pickel has been called to see her several times of late.
    Our postmaster, A. J. Florey, who has been quite sick for some time, is gradually improving. His son, Chauncey, is acting postmaster during his father's absence.
    Last Friday I received a message over the telephone from Rev. M. C. Davis stating that he was called upon to go north from Central Point, and could not fill his appointment here last Sunday and at Reese Creek school house the following Monday evening, but that he would be here next Sunday night and [at] Reese Creek on next Monday night to preach.
    Last Tuesday, December 21, 1907, James Ringer picked a quart of strawberries off of his son-in-law's berry patch and sent them to the exhibit building in Medford. How is that for winter? Ripe strawberries, green strawberries, strawberries in bloom and still a-coming in December. Ripe strawberries just off the vines for Christmas dinner--talk of your Garden of Eden, your Italy, but show us a better country, soil, climate, place for health and plenty and you will have to go to some other planet than ours.
    Died--In Butte Falls, December 23, 1907, Jeremiah Heckathorn, aged 38 years 10 months and 9 days. The deceased was born in Wabash County, Indiana and came to this county with his parents when quite young and was raised in this county to manhood. During the Spanish-American War he enlisted in the service of his country and went to the Philippine Islands. There he contracted a disease of the bowels that ultimately caused his death. After his return from those islands he married the widow of the late Mr. Parks, formerly of Central Point, who died in California. He leaves a wife, mother and five sisters. Mesdames Geo. Magerle and Oscar Simpkins, of Woodville, Mrs. Frank Ball, of Eureka, California, Mrs. D. G. Karnes, of Medford, and Mrs. Frank Lewis, of Eagle Point, besides a large circle of friends to feel his loss. The sisters were all in attendance at the funeral except Mrs. Ball. The services were conducted in the church at this place by Elder J. P. Moomaw and the remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery.
    The bereaved desire to extend thanks to the friends who so kindly assisted during his sickness and after his death.
    George Daniels and two of his cousins, Luther and Grover East, stayed here last Monday night. They were on their way to Peyton and expect to remain there a few days and visit friends.
    J. R. G. Haynes, of Eastern Oregon, stopped with us last Tuesday night. He was on his way to Butte Creek to visit his brother, whom he has not seen for several years. He expects to take him on surprise, as he does not know of his coming.
    Mr. Good, who has been stopping with us for the past month, working on the tract of land belonging to Mr. Frideger, went to Medford last Tuesday to spend Christmas.
    A man by the name of Gore, who has been at the Sunnyside for some time, went to the Abbott ranch this week for a little recreation.
    Ben. Fredenburg and wife drove out from Medford last Sunday morning, and by the time they reached here were well soaked, for the rain came down in torrents. They remained until Monday morning.
    Mr. Hawk, and one of his sons and a daughter, spent Sunday night with us. The next day they went to his sawmill north of Big Butte Creek.
    J. E. Stepp, of Round Top, Mr. Cowden, Miss Babe Edsall, and Ira Tungate, of Big Butte, stayed with us Sunday night. People in this mild climate don't stop for rain or mud.
    Mr. and Mrs. Magnus McDonald and their children came in on the P.&E. last Tuesday and called on us; in the afternoon they went up to his father's home near Brownsboro.
Medford Mail, December 27, 1907, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    There is not the usual amount of business done at Eagle Point on account of the free ferry being out of commission, it being on dry land and there being no way for the travel to cross Rogue River between the Flounce Rock bridge and the Bybee bridge, a distance of about thirty miles, thus causing those on the north and west side of the river to travel a long way around to even get to any railroad station. There is a lot of lumber laying on the bank of Rogue River about a mile below the old ferry place that has been hauled out to build a new boat, and the wire cable and other supplies are here at Eagle Point for said boat, but no boat. What we want and will eventually have is a good bridge across the river somewhere near the old Jackson place, so that the people of Sams Valley can come here and we can go to that section without traveling twenty-five miles to get ten or twelve.
    Born--To Mr. and Mrs. A. L. Haselton, January 7, '08, a son.
    Mr. Wilson of the unsurveyed came out last Friday and went to Medford to have some dental work done and returned here on Monday and on Tuesday morning started from the Sunnyside for his home with Mr. Ditsworth.
    M. C. Mahoney came down from Butte Falls last Sunday for a load of goods for Mr. Hughes, one of the merchants of that place. He went on to Medford the same day, returning on Monday. He was accompanied by L. V. Marcy. They report that the sawmill at that place is in operation and that business is livening up again.
    Mr. Hawk, proprietor of the Wakefield sawmill on the north side of Big Butte Creek, and his son and daughter, who have been spending the holidays on their mountain homestead, spent Sunday night here. The two children were on their way to Medford to resume their studies in the Medford schools.
    The masque ball given by George Daley on the eighth of January 1, '08 was a grand success. There were eighty-five whole and ten half tickets sold, and a large number of those who participated in the dance were masked and all seemed to have a fine time. Owing to the fact that the P.&E. railroad was in such a condition that the cars couldn't run, quite a number came on horseback and in rigs. After the midnight supper was over Mrs. Howlett thought that she was through feeding the crowd, but that morning she had fifty-two of the ball guests for breakfast, besides our regular boarders, and for once she had to cook more for the company, but they all had all they could eat and were satisfied.
    Fred Green, who is working for the S.P.R.R. Co. in San Francisco, came up on New Year's Day with his grandparents, J. J. Fryer and wife, and his brother Austin. He attended the masque ball and after he removed his masque his many friends here extended to him a hearty greeting.
    Rev. Haskell, of Medford, came out last Sunday and preached for us at 11 o'clock. The Sunday school was reorganized that afternoon. There was a good attendance.
    Mr. Miller, one of the old-time teachers, who has been teaching in Josephine County, passed through here last Tuesday on his way to his mountain home.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Bond, formerly of Prineville, but now stopping with Mrs. Bond's mother, Mrs. A. N. Thomas, were visiting Mrs. Howlett last Tuesday. They are spending the winter here sending the children to school.
    Misses Viola Kasshafer and Mable Sanders returned from their visit to Jacksonville last Tuesday.
    C. W. Jackson, one of the forest rangers, who has been stopping in the neighborhood of Brown's cabin on Upper Rogue River, came out last Saturday, and Sunday went on to Roseburg.
    Mrs. Libbie Eickmeyer came down from Washington last week to visit friends and attend to business.
    Mrs. Ben Brophy, who has been visiting her parents, Mr. and Mrs. T. E. Nichols, went to Talent last week to visit relatives there.
    Mr. Ditsworth and his daughter, Miss Bertha, stayed with us last Monday night on their way home from Jacksonville, where they had been to have Miss Bertha take the examination. She procured a permit and expects to commence teaching in the Nye school house next Monday. That is the fourth teacher that is at work teaching of that family and he has another daughter that has passed the eighth grade examination and will commence teaching as soon as she arrives at the required age--five teachers in one family, way back in a mountain district, where they try to get the best of teachers, pay a good price and consequently have good schools. If my memory serves me right that will be the tenth or eleventh teacher for that small mountain district.
Medford Mail, January 10, 1908, page 4


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    A. L. Cusick and H. J. Schutte, of Medford, were out one day last week. They were on their way to W. C. Daley's place on Big Butte and thence into the tall timber.
    Mrs. George Daley has gone up to A. H. Peachey's on Yankee Creek to help care for the sick. Mrs. Peachey is down with the grip and three or four of the children have the measles.
    H. E. Callahan, of Oakland, was a pleasant caller one day last week. He was looking over our part of the valley, noting our resources, and expressed a favorable opinion of this section, and seemed to think that the immediate surroundings of Eagle Point was underlaid with valuable deposits.
    Monday. Mr. Wilson had a mountain lion skin that he had just taken off of the animal he had killed near his homestead; it measured nine feet and four inches. He took it to Medford to a taxidermist to have it dressed to make a robe. He prized it very highly, being as he killed it himself.
    J. A. Abbott, one of the old citizens of this place, but now a resident of Elk Creek, came out last Monday to have his team shod, attend to business and see old friends. He stayed with us Monday and Tuesday night. He is another of the long list of taxpayers who urge the necessity of having a bridge across Rogue River above the old Jackson place.
    George Phillips, one of our townsmen, had a fall a few days ago in which he says he got hit all over. He was on an incline and he stepped on a slippery board and he says he fell and tumbled about twenty feet and struck on both legs, both arms, his back, head and in fact every part of his body was bruised more or less, but he is around town all right again.
    The box social given by the Knights and Ladies of Security last Saturday night was a grand success. The Eagle Point orchestra played several nice pieces and there was some speaking but the main feature was the selling of the boxes and voting on the most beautiful lady and the most ornery man for a prize. A cake was presented by Mrs. J. W. Grover to the most beautiful lady and a cane for the most ornery man. Miss Lottie Taylor took the cake, while Leo Ulrich now sports the cane. The boxes sold readily and brought a fair price. R. L. Wilson, of the unsurveyed, and Mr. C. Mahoney came out last.
Medford Mail, January 17, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. George Brown has been quite sick for some time with stomach trouble.
    Wm. Brown, a brother of our townsman George Brown, came to visit his brother last Friday.
    Clarence Pierce, of the real estate firm of Pierce & Son, of Medford, and Mr. Clark came out Monday.
    W. L. Childreth, our blacksmith, has moved his family onto the old Griffin place formerly occupied by Mr. Stone.
    Scott Claspill, of Butte Falls, was a sojourner here on Wednesday night of last week, on his way from Medford to take supplies for the folks at home.
    George Daley has had his bills ordered for another dance on St. Valentine's Day, February 14th, '08, and Mrs. Howlett will serve the supper.
    Thomas McAndrew and "Shorty" Dodge stayed here last Wednesday night. They were on their way to the McAndrew ranch on Rogue River.
    W. H. Glasscock stopped here overnight on his way to Butte Falls to take charge of the sawmill at that place. He was in company with Howard Boughden.
    Mr. Baker, of Butte Falls, stopped here last Monday night on his way from Medford. He seems to think that Butte Falls will come out all right this summer.
    G. M. Jones, of Medford, was a pleasant caller Saturday night. He was accompanied by J. O. Craven, of Klamath Falls. The last named gentleman has been up in the big timber east of Prospect.
    J. H. Carlton and S. B. Holmes sent about twenty-five head of hogs to the Medford market by the old-fashioned way of conveying them, i.e. by the wagon route. They were for Wortman & Gore.
    [omission] left their team and went down to look at the Shelton place, near the mouth of Little Butte Creek, returning after dark and Tuesday morning went to look at the tract of land Pierce & Son bought of J. W. Grover, but I didn't learn the results.
    Rev. John Fletcher, F. L. Grover and Scott Bruce came out from the unsurveyed country last Monday. They were on their way to Medford, stopping at the Sunnyside overnight. Mr. Bruce had a bear skin with him that he took from a bear he killed a short time ago. He is going to send it to Portland to have it dressed and made into a robe.
    I understand that arrangements have been made to have a road opened up between that part of the old Mathews place that belongs to N. L. Narregan and the Ulrich place, coming into the county road near the Childreth blacksmith shop. It will be a great convenience to many of the travelers.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Bond made a trip to Portland last week to procure medical treatment for Mr. Bond. He thought that he would have to have a surgical operation performed, but on his arrival there and on consulting a specialist it was decided that it was not necessary, and they returned home last Saturday.
    I am sorry to have to announce that one of our most promising young men, Thomas Young, is in a very critical condition, and but little hope is entertained for his recovery. His brother, Peter, came in from Burns last Tuesday, where he had been assisting his brother, Nick, who had both legs broken in a runaway with a disc plow. He  reports that Nick was able to walk on crutches the day he left there. Since writing the above I learn that Thomas Young had died.
    Messrs. G. R. Brobeck, J. C. Calking and A. J. Nichols, all of Wenatchee, Washington, stopped with us overnight last Monday. They came out on a handcar over the P.&E. railroad to look for fruit land. They are looking for a large tract of good land that they can purchase with the object of forming a colony. They asked a great many questions about our soil, seasons, climate, schools, churches etc., and in fact they seemed to want to know all about the country, and one of them, Mr. Brobeck, asked particularly about the prospect for coal here, saying that the indications were good for coal in our section of the country.

Medford Mail, January 24, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    George West came up from Ashland Monday night, where he has been to visit his wife who is there receiving medical treatment.
    Tracy Boothby came out from his home on upper Rogue River last Saturday night on his way to Talent to visit his sister, who is reported quite sick.
    Last Tuesday there was a number of our citizens turned out and prepared a lot of wood for our church. The wood was donated by Elder J. P. Moomaw. There was enough delivered at the church to last quite a while.
    Steve Hamilton, formerly of this place but now of the state of Washington, a brother-in-law of Wm. C. Daley, arrived here the last of last week to receive treatment for rheumatism, and at last accounts he was greatly benefited by his treatments.
    Mr. Baker, of Butte Falls, came out last Monday night for Dr. Holt to go to Butte Falls to set a broken leg for Benj. Lamb. Mr. Lamb was working around the sawmill and a stick of timber slipped endways, striking him on the calf of the leg with the above result.
    The citizens of Eagle Point have been looking for that automobile on the P.&E. road, but thus far have been doomed to disappointment, but we live in hope. The report comes that there is a gang of men at work straightening up the track and getting ready for business.
    Our school closed, indefinitely, last Friday, as the principal was employed on trial and his term on trial expired on that date and the board of directors decided to close the school for a while, and it is not known whether we will have any more school this winter or not.
    Rev. John Fletcher, of the unsurveyed section, and his son-in-law, Mr. Bruce, were pleasant callers Tuesday night of last week. Rev. Fletcher was on his way to Roseburg and Mr. Bruce was going south. He is in the employ of the S.P. Co. and is a timber cruiser.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis, the traveling evangelist for the Congregational Sunday school, preached here last Sunday night to a good-sized audience. He preached at the Reese Creek school house last Friday and Saturday nights and Sunday afternoon at 2 o'clock and assisted with the Sunday school. He reports an attendance of about forty at the Sunday school.
    J. Hartman stopped here last week on his way home from Flounce Rock bridge, where he had been to inspect it. He pronounces it in a bad condition and will recommend the court to condemn it. He says it will have to have new piers under it and that the work cannot be done until the water runs down to a low stage.
    G. E. Walter, of Ashland, but formerly of Montana, was a pleasant caller last Sunday night. He was on his way up Little Butte Creek to look at a farm. He came to this valley on account of his mother's health and finds that it has improved so much that they have decided to buy and make this country their future home.
    As announced in last week's Mail, Thomas Felix Young, one of our most promising young men, was called to go the way of all flesh, Jan. 23, 1908. He would have been thirty-nine years old the thirtieth day of this month. He was born and had lived in this neighborhood all of his life and if he had an enemy it was not known, a young man of good habits, and by his industry and energy had accumulated enough to make him independent. He leaves two brothers, Nick and Peter Young, and three sisters, Mrs. James Owens, Mrs. George Givan and Miss Clara Young, besides a long list of warm friends. The remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery, the services being conducted by A. C. Howlett. A large concourse of people followed the remains to the last resting place.

Medford Mail, January 31, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    John Higinbotham and his brother-in-law, Mr. McKee, were here for dinner last Saturday.
    W. H. Bowen, an old veteran who has been boarding with us for over two years, started for California on a visit last Tuesday morning.
    Mr. McCahn, of Central Point, was a pleasant caller last Saturday. He had been up in the tall timber on business and was on his way home.
    Mrs. Anderson and family went to Glendale this week to join her husband, who is section boss on the S.P. at that place. She shipped her household goods last week.
    People are already beginning to get their tickets for the dance on the 14th. Mr. Daley told me last Monday that he had sold quite a number of tickets at that time.
    J. T. Smith, of Butte Falls, who has been taking a layoff in Medford for the past few weeks, stopped a few days with us on his way home. He went on up last Saturday.
    B. A. Nason, of Prospect, stayed overnight here on his way from south of Ashland, where he had been working. He is going to plant an orchard on his homestead.
    C. C. Pierce and an evangelist by the name of Howard were out last Saturday looking at a tract of land near the month of Little Butte Creek, also other places in these parts.
    Magnes McDonnell, of Nevada, who is visiting home folks near Brownsboro, and his brother were pleasant callers last Monday. They came out for a load of bran for their cows.
    Mr. Ditsworth came out from Peyton last week on his way to Medford and to see P. H. Daily, the superintendent of schools. He reports fine schools in his neighborhood, and says that the reason is they pay a good price and get good teachers.
    W. S. Weston and D. F. Bliss, of North Yakima, Washington, were here last week looking for land. They seemed to be well pleased with the country, but concluded to look further before purchasing. They were accompanied by C. C. Pierce of Medford.
    Hon. J. R. Neil, of Jacksonville, and his son, Frank, of Derby, stayed here last Sunday night on their way to the home of the latter. Frank is taking his father home with him to recuperate. He is in poor health and they think if he gets where he can have rest and the pure mountain air it will be beneficial to him.
    Last Monday your Eagle Point correspondent had a new floor put on the suspension bridge between the Sunnyside Hotel and the commercial part of the town so that it is now considered safe and sound. The new floor is two feet wide and very strong.
    Mr. Wolverton, one of the enterprising homesteaders of Butte Falls, was out one day last week on his way to Medford to meet parties from Portland. He was on a deal with them, trading property in California for property in this county. Mr. Wolverton seems to think that this is about as good a country as he expects to find.
    Jud Edsall and Mr. Cowden, of Butte Falls, were out last Friday after a load of barley. They seem to think that there will be considerable business done at that place the coming season, and that the financial tangle in that place will straighten out. The mill will cut what lumber they need and by the time the P.&E. railroad gets there everything will be in readiness for it.
    Last Saturday your Eagle Point correspondent made a flying trip to Table Rock, where he saw that the most of the country is planted to fruit and the question is already being asked as to where we will procure our hay and grain, for the grain and alfalfa fields are being plowed up and put out in orchards. While there [I] had the pleasure of meeting with some of the admirers of the Mail, among whom was Mrs. J. C. Pendleton, and while she is a lady of literary taste, she is also an enthusiast over fine horses. Mr. Pendleton is keeping Farceur, the famous stallion, and she showed me, with considerable pride, the fine medals he had received.
Medford Mail, February 7, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Ed Cowden and Jud Edsall came out for a load of mill stuff last Friday.
    Dick Stepp and R. H. Graham, of Iowa, were pleasant callers last Friday night.
    J. A. Jonas' flue burned out last Friday night and that caused some excitement in our quiet neighborhood.
    Mr. Aiken, son of S. S. Aiken, of Prospect, was out a few nights ago for medicine for his sister, Miss Francis.
    F. V. Medynski was a pleasant caller on his way from Butte Falls. He had been upon his homestead for a few weeks.
    A. B. Hamilton, of Medford, took dinner with us last Tuesday. He was out here on business connected with the old Ulrich place.
    Mrs. Stevens, nee Beckie Singer, of Oak Grove, Oregon, a sister of Mrs. Susan Perry, has been visiting some of her relatives in these parts.
    Frank Neil came out last Tuesday morning and brought out his father, Judge J. R. Neil, and two of his daughters on their way to Medford.
    Scott Claspill of Butte Falls came out Thursday of last week and on Friday went to Medford for a load of goods for the Butte Falls merchants.
    Jason Hartman, the boss bridge builder, is repairing the railroad bridge across Butte Creek and we hope that we will have something done in that line in the near future.
    Mr. Wines of Medford, who has been over here considerable lately, was at Eagle Point last week talking to our land owners about coal, oil, etc. He seems confident that there is coal on the hill just above our town.
    Elmer Spencer and family passed through on Wednesday of last week and went to his home on the unsurveyed. Lou Smith took them with my team and Lou reports that the roads are out of sight, but they got through O.K.
    Miss March Kincaid, who has been teaching at Wimer in Josephine [sic] County, came here last Friday night and was met by her brother, Lucius Kincaid, Sunday, and Monday morning they went on their way to her parents' home near Peyton.
    W. H. Bowman started last week for Burnt Ranch, California, got as far as Redding and found that the snow on the road from there to Burnt Ranch was so deep that he could hardly make the trip, so he returned home last Saturday.
    Mr. Young and family of Prospect came out on Wednesday of last week on their way to Ashland to visit Mrs. Young's mother. Mr. Young has a homestead about five miles from Prospect and is putting out fruit
trees and making it a home The storm was so severe that they stopped over at the Sunnyside until Friday morning.
    The ladies of Eagle Point gave a necktie social in the church last Friday night. The attendance was not large, as it was gotten up on the spur of the moment and was not generally known. The proceeds were to be applied to purchasing seats for the church. They expect to give another in the near future. Those who attended report having had a very pleasant time and raised fifteen or sixteen dollars.
    There have been several changes in real estate in these parts lately, W. L. Childreth having bought the Pool property on the old J. J. Fryer place, three acres, house, barn etc., of Mrs. C. Pool, consideration $15000. O. C. Sheldon sold his farm through the agency of C. H. Pierce & Son, to a man by the name of Gabral, consideration $4,200. I learn that the Ulrich property has been sold to Medford capitalists, consideration $26,000, and land buyers are here every day or two looking for homes. So you see that Eagle Point is coming to the front very fast.
    C. W. Austin, Dr. S. F. Grover and Mrs. L. S. Stone, the former two from the unsurveyed and the lady is from Los Angeles, California. She has been out to visit some of her relatives in the unsurveyed section and was on her way home. They arrived at the Sunnyside after dark Sunday night and Monday proceeded on their way to Medford. Mr. Austin reports that they are going to build a large hall upon the unsurveyed, lay out a town, have a post office and let the world know that there is somebody in that part of the country. They are going to name the new town Zenith and try to have a branch of the P.&E. come to the new town.
Medford Mail, February 14, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    F. M. Stewart, the real estate man, was out last Sunday in his gasoline buggy. He found the roads very rough on the desert.
    B. P. Youmans, of Vancouver, Washington, called on his way to the timber belt on Salt Creek.
    Henry McCabe, of Medford, stopped with us for dinner on his way to visit his parents on Rogue River.
    J. E. Stepp sod son, Dick, came out last week. The latter was on his way to San Francisco to finish his course in telegraphy.
    Our school is progressing nicely under the new management, Miss Anna Jeffreys as principal and Miss Bertha Peachey as primary teacher.
    Miss Marsh Kincaid, who has been teaching near Wimer, Josephine County, stayed here last Saturday night on her way to her home near Peyton.
    H. J. Rizeor, of Medford, has rented one of the old Robert Potter buildings and is going to keep batch as soon as he can get things arranged to suit.
    Revs. Green of Ashland, and Davis, of Wolf Creek, are holding a series of meetings here this week and expect to continue over Sunday and perhaps a part of next week.
    Z. J. Emerick, W. W. Humphrey and W. W. Parker were here last week. The two former were going up to look at the country beyond Butte Falls and Mr. Parker was taking them up home with him.
    J. C. Brown, one of the real estate men of Medford, was a pleasant caller last week. He was accompanied by F. R. Weidenmeubler, of Fresno, California. They were out looking at the A. J. Daley tract of land in the edge of town.
    A. B. Hamilton, of Medford, came out last week and took a contract to cut a lot of wood for the owners of the old Ulrich place. He has a force of nine men cutting now, and Mrs. Howlett has to put up lunches for seven of them.
    J. L. Rider, of Ashland, was here looking at our surroundings. Everyone is favorably impressed with the beauties of our valley, but think that the price of land is rather high, but there are several changes taking place.
    Mr. Sawyer and his son, who have been surveying the old Ulrich tract of land, cutting it up into small tracts, returned to Medford last Saturday evening. The owners of the land are preparing to put out fifty acres of orchard this spring.
    A. V. Morrison sold his tract of land consisting of eighty acres on Reese Creek to Mrs. S. Clearwater last week, consideration $800.
    G. T. Richards and his nephew, Mr. Byers, from Montana, were pleasant callers last Friday night. They were on their way to Portland. Mr. Richards formerly lived at Butte Falls and talks some of returning to that place.
    Miss Jane Grigsby, of Klamath Falls, who has been attending the Ashland Normal, was visiting her relatives here last week. She was one of the successful applicants for teacher's certificate in the last examination.
    Tuesday morning a young man by the name of Rosco A. Johnson, of Chicago, Ill., came out and engaged a room for a week. He said he wanted to look around the country and asked to have his lunch fixed up every day.
    Dr. W. W. Irving, of Medford, and O. W. Benedict, of Lathrop, Mont., were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last week. They were looking for homes among us. They were accompanied by C. H. Pierce, of the real estate firm of Pierce & Son.
    John Iseli and wife, of Round Top, came out last Saturday, spending the night at the Sunnyside. They brought out trunks belonging to three young men that have come out to see the country, and the young men came out Monday and are now stopping with us cutting wood for Mr. Hamilton.
    J. R. Knodell, the noted lecturer who is canvassing the country in favor of local option, is billed for this place for the evening of the 12th of March. The Eagle Point band will be on hand with their fine music, a quartet will sing and a rousing good time is expected. We expect to have the church building filled to its utmost capacity.
    Tuesday morning the sad news came over the phone that Miss Julia Ayers, daughter of one of our citizens, F. J. Ayers, had died very suddenly on the 24th inst. in San Francisco. A message announcing her serious illness and summoning her parents and the one announcing her death both came at the same time Tuesday morning, the first one having been delayed.
    Mr. Green started last Sunday afternoon with one of the boilers of the big mill that the Iowa Lumber & Box Co. of Medford are sending up to the timber. The roads are so bad that it is quite a job to draw a boiler weighing nine thousand pounds and on a truck weighing four thousand and five hundred pounds, but at last accounts they had gone about seven miles, but had not come to the worst of the road. They have eight horses, but will use block and tackle on the hardest pulls.
    Messrs. Merrick, Wortman, Osgood and Eifert, a committee of Medford citizens, stopped here on Monday of last week on their way to the headwaters of the Butte creeks looking for a supply of water that could be piped to Medford so that the citizens of that thriving city could have an abundant of supply of pure water for domestic use, and the reader can be assured that if they succeed in procuring a supply from that source or from Rogue River they will have an abundant supply of as good water as there is to be found in the state.
Medford Mail, February 21, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    A. S. Pense, of Douglas County, was here last week on his way to look at the big timber.
    I understand that there has [been] a family moved into the old Griffith house, but I have not learned the name.
    Mrs. Mary Wright and her son Willie have returned from California and are occupying their old home, and Mrs. Saint Clair has gone to live with her sister, Mrs. A. N. Thomas.
    A. J. Daley, one of our merchants, has sold his store building and stock of goods to his son, John H. Daley, and he expects to replenish the stock of goods and keep a full stock on hand.
    Bud Obenchain passed through here last Friday on his way to visit his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John Obenchain. He lives in Klamath County and has not been to see his parents for a long time.
    Ham Watkins, the Trail stage driver, has moved his boarding place and now the Trail stage leaves the Sunnyside Hotel every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday morning, returning the same day.
    Mr. Byers, recently from Michigan, who is here looking for a home, is still looking around at the farms on Butte Creek. He seems to like this part of the country very much, and will probably locate here.
    There were four men came out from Medford last Sunday to look at the land south of our town and took dinner here, but there was such a large crowd that I did not learn their names. They were looking for homes.
    Miss Ethel Tucker, a daughter of Ed Tucker of Brownsboro, a graduate of the Ashland Normal and one of the successful applicants at the last teacher's examination, passed through here Tuesday on her way to visit her parents.
    A. J. Daley has an appointment to preach in the church next Sunday at 7:30 p.m. and Rev. A. C. Howlett will preach in the church on Sunday the 15th at 7:30 p.m. I will preach at the Reese Creek school next Sunday after the Sunday school closes, which meets at 2:30 p.m.
    Wes Green, outside business manager of the Iowa Lumber & Box Company, who are sending two big sawmills up to the tall timber, is here getting all the teams he can to haul the machinery to their different locations. The men all stop at the Sunnyside Hotel when they are in this section and Hamilton with his gang of nine wood choppers and the comers and goers keep the Sunnyside pretty well filled.
    Revs. Green, of Ashland, and Davis, of Wolf Creek, the latter the traveling Sunday school evangelist for the Congregational Church, have been holding meetings here for the last week. There has been more than an ordinary interest manifested and two accessions to the church, and quite a number have expressed a desire to become Christians, and several are making arrangements to take their letters from other churches and unite here, and the prospect seems bright for a good, large organization. Rev. Green delivered a lecture here last Monday evening on the subject of "Local Option'' or rather in favor of rooting the saloons out of the county, state and nation, showing that from a business standpoint the saloon is a financial curse and social nuisance. We are expecting to have a rousing time here on next Thursday, the 12th inst., when Rev. J. R. Knodell will lecture on the subject of local option at this place.
    Thursday of last week the remains of Miss Julia Ayers, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayers, of this neighborhood, who died in San Francisco on the 25th of February aged twenty-five years and seventeen days, arrived in Central Point and were buried in the Central Point cemetery the same day. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. A. C. Howlett, assisted by Rev. M. C. Davis. After the religious services were concluded F. T. Newport stepped forward and gave a short talk, stating that Miss Ayers lived and died a devoted Christian and that on her way to the hospital expressed her strong reliance in God and her hope of immortality beyond the grave. A large crowd of her friends and relatives attended the funeral. Her sister Laura and brother-in-law Mr. Newport came up with the remains and remained with her parents until Sunday.
Medford Mail, March 6, 1908, page 5


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Born--February 29, 1908, to Mr. and Mrs. Green Mathews, a daughter.
    John X. Miller, of Trail, was out and stopped here two nights last week.
    A. C. Howlett has an appointment to preach in the Eagle Point church next Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
    Wm. Ulrich sold a bunch of 2-, 3- and 4 year-old steers to a man by the name of Mitchell last Monday.
    J. W. Lawton, who is an aspirant for the nomination for assessor, was out last week talking to his friends on the subject.
    Henry Gordon and family called Monday night on their way to visit Mrs. Gordon's parents, Mr. and Mrs. Ben. Edmondson.
    E. S. Wolfer reports ripe strawberries in his patch on the 8th of March and he says that they are very fine but not very plentiful.
    Dr. Morrison and three other men from Medford were out here last Sunday for dinner. They were looking over our land with a view of buying.
    The many friends of Miss Mamie Wright were pleased to meet with her at church last Sunday night. She returned to Ashland Monday to resume her studies.
    On Tuesday eventing of last week Rev. E. F. Green of Ashland delivered a lecture under the auspices of the W.C.T.U., and those present report that they had a very enjoyable time.
    Prof. Narregan is putting a large part of his place out to fruit trees this spring, and the man who bought the Ulrich place, Mr. Hamilton, is having a large tract of land put to trees on that place.
    Miss Bessie Haselton, one of our prominent young lady teachers, went to Woodville last Saturday to resume her school duties. Her many friends wish her abundant success in her undertaking.
    Wm. Van Hardenburg, of Medford, is teaming here, hauling some of the machinery for the two big mills that the I.L.&B. Co. are taking to the big timber, and his wife is assisting Mrs. Howlett in the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Mr. Hamilton, the man who took the contract to cut the wood off of the timber part of the old Ulrich place, has taken another contract to clear more land, and he told Mrs. Howlett that he would likely be here for a month more and probably longer.
    Edgar Hafer and Mr. Green came out together a few days ago and Mr. Hafer told me that they are getting along fine with the railroad survey and that they think they will have a uniform grade to the timber belt.
    James Jordan, the man who bought the J. R. Cook place in Eagle Point last fall, arrived here on the ninth inst. with his family consisting of his wife and daughter, and Mrs. Walker and her little daughter. They are stopping at the Sunnyside at present awaiting the arrival of the household goods.
    Nelson Nye, of Flounce Rock, came out with his family last Friday and are stopping for the present with his brother-in-law, A. J. Florey. Mrs. Nye and the children expect to go to Washington and spend a while visiting her mother, while he goes to Alaska to secure a home, when the family will join him.
    Rev. Davis and myself went to Table Rock with the intention of having preaching services, but Revs. Shields and M. C. Henry were ahead of us so we remained and listened to them speak on the saloon question. Mr. Shields handled Dr. Reddy's amendment, giving incorporated towns and cities the right to license saloons, gambling houses, brothels, etc. without gloves, and out of that vast crowd I don't think that there was one who would vote for the amendment.
    On last Friday the W.C.T.U. of Eagle Point had a business meeting and took eight young ladies into the Union. Mrs. J. W. Grover, the president of the Union, presided and the secretary, Mrs. A. J. Florey, read her report which was quite interesting. She also read a communication from Mrs. Beck, president of the Medford Union, that made a very favorable impression on the audience. The ladies of Eagle Point are working on the subject of the liquor traffic and they will lend a helping hand to put the saloons of Jackson County out of commission next June.
    The Iowa Lumber & Box Company are hurrying their mills up to their destination as fast as they can. They are putting on all the teams they can muster, and they are having a hard time hauling over the mountain roads. Last week they turned over with one of their donkey engines in one of the worst sticky mud holes on the road; the mud--sticky at that--was about from eight to twelve inches deep, and when Wes Green came into the Sunnyside for dinner he reminded me of old times in Missouri when people used to get drunk and wallow in that Missouri mud, for he was mud all over, but they put the engine on another wagon and went on their way.
    The protracted meeting closed on Tuesday night of last week, Rev. Green conducting the closing exercise as Rev. Davis and myself went to Reese Creek school house to hold services and preached to [a] good and attentive audience; in spite of the bad roads and dark nights there were fifty-three persons came out to hear the preaching. I also preached there last Sunday and had the pleasure of attending the Sunday school--Miss Rosa Ayers is the superintendent, Miss Rosa Nealon teacher of the Bible class, and [I] have forgotten the names of the other teachers and secretary and treasurer. They have a very interesting Sunday school as well as a good district school with Miss Rosa Nealon as teacher.
    Eagle Point is becoming one of the most attractive places in Jackson County, and there is more business going on than we are used to and it almost makes our heads swim to see such a bustle and to see so many strangers coming and going and to see property changing hands so rapidly. I understand that R. G. Brown has sold the old Charley Taylor place, consideration $13,000.--that Grant Mathews has sold his place, consideration $8,000---that Wilbur Ashpole has sold his place for $[illegible]--although the last-named sale has not been confirmed--that S. B. Holmes has sold the lot where the old store stood, where J. H. Carlton was burned out, so that there are other trades on hand that are likely to be confirmed.
Medford Mail, March 13, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis will preach here next Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
    Elder Root, of Oklahoma, commenced a protracted meeting here last Tuesday night.
    David Cingcade, Thomas Coy and Joseph Riley have been putting up a lot of wire netting fence.
    Mrs. Holt, wife of our physician, started for San Francisco to remain several months last Saturday.
    Mr. Crumb and C. C. Pierce, of Medford, were out here one day last week looking at the country.
    Miss Delia Miller, of Trail, was a sojourner at the Sunnyside Thursday of last week on her way to Medford.
    John W. Smith Jr. left for San Francisco Saturday. His stay will depend on circumstances; he may remain all summer.
    Mrs. Eickmeyer, nee Libbie Perry, came out the last of the week to visit her sisters, Mesdames J. W. Grover and Frank Nichols.
    John McKee and his grandson, Earnest McKee, of Applegate, stayed here last Saturday night on their way to the old gentleman's former home.
        Miss Mattie Nutting passed through here last Friday on her way to Big Butte to visit her sister, Miss Bessie Nutting. She came direct from Boston, Mass.
    The Rogue River Milling Company sent out a load of lumber for E. L. Cooley. He expects to build as soon as he can on the land he bought of Mr. Stoddard.
    Miss Carthena Smith came out from Medford last Saturday with your correspondent on her way from Roseburg to teach school in the Antelope district, where she commenced to teach last Monday morning.
    Rev. McKee preached for us twice last Sunday, at 11 o'clock a.m. and after Sunday school in the afternoon, and I preached at night. We had a good audience each time. Mr. McKee is a very pleasant and forceful preacher and preached two fine sermons.
    Since my last there has been considerable property changed hands. Wm. Knighton has sold his place of 16 acres for $3200, and Claud Wamsley has sold his place of thirteen acres for $2500, and Mr. Stoddard has sold a ten-acre tract off of the old Brown place to a Mr. Cooley for $300, and the report is that Israel Patton has bought property in Eagle Point, but the facts are not known to your correspondent. Thus you see that this little town of Eagle Point is coming to the front very fast.
    The Iowa Lumber & Box Company are pushing the machinery into the hills as fast as they can. They started another boiler last Monday morning, besides several other teams, in all twenty-two horses, having had ten to one wagon--the one with the boiler on. They are doing a great deal of work to get the machinery up this time of the year. One of the teamsters reports that they will have one of the mills ready for use in another week.
    The Eagle Point W.C.T.U. is fast coming to the front under the leadership of its efficient officers. I herewith send, for the benefit of the thousands of readers of 
the Mail, an extract from the minutes of the last meeting that may be of interest to at least a number of those readers. Meeting opened by singing. The president, Mrs. Grove, read 12 Rom., songs followed by Lord's Prayer in concert. The following members answered to the roll call. Mesdames Grover, Jonas, Florey, Misses Varian Stickle, Dottie Harnish, Tinna Lewis, Marguerette Florey. We then listened to the report of the treasurer, Varian Stickle, read a selection and did it well. Mrs. Florey also read a poem. The president received three new members, Miss Sadie Gutches, Miss Gertie Abbott and Hilda Abbott. The president then gave one of her good talks to the young folks asking all to do something to make our meetings interesting and telling them we hope to soon organize them into a Loyal Temperance League. She appointed Misses Varian Stickle and Tinna Lewis as a committee to prepare a program for [the] next meeting. The meeting closed by singing the temperance doxology.
    Rev. McKee, the Baptist colporter, came out and assisted in the anti-saloon meeting that was held here on the evening of the 12th inst. He sang "The Brewer's Big Horses'' in his peculiar way greatly to the amusement of the audience The Eagle Point orchestra was there and did themselves credit in rendering some fine music. A mixed quartet sang a piece with Mrs. Wm. Brown as organist and then Rev. Knodell was introduced and he delivered a fine lecture on the saloon question and did not fail to tell the Eagle Point people how ashamed the people of Medford were of their mayor for furthering the amendment to grant cities and towns the exclusive right to license saloons, gambling houses, brothels etc., but it is not necessary for me to say much about his speech, for if the people turned out in other places as they did here almost everybody has heard him for themselves.
    Oliver McGee and wife came out to Eagle Point last Saturday afternoon to pay a visit to a few of their old friends. They only remained from the arrival of the car in the afternoon until 9 o'clock the next morning, so no one had much time to visit with them. Mr. McGee had just returned from the funeral of his brother Charley, who died in British Columbia, aged 50 years, and his friends there kept the body frozen from December 22, '07 until his relatives came for it. His death occurred 160 miles north of Kamloops and Oliver McGee traveled to within about 100 miles of the place and gave out so he had to send for the corpse. They brought it to the old family burying ground in Josephine County where they interred & with his father, mother and other members of the family. He leaves two brothers, Oliver and Perry, and a sister that I know of, and I think that there are other members of the family living, but [I] am not certain. The McGee family has been an important factor in the community in which they lived, and the surviving members of the family have a host of friends in that part of the country, and Mr. and Mrs. O. McGee, who were residents of our town for several years, have a host of friends in these parts.
Medford Mail, March 20, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    A. H. Peachey sold, last Tuesday, to Israel Patton his two lots with a small house on it, in Eagle Point, consideration $400. Mr. Patton has quite a family and will be a valuable addition to our school.
    Our school is progressing finely under the management of Miss Anna Jeffery, assisted by Miss Bertha Peachey.
    Wm. Knighton has purchased the Johnny Lewis place of J. J. Fryer, consideration six hundred dollars.
    Mrs. Maud Stickle, of Gold Hill, was out last Sunday visiting her sister-in-law, Mrs. Mae Bond, and Mrs. Bond returned home with her.
    Mr. Cooley has procured the material to build his house and has it well under way.
    James Jordan, the man who bought the J. R. Cook property, and who has been stopping with us for nearly two weeks, moved with his family into his new home last Saturday.
    John Obenchain, Charley Edmondson and Frank Netherland passed through town last Tuesday on their way to Medford to appear before Commissioner Bliton in land cases.
    The Iowa Lumber & Box Company are getting their two mills along quite well. One of them is so far along that they expect to be making lumber in a very short time.
    D. B. Deter has started a delivery wagon running from the depot to the hotels of Eagle Point and carrying baggage, etc. He expects to procure the contract for carrying the mail from the depot to the post office.
    Israel Patton, of Butte Falls, was here last week and again this week looking for a house to rent or a place to buy, but at last accounts he had not succeeded. He was also on his way to Medford to appear as a witness for Rev. Merley, of Butte Falls, in his homestead proof before Commissioner A. S. Bliton.
    While we were at Reese Creek we had the privilege of visiting the school where Miss Rose Nealon, of Table Rock, has been teaching. She closed her school today, Friday, and expects to take charge of another school on the other side of the river, near Joseph Hannah's, in a short time.
    The Dunkards closed their meetings here last Sunday at noon and Rev. Davis preached Sunday night, and Monday night he preached at the Reese Creek school house. I accompanied him there, and then on Wednesday and Thursday nights he preached at the Eagle Point church. The people of Eagle Point seem to be taking more interest in religious matters than they have in the past.
    G. T. Richards, formerly of Butte Falls, Mr. Meires, recently from Michigan, and Mr. and Mrs. Remede, of Montana, and A. B. Saling were here last week and procured a team at the Sunnyside stable and went to Butte Falls, up Rogue River and other places, looking at the country. Mr. and Mrs. Remede seemed to like this part of the country very much and Mr. Remede said that as soon as he could dispose of his property back east be expected to return and locate among us, for he seemed delighted with our climate and soil, and predicts wonderful developments in these parts in the near future.
    Mrs. J. G. Grover gave her Sunday school, infant class a little party last Sunday. There were twenty-seven little tots there and twenty-three of them belong to her class in our Sunday school. The children report having had one of the nicest times of their lives, and with the keen appetite of children, who are blessed with health and plenty of outdoor exercise, they thought that the dinner was beyond praise. Mrs. A. J. Florey assisted Mrs. Grover in the preparation and serving of the dinner, and it is needless to say that it was a time long to be remembered by the little folk.
    Mrs. E. A. Hildreth and her sister, Mrs. J. M. Van Tassel, of New York, arrived here last Saturday and according to previous arrangements I took them to Butte Falls on Sunday, arriving about 5:30 p.m., and had been there but a very short time before I met Mr. Claninger [Clevenger?] and he invited me to preach for them that night, which I readily consented to do. Arrangements had been made to have a meeting for singing, and some select pieces. After the entire audience had sung one or two songs five little girls came to the rostrum and sang "Mother We Are Coming,'' and they sang it in such a way as to make us older ones feel that we would like to be young again and join with them in the song and sentiment. Then three young ladies sang a beautiful piece, but the name has slipped my mind, after which I was invited to preach and a more attentive audience it has not been my good privilege to address for a long time. Butte Falls has grown considerable since I was there last and the people seem to to be alive and up and doing. The arrangements were made, I understood, to start the mill up last Wednesday morning.
    The Eagle Point W.C.T.U. met last Saturday p.m. and herewith send you an extract from the regular minutes last to let your thousands of readers know that our ladies are still awake and pushing the car of temperance along. Following is the report: Meeting opened by song. The president read 17 verses of the 15th chapter of Romans. She then offered prayer followed by roll call. The following members answered to their names, Mesdames Grover, Jonas, Moomaw and Florey, Misses Varian Stickle, Blanche Cox, Sadie Gutches and Marguerette Florey. As Miss Anna Jeffery, principal of our school, has been in the W.C.T.U. work longer than any of us here, our president, Mrs. Grover, requested her to accept the position of president during her stay among us. Which she, wishing to give us all the aid in her power, kindly consented to do. She read in her own impressive manner the pathetic story of Little Blossom. Miss Sadie Gutches gave us a fine recitation entitled "Do a Kindness.'' Mrs. Florey gave the young folks a little information about the Loyal Temperance Legion. The president appointed the following committee on program to serve for one month: Misses Varian Stickle, Blanche Cox and Marguerette Florey. Meeting closed with refreshments, a reading and singing the temperance doxology. Adjourned to meet at the church next Saturday at 2:20 p.m.
Medford Mail, March 27, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Miss Mabel Wamsley started last week for Ashland to attend the business college.
    Last Sunday it was voted to hold the Sunday school in the forenoon commencing at 10 o'clock.
    Rev. Merley, of Butte Falls, passed the night at the Sunnyside on his way home last Monday.
    J. H. Ditsworth is stopping with us and assisting in hauling the wood Mr. Hamilton cut on the old Ulrich place.
    Rev. McKee will preach here next Sunday morning and evening, and will preach at Table Rock next Sunday morning.
    Last Sunday the Central Point ball team came out and played with the Eagle Point team. The result was 8 to 9 in favor of Eagle Point.
    Last Monday there was some eight or ten of the citizens of Butte Falls came out and took dinner and most of them went on to Medford on foot.
    J. A. Abbott, of Elk Creek, came out last Saturday to secure medical treatment. He is stopping at the Sunnyside and Dr. Holt is tending the case.
    Miss Hattie Cingcade, who has been in San Francisco for the past few years, came home last Monday. Her many friends here gave her a cordial welcome.
    Mrs. Wolverton, who has been out to the valley on business for a few days, came out on the P.&E. train and I took her to their homestead on McNeil Creek last week.
    J. D. Wigle and son, J. F. Wigle, of Coburg, came down about the middle of last week, got a rig here and spent three days in the tall timber above here on Little Butte and its tributaries. They speak in the highest terms of our country and especially of our climate.
    Speaking of preaching, Rev. M. C. Davis has been preaching for us now for over a year, and organizing Sunday schools, and he has so far succeeded in that line of work that at Agate, Table Rock, Eagle Point, Reese Creek, and Peyton he is able to report an increase of three hundred attendance in these five Sunday schools, that is not counting Trail, Willow Springs, etc.
    Late Saturday the W.C.T.U. met at the usual hour and after the usual opening exercises acting president, Miss Anna Jeffreys, read a character sketch of Neil Dow, one of the most prominent temperance workers in this country, the father of the prohibition movement. Mrs. Grover read an article showing the working of the Y.L.L. and steps were taken to organize a Y.L.L. league next Saturday. Miss Varian Stickle read a piece entitled, "What Prohibition Has Done for You and I."
Medford Mail, April 3, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Mrs. Jack, of Ashland, is here visiting her son, Wilbur, and family.
    A. C. Howlett will preach next Sunday at the Reese Creek school house at 2:30 p.m.
    Rev. Merley, of Butte Falls, stopped here on Tuesday on his way to Ashland where he bought property and expects to reside.
    Mr. Birdsman, who lives north of Eagle Point, was here one day last week circulating a subscription paper for funds to build a ferry boat at the old stand two miles below Trail and he was meeting with good success.
    Rev. G. S. Clevenger, recently of Seattle, Wash. preached for us last Monday and announced an appointment for preaching for next Thursday night, the 16th, and the rest of the week including Sunday morning and evening.
    Mr. Stone and family, formerly of this place, but now of Medford, were pleasant callers last Tuesday. Mrs. McMillen and her daughter, Mrs. Van Hardenburg, were also welcome guests at the Sunnyside Hotel last Tuesday.
    Mr. Pierce, of Medford, informs me that he has sold another tract off of the quarter section he bought of Mr. Grover, and the land buyers are still looking for homes. Mr. Warren was out last Tuesday morning looking for land and engaged board of Mrs. Howlett for the present.
    On Monday of last week I went to Butte Falls to take Rev. Merley and after we reached there, the people asked me to preach for them and as soon as contented to do so the news was conveyed to every house by four little girls and the result was a full house to preach to and a very marked attention. The people up there seem to be hungry for old-fashioned gospel preaching.
    The carpenters commenced last Friday to remodel and rebuild the Sunnyside Hotel and at this writing Mrs. Howlett has her kitchen and dining room in a tent and some of the beds in tents and the most of them in the Brown house that we have rented for that purpose, but the people continue to come and she is now feeding an average of about twenty a day. The carpenters expect to have the house so that we can move into a part of it in the course of two weeks.
    The people need a way to cross Rogue River other than swimming or taking their lives in their hands and crossing in a small boat. What we need and ought to have is a good bridge across the river near the old Geo. Jackson place, and there is a majority of the taxpayers on each side of the river that think so, for while the ferry is a great accommodation to many in the summer and fall, in the winter there is a good part of the time that the water is so high that they cannot cross with a boat.
    The road from here to Butte Falls is in a horrible condition and I think if our county court was forced to haul lumber over the roads that we have in the hills north and east of here on a dead axle wagon, without spring seats, they would be a little more liberal with the road fund of the county. I was told that, while the road tax collected in the Butte Falls road district amounted to hundreds of dollars that there was but thirty dollars applied on the roads in that district, and the people in those districts will be careful who they elect for county judge and county commissioner next June.
    Hon. B. F. Mulkey, one of the candidates for the office of District Attorney came out last Thursday and spent Friday and Saturday in the Butte Creek country and on Sunday was the principal speaker at a Republican rally in Eagle Point. There was a large crowd came out to hear him and he gave us a plain, clean talk. There was no mudslinging; in fact he said nothing that anyone could take exceptions to. After he was through Mr. Eggleston, of Ashland, one of the candidates for the nomination for the office of county judge, gave us a short talk and then Wm. Greaves was called, but he had left the hall, so we were not favored with a speech from him. The Eagle Point band played several fine selections for us and a male quartet from Ashland favored as with several songs and thus the evening was spent very pleasantly.
Medford Mail, April 10, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    The carpenters are rushing the work on the new Sunnyside Hotel.
    Thomas Coy is remodeling the house that Wm. Knighton bought of J. J. Fryer.
    Dr. Holt and Wm. Brown are preparing to build as soon as they can get the material out.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at the Agate school house next Sunday at 3 o'clock a.m.
    Claud Wamsley has been building a large barn for Gus Nichols on his place on Rogue River.
    The Eagle Point Ditch Co. met last week and planned their work for another year and last Monday morning started a gang of men to work cleaning out the old ditch ready for irrigating.
    Dr. Reddy has a gang of men with teams hauling the wood to the P.&E. depot, that was cut off the Wm. Ulrich place, and Mr. A. B. Hamilton will bring out his steam saw, cut it into stovewood and have it shipped to Medford.
    Daniel Lawton, recently from San Jose, Calif., was here looking for land last week, also a Mr. Warren was looking at several of the places around here with the view of purchasing a home among us. They were both well pleased with our section of the country, especially our delightful climate.
    Mrs. Dasie Wilkinson, daughter of Elder J. P. Moomaw, arrived in Eagle Point with her children last Sunday. They left North Dakota on the 7th inst. and report the snow two feet deep and so cold that they could not get clothes enough on to keep them warm. Mrs. W. is so delighted with our country that she cannot find language to express her admiration of the country. To drop from a frozen region into a climate where the thermometer registers 70 to 80 in the shade is such a contrast that she seems to be perfectly bewildered. Her husband expects to be here in the course of ten or fifteen days with a carload of fine stock.
    There were two strangers here one day last week looking for land, hut I did not learn their names. They asked all sorts of questions about the climate, soil, water, with regard to the yearly supply of water, our schools and especially about the saloons, and when they were told that we had no saloons, they seemed to be surprised, as they had heard that Eagle Point went wet at the election four years ago, but when they were told that that was caused by importing votes from Big Butte and other places, and that during the last four years there had been five petitions circulated to get license for a saloon here and every time had been knocked out, they began to think that perhaps they had been misinformed. Speaking of voting, there is going to by the largest number of votes cast this year that has been cast for a number of years, and the leading light seems to be on the district attorneyship.
    Herewith [I] send you the report of the work of the W.C.T.U. in this place. They are doing a noble work.
    Eagle Point W.C.T.U. met at the church Saturday and after the usual exercises the president requested Mrs. Lula Moomaw to take charge of the meeting and organize the Loyal Temperance Legion, which she proceeded to do. The young folk elected her for their general secretary. The officers for the L.T.L. are, president, Miss Blanch Cox, secretary, Miss Margaret Florey, Treasurer, Feina Lewis, librarian, Dottie Harnish. The W.C.T.U. hopes to make this organization a source of great pleasure and profit to these young people, and extend a cordial invitation to all children who are old enough to attend Sunday school to come and join with them, both in the good times they expect to have and the useful knowledge they will gain. The meetings of the L.T.L. will be held each Saturday afternoon immediately following those of the W.C.T.U.
Medford Mail, April 17, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    On Tuesday of last week I was called to take Mr. Owen and family, a Mr. Smith and another man whose name I did not learn to Butte Falls and returning the same day brought back a Mr. Cozzen, who went on to California the next day. Mr. Owen is a son of Elder Owen, of Butte Falls, and he cane from Lane County, expecting to remain during the summer and work at the mill.
    The place is beginning to put on the appearance of quite a business place, and now that they have the mill running, soon that they can get lumber to us, the prospects are that the town will grow considerable this summer.
    On last Friday I took three men up to the Iowa Lumber & Box Co.'s mills in the Big Butte country, one of whom was Mr. McQuoid, husband of one of the Perry girls. On reaching there I found that Mr. Walker, the foreman, was keeping things moving. They have one of the mills almost ready for operation and the foundation of the other near completion. The Corum Bros. are attending to the culinary department and everything there had a neat and clean appearance. There is a constant string of men going and coming and from the Iowa Lumber & Box Co.'s mills and Butte Falls. The morning before I arrived there had been nine men discharged and the next day more were going on up looking for work.
    There has been a great many cattle sold in this section of the country and last Monday Wm. Nicholson, Asa Fordyce and Ed. Leever and Turner, all of Klamath County, came in and received six hundred head that Wig Ashpole and Gus Nichols had bought up for them and on Tuesday they started with them for their homes.
    Last Sunday morning the men who had been working on the P.&E.R.R. were discharged.
    Mrs. Thomas has taken charge of the Pool-Watkins-Scudder hotel and is looking for her son and his wife from Klamath County to take charge of it. There seems to be business enough just now here for two hotels, as we are crowded most of the time and still they come.
    Mrs. Howlett expects to have her new hotel so far completed by the first of May that she can serve supper for the dance in her new dining room. A large crowd is expected.
    Last Sunday the second Medford ball team came out and played the Eagle Point team. The result was six to seven in favor of Eagle Point.
    The many friends of Mrs. Ada Morine were pleased to see her among them, here at her old home last Monday. She came out with her son-in-law, C. F. Conrad, to spend a few days among her old friends.
    Mesdames Eickmeyer and McQuoid came out last Sunday to visit their sister, Mrs. J. W. Grover, and while here Mrs. Eickmeyer took a photo of Mrs.  Grover's infant Sunday school class, and we all hope that it will be a good one so as to please the little ones.
    I had announced that I would preach at Agate last Sunday p.m., but was taken sick and was unable to attend. I wrote on Saturday to cancel my announcement.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis will preach in the Reese Creek school house next Sunday p.m., after Sunday school, and in the first Baptist church of Eagle Point next Sunday at 7:30 p.m.
    Mr. and Mrs. Ed. Bond and their two children, Varian and Vernon, started for their old home near Burns, Oregon, last Saturday. They will be greatly missed from among us as Miss Varian has been acting secretary for our Sunday school for some time.
    Fred Tice, wife and two sons were guests with us last Sunday. They came over to visit their son, Ralph, who is driving one of the teams for the Iowa Lumber & Box Co. He happened to be in the hills at that time, taking up the last large boiler for the mill company, the fifth one transported from here.
    Rev. Wilson and family have moved from the place Dr. Page bought here, on which he has been living, to the Patterson place near Talent that Dr. Page bought a short time ago, and Mr. Wilson's brother-in-law, Mr. Bishop, has charge of the old place.
    Mrs. John Vaughn, of Roseburg, was met here by her brother, Mr. Owen, Monday evening. They remained here overnight and on Tuesday went on their way to the unsurveyed [to] visit her stepfather and her mother, Rev. and Mrs. John Fletcher.
    Mrs. A. J. Florey and Mrs. J. W. Grover went to Ashland last Sunday to attend the W.C.T.U. convention that meets there this week.
Medford Mail, April 24, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
    Born to Mr. and Mrs. Timothy Dugan, April 19, 1908, a twelve-pound boy.
    Born--to Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Smith, April 20, 1908, a daughter.
    Revs. Mark C. Davis and A. C. Howlett will commence a series of meetings at Trail tonight, Friday, continuing over Sunday.
    E. M. Hubbard, of Gault, Calif., arrived here Wednesday of last week and the next day I took him on to Butte Falls to meet his stepbrother, Mr. Scott Claspill, whom he had not seen for several years. They at one time had not heard of each other for forty years, and while Mr. Hubbard was in the Hawaiian Islands he happened to see the same of Scott Claspill as one of the jurors in a lynching trial, and by that means renewed their acquaintance. He  returned from Butte Falls last Monday and started for his home in California the same day. He is very favorably impressed with our country and predicts a bright future for us. He thinks that we have a world of fine timber and after that is gone we have good soil and climate to fall back on.
    Died--At the family residence April 22, 1908, Mrs. Mary Jane Brown, wife of County Commissioner George Brown, of Eagle Point, aged 68 years, 10 months and 11 days. The deceased was born in Huddersfield, England, June 11, 1839, and came to the United States in her youth and married Mr. Brown in Racine County, Wisconsin, in 1853. In 1860 they started west and arrived in Jackson County that fall.
They resided in Jacksonville for over thirty years, then moved to Eagle Point, where they lived until the time of her death. She leaves her husband and nine children, one son, George Brown, Jr. having died from an accidental gunshot wound inflicted by his own hands. Mrs. Brown was a woman who was loved by all who knew her, and those who knew her best loved her most. She spent her life in trying to make others happy, and has raised a family of which any parent may well feel proud. The funeral services were conducted by Rev. Shields, of Medford, at the family residence and the remains were taken to the family burying ground in the Jacksonville cemetery, followed by a large concourse of sorrowing friends.
    Last Sunday I was called upon to go to the residence of John Bergman and solemnize the marriage of Andrew J. Clarno and Miss Nettie Bergman. There was quite a number of their personal friends invited and about noon we all sat down to a table well laden with a dinner that would make a dyspeptic groan, for such a feast of good things as the Bergmans furnished would do credit to the most fastidious. After the marriage some of us proceeded to the Reese Creek school house, where I preached for Mr. Davis and he assisted in the management of the Sunday school and then he preached Sunday night in Eagle Point.
    A. B. Hamilton came out last Saturday with his wood sawing machine and Sunday morning he commenced to saw up the wood that has been cleared off of the old Ulrich place. He has quite a number of men employed at the business.
    Owing to my being called off to assist in the meeting at Trail I have called in my appointment at Table Rock for next Sunday. I expect to preach at the Reese Creek school house on the second Sunday in May at 3 p.m.
    The W.C.T.U. held their annual meeting at the Baptist church last Saturday. There was quite an interesting program. The delegates who attended the institute in Ashland reported a very pleasant visit and received very many helpful and encouraging words especially for the L.T.L. which our county president informed them was the only one in Jackson County. They were also informed that there would be an entertainment given at the church [in] May by Rev. Williams in the interest of the L.T.L., as he has been a worker in that order for many years, as we feel sure the young people will have a treat and gain much help from this visit.
Medford Mail, May 1, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.
(Received too late for last week.)
    On Thursday of last week I took a trip to the Trail Creek country by stage, reaching the old free ferry at 2:30 p.m., leaving the stage there and crossing Rogue River in a rowboat [I] was joined by Rev. M. C. Davis and we proceeded down the river a short distance to George Lynch's, and that night Rev. Davis organized a Sunday school in Central school house and preached to a good-sized audience. On Friday we wended our way up to Trail where we were greeted with a hearty welcome by mine hostess of the Trail Hotel, Mrs. Middlebusher, and her family. We found on our arrival that preparations were made in advance there that night. Those in attendance report having had a very pleasant time. Rev. Davis preached that night and then he and I preached alternately until Monday night, when the meeting closed. There was considerable interest manifested. On the road I learned that Mrs. John Black is building a new house on land of her own, as her son Lee had sold the old home place and expects to go to Washington. That Andrew Clarno, our new road supervisor, has been doing some needed work on the road between here and the free ferry. That Mr. Hartman, with two men, had gone to work on the new ferry boat, a thing that has been greatly needed by the travel; in fact the people feel that they have been outraged by the action of the county court by leaving them without any way to cross the river with team or baggage for the past winter and spring.
    Mr. Bass, our old ferry man, has been cleaning out quite a tract of land on his place at the ferry landing.
    While at Trail we had the pleasure of visiting the school taught by Miss Ada Welch on May Day and enjoyed an entertainment given by the school. She had the children well trained. Miss Welch is giving general satisfaction as a teacher.
    While at the Central school house Rev. Davis took a picture of the school and school house and we spent a short time visiting the school that is under the control of Miss Rose Nealon.
    Last week Silas McKee was here accompanied by Fort Hubbard's son, of Medford, who is going out on the forest reserve for a while with his uncle to try to improve his health.
    On Saturday of last week Mrs. Cap Miller and her three children arrived from Dakota and joined her husband. He has been looking for them for some time and was finally made happy by their arrival.
    The dance given by George W. Daley, Sr. on May 1st at that place was well attended and those who were here report having had very pleasant time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Wm. Terry took dinner last Monday with Mrs. Howlett and her two daughters, Misses Hattie and Agnes.
    There was preaching at the Reese Creek school house Sunday at 3 o'clock p.m.
    D. H. Miller and a friend of his from Portland by the name of Charles Redmond called last week as they were on their way to Butte Falls, Peyton, Trail. Mr. Redmond is a traveling artist soliciting work in his line.
    Mrs. Wilkinson, daughter of Elder J. P. Moomaw, wishes me to say to the readers of the Mail that she is so well pleased with Southern Oregon that she cannot help but rejoice that she is here, that she expects her husband and son in a very few days. They are on the road from North Dakota with a carload of fine stock for their farm, which they purchased from the late Arthur Pool. She also wishes me to say that she had a kind of an informal reception at her father's last Sunday. That about twenty-five of his old neighbors and friends met there and gave her a cordial greeting, that she can't help but notice the contrast between the people here and her old neighbors in North Dakota, for here the people seem to be good, quiet and sociable, while there they were a mixture of Dagoes, Indians and the rough class of whites, where instead of having religious meeting they have right the reverse.
    Mr. Frideger, of Medford, was engaged here Thursday and Friday of last week putting up flues in the new Sunnyside Hotel.
    A. B. Hamilton who has a wood sawing machine here to cut up the wood that was taken off the Wm. Ulrich place, had the misfortune to cut his hand very badly on the saw. Dr. Holt dressed the wound and the cut seems to be healing up nicely. A part of the machine gave way with him and he had to send to Los Angeles for a piece to replace it with the result that everything in that line is laying still.
    M. S. and E. A. Sullivan, of Oakley, Calif., have been stopping at the Sunnyside for several days, looking over the country with the object in view of buying a home among us. They are so well pleased with this section that they have determined to locate here.
    Merchant Lumsden of Medford came out last Friday with his big auto bringing with him his wife, Mr. Balcom, of Iowa, his cousins, Mr. and Mrs. Earl Cowsar, from Portland, and after taking dinner at the Sunnyside they all repaired to E. S. Wolfer's strawberry farm where they feasted on berries and procured a fine lot to take home.
    Miss C. F. Wilson, one of the teachers in the Medford public school, came out last Saturday, remaining overnight with us and Sunday morning Hamilton Watkins, the stage driver from here to Trail, took her up to Chris Beal's, where she is engaged to teach this summer.
    Married--At the residence of the bride in Eagle Point, May 9, 1908, by Rev. A. C. Howlett, James Ringer and Mrs. Mary A. Wright. It was a quiet wedding, as there was no one present except the relatives of the contracting parties, Mrs. A. M. Thomas and Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Grover and the minister. Before the words were said which made them man and wife Miss Mamie Wright played the wedding march on the piano. After the wedding light refreshments were served.
    Last Sunday at the close of the Sunday school Earnest Cole delivered a lecture, his subject being "Ideals of Life." The lecture was quite interesting and he kept the attention of the audience during the whole time. Mr. Cole is a young man of marked acuity and with proper culture as an elocutionist will make his mark in the literary world.
    J. W. Grover and J. A. Jonas having bought a one-sixth interest each in the water ditch, leading from the mill, belonging to J. J. Fryer, and Mr. Fryer having agreed to put in one sixth, the three men are digging a ditch on the south side of the creek and will bring water from the old ditch across the creek in a flume so as to irrigate their places in the creek bottom.
    Quite a number of Central Point ladies came out last week to visit Mrs. St. Clair, one of their old neighbors, who is confined to her room at her sister's, Mrs. A. M. Thomas.
    Miss Anna Watkins spent several days last week visiting her uncle and aunt, Mr. and Mrs. F. J. Ayers.
    W. H. Bowen (Dad), who has been staying at the Sunnyside for the past two or three years, took a trip to San Francisco to see the big fleet and expects to remain in California for some time.
    Mr. and Mrs. Hawk, who recently bought the R. G. Brown place, arrived at their new home last week.
Medford Mail, May 15, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
BY A. C. HOWLETT.

    S. S. Aiken and Irvin McCall, of Prospect, stopped here overnight the latter part of last week on their way home with a load of supplies, They were detained here a part of a day on account of the rain, but thought that they could well afford to lay over as long as the rain was so much needed as what they lose on account of the rain will be made up in the good the shower did.
    Since my last George Brown has sold the hours and lot known as the Riddle property to John Watkins, consideration $300. Mr. Watkins has torn away the old fence and replaced it with a new wire fence, and as soon as he can get the lumber intends to build an addition to the house.
    Rudolph Neff, of Round Top mill, was down last week buying hay and grain for the Rogue River Lumber Company and storing it in the Sunnyside feed barn to be hauled to the sawmill when they can do so, the last rains having made the roads so bad that it is difficult to haul a load at the present time.
    The carpenters have had to suspend work on the new Sunnyside Hotel at present on account of running out of lumber. We thought that we had enough lumber out last fall to complete the building, but it is the same old story, changes in the plans called for more lumber, but the work will be resumed in a few days and carried on to completion.
    J. E. Stepp, of Round Top, came out a few days ago to get some new belting for the Round Top mill. They have a force of men employed cutting and hauling logs and getting ready for a big summer run.
    Miss Bertha Peachey, who taught the primary department of our school the latter part of the term, has been engaged to teach the rest of the term in the Lake Creek district, as Prof. A. L. Haselton is unable to teach on account of poor health.
    Last Monday a message came over the 'phone for Rev. John Fletcher, of the unsurveyed region, that his son-in-law, Mr. Vaughn, of Roseburg, had died Sunday sight and A. C. Howlett was called on to take the message to him. So about nine o'clock a.m. [I] started not knowing where we [were] going and on reaching Mr. Kelsoe's at the Big Butte bridge where I expected to gut directions as to the route I found that Mr. Kelso was out hunting his horses. He has hunted now for three weeks without any success, and there was no one there who could give the desired information, so I drove on to Hawk's mill and there learned that I was to go up the hill, up, up, and when I got to the top, about six miles, and began to go down I would come to Jones', and there get further directions, but when I reached Jones there was no one there and there the roads forked, so I yelled and hollowed, but could raise no one and there I was on top of the mountain and it [was] raining, so I decided to follow the plainest road and so started on down the hill or rather down into a canyon and down, down I went until I finally reached the bottom of the canyon and then started up again. [I]  had gone about a mile up the hill and there the roads forked again; again I decided to follow the plainest road so went on and lo! came to a pole placed across the road and a new road cut out off at right angles and there I was up against it. It was then about five o'clock p.m. and me without grub, or horse feed or blankets and it raining to beat the band, so I began to use my voice again and in a few minutes I saw a man and two women coming in sight and it proved to be Mr. Fletcher himself and his two daughters so I stopped for the night, found Mrs. Fletcher quite sick but improving some. While I had a hard trip I rather enjoyed it, for I passed through one of the finest bodies of timber I have ever seen in Oregon. Mr. Fletcher has been doing considerable work on his claim, has a nice young orchard growing, a strawberry patch, so they will have strawberries and cream providing they can get the cream, has some grain, alfalfa and vetch growing, last year raised potatoes and cabbage for their own use, but it is too far from the railroad to suit them. On my return I brought Mrs. Bruce out with me and she took the train for Roseburg to be with her sister who had lost her husband.
    Mr. Hartman, who had the contract to build the new free ferry, finished the job last week so that the stage running from here to Trail crossed on it last Saturday, and we can begin to see a change in our hotel business already as the travel can come the near way from Trail to Medford via Eagle Point.
    Austin Green, grandson of J. J. Fryer, who went to San Francisco to see the big fleet, returned last Tuesday and reports having had a royal good time.
    The most of the candidates on the Republican ticket met here last Monday night. I was called away at the time, but the report comes to me that they had a good attendance and some good speaking.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis will preach here next Sunday at 8 o'clock p.m. and at 3 o'clock p.m. at the Reese Creek school house.
Medford Mail, May 22, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Mr. Clark of Medford has his buzz saw out here at work cutting up the wood cut off the old Simon place.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at the Table Rock school house on the first Sunday in June at 10 o'clock a.m.
    Mrs. Gladius Karnes of Medford was out the first of the week to visit her mother, Mrs. Heckathorn.
    The Mail is requested to announce that the ladies of Eagle Point will serve dinner in Holmes' warehouse on election day, the proceeds to be applied toward buying seats for the church.
    D. S. J. Pearce of Forest Creek came over with his family to visit his sister, Mrs. Esther Saint Clair, who is at her sister's, Mrs. Thomas, in a very critical condition. They have all returned home except Mrs. Pearce, Sr., who will remain with the invalid for awhile.
    Last week, as Mr. Wamsley was painting the windows in the new Sunnyside, one of the windows fell and drove a nail into his thumb on his left hand, so that he had to lay off for a few days, and about the same time John W. Smith, Jr. fell off a scaffold and sprained his ankle, but they both went to work again Tuesday morning.
    There will be a Sunday school picnic in the Bybee grove on Rogue River, near the Bybee bridge, on Sunday, June 14. It is expected that the following schools will take part in the exercises: Table Rock, Agate, Reese Creek, Roosevelt and Eagle Point. The teachers are arranging a nice program and expect to have a time among the children that they will never forget.
    W. B. Chance, the state examiner of the different kinds of machinery, was here last week and procured a saddle horse and visited the C.L.L. Co.'s mill near Caster's, Butte Falls, and the Nimrod Charley mills returning on Sunday evening, and on Monday took the car for his home in Albany. He reports the mills in fairly good condition and speaks in the highest terms of our timber.
    On Friday of last week Mr. Ditsworth of Peyton brought out an old man by the name or Wolden from near Prospect and took him to the county hospital. He is quite aged, being 72 years of age, and afflicted with some kind of disease of the legs so that he can hardly walk. Mr. Ditsworth returned to the Sunnyside the next day and reports that the county poorhouse is kept in as nice condition as anyone could desire, that the beds were clean and that the victuals were well cooked and of a good variety, showing quite a contrast between the old poor house management under the old Jacksonville ring and the present. It does one good to know that the poor unfortunates of our county are so well treated when they become county charges.
Medford Mail, May 29, 1908, page 3


Eagle Point Eaglets.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Rev. John Fletcher came out last Tuesday on his way to Grants Pass and Roseburg.
    Mrs. Jerry Heckathorn of Butte Falls came out the first of the week to visit relatives here.
    Charley Betz returned last Saturday from California, where he has been staying for some time.
    Mrs. Burnetta Williscroft Frasier has been visiting the Misses Hattie and Agnes Howlett last week.
    A. C. Howlett will preach in the Table Rock school house next Sunday, June 7, at 10 o'clock a.m.
    Miss Agnes von der Hellen returned home from Corvallis, where she has been attending school, last Monday.
    On Sunday the people of Butte Falls had memorial services in Albert's hall, which were well attended.
    Mrs. Jennie Simpkins of Woodville came up last week to visit her mother, Mrs. Heckathorn, and her sister, Mrs. Frank Lewis.
    Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, widowed daughter of George Brown, went to Ashland last week to visit in her father-in-law's family.
    Mrs. Joseph Rader was in Medford last Monday on business and on her return was accompanied by her brother, Mr. Rose of Phoenix.
    Miss Lottie Taylor, Dr. Holt, Merrit Brown, Thomas and George Lewis and Wilbur Ashpole went to Portland last Monday to attend the rose carnival.
    There was an entertainment given by the Butte Falls school last Friday evening. It is spoken of in the highest terms, and those who attended report that it was a grand success and that the children performed their parts fine.
    Messrs. Spencer and Faris and Miss Maud Prim of Butte Falls stopped here last Tuesday on their way to Medford. They report that they had a nice dance at Butte Falls Monday night, that Mrs. Albert gave the supper which gave very general satisfaction. Miss Prim has just closed her school in Butte Falls and was on her way to her home in Jacksonville.
    Miss Bessie Haselton, having closed her school at Foots Creek, has returned home and gone to Lake Creek to finish the term of school there commenced by her father, Professor A. L. Haselton, which he had to give up on account of poor health. I stated in a former article that Miss Bertha Peachey had gone to Lake Creek to teach the school, but on her arrival her and the school board could not agree on the price of teaching and so she has gone to Grants Pass.
    Died--At the family residence, in Brownsboro, May 31, James K. Bell, aged about 55 years. He leaves a wife and several children, who are all about grown. Mr. Bell had been in poor health for several months, and his death was not a surprise to his family or friends. He was a man who was highly respected by those who knew him.
    The same day, May 31, Mr. McDonald, another old pioneer, passed away near Brownsboro, quite suddenly, having been sick but a few days. He is supposed to have been over 70 years of age, but I have no way to get the facts. His remains were interred in the Brownsboro cemetery last Tuesday.
    Last Friday your correspondent took a trip to Ashland to attend the annual meeting of the Congregational association and on my arrival found that body at work planning for future work. Among those who were in attendance was Rev. H. N. Smith, superintendent of the Sunday school work in Oregon, Rev. A. A. Stillman of Eugene, H. B.  Pinkerton, Mrs. T. A. Lipp, Mrs. Gillette, Rev. A. F. Fulsom of Forest Grove, Mr. and Mrs. George H. Himes of Portland, secretary of the Oregon Historical Society; Rev. C. F. Clapp of Forest Grove, now state evangelist of the Congregational Church; Rev. A. E. Bradstreet of Hubbard, E. C. Oakley of Oregon City, P. S. Knight of Salem, Rev. H. M. Lenney and H. H. Hicoff of Berkeley, Cal.; and Dr. J. E. Walker, who has been a missionary in China for 28 years. The services were well attended and the utmost harmony prevailed. Rev. Mr. Green, the pastor of the Congregational church in Ashland, and his wife seem to be very popular and the attendance at the regular church services, Sunday school and the union league all showed their popularity. Arrangements were made to supply some of the places in this county that have been only partially cared for and the work was given a new inspiration. The preaching and lectures were exceptionally good and everyone seemed to feel as though they had come to the right place to have a good time.
    The stereopticon lecture, showing the work having been done by the missionaries in India, was a grand success and those who attended the series of meetings will have something to think of for a long time.
Medford Mail, June 5, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Rev. A. C. Howlett will preach in Butte Falls on Saturday evening at 8 o'clock and on Sunday at 10 a.m. and 8 p.m.
    Since my last, George Phillips has moved from the old Farlow house, where he has been living for some time, to the house formerly occupied by Claud Wamsley.
    Mr. and Mrs. Baker of Butte Falls came out last Tuesday and met their son, Mr. Brown of Seattle, who arrived on the P.&E. train. They had an early dinner and returned the same day for their home.
    Clarence Pierce and a Mr. Renkins, from Michigan, were out last Tuesday looking at the country. They had been at Brownsboro to look at a place and then came here for dinner and to look over some of our land.
    John Edsall and Mr. Conner were at the Sunnyside for dinner last Tuesday and report that the Crater Lake Lumber Company's mill on Big Butte cut last Monday 40,000 feet of lumber and that they are going right ahead.
    Hamilton Watkins, the Trail mail carrier, while at dinner last Tuesday remarked that they were having a regular feast of trout at Trail, that Clarence Middlebusher caught on last Monday 42 trout, and thought thar was not much.
    Our school clerk, J. A. Jonas, has posted notices calling a school meeting for the third Monday in June, which is next Monday. Let everybody turn out and put in a director who will help to have a good school and let us see if we cannot establish our reputation for having good schools.
    Green Mathews informs me that he has purchased a three-acre strip off the old D. P. Mathews place, lying along the county road, one acre wide and three long; consideration, $100 per acre. He tells me that he intends to build on it and if he sells his old home place he will move there and if not he will have it to rent.
    Since my last there has been another change in real estate. Eli Ellis has traded his house and two acres of land in Eagle Point to a man by the name of I. Harvey of Coquille City. They simply changed places. Mr. Harvey has a wife and one son. Mr. Ellis was here last week and took his household effects and started for Coquille and Mr. Harvey has moved into his new home. Mr. Ellis has married again.
    I have to record the death of another of our old pioneers, Thomas Baldwin of Brownsboro, who passed away last Friday at his daughter's home, and the remains were interred in the Brownsboro cemetery last Sunday. The deceased was quite aged and has been very active for a man of his age, as I understand that he was about 80 years of age. I have not been able to learn the particulars of his death or family, but know that he leaves some of a family behind. He was a man who was highly respected by all who knew him.
    On last Sunday Rev. Davis and myself went to Table Rock, where I preached, and we met the Sunday school and all the necessary arrangements were made for the picnic on Rogue River just below the Bybee bridge next Sunday at 10 o'clock a.m. In the afternoon we met the Agate Sunday school and after I had preached, arrangements were made to have the presentation exercises of the district school and the Lincoln Literary Society of Agate, of a very neat wristlet and ring to Miss Mae Newland, who has been teaching the Agate school and was also president of the literary society. The wristlet was presented on behalf of the literary society by Miss Florence Kincade, one of the pupils, with a neat and appropriate speech, and the ring was presented by Miss Fay Grigsby on behalf of the school with a very appropriate speech, and the responses by Miss Newland, the teacher, was not only appropriate, but quite impressive. The two presents were not only beautiful to look at, but quite costly and no doubt will be cherished through life, and the time of the presentation will be marked as a bright spot in her early history.
Medford Mail, June 12, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Wilford Jack came up from Ashland last week to visit his relatives in these parts.
    John Watkins has had the carpenters at work on his house putting on rustic and making additions to the building.
    Mrs. Dr. Grover of the unsurveyed stopped here last Monday for dinner on her way to Iowa to join her husband.
    There is considerable lumber being hauled here and through town to other parts of the valley, and business is looking up.
    Chauncey and Jack Florey. sons of our postmaster, started last Saturday to Crater Lake National Park to work this summer.
    Mesdames Schneider and Messenger of Elk Creek were pleasant callers on Wednesday of last week on their way to Agate and Medford.
    Haying is under way and men who have and will have hay to sell are looking around for a market, as the late rain has brought it out so that the crop seems to be up to the average.
    Mr. William Brown has the men at work making the foundation of his new residence of concrete and getting the lumber out to build. Dr. Holt is also getting the material out for his house.
    Dr. Holt of Eagle Point returned from Portland last week and Miss Lottie Taylor, who has been in Portland for the last two weeks visiting her mother and brothers, returned last Tuesday.
    Rev. McHenry, the anti-saloon campaigner, visited Eagle Point last Tuesday in the interest of the Anti-Saloon League. He is confident that every saloon in the county will be wiped out after the first of July.
    Mr. Briggs and Mr. Mahoney of Butte Falls were sojourners among us last Monday night. Mr. B. had been to Medford and secured a load of supplies for his drug store in Butte Falls, and Mr. Mahoney was doing his hauling for him.
    Our postmaster has put in a new set of boxes and changed everything around so that the office presents a neat and tidy appearance. Instead of having the old style of lock boxes with a key we now have the combination lock without a key.
    Mr. Pierce of Siskiyou County, California, was a pleasant caller last week on his way to the Crater Lake Lumber Company's mills to look over the situation, roads, etc. with the object in view of taking a contract to haul lumber with a large traction engine from the mills to the railroad.
    Deputy Assessor W. R. Stansell came among us last Sunday evening and has been assessing the property in this precinct. He is aiming to assess the property at its cash value and consequently making us poor fellows feel quite rich, but he assures us that the rate will be made such that our taxes will be no higher than they have been heretofore.
    Died--June 14, at the home of her sister, Mrs. A. M. Thomas, in Eagle Point, Mrs. St. Clair
[Esther Pearce Sinclair], aged about 70 years. The deceased had been living in this county for a number of years and was highly respected by those who knew her. She was a member of the Central Point Christian church where the funeral services were conducted last Monday, and the remains were interred in the Jacksonville cemetery by the side of her husband, who preceded her to the beyond several years ago. They never had any children, but she left a sister, Mrs. Thomas, and brother, D. S. J. Pearce of Forest Creek.
    Last Sunday being children's day, the Sunday school from the different sections of this end of the county met in a beautiful grove on the north bank of Rogue River, under the direction of Rev. M. C. Davis, the traveling Sunday school missionary of the Congregational Church. The exercises were opened with singing and prayer and in the forenoon we had the program of Table Rock school. After the exercises were concluded quite a number took boat rides in the river in boats that were there for the occasion. Everyone there seemed to enjoy themselves and the first children's day exercises on the Rogue River will be long remembered by those who were present and enjoyed the pleasures of the occasion.
    Our annual school meeting was held last Monday and there was a fair attendance. J. W. Grover was elected director and J. A. Jonas was re-elected district clerk. The meeting voted a 5-mill tax to be levied for school purposes for the next year and the valuation that Mr. Stansell, the deputy assessor, is putting on the property here that will raise about half enough to pay off the indebtedness of the district, but as we expect to pay at least $100 a month for the principal and $50 a month for the primary teacher and expect to have an eight months' school the coming school year. It will take some money to foot the bill, and the most of those present at the meeting were in favor of an eight months' school and hiring nothing but No. 1 teachers.
Medford Mail, June 19, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Miss Lina Lewis of this place was visiting her aunt, Mrs. Kernes, of Medford last week.
    Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls came here for dinner last Tuesday on his way home from the valley.
    Rev. A. C. Howlett will preach at Trail next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. and at Central school house at 3 o'clock p.m.
    Miss Parker, a daughter of W. W. Parker, came out from Butte Falls last Monday on her way to the Willamette Valley.
    Mrs. Netherland of Butte Falls came over on Wednesday of last week, the guest of Mr. and Mrs. Patton.
    Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Edmondson of Butte Falls came out last Monday to visit their daughter, Mrs. Patton.
    Surveyors Perkins and Osgood were out last week trying to locate the county road leading from here to Wellen, and surveying off some land for Pierce & Son, also dividing up the Dr. Page orchard into small tracts.
    John Watkins has had the carpenters and painters at work on the old Riddle house and changed the appearance of the place so that a stranger would hardly know it. Mr. Watkins went to Medford last Monday to get new doors, both solid and screen. They are fixing up things to stay.
Medford Mail, June 26, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    John Mayfield and family were visiting the family of Mr. and Mrs. Knighton last week
    Mr. Haak [Hawk?], the man who bought the R. G. Brown farm, is planning to build this summer.
    Mr. Debee. one of our local carpenters, is at work improving S. H. Harnish's residence.
    William Smith and family took an outing last Sunday upon Rogue River, spending the day in fishing.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Table Rock next Sunday at 10 o'clock a.m. and at Agate at 3 o'clock p.m.
    Mr. and Mrs. Lewis Overhalser of Medford, a brother-in-law of G. M. Childreth, was visiting here last week.
    Mr. Berwork of Medford was a caller one day last week. He was looking over our country with a view of locating amongst us.
    William Spencer of the unsurveyed came out the first of the week and went to work on the house being built by William Brown.
    Mr. Pettigrew has taken the contract to haul the lumber for Dr. Holt's house and Scott Bruce has taken the contract to build the same.
    William League and family of Medford, who have been taking an outing at Olson's sawmill, came out last Monday and took the P.&E. train for Medford.
    Mr. and Mrs. William Nessler of Washington, nephew and niece of Mrs. William Knighton, arrived on Wednesday of last week on a visit to their uncle and aunt.
    Mrs. Howlett, who has been cooking for the guests at the Sunnyside Hotel since the first of March, while the new building was being built, moved into her new house on Friday of last week.
    J. A. Abbott and his brother, J. D. Abbott, of Klamath River, were callers at the Sunnyside last Monday night. J. D. Abbott is here on a visit with his brother, and they both went to Elk Creek Tuesday morning, where they will visit for a few days.
    At our annual school meeting there was a 5-mill tax voted, but there was nothing said about having the school house painted, although it was ordered done a year ago, and as it now stands, it does not reflect credit on the energy and enterprise of the district, as it needs painting very much.
    Mr. and Mrs. Masters of New York were guests at the Sunnyside last Sunday. They have been constant readers of the Mail for the last three years, and when they met Mrs. Howlett, he said that he felt just as well acquainted as though they had always known her, having been a constant reader of the Eaglets during that time.
    Another unfortunate company started from Medford in two automobiles Sunday morning for Rogue River for an outing and fishing excursion and about 1 o'clock p.m. an axle in one of the autos broke and they had to send to Medford for another axle while the company camped under an oak tree by the side of the road. So we see that riding in an auto is not always attended with entire satisfaction.
    Last Sunday Mr. Enyart, president of the Medford National Bank, and his wife and mother had quite an experience. They started for the Caster sawmill, as he wanted to look it over for another party, in an automobile, and when they got to the Conover camp, about two miles from the mill, the auto broke down and Mr. Enyart had to walk to Caster's, procure a team and driver to drive his family back to the valley. I happened to pass them at the Reese Creek school house, as I was coming from preaching at Central, and relieved the overcrowded hack by taking Mr. E. in the buggy with me. At Eagle Point he hired Thomas & Son to take them to Medford with a team, as they could not get Medford over the phone. The trouble seemed to be in getting anyone at Central Point, and just as they crossed the bridge here they met an automobile and that frightened the horses and they started to run and came near running over the bank into the creek. Mr. E.'s mother fainted, and while this was going on outdoors Rev. Mr. Clevenger was making the opening prayer for the evening services in the church, and a large part of the congregation ran out of the house, and some of the ladies almost went into hysterics. The result was, Mr. Enyart had to hire a man to go to Agate and phone for an auto to come out for them, and I think that they reached home safely sometime that night.
Medford Mail, July 3, 1908, page 5


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Miss Belle Maltby of Medford and Austin Green of our town were guests at the Sunnyside one evening last week.
    Floyd Pearce and family of Forest Creek came over to visit Mrs. Pearce's parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer, last week,
    J. H. Mayhew of Medford and Mr. Ramsey of Wisconsin were here last week looking over the country.
    A man by the name of Thompson, from the Big Bend country, was here last week.
    George Westerfield of Chehalis, Wash., an old miner, called on Saturday night and on Sunday went on his way to Central Point.
    Claude Wamsley, who has been visiting old-time friends in Newport, Or., returned to his old home last Saturday.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at the Derby school house next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. and Reese Creek at 3 o'clock p.m.
    Owen Dunlap and William Miller called one night last week quite late and asked for an early breakfast. They started for Big Butte bridge by 5 a.m.
    Leonard Smith of Medford, the orator of the day at the Trail celebration on the Fourth, took dinner at our hostelry on the 3rd on his way to Trail.
    Mr. and Mrs. Cook of Boise, Idaho, came out last Saturday and remained with us until Monday evening. They looked at several of the places around our town and on Monday I took them out north and east of here to see some of the foothill country.
    Glen Fabrick and wife, accompanied by his brother and Dr. F. D. Wilson of Hood River, came out last Sunday for an outing and to see our country and try a meal at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Miss Hattie Allen of Trail, who has been in Medford for some time, stopped here for dinner last Saturday on her way home. She went on the Eagle Point and Trail stage line. Mrs. Underwood came out on the stage the same day on her way to Medford via the P.&E.R.R. Mrs. Underwood has been visiting friends in the Elk Creek country.
    There were quite a large number of our citizens went to Butte Falls to spend the Fourth, and on the road there on Friday one hackload of young men met with quite a mishap in going down the Obenchain Mountain. They got to driving faster than the law allows, and perhaps were a little reckless. You know it was nearing the Fourth and they were feeling a little jubilant, and [somehow it] was that they ran the horses off the grade, turned over the hack, and all of them were bruised more or less, and one or two of them were quite badly hurt. They were going to the dance, and of course had on their good clothes. One of them did not regain consciousness for several hours. But they learned one lesson----
Medford Mail, July 10, 1908, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Arthur Smith came over to our place to see his brothers, Leon and Roy, last Monday.
    A. C. Howlett will preach in Butte Falls next Sunday, at 11 o'clock a.m. and 8 p.m.
    J. A. Jonas has had the carpenters making some improvements on his premises.
    At this writing, John Watkins has the carpenters at work putting a neat porch on the front of his house.
    I should have mentioned in my last correspondence that Mrs. Dr. Holt had returned from her visit with relatives in San Francisco, but it slipped my mind.
    Mr. Jordan, the man who bought the Cook property here, is planning to build a new house this fall. He has had Wamsley and Son to draw a plan of the house.
    Misses Zoe Redden, of Fresno, Cal., and Bernice Carder, of Medford, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside Tuesday morning, on their way to visit Miss Jose Riley.
    Frank Brown has had three large windows put in his house, greatly improving the looks of the place. Also he had James Ringer do the painting act.
    There was quite a number of our townspeople went to Ashland to attend the Chautauqua, but I have not heard of their return, but know that they will have a fine time.
    S. S. Bouce and Mr. Grover of the unsurveyed have taken the contract to build the Dr. Holt house in Eagle Point, and are at work on it, pushing the work as fast as possible.
    Judge S. S. Pense, of Butte Falls, and Mr. Mahoney came out from Medford last Monday night on their way to Butte Falls with a load of cement for the new school house.
    C. W. Skeen, of Eugene, an employee of the S.P.R.R. Co., stopped with us two nights last week, going from here to several different points where he had business.
    Mrs. Argalee Green of Oxnard, Cal., and her son, Fred, a stenographer in the S.P.R.R. office in San Francisco, are here on a visit with her parents, Mr. and Mrs. J. J. Fryer.
    Rev. M. C. Davis came over to Eagle Point last Saturday eve, but I was not at home, but in a letter he says he will preach in Eagle Point the next time he comes out south. He is a very busy man.
    Wamsley & Son have been putting in some more doors in our school house and changing those that were in so that they will swing outward instead of inward as they have been, so in case of fire there would be less danger to the children.
    Last Monday E. H. Jemmey came out to the Sunnyside and on Tuesday he was joined by S. E. Mormon and Mr. Perkins and Claude Metz, a company of surveyors who are here surveying for different parties. They expect to commence on the place Mr. Haak bought of R. J. Brown.
    W. L. Denton, A. E. Moor, James Rummel and Aaron Wyland called at the Sunnyside for dinner last Monday, on their way home. They had been, via the Pelican Bay route, to Fort Klamath, Crater Lake, etc. and were on their way home to Medford. They report the road in fine condition from here to Crater Lake by the Rogue River route.
    Last Monday Mr. C. F. Cook, traveling salesman for the Russellville nursery, called on us for dinner. Last Saturday eve, Mrs. Argalee Green gave a party to the young folk of our town so that they all could meet and be met by her sons, Fred and Austin. Fred was on his way back to San Francisco. He had a layoff for a fortnight and took a trip to Salt Lake City, Ogden, Portland, Ore., and stopped off to see his mother, brother, grandparents and old-time friends, of which he has a host in these parts.
    There were two gentlemen from Medford came out last Saturday, and wanted to go to the Tom Fredenburg place, on Big Butte, to fish and have a good time, and so I took them up Saturday night and returned to John Allen's that night and preached for the people of Derby on Sunday. They have a nice Sunday school organized there. The hay crop in that section is very good considering the backward season.
    On Thursday of last week, the news reached us that the Round Top sawmill had been burned and about 250,000 feet of lumber and Mr. Iseli's barn. With no insurance the loan falls heavy on the three owners of the mill although they have the satisfaction of knowing that they are out of debt. It is not only a severe calamity on the owners of the mill, but it is felt in the valley, for it was the nearest and best place to get lumber, and the straight and honorable way they have of doing business has made them many warm friends in these parts.
    We came near having to record another fire in Eagle Point. Last week as Miss Mabel Wamsley was cleaning up a room in her home, she had occasion to move a commode and in rolling it out one of the rollers ran over a match unnoticed by her. As she was at work she smelled cotton burning and looking around discovered that there was a hole burned in the carpet and all that saved the house was her staying there a few minutes longer than she expected.
    A few of Mrs. Howlett's neighbors came in on her one day last week and assisted her in sewing her carpet together for her rooms in the Sunnyside Hotel. They were: Mesdames Dr. Holt, S. B. Holmes, J. H. Carlton, S. H. Harnish, James Gordon-Walker, Miss Dollie Harnish and Miss Lorine Walker. And later in the evening Mesdames Argalee Green, Cora Officer, Gladius Pierce and the Misses Lottie Taylor, Anna Little and Loraine Ulrich came in to help but the work was all done. Cake and strawberries were served and after spending awhile visiting and having a good time the company dispersed to their homes, feeling that they had had a very pleasant time.
Medford Mail, July 17, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    [illegible] Crowell and wife of Hanford[, Wash.,] were here last week looking for a location.
    Mrs. J. J. Fryer and her grandson, Austin Green, went to Cinnabar Springs last Friday.
    Mrs. Nye and daughter, Miss Elsie, who have been in Roseburg for some time, have returned and at this writing are [staying with?] Mrs. Nye's son-in-law, A. C. Florey.
    E. Ervin of Goldfield, Nev., was among the many callers last week. He is a mining man and was talking of going to the Elk Creek mines when he left here.
    Tarbell & Co. have opened up a meat market in our town, and now we may expect to have something good and handy. The Central Point meat man comes on Tuesday and Friday, so we will be well supplied in that line.
    W. C. Chaney of Los Angeles, Cal., was looking over our part of the country, and was very favorably impressed with our surroundings. He seemed to think that with our water power and other advantages the future outlook was encouraging.
    A party consisting of Mrs. Martin, 90 years old, her two sons, her grandson, granddaughter and her husband, Mr. and Mrs. McGowan, all of Ashland, stopped here last week on their way to Crater Lake and other places of interest. They came in on the P.&E. train and had a team meet them here from Ashland. They expect to spend most of the summer out in the hills and in Klamath County.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. A. Potter of Ashland and Mr. and Mrs. Frank Matthews of Petaluma, Cal., arrived at the residence of Joseph Riley this week to be at the bedside of Tobias Linksweiler (generally known as Charley Linksweiler), who is lying very low, and is expected to live only a short time. Mrs. Potter and Mrs. Matthews are stepdaughters of Mr. Linksweiler, and sisters of Mr. Riley. Mr. Linksweiler is now past 80 years of age, and there is no hope entertained of his recovery.
    Last Saturday the Eagle Point correspondent of the Morning Mail took a trip to Butte Falls and conducted services on Sunday. While there he learned that there was considerable sickness among the small children, and also the particulars with regard to the accident that befell B. F. Harris. He and Mr. Lewis were trying to raise a floodgate that held the water in the bulkhead when the water was 12 feet deep, and a large body of water back of it. The cable with which they had been raising the gate, 3½x3½ feet square, had pulled out and they were trying to raise it with crowbars. Mr. Harris had got his side started and stepped into the flume to assist Mr. Lewis, and just then the force of the water tore the floodgate away, tearing it apart, and the flood of water carried him about 15 [feet] out from the flue, he falling a distance of 30 feet, and landing him on solid rock, where the force of the water carried him over the falls, a distance of about 20 feet. I have this statement from two eyewitnesses, Messrs. Lewis and Miller, Mr. Harris' brother-in-law, who was standing right over him and saw the whole of the accident. When Messrs. Miller and Lewis got to him he was in water about 18 inches deep, on his hands and knees, and they and four other men picked him up and carried him up a steep cliff. Upon examination it was found that he was badly cut about the head, one rib broken, his spine badly hurt and bruised all over. When I saw him Sunday afternoon he was resting easily, and thought he would be able to be up in a short time.
    In speaking of accidents, Mr. Miller and his wife came near being killed but a few days before Mr. Miller got hurt. They were fishing on the bank of the Big Butte and happened to be in a thicket on the bank, and there was no wind, when Mr. Miller heard something cracking. He thought it was an animal, but the noise increased, and to his horror he discovered that it was a large fir tree falling right toward them. There seemed to be no way of escape but to jump into the water, and that was deep, so they had to stand and take the chances of being killed. The tree fell so close to them that the small limbs brushed them, and Mrs. Miller was so overcome that she had to be helped up the bank. Mr. Miller says it will be a long time before he gets over the nervous shock.
    I also learned that the three men who owned the Round Top mill, which was burned, have been engaged to operate the Butte Falls mill. They took charge of it last Monday.
    Mr. Brawnson, the contractor, who is to build the new school house in Butte Falls, is going right ahead with the work. The cornerstone of the building was to have been laid on Wednesday afternoon at 2 o'clock, with appropriate ceremonies. After the school house is completed, he intends to build a meeting house for church purposes. Mr. Harris proposes to give the lot on which to erect the house into the timber and the use of the mill to saw the lumber and let the men living here who understand running it saw the lumber. Our county road workers, with teams and machinery, are at work opening up the new road between here and Brownsboro.
    Surveyor Perkins, who has been doing surveying in this section, brought his family out last Monday and they are staying of the Sunnyside at present.
    H. E. Lee and Miss Agnes Schweisthal of Chicago, who are traveling in the interest of a magazine company in the East, came out Monday evening on the P.&E. They took supper at the Sunnyside and were met by Mr. Allen of Trail that evening and proceeded on their journey. They expect to spend some time at Trail fishing and hunting and then go to Crater Lake and Klamath County.
Medford Mail, July 24, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
    Miss Irene Palmer of Medford was a guest at the Sunnyside several days last week.
    I also learned that there was a fine boy born on July 25 to Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Morrison.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Table Rock next Sunday morning at 10 o'clock, and at Agate at 3 p.m.
    Fifteen hundred yards of lawn on sale today, 11
¢ a yard. Regular 15¢ and 20¢ values. W. H. Meeker & Co.
    I also learned that Miss Margaret Nealon had about finished her term of school in what is known as the Black district. The school closes Friday, July 31.
    Mr. Head, the organ cleaner of Medford, and his two boys passed through the city on Tuesday of last week, on their way to Klamath County.
    S. H. Harnish has gone to Cinnabar Springs for his health. He has an old trouble [of] the stomach and kidneys, and wants to try that resort for relief.
    Rev. Goulder of Medford, whose family is near Butte Falls taking an outing. and Frank Netherland of Butte Falls, stopped at the Sunnyside last Friday on their way to Medford.
    Mr. Perkins and family and his company of surveyors were here with us during last week. He did considerable work in his line in straightening out the lines of the different places in our town and vicinity.
    Mr. Hawk of the Clarks Creek sawmill, his son and a married daughter and her son came in about 12 o'clock last Monday night on their way home to the sawmill. His daughter is from California, and is here on a visit.
    Last Sunday I preached at the upper Trail Creek school house at 11 o'clock and at Central Point at 3 p.m. While on the trip I learned that the citizens of Trail and vicinity gave Mr. and Mrs. Grant Mathews a surprise party one night last week. There were about 14 young people and eight older ones present, and they report having had a very pleasant time, as Mr. and Mrs. Mathews know just how to entertain their guests.
    On my return home Sunday evening I learned that Tobias L. Linksweiler (generally known as Charley Linksweiler), had died on Sunday, July 26, at his old home on Antelope Creek, two miles from Eagle Point, of general debility. He was 84 years, two months and 20 days old. Mr. Linksweiler was one of our oldest citizens, having settled on the place where he died in the early '50s and has lived there continuously ever since. He was a man with a large and warm heart, always ready to turn a hand to help those whom he could, liberal to a fault, and he leaves four stepchildren--Joseph and William Riley, Mrs. S. A. Potter and Mrs. Frank Mathews. They were all at the funeral, except William, who is in Eastern Oregon. The remains were followed to their last resting place in the Antelope cemetery last Monday by a large number of his old neighbors, many of them having known him from their earliest childhood. The funeral services were conducted by Elder Moomaw.
    Our daughter, Miss Millie Hoyt of Fort Klamath, came in last week to visit her parents and sisters and to put up berries for next winter's use. While here she visited her old friends, Mr. and Mrs. Gardner of Talent.
Medford Mail, July 31, 1908, page 3


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
[By A. C. Howlett.]
   Miss Clarice Bayless of San Francisco is here visiting her cousin, Miss Mamie Wright.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Derby next Sunday morning at 11 o'clock, and at Reese Creek at 3 p.m.
    E. S. Wolfer is doing the plumbing work on the new houses built by William Brown and Dr. Holt.
    William Knighton and wife, who went to Cinnabar Springs some time ago, returned home last week.
    Mrs. Phillips, mother of one of our townsmen, arrived at her son's home one day last week from Bandon.
    The ladies of Eagle Point will give an ice cream social next Saturday night for the benefit of the church.
    Mr. Riggins and a friend by the name of Humphrey were pleasant callers last Friday on their way to Medford.
    Mrs. Wamsley, who went to Cinnabar Springs some days ago, had to return, as she was threatened with pneumonia.
    Our local meat market is doing a fine business here, and the people of Eagle Point know how to appreciate such a change.
    Messrs. Bruce and Grover, who have the contract for building Dr. Holt's house, are finishing the work and appear to be doing a fine job.
    Three of the Bunch brothers took dinner at the Sunnyside last Monday, two of them being on their way to Fort Klamath, the other returning to Medford that afternoon.
    James Ringer, our boss painter, has been doing the painting on William Brown's new house. He has been kept busy most of the time summer painting and paper hanging.
    I omitted to state in my last correspondence that Master Harold Bunch, who came in with our daughter, Mrs. Hoyt, returned to his home near Fort Klamath last Friday with her.
    Our farmers are storing large quantities of baled hay in this part of the county, and the prospect is that there will be no scarcity of that commodity next winter, although the price still keeps up.
    J. J. Fryer & Co. have completed the branch of the ditch on the south side of the creek, got the flue in and now have an abundant supply of water for several of the places in the lower part of the town.
    Dr. Grover, who has a claim on the unsurveyed, and has been back to Illinois on business, returned last week and, after remaining overnight with his brother at the Sunnyside, went on up to his home in the high hills.
    A. J. Daley and wife started for Cinnabar Springs this week on account of the poor health of Mrs. Daley. Their grandson, Henry, has returned from there and makes good reports of the condition of things
at that place.
    M. S. Wood, one of our pioneer citizens and an old G.A.R. man, had a severe attack of sunstroke last Monday, it being the second attack he has had, and [it] proved to be very serious. He was taken to his home and cared for by the members of the G.A.R. corps.
    Misses Alice J. French and Iney H. Willits and Messrs. Amos R. Willits and Henry Thorten were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside one night last week, Mr. Willits and his sister having come from the headwaters of Elk Creek to meet the other two and take them to their home for an outing.
    Jack Florey, son of our postmaster, who is working on the Crater Lake reserve, came near being killed by lightning last week, while he was washing dishes in camp. The shock was so great that it knocked him down, but did not hurt him any more than to give him a severe nervous shock, but Jack doesn't want any more of such experiences.
    By some means I omitted to announce the arrival of Mrs. David Ball at the home of her mother a short time ago, and her husband wrote that she must have arrived in the night, as he did not see anything of her arrival in the Eaglets. But she reached here all O.K. and had a good visit with her mother and other relatives and friends, and is now visiting friends and relatives in Woodville. Her home is in Humboldt  County, California, and she comes regularly once a year to see her mother and sisters.
    Last Saturday the ladies of Eagle Point gave an ice cream social for the benefit of the church fund. There was a remarkably good attendance and a splendid time had. The receipts of the evening were $17.50. When the ladies of Eagle Point undertake to do anything for the church they do it in such a manner as to reach the pockets of the men.
    R. C. Avery, our meat market man, has moved his family into a house adjoining the meat shop and, like most of the sensible men, subscribed for the Morning Mail, so that he can keep posted on the current affairs of the country.
    Mr. Ditsworth, a resident of the Upper Rogue River, returned last Saturday from a visit with his brother and other relatives in Illinois. He was gone about a month. He reports the weather back there exceedingly hot and damp and says it is almost unbearable. He also reports that there is all the difference in the world between the people, socially, there and here. In the northern part of the state a stranger can hardly get acquainted at all, as everybody seems to be paddling his own canoe and shunning the stranger as they would a contagion. He says that, after all, he finds no place like the Rogue River Valley.
Medford Mail, August 7, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Miss Bessie Haselton went to Medford last Tuesday to take the teacher's examination.
    E. L. Colwell, also of Portland, stopped with us overnight on his way to Trail to meet his father.
    A. Phillips and family arrived at his father-in-law's, John Watkins, the last of last week. I understand that they intend to go to Klamath County.
    Dr. Holt is looking for his brother and family at this writing, and anticipates a pleasant visit, although he is kept very busy most of the time.
    Mrs. William Abbot and her son Everett were out from their mountain home last week, returning Sunday. They report everything lovely in those parts.
    Mrs. Nye and her daughter Elsie went to Flounce Rock to their home last Monday. They have been spending a few days with Mrs. Nye's daughter, Mrs. A. Y. Flosie [Florey?].
    Mr. Owen of the unsurveyed came out last Friday night after the doctor for Rev. John Fletcher, who was reported to be quite sick. Dr. Holt went to see him and reported that he was resting easy when he left.
    Frank Manning, one of our prominent citizens of Upper Rogue River, came out last week and stopped on his way to Medford, where he was to appear before [the] United States commissioner as a witness for Miss Elsie Noye in a homestead case.
    Mrs. Howlett started on Wednesday of last week in company with William Perry and family and Mr. Baker of Butte Falls, for the country near Mount Pitt, for an outing, and to get wild blackberries, and has not returned as yet, Tuesday morning.
    Dr. Grover, his brother and Scott Bruce, the two last named being carpenters who took the contract to build Dr. Holt's new house, started last Saturday for their homes in the unsurveyed to be gone a few days. They expect to be home at the Sunnyside by Tuesday.
    H. T. Sinclair of Portland came out on the Trail stage via the Ham Watkins route, [and] stopped at the Sunnyside last week on his way to his home. He spends his winters in California, where he has a fruit orchard. He had been up in the timber belt on land business.
    S. S. Aiken of Prospect came out one day last week to buy a load of goods to take to Prospect. While he was here your correspondent took him up to our sulfur springs, about an eighth of a mile from the hotel, and he pronounced it equal to some of the famous springs noted as health resorts.
    The burning of the two sawmills, the Round Top and the Olsen mill, has caused a great change in the improvement of our little town, as Mr. Patton and Mr. Jordan were both expecting to build this fall, and G. W. Daley was preparing to put an addition to his dance hall, but we are having a genuine lumber famine here.
    While out last Saturday and Sunday I learned that a fine boy was born to Mr. and Mrs. Ed Higinbotham on July 17 at their home north of Big Butte Creek, on the Fort Klamath road, and that Mr. and Mrs. Fred Pettigrew were visited by a fine son on the 19th of July. The parents of both boys are doing well and consequently happy.
    Rev. M. C. Davis, the Sunday school missionary of the Congregational Church in Southern Oregon, called on us last Monday night. He has recently organized Sunday schools in Willow Springs and Moonville. He is one of the busiest men in Oregon, traveling on his wheel. He goes in the outside districts, where the ordinary preachers that depend on the railroad cars to go to their work can't or won't go.
    Professor A. H. Peachey and his son-in-law, Professor Abe Bish of Grants Pass, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last week. Professor Bish and family have been spending their vacation in the Yankee Creek hills. They expect to return to Grants Pass soon to resume work, as principal of the East City School of Grants Pass this fall and winter. Both of the above named gentlemen are among the leading educators of our valley.
    Last week as John Lee, one of the carpenters working on William Brown's house, was viewing the carnival at Medford he fell through some of the scaffolding which he was standing on and hurt both of his legs, and the next day was brought to his room at the Sunnyside. Dr. Holt was summoned and dressed the wounds. His right knee was badly hurt and he is now going on crutches, but still at work at the bench. He is one of the kind of men that don't give up.
Medford Mail, August 14, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
[By A. C. Howlett.]
    Business is beginning to brighten up again and last Monday night the Sunnyside was full to overflowing.
    C. F. Cook, our nurseryman, called at noon last Monday. He reports having considerable success in his line of business.
    I omitted to report in my last letter that Mrs. Lottie Van Scoy, who has been spending some time in Ashland, has returned to Eagle Point again.
    Mr. Radcliff, the man who bought a 40-acre tract of land joining S. B. Holmes' land, has moved onto the tract and is going to stay, I understand.
    During S. H. Harnish's absence to the Cinnabar Springs, Mrs. Harnish has had James Ringer to repaper the house and get it ready for his return.
    Al Phillips has abandoned the idea of going to Eastern Oregon, at present, at least, and has moved into the William Beale house, just outside of the town limits.
    Charley Thomas and family have gone to the mountains for berries and have employed Mrs. George W. Daley, Sr. to attend to the culinary department of their hotel while gone.
    A. B. Hamlinton came out last Sunday on his wheel to make arrangements to run a steam wood saw that Earnest Peachey bought from Claud Wamsley, and to look after other business.
    Harry Spencer and Mr. Reed came out last Saturday night, reaching the Sunnyside about midnight, from the unsurveyed, and Sunday were on their way to Medford, where they are engaged to work in the fruit business.
    The Crater Lake Lumber & Box company commenced to load the lumber on the cars that is lying alongside the track of the P.&E. but they find it hard to get hands to do the work, as everybody is busy out here.
    Last Monday, Rev. Mr. Golden, pastor of the M.E.C.S. of Medford, came out, accompanied by Mr. Hildreth of Ashland, on the P.&E. car and went to Butte Falls the same day, A. C. Howlett taking them in his hack.
    Sam Bruce, who is in the employ of the Southern Pacific as a timber cruiser, came here last Friday and procured a saddle horse and went to his claim on the unsurveyed, returning on Sunday evening, taking the train for Medford Monday morning.
    George W. Daley and family and Bert Peachey and sister, Miss Bertha Peachey, arrived from their outing on the headwaters of the Umpqua River, last Saturday evening, but I have not learned the result of their trip, only that they had a very pleasant time.
    Wamsley & Son, assisted by J. W. Smith, are putting up a new barn for ex-sheriff John Rader, 64 feet square. He is having it arranged so as to feed his stock inside of the barn, instead of by the old way, hauling the hay over and throwing it on the ground or on the chaparral brush.
    A. C. Howlett will preach at Trail next Sunday at 11 o'clock a.m. and at Central schoolhouse at 3 o'clock p.m. He would be glad to have as many as can that are interested in keeping up religious services at these places attend, as he has a matter to present of especial interest to the two neighborhoods.
    Burt Owen and his sister of Roseburg, who has been visiting her relatives in the unsurveyed country, dropped in on us at noon Tuesday, Mrs. Vaughn being on her way to her home in Roseburg. They report that the health of Rev. John Fletcher is greatly improved and that he anticipates coming to the valley soon.
    Dr. Holt moved into his new house the last of the week, commencing on Thursday, and on Saturday William Brown moved into his new house, and it is understood that John Ashpole is going to move into the house vacated by Mr. Brown. People are coming here every few days inquiring for houses to rent, but none to be had.
    B. F. Harris and his sister-in-law, Mrs. Miller, and son and daughter, Miss Frances, called for dinner last Sunday, on their way to Butte Falls. Mr. Harris' many friends here are pleased to see that he is regaining his normal condition so fast. They came as far as Eagle Point in his automobile and from here went in a carriage. He seems to think that he will be able to go out on a hunting expedition in the course of the next two weeks.
    Last Saturday Mrs. E. Maule, her daughter, Miss Blanch, and Mrs. T. J. Williams were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside, where they took dinner, after which they took the Eagle Point and Trail stage for Trail, where they were met by friends, who took them to the hatchery, where they expect to spend some time fishing and rusticating. While they were here they visited our celebrated sulfur springs and were very favorably impressed with the beverage.
Medford Mail, August 21, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Alfred Smith of Medford was here Wednesday canvassing.
    Joseph Miller of Trail was a caller at the Sunnyside on Wednesday of last week.
    Mrs. Joseph Moomaw started for Ohio on Thursday of last week to visit her relatives in her old home.
    Mrs. Joseph Geppert of Big Butte called last Monday for lunch, on her way to the valley for peaches and pears.
    A. B. Hamlinton is stopping at the Sunnyside, getting things in readiness to start the Peachey wood saw. He went to Mr. Peachey's last Saturday.
    Miss Florence Ditsworth arrived from the Ditsworth farm on Upper Rogue River, with her father, and took the P.&E. train for Medford Saturday morning.
    E. A. Hildreth of Ashland, who has been to Butte Falls visiting his parents, returned last Monday to the Sunnyside, where he reports everything lovely in Butte Falls.
    A. P. Whitney, at present a resident of Medford, but recently from Illinois, was a caller last Friday. He was out looking at some of the places with a view to locating among us.
    Mr. and Mrs. S. S. McKercher, accompanied by a stranger who was very reticent, stopped here for dinner last Friday on their way to Salt Creek to look at a farm in that section.
    R. C. Spencer and B. G. Thares of the unsurveyed and Rudolph Iseli of Round Top called on their way to the city of Medford. Mr. Iseli is on his way to Portland, where he expects to go into business.
    F. W. Fredner and wife came here last Friday and stopped overnight with us, and Saturday morning took the P.&E. train for Medford. They had been up on the unsurveyed country visiting Mrs. Fredner's brother,
Mr. Faris.
    Attorney O. C. Boggs of Medford and W. W. Taylor were callers on Wednesday of last week. They procured a rig at the Sunnyside stable and proceeded on their way up the creek to look at a farm about two miles above here.
    Alfred Gordon stayed overnight here with his family last week, on their way to Mrs. Gordon's father, John Obenchain, of Big Butte. He returned, leaving his family, last Saturday, on his way to Wyoming, where he thinks of locating.
    Mr. Austin, of the unsurveyed country, spent the night here on his way to Medford and to look for a horse that had strayed away from him. He reports that the feed is drying up in his section of the country and that they are needing rain very much.
    Mrs. Dr. Holt went to Medford last Saturday night with the doctor's brother's wife, he having preceded her several days to their home in Portland. As announced in a former article, the doctor's brother and family have been visiting him during his vacation.
    N. D. Pratt of Albany came in from Klamath County with Mr. Ditsworth, where he had been to see some of the wonders of Southern Oregon. He couldn't find language to express his admiration of the sights along the route and of Crater Lake and its surroundings. Mr. Pratt is a house furnisher in Albany and has been to Klamath Falls to visit his son, who is a Presbyterian minister of that city.
    Mr. Perkins and one of his assistants arrived last week and remained two nights at the Sunnyside. They have been running out the lines around S. B. Holmes' land, as there was a difference of opinion with regard to the line between Mr. Holmes' place and Mr. Radcliff's land.
    A. J. Daley and wife returned from the Cinnabar Springs last Sunday, where they had been for their health. Mr. Daley reports that Mrs. Wamsley, who is in a very critical condition, was to have started from there last Saturday, but would be several days on the road, as she is unable to travel far at a time. S. H. Harnish also returned from there last Friday night. He says that it is the most wonderful place he ever saw--down in a canyon five miles from the summit of the hill, and the mud that the patients use is dug out of a tunnel in the side of the mountain, about 20 feet deep. But he speaks well for the place as a resort.
    Rudolph Iseli of Round Top was a caller last Wednesday. He says that the Rogue River Lumber company will not rebuild the Round Top mill unless there is some assurance that the P.&E. railroad will be built so that they can have a better way to get out their lumber than hauling it on wagons.
    H. W. Harper of Los Angeles arrived from Trail with the Eagle Point and Trail stage driver, H. Watkins, and after taking dinner went via the P.&E. to Medford. He is engaged in the business of buying and selling second-hand automobiles. He speaks as though automobiles were as common there as wagons are here.
    Mrs. Cora Officer started for Portland Wednesday of last week to keep house for her sister, Mrs. Sarah Guerin, who was joined by her father, Hon. George Brown, who left here the next day, where he will visit his daughter's family, and then he and Mrs. Guerin will proceed to Illinois and Wisconsin to visit old-time friends and relatives.
    Miss Freda Hockenyos, who is in the Oregon Journal contest for a scholarship in a Portland school, arrived last Monday morning on the P.&E. train, called on us for dinner and reports that she is having good success in soliciting for the paper. She was accompanied by her sister, Miss Minnie, the latter being employed in teaching school in Los Angeles County, California. They are daughters of Mrs. Hockenyos of Medford, and have been raised in Jackson County. Miss Minnie thinks of going back to California to teach.
Medford Mail, August 28, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    John Watkins and A. C. Howlett have been erecting new woodsheds this fall.
    John Ashpole moved last week from the farm on which he has been living for some time to his old home in Eagle Point.
    Peachey & Hamilton have got their gasoline wood saw in operation and moved to Mr. von der Hellen's to make a start.
    Mr. McClanahan and Burt Higinbotham came in last Sunday eve with a bunch of 21 young beef cattle on their way to the Medford market.
    Mr. and Mrs. James S. Wasson of Marshfield, Or. are stopping at the Sunnyside, awaiting papers of importance from Washington, D.C.
    Born--August 19, at the home of the happy parents, on Salt Creek, above Brownsboro, to Mr. and Mrs. W. G. Messal, an eight-pound boy.
    Owing to having been called to Fort Klamath this week, I will not be able to attend to my appointments at Table Rock and Agate next Sunday.
    John Fitzgerald of Ocean Wave, Cal. sojourned with us a few days. He is a mining expert and was looking over our country with an eye to coal prospects.
    George W. Daley, Jr. is moving his household goods to Medford, where he is miller in A. A. Davis' mill, and R. C. Avery, our meat market man, will occupy the Daley house.
    Mrs. Wamsley, one of our esteemed citizens, who has been to the Cinnabar Springs for her health, returned last Friday in a critical condition, but at last accounts was somewhat improved.
    Your Eagle Point correspondent took Scott Bruce and his sister-in-law, Mrs. C. H. Leomiller, to the Big Butte country the middle of last week. Mrs. Leomiller is from Seattle, Wash. and is here on a visit to her sister, Mrs. Scott Bruce, of the unsurveyed country.
    Mr. and Mrs. Swihart of Stanley, Wis., a brother of Mesdames  Riggins and Howe, of Derby, arrived here on Tuesday of last week and proceeded on their way to the home of his brother-in-law, Mr. Riggins, and sister, Mrs. Howe, who have taken up homesteads in the neighborhood of Derby.
    Mr. Ditsworth came in from Fort Klamath last Sunday, bringing with him from Prospect Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Stine and son of Medford, who have been to Crater Lake and the huckleberry patch. They stopped here Sunday night and went on to Medford Monday morning. They report a nice rain in the hills and snow at Crater Lake the first of last week.
    J. P. Howe and J. F. Sutor of Portland, in company of Thomas Coram, were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside last Monday night on their way to Crater Lake, Fort Klamath, etc. The two Portland men are writing for the Sunday Oregon Journal. They promise to give a good write-up of our country.
    Mrs. Willard G. Wright of Elko, Nev., a daughter of one of our prominent millmen of Jackson County, Mr. Hawk, was a pleasant caller at the Sunnyside last week, taking the P.&E. train for her home. She has been up in the hills to the Hawk sawmill to visit her parents. She was accompanied by their stepson.
    Mr. Gardner of Talent was here last week, delivering gasoline lamps. He furnished Frank Lewis' confectionery store with one, the Eagle Point Hotel with one and the Sunnyside Hotel with three. They seem to be the proper thing to make a light. While he was here he distributed a few copies of the Talent Rustler, a new paper that has been started in Talent. The paper presents a neat appearance and is quite readable.
Medford Mail, September 4, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    The Caster sawmill is running full blast.
    Mr. Netherland has moved his family to the place he bought near Derby.
    Professor Johnson commenced teaching in the Reese Creek district on Monday of last week.
    Professor George O. Henry and Miss Bertha Peachey opened our school last Monday morning.
    W. E. Wamsley, a nephew of our townsman by that name, from Nevada, is here visiting his uncle.
    James Ringer, the paperhanger and painter, has been engaged for several days on Frank Brown's house.
    Mr. Riggins of Derby has built a new barn and is now building a neat and commodious residence on his homestead.
    John Lee, one of the carpenters who has been at work here this summer, went to Butte Falls last week on business.
    Lee Parker, who is stopping on Rogue River above Prospect, stopped here last Monday night on his way over with a load of supplies.
    Mr. Sherman, who has been spending the summer in Klamath County, returned a few days ago to his homestead near Eagle Point.
    A. B. Hamlinton has been engaged sawing up a lot of wood on the A. A. Davis farm, northeast of Medford, returning to the Sunnyside Tuesday noon.
    J. E. Stepp and his daughter, Miss Maggie, arrived out from their home on Round Top last Monday to do some business here. Mr. Stepp seems to talk as though his company will not rebuild the Round Top mill, for a while at least.
    Quite a number of our cattlemen are gathering up their beef cattle and driving them to market. Harry Carlton, Wy [Wig?] Ashpole, Gus Nichols and Grant Findley were camped at the Hawk sawmill last week gathering their cattle in that section.
    The ladies of Eagle Point have succeeded in having the church here lined and papered and the inside woodwork painted, greatly improving the appearance of the interior of the building, but the outside still needs painting. The work was done by James Ringer.
    There were 35 pupils in attendance the first day, but more to come. If the teachers prove to be competent there will be a good school again this winter, as of old, and our primary teacher, Miss Peachey, has already been tried and has given general satisfaction.
    Mr. Haak, the purchaser of the R. G. Brown place, is having considerable changes made in his residence. Scott Bruce is doing the carpenter work. He expected to have built this fall, but the burning of the two sawmills broke into the plans of several of our citizens in that line of business.
    John Allen, Benj. Fredenburg, Al Boardman and W. W. Parker came out last Monday with a bunch of beef cattle for the Medford market. Mr. Parker was accompanied by his daughter, Miss Ella, and they two went to Peter Young's to spend the night, but the other three stopped at the Sunnyside.
    Frank Smith, a son of John W. Smith of Big Sticky, came in from Lakeview with his family to visit his father and brothers, and last Saturday started for his home. He was accompanied by his father and brother, Alfred, and family, and another brother, Rollen, and family expect to go in the near future.
    Last Tuesday Mr. York, the real estate hustler of Medford, came out, accompanied by Messrs. C. F. Kellogg of Berkeley, Cal., R. M. Ludlow of Griggsville, Ill., L. Chandler and R. T. Sigenwalt of Colorado Springs, Colo. and John Gret of Chico, Cal. They came out to look at the country. While here they all went up to the noted sulfur spring and took a good drink of the water.
    The death of John Bergman, who died September 9, at the family residence on Rogue River. The correspondent was away from home and
consequently could not attend the funeral or learn the particulars of his death, age, etc., but he was a man about 50 years of age and left a wife and several children to mourn his demise. He was a man who was highly respected in the community where he lived.
    Died--At the residence of her stepson, Mr. Bickett, on Trail Creek, September 8, 1908, Mrs. Delila Ailsey Phipps, aged 75 years, 3 months and 28 days. She, in company of her husband, Reuben Phipps, came to Oregon in 1886, where they lived together until Mr. Phipps died in October, 1903, and since that time she has been living with her children. She leaves five sons and one daughter, two stepsons and a number of grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. The remains were buried by the side of those of her husband in the Antioch cemetery, Rev. A. C. Howlett officiating.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis, the Congregational Sunday school missionary, arrived last Monday evening and preached for us in the Eagle Point church.
    Miss Lelia Stinson of Roxy Ann precinct was a caller one night last week on her way to the Peyton district, where she taught school last summer. She was in company with Mr. Peyton and two of his children, a son and daughter.
Medford Mail, September 18, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT.
    The Baptist church, the only one at Eagle Point, will be dedicated tomorrow night and quite a crowd will go from Medford to assist in the good work. Rev. G. F. Clevenger has been laboring in "the master's vineyard'' for some time and at last his good work has brought forth fruit.
    The many trials encountered in establishing a church in a sparsely settled community cannot be realized by those who are accustomed to patronizing the city churches. However, the members of the First Baptist church of this city and its pastor, Rev. Mr. Hall, have shown in every way that their hearts and souls have been in the work at Eagle Point and the bread cast upon the waters has returned.
    Although this is a Baptist church, yet all Christians are invited to attend the dedication ceremonies. Just how the Medford people will go there has not been arranged as yet, but full particulars will appear in tomorrow's Morning Mail, and every member of any church in Medford who can do so should go and "boost" for the little church at Eagle Point.
Medford Mail, September 25, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)
(Last Week's Items.)
    Israel Patton has built an addition to his barn for stable purposes.
    The Eagle Point ladies have had some new seats put in the Eagle Point church.
    William Brown has put down nice cement walks from his house to the sidewalk along the street.
    J. A. Jonas, one of our townsmen, is teaching in the district near the mouth of Little Butte Creek.
    Miss Ada Welch, of Central Point, commenced her school in the Central schoolhouse last Monday morning.
    S. H. Harnish and Charley Thomas, who went to Fort Klamath with a load of vegetables for William Smith, returned last week.
    Mr. Avery, our meat market man, instead of moving to the G. W. Daley house, as was anticipated, has fitted up the upper part of the house used as a meat market, and his family is living there.
    Carl Taylor, son of Mrs. R. G. Brown, formerly of this place, but now a resident of Portland, came down last week to visit his sisters, Mrs. William Brown, and Miss Lottie Taylor, and his many friends and schoolmates here.
    C. F. Kellogg and R. M. Ludlow came out on Thursday night of last week in an auto, spent the night and the next day proceeded on their way toward Brown's cabin on Rogue River. They went from here with Messrs. Whitley and Aikens of Prospect, they having stopped here the night before with their teams.
    Last Friday Rev. M. C. Davis and your correspondent went to the Central schoolhouse, four miles below Trail, and commenced a meeting, having preaching Friday, Saturday night and Sunday, a basket dinner and three services. The people in that section are at this writing busy with their fall work, and several of them are making up their sorghum syrup. While in the neighborhood I learned that Mr. and Mrs. Jasper Hannah were blessed with a 12-pound boy, the first grandson in the Joseph Hannah family.
    W. V. Miller, Charles I. Fisher and F. G. Hyatt of St. James, Minn. were out here last week looking at our country. They were accompanied by Benj. Trowbridge. After remaining overnight at the Sunnyside the next morning they all went up to the sulfur spring and drank of the water, then took a trip to the famous onion garden of A. L. Haselton, Wolfer's strawberry garden, to Brownsboro and around by the Bradshaw orchard and back to Medford. They seemed to be well pleased with this part of the country and one of them promised that if he located in this section he would come back and stay a month and spend the time fishing in our beautiful Little Butte Creek.

Medford Mail, October 2, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    A. C. Howlett will preach at Table Rock next Sunday at 10 o'clock a.m. and at 3 o'clock at Agate.
    Herbert Stewart, one of the new arrivals, stayed with us one night last week, looking for a location.
    P. K. Nalley, formerly of the Hotel Nash, Medford, but now of the unsurveyed, was a pleasant caller last week.
    Mr. Riggins and his brother-in-law, Mr. Swihart of Derby, recently from Iowa, were sojourners at the Sunnyside last week.
    Mrs. Abigail Ball of Humboldt County, California, who has been here visiting her mother and sisters, returned home last week.
    Scott Claspill, one of the merchants of Butte Falls, stayed here with us last Friday night. He had a load of goods for his store.
    George Beale of Mount Pitt precinct came out with a load of lumber from his sawmill, stayed here overnight. The next day he took the lumber to Central, Point, where he is building. He intends to move there in the near future.
    James Ringer, our boss painter, has just finished painting J. W. Gower's house, and Tuesday commenced to repaint the schoolhouse.
    Thomas Lynch, who is traveling in the interest of the Oregon Tradesman of Portland and had been at Butte Falls, stopped at the Sunnyside for dinner on his way out to the Hub.
    One of four most popular young ladies in this vicinity, Miss Lottie Taylor, was married to Claude Rippy, formerly of Central Point, but now of Portland, in Jacksonville on Sunday, September 20, by Rev. Ennis. On the return of the happy couple they gave a reception, and most of her personal friends were invited, and they covered them with congratulations and expressed their regrets that they had to part with one who has lived here all her life, she being the daughter of Mrs. R. G. Brown and a sister to Mrs. William Brown.
    One day last week, B. H. Harris of Butte Falls, Miss Frances Miller, Miss Nina Stauffer and her sister, Miss Avis Stauffer, and Mamie Miller, nieces of Mr. Harris, and Miss Jennie Broughton, came in for dinner and afterward Mr. Harris procured a rig and went to Butte Falls with Miss Broughton, and the rest of the party went on to Medford, and later in the day J. H. Miller, manager of the Butte Falls Lumber Company, and wife, Isaac Stauffer and wife and children, from Grand Rapids, Mich., stopped for supper and proceeded on their way to Medford. They had all been out on an outing, starting with teams from Medford via Ashland, Dead Indian route, Odessa, Pelican Bay, Fort Klamath, taking in Crater Lake, returning via Rogue River route. They report having had the time of their lives.
Medford Mail, October 2, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    The entire community was shocked last Saturday on account of the sudden death of one of the prominent citizens, James A. Jonas. Saturday morning he got up as usual and asked his wife how she felt, she having had her hip broken some time ago, and she replied and asked him to make a fire in the cook stove, and as he started to go he found that he could not move one of his legs. Telling his wife so, he remarked that the feeling was going all over him when he fell over. Mrs. Jonas ran to the door and called a neighbor. They managed to get him onto the bed and he never regained consciousness again, being completely paralyzed. He died on Saturday about 4 o'clock p.m.
    James A. Jonas was born June 22, 1851, in Fayette County, Indiana, married to Rebekah H. Lazenby, August 29, 1877, and died October 3, 1908, aged 57 years, 3 months and 11 days. He leaves a wife, two sons, two sisters and one brother in Indiana, he being the youngest of the family.
    Mr. and Mrs. Jonas moved to Jackson County, Oregon, in 1877, and bought land that is now situated in the town of Eagle Point, where they have resided ever since up to the time of his death.
    In 1892 they both united with the Methodist Episcopal Church and since that time Mr. Jonas had devoted his talent toward assisting the young. He had been the superintendent of the Sunday school for a large part of the time since he joined the church, and was highly esteemed by all and beloved by almost the entire community. He has been elected and reelected school clerk for quite a number of years. He was a man who will be greatly missed.
    The funeral services were conducted by Rev. McKee in the Eagle Point church, and the remains were interred in the Central Point cemetery on Monday afternoon. Almost every person in our community respected him by attending the funeral.
    Mr. Jonas has been engaged in teaching school a large part of the time, and up till the time of his death was engaged teaching in the school district near the mouth of Little Butte, known here as the Givan district. There were quite a number of children from the  schools where he had taught who attended the funeral services last Monday. The following resolutions were adopted by the Eagle Point Sunday school:
    "Whereas, It has pleased our heavenly father to call to his reward and rest Mr. J. A. Jonas, superintendent of the Eagle Point Sunday school; and,
    "Whereas, We, the members of the Sunday school, wish to show our esteem and appreciation of his faithful service while among us,
    "Resolved, That we hereby publicly express our sense of loss in his death and extend to his bereaved family our sincere sympathy in their time of trial.
    "His life was quiet, but sincere and earnest, his death was but the passing into everlasting peace and joy, and his memory will ever be a lesson in the value of honest, Christian service."
    On Friday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent made  another trip to Butte Falls, taking Thomas Beavers and a tombstone from the granite works of Medford for his little boy who was interred in the Butte Falls cemetery a short time ago. The contractor is pushing the work along as fast as possible on the new schoolhouse, and when it is completed the people of Butte Falls will have a schoolhouse that they may well feel proud of. There will be four rooms and each room will be finished off in the most improved style and they intend to have a bell hung that can be heard for miles around.
    Scott Claspill has his new store building near completion. Mr. Hughes has already moved into his new store building. M. C. Mahoney has built a commodious house. Mr. Albert has built a house near his hall for sleeping rooms, and the mill company is getting rid of its lumber about as fast or faster than they can manufacture it. The town puts on the appearance of thrift and enterprise.
    Mr. Avery has closed his meat market and gone to the hills.
    J. W. Grover, one of our energetic farmers, is to put up new fence on his farm.
    Mr. Clarno, our road supervisor, is hauling gravel for our roads and is greatly improving them.
    M. C. Mahoney passed through town last Monday with a load of yew posts for the Medford market.
    The wrought-iron range man was here last Monday night, stopping at the Sunnyside. He claims to be doing good business.
    S. F. Robinett, formerly of this place but now of Grants Pass, is in this section visiting his son-in-law, Scott Pool, and family.
    J. E. Stepp and his daughter, Miss Maggie, were callers at the Sunnyside last Tuesday afternoon, on their way to Medford on the P.&E.
    Mr. Hildreth, son, his wife and his family stopped here one night last week on their way to the coast, where they expect to remain permanently.
    Mr. Arant, superintendent of the Crater Lake National Park, and his wife stopped at the Sunnyside one day last week on their way to Ashland to see their son.
    William Perry of Butte Falls and family were out last Friday and Saturday to attend the fair at Medford, and there was quite a number who went from here to the fair.
    Bennie Parker and George West arrived from the big timber last week, and Mr. West went on to Ashland to see his wife, who has been there under the care of a physician for several months.
    Mr. McCarty of Brownsboro, Mr. Beavers, W. C. Daley and Mr. Ditsworth were smiling on their friends last Tuesday. Mr. Daley was on his way to Fort Klamath with a load of Rogue River Valley fruit. He expects to make three more trips yet this fall.
Medford Mail, October 9, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
By A. C. Howlett.

    Mrs. Ida Hurley, of Toledo, Oregon, is here stopping at the Sunnyside visiting friends and looking after business. She is a school teacher by profession.
    Mr. and Mrs. Amos Stauffer, Miss Avis Stauffer, of the state of Michigan, and Mr. Maurice Miller and Howard Beryhton, of Butte Falls, called last Friday. They were on their way to Butte Falls to visit relatives and old-time friends. Mr. Stauffer is a cousin of the man by the same name who was reported being here a fortnight ago. They are friends and business acquaintances of B. H. Harris, the timber man of Medford and Butte Falls.
    Harvey Spencer and wife arrived in on the P.&E.R.R. last week and have been stopping at the Sunnyside since while looking for their goods shipped from Lebanon. Mr. Spencer went to Medford Monday, got his goods and Tuesday he and his wife went to their home on the unsurveyed country north of Big Butte.
    A. J. Florey has been putting in a new gate and then Wm. Bowen put in one and others are getting material to put in new fences and gates around their houses.
    George W. Daley Sr. has been clearing out some of the chaparral in his lot to make room for more trees.
    Last Saturday afternoon your E.P. correspondent went to Table Rock, where he had an appointment to preach on Sunday morning, and stopped at Mr. Nealon's and Miss Mae Nealon met me at the door and soon informed me that the superintendent of the Sunday school and some teachers was going to meet there that evening to study over the Sunday school lesson and asked me to join with them to which I readily assented, but when I got ready to go on Miss Margaret N. followed me to the door and told me that it was Miss Mae's birthday and that the Agate school, where she had been teaching, had planned a surprise party and insisted on my coming which I did, and lo! when I got there I found about sixty or seventy there from all around the country, and talk about pleasant times, we had the time of the season, but I am not going to try to tell, but leave it to your correspondent that lives there to tell for she was there, but I will add that the neighbors brought in cakes, candies, peanuts, etc., and we talked, sang, accompanied by the organ, and ate until about midnight and then reluctantly separated, but the meeting will be remembered for a long time as one of the bright spots in our lives.
    J. A. Stewart, son-in-law of our townsman Mr. Harvey, G. C. Harvey, a son of our townsman, and Mr. John Gillespie, all from Coos County, arrived here last week. Mr. Gillespie has rented J. T. Moomaw's place adjoining our town.
    Mr. T. B. Jones, of Salem, and his brother, Sam Jones, of Portland, and Homer Smith, of Salem, stayed at the Sunnyside last Sunday night and on Monday morning started for Peyton to take an outing, hunt and fish. They went prepared for big game but I heard one of them remark that he had not lost any bear. They are expecting to have Frank Ditsworth assist them in their hunting.
    Miss Dormie Rader has accepted a position in J. H. Carlton's hardware and drug store as saleslady.
Medford Mail, October 16, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
By A. C. Howlett.

    On Tuesday afternoon of last week Mr. and Mrs. T. M. Peelor and their son-in-law and daughter, Mr. and Mrs. H. D. Blanchard, arrived at the Sunnyside from Missouri. They started for Eagle Point when they left their homes in Missouri, having seen such glowing accounts of this town and the surrounding country. They stayed here for a week and then moved into the Wm. Ulrich house, where they expect to remain for some time, in the meanwhile looking over the country before they purchase. Several of their neighbors may come here in the near future and they, with those already here, will attempt to buy homes for themselves and families.
    They came with the expectation of going into the fruit business, but since learning the hay prices in the valley have about concluded that they would just as soon have a good hay farm as an orchard. They are delighted with the climate and seem to think Eagle Point is the proper place.
    Mr. Cross, of Ashland, stopped here one night last week on his way home from Elk Creek, where he had been on a hunt and to visit his old-time friend, J. C. Moor, formerly of Ashland precinct, but now of Elk Creek, he having sold his property in that section and located permanently on Elk Creek. Mr. Moor and a part of his family stopped here last Monday night, and Tuesday morning they went on their way to Elk. He had with him two of his sons, a grandson that was grown, a daughter, daughter-in-law and two little grandchildren
    Last Monday H. M. McIntosh and his son, O. H. McIntosh, arrived at the Sunnyside, Eagle Point, on their way to Mr. Riggins. They come direct from Illinois and are forerunners of more that will follow, as Mr. McIntosh expects his family and a carload of household goods and stock in a few days. Others are expected as soon as they can settle up their businesses.
    One day last week two mischievous boys put a bar of iron across the track of the P.&E. railroad near the terminal of the road at Eagle Point, and then began to go through the depot building, but the car came sooner than they expected and they started to run. Conductor Reid ran and caught them and one of them confessed he had put the bar on the track. They had overhauled the things in the depot, but had not taken anything. The matter was reported to the superintendent of the road. It has not been made known what action will be taken, but possibly the grand jury will take action in the case.
    The meat market has changed hands and now Henry Daley has an interest in it. He bought Mr. Deter out. Business is still being continued at the old stand.
    There has been another real estate deal in this section, S. B. Holmes having sold his farm to Dr. J. N. Coghlan. Consideration, $1200.
    I. Patton is gradually improving his place and making it look like a home.
Medford Mail, November 5, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Last week Rev. W. C. Reuter, pastor M.E. church of Medford, was a caller at the Sunnyside Hotel.
    Rev. A. C. Howlett will preach at Table Rock schoolhouse next Sunday at noon and at Agate at 3 p.m.
    William Brown, one of the leading merchants here, has had a neat henhouse erected. Scott Bruce did the work.
    Mr. McCabe, living on Rogue River, about five miles from here, brought in a load of hogs for Carlton & Holmes last Monday.
    Israel Patton has moved another building back from near the street and is clearing away the rubbish and getting ready to build next summer.
    Dr. Holt has been giving his new house a thorough painting and is fixing up his home so as to reflect credit on himself and beautify the town.
    A man by the name of Drake, who has been staying here for several days, is engaged trimming Mr. Haak's fruit trees. He claims to be an expert at the business.
    The Sunnyside Hotel property is being improved by having a neat picket fence put around the premises, having it painted, having the cellar enlarged and things shaped up generally.
    Green Mathews, who bought a three-acre tract of land off the old John Matthews place, paying $100 per acre, has it all fenced with a good wire fence and has it already plowed ready for tree planting.
    W. E. Lane of Medford, the man who bought the Sam Jackson place in the lower part of town, spent two or three days with us last week,  and while here made arrangements with S. H. Harnish to work his place for two years.
    Since Henry Daley has bought out Mr. Deter in the meat market here he has fixed up a place for slaughtering beeves, hogs and sheep in the old Daley barn, and he and Mr. Terrill are doing a good business in that line. Henry is wide-awake and a general hustler.
    Rev. Mark C. Davis, the traveling Sunday school evangelist, arrived last Sunday evening and preached for us, and on Tuesday evening he preached at the Reese Creek school house. He is about the busiest man I know of in these parts. He reports having grand success at Willow Springs, Moonville and Chaparral, in fact, all over his entire work in Southern Oregon.
    B. H. Harris and his bookkeeper, Miss McDonald, were callers at the Sunnyside last week. They had been up to Butte Falls on business and Mr. Harris was getting ready to start for Michigan. Mr. Boughton and wife, with their two youngest children, stayed with us the same night, and the next day she went to Medford, joined Mr. Harris and they went together to Michigan to visit her mother, whom she had not seen for seven years.
    Last Sunday A. C. Howlett preached at the Derby school house in the forenoon and at Reese Creek in the afternoon. The people of Derby have lined the interior of the school house with nice, clean lumber and have the material on the ground to build a woodhouse, and the  first thing the people of Jackson County know they will learn that Derby has a new and commodious school house. They have a store already and people are beginning to realize that the foothills are good orchard land. Mrs. Hume is teaching the Derby school.
    E. S. Wolfer, the strawberry man, is kept busy in his strawberry field tending the plants and gathering the strawberries. That sounds or reads strange, the idea of having ripe strawberries here in November, but he keeps the Sunnyside supplied and sells quite a lot to outsiders from a distance. He remarked the other day that he would be able to dispose of all of his plants this fall, as he is constantly receiving orders for more plants, and one man has ordered 10,000 and this is an order where he has already sold several thousand.
    Last Monday Messrs. B. F. Blaine of Ione, Morrow County, Oregon, and H. S. Rawley of New Mexico came to look. They remained overnight at the Sunnyside Hotel and were so favorably impressed with the surroundings that they decided to locate here if they could find a place that would suit them. They wanted to rent small places where they could have water to irrigate or buy if the terms were such that could be within their reach. Thus this community is gradually filling up with people of the right class. Among the first things after the price of land they asked was about churches and schools, and although there its not regular preaching here now, it is expected in the near future. Then there is as good a school here as one would wish for. Professor Henry is principal and Miss Burtley Peachey is primary teacher. She told me last evening that if there was many more came in her room she would have to have an assistant, so it can be seen that the good work is going on.
Medford Mail, November 13, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Miss Lula Warner is teaching a successful term of school in that district and that the people generally are doing well.
    Mrs. Pool, who has been living here for some time, has gone to live with her daughter, Mrs. J. Hartman, and her two sons are batching in her former home.
    Last Sunday night Charles Jones of Medford arrived and lectured here on the temperance question. His lecture was quite interesting and seemed to be appreciated by the audience.
    Mr. Austin, who went to the valley a few days ago from the unsurveyed, returned last Tuesday morning. He was accompanied by Mrs. Wilson, also of the unsurveyed. She has been visiting friends in Spokane, Wash.
    Joseph Riley, a stepson of the late T. L. Linksweiler, living in the same old house, has put on a new roof. The house is one of the old landmarks in these parts, as it was built in the early '50s, and the old roof has been on for 44 years that I know of, and it was not a new roof when I first knew it.
    Last week Mr. Ditsworth came over from Fort Klamath, bringing with him Mrs. Jackson and one of her sons. Mrs. Jackson is the hostess of the Jackson house of Fort Klamath, and was on her way to visit relatives in Ashland, whither she went from here, but she intended to go on to Portland, where she expects to put her son in school.
    Last Monday W. C. Green, Messrs. Bofenge and Ramen, the last two from California, and Mrs. Nalley of the unsurveyed, stopped for dinner. The three men had been in the Big Butte country looking over the timber, and from what one of the Californians told me they were very favorably impressed, and he remarked that there would be likely some new developments in these parts in a short time.
    Mr. Ditsworth reports the road in good condition across the mountains to Fort Klamath, as the snow is only about eight inches deep, but the road on the snow is packed so hard that it has formed an ice bed so that horses have to be sharp shod to hold their footing. Mr. Ditsworth left the Sunnyside last Tuesday morning with a part of a load for Fort Klamath. He will finish his load at his farm near Peyton.
    Mr. Blass has dug down the bank going out from the ferry on the north side of the river. Still it is entirely too steep for teams to go up with safety, as it is in one place, near the outcome from the boat, about a 45 percent grade, and if a team with a heavy load should happen to have anything give way there would be danger of the wagon and contents going back into the river. That is a matter that our commissioner's court should look after.
    James Ringer, the local nurseryman, and C. E. Hoover of Medford have been delivering fruit trees to different parties in this section of the country, and the result is that quite a number of the farmers and orchardists have been in our town during the last few days. There has been quite a lot of trees taken to the unsurveyed country and those people are preparing to stay there, whether Uncle Sam says so or not. They are clearing the land, putting in grain, fruit trees, garden, truck, etc.
    At Elk Creek the people have laid out and graded a road up the creek from the mouth up for quite a distance. Also that Dave Pence, one of the progressive citizens of that section, has built another large barn, and while he and Mr. Warner, the boss carpenter, were putting up the rafters, Mr. Pence stepped on a board in the scaffolding and one end of the board failed to reach the crosspiece, and the result was that he came near falling 20 feet to the ground, but just as he stepped and saw the board giving way he jumped and caught a rafter and thus saved himself from a fall. Mr. Warner says that he can't see how he ever saved himself as he did.
Medford Mail, November 20, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Scott Bruce is at work building a water conveyor for Mr. Haak.
    Mr. Bradshaw has been loading his apples on the P.&E. cars this week.
    George Brown & Sons are doing more business this fall by far than they have ever done since they started in business.
    Ed Higinbotham and his brother-in-law, Mr. Caster, stopped with us Tuesday night on their way to Pankey's timber camp with two loads of barley. Mr. Pankey has a contract to deliver a quantity of saw logs at the Gold Ray sawmill, to be floated down Rogue River. While Ed was at the Sunnyside he subscribed for the Medford Mail, in fact here, and that goes to show that Eagle Point is coming to the front very fast. Our hardware store keeps receiving new goods to replenish the old stock, our blacksmiths are kept busy most of the time, and in fact business is rushing. The cattle men are bringing in beef cattle, and times are flourishing generally.
Medford Mail, November 27, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    A. E. Le Pante of the I.X.L. monumental works, Central Point, was out here last week looking after business.
    Rudolph Iseli, who has been in Portland for some time, returned last Monday and Tuesday went to visit his parents on Round Top.
    The Baptists expect to dedicate the church on the eve of December 3. They expect several ministers to be present.
    Scott Claspill of Butte Falls, one of the leading business men of the place, stopped at the Sunnyside Monday night with a load of supplies for his store.
    Mr. Steward, the gentleman who has charge of the old Peter Britt place, has it about all plowed and ready for planting to trees, and is now fencing it.
    On the eve of December 1, Mr. Knodell, the great anti-saloon lecturer, will lecture in the church at Eagle Point at 7:30. He is one of the noted lecturers on this coast, and it will pay you to turn out to hear him.
    W. E. Hammel, the man who bought a large tract of land on the north side of Reese Creek, has built himself a neat house, barn and other outbuildings, and among other sensible things he has done is to subscribe for 
the Mail.
    Rev. M. C. Davis will preach in Eagle Point next Sunday evening at 7:30 and at Reese Creek at 3 p.m. A. C. Howlett will preach at the school house, near the old John Black place, next Sunday at 11 a.m. and organize a Sunday school. Everybody is invited to attend.
    Our strawberry man, E. S. Wolfer, is kept busy most of the time filling orders for berry plants for shipment and gathering berries for the market. He has just received an order for 8000 strawberry plants from the coast, and another for 10,000 from a man in Washington, and they each had laid a large order before, so you see that our Butte Creek country is not only noted for its apples, pears and peaches, but for its berries as well.
    Last week W. J. Roberts, civil engineer for the City of Medford, V. T. McCray, superintendent of the Fish Lake Ditch Company, Shirley Baker, one of the principal owners of the Fish Lake Ditch, and George  O. Jackson stopped here for dinner on their way up Butte Creek to see about the water supply for Medford. Also there was a man out here, said to be from Gold Hill, and supposed to be in the employ of the Condor Electric and Water Power Company, who was making inquiries of those who have water rights along Little Butte Creek, and asking them if they would defend their rights, etc., and the impression he made was that someone was trying to stir up a batch of trouble on the water question, but the people here seem to think that the company will do the square thing, so are inclined to let well enough alone.
    I have made two trips to Trail and vicinity in the last few days, and found the roads greatly improved, as Supervisor Clarno has done considerable work, but the outcome at the free ferry is still dangerous on account of the steepness of the bank on the north side of the river.
    Mrs. Fry has gone to Iowa to visit her mother, Mrs. John Warner, and is going to have a grand Thanksgiving dinner.
    The people of Central--not Central Point--are going to have a Christmas tree in the Central school house on the eve of December 24, and a basket supper connected with it. They intend to have a program connected with other things and anticipate having a grand time.
    On my second trip to Trail I took three men up that way Tuesday. They went with me as far as Trail and intended later to go on up to the headwaters of Elk Creek, where two of them have homes, and the third,
Mr. Mullen, has a home about 17 miles up the creek. They have just come in from Thrall, Cal., where they have been working in the logging camp.
Medford Mail, December 4, 1908, page 2


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    George Brown, of the firm of George Brown & Sons, has returned from his visit to Illinois.
    Mr. Shultz is stopping at the Sunnyside and planting trees on a ten-acre tract formerly owned by the late John Williscroft.
    Miss Ollie Feister commenced teaching school in the Black schoolhouse last week. She has eight pupils in attendance.
    Pike Monrey and wife, formerly of Jacksonville, but now of Coos Bay, are here visiting Mrs. Monrey's mother, Mrs. Art Thomas.
    The Ladies' Aid Society has been having some much-needed work done on the church at this place, greatly improving its appearance.
    Rev. Jones, a friend of Claud Wamsley, from Coquille, stayed Monday night here and Tuesday they went out to look at the country in the hills.
    Last week I made a trip to Round Top and found the roads in horrible shape, as they have not been worked since the Round Top mill was burned.
    C. M. Baldwin and wife were here from Santa Cruz County, California, looking for a place to locate. They seem to be favorably impressed with the surroundings here.
    John Iseli has been putting additions to his building and getting his home fixed up quite comfortable.
    At Round Top Jeff Conover killed a large cinnamon bear.
    Rev. M. C. Davis accompanied A. C. Howlett to the Black schoolhouse last Sunday, where I preached, and  in the afternoon he preached at Reese Creek and at night in Eagle Point, on Monday eve at Derby and at Butte Falls on Tuesday night.
    Last Friday night, Professor Alvin B. Hedges gave an entertainment. He had a good audience and his recitals were highly satisfactory. The receipts for the evening were $14.60, and after deducting his expenses, [he] gave half to the aid society.
    Monday night Messrs. Zimmerman, Erangburg
[Edinburgh?] and McIntyre arrived at the Sunnyside Hotel on their way to Derby, where they expect to remain for a while. They are all looking for homes. They brought their household goods with them and four horses, and came to stay.
    Messrs. John Edngberg [Edinburgh?] and A. B. Zimmerman, recently of Illinois, were here last week looking for a situation. They had been up to Derby and returned to look after their household goods and stock, they having brought out a carload with them. They intend to store their goods in Medford and look around before they decide where to locate.

Medford Mail, December 11, 1908, page 7

EAGLE POINT CHURCH.
    Rev. F. C. W. Parker, secretary of the Oregon Baptist state convention, with headquarters at Portland, dedicated the First Baptist church of Eagle Point Thursday night. An intelligent and attentive audience greeted him. All joined heartily in the services, and it was a most enjoyable occasion.
    The room has been beautifully papered and furnished throughout with pulpit and platform. The pulpit and pews are finished in the natural wood. The community is to be congratulated in the possession of such a commodious house of worship. Much credit is due the committee, Dr. William P. Holt, Mrs. J. Frank Brown and Mrs. J. W. Grover, for their efficient service. The church was dedicated free of debt. All bills were paid with a cash balance preceding the dedication. The community took a very active part in this work, giving it their generous financial support.
    While this is a Baptist church, it is open to any and all Christian people for religious services when not in actual use by the Baptists. Eagle Point is one of the thriving towns of Rogue River Valley and has a bright and prosperous future. C. H. McKee took part in the service.

Medford Mail, December 11, 1908, page 7


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Rev. McKee will preach in the Baptist church next Sunday at the usual time at night.
    Mr. Dennis of Ashland was here looking for fat hogs for his meat market in Ashland.
    Mr. Cook, another fruit tree man, was here delivering trees to the citizens in this section Monday.
    Last week Mr. Adams, the fruit tree man, was here a few days taking orders for shrubbery, flowers and trees.
    Scott Bruce, Claud Wamsley and John W. Smith commenced work on a new house for Mr. Cooley, the man who bought the Peter Britt place, above Eagle Point.
    There is another change in real estate. B. W. Harnish has bought another tract of land adjoining the one he bought, the old Jo Wilson property, and a water right with it.
    J. C. Howlett preached in the Derby schoolhouse on Sunday at 11 a.m. and at Reese Creek at 3 p.m. He had good congregations at both services.
    Last week the principal of the school was taken sick and had to give up his school for the present, and the school board has secured the services of Professor Narregan to take his place.
    George West started last Monday for the state of Washington to spend Christmas with his wife, who is there on account of her health, she having been an invalid for the past four years. Mr. West is one of the forest rangers and has been stationed above Prospect, near Brown's cabin, during the fall and thus far in the winter. He expects to be gone three or four weeks.
    Among the recent arrivals at the Sunnyside are: W. C. Schmidt and his son, who were looking over the country; J. T. Summerville, agent for the Metropolitan Life Insurance Company of New York; H. J. Peterson of Philomath, Or.; Allen Nelson, who was on his way to Trail; W. J. Stover, of Foreman, B.C., on his way to San Diego, Cal., besides several others.
    The school district is filling up very rapidly, as they have now 26 names enrolled and three more children have arrived since the census was taken, making 29 in all. They also voted to have a nine-months' school taught, beginning about September 1, 1909. The people in the hill districts are waking up to the fact that they have got to have good schools or their children will be taken out and sent to other schools, as they must be educated.
    While 
the Medford Mail correspondent was in the hills last week he stayed over Saturday night with Frank Neil of Derby and attended a special school meeting on Saturday afternoon, which was called for the purpose of levying a special tax for school purposes. They voted a 4-mill tax and arranged to have a porch built on the front of the school house that was all done by private subscription, Messrs. Edmondson and Caster agreeing to furnish the lumber, John Allen the shakes, Frank Neil the nails and Mr. Riggins to do the carpentering.
    There is a large number of fruit trees being put out in this neighborhood this winter. There is a large force of men at work on the old William Ulrich place, another on the old Ashpole place and E. S. Wolfer and Mr. Cooley--the Cooley who bought a small tract of land south of the town--are preparing to fence the tract of land that Rev. Reuter bought of C. H. Pierce & Son, to put that out to trees, and in fact trees are being planted all around here, and the question is, what are the citizens going to do for hay and grain if all the best land is taken up with fruit?
    There has been quite a number of strangers stopping here during the past week from the old states, among whom was Nomand Redick of Brighton, Pa. He is a cousin of Mr. Hawk of the Clarks Creek Lumber Company. On Friday of last week your Eagle Point correspondent took him up to the Hawks' mill. Mr. Hawk came here with a load of lumber and pickets for citizens here, and in a short time there will be quite a lot of new fences along the streets.
Medford Mail, December 18, 1908, page 8


EAGLE POINT EAGLETS.
(By A. C. Howlett.)

    Dakota Davis of Jacksonville was a guest last Sunday night at the Sunnyside, on his way up Butte Creek.
    Messrs. Moor and Faris of Elk Creek were pleasant callers Friday night of last week on their way to Medford and Ashland.
    Our citizens are preparing for a grand time Christmas eve. They expect to have a Christmas tree, recitations, songs, etc. and a good time generally.
    Charley and Albert Morine of Elk Creek were also sojourners with us Friday night. They had been to Medford and Jacksonville on land business and were returning home.
    J. C. Brown, one of Medford's wide-awake real estate men, and Mr. Root were pleasant callers last Monday. Mr. Root was inquiring the price of the hill land around Eagle Point.
    Mrs. J. A. Jonas started last Friday for Wallowa, where her son Robbie is publishing the Wallowa Sun, where she expects to remain. Her son Jake is boarding at the Sunnyside at present.
    The work on the Cooley house and barn on the old Britt place is retarded on account of the lack of lumber, as it seems to be scarce in Medford owing to the enormous demand there for building purposes.
    Baxter Grigsby, living near Klamath Falls, arrived on the P.&E. railroad last Monday eve to visit his mother, Mrs. A. N. Thomas. When he came in he brought in the remains of a man by the name of Whitman, who was buried in the Medford cemetery last Saturday or Sunday.
    Tuesday the Morning Mail correspondent was called on to attend the funeral services of Isaac Stinson, who died on the 20th inst. I have not learned the particulars of his death, but I am told that he was about 82 years of age. A more extended notice next week.
    Professor Henry, the principal of our school, who has been confined to his room in Jacksonville for the past two weeks, returned last Sunday and resumed his duties in the schoolroom. In Miss Bertha Peachey's department they have a two weeks' vacation, and Miss Peachey went to Ashland on Tuesday to spend the Christmas holidays with her parents.
    Married--In Bakersfield, Cal., November 29, Mr. Lewis H. Whitley of Flounce Rock precinct, and Miss Dora Vogel of Illinois. The happy couple arrived at the Sunnyside Hotel, Eagle Point, on the eve of the 20th, on the P.&E. railroad, and on Monday morning proceeded on their way to his home, his brother being here in readiness waiting for them. His many friends in these parts extend congratulations and wish them a long and happy life.
    Messrs. Baker, Albert and Benj. Fredenburg of Butte Falls were pleasant callers at the Sunnyside on Monday last for dinner. They report that the work on the new schoolhouse at Butte Falls was progressing finely, that they have three rooms already completed and will soon have the entire building ready for use. They proceeded on their way to Medford, expecting to go to the county seat to attend to some business before returning.
Medford Mail, December 25, 1908, page 8






  
Last revised June 30, 2020